WorldWideScience

Sample records for random network topology

  1. Topological properties of random wireless networks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wireless networks in which the node locations are random are best modelled as random geometric graphs (RGGs). In addition to their extensive application in the modelling of wireless networks, RGGs find many new applications and are being studied in their own right. In this paper we first provide a brief introduction to the ...

  2. Topological properties of random wireless networks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    indicating that a physical infrastructure needs to be put in place before nodes can communicate. Ad hoc and sensor ... edges, the communication paths of the wireless network can be represented by a graph. The representation of the ..... Pr (Gn ∈ P) → 1. Another definition of a threshold is from Friedgut & Kalal (1996). For a.

  3. Throughput Analysis of Fading Sensor Networks with Regular and Random Topologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Xiaowen

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We present closed-form expressions of the average link throughput for sensor networks with a slotted ALOHA MAC protocol in Rayleigh fading channels. We compare networks with three regular topologies in terms of throughput, transmit efficiency, and transport capacity. In particular, for square lattice networks, we present a sensitivity analysis of the maximum throughput and the optimum transmit probability with respect to the signal-to-interference ratio threshold. For random networks with nodes distributed according to a two-dimensional Poisson point process, the average throughput is analytically characterized and numerically evaluated. It turns out that although regular networks have an only slightly higher average link throughput than random networks for the same link distance, regular topologies have a significant benefit when the end-to-end throughput in multihop connections is considered.

  4. Network topology analysis.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalb, Jeffrey L.; Lee, David S.

    2008-01-01

    Emerging high-bandwidth, low-latency network technology has made network-based architectures both feasible and potentially desirable for use in satellite payload architectures. The selection of network topology is a critical component when developing these multi-node or multi-point architectures. This study examines network topologies and their effect on overall network performance. Numerous topologies were reviewed against a number of performance, reliability, and cost metrics. This document identifies a handful of good network topologies for satellite applications and the metrics used to justify them as such. Since often multiple topologies will meet the requirements of the satellite payload architecture under development, the choice of network topology is not easy, and in the end the choice of topology is influenced by both the design characteristics and requirements of the overall system and the experience of the developer.

  5. Network topology mapper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quist, Daniel A [Los Alamos, NM; Gavrilov, Eugene M [Los Alamos, NM; Fisk, Michael E [Jemez, NM

    2008-01-15

    A method enables the topology of an acyclic fully propagated network to be discovered. A list of switches that comprise the network is formed and the MAC address cache for each one of the switches is determined. For each pair of switches, from the MAC address caches the remaining switches that see the pair of switches are located. For each pair of switches the remaining switches are determined that see one of the pair of switches on a first port and the second one of the pair of switches on a second port. A list of insiders is formed for every pair of switches. It is determined whether the insider for each pair of switches is a graph edge and adjacent ones of the graph edges are determined. A symmetric adjacency matrix is formed from the graph edges to represent the topology of the data link network.

  6. OPTIMAL NETWORK TOPOLOGY DESIGN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, J. H.

    1994-01-01

    This program was developed as part of a research study on the topology design and performance analysis for the Space Station Information System (SSIS) network. It uses an efficient algorithm to generate candidate network designs (consisting of subsets of the set of all network components) in increasing order of their total costs, and checks each design to see if it forms an acceptable network. This technique gives the true cost-optimal network, and is particularly useful when the network has many constraints and not too many components. It is intended that this new design technique consider all important performance measures explicitly and take into account the constraints due to various technical feasibilities. In the current program, technical constraints are taken care of by the user properly forming the starting set of candidate components (e.g. nonfeasible links are not included). As subsets are generated, they are tested to see if they form an acceptable network by checking that all requirements are satisfied. Thus the first acceptable subset encountered gives the cost-optimal topology satisfying all given constraints. The user must sort the set of "feasible" link elements in increasing order of their costs. The program prompts the user for the following information for each link: 1) cost, 2) connectivity (number of stations connected by the link), and 3) the stations connected by that link. Unless instructed to stop, the program generates all possible acceptable networks in increasing order of their total costs. The program is written only to generate topologies that are simply connected. Tests on reliability, delay, and other performance measures are discussed in the documentation, but have not been incorporated into the program. This program is written in PASCAL for interactive execution and has been implemented on an IBM PC series computer operating under PC DOS. The disk contains source code only. This program was developed in 1985.

  7. Degree 3 Networks Topological Routing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gutierrez Lopez, Jose Manuel; Riaz, M. Tahir; Pedersen, Jens Myrup

    2009-01-01

    Topological routing is a table free alternative to traditional routing methods. It is specially well suited for organized network interconnection schemes. Topological routing algorithms correspond to the type O(1), constant complexity, being very attractive for large scale networks. It has been p...... proposed for many topologies and this work compares the algorithms for three degree three topologies using a more analytical approach than previous studies....

  8. The Dynamics of Network Topology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voicu, Ramiro; Legrand, Iosif; Newman, Harvey; Barczyk, Artur; Grigoras, Costin; Dobre, Ciprian

    2011-12-01

    Network monitoring is vital to ensure proper network operation over time, and is tightly integrated with all the data intensive processing tasks used by the LHC experiments. In order to build a coherent set of network management services it is very important to collect in near real-time information about the network topology, the main data flows, traffic volume and the quality of connectivity. A set of dedicated modules were developed in the MonALISA framework to periodically perform network measurements tests between all sites. We developed global services to present in near real-time the entire network topology used by a community. For any LHC experiment such a network topology includes several hundred of routers and tens of Autonomous Systems. Any changes in the global topology are recorded and this information is can be easily correlated with traffic patterns. The evolution in time of global network topology is shown a dedicated GUI. Changes in the global topology at this level occur quite frequently and even small modifications in the connectivity map may significantly affect the network performance. The global topology graphs are correlated with active end to end network performance measurements, done with the Fast Data Transfer application, between all sites. Access to both real-time and historical data, as provided by MonALISA, is also important for developing services able to predict the usage pattern, to aid in efficiently allocating resources globally.

  9. Transportation Network Topologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrov, Natalia (Editor)

    2004-01-01

    The existing U.S. hub-and-spoke air transportation system is reaching saturation. Major aspects of the current system, such as capacity, safety, mobility, customer satisfaction, security, communications, and ecological effects, require improvements. The changing dynamics - increased presence of general aviation, unmanned autonomous vehicles, military aircraft in civil airspace as part of homeland defense - contributes to growing complexity of airspace. The system has proven remarkably resistant to change. NASA Langley Research Center and the National Institute of Aerospace conducted a workshop on Transportation Network Topologies on 9-10 December 2003 in Williamsburg, Virginia. The workshop aimed to examine the feasibility of traditional methods for complex system analysis and design as well as potential novel alternatives in application to transportation systems, identify state-of-the-art models and methods, conduct gap analysis, and thus to lay a foundation for establishing a focused research program in complex systems applied to air transportation.

  10. Topological Rankings in Communication Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aabrandt, Andreas; Hansen, Vagn Lundsgaard; Træholt, Chresten

    2015-01-01

    In the theory of communication the central problem is to study how agents exchange information. This problem may be studied using the theory of connected spaces in topology, since a communication network can be modelled as a topological space such that agents can communicate if and only...... if they belong to the same path connected component of that space. In order to study combinatorial properties of such a communication network, notions from algebraic topology are applied. This makes it possible to determine the shape of a network by concrete invariants, e.g. the number of connected components...

  11. Fixed-points in random Boolean networks: The impact of parallelism in the Barabási-Albert scale-free topology case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moisset de Espanés, P; Osses, A; Rapaport, I

    2016-12-01

    Fixed points are fundamental states in any dynamical system. In the case of gene regulatory networks (GRNs) they correspond to stable genes profiles associated to the various cell types. We use Kauffman's approach to model GRNs with random Boolean networks (RBNs). In this paper we explore how the topology affects the distribution of the number of fixed points in randomly generated networks. We also study the size of the basins of attraction of these fixed points if we assume the α-asynchronous dynamics (where every node is updated independently with probability 0≤α≤1). It is well-known that asynchrony avoids the cyclic attractors into which parallel dynamics tends to fall. We observe the remarkable property that, in all our simulations, if for a given RBN with Barabási-Albert topology and α-asynchronous dynamics an initial configuration reaches a fixed point, then every configuration also reaches a fixed point. By contrast, in the parallel regime, the percentage of initial configurations reaching a fixed point (for the same networks) is dramatically smaller. We contrast the results of the simulations on Barabási-Albert networks with the classical Erdös-Rényi model of random networks. Everything indicates that Barabási-Albert networks are extremely robust. Finally, we study the mean and maximum time/work needed to reach a fixed point when starting from randomly chosen initial configurations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Systemic risk on different interbank network topologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenzu, Simone; Tedeschi, Gabriele

    2012-09-01

    In this paper we develop an interbank market with heterogeneous financial institutions that enter into lending agreements on different network structures. Credit relationships (links) evolve endogenously via a fitness mechanism based on agents' performance. By changing the agent's trust on its neighbor's performance, interbank linkages self-organize themselves into very different network architectures, ranging from random to scale-free topologies. We study which network architecture can make the financial system more resilient to random attacks and how systemic risk spreads over the network. To perturb the system, we generate a random attack via a liquidity shock. The hit bank is not automatically eliminated, but its failure is endogenously driven by its incapacity to raise liquidity in the interbank network. Our analysis shows that a random financial network can be more resilient than a scale free one in case of agents' heterogeneity.

  13. Topology of molecular interaction networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Molecular interactions are often represented as network models which have become the common language of many areas of biology. Graphs serve as convenient mathematical representations of network models and have themselves become objects of study. Their topology has been intensively researched over the last decade after evidence was found that they share underlying design principles with many other types of networks. Initial studies suggested that molecular interaction network topology is related to biological function and evolution. However, further whole-network analyses did not lead to a unified view on what this relation may look like, with conclusions highly dependent on the type of molecular interactions considered and the metrics used to study them. It is unclear whether global network topology drives function, as suggested by some researchers, or whether it is simply a byproduct of evolution or even an artefact of representing complex molecular interaction networks as graphs. Nevertheless, network biology has progressed significantly over the last years. We review the literature, focusing on two major developments. First, realizing that molecular interaction networks can be naturally decomposed into subsystems (such as modules and pathways), topology is increasingly studied locally rather than globally. Second, there is a move from a descriptive approach to a predictive one: rather than correlating biological network topology to generic properties such as robustness, it is used to predict specific functions or phenotypes. Taken together, this change in focus from globally descriptive to locally predictive points to new avenues of research. In particular, multi-scale approaches are developments promising to drive the study of molecular interaction networks further. PMID:24041013

  14. Topological analysis of telecommunications networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milojko V. Jevtović

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A topological analysis of the structure of telecommunications networks is a very interesting topic in the network research, but also a key issue in their design and planning. Satisfying multiple criteria in terms of locations of switching nodes as well as their connectivity with respect to the requests for capacity, transmission speed, reliability, availability and cost are the main research objectives. There are three ways of presenting the topology of telecommunications networks: table, matrix or graph method. The table method is suitable for a network of a relatively small number of nodes in relation to the number of links. The matrix method involves the formation of a connection matrix in which its columns present source traffic nodes and its rows are the switching systems that belong to the destination. The method of the topology graph means that the network nodes are connected via directional or unidirectional links. We can thus easily analyze the structural parameters of telecommunications networks. This paper presents the mathematical analysis of the star-, ring-, fully connected loop- and grid (matrix-shaped topology as well as the topology based on the shortest path tree. For each of these topologies, the expressions for determining the number of branches, the middle level of reliability, the medium length and the average length of the link are given in tables. For the fully connected loop network with five nodes the values of all topological parameters are calculated. Based on the topological parameters, the relationships that represent integral and distributed indicators of reliability are given in this work as well as the values of the particular network. The main objectives of the topology optimization of telecommunications networks are: achieving the minimum complexity, maximum capacity, the shortest path message transfer, the maximum speed of communication and maximum economy. The performance of telecommunications networks is

  15. From topology to dynamics in biochemical networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Jeffrey J.; Hill, Colin C.

    2001-12-01

    Abstract formulations of the regulation of gene expression as random Boolean switching networks have been studied extensively over the past three decades. These models have been developed to make statistical predictions of the types of dynamics observed in biological networks based on network topology and interaction bias, p. For values of mean connectivity chosen to correspond to real biological networks, these models predict disordered dynamics. However, chaotic dynamics seems to be absent from the functioning of a normal cell. While these models use a fixed number of inputs for each element in the network, recent experimental evidence suggests that several biological networks have distributions in connectivity. We therefore study randomly constructed Boolean networks with distributions in the number of inputs, K, to each element. We study three distributions: delta function, Poisson, and power law (scale free). We analytically show that the critical value of the interaction bias parameter, p, above which steady state behavior is observed, is independent of the distribution in the limit of the number of elements N--> infinity. We also study these networks numerically. Using three different measures (types of attractors, fraction of elements that are active, and length of period), we show that finite, scale-free networks are more ordered than either the Poisson or delta function networks below the critical point. Thus the topology of scale-free biochemical networks, characterized by a wide distribution in the number of inputs per element, may provide a source of order in living cells. (c) 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  16. Propagation dynamics on networks featuring complex topologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hébert-Dufresne, Laurent; Noël, Pierre-André; Marceau, Vincent; Allard, Antoine; Dubé, Louis J.

    2010-09-01

    Analytical description of propagation phenomena on random networks has flourished in recent years, yet more complex systems have mainly been studied through numerical means. In this paper, a mean-field description is used to coherently couple the dynamics of the network elements (such as nodes, vertices, individuals, etc.) on the one hand and their recurrent topological patterns (such as subgraphs, groups, etc.) on the other hand. In a susceptible-infectious-susceptible (SIS) model of epidemic spread on social networks with community structure, this approach yields a set of ordinary differential equations for the time evolution of the system, as well as analytical solutions for the epidemic threshold and equilibria. The results obtained are in good agreement with numerical simulations and reproduce the behavior of random networks in the appropriate limits which highlights the influence of topology on the processes. Finally, it is demonstrated that our model predicts higher epidemic thresholds for clustered structures than for equivalent random topologies in the case of networks with zero degree correlation.

  17. Dynamic Network Topologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-13

    possible network configurations. It is important to address the impacts this modification has to the cryptanalysis of AES. In [19], the creators address...differential and linear cryptanalysis through the propagation of bit patterns over the algorithm steps. Daemen and Rijmen state the ShiftRow has the...linear cryptanalysis . The ShiftInterfaces step provides further diffusion of the bit pattern, since the step moves bits of one layer into another. The

  18. Topological Analysis of Wireless Networks (TAWN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-31

    19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (Include area code) 31-05-2016 FINAL REPORT 12-02-2015 -- 31-05-2016 Topological Analysis of Wireless Networks (TAWN) Robinson...mathematical literature on sheaves that describes how to draw global ( network -wide) inferences from them. Wireless network , local homology, sheaf...topology U U U UU 32 Michael Robinson 202-885-3681 Final Report: May 2016 Topological Analysis of Wireless Networks Principal Investigator: Prof. Michael

  19. Topological properties of hierarchical networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agliari, Elena; Barra, Adriano; Galluzzi, Andrea; Guerra, Francesco; Tantari, Daniele; Tavani, Flavia

    2015-06-01

    Hierarchical networks are attracting a renewal interest for modeling the organization of a number of biological systems and for tackling the complexity of statistical mechanical models beyond mean-field limitations. Here we consider the Dyson hierarchical construction for ferromagnets, neural networks, and spin glasses, recently analyzed from a statistical-mechanics perspective, and we focus on the topological properties of the underlying structures. In particular, we find that such structures are weighted graphs that exhibit a high degree of clustering and of modularity, with a small spectral gap; the robustness of such features with respect to the presence of thermal noise is also studied. These outcomes are then discussed and related to the statistical-mechanics scenario in full consistency. Last, we look at these weighted graphs as Markov chains and we show that in the limit of infinite size, the emergence of ergodicity breakdown for the stochastic process mirrors the emergence of metastabilities in the corresponding statistical mechanical analysis.

  20. Topological properties of hierarchical networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agliari, Elena; Barra, Adriano; Galluzzi, Andrea; Guerra, Francesco; Tantari, Daniele; Tavani, Flavia

    2015-06-01

    Hierarchical networks are attracting a renewal interest for modeling the organization of a number of biological systems and for tackling the complexity of statistical mechanical models beyond mean-field limitations. Here we consider the Dyson hierarchical construction for ferromagnets, neural networks, and spin glasses, recently analyzed from a statistical-mechanics perspective, and we focus on the topological properties of the underlying structures. In particular, we find that such structures are weighted graphs that exhibit a high degree of clustering and of modularity, with a small spectral gap; the robustness of such features with respect to the presence of thermal noise is also studied. These outcomes are then discussed and related to the statistical-mechanics scenario in full consistency. Last, we look at these weighted graphs as Markov chains and we show that in the limit of infinite size, the emergence of ergodicity breakdown for the stochastic process mirrors the emergence of metastabilities in the corresponding statistical mechanical analysis.

  1. Sensitivity and network topology in chemical reaction systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Takashi; Mochizuki, Atsushi

    2017-08-01

    In living cells, biochemical reactions are catalyzed by specific enzymes and connect to one another by sharing substrates and products, forming complex networks. In our previous studies, we established a framework determining the responses to enzyme perturbations only from network topology, and then proved a theorem, called the law of localization, explaining response patterns in terms of network topology. In this paper, we generalize these results to reaction networks with conserved concentrations, which allows us to study any reaction system. We also propose network characteristics quantifying robustness. We compare E. coli metabolic network with randomly rewired networks, and find that the robustness of the E. coli network is significantly higher than that of the random networks.

  2. Topological generalizations of network motifs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashtan, N.; Itzkovitz, S.; Milo, R.; Alon, U.

    2004-09-01

    Biological and technological networks contain patterns, termed network motifs, which occur far more often than in randomized networks. Network motifs were suggested to be elementary building blocks that carry out key functions in the network. It is of interest to understand how network motifs combine to form larger structures. To address this, we present a systematic approach to define “motif generalizations”: families of motifs of different sizes that share a common architectural theme. To define motif generalizations, we first define “roles” in a subgraph according to structural equivalence. For example, the feedforward loop triad—a motif in transcription, neuronal, and some electronic networks—has three roles: an input node, an output node, and an internal node. The roles are used to define possible generalizations of the motif. The feedforward loop can have three simple generalizations, based on replicating each of the three roles and their connections. We present algorithms for efficiently detecting motif generalizations. We find that the transcription networks of bacteria and yeast display only one of the three generalizations, the multi-output feedforward generalization. In contrast, the neuronal network of C. elegans mainly displays the multi-input generalization. Forward-logic electronic circuits display a multi-input, multi-output hybrid. Thus, networks which share a common motif can have very different generalizations of that motif. Using mathematical modeling, we describe the information processing functions of the different motif generalizations in transcription, neuronal, and electronic networks.

  3. Network Topologies Decoding Cervical Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarika Jalan

    Full Text Available According to the GLOBOCAN statistics, cervical cancer is one of the leading causes of death among women worldwide. It is found to be gradually increasing in the younger population, specifically in the developing countries. We analyzed the protein-protein interaction networks of the uterine cervix cells for the normal and disease states. It was found that the disease network was less random than the normal one, providing an insight into the change in complexity of the underlying network in disease state. The study also portrayed that, the disease state has faster signal processing as the diameter of the underlying network was very close to its corresponding random control. This may be a reason for the normal cells to change into malignant state. Further, the analysis revealed VEGFA and IL-6 proteins as the distinctly high degree nodes in the disease network, which are known to manifest a major contribution in promoting cervical cancer. Our analysis, being time proficient and cost effective, provides a direction for developing novel drugs, therapeutic targets and biomarkers by identifying specific interaction patterns, that have structural importance.

  4. Inferring network topology via the propagation process

    CERN Document Server

    Zeng, An

    2013-01-01

    Inferring the network topology from the dynamics is a fundamental problem with wide applications in geology, biology and even counter-terrorism. Based on the propagation process, we present a simple method to uncover the network topology. The numerical simulation on artificial networks shows that our method enjoys a high accuracy in inferring the network topology. We find the infection rate in the propagation process significantly influences the accuracy, and each network is corresponding to an optimal infection rate. Moreover, the method generally works better in large networks. These finding are confirmed in both real social and nonsocial networks. Finally, the method is extended to directed networks and a similarity measure specific for directed networks is designed.

  5. Symmetric Topological Phases and Tensor Network States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shenghan

    Classification and simulation of quantum phases are one of main themes in condensed matter physics. Quantum phases can be distinguished by their symmetrical and topological properties. The interplay between symmetry and topology in condensed matter physics often leads to exotic quantum phases and rich phase diagrams. Famous examples include quantum Hall phases, spin liquids and topological insulators. In this thesis, I present our works toward a more systematically understanding of symmetric topological quantum phases in bosonic systems. In the absence of global symmetries, gapped quantum phases are characterized by topological orders. Topological orders in 2+1D are well studied, while a systematically understanding of topological orders in 3+1D is still lacking. By studying a family of exact solvable models, we find at least some topological orders in 3+1D can be distinguished by braiding phases of loop excitations. In the presence of both global symmetries and topological orders, the interplay between them leads to new phases termed as symmetry enriched topological (SET) phases. We develop a framework to classify a large class of SET phases using tensor networks. For each tensor class, we can write down generic variational wavefunctions. We apply our method to study gapped spin liquids on the kagome lattice, which can be viewed as SET phases of on-site symmetries as well as lattice symmetries. In the absence of topological order, symmetry could protect different topological phases, which are often referred to as symmetry protected topological (SPT) phases. We present systematic constructions of tensor network wavefunctions for bosonic symmetry protected topological (SPT) phases respecting both onsite and spatial symmetries.

  6. Topological Routing in Large-Scale Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jens Myrup; Knudsen, Thomas Phillip; Madsen, Ole Brun

    2004-01-01

    Topological Routing to large-scale networks are discussed. Hierarchical extensions are presented along with schemes for shortest path routing, fault handling and path restoration. Further reserach in the area is discussed and perspectives on the prerequisites for practical deployment of Topological Routing...

  7. Topological Routing in Large-Scale Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jens Myrup; Knudsen, Thomas Phillip; Madsen, Ole Brun

    Topological Routing to large-scale networks are discussed. Hierarchical extensions are presented along with schemes for shortest path routing, fault handling and path restoration. Further reserach in the area is discussed and perspectives on the prerequisites for practical deployment of Topological Routing...

  8. Spectrum-Based and Collaborative Network Topology Analysis and Visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xianlin

    2013-01-01

    Networks are of significant importance in many application domains, such as World Wide Web and social networks, which often embed rich topological information. Since network topology captures the organization of network nodes and links, studying network topology is very important to network analysis. In this dissertation, we study networks by…

  9. Combining Topological Hardware and Topological Software: Color-Code Quantum Computing with Topological Superconductor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Litinski

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a scalable architecture for fault-tolerant topological quantum computation using networks of voltage-controlled Majorana Cooper pair boxes and topological color codes for error correction. Color codes have a set of transversal gates which coincides with the set of topologically protected gates in Majorana-based systems, namely, the Clifford gates. In this way, we establish color codes as providing a natural setting in which advantages offered by topological hardware can be combined with those arising from topological error-correcting software for full-fledged fault-tolerant quantum computing. We provide a complete description of our architecture, including the underlying physical ingredients. We start by showing that in topological superconductor networks, hexagonal cells can be employed to serve as physical qubits for universal quantum computation, and we present protocols for realizing topologically protected Clifford gates. These hexagonal-cell qubits allow for a direct implementation of open-boundary color codes with ancilla-free syndrome read-out and logical T gates via magic-state distillation. For concreteness, we describe how the necessary operations can be implemented using networks of Majorana Cooper pair boxes, and we give a feasibility estimate for error correction in this architecture. Our approach is motivated by nanowire-based networks of topological superconductors, but it could also be realized in alternative settings such as quantum-Hall–superconductor hybrids.

  10. DETECTION OF TOPOLOGICAL PATTERNS IN PROTEIN NETWORKS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MASLOV,S.SNEPPEN,K.

    2003-11-17

    interesting property of many biological networks that was recently brought to attention of the scientific community [3, 4, 5] is an extremely broad distribution of node connectivities defined as the number of immediate neighbors of a given node in the network. While the majority of nodes have just a few edges connecting them to other nodes in the network, there exist some nodes, that we will refer to as ''hubs'', with an unusually large number of neighbors. The connectivity of the most connected hub in such a network is typically several orders of magnitude larger than the average connectivity in the network. Often the distribution of connectivities of individual nodes can be approximated by a scale-free power law form [3] in which case the network is referred to as scale-free. Among biological networks distributions of node connectivities in metabolic [4], protein interaction [5], and brain functional [6] networks can be reasonably approximated by a power law extending for several orders of magnitude. The set of connectivities of individual nodes is an example of a low-level (single-node) topological property of a network. While it answers the question about how many neighbors a given node has, it gives no information about the identity of those neighbors. It is clear that most functional properties of networks are defined at a higher topological level in the exact pattern of connections of nodes to each other. However, such multi-node connectivity patterns are rather difficult to quantify and compare between networks. In this work we concentrate on multi-node topological properties of protein networks. These networks (as any other biological networks) lack the top-down design. Instead, selective forces of biological evolution shape them from raw material provided by random events such as mutations within individual genes, and gene duplications. As a result their connections are characterized by a large degree of randomness. One may wonder which

  11. Scaling in topological properties of brain networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Singh, S.S.; Khundrakpam, B.S.; Reid, A.T.; Lewis, J.D.; Evans, A.C.; Ishrat, R.; Sharma, B.I.; Singh, R.K.B.

    2016-01-01

    The organization in brain networks shows highly modular features with weak inter-modular interaction. The topology of the networks involves emergence of modules and sub-modules at different levels of constitution governed by fractal laws that are signatures of self-organization in complex networks.

  12. LARGE-SCALE TOPOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF MOLECULAR NETWORKS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MASLOV,S.SNEPPEN,K.

    2003-11-17

    Bio-molecular networks lack the top-down design. Instead, selective forces of biological evolution shape them from raw material provided by random events such as gene duplications and single gene mutations. As a result individual connections in these networks are characterized by a large degree of randomness. One may wonder which connectivity patterns are indeed random, while which arose due to the network growth, evolution, and/or its fundamental design principles and limitations? Here we introduce a general method allowing one to construct a random null-model version of a given network while preserving the desired set of its low-level topological features, such as, e.g., the number of neighbors of individual nodes, the average level of modularity, preferential connections between particular groups of nodes, etc. Such a null-model network can then be used to detect and quantify the non-random topological patterns present in large networks. In particular, we measured correlations between degrees of interacting nodes in protein interaction and regulatory networks in yeast. It was found that in both these networks, links between highly connected proteins are systematically suppressed. This effect decreases the likelihood of cross-talk between different functional modules of the cell, and increases the overall robustness of a network by localizing effects of deleterious perturbations. It also teaches us about the overall computational architecture of such networks and points at the origin of large differences in the number of neighbors of individual nodes.

  13. Small Worlds in the Tree Topologies of Wireless Sensor Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qiao, Li; Lingguo, Cui; Baihai, Zhang

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the characteristics of small worlds are investigated in the context of the tree topologies of wireless sensor networks. Tree topologies, which construct spatial graphs with larger characteristic path lengths than random graphs and small clustering coefficients, are ubiquitous...... in wireless sensor networks. Suffering from the link rewiring or the link addition, the characteristic path length of the tree topology reduces rapidly and the clustering coefficient increases greatly. The variety of characteristic path length influences the time synchronization characteristics of wireless...... sensor networks greatly. With the increase of the link rewiring or the link addition probability, the time synchronization error decreases drastically. Two novel protocols named LEACH-SW and TREEPSI-SW are proposed to improve the performances of the sensor networks, in which the small world...

  14. Topological plasticity increases robustness of mutualistic networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Jiliberto, Rodrigo; Valdovinos, Fernanda S; Moisset de Espanés, Pablo; Flores, José D

    2012-07-01

    1. Earlier studies used static models to evaluate the responses of mutualistic networks to external perturbations. Two classes of dynamics can be distinguished in ecological networks; population dynamics, represented mainly by changes in species abundances, and topological dynamics, represented by changes in the architecture of the web. 2. In this study, we model the temporal evolution of three empirical plant-pollination networks incorporating both population and topological dynamics. We test the hypothesis that topological plasticity, realized through the ability of animals to rewire their connections after depletion of host abundances, enhances tolerance of mutualistic networks to species loss. We also compared the performance of various rewiring rules in affecting robustness. 3. The results show that topological plasticity markedly increased the robustness of mutualistic networks. Our analyses also revealed that network robustness reached maximum levels when animals with less host plant availability were more likely to rewire. Also, preferential attachment to richer host plants, that is, to plants exhibiting higher abundance and few exploiters, enhances robustness more than other rewiring alternatives. 4. Our results highlight the potential role of topological plasticity in the robustness of mutualistic networks to species extinctions and suggest some plausible mechanisms by which the decisions of foragers may shape the collective dynamics of plant-pollinator systems. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology © 2012 British Ecological Society.

  15. Network topology and resilience analysis of South Korean power grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong Hwan; Eisenberg, Daniel A.; Chun, Yeong Han; Park, Jeryang

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we present topological and resilience analyses of the South Korean power grid (KPG) with a broad voltage level. While topological analysis of KPG only with high-voltage infrastructure shows an exponential degree distribution, providing another empirical evidence of power grid topology, the inclusion of low voltage components generates a distribution with a larger variance and a smaller average degree. This result suggests that the topology of a power grid may converge to a highly skewed degree distribution if more low-voltage data is considered. Moreover, when compared to ER random and BA scale-free networks, the KPG has a lower efficiency and a higher clustering coefficient, implying that highly clustered structure does not necessarily guarantee a functional efficiency of a network. Error and attack tolerance analysis, evaluated with efficiency, indicate that the KPG is more vulnerable to random or degree-based attacks than betweenness-based intentional attack. Cascading failure analysis with recovery mechanism demonstrates that resilience of the network depends on both tolerance capacity and recovery initiation time. Also, when the two factors are fixed, the KPG is most vulnerable among the three networks. Based on our analysis, we propose that the topology of power grids should be designed so the loads are homogeneously distributed, or functional hubs and their neighbors have high tolerance capacity to enhance resilience.

  16. Topological properties of four networks in protein structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Seungsik; Kim, Kyungsik; Chang, Ki-Ho; Ha, Deok-Ho; Lee, Jun-Ho

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, we investigate the complex networks of interacting amino acids in protein structures. The cellular networks and their random controls are treated for the four threshold distances between atoms. The numerical simulation and analysis are relevant to the topological properties of the complex networks in the structural classification of proteins, and we mainly estimate the network's metrics from the resultant network. The cellular network is shown to exhibit a small-world feature regardless of their structural class. The protein structure presents the positive assortative coefficients, when the topological property is described as a tendency for connectivity of high-degree nodes. We particularly show that both the modularity and the small-wordness are significantly followed the increasing function against nodes.

  17. Algorithms for radio networks with dynamic topology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shacham, Nachum; Ogier, Richard; Rutenburg, Vladislav V.; Garcia-Luna-Aceves, Jose

    1991-08-01

    The objective of this project was the development of advanced algorithms and protocols that efficiently use network resources to provide optimal or nearly optimal performance in future communication networks with highly dynamic topologies and subject to frequent link failures. As reflected by this report, we have achieved our objective and have significantly advanced the state-of-the-art in this area. The research topics of the papers summarized include the following: efficient distributed algorithms for computing shortest pairs of disjoint paths; minimum-expected-delay alternate routing algorithms for highly dynamic unreliable networks; algorithms for loop-free routing; multipoint communication by hierarchically encoded data; efficient algorithms for extracting the maximum information from event-driven topology updates; methods for the neural network solution of link scheduling and other difficult problems arising in communication networks; and methods for robust routing in networks subject to sophisticated attacks.

  18. Quark Spectra, Topology, and Random Matrix Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, R.G.; Heller, U.M. [SCRI, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32306-4130 (United States); Kiskis, J. [Department of Physics, University of California, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Narayanan, R. [Department of Physics, Building 510A, Brookhaven National Laboratory, P.O. Box 5000, Upton, New York 11973 (United States)

    1999-05-01

    Quark spectra in QCD are linked to fundamental properties of the theory including the identification of pions as the Goldstone bosons of spontaneously broken chiral symmetry. The lattice overlap Dirac operator provides a nonperturbative, ultraviolet-regularized description of quarks with the correct chiral symmetry. Properties of the spectrum of this operator and their relation to random matrix theory are studied here. In particular, the predictions from chiral random matrix theory in topologically nontrivial gauge field sectors are tested for the first time. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  19. Robust network topologies for generating switch-like cellular responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najaf A Shah

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Signaling networks that convert graded stimuli into binary, all-or-none cellular responses are critical in processes ranging from cell-cycle control to lineage commitment. To exhaustively enumerate topologies that exhibit this switch-like behavior, we simulated all possible two- and three-component networks on random parameter sets, and assessed the resulting response profiles for both steepness (ultrasensitivity and extent of memory (bistability. Simulations were used to study purely enzymatic networks, purely transcriptional networks, and hybrid enzymatic/transcriptional networks, and the topologies in each class were rank ordered by parametric robustness (i.e., the percentage of applied parameter sets exhibiting ultrasensitivity or bistability. Results reveal that the distribution of network robustness is highly skewed, with the most robust topologies clustering into a small number of motifs. Hybrid networks are the most robust in generating ultrasensitivity (up to 28% and bistability (up to 18%; strikingly, a purely transcriptional framework is the most fragile in generating either ultrasensitive (up to 3% or bistable (up to 1% responses. The disparity in robustness among the network classes is due in part to zero-order ultrasensitivity, an enzyme-specific phenomenon, which repeatedly emerges as a particularly robust mechanism for generating nonlinearity and can act as a building block for switch-like responses. We also highlight experimentally studied examples of topologies enabling switching behavior, in both native and synthetic systems, that rank highly in our simulations. This unbiased approach for identifying topologies capable of a given response may be useful in discovering new natural motifs and in designing robust synthetic gene networks.

  20. Impact of network topology on synchrony of oscillatory power grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohden, Martin; Sorge, Andreas; Witthaut, Dirk; Timme, Marc

    2014-03-01

    Replacing conventional power sources by renewable sources in current power grids drastically alters their structure and functionality. In particular, power generation in the resulting grid will be far more decentralized, with a distinctly different topology. Here, we analyze the impact of grid topologies on spontaneous synchronization, considering regular, random, and small-world topologies and focusing on the influence of decentralization. We model the consumers and sources of the power grid as second order oscillators. First, we analyze the global dynamics of the simplest non-trivial (two-node) network that exhibit a synchronous (normal operation) state, a limit cycle (power outage), and coexistence of both. Second, we estimate stability thresholds for the collective dynamics of small network motifs, in particular, star-like networks and regular grid motifs. For larger networks, we numerically investigate decentralization scenarios finding that decentralization itself may support power grids in exhibiting a stable state for lower transmission line capacities. Decentralization may thus be beneficial for power grids, regardless of the details of their resulting topology. Regular grids show a specific sharper transition not found for random or small-world grids.

  1. Topology Optimisation of Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thike Aye Min

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Wireless sensor networks are widely used in a variety of fields including industrial environments. In case of a clustered network the location of cluster head affects the reliability of the network operation. Finding of the optimum location of the cluster head, therefore, is critical for the design of a network. This paper discusses the optimisation approach, based on the brute force algorithm, in the context of topology optimisation of a cluster structure centralised wireless sensor network. Two examples are given to verify the approach that demonstrate the implementation of the brute force algorithm to find an optimum location of the cluster head.

  2. Dynamical networks with topological self-organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zak, M.

    2001-01-01

    Coupled evolution of state and topology of dynamical networks is introduced. Due to the well organized tensor structure, the governing equations are presented in a canonical form, and required attractors as well as their basins can be easily implanted and controlled.

  3. Spectral Analysis of Rich Network Topology in Social Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Leting

    2013-01-01

    Social networks have received much attention these days. Researchers have developed different methods to study the structure and characteristics of the network topology. Our focus is on spectral analysis of the adjacency matrix of the underlying network. Recent work showed good properties in the adjacency spectral space but there are few…

  4. Topological Effects and Performance Optimization in Transportation Continuous Network Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianjun Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Because of the limitation of budget, in the planning of road works, increased efforts should be made on links that are more critical to the whole traffic system. Therefore, it would be helpful to model and evaluate the vulnerability and reliability of the transportation network when the network design is processing. This paper proposes a bilevel transportation network design model, in which the upper level is to minimize the performance of the network under the given budgets, while the lower level is a typical user equilibrium assignment problem. A new solution approach based on particle swarm optimization (PSO method is presented. The topological effects on the performance of transportation networks are studied with the consideration of three typical networks, regular lattice, random graph, and small-world network. Numerical examples and simulations are presented to demonstrate the proposed model.

  5. Robustness of cooperation on scale-free networks under continuous topological change

    CERN Document Server

    Ichinose, Genki; Tanizawa, Toshihiro

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we numerically investigate the robustness of cooperation clusters in prisoner's dilemma played on scale-free networks, where their network topologies change by continuous removal and addition of nodes. Each of these removal and addition can be either random or intentional. We therefore have four different strategies in changing network topology: random removal and random addition (RR), random removal and preferential addition (RP), targeted removal and random addition (TR), and targeted removal and preferential addition (TP). We find that cooperation clusters are the most fragile against TR, while they are the most robust against RP even in high temptation coefficients for defect. The effect of the degree mixing pattern of the network is not the primary factor for the robustness of cooperation under continuous change in network topology due to consequential removal and addition of nodes, which is quite different from the cases observed in static networks. Cooperation clusters become more robust...

  6. Neural network topology design for nonlinear control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haecker, Jens; Rudolph, Stephan

    2001-03-01

    Neural networks, especially in nonlinear system identification and control applications, are typically considered to be black-boxes which are difficult to analyze and understand mathematically. Due to this reason, an in- depth mathematical analysis offering insight into the different neural network transformation layers based on a theoretical transformation scheme is desired, but up to now neither available nor known. In previous works it has been shown how proven engineering methods such as dimensional analysis and the Laplace transform may be used to construct a neural controller topology for time-invariant systems. Using the knowledge of neural correspondences of these two classical methods, the internal nodes of the network could also be successfully interpreted after training. As further extension to these works, the paper describes the latest of a theoretical interpretation framework describing the neural network transformation sequences in nonlinear system identification and control. This can be achieved By incorporation of the method of exact input-output linearization in the above mentioned two transform sequences of dimensional analysis and the Laplace transformation. Based on these three theoretical considerations neural network topologies may be designed in special situations by pure translation in the sense of a structural compilation of the known classical solutions into their correspondent neural topology. Based on known exemplary results, the paper synthesizes the proposed approach into the visionary goals of a structural compiler for neural networks. This structural compiler for neural networks is intended to automatically convert classical control formulations into their equivalent neural network structure based on the principles of equivalence between formula and operator, and operator and structure which are discussed in detail in this work.

  7. Fermionic topological quantum states as tensor networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wille, C.; Buerschaper, O.; Eisert, J.

    2017-06-01

    Tensor network states, and in particular projected entangled pair states, play an important role in the description of strongly correlated quantum lattice systems. They do not only serve as variational states in numerical simulation methods, but also provide a framework for classifying phases of quantum matter and capture notions of topological order in a stringent and rigorous language. The rapid development in this field for spin models and bosonic systems has not yet been mirrored by an analogous development for fermionic models. In this work, we introduce a tensor network formalism capable of capturing notions of topological order for quantum systems with fermionic components. At the heart of the formalism are axioms of fermionic matrix-product operator injectivity, stable under concatenation. Building upon that, we formulate a Grassmann number tensor network ansatz for the ground state of fermionic twisted quantum double models. A specific focus is put on the paradigmatic example of the fermionic toric code. This work shows that the program of describing topologically ordered systems using tensor networks carries over to fermionic models.

  8. Topology Design for Directional Range Extension Networks with Antenna Blockage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Topology Design for Directional Range Extension Networks with Antenna Blockage Thomas Shake MIT Lincoln Laboratory shake@ll.mit.edu Abstract...associated electronics into small aircraft to perform such range extension. In particular, the paper examines trade-offs in network topology design...aircraft, and the topology characteristics of the aerial relay network. The analysis suggests that low-degree air topologies such as rings and strings

  9. Bipartite quantum states and random complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnerone, Silvano; Giorda, Paolo; Zanardi, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a mapping between graphs and pure quantum bipartite states and show that the associated entanglement entropy conveys non-trivial information about the structure of the graph. Our primary goal is to investigate the family of random graphs known as complex networks. In the case of classical random graphs, we derive an analytic expression for the averaged entanglement entropy \\bar S while for general complex networks we rely on numerics. For a large number of nodes n we find a scaling \\bar {S} \\sim c log n +g_{ {e}} where both the prefactor c and the sub-leading O(1) term ge are characteristic of the different classes of complex networks. In particular, ge encodes topological features of the graphs and is named network topological entropy. Our results suggest that quantum entanglement may provide a powerful tool for the analysis of large complex networks with non-trivial topological properties.

  10. Fundamental principles of vascular network topology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopylova, Veronika S; Boronovskiy, Stanislav E; Nartsissov, Yaroslav R

    2017-06-15

    The vascular system is arguably the most important biological system in many organisms. Although the general principles of its architecture are simple, the growth of blood vessels occurs under extreme physical conditions. Optimization is an important aspect of the development of computational models of the vascular branching structures. This review surveys the approaches used to optimize the topology and estimate different geometrical parameters of the vascular system. The review is focused on optimizations using complex cost functions based on the minimum total energy principle and the relationship between the laws of growth and precise vascular network topology. Experimental studies of vascular networks in different species are also discussed. © 2017 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  11. Phase Transitions on Random Lattices: How Random is Topological Disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barghathi, Hatem; Vojta, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    We study the effects of topological (connectivity) disorder on phase transitions. We identify a broad class of random lattices whose disorder fluctuations decay much faster with increasing length scale than those of generic random systems, yielding a wandering exponent of ω = (d - 1) / (2 d) in d dimensions. The stability of clean critical points is thus governed by the criterion (d + 1) ν > 2 rather than the usual Harris criterion dν > 2 , making topological disorder less relevant than generic randomness. The Imry-Ma criterion is also modified, allowing first-order transitions to survive in all dimensions d > 1 . These results explain a host of puzzling violations of the original criteria for equilibrium and nonequilibrium phase transitions on random lattices. We discuss applications, and we illustrate our theory by computer simulations of random Voronoi and other lattices. This work was supported by the NSF under Grant Nos. DMR-1205803 and PHYS-1066293. We acknowledge the hospitality of the Aspen Center for Physics.

  12. Novel topological descriptors for analyzing biological networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varmuza Kurt K

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Topological descriptors, other graph measures, and in a broader sense, graph-theoretical methods, have been proven as powerful tools to perform biological network analysis. However, the majority of the developed descriptors and graph-theoretical methods does not have the ability to take vertex- and edge-labels into account, e.g., atom- and bond-types when considering molecular graphs. Indeed, this feature is important to characterize biological networks more meaningfully instead of only considering pure topological information. Results In this paper, we put the emphasis on analyzing a special type of biological networks, namely bio-chemical structures. First, we derive entropic measures to calculate the information content of vertex- and edge-labeled graphs and investigate some useful properties thereof. Second, we apply the mentioned measures combined with other well-known descriptors to supervised machine learning methods for predicting Ames mutagenicity. Moreover, we investigate the influence of our topological descriptors - measures for only unlabeled vs. measures for labeled graphs - on the prediction performance of the underlying graph classification problem. Conclusions Our study demonstrates that the application of entropic measures to molecules representing graphs is useful to characterize such structures meaningfully. For instance, we have found that if one extends the measures for determining the structural information content of unlabeled graphs to labeled graphs, the uniqueness of the resulting indices is higher. Because measures to structurally characterize labeled graphs are clearly underrepresented so far, the further development of such methods might be valuable and fruitful for solving problems within biological network analysis.

  13. Socialising Health Burden Through Different Network Topologies: A Simulation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, Adrian; Cheung, Anthony; Kim, Peter; Poon, Simon K

    2017-01-01

    An aging population and the expectation of premium quality health services combined with the increasing economic burden of the healthcare system requires a paradigm shift toward patient oriented healthcare. The guardian angel theory described by Szolovits [1] explores the notion of enlisting patients as primary providers of information and motivation to patients with similar clinical history through social connections. In this study, an agent based model was developed to simulate to explore how individuals are affected through their levels of intrinsic positivity. Ring, point-to-point (paired buddy), and random networks were modelled, with individuals able to send messages to each other given their levels of variables positivity and motivation. Of the 3 modelled networks it is apparent that the ring network provides the most equal, collective improvement in positivity and motivation for all users. Further study into other network topologies should be undertaken in the future.

  14. Dissipative Topological Defects in Coupled Laser Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Pal, Vishwa; Chriki, Ronen; Friesem, Asher A; Davidson, Nir

    2016-01-01

    Topologically protected defects have been observed and studied in a wide range of fields, such as cosmology, spin systems, cold atoms and optics as they are quenched across a phase transition into an ordered state. Revealing their origin and control is becoming increasingly important field of research, as they limit the coherence of the system and its ability to approach a fully ordered state. Here, we present dissipative topological defects in a 1-D ring network of phase-locked lasers, and show how their formation is related to the Kibble-Zurek mechanism and is governed in a universal manner by two competing time scales of the lasers, namely the phase locking time and synchronization time of their amplitude fluctuations. The ratio between these two time scales depends on the system parameters such as gain and coupling strength, and thus offers the possibility to control the probability of topological defects in the system. Enabling the system to dissipate to the fully ordered, defect-free state can be exploi...

  15. Topological isomorphisms of human brain and financial market networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vértes, Petra E; Nicol, Ruth M; Chapman, Sandra C; Watkins, Nicholas W; Robertson, Duncan A; Bullmore, Edward T

    2011-01-01

    Although metaphorical and conceptual connections between the human brain and the financial markets have often been drawn, rigorous physical or mathematical underpinnings of this analogy remain largely unexplored. Here, we apply a statistical and graph theoretic approach to the study of two datasets - the time series of 90 stocks from the New York stock exchange over a 3-year period, and the fMRI-derived time series acquired from 90 brain regions over the course of a 10-min-long functional MRI scan of resting brain function in healthy volunteers. Despite the many obvious substantive differences between these two datasets, graphical analysis demonstrated striking commonalities in terms of global network topological properties. Both the human brain and the market networks were non-random, small-world, modular, hierarchical systems with fat-tailed degree distributions indicating the presence of highly connected hubs. These properties could not be trivially explained by the univariate time series statistics of stock price returns. This degree of topological isomorphism suggests that brains and markets can be regarded broadly as members of the same family of networks. The two systems, however, were not topologically identical. The financial market was more efficient and more modular - more highly optimized for information processing - than the brain networks; but also less robust to systemic disintegration as a result of hub deletion. We conclude that the conceptual connections between brains and markets are not merely metaphorical; rather these two information processing systems can be rigorously compared in the same mathematical language and turn out often to share important topological properties in common to some degree. There will be interesting scientific arbitrage opportunities in further work at the graph-theoretically mediated interface between systems neuroscience and the statistical physics of financial markets.

  16. Functional Topology of Evolving Urban Drainage Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Soohyun; Paik, Kyungrock; McGrath, Gavan S.; Urich, Christian; Krueger, Elisabeth; Kumar, Praveen; Rao, P. Suresh C.

    2017-11-01

    We investigated the scaling and topology of engineered urban drainage networks (UDNs) in two cities, and further examined UDN evolution over decades. UDN scaling was analyzed using two power law scaling characteristics widely employed for river networks: (1) Hack's law of length (L)-area (A) [L∝Ah] and (2) exceedance probability distribution of upstream contributing area (δ) [P>(A≥δ>)˜aδ-ɛ]. For the smallest UDNs ((A≥δ>) plots for river networks are abruptly truncated, those for UDNs display exponential tempering [P>(A≥δ>)=aδ-ɛexp⁡>(-cδ>)]. The tempering parameter c decreases as the UDNs grow, implying that the distribution evolves in time to resemble those for river networks. However, the power law exponent ɛ for large UDNs tends to be greater than the range reported for river networks. Differences in generative processes and engineering design constraints contribute to observed differences in the evolution of UDNs and river networks, including subnet heterogeneity and nonrandom branching.

  17. Discovering the Network Topology: An Efficient Approach for SDN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo OCHOA-ADAY

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Network topology is a physical description of the overall resources in the network. Collecting this information using efficient mechanisms becomes a critical task for important network functions such as routing, network management, quality of service (QoS, among many others. Recent technologies like Software-Defined Networks (SDN have emerged as promising approaches for managing the next generation networks. In order to ensure a proficient topology discovery service in SDN, we propose a simple agents-based mechanism. This mechanism improves the overall efficiency of the topology discovery process. In this paper, an algorithm for a novel Topology Discovery Protocol (SD-TDP is described. This protocol will be implemented in each switch through a software agent. Thus, this approach will provide a distributed solution to solve the problem of network topology discovery in a more simple and efficient way.

  18. Topological evolution of virtual social networks by modeling social activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xin; Dong, Junyu; Tang, Ruichun; Xu, Mantao; Qi, Lin; Cai, Yang

    2015-09-01

    With the development of Internet and wireless communication, virtual social networks are becoming increasingly important in the formation of nowadays' social communities. Topological evolution model is foundational and critical for social network related researches. Up to present most of the related research experiments are carried out on artificial networks, however, a study of incorporating the actual social activities into the network topology model is ignored. This paper first formalizes two mathematical abstract concepts of hobbies search and friend recommendation to model the social actions people exhibit. Then a social activities based topology evolution simulation model is developed to satisfy some well-known properties that have been discovered in real-world social networks. Empirical results show that the proposed topology evolution model has embraced several key network topological properties of concern, which can be envisioned as signatures of real social networks.

  19. Scheduling and Topology Design in Networks with Directional Antennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-19

    Wireless Mesh Networks , IEEE ICC 2006. [7] E. Gelal, et. al., “Topology Management in Directional Antenna-Equipped Ad Hoc Networks , IEEE Trans. Mobile...Scheduling and Topology Design in Networks with Directional Antennas Thomas Stahlbuhk, Nathaniel M. Jones, Brooke Shrader Lincoln Laboratory...Massachusetts Institute of Technology Lexington, Massachusetts 02420–9108 Abstract—In multihop wireless networks equipped with direc- tional antennas, network

  20. Network ecology: topological constraints on ecosystem dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordán, Ferenc; Scheuring, István

    2004-12-01

    Ecological systems are complex assemblages of various species with interactions between them. The interactions can be even more important than the species themselves for understanding how the whole system is functioning and organized. For the representation of the topological space of interspecific relationships, graph theory is a suitable mathematical tool: the network perspective and the various techniques of network analysis are more and more elaborated and invading ecology. Beyond a static view on networks, fundamental questions can only be answered if dynamical analyses are also made, and now it is clear that structural and dynamical studies must not “compete” but strongly complement each other. Our aim is to give a menu of classical and more recently suggested network indices and to discuss what do we know about their relations to ecosystem dynamics. Since ecologists have very diverse problems, they need diverse techniques and a good insight in matching the adequate method to a particular problem. The main question is how to link certain graph properties to understanding and predicting the behaviour of an ecosystem. We wish to contribute to bridging the gap between extreme structural and extreme dynamical views.

  1. Topology Control in Aerial Multi Beam Directional Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-24

    Topology Control in Aerial Multi-Beam Directional Networks Brian Proulx, Nathaniel M. Jones, Jennifer Madiedo, Greg Kuperman {brian.proulx, njones...significant interference. Topology control (i.e., selecting a subset of neighbors to communicate with) is vital to reduce the interference. Good topology... control balances the number of links utilized to achieve fewer collisions while maintaining robust network connectivity. In this work, we discuss the

  2. Hypergraph topological quantities for tagged social networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlatić, Vinko; Ghoshal, Gourab; Caldarelli, Guido

    2009-09-01

    Recent years have witnessed the emergence of a new class of social networks, which require us to move beyond previously employed representations of complex graph structures. A notable example is that of the folksonomy, an online process where users collaboratively employ tags to resources to impart structure to an otherwise undifferentiated database. In a recent paper, we proposed a mathematical model that represents these structures as tripartite hypergraphs and defined basic topological quantities of interest. In this paper, we extend our model by defining additional quantities such as edge distributions, vertex similarity and correlations as well as clustering. We then empirically measure these quantities on two real life folksonomies, the popular online photo sharing site Flickr and the bookmarking site CiteULike. We find that these systems share similar qualitative features with the majority of complex networks that have been previously studied. We propose that the quantities and methodology described here can be used as a standard tool in measuring the structure of tagged networks.

  3. Network Metamodeling: Effect of Correlation Metric Choice on Phylogenomic and Transcriptomic Network Topology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weighill, Deborah A; Jacobson, Daniel

    We explore the use of a network meta-modeling approach to compare the effects of similarity metrics used to construct biological networks on the topology of the resulting networks. This work reviews various similarity metrics for the construction of networks and various topology measures for the characterization of resulting network topology, demonstrating the use of these metrics in the construction and comparison of phylogenomic and transcriptomic networks.

  4. Robust quantum network architectures and topologies for entanglement distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Siddhartha; Khatri, Sumeet; Dowling, Jonathan P.

    2018-01-01

    Entanglement distribution is a prerequisite for several important quantum information processing and computing tasks, such as quantum teleportation, quantum key distribution, and distributed quantum computing. In this work, we focus on two-dimensional quantum networks based on optical quantum technologies using dual-rail photonic qubits for the building of a fail-safe quantum internet. We lay out a quantum network architecture for entanglement distribution between distant parties using a Bravais lattice topology, with the technological constraint that quantum repeaters equipped with quantum memories are not easily accessible. We provide a robust protocol for simultaneous entanglement distribution between two distant groups of parties on this network. We also discuss a memory-based quantum network architecture that can be implemented on networks with an arbitrary topology. We examine networks with bow-tie lattice and Archimedean lattice topologies and use percolation theory to quantify the robustness of the networks. In particular, we provide figures of merit on the loss parameter of the optical medium that depend only on the topology of the network and quantify the robustness of the network against intermittent photon loss and intermittent failure of nodes. These figures of merit can be used to compare the robustness of different network topologies in order to determine the best topology in a given real-world scenario, which is critical in the realization of the quantum internet.

  5. Interrogating the topological robustness of gene regulatory circuits by randomization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Huang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important roles of cells is performing their cellular tasks properly for survival. Cells usually achieve robust functionality, for example, cell-fate decision-making and signal transduction, through multiple layers of regulation involving many genes. Despite the combinatorial complexity of gene regulation, its quantitative behavior has been typically studied on the basis of experimentally verified core gene regulatory circuitry, composed of a small set of important elements. It is still unclear how such a core circuit operates in the presence of many other regulatory molecules and in a crowded and noisy cellular environment. Here we report a new computational method, named random circuit perturbation (RACIPE, for interrogating the robust dynamical behavior of a gene regulatory circuit even without accurate measurements of circuit kinetic parameters. RACIPE generates an ensemble of random kinetic models corresponding to a fixed circuit topology, and utilizes statistical tools to identify generic properties of the circuit. By applying RACIPE to simple toggle-switch-like motifs, we observed that the stable states of all models converge to experimentally observed gene state clusters even when the parameters are strongly perturbed. RACIPE was further applied to a proposed 22-gene network of the Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT, from which we identified four experimentally observed gene states, including the states that are associated with two different types of hybrid Epithelial/Mesenchymal phenotypes. Our results suggest that dynamics of a gene circuit is mainly determined by its topology, not by detailed circuit parameters. Our work provides a theoretical foundation for circuit-based systems biology modeling. We anticipate RACIPE to be a powerful tool to predict and decode circuit design principles in an unbiased manner, and to quantitatively evaluate the robustness and heterogeneity of gene expression.

  6. Peer-to-Peer Topology Formation Using Random Walk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwong, Kin-Wah; Tsang, Danny H. K.

    Peer-to-Peer (P2P) systems such as live video streaming and content sharing are usually composed of a huge number of users with heterogeneous capacities. As a result, designing a distributed algorithm to form such a giant-scale topology in a heterogeneous environment is a challenging question because, on the one hand, the algorithm should exploit the heterogeneity of users' capacities to achieve load-balancing and, on the other hand, the overhead of the algorithm should be kept as low as possible. To meet such requirements, we introduce a very simple protocol for building heterogeneous unstructured P2P networks. The basic idea behind our protocol is to exploit a simple, distributed nature of random walk sampling to assist the peers in selecting their suitable neighbors in terms of capacity and connectivity to achieve load-balancing. To gain more insights into our proposed protocol, we also develop a detailed analysis to investigate our protocol under any heterogeneous P2P environment. The analytical results are validated by the simulations. The ultimate goal of this chapter is to stimulate further research to explore the fundamental issues in heterogeneous P2P networks.

  7. SIMULATION OF WIRELESS SENSOR NETWORK WITH HYBRID TOPOLOGY

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    J. Jaslin Deva Gifty

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The design of low rate Wireless Personal Area Network (WPAN by IEEE 802.15.4 standard has been developed to support lower data rates and low power consuming application. Zigbee Wireless Sensor Network (WSN works on the network and application layer in IEEE 802.15.4. Zigbee network can be configured in star, tree or mesh topology. The performance varies from topology to topology. The performance parameters such as network lifetime, energy consumption, throughput, delay in data delivery and sensor field coverage area varies depending on the network topology. In this paper, designing of hybrid topology by using two possible combinations such as star-tree and star-mesh is simulated to verify the communication reliability. This approach is to combine all the benefits of two network model. The parameters such as jitter, delay and throughput are measured for these scenarios. Further, MAC parameters impact such as beacon order (BO and super frame order (SO for low power consumption and high channel utilization, has been analysed for star, tree and mesh topology in beacon disable mode and beacon enable mode by varying CBR traffic loads.

  8. Optimal network topologies: expanders, cages, Ramanujan graphs, entangled networks and all that

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donetti, Luca; Neri, Franco; Muñoz, Miguel A.

    2006-08-01

    We report on some recent developments in the search for optimal network topologies. First we review some basic concepts on spectral graph theory, including adjacency and Laplacian matrices, paying special attention to the topological implications of having large spectral gaps. We also introduce related concepts such as 'expanders', Ramanujan, and Cage graphs. Afterwards, we discuss two different dynamical features of Networks, synchronizability and flow of random walkers, so that they are optimized if the corresponding Laplacian matrix has a large spectral gap. From this, we show, by developing a numerical optimization algorithm, that maximum synchronizability and fast random walk spreading are obtained for a particular type of extremely homogeneous regular networks, with long loops and poor modular structure, that we call entangled networks. These turn out to be related to Ramanujan and Cage graphs. We argue also that these graphs are very good finite-size approximations to Bethe lattices, and provide optimal or almost optimal solutions to many other problems, for instance searchability in the presence of congestion or performance of neural networks. Finally, we study how these results are modified when studying dynamical processes controlled by a normalized (weighted and directed) dynamics; much more heterogeneous graphs are optimal in this case. Finally, a critical discussion of the limitations and possible extensions of this work is presented.

  9. Some network topological notions of the Mycielskian of a graph

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    Savitha K.S.

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Efficiency and reliability are two important criteria in the designing of a good interconnection network. Network topological notions such as wide diameter, fault diameter, diameter vulnerability and (l,k-domination can be used to study the efficiency and reliability of a network. In this paper we study these notions in the Mycielskian of a graph and its iterates.

  10. Random walk centrality for temporal networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Luis E. C.; Masuda, Naoki

    2014-06-01

    Nodes can be ranked according to their relative importance within a network. Ranking algorithms based on random walks are particularly useful because they connect topological and diffusive properties of the network. Previous methods based on random walks, for example the PageRank, have focused on static structures. However, several realistic networks are indeed dynamic, meaning that their structure changes in time. In this paper, we propose a centrality measure for temporal networks based on random walks under periodic boundary conditions that we call TempoRank. It is known that, in static networks, the stationary density of the random walk is proportional to the degree or the strength of a node. In contrast, we find that, in temporal networks, the stationary density is proportional to the in-strength of the so-called effective network, a weighted and directed network explicitly constructed from the original sequence of transition matrices. The stationary density also depends on the sojourn probability q, which regulates the tendency of the walker to stay in the node, and on the temporal resolution of the data. We apply our method to human interaction networks and show that although it is important for a node to be connected to another node with many random walkers (one of the principles of the PageRank) at the right moment, this effect is negligible in practice when the time order of link activation is included.

  11. Throughput Analysis of Large Wireless Networks with Regular Topologies

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    Kezhu Hong

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The throughput of large wireless networks with regular topologies is analyzed under two medium-access control schemes: synchronous array method (SAM and slotted ALOHA. The regular topologies considered are square, hexagon, and triangle. Both nonfading channels and Rayleigh fading channels are examined. Furthermore, both omnidirectional antennas and directional antennas are considered. Our analysis shows that the SAM leads to a much higher network throughput than the slotted ALOHA. The network throughput in this paper is measured in either bits-hops per second per Hertz per node or bits-meters per second per Hertz per node. The exact connection between the two measures is shown for each topology. With these two fundamental units, the network throughput shown in this paper can serve as a reliable benchmark for future works on network throughput of large networks.

  12. Throughput Analysis of Large Wireless Networks with Regular Topologies

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    Hong Kezhu

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The throughput of large wireless networks with regular topologies is analyzed under two medium-access control schemes: synchronous array method (SAM and slotted ALOHA. The regular topologies considered are square, hexagon, and triangle. Both nonfading channels and Rayleigh fading channels are examined. Furthermore, both omnidirectional antennas and directional antennas are considered. Our analysis shows that the SAM leads to a much higher network throughput than the slotted ALOHA. The network throughput in this paper is measured in either bits-hops per second per Hertz per node or bits-meters per second per Hertz per node. The exact connection between the two measures is shown for each topology. With these two fundamental units, the network throughput shown in this paper can serve as a reliable benchmark for future works on network throughput of large networks.

  13. Network topology of the desert rose

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    Sigmund Mongstad Hope

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Desert roses are gypsum crystals that consist of intersecting disks. We determine their geometrical structure using computer assisted tomography. By mapping the geometrical structure onto a graph, the topology of the desert rose is analyzed and compared to a model based on diffusion limited aggregation. By comparing the topology, we find that the model gets a number of the features of the real desert rose right, whereas others do not fit so well.

  14. Network topology of the desert rose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hope, Sigmund; Kundu, Sumanta; Roy, Chandreyee; Manna, Subhrangshu; Hansen, Alex

    2015-09-01

    Desert roses are gypsum crystals that consist of intersecting disks. We determine their geometrical structure using computer assisted tomography. By mapping the geometrical structure onto a graph, the topology of the desert rose is analyzed and compared to a model based on diffusion limited aggregation. By comparing the topology, we find that the model gets a number of the features of the real desert rose right, whereas others do not fit so well.

  15. Exploring complex networks through random walks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Luciano da Fontoura; Travieso, Gonzalo

    2007-01-01

    Most real complex networks--such as protein interactions, social contacts, and the Internet--are only partially known and available to us. While the process of exploring such networks in many cases resembles a random walk, it becomes a key issue to investigate and characterize how effectively the nodes and edges of such networks can be covered by different strategies. At the same time, it is critically important to infer how well can topological measurements such as the average node degree and average clustering coefficient be estimated during such network explorations. The present article addresses these problems by considering random, Barabási-Albert (BA), and geographical network models with varying connectivity explored by three types of random walks: traditional, preferential to untracked edges, and preferential to unvisited nodes. A series of relevant results are obtained, including the fact that networks of the three studied models with the same size and average node degree allow similar node and edge coverage efficiency, the identification of linear scaling with the size of the network of the random walk step at which a given percentage of the nodes/edges is covered, and the critical result that the estimation of the averaged node degree and clustering coefficient by random walks on BA networks often leads to heavily biased results. Many are the theoretical and practical implications of such results.

  16. Topology-function conservation in protein-protein interaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Darren; Yaveroğlu, Ömer Nebil; Malod-Dognin, Noël; Stojmirovic, Aleksandar; Pržulj, Nataša

    2015-05-15

    Proteins underlay the functioning of a cell and the wiring of proteins in protein-protein interaction network (PIN) relates to their biological functions. Proteins with similar wiring in the PIN (topology around them) have been shown to have similar functions. This property has been successfully exploited for predicting protein functions. Topological similarity is also used to guide network alignment algorithms that find similarly wired proteins between PINs of different species; these similarities are used to transfer annotation across PINs, e.g. from model organisms to human. To refine these functional predictions and annotation transfers, we need to gain insight into the variability of the topology-function relationships. For example, a function may be significantly associated with specific topologies, while another function may be weakly associated with several different topologies. Also, the topology-function relationships may differ between different species. To improve our understanding of topology-function relationships and of their conservation among species, we develop a statistical framework that is built upon canonical correlation analysis. Using the graphlet degrees to represent the wiring around proteins in PINs and gene ontology (GO) annotations to describe their functions, our framework: (i) characterizes statistically significant topology-function relationships in a given species, and (ii) uncovers the functions that have conserved topology in PINs of different species, which we term topologically orthologous functions. We apply our framework to PINs of yeast and human, identifying seven biological process and two cellular component GO terms to be topologically orthologous for the two organisms. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  17. Epilepsy is related to theta band brain connectivity and network topology in brain tumor patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douw Linda

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both epilepsy patients and brain tumor patients show altered functional connectivity and less optimal brain network topology when compared to healthy controls, particularly in the theta band. Furthermore, the duration and characteristics of epilepsy may also influence functional interactions in brain networks. However, the specific features of connectivity and networks in tumor-related epilepsy have not been investigated yet. We hypothesize that epilepsy characteristics are related to (theta band connectivity and network architecture in operated glioma patients suffering from epileptic seizures. Included patients participated in a clinical study investigating the effect of levetiracetam monotherapy on seizure frequency in glioma patients, and were assessed at two time points: directly after neurosurgery (t1, and six months later (t2. At these time points, magnetoencephalography (MEG was recorded and information regarding clinical status and epilepsy history was collected. Functional connectivity was calculated in six frequency bands, as were a number of network measures such as normalized clustering coefficient and path length. Results At the two time points, MEG registrations were performed in respectively 17 and 12 patients. No changes in connectivity or network topology occurred over time. Increased theta band connectivity at t1 and t2 was related to a higher total number of seizures. Furthermore, higher number of seizures was related to a less optimal, more random brain network topology. Other factors were not significantly related to functional connectivity or network topology. Conclusions These results indicate that (pathologically increased theta band connectivity is related to a higher number of epileptic seizures in brain tumor patients, suggesting that theta band connectivity changes are a hallmark of tumor-related epilepsy. Furthermore, a more random brain network topology is related to greater vulnerability to

  18. Topological phase transition of a fractal spin system: The relevance of the network complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Torres

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A new type of collective excitations, due to the topology of a complex random network that can be characterized by a fractal dimension DF, is investigated. We show analytically that these excitations generate phase transitions due to the non-periodic topology of the DF > 1 complex network. An Ising system, with long range interactions, is studied in detail to support the claim. The analytic treatment is possible because the evaluation of the partition function can be decomposed into closed factor loops, in spite of the architectural complexity. The removal of the infrared divergences leads to an unconventional phase transition, with spin correlations that are robust against thermal fluctuations.

  19. Efficient network reconstruction from dynamical cascades identifies small-world topology of neuronal avalanches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinisa Pajevic

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Cascading activity is commonly found in complex systems with directed interactions such as metabolic networks, neuronal networks, or disease spreading in social networks. Substantial insight into a system's organization can be obtained by reconstructing the underlying functional network architecture from the observed activity cascades. Here we focus on Bayesian approaches and reduce their computational demands by introducing the Iterative Bayesian (IB and Posterior Weighted Averaging (PWA methods. We introduce a special case of PWA, cast in nonparametric form, which we call the normalized count (NC algorithm. NC efficiently reconstructs random and small-world functional network topologies and architectures from subcritical, critical, and supercritical cascading dynamics and yields significant improvements over commonly used correlation methods. With experimental data, NC identified a functional and structural small-world topology and its corresponding traffic in cortical networks with neuronal avalanche dynamics.

  20. Synaptic Impairment and Robustness of Excitatory Neuronal Networks with Different Topologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzakhalili, Ehsan; Gourgou, Eleni; Booth, Victoria; Epureanu, Bogdan

    2017-01-01

    Synaptic deficiencies are a known hallmark of neurodegenerative diseases, but the diagnosis of impaired synapses on the cellular level is not an easy task. Nonetheless, changes in the system-level dynamics of neuronal networks with damaged synapses can be detected using techniques that do not require high spatial resolution. This paper investigates how the structure/topology of neuronal networks influences their dynamics when they suffer from synaptic loss. We study different neuronal network structures/topologies by specifying their degree distributions. The modes of the degree distribution can be used to construct networks that consist of rich clubs and resemble small world networks, as well. We define two dynamical metrics to compare the activity of networks with different structures: persistent activity (namely, the self-sustained activity of the network upon removal of the initial stimulus) and quality of activity (namely, percentage of neurons that participate in the persistent activity of the network). Our results show that synaptic loss affects the persistent activity of networks with bimodal degree distributions less than it affects random networks. The robustness of neuronal networks enhances when the distance between the modes of the degree distribution increases, suggesting that the rich clubs of networks with distinct modes keep the whole network active. In addition, a tradeoff is observed between the quality of activity and the persistent activity. For a range of distributions, both of these dynamical metrics are considerably high for networks with bimodal degree distribution compared to random networks. We also propose three different scenarios of synaptic impairment, which may correspond to different pathological or biological conditions. Regardless of the network structure/topology, results demonstrate that synaptic loss has more severe effects on the activity of the network when impairments are correlated with the activity of the neurons.

  1. Evaluation of Topology-Aware Broadcast Algorithms for Dragonfly Networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorier, Matthieu; Mubarak, Misbah; Ross, Rob; Li, Jianping Kelvin; Carothers, Christopher D.; Ma, Kwan-Liu

    2016-09-12

    Two-tiered direct network topologies such as Dragonflies have been proposed for future post-petascale and exascale machines, since they provide a high-radix, low-diameter, fast interconnection network. Such topologies call for redesigning MPI collective communication algorithms in order to attain the best performance. Yet as increasingly more applications share a machine, it is not clear how these topology-aware algorithms will react to interference with concurrent jobs accessing the same network. In this paper, we study three topology-aware broadcast algorithms, including one designed by ourselves. We evaluate their performance through event-driven simulation for small- and large-sized broadcasts (in terms of both data size and number of processes). We study the effect of different routing mechanisms on the topology-aware collective algorithms, as well as their sensitivity to network contention with other jobs. Our results show that while topology-aware algorithms dramatically reduce link utilization, their advantage in terms of latency is more limited.

  2. Context-Based Topology Control for Wireless Mesh Networks

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    Pragasen Mudali

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Topology Control has been shown to provide several benefits to wireless ad hoc and mesh networks. However these benefits have largely been demonstrated using simulation-based evaluations. In this paper, we demonstrate the negative impact that the PlainTC Topology Control prototype has on topology stability. This instability is found to be caused by the large number of transceiver power adjustments undertaken by the prototype. A context-based solution is offered to reduce the number of transceiver power adjustments undertaken without sacrificing the cumulative transceiver power savings and spatial reuse advantages gained from employing Topology Control in an infrastructure wireless mesh network. We propose the context-based PlainTC+ prototype and show that incorporating context information in the transceiver power adjustment process significantly reduces topology instability. In addition, improvements to network performance arising from the improved topology stability are also observed. Future plans to add real-time context-awareness to PlainTC+ will have the scheme being prototyped in a software-defined wireless mesh network test-bed being planned.

  3. Analysis of Network Topologies Underlying Ethylene Growth Response Kinetics

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    Aaron M. Prescott

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Most models for ethylene signaling involve a linear pathway. However, measurements of seedling growth kinetics when ethylene is applied and removed have resulted in more complex network models that include coherent feedforward, negative feedback, and positive feedback motifs. However, the dynamical responses of the proposed networks have not been explored in a quantitative manner. Here, we explore (i whether any of the proposed models are capable of producing growth-response behaviors consistent with experimental observations and (ii what mechanistic roles various parts of the network topologies play in ethylene signaling. To address this, we used computational methods to explore two general network topologies: The first contains a coherent feedforward loop that inhibits growth and a negative feedback from growth onto itself (CFF/NFB. In the second, ethylene promotes the cleavage of EIN2, with the product of the cleavage inhibiting growth and promoting the production of EIN2 through a positive feedback loop (PFB. Since few network parameters for ethylene signaling are known in detail, we used an evolutionary algorithm to explore sets of parameters that produce behaviors similar to experimental growth response kinetics of both wildtype and mutant seedlings. We generated a library of parameter sets by independently running the evolutionary algorithm many times. Both network topologies produce behavior consistent with experimental observations and analysis of the parameter sets allows us to identify important network interactions and parameter constraints. We additionally screened these parameter sets for growth recovery in the presence of sub-saturating ethylene doses, which is an experimentally-observed property that emerges in some of the evolved parameter sets. Finally, we probed simplified networks maintaining key features of the CFF/NFB and PFB topologies. From this, we verified observations drawn from the larger networks about mechanisms

  4. Interplay between Graph Topology and Correlations of Third Order in Spiking Neuronal Networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojan Jovanović

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The study of processes evolving on networks has recently become a very popular research field, not only because of the rich mathematical theory that underpins it, but also because of its many possible applications, a number of them in the field of biology. Indeed, molecular signaling pathways, gene regulation, predator-prey interactions and the communication between neurons in the brain can be seen as examples of networks with complex dynamics. The properties of such dynamics depend largely on the topology of the underlying network graph. In this work, we want to answer the following question: Knowing network connectivity, what can be said about the level of third-order correlations that will characterize the network dynamics? We consider a linear point process as a model for pulse-coded, or spiking activity in a neuronal network. Using recent results from theory of such processes, we study third-order correlations between spike trains in such a system and explain which features of the network graph (i.e. which topological motifs are responsible for their emergence. Comparing two different models of network topology-random networks of Erdős-Rényi type and networks with highly interconnected hubs-we find that, in random networks, the average measure of third-order correlations does not depend on the local connectivity properties, but rather on global parameters, such as the connection probability. This, however, ceases to be the case in networks with a geometric out-degree distribution, where topological specificities have a strong impact on average correlations.

  5. Interplay between Graph Topology and Correlations of Third Order in Spiking Neuronal Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanović, Stojan; Rotter, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    The study of processes evolving on networks has recently become a very popular research field, not only because of the rich mathematical theory that underpins it, but also because of its many possible applications, a number of them in the field of biology. Indeed, molecular signaling pathways, gene regulation, predator-prey interactions and the communication between neurons in the brain can be seen as examples of networks with complex dynamics. The properties of such dynamics depend largely on the topology of the underlying network graph. In this work, we want to answer the following question: Knowing network connectivity, what can be said about the level of third-order correlations that will characterize the network dynamics? We consider a linear point process as a model for pulse-coded, or spiking activity in a neuronal network. Using recent results from theory of such processes, we study third-order correlations between spike trains in such a system and explain which features of the network graph (i.e. which topological motifs) are responsible for their emergence. Comparing two different models of network topology-random networks of Erdős-Rényi type and networks with highly interconnected hubs-we find that, in random networks, the average measure of third-order correlations does not depend on the local connectivity properties, but rather on global parameters, such as the connection probability. This, however, ceases to be the case in networks with a geometric out-degree distribution, where topological specificities have a strong impact on average correlations.

  6. Stabilization Strategies of Supply Networks with Stochastic Switched Topology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shukai Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a dynamical supply networks model with stochastic switched topology is presented, in which the stochastic switched topology is dependent on a continuous time Markov process. The goal is to design the state-feedback control strategies to stabilize the dynamical supply networks. Based on Lyapunov stability theory, sufficient conditions for the existence of state feedback control strategies are given in terms of matrix inequalities, which ensure the robust stability of the supply networks at the stationary states and a prescribed H∞ disturbance attenuation level with respect to the uncertain demand. A numerical example is given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  7. A New Logistic Dynamic Particle Swarm Optimization Algorithm Based on Random Topology

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    Qingjian Ni

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Population topology of particle swarm optimization (PSO will directly affect the dissemination of optimal information during the evolutionary process and will have a significant impact on the performance of PSO. Classic static population topologies are usually used in PSO, such as fully connected topology, ring topology, star topology, and square topology. In this paper, the performance of PSO with the proposed random topologies is analyzed, and the relationship between population topology and the performance of PSO is also explored from the perspective of graph theory characteristics in population topologies. Further, in a relatively new PSO variant which named logistic dynamic particle optimization, an extensive simulation study is presented to discuss the effectiveness of the random topology and the design strategies of population topology. Finally, the experimental data are analyzed and discussed. And about the design and use of population topology on PSO, some useful conclusions are proposed which can provide a basis for further discussion and research.

  8. A new logistic dynamic particle swarm optimization algorithm based on random topology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Qingjian; Deng, Jianming

    2013-01-01

    Population topology of particle swarm optimization (PSO) will directly affect the dissemination of optimal information during the evolutionary process and will have a significant impact on the performance of PSO. Classic static population topologies are usually used in PSO, such as fully connected topology, ring topology, star topology, and square topology. In this paper, the performance of PSO with the proposed random topologies is analyzed, and the relationship between population topology and the performance of PSO is also explored from the perspective of graph theory characteristics in population topologies. Further, in a relatively new PSO variant which named logistic dynamic particle optimization, an extensive simulation study is presented to discuss the effectiveness of the random topology and the design strategies of population topology. Finally, the experimental data are analyzed and discussed. And about the design and use of population topology on PSO, some useful conclusions are proposed which can provide a basis for further discussion and research.

  9. Network topology analysis approach on China's QFII stock investment behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongjie; Cao, Xing; He, Feng; Zhang, Wei

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, the investment behavior of QFII in China stock market from 2004 to 2015 is studied with the network topology method. Based on the nodes topological characteristics, stock holding fluctuations correlation is studied from the micro network level. We conclude that the QFII mutual stock holding network have both scale free and small world properties, which presented mainly small world characteristics from 2005 to 2011, and scale free characteristics from 2012 to 2015. Moreover, fluctuations correlation is different with different nodes topological characteristics. In different economic periods, QFII represented different connection patterns and they reacted to the market crash spontaneously. Thus, this paper provides the first evidence of complex network research on QFII' investment behavior in China as an emerging market.

  10. In silico network topology-based prediction of gene essentiality

    CERN Document Server

    da Silva, Joao Paulo Muller; Mombach, Jose Carlos Merino; Vieira, Renata; da Silva, Jose Guliherme Camargo; Lemke, Ney; Sinigaglia, Marialva

    2007-01-01

    The identification of genes essential for survival is important for the understanding of the minimal requirements for cellular life and for drug design. As experimental studies with the purpose of building a catalog of essential genes for a given organism are time-consuming and laborious, a computational approach which could predict gene essentiality with high accuracy would be of great value. We present here a novel computational approach, called NTPGE (Network Topology-based Prediction of Gene Essentiality), that relies on network topology features of a gene to estimate its essentiality. The first step of NTPGE is to construct the integrated molecular network for a given organism comprising protein physical, metabolic and transcriptional regulation interactions. The second step consists in training a decision tree-based machine learning algorithm on known essential and non-essential genes of the organism of interest, considering as learning attributes the network topology information for each of these genes...

  11. Custom Topology Generation for Network-on-Chip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stuart, Matthias Bo; Sparsø, Jens

    2007-01-01

    This paper compares simulated annealing and tabu search for generating custom topologies for applications with periodic behaviour executing on a network-on-chip. The approach differs from previous work by starting from a fixed mapping of IP-cores to routers and performing design space exploration....... An analytical model is used to determine communication latencies in the network-on-chip....

  12. Complex brain networks: From topological communities to clustered ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Recent research has revealed a rich and complicated network topology in the cortical connectivity of mammalian brains. A challenging task is to understand the implications of such network structures on the functional organisation of the brain activ- ities. We investigate synchronisation dynamics on the ...

  13. Connected Dominating Set Based Topology Control in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jing

    2012-01-01

    Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) are now widely used for monitoring and controlling of systems where human intervention is not desirable or possible. Connected Dominating Sets (CDSs) based topology control in WSNs is one kind of hierarchical method to ensure sufficient coverage while reducing redundant connections in a relatively crowded network.…

  14. Characterization of Static/Dynamic Topological Routing For Grid Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gutierrez Lopez, Jose Manuel; Cuevas, Ruben; Riaz, M. Tahir

    2009-01-01

    Grid or 2D Mesh structures are becoming one of the most attractive network topologies to study. They can be used in many different fields raging from future broadband networks to multiprocessors structures. In addition, the high requirements of future services and applications demand more flexible...

  15. Static analysis of topology-dependent broadcast networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nanz, Sebastian; Nielson, Flemming; Nielson, Hanne Riis

    2010-01-01

    changing network topology is a crucial ingredient. In this paper, we develop a static analysis that automatically constructs an abstract transition system, labelled by actions and connectivity information, to yield a mobility-preserving finite abstraction of the behaviour of a network expressed...

  16. Random walk centrality in interconnected multilayer networks

    CERN Document Server

    Solé-Ribalta, Albert; Gómez, Sergio; Arenas, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Real-world complex systems exhibit multiple levels of relationships. In many cases they require to be modeled as interconnected multilayer networks, characterizing interactions of several types simultaneously. It is of crucial importance in many fields, from economics to biology and from urban planning to social sciences, to identify the most (or the less) influential nodes in a network using centrality measures. However, defining the centrality of actors in interconnected complex networks is not trivial. In this paper, we rely on the tensorial formalism recently proposed to characterize and investigate this kind of complex topologies, and extend two well known random walk centrality measures, the random walk betweenness and closeness centrality, to interconnected multilayer networks. For each of the measures we provide analytical expressions that completely agree with numerically results.

  17. Gossip in Random Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malarz, K.; Szvetelszky, Z.; Szekf, B.; Kulakowski, K.

    2006-11-01

    We consider the average probability X of being informed on a gossip in a given social network. The network is modeled within the random graph theory of Erd{õ}s and Rényi. In this theory, a network is characterized by two parameters: the size N and the link probability p. Our experimental data suggest three levels of social inclusion of friendship. The critical value pc, for which half of agents are informed, scales with the system size as N-gamma with gamma approx 0.68. Computer simulations show that the probability X varies with p as a sigmoidal curve. Influence of the correlations between neighbors is also evaluated: with increasing clustering coefficient C, X decreases.

  18. Topology detection for adaptive protection of distribution networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sachdev, M.S.; Sidhu, T.S.; Talukdar, B.K. [Univ. of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (Canada). Power System Research Group

    1995-12-31

    A general purpose network topology detection technique suitable for use in adaptive relaying applications is presented in this paper. Three test systems were used to check the performance of the proposed technique. Results obtained from the tests are included. The proposed technique was implemented in the laboratory as a part of the implementation of the adaptive protection scheme. The execution times of the topology detection software were monitored and were found to be acceptable.

  19. Exploring biological network structure with clustered random networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bansal Shweta

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complex biological systems are often modeled as networks of interacting units. Networks of biochemical interactions among proteins, epidemiological contacts among hosts, and trophic interactions in ecosystems, to name a few, have provided useful insights into the dynamical processes that shape and traverse these systems. The degrees of nodes (numbers of interactions and the extent of clustering (the tendency for a set of three nodes to be interconnected are two of many well-studied network properties that can fundamentally shape a system. Disentangling the interdependent effects of the various network properties, however, can be difficult. Simple network models can help us quantify the structure of empirical networked systems and understand the impact of various topological properties on dynamics. Results Here we develop and implement a new Markov chain simulation algorithm to generate simple, connected random graphs that have a specified degree sequence and level of clustering, but are random in all other respects. The implementation of the algorithm (ClustRNet: Clustered Random Networks provides the generation of random graphs optimized according to a local or global, and relative or absolute measure of clustering. We compare our algorithm to other similar methods and show that ours more successfully produces desired network characteristics. Finding appropriate null models is crucial in bioinformatics research, and is often difficult, particularly for biological networks. As we demonstrate, the networks generated by ClustRNet can serve as random controls when investigating the impacts of complex network features beyond the byproduct of degree and clustering in empirical networks. Conclusion ClustRNet generates ensembles of graphs of specified edge structure and clustering. These graphs allow for systematic study of the impacts of connectivity and redundancies on network function and dynamics. This process is a key step in

  20. Exploring biological network structure with clustered random networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Shweta; Khandelwal, Shashank; Meyers, Lauren Ancel

    2009-12-09

    Complex biological systems are often modeled as networks of interacting units. Networks of biochemical interactions among proteins, epidemiological contacts among hosts, and trophic interactions in ecosystems, to name a few, have provided useful insights into the dynamical processes that shape and traverse these systems. The degrees of nodes (numbers of interactions) and the extent of clustering (the tendency for a set of three nodes to be interconnected) are two of many well-studied network properties that can fundamentally shape a system. Disentangling the interdependent effects of the various network properties, however, can be difficult. Simple network models can help us quantify the structure of empirical networked systems and understand the impact of various topological properties on dynamics. Here we develop and implement a new Markov chain simulation algorithm to generate simple, connected random graphs that have a specified degree sequence and level of clustering, but are random in all other respects. The implementation of the algorithm (ClustRNet: Clustered Random Networks) provides the generation of random graphs optimized according to a local or global, and relative or absolute measure of clustering. We compare our algorithm to other similar methods and show that ours more successfully produces desired network characteristics.Finding appropriate null models is crucial in bioinformatics research, and is often difficult, particularly for biological networks. As we demonstrate, the networks generated by ClustRNet can serve as random controls when investigating the impacts of complex network features beyond the byproduct of degree and clustering in empirical networks. ClustRNet generates ensembles of graphs of specified edge structure and clustering. These graphs allow for systematic study of the impacts of connectivity and redundancies on network function and dynamics. This process is a key step in unraveling the functional consequences of the structural

  1. Co-location and Self-Similar Topologies of Urban Infrastructure Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinkhamer, Christopher; Zhan, Xianyuan; Ukkusuri, Satish; Elisabeth, Krueger; Paik, Kyungrock; Rao, Suresh

    2016-04-01

    The co-location of urban infrastructure is too obvious to be easily ignored. For reasons of practicality, reliability, and eminent domain, the spatial locations of many urban infrastructure networks, including drainage, sanitary sewers, and road networks, are well correlated. However, important questions dealing with correlations in the network topologies of differing infrastructure types remain unanswered. Here, we have extracted randomly distributed, nested subnets from the urban drainage, sanitary sewer, and road networks in two distinctly different cities: Amman, Jordan; and Indianapolis, USA. Network analyses were performed for each randomly chosen subnet (location and size), using a dual-mapping approach (Hierarchical Intersection Continuity Negotiation). Topological metrics for each infrastructure type were calculated and compared for all subnets in a given city. Despite large differences in the climate, governance, and populace of the two cities, and functional properties of the different infrastructure types, these infrastructure networks are shown to be highly spatially homogenous. Furthermore, strong correlations are found between topological metrics of differing types of surface and subsurface infrastructure networks. Also, the network topologies of each infrastructure type for both cities are shown to exhibit self-similar characteristics (i.e., power law node-degree distributions, [p(k) = ak-γ]. These findings can be used to assist city planners and engineers either expanding or retrofitting existing infrastructure, or in the case of developing countries, building new cities from the ground up. In addition, the self-similar nature of these infrastructure networks holds significant implications for the vulnerability of these critical infrastructure networks to external hazards and ways in which network resilience can be improved.

  2. On the topological structure of multinationals network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyez, Charlie

    2017-05-01

    This paper uses a weighted network analysis to examine the structure of multinationals' implantation countries network. Based on French firm-level dataset of multinational enterprises (MNEs) the network analysis provides information on each country position in the network and in internationalization strategies of French MNEs through connectivity preferences among the nodes. The paper also details network-wide features and their recent evolution toward a more decentralized structure. While much has been said on international trade network, this paper shows that multinational firms' studies would also benefit from network analysis, notably by investigating the sensitivity of the network construction to firm heterogeneity.

  3. Interdependent networks - Topological percolation research and application in finance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Di

    This dissertation covers the two major parts of my Ph.D. research: i) developing a theoretical framework of complex networks and applying simulation and numerical methods to study the robustness of the network system, and ii) applying statistical physics concepts and methods to quantitatively analyze complex systems and applying the theoretical framework to study real-world systems. In part I, we focus on developing theories of interdependent networks as well as building computer simulation models, which includes three parts: 1) We report on the effects of topology on failure propagation for a model system consisting of two interdependent networks. We find that the internal node correlations in each of the networks significantly changes the critical density of failures, which can trigger the total disruption of the two-network system. Specifically, we find that the assortativity within a single network decreases the robustness of the entire system. 2) We study the percolation behavior of two interdependent scale-free (SF) networks under random failure of 1-p fraction of nodes. We find that as the coupling strength q between the two networks reduces from 1 (fully coupled) to 0 (no coupling), there exist two critical coupling strengths q1 and q2 , which separate the behaviors of the giant component as a function of p into three different regions, and for q2 numerically. We study a starlike network of n Erdos-Renyi (ER), SF networks and a looplike network of n ER networks, and we find for starlike networks, their phase transition regions change with n, but for looplike networks the phase regions change with average degree k . In part II, we apply concepts and methods developed in statistical physics to study economic systems. We analyze stock market indices and foreign exchange daily returns for 60 countries over the period of 1999-2012. We build a multi-layer network model based on different correlation measures, and introduce a dynamic network model to simulate and

  4. Robustness Analysis of Real Network Topologies Under Multiple Failure Scenarios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manzano, M.; Marzo, J. L.; Calle, E.

    2012-01-01

    on topological characteristics. Recently approaches also consider the services supported by such networks. In this paper we carry out a robustness analysis of five real backbone telecommunication networks under defined multiple failure scenarios, taking into account the consequences of the loss of established......Nowadays the ubiquity of telecommunication networks, which underpin and fulfill key aspects of modern day living, is taken for granted. Significant large-scale failures have occurred in the last years affecting telecommunication networks. Traditionally, network robustness analysis has been focused...... connections. Results show which networks are more robust in response to a specific type of failure....

  5. Topology and robustness in the Drosophila segment polarity network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas T Ingolia

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available A complex hierarchy of genetic interactions converts a single-celled Drosophila melanogaster egg into a multicellular embryo with 14 segments. Previously, von Dassow et al. reported that a mathematical model of the genetic interactions that defined the polarity of segments (the segment polarity network was robust (von Dassow et al. 2000. As quantitative information about the system was unavailable, parameters were sampled randomly. A surprisingly large fraction of these parameter sets allowed the model to maintain and elaborate on the segment polarity pattern. This robustness is due to the positive feedback of gene products on their own expression, which induces individual cells in a model segment to adopt different stable expression states (bistability corresponding to different cell types in the segment polarity pattern. A positive feedback loop will only yield multiple stable states when the parameters that describe it satisfy a particular inequality. By testing which random parameter sets satisfy these inequalities, I show that bistability is necessary to form the segment polarity pattern and serves as a strong predictor of which parameter sets will succeed in forming the pattern. Although the original model was robust to parameter variation, it could not reproduce the observed effects of cell division on the pattern of gene expression. I present a modified version that incorporates recent experimental evidence and does successfully mimic the consequences of cell division. The behavior of this modified model can also be understood in terms of bistability in positive feedback of gene expression. I discuss how this topological property of networks provides robust pattern formation and how large changes in parameters can change the specific pattern produced by a network.

  6. Perspective Application of Passive Optical Network with Optimized Bus Topology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Lafata

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Passive optical networks (PONs represent a promising solution for modern access telecommunication networks.These networks are able to meet the increasing demands on transmission rate for demanding multimedia services,while they can offer typical shared transmission speed of 1.25 or 2.5 Gbps. The major role in deploying opticaldistribution networks ODNs plays the maximum attenuable loss, which is caused mainly by passive optical splitters.This paper proposes an innovative application of passive optical networks with optimized bus topology especially forlocal backbone data networks. Due to using only passive components, it is necessary to optimize certain parameters,especially an overall attenuation balance. Considering the possibility of such optimization, the passive optical networkwith optimized bus topology provides several interesting opportunities for specific applications. This paper will presentselected aspects of passive optical networks and splitters with asymmetric splitting ratio. The essential part is focusedon the practical demonstration of their use to optimize the passive optical network with bus topology, which acts as alocal backbone network for structured cabling systems, and for local data networks in large buildings.

  7. Topology for efficient information dissemination in ad-hoc networking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, E.; Okino, C. M.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we explore the information dissemination problem in ad-hoc wirless networks. First, we analyze the probability of successful broadcast, assuming: the nodes are uniformly distributed, the available area has a lower bould relative to the total number of nodes, and there is zero knowledge of the overall topology of the network. By showing that the probability of such events is small, we are motivated to extract good graph topologies to minimize the overall transmissions. Three algorithms are used to generate topologies of the network with guaranteed connectivity. These are the minimum radius graph, the relative neighborhood graph and the minimum spanning tree. Our simulation shows that the relative neighborhood graph has certain good graph properties, which makes it suitable for efficient information dissemination.

  8. Topological effects of data incompleteness of gene regulatory networks

    CERN Document Server

    Sanz, J; Borge-Holthoefer, J; Moreno, Y

    2012-01-01

    The topological analysis of biological networks has been a prolific topic in network science during the last decade. A persistent problem with this approach is the inherent uncertainty and noisy nature of the data. One of the cases in which this situation is more marked is that of transcriptional regulatory networks (TRNs) in bacteria. The datasets are incomplete because regulatory pathways associated to a relevant fraction of bacterial genes remain unknown. Furthermore, direction, strengths and signs of the links are sometimes unknown or simply overlooked. Finally, the experimental approaches to infer the regulations are highly heterogeneous, in a way that induces the appearance of systematic experimental-topological correlations. And yet, the quality of the available data increases constantly. In this work we capitalize on these advances to point out the influence of data (in)completeness and quality on some classical results on topological analysis of TRNs, specially regarding modularity at different level...

  9. Quantifying randomness in real networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsini, Chiara; Dankulov, Marija M.; Colomer-de-Simón, Pol; Jamakovic, Almerima; Mahadevan, Priya; Vahdat, Amin; Bassler, Kevin E.; Toroczkai, Zoltán; Boguñá, Marián; Caldarelli, Guido; Fortunato, Santo; Krioukov, Dmitri

    2015-10-01

    Represented as graphs, real networks are intricate combinations of order and disorder. Fixing some of the structural properties of network models to their values observed in real networks, many other properties appear as statistical consequences of these fixed observables, plus randomness in other respects. Here we employ the dk-series, a complete set of basic characteristics of the network structure, to study the statistical dependencies between different network properties. We consider six real networks--the Internet, US airport network, human protein interactions, technosocial web of trust, English word network, and an fMRI map of the human brain--and find that many important local and global structural properties of these networks are closely reproduced by dk-random graphs whose degree distributions, degree correlations and clustering are as in the corresponding real network. We discuss important conceptual, methodological, and practical implications of this evaluation of network randomness, and release software to generate dk-random graphs.

  10. Structure and Topology Dynamics of Hyper-Frequency Networks during Rest and Auditory Oddball Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Viktor; Perdikis, Dionysios; von Oertzen, Timo; Sleimen-Malkoun, Rita; Jirsa, Viktor; Lindenberger, Ulman

    2016-01-01

    Resting-state and task-related recordings are characterized by oscillatory brain activity and widely distributed networks of synchronized oscillatory circuits. Electroencephalographic recordings (EEG) were used to assess network structure and network dynamics during resting state with eyes open and closed, and auditory oddball performance through phase synchronization between EEG channels. For this assessment, we constructed a hyper-frequency network (HFN) based on within- and cross-frequency coupling (WFC and CFC, respectively) at 10 oscillation frequencies ranging between 2 and 20 Hz. We found that CFC generally differentiates between task conditions better than WFC. CFC was the highest during resting state with eyes open. Using a graph-theoretical approach (GTA), we found that HFNs possess small-world network (SWN) topology with a slight tendency to random network characteristics. Moreover, analysis of the temporal fluctuations of HFNs revealed specific network topology dynamics (NTD), i.e., temporal changes of different graph-theoretical measures such as strength, clustering coefficient, characteristic path length (CPL), local, and global efficiency determined for HFNs at different time windows. The different topology metrics showed significant differences between conditions in the mean and standard deviation of these metrics both across time and nodes. In addition, using an artificial neural network approach, we found stimulus-related dynamics that varied across the different network topology metrics. We conclude that functional connectivity dynamics (FCD), or NTD, which was found using the HFN approach during rest and stimulus processing, reflects temporal and topological changes in the functional organization and reorganization of neuronal cell assemblies.

  11. Data center networks topologies, architectures and fault-tolerance characteristics

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Yang; Veeraraghavan, Malathi; Lin, Dong; Hamdi, Mounir

    2013-01-01

    This SpringerBrief presents a survey of data center network designs and topologies and compares several properties in order to highlight their advantages and disadvantages. The brief also explores several routing protocols designed for these topologies and compares the basic algorithms to establish connections, the techniques used to gain better performance, and the mechanisms for fault-tolerance. Readers will be equipped to understand how current research on data center networks enables the design of future architectures that can improve performance and dependability of data centers. This con

  12. Modeling and dynamical topology properties of VANET based on complex networks theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Vehicular Ad hoc Network (VANET is a special subset of multi-hop Mobile Ad hoc Networks in which vehicles can not only communicate with each other but also with the fixed equipments along the roads through wireless interfaces. Recently, it has been discovered that essential systems in real world share similar properties. When they are regarded as networks, among which the dynamic topology structure of VANET system is an important issue. Many real world networks are actually growing with preferential attachment like Internet, transportation system and telephone network. Those phenomena have brought great possibility in finding a strategy to calibrate and control the topology parameters which can help find VANET topology change regulation to relieve traffic jam, prevent traffic accident and improve traffic safety. VANET is a typical complex network which has its basic characteristics. In this paper, we focus on the macroscopic Vehicle-to-Infrastructure (V2I and Vehicle-to-Vehicle (V2V inter-vehicle communication network with complex network theory. In particular, this paper is the first one to propose a method analyzing the topological structure and performance of VANET and present the communications in VANET from a new perspective. Accordingly, we propose degree distribution, clustering coefficient and the short path length of complex network to implement our strategy by numerical example and simulation. All the results demonstrate that VANET shows small world network features and is characterized by a truncated scale-free degree distribution with power-law degree distribution. The average path length of the network is simulated numerically, which indicates that the network shows small-world property and is rarely affected by the randomness. What’s more, we carry out extensive simulations of information propagation and mathematically prove the power law property when γ > 2. The results of this study provide useful information for VANET

  13. Crystal Structure Representation for Neural Networks using Topological Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, Aleksandr V; Shamanaev, Ivan V

    2017-08-01

    In the present work we describe a new approach, which uses topology of crystals for physicochemical properties prediction using artificial neural networks (ANN). The topologies of 268 crystal structures were determined using ToposPro software. Quotient graphs were used to identify topological centers and their neighbors. The topological approach was illustrated by training ANN to predict molar heat capacity, standard molar entropy and lattice energy of 268 crystals with different compositions and structures (metals, inorganic salts, oxides, etc.). ANN was trained using Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno (BFGS) algorithm. Mean absolute percentage error of predicted properties was ≤8 %. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Topological Embedding Feature Based Resource Allocation in Network Virtualization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyan Cui

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Virtualization provides a powerful way to run multiple virtual networks on a shared substrate network, which needs accurate and efficient mathematical models. Virtual network embedding is a challenge in network virtualization. In this paper, considering the degree of convergence when mapping a virtual network onto substrate network, we propose a new embedding algorithm based on topology mapping convergence-degree. Convergence-degree means the adjacent degree of virtual network’s nodes when they are mapped onto a substrate network. The contributions of our method are as below. Firstly, we map virtual nodes onto the substrate nodes with the maximum convergence-degree. The simulation results show that our proposed algorithm largely enhances the network utilization efficiency and decreases the complexity of the embedding problem. Secondly, we define the load balance rate to reflect the load balance of substrate links. The simulation results show our proposed algorithm achieves better load balance. Finally, based on the feature of star topology, we further improve our embedding algorithm and make it suitable for application in the star topology. The test result shows it gets better performance than previous works.

  15. Exploring complex networks via topological embedding on surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aste, Tomaso; Gramatica, Ruggero; Di Matteo, T

    2012-09-01

    We demonstrate that graphs embedded on surfaces are a powerful and practical tool to generate, to characterize, and to simulate networks with a broad range of properties. Any network can be embedded on a surface with sufficiently high genus and therefore the study of topologically embedded graphs is non-restrictive. We show that the local properties of the network are affected by the surface genus which determines the average degree, which influences the degree distribution, and which controls the clustering coefficient. The global properties of the graph are also strongly affected by the surface genus which is constraining the degree of interwovenness, changing the scaling properties of the network from large-world kind (small genus) to small- and ultrasmall-world kind (large genus). Two elementary moves allow the exploration of all networks embeddable on a given surface and naturally introduce a tool to develop a statistical mechanics description for these networks. Within such a framework, we study the properties of topologically embedded graphs which dynamically tend to lower their energy towards a ground state with a given reference degree distribution. We show that the cooling dynamics between high and low "temperatures" is strongly affected by the surface genus with the manifestation of a glass-like transition occurring when the distance from the reference distribution is low. We prove, with examples, that topologically embedded graphs can be built in a way to contain arbitrary complex networks as subgraphs. This method opens a new avenue to build geometrically embedded networks on hyperbolic manifolds.

  16. Random-matrix theory of Majorana fermions and topological superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beenakker, C. W. J.

    2015-07-01

    The theory of random matrices originated half a century ago as a universal description of the spectral statistics of atoms and nuclei, dependent only on the presence or absence of fundamental symmetries. Applications to quantum dots (artificial atoms) followed, stimulated by developments in the field of quantum chaos, as well as applications to Andreev billiards—quantum dots with induced superconductivity. Superconductors with topologically protected subgap states, Majorana zero modes, and Majorana edge modes, provide a new arena for applications of random-matrix theory. These recent developments are reviewed, with an emphasis on electrical and thermal transport properties that can probe the Majorana fermions.

  17. Random matrix analysis for gene interaction networks in cancer cells

    CERN Document Server

    Kikkawa, Ayumi

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: The investigation of topological modifications of the gene interaction networks in cancer cells is essential for understanding the desease. We study gene interaction networks in various human cancer cells with the random matrix theory. This study is based on the Cancer Network Galaxy (TCNG) database which is the repository of huge gene interactions inferred by Bayesian network algorithms from 256 microarray experimental data downloaded from NCBI GEO. The original GEO data are provided by the high-throughput microarray expression experiments on various human cancer cells. We apply the random matrix theory to the computationally inferred gene interaction networks in TCNG in order to detect the universality in the topology of the gene interaction networks in cancer cells. Results: We found the universal behavior in almost one half of the 256 gene interaction networks in TCNG. The distribution of nearest neighbor level spacing of the gene interaction matrix becomes the Wigner distribution when the net...

  18. Thermodynamics of random reaction networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob Fischer

    Full Text Available Reaction networks are useful for analyzing reaction systems occurring in chemistry, systems biology, or Earth system science. Despite the importance of thermodynamic disequilibrium for many of those systems, the general thermodynamic properties of reaction networks are poorly understood. To circumvent the problem of sparse thermodynamic data, we generate artificial reaction networks and investigate their non-equilibrium steady state for various boundary fluxes. We generate linear and nonlinear networks using four different complex network models (Erdős-Rényi, Barabási-Albert, Watts-Strogatz, Pan-Sinha and compare their topological properties with real reaction networks. For similar boundary conditions the steady state flow through the linear networks is about one order of magnitude higher than the flow through comparable nonlinear networks. In all networks, the flow decreases with the distance between the inflow and outflow boundary species, with Watts-Strogatz networks showing a significantly smaller slope compared to the three other network types. The distribution of entropy production of the individual reactions inside the network follows a power law in the intermediate region with an exponent of circa -1.5 for linear and -1.66 for nonlinear networks. An elevated entropy production rate is found in reactions associated with weakly connected species. This effect is stronger in nonlinear networks than in the linear ones. Increasing the flow through the nonlinear networks also increases the number of cycles and leads to a narrower distribution of chemical potentials. We conclude that the relation between distribution of dissipation, network topology and strength of disequilibrium is nontrivial and can be studied systematically by artificial reaction networks.

  19. Thermodynamics of Random Reaction Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Jakob; Kleidon, Axel; Dittrich, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Reaction networks are useful for analyzing reaction systems occurring in chemistry, systems biology, or Earth system science. Despite the importance of thermodynamic disequilibrium for many of those systems, the general thermodynamic properties of reaction networks are poorly understood. To circumvent the problem of sparse thermodynamic data, we generate artificial reaction networks and investigate their non-equilibrium steady state for various boundary fluxes. We generate linear and nonlinear networks using four different complex network models (Erdős-Rényi, Barabási-Albert, Watts-Strogatz, Pan-Sinha) and compare their topological properties with real reaction networks. For similar boundary conditions the steady state flow through the linear networks is about one order of magnitude higher than the flow through comparable nonlinear networks. In all networks, the flow decreases with the distance between the inflow and outflow boundary species, with Watts-Strogatz networks showing a significantly smaller slope compared to the three other network types. The distribution of entropy production of the individual reactions inside the network follows a power law in the intermediate region with an exponent of circa −1.5 for linear and −1.66 for nonlinear networks. An elevated entropy production rate is found in reactions associated with weakly connected species. This effect is stronger in nonlinear networks than in the linear ones. Increasing the flow through the nonlinear networks also increases the number of cycles and leads to a narrower distribution of chemical potentials. We conclude that the relation between distribution of dissipation, network topology and strength of disequilibrium is nontrivial and can be studied systematically by artificial reaction networks. PMID:25723751

  20. Emergence of Space-Time from Topologically Homogeneous Causal Networks

    CERN Document Server

    D'Ariano, Giacomo Mauro

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we study the emergence of Minkowski space-time from a causal network. Differently from previous approaches, we require the network to be topologically homogeneous, so that the metric is derived from pure event-counting. Emergence from events has an operational motivation in requiring that every physical quantity---including space-time---be defined through precise measurement procedures. Topological homogeneity is a requirement for having space-time metric emergent from the pure topology of causal connections, whereas physically corresponds to the universality of the physical law. We analyze in detail the case of 1+1 dimension. Coordinate systems are established via an Einsteinian protocol, and lead to a digital version of the Lorentz transformations. In a computational analogy, the foliation construction can also be regarded as the synchronization with a global clock of the calls to independent subroutines (corresponding to the causally independent events) in a parallel distributed computation, ...

  1. Gene Regulatory Network Evolution Through Augmenting Topologies

    OpenAIRE

    Cussat-Blanc, Sylvain; Harrington, Kyle; Pollack, Jordan

    2015-01-01

    Artificial gene regulatory networks (GRNs) are biologically inspired dynamical systems used to control various kinds of agents, from the cells in developmental models to embodied robot swarms. Most recent work uses a genetic algorithm (GA) or an evolution strategy in order to optimize the network for a specific task. However, the empirical performances of these algorithms are unsatisfactory. This paper presents an algorithm that primarily exploits a network distance metric, which allows genet...

  2. Gene Regulatory Network Evolution Through Augmenting Topologies

    OpenAIRE

    Cussat-Blanc, Sylvain; Harrington, Kyle; Pollack, Jordan

    2015-01-01

    International audience; Artificial gene regulatory networks (GRNs) are biologically inspired dynamical systems used to control various kinds of agents, from the cells in developmental models to embodied robot swarms. Most recent work uses a genetic algorithm (GA) or an evolution strategy in order to optimize the network for a specific task. However, the empirical performances of these algorithms are unsatisfactory. This paper presents an algorithm that primarily exploits a network distance me...

  3. Small Modifications to Network Topology Can Induce Stochastic Bistable Spiking Dynamics in a Balanced Cortical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonnell, Mark D.; Ward, Lawrence M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Directed random graph models frequently are used successfully in modeling the population dynamics of networks of cortical neurons connected by chemical synapses. Experimental results consistently reveal that neuronal network topology is complex, however, in the sense that it differs statistically from a random network, and differs for classes of neurons that are physiologically different. This suggests that complex network models whose subnetworks have distinct topological structure may be a useful, and more biologically realistic, alternative to random networks. Here we demonstrate that the balanced excitation and inhibition frequently observed in small cortical regions can transiently disappear in otherwise standard neuronal-scale models of fluctuation-driven dynamics, solely because the random network topology was replaced by a complex clustered one, whilst not changing the in-degree of any neurons. In this network, a small subset of cells whose inhibition comes only from outside their local cluster are the cause of bistable population dynamics, where different clusters of these cells irregularly switch back and forth from a sparsely firing state to a highly active state. Transitions to the highly active state occur when a cluster of these cells spikes sufficiently often to cause strong unbalanced positive feedback to each other. Transitions back to the sparsely firing state rely on occasional large fluctuations in the amount of non-local inhibition received. Neurons in the model are homogeneous in their intrinsic dynamics and in-degrees, but differ in the abundance of various directed feedback motifs in which they participate. Our findings suggest that (i) models and simulations should take into account complex structure that varies for neuron and synapse classes; (ii) differences in the dynamics of neurons with similar intrinsic properties may be caused by their membership in distinctive local networks; (iii) it is important to identify neurons that

  4. Early-warning signals of topological collapse in interbank networks

    CERN Document Server

    Squartini, Tiziano; Garlaschelli, Diego

    2013-01-01

    The financial crisis marked a paradigm shift, from traditional studies of individual risk to recent research on the "systemic risk" generated by whole networks of institutions. However, the reverse effects of realized defaults on network topology are poorly understood. Here we analyze the Dutch interbank network over the period 1998-2008, ending with the global crisis. We find that many topological properties, after controlling for overall density effects, display an abrupt change in 2008, thus providing a clear but unpredictable signature of the crisis. By contrast, if the intrinsic heterogeneity of banks is controlled for, the same properties undergo a slow and continuous transition, gradually connecting the crisis period to a much earlier stationary phase. This early-warning signal begins in 2005, and is preceded by an even earlier period of "risk autocatalysis" characterized by anomalous debt loops. These remarkable precursors are undetectable if the network is reconstructed from partial bank-specific inf...

  5. Comparative study on the topological structure of China Education Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ming-Min; Zhang, Ning; Mao, Guo-Yong

    2017-07-01

    China Education Network (CEN) of year 2014 was studied as a complex network object. By searching the domain of “.edu.cn” and filtering some unexpected results, we finally get a network with 14,100,628 pages and 213,513,401 links. The topology of this network was studied to get the features such as out-degree distribution, in-degree distribution and average shortest path length. These features were compared with that of year 2007 and 2004 to observe the evolution mechanisms of CEN. According to the statistical results, it is found that some topology features of CEN such as out-degree distribution, in-degree distribution and average shortest path have changed a lot and the related reasons for these changes are given in this paper.

  6. Statistical Inferences from the Topology of Complex Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-04

    included elsewhere such as: prepared in cooperation with; translation of; report supersedes; old edition number, etc. 14. ABSTRACT. A brief...Kang Jeng, and Yi-Hsuan Yang. Applying topological persistence in convolutional neural network for music audio signals. 08 2016, 1608.07373. 6

  7. Phase rotation symmetry and the topology of oriented scattering networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delplace, Pierre; Fruchart, Michel; Tauber, Clément

    2017-05-01

    We investigate the topological properties of dynamical states evolving on periodic oriented graphs. This evolution, which encodes the scattering processes occurring at the nodes of the graph, is described by a single-step global operator, in the spirit of the Ho-Chalker model. When the successive scattering events follow a cyclic sequence, the corresponding scattering network can be equivalently described by a discrete time-periodic unitary evolution, in line with Floquet systems. Such systems may present anomalous topological phases where all the first Chern numbers are vanishing, but where protected edge states appear in a finite geometry. To investigate the origin of such anomalous phases, we introduce the phase rotation symmetry, a generalization of usual symmetries which only occurs in unitary systems (as opposed to Hamiltonian systems). Equipped with this new tool, we explore a possible explanation of the pervasiveness of anomalous phases in scattering network models, and we define bulk topological invariants suited to both equivalent descriptions of the network model, which fully capture the topology of the system. We finally show that the two invariants coincide, again through a phase rotation symmetry arising from the particular structure of the network model.

  8. Analysis of Degree 5 Chordal Rings for Network Topologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riaz, M. Tahir; Pedersen, Jens Myrup; Bujnowski, Sławomir

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of degree 5 chordal rings, from a network topology point of view. The chordal rings are mainly evaluated with respect to average distance and diameter. We derive approximation expressions for the related ideal graphs, and show that these matches the real chordal ri...

  9. Exploiting Network Topology Information to Mitigate Ambiguities in VMP Localization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Claus; Pedersen, Troels; Fleury, Bernard Henri

    2011-01-01

    We investigate an extension to the probabilistic model of a wireless sensor network (WSN) in the variational message passing localization algorithm. This extension exploits network topology information to mitigate ambiguities in WSN localization schemes. In a simulation case study we show...... that this extension in some cases improves the location estimates produced by the algorithm. The final version of the paper will present quantitative results from more extensive investigations that will document the extent of this improvement....

  10. Learning and innovative elements of strategy adoption rules expand cooperative network topologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shijun; Szalay, Máté S; Zhang, Changshui; Csermely, Peter

    2008-04-09

    Cooperation plays a key role in the evolution of complex systems. However, the level of cooperation extensively varies with the topology of agent networks in the widely used models of repeated games. Here we show that cooperation remains rather stable by applying the reinforcement learning strategy adoption rule, Q-learning on a variety of random, regular, small-word, scale-free and modular network models in repeated, multi-agent Prisoner's Dilemma and Hawk-Dove games. Furthermore, we found that using the above model systems other long-term learning strategy adoption rules also promote cooperation, while introducing a low level of noise (as a model of innovation) to the strategy adoption rules makes the level of cooperation less dependent on the actual network topology. Our results demonstrate that long-term learning and random elements in the strategy adoption rules, when acting together, extend the range of network topologies enabling the development of cooperation at a wider range of costs and temptations. These results suggest that a balanced duo of learning and innovation may help to preserve cooperation during the re-organization of real-world networks, and may play a prominent role in the evolution of self-organizing, complex systems.

  11. Topology of the conceptual network of language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motter, Adilson E.; de Moura, Alessandro P.; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Dasgupta, Partha

    2002-06-01

    We define two words in a language to be connected if they express similar concepts. The network of connections among the many thousands of words that make up a language is important not only for the study of the structure and evolution of languages, but also for cognitive science. We study this issue quantitatively, by mapping out the conceptual network of the English language, with the connections being defined by the entries in a Thesaurus dictionary. We find that this network presents a small-world structure, with an amazingly small average shortest path, and appears to exhibit an asymptotic scale-free feature with algebraic connectivity distribution.

  12. Topological networks for quantum communication between distant qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Nicolai; Büchler, Hans Peter

    2017-11-01

    Efficient communication between qubits relies on robust networks, which allow for fast and coherent transfer of quantum information. It seems natural to harvest the remarkable properties of systems characterized by topological invariants to perform this task. Here, we show that a linear network of coupled bosonic degrees of freedom, characterized by topological bands, can be employed for the efficient exchange of quantum information over large distances. Important features of our setup are that it is robust against quenched disorder, all relevant operations can be performed by global variations of parameters, and the time required for communication between distant qubits approaches linear scaling with their distance. We demonstrate that our concept can be extended to an ensemble of qubits embedded in a two-dimensional network to allow for communication between all of them.

  13. A Topological Perspective of Neural Network Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sizemore, Ann; Giusti, Chad; Cieslak, Matthew; Grafton, Scott; Bassett, Danielle

    The wiring patterns of white matter tracts between brain regions inform functional capabilities of the neural network. Indeed, densely connected and cyclically arranged cognitive systems may communicate and thus perform distinctly. However, previously employed graph theoretical statistics are local in nature and thus insensitive to such global structure. Here we present an investigation of the structural neural network in eight healthy individuals using persistent homology. An extension of homology to weighted networks, persistent homology records both circuits and cliques (all-to-all connected subgraphs) through a repetitive thresholding process, thus perceiving structural motifs. We report structural features found across patients and discuss brain regions responsible for these patterns, finally considering the implications of such motifs in relation to cognitive function.

  14. Is the topology of the Internet network really fit to sustain its function?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosato, V.; Issacharoff, L.; Meloni, S.; Caligiore, D.; Tiriticco, F.

    2008-03-01

    The Internet is one of the most interesting realizations of a “complex” network. As a non-supervised growing object, it allows the study of the selective pressure which drives the network to assume its current structure. The DIMES and the ROUTEVIEWS projects are ongoing projects aimed at evaluating the topological structure of the Internet (at the Autonomous System or AS grain-level) on the basis of different types of measurements. The topological analysis of the networks produced by the two projects has allowed us to infer a growth mechanism which has been used to build up synthetic networks with similar properties. These networks have been used as test-beds for the implementation of a model of traffic dynamics, with the aim of assessing the ability of the Internet’s topology to support the basic actions for data traffic handling. Results have been compared with those obtained by using a random network of similar size. The effects of some structural perturbations (arcs and nodes’ removal, traffic localization) have been also evaluated in terms of the induced variations of the network’s efficiency. The resulting scenario is consistent with the hypothesis that the structure of the Internet is only partially fit to host communication processes and that the intelligence of the TCP/IP protocol is partly needed to overcome some “structural” deficiencies.

  15. Radiation-Induced Topological Disorder in Irradiated Network Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, Linn W.

    2002-12-21

    This report summarizes results of a research program investigating the fundamental principles underlying the phenomenon of topological disordering in a radiation environment. This phenomenon is known popularly as amorphization, but is more formally described as a process of radiation-induced structural arrangement that leads in crystals to loss of long-range translational and orientational correlations and in glasses to analogous alteration of connectivity topologies. The program focus has been on a set compound ceramic solids with directed bonding exhibiting structures that can be described as networks. Such solids include SiO2, Si3N4, SiC, which are of interest to applications in fusion energy production, nuclear waste storage, and device manufacture involving ion implantation or use in radiation fields. The principal investigative tools comprise a combination of experimental diffraction-based techniques, topological modeling, and molecular-dynamics simulations that have proven a rich source of information in the preceding support period. The results from the present support period fall into three task areas. The first comprises enumeration of the rigidity constraints applying to (1) more complex ceramic structures (such as rutile, corundum, spinel and olivine structures) that exhibit multiply polytopic coordination units or multiple modes of connecting such units, (2) elemental solids (such as graphite, silicon and diamond) for which a correct choice of polytope is necessary to achieve correct representation of the constraints, and (3) compounds (such as spinel and silicon carbide) that exhibit chemical disorder on one or several sublattices. With correct identification of the topological constraints, a unique correlation is shown to exist between constraint and amorphizability which demonstrates that amorphization occurs at a critical constraint loss. The second task involves the application of molecular dynamics (MD) methods to topologically-generated models

  16. Minimum curvilinearity to enhance topological prediction of protein interactions by network embedding

    KAUST Repository

    Cannistraci, Carlo

    2013-06-21

    Motivation: Most functions within the cell emerge thanks to protein-protein interactions (PPIs), yet experimental determination of PPIs is both expensive and time-consuming. PPI networks present significant levels of noise and incompleteness. Predicting interactions using only PPI-network topology (topological prediction) is difficult but essential when prior biological knowledge is absent or unreliable.Methods: Network embedding emphasizes the relations between network proteins embedded in a low-dimensional space, in which protein pairs that are closer to each other represent good candidate interactions. To achieve network denoising, which boosts prediction performance, we first applied minimum curvilinear embedding (MCE), and then adopted shortest path (SP) in the reduced space to assign likelihood scores to candidate interactions. Furthermore, we introduce (i) a new valid variation of MCE, named non-centred MCE (ncMCE); (ii) two automatic strategies for selecting the appropriate embedding dimension; and (iii) two new randomized procedures for evaluating predictions.Results: We compared our method against several unsupervised and supervisedly tuned embedding approaches and node neighbourhood techniques. Despite its computational simplicity, ncMCE-SP was the overall leader, outperforming the current methods in topological link prediction.Conclusion: Minimum curvilinearity is a valuable non-linear framework that we successfully applied to the embedding of protein networks for the unsupervised prediction of novel PPIs. The rationale for our approach is that biological and evolutionary information is imprinted in the non-linear patterns hidden behind the protein network topology, and can be exploited for predicting new protein links. The predicted PPIs represent good candidates for testing in high-throughput experiments or for exploitation in systems biology tools such as those used for network-based inference and prediction of disease-related functional modules. The

  17. A Topology Evolution Model Based on Revised PageRank Algorithm and Node Importance for Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaogang Qi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Wireless sensor network (WSN is a classical self-organizing communication network, and its topology evolution currently becomes one of the attractive issues in this research field. Accordingly, the problem is divided into two subproblems: one is to design a new preferential attachment method and the other is to analyze the dynamics of the network topology evolution. To solve the first subproblem, a revised PageRank algorithm, called Con-rank, is proposed to evaluate the node importance upon the existing node contraction, and then a novel preferential attachment is designed based on the node importance calculated by the proposed Con-rank algorithm. To solve the second one, we firstly analyze the network topology evolution dynamics in a theoretical way and then simulate the evolution process. Theoretical analysis proves that the network topology evolution of our model agrees with power-law distribution, and simulation results are well consistent with our conclusions obtained from the theoretical analysis and simultaneously show that our topology evolution model is superior to the classic BA model in the average path length and the clustering coefficient, and the network topology is more robust and can tolerate the random attacks.

  18. Developmental time windows for axon growth influence neuronal network topology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Sol; Kaiser, Marcus

    2015-04-01

    Early brain connectivity development consists of multiple stages: birth of neurons, their migration and the subsequent growth of axons and dendrites. Each stage occurs within a certain period of time depending on types of neurons and cortical layers. Forming synapses between neurons either by growing axons starting at similar times for all neurons (much-overlapped time windows) or at different time points (less-overlapped) may affect the topological and spatial properties of neuronal networks. Here, we explore the extreme cases of axon formation during early development, either starting at the same time for all neurons (parallel, i.e., maximally overlapped time windows) or occurring for each neuron separately one neuron after another (serial, i.e., no overlaps in time windows). For both cases, the number of potential and established synapses remained comparable. Topological and spatial properties, however, differed: Neurons that started axon growth early on in serial growth achieved higher out-degrees, higher local efficiency and longer axon lengths while neurons demonstrated more homogeneous connectivity patterns for parallel growth. Second, connection probability decreased more rapidly with distance between neurons for parallel growth than for serial growth. Third, bidirectional connections were more numerous for parallel growth. Finally, we tested our predictions with C. elegans data. Together, this indicates that time windows for axon growth influence the topological and spatial properties of neuronal networks opening up the possibility to a posteriori estimate developmental mechanisms based on network properties of a developed network.

  19. In silico network topology-based prediction of gene essentiality

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, João Paulo Müller; Acencio, Marcio Luis; Mombach, José Carlos Merino; Vieira, Renata; da Silva, José Camargo; Lemke, Ney; Sinigaglia, Marialva

    2008-02-01

    The identification of genes essential for survival is important for the understanding of the minimal requirements for cellular life and for drug design. As experimental studies with the purpose of building a catalog of essential genes for a given organism are time-consuming and laborious, a computational approach which could predict gene essentiality with high accuracy would be of great value. We present here a novel computational approach, called NTPGE (Network Topology-based Prediction of Gene Essentiality), that relies on the network topology features of a gene to estimate its essentiality. The first step of NTPGE is to construct the integrated molecular network for a given organism comprising protein physical, metabolic and transcriptional regulation interactions. The second step consists in training a decision-tree-based machine-learning algorithm on known essential and non-essential genes of the organism of interest, considering as learning attributes the network topology information for each of these genes. Finally, the decision-tree classifier generated is applied to the set of genes of this organism to estimate essentiality for each gene. We applied the NTPGE approach for discovering the essential genes in Escherichia coli and then assessed its performance.

  20. Distributed Energy-Efficient Topology Control Algorithm in Home M2M Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Chao-Yang Lee; Chu-Sing Yang

    2012-01-01

    Because machine-to-machine (M2M) technology enables machines to communicate with each other without human intervention, it could play a big role in sensor network systems. Through wireless sensor network (WSN) gateways, various information can be collected by sensors for M2M systems. For home M2M networks, this study proposes a distributed energy-efficient topology control algorithm for both topology construction and topology maintenance. Topology control is an effective method of enhancing e...

  1. Network topology reveals key cardiovascular disease genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anida Sarajlić

    Full Text Available The structure of protein-protein interaction (PPI networks has already been successfully used as a source of new biological information. Even though cardiovascular diseases (CVDs are a major global cause of death, many CVD genes still await discovery. We explore ways to utilize the structure of the human PPI network to find important genes for CVDs that should be targeted by drugs. The hope is to use the properties of such important genes to predict new ones, which would in turn improve a choice of therapy. We propose a methodology that examines the PPI network wiring around genes involved in CVDs. We use the methodology to identify a subset of CVD-related genes that are statistically significantly enriched in drug targets and "driver genes." We seek such genes, since driver genes have been proposed to drive onset and progression of a disease. Our identified subset of CVD genes has a large overlap with the Core Diseasome, which has been postulated to be the key to disease formation and hence should be the primary object of therapeutic intervention. This indicates that our methodology identifies "key" genes responsible for CVDs. Thus, we use it to predict new CVD genes and we validate over 70% of our predictions in the literature. Finally, we show that our predicted genes are functionally similar to currently known CVD drug targets, which confirms a potential utility of our methodology towards improving therapy for CVDs.

  2. Effects of spatial constraints on channel network topology: Implications for geomorphological inference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, Mariza Castanheira De Moura Da Costa

    range of Q values, the maximal-likelihood Q parameter value is generally in the vicinity of 1/2, which yields topological randomness. It is proposed that space filling originates the appearance of randomness in channel network topology, and may cause difficulties to geomorphological inference from network planform.

  3. Growing random networks with fitness

    OpenAIRE

    Ergun, G.; Rodgers, GJ

    2001-01-01

    Three models of growing random networks with fitness dependent growth rates are analysed using the rate equations for the distribution of their connectivities. In the first model (A), a network is built by connecting incoming nodes to nodes of connectivity $k$ and random additive fitness $\\eta$, with rate $(k-1)+ \\eta $. For $\\eta >0$ we find the connectivity distribution is power law with exponent $\\gamma=+2$. In the second model (B), the network is built by connecting nodes to nodes of conn...

  4. Asymmetric evolving random networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulomb, S.; Bauer, M.

    2003-10-01

    We generalize the Poissonian evolving random graph model of M. Bauer and D. Bernard (2003), to deal with arbitrary degree distributions. The motivation comes from biological networks, which are well-known to exhibit non Poissonian degree distributions. A node is added at each time step and is connected to the rest of the graph by oriented edges emerging from older nodes. This leads to a statistical asymmetry between incoming and outgoing edges. The law for the number of new edges at each time step is fixed but arbitrary. Thermodynamical behavior is expected when this law has a large time limit. Although (by construction) the incoming degree distributions depend on this law, this is not the case for most qualitative features concerning the size distribution of connected components, as long as the law has a finite variance. As the variance grows above 1/4, the average being < 1/2, a giant component emerges, which connects a finite fraction of the vertices. Below this threshold, the distribution of component sizes decreases algebraically with a continuously varying exponent. The transition is of infinite order, in sharp contrast with the case of static graphs. The local-in-time profiles for the components of finite size allow to give a refined description of the system.

  5. Human Dopamine Receptors Interaction Network (DRIN): a systems biology perspective on topology, stability and functionality of the network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podder, Avijit; Jatana, Nidhi; Latha, N

    2014-09-21

    Dopamine receptors (DR) are one of the major neurotransmitter receptors present in human brain. Malfunctioning of these receptors is well established to trigger many neurological and psychiatric disorders. Taking into consideration that proteins function collectively in a network for most of the biological processes, the present study is aimed to depict the interactions between all dopamine receptors following a systems biology approach. To capture comprehensive interactions of candidate proteins associated with human dopamine receptors, we performed a protein-protein interaction network (PPIN) analysis of all five receptors and their protein partners by mapping them into human interactome and constructed a human Dopamine Receptors Interaction Network (DRIN). We explored the topology of dopamine receptors as molecular network, revealing their characteristics and the role of central network elements. More to the point, a sub-network analysis was done to determine major functional clusters in human DRIN that govern key neurological pathways. Besides, interacting proteins in a pathway were characterized and prioritized based on their affinity for utmost drug molecules. The vulnerability of different networks to the dysfunction of diverse combination of components was estimated under random and direct attack scenarios. To the best of our knowledge, the current study is unique to put all five dopamine receptors together in a common interaction network and to understand the functionality of interacting proteins collectively. Our study pinpointed distinctive topological and functional properties of human dopamine receptors that have helped in identifying potential therapeutic drug targets in the dopamine interaction network. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Network topology and correlation features affiliated with European airline companies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ding-Ding; Qian, Jiang-Hai; Liu, Jin-Gao

    2009-01-01

    The physics information of four specific airline flight networks in European Continent, namely the Austrian airline, the British airline, the France-Holland airline and the Lufthhansa airline, was quantitatively analyzed by the concepts of a complex network. It displays some features of small-world networks, namely a large clustering coefficient and small average shortest-path length for these specific airline networks. The degree distributions for the small degree branch reveal power law behavior with an exponent value of 2-3 for the Austrian and the British flight networks, and that of 1-2 for the France-Holland and the Lufthhansa airline flight networks. So the studied four airlines are sorted into two classes according to the topology structure. Similarly, the flight weight distributions show two kinds of different decay behavior with the flight weight: one for the Austrian and the British airlines and another for the France-Holland airline and the Lufthhansa airlines. In addition, the degree-degree correlation analysis shows that the network has disassortative behavior for all the value of degree k, and this phenomenon is different from the international airline network and US airline network. Analysis of the clustering coefficient ( C(k)) versus k, indicates that the flight networks of the Austrian Airline and the British Airline reveal a hierarchical organization for all airports, however, the France-Holland Airline and the Lufthhansa Airline show a hierarchical organization mostly for larger airports. The correlation of node strength ( S(k)) and degree is also analyzed, and a power-law fit S(k)∼k1.1 can roughly fit all data of these four airline companies. Furthermore, we mention seasonal changes and holidays may cause the flight network to form a different topology. An example of the Austrian Airline during Christmas was studied and analyzed.

  7. Improvement of water distribution networks analysis by topological similarity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahavir Singh

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this research paper a methodology based on topological similarity is used to obtain starting point of iteration for solving reservoir and pipe network problems. As of now initial starting point for iteration is based on pure guess work which may be supported by experience. Topological similarity concept comes from the Principle of Quasi Work (PQW. In PQW the solution of any one problem of a class is used to solve other complex problems of the same class. This paves way for arriving at a unique concept of reference system the solution of which is used to obtain the starting point for starting the iteration process in reservoir and pipe network problems.

  8. Topological structure of the space of phenotypes: the case of RNA neutral networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacobo Aguirre

    Full Text Available The evolution and adaptation of molecular populations is constrained by the diversity accessible through mutational processes. RNA is a paradigmatic example of biopolymer where genotype (sequence and phenotype (approximated by the secondary structure fold are identified in a single molecule. The extreme redundancy of the genotype-phenotype map leads to large ensembles of RNA sequences that fold into the same secondary structure and can be connected through single-point mutations. These ensembles define neutral networks of phenotypes in sequence space. Here we analyze the topological properties of neutral networks formed by 12-nucleotides RNA sequences, obtained through the exhaustive folding of sequence space. A total of 4(12 sequences fragments into 645 subnetworks that correspond to 57 different secondary structures. The topological analysis reveals that each subnetwork is far from being random: it has a degree distribution with a well-defined average and a small dispersion, a high clustering coefficient, and an average shortest path between nodes close to its minimum possible value, i.e. the Hamming distance between sequences. RNA neutral networks are assortative due to the correlation in the composition of neighboring sequences, a feature that together with the symmetries inherent to the folding process explains the existence of communities. Several topological relationships can be analytically derived attending to structural restrictions and generic properties of the folding process. The average degree of these phenotypic networks grows logarithmically with their size, such that abundant phenotypes have the additional advantage of being more robust to mutations. This property prevents fragmentation of neutral networks and thus enhances the navigability of sequence space. In summary, RNA neutral networks show unique topological properties, unknown to other networks previously described.

  9. Topological Structure of the Space of Phenotypes: The Case of RNA Neutral Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Jacobo; Buldú, Javier M.; Stich, Michael; Manrubia, Susanna C.

    2011-01-01

    The evolution and adaptation of molecular populations is constrained by the diversity accessible through mutational processes. RNA is a paradigmatic example of biopolymer where genotype (sequence) and phenotype (approximated by the secondary structure fold) are identified in a single molecule. The extreme redundancy of the genotype-phenotype map leads to large ensembles of RNA sequences that fold into the same secondary structure and can be connected through single-point mutations. These ensembles define neutral networks of phenotypes in sequence space. Here we analyze the topological properties of neutral networks formed by 12-nucleotides RNA sequences, obtained through the exhaustive folding of sequence space. A total of 412 sequences fragments into 645 subnetworks that correspond to 57 different secondary structures. The topological analysis reveals that each subnetwork is far from being random: it has a degree distribution with a well-defined average and a small dispersion, a high clustering coefficient, and an average shortest path between nodes close to its minimum possible value, i.e. the Hamming distance between sequences. RNA neutral networks are assortative due to the correlation in the composition of neighboring sequences, a feature that together with the symmetries inherent to the folding process explains the existence of communities. Several topological relationships can be analytically derived attending to structural restrictions and generic properties of the folding process. The average degree of these phenotypic networks grows logarithmically with their size, such that abundant phenotypes have the additional advantage of being more robust to mutations. This property prevents fragmentation of neutral networks and thus enhances the navigability of sequence space. In summary, RNA neutral networks show unique topological properties, unknown to other networks previously described. PMID:22028856

  10. AN AUTOMATED 3D INDOOR TOPOLOGICAL NAVIGATION NETWORK MODELLING

    OpenAIRE

    JAMALI, A.; Rahman, A.A.; Boguslawski, P.; Gold, C. M.

    2015-01-01

    Indoor navigation is important for various applications such as disaster management and safety analysis. In the last decade, indoor environment has been a focus of wide research; that includes developing techniques for acquiring indoor data (e.g. Terrestrial laser scanning), 3D indoor modelling and 3D indoor navigation models. In this paper, an automated 3D topological indoor network generated from inaccurate 3D building models is proposed. In a normal scenario, 3D indoor navigation ...

  11. A topological analysis of scientific coauthorship networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardillo, Alessio; Scellato, Salvatore; Latora, Vito

    2006-12-01

    We study coauthorship networks based on the preprints submitted to the Los Alamos cond-mat database during the period 2000-2005. In our approach two scientists are considered connected if they have coauthored one or more cond-mat preprints together in the same year. We focus on the characterization of the structural properties of the derived graphs and on the time evolution of such properties. The results show that the cond-mat community has grown over the last six years. This is witnessed by an improvement in the connectivity properties of coauthorship graphs over the years, as confirmed by an increasing size of the largest connected component, of the global efficiency and of the clustering coefficient. We have also found that the graphs are characterized by long-tailed degree and betweenness distributions, assortative degree-degree correlations, and a power-law dependence of the clustering coefficient on the node degree.

  12. Resilient Wireless Sensor Networks Using Topology Control: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuanjiang; Martínez, José-Fernán; Sendra, Juana; López, Lourdes

    2015-01-01

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) may be deployed in failure-prone environments, and WSNs nodes easily fail due to unreliable wireless connections, malicious attacks and resource-constrained features. Nevertheless, if WSNs can tolerate at most losing k − 1 nodes while the rest of nodes remain connected, the network is called k − connected. k is one of the most important indicators for WSNs’ self-healing capability. Following a WSN design flow, this paper surveys resilience issues from the topology control and multi-path routing point of view. This paper provides a discussion on transmission and failure models, which have an important impact on research results. Afterwards, this paper reviews theoretical results and representative topology control approaches to guarantee WSNs to be k − connected at three different network deployment stages: pre-deployment, post-deployment and re-deployment. Multi-path routing protocols are discussed, and many NP-complete or NP-hard problems regarding topology control are identified. The challenging open issues are discussed at the end. This paper can serve as a guideline to design resilient WSNs. PMID:26404272

  13. Correlation and network topologies in global and local stock indices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nobi, A.; Lee, S.; Kim, D. H.

    2014-01-01

    We examined how the correlation and network structure of the global indices and local Korean indices have changed during years 2000-2012. The average correlations of the global indices increased with time, while the local indices showed a decreasing trend except for drastic changes during...... the crises. A significant change in the network topologies was observed due to the financial crises in both markets. The Jaccard similarities identified the change in the market state due to a crisis in both markets. The dynamic change of the Jaccard index can be used as an indicator of systemic risk...

  14. Estimating topological properties of weighted networks from limited information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimini, Giulio; Squartini, Tiziano; Gabrielli, Andrea; Garlaschelli, Diego

    2015-10-01

    A problem typically encountered when studying complex systems is the limitedness of the information available on their topology, which hinders our understanding of their structure and of the dynamical processes taking place on them. A paramount example is provided by financial networks, whose data are privacy protected: Banks publicly disclose only their aggregate exposure towards other banks, keeping individual exposures towards each single bank secret. Yet, the estimation of systemic risk strongly depends on the detailed structure of the interbank network. The resulting challenge is that of using aggregate information to statistically reconstruct a network and correctly predict its higher-order properties. Standard approaches either generate unrealistically dense networks, or fail to reproduce the observed topology by assigning homogeneous link weights. Here, we develop a reconstruction method, based on statistical mechanics concepts, that makes use of the empirical link density in a highly nontrivial way. Technically, our approach consists in the preliminary estimation of node degrees from empirical node strengths and link density, followed by a maximum-entropy inference based on a combination of empirical strengths and estimated degrees. Our method is successfully tested on the international trade network and the interbank money market, and represents a valuable tool for gaining insights on privacy-protected or partially accessible systems.

  15. Gene essentiality and the topology of protein interaction networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulomb, Stéphane; Bauer, Michel; Bernard, Denis; Marsolier-Kergoat, Marie-Claude

    2005-01-01

    The mechanistic bases for gene essentiality and for cell mutational resistance have long been disputed. The recent availability of large protein interaction databases has fuelled the analysis of protein interaction networks and several authors have proposed that gene dispensability could be strongly related to some topological parameters of these networks. However, many results were based on protein interaction data whose biases were not taken into account. In this article, we show that the essentiality of a gene in yeast is poorly related to the number of interactants (or degree) of the corresponding protein and that the physiological consequences of gene deletions are unrelated to several other properties of proteins in the interaction networks, such as the average degrees of their nearest neighbours, their clustering coefficients or their relative distances. We also found that yeast protein interaction networks lack degree correlation, i.e. a propensity for their vertices to associate according to their degrees. Gene essentiality and more generally cell resistance against mutations thus seem largely unrelated to many parameters of protein network topology. PMID:16087428

  16. Estimating topological properties of weighted networks from limited information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielli, Andrea; Cimini, Giulio; Garlaschelli, Diego; Squartini, Angelo

    A typical problem met when studying complex systems is the limited information available on their topology, which hinders our understanding of their structural and dynamical properties. A paramount example is provided by financial networks, whose data are privacy protected. Yet, the estimation of systemic risk strongly depends on the detailed structure of the interbank network. The resulting challenge is that of using aggregate information to statistically reconstruct a network and correctly predict its higher-order properties. Standard approaches either generate unrealistically dense networks, or fail to reproduce the observed topology by assigning homogeneous link weights. Here we develop a reconstruction method, based on statistical mechanics concepts, that exploits the empirical link density in a highly non-trivial way. Technically, our approach consists in the preliminary estimation of node degrees from empirical node strengths and link density, followed by a maximum-entropy inference based on a combination of empirical strengths and estimated degrees. Our method is successfully tested on the international trade network and the interbank money market, and represents a valuable tool for gaining insights on privacy-protected or partially accessible systems. Acknoweledgement to ``Growthcom'' ICT - EC project (Grant No: 611272) and ``Crisislab'' Italian Project.

  17. Topological Analysis of Network Structures in Three Dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glicksman, Martin E.

    2004-03-01

    Kinetics, topology, integral and differential geometry are combined to impose space-filling requirements on network structures. The theory centers on representing network cells as "average N-hedra," with curvatures and dihedral angles that satisfy thermodynamic equilibria at contact faces, triple lines and quadrajunctions. Exact kinetic relations are derived for average N-hedra that accurately predict the volumetric and areal time-rates of change for irregular polyhedral cells that comprise constructible network microstructures. The new results extend to three dimensions the von Neumann-Mullins law, which provides the well-known topologically-based kinetic relation valid for tessellations in 2-d Kinetic laws derived for here for 3-d may prove useful for constructing more accurate models of grain growth and foam coarsening, and for clarifying several long-standing general issues on space-filling criteria required for three-dimensional network structures. Comparisons will be shown between foams and isolated N-hedra, modeled recently using Surface Evolver simulations, and predictions from the new analytical results and other theoretical estimates. The availability of an exact analytic kinetic law provides benchmarks for testing simulations and for guiding quantitative experiments on network dynamics in three-dimensional microstructures. * The Author gives his special thanks for the financial assistance obtained from the Alexander von Humboldt Stiftung, as a Forschungs Preissträger, and for scientific support so generously provided at the Institut für Metallkunde und Metallphysik, RWTH-Aachen.

  18. Testing statistical self-similarity in the topology of river networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troutman, Brent M.; Mantilla, Ricardo; Gupta, Vijay K.

    2010-01-01

    Recent work has demonstrated that the topological properties of real river networks deviate significantly from predictions of Shreve's random model. At the same time the property of mean self-similarity postulated by Tokunaga's model is well supported by data. Recently, a new class of network model called random self-similar networks (RSN) that combines self-similarity and randomness has been introduced to replicate important topological features observed in real river networks. We investigate if the hypothesis of statistical self-similarity in the RSN model is supported by data on a set of 30 basins located across the continental United States that encompass a wide range of hydroclimatic variability. We demonstrate that the generators of the RSN model obey a geometric distribution, and self-similarity holds in a statistical sense in 26 of these 30 basins. The parameters describing the distribution of interior and exterior generators are tested to be statistically different and the difference is shown to produce the well-known Hack's law. The inter-basin variability of RSN parameters is found to be statistically significant. We also test generator dependence on two climatic indices, mean annual precipitation and radiative index of dryness. Some indication of climatic influence on the generators is detected, but this influence is not statistically significant with the sample size available. Finally, two key applications of the RSN model to hydrology and geomorphology are briefly discussed.

  19. Testing statistical self-similarity in the topology of river networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantilla, Ricardo; Troutman, Brent M.; Gupta, Vijay K.

    2010-09-01

    Recent work has demonstrated that the topological properties of real river networks deviate significantly from predictions of Shreve's random model. At the same time the property of mean self-similarity postulated by Tokunaga's model is well supported by data. Recently, a new class of network model called random self-similar networks (RSN) that combines self-similarity and randomness has been introduced to replicate important topological features observed in real river networks. We investigate if the hypothesis of statistical self-similarity in the RSN model is supported by data on a set of 30 basins located across the continental United States that encompass a wide range of hydroclimatic variability. We demonstrate that the generators of the RSN model obey a geometric distribution, and self-similarity holds in a statistical sense in 26 of these 30 basins. The parameters describing the distribution of interior and exterior generators are tested to be statistically different and the difference is shown to produce the well-known Hack's law. The inter-basin variability of RSN parameters is found to be statistically significant. We also test generator dependence on two climatic indices, mean annual precipitation and radiative index of dryness. Some indication of climatic influence on the generators is detected, but this influence is not statistically significant with the sample size available. Finally, two key applications of the RSN model to hydrology and geomorphology are briefly discussed.

  20. Topology analysis of social networks extracted from literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waumans, Michaël C; Nicodème, Thibaut; Bersini, Hugues

    2015-01-01

    In a world where complex networks are an increasingly important part of science, it is interesting to question how the new reading of social realities they provide applies to our cultural background and in particular, popular culture. Are authors of successful novels able to reproduce social networks faithful to the ones found in reality? Is there any common trend connecting an author's oeuvre, or a genre of fiction? Such an analysis could provide new insight on how we, as a culture, perceive human interactions and consume media. The purpose of the work presented in this paper is to define the signature of a novel's story based on the topological analysis of its social network of characters. For this purpose, an automated tool was built that analyses the dialogs in novels, identifies characters and computes their relationships in a time-dependent manner in order to assess the network's evolution over the course of the story.

  1. Topology analysis of social networks extracted from literature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaël C Waumans

    Full Text Available In a world where complex networks are an increasingly important part of science, it is interesting to question how the new reading of social realities they provide applies to our cultural background and in particular, popular culture. Are authors of successful novels able to reproduce social networks faithful to the ones found in reality? Is there any common trend connecting an author's oeuvre, or a genre of fiction? Such an analysis could provide new insight on how we, as a culture, perceive human interactions and consume media. The purpose of the work presented in this paper is to define the signature of a novel's story based on the topological analysis of its social network of characters. For this purpose, an automated tool was built that analyses the dialogs in novels, identifies characters and computes their relationships in a time-dependent manner in order to assess the network's evolution over the course of the story.

  2. A Comparison of Geographic Information Systems, Complex Networks, and Other Models for Analyzing Transportation Network Topologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrov, Natalia (Technical Monitor); Kuby, Michael; Tierney, Sean; Roberts, Tyler; Upchurch, Christopher

    2005-01-01

    This report reviews six classes of models that are used for studying transportation network topologies. The report is motivated by two main questions. First, what can the "new science" of complex networks (scale-free, small-world networks) contribute to our understanding of transport network structure, compared to more traditional methods? Second, how can geographic information systems (GIS) contribute to studying transport networks? The report defines terms that can be used to classify different kinds of models by their function, composition, mechanism, spatial and temporal dimensions, certainty, linearity, and resolution. Six broad classes of models for analyzing transport network topologies are then explored: GIS; static graph theory; complex networks; mathematical programming; simulation; and agent-based modeling. Each class of models is defined and classified according to the attributes introduced earlier. The paper identifies some typical types of research questions about network structure that have been addressed by each class of model in the literature.

  3. Topology

    CERN Document Server

    Hocking, John G

    1988-01-01

    ""As textbook and reference work, this is a valuable addition to the topological literature."" - Mathematical ReviewsDesigned as a text for a one-year first course in topology, this authoritative volume offers an excellent general treatment of the main ideas of topology. It includes a large number and variety of topics from classical topology as well as newer areas of research activity.There are four set-theoretic chapters, followed by four primarily algebraic chapters. Chapter I covers the fundamentals of topological and metrical spaces, mappings, compactness, product spaces, the Tychonoff t

  4. Topology

    CERN Document Server

    Lefschetz, Solomon

    1930-01-01

    Lefschetz's Topology was written in the period in between the beginning of topology, by Poincaré, and the establishment of algebraic topology as a well-formed subject, separate from point-set or geometric topology. At this time, Lefschetz had already proved his first fixed-point theorems. In some sense, the present book is a description of the broad subject of topology into which Lefschetz's theory of fixed points fits. Lefschetz takes the opportunity to describe some of the important applications of his theory, particularly in algebraic geometry, to problems such as counting intersections of

  5. Integration of network topological and connectivity properties for neuroimaging classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jie, Biao; Zhang, Daoqiang; Gao, Wei; Wang, Qian; Wee, Chong-Yaw; Shen, Dinggang

    2014-02-01

    Rapid advances in neuroimaging techniques have provided an efficient and noninvasive way for exploring the structural and functional connectivity of the human brain. Quantitative measurement of abnormality of brain connectivity in patients with neurodegenerative diseases, such as mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer's disease (AD), have also been widely reported, especially at a group level. Recently, machine learning techniques have been applied to the study of AD and MCI, i.e., to identify the individuals with AD/MCI from the healthy controls (HCs). However, most existing methods focus on using only a single property of a connectivity network, although multiple network properties, such as local connectivity and global topological properties, can potentially be used. In this paper, by employing multikernel based approach, we propose a novel connectivity based framework to integrate multiple properties of connectivity network for improving the classification performance. Specifically, two different types of kernels (i.e., vector-based kernel and graph kernel) are used to quantify two different yet complementary properties of the network, i.e., local connectivity and global topological properties. Then, multikernel learning (MKL) technique is adopted to fuse these heterogeneous kernels for neuroimaging classification. We test the performance of our proposed method on two different data sets. First, we test it on the functional connectivity networks of 12 MCI and 25 HC subjects. The results show that our method achieves significant performance improvement over those using only one type of network property. Specifically, our method achieves a classification accuracy of 91.9%, which is 10.8% better than those by single network-property-based methods. Then, we test our method for gender classification on a large set of functional connectivity networks with 133 infants scanned at birth, 1 year, and 2 years, also demonstrating very promising results.

  6. Sequential defense against random and intentional attacks in complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pin-Yu; Cheng, Shin-Ming

    2015-02-01

    Network robustness against attacks is one of the most fundamental researches in network science as it is closely associated with the reliability and functionality of various networking paradigms. However, despite the study on intrinsic topological vulnerabilities to node removals, little is known on the network robustness when network defense mechanisms are implemented, especially for networked engineering systems equipped with detection capabilities. In this paper, a sequential defense mechanism is first proposed in complex networks for attack inference and vulnerability assessment, where the data fusion center sequentially infers the presence of an attack based on the binary attack status reported from the nodes in the network. The network robustness is evaluated in terms of the ability to identify the attack prior to network disruption under two major attack schemes, i.e., random and intentional attacks. We provide a parametric plug-in model for performance evaluation on the proposed mechanism and validate its effectiveness and reliability via canonical complex network models and real-world large-scale network topology. The results show that the sequential defense mechanism greatly improves the network robustness and mitigates the possibility of network disruption by acquiring limited attack status information from a small subset of nodes in the network.

  7. LoTo: a graphlet based method for the comparison of local topology between gene regulatory networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto J. Martin

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the main challenges of the post-genomic era is the understanding of how gene expression is controlled. Changes in gene expression lay behind diverse biological phenomena such as development, disease and the adaptation to different environmental conditions. Despite the availability of well-established methods to identify these changes, tools to discern how gene regulation is orchestrated are still required. The regulation of gene expression is usually depicted as a Gene Regulatory Network (GRN where changes in the network structure (i.e., network topology represent adjustments of gene regulation. Like other networks, GRNs are composed of basic building blocks; small induced subgraphs called graphlets. Here we present LoTo, a novel method that using Graphlet Based Metrics (GBMs identifies topological variations between different states of a GRN. Under our approach, different states of a GRN are analyzed to determine the types of graphlet formed by all triplets of nodes in the network. Subsequently, graphlets occurring in a state of the network are compared to those formed by the same three nodes in another version of the network. Once the comparisons are performed, LoTo applies metrics from binary classification problems calculated on the existence and absence of graphlets to assess the topological similarity between both network states. Experiments performed on randomized networks demonstrate that GBMs are more sensitive to topological variation than the same metrics calculated on single edges. Additional comparisons with other common metrics demonstrate that our GBMs are capable to identify nodes whose local topology changes between different states of the network. Notably, due to the explicit use of graphlets, LoTo captures topological variations that are disregarded by other approaches. LoTo is freely available as an online web server at http://dlab.cl/loto.

  8. Foreign currency exchange network topology across the 2008 credit crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharif, Shamshuritawati; Ap, Nuraisah Che; Ruslan, Nuraimi

    2017-05-01

    A stable world currency exchange rate is a very important aspect to be considered for a developed country, i.e Malaysia. A better understanding about the currencies itself is needed nowadays. This project is about to understanding the fluctuation and to identify the most influential world currencies in the three different cases; before credit crisis, during credit crisis and after credit crisis. A network topology approach is use to examine the interrelationship between currencies based on correlation analysis. With this point of view, those relationships can be measured by a correlation structure among the currencies. The network can be analyse by filtering the important information using minimum spanning tree (MST) and interpret it using degree centrality as the centrality measure. This topology will give a useful guide to understand the behaviour and determine the most influential currency in the network as a part of a complex system. All currencies are compared among the three different cases; before credit crisis, during credit crisis and after credit crisis period. The result of this project shows that Unites State Dollar (USD), Brazilian Real (BRL), United Kingdom Pound (EUR) and Danish Krone (DKK) are the most influential currencies before the credit crisis period. With respect to during the credit crisis, New Zealand Dollar (NZD) dominates the network and it is followed by Singapore Dollar (SGD) for after the credit crisis period.

  9. Frequency-specific network topologies in the resting human brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuntaro eSasai

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A community is a set of nodes with dense inter-connections, while there are sparse connections between different communities. A hub is a highly connected node with high centrality. It has been shown that both communities and hubs exist simultaneously in the brain’s functional connectivity network, as estimated by correlations among low-frequency spontaneous fluctuations in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI signal changes (0.01–0.10 Hz. This indicates that the brain has a spatial organization that promotes both segregation and integration of information. Here, we demonstrate that frequency-specific network topologies that characterize segregation and integration also exist within this frequency range. In investigating the coherence spectrum among 87 brain regions, we found that two frequency bands, 0.01–0.03 Hz (very low frequency [VLF] band and 0.07–0.09 Hz (low frequency [LF] band, mainly contributed to functional connectivity. Comparing graph theoretical indices for the VLF and LF bands revealed that the network in the former had a higher capacity for information segregation between identified communities than the latter. Hubs in the VLF band were mainly located within the anterior cingulate cortices, whereas those in the LF band were located in the posterior cingulate cortices and thalamus. Thus, depending on the timescale of brain activity, at least two distinct network topologies contributed to information segregation and integration. This suggests that the brain intrinsically has timescale-dependent functional organizations.

  10. Robustness of Dengue Complex Network under Targeted versus Random Attack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafiz Abid Mahmood Malik

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Dengue virus infection is one of those epidemic diseases that require much consideration in order to save the humankind from its unsafe impacts. According to the World Health Organization (WHO, 3.6 billion individuals are at risk because of the dengue virus sickness. Researchers are striving to comprehend the dengue threat. This study is a little commitment to those endeavors. To observe the robustness of the dengue network, we uprooted the links between nodes randomly and targeted by utilizing different centrality measures. The outcomes demonstrated that 5% targeted attack is equivalent to the result of 65% random assault, which showed the topology of this complex network validated a scale-free network instead of random network. Four centrality measures (Degree, Closeness, Betweenness, and Eigenvector have been ascertained to look for focal hubs. It has been observed through the results in this study that robustness of a node and links depends on topology of the network. The dengue epidemic network presented robust behaviour under random attack, and this network turned out to be more vulnerable when the hubs of higher degree have higher probability to fail. Moreover, representation of this network has been projected, and hub removal impact has been shown on the real map of Gombak (Malaysia.

  11. A Qualitative Comparison of Different Logical Topologies for Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quazi Mamun

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs are formed by a large collection of power-conscious wireless-capable sensors without the support of pre-existing infrastructure, possibly by unplanned deployment. With a sheer number of sensor nodes, their unattended deployment and hostile environment very often preclude reliance on physical configuration or physical topology. It is, therefore, often necessary to depend on the logical topology. Logical topologies govern how a sensor node communicates with other nodes in the network. In this way, logical topologies play a vital role for resource-constraint sensor networks. It is thus more intuitive to approach the constraint minimizing problems from (logical topological point of view. Hence, this paper aims to study the logical topologies of WSNs. In doing so, a set of performance metrics is identified first. We identify various logical topologies from different application protocols of WSNs, and then compare the topologies using the set of performance metrics.

  12. Effects of behavioral patterns and network topology structures on Parrondo’s paradox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Ye; Cheong, Kang Hao; Cen, Yu-Wan; Xie, Neng-Gang

    2016-11-01

    A multi-agent Parrondo’s model based on complex networks is used in the current study. For Parrondo’s game A, the individual interaction can be categorized into five types of behavioral patterns: the Matthew effect, harmony, cooperation, poor-competition-rich-cooperation and a random mode. The parameter space of Parrondo’s paradox pertaining to each behavioral pattern, and the gradual change of the parameter space from a two-dimensional lattice to a random network and from a random network to a scale-free network was analyzed. The simulation results suggest that the size of the region of the parameter space that elicits Parrondo’s paradox is positively correlated with the heterogeneity of the degree distribution of the network. For two distinct sets of probability parameters, the microcosmic reasons underlying the occurrence of the paradox under the scale-free network are elaborated. Common interaction mechanisms of the asymmetric structure of game B, behavioral patterns and network topology are also revealed.

  13. Cross over of recurrence networks to random graphs and random ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Recurrence networks are complex networks constructed from the time series of chaotic dynamical systems where the connection between two nodes is limited by the recurrence threshold. This condition makes the topology of every recurrence network unique with the degree distribution determined by the probability ...

  14. Uncovering transcriptional regulation of metabolism by using metabolic network topology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Patil, Kiran Raosaheb; Nielsen, Jens

    2005-01-01

    therefore developed an algorithm that is based on hypothesis-driven data analysis to uncover the transcriptional regulatory architecture of metabolic networks. By using information on the metabolic network topology from genome-scale metabolic reconstruction, we show that it is possible to reveal patterns...... or environmental perturbations. We find that cells respond to perturbations by changing the expression pattern of several genes involved in the specific part(s) of the metabolism in which a perturbation is introduced. These changes then are propagated through the metabolic network because of the highly connected......Cellular response to genetic and environmental perturbations is often reflected and/or mediated through changes in the metabolism, because the latter plays a key role in providing Gibbs free energy and precursors for biosynthesis. Such metabolic changes are often exerted through transcriptional...

  15. Topology Analysis of Social Networks Extracted from Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    In a world where complex networks are an increasingly important part of science, it is interesting to question how the new reading of social realities they provide applies to our cultural background and in particular, popular culture. Are authors of successful novels able to reproduce social networks faithful to the ones found in reality? Is there any common trend connecting an author’s oeuvre, or a genre of fiction? Such an analysis could provide new insight on how we, as a culture, perceive human interactions and consume media. The purpose of the work presented in this paper is to define the signature of a novel’s story based on the topological analysis of its social network of characters. For this purpose, an automated tool was built that analyses the dialogs in novels, identifies characters and computes their relationships in a time-dependent manner in order to assess the network’s evolution over the course of the story. PMID:26039072

  16. Topology

    CERN Document Server

    Kuratowski, Kazimierz

    1966-01-01

    Topology, Volume I deals with topology and covers topics ranging from operations in logic and set theory to Cartesian products, mappings, and orderings. Cardinal and ordinal numbers are also discussed, along with topological, metric, and complete spaces. Great use is made of closure algebra. Comprised of three chapters, this volume begins with a discussion on general topological spaces as well as their specialized aspects, including regular, completely regular, and normal spaces. Fundamental notions such as base, subbase, cover, and continuous mapping, are considered, together with operations

  17. Topology Management Algorithms for Large Scale Aerial High Capacity Directional Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Topology Management Algorithms for Large-Scale Aerial High Capacity Directional Networks Joy Wang, Thomas Shake, Patricia Deutsch, Andrea Coyle, Bow...airborne backbone network is large- scale topology management of directional links in a dynamic environment. In this paper, we present several... topology manage- ment algorithms for large scale airborne networks and evaluate the performance of these algorithms under various scenarios. In each case

  18. Differential dependency network analysis to identify condition-specific topological changes in biological networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bai; Li, Huai; Riggins, Rebecca B; Zhan, Ming; Xuan, Jianhua; Zhang, Zhen; Hoffman, Eric P; Clarke, Robert; Wang, Yue

    2009-02-15

    Significant efforts have been made to acquire data under different conditions and to construct static networks that can explain various gene regulation mechanisms. However, gene regulatory networks are dynamic and condition-specific; under different conditions, networks exhibit different regulation patterns accompanied by different transcriptional network topologies. Thus, an investigation on the topological changes in transcriptional networks can facilitate the understanding of cell development or provide novel insights into the pathophysiology of certain diseases, and help identify the key genetic players that could serve as biomarkers or drug targets. Here, we report a differential dependency network (DDN) analysis to detect statistically significant topological changes in the transcriptional networks between two biological conditions. We propose a local dependency model to represent the local structures of a network by a set of conditional probabilities. We develop an efficient learning algorithm to learn the local dependency model using the Lasso technique. A permutation test is subsequently performed to estimate the statistical significance of each learned local structure. In testing on a simulation dataset, the proposed algorithm accurately detected all the genes with network topological changes. The method was then applied to the estrogen-dependent T-47D estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer cell line datasets and human and mouse embryonic stem cell datasets. In both experiments using real microarray datasets, the proposed method produced biologically meaningful results. We expect DDN to emerge as an important bioinformatics tool in transcriptional network analyses. While we focus specifically on transcriptional networks, the DDN method we introduce here is generally applicable to other biological networks with similar characteristics. The DDN MATLAB toolbox and experiment data are available at http://www.cbil.ece.vt.edu/software.htm.

  19. Classification of complex networks based on similarity of topological network features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attar, Niousha; Aliakbary, Sadegh

    2017-09-01

    Over the past few decades, networks have been widely used to model real-world phenomena. Real-world networks exhibit nontrivial topological characteristics and therefore, many network models are proposed in the literature for generating graphs that are similar to real networks. Network models reproduce nontrivial properties such as long-tail degree distributions or high clustering coefficients. In this context, we encounter the problem of selecting the network model that best fits a given real-world network. The need for a model selection method reveals the network classification problem, in which a target-network is classified into one of the candidate network models. In this paper, we propose a novel network classification method which is independent of the network size and employs an alignment-free metric of network comparison. The proposed method is based on supervised machine learning algorithms and utilizes the topological similarities of networks for the classification task. The experiments show that the proposed method outperforms state-of-the-art methods with respect to classification accuracy, time efficiency, and robustness to noise.

  20. An algebraic topological method for multimodal brain networks comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago eSimas

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Understanding brain connectivity is one of the most important issues in neuroscience. Nonetheless, connectivity data can reflect either functional relationships of brain activities or anatomical connections between brain areas. Although both representations should be related, this relationship is not straightforward. We have devised a powerful method that allows different operations between networks that share the same set of nodes, by embedding them in a common metric space, enforcing transitivity to the graph topology. Here, we apply this method to construct an aggregated network from a set of functional graphs, each one from a different subject. Once this aggregated functional network is constructed, we use again our method to compare it with the structural connectivity to identify particular brain regions that differ in both modalities (anatomical and functional. Remarkably, these brain regions include functional areas that form part of the classical resting state networks. We conclude that our method -based on the comparison of the aggregated functional network- reveals some emerging features that could not be observed when the comparison is performed with the classical averaged functional network.

  1. Local, distributed topology control for large-scale wireless ad-hoc networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieberg, T.; Hurink, Johann L.

    In this document, topology control of a large-scale, wireless network by a distributed algorithm that uses only locally available information is presented. Topology control algorithms adjust the transmission power of wireless nodes to create a desired topology. The algorithm, named local power

  2. Influence of topology in the evolution of coordination in complex networks under information diffusion constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasthurirathna, Dharshana; Piraveenan, Mahendra; Harré, Michael

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we study the influence of the topological structure of social systems on the evolution of coordination in them. We simulate a coordination game ("Stag-hunt") on four well-known classes of complex networks commonly used to model social systems, namely scale-free, small-world, random and hierarchical-modular, as well as on the well-mixed model. Our particular focus is on understanding the impact of information diffusion on coordination, and how this impact varies according to the topology of the social system. We demonstrate that while time-lags and noise in the information about relative payoffs affect the emergence of coordination in all social systems, some topologies are markedly more resilient than others to these effects. We also show that, while non-coordination may be a better strategy in a society where people do not have information about the payoffs of others, coordination will quickly emerge as the better strategy when people get this information about others, even with noise and time lags. Societies with the so-called small-world structure are most conducive to the emergence of coordination, despite limitations in information propagation, while societies with scale-free topologies are most sensitive to noise and time-lags in information diffusion. Surprisingly, in all topologies, it is not the highest connected people (hubs), but the slightly less connected people (provincial hubs) who first adopt coordination. Our findings confirm that the evolution of coordination in social systems depends heavily on the underlying social network structure.

  3. A Review of the Topologies Used in Smart Water Meter Networks: A Wireless Sensor Network Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaco Marais

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents several proposed and existing smart utility meter systems as well as their communication networks to identify the challenges of creating scalable smart water meter networks. Network simulations are performed on 3 network topologies (star, tree, and mesh to determine their suitability for smart water meter networks. The simulations found that once a number of nodes threshold is exceeded the network’s delay increases dramatically regardless of implemented topology. This threshold is at a relatively low number of nodes (50 and the use of network topologies such as tree or mesh helps alleviate this problem and results in lower network delays. Further simulations found that the successful transmission of application layer packets in a 70-end node tree network can be improved by 212% when end nodes only transmit data to their nearest router node. The relationship between packet success rate and different packet sizes was also investigated and reducing the packet size with a factor of 16 resulted in either 156% or 300% increases in the amount of successfully received packets depending on the network setup.

  4. Temporal and spatial evolution of brain network topology during the first two years of life.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Gao

    Full Text Available The mature brain features high wiring efficiency for information transfer. However, the emerging process of such an efficient topology remains elusive. With resting state functional MRI and a large cohort of normal pediatric subjects (n = 147 imaged during a critical time period of brain development, 3 wk- to 2 yr-old, the temporal and spatial evolution of brain network topology is revealed. The brain possesses the small world topology immediately after birth, followed by a remarkable improvement in whole brain wiring efficiency in 1 yr olds and becomes more stable in 2 yr olds. Regional developments of brain wiring efficiency and the evolution of functional hubs suggest differential development trend for primary and higher order cognitive functions during the first two years of life. Simulations of random errors and targeted attacks reveal an age-dependent improvement of resilience. The lower resilience to targeted attack observed in 3 wk old group is likely due to the fact that there are fewer well-established long-distance functional connections at this age whose elimination might have more profound implications in the overall efficiency of information transfer. Overall, our results offer new insights into the temporal and spatial evolution of brain topology during early brain development.

  5. Generating random networks and graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Coolen, Ton; Roberts, Ekaterina

    2017-01-01

    This book supports researchers who need to generate random networks, or who are interested in the theoretical study of random graphs. The coverage includes exponential random graphs (where the targeted probability of each network appearing in the ensemble is specified), growth algorithms (i.e. preferential attachment and the stub-joining configuration model), special constructions (e.g. geometric graphs and Watts Strogatz models) and graphs on structured spaces (e.g. multiplex networks). The presentation aims to be a complete starting point, including details of both theory and implementation, as well as discussions of the main strengths and weaknesses of each approach. It includes extensive references for readers wishing to go further. The material is carefully structured to be accessible to researchers from all disciplines while also containing rigorous mathematical analysis (largely based on the techniques of statistical mechanics) to support those wishing to further develop or implement the theory of rand...

  6. On the topologic structure of economic complex networks: Empirical evidence from large scale payment network of Estonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rendón de la Torre, Stephanie; Kalda, Jaan; Kitt, Robert; Engelbrecht, Jüri

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents the first topological analysis of the economic structure of an entire country based on payments data obtained from Swedbank. This data set is exclusive in its kind because around 80% of Estonia's bank transactions are done through Swedbank, hence, the economic structure of the country can be reconstructed. Scale-free networks are commonly observed in a wide array of different contexts such as nature and society. In this paper, the nodes are comprised by customers of the bank (legal entities) and the links are established by payments between these nodes. We study the scaling-free and structural properties of this network. We also describe its topology, components and behaviors. We show that this network shares typical structural characteristics known in other complex networks: degree distributions follow a power law, low clustering coefficient and low average shortest path length. We identify the key nodes of the network and perform simulations of resiliency against random and targeted attacks of the nodes with two different approaches. With this, we find that by identifying and studying the links between the nodes is possible to perform vulnerability analysis of the Estonian economy with respect to economic shocks.

  7. Topological dimension tunes activity patterns in hierarchical modular networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safari, Ali; Moretti, Paolo; Muñoz, Miguel A.

    2017-11-01

    Connectivity patterns of relevance in neuroscience and systems biology can be encoded in hierarchical modular networks (HMNs). Recent studies highlight the role of hierarchical modular organization in shaping brain activity patterns, providing an excellent substrate to promote both segregation and integration of neural information. Here, we propose an extensive analysis of the critical spreading rate (or ‘epidemic’ threshold)—separating a phase with endemic persistent activity from one in which activity ceases—on diverse HMNs. By employing analytical and computational techniques we determine the nature of such a threshold and scrutinize how it depends on general structural features of the underlying HMN. We critically discuss the extent to which current graph-spectral methods can be applied to predict the onset of spreading in HMNs and, most importantly, we elucidate the role played by the network topological dimension as a relevant and unifying structural parameter, controlling the epidemic threshold.

  8. Topological reversibility and causality in feed-forward networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corominas-Murtra, Bernat; RodrIguez-Caso, Carlos; Sole, Ricard [ICREA-Complex Systems Lab, Universitat Pompeu Fabra (Parc de Recerca Biomedica de Barcelona), Dr Aiguader 88, 08003 Barcelona (Spain); Goni, JoaquIn, E-mail: bernat.corominas@upf.ed [Functional Neuroimaging Laboratory, Department of Neurosciences, Center for Applied Medical Research, University of Navarra, Pamplona (Spain)

    2010-11-15

    Systems whose organization displays causal asymmetry constraints, from evolutionary trees to river basins or transport networks, can often be described in terms of directed paths on a discrete set of arbitrary units including states in state spaces, feed-forward neural nets, the evolutionary history of a given collection of events or the chart of computational states visited along a complex computation. Such a set of paths defines a feed-forward, acyclic network. A key problem associated with these systems involves characterizing their intrinsic degree of path reversibility: given an end node in the graph, what is the uncertainty of recovering the process backwards until the origin? Here, we propose a novel concept, topological reversibility, which is a measure of the complexity of the net that rigorously weights such uncertainty in path dependency, quantifying the minimum amount of information required to successfully reverse a causal path. Within the proposed framework, we also analytically characterize limit cases for both topologically reversible and maximally entropic structures. The relevance of these measures within the context of evolutionary dynamics is highlighted.

  9. Identifying Topology of Power Distribution Networks Based on Smart Meter Data

    OpenAIRE

    Satya, Jayadev P; Bhatt, Nirav; Pasumarthy, Ramkrishna; Rajeswaran, Aravind

    2016-01-01

    In a power distribution network, the network topology information is essential for an efficient operation of the network. This information of network connectivity is not accurately available, at the low voltage level, due to uninformed changes that happen from time to time. In this paper, we propose a novel data--driven approach to identify the underlying network topology including the load phase connectivity from time series of energy measurements. The proposed method involves the applicatio...

  10. Identifying topological motif patterns of human brain functional networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yongbin; Liao, Xuhong; Yan, Chaogan; He, Yong; Xia, Mingrui

    2017-05-01

    Recent imaging connectome studies demonstrated that the human functional brain network follows an efficient small-world topology with cohesive functional modules and highly connected hubs. However, the functional motif patterns that represent the underlying information flow remain largely unknown. Here, we investigated motif patterns within directed human functional brain networks, which were derived from resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data with controlled confounding hemodynamic latencies. We found several significantly recurring motifs within the network, including the two-node reciprocal motif and five classes of three-node motifs. These recurring motifs were distributed in distinct patterns to support intra- and inter-module functional connectivity, which also promoted integration and segregation in network organization. Moreover, the significant participation of several functional hubs in the recurring motifs exhibited their critical role in global integration. Collectively, our findings highlight the basic architecture governing brain network organization and provide insight into the information flow mechanism underlying intrinsic brain activities. Hum Brain Mapp 38:2734-2750, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Changes in topological organization of functional PET brain network with normal aging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiliang Liu

    Full Text Available Recent studies about brain network have suggested that normal aging is associated with alterations in coordinated patterns of the large-scale brain functional and structural systems. However, age-related changes in functional networks constructed via positron emission tomography (PET data are still barely understood. Here, we constructed functional brain networks composed of 90 regions in younger (mean age 36.5 years and older (mean age 56.3 years age groups with PET data. 113 younger and 110 older healthy individuals were separately selected for two age groups, from a physical examination database. Corresponding brain functional networks of the two groups were constructed by thresholding average cerebral glucose metabolism correlation matrices of 90 regions and analysed using graph theoretical approaches. Although both groups showed normal small-world architecture in the PET networks, increased clustering and decreased efficiency were found in older subjects, implying a degeneration process that brain system shifts from a small-world network to regular one along with normal aging. Moreover, normal senescence was related to changed nodal centralities predominantly in association and paralimbic cortex regions, e.g. increasing in orbitofrontal cortex (middle and decreasing in left hippocampus. Additionally, the older networks were about equally as robust to random failures as younger counterpart, but more vulnerable against targeted attacks. Finally, methods in the construction of the PET networks revealed reasonable robustness. Our findings enhanced the understanding about the topological principles of PET networks and changes related to normal aging.

  12. Changes in topological organization of functional PET brain network with normal aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhiliang; Ke, Lining; Liu, Huafeng; Huang, Wenhua; Hu, Zhenghui

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies about brain network have suggested that normal aging is associated with alterations in coordinated patterns of the large-scale brain functional and structural systems. However, age-related changes in functional networks constructed via positron emission tomography (PET) data are still barely understood. Here, we constructed functional brain networks composed of 90 regions in younger (mean age 36.5 years) and older (mean age 56.3 years) age groups with PET data. 113 younger and 110 older healthy individuals were separately selected for two age groups, from a physical examination database. Corresponding brain functional networks of the two groups were constructed by thresholding average cerebral glucose metabolism correlation matrices of 90 regions and analysed using graph theoretical approaches. Although both groups showed normal small-world architecture in the PET networks, increased clustering and decreased efficiency were found in older subjects, implying a degeneration process that brain system shifts from a small-world network to regular one along with normal aging. Moreover, normal senescence was related to changed nodal centralities predominantly in association and paralimbic cortex regions, e.g. increasing in orbitofrontal cortex (middle) and decreasing in left hippocampus. Additionally, the older networks were about equally as robust to random failures as younger counterpart, but more vulnerable against targeted attacks. Finally, methods in the construction of the PET networks revealed reasonable robustness. Our findings enhanced the understanding about the topological principles of PET networks and changes related to normal aging.

  13. Development of Active External Network Topology Module for Floodlight SDN Controller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Noskov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional network architecture is inflexible and complicated. This observation has led to a paradigm shift towards software-defined networking (SDN, where network management level is separated from data forwarding level. This change was made possible by control plane transfer from the switching equipment to software modules that run on a dedicated server, called the controller (or network operating system, or network applications, that work with this controller. Methods of representation, storage and communication interfaces with network topology elements are the most important aspects of network operating systems available to SDN user because performance of some key controller modules is heavily dependent on internal representation of the network topology. Notably, firewall and routing modules are examples of such modules. This article describes the methods used for presentation and storage of network topologies, as well as interface to the corresponding Floodlight modules. An alternative algorithm has been suggested and developed for message exchange conveying network topology alterations between the controller and network applications. Proposed algorithm makes implementation of module alerting based on subscription to the relevant events. API for interaction between controller and network applications has been developed. This algorithm and API formed the base for Topology Tracker module capable to inform network applications about the changes that had occurred in the network topology and also stores compact representation of the network to speed up the interaction process.

  14. Topology

    CERN Document Server

    Manetti, Marco

    2015-01-01

    This is an introductory textbook on general and algebraic topology, aimed at anyone with a basic knowledge of calculus and linear algebra. It provides full proofs and includes many examples and exercises. The covered topics include: set theory and cardinal arithmetic; axiom of choice and Zorn's lemma; topological spaces and continuous functions; connectedness and compactness; Alexandrov compactification; quotient topologies; countability and separation axioms; prebasis and Alexander's theorem; the Tychonoff theorem and paracompactness; complete metric spaces and function spaces; Baire spaces; homotopy of maps; the fundamental group; the van Kampen theorem; covering spaces; Brouwer and Borsuk's theorems; free groups and free product of groups; and basic category theory. While it is very concrete at the beginning, abstract concepts are gradually introduced. It is suitable for anyone needing a basic, comprehensive introduction to general and algebraic topology and its applications.

  15. Modular topology emerges from plasticity in a minimalistic excitable network model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damicelli, Fabrizio; Hilgetag, Claus C.; Hütt, Marc-Thorsten; Messé, Arnaud

    2017-04-01

    Topological features play a major role in the emergence of complex brain network dynamics underlying brain function. Specific topological properties of brain networks, such as their modular organization, have been widely studied in recent years and shown to be ubiquitous across spatial scales and species. However, the mechanisms underlying the generation and maintenance of such features are still unclear. Using a minimalistic network model with excitable nodes and discrete deterministic dynamics, we studied the effects of a local Hebbian plasticity rule on global network topology. We found that, despite the simple model set-up, the plasticity rule was able to reorganize the global network topology into a modular structure. The structural reorganization was accompanied by enhanced correlations between structural and functional connectivity, and the final network organization reflected features of the dynamical model. These findings demonstrate the potential of simple plasticity rules for structuring the topology of brain connectivity.

  16. Evolution of random catalytic networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraser, S.M. [Santa Fe Inst., NM (United States); Reidys, C.M. [Santa Fe Inst., NM (United States)]|[Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1997-06-01

    In this paper the authors investigate the evolution of populations of sequences on a random catalytic network. Sequences are mapped into structures, between which are catalytic interactions that determine their instantaneous fitness. The catalytic network is constructed as a random directed graph. They prove that at certain parameter values, the probability of some relevant subgraphs of this graph, for example cycles without outgoing edges, is maximized. Populations evolving under point mutations realize a comparatively small induced subgraph of the complete catalytic network. They present results which show that populations reliably discover and persist on directed cycles in the catalytic graph, though these may be lost because of stochastic effects, and study the effect of population size on this behavior.

  17. Employing Deceptive Dynamic Network Topology Through Software-Defined Networking

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    onePK Beacon , Floodlight , IRIS, Jaxon, Maestro, OpenDaylight (Java) HP VAN SDN NodeFlow (JavaScript) Table 3.1: Some common vendor and opensource SDN...supports, which we will further discuss in §3.4. As well, some open-source controller projects are sponsored by major switch vendors, (e.g., Floodlight ) [63...2008, pp. 105–110. [63] Project floodlight . [Online]. Available: http://www.projectfloodlight.org/ [64] OpenFlow Switch Specification, Open Networking

  18. ReNoC: A Network-on-Chip Architecture with Reconfigurable Topology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stensgaard, Mikkel Bystrup; Sparsø, Jens

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a Network-on-Chip (NoC) architecture that enables the network topology to be reconfigured. The architecture thus enables a generalized System-on-Chip (SoC) platform in which the topology can be customized for the application that is currently running on the chip, including long...

  19. Augmented Topological Descriptors of Pore Networks for Material Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushizima, D; Morozov, D; Weber, G H; Bianchi, A G C; Sethian, J A; Bethel, E W

    2012-12-01

    One potential solution to reduce the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is the geologic storage of captured CO2 in underground rock formations, also known as carbon sequestration. There is ongoing research to guarantee that this process is both efficient and safe. We describe tools that provide measurements of media porosity, and permeability estimates, including visualization of pore structures. Existing standard algorithms make limited use of geometric information in calculating permeability of complex microstructures. This quantity is important for the analysis of biomineralization, a subsurface process that can affect physical properties of porous media. This paper introduces geometric and topological descriptors that enhance the estimation of material permeability. Our analysis framework includes the processing of experimental data, segmentation, and feature extraction and making novel use of multiscale topological analysis to quantify maximum flow through porous networks. We illustrate our results using synchrotron-based X-ray computed microtomography of glass beads during biomineralization. We also benchmark the proposed algorithms using simulated data sets modeling jammed packed bead beds of a monodispersive material.

  20. Passive random walkers and riverlike networks on growing surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Chen-Shan

    2002-08-01

    Passive random walker dynamics is introduced on a growing surface. The walker is designed to drift upward or downward and then follow specific topological features, such as hill tops or valley bottoms, of the fluctuating surface. The passive random walker can thus be used to directly explore scaling properties of otherwise somewhat hidden topological features. For example, the walker allows us to directly measure the dynamical exponent of the underlying growth dynamics. We use the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang (KPZ) -type surface growth as an example. The world lines of a set of merging passive walkers show nontrivial coalescence behaviors and display the riverlike network structures of surface ridges in space-time. In other dynamics, such as Edwards-Wilkinson growth, this does not happen. The passive random walkers in KPZ-type surface growth are closely related to the shock waves in the noiseless Burgers equation. We also briefly discuss their relations to the passive scalar dynamics in turbulence.

  1. TopologyNet: Topology based deep convolutional and multi-task neural networks for biomolecular property predictions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zixuan Cang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Although deep learning approaches have had tremendous success in image, video and audio processing, computer vision, and speech recognition, their applications to three-dimensional (3D biomolecular structural data sets have been hindered by the geometric and biological complexity. To address this problem we introduce the element-specific persistent homology (ESPH method. ESPH represents 3D complex geometry by one-dimensional (1D topological invariants and retains important biological information via a multichannel image-like representation. This representation reveals hidden structure-function relationships in biomolecules. We further integrate ESPH and deep convolutional neural networks to construct a multichannel topological neural network (TopologyNet for the predictions of protein-ligand binding affinities and protein stability changes upon mutation. To overcome the deep learning limitations from small and noisy training sets, we propose a multi-task multichannel topological convolutional neural network (MM-TCNN. We demonstrate that TopologyNet outperforms the latest methods in the prediction of protein-ligand binding affinities, mutation induced globular protein folding free energy changes, and mutation induced membrane protein folding free energy changes.weilab.math.msu.edu/TDL/.

  2. TopologyNet: Topology based deep convolutional and multi-task neural networks for biomolecular property predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Although deep learning approaches have had tremendous success in image, video and audio processing, computer vision, and speech recognition, their applications to three-dimensional (3D) biomolecular structural data sets have been hindered by the geometric and biological complexity. To address this problem we introduce the element-specific persistent homology (ESPH) method. ESPH represents 3D complex geometry by one-dimensional (1D) topological invariants and retains important biological information via a multichannel image-like representation. This representation reveals hidden structure-function relationships in biomolecules. We further integrate ESPH and deep convolutional neural networks to construct a multichannel topological neural network (TopologyNet) for the predictions of protein-ligand binding affinities and protein stability changes upon mutation. To overcome the deep learning limitations from small and noisy training sets, we propose a multi-task multichannel topological convolutional neural network (MM-TCNN). We demonstrate that TopologyNet outperforms the latest methods in the prediction of protein-ligand binding affinities, mutation induced globular protein folding free energy changes, and mutation induced membrane protein folding free energy changes. Availability: weilab.math.msu.edu/TDL/ PMID:28749969

  3. Exploration of the topology of chemical spaces with network measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krein, Michael P; Sukumar, N

    2011-11-17

    Discontinuous changes in molecular structure (resulting from continuous transformations of molecular coordinates) lead to changes in chemical properties and biological activities that chemists attempt to describe through structure-activity or structure-property relationships (QSAR/QSPR). Such relationships are commonly envisioned in a continuous high-dimensional space of numerical descriptors, referred to as chemistry space. The choice of descriptors defining coordinates within chemistry space and the choice of similarity metrics thus influence the partitioning of this space into regions corresponding to local structural similarity. These are the regions (known as domains of applicability) most likely to be successfully modeled by a structure-activity relationship. In this work the network topology and scaling relationships of chemistry spaces are first investigated independent of a specific biological activity. Chemistry spaces studied include the ZINC data set, a qHTS PubChem bioassay, as well as the space of protein binding sites from the PDB. The characteristics of these networks are compared and contrasted with those of the bioassay SALI subnetwork, which maps discontinuities or cliffs in the structure-activity landscape. Mapping the locations of activity cliffs and comparing the global characteristics of SALI subnetworks with those of the underlying chemistry space networks generated using different representations, can guide the choice of a better representation. A higher local density of SALI edges with a particular representation indicates a more challenging structure-activity relationship using that fingerprint in that region of chemistry space.

  4. Networks of neuroblastoma cells on porous silicon substrates reveal a small world topology

    KAUST Repository

    Marinaro, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    The human brain is a tightly interweaving network of neural cells where the complexity of the network is given by the large number of its constituents and its architecture. The topological structure of neurons in the brain translates into its increased computational capabilities, low energy consumption, and nondeterministic functions, which differentiate human behavior from artificial computational schemes. In this manuscript, we fabricated porous silicon chips with a small pore size ranging from 8 to 75 nm and large fractal dimensions up to Df ∼ 2.8. In culturing neuroblastoma N2A cells on the described substrates, we found that those cells adhere more firmly to and proliferate on the porous surfaces compared to the conventional nominally flat silicon substrates, which were used as controls. More importantly, we observed that N2A cells on the porous substrates create highly clustered, small world topology patterns. We conjecture that neurons with a similar architecture may elaborate information more efficiently than in random or regular grids. Moreover, we hypothesize that systems of neurons on nano-scale geometry evolve in time to form networks in which the propagation of information is maximized. This journal is

  5. An Improved Topology-Potential-Based Community Detection Algorithm for Complex Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhixiao Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Topology potential theory is a new community detection theory on complex network, which divides a network into communities by spreading outward from each local maximum potential node. At present, almost all topology-potential-based community detection methods ignore node difference and assume that all nodes have the same mass. This hypothesis leads to inaccuracy of topology potential calculation and then decreases the precision of community detection. Inspired by the idea of PageRank algorithm, this paper puts forward a novel mass calculation method for complex network nodes. A node’s mass obtained by our method can effectively reflect its importance and influence in complex network. The more important the node is, the bigger its mass is. Simulation experiment results showed that, after taking node mass into consideration, the topology potential of node is more accurate, the distribution of topology potential is more reasonable, and the results of community detection are more precise.

  6. Research on social communication network evolution based on topology potential distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Dongjie; Jiang, Jian; Li, Deyi; Zhang, Haisu; Chen, Guisheng

    2011-12-01

    Aiming at the problem of social communication network evolution, first, topology potential is introduced to measure the local influence among nodes in networks. Second, from the perspective of topology potential distribution the method of network evolution description based on topology potential distribution is presented, which takes the artificial intelligence with uncertainty as basic theory and local influence among nodes as essentiality. Then, a social communication network is constructed by enron email dataset, the method presented is used to analyze the characteristic of the social communication network evolution and some useful conclusions are got, implying that the method is effective, which shows that topology potential distribution can effectively describe the characteristic of sociology and detect the local changes in social communication network.

  7. Fracture network topology and characterization of structural permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansberry, Rowan; King, Rosalind; Holford, Simon

    2017-04-01

    There are two fundamental requirements for successful geothermal development: elevated temperatures at accessible depths, and a reservoir from which fluids can be extracted. The Australian geothermal sector has successfully targeted shallow heat, however, due in part to the inherent complexity of targeting permeability, obtaining adequate flow rates for commercial production has been problematic. Deep sedimentary aquifers are unlikely to be viable geothermal resources due to the effects of diagenetic mineral growth on rock permeability. Therefore, it is likely structural permeability targets, exploiting natural or induced fracture networks will provide the primary means for fluid flow in geothermal, as well as unconventional gas, reservoirs. Recent research has focused on the pattern and generation of crustal stresses across Australia, while less is known about the resultant networks of faults, joints, and veins that can constitute interconnected sub-surface permeability pathways. The ability of a fracture to transmit fluid is controlled by the orientation and magnitude of the in-situ stress field that acts on the fracture walls, rock strength, and pore pressure, as well as fracture properties such as aperture, orientation, and roughness. Understanding the distribution, orientation and character of fractures is key to predicting structural permeability. This project focuses on extensive mapping of fractures over various scales in four key Australian basins (Cooper, Otway, Surat and Perth) with the potential to host geothermal resources. Seismic attribute analysis is used in concert with image logs from petroleum wells, and field mapping to identify fracture networks that are usually not resolved in traditional seismic interpretation. We use fracture network topology to provide scale-invariant characterisation of fracture networks from multiple data sources to assess similarity between data sources, and fracture network connectivity. These results are compared with

  8. A topology visualization early warning distribution algorithm for large-scale network security incidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hui; Fan, Guotao; Ye, Jianwei; Zhang, Weizhe

    2013-01-01

    It is of great significance to research the early warning system for large-scale network security incidents. It can improve the network system's emergency response capabilities, alleviate the cyber attacks' damage, and strengthen the system's counterattack ability. A comprehensive early warning system is presented in this paper, which combines active measurement and anomaly detection. The key visualization algorithm and technology of the system are mainly discussed. The large-scale network system's plane visualization is realized based on the divide and conquer thought. First, the topology of the large-scale network is divided into some small-scale networks by the MLkP/CR algorithm. Second, the sub graph plane visualization algorithm is applied to each small-scale network. Finally, the small-scale networks' topologies are combined into a topology based on the automatic distribution algorithm of force analysis. As the algorithm transforms the large-scale network topology plane visualization problem into a series of small-scale network topology plane visualization and distribution problems, it has higher parallelism and is able to handle the display of ultra-large-scale network topology.

  9. A Topology Visualization Early Warning Distribution Algorithm for Large-Scale Network Security Incidents

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hui; Fan, Guotao; Ye, Jianwei; Zhang, Weizhe

    2013-01-01

    It is of great significance to research the early warning system for large-scale network security incidents. It can improve the network system's emergency response capabilities, alleviate the cyber attacks' damage, and strengthen the system's counterattack ability. A comprehensive early warning system is presented in this paper, which combines active measurement and anomaly detection. The key visualization algorithm and technology of the system are mainly discussed. The large-scale network system's plane visualization is realized based on the divide and conquer thought. First, the topology of the large-scale network is divided into some small-scale networks by the MLkP/CR algorithm. Second, the sub graph plane visualization algorithm is applied to each small-scale network. Finally, the small-scale networks' topologies are combined into a topology based on the automatic distribution algorithm of force analysis. As the algorithm transforms the large-scale network topology plane visualization problem into a series of small-scale network topology plane visualization and distribution problems, it has higher parallelism and is able to handle the display of ultra-large-scale network topology. PMID:24191145

  10. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Topological Aspects of Critical Systems and Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakubo, Kousuke; Amitsuka, Hiroshi; Ishikawa, Goo; Machino, Kazuo; Nakagaki, Toshiyuki; Tanda, Satoshi; Yamada, Hideto; Kichiji, Nozomi

    2007-07-01

    I. General properties of networks. Physics of network security / Y.-C. Lai, X. Wand and C. H. Lai. Multi-state interacting particle systems on scale-free networks / N. Masuda and N. Konno. Homotopy Reduction of Complex Networks 18 / Y. Hiraoka and T. Ichinomiya. Analysis of the Susceptible-Infected-Susceptible Model on Complex Network / T. Ichinomiya -- II. Complexity in social science. Innovation and Development in a Random Lattice / J. Lahtinen. Long-tailed distributions in biological systems: revisit to Lognormals / N. Kobayashi ... [et al.]. Two-class structure of income distribution in the USA:exponential bulk and power-law tail / V. M. Yakovenko and A. Christian Silva. Power Law distributions in two community currencies / N. Kichiji and M. Nishibe -- III. Patterns in biological objects. Stoichiometric network analysis of nonlinear phenomena in rection mechanism for TWC converters / M. Marek ... [et al.]. Collective movement and morphogenesis of epithelial cells / H. Haga and K. Kawabata. Indecisive behavior of amoeba crossing an environmental barrier / S. Takagi ... [et al.]. Effects of amount of food on path selection in the transport network of an amoeboid organism / T. Nakagaki ... [et al.]. Light scattering study in double network gels / M. Fukunaya ... [et al.].Blood flow velocity in the choroid in punctate inner choroidopathy and Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease; amd multifractal analysis of choroidal blood flow in age-related macular degeneration / K. Yoshida ... [et al.]. Topological analysis of placental arteries: correlation with neonatal growth / H. Yamada and K. Yakubo -- IV. Criticality in pure and applied physics. Droplets in Disordered Metallic Quantum Critical Systems / A. H. Castro Neto and B. A. Jones. Importance of static disorder and inhomogeneous cooperative dynamics in heavy-fermion metals / O. O. Bernal. Competition between spin glass and Antiferromagnetic phases in heavy fermion materials / S. Sullow. Emergent Phases via Fermi surface

  11. Impact of the topology of global macroeconomic network on the spreading of economic crises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyu-Min; Yang, Jae-Suk; Kim, Gunn; Lee, Jaesung; Goh, Kwang-Il; Kim, In-mook

    2011-03-31

    Throughout economic history, the global economy has experienced recurring crises. The persistent recurrence of such economic crises calls for an understanding of their generic features rather than treating them as singular events. The global economic system is a highly complex system and can best be viewed in terms of a network of interacting macroeconomic agents. In this regard, from the perspective of collective network dynamics, here we explore how the topology of the global macroeconomic network affects the patterns of spreading of economic crises. Using a simple toy model of crisis spreading, we demonstrate that an individual country's role in crisis spreading is not only dependent on its gross macroeconomic capacities, but also on its local and global connectivity profile in the context of the world economic network. We find that on one hand clustering of weak links at the regional scale can significantly aggravate the spread of crises, but on the other hand the current network structure at the global scale harbors higher tolerance of extreme crises compared to more "globalized" random networks. These results suggest that there can be a potential hidden cost in the ongoing globalization movement towards establishing less-constrained, trans-regional economic links between countries, by increasing vulnerability of the global economic system to extreme crises.

  12. Impact of the Topology of Global Macroeconomic Network on the Spreading of Economic Crises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyu-Min; Yang, Jae-Suk; Kim, Gunn; Lee, Jaesung; Goh, Kwang-Il; Kim, In-mook

    2011-01-01

    Throughout economic history, the global economy has experienced recurring crises. The persistent recurrence of such economic crises calls for an understanding of their generic features rather than treating them as singular events. The global economic system is a highly complex system and can best be viewed in terms of a network of interacting macroeconomic agents. In this regard, from the perspective of collective network dynamics, here we explore how the topology of the global macroeconomic network affects the patterns of spreading of economic crises. Using a simple toy model of crisis spreading, we demonstrate that an individual country's role in crisis spreading is not only dependent on its gross macroeconomic capacities, but also on its local and global connectivity profile in the context of the world economic network. We find that on one hand clustering of weak links at the regional scale can significantly aggravate the spread of crises, but on the other hand the current network structure at the global scale harbors higher tolerance of extreme crises compared to more “globalized” random networks. These results suggest that there can be a potential hidden cost in the ongoing globalization movement towards establishing less-constrained, trans-regional economic links between countries, by increasing vulnerability of the global economic system to extreme crises. PMID:21483794

  13. Topological properties and community detection of venture capital network: Evidence from China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yonghong; Zhang, Qi; Li, Sai-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Financial networks have been extensively studied as examples of real world complex networks. Based on the data from Chinese GEM and SME board, we establish a venture capital (VC) network to study the statistical properties, topological properties and community structure of the Chinese venture capital network. The result shows that there are no dominant venture capital firms in China which act as hubs in the VC network, and multi-company syndication is not popular in China, meaning that the relationships among venture capital companies are weak. The network is robust under either random or intentional attack, and possesses small world property. We also find from its community structure that, venture capital companies are more concentrated in developed districts but the links within the same district are scarce as compared to the links between different developed districts, indicating that venture capital companies are more willing to syndicate with companies in other developed districts. Furthermore, venture capital companies which invest in the same industry have closer relations within their communities than those which do not invest in the same industry.

  14. TopoGen: A Network Topology Generation Architecture with application to automating simulations of Software Defined Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Laurito, Andres; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Simulation is an important tool to validate the performance impact of control decisions in Software Defined Networks (SDN). Yet, the manual modeling of complex topologies that may change often during a design process can be a tedious error-prone task. We present TopoGen, a general purpose architecture and tool for systematic translation and generation of network topologies. TopoGen can be used to generate network simulation models automatically by querying information available at diverse sources, notably SDN controllers. The DEVS modeling and simulation framework facilitates a systematic translation of structured knowledge about a network topology into a formal modular and hierarchical coupling of preexisting or new models of network entities (physical or logical). TopoGen can be flexibly extended with new parsers and generators to grow its scope of applicability. This permits to design arbitrary workflows of topology transformations. We tested TopoGen in a network engineering project for the ATLAS detector ...

  15. TopoGen: A Network Topology Generation Architecture with application to automating simulations of Software Defined Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Laurito, Andres; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Simulation is an important tool to validate the performance impact of control decisions in Software Defined Networks (SDN). Yet, the manual modeling of complex topologies that may change often during a design process can be a tedious error-prone task. We present TopoGen, a general purpose architecture and tool for systematic translation and generation of network topologies. TopoGen can be used to generate network simulation models automatically by querying information available at diverse sources, notably SDN controllers. The DEVS modeling and simulation framework facilitates a systematic translation of structured knowledge about a network topology into a formal modular and hierarchical coupling of preexisting or new models of network entities (physical or logical). TopoGen can be flexibly extended with new parsers and generators to grow its scope of applicability. This permits to design arbitrary workflows of topology transformations. We tested TopoGen in a network engineering project for the ATLAS detector ...

  16. Systematic reverse engineering of network topologies: a case study of resettable bistable cellular responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Debasish; Dougherty, Edward; Mukhopadhyay, Abhishek; Carbo, Adria; Yao, Guang; Xing, Jianhua

    2014-01-01

    A focused theme in systems biology is to uncover design principles of biological networks, that is, how specific network structures yield specific systems properties. For this purpose, we have previously developed a reverse engineering procedure to identify network topologies with high likelihood in generating desired systems properties. Our method searches the continuous parameter space of an assembly of network topologies, without enumerating individual network topologies separately as traditionally done in other reverse engineering procedures. Here we tested this CPSS (continuous parameter space search) method on a previously studied problem: the resettable bistability of an Rb-E2F gene network in regulating the quiescence-to-proliferation transition of mammalian cells. From a simplified Rb-E2F gene network, we identified network topologies responsible for generating resettable bistability. The CPSS-identified topologies are consistent with those reported in the previous study based on individual topology search (ITS), demonstrating the effectiveness of the CPSS approach. Since the CPSS and ITS searches are based on different mathematical formulations and different algorithms, the consistency of the results also helps cross-validate both approaches. A unique advantage of the CPSS approach lies in its applicability to biological networks with large numbers of nodes. To aid the application of the CPSS approach to the study of other biological systems, we have developed a computer package that is available in Information S1.

  17. A Topology Visualization Early Warning Distribution Algorithm for Large-Scale Network Security Incidents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui He

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It is of great significance to research the early warning system for large-scale network security incidents. It can improve the network system’s emergency response capabilities, alleviate the cyber attacks’ damage, and strengthen the system’s counterattack ability. A comprehensive early warning system is presented in this paper, which combines active measurement and anomaly detection. The key visualization algorithm and technology of the system are mainly discussed. The large-scale network system’s plane visualization is realized based on the divide and conquer thought. First, the topology of the large-scale network is divided into some small-scale networks by the MLkP/CR algorithm. Second, the sub graph plane visualization algorithm is applied to each small-scale network. Finally, the small-scale networks’ topologies are combined into a topology based on the automatic distribution algorithm of force analysis. As the algorithm transforms the large-scale network topology plane visualization problem into a series of small-scale network topology plane visualization and distribution problems, it has higher parallelism and is able to handle the display of ultra-large-scale network topology.

  18. A Topology Potential-Based Method for Identifying Essential Proteins from PPI Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Lu, Yu; Wang, Jianxin; Wu, Fang-Xiang; Pan, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Essential proteins are indispensable for cellular life. It is of great significance to identify essential proteins that can help us understand the minimal requirements for cellular life and is also very important for drug design. However, identification of essential proteins based on experimental approaches are typically time-consuming and expensive. With the development of high-throughput technology in the post-genomic era, more and more protein-protein interaction data can be obtained, which make it possible to study essential proteins from the network level. There have been a series of computational approaches proposed for predicting essential proteins based on network topologies. Most of these topology based essential protein discovery methods were to use network centralities. In this paper, we investigate the essential proteins' topological characters from a completely new perspective. To our knowledge it is the first time that topology potential is used to identify essential proteins from a protein-protein interaction (PPI) network. The basic idea is that each protein in the network can be viewed as a material particle which creates a potential field around itself and the interaction of all proteins forms a topological field over the network. By defining and computing the value of each protein's topology potential, we can obtain a more precise ranking which reflects the importance of proteins from the PPI network. The experimental results show that topology potential-based methods TP and TP-NC outperform traditional topology measures: degree centrality (DC), betweenness centrality (BC), closeness centrality (CC), subgraph centrality (SC), eigenvector centrality (EC), information centrality (IC), and network centrality (NC) for predicting essential proteins. In addition, these centrality measures are improved on their performance for identifying essential proteins in biological network when controlled by topology potential.

  19. An Implementation fo a Flexible Topology Management System for Aerial High Capacity Directional Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    different transmit and receive frequency bands from the local wide-area coverage links. The primary performance metric for candidate topology ...An Implementation of a Flexible Topology Management System for Aerial High Capacity Directional Networks Joy Wang, Patricia Deutsch, Andrea Coyle...several advantages such as high data rates at long ranges and interference resistant links when paired with directional systems. On the flip side, topology

  20. Average Consensus in Networks of Neutral Dynamical Agents with Fixed and Switching Topologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingying Wu

    2015-01-01

    networks with fixed and switching topologies. For the case of fixed topology, necessary and sufficient conditions to average consensus are established by decoupling the neutral multiagent system in terms of the eigenvalues of the Laplacian matrix. For the case of switching topology, sufficient conditions to average consensus are given in terms of linear matrix inequalities to determine the allowable upper bound of the time-varying communication delay. Finally, two examples are worked out to explain the effectiveness of the theoretical results.

  1. Expected Number of Fixed Points in Boolean Networks with Arbitrary Topology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Fumito; Mochizuki, Atsushi

    2017-07-01

    Boolean network models describe genetic, neural, and social dynamics in complex networks, where the dynamics depend generally on network topology. Fixed points in a genetic regulatory network are typically considered to correspond to cell types in an organism. We prove that the expected number of fixed points in a Boolean network, with Boolean functions drawn from probability distributions that are not required to be uniform or identical, is one, and is independent of network topology if only a feedback arc set satisfies a stochastic neutrality condition. We also demonstrate that the expected number is increased by the predominance of positive feedback in a cycle.

  2. The trade-off between wiring cost and network topology in white matter structural networks in health and migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jixin; Zhao, Ling; Nan, Jiaofen; Li, Guoying; Xiong, Shiwei; von Deneen, Karen M; Gong, Qiyong; Liang, Fanrong; Qin, Wei; Tian, Jie

    2013-10-01

    The human brain organization of cortical networks has optimized trade-off architecture for the economical minimization of connection distance and maximizing valuable topological properties; however, whether this network configuration is disrupted in chronic migraine remains unknown. Here, employing the diffusion tensor imaging and graph theory approaches to construct white matter networks in 26 patients with migraine (PM) and 26 gender-matched healthy controls (HC), we investigated relationships between structural connectivity, cortical network architecture and anatomical distance in the two groups separately. Compared with the HC group, the patients showed longer global distance connection in PM, with proportionally less short-distance and more medium-distance; correspondingly, the patients showed abnormal global topology in their structural networks, mainly presented as a higher clustering coefficient. Moreover, the abnormal association between these two network features was also found. Intriguingly, the network measure that combined the nodal anatomical distance and network topology could distinguish PM from HC with high accuracy of 90.4%. We also demonstrated a high reproducibility of our findings across different parcellation schemes. Our results demonstrated that long-term migraine may result in a abnormal optimization of a trade-off between wiring cost and network topology in white matter structural networks and highlights the potential for combining spatial and topological aspects as a network marker, which may provide valuable insights into the understanding of brain network reorganization that could be attributed to the underlying pathophysiology resulting from migraine. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Invertebrate diversity classification using self-organizing map neural network: with some special topological functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WenJun Zhang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In present study we used self-organizing map (SOM neural network to conduct the non-supervisory clustering of invertebrate orders in rice field. Four topological functions, i.e., cossintopf, sincostopf, acossintopf, and expsintopf, established on the template in toolbox of Matlab, were used in SOM neural network learning. Results showed that clusters were different when using different topological functions because different topological functions will generate different spatial structure of neurons in neural network. We may chose these functions and results based on comparison with the practical situation.

  4. Mean-Square Exponential Synchronization of Stochastic Complex Dynamical Networks with Switching Topology by Impulsive Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuefei Wu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the mean-square exponential synchronization issues of delayed stochastic complex dynamical networks with switching topology and impulsive control. By using the Lyapunov functional method, impulsive control theory, and linear matrix inequality (LMI approaches, some sufficient conditions are derived to guarantee the mean-square exponential synchronization of delay complex dynamical network with switch topology, which are independent of the network size and switch topology. Numerical simulations are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the obtained results in the end.

  5. Organization of growing random networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krapivsky, P. L.; Redner, S.

    2001-06-01

    The organizational development of growing random networks is investigated. These growing networks are built by adding nodes successively, and linking each to an earlier node of degree k with an attachment probability A{sub k}. When A{sub k} grows more slowly than linearly with k, the number of nodes with k links, N{sub k}(t), decays faster than a power law in k, while for A{sub k} growing faster than linearly in k, a single node emerges which connects to nearly all other nodes. When A{sub k} is asymptotically linear, N{sub k}(t){similar_to}tk{sup {minus}{nu}}, with {nu} dependent on details of the attachment probability, but in the range 2{lt}{nu}{lt}{infinity}. The combined age and degree distribution of nodes shows that old nodes typically have a large degree. There is also a significant correlation in the degrees of neighboring nodes, so that nodes of similar degree are more likely to be connected. The size distributions of the in and out components of the network with respect to a given node{emdash}namely, its {open_quotes}descendants{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}ancestors{close_quotes}{emdash}are also determined. The in component exhibits a robust s{sup {minus}2} power-law tail, where s is the component size. The out component has a typical size of order lnt, and it provides basic insights into the genealogy of the network.

  6. Localized and Energy-Efficient Topology Control in Wireless Sensor Networks Using Fuzzy-Logic Control Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanjiang Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The sensor nodes in the Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs are prone to failures due to many reasons, for example, running out of battery or harsh environment deployment; therefore, the WSNs are expected to be able to maintain network connectivity and tolerate certain amount of node failures. By applying fuzzy-logic approach to control the network topology, this paper aims at improving the network connectivity and fault-tolerant capability in response to node failures, while taking into account that the control approach has to be localized and energy efficient. Two fuzzy controllers are proposed in this paper: one is Learning-based Fuzzy-logic Topology Control (LFTC, of which the fuzzy controller is learnt from a training data set; another one is Rules-based Fuzzy-logic Topology Control (RFTC, of which the fuzzy controller is obtained through designing if-then rules and membership functions. Both LFTC and RFTC do not rely on location information, and they are localized. Comparing them with other three representative algorithms (LTRT, List-based, and NONE through extensive simulations, our two proposed fuzzy controllers have been proved to be very energy efficient to achieve desired node degree and improve the network connectivity when sensor nodes run out of battery or are subject to random attacks.

  7. Impaired topological architecture of brain structural networks in idiopathic Parkinson's disease: a DTI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Changhong; Huang, Biao; Zhang, Ruibin; Ma, Qing; Yang, Wanqun; Wang, Lijuan; Wang, Limin; Xu, Qin; Feng, Jieying; Liu, Liqing; Zhang, Yuhu; Huang, Ruiwang

    2017-02-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is considered as a neurodegenerative disorder of the brain central nervous system. But, to date, few studies adopted the network model to reveal topological changes in brain structural networks in PD patients. Additionally, although the concept of rich club organization has been widely used to study brain networks in various brain disorders, there is no study to report the changed rich club organization of brain networks in PD patients. Thus, we collected diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data from 35 PD patients and 26 healthy controls and adopted deterministic tractography to construct brain structural networks. During the network analysis, we calculated their topological properties, and built the rich club organization of brain structural networks for both subject groups. By comparing the between-group differences in topological properties and rich club organizations, we found that the connectivity strength of the feeder and local connections are lower in PD patients compared to those of the healthy controls. Furthermore, using a network-based statistic (NBS) approach, we identified uniformly significantly decreased connections in two modules, the limbic/paralimbic/subcortical module and the cognitive control/attention module, in patients compared to controls. In addition, for the topological properties of brain network topology in the PD patients, we found statistically increased shortest path length and decreased global efficiency. Statistical comparisons of nodal properties were also widespread in the frontal and parietal regions for the PD patients. These findings may provide useful information to better understand the abnormalities of brain structural networks in PD patients.

  8. Altered network topology in pediatric traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Emily L.; Rashid, Faisal; Babikian, Talin; Mink, Richard; Babbitt, Christopher; Johnson, Jeffrey; Giza, Christopher C.; Asarnow, Robert F.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2017-11-01

    Outcome after a traumatic brain injury (TBI) is quite variable, and this variability is not solely accounted for by severity or demographics. Identifying sub-groups of patients who recover faster or more fully will help researchers and clinicians understand sources of this variability, and hopefully lead to new therapies for patients with a more prolonged recovery profile. We have previously identified two subgroups within the pediatric TBI patient population with different recovery profiles based on an ERP-derived (event-related potential) measure of interhemispheric transfer time (IHTT). Here we examine structural network topology across both patient groups and healthy controls, focusing on the `rich-club' - the core of the network, marked by high degree nodes. These analyses were done at two points post-injury - 2-5 months (post-acute), and 13-19 months (chronic). In the post-acute time-point, we found that the TBI-slow group, those showing longitudinal degeneration, showed hyperconnectivity within the rich-club nodes relative to the healthy controls, at the expense of local connectivity. There were minimal differences between the healthy controls and the TBI-normal group (those patients who show signs of recovery). At the chronic phase, these disruptions were no longer significant, but closer analysis showed that this was likely due to the loss of power from a smaller sample size at the chronic time-point, rather than a sign of recovery. We have previously shown disruptions to white matter (WM) integrity that persist and progress over time in the TBI-slow group, and here we again find differences in the TBI-slow group that fail to resolve over the first year post-injury.

  9. Computer simulation of randomly cross-linked polymer networks

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, T P

    2002-01-01

    In this work, Monte Carlo and Stochastic Dynamics computer simulations of mesoscale model randomly cross-linked networks were undertaken. Task parallel implementations of the lattice Monte Carlo Bond Fluctuation model and Kremer-Grest Stochastic Dynamics bead-spring continuum model were designed and used for this purpose. Lattice and continuum precursor melt systems were prepared and then cross-linked to varying degrees. The resultant networks were used to study structural changes during deformation and relaxation dynamics. The effects of a random network topology featuring a polydisperse distribution of strand lengths and an abundance of pendant chain ends, were qualitatively compared to recent published work. A preliminary investigation into the effects of temperature on the structural and dynamical properties was also undertaken. Structural changes during isotropic swelling and uniaxial deformation, revealed a pronounced non-affine deformation dependant on the degree of cross-linking. Fractal heterogeneiti...

  10. UPGRADE FOR HARDWARE/SOFTWARE SERVER AND NETWORK TOPOLOGY IN INFORMATION SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleksii O. Kaplun

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The network modernization, educational information systems software and hardware updates problem is actual in modern term of information technologies prompt development. There are server applications and network topology of Institute of Information Technology and Learning Tools of National Academy of Pedagogical Sciences of Ukraine analysis and their improvement methods expound in the article. The article materials represent modernization results implemented to increase network efficiency and reliability, decrease response time in Institute’s network information systems. The article gives diagrams of network topology before upgrading and after finish of optimization and upgrading processes.

  11. Disrupted brain network topology in Parkinson's disease: a longitudinal magnetoencephalography study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olde Dubbelink, K.T.E.; Hillebrand, A.; Stoffers, D.; Deijen, J.B.; Twisk, J.W.R.; Stam, C.J.; Berendse, H.W.

    2014-01-01

    Although alterations in resting-state functional connectivity between brain regions have previously been reported in Parkinson's disease, the spatial organization of these changes remains largely unknown. Here, we longitudinally studied brain network topology in Parkinson's disease in relation to

  12. A Topology Control Strategy with Reliability Assurance for Satellite Cluster Networks in Earth Observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qing; Zhang, Jinxiu; Hu, Ze

    2017-02-23

    This article investigates the dynamic topology control problemof satellite cluster networks (SCNs) in Earth observation (EO) missions by applying a novel metric of stability for inter-satellite links (ISLs). The properties of the periodicity and predictability of satellites' relative position are involved in the link cost metric which is to give a selection criterion for choosing the most reliable data routing paths. Also, a cooperative work model with reliability is proposed for the situation of emergency EO missions. Based on the link cost metric and the proposed reliability model, a reliability assurance topology control algorithm and its corresponding dynamic topology control (RAT) strategy are established to maximize the stability of data transmission in the SCNs. The SCNs scenario is tested through some numeric simulations of the topology stability of average topology lifetime and average packet loss rate. Simulation results show that the proposed reliable strategy applied in SCNs significantly improves the data transmission performance and prolongs the average topology lifetime.

  13. Random Network Coding over Composite Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geil, Olav; Lucani Rötter, Daniel Enrique

    2017-01-01

    Random network coding is a method that achieves multicast capacity asymptotically for general networks [1, 7]. In this approach, vertices in the network randomly and linearly combine incoming information in a distributed manner before forwarding it through their outgoing edges. To ensure success...

  14. Capacity Extension of Software Defined Data Center Networks With Jellyfish Topology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehmeri, Victor; Vegas Olmos, Juan José; Tafur Monroy, Idelfonso

    We present a performance analysis of Jellyfish topology with Software-Defined commodity switches for Data Center networks. Our results show up to a 2-fold performance gain when compared to a Spanning Tree Protocol implementation.......We present a performance analysis of Jellyfish topology with Software-Defined commodity switches for Data Center networks. Our results show up to a 2-fold performance gain when compared to a Spanning Tree Protocol implementation....

  15. Average Consensus Problems in Networks of Agents with Fixed and Switching Topology and Unknown Control Direction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caixian Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is devoted to the average consensus problems in directed networks of agents with unknown control direction. In this paper, by using Nussbaum function techniques and Laplacian matrix, novel average consensus protocols are designed for multiagent systems with unknown control direction in the cases of directed networks with fixed and switching topology. In the case of switching topology, the disagreement vector is utilized. Finally, simulation is provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of our results.

  16. Computationally efficient measure of topological redundancy of biological and social networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Réka; Dasgupta, Bhaskar; Hegde, Rashmi; Sivanathan, Gowri Sangeetha; Gitter, Anthony; Gürsoy, Gamze; Paul, Pradyut; Sontag, Eduardo

    2011-09-01

    It is well known that biological and social interaction networks have a varying degree of redundancy, though a consensus of the precise cause of this is so far lacking. In this paper, we introduce a topological redundancy measure for labeled directed networks that is formal, computationally efficient, and applicable to a variety of directed networks such as cellular signaling, and metabolic and social interaction networks. We demonstrate the computational efficiency of our measure by computing its value and statistical significance on a number of biological and social networks with up to several thousands of nodes and edges. Our results suggest a number of interesting observations: (1) Social networks are more redundant that their biological counterparts, (2) transcriptional networks are less redundant than signaling networks, (3) the topological redundancy of the C. elegans metabolic network is largely due to its inclusion of currency metabolites, and (4) the redundancy of signaling networks is highly (negatively) correlated with the monotonicity of their dynamics.

  17. Energy-Aware Topology Evolution Model with Link and Node Deletion in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojuan Luo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the complex network theory, a new topological evolving model is proposed. In the evolution of the topology of sensor networks, the energy-aware mechanism is taken into account, and the phenomenon of change of the link and node in the network is discussed. Theoretical analysis and numerical simulation are conducted to explore the topology characteristics and network performance with different node energy distribution. We find that node energy distribution has the weak effect on the degree distribution P(k that evolves into the scale-free state, nodes with more energy carry more connections, and degree correlation is nontrivial disassortative. Moreover, the results show that, when nodes energy is more heterogeneous, the network is better clustered and enjoys higher performance in terms of the network efficiency and the average path length for transmitting data.

  18. An analog CMOS chip set for neural networks with arbitrary topologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lansner, John; Lehmann, Torsten

    1993-01-01

    An analog CMOS chip set for implementations of artificial neural networks (ANNs) has been fabricated and tested. The chip set consists of two cascadable chips: a neuron chip and a synapse chip. Neurons on the neuron chips can be interconnected at random via synapses on the synapse chips thus...... implementing an ANN with arbitrary topology. The neuron test chip contains an array of 4 neurons with well defined hyperbolic tangent activation functions which is implemented by using parasitic lateral bipolar transistors. The synapse test chip is a cascadable 4×4 matrix-vector multiplier with variable, 10-b...... resolution matrix elements. The propagation delay of the test chips was measured to 2.6 μs per layer...

  19. Empirical study of the role of the topology in spreading on communication networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medvedev, Alexey; Kertesz, Janos

    2017-03-01

    Topological aspects, like community structure, and temporal activity patterns, like burstiness, have been shown to severely influence the speed of spreading in temporal networks. We study the influence of the topology on the susceptible-infected (SI) spreading on time stamped communication networks, as obtained from a dataset of mobile phone records. We consider city level networks with intra- and inter-city connections. The networks using only intra-city links are usually sparse, where the spreading depends mainly on the average degree. The inter-city links serve as bridges in spreading, speeding up considerably the process. We demonstrate the effect also on model simulations.

  20. Handbook of Large-Scale Random Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Bollobas, Bela; Miklos, Dezso

    2008-01-01

    Covers various aspects of large-scale networks, including mathematical foundations and rigorous results of random graph theory, modeling and computational aspects of large-scale networks, as well as areas in physics, biology, neuroscience, sociology and technical areas

  1. Importance of randomness in biological networks: A random matrix ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-01-29

    Jan 29, 2015 ... We show that in spite of huge differences these interaction networks, representing real-world systems, posses from random matrix models, the spectral properties of the underlying matrices of these networks follow random matrix theory bringing them into the same universality class. We further demonstrate ...

  2. A new computational strategy for identifying essential proteins based on network topological properties and biological information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Chao; Sun, Yongqi; Dong, Yadong

    2017-01-01

    Essential proteins are the proteins that are indispensable to the survival and development of an organism. Deleting a single essential protein will cause lethality or infertility. Identifying and analysing essential proteins are key to understanding the molecular mechanisms of living cells. There are two types of methods for predicting essential proteins: experimental methods, which require considerable time and resources, and computational methods, which overcome the shortcomings of experimental methods. However, the prediction accuracy of computational methods for essential proteins requires further improvement. In this paper, we propose a new computational strategy named CoTB for identifying essential proteins based on a combination of topological properties, subcellular localization information and orthologous protein information. First, we introduce several topological properties of the protein-protein interaction (PPI) network. Second, we propose new methods for measuring orthologous information and subcellular localization and a new computational strategy that uses a random forest prediction model to obtain a probability score for the proteins being essential. Finally, we conduct experiments on four different Saccharomyces cerevisiae datasets. The experimental results demonstrate that our strategy for identifying essential proteins outperforms traditional computational methods and the most recently developed method, SON. In particular, our strategy improves the prediction accuracy to 89, 78, 79, and 85 percent on the YDIP, YMIPS, YMBD and YHQ datasets at the top 100 level, respectively.

  3. Algebraic Topology of Multi-Brain Connectivity Networks Reveals Dissimilarity in Functional Patterns during Spoken Communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadić, Bosiljka; Andjelković, Miroslav; Boshkoska, Biljana Mileva; Levnajić, Zoran

    2016-01-01

    Human behaviour in various circumstances mirrors the corresponding brain connectivity patterns, which are suitably represented by functional brain networks. While the objective analysis of these networks by graph theory tools deepened our understanding of brain functions, the multi-brain structures and connections underlying human social behaviour remain largely unexplored. In this study, we analyse the aggregate graph that maps coordination of EEG signals previously recorded during spoken communications in two groups of six listeners and two speakers. Applying an innovative approach based on the algebraic topology of graphs, we analyse higher-order topological complexes consisting of mutually interwoven cliques of a high order to which the identified functional connections organise. Our results reveal that the topological quantifiers provide new suitable measures for differences in the brain activity patterns and inter-brain synchronisation between speakers and listeners. Moreover, the higher topological complexity correlates with the listener's concentration to the story, confirmed by self-rating, and closeness to the speaker's brain activity pattern, which is measured by network-to-network distance. The connectivity structures of the frontal and parietal lobe consistently constitute distinct clusters, which extend across the listener's group. Formally, the topology quantifiers of the multi-brain communities exceed the sum of those of the participating individuals and also reflect the listener's rated attributes of the speaker and the narrated subject. In the broader context, the presented study exposes the relevance of higher topological structures (besides standard graph measures) for characterising functional brain networks under different stimuli.

  4. Algebraic Topology of Multi-Brain Connectivity Networks Reveals Dissimilarity in Functional Patterns during Spoken Communications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bosiljka Tadić

    Full Text Available Human behaviour in various circumstances mirrors the corresponding brain connectivity patterns, which are suitably represented by functional brain networks. While the objective analysis of these networks by graph theory tools deepened our understanding of brain functions, the multi-brain structures and connections underlying human social behaviour remain largely unexplored. In this study, we analyse the aggregate graph that maps coordination of EEG signals previously recorded during spoken communications in two groups of six listeners and two speakers. Applying an innovative approach based on the algebraic topology of graphs, we analyse higher-order topological complexes consisting of mutually interwoven cliques of a high order to which the identified functional connections organise. Our results reveal that the topological quantifiers provide new suitable measures for differences in the brain activity patterns and inter-brain synchronisation between speakers and listeners. Moreover, the higher topological complexity correlates with the listener's concentration to the story, confirmed by self-rating, and closeness to the speaker's brain activity pattern, which is measured by network-to-network distance. The connectivity structures of the frontal and parietal lobe consistently constitute distinct clusters, which extend across the listener's group. Formally, the topology quantifiers of the multi-brain communities exceed the sum of those of the participating individuals and also reflect the listener's rated attributes of the speaker and the narrated subject. In the broader context, the presented study exposes the relevance of higher topological structures (besides standard graph measures for characterising functional brain networks under different stimuli.

  5. Entropy Characterization of Random Network Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro J. Zufiria

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper elaborates on the Random Network Model (RNM as a mathematical framework for modelling and analyzing the generation of complex networks. Such framework allows the analysis of the relationship between several network characterizing features (link density, clustering coefficient, degree distribution, connectivity, etc. and entropy-based complexity measures, providing new insight on the generation and characterization of random networks. Some theoretical and computational results illustrate the utility of the proposed framework.

  6. Routing Topologies of Wireless Sensor Networks for Health Monitoring of a Cultural Heritage Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparicio, Sofía; Martínez-Garrido, María I; Ranz, Javier; Fort, Rafael; Izquierdo, Miguel Ángel G

    2016-10-19

    This paper provides a performance evaluation of tree and mesh routing topologies of wireless sensor networks (WSNs) in a cultural heritage site. The historical site selected was San Juan Bautista church in Talamanca de Jarama (Madrid, Spain). We report the preliminary analysis required to study the effects of heating in this historical location using WSNs to monitor the temperature and humidity conditions during periods of weeks. To test which routing topology was better for this kind of application, the WSNs were first deployed on the upper floor of the CAEND institute in Arganda del Rey simulating the church deployment, but in the former scenario there was no direct line of sight between the WSN elements. Two parameters were selected to evaluate the performance of the routing topologies of WSNs: the percentage of received messages and the lifetime of the wireless sensor network. To analyze in more detail which topology gave the best performance, other communication parameters were also measured. The tree topology used was the collection tree protocol and the mesh topology was the XMESH provided by MEMSIC (Andover, MA, USA). For the scenarios presented in this paper, it can be concluded that the tree topology lost fewer messages than the mesh topology.

  7. Routing Topologies of Wireless Sensor Networks for Health Monitoring of a Cultural Heritage Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofía Aparicio

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a performance evaluation of tree and mesh routing topologies of wireless sensor networks (WSNs in a cultural heritage site. The historical site selected was San Juan Bautista church in Talamanca de Jarama (Madrid, Spain. We report the preliminary analysis required to study the effects of heating in this historical location using WSNs to monitor the temperature and humidity conditions during periods of weeks. To test which routing topology was better for this kind of application, the WSNs were first deployed on the upper floor of the CAEND institute in Arganda del Rey simulating the church deployment, but in the former scenario there was no direct line of sight between the WSN elements. Two parameters were selected to evaluate the performance of the routing topologies of WSNs: the percentage of received messages and the lifetime of the wireless sensor network. To analyze in more detail which topology gave the best performance, other communication parameters were also measured. The tree topology used was the collection tree protocol and the mesh topology was the XMESH provided by MEMSIC (Andover, MA, USA. For the scenarios presented in this paper, it can be concluded that the tree topology lost fewer messages than the mesh topology.

  8. Efficient Strategies for Active Interface-Level Network Topology Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    massive outage of services globally. There are other similar projects at Ark that are dedicated to Internet topology research, including Dolphin [3... Dolphin : The measurement system for the next generation Internet,” in 4th International Conference on Communications, Internet and Information... evolution of the Internet’s AS-level topology,” in IEEE International Conference on Computer Communications, pp. 1–12, 2006. [23] Y.-J. Chi, R

  9. Performance Analysis of Public Transport Systems in Nanjing Based on Network Topology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ping; Zhu, Zhen-Tao; Zhou, Jing; Ding, Jin-Yuan; Wang, Hong-Wei; Wei, Shan-Sen

    The urban public transport network (UPTN) in Nanjing is characterized by a complex network with topological pedestals. The empirical data indicates that it is a small-world network. Under malicious attack to the high connectivity nodes of the network, the average path-length will increase 2.5 times, the reliability and traffic capacity of the UPTN will greatly decline, and the travel expenditure will distinctively increase. The topological significance of stations and routes are redefined to help assess the small-world property of UPTNs, so as to improve city transportation. It is also found that if the urban rail transit, such as metro, is introduced to the UPTN, then the topological diameter of the network is reduced, and its structure is optimized.

  10. Network topology and functional connectivity disturbances precede the onset of Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Deborah L; Rubinov, Mikail; Durgerian, Sally; Mourany, Lyla; Reece, Christine; Koenig, Katherine; Bullmore, Ed; Long, Jeffrey D; Paulsen, Jane S; Rao, Stephen M

    2015-08-01

    Cognitive, motor and psychiatric changes in prodromal Huntington's disease have nurtured the emergent need for early interventions. Preventive clinical trials for Huntington's disease, however, are limited by a shortage of suitable measures that could serve as surrogate outcomes. Measures of intrinsic functional connectivity from resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging are of keen interest. Yet recent studies suggest circumscribed abnormalities in resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging connectivity in prodromal Huntington's disease, despite the spectrum of behavioural changes preceding a manifest diagnosis. The present study used two complementary analytical approaches to examine whole-brain resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging connectivity in prodromal Huntington's disease. Network topology was studied using graph theory and simple functional connectivity amongst brain regions was explored using the network-based statistic. Participants consisted of gene-negative controls (n = 16) and prodromal Huntington's disease individuals (n = 48) with various stages of disease progression to examine the influence of disease burden on intrinsic connectivity. Graph theory analyses showed that global network interconnectivity approximated a random network topology as proximity to diagnosis neared and this was associated with decreased connectivity amongst highly-connected rich-club network hubs, which integrate processing from diverse brain regions. However, functional segregation within the global network (average clustering) was preserved. Functional segregation was also largely maintained at the local level, except for the notable decrease in the diversity of anterior insula intermodular-interconnections (participation coefficient), irrespective of disease burden. In contrast, network-based statistic analyses revealed patterns of weakened frontostriatal connections and strengthened frontal-posterior connections that evolved as disease

  11. Network topology and functional connectivity disturbances precede the onset of Huntington’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Deborah L.; Rubinov, Mikail; Durgerian, Sally; Mourany, Lyla; Reece, Christine; Koenig, Katherine; Bullmore, Ed; Long, Jeffrey D.; Paulsen, Jane S.

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive, motor and psychiatric changes in prodromal Huntington’s disease have nurtured the emergent need for early interventions. Preventive clinical trials for Huntington’s disease, however, are limited by a shortage of suitable measures that could serve as surrogate outcomes. Measures of intrinsic functional connectivity from resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging are of keen interest. Yet recent studies suggest circumscribed abnormalities in resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging connectivity in prodromal Huntington’s disease, despite the spectrum of behavioural changes preceding a manifest diagnosis. The present study used two complementary analytical approaches to examine whole-brain resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging connectivity in prodromal Huntington’s disease. Network topology was studied using graph theory and simple functional connectivity amongst brain regions was explored using the network-based statistic. Participants consisted of gene-negative controls (n = 16) and prodromal Huntington’s disease individuals (n = 48) with various stages of disease progression to examine the influence of disease burden on intrinsic connectivity. Graph theory analyses showed that global network interconnectivity approximated a random network topology as proximity to diagnosis neared and this was associated with decreased connectivity amongst highly-connected rich-club network hubs, which integrate processing from diverse brain regions. However, functional segregation within the global network (average clustering) was preserved. Functional segregation was also largely maintained at the local level, except for the notable decrease in the diversity of anterior insula intermodular-interconnections (participation coefficient), irrespective of disease burden. In contrast, network-based statistic analyses revealed patterns of weakened frontostriatal connections and strengthened frontal-posterior connections that evolved

  12. Topological dynamics in spike-timing dependent plastic model neural networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David B. Stone

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP is a biologically constrained unsupervised form of learning that potentiates or depresses synaptic connections based on the precise timing of pre-synaptic and post-synaptic firings. The effects of on-going STDP on the topology of evolving model neural networks were assessed in 50 unique simulations which modeled two hours of activity. After a period of stabilization, a number of global and local topological features were monitored periodically to quantify on-going changes in network structure. Global topological features included the total number of remaining synapses, average synaptic strengths, and average number of synapses per neuron (degree. Under a range of different input regimes and initial network configurations, each network maintained a robust and highly stable global structure across time. Local topology was monitored by assessing state changes of all three-neuron subgraphs (triads present in the networks. Overall counts and the range of triad configurations varied little across the simulations; however, a substantial set of individual triads continued to undergo rapid state changes and revealed a dynamic local topology. In addition, specific small-world properties also fluctuated across time. These findings suggest that on-going STDP provides an efficient means of selecting and maintaining a stable yet flexible network organization.

  13. Randomization and resilience of brain functional networks as systems-level endophenotypes of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Chun-Yi Zac; Su, Tsung-Wei; Huang, Chu-Chung; Hung, Chia-Chun; Chen, Wei-Ling; Lan, Tsuo-Hung; Lin, Ching-Po; Bullmore, Edward T

    2015-07-21

    Schizophrenia is increasingly conceived as a disorder of brain network organization or dysconnectivity syndrome. Functional MRI (fMRI) networks in schizophrenia have been characterized by abnormally random topology. We tested the hypothesis that network randomization is an endophenotype of schizophrenia and therefore evident also in nonpsychotic relatives of patients. Head movement-corrected, resting-state fMRI data were acquired from 25 patients with schizophrenia, 25 first-degree relatives of patients, and 29 healthy volunteers. Graphs were used to model functional connectivity as a set of edges between regional nodes. We estimated the topological efficiency, clustering, degree distribution, resilience, and connection distance (in millimeters) of each functional network. The schizophrenic group demonstrated significant randomization of global network metrics (reduced clustering, greater efficiency), a shift in the degree distribution to a more homogeneous form (fewer hubs), a shift in the distance distribution (proportionally more long-distance edges), and greater resilience to targeted attack on network hubs. The networks of the relatives also demonstrated abnormal randomization and resilience compared with healthy volunteers, but they were typically less topologically abnormal than the patients' networks and did not have abnormal connection distances. We conclude that schizophrenia is associated with replicable and convergent evidence for functional network randomization, and a similar topological profile was evident also in nonpsychotic relatives, suggesting that this is a systems-level endophenotype or marker of familial risk. We speculate that the greater resilience of brain networks may confer some fitness advantages on nonpsychotic relatives that could explain persistence of this endophenotype in the population.

  14. Statistical properties of random clique networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yi-Min; Meng, Jun; Fan, Jing-Fang; Ye, Fang-Fu; Chen, Xiao-Song

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, a random clique network model to mimic the large clustering coefficient and the modular structure that exist in many real complex networks, such as social networks, artificial networks, and protein interaction networks, is introduced by combining the random selection rule of the Erdös and Rényi (ER) model and the concept of cliques. We find that random clique networks having a small average degree differ from the ER network in that they have a large clustering coefficient and a power law clustering spectrum, while networks having a high average degree have similar properties as the ER model. In addition, we find that the relation between the clustering coefficient and the average degree shows a non-monotonic behavior and that the degree distributions can be fit by multiple Poisson curves; we explain the origin of such novel behaviors and degree distributions.

  15. Inferring meaningful communities from topology-constrained correlation networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hleap, Jose Sergio; Blouin, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Community structure detection is an important tool in graph analysis. This can be done, among other ways, by solving for the partition set which optimizes the modularity scores [Formula: see text]. Here it is shown that topological constraints in correlation graphs induce over-fragmentation of community structures. A refinement step to this optimization based on Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) and a statistical test for significance is proposed. In structured simulation constrained by topology, this novel approach performs better than the optimization of modularity alone. This method was also tested with two empirical datasets: the Roll-Call voting in the 110th US Senate constrained by geographic adjacency, and a biological dataset of 135 protein structures constrained by inter-residue contacts. The former dataset showed sub-structures in the communities that revealed a regional bias in the votes which transcend party affiliations. This is an interesting pattern given that the 110th Legislature was assumed to be a highly polarized government. The [Formula: see text]-amylase catalytic domain dataset (biological dataset) was analyzed with and without topological constraints (inter-residue contacts). The results without topological constraints showed differences with the topology constrained one, but the LDA filtering did not change the outcome of the latter. This suggests that the LDA filtering is a robust way to solve the possible over-fragmentation when present, and that this method will not affect the results where there is no evidence of over-fragmentation.

  16. Inferring meaningful communities from topology-constrained correlation networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Sergio Hleap

    Full Text Available Community structure detection is an important tool in graph analysis. This can be done, among other ways, by solving for the partition set which optimizes the modularity scores [Formula: see text]. Here it is shown that topological constraints in correlation graphs induce over-fragmentation of community structures. A refinement step to this optimization based on Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA and a statistical test for significance is proposed. In structured simulation constrained by topology, this novel approach performs better than the optimization of modularity alone. This method was also tested with two empirical datasets: the Roll-Call voting in the 110th US Senate constrained by geographic adjacency, and a biological dataset of 135 protein structures constrained by inter-residue contacts. The former dataset showed sub-structures in the communities that revealed a regional bias in the votes which transcend party affiliations. This is an interesting pattern given that the 110th Legislature was assumed to be a highly polarized government. The [Formula: see text]-amylase catalytic domain dataset (biological dataset was analyzed with and without topological constraints (inter-residue contacts. The results without topological constraints showed differences with the topology constrained one, but the LDA filtering did not change the outcome of the latter. This suggests that the LDA filtering is a robust way to solve the possible over-fragmentation when present, and that this method will not affect the results where there is no evidence of over-fragmentation.

  17. Brain network analysis: separating cost from topology using cost-integration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cedric E Ginestet

    Full Text Available A statistically principled way of conducting brain network analysis is still lacking. Comparison of different populations of brain networks is hard because topology is inherently dependent on wiring cost, where cost is defined as the number of edges in an unweighted graph. In this paper, we evaluate the benefits and limitations associated with using cost-integrated topological metrics. Our focus is on comparing populations of weighted undirected graphs that differ in mean association weight, using global efficiency. Our key result shows that integrating over cost is equivalent to controlling for any monotonic transformation of the weight set of a weighted graph. That is, when integrating over cost, we eliminate the differences in topology that may be due to a monotonic transformation of the weight set. Our result holds for any unweighted topological measure, and for any choice of distribution over cost levels. Cost-integration is therefore helpful in disentangling differences in cost from differences in topology. By contrast, we show that the use of the weighted version of a topological metric is generally not a valid approach to this problem. Indeed, we prove that, under weak conditions, the use of the weighted version of global efficiency is equivalent to simply comparing weighted costs. Thus, we recommend the reporting of (i differences in weighted costs and (ii differences in cost-integrated topological measures with respect to different distributions over the cost domain. We demonstrate the application of these techniques in a re-analysis of an fMRI working memory task. We also provide a Monte Carlo method for approximating cost-integrated topological measures. Finally, we discuss the limitations of integrating topology over cost, which may pose problems when some weights are zero, when multiplicities exist in the ranks of the weights, and when one expects subtle cost-dependent topological differences, which could be masked by cost-integration.

  18. Brain network analysis: separating cost from topology using cost-integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginestet, Cedric E; Nichols, Thomas E; Bullmore, Ed T; Simmons, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    A statistically principled way of conducting brain network analysis is still lacking. Comparison of different populations of brain networks is hard because topology is inherently dependent on wiring cost, where cost is defined as the number of edges in an unweighted graph. In this paper, we evaluate the benefits and limitations associated with using cost-integrated topological metrics. Our focus is on comparing populations of weighted undirected graphs that differ in mean association weight, using global efficiency. Our key result shows that integrating over cost is equivalent to controlling for any monotonic transformation of the weight set of a weighted graph. That is, when integrating over cost, we eliminate the differences in topology that may be due to a monotonic transformation of the weight set. Our result holds for any unweighted topological measure, and for any choice of distribution over cost levels. Cost-integration is therefore helpful in disentangling differences in cost from differences in topology. By contrast, we show that the use of the weighted version of a topological metric is generally not a valid approach to this problem. Indeed, we prove that, under weak conditions, the use of the weighted version of global efficiency is equivalent to simply comparing weighted costs. Thus, we recommend the reporting of (i) differences in weighted costs and (ii) differences in cost-integrated topological measures with respect to different distributions over the cost domain. We demonstrate the application of these techniques in a re-analysis of an fMRI working memory task. We also provide a Monte Carlo method for approximating cost-integrated topological measures. Finally, we discuss the limitations of integrating topology over cost, which may pose problems when some weights are zero, when multiplicities exist in the ranks of the weights, and when one expects subtle cost-dependent topological differences, which could be masked by cost-integration.

  19. Architecture of transcriptional regulatory circuits is knitted over the topology of bio-molecular interaction networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soberano de Oliveira, Ana Paula; Patil, Kiran Raosaheb; Nielsen, Jens

    2008-01-01

    is to use the topology of bio-molecular interaction networks in order to constrain the solution space. Such approaches systematically integrate the existing biological knowledge with the 'omics' data. Results: Here we introduce a hypothesis-driven method that integrates bio-molecular network topology...... Factors, Reporter Proteins and Reporter Complexes, and use this to decipher the logic of regulatory circuits playing a key role in yeast glucose repression and human diabetes. Conclusion: Reporter Features offer the opportunity to identify regulatory hot-spots in bio-molecular interaction networks...

  20. Study of network topology effect on measurement accuracy for a distributed rotary-laser measurement system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Siyang; Lin, Jiarui; Ren, Yongjie; Yang, Linghui; Zhu, Jigui

    2017-09-01

    The workshop Measurement Positioning System (wMPS) is a large-scale measurement system that better copes with the current challenges of dimensional metrology. However, as a distributed measuring system with multiple transmitters forming a spatial measurement network, the network topology of transmitters relative to the receiver exerts a significant influence on the measurement accuracy albeit one that is difficult to quantify. An evaluation metric, termed the geometric dilution of precision (GDOP), is introduced to quantify the quality of the network topology of the wMPS. The GDOP is derived from the measurement error model of wMPS and its mathematical derivation is expounded. Two significant factors (density and layout of the transmitter) affecting the network topology are analyzed by simulations and experiments. The experimental results show that GDOP is approximately proportional to the measurement error. More transmitters, and a relatively good layout thereof, can decrease the value of GDOP and the measurement error.

  1. The relations between network-operation and topological-property in a scale-free and small-world network with community structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Fei; Yao, Bing

    2017-10-01

    It is always an open, demanding and difficult task for generating available model to simulate dynamical functions and reveal inner principles from complex systems and networks. In this article, due to lots of real-life and artificial networks are built from series of simple and small groups (components), we discuss some interesting and helpful network-operation to generate more realistic network models. In view of community structure (modular topology), we present a class of sparse network models N(t , m) . At the moment, we capture the fact the N(t , 4) has not only scale-free feature, which means that the probability that a randomly selected vertex with degree k decays as a power-law, following P(k) ∼k-γ, where γ is the degree exponent, but also small-world property, which indicates that the typical distance between two uniform randomly chosen vertices grows proportionally to logarithm of the order of N(t , 4) , namely, relatively shorter diameter and lower average path length, simultaneously displays higher clustering coefficient. Next, as a new topological parameter correlating to reliability, synchronization capability and diffusion properties of networks, the number of spanning trees over a network is studied in more detail, an exact analytical solution for the number of spanning trees of the N(t , 4) is obtained. Based on the network-operation, part hub-vertex linking with each other will be helpful for structuring various network models and investigating the rules related with real-life networks.

  2. RMBNToolbox: random models for biochemical networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niemi Jari

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is an increasing interest to model biochemical and cell biological networks, as well as to the computational analysis of these models. The development of analysis methodologies and related software is rapid in the field. However, the number of available models is still relatively small and the model sizes remain limited. The lack of kinetic information is usually the limiting factor for the construction of detailed simulation models. Results We present a computational toolbox for generating random biochemical network models which mimic real biochemical networks. The toolbox is called Random Models for Biochemical Networks. The toolbox works in the Matlab environment, and it makes it possible to generate various network structures, stoichiometries, kinetic laws for reactions, and parameters therein. The generation can be based on statistical rules and distributions, and more detailed information of real biochemical networks can be used in situations where it is known. The toolbox can be easily extended. The resulting network models can be exported in the format of Systems Biology Markup Language. Conclusion While more information is accumulating on biochemical networks, random networks can be used as an intermediate step towards their better understanding. Random networks make it possible to study the effects of various network characteristics to the overall behavior of the network. Moreover, the construction of artificial network models provides the ground truth data needed in the validation of various computational methods in the fields of parameter estimation and data analysis.

  3. A Brief Historical Introduction to Euler's Formula for Polyhedra, Topology, Graph Theory and Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debnath, Lokenath

    2010-01-01

    This article is essentially devoted to a brief historical introduction to Euler's formula for polyhedra, topology, theory of graphs and networks with many examples from the real-world. Celebrated Konigsberg seven-bridge problem and some of the basic properties of graphs and networks for some understanding of the macroscopic behaviour of real…

  4. Scale-space measures for graph topology link protein network architecture to function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulsman, M.; Dimitrakopoulos, C.; De Ridder, J.

    2014-01-01

    MOTIVATION: The network architecture of physical protein interactions is an important determinant for the molecular functions that are carried out within each cell. To study this relation, the network architecture can be characterized by graph topological characteristics such as shortest paths and

  5. Dynamic Cooperative Clustering Based Power Assignment: Network Capacity and Lifetime Efficient Topology Control in Cooperative Ad Hoc Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Hong Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cooperative communication (CC is used in topology control as it can reduce the transmission power and expand the transmission range. However, all previous research on topology control under the CC model focused on maintaining network connectivity and minimizing the total energy consumption, which would lead to low network capacity, transmission interruption, or even network paralysis. Meanwhile, without considering the balance of energy consumption in the network, it would reduce the network lifetime and greatly affect the network performance. This paper tries to solve the above problems existing in the research on topology control under the CC model by proposing a power assignment (DCCPA algorithm based on dynamic cooperative clustering in cooperative ad hoc networks. The new algorithm clusters the network to maximize network capacity and makes the clusters communicate with each other by CC. To reduce the number of redundant links between clusters, we design a static clustering method by using Kruskal algorithm. To maximize the network lifetime, we also propose a cluster head rotating method which can reach a good tradeoff between residual energy and distance for the cluster head reselection. Experimental results show that DCCPA can improve 80% network capacity with Cooperative Bridges algorithm; meanwhile, it can improve 20% network lifetime.

  6. Topological traps control flow on real networks: the case of coordination failures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca, Carlos P; Lozano, Sergi; Arenas, Alex; Sánchez, Angel

    2010-12-09

    We study evolutionary games in real social networks, with a focus on coordination games. We find that populations fail to coordinate in the same behavior for a wide range of parameters, a novel phenomenon not observed in most artificial model networks. We show that this result arises from the relevance of correlations beyond the first neighborhood, in particular from topological traps formed by links between nodes of different degrees in regions with few or no redundant paths. This specificity of real networks has not been modeled so far with synthetic networks. We thus conclude that model networks must be improved to include these mesoscopic structures, in order to successfully address issues such as the emergence of cooperation in real societies. We finally show that topological traps are a very generic phenomenon that may arise in very many different networks and fields, such as opinion models, spread of diseases or ecological networks.

  7. Flexible foraging shapes the topology of plant-pollinator interaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiesman, Brian J; Gratton, Claudio

    2016-06-01

    In plant-pollinator networks, foraging choices by pollinators help form the connecting links between species. Flexible foraging should therefore play an important role in defining network topology. Factors such as morphological trait complementarity limit a pollinator's pool of potential floral resources, but which potential resource species are actually utilized at a location depends on local environmental and ecological context. Pollinators can be highly flexible foragers, but the effect of this flexibility on network topology remains unclear. To understand how flexible foraging affects network topology, we examined differences between sets of locally realized interactions and corresponding sets of potential interactions within 25 weighted plant-pollinator networks in two different regions of the United States. We examined two possible mechanisms for flexible foraging effects on realized networks: (1) preferential targeting of higher-density plant resources, which should increase network nestedness, and (2) context-dependent resource partitioning driven by interspecific competition, which should increase modularity and complementary specialization. We found that flexible foraging has strong effects on realized network topology. Realized connectance was much lower than connectance based on potential interactions, indicating a local narrowing of diet breadth. Moreover, the foraging choices pollinators made, which particular plant species to visit and at what rates, resulted in networks that were significantly less nested and significantly more modular and specialized than their corresponding networks of potential interactions. Preferentially foraging on locally abundant resources was not a strong driver of the realization of potential interactions. However, the degree of modularity and complementary specialization both increased with the number of competing pollinator species and with niche availability. We therefore conclude that flexible foraging affects realized

  8. Holographic duality from random tensor networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayden, Patrick; Nezami, Sepehr; Qi, Xiao-Liang; Thomas, Nathaniel; Walter, Michael; Yang, Zhao [Stanford Institute for Theoretical Physics, Department of Physics, Stanford University,382 Via Pueblo, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2016-11-02

    Tensor networks provide a natural framework for exploring holographic duality because they obey entanglement area laws. They have been used to construct explicit toy models realizing many of the interesting structural features of the AdS/CFT correspondence, including the non-uniqueness of bulk operator reconstruction in the boundary theory. In this article, we explore the holographic properties of networks of random tensors. We find that our models naturally incorporate many features that are analogous to those of the AdS/CFT correspondence. When the bond dimension of the tensors is large, we show that the entanglement entropy of all boundary regions, whether connected or not, obey the Ryu-Takayanagi entropy formula, a fact closely related to known properties of the multipartite entanglement of assistance. We also discuss the behavior of Rényi entropies in our models and contrast it with AdS/CFT. Moreover, we find that each boundary region faithfully encodes the physics of the entire bulk entanglement wedge, i.e., the bulk region enclosed by the boundary region and the minimal surface. Our method is to interpret the average over random tensors as the partition function of a classical ferromagnetic Ising model, so that the minimal surfaces of Ryu-Takayanagi appear as domain walls. Upon including the analog of a bulk field, we find that our model reproduces the expected corrections to the Ryu-Takayanagi formula: the bulk minimal surface is displaced and the entropy is augmented by the entanglement of the bulk field. Increasing the entanglement of the bulk field ultimately changes the minimal surface behavior topologically, in a way similar to the effect of creating a black hole. Extrapolating bulk correlation functions to the boundary permits the calculation of the scaling dimensions of boundary operators, which exhibit a large gap between a small number of low-dimension operators and the rest. While we are primarily motivated by the AdS/CFT duality, the main

  9. Empirical Research on the Topological Properties of Internet+ Information Resources Network Nodes

    OpenAIRE

    Wu Bin; Wu Ping; Ma Ji-Tao; Guo Ting-Ting; Li Jun; Liu Wei

    2017-01-01

    The “Internet+” is the product of the Internet development, and its network topology isn’t the same as the traditional Internet. The relevance of the average daily visiting data and the daily page viewing data are studied empirically, the rich-club coefficient and the node access probability are redefined, and the topological entropy model to measure the degree of nodes information aggregation is built by using the entropy theory. The experimental results showed that the calculation model sca...

  10. Emergence of Scaling in Random Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barabási, Albert-László; Albert, Réka

    1999-10-01

    Systems as diverse as genetic networks or the World Wide Web are best described as networks with complex topology. A common property of many large networks is that the vertex connectivities follow a scale-free power-law distribution. This feature was found to be a consequence of two generic mechanisms: (i) networks expand continuously by the addition of new vertices, and (ii) new vertices attach preferentially to sites that are already well connected. A model based on these two ingredients reproduces the observed stationary scale-free distributions, which indicates that the development of large networks is governed by robust self-organizing phenomena that go beyond the particulars of the individual systems.

  11. Topological Phenotypes Constitute a New Dimension in the Phenotypic Space of Leaf Venation Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronellenfitsch, Henrik; Lasser, Jana; Daly, Douglas C; Katifori, Eleni

    2015-12-01

    The leaves of angiosperms contain highly complex venation networks consisting of recursively nested, hierarchically organized loops. We describe a new phenotypic trait of reticulate vascular networks based on the topology of the nested loops. This phenotypic trait encodes information orthogonal to widely used geometric phenotypic traits, and thus constitutes a new dimension in the leaf venation phenotypic space. We apply our metric to a database of 186 leaves and leaflets representing 137 species, predominantly from the Burseraceae family, revealing diverse topological network traits even within this single family. We show that topological information significantly improves identification of leaves from fragments by calculating a "leaf venation fingerprint" from topology and geometry. Further, we present a phenomenological model suggesting that the topological traits can be explained by noise effects unique to specimen during development of each leaf which leave their imprint on the final network. This work opens the path to new quantitative identification techniques for leaves which go beyond simple geometric traits such as vein density and is directly applicable to other planar or sub-planar networks such as blood vessels in the brain.

  12. Diffusion Strategies for Distributed Kalman Filter with Dynamic Topologies in Virtualized Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shujie Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Network virtualization has become pervasive and is used in many applications. Through the combination of network virtualization and wireless sensor networks, it can greatly improve the multiple applications of traditional wireless sensor networks. However, because of the dynamic reconfiguration of topologies in the physical layer of virtualized sensor networks (VSNs, it requires a mechanism to guarantee the accuracy of estimate values by sensors. In this paper, we focus on the distributed Kalman filter algorithm with dynamic topologies to support this requirement. As one strategy of distributed Kalman filter algorithms, diffusion Kalman filter algorithm has a better performance on the state estimation. However, the existing diffusion Kalman filter algorithms all focus on the fixed topologies. Considering the dynamic topologies in the physical layer of VSNs mentioned above, we present a diffusion Kalman filter algorithm with dynamic topologies (DKFdt. Then, we emphatically derive the theoretical expressions of the mean and mean-square performance. From the expressions, the feasibility of the algorithm is verified. Finally, simulations confirm that the proposed algorithm achieves a greatly improved performance as compared with a noncooperative manner.

  13. Topological Phenotypes Constitute a New Dimension in the Phenotypic Space of Leaf Venation Networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik Ronellenfitsch

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The leaves of angiosperms contain highly complex venation networks consisting of recursively nested, hierarchically organized loops. We describe a new phenotypic trait of reticulate vascular networks based on the topology of the nested loops. This phenotypic trait encodes information orthogonal to widely used geometric phenotypic traits, and thus constitutes a new dimension in the leaf venation phenotypic space. We apply our metric to a database of 186 leaves and leaflets representing 137 species, predominantly from the Burseraceae family, revealing diverse topological network traits even within this single family. We show that topological information significantly improves identification of leaves from fragments by calculating a "leaf venation fingerprint" from topology and geometry. Further, we present a phenomenological model suggesting that the topological traits can be explained by noise effects unique to specimen during development of each leaf which leave their imprint on the final network. This work opens the path to new quantitative identification techniques for leaves which go beyond simple geometric traits such as vein density and is directly applicable to other planar or sub-planar networks such as blood vessels in the brain.

  14. Predicting the connectivity of primate cortical networks from topological and spatial node properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaiser Marcus

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The organization of the connectivity between mammalian cortical areas has become a major subject of study, because of its important role in scaffolding the macroscopic aspects of animal behavior and intelligence. In this study we present a computational reconstruction approach to the problem of network organization, by considering the topological and spatial features of each area in the primate cerebral cortex as subsidy for the reconstruction of the global cortical network connectivity. Starting with all areas being disconnected, pairs of areas with similar sets of features are linked together, in an attempt to recover the original network structure. Results Inferring primate cortical connectivity from the properties of the nodes, remarkably good reconstructions of the global network organization could be obtained, with the topological features allowing slightly superior accuracy to the spatial ones. Analogous reconstruction attempts for the C. elegans neuronal network resulted in substantially poorer recovery, indicating that cortical area interconnections are relatively stronger related to the considered topological and spatial properties than neuronal projections in the nematode. Conclusion The close relationship between area-based features and global connectivity may hint on developmental rules and constraints for cortical networks. Particularly, differences between the predictions from topological and spatial properties, together with the poorer recovery resulting from spatial properties, indicate that the organization of cortical networks is not entirely determined by spatial constraints.

  15. Predicting genetic interactions with random walks on biological networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Ambuj K

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several studies have demonstrated that synthetic lethal genetic interactions between gene mutations provide an indication of functional redundancy between molecular complexes and pathways. These observations help explain the finding that organisms are able to tolerate single gene deletions for a large majority of genes. For example, system-wide gene knockout/knockdown studies in S. cerevisiae and C. elegans revealed non-viable phenotypes for a mere 18% and 10% of the genome, respectively. It has been postulated that the low percentage of essential genes reflects the extensive amount of genetic buffering that occurs within genomes. Consistent with this hypothesis, systematic double-knockout screens in S. cerevisiae and C. elegans show that, on average, 0.5% of tested gene pairs are synthetic sick or synthetic lethal. While knowledge of synthetic lethal interactions provides valuable insight into molecular functionality, testing all combinations of gene pairs represents a daunting task for molecular biologists, as the combinatorial nature of these relationships imposes a large experimental burden. Still, the task of mapping pairwise interactions between genes is essential to discovering functional relationships between molecular complexes and pathways, as they form the basis of genetic robustness. Towards the goal of alleviating the experimental workload, computational techniques that accurately predict genetic interactions can potentially aid in targeting the most likely candidate interactions. Building on previous studies that analyzed properties of network topology to predict genetic interactions, we apply random walks on biological networks to accurately predict pairwise genetic interactions. Furthermore, we incorporate all published non-interactions into our algorithm for measuring the topological relatedness between two genes. We apply our method to S. cerevisiae and C. elegans datasets and, using a decision tree

  16. Multifractal analysis and topological properties of a new family of weighted Koch networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Da-Wen; Yu, Zu-Guo; Anh, Vo

    2017-03-01

    Weighted complex networks, especially scale-free networks, which characterize real-life systems better than non-weighted networks, have attracted considerable interest in recent years. Studies on the multifractality of weighted complex networks are still to be undertaken. In this paper, inspired by the concepts of Koch networks and Koch island, we propose a new family of weighted Koch networks, and investigate their multifractal behavior and topological properties. We find some key topological properties of the new networks: their vertex cumulative strength has a power-law distribution; there is a power-law relationship between their topological degree and weight strength; the networks have a high weighted clustering coefficient of 0.41004 (which is independent of the scaling factor c) in the limit of large generation t; the second smallest eigenvalue μ2 and the maximum eigenvalue μn are approximated by quartic polynomials of the scaling factor c for the general Laplacian operator, while μ2 is approximately a quartic polynomial of c and μn= 1.5 for the normalized Laplacian operator. Then, we find that weighted koch networks are both fractal and multifractal, their fractal dimension is influenced by the scaling factor c. We also apply these analyses to six real-world networks, and find that the multifractality in three of them are strong.

  17. Stability and dynamical properties of material flow systems on random networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, K.; Galla, T.

    2009-04-01

    The theory of complex networks and of disordered systems is used to study the stability and dynamical properties of a simple model of material flow networks defined on random graphs. In particular we address instabilities that are characteristic of flow networks in economic, ecological and biological systems. Based on results from random matrix theory, we work out the phase diagram of such systems defined on extensively connected random graphs, and study in detail how the choice of control policies and the network structure affects stability. We also present results for more complex topologies of the underlying graph, focussing on finitely connected Erdös-Réyni graphs, Small-World Networks and Barabási-Albert scale-free networks. Results indicate that variability of input-output matrix elements, and random structures of the underlying graph tend to make the system less stable, while fast price dynamics or strong responsiveness to stock accumulation promote stability.

  18. A New Energy-Efficient Topology for Wireless Body Area Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostampour, Ameneh; Moghim, Neda; Kaedi, Marjan

    2017-01-01

    Wireless body area networks consist of several devices placed on the human body, sensing vital signs and providing remote recognition of health disorders. Low power consumption is crucial in these networks. A new energy-efficient topology is provided in this paper, considering relay and sensor nodes' energy consumption and network maintenance costs. In this topology design, relay nodes, placed on the cloth, are used to help the sensor nodes forwarding data to the sink. Relay nodes' situation is determined such that the relay nodes' energy consumption merges the uniform distribution. Simulation results show that the proposed method increases the lifetime of the network with nearly uniform distribution of the relay nodes' energy consumption. Furthermore, this technique simultaneously reduces network maintenance costs and continuous replacements of the designer clothing. The proposed method also determines the way by which the network traffic is split and multipath routed to the sink.

  19. Accepting Hybrid Networks of Evolutionary Processors with Special Topologies and Small Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgen Dassow

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Starting from the fact that complete Accepting Hybrid Networks of Evolutionary Processors allow much communication between the nodes and are far from network structures used in practice, we propose in this paper three network topologies that restrict the communication: star networks, ring networks, and grid networks. We show that ring-AHNEPs can simulate 2-tag systems, thus we deduce the existence of a universal ring-AHNEP. For star networks or grid networks, we show a more general result; that is, each recursively enumerable language can be accepted efficiently by a star- or grid-AHNEP. We also present bounds for the size of these star and grid networks. As a consequence we get that each recursively enumerable can be accepted by networks with at most 13 communication channels and by networks where each node communicates with at most three other nodes.

  20. Complex brain networks: From topological communities to clustered ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We investigate synchronisation dynamics on the corticocortical network of the cat by modelling each node of the network (cortical area) with a subnetwork of interacting excitable neurons. We find that this network of networks displays clustered synchronisation behaviour and the dynamical clusters closely coincide with the ...

  1. Effect of the social influence on topological properties of user-object bipartite networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jian-Guo; Hu, Zhaolong; Guo, Qiang

    2013-11-01

    Social influence plays an important role in analyzing online users' collective behaviors [Salganik et al., Science 311, 854 (2006)]. However, the effect of the social influence from the viewpoint of theoretical model is missing. In this paper, by taking into account the social influence and users' preferences, we develop a theoretical model to analyze the topological properties of user-object bipartite networks, including the degree distribution, average nearest neighbor degree and the bipartite clustering coefficient, as well as topological properties of the original user-object networks and their unipartite projections. According to the users' preferences and the global ranking effect, we analyze the theoretical results for two benchmark data sets, Amazon and Bookcrossing, which are approximately consistent with the empirical results. This work suggests that this model is feasible to analyze topological properties of bipartite networks in terms of the social influence and the users' preferences.

  2. Topological basis of signal integration in the transcriptional-regulatory network of the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chennubhotla Chakra

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Signal recognition and information processing is a fundamental cellular function, which in part involves comprehensive transcriptional regulatory (TR mechanisms carried out in response to complex environmental signals in the context of the cell's own internal state. However, the network topological basis of developing such integrated responses remains poorly understood. Results By studying the TR network of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae we show that an intermediate layer of transcription factors naturally segregates into distinct subnetworks. In these topological units transcription factors are densely interlinked in a largely hierarchical manner and respond to external signals by utilizing a fraction of these subnets. Conclusion As transcriptional regulation represents the 'slow' component of overall information processing, the identified topology suggests a model in which successive waves of transcriptional regulation originating from distinct fractions of the TR network control robust integrated responses to complex stimuli.

  3. A Network Topology Control and Identity Authentication Protocol with Support for Movable Sensor Nodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Chen, Wei; Liang, Jixing; Zheng, Bingxin; Jiang, Shengming

    2015-12-01

    It is expected that in the near future wireless sensor network (WSNs) will be more widely used in the mobile environment, in applications such as Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs) for marine monitoring and mobile robots for environmental investigation. The sensor nodes' mobility can easily cause changes to the structure of a network topology, and lead to the decline in the amount of transmitted data, excessive energy consumption, and lack of security. To solve these problems, a kind of efficient Topology Control algorithm for node Mobility (TCM) is proposed. In the topology construction stage, an efficient clustering algorithm is adopted, which supports sensor node movement. It can ensure the balance of clustering, and reduce the energy consumption. In the topology maintenance stage, the digital signature authentication based on Error Correction Code (ECC) and the communication mechanism of soft handover are adopted. After verifying the legal identity of the mobile nodes, secure communications can be established, and this can increase the amount of data transmitted. Compared to some existing schemes, the proposed scheme has significant advantages regarding network topology stability, amounts of data transferred, lifetime and safety performance of the network.

  4. A Network Topology Control and Identity Authentication Protocol with Support for Movable Sensor Nodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Zhang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available It is expected that in the near future wireless sensor network (WSNs will be more widely used in the mobile environment, in applications such as Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs for marine monitoring and mobile robots for environmental investigation. The sensor nodes’ mobility can easily cause changes to the structure of a network topology, and lead to the decline in the amount of transmitted data, excessive energy consumption, and lack of security. To solve these problems, a kind of efficient Topology Control algorithm for node Mobility (TCM is proposed. In the topology construction stage, an efficient clustering algorithm is adopted, which supports sensor node movement. It can ensure the balance of clustering, and reduce the energy consumption. In the topology maintenance stage, the digital signature authentication based on Error Correction Code (ECC and the communication mechanism of soft handover are adopted. After verifying the legal identity of the mobile nodes, secure communications can be established, and this can increase the amount of data transmitted. Compared to some existing schemes, the proposed scheme has significant advantages regarding network topology stability, amounts of data transferred, lifetime and safety performance of the network.

  5. graphite - a Bioconductor package to convert pathway topology to gene network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sales Gabriele

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene set analysis is moving towards considering pathway topology as a crucial feature. Pathway elements are complex entities such as protein complexes, gene family members and chemical compounds. The conversion of pathway topology to a gene/protein networks (where nodes are a simple element like a gene/protein is a critical and challenging task that enables topology-based gene set analyses. Unfortunately, currently available R/Bioconductor packages provide pathway networks only from single databases. They do not propagate signals through chemical compounds and do not differentiate between complexes and gene families. Results Here we present graphite, a Bioconductor package addressing these issues. Pathway information from four different databases is interpreted following specific biologically-driven rules that allow the reconstruction of gene-gene networks taking into account protein complexes, gene families and sensibly removing chemical compounds from the final graphs. The resulting networks represent a uniform resource for pathway analyses. Indeed, graphite provides easy access to three recently proposed topological methods. The graphite package is available as part of the Bioconductor software suite. Conclusions graphite is an innovative package able to gather and make easily available the contents of the four major pathway databases. In the field of topological analysis graphite acts as a provider of biological information by reducing the pathway complexity considering the biological meaning of the pathway elements.

  6. Comparing genomes to computer operating systems in terms of the topology and evolution of their regulatory control networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Koon-Kiu; Fang, Gang; Bhardwaj, Nitin; Alexander, Roger P; Gerstein, Mark

    2010-05-18

    The genome has often been called the operating system (OS) for a living organism. A computer OS is described by a regulatory control network termed the call graph, which is analogous to the transcriptional regulatory network in a cell. To apply our firsthand knowledge of the architecture of software systems to understand cellular design principles, we present a comparison between the transcriptional regulatory network of a well-studied bacterium (Escherichia coli) and the call graph of a canonical OS (Linux) in terms of topology and evolution. We show that both networks have a fundamentally hierarchical layout, but there is a key difference: The transcriptional regulatory network possesses a few global regulators at the top and many targets at the bottom; conversely, the call graph has many regulators controlling a small set of generic functions. This top-heavy organization leads to highly overlapping functional modules in the call graph, in contrast to the relatively independent modules in the regulatory network. We further develop a way to measure evolutionary rates comparably between the two networks and explain this difference in terms of network evolution. The process of biological evolution via random mutation and subsequent selection tightly constrains the evolution of regulatory network hubs. The call graph, however, exhibits rapid evolution of its highly connected generic components, made possible by designers' continual fine-tuning. These findings stem from the design principles of the two systems: robustness for biological systems and cost effectiveness (reuse) for software systems.

  7. Reconstruction of network topology using status-time-series data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Pradumn Kumar; Badarla, Venkataramana

    2018-01-01

    Uncovering the heterogeneous connection pattern of a networked system from the available status-time-series (STS) data of a dynamical process on the network is of great interest in network science and known as a reverse engineering problem. Dynamical processes on a network are affected by the structure of the network. The dependency between the diffusion dynamics and structure of the network can be utilized to retrieve the connection pattern from the diffusion data. Information of the network structure can help to devise the control of dynamics on the network. In this paper, we consider the problem of network reconstruction from the available status-time-series (STS) data using matrix analysis. The proposed method of network reconstruction from the STS data is tested successfully under susceptible-infected-susceptible (SIS) diffusion dynamics on real-world and computer-generated benchmark networks. High accuracy and efficiency of the proposed reconstruction procedure from the status-time-series data define the novelty of the method. Our proposed method outperforms compressed sensing theory (CST) based method of network reconstruction using STS data. Further, the same procedure of network reconstruction is applied to the weighted networks. The ordering of the edges in the weighted networks is identified with high accuracy.

  8. Positron Emission Tomography Reveals Abnormal Topological Organization in Functional Brain Network in Diabetic Patients

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    Qiu eXiangzhe

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have demonstrated alterations in the topological organization of structural brain networks in diabetes mellitus (DM. However, the DM-related changes in the topological properties in functional brain networks are almost unexplored so far. We therefore used fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET data to construct functional brain networks of 73 DM patients and 91 sex- and age-matched normal controls (NCs, followed by a graph theoretical analysis. We found that both DM patients and NCs had a small-world topology in functional brain network. In comparison to the NC group, the DM group was found to have significantly lower small-world index, lower normalized clustering coefficients and higher normalized shortest path length. Moreover, for diabetic patients, the nodal centrality was significantly reduced in the right rectus, the right cuneus, the left middle occipital gyrus, and the left postcentral gyrus, and it was significantly increased in the orbitofrontal region of the left middle frontal gyrus, the left olfactory region, and the right paracentral lobule. Our results demonstrated that the diabetic brain was associated with disrupted topological organization in the functional PET network, thus providing the functional evidence for the abnormalities of brain networks in DM.

  9. Topology control of tactical wireless sensor networks using energy efficient zone routing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preetha Thulasiraman

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The US Department of Defense (DoD routinely uses wireless sensor networks (WSNs for military tactical communications. Sensor node die-out has a significant impact on the topology of a tactical WSN. This is problematic for military applications where situational data is critical to tactical decision making. To increase the amount of time all sensor nodes remain active within the network and to control the network topology tactically, energy efficient routing mechanisms must be employed. In this paper, we aim to provide realistic insights on the practical advantages and disadvantages of using established routing techniques for tactical WSNs. We investigate the following established routing algorithms: direct routing, minimum transmission energy (MTE, Low Energy Adaptive Cluster Head routing (LEACH, and zone clustering. Based on the node die out statistics observed with these algorithms and the topological impact the node die outs have on the network, we develop a novel, energy efficient zone clustering algorithm called EZone. Via extensive simulations using MATLAB, we analyze the effectiveness of these algorithms on network performance for single and multiple gateway scenarios and show that the EZone algorithm tactically controls the topology of the network, thereby maintaining significant service area coverage when compared to the other routing algorithms.

  10. Cross over of recurrence networks to random graphs and random ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-01-27

    Jan 27, 2017 ... analysis based on net theoretic measures has developed into a major field, .... with the value of the scaling index γ falling between 2 and 3. To compute the network measures, we first construct an ensemble of synthetic networks, both random and ... higher k values are present to maintain the same γ. In both.

  11. A cluster-based architecture to structure the topology of parallel wireless sensor networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloret, Jaime; Garcia, Miguel; Bri, Diana; Diaz, Juan R

    2009-01-01

    A wireless sensor network is a self-configuring network of mobile nodes connected by wireless links where the nodes have limited capacity and energy. In many cases, the application environment requires the design of an exclusive network topology for a particular case. Cluster-based network developments and proposals in existence have been designed to build a network for just one type of node, where all nodes can communicate with any other nodes in their coverage area. Let us suppose a set of clusters of sensor nodes where each cluster is formed by different types of nodes (e.g., they could be classified by the sensed parameter using different transmitting interfaces, by the node profile or by the type of device: laptops, PDAs, sensor etc.) and exclusive networks, as virtual networks, are needed with the same type of sensed data, or the same type of devices, or even the same type of profiles. In this paper, we propose an algorithm that is able to structure the topology of different wireless sensor networks to coexist in the same environment. It allows control and management of the topology of each network. The architecture operation and the protocol messages will be described. Measurements from a real test-bench will show that the designed protocol has low bandwidth consumption and also demonstrates the viability and the scalability of the proposed architecture. Our ccluster-based algorithm is compared with other algorithms reported in the literature in terms of architecture and protocol measurements.

  12. Topology of Innovation Spaces in the Knowledge Networks Emerging through Questions-And-Answers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andjelković, Miroslav; Tadić, Bosiljka; Mitrović Dankulov, Marija; Rajković, Milan; Melnik, Roderick

    2016-01-01

    The communication processes of knowledge creation represent a particular class of human dynamics where the expertise of individuals plays a substantial role, thus offering a unique possibility to study the structure of knowledge networks from online data. Here, we use the empirical evidence from questions-and-answers in mathematics to analyse the emergence of the network of knowledge contents (or tags) as the individual experts use them in the process. After removing extra edges from the network-associated graph, we apply the methods of algebraic topology of graphs to examine the structure of higher-order combinatorial spaces in networks for four consecutive time intervals. We find that the ranking distributions of the suitably scaled topological dimensions of nodes fall into a unique curve for all time intervals and filtering levels, suggesting a robust architecture of knowledge networks. Moreover, these networks preserve the logical structure of knowledge within emergent communities of nodes, labeled according to a standard mathematical classification scheme. Further, we investigate the appearance of new contents over time and their innovative combinations, which expand the knowledge network. In each network, we identify an innovation channel as a subgraph of triangles and larger simplices to which new tags attach. Our results show that the increasing topological complexity of the innovation channels contributes to network's architecture over different time periods, and is consistent with temporal correlations of the occurrence of new tags. The methodology applies to a wide class of data with the suitable temporal resolution and clearly identified knowledge-content units.

  13. Plasticity-Driven Self-Organization under Topological Constraints Accounts for Non-random Features of Cortical Synaptic Wiring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Miner

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the structure and dynamics of cortical connectivity is vital to understanding cortical function. Experimental data strongly suggest that local recurrent connectivity in the cortex is significantly non-random, exhibiting, for example, above-chance bidirectionality and an overrepresentation of certain triangular motifs. Additional evidence suggests a significant distance dependency to connectivity over a local scale of a few hundred microns, and particular patterns of synaptic turnover dynamics, including a heavy-tailed distribution of synaptic efficacies, a power law distribution of synaptic lifetimes, and a tendency for stronger synapses to be more stable over time. Understanding how many of these non-random features simultaneously arise would provide valuable insights into the development and function of the cortex. While previous work has modeled some of the individual features of local cortical wiring, there is no model that begins to comprehensively account for all of them. We present a spiking network model of a rodent Layer 5 cortical slice which, via the interactions of a few simple biologically motivated intrinsic, synaptic, and structural plasticity mechanisms, qualitatively reproduces these non-random effects when combined with simple topological constraints. Our model suggests that mechanisms of self-organization arising from a small number of plasticity rules provide a parsimonious explanation for numerous experimentally observed non-random features of recurrent cortical wiring. Interestingly, similar mechanisms have been shown to endow recurrent networks with powerful learning abilities, suggesting that these mechanism are central to understanding both structure and function of cortical synaptic wiring.

  14. Modelling complex networks by random hierarchical graphs

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    M.Wróbel

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Numerous complex networks contain special patterns, called network motifs. These are specific subgraphs, which occur oftener than in randomized networks of Erdős-Rényi type. We choose one of them, the triangle, and build a family of random hierarchical graphs, being Sierpiński gasket-based graphs with random "decorations". We calculate the important characteristics of these graphs - average degree, average shortest path length, small-world graph family characteristics. They depend on probability of decorations. We analyze the Ising model on our graphs and describe its critical properties using a renormalization-group technique.

  15. Social optimization in the presence of cognitive local optima: effects of social network topology and interaction mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, James

    2009-07-01

    The combined tendency for positive self-presentation and mimicry or social learning results in the capability of a population of simulated individuals to optimize their cognitive structures. A population of parallel constraint satisfaction networks was created, with globally and locally optimal activation patterns. Individuals started with random activations and interacted to find optimal vectors. Two social network topologies were tested, as well as two modes of interaction; results indicated that the ability to optimize activation vectors depends on the social network configuration and whether individuals are influenced by their best neighbor or are attracted to a neighborhood centroid. Simulated individuals are able to find suitable patterns of belief or attitude with very little internal information processing, using social interaction. Copyright © 2009 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  16. Computing distance-based topological descriptors of complex chemical networks: New theoretical techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayat, Sakander

    2017-11-01

    Structure-based topological descriptors/indices of complex chemical networks enable prediction of physico-chemical properties and the bioactivities of these compounds through QSAR/QSPR methods. In this paper, we have developed a rigorous computational and theoretical technique to compute various distance-based topological indices of complex chemical networks. A fullerene is called the IPR (Isolated-Pentagon-Rule) fullerene, if every pentagon in it is surrounded by hexagons only. To ensure the applicability of our technique, we compute certain distance-based indices of an infinite family of IPR fullerenes. Our results show that the proposed technique is more diverse and bears less algorithmic and combinatorial complexity.

  17. Distributed topology control algorithm to conserve energy in heterogeneous wireless mesh networks

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Aron, FO

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available in performance with the resulting topology being a sub-network of the one generated by [11]. Li and Halpern [13] further propose the small minimum energy communication network (SMECN). In this algorithm, each node u initially broadcasts a “hello” message... algorithm that runs in each node is presented as follows:- Phase1: Establishing the accessible neighbourhood topology. In this stage, node u broadcasts a “hello” message using its full power, max uP . The nodes that receive the “hello” message form...

  18. Impact of the environment and the topology on the performance of hierarchical body area networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrari Gianluigi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Personal area networks and, more specifically, body area networks (BANs are key building blocks of future generation networks and of the Internet of Things as well. In this article, we present a novel analytical framework for network performance analysis of body sensor networks with hierarchical (tree topologies. This framework takes into account the specificities of the on-body channel modeling and the impact of the surrounding environment. The obtained results clearly highlight the differences between indoor and outdoor scenarios, and provide several insights on BAN design and analysis. In particular, it will be shown that the BAN topology should be selected according to the foreseen medical application and the deployment environment.

  19. ELASTICITY:Topological characterization of robustness in complex networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sydney, A.; Scoglio, C.; Schumm, P.; Kooij, R.E.

    2008-01-01

    Just as a herd of animals relies on its robust social structure to survive in the wild, similarly robustness is a crucial characteristic for the survival of a complex network under attack. The capacity to measure robustness in complex networks defines a network's survivability in the advent of

  20. Understanding Terrorist Network Topologies and Their Resilience Against Disruption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindelauf, R.; Borm, P.E.M.; Hamers, H.J.M.

    2009-01-01

    This article investigates the structural position of covert (terrorist or criminal) networks. Using the secrecy versus information tradeoff characterization of covert networks it is shown that their network structures are generally not small-worlds, in contradistinction to many overt social

  1. Stable and emergent network topologies : A structural approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herman Monsuur

    2007-01-01

    Economic, social and military networks have at least one thing in common: they change over time. For various reasons, nodes form and terminate links, thereby rearranging the network. In this paper, we present a structural network mechanism that formalizes a possible incentive that guides nodes in

  2. Wave speed in excitable random networks with spatially constrained connections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikita Vladimirov

    Full Text Available Very fast oscillations (VFO in neocortex are widely observed before epileptic seizures, and there is growing evidence that they are caused by networks of pyramidal neurons connected by gap junctions between their axons. We are motivated by the spatio-temporal waves of activity recorded using electrocorticography (ECoG, and study the speed of activity propagation through a network of neurons axonally coupled by gap junctions. We simulate wave propagation by excitable cellular automata (CA on random (Erdös-Rényi networks of special type, with spatially constrained connections. From the cellular automaton model, we derive a mean field theory to predict wave propagation. The governing equation resolved by the Fisher-Kolmogorov PDE fails to describe wave speed. A new (hyperbolic PDE is suggested, which provides adequate wave speed v( that saturates with network degree , in agreement with intuitive expectations and CA simulations. We further show that the maximum length of connection is a much better predictor of the wave speed than the mean length. When tested in networks with various degree distributions, wave speeds are found to strongly depend on the ratio of network moments / rather than on mean degree , which is explained by general network theory. The wave speeds are strikingly similar in a diverse set of networks, including regular, Poisson, exponential and power law distributions, supporting our theory for various network topologies. Our results suggest practical predictions for networks of electrically coupled neurons, and our mean field method can be readily applied for a wide class of similar problems, such as spread of epidemics through spatial networks.

  3. The pairwise disconnectivity index as a new metric for the topological analysis of regulatory networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potapov, Anatolij P; Goemann, Björn; Wingender, Edgar

    2008-05-02

    Currently, there is a gap between purely theoretical studies of the topology of large bioregulatory networks and the practical traditions and interests of experimentalists. While the theoretical approaches emphasize the global characterization of regulatory systems, the practical approaches focus on the role of distinct molecules and genes in regulation. To bridge the gap between these opposite approaches, one needs to combine 'general' with 'particular' properties and translate abstract topological features of large systems into testable functional characteristics of individual components. Here, we propose a new topological parameter--the pairwise disconnectivity index of a network's element - that is capable of such bridging. The pairwise disconnectivity index quantifies how crucial an individual element is for sustaining the communication ability between connected pairs of vertices in a network that is displayed as a directed graph. Such an element might be a vertex (i.e., molecules, genes), an edge (i.e., reactions, interactions), as well as a group of vertices and/or edges. The index can be viewed as a measure of topological redundancy of regulatory paths which connect different parts of a given network and as a measure of sensitivity (robustness) of this network to the presence (absence) of each individual element. Accordingly, we introduce the notion of a path-degree of a vertex in terms of its corresponding incoming, outgoing and mediated paths, respectively. The pairwise disconnectivity index has been applied to the analysis of several regulatory networks from various organisms. The importance of an individual vertex or edge for the coherence of the network is determined by the particular position of the given element in the whole network. Our approach enables to evaluate the effect of removing each element (i.e., vertex, edge, or their combinations) from a network. The greatest potential value of this approach is its ability to systematically analyze the

  4. The pairwise disconnectivity index as a new metric for the topological analysis of regulatory networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wingender Edgar

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Currently, there is a gap between purely theoretical studies of the topology of large bioregulatory networks and the practical traditions and interests of experimentalists. While the theoretical approaches emphasize the global characterization of regulatory systems, the practical approaches focus on the role of distinct molecules and genes in regulation. To bridge the gap between these opposite approaches, one needs to combine 'general' with 'particular' properties and translate abstract topological features of large systems into testable functional characteristics of individual components. Here, we propose a new topological parameter – the pairwise disconnectivity index of a network's element – that is capable of such bridging. Results The pairwise disconnectivity index quantifies how crucial an individual element is for sustaining the communication ability between connected pairs of vertices in a network that is displayed as a directed graph. Such an element might be a vertex (i.e., molecules, genes, an edge (i.e., reactions, interactions, as well as a group of vertices and/or edges. The index can be viewed as a measure of topological redundancy of regulatory paths which connect different parts of a given network and as a measure of sensitivity (robustness of this network to the presence (absence of each individual element. Accordingly, we introduce the notion of a path-degree of a vertex in terms of its corresponding incoming, outgoing and mediated paths, respectively. The pairwise disconnectivity index has been applied to the analysis of several regulatory networks from various organisms. The importance of an individual vertex or edge for the coherence of the network is determined by the particular position of the given element in the whole network. Conclusion Our approach enables to evaluate the effect of removing each element (i.e., vertex, edge, or their combinations from a network. The greatest potential value of

  5. Using Hybrid Angle/Distance Information for Distributed Topology Control in Vehicular Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Chi Huang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In a vehicular sensor network (VSN, the key design issue is how to organize vehicles effectively, such that the local network topology can be stabilized quickly. In this work, each vehicle with on-board sensors can be considered as a local controller associated with a group of communication members. In order to balance the load among the nodes and govern the local topology change, a group formation scheme using localized criteria is implemented. The proposed distributed topology control method focuses on reducing the rate of group member change and avoiding the unnecessary information exchange. Two major phases are sequentially applied to choose the group members of each vehicle using hybrid angle/distance information. The operation of Phase I is based on the concept of the cone-based method, which can select the desired vehicles quickly. Afterwards, the proposed time-slot method is further applied to stabilize the network topology. Given the network structure in Phase I, a routing scheme is presented in Phase II. The network behaviors are explored through simulation and analysis in a variety of scenarios. The results show that the proposed mechanism is a scalable and effective control framework for VSNs.

  6. Optimality problem of network topology in stocks market analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djauhari, Maman Abdurachman; Gan, Siew Lee

    2015-02-01

    Since its introduction fifteen years ago, minimal spanning tree has become an indispensible tool in econophysics. It is to filter the important economic information contained in a complex system of financial markets' commodities. Here we show that, in general, that tool is not optimal in terms of topological properties. Consequently, the economic interpretation of the filtered information might be misleading. To overcome that non-optimality problem, a set of criteria and a selection procedure of an optimal minimal spanning tree will be developed. By using New York Stock Exchange data, the advantages of the proposed method will be illustrated in terms of the power-law of degree distribution.

  7. Empirical Research on the Topological Properties of Internet+ Information Resources Network Nodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Bin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The “Internet+” is the product of the Internet development, and its network topology isn’t the same as the traditional Internet. The relevance of the average daily visiting data and the daily page viewing data are studied empirically, the rich-club coefficient and the node access probability are redefined, and the topological entropy model to measure the degree of nodes information aggregation is built by using the entropy theory. The experimental results showed that the calculation model scaled the degree of information aggregation of the nodes in the “Internet+” topology efficiently. It provides an available computational model for the observation of resource access behaviors in the “Internet+” network.

  8. A Probabilistic and Highly Efficient Topology Control Algorithm for Underwater Cooperating AUV Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ning; Cürüklü, Baran; Bastos, Joaquim; Sucasas, Victor; Fernandez, Jose Antonio Sanchez; Rodriguez, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the Smart and Networking Underwater Robots in Cooperation Meshes (SWARMs) project is to make autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs), remote operated vehicles (ROVs) and unmanned surface vehicles (USVs) more accessible and useful. To achieve cooperation and communication between different AUVs, these must be able to exchange messages, so an efficient and reliable communication network is necessary for SWARMs. In order to provide an efficient and reliable communication network for mission execution, one of the important and necessary issues is the topology control of the network of AUVs that are cooperating underwater. However, due to the specific properties of an underwater AUV cooperation network, such as the high mobility of AUVs, large transmission delays, low bandwidth, etc., the traditional topology control algorithms primarily designed for terrestrial wireless sensor networks cannot be used directly in the underwater environment. Moreover, these algorithms, in which the nodes adjust their transmission power once the current transmission power does not equal an optimal one, are costly in an underwater cooperating AUV network. Considering these facts, in this paper, we propose a Probabilistic Topology Control (PTC) algorithm for an underwater cooperating AUV network. In PTC, when the transmission power of an AUV is not equal to the optimal transmission power, then whether the transmission power needs to be adjusted or not will be determined based on the AUV’s parameters. Each AUV determines their own transmission power adjustment probability based on the parameter deviations. The larger the deviation, the higher the transmission power adjustment probability is, and vice versa. For evaluating the performance of PTC, we combine the PTC algorithm with the Fuzzy logic Topology Control (FTC) algorithm and compare the performance of these two algorithms. The simulation results have demonstrated that the PTC is efficient at reducing the transmission power

  9. A Probabilistic and Highly Efficient Topology Control Algorithm for Underwater Cooperating AUV Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ning; Cürüklü, Baran; Bastos, Joaquim; Sucasas, Victor; Fernandez, Jose Antonio Sanchez; Rodriguez, Jonathan

    2017-05-04

    The aim of the Smart and Networking Underwater Robots in Cooperation Meshes (SWARMs) project is to make autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs), remote operated vehicles (ROVs) and unmanned surface vehicles (USVs) more accessible and useful. To achieve cooperation and communication between different AUVs, these must be able to exchange messages, so an efficient and reliable communication network is necessary for SWARMs. In order to provide an efficient and reliable communication network for mission execution, one of the important and necessary issues is the topology control of the network of AUVs that are cooperating underwater. However, due to the specific properties of an underwater AUV cooperation network, such as the high mobility of AUVs, large transmission delays, low bandwidth, etc., the traditional topology control algorithms primarily designed for terrestrial wireless sensor networks cannot be used directly in the underwater environment. Moreover, these algorithms, in which the nodes adjust their transmission power once the current transmission power does not equal an optimal one, are costly in an underwater cooperating AUV network. Considering these facts, in this paper, we propose a Probabilistic Topology Control (PTC) algorithm for an underwater cooperating AUV network. In PTC, when the transmission power of an AUV is not equal to the optimal transmission power, then whether the transmission power needs to be adjusted or not will be determined based on the AUV's parameters. Each AUV determines their own transmission power adjustment probability based on the parameter deviations. The larger the deviation, the higher the transmission power adjustment probability is, and vice versa. For evaluating the performance of PTC, we combine the PTC algorithm with the Fuzzy logic Topology Control (FTC) algorithm and compare the performance of these two algorithms. The simulation results have demonstrated that the PTC is efficient at reducing the transmission power

  10. A Probabilistic and Highly Efficient Topology Control Algorithm for Underwater Cooperating AUV Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Li

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the Smart and Networking Underwater Robots in Cooperation Meshes (SWARMs project is to make autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs, remote operated vehicles (ROVs and unmanned surface vehicles (USVs more accessible and useful. To achieve cooperation and communication between different AUVs, these must be able to exchange messages, so an efficient and reliable communication network is necessary for SWARMs. In order to provide an efficient and reliable communication network for mission execution, one of the important and necessary issues is the topology control of the network of AUVs that are cooperating underwater. However, due to the specific properties of an underwater AUV cooperation network, such as the high mobility of AUVs, large transmission delays, low bandwidth, etc., the traditional topology control algorithms primarily designed for terrestrial wireless sensor networks cannot be used directly in the underwater environment. Moreover, these algorithms, in which the nodes adjust their transmission power once the current transmission power does not equal an optimal one, are costly in an underwater cooperating AUV network. Considering these facts, in this paper, we propose a Probabilistic Topology Control (PTC algorithm for an underwater cooperating AUV network. In PTC, when the transmission power of an AUV is not equal to the optimal transmission power, then whether the transmission power needs to be adjusted or not will be determined based on the AUV’s parameters. Each AUV determines their own transmission power adjustment probability based on the parameter deviations. The larger the deviation, the higher the transmission power adjustment probability is, and vice versa. For evaluating the performance of PTC, we combine the PTC algorithm with the Fuzzy logic Topology Control (FTC algorithm and compare the performance of these two algorithms. The simulation results have demonstrated that the PTC is efficient at reducing the

  11. Damage Spreading in Spatial and Small-world Random Boolean Networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Qiming [Fermilab; Teuscher, Christof [Portland State U.

    2014-02-18

    The study of the response of complex dynamical social, biological, or technological networks to external perturbations has numerous applications. Random Boolean Networks (RBNs) are commonly used a simple generic model for certain dynamics of complex systems. Traditionally, RBNs are interconnected randomly and without considering any spatial extension and arrangement of the links and nodes. However, most real-world networks are spatially extended and arranged with regular, power-law, small-world, or other non-random connections. Here we explore the RBN network topology between extreme local connections, random small-world, and pure random networks, and study the damage spreading with small perturbations. We find that spatially local connections change the scaling of the relevant component at very low connectivities ($\\bar{K} \\ll 1$) and that the critical connectivity of stability $K_s$ changes compared to random networks. At higher $\\bar{K}$, this scaling remains unchanged. We also show that the relevant component of spatially local networks scales with a power-law as the system size N increases, but with a different exponent for local and small-world networks. The scaling behaviors are obtained by finite-size scaling. We further investigate the wiring cost of the networks. From an engineering perspective, our new findings provide the key design trade-offs between damage spreading (robustness), the network's wiring cost, and the network's communication characteristics.

  12. Evolution versus "intelligent design": comparing the topology of protein-protein interaction networks to the Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Q; Siganos, G; Faloutsos, M; Lonardi, S

    2006-01-01

    Recent research efforts have made available genome-wide, high-throughput protein-protein interaction (PPI) maps for several model organisms. This has enabled the systematic analysis of PPI networks, which has become one of the primary challenges for the system biology community. In this study, we attempt to understand better the topological structure of PPI networks by comparing them against man-made communication networks, and more specifically, the Internet. Our comparative study is based on a comprehensive set of graph metrics. Our results exhibit an interesting dichotomy. On the one hand, both networks share several macroscopic properties such as scale-free and small-world properties. On the other hand, the two networks exhibit significant topological differences, such as the cliqueishness of the highest degree nodes. We attribute these differences to the distinct design principles and constraints that both networks are assumed to satisfy. We speculate that the evolutionary constraints that favor the survivability and diversification are behind the building process of PPI networks, whereas the leading force in shaping the Internet topology is a decentralized optimization process geared towards efficient node communication.

  13. Analyzing fixed points of intracellular regulation networks with interrelated feedback topology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radde Nicole

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Modeling the dynamics of intracellular regulation networks by systems of ordinary differential equations has become a standard method in systems biology, and it has been shown that the behavior of these networks is often tightly connected to the network topology. We have recently introduced the circuit-breaking algorithm, a method that uses the network topology to construct a one-dimensional circuit-characteristic of the system. It was shown that this characteristic can be used for an efficient calculation of the system’s fixed points. Results Here we extend previous work and show several connections between the circuit-characteristic and the stability of fixed points. In particular, we derive a sufficient condition on the characteristic for a fixed point to be unstable for certain graph structures and demonstrate that the characteristic does not contain the information to decide whether a fixed point is asymptotically stable. All statements are illustrated on biological network models. Conclusions Single feedback circuits and their role for complex dynamic behavior of biological networks have extensively been investigated, but a transfer of most of these concepts to more complex topologies is difficult. In this context, our algorithm is a powerful new approach for the analysis of regulation networks that goes beyond single isolated feedback circuits.

  14. Role of Network Topology in the Synchronization of Power Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Lozano, Sergi; Díaz-Guilera, Albert; 10.1140/epjb/e2012-30209-9

    2012-01-01

    We study synchronization dynamics in networks of coupled oscillators with bimodal distribution of natural frequencies. This setup can be interpreted as a simple model of frequency synchronization dynamics among generators and loads working in a power network. We derive the minimum coupling strength required to ensure global frequency synchronization. This threshold value can be efficiently found by solving a binary optimization problem, even for large networks. In order to validate our procedure, we compare its results with numerical simulations on a realistic network describing the European interconnected high-voltage electricity system, finding a very good agreement. Our synchronization threshold can be used to test the stability of frequency synchronization to link removals. As the threshold value changes only in very few cases when aplied to the European realistic network, we conclude that network is resilient in this regard. Since the threshold calculation depends on the local connectivity, it can also b...

  15. A network perspective on the topological importance of enzymes and their phylogenetic conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordán Ferenc

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A metabolic network is the sum of all chemical transformations or reactions in the cell, with the metabolites being interconnected by enzyme-catalyzed reactions. Many enzymes exist in numerous species while others occur only in a few. We ask if there are relationships between the phylogenetic profile of an enzyme, or the number of different bacterial species that contain it, and its topological importance in the metabolic network. Our null hypothesis is that phylogenetic profile is independent of topological importance. To test our null hypothesis we constructed an enzyme network from the KEGG (Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes database. We calculated three network indices of topological importance: the degree or the number of connections of a network node; closeness centrality, which measures how close a node is to others; and betweenness centrality measuring how frequently a node appears on all shortest paths between two other nodes. Results Enzyme phylogenetic profile correlates best with betweenness centrality and also quite closely with degree, but poorly with closeness centrality. Both betweenness and closeness centralities are non-local measures of topological importance and it is intriguing that they have contrasting power of predicting phylogenetic profile in bacterial species. We speculate that redundancy in an enzyme network may be reflected by betweenness centrality but not by closeness centrality. We also discuss factors influencing the correlation between phylogenetic profile and topological importance. Conclusion Our analysis falsifies the hypothesis that phylogenetic profile of enzymes is independent of enzyme network importance. Our results show that phylogenetic profile correlates better with degree and betweenness centrality, but less so with closeness centrality. Enzymes that occur in many bacterial species tend to be those that have high network importance. We speculate that this phenomenon

  16. An approach to evaluate the topological significance of motifs and other patterns in regulatory networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wingender Edgar

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The identification of network motifs as statistically over-represented topological patterns has become one of the most promising topics in the analysis of complex networks. The main focus is commonly made on how they operate by means of their internal organization. Yet, their contribution to a network's global architecture is poorly understood. However, this requires switching from the abstract view of a topological pattern to the level of its instances. Here, we show how a recently proposed metric, the pairwise disconnectivity index, can be adapted to survey if and which kind of topological patterns and their instances are most important for sustaining the connectivity within a network. Results The pairwise disconnectivity index of a pattern instance quantifies the dependency of the pairwise connections between vertices in a network on the presence of this pattern instance. Thereby, it particularly considers how the coherence between the unique constituents of a pattern instance relates to the rest of a network. We have applied the method exemplarily to the analysis of 3-vertex topological pattern instances in the transcription networks of a bacteria (E. coli, a unicellular eukaryote (S. cerevisiae and higher eukaryotes (human, mouse, rat. We found that in these networks only very few pattern instances break lots of the pairwise connections between vertices upon the removal of an instance. Among them network motifs do not prevail. Rather, those patterns that are shared by the three networks exhibit a conspicuously enhanced pairwise disconnectivity index. Additionally, these are often located in close vicinity to each other or are even overlapping, since only a small number of genes are repeatedly present in most of them. Moreover, evidence has gathered that the importance of these pattern instances is due to synergistic rather than merely additive effects between their constituents. Conclusion A new method has been proposed

  17. A network perspective on the topological importance of enzymes and their phylogenetic conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei-chung; Lin, Wen-hsien; Davis, Andrew J; Jordán, Ferenc; Yang, Hsih-te; Hwang, Ming-jing

    2007-04-11

    A metabolic network is the sum of all chemical transformations or reactions in the cell, with the metabolites being interconnected by enzyme-catalyzed reactions. Many enzymes exist in numerous species while others occur only in a few. We ask if there are relationships between the phylogenetic profile of an enzyme, or the number of different bacterial species that contain it, and its topological importance in the metabolic network. Our null hypothesis is that phylogenetic profile is independent of topological importance. To test our null hypothesis we constructed an enzyme network from the KEGG (Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes) database. We calculated three network indices of topological importance: the degree or the number of connections of a network node; closeness centrality, which measures how close a node is to others; and betweenness centrality measuring how frequently a node appears on all shortest paths between two other nodes. Enzyme phylogenetic profile correlates best with betweenness centrality and also quite closely with degree, but poorly with closeness centrality. Both betweenness and closeness centralities are non-local measures of topological importance and it is intriguing that they have contrasting power of predicting phylogenetic profile in bacterial species. We speculate that redundancy in an enzyme network may be reflected by betweenness centrality but not by closeness centrality. We also discuss factors influencing the correlation between phylogenetic profile and topological importance. Our analysis falsifies the hypothesis that phylogenetic profile of enzymes is independent of enzyme network importance. Our results show that phylogenetic profile correlates better with degree and betweenness centrality, but less so with closeness centrality. Enzymes that occur in many bacterial species tend to be those that have high network importance. We speculate that this phenomenon originates in mechanisms driving network evolution. Closeness

  18. On the dynamics of random neuronal networks

    OpenAIRE

    Robert, Philippe; Touboul, Jonathan D.

    2014-01-01

    We study the mean-field limit and stationary distributions of a pulse-coupled network modeling the dynamics of a large neuronal assemblies. Our model takes into account explicitly the intrinsic randomness of firing times, contrasting with the classical integrate-and-fire model. The ergodicity properties of the Markov process associated to finite networks are investigated. We derive the limit in distribution of the sample path of the state of a neuron of the network when its size gets large. T...

  19. Topological data analysis of contagion maps for examining spreading processes on networks

    KAUST Repository

    Taylor, Dane

    2015-07-21

    Social and biological contagions are influenced by the spatial embeddedness of networks. Historically, many epidemics spread as a wave across part of the Earth\\'s surface; however, in modern contagions long-range edges - for example, due to airline transportation or communication media - allow clusters of a contagion to appear in distant locations. Here we study the spread of contagions on networks through a methodology grounded in topological data analysis and nonlinear dimension reduction. We construct \\'contagion maps\\' that use multiple contagions on a network to map the nodes as a point cloud. By analysing the topology, geometry and dimensionality of manifold structure in such point clouds, we reveal insights to aid in the modelling, forecast and control of spreading processes. Our approach highlights contagion maps also as a viable tool for inferring low-dimensional structure in networks.

  20. Topological Origin of the Network Dilation Anomaly in Ion-Exchanged Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mengyi; Smedskjaer, Morten M.; Mauro, John C.; Sant, Gaurav; Bauchy, Mathieu

    2017-11-01

    Ion exchange is commonly used to strengthen oxide glasses. However, the resulting stuffed glasses usually do not reach the molar volume of as-melted glasses of similar composition—a phenomenon known as the network dilation anomaly. This behavior seriously limits the potential for the chemical strengthening of glasses and its origin remains one of the mysteries of glass science. Here, based on molecular dynamics simulations of sodium silicate glasses coupled with topological constraint theory, we show that the topology of the atomic network controls the extent of ion-exchange-induced dilation. We demonstrate that isostatic glasses do not show any network dilation anomaly. This is found to arise from the combined absence of floppy modes of deformation and internal eigenstress in isostatic atomic networks.

  1. Exploitation of genetic interaction network topology for the prediction of epistatic behavior

    KAUST Repository

    Alanis Lobato, Gregorio

    2013-10-01

    Genetic interaction (GI) detection impacts the understanding of human disease and the ability to design personalized treatment. The mapping of every GI in most organisms is far from complete due to the combinatorial amount of gene deletions and knockdowns required. Computational techniques to predict new interactions based only on network topology have been developed in network science but never applied to GI networks.We show that topological prediction of GIs is possible with high precision and propose a graph dissimilarity index that is able to provide robust prediction in both dense and sparse networks.Computational prediction of GIs is a strong tool to aid high-throughput GI determination. The dissimilarity index we propose in this article is able to attain precise predictions that reduce the universe of candidate GIs to test in the lab. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.

  2. Connectomic Insights into Topologically Centralized Network Edges and Relevant Motifs in the Human Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingrui eXia

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available White matter (WM tracts serve as important material substrates for information transfer across brain regions. However, the topological roles of WM tracts in global brain communications and their underlying microstructural basis remain poorly understood. Here, we employed diffusion magnetic resonance imaging and graph-theoretical approaches to identify the pivotal WM connections in human whole-brain networks and further investigated their wiring substrates (including WM microstructural organization and physical consumption and topological contributions to the brain’s network backbone. We found that the pivotal WM connections with highly topological-edge centrality were primarily distributed in several long-range cortico-cortical connections (including the corpus callosum, cingulum and inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus and some projection tracts linking subcortical regions. These pivotal WM connections exhibited high levels of microstructural organization indicated by diffusion measures (the fractional anisotropy, the mean diffusivity and the axial diffusivity and greater physical consumption indicated by streamline lengths, and contributed significantly to the brain’s hubs and the rich-club structure. Network motif analysis further revealed their heavy participations in the organization of communication blocks, especially in routes involving inter-hemispheric heterotopic and extremely remote intra-hemispheric systems. Computational simulation models indicated the sharp decrease of global network integrity when attacking these highly centralized edges. Together, our results demonstrated high building-cost consumption and substantial communication capacity contributions for pivotal WM connections, which deepens our understanding of the topological mechanisms that govern the organization of human connectomes.

  3. Robust spatial memory maps in flickering neuronal networks: a topological model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabaghian, Yuri; Babichev, Andrey; Memoli, Facundo; Chowdhury, Samir; Rice University Collaboration; Ohio State University Collaboration

    It is widely accepted that the hippocampal place cells provide a substrate of the neuronal representation of the environment--the ``cognitive map''. However, hippocampal network, as any other network in the brain is transient: thousands of hippocampal neurons die every day and the connections formed by these cells constantly change due to various forms of synaptic plasticity. What then explains the remarkable reliability of our spatial memories? We propose a computational approach to answering this question based on a couple of insights. First, we propose that the hippocampal cognitive map is fundamentally topological, and hence it is amenable to analysis by topological methods. We then apply several novel methods from homology theory, to understand how dynamic connections between cells influences the speed and reliability of spatial learning. We simulate the rat's exploratory movements through different environments and study how topological invariants of these environments arise in a network of simulated neurons with ``flickering'' connectivity. We find that despite transient connectivity the network of place cells produces a stable representation of the topology of the environment.

  4. A model for phosphate glass topology considering the modifying ion sub-network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermansen, Christian; Mauro, J.C.; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2014-01-01

    In the present paper we establish a temperature dependent constraint model of alkali phosphate glasses considering the structural and topological role of the modifying ion sub-network constituted by alkali ions and their non-bonding oxygen coordination spheres. The model is consistent with availa...

  5. Topological and Geometric Tools for the Analysis fo Complex Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    faster than the current subgradient techniques for network optimization. Below, we will highlight some of the major advances. Some highlights are...Maximization Most existing work uses dual decomposition and subgradient methods to solve network optimization problems in a distributed manner, which...neighborhood. Simulation results illustrate the significant multiple order of magnitude performance gains of this method relative to subgradient methods

  6. A Topology Control Strategy with Reliability Assurance for Satellite Cluster Networks in Earth Observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Chen

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates the dynamic topology control problemof satellite cluster networks (SCNs in Earth observation (EO missions by applying a novel metric of stability for inter-satellite links (ISLs. The properties of the periodicity and predictability of satellites’ relative position are involved in the link cost metric which is to give a selection criterion for choosing the most reliable data routing paths. Also, a cooperative work model with reliability is proposed for the situation of emergency EO missions. Based on the link cost metric and the proposed reliability model, a reliability assurance topology control algorithm and its corresponding dynamic topology control (RAT strategy are established to maximize the stability of data transmission in the SCNs. The SCNs scenario is tested through some numeric simulations of the topology stability of average topology lifetime and average packet loss rate. Simulation results show that the proposed reliable strategy applied in SCNs significantly improves the data transmission performance and prolongs the average topology lifetime.

  7. Fibril growth kinetics link buffer conditions and topology of 3D collagen I networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalbitzer, Liv; Pompe, Tilo

    2018-02-01

    Three-dimensional fibrillar networks reconstituted from collagen I are widely used as biomimetic scaffolds for in vitro and in vivo cell studies. Various physicochemical parameters of buffer conditions for in vitro fibril formation are well known, including pH-value, ion concentrations and temperature. However, there is a lack of a detailed understanding of reconstituting well-defined 3D network topologies, which is required to mimic specific properties of the native extracellular matrix. We screened a wide range of relevant physicochemical buffer conditions and characterized the topology of the reconstituted 3D networks in terms of mean pore size and fibril diameter. A congruent analysis of fibril formation kinetics by turbidimetry revealed the adjustment of the lateral growth phase of fibrils by buffer conditions to be key in the determination of pore size and fibril diameter of the networks. Although the kinetics of nucleation and linear growth phase were affected by buffer conditions as well, network topology was independent of those two growth phases. Overall, the results of our study provide necessary insights into how to engineer 3D collagen matrices with an independent control over topology parameters, in order to mimic in vivo tissues in in vitro experiments and tissue engineering applications. The study reports a comprehensive analysis of physicochemical conditions of buffer solutions to reconstitute defined 3D collagen I matrices. By a combined analysis of network topology, i.e., pore size and fibril diameter, and the kinetics of fibril formation we can reveal the dependence of 3D network topology on buffer conditions, such as pH-value, phosphate concentration and sodium chloride content. With those results we are now able to provide engineering strategies to independently tune the topology parameters of widely used 3D collagen scaffolds based on the buffer conditions. By that, we enable the straightforward mimicking of extracellular matrices of in vivo

  8. Fractal Topology of Gene Promoter Networks at Phase Transitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preston R. Aldrich

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Much is known regarding the structure and logic of genetic regulatory networks. Less understood is the contextual organization of promoter signals used during transcription initiation, the most pivotal stage during gene expression. Here we show that promoter networks organize spontaneously at a dimension between the 1-dimension of the DNA and 3-dimension of the cell. Network methods were used to visualize the global structure of E. coli sigma (σ recognition footprints using published promoter sequences (RegulonDB. Footprints were rendered as networks with weighted edges representing bp-sharing between promoters (nodes. Serial thresholding revealed phase transitions at positions predicted by percolation theory, and nuclei denoting short steps through promoter space with geometrically constrained linkages. The network nuclei are fractals, a power-law organization not yet described for promoters. Genome-wide promoter abundance also scaled as a power-law. We propose a general model for the development of a fractal nucleus in a transcriptional grammar.

  9. Dynamics in small worlds of tree topologies of wireless sensor networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Qiao; Zhang, Baihai; Fan, Zhun

    2012-01-01

    rapidly and clustering coefficients increase greatly. A tree abstract, Cayley tree, is considered for the study of the navigation algorithm, which runs automatically in the small worlds of tree-based networks. In the further study, epidemics in the small worlds of tree-based wireless sensor networks......Tree topologies, which construct spatial graphs with large characteristic path lengths and small clustering coefficients, are ubiquitous in deployments of wireless sensor networks. Small worlds are investigated in tree-based networks. Due to link additions, characteristic path lengths reduce...

  10. A Topological Criterion for Filtering Information in Complex Brain Networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio De Vico Fallani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In many biological systems, the network of interactions between the elements can only be inferred from experimental measurements. In neuroscience, non-invasive imaging tools are extensively used to derive either structural or functional brain networks in-vivo. As a result of the inference process, we obtain a matrix of values corresponding to a fully connected and weighted network. To turn this into a useful sparse network, thresholding is typically adopted to cancel a percentage of the weakest connections. The structural properties of the resulting network depend on how much of the inferred connectivity is eventually retained. However, how to objectively fix this threshold is still an open issue. We introduce a criterion, the efficiency cost optimization (ECO, to select a threshold based on the optimization of the trade-off between the efficiency of a network and its wiring cost. We prove analytically and we confirm through numerical simulations that the connection density maximizing this trade-off emphasizes the intrinsic properties of a given network, while preserving its sparsity. Moreover, this density threshold can be determined a-priori, since the number of connections to filter only depends on the network size according to a power-law. We validate this result on several brain networks, from micro- to macro-scales, obtained with different imaging modalities. Finally, we test the potential of ECO in discriminating brain states with respect to alternative filtering methods. ECO advances our ability to analyze and compare biological networks, inferred from experimental data, in a fast and principled way.

  11. On the Feasibility of Wireless Multimedia Sensor Networks over IEEE 802.15.5 Mesh Topologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Sanchez, Antonio-Javier; Losilla, Fernando; Rodenas-Herraiz, David; Cruz-Martinez, Felipe; Garcia-Sanchez, Felipe

    2016-05-05

    Wireless Multimedia Sensor Networks (WMSNs) are a special type of Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) where large amounts of multimedia data are transmitted over networks composed of low power devices. Hierarchical routing protocols typically used in WSNs for multi-path communication tend to overload nodes located within radio communication range of the data collection unit or data sink. The battery life of these nodes is therefore reduced considerably, requiring frequent battery replacement work to extend the operational life of the WSN system. In a wireless sensor network with mesh topology, any node may act as a forwarder node, thereby enabling multiple routing paths toward any other node or collection unit. In addition, mesh topologies have proven advantages, such as data transmission reliability, network robustness against node failures, and potential reduction in energy consumption. This work studies the feasibility of implementing WMSNs in mesh topologies and their limitations by means of exhaustive computer simulation experiments. To this end, a module developed for the Synchronous Energy Saving (SES) mode of the IEEE 802.15.5 mesh standard has been integrated with multimedia tools to thoroughly test video sequences encoded using H.264 in mesh networks.

  12. Single-subject morphological brain networks: connectivity mapping, topological characterization and test-retest reliability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Jin, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Ye; Wang, Jinhui

    2016-04-01

    Structural MRI has long been used to characterize local morphological features of the human brain. Coordination patterns of the local morphological features among regions, however, are not well understood. Here, we constructed individual-level morphological brain networks and systematically examined their topological organization and long-term test-retest reliability under different analytical schemes of spatial smoothing, brain parcellation, and network type. This study included 57 healthy participants and all participants completed two MRI scan sessions. Individual morphological brain networks were constructed by estimating interregional similarity in the distribution of regional gray matter volume in terms of the Kullback-Leibler divergence measure. Graph-based global and nodal network measures were then calculated, followed by the statistical comparison and intra-class correlation analysis. The morphological brain networks were highly reproducible between sessions with significantly larger similarities for interhemispheric connections linking bilaterally homotopic regions. Further graph-based analyses revealed that the morphological brain networks exhibited nonrandom topological organization of small-worldness, high parallel efficiency and modular architecture regardless of the analytical choices of spatial smoothing, brain parcellation and network type. Moreover, several paralimbic and association regions were consistently revealed to be potential hubs. Nonetheless, the three studied factors particularly spatial smoothing significantly affected quantitative characterization of morphological brain networks. Further examination of long-term reliability revealed that all the examined network topological properties showed fair to excellent reliability irrespective of the analytical strategies, but performing spatial smoothing significantly improved reliability. Interestingly, nodal centralities were positively correlated with their reliabilities, and nodal degree

  13. Common neighbours and the local-community-paradigm for topological link prediction in bipartite networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daminelli, Simone; Thomas, Josephine Maria; Durán, Claudio; Vittorio Cannistraci, Carlo

    2015-11-01

    Bipartite networks are powerful descriptions of complex systems characterized by two different classes of nodes and connections allowed only across but not within the two classes. Unveiling physical principles, building theories and suggesting physical models to predict bipartite links such as product-consumer connections in recommendation systems or drug-target interactions in molecular networks can provide priceless information to improve e-commerce or to accelerate pharmaceutical research. The prediction of nonobserved connections starting from those already present in the topology of a network is known as the link-prediction problem. It represents an important subject both in many-body interaction theory in physics and in new algorithms for applied tools in computer science. The rationale is that the existing connectivity structure of a network can suggest where new connections can appear with higher likelihood in an evolving network, or where nonobserved connections are missing in a partially known network. Surprisingly, current complex network theory presents a theoretical bottle-neck: a general framework for local-based link prediction directly in the bipartite domain is missing. Here, we overcome this theoretical obstacle and present a formal definition of common neighbour index and local-community-paradigm (LCP) for bipartite networks. As a consequence, we are able to introduce the first node-neighbourhood-based and LCP-based models for topological link prediction that utilize the bipartite domain. We performed link prediction evaluations in several networks of different size and of disparate origin, including technological, social and biological systems. Our models significantly improve topological prediction in many bipartite networks because they exploit local physical driving-forces that participate in the formation and organization of many real-world bipartite networks. Furthermore, we present a local-based formalism that allows to intuitively

  14. Optical Pipelined Multi-bus Interconnection Network Intrinsic Topologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Joseph d'Auriol

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Digital all-optical parallel computing is an important research direction and spans conventional devices and convergent nano-optics deployments. Optical bus-based interconnects provide interesting aspects such as relative information communication speed-up or slow-down between optical signals. This aspect is harnessed in the newly proposed All-Optical Linear Array with a Reconfigurable Pipelined Bus System (OLARPBS model. However, the physical realization of such communication interconnects needs to be considered. This paper considers spatial layouts of processing elements along with the optical bus light paths that are necessary to realize the corresponding interconnection requirements. A metric in terms of the degree of required physical constraint is developed to characterize the variety of possible solutions. Simple algorithms that determine spatial layouts are given. It is shown that certain communication interconnection structures have associated intrinsic topologies.

  15. Regular Topologies for Gigabit Wide-Area Networks. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shacham, Nachum; Denny, Barbara A.; Lee, Diane S.; Khan, Irfan H.; Lee, Danny Y. C.; McKenney, Paul

    1994-01-01

    In general terms, this project aimed at the analysis and design of techniques for very high-speed networking. The formal objectives of the project were to: (1) Identify switch and network technologies for wide-area networks that interconnect a large number of users and can provide individual data paths at gigabit/s rates; (2) Quantitatively evaluate and compare existing and proposed architectures and protocols, identify their strength and growth potentials, and ascertain the compatibility of competing technologies; and (3) Propose new approaches to existing architectures and protocols, and identify opportunities for research to overcome deficiencies and enhance performance. The project was organized into two parts: 1. The design, analysis, and specification of techniques and protocols for very-high-speed network environments. In this part, SRI has focused on several key high-speed networking areas, including Forward Error Control (FEC) for high-speed networks in which data distortion is the result of packet loss, and the distribution of broadband, real-time traffic in multiple user sessions. 2. Congestion Avoidance Testbed Experiment (CATE). This part of the project was done within the framework of the DARTnet experimental T1 national network. The aim of the work was to advance the state of the art in benchmarking DARTnet's performance and traffic control by developing support tools for network experimentation, by designing benchmarks that allow various algorithms to be meaningfully compared, and by investigating new queueing techniques that better satisfy the needs of best-effort and reserved-resource traffic. This document is the final technical report describing the results obtained by SRI under this project. The report consists of three volumes: Volume 1 contains a technical description of the network techniques developed by SRI in the areas of FEC and multicast of real-time traffic. Volume 2 describes the work performed under CATE. Volume 3 contains the source

  16. Dynamic regimes of random fuzzy logic networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wittmann, Dominik M; Theis, Fabian J, E-mail: dominik.wittmann@helmholtz-muenchen.de [Computational Modeling in Biology, Institute for Bioinformatics and Systems Biology, Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen-German Research Center for Environmental Health, Ingolstaedter Landstrasse 1, 85764 Munich-Neuherberg (Germany); Centre for Mathematical Sciences, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Boltzmannstrasse 3, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2011-01-15

    Random multistate networks, generalizations of the Boolean Kauffman networks, are generic models for complex systems of interacting agents. Depending on their mean connectivity, these networks exhibit ordered as well as chaotic behavior with a critical boundary separating both regimes. Typically, the nodes of these networks are assigned single discrete states. Here, we describe nodes by fuzzy numbers, i.e. vectors of degree-of-membership (DOM) functions specifying the degree to which the nodes are in each of their discrete states. This allows our models to deal with imprecision and uncertainties. Compatible update rules are constructed by expressing the update rules of the multistate network in terms of Boolean operators and generalizing them to fuzzy logic (FL) operators. The standard choice for these generalizations is the Goedel FL, where AND and OR are replaced by the minimum and maximum of two DOMs, respectively. In mean-field approximations we are able to analytically describe the percolation and asymptotic distribution of DOMs in random Goedel FL networks. This allows us to characterize the different dynamic regimes of random multistate networks in terms of FL. In a low-dimensional example, we provide explicit computations and validate our mean-field results by showing that they agree well with network simulations.

  17. Topology Optimisation for Energy Management in Underwater Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    sensing and communication models for underwater environment. The approximate Pareto - optimal surface is obtained as a trade-off between network...lifetime and probability of successful search over the surveillance region. Keywords: underwater sensor network; energy management; Pareto optimisation...horizon power trade-off problem with the probability π ss (Wettergren, 2008) of successful search as the cost function , where π ss is shown to be a

  18. Topology Optimization for Energy Management in Underwater Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    and communication. This multi-objective cost functional leads to non-dominant optimization. Such a problem is formulated as a Pareto -optimal trade...K. Jha1 Thomas A. Wettergren2 Asok Ray1 Kushal Mukherjee3 Keywords: Underwater Sensor Network, Energy Management, Pareto Optimization, Adaptation...communication models for under- water environment. The approximate Pareto -optimal surface is obtained as a trade-off between network lifetime and probability

  19. Long-term effects of attentional performance on functional brain network topology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas P K Breckel

    Full Text Available Individuals differ in their cognitive resilience. Less resilient people demonstrate a greater tendency to vigilance decrements within sustained attention tasks. We hypothesized that a period of sustained attention is followed by prolonged changes in the organization of "resting state" brain networks and that individual differences in cognitive resilience are related to differences in post-task network reorganization. We compared the topological and spatial properties of brain networks as derived from functional MRI data (N = 20 recorded for 6 mins before and 12 mins after the performance of an attentional task. Furthermore we analysed changes in brain topology during task performance and during the switches between rest and task conditions. The cognitive resilience of each individual was quantified as the rate of increase in response latencies over the 32-minute time course of the attentional paradigm. On average, functional networks measured immediately post-task demonstrated significant and prolonged changes in network organization compared to pre-task networks with higher connectivity strength, more clustering, less efficiency, and shorter distance connections. Individual differences in cognitive resilience were significantly correlated with differences in the degree of recovery of some network parameters. Changes in network measures were still present in less resilient individuals in the second half of the post-task period (i.e. 6-12 mins after task completion, while resilient individuals already demonstrated significant reductions of functional connectivity and clustering towards pre-task levels. During task performance brain topology became more integrated with less clustering and higher global efficiency, but linearly decreased with ongoing time-on-task. We conclude that sustained attentional task performance has prolonged, "hang-over" effects on the organization of post-task resting-state brain networks; and that more cognitively

  20. Probing the topological properties of complex networks modeling short written texts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego R Amancio

    Full Text Available In recent years, graph theory has been widely employed to probe several language properties. More specifically, the so-called word adjacency model has been proven useful for tackling several practical problems, especially those relying on textual stylistic analysis. The most common approach to treat texts as networks has simply considered either large pieces of texts or entire books. This approach has certainly worked well-many informative discoveries have been made this way-but it raises an uncomfortable question: could there be important topological patterns in small pieces of texts? To address this problem, the topological properties of subtexts sampled from entire books was probed. Statistical analyses performed on a dataset comprising 50 novels revealed that most of the traditional topological measurements are stable for short subtexts. When the performance of the authorship recognition task was analyzed, it was found that a proper sampling yields a discriminability similar to the one found with full texts. Surprisingly, the support vector machine classification based on the characterization of short texts outperformed the one performed with entire books. These findings suggest that a local topological analysis of large documents might improve its global characterization. Most importantly, it was verified, as a proof of principle, that short texts can be analyzed with the methods and concepts of complex networks. As a consequence, the techniques described here can be extended in a straightforward fashion to analyze texts as time-varying complex networks.

  1. Probing the Topological Properties of Complex Networks Modeling Short Written Texts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amancio, Diego R.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, graph theory has been widely employed to probe several language properties. More specifically, the so-called word adjacency model has been proven useful for tackling several practical problems, especially those relying on textual stylistic analysis. The most common approach to treat texts as networks has simply considered either large pieces of texts or entire books. This approach has certainly worked well—many informative discoveries have been made this way—but it raises an uncomfortable question: could there be important topological patterns in small pieces of texts? To address this problem, the topological properties of subtexts sampled from entire books was probed. Statistical analyses performed on a dataset comprising 50 novels revealed that most of the traditional topological measurements are stable for short subtexts. When the performance of the authorship recognition task was analyzed, it was found that a proper sampling yields a discriminability similar to the one found with full texts. Surprisingly, the support vector machine classification based on the characterization of short texts outperformed the one performed with entire books. These findings suggest that a local topological analysis of large documents might improve its global characterization. Most importantly, it was verified, as a proof of principle, that short texts can be analyzed with the methods and concepts of complex networks. As a consequence, the techniques described here can be extended in a straightforward fashion to analyze texts as time-varying complex networks. PMID:25719799

  2. Distributed H∞ Sampled-Data Filtering over Sensor Networks with Markovian Switching Topologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers a distributed H∞ sampled-data filtering problem in sensor networks with stochastically switching topologies. It is assumed that the topology switching is triggered by a Markov chain. The output measurement at each sensor is first sampled and then transmitted to the corresponding filters via a communication network. Considering the effect of a transmission delay, a distributed filter structure for each sensor is given based on the sampled data from itself and its neighbor sensor nodes. As a consequence, the distributed H∞ sampled-data filtering in sensor networks under Markovian switching topologies is transformed into H∞ mean-square stability problem of a Markovian jump error system with an interval time-varying delay. By using Lyapunov Krasovskii functional and reciprocally convex approach, a new bounded real lemma (BRL is derived, which guarantees the mean-square stability of the error system with a desired H∞ performance. Based on this BRL, the topology-dependent H∞ sampled-data filters are obtained. An illustrative example is given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  3. Geometry and topology of parameter space: investigating measures of robustness in regulatory networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Madalena; Sengupta, Anirvan; Sontag, Eduardo D

    2009-09-01

    The concept of robustness of regulatory networks has been closely related to the nature of the interactions among genes, and the capability of pattern maintenance or reproducibility. Defining this robustness property is a challenging task, but mathematical models have often associated it to the volume of the space of admissible parameters. Not only the volume of the space but also its topology and geometry contain information on essential aspects of the network, including feasible pathways, switching between two parallel pathways or distinct/disconnected active regions of parameters. A method is presented here to characterize the space of admissible parameters, by writing it as a semi-algebraic set, and then theoretically analyzing its topology and geometry, as well as volume. This method provides a more objective and complete measure of the robustness of a developmental module. As a detailed case study, the segment polarity gene network is analyzed.

  4. Developmental Changes in Topological Asymmetry Between Hemispheric Brain White Matter Networks from Adolescence to Young Adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Suyu; He, Yong; Shu, Hua; Gong, Gaolang

    2017-04-01

    Human brain asymmetries have been well described. Intriguingly, a number of asymmetries in brain phenotypes have been shown to change throughout the lifespan. Recent studies have revealed topological asymmetries between hemispheric white matter networks in the human brain. However, it remains unknown whether and how these topological asymmetries evolve from adolescence to young adulthood, a critical period that constitutes the second peak of human brain and cognitive development. To address this question, the present study included a large cohort of healthy adolescents and young adults. Diffusion and structural magnetic resonance imaging were acquired to construct hemispheric white matter networks, and graph-theory was applied to quantify topological parameters of the hemispheric networks. In both adolescents and young adults, rightward asymmetry in both global and local network efficiencies was consistently observed between the 2 hemispheres, but the degree of the asymmetry was significantly decreased in young adults. At the nodal level, the young adults exhibited less rightward asymmetry of nodal efficiency mainly around the parasylvian area, posterior tempo-parietal cortex, and fusiform gyrus. These developmental patterns of network asymmetry provide novel insight into the human brain structural development from adolescence to young adulthood and also likely relate to the maturation of language and social cognition that takes place during this period. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Space station common module network topology and hardware development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, P.; Braunagel, L.; Chwirka, S.; Fishman, M.; Freeman, K.; Eason, D.; Landis, D.; Lech, L.; Martin, J.; Mccorkle, J.

    1990-01-01

    Conceptual space station common module power management and distribution (SSM/PMAD) network layouts and detailed network evaluations were developed. Individual pieces of hardware to be developed for the SSM/PMAD test bed were identified. A technology assessment was developed to identify pieces of equipment requiring development effort. Equipment lists were developed from the previously selected network schematics. Additionally, functional requirements for the network equipment as well as other requirements which affected the suitability of specific items for use on the Space Station Program were identified. Assembly requirements were derived based on the SSM/PMAD developed requirements and on the selected SSM/PMAD network concepts. Basic requirements and simplified design block diagrams are included. DC remote power controllers were successfully integrated into the DC Marshall Space Flight Center breadboard. Two DC remote power controller (RPC) boards experienced mechanical failure of UES 706 stud-mounted diodes during mechanical installation of the boards into the system. These broken diodes caused input to output shorting of the RPC's. The UES 706 diodes were replaced on these RPC's which eliminated the problem. The DC RPC's as existing in the present breadboard configuration do not provide ground fault protection because the RPC was designed to only switch the hot side current. If ground fault protection were to be implemented, it would be necessary to design the system so the RPC switched both the hot and the return sides of power.

  6. Effect of Network Structure/Topology on Mechanical Properties of Crosslinked Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi, Majid

    The interest in epoxy thermosetting polymers is widespread (e.g. Boeing 787 Dreamliner, windmill blades, automobiles, coatings, adhesives, etc.), and a demand still exists for improving toughness of these materials without degrading advantageous properties such as strength, modulus, and Tg. This study introduces novel approaches for improving the intrinsic mechanical characteristics of these polymers. The designed synthetic techniques focus on developing polymer materials with the same overall compositions but varying in network topologies, with distinct topological features in the size range of 5-50 nm, measured by SAXS and SEM. It was found that without altering chemical structure, the network topology of a dense thermoset can be engineered such that, under mechanical deformation, nano-cavities open and dissipate energy before rupturing covalent bonds, producing a tougher material without sacrificing strength, modulus, and even glass transition temperature. Modified structures also revealed higher resistance to fracture than the corresponding control structures. The major fracture mechanism responsible for the increased energy dissipation was found to be nano-cavitation. SEM images from the fracture surfaces showed clear cavities on the modified samples whereas none were seen on the fracture surface of the control samples. Overall, it was demonstrated that network topology can be used to tailor thermal and mechanical properties of thermosetting polymers. The experimental methodologies in this dissertation can directly and economically be applied to design polymeric materials with improved properties for desired applications. Although topology-based toughening was investigated on epoxy-amine polymers, the concept can be extended to most thermoset chemistries and perhaps to other brittle network forming materials.

  7. Characterizing disease states from topological properties of transcriptional regulatory networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kluger Harriet M

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High throughput gene expression experiments yield large amounts of data that can augment our understanding of disease processes, in addition to classifying samples. Here we present new paradigms of data Separation based on construction of transcriptional regulatory networks for normal and abnormal cells using sequence predictions, literature based data and gene expression studies. We analyzed expression datasets from a number of diseased and normal cells, including different types of acute leukemia, and breast cancer with variable clinical outcome. Results We constructed sample-specific regulatory networks to identify links between transcription factors (TFs and regulated genes that differentiate between healthy and diseased states. This approach carries the advantage of identifying key transcription factor-gene pairs with differential activity between healthy and diseased states rather than merely using gene expression profiles, thus alluding to processes that may be involved in gene deregulation. We then generalized this approach by studying simultaneous changes in functionality of multiple regulatory links pointing to a regulated gene or emanating from one TF (or changes in gene centrality defined by its in-degree or out-degree measures, respectively. We found that samples can often be separated based on these measures of gene centrality more robustly than using individual links. We examined distributions of distances (the number of links needed to traverse the path between each pair of genes in the transcriptional networks for gene subsets whose collective expression profiles could best separate each dataset into predefined groups. We found that genes that optimally classify samples are concentrated in neighborhoods in the gene regulatory networks. This suggests that genes that are deregulated in diseased states exhibit a remarkable degree of connectivity. Conclusion Transcription factor-regulated gene links and

  8. A Topological Description of Hubs in Amino Acid Interaction Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Gaci

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We represent proteins by amino acid interaction networks. This is a graph whose vertices are the proteins amino acids and whose edges are the interactions between them. Once we have compared this type of graphs to the general model of scale-free networks, we analyze the existence of nodes which highly interact, the hubs. We describe these nodes taking into account their position in the primary structure to study their apparition frequency in the folded proteins. Finally, we observe that their interaction level is a consequence of the general rules which govern the folding process.

  9. Functional network topology associated with posttraumatic stress disorder in veterans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kennis, M.; Van Rooij, S. J H; Van Den Heuvel, M. P.; Kahn, R. S.; Geuze, E.

    2016-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a disabling disorder associated with resting state functional connectivity alterations. However, whether specific brain regions are altered in PTSD or whether the whole brain network organization differs remains unclear. PTSD can be treated with trauma-focused

  10. Energy efficient topology for Wireless Mesh Networks | Negash ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We analyze the power control problem using coalition formation game theory employing utilities based on the coverage areas of the access points by associating a cost function with the utility as the payoff of the coalition members. Our work focuses on the access layer of a wireless mesh local area network. We show that by ...

  11. Effects of network resolution on topological properties of human neocortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Romero-Garcia, Rafael; Atienza, Mercedes; Clemmensen, Line Katrine Harder

    2012-01-01

    networks and the number of cortical regions included in the scale. Results revealed that schemes comprising 540–599 regions (surface areas spanning between 250 and 275mm2) at sparsities below 10% showed a superior balance between small-world organization and the size of the cortical scale employed...

  12. Fault-Tolerant Topology Selection for TTEthernet Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gavrilut, Voica Maria; Tamas-Selicean, Domitian; Pop, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Many safety-critical real-time applications are implemented using distributed architectures, composed of heterogeneous processing elements (PEs) interconnected in a network. In this paper, we are interested in the TTEthernet protocol, which is a deterministic, synchronized and congestion-free net...

  13. Will electrical cyber-physical interdependent networks undergo first-order transition under random attacks?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Xingpei; Wang, Bo; Liu, Dichen; Dong, Zhaoyang; Chen, Guo; Zhu, Zhenshan; Zhu, Xuedong; Wang, Xunting

    2016-10-01

    Whether the realistic electrical cyber-physical interdependent networks will undergo first-order transition under random failures still remains a question. To reflect the reality of Chinese electrical cyber-physical system, the "partial one-to-one correspondence" interdependent networks model is proposed and the connectivity vulnerabilities of three realistic electrical cyber-physical interdependent networks are analyzed. The simulation results show that due to the service demands of power system the topologies of power grid and its cyber network are highly inter-similar which can effectively avoid the first-order transition. By comparing the vulnerability curves between electrical cyber-physical interdependent networks and its single-layer network, we find that complex network theory is still useful in the vulnerability analysis of electrical cyber-physical interdependent networks.

  14. Topological Vulnerability Evaluation Model Based on Fractal Dimension of Complex Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Li; Wei, Bo; Sadiq, Rehan; Sadiq, Yong; Deng, Yong

    2016-01-01

    With an increasing emphasis on network security, much more attentions have been attracted to the vulnerability of complex networks. In this paper, the fractal dimension, which can reflect space-filling capacity of networks, is redefined as the origin moment of the edge betweenness to obtain a more reasonable evaluation of vulnerability. The proposed model combining multiple evaluation indexes not only overcomes the shortage of average edge betweenness’s failing to evaluate vulnerability of some special networks, but also characterizes the topological structure and highlights the space-filling capacity of networks. The applications to six US airline networks illustrate the practicality and effectiveness of our proposed method, and the comparisons with three other commonly used methods further validate the superiority of our proposed method. PMID:26751371

  15. Topology association analysis in weighted protein interaction network for gene prioritization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shunyao; Shao, Fengjing; Zhang, Qi; Ji, Jun; Xu, Shaojie; Sun, Rencheng; Sun, Gengxin; Du, Xiangjun; Sui, Yi

    2016-11-01

    Although lots of algorithms for disease gene prediction have been proposed, the weights of edges are rarely taken into account. In this paper, the strengths of topology associations between disease and essential genes are analyzed in weighted protein interaction network. Empirical analysis demonstrates that compared to other genes, disease genes are weakly connected with essential genes in protein interaction network. Based on this finding, a novel global distance measurement for gene prioritization with weighted protein interaction network is proposed in this paper. Positive and negative flow is allocated to disease and essential genes, respectively. Additionally network propagation model is extended for weighted network. Experimental results on 110 diseases verify the effectiveness and potential of the proposed measurement. Moreover, weak links play more important role than strong links for gene prioritization, which is meaningful to deeply understand protein interaction network.

  16. Study on the evolutionary optimization of the topology of network control systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Z.; Chen, B.; Wang, H.

    2010-01-01

    Computer networks have been very popular in enterprise applications. However, optimisation of network designs that allows networks to be used more efficiently in industrial environment and enterprise applications remains an interesting research topic. This article mainly discusses the topology...... optimisation theory and methods of the network control system based on switched Ethernet in an industrial context. Factors that affect the real-time performance of the industrial control network are presented in detail, and optimisation criteria with their internal relations are analysed. After the definition...... control network are considered in the optimisation process. In respect to the evolutionary algorithm design, an improved arena algorithm is proposed for the construction of the non-dominated set of the population. In addition, for the evaluation of individuals, the integrated use of the dominative...

  17. EEG functional network topology is associated with disability in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraschini, Matteo; Demuru, Matteo; Hillebrand, Arjan; Cuccu, Lorenza; Porcu, Silvia; di Stefano, Francesca; Puligheddu, Monica; Floris, Gianluca; Borghero, Giuseppe; Marrosu, Francesco

    2016-12-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is one of the most severe neurodegenerative diseases, which is known to affect upper and lower motor neurons. In contrast to the classical tenet that ALS represents the outcome of extensive and progressive impairment of a fixed set of motor connections, recent neuroimaging findings suggest that the disease spreads along vast non-motor connections. Here, we hypothesised that functional network topology is perturbed in ALS, and that this reorganization is associated with disability. We tested this hypothesis in 21 patients affected by ALS at several stages of impairment using resting-state electroencephalography (EEG) and compared the results to 16 age-matched healthy controls. We estimated functional connectivity using the Phase Lag Index (PLI), and characterized the network topology using the minimum spanning tree (MST). We found a significant difference between groups in terms of MST dissimilarity and MST leaf fraction in the beta band. Moreover, some MST parameters (leaf, hierarchy and kappa) significantly correlated with disability. These findings suggest that the topology of resting-state functional networks in ALS is affected by the disease in relation to disability. EEG network analysis may be of help in monitoring and evaluating the clinical status of ALS patients.

  18. The topology of large Open Connectome networks for the human brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastner, Michael T.; Ódor, Géza

    2016-06-01

    The structural human connectome (i.e. the network of fiber connections in the brain) can be analyzed at ever finer spatial resolution thanks to advances in neuroimaging. Here we analyze several large data sets for the human brain network made available by the Open Connectome Project. We apply statistical model selection to characterize the degree distributions of graphs containing up to nodes and edges. A three-parameter generalized Weibull (also known as a stretched exponential) distribution is a good fit to most of the observed degree distributions. For almost all networks, simple power laws cannot fit the data, but in some cases there is statistical support for power laws with an exponential cutoff. We also calculate the topological (graph) dimension D and the small-world coefficient σ of these networks. While σ suggests a small-world topology, we found that D < 4 showing that long-distance connections provide only a small correction to the topology of the embedding three-dimensional space.

  19. Evidence for fish dispersal from spatial analysis of stream network topology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitt, N.P.; Angermeier, P.L.

    2008-01-01

    Developing spatially explicit conservation strategies for stream fishes requires an understanding of the spatial structure of dispersal within stream networks. We explored spatial patterns of stream fish dispersal by evaluating how the size and proximity of connected streams (i.e., stream network topology) explained variation in fish assemblage structure and how this relationship varied with local stream size. We used data from the US Environmental Protection Agency's Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program in wadeable streams of the Mid-Atlantic Highlands region (n = 308 sites). We quantified stream network topology with a continuous analysis based on the rate of downstream flow accumulation from sites and with a discrete analysis based on the presence of mainstem river confluences (i.e., basin area >250 km2) within 20 fluvial km (fkm) from sites. Continuous variation in stream network topology was related to local species richness within a distance of ???10 fkm, suggesting an influence of fish dispersal within this spatial grain. This effect was explained largely by catostomid species, cyprinid species, and riverine species, but was not explained by zoogeographic regions, ecoregions, sampling period, or spatial autocorrelation. Sites near mainstem river confluences supported greater species richness and abundance of catostomid, cyprinid, and ictalurid fishes than did sites >20 fkm from such confluences. Assemblages at sites on the smallest streams were not related to stream network topology, consistent with the hypothesis that local stream size regulates the influence of regional dispersal. These results demonstrate that the size and proximity of connected streams influence the spatial distribution of fish and suggest that these influences can be incorporated into the designs of stream bioassessments and reserves to enhance management efficacy. ?? 2008 by The North American Benthological Society.

  20. A Survey on Topology Control and Maintenance in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Singh

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs consist of devices equipped with radio transceivers that cooperate to form and maintain a fully connected network of sensor nodes. WSNs do not have a fixed infrastructure and do not use centralized methods for organization. This flexibility enables them to be used whenever a fixed infrastructure is unfeasible or inconvenient, hence making them attractive for numerous applications ranging from military, civil, industrial or health. Because of their unique structure, and limited energy storage, computational and memory resources, many of the existing protocols and algorithms designed for wired or wireless ad hoc networks cannot be directly used in WSNs. Beside this, they offer a flexible low cost solution to the problem of event monitoring, especially in places with limited accessibility or that represent danger to humans. Applications of  large scale WSNs are becoming a reality example are being a Smart Grid, Machine to Machine communication networks and smart environment. It is expected that a topology control techniques will play an important role in managing the complexity of such highly complicated and distributed systems through self-organization capabilities. WSNs are made of resource constrained wireless devices, which require energy efficient mechanisms, algorithm/protocol. Control on topology is very important for efficient utilization of networks and is composed of two mechanisms, Topology Construction (TC and Topology Maintenance (TM. By using these mechanism various protocols/algorithm have came into existence, like: A3, A3-Coverage (A3-Cov, Simple Tree, Just Tree, etc. This paper provides a full view of the studies of above mentioned algorithms and also provides an analysis of their merits and demerits.

  1. The probability of a gene tree topology within a phylogenetic network with applications to hybridization detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yun; Degnan, James H; Nakhleh, Luay

    2012-01-01

    Gene tree topologies have proven a powerful data source for various tasks, including species tree inference and species delimitation. Consequently, methods for computing probabilities of gene trees within species trees have been developed and widely used in probabilistic inference frameworks. All these methods assume an underlying multispecies coalescent model. However, when reticulate evolutionary events such as hybridization occur, these methods are inadequate, as they do not account for such events. Methods that account for both hybridization and deep coalescence in computing the probability of a gene tree topology currently exist for very limited cases. However, no such methods exist for general cases, owing primarily to the fact that it is currently unknown how to compute the probability of a gene tree topology within the branches of a phylogenetic network. Here we present a novel method for computing the probability of gene tree topologies on phylogenetic networks and demonstrate its application to the inference of hybridization in the presence of incomplete lineage sorting. We reanalyze a Saccharomyces species data set for which multiple analyses had converged on a species tree candidate. Using our method, though, we show that an evolutionary hypothesis involving hybridization in this group has better support than one of strict divergence. A similar reanalysis on a group of three Drosophila species shows that the data is consistent with hybridization. Further, using extensive simulation studies, we demonstrate the power of gene tree topologies at obtaining accurate estimates of branch lengths and hybridization probabilities of a given phylogenetic network. Finally, we discuss identifiability issues with detecting hybridization, particularly in cases that involve extinction or incomplete sampling of taxa.

  2. Consensus of Multiagent Networks with Intermittent Interaction and Directed Topology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xiao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Intermittent interaction control is introduced to solve the consensus problem for second-order multiagent networks due to the limited sensing abilities and environmental changes periodically. And, we get some sufficient conditions for the agents to reach consensus with linear protocol from the theoretical findings by using the Lyapunov control approach. Finally, the validity of the theoretical results is validated through the numerical example.

  3. A Dynamic Game on Network Topology for Counterinsurgency Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-26

    many potential applications within military operations. Miller (2013) presents a novel application of network analysis in the Islamic Maghreb , Mali...particular node, and can be thought of all the union of all local neighborhoods. It is designated as Nki (g) = Ni(g) ∪ (⋃ j∈Ni(g)N k−1 j (g) ) . Table 1...Conflict in the Maghreb . Tech. rept. DTIC Document. Montgomery, Douglas C. 2008. Design and analysis of experiments. John Wiley & Sons. 88 Morris, James

  4. Stability of whole brain and regional network topology within and between resting and cognitive states.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justyna K Rzucidlo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Graph-theory based analyses of resting state functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI data have been used to map the network organization of the brain. While numerous analyses of resting state brain organization exist, many questions remain unexplored. The present study examines the stability of findings based on this approach over repeated resting state and working memory state sessions within the same individuals. This allows assessment of stability of network topology within the same state for both rest and working memory, and between rest and working memory as well. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: fMRI scans were performed on five participants while at rest and while performing the 2-back working memory task five times each, with task state alternating while they were in the scanner. Voxel-based whole brain network analyses were performed on the resulting data along with analyses of functional connectivity in regions associated with resting state and working memory. Network topology was fairly stable across repeated sessions of the same task, but varied significantly between rest and working memory. In the whole brain analysis, local efficiency, Eloc, differed significantly between rest and working memory. Analyses of network statistics for the precuneus and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex revealed significant differences in degree as a function of task state for both regions and in local efficiency for the precuneus. Conversely, no significant differences were observed across repeated sessions of the same state. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings suggest that network topology is fairly stable within individuals across time for the same state, but also fluid between states. Whole brain voxel-based network analyses may prove to be a valuable tool for exploring how functional connectivity changes in response to task demands.

  5. Stability of whole brain and regional network topology within and between resting and cognitive states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzucidlo, Justyna K; Roseman, Paige L; Laurienti, Paul J; Dagenbach, Dale

    2013-01-01

    Graph-theory based analyses of resting state functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) data have been used to map the network organization of the brain. While numerous analyses of resting state brain organization exist, many questions remain unexplored. The present study examines the stability of findings based on this approach over repeated resting state and working memory state sessions within the same individuals. This allows assessment of stability of network topology within the same state for both rest and working memory, and between rest and working memory as well. fMRI scans were performed on five participants while at rest and while performing the 2-back working memory task five times each, with task state alternating while they were in the scanner. Voxel-based whole brain network analyses were performed on the resulting data along with analyses of functional connectivity in regions associated with resting state and working memory. Network topology was fairly stable across repeated sessions of the same task, but varied significantly between rest and working memory. In the whole brain analysis, local efficiency, Eloc, differed significantly between rest and working memory. Analyses of network statistics for the precuneus and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex revealed significant differences in degree as a function of task state for both regions and in local efficiency for the precuneus. Conversely, no significant differences were observed across repeated sessions of the same state. These findings suggest that network topology is fairly stable within individuals across time for the same state, but also fluid between states. Whole brain voxel-based network analyses may prove to be a valuable tool for exploring how functional connectivity changes in response to task demands.

  6. Frequency enhancement in coupled noisy excitable elements: effects of network topology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Wei-Yin; Lai, Pik-Yin; Chan, Chi-Keung

    2013-07-01

    Coupled excitable elements in the presence of noise can exhibit oscillatory behavior with non-trivial frequency dependence as the coupling strength of the system increases. The phenomenon of frequency enhancement (FE) occurs in some coupling regime, in which the elements can oscillate with a frequency higher than their uncoupled frequencies. In this paper, details of the FE are investigated by simulations of the FitzHugh-Nagumo model with different network topologies. It is found that the characteristics of FE, such as the maximal enhancement coupling, enhancement level etc, are functions of the network topology and spatial dimensions. The effect of excitability and the spatio-temporal patterns during FE are investigated to provide an intuitive picture for the enhancement mechanism. Interestingly, some of these characteristics of FE can be described by scaling laws; suggesting the existence of universality in the FE phenomenon. The relevance of these results to biological rhythms are also discussed.

  7. The Effects of Topology on Throughput Capacity of Large Scale Wireless Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiuming Liu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we jointly consider the inhomogeneity and spatial dimension in large scale wireless networks. We study the effects of topology on the throughput capacity. This problem is inherently difficult since it is complex to handle the interference caused by simultaneous transmission. To solve this problem, we, according to the inhomogeneity of topology, divide the transmission into intra-cluster transmission and inter-cluster transmission. For the intra-cluster transmission, a spheroidal percolation model is constructed. The spheroidal percolation model guarantees a constant rate when a power control strategy is adopted. We also propose a cube percolation mode for the inter-cluster transmission. Different from the spheroidal percolation model, a constant transmission rate can be achieved without power control. For both transmissions, we propose a routing scheme with five phases. By comparing the achievable rate of each phase, we get the rate bottleneck, which is the throughput capacity of the network.

  8. Network-based statistical comparison of citation topology of bibliographic databases

    CERN Document Server

    Šubelj, Lovro; Bajec, Marko

    2015-01-01

    Modern bibliographic databases provide the basis for scientific research and its evaluation. While their content and structure differ substantially, there exist only informal notions on their reliability. Here we compare the topological consistency of citation networks extracted from six popular bibliographic databases including Web of Science, CiteSeer and arXiv.org. The networks are assessed through a rich set of local and global graph statistics. We first reveal statistically significant inconsistencies between some of the databases with respect to individual statistics. For example, the introduced field bow-tie decomposition of DBLP Computer Science Bibliography substantially differs from the rest due to the coverage of the database, while the citation information within arXiv.org is the most exhaustive. Finally, we compare the databases over multiple graph statistics using the critical difference diagram. The citation topology of DBLP Computer Science Bibliography is the least consistent with the rest, w...

  9. The influence of passenger flow on the topology characteristics of urban rail transit networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yingyue; Chen, Feng; Chen, Peiwen; Tan, Yurong

    2017-05-01

    Current researches on the network characteristics of metro networks are generally carried out on topology networks without passenger flows running on it, thus more complex features of the networks with ridership loaded on it cannot be captured. In this study, we incorporated the load of metro networks, passenger volume, into the exploration of network features. Thus, the network can be examined in the context of operation, which is the ultimate purpose of the existence of a metro network. To this end, section load was selected as an edge weight to demonstrate the influence of ridership on the network, and a weighted calculation method for complex network indicators and robustness were proposed to capture the unique behaviors of a metro network with passengers flowing in it. The proposed method was applied on Beijing Subway. Firstly, the passenger volume in terms of daily origin and destination matrix was extracted from exhausted transit smart card data. Using the established approach and the matrix as weighting, common indicators of complex network including clustering coefficient, betweenness and degree were calculated, and network robustness were evaluated under potential attacks. The results were further compared to that of unweighted networks, and it suggests indicators of the network with consideration of passenger volumes differ from that without ridership to some extent, and networks tend to be more vulnerable than that without load on it. The significance sequence for the stations can be changed. By introducing passenger flow weighting, actual operation status of the network can be reflected more accurately. It is beneficial to determine the crucial stations and make precautionary measures for the entire network’s operation security.

  10. Critical conducting networks in disordered solids: ac universality from topological arguments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milovanov, A.V.; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    2001-01-01

    This paper advocates an unconventional description of charge transport processes in disordered solids, which brings together the ideas of fractal geometry, percolation theory, and topology of manifolds. We demonstrate that the basic features of ac conductivity in disordered materials as seen...... in various experiments are reproduced with remarkable accuracy by the conduction properties of percolating fractal networks near the threshold of percolation. The universal character of ac conductivity in three embedding dimensions is discussed in connection with the available experimental data. An important...

  11. Topological Analysis and Visualisation of Network Monitoring Data: Darknet case study

    OpenAIRE

    Coudriau, Marc; Lahmadi, Abdelkader; Francois, Jerome

    2016-01-01

    International audience; Network monitoring is a primordial source of data in cyber-security since it may reveal abnormal behaviors of users or applications. Indeed, security analysts and tools like IDS (Intrusion Detection system) or SIEM (security information and event management) rely on them as a single source of information or combined with others. In this paper, we propose a visualisation method derived from the Mapper algorithm that has been developed in the field of Topological Data An...

  12. Dynamic Information Networks: Geometry, Topology and Statistical Learning for the Articulation of Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-23

    G. Leibon, S. Pauls, D. Rockmore, and R. Savell, Topological structures in the equities market network PNAS 2008 105 (52) 20589-20594; published...example  is  a  deeper  look  at  the   Tea  Party    in  112th  Congress  whose  members  are   best

  13. Adaptive Synchronization of Complex Dynamical Networks Governed by Local Lipschitz Nonlinearlity on Switching Topology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the adaptive synchronization of complex dynamical networks satisfying the local Lipschitz condition with switching topology. Based on differential inclusion and nonsmooth analysis, it is proved that all nodes can converge to the synchronous state, even though only one node is informed by the synchronous state via introducing decentralized adaptive strategies to the coupling strengths and feedback gains. Finally, some numerical simulations are worked out to illustrate the analytical results.

  14. Altered topological organization of white matter structural networks in patients with neuromyelitis optica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaou Liu

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the topological alterations of the whole-brain white-matter (WM structural networks in patients with neuromyelitis optica (NMO. METHODS: The present study involved 26 NMO patients and 26 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. WM structural connectivity in each participant was imaged with diffusion-weighted MRI and represented in terms of a connectivity matrix using deterministic tractography method. Graph theory-based analyses were then performed for the characterization of brain network properties. A multiple linear regression analysis was performed on each network metric between the NMO and control groups. RESULTS: The NMO patients exhibited abnormal small-world network properties, as indicated by increased normalized characteristic path length, increased normalized clustering and increased small-worldness. Furthermore, largely similar hub distributions of the WM structural networks were observed between NMO patients and healthy controls. However, regional efficiency in several brain areas of NMO patients was significantly reduced, which were mainly distributed in the default-mode, sensorimotor and visual systems. Furthermore, we have observed increased regional efficiency in a few brain regions such as the orbital parts of the superior and middle frontal and fusiform gyri. CONCLUSION: Although the NMO patients in this study had no discernible white matter T2 lesions in the brain, we hypothesize that the disrupted topological organization of WM networks provides additional evidence for subtle, widespread cerebral WM pathology in NMO.

  15. Protection of Passive Optical Networks by Using Ring Topology and Tunable Splitters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Lafata

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This article proposes an innovative method for protecting of passive optical networks (PONs, especially the central optical unit – optical line termination (OLT. PON networks are typically used in modern high-speed access networks, but there are also several specific applications, such as in business, army or science sector, which require a complex protection and backup system against failures and malfunctions. A standard tree or star topologies, which are usually used for PON networks, are significantly vulnerable mainly against the malfunctions and failures of OLT unit or feeder optical cable. The method proposed in this paper is focused on forming PON network with ring topology using passive optical splitters. The main idea is based on the possibility of placing both OLT units (primary and secondary on the opposite sides of the ring, which can potentially increase the resistance of network. This method is described in the article and scenarios and calculations using symmetric or tunable asymmetric passive optical splitters are included as well.

  16. Investigating the Relationship between Topology and Evolution in a Dynamic Nematode Odor Genetic Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Fitzpatrick

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between biological network architectures and evolution is unclear. Within the phylum nematoda olfaction represents a critical survival tool. For nematodes, olfaction contributes to multiple processes including the finding of food, hosts, and reproductive partners, making developmental decisions, and evading predators. Here we examine a dynamic nematode odor genetic network to investigate how divergence, diversity, and contribution are shaped by network topology. Our findings describe connectivity frameworks and characteristics that correlate with molecular evolution and contribution across the olfactory network. Our data helps guide the development of a robust evolutionary description of the nematode odor network that may eventually aid in the prediction of interactive and functional qualities of novel nodes.

  17. Control of water distribution networks with dynamic DMA topology using strictly feasible sequential convex programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Robert; Abraham, Edo; Parpas, Panos; Stoianov, Ivan

    2015-12-01

    The operation of water distribution networks (WDN) with a dynamic topology is a recently pioneered approach for the advanced management of District Metered Areas (DMAs) that integrates novel developments in hydraulic modeling, monitoring, optimization, and control. A common practice for leakage management is the sectorization of WDNs into small zones, called DMAs, by permanently closing isolation valves. This facilitates water companies to identify bursts and estimate leakage levels by measuring the inlet flow for each DMA. However, by permanently closing valves, a number of problems have been created including reduced resilience to failure and suboptimal pressure management. By introducing a dynamic topology to these zones, these disadvantages can be eliminated while still retaining the DMA structure for leakage monitoring. In this paper, a novel optimization method based on sequential convex programming (SCP) is outlined for the control of a dynamic topology with the objective of reducing average zone pressure (AZP). A key attribute for control optimization is reliable convergence. To achieve this, the SCP method we propose guarantees that each optimization step is strictly feasible, resulting in improved convergence properties. By using a null space algorithm for hydraulic analyses, the computations required are also significantly reduced. The optimized control is actuated on a real WDN operated with a dynamic topology. This unique experimental program incorporates a number of technologies set up with the objective of investigating pioneering developments in WDN management. Preliminary results indicate AZP reductions for a dynamic topology of up to 6.5% over optimally controlled fixed topology DMAs. This article was corrected on 12 JAN 2016. See the end of the full text for details.

  18. MrTADFinder: A network modularity based approach to identify topologically associating domains in multiple resolutions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koon-Kiu Yan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide proximity ligation based assays such as Hi-C have revealed that eukaryotic genomes are organized into structural units called topologically associating domains (TADs. From a visual examination of the chromosomal contact map, however, it is clear that the organization of the domains is not simple or obvious. Instead, TADs exhibit various length scales and, in many cases, a nested arrangement. Here, by exploiting the resemblance between TADs in a chromosomal contact map and densely connected modules in a network, we formulate TAD identification as a network optimization problem and propose an algorithm, MrTADFinder, to identify TADs from intra-chromosomal contact maps. MrTADFinder is based on the network-science concept of modularity. A key component of it is deriving an appropriate background model for contacts in a random chain, by numerically solving a set of matrix equations. The background model preserves the observed coverage of each genomic bin as well as the distance dependence of the contact frequency for any pair of bins exhibited by the empirical map. Also, by introducing a tunable resolution parameter, MrTADFinder provides a self-consistent approach for identifying TADs at different length scales, hence the acronym "Mr" standing for Multiple Resolutions. We then apply MrTADFinder to various Hi-C datasets. The identified domain boundaries are marked by characteristic signatures in chromatin marks and transcription factors (TF that are consistent with earlier work. Moreover, by calling TADs at different length scales, we observe that boundary signatures change with resolution, with different chromatin features having different characteristic length scales. Furthermore, we report an enrichment of HOT (high-occupancy target regions near TAD boundaries and investigate the role of different TFs in determining boundaries at various resolutions. To further explore the interplay between TADs and epigenetic marks, as tumor mutational

  19. Ranking transitive chemical-disease inferences using local network topology in the comparative toxicogenomics database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Benjamin L; Davis, Allan Peter; Rosenstein, Michael C; Wiegers, Thomas C; Mattingly, Carolyn J

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to chemicals in the environment is believed to play a critical role in the etiology of many human diseases. To enhance understanding about environmental effects on human health, the Comparative Toxicogenomics Database (CTD; http://ctdbase.org) provides unique curated data that enable development of novel hypotheses about the relationships between chemicals and diseases. CTD biocurators read the literature and curate direct relationships between chemicals-genes, genes-diseases, and chemicals-diseases. These direct relationships are then computationally integrated to create additional inferred relationships; for example, a direct chemical-gene statement can be combined with a direct gene-disease statement to generate a chemical-disease inference (inferred via the shared gene). In CTD, the number of inferences has increased exponentially as the number of direct chemical, gene and disease interactions has grown. To help users navigate and prioritize these inferences for hypothesis development, we implemented a statistic to score and rank them based on the topology of the local network consisting of the chemical, disease and each of the genes used to make an inference. In this network, chemicals, diseases and genes are nodes connected by edges representing the curated interactions. Like other biological networks, node connectivity is an important consideration when evaluating the CTD network, as the connectivity of nodes follows the power-law distribution. Topological methods reduce the influence of highly connected nodes that are present in biological networks. We evaluated published methods that used local network topology to determine the reliability of protein-protein interactions derived from high-throughput assays. We developed a new metric that combines and weights two of these methods and uniquely takes into account the number of common neighbors and the connectivity of each entity involved. We present several CTD inferences as case studies to

  20. Ranking transitive chemical-disease inferences using local network topology in the comparative toxicogenomics database.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin L King

    Full Text Available Exposure to chemicals in the environment is believed to play a critical role in the etiology of many human diseases. To enhance understanding about environmental effects on human health, the Comparative Toxicogenomics Database (CTD; http://ctdbase.org provides unique curated data that enable development of novel hypotheses about the relationships between chemicals and diseases. CTD biocurators read the literature and curate direct relationships between chemicals-genes, genes-diseases, and chemicals-diseases. These direct relationships are then computationally integrated to create additional inferred relationships; for example, a direct chemical-gene statement can be combined with a direct gene-disease statement to generate a chemical-disease inference (inferred via the shared gene. In CTD, the number of inferences has increased exponentially as the number of direct chemical, gene and disease interactions has grown. To help users navigate and prioritize these inferences for hypothesis development, we implemented a statistic to score and rank them based on the topology of the local network consisting of the chemical, disease and each of the genes used to make an inference. In this network, chemicals, diseases and genes are nodes connected by edges representing the curated interactions. Like other biological networks, node connectivity is an important consideration when evaluating the CTD network, as the connectivity of nodes follows the power-law distribution. Topological methods reduce the influence of highly connected nodes that are present in biological networks. We evaluated published methods that used local network topology to determine the reliability of protein-protein interactions derived from high-throughput assays. We developed a new metric that combines and weights two of these methods and uniquely takes into account the number of common neighbors and the connectivity of each entity involved. We present several CTD inferences as case

  1. Efficient physical embedding of topologically complex information processing networks in brains and computer circuits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle S Bassett

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Nervous systems are information processing networks that evolved by natural selection, whereas very large scale integrated (VLSI computer circuits have evolved by commercially driven technology development. Here we follow historic intuition that all physical information processing systems will share key organizational properties, such as modularity, that generally confer adaptivity of function. It has long been observed that modular VLSI circuits demonstrate an isometric scaling relationship between the number of processing elements and the number of connections, known as Rent's rule, which is related to the dimensionality of the circuit's interconnect topology and its logical capacity. We show that human brain structural networks, and the nervous system of the nematode C. elegans, also obey Rent's rule, and exhibit some degree of hierarchical modularity. We further show that the estimated Rent exponent of human brain networks, derived from MRI data, can explain the allometric scaling relations between gray and white matter volumes across a wide range of mammalian species, again suggesting that these principles of nervous system design are highly conserved. For each of these fractal modular networks, the dimensionality of the interconnect topology was greater than the 2 or 3 Euclidean dimensions of the space in which it was embedded. This relatively high complexity entailed extra cost in physical wiring: although all networks were economically or cost-efficiently wired they did not strictly minimize wiring costs. Artificial and biological information processing systems both may evolve to optimize a trade-off between physical cost and topological complexity, resulting in the emergence of homologous principles of economical, fractal and modular design across many different kinds of nervous and computational networks.

  2. On implementation of DCTCP on three-tier and fat-tree data center network topologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafar, Saima; Bashir, Abeer; Chaudhry, Shafique Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    A data center is a facility for housing computational and storage systems interconnected through a communication network called data center network (DCN). Due to a tremendous growth in the computational power, storage capacity and the number of inter-connected servers, the DCN faces challenges concerning efficiency, reliability and scalability. Although transmission control protocol (TCP) is a time-tested transport protocol in the Internet, DCN challenges such as inadequate buffer space in switches and bandwidth limitations have prompted the researchers to propose techniques to improve TCP performance or design new transport protocols for DCN. Data center TCP (DCTCP) emerge as one of the most promising solutions in this domain which employs the explicit congestion notification feature of TCP to enhance the TCP congestion control algorithm. While DCTCP has been analyzed for two-tier tree-based DCN topology for traffic between servers in the same rack which is common in cloud applications, it remains oblivious to the traffic patterns common in university and private enterprise networks which traverse the complete network interconnect spanning upper tier layers. We also recognize that DCTCP performance cannot remain unaffected by the underlying DCN architecture hence there is a need to test and compare DCTCP performance when implemented over diverse DCN architectures. Some of the most notable DCN architectures are the legacy three-tier, fat-tree, BCube, DCell, VL2, and CamCube. In this research, we simulate the two switch-centric DCN architectures; the widely deployed legacy three-tier architecture and the promising fat-tree architecture using network simulator and analyze the performance of DCTCP in terms of throughput and delay for realistic traffic patterns. We also examine how DCTCP prevents incast and outcast congestion when realistic DCN traffic patterns are employed in above mentioned topologies. Our results show that the underlying DCN architecture

  3. Efficient physical embedding of topologically complex information processing networks in brains and computer circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassett, Danielle S; Greenfield, Daniel L; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Weinberger, Daniel R; Moore, Simon W; Bullmore, Edward T

    2010-04-22

    Nervous systems are information processing networks that evolved by natural selection, whereas very large scale integrated (VLSI) computer circuits have evolved by commercially driven technology development. Here we follow historic intuition that all physical information processing systems will share key organizational properties, such as modularity, that generally confer adaptivity of function. It has long been observed that modular VLSI circuits demonstrate an isometric scaling relationship between the number of processing elements and the number of connections, known as Rent's rule, which is related to the dimensionality of the circuit's interconnect topology and its logical capacity. We show that human brain structural networks, and the nervous system of the nematode C. elegans, also obey Rent's rule, and exhibit some degree of hierarchical modularity. We further show that the estimated Rent exponent of human brain networks, derived from MRI data, can explain the allometric scaling relations between gray and white matter volumes across a wide range of mammalian species, again suggesting that these principles of nervous system design are highly conserved. For each of these fractal modular networks, the dimensionality of the interconnect topology was greater than the 2 or 3 Euclidean dimensions of the space in which it was embedded. This relatively high complexity entailed extra cost in physical wiring: although all networks were economically or cost-efficiently wired they did not strictly minimize wiring costs. Artificial and biological information processing systems both may evolve to optimize a trade-off between physical cost and topological complexity, resulting in the emergence of homologous principles of economical, fractal and modular design across many different kinds of nervous and computational networks.

  4. Network module detection: Affinity search technique with the multi-node topological overlap measure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horvath Steve

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many clustering procedures only allow the user to input a pairwise dissimilarity or distance measure between objects. We propose a clustering method that can input a multi-point dissimilarity measure d(i1, i2, ..., iP where the number of points P can be larger than 2. The work is motivated by gene network analysis where clusters correspond to modules of highly interconnected nodes. Here, we define modules as clusters of network nodes with high multi-node topological overlap. The topological overlap measure is a robust measure of interconnectedness which is based on shared network neighbors. In previous work, we have shown that the multi-node topological overlap measure yields biologically meaningful results when used as input of network neighborhood analysis. Findings We adapt network neighborhood analysis for the use of module detection. We propose the Module Affinity Search Technique (MAST, which is a generalized version of the Cluster Affinity Search Technique (CAST. MAST can accommodate a multi-node dissimilarity measure. Clusters grow around user-defined or automatically chosen seeds (e.g. hub nodes. We propose both local and global cluster growth stopping rules. We use several simulations and a gene co-expression network application to argue that the MAST approach leads to biologically meaningful results. We compare MAST with hierarchical clustering and partitioning around medoid clustering. Conclusion Our flexible module detection method is implemented in the MTOM software which can be downloaded from the following webpage: http://www.genetics.ucla.edu/labs/horvath/MTOM/

  5. Random graph models for dynamic networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao; Moore, Cristopher; Newman, Mark E. J.

    2017-10-01

    Recent theoretical work on the modeling of network structure has focused primarily on networks that are static and unchanging, but many real-world networks change their structure over time. There exist natural generalizations to the dynamic case of many static network models, including the classic random graph, the configuration model, and the stochastic block model, where one assumes that the appearance and disappearance of edges are governed by continuous-time Markov processes with rate parameters that can depend on properties of the nodes. Here we give an introduction to this class of models, showing for instance how one can compute their equilibrium properties. We also demonstrate their use in data analysis and statistical inference, giving efficient algorithms for fitting them to observed network data using the method of maximum likelihood. This allows us, for example, to estimate the time constants of network evolution or infer community structure from temporal network data using cues embedded both in the probabilities over time that node pairs are connected by edges and in the characteristic dynamics of edge appearance and disappearance. We illustrate these methods with a selection of applications, both to computer-generated test networks and real-world examples.

  6. Constrained Task Assignment and Scheduling On Networks of Arbitrary Topology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Justin Patrick

    This dissertation develops a framework to address centralized and distributed constrained task assignment and task scheduling problems. This framework is used to prove properties of these problems that can be exploited, develop effective solution algorithms, and to prove important properties such as correctness, completeness and optimality. The centralized task assignment and task scheduling problem treated here is expressed as a vehicle routing problem with the goal of optimizing mission time subject to mission constraints on task precedence and agent capability. The algorithm developed to solve this problem is able to coordinate vehicle (agent) timing for task completion. This class of problems is NP-hard and analytical guarantees on solution quality are often unavailable. This dissertation develops a technique for determining solution quality that can be used on a large class of problems and does not rely on traditional analytical guarantees. For distributed problems several agents must communicate to collectively solve a distributed task assignment and task scheduling problem. The distributed task assignment and task scheduling algorithms developed here allow for the optimization of constrained military missions in situations where the communication network may be incomplete and only locally known. Two problems are developed. The distributed task assignment problem incorporates communication constraints that must be satisfied; this is the Communication-Constrained Distributed Assignment Problem. A novel distributed assignment algorithm, the Stochastic Bidding Algorithm, solves this problem. The algorithm is correct, probabilistically complete, and has linear average-case time complexity. The distributed task scheduling problem addressed here is to minimize mission time subject to arbitrary predicate mission constraints; this is the Minimum-time Arbitrarily-constrained Distributed Scheduling Problem. The Optimal Distributed Non-sequential Backtracking Algorithm

  7. A topology reorganization scheme for reliable communication in underwater wireless sensor networks affected by shadow zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingo, Mari Carmen

    2009-01-01

    Effective solutions should be devised to handle the effects of shadow zones in Underwater Wireless Sensor Networks (UWSNs). An adaptive topology reorganization scheme that maintains connectivity in multi-hop UWSNs affected by shadow zones has been developed in the context of two Spanish-funded research projects. A mathematical model has been proposed to find the optimal location for sensors with two objectives: the minimization of the transmission loss and the maintenance of network connectivity. The theoretical analysis and the numerical evaluations reveal that our scheme reduces the transmission loss under all propagation phenomena scenarios for all water depths in UWSNs and improves the signal-to-noise ratio.

  8. A Topology Reorganization Scheme for Reliable Communication in Underwater Wireless Sensor Networks Affected by Shadow Zones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari Carmen Domingo

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Effective solutions should be devised to handle the effects of shadow zones in Underwater Wireless Sensor Networks (UWSNs. An adaptive topology reorganization scheme that maintains connectivity in multi-hop UWSNs affected by shadow zones has been developed in the context of two Spanish-funded research projects. A mathematical model has been proposed to find the optimal location for sensors with two objectives: the minimization of the transmission loss and the maintenance of network connectivity. The theoretical analysis and the numerical evaluations reveal that our scheme reduces the transmission loss under all propagation phenomena scenarios for all water depths in UWSNs and improves the signal-to-noise ratio.

  9. A note on the consensus finding problem in communication networks with switching topologies

    KAUST Repository

    Haskovec, Jan

    2014-05-07

    In this note, we discuss the problem of consensus finding in communication networks of agents with dynamically switching topologies. In particular, we consider the case of directed networks with unbalanced matrices of communication rates. We formulate sufficient conditions for consensus finding in terms of strong connectivity of the underlying directed graphs and prove that, given these conditions, consensus is found asymptotically. Moreover, we show that this consensus is an emergent property of the system, being encoded in its dynamics and not just an invariant of its initial configuration. © 2014 © 2014 Taylor & Francis.

  10. Plasmonic response in nanoporous metal: dependence on network topology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galí, Marc A.; Tai, Matthew C.; Arnold, Matthew D.; Cortie, Michael B.; Gentle, Angus R.; Smith, Geoffrey B.

    2015-12-01

    The optical and electrical responses of open, nanoscale, metal networks are of interest in a variety of technologies including transparent conducting electrodes, charge storage, and surfaces with controlled spectral selectivity. The properties of such nanoporous structures depend on the shape and extent of individual voids and the associated hyper-dimensional connectivity and density of the metal filaments. Unfortunately, a quantitative understanding of this dependence is at present only poorly developed. Here we address this problem using numerical simulations applied to a systematically designed series of prototypical sponges. The sponges are produced by a Monte Carlo simulation of the dealloying of Ag-Al alloys containing from 60% to 85% Al. The result is a series of Ag sponges of realistic morphology. The optical properties of the sponges are then calculated by the discrete dipole approximation and the results used to construct an 'effective medium' model for each sponge. We show how the resulting effective medium can be correlated with the associated morphological characteristics of each target and how the optical properties are primarily controlled by the density of the sponge and its state of percolation.

  11. Consumers' online social network topologies and health behaviours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Annie Y S; Dunn, Adam; Mortimer, Nathan; Proudfoot, Judith; Andrews, Annie; Liaw, Siaw-Teng; Crimmins, Jacinta; Arguel, Amaël; Coiera, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    Personally controlled health management systems (PCHMS) often consist of multiple design features. Yet, they currently lack empirical evidence on how consumers use and engage with a PCHMS. An online prospective study was designed to investigate how 709 consumers used a web-based PCHMS to manage their physical and emotional wellbeing over five months. The web-based PCHMS, Healthy.me, was developed at UNSW and incorporates an untethered personal health record, consumer care pathways, forums, polls, diaries, and messaging links with healthcare professionals. The two PCHMS features that consumers used most frequently, found most useful, and engaging were the social features, i.e. forum and poll. Compared to participants who did not use any PCHMS social feature, those who used either the poll or the forum were 12.3% more likely to visit a healthcare professional (P=0.001) during the study. Social network analysis of forums revealed a spectrum of social interaction patterns - from question-and-answer structures to community discussions. This study provides a basis for understanding how a PCHMS can be used as a socially-driven intervention to influence consumers' health behaviours.

  12. Exploitation of complex network topology for link prediction in biological interactomes

    KAUST Repository

    Alanis Lobato, Gregorio

    2014-06-01

    The network representation of the interactions between proteins and genes allows for a holistic perspective of the complex machinery underlying the living cell. However, the large number of interacting entities within the cell makes network construction a daunting and arduous task, prone to errors and missing information. Fortunately, the structure of biological networks is not different from that of other complex systems, such as social networks, the world-wide web or power grids, for which growth models have been proposed to better understand their structure and function. This means that we can design tools based on these models in order to exploit the topology of biological interactomes with the aim to construct more complete and reliable maps of the cell. In this work, we propose three novel and powerful approaches for the prediction of interactions in biological networks and conclude that it is possible to mine the topology of these complex system representations and produce reliable and biologically meaningful information that enriches the datasets to which we have access today.

  13. A Specification-Based IDS for Detecting Attacks on RPL-Based Network Topology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anhtuan Le

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Routing Protocol for Low power and Lossy network (RPL topology attacks can downgrade the network performance significantly by disrupting the optimal protocol structure. To detect such threats, we propose a RPL-specification, obtained by a semi-auto profiling technique that constructs a high-level abstract of operations through network simulation traces, to use as reference for verifying the node behaviors. This specification, including all the legitimate protocol states and transitions with corresponding statistics, will be implemented as a set of rules in the intrusion detection agents, in the form of the cluster heads propagated to monitor the whole network. In order to save resources, we set the cluster members to report related information about itself and other neighbors to the cluster head instead of making the head overhearing all the communication. As a result, information about a cluster member will be reported by different neighbors, which allow the cluster head to do cross-check. We propose to record the sequence in RPL Information Object (DIO and Information Solicitation (DIS messages to eliminate the synchronized issue created by the delay in transmitting the report, in which the cluster head only does cross-check on information that come from sources with the same sequence. Simulation results show that the proposed Intrusion Detection System (IDS has a high accuracy rate in detecting RPL topology attacks, while only creating insignificant overhead (about 6.3% that enable its scalability in large-scale network.

  14. Alteration of long-distance functional connectivity and network topology in patients with supratentorial gliomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ji Eun; Kim, Ho Sung; Kim, Sang Joon; Shim, Woo Hyun [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, Songpa-Gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jeong Hoon [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Neurosurgery, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    The need for information regarding functional alterations in patients with brain gliomas is increasing, but little is known about the functional consequences of focal brain tumors throughout the entire brain. Using resting-state functional MR imaging (rs-fMRI), this study assessed functional connectivity in patients with supratentorial brain gliomas with possible alterations in long-distance connectivity and network topology. Data from 36 patients with supratentorial brain gliomas and 12 healthy subjects were acquired using rs-fMRI. The functional connectivity matrix (FCM) was created using 32 pairs of cortical seeds on Talairach coordinates in each individual subject. Local and distant connectivity were calculated using z-scores in the individual patient's FCM, and the averaged FCM of patients was compared with that of healthy subjects. Weighted network analysis was performed by calculating local efficiency, global efficiency, clustering coefficient, and small-world topology, and compared between patients and healthy controls. When comparing the averaged FCM of patients with that of healthy controls, the patients showed decreased long-distance, inter-hemispheric connectivity (0.32 ± 0.16 in patients vs. 0. 42 ± 0.15 in healthy controls, p = 0.04). In network analysis, patients showed increased local efficiency (p < 0.05), but global efficiency, clustering coefficient, and small-world topology were relatively preserved compared to healthy subjects. Patients with supratentorial brain gliomas showed decreased long-distance connectivity while increased local efficiency and preserved small-world topology. The results of this small case series may provide a better understanding of the alterations of functional connectivity in patients with brain gliomas across the whole brain scale. (orig.)

  15. Accessibility and delay in random temporal networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajbakhsh, Shahriar Etemadi; Coon, Justin P.; Simmons, David E.

    2017-09-01

    In a wide range of complex networks, the links between the nodes are temporal and may sporadically appear and disappear. This temporality is fundamental to analyzing the formation of paths within such networks. Moreover, the presence of the links between the nodes is a random process induced by nature in many real-world networks. In this paper, we study random temporal networks at a microscopic level and formulate the probability of accessibility from a node i to a node j after a certain number of discrete time units T . While solving the original problem is computationally intractable, we provide an upper and two lower bounds on this probability for a very general case with arbitrary time-varying probabilities of the links' existence. Moreover, for a special case where the links have identical probabilities across the network at each time slot, we obtain the exact probability of accessibility between any two nodes. Finally, we discuss scenarios where the information regarding the presence and absence of links is initially available in the form of time duration (of presence or absence intervals) continuous probability distributions rather than discrete probabilities over time slots. We provide a method for transforming such distributions to discrete probabilities, which enables us to apply the given bounds in this paper to a broader range of problem settings.

  16. Resting-State Temporal Synchronization Networks Emerge from Connectivity Topology and Heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce-Alvarez, Adrián; Deco, Gustavo; Hagmann, Patric; Romani, Gian Luca; Mantini, Dante; Corbetta, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Spatial patterns of coherent activity across different brain areas have been identified during the resting-state fluctuations of the brain. However, recent studies indicate that resting-state activity is not stationary, but shows complex temporal dynamics. We were interested in the spatiotemporal dynamics of the phase interactions among resting-state fMRI BOLD signals from human subjects. We found that the global phase synchrony of the BOLD signals evolves on a characteristic ultra-slow (synchronized brain regions. Synchronized communities reoccurred intermittently in time and across scanning sessions. We found that the synchronization communities relate to previously defined functional networks known to be engaged in sensory-motor or cognitive function, called resting-state networks (RSNs), including the default mode network, the somato-motor network, the visual network, the auditory network, the cognitive control networks, the self-referential network, and combinations of these and other RSNs. We studied the mechanism originating the observed spatiotemporal synchronization dynamics by using a network model of phase oscillators connected through the brain’s anatomical connectivity estimated using diffusion imaging human data. The model consistently approximates the temporal and spatial synchronization patterns of the empirical data, and reveals that multiple clusters that transiently synchronize and desynchronize emerge from the complex topology of anatomical connections, provided that oscillators are heterogeneous. PMID:25692996

  17. Motif formation and industry specific topologies in the Japanese business firm network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maluck, Julian; Donner, Reik V.; Takayasu, Hideki; Takayasu, Misako

    2017-05-01

    Motifs and roles are basic quantities for the characterization of interactions among 3-node subsets in complex networks. In this work, we investigate how the distribution of 3-node motifs can be influenced by modifying the rules of an evolving network model while keeping the statistics of simpler network characteristics, such as the link density and the degree distribution, invariant. We exemplify this problem for the special case of the Japanese Business Firm Network, where a well-studied and relatively simple yet realistic evolving network model is available, and compare the resulting motif distribution in the real-world and simulated networks. To better approximate the motif distribution of the real-world network in the model, we introduce both subgraph dependent and global additional rules. We find that a specific rule that allows only for the merging process between nodes with similar link directionality patterns reduces the observed excess of densely connected motifs with bidirectional links. Our study improves the mechanistic understanding of motif formation in evolving network models to better describe the characteristic features of real-world networks with a scale-free topology.

  18. Designing Structure-Dependent MPC-Based AGC Schemes Considering Network Topology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Sik Jang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the important features of structure-dependent model predictive control (MPC-based approaches for automatic generation control (AGC considering network topology. Since power systems have various generators under different topologies, it is necessary to reflect the characteristics of generators in power networks and the control system structures in order to improve the dynamic performance of AGC. Specifically, considering control system structures is very important because not only can the topological problems be reduced, but also a computing system for AGC in a bulk-power system can be realized. Based on these considerations, we propose new schemes in the proposed controller for minimizing inadvertent line flows and computational burden, which strengthen the advantages of MPC-based approach for AGC. Analysis and simulation results in the IEEE 39-bus model system show different dynamic behaviors among structure-dependent control schemes and possible improvements in computational burden via the proposed control scheme while system operators in each balancing area consider physical load reference ramp constraints among generators.

  19. Effect of inhibitory firing pattern on coherence resonance in random neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Haitao; Zhang, Lianghao; Guo, Xinmeng; Wang, Jiang; Cao, Yibin; Liu, Jing

    2018-01-01

    The effect of inhibitory firing patterns on coherence resonance (CR) in random neuronal network is systematically studied. Spiking and bursting are two main types of firing pattern considered in this work. Numerical results show that, irrespective of the inhibitory firing patterns, the regularity of network is maximized by an optimal intensity of external noise, indicating the occurrence of coherence resonance. Moreover, the firing pattern of inhibitory neuron indeed has a significant influence on coherence resonance, but the efficacy is determined by network property. In the network with strong coupling strength but weak inhibition, bursting neurons largely increase the amplitude of resonance, while they can decrease the noise intensity that induced coherence resonance within the neural system of strong inhibition. Different temporal windows of inhibition induced by different inhibitory neurons may account for the above observations. The network structure also plays a constructive role in the coherence resonance. There exists an optimal network topology to maximize the regularity of the neural systems.

  20. A Cluster-Based Dual-Adaptive Topology Control Approach in Wireless Sensor Networks

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    Jinsong Gui

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Multi-Input Multi-Output (MIMO can improve wireless network performance. Sensors are usually single-antenna devices due to the high hardware complexity and cost, so several sensors are used to form virtual MIMO array, which is a desirable approach to efficiently take advantage of MIMO gains. Also, in large Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs, clustering can improve the network scalability, which is an effective topology control approach. The existing virtual MIMO-based clustering schemes do not either fully explore the benefits of MIMO or adaptively determine the clustering ranges. Also, clustering mechanism needs to be further improved to enhance the cluster structure life. In this paper, we propose an improved clustering scheme for virtual MIMO-based topology construction (ICV-MIMO, which can determine adaptively not only the inter-cluster transmission modes but also the clustering ranges. Through the rational division of cluster head function and the optimization of cluster head selection criteria and information exchange process, the ICV-MIMO scheme effectively reduces the network energy consumption and improves the lifetime of the cluster structure when compared with the existing typical virtual MIMO-based scheme. Moreover, the message overhead and time complexity are still in the same order of magnitude.

  1. Large-scale identification of human protein function using topological features of interaction network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhanchao; Liu, Zhiqing; Zhong, Wenqian; Huang, Menghua; Wu, Na; Xie, Yun; Dai, Zong; Zou, Xiaoyong

    2016-11-01

    The annotation of protein function is a vital step to elucidate the essence of life at a molecular level, and it is also meritorious in biomedical and pharmaceutical industry. Developments of sequencing technology result in constant expansion of the gap between the number of the known sequences and their functions. Therefore, it is indispensable to develop a computational method for the annotation of protein function. Herein, a novel method is proposed to identify protein function based on the weighted human protein-protein interaction network and graph theory. The network topology features with local and global information are presented to characterise proteins. The minimum redundancy maximum relevance algorithm is used to select 227 optimized feature subsets and support vector machine technique is utilized to build the prediction models. The performance of current method is assessed through 10-fold cross-validation test, and the range of accuracies is from 67.63% to 100%. Comparing with other annotation methods, the proposed way possesses a 50% improvement in the predictive accuracy. Generally, such network topology features provide insights into the relationship between protein functions and network architectures. The source code of Matlab is freely available on request from the authors.

  2. Evolutionary and Topological Properties of Genes and Community Structures in Human Gene Regulatory Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szedlak, Anthony; Smith, Nicholas; Liu, Li; Paternostro, Giovanni; Piermarocchi, Carlo

    2016-06-01

    The diverse, specialized genes present in today's lifeforms evolved from a common core of ancient, elementary genes. However, these genes did not evolve individually: gene expression is controlled by a complex network of interactions, and alterations in one gene may drive reciprocal changes in its proteins' binding partners. Like many complex networks, these gene regulatory networks (GRNs) are composed of communities, or clusters of genes with relatively high connectivity. A deep understanding of the relationship between the evolutionary history of single genes and the topological properties of the underlying GRN is integral to evolutionary genetics. Here, we show that the topological properties of an acute myeloid leukemia GRN and a general human GRN are strongly coupled with its genes' evolutionary properties. Slowly evolving ("cold"), old genes tend to interact with each other, as do rapidly evolving ("hot"), young genes. This naturally causes genes to segregate into community structures with relatively homogeneous evolutionary histories. We argue that gene duplication placed old, cold genes and communities at the center of the networks, and young, hot genes and communities at the periphery. We demonstrate this with single-node centrality measures and two new measures of efficiency, the set efficiency and the interset efficiency. We conclude that these methods for studying the relationships between a GRN's community structures and its genes' evolutionary properties provide new perspectives for understanding evolutionary genetics.

  3. Architecture of transcriptional regulatory circuits is knitted over the topology of bio-molecular interaction networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nielsen Jens

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Uncovering the operating principles underlying cellular processes by using 'omics' data is often a difficult task due to the high-dimensionality of the solution space that spans all interactions among the bio-molecules under consideration. A rational way to overcome this problem is to use the topology of bio-molecular interaction networks in order to constrain the solution space. Such approaches systematically integrate the existing biological knowledge with the 'omics' data. Results Here we introduce a hypothesis-driven method that integrates bio-molecular network topology with transcriptome data, thereby allowing the identification of key biological features (Reporter Features around which transcriptional changes are significantly concentrated. We have combined transcriptome data with different biological networks in order to identify Reporter Gene Ontologies, Reporter Transcription Factors, Reporter Proteins and Reporter Complexes, and use this to decipher the logic of regulatory circuits playing a key role in yeast glucose repression and human diabetes. Conclusion Reporter Features offer the opportunity to identify regulatory hot-spots in bio-molecular interaction networks that are significantly affected between or across conditions. Results of the Reporter Feature analysis not only provide a snapshot of the transcriptional regulatory program but also are biologically easy to interpret and provide a powerful way to generate new hypotheses. Our Reporter Features analyses of yeast glucose repression and human diabetes data brings hints towards the understanding of the principles of transcriptional regulation controlling these two important and potentially closely related systems.

  4. A Genetic Algorithm for the Bi-Level Topological Design of Local Area Networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José-Fernando Camacho-Vallejo

    Full Text Available Local access networks (LAN are commonly used as communication infrastructures which meet the demand of a set of users in the local environment. Usually these networks consist of several LAN segments connected by bridges. The topological LAN design bi-level problem consists on assigning users to clusters and the union of clusters by bridges in order to obtain a minimum response time network with minimum connection cost. Therefore, the decision of optimally assigning users to clusters will be made by the leader and the follower will make the decision of connecting all the clusters while forming a spanning tree. In this paper, we propose a genetic algorithm for solving the bi-level topological design of a Local Access Network. Our solution method considers the Stackelberg equilibrium to solve the bi-level problem. The Stackelberg-Genetic algorithm procedure deals with the fact that the follower's problem cannot be optimally solved in a straightforward manner. The computational results obtained from two different sets of instances show that the performance of the developed algorithm is efficient and that it is more suitable for solving the bi-level problem than a previous Nash-Genetic approach.

  5. Loop topology based white light interferometric fiber optic sensor network for application of perimeter security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Libo; Dong, Yongtao

    2011-09-01

    A loop topology based white light interferometric sensor network for perimeter security has been designed and demonstrated. In the perimeter security sensing system, where fiber sensors are packaged in the suspended cable or buried cable, a bi-directional optical path interrogator is built by using Michelson or Mach-Zehnder interferometer. A practical implementation of this technique is presented by using an amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) light source and standard single mode fiber, which are common in communication industry. The sensor loop topology is completely passive and absolute length measurements can be obtained for each sensing fiber segment so that it can be used to measure quasi-distribution strain perturbation. For the long distance perimeter monitoring, this technique not only extends the multiplexing potential, but also provides a redundancy for the sensing system. One breakdown point is allowed in the sensor loop because the sensing system will still work even if the embedded sensor loop breaks somewhere.

  6. Determination of keystone species in CSM food web: A topological analysis of network structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LiQin Jiang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The importance of a species is correlated with its topological properties in a food web. Studies of keystone species provide the valuable theory and evidence for conservation ecology, biodiversity, habitat management, as well as the dynamics and stability of the ecosystem. Comparing with biological experiments, network methods based on topological structure possess particular advantage in the identification of keystone species. In present study, we quantified the relative importance of species in Carpinteria Salt Marsh food web by analyzing five centrality indices. The results showed that there were large differences in rankings species in terms of different centrality indices. Moreover, the correlation analysis of those centralities was studied in order to enhance the identifying ability of keystone species. The results showed that the combination of degree centrality and closeness centrality could better identify keystone species, and the keystone species in the CSM food web were identified as, Stictodora hancocki, small cyathocotylid, Pygidiopsoides spindalis, Phocitremoides ovale and Parorchis acanthus.

  7. Effects in the network topology due to node aggregation: Empirical evidence from the domestic maritime transportation in Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiotas, Dimitrios; Polyzos, Serafeim

    2018-02-01

    This article studies the topological consistency of spatial networks due to node aggregation, examining the changes captured between different network representations that result from nodes' grouping and they refer to the same socioeconomic system. The main purpose of this study is to evaluate what kind of topological information remains unalterable due to node aggregation and, further, to develop a framework for linking the data of an empirical network with data of its socioeconomic environment, when the latter are available for hierarchically higher levels of aggregation, in an effort to promote the interdisciplinary research in the field of complex network analysis. The research question is empirically tested on topological and socioeconomic data extracted from the Greek Maritime Network (GMN) that is modeled as a non-directed multilayer (bilayer) graph consisting of a port-layer, where nodes represent ports, and a prefecture-layer, where nodes represent coastal and insular prefectural groups of ports. The analysis highlights that the connectivity (degree) of the GMN is the most consistent aspect of this multilayer network, which preserves both the topological and the socioeconomic information through node aggregation. In terms of spatial analysis and regional science, such effects illustrate the effectiveness of the prefectural administrative division for the functionality of the Greek maritime transportation system. Overall, this approach proposes a methodological framework that can enjoy further applications about the grouping effects induced on the network topology, providing physical, technical, socioeconomic, strategic or political insights.

  8. ILP Model and Relaxation-Based Decomposition Approach for Incremental Topology Optimization in p-Cycle Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Noor-E-Alam

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available p-cycle networks have attracted a considerable interest in the network survivability literature in recent years. However, most of the existing work assumes a known network topology upon which to apply p-cycle restoration. In the present work, we develop an incremental topology optimization ILP for p-cycle network design, where a known topology can be amended with new fibre links selected from a set of eligible spans. The ILP proves to be relatively easy to solve for small test case instances but becomes computationally intensive on larger networks. We then follow with a relaxation-based decomposition approach to overcome this challenge. The decomposition approach significantly reduces computational complexity of the problem, allowing the ILP to be solved in reasonable time with no statistically significant impact on solution optimality.

  9. Correlating the Network Topology of Oxide Glasses with their Chemical Durability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascaraque, Nerea; Bauchy, Mathieu; Smedskjaer, Morten M

    2017-02-09

    Glasses gradually dissolve and corrode when they are exposed to aqueous solutions, and for many applications it is necessary to understand and predict the kinetics of the glass dissolution. Despite the recent progress in understanding the impact of chemical composition on the dissolution rate, a detailed understanding of the structural and topological origin of chemical durability in solutions of different pH is still largely lacking. Such knowledge would enable the tailoring of glass dissolution kinetics as a function of chemical composition. In a recent study focusing on silicate minerals and glasses, a direct relation was demonstrated between the dissolution rate at high pH and the number of chemical topological constraints per atom (nc) acting within the molecular network [Pignatelli, I.; Kumar, A.; Bauchy, M.; Sant, G. Langmuir 2016, 32, 4434-4439]. Here, we extend this work by studying the bulk dissolution rate (Dr) of a wider range of oxide glasses in various acidic, neutral, and basic solutions. The glass compositions have been selected to obtain a wide range of chemistries and values of nc, from flexible phosphate glasses to stressed-rigid aluminosilicate glasses. We show that, in flexible glasses, the internal modes of deformation facilitate the hydration of the network, whereas, in stressed-rigid glasses, the high number of constraints largely inhibits hydration in basic, neutral, and acidic solutions. Our study of chemical dissolution also allows establishing the kinetic mechanisms, which is controlled through an effective activation energy and depends on pH and glass topology. The energy barrier that needs to be overcome to break a unit atomic constraint is approximately constant for pH > 2, but then decreases at lower pH, indicating a change in dissolution mechanism from hydrolysis to ion exchange at low pH. Thus, with this research and existing topological models, the atomistic design of new oxide glasses with a specific chemical durability for a

  10. The topology of the bacterial co-conserved protein network and its implications for predicting protein function

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    Leach Sonia M

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein-protein interactions networks are most often generated from physical protein-protein interaction data. Co-conservation, also known as phylogenetic profiles, is an alternative source of information for generating protein interaction networks. Co-conservation methods generate interaction networks among proteins that are gained or lost together through evolution. Co-conservation is a particularly useful technique in the compact bacteria genomes. Prior studies in yeast suggest that the topology of protein-protein interaction networks generated from physical interaction assays can offer important insight into protein function. Here, we hypothesize that in bacteria, the topology of protein interaction networks derived via co-conservation information could similarly improve methods for predicting protein function. Since the topology of bacteria co-conservation protein-protein interaction networks has not previously been studied in depth, we first perform such an analysis for co-conservation networks in E. coli K12. Next, we demonstrate one way in which network connectivity measures and global and local function distribution can be exploited to predict protein function for previously uncharacterized proteins. Results Our results showed, like most biological networks, our bacteria co-conserved protein-protein interaction networks had scale-free topologies. Our results indicated that some properties of the physical yeast interaction network hold in our bacteria co-conservation networks, such as high connectivity for essential proteins. However, the high connectivity among protein complexes in the yeast physical network was not seen in the co-conservation network which uses all bacteria as the reference set. We found that the distribution of node connectivity varied by functional category and could be informative for function prediction. By integrating of functional information from different annotation sources and using the

  11. Large-scale identification of potential drug targets based on the topological features of human protein-protein interaction network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhan-Chao; Zhong, Wen-Qian; Liu, Zhi-Qing; Huang, Meng-Hua; Xie, Yun; Dai, Zong; Zou, Xiao-Yong

    2015-04-29

    Identifying potential drug target proteins is a crucial step in the process of drug discovery and plays a key role in the study of the molecular mechanisms of disease. Based on the fact that the majority of proteins exert their functions through interacting with each other, we propose a method to recognize target proteins by using the human protein-protein interaction network and graph theory. In the network, vertexes and edges are weighted by using the confidence scores of interactions and descriptors of protein primary structure, respectively. The novel network topological features are defined and employed to characterize protein using existing databases. A widely used minimum redundancy maximum relevance and random forests algorithm are utilized to select the optimal feature subset and construct model for the identification of potential drug target proteins at the proteome scale. The accuracies of training set and test set are 89.55% and 85.23%. Using the constructed model, 2127 potential drug target proteins have been recognized and 156 drug target proteins have been validated in the database of drug target. In addition, some new drug target proteins can be considered as targets for treating diseases of mucopolysaccharidosis, non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy, Bernard-Soulier syndrome and pseudo-von Willebrand, etc. It is anticipated that the proposed method may became a powerful high-throughput virtual screening tool of drug target. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Optimal Channel Width Adaptation, Logical Topology Design, and Routing in Wireless Mesh Networks

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    Li Li

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Radio frequency spectrum is a finite and scarce resource. How to efficiently use the spectrum resource is one of the fundamental issues for multi-radio multi-channel wireless mesh networks. However, past research efforts that attempt to exploit multiple channels always assume channels of fixed predetermined width, which prohibits the further effective use of the spectrum resource. In this paper, we address how to optimally adapt channel width to more efficiently utilize the spectrum in IEEE802.11-based multi-radio multi-channel mesh networks. We mathematically formulate the channel width adaptation, logical topology design, and routing as a joint mixed 0-1 integer linear optimization problem, and we also propose our heuristic assignment algorithm. Simulation results show that our method can significantly improve spectrum use efficiency and network performance.

  13. Secure Adaptive Topology Control for Wireless Ad-Hoc Sensor Networks

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    Yen-Chieh Ouyang

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a secure decentralized clustering algorithm for wireless ad-hoc sensor networks. The algorithm operates without a centralized controller, operates asynchronously, and does not require that the location of the sensors be known a priori. Based on the cluster-based topology, secure hierarchical communication protocols and dynamic quarantine strategies are introduced to defend against spam attacks, since this type of attacks can exhaust the energy of sensor nodes and will shorten the lifetime of a sensor network drastically. By adjusting the threshold of infected percentage of the cluster coverage, our scheme can dynamically coordinate the proportion of the quarantine region and adaptively achieve the cluster control and the neighborhood control of attacks. Simulation results show that the proposed approach is feasible and cost effective for wireless sensor networks.

  14. Topological correlations of structural and functional networks in patients with traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen eCaeyenberghs

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Despite an increasing amount of specific correlation studies between structural and functional connectivity, there is still a need for combined studies, especially in pathological conditions. Impairments of brain white matter and diffuse axonal injuries are commonly suspected to be responsible for the disconnection hypothesis in traumatic brain injury (TBI patients. Moreover, our previous research on TBI patients shows a strong relationship between abnormalities in topological organization of brain networks and behavioral deficits. In this study, we combined task-related functional connectivity (using event-related fMRI with structural connectivity (derived from fiber tractography using diffusion MRI data estimates in the same participants (17 adults with TBI and 16 controls, allowing for direct comparison between graph metrics of the different imaging modalities. Connectivity matrices were computed covering the switching motor network, which includes the basal ganglia, anterior cingulate cortex/supplementary motor area, and anterior insula/inferior frontal gyrus. The edges constituting this network consisted of the partial correlations between the fMRI time series from each node of the switching motor network. The interregional anatomical connections between the switching-related areas were determined using the fiber tractography results. We found that graph metrics and hubs obtained showed no agreement in both groups. The topological properties of brain functional networks could not be solely accounted for the properties of the underlying structural networks. However, combining complementary information from both different imaging modalities could improve accuracy in prediction of switching performance. Direct comparison between functional task-related and anatomical structural connectivity, presented here for the first time in TBI patients, links two powerful approaches to map the patterns of brain connectivity that may underlie behavioral

  15. Effective identification of essential proteins based on priori knowledge, network topology and gene expressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Zheng, Ruiqing; Zhang, Hanhui; Wang, Jianxin; Pan, Yi

    2014-06-01

    Identification of essential proteins is very important for understanding the minimal requirements for cellular life and also necessary for a series of practical applications, such as drug design. With the advances in high throughput technologies, a large number of protein-protein interactions are available, which makes it possible to detect proteins' essentialities from the network level. Considering that most species already have a number of known essential proteins, we proposed a new priori knowledge-based scheme to discover new essential proteins from protein interaction networks. Based on the new scheme, two essential protein discovery algorithms, CPPK and CEPPK, were developed. CPPK predicts new essential proteins based on network topology and CEPPK detects new essential proteins by integrating network topology and gene expressions. The performances of CPPK and CEPPK were validated based on the protein interaction network of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The experimental results showed that the priori knowledge of known essential proteins was effective for improving the predicted precision. The predicted precisions of CPPK and CEPPK clearly exceeded that of the other 10 previously proposed essential protein discovery methods: Degree Centrality (DC), Betweenness Centrality (BC), Closeness Centrality (CC), Subgraph Centrality (SC), Eigenvector Centrality (EC), Information Centrality (IC), Bottle Neck (BN), Density of Maximum Neighborhood Component (DMNC), Local Average Connectivity-based method (LAC), and Network Centrality (NC). Especially, CPPK achieved 40% improvement in precision over BC, CC, SC, EC, and BN, and CEPPK performed even better. CEPPK was also compared to four other methods (EPC, ORFL, PeC, and CoEWC) which were not node centralities and CEPPK was showed to achieve the best results. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Multi-scale structure and topological anomaly detection via a new network statistic: The onion decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hébert-Dufresne, Laurent; Grochow, Joshua A.; Allard, Antoine

    2016-08-01

    We introduce a network statistic that measures structural properties at the micro-, meso-, and macroscopic scales, while still being easy to compute and interpretable at a glance. Our statistic, the onion spectrum, is based on the onion decomposition, which refines the k-core decomposition, a standard network fingerprinting method. The onion spectrum is exactly as easy to compute as the k-cores: It is based on the stages at which each vertex gets removed from a graph in the standard algorithm for computing the k-cores. Yet, the onion spectrum reveals much more information about a network, and at multiple scales; for example, it can be used to quantify node heterogeneity, degree correlations, centrality, and tree- or lattice-likeness. Furthermore, unlike the k-core decomposition, the combined degree-onion spectrum immediately gives a clear local picture of the network around each node which allows the detection of interesting subgraphs whose topological structure differs from the global network organization. This local description can also be leveraged to easily generate samples from the ensemble of networks with a given joint degree-onion distribution. We demonstrate the utility of the onion spectrum for understanding both static and dynamic properties on several standard graph models and on many real-world networks.

  17. Multi-scale structure and topological anomaly detection via a new network statistic: The onion decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hébert-Dufresne, Laurent; Grochow, Joshua A; Allard, Antoine

    2016-08-18

    We introduce a network statistic that measures structural properties at the micro-, meso-, and macroscopic scales, while still being easy to compute and interpretable at a glance. Our statistic, the onion spectrum, is based on the onion decomposition, which refines the k-core decomposition, a standard network fingerprinting method. The onion spectrum is exactly as easy to compute as the k-cores: It is based on the stages at which each vertex gets removed from a graph in the standard algorithm for computing the k-cores. Yet, the onion spectrum reveals much more information about a network, and at multiple scales; for example, it can be used to quantify node heterogeneity, degree correlations, centrality, and tree- or lattice-likeness. Furthermore, unlike the k-core decomposition, the combined degree-onion spectrum immediately gives a clear local picture of the network around each node which allows the detection of interesting subgraphs whose topological structure differs from the global network organization. This local description can also be leveraged to easily generate samples from the ensemble of networks with a given joint degree-onion distribution. We demonstrate the utility of the onion spectrum for understanding both static and dynamic properties on several standard graph models and on many real-world networks.

  18. Topological specificity and hierarchical network of the circadian calcium rhythm in the suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enoki, Ryosuke; Kuroda, Shigeru; Ono, Daisuke; Hasan, Mazahir T; Ueda, Tetsuo; Honma, Sato; Honma, Ken-ichi

    2012-12-26

    The circadian pacemaker in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is a hierarchical multioscillator system in which neuronal networks play crucial roles in expressing coherent rhythms in physiology and behavior. However, our understanding of the neuronal network is still incomplete. Intracellular calcium mediates the input signals, such as phase-resetting stimuli, to the core molecular loop involving clock genes for circadian rhythm generation and the output signals from the loop to various cellular functions, including changes in neurotransmitter release. Using a unique large-scale calcium imaging method with genetically encoded calcium sensors, we visualized intracellular calcium from the entire surface of SCN slice in culture including the regions where autonomous clock gene expression was undetectable. We found circadian calcium rhythms at a single-cell level in the SCN, which were topologically specific with a larger amplitude and more delayed phase in the ventral region than the dorsal. The robustness of the rhythm was reduced but persisted even after blocking the neuronal firing with tetrodotoxin (TTX). Notably, TTX dissociated the circadian calcium rhythms between the dorsal and ventral SCN. In contrast, a blocker of gap junctions, carbenoxolone, had only a minor effect on the calcium rhythms at both the single-cell and network levels. These results reveal the topological specificity of the circadian calcium rhythm in the SCN and the presence of coupled regional pacemakers in the dorsal and ventral regions. Neuronal firings are not necessary for the persistence of the calcium rhythms but indispensable for the hierarchical organization of rhythmicity in the SCN.

  19. Random Walker Coverage Analysis for Information Dissemination in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Skiadopoulos

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The increasing technological progress in electronics provides network nodes with new and enhanced capabilities that allow the revisit of the traditional information dissemination (and collection problem. The probabilistic nature of information dissemination using random walkers is exploited here to deal with challenges imposed by unconventional modern environments. In such systems, node operation is not deterministic (e.g., does not depend only on network nodes’ battery, but it rather depends on the particulars of the ambient environment (e.g., in the case of energy harvesting: sunshine, wind. The mechanism of information dissemination using one random walker is studied and analyzed in this paper under a different and novel perspective. In particular, it takes into account the stochastic nature of random walks, enabling further understanding of network coverage. A novel and original analysis is presented, which reveals the evolution network coverage by a random walker with respect to time. The derived analytical results reveal certain additional interesting aspects regarding network coverage, thus shedding more light on the random walker mechanism. Further analytical results, regarding the walker’s spatial movement and its associated neighborhood, are also confirmed through experimentation. Finally, simulation results considering random geometric graph topologies, which are suitable for modeling mobile environments, support and confirm the analytical findings.

  20. Serial and Parallel Implementations of Hybrid Fluid Model of Information Flows in Networks with Complex Topology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basavin Dmitry

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is dedicated to the issue of modeling information flows in networks with complex topologies and it describes a comparison of the sequential (written in the MATLAB language and parallel (based on GPGPU technology software implementations of the hybrid fluid model (HFM of Internet traffic. Obtained performance estimates of both software implementations indicate a higher performance of parallel software implementation HFM. The directions of further research, the results of which will be the basis for the later development of parallel software implementation HFM are proposed.

  1. Synchronization of fractional-order linear complex networks with directed coupling topology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Qingxiang; Peng, Jigen

    2018-01-01

    The synchronization of fractional-order complex networks with general linear dynamics under directed connected topology is investigated. The synchronization problem is converted to an equivalent simultaneous stability problem of corresponding independent subsystems by use of a pseudo-state transformation technique and real Jordan canonical form of matrix. Sufficient conditions in terms of linear matrix inequalities for synchronization are established according to stability theory of fractional-order differential equations. In a certain range of fractional order, the effects of the fractional order on synchronization is clearly revealed. Conclusions obtained in this paper generalize the existing results. Three numerical examples are provided to illustrate the validity of proposed conclusions.

  2. Understanding the shift of correlation matrices during financial crisis: A network topology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusoff, Nur Syahidah; Sharif, Shamshuritawati

    2015-02-01

    Understanding the shift of correlation matrices in any process is not an easy task. From the literatures, the most popular and widely used test for correlation shift is Jennrich's test. This motivates us to use it in this paper. However, if after hypothesis testing the hypothesis of stable process correlation is rejected, then the next problem is to find out the root causes of that situation. In this paper, network topology approach will be used to understand the shift. A case study will be discussed and presented to illustrate the advantage of this approach.

  3. Asymmetry of Hemispheric Network Topology Reveals Dissociable Processes between Functional and Structural Brain Connectome in Community-Living Elders

    OpenAIRE

    Yu Sun; Junhua Li; John Suckling; Lei Feng

    2017-01-01

    Human brain is structurally and functionally asymmetrical and the asymmetries of brain phenotypes have been shown to change in normal aging. Recent advances in graph theoretical analysis have showed topological lateralization between hemispheric networks in the human brain throughout the lifespan. Nevertheless, apparent discrepancies of hemispheric asymmetry were reported between the structural and functional brain networks, indicating the potentially complex asymmetry patterns between struct...

  4. Features of Random Metal Nanowire Networks with

    KAUST Repository

    Maloth, Thirupathi

    2017-05-01

    Among the alternatives to conventional Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) used in making transparent conducting electrodes, the random metal nanowire (NW) networks are considered to be superior offering performance at par with ITO. The performance is measured in terms of sheet resistance and optical transmittance. However, as the electrical properties of such random networks are achieved thanks to a percolation network, a minimum size of the electrodes is needed so it actually exceeds the representative volume element (RVE) of the material and the macroscopic electrical properties are achieved. There is not much information about the compatibility of this minimum RVE size with the resolution actually needed in electronic devices. Furthermore, the efficiency of NWs in terms of electrical conduction is overlooked. In this work, we address the above industrially relevant questions - 1) The minimum size of electrodes that can be made based on the dimensions of NWs and the material coverage. For this, we propose a morphology based classification in defining the RVE size and we also compare the same with that is based on macroscopic electrical properties stabilization. 2) The amount of NWs that do not participate in electrical conduction, hence of no practical use. The results presented in this thesis are a design guide to experimentalists to design transparent electrodes with more optimal usage of the material.

  5. Epidemic Spreading in Random Rectangular Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Estrada, Ernesto; Moreno, Yamir

    2015-01-01

    Recently, Estrada and Sheerin (Phys. Rev. E 91, 042805 (2015)) developed the random rectangular graph (RRG) model to account for the spatial distribution of nodes in a network allowing the variation of the shape of the unit square commonly used in random geometric graphs (RGGs). Here, we consider an epidemics dynamics taking place on the nodes and edges of an RRG and we derive analytically a lower bound for the epidemic threshold for a Susceptible-Infected-Susceptible (SIS) or Susceptible-Infected-Recovered (SIR) model on these networks. Using extensive numerical simulations of the SIS dynamics we show that the lower bound found is very tight. We conclude that the elongation of the area in which the nodes are distributed makes the network more resilient to the propagation of an epidemics due to the fact that the epidemic threshold increases with the elongation of the rectangle. On the other hand, using the "classical" RGG for modeling epidemics on non-squared cities generates a larger error due to the effects...

  6. Holographic coherent states from random tensor networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xiao-Liang; Yang, Zhao; You, Yi-Zhuang

    2017-08-01

    Random tensor networks provide useful models that incorporate various important features of holographic duality. A tensor network is usually defined for a fixed graph geometry specified by the connection of tensors. In this paper, we generalize the random tensor network approach to allow quantum superposition of different spatial geometries. We setup a framework in which all possible bulk spatial geometries, characterized by weighted adjacient matrices of all possible graphs, are mapped to the boundary Hilbert space and form an overcomplete basis of the boundary. We name such an overcomplete basis as holographic coherent states. A generic boundary state can be expanded in this basis, which describes the state as a superposition of different spatial geometries in the bulk. We discuss how to define distinct classical geometries and small fluctuations around them. We show that small fluctuations around classical geometries define "code subspaces" which are mapped to the boundary Hilbert space isometrically with quantum error correction properties. In addition, we also show that the overlap between different geometries is suppressed exponentially as a function of the geometrical difference between the two geometries. The geometrical difference is measured in an area law fashion, which is a manifestation of the holographic nature of the states considered.

  7. Neural-Network Quantum States, String-Bond States, and Chiral Topological States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasser, Ivan; Pancotti, Nicola; August, Moritz; Rodriguez, Ivan D.; Cirac, J. Ignacio

    2018-01-01

    Neural-network quantum states have recently been introduced as an Ansatz for describing the wave function of quantum many-body systems. We show that there are strong connections between neural-network quantum states in the form of restricted Boltzmann machines and some classes of tensor-network states in arbitrary dimensions. In particular, we demonstrate that short-range restricted Boltzmann machines are entangled plaquette states, while fully connected restricted Boltzmann machines are string-bond states with a nonlocal geometry and low bond dimension. These results shed light on the underlying architecture of restricted Boltzmann machines and their efficiency at representing many-body quantum states. String-bond states also provide a generic way of enhancing the power of neural-network quantum states and a natural generalization to systems with larger local Hilbert space. We compare the advantages and drawbacks of these different classes of states and present a method to combine them together. This allows us to benefit from both the entanglement structure of tensor networks and the efficiency of neural-network quantum states into a single Ansatz capable of targeting the wave function of strongly correlated systems. While it remains a challenge to describe states with chiral topological order using traditional tensor networks, we show that, because of their nonlocal geometry, neural-network quantum states and their string-bond-state extension can describe a lattice fractional quantum Hall state exactly. In addition, we provide numerical evidence that neural-network quantum states can approximate a chiral spin liquid with better accuracy than entangled plaquette states and local string-bond states. Our results demonstrate the efficiency of neural networks to describe complex quantum wave functions and pave the way towards the use of string-bond states as a tool in more traditional machine-learning applications.

  8. Neural-Network Quantum States, String-Bond States, and Chiral Topological States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Glasser

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Neural-network quantum states have recently been introduced as an Ansatz for describing the wave function of quantum many-body systems. We show that there are strong connections between neural-network quantum states in the form of restricted Boltzmann machines and some classes of tensor-network states in arbitrary dimensions. In particular, we demonstrate that short-range restricted Boltzmann machines are entangled plaquette states, while fully connected restricted Boltzmann machines are string-bond states with a nonlocal geometry and low bond dimension. These results shed light on the underlying architecture of restricted Boltzmann machines and their efficiency at representing many-body quantum states. String-bond states also provide a generic way of enhancing the power of neural-network quantum states and a natural generalization to systems with larger local Hilbert space. We compare the advantages and drawbacks of these different classes of states and present a method to combine them together. This allows us to benefit from both the entanglement structure of tensor networks and the efficiency of neural-network quantum states into a single Ansatz capable of targeting the wave function of strongly correlated systems. While it remains a challenge to describe states with chiral topological order using traditional tensor networks, we show that, because of their nonlocal geometry, neural-network quantum states and their string-bond-state extension can describe a lattice fractional quantum Hall state exactly. In addition, we provide numerical evidence that neural-network quantum states can approximate a chiral spin liquid with better accuracy than entangled plaquette states and local string-bond states. Our results demonstrate the efficiency of neural networks to describe complex quantum wave functions and pave the way towards the use of string-bond states as a tool in more traditional machine-learning applications.

  9. Analysis of Greedy Decision Making for Geographic Routing for Networks of Randomly Moving Objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amber Israr

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Autonomous and self-organizing wireless ad-hoc communication networks for moving objects consist of nodes, which use no centralized network infrastructure. Examples of moving object networks are networks of flying objects, networks of vehicles, networks of moving people or robots. Moving object networks have to face many critical challenges in terms of routing because of dynamic topological changes and asymmetric networks links. A suitable and effective routing mechanism helps to extend the deployment of moving nodes. In this paper an attempt has been made to analyze the performance of the Greedy Decision method (position aware distance based algorithm for geographic routing for network nodes moving according to the random waypoint mobility model. The widely used GPSR (Greedy Packet Stateless Routing protocol utilizes geographic distance and position based data of nodes to transmit packets towards destination nodes. In this paper different scenarios have been tested to develop a concrete set of recommendations for optimum deployment of distance based Greedy Decision of Geographic Routing in randomly moving objects network

  10. Statistical metrics for the characterization of karst network geometry and topology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collon, Pauline; Bernasconi, David; Vuilleumier, Cécile; Renard, Philippe

    2017-04-01

    Statistical metrics can be used to analyse the morphology of natural or simulated karst systems; they allow describing, comparing, and quantifying their geometry and topology. In this paper, we present and discuss a set of such metrics. We study their properties and their usefulness based on a set of more than 30 karstic networks mapped by speleologists. The data set includes some of the largest explored cave systems in the world and represents a broad range of geological and speleogenetic conditions allowing us to test the proposed metrics, their variability, and their usefulness for the discrimination of different morphologies. All the proposed metrics require that the topographical survey of the caves are first converted to graphs consisting of vertices and edges. This data preprocessing includes several quality check operations and some corrections to ensure that the karst is represented as accurately as possible. The statistical parameters relating to the geometry of the system are then directly computed on the graphs, while the topological parameters are computed on a reduced version of the network focusing only on its structure. Among the tested metrics, we include some that were previously proposed such as tortuosity or the Howard's coefficients. We also investigate the possibility to use new metrics derived from graph theory. In total, 21 metrics are introduced, discussed in detail, and compared on the basis of our data set. This work shows that orientation analysis and, in particular, the entropy of the orientation data can help to detect the existence of inception features. The statistics on branch length are useful to describe the extension of the conduits within the network. Rather surprisingly, the tortuosity does not vary very significantly. It could be heavily influenced by the survey methodology. The degree of interconnectivity of the network, related to the presence of maze patterns, can be measured using different metrics such as the Howard

  11. Globally altered structural brain network topology in grapheme-color synesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hänggi, Jürgen; Wotruba, Diana; Jäncke, Lutz

    2011-04-13

    Synesthesia is a perceptual phenomenon in which stimuli in one particular modality elicit a sensation within the same or another sensory modality (e.g., specific graphemes evoke the perception of particular colors). Grapheme-color synesthesia (GCS) has been proposed to arise from abnormal local cross-activation between grapheme and color areas because of their hyperconnectivity. Recently published studies did not confirm such a hyperconnectivity, although morphometric alterations were found in occipitotemporal, parietal, and frontal regions of synesthetes. We used magnetic resonance imaging surface-based morphometry and graph-theoretical network analyses to investigate the topology of structural brain networks in 24 synesthetes and 24 nonsynesthetes. Connectivity matrices were derived from region-wise cortical thickness correlations of 2366 different cortical parcellations across the whole cortex and from 154 more common brain divisions as well. Compared with nonsynesthetes, synesthetes revealed a globally altered structural network topology as reflected by reduced small-worldness, increased clustering, increased degree, and decreased betweenness centrality. Connectivity of the fusiform gyrus (FuG) and intraparietal sulcus (IPS) was changed as well. Hierarchical modularity analysis revealed increased intramodular and intermodular connectivity of the IPS in GCS. However, connectivity differences in the FuG and IPS showed a low specificity because of global changes. We provide first evidence that GCS is rooted in a reduced small-world network organization that is driven by increased clustering suggesting global hyperconnectivity within the synesthetes' brain. Connectivity alterations were widespread and not restricted to the FuG and IPS. Therefore, synesthetic experience might be only one phenotypic manifestation of the globally altered network architecture in GCS.

  12. Topology Control with Anisotropic and Sector Turning Antennas in Ad-hoc and Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Černý

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last several years, technological advances have allowed the development of small, cheap, embedded, independent and rather powerful radio devices that can self-organise into data networks. Such networks are usually called ad-hoc networks or, sometimes, depending on the application field, sensor networks. One of the first standards for ad-hoc networks to impose itself as a fully industrial framework for data gathering and control over such devices is IEEE 802.15.4 and, on top of it, its pair network architecture: ZigBee. In the case of multiple radio devices clamped into a small geographical area, the lack of radio bandwidth becomes a major problem, leading to multiple data losses and unnecessary power drain from the batteries of these small devices. This problem is usually perceived as interference. The deployment of appropriate topology control mechanisms (TC can solve interference. All of these algorithms calculate TC on the basis of isotropic antenna radiation patterns in the horizontal plane.

  13. APHiD: Hierarchical Task Placement to Enable a Tapered Fat Tree Topology for Lower Power and Cost in HPC Networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelogiannakis, George; Ibrahim, Khaled Z.; Shalf, John; Wilke, Jeremiah J.; Knight, Samuel; Kenny, Joseph P.

    2017-05-14

    The power and procurement cost of bandwidth in system-wide networks has forced a steady drop in the byte/flop ratio. This trend of computation becoming faster relative to the network is expected to hold. In this paper, we explore how cost-oriented task placement enables reducing the cost of system-wide networks by enabling high performance even on tapered topologies where more bandwidth is provisioned at lower levels. We describe APHiD, an efficient hierarchical placement algorithm that uses new techniques to improve the quality of heuristic solutions and reduces the demand on high-level, expensive bandwidth in hierarchical topologies. We apply APHiD to a tapered fat-tree, demonstrating that APHiD maintains application scalability even for severely tapered network configurations. Using simulation, we show that for tapered networks APHiD improves performance by more than 50% over random placement and even 15% in some cases over costlier, state-of-the-art placement algorithms.

  14. Marginalization in Random Nonlinear Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudeva Raju, Rajkumar; Pitkow, Xaq

    2015-03-01

    Computations involved in tasks like causal reasoning in the brain require a type of probabilistic inference known as marginalization. Marginalization corresponds to averaging over irrelevant variables to obtain the probability of the variables of interest. This is a fundamental operation that arises whenever input stimuli depend on several variables, but only some are task-relevant. Animals often exhibit behavior consistent with marginalizing over some variables, but the neural substrate of this computation is unknown. It has been previously shown (Beck et al. 2011) that marginalization can be performed optimally by a deterministic nonlinear network that implements a quadratic interaction of neural activity with divisive normalization. We show that a simpler network can perform essentially the same computation. These Random Nonlinear Networks (RNN) are feedforward networks with one hidden layer, sigmoidal activation functions, and normally-distributed weights connecting the input and hidden layers. We train the output weights connecting the hidden units to an output population, such that the output model accurately represents a desired marginal probability distribution without significant information loss compared to optimal marginalization. Simulations for the case of linear coordinate transformations show that the RNN model has good marginalization performance, except for highly uncertain inputs that have low amplitude population responses. Behavioral experiments, based on these results, could then be used to identify if this model does indeed explain how the brain performs marginalization.

  15. Relationship of white matter network topology and cognitive outcome in adolescents with d-transposition of the great arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panigrahy, Ashok; Schmithorst, Vincent J; Wisnowski, Jessica L; Watson, Christopher G; Bellinger, David C; Newburger, Jane W; Rivkin, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) are at risk for neurocognitive impairments. Little is known about the impact of CHD on the organization of large-scale brain networks. We applied graph analysis techniques to diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data obtained from 49 adolescents with dextro-transposition of the great arteries (d-TGA) repaired with the arterial switch operation in early infancy and 29 healthy referent adolescents. We examined whether differences in neurocognitive functioning were related to white matter network topology. We developed mediation models revealing the respective contributions of peri-operative variables and network topology on cognitive outcome. Adolescents with d-TGA had reduced global efficiency at a trend level (p = 0.061), increased modularity (p = 0.012), and increased small-worldness (p = 0.026) as compared to controls. Moreover, these network properties mediated neurocognitive differences between the d-TGA and referent adolescents across every domain assessed. Finally, structural network topology mediated the neuroprotective effect of longer duration of core cooling during reparative neonatal cardiac surgery, as well as the detrimental effects of prolonged hospitalization. Taken together, worse neurocognitive function in adolescents with d-TGA is mediated by global differences in white matter network topology, suggesting that disruption of this configuration of large-scale networks drives neurocognitive dysfunction. These data provide new insights into the interplay between perioperative factors, brain organization, and cognition in patients with complex CHD.

  16. Mechanical Behavior of Homogeneous and Composite Random Fiber Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahsavari, Ali

    systems with large multiscale heterogeneity, which controls their mechanical behavior. This pronounced heterogeneity leads to a pronounced size and boundary condition effects on their mechanical behavior. To emphasize the source of the size effect, the network heterogeneity is characterized by analyzing the geometry of the network (density distribution), the strain field and the strain energy distribution. It is shown that the heterogeneity of the mechanical fields depends not only on the network topology, but also on the ratio between the bending and axial stiffness of fibers. In this study, the size effect is quantified and the minimum model size needed to eliminate the size effect for a given set of system parameters, is determined. The results are also used for the selection of the size of representative volume elements useful for multiscale models of fiber networks such as the sequential approach. The elastic response of composite random fiber networks in which two types of fibers are used, is studied. This analysis is performed by adding stiff fibers to a relatively softer base while considering two cases: cross-linked and non-cross-linked added fibers. The linear elastic modulus of the network is determined in terms of the system parameters, including the density of added fibers. The results are compared to the case of adding stiff fibers to a homogeneous continuum base. It is shown that there is a threshold of added fiber density, above which the axial stiffens of the base filaments controls the mechanics. In this regime, the elastic response of the composites that have network bases mimics the behavior of those with continuum bases. The results presented in this thesis are relevant for many biological and engineering fibrous materials, including connective tissue, the cellular cytoskeleton, special clothing, consumer products, filters, and dampers. It is shown that the overall behavior of the material is very sensitive to several system parameters (power law

  17. Association between resting-state brain network topological organization and creative ability: Evidence from a multiple linear regression model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Bingqing; Zhang, Delong; Liang, Aiying; Liang, Bishan; Wang, Zengjian; Li, Junchao; Cai, Yuxuan; Gao, Mengxia; Gao, Zhenni; Chang, Song; Huang, Ruiwang; Liu, Ming

    2017-10-01

    Previous studies have indicated a tight linkage between resting-state functional connectivity of the human brain and creative ability. This study aimed to further investigate the association between the topological organization of resting-state brain networks and creativity. Therefore, we acquired resting-state fMRI data from 22 high-creativity participants and 22 low-creativity participants (as determined by their Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking scores). We then constructed functional brain networks for each participant and assessed group differences in network topological properties before exploring the relationships between respective network topological properties and creative ability. We identified an optimized organization of intrinsic brain networks in both groups. However, compared with low-creativity participants, high-creativity participants exhibited increased global efficiency and substantially decreased path length, suggesting increased efficiency of information transmission across brain networks in creative individuals. Using a multiple linear regression model, we further demonstrated that regional functional integration properties (i.e., the betweenness centrality and global efficiency) of brain networks, particularly the default mode network (DMN) and sensorimotor network (SMN), significantly predicted the individual differences in creative ability. Furthermore, the associations between network regional properties and creative performance were creativity-level dependent, where the difference in the resource control component may be important in explaining individual difference in creative performance. These findings provide novel insights into the neural substrate of creativity and may facilitate objective identification of creative ability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Robust node estimation and topology discovery for large-scale networks

    KAUST Repository

    Alouini, Mohamed-Slim

    2017-02-23

    Various examples are provided for node estimation and topology discovery for networks. In one example, a method includes receiving a packet having an identifier from a first node; adding the identifier to another transmission packet based on a comparison between the first identifier and existing identifiers associated with the other packet; adjusting a transmit probability based on the comparison; and transmitting the other packet based on a comparison between the transmit probability and a probability distribution. In another example, a system includes a network device that can adds an identifier received in a packet to a list including existing identifiers and adjust a transmit probability based on a comparison between the identifiers; and transmit another packet based on a comparison between the transmit probability and a probability distribution. In another example, a method includes determining a quantity of sensor devices based on a plurality of identifiers received in a packet.

  19. Topological quantum computing with a very noisy network and local error rates approaching one percent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickerson, Naomi H; Li, Ying; Benjamin, Simon C

    2013-01-01

    A scalable quantum computer could be built by networking together many simple processor cells, thus avoiding the need to create a single complex structure. The difficulty is that realistic quantum links are very error prone. A solution is for cells to repeatedly communicate with each other and so purify any imperfections; however prior studies suggest that the cells themselves must then have prohibitively low internal error rates. Here we describe a method by which even error-prone cells can perform purification: groups of cells generate shared resource states, which then enable stabilization of topologically encoded data. Given a realistically noisy network (≥10% error rate) we find that our protocol can succeed provided that intra-cell error rates for initialisation, state manipulation and measurement are below 0.82%. This level of fidelity is already achievable in several laboratory systems.

  20. Network-based statistical comparison of citation topology of bibliographic databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šubelj, Lovro; Fiala, Dalibor; Bajec, Marko

    2014-01-01

    Modern bibliographic databases provide the basis for scientific research and its evaluation. While their content and structure differ substantially, there exist only informal notions on their reliability. Here we compare the topological consistency of citation networks extracted from six popular bibliographic databases including Web of Science, CiteSeer and arXiv.org. The networks are assessed through a rich set of local and global graph statistics. We first reveal statistically significant inconsistencies between some of the databases with respect to individual statistics. For example, the introduced field bow-tie decomposition of DBLP Computer Science Bibliography substantially differs from the rest due to the coverage of the database, while the citation information within arXiv.org is the most exhaustive. Finally, we compare the databases over multiple graph statistics using the critical difference diagram. The citation topology of DBLP Computer Science Bibliography is the least consistent with the rest, while, not surprisingly, Web of Science is significantly more reliable from the perspective of consistency. This work can serve either as a reference for scholars in bibliometrics and scientometrics or a scientific evaluation guideline for governments and research agencies. PMID:25263231

  1. Bridging topological and functional information in protein interaction networks by short loops profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Sun Sook; Pandini, Alessandro; Annibale, Alessia; Coolen, Anthony C. C.; Thomas, N. Shaun B.; Fraternali, Franca

    2015-02-01

    Protein-protein interaction networks (PPINs) have been employed to identify potential novel interconnections between proteins as well as crucial cellular functions. In this study we identify fundamental principles of PPIN topologies by analysing network motifs of short loops, which are small cyclic interactions of between 3 and 6 proteins. We compared 30 PPINs with corresponding randomised null models and examined the occurrence of common biological functions in loops extracted from a cross-validated high-confidence dataset of 622 human protein complexes. We demonstrate that loops are an intrinsic feature of PPINs and that specific cell functions are predominantly performed by loops of different lengths. Topologically, we find that loops are strongly related to the accuracy of PPINs and define a core of interactions with high resilience. The identification of this core and the analysis of loop composition are promising tools to assess PPIN quality and to uncover possible biases from experimental detection methods. More than 96% of loops share at least one biological function, with enrichment of cellular functions related to mRNA metabolic processing and the cell cycle. Our analyses suggest that these motifs can be used in the design of targeted experiments for functional phenotype detection.

  2. Energy-Aware Topology Control Strategy for Human-Centric Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roc Meseguer

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The adoption of mobile and ubiquitous solutions that involve participatory or opportunistic sensing increases every day. This situation has highlighted the relevance of optimizing the energy consumption of these solutions, because their operation depends on the devices’ battery lifetimes. This article presents a study that intends to understand how the prediction of topology control messages in human-centric wireless sensor networks can be used to help reduce the energy consumption of the participating devices. In order to do that, five research questions have been defined and a study based on simulations was conducted to answer these questions. The obtained results help identify suitable mobile computing scenarios where the prediction of topology control messages can be used to save energy of the network nodes. These results also allow estimating the percentage of energy saving that can be expected, according to the features of the work scenario and the participants behavior. Designers of mobile collaborative applications that involve participatory or opportunistic sensing, can take advantage of these findings to increase the autonomy of their solutions.

  3. Comparisons of topological properties in autism for the brain network construction methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Min-Hee; Kim, Dong Youn; Lee, Sang Hyeon; Kim, Jin Uk; Chung, Moo K.

    2015-03-01

    Structural brain networks can be constructed from the white matter fiber tractography of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), and the structural characteristics of the brain can be analyzed from its networks. When brain networks are constructed by the parcellation method, their network structures change according to the parcellation scale selection and arbitrary thresholding. To overcome these issues, we modified the Ɛ -neighbor construction method proposed by Chung et al. (2011). The purpose of this study was to construct brain networks for 14 control subjects and 16 subjects with autism using both the parcellation and the Ɛ-neighbor construction method and to compare their topological properties between two methods. As the number of nodes increased, connectedness decreased in the parcellation method. However in the Ɛ-neighbor construction method, connectedness remained at a high level even with the rising number of nodes. In addition, statistical analysis for the parcellation method showed significant difference only in the path length. However, statistical analysis for the Ɛ-neighbor construction method showed significant difference with the path length, the degree and the density.

  4. Maximum Data Collection Rate Routing Protocol Based on Topology Control for Rechargeable Wireless Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Haifeng; Bai, Di; Gao, Demin; Liu, Yunfei

    2016-07-30

    In Rechargeable Wireless Sensor Networks (R-WSNs), in order to achieve the maximum data collection rate it is critical that sensors operate in very low duty cycles because of the sporadic availability of energy. A sensor has to stay in a dormant state in most of the time in order to recharge the battery and use the energy prudently. In addition, a sensor cannot always conserve energy if a network is able to harvest excessive energy from the environment due to its limited storage capacity. Therefore, energy exploitation and energy saving have to be traded off depending on distinct application scenarios. Since higher data collection rate or maximum data collection rate is the ultimate objective for sensor deployment, surplus energy of a node can be utilized for strengthening packet delivery efficiency and improving the data generating rate in R-WSNs. In this work, we propose an algorithm based on data aggregation to compute an upper data generation rate by maximizing it as an optimization problem for a network, which is formulated as a linear programming problem. Subsequently, a dual problem by introducing Lagrange multipliers is constructed, and subgradient algorithms are used to solve it in a distributed manner. At the same time, a topology controlling scheme is adopted for improving the network's performance. Through extensive simulation and experiments, we demonstrate that our algorithm is efficient at maximizing the data collection rate in rechargeable wireless sensor networks.

  5. Leveraging Fog Computing for Scalable IoT Datacenter Using Spine-Leaf Network Topology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. C. Okafor

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available With the Internet of Everything (IoE paradigm that gathers almost every object online, huge traffic workload, bandwidth, security, and latency issues remain a concern for IoT users in today’s world. Besides, the scalability requirements found in the current IoT data processing (in the cloud can hardly be used for applications such as assisted living systems, Big Data analytic solutions, and smart embedded applications. This paper proposes an extended cloud IoT model that optimizes bandwidth while allowing edge devices (Internet-connected objects/devices to smartly process data without relying on a cloud network. Its integration with a massively scaled spine-leaf (SL network topology is highlighted. This is contrasted with a legacy multitier layered architecture housing network services and routing policies. The perspective offered in this paper explains how low-latency and bandwidth intensive applications can transfer data to the cloud (and then back to the edge application without impacting QoS performance. Consequently, a spine-leaf Fog computing network (SL-FCN is presented for reducing latency and network congestion issues in a highly distributed and multilayer virtualized IoT datacenter environment. This approach is cost-effective as it maximizes bandwidth while maintaining redundancy and resiliency against failures in mission critical applications.

  6. A sparse sensor network topologized for cylindrical wave-based identification of damage in pipeline structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiang; Hong, Ming; Su, Zhongqing

    2016-07-01

    A sparse sensor network, based on the concept of semi-decentralized and standardized sensing, is developed, to actively excite and acquire cylindrical waves for damage identification and health monitoring of pipe structures. Differentiating itself from conventional ‘ring-style’ transducer arrays which attempt to steer longitudinal axisymmetric cylindrical waves via transducer synchronism, this sparse sensor network shows advantages in some aspects, including the use of fewer sensors, simpler manipulation, quicker configuration, less mutual dependence among sensors, and an improved signal-to-noise ratio. The sparse network is expanded topologically, aimed at eliminating the presence of ‘blind zones’ and the challenges associated with multi-path propagation of cylindrical waves. Theoretical analysis is implemented to comprehend propagation characteristics of waves guided by a cylindrical structure. A probability-based diagnostic imaging algorithm is introduced to visualize damage in pixelated images in an intuitive, prompt, and automatic manner. A self-contained health monitoring system is configured for experimental validation, via which quantitative identification of mono- and multi-damage in a steel cylinder is demonstrated. The results highlight an expanded sensing coverage of the sparse sensor network and its enhanced capacity of acquiring rich information, avoiding the cost of augmenting the number of sensors in a sensor network.

  7. The information coded in the yeast response elements accounts for most of the topological properties of its transcriptional regulation network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duygu Balcan

    Full Text Available The regulation of gene expression in a cell relies to a major extent on transcription factors, proteins which recognize and bind the DNA at specific binding sites (response elements within promoter regions associated with each gene. We present an information theoretic approach to modeling transcriptional regulatory networks, in terms of a simple "sequence-matching" rule and the statistics of the occurrence of binding sequences of given specificity in random promoter regions. The crucial biological input is the distribution of the amount of information coded in these cognate response elements and the length distribution of the promoter regions. We provide an analysis of the transcriptional regulatory network of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which we extract from the available databases, with respect to the degree distributions, clustering coefficient, degree correlations, rich-club coefficient and the k-core structure. We find that these topological features are in remarkable agreement with those predicted by our model, on the basis of the amount of information coded in the interaction between the transcription factors and response elements.

  8. Topological effects of network structure on long-term social network dynamics in a wild mammal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilany, Amiyaal; Booms, Andrew S; Holekamp, Kay E

    2015-07-01

    Social structure influences ecological processes such as dispersal and invasion, and affects survival and reproductive success. Recent studies have used static snapshots of social networks, thus neglecting their temporal dynamics, and focused primarily on a limited number of variables that might be affecting social structure. Here, instead we modelled effects of multiple predictors of social network dynamics in the spotted hyena, using observational data collected during 20 years of continuous field research in Kenya. We tested the hypothesis that the current state of the social network affects its long-term dynamics. We employed stochastic agent-based models that allowed us to estimate the contribution of multiple factors to network changes. After controlling for environmental and individual effects, we found that network density and individual centrality affected network dynamics, but that social bond transitivity consistently had the strongest effects. Our results emphasise the significance of structural properties of networks in shaping social dynamics. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  9. Becoming-Topologies of Education: Deformations, Networks and the Database Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Greg; Cook, Ian

    2015-01-01

    This article uses topological approaches to suggest that education is becoming-topological. Analyses presented in a recent double-issue of "Theory, Culture & Society" are used to demonstrate the utility of topology for education. In particular, the article explains education's topological character through examining the global…

  10. Altered white matter connectivity and network organization in polymicrogyria revealed by individual gyral topology-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Kiho; Paldino, Michael J; Poduri, Annapurna; Sporns, Olaf; Grant, P Ellen

    2014-02-01

    Polymicrogyria (PMG) is a cortical malformation characterized by multiple small gyri and altered cortical lamination, which may be associated with disrupted white matter connectivity. However, little is known about the topological patterns of white matter networks in PMG. We examined structural connectivity and network topology using individual primary gyral pattern-based nodes in PMG patients, overcoming the limitations of an atlas-based approach. Structural networks were constructed from structural and diffusion magnetic resonance images in 25 typically developing and 14 PMG subjects. The connectivity analysis for different fiber groups divided based on gyral topology revealed severely reduced connectivity between neighboring primary gyri (short U-fibers) in PMG, which was highly correlated with the regional involvement and extent of abnormal gyral folding. The patients also showed significantly reduced connectivity between distant gyri (long association fibers) and between the two cortical hemispheres. In relation to these results, gyral node-based graph theoretical analysis revealed significantly altered topological organization of the network (lower clustering and higher modularity) and disrupted network hub architecture in cortical association areas involved in cognitive and language functions in PMG patients. Furthermore, the network segregation in PMG patients decreased with the extent of PMG and the degree of language impairment. Our approach provides the first detailed findings and interpretations on altered cortical network topology in PMG related to abnormal cortical structure and brain function, and shows the potential for an individualized method to characterize network properties and alterations in connections that are associated with malformations of cortical development. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Towards a proper assignment of systemic risk: the combined roles of network topology and shock characteristics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lasse Loepfe

    Full Text Available The 2007-2008 financial crisis solidified the consensus among policymakers that a macro-prudential approach to regulation and supervision should be adopted. The currently preferred policy option is the regulation of capital requirements, with the main focus on combating procyclicality and on identifying the banks that have a high systemic importance, those that are "too big to fail". Here we argue that the concept of systemic risk should include the analysis of the system as a whole and we explore systematically the most important properties for policy purposes of networks topology on resistance to shocks. In a thorough study going from analytical models to empirical data, we show two sharp transitions from safe to risky regimes: 1 diversification becomes harmful with just a small fraction (~2% of the shocks sampled from a fat tailed shock distributions and 2 when large shocks are present a critical link density exists where an effective giant cluster forms and most firms become vulnerable. This threshold depends on the network topology, especially on modularity. Firm size heterogeneity has important but diverse effects that are heavily dependent on shock characteristics. Similarly, degree heterogeneity increases vulnerability only when shocks are directed at the most connected firms. Furthermore, by studying the structure of the core of the transnational corporation network from real data, we show that its stability could be clearly increased by removing some of the links with highest centrality betweenness. Our results provide a novel insight and arguments for policy makers to focus surveillance on the connections between firms, in addition to capital requirements directed at the nodes.

  12. Towards a proper assignment of systemic risk: the combined roles of network topology and shock characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loepfe, Lasse; Cabrales, Antonio; Sánchez, Angel

    2013-01-01

    The 2007-2008 financial crisis solidified the consensus among policymakers that a macro-prudential approach to regulation and supervision should be adopted. The currently preferred policy option is the regulation of capital requirements, with the main focus on combating procyclicality and on identifying the banks that have a high systemic importance, those that are "too big to fail". Here we argue that the concept of systemic risk should include the analysis of the system as a whole and we explore systematically the most important properties for policy purposes of networks topology on resistance to shocks. In a thorough study going from analytical models to empirical data, we show two sharp transitions from safe to risky regimes: 1) diversification becomes harmful with just a small fraction (~2%) of the shocks sampled from a fat tailed shock distributions and 2) when large shocks are present a critical link density exists where an effective giant cluster forms and most firms become vulnerable. This threshold depends on the network topology, especially on modularity. Firm size heterogeneity has important but diverse effects that are heavily dependent on shock characteristics. Similarly, degree heterogeneity increases vulnerability only when shocks are directed at the most connected firms. Furthermore, by studying the structure of the core of the transnational corporation network from real data, we show that its stability could be clearly increased by removing some of the links with highest centrality betweenness. Our results provide a novel insight and arguments for policy makers to focus surveillance on the connections between firms, in addition to capital requirements directed at the nodes.

  13. Comparison of low and high dose ionising radiation using topological analysis of gene coexpression networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ray Monika

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The growing use of imaging procedures in medicine has raised concerns about exposure to low-dose ionising radiation (LDIR. While the disastrous effects of high dose ionising radiation (HDIR is well documented, the detrimental effects of LDIR is not well understood and has been a topic of much debate. Since little is known about the effects of LDIR, various kinds of wet-lab and computational analyses are required to advance knowledge in this domain. In this paper we carry out an “upside-down pyramid” form of systems biology analysis of microarray data. We characterised the global genomic response following 10 cGy (low dose and 100 cGy (high dose doses of X-ray ionising radiation at four time points by analysing the topology of gene coexpression networks. This study includes a rich experimental design and state-of-the-art computational systems biology methods of analysis to study the differences in the transcriptional response of skin cells exposed to low and high doses of radiation. Results Using this method we found important genes that have been linked to immune response, cell survival and apoptosis. Furthermore, we also were able to identify genes such as BRCA1, ABCA1, TNFRSF1B, MLLT11 that have been associated with various types of cancers. We were also able to detect many genes known to be associated with various medical conditions. Conclusions Our method of applying network topological differences can aid in identifying the differences among similar (eg: radiation effect yet very different biological conditions (eg: different dose and time to generate testable hypotheses. This is the first study where a network level analysis was performed across two different radiation doses at various time points, thereby illustrating changes in the cellular response over time.

  14. Game-Theoretic Optimal Power-Link Quality Topology Control in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangelos D. SPYROU

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available One of the most significant problems in Wireless Sensor Network (WSN deployment is the generation of topologies that maximize transmission reliability and guarantee network connectivity while also maximizing the network’s lifetime. Transmission power settings have a large impact on the aforementioned factors. Increasing transmission power to provide coverage is the intuitive solution yet with it may come with lower packet reception and shorter network lifetime. However, decreasing the transmission power may result in the network being disconnected. To balance these trade-offs we propose a discrete strategy game-theoretic solution, which we call TopGame that aims to maximize the reliability between nodes while using the most appropriate level of transmission power that guarantees connectivity. In this paper, we provide the conditions for the convergence of our algorithm to a pure Nash equilibrium as well as experimental results. Here we show, using the Indriya WSN testbed, that TopGame is more energy-efficient and approaches a similar packet reception ratio with the current closest state of the art protocol ART. Finally, we provide a methodology for further optimization of our work using an indicator function to distinguish between satisfactory and poor links.

  15. Application of radial basis function neural network to predict soil sorption partition coefficient using topological descriptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabour, Mohammad Reza; Moftakhari Anasori Movahed, Saman

    2017-02-01

    The soil sorption partition coefficient logKoc is an indispensable parameter that can be used in assessing the environmental risk of organic chemicals. In order to predict soil sorption partition coefficient for different and even unknown compounds in a fast and accurate manner, a radial basis function neural network (RBFNN) model was developed. Eight topological descriptors of 800 organic compounds were used as inputs of the model. These 800 organic compounds were chosen from a large and very diverse data set. Generalized Regression Neural Network (GRNN) was utilized as the function in this neural network model due to its capability to adapt very quickly. Hence, it can be used to predict logKoc for new chemicals, as well. Out of total data set, 560 organic compounds were used for training and 240 to test efficiency of the model. The obtained results indicate that the model performance is very well. The correlation coefficients (R2) for training and test sets were 0.995 and 0.933, respectively. The root-mean square errors (RMSE) were 0.2321 for training set and 0.413 for test set. As the results for both training and test set are extremely satisfactory, the proposed neural network model can be employed not only to predict logKoc of known compounds, but also to be adaptive for prediction of this value precisely for new products that enter the market each year. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Analysis and Visualization of Discrete Fracture Networks Using a Flow Topology Graph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldrich, Garrett; Hyman, Jeffrey D; Karra, Satish; Gable, Carl W; Makedonska, Nataliia; Viswanathan, Hari; Woodring, Jonathan; Hamann, Bernd

    2017-08-01

    We present an analysis and visualization prototype using the concept of a flow topology graph (FTG) for characterization of flow in constrained networks, with a focus on discrete fracture networks (DFN), developed collaboratively by geoscientists and visualization scientists. Our method allows users to understand and evaluate flow and transport in DFN simulations by computing statistical distributions, segment paths of interest, and cluster particles based on their paths. The new approach enables domain scientists to evaluate the accuracy of the simulations, visualize features of interest, and compare multiple realizations over a specific domain of interest. Geoscientists can simulate complex transport phenomena modeling large sites for networks consisting of several thousand fractures without compromising the geometry of the network. However, few tools exist for performing higher-level analysis and visualization of simulated DFN data. The prototype system we present addresses this need. We demonstrate its effectiveness for increasingly complex examples of DFNs, covering two distinct use cases - hydrocarbon extraction from unconventional resources and transport of dissolved contaminant from a spent nuclear fuel repository.

  17. Improved image classification with neural networks by fusing multispectral signatures with topological data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harston, Craig; Schumacher, Chris

    1992-01-01

    Automated schemes are needed to classify multispectral remotely sensed data. Human intelligence is often required to correctly interpret images from satellites and aircraft. Humans suceed because they use various types of cues about a scene to accurately define the contents of the image. Consequently, it follows that computer techniques that integrate and use different types of information would perform better than single source approaches. This research illustrated that multispectral signatures and topographical information could be used in concert. Significantly, this dual source tactic classified a remotely sensed image better than the multispectral classification alone. These classifications were accomplished by fusing spectral signatures with topographical information using neural network technology. A neural network was trained to classify Landsat mulitspectral signatures. A file of georeferenced ground truth classifications were used as the training criterion. The network was trained to classify urban, agriculture, range, and forest with an accuracy of 65.7 percent. Another neural network was programmed and trained to fuse these multispectral signature results with a file of georeferenced altitude data. This topological file contained 10 levels of elevations. When this nonspectral elevation information was fused with the spectral signatures, the classifications were improved to 73.7 and 75.7 percent.

  18. Altered Topological Properties of Brain Networks in Social Anxiety Disorder: A Resting-state Functional MRI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hongru; Qiu, Changjian; Meng, Yajing; Yuan, Minlan; Zhang, Yan; Ren, Zhengjia; Li, Yuchen; Huang, Xiaoqi; Gong, Qiyong; Lui, Su; Zhang, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies involving connectome analysis including graph theory have yielded potential biomarkers for mental disorders. In this study, we aimed to investigate the differences of resting-state network between patients with social anxiety disorder (SAD) and healthy controls (HCs), as well as to distinguish between individual subjects using topological properties. In total, 42 SAD patients and the same number of HCs underwent resting functional MRI, and the topological organization of the whole-brain functional network was calculated using graph theory. Compared with the controls, the patients showed a decrease in 49 positive connections. In the topological analysis, the patients showed an increase in the area under the curve (AUC) of the global shortest path length of the network (Lp) and a decrease in the AUC of the global clustering coefficient of the network (Cp). Furthermore, the AUCs of Lp and Cp were used to effectively discriminate the individual SAD patients from the HCs with high accuracy. This study revealed that the neural networks of the SAD patients showed changes in topological characteristics, and these changes were prominent not only in both groups but also at the individual level. This study provides a new perspective for the identification of patients with SAD. PMID:28266518

  19. Using a Multiobjective Approach to Balance Mission and Network Goals within a Delay Tolerant Network Topology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    region possibilities and the probability defined using the MATLAB RAND function. The RAND function is based upon the Mersanne Twister pseudorandom...building in disruption-tolerant networks. Ad Hoc Networks, 2008. 6(4): p. 600-620. 45. Matsumoto, Makoto. Mersanne Twister Algorithm. 1997

  20. Dynamics of comb-of-comb-network polymers in random layered flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katyal, Divya; Kant, Rama

    2016-12-01

    We analyze the dynamics of comb-of-comb-network polymers in the presence of external random flows. The dynamics of such structures is evaluated through relevant physical quantities, viz., average square displacement (ASD) and the velocity autocorrelation function (VACF). We focus on comparing the dynamics of the comb-of-comb network with the linear polymer. The present work displays an anomalous diffusive behavior of this flexible network in the random layered flows. The effect of the polymer topology on the dynamics is analyzed by varying the number of generations and branch lengths in these networks. In addition, we investigate the influence of external flow on the dynamics by varying flow parameters, like the flow exponent α and flow strength W_{α}. Our analysis highlights two anomalous power-law regimes, viz., subdiffusive (intermediate-time polymer stretching and flow-induced diffusion) and superdiffusive (long-time flow-induced diffusion). The anomalous long-time dynamics is governed by the temporal exponent ν of ASD, viz., ν=2-α/2. Compared to a linear polymer, the comb-of-comb network shows a shorter crossover time (from the subdiffusive to superdiffusive regime) but a reduced magnitude of ASD. Our theory displays an anomalous VACF in the random layered flows that scales as t^{-α/2}. We show that the network with greater total mass moves faster.

  1. Random-matrix theory and stroboscopic models of topological insulators and superconductors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dahlhaus, Jan Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Topological phases of matter are exceptional because they do not arise due to a symmetry breaking mechanism. Instead they are characterized by topological invariants -- integer numbers that are insensitive to small perturbations of the Hamiltonian. As a consequence they support conducting surface

  2. A Novel Topology Link-Controlling Approach for Active Defense of a Node in a Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Li

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid development of virtual machine technology and cloud computing, distributed denial of service (DDoS attacks, or some peak traffic, poses a great threat to the security of the network. In this paper, a novel topology link control technique and mitigation attacks in real-time environments is proposed. Firstly, a non-invasive method of deploying virtual sensors in the nodes is built, which uses the resource manager of each monitored node as a sensor. Secondly, a general topology-controlling approach of resisting the tolerant invasion is proposed. In the proposed approach, a prediction model is constructed by using copula functions for predicting the peak of a resource through another resource. The result of prediction determines whether or not to initiate the active defense. Finally, a minority game with incomplete strategy is employed to suppress attack flows and improve the permeability of the normal flows. The simulation results show that the proposed approach is very effective in protecting nodes.

  3. A Novel Topology Link-Controlling Approach for Active Defense of a Node in a Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Hu, HanPing; Ke, Qiao; Xiong, Naixue

    2017-03-09

    With the rapid development of virtual machine technology and cloud computing, distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks, or some peak traffic, poses a great threat to the security of the network. In this paper, a novel topology link control technique and mitigation attacks in real-time environments is proposed. Firstly, a non-invasive method of deploying virtual sensors in the nodes is built, which uses the resource manager of each monitored node as a sensor. Secondly, a general topology-controlling approach of resisting the tolerant invasion is proposed. In the proposed approach, a prediction model is constructed by using copula functions for predicting the peak of a resource through another resource. The result of prediction determines whether or not to initiate the active defense. Finally, a minority game with incomplete strategy is employed to suppress attack flows and improve the permeability of the normal flows. The simulation results show that the proposed approach is very effective in protecting nodes.

  4. Predicting DNA Methylation State of CpG Dinucleotide Using Genome Topological Features and Deep Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yiheng; Liu, Tong; Xu, Dong; Shi, Huidong; Zhang, Chaoyang; Mo, Yin-Yuan; Wang, Zheng

    2016-01-22

    The hypo- or hyper-methylation of the human genome is one of the epigenetic features of leukemia. However, experimental approaches have only determined the methylation state of a small portion of the human genome. We developed deep learning based (stacked denoising autoencoders, or SdAs) software named "DeepMethyl" to predict the methylation state of DNA CpG dinucleotides using features inferred from three-dimensional genome topology (based on Hi-C) and DNA sequence patterns. We used the experimental data from immortalised myelogenous leukemia (K562) and healthy lymphoblastoid (GM12878) cell lines to train the learning models and assess prediction performance. We have tested various SdA architectures with different configurations of hidden layer(s) and amount of pre-training data and compared the performance of deep networks relative to support vector machines (SVMs). Using the methylation states of sequentially neighboring regions as one of the learning features, an SdA achieved a blind test accuracy of 89.7% for GM12878 and 88.6% for K562. When the methylation states of sequentially neighboring regions are unknown, the accuracies are 84.82% for GM12878 and 72.01% for K562. We also analyzed the contribution of genome topological features inferred from Hi-C. DeepMethyl can be accessed at http://dna.cs.usm.edu/deepmethyl/.

  5. Network Analysis of Publications on Topological Indices from the Web of Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodlaj, Jernej; Batagelj, Vladimir

    2014-08-01

    In this paper we analyze a collection of bibliographic networks, constructed from the data from the Web of Science on works (papers, books, etc.) on the topic of topological indices and on relating scientific fields. We present the general outlook and more specific findings about authors, works and journals, subtopics and keywords and also important relations between them based on scientometric approaches like the strongest and main citation paths, the main themes on citation path based on keywords, results of co-authorship analysis in form of the most prominent islands of citing authors, groups of collaborating authors, two-mode cores of authors and works. We investigate the nature of citing of authors, important journals and citing of works between them, journals preferred by authors and expose hierarchy of similar collaborating authors, based on keywords they use. We perform temporal analysis on one important journal as well. We give a comprehensive scientometric insight into the field of topological indices. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Applying Hybrid PSO to Optimize Directional Overcurrent Relay Coordination in Variable Network Topologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Ta Yang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In power systems, determining the values of time dial setting (TDS and the plug setting (PS for directional overcurrent relays (DOCRs is an extremely constrained optimization problem that has been previously described and solved as a nonlinear programming problem. Optimization coordination problems of near-end faults and far-end faults occurring simultaneously in circuits with various topologies, including fixed and variable network topologies, are considered in this study. The aim of this study was to apply the Nelder-Mead (NM simplex search method and particle swarm optimization (PSO to solve this optimization problem. The proposed NM-PSO method has the advantage of NM algorithm, with a quicker movement toward optimal solution, as well as the advantage of PSO algorithm in the ability to obtain globally optimal solution. Neither a conventional PSO nor the proposed NM-PSO method is capable of dealing with constrained optimization problems. Therefore, we use the gradient-based repair method embedded in a conventional PSO and the proposed NM-PSO. This study used an IEEE 8-bus test system as a case study to compare the convergence performance of the proposed NM-PSO method and a conventional PSO approach. The results demonstrate that a robust and optimal solution can be obtained efficiently by implementing the proposal.

  7. Distributed reconfigurable control strategies for switching topology networked multi-agent systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallehdari, Z; Meskin, N; Khorasani, K

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, distributed control reconfiguration strategies for directed switching topology networked multi-agent systems are developed and investigated. The proposed control strategies are invoked when the agents are subject to actuator faults and while the available fault detection and isolation (FDI) modules provide inaccurate and unreliable information on the estimation of faults severities. Our proposed strategies will ensure that the agents reach a consensus while an upper bound on the team performance index is ensured and satisfied. Three types of actuator faults are considered, namely: the loss of effectiveness fault, the outage fault, and the stuck fault. By utilizing quadratic and convex hull (composite) Lyapunov functions, two cooperative and distributed recovery strategies are designed and provided to select the gains of the proposed control laws such that the team objectives are guaranteed. Our proposed reconfigurable control laws are applied to a team of autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) under directed switching topologies and subject to simultaneous actuator faults. Simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of our proposed distributed reconfiguration control laws in compensating for the effects of sudden actuator faults and subject to fault diagnosis module uncertainties and unreliabilities. Copyright © 2017 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Predicting DNA Methylation State of CpG Dinucleotide Using Genome Topological Features and Deep Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yiheng; Liu, Tong; Xu, Dong; Shi, Huidong; Zhang, Chaoyang; Mo, Yin-Yuan; Wang, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    The hypo- or hyper-methylation of the human genome is one of the epigenetic features of leukemia. However, experimental approaches have only determined the methylation state of a small portion of the human genome. We developed deep learning based (stacked denoising autoencoders, or SdAs) software named “DeepMethyl” to predict the methylation state of DNA CpG dinucleotides using features inferred from three-dimensional genome topology (based on Hi-C) and DNA sequence patterns. We used the experimental data from immortalised myelogenous leukemia (K562) and healthy lymphoblastoid (GM12878) cell lines to train the learning models and assess prediction performance. We have tested various SdA architectures with different configurations of hidden layer(s) and amount of pre-training data and compared the performance of deep networks relative to support vector machines (SVMs). Using the methylation states of sequentially neighboring regions as one of the learning features, an SdA achieved a blind test accuracy of 89.7% for GM12878 and 88.6% for K562. When the methylation states of sequentially neighboring regions are unknown, the accuracies are 84.82% for GM12878 and 72.01% for K562. We also analyzed the contribution of genome topological features inferred from Hi-C. DeepMethyl can be accessed at http://dna.cs.usm.edu/deepmethyl/.

  9. Application of Random Matrix Theory to Complex Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Aparna; Jalan, Sarika

    The present article provides an overview of recent developments in spectral analysis of complex networks under random matrix theory framework. Adjacency matrix of unweighted networks, reviewed here, differ drastically from a random matrix, as former have only binary entries. Remarkably, short range correlations in corresponding eigenvalues of such matrices exhibit Gaussian orthogonal statistics of RMT and thus bring them into the universality class. Spectral rigidity of spectra provides measure of randomness in underlying networks. We will consider several examples of model networks vastly studied in last two decades. To the end we would provide potential of RMT framework and obtained results to understand and predict behavior of complex systems with underlying network structure.

  10. Probability of Interference-Optimal and Energy-Efficient Analysis for Topology Control in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Li

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Because wireless sensor networks (WSNs have been widely used in recent years, how to reduce their energy consumption and interference has become a major issue. Topology control is a common and effective approach to improve network performance, such as reducing the energy consumption and network interference, improving the network connectivity, etc. Many topology control algorithms reduce network interference by dynamically adjusting the node transmission range. However, reducing the network interference by adjusting the transmission range is probabilistic. Therefore, in this paper, we analyze the probability of interference-optimality for the WSNs and prove that the probability of interference-optimality increases with the increasing of the original transmission range. Under a specific transmission range, the probability reaches the maximum value when the transmission range is 0.85r in homogeneous networks and 0.84r in heterogeneous networks. In addition, we also prove that when the network is energy-efficient, the network is also interference-optimal with probability 1 both in the homogeneous and heterogeneous networks.

  11. Predicting Essential Genes and Proteins Based on Machine Learning and Network Topological Features: A Comprehensive Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xue; Acencio, Marcio Luis; Lemke, Ney

    2016-01-01

    Essential proteins/genes are indispensable to the survival or reproduction of an organism, and the deletion of such essential proteins will result in lethality or infertility. The identification of essential genes is very important not only for understanding the minimal requirements for survival of an organism, but also for finding human disease genes and new drug targets. Experimental methods for identifying essential genes are costly, time-consuming, and laborious. With the accumulation of sequenced genomes data and high-throughput experimental data, many computational methods for identifying essential proteins are proposed, which are useful complements to experimental methods. In this review, we show the state-of-the-art methods for identifying essential genes and proteins based on machine learning and network topological features, point out the progress and limitations of current methods, and discuss the challenges and directions for further research. PMID:27014079

  12. Predicting Essential Genes and Proteins Based on Machine Learning and Network Topological Features: A Comprehensive Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xue; Acencio, Marcio Luis; Lemke, Ney

    2016-01-01

    Essential proteins/genes are indispensable to the survival or reproduction of an organism, and the deletion of such essential proteins will result in lethality or infertility. The identification of essential genes is very important not only for understanding the minimal requirements for survival of an organism, but also for finding human disease genes and new drug targets. Experimental methods for identifying essential genes are costly, time-consuming, and laborious. With the accumulation of sequenced genomes data and high-throughput experimental data, many computational methods for identifying essential proteins are proposed, which are useful complements to experimental methods. In this review, we show the state-of-the-art methods for identifying essential genes and proteins based on machine learning and network topological features, point out the progress and limitations of current methods, and discuss the challenges and directions for further research.

  13. Coherence of biochemical oscillations is bounded by driving force and network topology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barato, Andre C.; Seifert, Udo

    2017-06-01

    Biochemical oscillations are prevalent in living organisms. Systems with a small number of constituents cannot sustain coherent oscillations for an indefinite time because of fluctuations in the period of oscillation. We show that the number of coherent oscillations that quantifies the precision of the oscillator is universally bounded by the thermodynamic force that drives the system out of equilibrium and by the topology of the underlying biochemical network of states. Our results are valid for arbitrary Markov processes, which are commonly used to model biochemical reactions. We apply our results to a model for a single KaiC protein and to an activator-inhibitor model that consists of several molecules. From a mathematical perspective, based on strong numerical evidence, we conjecture a universal constraint relating the imaginary and real parts of the first nontrivial eigenvalue of a stochastic matrix.

  14. Robust distributed control of spacecraft formation flying with adaptive network topology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shasti, Behrouz; Alasty, Aria; Assadian, Nima

    2017-07-01

    In this study, the distributed six degree-of-freedom (6-DOF) coordinated control of spacecraft formation flying in low earth orbit (LEO) has been investigated. For this purpose, an accurate coupled translational and attitude relative dynamics model of the spacecraft with respect to the reference orbit (virtual leader) is presented by considering the most effective perturbation acceleration forces on LEO satellites, i.e. the second zonal harmonic and the atmospheric drag. Subsequently, the 6-DOF coordinated control of spacecraft in formation is studied. During the mission, the spacecraft communicate with each other through a switching network topology in which the weights of its graph Laplacian matrix change adaptively based on a distance-based connectivity function between neighboring agents. Because some of the dynamical system parameters such as spacecraft masses and moments of inertia may vary with time, an adaptive law is developed to estimate the parameter values during the mission. Furthermore, for the case that there is no knowledge of the unknown and time-varying parameters of the system, a robust controller has been developed. It is proved that the stability of the closed-loop system coupled with adaptation in network topology structure and optimality and robustness in control is guaranteed by the robust contraction analysis as an incremental stability method for multiple synchronized systems. The simulation results show the effectiveness of each control method in the presence of uncertainties and parameter variations. The adaptive and robust controllers show their superiority in reducing the state error integral as well as decreasing the control effort and settling time.

  15. Analyzing topological characteristics of neuronal functional networks in the rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Hu [School of Computer Science and Communication Engineering, Jiangsu University, Jiangsu 212003 (China); School of Computer Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Yang, Shengtao [Institutes of Brain Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Song, Yuqing [School of Computer Science and Communication Engineering, Jiangsu University, Jiangsu 212003 (China); Wei, Hui [School of Computer Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)

    2014-08-28

    In this study, we recorded spike trains from brain cortical neurons of several behavioral rats in vivo by using multi-electrode recordings. An NFN was constructed in each trial, obtaining a total of 150 NFNs in this study. The topological characteristics of NFNs were analyzed by using the two most important characteristics of complex networks, namely, small-world structure and community structure. We found that the small-world properties exist in different NFNs constructed in this study. Modular function Q was used to determine the existence of community structure in NFNs, through which we found that community-structure characteristics, which are related to recorded spike train data sets, are more evident in the Y-maze task than in the DM-GM task. Our results can also be used to analyze further the relationship between small-world characteristics and the cognitive behavioral responses of rats. - Highlights: • We constructed the neuronal function networks based on the recorded neurons. • We analyzed the two main complex network characteristics, namely, small-world structure and community structure. • NFNs which were constructed based on the recorded neurons in this study exhibit small-world properties. • Some NFNs have community structure characteristics.

  16. Automated and comprehensive link engineering supporting branched, ring, and mesh network topologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farina, J.; Khomchenko, D.; Yevseyenko, D.; Meester, J.; Richter, A.

    2016-02-01

    Link design, while relatively easy in the past, can become quite cumbersome with complex channel plans and equipment configurations. The task of designing optical transport systems and selecting equipment is often performed by an applications or sales engineer using simple tools, such as custom Excel spreadsheets. Eventually, every individual has their own version of the spreadsheet as well as their own methodology for building the network. This approach becomes unmanageable very quickly and leads to mistakes, bending of the engineering rules and installations that do not perform as expected. We demonstrate a comprehensive planning environment, which offers an efficient approach to unify, control and expedite the design process by controlling libraries of equipment and engineering methodologies, automating the process and providing the analysis tools necessary to predict system performance throughout the system and for all channels. In addition to the placement of EDFAs and DCEs, performance analysis metrics are provided at every step of the way. Metrics that can be tracked include power, CD and OSNR, SPM, XPM, FWM and SBS. Automated routine steps assist in design aspects such as equalization, padding and gain setting for EDFAs, the placement of ROADMs and transceivers, and creating regeneration points. DWDM networks consisting of a large number of nodes and repeater huts, interconnected in linear, branched, mesh and ring network topologies, can be designed much faster when compared with conventional design methods. Using flexible templates for all major optical components, our technology-agnostic planning approach supports the constant advances in optical communications.

  17. Fair Topologies: Community Structures and Network Hubs Drive Emergence of Fairness Norms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosleh, Mohsen; Heydari, Babak

    2017-06-02

    Fairness has long been argued to govern human behavior in a wide range of social, economic, and organizational activities. The sense of fairness, although universal, varies across different societies. In this study, using a computational model, we test the hypothesis that the topology of social interaction can causally explain some of the cross-societal variations in fairness norms. We show that two network parameters, namely, community structure, as measured by the modularity index, and network hubiness, represented by the skewness of degree distribution, have the most significant impact on emergence of collective fair behavior. These two parameters can explain much of the variations in fairness norms across societies and can also be linked to hypotheses suggested by earlier empirical studies in social and organizational sciences. We devised a multi-layered model that combines local agent interactions with social learning, thus enables both strategic behavior as well as diffusion of successful strategies. By applying multivariate statistics on the results, we obtain the relation between network structural features and the collective fair behavior.

  18. Network topologies and dynamics leading to endotoxin tolerance and priming in innate immune cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Fu

    Full Text Available The innate immune system, acting as the first line of host defense, senses and adapts to foreign challenges through complex intracellular and intercellular signaling networks. Endotoxin tolerance and priming elicited by macrophages are classic examples of the complex adaptation of innate immune cells. Upon repetitive exposures to different doses of bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide or other stimulants, macrophages show either suppressed or augmented inflammatory responses compared to a single exposure to the stimulant. Endotoxin tolerance and priming are critically involved in both immune homeostasis and the pathogenesis of diverse inflammatory diseases. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not well understood. By means of a computational search through the parameter space of a coarse-grained three-node network with a two-stage Metropolis sampling approach, we enumerated all the network topologies that can generate priming or tolerance. We discovered three major mechanisms for priming (pathway synergy, suppressor deactivation, activator induction and one for tolerance (inhibitor persistence. These results not only explain existing experimental observations, but also reveal intriguing test scenarios for future experimental studies to clarify mechanisms of endotoxin priming and tolerance.

  19. Randomized gradient-free method for multiagent optimization over time-varying networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Deming; Ho, Daniel W C

    2015-06-01

    In this brief, we consider the multiagent optimization over a network where multiple agents try to minimize a sum of nonsmooth but Lipschitz continuous functions, subject to a convex state constraint set. The underlying network topology is modeled as time varying. We propose a randomized derivative-free method, where in each update, the random gradient-free oracles are utilized instead of the subgradients (SGs). In contrast to the existing work, we do not require that agents are able to compute the SGs of their objective functions. We establish the convergence of the method to an approximate solution of the multiagent optimization problem within the error level depending on the smoothing parameter and the Lipschitz constant of each agent's objective function. Finally, a numerical example is provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the method.

  20. Relationship between gene duplicability and diversifiability in the topology of biochemical networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhanyong; Jiang, Wen; Lages, Nuno; Borcherds, Wade; Wang, Degeng

    2014-07-08

    Selective gene duplicability, the extensive expansion of a small number of gene families, is universal. Quantitatively, the number of genes (P(K)) with K duplicates in a genome decreases precipitously as K increases, and often follows a power law (P(k)∝k-α). Functional diversification, either neo- or sub-functionalization, is a major evolution route for duplicate genes. Using three lines of genomic datasets, we studied the relationship between gene duplicability and diversifiability in the topology of biochemical networks. First, we explored scenario where two pathways in the biochemical networks antagonize each other. Synthetic knockout of respective genes for the two pathways rescues the phenotypic defects of each individual knockout. We identified duplicate gene pairs with sufficient divergences that represent this antagonism relationship in the yeast S. cerevisiae. Such pairs overwhelmingly belong to large gene families, thus tend to have high duplicability. Second, we used distances between proteins of duplicate genes in the protein interaction network as a metric of their diversification. The higher a gene's duplicate count, the further the proteins of this gene and its duplicates drift away from one another in the networks, which is especially true for genetically antagonizing duplicate genes. Third, we computed a sequence-homology-based clustering coefficient to quantify sequence diversifiability among duplicate genes - the lower the coefficient, the more the sequences have diverged. Duplicate count (K) of a gene is negatively correlated to the clustering coefficient of its duplicates, suggesting that gene duplicability is related to the extent of sequence divergence within the duplicate gene family. Thus, a positive correlation exists between gene diversifiability and duplicability in the context of biochemical networks - an improvement of our understanding of gene duplicability.

  1. Extraversion and Neuroticism relate to topological properties of resting-state brain networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing eGao

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available With the advent and development of modern neuroimaging techniques, there is an increasing interest in linking extraversion and neuroticism to anatomical and functional brain markers. Here we aimed to test the theoretically derived biological personality model as proposed by Eysenck using graph theoretical analyses. Specifically, the association between the topological organization of whole-brain functional networks and extraversion/neuroticism was explored. To construct functional brain networks, functional connectivity among 90 brain regions was measured by temporal correlation using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI data of 71 healthy subjects. Graph theoretical analysis revealed a positive association of extraversion scores and normalized clustering coefficient values. These results suggested a more clustered configuration in brain networks of individuals high in extraversion, which could imply a higher arousal threshold and higher levels of arousal tolerance in the cortex of extraverts. On a local network level, we observed that a specific nodal measure, i.e. betweenness centrality (BC, was positively associated with neuroticism scores in the right precentral gyrus, right caudate nucleus, right olfactory cortex and bilateral amygdala. For individuals high in neuroticism, these results suggested a more frequent participation of these specific regions in information transition within the brain network and, in turn, may partly explain greater regional activation levels and lower arousal thresholds in these regions. In contrast, extraversion scores were positively correlated with BC in the right insula, while negatively correlated with BC in the bilateral middle temporal gyrus, indicating that the relationship between extraversion and regional arousal is not as simple as proposed by Eysenck.

  2. Evaluating the Limits of Network Topology Inference Via Virtualized Network Emulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    activities from identifying Internet censorship under oppressive regimes and tracking the Internet’s penetration into previously unserved countries and...AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited 12b. DISTRIBUTION CODE 13. ABSTRACT (maximum 200 words) The Internet ...ability to induce link failures within the network. In addition, this thesis reexamines previous work in sampling Autonomous System-level Internet

  3. Scaling solutions for connectivity and conductivity of continuous random networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo-Torres, S A; Molebatsi, T; Kong, X-Z; Scheuermann, A; Bringemeier, D; Li, L

    2015-10-01

    Connectivity and conductivity of two-dimensional fracture networks (FNs), as an important type of continuous random networks, are examined systematically through Monte Carlo simulations under a variety of conditions, including different power law distributions of the fracture lengths and domain sizes. The simulation results are analyzed using analogies of the percolation theory for discrete random networks. With a characteristic length scale and conductivity scale introduced, we show that the connectivity and conductivity of FNs can be well described by universal scaling solutions. These solutions shed light on previous observations of scale-dependent FN behavior and provide a powerful method for quantifying effective bulk properties of continuous random networks.

  4. Asymmetry of Hemispheric Network Topology Reveals Dissociable Processes between Functional and Structural Brain Connectome in Community-Living Elders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Sun

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Human brain is structurally and functionally asymmetrical and the asymmetries of brain phenotypes have been shown to change in normal aging. Recent advances in graph theoretical analysis have showed topological lateralization between hemispheric networks in the human brain throughout the lifespan. Nevertheless, apparent discrepancies of hemispheric asymmetry were reported between the structural and functional brain networks, indicating the potentially complex asymmetry patterns between structural and functional networks in aging population. In this study, using multimodal neuroimaging (resting-state fMRI and structural diffusion tensor imaging, we investigated the characteristics of hemispheric network topology in 76 (male/female = 15/61, age = 70.08 ± 5.30 years community-dwelling older adults. Hemispheric functional and structural brain networks were obtained for each participant. Graph theoretical approaches were then employed to estimate the hemispheric topological properties. We found that the optimal small-world properties were preserved in both structural and functional hemispheric networks in older adults. Moreover, a leftward asymmetry in both global and local levels were observed in structural brain networks in comparison with a symmetric pattern in functional brain network, suggesting a dissociable process of hemispheric asymmetry between structural and functional connectome in healthy older adults. Finally, the scores of hemispheric asymmetry in both structural and functional networks were associated with behavioral performance in various cognitive domains. Taken together, these findings provide new insights into the lateralized nature of multimodal brain connectivity, highlight the potentially complex relationship between structural and functional brain network alterations, and augment our understanding of asymmetric structural and functional specializations in normal aging.

  5. A New Method for Identifying Essential Proteins Based on Network Topology Properties and Protein Complexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Qin

    Full Text Available Essential proteins are indispensable to the viability and reproduction of an organism. The identification of essential proteins is necessary not only for understanding the molecular mechanisms of cellular life but also for disease diagnosis, medical treatments and drug design. Many computational methods have been proposed for discovering essential proteins, but the precision of the prediction of essential proteins remains to be improved. In this paper, we propose a new method, LBCC, which is based on the combination of local density, betweenness centrality (BC and in-degree centrality of complex (IDC. First, we introduce the common centrality measures; second, we propose the densities Den1(v and Den2(v of a node v to describe its local properties in the network; and finally, the combined strategy of Den1, Den2, BC and IDC is developed to improve the prediction precision. The experimental results demonstrate that LBCC outperforms traditional topological measures for predicting essential proteins, including degree centrality (DC, BC, subgraph centrality (SC, eigenvector centrality (EC, network centrality (NC, and the local average connectivity-based method (LAC. LBCC also improves the prediction precision by approximately 10 percent on the YMIPS and YMBD datasets compared to the most recently developed method, LIDC.

  6. A New Method for Identifying Essential Proteins Based on Network Topology Properties and Protein Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Chao; Sun, Yongqi; Dong, Yadong

    2016-01-01

    Essential proteins are indispensable to the viability and reproduction of an organism. The identification of essential proteins is necessary not only for understanding the molecular mechanisms of cellular life but also for disease diagnosis, medical treatments and drug design. Many computational methods have been proposed for discovering essential proteins, but the precision of the prediction of essential proteins remains to be improved. In this paper, we propose a new method, LBCC, which is based on the combination of local density, betweenness centrality (BC) and in-degree centrality of complex (IDC). First, we introduce the common centrality measures; second, we propose the densities Den1(v) and Den2(v) of a node v to describe its local properties in the network; and finally, the combined strategy of Den1, Den2, BC and IDC is developed to improve the prediction precision. The experimental results demonstrate that LBCC outperforms traditional topological measures for predicting essential proteins, including degree centrality (DC), BC, subgraph centrality (SC), eigenvector centrality (EC), network centrality (NC), and the local average connectivity-based method (LAC). LBCC also improves the prediction precision by approximately 10 percent on the YMIPS and YMBD datasets compared to the most recently developed method, LIDC.

  7. Network topology of stable isotope interactions in a sub-arctic raptor guild.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalerum, F; Hellström, P; Miranda, M; Nyström, J; Ekenstedt, J; Angerbjörn, A

    2016-10-01

    Predation is an ecologically important process, and intra-guild interactions may substantially influence the ecological effects of predator species. Despite a rapid expansion in the use of mathematical graph theory to describe trophic relations, network approaches have rarely been used to study interactions within predator assemblages. Assemblages of diurnal raptors are subject to substantial intra- and interspecific competition. Here we used the novel approach of applying analyzes based on network topology to species-specific data on the stable isotopes (13)C and (15)N in feathers to evaluate patterns of relative resource utilization within a guild of diurnal raptors in northern Sweden. Our guild consisted of the golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos), the gyrfalcon (Falco rusticolus), the peregrine falcon (Falco peregrinus) and the rough-legged buzzard (Buteo lagopus). We found a modular trophic interaction structure within the guild, but the interactions were less nested than expected by chance. These results suggest low redundancy and hence a strong ecological importance of individual species. Our data also suggested that species were less connected through intra-guild interactions than expected by chance. We interpret our results as a convergence on specific isotope niches, and that body size and different hunting behaviour may mediate competition within these niches. We finally highlight that generalist predators could be ecologically important by linking specialist predator species with disparate dietary niches.

  8. Sub-critical crack growth in silicate glasses: Role of network topology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smedskjaer, Morten M.; Bauchy, Mathieu

    2015-10-01

    The presence of water in the surrounding atmosphere can cause sub-critical crack growth (SCCG) in glasses, a phenomenon known as fatigue or stress corrosion. Here, to facilitate the compositional design of more fatigue-resistant glasses, we investigate the composition dependence of SCCG by studying fourteen silicate glasses. The fatigue curves (V-KI) have been obtained by indentation experiments through measurements of the crack length as a function of post-indentation fatigue duration. Interestingly, we find that the fatigue resistance parameter N is generally improved by increasing the alumina content and is thereby found to exhibit a fairly linear dependence on the measured Vickers hardness HV for a wide range of N and HV values. This finding highlights the important role of network topology in governing the SCCG in silicate glasses, since hardness has been shown to scale linearly with the number of atomic constraints. Our results therefore suggest that glasses showing under-constrained flexible networks, which feature floppy internal modes of deformation, are more readily attacked by water molecules, thus promoting stress corrosion and reducing the fatigue resistance.