WorldWideScience

Sample records for random media john

  1. Media perceptions of Tommy John surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conte, Stan A; Hodgins, Justin L; ElAttrache, Neal S; Patterson-Flynn, Nancy; Ahmad, Christopher S

    2015-11-01

    misconceptions exist regarding UCL reconstruction within the professional baseball media. Efforts for physicians to educate the media on the risks of overuse throwing injuries with emphasis on accurate indications, outcomes, and recovery of Tommy John Surgery are encouraged.

  2. Electromagnetic scattering from random media

    CERN Document Server

    Field, Timothy R

    2009-01-01

    - ;The book develops the dynamical theory of scattering from random media from first principles. Its key findings are to characterize the time evolution of the scattered field in terms of stochastic differential equations, and to illustrate this framework

  3. Wave propagation and scattering in random media

    CERN Document Server

    Ishimaru, Akira

    1978-01-01

    Wave Propagation and Scattering in Random Media, Volume 2, presents the fundamental formulations of wave propagation and scattering in random media in a unified and systematic manner. The topics covered in this book may be grouped into three categories: waves in random scatterers, waves in random continua, and rough surface scattering. Random scatterers are random distributions of many particles. Examples are rain, fog, smog, hail, ocean particles, red blood cells, polymers, and other particles in a state of Brownian motion. Random continua are the media whose characteristics vary randomly an

  4. Wave Propagation inside Random Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiaojun

    This thesis presents results of studies of wave scattering within and transmission through random and periodic systems. The main focus is on energy profiles inside quasi-1D and 1D random media. The connection between transport and the states of the medium is manifested in the equivalence of the dimensionless conductance, g, and the Thouless number which is the ratio of the average linewidth and spacing of energy levels. This equivalence and theories regarding the energy profiles inside random media are based on the assumption that LDOS is uniform throughout the samples. We have conducted microwave measurements of the longitudinal energy profiles within disordered samples contained in a copper tube supporting multiple waveguide channels with an antenna moving along a slit on the tube. These measurements allow us to determine the local density of states (LDOS) at a location which is the sum of energy from all incoming channels on both sides. For diffusive samples, the LDOS is uniform and the energy profile decays linearly as expected. However, for localized samples, we find that the LDOS drops sharply towards the middle of the sample and the energy profile does not follow the result of the local diffusion theory where the LDOS is assumed to be uniform. We analyze the field spectra into quasi-normal modes and found that the mode linewidth and the number of modes saturates as the sample length increases. Thus the Thouless number saturates while the dimensionless conductance g continues to fall with increasing length, indicating that the modes are localized near the boundaries. This is in contrast to the general believing that g and Thouless number follow the same scaling behavior. Previous measurements show that single parameter scaling (SPS) still holds in the same sample where the LDOS is suppressed te{shi2014microwave}. We explore the extension of SPS to the interior of the sample by analyzing statistics of the logrithm of the energy density ln W(x) and found that

  5. Non-diffractive beam in random media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiina, Tatsuo

    2017-09-01

    Beam propagation has been given important attention in a variety of applications in medicine, remote sensing and information science. Especially, the beam propagation in highly scattering media, which is called random media, is important. In general, the multiple scattering gets rid of beam characteristics, e.g., intensity distribution, phase front, and polarization. In this study, self-converging effect of annular beam was applied in random media. Diluted milk was used as random media, and the transmitted light was detected with a narrow view angle of 5.5mrad. The collimated annular beam of a few tens millimeters takes a few hundred meters to transform its beam shape into the non-diffractive beam in free space, while this transformation was shorten only to 20 cm in random media, that is, the collimated annular beam caused its transformation at only 20 cm in random media. The transformed beam kept its optical characteristics of ;non-diffractive beam;. Such transformation of the annular beam needs the appropriate condition of random media. Media concentration and propagation distance control the generation of the center peak intensity of the transformed beam. This study indicates the generation of the non-diffractive beam in random media and reveals its appropriate condition.

  6. Neutron transport in random media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makai, M. [KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute, Budapest (Hungary)

    1996-08-01

    The survey reviews the methods available in the literature which allow a discussion of corium recriticality after a severe accident and a characterization of the corium. It appears that to date no one has considered the eigenvalue problem, though for the source problem several approaches have been proposed. The mathematical formulation of a random medium may be approached in different ways. Based on the review of the literature, we can draw three basic conclusions. The problem of static, random perturbations has been solved. The static case is tractable by the Monte Carlo method. There is a specific time dependent case for which the average flux is given as a series expansion.

  7. Cherenkov radiation threshold in random inhomogeneous media

    CERN Document Server

    Grichine, V M

    2009-01-01

    Cherenkov radiation in media with random inhomogeneities like aerogel or Earth atmosphere is discussed. The spectral-angular distribution of Cherenkov photons emitted by relativistic charged particle and averaged over the dielectric permittivity fluctuations shows angular broadening similarly to the case of media with the photon absorption. The broadening results in the smoothing of Cherenkov threshold, and therefore media with strong photon scattering have more extended dependence of Cherenkov light output on the particle speed. It can be potentially used for the particle identification

  8. Quantum optics in multiple scattering random media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lodahl, Peter

    Quantum Optics in Multiple Scattering Random Media Peter Lodahl Research Center COM, Technical University of Denmark, Dk-2800 Lyngby, Denmark. Coherent transport of light in a disordered random medium has attracted enormous attention both from a fundamental and application point of view. Coherent...... quantum optics in multiple scattering media and novel fundamental phenomena have been predicted when examining quantum fluctuations instead of merely the intensity of the light [1]. Here I will present the first experimental study of the propagation of quantum noise through an elastic, multiple scattering...

  9. Mathematical Problems in Imaging in Random Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-15

    random media but flat boundaries. 2 distribution to a random Markov diffusion P whose generator can be computed explicitly in terms of the...Note how the numerically computed weights (blue line) match those computed analytically (red). Note also that the algorithm estimates that only the first...source electromagnetic inversion. We analyzed theoretically the algorithm and assesed its performance using numerical simulations. • The solicited article

  10. Entanglement dynamics in random media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, G.; Svaiter, N. F.; Zarro, C. A. D.

    2017-12-01

    We study how the entanglement dynamics between two-level atoms is impacted by random fluctuations of the light cone. In our model the two-atom system is envisaged as an open system coupled with an electromagnetic field in the vacuum state. We employ the quantum master equation in the Born-Markov approximation in order to describe the completely positive time evolution of the atomic system. We restrict our investigations to the situation in which the atoms are coupled individually to two spatially separated cavities, one of which displays the emergence of light-cone fluctuations. In such a disordered cavity, we assume that the coefficients of the Klein-Gordon equation are random functions of the spatial coordinates. The disordered medium is modeled by a centered, stationary, and Gaussian process. We demonstrate that disorder has the effect of slowing down the entanglement decay. We conjecture that in a strong-disorder environment the mean life of entangled states can be enhanced in such a way as to almost completely suppress quantum nonlocal decoherence.

  11. John Plunkett, Queen Victoria, First Media Monarch, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 2003, 256 p.

    OpenAIRE

    Chassaigne, Philippe

    2005-01-01

    Cet ouvrage, tiré de la thèse de doctorat soutenue par John Plunkett, Junior Research Fellow (allocataire de recherche) en anglais à l’université d’Exeter, aborde la question de la mise en image(s) de la monarchie britannique, partant du principe que les media sont « l’un des principaux moyens par lesquels [elle] maintient sa traditionnelle prééminence » (p. 1). L’un des éléments très positifs de son livre est d’étudier un segment chronologique souvent délaissé, à savoir, la première partie d...

  12. Optical wireless communication through random media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnon, Shlomi

    2011-03-01

    The growing need for high data-rate communication both through the atmosphere and the ocean (sub-sea) has stimulated considerable interest in optical wireless communication (OWC) technologies. The main advantages of OWC as compared with RF communication in the atmosphere and with acoustic communication in sub-sea applications are a) high achievable data-rate, b) small size of equipment and c) low power-consumption. On the other hand the characteristics of the communication channel in both scenarios are stochastic with high values of variance, which severely degrades OWC communication system performance. In this paper we present a tutorial discussing the effects of random media on OWC and expand on two examples: Monte-Carlo simulation for sub-sea communication and mathematical synthesis using Meijer G-function for OWC through atmospheric turbulence. These two examples demonstrate that it is possible to gain significant insights on the effects of the random channel on system performance. The results of the different analysis methods could also indicate solutions for the improvement of performance using adaptive solutions or for extending the communication range by applying a multi-hop concept. We summarize the paper with a brief review of two emerging research fields that could, surprisingly, benefit from the characteristics of light propagation through random media and its effect on the communication system performance. The first research field is trans-cutaneous OWC and the second is an unguided optical communication bus for next-generation computers.

  13. A randomized trial of social media from Circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Caroline S; Bonaca, Marc A; Ryan, John J; Massaro, Joseph M; Barry, Karen; Loscalzo, Joseph

    2015-01-06

    Medical journals use social media to distribute the findings of published articles. Whether social media exposure to original articles improves article impact metrics is uncertain. Articles were randomized to receive targeted social media exposure from Circulation, including postings on the journal's Facebook and Twitter feeds. The primary end point was 30-day article page views. We conducted an intention-to-treat analysis comparing article page views by the Wilcoxon Rank sum test between articles randomized to social media as compared with those in the control group, which received no social media from Circulation. Prespecified subgroups included article type (population/clinical/basic), US versus non-US corresponding author, and whether the article received an editorial. Overall, 243 articles were randomized: 121 in the social media arm and 122 in the control arm. There was no difference in median 30-day page views (409 [social media] versus 392 [control], P=0.80). No differences were observed by article type (clinical, population, or basic science; P=0.19), whether an article had an editorial (P=0.87), or whether the corresponding author was from the United States (P=0.73). A social media strategy for a cardiovascular journal did not increase the number of times an article was viewed. Further research is necessary to understand and quantify the ways in which social media can increase the impact of published cardiovascular research. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Infinite range correlations of intensity in random media

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Infinite range correlations of intensity in random media. A RETZKER and B SHAPIRO. Department of Physics, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000, Israel. Abstract. We study a new type of long-range correlations for waves propagating in a random medium. These correlations originate from scattering events ...

  15. Electromagnetic Wave Propagation in Random Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pécseli, Hans

    1984-01-01

    The propagation of a narrow frequency band beam of electromagnetic waves in a medium with randomly varying index of refraction is considered. A novel formulation of the governing equation is proposed. An equation for the average Green function (or transition probability) can then be derived....... A Fokker-Planck type equation is contained as a limiting case. The results are readily generalized to include the features of the random coupling model and it is argued that the present problem is particularly suited for an analysis of this type....

  16. Exactly averaged equations for flow and transport in random media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shvidler, Mark; Karasaki, Kenzi [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., Earth Sciences Division, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2001-07-01

    It is well known that exact averaging of the equations of flow and transport in random porous media can be realized only for a small number of special, occasionally exotic, fields. On the other hand, the properties of approximate averaging methods are not yet fully understood. For example, the convergence behavior and the accuracy of truncated perturbation series. Furthermore, the calculation of the high-order perturbations is very complicated. These problems for a long time have stimulated attempts to find the answer for the question: Are there in existence some exact general and sufficiently universal forms of averaged equations? If the answer is positive, there arises the problem of the construction of these equations and analyzing them. There exist many publications related to these problems and oriented on different applications: hydrodynamics, flow and transport in porous media, theory of elasticity, acoustic and electromagnetic waves in random fields, etc. We present a method of finding the general form of exactly averaged equations for flow and transport in random fields by using (1) an assumption of the existence of Green's functions for appropriate stochastic problems, (2) some general properties of the Green's functions, and (3) the some basic information about the random fields of the conductivity, porosity and flow velocity. We present a general form of the exactly averaged non-local equations for the following cases. 1. Steady-state flow with sources in porous media with random conductivity. 2. Transient flow with sources in compressible media with random conductivity and porosity. 3. Non-reactive solute transport in random porous media. We discuss the problem of uniqueness and the properties of the non-local averaged equations, for the cases with some types of symmetry (isotropic, transversal isotropic, orthotropic) and we analyze the hypothesis of the structure non-local equations in general case of stochastically homogeneous fields

  17. Laser beam propagation through random media

    CERN Document Server

    Andrews, Larry C

    2005-01-01

    Since publication of the first edition of this text in 1998, there have been several new, important developments in the theory of beam wave propagation through a random medium, which have been incorporated into this second edition. Also new to this edition are models for the scintillation index under moderate-to-strong irradiance fluctuations; models for aperture averaging based on ABCD ray matrices; beam wander and its effects on scintillation; theory of partial coherence of the source; models of rough targets for ladar applications; phase fluctuations; analysis of other beam shapes; plus exp

  18. Lensless imaging based on coherent backscattering in random media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Xu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We studied lensless imaging due to coherent backscattering in random media both theoretically and experimentally. The point spread function of the lensless imaging system was derived. Parameters such as the volume fraction of the scatterer in the random scattering medium, the diameter of the scatterer, the distance between the object to be imaged and the surface of the random scattering medium were optimized to improve the image contrast and resolution. Moreover, for complicated objects, high contrast and quality images were achieved through the high-order intensity correlation measurement on the image plane, which may propel this imaging technique to practical applications.

  19. Manifolds in random media: beyond the variational approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldschmidt, Yadin Y.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we give a closed form expression for the 1/d corrections to the selfenergy characterizing the correlation function of a manifold in random media. This amounts to the first confection beyond the variational approximation. At this time we were able to evaluate these corrections in the high temperature "phase" of the notorious toy-model describing a classical particle subject to the influence of both a harmonic potential and a random potential. Although in this phase the correct solution is replica symmetric the calculation is non-trivial. The outcome is compared with previous analytical and numerical results. The corrections diverge at the "transition" temperature.

  20. Parent-child interactions during traditional and interactive media settings: A pilot randomized control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaug, Silje; Englund, Kjellrun T; Saksvik-Lehouillier, Ingvild; Lydersen, Stian; Wichstrøm, Lars

    2017-12-15

    Parent-child interactions are pivotal for children's socioemotional development, yet might suffer with increased attention to screen media, as research has suggested. In response, we hypothesized that parent-child play on a tablet computer, as representative of interactive media, would generate higher-quality parent-child interactions than toy play or watching TV. We examined the emotional availability of mothers and their 2-year-old child during the previous three contexts using a randomized crossover design (n = 22) in a laboratory room. Among other results, mothers were more sensitive and structuring during joint gaming on a tablet than when engaged in toy play or watching TV. In addition, mothers were more hostile toward their children during play with traditional toys than during joint tablet gaming and television co-viewing. Such findings provide new insights into the impact of new media on parent-child interactions, chiefly by demonstrating that interactive media devices such as tablets can afford growth-enhancing parent-child interactions. © 2017 Scandinavian Psychological Associations and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Digital ultrasonically encoded (DUE) optical focusing into random media

    CERN Document Server

    Tay, Jian Wei; Suzuki, Yuta; Wang, Lihong V

    2013-01-01

    Focusing light into opaque random or scattering media such as biological tissue is a much sought-after goal for biomedical applications such as photodynamic therapy, optical manipulation, and photostimulation. However, focusing with conventional lenses is restricted to one transport mean free path in scattering media, limiting both optical penetration depth and resolution. Focusing deeper is possible by using optical phase conjugation or wavefront shaping to compensate for the scattering. For practical applications, wavefront shaping offers the advantage of a robust optical system that is less sensitive to optical misalignment. Here, the phase of the incident light is spatially tailored using a phase-shifting array to pre-compensate for scattering. The challenge, then, is to determine the phase pattern which allows light to be optimally delivered to the target region. Optimization algorithms are typically employed for this purpose, with visible particles used as targets to generate feedback. However, using th...

  2. In the Beginning Was the Word: Theological Reflections on Language and Technical Media in the Context of the Gospel of John

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gábor Ambrus

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A proper theological perspective on technical media is not possible without a thorough consideration of the role of language in Christianity. Christian theology can gain this perspective in view of the fact that the sphere of language and that of technical media have a large cultural space in common and that language occupies a central position in the theological tradition. A representative example of the theology of language is the Gospel of John, which portrays Jesus Christ as the eternal Word of God, who was sent into the world to proclaim God’s incarnate words. The “Word-in-flesh”, that is in the flesh of human language, is fully normative to the “Word-in-the-beginning”. The term “flesh” may be normative in the full scale of its relevant application, as it may denote and cover all kinds of technical media such as the human body, the printed book and the digital computer. As possible carriers of the incarnate words of the Word, these material media may, to some extent, share the glory of the risen Christ. A theory of God’s Medium and media as inspired by the Gospel of John, is necessarily at variance with secular media theory, whose assistance, at the same time, it certainly also requires.

  3. Optimal coherence for beam propagation through random media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Timothy J.; Liu, Baoyong

    2005-08-01

    In this paper we consider the optimal coherence for beam propagation through random media. First, we demonstrate that a beam that maximizes the average receiver intensity is fully coherent, and that the upper bounds on received intensity are nearly attained by a beam that is focused for clear air. Second, we demonstrate that a beam that maximizes the scintillation index (along with other criteria that trade-off the mean and standard deviation for the received intensity) is, in general, partially coherent. We conclude with an example in which modal intensities are optimized for a beam that is constructed from Hermite-Gaussian modes.

  4. Transition Fronts in Time Heterogeneous and Random Media of Ignition Type

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Wenxian; Shen, Zhongwei

    2014-01-01

    The current paper is devoted to the investigation of wave propagation phenomenon in reaction-diffusion equations with ignition type nonlinearity in time heterogeneous and random media. It is proven that such equations in time heterogeneous media admit transition fronts or generalized traveling wave solutions with time dependent profiles and that such equations in time random media admit generalized traveling wave solutions with random profiles. Important properties of generalized traveling wa...

  5. Variational Calculation of Effective Parameters in Random Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hristopulos, Dionissios T.; Christakos, George

    1998-03-01

    Effective parameters are used in stochastic hydrology and petroleum engineering as estimates of the coarse-grained behavior of fluid flow and transport. Stochastic effective parameter estimation involves averaging over the local heterogeneity. Explicit evaluation methods are often based on low order perturbation expansions. We obtain more general estimates using a variational scheme that employs auxiliary probability measures. The average over the local fluctuations is evaluated by means of the logarithm transform and the replica trick. The equations satisfied by the effective parameters are obtained variationally from an effective free energy functional. We use this method for the evaluation of the effective permeability of random porous media with Gaussian local fluctuations. The resulting equations are solved explicitly in specific cases, and the results are compared with leading-order perturbation estimates and experimental data. Explicit finite-size expressions are obtained using momentum-space filters. The implications of the finite size behavior for the scaleup problem are discussed.

  6. Geometric Models for Isotropic Random Porous Media: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmut Hermann

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Models for random porous media are considered. The models are isotropic both from the local and the macroscopic point of view; that is, the pores have spherical shape or their surface shows piecewise spherical curvature, and there is no macroscopic gradient of any geometrical feature. Both closed-pore and open-pore systems are discussed. The Poisson grain model, the model of hard spheres packing, and the penetrable sphere model are used; variable size distribution of the pores is included. A parameter is introduced which controls the degree of open-porosity. Besides systems built up by a single solid phase, models for porous media with the internal surface coated by a second phase are treated. Volume fraction, surface area, and correlation functions are given explicitly where applicable; otherwise numerical methods for determination are described. Effective medium theory is applied to calculate physical properties for the models such as isotropic elastic moduli, thermal and electrical conductivity, and static dielectric constant. The methods presented are exemplified by applications: small-angle scattering of systems showing fractal-like behavior in limited ranges of linear dimension, optimization of nanoporous insulating materials, and improvement of properties of open-pore systems by atomic layer deposition of a second phase on the internal surface.

  7. Statistical methods for mechanical characterization of randomly reinforced media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashkinov, Mikhail

    2017-12-01

    Advanced materials with heterogeneous microstructure attract extensive interest of researchers and engineers due to combination of unique properties and ability to create materials that are most suitable for each specific application. One of the challenging tasks is development of models of mechanical behavior for such materials since precision of the obtained numerical results highly depends on level of consideration of features of their heterogeneous microstructure. In most cases, numerical modeling of composite structures is based on multiscale approaches that require special techniques for establishing connection between parameters at different scales. This work offers a review of instruments of the statistics and the probability theory that are used for mechanical characterization of heterogeneous media with random positions of reinforcements. Such statistical descriptors are involved in assessment of correlations between the microstructural components and are parts of mechanical theories which require formalization of the information about microstructural morphology. Particularly, the paper addresses application of the instruments of statistics for geometry description and media reconstruction as well as their utilization in homogenization methods and local stochastic stress and strain field analysis.

  8. A Theoretical Understanding of Circular Polarization Memory in Random Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dark, Julia

    Radiative transport theory describes the propagation of light in random media that absorb, scatter, and emit radiation. To describe the propagation of light, the full polarization state is quantified using the Stokes parameters. For the sake of mathematical convenience, the polarization state of light is often neglected leading to the scalar radiative transport equation for the intensity only. For scalar transport theory, there is a well-established body of literature on numerical and analytic approximations to the radiative transport equation. We extend the scalar theory to the vector radiative transport equation (vRTE). In particular, we are interested in the theoretical basis for a phenomena called circular polarization memory. Circular polarization memory is the physical phenomena whereby circular polarization retains its ellipticity and handedness when propagating in random media. This is in contrast to the propagation of linear polarization in random media, which depolarizes at a faster rate, and specular reflection of circular polarization, whereby the circular polarization handedness flips. We investigate two limits that are of known interest in the phenomena of circular polarization memory. The first limit we investigate is that of forward-peaked scattering, i.e. the limit where most scattering events occur in the forward or near-forward directions. The second limit we consider is that of strong scattering and weak absorption. In the forward-peaked scattering limit we approximate the vRTE by a system of partial differential equations motivated by the scalar Fokker-Planck approximation. We call the leading order approximation the vector Fokker-Planck approximation. The vector Fokker Planck approximation predicts that strongly forward-peaked media exhibit circular polarization memory where the strength of the effect can be calculated from the expansion of the scattering matrix in special functions. In addition, we find in this limit that total intensity

  9. A numerical study of rays in random media. [Monte Carlo method simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youakim, M. Y.; Liu, C. H.; Yeh, K. C.

    1973-01-01

    Statistics of electromagnetic rays in a random medium are studied numerically by the Monte Carlo method. Two dimensional random surfaces with prescribed correlation functions are used to simulate the random media. Rays are then traced in these sample media. Statistics of the ray properties such as the ray positions and directions are computed. Histograms showing the distributions of the ray positions and directions at different points along the ray path as well as at given points in space are given. The numerical experiment is repeated for different cases corresponding to weakly and strongly random media with isotropic and anisotropic irregularities. Results are compared with those derived from theoretical investigations whenever possible.

  10. Discontinuous percolation transitions in epidemic processes, surface depinning in random media, and Hamiltonian random graphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizhani, Golnoosh; Paczuski, Maya; Grassberger, Peter

    2012-07-01

    Discontinuous percolation transitions and the associated tricritical points are manifest in a wide range of both equilibrium and nonequilibrium cooperative phenomena. To demonstrate this, we present and relate the continuous and first-order behaviors in two different classes of models: The first are generalized epidemic processes that describe in their spatially embedded version—either on or off a regular lattice—compact or fractal cluster growth in random media at zero temperature. A random graph version of these processes is mapped onto a model previously proposed for complex social contagion. We compute detailed phase diagrams and compare our numerical results at the tricritical point in d=3 with field theory predictions of Janssen [Phys. Rev. EPLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.70.026114 70, 026114 (2004)]. The second class consists of exponential (“Hamiltonian,” i.e., formally equilibrium) random graph models and includes the Strauss and the two-star model, where “chemical potentials” control the densities of links, triangles, or two-stars. When the chemical potentials in either graph model are O(logN), the percolation transition can coincide with a first-order phase transition in the density of links, making the former also discontinuous. Hysteresis loops can then be of mixed order, with second-order behavior for decreasing link fugacity, and a jump (first order) when it increases.

  11. Modifying media content for preschool children: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christakis, Dimitri A; Garrison, Michelle M; Herrenkohl, Todd; Haggerty, Kevin; Rivara, Frederick P; Zhou, Chuan; Liekweg, Kimberly

    2013-03-01

    Although previous studies have revealed that preschool-aged children imitate both aggression and prosocial behaviors on screen, there have been few population-based studies designed to reduce aggression in preschool-aged children by modifying what they watch. We devised a media diet intervention wherein parents were assisted in substituting high quality prosocial and educational programming for aggression-laden programming without trying to reduce total screen time. We conducted a randomized controlled trial of 565 parents of preschool-aged children ages 3 to 5 years recruited from community pediatric practices. Outcomes were derived from the Social Competence and Behavior Evaluation at 6 and 12 months. At 6 months, the overall mean Social Competence and Behavior Evaluation score was 2.11 points better (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.78-3.44) in the intervention group as compared with the controls, and similar effects were observed for the externalizing subscale (0.68 [95% CI: 0.06-1.30]) and the social competence subscale (1.04 [95% CI: 0.34-1.74]). The effect for the internalizing subscale was in a positive direction but was not statistically significant (0.42 [95% CI: -0.14 to 0.99]). Although the effect sizes did not noticeably decay at 12 months, the effect on the externalizing subscale was no longer statistically significant (P = .05). In a stratified analysis of the effect on the overall scores, low-income boys appeared to derive the greatest benefit (6.48 [95% CI: 1.60-11.37]). An intervention to reduce exposure to screen violence and increase exposure to prosocial programming can positively impact child behavior.

  12. Can Babies Learn to Read? A Randomized Trial of Baby Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuman, Susan B.; Kaefer, Tanya; Pinkham, Ashley; Strouse, Gabrielle

    2014-01-01

    Targeted to children as young as 3 months old, there is a growing number of baby media products that claim to teach babies to read. This randomized controlled trial was designed to examine this claim by investigating the effects of a best-selling baby media product on reading development. One hundred and seventeen infants, ages 9 to 18 months,…

  13. Remarks on the Radiative Transfer Approach to Scattering of Electromagnetic Waves in Layered Random Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    AFRL-RY-HS-TR-2010-0029 REMARKS ON THE RADIATIVE TRANSFER APPROACH TO SCATTERING OF ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVES IN LAYERED RANDOM MEDIA...TRANSFER APPROACH TO SCATTERING OF ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVES IN LAYERED RANDOM MEDIA 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER IN-HOUSE 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...Beckmann and A. Spizzichino. The Scattering of Electromagnetic Waves from Rough Surfaces. Artech House, Norwood, Massachusetts, 1987. [3] G. S. Brown. A

  14. Randomized Controlled Trial of Social Media: Effect of Increased Intensity of the Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Caroline S; Gurary, Ellen B; Ryan, John; Bonaca, Marc; Barry, Karen; Loscalzo, Joseph; Massaro, Joseph

    2016-04-27

    A prior randomized controlled trial of social media exposure at Circulation determined that social media did not increase 30-day page views. Whether insufficient social media intensity contributed to these results is uncertain. Original article manuscripts were randomized to social media exposure compared with no social media exposure (control) at Circulation beginning in January 2015. Social media exposure consisted of Facebook and Twitter posts on the journal's accounts. To increase social media intensity, a larger base of followers was built using advertising and organic growth, and posts were presented in triplicate and boosted on Facebook and retweeted on Twitter. The primary outcome was 30-day page views. Stopping rules were established at the point that 50% of the manuscripts were randomized and had 30-day follow-up to compare groups on 30-day page views. The trial was stopped for futility on September 26, 2015. Overall, 74 manuscripts were randomized to receive social media exposure, and 78 manuscripts were randomized to the control arm. The intervention and control arms were similar based on article type (P=0.85), geographic location of the corresponding author (P=0.33), and whether the manuscript had an editorial (P=0.80). Median number of 30-day page views was 499.5 in the social media arm and 450.5 in the control arm; there was no evidence of a treatment effect (P=0.38). There were no statistically significant interactions of treatment by manuscript type (P=0.86), by corresponding author (P=0.35), by trimester of publication date (P=0.34), or by editorial status (P=0.79). A more intensive social media strategy did not result in increased 30-day page views of original research. © 2016 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  15. Condition for invariant spectrum of an electromagnetic wave scattered from an anisotropic random media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jia; Wu, Pinghui; Chang, Liping

    2015-08-24

    Within the accuracy of the first-order Born approximation, sufficient conditions are derived for the invariance of spectrum of an electromagnetic wave, which is generated by the scattering of an electromagnetic plane wave from an anisotropic random media. We show that the following restrictions on properties of incident fields and the anisotropic media must be simultaneously satisfied: 1) the elements of the dielectric susceptibility matrix of the media must obey the scaling law; 2) the spectral components of the incident field are proportional to each other; 3) the second moments of the elements of the dielectric susceptibility matrix of the media are inversely proportional to the frequency.

  16. Sweet Sixteen: The Prospective Clinical Trials of John L. Cameron, MD-The Clinician-Scientist: From Alternate-Allocation to Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Charles J

    2017-09-15

    : The era of randomized controlled trials was ushered in by the British epidemiologist-statistician Austin Bradford Hill, with his work on the use of streptomycin in patients with tuberculosis. John L. Cameron, can be linked to 16 prospective clinical trials over his career thus far, starting with alternate-allocation trials and transitioning to prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled trials. These trials studied various topics in surgery-from pancreatitis to surgical site infections, to drain trials, a trial in Crohn disease and multiple trials in pancreatic surgery and cancer. Herein are described the "sweet sixteen" prospective clinical trials of Dr Cameron.

  17. Electrical generation of stationary light in random scattering media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmond, S. M.; Armstrong, G. L.; Chan, H.-Y.; Mattson, E.; Mock, A.; Li, B.; Potts, J. R.; Cui, M.; Rand, S. C.; Oliveira, S. L.; Marchal, J.; Hinklin, T.; Laine, R. M.

    2004-01-01

    In recent years there has been great interest in controlling the speed of propagation of electromagnetic waves. In gases and crystals, coherent techniques have been applied to alter the speed of light without changing the physical or chemical structure of the medium. Also, light transmitted by highly disordered solids has exhibited signatures of Anderson localization, indicating the existence of a regime of ``stopped'' light that is mediated by random elastic scattering. However, to date, light has not been generated in a random medium as a pointlike excitation that is fixed in space from the outset. Here we report experimental evidence for the electrical generation and confinement of light within nanosized volumes of a random dielectric scattering medium in which a population inversion has been established, and discuss the properties of these novel light sources.

  18. Infinite range correlations of intensity in random media

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We study a new type of long-range correlations for waves propagating in a random medium. These correlations originate from scattering events which take place close to a point source. The scattered waves propagate by diffusion to distant regions. In this way long range correlations, between any pair of distant points, are ...

  19. Reduced-Order Monte Carlo Modeling of Radiation Transport in Random Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Aaron

    The ability to perform radiation transport computations in stochastic media is essential for predictive capabilities in applications such as weather modeling, radiation shielding involving non-homogeneous materials, atmospheric radiation transport computations, and transport in plasma-air structures. Due to the random nature of such media, it is often not clear how to model or otherwise compute on many forms of stochastic media. Several approaches to evaluation of transport quantities for some stochastic media exist, though such approaches often either yield considerable error or are quite computationally expensive. We model stochastic media using the Karhunen-Loeve (KL) expansion, seek to improve efficiency through use of stochastic collocation (SC), and provide higher-order information of output values using the polynomial chaos expansion (PCE). We study and demonstrate method convergence and apply the new methods to both spatially continuous and spatially discontinuous stochastic media. New methods are shown to produce accurate solutions for reasonable computational cost for several problem when compared with existing solution methods. Spatially random media are modeled using transformations of the Gaussian-distributed KL expansion-continuous random media with a lognormal transformation and discontinuous random media with a Nataf transformation. Each transformation preserves second-order statistics for the quantity-atom density or material index, respectively-being modeled. The Nystrom method facilitates numerical solution of the KL eigenvalues and eigenvectors, and a variety of methods are investigated for sampling KL eigenfunctions as a function of solved eigenvectors. The infinite KL expansion is truncated to a finite number of terms each containing a random variable, and material realizations are created by either randomly or deterministically sampling from the random variables. Deterministic sampling is performed with either isotropic or anisotropic

  20. Exactly averaged stochastic equations for flow and transport in random media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shvidler, Mark; Karasaki, Kenzi

    2001-11-30

    It is well known that exact averaging of the equations of flow and transport in random porous media are at present realized only for a small number of special, occasionally exotic, fields. On the other hand, the properties of approximate averaging methods are not yet fully understood. For example, the convergence behavior and the accuracy of truncated perturbation series are not well known. Furthermore, the calculation of the high-order perturbations is very complicated. These problems for a long time have stimulated attempts to find the answer for the question: Are there in existence some exact general and sufficiently universal forms of averaged equations? If the answer is positive, there arises the problem of the construction of these equations and analyzing them. There exist many publications related to these problems and oriented on different applications: hydrodynamics, flow and transport in porous media, theory of elasticity, acoustic and electromagnetic waves in random fields, etc. We present a method of finding some general forms of exactly averaged equations for flow and transport in random fields by using (1) an assumption of the existence of Green's functions for appropriate stochastic problems, (2 ) some general properties of the Green's functions, and (3) the some basic information about the random fields of the conductivity, porosity and flow velocity. We present some general forms of the exactly averaged non-local equations for the following cases. 1. Steady-state flow with sources in porous media with random conductivity. 2. Transient flow with sources in compressible media with random conductivity and porosity. 3. Non-reactive solute transport in random porous media. We discuss the problem of uniqueness and the properties of the non-local averaged equations, for the cases with some types of symmetry (isotropic, transversal isotropic, orthotropic) and we analyze the hypothesis of the structure of non-local equations in a general case of

  1. A functional renormalization method for wave propagation in random media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamagna, Federico; Calzetta, Esteban

    2017-08-01

    We develop the exact renormalization group approach as a way to evaluate the effective speed of the propagation of a scalar wave in a medium with random inhomogeneities. We use the Martin-Siggia-Rose formalism to translate the problem into a non equilibrium field theory one, and then consider a sequence of models with a progressively lower infrared cutoff; in the limit where the cutoff is removed we recover the problem of interest. As a test of the formalism, we compute the effective dielectric constant of an homogeneous medium interspersed with randomly located, interpenetrating bubbles. A simple approximation to the renormalization group equations turns out to be equivalent to a self-consistent two-loops evaluation of the effective dielectric constant.

  2. Reporting of Randomized Trials in Common Cancers in the Lay Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribnikar, Domen; Goldvaser, Hadar; Ocana, Alberto; Templeton, Arnoud J; Seruga, Bostjan; Amir, Eitan

    2018-01-01

    Limited data exist about the role of the lay media in the dissemination of results of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in common cancers. Completed phase III RCTs evaluating new drugs in common cancers between January 2005 and October 2016 were identified from ClinicalTrials.gov. Lay media reporting was identified by searching LexisNexis Academic. Scientific reporting was defined as presentation at an academic conference or publication in full. Associations between reporting in the lay media before scientific reporting and study design and sponsorship were evaluated using logistic regression. Of 180 RCTs identified, 52% were reported in the lay media and in 27%, lay media reporting occurred before scientific reporting with an increasing trend over time (p = 0.009). Reporting in the lay media before scientific reporting was associated with positive results (OR: 2.10, p = 0.04), targeted therapy compared to chemotherapy (OR: 4.75, p = 0.006), immunotherapy compared to chemotherapy (OR: 7.60, p = 0.02), and prostate cancer compared to breast cancer (OR: 3.25, p = 0.02). Over a quarter of all RCTs in common cancers are reported in the lay media before they are reported scientifically with an increasing proportion over time. Positive trials, studies in prostate cancer, and trials of immunotherapy are associated with early reporting in the lay media. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Normalizing Social Media Texts by Combining Word Embeddings and Edit Distances in a Random Forest Regressor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Goot, Rob

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we adapt the traditional framework for spelling correction to the more novel task of normalization of social media content. To generate possible normalization candidates, we complement the traditional approach with a word embeddings model. To rank the candidates we will use a random

  4. Polymer Dynamics in Random Media, Replica Theory, Ternary Systems: Mappings and Equivalences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    U. Ebert (Ute); L. Schäfer

    1994-01-01

    htmlabstractFor polymer dynamics in quenched random media a renormalizability proof is lacking and calculations are lengthy. We here propose and define the static and the ergodic limit of the dynamic theory, and show, that these limits are equivalent to well-known renormalizable static polymer

  5. Elliptic random-walk equation for suspension and tracer transport in porous media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shapiro, Alexander; Bedrikovetsky, P. G.

    2008-01-01

    We propose a new approach to transport of the suspensions and tracers in porous media. The approach is based on a modified version of the continuous time random walk (CTRW) theory. In the framework of this theory we derive an elliptic transport equation. The new equation contains the time and the...

  6. Analysis of a non-diffractive beam generated from an annular beam in random media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Ziqi; Shiina, Tatsuo

    2017-11-01

    An annular beam has the ability to self-transform into a non-diffractive beam when it propagates in air at a long distance. In our previous study, we propagated an annular beam in random media and obtained a non-diffractive beam at a short propagation distance of a few tens centimeters by adjusting the concentration of random media and narrowing the view angle of the receiver. In this paper, we aim to analyze the components and characteristics of a non-diffractive beam and elucidate how the non-diffractive beam is generated in random media. The intensity variation of the scattered waveform is examined when the distance between the receiver and the back plane of a medium tank is changed. The waveform scattered in random media is constructed from forward scattering light at the center and multiple scattering light in the surrounding part. The forward scattering light at the center generates the non-diffractive beam. In numerical analysis based on diffusion theory, the calculation result of the non-diffractive beam shows agreement with the experimental result.

  7. Method of model reduction and multifidelity models for solute transport in random layered porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhijie; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2017-09-01

    This work presents a method of model reduction that leads to models with three solutions of increasing fidelity (multifidelity models) for solute transport in a bounded layered porous media with random permeability. The model generalizes the Taylor-Aris dispersion theory to stochastic transport in random layered porous media with a known velocity covariance function. In the reduced model, we represent (random) concentration in terms of its cross-sectional average and a variation function. We derive a one-dimensional stochastic advection-dispersion-type equation for the average concentration and a stochastic Poisson equation for the variation function, as well as expressions for the effective velocity and dispersion coefficient. In contrast to the linear scaling with the correlation length and the mean velocity from macrodispersion theory, our model predicts a nonlinear and a quadratic dependence of the effective dispersion on the correlation length and the mean velocity, respectively. We observe that velocity fluctuations enhance dispersion in a nonmonotonic fashion (a stochastic spike phenomenon): The dispersion initially increases with correlation length λ, reaches a maximum, and decreases to zero at infinity (correlation). Maximum enhancement in dispersion can be obtained at a correlation length about 0.25 the size of the porous media perpendicular to flow. This information can be useful for engineering such random layered porous media. Numerical simulations are implemented to compare solutions with varying fidelity.

  8. Effects of a brief school-based media literacy intervention on digital media use in adolescents: cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, Birte; Hanewinkel, Reiner; Morgenstern, Matthis

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a four-session school-based media literacy curriculum on adolescent computer gaming and Internet use behavior. The study comprised a cluster randomized controlled trial with three assessments (baseline, posttest, and 12-month follow-up). At baseline, a total of 2,303 sixth and seventh grade adolescents from 27 secondary schools were assessed. Of these, 1,843 (80%) could be reached at all three assessments (Mage=12.0 years; SD=0.83). Students of the intervention group received the media literacy program Vernetzte www.Welten ("Connected www.Worlds ") implemented by trained teachers during class time. The control group attended regular class. Main outcome measures were adolescents' computer gaming and Internet use: days per month, hours per day, and addictive use patterns. Parental media monitoring and rules at home were assessed as secondary outcomes. Results of multilevel growth-curve models revealed a significant intervention effect in terms of a lower increase in self-reported gaming frequency (β = -1.10 [95% CI -2.06, -0.13]), gaming time (β = -0.27 [95% CI -0.40, -0.14]), and proportion of excessive gamers (AOR=0.21 [95% CI 0.08, 0.57]) in the intervention group. There were also significant group-time interactions for the addictive gaming scale (β=-0.08 [95% CI -0.12, -0.04]), and the Internet Addiction Scale (β = -0.06 [95% CI -0.10, -0.01]). No effect was found for days and hours of Internet use or parental media behavior. The study shows that the program Vernetzte www.Welten can influence adolescents' media use behavior. Future research should address mediating and moderating variables of program effects.

  9. Comparison of media literacy and usual education to prevent tobacco use: a cluster randomized trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Erika L.; Land, Stephanie R.; Miller, Elizabeth; Fine, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Media literacy programs have shown potential for reduction of adolescent tobacco use. We aimed to determine if an anti-smoking media literacy curriculum improves students’ media literacy and affects factors related to adolescent smoking. METHODS We recruited 1170 9th grade students from 64 classrooms in 3 public urban high schools. Students were randomized by classroom to a media literacy curriculum versus a standard educational program. In an intent-to-treat analysis, we used multi-level modeling to determine if changes in study outcomes were associated with the curricular intervention, controlling for baseline student covariates and the clustering of students within classrooms. RESULTS Among participants, mean age was 14.5 years and 51% were male, with no significant differences in baseline characteristics between groups. Smoking media literacy changed more among intervention participants compared with control participants (0.24 vs. 0.08, p media literacy curriculum is more effective than a standard educational program in teaching media literacy and improving perceptions of the true prevalence of smoking among adolescents. PMID:25099425

  10. Comparison of media literacy and usual education to prevent tobacco use: a cluster-randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primack, Brian A; Douglas, Erika L; Land, Stephanie R; Miller, Elizabeth; Fine, Michael J

    2014-02-01

    Media literacy programs have shown potential for reduction of adolescent tobacco use. We aimed to determine if an anti-smoking media literacy curriculum improves students' media literacy and affects factors related to adolescent smoking. We recruited 1170 9th-grade students from 64 classrooms in 3 public urban high schools. Students were randomized by classroom to a media literacy curriculum versus a standard educational program. In an intent-to-treat analysis, we used multilevel modeling to determine if changes in study outcomes were associated with the curricular intervention, controlling for baseline student covariates and the clustering of students within classrooms. Among participants, mean age was 14.5 years and 51% were male, with no significant differences in baseline characteristics between groups. Smoking media literacy changed more among intervention participants compared with control participants (0.24 vs. 0.08, p media literacy curriculum is more effective than a standard educational program in teaching media literacy and improving perceptions of the true prevalence of smoking among adolescents. © 2014, American School Health Association.

  11. Numerically Exact Computer Simulations of Light Scattering by Densely Packed, Random Particulate Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dlugach, Janna M.; Mishchenko, Michael I.; Liu, Li; Mackowski, Daniel W.

    2011-01-01

    Direct computer simulations of electromagnetic scattering by discrete random media have become an active area of research. In this progress review, we summarize and analyze our main results obtained by means of numerically exact computer solutions of the macroscopic Maxwell equations. We consider finite scattering volumes with size parameters in the range, composed of varying numbers of randomly distributed particles with different refractive indices. The main objective of our analysis is to examine whether all backscattering effects predicted by the low-density theory of coherent backscattering (CB) also take place in the case of densely packed media. Based on our extensive numerical data we arrive at the following conclusions: (i) all backscattering effects predicted by the asymptotic theory of CB can also take place in the case of densely packed media; (ii) in the case of very large particle packing density, scattering characteristics of discrete random media can exhibit behavior not predicted by the low-density theories of CB and radiative transfer; (iii) increasing the absorptivity of the constituent particles can either enhance or suppress typical manifestations of CB depending on the particle packing density and the real part of the refractive index. Our numerical data strongly suggest that spectacular backscattering effects identified in laboratory experiments and observed for a class of high-albedo Solar System objects are caused by CB.

  12. Low-coherence interferometry as a method for assessing the transport parameters in randomly inhomogeneous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimnyakov, D. A.; Sina, J. S.; Yuvchenko, S. A.; Isaeva, E. A.; Chekmasov, S. P.; Ushakova, O. V.

    2014-01-01

    The specific features of using low-coherence interferometric probing of layers in randomly inhomogeneous media for determination of the radiation propagation transport length both in diffuse regime and in the case of optically thin media are discussed. The transport length is determined by the rate of exponential decay of the interference signal with the increase in the path length difference between the light beams in the reference arm of the low-coherence interferometer and in the object arm, containing the probed layer as a diffuse reflector. The results are presented of experimental testing of the discussed approach with the use of layers of densely packed titanium dioxide nanoparticles and polytetrafluoroethylene.

  13. John Lindsay

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    A few weeks ago John Lindsay passed away unexpectedly at his home in St. Genis. With his death we have lost a pioneer in detector electronics and one of the founding fathers of the CERN Electronics Group. John came to CERN in 1956 to join the Electronics Group, which was being formed in the SC Division. He thus participated from the beginning in the design, development, production, commissioning and support of electronics for the experiments at the CERN accelerators, initially at the SC and finally at the SPS. From the University of Glasgow he brought his expertise on pulse height analyzers, which were called kick sorters in those days, and did pioneering work with it in the early CERN experiments. He designed read-out systems for successive generations of detectors, such as wire spark chambers, multiwire proportional chambers, calorimeters, etc., often coming up with innovative solutions. Surely one of his finest moments must have been when he worked on complex detector systems, such as liquid argon calo...

  14. Adolescents' impressions of antismoking media literacy education: qualitative results from a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primack, Brian A; Fine, Danielle; Yang, Christopher K; Wickett, Dustin; Zickmund, Susan

    2009-08-01

    Although media literacy represents an innovative venue for school-based antismoking programming, studies have not systematically compared student impressions of these and traditional programs. This study utilized data from a randomized trial comparing these two types of programs. After each program, students responded to three open-ended questions related to their assigned curriculum. Two coders, blinded to student assignments, independently coded these data. Coders had strong inter-rater agreement (kappa = 0.77). Our primary measures were spontaneously noted overall assessment, enjoyment/interest and the likelihood of changing smoking behavior. Of the 531 participants, 255 (48.0%) were randomized to the intervention (media literacy) group. Intervention participants had more net positive responses [rate ratio (RR) = 1.27, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.05, 1.54], more responses rating the program as compelling (RR = 1.63, 95% CI = 1.16, 2.29) and fewer responses rating the program as non-compelling (RR = 0.62, 95% CI = 0.39, 0.97). However, the intervention group was not more likely to suggest that the curriculum was likely to change behavior positively (RR = 0.57, 95% CI = 0.30, 1.06). Findings suggest that although media literacy provides a compelling format for the delivery of anti-tobacco programming, integration of components of traditional programming may help media literacy programs achieve maximal efficacy.

  15. First-principles modeling of electromagnetic scattering by discrete and discretely heterogeneous random media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishchenko, Michael I., E-mail: michael.i.mishchenko@nasa.gov [NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, 2880 Broadway, New York, NY 10025 (United States); Dlugach, Janna M. [Main Astronomical Observatory of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 27 Zabolotny Str., 03680, Kyiv (Ukraine); Yurkin, Maxim A. [Voevodsky Institute of Chemical Kinetics and Combustion, SB RAS, Institutskaya str. 3, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Pirogova 2, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Bi, Lei [Department of Atmospheric Sciences, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Cairns, Brian [NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, 2880 Broadway, New York, NY 10025 (United States); Liu, Li [NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, 2880 Broadway, New York, NY 10025 (United States); Columbia University, 2880 Broadway, New York, NY 10025 (United States); Panetta, R. Lee [Department of Atmospheric Sciences, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Travis, Larry D. [NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, 2880 Broadway, New York, NY 10025 (United States); Yang, Ping [Department of Atmospheric Sciences, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Zakharova, Nadezhda T. [Trinnovim LLC, 2880 Broadway, New York, NY 10025 (United States)

    2016-05-16

    A discrete random medium is an object in the form of a finite volume of a vacuum or a homogeneous material medium filled with quasi-randomly and quasi-uniformly distributed discrete macroscopic impurities called small particles. Such objects are ubiquitous in natural and artificial environments. They are often characterized by analyzing theoretically the results of laboratory, in situ, or remote-sensing measurements of the scattering of light and other electromagnetic radiation. Electromagnetic scattering and absorption by particles can also affect the energy budget of a discrete random medium and hence various ambient physical and chemical processes. In either case electromagnetic scattering must be modeled in terms of appropriate optical observables, i.e., quadratic or bilinear forms in the field that quantify the reading of a relevant optical instrument or the electromagnetic energy budget. It is generally believed that time-harmonic Maxwell’s equations can accurately describe elastic electromagnetic scattering by macroscopic particulate media that change in time much more slowly than the incident electromagnetic field. However, direct solutions of these equations for discrete random media had been impracticable until quite recently. This has led to a widespread use of various phenomenological approaches in situations when their very applicability can be questioned. Recently, however, a new branch of physical optics has emerged wherein electromagnetic scattering by discrete and discretely heterogeneous random media is modeled directly by using analytical or numerically exact computer solutions of the Maxwell equations. Therefore, the main objective of this Report is to formulate the general theoretical framework of electromagnetic scattering by discrete random media rooted in the Maxwell–Lorentz electromagnetics and discuss its immediate analytical and numerical consequences. Starting from the microscopic Maxwell–Lorentz equations, we trace the development

  16. Directed polymer in random media, in two dimensions: numerical study of the aging dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Barrat, A

    1997-01-01

    Following a recent work by Yoshino, we study the aging dynamics of a directed polymer in random media, in 1+1 dimensions. Through temperature quench, and temperature cycling numerical experiments similar to the experiments on real spin glasses, we show that the observed behaviour is comparable to the one of a well known mean field spin glass model. The observation of various quantities (correlation function, ``clonation'' overlap function) leads to an analysis of the phase space landscape.

  17. Monte Carlo particle transport in random media: The effects of mixing statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larmier, Coline; Zoia, Andrea; Malvagi, Fausto; Dumonteil, Eric; Mazzolo, Alain

    2017-07-01

    Particle transport in random media obeying a given mixing statistics is key in several applications in nuclear reactor physics and more generally in diffusion phenomena emerging in optics and life sciences. Exact solutions for the ensemble-averaged physical observables are hardly available, and several approximate models have been thus developed, providing a compromise between the accurate treatment of the disorder-induced spatial correlations and the computational time. In order to validate these models, it is mandatory to use reference solutions in benchmark configurations, typically obtained by explicitly generating by Monte Carlo methods several realizations of random media, simulating particle transport in each realization, and finally taking the ensemble averages for the quantities of interest. In this context, intense research efforts have been devoted to Poisson (Markov) mixing statistics, where benchmark solutions have been derived for transport in one-dimensional geometries. In a recent work, we have generalized these solutions to two and three-dimensional configurations, and shown how dimension affects the simulation results. In this paper we will examine the impact of mixing statistics: to this aim, we will compare the reflection and transmission probabilities, as well as the particle flux, for three-dimensional random media obtained by using Poisson, Voronoi and Box stochastic tessellations. For each tessellation, we will furthermore discuss the effects of varying the fragmentation of the stochastic geometry, the material compositions, and the cross sections of the background materials.

  18. Statistics of resonances and delay times in random media: beyond random matrix theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kottos, Tsampikos [Department of Physics, Wesleyan University, Middletown, CT 06459-0155 (United States); Max-Planck-Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization, Bunsenstrasse 10, D-37073 Goettingen (Germany)

    2005-12-09

    We review recent developments in quantum scattering from mesoscopic systems. Various spatial geometries whose closed analogues show diffusive, localized or critical behaviour are considered. These are the features that cannot be described by the universal random matrix theory results. Instead, one has to go beyond this approximation and incorporate them in a non-perturbative way. Here, we pay particular attention to the traces of these non-universal characteristics, in the distribution of the Wigner delay times and resonance widths. The former quantity captures time-dependent aspects of quantum scattering while the latter is associated with the poles of the scattering matrix.

  19. Nonlinear spatial focusing in random layered media by spectral pulse shaping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Alex C.; Milner, Valery

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrate numerically a method of focusing two-photon fields inside one-dimensional random media. The approach is based on coherent control of backscattering achieved by adaptive spectral pulse shaping. The spectral phases of a femtosecond laser pulse are adjusted for the constructive interference of its backward-traveling components, resulting in an enhanced reflection from within the random system. A delayed forward-propagating second pulse overlaps with the controlled reflection, increasing the interpulse multiphoton field at a location determined by the delay between the two pulses. The technique is shown to be robust against the variations of the disorder and to work with realistic pulse-shaping parameters, hence enabling applications in controlling random lasing and multiphoton imaging in scattering materials.

  20. Echinacea purpurea and osteopathic manipulative treatment in children with recurrent otitis media: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Worden Katherine A

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recurrent otitis media is a common problem in young children. Echinacea and osteopathic manipulative treatment have been proposed as preventive measures, but have been inadequately studied. This study was designed to assess the efficacy of Echinacea purpurea and/or osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT for prevention of acute otitis media in otitis-prone children. Methods A randomized, placebo-controlled, two-by-two factorial trial with 6-month follow-up, conducted 1999 – 2002 in Tucson, Arizona. Patients were aged 12–60 months with recurrent otitis media, defined as three or more separate episodes of acute otitis media within six months, or at least four episodes in one year. Ninety children (44% white non-Hispanic, 39% Hispanic, 57% male were enrolled, of which 84 had follow-up for at least 3 months. Children were randomly assigned to one of four protocol groups: double placebo, echinacea plus sham OMT, true OMT (including cranial manipulation plus placebo echinacea, or true echinacea plus OMT. An alcohol extract of Echinacea purpurea roots and seeds (or placebo was administered for 10 days at the first sign of each common cold. Five OMT visits (or sham treatments were offered over 3 months. Results No interaction was found between echinacea and OMT. Echinacea was associated with a borderline increased risk of having at least one episode of acute otitis media during 6-month follow-up compared to placebo (65% versus 41%; relative risk, 1.59, 95% CI 1.04, 2.42. OMT did not significantly affect risk compared to sham (44% versus 61%; relative risk, 0.72, 95% CI 0.48, 1.10. Conclusion In otitis-prone young children, treating colds with this form of echinacea does not decrease the risk of acute otitis media, and may in fact increase risk. A regimen of up to five osteopathic manipulative treatments does not significantly decrease the risk of acute otitis media. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00010465

  1. Echinacea purpurea and osteopathic manipulative treatment in children with recurrent otitis media: a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, Richard A; Aldous, Michael B; Worden, Katherine A; Grant, Kathryn L

    2008-01-01

    Background Recurrent otitis media is a common problem in young children. Echinacea and osteopathic manipulative treatment have been proposed as preventive measures, but have been inadequately studied. This study was designed to assess the efficacy of Echinacea purpurea and/or osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT) for prevention of acute otitis media in otitis-prone children. Methods A randomized, placebo-controlled, two-by-two factorial trial with 6-month follow-up, conducted 1999 – 2002 in Tucson, Arizona. Patients were aged 12–60 months with recurrent otitis media, defined as three or more separate episodes of acute otitis media within six months, or at least four episodes in one year. Ninety children (44% white non-Hispanic, 39% Hispanic, 57% male) were enrolled, of which 84 had follow-up for at least 3 months. Children were randomly assigned to one of four protocol groups: double placebo, echinacea plus sham OMT, true OMT (including cranial manipulation) plus placebo echinacea, or true echinacea plus OMT. An alcohol extract of Echinacea purpurea roots and seeds (or placebo) was administered for 10 days at the first sign of each common cold. Five OMT visits (or sham treatments) were offered over 3 months. Results No interaction was found between echinacea and OMT. Echinacea was associated with a borderline increased risk of having at least one episode of acute otitis media during 6-month follow-up compared to placebo (65% versus 41%; relative risk, 1.59, 95% CI 1.04, 2.42). OMT did not significantly affect risk compared to sham (44% versus 61%; relative risk, 0.72, 95% CI 0.48, 1.10). Conclusion In otitis-prone young children, treating colds with this form of echinacea does not decrease the risk of acute otitis media, and may in fact increase risk. A regimen of up to five osteopathic manipulative treatments does not significantly decrease the risk of acute otitis media. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00010465 PMID:18831749

  2. Role of quenching on superdiffusive transport in two-dimensional random media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthelemy, Pierre; Bertolotti, Jacopo; Vynck, Kevin; Lepri, Stefano; Wiersma, Diederik S.

    2010-07-01

    Transport in random media is known to be affected by quenched disorder. From the point of view of random walks, quenching induces correlations between steps that may alter the dynamical properties of the medium. This paper is intended to provide more insight into the role of quenched disorder on superdiffusive transport in two-dimensional random media. The systems under consideration are disordered materials called Lévy glasses that exhibit large spatial fluctuations in the density of scattering elements. We show that in an ideal Lévy glass the influence of quenching can be neglected, in the sense that transport follows to very good approximation that of a standard Lévy walk. We also show that, by changing sample parameters, quenching effects can be increased intentionally, thereby making it possible to investigate systematically diverse regimes of transport. In particular, we find that strong quenching induces local trapping effects which slow down superdiffusion and lead to a transient subdiffusivelike transport regime close to the truncation time of the system.

  3. A continuous time random walk model for Darcy-scale anomalous transport in heterogeneous porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comolli, Alessandro; Hakoun, Vivien; Dentz, Marco

    2017-04-01

    Achieving the understanding of the process of solute transport in heterogeneous porous media is of crucial importance for several environmental and social purposes, ranging from aquifers contamination and remediation, to risk assessment in nuclear waste repositories. The complexity of this aim is mainly ascribable to the heterogeneity of natural media, which can be observed at all the scales of interest, from pore scale to catchment scale. In fact, the intrinsic heterogeneity of porous media is responsible for the arising of the well-known non-Fickian footprints of transport, including heavy-tailed breakthrough curves, non-Gaussian spatial density profiles and the non-linear growth of the mean squared displacement. Several studies investigated the processes through which heterogeneity impacts the transport properties, which include local modifications to the advective-dispersive motion of solutes, mass exchanges between some mobile and immobile phases (e.g. sorption/desorption reactions or diffusion into solid matrix) and spatial correlation of the flow field. In the last decades, the continuous time random walk (CTRW) model has often been used to describe solute transport in heterogenous conditions and to quantify the impact of point heterogeneity, spatial correlation and mass transfer on the average transport properties [1]. Open issues regarding this approach are the possibility to relate measurable properties of the medium to the parameters of the model, as well as its capability to provide predictive information. In a recent work [2] the authors have shed new light on understanding the relationship between Lagrangian and Eulerian dynamics as well as on their evolution from arbitrary initial conditions. On the basis of these results, we derive a CTRW model for the description of Darcy-scale transport in d-dimensional media characterized by spatially random permeability fields. The CTRW approach models particle velocities as a spatial Markov process, which is

  4. Fractional White-Noise Limit and Paraxial Approximation for Waves in Random Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Christophe; Pinaud, Olivier

    2017-12-01

    This work is devoted to the asymptotic analysis of high frequency wave propagation in random media with long-range dependence. We are interested in two asymptotic regimes, that we investigate simultaneously: the paraxial approximation, where the wave is collimated and propagates along a privileged direction of propagation, and the white-noise limit, where random fluctuations in the background are well approximated in a statistical sense by a fractional white noise. The fractional nature of the fluctuations is reminiscent of the long-range correlations in the underlying random medium. A typical physical setting is laser beam propagation in turbulent atmosphere. Starting from the high frequency wave equation with fast non-Gaussian random oscillations in the velocity field, we derive the fractional Itô-Schrödinger equation, that is, a Schrödinger equation with potential equal to a fractional white noise. The proof involves a fine analysis of the backscattering and of the coupling between the propagating and evanescent modes. Because of the long-range dependence, classical diffusion-approximation theorems for equations with random coefficients do not apply, and we therefore use moment techniques to study the convergence.

  5. Fractional White-Noise Limit and Paraxial Approximation for Waves in Random Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Christophe; Pinaud, Olivier

    2017-07-01

    This work is devoted to the asymptotic analysis of high frequency wave propagation in random media with long-range dependence. We are interested in two asymptotic regimes, that we investigate simultaneously: the paraxial approximation, where the wave is collimated and propagates along a privileged direction of propagation, and the white-noise limit, where random fluctuations in the background are well approximated in a statistical sense by a fractional white noise. The fractional nature of the fluctuations is reminiscent of the long-range correlations in the underlying random medium. A typical physical setting is laser beam propagation in turbulent atmosphere. Starting from the high frequency wave equation with fast non-Gaussian random oscillations in the velocity field, we derive the fractional Itô-Schrödinger equation, that is, a Schrödinger equation with potential equal to a fractional white noise. The proof involves a fine analysis of the backscattering and of the coupling between the propagating and evanescent modes. Because of the long-range dependence, classical diffusion-approximation theorems for equations with random coefficients do not apply, and we therefore use moment techniques to study the convergence.

  6. Directed polymer in random media in two dimensions: Numerical study of the aging dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrat, A.

    1997-05-01

    Following a recent work by Yoshino [J. Phys. A 29, 1421 (1996)], we study the aging dynamics of a directed polymer in random media, in 1+1 dimensions. Through temperature quench and temperature cycling numerical experiments similar to the experiments on real spin glasses, we show that the observed behavior is comparable to that of a well-known mean-field spin glass model. The observation of various quantities (correlation function, ``clonation'' overlap function, etc.) leads to an analysis of the phase space landscape.

  7. Continuous-time random-walk model of transport in variably saturated heterogeneous porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoia, Andrea; Néel, Marie-Christine; Cortis, Andrea

    2010-03-01

    We propose a unified physical framework for transport in variably saturated porous media. This approach allows fluid flow and solute migration to be treated as ensemble averages of fluid and solute particles, respectively. We consider the cases of homogeneous and heterogeneous porous materials. Within a fractal mobile-immobile continuous time random-walk framework, the heterogeneity will be characterized by algebraically decaying particle retention times. We derive the corresponding (nonlinear) continuum-limit partial differential equations and we compare their solutions to Monte Carlo simulation results. The proposed methodology is fairly general and can be used to track fluid and solutes particles trajectories for a variety of initial and boundary conditions.

  8. Boundary effects on effective conductivity of random heterogeneous media with spherical inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinovich, A.; Dagan, G.; Miloh, T.

    2012-10-01

    It is common to determine the effective conductivity of heterogeneous media by assuming stationarity of the random local properties. This assumption is not obeyed in a boundary layer of a body of finite size. The effect of different types of boundaries is examined for a two-phase medium with spherical inclusions of given conductivity distributed randomly in a matrix of a different conductivity. Exact solutions are derived for the apparent conductivity and the boundary layer thickness. The interaction between the spheres and the boundaries is fully incorporated in the solutions using a spherical harmonics expansion and the method of images. As applications, the corrections for the effective conductivity are given for two cases of finite bodies: the Maxwell sphere and a cylinder of flow parallel to the axis.

  9. Analysis and Computation of Acoustic and Elastic Wave Equations in Random Media

    KAUST Repository

    Motamed, Mohammad

    2014-01-06

    We propose stochastic collocation methods for solving the second order acoustic and elastic wave equations in heterogeneous random media and subject to deterministic boundary and initial conditions [1, 4]. We assume that the medium consists of non-overlapping sub-domains with smooth interfaces. In each sub-domain, the materials coefficients are smooth and given or approximated by a finite number of random variable. One important example is wave propagation in multi-layered media with smooth interfaces. The numerical scheme consists of a finite difference or finite element method in the physical space and a collocation in the zeros of suitable tensor product orthogonal polynomials (Gauss points) in the probability space. We provide a rigorous convergence analysis and demonstrate different types of convergence of the probability error with respect to the number of collocation points under some regularity assumptions on the data. In particular, we show that, unlike in elliptic and parabolic problems [2, 3], the solution to hyperbolic problems is not in general analytic with respect to the random variables. Therefore, the rate of convergence is only algebraic. A fast spectral rate of convergence is still possible for some quantities of interest and for the wave solutions with particular types of data. We also show that the semi-discrete solution is analytic with respect to the random variables with the radius of analyticity proportional to the grid/mesh size h. We therefore obtain an exponential rate of convergence which deteriorates as the quantity h p gets smaller, with p representing the polynomial degree in the stochastic space. We have shown that analytical results and numerical examples are consistent and that the stochastic collocation method may be a valid alternative to the more traditional Monte Carlo method. Here we focus on the stochastic acoustic wave equation. Similar results are obtained for stochastic elastic equations.

  10. Diffusion in time-dependent random media and the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Doussal, Pierre; Thiery, Thimothée

    2017-07-01

    Although time-dependent random media with short-range correlations lead to (possibly biased) normal tracer diffusion, anomalous fluctuations occur away from the most probable direction. This was pointed out recently in one-dimensional (1D) lattice random walks, where statistics related to the 1D Kardar-Parisi-Zhang (KPZ) universality class, i.e., the Gaussian unitary ensemble Tracy-Widom distribution, were shown to arise. Here, we provide a simple picture for this correspondence, directly in the continuum, which allows one to study arbitrary space dimensions and to predict a variety of universal distributions. In d =1 , we predict and verify numerically the emergence of the Gaussian orthogonal ensemble Tracy-Widom distribution for fluctuations of the transition probability. In d =3 , we predict a phase transition from Gaussian fluctuations to three-dimensional KPZ-type fluctuations as the bias is increased. We predict KPZ universal distributions for the arrival time of a first particle from a cloud diffusing in such media.

  11. Bayesian and variational Bayesian approaches for flows in heterogeneous random media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Keren; Guha, Nilabja; Efendiev, Yalchin; Mallick, Bani K.

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we study porous media flows in heterogeneous stochastic media. We propose an efficient forward simulation technique that is tailored for variational Bayesian inversion. As a starting point, the proposed forward simulation technique decomposes the solution into the sum of separable functions (with respect to randomness and the space), where each term is calculated based on a variational approach. This is similar to Proper Generalized Decomposition (PGD). Next, we apply a multiscale technique to solve for each term (as in [1]) and, further, decompose the random function into 1D fields. As a result, our proposed method provides an approximation hierarchy for the solution as we increase the number of terms in the expansion and, also, increase the spatial resolution of each term. We use the hierarchical solution distributions in a variational Bayesian approximation to perform uncertainty quantification in the inverse problem. We conduct a detailed numerical study to explore the performance of the proposed uncertainty quantification technique and show the theoretical posterior concentration.

  12. Reference-free path length interferometry of random media with the intensity moments analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimnyakov, Dmitry A; Yuvchenko, Sergey A; Pavlova, Maria V; Alonova, Marina V

    2017-06-26

    Stochastic interference of partially coherent light multiple scattered by a random medium is considered. The relationship between the second- and third-order moments of intensity fluctuations in random interference patterns, the coherence function of probe radiation, and the probability density of path differences for the interfering partial waves in the medium are established. The obtained relationships were verified using the statistical analysis of spectrally selected fluorescence radiation emitted by the laser-pumped dye-doped random medium. Rhodamine 6G water solution was applied as the doping agent for the ensembles of densely packed silica grains which were pumped by the CW radiation (532 nm) from the diode-pumped solid state laser. Experimentally observed abrupt decay of the second- and third-order moments of fluorescence intensity fluctuations for the wavelengths ranging from 620 nm to 680 nm is interpreted in terms of amplification of spontaneous emission at large dye concentrations. This paper discusses the new optical probe of random media defined as "the reference-free path length interferometry with the intensity moments analysis".

  13. Web-based Social Media Intervention to Increase Vaccine Acceptance: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glanz, Jason M; Wagner, Nicole M; Narwaney, Komal J; Kraus, Courtney R; Shoup, Jo Ann; Xu, Stanley; O'Leary, Sean T; Omer, Saad B; Gleason, Kathy S; Daley, Matthew F

    2017-12-01

    Interventions to address vaccine hesitancy and increase vaccine acceptance are needed. This study sought to determine if a Web-based, social media intervention increases early childhood immunization. A 3-arm, randomized controlled trial was conducted in Colorado from September 2013 to July 2016. Participants were pregnant women, randomly assigned (3:2:1) to a Web site with vaccine information and interactive social media components (VSM), a Web site with vaccine information (VI), or usual care (UC). Vaccination was assessed in infants of participants from birth to age 200 days. The primary outcome was days undervaccinated, measured as a continuous and dichotomous variable. Infants of 888 participants were managed for 200 days. By using a nonparametric rank-based analysis, mean ranks for days undervaccinated were significantly lower in the VSM arm versus UC (P = .02) but not statistically different between the VI and UC (P = .08) or between VSM and VI arms (P = .63). The proportions of infants up-to-date at age 200 days were 92.5, 91.3, and 86.6 in the VSM, VI, and UC arms, respectively. Infants in the VSM arm were more likely to be up-to-date than infants in the UC arm (odds ratio [OR] = 1.92; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.07-3.47). Up-to-date status was not statistically different between VI and UC arms (OR = 1.62; 95% CI, 0.87-3.00) or between the VSM and VI arms (OR = 1.19, 95% CI, 0.70-2.03). Providing Web-based vaccine information with social media applications during pregnancy can positively influence parental vaccine behaviors. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  14. Averaged Description of Flow (Steady and Transient) and Nonreactive Solute Transport in Random Porous Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schvidler, M.; Karasaki, K.

    2011-06-15

    In previous papers (Shvidler and Karasaki, 1999, 2001, 2005, and 2008) we presented and analyzed an approach for finding the general forms of exactly averaged equations of flow and transport in porous media. We studied systems of basic equations for steady flow with sources in unbounded domains with stochastically homogeneous conductivity fields. A brief analysis of exactly averaged equations of nonsteady flow and nonreactive solute transport was also presented. At the core of this approach is the existence of appropriate random Green's functions. For example, we showed that in the case of a 3-dimensional unbounded domain the existence of appropriate random Green's functions is sufficient for finding the exact nonlocal averaged equations for flow velocity using the operator with a unique kernel-vector. Examination of random fields with global symmetry (isotropy, transversal isotropy and orthotropy) makes it possible to describe significantly different types of averaged equations with nonlocal unique operators. It is evident that the existence of random Green's functions for physical linear processes is equivalent to assuming the existence of some linear random operators for appropriate stochastic equations. If we restricted ourselves to this assumption only, as we have done in this paper, we can study the processes in any dimensional bounded or unbounded fields and in addition, cases in which the random fields of conductivity and porosity are stochastically nonhomogeneous, nonglobally symmetrical, etc.. It is clear that examining more general cases involves significant difficulty and constricts the analysis of structural types for the processes being studied. Nevertheless, we show that we obtain the essential information regarding averaged equations for steady and transient flow, as well as for solute transport.

  15. Interactive media as a tool for reducing waiting anxiety at paediatric rehabilitation hospitals: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biddiss, Elaine; Knibbe, Tara Joy; Fehlings, Darcy; Mckeever, Patricia; Cohen, Ashley; Mcpherson, Amy

    2017-12-15

    To investigate the efficacy of waiting room media for reducing anxiety and increasing satisfaction at a paediatric rehabilitation hospital. In this clustered, parallel, randomized controlled trial, 310 young people with disabilities (age range 5-19y) and their parents attending outpatient clinics were assigned to interactive media (n=113), a silent nature video (n=97), or media-free comparison (n=100) groups. Young person and parent anxiety was reported using the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) on arrival and after 10 minutes in the waiting space. Questionnaires measured young person, parent, and staff satisfaction. Young people exposed to interactive media reported a postexposure state anxiety that was 1.1 raw points (2.7 standardized points) lower on the STAI than the comparison group (95% confidence interval [CI] -1.9 to -0.22). There was no difference in postexposure state anxiety between the passive media and comparison groups (95% CI -0.64 to 1.1). Parents' state anxiety did not differ between conditions, but interactive media were associated with greater satisfaction (p=0.009). Of 120 staff, 119 reported that interactive media improved the clinic experience for families. Interactive media designed for accessible, hands-free play mitigate waiting anxiety and increases satisfaction. This paper provides evidence to guide design and decision-making around the use of interactive media in health care spaces. Interactive media reduced preclinic waiting anxiety for young people with disabilities. Interactive media were accessible to young people with a range of mobility. Interactive media increased parental and staff satisfaction in the clinic. Guidelines for the design of hands-free, inclusive interactive media for health care facilities are presented. © 2017 Mac Keith Press.

  16. Engaging Moms on Teen Indoor Tanning Through Social Media: Protocol of a Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Katie; Griffith, Julia; Oleski, Jessica L; Palumbo, Ashley; Walkosz, Barbara J; Hillhouse, Joel; Henry, Kimberly L; Buller, David B

    2016-01-01

    anticipate completing this study by October 2019. Conclusions This trial will deliver social media content grounded in theory and will test it in a randomized design with state-of-the-art measures. This will contribute much needed insights on how to employ social media for health behavior change and disease prevention both for indoor tanning and other health risk behaviors and inform future social media efforts by public health and health care organizations. ClinicalTrial Clinicaltrials.gov NCT02835807; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02835807 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6mDMICcCE). PMID:27899339

  17. Engaging Moms on Teen Indoor Tanning Through Social Media: Protocol of a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagoto, Sherry L; Baker, Katie; Griffith, Julia; Oleski, Jessica L; Palumbo, Ashley; Walkosz, Barbara J; Hillhouse, Joel; Henry, Kimberly L; Buller, David B

    2016-11-29

    . This trial will deliver social media content grounded in theory and will test it in a randomized design with state-of-the-art measures. This will contribute much needed insights on how to employ social media for health behavior change and disease prevention both for indoor tanning and other health risk behaviors and inform future social media efforts by public health and health care organizations. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT02835807; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02835807 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6mDMICcCE).

  18. Media

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Emily Wexler

    2010-01-01

    .... Tradigital allows us to use online behaviour to track the effectiveness of online and offline media, not simply the correlation of TV airings with search activity, but also by employing a bevy...

  19. Media Use and Source Trust among Muslims in Seven Countries: Results of a Large Random Sample Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven R. Corman

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite the perceived importance of media in the spread of and resistance against Islamist extremism, little is known about how Muslims use different kinds of media to get information about religious issues, and what sources they trust when doing so. This paper reports the results of a large, random sample survey among Muslims in seven countries Southeast Asia, West Africa and Western Europe, which helps fill this gap. Results show a diverse set of profiles of media use and source trust that differ by country, with overall low trust in mediated sources of information. Based on these findings, we conclude that mass media is still the most common source of religious information for Muslims, but that trust in mediated information is low overall. This suggests that media are probably best used to persuade opinion leaders, who will then carry anti-extremist messages through more personal means.

  20. Social Media and Peer-Reviewed Medical Journal Readership: A Randomized Prospective Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, C Matthew; Hunter, Makeba; Kolenic, Giselle E; Carlos, Ruth C

    2017-05-01

    To prospectively evaluate the impact of increasing levels of social media engagement on page visits and web-link clicks for content published in the Journal of the American College of Radiology. A three-arm prospective trial was designed using a control group, a basic Twitter intervention group (using only the Journal's @JACRJournal Twitter account), and an enhanced Twitter intervention group (using the personal Twitter accounts of editorial board members and trainees). Overall, 428 articles published between June 2013 and July 2015 were randomly assigned to the three groups. Article-specific tweets for both intervention arms were sent between September 14, 2015, and October 28, 2015. Primary end points included article-specific weekly and monthly page visits on the journal's Elsevier website (Amsterdam, Netherlands). For the two intervention groups, additional end points included 7-day and 30-day Twitter link clicks. Weekly page visits for the enhanced Twitter arm (mean 18.2; 95% confidence interval [CI] 15.6-20.7) were significantly higher when compared with the weekly page visits for the control arm (mean 7.6; 95% CI 1.7-13.6). However, there was no demonstrable increase in weekly page visits (mean 9.4; 95% CI 7.4-11.5) for the basic Twitter arm compared with the control arm. No intervention effects over control, regardless of Twitter arm assignment, were demonstrated for monthly page visits. The enhanced Twitter intervention resulted in a statistically significant increase in both 7-day and 30-day Twitter link clicks compared with the basic Twitter intervention group. An organized social media strategy, with focused social media activity from editorial board members, increased engagement with content published in a peer-reviewed radiology journal. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Adjunctive social media for more effective contraceptive counseling: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofinas, Jason D; Varrey, Aneesha; Sapra, Katherine J; Kanj, Rula V; Chervenak, Frank A; Asfaw, Tirsit

    2014-04-01

    To determine whether social media, specifically Facebook, is an effective tool for improving contraceptive knowledge. English-speaking women aged 18-45 years receiving care at an urban academic center obstetrics and gynecology clinic were included and randomized to a trial of standard contraceptive education and pamphlet (n=74) compared with standard contraceptive education and Facebook (n=69) information for contraception counseling. Contraceptive knowledge was evaluated preintervention and postintervention by the Contraceptive Knowledge Inventory. We evaluated the effect of the intervention by raw score and percent increase in Contraceptive Knowledge Inventory score, participant satisfaction with counseling method, and contraceptive preference postintervention. All analyses were stratified by age group. The median raw postintervention Contraceptive Knowledge Inventory score was significantly higher in the Facebook compared with the pamphlet group (15 compared with 12, Phigher in the Facebook group (median 10 compared with 6, Phigher in the Facebook compared with the pamphlet group (48% compared with 33%, P=.19). Social media as an adjunct to traditional in-office counseling improves patient contraceptive knowledge and increases patient preference for LARCs. ClinicalTrials.gov, www.clinicaltrials.gov, NCT5327714500.

  2. A randomized crossover study of web-based media literacy to prevent smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shensa, Ariel; Phelps-Tschang, Jane; Miller, Elizabeth; Primack, Brian A

    2016-02-01

    Feasibly implemented Web-based smoking media literacy (SML) programs have been associated with improving SML skills among adolescents. However, prior evaluations have generally had weak experimental designs. We aimed to examine program efficacy using a more rigorous crossover design. Seventy-two ninth grade students completed a Web-based SML program based on health behavior theory and implemented using a two-group two-period crossover design. Students were randomly assigned by classroom to receive media literacy or control interventions in different sequences. They were assessed three times, at baseline (T0), an initial follow-up after the first intervention (T1) and a second follow-up after the second intervention (T2). Crossover analysis using analysis of variance demonstrated significant intervention coefficients, indicating that the SML condition was superior to control for the primary outcome of total SML (F = 11.99; P < 0.001) and for seven of the nine individual SML items. Results were consistent in sensitivity analyses conducted using non-parametric methods. There were changes in some exploratory theory-based outcomes including attitudes and normative beliefs but not others. In conclusion, while strength of the design of this study supports and extends prior findings around effectiveness of SML programs, influences on theory-based mediators of smoking should be further explored. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Upscaling solute transport in naturally fractured porous media with the continuous time random walk method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geiger, S.; Cortis, A.; Birkholzer, J.T.

    2010-04-01

    Solute transport in fractured porous media is typically 'non-Fickian'; that is, it is characterized by early breakthrough and long tailing and by nonlinear growth of the Green function-centered second moment. This behavior is due to the effects of (1) multirate diffusion occurring between the highly permeable fracture network and the low-permeability rock matrix, (2) a wide range of advection rates in the fractures and, possibly, the matrix as well, and (3) a range of path lengths. As a consequence, prediction of solute transport processes at the macroscale represents a formidable challenge. Classical dual-porosity (or mobile-immobile) approaches in conjunction with an advection-dispersion equation and macroscopic dispersivity commonly fail to predict breakthrough of fractured porous media accurately. It was recently demonstrated that the continuous time random walk (CTRW) method can be used as a generalized upscaling approach. Here we extend this work and use results from high-resolution finite element-finite volume-based simulations of solute transport in an outcrop analogue of a naturally fractured reservoir to calibrate the CTRW method by extracting a distribution of retention times. This procedure allows us to predict breakthrough at other model locations accurately and to gain significant insight into the nature of the fracture-matrix interaction in naturally fractured porous reservoirs with geologically realistic fracture geometries.

  4. Effects of aggregation on the permittivity of random media containing monodisperse spheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Timothy E.; Tew, Adam T.; Jain, Rahul; Robinson, David A.

    2009-12-01

    challenge the general applicability of the quasistatic limit for heterogeneous media by showing how microstructural changes much smaller than the electromagnetic wavelength can alter the effective permittivity by a statistically significant degree. The results also provide a quantitative indication of the effects of aggregation and hierarchical microstructures on the electromagnetic properties of random media and have application to the remote and in situ sensing of soils, the rational design and nondestructive evaluation of composites, and the study of biological tissues and other random materials.

  5. Foreword: Sir John Pendry FRS Sir John Pendry FRS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inglesfield, John; Echenique, Pedro

    2008-07-01

    realised that he should explore the properties of pseudopotentials in depth. This had never been done before, and the result was a paper of typical originality. The story of how John explored truly original aspects of physics, right from the start of his research career, is given by Volker Heine (in his own inimitable style), at the end of this short biography. Of course the result of John's PhD research was his development of the entire methodology for computing and interpreting LEED intensities, and their relationship to surface atomic structure. With experiments performed by Stig Andersson in Gothenburg, John's calculations led to the first ever surface structure determination, of Na adsorbed in a c(2 x 2) structure on Ni(001) [2]. His 1974 book, 'Low Energy Electron Diffraction' [3], remains a classic, and not only for LEED theorists—there is plenty of other surface science here to get one's teeth into. John extended the theory of LEED in the 1980s with the introduction of several new theoretical techniques and concepts. The Pendry R-factor [4] enabled surface structure determination to be largely automated, and quantified agreement between LEED theory and experiment. Tensor-LEED was developed by John, together with his PhD student Philip Rous [5], as an accurate approximation for calculating the LEED spectra of complex surface structures, enabling structures of hitherto impossible complexity to be determined. The methods of DLEED—both the experimental technique and its theoretical interpretation—were developed with Saldin, Van Hove and the Erlangen group of Heinz and Müller [6, 7]; this is a technique for interpreting electron scattering from atoms randomly adsorbed on surfaces, hence determining their bonding to neighbouring atoms. LEED experiments and calculations continue to this day, of course, with John's contribution remaining fundamental. Articles in this issue by John's former PhD student Michel Van Hove, his one-time post-doc Dilano Saldin, and his

  6. Simulating propagation of coherent light in random media using the Fredholm type integral equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraszewski, Maciej; Pluciński, Jerzy

    2017-06-01

    Studying propagation of light in random scattering materials is important for both basic and applied research. Such studies often require usage of numerical method for simulating behavior of light beams in random media. However, if such simulations require consideration of coherence properties of light, they may become a complex numerical problems. There are well established methods for simulating multiple scattering of light (e.g. Radiative Transfer Theory and Monte Carlo methods) but they do not treat coherence properties of light directly. Some variations of these methods allows to predict behavior of coherent light but only for an averaged realization of the scattering medium. This limits their application in studying many physical phenomena connected to a specific distribution of scattering particles (e.g. laser speckle). In general, numerical simulation of coherent light propagation in a specific realization of random medium is a time- and memory-consuming problem. The goal of the presented research was to develop new efficient method for solving this problem. The method, presented in our earlier works, is based on solving the Fredholm type integral equation, which describes multiple light scattering process. This equation can be discretized and solved numerically using various algorithms e.g. by direct solving the corresponding linear equations system, as well as by using iterative or Monte Carlo solvers. Here we present recent development of this method including its comparison with well-known analytical results and a finite-difference type simulations. We also present extension of the method for problems of multiple scattering of a polarized light on large spherical particles that joins presented mathematical formalism with Mie theory.

  7. Effectiveness of trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole for children with chronic active otitis media: a randomized, placebo-controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Veen, E.L.; Rovers, M.M.; Albers, F.W.J.; Sanders, E.A.M.; Schilder, A.G.M.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The goal was to determine the clinical effectiveness of prolonged outpatient treatment with trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole for children with chronic active otitis media. METHODS: We performed a randomized, placebo-controlled trial with 101 children (1-12 years of age) with chronic active

  8. Comparison of Media Literacy and Usual Education to Prevent Tobacco Use: A Cluster-Randomized Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primack, Brian A.; Douglas, Erika L.; Land, Stephanie R.; Miller, Elizabeth; Fine, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Media literacy programs have shown potential for reduction of adolescent tobacco use. We aimed to determine if an anti-smoking media literacy curriculum improves students' media literacy and affects factors related to adolescent smoking. Methods: We recruited 1170 9th-grade students from 64 classrooms in 3 public urban high…

  9. St. John's Wort (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The herb St. John's Wort is believed to be helpful in relieving mild to moderate depression, but should only be taken under a physician's supervision. St. John's Wort may clash with other medications or foods ...

  10. John Dewey: Demokratiets filosof

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Martin Ejsing

    2016-01-01

    Ide-og filosofihistorisk artikel om den rolle, som den amerikanske filosof John Dewey har spillet i den amerikanske offentlighed......Ide-og filosofihistorisk artikel om den rolle, som den amerikanske filosof John Dewey har spillet i den amerikanske offentlighed...

  11. Local radial basis function meshless scheme for vector radiative transfer in participating media with randomly oriented axisymmetric particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jie; Yi, Hong-Liang; Tan, He-Ping

    2016-02-20

    A local radial basis function meshless scheme (LRBFM) is developed to solve polarized radiative transfer in participating media containing randomly oriented axisymmetric particles in which radial basis functions augmented with polynomial basis are employed to construct the trial functions, and the vector radiative-transfer equation based on the discrete-ordinates approach is discretized directly by collocation method. The LRBFM belongs to a class of truly meshless methods that do not need any mesh or any numerical integration scheme. Performances of the LRBFM are verified with analytical solutions and other numerical results reported earlier in the literature via five various test cases. The predicted angular distribution of brightness temperature and Stokes vector by the LRBFM agree very well with the benchmark. It is demonstrated that the LRBFM is accurate to solve vector radiative transfer in participating media with randomly oriented axisymmetric particles.

  12. Quantum correlation of fiber-based telecom-band photon pairs through standard loss and random media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sua, Yong Meng; Malowicki, John; Lee, Kim Fook

    2014-08-15

    We study quantum correlation and interference of fiber-based telecom-band photon pairs with one photon of the pair experiencing multiple scattering in a random medium. We measure joint probability of two-photon detection for signal photon in a normal channel and idler photon in a channel, which is subjected to two independent conditions: standard loss (neutral density filter) and random media. We observe that both conditions degrade the correlation of signal and idler photons, and depolarization of the idler photon in random medium can enhance two-photon interference at certain relative polarization angles. Our theoretical calculation on two-photon polarization correlation and interference as a function of mean free path is in agreement with our experiment data. We conclude that quantum correlation of a polarization-entangled photon pair is better preserved than a polarization-correlated photon pair as one photon of the pair scatters through a random medium.

  13. Continuous-time random-walk model for anomalous diffusion in expanding media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Vot, F.; Abad, E.; Yuste, S. B.

    2017-09-01

    Expanding media are typical in many different fields, e.g., in biology and cosmology. In general, a medium expansion (contraction) brings about dramatic changes in the behavior of diffusive transport properties such as the set of positional moments and the Green's function. Here, we focus on the characterization of such effects when the diffusion process is described by the continuous-time random-walk (CTRW) model. As is well known, when the medium is static this model yields anomalous diffusion for a proper choice of the probability density function (pdf) for the jump length and the waiting time, but the behavior may change drastically if a medium expansion is superimposed on the intrinsic random motion of the diffusing particle. For the case where the jump length and the waiting time pdfs are long-tailed, we derive a general bifractional diffusion equation which reduces to a normal diffusion equation in the appropriate limit. We then study some particular cases of interest, including Lévy flights and subdiffusive CTRWs. In the former case, we find an analytical exact solution for the Green's function (propagator). When the expansion is sufficiently fast, the contribution of the diffusive transport becomes irrelevant at long times and the propagator tends to a stationary profile in the comoving reference frame. In contrast, for a contracting medium a competition between the spreading effect of diffusion and the concentrating effect of contraction arises. In the specific case of a subdiffusive CTRW in an exponentially contracting medium, the latter effect prevails for sufficiently long times, and all the particles are eventually localized at a single point in physical space. This "big crunch" effect, totally absent in the case of normal diffusion, stems from inefficient particle spreading due to subdiffusion. We also derive a hierarchy of differential equations for the moments of the transport process described by the subdiffusive CTRW model in an expanding medium

  14. Randomized Controlled Trial of a Computerized Interactive Media-Based Problem Solving Treatment for Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval, Luis R; Buckey, Jay C; Ainslie, Ricardo; Tombari, Martin; Stone, William; Hegel, Mark T

    2017-05-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of an interactive media-based, computer-delivered depression treatment program (imbPST) compared to a no-treatment control condition (NTC) in a parallel-group, randomized, controlled trial conducted in an outpatient psychiatric research clinic. 45 adult participants with major depressive disorder or dysthymia were randomized to receive either 6 weekly sessions of imbPST or no treatment (No Treatment Control; NTC). The primary outcome measure was the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II). There was a significant Group x Time interaction effect [F (1.73, 43)= 58.78; p<.001; η2=.58, Cohens d=1.94], such that the patients receiving imbPST had a significantly greater reduction in depressive symptoms compared to the patients in the NTC condition. Participants in the imbPST group improved their depression symptoms significantly from moderate (BDI-II=21.9±4.20) to mild levels of depression (BDI-II=17.9±4.0) after receiving 3 weekly sessions of imbPST (p<0.001), and progressed to still milder levels of depression after six weekly sessions (BDI-II=14.5±3.7, p<0.001). NTC participants showed no significant reduction in BDI-II scores (BDI-II=21.8±4.2 pre, BDI-II=21.5±5.2 post, N.S.). Additionally, 40% of the imbPST group showed a clinically significant and reliable change in depression levels while none of the NTC group met this criterion. imbPST participants rated the program highly usable on the system usability scale (SUS) after the first session (SUS Session 1=74.6±7.2) and usability scores increased significantly by the last session (SUS Session 6=85.4±5.6). We conclude that imbPST is an effective, engaging, and easily used depression treatment program that warrants further evaluation with heterogeneous depressed populations in a stand-alone, self-administered fashion. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Renal Insufficiency Following Contrast Media Administration Trial (REMEDIAL): a randomized comparison of 3 preventive strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briguori, Carlo; Airoldi, Flavio; D'Andrea, Davide; Bonizzoni, Erminio; Morici, Nuccia; Focaccio, Amelia; Michev, Iassen; Montorfano, Matteo; Carlino, Mauro; Cosgrave, John; Ricciardelli, Bruno; Colombo, Antonio

    2007-03-13

    Volume supplementation by saline infusion combined with N-acetylcysteine (NAC) represents an effective strategy to prevent contrast agent-induced nephrotoxicity (CIN). Preliminary data support the concept that sodium bicarbonate and ascorbic acid also may be effective in preventing CIN. Three hundred twenty-six consecutive patients with chronic kidney disease, referred to our institutions for coronary and/or peripheral procedures, were randomly assigned to prophylactic administration of 0.9% saline infusion plus NAC (n=111), sodium bicarbonate infusion plus NAC (n=108), and 0.9% saline plus ascorbic acid plus NAC (n=107). All enrolled patients had serum creatinine > or = 2.0 mg/dL and/or estimated glomerular filtration rate or = 25% in the creatinine concentration 48 hours after the procedure (CIN). The amount of contrast media administered (179+/-102, 169+/-92, and 169+/-94 mL, respectively; P=0.69) and risk scores (9.1+/-3.4, 9.5+/-3.6, and 9.3+/-3.6; P=0.21) were similar in the 3 groups. CIN occurred in 11 of 111 patients (9.9%) in the saline plus NAC group, in 2 of 108 (1.9%) in the bicarbonate plus NAC group (P=0.019 by Fisher exact test versus saline plus NAC group), and in 11 of 107 (10.3%) in the saline plus ascorbic acid plus NAC group (P=1.00 versus saline plus NAC group). The strategy of volume supplementation by sodium bicarbonate plus NAC seems to be superior to the combination of normal saline with NAC alone or with the addition of ascorbic acid in preventing CIN in patients at medium to high risk.

  16. Multilevel and quasi-Monte Carlo methods for uncertainty quantification in particle travel times through random heterogeneous porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crevillén-García, D; Power, H

    2017-08-01

    In this study, we apply four Monte Carlo simulation methods, namely, Monte Carlo, quasi-Monte Carlo, multilevel Monte Carlo and multilevel quasi-Monte Carlo to the problem of uncertainty quantification in the estimation of the average travel time during the transport of particles through random heterogeneous porous media. We apply the four methodologies to a model problem where the only input parameter, the hydraulic conductivity, is modelled as a log-Gaussian random field by using direct Karhunen-Loéve decompositions. The random terms in such expansions represent the coefficients in the equations. Numerical calculations demonstrating the effectiveness of each of the methods are presented. A comparison of the computational cost incurred by each of the methods for three different tolerances is provided. The accuracy of the approaches is quantified via the mean square error.

  17. Space-time mesh adaptation for solute transport in randomly heterogeneous porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell'Oca, Aronne; Porta, Giovanni Michele; Guadagnini, Alberto; Riva, Monica

    2017-07-05

    We assess the impact of an anisotropic space and time grid adaptation technique on our ability to solve numerically solute transport in heterogeneous porous media. Heterogeneity is characterized in terms of the spatial distribution of hydraulic conductivity, whose natural logarithm, Y, is treated as a second-order stationary random process. We consider nonreactive transport of dissolved chemicals to be governed by an Advection Dispersion Equation at the continuum scale. The flow field, which provides the advective component of transport, is obtained through the numerical solution of Darcy's law. A suitable recovery-based error estimator is analyzed to guide the adaptive discretization. We investigate two diverse strategies guiding the (space-time) anisotropic mesh adaptation. These are respectively grounded on the definition of the guiding error estimator through the spatial gradients of: (i) the concentration field only; (ii) both concentration and velocity components. We test the approach for two-dimensional computational scenarios with moderate and high levels of heterogeneity, the latter being expressed in terms of the variance of Y. As quantities of interest, we key our analysis towards the time evolution of section-averaged and point-wise solute breakthrough curves, second centered spatial moment of concentration, and scalar dissipation rate. As a reference against which we test our results, we consider corresponding solutions associated with uniform space-time grids whose level of refinement is established through a detailed convergence study. We find a satisfactory comparison between results for the adaptive methodologies and such reference solutions, our adaptive technique being associated with a markedly reduced computational cost. Comparison of the two adaptive strategies tested suggests that: (i) defining the error estimator relying solely on concentration fields yields some advantages in grasping the key features of solute transport taking place within

  18. A John Peter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education. A John Peter. Articles written in Resonance – Journal of Science Education. Volume 3 Issue 3 March 1998 pp 41-45 General Article. Plant Glandular Trichomes Chemical Factories with Many Potential Uses · A John Peter Thomas G Shanower · More Details ...

  19. John Dewey, an Appreciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clopton, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    The subject of the annual Presidential address of Phi Kappa Phi, presented on May 8, 1962, was John Dewey. Dewey is identified in the public mind chiefly as an educational philosopher. In this address, the author describes the life and work of John Dewey as an indefatigable student of life whose interests ranged, like those of Aristotle, over the…

  20. Blastocyst utilization rates after continuous culture in two commercial single-step media: a prospective randomized study with sibling oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sfontouris, Ioannis A; Kolibianakis, Efstratios M; Lainas, George T; Venetis, Christos A; Petsas, George K; Tarlatzis, Basil C; Lainas, Tryfon G

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study is to determine whether blastocyst utilization rates are different after continuous culture in two different commercial single-step media. This is a paired randomized controlled trial with sibling oocytes conducted in infertility patients, aged ≤40 years with ≥10 oocytes retrieved assigned to blastocyst culture and transfer. Retrieved oocytes were randomly allocated to continuous culture in either Sage one-step medium (Origio) or Continuous Single Culture (CSC) medium (Irvine Scientific) without medium renewal up to day 5 post oocyte retrieval. Main outcome measure was the proportion of embryos suitable for clinical use (utilization rate). A total of 502 oocytes from 33 women were randomly allocated to continuous culture in either Sage one-step medium (n = 250) or CSC medium (n = 252). Fertilization was performed by either in vitro fertilization or intracytoplasmic sperm injection, and embryo transfers were performed on day 5. Two patients had all blastocysts frozen due to the occurrence of severe ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome. Fertilization and cleavage rates, as well as embryo quality on day 3, were similar in the two media. Blastocyst utilization rates (%, 95% CI) [55.4% (46.4-64.1) vs 54.7% (44.9-64.6), p = 0.717], blastocyst formation rates [53.6% (44.6-62.5) vs 51.9 (42.2-61.6), p = 0.755], and proportion of good quality blastocysts [36.8% (28.1-45.4) vs 36.1% (27.2-45.0), p = 0.850] were similar in Sage one-step and CSC media, respectively. Continuous culture of embryos in Sage one-step and CSC media is associated with similar blastocyst development and utilization rates. Both single-step media appear to provide adequate support during in vitro preimplantation embryo development. Whether these observations are also valid for other continuous single medium protocols remains to be determined. NCT02302638.

  1. The Adoption of Social Media to Recruit Participants for the Cool Runnings Randomized Controlled Trial in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Jacqueline D; Kimble, Roy M; Watt, Kerrianne; Cameron, Cate M

    2017-10-24

    Using social media to recruit specific populations for research studies is gaining popularity. Given that mothers of young children are the most active on social media, and young children are the most at risk of preventable burn injuries, social media was used to recruit mothers of young children to a burn prevention intervention. The aim of this paper was to describe the social media recruitment methods used to enroll mothers of young children to the app-based burn prevention intervention Cool Runnings. Participants were recruited via paid Facebook and Instagram advertisements to a 2-group, parallel, single-blinded, randomized controlled trial (RCT). The advertisements were targeted at women 18 years and older, living in Queensland, Australia, with at least 1 child aged 5 to 12 months at the time of recruitment. Over the 30-day recruitment period from January to February 2016, Facebook and Instagram advertisements reached 65,268 people, generating 2573 link clicks, 1161 app downloads, and 498 enrolled participants to the Cool Runnings RCT. The cost per enrolled participant was Aus $13.08. Saturdays were the most effective day of the week for advertising results. The most popular time of day for enrolments was between 5 to 11 PM. This recruitment strategy campaign resulted in a broad reach of participants from regional, rural, and remote Queensland. Participants were representative of the population in regard to age and education levels. To our knowledge, this is the first use of social media recruitment for an injury prevention campaign. This recruitment method resulted in the rapid and cost-effective recruitment of participants with social, geographic, and economic diversity that were largely representative of the population.

  2. Inverse random source scattering for the Helmholtz equation in inhomogeneous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Chen, Chuchu; Li, Peijun

    2018-01-01

    This paper is concerned with an inverse random source scattering problem in an inhomogeneous background medium. The wave propagation is modeled by the stochastic Helmholtz equation with the source driven by additive white noise. The goal is to reconstruct the statistical properties of the random source such as the mean and variance from the boundary measurement of the radiated random wave field at multiple frequencies. Both the direct and inverse problems are considered. We show that the direct problem has a unique mild solution by a constructive proof. For the inverse problem, we derive Fredholm integral equations, which connect the boundary measurement of the radiated wave field with the unknown source function. A regularized block Kaczmarz method is developed to solve the ill-posed integral equations. Numerical experiments are included to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  3. John Deakin: Double Exposures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Rousseau

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this series of short films made by Jonathan Law, the art historian James Boaden, and the curator of The John Deakin Archive, Paul Rousseau, discuss the double-exposure images made by the photographer John Deakin (1912-1972 in the 1950s and 1960s. The films ask you, firstly, to look closely at the images being discussed. Each one begins with a sustained and intense shot of a single image before opening up to a wide-ranging discussion about Deakin, double exposures, and photography.

  4. Distance learning strategies for weight management utilizing social media: A comparison of phone conference call versus social media platform. Rationale and design for a randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Erik A; Szabo-Reed, Amanda N; Ptomey, Lauren T; Steger, Felicia L; Honas, Jeffery J; Al-Hihi, Eyad M; Lee, Robert; Vansaghi, Lisa; Washburn, Richard A; Donnelly, Joseph E

    2016-03-01

    Management of obesity in the context of the primary care physician visit is of limited efficacy in part because of limited ability to engage participants in sustained behavior change between physician visits. Therefore, healthcare systems must find methods to address obesity that reach beyond the walls of clinics and hospitals and address the issues of lifestyle modification in a cost-conscious way. The dramatic increase in technology and online social networks may present healthcare providers with innovative ways to deliver weight management programs that could have an impact on health care at the population level. A randomized study will be conducted on 70 obese adults (BMI 30.0-45.0 kg/m(2)) to determine if weight loss (6 months) is equivalent between weight management interventions utilizing behavioral strategies by either a conference call or social media approach. The primary outcome, body weight, will be assessed at baseline and 6 months. Secondary outcomes including waist circumference, energy and macronutrient intake, and physical activity will be assessed on the same schedule. In addition, a cost analysis and process evaluation will be completed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Anderson localization of electromagnetic waves in randomly-stratified magnetodielectric media with uniform impedance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kihong

    2015-06-01

    The propagation and the Anderson localization of electromagnetic waves in a randomly-stratified slab, where both the dielectric permittivity and the magnetic permeability depend on one spatial coordinate in a random manner, is theoretically studied. The case where the wave impedance is uniform, while the refractive index is random, is considered in detail. The localization length and the disorder-averaged transmittance of s and p waves incident obliquely on the slab are calculated as a function of the incident angle θ and the strength of randomness in a numerically precise manner, using the invariant imbedding method. It is found that the waves incident perpendicularly on the slab are delocalized, while those incident obliquely are localized. As the incident angle increases from zero, the localization length decreases from infinity monotonically to some finite value. The localization length is found to depend on the incident angle as θ-4 and a simple analytical formula, which works quite well for weak disorder and small incident angles, is derived. The localization length does not depend on the wave polarization, but the disorder-averaged transmittance generally does.

  6. Localization of transverse waves in randomly layered media at oblique incidence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bliokh, K.Yu.; Freilikher, V.D.

    2004-01-01

    We investigate the oblique incidence of electromagnetic waves on a randomly layered medium in the limit of strong disorder. An approximate method for calculating the inverse localization length based on the assumptions of zero-energy flux and complete phase stochastization is presented. Two effects

  7. John Maynard Smith

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    2004-04-19

    Apr 19, 2004 ... The evolutionary biology community has been saddened and depleted this month by the loss of Prof. John Maynard. Smith who made many important contributions to evolu- tionary theory, including the now ubiquitous concept of an evolutionarily stable strategy (ESS). In a half-century long working career ...

  8. Cockcroft, Prof. John Douglas

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    John Douglas Nobel Laureate (Physics) - 1951. Date of birth: 27 May 1897. Date of death: 18 September 1967. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook ... Summer Schools. Posted on 21 December 2017. ASTROPHYSICS: An Observational View of the Universe. Math Art and Design: MAD about Math, Math Education and Outreach.

  9. Russell, Prof. John

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1935 Honorary. Russell, Prof. John. Date of birth: 31 October 1872. Date of death: 12 July 1965 ... Posted on 21 December 2017. ASTROPHYSICS: An Observational View of the Universe. Math Art and Design: MAD about Math, Math Education and Outreach. Math and Finance ...

  10. John Ruskin as Zoologist

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hammen, van der L.

    1983-01-01

    A study is made of John Ruskin's work in the field of zoology. It is demonstrated that Ruskin's early interest in zoology was connected with his study of ornament, whilst his later studies are connected with his Oxford teaching and his social work. Ruskin's interest in zoology concerned groups

  11. John Archibald Wheeler

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 18; Issue 1. John Archibald Wheeler - Man with Picturesque Imagination. Jayant V Narlikar. General Article Volume 18 Issue 1 January 2013 pp 22-28. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  12. John Archibald Wheeler

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    John Archibald Wheeler was born in 1911 in Jacksonville, Florida – he adopted the Archibald from his mother's side. His upbringing was in many parts of the US given his father's job as a librarian, nd he even spent a year in a small rural school in which there was only one teacher for all classes! His early interests included ...

  13. John Cale avaldas memuaarid

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    1999-01-01

    Rockbändi "The Velvet Underground" asutajaliige John Cale avaldas oma autobiograafia "What's Welsh for Zen?". Koos biograafiakirjanik Victor Bockrisiga kirjutatud teos räägib 60ndate lõpu kultuurielust New Yorgis, koostööst Andy Warholiga jm.

  14. John Cage Discusses Fluxus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Ellsworth

    1992-01-01

    Presents an informal discussion with composer John Cage which includes his response to George Maciunas' work, his recollections of Marcel Duchamp, the complex relationship between inelegant material and revealing works of art, neo-Dada and neo-Fluxus, Wittgenstein and the artist's ultimate responsibility to initiate a change in the viewer or…

  15. Eccles, Prof. John Carew

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1968 Honorary. Eccles, Prof. John Carew Nobel Laureate (Medicine) - 1963. Date of birth: 27 January 1903. Date of death: 2 May 1997. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. Theory Of Evolution. Posted on 23 January 2018. Joint Statement by the Three ...

  16. Joel John Taura

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Astrophysics and Astronomy. Joel John Taura. Articles written in Journal of Astrophysics and Astronomy. Volume 35 Issue 2 June 2014 pp 107-119. Stability of Triangular Equilibrium Points in the Photogravitational Restricted Three-Body Problem with Oblateness and Potential from a Belt.

  17. Anderson, Prof. John Stuart

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1978 Honorary. Anderson, Prof. John Stuart. Date of birth: 9 January 1908. Date of death: 25 December 1990. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. Theory Of Evolution. Posted on 23 January 2018. Joint Statement by the Three Science Academies of India ...

  18. John Archibald Wheeler

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    to promote teaching and research in astronomy in the universities. He has written extensively in. English and Marathi to popularize science. John Archibald Wheeler was a researcher and teacher par excellence who was responsible for popularizing the theory of general relativity amongst the academics in the United States.

  19. Conversations with John Williams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Jack

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author shares the views of John Williams, Hollywood's premier composer, who has written more than 300 scores, about the future of classical and film music. A gregarious person in a field requiring monklike isolation, Williams values the "association with the soloists, and the wonderful inspiration from players." His…

  20. Goodenough, Prof. John B

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1980 Honorary. Goodenough, Prof. John B. Date of birth: 25 July 1922. Address: Virginia H Cockrell Centennial, Professor of Engineering, University of Texat at Austin, ETC 9.184, Stop C2200, Austin, TX 78712, U.S.A.. Contact: Office: (+1-512) 471 1646. Email: jgoodenough@mail.utexas.edu.

  1. Multiple Volume Scattering in Random Media and Periodic Structures with Applications in Microwave Remote Sensing and Wave Functional Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Shurun

    The objective of my research is two-fold: to study wave scattering phenomena in dense volumetric random media and in periodic wave functional materials. For the first part, the goal is to use the microwave remote sensing technique to monitor water resources and global climate change. Towards this goal, I study the microwave scattering behavior of snow and ice sheet. For snowpack scattering, I have extended the traditional dense media radiative transfer (DMRT) approach to include cyclical corrections that give rise to backscattering enhancements, enabling the theory to model combined active and passive observations of snowpack using the same set of physical parameters. Besides DMRT, a fully coherent approach is also developed by solving Maxwell's equations directly over the entire snowpack including a bottom half space. This revolutionary new approach produces consistent scattering and emission results, and demonstrates backscattering enhancements and coherent layer effects. The birefringence in anisotropic snow layers is also analyzed by numerically solving Maxwell's equation directly. The effects of rapid density fluctuations in polar ice sheet emission in the 0.5˜2.0 GHz spectrum are examined using both fully coherent and partially coherent layered media emission theories that agree with each other and distinct from incoherent approaches. For the second part, the goal is to develop integral equation based methods to solve wave scattering in periodic structures such as photonic crystals and metamaterials that can be used for broadband simulations. Set upon the concept of modal expansion of the periodic Green's function, we have developed the method of broadband Green's function with low wavenumber extraction (BBGFL), where a low wavenumber component is extracted and results a non-singular and fast-converging remaining part with simple wavenumber dependence. We've applied the technique to simulate band diagrams and modal solutions of periodic structures, and to

  2. Modeling of Electromagnetic Scattering by Discrete and Discretely Heterogeneous Random Media by Using Numerically Exact Solutions of the Maxwell Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dlugach, Janna M.; Mishchenko, Michael I.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss some aspects of numerical modeling of electromagnetic scattering by discrete random medium by using numerically exact solutions of the macroscopic Maxwell equations. Typical examples of such media are clouds of interstellar dust, clouds of interplanetary dust in the Solar system, dusty atmospheres of comets, particulate planetary rings, clouds in planetary atmospheres, aerosol particles with numerous inclusions and so on. Our study is based on the results of extensive computations of different characteristics of electromagnetic scattering obtained by using the superposition T-matrix method which represents a direct computer solver of the macroscopic Maxwell equations for an arbitrary multisphere configuration. As a result, in particular, we clarify the range of applicability of the low-density theories of radiative transfer and coherent backscattering as well as of widely used effective-medium approximations.

  3. Social media-delivered sexual health intervention: a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Sheana S; Levine, Deborah K; Black, Sandra R; Schmiege, Sarah J; Santelli, John

    2012-11-01

    Youth are using social media regularly and represent a group facing substantial risk for sexually transmitted infection (STI). Although there is evidence that the Internet can be used effectively in supporting healthy sexual behavior, this has not yet extended to social networking sites. To determine whether STI prevention messages delivered via Facebook are efficacious in preventing increases in sexual risk behavior at 2 and 6 months. Cluster RCT, October 2010-May 2011. Individuals (seeds) recruited in multiple settings (online, via newspaper ads and face-to-face) were asked to recruit three friends, who in turn recruited additional friends, extending three waves from the seed. Seeds and waves of friends were considered networks and exposed to either the intervention or control condition. Exposure to Just/Us, a Facebook page developed with youth input, or to control content on 18-24 News, a Facebook page with current events for 2 months. Condom use at last sex and proportion of sex acts protected by condoms. Repeated measures of nested data were used to model main effects of exposure to Just/Us and time by treatment interaction. A total of 1578 participants enrolled, with 14% Latino and 35% African-American; 75% of participants completed at least one study follow-up. Time by treatment effects were observed at 2 months for condom use (intervention 68% vs control 56%, p=0.04) and proportion of sex acts protected by condoms (intervention 63% vs control 57%, p=0.03) where intervention participation reduced the tendency for condom use to decrease over time. No effects were seen at 6 months. Social networking sites may be venues for efficacious health education interventions. More work is needed to understand what elements of social media are compelling, how network membership influences effects, and whether linking social media to clinical and social services can be beneficial. This study is registered at www.clinicaltrials.govNCT00725959. Copyright © 2012 American

  4. Statistics of highly heterogeneous flow fields confined to three-dimensional random porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, C.; Langston, P. A.; Pavlovskaya, G. E.; Hall, M. R.; Rigby, S. P.

    2016-01-01

    We present a strong relationship between the microstructural characteristics of, and the fluid velocity fields confined to, three-dimensional random porous materials. The relationship is revealed through simultaneously extracting correlation functions Ru u(r ) of the spatial (Eulerian) velocity fields and microstructural two-point correlation functions S2(r ) of the random porous heterogeneous materials. This demonstrates that the effective physical transport properties depend on the characteristics of complex pore structure owing to the relationship between Ru u(r ) and S2(r ) revealed in this study. Further, the mean excess plot was used to investigate the right tail of the streamwise velocity component that was found to obey light-tail distributions. Based on the mean excess plot, a generalized Pareto distribution can be used to approximate the positive streamwise velocity distribution.

  5. Crossing probability for directed polymers in random media. II. Exact tail of the distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, Andrea; Le Doussal, Pierre

    2016-03-01

    We study the probability p ≡ p(η)(t) that two directed polymers in a given random potential η and with fixed and nearby endpoints do not cross until time t. This probability is itself a random variable (over samples η), which, as we show, acquires a very broad probability distribution at large time. In particular, the moments of p are found to be dominated by atypical samples where p is of order unity. Building on a formula established by us in a previous work using nested Bethe ansatz and Macdonald process methods, we obtain analytically the leading large time behavior of all moments p(m) ≃ γ(m)/t. From this, we extract the exact tail ∼ρ(p)/t of the probability distribution of the noncrossing probability at large time. The exact formula is compared to numerical simulations, with excellent agreement.

  6. On the effect of random inhomogeneities in Kerr media modelled by a nonlinear Schroedinger equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villarroel, Javier [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Salamanca, Plaza Merced s/n, E-37008 Salamanca (Spain); Montero, Miquel, E-mail: javier@usal.e, E-mail: miquel.montero@ub.ed [Departament de FIsica Fonamental, Universitat de Barcelona, Diagonal 647, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2010-07-14

    We consider the propagation of optical beams under the interplay of dispersion and Kerr nonlinearity in optical fibres with impurities distributed at random uniformly on the fibre. By using a model based on the nonlinear Schroedinger equation we clarify how such inhomogeneities affect different aspects such as the number of solitons present and the intensity of the signal. We also obtain the mean distance for the signal to dissipate to a given level.

  7. Lightwave Propagation in the Presence of Random Turbulent Media and Pointing Jitter in Optical Space Communications

    OpenAIRE

    Toyoshima, Morio

    2003-01-01

    This study is devoted to lightwave propagation in the presence of random pointing jitter and atmospheric turbulence. The intrinsic narrow beam/high gain nature of free-space laser communications produces several extremely valuable advantages when compared to microwaves, but also requires a very high tracking and pointing accuracy. Furthermore, space-to-ground optical communications are strongly affected by scintillation effects due to the turbulent atmosphere. The purpose of this study is to ...

  8. Random Search with Memory in Patchy Media: Exploration-Exploitation Tradeoff

    CERN Document Server

    Chupeau, M; Redner, S

    2016-01-01

    How to best exploit patchy resources? This long-standing question belongs to the extensively studied class of explore/exploit problems that arise in a wide range of situations, from animal foraging, to robotic exploration, and to human decision processes. Despite its broad relevance, the issue of optimal exploitation has previously only been tackled through two paradigmatic limiting models---patch-use and random search---that do not account for the interplay between searcher motion within patches and resource depletion. Here, we bridge this gap by introducing a minimal patch exploitation model that incorporates this coupling: the searcher depletes the resources along its random-walk trajectory within a patch and travels to a new patch after it takes $\\mathcal{S}$ consecutive steps without finding resources. We compute the distribution of the amount of resources $F_t$ consumed by time $t$ for this non-Markovian random walker and show that exploring multiple patches is beneficial. In one dimension, we analytica...

  9. Noninferiority, randomized, controlled trial comparing embryo development using media developed for sequential or undisturbed culture in a time-lapse setup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardarson, Thorir; Bungum, Mona; Conaghan, Joe; Meintjes, Marius; Chantilis, Samuel J; Molnar, Laszlo; Gunnarsson, Kristina; Wikland, Matts

    2015-12-01

    To study whether a culture medium that allows undisturbed culture supports human embryo development to the blastocyst stage equivalently to a well-established sequential media. Randomized, double-blinded sibling trial. Independent in vitro fertilization (IVF) clinics. One hundred twenty-eight patients, with 1,356 zygotes randomized into two study arms. Embryos randomly allocated into two study arms to compare embryo development on a time-lapse system using a single-step medium or sequential media. Percentage of good-quality blastocysts on day 5. Percentage of day 5 good-quality blastocysts was 21.1% (standard deviation [SD] ± 21.6%) and 22.2% (SD ± 22.1%) in the single-step time-lapse medium (G-TL) and the sequential media (G-1/G-2) groups, respectively. The mean difference (-1.2; 95% CI, -6.0; 3.6) between the two media systems for the primary end point was less than the noninferiority margin of -8%. There was a statistically significantly lower number of good-quality embryos on day 3 in the G-TL group [50.7% (SD ± 30.6%) vs. 60.8% (SD ± 30.7%)]. Four out of the 11 measured morphokinetic parameters were statistically significantly different for the two media used. The mean levels of ammonium concentration in the media at the end of the culture period was statistically significantly lower in the G-TL group as compared with the G-2 group. We have shown that a single-step culture medium supports blastocyst development equivalently to established sequential media. The ammonium concentrations were lower in the single-step media, and the measured morphokinetic parameters were modified somewhat. NCT01939626. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Addressing dental fear in children with autism spectrum disorders: a randomized controlled pilot study using electronic screen media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isong, Inyang A; Rao, Sowmya R; Holifield, Chloe; Iannuzzi, Dorothea; Hanson, Ellen; Ware, Janice; Nelson, Linda P

    2014-03-01

    Dental care is a significant unmet health care need for children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Many children with ASD do not receive dental care because of fear associated with dental procedures; oftentimes they require general anesthesia for regular dental procedures, placing them at risk of associated complications. Many children with ASD have a strong preference for visual stimuli, particularly electronic screen media. The use of visual teaching materials is a fundamental principle in designing educational programs for children with ASD. To determine if an innovative strategy using 2 types of electronic screen media was feasible and beneficial in reducing fear and uncooperative behaviors in children with ASD undergoing dental visits. We conducted a randomized controlled trial at Boston Children's Hospital dental clinic. Eighty (80) children aged 7 to 17 years with a known diagnosis of ASD and history of dental fear were enrolled in the study. Each child completed 2 preventive dental visits that were scheduled 6 months apart (visit 1 and visit 2). After visit 1, subjects were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 groups: (1) group A, control (usual care); (2) group B, treatment (video peer modeling that involved watching a DVD recording of a typically developing child undergoing a dental visit); (3) group C, treatment (video goggles that involved watching a favorite movie during the dental visit using sunglass-style video eyewear); and (4) group D, treatment (video peer modeling plus video goggles). Subjects who refused or were unable to wear the goggles watched the movie using a handheld portable DVD player. During both visits, the subject's level of anxiety and behavior were measured using the Venham Anxiety and Behavior Scales. Analyses of variance and Fisher's exact tests compared baseline characteristics across groups. Using intention to treat approach, repeated measures analyses were employed to test whether the outcomes differed significantly: (1) between

  11. A Peer-Led, Social Media-Delivered, Safer Sex Intervention for Chinese College Students: Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wai Han; Wong, Carlos King Ho

    2017-01-01

    Background The peer-led, social media-delivered intervention is an emerging method in sexual health promotion. However, no research has yet investigated its effectiveness as compared with other online channels or in an Asian population. Objective The objective of this study is to compare a peer-led, social media-delivered, safer sex intervention with a sexual health website. Both conditions target Chinese college students in Hong Kong. Methods A randomized controlled trial was conducted with a peer-led, safer sex Facebook group as the intervention and an existing online sexual health website as the control. The intervention materials were developed with peer input and followed the information-motivation-behavioral skills model; the intervention was moderated by peer educators. The participants filled out the online questionnaires before and after the 6-week intervention period. Outcome evaluations included safer sex attitudes, behavioral skills, and behaviors, while process evaluation focused on online experience, online-visiting frequency, and online engagement. The effect of online-visiting frequency and online engagement on outcome variables was investigated. Results Of 196 eligible participants—100 in the control group and 96 in the intervention group—who joined the study, 2 (1.0%) control participants joined the Facebook group and 24 of the remaining 194 participants (12.4%) were lost to follow-up. For the process evaluation, participants in the intervention group reported more satisfying online experiences (Psocial media-delivered, safer sex intervention was found to be feasible and effective in improving attitudes toward condom use and behavioral skills, but was not significantly more effective than a website. Future research may focus on the long-term effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of this popular method, as well as the potential cultural differences of using social media between different countries. Trial Registration Chinese Clinical Trial

  12. A Peer-Led, Social Media-Delivered, Safer Sex Intervention for Chinese College Students: Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wai Han; Wong, Carlos King Ho; Wong, William Chi Wai

    2017-08-09

    The peer-led, social media-delivered intervention is an emerging method in sexual health promotion. However, no research has yet investigated its effectiveness as compared with other online channels or in an Asian population. The objective of this study is to compare a peer-led, social media-delivered, safer sex intervention with a sexual health website. Both conditions target Chinese college students in Hong Kong. A randomized controlled trial was conducted with a peer-led, safer sex Facebook group as the intervention and an existing online sexual health website as the control. The intervention materials were developed with peer input and followed the information-motivation-behavioral skills model; the intervention was moderated by peer educators. The participants filled out the online questionnaires before and after the 6-week intervention period. Outcome evaluations included safer sex attitudes, behavioral skills, and behaviors, while process evaluation focused on online experience, online-visiting frequency, and online engagement. The effect of online-visiting frequency and online engagement on outcome variables was investigated. Of 196 eligible participants-100 in the control group and 96 in the intervention group-who joined the study, 2 (1.0%) control participants joined the Facebook group and 24 of the remaining 194 participants (12.4%) were lost to follow-up. For the process evaluation, participants in the intervention group reported more satisfying online experiences (Pdifference was found. After adjusting for demographic data, increased online-visiting frequency was associated with better contraceptive use behavioral intention (P=.05), better behavioral skills (P=.02), and more frequent condom use (P=.04). A peer-led, social media-delivered, safer sex intervention was found to be feasible and effective in improving attitudes toward condom use and behavioral skills, but was not significantly more effective than a website. Future research may focus on the

  13. John Hatties feedbackmodel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyldahl, Kirsten Kofod

    2015-01-01

    Med afsæt i den newzealandske professor John Hatties feedbackmodel giver denne artikel et perspektiv på, hvordan der kan arbejdes med effektiv feedback i undervisningen. Artiklen belyser hvordan en god feedbackkultur har betydning for, at læringsmål og feedbackprocesser anvendes konstruktivt og e...... effektivt i elevernes læreprocesser. Der gives desuden et eksempel på differentiering af fælles læringsmål og hvordan feedback, med afsæt i elevernes forudsætninger, kan gives i henhold til aktuelle læringsmål.......Med afsæt i den newzealandske professor John Hatties feedbackmodel giver denne artikel et perspektiv på, hvordan der kan arbejdes med effektiv feedback i undervisningen. Artiklen belyser hvordan en god feedbackkultur har betydning for, at læringsmål og feedbackprocesser anvendes konstruktivt og...

  14. Single realization stochastic FDTD for weak scattering waves in biological random media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Tengmeng; Taflove, Allen; Backman, Vadim

    2013-02-01

    This paper introduces an iterative scheme to overcome the unresolved issues presented in S-FDTD (stochastic finite-difference time-domain) for obtaining ensemble average field values recently reported by Smith and Furse in an attempt to replace the brute force multiple-realization also known as Monte-Carlo approach with a single-realization scheme. Our formulation is particularly useful for studying light interactions with biological cells and tissues having sub-wavelength scale features. Numerical results demonstrate that such a small scale variation can be effectively modeled with a random medium problem which when simulated with the proposed S-FDTD indeed produces a very accurate result.

  15. Elliptic equation for random walks. Application to transport in microporous media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shapiro, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    We consider a process of random walks with arbitrary residence time distribution. We show that in many cases this process may not be described by the classical (Fick) parabolic diffusion equation, but an elliptic equation. An additional term proportional to the second time derivative takes...... into account the distribution of the residence times of molecules ill pores. The new elliptic diffusion equation is strictly derived by the operator approach. A criterion showing where the new equation should be applied instead of the standard diffusion equation is obtained. Boundary conditions are studied...

  16. Wave propagation through random media: A local method of small perturbations based on the Helmholtz equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosse, Ralf

    1990-01-01

    Propagation of sound through the turbulent atmosphere is a statistical problem. The randomness of the refractive index field causes sound pressure fluctuations. Although no general theory to predict sound pressure statistics from given refractive index statistics exists, there are several approximate solutions to the problem. The most common approximation is the parabolic equation method. Results obtained by this method are restricted to small refractive index fluctuations and to small wave lengths. While the first condition is generally met in the atmosphere, it is desirable to overcome the second. A generalization of the parabolic equation method with respect to the small wave length restriction is presented.

  17. John Ruskin as Zoologist

    OpenAIRE

    Hammen, van der, L.

    1983-01-01

    A study is made of John Ruskin's work in the field of zoology. It is demonstrated that Ruskin's early interest in zoology was connected with his study of ornament, whilst his later studies are connected with his Oxford teaching and his social work. Ruskin's interest in zoology concerned groups frequently represented in art (particularly birds and snakes). Of these groups he studied, in a fragmentary way, the artistic morphology, the life-habits, the particular position to art and literature, ...

  18. John Strong (1941 - 2006)

    CERN Document Server

    Wickens, F

    Our friend and colleague John Strong was cruelly taken from us by a brain tumour on Monday 31st July, a few days before his 65th birthday John started his career working with a group from Westfield College, under the leadership of Ted Bellamy. He obtained his PhD and spent the early part of his career on experiments at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL), but after the early 1970s his research was focussed on experiments in CERN. Over the years he made a number of notable contributions to experiments in CERN: The Omega spectrometer adopted a system John had originally developed for experiments at RAL using vidicon cameras to record the sparks in the spark chambers; He contributed to the success of NA1 and NA7, where he became heavily involved in the electronic trigger systems; He was responsible for the second level trigger system for the ALEPH detector and spent five years leading a team that designed and built the system, which ran for twelve years with only minor interventions. Following ALEPH he tur...

  19. Direct Simulation of Multiple Scattering by Discrete Random Media Illuminated by Gaussian Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackowski, Daniel W.; Mishchenko, Michael I.

    2011-01-01

    The conventional orientation-averaging procedure developed in the framework of the superposition T-matrix approach is generalized to include the case of illumination by a Gaussian beam (GB). The resulting computer code is parallelized and used to perform extensive numerically exact calculations of electromagnetic scattering by volumes of discrete random medium consisting of monodisperse spherical particles. The size parameters of the scattering volumes are 40, 50, and 60, while their packing density is fixed at 5%. We demonstrate that all scattering patterns observed in the far-field zone of a random multisphere target and their evolution with decreasing width of the incident GB can be interpreted in terms of idealized theoretical concepts such as forward-scattering interference, coherent backscattering (CB), and diffuse multiple scattering. It is shown that the increasing violation of electromagnetic reciprocity with decreasing GB width suppresses and eventually eradicates all observable manifestations of CB. This result supplements the previous demonstration of the effects of broken reciprocity in the case of magneto-optically active particles subjected to an external magnetic field.

  20. Superior efficacy of St John's wort extract WS® 5570 compared to placebo in patients with major depression: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multi-center trial [ISRCTN77277298

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dienel Angelika

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the current study was to assess the antidepressant efficacy and safety of Hypericum perforatum (St. John's wort extract WS® 5570 at doses of 600 mg/day in a single dose and 1200 mg/day in two doses. Methods The participants in this double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, multi-center clinical trial were male and female adult out-patients with an episode of mild or moderate major depressive episode (single or recurrent episode, DSM-IV criteria. As specified by the relevant guideline, the study was preceded by a medication-free run-in phase. For the 6-week treatment, 332 patients were randomized: 123 to WS® 5570 600 mg/day, 127 to WS® 5570 1200 mg/day, and 82 to placebo. The primary outcome measure was the change in total score on the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D, 17-item version between baseline and endpoint. Additional measures included the number of responders, the number of patients in remission, and several other standard rating scales. Efficacy and safety were assessed after 2 and 6 weeks. The design included an interim analysis performed after randomization with the option of early termination. Results After 6 weeks of treatment, mean ± standard deviation decreases in HAM-D total scores of 11.6 ± 6.4, 10.8 ± 7.3, and 6.0 ± 8.1 points were observed for the WS® 5570 600 mg/day, 1200 mg/day and placebo groups, respectively (endpoint analysis. Secondary measures of treatment efficacy also showed that both WS® 5570 groups were statistically superior to placebo. Significantly more patients in the WS® 5570 treatment groups than in the placebo group showed treatment response and remission. WS® 5570 was consistently more effective than placebo in patients with either less severe or more severe baseline impairment. The number of patients who experienced remission was higher in the WS® 5570 1200 mg/day group than the WS® 5570 600 mg/day group. The incidence of adverse events was low in

  1. Anomaly detection in random heterogeneous media Feynman-Kac formulae, stochastic homogenization and statistical inversion

    CERN Document Server

    Simon, Martin

    2015-01-01

    This monograph is concerned with the analysis and numerical solution of a stochastic inverse anomaly detection problem in electrical impedance tomography (EIT). Martin Simon studies the problem of detecting a parameterized anomaly in an isotropic, stationary and ergodic conductivity random field whose realizations are rapidly oscillating. For this purpose, he derives Feynman-Kac formulae to rigorously justify stochastic homogenization in the case of the underlying stochastic boundary value problem. The author combines techniques from the theory of partial differential equations and functional analysis with probabilistic ideas, paving the way to new mathematical theorems which may be fruitfully used in the treatment of the problem at hand. Moreover, the author proposes an efficient numerical method in the framework of Bayesian inversion for the practical solution of the stochastic inverse anomaly detection problem.   Contents Feynman-Kac formulae Stochastic homogenization Statistical inverse problems  Targe...

  2. John Campbell Begg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Robert

    2002-03-01

    John Campbell Begg born in Dunedin in 1876 was the son of Alexander Campbell Begg and Katherine Begg, early Otago settlers. He studied physics and philosophy at the University of Otago before turning to business and rural pursuits. He died in Dunedin in 1965 age 89. The Begg family were foundation members of the Otago Astronomical Society. Visits to the Tanna Hill Observatory were made in 1915. The astronomical observatory which stands in Robin Hood Park, Roslyn, Dunedin bears his name; Beverly Begg Observatory

  3. John Adams in 1959

    CERN Document Server

    1959-01-01

    On 24 November 1959, the Proton Synchrotron accelerated particles to 24 GeV. John Adams, leader of the construction team, announced the achievement in the Main Auditorium. In his hand can be seen an empty vodka bottle, which he had received from Nikitin with the message that it was to be drunk when CERN passed Dubna's world record energy of 10 Gev. The bottle now contains a polaroid photograph of the 24 GeV pulse ready to be sent to the Soviet Union.

  4. The Efficacy of a Walking Intervention Using Social Media to Increase Physical Activity: A Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rote, Aubrianne E; Klos, Lori A; Brondino, Michael J; Harley, Amy E; Swartz, Ann M

    2015-06-16

    Facebook may be a useful tool to provide a social support group to encourage increases in physical activity. This study examines the efficacy of a Facebook social support group to increase steps/day in young women. Female college freshmen (N = 63) were randomized to one of two 8-week interventions: a Facebook Social Support Group (n = 32) or a Standard Walking Intervention (n = 31). Participants in both groups received weekly step goals and tracked steps/day with a pedometer. Women in the Facebook Social Support Group were also enrolled in a Facebook group and asked to post information about their steps/day and provide feedback to one another. Women in both intervention arms significantly increased steps/day pre- to postintervention (F(8,425) = 94.43, P Social Support Group increased steps/day significantly more (F(1,138) = 11.34, P social support group to increase physical activity in young women. Women in the Facebook Social Support Group increased walking by approximately 1.5 miles/day more than women in the Standard Walking Intervention which, if maintained, could have a profound impact on their future health.

  5. John Knox and education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham A. Duncan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available John Knox the 16th century Scottish reformer made a lasting impact on the Scottish nation in the fields of society, politics, church and education. He is remembered mainly for his reform of the church but he also made a significant contribution to the reform of education, which has lasted until the present day and has impacted on other contexts. Although much of his vision was not realised during his lifetime, his mission continued nonetheless. He was a product of the late Medieval age and his transformation was completed by his experience alongside John Calvin in Geneva. This was then contextualised in his own Scottish situation. Here we examine his work in the field of education with particular reference to the First Book of Discipline. The outcome of his labours was a compulsory, universal system of free education, which involved character formation and enabled all to achieve the limit of their potential.

  6. A Justiça como Equidade na Teoria de John Rawls: a mediação enquanto política pública de sua concretização

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina Ghisleni

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The theory of justice as equity from John Rawls is based in the use of two basics principles that ensure individual freedoms and reduction of social inequalities, legitimazing the existence of a democratic society. Accordingly, this principles assist in the maintenance of social peace, but often they are not enough for this, so the mediation as a public policy in the conflict¿s treatment is a mechanism helper of dialogue, solves conflicts consensually and prevents occurrence of other conflicts. So, as mediation is not the imposition of a decisión, but its construction by the parties themselves, it becomes a instrument of achieving the principles established by John Rawls, because it is based in the principles of equality and freedom.

  7. A Social Media Peer Group for Mothers To Prevent Obesity from Infancy: The Grow2Gether Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiks, Alexander G; Gruver, Rachel S; Bishop-Gilyard, Chanelle T; Shults, Justine; Virudachalam, Senbagam; Suh, Andrew W; Gerdes, Marsha; Kalra, Gurpreet K; DeRusso, Patricia A; Lieberman, Alexandra; Weng, Daniel; Elovitz, Michal A; Berkowitz, Robert I; Power, Thomas J

    2017-10-01

    Few studies have addressed obesity prevention among low-income families whose infants are at increased obesity risk. We tested a Facebook peer-group intervention for low-income mothers to foster behaviors promoting healthy infant growth. In this randomized controlled trial, 87 pregnant women (Medicaid insured, BMI ≥25 kg/m2) were randomized to the Grow2Gether intervention or text message appointment reminders. Grow2Gether participants joined a private Facebook group of 9-13 women from 2 months before delivery until infant age 9 months. A psychologist facilitated groups featuring a curriculum of weekly videos addressing feeding, sleep, parenting, and maternal well-being. Feasibility was assessed using the frequency and content of participation, and acceptability using surveys. Maternal beliefs and behaviors and infant growth were assessed at birth, 2, 4, 6, and 9 months. Differences in infant growth between study arms were explored. We conducted intention-to-treat analyses using quasi-least-squares regression. Eighty-eight percent (75/85) of intervention participants (42% (36/85) food insecure, 88% (75/85) black) reported the group was helpful. Participants posted 30 times/group/week on average. At 9 months, the intervention group had significant improvement in feeding behaviors (Infant Feeding Style Questionnaire) compared to the control group (p = 0.01, effect size = 0.45). Intervention group mothers were significantly less likely to pressure infants to finish food and, at age 6 months, give cereal in the bottle. Differences were not observed for other outcomes, including maternal feeding beliefs or infant weight-for-length. A social media peer-group intervention was engaging and significantly impacted certain feeding behaviors in families with infants at high risk of obesity.

  8. Driven interfaces in random media at finite temperature: existence of an anomalous zero-velocity phase at small external force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monthus, Cécile; Garel, Thomas

    2008-10-01

    The motion of driven interfaces in random media at finite temperature T and small external force F is usually described by a linear displacement h{G}(t) approximately V(F,T)t at large times, where the velocity vanishes according to the creep formula as V(F,T) approximately e;{-K(T)F;{mu}} for F-->0 . In this paper, we question this picture on the specific example of the directed polymer in a two-dimensional random medium. We have recently shown [C. Monthus and T. Garel, J. Phys. A 41, 255002 (2008)] that its dynamics for F=0 can be analyzed in terms of a strong disorder renormalization procedure, where the distribution of renormalized barriers flows towards some "infinite disorder fixed point." In the present paper, we obtain that for small F , this "infinite disorder fixed point" becomes a "strong disorder fixed point" with an exponential distribution of renormalized barriers. The corresponding distribution of trapping times then only decays as a power law P(tau) approximately 1tau;{1+alpha} , where the exponent alpha(F,T) vanishes as alpha(F,T) proportional, variant F micro as F-->0 . Our conclusion is that in the small force region alpha(F,T)infinity induces strong non-self-averaging effects that invalidate the usual creep formula obtained by replacing all trapping times by the typical value. We find instead that the motion is only sublinearly in time h{G}(t) approximately t;{alpha(F,T)} , i.e., the asymptotic velocity vanishes V=0 . This analysis is confirmed by numerical simulations of a directed polymer with a metric constraint driven in a traps landscape. We moreover obtain that the roughness exponent, which is governed by the equilibrium value zeta{eq}=23 up to some large scale, becomes equal to zeta=1 at the largest scales.

  9. A social media-based physical activity intervention: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallo, David N; Tate, Deborah F; Ries, Amy V; Brown, Jane D; DeVellis, Robert F; Ammerman, Alice S

    2012-11-01

    Online social networks, such as Facebook™, have extensive reach, and they use technology that could enhance social support, an established determinant of physical activity. This combination of reach and functionality makes online social networks a promising intervention platform for increasing physical activity. To test the efficacy of a physical activity intervention that combined education, physical activity monitoring, and online social networking to increase social support for physical activity compared to an education-only control. RCT. Students (n=134) were randomized to two groups: education-only controls receiving access to a physical activity-focused website (n=67) and intervention participants receiving access to the same website with physical activity self-monitoring and enrollment in a Facebook group (n=67). Recruitment and data collection occurred in 2010 and 2011; data analyses were performed in 2011. Female undergraduate students at a large southeastern public university. Intervention participants were encouraged through e-mails, website instructions, and moderator communications to solicit and provide social support related to increasing physical activity through a physical activity-themed Facebook group. Participants received access to a dedicated website with educational materials and a physical activity self-monitoring tool. The primary outcome was perceived social support for physical activity; secondary outcomes included self-reported physical activity. Participants experienced increases in social support and physical activity over time but there were no differences in perceived social support or physical activity between groups over time. Facebook participants posted 259 times to the group. Two thirds (66%) of intervention participants completing a post-study survey indicated that they would recommend the program to friends. Use of an online social networking group plus self-monitoring did not produce greater perceptions of social support or

  10. Calculation Of Effective Fluid Permeability In Porous Media With Quenched Random Disorder Using The Coherent Potential Approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hristopulos, Dionissios

    2001-03-01

    Quenched random disorder models represent the heterogeneity of the saturated fluid permeability of porous media in steady-state flow conditions. The effective permeability is based on the stochastic average of local fluctuations and measures large-scale effects of the disorder. Explicit calculations of effective permeability require various restrictive assumptions on the disorder distribution, and numerical methods are computationally intensive. We propose a semianalytical approach based on the coherent potential approximation (CPA), used for electronic band structure calculations in disordered semiconductors. The PCPA does not require the restrictions of explicit methods and admits efficient numerical solutions. The PCPA equations yield the exact effective permeability (the harmonic mean), in one spatial dimension. The leading order solution in higher dimensions agrees with the standard perturbation expansion. It is known that the effective permeability of a two-dimensional medium with lognormal disorder is given exactly by the geometric mean. We show that the numerical solutions of the PCPA are in good agreement with the exact expression.

  11. Following John Wilkinson

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joe Luna

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This article reads closely John Wilkinson’s essay ‘Following the Poem’ (2007 alongside some of Wilkinson’s poetry from the 1980s and 1990s. Using the work of Donald Winnicott as a touchstone, the article critically evaluates the claims made in Wilkinson’s essay about fullness and intersubjectivity against some of his poetry’s expressions of fragmentation and dismemberment. The article concludes with some reflections on Wilkinson’s quotation of Shelley’s 'Prometheus Unbound in Proud Flesh' (1986, and on the later collection 'Hid Lip' (1992. It argues that an illuminating disparity or contradiction exists between the avowed aim of the reading practices described and advocated in ‘Following the Poem,’ and the state of the subjects repeatedly presented in Wilkinson’s poetry. The article finally suggests that this contradiction itself speaks volumes about the kind of world in which both poetry and poetics exist.

  12. Blastocyst culture using single versus sequential media in clinical IVF: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sfontouris, Ioannis A; Martins, Wellington P; Nastri, Carolina O; Viana, Iara G R; Navarro, Paula A; Raine-Fenning, Nick; van der Poel, Sheryl; Rienzi, Laura; Racowsky, Catherine

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to undertake a review of the available evidence comparing the use of a single medium versus sequential media for embryo culture to the blastocyst stage in clinical IVF. We searched the Cochrane Central, PubMed, Scopus, ClinicalTrials.gov, Current Controlled Trials and WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform to identify randomized controlled trials comparing single versus sequential media for blastocyst culture and ongoing pregnancy rate. Included studies randomized either oocytes/zygotes or women. Eligible oocyte/zygote studies were analyzed to assess the risk difference (RD) and 95 % confidence intervals (CI) between the two media systems; eligible woman-based studies were analyzed to assess the risk ratio (RR) and 95 % CI for clinical pregnancy rate. No differences were observed between single and sequential media for either ongoing pregnancy per randomized woman (relative risk (RR) = 0.9, 95 % CI = 0.7 to 1.3, two studies including 246 women, I 2  = 0 %) or clinical pregnancy per randomized woman (RR = 1.0, 95 % CI = 0.7 to 1.4, one study including 100 women); or miscarriage per clinical pregnancy: RR = 1.3, 95 % CI = 0.4 to 4.3, two studies including 246 participants, I 2  = 0 %). Single media use was associated with an increase blastocyst formation per randomized oocyte/zygote (relative distribution (RD) = +0.06, 95 % CI = +0.01 to +0.12, ten studies including 7455 oocytes/zygotes, I 2  = 83 %) but not top/high blastocyst formation (RD = +0.05, 95 % CI = -0.01 to +0.11, five studies including 3879 oocytes/zygotes, I 2  = 93 %). The overall quality of the evidence was very low for all these four outcomes. Although using a single medium for extended culture has some practical advantages and blastocyst formation rates appear to be higher, there is insufficient evidence to recommend either sequential or single-step media as being superior for the culture of

  13. Portable Video Media Versus Standard Verbal Communication in Surgical Information Delivery to Nurses: A Prospective Multicenter, Randomized Controlled Crossover Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kam, Jonathan; Ainsworth, Hannah; Handmer, Marcus; Louie-Johnsun, Mark; Winter, Matthew

    2016-10-01

    Continuing education of health professionals is important for delivery of quality health care. Surgical nurses are often required to understand surgical procedures. Nurses need to be aware of the expected outcomes and recognize potential complications of such procedures during their daily work. Traditional educational methods, such as conferences and tutorials or informal education at the bedside, have many drawbacks for delivery of this information in a universal, standardized, and timely manner. The rapid uptake of portable media devices makes portable video media (PVM) a potential alternative to current educational methods. To compare PVM to standard verbal communication (SVC) for surgical information delivery and educational training for nurses and evaluate its impact on knowledge acquisition and participant satisfaction. Prospective, multicenter, randomized controlled crossover trial. Two hospitals: Gosford District Hospital and Wyong Hospital. Seventy-two nursing staff (36 at each site). Information delivery via PVM--7-minute video compared to information delivered via SVC. Knowledge acquisition was measured by a 32-point questionnaire, and satisfaction with the method of education delivery was measured using the validated Client Satisfaction Questionnaire (CSQ-8). Knowledge acquisition was higher via PVM compared to SVC 25.9 (95% confidence interval [CI] 25.2-26.6) versus 24.3 (95% CI 23.5-25.1), p = .004. Participant satisfaction was higher with PVM 29.5 (95% CI 28.3-30.7) versus 26.5 (95% CI 25.1-27.9), p = .003. Following information delivery via SVC, participants had a 6% increase in knowledge scores, 24.3 (95% CI 23.5-25.1) versus 25.7 (95% CI 24.9-26.5) p = .001, and a 13% increase in satisfaction scores, 26.5 (95% CI 25.1-27.9) versus 29.9 (95% CI 28.8-31.0) p < .001, when they crossed-over to information delivery via PVM. PVM provides a novel method for providing education to nurses that improves knowledge retention and satisfaction with the

  14. Social media to supplement point-of-care ultrasound courses: the "sandwich e-learning" approach. A randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hempel, Dorothea; Haunhorst, Stephanie; Sinnathurai, Sivajini; Seibel, Armin; Recker, Florian; Heringer, Frank; Michels, Guido; Breitkreutz, Raoul

    2016-12-01

    Point-of-care ultrasound (POC-US) is gaining importance in almost all specialties. E-learning has been used to teach theoretical knowledge and pattern recognition. As social media are universally available, they can be utilized for educational purposes. We wanted to evaluate the utility of the sandwich e-learning approach defined as a pre-course e-learning and a post-course learning activity using Facebook after a one-day point-of-care ultrasound (POC-US) course and its effect on the retention of knowledge. A total of 62 medial students were recruited for this study and randomly assigned to one of four groups. All groups received an identical hands-on training and performed several tests during the study period. The hands-on training was performed in groups of five students per instructor with the students scanning each other. Group 1 had access to pre-course e-learning, but not to post-course e-learning. Instead of a pre-course e-learning, group 2 listened to presentations at the day of the course (classroom teaching) and had access to the post-course learning activity using Facebook. Group 3 had access to both pre- and post-course e-learning (sandwich e-learning) activities, while group 4 listened classroom presentations only (classroom teaching only). Therefore only groups 2 and 3 had access to post-course learning via Facebook by joining a secured group. Posts containing ultrasound pictures and videos were published to this group. The students were asked to "like" the posts to monitor attendance. Knowledge retention was assessed 6 weeks after the course. After 6 weeks, group 3 achieved comparable results when compared to group 2 (82.2 % + -8.2 vs. 84.3 + -8.02) (p = 0.3). Students who participated in the post-course activity were more satisfied with the overall course than students without post-course learning (5.5 vs. 5.3 on a range from 1 to 6). In this study, the sandwich e-learning approach led to equal rates of knowledge retention compared to

  15. An online randomized controlled trial evaluating HIV prevention digital media interventions for men who have sex with men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabina Hirshfield

    Full Text Available As HIV infection continues unabated, there is a need for effective interventions targeting at-risk men who have sex with men (MSM. Engaging MSM online where they meet sexual partners is critical for HIV prevention efforts.A randomized controlled trial (RCT conducted online among U.S. MSM recruited from several gay sexual networking websites assessed the impact of 2 HIV prevention videos and an HIV prevention webpage compared to a control condition for the study outcomes HIV testing, serostatus disclosure, and unprotected anal intercourse (UAI at 60-day follow-up. Video conditions were pooled due to reduced power from low retention (53%, n = 1,631. No participant incentives were provided.Follow-up was completed by 1,631 (53% of 3,092 eligible men. In the 60 days after the intervention, men in the pooled video condition were significantly more likely than men in the control to report full serostatus disclosure ('asked and told' with their last sexual partner (OR 1.32, 95% CI 1.01-1.74. Comparing baseline to follow-up, HIV-negative men in the pooled video (OR 0.70, 95% CI 0.54-0.91 and webpage condition (OR 0.43, 95% CI 0.25-0.72 significantly reduced UAI at follow-up. HIV-positive men in the pooled video condition significantly reduced UAI (OR 0.38, 95% CI 0.20-0.67 and serodiscordant UAI (OR 0.53, 95% CI 0.28-0.96 at follow-up.Findings from this online RCT of MSM recruited from sexual networking websites suggest that a low cost, brief digital media intervention designed to engage critical thinking can increase HIV disclosure to sexual partners and decrease sexual risk. Effective, brief HIV prevention interventions featuring digital media that are made widely available may serve as a complementary part of an overall behavioral and biomedical strategy for reducing sexual risk by addressing the specific needs and circumstances of the target population, and by changing individual knowledge, motivations, and community norms.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT

  16. An online randomized controlled trial evaluating HIV prevention digital media interventions for men who have sex with men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirshfield, Sabina; Chiasson, Mary Ann; Joseph, Heather; Scheinmann, Roberta; Johnson, Wayne D; Remien, Robert H; Shaw, Francine Shuchat; Emmons, Reed; Yu, Gary; Margolis, Andrew D

    2012-01-01

    As HIV infection continues unabated, there is a need for effective interventions targeting at-risk men who have sex with men (MSM). Engaging MSM online where they meet sexual partners is critical for HIV prevention efforts. A randomized controlled trial (RCT) conducted online among U.S. MSM recruited from several gay sexual networking websites assessed the impact of 2 HIV prevention videos and an HIV prevention webpage compared to a control condition for the study outcomes HIV testing, serostatus disclosure, and unprotected anal intercourse (UAI) at 60-day follow-up. Video conditions were pooled due to reduced power from low retention (53%, n = 1,631). No participant incentives were provided. Follow-up was completed by 1,631 (53%) of 3,092 eligible men. In the 60 days after the intervention, men in the pooled video condition were significantly more likely than men in the control to report full serostatus disclosure ('asked and told') with their last sexual partner (OR 1.32, 95% CI 1.01-1.74). Comparing baseline to follow-up, HIV-negative men in the pooled video (OR 0.70, 95% CI 0.54-0.91) and webpage condition (OR 0.43, 95% CI 0.25-0.72) significantly reduced UAI at follow-up. HIV-positive men in the pooled video condition significantly reduced UAI (OR 0.38, 95% CI 0.20-0.67) and serodiscordant UAI (OR 0.53, 95% CI 0.28-0.96) at follow-up. Findings from this online RCT of MSM recruited from sexual networking websites suggest that a low cost, brief digital media intervention designed to engage critical thinking can increase HIV disclosure to sexual partners and decrease sexual risk. Effective, brief HIV prevention interventions featuring digital media that are made widely available may serve as a complementary part of an overall behavioral and biomedical strategy for reducing sexual risk by addressing the specific needs and circumstances of the target population, and by changing individual knowledge, motivations, and community norms. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00649701.

  17. An Online Randomized Controlled Trial Evaluating HIV Prevention Digital Media Interventions for Men Who Have Sex with Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirshfield, Sabina; Chiasson, Mary Ann; Joseph, Heather; Scheinmann, Roberta; Johnson, Wayne D.; Remien, Robert H.; Shaw, Francine Shuchat; Emmons, Reed; Yu, Gary; Margolis, Andrew D.

    2012-01-01

    Background As HIV infection continues unabated, there is a need for effective interventions targeting at-risk men who have sex with men (MSM). Engaging MSM online where they meet sexual partners is critical for HIV prevention efforts. Methods A randomized controlled trial (RCT) conducted online among U.S. MSM recruited from several gay sexual networking websites assessed the impact of 2 HIV prevention videos and an HIV prevention webpage compared to a control condition for the study outcomes HIV testing, serostatus disclosure, and unprotected anal intercourse (UAI) at 60-day follow-up. Video conditions were pooled due to reduced power from low retention (53%, n = 1,631). No participant incentives were provided. Principal Findings Follow-up was completed by 1,631 (53%) of 3,092 eligible men. In the 60 days after the intervention, men in the pooled video condition were significantly more likely than men in the control to report full serostatus disclosure (‘asked and told’) with their last sexual partner (OR 1.32, 95% CI 1.01–1.74). Comparing baseline to follow-up, HIV-negative men in the pooled video (OR 0.70, 95% CI 0.54–0.91) and webpage condition (OR 0.43, 95% CI 0.25–0.72) significantly reduced UAI at follow-up. HIV-positive men in the pooled video condition significantly reduced UAI (OR 0.38, 95% CI 0.20–0.67) and serodiscordant UAI (OR 0.53, 95% CI 0.28–0.96) at follow-up. Conclusions/Significance Findings from this online RCT of MSM recruited from sexual networking websites suggest that a low cost, brief digital media intervention designed to engage critical thinking can increase HIV disclosure to sexual partners and decrease sexual risk. Effective, brief HIV prevention interventions featuring digital media that are made widely available may serve as a complementary part of an overall behavioral and biomedical strategy for reducing sexual risk by addressing the specific needs and circumstances of the target population, and by changing

  18. John Adams Lecture

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2010-01-01

    13 December 2010 14:30 - Council Chamber, Bldg.503-1-001 Accelerator Breakthroughs, Achievements and Lessons from the Tevatron Collider V. Shiltsev / Fermilab’s Accelerator Physics Centre This year we celebrate the 25th anniversary of the first proton-antiproton collisions in the Tevatron. For two and a half decades the Tevatron at Fermilab (Batavia, IL, USA) was a centerpiece of the US and world’s High Energy Physics as the world’s highest energy particle collider at 1.8 TeV center of mass energy. While funding agencies are deciding on a 3-year extension of the Collider Run II operation through 2014, we – in this 2010 John Adams Lecture - will take a look in exciting story of the Tevatron: the story of long preparations, great expectations, numerous difficulties, years of “blood and sweat”, continuous upgrades, exceeding original goals (by a factor of 400) and high emotions. An accelerator scientist prospective will be given on a wide spectrum o...

  19. A KDE-Based Random Walk Method for Modeling Reactive Transport With Complex Kinetics in Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sole-Mari, Guillem; Fernà ndez-Garcia, Daniel; Rodríguez-Escales, Paula; Sanchez-Vila, Xavier

    2017-11-01

    In recent years, a large body of the literature has been devoted to study reactive transport of solutes in porous media based on pure Lagrangian formulations. Such approaches have also been extended to accommodate second-order bimolecular reactions, in which the reaction rate is proportional to the concentrations of the reactants. Rather, in some cases, chemical reactions involving two reactants follow more complicated rate laws. Some examples are (1) reaction rate laws written in terms of powers of concentrations, (2) redox reactions incorporating a limiting term (e.g., Michaelis-Menten), or (3) any reaction where the activity coefficients vary with the concentration of the reactants, just to name a few. We provide a methodology to account for complex kinetic bimolecular reactions in a fully Lagrangian framework where each particle represents a fraction of the total mass of a specific solute. The method, built as an extension to the second-order case, is based on the concept of optimal Kernel Density Estimator, which allows the concentrations to be written in terms of particle locations, hence transferring the concept of reaction rate to that of particle location distribution. By doing so, we can update the probability of particles reacting without the need to fully reconstruct the concentration maps. The performance and convergence of the method is tested for several illustrative examples that simulate the Advection-Dispersion-Reaction Equation in a 1-D homogeneous column. Finally, a 2-D application example is presented evaluating the need of fully describing non-bilinear chemical kinetics in a randomly heterogeneous porous medium.

  20. Randomized pilot trial measuring knowledge acquisition of opioid education in emergency department patients using a novel media platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarthy, Bharath; Somasundaram, Shashank; Mogi, Jennifer; Burns, Roshan; Hoonpongsimanont, Wirachin; Wiechmann, Warren; Lotfipour, Shahram

    2017-09-05

    The number of active opioid analgesic prescriptions has risen steadily, causing increases in nonmedical opioid use, addiction, and overdose. Insufficient focus on patient discharge instructions has contributed to lack of patient awareness regarding dangers of opioids. This study examines whether an educational Khan Academy-style animation discharge instruction on the dangers and safe usage of opioid analgesics elicits higher knowledge acquisition than current standard of care. Additionally, it measures the feasibility of implementing this video discharge instruction in the emergency department (ED). Fifty-two English-speaking patients aged 18 years or older receiving an opioid prescription were enrolled in this study. Patients were randomized into 2 groups. The standard of care group received verbal instruction and an informational sheet, whereas the video animation group received a 6-minute video on proper usage of opioids in addition to standard of care. Video content was sourced from samhsa.gov and administered within the ED prior to discharge. Both groups received a 26-question test regarding the dangers and safe usage of opioids immediately after education. An unpaired t test compared knowledge acquisition between the 2 groups. Fifty-four patients were approached, 52 patients enrolled; 27 in the standard group and 25 in the animation group. The standard of care group averaged 65% knowledge acquisition (16.8/26 correct), whereas the animation group averaged 82% acquisition (21.2/26 correct). The video animation significantly increased patient knowledge acquisition about opioid medications' risks and proper usage and disposal (P = .001). It can be concluded that medical knowledge acquisition is improved in the video animation group compared with the current standard of care (P = .001). It can also be concluded that it is feasible to implement a novel media platform to educate patients receiving opioid analgesics in the ED (96.1%).

  1. Nutritional Online Information for Cancer Patients: a Randomized Trial of an Internet Communication Plus Social Media Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnagnarella, Patrizia; Misotti, Alessandro Maria; Santoro, Luigi; Akoumianakis, Demosthenes; Del Campo, Laura; De Lorenzo, Francesco; Lombardo, Claudio; Milolidakis, Giannis; Sullivan, Richard; McVie, John Gordon

    2016-09-01

    We hypothesized that cancer patients using an Internet website would show an improvement in the knowledge about healthy eating habits, and this might be enhanced by social media interaction. A 6-month randomized intervention was set up. Eligible subjects were allocated in intervention (IG) and control groups (CG). IG had access to the website, and CG was provided with printed versions. All enrolled participants filled in Nutrition Questionnaire (NQ), Quality of Life Questionnaire (QoL) and Psychological Distress Inventory (PDI), at baseline and after 6 months. The difference between post- vs pre-questionnaires was calculated. Seventy-four subjects (CG 39; IG 35) completed the study. There was an increase in the score after the intervention in both groups for the NQ, even if not statistically significant. Dividing the IG into three categories, no (NI), low (LI) and high interactions (HI), we found a decreased score (improvement) in the CG (-0.2) and in the HI (-1.7), and an increased score (worsening) in the NI (+3.3) (p = NS) analysing the PDI. We found an increased score in the QoL both in CG and IG (adjusted LSMeans +3.5 and +2.8 points, respectively; p = NS). This study represents an example for support cancer patients. Despite the lack of significant effects, critical points and problems encountered may be of interest to researchers and organization working in the cancer setting. Intervention strategies to support patients during the care process are needed in order to attain the full potential of patient-centred care on cancer outcomes.

  2. Using Culturally Sensitive Media Messages to Reduce HIV-associated Sexual Behavior in High-risk African-American Adolescents: Results from a Randomized Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sznitman, Sharon; Vanable, Peter A.; Carey, Michael P.; Hennessy, Michael; Brown, Larry K.; Valois, Robert F.; Stanton, Bonita F.; Salazar, Laura F.; DiClemente, Ralph; Farber, Naomi; Romer, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To test the long-term effects of a mass media intervention that used culturally and developmentally appropriate messages to enhance HIV-preventive beliefs and behavior of high-risk African-American adolescents. Methods Television and radio messages were delivered over three years in two cities (Syracuse, NY and Macon, GA) that were randomly selected within each of two regionally matched city pairs with the other cities (Providence, RI and Columbia, SC) serving as controls. African American adolescents ages 14 to 17 (N = 1710), recruited in the four cities over a 16-month period, completed audio computer-assisted self-interviews at recruitment and again at 3, 6, 12 and 18-months post-recruitment to assess the long-term effects of the media program. To identify the unique effects of the media intervention, youth who completed at least one follow-up and who did not test positive for any of three sexually transmitted infections at recruitment or at 6 and 12-month follow-up were retained for analysis (N=1346). Results The media intervention reached virtually all of the adolescents in the trial and produced a range of effects including improved normative condom-use negotiation expectancies and increased sex refusal self-efficacy. Most importantly, older adolescents (ages 16-17) exposed to the media program exhibited a less risky age trajectory of unprotected sex than those in the non-media cities. Conclusions Culturally tailored mass media messages delivered consistently over time have the potential to reach a large audience of high-risk adolescents, to support changes in HIV-preventive beliefs, and to reduce HIV-associated risk behaviors among older youth. PMID:21856515

  3. Using culturally sensitive media messages to reduce HIV-associated sexual behavior in high-risk African American adolescents: results from a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sznitman, Sharon; Vanable, Peter A; Carey, Michael P; Hennessy, Michael; Brown, Larry K; Valois, Robert F; Stanton, Bonita F; Salazar, Laura F; Diclemente, Ralph; Farber, Naomi; Romer, Daniel

    2011-09-01

    To test the long-term effects of a mass media intervention that used culturally and developmentally appropriate messages to enhance human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-preventive beliefs and behavior of high-risk African American adolescents. Television and radio messages were delivered for more than 3 years in two cities (Syracuse, NY; and Macon, GA) that were randomly selected within each of the two regionally matched city pairs, with the other cities (Providence, RI; and Columbia, SC) serving as controls. African American adolescents, aged 14-17 years (N = 1,710), recruited in the four cities over a 16-month period, completed audio computer-assisted self-interviews at recruitment and again at 3, 6, 12, and 18-months postrecruitment to assess the long-term effects of the media program. To identify the unique effects of the media intervention, youth who completed at least one follow-up and who did not test positive for any of the three sexually transmitted infections at recruitment or at 6-and 12-month follow-up were retained for analysis (N = 1,346). The media intervention reached virtually all the adolescents in the trial and produced a range of effects including improved normative condom-use negotiation expectancies and increased sex refusal self-efficacy. Most importantly, older adolescents (aged 16-17 years) exposed to the media program showed a less risky age trajectory of unprotected sex than those in the nonmedia cities. Culturally tailored mass media messages that are delivered consistently over time have the potential to reach a large audience of high-risk adolescents, to support changes in HIV-preventive beliefs, and to reduce HIV-associated risk behaviors among older youth. Copyright © 2011 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Efficacy of a randomized trial of a community and school-based anti-violence media intervention among small-town middle school youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaim, Randall C; Kelly, Kathleen

    2008-09-01

    In a community randomized controlled trial, intervention middle school students from small towns were exposed to a community and school-based anti-violence intervention ("Resolve It, Solve It"). The primary intervention was a media campaign in which local high school students served as models in print, radio, and television PSAs and spearheaded local school and community activities. The media campaign was supported with school and community events that reinforced campaign messages. Tests of recognition and recall indicated widespread exposure to the media intervention. Multiple group latent growth models indicated that relative to control students, intervention students reported significant differences in rates of growth for intent for violence, physical assault against people, verbal victimization, and perceived safety at school. No differences were found for verbal assault, physical assault against objects, physical victimization, or self-efficacy for avoiding violence. When examined by sex, it was determined that results for physical assault against people were obtained only among female students, and changes in verbal victimization and perceived school safety were observed only among male students. These results suggest that a media and reinforcing community intervention led by older peers can alter rates of growth for some measures of violence and associated factors among small-town youth. Further research is indicated to determine how different campaign messages influence students by sex.

  5. John locke on personal identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimbalkar, Namita

    2011-01-01

    John Locke speaks of personal identity and survival of consciousness after death. A criterion of personal identity through time is given. Such a criterion specifies, insofar as that is possible, the necessary and sufficient conditions for the survival of persons. John Locke holds that personal identity is a matter of psychological continuity. He considered personal identity (or the self) to be founded on consciousness (viz. memory), and not on the substance of either the soul or the body.

  6. Media Coverage, Journal Press Releases and Editorials Associated with Randomized and Observational Studies in High-Impact Medical Journals: A Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael T M Wang

    Full Text Available Publication of clinical research findings in prominent journals influences health beliefs and medical practice, in part by engendering news coverage. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs should be most influential in guiding clinical practice. We determined whether study design of clinical research published in high-impact journals influences media coverage.We compared the incidence and amount of media coverage of RCTs with that of observational studies published in the top 7 medical journals between 1 January 2013 and 31 March 2013. We specifically assessed media coverage of the most rigorous RCTs, those with >1000 participants that reported 'hard' outcomes. There was no difference between RCTs and observational studies in coverage by major newspapers or news agencies, or in total number of news stories generated (all P>0.63. Large RCTs reporting 'hard' outcomes did not generate more news coverage than small RCTs that reported surrogate outcomes and observational studies (all P>0.32. RCTs were more likely than observational studies to attract a journal editorial (70% vs 46%, P = 0.003, but less likely to be the subject of a journal press release (17% vs 50%, P0.99, nor were they more likely to be the subject of a journal press release (14% vs 38%, P = 0.14.The design of clinical studies whose results are published in high-impact medical journals is not associated with the likelihood or amount of ensuing news coverage.

  7. Effects of a mixed media education intervention program on increasing knowledge, attitude, and compliance with standard precautions among nursing students: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Peng; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Xiaohui; Wu, Tat Leong; Hall, Brian J

    2017-04-01

    Standard precautions (SPs) are considered fundamental protective measures to manage health care-associated infections and to reduce occupational health hazards. This study intended to assess the effectiveness of a mixed media education intervention to enhance nursing students' knowledge, attitude, and compliance with SPs. A randomized controlled trial with 84 nursing students was conducted in a teaching hospital in Hubei, China. The intervention group (n = 42) attended 3 biweekly mixed media education sessions, consisting of lectures, videos, role-play, and feedback with 15-20 minutes of individual online supervision and feedback sessions following each class. The control group learned the same material through self-directed readings. Pre- and posttest assessments of knowledge, attitudes, and compliance were assessed with the Knowledge with Standard Precautions Questionnaire, Attitude with Standard Precautions Scale, and the Compliance with Standard Precautions Scale, respectively. The Standard Bacterial Colony Index was used to assess handwashing effectiveness. At 6-week follow-up, performance on the Knowledge with Standard Precautions Questionnaire, Attitude with Standard Precautions Scale, and Compliance with Standard Precautions Scale were significantly improved in the intervention group compared with the control group (P < .01). The hand hygiene standard in the intervention group (38 passed) outperformed the control group (23 passed) (P < .01). A mixed media education intervention is effective in improving knowledge, attitude, and compliance with SPs. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Noninvasive bipolar double-pulsed-field-gradient NMR reveals signatures for pore size and shape in polydisperse, randomly oriented, inhomogeneous porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemesh, Noam; Ozarslan, Evren; Adiri, Tal; Basser, Peter J; Cohen, Yoram

    2010-07-28

    Noninvasive characterization of pore size and shape in opaque porous media is a formidable challenge. NMR diffusion-diffraction patterns were found to be exceptionally useful for obtaining such morphological features, but only when pores are monodisperse and coherently placed. When locally anisotropic pores are randomly oriented, conventional diffusion NMR methods fail. Here, we present a simple, direct, and general approach to obtain both compartment size and shape even in such settings and even when pores are characterized by internal field gradients. Using controlled porous media, we show that the bipolar-double-pulsed-field-gradient (bp-d-PFG) methodology yields diffusion-diffraction patterns from which pore size can be directly obtained. Moreover, we show that pore shape, which cannot be obtained by conventional methods, can be directly inferred from the modulation of the signal in angular bp-d-PFG experiments. This new methodology significantly broadens the types of porous media that can be studied using noninvasive diffusion-diffraction NMR.

  9. Is John Locke a democrat?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Palle

      Over recent years there has been a tendency to present John Locke as an equalitarian democrat (Ashcraft) and being close to the political views of the levellers (Waldron). This is not a completely new interpretation (Kendall, 1941), but contrasts with the prevalent view presented in textbooks...... (Holden, Held, Ball and Dagger) and monographs on Locke (Dunn, Parry, Marshall). In this paper a new approach to the democratic character of John Locke's political theory is suggested, as his Second Treatise is analysed with Robert A. Dahl's conceptual framework on assumptions for a democratic order...

  10. The public of media events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Morgner

    2011-06-01

    The article examines different types of semantic inclusion, with a focus on emotional reactions towards three different media events: the Titanic disaster, the assassination of John F. Kennedy, and the death of Princess Diana.

  11. Uncle Sam vs. John Bull.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellini, Peter

    1990-01-01

    Compares John Bull and Uncle Sam as iconographic symbols, respectively personifying male images of the British and United States national characters. Recounts their origins, evolutions, and representative values, and includes cartoons depicting the evolution. Describes female counterparts: Britannia and Columbia/Liberty. (CH)

  12. John Milton Oskison and Assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larre, Lionel

    2013-01-01

    John Milton Oskison (1874-1947) was a Cherokee writer, journalist, and activist and the author of novels and biographies as well as numerous short stories, essays, and articles about a great variety of subjects. Oskison thought of himself as "an interpreter to the world, of the modern, progressive Indian." The kind of representation Oskison gave…

  13. Thomas, Prof. Sir John Meurig

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Thomas, Prof. Sir John Meurig FRS. Date of birth: 15 December 1932. Address: Department of Materials Science and, Metallurgy, New Museums Site, 27, Babbage Road, Cambridge CB3 0FS, U.K.. Contact: Office: (+44-1223) 33 4300. Fax: (+44-1223) 33 4567. Email: jmt2@cam.ac.uk. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  14. Dr. John Marburger visits DESY

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Dr. John Marburger, Director of the United States Office of Science and Technology Policy, visited the research center DESY in Hamburg. The American physicist wanted to inform himself about the status of the TESLA X-ray laser and the TESLA linear collider as well as the international collaboration at DESY (1/2 page).

  15. John Dewey, Gothic and Modern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminsky, James S.

    2010-01-01

    It is argued here that understanding John Dewey's thought as that of a prodigal liberal or a fellow traveller does not capture the complexity of his work. It is also important to recognise the portion of his work that is "historie morale." In the very best sense it is epic, encapsulating the hopes and dreams of a history of the American people in…

  16. The Poetry of John Dewey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jerry L.

    2016-01-01

    This essay examines the poetry of John Dewey, 101 poems in total. Characteristic of the rhymed and metered poetry of the period, they show a very human side of Dewey. This analysis argues that many of his poems deal with existential themes--love, finitude, and God, for example. On a deeper level these poems are also show connections to Dewey's…

  17. An Interview with John Liontas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Karim

    2017-01-01

    John I. Liontas, Ph.D. is an associate professor of foreign languages, English for speakers of other languages (ESOL), and technology in education and second language acquisition (TESLA), and director and faculty of the TESLA doctoral program at the University of South Florida. Dr. Liontas is a distinguished thought leader, author, and…

  18. John Knox Stuart, accoucheur extraordinaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dow, D A

    1990-06-01

    John Knox Stuart of Glasgow epitomises the kind of 19th-century medical entrepreneur whose activities were intended to be curbed by the 1858 Medical Act. Druggist, obstetrician, builder, lecturer, poet and philanderer, his career was a chequered and eventful one.

  19. The Art of John Biggers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coy, Mary

    2010-01-01

    In their 2005 exhibit of John Biggers' work, the New Orleans Museum of Art described it as being inspired by "African art and culture, the injustices of a segregated United States, the stoic women in his own family, and the heroes of everyday survival." In this article, the author describes how her students reinterpreted Biggers' work.…

  20. Media arrangement impacts cell growth in anaerobic fixed-bed reactors treating sugarcane vinasse: Structured vs. randomic biomass immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Aquino, Samuel; Fuess, Lucas Tadeu; Pires, Eduardo Cleto

    2017-07-01

    This study reports on the application of an innovative structured-bed reactor (FVR) as an alternative to conventional packed-bed reactors (PBRs) to treat high-strength solid-rich wastewaters. Using the FVR prevents solids from accumulating within the fixed-bed, while maintaining the advantages of the biomass immobilization. The long-term operation (330days) of a FVR and a PBR applied to sugarcane vinasse under increasing organic loads (2.4-18.0kgCODm -3 day -1 ) was assessed, focusing on the impacts of the different media arrangements over the production and retention of biomass. Much higher organic matter degradation rates, as well as long-term operational stability and high conversion efficiencies (>80%) confirmed that the FVR performed better than the PBR. Despite the equivalent operating conditions, the biomass growth yield was different in both reactors, i.e., 0.095gVSSg -1 COD (FVR) and 0.066gVSSg -1 COD (PBR), indicating a clear control of the media arrangement over the biomass production in fixed-bed reactors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Patient discomfort associated with the use of intra-arterial iodinated contrast media: a meta-analysis of comparative randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Peter A; Capasso, Patrizio

    2011-05-24

    Discomfort characterized by pain and warmth are common adverse effects associated with the use of intra-arterial iodinated contrast media (CM). The objective of this review was to pool patient-reported outcomes available from head-to-head randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and to compare the discomfort rates associated with iso-osmolar contrast media (IOCM; i.e., iodixanol) to those reported with various low-osmolar contrast media (LOCM). A review of the literature published between 1990 and 2009 available through Medline, Medline Preprints, Embase, Biological Abstracts, BioBase, Cab Abstracts, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts, Life Sciences Collection, Inside Conferences, Energy Database, Engineering Index and Technology Collection was performed to compare rates of discomfort associated with the use of the IOCM (iodixanol) vs. various LOCM agents in head-to-head RCTs. All trials with a Jadad score ≥2 that reported patient discomfort data following intra-arterial administration of CM were reviewed, coded, and extracted. A total of 22 RCTs (n = 8087) were included. Overall discomfort (regardless of severity) was significantly different between patients receiving IOCM and various LOCMs (risk difference [RD] -0.049; 95% confidence interval [CI]: -0.076, -0.021; p = 0.001). IOCM was favored over all LOCMs combined with a summary RD value of -0.188 (95% CI: -0.265, -0.112; p effect size and age and a negative relationship with increasing proportion of women. The opposite trends were observed with warmth sensation. IOCM was associated with less frequent and severe patient discomfort during intra-arterial administration. These data support differences in osmolality as a possible determinant of CM discomfort.

  2. Patient Discomfort Associated with the Use of Intra-arterial Iodinated Contrast Media: A Meta-Analysis of Comparative Randomized Controlled Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Capasso Patrizio

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Discomfort characterized by pain and warmth are common adverse effects associated with the use of intra-arterial iodinated contrast media (CM. The objective of this review was to pool patient-reported outcomes available from head-to-head randomized controlled trials (RCTs and to compare the discomfort rates associated with iso-osmolar contrast media (IOCM; i.e., iodixanol to those reported with various low-osmolar contrast media (LOCM. Methods A review of the literature published between 1990 and 2009 available through Medline, Medline Preprints, Embase, Biological Abstracts, BioBase, Cab Abstracts, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts, Life Sciences Collection, Inside Conferences, Energy Database, Engineering Index and Technology Collection was performed to compare rates of discomfort associated with the use of the IOCM (iodixanol vs. various LOCM agents in head-to-head RCTs. All trials with a Jadad score ≥2 that reported patient discomfort data following intra-arterial administration of CM were reviewed, coded, and extracted. Results A total of 22 RCTs (n = 8087 were included. Overall discomfort (regardless of severity was significantly different between patients receiving IOCM and various LOCMs (risk difference [RD] -0.049; 95% confidence interval [CI]: -0.076, -0.021; p = 0.001. IOCM was favored over all LOCMs combined with a summary RD value of -0.188 (95% CI: -0.265, -0.112; p Conclusions IOCM was associated with less frequent and severe patient discomfort during intra-arterial administration. These data support differences in osmolality as a possible determinant of CM discomfort.

  3. Violation of light beam reversibility principle in optical media with a random quasi-zero refractive index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadomsky, O. N.; Ushakov, N. M.; Shchukarev, I. A.

    2017-10-01

    We report on experimental and theoretical evidence of the violation of one of the fundamental principles in the Fresnel optics, namely, light beam reversibility, in new nanostructured composite metamaterials with silver nanoparticle in a polymer matrix. It is shown that optical transmittance of (PMMA + Ag)/glass samples in counter directions is not the same. We propose a theoretical explanation of this phenomenon based on the effect of photon localization on the surface of the composite layer with a random quasizero refractive index.

  4. Overview of Johne's disease immunology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashutosh Wadhwa

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Johne's disease or paratuberculosis is one of the most economically important diseases of the livestock. Most of the economiclosses associated with paratuberculosis are related to decreased milk production, reduced fertility and higher rates of culling.Understanding the immunology of the disease is very important for better understanding of the interplay between the host andthe causative agent, Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP. After uptake of MAPby macrophages residing inhost's intestinal tissue, two possible scenarios may emerge; MAP may be destroyed or may establish persistent infectionwithin the macrophages. If MAPpersists in the infected macrophage, it continuously modulates adaptive immune responsesof the animal. In this short review we describe the host-pathogen interactions in Johne's disease and highlights potentialprotective mechanisms in order for future design of more effective diagnostic method and vaccine.

  5. Titular Tilting in John Ashbery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balle, Søren Hattesen

    2008-01-01

    Among the numerous poems published by the American poet John Ashbery since his debut in 1956 one finds a few that specifically deal with the issue of entitlement. These poems do not appear in one single of his volumes, but are disseminated throughout Ashbery’s career and production. Their occurre......Among the numerous poems published by the American poet John Ashbery since his debut in 1956 one finds a few that specifically deal with the issue of entitlement. These poems do not appear in one single of his volumes, but are disseminated throughout Ashbery’s career and production...... discuss two ways in which this double marginalizing of Ashbery’s entitlement poems may lead to considerations of their potentially ‘untitled’ status....

  6. John von Neumann selected letters

    CERN Document Server

    2005-01-01

    John von Neuman was perhaps the most influential mathematician of the twentieth century, especially if his broad influence outside mathematics is included. Not only did he contribute to almost all branches of mathematics and created new fields, but he also changed post-World War II history with his work on the design of computers and with being a sought-after technical advisor to many figures in the U.S. military-political establishment in the 1940s and 1950s. The present volume is the first substantial collection of (previously mainly unpublished) letters written by von Neumann to colleagues, friends, government officials, and others. The letters give us a glimpse of the thinking of John von Neumann about mathematics, physics, computer science, science management, education, consulting, politics, and war. Readers of quite diverse backgrounds will find much of interest in this fascinating first-hand look at one of the towering figures of twentieth century science.

  7. Charles Darwin and John Herschel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, B.

    2009-11-01

    The influence of John Herschel on the philosophical thoughts of Charles Darwin, both through the former's book, Natural Philosophy, and through their meeting in 1836 at the Cape of Good Hope, is discussed. With Herschel having himself speculated on evolution just a few months before he met Darwin, it is probable that he stimulated at least the beginnings of the latter's lifelong work on the subject.

  8. John Strong - 1941-2006

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    Our friend and colleague John Strong was cruelly taken from us by a brain tumour on 31 July, a few days before his 65th birthday. John started his career and obtained his PhD in a group from Westfield College, initially working on experiments at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL). From the early 1970s onwards, however, his research was focused on experiments in CERN, with several particularly notable contributions. The Omega spectrometer adopted a system John had originally developed for experiments at RAL using vidicon cameras (a type of television camera) to record the sparks in the spark chambers. This highly automated system allowed Omega to be used in a similar way to bubble chambers. He contributed to the success of NA1 and NA7, where he became heavily involved in the electronic trigger systems. In these experiments the Westfield group joined forces with Italian colleagues to measure the form factors of the pion and the kaon, and the lifetime of some of the newly discovered charm particles. Such h...

  9. Random walks in a random environment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Abstract. Random walks as well as diffusions in random media are considered. Methods are developed that allow one to establish large deviation results for both the 'quenched' and the 'averaged' case. Keywords. Large deviations; random walks in a random environment. 1. Introduction. A random walk on Zd is a stochastic ...

  10. The effect of four-phasic versus three-phasic contrast media injection protocols on extravasation rate in coronary CT angiography. A randomized controlled trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karady, Julia; Panajotu, Alexisz; Kolossvary, Marton; Szilveszter, Balint; Jermendy, Adam L.; Bartykowszki, Andrea; Karolyi, Mihaly; Celeng, Csilla; Merkely, Bela; Maurovich-Horvat, Pal [Semmelweis University, MTA-SE Cardiovascular Imaging Research Group, Heart and Vascular Center, Budapest (Hungary)

    2017-11-15

    Contrast media (CM) extravasation is a well-known complication of CT angiography (CTA). Our prospective randomized control study aimed to assess whether a four-phasic CM administration protocol reduces the risk of extravasation compared to the routinely used three-phasic protocol in coronary CTA. Patients referred to coronary CTA due to suspected coronary artery disease were included in the study. All patients received 400 mg/ml iomeprol CM injected with dual-syringe automated injector. Patients were randomized into a three-phasic injection-protocol group, with a CM bolus of 85 ml followed by 40 ml of 75%:25% saline/CM mixture and 30 ml saline chaser bolus; and a four-phasic injection-protocol group, with a saline pacer bolus of 10 ml injected at a lower flow rate before the three-phasic protocol. 2,445 consecutive patients were enrolled (mean age 60.6 ± 12.1 years; females 43.6%). Overall rate of extravasation was 0.9% (23/2,445): 1.4% (17/1,229) in the three-phasic group and 0.5% (6/1,216) in the four-phasic group (p = 0.034). Four-phasic CM administration protocol is easy to implement in the clinical routine at no extra cost. The extravasation rate is reduced by 65% with the application of the four-phasic protocol compared to the three-phasic protocol in coronary CTA. (orig.)

  11. John Ruskin and the Savage Gothic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frances S. Connelly

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available John Ruskin’s provocative theories concerning Gothic art and architecture bear serious consideration in light of the formative debates concerning “primitive” art and its relation to modern European society. Like many primitivists, Ruskin’s advocacy for the medieval was motivated by a reformist zeal concerning the state of modern industrial Europe. He differs markedly in his ideas concerning the value and uses of the "savage” Gothic for modern audiences. Ruskin rejected the random borrowing of stylistic elements, stressing instead the artisanal process and the communal role of Gothic monuments. It is also significant that Ruskin problematises the relationship between “primitive” and modern by repeatedly acknowledging his position as a modern viewer and emphasising the process through which he makes (artisan-like his interpretive history of the Gothic. Rejecting the mastering gaze, Ruskin constantly reminds readers that their view of this pre-modern work is fragmentary and disjunctive.

  12. Improving degradation of emerging organic compounds by applying chaotic advection in Managed Aquifer Recharge in randomly heterogeneous porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Escales, P.; Fernà ndez-Garcia, D.; Drechsel, J.; Folch, A.; Sanchez-Vila, X.

    2017-05-01

    Improving degradation rates of emerging organic compounds (EOCs) in groundwater is still a challenge. Although their degradation is not fully understood, it has been observed that some substances are preferably degraded under specific redox conditions. The coupling of Managed Aquifer Recharge with soil aquifer remediation treatment, by placing a reactive layer containing organic matter at the bottom of the infiltration pond, is a promising technology to improve the rate of degradation of EOCs. Its success is based on assuming that recharged water and groundwater get well mixed, which is not always true. It has been demonstrated that mixing can be enhanced by inducing chaotic advection through extraction-injection-engineering. In this work, we analyze how chaotic advection might enhance the spreading of redox conditions with the final aim of improving degradation of a mix of benzotriazoles: benzotriazole, 5-methyl-benzotriazole, and 5-chloro-benzotriazole. The degradation of the first two compounds was fastest under aerobic conditions whereas the third compound was best degraded under denitrification conditions. We developed a reactive transport model that describes how a recharged water rich in organic matter mixes with groundwater, how this organic matter is oxidized by different electron acceptors, and how the benzotriazoles are degraded attending for the redox state. The model was tested in different scenarios of recharge, both in homogenous and in heterogenous media. It was found that chaotic flow increases the spreading of the plume of recharged water. Consequently, different redox conditions coexist at a given time, facilitating the degradation of EOCs.

  13. John von Neumann Birthday Centennial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grcar, Joseph F.

    2004-11-12

    In celebration of John von Neumann's 100th birthday, a series of four lectures were presented on the evening of February 10, 2003 during the SIAM Conference on Computational Science and Engineering in San Diego. The venue was appropriate because von Neumann spent much of the later part of his life, in the 1950's, as an unofficial ambassador for computational science. He was then the only senior American scientist who had experience with the new computers (digital, electronic, and programmable) and a vision of their future importance. No doubt he would have relished the chance to attend a meeting such as this. The first speaker, William Aspray, described the ''interesting times'' during which computers were invented. His remarks were based on his history [1] of this period in von Neumann's life. We were honored to have John von Neumann's daughter, Marina von Neumann-Whitman, as our second speaker. Other accounts of von Neumann's life can be found in books by two of his colleagues [2] and [3]. Our third speaker, Peter Lax, provided both mathematical and international perspectives on John von Neumann's career. Finally, Pete Stewart spoke about von Neumann's numerical error analysis [4] in the context of later work; this talk did not lend itself to transcription, but readers may consult the historical notes in [5]. Our thanks to all the speakers for a remarkable evening. We are grateful to the DOE Applied Mathematical Sciences (AMS) program for partially supporting these lectures. Thanks are also due to SIAM and William Kolata, to our emcee, Gene Golub, to Paul Saylor for recording and editing, and to Barbara Lytle for the transcriptions. More about von Neumann's work can be learned from the recent American Mathematical Society proceedings [6].

  14. John Dewey: implications for schooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, D

    1977-01-01

    Propositions, whether great and lasting or insignificant and passing, reside in the "guts of the living." Each age rediscovers its Plato, Dickens, Newton, or Dewey. Each age rewrites history, redefines science, develops its own theoretical perspectives. Propositions are tentative, conditional, or relative. They depend on contemporary priorities, and on a personal space and time context. At any future moment propositions may change, perspectives alter, new choices emerge. John Dewey provided for constructive innovation in schooling and the battles about his suggested criteria continue unabated. The purpose here, however, is only to examine some of Dewey's theoretical propositions and their probable implications (1).

  15. John Strong 1941-2006

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    John started his career and obtained his PhD in a group from Westfield College, initially working on experiments at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL). From the early 1970s onwards, however, his research was focused on experiments in CERN, with several particularly notable contributions. The Omega spectrometer adopted a system John had originally developed for experiments at RAL using vidicon Cameras (a type of television camera) to record the sparks in the spark chambers. This highly automated system allowed Omega to be used in a similar way to bubble chambers.  He contributed to the success of NA1 and NA7, where he became heavily involved in the electronic trigger systems. In these experiments the Westfield group joined forces with Italian colleagues to measure the form factors of the pion and the kaon, and the lifetime of some of the newly discovered charm particles. Such has been the lasting impact of these measurements that the paper on the pion form-factor had been cited 323 times up to the time of J...

  16. John Greenleaf's life of science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watenpaugh, Donald E

    2012-12-01

    This article summarizes the life and career of John E. Greenleaf, PhD. It complements an interview of Dr. Greenleaf sponsored by the American Physiological Society Living History Project found on the American Physiological Society website. Dr. Greenleaf is a "thought leader" and internationally renowned physiologist, with extensive contributions in human systems-level environmental physiology. He avoided self-aggrandizement and believed that deeds rather than words define one's legacy. Viewed another way, however, Greenleaf's words define his deeds: 48% of his 185 articles are first author works, which is an unusually high proportion for a scientist of his stature. He found that writing a thorough and thoughtful discussion section often led to novel ideas that drove future research. Beyond Greenleaf's words are the many students, postdocs, and collaborators lucky enough to have worked with him and thus learn and carry on his ways of science. His core principles included the following: avoid research "fads," embrace diversity, be the first subject in your own research, adhere to rules of fiscal responsibility, and respect administrative forces-but never back down from them when you know you are right. Greenleaf's integrity ensured he was usually right. He thrived on the axiom of many successful scientists: avoid falling in love with hypotheses, so that when unexpected findings appear, they arouse curiosity instead of fear. Dr. Greenleaf's legacy will include the John and Carol Greenleaf Award for prolific environmental and exercise-related publication in the Journal of Applied Physiology.

  17. Contrast media use in patients with chronic kidney disease undergoing coronary angiography: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Bhavi; Chalhoub, Jean M; Parikh, Valay; Gaddam, Sainath; Spagnola, Jonathan; El-Sayegh, Suzanne; Bogin, Marc; Kandov, Ruben; Lafferty, James; Bangalore, Sripal

    2017-02-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) undergoing coronary angiography (CA), adequate hydration and minimizing volume of contrast media (CM) are class 1b recommendations for preventing contrast induced nephropathy (CIN). Current data are insufficient to justify specific recommendations about isoosmolar vs. low-osmolar contrast media by the ACCF/AHA/SCAI guidelines. Randomized trials comparing IOCM to LOCM in CKD stage 3 and above patients undergoing CA, and reporting incidence of CIN (defined by a rise in creatinine of 25% from baseline) were included in the analysis. The secondary outcome of the study was the incidence of serum creatinine increase by >1mg/dl. A total of 2839 patients were included in 10 trials, in which 1430 patients received IOCM and 1393 received LOCM. When compared to LOCM, IOCM was not associated with significant benefit in preventing CIN (OR=0.72, [CI: 0.50-1.04], P=0.08, I2=59%). Subgroup analysis revealed non-significant difference in incidence of CIN based on baseline use of N-acetylcystine (NAC), diabetes status, ejection fraction, and whether percutaneous coronary intervention vs coronary angiography alone was performed. The difference between IOCM and LOCM was further attenuated when restricted to studies with larger sample size (>250 patients) (OR=0.93; [CI: 0.66-1.30]) or when compared with non-ionic LOCM (OR=0.79, [CI: 0.52-1.21]). In patients with CKD stage 3 and above undergoing coronary angiography, use of IOCM showed overall non-significant difference in incidence of CIN compared to LOCM. The difference was further attenuated when IOCM was compared with non-ionic LOCM. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Predictors for contrast media-induced nephropathy and long-term survival: Prospectively assessed data from the randomized controlled Dialysis-Versus-Diuresis (DVD) trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hölscher, Birgit; Heitmeyer, Christine; Fobker, Manfred; Breithardt, Günter; Schaefer, Roland M; Reinecke, Holger

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Among the numerous studies concerning contrast media-induced nephropathy (CIN), there was no prospective trial that provided data on the long-term outcomes. OBJECTIVES: To prospectively assess predictors of CIN and long-term outcomes of affected patients. METHODS: Four hundred twelve consecutive patients with serum creatinine levels of 115 μmol/L to 309 μmol/L (1.3 mg/dL to 3.5 mg/dL) undergoing elective coronary angiography were included. Patients were randomly assigned to periprocedural hydration alone, hydration plus onetime hemodialysis or hydration plus N-acetylcysteine. RESULTS: Multivariate logistic regression identified the following as predictors of CIN within 72 h (equivalent to an increase in creatinine 44.2 μmol/L [0.5 mg/dL] or more) : prophylactic postprocedural hemodialysis (OR 2.86, 95% CI 1.07 to 7.69), use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (OR 6.16, 95% CI 2.01 to 18.93), baseline glomerular filtration rate (OR 0.94, 95% CI 0.90 to 0.98) and the amount of contrast media given (OR 1.01, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.01). With regard to long-term outcome (mean follow-up 649 days), multivariate Cox regression models found elevated creatinine levels at 30 days (hazard rate ratio [HRR] 5.48, 95% CI 2.85 to 10.53), but not CIN within 72 h (HRR 1.12, 95% CI 0.63 to 2.02), to be associated with increased mortality. In addition, independent predictors for death during follow-up included left ventricular ejection fraction lower than 35% (HRR 4.01, 95% CI 2.22 to 7.26), serum phosphate (HRR 1.64, 95% CI 1.10 to 2.43) and hemoglobin (HRR 0.80, 95% CI 0.67 to 0.96). CONCLUSION: From the present prospective trial, performance of post-procedural hemodialysis, use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, reduced baseline glomerular filtration rate and amount of contrast media were independent predictors of CIN within 72 h after catheterization. Assessing renal function after 30 days, rather than within 72 h, seemed to be more predictive for

  19. Innovative delivery of newborn anticipatory guidance: a randomized, controlled trial incorporating media-based learning into primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradis, Heather A; Conn, Kelly M; Gewirtz, Janna R; Halterman, Jill S

    2011-01-01

    Recent initiatives seek to incorporate efficient, evidence-based practices into primary care. This study tested the feasibility, impact, and acceptance of incorporating a DVD of newborn anticipatory guidance into routine well-child care. This randomized trial tested a 15-minute educational DVD intervention versus control condition with paper handouts on newborn anticipatory guidance. We recruited parents of newborns ≤1 month old presenting for their first visit. Blinded research assistants conducted telephone follow-up 2 weeks later and medical chart reviews 2 months after enrollment. Clinic staff and providers completed semistructured surveys to rate the intervention. Primary outcomes included parent knowledge of infant development, self-efficacy with infant care skills, and problem-solving competence. We enrolled 137 subjects (response rate 82%). Scores on knowledge, self-efficacy, and problem solving were high at baseline for both groups and did not significantly change. More parents in the DVD group reported feeling prepared to care for their baby after the visit (94% vs 81%, P = .03), feeling high confidence bathing their baby (93% vs 78%, P = .01), and recognizing congestion (70% vs 52%, P = .03) compared to the control group. Those in the DVD group also had fewer additional office visits between birth and 2 months (P = .01). Staff and providers agreed the DVD was useful for patients (88%) and did not disrupt patient flow (93%). A DVD of newborn anticipatory guidance was feasible, well accepted, and had a positive impact in a pediatric practice. Video and other technologies represent an efficient, innovative way to reach parents as part of the office encounter. Copyright © 2011 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. John Tyndall's religion: a fragment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantor, Geoffrey

    2015-01-01

    Both contemporaries and historians have focused on the high-profile 1874 Belfast Address in which John Tyndall was widely perceived as promulgating atheism. Although some historians have instead interpreted him as a pantheist or an agnostic, it is clear that any such labels do not accurately capture Tyndall's religious position throughout his life. By contrast, this paper seeks to chart Tyndall's religious journey from 1840 (when he was in his late teens) to the autumn of 1848 when he commenced his scientific studies at Marburg. Although he had been imbued with his father's stern conservative Irish Protestantism and opposition to Catholicism, as a youth he seems for a time to have been attracted to Methodism. Later, however, he questioned and rejected his father's religious views and was increasingly drawn to the more spiritual outlook of Ralph Waldo Emerson and Thomas Carlyle, along with a more radical attitude to politics.

  1. 75 FR 49497 - John Bonnes: Debarment Order

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration John Bonnes: Debarment Order AGENCY: Food and Drug... the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act) debarring John Bonnes for a period of 5 years from... the act, under authority delegated to the Director (Staff Manual Guide 1410.35), finds that Mr. John...

  2. Acute Adverse Reactions to Nonionic Iodinated Contrast Media for CT: Prospective Randomized Evaluation of the Effects of Dehydration, Oral Rehydration, and Patient Risk Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motosugi, Utaroh; Ichikawa, Tomoaki; Sano, Katsuhiro; Onishi, Hiroshi

    2016-11-01

    The objective of our study was to determine the effects of dehydration and oral rehydration on the incidence of acute adverse reactions to iodinated contrast media administered during abdominal and pelvic CT in outpatients. For our prospective randomized study performed at a single institution, adult outpatients undergoing contrast-enhanced abdominal CT were randomly divided into a rehydration group (n = 2244 patients [1379 men and 865 women]; mean age, 65.2 years; age range, 18-90 years) and a control group (n = 3715 [2112 male patients and 1603 female patients]; mean age, 65.8 years; age range, 17-96 years), which included an age- and sex-matched subgroup (adjusted control group, n = 2244). The rehydration group received an oral rehydration solution (500 mL of liquid in which osmotic pressure is adjusted to enhance gastrointestinal absorption) before abdominal and pelvic CT. Patients were also divided into subclinically dehydrated (n = 997) and hydrated (n = 4962) groups according to their answers to a questionnaire that they completed before the CT examination. The patients were interviewed about contrast-induced adverse reactions before they left the CT room, and the reactions were categorized as allergiclike or physiologic. The incidence of reactions was compared between the rehydration and control groups and between the subclinical dehydration and hydrated groups. The rehydration and control groups were compared with an unpaired t test or a chi-square or Fisher test. The overall incidence of an acute adverse reaction was 4.3% (254/5959); the acute adverse reactions included 136 allergiclike and 118 physiologic reactions. Fourteen allergiclike and nine physiologic reactions were moderate grade, and none was severe. There was no significant difference between the rehydration group and adjusted control group in the overall incidence of adverse reactions (99/2244 [4.4%] vs 100/2244 [4.5%], respectively; p = 0.9422) or between the subclinically dehydrated group

  3. Medicine in John Locke's philosophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Gonzalez, M A

    1990-12-01

    John Locke's philosophy was deeply affected by medicine of his times. It was specially influenced by the medical thought and practice of Thomas Sydenham. Locke was a personal friend of Sydenham, expressed an avid interest in his work and shared his views and methods. The influence of Sydenham's medicine can be seen in the following areas of Locke's philosophy: his "plain historical method"; the emphasis on observation and sensory experience instead of seeking the essence of things; the rejection of hypotheses and principles; the refusal of research into final causes and inner mechanisms; the ideal of irrefutable evidence and skepticism on the possibilities of certainty in science. The science which for Locke held the highest paradigmatic value in his theory of knowledge was precisely medicine. To a great extent, Locke's Essay on Human Understanding can be understood as an attempt to justify, substantiate, and promote Sydenham's medical method. This method, generalized, was then proposed as an instrument for the elaboration of all natural sciences.

  4. Effectiveness of social media in reducing risk factors for noncommunicable diseases: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mita, George; Ni Mhurchu, Cliona; Jull, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    The primary aim of the current study was to synthesize evidence of the effect of social media use compared with no social media use as part of interventions to reduce risk factors for noncommunicable diseases. Databases were searched up to June 10, 2014, using medical subject headings. A secondary aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of social media use compared with no social media use in reducing the risk factors for noncommunicable diseases, stratifying the results by the extent of bias on outcomes, by social media use alone, and by the levels of social presence and media richness. Sixteen trials (n=10,711 participants) met the inclusion criteria, but interventions mostly used social media with low levels of media richness and presence (e.g., discussion boards, bulletin boards). Meta-analysis of all trials showed no significant differences (standardized mean difference [SMD] -0.14; 95%CI -0.28 to 0.01), with similar findings for physical activity (SMD 0.07; 95%CI -0.25 to 0.38), body weight (SMD 0.07; 95%CI -0.17 to 0.20), and fruit and vegetable intake (SMD 0.39; 95%CI -0.11 to 0.89). Trials assessing social media interventions aimed at modifying risk factors for noncommunicable diseases showed that social media use improved the primary outcomes, but the overall quality of the included studies limits the generalizability of these findings. Further trials are warranted, especially to isolate the effect of social media use and to fully evaluate the effect of the social presence and media richness of social media platforms. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Life Sciences Institute. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. The Effectiveness Of Social Media (Facebook) Compared With More Traditional Advertising Methods for Recruiting Eligible Participants To Health Research Studies: A Randomized, Controlled Clinical Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Frandsen, Mai; Thow, Megan; Ferguson, Stuart G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Recruiting participants for research studies can be difficult and costly. The popularity of social media platforms (eg, Facebook) has seen corresponding growth in the number of researchers turning to social networking sites and their embedded advertising frameworks to locate eligible participants for studies. Compared with traditional recruitment strategies such as print media, social media advertising has been shown to be favorable in terms of its reach (especially with hard-to-re...

  6. A randomized, placebo-controlled trial of online cognitive behavioral therapy for chronic insomnia disorder delivered via an automated media-rich web application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espie, Colin A; Kyle, Simon D; Williams, Chris; Ong, Jason C; Douglas, Neil J; Hames, Peter; Brown, June S L

    2012-06-01

    The internet provides a pervasive milieu for healthcare delivery. The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of a novel web-based cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) course delivered by an automated virtual therapist, when compared with a credible placebo; an approach required because web products may be intrinsically engaging, and vulnerable to placebo response. Randomized, placebo-controlled trial comprising 3 arms: CBT, imagery relief therapy (IRT: placebo), treatment as usual (TAU). Online community of participants in the UK. One hundred sixty-four adults (120 F: [mean age 49y (18-78y)] meeting proposed DSM-5 criteria for Insomnia Disorder, randomly assigned to CBT (n = 55; 40 F), IRT placebo (n = 55; 42 F) or TAU (n = 54; 38 F). CBT and IRT each comprised 6 online sessions delivered by an animated personal therapist, with automated web and email support. Participants also had access to a video library/back catalogue of session content and Wikipedia style articles. Online CBT users had access to a moderated social network/community of users. TAU comprised no restrictions on usual care and access to an online sleep diary. Major assessments at baseline, post-treatment, and at follow-up 8-weeks post-treatment; outcomes appraised by online sleep diaries and clinical status. On the primary endpoint of sleep efficiency (SE; total time asleep expressed as a percentage of the total time spent in bed), online CBT was associated with sustained improvement at post-treatment (+20%) relative to both TAU (+6%; d = 0.95) and IRT (+6%: d = 1.06), and at 8 weeks (+20%) relative to IRT (+7%: d = 1.00) and TAU (+9%: d = 0.69) These findings were mirrored across a range of sleep diary measures. Clinical benefits of CBT were evidenced by modest superiority over placebo on daytime outcomes (d = 0.23-0.37) and by substantial improved sleep-wake functioning on the Sleep Condition Indicator (range of d = 0.77-1.20). Three-quarters of CBT participants (76% [CBT] vs. 29

  7. Social Franchising and a Nationwide Mass Media Campaign Increased the Prevalence of Adequate Complementary Feeding in Vietnam: A Cluster-Randomized Program Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawat, Rahul; Nguyen, Phuong Hong; Tran, Lan Mai; Hajeebhoy, Nemat; Nguyen, Huan Van; Baker, Jean; Frongillo, Edward A; Ruel, Marie T; Menon, Purnima

    2017-04-01

    Background: Rigorous evaluations of health system-based interventions in large-scale programs to improve complementary feeding (CF) practices are limited. Alive & Thrive applied principles of social franchising within the government health system in Vietnam to improve the quality of interpersonal counseling (IPC) for infant and young child feeding combined with a national mass media (MM) campaign and community mobilization (CM).Objective: We evaluated the impact of enhanced IPC + MM + CM (intensive) compared with standard IPC + less-intensive MM and CM (nonintensive) on CF practices and anthropometric indicators.Methods: A cluster-randomized, nonblinded evaluation design with cross-sectional surveys (n = ∼500 children aged 6-23.9 mo and ∼1000 children aged 24-59.9 mo/group) implemented at baseline (2010) and endline (2014) was used. Difference-in-difference estimates (DDEs) of impact were calculated for intent-to-treat (ITT) analyses and modified per-protocol analyses (MPAs; mothers who attended the social franchising at least once: 62%).Results: Groups were similar at baseline. In ITT analyses, there were no significant differences between groups in changes in CF practices over time. In the MPAs, greater improvements in the intensive than in the nonintensive group were seen for minimum dietary diversity [DDE: 6.4 percentage points (pps); P social franchising approach to improve IPC, delivered through the existing health care system, significantly improved CF practices, but not child growth, among mothers who used counseling services at least once. A greater impact may be achieved with strategies designed to increase service utilization. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01676623.

  8. Is gender still a predisposing factor in contrast-media associated adverse drug reactions? A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized trials and observational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Heeyoung; Song, Seungyeon; Oh, Yun-Kyoung; Kang, WonKu; Kim, Eunyoung

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the role of gender as a risk factor for developing contrast media-associated adverse drug reactions (CM-ADRs) by comparing the incidence of CM-ADR between male and female patients according to study design, ADR type, and computed tomography (CT) examination. We systematically searched three electronic databases for eligible studies. In the studies included (n=18), we assessed effect estimates of the relative incidence of CM-ADR, analysed by experimental design, ADR type and CT examination. This was calculated by using a random effects model if clinical conditions showed heterogeneity; otherwise, a fixed effects model was used. We identified 10,776 patients administered CM. According to the designs, studies were classified into randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and observational studies. Results were as follows: risk ratio (RR)=1.07 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.79-1.46, P=0.66) for RCTs, and RR=0.77 (95% CI: 0.58-1.04, P=0.09) for observational studies. The results of analysis according to ADR type and for undergoing CT demonstrated that the incidence of CM-ADR did not differ between males and females. We found no significant difference in the incidence of CM-ADRs between male and female patients according to study design, ADR type, or CT examination. Future studies to determine why gender has shown different roles as a risk factor between CM-ADRs and non-CM ADRs are needed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of a Mediterranean diet on endothelial progenitor cells and carotid intima-media thickness in type 2 diabetes: Follow-up of a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiorino, Maria Ida; Bellastella, Giuseppe; Petrizzo, Michela; Gicchino, Maurizio; Caputo, Mariangela; Giugliano, Dario; Esposito, Katherine

    2017-03-01

    Background We assessed the long-term effects of a Mediterranean diet on circulating levels of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and the carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) in patients with type 2 diabetes. Design This was a parallel, two-arm, single-centre trial. Methods Two hundred and fifteen men and women with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes were randomized to a Mediterranean diet ( n = 108) or a low-fat diet ( n = 107). The primary outcome measures were changes in the EPC count and the CIMT of the common carotid artery after the treatment period defined as the end of trial (EOT). Results At the EOT, both the CD34(+)KDR(+) and CD34(+)KDR(+)CD133(+) counts had increased with the Mediterranean diet compared with the low-fat diet ( p Mediterranean diet. Compared with the low-fat diet, the rate of regression in the CIMT was higher in the Mediterranean diet group (51 vs. 26%), whereas the rate of progression was lower (25 vs. 50%) ( p = 0.032 for both). Changes in the CIMT were inversely correlated with the changes in EPC levels (CD34(+)KDR(+), r = -0.24, p = 0.020; CD34(+)KDR(+)CD133(+), r = -0.28, p = 0.014). At the EOT, changes in levels of HbA1c, HOMA, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and systolic blood pressure were significantly greater with the Mediterranean diet than with the low-fat diet. Conclusion Compared with a low-fat diet, a long-term trial with Mediterranean diet was associated with an increase in circulating EPCs levels and prevention of the progression of subclinical atherosclerosis in patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes.

  10. Psychophysiological effects of a web-based stress management system: A prospective, randomized controlled intervention study of IT and media workers [ISRCTN54254861

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theorell Töres

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the present study was to assess possible effects on mental and physical well-being and stress-related biological markers of a web-based health promotion tool. Methods A randomized, prospectively controlled study was conducted with before and after measurements, involving 303 employees (187 men and 116 women, age 23–64 from four information technology and two media companies. Half of the participants were offered web-based health promotion and stress management training (intervention lasting for six months. All other participants constituted the reference group. Different biological markers were measured to detect possible physiological changes. Results After six months the intervention group had improved statistically significantly compared to the reference group on ratings of ability to manage stress, sleep quality, mental energy, concentration ability and social support. The anabolic hormone dehydroepiandosterone sulphate (DHEA-S decreased significantly in the reference group as compared to unchanged levels in the intervention group. Neuropeptide Y (NPY increased significantly in the intervention group compared to the reference group. Chromogranin A (CgA decreased significantly in the intervention group as compared to the reference group. Tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα decreased significantly in the reference group compared to the intervention group. Logistic regression analysis revealed that group (intervention vs. reference remained a significant factor in five out of nine predictive models. Conclusion The results indicate that an automatic web-based system might have short-term beneficial physiological and psychological effects and thus might be an opportunity in counteracting some clinically relevant and common stress and health issues of today.

  11. Psychophysiological effects of a web-based stress management system: a prospective, randomized controlled intervention study of IT and media workers [ISRCTN54254861].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasson, Dan; Anderberg, Ulla Maria; Theorell, Töres; Arnetz, Bengt B

    2005-07-25

    The aim of the present study was to assess possible effects on mental and physical well-being and stress-related biological markers of a web-based health promotion tool. A randomized, prospectively controlled study was conducted with before and after measurements, involving 303 employees (187 men and 116 women, age 23-64) from four information technology and two media companies. Half of the participants were offered web-based health promotion and stress management training (intervention) lasting for six months. All other participants constituted the reference group. Different biological markers were measured to detect possible physiological changes. After six months the intervention group had improved statistically significantly compared to the reference group on ratings of ability to manage stress, sleep quality, mental energy, concentration ability and social support. The anabolic hormone dehydroepiandosterone sulphate (DHEA-S) decreased significantly in the reference group as compared to unchanged levels in the intervention group. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) increased significantly in the intervention group compared to the reference group. Chromogranin A (CgA) decreased significantly in the intervention group as compared to the reference group. Tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) decreased significantly in the reference group compared to the intervention group. Logistic regression analysis revealed that group (intervention vs. reference) remained a significant factor in five out of nine predictive models. The results indicate that an automatic web-based system might have short-term beneficial physiological and psychological effects and thus might be an opportunity in counteracting some clinically relevant and common stress and health issues of today.

  12. Modeling Transport in Fractured Porous Media with the Random-Walk Particle Method: The Transient Activity Range and the Particle-Transfer Probability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehua Pan; G.S. Bodvarsson

    2001-10-22

    Multiscale features of transport processes in fractured porous media make numerical modeling a difficult task, both in conceptualization and computation. Modeling the mass transfer through the fracture-matrix interface is one of the critical issues in the simulation of transport in a fractured porous medium. Because conventional dual-continuum-based numerical methods are unable to capture the transient features of the diffusion depth into the matrix (unless they assume a passive matrix medium), such methods will overestimate the transport of tracers through the fractures, especially for the cases with large fracture spacing, resulting in artificial early breakthroughs. We have developed a new method for calculating the particle-transfer probability that can capture the transient features of diffusion depth into the matrix within the framework of the dual-continuum random-walk particle method (RWPM) by introducing a new concept of activity range of a particle within the matrix. Unlike the multiple-continuum approach, the new dual-continuum RWPM does not require using additional grid blocks to represent the matrix. It does not assume a passive matrix medium and can be applied to the cases where global water flow exists in both continua. The new method has been verified against analytical solutions for transport in the fracture-matrix systems with various fracture spacing. The calculations of the breakthrough curves of radionuclides from a potential repository to the water table in Yucca Mountain demonstrate the effectiveness of the new method for simulating 3-D, mountain-scale transport in a heterogeneous, fractured porous medium under variably saturated conditions.

  13. WIT Diversity Talk with John Ellis

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Ellis, Jonathan R.

    2017-01-01

    Sudeshna Datta Cockerill, CERN Ombudsperson, will interview John Ellis, a renown British theoretical physicist with a long career both at CERN and externally. John Ellis has also been awarded several prizes for his work in physics. Among many other outstanding roles and positions, he was Division Leader of the Theory Division at CERN from 1988-1994. John Ellis is currently Clerk Maxwell Professor of Theoretical Physics at King's College London.

  14. El derecho de propiedad en John Locke

    OpenAIRE

    Jorge Luis Toyama Miyagusuku

    1998-01-01

    El tema que abordaremos en esta monografía se contrae en determinar los principales aspectos de la teoría sobre el derecho de propiedad del inglés John Locke (Wrington, 1632-1704), en su obra«Segundo Ensayo sobre el GobiernoCivil».John

  15. John Smithi kaks palet / Johannes Saar

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Saar, Johannes, 1965-

    2003-01-01

    Näitus "John Smith. Marko ja Kaido" Tallinna Kunstihoones. Kaido Ole ja Marko Mäetamm esindavad rühmitusena "John Smith" Eestit 2003. a. Veneetsia biennaalil. Ilmunud ka kogumikus "Päevast päeva", lk. 90-96

  16. John of Salisbury on Aristotelian Science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloch, David

    The First substantial treatment of John of Salisbury's views on Aristotelian science. Important for our understanding of the reception of Aristotle's works and for the history of theories of science.......The First substantial treatment of John of Salisbury's views on Aristotelian science. Important for our understanding of the reception of Aristotle's works and for the history of theories of science....

  17. Kajian Analisis Terhadap Konsep Pemikiran John Dewey

    OpenAIRE

    Maiaweng, Peniel C.D

    2009-01-01

    John Dewey dikenal oleh karena konsep pemikirannya tentang pragmatisme, relativisme, dan active learner. Untuk itu, dalam makalah ini akan dibahas tentang riwayat hidup John Dewey sebagai dasar pemunculan konsep pemikirannya (yang tertuang dalam konsep filsafat, agama, dan pendidikan), sumbangsihnya dalam dunia pendidikan, dan kritik terhadap konsep pemikirannya berdasarkan perspektif Krisren.

  18. John Kotter on Leadership, Management and Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencivenga, Jim

    2002-01-01

    Excerpts from interview with John Kotter, Konosuke Matsushita Professor of Leadership at the Harvard Business School, about his thoughts on the role of the superintendent as leader and manager. Describes his recent book "John P. Kotter on What Leaders Really Do," 1999. Lists eight-step change process from his book "Leading Change," 1996. (PKP)

  19. JBS Haldane: the John Innes years

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 96; Issue 5. J. B. S. Haldane: the John Innes years. SARAH WILMOT. HALDANE AT 125 Volume 96 Issue 5 November ... Keywords. J. B. S. Haldane; John Innes Horticultural Institution; history of genetics; William Bateson; Primula sinensis; plant genetics; biochemical genetics.

  20. Pope John Paul II's Address to Black Catholics: A Motive Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costanza, Jean M.

    Pope John Paul's visit to the United States in 1987 provided many opportunities for the analysis of papal rhetoric. The Pope's address to black Catholics in America may be of particular interest to those focusing on the study of intercultural or interracial communication. This address did not garner as much media attention as did some of the…

  1. John Bell and the Identical Twins

    CERN Multimedia

    1984-01-01

    A biographical profile of John S.Bell is presented based on extensive interviews the author had with Bell. Bell’s vierws on the quantum theory are presented along with a simple explanation of his idenity.

  2. John Dewey--Philosopher and Educational Reformer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talebi, Kandan

    2015-01-01

    John Dewey was an American philosopher and educator, founder of the philosophical movement known as pragmatism, a pioneer in functional psychology, and a leader of the progressive movement in education in the United States.

  3. 2008 St. Johns County, FL Countywide Lidar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Airborne terrestrial LiDAR was collected for St. Johns County, FL. System Parameters/Flight Plan. The LiDAR system acquisition parameters were developed based on a...

  4. Johns Hopkins Particulate Matter Research Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Johns Hopkins Particulate Matter Research Center will map health risks of PM across the US based on analyses of national databases on air pollution, mortality,...

  5. 2004 St. Johns County, Florida Lidar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset is the bare earth lidar data for St. Johns County, Florida, acquired in early January and February of 2004. This data was collected to develop...

  6. John af Salisbury. Forsker, formidler og inspirator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloch, David

    2011-01-01

    Artikel om John of Salisbury (12. årh.) og hans syn på forskning og formidling. Der fokuseres først og fremmest på hans forhold til Aristoteles.......Artikel om John of Salisbury (12. årh.) og hans syn på forskning og formidling. Der fokuseres først og fremmest på hans forhold til Aristoteles....

  7. Would John Stuart Mill have regulated pornography?

    OpenAIRE

    McGlynn, C.; Ward, I.

    2014-01-01

    John Stuart Mill dominates contemporary pornography debates where he is routinely invoked as an authoritative defence against regulation. This article, by contrast, argues that a broader understanding of Mill's ethical liberalism, his utilitarianism, and his feminism casts doubt over such an assumption. New insights into Mill's approach to sex, sexual activity, and the regulation of prostitution reveal an altogether more nuanced and activist approach. We conclude that John Stuart Mill would a...

  8. Media education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasburger, Victor C

    2010-11-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics recognizes that exposure to mass media (eg, television, movies, video and computer games, the Internet, music lyrics and videos, newspapers, magazines, books, advertising) presents health risks for children and adolescents but can provide benefits as well. Media education has the potential to reduce the harmful effects of media and accentuate the positive effects. By understanding and supporting media education, pediatricians can play an important role in reducing harmful effects of media on children and adolescents.

  9. Obituary: John W. Firor (1927-2007)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilman, Peter A.

    2009-12-01

    John W. Firor, a former Director of the High Altitude Observatory and the National Center for Atmospheric Research, and a founder of the Solar Physics Division of the American Astronomical Society, died of Alzheimer's disease in Pullman, Washington on November 5, 2007, he was 80. He was born in Athens Georgia on October 18, 1927, where his father was a professor of agricultural economics. John had an unusually diverse scientific career. His interest in physics and astrophysics began while serving in the army, during which time he was assigned to the Los Alamos National Laboratory, where he guarded highly radioactive materials (many have heard him describe how informal the protections were compared to later times). After his service he returned to college and graduated in physics from Georgia Tech in 1949. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago in 1954, writing his thesis on cosmic rays under John Simpson. John Firor would later remark that: "If you needed cosmic rays to actually do anything, you are sunk." That thought, partly in jest, may help explain his motivation for moving to so many new scientific and management pursuits. John moved from cosmic ray physics to radio astronomy (particularly of the Sun) when he began work at the Carnegie Institution of Washington's Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, where he remained until 1961. During this time, he met Walter Orr Roberts, then the Director of the High Altitude Observatory (HAO) in Boulder, Colorado. HAO was then affiliated with the University of Colorado. In 1959, a movement began to upgrade the atmospheric sciences in the United States by establishing a National Center, where the largest, most important atmospheric research problems could be addressed. Roberts became the first Director of NCAR, as well as the first president of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR), the consortium of universities that was commissioned to manage and staff the new Center. HAO became a

  10. The Effectiveness Of Social Media (Facebook) Compared With More Traditional Advertising Methods for Recruiting Eligible Participants To Health Research Studies: A Randomized, Controlled Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thow, Megan; Ferguson, Stuart G

    2016-01-01

    Background Recruiting participants for research studies can be difficult and costly. The popularity of social media platforms (eg, Facebook) has seen corresponding growth in the number of researchers turning to social networking sites and their embedded advertising frameworks to locate eligible participants for studies. Compared with traditional recruitment strategies such as print media, social media advertising has been shown to be favorable in terms of its reach (especially with hard-to-reach populations), cost effectiveness, and usability. However, to date, no studies have examined how participants recruited via social media progress through a study compared with those recruited using more traditional recruitment strategies. Objectives (1) Examine whether visiting the study website prior to being contacted by researchers creates self-screened participants who are more likely to progress through all study phases (eligible, enrolled, completed); (2) compare conversion percentages and cost effectiveness of each recruitment method at each study phase; and, (3) compare demographic and smoking characteristics of participants recruited through each strategy to determine if they attract similar samples. Methods Participants recruited to a smoking cessation clinical trial were grouped by how they had become aware of the study: via social media (Facebook) or traditional media (eg, newspaper, flyers, radio, word of mouth). Groups were compared based on throughput data (conversion percentages and cost) as well as demographic and smoking characteristics. Results Visiting the study website did not result in individuals who were more likely to be eligible for (P=.24), enroll in (P=.20), or complete (P=.25) the study. While using social media was more cost effective than traditional methods when we examined earlier endpoints of the recruitment process (cost to obtain a screened respondent: AUD $22.73 vs $29.35; cost to obtain an eligible respondent: $37.56 vs $44.77), it was

  11. The Effectiveness Of Social Media (Facebook) Compared With More Traditional Advertising Methods for Recruiting Eligible Participants To Health Research Studies: A Randomized, Controlled Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frandsen, Mai; Thow, Megan; Ferguson, Stuart G

    2016-08-10

    Recruiting participants for research studies can be difficult and costly. The popularity of social media platforms (eg, Facebook) has seen corresponding growth in the number of researchers turning to social networking sites and their embedded advertising frameworks to locate eligible participants for studies. Compared with traditional recruitment strategies such as print media, social media advertising has been shown to be favorable in terms of its reach (especially with hard-to-reach populations), cost effectiveness, and usability. However, to date, no studies have examined how participants recruited via social media progress through a study compared with those recruited using more traditional recruitment strategies. (1) Examine whether visiting the study website prior to being contacted by researchers creates self-screened participants who are more likely to progress through all study phases (eligible, enrolled, completed); (2) compare conversion percentages and cost effectiveness of each recruitment method at each study phase; and, (3) compare demographic and smoking characteristics of participants recruited through each strategy to determine if they attract similar samples. Participants recruited to a smoking cessation clinical trial were grouped by how they had become aware of the study: via social media (Facebook) or traditional media (eg, newspaper, flyers, radio, word of mouth). Groups were compared based on throughput data (conversion percentages and cost) as well as demographic and smoking characteristics. Visiting the study website did not result in individuals who were more likely to be eligible for (P=.24), enroll in (P=.20), or complete (P=.25) the study. While using social media was more cost effective than traditional methods when we examined earlier endpoints of the recruitment process (cost to obtain a screened respondent: AUD $22.73 vs $29.35; cost to obtain an eligible respondent: $37.56 vs $44.77), it was less cost effective in later endpoints

  12. Media Embedded Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, J. David

    A review of literature and two surveys, one of college students and one of a random sample of adults, were used to examine four aspects of media embedded interactions (social behavior in front of a TV or radio): their functions, their environment, their effects, and the reactions of the interactants to them. Television is seen as performing a…

  13. John Twysden and John Palmer: 17th-century Northamptonshire astronomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, M. A.

    2008-01-01

    John Twysden (1607-1688) and John Palmer (1612-1679) were two astronomers in the circle of Samuel Foster (circa 1600-1652), the subject of a recent paper in this journal. John Twysden qualified in law and medicine and led a peripatetic life around England and Europe. John Palmer was Rector of Ecton, Northamptonshire and later Archdeacon of Northampton. The two astronomers catalogued observations made from Northamptonshire from the 1640s to the 1670s. In their later years Twysden and Palmer published works on a variety of topics, often astronomical. Palmer engaged in correspondence with Henry Oldenburg, the first secretary of the Royal Society, on topics in astronomy and mathematics.

  14. Media Komunitas dan Media Literacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawito .

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract:This essay deals with community media in relation to media literacy. After a short discussion on a number of community media characters is made the essay goes further with somewhat detail theoretical presumptions of the roles of media community with respect primarily to the development as Amartya Sen mentioned about. The author suggests that community media may play some significant roles in the development including (a disseminating information (from varieties of perspective, (b facilitating public discussion, (c helping to reach solutions of problems, (d encouraging participations, and (e encouraging the development of media literacy. Regarding the last point the author remarks that media community may have a dual-roles i.e facilitating community’s member in media participation and facilitating community’s member in media education.

  15. Media, Gadgets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Chemical Education, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Summarizes papers presented at the Sixth Biennial Conference on Chemical Education describing new media and gadgets, particularly models, computers, and other media. A bibliography of 15 presented papers on these topics is attached. (CS)

  16. Reformasie: John Knox, Die Skotse Calvinis*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. E. d'Assonville

    1958-03-01

    Full Text Available As ons aan John Knox, die Skotse Hervormer, dink, dan sien ons voor ons oprys die beeld van die Ou-Testamentiese profeet wat sy stem in die woestyn verhef en gekleed gaan met ’n harige mantel en ’n leergord om sy heupe. John Knox het die byl aan die wortel van elke afgodsboom gelê. Soos ’n Luther het hy in die taal van die volk gespreek en daar was by hom geen vrees om selfs in paleise die oordeel van God oor konings aan te kondig nie.

  17. Effects of conducting media and gender on an electric pulp test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chunhacheevachaloke, E; Ajcharanukul, O

    2016-03-01

    (1) To determine the pulpal sensory thresholds in human teeth obtained from using various EPT conducting media and (2) to determine whether there are gender differences. One intact maxillary central incisor was randomly selected from each of 40 participants (20 male, 20 female) aged 19-24 year. A constant-current electrical stimulator (University of Bristol, UK) was used to apply electrical stimuli with different conducting media at intervals of 1 min on the middle of the crown to evaluate the sensory threshold of the tooth. The tip of the electrode was coated with a thin layer of test media. The sensory thresholds and the pain scores were measured simultaneously after applying stimuli twice a second and gradually increasing the intensity until felt by the participants. Test media included water-based gels (K-Y UltraGel; Xylocaine 2% Jelly, electrode gel, fluoride gel) and toothpastes (Colgate Total; Sensodyne Repair & Protect; Dentiste' Plus White; Sparkle White). The sensory threshold data were evaluated using two-way anova followed by the Tukey test. Xylocaine 2% Jelly and fluoride gel evoked significantly lower threshold values when compared with Sensodyne Repair & Protect (P media, the mean sensory threshold from the female group was significantly lower than that of the male group (P electrical stimuli in human teeth was influenced by the type of conducting media and gender. © 2015 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Obituary: John Louis Perdrix, 1926-2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orchiston, D. Wayne

    2006-12-01

    John Perdrix, astronomical historian and co-founder of the Journal of Astronomical History and Heritage, died on 27 June 2005. John Louis Perdrix was born in Adelaide, Australia, on 30 June 1926. After studying chemistry at Melbourne Technical College and working in industry, he joined the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation's Division of Minerals and Geochemistry. In 1974 the Division relocated to the Western Australian capital, Perth, and John spent the rest of his working life there involved in geochemical research. From his teenage years John had a passion for astronomy, which he fine-tuned through the Astronomical Society of Victoria and the Victorian Branch of the British Astronomical Association. He was very active in both groups, serving as President of the former and Secretary/Treasurer of the latter. He was also an FRAS, and a member of the AAS, the BAA parent body, and the IAU (Commission 41)?no mean feat for an Australian amateur astronomer. Throughout his life, he was a strong advocate of close amateur-professional relations. John's main research interest was history of astronomy, and over the years he wrote a succession of research papers, mainly about aspects of Australian astronomy. His well-researched and neatly-illustrated papers on the Melbourne Observatory and the Great Melbourne Telescope are classics, and when the Observatory's future was in the balance they played a key role in the State Government's decision to convert this unique facility into a museum precinct. To support his research activities, John built up an amazing library that developed its own distinctive personality and quickly took over his house and garage before invading commercial storage facilities! Apart from writing papers, John had an even greater passion for editing and publishing. From 1985 to 1997 he produced the Australian Journal of Astronomy, and in 1998 this was replaced by the Journal of Astronomical History and Heritage (JAH2). Both

  19. Conceptions of Childhood in the Educational Philosophies of John Locke and John Dewey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bynum, Gregory Lewis

    2015-01-01

    This article compares progressive conceptions of childhood in the educational philosophies of John Locke and John Dewey. Although the lives of the two philosophers were separated by an ocean and two centuries of history, they had in common the following things: (1) a relatively high level of experience working with, and observing, children that is…

  20. John Furlong and the "University Project"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, David

    2014-01-01

    Like many senior teacher-educators and educational researchers, John Furlong has faced in several directions throughout his career, sometimes simultaneously. He has clearly not lost his enthusiasm for what happens in the classroom: he strongly appreciates those magical moments which can happen at any time, and which keep teachers going. He loves…

  1. John Hull and the Money Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attfield, David

    2008-01-01

    John Hull's recent educational writings have included several on what he calls the "money culture". This is analysed and criticised in this article. Hull offers a Marxist and a neo-Marxist account of the role of money in western societies utilising the labour theory of value, false consciousness and the materialist interpretation of history. It is…

  2. Astronaut John Glenn Enters Friendship 7

    Science.gov (United States)

    1962-01-01

    Astronaut John Glenn enters the Mercury spacecraft, Friendship 7, prior to the launch of MA-6 on February 20, 1961 and became the first American who orbited the Earth. The MA-6 mission was the first manned orbital flight boosted by the Mercury-Atlas vehicle, a modified Atlas ICBM (Intercontinental Ballistic Missile), lasted for five hours, and orbited the Earth three times.

  3. John Forbes (ca. 1568-1634)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, Christiaan George Frederik de

    1987-01-01

    This book deals sith the life and work of the Scotsman John Forbes (c.1568-1634), who studied at the University of Saint Andrews and then served as a minister of the Church of Scotland (1593-1605). During his ministy he witnessed and later became a victim of the fierce battle between the Calvinistic

  4. Bathymetry (2011) for Coral Bay, St. John

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a LiDAR (Light Detection & Ranging) 0.3x0.3 meter resolution depth surface for Coral Bay, St. John in the U.S. Virgin Islands (USVI). The...

  5. John Smith - eesti kunstnik / Ants Juske

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Juske, Ants, 1956-2016

    2006-01-01

    Marko Mäetamme ja Kaido Ole kollektiivsest loomingust, mida esitatakse John Smithi autorinime all, mõnda ka salapärase J. Smithi nn. biograafiast. Illustratsiooniks J. Smith'i "Jumalate maailm I (fragment). Õli, lõuend, 2002. Erakogu

  6. John Maynard Smith (1920-2004)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 10; Issue 11. John Maynard Smith (1920-2004). Featured Scientist Volume 10 Issue 11 November 2005 pp 110-110. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/010/11/0110-0110. Resonance – Journal ...

  7. John Dewey in the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Morgan K.

    2017-01-01

    John Dewey was a pragmatist, progressivist, educator, philosopher, and social reformer (Gutek, 2014). Dewey's various roles greatly impacted education, and he was perhaps one of the most influential educational philosophers known to date (Theobald, 2009). Dewey's influence on education was evident in his theory about social learning; he believed…

  8. John Deweys kritik af liberal education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huggler, Jørgen

    2017-01-01

    The paper deals with John Dewey's aversion against liberal education and his concern about a 'dual track' educational system separating liberal education and vocational education. It investigates the reason why Dewey maintains that the philosophical 'dualisms' culminate in the question on vocation....

  9. John Dewey on Philosophy and Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Maughn; Granger, David

    2012-01-01

    John Dewey was not a philosopher of education in the now-traditional sense of a doctor of philosophy who examines educational ends, means, and controversies through the disciplinary lenses of epistemology, ethics, and political theory, or of agenda-driven schools such as existentialism, feminism, and critical theory. Rather, Dewey was both an…

  10. John Dewey and Adult Learning in Museums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monk, David F.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this article is to investigate learning in museums through the lens of John Dewey's philosophy of education and experiential learning. The influence of Dewey's philosophy of education is widespread and resounding. In this article, I examine the experiential qualities of Dewey's philosophy and compare it with the objectives of the…

  11. Preparing for Citizenship: Bring Back John Dewey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pring, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The paper traces the development of citizenship in the curriculum in England since the 1960s, emerging particularly from the Crick report. It argues for lessons to be learnt from John Dewey's "Democracy and education", the centenary of which is being celebrated this year.

  12. Jean Piaget's Debt to John Dewey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Jean Piaget became a veritable institution unto himself in education and psychology, largely as the result of his developmental-stage theory advanced over the second quarter of the twentieth century. Not until Piaget was 73 did he make mention of John Dewey's work at Dewey's laboratory school, founded in 1894 at the University of Chicago. But here…

  13. We, John Dewey's Audience of Today

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cunha, Marcus Vinicius

    2016-01-01

    This article suggests that John Dewey's "Democracy and Education" does not describe education in an existing society, but it conveys a utopia, in the sense coined by Mannheim: utopian thought aims at instigating actions towards the transformation of reality, intending to attain a better world in the future. Today's readers of Dewey (his…

  14. John Wilkes Booth and the Lincoln Conspiracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nufrio, Ronald M.

    The 1865 conspiracy to assassinate Abraham Lincoln also included plans to assassinate other government officials on that same April evening. The actor, John Wilkes Booth, succeeded in killing Lincoln, but his fellow conspirators bungled their attempts to kill William Seward, Andrew Johnson, Ulysses S. Grant, and possibly Edwin Stanton. In…

  15. Bathymetry (2011) for Fish Bay, St. John

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a LiDAR (Light Detection & Ranging) 0.3x0.3 meter resolution depth surface for Fish Bay, St. John in the U.S. Virgin Islands (USVI). The...

  16. John Rohr honored with emeritus status

    OpenAIRE

    Chadwick, Heather Riley

    2008-01-01

    John A. Rohr, of Blacksburg, professor of public administration and policy in the College of Architecture and Urban Studies at Virginia Tech, was conferred the "professor emeritus" title by the Virginia Tech Board of Visitors during the board's quarterly meeting on June 20.

  17. John Newbery, "Friend of All Mankind."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hearn, Michael Patrick

    1997-01-01

    Recounts the life of John Newbery, the 18th-century London bookseller who did more than anyone to establish the children's book trade, and for whom the prestigious Newbery Award is named. States that Newbery published many books, including a line of books called the Juvenile Library, entertaining but also didactic, in the manner of the times. (PA)

  18. The Life and Work of John Snow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melville, Wayne; Fazio, Xavier

    2007-01-01

    Due to his work to determine how cholera was spread in the 18th century, John Snow (1813-1858) has been hailed as the father of modern epidemiology. This article presents an inquiry model based on his life and work, which teachers can use to develop a series of biology lessons involving the history and nature of science. The lessons presented use…

  19. Speaking Personally--With John "Pathfinder" Lester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaubois, Terry

    2013-01-01

    John Lester is currently the chief learning officer at ReactionGrid, a software company developing 3-D simulations and multiuser virtual world platforms. Lester's background includes working with Linden Lab on Second Life's education activities and neuroscience research. His primary focus is on collaborative learning and instructional…

  20. The Bildungsroman in Cameroon Anglophone Literature: John ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper investigates the bildungsroman genre in postcolonial Cameroon Anglophone fiction through a textual analysis of John Nkemngong Nkengasong's Across the Mongolo and Margaret Afuh's Born before Her Time. It seeks to show that these two writers have borrowed a foreign genre and successfully manipulated ...

  1. John Locke‟s Epistemology and Teachings

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    First Lady

    2013-01-28

    Jan 28, 2013 ... John Locke belongs to the epistemological school of thought called. Empiricism. Empiricism is a reaction ..... training at Westminster were not favourable to public school education. He sees very clearly the ... Locke is also opposed to multiplication of rules and again would rather trust the formation of habits' ...

  2. The Academic Freedom of John Dewey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Louis

    1977-01-01

    Academic freedom is a perennial issue in the public schools of America. As with most significant social issues, disagreements regarding the nature and extent of freedom appropriate in our society is reflected in our schools in various ways. Examines some of those conflicts with comments on John Dewey's convictions on academic freedom. (Author/RK)

  3. Obituary: John Leroy Climenhaga, 1916-2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarfe, Colin

    2009-01-01

    John Leroy Climenhaga was born on 7 November 1916 on a farm some 10 km from Delisle, a small town on the Canadian prairies, located about 50 km south-west of Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, and died at his home in Victoria, British Columbia, on 27 May 2008. His parents, Reuben and Elizabeth (nee Bert) Climenhaga, were farming folk, and he carried their honest and open attitude to the world throughout his life. John was the seventh born, and last to die, of their ten children. His father also served as an ordained minister of the Brethren in Christ. In early adulthood, John worked on his father's farm, but then attended the University of Saskatchewan, obtaining a B.A. with Honors in Mathematics and Physics and an M.A. in Physics, in 1945 and 1949 respectively. Between these events he worked as a Physics Instructor at Regina College from 1946 to 1948. In 1949 Climenhaga joined the faculty of Victoria College, as one of only two physicists in a small institution that was then part of the University of British Columbia. He remained in Victoria for the rest of his career, playing a major role in the College's growth into a full-fledged university, complete with thriving graduate programs in physics and astronomy as well as in many other fields. He served as Head of the Physics Department during the 1960s, a period which saw the College become the University of Victoria, with a full undergraduate program in Physics, and campaigned successfully for the establishment of a program in Astronomy, which began in 1965. From 1969 until 1972 he held the position of Dean of Arts and Science, and championed the university's participation in the Tri-University Meson Facility, whose high-current medium-energy beam was ideal for the production and study of mesons and their physics. That period was a turbulent one in the university's history, but John's integrity and his balanced and fair-minded approach to conflicts were of immeasurable importance in steering the young institution through it

  4. John Maynard Smith (1920-2004)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 10; Issue 11. John Maynard Smith (1920-2004) - “One of the last Grand Evolutionary Theorists of the 20th Century”. Vidyanand Nanjundiah. General Article Volume 10 Issue 11 November 2005 pp 70-78 ...

  5. Capitalism in Six Westerns by John Ford

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Carlos Rodriguez

    2011-01-01

    The economic and institutional analysis of capitalism can be illustrated through John Ford's Westerns. This article focuses on six classics by Ford that show the move toward modern order, the creation of a new society, and the rule of law. Economic features are pervading, from property rights and contracts to markets, money, and trade. Ford has…

  6. John W. Thoburn: International Humanitarian Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Presents a short biography of the winner of the American Psychological Association's International Humanitarian Award. The 2012 winner, John W. Thoburn, is an extraordinary psychologist who devotes himself consistently to service to underserved populations, especially in the aftermath of natural or human-induced disasters. He exemplifies a genuine…

  7. John Dinsdale on Intellectual Self-knowledge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Michael Stenskjær

    2017-01-01

    This is an edition of the prologue and two questions concerning intellectual self-knowledge from John Dinsdale's Quaestiones in De anima. The edition is supplied with a translation, and in an appendix the prologue is compared with Giles of Rome's prologue to his Expositio De anima, on which...

  8. Mass Media for Smoking Cessation in Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Laura J.; Bunn, Janice Y.; Flynn, Brian S.; Pirie, Phyllis L.; Worden, John K.; Ashikaga, Takamaru

    2009-01-01

    Theory-driven, mass media interventions prevent smoking among youth. This study examined effects of a media campaign on adolescent smoking cessation. Four matched pairs of media markets in four states were randomized to receive or not receive a 3-year television/radio campaign aimed at adolescent smoking cessation based on social cognitive theory.…

  9. Media Entrepreneurship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khajeheian, Datis

    2017-01-01

    Media Entrepreneurship has been an ambiguous, unclear and controversial concept and despite of growing academic efforts in the last decade, it is still a poorly defined subject. This paper is an effort to fill this gap by providing a comprehensive definition of media entrepreneurship. Firstly......, a literature review conducted and entrepreneurship, media, opportunity and innovation as building blocks of media entrepreneurship explained. Then by using of a mixed of bibliographic method and a Delphi method with multi-stage analysis process, a consensual definition of media entrepreneurship proposed...... entrepreneurship....

  10. Media Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Gang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern colleges are faced with the dual pressures of university reform and international competition, how to overcome difficulties, to play the role of modern English teaching in colleges and colleges to enhance the core competitiveness of colleges, colleges and colleges modern English teaching problems to be solved. Based on the current situation of modern colleges in the premise of the Modern media platform fully demonstrated the characteristics and viability of the Modern media English teaching, the necessity of modern English teaching of college Modern media. Discusses the Modern media targeting English teaching and important role is in the English teaching to guide the development of modern colleges modern media.

  11. Media Framing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Rasmus T.

    2017-01-01

    The concept of media framing refers to the way in which the news media organize and provide meaning to a news story by emphasizing some parts of reality and disregarding other parts. These patterns of emphasis and exclusion in news coverage create frames that can have considerable effects on news...... consumers’ perceptions and attitudes regarding the given issue or event. This entry briefly elaborates on the concept of media framing, presents key types of media frames, and introduces the research on media framing effects....

  12. A simulation of Johne's disease control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groenendaal, Huybert; Nielen, Mirjam; Jalvingh, Alien W; Horst, Suzan H; Galligan, David T; Hesselink, Jan Willem

    2002-07-25

    A dynamic and stochastic simulation model (the "JohneSSim model") was developed to evaluate the economic and epidemiological effects of different strategies for control of paratuberculosis in dairy herds. Animals occupy one of the six defined infection states; the spread of Johne's disease is modeled with five infection routes. Many different dairy farm situations can be simulated. Control strategies that can be simulated are: (1) test-and-cull; (2) calf hygiene management; (3) vaccination and (4) grouping of animals. Losses are caused by: (1) reduced milk production; (2) diagnosis and treatment costs; (3) lower slaughter value of cows and (4) sub-optimal culling. The benefits were calculated as reduction in the losses caused by Johne's disease; the costs of each strategy were calculated on the basis of actual costs of each item; and net present value (NPV) was calculated as benefits minus costs. Herd and prevalence data from The Netherlands and Pennsylvania, USA were used. In both situations, a low true mean prevalence within 20 years could be reached only when all calf management tools were applied. The Dutch control program (PPN) was on average economically attractive (with or without labor costs, the average NPV was Euro 1183 and 12,397, respectively). In Pennsylvania, contract heifer rearing and improved calf hygiene reduced the prevalence effectively and had large economic benefits (US$ 43,917 for 20-year period) if the calves were sent to the heifer facility while very young. Validation with data from 21 infected Dutch dairy farms (as well as face-validation: comparison of the results of the JohneSSim model with experiences of Johne's experts) supported the basic assumptions in the model.

  13. Obituary: John J. Hillman, 1938-2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanover, Nancy

    2007-12-01

    John J. Hillman, a dedicated NASA civil servant, spectroscopist, astrophysicist, planetary scientist, and mentor, died on February 12, 2006 of ocular melanoma at his home in Columbia, Maryland. His professional and personal interests were wide-reaching and varied, and he devoted his career to the advancement of our understanding of the beauty and wonder in the world around us. His love of nature, art, and science made him a true Renaissance man. John was born in Fort Jay, New York, on November 22, 1938, and was raised in Washington, D.C. He received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in Physics from American University in 1967, 1970, and 1975, respectively. He began working at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, then in its infancy, in 1969, juggling a full-time position as a Research Physicist, the completion of his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees, and a young family. His background in molecular spectroscopy enabled him to apply his skills to numerous disciplines within NASA: infrared and radio astronomy; electronic, vibrational, and rotational structure of interstellar molecules; solar and stellar atmospheres; and planetary atmospheres. He published more than 70 journal papers in these disciplines. He was a frequent contributor to the Ohio State University International Symposium on Molecular Spectroscopy, and possessed a rare ability to bridge the gap between laboratory and remote sensing spectroscopy, bringing scientists from different disciplines together to understand our Universe. The last fifteen years of John's career were devoted to the development of acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) cameras. He championed this technology as a low-cost, low-power alternative to traditional imaging cameras for in situ or remotely sensed planetary exploration. It was within this context that I got to know John, and eventually worked closely with him on the demonstration and application of this technology for planetary science using ground-based telescopes in New Mexico, California

  14. A New Reading of Shakespeare's King John.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usher, Peter D.

    1995-12-01

    Shakespeare wrote King John c.1594, six years after the defeat of the Spanish Armada, and ~ 50 years after publication of the Copernican heliocentric hypothesis. It is said to be the most unhistorical of the History Plays, ``anomalous'', ``puzzling'', and ``odd'', and as such it has engendered far more than the customary range of interpretive opinion. I suggest that the play alerts Elizabethans not just to military and political threats, but to a changing cosmic world view, all especially threatening as they arise in Catholic countries. (a) Personification characterizes the play. John personifies the old order, while Arthur and the Dauphin's armies personify the new. I suggest that Shakespeare decenters King John just as Copernicus decentered the world. (b) Hubert menaces Arthur's eyes for a whole scene (4.1), but the need for such cruelty is not explained and is especially odd as Arthur is already under sentence of death (3.3.65-66). This hitherto unexplained anomaly suggests that the old order fears what the new might see. (c) Eleanor's confession is made only to Heaven and to her son the King (1.1.42-43), yet by echoing and word play the Messenger from France later reveals to John that he is privy to it (4.2.119-124). This circumstance has not been questioned heretofore. I suggest that the Messenger is like the wily Hermes (Mercury), chief communicator of the gods and patron of the sciences; by revealing that he moves in the highest circles, he tells John that he speaks with an authority that transcends even that of a king. The message from on high presages more than political change; it warns of a new cosmic and religious world order (d) Most agree that John is a weak king, so Shakespeare must have suspected flaws in the old ways. He would have known that Tycho Brahe's new star of 1572, the comet of 1577, and the 1576 model of his compatriot Thomas Digges, were shattering old ideas. (e) The tensions of the play are not resolved because in 1594 the new order was

  15. Universal randomness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dotsenko, Viktor S [Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2011-03-31

    In the last two decades, it has been established that a single universal probability distribution function, known as the Tracy-Widom (TW) distribution, in many cases provides a macroscopic-level description of the statistical properties of microscopically different systems, including both purely mathematical ones, such as increasing subsequences in random permutations, and quite physical ones, such as directed polymers in random media or polynuclear crystal growth. In the first part of this review, we use a number of models to examine this phenomenon at a simple qualitative level and then consider the exact solution for one-dimensional directed polymers in a random environment, showing that free energy fluctuations in such a system are described by the universal TW distribution. The second part provides detailed appendix material containing the necessary mathematical background for the first part. (reviews of topical problems)

  16. Synthesis of a scalar wavelet intensity propagating through von Kármán-type random media: joint use of the radiative transfer equation with the Born approximation and the Markov approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Haruo; Emoto, Kentaro

    2017-10-01

    In high-frequency seismograms of small earthquakes, we clearly see the excitation of long lasting coda waves and the envelope broadening of an S-wavelet with travel distance increasing. We can interpret those phenomena resulting from scattering by random inhomogeneities distributed in the earth medium. Those phenomena have been theoretically studied by stochastic methods, which deal with velocity inhomogeneities as random media. As a simple mathematical model, we study the propagation of a scalar wavelet for the spherical radiation from a point source in 3-D von Kármán-type random media, of which the power spectral density function (PSDF) decreases according to a power-law higher than the corner wavenumber. Our objective is to propose a method to synthesize the wavelet intensity time trace, the mean square amplitude trace, at a given travel distance by using statistical parameters characterizing the PSDF and the centre wavenumber of the wavelet. When the phase shift is small, we can use the Born approximation to calculate the non-isotropic scattering coefficient representing the scattering power per unit volume. Using the scattering coefficient in the radiative transfer equation (RTE), we are able to synthesize the wavelet intensity time trace. When the centre wavenumber increases in the power-law spectral range, however, we often face the situation of a large phase shift, where the Born approximation is inapplicable, but we are able to use the Markov approximation based on the parabolic approximation. It well explains the intensity time traces showing envelope broadening with peak delay due to multiple scattering around the forward direction and the wandering effect caused by travel time fluctuations; however, it fails to explain rich coda waves composed of scattered waves in wide angles. In such a case, here, we newly propose the spectrum division method as follows: at first, taking the centre wavenumber with a tuning parameter as a reference, we divide the

  17. John Aitken (d. 1790)--grinder or scholar?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Matthew H

    2003-11-01

    John Aitken attended the University of Edinburgh between 1763 and 1769 but did not graduate MD. He gained the membership (i.e. fellowship) of the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh in 1770, and was for two sessions Senior President of the Royal Medical Society. Between 1771 and 1790 he published numerous books and pamphlets on surgery, medicine, midwifery, anatomy and physiology. As a surgeon at the Royal Infirmary, from 1779, he lectured on most subjects in the medical curriculum. John Struthers was particularly scathing of Aitken's scholarship, and this article attempts to restore Aitken's reputation as a scholar and probably one of the first of the extra-academical lecturers, who taught both anatomy and surgery in Edinburgh from 1779 until his death in 1790.

  18. In Memoriam: Dr. Frank John Fenner

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-04-22

    This podcast reflects on one of the greatest pioneers in virology, Dr. Frank John Fenner. Dr. Frederick Murphy, a member of EID's editorial board and the Institute of Medicine, and professor of Pathology at the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston, shares professional and personal stories of Dr. Frank Fenner.  Created: 4/22/2011 by National Center for Emerging Zoonotic and Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 4/26/2011.

  19. John Stuart Mill’s Utilitarianism

    OpenAIRE

    Aydın, Metin

    2013-01-01

    Utilitarianism, systematised by Jeremy Bentham (1748–1832) in 18th century, is a theory having strong effects in many different areas from economy and ethics to politic and law especially in England and geopraphies in which anglo-saxon culture reigns. John Stuart Mill (1806 – 1873) reinterpreted Utilitrianism which was inherited from Bentham, in the context of critics of utilitarianism and his own thoughts. In this essay, Mill’s utilitarianism will be examined. In this context, I will discuss...

  20. John Dewey's Visits to Hawai'i

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwan, Hunter

    2015-01-01

    John Dewey visited Hawai'i on three separate occasions. Of all three trips, by far the most important, as far as Dewey's influence on education in Hawai'i is concerned, was in 1899 when he came with his wife, Alice Chipman Dewey, to help launch the University Extension program in Honolulu. The Deweys' second trip was a very brief one--twenty years…

  1. The mystery of John Wilkes Booth's dentist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyson, J M; Kauffman, M W

    1999-11-01

    For many years there has been much speculation over the identity of the dentist of President Abraham Lincoln's assassin, John Wilkes Booth. Some have considered Dr. William Merrill (1833-1918), a rather prominent Washington, D.C. dentist, as the man who restored two of Booth's teeth with gold a few days before the assassination. Who was the mysterious Dr. Merrill and what evidence do we have that he ever treated Booth?

  2. 65 Year Birthday Celebration's Prof. John Ellis.

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Jeannet

    2011-01-01

    On 13 September, physicists from around the world joined John Ellis at a colloquium to celebrate his 65th birthday, and as he ended his long career as a distinguished CERN staff member and joins King’s College London. Here he is in the audience with fellow theorists, Nobel laureate Gerard ’t Hooft and Chris Llewellyn Smith, former director-general of CERN.

  3. Reformasie: John Knox, Die Skotse Calvinis* 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. E. d'Assonville

    1959-03-01

    Full Text Available Na negentien maande van onophoudelike stryd en nood, word John Knox gedurende Februarie 1549 van die wrede Franse galeiskip losgelaat. Hierop begeef die liggaamlik gebroke hervormer hom na Engeland, omdat Skotland nog te onveilig was, Die Rooms-Katolieke party het sake aldaar so onder die kiel gehad, dat ’n deurbraak van die Hervorming menslik gesproke op hierdie tydstip onmoontlikwas.

  4. Perugino's 'Virgin and Child with Saint John'

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bamford, David

    1977-01-01

    .... Details of the cleaning tests are given, which show, amongst other things, that the drapery of Saint John was not original and that part of the parapet was false. Following a section on the restoration and framing, the author suggests possible explanations for the alterations that were found. There are illustrations of the panel before, during, and following cleaning and restoration, as well as an x-ray mosaic.

  5. Media stylistics

    OpenAIRE

    Lambrou, Marina; Durant, Alan

    2014-01-01

    In this chapter we review the concept of ‘media stylistics’. In particular, we disentangle the polysemy of these two terms which, when combined, describe but can also obscure work in this area; and we discuss key themes and concerns which emerge. Through analysis of two short extracts of media discourse in English, we elaborate a distinction between two alternative emphases: study of media language as concerned with the capabilities associated with changing technologies for conveying linguist...

  6. Media Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kabel, Lars

    2016-01-01

    News and other kinds of journalistic stories, 16-17 hours a day, all year round, on all platforms, also the moderated social media. The key research thesis behind this article is that the continuous and speedy stream of news stories and media content now is becoming the centre of the production...... processes and the value creation in converged multimedia newsrooms. The article identify new methods and discuss editorial challenges in handling media flow....

  7. Assessing vaccine efficacy for the prevention of acute otitis media by pneumococcal vaccination in children: a methodological overview of statistical practice in randomized controlled clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn-Eimermacher, Antje; du Prel, Jean-Baptist; Schmitt, Heinz-Josef

    2007-08-14

    Acute otitis media (AOM) is the most common bacterial infectious disease among children. Vaccination is proposed to prevent otitis and several clinical trials were performed to assess the efficacy of pneumococcal vaccines. The way vaccine efficacy is analysed varies among trials. However, the clinical meaning of an estimate of vaccine effect and its statistical test depends on the applied statistical method. We aim to bring the meaning and validity of statistical trial results to the attention of researchers. We consider all methodological approaches for analysing vaccine efficacy applied in pneumococcal vaccination trials included in a recent Cochrane Review. We demonstrate how different methods address different scientific questions on the effect of vaccination, how they can complement each other and why some methods can produce misleading results.

  8. Scattering of electromagnetic waves from random media with strong permittivity fluctuations. [with application to atmospheric turbulence effects on microwave remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, L.; Kong, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    By taking into account the singularity of the dyadic Green's function in the renormalization method, a theory is derived for vector electromagnetic wave propagation in a random medium with large permittivity fluctuations and with anisotropic correlation function. The strong fluctuation theory is then applied to a discrete scatterer problem in which the permittivity can assume only two values. The results are found to be consistent with those derived from discrete scatterer theory for all values of dielectric constants of the scatterers.

  9. John J. Bergan, 1927-2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Zamboni

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available John Bergan was born on August 4, 1927 and graduated in Medicine at the University of Indiana in 1954. He spent the residency in surgery at the Chicago Wesley Memorial Hospital and in 1960 was certified in the American Board of Surgery. The body of his academic career took place at the North Western University in Chicago, where he devoted himself to vascular surgery and also to its applications in transplantation surgery. Scrolling through the records of the North-Western Registry, it turns out that John performed his first kidney transplant as the first operator in 1964, and was Director of the program till 1976. However, for the European phlebologist John was the ambassador of Phlébologie in the United States of America. Two were his key meetings in the field. The first was with Geza de Takats, a forerunner of the modern Phlebology, who operated for long time in Chicago. John was in strong contact with this Mentor, to the point that he wrote the obituary on Surgery in 1986, when he died. The second was the stellar conjunction with James S. T. Yao at the NorthWestern University. Together they released the first complete text-book of Phlebology in the United States, Venous Problems, at the end of the 70’s. In the 80’s, he was one of the Founding Fathers of the American Venus forum, at the famous first meeting at the hotel of Coronado, and, subsequently, President. But he also served as President the American College of Phlebology. This because was an eclectic and multi-core phlebologist, equally interested and curious about the new features in outpatient practice, as well as in cutting-edge research applied to the venous system. The last years of his academic career were actively spent in a climate much more favourable compared to Illinois, at the University of California San Diego, in La Jolla, where he continued to work and publish on veins. Few years ago Claude Franceschi and me taught venous haemodynamics, at a course organised in

  10. Book in three volumes of dr. John Puricha: Theology and pedagogy of St. John Chrysostom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parlić-Božović Jasna Lj.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Before the is latest work of Bishop Dr John Puric, by its importance, analytically decorated works, an impressive and voluminous number of facts happy including pedagogical Serbian public. Specifically, our pedagogical public is missing in this way displayed the Orthodox point of view of observation pedagogical crown and top categories. Episkom John was the there / volume work attempted to provide the interested reader the personality profile of any precise data from the conception of St. John Crisostom by looking at the same time as its pedagogy, and theology. Moreover these two concepts and bringing them to their assence, John episcope them actually connects into one inseparable unity. Therefore, this work has a multiple value and importance esportance especially for educators, who have not tried or had the oppotunality to see and understand the pedagogy of Orthodox theology in general, decorated with the ideas of Saint John Chrysostom special. Mindfullpeace as heir and successor creative Cappadocia 'novonikejske' trijadologije, St. John Chrystom recognizes the statut of Divine pedagogy educational philanthropy and philanthropic saving of pedagogy in each of the three Divine Persons. God the Father is this part, written by Bishop John, and from the perspective of John Chrysostom, is uncreated and unborn educationak philanthropy source of grace of the Holy Trinity. God the Son, and of the Father, uncreated etrinilly born, only begotten Son of God, newborn Logos, Jesus Christ the God/ man, BewAdam is alive and saving, hypostatic Ikonomija God, great mystery of the faith- God is reported in the body, the Divine Krishna- resurrect pedagogy, in which the comic-eschatologiocal Body, Church of Heaven and Earth, The Secret New Substances contain - the salvation of all creation, all creatures animate and inanimate. The salvation of man and the world, in the Divine dispensation and the pedagogy of salvation invation involve all there persons of the Holy

  11. Inaugural Lecture in the John Adams Memorial Lecture Series John Adams and his times

    CERN Document Server

    Amaldi, Edoardo; CERN. Geneva

    1985-01-01

    The John Adams' Memorial Lecture will be an annual event which in futur years will provide young and promising accelerator engineers and physicists with an opportunity to expose their work in the accelerator field. The inaugural lecture will put the many very important contribution of John Adams into perspective, not only with respect to CERN, but also with respect to the development of high energy physics in the world.

  12. 767-IJBCS-Article-John David Okieku

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR GATSING

    Impact of multi drugs resistant bacteria on pathogenesis of chronic supperative otitis media. Afr. J. Microbiol. Res.,. 4(13): 1373-1382. Brown PD, Izundu A. 2004. Antibiotic. Resistance in Clinical Isolates of. Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Jamaica. Rev. Panam Salud Publica, 16(2): 125-. 130. Chigbu CO, Ezeronye OU. 2003.

  13. Obituary: John Daniel Kraus, 1910-2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, John D., Jr.; Marhefka, Ronald J.

    2005-12-01

    John Daniel Kraus, 94, of Delaware, Ohio, director of the Ohio State University "Big Ear" Radio Observatory, physicist, inventor, and environmentalist died 18 July 2004 at his home in Delaware, Ohio. He was born on 28 June 1910 in Ann Arbor, Michigan. He received a Bachelor of Science in 1930, a Master of Science in 1931, and a PhD in physics in 1933 (at 23 years of age), all from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. During the 1930s at Michigan, he was involved in physics projects, antenna consulting, and in atomic-particle-accelerator research using the University of Michigan's premier cyclotron. Throughout the late 1920s and the 1930s, John was an avid radio amateur with call sign W8JK. He was back on the air in the 1970s. In 2001 the amateur radio magazine CQ named him to the inaugural class of its Amateur Radio Hall of Fame. He developed many widely used innovative antennas. The "8JK closely spaced array" and the "corner reflector" were among his early designs. Edwin H. Armstrong wrote John in July 1941 indicating in part, "I have read with interest your article in the Proceedings of the Institute on the corner reflector...Please let me congratulate you on a very fine piece of work." Perhaps John's most famous invention, and a product of his intuitive reasoning process, is the helical antenna, widely used in space communications, on global positioning satellites, and for other applications. During World War II, John was in Washington, DC as a civilian scientist with the U.S. Navy responsible for "degaussing" the electromagnetic fields of steel ships to make them safe from magnetic mines. He also worked on radar countermeasures at Harvard University's Radio Research Laboratory. He received the U.S. Navy Meritorious Civilian Service Award for his war work. In 1946 he took a faculty position at Ohio State University, becoming professor in 1949, and retiring in 1980 as McDougal Professor Emeritus of Electrical Engineering and Astronomy. Even so, he never retired

  14. Early detection and intervention using neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL may improve renal outcome of acute contrast media induced nephropathy: A randomized controlled trial in patients undergoing intra-arterial angiography (ANTI-CIN Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stiegler Philipp

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with pre-existing impaired renal function are prone to develop acute contrast media induced nephropathy (CIN. Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL, a new biomarker predictive for acute kidney injury (AKI, has been shown to be useful for earlier diagnosis of CIN; however, urinary NGAL values may be markedly increased in chronic renal failure at baseline. Results from those studies suggested that urinary NGAL values may not be helpful for the clinician. An intravenous volume load is a widely accepted prophylactic measure and possibly a reasonable intervention to prevent deterioration of renal function. The aim of our study is to evaluate NGAL as an early predictor of CIN and to investigate the clinical benefit of early post-procedural i.v. hydration. Methods/Design The study will follow a prospective, open-label, randomized controlled design. Patients requiring intra-arterial contrast media (CM application will be included and receive standardized, weight-based, intravenous hydration before investigation. Subjects with markedly increased urinary NGAL values after CM application will be randomized into one of two study groups. Group A will receive 3-4 ml/kg BW/h 0.9% saline intravenously for 6 hours. Group B will undergo only standard treatment consisting of unrestricted oral fluid intake. The primary outcome measure will be CIN defined by an increase greater than 25% of baseline serum creatinine. Secondary outcomes will include urinary NGAL values, cystatin C values, contrast media associated changes in cardiac parameters such as NT-pro-BNP/troponin T, changes in urinary cytology, need for renal replacement treatment, length of stay in hospital and death. We assume that 20% of the included patients will show a definite rise in urinary NGAL. Prospective statistical power calculations indicate that the study will have 80% statistical power to detect a clinically significant decrease of CIN of 40% in the

  15. Print media vs internet media

    OpenAIRE

    Koganuramath, M. M.; Angadi, Mallikarjun

    1999-01-01

    The Information Technology has revolutionised the communication media with the emergence of Internet. This paper describes the pace of change in print media to On-line journalism. The process has began with On-line journalism utilising Internet wherein websites are replacing the print media. Most of the On-line newspapers are free, interactive and archival in nature and it provides users to search the information on newspapers through various access points i.e. by contributors, title, and dat...

  16. Perception of the role of mass media in environmental conservation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper focuses on the role of mass media in environmental conservation. Six media houses were randomly selected within Ibadan metropolis. Structured questionnaire were administered to assess the impact of the selected media houses on environmental conservation. It was discovered that media houses in Oyo State ...

  17. 77 FR 3007 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-Advanced Media...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-20

    ..., Hula Media, Long Island City, NY; John A. Hoehn (individual member), Pennsville, NJ; Peter Humphrey... (individual member), Sewickley, PA; Matt Pearcey (individual member), Wells, UNITED KINGDOM; and Jason...

  18. Media darling

    CERN Multimedia

    Chalmers, Matthew

    2008-01-01

    He is the media-friendly face of particle physics, appearing on countless TV and radio shows in the run-up to the opening of CERN's Large Hadron Collider. Matthew Chalmers discovers how Brian Cox finds the time to be both a physicist and a media personality. (2 pages)

  19. MediaQuotient[TM]: National Survey of Family Media Habits, Knowledge, and Attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentile, Douglas A.; Walsh, David A.

    This study examined family media habits, including the use of television, movies, videos, computer and video games, the Internet, music, and print media. The study was conducted by mail with telephone follow-ups, surveying a national random sample of 527 parents of 2- to 17-year-olds who completed MediaQuotient questionnaires. Findings were…

  20. John Paul College: The Professional Renewal Journey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline Mundie

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available John Paul College, a K-12 School in Queensland, Australia, recognises the centrality of classroom teachers to the ongoing improvement of student outcomes. The college has implemented a multi-tiered professional renewal and assessment process. These changes of emphasis are the result of significant research and subsequent/associated professional discussion and were supported during the EBA decision-making in 2012. The professional renewal process at John Paul College guides teachers through a cycle of goal setting (related to any aspect of teacher practice which aims to improve student learning and achievement; ongoing discussion between the teacher and a mentor which determines actions; directed classroom observations (3 per term and associated pre and post reflection/discussion; leading to application of changed practice toward achieving the criteria of the goals. The principles of the professional renewal program are to:  enhance development along accepted school-wide, team and department goals;  encourage professional pedagogical reflections and conversations with a colleague/mentor;  motivate improved performance and highlight the next steps in a teacher’s development. Through the introduction of professional renewal, attestation and exemplary teacher processes, the leadership and teachers of John Paul College have achieved an appropriate and innovative balance between self-directed, peer supported/directed and college-wide, strategic initiatives. Each member of the teaching team, from graduate to senior leaders are actively engaged in personalised programs of professional growth which is specifically aimed at improved learning and outcomes of the college’s students.

  1. Gifts from Mary Ainsworth and John Bowlby.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crittenden, Patricia M

    2017-07-01

    Attachment theory has developed over many decades - and continues to develop. Its roots lie in several seminal publications of John Bowlby (the basis of attachment theory) and Mary D. S. Ainsworth (the notion of individual differences in attachment). This paper identifies the prescient contributions of these early publications and two processes (a long-term dialogue and reflection on discrepancy) that underlay emergent theory. Because I was a student of Ainsworth when both attachment theory and individual differences in attachment organization were becoming better known, I offer some of my recollections of that period, suggesting how that period may have affected current work in attachment.

  2. Review of Due south, by John Kelly

    OpenAIRE

    Headland, Robert K.

    2007-01-01

    This small volume is basically the diary of John Kelly, who visited the British Antarctic Survey station on Signy Island in the South Orkney Islands. It includes about 60 monochrome plates (mainly half-page ones), a few sketches and a map of the island. The text is essentially a diary of the author’s time, from beginning in the Falkland Islands, sailing aboard RRS Ernest Shackleton , staying on the island from 25 January to 8 March 2003 to the return journey. As well as the illustrations, the...

  3. Decomposition and removability properties of John domains

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A quasidisk is the image of a disk or a half-plane under a quasiconformal mapping of the ... also a John domain, where P = {p1,p2,...,pm} and pi ∈ D (i = 1, 2,...,m). .... (2.5). Proof. Let S = ∂Bn(w1,r1)∩∂Bn(w2,r2). If S contains at most one point, then the proof is obvious. On the other hand, if S contains at least two points, ...

  4. The John Zink Hamworthy combustion handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Baukal, Charles E

    2013-01-01

    Despite the length of time it has been around, its importance, and vast amounts of research, combustion is still far from being completely understood. Issues regarding the environment, cost, and fuel consumption add further complexity, particularly in the process and power generation industries. Dedicated to advancing the art and science of industrial combustion, The John Zink Hamworthy Combustion Handbook, Second Edition: Volume 3 - Applications offers comprehensive, up-to-date coverage of equipment used in the process and power generation industries. Under the leadership of Charles E. Baukal

  5. El constitucionalismo según John Rawls

    OpenAIRE

    Gargarella, Roberto

    2005-01-01

    El término democracia se encuentra completamente ausente del famoso libro de John Rawls, Teoría de la justicia. En Liberalismo político, en cambio, Rawls discute varios de los muchos temas sobre los que el concepto de democracia nos invita a reflexionar. En este escrito concentro mi atención en una de esas discusiones: la tensión entre constitucionalismo y democracia. Más específicamente, procuro examinar de qué modo Rawls trata de afirmar el doble compromiso que toda constitución quiere honr...

  6. The chemistry of John Dalton's color blindness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, D M; Dulai, K S; Bowmaker, J K; Mollon, J D

    1995-02-17

    John Dalton described his own color blindness in 1794. In common with his brother, he confused scarlet with green and pink with blue. Dalton supposed that his vitreous humor was tinted blue, selectively absorbing longer wavelengths. He instructed that his eyes should be examined after his death, but the examination revealed that the humors were perfectly clear. In experiments presented here, DNA extracted from his preserved eye tissue showed that Dalton was a deuteranope, lacking the middlewave photopigment of the retina. This diagnosis is shown to be compatible with the historical record of his phenotype, although it contradicts Thomas Young's belief that Dalton was a protanope.

  7. Dedication: John W. Wright, 1929-1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, John W.

    1980-09-01

    The death of John W. Wright in an automobile accident on November 20, 1978, came as a great shock to all who knew him. His family and friends lost a stimulating, compassionate human being whose many-faceted personality they greatly admired. The scientific community working on remote sensing of the air-water interface lost one of its pioneers and leaders. To dedicate this issue of the Journal of Geophysical Research to Dr. Wright seems a fitting tribute to his many scientific achievements.

  8. The healing philosopher: John Locke's medical ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Bradford William

    2004-01-01

    This article examines a heretofore unexplored facet of John Locke's philosophy. Locke was a medical doctor and he also wrote about medical issues that are controversial today. Despite this, Locke's medical ethics has yet to be studied. An analysis of Locke's education and his teachers and colleagues in the medical profession, of the 17th century Hippocratic Oath, and of the reaction to the last recorded outbreak of the bubonic plague in London, shines some light on the subject of Locke's medical ethics. The study of Locke's medical ethics confirms that he was a deontologist who opposed all suicide and abortion through much of pregnancy.

  9. Reformasie: John Knox, die Skotse Calvinis 3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. E. d'Assonville

    1959-03-01

    Full Text Available Knox land in Skotland op 2 Mei 1559 in die hitte van die stryd, of soos hy dit self noem „in the brunt of the battle”. Maria die regentes het nou openlik haar ware kleure gewys en sydag vaar die Protestantse predikers Harlow, Douglas en Willock om op 10 Mei in die kasteel van Stirling te verskyn (Fleming, p. 42. John Knox neem hom voor om self daar teenwoordig te wees om, soos hy skryf, deur sy lewe of deur sy dood God se Naam teverheerlik (Laing, p. 21.

  10. Touchscreen generation: children's current media use, parental supervision methods and attitudes towards contemporary media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostyrka-Allchorne, Katarzyna; Cooper, Nicholas R; Simpson, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    To explore media preferences and use among young children, as well as to obtain information about parental supervision methods and beliefs about media. Ninety parents of three- to six-year-olds, recruited from a relatively economically advantaged area in the United Kingdom, completed a media opinion survey. Although traditional television remains the favourite type of media platform among young children, touchscreen devices are gaining in popularity, and may promote simultaneous multi-screen use. Moreover, parents believe that the effects of media on developmental outcomes are generally positive. However, they do monitor the content of traditional and new media their children are exposed to. This study shows an emerging evidence of concurrent multi-screen use among very young children. More detailed examination of early media multitasking, and its relationship to cognitive and behavioural outcomes, is necessary. ©2016 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Effect of social media in improving knowledge among patients having fixed appliance orthodontic treatment: A single-center randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Silwadi, Fadi M; Gill, Daljit S; Petrie, Aviva; Cunningham, Susan J

    2015-08-01

    Research has shown that orthodontic patients are more likely to retain information presented in an audiovisual format. However, there has been little research on the effectiveness of audiovisual information provided through different routes such as the Internet. This parallel-group randomized controlled trial assessed whether provision of audiovisual information on the YouTube (Google, San Bruno, Calif) Web site to orthodontic patients undergoing fixed appliance treatment results in improved patient knowledge when compared with conventional methods of information provision. The effects of sex and ethnicity were also investigated. Participants were recruited from the Department of Orthodontics of the Eastman Dental Hospital, University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, United Kingdom. The patients were 13 years of age and over, with no history of orthodontic treatment, and patient and parental (where appropriate) consent were obtained. The participants were randomized into control (n = 34) and intervention (n = 33) groups using a random number table; there was stratification based on age group, with permuted blocks of 10 patients. Both groups were given routine verbal and written patient information related to fixed appliances, and the participants in the intervention group were sent 3 e-mails over 6 weeks requesting that they view a 6-minute YouTube video containing similar information but in audiovisual format. Patient knowledge was measured using identical questionnaires answered on the day of recruitment (baseline) and again 6 to 8 weeks later. The researchers were unaware of group allocations when enrolling patients and scoring questionnaires. Sixty participants (89.55%) completed the study. Those who completed the trial in the intervention group (n = 30) demonstrated significantly greater improvements in knowledge than did those in the control group (n = 30), scoring, on average, almost 1 point more (95% CI for the difference, 0.305-1.602; P = 0

  12. The Trieste Lecture of John Stewart Bell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassi, Angelo; Carlo Ghirardi, Gian

    2007-03-01

    Delivered at Trieste on the occasion of the 25th Anniversary of the International Centre for Theoretical Physics, 2 November 1989 The video of this lecture is available here. Please see the PDF for the transcript of the lecture. General remarks by Angelo Bassi and GianCarlo Ghirardi During the autumn of 1989 the International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste, celebrated the 25th anniversary of its creation. Among the many prestigious speakers, who delivered extremely interesting lectures on that occasion, was the late John Stewart Bell. All lectures have been recorded on tape. We succeeded in getting a copy of John's lecture. In the lecture, many of the arguments that John had lucidly stressed in his writings appear once more, but there are also extremely interesting new remarks which, to our knowledge, have not been presented elsewhere. In particular he decided, as pointed out by the very choice of the title of his lecture, to call attention to the fact that the theory presents two types of difficulties, which Dirac classified as first and second class. The former are those connected with the so-called macro-objectification problem, the latter with the divergences characterizing relativistic quantum field theories. Bell describes the precise position of Dirac on these problems and he stresses appropriately how, contrary to Dirac's hopes, the steps which have led to a partial overcoming of the second class difficulties have not helped in any way whatsoever to overcome those of the first class. He then proceeds to analyse the origin and development of the Dynamical Reduction Program and draws attention to the problems that still affect it, in particular that of a consistent relativistic generalization. When the two meetings Are there quantum jumps? and On the present status of Quantum Mechanics were organized in Trieste and Losinj (Croatia), on 5 10 September 2005, it occurred to us that this lecture, which has never been published, might represent an

  13. John Napier life, logarithms, and legacy

    CERN Document Server

    Havil, Julian

    2014-01-01

    John Napier (1550–1617) is celebrated today as the man who invented logarithms—an enormous intellectual achievement that would soon lead to the development of their mechanical equivalent in the slide rule: the two would serve humanity as the principal means of calculation until the mid-1970s. Yet, despite Napier’s pioneering efforts, his life and work have not attracted detailed modern scrutiny. John Napier is the first contemporary biography to take an in-depth look at the multiple facets of Napier’s story: his privileged position as the eighth Laird of Merchiston and the son of influential Scottish landowners; his reputation as a magician who dabbled in alchemy; his interest in agriculture; his involvement with a notorious outlaw; his staunch anti-Catholic beliefs; his interactions with such peers as Henry Briggs, Johannes Kepler, and Tycho Brahe; and, most notably, his estimable mathematical legacy. Julian Havil explores Napier’s original development of logarithms, the motivations for his approa...

  14. Media violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantor, J

    2000-08-01

    Research on the effects of media violence is not well understood by the general public. Despite this fact, there is an overwhelming consensus in the scientific literature about the unhealthy effects of media violence. Meta-analyses show that media-violence viewing consistently is associated with higher levels of antisocial behavior, ranging from the trivial (imitative violence directed against toys) to the serious (criminal violence), with many consequential outcomes in between (acceptance of violence as a solution to problems, increased feelings of hostility, and the apparent delivery of painful stimulation to another person). Desensitization is another well-documented effect of viewing violence, which is observable in reduced arousal and emotional disturbance while witnessing violence, the reduced tendency to intervene in a fight, and less sympathy for the victims of violence. Although there is evidence that youth who are already violent are more likely to seek out violent entertainment, there is strong evidence that the relationship between violence viewing and antisocial behavior is bidirectional. There is growing evidence that media violence also engenders intense fear in children which often lasts days, months, and even years. The media's potential role in solutions to these problems is only beginning to be explored, in investigations examining the uses and effects of movie ratings, television ratings, and the V-chip, and the effects of media literacy programs and public education efforts. Future research should explore important individual differences in responses to media violence and effective ways to intervene in the negative effects.

  15. Scientists as communicators: A randomized experiment to assess public reactions to scientists' social media communication along the science-advocacy continuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotcher, J.; Vraga, E.; Myers, T.; Stenhouse, N.; Roser-Renouf, C.; Maibach, E.

    2014-12-01

    The question of what type of role scientists, or experts more generally, should play in policy debates is a perennial point of discussion within the scientific community. It is often thought that communication containing some form of policy advocacy is likely to compromise the perceived credibility of the individual scientist engaged in such behavior, with the possibility that it may also harm the credibility of the scientific community more broadly. Rather than evaluating statements in a binary fashion as representing either pure objectivity or pure advocacy, one recent model proposes that public communication by scientists should instead be thought of as falling along a continuum based upon the extent of normative judgment implicit in a statement. This approach predicts that as the extent of normative judgment increases, it poses a relatively greater risk to a scientist's perceived credibility. Though such a model is conceptually useful, little empirical social science research has systematically explored how individuals form judgments about different types of advocacy to examine common assumptions about the relative risks associated with such behaviors. In this presentation, we will report results from a national online experiment (N=1200) that examines audience responses to fictional social media posts written by either a climate scientist or a television weathercaster. Following the above model, the posts represent differing degrees of advocacy defined by the extent of normative judgment implicit in each statement. In instances where a specific policy is advocated, we examine whether participants' reactions are shaped by the extent to which the policy mentioned is congruent with one's political ideology. We hope this study will serve as an exemplar of applied science communication research that can begin to help inform scientists and other experts about the potential implications of different communication options they may choose from in deciding how to engage

  16. Comparison of Low-Dose Higher-Relaxivity and Standard-Dose Lower-Relaxivity Contrast Media for Delayed-Enhancement MRI: A Blinded Randomized Crossover Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Benjamin Y C; Duran, Cihan; Preventza, Ourania A; Muthupillai, Raja

    2015-09-01

    The gadolinium-based MRI contrast agent gadobenate dimeglumine has nearly twice the MR relaxivity of gadopentetate dimeglumine at 1.5 T. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a lower dose (0.1 mmol/kg) of gadobenate dimeglumine can be used to obtain delayed-enhancement MR images comparable to those obtained with a standard dose (0.2 mmol/kg) of gadopentetate dimeglumine. In this blinded randomized crossover study, 20 patients with known myocardial infarction underwent two separate delayed-enhancement MRI examinations after receiving 0.1 mmol/kg gadobenate dimeglumine and 0.2 mmol/kg gadopentetate dimeglumine (random administration). The conspicuity of lesion enhancement 5, 10, and 20 minutes after contrast administration was quantified as relative enhancement ratio (RER). With either gadolinium-based contrast agent, damaged myocardium had higher signal intensity than normal remote myocardium (RER > 4) on delayed-enhancement MR images, and the blood RER declined over time after contrast administration. The blood RER was not significantly higher for gadobenate dimeglumine than for gadopentetate dimeglumine at 5 and 10 minutes. Nevertheless, there was a larger reduction in blood RER for gadobenate dimeglumine than for gadopentetate dimeglumine between 5 and 10 minutes and between 10 and 20 minutes. The volumes of enhancement were similar for gadobenate dimeglumine (13.6 ± 8.8 cm(3)) and gadopentetate dimeglumine (13.5 ± 8.9 cm(3)) (p = 0.98). The mean difference in Bland-Altman analysis for delayed-enhancement volume between the agents was 0.1 cm(3). Qualitatively and quantitatively, delayed-enhancement MR images of ischemic myocardium obtained with 0.1 mmol/kg gadobenate dimeglumine are comparable to those obtained with 0.2 mmol/kg gadopentetate dimeglumine 5, 10, and 20 minutes after contrast administration.

  17. Environmental risk factors in the incidence of Johne's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Geoffrey N; Hough, Rupert L; Avery, Lisa M; Maltin, Charlotte A; Campbell, Colin D

    2015-01-01

    This review addresses the survival and persistence of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), the causative pathogen of Johne's disease (JD), once it has left its ruminant host. JD has significant economic impact on dairy, beef and sheep industries and is difficult to control due to the long-term sub-clinical nature of the infection, intermittent or persistent MAP shedding during and after this period, inadequate test effectiveness, and the potential for MAP to exist for extended periods outside the host. The role that environmental factors play in the persistence and spread of MAP and consequent disease is assessed. Published risk factor analysis, organism survival across various environmental media and conditions, presence and spread in ruminant and non-ruminant wildlife, and the general potential for survival and multiplication of MAP ex-host both on and off-farm are discussed and knowledge gaps highlighted. An inclusive approach to disease management that takes into account the persistence and transport of the causative organism in on-farm soils and waters, land use and management, dispersal by domestic and non-domestic host species, as well as general animal husbandry is required on those farms where more traditional approaches to disease management have failed to reduce disease prevalence.

  18. The public of media events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Morgner

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on the growing importance of large-scale events and their central role in a globalised media world in relation to public reactions and public involvement. The peculiar structure of such events requires a different understanding of mass communication and its audience. Therefore, the audience is further examined with regard to its impact on and inclusion in the media itself. Consequently, questions are raised as to how the public is incorporated, the form this inclusion takes and the effect that this has on the audience’s participation.The article examines different types of semantic inclusion, with a focus on emotional reactions towards three different media events: the Titanic disaster, the assassination of John F. Kennedy, and the death of Princess Diana.

  19. Translating The Infinities by John Banville

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Abigail Piccinini

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract - John Banville’s talent as a prose stylist is widely recognized. The polished elegance of his phrases constitutes a continuing and fascinating challenge for his translator, due to the intricacies of the source text, its manifold registers and lexical choices. In his novel The Infinities, in Italian Teoria degli Infiniti, John Banville takes cue from Kleist’s Amphytrion to devise a novel where classicality interweaves with science and science fiction through the invention of a world where the ancient gods intermingle with the humans while waiting for the death of Adam Godley, a famous mathematician who explained how an infinity of worlds exist and interact with each other. To translate this book I had not only to work extensively on lexis and style, but also to do considerable research to render the many literary and non literary references. Some examples of these struggles with the source text during the translation process are given in the present paper. Riassunto - John Banville, autore irlandese noto per la sua prosa raffinata, scrive in una lingua che rappresenta una sfida continua e affascinante per chi lo traduce. La sua complessità stilistica, che sfrutta molteplici registri linguistici e si avvale di scelte lessicali cui spesso è arduo trovare un traducente italiano soddisfacente, costringe il traduttore a fare ricorso a tutte le sottigliezze del proprio mestiere per restituire quanto più possibile l’eleganza dell’originale nella propria lingua. Nel romanzo The Infinities, tradotto in italiano come Teoria degli infiniti (Guanda, Parma 2011, Banville prende spunto dall’Anfitrione di Kleist per costruire un romanzo che guarda alla classicità sconfinando in un misto di scienza e fantascienza con la concezione di un’infinità di mondi paralleli teorizzata dal matematico Adam Godley, il protagonista morente al cui capezzale si radunano uomini e antichi dei in attesa che il cerchio della vita e della morte si compia

  20. Porous media geometry and transports

    CERN Document Server

    Adler, Pierre

    1992-01-01

    The goal of ""Porous Media: Geometry and Transports"" is to provide the basis of a rational and modern approach to porous media. This book emphasizes several geometrical structures (spatially periodic, fractal, and random to reconstructed) and the three major single-phase transports (diffusion, convection, and Taylor dispersion).""Porous Media"" serves various purposes. For students it introduces basic information on structure and transports. Engineers will find this book useful as a readily accessible assemblage of al the major experimental results pertaining to single-phase tr

  1. SOCIAL MEDIA

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Christine Weiser

    2013-01-01

      For the leaders assembled in the SchoolCIO working group, it seems the most successful implementations of social media use are found in those schools that recognize the importance of guiding students in their journey...

  2. From Augmentation Media to Meme Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yuzuru

    Computers as meta media are now evolving from augmentation media vehicles to meme media vehicles. While an augmentation media system provides a seamlessly integrated environment of various tools and documents, meme media system provides further functions to edit and distribute tools and documents. Documents and tools on meme media can easily…

  3. Community Media: Muting the Democratic Media Discourse?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carpentier, N.; Lie, R.; Servaes, J.

    2003-01-01

    Focuses on the concept of community media. Components that construct the identity of community media; Multi-theoretical approaches for analysis of community media; Definition of community media based on the concept of alternative media; Link between community media and civil society; Problems faced

  4. Media Bias

    OpenAIRE

    Sendhil Mullainathan; Andrei Shleifer

    2002-01-01

    There are two different types of media bias. One bias, which we refer to as ideology, reflects a news outlet's desire to affect reader opinions in a particular direction. The second bias, which we refer to as spin, reflects the outlet's attempt to simply create a memorable story. We examine competition among media outlets in the presence of these biases. Whereas competition can eliminate the effect of ideological bias, it actually exaggerates the incentive to spin stories.

  5. URobotics—Urology Robotics at Johns Hopkins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoianovici, D

    2011-01-01

    URobotics (Urology Robotics) is a program of the Urology Department at the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions dedicated to the development of new technology for urologic surgery (http://urology.jhu.edu/urobotics). The program is unique in that it is the only academic engineering program exclusively applied to urology. The program combines efforts and expertise from the medical and engineering fields through a close partnership of clinical and technical personnel. Since its creation in 1996, the URobotics lab has created several devices, instruments, and robotic systems, several of which have been successfully used in the operating room. This article reviews the technology developed in our laboratory and its surgical applications, and highlights our future directions. PMID:11954067

  6. CONHECIMENTO SIMBÓLICO EM JOHN VENN

    OpenAIRE

    Bruno Ramos Mendonça

    2013-01-01

    Esta dissertação apresenta uma reconstrução da teoria lógica de John Venn (1834- 1923) em Symbolic Logic (1881; 1894). Em sua obra, Venn apresenta uma álgebra da lógica, e enfrenta uma série de problemas filosóficos subjacentes a essa lógica simbólica. Em primeiro lugar, Venn precisa considerar a relação entre a lógica simbólica e a lógica tradicional, i.e., a silogística. Em segundo lugar, Venn precisa considerar a relação entre a lógica simbólica e a matemática. No tratamento...

  7. John Adams and CERN: Personal Recollections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brianti, G.; Plane, D. E.

    2014-02-01

    By any standards, John Adams had a most remarkable career. He was involved in three important, emerging technologies, radar, particle accelerators and controlled fusion, and had an outstanding impact on the last two. Without a university education, he attained hierarchical positions of the highest level in prestigious national and international organizations. This article covers the CERN part of his career, by offering some personal insights into the different facets of his contributions to major accelerator projects, from the first strong-focusing synchrotron, the PS, to the SPS and its conversion to a proton--antiproton collider. In particular, it outlines his abilities as a leader of an international collaboration, which has served as an example for international initiatives in other disciplines.

  8. John Dewey and His Philosophy of Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliya Sikandar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This review paper on John Dewey, the pioneering educationist of the 20th century, discusses his educational thoughts, and writings, which gave a new direction to education at the turn of the century. Dewey’s contributions are immense and overwhelming in the fields of education, politics, humanism, logic, and aesthetics. This discussion will focus on Dewey and his philosophy related to educational approaches, pedagogical issues, and the linkages that he made between education, democracy, experience, and society. At the heart of his educational thought is the child. Dewey’s idea on humanism springs from his democratic bent and his quest for freedom, equity, and the value of child’s experiences.

  9. John Dewey and early Chicago functionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backe, A

    2001-11-01

    John Dewey and James Angell are regarded respectively as the founder and systematizer of the Chicago school of functional psychology. The early Chicago school traditionally has been portrayed as a unified theoretical approach based primarily on William James's naturalist theory of mental processes. It is argued in this article that although the psychology systematized by Angell bore a close affinity to James's naturalism, Dewey's own psychology was based primarily on the neo-Hegelian philosophy of Thomas Hill Green. Through a review of a number of Dewey's major writings, Green's neo-Hegelian philosophy is shown to have influenced Dewey's views on psychological concepts such as reaction, emotion, and perception during the formative period of the Chicago school. The interpretation of Dewey's psychology developed in this article leads to the conclusion that early Chicago functionalism should not be regarded as a unified theoretical approach.

  10. John F. Dewey—Tectonics Editor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    ‘I want the journal to acquire a reputation for very rapid, fair, and accurate reviewing,’ asserted John F. Dewey, editor-in-chief of AGU's newest journal, Tectonics. Dewey said that he will rule the bimonthly, which will begin publication in February, ‘with a bit of a rod of iron’ to ensure that Tectonics is ‘where only original and important papers are published.’‘I'm going to be very strict with reviewers,’ Dewey explained in his quick British clip. ‘If the review does not come back to me within 10 days to 2 weeks, I'll review the paper myself. I'm also going to have a system whereby, if a paper needs major surgery after being refereed, it will be rejected. Papers will have to be in virtually publishable condition before they are first submitted,’ he said.

  11. El constitucionalismo según John Rawls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Gargarella

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available El término “democracia” se encuentra completamente ausente del famoso libro de John Rawls, Teoría de la justicia. En Liberalismo político, en cambio, Rawls discute varios de los muchos temas sobre los que el concepto de democracia nos invita a reflexionar. En este escrito concentro mi atención en una de esas discusiones: la tensión entre constitucionalismo y democracia. Más específicamente, procuro examinar de qué modo Rawls trata de afirmar el doble compromiso que toda constitución quiere honrar, esto es, el compromiso con el ideal de la autonomía individual, y el compromiso con el ideal del auto-gobierno colectivo.

  12. General Relativity and John Archibald Wheeler

    CERN Document Server

    Ciufolini, Ignazio

    2010-01-01

    Observational and experimental data pertaining to gravity and cosmology are changing our view of the Universe. General relativity is a fundamental key for the understanding of these observations and its theory is undergoing a continuing enhancement of its intersection with observational and experimental data. These data include direct observations and experiments carried out in our solar system, among which there are direct gravitational wave astronomy, frame dragging and tests of gravitational theories from solar system and spacecraft observations. This book explores John Archibald Wheeler's seminal and enduring contributions in relativistic astrophysics and includes: the General Theory of Relativity and Wheeler's influence; recent developments in the confrontation of relativity with experiments; the theory describing gravitational radiation, and its detection in Earth-based and space-based interferometer detectors as well as in Earth-based bar detectors; the mathematical description of the initial value pro...

  13. John Locke and the right to resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanov Ilija D.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available John Locke was a great thinker and many works have been devoted to clear up his theories. One of the most significant, stated in his principal work, Two Treatises of Government, is the theory of the right to resistance. It was a bit revolutionary then, and to a large extent it is today. Domination of legal positivism is negation of that, by Locke, natural right. However, the fact is that in recent times the resistance to the established power occurs in a number of countries and in different forms, so that the idea of the right to resistance becomes live question again. In this regard it is interesting to consider Locke's viewpoint on this important issue and to determine whether his theory on the resistance is applicable in modern societies.

  14. John Watson's paradoxical struggle to explain Freud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rilling, M

    2000-03-01

    John Watson was fascinated by the discoveries of psychoanalysis, but he rejected Freud's central concept of the unconscious as incompatible with behaviorism. After failing to explain psychoanalysis in terms of William James's concept of habit, Watson borrowed concepts from classical conditioning to explain Freud's discoveries. Watson's famous experiment with Little Albert is interpreted not only in the context of Pavlovian conditioning but also as a psychoanalytically inspired attempt to capture simplified analogues of adult phobic behavior, including the "transference" of emotion in an infant. Watson used his behavioristic concept of conditioned emotional responses to compete with Freud's concepts of displacement and the unconscious transference of emotion. Behind a mask of anti-Freudian bias, Watson surprisingly emerges as a psychologist who popularized Freud and pioneered the scientific appraisal of his ideas in the laboratory.

  15. John Adams and CERN: Personal Recollections

    CERN Document Server

    Brianti, Giorgio

    2013-01-01

    By any standards, John Adams had a most remarkable career. He was involved in three important, emerging technologies, radar, particle accelerators and controlled fusion, and had an outstanding impact on the last two. Without a university education, he attained hierarchical positions of the highest level in prestigious national and international organizations. This article covers the CERN part of his career, by offering some personal insights into the different facets of his contributions to major accelerator projects, from the first strong-focusing synchrotron, the PS, to the SPS and its conversion to a proton–antiproton collider. In particular, it outlines his abilities as a leader of an international collaboration, which has served as an example for international initiatives in other disciplines.

  16. John Ruskin e o desenho no Brasil

    OpenAIRE

    Claudio Silveira Amaral

    2005-01-01

    O assunto principal do critico de arte inglês do século XIX John Ruskin foi uma teoria da percepção cujo objetivo era o ensino do desenho para a sociedade industrial. No século XIX o ensino do desenho era considerado uma politica industrial, e no Brasil não foi diferente. A vinda da família real ao país deflagrou o nosso primeiro projeto de industrialização com base no ensino do desenho. A Missão Francesa veio fundar aqui duas escolas, uma para as artes liberais e outra para as artes Mecânica...

  17. Caruso St John y Robert Smithson: Interferencias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilia Hernández Pezzi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Resumen Los discursos cruzados son el soporte común del presente número de Cuadernos. El cruce que planteamos tiene como protagonistas al artista Robert Smithson y a los arquitectos Adam Caruso y Peter St John. Estos últimos hacen mención del trabajo del artista norteamericano para explicar su proyecto de remodelación de Stortorget, la plaza de la catedral en el centro de Kalmar, Suecia. A partir de aquí, comenzamos una exploración del trabajo y las preocupaciones de ambos que nos permite dibujar convergencias y sintonías procesuales por encima de las diferencias temáticas, ideológicas y estilísticas. Al disponer en paralelo la obra de Smithson y Caruso St John descubrimos vibraciones y resonancias que muestran una interacción productiva de sus preocupaciones. La materia se convierte en sus propuestas en un objeto activo y sensible, un depósito energético con el que operar. El traslado de piedras en Stortorget convoca la memoria de la ciudad del mismo modo que el basalto y la sal del Spiral Jetty, erosionados por el tiempo, nos hablan de procesos abiertos. El tiempo y la memoria pasan a ser soportes estratégicos con los que construyen sus miradas. Los objetos se disuelven en las relaciones que establecen con su entorno produciendo equilibrios frágiles e instantáneos. De esta manera el artículo pretende generar un vórtice de reflexión, una espiral en cuyo recorrido se manifiesten las tensiones parciales del cruce propuesto, sus fijezas momentáneas.

  18. Effect of intensive statin therapy on regression of carotid intima-media thickness in patients with subclinical carotid atherosclerosis (a prospective, randomized trial: PEACE (Pitavastatin Evaluation of Atherosclerosis Regression by Intensive Cholesterol-lowering Therapy) study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Koji; Takahashi, Tomosaburo; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Matsui, Kiyoaki; Sawada, Takahisa; Nakamura, Takashi; Matsubara, Hiroaki

    2013-12-01

    Atherosclerosis often advances before symptoms appear. It remains uncertain whether intensive cholesterol-lowering therapy with statin is beneficial when compared with moderate cholesterol-lowering therapy in patients with subclinical carotid atherosclerosis. The PEACE study was a prospective, randomized, open-labeled, blinded end points, two-arm parallel treatment group comparison study conducted at 15 centers in Japan. A total of 303 patients with carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) thickening (>1.1 mm) whose low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) level was more than 100 mg/dl were enrolled, in which 223 patients completed the 12 months' follow-up study. Patients were randomly assigned to receive either moderate (target LDL-C; 100 mg/dl) or intensive (target LDL-C; 80 mg/dl) cholesterol-lowering therapy with pitavastatin. The primary end point was the change in mean far wall common CIMT. LDL-C level declined to 89.4 ± 20 mg/dl in the intensive group, while it declined to 95.1 ± 22.5 mg/dl in the moderate group at 12 months' follow-up (p confidence interval -0.046 to -0.0014) mm/year (p confidence interval -0.028 to 0.012) mm/year (p = 0.4406 vs. baseline) in the moderate group. However, there was no significant difference in the change in mean far wall common CIMT between the groups (p = 0.29). Intensive cholesterol-lowering therapy did not show superior effects on the progression of CIMT to moderate cholesterol-lowering therapy, whereas only intensive cholesterol-lowering therapy regressed the carotid atherosclerosis over one year.

  19. Using Social Media for the Promotion of Education and Consultation in Adolescents Who Have Undergone Kidney Transplant: Protocol for a Randomized Control Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pase, Claudiana; Mathias, Andréia Dias; Garcia, Clotilde Druck; Garcia Rodrigues, Clarissa

    2018-01-09

    Falling ill represents a traumatic experience especially in adolescence, since in addition to the moments of ambiguity and contradictions that this period brings, there is coping with the disease. Renal transplantation provides a better quality of life but the dependence on dialysis is replaced by the greater responsibility of self-care. With advances in technology, contemporary communication methods are a strategic mechanism for the approximation of the adolescent and the multiprofessional team. In this perspective, our research may provide possible changes and propose alternatives, using social networks for the integration of the multiprofessional team, promoting education within a virtual environment for adolescents who have undergone kidney transplants. The goal of our research is to compare the knowledge, satisfaction, and self-esteem of adolescent renal transplant patients in 2 groups: patients undergoing conventional treatment versus patients undergoing conventional treatment plus the full-time use of social networks to aid in education and consultation. Nonblind randomized clinical trial with 128 adolescents (aged 13 to 21 years) divided in 2 groups: the first group will receive conventional care and the second group will be invited to participate in a secret group on the social network Facebook. This group will be used as a new education platform to involve young renal transplant patients to participate in the guidelines provided to them by the multiprofessional team. An environment for learning and exchanging life experiences will be created by using a well-known technology among adolescents. As a low-cost intervention, it will allow a better interaction between the patient and the transplant team. It is expected that the adolescents will improve their knowledge about the disease also increasing their self-esteem and the treatment adhesion. Health professionals need to seek alternatives when educating patients, focusing on easily understandable ways for

  20. Obituary: John Norris Bahcall, 1934-2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striker, Jeremiah P.; Bahcall, Neta A.

    2007-12-01

    John Norris Bahcall, one of the most creative and influential astrophysicists of his generation — a scientist who helped prove what makes the Sun shine and helped make the Hubble Space Telescope a reality — passed away in Pasadena, California, on 17 August 2005. Bahcall died peacefully in his sleep from a rare blood disorder. For the past 35 years, Bahcall was the Richard Black Professor of Natural Sciences at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey, where he created one of the leading astrophysics programs in the world. Active and working to the end, Bahcall said that he was always grateful for a full and happy life that exceeded his wildest expectations. Bahcall died as he lived, surrounded by the family he loved, embracing life to its fullest, happy, working and joking to the end. Bahcall's stellar career encompassed seminal contributions in numerous fields of astrophysics as well as extraordinary leadership on behalf of the scientific community, including the American Astronomical Society, the American Physical Society, the National Academy of Sciences, NASA, and Congress. Bahcall's contributions made him one of the scientific leaders of his time. He had been recognized by numerous awards including the 1998 National Medal of Science from President Clinton, the Gold Medal of the Royal Astronomical Society, the Medal of the Swedish Royal Academy, the Dan David Award, the Fermi Award, the first Hans Bethe Prize, the Franklin Medal, the Comstock Prize in physics, NASA's Exceptional Scientific Achievement Medal, NASA's Distinguished Public Service Medal, and the top awards of the American Astronomical Society — including the Russell Award, the Heineman Prize, and the Warner Prize. Bahcall was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 1976 and to the American Philosophical Society in 2001. He was the recipient of Honorary Degrees from numerous universities around the world. Bahcall's scientific interests and expertise ranged from neutrino

  1. UNDERSTANDING SEVERE WEATHER PROCESSES THROUGH SPATIOTEMPORAL RELATIONAL RANDOM FORESTS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — UNDERSTANDING SEVERE WEATHER PROCESSES THROUGH SPATIOTEMPORAL RELATIONAL RANDOM FORESTS AMY MCGOVERN, TIMOTHY SUPINIE, DAVID JOHN GAGNE II, NATHANIEL TROUTMAN,...

  2. High concentration (400 mgI/mL) versus low concentration (320 mgI/mL) iodinated contrast media in multi detector computed tomography of the liver: A randomized, single centre, non-inferiority study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rengo, Marco, E-mail: marco.rengo@gmail.com [Department of Radiological Sciences, Oncology and Pathology, University of Rome ' SAPIENZA' , Polo Pontino, I.C.O.T., Via Franco Faggiana 34, 04100 Latina (Italy); Caruso, Damiano, E-mail: dcaruso85@gmail.com [Department of Radiological Sciences, Oncology and Pathology, University of Rome ' SAPIENZA' , Polo Pontino, I.C.O.T., Via Franco Faggiana 34, 04100 Latina (Italy); De Cecco, Carlo N., E-mail: carlodececco@gmail.com [Department of Radiological Sciences, Oncology and Pathology, University of Rome ' SAPIENZA' , Polo Pontino, I.C.O.T., Via Franco Faggiana 34, 04100 Latina (Italy); Lucchesi, Paola, E-mail: paola.lucchesi@email.it [Department of Radiological Sciences, Oncology and Pathology, University of Rome ' SAPIENZA' , Polo Pontino, I.C.O.T., Via Franco Faggiana 34, 04100 Latina (Italy); Bellini, Davide, E-mail: bellinidavide29@gmail.com [Department of Radiological Sciences, Oncology and Pathology, University of Rome ' SAPIENZA' , Polo Pontino, I.C.O.T., Via Franco Faggiana 34, 04100 Latina (Italy); Maceroni, Marco Maria, E-mail: marcom.maceroni@gmail.com [Department of Radiological Sciences, Oncology and Pathology, University of Rome ' SAPIENZA' , Polo Pontino, I.C.O.T., Via Franco Faggiana 34, 04100 Latina (Italy); Ferrari, Riccardo, E-mail: ferraririccardo@gmail.com [Department of Radiological Sciences, San Giovanni Hospital, Via dell' Amba Aradam 9, 00184 Rome (Italy); Paolantonio, Pasquale, E-mail: paolantoniopasquale@hotmail.com [Department of Radiological Sciences, San Giovanni Hospital, Via dell' Amba Aradam 9, 00184 Rome (Italy); and others

    2012-11-15

    Objectives: To compare vascular and parenchymal contrast enhancement in multidetector computed tomography of the liver using two contrast media with different iodine concentration (Iodixanol 320 mgI/mL and Iomeprol 400 mgI/mL) and similar viscosity, using fixed total iodine volume (40 gI) and iodine delivery rate (1.6 gI/s). Methods: 110 patients were prospectively randomized into two groups. Group A received 125 mL of Iodixanol 320 and group B 100 mL of Iomeprol 400. Attenuation values were measured at the level of the aorta, portal vein and liver parenchyma on unenhanced, arterial, portal and equilibrium phases. A non inferiority test was performed on the differences between the two groups. An independent reader evaluated image quality. Results: The equivalence of the two CM was demonstrated in all measurements. Higher, but not statistically significant, attenuation values were obtained with Iomeprol 400 in the aorta during the arterial phase (305.3 HU versus 288.4 HU; P = 0.32) and with Iodixanol 320 in the liver parenchyma, during both portal (59.8 HU versus 65.5 HU; P = 0.78) and equilibrium (40.4 HU versus 41.8 HU; P = 0.55) phases. Conclusions: Iodixanol 320 and Iomeprol 400 injected at the same iodine delivery rate (1.6 gI/s) and total iodine load (40 gI) did not provide statistically significant differences in liver parenchymal and vascular contrast enhancement.

  3. A prospective randomized study comparing two commercially available types of human embryo culture media: G1-PLUS™/G2-PLUS™ sequential medium (Vitrolife) and the GL BLAST™ sole medium (Ingamed).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceschin, Ianae I; Ribas, Mariana H; Ceschin, Alvaro P; Nishikawa, Lucileine; Rocha, Claudia C; Pic-Taylor, Aline; Baroneza, José Eduardo

    2016-03-01

    To check the efficacy of two types of commercially available embryo culture medium: G1-PLUS™/G2-PLUS™ sequential (Vitrolife, Gothenburg, Sweden) and GV BLAST™ sole (Ingamed, Maringá, Brazil) with regards to fertilization, cleavage, blastocyst and pregnancy rates. Prospective and randomized study conducted from March to July 2015, using the medical records of 60 patients submitted to Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection techniques (ICSI). Data regarding the age of patients, together with fertilization, cleavage, blastocyst and pregnancy rates, were collected and compared in relation to the: G1-PLUS™/G2-PLUS™ sequential and GV BLAST™ sole mediums. The data were tabulated and compared using the Pearson's Chi-Square test (95% CI). There was no significant difference when comparing patients divided into higher and lower fertility age. No significant statistical difference was noted between the fertilization rates (P=0.59), cleavage (P=0.91), evolution to blastocyst (P=0.33) and total pregnancy (P=0.83) when comparing the embryos cultured in the different media analysed. We conclude that the G1-PLUS™/G2-PLUS™ sequential and GV BLAST™ sole mediums are equally effective with regards to fertilization, cleavage, blastocyst development and total pregnancy rates.

  4. Mass transport in fracture media: impact of the random function model assumed for fractures conductivity; Transporte de masa en medio fracturado: impacto del modelo estocastico de conductividad en las fracturas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capilla, J. E.; Rodrigo, J.; Gomez Hernandez, J. J.

    2003-07-01

    Characterizing the uncertainty of flow and mass transport models requires the definition of stochastic models to describe hydrodynamic parameters. Porosity and hydraulic conductivity (K) are two of these parameters that exhibit a high degree of spatial variability. K is usually the parameter whose variability influence to a more extended degree solutes movement. In fracture media, it is critical to properly characterize K in the most altered zones where flow and solutes migration tends to be concentrated. However, K measurements use to be scarce and sparse. This fact calls to consider stochastic models that allow quantifying the uncertainty of flow and mass transport predictions. This paper presents a convective transport problem solved in a 3D block of fractured crystalline rock. the case study is defined based on data from a real geological formation. As the scarcity of K data in fractures does not allow supporting classical multi Gaussian assumptions for K in fractures, the non multi Gaussian hypothesis has been explored, comparing mass transport results for alternative Gaussian and non-Gaussian assumptions. The latter hypothesis allows reproducing high spatial connectivity for extreme values of K. This feature is present in nature, might lead to reproduce faster solute pathways, and therefore should be modeled in order to obtain reasonably safe prediction of contaminants migration in a geological formation. The results obtained for the two alternative hypotheses show a remarkable impact of the K random function model in solutes movement. (Author) 9 refs.

  5. Social media management and media environment

    OpenAIRE

    Šiđanin Iva

    2012-01-01

    The paper deals with the system of services that social media management can offer to a variety of users. As social media systems are emerging, social media management can strengthen teams in social media and help to manage numerous social channels and distribution of social information from one place. Social media management is a system of procedures that are used to manage the flow of information in the environment of social media. This involves connecting with social media like Facebook, T...

  6. A Conversation with John McKetta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKetta, John J; Truskett, Thomas M

    2017-06-07

    John J. McKetta, Jr. is a foundational figure in chemical engineering education and energy policy in the United States. An authority on the thermodynamic properties of hydrocarbons and an energy adviser to several US presidents, McKetta helped to educate and mentor thousands of students at the University of Texas at Austin for over 40 years, many of whom became leading figures in the energy and petrochemical industries, as well as in academia. As dean of the College of Engineering, McKetta helped to establish a bioengineering program, which later became the Biomedical Engineering Department, at the University of Texas at Austin, and was a tireless advocate for excellence and a focus on the student. At age 100, McKetta recalls the challenges and opportunities he faced in childhood, his memories of the emergence of petrochemical engineering, and his views on chemical engineering education and the people it has impacted in the United States over the past 100 years.

  7. The life and works of John Napier

    CERN Document Server

    Rice, Brian; Corrigan, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    For the first time, all five of John Napier’s works have been brought together in English in a single volume, making them more accessible than ever before. His four mathematical works were originally published in Latin: two in his lifetime (1550–1617), one shortly after he died, and one over 200 years later. The authors have prepared three introductory chapters, one covering Napier himself, one his mathematical works, and one his religious work. The former has been prepared by one of Napier’s descendants and contains many new findings about Napier’s life to provide the most complete biography of this enigmatic character, whose reputation has previously been overshadowed by rumour and speculation. The latter has been written by an academic who was awarded a PhD for his thesis on Napier at the University of Edinburgh, and it provides the most lucid and coherent coverage available of this abstruse and little understood work. The chapter on Napier’s mathematical texts has been authored by an experienced...

  8. Disorientations: John Singer Sargent and Queer Phenomenology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Pasek

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Art history has long struggled to find a method to account for the diverse expressions of queer desire across the heterogeneous landscape of history. While there has been a surge of research on the lives, artworks, and audiences of artists that trouble the heterosexual norm, the wider impact of this scholarship is often limited to singular biographies. Following the call for greater self-reflexivity and acknowledgement of difference in queer theory and phenomenological approaches to art history, the additive goals of gay and lesbian scholarship with its political investment in strategies of representation can be brought into scrutiny. To this end, a critical historiographical review of gay and lesbian art history is undertaken and a queer phenomenological method is presented as a new means forward. Applied to the work of John Singer Sargent, it is argued that a focus on the spatial orientation of bodies in his album of male nudes provides a more nuanced and ethical account of the queer than a focus on identity and identifications.

  9. John Stuart Mill on socialism and accountability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco José Sales Rocha

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1677-2954.2010v9n1p17Este artigo mostra que o tipo de socialismo proposto por John Stuart Mill é marcado por uma forte preocupação com a controlabilidade do poder econômico e político. Ele rejeitou enfaticamente os modelos centralistas de socialismo por entender que eles levam a uma grande concentração de poder que compromete a liberdade. Para J. S. Mill, o socialismo deve ser implantado lentamente a partir de reformas amplamente discutidas que favoreçam a cidadania econômica dos trabalhadores, promovam a participação deles nas decisões referentes ao processo produtivo e em associações voluntárias. J. S. Mill acreditava que a competição econômica é essencial para o adequado funcionamento de uma economia socialista. Ele não esperava que tal economia se tornasse uma realidade em um futuro próximo.

  10. Did John B. Watson Really "Found" Behaviorism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, John C

    2014-05-01

    Developments culminating in the nineteenth century, along with the predictable collapse of introspective psychology, meant that the rise of behavioral psychology was inevitable. In 1913, John B. Watson was an established scientist with impeccable credentials who acted as a strong and combative promoter of a natural science approach to psychology when just such an advocate was needed. He never claimed to have founded "behavior psychology" and, despite the acclaim and criticism attending his portrayal as the original behaviorist, he was more an exemplar of a movement than a founder. Many influential writers had already characterized psychology, including so-called mental activity, as behavior, offered many applications, and rejected metaphysical dualism. Among others, William Carpenter, Alexander Bain, and (early) Sigmund Freud held views compatible with twentieth-century behaviorism. Thus, though Watson was the first to argue specifically for psychology as a natural science, behaviorism in both theory and practice had clear roots long before 1913. If behaviorism really needs a "founder," Edward Thorndike might seem more deserving, because of his great influence and promotion of an objective psychology, but he was not a true behaviorist for several important reasons. Watson deserves the fame he has received, since he first made a strong case for a natural science (behaviorist) approach and, importantly, he made people pay attention to it.

  11. John Beebe in conversation with Beverley Zabriskie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beebe, John; Zabriskie, Beverley

    2011-06-01

    John Beebe speaks with Beverley Zabriskie about the central motifs of his life and depth psychological experience, and how these informed his choice of vocation as psychiatrist, Jungian analyst, educator and author. Dr. Beebe narrates how he moved beyond the fate assigned the son of a needy mother and abandoning father. He illustrates how the role his family expected him to fill constellated archetypal motifs--the magical or divine curative child, the whiz kid--from which he had then to disidentify for the sake of becoming an individual with a personal voice and capacity to express his own true values. He tells of his differentiation and search for completion through the perspective of Jung's psychological types theory. He also reflects on the evolution of Jungian analytic theory and practice generally, his editorship of the JAP and the San Francisco Jung Institute Library Journal, his confrontation with analytic homophobia, and the emerging quality of professional and personal relationships in relation to ethics and to love. He assesses Jung's courage and integrity as displayed through the release of Jung's Red Book, and his own quest for an organic and psychological moral stance expressed in his benchmark book, Integrity in Depth. © 2011, The Society of Analytical Psychology.

  12. PREFACE: John Desmond Bernal: Science and Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Vincent

    2007-02-01

    This meeting, held in the Limerick Institute of Technology, on Thursday 1 June 2006, was organised by the Munster Group of the Institute of Physics in Ireland to commemorate the life and work of John Desmond Bernal. Bernal, was born in Nenagh in 1901. Alan Mackay, who worked with Bernal at Birkbeck College coins the word 'Polytropic' to describe Bernal. He was active and hugely influential in a wide range of areas such as science, politics and society, and was instrumental in the creation of whole new areas of intellectual endeavour such as the 'science of science', molecular biology, and operations research. Andrew Brown's analogy for Bernal's mind is that 'it was like a diamond—beautifully structured, multifaceted and dazzling to behold'. In relation to Bernal, Helena Sheehan states that: 'His legacy is complex. All the more so because he was marxist in philosophy, communist in politics, polyamorous in sexuality.'. Like religion, these are areas that conventional scientists tend to shy away from or at the very least consign to very separate and often neglected 'compartments'. According to Sheehan, 'Bernal came to marxism seriously and intelligently. He found in its philosophical framework a structure in which he could live, think, create, pursue science, act politically and develop further. It opened him radically to the world, rather than closing him down or constricting him, as critics imply.'. And his contributions to science and to society are significant and enduring. Just two areas of 'his science' were addressed in some detail at this meeting. Martin Caffrey treats the area of structural biology in the context of modern developments but focusing on Bernal's role in its evolution. John Finney gives an account of Bernal's 'two bouts of activity' on the structure of water and as Bernal's last PhD student he gives unique insights on how Bernal worked and why he 'did science'. Bernal writes in response to a well wisher on his 70th birthday: 'I am sure that

  13. John Wheeler, 1933 - 1959: Particles and Weapons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Kenneth

    2009-05-01

    During the early part of his career, John Archibald Wheeler made an astonishing number of contributions to nuclear and particle physics, as well as to classical electrodynamics, often in collaboration with another physicist. He was also a major contributor to the Manhattan Project (in Chicago and Hanford rather than Los Alamos), and, following World War II, became an influential scientific cold warrior. His early achievements in physics include the calculated scattering of light by light (with Gregory Breit), the prediction of nuclear rotational states (with Edward Teller), the theory of fission (with Niels Bohr), action-at-a-distance electrodynamics (with Richard Feynman), the theory of positronium, the universal weak interaction (with Jayme Tiomno), and the proposed use of the muon as a nuclear probe particle. He gained modest fame as the person who identified xenon 135 as a reactor poison. His Project Matterhorn contributed significantly to the design of the H bomb, and his Project 137, which he had hoped would flower into a major defense lab, served as the precursor to the Jason group.

  14. The romantic sexology of John Addington Symonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binkley, S

    2000-01-01

    This paper examines a radical text by the English Classicist and homosexual, John Addington Symonds (1840-1893). Through a close study of an unpublished and long concealed manuscript, "A Problem in Modern Ethics" (1891), Symonds's political vision and the odd form of writing it takes is revealed as romantic in character. Symonds polemicizes against the pathologization of homosexuals in the legal-medical discourses of the time and advocates on behalf of a latent homosexual ethics, shunned from modern Western society, but continuing to hold forth a promise for the civic and moral renewal of Western countries. Against the positions of Krafft-Ebing and others, Symonds argues for the acceptance of "manly love," in the spirit of the ancients, as a source of moral inspiration for a declining Europe. Where Symonds is often read by historians of homosexual radicalism as a precursor to the radical tradition of the 20th century, romantic acceptance of the untimeliness of his moral vision, indicates less a politically progressive than a romantically fatalistic enterprise.

  15. Breathing Silence. An interview with John Palmer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Scuderi

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The interview focuses on some aspects of the composer’s work with electronics. Palmer, described by the critics as «undoubtedly the most visionary composer of his generation» speaks about the composers and musical works that have had a major impact on him. He also mentions the friendship with John Cage, his numerous travels – with particular emphasis on Japan – and the influence of Eastern culture on his musical mind. The composer discusses the notion of causality explored in Renge-Kyo, the meditative nature of Transient and Inwards, and spirituality as the central theme of both acousmatic works In the Temple and I Am. The electronic medium is also por- trayed as a mirror of an intense and vivid preoccupation for intimacy and perpetual search for timbral qualities that by now characterize most of his music. Another important aspect of Palmer’s work mentioned in the interview is the collaboration with some established performers and its importance for the realization of a musical work.

  16. From John Lee to John Gottman: Recognizing Intra- and Interpersonal Differences to Promote Marital Satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Kimberly

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Since Extension agents work with a variety of families, there is a desperate need to further our understanding of how to educate diverse communities on a family-related topic. Focused on assisting those teaching marital education to a diverse population, this study attempts to understand how individual differences impact relationship satisfaction and marital communication. Based on John Gottman’s research on marital communication and John Lee’s six loves styles, 653 participants completed a survey to further understanding of the relationship between inter- and intrapersonal variables. Results revealed that marital communication and love styles accounted for 54.6% of the variance in marital satisfaction regardless of difference in demographics. Results of this study provide a resource for educators and practitioners to use with diverse clientele, while also emphasizing the need to understand both intra- and interpersonal variables when working with families.

  17. Media Training

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2009-01-01

    With the LHC starting up soon, the world's media are again turning their attention to CERN. We're all likely to be called upon to explain what is happening at CERN to media, friends and neighbours. The seminar will be given by BBC television news journalists Liz Pike and Nadia Marchant, and will deal with the kind of questions we're likely to be confronted with through the restart period. The training is open for everybody. Make sure you arrive early enough to get a seat - there are only 200 seats in the Globe. The session will also be webcast: http://webcast.cern.ch/

  18. How serendipity shaped a life; an interview with John W. Saunders, Jr. by John F. Fallon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, John W

    2002-01-01

    John W. Saunders Jr. is an outstanding contributor to the field of Developmental Biology. His analyses of the apical ectodermal ridge, discovery and study of the zone of polarizing activity, insights into cell death in development, and analytical studies of feather patterns are part of a legacy to developmental biology. The body of his published work remains central to the understanding of limb development and is a major reason for the premiere place that the developmental biology of limbs holds in our research and teaching today. Beyond these things known to nearly everyone, there is John's role as teacher that is equally impressive. His one-on-one style, in small groups or from the podium is engaging, encompassing, and above all else, enthusiastic about the study of the development of living things. His love of developmental biology comes through to students of all ages and is inspirational. And, of course, inimitable charm accompanies the substance of any interaction with John. He still teaches in the Embryology Course at MBL Woods Hole. Recent students say that hearing his lectures and his involvement in the laboratory are highlights of the course. His continued knowledge of science and delight in new advances is a model for students to follow and they recognize it. John Saunders is a scientist and educator par excellence. His contributions have stood the test of time. His personal interactions with colleagues and students have enriched their lives in innumerable ways, large and small. His is a lifetime of outstanding achievements. In this interview, he reflects on his six--going on seven--decades in science and his personal enjoyment of recent advances in Developmental Biology.

  19. John Stuart Mill, John Rawls y Amartya Sen, los tres nombres de la equidad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Teresa Lopera

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available Tres autores como John Stuart Mill, John Rawls y Amartia Sen son objeto de análisis en este artículo que estudia el tema de la equidad en un contexto que se caracteriza por el abandono casi generalizado del estudio de los valores en relación a los grandes problemas económicos; el artículo defiende como necesaria la recuperación de las preocupaciones éticas en la ciencia económica. La segunda parte, presenta una bibliografía reciente presentada como respuesta a la obra de John Rawls a partir de 1985, cuando este autor da el llamado giro desde su teoría de la justicia como equidad hacia un reciente liberalismo político, período de gran interés para comprender las discusiones actuales de la filosofía política y el futuro de la discusión interdisciplinaria con la economía.

  20. La herencia igualitarista de John Rawls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puyol González, Ángel

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the indisputable achievements of John Rawls work has been the revitalisation of the concept of equality in the ethics and political philosophy of the last few years. He has removed it from the monopoly of the ideologies that have had better or worse luck throughout the entire twentieth century and returned it to the analytical and conceptual rigor of philosophy. Moreover, he has done so with the added virtue of harmonising the value of equality with the values of freedom and efficiency, which is an effort that is not always valued with sufficient understanding. There is no doubt about the influence of Rawls theory of justice on current egalitarian thinking that, in some way, has been, and is still being, built -following -or diverging from the wake opened by the philosopher from Harvard. In this article, I analyse the main debates that are going on about Rawlsian egalitarianism and I point out some possible future orientation. In the first place, I set out the two great egalitarian arguments in Rawls work stemming, respectively, from a person's moral conception and the moral arbitrariness of the individual' s social and natural contingencies. Afterwards, I explore the problems of both arguments insisting, on one hand, on the inadequacy of the Kantian moral personality as a foundation for an egalitarian theory and, on the other hand, on the inconsistency of luck egalitarianism as an egalitarian extension of Rawls theory. In third place, I demonstrate that the main egalitarian problem in Rawls work comes from the concept of equality and equity void of solidarity. I conclude, finally, that justice as fairness should be contrasted with justice as fraternity.

    Uno de los logros indiscutibles de la obra de John Rawls ha sido la revitalización del concepto de igualdad en la ética y la filosofía política de los últimos años, desmonopolizándolo de las ideologías que han recorrido con mejor o peor fortuna todo el siglo xx y devolvi

  1. Case definition terminology for paratuberculosis (Johne's disease).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittington, R J; Begg, D J; de Silva, K; Purdie, A C; Dhand, N K; Plain, K M

    2017-11-09

    Paratuberculosis (Johne's disease) is an economically significant condition caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis. However, difficulties in diagnosis and classification of individual animals with the condition have hampered research and impeded efforts to halt its progressive spread in the global livestock industry. Descriptive terms applied to individual animals and herds such as exposed, infected, diseased, clinical, sub-clinical, infectious and resistant need to be defined so that they can be incorporated consistently into well-understood and reproducible case definitions. These allow for consistent classification of individuals in a population for the purposes of analysis based on accurate counts. The outputs might include the incidence of cases, frequency distributions of the number of cases by age class or more sophisticated analyses involving statistical comparisons of immune responses in vaccine development studies, or gene frequencies or expression data from cases and controls in genomic investigations. It is necessary to have agreed definitions in order to be able to make valid comparisons and meta-analyses of experiments conducted over time by a given researcher, in different laboratories, by different researchers, and in different countries. In this paper, terms are applied systematically in an hierarchical flow chart to enable classification of individual animals. We propose descriptive terms for different stages in the pathogenesis of paratuberculosis to enable their use in different types of studies and to enable an independent assessment of the extent to which accepted definitions for stages of disease have been applied consistently in any given study. This will assist in the general interpretation of data between studies, and will facilitate future meta-analyses.

  2. John Frassanito &Associates: Designer for Space Travel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zukowsky, John

    2002-01-01

    When most people think of design for space travel they think immediately of engineers and scientists, not architects or industrial designers. Yet, one of those arts professionals has been at the center of creating "space" in space for almost four decades. John Frassanito (born 1941) is an industrial designer who trained at the Art Center (now the famous Art Center College of Design in Pasadena) in the mid 1960s. After graduation in 1968, he began his design career by working with Raymond Loewy and William Snaith at the same time that Loewy's office was designing the interiors of Skylab, America's first space station (launched 1973). Frassanito worked on Skylab while at the Loewy firm until the early 1970s, when he was hired as a designer within the Computer Terminal Corporation where, in 1972, he designed the Datapoint 2000 -- the computer that the journal Invention and Technology (Fall 1994) called the "direct ancestor of today's PC." Frassanito started his own firm in 1983, where he continued to design computers as well as products for companies such as Sani-Fresh and Scott Paper. But he has made his mark on design for space travel since the mid-1980s, where he has been an outside contractor who has worked on a variety of NASA projects through today. These include 1980s works such as interior configuration and design for Space Station Freedom, as well as concepts for inflatable TransHab structures, through 1990s computer- generated animations for NASA missions, real and conceptual. In fact, Frassanito's high quality of design and animated imaging has been consistently utilized by NASA over the past decade to present mission realities and future concepts to scientists, engineers, lawmakers, and the general public alike. A survey of his work will be the subject of this paper in an effort to document the essential role that visual arts professionals play in designing "space" for space.

  3. Otitis media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rovers, MM; Schilder, AGM; Zielhuis, GA; Rosenfeld, RM

    2004-01-01

    Otitis media (OM) continues to be one of the most common childhood infections and is a major cause of morbidity in children. The pathogenesis of OM is multifactorial, involving the adaptive and native immune system, Eustachian-tube dysfunction, viral and bacterial load, and genetic and environmental

  4. Social Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    Digital Marketing and Ecommerce Professionals. 29 January 2010. 20 May 2010. <http://econsultancy.com/blog/5324-20+-mind-blowing-social- media...Statistics Revisited.” Econsultancy | Community of Digital Marketing and Ecommerce Professionals. 29 Jan. 2010. 20 May 2010. <http://econsultancy.com/blog

  5. Streaming Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulley, John

    2009-01-01

    At a time when the evolutionary pace of new media resembles the real-time mutation of certain microorganisms, the age-old question of how best to connect with constituents can seem impossibly complex--even for an elite institution plugged into the motherboard of Silicon Valley. Identifying the most effective vehicle for reaching a particular…

  6. Media and youth: access, exposure, and privatization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, D F

    2000-08-01

    To describe U.S. youth's access and exposure to the full array of media, as well as the social contexts in which media exposure occurs. A cross-sectional national random sample of 2065 adolescents aged 8 through 18 years, including oversamples of African-American and Hispanic youth, completed questionnaires about use of television, videotapes, movies, computers, video games, radio, compact discs, tape players, books, newspapers, and magazines. U.S. youngsters are immersed in media. Most households contain most media (computers and video game systems are the exception); the majority of youth have their own personal media. The average youth devotes 6 3/4 h to media; simultaneous use of multiple media increases exposure to 8 h of media messages daily. Overall, media exposure and exposure to individual media vary as a function of age, gender, race/ethnicity, and family socioeconomic level. Television remains the dominant medium. About one-half of the youth sampled uses a computer daily. A substantial proportion of children's and adolescents' media use occurs in the absence of parents. American youth devote more time to media than to any other waking activity, as much as one-third of each day. This demands increased parental attention and research into the effects of such extensive exposure.

  7. Obituary: John P. Davidson (1924-2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twarog, Bruce; Anthony-Twarog, Barbara

    2011-12-01

    Nuclear physicist and astrophysicist John P. Davidson died at his home on January 10, 2010. He was born on July 22, 1924 in Los Angeles, California. Jack followed his high school interests in rocketry and physical science to the University of California, Berkeley, where he earned a Bachelor of Science degree in physics in June 1948 after serving a stint from 1943 to 1946 in the Army Signal Corps in the European Theater of Operations. Following the war and graduation, Jack embarked on a graduate career in nuclear physics at Washington University, St. Louis. While there, he also initiated what became a life-long partnership with Mary Reiser dedicated to issues of social justice by co-founding an organization to lobby for university admission of African-American students, a policy change opposed by physicist and Chancellor, Arthur Holly Compton. Mary and Jack married in 1949. Jack Davidson's academic career began shortly after completion of his PhD in 1952 under Eugene Feenberg. He taught in Brazil and in Norway before becoming an assistant professor at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in 1957. He stayed at RPI until 1966, at which time he joined the faculty of the University of Kansas where he served faculty and students until his retirement in 1996. His teaching, research and administrative career at KU was distinguished by a growing commitment to the astronomy and astrophysics program. Not only did he foster its growth during his tenure as department chair (1977-1989), he directed a residential summer science program in astronomy for high school students at KU for nearly 10 years in the 1970's. He combined his background in nuclear physics and his fascination with astrophysics into a research program to study elemental abundance anomalies in stellar spectra, authoring with Don Bord several pioneering applications of wavelength coincidence statistics to the ultraviolet spectra of peculiar A stars. At KU, Jack assumed leadership roles in the local chapter of Phi Beta

  8. [Chronic otitis mediaChronic Otitis Media].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohles, N; Schulz, T; Eßer, D

    2015-11-01

    There are 2 different kinds of chronic otitis media: Otitis media chronica mesotympanalis and otitis media chronica epitympanalis (cholesteatoma). The incidence of chronic otitis media as reported in literature differs in a wide range. The incidence rates vary between 0.45 and 46%. Both, otitis media chronica mesotympanalis and cholesteatoma, lead to eardrum perforation due to lengthy and recurring inflammations. Furthermore, chronic otitis media is characterized by frequently recurring otorrhea and conductive hearing loss. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. Praktik Internasionalisasi Media Beritasatu Media Holdings

    OpenAIRE

    Endang SM, Anis

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the practice of Internationalization carried out by BeritaSatu Media Holdings in supporting global economic interests of Lippo Group Company. Internationalization is an implication of media industrialization which the media company owner sought to reduce the spatial distance to obtain greater profits. Theory of Political Economy Media used to see how media content represents the interests of certain political economy, especially from media owners. To view the pra...

  10. Obituary: Michael John Klein, 1940-2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulkis, Samuel

    2006-12-01

    Michael John Klein died on 14 May 2005 at home in South Pasadena, California. The cause of death was tongue cancer that metastasized to the lungs. He was a non-smoker. Mike was a passionate radio astronomer, a trusted astronomical observer, an educator and a family man. Mike was born on 19 January 1940 in Ames, Iowa, the son of Florence Marie (Graf) and Fred Michael Klein. His mother was a homemaker, and his father was a banker. Mike had two older sisters, Lois Jean (Klein) Flauher and Marilyn June (Klein) Griffin. In 1962, Mike married his high school sweetheart Barbara Dahlberg, who survives him along with their three children, Kristin Marie (Klein) Shields, Michael John Klein Jr., Timothy Joel Klein, and six grandchildren. Mike developed a love for astronomy early in his life, and credited an early morning, newspaper-delivery route that he had at age twelve, which took him outside well before sunrise. He told family members that as he walked along his route, he stared into the sky and wondered what everything was. He studied sky charts, located stars, and began to understand how the planets shifted their positions relative to the stars each day. Another big influence in Mike's life was his brother in-law, Jim Griffin. Jim helped Mike understand that his passion for science did not have to remain a hobby, but could and should become a career. Jim's encouragement led Mike to attend Iowa State University in Ames, where he earned a BS in electrical engineering in 1962. Mike then started graduate school in electrical engineering at Michigan State, but after one semester transferred to the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, where he earned an MS (1966) and PhD (1968) in astronomy. His doctoral dissertation, under the direction of Professor Fred Haddock, was based on extensive observations of the planets and examined the physical and thermal properties of planetary atmospheres and surfaces. Mike was awarded a Resident Research Associate position at JPL by the National

  11. Obituary: Michael John Seaton, 1923-2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Anil; Nahar, Sultana

    2007-12-01

    Professor Michael John Seaton, hailed as the "Father of Atomic Astrophysics," passed away on May 29, 2007. He was one of the few Honorary Fellows of both the American Astronomical Society and the American Physical Society, so honored for his monumental contributions to both physics and astronomy. Mike Seaton was born on January 16, 1923 in Bristol, England. He attended Wallington County High School. But his leftist political activities, even at that stage, led to his expulsion, though he was eventually allowed to matriculate. He enlisted in the Royal Air Force as a navigator during the Second World War, and flew many dangerous missions. His legendary concentration and precision are reflected in the following anecdote. Once after a bombing mission his aircraft was lost in fog over the Alps. Seaton calculated the position and coordinates in flight to guide the aircraft. When the fog lifted, the crew found themselves flying perilously close to the mountains, but made it safely back. His associates often said, "A Seaton calculation is carried out as if his life depended on it." After the War he was admitted to University College London (UCL) as an undergraduate. Thereafter, he spent all of his professional career at UCL. Seaton received his Batchelor's degree in 1948, and his Ph.D. in 1951. His tenure at UCL coincided with the golden age of atomic astrophysics, for he was largely responsible for it. Seaton was elected Fellow of the Royal Society in 1967, and as President of the Royal Astronomical Society (RAS) in 1978. He was the recipient of an Honorary Doctorate from the Observatoire de Paris, an Honorary D.Sc. from the Queen's University of Belfast, the Gold Medal for Astronomy by the RAS, the Guthrie Medal by the Institute of Physics, the Royal Society Hughes award for lifetime work by the RAS, and several other prestigious awards. Nevertheless, as Alex Dalgarno recently remarked, Seaton was not part of the establishment because he chose not to be. Though rooted in

  12. Otitis media with effusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    OME; Secretory otitis media; Serous otitis media; Silent otitis media; Silent ear infection; Glue ear ... Kerschner JE, Preciado D. Otitis media. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St. ... of Pediatrics . 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016: ...

  13. Dr. John Frederick May and the identification of John Wilkes Booth's body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegel, A D

    1998-10-01

    Shortly after President Abraham Lincoln's assassin was killed on April 26, 1865, a formal inquest was held to positively identify the body. Dr. John Frederick May, a leading surgeon in the District of Columbia, was summoned to examine the remains. Two years earlier, Dr. May had removed a fibroid tumor from the back of the assassin's neck and an identifiable large ugly scar resulted when the wound inadvertently opened and healed by granulation. Based upon the recognition of the scar made by his scalpel, Dr. May made a positive identification.

  14. Narratological perspectives on John 13:1-38

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. du Rand

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available The text of John 13 as a literary phenomenon is taken as narrative communication. Emphasis is laid on the pragmatic dimension, in which the relation between the sign and the recipient is highlighted. This article describes John 13 as a structured narrative in which a specific ideological perspective is reflected. Retrospectively viewed, John 13 provides an interpretative framework for meaningful discipleship. The modem reader is challenged to seek for deeper significance in the narration of the footwashing.

  15. Use and Acceptance of Social Media among Health Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Carl; West, Joshua; Neiger, Brad; Thackeray, Rosemary; Barnes, Michael; McIntyre, Emily

    2011-01-01

    Background: As social media use grows in popularity, health educators are challenged to think differently about how to communicate with audiences. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore social media use and factors that determine acceptance of social media use among health educators. Methods: A random sample of Certified Health…

  16. Media places

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linde, Per; Messeter, Jörn

    are no longer neutral layers in urban living, but rather an integrated part of the materialities of architecture and urban planning, the social dimensions of city life and emerging new cultural frameworks. Arguably, we have reached a point at which digital designs may be regarded as elements of our everyday...... for the Media places project, give some brief insights into the themes of setting up temporary digital streams of media and mobile games. Considering the work-in-progress character of the research and the smaller format of text, no real in-depth analysis will be carried out. The goal is rather to position...... construction of place in the urban setting. The concept of Hertzian space, put forth by Anthony Dunne and others (Dunne, 1999) also carries a dimension of how spaces of wireless communication may be problematized, and how we can criticize cultural phenomena taken for granted through innovative technology. From...

  17. Quantum optics in multiple scattering random media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lodahl, P.; Lagendijk, Aart

    2005-01-01

    The paper presents the first experimental study of the propagation of quantum noise through an elastic, multiple scattering medium. Two different types of quantum noise measurements have been carried out: total transmission and short-range frequency correlations. When comparing shot noise (quantum)

  18. Scattering and Propagation in Random Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    extensively by researchers with interests in fields such as atmospheric aerosols, smoke and dust in planetary atmospheres (Choadresekhar 1950, Ishimaru 1978...syst~nies 6Iectro-optiques. La deuxd~me 6.tudie les effets de l’absorption par l’ozone stir la conception de systi-1mea de surveillance passifs

  19. John Considine: Dictionaries in Early Modern Europe: Lexicography ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. John Considine. Dictionaries in Early Modern Europe: Lexicography and the Making of Heritage. 2008, xiv + 393 pp. ISBN: 9780521886741. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Price: £55 / $99.

  20. Media matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, L M

    1995-01-01

    The impact of the mass media on woman's status was addressed at two 1995 conferences: the Fourth World Conference on Women, held in Beijing, China, and the Congress of the World Association for Christian Communication, held in Puebla, Mexico. The globalization process facilitated by the mass media has served to increase the power of patriarchy, with no advantages to the cause of women's rights. Coverage of popular movements has been suppressed out of deference to male-controlled governments. Coverage of the Beijing Conference highlighted celebrities and personal stories, to the exclusion of the economic and political issues under debate. Television has commodified women, reinforcing their oppression. On the other hand, the alternative media, which tend to be decentralized, democratic, low-cost, and low in technology, are presenting women as subjects rather than objects and deconstructing gender stereotypes. Of concern, however, is the tendency of computer technology to widen the gap between social classes and developed and developing countries. Women must use information networks to disseminate information on women's rights and strengthen the links between women throughout the world.

  1. Media Education Initiatives by Media Organizations: The Uses of Media Literacy in Hong Kong Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Donna; Lee, Alice Y. L.

    2014-01-01

    As more media organizations have engaged in media education, this paper investigates the goals and practices of these activities. This article coins media education initiatives by media organizations with the term "media-organization media literac"y (MOML). Four MOML projects in Hong Kong were selected for examination. Built on critical…

  2. John Calvin and John Locke on the Sensus Divinitatis and Innatism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Caleb Clanton

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Inheritors of the Calvinist Reformed tradition have long disagreed about whether knowledge of God’s nature and existence can be or need be acquired inferentially by means of the standard arguments of natural theology. Nonetheless, they have traditionally coalesced around the thought that some sense or awareness of God is naturally implanted or innate in human beings. A root of this orientation can be found in John Calvin’s discussion of the sensus divinitatis in the first book of The Institutes of the Christian Religion. This paper outlines a pedagogical strategy for organizing and evaluating Calvin’s treatment of the sensus divinitatis, chiefly by putting it in tension with John Locke’s polemic against innatism in Book I of An Essay concerning Human Understanding. I begin by reconstructing Calvin’s depiction of the sensus divinitatis, as well as his case for thinking that it is innate. I then explain how Locke’s critique of innatism offers a fairly direct response to Calvin and, hence, a useful framework for exploring the limits of Calvin’s treatment of the sensus divinitatis.

  3. John dos Passos in the 1930s John dos Passos in the 1930s

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Townsend Ludington

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available In 1930 John dos Passos was nearing the pinnacle of his impressive career. The Forty Second Parallel, the first volume of his trilogy USA, would be published that year to critical acclaim; he was respected as a writer by political factions both left and right; he was actively involved in causes in which he believed such as Emergency Committee for the Southern Political Prisoners (the Scottsboro Boys; and he was newly and happily married to Katy Smith and enjoying his friendships with other literary lights such as Ernest Hemingway. In 1930 John dos Passos was nearing the pinnacle of his impressive career. The Forty Second Parallel, the first volume of his trilogy USA, would be published that year to critical acclaim; he was respected as a writer by political factions both left and right; he was actively involved in causes in which he believed such as Emergency Committee for the Southern Political Prisoners (the Scottsboro Boys; and he was newly and happily married to Katy Smith and enjoying his friendships with other literary lights such as Ernest Hemingway.

  4. Critical media pedagogy - theoretical underpinning and contribution to media education

    OpenAIRE

    Valenta, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Critical media pedagogy - theoretical underpinnigs and contribution to media education Dissertation Mgr. Petr Valenta Keywords critical theory, critical media pedagogy, media literacy, critical pedagogy, media, ideology, discourse, power, symbolic power, knowledge Abstract The theoretical dissertation analyzes the traditional media education model issues, which derives from the orientation of media literacy on the dominant paradigm of media effects research in media studies. Media education t...

  5. Reproducibility of artificial multiple scattering media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marakis, Evangelos; van Harten, Wouter; Uppu, Ravitej; Pinkse, Pepijn Willemszoon Harry

    2016-01-01

    State of the art authentication systems depend on physical unclonable functions (PUF) [1], physical keys that are assumed unclonable due to technological constraints. Random scattering media, dielectric materials with rapid and random refractive index variations, are considered as ideal optical PUFs

  6. NEWS: John Goronwy Jones (1920-1999)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennison, Brenda M.

    2000-05-01

    John Goronwy Jones Gron Jones, as he was known to all, was a champion of Physics Education and his death, shortly before his eightieth birthday, robbed physics teachers of a colleague who fought many battles on their behalf. He was not shy of taking issue with anyone in authority who might be putting forward policies which would harm his great love: Physics Education and Physics Teaching. His photograph shows a man with an impish grin, looking friend and foe alike straight in the eye, before delivering the death blow to an argument which was founded on less than common sense. At other times he would listen patiently to the woes of colleagues before offering them fatherly/grandfatherly advice so that whoever was on the receiving end would go away feeling better for the encounter. Gron was born in Swansea and educated at Lewis Boys Grammar School in Glamorgan before entering University College Cardiff first of all as a mathematician before graduating in Physics in 1941. After his war service in the RAF, working on signals and radar development, he returned to do an MSc in X-ray crystallography before completing a PGCE in Bristol. What then passed for teacher training in all institutions left him wary of returning to train teachers himself but after 14 years spent teaching physics in three schools he returned to Cardiff and began a 25 year career in teacher training. He and his two colleagues, Clifford Othen (chemistry) and Douglas Hillier (biology) built up the Cardiff Science Centre as a focus for initial and in-service science teacher training in South Wales. The triumvirate was well known and a power to be reckoned with. They created links between the University Science Departments and the Schools. Gron knew the local schools and their physics teachers intimately. Cardiff became a focus for science education both nationally and internationally. He was a frequent attender at both ICPE (International Commission for Physics Education) and GIREP (International Physics

  7. 77 FR 27766 - Jamar, John P.; Notice of Filing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Jamar, John P.; Notice of Filing Take notice that on May 3, 2012, John P. Jamar submitted for filing, an application for authority to hold interlocking positions, pursuant to...

  8. 33 CFR 117.881 - John Day River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false John Day River. 117.881 Section 117.881 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Oregon § 117.881 John Day River. The draw of the...

  9. Familiar-Strange: Teaching the Scripture as John Would Teach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Tung-Chiew

    2014-01-01

    The Gospel of John teaches through telling the story of Jesus in light of the familiar Hebrew faith stories. It is an interpretive task that presents Jesus to his audience and teaches them adequate faith. John the Teacher skillfully uses narrative skills to create the familiar-strange effect in his storytelling. Each story is followed by a…

  10. Celebrating the Life and Legacy of Dr. John Hope Franklin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Robert L., Jr.; Levering-Lewis, David; French, John D.; Wharton, Clifton R., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    Dr. John Hope Franklin chronicled the experiences of African-Americans like no one before him, forcing America to recognize Black history as American history. His contributions were innumerable and his impact was abiding. In celebration of his life and legacy, the authors profile the celebrated scholar and activist, Dr. John Hope Franklin.

  11. 76 FR 39867 - Russell, John G.; Notice of Filing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Russell, John G.; Notice of Filing Take notice that on June 29, 2011, John G. Russell submitted for filing, an application for authority to hold interlocking positions, pursuant to...

  12. John Dewey's Experiential Theories and Leadership Preparation in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Larry A.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the degree to which John Dewey's experiential theories were embedded in leadership preparation curricula in departments of leadership and college student personnel administration at universities in the Midwestern United States. John Dewey, who is considered to be America's greatest philosopher, defined…

  13. 33 CFR 110.73 - St. Johns River, Fla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false St. Johns River, Fla. 110.73 Section 110.73 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.73 St. Johns River, Fla. (a) Area A. The waters lying...

  14. Developing nursing leadership in social media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorley, Calvin; Chinn, Teresa

    2016-03-01

    A discussion on how nurse leaders are using social media and developing digital leadership in online communities. Social media is relatively new and how it is used by nurse leaders and nurses in a digital space is under explored. Discussion paper. Searches used CINAHL, the Royal College of Nursing webpages, Wordpress (for blogs) and Twitter from 2000-2015. Search terms used were Nursing leadership + Nursing social media. Understanding the development and value of nursing leadership in social media is important for nurses in formal and informal (online) leadership positions. Nurses in formal leadership roles in organizations such as the National Health Service are beginning to leverage social media. Social media has the potential to become a tool for modern nurse leadership, as it is a space where can you listen on a micro level to each individual. In addition to listening, leadership can be achieved on a much larger scale through the use of social media monitoring tools and exploration of data and crowd sourcing. Through the use of data and social media listening tools nursing leaders can seek understanding and insight into a variety of issues. Social media also places nurse leaders in a visible and accessible position as role models. Social media and formal nursing leadership do not have to be against each other, but they can work in harmony as both formal and online leadership possess skills that are transferable. If used wisely social media has the potential to become a tool for modern nurse leadership. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. La Public Diplomacy : de John F. Kennedy à Tony Blair Public Diplomacy: From John F. Kennedy to Tony Blair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Leclercq

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Public diplomacy was first implemented under the impulsion of John F. Kennedy and Edward R. Murrow by the United States Information Agency in the 1960s. This article emphasizes the critical role of public diplomacy in the fight against communism as well as the way the British authorities resorted to this concept almost forty years later to offer public opinion abroad a more modern and efficient image of the UK. In this perspective, it is legitimate to observe the evolution of both technology and the various media as well as to focus on Edward R. Murrow and Mark Leonard, Murrow’s British counterpart. Far from being mere communication, public diplomacy consists in the actual representation of a country’s policies and core values, and can therefore not avoid being assimilated to propaganda, even if it serves the noble purpose of information, not disinformation.

  16. A Personal Perspective: My Four Encounters with John Kendrew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassarman, Paul M

    2017-08-18

    By celebrating the 100th anniversary of John Kendrew's birth in 1917, the Journal of Molecular Biology recognizes his seminal contributions to science in general and structural biology in particular. John was first to use X-ray diffraction to solve the 3-dimensional structure of a protein, sperm-whale myoglobin, worthy of a Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1962. John was the Founder and first Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Molecular Biology, Deputy Chairman of the Laboratory of Molecular Biology and Head of its Division of Structural Studies, a Founder of the European Molecular Biology Organization, first Director-General of the European Molecular Biology Laboratory, and 33rd President of St. John's College, Oxford. In this personal perspective I relate how I came to know John as his postdoctoral fellow at the Laboratory of Molecular Biology in 1967 and as his biographer 45 years later. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Anamnesis and the Silent Narrator in Plato and John

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George L. Parsenios

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The Gospel of John is often compared to the dialogues of Plato by those who connect Johannine theology and Platonic philosophy. The comparison operates on the level of ideas. The present paper does not ignore issues of theology and philosophy but grounds a comparison of John and Plato first and foremost on the literary level. In several key places in John 1, 3, and 14, the Johannine narrator recedes from view and is unexpectedly silent where one would expect a narrator’s comment to organize the conversations and interactions between characters in John. Plato also renders the voice of the narrator silent in a dialogue like the Theaetetus. This paper argues that John and Plato both suppress the narrator’s voice in order to further their anamnetic efforts and to make later generations not only readers but participants in their original conversations.

  18. John Stuart Mill: utilitarismo e liberalismo = John Stuart Mill: utilitarianism and liberalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simões, Mauro Cardoso

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Meu objetivo, neste trabalho, é investigar a compatibilidade das teses utilitaristas e liberais de John Stuart Mill. Apresentarei, inicialmente, os principais críticos da filosofia moral e política de Mill, para os quais o discípulo de Bentham teria abandonado o utilitarismo ou, ainda, não esclarecido suficientemente seu princípio da liberdade, o que o tornaria um pensador assistemático e inconsistente. Minha tese é contrária a tais interpretações, uma vez que sustenta ser Mill consistente. Em seguida, defenderei uma interpretação do princípio da liberdade e da individualidade, procurando demonstrar que seu utilitarismo é compatível com seu liberalismo

  19. Obituary: John P. Oliver (1939-2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Howard

    2011-12-01

    John P. Oliver, an emeritus professor of astronomy at the University of Florida in Gainesville, passed away Thursday, February 10, 2011, after a courageous and long battle with renal cancer. He left behind memories of a life and career to envy. During his forty years of service to his profession and department, this unique astronomer distinguished himself as a research scientist and instrumentalist, creative software designer, gifted teacher and speaker, a vocal advocate of public outreach, and friend to all who knew him. Oliver was born in New Rochelle, New York, during late fall 1939 on November 24. His father, James P. Oliver, was a naval officer and his mother was the former Dorothy Armstrong Cambell. Oliver's early days were spent in various cities due to his father's military life but he eventually received a high school diploma from Princess Ann High School in Virginia. Oliver subsequently graduated with a bachelor of science degree in physics in 1963 from the prestigious Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy. Lick Observatory awarded him a graduate assistantship so he moved west to California where he met and, on November 2, 1963, married Barbara Kay McKenna, who became his lifelong love and partner. In California Oliver had the good fortune to work with several eminent astronomers. This included Albert E. Whifford, director of Lick Observatory and known for his work on interstellar reddening, and Merle F. Walker, an expert in photometry, who also helped establish Pluto's rotation period. His close relation with Lawrence H. Aller, one of the 20th century's memorable astronomers, known for his ability to combine observation, theory and education, and for his care and kindness, helped bind Oliver and astronomy together for life. Oliver would also join the technical staff of the Aerospace Corporation, become an acting director of the Pine Mountain Observatory (University of Oregon), and a research assistant at the University of California in Los Angeles

  20. Obituary: John Allen Eddy (1931-2009)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gingerich, Owen

    2011-12-01

    and eventual impacts of environmental changes of all kinds. In 2004 they moved to Tucson, where Eddy worked for NASA at the National Solar Observatory until the time of his death. Author's Note: A principal source of information is the interview with John A. Eddy by Spencer Weart on 21 April 1999, Niels Bohr Library & Archives, American Institute of Physics, College Park, MD USA, www.aip.org/history/ohilist/22910.html. See also the obituary by Peter Foukal in Physics Today, January 2010, pp. 60-61.

  1. Obituary: John Beverley Oke, 1928-2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesser, James Edward

    2004-12-01

    John Beverley (Bev) Oke passed away of heart failure early on 2 March 2004 at his Victoria, B.C. home. Bev's insatiable scientific curiosity led to fundamental contributions in many areas of stellar and extragalactic astronomy, including the development of advanced instrumentation for the largest optical telescopes and the mentoring of scores of grateful students and colleagues. Bev Oke was born in Sault Ste. Marie, ON, Canada on 23 March 1928, the son of Lyla Parteshuk and the Rev. C. Clare Oke. He entered the University of Toronto in 1945 to study physics with a steadily increasing fraction of astronomy, receiving his BA in 1949. Summer employment at the David Dunlap Observatory (DDO, 1948) and at the Dominion Observatory (Ottawa, 1949, 1950) sealed his interest in astronomy as a career. For his MA thesis (1950, Toronto), performed under theoretician Ralph Williamson, he made interior models of the Sun, and was proud to have proved that the proton-proton cycle was indeed the source of solar energy. Upon entering Princeton University he worked with Martin Schwarzschild on stellar interiors models and Lyman Spitzer on interstellar lines. A lifelong friendship with Alan Sandage began during Bev's second year while Alan was a post-doc at Princeton. During Bev's third year he spent three months in Pasadena with Lyman obtaining data for his thesis on Of stars. While in Pasadena he began a second life-long collaboration with Jesse Greenstein, an astronomer whose approach to science Bev deeply respected. In the small field of astronomy in that era, Bev wrote to DDO Director Jack Heard indicating the nearing completion of his PhD studies and his interest in a position. This led to a lectureship at the University of Toronto (1953-1956), followed by an Assistant Professorship (1956-1958). Bev's interest in instruments began at this time, when he built a device to convert photographic density to intensity, and worked with DDO engineer-machinist Jerry Longworth to implement

  2. Effective Social Media Engagement for Nonprofits: What Matters?

    OpenAIRE

    Julia L Carboni; Sarah P. Maxwell

    2015-01-01

    We employ public management relationship theory to examine how nonprofits can effectively engage social media stakeholders in two-way communication. Though many nonprofit organizations have a social media presence, there is variance in how well organizations use social media to engage stakeholders. Simply having a social media presence is not enough to engage stakeholders.  We examine Facebook posts of a stratified random sample of youth development organizations to determine what predicts st...

  3. Effectiveness of the 10-Valent Pneumococcal Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Protein D-Conjugated Vaccine (PHiD-CV) Against Carriage and Acute Otitis Media-A Double-Blind Randomized Clinical Trial in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesikari, Timo; Forsten, Aino; Seppä, Ilkka; Kaijalainen, Tarja; Puumalainen, Taneli; Soininen, Anu; Traskine, Magali; Lommel, Patricia; Schoonbroodt, Sonia; Hezareh, Marjan; Moreira, Marta; Borys, Dorota; Schuerman, Lode

    2016-09-01

    After administering the 10-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae protein D-conjugated vaccine (PHiD-CV) to children aged 2-18 months, we observed a reduction in vaccine-type nasopharyngeal carriage, resulting in a reduction of overall pneumococcal nasopharyngeal carriage, which may be important for indirect vaccine effects. We noted a trend toward reduction of acute otitis media. This trial (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT00839254), nested within a cluster-randomized double-blind invasive pneumococcal disease effectiveness study in Finland (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT00861380), assessed the effectiveness of the 10-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae protein D-conjugated vaccine (PHiD-CV or PCV10) against bacterial nasopharyngeal carriage and acute otitis media (AOM). Infants (aged 6 weeks to 6 months) received the PHiD-CV or a control vaccine (hepatitis B) (schedule 3+1 or 2+1). Nasopharyngeal swabs were collected at 4 time points post-vaccination from all of the infants and at pre-vaccination from a subset. Parent-reported physician-diagnosed AOM was assessed from first vaccination until last contact (mean follow-up, 18 months). Vaccine effectiveness (VE) was derived as (1 - relative risk)*100, accounting for cluster design in AOM analysis. Significant VE was assessed descriptively (positive lower limit of the non-adjusted 95% confidence interval [CI]). The vaccinated cohort included 5093 infants for carriage assessment and 4117 infants for AOM assessment. Both schedules decreased vaccine-serotype carriage, with a trend toward a lesser effect from the 2+1 schedule ( VE across timpoints 19%-56% [3+1] and 1%-38% [2+1]). Trends toward reduced pneumococcal carriage (predominantly vaccine serotypes 6B, 14, 19F, and 23F), decreased carriage of vaccine-related serotype 19A, and small increases at later time points (ages 14-15 months) in non-vaccine-serotype carriage were observed. No effects on

  4. John Dewey: Su filosofia y filosofia de la educacion (John Dewey: His Philosophy and Philosophy of Education). Working Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoreda, Margaret Lee

    This paper forms part of an investigation about how the philosophy of John Dewey (1859-1952) can illuminate the practice of the teaching of English as a foreign language. The paper seeks to interpret and synthesize John Dewey's philosophical works to construct a "Deweyian lens" with which to analyze and evaluate the field of the teaching…

  5. Evaluation of a High Concentrated Contrast Media Injection Protocol in Combination with Low Tube Current for Dose Reduction in Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography: A Randomized, Two-center Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yibo; Hua, Yanqing; Wang, Mingpeng; Mao, Dingbiao; Jin, Xiu; Li, Cheng; Shi, Kailei; Xu, Jianrong

    2017-12-01

    The study aimed to prospectively evaluate the radiation dose reduction potential and image quality (IQ) of a high-concentration contrast media (HCCM) injection protocol in combination with a low tube current (mAs) in coronary computed tomography angiography. Eighty-one consecutive patients (mean age: 62 years; 34 females; body mass index: 18-31) were included and randomized-assigned into two groups. All computed tomography (CT) examinations were performed in two groups with the same tube voltage (100 kV), flow rate of contrast medium (5.0 mL/s), and iodine dose (22.8 g). An automatic mAs and low concentration contrast medium (300 mgI/mL) were used in group A, whereas effective mAs was reduced by a factor 0.6 along with HCCM (400 mgI/mL) in group B. Radiation dose was assessed (CT dose index [CTDI vol ] and dose length product), and vessel-based objective IQ for various regions of interest (enhancement, noise, signal-to-noise ratio, and contrast-to-noise ratio), subjective IQ, noise, and motion artifacts were analyzed overall and vessel-based with a 5-point Likert scale. The CT attenuation of coronary arteries and image noise in group B were significantly higher than those in group A (ranges: 507.5-548.1 Hounsfield units vs 407.5-444.5 Hounsfield units; and 20.3 ± 8.6 vs 17.7 ± 8.0) (P ≤ 0.0166). There was no significant difference between the two groups in signal-to-noise ratio, contrast-to-noise ratio, and subjective IQ of coronary arteries (29.4-31.7, 30.0-37.0, and medium score of 5 in group A vs 29.4-32.4, 27.7-36.3, and medium score of 5 in group B, respectively, P ≥ 0.1859). Both mean CTDI vol and dose length product in group B were 58% of those of group A. HCCM combined with low tube current allows dose reduction in coronary computed tomography angiography and does not compromise IQ. Copyright © 2017 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Protest, Performance and Politics: The Use of "Nano-Media" in Social Movement Activism in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Marcelle C.

    2012-01-01

    Considering the lack of coverage in the mass media of certain kinds of social movement activity, many movements make use of smaller scale, independent media to publicise their struggles. From the vantage point of social movements in South Africa, this paper addresses what Mojca Pajnik and John Downing call "nano-media". Based on…

  7. Managing Media: Segmenting Media Through Consumer Expectancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matt Eastin

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available It has long been understood that consumers are motivated to media differently. However, given the lack of comparative model analysis, this assumption is without empirical validation, and thus, the orientation of segmentation from a media management perspective is without motivational grounds. Thus, evolving the literature on media consumption, the current study develops and compares models of media segmentation within the context of use. From this study, six models of media expectancies were constructed so that motivational differences between media (i.e., local and national newspapers, network and cable television, radio, and Internet could be observed. Utilizing higher order statistical analyses the data indicates differences across a model comparison approach for media motivations. Furthermore, these differences vary across numerous demographic factors. Results afford theoretical advancement within the literature of consumer media consumption as well as provide media planners’ insight into consumer choices.

  8. Impacts on Breastfeeding Practices of At-Scale Strategies That Combine Intensive Interpersonal Counseling, Mass Media, and Community Mobilization: Results of Cluster-Randomized Program Evaluations in Bangladesh and Viet Nam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Purnima; Nguyen, Phuong Hong; Saha, Kuntal Kumar; Khaled, Adiba; Kennedy, Andrew; Tran, Lan Mai; Sanghvi, Tina; Hajeebhoy, Nemat; Baker, Jean; Alayon, Silvia; Afsana, Kaosar; Haque, Raisul; Frongillo, Edward A; Ruel, Marie T; Rawat, Rahul

    2016-10-01

    Despite recommendations supporting optimal breastfeeding, the number of women practicing exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) remains low, and few interventions have demonstrated implementation and impact at scale. Alive & Thrive was implemented over a period of 6 y (2009-2014) and aimed to improve breastfeeding practices through intensified interpersonal counseling (IPC), mass media (MM), and community mobilization (CM) intervention components delivered at scale in the context of policy advocacy (PA) in Bangladesh and Viet Nam. In Bangladesh, IPC was delivered through a large non-governmental health program; in Viet Nam, it was integrated into government health facilities. This study evaluated the population-level impact of intensified IPC, MM, CM, and PA (intensive) compared to standard nutrition counseling and less intensive MM, CM, and PA (non-intensive) on breastfeeding practices in these two countries. A cluster-randomized evaluation design was employed in each country. For the evaluation sample, 20 sub-districts in Bangladesh and 40 communes in Viet Nam were randomized to either the intensive or the non-intensive group. Cross-sectional surveys (n ~ 500 children 0-5.9 mo old per group per country) were implemented at baseline (June 7-August 29, 2010, in Viet Nam; April 28-June 26, 2010, in Bangladesh) and endline (June 16-August 30, 2014, in Viet Nam; April 20-June 23, 2014, in Bangladesh). Difference-in-differences estimates (DDEs) of impact were calculated, adjusting for clustering. In Bangladesh, improvements were significantly greater in the intensive compared to the non-intensive group for the proportion of women who reported practicing EBF in the previous 24 h (DDE 36.2 percentage points [pp], 95% CI 21.0-51.5, p < 0.001; prevalence in intensive group rose from 48.5% to 87.6%) and engaging in early initiation of breastfeeding (EIBF) (16.7 pp, 95% CI 2.8-30.6, p = 0.021; 63.7% to 94.2%). In Viet Nam, EBF increases were greater in the intensive group (27.9 pp

  9. THE CHECHEN WARS, MEDIA, AND DEMOCRACY IN RUSSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Askerov

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Media, like religion, may create, escalate, or deescalate conflict. In the age of technology, parties to protracted conflicts often use the media for their propaganda purposes. In many cases, despite politically created discourses, individual media members struggle to reveal the truth of the violent confrontation that causes human casualties. This paper discusses Moscow’s tough media policy during the Chechen wars, especially from 1999 to 2009 during the Second Chechen War, and argues that Kremlin’s severe media policy in the course of the height of this violent conflict negatively affected the values of democracy in Russia. Nonetheless, Russia’s new media policy had affected different media means differently depending on their missions and commitment. To produce this paper, data were collected through interviewing twenty-two Chechen nationals, including media experts, and randomly analyzing the contents of the Russian media and Chechen websites available online.

  10. Geographic Media Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukinbeal, Chris

    2014-01-01

    While the use of media permeates geographic research and pedagogic practice, the underlying literacies that link geography and media remain uncharted. This article argues that geographic media literacy incorporates visual literacy, information technology literacy, information literacy, and media literacy. Geographic media literacy is the ability…

  11. Measuring News Media Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksl, Adam; Ashley, Seth; Craft, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    News media literacy refers to the knowledge and motivations needed to identify and engage with journalism. This study measured levels of news media literacy among 500 teenagers using a new scale measure based on Potter's model of media literacy and adapted to news media specifically. The adapted model posits that news media literate individuals…

  12. The Mass Media Book.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmgren, Rod, Ed.; Norton, William, Ed.

    This anthology consists of two major sections, "The News Media" and "The Entertainment Media." Both feature essays by critics, working professionals, and professional observers of the media. One aim of the anthology is to show the pervasive effect of the media on us. The section on news media comments on such topics as credibility gap, Vice…

  13. Update on otitis media – prevention and treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Qureishi, Ali; Lee, Yan; Belfield,Katherine; John P. Birchall; Daniel, Matija

    2014-01-01

    Ali Qureishi,1 Yan Lee,2 Katherine Belfield,3 John P Birchall,4 Matija Daniel,21Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Northampton General Hospital, Northampton, UK; 2NIHR Nottingham Hearing Biomedical Research Unit, Nottingham, UK; 3Biomaterials Related Infection Group, 4Otorhinolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, The University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UKAbstract: Acute otitis media and otitis media with effusion are common childhood disorders, a source of significant morbidity, and a leadi...

  14. Social Media: New Spaces for Contention In Authoritarian Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    journal.media-culture.org.au/index.php/mcjournal/article/viewArticle/364Two. 8 Taylor Dewey , Juliane Kaden, Miriam Marks, Shun Matsushima, and Beijing Zhu. “The...81 John L. Hochheimer, and Mohammed Al-Emad, “Social Media in the Arab Spring: Hope and the Spiral of Voice,” 5th Global...available. Government forces, at the same time, were unaware the shift to social 115 Taylor Dewey

  15. The Importance of Social Media in Business Models on Internet

    OpenAIRE

    Nicodim Liliana; Negoi Eugen Remus; Tileaga Cosmin

    2012-01-01

    Social media is a term that reflects the rapid development of technology and the skills and knowledge users, a complex concept for which there is no universally accepted definition. The term defines generic, a set of online communication channels, social networks and transmission of information, including social networks, groups, forums, blogs and various content platforms that facilitate transmission and instant communication (Safko, L., The Social Media Bible, John Willey & Sons, New Jersey...

  16. BNL director John Marburger addresses the 'state of the lab'

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    John Marburger presented a 'State of the Laboratory' address focusing on three main themes: BNL's improved interactions with the local community; the development of management systems and laboratory successes (1 page).

  17. Reflections on Cambridge: John Maynard Keynes at King's College Cambridge

    OpenAIRE

    Macfarlane, Alan

    2012-01-01

    .mp4 video file The economist John Maynard Keynes spent much of his life in Cambridge, connected to King's College. Alan Macfarlane reflects on a few aspects of his life and work. Filmed by Xu Bei in 2010

  18. Chapter 3: Contextual survey of John 9 | Ito | Acta Theologica

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Book Title: The story of Jesus and the blind man: A speech act reading of John 9. Book Author: Hisayasu Ito. Ritsumeikan University, Kyoto City, Japan. Acta Theologica, Supplementum 21 2015.

  19. John White on Philosophy of Education and Philosophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Harvey

    2014-01-01

    John White offers a provocative characterization of philosophy of education. In this brief reaction, I evaluate the characterization and urge the maintenance of a strong connection between philosophy of education and philosophy.

  20. John McCain : muutuste aeg tulgu! / Tõnis Erilaid

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Erilaid, Tõnis, 1943-

    2008-01-01

    John McCain kuulutati vabariiklaste ametlikuks presidendikandidaadiks ning parteikongressil peetud kõnes lubas ta muutusi, mida eelnevalt oli lubanud ka tema demokraadist konkurent Barack Obama. Vt. samas: Rünnakud Sarah Palinile ei lõpe

  1. John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge at Tinicum: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the...

  2. John Malkovich ikka oskab / Kätlin Kaldmaa

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kaldmaa, Kätlin, 1970-

    2006-01-01

    Edinburghi filmifestivalil esilinastus "Colour Me Kubrick" (stsenarist Anthony Frewin, režissöör Brian Cook, peaosas John Malkovich) mehest, kes režissööri eluajal 1996.a. esines Stanley Kubrick'una

  3. Darwin and Genomics: Regenia Gagnier interviews John Dupré

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Dupré

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In an interview with Regenia Gagnier, the philosopher of science John Dupré discusses some of the fundamental concepts of genomics and their implications for human nature and freedom.

  4. John Hay National Wildlife Refuge: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on John Hay NWR for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the Refuge vision and purpose...

  5. "Thoughts Concerning Education": John Locke On Teaching Speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, John E.

    1971-01-01

    Locke's suggestions for more effective speech instruction have gone largely unnoticed. Consequently, it is the purpose of this article to consider John Locke's criticisms, theory and specific methods of speech education. (Author)

  6. NPP Tropical Forest: John Crow Ridge, Jamaica, 1974-1978

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: Biomass and productivity for four subtypes of an upper montane tropical forest along John Crow Ridge in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Jamaica from 1974 to 1978

  7. Biographical Sketch: John Royal Moore, MD 1899–1988

    OpenAIRE

    Brand, Richard A.

    2011-01-01

    This biographical sketch on John R. Moore corresponds to the historic text, The Classic: Cartilaginous-cup Arthroplasty in Ununited Fractures of the Neck of the Femur (1948), available at DOI 10.1007/s11999-011-1974-z.

  8. Conceptualising holiness in the Gospel of John: The mode and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-02-24

    ). The fourth and the ultimate objective is the glorification of God (17:4). Conceptualising holiness in the Gospel of John: The mode and objectives of holiness (part 1). Read online: Scan this QR code with your smart phone or.

  9. Exploring the Universe with John Milton and Mary Shelley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poston, David

    1989-01-01

    Presents an approach to teaching John Milton's "Paradise Lost" in conjunction with Mary Shelley's "Frankenstein." Notes that a study of these works stimulates vigorous discussions on theological and moral issues, human nature, and the cultural past and future. (MM)

  10. Biographical sketch: John Albert Key, 1890-1955.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Richard A

    2013-07-01

    This biographical sketch on John Albert Key corresponds to the historic text, The Classic: Epiphyseal coxa vara or displacement of the capital epiphysis of the femur in adolescence, available at DOI 10.1007/s11999-013-2913-y.

  11. Biographical sketch: John Royal Moore, MD 1899-1988.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Richard A

    2011-10-01

    This biographical sketch on John R. Moore corresponds to the historic text, The Classic: Cartilaginous-cup Arthroplasty in Ununited Fractures of the Neck of the Femur (1948), available at DOI 10.1007/s11999-011-1974-z.

  12. John of Salisbury, Adam of Balsham and The Cornifician Problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloch, David

    2010-01-01

    En undersøgelse af den Cornificius, som John of Salisbury angriber i sit værk Metalogicon. Der argumenteres for, at Cornificius er åbenlyst inspireret af den berømte Adam of Balsham......En undersøgelse af den Cornificius, som John of Salisbury angriber i sit værk Metalogicon. Der argumenteres for, at Cornificius er åbenlyst inspireret af den berømte Adam of Balsham...

  13. John of Salisbury, The Quadrivium and Demonstrative Science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloch, David

    2009-01-01

    Artiklen undersøger John of Salisburys viden om, og forståelse af, quadrivium med særlig henblik på betydningen for hans syn på demonstrativ videnskab......Artiklen undersøger John of Salisburys viden om, og forståelse af, quadrivium med særlig henblik på betydningen for hans syn på demonstrativ videnskab...

  14. Lifelong Liberal John Maynard Keynes: Some Highlights from His Life

    OpenAIRE

    Gumus, Erdal

    2003-01-01

    History has witnessed many great individuals who have had unforgettable impact and great influences on societies that they may not last for centuries. Among these, doubtless to say, John Maynard Keynes was one of the most influenced social scientists. It is therefore the subject of this study to briefly examine his personal life from his birth and school years. This study shows that John Maynard Keynes life carries so many distinguished features that are to be invaluable examples for young ec...

  15. Media Pembelajaran Global Warming

    OpenAIRE

    Tham, Fikri Jufri; Liliana, Liliana; Purba, Kristo Radion

    2016-01-01

    Computer based learning media is one of the media has an important role in learning. Learning media will be attractive when packaged through interactive media , such as interactive media created in paper manufacture " instructional media global warming" . The advantage gained is that it can increase knowledge, generally educate people to be more concerned about the environment , and also can be a means of entertainment. This application is focused to learn about global warming and packaged in...

  16. Social media metrics

    OpenAIRE

    Balvín, Radek

    2013-01-01

    With growing amount of data produced by users on social media the need of extraction of relevant data for marketing, research and other uses grows as well. The bachelor thesis named "Social media metrics" presents the issues of monitoring, measurement and metrics of social media. In the research part it also maps and captures the present Czech practice in measurement and monitoring of social media. I also rate the use of social media monitoring tools and usual methods of social media measurem...

  17. First John structure resolved: Exegetical analysis, Part 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ron J. Bigalke

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Numerous attempts have been suggested regarding the structure of First John. The only nearly unanimous agreement amongst commentators is concerning the prologue (1:1–4 and the conclusion (5:13–21. The lack of unanimity can be frustrating for the majority of those who seek to understand the macrostructure of the First Epistle of John. Consequentially, some commentators have opined that it is impossible to determine a notable structure of First John, and the epistle is thus regarded as a relatively imprecise series of various thoughts that were composed on the basis of mere association. Many exegetes have therefore proposed suggested outlines to aid the understanding of First John as opposed to providing genuine efforts to articulate a discernable structure of the epistle. The final part of this exegetical analysis seeks to demonstrate that exegetes need not succumb to such pessimism because there does appear to be a discernable structure to First John. Providing and stating resolve concerning the First John structure is fundamental for understanding the revealed contents of the epistle.

  18. First John structure resolved: Exegetical analysis, Part 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ron J. Bigalke

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous attempts have been suggested regarding the structure of First John. The only nearly unanimous agreement amongst commentators is concerning the prologue (1:1–4 and the conclusion (5:13–21. The lack of unanimity can be frustrating for the majority of those who seek to understand the macrostructure of the First Epistle of John. Consequentially, some commentators have opined that it is impossible to determine a notable structure of First John, and the epistle is thus regarded as a relatively imprecise series of various thoughts that were composed on the basis of mere association. Many exegetes have therefore proposed suggested outlines to aid the understanding of First John as opposed to providing genuine efforts to articulate a discernable structure of the epistle. The final part of this exegetical analysis seeks to demonstrate that exegetes need not succumb to such pessimism because there does appear to be a discernable structure to First John. Providing and stating resolve concerning the First John structure is fundamental for understanding the revealed contents of the epistle.

  19. Media literacy education for elementary school substance use prevention: study of media detective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupersmidt, Janis B; Scull, Tracy M; Austin, Erica Weintraub

    2010-09-01

    Media Detective is a 10-lesson elementary school substance use prevention program developed on the basis of the message interpretation processing model designed to increase children's critical thinking skills about media messages and reduce intent to use tobacco and alcohol products. The purpose of this study was to conduct a short-term, randomized, controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of Media Detective for achieving these goals. Elementary schools were randomly assigned to conditions to either receive the Media Detective program (n=344) or serve in a waiting list control group (n=335). Boys in the Media Detective group reported significantly less interest in alcohol-branded merchandise than boys in the control group. Also, students who were in the Media Detective group and had used alcohol or tobacco in the past reported significantly less intention to use and more self-efficacy to refuse substances than students who were in the control group and had previously used alcohol or tobacco. This evaluation provides evidence that Media Detective can be effective for substance use prevention in elementary school-aged children. Notably, media-related cognitions about alcohol and tobacco products are malleable and relevant to the development and maintenance of substance use behaviors during late childhood. The findings from this study suggest that media literacy-based interventions may serve as both a universal and a targeted prevention program that has potential for assisting elementary school children in making healthier, more informed decisions about use of alcohol and tobacco products.

  20. Social media management and media environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šiđanin Iva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the system of services that social media management can offer to a variety of users. As social media systems are emerging, social media management can strengthen teams in social media and help to manage numerous social channels and distribution of social information from one place. Social media management is a system of procedures that are used to manage the flow of information in the environment of social media. This involves connecting with social media like Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Plaxo, Ecademy, YouTube and many others, then the aggregation and management of social data. Social media management services are analysed through various fields, such as managing multiple social media profiles, mail scheduling and filtering, reporting and analytics. Social media management enables managing personal business through social media, which contributes to a significant reduction in expenditures. The paper also discusses the importance of social media management in marketing activities and various forms of social promotion, which allow companies to easily reach their customers.

  1. Konservasi Media: Memori Kultural pada Media-Media Lama

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aloysius Ranggabumi Nuswantoro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Technology boosts the emergence of new communication tools and also creates the dichotomy of old media and new media. At first, it seems like there is nothing wrong with the dichotomy. However, in the context of communication value and meaning, there may be something missing when old media are being abandoned. Not merely the physical manifestation of old media, but rather the work it that contains useful information for the current generation. As a result, today’s people are now losing the root of their thoughts in the past. Thus, conservation is frankly needed to preserve the cultural memory in society Abstrak: Teknologi mendorong munculnya alat-alat komunikasi baru dan membuat dikotomi media lama dan media baru. Sekilas tidak ada yang salah dengan dikotomi tersebut dan konsekuensi yang menyertainya. Namun dalam konteks nilai dan makna komunikasi, ada sesuatu yang hilang ketika media lama ditinggalkan. Bukan semata-mata pada perwujudan fisik media lama, tetapi lebih kepada karya media lama yang memuat informasi berguna bagi generasi saat itu. Akibatnya orang zaman kini kehilangan jejak atau akar pikiran mereka di masa lalu. Maka konservasi media perlu dilakukan untuk mempertahankan memori kultural tersebut.

  2. Alterations in the mechanical properties of the extracted human teeth to be used as biological restorations on storing them in different storage media: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantoor, Pallavi; Srivastava, Nikhil; Rana, Vivek; Adlakha, Vivek K

    2015-08-01

    Total or partial loss of tooth structure occured due to caries or trauma. The decayed or fractured tooth is restored with appropriate restorative materials. A range of restorative materials are available in the market today, but each of them has one or the other drawbacks, viz. color mismatch, variable wear resistance, and strength. Therefore, there has always been a quest to use a restorative material which has properties as close to natural tooth as possible. Extracted human teeth have been tried as restorative materials with good success rate, but their storage has been a problem due to change in physical properties. To evaluate the changes in the mechanical properties of the extracted human teeth to be used as biological restoration upon storing them in different storage media and to compare their effectiveness. Five hundred and twenty extracted human teeth (samples) included in the study were equally distributed and randomly stored in different storage media (saline, artificial saliva, ORS, coconut water, and eye solution), and their mechanical properties were checked at different time intervals (7, 14, and 30 days) using universal testing machine and Vickers hardness test. None of the storage media used in the study significantly altered mechanical properties of the stored extracted human teeth except the hardness which was substantially reduced after storing for 30 days. Of the 4 media tested, eye solution was found to be the best, while artificial saliva was found to be least effective as storage media. It was also concluded that storage time of the extracted teeth to be used as biological restorations should not exceed more than 3-4 weeks as beyond this time, mechanical properties namely hardness get altered significantly. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. John Hejduk ja tema Wall House 2 = John Hejduk and his Wall House 2 / Vilen Künnapu

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Künnapu, Vilen, 1948-

    2010-01-01

    Ameerika arhitekt John Hejdukist ja tema mõjust 20. sajandi lõpukümnendite arhitektuurimõttele. Ka 1973. aastal projekteeritud eramust Wall House 2, mis valmis alles 2001. aastal Groningenis. Kommentaar Soome arhitektuuriprofessor Juhani Pallasmaalt

  4. EFEKTIVITAS MEDIA DALAM PEMBELAJARAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjar Sri Wahyuni

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Advances in technology in various fields, for example in communications and information technology at the moment, learning media has a central position in the learning process and not solely aids. The media is an integral part of the learning process. In this process, using instructional media associated with anything that can be done by the media. Instructional media used in learning activities can influence the learning efektitas. At first, learning media only serves as a tool for teachers. Two approaches / models of learning media in the electoral process, namely: selecting the model enclosed and open selection model. Closed election occurs when alternative media has been determined. Open selection model is the inverse of the secret ballot. We are still free to choose any type of media, according to our needs. Alternative media is still wide open. Choose open procedures more flexible in nature, because really we adjust to the needs and conditions.   Keywords :  Effectiveness, Media, Learning.

  5. Random Raman lasing

    CERN Document Server

    Hokr, Brett H; Mason, John D; Beier, Hope T; Rockwll, Benjamin A; Thomas, Robert J; Noojin, Gary D; Petrov, Georgi I; Golovan, Leonid A; Yakovlev, Vladislav V

    2013-01-01

    Propagation of light in a highly scattering medium is among the most fascinating optical effect that everyone experiences on an everyday basis and possesses a number of fundamental problems which have yet to be solved. Conventional wisdom suggests that non-linear effects do not play a significant role because the diffusive nature of scattering acts to spread the intensity, dramatically weakening these effects. We demonstrate the first experimental evidence of lasing on a Raman transition in a bulk three-dimensional random media. From a practical standpoint, Raman transitions allow for spectroscopic analysis of the chemical makeup of the sample. A random Raman laser could serve as a bright Raman source allowing for remote, chemically specific, identification of powders and aerosols. Fundamentally, the first demonstration of this new light source opens up an entire new field of study into non-linear light propagation in turbid media, with the most notable application related to non-invasive biomedical imaging.

  6. UJI EFEKTIVITAS BEBERAPA MEDIA UNTUK PERBANYAKAN AGENS HAYATI Trichoderma sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gusnawaty HS

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Effectiveness test of several media for propagation biological agent Trichoderma sp.. This study aims to look at the effectiveness of some media to propagation of Trichoderma sp. and to determine the effectiveness of the media that has the best propagation of Trichoderma sp. This research is compiled in a completely randomized design (CRD, consists of seven treatment propagation medium that is 1 Media dregs sago (A, 2 Media dregs of the cashew nut shell (B, 3 Media sawdust (C, 4 Media maize (D, 5 Media bran (E , 6 Media rice (F, 7 Media rice husk (G. The results showed that the medium used for propagation Trichoderma sp. have varying effectiveness. The most effective media for propogation Trichoderma sp. is media bran, with growth capability Trichoderma sp on day 4days after incubation reaches 100%, the difference in weight of the media before and after incubation Trichoderma sp. 2,04 g and the number of conidia 104,125.103/g media.

  7. New Technology Tools: Using Social Media for Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Violence Prevention. Prevention Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higher Education Center for Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Violence Prevention, 2011

    2011-01-01

    When it comes to using social media technology for alcohol, drug abuse, and violence prevention, Thomas Workman, at Baylor College of Medicine's John M. Eisenberg Center for Clinical Decisions and Communications Science, points out that social media is interactive. This means that a person is entering a conversation rather than a declaration, and…

  8. Randomization tests

    CERN Document Server

    Edgington, Eugene

    2007-01-01

    Statistical Tests That Do Not Require Random Sampling Randomization Tests Numerical Examples Randomization Tests and Nonrandom Samples The Prevalence of Nonrandom Samples in Experiments The Irrelevance of Random Samples for the Typical Experiment Generalizing from Nonrandom Samples Intelligibility Respect for the Validity of Randomization Tests Versatility Practicality Precursors of Randomization Tests Other Applications of Permutation Tests Questions and Exercises Notes References Randomized Experiments Unique Benefits of Experiments Experimentation without Mani

  9. Konservasi Media: Memori Kultural pada Media-Media Lama

    OpenAIRE

    Aloysius Ranggabumi Nuswantoro

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Technology boosts the emergence of new communication tools and also creates the dichotomy of old media and new media. At first, it seems like there is nothing wrong with the dichotomy. However, in the context of communication value and meaning, there may be something missing when old media are being abandoned. Not merely the physical manifestation of old media, but rather the work it that contains useful information for the current generation. As a result, today’s people are now l...

  10. Konservasi Media: Memori Kultural Pada Media-Media Lama

    OpenAIRE

    Nuswantoro, Aloysius Ranggabumi

    2014-01-01

    : Technology boosts the emergence of new communication tools and also creates the dichotomy of old media and new media. At first, it seems like there is nothing wrong with the dichotomy. However, in the context of communication value and meaning, there may be something missing when old media are being abandoned. Not merely the physical manifestation of old media, but rather the work it that contains useful information for the current generation. As a result, today’s people are now losing th...

  11. Old Testament spirituality in the gospel of John

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk G. van der Merwe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The majority of early Christian documents are saturated with Jewish thought. Although Second-Temple Judaism did include a certain amount of diversity, when the Gospel of John was written in different phases during the latter half of the 1st century, the written Torah was a fixed part of Jewish Scripture. In this research, I endeavour to point out how Torah themes saturate the Prologue of the Gospel of John and also how these themes create a certain spirituality amongst its readers. A positive feature of Old Testament imagery and themes is that they are polysemantic, which made it easy for the writers of New Testament documents to reinterpret the Old Testament in the light of Jesus Christ. The author of the Gospel of John also made use of significant characters, themes and imagery, all taken from the Torah. In doing so, he created new spiritualities amongst the readers of the Gospel of John to endorse the identity, reality and a certain image and experience of the unseen God (1:18 of the Old Testament through Jesus Christ. The spirituality in the Gospel of John is bound up with a real God interacting with real people in real situations.

  12. Diffuse Matter from Star Forming Regions to Active Galaxies A Volume Honouring John Dyson

    CERN Document Server

    Hartquist, T W

    2006-01-01

    John Dyson has contributed to the study of the hydrodynamic processes that govern a wide variety of astrophysical sources which he has helped explain. In this volume dedicated to him, introductory reviews to a number of the key processes and to the sources themselves are given by leading experts. The mechanisms in which the multi-component natures of media affect their dynamics receive particular attention, but the roles of hydromagnetic effects are also highlighted. The importance of cosmic ray moderation and mass transfer between different thermal phases for cosmic ray moderation and mass transfer between different thermal phases for the evolution of flows are amongst the topics treated. The main types of regions considered include those where stars form, the circumstellar environments of evolved stars, the larger scale interstellar structures caused by the mass loss of stars, and those where the lines of AGNs form. The reviews complement one another and together provide a coherent introduction to the astro...

  13. Logos Announced the Light of Salvation: Interpreting How John Presented His Message in John 1:1-18, According to Functional Grammar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollinger, Seth

    2014-01-01

    This study of John 1:1-18 describes how John (the speaker) presented his message to his audience within their activity of verbal communication. By focusing on verbal meaning, this interpretation analyzes how John presented and expressed his meanings through language by interpreting this text based on the seamless interrelation between John's…

  14. Media Violence and Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groebel, Jo

    1998-01-01

    Presents the results of the UNESCO global study on media violence and children which was conducted between 1996 and 1997. Highlights include the role of the media, media heroes as role models, media violence and aggression, differences by gender, rural versus urban environments, the pervasiveness of television, and recommendations. (Author/LRW)

  15. Living within the Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Erin

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author shares how media affects her as a teenager. The author says that media has such a relationship with the world today, specifically with teenagers like her. Media gives off so much information that can be valid or invalid, positive or negative. The media can persuade anyone to do something or to think a certain way.…

  16. The Media Teacher's Handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarratt, Elaine, Ed.; Davison, Jon, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    "The Media Teacher's Handbook" is an indispensible guide for all teachers, both specialist and non-specialist, delivering Media Studies and media education in secondary schools and colleges. It is the first text to draw together the three key elements of secondary sector teaching in relation to media study--the "theoretical",…

  17. Media Literacy Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Barry

    1989-01-01

    Provides an up-to-date bibliography of resources available for teaching media literacy. Groups resources into the areas of media education methodology, mass media texts, general background, television, film, the news and medium of print, advertising, gender and the media, popular culture, popular music and rock video, periodicals, and…

  18. The effects of contrast media volume on acute kidney injury after transcatheter aortic valve replacement: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thongprayoon, Charat; Cheungpasitporn, Wisit; Podboy, Alexander J; Gillaspie, Erin A; Greason, Kevin L; Kashani, Kianoush B

    2016-11-01

    The goal of this systematic review was to assess the effects of contrast media volume on transcatheter aortic valve replacement-related acute kidney injury. A literature search was performed using Medline, EMbase, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and clinicaltrials.gov from the inception of these databases through December 2015. Studies that reported relative risk, odds ratio, or hazard ratio comparing the risks of acute kidney injury following transcatheter aortic valve replacement in patients who received high contrast media volume were included. Pooled risk ratio (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated using a random-effect, generic inverse variance method. Four cohort studies composed of 891 patients were included in the analyses to assess the risk of acute kidney injury after transcatheter aortic valve replacement in patients who received high contrast media volume. The pooled RR of acute kidney injury after transcatheter aortic valve replacement in patients who received a large volume of contrast media was 1.41 (95% CI, 0.87 to 2.28) compared with low contrast media volume. The meta-analysis was limited to studies using standard acute kidney injury definitions, and the pooled RR of acute kidney injury in patients who received high contrast media volume is 1.12 (95% CI, 0.78 to 1.62). Our meta-analysis shows no significant association between contrast media volume and risk of acute kidney injury after transcatheter aortic valve replacement. © 2016 Chinese Cochrane Center, West China Hospital of Sichuan University and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  19. Efektivitas Media Dalam Pembelajaran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjar Sri Wahyuni

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Advances in technology in various fields, for example in communications and information technology at the moment, learning media has a central position in the learning process and not solely aids. The media is an integral part of the learning process. In this process, using instructional media associated with anything that can be done by the media. Instructional media used in learning activities can influence the learning efektitas. At first, learning media only serves as a tool for teachers. Two approaches / models of learning media in the electoral process, namely: selecting the model enclosed and open selection model. Closed election occurs when alternative media has been determined. Open selection model is the inverse of the secret ballot. We are still free to choose any type of media, according to our needs. Alternative media is still wide open. Choose open procedures more flexible in nature, because really we adjust to the needs and conditions.

  20. John Bell (1763-1820): brother artist and anatomist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner-Thorpe, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    John Bell, brother-surgeon of Charles Bell, was, like Charles, an outstanding surgeon and a good artist. John was one of the few who illustrated his work with their own drawings in the days before audiovisual aids were available and without the benefit of reliable drawing aids, photography and computer-aided design. Charles, on the other hand, was the better artist and illustrated much of the normal anatomy of the nervous system. Each brother undertook extensive surgery of men who had been wounded in war; John Bell left us his engravings from the textbooks, more numerous perhaps than Charles, but Charles left us a series of oil paintings and watercolours in addition to the illustrations in his textbooks. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Geology of St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, Douglas W.

    2002-01-01

    The rocks of St. John, which is located near the eastern end of the Greater Antilles and near the northeastern corner of the Caribbean plate, consist of Cretaceous basalt, andesite, keratophyre, their volcaniclastic and hypabyssal intrusive equivalents, and minor calcareous rocks and chert. These rocks were intruded by Tertiary mafic dikes and tonalitic plutons. The oldest rocks formed in an extensional oceanic environment characterized by abundant keratophyre and sheeted dikes. Subduction-related volcanism of the east-west-trending marine Greater Antilles volcanic arc began on St. John near the transition between the Early and Late Cretaceous. South-directed compression, probably caused by the initial collision between the Greater Antilles arc of the Caribbean plate and the Bahama platform of the North American plate, deformed the Cretaceous strata into east-west-trending folds with axial-plane cleavage. Late Eocene tonalitic intrusions, part of the Greater Antilles arc magmatism, produced a contact aureole that is as much as two kilometers wide and that partly annealed the axial-plane cleavage. East-west compression, possibly related to the relative eastward transport of the Caribbean plate in response to the beginning of spreading at the Cayman Trough, produced long-wavelength, low-amplitude folds whose axes plunge gently north and warp the earlier folds. A broad north-plunging syncline-anticline pair occupies most of St. John. The last tectonic event affecting St. John is recorded by a series of post-late Eocene sinistral strike-slip faults related to the early stages of spreading at the Cayman Trough spreading center and sinistral strike-slip accommodation near the northern border of the Caribbean plate. Central St. John is occupied by a rhomb horst bounded by two of these sinistral faults. Unlike other parts of the Greater Antilles, evidence for recent tectonic movement has not been observed on St. John.

  2. Ethics of Media

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Events such as the phone-hacking scandal, Wikileaks and the Mohammed cartoons controversy have placed ethics of media at the centre of current debates. Media are not only centralised institutions, but also technologies and means through which we sustain relationships with each other. We live with and in media, and this book sketches and critiques the normative contours of our intensely mediated worlds. What are the 'ethics' of media? What forms would we expect them to take? Do digital media c...

  3. Social media influencer marketing

    OpenAIRE

    Isosuo, Heli

    2016-01-01

    The marketing field is changing simultaneously with the digital world. Social media is getting more and more important to marketers, and there is a need to stand out in the social media noise. Social media influencer marketing could be a good alternative to other types of marketing. A need from the consignor and the interest of the author were the motivations for conducting the study. Sääskilahti Consulting has a social media influencer network Somevaikuttajat, which is offering social media ...

  4. Dynamic randomization and a randomization model for clinical trials data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Lee D

    2012-12-20

    Randomization models are useful in supporting the validity of linear model analyses applied to data from a clinical trial that employed randomization via permuted blocks. Here, a randomization model for clinical trials data with arbitrary randomization methodology is developed, with treatment effect estimators and standard error estimators valid from a randomization perspective. A central limit theorem for the treatment effect estimator is also derived. As with permuted-blocks randomization, a typical linear model analysis provides results similar to the randomization model results when, roughly, unit effects display no pattern over time. A key requirement for the randomization inference is that the unconditional probability that any patient receives active treatment is constant across patients; when this probability condition is violated, the treatment effect estimator is biased from a randomization perspective. Most randomization methods for balanced, 1 to 1, treatment allocation satisfy this condition. However, many dynamic randomization methods for planned unbalanced treatment allocation, like 2 to 1, do not satisfy this constant probability condition, and these methods should be avoided. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Process and progress: John Hughlings Jackson's philosophy of science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacyna, L Stephen

    2011-10-01

    Some scepticism has been voiced over whether the work of John Hughlings Jackson possesses any significant philosophical orientation. This article argues that Hughlings Jackson was acquainted with the work of a wide range of philosophers. In particular, certain aspects of the writings of John Stuart Mill are reflected in Hughlings Jackson's own work. From early in his career, Hughlings Jackson adopted a critical stance in his neurological papers, seeking to expose shortcomings in the conventional practices of his peers and urging greater methodological rigour and sophistication in order to advance their science. This critical and 'procedurist' bias endows Hughlings Jackson's writings with a characteristically modern character.

  6. Was John Paul II an Apologist of Christianity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Michalik

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper tries to answer the question whether John Paul II was an apologist of Christianity. Moving along scholastic methodology, the paper progress along three stages, exploring a negative statement ( videtur quod non , justifying a positive assertion ( sed contra , to formulate a conclusion ( ergo . Through this methodology the paper argues that Pope John Paul II was the defender of Christianity. This methodology allows thorough study of the highlights of the pontificate of this Great Pope and on the basis of counter-points to bring out a more clear answer to the research question.

  7. Media Pluralism and Diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    challenges for media pluralism policies in the light of a fast changing media environment. The book is unique in that it confronts insights from all parts of the world and from a broad range of disciplines including law, economics, media studies, and sociology.......In the western world, a diverse and pluralistic media landscape is deemed essential for democracy. But how universal is media pluralism as a concept underpinning media policies? To what extent do normative approaches, regulatory dimensions and monitoring systems differ throughout the world......? Adopting a truly global, theoretical and multidisciplinary perspective, Media Pluralism and Diversity advances our understanding of media pluralism across the globe. It compares metrics developed in different parts of the world to assess levels of, or threats to, media pluralism. It identifies common...

  8. Unpacking New Media Literacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Der-Thanq “victor” Chen

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The 21st century has marked an unprecedented advancement of new media. New media has become so pervasive that it has penetrated into every aspect of our society. New media literacy plays an essential role for any citizen to participate fully in the 21st century society. Researchers have documented that literacy has evolved historically from classic literacy (reading-writing-understanding to audiovisual literacy to digital literacy or information literacy and recently to new media literacy. A review of literature on media literacy reveals that there is a lack of thorough analysis of unique characteristics of new media and its impacts upon the notion of new media literacy. The purpose of the study is to unpack new media literacy and propose a framework for a systematic investigation of new media literacy.

  9. “HAVING FELLOWSHIP WITH GOD” ACCORDING TO 1 JOHN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    For believers to have fellowship (koinwniva) with one another and corporately with. God, is one of the main objectives stated for the proclamation of the gospel by the author of 1 John. This article investigates the intermediation and environment through which and in which fellowship is constituted between God and his ...

  10. Haunting Masculinity and Frightening Femininity: The Novels of John Bellairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinecken, Dawn

    2011-01-01

    While developing scholarship around children's horror fiction has focused on the works of contemporary writers, this essay provides a close reading of the novels of John Bellairs, a leading and early practitioner of the genre. It argues that the first three novels in his Lewis Barnevelt series may be understood as addressing some of the same…

  11. Interview with Antony John Kunnan on Language Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimehchisalem, Vahid

    2015-01-01

    Antony John Kunnan is a language assessment specialist. His research interests are fairness of tests and testing practice, assessment literacy, research methods and statistics, ethics and standards, and language assessment policy. His most recent publications include a four-volume edited collection of 140 chapters titled "The Companion to…

  12. Collected works of John Tate part II (1976--2006)

    CERN Document Server

    Tate, John; Serre, Jean-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    In these volumes, a reader will find all of John Tate's published mathematical papers-spanning more than six decades-enriched by new comments made by the author. Included also is a selection of his letters. His letters give us a close view of how he works and of his ideas in process of formation.

  13. John Ellis considers cosmology, colloquiums and new collaborations

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2011-01-01

    On 13 September, physicists from around the world joined John Ellis in a colloquium to celebrate his 65th birthday. In our last issue, we talked to John about the Higgs, the lack of the Higgs and extra dimensions. In this second part of the interview, John speaks about the colloquium and the wide range of topics it covered, all inspired by his career.   John Ellis in his office (July 2011). How did your birthday colloquium come about? When physicists here at CERN reach a “certain age” – or reach a transition point in their careers – it is traditional to hold some kind of colloquium. I had previously resisted pressure to hold one of these events. But this year, my official duties for the Organization have come to an end.  While it is unlikely you will see any difference in my working habits, it was a milestone that proved too important to not give into requests for an event. Rather than a very long sequence of people talking about what they d...

  14. John McArthur | IDRC - International Development Research Centre

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    John serves as a Senior Fellow at The Brookings Institution and as a Senior Advisor on Sustainable Development to the United Nations Foundation. He previously served as CEO of Millennium Promise Alliance; as faculty member at Columbia University, School of International and Public Affairs; and as Manager and ...

  15. Scholarship in Teaching and Learning: An Interview with John Mitterer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, David B.

    2009-01-01

    John Mitterer earned his PhD in cognitive psychology from McMaster University. Like many teaching professors, his career took an unexpected turn early on when he was hired to teach introductory psychology at Brock University, near Niagara Falls, in Ontario, Canada. It was love at first lecture. He never left the course and now, as a full professor…

  16. Conceptualising holiness in the Gospel of John: The mode and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the Gospel of John, the holiness of the trinity constitutes the theological environment for the code of holiness and forms the basis for the exhortation to holiness. The code of holiness is described in the light of the interaction of three levels of relationships: the unity between Father and the Son as the example of holiness, ...

  17. 'Epistemology models ontology'− In gesprek met John Polkinghorne

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Test

    7 Jun 2011 ... The famous premise of John Polkinghorne, 'epistemology models ontology', has been assessed in this article. It is interpreted that its logic is based on a linear trajectory of knowledge → being. Polkinghorne places much emphasis on the fact that he pursues a 'bottom-up' approach, that is, an inductive way ...

  18. The John Henry wars | Berman | Marang: Journal of Language and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    academics, the former accusing the latter of ruining the legend through endless analysis. As the title suggests, these 'wars' over this national icon unearth the subtleties of the political economy of labor, the ironies of racial identity, and the intricate relationship between folklore and fiction. Keywords:folklore, John Henry

  19. John Hick's Philosophy of Religious Pluralism in the Context of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article is an interpretation of John Hick's philosophy of religious pluralism in the context of traditional Yoruba religion. The ultimate goal of the article is pragmatic, viz. to provide a theoretical basis for peaceful coexistence among different religions in Nigeria. The methods adopted to achieve this objective are ...

  20. Toward a Contextual Theological Reading of John Amos Comenius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Justin

    2016-01-01

    John Amos Comenius developed a revolutionary philosophy of education in seventeenth-century Europe. He argued for ideas such as universal education, which was virtually unheard of in his time but has become standard in modern western society. In the middle of the twentieth century, Comenius's ideas were heralded in the secular educational…

  1. Automation of library system: A study of John Harris library ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study cover ed the automation of Circulation and OPAC operation of John Harris library, University of Benin. System analysis of the existing system was carried out; the elicited information was employed in building a web - based application programme, designed, developed a nd implemented in PHP and MySQL ...

  2. John Stuart Mill on Freedom, Education, and Social Reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Peter F.

    1983-01-01

    Examines the social philosophy of John Stuart Mill, emphasizing his views on freedom, education, and social reform. Considers Mill's individualism and reformism, the conflict between freedom and control that characterizes his work, and the importance of freedom and education. Suggests caution in drawing educational implications from his work. (DAB)

  3. John Stuart Mill's Concepts of Quality and Pedagogical Norms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki Su

    1986-01-01

    Considers the paradoxical relationship between two pervasive educational goals--quality and equality. Sees this paradox embedded in John Stuart Mill's writings on education, which attempted to reconcile the utilitarian pleasure principle (which emphasizes quantitative measures), with a traditional differentiation among levels and kinds of desires…

  4. How to Write About a Bumblebee--John Burroughs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Tom

    1981-01-01

    The personal comments of literary naturalist, John Burroughs, whose 60-year writing career began in the 1860s, can guide writing teachers today. Recommended techniques include literary walks, a fermentation process between contact with nature and writing about it, emphasis on clarity and truth, and keeping a journal. (NEC)

  5. Principal Component Surface (2011) for Fish Bay, St. John

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a 0.3x0.3 meter principal component analysis (PCA) surface for areas inside Fish Bay, St. John in the U.S. Virgin Islands (USVI). It was...

  6. Principal Component Surface (2011) for Coral Bay, St. John

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a 0.3x0.3 meter principal component analysis (PCA) surface for areas inside Coral Bay, St. John in the U.S. Virgin Islands (USVI). It was...

  7. Paratuberculosis (Johne’s Disease) in the Monkey (Macaca Mulatta),

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johne’s disease or paratuberculosis is caused by the acid-fast organism Mycobacterium paratuberculosis and is known to affect cattle, sheep and goats...IT HAS A PROLONGED COURSE CHARACTERIZED BY DIARRHEA, EMACIATION, AND EVENTUALLY DEATH. The recognition of paratuberculosis in the monkey provides

  8. Inquiry, Agency, and Art: John Dewey's Contribution to Pragmatic Cosmopolitanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waks, Leonard

    2009-01-01

    Cosmopolitanism in 2009 is arguably the philosophical and social counterpart of the progressivism of 1909. In this article, the author argues that John Dewey's pragmatism has (at least) two valuable lessons for the theory and practice of cosmopolitanism. After situating Dewey in the current discussion of cosmopolitanism and locating this…

  9. William Morris and John Dewey: Imagining Utopian Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman-Moir, John

    2012-01-01

    With strikingly resonance William Morris and John Dewey independently imagined what utopian education might plausibly be. Neither remotely thought of utopia as a perfectly ordered society, but rather as a process. Each understood education functionally in terms of how it fits with art, work, and democracy within a holistic conception of utopia.…

  10. John Dewey on Listening and Friendship in School and Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waks, Leonard J.

    2011-01-01

    In this essay, Leonard Waks examines John Dewey's account of listening, drawing on Dewey's writings to establish a direct connection in his work between listening and democracy. Waks devotes the first part of the essay to explaining Dewey's distinction between one-way or straight-line listening and transactional listening-in-conversation, and to…

  11. Russian Philosophers and Educators on the Pragmatism of John Dewey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorshkova, V. V.

    2015-01-01

    The article demonstrates how the views of Russian academics have evolved over time. These views cover topics from the falsification and ideological rejection of the ideas of John Dewey to the objective contextual readings and interpretations of his major works. [This article was translated by Kenneth Cargill.

  12. Scapegoat: John Dewey and the Character Education Crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Many conservatives, including some conservative scholars, blame the ideas and influence of John Dewey for what has frequently been called a crisis of character, a catastrophic decline in moral behavior in the schools and society of North America. Dewey's critics claim that he is responsible for the undermining of the kinds of instruction that…

  13. PROGRESIVISME JOHN DEWEY DAN PENDIDIKAN PARTISIPATIF PERSPEKTIF PENDIDIKAN ISLAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilun Mualifah

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses about participative education related to education progressivism concept by John Dewey, and then it is examined on Islamic studies perception. Participative education concept on John Dewey’s education progressivism is education concept that refers to John Dewey’s theories that bring up progressive principles. The progressive principles base on optimistic attitude on viewing the progress of learners’ learning process. The education progressivism concept by John Dewey contains participative education principles; it can be strengthened on Islamic education view that there are some compatibility aspects (especially in worldly usefulness, and there are many differences based on principles (especially in metaphysic-spiritual thing. Therefore, when Muslims will implement participative principles on Dewey’s educational concept in their life, they need to filter it based on Islamic views. If it does not contradict to Islamic views, it should be implemented on their life. Nevertheless, if it opposes Islamic views, it should not be implemented on their life (it is enough for them to know it as knowledge.

  14. John Dewey and the Challenge of Progressive Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waks, Leonard J.

    2013-01-01

    In "The School and Society" John Dewey noted new tendencies in education, e.g., manual training and nature study. He raised two related questions: (1) how are we to "understand the" new educational trends as reflections of the "social context"--as an "inevitable" effort to bring education into line with the broader pattern of change in industrial…

  15. Why Should Scholars Keep Coming Back to John Dewey?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Mordechai

    2016-01-01

    This essay attempts to explain why philosophers, philosophers of education, and scholars of democracy should keep coming back to John Dewey for insights and inspiration on issues related to democracy and education. Mordechai Gordon argues that there are four major reasons that contribute to scholars' need to keep returning to Dewey for inspiration…

  16. John Knopfmacher, [Abstract] Analytic Number Theory, and the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper some important contributions of John Knopfmacher to ' Analytic Number Theory' are described. This theory investigates semigroups with countably many generators (generalized 'primes'), with a norm map (or a 'degree map'), and satisfying certain conditions on the number of elements with norm less

  17. SuchThatCast Episode 9: John Dupré

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soraker, Johnny

    2013-01-01

    John Dupré is the director of the ESRC Centre for Genomics in Society and professor of philosophy at the University of Exeter. Dupré was educated at the University of Oxford and the University of Cambridge and taught at Oxford, Stanford University and Birkbeck College of the University of London

  18. John Paynter, Music Education and the Creativity of Coincidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finney, John

    2011-01-01

    My purpose is to develop better understanding of John Paynter's professional life and work, and by examining his pedagogic principles, discern something of the system of beliefs that underlay his commitment to finding a place for music within a system of general education. A number of significant influences are identified that bear upon his…

  19. Discursive investigation into John's internalised spirit identity and its ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-05-31

    May 31, 2016 ... (John 8:44–46). In the verses, Jesus castigated the Jews and naturalised their identity. For the Johannine Jesus, the. Jews – the outsiders, are ..... kingdom. Clinging to her mundane identity of being a. Samaritan, she exuded ignorance by asking invalid questions. The Johannine Jesus perceived her ...

  20. Two Cheers for Worldview: A Response to Elmer John Thiessen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, James K. A.

    2010-01-01

    This article presents Smith's response to Elmer John Thiessen's review of his book "Desiring the Kingdom." Before attending to specific concerns, the author first begins with an affirmation that he shares with Thiessen: He, too, found "worldview thinking" to be revolutionary. He said he is a whole-hearted worldview convert, as it were. Smith…