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Sample records for random network single-walled

  1. Extracting the field-effect mobilities of random semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotube networks: A critical comparison of methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schießl, Stefan P.; Rother, Marcel; Lüttgens, Jan; Zaumseil, Jana

    2017-11-01

    The field-effect mobility is an important figure of merit for semiconductors such as random networks of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). However, owing to their network properties and quantum capacitance, the standard models for field-effect transistors cannot be applied without modifications. Several different methods are used to determine the mobility with often very different results. We fabricated and characterized field-effect transistors with different polymer-sorted, semiconducting SWNT network densities ranging from low (≈6 μm-1) to densely packed quasi-monolayers (≈26 μm-1) with a maximum on-conductance of 0.24 μS μm-1 and compared four different techniques to evaluate the field-effect mobility. We demonstrate the limits and requirements for each method with regard to device layout and carrier accumulation. We find that techniques that take into account the measured capacitance on the active device give the most reliable mobility values. Finally, we compare our experimental results to a random-resistor-network model.

  2. A Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Network Gas Sensing Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Ju Teng

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this research was to develop a chemical gas sensing device based on single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT networks. The SWCNT networks are synthesized on Al2O3-deposted SiO2/Si substrates with 10 nm-thick Fe as the catalyst precursor layer using microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD. The development of interconnected SWCNT networks can be exploited to recognize the identities of different chemical gases by the strength of their particular surface adsorptive and desorptive responses to various types of chemical vapors. The physical responses on the surface of the SWCNT networks cause superficial changes in the electric charge that can be converted into electronic signals for identification. In this study, we tested NO2 and NH3 vapors at ppm levels at room temperature with our self-made gas sensing device, which was able to obtain responses to sensitivity changes with a concentration of 10 ppm for NO2 and 24 ppm for NH3.

  3. The geometrical effect of single walled carbon nanotube network transistors on low frequency noise characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Un Jeong; Kil, Joon Pyo; Park, Wanjun

    2011-07-01

    The noise characteristics of randomly networked single walled carbon nanotubes grown directly by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition with field effect transistor. Geometrical complexity due to the large number of tube-tube junctions in the nanotube network is expected to be one of the key factors for the noise power of 1/f dependence. We investigated low frequency noise as a function of channel length (2-10 microm) and found that increased with longer channel length. Percolational behaviors of nanotube network that differs from ordinary semiconducting and metallic materials can be characterized by a geometrical picture with electrical homo- and hetero-junctions. Fixed nanotube density provides a test conditions to evaluate the contributions of junctions as a noise center. Hooge's empirical law is applied to investigate the low frequency noise characteristics of single walled carbon nanotube random network transistors. The noise power shows the dependence of the transistor channel length. It is understood that nanotube/nanotube junctions act as a noise center. However, the differences induced by channel length in the noise power are observed as not so significant. We conclude that tolerance of low frequency noise is important property for SWNT networks as an electronic device application.

  4. Ultrathin single-walled carbon nanotube network framed graphene hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Hong, Tu; Xu, Ya-Qiong

    2015-03-11

    Graphene and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have shown superior potential in electronics and optoelectronics because of their excellent thermal, mechanical, electronic, and optical properties. Here, a simple method is developed to synthesize ultrathin SWNT-graphene films through chemical vapor deposition. These novel two-dimensional hybrids show enhanced mechanical strength that allows them to float on water without polymer supporting layers. Characterizations by Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy indicate that SWNTs can interlace as a concrete backbone for the subsequent growth of monolayer graphene. Optical and electrical transport measurements further show that SWNT-graphene hybrids inherit high optical transparency and superior electrical conductivity from monolayer graphene. We also explore the local optoelectronic properties of SWNT-graphene hybrids through spatially resolved photocurrent microscopy and find that the interactions between SWNTs and graphene can induce a strong photocurrent response in the areas where SWNTs link different graphene domains together. These fundamental studies may open a door for engineering optoelectronic properties of SWNT-graphene hybrids by controlling the morphologies of the SWNT frames.

  5. Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Network Field Effect Transistor as a Humidity Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasantha R. Mudimela

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Single-walled carbon nanotube network field effect transistors were fabricated and studied as humidity sensors. Sensing responses were altered by changing the gate voltage. At the open channel state (negative gate voltage, humidity pulse resulted in the decrease of the source-drain current, and, vice versa, the increase in the source-drain current was observed at the positive gate voltage. This effect was explained by the electron-donating nature of water molecules. The operation speed and signal intensity was found to be dependent on the gate voltage polarity. The positive or negative change in current with humidity pulse at zero-gate voltage was found to depend on the previous state of the gate electrode (positive or negative voltage, respectively. Those characteristics were explained by the charge traps in the gate dielectric altering the effective gate voltage, which influenced the operation of field effect transistor.

  6. Detection of a nerve agent simulant using single-walled carbon nanotube networks: dimethyl-methyl-phosphonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeonju; Lee, Seunghyun; Choi, Hyang Hee; Noh, Jin-Seo; Lee, Wooyoung

    2010-12-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) networks were used to detect hazardous dimethyl-methyl-phosphonate (DMMP) gas in real time, employing two different metals as electrodes. Random networks of SWNTs were simply obtained by drop-casting a SWNT-containing solution onto a surface-oxidized Si substrate. Although the electrical responses to DMMP at room temperature were reversible for both metals, the Pd-contacting SWNT network sensors exhibited a higher response and a shorter response time than those of the Au-contacting SWNT network sensors at the same DMMP concentration, due to the stronger interactions between the SWNTs and Pd surface atoms. In Pd-contacting SWNT network sensors, the response increased linearly with increasing DMMP concentration and reproducible response curves were obtained for DMMP levels as low as 1 ppm. These results indicate that SWNT networks in contact with Pd electrodes can function as good DMMP sensors at room temperature with scalable and fast response and excellent recovery.

  7. High-performance hydrogen production and oxidation electrodes with hydrogenase supported on metallic single-wall carbon nanotube networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svedružić, Draženka; Blackburn, Jeffrey L; Tenent, Robert C; Rocha, John-David R; Vinzant, Todd B; Heben, Michael J; King, Paul W

    2011-03-30

    We studied the electrocatalytic activity of an [FeFe]-hydrogenase from Clostridium acetobutylicum (CaH2ase) immobilized on single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) networks. SWNT networks were prepared on carbon cloth by ultrasonic spraying of suspensions with predetermined ratios of metallic and semiconducting nanotubes. Current densities for both proton reduction and hydrogen oxidation electrocatalytic activities were at least 1 order of magnitude higher when hydrogenase was immobilized onto SWNT networks with high metallic tube (m-SWNT) content in comparison to hydrogenase supported on networks with low metallic tube content or when SWNTs were absent. We conclude that the increase in electrocatalytic activities in the presence of SWNTs was mainly due to the m-SWNT fraction and can be attributed to (i) substantial increases in the active electrode surface area, and (ii) improved electronic coupling between CaH2ase redox-active sites and the electrode surface.

  8. Electrical behavior of Langmuir-Blodgett networks of sorted metallic and semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Mark K; Rosamond, Mark C; Pearson, Christopher; Zeze, Dagou A; Petty, Michael C

    2012-10-30

    Langmuir-Blodgett deposition has been used to form thin film networks of both metallic and semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes. These have been investigated to understand their physical, optical, and morphological properties. The electrical conductivities over the temperature range 80-350 K and across electrode gaps of 220 nm and 2 mm have been explored. In the case of semiconducting tubes, the results suggest that Poole-Frenkel conduction is the dominant electrical process at temperatures below 150 K and electric fields of greater than 1 MV m(-1). Metallic nanotube networks exhibit a decrease in resistance with a reduction in temperature. This can be approximated by a linear relationship, giving a temperature coefficient of resistance of 10(-3) K(-1).

  9. Engineering highly organized and aligned single walled carbon nanotube networks for electronic device applications: Interconnects, chemical sensor, and optoelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Lae

    For 20 years, single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have been studied actively due to their unique one-dimensional nanostructure and superior electrical, thermal, and mechanical properties. For these reasons, they offer the potential to serve as building blocks for future electronic devices such as field effect transistors (FETs), electromechanical devices, and various sensors. In order to realize these applications, it is crucial to develop a simple, scalable, and reliable nanomanufacturing process that controllably places aligned SWNTs in desired locations, orientations, and dimensions. Also electronic properties (semiconducting/metallic) of SWNTs and their organized networks must be controlled for the desired performance of devices and systems. These fundamental challenges are significantly limiting the use of SWNTs for future electronic device applications. Here, we demonstrate a strategy to fabricate highly controlled micro/nanoscale SWNT network structures and present the related assembly mechanism to engineer the SWNT network topology and its electrical transport properties. A method designed to evaluate the electrical reliability of such nano- and microscale SWNT networks is also presented. Moreover, we develop and investigate a robust SWNT based multifunctional selective chemical sensor and a range of multifunctional optoelectronic switches, photo-transistors, optoelectronic logic gates and complex optoelectronic digital circuits.

  10. Toxicity induced enhanced extracellular matrix production in osteoblastic cells cultured on single-walled carbon nanotube networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tutak, Wojtek; Fanchini, Giovanni; Chhowalla, Manish [Materials Science and Engineering, School of Engineering, Rutgers, State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Park, Ki Ho; Vasilov, Anatoly; Cai Shiqing; Partridge, Nicola C; Sesti, Federico [Department of Physiology and Biophysics, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Starovoytov, Valentin [Department of Cell Biology and Neuroscience, Rutgers, State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ 08855 (United States)], E-mail: sestife@umdnj.edu, E-mail: manish1@rci.rutgers.edu

    2009-06-24

    A central effort in biomedical research concerns the development of materials for sustaining and controlling cell growth. Carbon nanotube based substrates have been shown to support the growth of different kinds of cells (Hu et al 2004 Nano Lett. 4 507-11; Kalbacova et al 2006 Phys. Status Solidi b 13 243; Zanello et al 2006 Nano Lett. 6 562-7); however the underlying molecular mechanisms remain poorly defined. To address the fundamental question of mechanisms by which nanotubes promote bone mitosis and histogenesis, primary calvariae osteoblastic cells were grown on single-walled carbon nanotube thin film (SWNT) substrates. Using a combination of biochemical and optical techniques we demonstrate here that SWNT networks promote cell development through two distinct steps. Initially, SWNTs are absorbed in a process that resembles endocytosis, inducing acute toxicity. Nanotube-mediated cell destruction, however, induces a release of endogenous factors that act to boost the activity of the surviving cells by stimulating the synthesis of extracellular matrix.

  11. Effect of tetrahedral amorphous carbon coating on the resistivity and wear of single-walled carbon nanotube network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iyer, Ajai, E-mail: ajai.iyer@aalto.fi; Etula, Jarkko; Liu, Xuwen; Koskinen, Jari [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, School of Chemical Technology, Aalto University, P.O. Box 16200, 00076 Espoo (Finland); Kaskela, Antti; Kauppinen, Esko I. [NanoMaterials Group, Department of Applied Physics, School of Science, Aalto University, P.O. Box 15100, 00076 Espoo (Finland); Novikov, Serguei [Department of Micro and Nanosciences, Aalto University, P.O. Box 13500, 00076 Aalto (Finland)

    2016-05-14

    Single walled carbon nanotube networks (SWCNTNs) were coated by tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) to improve the mechanical wear properties of the composite film. The ta-C deposition was performed by using pulsed filtered cathodic vacuum arc method resulting in the generation of C+ ions in the energy range of 40–60 eV which coalesce to form a ta-C film. The primary disadvantage of this process is a significant increase in the electrical resistance of the SWCNTN post coating. The increase in the SWCNTN resistance is attributed primarily to the intrinsic stress of the ta-C coating which affects the inter-bundle junction resistance between the SWCNTN bundles. E-beam evaporated carbon was deposited on the SWCNTNs prior to the ta-C deposition in order to protect the SWCNTN from the intrinsic stress of the ta-C film. The causes of changes in electrical resistance and the effect of evaporated carbon thickness on the changes in electrical resistance and mechanical wear properties have been studied.

  12. Effect of Varying the Semiconducting/Metallic Tube Ratio on the Performance of Mixed Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Network Gas Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Joon Min

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The sensing properties of mixed networks consisting of semiconducting and metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs have been found to largely vary depending on the ratio of semiconducting to metallic tubes. Solution-deposited 99% semiconductor-enriched nanotube networks exhibited a sensitivity of 1.908%/ppm, whereas the unenriched 66% and 90% enriched samples exhibited a sensitivity of 0.027%/ppm and 0.113%/ppm, respectively. These results suggest that it is extremely important to minimize the metallic pathways to achieve high sensitivity. After an oxygen plasma treatment, the unenriched 66% sample exhibited a 526% increase in sensitivity (0.142%/ppm compared to the untreated one, whereas the 90% device demonstrated a sensitivity of 1.521%/ppm, which corresponds to an improvement in the sensitivity of 13.5 times the pristine 90% sample. In addition, the plasma-treated sensors exhibited a much faster response time than the untreated one. The significant improvement in the performance of the highly enriched network sensors was explained by the large increase in the anchoring sites for ammonia molecules on the surface of the semiconducting single-walled CNTs and the faster charge transfer from absorbed molecules.

  13. Adjustable hydrazine modulation of single-wall carbon nanotube network field effect transistors from p-type to n-type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Ruixuan; Xie, Dan; Xu, Jianlong; Sun, Yilin; Sun, MengXing; Zhang, Cheng; Li, Xian

    2016-11-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) network field effect transistors (FETs), which show decent p-type electronic properties, have been fabricated. The use of hydrazine as an aqueous solution and a strong n-type dopant for the SWCNTs is demonstrated in this paper. The electrical properties are obviously tuned by hydrazine treatment at different concentrations on the surface of the SWCNT network FETs. The transport behavior of SWCNTs can be modulated from p-type to n-type, demonstrating the controllable and adjustable doping effect of hydrazine. With a higher concentration of hydrazine, more electrons can be transferred from the hydrazine molecules to the SWCNT network films, thus resulting in a change of threshold voltage, carrier mobility and on-current. By cleaning the device, the hydrazine doping effects vanish, which indicates that the doping effects of hydrazine are reversible. Through x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) characterization, the doping effects of hydrazine have also been studied.

  14. Long-term stability of superhydrophilic oxygen plasma-modified single-walled carbon nanotube network surfaces and the influence on ammonia gas detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Sungjoon [Department of Biomicrosystem Technology, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Joonhyub [Department of Control and Instrumentation Engineering, Korea University, 2511 Sejong-ro, Sejong City 339-770 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Chanwon [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon 200-701 (Korea, Republic of); Jin, Joon-Hyung, E-mail: jj1023@chol.com [Department of Chemical Engineering, Kyonggi University, 154-42 Gwanggyosan-ro, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon-si, Gyeonggi-do 16227 (Korea, Republic of); Min, Nam Ki, E-mail: nkmin@korea.ac.kr [Department of Biomicrosystem Technology, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-07-15

    Graphical abstract: Superhydrophilic single-walled carbon nanotube obtained by O{sub 2} plasma treatment voluntarily and non-reversibly reverts to a metastable state. This aerobic aging is an essential process to develop a stable carbon nanotube-based sensor. - Highlights: • Superhydrophilic single-walled carbon nanotube network can be obtained by O{sub 2} plasma-based surface modification. • The modified carbon nanotube surface invariably reverts to a metastable state in a non-reversible manner. • Aerobic aging is essential to stabilize the modified carbon nanotube and the carbon nanotube-based sensing device due to minimized sensor-to-sensor variation. - Abstract: Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) networks are subjected to a low-powered oxygen plasma for the surface modification. Changes in the surface chemical composition and the stability of the plasma-treated SWCNT (p-SWCNT) with aging in air for up to five weeks are studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and contact angle analysis. The contact angle decreases from 120° of the untreated hydrophobic SWCNT to 0° for the superhydrophilic p-SWCNT. Similarly, the ratio of oxygen to carbon (O:C) based on the XPS spectra increases from 0.25 to 1.19, indicating an increase in surface energy of the p-SWCNT. The enhanced surface energy is gradually dissipated and the p-SWCNT network loses the superhydrophilic surface property. However, it never revert to the original hydrophobic surface state but to a metastable hydrophilic state. The aging effect on sensitivity of the p-SWCNT network-based ammonia sensor is investigated to show the importance of the aging process for the stabilization of the p-SWCNT. The best sensitivity for monitoring NH{sub 3} gas is observed with the as-prepared p-SWCNT, and the sensitivity decreases as similar as the p-SWCNT loses its hydrophilicity with time goes by. After a large performance degradation during the aging time for about two weeks, the response

  15. Long-term stability of superhydrophilic oxygen plasma-modified single-walled carbon nanotube network surfaces and the influence on ammonia gas detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Sungjoon; Kim, Joonhyub; Park, Chanwon; Jin, Joon-Hyung; Min, Nam Ki

    2017-07-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) networks are subjected to a low-powered oxygen plasma for the surface modification. Changes in the surface chemical composition and the stability of the plasma-treated SWCNT (p-SWCNT) with aging in air for up to five weeks are studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and contact angle analysis. The contact angle decreases from 120° of the untreated hydrophobic SWCNT to 0° for the superhydrophilic p-SWCNT. Similarly, the ratio of oxygen to carbon (O:C) based on the XPS spectra increases from 0.25 to 1.19, indicating an increase in surface energy of the p-SWCNT. The enhanced surface energy is gradually dissipated and the p-SWCNT network loses the superhydrophilic surface property. However, it never revert to the original hydrophobic surface state but to a metastable hydrophilic state. The aging effect on sensitivity of the p-SWCNT network-based ammonia sensor is investigated to show the importance of the aging process for the stabilization of the p-SWCNT. The best sensitivity for monitoring NH3 gas is observed with the as-prepared p-SWCNT, and the sensitivity decreases as similar as the p-SWCNT loses its hydrophilicity with time goes by. After a large performance degradation during the aging time for about two weeks, the response characteristics including sensitivity and response time of the p-SWCNT to ammonia gas are stabilized and eventually saturated.

  16. Gossip in Random Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malarz, K.; Szvetelszky, Z.; Szekf, B.; Kulakowski, K.

    2006-11-01

    We consider the average probability X of being informed on a gossip in a given social network. The network is modeled within the random graph theory of Erd{õ}s and Rényi. In this theory, a network is characterized by two parameters: the size N and the link probability p. Our experimental data suggest three levels of social inclusion of friendship. The critical value pc, for which half of agents are informed, scales with the system size as N-gamma with gamma approx 0.68. Computer simulations show that the probability X varies with p as a sigmoidal curve. Influence of the correlations between neighbors is also evaluated: with increasing clustering coefficient C, X decreases.

  17. Conductivity of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gets, A. V.; Krainov, V. P., E-mail: vpkrainov@mail.ru [Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-15

    The conductivity of single-walled carbon nanotubes at low temperatures is calculated. It is shown that it is much higher than the well-known conductivity of a model 1D Fermi system. This is a purely quantum-mechanical effect.

  18. Quantifying randomness in real networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsini, Chiara; Dankulov, Marija M.; Colomer-de-Simón, Pol; Jamakovic, Almerima; Mahadevan, Priya; Vahdat, Amin; Bassler, Kevin E.; Toroczkai, Zoltán; Boguñá, Marián; Caldarelli, Guido; Fortunato, Santo; Krioukov, Dmitri

    2015-10-01

    Represented as graphs, real networks are intricate combinations of order and disorder. Fixing some of the structural properties of network models to their values observed in real networks, many other properties appear as statistical consequences of these fixed observables, plus randomness in other respects. Here we employ the dk-series, a complete set of basic characteristics of the network structure, to study the statistical dependencies between different network properties. We consider six real networks--the Internet, US airport network, human protein interactions, technosocial web of trust, English word network, and an fMRI map of the human brain--and find that many important local and global structural properties of these networks are closely reproduced by dk-random graphs whose degree distributions, degree correlations and clustering are as in the corresponding real network. We discuss important conceptual, methodological, and practical implications of this evaluation of network randomness, and release software to generate dk-random graphs.

  19. Nicotine adsorption on single wall carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girao, Eduardo C. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Ceara, Caixa Postal 6030, Campus do Pici, 60455-900 Fortaleza, Ceara (Brazil); Fagan, Solange B.; Zanella, Ivana [Area de Ciencias Tecnologicas, Centro Universitario Franciscano - UNIFRA, 97010-032 Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Filho, Antonio G. Souza, E-mail: agsf@fisica.ufc.br [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Ceara, Caixa Postal 6030, Campus do Pici, 60455-900 Fortaleza, Ceara (Brazil)

    2010-12-15

    This work reports a theoretical study of nicotine molecules interacting with single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) through ab initio calculations within the framework of density functional theory (DFT). Different adsorption sites for nicotine on the surface of pristine and defective (8,0) SWCNTs were analyzed and the total energy curves, as a function of molecular position relative to the SWCNT surface, were evaluated. The nicotine adsorption process is found to be energetically favorable and the molecule-nanotube interaction is intermediated by the tri-coordinated nitrogen atom from the nicotine. It is also predicted the possibility of a chemical bonding between nicotine and SWCNT through the di-coordinated nitrogen.

  20. Superconductivity in single wall carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Yavari

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available   By using Greens function method we first show that the effective interaction between two electrons mediated by plasmon exchange can become attractive which in turn can lead to superconductivity at a high critical temperature in a singl wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT. The superconducting transition temperature Tc for the SWCNT (3,3 obtained by this mechanism agrees with the recent experimental result. We also show as the radius of SWCNT increases, plasmon frequency becomes lower and leads to lower Tc.

  1. Growing random networks with fitness

    OpenAIRE

    Ergun, G.; Rodgers, GJ

    2001-01-01

    Three models of growing random networks with fitness dependent growth rates are analysed using the rate equations for the distribution of their connectivities. In the first model (A), a network is built by connecting incoming nodes to nodes of connectivity $k$ and random additive fitness $\\eta$, with rate $(k-1)+ \\eta $. For $\\eta >0$ we find the connectivity distribution is power law with exponent $\\gamma=+2$. In the second model (B), the network is built by connecting nodes to nodes of conn...

  2. Asymmetric evolving random networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulomb, S.; Bauer, M.

    2003-10-01

    We generalize the Poissonian evolving random graph model of M. Bauer and D. Bernard (2003), to deal with arbitrary degree distributions. The motivation comes from biological networks, which are well-known to exhibit non Poissonian degree distributions. A node is added at each time step and is connected to the rest of the graph by oriented edges emerging from older nodes. This leads to a statistical asymmetry between incoming and outgoing edges. The law for the number of new edges at each time step is fixed but arbitrary. Thermodynamical behavior is expected when this law has a large time limit. Although (by construction) the incoming degree distributions depend on this law, this is not the case for most qualitative features concerning the size distribution of connected components, as long as the law has a finite variance. As the variance grows above 1/4, the average being < 1/2, a giant component emerges, which connects a finite fraction of the vertices. Below this threshold, the distribution of component sizes decreases algebraically with a continuously varying exponent. The transition is of infinite order, in sharp contrast with the case of static graphs. The local-in-time profiles for the components of finite size allow to give a refined description of the system.

  3. Printable Thin Film Supercapacitors Using Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Kaempgen, Martti

    2009-05-13

    Thin film supercapacitors were fabricated using printable materials to make flexible devices on plastic. The active electrodes were made from sprayed networks of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) serving as both electrodes and charge collectors. Using a printable aqueous gel electrolyte as well as an organic liquid electrolyte, the performances of the devices show very high energy and power densities (6 W h/kg for both electrolytes and 23 and 70 kW/kg for aqueous gel electrolyte and organic electrolyte, respectively) which is comparable to performance in other SWCNT-based supercapacitor devices fabricated using different methods. The results underline the potential of printable thin film supercapacitors. The simplified architecture and the sole use of printable materials may lead to a new class of entirely printable charge storage devices allowing for full integration with the emerging field of printed electronics. © 2009 American Chemical Society.

  4. Transmittance of single wall carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmes, W.; Hone, J.; Richards, P.L.; Zettl, A.

    2001-07-31

    The authors have measured the far infrared absorption of single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) ropes at 1.5K and SWNT ropes in polyethylene (PE) over the range 1.5 < T < 300 K. A weak peak is observed at 28 cm{sup -1} at 1.5K for free standing SWNT samples. The frequency and temperature dependence of the peak is consistent with absorption by an E{sub 2g} symmetric, ''squash mode'', SWNT phonon, which is infrared active due to an adsorbate or disorder. The peak frequency for SWNT ropes in PE is at 40 cm{sup -1} and temperature dependent. They attribute the increase in the frequency of the peak for SWNT in PE to the effect of {approx} 0.2GPa of hydrostatic pressure exerted on the SWNT ropes due to the thermal contraction of PE when cooled to low temperatures. Using two independent methods, they estimate that the SWNT may radially buckle at this pressure. The buckling distortion may cause the pressure dependence of the peak frequency. They cannot rule out the possibility that the peak is an absorption onset from adsorbate modes extrinsic to the SWNT or from interband transitions at a small electronic band gap. An effective medium calculation of Drude metal grains in polyethylene gives a frequency dependence consistent with their data, but the model underestimates the strength of scattering by orders of magnitude.

  5. Toxicity of single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Li-Chu; Chung, Felicia Fei-Lei; Tan, Yuen-Fen; Leong, Chee-Onn

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are an important class of nanomaterials, which have numerous novel properties that make them useful in technology and industry. Generally, there are two types of CNTs: single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) and multi-walled nanotubes. SWNTs, in particular, possess unique electrical, mechanical, and thermal properties, allowing for a wide range of applications in various fields, including the electronic, computer, aerospace, and biomedical industries. However, the use of SWNTs has come under scrutiny, not only due to their peculiar nanotoxicological profile, but also due to the forecasted increase in SWNT production in the near future. As such, the risk of human exposure is likely to be increased substantially. Yet, our understanding of the toxicological risk of SWNTs in human biology remains limited. This review seeks to examine representative data on the nanotoxicity of SWNTs by first considering how SWNTs are absorbed, distributed, accumulated and excreted in a biological system, and how SWNTs induce organ-specific toxicity in the body. The contradictory findings of numerous studies with regards to the potential hazards of SWNT exposure are discussed in this review. The possible mechanisms and molecular pathways associated with SWNT nanotoxicity in target organs and specific cell types are presented. We hope that this review will stimulate further research into the fundamental aspects of CNTs, especially the biological interactions which arise due to the unique intrinsic characteristics of CNTs.

  6. Generating random networks and graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Coolen, Ton; Roberts, Ekaterina

    2017-01-01

    This book supports researchers who need to generate random networks, or who are interested in the theoretical study of random graphs. The coverage includes exponential random graphs (where the targeted probability of each network appearing in the ensemble is specified), growth algorithms (i.e. preferential attachment and the stub-joining configuration model), special constructions (e.g. geometric graphs and Watts Strogatz models) and graphs on structured spaces (e.g. multiplex networks). The presentation aims to be a complete starting point, including details of both theory and implementation, as well as discussions of the main strengths and weaknesses of each approach. It includes extensive references for readers wishing to go further. The material is carefully structured to be accessible to researchers from all disciplines while also containing rigorous mathematical analysis (largely based on the techniques of statistical mechanics) to support those wishing to further develop or implement the theory of rand...

  7. Room temperature ammonia vapor sensing properties of transparent single walled carbon nanotube thin film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shobin, L. R.; Manivannan, S.

    2014-10-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) networks are identified as potential substitute and surpass the conventional indium doped tin oxide (ITO) in transparent conducting electrodes, thin-film transistors, solar cells, and chemical sensors. Among them, CNT based gas sensors gained more interest because of its need in environmental monitoring, industrial control, and detection of gases in warfare or for averting security threats. The unique properties of CNT networks such as high surface area, low density, high thermal conductivity and chemical sensitivity making them as a potential candidate for gas sensing applications. Commercial unsorted single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) were purified by thermal oxidation and acid treatment processes and dispersed in organic solvent N-methyl pyrolidone using sonication process in the absence of polymer or surfactant. Optically transparent SWCNT networks are realized on glass substrate by coating the dispersed SWCNT with the help of dynamic spray coating process at 200ºC. The SWCNT random network was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and UV-vis-NIR spectroscopy. Gas sensing property of transparent film towards ammonia vapor is studied at room temperature by measuring the resistance change with respect to the concentration in the range 0-1000 ppm. The sensor response is increased logarithmically in the concentration range 0 to 1000 ppm with the detection limit 0.007 ppm. The random networks are able to detect ammonia vapor selectively because of the high electron donating nature of ammonia molecule to the SWCNT. The sensor is reversible and selective to ammonia vapor with response time 70 seconds and recovery time 423 seconds for 62.5 ppm with 90% optical transparency at 550 nm.

  8. Evolution of random catalytic networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraser, S.M. [Santa Fe Inst., NM (United States); Reidys, C.M. [Santa Fe Inst., NM (United States)]|[Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1997-06-01

    In this paper the authors investigate the evolution of populations of sequences on a random catalytic network. Sequences are mapped into structures, between which are catalytic interactions that determine their instantaneous fitness. The catalytic network is constructed as a random directed graph. They prove that at certain parameter values, the probability of some relevant subgraphs of this graph, for example cycles without outgoing edges, is maximized. Populations evolving under point mutations realize a comparatively small induced subgraph of the complete catalytic network. They present results which show that populations reliably discover and persist on directed cycles in the catalytic graph, though these may be lost because of stochastic effects, and study the effect of population size on this behavior.

  9. Uncovering the ultimate performance of single-walled carbon nanotube films as transparent conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustonen, K.; Laiho, P.; Kaskela, A.; Susi, T.; Nasibulin, A. G.; Kauppinen, E. I.

    2015-10-01

    The ultimate performance—ratio of electrical conductivity to optical absorbance—of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) transparent conductive films (TCFs) is an issue of considerable application relevance. Here, we present direct experimental evidence that SWCNT bundling is detrimental for their performance. We combine floating catalyst synthesis of non-bundled, high-quality SWCNTs with an aggregation chamber, in which bundles with mean diameters ranging from 1.38 to 2.90 nm are formed from identical 3 μm long SWCNTs. The as-deposited TCFs from 1.38 nm bundles showed sheet resistances of 310 Ω/□ at 90% transparency, while those from larger bundles of 1.80 and 2.90 nm only reached values of 475 and 670 Ω/□, respectively. Based on these observations, we elucidate how networks formed by smaller bundles perform better due to their greater interconnectivity at a given optical density. Finally, we present a semi-empirical model for TCF performance as a function of SWCNT mean length and bundle diameter. This gives an estimate for the ultimate performance of non-doped, random network mixed-metallicity SWCNT TCFs at ˜80 Ω/□ and 90% transparency.

  10. Methods for Gas Sensing with Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, Anupama B. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Methods for gas sensing with single-walled carbon nanotubes are described. The methods comprise biasing at least one carbon nanotube and exposing to a gas environment to detect variation in temperature as an electrical response.

  11. Organization of growing random networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krapivsky, P. L.; Redner, S.

    2001-06-01

    The organizational development of growing random networks is investigated. These growing networks are built by adding nodes successively, and linking each to an earlier node of degree k with an attachment probability A{sub k}. When A{sub k} grows more slowly than linearly with k, the number of nodes with k links, N{sub k}(t), decays faster than a power law in k, while for A{sub k} growing faster than linearly in k, a single node emerges which connects to nearly all other nodes. When A{sub k} is asymptotically linear, N{sub k}(t){similar_to}tk{sup {minus}{nu}}, with {nu} dependent on details of the attachment probability, but in the range 2{lt}{nu}{lt}{infinity}. The combined age and degree distribution of nodes shows that old nodes typically have a large degree. There is also a significant correlation in the degrees of neighboring nodes, so that nodes of similar degree are more likely to be connected. The size distributions of the in and out components of the network with respect to a given node{emdash}namely, its {open_quotes}descendants{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}ancestors{close_quotes}{emdash}are also determined. The in component exhibits a robust s{sup {minus}2} power-law tail, where s is the component size. The out component has a typical size of order lnt, and it provides basic insights into the genealogy of the network.

  12. Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes: Mimics of Biological Ion Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri, Hasti; Shepard, Kenneth L; Nuckolls, Colin; Hernández Sánchez, Raúl

    2017-02-08

    Here we report on the ion conductance through individual, small diameter single-walled carbon nanotubes. We find that they are mimics of ion channels found in natural systems. We explore the factors governing the ion selectivity and permeation through single-walled carbon nanotubes by considering an electrostatic mechanism built around a simplified version of the Gouy-Chapman theory. We find that the single-walled carbon nanotubes preferentially transported cations and that the cation permeability is size-dependent. The ionic conductance increases as the absolute hydration enthalpy decreases for monovalent cations with similar solid-state radii, hydrated radii, and bulk mobility. Charge screening experiments using either the addition of cationic or anionic polymers, divalent metal cations, or changes in pH reveal the enormous impact of the negatively charged carboxylates at the entrance of the single-walled carbon nanotubes. These observations were modeled in the low-to-medium concentration range (0.1-2.0 M) by an electrostatic mechanism that mimics the behavior observed in many biological ion channel-forming proteins. Moreover, multi-ion conduction in the high concentration range (>2.0 M) further reinforces the similarity between single-walled carbon nanotubes and protein ion channels.

  13. Random Network Coding over Composite Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geil, Olav; Lucani Rötter, Daniel Enrique

    2017-01-01

    Random network coding is a method that achieves multicast capacity asymptotically for general networks [1, 7]. In this approach, vertices in the network randomly and linearly combine incoming information in a distributed manner before forwarding it through their outgoing edges. To ensure success...

  14. Photodynamic Action of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Tatsuya

    2017-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy is achieved by the combination of photosensitizers, harmless visible or near-infrared (NIR) light, and molecular oxygen (O2). Photosensitizers transfer their absorbed light energy to O2 to generate a major active species in photodynamic therapy, singlet oxygen. In this review, I will discuss the possibility of single-walled carbon nanotubes as NIR photosensitizers, while explaining the general photophysics and photochemistry underlying photodynamic therapy as well as summarizing recent advances in the purification technologies for single-walled carbon nanotubes to reduce their toxicity concerns.

  15. Enhancement of semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes photoluminescence

    OpenAIRE

    Gaufrès, Etienne; Izard, Nicolas; Vivien, Laurent; Kazaoui, Saïd; Marris-Morini, Delphine; Cassan, Eric

    2009-01-01

    International audience; Photoluminescence properties of semiconducting single wall carbon nanotubes (s-SWNT) thin films with different metallic single wall carbon nanotubes (m-SWNT) concentrations are reported. s-SWNT purified samples are obtained by polymer assisted selective extraction. We show that a few m-SWNT in the sample generates a drastic quenching of the emission. Therefore, highly purified s-SWNT films are a strongly luminescent material and a good candidate for future applications in p...

  16. Handbook of Large-Scale Random Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Bollobas, Bela; Miklos, Dezso

    2008-01-01

    Covers various aspects of large-scale networks, including mathematical foundations and rigorous results of random graph theory, modeling and computational aspects of large-scale networks, as well as areas in physics, biology, neuroscience, sociology and technical areas

  17. Importance of randomness in biological networks: A random matrix ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-01-29

    Jan 29, 2015 ... We show that in spite of huge differences these interaction networks, representing real-world systems, posses from random matrix models, the spectral properties of the underlying matrices of these networks follow random matrix theory bringing them into the same universality class. We further demonstrate ...

  18. Entropy Characterization of Random Network Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro J. Zufiria

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper elaborates on the Random Network Model (RNM as a mathematical framework for modelling and analyzing the generation of complex networks. Such framework allows the analysis of the relationship between several network characterizing features (link density, clustering coefficient, degree distribution, connectivity, etc. and entropy-based complexity measures, providing new insight on the generation and characterization of random networks. Some theoretical and computational results illustrate the utility of the proposed framework.

  19. Synthesis of single walled carbon nanotubes by dual laser vaporization

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Moodley, MK et al.

    2006-02-27

    Full Text Available Single-walled carbon nanotubes were synthesised by the laser vaporisation of graphite composite targets in a tube furnace. Two pulsed Nd:YAG lasers operating at fundamental (1 064 nm) and 2nd harmonic (532 nm) were combined, focused and evaporated...

  20. Hydrogen adsorption on N-decorated single wall carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rangel, Eduardo [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 20-364, Codigo Postal 01000, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Ruiz-Chavarria, Gregorio [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 20-364, Codigo Postal 01000, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico Ciudad Universitaria, Codigo Postal 04510, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Magana, L.F., E-mail: fernando@fisica.unam.m [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 20-364, Codigo Postal 01000, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Arellano, J.S. [Departamento de Ciencias Basicas, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Azcapotzalco. Avenida San Pablo No. 180, Col. Reynosa Tamaulipas Codigo Postal 02200, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2009-07-06

    Using density functional theory and molecular dynamics we found that N-decorated single walled (8,0) carbon nanotubes are potential high capacity hydrogen storage media. This system could store up to 6.0 wt% hydrogen at 300 K and ambient pressure, with average adsorption energy of -80 meV/(H{sub 2}). Nitrogen coverage was C{sub 8}N.

  1. Synthesis of single wall carbon nanotubes from a lamellar type ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    walled nanotubes. These nanotubes are applicable to store more hydrogen. Keywords. AlPO4-L; single wall carbon nanotubes. 1. Introduction. Carbon nanotubes (Iijima 1991) are nano-scale structures formed by self assembly. They possess excellent chemical and physical properties (Rodney and Donald 1995; Chen.

  2. Synthesis of single walled carbon nanotubes by dual laser vaporization

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Moodley, MK

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Single walled carbon nanotubes were synthesized by the laser vaporization of graphite composite targets in a tube furnace. Two pulsed Nd:Yag lasers operating at fundamental (1064 nm) and 2 nd harmonic (532 nm) were combined, focused and evaporated...

  3. Estimation of mechanical properties of single wall carbon nanotubes ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The geometry of CNT is built using a macro that is developed for the finite element analysis software. The finite element model of the CNT is con- structed, appropriate boundary conditions are applied and the behavior of mechanical properties of CNT is studied. Keywords. Molecular mechanics; single wall carbon nanotube; ...

  4. A Computational Experiment on Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Scott; Lonie, David C.; Chen, Jiechen; Zurek, Eva

    2013-01-01

    A computational experiment that investigates single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) has been developed and employed in an upper-level undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory course. Computations were carried out to determine the electronic structure, radial breathing modes, and the influence of the nanotube's diameter on the…

  5. A new method of preparing single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A novel method of purification for single-walled carbon nanotubes, prepared by an arc-discharge method, is described. The method involves a combination of acid washing followed by high temperature hydrogen treatment to remove the metal nanoparticles and amorphous carbon present in the as-synthesized singlewalled ...

  6. Phonon and thermal properties of achiral single wall carbon ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A detailed theoretical study of the phonon and thermal properties of achiral single wall carbon nanotubes has been carried out using force constant model considering up to third nearest-neighbor interactions. We have calculated the phonon dispersions, density of states, radial breathing modes (RBM) and the specific heats ...

  7. Transient reflectivity on vertically aligned single-wall carbon nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galimberti, Gianluca; Ponzoni, Stefano; Ferrini, Gabriele; Hofmann, Stephan; Arshad, Muhammad; Cepek, Cinzia; Pagliara, Stefania

    2013-01-01

    One-color transient reflectivity measurements are carried out on two different samples of vertically aligned single-wall carbon nanotube bundles and compared with the response recently published on unaligned bundles. The negative sign of the optical response for both samples indicates that the free

  8. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy of suspended single-wall carbon nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LeRoy, B.J.; Lemay, S.G.; Kong, J.; Dekker, C.

    2004-01-01

    We have performed low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy measurements on single-wall carbon nanotubes that are freely suspended over a trench. The nanotubes were grown by chemical vapor deposition on a Pt substrate with predefined trenches etched into it. Atomic resolution was obtained on the

  9. Intrinsic electrochemical activity of single walled carbon nanotube–Nafion assemblies

    OpenAIRE

    Snowden, Michael E.; Edwards, Martin A.; Rudd, Nicola C.; Macpherson, Julie V.; Unwin, Patrick R.

    2013-01-01

    The intrinsic electrochemical properties and activity of single walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) network electrodes modified by a drop-cast Nafion film have been determined using the one electron oxidation of ferrocene trimethyl ammonium (FcTMA+) as a model redox probe in the Nafion film. Facilitated by the very low transport coefficient of FcTMA+ in Nafion (apparent diffusion coefficient of 1.8 × 10−10 cm2 s−1), SWNTs in the 2-D network behave as individual elements, at short (practical) times,...

  10. Statistical properties of random clique networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yi-Min; Meng, Jun; Fan, Jing-Fang; Ye, Fang-Fu; Chen, Xiao-Song

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, a random clique network model to mimic the large clustering coefficient and the modular structure that exist in many real complex networks, such as social networks, artificial networks, and protein interaction networks, is introduced by combining the random selection rule of the Erdös and Rényi (ER) model and the concept of cliques. We find that random clique networks having a small average degree differ from the ER network in that they have a large clustering coefficient and a power law clustering spectrum, while networks having a high average degree have similar properties as the ER model. In addition, we find that the relation between the clustering coefficient and the average degree shows a non-monotonic behavior and that the degree distributions can be fit by multiple Poisson curves; we explain the origin of such novel behaviors and degree distributions.

  11. Selective detection of SO2 at room temperature based on organoplatinum functionalized single-walled carbon nanotube field effect transistors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cid, C.C.; Jimenez-Cadena, G.; Riu, J.; Maroto, A.; Rius, F.X.; Batema, G.D.; van Koten, G.

    2009-01-01

    We report a field effect transistor (FET) based on a network of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) that for the first time can selectively detect a single gaseous molecule in air by chemically functionalizing the SWCNTs with a selective molecular receptor. As a target model we used SO2. The

  12. Topological properties of random wireless networks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wireless networks in which the node locations are random are best modelled as random geometric graphs (RGGs). In addition to their extensive application in the modelling of wireless networks, RGGs find many new applications and are being studied in their own right. In this paper we first provide a brief introduction to the ...

  13. RMBNToolbox: random models for biochemical networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niemi Jari

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is an increasing interest to model biochemical and cell biological networks, as well as to the computational analysis of these models. The development of analysis methodologies and related software is rapid in the field. However, the number of available models is still relatively small and the model sizes remain limited. The lack of kinetic information is usually the limiting factor for the construction of detailed simulation models. Results We present a computational toolbox for generating random biochemical network models which mimic real biochemical networks. The toolbox is called Random Models for Biochemical Networks. The toolbox works in the Matlab environment, and it makes it possible to generate various network structures, stoichiometries, kinetic laws for reactions, and parameters therein. The generation can be based on statistical rules and distributions, and more detailed information of real biochemical networks can be used in situations where it is known. The toolbox can be easily extended. The resulting network models can be exported in the format of Systems Biology Markup Language. Conclusion While more information is accumulating on biochemical networks, random networks can be used as an intermediate step towards their better understanding. Random networks make it possible to study the effects of various network characteristics to the overall behavior of the network. Moreover, the construction of artificial network models provides the ground truth data needed in the validation of various computational methods in the fields of parameter estimation and data analysis.

  14. Thermodynamics of random reaction networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob Fischer

    Full Text Available Reaction networks are useful for analyzing reaction systems occurring in chemistry, systems biology, or Earth system science. Despite the importance of thermodynamic disequilibrium for many of those systems, the general thermodynamic properties of reaction networks are poorly understood. To circumvent the problem of sparse thermodynamic data, we generate artificial reaction networks and investigate their non-equilibrium steady state for various boundary fluxes. We generate linear and nonlinear networks using four different complex network models (Erdős-Rényi, Barabási-Albert, Watts-Strogatz, Pan-Sinha and compare their topological properties with real reaction networks. For similar boundary conditions the steady state flow through the linear networks is about one order of magnitude higher than the flow through comparable nonlinear networks. In all networks, the flow decreases with the distance between the inflow and outflow boundary species, with Watts-Strogatz networks showing a significantly smaller slope compared to the three other network types. The distribution of entropy production of the individual reactions inside the network follows a power law in the intermediate region with an exponent of circa -1.5 for linear and -1.66 for nonlinear networks. An elevated entropy production rate is found in reactions associated with weakly connected species. This effect is stronger in nonlinear networks than in the linear ones. Increasing the flow through the nonlinear networks also increases the number of cycles and leads to a narrower distribution of chemical potentials. We conclude that the relation between distribution of dissipation, network topology and strength of disequilibrium is nontrivial and can be studied systematically by artificial reaction networks.

  15. Thermodynamics of Random Reaction Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Jakob; Kleidon, Axel; Dittrich, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Reaction networks are useful for analyzing reaction systems occurring in chemistry, systems biology, or Earth system science. Despite the importance of thermodynamic disequilibrium for many of those systems, the general thermodynamic properties of reaction networks are poorly understood. To circumvent the problem of sparse thermodynamic data, we generate artificial reaction networks and investigate their non-equilibrium steady state for various boundary fluxes. We generate linear and nonlinear networks using four different complex network models (Erdős-Rényi, Barabási-Albert, Watts-Strogatz, Pan-Sinha) and compare their topological properties with real reaction networks. For similar boundary conditions the steady state flow through the linear networks is about one order of magnitude higher than the flow through comparable nonlinear networks. In all networks, the flow decreases with the distance between the inflow and outflow boundary species, with Watts-Strogatz networks showing a significantly smaller slope compared to the three other network types. The distribution of entropy production of the individual reactions inside the network follows a power law in the intermediate region with an exponent of circa −1.5 for linear and −1.66 for nonlinear networks. An elevated entropy production rate is found in reactions associated with weakly connected species. This effect is stronger in nonlinear networks than in the linear ones. Increasing the flow through the nonlinear networks also increases the number of cycles and leads to a narrower distribution of chemical potentials. We conclude that the relation between distribution of dissipation, network topology and strength of disequilibrium is nontrivial and can be studied systematically by artificial reaction networks. PMID:25723751

  16. Assessing the pulmonary toxicity of single-walled carbon nanohorns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynch, Rachel M [ORNL; Voy, Brynn H [ORNL; Glass-Mattie, Dana F [ORNL; Mahurin, Shannon Mark [ORNL; Saxton, Arnold [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Donnel, Robert L. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Cheng, Mengdawn [ORNL

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) may be pose a pulmonary hazard. We investigated the pulmonary toxicity of single-walled carbon nanohorns (SWCNHs), a relatively new carbon-based nanomaterial that is structurally similar to SWCNTs. Mice were exposed to 30 g of surfactant-suspended SWCNHs by pharyngeal aspiration and sacrificed 24 hours or 7 days post exposure. Total and differential cell counts and cytokine analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid demonstrated a mild inflammatory response which was mitigated by day 7 post exposure. Whole lung microarray analysis demonstrated that SWCNH-exposure did not lead to robust changes in gene expression. Finally, histological analysis showed no evidence of granuloma formation or fibrosis following SWCNH aspiration. These combined results suggest that SWCNH is a relatively innocuous nanomaterial when delivered to mice in vivo using aspiration as a delivery mechanism.

  17. Assessing the pulmonary toxicity of single-walled carbon nanohorns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynch, Rachel M [ORNL; Voy, Brynn H [ORNL; Glass-Mattie, Dana F [ORNL; Mahurin, Shannon Mark [ORNL; Saxton, Arnold [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Donnel, Robert L. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Cheng, Mengdawn [ORNL

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) may pose a pulmonary hazard. We investigated the pulmonary toxicity of single-walled carbon nanohorns (SWCNHs), a relatively new carbon-based nanomaterial that is structurally similar to SWCNTs. Mice were exposed to 30 {micro}g of surfactant-suspended SWCNHs or an equal volume of vehicle control by pharyngeal aspiration and sacrificed 24 hours or 7 days post-exposure. Total and differential cell counts and cytokine analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid demonstrated a mild inflammatory response which was mitigated by day 7 post-exposure. Whole lung microarray analysis demonstrated that SWCNH-exposure did not lead to robust changes in gene expression. Finally, histological analysis showed no evidence of granuloma formation or fibrosis following SWCNH aspiration. These combined results suggest that SWCNH is a relatively innocuous nanomaterial when delivered to mice in vivo using aspiration as a delivery mechanism.

  18. Electrochemical hydrogen storage in single-walled carbon nanotube paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Z P; Ng, S H; Wang, J Z; Huang, Z G; Liu, H K; Too, C O; Wallace, G G

    2006-03-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) papers were successfully prepared by dispersing SWNTs in Triton X-100 solution, then filtered by PVDF membrane (0.22 microm pore size). The electrochemical behavior and the reversible hydrogen storage capacity of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) papers have been investigated in alkaline electrolytic solutions (6 N KOH) by cyclic voltammetry, linear micropolarization, and constant current charge/discharge measurements. The effect of thickness and the addition of carbon black on hydrogen adsorption/desorption were also investigated. It was found that the electrochemical charge-discharge mechanism occurring in SWNT paper electrodes is somewhere between that of carbon nanotubes (physical process) and that of metal hydride electrodes (chemical process), and consists of a charge-transfer reaction (Reduction/Oxidation) and a diffusion step (Diffusion).

  19. Thermogravimetric Analysis of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arepalli, Sivram; Nikolaev, Pavel; Gorelik, Olga

    2010-01-01

    An improved protocol for thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) of samples of single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) material has been developed to increase the degree of consistency among results so that meaningful comparisons can be made among different samples. This improved TGA protocol is suitable for incorporation into the protocol for characterization of carbon nanotube material. In most cases, TGA of carbon nanotube materials is performed in gas mixtures that contain oxygen at various concentrations. The improved protocol is summarized.

  20. Production of single-walled carbon nanotube grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauge, Robert H; Xu, Ya-Qiong; Pheasant, Sean

    2013-12-03

    A method of forming a nanotube grid includes placing a plurality of catalyst nanoparticles on a grid framework, contacting the catalyst nanoparticles with a gas mixture that includes hydrogen and a carbon source in a reaction chamber, forming an activated gas from the gas mixture, heating the grid framework and activated gas, and controlling a growth time to generate a single-wall carbon nanotube array radially about the grid framework. A filter membrane may be produced by this method.

  1. Titanium dioxide, single-walled carbon nanotube composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yuan; Li, Gonghu; Gray, Kimberly; Lueptow, Richard M.

    2015-07-14

    The present invention provides titanium dioxide/single-walled carbon nanotube composites (TiO.sub.2/SWCNTs), articles of manufacture, and methods of making and using such composites. In certain embodiments, the present invention provides membrane filters and ceramic articles that are coated with TiO.sub.2/SWCNT composite material. In other embodiments, the present invention provides methods of using TiO.sub.2/SWCNT composite material to purify a sample, such as a water or air sample.

  2. Random walk centrality for temporal networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Luis E. C.; Masuda, Naoki

    2014-06-01

    Nodes can be ranked according to their relative importance within a network. Ranking algorithms based on random walks are particularly useful because they connect topological and diffusive properties of the network. Previous methods based on random walks, for example the PageRank, have focused on static structures. However, several realistic networks are indeed dynamic, meaning that their structure changes in time. In this paper, we propose a centrality measure for temporal networks based on random walks under periodic boundary conditions that we call TempoRank. It is known that, in static networks, the stationary density of the random walk is proportional to the degree or the strength of a node. In contrast, we find that, in temporal networks, the stationary density is proportional to the in-strength of the so-called effective network, a weighted and directed network explicitly constructed from the original sequence of transition matrices. The stationary density also depends on the sojourn probability q, which regulates the tendency of the walker to stay in the node, and on the temporal resolution of the data. We apply our method to human interaction networks and show that although it is important for a node to be connected to another node with many random walkers (one of the principles of the PageRank) at the right moment, this effect is negligible in practice when the time order of link activation is included.

  3. Cross over of recurrence networks to random graphs and random ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-01-27

    Jan 27, 2017 ... analysis based on net theoretic measures has developed into a major field, .... with the value of the scaling index γ falling between 2 and 3. To compute the network measures, we first construct an ensemble of synthetic networks, both random and ... higher k values are present to maintain the same γ. In both.

  4. Modelling complex networks by random hierarchical graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.Wróbel

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Numerous complex networks contain special patterns, called network motifs. These are specific subgraphs, which occur oftener than in randomized networks of Erdős-Rényi type. We choose one of them, the triangle, and build a family of random hierarchical graphs, being Sierpiński gasket-based graphs with random "decorations". We calculate the important characteristics of these graphs - average degree, average shortest path length, small-world graph family characteristics. They depend on probability of decorations. We analyze the Ising model on our graphs and describe its critical properties using a renormalization-group technique.

  5. Electronic Durability of Flexible Transparent Films from Type-Specific Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, J; Iyer, S; Bernhardt, A; Huh, JY; Hudson, S; Fagan, J; Hobbie, E.

    2011-12-11

    The coupling between mechanical flexibility and electronic performance is evaluated for thin films of metallic and semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) deposited on compliant supports. Percolated networks of type-purified SWCNTs are assembled as thin conducting coatings on elastic polymer substrates, and the sheet resistance is measured as a function of compression and cyclic strain through impedance spectroscopy. The wrinkling topography, microstructure and transparency of the films are independently characterized using optical microscopy, electron microscopy, and optical absorption spectroscopy. Thin films made from metallic SWCNTs show better durability as flexible transparent conductive coatings, which we attribute to a combination of superior mechanical performance and higher interfacial conductivity.

  6. Identification of nitrogen dopants in single-walled carbon nanotubes by scanning tunneling microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tison, Yann; Lin, Hong; Lagoute, Jérôme; Repain, Vincent; Chacon, Cyril; Girard, Yann; Rousset, Sylvie; Henrard, Luc; Zheng, Bing; Susi, Toma; Kauppinen, Esko I; Ducastelle, François; Loiseau, Annick

    2013-08-27

    Using scanning tunnelling microscopy and spectroscopy, we investigated the atomic and electronic structure of nitrogen-doped single walled carbon nanotubes synthesized by chemical vapor deposition. The insertion of nitrogen in the carbon lattice induces several types of point defects involving different atomic configurations. Spectroscopic measurements on semiconducting nanotubes reveal that these local structures can induce either extended shallow levels or more localized deep levels. In a metallic tube, a single doping site associated with a donor state was observed in the gap at an energy close to that of the first van Hove singularity. Density functional theory calculations reveal that this feature corresponds to a substitutional nitrogen atom in the carbon network.

  7. Exploring complex networks through random walks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Luciano da Fontoura; Travieso, Gonzalo

    2007-01-01

    Most real complex networks--such as protein interactions, social contacts, and the Internet--are only partially known and available to us. While the process of exploring such networks in many cases resembles a random walk, it becomes a key issue to investigate and characterize how effectively the nodes and edges of such networks can be covered by different strategies. At the same time, it is critically important to infer how well can topological measurements such as the average node degree and average clustering coefficient be estimated during such network explorations. The present article addresses these problems by considering random, Barabási-Albert (BA), and geographical network models with varying connectivity explored by three types of random walks: traditional, preferential to untracked edges, and preferential to unvisited nodes. A series of relevant results are obtained, including the fact that networks of the three studied models with the same size and average node degree allow similar node and edge coverage efficiency, the identification of linear scaling with the size of the network of the random walk step at which a given percentage of the nodes/edges is covered, and the critical result that the estimation of the averaged node degree and clustering coefficient by random walks on BA networks often leads to heavily biased results. Many are the theoretical and practical implications of such results.

  8. Exploring biological network structure with clustered random networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bansal Shweta

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complex biological systems are often modeled as networks of interacting units. Networks of biochemical interactions among proteins, epidemiological contacts among hosts, and trophic interactions in ecosystems, to name a few, have provided useful insights into the dynamical processes that shape and traverse these systems. The degrees of nodes (numbers of interactions and the extent of clustering (the tendency for a set of three nodes to be interconnected are two of many well-studied network properties that can fundamentally shape a system. Disentangling the interdependent effects of the various network properties, however, can be difficult. Simple network models can help us quantify the structure of empirical networked systems and understand the impact of various topological properties on dynamics. Results Here we develop and implement a new Markov chain simulation algorithm to generate simple, connected random graphs that have a specified degree sequence and level of clustering, but are random in all other respects. The implementation of the algorithm (ClustRNet: Clustered Random Networks provides the generation of random graphs optimized according to a local or global, and relative or absolute measure of clustering. We compare our algorithm to other similar methods and show that ours more successfully produces desired network characteristics. Finding appropriate null models is crucial in bioinformatics research, and is often difficult, particularly for biological networks. As we demonstrate, the networks generated by ClustRNet can serve as random controls when investigating the impacts of complex network features beyond the byproduct of degree and clustering in empirical networks. Conclusion ClustRNet generates ensembles of graphs of specified edge structure and clustering. These graphs allow for systematic study of the impacts of connectivity and redundancies on network function and dynamics. This process is a key step in

  9. Exploring biological network structure with clustered random networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Shweta; Khandelwal, Shashank; Meyers, Lauren Ancel

    2009-12-09

    Complex biological systems are often modeled as networks of interacting units. Networks of biochemical interactions among proteins, epidemiological contacts among hosts, and trophic interactions in ecosystems, to name a few, have provided useful insights into the dynamical processes that shape and traverse these systems. The degrees of nodes (numbers of interactions) and the extent of clustering (the tendency for a set of three nodes to be interconnected) are two of many well-studied network properties that can fundamentally shape a system. Disentangling the interdependent effects of the various network properties, however, can be difficult. Simple network models can help us quantify the structure of empirical networked systems and understand the impact of various topological properties on dynamics. Here we develop and implement a new Markov chain simulation algorithm to generate simple, connected random graphs that have a specified degree sequence and level of clustering, but are random in all other respects. The implementation of the algorithm (ClustRNet: Clustered Random Networks) provides the generation of random graphs optimized according to a local or global, and relative or absolute measure of clustering. We compare our algorithm to other similar methods and show that ours more successfully produces desired network characteristics.Finding appropriate null models is crucial in bioinformatics research, and is often difficult, particularly for biological networks. As we demonstrate, the networks generated by ClustRNet can serve as random controls when investigating the impacts of complex network features beyond the byproduct of degree and clustering in empirical networks. ClustRNet generates ensembles of graphs of specified edge structure and clustering. These graphs allow for systematic study of the impacts of connectivity and redundancies on network function and dynamics. This process is a key step in unraveling the functional consequences of the structural

  10. On the dynamics of random neuronal networks

    OpenAIRE

    Robert, Philippe; Touboul, Jonathan D.

    2014-01-01

    We study the mean-field limit and stationary distributions of a pulse-coupled network modeling the dynamics of a large neuronal assemblies. Our model takes into account explicitly the intrinsic randomness of firing times, contrasting with the classical integrate-and-fire model. The ergodicity properties of the Markov process associated to finite networks are investigated. We derive the limit in distribution of the sample path of the state of a neuron of the network when its size gets large. T...

  11. Improvements in Production of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balzano, Leandro; Resasco, Daniel E.

    2009-01-01

    A continuing program of research and development has been directed toward improvement of a prior batch process in which single-walled carbon nanotubes are formed by catalytic disproportionation of carbon monoxide in a fluidized-bed reactor. The overall effect of the improvements has been to make progress toward converting the process from a batch mode to a continuous mode and to scaling of production to larger quantities. Efforts have also been made to optimize associated purification and dispersion post processes to make them effective at large scales and to investigate means of incorporating the purified products into composite materials. The ultimate purpose of the program is to enable the production of high-quality single-walled carbon nanotubes in quantities large enough and at costs low enough to foster the further development of practical applications. The fluidized bed used in this process contains mixed-metal catalyst particles. The choice of the catalyst and the operating conditions is such that the yield of single-walled carbon nanotubes, relative to all forms of carbon (including carbon fibers, multi-walled carbon nanotubes, and graphite) produced in the disproportionation reaction is more than 90 weight percent. After the reaction, the nanotubes are dispersed in various solvents in preparation for end use, which typically involves blending into a plastic, ceramic, or other matrix to form a composite material. Notwithstanding the batch nature of the unmodified prior fluidized-bed process, the fluidized-bed reactor operates in a continuous mode during the process. The operation is almost entirely automated, utilizing mass flow controllers, a control computer running software specific to the process, and other equipment. Moreover, an important inherent advantage of fluidized- bed reactors in general is that solid particles can be added to and removed from fluidized beds during operation. For these reasons, the process and equipment were amenable to

  12. Metal-doped single-walled carbon nanotubes and production thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, Anne C.; Heben, Michael J.; Gennett, Thomas; Parilla, Philip A.

    2007-01-09

    Metal-doped single-walled carbon nanotubes and production thereof. The metal-doped single-walled carbon nanotubes may be produced according to one embodiment of the invention by combining single-walled carbon nanotube precursor material and metal in a solution, and mixing the solution to incorporate at least a portion of the metal with the single-walled carbon nanotube precursor material. Other embodiments may comprise sputter deposition, evaporation, and other mixing techniques.

  13. Crystallization and mechanical properties of functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes/polyvinylidene fluoride composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Jing; Iftekharul Haque, Rubaiyet; Larsen, Mikael

    2012-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes were purified and functionalized by nitric acid and octadecylamine. Raman and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were used to characterize the functionalization of the single-walled carbon nanotubes. Polyvinylidene flouride nanocomposites containing 1 wt......% purified or functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes were prepared by solution blending and injection molding. The dispersion of different carbon nanotubes in dimethylformamide and in polyvinylidene flouride has been investigated. Mechanical properties show that adding single-walled carbon nanotubes...

  14. Zinc oxide catalyzed growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao Fenglei, E-mail: jsxzgfl@sina.com [Nanomaterials and Chemistry Key Laboratory, Wenzhou University, Wenzhou 325027 (China); Zhang Lijie; Huang Shaoming [Nanomaterials and Chemistry Key Laboratory, Wenzhou University, Wenzhou 325027 (China)

    2010-02-01

    We demonstrate that zinc oxide can catalyze the growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with high efficiency by a chemical vapor deposition process. The zinc oxide nanocatalysts, prepared using a diblock copolymer templating method and characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM), were uniformly spaced over a large deposition area with an average diameter of 1.7 nm and narrow size distribution. Dense and uniform SWNTs films with high quality were obtained by using a zinc oxide catalyst, as characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Raman spectroscopy, AFM, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM).

  15. Investigation of Chirality Selection Mechanism of Single Walled Carbon Nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-13

    ALD) followed by coating with a 1-nm-thick Fe thin film by e-beam evaporation. The substrates were cut into small pieces in the dimensions of about...60 keV at Korea Multi-Purpose Accelerator Complex. The dose of Fe+ ion was 1016/cm2. As a control sample, 1 nm- thin Fe film was deposited on a...research involved investigation of two fundamental mechanisms of carbon nanotube (CNT) growth: chirality selection of single-walled CNT (SWCNT) and

  16. Growth of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes by Plasma CVD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiaki Kato

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent research in plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD for single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT growth has achieved low-temperature synthesis, individually freestanding formation, and structure control of diameter, chirality, and length. Detailed growth kinetics of SWNTs are revealed using a combination of techniques for plasma control and nanomaterial analysis. Plasma CVD also allows tube metallicity to be controlled by tuning the mean diameter of SWNTs. This plasma CVD progress contributes to the next stage of nanotube fabrication, which is required for practical use of SWNTs in a variety of applications.

  17. Single Wall Nanotube Type-Specific Functionalization and Separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boul, Peter; Nikolaev, Pavel; Sosa, Edward; Arepalli, Sivaram; Yowell, Leonard

    2008-01-01

    Metallic single-wall carbon nanotubes were selectively solubilized in THF and separated from semiconducting nanotubes. Once separated, the functionalized metallic tubes were de-functionalized to restore their metallic band structure. Absorption and Raman spectroscopy of the enriched samples support conclusions of the enrichment of nanotube samples by metallic type. A scalable method for enriching nanotube conductive type has been developed. Raman and UV-Vis data indicate SWCNT reaction with dodecylbenzenediazonium results in metallic enrichment. It is expected that further refinement of this techniques will lead to more dramatic separations of types and diameters.

  18. "Zero-dimensional" single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamalasanan, Kaladhar; Gottardi, Riccardo; Tan, Susheng; Chen, Yanan; Godugu, Bhaskar; Rothstein, Sam; Balazs, Anna C; Star, Alexander; Little, Steven R

    2013-10-18

    The shorter, the more dispersible: An iterative, emulsion-based shortening technique has been used to reduce the length of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) to the same order of magnitude as their diameter (ca. 1 nm), thus achieving an effectively "zero-dimensional" structure with improved dispersibility and, after hydroxylation, long-term water solubility. Finally, zero-dimensional SWNTs were positively identified using mass spectrometry for the first time. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Bipartite quantum states and random complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnerone, Silvano; Giorda, Paolo; Zanardi, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a mapping between graphs and pure quantum bipartite states and show that the associated entanglement entropy conveys non-trivial information about the structure of the graph. Our primary goal is to investigate the family of random graphs known as complex networks. In the case of classical random graphs, we derive an analytic expression for the averaged entanglement entropy \\bar S while for general complex networks we rely on numerics. For a large number of nodes n we find a scaling \\bar {S} \\sim c log n +g_{ {e}} where both the prefactor c and the sub-leading O(1) term ge are characteristic of the different classes of complex networks. In particular, ge encodes topological features of the graphs and is named network topological entropy. Our results suggest that quantum entanglement may provide a powerful tool for the analysis of large complex networks with non-trivial topological properties.

  20. Dynamic regimes of random fuzzy logic networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wittmann, Dominik M; Theis, Fabian J, E-mail: dominik.wittmann@helmholtz-muenchen.de [Computational Modeling in Biology, Institute for Bioinformatics and Systems Biology, Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen-German Research Center for Environmental Health, Ingolstaedter Landstrasse 1, 85764 Munich-Neuherberg (Germany); Centre for Mathematical Sciences, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Boltzmannstrasse 3, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2011-01-15

    Random multistate networks, generalizations of the Boolean Kauffman networks, are generic models for complex systems of interacting agents. Depending on their mean connectivity, these networks exhibit ordered as well as chaotic behavior with a critical boundary separating both regimes. Typically, the nodes of these networks are assigned single discrete states. Here, we describe nodes by fuzzy numbers, i.e. vectors of degree-of-membership (DOM) functions specifying the degree to which the nodes are in each of their discrete states. This allows our models to deal with imprecision and uncertainties. Compatible update rules are constructed by expressing the update rules of the multistate network in terms of Boolean operators and generalizing them to fuzzy logic (FL) operators. The standard choice for these generalizations is the Goedel FL, where AND and OR are replaced by the minimum and maximum of two DOMs, respectively. In mean-field approximations we are able to analytically describe the percolation and asymptotic distribution of DOMs in random Goedel FL networks. This allows us to characterize the different dynamic regimes of random multistate networks in terms of FL. In a low-dimensional example, we provide explicit computations and validate our mean-field results by showing that they agree well with network simulations.

  1. Single-Walled Carbon Nanohorns for Energy Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhichao Zhang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available With the growth of the global economy and population, the demand for energy is increasing sharply. The development of environmentally a benign and reliable energy supply is very important and urgent. Single-walled carbon nanohorns (SWCNHs, which have a horn-shaped tip at the top of single-walled nanotube, have emerged as exceptionally promising nanomaterials due to their unique physical and chemical properties since 1999. The high purity and thermal stability, combined with microporosity and mesoporosity, high surface area, internal pore accessibility, and multiform functionalization make SWCNHs promising candidates in many applications, such as environment restoration, gas storage, catalyst support or catalyst, electrochemical biosensors, drug carrier systems, magnetic resonance analysis and so on. The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of SWCNHs in energy applications, including energy conversion and storage. The commonly adopted method to access SWCNHs, their structural modifications, and their basic properties are included, and the emphasis is on their application in different devices such as fuel cells, dye-sensitized solar cells, supercapacitors, Li-ion batteries, Li-S batteries, hydrogen storage, biofuel cells and so forth. Finally, a perspective on SWCNHs’ application in energy is presented.

  2. Photophysics of covalently functionalized single wall carbon nanotubes with verteporfin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staicu, Angela; Smarandache, Adriana; Pascu, Alexandru; Pascu, Mihail Lucian

    2017-09-01

    Covalently functionalized single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) with the photosensitizer verteporfin (VP) were synthesized and studied. Photophysical properties of the obtained compounds like optical absorption, laser-induced fluorescence and generated singlet oxygen were investigated. In order to highlight the features of the conjugated compound, its photophysical characteristics were compared with those of the mixtures of the initial components. The optical absorption data evidenced a compound that combines features of the primary SWCNTs and VP. This is the also the case of the laser induced fluorescence of the synthesized product. Moreover, fluorescence quantum yield (Φf) of the compound (Φf = 2.4%) is smaller than for the mixture of SWCNT and VP in (Φf = 3.2%). The behavior is expected, because linked VP (carrying the fluorescent moiety) transfers easier a part of its excitation energy to the SWCNT in the covalent structure. Relative to the quantum yield of singlet oxygen generation (ΦΔ) by Methylene Blue, it was found that the ΦΔ for the conjugated VP-SWCNT is 51% while for the mixture ΦΔ is 23%. The results indicate covalently functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes with verteporfin as potential compounds of interest in targeted drug delivery and photodynamic therapy.

  3. Alignment enhanced photoconductivity in single wall carbon nanotube films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ye; Lu, Shaoxin; Panchapakesan, Balaji

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we report, for the first time, the alignment enhanced photoconductivity of single wall carbon nanotube films upon laser illumination. The photoconductivity exhibited an increase, decrease or even 'negative' values when the laser spot was on different positions between contact electrodes, showing a 'position' dependent photoconductivity of partially aligned films of carbon nanotubes. Photon induced charge carrier generation in single wall carbon nanotubes and subsequent charge separation across the metal-carbon nanotube contacts is believed to cause the photoconductivity changes. A net photovoltage of ~4 mV and a photocurrent of ~10 µA were produced under the laser intensity of ~273 mW with a quantum efficiency of ~7.8% in vacuum. The photocurrent was observed to be in the direction of nanotube alignment. Finally, there was a strong dependence of the polarization of the incident light on the photocurrent and the orientation of the films influenced the dynamics of the rise and fall of the photocurrent. All of these phenomena clearly have significance in the area of design and fabrication of solar cells, micro-opto-mechanical systems and photodetectors based on carbon nanotubes.

  4. High-performance thin-film-transistors based on semiconducting-enriched single-walled carbon nanotubes processed by electrical-breakdown strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aïssa, B., E-mail: aissab@emt.inrs.ca [Centre Énergie, Matériaux et Télécommunications, INRS, 1650, boulevard Lionel-Boulet, Varennes, Quebec J3X 1S2 (Canada); Qatar Environment and Energy Research Institute (QEERI), Qatar Foundation, P.O. Box 5825, Doha (Qatar); Nedil, M. [Telebec Wireless Underground Communication Laboratory, UQAT, 675, 1" è" r" e Avenue, Val d’Or, Québec J9P 1Y3 (Canada); Habib, M.A. [Computer Sciences and Engineering Department, Yanbu University College, P.O. Box 30031 (Saudi Arabia); Abdul-Hafidh, E.H. [High Energy Physics Department, Yanbu University College, P.O. Box 30031 (Saudi Arabia); Rosei, F. [Centre Énergie, Matériaux et Télécommunications, INRS, 1650, boulevard Lionel-Boulet, Varennes, Quebec J3X 1S2 (Canada)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • We selectively burn metallic single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) by electrical breakdown. • We successfully achieve a semiconducting enriched-SWCNT in TFT configuration. • High performance, like On/Off of 10{sup 5} and a subthreshold swing of 165 mV/decades were obtained. • After PMMA coating, the SWCNT–TFTs were found stables for more than 4 months. - Abstract: Over the past two decades, among remarkable variety of nanomaterials, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) remain the most intriguing and uniquely well suited materials for applications in high-performance electronics. The most advanced technologies require the ability to form purely semiconducting SWCNTs. Here, we report on our strategy based on the well known progressive electrical breakdown process that offer this capability and serves as highly efficient means for selectively removing metallic carbon nanotubes from electronically heterogeneous random networks, deposited on silicon substrates in a thin film transistor (TFT) configuration. We demonstrate the successful achievement of semiconducting enriched-SWCNT networks in TFT scheme that reach On/Off switching ratios of ∼100,000, on-conductance of 20 μS, and a subthreshold swing of less than 165 mV/decades. The obtained TFT devices were then protected with thin film poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) to keep the percolation level of the SWCNTs network spatially and temporally stable, while protecting it from atmosphere exchanges. TFT devices were found to be air-stable and maintained their excellent characteristics in ambient atmosphere for more than 4 months. This approach could work as a platform for future nanotube-based nanoelectronics.

  5. Random walk centrality in interconnected multilayer networks

    CERN Document Server

    Solé-Ribalta, Albert; Gómez, Sergio; Arenas, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Real-world complex systems exhibit multiple levels of relationships. In many cases they require to be modeled as interconnected multilayer networks, characterizing interactions of several types simultaneously. It is of crucial importance in many fields, from economics to biology and from urban planning to social sciences, to identify the most (or the less) influential nodes in a network using centrality measures. However, defining the centrality of actors in interconnected complex networks is not trivial. In this paper, we rely on the tensorial formalism recently proposed to characterize and investigate this kind of complex topologies, and extend two well known random walk centrality measures, the random walk betweenness and closeness centrality, to interconnected multilayer networks. For each of the measures we provide analytical expressions that completely agree with numerically results.

  6. A terahertz performance of hybrid single walled CNT based amplifier with analytical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Song, Hanjung

    2018-01-01

    This work is focuses on terahertz performance of hybrid single walled carbon nanotube (CNT) based amplifier and proposed for measurement of soil parameters application. The proposed circuit topology provides hybrid structure which achieves wide impedance bandwidth of 0.33 THz within range of 1.07-THz to 1.42-THz with fractional amount of 28%. The single walled RF CNT network executes proposed ambition and proves its ability to resonant at 1.25-THz with analytical approach. Moreover, a RF based microstrip transmission line radiator used as compensator in the circuit topology which achieves more than 30 dB of gain. A proper methodology is chosen for achieves stability at circuit level in order to obtain desired optimal conditions. The fundamental approach optimizes matched impedance condition at (50+j0) Ω and noise variation with impact of series resistances for the proposed hybrid circuit topology and demonstrates the accuracy of performance parameters at the circuit level. The chip fabrication of the proposed circuit by using RF based commercial CMOS process of 45 nm which reveals promising results with simulation one. Additionally, power measurement analysis achieves highest output power of 26 dBm with power added efficiency of 78%. The succeed minimum noise figure from 0.6 dB to 0.4 dB is outstanding achievement for circuit topology at terahertz range. The chip area of hybrid circuit is 0.65 mm2 and power consumption of 9.6 mW.

  7. Polypyrrole-Functionalized Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Gas Sensor Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakoullis, James, Jr.

    The overall objective of this work is to fabricate and evaluate polypyrrole-single-walled carbon nanotubes hybrid structures based chemiresistive sensor arrays for sensitive, selective and discriminative sensing at room temperature of emissions from automobiles and industrial manufacturing. To conceive the sensor arrays single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) networks were aligned to bridge a 3 mum gap between a pair of prefabricated microelectrodes followed by coating with polypyrrole (PPY) with different dopants by electrochemical polymerization. Initially, the sensor¡¦s synthesis conditions in terms of PPY thickness on SWNTs networks by varying the electropolymerization charge of the monomer pyrrole in presence of LiClO4 dopant for the sensing of NH3 was optimized. Using the optimized polymerization charge of 1 muC determined previously, arrays of SWNTs-PPY hybrid sensors were fabricated by replacing dopant LiClO4 by L-camphor sulfonic acid, D-camphor sulfonic acid, p-toluene sulfonic acid and sodium dodecyl sulfonate. Room temperature gas sensing performance of the PPY coated SWNTs network arrays to gases of environmental significance such as NH3, NO 2, H2S, SO2, CO and CO2 and volatile organic compounds such as benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene, p-xylene, methanol, n-hexane and acetone and humidity, was evaluated. Several folds enhancement in sensing performance was observed towards all the tested analytesfor hybrid devices when compared to bare SWNTs network devices. Differences in sensing performance were noticed for PPY coating with different dopants demonstrating the potential of using the array for discrimination of the tested analytes in a mixture by using chemometric techniques. The underlying sensing mechanism was also investigated by using the devices in chemFET mode configuration.

  8. Molecular Imaging with Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Hao; Gao, Ting; Cai, Weibo

    2011-01-01

    Nanoparticle-based molecular imaging has emerged as an interdisciplinary field which involves physics, chemistry, engineering, biology, and medicine. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have unique properties which make them suitable for applications in a variety of imaging modalities, such as magnetic resonance, near-infrared fluorescence, Raman spectroscopy, photoacoustic tomography, and radionuclide-based imaging. In this review, we will summarize the current state-of-the-art of SWCNTs in molecular imaging applications. Multifunctionality is the key advantage of nanoparticles over traditional approaches. Targeting ligands, imaging labels, therapeutic drugs, and many other agents can all be integrated into the nanoparticle to allow for targeted molecular imaging and molecular therapy by encompassing many biological and biophysical barriers. A multifunctional, SWCNT-based nanoplatform holds great potential for clinical applications in the future. PMID:21754949

  9. Review of Electronics Based on Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yu; Cong, Sen; Cao, Xuan; Wu, Fanqi; Liu, Qingzhou; Amer, Moh R; Zhou, Chongwu

    2017-08-14

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are extremely promising materials for building next-generation electronics due to their unique physical and electronic properties. In this article, we will review the research efforts and achievements of SWNTs in three electronic fields, namely analog radio-frequency electronics, digital electronics, and macroelectronics. In each SWNT-based electronic field, we will present the major challenges, the evolutions of the methods to overcome these challenges, and the state-of-the-art of the achievements. At last, we will discuss future directions which could lead to the broad applications of SWNTs. We hope this review could inspire more research on SWNT-based electronics, and accelerate the applications of SWNTs.

  10. Generalizing thermodynamic properties of bulk single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, Kenneth R., E-mail: krodriguez@chemistry.csudh.edu; Nanney, Warren A.; Maddux, Cassandra J.A.; Martínez, Hernán L. [Department of Chemistry, California State University, Dominguez Hills, CA 90747 (United States); Malone, Marvin A.; Coe, James V. [Department of Chemistry, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210-1173 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    The enthalpy and Gibbs free energy thermodynamical potentials of single walled carbon nanotubes were studied of all types (armchairs, zig-zags, chirals (n>m), and chiral (n

  11. Radiation Protection Using Single-Wall Carbon Nanotube Derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tour, James M.; Lu, Meng; Lucente-Schultz, Rebecca; Leonard, Ashley; Doyle, Condell Dewayne; Kosynkin, Dimitry V.; Price, Brandi Katherine

    2011-01-01

    This invention is a means of radiation protection, or cellular oxidative stress mitigation, via a sequence of quenching radical species using nano-engineered scaffolds, specifically single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and their derivatives. The material can be used as a means of radiation protection by reducing the number of free radicals within, or nearby, organelles, cells, tissue, organs, or living organisms, thereby reducing the risk of damage to DNA and other cellular components (i.e., RNA, mitochondria, membranes, etc.) that can lead to chronic and/or acute pathologies, including but not limited to cancer, cardiovascular disease, immuno-suppression, and disorders of the central nervous system. In addition, this innovation could be used as a prophylactic or antidote for accidental radiation exposure, during high-altitude or space travel where exposure to radiation is anticipated, or to protect from exposure from deliberate terrorist or wartime use of radiation- containing weapons.

  12. The synthesis and filling of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    CERN Document Server

    Friedrichs, S

    2002-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the synthesis, properties and application of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). The two main objectives of the work were the development of a continuous-flow synthesis of SWNTs, using chemical vapour deposition (CVD) techniques, and the application of the hollow SWNTs as moulds for the study of the crystallisation behaviour of inorganic materials in the confined space of their inner cavity. The latter study was mainly performed by interpreting high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images of the filled SWNTs. A so-called focal series restoration approach, which enhances the resolution of the images and thereby increases the information content, was employed where possible. Chapter I reviews the previous work in the field of SWNTs and introduces their basic structure, symmetry, physical and mechanical properties and the common methods of SWNT synthesis. The chapter ends with an overview of the techniques used in the present work for the characterisation of c...

  13. Fluorescent single walled nanotube/silica composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dattelbaum, Andrew M.; Gupta, Gautam; Duque, Juan G.; Doorn, Stephen K.; Hamilton, Christopher E.; DeFriend Obrey, Kimberly A.

    2013-03-12

    Fluorescent composites of surfactant-wrapped single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were prepared by exposing suspensions of surfactant-wrapped carbon nanotubes to tetramethylorthosilicate (TMOS) vapor. Sodium deoxycholate (DOC) and sodium dodecylsulphate (SDS) were the surfactants. No loss in emission intensity was observed when the suspension of DOC-wrapped SWNTs were exposed to the TMOS vapors, but about a 50% decrease in the emission signal was observed from the SDS-wrapped SWNTs nanotubes. The decrease in emission was minimal by buffering the SDS/SWNT suspension prior to forming the composite. Fluorescent xerogels were prepared by adding glycerol to the SWNT suspensions prior to TMOS vapor exposure, followed by drying the gels. Fluorescent aerogels were prepared by replacing water in the gels with methanol and then exposing them to supercritical fluid drying conditions. The aerogels can be used for gas sensing.

  14. Confinement in single walled carbon nanotubes investigated by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battie, Y., E-mail: yann.battie@univ-lorraine.fr [LCP-A2MC, Institut Jean Barriol, Université de Lorraine, 1 Bd Arago, 57070 Metz (France); Jamon, D. [Université de Lyon, Université Jean Monnet, EA 3523, Laboratoire Télécom Claude Chappe, 25 rue du Dr Rémy Annino, 42000 Saint Etienne (France); Lauret, J.S. [Laboratoire Aimé Cotton, UPR 3321, ENS Cachan, 94245 Cachan (France); Gu, Q.; Gicquel-Guézo, M. [FOTON, UMR 6082, INSA, Avenue des Buttes de Coësmes, 35043 Rennes (France); En Naciri, A. [LCP-A2MC, Institut Jean Barriol, Université de Lorraine, 1 Bd Arago, 57070 Metz (France); Loiseau, A. [Laboratoire d' étude des microstructures, ONERA-CNRS UMR 104, 29 Av. de la Division Leclerc, 92322 Chatillon (France)

    2014-11-28

    Thick films of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with different diameter and chirality distributions are characterized by combining transmission electron microscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry. The dependence of the dielectric function with the increase of the SWCNT diameter occurs with a drastic redshift of the S{sub 11}, S{sub 22} and M{sub 11} transition energies. The transfer integral parameter γ{sub 0} of SWCNT is also evaluated and analyzed. We demonstrate that parts of the optical properties of SWCNTs are attributed to a one dimensional confinement effect. - Highlights: • Ellipsometric measurements are performed on carbon nanotube thick films. • The complex dielectric functions of conventional carbon nanotubes are given. • Confinement effects explain the variations of dielectric function of nanotubes.

  15. Center for Applications of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resasco, Daniel E

    2008-02-21

    This report describes the activities conducted under a Congressional Direction project whose goal was to develop applications for Single-walled carbon nanotubes, under the Carbon Nanotube Technology Center (CANTEC), a multi-investigator program that capitalizes on OU’s advantageous position of having available high quality carbon nanotubes. During the first phase of CANTEC, 11 faculty members and their students from the College of Engineering developed applications for carbon nanotubes by applying their expertise in a number of areas: Catalysis, Reaction Engineering, Nanotube synthesis, Surfactants, Colloid Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry, Spectroscopy, Tissue Engineering, Biosensors, Biochemical Engineering, Cell Biology, Thermal Transport, Composite Materials, Protein synthesis and purification, Molecular Modeling, Computational Simulations. In particular, during this phase, the different research groups involved in CANTEC made advances in the tailoring of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWNT) of controlled diameter and chirality by Modifying Reaction Conditions and the Nature of the catalyst; developed kinetic models that quantitatively describe the SWNT growth, created vertically oriented forests of SWNT by varying the density of metal nanoparticles catalyst particles, and developed novel nanostructured SWNT towers that exhibit superhydrophobic behavior. They also developed molecular simulations of the growth of Metal Nanoparticles on the surface of SWNT, which may have applications in the field of fuell cells. In the area of biomedical applications, CANTEC researchers fabricated SWNT Biosensors by a novel electrostatic layer-by-layer (LBL) deposition method, which may have an impact in the control of diabetes. They also functionalized SWNT with proteins that retained the protein’s biological activity and also retained the near-infrared light absorbance, which finds applications in the treatment of cancer.

  16. Random graph models for dynamic networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao; Moore, Cristopher; Newman, Mark E. J.

    2017-10-01

    Recent theoretical work on the modeling of network structure has focused primarily on networks that are static and unchanging, but many real-world networks change their structure over time. There exist natural generalizations to the dynamic case of many static network models, including the classic random graph, the configuration model, and the stochastic block model, where one assumes that the appearance and disappearance of edges are governed by continuous-time Markov processes with rate parameters that can depend on properties of the nodes. Here we give an introduction to this class of models, showing for instance how one can compute their equilibrium properties. We also demonstrate their use in data analysis and statistical inference, giving efficient algorithms for fitting them to observed network data using the method of maximum likelihood. This allows us, for example, to estimate the time constants of network evolution or infer community structure from temporal network data using cues embedded both in the probabilities over time that node pairs are connected by edges and in the characteristic dynamics of edge appearance and disappearance. We illustrate these methods with a selection of applications, both to computer-generated test networks and real-world examples.

  17. Highly Increased Flow-Induced Power Generation on Plasmonically Carbonized Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jangheon; Lee, Janghyeon; Kim, Soohyun; Jung, Wonsuk

    2016-11-09

    We generate networks and carbonization between individualized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) by an optimized plasmonic heating process using a halogen lamp to improve electrical properties for flow-induced energy harvesting. These properties were characterized by Raman spectra, a field-emission-scanning probe, transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and thermographic camera. The electrical sheet resistance of carbonized SWCNTs was decreased to 2.71 kΩ/□, 2.5 times smaller than normal-SWCNTs. We demonstrated flow-induced voltage generation on SWCNTs at various ion concentrations of NaCl. The generated voltage and current for the carbonized-SWCNTs were 9.5 and 23.5 times larger than for the normal-SWCNTs, respectively, based on the electron dragging mechanism.

  18. Fabrication and performance of contamination free individual single-walled carbon nanotube optical devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yuxiu; Cheng, Rong; Liu, Jianqiang; Li, Tie

    2014-06-01

    Contamination free individual single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) optical devices are fabricated using a hybrid method in the purpose of increase sensitivity as well as further understanding the sensing mechanism. The devices were tested in vacuum to avoid contamination. Three typical devices are discussed comparatively. Under infrared lamp illumination, photovoltaic and photoconductive properties are revealed in device A and B respectively, while device C shows no detectable signal. The photoresponse of device B reaches 108% at 78 K, much larger than that of horizontally aligned or network carbon nanotube devices, indicating priority of the individual nanotube device structure. Interestingly, the temperature characteristics of device A and B are just the opposite. The individual SWCNT devices hold promise in high performance and low cost optical sensors as well as nano-scale solar cells.

  19. Accessibility and delay in random temporal networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajbakhsh, Shahriar Etemadi; Coon, Justin P.; Simmons, David E.

    2017-09-01

    In a wide range of complex networks, the links between the nodes are temporal and may sporadically appear and disappear. This temporality is fundamental to analyzing the formation of paths within such networks. Moreover, the presence of the links between the nodes is a random process induced by nature in many real-world networks. In this paper, we study random temporal networks at a microscopic level and formulate the probability of accessibility from a node i to a node j after a certain number of discrete time units T . While solving the original problem is computationally intractable, we provide an upper and two lower bounds on this probability for a very general case with arbitrary time-varying probabilities of the links' existence. Moreover, for a special case where the links have identical probabilities across the network at each time slot, we obtain the exact probability of accessibility between any two nodes. Finally, we discuss scenarios where the information regarding the presence and absence of links is initially available in the form of time duration (of presence or absence intervals) continuous probability distributions rather than discrete probabilities over time slots. We provide a method for transforming such distributions to discrete probabilities, which enables us to apply the given bounds in this paper to a broader range of problem settings.

  20. Broadband Spectroscopic Thermoacoustic Characterization of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel R. Bauer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes have attracted interest as contrast agents for biomedical imaging because they strongly absorb electromagnetic radiation in the optical and microwave regions. This study applies thermoacoustic (TA imaging and spectroscopy to measure the frequency-dependent absorption profile of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT in the ranges of 2.7–3.1 GHz and 7–9 GHz using two tunable microwave sources. Between 7 and 9 GHz, the peak TA signal for solutions containing semiconducting and metallic SWNTs increased monotonically with a slope of 1.75 AU/GHz (R2=0.95 and 2.8 AU/GHz (R2=0.93, respectively, relative to a water baseline. However, after compensating for the background signal from water, it was revealed that the TA signal from metallic SWNTs increased exponentially within this frequency band. Results suggest that TA imaging and spectroscopy could be a powerful tool for quantifying the absorption properties of SWNTs and optimizing their performance as contrast agents for imaging or heat sources for thermal therapy.

  1. Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes Based Cryogenic Temperature Sensor Platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monea, Bogdan Florian; Ionete, Eusebiu Ilarian; Spiridon, Stefan Ionut; Leca, Aurel; Stanciu, Anda; Petre, Emil; Vaseashta, Ashok

    2017-09-10

    We present an investigation consisting of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) based cryogenic temperature sensors, capable of measuring temperatures in the range of 2-77 K. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) due to their extremely small size, superior thermal and electrical properties have suggested that it is possible to create devices that will meet necessary requirements for miniaturization and better performance, by comparison to temperature sensors currently available on the market. Starting from SWCNTs, as starting material, a resistive structure was designed. Employing dropcast method, the carbon nanotubes were deposited over pairs of gold electrodes and in between the structure electrodes from a solution. The procedure was followed by an alignment process between the electrodes using a dielectrophoretic method. Two sensor structures were tested in cryogenic field down to 2 K, and the resistance was measured using a standard four-point method. The measurement results suggest that, at temperatures below 20 K, the temperature coefficient of resistance average for sensor 1 is 1.473%/K and for sensor 2 is 0.365%/K. From the experimental data, it can be concluded that the dependence of electrical resistance versus temperature can be approximated by an exponential equation and, correspondingly, a set of coefficients are calculated. It is further concluded that the proposed approach described here offers several advantages, which can be employed in the fabrication of a microsensors for cryogenic applications.

  2. Strain controlled thermomutability of single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhiping; Buehler, Markus J

    2009-05-06

    Carbon nanotubes are superior materials for thermal management and phononic device use due to their extremely high thermal conductivity and unique one-dimensional geometry. Here we report a systematic investigation of the effects of mechanical tensile, compressive and torsional strain on the thermal conductivity of single-walled carbon nanotubes using molecular dynamics simulation. In contrast to conventional predictions for solids, an unexpected dependence on the applied strain is revealed by the low-dimensional nature and tubular geometry of carbon nanotubes. Under tension, the thermal conductivity is reduced due to the softening of G-band phonon modes. Under compression--in contrast to the case for conventional theories for solids--geometric instabilities lower the thermal conductivity due to the scattering, shortening of the mean free path and interface resistance that arise from localized radial buckling. We find that when torsional strain is applied, the thermal conductivity drops as well, with significant reductions once the carbon nanotube begins to buckle. This thermomutability concept--the ability to control thermal properties by means of external cues--could be used in developing novel thermal materials whose properties can be altered in situ.

  3. Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Il; Matsuo, Yutaka; Maruyama, Shigeo

    2018-01-22

    Photovoltaics, more generally known as solar cells, are made from semiconducting materials that convert light into electricity. Solar cells have received much attention in recent years due to their promise as clean and efficient light-harvesting devices. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) could play a crucial role in these devices and have been the subject of much research, which continues to this day. SWNTs are known to outperform multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) at low densities, because of the difference in their optical transmittance for the same current density, which is the most important parameter in comparing SWNTs and MWNTs. SWNT films show semiconducting features, which make SWNTs function as active or charge-transporting materials. This chapter, consisting of two sections, focuses on the use of SWNTs in solar cells. In the first section, we discuss SWNTs as a light harvester and charge transporter in the photoactive layer, which are reviewed chronologically to show the history of the research progress. In the second section, we discuss SWNTs as a transparent conductive layer outside of the photoactive layer, which is relatively more actively researched. This section introduces SWNT applications in silicon solar cells, organic solar cells, and perovskite solar cells each, from their prototypes to recent results. As we go along, the science and prospects of the application of solar cells will be discussed.

  4. Single-Wall Carbon Nanotube Anodes for Lithium Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepp, Aloysius F.; Raffaelle, Ryne; Gennett, Tom; Kumta, Prashant; Maranchi, Jeff; Heben, Mike

    2006-01-01

    In recent experiments, highly purified batches of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have shown promise as superior alternatives to the graphitic carbon-black anode materials heretofore used in rechargeable thin-film lithium power cells. The basic idea underlying the experiments is that relative to a given mass of graphitic carbon-black anode material, an equal mass of SWCNTs can be expected to have greater lithium-storage and charge/discharge capacities. The reason for this expectation is that whereas the microstructure and nanostructure of a graphitic carbon black is such as to make most of the interior of the material inaccessible for intercalation of lithium, a batch of SWCNTs can be made to have a much more open microstructure and nanostructure, such that most of the interior of the material is accessible for intercalation of lithium. Moreover, the greater accessibility of SWCNT structures can be expected to translate to greater mobilities for ion-exchange processes and, hence, an ability to sustain greater charge and discharge current densities.

  5. Antenna chemistry with metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duque, Juan G; Pasquali, Matteo; Schmidt, Howard K

    2008-11-19

    We show that, when subjected to microwave fields, surfactant-stabilized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) develop polarization potentials at their extremities that readily drive electrochemical reactions. In the presence of transition metal salts with high oxidation potential (e.g., FeCl3), SWNTs drive reductive condensation to metallic nanoparticles with essentially diffusion-limited kinetics in a laboratory microwave reactor. Using HAuCl4, metallic particles and sheaths deposit regioselectively at the SWNT tips, yielding novel SWNT-metal composite nanostructures. This process is shown to activate exclusively metallic SWNTs; a degree of diameter selectivity is observed using acceptors with different oxidation potentials. The reaction mechanism is shown to involve Fowler-Nordheim field emission in solution, where electric fields concentrate at the SWNT tips (attaining approximately 10(9) V/m) due to the SWNT high aspect ratio (approximately 1000) and gradient compression in the insulating surfactant monolayer. Nanotube antenna chemistry is remarkably simple and should be useful in SWNT separation and fractionation processes, while the unusual nanostructures produced could impact nanomedicine, energy harvesting, and synthetic applications.

  6. Reinforced Thermoplastic Polyimide with Dispersed Functionalized Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebron-Colon, Marisabel; Meador, Michael A.; Gaier, James R.; Sola, Francisco; Scheiman, Daniel A.; McCorkle, Linda S.

    2010-01-01

    Molecular pi-complexes were formed from pristine HiPCO single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and 1-pyrene- N-(4- N'-(5-norbornene-2,3-dicarboxyimido)phenyl butanamide, 1. Polyimide films were prepared with these complexes as well as uncomplexed SWCNTs and the effects of nanoadditive addition on mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties of these films were evaluated. Although these properties were enhanced by both nanoadditives, larger increases in tensile strength and thermal and electrical conductivities were obtained when the SWCNT/1 complexes were used. At a loading level of 5.5 wt %, the Tg of the polyimide increased from 169 to 197 C and the storage modulus increased 20-fold (from 142 to 3045 MPa). The addition of 3.5 wt % SWCNT/1 complexes increased the tensile strength of the polyimide from 61.4 to 129 MPa; higher loading levels led to embrittlement and lower tensile strengths. The electrical conductivities (DC surface) of the polyimides increased to 1 x 10(exp -4) Scm(exp -1) (SWCNT/1 complexes loading level of 9 wt %). Details of the preparation of these complexes and their effects on polyimide film properties are discussed.

  7. Directed Assembly of Single Wall Carbon Nanotube Field Effect Transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penzo, Erika; Palma, Matteo; Chenet, Daniel A; Ao, Geyou; Zheng, Ming; Hone, James C; Wind, Shalom J

    2016-02-23

    The outstanding electronic properties of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have made them prime candidates for future nanoelectronics technologies. One of the main obstacles to the implementation of advanced SWCNT electronics to date is the inability to arrange them in a manner suitable for complex circuits. Directed assembly of SWCNT segments onto lithographically patterned and chemically functionalized substrates is a promising way to organize SWCNTs in topologies that are amenable to integration for advanced applications, but the placement and orientational control required have not yet been demonstrated. We have developed a technique for assembling length sorted and chirality monodisperse DNA-wrapped SWCNT segments on hydrophilic lines patterned on a passivated oxidized silicon substrate. Placement of individual SWCNT segments at predetermined locations was achieved with nanometer accuracy. Three terminal electronic devices, consisting of a single SWCNT segment placed either beneath or on top of metallic source/drain electrodes were fabricated. Devices made with semiconducting nanotubes behaved as typical p-type field effect transistors (FETs), whereas devices made with metallic nanotubes had a finite resistance with little or no gate modulation. This scalable, high resolution approach represents an important step forward toward the potential implementation of complex SWCNT devices and circuits.

  8. Selective etching of thin single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalbác, Martin; Kavan, Ladislav; Dunsch, Lothar

    2009-04-01

    Raman spectroscopy and in situ Raman spectroelectrochemistry were applied to study the selective etching of thin tubes by lithium vapor in doped single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). A strong doping of SWCNTs after the reaction with Li vapor was confirmed by the vanishing of the radial breathing mode (RBM) and by a strong attenuation of the tangential displacement (TG) band in the Raman spectra. The Raman spectra of the Li-vapor-treated SWCNTs after subsequent reaction with water showed changes in the diameter distribution compared with that of a pristine sample (nanotubes with diameters of <1 nm disappeared from the Raman spectra). The samples were tested by the Raman pattern with five different laser lines, and a removal of narrower tubes was confirmed. The remaining wider tubes were not significantly damaged by the treatment with Li, as indicated by the D line in the Raman spectra. Furthermore, the small-diameter tubes are converted not into amorphous carbon but into lithium carbide, which could easily be removed by hydrolysis. The treated samples were further charged electrochemically. It was shown by spectroelectrochemistry that anodic charging may lead to removal of the residual chemical doping from the thicker nanotubes in the sample, but the thin nanotubes did not appear in the spectra. This is a further confirmation of the removal of the small-diameter tubes.

  9. Economic assessment of single-walled carbon nanotube processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacs, J. A.; Tanwani, A.; Healy, M. L.; Dahlben, L. J.

    2010-02-01

    The carbon nanotube market is steadily growing and projected to reach 1.9 billion by 2010. This study examines the economics of manufacturing single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) using process-based cost models developed for arc, CVD, and HiPco processes. Using assumed input parameters, manufacturing costs are calculated for 1 g SWNT for arc, CVD, and HiPco, totaling 1,906, 1,706, and 485, respectively. For each SWNT process, the synthesis and filtration steps showed the highest costs, with direct labor as a primary cost driver. Reductions in production costs are calculated for increased working hours per day and for increased synthesis reaction yield (SRY) in each process. The process-based cost models offer a means for exploring opportunities for cost reductions, and provide a structured system for comparisons among alternative SWNT manufacturing processes. Further, the models can be used to comprehensively evaluate additional scenarios on the economics of environmental, health, and safety best manufacturing practices.

  10. Improved cellular uptake of functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonelli, A.; Serafini, S.; Menotta, M.; Sfara, C.; Pierigé, F.; Giorgi, L.; Ambrosi, G.; Rossi, L.; Magnani, M.

    2010-10-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) due to their unique structural and physicochemical properties, have been proposed as delivery systems for a variety of diagnostic and therapeutic agents. However, SWNTs have proven difficult to solubilize in aqueous solution, limiting their use in biological applications. In an attempt to improve SWNTs' solubility, biocompatibility, and to increase cell penetration we have thoroughly investigated the construction of carbon scaffolds coated with aliphatic carbon chains and phospholipids to obtain micelle-like structures. At first, oxidized SWNTs (2370 ± 30 nmol mg - 1 of SWNTs) were covalently coupled with an alcoholic chain (stearyl alcohol, C18H37OH; 816 nmol mg - 1 of SWNTs). Subsequently, SWNTs-COOC18H37 derivatives were coated with phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) or -serine (PS) phospholipids obtaining micelle-like structures. We found that cellular uptake of these constructs by phagocytic cells occurs via an endocytotic mechanism for constructs larger than 400 nm while occurs via diffusion through the cell membrane for constructs up to 400 nm. The material that enters the cell by phagocytosis is actively internalized by macrophages and localizes inside endocytotic vesicles. In contrast the material that enters the cells by diffusion is found in the cell cytosol. In conclusion, we have realized new biomimetic constructs based on alkylated SWNTs coated with phospholipids that are efficiently internalized by different cell types only if their size is lower than 400 nm. These constructs are not toxic to the cells and could now be explored as delivery systems for non-permeant cargoes.

  11. Fluorescent single walled carbon nanotube/silica composite materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satishkumar, B C; Doorn, Stephen K; Baker, Gary A; Dattelbaum, Andrew M

    2008-11-25

    We present a new approach for the preparation of single walled carbon nanotube silica composite materials that retain the intrinsic fluorescence characteristics of the encapsulated nanotubes. Incorporation of isolated nanotubes into optically transparent matrices, such as sol-gel prepared silica, to take advantage of their near-infrared emission properties for applications like sensing has been a challenging task. In general, the alcohol solvents and acidic conditions required for typical sol-gel preparations disrupt the nanotube/surfactant assembly and cause the isolated nanotubes to aggregate leading to degradation of their fluorescence properties. To overcome these issues, we have used a sugar alcohol modified silica precursor molecule, diglycerylsilane, for encapsulation of nanotubes in silica under aqueous conditions and at neutral pH. The silica/nanotube composite materials have been prepared as monoliths, at least 5 mm thick, or as films (characteristics of the silica encapsulated carbon nanotubes by means of redox doping studies as well as demonstrated their potential for biosensing applications. Such nanotube/silica composite systems may allow for new sensing and imaging applications that are not currently achievable.

  12. Transient reflectivity on vertically aligned single-wall carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galimberti, Gianluca; Ponzoni, Stefano; Ferrini, Gabriele [Interdisciplinary Laboratory for Advanced Materials Physics (i-LAMP) and Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, I-25121 Brescia (Italy); Hofmann, Stephan [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0FA (United Kingdom); Arshad, Muhammad [Zernike Institute for Advanced Materials, University of Groningen (Netherlands); ICTP, Strada Costiera 11, I-34151 Trieste (Italy); National Centre for Physics Quaid-i-Azam University Islamabad (Pakistan); Cepek, Cinzia [Istituto Officina dei Materiali — CNR, Laboratorio TASC, Area Science Park, Basovizza, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Pagliara, Stefania, E-mail: pagliara@dmf.unicatt.it [Interdisciplinary Laboratory for Advanced Materials Physics (i-LAMP) and Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, I-25121 Brescia (Italy)

    2013-09-30

    One-color transient reflectivity measurements are carried out on two different samples of vertically aligned single-wall carbon nanotube bundles and compared with the response recently published on unaligned bundles. The negative sign of the optical response for both samples indicates that the free electron character revealed on unaligned bundles is only due to the intertube interactions favored by the tube bending. Neither the presence of bundles nor the existence of structural defects in aligned bundles is able to induce a free-electron like behavior of the photoexcited carriers. This result is also confirmed by the presence of non-linear excitonic effects in the transient response of the aligned bundles. - Highlights: • Transient reflectivity measurements on two aligned carbon nanotube samples • Relationship between unalignment and/or bundling and intertube interaction • The bundling is not able to modify the intertube interactions • The presence of structural defects does not affect the intertube interactions • A localized exciton-like behavior has been revealed in these samples.

  13. Single-Walled Carbon-Nanotubes-Based Organic Memory Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundes Fakher

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The electrical behaviour of organic memory structures, based on single-walled carbon-nanotubes (SWCNTs, metal–insulator–semiconductor (MIS and thin film transistor (TFT structures, using poly(methyl methacrylate (PMMA as the gate dielectric, are reported. The drain and source electrodes were fabricated by evaporating 50 nm gold, and the gate electrode was made from 50 nm-evaporated aluminium on a clean glass substrate. Thin films of SWCNTs, embedded within the insulating layer, were used as the floating gate. SWCNTs-based memory devices exhibited clear hysteresis in their electrical characteristics (capacitance–voltage (C–V for MIS structures, as well as output and transfer characteristics for transistors. Both structures were shown to produce reliable and large memory windows by virtue of high capacity and reduced charge leakage. The hysteresis in the output and transfer characteristics, the shifts in the threshold voltage of the transfer characteristics, and the flat-band voltage shift in the MIS structures were attributed to the charging and discharging of the SWCNTs floating gate. Under an appropriate gate bias (1 s pulses, the floating gate is charged and discharged, resulting in significant threshold voltage shifts. Pulses as low as 1 V resulted in clear write and erase states.

  14. High performance electronics based on aligned arrays of single walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocabas, Coskun

    This dissertation describes a new approach for generating large area homogenous parallel array of single walled carbon nanotubes. The approach uses guided growth, by chemical vapor deposition (CVD), of SWNTs on single crystal quartz substrates. The anisotropic interaction associated with lattice structure of the quartz between SWNT and quartz surface guides SWNT during the deposition process. We have optimized CVD conditions that can produce arrays of individual single walled carbon nanotubes in horizontal configurations with perfect linear shapes, to within experimental uncertainties, and with levels of alignment >99.9%. We took the method one step further by printing these SWNT arrays on unusual substrate such as plastic. Using the developed printing technique, we can fabricate multilayer superstructures of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) on a wide range of substrates. In order to understand charge transport through SWNT networks, we studied the scaling behaviours SWNT transistors by systematically varying degrees of alignment and coverage in transistors with a range of channel lengths and orientations perpendicular and parallel to the direction of alignment. We have modelled our experimental results using a first principles stick-percolation based transport model which provides a simple framework to interpret the sometimes counter-intuitive transport parameters measured in these devices. We have used dense, perfectly aligned arrays of long, perfectly linear SWNTs as an effective thin film semiconductor suitable for integration into transistors and other classes of electronic devices. These types of devices show excellent electric performance with mobilities and scaled transconductances approaching ˜2,000 cm2 V-1 s-1 and ˜3,000 S m-1, respectively. MOS and CMOS logic gates and mechanically flexible transistors on plastic were also demonstrated. Finally we have studied the high frequency performance of transistors that use aligned SWNT arrays. For the

  15. Synthesis, assembly, and applications of single-walled carbon nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Koungmin

    This dissertation presents the synthesis and assembly of aligned carbon nanotubes, and their applications in both nano-electronics such as transistor and integrated circuits and macro-electronics in energy conversion devices as transparent conducting electrodes. Also, the high performance chemical sensor using metal oxide nanowire has been demonstrated. Chapter 1 presents a brief introduction of carbon nanotube, followed by discussion of a new synthesis technique using nanosphere lithography to grow highly aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes atop quartz and sapphire substrates. This method offers great potential to produce carbon nanotube arrays with simultaneous control over the nanotube orientation, position, density, diameter and even chirality. Chapter 3 introduces the wafer-scale integration and assembly of aligned carbon nanotubes, including full-wafer scale synthesis and transfer of massively aligned carbon nanotube arrays, and nanotube device fabrication on 4 inch Si/SiO2 wafer to yield submicron channel transistors with high on-current density ˜ 20 muA/mum and good on/off ratio and CMOS integrated circuits. In addition, various chemical doping methods for n-type nanotube transistors are studied to fabricate CMOS integrated nanotube circuits such as inverter, NAND and NOR logic devices. Furthermore, defect-tolerant circuit design for NAND and NOR is proposed and demonstrated to guarantee the correct operation of logic circuit, regardless of the presence of mis-aligned or mis-positioned nanotubes. Carbon nanotube flexible electronics and smart textiles for ubiquitous computing and sensing are demonstrated in chapter 4. A facile transfer printing technique has been introduced to transfer massively aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes from the original sapphire/quartz substrates to virtually any other substrates, including glass, silicon, polymer sheets, and even fabrics. The characterization of transferred nanotubes reveals that the transferred

  16. Improved cellular uptake of functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonelli, A; Serafini, S; Menotta, M; Sfara, C; Pierige, F; Rossi, L; Magnani, M [Department of Biomolecular Sciences, University of Urbino ' Carlo Bo' , Via Saffi 2, 61029 Urbino (Italy); Giorgi, L; Ambrosi, G, E-mail: antonella.antonelli@uniurb.it, E-mail: sonja.serafini@erydel.com, E-mail: michele.menotta@uniurb.it, E-mail: carla.sfara@uniurb.it, E-mail: francesca.pierige@uniurb.it, E-mail: luca.giorgi@uniurb.it, E-mail: gianluca.ambrosi@uniurb.it, E-mail: luigia.rossi@uniurb.it, E-mail: mauro.magnani@uniurb.it [Department of Mathematics, Physics and Informatics, University of Urbino ' Carlo Bo' , Via S Chiara 27, 61029 Urbino (Italy)

    2010-10-22

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) due to their unique structural and physicochemical properties, have been proposed as delivery systems for a variety of diagnostic and therapeutic agents. However, SWNTs have proven difficult to solubilize in aqueous solution, limiting their use in biological applications. In an attempt to improve SWNTs' solubility, biocompatibility, and to increase cell penetration we have thoroughly investigated the construction of carbon scaffolds coated with aliphatic carbon chains and phospholipids to obtain micelle-like structures. At first, oxidized SWNTs (2370 {+-} 30 nmol mg{sup -1} of SWNTs) were covalently coupled with an alcoholic chain (stearyl alcohol, C{sub 18}H{sub 37}OH; 816 nmol mg{sup -1} of SWNTs). Subsequently, SWNTs-COOC{sub 18}H{sub 37} derivatives were coated with phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) or -serine (PS) phospholipids obtaining micelle-like structures. We found that cellular uptake of these constructs by phagocytic cells occurs via an endocytotic mechanism for constructs larger than 400 nm while occurs via diffusion through the cell membrane for constructs up to 400 nm. The material that enters the cell by phagocytosis is actively internalized by macrophages and localizes inside endocytotic vesicles. In contrast the material that enters the cells by diffusion is found in the cell cytosol. In conclusion, we have realized new biomimetic constructs based on alkylated SWNTs coated with phospholipids that are efficiently internalized by different cell types only if their size is lower than 400 nm. These constructs are not toxic to the cells and could now be explored as delivery systems for non-permeant cargoes.

  17. Noncovalent functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes with porphyrins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bassiouk, María; Basiuk, Vladimir A. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 México D.F. (Mexico); Basiuk, Elena V., E-mail: elenagd@unam.mx [Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnológico, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 México D.F. (Mexico); Álvarez-Zauco, Edgar [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior C.U., 04510 México D.F. (Mexico); Martínez-Herrera, Melchor [Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnológico, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 México D.F. (Mexico); Rojas-Aguilar, Aaron [Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Av. Instituto Politécnico Nacional 2508, San Pedro Zacatenco, 07360 México D.F. (Mexico); Puente-Lee, Iván [Facultad de Química, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior C.U., 04510 México D.F. (Mexico)

    2013-06-15

    The covalent and noncovalent interactions of porphyrins and related tetraazamacrocyclic compounds with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is a subject of increasing research effort, directed toward the design of novel hybrid nanomaterials combining unique electronic and optical properties of both molecular species. In this report, we used different experimental techniques as well as molecular mechanics (MM) calculations to analyze the adsorption of meso-tetraphenylporphine (or 5,10,15,20-tetraphenyl-21H,23H-porphine, H{sub 2}TPP) and its complexes with Ni(II) and Co(II) (NiTPP and CoTPP, respectively), as well as hemin (a natural porphyrin), onto the surface of SWNTs. Altogether, the results suggested that all four porphyrin species noncovalently interact with SWNTs, forming hybrid nanomaterials. Nevertheless, of all four porphyrin species, the strongest interaction with SWNTs occurs in the case of CoTPP, which is able to intercalate and considerably disperse SWNT bundles, and therefore absorb onto the surface of individual SWNTs. In contrast, NiTPP, CoTPP and hemin, due to a weaker interaction, are unable to do so and therefore are only capable to adsorb onto the surface of SWNT bundles. According to the scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) imaging and MM results, the adsorption of CoTPP onto SWNT sidewalls results in the formation of porphyrin arrays in the shape of long-period interacting helixes with variable periodicity, possibly due to different diameters and chiralities of SWNTs present in the samples. Since the remaining porphyrin species were found to adsorb onto the surface of SWNT bundles, the precise geometry of the corresponding porphyrin/SWNT complexes is difficult to characterize.

  18. Single-walled carbon nanotubes as near-infrared optical biosensors for life sciences and biomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Astha; Homayoun, Aida; Bannister, Christopher W; Yum, Kyungsuk

    2015-03-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes that emit photostable near-infrared fluorescence have emerged as near-infrared optical biosensors for life sciences and biomedicine. Since the discovery of their near-infrared fluorescence, researchers have engineered single-walled carbon nanotubes to function as an optical biosensor that selectively modulates its fluorescence upon binding of target molecules. Here we review the recent advances in the single-walled carbon nanotube-based optical sensing technology for life sciences and biomedicine. We discuss the structure and optical properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes, the mechanisms for molecular recognition and signal transduction in single-walled carbon nanotube complexes, and the recent development of various single-walled carbon nanotube-based optical biosensors. We also discuss the opportunities and challenges to translate this emerging technology into biomedical research and clinical use, including the biological safety of single-walled carbon nanotubes. The advances in single-walled carbon nanotube-based near-infrared optical sensing technology open up a new avenue for in vitro and in vivo biosensing with high sensitivity and high spatial resolution, beneficial for many areas of life sciences and biomedicine. Copyright © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Photovoltaic device using single wall carbon nanotubes and method of fabricating the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biris, Alexandru S.; Li, Zhongrui

    2012-11-06

    A photovoltaic device and methods for forming the same. In one embodiment, the photovoltaic device has a silicon substrate, and a film comprising a plurality of single wall carbon nanotubes disposed on the silicon substrate, wherein the plurality of single wall carbon nanotubes forms a plurality of heterojunctions with the silicon in the substrate.

  20. Study on the Microwave Permittivity of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaolai; Zhao, Donglin

    2009-01-01

    In this article, we studied the microwave permittivity of the complex of the single-walled carbon nanotube and paraffin in 2-18GHz. In the range, the dielectric loss of single-walled carbon nanotube is higher, and the real part and the imaginary part of the dielectric constant decrease with the increase of frequency, and the dielectric constant…

  1. Features of Random Metal Nanowire Networks with

    KAUST Repository

    Maloth, Thirupathi

    2017-05-01

    Among the alternatives to conventional Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) used in making transparent conducting electrodes, the random metal nanowire (NW) networks are considered to be superior offering performance at par with ITO. The performance is measured in terms of sheet resistance and optical transmittance. However, as the electrical properties of such random networks are achieved thanks to a percolation network, a minimum size of the electrodes is needed so it actually exceeds the representative volume element (RVE) of the material and the macroscopic electrical properties are achieved. There is not much information about the compatibility of this minimum RVE size with the resolution actually needed in electronic devices. Furthermore, the efficiency of NWs in terms of electrical conduction is overlooked. In this work, we address the above industrially relevant questions - 1) The minimum size of electrodes that can be made based on the dimensions of NWs and the material coverage. For this, we propose a morphology based classification in defining the RVE size and we also compare the same with that is based on macroscopic electrical properties stabilization. 2) The amount of NWs that do not participate in electrical conduction, hence of no practical use. The results presented in this thesis are a design guide to experimentalists to design transparent electrodes with more optimal usage of the material.

  2. Epidemic Spreading in Random Rectangular Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Estrada, Ernesto; Moreno, Yamir

    2015-01-01

    Recently, Estrada and Sheerin (Phys. Rev. E 91, 042805 (2015)) developed the random rectangular graph (RRG) model to account for the spatial distribution of nodes in a network allowing the variation of the shape of the unit square commonly used in random geometric graphs (RGGs). Here, we consider an epidemics dynamics taking place on the nodes and edges of an RRG and we derive analytically a lower bound for the epidemic threshold for a Susceptible-Infected-Susceptible (SIS) or Susceptible-Infected-Recovered (SIR) model on these networks. Using extensive numerical simulations of the SIS dynamics we show that the lower bound found is very tight. We conclude that the elongation of the area in which the nodes are distributed makes the network more resilient to the propagation of an epidemics due to the fact that the epidemic threshold increases with the elongation of the rectangle. On the other hand, using the "classical" RGG for modeling epidemics on non-squared cities generates a larger error due to the effects...

  3. Holographic coherent states from random tensor networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xiao-Liang; Yang, Zhao; You, Yi-Zhuang

    2017-08-01

    Random tensor networks provide useful models that incorporate various important features of holographic duality. A tensor network is usually defined for a fixed graph geometry specified by the connection of tensors. In this paper, we generalize the random tensor network approach to allow quantum superposition of different spatial geometries. We setup a framework in which all possible bulk spatial geometries, characterized by weighted adjacient matrices of all possible graphs, are mapped to the boundary Hilbert space and form an overcomplete basis of the boundary. We name such an overcomplete basis as holographic coherent states. A generic boundary state can be expanded in this basis, which describes the state as a superposition of different spatial geometries in the bulk. We discuss how to define distinct classical geometries and small fluctuations around them. We show that small fluctuations around classical geometries define "code subspaces" which are mapped to the boundary Hilbert space isometrically with quantum error correction properties. In addition, we also show that the overlap between different geometries is suppressed exponentially as a function of the geometrical difference between the two geometries. The geometrical difference is measured in an area law fashion, which is a manifestation of the holographic nature of the states considered.

  4. Intrinsic electrochemical activity of single walled carbon nanotube-Nafion assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snowden, Michael E; Edwards, Martin A; Rudd, Nicola C; Macpherson, Julie V; Unwin, Patrick R

    2013-04-14

    The intrinsic electrochemical properties and activity of single walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) network electrodes modified by a drop-cast Nafion film have been determined using the one electron oxidation of ferrocene trimethyl ammonium (FcTMA(+)) as a model redox probe in the Nafion film. Facilitated by the very low transport coefficient of FcTMA(+) in Nafion (apparent diffusion coefficient of 1.8 × 10(-10) cm(2) s(-1)), SWNTs in the 2-D network behave as individual elements, at short (practical) times, each with their own characteristic diffusion, independent of neighbouring sites, and the response is diagnostic of the proportion of SWNTs active in the composite. Data are analysed using candidate models for cases where: (i) electron transfer events only occur at discrete sites along the sidewall (with a defect density typical of chemical vapour deposition SWNTs); (ii) all of the SWNTs in a network are active. The first case predicts currents that are much smaller than seen experimentally, indicating that significant portions of SWNTs are active in the SWNT-Nafion composite. However, the predictions for a fully active SWNT result in higher currents than seen experimentally, indicating that a fraction of SWNTs are not connected and/or that not all SWNTs are wetted completely by the Nafion film to provide full access of the redox mediator to the SWNT surface.

  5. Single walled carbon nanotube-based stochastic resonance device with molecular self-noise source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Hayato; Setiadi, Agung; Kuwahara, Yuji; Akai-Kasaya, Megumi

    2017-09-01

    Stochastic resonance (SR) is an intrinsic noise usage system for small-signal sensing found in various living creatures. The noise-enhanced signal transmission and detection system, which is probabilistic but consumes low power, has not been used in modern electronics. We demonstrated SR in a summing network based on a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) device that detects small subthreshold signals with very low current flow. The nonlinear current-voltage characteristics of this SWNT device, which incorporated Cr electrodes, were used as the threshold level of signal detection. The adsorption of redox-active polyoxometalate molecules on SWNTs generated additional noise, which was utilized as a self-noise source. To form a summing network SR device, a large number of SWNTs were aligned parallel to each other between the electrodes, which increased the signal detection ability. The functional capabilities of the present small-size summing network SR device, which rely on dense nanomaterials and exploit intrinsic spontaneous noise at room temperature, offer a glimpse of future bio-inspired electronic devices.

  6. Single Walled Carbon Nanohorns as Photothermal Cancer Agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitney, John [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Sarkar, Saugata [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Zhang, Jianfei [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Do, Thao [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Manson, Mary kyle [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Campbell, Tom [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Puretzky, Alexander A [ORNL; Rouleau, Christopher M [ORNL; More, Karren Leslie [ORNL; Geohegan, David B [ORNL; Rylander, Christopher [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Dorn, Harry C [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Rylander, Nichole M [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech)

    2011-01-01

    Nanoparticles have significant potential as selective photo-absorbing agents for laser based cancer treatment. This study investigates the use of single walled carbon nanohorns (SWNHs) as thermal enhancers when excited by near infrared (NIR) light for tumor cell destruction. Absorption spectra of SWNHs in deionized water at concentrations of 0, 0.01, 0.025, 0.05, 0.085, and 0.1 mg/ml were measured using a spectrophotometer for the wavelength range of 200-1,400 nm. Mass attenuation coefficients were calculated using spectrophotometer transmittance data. Cell culture media containing 0, 0.01, 0.085, and 0.333 mg/ml SWNHs was laser irradiated at 1,064 nm wavelength with an irradiance of 40 W/cm{sup 2} for 0-5 minutes. Temperature elevations of these solutions during laser irradiation were measured with a thermocouple 8 mm away from the incident laser beam. Cell viability of murine kidney cancer cells (RENCA) was measured 24 hours following laser treatment with the previously mentioned laser parameters alone or with SWNHs. Cell viability as a function of radial position was determined qualitatively using trypan blue staining and bright field microscopy for samples exposed to heating durations of 2 and 6 minutes alone or with 0.085 mg/ml SWNHs. A Beckman Coulter Vi-Cell instrument quantified cell viability of samples treated with varying SWNH concentration (0, 0.01, 0.085, and 0.333 mg/ml) and heating durations of 0-6 minutes. Spectrophotometer measurements indicated inclusion of SWNHs increased light absorption and attenuation across all wavelengths. Utilizing SWNHs with laser irradiation increased temperature elevation compared to laser heating alone. Greater absorption and higher temperature elevations were observed with increasing SWNH concentration. No inherent toxicity was observed with SWNH inclusion. A more rapid and substantial viability decline was observed over time in samples exposed to SWNHs with laser treatment compared with samples experiencing laser

  7. Flame Synthesis Of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes And Nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wal, Randy L. Vander; Berger, Gordon M.; Ticich, Thomas M.

    2003-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are widely sought for a variety of applications including gas storage, intercalation media, catalyst support and composite reinforcing material [1]. Each of these applications will require large scale quantities of CNTs. A second consideration is that some of these applications may require redispersal of the collected CNTs and attachment to a support structure. If the CNTs could be synthesized directly upon the support to be used in the end application, a tremendous savings in post-synthesis processing could be realized. Therein we have pursued both aerosol and supported catalyst synthesis of CNTs. Given space limitations, only the aerosol portion of the work is outlined here though results from both thrusts will be presented during the talk. Aerosol methods of SWNT, MWNT or nanofiber synthesis hold promise of large-scale production to supply the tonnage quantities these applications will require. Aerosol methods may potentially permit control of the catalyst particle size, offer continuous processing, provide highest product purity and most importantly, are scaleable. Only via economy of scale will the cost of CNTs be sufficient to realize the large-scale structural and power applications on both earth and in space. Present aerosol methods for SWNT synthesis include laser ablation of composite metalgraphite targets or thermal decomposition/pyrolysis of a sublimed or vaporized organometallic [2]. Both approaches, conducted within a high temperature furnace, have produced single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs). The former method requires sophisticated hardware and is inherently limited by the energy deposition that can be realized using pulsed laser light. The latter method, using expensive organometallics is difficult to control for SWNT synthesis given a range of gasparticle mixing conditions along variable temperature gradients; multi-walled nanotubes (MWNTs) are a far more likely end products. Both approaches require large energy expenditures and

  8. Marginalization in Random Nonlinear Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudeva Raju, Rajkumar; Pitkow, Xaq

    2015-03-01

    Computations involved in tasks like causal reasoning in the brain require a type of probabilistic inference known as marginalization. Marginalization corresponds to averaging over irrelevant variables to obtain the probability of the variables of interest. This is a fundamental operation that arises whenever input stimuli depend on several variables, but only some are task-relevant. Animals often exhibit behavior consistent with marginalizing over some variables, but the neural substrate of this computation is unknown. It has been previously shown (Beck et al. 2011) that marginalization can be performed optimally by a deterministic nonlinear network that implements a quadratic interaction of neural activity with divisive normalization. We show that a simpler network can perform essentially the same computation. These Random Nonlinear Networks (RNN) are feedforward networks with one hidden layer, sigmoidal activation functions, and normally-distributed weights connecting the input and hidden layers. We train the output weights connecting the hidden units to an output population, such that the output model accurately represents a desired marginal probability distribution without significant information loss compared to optimal marginalization. Simulations for the case of linear coordinate transformations show that the RNN model has good marginalization performance, except for highly uncertain inputs that have low amplitude population responses. Behavioral experiments, based on these results, could then be used to identify if this model does indeed explain how the brain performs marginalization.

  9. High-Purity Semiconducting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes: A Key Enabling Material in Emerging Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, Jacques; Ding, Jianfu; Li, Zhao; Finnie, Paul; Lopinski, Gregory; Malenfant, Patrick R L

    2017-10-17

    Semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (sc-SWCNTs) are emerging as a promising material for high-performance, high-density devices as well as low-cost, large-area macroelectronics produced via additive manufacturing methods such as roll-to-roll printing. Proof-of-concept demonstrations have indicated the potential of sc-SWCNTs for digital electronics, radiofrequency circuits, radiation hard memory, improved sensors, and flexible, stretchable, conformable electronics. Advances toward commercial applications bring numerous opportunities in SWCNT materials development and characterization as well as fabrication processes and printing technologies. Commercialization in electronics will require large quantities of sc-SWCNTs, and the challenge for materials science is the development of scalable synthesis, purification, and enrichment methods. While a few synthesis routes have shown promising results in making near-monochiral SWCNTs, gram quantities are available only for small-diameter sc-SWCNTs, which underperform in transistors. Most synthesis routes yield mixtures of SWCNTs, typically 30% metallic and 70% semiconducting, necessitating the extraction of sc-SWCNTs from their metallic counterparts in high purity using scalable postsynthetic methods. Numerous routes to obtain high-purity sc-SWCNTs from raw soot have been developed, including density-gradient ultracentrifugation, chromatography, aqueous two-phase extraction, and selective DNA or polymer wrapping. By these methods (termed sorting or enrichment), >99% sc-SWCNT content can be achieved. Currently, all of these approaches have drawbacks and limitations with respect to electronics applications, such as excessive dilution, expensive consumables, and high ionic impurity content. Excess amount of dispersant is a common challenge that hinders direct inclusion of sc-SWCNTs into electronic devices. At present, conjugated polymer extraction may represent the most practical route to sc-SWCNTs. By the use of

  10. Direct imaging the subcellular localization of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Feifan; Xing, Da; Chen, Wei R.

    2011-03-01

    The development of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) for various biomedical applications is an area of great promise. However, the contradictory data on the interaction of single-walled carbon nanotubes with cells highlight the need to study their uptake and cytotoxic effects in cells. Here, we use confocal microscopy to image the translocation of single-walled carbon nanotubes into cells and localization on the subcellular organelle. We also observe that single-walled carbon nanotubes do not affect the cellular condition and mitochondrial membrane potential. One intrinsic property of single-walled carbon nanotubes is their strong optical absorbance in the near-infrared (NIR) region. It could be used to selectively increase the thermal destructions in the target tumors. A specific type of SWNT by the CoMoCAT method has an intense absorption band at 980 nm. When irradiated with a 980-nm laser, the single-walled carbon nanotubes affect the cellular oxidation and destroy the mitochondrial membrane potential, and induce cell apoptosis. Thus, the single-walled carbon nanotubes appear to enter the cytoplasm without cytotoxic effects in cells, and can be used as effective and selective nanomaterials for cancer photothermal therapy.

  11. Enhanced thermoelectric performance of Bi2Te3 through uniform dispersion of single wall carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Kaleem; Wan, Chunlei

    2017-10-01

    The advancement in nanostructured powder processing has attracted great interest as a cost effective and scalable strategy for high performance thermoelectric bulk materials. However, the level of technical breakthrough realized in quantum dot supperlattices/wires has not yet been demonstrated in these materials. Here, we report the first ever study on the uniform dispersion of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in nanostructured Bi2Te3 bulk, and their effect on thermoelectric parameters above room temperature. The Bi2Te3 based SWCNT composites were prepared through controlled powder processing, and their thermoelectric properties were finely tuned at the nanoscale by regulating various (0.5, 0.75, 1.0 and 1.5) vol% of SWCNTs in the matrix. The flexible ropes of SWCNT, making an interconnected network through the inter/trans granular positions of Bi2Te3, thus substantially change the transport properties of the composites. The perfect one-dimensional (1D) conducting structure of SWCNTs acts as a source of electrical transport through a percolating network, with significantly suppressed lattice thermal conductivity, via intensified boundary scattering. The remarkable increase in power factor is ascribed to energy filtering effects and excellent electrical transport of 1D SWCNTs in the composites. Consequently, with a considerable reduction in thermal conductivity, the figure of merit culminates in a several-fold improvement, at 0.5 vol% of SWCNTs, over pristine bulk Bi2Te3.

  12. Silicon spectral response extension through single wall carbon nanotubes in hybrid solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Del Gobbo, Silvano

    2013-01-01

    Photovoltaic devices based on single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and n-silicon multiple heterojunctions have been fabricated by a SWCNT film transferring process. We report on the ability of the carbon nanotubes to extend the Si spectral range towards the near ultraviolet (UV) and the near infrared regions. Semiconducting and about metallic SWCNT networks have been studied as a function of the film sheet resistance, Rsh. Optical absorbance and Raman spectroscopy have been used to assign nanotube chirality and electronic character. This gave us hints of evidence of the participation of the metal nanotubes in the photocurrent generation. Moreover, we provide evidence that the external quantum efficiency spectral range can be modulated as a function of the SWCNT network sheet resistance in a hybrid SWCNT/Si solar cell. This result will be very useful to further design/optimize devices with improved performance in spectral regions generally not covered by conventional Si p-n devices. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  13. Plasmonic welded single walled carbon nanotubes on monolayer graphene for sensing target protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jangheon; Kim, Soohyun [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 373-1 Guseong, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Gi Gyu; Jung, Wonsuk, E-mail: wonsuk81@wku.ac.kr [Department of Mechanical and Automotive Engineering, Wonkwang University, Iksan, Jeonbuk 570-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-16

    We developed plasmonic welded single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) on monolayer graphene as a biosensor to detect target antigen molecules, fc fusion protein without any treatment to generate binder groups for linker and antibody. This plasmonic welding induces atomic networks between SWCNTs as junctions containing carboxylic groups and improves the electrical sensitivity of a SWCNTs and the graphene membrane to detect target protein. We investigated generation of the atomic networks between SWCNTs by field-emission scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy after plasmonic welding process. We compared the intensity ratios of D to G peaks from the Raman spectra and electrical sheet resistance of welded SWCNTs with the results of normal SWCNTs, which decreased from 0.115 to 0.086 and from 10.5 to 4.12, respectively. Additionally, we measured the drain current via source/drain voltage after binding of the antigen to the antibody molecules. This electrical sensitivity of the welded SWCNTs was 1.55 times larger than normal SWCNTs.

  14. Sequestration of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in a Polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bley, Richard A.

    2007-01-01

    Sequestration of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNs) in a suitably chosen polymer is under investigation as a means of promoting the dissolution of the nanotubes into epoxies. The purpose of this investigation is to make it possible to utilize SWCNs as the reinforcing fibers in strong, lightweight epoxy-matrix/carbon-fiber composite materials. SWCNs are especially attractive for use as reinforcing fibers because of their stiffness and strength-to-weight ratio: Their Young s modulus has been calculated to be 1.2 TPa, their strength has been calculated to be as much as 100 times that of steel, and their mass density is only one-sixth that of steel. Bare SWCNs cannot be incorporated directly into composite materials of the types envisioned because they are not soluble in epoxies. Heretofore, SWCNS have been rendered soluble by chemically attaching various molecular chains to them, but such chemical attachments compromise their structural integrity. In the method now under investigation, carbon nanotubes are sequestered in molecules of poly(m-phenylenevinylene-co-2,5-dioctyloxy-p-phenylenevinylene) [PmPV]. The strength of the carbon nanotubes is preserved because they are not chemically bonded to the PmPV. This method exploits the tendency of PmPV molecules to wrap themselves around carbon nanotubes: the wrapping occurs partly because there exists a favorable interface between the conjugated face of a nanotube and the conjugated backbone of the polymer and partly because of the helical molecular structure of PmPV. The constituents attached to the polymer backbones (the side chains) render the PmPV-wrapped carbon nanotubes PmPV soluble in organic materials that, in turn, could be used to suspend the carbon nanotubes in epoxy precursors. At present, this method is being optimized: The side chains on the currently available form of PmPV are very nonpolar and unable to react with the epoxy resins and/or hardeners; as a consequence, SWCN/PmPV composites have been

  15. Preparation of Nickel-Copper Bilayers Coated on Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to oxidizability of copper coating on carbon nanotubes, the interfacial bond strength between copper coating and its matrix is weak, which leads to the reduction of the macroscopic properties of copper matrix composite. The electroless coating technics was applied to prepare nickel-copper bilayers coated on single-walled carbon nanotubes. The coated single-walled carbon nanotubes were characterized through transmission electron microscope spectroscopy, field-emission electron microscope spectroscopy, X-ray diffractometry, and thermogravimetric analysis. The results demonstrated that the nickel-copper bilayers coated on single-walled carbon nanotubes possessed higher purity of unoxidized copper fine-grains than copper monolayers.

  16. Vibrational Analysis of Curved Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube on a Pasternak Elastic Foundation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehdipour, I.; Barari, Amin; Kimiaeifar, Amin

    2012-01-01

    . By utilizing He’s Energy Balance Method (HEBM), the relationships of the nonlinear amplitude and frequency were expressed for a curved, single-walled carbon nanotube. The amplitude frequency response curves of the nonlinear free vibration were obtained for a curved, single-walled carbon nanotube embedded......Continuum mechanics and an elastic beam model were employed in the nonlinear force vibrational analysis of an embedded, curved, single-walled carbon nanotube. The analysis considered the effects of the curvature or waviness and midplane stretching of the nanotube on the nonlinear frequency...

  17. A bench arc-furnace facility for fullerene and single-wall nanotubes synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huber John G

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A metallic-sample arc-furnace was modified to synthesize fullerenes and nanotubes. The (reversible changes and the process for producing single-wall nanotubes (SWNTs are described.

  18. Phototransformation-Induced Aggregation of Functionalized Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes: The Importance of Amorphous Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with proper functionalization are desirable for applications that require dispersion in aqueous and biological environments, and functionalized SWCNTs also serve as building blocks for conjugation with specific molecules in these applicatio...

  19. Monte-Carlo Simulation of Hydrogen Adsorption in Single-Wall Carbon Nano-Cones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Ahadi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The properties of hydrogen adsorption in single-walled carbon nano-cones are investigated in detail by Monte Carlo simulations. A great deal of our computational results show that the hydrogen storage capacity in single-walled carbon nano-cones is slightly smaller than the capacity of single-walled carbon nanotubes at any time at the same conditions. This indicates that the hydrogen storage capacity of single-walled carbon nano-cones is related to angles of carbon nano-cones. It seems that these type of nanotubes could not exceed the 2010 goal of 6 wt%, which is presented by the U.S. Department of Energy. In addition, these results are discussed in theory.

  20. Vertical Alignment of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes on Nanostructure Fabricated by Atomic Force Microscope

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lee, Haiwon

    2007-01-01

    This project focused on the behavior of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in the electrophoresis cells and aligned growth of SWCNTs by thermal chemical vapor deposition on selectively deposited metallic nanoparticle...

  1. Polyvinylchloride-Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Composites: Thermal and Spectroscopic Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mircea Chipara

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanocomposites of single-walled carbon nanotubes dispersed within polyvinylchloride have been obtained by using the solution path. High-power sonication was utilized to achieve a good dispersion of carbon nanotubes. Thermogravimetric analysis revealed that during the synthesis, processing, or thermal analysis of these nanocomposites the released chlorine is functionalizing the single-walled carbon nanotubes. The loading of polyvinylchloride by single-walled carbon nanotubes increases the glass transition temperature of the polymeric matrix, demonstrating the interactions between macromolecular chains and filler. Wide Angle X-Ray Scattering data suggested a drop of the crystallite size and of the degree of crystallinity as the concentration of single-walled carbon nanotubes is increased. The in situ chlorination and amorphization of nanotube during the synthesis (sonication step is confirmed by Raman spectroscopy.

  2. Application of Random Matrix Theory to Complex Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Aparna; Jalan, Sarika

    The present article provides an overview of recent developments in spectral analysis of complex networks under random matrix theory framework. Adjacency matrix of unweighted networks, reviewed here, differ drastically from a random matrix, as former have only binary entries. Remarkably, short range correlations in corresponding eigenvalues of such matrices exhibit Gaussian orthogonal statistics of RMT and thus bring them into the universality class. Spectral rigidity of spectra provides measure of randomness in underlying networks. We will consider several examples of model networks vastly studied in last two decades. To the end we would provide potential of RMT framework and obtained results to understand and predict behavior of complex systems with underlying network structure.

  3. Robust neurite extension following exogenous electrical stimulation within single walled carbon nanotube-composite hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppes, A N; Keating, K W; McGregor, A L; Koppes, R A; Kearns, K R; Ziemba, A M; McKay, C A; Zuidema, J M; Rivet, C J; Gilbert, R J; Thompson, D M

    2016-07-15

    nanotubes and other novel materials are being explored for novel nano-neuro devices based on their unique properties. Neuronal growth on carbon nanotubes has been studied in 2D since the early 2000s demonstrating increased outgrowth, synapse formation and network activity. In this work, single-walled carbon nanotubes were selected as one possible electrically-conductive material, dispersed within a 3D hydrogel containing primary neurons; extending previous 2D work to 3D to evaluate outgrowth within nanomaterial composites with electrical stimulation. This is the first study to our knowledge that stimulates neurons in 3D composite nanomaterial-laden hydrogels. Examination of electrically conductive biomaterials may serve to promote regrowth following injury or in long term stimulation. Copyright © 2016 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Experimental and theoretical investigation of thermal conductivity of ethylene glycol containing functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmat Esfe, Mohammad; Firouzi, Masoumeh; Afrand, Masoud

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes (FSWCNTs) were suspended in Ethylene Glycol (EG) at different volume fractions. A KD2 pro thermal conductivity meter was used to measure the thermal conductivity in the temperature range from 30 to 50 °C. Nanofluids were prepared in solid volume fraction of 0.02, 0.05, 0.075, 0.1, 0.25, 0.5 and, 0.75%. Experimental results revealed that the thermal conductivity of the nanofluid is a non-linear function of temperature and SWCNTs volume fraction in the range of this investigation. Thermal conductivity increases with temperature and nanoparticles volume fraction as usual for this type of nanofluid. Maximum increment in thermal conductivity of the nanofluids was found to be about 45% at 0.75 vol fractions loading at 50 °C. Finally, a new correlation based on artificial neural network (ANN) approach has been proposed for SWCNT-EG thermal conductivity in terms of nanoparticles volume fraction and temperature using the experimental data. Used ANN approach has estimated the experimental values of thermal conductivity with the absolute average relative deviation lower than 0.9%, mean square error of 3.67 × 10-5 and regression coefficient of 0.9989. Comparison between the suggested techniques with various used correlation in the literatures established that the ANN approach is better to other presented methods and therefore can be proposed as a useful means for predicting of the nanofluids thermal conductivity.

  5. Thermal conductivity of a film of single walled carbon nanotubes measured with infrared thermal imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Ya; Inoue, Taiki; Xiang, Rong; Chiashi, Shohei; Maruyama, Shigeo

    Heat dissipation has restricted the modern miniaturization trend with the development of electronic devices. Theoretically proven to be with high axial thermal conductivity, single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) have long been expected to cool down the nanoscale world. Even though the tube-tube contact resistance limits the capability of heat transfer of the bulk film, the high intrinsic thermal conductivity of SWNT still glorify the application of films of SWNT network as a thermal interface material. In this work, we proposed a new method to straightly measure the thermal conductivity of SWNT film. We bridged two cantilevered Si thin plate with SWNT film, and kept a steady state heat flow in between. With the infrared camera to record the temperature distribution, the Si plates with known thermal conductivity can work as a reference to calculate the heat flux going through the SWNT film. Further, the thermal conductivity of the SWNT film can be obtained through Fourier's law after deducting the effect of thermal radiation. The sizes of the structure, the heating temperature, the vacuum degree and other crucial impact factors are carefully considered and analyzed. The author Y. F. was supported through the Advanced Integration Science Innovation Education and Research Consortium Program by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sport, Science and Technology.

  6. Spin wave dynamics in Heisenberg ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic single-walled nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mi, Bin-Zhou, E-mail: mbzfjerry2008@126.com [Department of Basic Curriculum, North China Institute of Science and Technology, Beijing 101601 (China); Department of Physics, School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2016-09-15

    The spin wave dynamics, including the magnetization, spin wave dispersion relation, and energy level splitting, of Heisenberg ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic single-walled nanotubes are systematically calculated by use of the double-time Green’s function method within the random phase approximation. The role of temperature, diameter of the tube, and wave vector on spin wave energy spectrum and energy level splitting are carefully analyzed. There are two categories of spin wave modes, which are quantized and degenerate, and the total number of independent magnon branches is dependent on diameter of the tube, caused by the physical symmetry of nanotubes. Moreover, the number of flat spin wave modes increases with diameter of the tube rising. The spin wave energy and the energy level splitting decrease with temperature rising, and become zero as temperature reaches the critical point. At any temperature, the energy level splitting varies with wave vector, and for a larger wave vector it is smaller. When pb=π, the boundary of first Brillouin zone, spin wave energies are degenerate, and the energy level splittings are zero.

  7. Theoretical studies on lattice-oriented growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes on sapphire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhengwei; Meng, Xianhong; Xiao, Jianliang

    2017-09-01

    Due to their excellent mechanical and electrical properties, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) can find broad applications in many areas, such as field-effect transistors, logic circuits, sensors and flexible electronics. High-density, horizontally aligned arrays of SWNTs are essential for high performance electronics. Many experimental studies have demonstrated that chemical vapor deposition growth of nanotubes on crystalline substrates such as sapphire offers a promising route to achieve such dense, perfectly aligned arrays. In this work, a theoretical study is performed to quantitatively understand the van der Waals interactions between SWNTs and sapphire substrates. The energetically preferred alignment directions of SWNTs on A-, R- and M-planes and the random alignment on the C-plane predicted by this study are all in good agreement with experiments. It is also shown that smaller SWNTs have better alignment than larger SWNTs due to their stronger interaction with sapphire substrate. The strong vdW interactions along preferred alignment directions can be intuitively explained by the nanoscale ‘grooves’ formed by atomic lattice structures on the surface of sapphire. This study provides important insights to the controlled growth of nanotubes and potentially other nanomaterials.

  8. Selective parallel integration of individual metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes from heterogeneous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burg, Brian R; Schneider, Julian; Bianco, Vincenzo; Schirmer, Niklas C; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2010-07-06

    The dielectrophoretic separation of individual metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) from heterogeneous solutions and their simultaneous deposition between electrodes is achieved and confirmed by direct electric transport measurements. Out-of-solution guided parallel assembly of individual SWNTs was investigated for electric field frequencies between 1 and 200 MHz. At 200 MHz, 19 of the 22 deposited SWNTs (86%) displayed metallic behavior, whereas at lower frequencies the expected random growth distribution of 1/3 metallic SWNTs prevailed. A threshold separation frequency of 188 MHz is extracted from a surface-conductivity model, and a conductivity weighting factor is introduced to elucidate the separation frequency dependence. Low-frequency experiments and numerical simulations show that long-range nanotube transport is governed by hydrodynamic effects whereas local trapping is dominated by dielectrophoretic forces. The electrokinetic framework of dielectrophoresis in low-concentration solutions is thus provided and allows a deeper understanding of the underlying mechanisms in dielectrophoretic deposition processes for long and large-diameter SWNT-based low-resistance device integration.

  9. Cross over of recurrence networks to random graphs and random ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Recurrence networks are complex networks constructed from the time series of chaotic dynamical systems where the connection between two nodes is limited by the recurrence threshold. This condition makes the topology of every recurrence network unique with the degree distribution determined by the probability ...

  10. Holographic duality from random tensor networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayden, Patrick; Nezami, Sepehr; Qi, Xiao-Liang; Thomas, Nathaniel; Walter, Michael; Yang, Zhao [Stanford Institute for Theoretical Physics, Department of Physics, Stanford University,382 Via Pueblo, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2016-11-02

    Tensor networks provide a natural framework for exploring holographic duality because they obey entanglement area laws. They have been used to construct explicit toy models realizing many of the interesting structural features of the AdS/CFT correspondence, including the non-uniqueness of bulk operator reconstruction in the boundary theory. In this article, we explore the holographic properties of networks of random tensors. We find that our models naturally incorporate many features that are analogous to those of the AdS/CFT correspondence. When the bond dimension of the tensors is large, we show that the entanglement entropy of all boundary regions, whether connected or not, obey the Ryu-Takayanagi entropy formula, a fact closely related to known properties of the multipartite entanglement of assistance. We also discuss the behavior of Rényi entropies in our models and contrast it with AdS/CFT. Moreover, we find that each boundary region faithfully encodes the physics of the entire bulk entanglement wedge, i.e., the bulk region enclosed by the boundary region and the minimal surface. Our method is to interpret the average over random tensors as the partition function of a classical ferromagnetic Ising model, so that the minimal surfaces of Ryu-Takayanagi appear as domain walls. Upon including the analog of a bulk field, we find that our model reproduces the expected corrections to the Ryu-Takayanagi formula: the bulk minimal surface is displaced and the entropy is augmented by the entanglement of the bulk field. Increasing the entanglement of the bulk field ultimately changes the minimal surface behavior topologically, in a way similar to the effect of creating a black hole. Extrapolating bulk correlation functions to the boundary permits the calculation of the scaling dimensions of boundary operators, which exhibit a large gap between a small number of low-dimension operators and the rest. While we are primarily motivated by the AdS/CFT duality, the main

  11. Scaling solutions for connectivity and conductivity of continuous random networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo-Torres, S A; Molebatsi, T; Kong, X-Z; Scheuermann, A; Bringemeier, D; Li, L

    2015-10-01

    Connectivity and conductivity of two-dimensional fracture networks (FNs), as an important type of continuous random networks, are examined systematically through Monte Carlo simulations under a variety of conditions, including different power law distributions of the fracture lengths and domain sizes. The simulation results are analyzed using analogies of the percolation theory for discrete random networks. With a characteristic length scale and conductivity scale introduced, we show that the connectivity and conductivity of FNs can be well described by universal scaling solutions. These solutions shed light on previous observations of scale-dependent FN behavior and provide a powerful method for quantifying effective bulk properties of continuous random networks.

  12. Selective synthesis and device applications of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes using isopropyl alcohol as feedstock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Yuchi; Wang, Chuan; Liu, Jia; Liu, Bilu; Lin, Xue; Parker, Jason; Beasley, Cara; Wong, H-S Philip; Zhou, Chongwu

    2012-08-28

    The development of guided chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes provides a great platform for wafer-scale integration of aligned nanotubes into circuits and functional electronic systems. However, the coexistence of metallic and semiconducting nanotubes is still a major obstacle for the development of carbon-nanotube-based nanoelectronics. To address this problem, we have developed a method to obtain predominantly semiconducting nanotubes from direct CVD growth. By using isopropyl alcohol (IPA) as the carbon feedstock, a semiconducting nanotube purity of above 90% is achieved, which is unambiguously confirmed by both electrical and micro-Raman measurements. Mass spectrometric study was performed to elucidate the underlying chemical mechanism. Furthermore, high performance thin-film transistors with an on/off ratio above 10(4) and mobility up to 116 cm(2)/(V·s) have been achieved using the IPA-synthesized nanotube networks grown on silicon substrate. The method reported in this contribution is easy to operate and the results are highly reproducible. Therefore, such semiconducting predominated single-walled carbon nanotubes could serve as an important building block for future practical and scalable carbon nanotube electronics.

  13. Vibrational Behavior of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes: Atomistic Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, I.-Ling; Huang, Chang-Ming

    2013-10-01

    This study examines the vibrational behaviors of both armchair and zigzag carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The natural longitudinal/flexural/torsional/radial frequencies of CNTs were extracted and analyzed simultaneously from an equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulation without imposing any initial modal displacement or force. Initial random atomic velocities, which were assigned to fit the simulated temperature, could be considered as an excitation on CNTs composing of wide range of spatial frequencies. The position and velocity of each atom at every time step was calculated using finite difference algorithm, and fast Fourier transform (FFT) was used to perform time-to-frequency domain transform. The effects of CNT length, radius, chirality, and boundary condition on the vibrational behaviors of CNTs were systematically examined. Moreover, the simulated natural frequencies and mode shapes were compared with the predictions based on continuum theories, i.e., rod, Euler-Bernoulli beam and nonlocal Timoshenko beam, to examine their applicability in nanostructures.

  14. Randomizing bipartite networks: the case of the World Trade Web

    CERN Document Server

    Saracco, Fabio; Gabrielli, Andrea; Squartini, Tiziano

    2015-01-01

    Within the last fifteen years, network theory has been successfully applied both to natural sciences and to socioeconomic disciplines. In particular, bipartite networks have been recognized to provide a particularly insightful representation of many systems, ranging from mutualistic networks in ecology to trade networks in economy, whence the need of a pattern detection-oriented analysis in order to identify statistically-significant structural properties. Such an analysis rests upon the definition of suitable null models, i.e. upon the choice of the portion of network structure to be preserved while randomizing everything else. However, quite surprisingly, little work has been done so far to define null models for real bipartite networks. The aim of the present work is to fill this gap, extending a recently-proposed method to randomize monopartite networks to bipartite networks. While the proposed formalism is perfectly general, we apply our method to the binary, undirected, bipartite representation of the W...

  15. Phase transitions for information diffusion in random clustered networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Sungsu; Shin, Joongbo; Kwak, Namju; Jung, Kyomin

    2016-09-01

    We study the conditions for the phase transitions of information diffusion in complex networks. Using the random clustered network model, a generalisation of the Chung-Lu random network model incorporating clustering, we examine the effect of clustering under the Susceptible-Infected-Recovered (SIR) epidemic diffusion model with heterogeneous contact rates. For this purpose, we exploit the branching process to analyse information diffusion in random unclustered networks with arbitrary contact rates, and provide novel iterative algorithms for estimating the conditions and sizes of global cascades, respectively. Showing that a random clustered network can be mapped into a factor graph, which is a locally tree-like structure, we successfully extend our analysis to random clustered networks with heterogeneous contact rates. We then identify the conditions for phase transitions of information diffusion using our method. Interestingly, for various contact rates, we prove that random clustered networks with higher clustering coefficients have strictly lower phase transition points for any given degree sequence. Finally, we confirm our analytical results with numerical simulations of both synthetically-generated and real-world networks.

  16. On the Vibration of Single-Walled Carbon Nanocones: Molecular Mechanics Approach versus Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ansari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The vibrational behavior of single-walled carbon nanocones is studied using molecular structural method and molecular dynamics simulations. In molecular structural approach, point mass and beam elements are employed to model the carbon atoms and the connecting covalent bonds, respectively. Single-walled carbon nanocones with different apex angles are considered. Besides, the vibrational behavior of nanocones under various types of boundary conditions is studied. Predicted natural frequencies are compared with the existing results in the literature and also with the ones obtained by molecular dynamics simulations. It is found that decreasing apex angle and the length of carbon nanocone results in an increase in the natural frequency. Comparing the vibrational behavior of single-walled carbon nanocones under different boundary conditions shows that the effect of end condition on the natural frequency is more prominent for nanocones with smaller apex angles.

  17. Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes as Fluorescence Biosensors for Pathogen Recognition in Water Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkata K. K. Upadhyayula

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs aggregates as fluorescence sensors for pathogen recognition in drinking water treatment applications has been studied. Batch adsorption study is conducted to adsorb large concentrations of Staphylococcus aureus aureus SH 1000 and Escherichia coli pKV-11 on single-walled carbon nanotubes. Subsequently the immobilized bacteria are detected with confocal microscopy by coating the nanotubes with fluorescence emitting antibodies. The Freundlich adsorption equilibrium constant (k for S.aureus and E.coli determined from batch adsorption study was found to be 9×108 and 2×108 ml/g, respectively. The visualization of bacterial cells adsorbed on fluorescently modified carbon nanotubes is also clearly seen. The results indicate that hydrophobic single-walled carbon nanotubes have excellent bacterial adsorption capacity and fluorescent detection capability. This is an important advancement in designing fluorescence biosensors for pathogen recognition in water systems.

  18. Continuous growth of single-wall carbon nanotubes using chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigorian, Leonid; Hornyak, Louis; Dillon, Anne C; Heben, Michael J

    2014-09-23

    The invention relates to a chemical vapor deposition process for the continuous growth of a carbon single-wall nanotube where a carbon-containing gas composition is contacted with a porous membrane and decomposed in the presence of a catalyst to grow single-wall carbon nanotube material. A pressure differential exists across the porous membrane such that the pressure on one side of the membrane is less than that on the other side of the membrane. The single-wall carbon nanotube growth may occur predominately on the low-pressure side of the membrane or, in a different embodiment of the invention, may occur predominately in between the catalyst and the membrane. The invention also relates to an apparatus used with the carbon vapor deposition process.

  19. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of the Thermal Conductivity of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, M.; Srivastava, Deepak; Govindan,T. R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) have very attractive electronic, mechanical. and thermal properties. Recently, measurements of thermal conductivity in single wall CNT mats showed estimated thermal conductivity magnitudes ranging from 17.5 to 58 W/cm-K at room temperature. which are better than bulk graphite. The cylinderical symmetry of CNT leads to large thermal conductivity along the tube axis, additionally, unlike graphite. CNTs can be made into ropes that can be used as heat conducting pipes for nanoscale applications. The thermal conductivity of several single wall carbon nanotubes has been calculated over temperature range from l00 K to 600 K using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics using Tersoff-Brenner potential for C-C interactions. Thermal conductivity of single wall CNTs shows a peaking behavior as a function of temperature. Dependence of the peak position on the chirality and radius of the tube will be discussed and explained in this presentation.

  20. Continuous growth of single-wall carbon nanotubes using chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigorian, Leonid [Raymond, OH; Hornyak, Louis [Evergreen, CO; Dillon, Anne C [Boulder, CO; Heben, Michael J [Denver, CO

    2008-10-07

    The invention relates to a chemical vapor deposition process for the continuous growth of a carbon single-wall nanotube where a carbon-containing gas composition is contacted with a porous membrane and decomposed in the presence of a catalyst to grow single-wall carbon nanotube material. A pressure differential exists across the porous membrane such that the pressure on one side of the membrane is less than that on the other side of the membrane. The single-wall carbon nanotube growth may occur predominately on the low-pressure side of the membrane or, in a different embodiment of the invention, may occur predominately in between the catalyst and the membrane. The invention also relates to an apparatus used with the carbon vapor deposition process.

  1. Application of random matrix theory to biological networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo Feng [Department of Computer Science, Clemson University, 100 McAdams Hall, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Department of Pathology, U.T. Southwestern Medical Center, 5323 Harry Hines Blvd. Dallas, TX 75390-9072 (United States); Zhong Jianxin [Department of Physics, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)]. E-mail: zhongjn@ornl.gov; Yang Yunfeng [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Scheuermann, Richard H. [Department of Pathology, U.T. Southwestern Medical Center, 5323 Harry Hines Blvd. Dallas, TX 75390-9072 (United States); Zhou Jizhong [Department of Botany and Microbiology, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019 (United States) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)]. E-mail: zhouj@ornl.gov

    2006-09-25

    We show that spectral fluctuation of interaction matrices of a yeast protein-protein interaction network and a yeast metabolic network follows the description of the Gaussian orthogonal ensemble (GOE) of random matrix theory (RMT). Furthermore, we demonstrate that while the global biological networks evaluated belong to GOE, removal of interactions between constituents transitions the networks to systems of isolated modules described by the Poisson distribution. Our results indicate that although biological networks are very different from other complex systems at the molecular level, they display the same statistical properties at network scale. The transition point provides a new objective approach for the identification of functional modules.

  2. Acute toxicity of functionalized single wall carbon nanotubes: A biochemical, histopathologic and proteomics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Homa; Ramezani, Mohammad; Yazdian-Robati, Rezvan; Behnam, Behzad; Razavi Azarkhiavi, Kamal; Hashem Nia, Azadeh; Mokhtarzadeh, Ahad; Matbou Riahi, Maryam; Razavi, Bibi Marjan; Abnous, Khalil

    2017-09-25

    Recently carbon nanotubes (CNTs) showed promising potentials in different biomedical applications but their safe use in humans and probable toxicities are still challenging. The aim of this study was to determine the acute toxicity of functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). In this project, PEGylated and Tween functionalized SWCNTs were prepared. BALB/c mice were randomly divided into nine groups, including PEGylated SWCNTs (75,150μg/mouse) and PEG, Tween80 suspended SWCNTs, Tween 80 and a control group (intact mice). One or 7 days after intravenous injection, the mice were killed and serum and livers were collected. The oxidative stress markers, biochemical and histopathological changes were studied. Subsequently, proteomics approach was used to investigate the alterations of protein expression profiles in the liver. Results showed that there were not any significant differences in malondealdehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH) levels and biochemical enzymes (ALT and AST) between groups, while the histopathological observations of livers showed some injuries. The results of proteomics analysis revealed indolethylamine N-Methyltransferase (INMT), glycine N-Methyltransferase (GNMT), selenium binding protein (Selenbp), thioredoxin peroxidase (TPx), TNF receptor associated protein 1(Trap1), peroxiredoxin-6 (Prdx6), electron transport flavoprotein (Etf-α), regucalcin (Rgn) and ATP5b proteins were differentially expressed in functionalized SWCNTs groups. Western blot analyses confirmed that the changes in Prdx6 were consistent with 2-DE gel analysis. In summary, acute toxicological study on two functionalized SWCNTs did not show any significant toxicity at selected doses. Proteomics analysis also showed that following exposure to functionalized SWCNTs, the expression of some proteins with antioxidant activity and detoxifying properties were increased in liver tissue. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Dispersion of Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes by in situ Polymerization Under Sonication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Cheol; Ounaies, Zoubeida; Watson, Kent A.; Crooks, Roy E.; Smith, Joseph, Jr.; Lowther, Sharon E.; Connell, John W.; Siochi, Emilie J.; Harrison, Joycelyn S.; St.Clair, Terry L.

    2002-01-01

    Single wall nanotube reinforced polyimide nanocomposites were synthesized by in situ polymerization of monomers of interest in the presence of sonication. This process enabled uniform dispersion of single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) bundles in the polymer matrix. The resultant SWNT-polyimide nanocomposite films were electrically conductive (antistatic) and optically transparent with significant conductivity enhancement (10 orders of magnitude) at a very low loading (0.1 vol%). Mechanical properties as well as thermal stability were also improved with the incorporation of the SWNT.

  4. Investigation on Vibration Characteristics of Fluid Conveying Single Walled Carbon Nanotube Via DTM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, B. Ravi; Sankara Subramanian, H.

    2017-08-01

    In this work differential transform method (DTM) is used to study the vibration behavior of fluid conveying single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT). Based on the theories of elasticity mechanics and nonlocal elasticity, an elastic Bernoulli-Euler beam model is developed for thermal-mechanical vibration and instability of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) conveying fluid and resting on an elastic medium. The critical fluid velocity is being found out with different boundary conditions, i.e. Fixed-Fixed and simply supported at ends. Effects of different temperature change, nonlocal parameters on natural frequency and critical fluid velocity are being discussed.

  5. Single-walled carbon nanotubes as stabilizing agents in red phosphorus Li-ion battery anodes

    KAUST Repository

    Smajic, Jasmin

    2017-08-16

    Phosphorus boasts extremely high gravimetric and volumetric capacities but suffers from poor electrochemical stability with significant capacity loss immediately after the first cycle. We propose to circumvent this issue by mixing amorphous red phosphorus with single-walled carbon nanotubes. Employing a non-destructive sublimation–deposition method, we have synthesized composites where the synergetic effect between red phosphorus and single-walled carbon nanotubes allows for a considerable improvement in the electrochemical stability of battery anodes. In contrast to the average 40% loss of capacity after 50 cycles for other phosphorus–carbon composites in the literature, our material shows losses of just 22% under analogous cycling conditions.

  6. Random matrix analysis for gene interaction networks in cancer cells

    CERN Document Server

    Kikkawa, Ayumi

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: The investigation of topological modifications of the gene interaction networks in cancer cells is essential for understanding the desease. We study gene interaction networks in various human cancer cells with the random matrix theory. This study is based on the Cancer Network Galaxy (TCNG) database which is the repository of huge gene interactions inferred by Bayesian network algorithms from 256 microarray experimental data downloaded from NCBI GEO. The original GEO data are provided by the high-throughput microarray expression experiments on various human cancer cells. We apply the random matrix theory to the computationally inferred gene interaction networks in TCNG in order to detect the universality in the topology of the gene interaction networks in cancer cells. Results: We found the universal behavior in almost one half of the 256 gene interaction networks in TCNG. The distribution of nearest neighbor level spacing of the gene interaction matrix becomes the Wigner distribution when the net...

  7. Performance of wireless sensor networks under random node failures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradonjic, Milan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hagberg, Aric [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Feng, Pan [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-28

    Networks are essential to the function of a modern society and the consequence of damages to a network can be large. Assessing network performance of a damaged network is an important step in network recovery and network design. Connectivity, distance between nodes, and alternative routes are some of the key indicators to network performance. In this paper, random geometric graph (RGG) is used with two types of node failure, uniform failure and localized failure. Since the network performance are multi-facet and assessment can be time constrained, we introduce four measures, which can be computed in polynomial time, to estimate performance of damaged RGG. Simulation experiments are conducted to investigate the deterioration of networks through a period of time. With the empirical results, the performance measures are analyzed and compared to provide understanding of different failure scenarios in a RGG.

  8. Amperometric Detection of Sub-ppm Formaldehyde Using Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes and Hydroxylamines: A Referenced Chemiresistive System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, Shinsuke; Labuta, Jan; Nakanishi, Takashi; Tanaka, Takeshi; Kataura, Hiromichi

    2017-10-27

    We report amperometric detection of formaldehyde (HCHO) using hydroxylamine hydrochloride and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). Hydroxylamine hydrochloride reacts with HCHO to emit HCl vapor, which injects a hole carrier into semiconducting SWCNTs. The increase of conductivity in SWCNTs is easily monitored using an ohmmeter. The debundling of SWCNTs with a metallo-supramolecular polymer (MSP) increased the active surface area in the SWCNTs network, leading to excellent sensitivity to HCHO with a limit of detection (LoD) of 0.016 ppm. The response of sensor is reversible, and the sensor is reusable. The selectivity to HCHO is 10 5 -10 6 times higher than interferences with other volatiles such as water, methanol, and toluene. Moreover, false-positive responses caused by a significant variation of humidity and/or temperature are successfully discriminated from true-positive responses by using two sensors, one with and the other without hydroxylamine hydrochloride, in a referenced system.

  9. Dye-assisted dispersion of single-walled carbon nanotubes for solution fabrication of NO2 sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Ramli

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Direct golden orange dye molecules were used as a dispersing agent to produce suspensions of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs in water. Uniform, thin film networks were fabricated by vacuum filtration using different concentrations of SWCNT and transferred subsequently to glass substrates. The dispersion efficiency was compared to other surfactants. Measurement of the sheet resistance as a function of SWCNT concentration showed a transition from 2D percolation to 3D conduction behaviour when the concentration of SWCNTs exceeded 0.001 mg/mL. The electrical response to NO2 gas exposure was investigated as a function of temperature and an optimum response was observed at 200°C.

  10. Large-area fluidic assembly of single-walled carbon nanotubes through dip-coating and directional evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Pilnam; Kang, Tae June

    2017-12-01

    We present a simple and scalable fluidic-assembly approach, in which bundles of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are selectively aligned and deposited by directionally controlled dip-coating and solvent evaporation processes. The patterned surface with alternating regions of hydrophobic polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS) (height 100 nm) strips and hydrophilic SiO2 substrate was withdrawn vertically at a constant speed ( 3 mm/min) from a solution bath containing SWCNTs ( 0.1 mg/ml), allowing for directional evaporation and subsequent selective deposition of nanotube bundles along the edges of horizontally aligned PDMS strips. In addition, the fluidic assembly was applied to fabricate a field effect transistor (FET) with highly oriented SWCNTs, which demonstrate significantly higher current density as well as high turn-off ratio (T/O ratio 100) as compared to that with randomly distributed carbon nanotube bundles (T/O ratio <10).

  11. Softening in random networks of non-identical beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, Ehsan; Barocas, Victor H.; Shephard, Mark S.; Picu, R. Catalin

    2016-02-01

    Random fiber networks are assemblies of elastic elements connected in random configurations. They are used as models for a broad range of fibrous materials including biopolymer gels and synthetic nonwovens. Although the mechanics of networks made from the same type of fibers has been studied extensively, the behavior of composite systems of fibers with different properties has received less attention. In this work we numerically and theoretically study random networks of beams and springs of different mechanical properties. We observe that the overall network stiffness decreases on average as the variability of fiber stiffness increases, at constant mean fiber stiffness. Numerical results and analytical arguments show that for small variabilities in fiber stiffness the amount of network softening scales linearly with the variance of the fiber stiffness distribution. This result holds for any beam structure and is expected to apply to a broad range of materials including cellular solids.

  12. Softening in Random Networks of Non-Identical Beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, Ehsan; Barocas, Victor H; Shephard, Mark S; Picu, Catalin R

    2016-02-01

    Random fiber networks are assemblies of elastic elements connected in random configurations. They are used as models for a broad range of fibrous materials including biopolymer gels and synthetic nonwovens. Although the mechanics of networks made from the same type of fibers has been studied extensively, the behavior of composite systems of fibers with different properties has received less attention. In this work we numerically and theoretically study random networks of beams and springs of different mechanical properties. We observe that the overall network stiffness decreases on average as the variability of fiber stiffness increases, at constant mean fiber stiffness. Numerical results and analytical arguments show that for small variabilities in fiber stiffness the amount of network softening scales linearly with the variance of the fiber stiffness distribution. This result holds for any beam structure and is expected to apply to a broad range of materials including cellular solids.

  13. Localization transition of biased random walks on random networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sood, Vishal; Grassberger, Peter

    2007-08-31

    We study random walks on large random graphs that are biased towards a randomly chosen but fixed target node. We show that a critical bias strength bc exists such that most walks find the target within a finite time when b > bc. For b infinity before hitting the target. The phase transition at b=bc is a critical point in the sense that quantities such as the return probability P(t) show power laws, but finite-size behavior is complex and does not obey the usual finite-size scaling ansatz. By extending rigorous results for biased walks on Galton-Watson trees, we give the exact analytical value for bc and verify it by large scale simulations.

  14. Emergence of Scaling in Random Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barabási, Albert-László; Albert, Réka

    1999-10-01

    Systems as diverse as genetic networks or the World Wide Web are best described as networks with complex topology. A common property of many large networks is that the vertex connectivities follow a scale-free power-law distribution. This feature was found to be a consequence of two generic mechanisms: (i) networks expand continuously by the addition of new vertices, and (ii) new vertices attach preferentially to sites that are already well connected. A model based on these two ingredients reproduces the observed stationary scale-free distributions, which indicates that the development of large networks is governed by robust self-organizing phenomena that go beyond the particulars of the individual systems.

  15. Sequential defense against random and intentional attacks in complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pin-Yu; Cheng, Shin-Ming

    2015-02-01

    Network robustness against attacks is one of the most fundamental researches in network science as it is closely associated with the reliability and functionality of various networking paradigms. However, despite the study on intrinsic topological vulnerabilities to node removals, little is known on the network robustness when network defense mechanisms are implemented, especially for networked engineering systems equipped with detection capabilities. In this paper, a sequential defense mechanism is first proposed in complex networks for attack inference and vulnerability assessment, where the data fusion center sequentially infers the presence of an attack based on the binary attack status reported from the nodes in the network. The network robustness is evaluated in terms of the ability to identify the attack prior to network disruption under two major attack schemes, i.e., random and intentional attacks. We provide a parametric plug-in model for performance evaluation on the proposed mechanism and validate its effectiveness and reliability via canonical complex network models and real-world large-scale network topology. The results show that the sequential defense mechanism greatly improves the network robustness and mitigates the possibility of network disruption by acquiring limited attack status information from a small subset of nodes in the network.

  16. Cascading failures in spatially-embedded random networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asztalos, Andrea; Sreenivasan, Sameet; Szymanski, Boleslaw K; Korniss, Gyorgy

    2014-01-01

    Cascading failures constitute an important vulnerability of interconnected systems. Here we focus on the study of such failures on networks in which the connectivity of nodes is constrained by geographical distance. Specifically, we use random geometric graphs as representative examples of such spatial networks, and study the properties of cascading failures on them in the presence of distributed flow. The key finding of this study is that the process of cascading failures is non-self-averaging on spatial networks, and thus, aggregate inferences made from analyzing an ensemble of such networks lead to incorrect conclusions when applied to a single network, no matter how large the network is. We demonstrate that this lack of self-averaging disappears with the introduction of a small fraction of long-range links into the network. We simulate the well studied preemptive node removal strategy for cascade mitigation and show that it is largely ineffective in the case of spatial networks. We introduce an altruistic strategy designed to limit the loss of network nodes in the event of a cascade triggering failure and show that it performs better than the preemptive strategy. Finally, we consider a real-world spatial network viz. a European power transmission network and validate that our findings from the study of random geometric graphs are also borne out by simulations of cascading failures on the empirical network.

  17. Decoding Algorithms for Random Linear Network Codes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heide, Janus; Pedersen, Morten Videbæk; Fitzek, Frank

    2011-01-01

    We consider the problem of efficient decoding of a random linear code over a finite field. In particular we are interested in the case where the code is random, relatively sparse, and use the binary finite field as an example. The goal is to decode the data using fewer operations to potentially a...

  18. Encapsulation of Conjugated Oligomers in Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes : Towards Nanohybrids for Photonic Devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loi, Maria Antonietta; Gao, Jia; Cordella, Fabrizio; Blondeau, Pascal; Menna, Enzo; Bartova, Barbora; Hebert, Cecile; Lazar, Sorin; Botton, Gianluigi A.; Milko, Matus; Ambrosch-Draxl, Claudia

    2010-01-01

    Visible-light emitting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs)/organic hybrids have been successfully synthesized and promise to be a photon source to be used in future optoelectronic devices. The nanohybrids are "peapods" having sexithiophene molecules inside the hollow space of SWNTs.

  19. Structural profiling and biological performance of phospholipid-hyaluronan functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dvash, Ram; Khatchatouriants, Artium; Solmesky, Leonardo J

    2013-01-01

    In spite of significant insolubility and toxicity, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) erupt into the biomedical research, and create an increasing interest in the field of nanomedicine. Single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs) are highly hydrophobic and have been shown to be toxic while systemically administrated. Thus,...

  20. Plasma excitations in a single-walled carbon nanotube with an ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The effect of different uniform transverse external magnetic fields in plasma frequency when propagated parallel to the surface of the single-walled metallic carbon nanotubes is studied. The classical electrodynamics as well as Maxwell's equations are used in the calculations. Equations are developed for both short- and ...

  1. Plasma excitations in a single-walled carbon nanotube with an ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013-02-03

    Feb 3, 2013 ... Abstract. The effect of different uniform transverse external magnetic fields in plasma frequency when propagated parallel to the surface of the single-walled metallic carbon nanotubes is stud- ied. The classical electrodynamics as well as Maxwell's equations are used in the calculations. Equations are ...

  2. An approach to modelling and simulation of single-walled carbon nanocones for sensing applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhavik Ardeshana

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present manuscript an approach to modelling and simulation of nanocones has been suggested for their use as sensing mediums. The vibrational behaviours of bridged and cantilever Single-Walled Carbon nanocones are modelled using three-dimensional elastic beams of carbon- carbon bonds and atomic masses. Also, the dynamic analysis of bridged and cantilever configurations of these nanocones with different disclination angles of 60°, 120°, 180°, and 240° is performed to evaluate the variation in stiffness with different configurations. The analysis also exhibits the effect of change in the length of nanocones on the vibrational frequencies. For the said purpose a mass equivalent to a carbon atom has been added at the nodes. It is observed that increasing side length of a Single-Walled Carbon nanocones with a constant apex angle results in a reduction in the fundamental frequency. It is also clear from the results that Single-Walled Carbon nanocones with larger apex angles exhibit smaller values of fundamental frequencies. The results suggest that smaller lengths of nanocones are better candidates for sensing applications as they exhibit substantial change in the fundamental frequencies. It can be stated that with higher number of bonds and atoms Single-Walled Carbon nanocones undergoes substantial bending with large declination angle which can be considered as an important finding.

  3. Synthesis of dark brown single-walled carbon nanotubes and their ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We report here a simple and effective approach to the covalent attachment of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and azo compounds. The functionalized SWCNTs prepared (through a radical mechanism) have been used for a diazonium coupling reaction. The results showed that the chemical method used has ...

  4. Increasing amperometric biosensor sensitivity by length fractionated single-walled carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tasca, Federico; Gorton, Lo; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal

    2008-01-01

    In this work the sensitivity-increasing effect of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in amperometric biosensors, depending on their average length distribution, was studied. For this purpose the SWCNTs were oxidatively shortened and subsequently length separated by size exclusion...

  5. Oxidative corrosion potential vs. pH diagram for single-walled carbon nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Tominaga, Masato; Yatsugi, Yuto; Watanabe, Noriaki(Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba, 277-8583, Japan); トミナガ, マサト; ヤツギ, ユウト; ワタナベ, ノリアキ; 冨永, 昌人; 矢次, 祐人; 渡邊, 範明

    2014-01-01

    The oxidative corrosion of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) was investigated, and the diagram of oxidative corrosion potential vs. pH was obtained. The results will contribute to fundamental understanding of oxidative corrosion reactions on sp^2 type carbons.

  6. Conjugated Polymer-Assisted Dispersion of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes : The Power of Polymer Wrapping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Samanta, Suman Kalyan; Fritsch, Martin; Scherf, Ullrich; Gomulya, Widianta; Bisri, Satria Zulkarnaen; Loi, Maria Antonietta

    CONSPECTUS: The future application of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in electronic (nano)devices is closely coupled to the availability of pure, semiconducting SWNTs and preferably, their defined positioning on suited substrates. Commercial carbon nanotube raw mixtures contain metallic as

  7. Raman study on single-walled carbon nanotubes with different laser ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TECS

    Indian Academy of Sciences. 295. Raman study on single-walled carbon nanotubes with different laser excitation energies. S S ISLAM*, KHURSHED AHMAD SHAH, H S MAVI. †. , A K SHAUKLA. †. ,. S RATH. ‡ and HARSH. #. Department of Applied Sciences and Humanities, Faculty of Engineering and Technology, ...

  8. Effectiveness of sorting single-walled carbon nanotubes by diameter using polyfluorene derivatives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gao, J.; Kwak, M.; Wildeman, J.; Hermann, A.; Loi, M. A.; Herrmann, A.

    Semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) sorted by conjugated polymers are of great interest for electronic and optoelectronic applications Here we demonstrate by optical methods that the selectivity of conjugated polymers for semiconducting SWCNTs is influenced by the structure of

  9. Environmental Detection of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Utilizing Near-Infrared Fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    There are a growing number of applications for carbon nanotubes (CNT) in modern technologies and, subsequently, growth in production of CNT has expanded rapidly. Single-walled CNT (SWCNT) consist of a graphene sheet rolled up into a tube. With growing manufacture and use, the ...

  10. Production of vertical arrays of small diameter single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauge, Robert H; Xu, Ya-Qiong

    2013-08-13

    A hot filament chemical vapor deposition method has been developed to grow at least one vertical single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT). In general, various embodiments of the present invention disclose novel processes for growing and/or producing enhanced nanotube carpets with decreased diameters as compared to the prior art.

  11. Raman study of bromine-doped single-walled carbon nanotubes under high pressure

    CERN Document Server

    Liu Bing Bing; Yu Miao; Zou Guang Tian; Carlsten, J; Wagberg, T; Sundqvist, B

    2002-01-01

    Raman results for different single-walled carbon nanotube bundles doped with Br sub 2 were studied both at ambient pressure and under high pressure up to 6 GPa. Our study indicates that bromine resides in the interstitial channel of nanotube bundles as a form of polymer.

  12. Graphitization of single-wall nanotube bundles at extreme conditions: Collapse or coalescence route

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Colonna, F.; Fasolino, A.; Meijer, E.J.

    2013-01-01

    We determine the reaction phase diagram and the transformation mechanism of (5,5) and (10,10) single-walled carbon nanotube bundles up to 20 GPa and 4000 K. We use Monte Carlo simulations, based on the state-of-the-art reactive potential LCBOPII, that incorporates both covalent and van der Waals

  13. Near-complete phase transfer of single-wall carbon nanotubes by ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    alization including purity of the sample, temperature and time. Keywords. Carbon nanotubes; nanostructures; microscopy; microwave; solubility of SWNTs. 1. Introduction. Recently, functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes has attracted great interest in numerous areas of research, ranging from high-strength poly-.

  14. Diameter grouping in bulk samples of single-walled carbon nanotubes from optical absorption spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golden, M.S.; Fink, J.; Dunsch, L.; Bauer, H.-D.; Reibold, M.; Knupfer, M.; Friedlein, R.; Pichler, T.; Jost, O.

    1999-01-01

    The influence of the synthesis parameters on the mean characteristics of single-wall carbon nanotubes in soot produced by the laser vaporization of graphite has been analyzed using optical absorption spectroscopy. The abundance and mean diameter of the nanotubes were found to be most influenced by

  15. Direct observation of spin-injection in tyrosinate-functionalized single-wall carbon nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsoufis, Theodoros; Ampoumogli, Asem; Gournis, Dimitrios; Georgakilas, Vasilios; Jankovic, Lubos; Christoforidis, Konstantinos C.; Deligiannakis, Yiannis; Mavrandonakis, Andreas; Froudakis, George E.; Maccallini, Enrico; Rudolf, Petra; Mateo-Alonso, Aurelio; Prato, Maurizio

    In this work, we report on the interaction of a tyrosinate radical with single wall carbon nanotubes (CNT). The tyrosinate radical was formed from tyrosine (ester) by Fenton's reagent and, reacted in situ with carbon nanotubes resulting in novel tyrosinated carbon nanotube derivatives. The covalent

  16. Structural and chemical evolution of single-wall carbon nanotubes under atomic and molecular deuterium interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lisowski, W.F.; Keim, Enrico G.; van den Berg, A.H.J.; Smithers, M.A.; Smithers, Mark A.

    2005-01-01

    The interaction of atomic (D) and molecular (D2) deuterium, as present in a (D + D2) gas mixture, with single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) has been studied by means of a combination of scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The SWNT

  17. Scanning gate imaging of two coupled quantum dots in single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xin; Hedberg, James; Miyahara, Yoichi; Grutter, Peter; Ishibashi, Koji

    2014-12-12

    Two coupled single wall carbon nanotube quantum dots in a multiple quantum dot system were characterized by using a low temperature scanning gate microscopy (SGM) technique, at a temperature of 170 mK. The locations of single wall carbon nanotube quantum dots were identified by taking the conductance images of a single wall carbon nanotube contacted by two metallic electrodes. The single electron transport through single wall carbon nanotube multiple quantum dots has been observed by varying either the position or voltage bias of a conductive atomic force microscopy tip. Clear hexagonal patterns were observed in the region of the conductance images where only two sets of overlapping conductance rings are visible. The values of coupling capacitance over the total capacitance of the two dots, C(m)/C(1(2)) have been extracted to be 0.21 ∼ 0.27 and 0.23 ∼ 0.28, respectively. In addition, the interdot coupling (conductance peak splitting) has also been confirmed in both conductance image measurement and current-voltage curves. The results show that a SGM technique enables spectroscopic investigation of coupled quantum dots even in the presence of unexpected multiple quantum dots.

  18. Robustness of Dengue Complex Network under Targeted versus Random Attack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafiz Abid Mahmood Malik

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Dengue virus infection is one of those epidemic diseases that require much consideration in order to save the humankind from its unsafe impacts. According to the World Health Organization (WHO, 3.6 billion individuals are at risk because of the dengue virus sickness. Researchers are striving to comprehend the dengue threat. This study is a little commitment to those endeavors. To observe the robustness of the dengue network, we uprooted the links between nodes randomly and targeted by utilizing different centrality measures. The outcomes demonstrated that 5% targeted attack is equivalent to the result of 65% random assault, which showed the topology of this complex network validated a scale-free network instead of random network. Four centrality measures (Degree, Closeness, Betweenness, and Eigenvector have been ascertained to look for focal hubs. It has been observed through the results in this study that robustness of a node and links depends on topology of the network. The dengue epidemic network presented robust behaviour under random attack, and this network turned out to be more vulnerable when the hubs of higher degree have higher probability to fail. Moreover, representation of this network has been projected, and hub removal impact has been shown on the real map of Gombak (Malaysia.

  19. Selectivity and sparseness in randomly connected balanced networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cengiz Pehlevan

    Full Text Available Neurons in sensory cortex show stimulus selectivity and sparse population response, even in cases where no strong functionally specific structure in connectivity can be detected. This raises the question whether selectivity and sparseness can be generated and maintained in randomly connected networks. We consider a recurrent network of excitatory and inhibitory spiking neurons with random connectivity, driven by random projections from an input layer of stimulus selective neurons. In this architecture, the stimulus-to-stimulus and neuron-to-neuron modulation of total synaptic input is weak compared to the mean input. Surprisingly, we show that in the balanced state the network can still support high stimulus selectivity and sparse population response. In the balanced state, strong synapses amplify the variation in synaptic input and recurrent inhibition cancels the mean. Functional specificity in connectivity emerges due to the inhomogeneity caused by the generative statistical rule used to build the network. We further elucidate the mechanism behind and evaluate the effects of model parameters on population sparseness and stimulus selectivity. Network response to mixtures of stimuli is investigated. It is shown that a balanced state with unselective inhibition can be achieved with densely connected input to inhibitory population. Balanced networks exhibit the "paradoxical" effect: an increase in excitatory drive to inhibition leads to decreased inhibitory population firing rate. We compare and contrast selectivity and sparseness generated by the balanced network to randomly connected unbalanced networks. Finally, we discuss our results in light of experiments.

  20. Maximal information transfer and behavior diversity in Random Threshold Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrecut, M; Foster, D; Carteret, H; Kauffman, S A

    2009-07-01

    Random Threshold Networks (RTNs) are an idealized model of diluted, non-symmetric spin glasses, neural networks or gene regulatory networks. RTNs also serve as an interesting general example of any coordinated causal system. Here we study the conditions for maximal information transfer and behavior diversity in RTNs. These conditions are likely to play a major role in physical and biological systems, perhaps serving as important selective traits in biological systems. We show that the pairwise mutual information is maximized in dynamically critical networks. Also, we show that the correlated behavior diversity is maximized for slightly chaotic networks, close to the critical region. Importantly, critical networks maximize coordinated, diverse dynamical behavior across the network and across time: the information transmission between source and receiver nodes and the diversity of dynamical behaviors, when measured with a time delay between the source and receiver, are maximized for critical networks.

  1. Transition to Chaos in Random Neuronal Networks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jonathan Kadmon; Haim Sompolinsky

    2015-01-01

    .... Indeed, simplified rate-based neuronal networks with synaptic connections drawn from Gaussian distribution and sigmoidal nonlinearity are known to exhibit chaotic dynamics when the synaptic gain (i.e...

  2. Selecting Optimal Parameters of Random Linear Network Coding for Wireless Sensor Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heide, Janus; Zhang, Qi; Fitzek, Frank

    2013-01-01

    This work studies how to select optimal code parameters of Random Linear Network Coding (RLNC) in Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs). With Rateless Deluge [1] the authors proposed to apply Network Coding (NC) for Over-the-Air Programming (OAP) in WSNs, and demonstrated that with NC a significant...

  3. Isotherm, thermodynamic, kinetics, and adsorption mechanism studies of Ethidium bromide by single-walled carbon nanotube and carboxylate group functionalized single-walled carbon nanotube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Omid; Fakhri, Ali; Adami, Saeideh; Adami, Sepideh

    2013-04-01

    The studies of kinetics and thermodynamics of adsorption of Ethidium bromide in aqueous solutions on single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) and carboxylate group functionalized single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT-COOH) surfaces were by UV-Vis spectroscopy. The adsorption kinetics for SWCNT-COOH and SWCNTs were well described by a intra-particle diffusion model, while Langmuir, Freundlich, Harkins-Jura, and Halsey isotherms described the adsorption isotherms, and the adsorption thermodynamic parameters of equilibrium constant (K0), standard free energy (ΔG0), standard enthalpy (ΔH0), and standard entropy changes (ΔS0) were measured. The maximum surface coverage for SWCNTs is 36.10% and for SWCNT-COOH is 38.42%. The values of ΔH0 and ΔG0 suggested that the adsorption of EtBr on SWCNT-COOH and SWCNTs was endothermic and spontaneous. The adsorption of EtBr on SWCNT-COOH is more than SWCNTs surfaces. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Efficient sampling of complex network with modified random walk strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yunya; Chang, Shuhua; Zhang, Zhipeng; Zhang, Mi; Yang, Lei

    2018-02-01

    We present two novel random walk strategies, choosing seed node (CSN) random walk and no-retracing (NR) random walk. Different from the classical random walk sampling, the CSN and NR strategies focus on the influences of the seed node choice and path overlap, respectively. Three random walk samplings are applied in the Erdös-Rényi (ER), Barabási-Albert (BA), Watts-Strogatz (WS), and the weighted USAir networks, respectively. Then, the major properties of sampled subnets, such as sampling efficiency, degree distributions, average degree and average clustering coefficient, are studied. The similar conclusions can be reached with these three random walk strategies. Firstly, the networks with small scales and simple structures are conducive to the sampling. Secondly, the average degree and the average clustering coefficient of the sampled subnet tend to the corresponding values of original networks with limited steps. And thirdly, all the degree distributions of the subnets are slightly biased to the high degree side. However, the NR strategy performs better for the average clustering coefficient of the subnet. In the real weighted USAir networks, some obvious characters like the larger clustering coefficient and the fluctuation of degree distribution are reproduced well by these random walk strategies.

  5. Random fracture networks: percolation, geometry and flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, P. M.; Thovert, J. F.; Mourzenko, V. V.

    2015-12-01

    This paper reviews some of the basic properties of fracture networks. Most of the data can only be derived numerically, and to be useful they need to be rationalized, i.e., a large set of numbers should be replaced by a simple formula which is easy to apply for estimating orders of magnitude. Three major tools are found useful in this rationalization effort. First, analytical results can usually be derived for infinite fractures, a limit which corresponds to large densities. Second, the excluded volume and the dimensionless density prove crucial to gather data obtained at intermediate densities. Finally, shape factors can be used to further reduce the influence of fracture shapes. Percolation of fracture networks is of primary importance since this characteristic controls transport properties such as permeability. Recent numerical studies for various types of fracture networks (isotropic, anisotropic, heterogeneous in space, polydisperse, mixture of shapes) are summarized; the percolation threshold rho is made dimensionless by means of the excluded volume. A general correlation for rho is proposed as a function of the gyration radius. The statistical characteristics of the blocks which are cut in the solid matrix by the network are presented, since they control transfers between the porous matrix and the fractures. Results on quantities such as the volume, surface and number of faces are given and semi empirical relations are proposed. The possible intersection of a percolating network and of a cubic cavity is also summarized. This might be of importance for the underground storage of wastes. An approximate reasoning based on the excluded volume of the percolating cluster and of the cubic cavity is proposed. Finally, consequences on the permeability of fracture networks are briefly addressed. An empirical formula which verifies some theoretical properties is proposed.

  6. Random walks on activity-driven networks with attractiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alessandretti, Laura; Sun, Kaiyuan; Baronchelli, Andrea; Perra, Nicola

    2017-05-01

    Virtually all real-world networks are dynamical entities. In social networks, the propensity of nodes to engage in social interactions (activity) and their chances to be selected by active nodes (attractiveness) are heterogeneously distributed. Here, we present a time-varying network model where each node and the dynamical formation of ties are characterized by these two features. We study how these properties affect random-walk processes unfolding on the network when the time scales describing the process and the network evolution are comparable. We derive analytical solutions for the stationary state and the mean first-passage time of the process, and we study cases informed by empirical observations of social networks. Our work shows that previously disregarded properties of real social systems, such as heterogeneous distributions of activity and attractiveness as well as the correlations between them, substantially affect the dynamical process unfolding on the network.

  7. Random field Ising model and community structure in complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, S.-W.; Jeong, H.; Noh, J. D.

    2006-04-01

    We propose a method to determine the community structure of a complex network. In this method the ground state problem of a ferromagnetic random field Ising model is considered on the network with the magnetic field Bs = +∞, Bt = -∞, and Bi≠s,t=0 for a node pair s and t. The ground state problem is equivalent to the so-called maximum flow problem, which can be solved exactly numerically with the help of a combinatorial optimization algorithm. The community structure is then identified from the ground state Ising spin domains for all pairs of s and t. Our method provides a criterion for the existence of the community structure, and is applicable equally well to unweighted and weighted networks. We demonstrate the performance of the method by applying it to the Barabási-Albert network, Zachary karate club network, the scientific collaboration network, and the stock price correlation network. (Ising, Potts, etc.)

  8. Topological properties of random wireless networks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    indicating that a physical infrastructure needs to be put in place before nodes can communicate. Ad hoc and sensor ... edges, the communication paths of the wireless network can be represented by a graph. The representation of the ..... Pr (Gn ∈ P) → 1. Another definition of a threshold is from Friedgut & Kalal (1996). For a.

  9. Dynamic Output Feedback Control for Nonlinear Networked Control Systems with Random Packet Dropout and Random Delay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuiqing Yu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the dynamic output feedback control for nonlinear networked control systems with both random packet dropout and random delay. Random packet dropout and random delay are modeled as two independent random variables. An observer-based dynamic output feedback controller is designed based upon the Lyapunov theory. The quantitative relationship of the dropout rate, transition probability matrix, and nonlinear level is derived by solving a set of linear matrix inequalities. Finally, an example is presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  10. Experimental determination of excitonic band structures of single-walled carbon nanotubes using circular dichroism spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiaojun; Tanaka, Takeshi; Yomogida, Yohei; Sato, Naomichi; Saito, Riichiro; Kataura, Hiromichi

    2016-10-05

    Experimental band structure analyses of single-walled carbon nanotubes have not yet been reported, to the best of our knowledge, except for a limited number of reports using scanning tunnelling spectroscopy. Here we demonstrate the experimental determination of the excitonic band structures of single-chirality single-walled carbon nanotubes using their circular dichroism spectra. In this analysis, we use gel column chromatography combining overloading selective adsorption with stepwise elution to separate 12 different single-chirality enantiomers. Our samples show higher circular dichroism intensities than the highest values reported in previous works, indicating their high enantiomeric purity. Excitonic band structure analysis is performed by assigning all observed Eii and Eij optical transitions in the circular dichroism spectra. The results reproduce the asymmetric structures of the valence and conduction bands predicted by density functional theory. Finally, we demonstrate that an extended empirical formula can estimate Eij optical transition energies for any (n,m) species.

  11. Functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes with silver nanoparticles using Tecoma stans leaf extract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivekanandhan, S.; Venkateswarlu, M.; Carnahan, D.; Misra, M.; Mohanty, A. K.; Satyanarayana, N.

    2012-04-01

    Bioreduction mechanism of Tecoma stans leaf extract for the extracellular synthesis of silver nanoparticles was investigated using ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis). Nanostructure of the bio synthesized silver particles was confirmed by transmission electron microscopic (TEM) analysis. Crystalline cubic phase of the synthesized silver nanoparticles was confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique. Observed rapid reduction behavior of Tecoma stans leaf extract was effectively explored for the functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) with silver nanoparticles. Scanning electron microscopic (SEM) and TEM characterization confirmed the functionalization of single walled carbon nanotubes with the silver nanoparticles and the size of silver nanoparticles were found to be in the range of ∼5-10 nm.

  12. Computational and experimental studies of the interaction between single-walled carbon nanotubes and folic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castillo, John J.; Rozo, Ciro E.; Castillo-León, Jaime

    2013-01-01

    This work involved the preparation of a conjugate between single-walled carbon nanotubes and folic acid that was obtained without covalent chemical functionalization using a simple “one pot” synthesis method. Subsequently, the conjugate was investigated by a computational hybrid method: our own...... Nlayered Integrated Molecular Orbital and Molecular Mechanics (B3LYP(6–31G(d):UFF)). The results confirmed that the interaction occurred via hydrogen bonding between protons of the glutamic moiety from folic acid and π electrons from the carbon nanotubes. The single-walled carbon nanotube-folic acid...... conjugate presented herein is believed to lead the way to new potential applications as carbon nanotube-based drug delivery systems....

  13. Stable double helical iodine chains inside single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Zhen [College of Science, Liaoning University of Technology, Jinzhou, Liaoning, 121001 (China); Liu, Chun-Jian [College of Mathematics and Physics, Bohai University, Jinzhou, Liaoning, 121000 (China); Lv, Hang [Institute of New Energy, Bohai University, Jinzhou, Liaoning, 121000 (China); Liu, Bing-Bing, E-mail: liubb@jlu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Superhard Materials, Jilin University, Changchun, 130012 (China)

    2016-08-12

    The helicity of stable double helical iodine chains inside single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is studied by calculating the systematic interaction energy. Our results present clear images of stable double helical structures inside SWCNTs. The optimum helical radius and helical angle increase and decrease with increasing diameter, respectively. The tube's diameter plays a leading role in the helicity of encapsulated structures, while the tube's chirality may induce different metastable structures. This study indicates that the observed double helical iodine chains in experiments are not necessarily the optimum structures, but may also be metastable structures. - Highlights: • The stable double helical iodine chain inside single-walled carbon nanotubes is proposed. • The influence of tube's diameter and chirality on the stability of encapsulated iodine chains is studied. • The metastable double helical structures may be co-existence with the stable structure but not in the same tubes.

  14. Ultrananocrystalline diamond decoration on to the single wall carbon nano tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Bhavesh; Late, Datta; Jejurikar, Suhas M.

    2017-10-01

    We have demonstrated the decoration of the ultrananocrystalline diamonds on single walled carbon nanotubes using a hot filament assisted chemical vapor deposition. Study reveals the critical influence of the filament to substrate distance on the formation of ultrananocrystalline diamonds on to the single walled carbon nanotubes. It is also observed that etching of carbon nanotubes, due to the presence of unavoidable atomic hydrogen throughout the chemical vapor deposition processes, can be significantly reduced by adjusting the filament to substrate distance. Morphological and structural investigations performed using high resolution transmission electron microscope suggests the growth of ultrananocrystalline diamond is subsequent to the formation of crystalline sp2 carbon layer on the nanotube wall, enabling us to suggest a growth model. The composite synthesized can be thought not only to use as a fuel cell catalyst support but also as chemical sensors, bio-sensors and micro electromechanical systems (MEMS).

  15. Absorption Properties of Hybrid Composites of Gold Nanorods and Functionalized Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deok-Jin Yu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on the optical properties of fabricated nanohybrid structures containing Au nanorods and functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes in aqueous solutions. In particular, the absorption spectra of these hybrid materials are studied as a function of the concentration of the functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes as well as the evolution time following preparation. The absorption spectra show a red shift of the longitudinal plasmon mode of the Au nanorods along with the emergence of broadened structures at wavelengths between 1000 and 1100 nm. These results, supported by TEM images, indicate the self-assembly of the Au nanorods forming on the sidewalls of the functionalized SWNTs driven by polyelectrolyte interactions.

  16. Synthesis of Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes by Plasma Arc: Role of Plasma Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhart, Samir; Scott, Carl D.

    2000-01-01

    Single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) are porous objects on the molecular scale and have a low density, which gives them potential applications as adsorbent for molecular hydrogen. Their H2 absorption capacity published in the literature varies from 4 to 10% by mass according to the purity of the materials and storage conditions. Optimization of production methods of SWNTs should permit improving these new materials for storage of hydrogen. In this article, we show the potential of using SWNTs in hydrogen storage. In particular, we pose problems associated with synthesis, purification, and opening up of the nanotubes. We present an electric arc process currently used at laboratory scale to produce single wall carbon nanotubes. We discuss, in particular, operating conditions that permit growth of nanotubes and some plasma parameters that assure control of the material. Analysis of the process is carried out with the aid of local measurements of temperature and scanning and transmission electron microscopy of the materials.

  17. Reconstruction of a random phase dynamics network from observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikovsky, A.

    2018-01-01

    We consider networks of coupled phase oscillators of different complexity: Kuramoto-Daido-type networks, generalized Winfree networks, and hypernetworks with triple interactions. For these setups an inverse problem of reconstruction of the network connections and of the coupling function from the observations of the phase dynamics is addressed. We show how a reconstruction based on the minimization of the squared error can be implemented in all these cases. Examples include random networks with full disorder both in the connections and in the coupling functions, as well as networks where the coupling functions are taken from experimental data of electrochemical oscillators. The method can be directly applied to asynchronous dynamics of units, while in the case of synchrony, additional phase resettings are necessary for reconstruction.

  18. Amperometric Low-Potential Detection of Malic Acid Using Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes Based Electrodes

    OpenAIRE

    Camelia Bala; Lucian Rotariu; Adina Arvinte

    2008-01-01

    The electrocatalytical property of single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) modified electrode toward NADH detection was explored by cyclic voltammetry and amperometry techniques. The experimental results show that SWNT decrease the overvoltage required for oxidation of NADH (to +300 mV vs. Ag/AgCl) and this property make them suitable for dehydrogenases based biosensors. The behavior of the SWNT modified biosensor for L-malic acid was studied as an example for dehydrogenases biosensor. The amperom...

  19. Evaluation of single-walled carbon nanohorns as sorbent in dispersive micro solid-phase extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez-Soto, Juan Manuel; Cardenas, Soledad [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Institute of Fine Chemistry and Nanochemistry, Marie Curie Building, Campus de Rabanales, University of Cordoba, 14071 Cordoba (Spain); Valcarcel, Miguel, E-mail: qa1meobj@uco.es [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Institute of Fine Chemistry and Nanochemistry, Marie Curie Building, Campus de Rabanales, University of Cordoba, 14071 Cordoba (Spain)

    2012-02-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The potential of single walled carbon nanohorns in dispersive solid phase microextraction has been evaluated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The method was characterized for the extraction of PAHs from waters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Single walled carbon nanohorns were better extractant than carbon nanotubes and carbon nanocones. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The limits of detection were adequate for the target analytes in environmental waters. - Abstract: A new dispersive micro solid-phase extraction method which uses single-walled carbon nanohorns (SWNHs) as sorbent is proposed. The procedure combines the excellent sorbent properties of the nanoparticles with the efficiency of the dispersion of the material in the sample matrix. Under these conditions, the interaction with the analytes is maximized. The determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons was selected as model analytical problem. Two dispersion strategies were evaluated, being the functionalization via microwave irradiation better than the use of a surfactant. The extraction was accomplished by adding 1 mL of oxidized SWHNs (o-SWNHs) dispersion to 10 mL of water sample. After extraction, the mixture was passed through a disposable Nylon filter were the nanoparticles enriched with the PAHs were retained. The elution was carried out with 100 {mu}L of hexane. The limits of detection achieved were between 30 and 60 ng L{sup -1} with a precision (as repeatability) better than 12.5%. The recoveries obtained for the analytes in three different water samples were acceptable in all instances. The performance of o-SWNHs was favourably compared with that provided by carboxylated single-walled carbon nanotubes and thermally treated carbon nanocones.

  20. Dynamic Raman Spectroelectrochemistry of Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes modified electrodes using a Langmuir-Schaefer method

    OpenAIRE

    Ibáñez, David; Romero, Edna Cecilia; Colina, Álvaro; Heras, Aránzazu

    2014-01-01

    Raman spectroelectrochemistry is a fundamental technique to characterize single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) films. In this work, we have performed the study of SWCNT films transferred to a glassy carbon electrode using a Langmuir-Schaefer method. Langmuir balance has allowed us to control the characteristics of the film that can be easily transferred to the electrode support. Time-resolved Raman spectroelectrochemistry experiments at scan rates between 20 and 400 mV s−1 were done in two di...

  1. A triple quantum dot in a single-wall carbon nanotube

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grove-Rasmussen, Kasper; Jørgensen, Henrik Ingerslev; Hayashi, T.

    2008-01-01

    A top-gated single-wall carbon nanotube is used to define three coupled quantum dots in series between two electrodes. The additional electron number on each quantum dot is controlled by top-gate voltages allowing for current measurements of single, double, and triple quantum dot stability diagrams....... Simulations using a capacitor model including tunnel coupling between neighboring dots captures the observed behavior with good agreement. Furthermore, anticrossings between indirectly coupled levels and higher order cotunneling are discussed. Udgivelsesdato: April...

  2. Fabrication of high yield horizontally aligned single wall carbon nanotubes for molecular electronics

    OpenAIRE

    Ibrahim, Imad

    2014-01-01

    The extraordinary properties of the single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have stimulated an enormous amount of research towards the realization of SWCNT-based products for different applications ranging form nanocomposites to nanoelectronics. Their high charge mobility, exceedingly good current-carrying capacities and ability to be either semiconducting or metallic render them ideal building blocks for nanoelectronics. For nanoelectronic applications, either individual or parallel aligned SW...

  3. Investigation of Chirality Selection Mechanism of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-17

    deposition of carbon nanotubes : a review on growth mechanism and mass production ,” J. Nanosci. Nanotechnol., 10, 3739 (2010). List of Publications...Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA2386-14-1-4047 5b. GRANT NUMBER Grant 14IOA058_144047 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 61102F...of two significant mechanistic aspects of carbon nanotube (CNT) array growth under chemical vapor deposition conditions: chirality selectivity and

  4. Three-phonon Umklapp process in zigzag single-walled carbon nanotubes

    CERN Document Server

    Xiao, Y; Cao, J X; Ding, J W

    2003-01-01

    The rate of relaxation of zigzag single-walled carbon nanotubes is calculated by consideration of three-phonon Umklapp process. The results show that the relaxation rate increases exponentially with phonon frequency at low frequency. The linear dependence of the relaxation rate on temperature is obtained. It is shown that the value of the phonon mean free path reaches a few micrometres, which is consistent with the estimated experimental result. (letter to the editor)

  5. The Effects of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes on the Shear Piezoelectricity of Biopolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovell, Conrad; Fitz-Gerald, James M.; Harrison, Joycelyn S.; Park, Cheol

    2008-01-01

    Shear piezoelectricity was investigated in a series of composites consisting of increased loadings of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in poly (gamma-benzyl-L-glutamate), or PBLG. The effects of the SWCNTs on this material property in PBLG will be discussed. Their influence on the morphology of the polymer (degree of orientation and crystallinity), and electrical and dielectric properties of the composite will be reported

  6. Fabrication of spintronics device by direct synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes from ferromagnetic electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Ambri Mohamed, Nobuhito Inami, Eiji Shikoh, Yoshiyuki Yamamoto, Hidenobu Hori and Akihiko Fujiwara

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe an alternative method for realizing a carbon nanotube spin field-effect transistor device by the direct synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs on substrates by alcohol catalytic chemical vapor deposition. We observed hysteretic magnetoresistance (MR at low temperatures due to spin-dependent transport. In these devices, the maximum ratio in resistance variation of MR was found to be 1.8%.

  7. Predicting Excitonic Gaps of Semiconducting Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes From a Field Theoretic Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Konik, Robert M.; Sfeir, Matthew Y.; Misewich, James A.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate that a non-perturbative framework for the treatment of the excitations of single walled carbon nanotubes based upon a field theoretic reduction is able to accurately describe experiment observations of the absolute values of excitonic energies. This theoretical framework yields a simple scaling function from which the excitonic energies can be read off. This scaling function is primarily determined by a single parameter, the charge Luttinger parameter of the tube, which is in t...

  8. Single wall carbon nanotube supports for portable direct methanol fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girishkumar, G; Hall, Timothy D; Vinodgopal, K; Kamat, Prashant V

    2006-01-12

    Single-wall and multiwall carbon nanotubes are employed as carbon supports in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC). The morphology and electrochemical activity of single-wall and multiwall carbon nanotubes obtained from different sources have been examined to probe the influence of carbon support on the overall performance of DMFC. The improved activity of the Pt-Ru catalyst dispersed on carbon nanotubes toward methanol oxidation is reflected as a shift in the onset potential and a lower charge transfer resistance at the electrode/electrolyte interface. The evaluation of carbon supports in a passive air breathing DMFC indicates that the observed power density depends on the nature and source of carbon nanostructures. The intrinsic property of the nanotubes, dispersion of the electrocatalyst and the electrochemically active surface area collectively influence the performance of the membrane electrode assembly (MEA). As compared to the commercial carbon black support, single wall carbon nanotubes when employed as the support for anchoring the electrocatalyst particles in the anode and cathode sides of MEA exhibited a approximately 30% enhancement in the power density of a single stack DMFC operating at 70 degrees C.

  9. Free vibration analysis of single-walled boron nitride nanotubes based on a computational mechanics framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, J. W.; Tong, L. H.; Xiang, Ping

    2017-12-01

    Free vibration behaviors of single-walled boron nitride nanotubes are investigated using a computational mechanics approach. Tersoff-Brenner potential is used to reflect atomic interaction between boron and nitrogen atoms. The higher-order Cauchy-Born rule is employed to establish the constitutive relationship for single-walled boron nitride nanotubes on the basis of higher-order gradient continuum theory. It bridges the gaps between the nanoscale lattice structures with a continuum body. A mesh-free modeling framework is constructed, using the moving Kriging interpolation which automatically satisfies the higher-order continuity, to implement numerical simulation in order to match the higher-order constitutive model. In comparison with conventional atomistic simulation methods, the established atomistic-continuum multi-scale approach possesses advantages in tackling atomic structures with high-accuracy and high-efficiency. Free vibration characteristics of single-walled boron nitride nanotubes with different boundary conditions, tube chiralities, lengths and radii are examined in case studies. In this research, it is pointed out that a critical radius exists for the evaluation of fundamental vibration frequencies of boron nitride nanotubes; opposite trends can be observed prior to and beyond the critical radius. Simulation results are presented and discussed.

  10. Exploring community structure in biological networks with random graphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sah, Pratha; Singh, Lisa O; Clauset, Aaron; Bansal, Shweta

    2014-06-25

    Community structure is ubiquitous in biological networks. There has been an increased interest in unraveling the community structure of biological systems as it may provide important insights into a system's functional components and the impact of local structures on dynamics at a global scale. Choosing an appropriate community detection algorithm to identify the community structure in an empirical network can be difficult, however, as the many algorithms available are based on a variety of cost functions and are difficult to validate. Even when community structure is identified in an empirical system, disentangling the effect of community structure from other network properties such as clustering coefficient and assortativity can be a challenge. Here, we develop a generative model to produce undirected, simple, connected graphs with a specified degrees and pattern of communities, while maintaining a graph structure that is as random as possible. Additionally, we demonstrate two important applications of our model: (a) to generate networks that can be used to benchmark existing and new algorithms for detecting communities in biological networks; and (b) to generate null models to serve as random controls when investigating the impact of complex network features beyond the byproduct of degree and modularity in empirical biological networks. Our model allows for the systematic study of the presence of community structure and its impact on network function and dynamics. This process is a crucial step in unraveling the functional consequences of the structural properties of biological systems and uncovering the mechanisms that drive these systems.

  11. Listening to the noise: random fluctuations reveal gene network parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munsky, Brian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Khammash, Mustafa [UCSB

    2009-01-01

    The cellular environment is abuzz with noise. The origin of this noise is attributed to the inherent random motion of reacting molecules that take part in gene expression and post expression interactions. In this noisy environment, clonal populations of cells exhibit cell-to-cell variability that frequently manifests as significant phenotypic differences within the cellular population. The stochastic fluctuations in cellular constituents induced by noise can be measured and their statistics quantified. We show that these random fluctuations carry within them valuable information about the underlying genetic network. Far from being a nuisance, the ever-present cellular noise acts as a rich source of excitation that, when processed through a gene network, carries its distinctive fingerprint that encodes a wealth of information about that network. We demonstrate that in some cases the analysis of these random fluctuations enables the full identification of network parameters, including those that may otherwise be difficult to measure. This establishes a potentially powerful approach for the identification of gene networks and offers a new window into the workings of these networks.

  12. Nonparametric resampling of random walks for spectral network clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallani, Fabrizio De Vico; Nicosia, Vincenzo; Latora, Vito; Chavez, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Parametric resampling schemes have been recently introduced in complex network analysis with the aim of assessing the statistical significance of graph clustering and the robustness of community partitions. We propose here a method to replicate structural features of complex networks based on the non-parametric resampling of the transition matrix associated with an unbiased random walk on the graph. We test this bootstrapping technique on synthetic and real-world modular networks and we show that the ensemble of replicates obtained through resampling can be used to improve the performance of standard spectral algorithms for community detection.

  13. Nonparametric resampling of random walks for spectral network clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vico Fallani, Fabrizio; Nicosia, Vincenzo; Latora, Vito; Chavez, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Parametric resampling schemes have been recently introduced in complex network analysis with the aim of assessing the statistical significance of graph clustering and the robustness of community partitions. We propose here a method to replicate structural features of complex networks based on the non-parametric resampling of the transition matrix associated with an unbiased random walk on the graph. We test this bootstrapping technique on synthetic and real-world modular networks and we show that the ensemble of replicates obtained through resampling can be used to improve the performance of standard spectral algorithms for community detection.

  14. Exponential random graph models for networks with community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fronczak, Piotr; Fronczak, Agata; Bujok, Maksymilian

    2013-09-01

    Although the community structure organization is an important characteristic of real-world networks, most of the traditional network models fail to reproduce the feature. Therefore, the models are useless as benchmark graphs for testing community detection algorithms. They are also inadequate to predict various properties of real networks. With this paper we intend to fill the gap. We develop an exponential random graph approach to networks with community structure. To this end we mainly built upon the idea of blockmodels. We consider both the classical blockmodel and its degree-corrected counterpart and study many of their properties analytically. We show that in the degree-corrected blockmodel, node degrees display an interesting scaling property, which is reminiscent of what is observed in real-world fractal networks. A short description of Monte Carlo simulations of the models is also given in the hope of being useful to others working in the field.

  15. Maps of random walks on complex networks reveal community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosvall, Martin; Bergstrom, Carl T

    2008-01-29

    To comprehend the multipartite organization of large-scale biological and social systems, we introduce an information theoretic approach that reveals community structure in weighted and directed networks. We use the probability flow of random walks on a network as a proxy for information flows in the real system and decompose the network into modules by compressing a description of the probability flow. The result is a map that both simplifies and highlights the regularities in the structure and their relationships. We illustrate the method by making a map of scientific communication as captured in the citation patterns of >6,000 journals. We discover a multicentric organization with fields that vary dramatically in size and degree of integration into the network of science. Along the backbone of the network-including physics, chemistry, molecular biology, and medicine-information flows bidirectionally, but the map reveals a directional pattern of citation from the applied fields to the basic sciences.

  16. On Distributed Computation in Noisy Random Planar Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Kanoria, Y.; Manjunath, D.

    2007-01-01

    We consider distributed computation of functions of distributed data in random planar networks with noisy wireless links. We present a new algorithm for computation of the maximum value which is order optimal in the number of transmissions and computation time.We also adapt the histogram computation algorithm of Ying et al to make the histogram computation time optimal.

  17. Random Access with Physical-layer Network Coding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goseling, J.; Gastpar, M.C.; Weber, J.H.

    2013-01-01

    Leveraging recent progress in compute-and-forward we propose an approach to random access that is based on physical-layer network coding: When packets collide, it is possible to recover a linear combination of the packets at the receiver. Over many rounds of transmission, the receiver can thus

  18. Transition of single-walled carbon nanotubes from metallic to semiconducting in field-effect transistors by hydrogen plasma treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Gang; Li, Qunqing; Jiang, Kaili; Zhang, Xiaobo; Chen, Jia; Ren, Zheng; Fan, Shoushan

    2007-06-01

    We report hydrogen plasma treatment results on converting the metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes to semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes. We found that the as-grown single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) can be sorted as three groups which behave as metallic, as-metallic, and semiconducting SWNTs. These three groups have different changes under hydrogen plasma treatment and successive annealing process. The SWNTs can be easily hydrogenated in the hydrogen plasma environment and the as-metallic SWNTs can be transformed to semiconducting SWNTs. The successive annealing process can break the C-H bond, so the conversion is reversible.

  19. Unravelling the mechanisms behind mixed catalysts for the high yield production of single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetali, Sailaja; Zaka, Mujtaba; Schönfelder, Ronny; Bachmatiuk, Alicja; Börrnert, Felix; Ibrahim, Imad; Lin, Jarrn H; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio; Warner, Jamie H; Büchner, Bernd; Rümmeli, Mark H

    2009-12-22

    The use of mixed catalysts for the high-yield production of single-walled carbon nanotubes is well-known. The mechanisms behind the improved yield are poorly understood. In this study, we systematically explore different catalyst combinations from Ni, Co, and Mo for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes via laser evaporation. Our findings reveal that the mixing of catalysts alters the catalyst cluster size distribution, maximizing the clusters' potential to form a hemispherical cap at nucleation and, hence, form a single-walled carbon nanotube. This process significantly improves the single-walled carbon nanotube yields.

  20. Navigation by anomalous random walks on complex networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Tongfeng; Zhang, Jie; Khajehnejad, Moein; Small, Michael; Zheng, Rui; Hui, Pan

    2016-11-23

    Anomalous random walks having long-range jumps are a critical branch of dynamical processes on networks, which can model a number of search and transport processes. However, traditional measurements based on mean first passage time are not useful as they fail to characterize the cost associated with each jump. Here we introduce a new concept of mean first traverse distance (MFTD) to characterize anomalous random walks that represents the expected traverse distance taken by walkers searching from source node to target node, and we provide a procedure for calculating the MFTD between two nodes. We use Lévy walks on networks as an example, and demonstrate that the proposed approach can unravel the interplay between diffusion dynamics of Lévy walks and the underlying network structure. Moreover, applying our framework to the famous PageRank search, we show how to inform the optimality of the PageRank search. The framework for analyzing anomalous random walks on complex networks offers a useful new paradigm to understand the dynamics of anomalous diffusion processes, and provides a unified scheme to characterize search and transport processes on networks.

  1. Computer simulation of randomly cross-linked polymer networks

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, T P

    2002-01-01

    In this work, Monte Carlo and Stochastic Dynamics computer simulations of mesoscale model randomly cross-linked networks were undertaken. Task parallel implementations of the lattice Monte Carlo Bond Fluctuation model and Kremer-Grest Stochastic Dynamics bead-spring continuum model were designed and used for this purpose. Lattice and continuum precursor melt systems were prepared and then cross-linked to varying degrees. The resultant networks were used to study structural changes during deformation and relaxation dynamics. The effects of a random network topology featuring a polydisperse distribution of strand lengths and an abundance of pendant chain ends, were qualitatively compared to recent published work. A preliminary investigation into the effects of temperature on the structural and dynamical properties was also undertaken. Structural changes during isotropic swelling and uniaxial deformation, revealed a pronounced non-affine deformation dependant on the degree of cross-linking. Fractal heterogeneiti...

  2. Random Deep Belief Networks for Recognizing Emotions from Speech Signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Guihua; Li, Huihui; Huang, Jubing; Li, Danyang; Xun, Eryang

    2017-01-01

    Now the human emotions can be recognized from speech signals using machine learning methods; however, they are challenged by the lower recognition accuracies in real applications due to lack of the rich representation ability. Deep belief networks (DBN) can automatically discover the multiple levels of representations in speech signals. To make full of its advantages, this paper presents an ensemble of random deep belief networks (RDBN) method for speech emotion recognition. It firstly extracts the low level features of the input speech signal and then applies them to construct lots of random subspaces. Each random subspace is then provided for DBN to yield the higher level features as the input of the classifier to output an emotion label. All outputted emotion labels are then fused through the majority voting to decide the final emotion label for the input speech signal. The conducted experimental results on benchmark speech emotion databases show that RDBN has better accuracy than the compared methods for speech emotion recognition.

  3. Finite plateau in spectral gap of polychromatic constrained random networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avetisov, V.; Gorsky, A.; Nechaev, S.; Valba, O.

    2017-12-01

    We consider critical behavior in the ensemble of polychromatic Erdős-Rényi networks and regular random graphs, where network vertices are painted in different colors. The links can be randomly removed and added to the network subject to the condition of the vertex degree conservation. In these constrained graphs we run the Metropolis procedure, which favors the connected unicolor triads of nodes. Changing the chemical potential, μ , of such triads, for some wide region of μ , we find the formation of a finite plateau in the number of intercolor links, which exactly matches the finite plateau in the network algebraic connectivity (the value of the first nonvanishing eigenvalue of the Laplacian matrix, λ2). We claim that at the plateau the spontaneously broken Z2 symmetry is restored by the mechanism of modes collectivization in clusters of different colors. The phenomena of a finite plateau formation holds also for polychromatic networks with M ≥2 colors. The behavior of polychromatic networks is analyzed via the spectral properties of their adjacency and Laplacian matrices.

  4. Wave speed in excitable random networks with spatially constrained connections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikita Vladimirov

    Full Text Available Very fast oscillations (VFO in neocortex are widely observed before epileptic seizures, and there is growing evidence that they are caused by networks of pyramidal neurons connected by gap junctions between their axons. We are motivated by the spatio-temporal waves of activity recorded using electrocorticography (ECoG, and study the speed of activity propagation through a network of neurons axonally coupled by gap junctions. We simulate wave propagation by excitable cellular automata (CA on random (Erdös-Rényi networks of special type, with spatially constrained connections. From the cellular automaton model, we derive a mean field theory to predict wave propagation. The governing equation resolved by the Fisher-Kolmogorov PDE fails to describe wave speed. A new (hyperbolic PDE is suggested, which provides adequate wave speed v( that saturates with network degree , in agreement with intuitive expectations and CA simulations. We further show that the maximum length of connection is a much better predictor of the wave speed than the mean length. When tested in networks with various degree distributions, wave speeds are found to strongly depend on the ratio of network moments / rather than on mean degree , which is explained by general network theory. The wave speeds are strikingly similar in a diverse set of networks, including regular, Poisson, exponential and power law distributions, supporting our theory for various network topologies. Our results suggest practical predictions for networks of electrically coupled neurons, and our mean field method can be readily applied for a wide class of similar problems, such as spread of epidemics through spatial networks.

  5. Organic/hybrid nanoparticles and single-walled carbon nanotubes: preparation methods and chiral applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhassen, Haysem; Antony, Vijy; Ghanem, Ashraf; Yajadda, Mir Massoud Aghili; Han, Zhao Jun; Ostrikov, Kostya Ken

    2014-11-01

    Nanoparticles are molecular-sized solids with at least one dimension measuring between 1-100 nm or 10-1000 nm depending on the individual discipline's perspective. They are aggregates of anywhere from a few hundreds to tens of thousands of atoms which render them larger than molecules but smaller than bulk solids. Consequently, they frequently exhibit physical and chemical properties somewhere between. On the other hand, nanocrystals are a special class of nanoparticles which have started gaining attention recently owing to their unique crystalline structures which provide a larger surface area and promising applications including chiral separations. Hybrid nanoparticles are supported by the growing interest of chemists, physicists, and biologists, who are researching to fully exploit them. These materials can be defined as molecular or nano-composites with mixed (organic or bio) and inorganic components, where at least one of the component domain has a dimension ranging from a few Å to several nanometers. Similarly, and due to their extraordinary physical, chemical, and electrical properties, single-walled carbon nanotubes have been the subject of intense research. In this short review, the focus is mainly on the current well-established simple preparation techniques of chiral organic and hybrid nanoparticles as well as single-walled carbon nanotubes and their applications in separation science. Of particular interest, cinchonidine, chitosan, and β-CD-modified gold nanoparticles (GNPs) are discussed as model examples for organic and hybrid nanoparticles. Likewise, the chemical vapor deposition method, used in the preparation of single-walled carbon nanotubes, is discussed. The enantioseparation applications of these model nanomaterials is also presented. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Electrocatalytic oxidation of diethylaminoethanethiol and hydrazine at single-walled carbon nanotubes modified with prussian blue nanoparticles

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Adekunle, AS

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available In this work, edged plane pyrolytic graphite electrode EPPGE was modified with functionalised single-walled carbon nanotubes and Prussian blue nanoparticles (PB). The modified electrode was characterised by techniques such as TEM, FTIR, XPS, EDX...

  7. Vertical Alignment of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes on Nanostructure Fabricated by Atomic Force Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-16

    Technology, and Entrepreneurship , NST-4.3, San Diego, CA, August 2008. [10] J. E. Seo, T. J. Lee, K. W. Oh, M. M. Sung, J. W. Lee, W. Yi, H. Lee...T. Chen and J.-I, Chyi, Appl . Phys. Lett. 84, 2919 (2004). [30] J. L. Sauvajol, E. Anglaret, S. Rols and L. Alvarez, Car- bon 40, 1697 (2002). [31...Elastic strain of freely suspended single-wall carbon nanotube ropes. Appl Phys Lett. 1999;74(25):3803-5. [2] Tombler TW, Zhou C, Alexseyev L, Kong

  8. Immobilization of Lipase on Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes in Ionic Liquid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Han Ki; Lee, Jae Kwan; Kim, Mahn Joo [Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Cheol Jin [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-03-15

    A lipase from Pseudomonas cepacia was immobilized onto single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in two different ways in each of two solvent systems (buffer and ionic liquid). The most efficient immobilization was achieved in ionic liquid (1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate, BMIM-BF4). In this procedure, carbon nanotubes were first functionalized noncovalently with 1-pyrenebutyric acid N-hydroxysuccinimide ester and then subject to the coupling reaction with the lipase in ionic liquid. The resulting immobilized enzyme displayed the highest activity in the transesterification of 1-phenylethyl alcohol in the presence of vinyl acetate in toluene.

  9. Inkjet printing of aligned single-walled carbon-nanotube thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Yuki; Nobusa, Yuki; Gocho, Shota; Kudou, Hikaru; Yanagi, Kazuhiro; Kataura, Hiromichi; Takenobu, Taishi

    2013-04-01

    We report a method for the inkjet printing of aligned single-walled carbon-nanotube (SWCNT) films by combining inkjet technology with the strong wettability contrast between hydrophobic and hydrophilic areas based on the patterning of self-assembled monolayers. Both the drying process control using the strong wettability boundary and the coffee-stain effect strongly promote the aggregation of SWCNTs along the contact line of a SWCNT ink droplet, thereby demonstrating our achievement of inkjet-printed aligned SWCNT films. This method could open routes for developing high-performance and environmentally friendly SWCNT printed electronics.

  10. Observation and Characterization of Fragile Organometallic Molecules Encapsulated in Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Ogawa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermally fragile tris(η5-cyclopentadienylerbium (ErCp3 molecules are encapsulated in single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs with high yield. We realized the encapsulation of ErCp3 with high filling ratio by using high quality SWCNTs at an optimized temperature under higher vacuum. Structure determination based on high-resolution transmission electron microscope observations together with the image simulations reveals the presence of almost free rotation of each ErCp3 molecule in SWCNTs. The encapsulation is also confirmed by X-ray diffraction. Trivalent character of Er ions (i.e., Er3+ is confirmed by X-ray absorption spectrum.

  11. Dual distributions for the metallic and semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes observed by Raman spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosuke Sakai

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The prospective applicability of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT is highly dependent on its controlled synthesis.Effects of few macroscopic growth-conditions (such as catalyst composition, temperature of deposition etc. reflected on thedistributions of SWNT (diameter, chiralities and semiconducting-metallic nature, are studied by Raman spectroscopicanalysis. We report the presence of two different diameter distributions for as-grown metallic and semiconducting SWNT, themetallic tubes having larger average diameters than their semiconducting counterpart. We hope that, in future, it should bepossible to selectively synthesize SWNT with pre-determined chirality, diameter and metallic/semiconducting nature.

  12. Effect of Topological Defects on Buckling Behavior of Single-walled Carbon Nanotube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Guoxiu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Molecular dynamic simulation method has been employed to consider the critical buckling force, pressure, and strain of pristine and defected single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT under axial compression. Effects of length, radius, chirality, Stone–Wales (SW defect, and single vacancy (SV defect on buckling behavior of SWCNTs have been studied. Obtained results indicate that axial stability of SWCNT reduces significantly due to topological defects. Critical buckling strain is more susceptible to defects than critical buckling force. Both SW and SV defects decrease the buckling mode of SWCNT. Comparative approach of this study leads to more reliable design of nanostructures.

  13. Energy loss of the electron system in individual single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santavicca, Daniel F; Chudow, Joel D; Prober, Daniel E; Purewal, Meninder S; Kim, Philip

    2010-11-10

    We characterize the energy loss of the nonequilibrium electron system in individual metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes at low temperature. Using Johnson noise thermometry, we demonstrate that, for a nanotube with Ohmic contacts, the dc resistance at finite bias current directly reflects the average electron temperature. This enables a straightforward determination of the thermal conductance associated with cooling of the nanotube electron system. In analyzing the temperature- and length-dependence of the thermal conductance, we consider contributions from acoustic phonon emission, optical phonon emission, and hot electron outdiffusion.

  14. Narrow-chirality distributed single-walled carbon nanotube growth from nonmagnetic catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorannevis, Zohreh; Kato, Toshiaki; Kaneko, Toshiro; Hatakeyama, Rikizo

    2010-07-21

    We present the first demonstration of the nonmagnetic catalyzed synthesis of narrow-chirality distributed single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Based on the systematic investigation using different combinations of catalyst types (magnetic or nonmagnetic) and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) methods (thermal CVD (TCVD) or plasma CVD (PCVD)), PCVD with the nonmagnetic catalyst under the appropriate H(2) concentration is found to be critical as the methodological element of realizing the narrow-chirality distribution. Electrical measurements of thin film SWNTs produced under the different combinations of catalyst types and CVD methods are also investigated, which reveals the SWNTs grown from the nonmagnetic catalyst with PCVD display the best device performance.

  15. Visualizing the growth dynamics of individual single-wall carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Jakob Birkedal; Zhang, Lili; He, Maoshuai

    In order to meet the increasing demand of faster and more flexible electronics and optical devices and at the same time decrease the use of the critical metals, carbon based devices are in fast development. Single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) based electronics is a way of addressing...... around the studied sample at elevated temperature gives a unique way of monitoring gas-solid interactions such as CNT growth. Here we show the direct experimental evidence on the growth dynamics of SW-CNTs from Co/MgO catalysts using CO as carbon source inside the environmental TEM. The evolution...

  16. New Method Developed To Purify Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes for Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebron, Marisabel; Meador, Michael A.

    2003-01-01

    Single wall carbon nanotubes have attracted considerable attention because of their remarkable mechanical properties and electrical and thermal conductivities. Use of these materials as primary or secondary reinforcements in polymers or ceramics could lead to new materials with significantly enhanced mechanical strength and electrical and thermal conductivity. Use of carbon-nanotube-reinforced materials in aerospace components will enable substantial reductions in component weight and improvements in durability and safety. Potential applications for single wall carbon nanotubes include lightweight components for vehicle structures and propulsion systems, fuel cell components (bipolar plates and electrodes) and battery electrodes, and ultra-lightweight materials for use in solar sails. A major barrier to the successful use of carbon nanotubes in these components is the need for methods to economically produce pure carbon nanotubes in large enough quantities to not only evaluate their suitability for certain applications but also produce actual components. Most carbon nanotube synthesis methods, including the HiPCO (high pressure carbon monoxide) method developed by Smalley and others, employ metal catalysts that remain trapped in the final product. These catalyst impurities can affect nanotube properties and accelerate their decomposition. The development of techniques to remove most, if not all, of these impurities is essential to their successful use in practical applications. A new method has been developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center to purify gram-scale quantities of single wall carbon nanotubes. This method, a modification of a gas phase purification technique previously reported by Smalley and others, uses a combination of high-temperature oxidations and repeated extractions with nitric and hydrochloric acid. This improved procedure significantly reduces the amount of impurities (catalyst and nonnanotube forms of carbon) within the nanotubes, increasing

  17. Molecular views of physical adsorption inside and outside of single-wall carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondratyuk, Petro; Yates, John T

    2007-10-01

    We discuss our own studies of molecular adsorption on and inside of single-wall carbon nanotubes in the broader context of important theoretical and experimental developments in the field. We show that adsorption in the nanotube interior sites as well as in the groove and exterior sites may be resolved by various experimental methods. In addition, the changes that the adsorbate phases undergo due to confinement in the nanotube interior are discussed, particularly focusing on confined molecules of water, alkanes, and an alkene. Attention is also devoted to the use of oxidizing agents such as ozone to open the ends and walls of nanotubes for interior adsorption.

  18. Carbohydrate conjugation through microwave-assisted functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes using perfluorophenyl azides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Na; Shimpi, Manishkumar R; Ramström, Olof; Yan, Mingdi

    2015-03-20

    Carbohydrate-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were synthesized using microwave-assisted reaction of perfluorophenyl azide with the nanotubes. The results showed that microwave radiation provides a rapid and effective means to covalently attach carbohydrates to SWNTs, producing carbohydrate-SWNT conjugates for biorecognition. The carbohydrate-functionalized SWNTs were furthermore shown to interact specifically with cognate carbohydrate-specific proteins (lectins), resulting in predicted recognition patterns. The carbohydrate-presenting SWNTs constitute a new platform for sensitive protein- or cell recognition, which pave the way for glycoconjugated carbon nanomaterials in biorecognition applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Nanobioconjugates of Candida antarctica lipase B and single-walled carbon nanotubes in biodiesel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencze, László Csaba; Bartha-Vári, Judith H; Katona, Gabriel; Toşa, Monica Ioana; Paizs, Csaba; Irimie, Florin-Dan

    2016-01-01

    Carboxylated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTCOOH) were used as support for covalent immobilization of Candida antarctica lipase B (CaL-B) using linkers with different lengths. The obtained nanostructured biocatalysts with low diffusional limitation were tested in batch mode in the ethanolysis of the sunflower oil. SWCNTCOOH-CaL-B proved to be a highly efficient and stable biocatalyst in acetonitrile (83.4% conversion after 4h at 35°C, retaining >90% of original activity after 10 cycles). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Gold Nanoparticles as the Catalyst of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshikazu Homma

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Gold nanoparticles have been proven to act as efficient catalysts for chemical reactions, such as oxidation and hydrogen production. In this review we focus on a different aspect of the catalysis of gold nanoparticles; single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT synthesis. This is not a traditional meaning of catalytic reaction, but SWCNTs cannot be synthesized without nanoparticles. Previously, gold was considered as unsuitable metal species as the catalyst of SWCNT synthesis. However, gold nanoparticles with diameters smaller than 5 nm were found to effectively produce SWCNTs. We discuss the catalysis of gold and related metals for SWCNT synthesis in comparison with conventional catalysts, such as iron, cobalt, and nickel.

  1. BUCKLING BEHAVIOUR OF SINGLE-WALLED CARBON NANOTUBES UNDER AXIAL LOADING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Litak

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigate a single walled Carbon Nanotube under an axially directed compressive line loading applied at both of its edges. The expected buckling behavior we study by application of a molecular computation approach. We formulate a global potential and search for its minimum to obtain the equilibrium configuration. Using besides the main parameter, which is the value of the loading, as second parameter the diameter of the tube, we are able to define the critical value of the diameter, for which we obtain the coincident case of local shell buckling.

  2. Quantum ion-acoustic oscillations in single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, S.A. [Kyoto Univ., Katsura (Japan). Graduate School of Engineering; Quaid-i-Azam Univ., Islamabad (Pakistan). National Centre for Physics; Iqbal, Z. [University of Management and Technology, Sialkot (Pakistan); Wazir, Z. [Riphah International Univ., Islamabad (Pakistan). Dept. of Basic Sciences; Rehman, Aman ur [Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences (PIEAS), Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2016-08-01

    Quantum ion-acoustic oscillations in single-walled carbon nanotubes are studied by employing a quantum hydrodynamics model. The dispersion equation is obtained by Fourier transformation, which exhibits the existence of quantum ion-acoustic wave affected by change of density balance due to presence of positive or negative heavy species as stationary ion clusters and wave potential at equilibrium. The numerical results are presented, and the role of quantum degeneracy, nanotube geometry, electron exchange-correlation effects, and concentration and polarity of heavy species on wave dispersion is pointed out for typical systems of interest.

  3. Zinc oxide nanowire photodetectors with single-walled carbon nanotube thin-film electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ates, Elif Selen; Kucukyildiz, Seyda; Unalan, Husnu Emrah

    2012-10-24

    In this study, transparent and flexible zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowire ultraviolet (UV) photodetectors prepared via a solution-based method in which single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) thin films were used as transparent electrodes are reported. The photoresponse current was found to be in proportion with the ZnO nanowire density, and the nanowire density could be tuned to increase the photocurrent by a factor of 300. The decay time for the fabricated photodetectors was found to be as low as 16 s. This study suggests the possibility of fabricating inexpensive, visible-blind UV photodetectors via solution-based methods.

  4. Purification and Functionalization of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes through Different Treatment Procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peir-An Tsai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs were purified by the combined use of ultrasonic- and microwave-assisted acid digestion. The results show that the method efficiently eliminates impurities, reduces solvent consumption, and prevents damage to the structure of the SWCNTs. The purified SWCNTs were given functionalization treatments with a nitric acid/sulfuric acid mixture. These acid-treated SWCNTs (A-SWCNTs were then grafted with 3-isocyanatopropyl triethoxysilane (A-SWCNTs-Si. The A-SWCNTs and A-SWCNTs-Si were used to improve interfacial interactions with polymers and to produce a well-dispersed SWCNT composite.

  5. The drop evaporation on a heated substrate with single wall nanotubes coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenov, A. A.; Zaitsev, D. V.

    2017-11-01

    Evaporation of a sessile nanoliter water droplet was investigated experimentally at the substrate temperature of 30 °C. The studies were performed on the two substrates made of copper. One of them had no coating and was polished to the root mean square roughness of 20 nm. Another one was coated with single wall nanotubes (the root mean square roughness is 62 nm). The research has shown that specific rate of evaporation (mass loss per unit of the drop surface area) on the substrate with nanotubes coating is up to 20 percent higher in comparison with the substrate without coating.

  6. Effect of Surface Modification on the Hansen Solubility Parameters of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Jing; Larsen, Mikael

    2013-01-01

    In this work, seven types of surface-modified single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Raman spectroscopy to investigate the functional groups and extent of functionalization. Hansen solubility parameters were determined based on observations...... of the sedimentation and swollen states of the SWNTs in solvents after ultrasonication, and the results were compared with the hydrodynamic sizes of the SWNTs evaluated by the dynamic light scattering method. We found that the solubility of SWNTs is related to their functional groups and degree of functionalization...

  7. Effective permittivity of single-walled carbon nanotube composites: Two-fluid model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moradi, Afshin, E-mail: a.moradi@kut.ac.ir [Department of Engineering Physics, Kermanshah University of Technology, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Nano Sciences, Institute for Studies in Theoretical Physics and Mathematics (IPM), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zangeneh, Hamid Reza; Moghadam, Firoozeh Karimi [Department of Photonics, Faculty of Physics, University of Kashan, Kashan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    We develop an effective medium theory to obtain effective permittivity of a composite of two-dimensional (2D) aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes. Electronic excitations on each nanotube surface are modeled by an infinitesimally thin layer of a 2D electron gas represented by two interacting fluids, which takes into account different nature of the σ and π electrons. Calculations of both real and imaginary parts of the effective dielectric function of the system are presented, for different values of the filling factor and radius of carbon nanotubes.

  8. Record Endurance for Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube–Based Memory Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Y

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We study memory devices consisting of single-walled carbon nanotube transistors with charge storage at the SiO2/nanotube interface. We show that this type of memory device is robust, withstanding over 105 operating cycles, with a current drive capability up to 10−6 A at 20 mV drain bias, thus competing with state-of-the-art Si-devices. We find that the device performance depends on temperature and pressure, while both endurance and data retention are improved in vacuum.

  9. Interaction of nucleic acid bases with single-walled carbon nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, M. K.; Dubey, Madan; Zakar, Eugene; Namburu, Raju; Czyznikowska, Zaneta; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2009-10-01

    Theoretical investigations at the M05-2X DFT level employing the 6-31G(d), 6-31G(d,p), 6-31+G(d,p) and cc-pVDZ basis sets show that all nucleic acid bases (NABs), guanine, adenine, cytosine, thymine and uracil form stable stacking complexes with the zigzag (7,0) single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT). The values of the BSSE corrected interaction energy suggested that among the bases guanine forms the most stable complex. The other bases generate complexes of similar stability with the considered SWCNT that are less stable than the guanine-SWCNT dimer.

  10. Efficient organometallic spin filter between single-wall carbon nanotube or graphene electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koleini, Mohammad; Paulsson, Magnus; Brandbyge, Mads

    2007-01-01

    and nonequilibrium Green's function techniques. We consider weak and strong cluster-contact bonds. Depending on the bonding we find from 73% (strong bonds) up to 99% (weak bonds) spin polarization of the electron transmission, and enhanced polarization with increased cluster length.......We present a theoretical study of spin transport in a class of molecular systems consisting of an organometallic benzene-vanadium cluster placed in between graphene or single-wall carbon-nanotube-model contacts. Ab initio modeling is performed by combining spin density functional theory...

  11. Navigation by anomalous random walks on complex networks

    CERN Document Server

    Weng, Tongfeng; Khajehnejad, Moein; Small, Michael; Zheng, Rui; Hui, Pan

    2016-01-01

    Anomalous random walks having long-range jumps are a critical branch of dynamical processes on networks, which can model a number of search and transport processes. However, traditional measurements based on mean first passage time are not useful as they fail to characterize the cost associated with each jump. Here we introduce a new concept of mean first traverse distance (MFTD) to characterize anomalous random walks that represents the expected traverse distance taken by walkers searching from source node to target node, and we provide a procedure for calculating the MFTD between two nodes. We use Levy walks on networks as an example, and demonstrate that the proposed approach can unravel the interplay between diffusion dynamics of Levy walks and the underlying network structure. Interestingly, applying our framework to the famous PageRank search, we can explain why its damping factor empirically chosen to be around 0.85. The framework for analyzing anomalous random walks on complex networks offers a new us...

  12. Visual Tracking With Convolutional Random Vector Functional Link Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Le; Suganthan, Ponnuthurai Nagaratnam

    2017-10-01

    Deep neural network-based methods have recently achieved excellent performance in visual tracking task. As very few training samples are available in visual tracking task, those approaches rely heavily on extremely large auxiliary dataset such as ImageNet to pretrain the model. In order to address the discrepancy between the source domain (the auxiliary data) and the target domain (the object being tracked), they need to be finetuned during the tracking process. However, those methods suffer from sensitivity to the hyper-parameters such as learning rate, maximum number of epochs, size of mini-batch, and so on. Thus, it is worthy to investigate whether pretraining and fine tuning through conventional back-prop is essential for visual tracking. In this paper, we shed light on this line of research by proposing convolutional random vector functional link (CRVFL) neural network, which can be regarded as a marriage of the convolutional neural network and random vector functional link network, to simplify the visual tracking system. The parameters in the convolutional layer are randomly initialized and kept fixed. Only the parameters in the fully connected layer need to be learned. We further propose an elegant approach to update the tracker. In the widely used visual tracking benchmark, without any auxiliary data, a single CRVFL model achieves 79.0% with a threshold of 20 pixels for the precision plot. Moreover, an ensemble of CRVFL yields comparatively the best result of 86.3%.

  13. Delineating social network data anonymization via random edge perturbation

    KAUST Repository

    Xue, Mingqiang

    2012-01-01

    Social network data analysis raises concerns about the privacy of related entities or individuals. To address this issue, organizations can publish data after simply replacing the identities of individuals with pseudonyms, leaving the overall structure of the social network unchanged. However, it has been shown that attacks based on structural identification (e.g., a walk-based attack) enable an adversary to re-identify selected individuals in an anonymized network. In this paper we explore the capacity of techniques based on random edge perturbation to thwart such attacks. We theoretically establish that any kind of structural identification attack can effectively be prevented using random edge perturbation and show that, surprisingly, important properties of the whole network, as well as of subgraphs thereof, can be accurately calculated and hence data analysis tasks performed on the perturbed data, given that the legitimate data recipient knows the perturbation probability as well. Yet we also examine ways to enhance the walk-based attack, proposing a variant we call probabilistic attack. Nevertheless, we demonstrate that such probabilistic attacks can also be prevented under sufficient perturbation. Eventually, we conduct a thorough theoretical study of the probability of success of any}structural attack as a function of the perturbation probability. Our analysis provides a powerful tool for delineating the identification risk of perturbed social network data; our extensive experiments with synthetic and real datasets confirm our expectations. © 2012 ACM.

  14. Increasing the luminous efficiency of an MEH-PPV based PLED using salmon DNA and single walled carbon nanotube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madhwal, Devinder, E-mail: devindermadhwal@gmail.co [Department of Electronic Science, University of Delhi South campus, Benito Juarez Road, New Delhi 110021 (India); Singh, Inderpreet; Kumar, Jitender [Department of Electronic Science, University of Delhi South campus, Benito Juarez Road, New Delhi 110021 (India); Bhatia, C.S. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Bhatnagar, P.K.; Mathur, P.C. [Department of Electronic Science, University of Delhi South campus, Benito Juarez Road, New Delhi 110021 (India)

    2011-07-15

    The combined effect of a salmon deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-based electron blocking layer and a single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) composite-based electron transport layer on the performance of a poly[2-methoxy-5-(2'-ethyl-hexyloxy)-1,4-phenylene vinylene](MEH-PPV) polymer light emitting diode (PLED) has been examined. The SWCNT network in the composite layer improves electron injection from cathode and the DNA blocks these high mobility electrons at the electron blocking layer-polymer interface, leading to high luminance from the device. The luminous efficiency of the PLED is increased {approx}20 times compared to that of a PLED using only MEH-PPV. - Highlights: {yields} We report fabrication of a high luminous efficiency MEH-PPV based polymer LED. {yields} Salmon DNA-CTMA layer is used to block injected electrons in the polymer layer. {yields} MEH-PPV-SWCNT composite is used to transport electrons in the polymer layer. {yields} The luminous efficiency of the polymer LED thereby improves about 20 times.

  15. First-Principles Electronic Structure Calculations of N2H4 Adsorbed on Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, M.; Tian, W. Q.; Jayanthi, C. S.; Wu, S. Y.

    2008-03-01

    Recent experiments conducted by Desai et al. [1] reveal that single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) networks exposed to N2H4 vapor at various pressures exhibit considerable drop in resistance with respect to the pristine sample. Experimental findings reveal: (i) n-type behavior for the adsorption of N2H4/SWCNT, and (ii) the binding of N2H4 on SWCNT as chemisorption. In the present work, we have performed first-principles electronic structure calculations [2] for the N2H4 adsorbed on the (14, 0) SWCNT, where several orientations for the N2H4 molecule were considered. Calculations for the combined system were performed using 3 unit cells with the DFT/GGA and ultra soft pseudo-potentials. Our calculations reveal: (i) the binding of N2H4 on SWCNT as physisorption, and (ii) the electronic structure of SWCNT to be practically unaltered by the adsorption of N2H4, suggesting that there will not be a dramatic drop in resistance for N2H4/SWCNT. This is in disagreement with the experimental findings. To further understand the experimental observations, we will discuss mechanisms that may alter the binding nature of N2H4 on SWCNT. [1] S. Desai, G. Sumanasekera, et al. (APS, March 2008). [2] G. Kresse and J. Furthmuller, Phys. Rev. B 54, 11169 (1996).

  16. Protein Detection with Potentiometric Aptasensors: A Comparative Study between Polyaniline and Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Transducers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Düzgün

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A comparison study on the performance characteristics and surface characterization of two different solid-contact selective potentiometric thrombin aptasensors, one exploiting a network of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs and the other the polyaniline (PANI, both acting as a transducing element, is described in this work. The molecular properties of both SWCNT and PANI surfaces have been modified by covalently linking thrombin binding aptamers as biorecognition elements. The two aptasensors are compared and characterized through potentiometry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS based on the voltammetric response of multiply charged transition metal cations (such as hexaammineruthenium, [Ru(NH36]3+ bound electrostatically to the DNA probes. The surface densities of aptamers were accurately determined by the integration of the peak for the reduction of [Ru(NH36]3+ to [Ru(NH36]2+. The differences and the similarities, as well as the transduction mechanism, are also discussed. The sensitivity is calculated as 2.97 mV/decade and 8.03 mV/decade for the PANI and SWCNTs aptasensors, respectively. These results are in accordance with the higher surface density of the aptamers in the SWCNT potentiometric sensor.

  17. Protein Detection with Potentiometric Aptasensors: A Comparative Study between Polyaniline and Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imran, Hassan; Levon, Kalle; Rius, F. Xavier

    2013-01-01

    A comparison study on the performance characteristics and surface characterization of two different solid-contact selective potentiometric thrombin aptasensors, one exploiting a network of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and the other the polyaniline (PANI), both acting as a transducing element, is described in this work. The molecular properties of both SWCNT and PANI surfaces have been modified by covalently linking thrombin binding aptamers as biorecognition elements. The two aptasensors are compared and characterized through potentiometry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) based on the voltammetric response of multiply charged transition metal cations (such as hexaammineruthenium, [Ru(NH3)6]3+) bound electrostatically to the DNA probes. The surface densities of aptamers were accurately determined by the integration of the peak for the reduction of [Ru(NH3)6]3+ to [Ru(NH3)6]2+. The differences and the similarities, as well as the transduction mechanism, are also discussed. The sensitivity is calculated as 2.97 mV/decade and 8.03 mV/decade for the PANI and SWCNTs aptasensors, respectively. These results are in accordance with the higher surface density of the aptamers in the SWCNT potentiometric sensor. PMID:23533345

  18. Molecular dynamics study of radiation damage and microstructure evolution of zigzag single-walled carbon nanotubes under carbon ion incidence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Huan [Department of Nuclear Science & Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing (China); Tang, Xiaobin, E-mail: tangxiaobin@nuaa.edu.cn [Department of Nuclear Science & Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Nuclear Energy Equipment Materials Engineering, Nanjing (China); Chen, Feida; Huang, Hai; Liu, Jian [Department of Nuclear Science & Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing (China); Chen, Da [Department of Nuclear Science & Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Nuclear Energy Equipment Materials Engineering, Nanjing (China)

    2016-07-01

    Highlights: • Various incident sites of CNTs are classified into three types for the first time. • Different ion energies and fluences are considered to study the radiation damage. • CNTs have ability to heal the radiation-induced damage at higher temperature. • Stability of a large-diameter tube excels in a slim one under the same conditions. - Abstract: The radiation damage and microstructure evolution of different zigzag single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were investigated under incident carbon ion by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The radiation damage of SWCNTs under incident carbon ion with energy ranging from 25 eV to 1 keV at 300 K showed many differences at different incident sites, and the defect production increased to the maximum value with the increase in incident ion energy, and slightly decreased but stayed fairly stable within the majority of the energy range. The maximum damage of SWCNTs appeared when the incident ion energy reached 200 eV and the level of damage was directly proportional to incident ion fluence. The radiation damage was also studied at 100 K and 700 K and the defect production decreased distinctly with rising temperature because radiation-induced defects would anneal and recombine by saturating dangling bonds and reconstructing carbon network at the higher temperature. Furthermore, the stability of a large-diameter tube surpassed that of a thin one under the same radiation environments.

  19. Probing the Extent of Randomness in Protein Interaction Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-07-11

    scale-free networks are born equal: the role of the seed graph in PPI network evolution. PLoS Comput Biol 3: e118. doi:10.1371/journal.pcbi.0030118. 57...from seeds [56]. In the degree-conserving degree-weighted (DCDW) model, each node is considered once, in a random order, and a set number of edges are...gene duplication in fungi . Nature 449: 54–61. 63. Fraser HB, Hirsh AE, Steinmetz LM, Scharfe C, Feldman MW (2002) Evolutionary rate in the protein

  20. A Random Dot Product Model for Weighted Networks

    CERN Document Server

    DeFord, Daryl R

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a generalization of the random dot product model for networks whose edge weights are drawn from a parametrized probability distribution. We focus on the case of integer weight edges and show that many previously studied models can be recovered as special cases of this generalization. Our model also determines a dimension--reducing embedding process that gives geometric interpretations of community structure and centrality. The dimension of the embedding has consequences for the derived community structure and we exhibit a stress function for determining appropriate dimensions. We use this approach to analyze a coauthorship network and voting data from the U.S. Senate.

  1. Fractal structures of single-walled carbon nanotubes in biologically relevant conditions: role of chirality vs. media conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Iftheker A; Aich, Nirupam; Afrooz, A R M Nabiul; Flora, Joseph R V; Schierz, P Ariette; Ferguson, P Lee; Sabo-Attwood, Tara; Saleh, Navid B

    2013-11-01

    Aggregate structure of covalently functionalized chiral specific semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) was systematically studied employing static light scattering (SLS). Fractal dimensions (Df) of two specific chirality SWNTs-SG65 and SG76 with (6, 5) and (7, 6) chiral enrichments-were measured under four biological exposure media conditions, namely: Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium (DMEM), Minimum Essential Medium (MEM), Roswell Park Memorial Institute (RPMI) 1640 medium, and 0.9% saline solution. The SWNTs exhibited chiral dependence on Df with SG65 showing more fractal or loosely bound aggregate structures, i.e., lower Df values (range of 2.24±0.03 to 2.64±0.05), compared to the SG76 sample (range of 2.58±0.13 to 2.90±0.08). All the Df values reported are highly reproducible, measured from multiple SLS runs and estimated with 'random block-effects' statistical analysis that yielded all p values to be fractal aggregates. Moreover, presence of fetal bovine serum (FBS) and bovine serum albumin (BSA), used to mimic the in vitro cell culture condition, reduced the Df values, i.e., created more fractal structures. Steric hindrance to aggregation was identified as the key mechanism for creating the fractal structures. Also, increase in FBS concentration from 1% to 10% resulted in increasingly lower Df values. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Origins and characteristics of the threshold voltage variability of quasiballistic single-walled carbon nanotube field-effect transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Qing; Han, Shu-jen; Penumatcha, Ashish V; Frank, Martin M; Tulevski, George S; Tersoff, Jerry; Haensch, Wilfried E

    2015-02-24

    Ultrascaled transistors based on single-walled carbon nanotubes are identified as one of the top candidates for future microprocessor chips as they provide significantly better device performance and scaling properties than conventional silicon technologies. From the perspective of the chip performance, the device variability is as important as the device performance for practical applications. This paper presents a systematic investigation on the origins and characteristics of the threshold voltage (VT) variability of scaled quasiballistic nanotube transistors. Analysis of experimental results from variable-temperature measurement as well as gate oxide thickness scaling studies shows that the random variation from fixed charges present on the oxide surface close to nanotubes dominates the VT variability of nanotube transistors. The VT variability of single-tube transistors has a figure of merit that is quantitatively comparable with that of current silicon devices; and it could be reduced with the adoption of improved device passivation schemes, which might be necessary for practical devices incorporating multiple nanotubes, whose area normalized VT variability becomes worse due to the synergic effects from the limited surface coverage of nanotubes and the nonlinearity of the device off-state leakage current, as predicted by the Monte Carlo simulation.

  3. Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes Exhibit Dual-Phase Regulation to Exposed Arabidopsis Mesophyll Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Peng

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Herein we are the first to report that single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs exhibit dual-phase regulation to Arabidopsis mesophyll cells exposed to different concentration of SWCNTs. The mesophyll protoplasts were prepared by enzyme digestion, and incubated with 15, 25, 50, 100 μg/ml SWCNTs for 48 h, and then were observed by optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, the reactive oxygen species (ROS generation was measured. Partial protoplasts were stained with propidium iodide and 4'-6- diamidino-2-phenylindole, partial protoplasts were incubated with fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled SWCNTs, and observed by fluorescence microscopy. Results showed that SWCNTs could traverse both the plant cell wall and cell membrane, with less than or equal to 50 μg/ml in the culture medium, SWCNTs stimulated plant cells to grow out trichome clusters on their surface, with more than 50 μg/ml SWCNTs in the culture medium, SWCNTs exhibited obvious toxic effects to the protoplasts such as increasing generation of ROS, inducing changes of protoplast morphology, changing green leaves into yellow, and inducing protoplast cells' necrosis and apoptosis. In conclusion, single walled carbon nanotubes can get through Arabidopsis mesophyll cell wall and membrane, and exhibit dose-dependent dual-phase regulation to Arabidopsis mesophyll protoplasts such as low dose stimulating cell growth, and high dose inducing cells' ROS generation, necrosis or apoptosis.

  4. Structural stability of transparent conducting films assembled from length purified single-wall carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. M. Harris; G. R. S. Iyer; D. O. Simien; J. A. Fagan; J. Y. Huh; J. Y. Chung; S. D. Hudson; J. Obrzut; J. F. Douglas; C. M. Stafford; E. K. Hobbie

    2011-01-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) films show significant promise for transparent electronics applications that demand mechanical flexibility, but durability remains an outstanding issue. In this work, thin membranes of length purified single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are uniaxially and isotropically compressed by depositing them on prestrained polymer substrates. Upon release of the strain, the topography, microstructure, and conductivity of the films are characterized using a combination of optical/fluorescence microscopy, light scattering, force microscopy, electron microscopy, and impedance spectroscopy. Above a critical surface mass density, films assembled from nanotubes of well-defined length exhibit a strongly nonlinear mechanical response. The measured strain dependence reveals a dramatic softening that occurs through an alignment of the SWCNTs normal to the direction of prestrain, which at small strains is also apparent as an anisotropic increase in sheet resistance along the same direction. At higher strains, the membrane conductivities increase due to a compression-induced restoration of conductive pathways. Our measurements reveal the fundamental mode of elasto-plastic deformation in these films and suggest how it might be suppressed.

  5. Mechanism of Synthesis of Ultra-Long Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes in Arc Discharge Plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keidar, Michael [George Washington University

    2013-06-23

    In this project fundamental issues related to synthesis of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), which is relationship between plasma parameters and SWNT characteristics were investigated. Given that among plasma-based techniques arc discharge stands out as very advantageous in several ways (fewer defects, high flexibility, longer lifetime) this techniques warrants attention from the plasma physics and plasma technology standpoint. Both experimental and theoretical investigations of the plasma and SWNTs synthesis were conducted. Experimental efforts focused on plasma diagnostics, measurements of nanostructures parameters, and nanoparticle characterization. Theoretical efforts focused to focus on multi-dimensional modeling of the arc discharge and single wall nanotube synthesis in arc plasmas. It was demonstrated in experiment and theoretically that controlling plasma parameters can affect nanostucture synthesis altering SWNT properties (length and diameter) and leading to synthesis of new structures such as a few-layer graphene. Among clearly identified parameters affecting synthesis are magnetic and electric fields. Knowledge of the plasma parameters and discharge characteristics is crucial for ability to control synthesis process by virtue of both magnetic and electric fields. New graduate course on plasma engineering was introduced into curriculum. 3 undergraduate students were attracted to the project and 3 graduate students (two are female) were involved in the project. Undergraduate student from Historically Black University was attracted and participated in the project during Summer 2010.

  6. Synergistic Effects in the Gas Sensitivity of Polypyrrole/Single Wall Carbon Nanotube Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Duc Thien

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Polypyrrole/single wall carbon nanotube composites were synthesized by in-situ chemical polymerization using pyrrole (PPy as precursor and single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs as additive component. Electron microscope images reveal that SWNTs component acts as nucleation sites for PPy growth in the form of spherical and cylindrical core-shell structures. The SWNTs/PPy core-shell results in thin n-p junctions which modify the PPy bandgap and reduce the work function of electrons. As a result of the strong coupling, Raman and IR spectra show that the PPy undergoes a transition from polaron to bipolaron state, i.e., indicating an increase in the conductivity. In the UV-Vis spectra, the 340 nm adsorption band (π*-π transition exhibits a red shift, while the 460 nm adsorption band (bipolaron transition experiences a blue shift indicating a change in electronic structure and a relocation of polaron levels in the band gap of PPy. The modification in PPy electronic structure brings in a synergistic effect in sensing feature. Upon exposure to oxygen (an oxidizing agent and NH3 gas (a reducing agent, the PPy/SWNTs nanocomposite shows an enhancement in sensitivity exceeding ten folds in comparison with those of PPy or SWNTs.

  7. Purification of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes by spiral counter-current chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Martha; Lazo-Portugal, Rodrigo; Ahn, Saeyoung Nate; Stefansson, Steingrimur

    2017-02-03

    Over the last decade man-made carbon nanostructures have shown great promise in electronic applications, but they are produced as very heterogeneous mixtures with different properties so the achievement of a significant commercial application has been elusive. The dimensions of single-wall carbon nanotubes are generally a nanometer wide, up to hundreds of microns long and the carbon nanotubes have anisotropic structures. They are processed to have shorter lengths but they need to be sorted by diameter and chirality. Thus counter-current chromatography methods developed for large molecules are applied to separate these compounds. A modified mixer-settler spiral CCC rotor made with 3 D printed disks was used with a polyethylene glycol-dextran 2-phase solvent system and a surfactant gradient to purify the major species in a commercial preparation. We isolated the semi-conducting single walled carbon nanotube chiral species identified by UV spectral analysis. The further development of spiral counter-current chromatography instrumentation and methods will enable the scalable purification of carbon nanotubes useful for the next generation electronics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Designable and dynamic single-walled stiff nanotubes assembled from sequence-defined peptoids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Haibao; Ding, Yanhuai; Wang, Mingming; Song, Yang; Liao, Zhihao; Newcomb, Christina J.; Wu, Xuepeng; Tang, Xian-Qiong; Li, Zheng; Lin, Yuehe; Yan, Feng; Jian, Teng-Yue; Mu, Peng; Chen, Chunlong

    2018-01-18

    Despite recent advances in assembly of organic nanotubes, conferral of sequence-defined engineering and dynamic response characteristics to the tubules remains a challenge. Here we report a new family of highly-designable and dynamic single-walled nanotubes assembled from sequence-defined peptoids through a unique “rolling-up and closure of nanosheet” mechanism. During the assembly process, amorphous spherical particles of amphiphilic peptoid oligomers (APOs) crystallized to form well-defined nanosheets which were then folded to form single-walled peptoid nanotubes (SW-PNTs). These SW-PNTs undergo a pH-triggered, reversible contraction-expansion motion. By varying the number of hydrophobic residues of APOs, we demonstrate the tuning of PNT wall thickness and diameter, and mechanical properties. AFM-based mechanical measurements indicate that PNTs are highly stiff (Young’s Modulus ~13-17 GPa), comparable to the stiffest known biological materials. We further demonstrate that the precise incorporation of functional groups within PNTs and the application of functional PNTs in water decontamination. We believe these SW-PNTs can provide a robust platform for development of biomimetic materials tailored to specific applications.

  9. Advances in NO2 sensing with individual single-walled carbon nanotube transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muoth, Matthias; Roman, Cosmin; Haluska, Miroslav; Hierold, Christofer

    2014-01-01

    Summary The charge carrier transport in carbon nanotubes is highly sensitive to certain molecules attached to their surface. This property has generated interest for their application in sensing gases, chemicals and biomolecules. With over a decade of research, a clearer picture of the interactions between the carbon nanotube and its surroundings has been achieved. In this review, we intend to summarize the current knowledge on this topic, focusing not only on the effect of adsorbates but also the effect of dielectric charge traps on the electrical transport in single-walled carbon nanotube transistors that are to be used in sensing applications. Recently, contact-passivated, open-channel individual single-walled carbon nanotube field-effect transistors have been shown to be operational at room temperature with ultra-low power consumption. Sensor recovery within minutes through UV illumination or self-heating has been shown. Improvements in fabrication processes aimed at reducing the impact of charge traps have reduced the hysteresis, drift and low-frequency noise in carbon nanotube transistors. While open challenges such as large-scale fabrication, selectivity tuning and noise reduction still remain, these results demonstrate considerable progress in transforming the promise of carbon nanotube properties into functional ultra-low power, highly sensitive gas sensors. PMID:25551046

  10. Advances in NO2 sensing with individual single-walled carbon nanotube transistors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran Chikkadi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The charge carrier transport in carbon nanotubes is highly sensitive to certain molecules attached to their surface. This property has generated interest for their application in sensing gases, chemicals and biomolecules. With over a decade of research, a clearer picture of the interactions between the carbon nanotube and its surroundings has been achieved. In this review, we intend to summarize the current knowledge on this topic, focusing not only on the effect of adsorbates but also the effect of dielectric charge traps on the electrical transport in single-walled carbon nanotube transistors that are to be used in sensing applications. Recently, contact-passivated, open-channel individual single-walled carbon nanotube field-effect transistors have been shown to be operational at room temperature with ultra-low power consumption. Sensor recovery within minutes through UV illumination or self-heating has been shown. Improvements in fabrication processes aimed at reducing the impact of charge traps have reduced the hysteresis, drift and low-frequency noise in carbon nanotube transistors. While open challenges such as large-scale fabrication, selectivity tuning and noise reduction still remain, these results demonstrate considerable progress in transforming the promise of carbon nanotube properties into functional ultra-low power, highly sensitive gas sensors.

  11. Apparent Enhanced Solubility of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes in a Deuterated Acid Mixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Ramanathan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available An apparent enhanced solubility of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs in the deuterated form of the standard 3 : 1 sulfuric (H2SO4 to nitric (HNO3 acid mixture treatment is reported and attributed to the stronger interaction of deuterium bonds with the single-wall carbon nanotube surface. UV-Visible spectroscopy was used to characterize the apparent enhanced solubility of the SWNTs treated in deuterated forms of the acid mixture in comparison to the standard acid mix, while FTIR was used to analyze the nature of the functional groups generated on the SWNTs as a result of the different acid treatments. The apparent enhanced solubility reported here is consistent with the limited number of computational and experimental results published in the literature regarding the interaction of carbon nanotubes with deuterated solvents; however, a detailed understanding of the underlying mechanism responsible for this observation is currently lacking. The apparent increased solubility observed here could potentially be utilized in many applications where carbon nanotube dispersion is required.

  12. Single-Wall Carbon Nanotube Field Effect Transistors with Non-Volatile Memory Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Tatsuya; Yoshimura, Takeshi; Akita, Seiji; Fujimura, Norifumi; Nakayama, Yoshikazu

    2006-10-01

    We describe the fabrication and electrical characteristics of single-wall carbon-nanotubes field-effect transistors (CNT-FETs) with a non-volatile memory function using ferroelectric thin films as gate insulators. The ferroelectric-gate CNT-FETs were fabricated using single-wall CNTs synthesized from alcohol by catalytic chemical vapor deposition and sol-gel derived PbZr0.5Ti0.5O3 thin films. The ferroelectric-gate CNT-FETs showed modulation of the drain current with the gate voltage and the threshold voltage shift (memory window) on the drain current-gate voltage characteristics. Moreover, the memory window was saturated around 1.1 V as the gate voltage sweeping range increased. These results indicate that carriers in CNTs are controlled by spontaneous polarization of the ferroelectric films. Because ferroelectrics exhibit complex couplings between their electrical, structural, mechanical, thermal, and optical properties, and because CNTs have unique mechanical and electrical properties, ferroelectric-gate CNT-FETs offer promise as potentially useful nanoelectronics devices not only for non-volatile memory elements but also for high-sensitivity sensors.

  13. Design and implementation of a random neural network routing engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocak, T; Seeber, J; Terzioglu, H

    2003-01-01

    Random neural network (RNN) is an analytically tractable spiked neural network model that has been implemented in software for a wide range of applications for over a decade. This paper presents the hardware implementation of the RNN model. Recently, cognitive packet networks (CPN) is proposed as an alternative packet network architecture where there is no routing table, instead the RNN based reinforcement learning is used to route packets. Particularly, we describe implementation details for the RNN based routing engine of a CPN network processor chip: the smart packet processor (SPP). The SPP is a dual port device that stores, modifies, and interprets the defining characteristics of multiple RNN models. In addition to hardware design improvements over the software implementation such as the dual access memory, output calculation step, and reduced output calculation module, this paper introduces a major modification to the reinforcement learning algorithm used in the original CPN specification such that the number of weight terms are reduced from 2n/sup 2/ to 2n. This not only yields significant memory savings, but it also simplifies the calculations for the steady state probabilities (neuron outputs in RNN). Simulations have been conducted to confirm the proper functionality for the isolated SPP design as well as for the multiple SPP's in a networked environment.

  14. Randomly evolving idiotypic networks: modular mean field theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidtchen, Holger; Behn, Ulrich

    2012-07-01

    We develop a modular mean field theory for a minimalistic model of the idiotypic network. The model comprises the random influx of new idiotypes and a deterministic selection. It describes the evolution of the idiotypic network towards complex modular architectures, the building principles of which are known. The nodes of the network can be classified into groups of nodes, the modules, which share statistical properties. Each node experiences only the mean influence of the groups to which it is linked. Given the size of the groups and linking between them the statistical properties such as mean occupation, mean lifetime, and mean number of occupied neighbors are calculated for a variety of patterns and compared with simulations. For a pattern which consists of pairs of occupied nodes correlations are taken into account.

  15. Peer-Assisted Content Distribution with Random Linear Network Coding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hundebøll, Martin; Ledet-Pedersen, Jeppe; Sluyterman, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Peer-to-peer networks constitute a widely used, cost-effective and scalable technology to distribute bandwidth-intensive content. The technology forms a great platform to build distributed cloud storage without the need of a central provider. However, the majority of todays peer-to-peer systems...... require complex algorithms to schedule what parts of obtained content to forward to other peers. Random Linear Network Coding can greatly simplify these algorithm by removing the need for coordination between the distributing nodes. In this paper we propose and evaluate the structure of the BRONCO peer-to-peer....... Furthermore, we evaluate the performance of different parameters and suggest a suitable trade-off between CPU utilization and network overhead. Within the limitations of the used test environment, we have shown that networkc coding is usable in peer-assisted content distribution and we suggest further...

  16. Coevolution of quantum and classical strategies on evolving random networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Li

    Full Text Available We study the coevolution of quantum and classical strategies on weighted and directed random networks in the realm of the prisoner's dilemma game. During the evolution, agents can break and rewire their links with the aim of maximizing payoffs, and they can also adjust the weights to indicate preferences, either positive or negative, towards their neighbors. The network structure itself is thus also subject to evolution. Importantly, the directionality of links does not affect the accumulation of payoffs nor the strategy transfers, but serves only to designate the owner of each particular link and with it the right to adjust the link as needed. We show that quantum strategies outperform classical strategies, and that the critical temptation to defect at which cooperative behavior can be maintained rises, if the network structure is updated frequently. Punishing neighbors by reducing the weights of their links also plays an important role in maintaining cooperation under adverse conditions. We find that the self-organization of the initially random network structure, driven by the evolutionary competition between quantum and classical strategies, leads to the spontaneous emergence of small average path length and a large clustering coefficient.

  17. Passive random walkers and riverlike networks on growing surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Chen-Shan

    2002-08-01

    Passive random walker dynamics is introduced on a growing surface. The walker is designed to drift upward or downward and then follow specific topological features, such as hill tops or valley bottoms, of the fluctuating surface. The passive random walker can thus be used to directly explore scaling properties of otherwise somewhat hidden topological features. For example, the walker allows us to directly measure the dynamical exponent of the underlying growth dynamics. We use the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang (KPZ) -type surface growth as an example. The world lines of a set of merging passive walkers show nontrivial coalescence behaviors and display the riverlike network structures of surface ridges in space-time. In other dynamics, such as Edwards-Wilkinson growth, this does not happen. The passive random walkers in KPZ-type surface growth are closely related to the shock waves in the noiseless Burgers equation. We also briefly discuss their relations to the passive scalar dynamics in turbulence.

  18. Optical and electrical studies of single walled carbon nanotubes for infrared sensing and photovoltaic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omari, Mones A.

    Carbon nanotubes are emerging as highly promising opto-electro-mechanical device components essential for the development of a variety of hybrid opto-electronic, electro-mechanical and bio-medical technologies on the nanoscale and have been a subject of continued research. In particular, single-walled carbon nanotubes are predicted to exhibit strong light absorption induced by photon-assisted electronic transitions, free carrier and plasmonic-based absorption. Single-walled carbon nanotubes have been confirmed to exhibit a strong photoconduction response in the infrared range, which can provide many new opportunities in engineering nano-photovoltaic and optoelectronic devices. At the same time, the use of strong chemical reagents has been long considered as one of the key processing steps for the separation and purification of single-walled carbon nanotube post-synthesis. In this work, optically-induced voltage in carbon nanotube bundles and thin-films configured as two-terminal resistive elements and operating as junctionless photo-cells in the infrared range as well as the time-dependent wet-processing of HiPCo nanotubes in phosphoric acid and its effect on the structural, transport, infrared light absorption, and photoconduction characteristics were studied. As the photo-voltage generated is found to appear only for asymmetric and off-contact illuminations, the effect is explained based on a photo-generated heat flow model. The engineered cell prototypes were found to yield electrical powers of ˜ 30 pW while demonstrating improved conversion efficiency under high-flux illumination. The cell is also shown to act as an uncooled infrared sensor, with its dark-to-photocurrent ratio improving as temperature increases. The wet-processing of HiPCo nanotubes was done for a nominal time intervals of 1, 2 and 3 hours. The treatment was found to be a two-step process that initially results in the removal and partial replacement of most pre-existing C-O, O-H and CHx groups

  19. Robustness and information propagation in attractors of Random Boolean Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd-Price, Jason; Gupta, Abhishekh; Ribeiro, Andre S

    2012-01-01

    Attractors represent the long-term behaviors of Random Boolean Networks. We study how the amount of information propagated between the nodes when on an attractor, as quantified by the average pairwise mutual information (I(A)), relates to the robustness of the attractor to perturbations (R(A)). We find that the dynamical regime of the network affects the relationship between I(A) and R(A). In the ordered and chaotic regimes, I(A) is anti-correlated with R(A), implying that attractors that are highly robust to perturbations have necessarily limited information propagation. Between order and chaos (for so-called "critical" networks) these quantities are uncorrelated. Finite size effects cause this behavior to be visible for a range of networks, from having a sensitivity of 1 to the point where I(A) is maximized. In this region, the two quantities are weakly correlated and attractors can be almost arbitrarily robust to perturbations without restricting the propagation of information in the network.

  20. Mechanical Behavior of Homogeneous and Composite Random Fiber Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahsavari, Ali

    Random fiber networks are present in many biological and non-biological materials such as paper, cytoskeleton, and tissue scaffolds. Mechanical behavior of networks is controlled by the mechanical properties of the constituent fibers and the architecture of the network. To characterize these two main factors, different parameters such as fiber density, fiber length, average segment length, nature of the cross-links at the fiber intersections, ratio of bending to axial behavior of fibers have been considered. Random fiber networks are usually modeled by representing each fiber as a Timoshenko or an Euler-Bernoulli beam and each cross-link as either a welded or rotating joint. In this dissertation, the effect of these modeling options on the dependence of the overall linear network modulus on microstructural parameters is studied. It is concluded that Timoshenko beams can be used for the whole range of density and fiber stiffness parameters, while the Euler-Bernoulli model can be used only at relatively low densities. In the low density-low bending stiffness range, elastic strain energy is stored in the bending mode of the deformation, while in the other extreme range of parameters, the energy is stored predominantly in the axial and shear deformation modes. It is shown that both rotating and welded joint models give the same rules for scaling of the network modulus with different micromechanical parameters. The elastic modulus of sparsely cross-linked random fiber networks, i.e. networks in which the degree of cross-linking varies, is studied. The relationship between the micromechanical parameters - fiber density, fiber axial and bending stiffness, and degree of cross-linking - and the overall elastic modulus is presented in terms of a master curve. It is shown that the master plot with various degrees of cross-linking can be collapsed to a curve which is also valid for fully cross-linked networks. Random fiber networks in which fibers are bonded to each other are

  1. Abrasive wear under multiscratching of polystyrene + single-walled carbon nanotube nanocomposites. Effect of sliding direction and modification by ionic liquid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bermudez, M.D., E-mail: mdolores.bermudez@upct.es [Grupo de Ciencia de Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica, Departamento de Ingenieria de Materiales y Fabricacion, Universidad Politecnica de Cartagena, Campus de la Muralla del Mar. C/Doctor Fleming, s/n. 30202 Cartagena (Spain); Carrion, F.J.; Espejo, C.; Martinez-Lopez, E.; Sanes, J. [Grupo de Ciencia de Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica, Departamento de Ingenieria de Materiales y Fabricacion, Universidad Politecnica de Cartagena, Campus de la Muralla del Mar. C/Doctor Fleming, s/n. 30202 Cartagena (Spain)

    2011-08-15

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (NTs) and single-walled carbon nanotubes modified (NTms) by the room-temperature ionic liquid (IL) 1-octyl, 3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([OMIM]BF{sub 4}) were added in a 1 wt.% to polystyrene (PS) and processed by compression or injection moulding to obtain PS + NT and PS + NTm, respectively. Friction coefficients and abrasive wear from penetration depth, residual depth and viscoelastic recovery were determined under multiple scratching. The effect of the moulding process, the additives and the sliding direction was studied. Compression moulded PS shows a transition to more severe damage after a critical number of successive passes. Addition of NTs or NTms to compression moulded PS induces a strain hardening effect and reduces friction, residual depth and viscoelastic recovery. Strain hardening is also observed in injection moulded PS with sliding in the longitudinal and random directions, but not in the transverse direction. The scratch resistance of PS + NTm depends on sliding direction. The lowest friction coefficient and residual depth values, and the highest viscoelastic recovery were found for injection moulded PS + NTm, in the sliding direction parallel to injection flow. Mechanisms of surface damage are discussed upon scanning electron microscopy (SEM), focused ion beam-field emission scanning electron microscopy (FIB-FESEM), 3D surface topography, surface roughness and profilometry observations.

  2. Adsorption behavior of ternary mixtures of noble gases inside single-walled carbon nanotube bundles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foroutan, Masumeh; Nasrabadi, Amir Taghavi

    2010-09-01

    In order to study the gas-storage and gas-filtering capability of carbon nanotube (CNT) bundles simultaneously, we considered the adsorption behavior of a ternary mixture of noble gases, including Argon (Ar), Krypton (Kr), and Xenon (Xe), i.e., Ar-Kr-Xe mixture, on (10, 10) single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) bundles. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations at different temperatures of (75, 100, 150, 200, 250, and 300) K were performed, and adsorption energies, self-diffusion coefficients, activation energies, and radial distribution functions (RDFs) were computed to analyze the thermodynamics, transport and structural properties of the adsorption systems. It is observed that the SWCNT bundles have larger contents of heavier noble gases compared to the lighter ones. This interesting behavior of SWCNT bundles makes them proper candidates for gas-storage and gas molecular-sieving processes.

  3. Surfactant-coated single-walled carbon nanotubes as a novel pseudostationary phase in capillary EKC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez, Beatriz; Simonet, Bartolomé M; Cárdenas, Soledad; Valcárcel, Miguel

    2007-06-01

    The analytical potential of the use of surfactant-coated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SC-SWNTs) as pseudostationary phase in CE is described. The pseudostationary phase shows an efficient alternative in enhancing electrochromatographic resolution of compounds which are capable of interacting with a nanotube surface, such as aromatic compounds. In general, the resolution is enhanced by increasing nanotube concentration in the buffer but the maximum amount of SWNTs that can be added to background electrolyte was found limited by compatibility with the UV/visible detection. As an alternative, a low-extension partial filling was used, consisting of the introduction into the capillary of concentrated SC-SWNT, just before the sample, with a plug length similar to the sample one. This has been showed as a reliable procedure in increasing resolution and sensitivity by sweeping phenomena. Finally, the potential of SC-SWNTs to perform chiral separations is discussed.

  4. Non-covalent functionalization of single wall carbon nanotubes and graphene by a conjugated polymer

    KAUST Repository

    Jiwuer, Jilili

    2014-07-07

    We report first-principles calculations on the binding of poly[(9,9-bis-(6-bromohexylfluorene-2,7-diyl)-co-(benzene-1,4-diyl)] to a (8,0) single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) and to graphene. Considering different relative orientations of the subsystems, we find for the generalized gradient approximation a non-binding state, whereas the local density approximation predicts reasonable binding energies. The results coincide after inclusion of van der Waals corrections, which demonstrates a weak interaction between the polymer and SWCNT/graphene, mostly of van der Waals type. Accordingly, the density of states shows essentially no hybridization. The physisorption mechanism explains recent experimental observations and suggests that the conjugated polymer can be used for non-covalent functionalization.

  5. ULTRAHIGH MAGNETIC FIELD OPTICAL STUDY OF SINGLE-WALLED CARBON NANOTUBES FILM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukhtar Effendi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Excitons in Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWNTs have emerged as an ideal candidate for exploring one-dimensional (1-D exciton physics. Exciton states which dominate optical properties of SWNTs even at room temperature, are not clarify yet. The optical absorption spectra of aligned SWNTs films under ultra high magnetic fields up to 190 T are examined to investigate this issue. Shifting and splitting of the absorption peaks due to Aharonov-Bohm effect was observed clearly above 80 T in the configuration where the magnetic fields were applied in parallel to the alignment of SWNTs. The lowest singlet exciton state has been determined through the analysis of energy splitting of excitons by the application of magnetic fields.   Keywords: blue shift, optically active, optically inactive, red shift, single-turn coil system

  6. Quantum dot-like excitonic behavior in individual single walled-carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu; Alexander-Webber, Jack A.; Jia, Wei; Reid, Benjamin P. L.; Stranks, Samuel D.; Holmes, Mark J.; Chan, Christopher C. S.; Deng, Chaoyong; Nicholas, Robin J.; Taylor, Robert A.

    2016-11-01

    Semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes are one-dimensional materials with great prospects for applications such as optoelectronic and quantum information devices. Yet, their optical performance is hindered by low fluorescent yield. Highly mobile excitons interacting with quenching sites are attributed to be one of the main non-radiative decay mechanisms that shortens the exciton lifetime. In this paper we report on time-integrated photoluminescence measurements on individual polymer wrapped semiconducting carbon nanotubes. An ultra narrow linewidth we observed demonstrates intrinsic exciton dynamics. Furthermore, we identify a state filling effect in individual carbon nanotubes at cryogenic temperatures as previously observed in quantum dots. We propose that each of the CNTs is segmented into a chain of zero-dimensional states confined by a varying local potential along the CNT, determined by local environmental factors such as the amount of polymer wrapping. Spectral diffusion is also observed, which is consistent with the tunneling of excitons between these confined states.

  7. Relationships among the structural topology, bond strength, and mechanical properties of single-walled aluminosilicate nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Kai-Hsin; Tsou, Nien-Ti; Kang, Dun-Yen

    2015-10-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are regarded as small but strong due to their nanoscale microstructure and high mechanical strength (Young's modulus exceeds 1000 GPa). A longstanding question has been whether there exist other nanotube materials with mechanical properties as good as those of CNTs. In this study, we investigated the mechanical properties of single-walled aluminosilicate nanotubes (AlSiNTs) using a multiscale computational method and then conducted a comparison with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). By comparing the potential energy estimated from molecular and macroscopic material mechanics, we were able to model the chemical bonds as beam elements for the nanoscale continuum modeling. This method allowed for simulated mechanical tests (tensile, bending, and torsion) with minimum computational resources for deducing their Young's modulus and shear modulus. The proposed approach also enabled the creation of hypothetical nanotubes to elucidate the relative contributions of bond strength and nanotube structural topology to overall nanotube mechanical strength. Our results indicated that it is the structural topology rather than bond strength that dominates the mechanical properties of the nanotubes. Finally, we investigated the relationship between the structural topology and the mechanical properties by analyzing the von Mises stress distribution in the nanotubes. The proposed methodology proved effective in rationalizing differences in the mechanical properties of AlSiNTs and SWCNTs. Furthermore, this approach could be applied to the exploration of new high-strength nanotube materials.Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are regarded as small but strong due to their nanoscale microstructure and high mechanical strength (Young's modulus exceeds 1000 GPa). A longstanding question has been whether there exist other nanotube materials with mechanical properties as good as those of CNTs. In this study, we investigated the mechanical properties of single-walled

  8. Single-walled carbon nanotubes coated with ZnO by atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Partha P.; Gilshteyn, Evgenia; Jiang, Hua; Timmermans, Marina; Kaskela, Antti; Tolochko, Oleg V.; Kurochkin, Alexey V.; Karppinen, Maarit; Nisula, Mikko; Kauppinen, Esko I.; Nasibulin, Albert G.

    2016-12-01

    The possibility of ZnO deposition on the surface of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with the help of an atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique was successfully demonstrated. The utilization of pristine SWCNTs as a support resulted in a non-uniform deposition of ZnO in the form of nanoparticles. To achieve uniform ZnO coating, the SWCNTs first needed to be functionalized by treating the samples in a controlled ozone atmosphere. The uniformly ZnO coated SWCNTs were used to fabricate UV sensing devices. An UV irradiation of the ZnO coated samples turned them from hydrophobic to hydrophilic behaviour. Furthermore, thin films of the ZnO coated SWCNTs allowed us switch p-type field effect transistors made of pristine SWCNTs to have ambipolar characteristics.

  9. Characterization of ester- or thioamide-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotube-azithromycin conjugates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darabi, Hossein Reza; Roozkhosh, Atefeh; Jafar Tehrani, Mohammad; Aghapoor, Kioumars; Sayahi, Hani; Balavar, Yadollah; Mohsenzadeh, Farshid

    2014-01-01

    Functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with nitrile groups, followed by further reactions allowed direct attachment of azithromycin and its N-demethyl derivative to the side-walls of SWCNTs for the first time. With these approaches, the cleavable ester or thioamide bonds are formed to connect azithromycin to SWCNTs resulting in azithromycin-SWCNT conjugates. These cleavable bonds are able to control molecular release from nanotube surfaces which are generally applicable to a variety of hybrid materials based on SWCNTs. A non-covalent azithromycin-SWCNT has also been compared with azithromycin-SWCNTs conjugates. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Fourier-transformed infrared (FT-IR), UV-vis, and Raman spectroscopies give hints on the characterization of azithromycin-SWCNT. Both drug release and antimicrobial activity of azithromycin-SWCNT conjugates were also tested.

  10. Carbon nanobamboo: Junctions between left and right handed single walled carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rusznyak, A.; Koltai, J.; Kuerti, J. [Department of Biological Physics, Eoetvoes University, Pazmany Peter setany 1/A, 1117 Budapest (Hungary); Zolyomi, V. [Department of Physics, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YB (United Kingdom); Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Wigner Research Center for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 49, 1525 Budapest (Hungary)

    2012-12-15

    Heating of organic molecules, for example, fullerenes encapsulated in single walled carbon nanotubes can result in the coalescence of the molecules forming an inner tube. The growth of tubes with different diameters and/or chiralities can start at different places at the same time. The formation of a junction between the two different tubes depends on many parameters. A special case is when the two tubes have the same chiralities, but opposite handedness. We have shown using topological and combinatorial arguments that at least two non-equivalent junctions can be formed in these cases, with different arrangements of the pentagons and heptagons in the junction. We optimized the geometry using first principles method and investigated the effect of the junction on the electronic density of states of the bamboo-type nanotube. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. Amperometric Low-Potential Detection of Malic Acid Using Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes Based Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvinte, Adina; Rotariu, Lucian; Bala, Camelia

    2008-03-03

    The electrocatalytical property of single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT)modified electrode toward NADH detection was explored by cyclic voltammetry andamperometry techniques. The experimental results show that SWNT decrease theovervoltage required for oxidation of NADH (to 300 mV vs. Ag/AgCl) and this propertymake them suitable for dehydrogenases based biosensors. The behavior of the SWNTmodified biosensor for L-malic acid was studied as an example for dehydrogenasesbiosensor. The amperometric measurements indicate that malate dehydrogenase (MDH)can be strongly adsorbed on the surface of the SWNT-modified electrode to form anapproximate monolayer film. Enzyme immobilization in Nafion membrane can increasethe biosensor stability. A linear calibration curve was obtained for L-malic acidconcentrations between 0.2 and 1mM.

  12. Amperometric Low-Potential Detection of Malic Acid Using Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes Based Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camelia Bala

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The electrocatalytical property of single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNTmodified electrode toward NADH detection was explored by cyclic voltammetry andamperometry techniques. The experimental results show that SWNT decrease theovervoltage required for oxidation of NADH (to 300 mV vs. Ag/AgCl and this propertymake them suitable for dehydrogenases based biosensors. The behavior of the SWNTmodified biosensor for L-malic acid was studied as an example for dehydrogenasesbiosensor. The amperometric measurements indicate that malate dehydrogenase (MDHcan be strongly adsorbed on the surface of the SWNT-modified electrode to form anapproximate monolayer film. Enzyme immobilization in Nafion membrane can increasethe biosensor stability. A linear calibration curve was obtained for L-malic acidconcentrations between 0.2 and 1mM.

  13. Tailored distribution of single-wall carbon nanotubes from arc plasma synthesis using magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volotskova, Olga; Fagan, Jeffrey A; Huh, Ji Yeon; Phelan, Frederick R; Shashurin, Alexey; Keidar, Michael

    2010-09-28

    We report a method for tuning the distribution of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) produced by the anodic arc production method via the application of nonuniform magnetic fields to the gap region during synthesis. Raman, ultraviolet-visible-near-infrared absorbance and near-infrared fluorescence spectroscopies were used to characterize samples together with scanning electron microscopy. Application of the nonuniform magnetic field 0.2-2 kG results in a broadening of the diameter range of SWCNTs produced toward decreased diameters, with substantial fractions of produced SWCNTs being of small diameter, less than ∼1.3 nm, at the highest field. The ability to tune production of the arc production method may allow for improvement in achievable SWCNT properties.

  14. Chemisorption and Diffusion of H on a Graphene Sheet and Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Dzegilenko, Fedor; Menon, Madhu

    2000-01-01

    Recent experiments on hydrogen storage in single wall nanotubes and nanotube bundles have reported large fractional weight of stored molecular hydrogen which are not in agreement with theoretical estimates based of simulation of hydrogen storage by physisorption mechanisms. Hydrogen storage in catalytically doped nanotube bundles indicate that atomic H might undergo chemisorption changing the basic nature of the storage mechanism under investigation by many groups. Using a generalized tight-binding molecular dynamics (GTBMD) method for reactive C-H dynamics, we investigate chemisorption and diffusion of atomic H on graphene sheet and C nanotubes. Effective potential energy surfaces (EPS) for chemisorption and diffusion are calculated for graphene sheet and nanotubes of different curvatures. Analysis of the activation barriers and quantum rate constants, computed via wave-packet dynamics method, will be discussed in this presentation.

  15. Optical properties of graphene nanoribbons encapsulated in single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernov, Alexander I; Fedotov, Pavel V; Talyzin, Alexandr V; Suarez Lopez, Inma; Anoshkin, Ilya V; Nasibulin, Albert G; Kauppinen, Esko I; Obraztsova, Elena D

    2013-07-23

    We report the photoluminescence (PL) from graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) encapsulated in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). New PL spectral features originating from GNRs have been detected in the visible spectral range. PL peaks from GNRs have resonant character, and their positions depend on the ribbon geometrical structure in accordance with the theoretical predictions. GNRs were synthesized using confined polymerization and fusion of coronene molecules. GNR@SWCNTs material demonstrates a bright photoluminescence both in infrared (IR) and visible regions. The photoluminescence excitation mapping in the near-IR spectral range has revealed the geometry-dependent shifts of the SWCNT peaks (up to 11 meV in excitation and emission) after the process of polymerization of coronene molecules inside the nanotubes. This behavior has been attributed to the strain of SWCNTs induced by insertion of the coronene molecules.

  16. Quantum dot-like excitonic behavior in individual single walled-carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu; Alexander-Webber, Jack A; Jia, Wei; Reid, Benjamin P L; Stranks, Samuel D; Holmes, Mark J; Chan, Christopher C S; Deng, Chaoyong; Nicholas, Robin J; Taylor, Robert A

    2016-11-16

    Semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes are one-dimensional materials with great prospects for applications such as optoelectronic and quantum information devices. Yet, their optical performance is hindered by low fluorescent yield. Highly mobile excitons interacting with quenching sites are attributed to be one of the main non-radiative decay mechanisms that shortens the exciton lifetime. In this paper we report on time-integrated photoluminescence measurements on individual polymer wrapped semiconducting carbon nanotubes. An ultra narrow linewidth we observed demonstrates intrinsic exciton dynamics. Furthermore, we identify a state filling effect in individual carbon nanotubes at cryogenic temperatures as previously observed in quantum dots. We propose that each of the CNTs is segmented into a chain of zero-dimensional states confined by a varying local potential along the CNT, determined by local environmental factors such as the amount of polymer wrapping. Spectral diffusion is also observed, which is consistent with the tunneling of excitons between these confined states.

  17. Theory of energy and power flow of plasmonic waves on single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Afshin

    2017-10-01

    The energy theorem of electrodynamics is extended so as to apply to the plasmonic waves on single-walled carbon nanotubes which propagate parallel to the axial direction of the system and are periodic waves in the azimuthal direction. Electronic excitations on the nanotube surface are modeled by an infinitesimally thin layer of free-electron gas which is described by means of the linearized hydrodynamic theory. General expressions of energy and power flow associated with surface waves are obtained by solving Maxwell and hydrodynamic equations with appropriate boundary conditions. Numerical results for the transverse magnetic mode show that energy, power flow, and energy transport velocity of the plasmonic waves strongly depend on the nanotube radius in the long-wavelength region.

  18. Quantum yield in polymer wrapped single walled carbon nanotubes: a computational model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djokić, Dejan M.; Goswami, Aranya

    2017-11-01

    Quantum yield in polymer wrapped single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) has been computationally investigated using a 2D model of exciton decay with non-radiative channels due to the diffusive motion across the nanotube surface. Beside the role of SWCNT’s ends as the exciton quenchers, we have considered the influence of the wrapping polymer through its chemistry and wrapping angle. The model has been solved exactly for zero-angle wrapping, a particular case when the polymer interfaces the nanotube along its axis. The general case has been treated numerically and it has been concluded that the wrapping angle has no relevant influence upon the quantum yield values which are of experimental interest. A wide range of quantum yield values computed in the present contribution can be helpful in understanding potentially available photoluminescence data of SWCNTs wrapped with a variety of polymer families.

  19. Novel Materials Containing Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes Wrapped in Polymer Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalley, Richard E.; O'Connell, Michael J.; Smith, Kenneth; Colbert, Daniel T.

    2009-01-01

    In this design, single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have been coated in polymer molecules to create a new type of material that has low electrical conductivity, but still contains individual nanotubes, and small ropes of individual nanotubes, which are themselves good electrical conductors and serve as small conducting rods immersed in an electrically insulating matrix. The polymer is attached through weak chemical forces that are primarily non-covalent in nature, caused primarily through polarization rather than the sharing of valence electrons. Therefore, the electronic structure of the SWNT involved is substantially the same as that of free, individual (and small ropes of) SWNT. Their high conductivity makes the individual nanotubes extremely electrically polarizable, and materials containing these individual, highly polarizable molecules exhibit novel electrical properties including a high dielectric constant.

  20. Momentum angular mapping of enhanced Raman scattering of single-walled carbon nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Padmnabh; Singh, Tapender; Brulé, Thibault; Bouhelier, Alexandre; Finot, Eric

    2017-07-01

    We perform momentum mapping of the Raman scattering of individual single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) or thin ropes of SWNTs enhanced by surface plasmons sustained by either a linear chain of nanoantennas or flower-shaped nanoparticles. The momentum spectroscopy of Raman scattering of the carbon nanotube (CNT) demonstrates the direct verification of momentum selection rules and identifies the characteristic bands of the molecules or the nanomaterials under scrutiny. The characteristic vibrational signatures of the D, G-, and G bands provide an isotropic response in k-space irrespective of the arrangement of the enhancing platform. However, other dispersive or double resonance bands, such as D-, D+, D', M, and iTOLA bands appear as a dipolar emission oriented towards the long axis of the CNT regardless of the CNT orientation but strongly depend on the patterning of enhancement of the electromagnetic field.

  1. Purity and Defect Characterization of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes Using Raman Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasumitsu Miyata

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the purity and defects of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs produced by various synthetic methods including chemical vapor deposition, arc discharge, and laser ablation. The SWCNT samples were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, and Raman spectroscopy. Quantitative analysis of SEM images suggested that the G-band Raman intensity serves as an index for the purity. By contrast, the intensity ratio of G-band to D-band (G/D ratio reflects both the purity and the defect density of SWCNTs. The combination of G-band intensity and G/D ratio is useful for a quick, nondestructive evaluation of the purity and defect density of a SWCNT sample.

  2. Surface tailored single walled carbon nanotubes as catalyst support for direct methanol fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kireeti, Kota V. M. K.; Jha, Neetu

    2017-10-01

    A strategy for tuning the surface property of Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWNTs) for enhanced methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) along with methanol tolerance is presented. The surface functionality is tailored using controlled acid and base treatment. Acid treatment leads to the attachment of carboxylic carbon (CC) fragments to SWNT making it hydrophilic (P3-SWNT). Base treatment of P3-SWNT with 0.05 M NaOH reduces the CCs and makes it hydrophobic (P33-SWNT). Pt catalyst supported on the P3-SWNT possesses enhanced MOR whereas that supported on P33-SWNT not only enhances ORR kinetics but also possess good tolerance towards methanol oxidation as verified by the electrochemical technique.

  3. Coupling between flexural modes in free vibration of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Rumeng; Wang, Lifeng, E-mail: walfe@nuaa.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Mechanics and Control of Mechanical Structures, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, 210016 Nanjing (China)

    2015-12-15

    The nonlinear thermal vibration behavior of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) is investigated by molecular dynamics simulation and a nonlinear, nonplanar beam model. Whirling motion with energy transfer between flexural motions is found in the free vibration of the SWCNT excited by the thermal motion of atoms where the geometric nonlinearity is significant. A nonlinear, nonplanar beam model considering the coupling in two vertical vibrational directions is presented to explain the whirling motion of the SWCNT. Energy in different vibrational modes is not equal even over a time scale of tens of nanoseconds, which is much larger than the period of fundamental natural vibration of the SWCNT at equilibrium state. The energy of different modes becomes equal when the time scale increases to the microsecond range.

  4. Non-covalent functionalization of single wall carbon nanotubes and graphene by a conjugated polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiwuer, Jilili; Abdurahman, Ayjamal; Gülseren, Oğuz; Schwingenschlögl, Udo

    2015-03-01

    We report first-principles calculations on the binding of poly[(9,9-bis-(6-bromohexylfluorene-2,7-diyl)-co-(benzene-1,4-diyl)] to a (8,0) single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) and to graphene. Considering different relative orientations of the subsystems, we find for the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) a non-binding state, whereas the local density approximation (LDA) predicts reasonable binding energies. The results coincide after inclusion of van der Waals (vdW) corrections, which demonstrates a weak interaction between the polymer and SWCNT/graphene, mostly of van der Waals type. Accordingly, the density of states shows essentially no hybridization. The physisorption mechanism explains recent experimental observations and suggests that the conjugated polymer can be used for non-covalent functionalization. Research reported in this publication was supported by the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST).

  5. Effect of chirality and curvature of single-walled carbon nanotubes on the adsorption of uracil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajarajeswari, M.; Iyakutti, K. [School of Physics, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai, Tamil Nadu 625 021 (India); Kawazoe, Y. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2011-06-15

    Adsorption of uracil on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) (5,2) and (5,5) in the presence of water molecules has been investigated using first-principles technique. Uracil is adsorbed on the nanotube noncovalently through {pi}-{pi} stacking interaction. The binding strength of uracil varies with the chirality of the carbon nanotubes. Addition of water molecules inside and outside the nanotube altered the interaction of the uracil with the nanotube and modifies the binding strength. Orientation of the water molecule and the charge transfer through the C-H bonds are the important factors in the interaction of the water molecule with the carbon nanotube. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  6. Interaction between methanol and single-walled carbon nanotubes: Density functional theory study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganji, M.D., E-mail: ganji_md@yahoo.co [Department of Chemistry, Islamic Azad University, Qaemshahr Branch, Mazandaran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hesami, M.; Shokry, M. [Department of Chemistry, Islamic Azad University, Qaemshahr Branch, Mazandaran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahmoudi, S. [Department of Chemistry, University of Payam-e-noor, Sari, Mazandaran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-03-15

    Density functional calculations have been performed to investigate the dependence of methanol interaction with the side walls of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) on the nanotube's type, curvature and chirality. The author's results show that methanol prefers to be physically adsorbed on semiconducting CNTs in comparison with the metallic one. It was found that the binding energy of methanol is increased for adsorption on larger-diameter nanotubes. Furthermore, we find that when a methanol molecule was adsorbed on higher chiral angle nanotubes the binding energy was increased. The study of the electronic structures and Mulliken analysis indicate that the methanol and CNT are interacting rather weakly, consistent with recent experimental observation.

  7. Compressive characteristics of single walled carbon nanotube with water interactions investigated by using molecular dynamics simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, C.H., E-mail: chwong@ntu.edu.sg; Vijayaraghavan, V.

    2014-01-24

    The elastic properties of single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) with surrounding water interactions are studied using molecular dynamics simulation technique. The compressive loading characteristic of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in a fluidic medium such as water is critical for its role in determining the lifetime and stability of CNT based nano-fluidic devices. In this paper, we conducted a comprehensive analysis on the effect of geometry, chirality and density of encapsulated water on the elastic properties of SWCNT. Our studies show that defect density and distribution can strongly impact the compressive resistance of SWCNTs in water. Further studies were conducted on capped SWCNTs with varying densities of encapsulated water, which is necessary to understand the strength of CNT as a potential drug carrier. The results obtained from this paper will help determining the potential applications of CNTs in the field of nano-electromechanical systems (NEMS) such as nano-biological and nano-fluidic devices.

  8. A theoretical study on the interaction of amphetamine and single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafizi, Hamid; Najafi Chermahini, Alireza; Mohammadnezhad, Gholamhossein; Teimouri, Abbas

    2015-02-01

    The adsorption of 1-phenyl-2-aminopropane (amphetamine) on the (4,4), (5,5), (6,6), and (7,7) single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) has been theoretically investigated. The molecule has been located in different modes including parallel, perpendicular, and oblique on the outer surface of carbon nanotubes. The physisorption of amphetamine onto SWCNT sidewall is thermodynamically favored; as a consequence, it modulates the electronic properties of pristine nanotube in the vicinity of Fermi region. The adsorption energies for the parallel and oblique modes found in the range of -1.13 to -1.88 and -1.27 to -2.01 kcal/mol, respectively. Projected density of states (PDOS) and frontier orbital analysis in the vicinity of Fermi level region suggest the electronic states to be contributed from SWCNT rather than amphetamine molecule.

  9. Controlled growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes on patterned substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaozhu; Boey, Freddy; Zhang, Hua

    2011-11-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have attracted great interest in the last two decades because of their unique electrical, optical, thermal, mechanical properties, etc. One major research field of SWCNTs is the controlled growth of them from the patterned catalysts on substrates, since the integration of SWCNTs into nanoelectronics and other devices requires well-organized SWCNT arrays. This tutorial review describes the commonly used lithographic techniques to pattern catalysts used for controlled growth of SWCNTs, specifically confined to the horizontal direction. Advantages and disadvantages of each method will be briefly discussed. Applications of the SWCNT arrays grown from the catalyst patterns will also be introduced. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  10. Versatile visualization of individual single-walled carbon nanotubes with near-infrared fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsyboulski, Dmitri A; Bachilo, Sergei M; Weisman, R Bruce

    2005-05-01

    Fluorescence microscopy in the near-infrared between 950 and 1600 nm has been developed as a novel method to image and study single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in a variety of environments. Intrinsic photoluminescence of disaggregated pristine SWNTs was excited by a diode laser and detected with a two-dimensional InGaAs photodiode array. Individual nanotubes were visualized with a spatial resolution of ca. 1 microm and characterized with polarization measurements and emission spectroscopy. Spatially resolved emission spectra allowed (n,m) identification of single nanotubes and revealed small environmentally induced spectral shifts between segments of long tubes. Nanotube motions in aqueous surfactant were visualized with a time resolution of 50 ms and used to estimate the diffusion coefficient.

  11. Stable sequestration of single-walled carbon nanotubes in self-assembled aqueous nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauter, Meagan S; Elimelech, Menachem; Osuji, Chinedum O

    2012-03-07

    We demonstrate the ability to stably sequester individual single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) within self-contained nanometer-scale aqueous volumes arrayed in an organic continuum. Large areal densities of 4 × 10(9) cm(-2) are readily achieved. SWNTs are incorporated into a surfactant mesophase which forms 2.3 nm diameter water channels by lyotropic self-assembly. Near-infrared fluorescence spectroscopy demonstrates that the SWNTs exist as well-dispersed tubes that are stable over several months and through multiple cycles of heating and cooling. Absence of physical distortion of the mesophase suggests that the SWNTs are stabilized by adsorbed surfactants that do not extend considerably from the surface. Our findings have important implications for templated assembly of carbon nanotubes using soft mesophases and the development of functional nanocomposites. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  12. Transverse electric field–induced deformation of armchair single-walled carbon nanotube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Ningyi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The deformation of armchair single-walled carbon nanotube under transverse electric field has been investigated using density functional theory. The results show that the circular cross-sections of the nanotubes are deformed to elliptic ones, in which the tube diameter along the field direction is increased, whereas the diameter perpendicular to the field direction is reduced. The electronic structures of the deformed nanotubes were also studied. The ratio of the major diameter to the minor diameter of the elliptic cross-section was used to estimate the degree of the deformation. It is found that this ratio depends on the field strength and the tube diameter. However, the field direction has little role in the deformation. (See supplementary material 1 Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11671-010-9617-y contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. Click here for file

  13. Diameter Tuning of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes by Diffusion Plasma CVD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiaki Kato

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We have realized a diameter tuning of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs by adjusting process gas pressures with plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD. Detailed photoluminescence measurements reveal that the diameter distribution of SWNTs clearly shifts to a large-diameter region with an increase in the pressure during plasma CVD, which is also confirmed by Raman scattering spectroscopy. Based on the systematical investigation, it is found that the main diameter of SWNTs is determined by the pressure during the heating in an atmosphere of hydrogen and the diameter distribution is narrowed by adjusting the pressure during the plasma generation. Our results could contribute to an application of SWNTs to high-performance thin-film transistors, which requires the diameter-controlled semiconductor-rich SWNTs.

  14. Coupling between flexural modes in free vibration of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rumeng Liu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The nonlinear thermal vibration behavior of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT is investigated by molecular dynamics simulation and a nonlinear, nonplanar beam model. Whirling motion with energy transfer between flexural motions is found in the free vibration of the SWCNT excited by the thermal motion of atoms where the geometric nonlinearity is significant. A nonlinear, nonplanar beam model considering the coupling in two vertical vibrational directions is presented to explain the whirling motion of the SWCNT. Energy in different vibrational modes is not equal even over a time scale of tens of nanoseconds, which is much larger than the period of fundamental natural vibration of the SWCNT at equilibrium state. The energy of different modes becomes equal when the time scale increases to the microsecond range.

  15. Retracted-Enhanced X-Ray Absorption Property of Gold-Doped Single Wall Carbon Nanotube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alimin Alimin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Enhanced X-ray absorption property of single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT through gold (Au doping (Au@SWCNT has been studied. Mass attenuation coefficient of SWCNT increased 5.2-fold after Au doping treatment. The use of ethanol in the liquid phase adsorption could produce Au nanoparticles as confirmed by the X-ray Diffraction (XRD patterns. The possibility of gold nanoparticles encapsulated in the internal tube space of SWCNT was observed by transmission electron microscope technique. A significant decrease of nitrogen uptakes and upshifts of Radial Breathing Mode (RBM of Au@SWCNT specimen suggest that the nanoparticles might be encapsulated in the internal tube spaces of the nanotube. In addition, a decrease intensity of XRD pattern of Au@SWCNT at around 2θ ≈ 2.6° supports the suggestion that Au nanoparticles are really encapsulated into SWCNT.

  16. Catalyst size effects on the growth of single-walled nanotubes in neutral and plasma systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Eugene; Ostrikov, Kostya Ken

    2009-09-16

    The results of large-scale ( approximately 10(9) atoms) numerical simulations of the growth of different-diameter vertically-aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes in plasma systems with different sheath widths and in neutral gases with the same operating parameters are reported. It is shown that the nanotube lengths and growth rates can be effectively controlled by varying the process conditions. The SWCNT growth rates in the plasma can be up to two orders of magnitude higher than in the equivalent neutral gas systems. Under specific process conditions, thin SWCNTs can grow much faster than their thicker counterparts despite the higher energies required for catalyst activation and nanotube nucleation. This selective growth of thin SWCNTs opens new avenues for the solution of the currently intractable problem of simultaneous control of the nanotube chirality and length during the growth stage.

  17. Transverse Vibration of Tapered Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Embedded in Viscoelastic Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Y. J.; Zhang, D. P.; Shen, Z. B.

    2017-10-01

    Based on the nonlocal theory, Euler-Bernoulli beam theory and Kelvin viscoelastic foundation model, free transverse vibration is studied for a tapered viscoelastic single-walled carbon nanotube (visco-SWCNT) embedded in a viscoelastic medium. Firstly, the governing equations for vibration analysis are established. And then, we derive the natural frequencies in closed form for SWCNTs with arbitrary boundary conditions by applying transfer function method and perturbation method. Numerical results are also presented to discuss the effects of nonlocal parameter, relaxation time and taper parameter of SWCNTs, and material property parameters of the medium. This study demonstrates that the proposed model is available for vibration analysis of the tapered SWCNTs-viscoelastic medium coupling system.

  18. A Comprehensive Review on Separation Methods and Techniques for Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Naoki; Wang, Feng

    2010-01-01

    Structural control of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is attracting enormous interest in view of their applications to nanoelectronics and nanooptics. Actually, more than 200 papers regarding separation of SWNTs have been published since 1998. In this review, they are classified into the following five sections according to the separation methods; electrophoresis, centrifugation, chromatography, selective solubilization and selective reaction. In each method, all literature is summarized in tables showing the separated objects (metallic/semiconducting (M/S), length, diameter, (n, m) structure and/or handedness), the production process of the used SWNTs (CoMoCAT, HiPco, arc discharge and/or laser vaporization) and the employed chemicals, such as detergents and polymers. Changes in annual number of publications related to this subject are also discussed. PMID:28883313

  19. Tuning the nonlinear response of (6,5)-enriched single-wall carbon nanotubes dispersions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aréstegui, O. S.; Silva, E. C. O.; Baggio, A. L.; Gontijo, R. N.; Hickmann, J. M.; Fantini, C.; Alencar, M. A. R. C.; Fonseca, E. J. S.

    2017-04-01

    Ultrafast nonlinear optical properties of (6,5)-enriched single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) dispersions are investigated using the thermally managed Z-scan technique. As the (6,5) SWCNTs presented a strong resonance in the range of 895-1048 nm, the nonlinear refractive index (n2) and the absorption coefficients (β) measurements were performed tuning the laser exactly around absorption peak of the (6,5) SWCNTs. It is observed that the nonlinear response is very sensitive to the wavelength and the spectral behavior of n2 is strongly correlated to the tubes one-photon absorption band, presenting also a peak when the laser photon energy is near the tube resonance energy. This result suggests that a suitable selection of nanotubes types may provide optimized nonlinear optical responses in distinct regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. Analysis of the figures of merit indicated that this material is promising for ultrafast nonlinear optical applications under near infrared excitation.

  20. Solution-phase synthesis of chromium-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Kalinina, Irina V.

    2015-03-01

    The solution phase reactions of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with Cr(CO)6 and benzene-Cr(CO)3 can lead to the formation of small chromium clusters. The cluster size can be varied from less than 1 nm to about 4 nm by increasing the reaction time. TEM images suggest that the clusters are deposited predominantly on the exterior walls of the nanotubes. TGA analysis was used to obtain the Cr content and carbon to chromium ratio in the Cr-complexed SWNTs. It is suggested that the carbon nanotube benzenoid structure templates the condensation of chromium atoms and facilitates the loss of carbon monoxide leading to well defined metal clusters.

  1. A dislocation model for the pentagon-heptagon pair in zigzag single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shao Feng; Zhang, Hui Li; Zhi Wu, Xiao

    2010-06-01

    The pentagon-heptagon (5/7) pair in a zigzag single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) is described as a dislocation by the modified Peierls-Nabarro (P-N) theory. The theory takes discrete effects, size effects and curvature effects into account. The bonds variation and shape distortion caused by 5/7 pair have been evaluated. It is found that the neck bond (shared bond) becomes longer while the shoulder bonds become shorter comparing with the one of the hexagons. The results show that the zigzag chain across the center of the 5/7 pair will bend slightly in the axis direction towards the heptagon, and the tube will be flattened where the 5/7 pair is located because of the appearance of the internal stress and nonzero curvature.

  2. Orbital and spin magnetic moments of ferrocene encapsulated in metallicity sorted single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briones-Leon, Antonio; Ayala, Paola; Pichler, Thomas; Shiozawa, Hidetsugu [Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, Strudlhofgasse 4, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Liu, Xianjie [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linkoeping University, 58333 Linkoeping (Sweden); Kataura, Hiromichi [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba 305-8565 (Japan); Yanagi, Kazuhiro [Department of Physics, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Hachiouji, Tokyo 192-0397 (Japan); Weschke, Eugen [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fr Materialien und Energie, Wilhelm-Conrad-Rntgen-Campus BESSY II, Albert-Einstein-Str. 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    The nature of the electronic and local magnetic properties of ferrocene (FeCp{sub 2}) filled single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) has been investigated by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD). Metallic, semiconducting, and unsorted ferrocene-filled tubes have been studied in different conditions of temperature and magnetic field. XMCD signal becomes evident with the application of a magnetic field at low temperature. We find that the molecular states of ferrocene interact with SWCNT of different metallicities. A paramagnetic behavior of encapsulated ferrocene is observed from the magnetic field dependent XMCD measurements which is consistent with theoretical predictions. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  3. Controlling the growth of vertically aligned single walled carbon nanotubes from ethanol for electrochemical supercapacitor application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azam, M.A.; Mohamed, M.A.; Shikoh, E.; Fujiwara, A.; Shimoda, T. [Japan Advanced Inst. of Science and Technology, Ishikawa (Japan)

    2010-07-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have been proven suitable for use as electrodes in electrochemical capacitors (EC). In this study, alcohol catalytic chemical vapor deposition (ACCVD) was used to grow vertically-aligned SWCNTs (VASWCNTs). An aluminium oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3})-supported cobalt (Co) catalyst and high purity ethanol carbon feedstock was used for the growth process. The Al layer and Co thin films were deposited using an electron beam evaporator. CNT growth was optimized using Si/SiO{sub 2} substrates. An atomic force microscope, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses were used to characterize the synthesis of the catalyst nanoparticles and their subsequent growth. Raman spectrum of the samples demonstrated peaks of radial breathing mode (RBM) from 100 to 250 per cm. Results demonstrated that the CNTs were successfully grown on the conducting metal substrate using the ACCVD process. 4 refs.

  4. One-Dimensional Organic-Inorganic Nanocomposite Synthesized with Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Templates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Li

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This study reports on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT as templates for the preparation of 1D porous organic-inorganic hybrid composites. The in situ deposited SWCNT were sputter coated with Sn metal and thermally oxidized in air to form a SnO2/SWCNT nanowire framework on SiO2/Si substrate. Poly(acrylic acid (PAA was coated onto this scaffold through UV light-induced radical polymerization, which resulted in the final formation of hybrid composites. The structures of hybrid composites were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. The results show that PAA was successfully coated and the structural advantage of nanowire was fairly maintained, which indicates that this framework is very stable for organic functionalization in solution. The simplicity of this method for the formation of porous organic-inorganic hybrid composites provides a potential application for nanoelectronic devices.

  5. Brightly and directionally luminescent single-walled carbon nanotubes in a wedge cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Weihang; Zhang, Yingjun; Zhang, Xinhan; Tian, Chuan; Xu, Chunyan

    2017-10-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes suffer severely from their extremely low luminescence quantum yield and spectral purity. In this work, we produced brightly and directionally luminescent, as well as spectrally pure, carbon nanotubes by embedding them into a wedge-shaped planar cavity. By controlling the detuning between the cavity mode and exciton emission, the photoluminescence of carbon nanotubes could be enhanced up to 60 times. Coupling efficiency, i.e., percentage of nanotube luminescence emitted into a cavity mode, was found to be detuning dependent with a maximum efficiency of ˜54%. Moreover, emission from nanotubes inside the cavity becomes highly directional. The emission angle was measured to be less than 1.8 ° , demonstrating their great potential in device applications of future optoelectronics.

  6. Antenna-coupled terahertz radiation from joule-heated single-wall carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Muthee

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this letter an experimental method is introduced that allows detection of terahertz (THz radiation from arrays of joule-heated Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWCNTs, by coupling this radiation through integrated antennas and a silicon lens. The radiation forms a diffraction-limited beam with a total maximum radiated power of 450 nW, significantly greater than the power estimated from Nyquist thermal noise (8 nW. The physical radiation process is unknown at this stage, but possible explanations for the high radiated power are discussed briefly. The emission has a typical bandwidth of 1.2 THz and can be tuned to different frequencies by changing the dimensions of the antennas. Arrays of the devices could be integrated in CMOS integrated circuits, and find application in THz systems, such as in near-range medical imaging.

  7. Dysprosium-Catalyzed Growth of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Arrays on Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Yong

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this letter, we report that dysprosium is an effective catalyst for single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs growth via a chemical vapor deposition (CVD process for the first time. Horizontally superlong well-oriented SWNT arrays on SiO2/Si wafer can be fabricated by EtOH-CVD under suitable conditions. The structure and properties are characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transition electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. The results show that the SWNTs from dysprosium have better structural uniformity and better conductivity with fewer defects. This rare earth metal provides not only an alternative catalyst for SWNTs growth, but also a possible method to generate high percentage of superlong semiconducting SWNT arrays for various applications of nanoelectronic device.

  8. Protein Adsorption on Hybrids of Thermoresponsive Polymers and Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuo Umemura

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide (PNIPAAm is one of the most popular thermoresponsive polymers. Adsorption of RecA proteins onto hybrids of PNIPAAm and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs was observed in the presence and absence of DNA molecules. Although RecA molecules were adsorbed efficiently onto the hybrid surfaces at 37°C, even in the absence of DNA molecules, the adsorption of RecA was inhibited at 4°C. These results suggest that the thermoresponsive functions of PNIPAAm were effective, even on the SWNT surfaces, which supports the possibility of developing nanobiodevices using PNIPAAm-SWNT hybrids. However, although RecA is a DNA binding protein, there was no significant difference in the adsorption of RecA onto PNIPAAm-SWNT surfaces with and without DNA molecules. This study provides fundamental information for potential biological applications of PNIPAAm-SWNT hybrids.

  9. Enzymatic formation of carbohydrate rings catalyzed by single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Moon Seop; Park, Jong Pil; Seo, Dongkyun; Chang, Sung-Jin; Lee, Seok Jae; Lee, Sang Yup; Kwak, Kyungwon; Park, Tae Jung

    2016-05-01

    Macrocyclic carbohydrate rings were formed via enzymatic reactions around single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) as a catalyst. Cyclodextrin glucanotransferase, starch substrate and SWNTs were reacted in buffer solution to yield cyclodextrin (CD) rings wrapped around individual SWNTs. Atomic force microscopy showed the resulting complexes to be rings of 12-50 nm in diameter, which were highly soluble and dispersed in aqueous solution. They were further characterized by Raman and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and molecular simulation using density functional theory calculation. In the absence of SWNT, hydrogen bonding between glucose units determines the structure of maltose (the precursor of CD) and produces the curvature along the glucose chain. Wrapping SWNT along the short axis was preferred with curvature in the presence of SWNTs and with the hydrophobic interactions between the SWNTs and CD molecules. This synthetic approach may be useful for the functionalization of carbon nanotubes for development of nanostructures.

  10. Capture of unstable protein complex on the streptavidin-coated single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Zunfeng, E-mail: liuz2@chem.leidenuniv.nl; Voskamp, Patrick [Cell Observatory, Biophysical Structural Chemistry, Leiden Institute of Chemistry (Netherlands); Zhang Yue; Chu Fuqiang [Changzhou University, School of Pharmaceutical Engineering and Life Science (China); Abrahams, Jan Pieter, E-mail: abrahams@chem.leidenuniv.nl [Cell Observatory, Biophysical Structural Chemistry, Leiden Institute of Chemistry (Netherlands)

    2013-04-15

    Purification of unstable protein complexes is a bottleneck for investigation of their 3D structure and in protein-protein interaction studies. In this paper, we demonstrate that streptavidin-coated single-walled carbon nanotubes (Strep Bullet SWNT) can be used to capture the biotinylated DNA-EcoRI complexes on a 2D surface and in solution using atomic force microscopy and electrophoresis analysis, respectively. The restriction enzyme EcoRI forms unstable complexes with DNA in the absence of Mg{sup 2+}. Capturing the EcoRI-DNA complexes on the Strep Bullet SWNT succeeded in the absence of Mg{sup 2+}, demonstrating that the Strep Bullet SWNT can be used for purifying unstable protein complexes.

  11. Transverse Vibration of Tapered Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Embedded in Viscoelastic Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Y. J.; Zhang, D. P.; Shen, Z. B.

    2017-12-01

    Based on the nonlocal theory, Euler-Bernoulli beam theory and Kelvin viscoelastic foundation model, free transverse vibration is studied for a tapered viscoelastic single-walled carbon nanotube (visco-SWCNT) embedded in a viscoelastic medium. Firstly, the governing equations for vibration analysis are established. And then, we derive the natural frequencies in closed form for SWCNTs with arbitrary boundary conditions by applying transfer function method and perturbation method. Numerical results are also presented to discuss the effects of nonlocal parameter, relaxation time and taper parameter of SWCNTs, and material property parameters of the medium. This study demonstrates that the proposed model is available for vibration analysis of the tapered SWCNTs-viscoelastic medium coupling system.

  12. One-step direct transfer of pristine single-walled carbon nanotubes for functional nanoelectronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chung Chiang; Liu, Chang Hua; Zhong, Zhaohui

    2010-03-10

    We report a one-step direct transfer technique for the fabrication of functional nanoelectronic devices using pristine single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Suspended SWNTs grown by the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method are aligned and directly transferred onto prepatterned device electrodes at ambient temperature. Using this technique, we successfully fabricated SWNT electromechanical resonators with gate-tunable resonance frequencies. A fully suspended SWNT p-n diode has also been demonstrated with the diode ideality factor equal to 1. Our method eliminates the organic residues on SWNTs resulting from conventional lithography and solution processing. The results open up opportunities for the fundamental study of electron transport physics in ultraclean SWNTs and for room temperature fabrication of novel functional devices based on pristine SWNTs.

  13. Chirality Separation of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes using Aqueous Two-Phase Extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagan, Jeffrey

    2014-03-01

    Aqueous two-phase extraction (ATPE) was recently demonstrated to enable the separation of individual species of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) across the separated phases. In this presentation I will describe the use of a dextran - polyethylene glycol aqueous two-phase system along with a separation scheme of varying surfactant concentrations to enable isolation at high purity of specific small diameter SWCNT species. Separation by ATPE is rapid and robust, with a remarkable tunability that allows isolation of most single nanotube chiralities at high purity. Choice of surfactant(s), temperature, polymer concentrations, and the addition of small molecule salts can all be used to tune the exact partitioning of single SWCNT species between the two phases.

  14. The removal of metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes using an aqueous two-phase system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Malcolm S Y; Whitcher, T J; Yeoh, K H; Chua, C L; Woon, K L; Show, P L; Lin, Y K; Ling, T C

    2014-05-01

    Here we report our findings on the removal of metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes using an aqueous two-phase system. The aqueous two-phase system contained as received carbon nanotubes, polyethylene glycol, dextran, N-methylpyrrolidone, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, and water which phase separated into top and bottom phases. The top phase was dominated by polyethylene glycol whereas the bottom phase was dominated by dextran. The dextran-rich phase contained more semiconducting species while metallic species was more abundant in the polyethylene glycol rich-phase. It was found via Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectroscopy that cetyltrimethylammonium bromide only present in the dextran-rich phase. A selectivity mechanism is tentatively proposed and discussed.

  15. Reorientation of single-wall carbon nanotubes in negative anisotropy liquid crystals by an electric field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda García-García

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT are anisotropic nanoparticles that can cause modifications in the electrical and electro-optical properties of liquid crystals. The control of the SWCNT concentration, distribution and reorientation in such self-organized fluids allows for the possibility of tuning the liquid crystal properties. The alignment and reorientation of CNTs are studied in a system where the liquid crystal orientation effect has been isolated. Complementary studies including Raman spectroscopy, microscopic inspection and impedance studies were carried out. The results reveal an ordered reorientation of the CNTs induced by an electric field, which does not alter the orientation of the liquid crystal molecules. Moreover, impedance spectroscopy suggests a nonnegligible anchoring force between the CNTs and the liquid crystal molecules.

  16. Encapsulation and Polymerization of White Phosphorus Inside Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Martin; White, Edward R; Chen, Ji; McGilvery, Catriona M; Pickard, Chris J; Michaelides, Angelos; Sella, Andrea; Shaffer, Milo S P; Salzmann, Christoph G

    2017-07-03

    Elemental phosphorus displays an impressive number of allotropes with highly diverse chemical and physical properties. White phosphorus has now been filled into single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) from the liquid and thereby stabilized against the highly exothermic reaction with atmospheric oxygen. The encapsulated tetraphosphorus molecules were visualized with transmission electron microscopy, but found to convert readily into chain structures inside the SWCNT "nanoreactors". The energies of the possible chain structures were determined computationally, highlighting a delicate balance between the extent of polymerization and the SWCNT diameter. Experimentally, a single-stranded zig-zag chain of phosphorus atoms was observed, which is the lowest energy structure at small confinement diameters. These one-dimensional chains provide a glimpse into the very first steps of the transformation from white to red phosphorus. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Energy Band Gap Study of Semiconducting Single Walled Carbon Nanotube Bundle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkadi, Asmaa; Decrossas, Emmanuel; El-Ghazaly, Samir

    2013-01-01

    The electronic properties of multiple semiconducting single walled carbon nanotubes (s-SWCNTs) considering various distribution inside a bundle are studied. The model derived from the proposed analytical potential function of electron density for na individual s-SWCNT is general and can be easily applied to multiple nanotubes. This work demonstrates that regardless the number of carbon nanotubes, the strong coupling occurring between the closet neighbors reduces the energy band gap of the bundle by 10%. As expected, the coupling is strongly dependent on the distance separating the s-SWCNTs. In addition, based on the developed model, it is proposed to enhance this coupling effect by applying an electric field across the bundle to significantly reduce the energy band gap of the bundle by 20%.

  18. Unveiling the Evolutions of Nanotube Diameter Distribution during the Growth of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navas, Hugo; Picher, Matthieu; Andrieux-Ledier, Amandine; Fossard, Frédéric; Michel, Thierry; Kozawa, Akinari; Maruyama, Takahiro; Anglaret, Eric; Loiseau, Annick; Jourdain, Vincent

    2017-03-28

    In situ and ex situ Raman measurements were used to study the dynamics of the populations of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) during their catalytic growth by chemical vapor deposition. Our study reveals that the nanotube diameter distribution strongly evolves during SWCNT growth but in dissimilar ways depending on the growth conditions. We notably show that high selectivity can be obtained using short or moderate growth times. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy observations support that Ostwald ripening is the key process driving these seemingly contradictory results by regulating the size distribution and lifetime of the active catalyst particles. Ostwald ripening appears as the main termination mechanism for the smallest diameter tubes, whereas carbon poisoning dominates for the largest ones. By unveiling the key concept of dynamic competition between nanotube growth and catalyst ripening, we show that time can be used as an active parameter to control the growth selectivity of carbon nanotubes and other 1D systems.

  19. Cell response to single-walled carbon nanotubes in hybrid porous collagen sponges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Hongli; Kawazoe, Naoki; Chen, Guoping

    2015-02-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) porous collagen sponges incorporated with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were prepared and used for 3D culture of bovine articular chondrocytes (BACs). The pore structures of the sponges were controlled by using ice particulates as a porogen material. The responses of cells to SWCNTs were investigated in this 3D cell culture system by evaluation of cell functions and cellular uptake of SWCNTs. The results showed that cells adhered and spatially distributed in the porous sponges. The incorporation of SWCNTs in the porous sponges promoted cell proliferation and production of sulfated glycosaminoglycans (sGAG). Confocal Raman imaging revealed that SWCNTs could be internalized by cells. The hybrid porous sponges not only provided nanostructured pore surfaces to facilitate cell proliferation and extracellular matrix (ECM) secretion but also supplied nanomaterials for cellular uptake which may be useful for biomedical applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Purification of Single-Wall carbon nanotubes by heat treatment and supercritical extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Bertoncini

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Arc discharge is the most practical method for the synthesis of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT. However, the production of SWCNT by this technique has low selectivity and yield, requiring further purification steps. This work is a study of purification of SWCNT by heat treatment in an inert atmosphere followed by supercritical fluid extraction. The raw arc discharge material was first heat-treated at 1250 °C under argon. The nanotubes were further submitted to an extraction process using supercritical CO2 as solvent. A surfactant (tributylphosphate, TBP and a chelating agent (hexafluoroacetylacetone, HFA were used together to eliminate metallic impurities from the remaining arc discharge catalysts. Analysis of Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES showed an efficient removal of iron and cobalt (>80%. The purified nanotubes were further analyzed by TGA and Raman spectroscopy.

  1. A Comprehensive Review on Separation Methods and Techniques for Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Komatsu

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Structural control of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs is attracting enormous interest in view of their applications to nanoelectronics and nanooptics. Actually, more than 200 papers regarding separation of SWNTs have been published since 1998. In this review, they are classified into the following five sections according to the separation methods; electrophoresis, centrifugation, chromatography, selective solubilization and selective reaction. In each method, all literature is summarized in tables showing the separated objects (metallic/semiconducting (M/S, length, diameter, (n, m structure and/or handedness, the production process of the used SWNTs (CoMoCAT, HiPco, arc discharge and/or laser vaporization and the employed chemicals, such as detergents and polymers. Changes in annual number of publications related to this subject are also discussed.

  2. Recent progress on the structure separation of single-wall carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jiaming; Yang, Dehua; Zeng, Xiang; Zhou, Naigen; Liu, Huaping

    2017-11-01

    The mass production of single-structure, single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with identical properties is critical for their basic research and technical applications in the fields of electronics, optics and optoelectronics. Great efforts have been made to control the structures of SWCNTs since their discovery. Recently, the structure separation of SWCNTs has been making great progress. Various solution-sorting methods have been developed to achieve not only the separation of metallic and semiconducting species, but also the sorting of distinct (n, m) single-chirality species and even their enantiomers. This progress would dramatically accelerate the application of SWCNTs in the next-generation electronic devices. Here, we review the recent progress in the structure sorting of SWCNTs and outline the challenges and prospects of the structure separation of SWCNTs.

  3. A step toward production of smaller diameter single wall carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Lemos

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Single-wall carbon nanotubes were produced with, either, a bimetallic or a mixture of three catalysts. Raman scattering and high resolution transmission electron microscopy were used as characterization tools. The mixture LiNi0.5Co0.5O2 leaded to a sample relatively free from impurities with long bundles, each containing a few tubes. A narrow distribution of diameters for the sample produced with this mixture was evidenced by Raman scattering experiences. The mean tube diameter was found to be smaller than those measured for the nanotubes obtained with the bimetallic catalysts, Fe/Ni and Ni/Co. Possible chiralities were calculated for the semiconductor nanotubes formed. Assignments of the Raman radial breathing mode frequencies to the calculated structures are presented.

  4. Single walled carbon nanotube/Si heterojunctions for high responsivity photodetectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvato, M.; Scagliotti, M.; De Crescenzi, M.; Crivellari, M.; Prosposito, P.; Cacciotti, I.; Castrucci, P.

    2017-10-01

    Single walled carbon nanotube/n-Si (SWCNT/n-Si) hetero-junctions have been obtained by depositing SWCNT ultra-thin films on the surface of an n-Si substrate by dry transfer method. The as obtained junctions are photo sensitive in the measured wavelength range (300-1000 nm) and show zero bias responsivity and detectivity values of the order of 1 A W-1 and 1014 Jones respectively, which are higher than those previously observed in carbon based devices. Moreover, under on-off light excitation, the junctions show response speed as fast as 1 μs or better and noise equivalent powers comparable to commercial Si photomultipliers. Current-voltage measurements in dark and under illumination suggest that the devices consist of Schottky and semiconductor/semiconductor junctions both contributing to the fast and high responses observed.

  5. Coating individual single-walled carbon nanotubes with nylon 6,10 through emulsion polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Chiang; Wang, Randy K; Ziegler, Kirk J

    2009-08-01

    Solvent microenvironments are formed around individual single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) by mixing SWNT suspensions with water-immiscible organic solvents. These microenvironments are used to encapsulate the SWNTs with the monomer sebacoyl chloride. Hexamethylene diamine is then injected into the aqueous phase so the formation of nylon 6,10 is restricted to the interface between the microenvironment and water. This emulsion polymerization process results in uniform coatings of nylon 6,10 around individual SWNTs. The nylon-coated SWNTs remain dispersed in the aqueous phase and are highly luminescent at pH values ranging from 3 to 12. This emulsion polymerization method provides a general approach to coat nanotubes with various polymers.

  6. Revealing properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes under high pressure

    CERN Document Server

    Tang Jie; Sasaki, T; Yudasaka, M; Matsushita, A; Iijima, S

    2002-01-01

    It was found by the x-ray diffraction experiment under hydrostatic pressure that the carbon nanotubes are compressed easily with a high volume compressibility of 0.024 GPa sup - sup 1. The single-walled carbon nanotubes are polygonized when they form bundles of hexagonal close-packed structure and the inter-tubular gap is smaller than the equilibrium spacing of graphite. Under high pressure, further polygonization occurs to accommodate the extra amount of volume reduction. The ratio of the short and the long diagonals in the hexagonalized cross section is found to have changed from 0.991 at zero pressure to 0.982 at 1.5 GPa pressure, when the Bragg reflection from the nanotube lattice diminished. Accompanying polygonization, a discontinuous change in electrical resistivity was observed at 1.5 GPa pressure, suggesting a phase transition had occurred.

  7. Vibration analysis of viscoelastic single-walled carbon nanotubes resting on a viscoelastic foundation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Da Peng; Lei, Yong Jun; Shen, Zhi Bin [College of Aerospace Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha (China); Wang, Cheng Yuan [Zienkiewicz Centre for Computational Engineering, College of Engineering, Swansea University, Swansea Wales (United Kingdom)

    2017-01-15

    Vibration responses were investigated for a viscoelastic Single-walled carbon nanotube (visco-SWCNT) resting on a viscoelastic foundation. Based on the nonlocal Euler-Bernoulli beam model, velocity-dependent external damping and Kelvin viscoelastic foundation model, the governing equations were derived. The Transfer function method (TFM) was then used to compute the natural frequencies for general boundary conditions and foundations. In particular, the exact analytical expressions of both complex natural frequencies and critical viscoelastic parameters were obtained for the Kelvin-Voigt visco-SWCNTs with full foundations and certain boundary conditions, and several physically intuitive special cases were discussed. Substantial nonlocal effects, the influence of geometric and physical parameters of the SWCNT and the viscoelastic foundation were observed for the natural frequencies of the supported SWCNTs. The study demonstrates the efficiency and robustness of the developed model for the vibration of the visco-SWCNT-viscoelastic foundation coupling system.

  8. Bulk properties of crystalline single wall carbon nanotubes: Purification, pressure effects and transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, J. E.; Lee, R. S.; Kim, H. J.; Rinzler, A. G.; Smalley, R. E.; Yaguzhinski, S. L.; Bozhko, A. D.; Sklovsky, D. E.; Nalimova, V. A.

    1998-08-01

    Pulsed laser ablation (PLA) has been scaled up to yield several grams/day of single-walled nanotubes. Annealed, purified material is highly crystalline, essentially free of amorphous carbon, fullerenes and catalyst residues, and about 3 times denser than the highly porous, as-grown product. In principle the interactions between tubes in a rope, and/or between rope crystallites, may be "tuned" by 3 different approaches—chemical doping, hydrostatic pressure, or purification/annealing, all of which have a dramatic effect on the temperature dependence of resistivity. In particular, we suggest that the crossover from positive to negative dR/dT at low temperature is a 3D effect and not an intrinsic property of isolated neutral SWNT.

  9. Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Decorated with Polypyrrole-TiO2 Nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radha, Gosala; Samanta, Debasis; Balakumar, Subramanian; Mandal, Asit Baran; Jaisankar, Sellamuthu N

    2015-05-01

    Nanomaterials decorated with polypyrrole were synthesized using two types of oxidants by chemical oxidative polymerization method. The interaction and influence of the addition of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles in polypyrrole (PPy) were studied using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Thermal stability has been observed by using thermogravimetric analysis. Electrochemical properties were calculated by using Cyclic Voltammetry to study comparative analysis between samples. Particle size measurements and morphology were determined by Field emission transmission electron microscopy. All the nanocomposites exhibit better thermal and electrochemical properties than native polymer. The size of the polypyrrole particles were in the range of 50 nm to 60 nm.

  10. Alignment and Alignment Modulation of Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes Using Lyotropic Chromonic Liquid Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, M. F.; Smalyukh, I. I.; Lavrentovich, O. D.; Yodh, A. G.

    2006-03-01

    We report alignment and local alignment modulation of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) dispersed in a nematic solvent of lyotropic chromonic liquid crystals (LCLCs). Polarized optical absorption suggests that when SWNTs are coated with surfactant molecules, e.g., sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (NaDDBS), the SWNTs align along the nematic director of the LCLCs, possibly due to elastic interaction between the anisotropic SWNTs and the nematic field of the LCLCs. In contrast, if the SWNTs are not coated with surfactant, then SWNTs align normal to the LCLC nematic director, possibly due to π-π interactions between the aromatic groups of the LCLCs and the graphitic surface of SWNTs. We describe these observations and show that SWNTs can easily be realigned via realignment of nematic LCLCs using a magnetic field of only a few KGauss. This work is supported by grants from NSF (MRSEC DMR 05-20020 and DMR-0505048) and NASA NAG8-2172.

  11. Electromagnetic Wave Interactions with 2D Arrays of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taha A. Elwi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report, for the first time, the scattering, absorption, and reflection characteristics of 2D arrays of finite-length, armchair, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs in the visible frequency regime. The analysis is based on the Finite-Element-Method formulation of Maxwell's equations and a 3D quantum electrical conductivity function. Three geometrical models have been considered: solid cylinder, hollow cylinder, and honeycomb. We demonstrate that classical electromagnetic theory is sufficient to evaluate the scattering and absorption cross sections of SWNTs, which revealed excellent agreement against measurements without the need to invoke the effective impedance boundary conditions. The solid and hollow cylindrical models fail to provide accurate results, when both scattering and absorption are considered. Finally, it is shown that reflection and transmission characteristics of both individual and arrays of SWNTs, which are essential for solar cell applications, are strongly influenced by the length and the phenomenological parameters of the SWNT.

  12. Application of single walled carbon nanotubes for heating agent in photothermal therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Siregar, Syahril; Nagaoka, Ryo; Saijo, Yoshifumi

    2016-01-01

    We present the theoretical investigation of the single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) as the heating agent of photothermal therapy. In our model, the SWNT is modeled by rigid tube surrounded by cancer cells. In this model, we neglect the angle dependence of temperature and assume that the length of SWNT is much longer than the radius of tube. We calculated the temperature rise of the SWNT and its surrounding cancer cells during the laser heating by solving one-dimensional heat conduction equation in steady state condition. We found that the maximum temperature is located at the interface between SWNT and cancer cells. This maximum temperature is proportional to the square of SWNTs diameter and diameter of SWNTs depends on their chirality. These results extend our understanding of the temperature distribution in SWNT during the laser heating process and provide the suggested specification of SWNT for the improvement the photothermal therapy in the future.

  13. Carbon nanotube-nucleobase hybrids: nanorings from uracil-modified single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Prabhpreet; Toma, Francesca Maria; Kumar, Jitendra; Venkatesh, V; Raya, Jesus; Prato, Maurizio; Verma, Sandeep; Bianco, Alberto

    2011-06-06

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have been covalently functionalized with uracil nucleobase. The hybrids have been characterized by using complementary spectroscopic and microscopic techniques including solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The uracil-functionalized SWCNTs are able to self-assemble into regular nanorings with a diameter of 50-70 nm, as observed by AFM and TEM. AFM shows that the rings do not have a consistent height and thickness, which indicates that they may be formed by separate bundles of CNTs. The simplest model for the nanoring formation likely involves two bundles of CNTs interacting with each other via uracil-uracil base-pairing at both CNT ends. These nanorings can be envisaged for the development of advanced electronic circuits. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Surface Control of Complement Recognition and Activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Alina Joukainen; Robinson, Joshua T.; Dai, Hongjie

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are receiving considerable attention in site-specific drug and nucleic acid delivery, photodynamic therapy, and photoacoustic molecular imaging. Despite these advances, nanotubes may activate the complement system (an integral part of innate immunity), which can induce...... clinically significant anaphylaxis. We demonstrate that single-walled CNTs coated with human serum albumin activate the complement system through C1q-mediated classical and the alternative pathways. Surface coating with methoxypoly(ethylene glycol)-based amphiphiles, which confers solubility and prolongs...... circulation profiles of CNTs, activates the complement system differently, depending on the amphiphile structure. CNTs with linear poly(ethylene glycol) amphiphiles trigger the lectin pathway of the complement through both l-ficolin and mannan-binding lectin recognition. The lectin pathway activation, however...

  15. Extinction properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes: Two-fluid model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moradi, Afshin, E-mail: a.moradi@kut.ac.ir [Department of Basic Sciences, Kermanshah University of Technology, Kermanshah, Iran and Department of Nano Science, Institute for Studies in Theoretical Physics and Mathematics (IPM), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    The extinction spectra of a single-walled carbon nanotube are investigated, within the framework of the vector wave function method in conjunction with the hydrodynamic model. Both polarizations of the incident plane wave (TE and TM with respect to the x-z plane) are treated. Electronic excitations on the nanotube surface are modeled by an infinitesimally thin layer of a two-dimensional electron gas represented by two interacting fluids, which takes into account the different nature of the σ and π electrons. Numerical results show that strong interaction between the fluids gives rise to the splitting of the extinction spectra into two peaks in quantitative agreement with the π and σ + π plasmon energies.

  16. Structural and electronic properties of chiral single-wall copper nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, YingNi; Zhang, JianMin; Xu, KeWei

    2014-04-01

    The structural, energetic and electronic properties of chiral ( n, m) (3⩽ n⩽6, n/2⩽ m⩽ n) single-wall copper nanotubes (CuNTs) have been investigated by using projector-augmented wave method based on density-functional theory. The (4, 3) CuNT is energetically stable and should be observed experimentally in both free-standing and tip-suspended conditions, whereas the (5, 5) and (6, 4) CuNTs should be observed in free-standing and tip-suspended conditions, respectively. The number of conductance channels in the CuNTs does not always correspond to the number of atomic strands comprising the nanotube. Charge density contours show that there is an enhanced interatomic interaction in CuNTs compared with Cu bulk. Current transporting states display different periods and chirality, the combined effects of which lead to weaker chiral currents on CuNTs.

  17. Nonlinear free vibration of single walled Carbone NanoTubes conveying fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azrar A.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Nonlinear free vibration of single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs conveying fluid are modeled and numerically simulated based on von Kármán geometric nonlinearity and Eringen’s nonlocal elasticity theory. The CNTs are modelled as nanobeams where the effects of transverse shear deformation and rotary inertia are considered within the framework of Timoshenko beam theory. The governing equations and boundary conditions are derived using the Hamilton’s principle and the nonlinear equation of motion is solved by the Galerkin’s method. The small scale parameter and the fluid-tube interaction effects on the dynamic behaviours of the CNT-fluid system as well as the instabilities induced by the fluid-velocity can be investigated. The critical fluid-velocity and frequency-amplitude relationships as well as the flutter and divergence instability types and the associated time responses are obtained based on the presented methodological approach.

  18. Interaction between fullerene halves C{sub n} (n ≤ 40) and single wall carbon nanotube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Amrish, E-mail: amrish99@gmail.com; Kaur, Sandeep, E-mail: sipusukhn@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Punjabi University, Patiala (India); Mudahar, Isha, E-mail: isha@pbi.ac.in [Department of Basic and Applied Sciences, Punjabi University, Patiala (India)

    2016-05-06

    We have investigated the structural and electronic properties of carbon nanotube with small fullerene halves C{sub n} (n ≤ 40) which are covalently bonded to the side wall of an armchair single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) using first principle method based on density functional theory. The fullerene size results in weak bonding between fullerene halves and carbon nanotube (CNT). Further, it was found that the C-C bond distance that attaches the fullerene half and CNT is of the order of 1.60 Å. The calculated binding energies indicate the stability of the complexes formed. The HOMO-LUMO gaps and electron density of state plots points towards the metallicity of the complex formed. Our calculations on charge transfer reveal that very small amount of charge is transferred from CNT to fullerene halves.

  19. Aggregated single-walled carbon nanotubes attenuate the behavioural and neurochemical effects of methamphetamine in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Xue; Yang, Jing-Yu; He, Yi; Wang, Li-Rong; Liu, Ping; Yu, Li-Sha; Bi, Guo-Hua; Zhu, Ming-Ming; Liu, Yue-Yang; Xiang, Rong-Wu; Yang, Xiao-Ting; Fan, Xin-Yu; Wang, Xiao-Min; Qi, Jia; Zhang, Hong-Jie; Wei, Tuo; Cui, Wei; Ge, Guang-Lu; Xi, Zheng-Xiong; Wu, Chun-Fu; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2016-07-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) abuse is a serious social and health problem worldwide. At present, there are no effective medications to treat METH addiction. Here, we report that aggregated single-walled carbon nanotubes (aSWNTs) significantly inhibited METH self-administration, METH-induced conditioned place preference and METH- or cue-induced relapse to drug-seeking behaviour in mice. The use of aSWNTs alone did not significantly alter the mesolimbic dopamine system, whereas pretreatment with aSWNTs attenuated METH-induced increases in extracellular dopamine in the ventral striatum. Electrochemical assays suggest that aSWNTs facilitated dopamine oxidation. In addition, aSWNTs attenuated METH-induced increases in tyrosine hydroxylase or synaptic protein expression. These findings suggest that aSWNTs may have therapeutic effects for treatment of METH addiction by oxidation of METH-enhanced extracellular dopamine in the striatum.

  20. Efficient Growth of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes on Supported Fe/Mo Catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornyak, Louis; Grigorian, Leonid; Dillon, Anne; Parilla, Phillip; Jones, Kim; Heben, Mike

    2002-03-01

    Efficient chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) from methane on supported Fe/Mo catalyst has been demonstrated over a temperature window ranging from 680 to 850 C. Mass gain, transmission electron microscopic (TEM) and Raman data were used to gauge the quality of SWNT growth. Four domains have been characterized. In the low temperature domain, an abrupt rise in SWNT growth occurs as a function of increasing CVD temperature. Next, a plateau region equivalent to the "temperature window" is observed. SWNT growth is favored in this window region. A decline in SWNT production and an increase in non-SWNT hydrocarbons is noted in the 3rd and 4th domains of the profile respectively. The apparent SWNT turn-off is associated with the competitive deposition of amorphous and nanocrystalline carbons.

  1. Structural and Morphological Investigation for Water-Processed Graphene Oxide/Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muda, M. R.; Ramli, M. M.; Mat Isa, S. S.; Halin, D. S. C.; Talip, L. F. A.; Mazelan, N. S.; Anhar, N. A. M.; Danial, N. A.

    2017-06-01

    New group of materials derived from hybridization of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and graphene oxide (GO) which resulting novel three dimensional (3D) materials generates an outstanding properties compared to corresponding SWCNTs and GO/Graphene. In this paper, we describe a simple approach using water processing method to develop integrated rGO/GO-SWCNT hybrids with different hybrid ratios. The hybrid ratios were varied into three divided ratio and the results were compared between pristine SWCNTs and GO in order to investigate the structural density and morphology of these carbonaceous materials. With an optimized ratio of rGO/GO-SWCNT, the hybrid shows a well-organized hybrid film structures with less defects density sites. The optimized mixture ratio emphasized the important of both rGO and SWCNTs in the hybrid structures. Morphological structural and defects density degrees were examined by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) and Raman spectroscopy.

  2. Adhesion energy of single wall carbon nanotube loops on various substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Tianjun [Université de Lyon, Laboratoire de Physique, ENS de Lyon, CNRS-46, Allée d' Italie, Lyon 69364 (France); Department of Physics, Shaoxing University, 508 Huancheng West Rd., Shaoxing 312000 (China); Ayari, Anthony [Institut Lumière Matière, UMR5306 Université Lyon 1-CNRS, Université de Lyon, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Bellon, Ludovic, E-mail: ludovic.bellon@ens-lyon.fr [Université de Lyon, Laboratoire de Physique, ENS de Lyon, CNRS-46, Allée d' Italie, Lyon 69364 (France)

    2015-04-28

    The physics of adhesion of one-dimensional nano structures such as nanotubes, nano wires, and biopolymers on different substrates is of great interest for the study of biological adhesion and the development of nano electronics and nano mechanics. In this paper, we present force spectroscopy experiments of individual single wall carbon nanotube loops using a home-made interferometric atomic force microscope. Characteristic force plateaus during the peeling process allow the quantitative measurement of the adhesion energy per unit length on various substrates: graphite, mica, platinum, gold, and silicon. Moreover, using a time-frequency analysis of the deflection of the cantilever, we estimate the dynamic stiffness of the contact, providing more information on the nanotube configurations and its intrinsic mechanical properties.

  3. Single-walled carbon nanotube-based polymer monoliths for the enantioselective nano-liquid chromatographic separation of racemic pharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Marwa; Yajadda, Mir Massoud Aghili; Han, Zhao Jun; Su, Dawei; Wang, Guoxiu; Ostrikov, Kostya Ken; Ghanem, Ashraf

    2014-09-19

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes were encapsulated into different polymer-based monolithic backbones. The polymer monoliths were prepared via the copolymerization of 20% monomers, glycidyl methacrylate, 20% ethylene glycol dimethacrylate and 60% porogens (36% 1-propanol, 18% 1,4-butanediol) or 16.4% monomers (16% butyl methacrylate, 0.4% sulfopropyl methacrylate), 23.6% ethylene glycol dimethacrylate and 60% porogens (36% 1-propanol, 18% 1,4-butanediol) along with 6% single-walled carbon nanotubes aqueous suspension. The effect of single-walled carbon nanotubes on the chiral separation of twelve classes of pharmaceutical racemates namely; α- and β-blockers, antiinflammatory drugs, antifungal drugs, dopamine antagonists, norepinephrine-dopamine reuptake inhibitors, catecholamines, sedative hypnotics, diuretics, antihistaminics, anticancer drugs and antiarrhythmic drugs was investigated. The enantioselective separation was carried out under multimodal elution to explore the chiral recognition capabilities of single-walled carbon nanotubes using reversed phase, polar organic and normal phase chromatographic conditions using nano-liquid chromatography. Baseline separation was achieved for celiprolol, chlorpheniramine, etozoline, nomifensine and sulconazole under multimodal elution conditions. Satisfactory repeatability was achieved through run-to-run, column-to-column and batch-to-batch investigations. Our findings demonstrate that single-walled carbon nanotubes represent a promising stationary phase for the chiral separation and may open the field for a new class of chiral selectors. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes regulates their effect on hemostasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokolov, A V; Aseychev, A V; Kostevich, V A; Gusev, A A; Gusev, S A; Vlasova, I I, E-mail: irina.vlasova@yahoo.com [Research Institute for Physico-Chemical Medicine, FMBA, M. Pirogovskaya Str. 1a, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2011-04-01

    Applications of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in medical field imply the use of drug-coupled carbon nanotubes as well as carbon nanotubes functionalized with different chemical groups that change nanotube surface properties and interactions between nanotubes and cells. Covalent attachment of polyethylene glycol (PEG) to carboxylated single-walled carbon nanotubes (c-SWNT) is known to prevent the nanotubes from interaction with macrophages. Here we characterized nanotube's ability to stimulate coagulation processes in platelet-poor plasma (PPP), and evaluated the effect of SWNTs on platelet aggregation in platelet-rich plasma (PRP). Our study showed that PEG-SWNT did not affect the rate of clotting in PPP, while c-SWNT shortened the clot formation time five times compared to the control PPP. Since c-SWNT failed to accelerate coagulation in plasma lacking coagulation factor XI, it may be suggested that c-SWNT affects the contact activation pathway. In PRP, platelets responded to both SWNT types with irreversible aggregation, as evidenced by changes in the aggregate mean radius. However, the rate of aggregation induced by c-SWNT was two times higher than it was with PEG-SWNT. Cytological analysis also showed that c-SWNT was two times more efficient when compared to PEG-SWNT in aggregating platelets in PRP. Taken together, our results show that functionalization of nanoparticles can diminish their negative influence on blood cells. As seen from our data, modification of c-SWNT with PEG, when only a one percent of carbon atoms is bound to polymer (70 wt %), decreased the nanotube-induced coagulation in PRP and repelled the accelerating effect on the coagulation in PPP. Thus, when functionalized SWNTs are used for administration into bloodstream of laboratory animals, their possible pro-coagulant and pro-aggregating properties must be taken into account.

  5. Functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes regulates their effect on hemostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, A. V.; Aseychev, A. V.; Kostevich, V. A.; Gusev, A. A.; Gusev, S. A.; Vlasova, I. I.

    2011-04-01

    Applications of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in medical field imply the use of drug-coupled carbon nanotubes as well as carbon nanotubes functionalized with different chemical groups that change nanotube surface properties and interactions between nanotubes and cells. Covalent attachment of polyethylene glycol (PEG) to carboxylated single-walled carbon nanotubes (c-SWNT) is known to prevent the nanotubes from interaction with macrophages. Here we characterized nanotube's ability to stimulate coagulation processes in platelet-poor plasma (PPP), and evaluated the effect of SWNTs on platelet aggregation in platelet-rich plasma (PRP). Our study showed that PEG-SWNT did not affect the rate of clotting in PPP, while c-SWNT shortened the clot formation time five times compared to the control PPP. Since c-SWNT failed to accelerate coagulation in plasma lacking coagulation factor XI, it may be suggested that c-SWNT affects the contact activation pathway. In PRP, platelets responded to both SWNT types with irreversible aggregation, as evidenced by changes in the aggregate mean radius. However, the rate of aggregation induced by c-SWNT was two times higher than it was with PEG-SWNT. Cytological analysis also showed that c-SWNT was two times more efficient when compared to PEG-SWNT in aggregating platelets in PRP. Taken together, our results show that functionalization of nanoparticles can diminish their negative influence on blood cells. As seen from our data, modification of c-SWNT with PEG, when only a one percent of carbon atoms is bound to polymer (70 wt %), decreased the nanotube-induced coagulation in PRP and repelled the accelerating effect on the coagulation in PPP. Thus, when functionalized SWNTs are used for administration into bloodstream of laboratory animals, their possible pro-coagulant and pro-aggregating properties must be taken into account.

  6. Size reduction of 3D-polymer-coated single-walled carbon nanotubes by ultracentrifugation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsumi, Yusuke; Fujigaya, Tsuyohiko; Nakashima, Naotoshi

    2015-11-01

    We describe a novel single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) cutting method without introducing any structural defects on the tubes; namely, the finding that simple ultracentrifugation at 600 000g for the SWNTs coated with a cross-linked polymer formed by poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) or the polyethylene glycol-carrying PNIPAM copolymer provides shortened (water and buffer solution due to the remaining cross-linked polymer structures on the SWNTs. The present method is very simple (only ultracentrifugation) and the yield is very high, which are the advantages in the preparation of many shortened isolated SWNTs with specific properties and functions that are applicable in many fields including bioapplications in vivo, such as imaging, NIR-hyperthermic treatment, photodynamic therapy, etc.We describe a novel single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) cutting method without introducing any structural defects on the tubes; namely, the finding that simple ultracentrifugation at 600 000g for the SWNTs coated with a cross-linked polymer formed by poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) or the polyethylene glycol-carrying PNIPAM copolymer provides shortened (water and buffer solution due to the remaining cross-linked polymer structures on the SWNTs. The present method is very simple (only ultracentrifugation) and the yield is very high, which are the advantages in the preparation of many shortened isolated SWNTs with specific properties and functions that are applicable in many fields including bioapplications in vivo, such as imaging, NIR-hyperthermic treatment, photodynamic therapy, etc. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: DLS profile of the supernatant after one ultracentrifugation at 600 000g for SWNT/PNIPAM (NIPAM : BIS = 100 : 1). DLS profiles, AFM images and length histograms, average length as a function of the number of repeated centrifugations, Raman spectra, absorption spectra and PL mappings of SWNT/PNIPAM (NIPAM : BIS = 18 : 1). See DOI: 10.1039/c5

  7. Interaction of amidated single-walled carbon nanotubes with protein by multiple spectroscopic methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Lili [China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China); The Nursing College of Pingdingshan University, Pingdingshan 467000 (China); Lin, Rui [Yancheng Health Vocational and Technical College, Yancheng 224005 (China); He, Hua, E-mail: dochehua@163.com [China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Key Laboratory of Drug Quality Control and Pharmacovigilance, Ministry of Education, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Sun, Meiling, E-mail: sml-nir@sohu.com [China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Jiang, Li; Gao, Mengmeng [China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China)

    2014-01-15

    The aim of this work was to investigate the detailed interaction between BSA and amidated single walled carbon nanotubes (e-SWNTs) in vitro. Ethylenediamine (EDA) was successfully linked on the surface of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) via acylation to improve their dispersion and to introduce active groups. Bovine serum albumin (BSA) was selected as the template protein to inspect the interaction of e-SWNTs with protein. Decreases in fluorescence intensity of BSA induced by e-SWNTs demonstrated the occurrence of interaction between BSA and e-SWNTs. Quenching parameters and different absorption spectra for e-SWNTs–BSA show that the quenching effect of e-SWNTs was static quenching. Hydrophobic force had a leading contribution to the binding roles of BSA on e-SWNTs, which was confirmed by positive enthalpy change and entropy change. The interference of Na{sup +} with the quenching effect of e-SWNTs authenticated that electrostatic force existed in the interactive process simultaneously. The hydrophobicity of amino acid residues markedly increased with the addition of e-SWNTs viewed from UV spectra of BSA. The content of α-helix structure in BSA decreased by 6.8% due to the addition of e-SWNTs, indicating that e-SWNTs have an effect on the secondary conformation of BSA. -- Highlights: • The interaction between e-SWNTs and BSA was investigated by multiple spectroscopic methods. • Quenching mechanism was static quenching. • Changes in structure of BSA were inspected by synchronous fluorescence, UV–vis and CD spectrum.

  8. Developing Xenopus Embryos Recover by Compacting and Expelling Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Brian D.; Shawky, Joseph H.; Dahl, Kris Noel; Davidson, Lance A.; Islam, Mohammad F.

    2015-01-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes are high aspect ratio nanomaterials that are being developed for use in materials, technological and biological applications due to their high mechanical stiffness, optical properties, and chemical inertness. Because of their prevalence, it is inevitable that biological systems will be exposed to nanotubes, yet studies of the effects of nanotubes on developing embryos have been inconclusive and are lacking for single-wall carbon nanotubes exposed to the widely studied model organism Xenopus laevis (African clawed frog). Microinjection of experimental substances into the Xenopus embryo is a standard technique for toxicology studies and cellular lineage tracing. Here we report the surprising finding that superficial (12.5 ± 7.5 μm below the membrane) microinjection of nanotubes dispersed with Pluronic F127 into one-to-two cell Xenopus embryos resulted in the formation and expulsion of compacted, nanotube-filled, punctate masses, at the blastula to mid-gastrula developmental stages, which we call “boluses”. Such expulsion of microinjected materials by Xenopus embryos has not been reported before and is dramatically different from the typical distribution of the materials throughout the progeny of the microinjected cells. Previous studies of microinjections of nanomaterials such as nanodiamonds, quantum dots or spherical nanoparticles report that nanomaterials often induce toxicity and remain localized within the embryos. In contrast, our results demonstrate an active recovery pathway for embryos after exposure to Pluronic F127-coated nanotubes, which we speculate is due to a combined effect of the membrane activity of the dispersing agent, Pluronic F127, and the large aspect ratio of nanotubes. PMID:26153061

  9. Tight binding simulation study on zigzag single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Deepa; Jaggi, Neena; Gupta, Vishu

    2018-01-01

    Tight binding simulation studies using the density functional tight binding (DFTB) model have been performed on various zigzag single-walled carbon-nanotubes (SWCNTs) to investigate their electronic properties using DFTB module of the Material Studio Software version 7.0. Various combinations of different eigen-solvers and charge mixing schemes available in the DFTB Module have been tried to chalk out the electronic structure. The analytically deduced values of the bandgap of (9, 0) SWCNT were compared with the experimentally determined value reported in the literature. On comparison, it was found that the tight binding approximations tend to drastically underestimate the bandgap values. However, the combination of Anderson charge mixing method with standard eigensolver when implemented using the smart algorithm was found to produce fairly close results. These optimized model parameters were then used to determine the band structures of various zigzag SWCNTs. (9, 0) Single-walled Nanotube which is extensively being used for sensing NH3, CH4 and NO2 has been picked up as a reference material since its experimental bandgap value has been reported in the literature. It has been found to exhibit a finite energy bandgap in contrast to its expected metallic nature. The study is of utmost significance as it not only probes and validates the simulation route for predicting suitable properties of nanomaterials but also throws light on the comparative efficacy of the different approximation and rationalization quantum mechanical techniques used in simulation studies. Such simulation studies if used intelligently prove to be immensely useful to the material scientists as they not only save time and effort but also pave the way to new experiments by making valuable predictions.

  10. [Study on single-walled carbon nanotube thin film photoelectric device].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wen-bin; Zhu, Yong; Gong, Tian-cheng; Chen, Yu-lin; Zhang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    The single-walled carbon nanotube film photoelectric device was invented, and it can generate net photocurrent under bias voltage when it is illuminated by the laser. The influences of bias voltage, laser power and illuminating position on the net photocurrent were investigated. The experimental results showed that when the center of the film was illuminated, the photocurrent increased with the applied bias, but tended to saturate as the laser power increased. As the voltage and the laser power reached 0. 2 V and 22. 7 mW respectively, the photocurrent reached 0. 24 µA. When the voltage was removed, the photocurrent varied with the laser illuminating position on the film and its value was distributed symmetrically about the center of the device. The photocurrent reached maximum and almost zero respectively when the laser illuminated on two ends and the center of the film. Analysis proposes that the net photocurrent can be generated due to internal photoelectric effect when the device is under voltage and the laser illuminates on the center of the film. It can be also generated due to photo-thermoelectric effect when the device is under no voltage and the laser illuminates on the film, and the relation between the net photocurrent and the illuminating position was derived according to the nature of thermoelectric power of single-walled carbon nanotubes with the established temperature model, which coincides with experimental result. Two effects are the reasons for the generation and variety of the net photocurrent and they superimpose to form the result of the net photocurrent when the device is under general conditions of voltage and laser illuminating position. The device has potential applications in the areas of photovoltaic device and optical sensor for its characteristic.

  11. Functional brain networks: random, "small world" or deterministic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blinowska, Katarzyna J; Kaminski, Maciej

    2013-01-01

    Lately the problem of connectivity in brain networks is being approached frequently by graph theoretical analysis. In several publications based on bivariate estimators of relations between EEG channels authors reported random or "small world" structure of networks. The results of these works often have no relation to other evidence based on imaging, inverse solutions methods, physiological and anatomical data. Herein we try to find reasons for this discrepancy. We point out that EEG signals are very much interdependent, thus bivariate measures applied to them may produce many spurious connections. In fact, they may outnumber the true connections. Giving all connections equal weights, as it is usual in the framework of graph theoretical analysis, further enhances these spurious links. In effect, close to random and disorganized patterns of connections emerge. On the other hand, multivariate connectivity estimators, which are free of the artificial links, show specific, well determined patterns, which are in a very good agreement with other evidence. The modular structure of brain networks may be identified by multivariate estimators based on Granger causality and formalism of assortative mixing. In this way, the strength of coupling may be evaluated quantitatively. During working memory task, by means of multivariate Directed Transfer Function, it was demonstrated that the modules characterized by strong internal bonds exchange the information by weaker connections.

  12. Functional brain networks: random, "small world" or deterministic?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna J Blinowska

    Full Text Available Lately the problem of connectivity in brain networks is being approached frequently by graph theoretical analysis. In several publications based on bivariate estimators of relations between EEG channels authors reported random or "small world" structure of networks. The results of these works often have no relation to other evidence based on imaging, inverse solutions methods, physiological and anatomical data. Herein we try to find reasons for this discrepancy. We point out that EEG signals are very much interdependent, thus bivariate measures applied to them may produce many spurious connections. In fact, they may outnumber the true connections. Giving all connections equal weights, as it is usual in the framework of graph theoretical analysis, further enhances these spurious links. In effect, close to random and disorganized patterns of connections emerge. On the other hand, multivariate connectivity estimators, which are free of the artificial links, show specific, well determined patterns, which are in a very good agreement with other evidence. The modular structure of brain networks may be identified by multivariate estimators based on Granger causality and formalism of assortative mixing. In this way, the strength of coupling may be evaluated quantitatively. During working memory task, by means of multivariate Directed Transfer Function, it was demonstrated that the modules characterized by strong internal bonds exchange the information by weaker connections.

  13. Predicting genetic interactions with random walks on biological networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Ambuj K

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several studies have demonstrated that synthetic lethal genetic interactions between gene mutations provide an indication of functional redundancy between molecular complexes and pathways. These observations help explain the finding that organisms are able to tolerate single gene deletions for a large majority of genes. For example, system-wide gene knockout/knockdown studies in S. cerevisiae and C. elegans revealed non-viable phenotypes for a mere 18% and 10% of the genome, respectively. It has been postulated that the low percentage of essential genes reflects the extensive amount of genetic buffering that occurs within genomes. Consistent with this hypothesis, systematic double-knockout screens in S. cerevisiae and C. elegans show that, on average, 0.5% of tested gene pairs are synthetic sick or synthetic lethal. While knowledge of synthetic lethal interactions provides valuable insight into molecular functionality, testing all combinations of gene pairs represents a daunting task for molecular biologists, as the combinatorial nature of these relationships imposes a large experimental burden. Still, the task of mapping pairwise interactions between genes is essential to discovering functional relationships between molecular complexes and pathways, as they form the basis of genetic robustness. Towards the goal of alleviating the experimental workload, computational techniques that accurately predict genetic interactions can potentially aid in targeting the most likely candidate interactions. Building on previous studies that analyzed properties of network topology to predict genetic interactions, we apply random walks on biological networks to accurately predict pairwise genetic interactions. Furthermore, we incorporate all published non-interactions into our algorithm for measuring the topological relatedness between two genes. We apply our method to S. cerevisiae and C. elegans datasets and, using a decision tree

  14. First Passage Time for Random Walks in Heterogeneous Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, S.; Lee, D.-S.; Kahng, B.

    2012-08-01

    The first passage time (FPT) for random walks is a key indicator of how fast information diffuses in a given system. Despite the role of FPT as a fundamental feature in transport phenomena, its behavior, particularly in heterogeneous networks, is not yet fully understood. Here, we study, both analytically and numerically, the scaling behavior of the FPT distribution to a given target node, averaged over all starting nodes. We find that random walks arrive quickly at a local hub, and therefore, the FPT distribution shows a crossover with respect to time from fast decay behavior (induced from the attractive effect to the hub) to slow decay behavior (caused by the exploring of the entire system). Moreover, the mean FPT is independent of the degree of the target node in the case of compact exploration. These theoretical results justify the necessity of using a random jump protocol (empirically used in search engines) and provide guidelines for designing an effective network to make information quickly accessible.

  15. Random Deep Belief Networks for Recognizing Emotions from Speech Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guihua Wen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Now the human emotions can be recognized from speech signals using machine learning methods; however, they are challenged by the lower recognition accuracies in real applications due to lack of the rich representation ability. Deep belief networks (DBN can automatically discover the multiple levels of representations in speech signals. To make full of its advantages, this paper presents an ensemble of random deep belief networks (RDBN method for speech emotion recognition. It firstly extracts the low level features of the input speech signal and then applies them to construct lots of random subspaces. Each random subspace is then provided for DBN to yield the higher level features as the input of the classifier to output an emotion label. All outputted emotion labels are then fused through the majority voting to decide the final emotion label for the input speech signal. The conducted experimental results on benchmark speech emotion databases show that RDBN has better accuracy than the compared methods for speech emotion recognition.

  16. Exploring MEDLINE space with random indexing and pathfinder networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Trevor

    2008-11-06

    The integration of disparate research domains is a prerequisite for the success of the translational science initiative. MEDLINE abstracts contain content from a broad range of disciplines, presenting an opportunity for the development of methods able to integrate the knowledge they contain. Latent Semantic Analysis (LSA) and related methods learn human-like associations between terms from unannotated text. However, their computational and memory demands limits their ability to address a corpus of this size. Furthermore, visualization methods previously used in conjunction with LSA have limited ability to define the local structure of the associative networks LSA learns. This paper explores these issues by (1) processing the entire MEDLINE corpus using Random Indexing, a variant of LSA, and (2) exploring learned associations using Pathfinder Networks. Meaningful associations are inferred from MEDLINE, including a drug-disease association undetected by PUBMED search.

  17. Comparison of Synchronization in Small World and Random Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Tess; Miller, Bruce

    2008-10-01

    There are many models that simulate neuron firing in the brain. These range from the basic integrate-and-fire method to the complex Hodgkin-Huxley model. Eugene Izhikevich (2003) employed the principles of nonlinear dynamics, specifically bifurcation theory, to develop a model that is both simple and powerful, which can be described as an integrate-and-reset model. By changing only a few parameters, this model can simulate all the known types of cortical neuron firing patterns. Using it, we studied the properties of two different types of neural networks. In the first, originally used by Izhikevich, the synaptic connection strengths between the neurons are determined randomly, and each neuron is connected to all of the other neurons in the network. The second is a small world network modeled after the one employed by Alex Roxin, et al. (2004), but expanded to include inhibition. This geometry is an idealized representation of the nervous system. In our investigation we compared the onset of synchronization in each network, as well as its stability in the presence of external currents. We also considered the relevance of these results to real world phenomena such as seizures.

  18. Characterizing the Path Coverage of Random Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moslem Noori

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Wireless sensor networks are widely used in security monitoring applications to sense and report specific activities in a field. In path coverage, for example, the network is in charge of monitoring a path and discovering any intruder trying to cross it. In this paper, we investigate the path coverage properties of a randomly deployed wireless sensor network when the number of sensors and also the length of the path are finite. As a consequence, Boolean model, which has been widely used previously, is not applicable. Using results from geometric probability, we determine the probability of full path coverage, distribution of the number of uncovered gaps over the path, and the probability of having no uncovered gaps larger than a specific size. We also find the cumulative distribution function (cdf of the covered part of the path. Based on our results on the probability of full path coverage, we derive a tight upper bound for the number of nodes guaranteeing the full path coverage with a desired reliability. Through computer simulations, it is verified that for networks with nonasymptotic size, our analysis is accurate where the Boolean model can be inaccurate.

  19. Network Randomization and Dynamic Defense for Critical Infrastructure Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavez, Adrian R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Martin, Mitchell Tyler [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hamlet, Jason [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Stout, William M.S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lee, Erik [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Critical Infrastructure control systems continue to foster predictable communication paths, static configurations, and unpatched systems that allow easy access to our nation's most critical assets. This makes them attractive targets for cyber intrusion. We seek to address these attack vectors by automatically randomizing network settings, randomizing applications on the end devices themselves, and dynamically defending these systems against active attacks. Applying these protective measures will convert control systems into moving targets that proactively defend themselves against attack. Sandia National Laboratories has led this effort by gathering operational and technical requirements from Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) and performing research and development to create a proof-of-concept solution. Our proof-of-concept has been tested in a laboratory environment with over 300 nodes. The vision of this project is to enhance control system security by converting existing control systems into moving targets and building these security measures into future systems while meeting the unique constraints that control systems face.

  20. Long-Range Navigation on Complex Networks using L\\'evy Random Walks

    OpenAIRE

    Riascos, A. P.; Mateos, José L.

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a strategy of navigation in undirected networks, including regular, random, and complex networks, that is inspired by L\\'evy random walks, generalizing previous navigation rules. We obtained exact expressions for the stationary probability distribution, the occupation probability, the mean first passage time, and the average time to reach a node on the network. We found that the long-range navigation using the L\\'evy random walk strategy, compared with the normal random walk stra...

  1. Random linear network coding for streams with unequally sized packets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taghouti, Maroua; Roetter, Daniel Enrique Lucani; Pedersen, Morten Videbæk

    2016-01-01

    State of the art Random Linear Network Coding (RLNC) schemes assume that data streams generate packets with equal sizes. This is an assumption that results in the highest efficiency gains for RLNC. A typical solution for managing unequal packet sizes is to zero-pad the smallest packets. However...... of packets, which are strategies that require additional signalling. Performance is evaluated using CAIDA TCP packets and 4k video traces. Our results show that our mechanisms reduce significantly the padding overhead even for small field sizes. Finally, our strategies provide a natural trade-off between...

  2. Deep recurrent conditional random field network for protein secondary prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Alexander Rosenberg; Sønderby, Søren Kaae; Sønderby, Casper Kaae

    2017-01-01

    Deep learning has become the state-of-the-art method for predicting protein secondary structure from only its amino acid residues and sequence profile. Building upon these results, we propose to combine a bi-directional recurrent neural network (biRNN) with a conditional random field (CRF), which...... of the labels for all time-steps. We condition the CRF on the output of biRNN, which learns a distributed representation based on the entire sequence. The biRNN-CRF is therefore close to ideally suited for the secondary structure task because a high degree of cross-talk between neighboring elements can...

  3. Measuring symmetry, asymmetry and randomness in neural network connectivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umberto Esposito

    Full Text Available Cognitive functions are stored in the connectome, the wiring diagram of the brain, which exhibits non-random features, so-called motifs. In this work, we focus on bidirectional, symmetric motifs, i.e. two neurons that project to each other via connections of equal strength, and unidirectional, non-symmetric motifs, i.e. within a pair of neurons only one neuron projects to the other. We hypothesise that such motifs have been shaped via activity dependent synaptic plasticity processes. As a consequence, learning moves the distribution of the synaptic connections away from randomness. Our aim is to provide a global, macroscopic, single parameter characterisation of the statistical occurrence of bidirectional and unidirectional motifs. To this end we define a symmetry measure that does not require any a priori thresholding of the weights or knowledge of their maximal value. We calculate its mean and variance for random uniform or Gaussian distributions, which allows us to introduce a confidence measure of how significantly symmetric or asymmetric a specific configuration is, i.e. how likely it is that the configuration is the result of chance. We demonstrate the discriminatory power of our symmetry measure by inspecting the eigenvalues of different types of connectivity matrices. We show that a Gaussian weight distribution biases the connectivity motifs to more symmetric configurations than a uniform distribution and that introducing a random synaptic pruning, mimicking developmental regulation in synaptogenesis, biases the connectivity motifs to more asymmetric configurations, regardless of the distribution. We expect that our work will benefit the computational modelling community, by providing a systematic way to characterise symmetry and asymmetry in network structures. Further, our symmetry measure will be of use to electrophysiologists that investigate symmetry of network connectivity.

  4. Pulsed ytterbium-doped fibre laser with a combined modulator based on single-wall carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khudyakov, D V; Borodkin, A A; Vartapetov, S K [Physics Instrumentation Center, A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Troitsk, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Lobach, A S [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-30

    This paper describes an all-normal-dispersion pulsed ytterbium-doped fibre ring laser mode-locked by a nonlinear combined modulator based on single-wall carbon nanotubes. We have demonstrated 1.7-ps pulse generation at 1.04 μm with a repetition rate of 35.6 MHz. At the laser output, the pulses were compressed to 180 fs. We have examined an intracavity nonlinear modulator which utilises nonlinear polarisation ellipse rotation in conjunction with a saturable absorber in the form of a polymer-matrix composite film containing single-wall carbon nanotubes. (lasers)

  5. Upscaling of spectral induced polarization response using random tube networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maineult, Alexis; Revil, André; Camerlynck, Christian; Florsch, Nicolas; Titov, Konstantin

    2017-05-01

    In order to upscale the induced polarization (IP) response of porous media, from the pore scale to the sample scale, we implement a procedure to compute the macroscopic complex resistivity response of random tube networks. A network is made of a 2-D square-meshed grid of connected tubes, which obey to a given tube radius distribution. In a simplified approach, the electrical impedance of each tube follows a local Pelton resistivity model, with identical resistivity, chargeability and Cole-Cole exponent values for all the tubes-only the time constant varies, as it depends on the radius of each tube and on a diffusion coefficient also identical for all the tubes. By solving the conservation law for the electrical charge, the macroscopic IP response of the network is obtained. We fit successfully the macroscopic complex resistivity also by a Pelton resistivity model. Simulations on uncorrelated and correlated networks, for which the tube radius distribution is so that the decimal logarithm of the radius is normally distributed, evidence that the local and macroscopic model parameters are the same, except the Cole-Cole exponent: its macroscopic value diminishes with increasing heterogeneity (i.e. with increasing standard deviation of the radius distribution), compared to its local value. The methodology is also applied to six siliciclastic rock samples, for which the pore radius distributions from mercury porosimetry are available. These samples exhibit the same behaviour as synthetic media, that is, the macroscopic Cole-Cole exponent is always lower than the local one. As a conclusion, the pore network method seems to be a promising tool for studying the upscaling of the IP response of porous media.

  6. The Random Walk Model Based on Bipartite Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Man-Dun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available With the continuing development of the electronic commerce and growth of network information, there is a growing possibility for citizens to be confused by the information. Though the traditional technology of information retrieval have the ability to relieve the overload of information in some extent, it can not offer a targeted personality service based on user’s interests and activities. In this context, the recommendation algorithm arose. In this paper, on the basis of conventional recommendation, we studied the scheme of random walk based on bipartite network and the application of it. We put forward a similarity measurement based on implicit feedback. In this method, a uneven character vector is imported(the weight of item in the system. We put forward a improved random walk pattern which make use of partial or incomplete neighbor information to create recommendation information. In the end, there is an experiment in the real data set, the recommendation accuracy and practicality are improved. We promise the reality of the result of the experiment

  7. Analysis of complex contagions in random multiplex networks

    CERN Document Server

    Yagan, Osman

    2012-01-01

    We study the diffusion of influence in random multiplex networks where links can be of $r$ different types, and for a given content (e.g., rumor, product, political view), each link type is associated with a content dependent parameter $c_i$ in $[0,\\infty]$ that measures the relative bias type-$i$ links have in spreading this content. In this setting, we propose a linear threshold model of contagion where nodes switch state if their "perceived" proportion of active neighbors exceeds a threshold \\tau. Namely, a node connected to $m_i$ active neighbors and $k_i-m_i$ inactive neighbors via type-$i$ links will turn active if $\\sum{c_i m_i}/\\sum{c_i k_i}$ exceeds its threshold \\tau. Under this model, we obtain the condition, probability and expected size of global spreading events. Our results extend the existing work on complex contagions in several directions by i) providing solutions for coupled random networks whose vertices are neither identical nor disjoint, (ii) highlighting the effect of content on the dyn...

  8. Identification of yeast transcriptional regulation networks using multivariate random forests.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanyuan Xiao

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The recent availability of whole-genome scale data sets that investigate complementary and diverse aspects of transcriptional regulation has spawned an increased need for new and effective computational approaches to analyze and integrate these large scale assays. Here, we propose a novel algorithm, based on random forest methodology, to relate gene expression (as derived from expression microarrays to sequence features residing in gene promoters (as derived from DNA motif data and transcription factor binding to gene promoters (as derived from tiling microarrays. We extend the random forest approach to model a multivariate response as represented, for example, by time-course gene expression measures. An analysis of the multivariate random forest output reveals complex regulatory networks, which consist of cohesive, condition-dependent regulatory cliques. Each regulatory clique features homogeneous gene expression profiles and common motifs or synergistic motif groups. We apply our method to several yeast physiological processes: cell cycle, sporulation, and various stress conditions. Our technique displays excellent performance with regard to identifying known regulatory motifs, including high order interactions. In addition, we present evidence of the existence of an alternative MCB-binding pathway, which we confirm using data from two independent cell cycle studies and two other physioloigical processes. Finally, we have uncovered elaborate transcription regulation refinement mechanisms involving PAC and mRRPE motifs that govern essential rRNA processing. These include intriguing instances of differing motif dosages and differing combinatorial motif control that promote regulatory specificity in rRNA metabolism under differing physiological processes.

  9. Electrode property of single-walled carbon nanotubes in all-solid-state lithium ion battery using polymer electrolyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakamoto, Y.; Ishii, Y.; Kawasaki, S., E-mail: kawasaki.shinji@nitech.ac.jp [Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso, Showa, Nagoya, Aichi (Japan)

    2016-07-06

    Electrode properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in an all-solid-state lithium ion battery were investigated using poly-ethylene oxide (PEO) solid electrolyte. Charge-discharge curves of SWCNTs in the solid electrolyte cell were successfully observed. It was found that PEO electrolyte decomposes on the surface of SWCNTs.

  10. In vivo biocompatibility of ultra-short single-walled carbon nanotube/biodegradable polymer nanocomposites for bone tissue engineering.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sitharaman, B.; Shi, X.; Walboomers, X.F.; Liao, H.; Cuijpers, V.; Wilson, L.J.; Mikos, A.G.; Jansen, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    Scaffolds play a pivotal role in the tissue engineering paradigm by providing temporary structural support, guiding cells to grow, assisting the transport of essential nutrients and waste products, and facilitating the formation of functional tissues and organs. Single-walled carbon nanotubes

  11. Chiral-Selective Growth of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes on Lattice-Mismatched Epitaxial Cobalt Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Maoshuai; Jiang, Hua; Liu, Bilu

    2013-01-01

    Controlling chirality in growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is important for exploiting their practical applications. For long it has been conceptually conceived that the structural control of SWNTs is potentially achievable by fabricating nanoparticle catalysts with proper structur...

  12. Non-covalent conjugates of single-walled carbon nanotubes and folic acid for interaction with cells overexpressing folate receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castillo, John J.; Rindzevicius, Tomas; Novoa, Leidy V.

    2013-01-01

    a low toxicity of the conjugates in the THP-1 cells. The low toxicity and the cellular uptake of single-walled carbon nanotube–folic acid by cancer cells suggest their potential use in carbon nanotube-based drug delivery systems and in the diagnosis of cancer or tropical diseases such as leishmaniasis....

  13. Defection-selective solubilization and chemically-responsive solubility switching of single-walled carbon nanotubes with cucurbit[7]uril

    OpenAIRE

    Ogoshi, Tomoki; Inagaki, Ayumi; Yamagishi, Tada-aki; Nakamoto, Yoshiaki

    2008-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were suspended in aqueous media with cucurbit[7]uril (CB7), while SWCNTs were insoluble with cucurbit[5]uril (CB5). Moreover, defection-selective solubilization of SWCNTs with CB7 was demonstrated. © The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  14. Effect of temperature on the selection of semiconducting single walled carbon nanotubes using Poly(3-dodecylthiophene-2,5-diyl)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gomulya, Widianta; Salazar Rios, Jorge; Derenskyi, Vladimir; Bisri, Satria Zulkarnaen; Jung, Stefan; Fritsch, Martin; Allard, Sybille; Scherf, Ullrich; dos Santos, Maria Cristina; Loi, Maria Antonietta

    We report on the investigation of the temperature effect on the selective dispersion of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) by Poly(3-dodecylthiophene-2,5-diy1) wrapping. The interaction mechanism between polymer chains and SWNTs is studied by controlling the polymer aggregation via variation of

  15. Single walled carbon nanotube-based electrical biosensor for the label-free detection of pathogenic bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yoo, S. M.; Baek, Y. K.; Shin, S.

    2016-01-01

    We herein describe the development of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)-based electrical biosensor consisting of a two-terminal resistor, and report its use for the specific, label-free detection of pathogenic bacteria via changes in conductance. The ability of this biosensor to recognize...

  16. Inkjet Printed Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Based Ambipolar and Unipolar Transistors for High-Performance Complementary Logic Circuits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bucella, Sadir Gabriele; Salazar-Rios, Jorge Mario; Derenskyi, Vladimir; Fritsch, Martin; Scherf, Ullrich; Loi, Maria Antonietta; Caironi, Mario

    Inkjet printed single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) field-effect transistors with mobilities of 15 and 7 cm(2) V-1 s(-1) for holes and electrons, respectively, and high on-off ratio, are demonstrated. The high loading of the ink formulation and high electronic quality of the sorted SWCNT enable

  17. Bioaccumulation and Toxicity of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes to Benthic Organisms at the Base of the Marine Food Chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    As the use of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) increases over time, so does the potential for environmental release. This research aimed to determine the toxicity, bioavailability, and bioaccumulation of SWNTs in marine benthic organisms at the base of the food chain. The t...

  18. Toxic effects of single-walled carbon nanotubes in the development of E. coli biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Debora F; Elimelech, Menachem

    2010-06-15

    The impact of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) on the different developmental stages of biofilms has been investigated using E. coli K12 as a model organism. Specifically, we investigated (i) the impact of SWNT concentration on cell growth and biofilm formation, (ii) toxic effects of SWNTs on mature biofilms, and (iii) formation of biofilm on SWNT-coated surfaces. The results show that at the initial stage of biofilm formation, SWNTs come into contact with bacterial cells prior to biofilm maturation and inhibit their growth. Furthermore, the results suggest that bacteria in mature biofilms are less sensitive to the presence of SWNTs than cells in other biofilm stages, similar to previous observations of biofilm resistance to antimicrobials. In mature biofilms, the soluble exopolymeric substances (EPS) secreted by the biofilm play an important role in mitigating the toxic effects of SWNTs. Upon exposure to SWNTs, biofilms without soluble EPS in the supernatant had a much more significant loss of biomass because of cell detachment from the biofilm than biofilms containing soluble EPS. To observe similar cell loss, biofilms with soluble EPS needed SWNT concentrations that were 10 times higher compared to biofilms without soluble EPS. Finally, SWNTs deposited onto surfaces affected significantly the subsequent biofilm development. Analysis of the total biomass and the area occupied by cells indicates that a SWNT-coated substratum has 10 times less biofilm colonization and biomass production than a control substratum without SWNTs.

  19. Half-Metallic Properties of Single-Walled Polymeric Manganese Phthalocyanine Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hongbin; Bai, Meilin; Wei, Peng; Sun, Lili; Shen, Ziyong; Hou, Shimin

    2012-01-01

    We present a theoretical study of the electronic and magnetic properties of single-walled manganese phthalocyanine (MnPc) nanotubes which can be thought of as rolled-up ribbons of the two-dimensional (2D) polymeric MnPc sheet. Our density functional theory calculations show that all of the MnPc nanotubes investigated here are half-metals with 100% spin polarization around the Fermi level. Following the increase of the tube diameter, the number of spin-down energy bands of MnPc nanotubes is always increased while the spin-up band gap of MnPc nanotubes approaches that of the 2D MnPc sheet in an oscillatory manner. Because the half-metallic character of MnPc nanotubes is deeply rooted in the distribution of electrons in the energy bands dominated by the Mn 3d atomic orbitals, adsorption of CO molecules on the Mn ions leads to a redistribution of electrons in the Mn 3d orbitals and thus can tune precisely the spin state and electronic transport properties of MnPc nanotubes, demonstrating promising applications of MnPc nanotubes in future molecular spintronics and single-molecule sensors. PMID:23012498

  20. A Facile Route to Metal Oxides/Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Macrofilm Nanocomposites for Energy Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeyuan eCao

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Nanocomposites consisting of transition-metal oxides and carbon nanomaterials with a desired size and structure are highly demanded for high performance energy storage devices. Here, a facile two-step and cost-efficient approach relying on directly thermal treatment of chemical-vapor-deposition products is developed as a general synthetic method to prepare a family of metal oxides (MxOy (M=Fe, Co, Ni/single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT macrofilm nanocomposites. The MxOy nanoparticles obtained are of 3-17 nm in diameter and homogeneously anchor on the free-standing SWNT macrofilms. NiO/SWNT also exhibits a high specific capacitance of 400 F g-1 and fast charge-transfer Faradaic redox reactions to achieve asymmetric supercapacitors with a high power and energy density. All MxOy/SWNT nanocomposites could deliver a high capacity beyond 1000 mAh g-1 and show excellent cycling stability for lithium-ion batteries. The impressive results demonstrate the promise for energy storage devices and the general approach may pave the way to synthesize other functional nanocomposites.

  1. Nanocatalyst shape and composition during nucleation of single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Ballesteros, Jose L; Burgos, Juan C; Lin, Pin Ann; Sharma, Renu; Balbuena, Perla B

    The dynamic evolution of nanocatalyst particle shape and carbon composition during the initial stages of single-walled carbon nanotube growth by chemical vapor deposition synthesis is investigated. Classical reactive and ab initio molecular dynamics simulations are used, along with environmental transmission electron microscope video imaging analyses. A clear migration of carbon is detected from the nanocatalyst/substrate interface, leading to a carbon gradient showing enrichment of the nanocatalyst layers in the immediate vicinity of the contact layer. However, as the metal nanocatalyst particle becomes saturated with carbon, a dynamic equilibrium is established, with carbon precipitating on the surface and nucleating a carbon cap that is the precursor of nanotube growth. A carbon composition profile decreasing towards the nanoparticle top is clearly revealed by the computational and experimental results that show a negligible amount of carbon in the nanoparticle region in contact with the nucleating cap. The carbon composition profile inside the nanoparticle is accompanied by a well-defined shape evolution of the nanocatalyst driven by the various opposing forces acting upon it both from the substrate and from the nascent carbon nanostructure. This new understanding suggests that tuning the nanoparticle/substrate interaction would provide unique ways of controlling the nanotube synthesis.

  2. Spectral triangulation: a 3D method for locating single-walled carbon nanotubes in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ching-Wei; Bachilo, Sergei M; Vu, Michael; Beckingham, Kathleen M; Bruce Weisman, R

    2016-05-21

    Nanomaterials with luminescence in the short-wave infrared (SWIR) region are of special interest for biological research and medical diagnostics because of favorable tissue transparency and low autofluorescence backgrounds in that region. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) show well-known sharp SWIR spectral signatures and therefore have potential for noninvasive detection and imaging of cancer tumours, when linked to selective targeting agents such as antibodies. However, such applications face the challenge of sensitively detecting and localizing the source of SWIR emission from inside tissues. A new method, called spectral triangulation, is presented for three dimensional (3D) localization using sparse optical measurements made at the specimen surface. Structurally unsorted SWCNT samples emitting over a range of wavelengths are excited inside tissue phantoms by an LED matrix. The resulting SWIR emission is sampled at points on the surface by a scanning fibre optic probe leading to an InGaAs spectrometer or a spectrally filtered InGaAs avalanche photodiode detector. Because of water absorption, attenuation of the SWCNT fluorescence in tissues is strongly wavelength-dependent. We therefore gauge the SWCNT-probe distance by analysing differential changes in the measured SWCNT emission spectra. SWCNT fluorescence can be clearly detected through at least 20 mm of tissue phantom, and the 3D locations of embedded SWCNT test samples are found with sub-millimeter accuracy at depths up to 10 mm. Our method can also distinguish and locate two embedded SWCNT sources at distinct positions.

  3. Invariant wide bandgaps in honeycomb monolayer and single-walled nanotubes of IIB-VI semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaoxuan; Hu, Jun; Pan, Bicai

    2017-09-01

    The search for low-dimensional materials with unique electronic properties is important for the development of electronic devices in the nanoscale. Through systematic first-principles calculations, we found that the band gaps of the two-dimensional honeycomb monolayers (HMs) and one-dimensional single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) of IIB-VI semiconductors (ZnO, CdO, ZnS and CdS) are nearly chirality-independent and weakly diameter-dependent. Based on analysis of the electronic structures, it was found that the conduction band minimum is contributed to by the spherically symmetric s orbitals of cations and the valence band maximum is dominated by the in-plane ({d}{xy}-{p}y) and ({d}{x2-{y}2}-{p}x) hybridizations. These electronic states are robust against radius curvature, resulting in the invariant feature of the band gaps for the structures changing from HM to SWNTs. The band gaps of these materials range from 2.3 to 4.7 eV, which is of potential application in electronic devices and optoelectronic devices. Our studies show that searching for and designing specific electronic structures can facilitate the process of exploring novel nanomaterials for future applications.

  4. Effect of tubular chiralities of single-walled ZnO nanotubes on electronic transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Qin; Liu, Zhenghui; Zhou, Liping; Yu, Yiqing; Wu, Xuemei

    2017-04-01

    The electronic transport properties of single-walled ZnO nanotubes with different chiralities are investigated by nonequilibrium Green's function combined with density functional theory. In this paper we consider three representative ZnO nanotubes, namely (3, 3) armchair, (5, 0) zigzag, and (4, 2) chiral, with a similar diameter of about 5.4 Å. Short nanotubes exhibit good conductance behavior. As the tube length increases, the conductance decreases at low bias and the nanotubes indicate semiconducting behavior. The current-voltage characteristics of the nanotubes longer than 3 nm depend weakly on the length of the tubes. The armchair and chiral ZnO nanotubes with the same length and diameter have almost overlapped current-voltage curves. The electron transport behaviors are analyzed in terms of the transmission spectra, density of states and charge population of these nanotubes. The results indicate that the resonant peaks above the Fermi level are responsible for electric currents. However, the zigzag ZnO nanotubes exhibit asymmetric current-voltage curves attributed to the built-in polarization field and give larger current than the armchair and chiral nanotubes at the same bias. The features explored here strongly suggest that the ZnO nanotubes are stable, flexible structures, which are valuable in Nano-Electromechanical System.

  5. Solution-processed zinc oxide nanoparticles/single-walled carbon nanotubes hybrid thin-film transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fangmei; Sun, Jia; Qian, Chuan; Hu, Xiaotao; Wu, Han; Huang, Yulan; Yang, Junliang

    2016-09-01

    Solution-processed thin-film transistors (TFTs) are the essential building blocks for manufacturing the low-cost and large-area consumptive electronics. Herein, solution-processed TFTs based on the composites of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were fabricated by the methods of spin-coating and doctor-blading. Through controlling the weight of SWCNTs, the ZnO/SWCNTs TFTs fabricated by spin-coating demonstrated a field-effect mobility of 4.7 cm2/Vs and a low threshold voltage of 0.8 V, while the TFTs devices fabricated by doctor-blading technique showed reasonable electrical performance with a mobility of 0.22 cm2/Vs. Furthermore, the ion-gel was used as an efficient electrochemical gate dielectric because of its large electric double-layer capacitance. The operating voltage of all the TFTs devices is as low as 4.0 V. The research suggests that ZnO/SWCNTs TFTs have the potential applications in low-cost, large-area and flexible consumptive electronics, such as chemical-biological sensors and smart label.

  6. Enhancement of photoluminescence from ZnO film by single wall carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Jooyoung; Song, Hooyoung; Kim, Eun Kyu

    2011-07-01

    Optical emissions from ZnO films were enhanced by a formation of hybrid structures with single wall carbon-nanotubes (SWCNTs). The SWCNTs were characterized by the presence of the associated fibers and islands together with many carbon nanotube structures and their average height was about ZnO films with SWCNTs were increased up to about 30 and 60% in the region of 3.3 eV (near band edge) and 2.3 eV (deep-level) bands, respectively. It was considered that the enhancement of optical emissions from ZnO might be resulted from the effects of an excitation light scattering by SWCNTs and a surface plasmon resonance between bandgap of ZnO and SWCNTs. The surface plasmon resonance mode in the ultra-violet regions is smaller than the deep-level region relatively. This result showed that the commercial ZnO/carbon nanotubes have a feasibility of application to optoelectronic device.

  7. Theoretical Investigation on the Solubilization in Water of Functionalized Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

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    Michael Mananghaya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An important technique to increase the solubility and reactivity of carbon nanotube is through functionalization. In this study, the effects of functionalization of some single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs were investigated with the aid of density functional theory. The SWCNT model used in the study consists of a finite, (5, 0 zigzag nanotube segment containing 60 C atoms with hydrogen atoms added to the dangling bonds of the perimeter carbons. There are three water-dispersible SWCNTs used in this study that were functionalized with (a formic acid, as a model of carboxylic acid, (b isophthalic acid, as a model aromatic dicarboxylic acid, and (c benzenesulfonic acid, as a model aromatic sulfonic acid. Binding energies of the organic radicals to the nanotubes are calculated, as well as the HOMO-LUMO gaps and dipole moments of both nanotubes and functionalized nanotubes. Binding was found out to be thermodynamically favorable. The functionalization increases the electrical dipole moments and results in an enhancement in the solubility of the nanotubes in water manifested through favorable changes in the free energies of solvation. This should lower the toxicity of nanotubes and improve their biocompatibility.

  8. Effect of single walled carbon nanotubes on the threshold voltage of dye based photovoltaic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, S.; Manik, N. B.

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are being widely used in organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices as their usage has been reported to enhance the device efficiency along with other related parameters. In this work we have studied the energy (Ec) effect of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) on the threshold voltage (Vth) and also on the trap states of dye based photovoltaic devices. SWCNT is added in a series of dyes such as Rose Bengal (RB), Methyl Red (MR), Malachite Green (MG) and Crystal Violet (CV). By analysing the steady state dark current-voltage (I-V) characteristics Vth and Ec is estimated for the different devices with and without addition of SWCNT. It is observed that on an average for all the dyes Vth is reduced by about 30% in presence of SWCNT. The trap energy Ec also reduces in case of all the dyes. The relation between Vth, Ec and total trap density is discussed. From the photovoltaic measurements it is seen that the different photovoltaic parameters change with addition of SWCNT to the dye based devices. Both the short circuit current density and fill factor are found to increase for all the dye based devices in presence of SWCNT.

  9. Probing nuclear dynamics and architecture using single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yoon; Li, Junang; Fakhri, Nikta

    Chromatin is a multiscale dynamic architecture that acts as a template for many biochemical processes such as transcription and DNA replication. Recent developments such as Hi-C technology enable an identification of chromatin interactions across an entire genome. However, a single cell dynamic view of chromatin organization is far from understood. We discuss a new live cell imaging technique to probe the dynamics of the nucleus at a single cell level using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). SWNTs are non-perturbing rigid rods (diameter of 1 nm and length of roughly 100 nm) that fluoresce in the near infrared region. Due to their high aspect ratio, they can diffuse in tight spaces and report on the architecture and dynamics of the nucleoplasm. We develop 3D imaging and tracking of SWNTs in the volume of the nucleus using double helix point spread function microscopy (DH-PSF) and discuss the capabilities of the DH-PSF for inferring the 3D orientation of nanotubes based on vectorial diffraction theory.

  10. Terahertz-infrared electrodynamics of single-wall carbon nanotube films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhukova, E. S.; Grebenko, A. K.; Bubis, A. V.; Prokhorov, A. S.; Belyanchikov, M. A.; Tsapenko, A. P.; Gilshteyn, E. P.; Kopylova, D. S.; Gladush, Yu G.; Anisimov, A. S.; Anzin, V. B.; Nasibulin, A. G.; Gorshunov, B. P.

    2017-11-01

    Broad-band (4-20 000 cm-1) spectra of real and imaginary conductance of a set of high-quality pristine and AuCl3-doped single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) films with different transparency are systematically measured. It is shown that while the high-energy (≥1 eV) response is determined by well-known interband transitions, the lower-energy electrodynamic properties of the films are fully dominated by unbound charge carriers. Their main spectral effect is seen as the free-carrier Drude-type contribution. Partial localization of these carriers leads to a weak plasmon resonance around 100 cm-1. At the lowest frequencies, below 10 cm-1, a gap-like feature is detected whose origin is associated with the energy barrier experienced by the carriers at the intersections between SWCNTs. It is assumed that these three mechanisms are universal and determine the low-frequency terahertz-infrared electrodynamics of SWCNT wafer-scale films.

  11. Interaction between single wall carbon nanotubes and a human enteric virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrinca, Anna Rita; Donia, Domenica; Cicchetti, Rosadele; Valentini, Federica; Argentin, Gabriella; Carbone, Marilena; Pietroiusti, Antonio; Magrini, Andrea; Palleschi, Giuseppe; Divizia, Maurizio

    2010-09-01

    Activated single wall carbon nanotubes have been used for biomedical purposes as carriers for drugs, peptides, proteins and nucleic acids. A large volume of data speaks to their suitability to act as a carrier. The ability of two differently activated SWNTs (with carboxyl groups or with carboxyl groups and polyethylenimine (PEI)) to form a complex with the hepatitis A virus was evaluated. Both types of activations permitted the formation of a virus-SWNT complex. However, their patterns were different. The carboxyl-activated nanotubes had a somewhat low adsorptive capacity that was related inversely to the concentrations of the SWNTs and viruses. Statistical analysis, using the chi(2)-test, showed no significant differences between the SWNT-PEI ratios of 1:2.5, 1:1 and 1:0.5. The addiction of PEI improved the adsorption, probably because of the electropositive charge of the molecule. Adsorption was optimal between 100 microg and 10 ng with a SWNTs-PEI weight ratio of 1:0.2 up to an inoculum of 10(5) genome equivalents of hepatitis A virus. Reducing or increasing this weight ratio reduced the adsorptive capacity of the PEI, and this adsorption activity was time and contact-dependent. Thus, SWNTs coated with PEI are able to complex with viruses, and they might be used in the future to transfect non-permissive cell lines. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Does Moisture Influence the Chemical Detection of Gas Molecules Adsorbed on Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ming; Tian, W. Q.; Jayanthi, C. S.; Wu, S. Y.

    2009-03-01

    In this work, the role of water in the detection of hydrazine (N2H4) by a single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) is investigated using first principles electronic structure calculations (DFT/GGA--USPP)[1]. This calculation is undertaken to interpret the experimental resistivity measurements for N2H4 adsorbed on SWCNT that reveal an n-type behavior [2]. Our preliminary theoretical studies of the adsorption of N2H4 on SWCNT revealed physisorption for N2H4 and an unaltered band structure for the SWCNT [3]. This prompted us to look into the role of water on the bonding of N2H4 to the SWCNT. We found that, by introducing a monolayer of water film on the (8,0) SWCNT, the adsorption of N2H4 can introduce occupied states near the Fermi level, exhibiting an n-type behavior. However, the introduction of just few water molecules was not sufficient to influence the electronic structure of N2H4/SWCNT. Presently, we are studying the influence of water films on the chemical detection of a variety of other gas molecules (N2, NH3, etc.) by SWCNTs, and the results from such studies will also be reported. [1]. G. Kresse et al. Phys. Rev. B 54, 11169 (1996). [2]. S. Desai, et al. (APS, March 2008). [3]. M. Yu, et al. (APS, March 2008).

  13. High concentrations of single-walled carbon nanotubes lower soil enzyme activity and microbial biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Lixia; Son, Yowhan; Yoon, Tae Kyung; Kang, Yu Jin; Kim, Woong; Chung, Haegeun

    2013-02-01

    Nanomaterials such as single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) may enter the soil environment with unknown consequences resulting from the development of nanotechnology for a variety of applications. We determined the effects of SWCNTs on soil enzyme activity and microbial biomass through a 3-week incubation of urban soils treated with different concentrations of SWCNTs ranging from 0 to 1000 μg g(-1) soil. The activities of cellobiohydrolase, β-1,4-glucosidase, β-1,4-xylosidase, β-1,4-N-acetylglucosaminidase, L-leucine aminopeptidase, and acid phosphatase and microbial biomass were measured in soils treated with powder and suspended forms of SWCNTs. SWCNTs of concentrations at 300-1000 μg g(-1) soil significantly lowered activities of most enzymes and microbial biomass. It is noteworthy that the SWCNTs showed similar effects to that of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), but at a concentration approximately 5 times lower; we suggest that this is mainly due to the higher surface area of SWCNTs than that of MWCNTs. Indeed, our results show that surface area of CNTs has significant negative relationship with relative enzyme activity and biomass, which suggests that greater microorganism-CNT interactions could increase the negative effect of CNTs on microorganisms. Current work may contribute to the preparation of a regulatory guideline for the release of CNTs to the soil environment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Electric field effect on (6,0) zigzag single-walled aluminum nitride nanotube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baei, Mohammad T; Peyghan, Ali Ahmadi; Moghimi, Masoumeh

    2012-09-01

    Structural, electronic, and electrical responses of the H-capped (6,0) zigzag single-walled aluminum nitride nanotube was studied under the parallel and transverse electric fields with strengths 0-140 × 10(-4) a.u. by using density functional calculations. Geometry optimizations were carried out at the B3LYP/6-31G* level of theory using a locally modified version of the GAMESS electronic structure program. The dipole moments, atomic charge variations, and total energy of the (6,0) zigzag AlNNT show increases with increase in the applied external electric field strengths. The length, tip diameters, electronic spatial extent, and molecular volume of the nanotube do not significantly change with increasing electric field strength. The energy gap of the nanotube decreases with increases of the electric field strength and its reactivity is increased. Increase of the ionization potential, electron affinity, chemical potential, electrophilicity, and HOMO and LUMO in the nanotube with increase of the applied parallel electric field strengths shows that the parallel field has a much stronger interaction with the nanotube with respect to the transverse electric field strengths. Analysis of the parameters indicates that the properties of AlNNTs can be controlled by the proper external electric field.

  15. Altered Cell Mechanics from the Inside: Dispersed Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes Integrate with and Restructure Actin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad F. Islam

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available With a range of desirable mechanical and optical properties, single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs are a promising material for nanobiotechnologies. SWCNTs also have potential as biomaterials for modulation of cellular structures. Previously, we showed that highly purified, dispersed SWCNTs grossly alter F-actin inside cells. F-actin plays critical roles in the maintenance of cell structure, force transduction, transport and cytokinesis. Thus, quantification of SWCNT-actin interactions ranging from molecular, sub-cellular and cellular levels with both structure and function is critical for developing SWCNT-based biotechnologies. Further, this interaction can be exploited, using SWCNTs as a unique actin-altering material. Here, we utilized molecular dynamics simulations to explore the interactions of SWCNTs with actin filaments. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy confirmed that SWCNTs were located within ~5 nm of F-actin in cells but did not interact with G-actin. SWCNTs did not alter myosin II sub-cellular localization, and SWCNT treatment in cells led to significantly shorter actin filaments. Functionally, cells with internalized SWCNTs had greatly reduced cell traction force. Combined, these results demonstrate direct, specific SWCNT alteration of F-actin structures which can be exploited for SWCNT-based biotechnologies and utilized as a new method to probe fundamental actin-related cellular processes and biophysics.

  16. Study on electroactive and electrocatalytic surfaces of single walled carbon nanotube-modified electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salinas-Torres, David [Departamento de Quimica Fisica and Instituto Universitario de Materiales de Alicante, Universidad de Alicante, Apdo. de Correos 99, E-03080 Alicante (Spain); Huerta, Francisco [Departamento de Ingenieria Textil y Papelera, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Plaza Ferrandiz y Carbonell, 1. E-03801 Alcoy (Spain); Montilla, Francisco, E-mail: francisco.montilla@ua.e [Departamento de Quimica Fisica and Instituto Universitario de Materiales de Alicante, Universidad de Alicante, Apdo. de Correos 99, E-03080 Alicante (Spain); Morallon, Emilia [Departamento de Quimica Fisica and Instituto Universitario de Materiales de Alicante, Universidad de Alicante, Apdo. de Correos 99, E-03080 Alicante (Spain)

    2011-02-01

    An investigation of the electrocatalysis of single-walled carbon nanotubes modified electrodes has been performed in this work. Nanotube-modified electrodes present a surface area much higher than the bare glassy carbon surfaces as determined by capacitance measurements. Several redox probes were selected for checking the reactivity of specific sites at the carbon nanotube surface. The presence of carbon nanotubes on the electrode improves the kinetics for all the reactions studied compared with the bare glassy carbon electrode with variations of the heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant up to 5 orders of magnitude. The most important effects are observed for the benzoquinone/hydroquinone and ferrocene/ferricinium redox couples, which show a remarkable improvement of their electron transfer kinetics on SWCNT-modified electrodes, probably due to strong {pi}-{pi} interaction between the organic molecules and the walls of the carbon nanotubes. For many of the reactions studied, less than 1% of the nanotube-modified electrode surface is transferring charge to species in solution. This result suggests that only nanotube tips are active sites for the electron transfer in such cases. On the contrary, the electroactive surface for the reactions of ferrocene and quinone is higher indicating that the electron transfer is produced also from the nanotube walls.

  17. Study of a butane monolayer adsorbed on single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawat, Dinesh S; Furuhashi, T; Migone, A D

    2009-01-20

    We present the results of a study of first-layer butane films adsorbed on single-walled carbon nanotubes. We measured 12 isotherms between 180 and 311 K. Butane molecules bind more strongly than shorter alkanes to the nanotubes. We measured a value of 391 meV for the low-coverage isosteric heat of butane. This value is 1.21 times larger than that for butane adsorbed on planar graphite and 1.27 times larger than the value for ethane on nanotubes at comparable coverages. We also compared the characteristics of the adsorption isotherms for butane with those we determined for ethane at the same relative temperatures. This comparison allowed us to infer that there is a change in the adsorption behavior of linear alkanes which occurs as a function of increasing carbon chain length. While ethane isotherms display two substeps in the first layer (corresponding to adsorption on different groups of adsorption sites), one of these steps is significantly smeared for butane isotherms, becoming essentially impossible to resolve above 220 K.

  18. Dispersion of single walled carbon nanotubes in organogels by incorporation into organogel fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hyukkeun; Jung, Byung Mun; Lee, Hyun Pyo; Chang, Ji Young

    2010-12-01

    We prepared hybrid organogels, where single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were incorporated into organogel fibers. The SWNTs were covalently functionalized with organic branches that had a similar structure to the organogelator. The effect of relative interactions between the carbon nanotubes (CNTs), organogelator, and solvent molecules on the hybrid organogel structure was investigated. Compounds 1 and 2 were synthesized from 3,4,5-tris(decyloxy)benzoic acid and 1,8-diaminooctane, as an organogelator and a functional group for SWNTs, respectively. Organogelator 1 showed excellent ability to gelate alkanes and alcohols. The pristine SWNTs were oxidized by acids to create carboxylic acid groups and functionalized covalently with compound 2 using thionyl chloride. Hybrid organogels of compound 1 with functionalized SWNTs (f-SWNTs) were prepared in decane and N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images showed that the f-SWNTs in the hybrid organogel formed in decane were mainly located inside or on the surface of the organogel fibers, while the f-SWNTs in the hybrid organogel formed in DMF were distributed evenly over the sample. When an organogelator had a different chemical structure to that of an organic functional group on the SWNT surface, SWNTs existed as large aggregates, or long bundles, which were not incorporated inside of the organogel fibers. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Solution-processed single-wall carbon nanotube transistor arrays for wearable display backplanes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byeong-Cheol Kang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we demonstrate solution-processed single-wall carbon nanotube thin-film transistor (SWCNT-TFT arrays with polymeric gate dielectrics on the polymeric substrates for wearable display backplanes, which can be directly attached to the human body. The optimized SWCNT-TFTs without any buffer layer on flexible substrates exhibit a linear field-effect mobility of 1.5cm2/V-s and a threshold voltage of around 0V. The statistical plot of the key device metrics extracted from 35 SWCNT-TFTs which were fabricated in different batches at different times conclusively support that we successfully demonstrated high-performance solution-processed SWCNT-TFT arrays which demand excellent uniformity in the device performance. We also investigate the operational stability of wearable SWCNT-TFT arrays against an applied strain of up to 40%, which is the essential for a harsh degree of strain on human body. We believe that the demonstration of flexible SWCNT-TFT arrays which were fabricated by all solution-process except the deposition of metal electrodes at process temperature below 130oC can open up new routes for wearable display backplanes.

  20. Variability and Reliability of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Field Effect Transistors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Ehteshamul Islam

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Excellent electrical performance and extreme sensitivity to chemical species in semiconducting Single-Walled Carbon NanoTubes (s-SWCNTs motivated the study of using them to replace silicon as a next generation field effect transistor (FET for electronic, optoelectronic, and biological applications. In addition, use of SWCNTs in the recently studied flexible electronics appears more promising because of SWCNTs’ inherent flexibility and superior electrical performance over silicon-based materials. All these applications require SWCNT-FETs to have a wafer-scale uniform and reliable performance over time to a level that is at least comparable with the currently used silicon-based nanoscale FETs. Due to similarity in device configuration and its operation, SWCNT-FET inherits most of the variability and reliability concerns of silicon-based FETs, namely the ones originating from line edge roughness, metal work-function variation, oxide defects, etc. Additional challenges arise from the lack of chirality control in as-grown and post-processed SWCNTs and also from the presence of unstable hydroxyl (–OH groups near the interface of SWCNT and dielectric. In this review article, we discuss these variability and reliability origins in SWCNT-FETs. Proposed solutions for mitigating each of these sources are presented and a future perspective is provided in general, which are required for commercial use of SWCNT-FETs in future nanoelectronic applications.

  1. Extraction of (9,8) single-walled carbon nanotubes by fluorene-based polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Rongmei; Wei, Li; Wang, Hong; Su, Dingdian; Mushrif, Samir H; Chen, Yuan

    2014-03-01

    Selective polymer wrapping is a promising approach to obtain high-chiral-purity single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) needed in technical applications and scientific studies. We showed that among three fluorene-based polymers with different side-chain lengths and backbones, poly[(9,9-dihexylfluorenyl-2,7-diyl)-co-(9,10-anthracene)] (PFH-A) can selectively extract SWCNTs synthesized from the CoSO4 /SiO2 catalyst, which results in enrichment of 78.3 % (9,8) and 12.2 % (9,7) nanotubes among all semiconducting species. These high-chiral-purity SWCNTs may find potential applications in electronics, optoelectronics, and photovoltaics. Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulations suggest that the extraction selectivity of PFH-A relates to the bending and alignment of its alkyl chains and the twisting of its two aromatic backbone units (biphenyl and anthracene) relative to SWCNTs. The strong π-π interaction between polymers and SWCNTs would increase the extraction yield, but it is not beneficial for chiral selectivity. Our findings suggest that the matching between the curvature of SWCNTs and the flexibility of the polymer side chains and the aromatic backbone units is essential in designing novel polymers for selective extraction of (n,m) species. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Inhibit the Cytochrome P450 Enzyme, CYP3A4

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sayed, Ramy; Bhattacharya, Kunal; Gu, Zonglin; Yang, Zaixing; Weber, Jeffrey K.; Li, Hu; Leifer, Klaus; Zhao, Yichen; Toprak, Muhammet S.; Zhou, Ruhong; Fadeel, Bengt

    2016-02-01

    We report a detailed computational and experimental study of the interaction of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with the drug-metabolizing cytochrome P450 enzyme, CYP3A4. Dose-dependent inhibition of CYP3A4-mediated conversion of the model compound, testosterone, to its major metabolite, 6β-hydroxy testosterone was noted. Evidence for a direct interaction between SWCNTs and CYP3A4 was also provided. The inhibition of enzyme activity was alleviated when SWCNTs were pre-coated with bovine serum albumin. Furthermore, covalent functionalization of SWCNTs with polyethylene glycol (PEG) chains mitigated the inhibition of CYP3A4 enzymatic activity. Molecular dynamics simulations suggested that inhibition of the catalytic activity of CYP3A4 is mainly due to blocking of the exit channel for substrates/products through a complex binding mechanism. This work suggests that SWCNTs could interfere with metabolism of drugs and other xenobiotics and provides a molecular mechanism for this toxicity. Our study also suggests means to reduce this toxicity, eg., by surface modification.

  3. A theoretical study on the interaction of amphetamine and single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hafizi, Hamid [Department of Chemistry, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Najafi Chermahini, Alireza, E-mail: anajafi@cc.iut.ac.ir [Department of Chemistry, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mohammadnezhad, Gholamhossein [Department of Chemistry, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Teimouri, Abbas [Chemistry Department, Payame Noor University (PNU), Tehran 19395-4697 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-02-28

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Interaction energy between several armchair CNTs and amphetamine is investigated. • The adsorption of amphetamine molecule is observed to be exothermic and physical in nature. • HOMO–LUMO for pure CNTs, amphetamine and their corresponded complexes are studied. • Density of states (DOS) near the Fermi level is calculated and presented. - Abstract: The adsorption of 1-phenyl-2-aminopropane (amphetamine) on the (4,4), (5,5), (6,6), and (7,7) single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) has been theoretically investigated. The molecule has been located in different modes including parallel, perpendicular, and oblique on the outer surface of carbon nanotubes. The physisorption of amphetamine onto SWCNT sidewall is thermodynamically favored; as a consequence, it modulates the electronic properties of pristine nanotube in the vicinity of Fermi region. The adsorption energies for the parallel and oblique modes found in the range of −1.13 to −1.88 and −1.27 to −2.01 kcal/mol, respectively. Projected density of states (PDOS) and frontier orbital analysis in the vicinity of Fermi level region suggest the electronic states to be contributed from SWCNT rather than amphetamine molecule.

  4. Properties of Cs-intercalated single wall carbon nanotubes investigated by 133Cs Nuclear Magnetic resonance

    KAUST Repository

    Schmid, Marc R.

    2012-11-01

    In the present study, we investigated Cs-intercalated single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) using 133Cs Nuclear Magnetic resonance. We show that there are two types of Cs cations depending on the insertion level. Indeed, at low concentrations, Static spectra analysis shows that the Cs (α)+ species are fully ionized, i.e. α equal ca.1, while at higher concentrations a second paramagnetically shifted line appears, indicating the formation of Cs (β)+ ions with β < α ∼ +1. At low concentrations and low temperatures the Cs (α)+ ions exhibit a weak hyperfine coupling to the SWCNT conduction electrons, whereas, at higher temperatures, a thermally activated slow-motion diffusion process of the Cs (α)+ ions occurs along the interstitial channels present within the carbon nanotube bundles. At high concentrations, the Cs (β)+ ions seem to occupy well defined positions relative to the carbon lattice. As a matter of fact, the Korringa relaxation behavior suggests a strong hyperfine coupling between Cs nuclei and conduction electrons in the carbon nanotubes and a partial charge transfer, which suggest a plausible Cs(6s)-C(2p) hybridization. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Conformational structural changes of bacteriorhodopsin adsorbed onto single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoncini, Patricia; Chauvet, Olivier

    2010-04-01

    The interaction between purple membranes, composed of proteins of bacteriorhodopsin (bR) and their native surrounding lipids, and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) has been investigated. In this work, sonication has been used to debundle SWNT in buffer solution without surfactant before the addition of native purple membranes. The sample was then sonicated in a bath for a short time, followed by a centrifugation. The supernatants contain proteins in excess and SWNT as individual and small bundles covered by a bR layer with an average thickness of 1.5 nm. TEM and AFM observations support the idea that only a protein monolayer surrounds the tubes. Optical absorption and infrared spectroscopy measurements provide evidence that the proteins adsorbed onto the SWNT undergo orientational changes of the helical segments in bR and helix conformational changes. We ascribe the main driving force to the hydrophobic interactions between the sidewall of the SWNT and the hydrophobic residues of the alpha-helices of bR.

  6. Taguchi analysis of parameters for small-diameter single wall carbon nanotube growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DaeJin Kang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Small diameter single wall carbon nanotubes are desirable for various physical and electrical properties of carbon nanotubes. Here, we report the sensitivities of parameters and the optimal conditions for small diameter carbon nanotube growth by chemical vapor deposition (CVD. These results were obtained using the Taguchi method, which is commonly used to find the optimal parameters of various processes. The possible parameter ranges given by the experimental equipment and laboratory conditions, we attempted several times to determine the proper ranges, using photoluminescence (PL imaging to determine the exact positions of suspended carbon nanotubes on the quartz substrates after synthesis. The diameters of the carbon nanotubes were then determined from the radial breathing modes (RBM using Raman spectroscopy with a 785nm wavelength laser. Among the 4 major parameters listed above, we concluded that the temperature was the most significant parameter in determining carbon nanotube diameter, hydrogen flow rate was the second most significant, the ethanol and argon gas flow rate was the third, and finally time was the least significant factor.

  7. Taguchi analysis of parameters for small-diameter single wall carbon nanotube growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, DaeJin; Yang, Sisi; Wang, Bo; Chen, Jihan; Dhall, Rohan; Hou, Bingya; Kang, Jimin; Cronin, Stephen B.

    2017-09-01

    Small diameter single wall carbon nanotubes are desirable for various physical and electrical properties of carbon nanotubes. Here, we report the sensitivities of parameters and the optimal conditions for small diameter carbon nanotube growth by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). These results were obtained using the Taguchi method, which is commonly used to find the optimal parameters of various processes. The possible parameter ranges given by the experimental equipment and laboratory conditions, we attempted several times to determine the proper ranges, using photoluminescence (PL) imaging to determine the exact positions of suspended carbon nanotubes on the quartz substrates after synthesis. The diameters of the carbon nanotubes were then determined from the radial breathing modes (RBM) using Raman spectroscopy with a 785nm wavelength laser. Among the 4 major parameters listed above, we concluded that the temperature was the most significant parameter in determining carbon nanotube diameter, hydrogen flow rate was the second most significant, the ethanol and argon gas flow rate was the third, and finally time was the least significant factor.

  8. Characterizing the chiral index of a single-walled carbon nanotube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qiuchen; Zhang, Jin

    2014-11-01

    The properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) mainly depend on their geometry. However, there are still formidable difficulties to determine the chirality of SWCNTs accurately. In this review, some efficient methods to characterize the chiral indices of SWCNTs are illuminated. These methods are divided into imaging techniques and spectroscopy techniques. With these methods, diameter, helix angle, and energy states can be measured. Generally speaking, imaging techniques have a higher accuracy and universality, but are time-consuming with regard to the sample preparation and characterization. The spectroscopy techniques are very simple and fast in operation, but these techniques can be applied only to the particular structure of the sample. Here, the principles and operations of each method are introduced, and a comprehensive understanding of each technique, including their advantages and disadvantages, is given. Advanced applications of some methods are also discussed. The aim of this review is to help readers to choose methods with the appropriate accuracy and time complexity and, furthermore, to put forward an idea to find new methods for chirality characterization. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Probing Exciton Diffusion and Dissociation in Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube-C60 Heterojunctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dowgiallo, Anne-Marie; Mistry, Kevin S.; Johnson, Justin C.; Reid, Obadiah G.; Blackburn, Jeffrey L.

    2016-05-19

    The efficiency of thin-film organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices relies heavily upon the transport of excitons to type-II heterojunction interfaces, where there is sufficient driving force for exciton dissociation and ultimately the formation of charge carriers. Semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are strong near-infrared absorbers that form type-II heterojunctions with fullerenes such as C60. Although the efficiencies of SWCNT-fullerene OPV devices have climbed over the past few years, questions remain regarding the fundamental factors that currently limit their performance. In this study, we determine the exciton diffusion length in the C60 layer of SWCNT-C60 bilayer active layers using femtosecond transient absorption measurements. We demonstrate that hole transfer from photoexcited C60 molecules to SWCNTs can be tracked by the growth of narrow spectroscopic signatures of holes in the SWCNT 'reporter layer'. In bilayers with thick C60 layers, the SWCNT charge-related signatures display a slow rise over hundreds of picoseconds, reflecting exciton diffusion through the C60 layer to the interface. A model based on exciton diffusion with a Beer-Lambert excitation profile, as well as Monte Carlo simulations, gives the best fit to the data as a function of C60 layer thickness using an exciton diffusion length of approximately 5 nm.

  10. Commercial single-walled carbon nanotubes effects in fibrinolysis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Yáñez, Yury; Bahena-Uribe, Daniel; Chávez-Munguía, Bibiana; López-Marure, Rebeca; González-Monroy, Stuart; Cisneros, Bulmaro; Albores, Arnulfo

    2015-08-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that carbon nanotubes (CNTs) induce platelet aggregation, endothelial dysfunction and vascular thrombosis. However, there is little information on the effects of CNTs on fibrinolysis. We investigated the role of pristine-commercial single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with fibrinolysis and their contribution to the induction of pro-thrombotic processes in human vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). SWCNTs alone produced concentration-dependent oxidation, as measured by a dithiothreitol oxidation assay. Internalized SWCNTs were located in HUVEC treated with 25 μg/ml using transmission electron microscopy, whereas treatment with 50 μg/ml compromised cell viability, and oxidative stress increased significantly at 5 μg/ml. The study showed that in HUVEC treated with 25 μg SWCNT/ml, fibrinolysis-related gene expression and protein levels had increased by 3-12 h after treatment (serpine-1: 13-fold; PLAT: 11-fold and PLAU: 2-fold), but only the PAI-1 protein was increased (1.5-fold), whereas tissue and urokinase plasminogen activator proteins (tPA and uPA, respectively) tended to decrease. In summary, pristine SWCNTs treatment resulted in evident HUVEC damage caused by cell fiber contact, internalization, and oxidative stress due to contaminant metals. The generation of endothelial dysfunction, as shown by the altered expression of genes and proteins involved in fibrinolysis, suggest that SWCNTs display pro-thrombotic effects. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Adsorption of triclosan on single wall carbon nanotubes: A first principle approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, S.M. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Maranhão, 65080-805 SãoLuís, MA (Brazil); Araújo, A.B. [Instituto Federal do Maranhão, Campus São Luis-Centro Histórico, 65010-500 SãoLuís, MA (Brazil); Nogueira, R.F.P. [Departamento de Química Analítica, Instituto de Química de Araraquara, UNESP e Univ Estadual Paulista, Araraquara, SP 14801-970 (Brazil); Guerini, S., E-mail: silvete@gmail.com [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Maranhão, 65080-805 SãoLuís, MA (Brazil)

    2017-05-01

    Highlights: • The interaction between the (8,0) SWCNT and triclosan molecule occurs via chemical process in parallel configuration. • The semiconductor SWCNT present predominantly binding energies larger than that of metallic SWCNT. • Triclosan behaves as an electron donor or acceptor depending on configuration. - Abstract: The interaction of triclosan on (8,0) and (5,5) single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) was investigated using density functional calculations. The results show that the adsorption of triclosan modifies the electronic properties of pristine (8,0) and (5,5) SWCNT and induced changes in the electronic properties are dependent on the triclosan adsorption site. It was observed through binding energy that triclosan molecule interacts mainly via chemical process in parallel configuration to (8,0) SWCNT, while interaction via physical process was observed with both (8,0) and (5,5) SWCNT. It is proposed that these SWCNTs are a potential filter device due to reasonable physical interaction with triclosan molecule. Furthermore, this type of filter could be reusable, therefore after the filtering, the SWCNTs could be separated from triclosan molecule.

  12. Electronic properties of Cs-intercalated single-walled carbon nanotubes derived from nuclear magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abou-Hamad, E; Goze-Bac, C; Aznar, R [nanoNMRI group, UMR5587, Universite Montpellier II, Place E Bataillon, 34095 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Nitze, F; Waagberg, T [Department of Physics, Umeaa University, 90187 Umeaa (Sweden); Schmid, M; Mehring, M, E-mail: Thomas.wagberg@physics.umu.se [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Stuttgart, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2011-05-15

    We report on the electronic properties of Cs-intercalated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). A detailed analysis of the {sup 13}C and {sup 133}Cs nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra reveals an increased metallization of the pristine SWNTs under Cs intercalation. The 'metallization' of Cs{sub x}C materials where x=0-0.144 is evidenced from the increased local electronic density of states (DOS) n(E{sub F}) at the Fermi level of the SWNTs as determined from spin-lattice relaxation measurements. In particular, there are two distinct electronic phases called {alpha} and {beta} and the transition between these occurs around x=0.05. The electronic DOS at the Fermi level increases monotonically at low intercalation levels x<0.05 ({alpha}-phase), whereas it reaches a plateau in the range 0.05{<=}x{<=}0.143 at high intercalation levels ({beta}-phase). The new {beta}-phase is accompanied by a hybridization of Cs(6s) orbitals with C(sp{sup 2}) orbitals of the SWNTs. In both phases, two types of metallic nanotubes are found with a low and a high local n(E{sub F}), corresponding to different local electronic band structures of the SWNTs.

  13. Environmental Impacts from Photovoltaic Solar Cells Made with Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Ilke; Mason, Brooke E; Phillips, Adam B; Heben, Michael J; Apul, Defne

    2017-04-18

    An ex-ante life cycle inventory was developed for single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) PV cells, including a laboratory-made 1% efficient device and an aspirational 28% efficient four-cell tandem device. The environmental impact of unit energy generation from the mono-Si PV technology was used as a reference point. Compared to monocrystalline Si (mono-Si), the environmental impacts from 1% SWCNT was ∼18 times higher due mainly to the short lifetime of three years. However, even with the same short lifetime, the 28% cell had lower environmental impacts than mono-Si. The effects of lifetime and efficiency on the environmental impacts were further examined. This analysis showed that if the SWCNT device efficiency had the same value as the best efficiency of the material under comparison, to match the total normalized impacts of the mono- and poly-Si, CIGS, CdTe, and a-Si devices, the SWCNT devices would need a lifetime of 2.8, 3.5, 5.3, 5.1, and 10.8 years, respectively. It was also found that if the SWCNT PV has an efficiency of 4.5% or higher, its energy payback time would be lower than other existing and emerging PV technologies. The major impacts of SWCNT PV came from the cell's materials synthesis.

  14. Estimating Young’s Modulus of Single-Walled Zirconia Nanotubes Using Nonlinear Finite Element Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Dauda Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The single-walled zirconia nanotube is structurally modeled and its Young’s modulus is valued by using the finite element approach. The nanotube was assumed to be a frame-like structure with bonds between atoms regarded as beam elements. The properties of the beam required for input into the finite element analysis were computed by connecting energy equivalence between molecular and continuum mechanics. Simulation was conducted by applying axial tensile strain on one end of the nanotube while the other end was fixed and the corresponding reaction force recorded to compute Young’s modulus. It was found out that Young’s modulus of zirconia nanotubes is significantly affected by some geometrical parameters such as chirality, diameter, thickness, and length. The obtained values of Young’s modulus for a certain range of diameters are in agreement with what was obtained in the few experiments that have been conducted so far. This study was conducted on the cubic phase of zirconia having armchair and zigzag configuration. The optimal diameter and thickness were obtained, which will assist in designing and fabricating bulk nanostructured components containing zirconia nanotubes for various applications.

  15. Large-scale separation of single-walled carbon nanotubes by electronic type using click chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Um, Jo-Eun; Song, Sun Gu; Yoo, Pil J.; Song, Changsik; Kim, Woo-Jae

    2018-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) can be either metallic or semiconducting, making their separation critical for applications in nanoelectronics, biomedical materials, and solar cells. Herein, we investigate a novel solution-phase separation method based on click chemistry (azide-alkyne Huisgen cycloaddition) and determine its efficiency and scalability. In this method, metallic SWCNTs in metallic/semiconducting SWCNT mixtures are selectively functionalized with alkyne groups by being reacted with 4-propargyloxybenezenediazonium tetrafluoroborate. Subsequently, silica nanoparticles are functionalized with azide groups and reacted with alkyne-bearing metallic SWCNTs in the SWCNT mixture in the presence of a Cu catalyst. As a result, metallic SWCNTs are anchored on silica powder, whereas non-functionalized semiconducting SWCNTs remain in solution. Low-speed centrifugation effectively removes the silica powder with attached metallic SWCNTs, furnishing a solution of highly pure semiconducting SWCNTs, as confirmed by Raman and UV-vis/near-infrared absorption measurements. This novel separation scheme exhibits the advantage of simultaneously separating both metallic and semiconducting SWCNTs from their mixtures, being cost-effective and therefore applicable at an industrial scale.

  16. Preparation of single-walled carbon nanotube/silicon composites and their lithium storage properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Ji-Yong; Kwon, Hyuk-Sang

    2011-04-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)/silicon composites were produced from the purified SWCNTs and Si powder by high-energy ball-milling and then electrochemically inserted with Li using Li/(SWCNT/Si) cells. The highest reversible capacity and lowest irreversible capacity of the SWCNT/Si composites were measured to be 1845 and 474 mAh g(-1) after ball-milling for 60 min, respectively. During the charge/discharge process, most of the Li ions were inserted into the SWCNT/Si composites by alloying with Si particles below 0.2 V and extracted from the SWCNT/Si composites by dealloying with Si particles around 0.5 V. The enhanced capacity and cycle performance of the SWCNT/Si composites produced by high-energy ball-milling were due primarily to the fact that SWCNTs provided a flexible conductive matrix, which compensated for the dimensional changes of Si particles during Li insertion and avoided loosening of the interparticle contacts during the crumbling of Si particles. The ball-milling contributed to a decrease in the particle size of SWCNTs and Si particles and to an increase in the electrical contact between SWCNTs and Si particles in the SWCNT/Si composites. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  17. Elastic properties of single-walled carbon nanotube thin film by nanoindentation test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xingling; El-Hami, Abdelkhalak; El-Hami, Khalil; Eid, Mohamed; Si, Chaorun

    2017-09-12

    This paper carries out a preliminary study for the elastic properties of single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) thin film. The SWCNT thin films (~250 nm) are prepared by a simple and cost effective method of spin-coating technology. Nanoindentation test with a Berkovich indenter is used to determine the hardness and elastic modulus of the SWCNT thin film. It is important to note that the elastic properties of SWCNT film are indirectly derived from the information of load and displacement of the indenter under certain assumptions, deviation of the 'test value' is inevitable. In this regard, uncertainty analysis is an effective process in guarantying the validity of the material properties. This paper carries out uncertainty estimation for the tested elastic properties of SWCNT film by nanoindentation. Experimental results and uncertainty analysis indicates that nanoindentation test could be an effective and reliable method in determine the elastic properties of SWCNT thin film. Moreover, the obtained values of hardness and elastic modulus can further benefit the design of SWCNT thin film based components.

  18. Polymer-Single Wall Carbon Nanotube Composites for Potential Spacecraft Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, C.; Ounaies, Z.; Watson, K. A.; Pawlowski, K.; Lowther, S. E.; Connell, J. W.; Siochi, E. J.; Harrison, J. S.; St.Clair, T. L.; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Polymer-single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) composite films were prepared and characterized as part of an effort to develop polymeric materials with improved combinations of properties for potential use on future spacecraft. Next generation spacecraft will require ultra-lightweight materials that possess specific and unique combinations of properties such as radiation and atomic oxygen resistance, low solar absorptivity, high thermal emissitivity, electrical conductivity, tear resistance, ability to be folded and seamed, and good mechanical properties. The objective of this work is to incorporate sufficient electrical conductivity into space durable polyimides to mitigate static charge build-up. The challenge is to obtain this level of conductivity (10(exp -8) S/cm) without degrading other properties of importance, particularly optical transparency. Several different approaches were attempted to fully disperse the SWNTs into the polymer matrix. These included high shear mixing, sonication, and synthesizing the polymers in the presence of pre-dispersed SWNTs. Acceptable levels of conductivity were obtained at loading levels less than one tenth weight percent SWNT without significantly sacrificing optical properties. Characterization of the nanocomposite films and the effect of SWNT concentration and dispersion on the conductivity, solar absorptivity, thermal emissivity, mechanical and thermal properties were discussed. Fibers and non-woven porous mats of SWNT reinforced polymer nanocomposite were produced using electrospinning.

  19. Symmetry and models of single-walled TiO2 nanotubes with rectangular morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evarestov, Robert A.; Zhukovskii, Yuri F.; Bandura, Andrei V.; Piskunov, Sergei

    2011-04-01

    The formalism of line symmetry groups for one-periodic (1D) nanostructures with rotohelical symmetry has been applied for symmetry analysis of single-walled titania nanotubes (SW TiO2 NTs) formed by rolling up the stoichiometric two-periodic (2D) slabs of anatase structure. Either six- or twelve-layer (101) slabs have been cut from TiO2 crystal in a stable anatase phase. After structural optimization, the latter keeps the centered rectangular symmetry of initial slab slightly compressed along a direction coincided with large sides of elemental rectangles. We have considered two sets of SW TiO2 NTs with optimized six- and twelve-layer structures, which possess chiralities (- n, n) and ( n, n) of anatase nanotubes. To analyze the structural and electronic properties of titania slabs and nanotubes, we have performed their ab initio LCAO calculations, using the hybrid Hartree-Fock/Kohn-Sham exchange-correlation functional PBE0. The band gaps (Δ ɛ gap ) and strain energies ( E strain ) of six-layer nanotubes have been computed and analyzed as functions of NT diameter ( D NT). As to models of 12-layer SW TiO2 NTs of both chiralities, their optimization results in structural exfoliation, i.e., the multi-walled structure should be rather formed in nanotubes with such a number of atomic layers.

  20. First-principles calculations of single-walled nanotubes in sulfides MS2 (M = Ti, Zr)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evarestov, Robert A.; Bandura, Andrei V.

    2014-04-01

    Hybrid density functional theory has been applied for investigations of the electronic and atomic structure of nanotubes based on titanium and zirconium disulfides. The full optimization of all atomic positions in the considered systems has been performed to study the atomic relaxation and to determine the most favorable nanostructures. Our calculations on single-wall TiS2 and ZrS2 nanotubes confirmed that the nanotubes obtained by rolling of the hexagonal layers of 1T crystalline polymorphs with the octahedral morphology (and with the layer group P\\overline 3 m1) are the most stable. However, it is also possible to obtain the relatively stable nanotubes with lepidocrocite morphology by rolling up layers of the metastable tetragonal or orthorhombic phases. The strain energy of TiS2 is almost the same as that of ZrS2 but it is greater than the strain energy of TiO2 and ZrO2 nanotubes. However, the formation energy of the sulfide nanotubes is considerably less than the formation energy of the oxide nanotubes.

  1. Interactions and effects of BSA-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes on different cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzi, Laura; Tardani, Franco; La Mesa, Camillo; Bonincontro, Adalberto; Bianco, Alberto; Risuleo, Gianfranco

    2016-04-01

    Functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have shown great promise in several biomedical contexts, spanning from drug delivery to tissue regeneration. Thanks to their unique size-related properties, single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs) are particularly interesting in these fields. However, their use in nanomedicine requires a clear demonstration of their safety in terms of tissue damage, toxicity and pro-inflammatory response. Thus, a better understanding of the cytotoxicity mechanisms, the cellular interactions and the effects that these materials have on cell survival and on biological membranes is an important first step for an appropriate assessment of their biocompatibility. In this study we show how bovine serum albumin (BSA) is able to generate homogeneous and stable dispersions of SWCNTs (BSA-CNTs), suggesting their possible use in the biomedical field. On the other hand, this study wishes to shed more light on the impact and the interactions of protein-stabilized SWCNTs with two different cell types exploiting multidisciplinary techniques. We show that BSA-CNTs are efficiently taken up by cells. We also attempt to describe the effect that the interaction with cells has on the dielectric characteristics of the plasma membrane and ion flux using electrorotation. We then focus on the BSA-CNTs’ acute toxicity using different cellular models. The novel aspect of this work is the evaluation of the membrane alterations that have been poorly investigated to date.

  2. Atomic Force Microscopy of DNA-wrapped Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes in Aqueous Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashida, Takuya; Umemura, Kazuo

    2016-07-01

    We evaluated hybrids of DNA and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in aqueous solution and in air using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Although intensive AFM observations of these hybrids were previously carried out for samples in air, this is the first report on AFM observations of these hybrids in solution. As expected, diameters of DNA-SWNT hybrids dramatically increased in tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (TE) buffer solution. The data suggest that DNA molecules maintain their structures even on the SWNT surfaces. Furthermore, we simultaneously observed single DNA-SWNT hybrids using three different AFM modes in air and in the TE buffer solution. Height value of the hybrids was largest in the solution, and lowest for the mode that repulsive force is expected in air. For the bare SWNT molecules, height differences among the three AFM modes were much lower than those of the DNA-SWNT hybrids. DNA molecules adsorbed on SWNT surfaces flexibly changed their morphology as well as DNA molecules on flat surfaces such as mica. This is hopeful results for biological applications of DNA-SWNT hybrids. In addition, our results revealed the importance of the single-molecule approach to evaluate DNA structures on SWNT surfaces. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Electronic properties of Cs-intercalated single-walled carbon nanotubes derived from nuclear magnetic resonance

    KAUST Repository

    Abou-Hamad, E

    2011-05-24

    We report on the electronic properties of Cs-intercalated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). A detailed analysis of the 13C and 133Cs nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra reveals an increased metallization of the pristine SWNTs under Cs intercalation. The \\'metallization\\' of CsxC materials where x=0–0.144 is evidenced from the increased local electronic density of states (DOS) n(EF) at the Fermi level of the SWNTs as determined from spin–lattice relaxation measurements. In particular, there are two distinct electronic phases called α and β and the transition between these occurs around x=0.05. The electronic DOS at the Fermi level increases monotonically at low intercalation levels x<0.05 (α-phase), whereas it reaches a plateau in the range 0.05≤x≤0.143 at high intercalation levels (β-phase). The new β-phase is accompanied by a hybridization of Cs(6s) orbitals with C(sp2) orbitals of the SWNTs. In both phases, two types of metallic nanotubes are found with a low and a high local n(EF), corresponding to different local electronic band structures of the SWNTs.

  4. X-ray irradiation-induced structural changes on Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardi, N.; Jurewicz, I.; King, A. K.; Alkhorayef, M. A.; Bradley, D.; Dalton, A. B.

    2017-11-01

    Dosimetry devices based on Carbon Nanotubes are a promising new technology. In particular using devices based on single wall Carbon Nanotubes may offer a tissue equivalent response with the possibility for device miniaturisation, high scale manufacturing and low cost. An important precursor to device fabrication requires a quantitative study of the effects of X-ray radiation on the physical and chemical properties of the individual nanotubes. In this study, we concentrate on the effects of relatively low doses, 20 cGy and 45 cGy , respectively. We use a range of characterization techniques including scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to quantify the effects of the radiation dose on inherent properties of the nanotubes. Specifically we find that the radiation exposure results in a reduction in the sp2 nature of the nanotube bond structure. Moreover, our analysis indicates that the exposure results in nanotubes that have an increased defect density which ultimately effects the electrical properties of the nanotubes.

  5. Structural and compositional changes in single wall carbon nanotube ensemble upon exposure to microwave plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Soumyendu; Bajpai, Reeti; Soin, Navneet; Sinha Roy, Susanta; McLaughlin, James A.; Misra, D. S.

    2017-10-01

    Microwave plasma treatment of single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) films called bucky papers (BPs) resulted in changes in the relative proportion of different chiralities of SWNTs present in the BP and the production of vertical microstructures on the surface of BP. The plasma was created using H2 gas mixed with Ar or CH4, at a temperature of 900 °C and a pressure of 70 Torr. Radial breathing mode spectra of the BPs revealed that the preferential sputtering by plasma is not with respect to the diameter or the metallic nature of SWNTs. We propose that the lengths of SWNTs influence how they interact with plasma. Longer tubes will have higher dielectric constants and hence will be polarized more strongly by the electric field of the plasma sheath. This in turn results in greater ion bombardment and sputtering. Finite element method was used to find the strengths of the induced electric fields on model SWNT surfaces. Microscopy, Raman, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to study the effect of plasma on the crystallinity of the surviving SWNTs. Structural integrity of SWNTs was preserved after the plasma treatment.

  6. Synthesis and Characterization of Hexahapto-Chromium Complexes of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Kalinina, Irina

    2016-12-17

    This chapter employs purified pristine single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and octadecylaminefunctionalized-SWNTs. These SWNTs are employed for investigate the potential of the SWNT sidewall to function as a hexahapto ligand for chromium (Cr), with in-depth characterization of the products using some of the techniques, such as thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Purified electric arc (EA)-produced SWNTs (P2-SWNT) and octadecylaminefunctionalized SWNTs were obtained from Carbon Solutions, Inc. The TEM images show the removal of the Cr particles from the outer surface of the SWNT bundles in the SWNT-Cr complexes after decomplexation; Cr attachment to the surface of the as-prepared complexes (η6-SWNT)Cr(CO)3 and (η6-SWNT-CONH(CH2)17CH3)Cr(CO)3 is clearly evident. The positions of the bands in the Raman spectra of SWNTs are sensitive to doping and thus the chapter examines the effect of complexation of the Cr(CO)3 and Cr(η6-benzene) units on the position of the G and 2D bands in the (η6-SWNT)Cr(CO)3 and (η6-SWNT)Cr(η6-benzene) complexes.

  7. Effects of serum albumin on the degradation and cytotoxicity of single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yun; Tian, Rong; Yang, Zhen; Chen, Jianfa; Lu, Naihao

    2017-03-01

    Neutrophil myeloperoxidase (MPO) and peroxynitrite (ONOO-) can oxidatively biodegrade carboxylated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). The protein-SWCNTs interactions will play an important role in the degradation and cytotoxicity of nanotubes. Here, we investigated the binding of bovine serum albumin (BSA, a common and well-characterized model blood serum protein) to SWCNTs, and found that the hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions might be crucial factors in stabilizing the binding of SWCNTs with BSA. The binding of BSA could impair SWCNTs biodegradation in vitro through the competitive adsorption to nanotube. Both SWCNTs and BSA-SWCNTs were significantly degraded in zymosan-stimulated macrophages, and the degradation degree was more for BSA-SWCNTs. The mechanism for SWCNTs degradation in activated macrophages was further investigated to demonstrate the dominant participation of MPO and ONOO--driven pathways. Moreover, binding of BSA to SWCNTs reduced cytotoxicity and degraded nanotubes induced less cytotoxicity than non-degraded nanotubes. The binding of BSA may be an important determinant for the biodegradation and cytotoxicity of SWCNTs in inflammatory cells, and therefore, provide a new route to mitigate the potential toxicity of nanotubes in future biomedical applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Electronic properties of prismatic modifications of single-wall carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomilin, O. B.; Muryumin, E. E.; Rodionova, E. V.; Ryskina, N. P.

    2018-01-01

    The article shows the possibility of target modifying the prismatic single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) by regular chemisorption of fluorine atoms in the graphene surface. It is shown that the electronic properties of prismatic SWCNT modifications are determined by the interaction of π- and ρ(in-plane)-electron conjugation in the carbon-conjugated subsystems (tracks) formed in the faces. The contributions of π- and ρ(in-plane)-electron conjugation depend on the structural characteristics of the tracks. It was found that the minimum of degree deviation of the track from the plane of the prism face and the maximum of the track width ensure the maximum contribution of the π-electron conjugation, and the band gap of the prismatic modifications of the SWCNT tends to the band gap of the hydrocarbon analog of the carbon track. It is established that the maximum of degree deviation of the track from the plane of the prism face and the maximum of track width ensure the maximum contribution of the ρ(in-plane) electron interface, and the band gap of the prismatic modifications of the SWCNT tends to the band gap of the unmodified carbon nanotube. The calculation of the model systems has been carried out using an ab initio Hartree-Fock method in the 3-21G basis.

  9. Effect of Saline Solution on the Electrical Response of Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes-Epoxy Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hammad Younes

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of saline solution on the electrical resistance of single wall carbon nanotubes-epoxy nanocomposites have been investigated experimentally. Ultrasonic assisted fabricated 1.0% and 0.5 W/W% SWCNTs epoxy nanocomposites are integrated into a Kelvin structure by smear cast the nanocomposites on a glass wafer. Four metal pads are deposited on the nanocomposites using the beam evaporator and wires are tethered using soldering. The effect of saline solution on the electrical resistance of the nanocomposites is studied by adding drop of saline solution to the surface of the fabricated nanocomposites and measuring electrical resistance. Moreover, the nanocomposites are soaked completely into 3 wt.% saline solution and real-time measurement of the electrical resistance is conducted. It is found that a drop of saline solution on the surface of the nanocomposites film increases the resistance by 50%. Furthermore, the real-time measurement reveals a 40% increase in the resistance of the nanocomposites film. More importantly, the nanocomposites are successfully reset by soaking in DI water for four hours. This study may open the door for using SWCNTs epoxy nanocomposites as scale sensors in oil and gas industry.

  10. Investigating the Potential of Single-Walled Aluminosilicate Nanotubes in Water Desalination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Kai-Hsin; Kang, Dun-Yen; Lin, Li-Chiang

    2017-01-18

    Water shortage has become a critical issue. To facilitate the large-scale deployment of reverse-osmosis water desalination to produce fresh water, discovering novel membranes is essential. Here, we computationally demonstrate the great potential of single-walled aluminosilicate nanotubes (AlSiNTs), materials that can be synthesized through scalable methods, in desalination. State-of-the-art molecular dynamics simulations were employed to investigate the desalination performance and structure-performance relationship of AlSiNTs. Free energy profiles, passage time distribution, and water density map were also analyzed to further understand the dependence of transport properties on diameter and water dynamics in the nanotubes. AlSiNTs with an inner diameter of 0.86 nm were found to fully reject NaCl ions while allowing orders of magnitude higher water fluxes compared to currently available reverse osmosis membranes, providing opportunities in water desalination. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Acute Toxicity Comparison of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in Various Freshwater Organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun Kyung Sohn

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available While the commercialization of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs is rapidly expanding, the environmental impact of this nanomaterial is not well understood. Therefore, the present study evaluates the acute aquatic toxicity of SWCNTs towards two freshwater microalgae (Raphidocelis subcapitata and Chlorella vulgaris, a microcrustacean (Daphnia magna, and a fish (Oryzias latipes based on OECD test guidelines (201, 202, and 203. According to the results, the SWCNTs inhibited the growth of the algae R. subcapitata and C. vulgaris with a median effective concentration (EC50 of 29.99 and 30.96 mg/L, respectively, representing “acute category 3” in the Globally Harmonized System (GHS of classification and labeling of chemicals. Meanwhile, the acute toxicity test using O. latipes and D. magna did not show any mortality/immobilizing effects up to a concentration of 100.00 mg/L SWCNTs, indicating no hazard category in the GHS classification. In conclusion, SWCNTs were found to induce acute ecotoxicity in freshwater microalgae, yet not in D. magna and medaka fish.

  12. Defects in individual semiconducting single wall carbon nanotubes: Raman spectroscopic and in situ Raman spectroelectrochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalbac, Martin; Hsieh, Ya-Ping; Farhat, Hootan; Kavan, Ladislav; Hofmann, Mario; Kong, Jing; Dresselhaus, Mildred S

    2010-11-10

    Raman spectroscopy and in situ Raman spectroelectrochemistry have been used to study the influence of defects on the Raman spectra of semiconducting individual single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). The defects were created intentionally on part of an originally defect-free individual semiconducting nanotube, which allowed us to analyze how defects influence this particular nanotube. The formation of defects was followed by Raman spectroscopy that showed D band intensity coming from the defective part and no D band intensity coming from the original part of the same nanotube. It is shown that the presence of defects also reduces the intensity of the symmetry-allowed Raman features. Furthermore, the changes to the Raman resonance window upon the introduction of defects are analyzed. It is demonstrated that defects lead to both a broadening of the Raman resonance profile and a decrease in the maximum intensity of the resonance profile. The in situ Raman spectroelectrochemical data show a doping dependence of the Raman features taken from the defective part of the tested SWCNT.

  13. Large work function difference driven electron transfer from electrides to single-walled carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Menamparambath, Mini Mol

    2014-06-23

    A difference in work function plays a key role in charge transfer between two materials. Inorganic electrides provide a unique opportunity for electron transfer since interstitial anionic electrons result in a very low work function of 2.4-2.6 eV. Here we investigated charge transfer between two different types of electrides, [Ca2N]+·e- and [Ca 24Al28O64]4+·4e-, and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with a work function of 4.73-5.05 eV. [Ca2N]+·e- with open 2-dimensional electron layers was more effective in donating electrons to SWNTs than closed cage structured [Ca24Al28O64] 4+·4e- due to the higher electron concentration (1.3 × 1022 cm-3) and mobility (∼200 cm 2 V-1 s-1 at RT). A non-covalent conjugation enhanced near-infrared fluorescence of SWNTs as high as 52%. The field emission current density of electride-SWNT-silver paste dramatically increased by a factor of 46000 (14.8 mA cm-2) at 2 V μm-1 (3.5 wt% [Ca2N]+·e-) with a turn-on voltage of 0.85 V μm-1. This journal is © the Partner Organisations 2014.

  14. Defect Screening Effects of Fluoropolymer Capping in Single Walled Carbon Nanotube Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Seonpil; Kim, Bongjun; Geier, Michael; Hersam, Mark; Dodabalapur, Ananth

    2015-03-01

    One of the most promising uses of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is as active channel semiconductor materials in field-effect transistors (FETs). Recent advances in the availability of highly sorted semiconducting SWCNT source material and in printing such nanotubes to realize high-performance thin-film transistors make them very promising candidates for printed electronics. In this presentation, we report on the substantial improvements in the characteristics of SWCNT FET devices and circuits comprised of these devices by the use of coatings of the fluoropolymer containing copolymer, PVDF-TrFE. The origins of these improvements may be attributed to the polar nature of C-F bonds and the local organization of the fluoropolymer at the interfaces with the SWCNTs so as to partially neutralize charged defects. This hypothesis was tested by the experiments using a number of vapor phase polar molecules which produce similar effects on the FET characteristics. The polar vapor experiments show that dipoles can partially neutralize residual charges arising from defects/impurities. The dipole present in polar molecules adopts an orientation that tends to cancel the effects of the charged defect/impurity from the perspective of mobile charges in the SWCNTs.

  15. DNA origami templated self-assembly of discrete length single wall carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhao; Liu, Yan; Yan, Hao

    2013-01-28

    Constructing intricate geometric arrangements of components is one of the central challenges of nanotechnology. Here we report a convenient, versatile method to organize discrete length single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) into complex geometries using 2D DNA origami structures. First, a size exclusion HPLC purification protocol was used to isolate uniform length, SWNTs labelled with single stranded DNA (ssDNA). The nanotube-bound ssDNAs are composed of two domains: a SWNT binding domain and a linker binding domain. Although initially bound to the SWNTs, the linker domain is displaced from the surface by the addition of an external ssDNA linker strand. One portion of the linker strand is designed to form a double helix with the linker binding domain, compelling the DNA to project away from the SWNT surface. The remainder of the linker strand contains an ssDNA origami recognition sequence available for hybridization to a DNA origami nanostructure. Two different 2D DNA origami structures, a triangle and a rectangle, were used to organize the nanotubes. Several arrangements of nanotubes were constructed, with defined tube lengths and inter-tube angles. The uniform tube lengths and positional precision that this method affords may have applications in electronic device fabrication.

  16. Cytotoxicity Investigation on Cultured Human Blood Cells Treated with Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Rosaria Scarfì

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs are one of the new materials ofemerging technologies. They are becoming increasingly studied for the possibleapplications in electronics, optics and biology. In particular, very promising fields ofapplication are the development of optical biosensors and the intracellular drug delivery.Nevertheless, there is a paucity of information on their toxicological properties and onpotential human health risk. In the present study the SWCNTs were investigated for thepossible induction of toxicity in human blood cells. Cell growth, viability, apoptosis andmetabolic activity were evaluated in proliferating human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Inun-stimulated human leukocytes primary DNA damage was also evaluated. SWCNTsconcentrations ranging from 1 to 50 μg/ml were tested, and treatment duration varied from6 to 72 h, in accordance with the biological target investigated. A statistically significantdecrease in cell growth was found in cells treated with the highest concentrations (25 and50 μg/ml. Such decrease was not associated to cell death or apoptosis, but it wasdemonstrated to be related to a decrease in metabolic activity, as assessed by resazurinassay. Moreover, treatments of 6 h with SWCNTs concentrations of 1, 5 and 10 μg/mlfailed to induce primary DNA damage on the entire human leukocytes population.

  17. NASA-JSC Protocol for the Characterization of Single Wall Carbon Nanotube Material Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arepalli, Sivaram; Nikolaev, Pasha; Gorelik, Olga; Hadjiev, Victor; Holmes, William; Devivar, Rodrigo; Files, Bradley; Yowell, Leonard

    2010-01-01

    It is well known that the raw as well as purified single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) material always contain certain amount of impurities of varying composition (mostly metal catalyst and non-tubular carbon). Particular purification method also creates defects and/or functional groups in the SWCNT material and therefore affects the its dispersability in solvents (important to subsequent application development). A number of analytical characterization tools have been used successfully in the past years to assess various properties of nanotube materials, but lack of standards makes it difficult to compare these measurements across the board. In this work we report the protocol developed at NASA-JSC which standardizes measurements using TEM, SEM, TGA, Raman and UV-Vis-NIR absorption techniques. Numerical measures are established for parameters such as metal content, homogeneity, thermal stability and dispersability, to allow easy comparison of SWCNT materials. We will also report on the recent progress in quantitative measurement of non-tubular carbon impurities and a possible purity standard for SWCNT materials.

  18. Phthalimide containing donor-acceptor polymers for effective dispersion of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baris Yilmaz

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Single-walled carbon nanotubes have been dispersed by novel phthalimide containing donor-acceptor type copolymers in organic media. Brominated phthalimide comonomer has been copolymerized with several electron rich structures using Suzuki and Stille coupling reactions. Carbon nanotube dispersion capability of the resultant polymers has been assessed by exploiting the non-covalent interaction of nanotube surface with the pi-system of conjugated backbone of polymers. Four polymers have been found to be good candidates for individually dispersing nanotubes in solution. In order to identify the dispersed nanotube species, 2D excitation-emission map and Raman spectroscopy have been performed. Molecular dynamics modelling has been utilized to reveal the binding energies of dispersants with the nanotube surface and the simulation results have been compared with the experimental findings. Both experimental and theoretical results imply the presence of a complex mechanism that governs the extent of dispersion capacity and selectivity of each conjugated polymeric dispersant in solubilizing carbon nanotubes.

  19. Toxicity of single-walled carbon nanotubes on green microalga Chromochloris zofingiensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Yang, Kaijing

    2013-03-01

    Nanoparticles, or particles in size of 1-100 nm, are extensively used in the world in different applications. For instance, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are commonly used in consumer products, such as biosensors, drug and vaccine delivery transporters, and novel biomaterials. Although nanoparticles do not cause safety concerns to consumers who use nanoparticle-containing products, these small particles are potentially harmful for workers who produce them in factories or in cases of discharge to aquatic ecosystems. SWCNTs do not have a natural analogue, so the effects on health of their disposal remain largely unknown. In this study, we evaluated the effects of SWCNTs on a population of the green microalga Chromochloris zofingiensis and the profile and production of pigments and fatty acids. The alga was incubated with SWCNTs for 6 days in 0 (control), 40, 80, 160, or 320 mg/L concentrations. SWCNTs showed both positive and negative effects on the growth of C. zofingiensis, with a biomass enhancement at low levels (40-160 mg/L) but inhibition at high levels (320 mg/L). By contrast, a decreased accumulation of fatty acids and pigments of C. zofingiensis was observed over the range of the tested concentrations. These results indicate that the markers on the inhibitive toxicity of SWCNTs are increasingly sensitive in the following order: biomass and fatty acids microalga for evaluating the ecotoxicological hazards of SWCNTs, especially in terms of pigmentation response.

  20. Single-walled carbon nanotubes functionalized with sodium hyaluronate enhance bone mineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sá, M.A.; Ribeiro, H.J.; Valverde, T.M.; Sousa, B.R.; Martins-Júnior, P.A.; Mendes, R.M.; Ladeira, L.O.; Resende, R.R.; Kitten, G.T.; Ferreira, A.J.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of sodium hyaluronate (HY), single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and HY-functionalized SWCNTs (HY-SWCNTs) on the behavior of primary osteoblasts, as well as to investigate the deposition of inorganic crystals on titanium surfaces coated with these biocomposites. Primary osteoblasts were obtained from the calvarial bones of male newborn Wistar rats (5 rats for each cell extraction). We assessed cell viability using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide assay and by double-staining with propidium iodide and Hoechst. We also assessed the formation of mineralized bone nodules by von Kossa staining, the mRNA expression of bone repair proteins, and the deposition of inorganic crystals on titanium surfaces coated with HY, SWCNTs, or HY-SWCNTs. The results showed that treatment with these biocomposites did not alter the viability of primary osteoblasts. Furthermore, deposition of mineralized bone nodules was significantly increased by cells treated with HY and HY-SWCNTs. This can be partly explained by an increase in the mRNA expression of type I and III collagen, osteocalcin, and bone morphogenetic proteins 2 and 4. Additionally, the titanium surface treated with HY-SWCNTs showed a significant increase in the deposition of inorganic crystals. Thus, our data indicate that HY, SWCNTs, and HY-SWCNTs are potentially useful for the development of new strategies for bone tissue engineering. PMID:26648087

  1. Single-walled carbon nanotubes functionalized with sodium hyaluronate enhance bone mineralization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Sá

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of sodium hyaluronate (HY, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs and HY-functionalized SWCNTs (HY-SWCNTs on the behavior of primary osteoblasts, as well as to investigate the deposition of inorganic crystals on titanium surfaces coated with these biocomposites. Primary osteoblasts were obtained from the calvarial bones of male newborn Wistar rats (5 rats for each cell extraction. We assessed cell viability using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide assay and by double-staining with propidium iodide and Hoechst. We also assessed the formation of mineralized bone nodules by von Kossa staining, the mRNA expression of bone repair proteins, and the deposition of inorganic crystals on titanium surfaces coated with HY, SWCNTs, or HY-SWCNTs. The results showed that treatment with these biocomposites did not alter the viability of primary osteoblasts. Furthermore, deposition of mineralized bone nodules was significantly increased by cells treated with HY and HY-SWCNTs. This can be partly explained by an increase in the mRNA expression of type I and III collagen, osteocalcin, and bone morphogenetic proteins 2 and 4. Additionally, the titanium surface treated with HY-SWCNTs showed a significant increase in the deposition of inorganic crystals. Thus, our data indicate that HY, SWCNTs, and HY-SWCNTs are potentially useful for the development of new strategies for bone tissue engineering.

  2. Half-Metallic Properties of Single-Walled Polymeric Manganese Phthalocyanine Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongbin Jiang

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a theoretical study of the electronic and magnetic properties of single-walled manganese phthalocyanine (MnPc nanotubes which can be thought of as rolled-up ribbons of the two-dimensional (2D polymeric MnPc sheet. Our density functional theory calculations show that all of the MnPc nanotubes investigated here are half-metals with 100% spin polarization around the Fermi level. Following the increase of the tube diameter, the number of spin-down energy bands of MnPc nanotubes is always increased while the spin-up band gap of MnPc nanotubes approaches that of the 2D MnPc sheet in an oscillatory manner. Because the half-metallic character of MnPc nanotubes is deeply rooted in the distribution of electrons in the energy bands dominated by the Mn 3d atomic orbitals, adsorption of CO molecules on the Mn ions leads to a redistribution of electrons in the Mn 3d orbitals and thus can tune precisely the spin state and electronic transport properties of MnPc nanotubes, demonstrating promising applications of MnPc nanotubes in future molecular spintronics and single-molecule sensors.

  3. Dipole induced conductance modulation in chromophore-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuanchun; Huang, Changshui; Kim, Myungwoong; Gopalan, Padma; Eriksson, Mark

    2013-03-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are highly sensitive to local electrostatic environments, making SWNT field-effect transistors (FETs) of interest for a number of sensor applications and optoelectronic devices. Here we demonstrate a direct correlation between the conduction of SWNTs and their surrounding dipolar environments. We use azobenzene-based dipolar chromophores, Disperse Red 1 (DR1) and its derivatives to functionalize the sidewalls of SWNTs. The chromophores are coupled with a pyrenebutyric group for realizing noncovalent attachment and to attempt to direct their dipole moments. The functionalizing chromophores produce a dipole field that shifts the threshold voltage (Vth) of the nanotube FET. Under light illumination, these molecules isomerize from the ground trans state to the excited cis state, leading to a decrease of their dipole moments. This dipole moment change acts as an additional gate, causing a shift in Vth. Our results provide a new insight into the photogating mechanisms of the nanotube-chromophore hybrid devices, and they reveal the possibility to modulate optoelectronic properties of nanotube-hybrid devices by designing chromophores with required photosensitive features.

  4. Comparison of complex permittivities of isotonic colloids containing single-wall carbon nanotubes of varying chirality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Tejas; Symanowski, James T; Gach, H Michael

    2012-02-01

    The application of bio-compatible, conductive nanoparticles in combination with radiofrequency (RF) irradiation to raise tissue temperatures between 40 and 60 °C for hyperthermia and ablation spurred interest in the complex permittivities of isotonic nanoparticle-based colloids. Nanoparticles with large aspect ratios and high permittivities increase the bulk permittivity of the colloid and RF losses at the macroscopic scale. The complex permittivities of isotonic colloids with and without single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) containing either metallic, semiconducting, or mixed chiralities were measured from 20 MHz to 1 GHz at room temperature. The colloids were made with one of three different isotonic solvents: phosphate buffered saline (PBS), and Dulbecco's modified eagle medium (DMEM) with and without 0.5% weight/volume bovine serum albumin to simulate cytosol and blood, respectively. The concentration of elemental carbon from the SWCNTs in the colloids ranged from 16 to 17 mM. The permittivities were corrected for electrode polarization effects by fitting the data to the Cole-Cole relaxation model with a constant phase angle element. The presence of SWCNTs increased both the real and imaginary components of the permittivities of the colloids. For all three solvents, the direct current (DC) components of the real and imaginary permittivities were greatest for the colloids containing the mixed chirality SWCNTs, followed by the colloids with semiconducting SWCNTs, and then metallic SWCNTs. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Rainbow effect in channeling of high energy protons through single-wall carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrovic, S. [Laboratory of Physics (010), Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, P.O. Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)]. E-mail: petrovs@vin.bg.ac.yu; Borka, D. [Laboratory of Physics (010), Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, P.O. Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro); Neskovic, N. [Laboratory of Physics (010), Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, P.O. Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)

    2005-05-01

    We studied theoretically the angular distributions and the rainbows in the case of 1 GeV protons channeled in the ropes of (10, 10) single-wall carbon nanotubes. It was assumed that the transverse cross section of a rope could be described via a (two-dimensional) hexagonal superlattice with one nanotube per lattice point. The rope length was varied between 2.4 and 7.2 {mu}m, corresponding to the reduced rope lengths associated with the transverse proton motion close to the centers of the regions in between three neighboring nanotubes, {lambda} {sub b}, between 0.17 and 0.50, respectively. The angular distributions of channeled protons were generated by the computer simulation method using the numerical solution of the proton equations of motion in the transverse plane. We used the Moliere's expression for the interaction potential of the proton and a carbon atom. The rainbow lines were determined numerically too. We showed that they ensured the full explanation of the angular distributions. The effect of zero-degree focusing of channeled ions for the reduced rope length {lambda} {sub b} = 0.50 was also observed, indicating the existence of the rainbow cycles in the evolution of the angular distribution. We noted a strong influence of the rainbow effect on the effect of zero-degree focusing.

  6. Morphology and anisotropy of thin conductive inkjet printed lines of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Canas, Fernando; Blanc, Christophe; Mašlík, Jan; Tahir, Said; Izard, Nicolas; Karasahin, Senguel; Castellani, Mauro; Dammasch, Matthias; Zamora-Ledezma, Camilo; Anglaret, Eric

    2017-03-01

    We show that the properties of thin conductive inkjet printed lines of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) can be greatly tuned, using only a few deposition parameters. The morphology, anisotropy and electrical resistivity of single-stroke printed lines are studied as a function of ink concentration and drop density. An original method based on coupled profilometry-Raman measurements is developed to determine the height, mass, orientational order and density profiles of SWCNT across the printed lines with a micrometric lateral resolution. Height profiles can be tuned from ‘rail tracks’ (twin parallel lines) to layers of homogeneous thickness by controlling nanotube concentration and drop density. In all samples, the nanotubes are strongly oriented parallel to the line axis at the edges of the lines, and the orientational order decreases continuously towards the center of the lines. The resistivity of ‘rail tracks’ is significantly larger than that of homogeneous deposits, likely because of large amounts of electrical dead-ends.

  7. Torsional behavior of chiral single-walled and double-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dian-Rong, Han; Lei, Zhu; Ya-Fei, Dai; Cheng-Lin, Luo

    2017-10-01

    The torsional behavior of the chiral single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) is investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) method. The results show that the torsional behavior of chiral DWCNTs presents a weaker direction dependent than that of SWCNTs. The critical buckling shear strain of DWCNT in the untwisting direction of the outer tube is always greater than that in the opposite direction. The torsional rigidities of the DWCNT and its outer tubes are approximately identical. However, torsional elastic range of the DWCNT is much higher than that of the outer tube. Moreover, the torsional direction dependency of incommensurate chiral (n 1  +  m 1, -m1)@ (n 2,m 2) tube is weaker than that of commensurate (n 1,m 1)@ (n 2,m 2) tube, which implies that if the chiral angles of the inner and the outer tube of a DWCNT are arranged in opposite directions, the torsional direction dependency of a DWCNT will be further reduced. Meanwhile, rotational inertia of the DWCNT remains nearly unchanged under torsion in a quite large torsional range. These conclusions will be helpful in designing torsional components of NEMS (nano-electromechanical system) using carbon tubes.

  8. Thermal conductivity of freestanding single wall carbon nanotube sheet by Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Satyaprakash; Chitturi, Venkateswara Rao; Agarwal, Radhe; Jiang, Jin-Wu; Katiyar, Ram S

    2014-11-26

    Thermal properties of single wall carbon nanotube sheets (SWCNT-sheets) are of significant importance in the area of thermal management, as an isolated SWCNT possesses high thermal conductivity of the value about 3000 W m(-1) K(-1). Here we report an indirect method of estimating the thermal conductivity of a nanometer thick suspended SWCNT-sheet by employing the Raman scattering technique. Tube diameter size is examined by the transmissions electron microscopy study. The Raman analysis of the radial breathing modes predicts narrow diameter size distribution with achiral (armchair) symmetry of the constituent SWCNTs. From the first order temperature coefficient of the A1g mode of the G band along with the laser power dependent frequency shifting of this mode, the thermal conductivity of the suspended SWCNT-sheet is estimated to be about ∼18.3 W m(-1) K(-1). Our theoretical study shows that the thermal conductivity of the SWCNT-sheet has contributions simultaneously from the intratube and intertube thermal transport. The intertube thermal conductivity (with contributions from the van der Waals interaction) is merely around 0.7 W m(-1) K(-1), which is three orders smaller than the intratube thermal conductivity, leading to an abrupt decrease in the thermal conductivity of the SWCNT-sheet as compared to the reported value for isolated SWCNT.

  9. Growth, dispersion, and electronic devices of nitrogen-doped single-wall carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oikonomou, Antonios [School of Computer Science, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Susi, Toma; Kauppinen, Esko I. [Nanomaterials Group, Department of Applied Physics, Aalto University School of Science, PO Box 15100, 00076 Aalto (Finland); Vijayaraghavan, Aravind [School of Computer Science, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Centre for Mesoscience and Nanotechnology, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2012-12-15

    This paper describes the complete processes from growth to electronic devices of nitrogen-doped single-wall carbon nanotubes (N-SWCNTs). The N-SWCNTs were synthesized using a floating catalyst chemical vapor deposition method. The dry-deposited N-SWCNT films were dispersed in N-methylpyrolidone followed by sonication and centrifugation steps to yield a stable dispersion of N-SWCNTs in solution. The length and diameter distribution as well as concentration of N-SWCNTs in solution were measured by atomic force microscopy and optical absorption spectroscopy, respectively. The N-SWCNTs were then assembled into electronic devices using bottom-up dielectrophoresis and characterized as field-effect transistors. Finally, the potential for application of N-SWCNTs in sensors is discussed. The three stages of N-doped SWCNT processing: (a) growth and collection on filter, (b) dispersion in NMP, and (c) dielectrophoretic assembly into transistor device. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  10. Carbon Single-Wall Nanatube Growth in a Volumetrically Confined Arc Discharge System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franz, K.J.; Alleman, J.L.; Jones, K.M.; Dillon, A.C.; Heben, M.J.

    2004-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes hold significant promise for a vast number of materials applications due to their unique mechanical, electrical, and gas storage properties. Although carbon single-wall nanotubes (SWNTs) have been synthesized since 1993 by the arc discharge method, and numerous other synthesis methods have since been developed, no method has yet produced 100% pure carbon nanotubes. Instead, a significant amount of impurities—various carbon structures and metal catalysts—are present in the raw soot. While arc discharge was the first method for SWNT synthesis, it also produces more impure raw soot in comparison to the more recently developed laser vaporization, which has produced the purest raw soot to date but is much slower. Geometry and thermal gradient are appreciably different between traditional arc discharge systems and laser vaporization systems. We report that, by incorporating some characteristics inherent to a laser vaporization system into an arc discharge system, improvement in the yield of SWNT raw soot may be achieved. This is accomplished by confining the arc within a 50 mm diameter quartz tube, similar to laser vaporization. We find through transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy that SWNTs are made in significant numbers in this confined arc discharge system, comparable to laser vaporization synthesized material. Further study is, however, required to prove reproducibility and attain an exact value for the purity of the produced raw soot.

  11. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) induce vasodilation in isolated rat aortic rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Hernández, J M; Ramirez-Lee, M A; Rosas-Hernandez, H; Salazar-García, S; Maldonado-Ortega, D A; González, F J; Gonzalez, C

    2015-06-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are used in biological systems with impact in biomedicine in order to improve diagnostics and treatment of diseases. However, their effects upon the vascular system, are not fully understood. Endothelium and smooth muscle cells (SMC) communicate through release of vasoactive factors as nitric oxide (NO) to maintain vascular tone. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of SWCNTs on vascular tone using isolated rat aortic rings, which were exposed to SWCNTs (0.1, 1 and 10 μg/mL) in presence and absence of endothelium. SWCNTs induced vasodilation in both conditions, indicating that this effect was independent on endothelium; moreover that vasodilation was NO-independent, since its blockage with L-NAME did not modify the observed effect. Together, these results indicate that SWCNTs induce vasodilation in the macrovasculature, may be through a direct interaction with SMC rather than endothelium independent of NO production. Further investigation is required to fully understand the mechanisms of action and mediators involved in the signaling pathway induced by SWCNTs on the vascular system. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Plasmon-Induced Selective Oxidation Reaction at Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Satoshi; Yoshii, Takahiro; Chiashi, Shohei; Maruyama, Shigeo; Murakoshi, Kei

    2017-11-08

    Local surface plasmon resonance (LSPR)-induced oxidation of semiconducting and metallic single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) on the nanometer scale was investigated using surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) measurements. An isolated SWNT was supported on a well-defined Au nanodimer structure that possesses an LSPR field at the nanogap under light irradiation, and highly intense SERS spectra of the SWNT at the gap region were measured. SERS analysis under O2-saturated solutions and the addition of reactive oxygen species inhibitors demonstrated that condensed singlet oxygen (1O2), which is one of the reactive oxygen species, was efficiently generated from a semiconducting SWNT at the nanogap by the LSPR field and led to the local oxidation of the tube. In contrast to the semiconducting SWNT, no defect formation was observed in a metallic SWNT, probably because of rapid quenching of the photoexcited state. This selective local defect formation by LSPR-induced oxidation of a semiconducting SWNT would provide novel nanoprocessing and nanofunctionalization methods for the fabrication of future SWNT-based nanodevices.

  13. Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Probed with Insulator-based Dielectrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbani, Mohammad Towshif; Schmidt, Christoph F; Ros, Alexandra

    2017-11-13

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) offer unique electrical and optical properties. Common synthesis processes yield SWNTs with large length polydispersity (several tens of nanometers up to centimeters) and heterogeneous electrical and optical properties. Applications often require suitable selection and purification. Dielectrophoresis is one manipulation method for separating SWNTs based on dielectric properties and geometry. Here, we present a study of surfactant and ssDNA wrapped SWNTs suspended in aqueous solutions manipulated by insulator-based dielectrophoresis (iDEP). This method allows us to manipulate SWNTs with the help of arrays of insulating posts in a microfluidic device around which electric field gradients are created by the application of an electric potential to the extremities of the device. Semiconducting SWNTs were imaged during dielectrophoretic manipulation with fluorescence microscopy making use of their fluorescence emission in the near IR. We demonstrate SWNT trapping at low-frequency alternating-current (AC) electric fields with applied potentials not exceeding 1000 V. Interestingly, suspended SWNTs showed both positive and negative dielectrophoresis, which we attribute to their Zeta potential and the suspension properties. Such behavior agrees with common theoretical models for nanoparticle dielectrophoresis. We further show that the measured Zeta potentials and suspension properties are in excellent agreement with a numerical model predicting the trapping locations in the iDEP device. This study is fundamental for the future application of low frequency AC iDEP for technological applications of SWNTs.

  14. Recent developments in the selective dispersion of single-walled carbon nanotubes using conjugated polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Darryl; Adronov, Alex

    2017-11-01

    A significant barrier that impedes the commercialization of single-walled carbon nanotube-related applications is that all known synthetic methods produce a complicated mixture of semiconducting and metallic species. For device applications, pure semiconducting or pure metallic samples are desirable. Thus far, the purification methods that have been identified are capable of separating individual carbon nanotube species on a microgram scale, but purification on a large scale has remained elusive. The use of conjugated polymers to selectively disperse specific nanotube species is a promising approach to resolve the scalability issue, but a comprehensive understanding of the selectivity mechanism has not yet been achieved. Here, several of the trends reported in the literature are outlined to further the rational design of conjugated polymers for nanotube sorting. Numerous variables influence dispersion selectivity, including polymer structure and molecular weight, nanotube type used, sonication temperature, amount of polymer relative to nanotube, and solvent. We have organized these seemingly disparate parameters into two simple categories: conjugated polymer structure, and dispersion preparation conditions. Most importantly, we consider the mechanistic arguments that have been proposed, and provide additional insights based on the observations in the literature.

  15. Channeling potential in single-walled carbon nanotubes: The effect of radial deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abu-Assy, M.K. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Suez-Canal University, Ismailia 41522 (Egypt); Soliman, M.S., E-mail: Mahmoud_einstien2@yahoo.com [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Suez-Canal University, El-Arish (Egypt)

    2016-10-01

    We study the effect of radial deformation in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), due to one external factor, on the channeling potential. The calculations covered the channeling potential for positrons of 100 MeV move along the z-axis, which is the axis of the radially deformed SWCNTs (6, 0), (8, 0) under external mechanical stress at different values for the induced strain and also for radially deformed SWCNT (5, 5) under external transverse electric field of 1.8 and 2.6 V/Å. The calculations executed according to the continuum model approximation given by Lindhard for the case of an axial channeling in single crystals. The results of the calculations in this work agreed well with previous calculations depending on the equilibrium electron density in perfect carbon nanotubes. It has been found that, for perfect nanotubes, the channeling potential, i.e., the potential at any point (x, y) in a plane normal to the nanotube axis (xy-plane), is a function of the distance from the nanotube center whatever the (x, y) coordinate and hence, it could be expressed in terms of one independent variable. On the other hand, in radially deformed SWCNTs, the channeling potential was found to be a function of two independent variables (x, y) and could be given here by a general formula in terms of fitting parameters for each nanotube with chiral index (n, m). The obtained formula has been used in plotting the contour plot for the channeling potential.

  16. Effects of Two Purification Pretreatments on Electroless Copper Coating over Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Zheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To achieve the reinforcement of copper matrix composite by single-walled carbon nanotubes, a three-step-refluxing purification of carbon nanotubes sample with HNO3-NaOH-HCl was proposed and demonstrated. A previously reported purification process using an electromagnetic stirring with H2O2/HCl mixture was also repeated. Then, the purified carbon nanotubes were coated with copper by the same electroless plating process. At the end, the effects of the method on carbon nanotubes themselves and on copper coating were determined by transmission electron microscope spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope spectroscopy, X-ray diffractometry, thermogravimetric analysis, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, and energy dispersive spectrometry. It was clearly confirmed that both of the two processes could remove most of iron catalyst particles and carbonaceous impurities without significant damage to carbon nanotubes. The thermal stability of the sample purified by H2O2/HCl treatment was slightly higher than that purified by HNO3-NaOH-HCl treatment. Nevertheless, the purification by HNO3-NaOH-HCl treatment was more effective for carboxyl functionalization on nanotubes than that by H2O2/HCl treatment. The Cu-coating on carbon nanotubes purified by both purification processes was complete, homogenous, and continuous. However, the Cu-coating on carbon nanotubes purified by H2O2/HCl was oxidized more seriously than those on carbon nanotubes purified by HNO3-NaOH-HCl treatment.

  17. Determination of Enantiomeric Purity of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes Using Flavin Mononucleotide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiaojun; Tanaka, Takeshi; Hirakawa, Takuya; Yomogida, Yohei; Kataura, Hiromichi

    2017-11-15

    Although enantiomeric separation of single-wall carbon nanotubes is possible, their enantiomeric purity (EP) remains an issue due to a lack of effective evaluation methods. In this work, we report the EP of (6,5) carbon nanotube enantiomers using flavin mononucleotide (FMN) as an enantiomer-sensitive dispersant. The enantiomers (6,5) and (11,-5) were separated by a gel column chromatography method and dispersed in a FMN aqueous solution. In these solutions, (6,5) and (11,-5) showed E11 optical transitions at different wavelengths due to handedness-dependent interactions with the FMN molecule, which enabled us to estimate each concentration, namely, the EP. We prepared six intermediate-purity enantiomer samples by mixing the (6,5) and (11,-5) enantiomers and measured their circular dichroism (CD) spectra. The CD signal was confirmed to change linearly with the EP. Using this relationship, we can estimate the EP of any mixture of (6,5) and (11,-5) from its CD intensity.

  18. Excited-State Interaction of Semiconducting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes with Their Wrapping Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahmann, Simon; Salazar Rios, Jorge M; Zink, Matthias; Allard, Sybille; Scherf, Ullrich; Dos Santos, Maria C; Brabec, Christoph J; Loi, Maria A

    2017-11-16

    We employ photoluminescence and pump-probe spectroscopy on films of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) of different chirality wrapped with either a wide band gap polyfluorene derivative (PF12) or a polythiophene with narrower gap (P3DDT) to elucidate the excited states' interplay between the two materials. Excitation above the polymer band gap gives way to an ultrafast electron transfer from both polymers toward the CNTs. By monitoring the hole polaron on the polymer via its mid infrared signature, we show that also illumination below the polymer band gap leads to the formation of this fingerprint and infer that holes are also transferred toward the polymer. As this contradicts the standard way of discussing the involved energy levels, we propose that polymer-wrapped CNTs should be considered as a single hybrid system, exhibiting states shared between the two components. This proposition is validated through quantum chemical calculations that show hybridization of the first excited states, especially for the thiophene-CNT sample.

  19. Uptake of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Conjugated with DNA by Microvascular Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Harvey

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs have been proposed to have great therapeutic potential. SWCNTs conjugated with drugs or genes travel in the systemic circulation to reach target cells or tissues following extravasation from microvessels although the interaction between SWCNT conjugates and the microvascular endothelial cells (ECs remains unknown. We hypothesized that SWCNT-DNA conjugates would be taken up by microvascular ECs and that this process would be facilitated by SWCNTs compared to facilitation by DNA alone. ECs were treated with various concentrations of SWCNT-DNA-FITC conjugates, and the uptake and intracellular distribution of these conjugates were determined by a confocal microscope imaging system followed by quantitative analysis of fluorescence intensity. The uptake of SWCNT-DNA-FITC conjugates (2 μg/mL by microvascular ECs was significantly greater than that of DNA-FITC (2 μg/mL, observed at 6 hrs after treatment. For the intracellular distribution, SWCNT-DNA-FITC conjugates were detected in the nucleus of ECs, while DNA-FITC was restricted to the cytoplasm. The fluorescence intensity and distribution of SWCNTs were concentration and time independent. The findings demonstrate that SWCNTs facilitate DNA delivery into microvascular ECs, thus suggesting that SWCNTs serving as drug and gene vehicles have therapeutic potential.

  20. Low-energy electron irradiation of preheated and gas-exposed single-wall carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ecton, P.A. [Department of Physics, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203 (United States); Beatty, J.; Verbeck, G. [Department of Chemistry, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203 (United States); Lakshantha, W.; Rout, B. [Department of Physics, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203 (United States); Perez, J.M., E-mail: jperez@unt.edu [Department of Physics, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203 (United States)

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • Preheating SWCNTs in situ before irradiation prevents an increase in the D peak. • Preheated SWCNTs exposed to air or gases before irradiation show an increase in D peak. • The increase in D peak is not due to irradiation-induced chemisorption of adsorbates. • The effects are more significant for small diameter SWCNTs. • The increase in D peak is attributed to defects that increase inter-tube interactions. - Abstract: We investigate the conditions under which electron irradiation at 2 keV of single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) bundles produces an increase in the Raman D peak. We find that irradiation of SWCNTs that are preheated in situ at 600 °C for 1 h in ultrahigh vacuum before irradiation does not result in an increase in the D peak. Irradiation of SWCNTs that are preheated in vacuum and then exposed to air or gases results in an increase in the D peak, suggesting that adsorbates play a role in the increase in the D peak. Small diameter SWCNTs that are not preheated or preheated and then exposed to air show a significant increase in the D and G bands after irradiation. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows no chemical shifts in the C 1s peak of SWCNTs that have been irradiated versus SWCNTs that have not been irradiated, suggesting that chemisorption of adsorbates is not responsible for the increase in the D peak.