WorldWideScience

Sample records for random media induced

  1. Optomechanics of random media

    CERN Document Server

    Gentilini, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Using light to control the movement of nano-structured objects is a great challenge. This challenge involves fields like optical tweezing, Casimir forces, integrated optics, bio-physics, and many others. Photonic "robots" could have uncountable applications. However, if the complexity of light-activated devices increases, structural disorder unavoidably occurs and, correspondingly, light scattering, diffusion and localization. Are optically-driven mechanical forces affected by disorder-induced effects? A possible hypothesis is that light scattering reduces the optomechanical interaction. Conversely, we show that disorder is a mechanism that radically enhances the mechanical effect of light. We determine the link between optical pressure and the light diffusion coefficient, and unveil that when the Thouless conductivity becomes smaller than the unity, at the so-called Anderson transition, optical forces and their statistical fluctuations reach a maximum. Recent advances in photonics demonstrate the possibility...

  2. Wave propagation and scattering in random media

    CERN Document Server

    Ishimaru, Akira

    1978-01-01

    Wave Propagation and Scattering in Random Media, Volume 2, presents the fundamental formulations of wave propagation and scattering in random media in a unified and systematic manner. The topics covered in this book may be grouped into three categories: waves in random scatterers, waves in random continua, and rough surface scattering. Random scatterers are random distributions of many particles. Examples are rain, fog, smog, hail, ocean particles, red blood cells, polymers, and other particles in a state of Brownian motion. Random continua are the media whose characteristics vary randomly an

  3. Non-diffractive beam in random media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiina, Tatsuo

    2017-09-01

    Beam propagation has been given important attention in a variety of applications in medicine, remote sensing and information science. Especially, the beam propagation in highly scattering media, which is called random media, is important. In general, the multiple scattering gets rid of beam characteristics, e.g., intensity distribution, phase front, and polarization. In this study, self-converging effect of annular beam was applied in random media. Diluted milk was used as random media, and the transmitted light was detected with a narrow view angle of 5.5mrad. The collimated annular beam of a few tens millimeters takes a few hundred meters to transform its beam shape into the non-diffractive beam in free space, while this transformation was shorten only to 20 cm in random media, that is, the collimated annular beam caused its transformation at only 20 cm in random media. The transformed beam kept its optical characteristics of ;non-diffractive beam;. Such transformation of the annular beam needs the appropriate condition of random media. Media concentration and propagation distance control the generation of the center peak intensity of the transformed beam. This study indicates the generation of the non-diffractive beam in random media and reveals its appropriate condition.

  4. EFFECT OF INTRACUFF MEDIA-ALKALINISED LIGNOCAINE, SALINE, AND AIR ON ENDOTRACHEAL TUBE INDUCED EMERGENCE PHENOMENA: A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indu S

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT Emergence from general anaesthesia is associated with post extubation cough, hoarseness, sore throat, and dysphagia, which may affect the smoothness of extubation. Prophylactic interventions have been studied to reduce these tracheal morbidities with varying results. AIMS To compare the efficacy of air, alkalinised lignocaine and saline in maintaining intracuff pressure and reducing postoperative cough (PEC and sore throat (POST. SETTINGS AND DESIGN A randomised controlled study conducted in a teaching hospital. METHODS AND MATERIALS 105 patients scheduled for elective surgeries were randomly allocated into groups of 35 each. The endotracheal tube (ETT cuffs were inflated with air, alkalinised lignocaine, or saline. The intracuff pressure (ICP was initially set to 25-30 cm of H2O; measured every 30 minutes and before extubation; the minimum volume for occlusion (MOV noted. The incidence PEC and POST were monitored. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS Data analysed using Chi-square test, Fisher’s exact test; Bonferroni method allowed multiple comparisons. A p value <0.05 was considered significant. RESULTS Pre-lubricated ETT cuff inflation with liquid media maintained an acceptable ICP. Saline and alkalinised lignocaine were effective in reducing PEC and POST. Alkalinised lignocaine provided smoother extubation and fared better in the early postoperative period. CONCLUSIONS Pre-lubricated ETT cuffs with liquid media reduced PEC and POST. Alkalinised lignocaine showed better profile than saline. Optimum ICP reduces tracheal morbidity.

  5. Neutron transport in random media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makai, M. [KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute, Budapest (Hungary)

    1996-08-01

    The survey reviews the methods available in the literature which allow a discussion of corium recriticality after a severe accident and a characterization of the corium. It appears that to date no one has considered the eigenvalue problem, though for the source problem several approaches have been proposed. The mathematical formulation of a random medium may be approached in different ways. Based on the review of the literature, we can draw three basic conclusions. The problem of static, random perturbations has been solved. The static case is tractable by the Monte Carlo method. There is a specific time dependent case for which the average flux is given as a series expansion.

  6. Cherenkov radiation threshold in random inhomogeneous media

    CERN Document Server

    Grichine, V M

    2009-01-01

    Cherenkov radiation in media with random inhomogeneities like aerogel or Earth atmosphere is discussed. The spectral-angular distribution of Cherenkov photons emitted by relativistic charged particle and averaged over the dielectric permittivity fluctuations shows angular broadening similarly to the case of media with the photon absorption. The broadening results in the smoothing of Cherenkov threshold, and therefore media with strong photon scattering have more extended dependence of Cherenkov light output on the particle speed. It can be potentially used for the particle identification

  7. oscopic Random Media and Percolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyon, Etienne; Hulin, Jean-Pierre; Roux, StéPhane

    Percolation theory, which de Gennes co-invented, is revealed to be a very fruitful approach. In his 1976 paper in La Recherche (reproduced in part in the present paper), he foresees a variety of applications to many problems of soft condensed matter and even to biology and sociology. In this chapter, we recall the initiation of the theory and its application to flow in porous media and to the gelation transition. In addition to the key understanding that originated from such research work, we stress some characteristic features of his approaches to new problems, such as analogies and transpositions between apparently very remote questions. At the same level as his research achievements, this way of thinking is part of his scientific legacy.

  8. Localization length fluctuation in randomly layered media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Haiming; Huang, Feng; Jiang, Xiangqian; Sun, Xiudong

    2016-10-01

    Localization properties of the two-component randomly layered media (RLM) are studied in detail both analytically and numerically. The localization length is found fluctuating around the analytical result obtained under the high-frequency limit. The fluctuation amplitude approaches zero with the increasing of disorder, which is characterized by the distribution width of random thickness. It is also found that the localization length over the mean thickness periodically varies with the distribution center of random thickness. For the multi-component RLM structure, the arrangement of material must be considered.

  9. Stochastic structure formation in random media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klyatskin, V. I.

    2016-01-01

    Stochastic structure formation in random media is considered using examples of elementary dynamical systems related to the two-dimensional geophysical fluid dynamics (Gaussian random fields) and to stochastically excited dynamical systems described by partial differential equations (lognormal random fields). In the latter case, spatial structures (clusters) may form with a probability of one in almost every system realization due to rare events happening with vanishing probability. Problems involving stochastic parametric excitation occur in fluid dynamics, magnetohydrodynamics, plasma physics, astrophysics, and radiophysics. A more complicated stochastic problem dealing with anomalous structures on the sea surface (rogue waves) is also considered, where the random Gaussian generation of sea surface roughness is accompanied by parametric excitation.

  10. Quantum optics in multiple scattering random media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lodahl, Peter

    Quantum Optics in Multiple Scattering Random Media Peter Lodahl Research Center COM, Technical University of Denmark, Dk-2800 Lyngby, Denmark. Coherent transport of light in a disordered random medium has attracted enormous attention both from a fundamental and application point of view. Coherent...... quantum optics in multiple scattering media and novel fundamental phenomena have been predicted when examining quantum fluctuations instead of merely the intensity of the light [1]. Here I will present the first experimental study of the propagation of quantum noise through an elastic, multiple scattering...... medium [2]. Two different types of quantum noise measurements have been carried out: total transmission and short-range frequency correlations. When comparing shot noise (quantum) to technical noise (classical) we observed markedly different behavior, c.f. Fig. 1. The experimental results are found...

  11. Excitation of localized modes and mechanism of random lasing forming in random media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hong; LIU Jinsong; WANG Kejia; HAN Yanling

    2006-01-01

    Laser phenomena in random media have been studied based on the localized theory for lightwave in random media. The relationship between random lasing modes and localized modes has been investigated by directly solving Maxwell equations numerically via the finite difference time domain method. The spatial distribution and the spectra of localized modes are obtained for both passive and active random media. The results show that random lasing modes directly originate from the localized modes inside the random medium. In the presence of gain, any one of the localized modes can be amplified and can serve as random lasing mode.

  12. The transmission coefficient distribution of highly scattering sparse random media

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Curtis; Nadakuditi, Raj Rao; Michielssen, Eric

    2015-01-01

    We consider the distribution of the transmission coefficients, i.e. the singular values of the modal transmission matrix, for 2D random media with periodic boundary conditions composed of a large number of point-like non-absorbing scatterers. The scatterers are placed at random locations in the medium and have random refractive indices that are drawn from an arbitrary, known distribution. We construct a randomized model for the scattering matrix that retains scatterer dependent properties ess...

  13. On the dual symmetry between absorbing and amplifying random media

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Anantha Ramakrishna

    2004-06-01

    We re-examine the dual symmetry between absorbing and amplifying random media. By analysing the physically allowed choice of the sign of the square root to determine the complex wave vector in a medium, we draw a broad set of conclusions that enables us to resolve the apparent paradox of the dual symmetry and also to anticipate the large local electromagnetic field enhancements in amplifying random media.

  14. HOMOGENIZATION, SYMMETRY, AND PERIODIZATION IN DIFFUSIVE RANDOM MEDIA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alen Alexanderian; Muruhan Rathinam; Rouben Rostamian

    2012-01-01

    We present a systematic study of homogenization of diffusion in random media with emphasis on tile-based random microstructures.We give detailed examples of several such media starting from their physical descriptions,then construct the associated probability spaces and verify their ergodicity.After a discussion of material symmetries of random media,we derive criteria for the isotropy of the homogenized limits in tile-based structures.Furthermore,we study the periodization algorithm for the numerical approximation of the homogenized diffusion tensor and study the algorithm's rate of convergence.For one dimensional tile-based media,we prove a central limit result,giving a concrete rate of convergence for periodization.We also provide numerical evidence for a similar central limit behavior in the case of two dimensional tile-based structures.

  15. Mathematical Problems in Imaging in Random Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-15

    report our research results on the following topics: - Sound and electromagnetic wave propagation in random waveguides - Imaging in random waveguides...equation in the waveguide, with excitation given by a source with density ρ(~x) compactly supported around range z = 0, emitting a pulse f(t) with...in a time window of order ε−2ω−1o centered at τ , for an initial excitation in the q−th mode. It satisfies a linear system of transport equations, and

  16. Electromagnetic Wave Propagation in Random Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pécseli, Hans

    1984-01-01

    The propagation of a narrow frequency band beam of electromagnetic waves in a medium with randomly varying index of refraction is considered. A novel formulation of the governing equation is proposed. An equation for the average Green function (or transition probability) can then be derived...

  17. Enhanced propagation of photon density waves in random amplifying media

    CERN Document Server

    Renthlei, Lalruatfela; Ramakrishna, S A

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate enhanced wave-like character of diffuse photon density waves (DPDW) in an amplifying random medium. The amplifying nature makes it contingent to choose the wave solution that grows inside the amplifying medium, and has a propagation vector pointing opposite to the growth direction. This results in negative refraction of the DPDW at an absorbing-amplifying random medium interface as well as the possibility of supporting "anti"-surface-like modes at the interface. A slab of amplifying random medium sandwiched between two absorbing random media supports waveguide resonances that can be utilized to extend the imaging capabilities of DPDW.

  18. Enhanced propagation of photon density waves in random amplifying media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renthlei, Lalruatfela; Wanare, Harshawardhan; Ramakrishna, S. Anantha

    2015-04-01

    We demonstrate enhanced wavelike character of diffuse photon density waves (DPDW) in an amplifying random medium. The amplifying nature makes it necessary to choose the wave solution that grows inside the amplifying medium, and has a propagation vector pointing opposite to the growth direction. This results in negative refraction of the DPDW at an absorbing-amplifying random medium interface as well as the possibility of supporting "anti"-surface-like modes at the interface. A slab of an amplifying random medium sandwiched between two absorbing random media supports waveguide resonances that can be utilized to extend the imaging capabilities of DPDW.

  19. Field and intensity correlation in random media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebbah; Pnini; Genack

    2000-11-01

    We have obtained the spectral and spatial field correlation functions, C(E)(Deltaomega) and C(E)(Deltax), respectively, from measurement of the microwave field spectrum at a series of points along a line on the output of a random dielectric medium. C(E)(Deltaomega) and C(E)(Deltax) are shown to be the Fourier transforms, respectively, of the time of flight distribution, obtained from pulsed measurements, and of the specific intensity. Unlike C(E)(Deltaomega), the imaginary part of C(E)(Deltax) is shown to vanish as a result of the isotropy of the correlation function in the output plane. The complex square of the field correlation function gives the short-range or C1 contribution to the intensity correlation function C. Longer-range contributions to the intensity correlation function are obtained directly by subtracting C1 from C and are in good agreement with theory.

  20. Early detection and intervention using neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL may improve renal outcome of acute contrast media induced nephropathy: A randomized controlled trial in patients undergoing intra-arterial angiography (ANTI-CIN Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stiegler Philipp

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with pre-existing impaired renal function are prone to develop acute contrast media induced nephropathy (CIN. Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL, a new biomarker predictive for acute kidney injury (AKI, has been shown to be useful for earlier diagnosis of CIN; however, urinary NGAL values may be markedly increased in chronic renal failure at baseline. Results from those studies suggested that urinary NGAL values may not be helpful for the clinician. An intravenous volume load is a widely accepted prophylactic measure and possibly a reasonable intervention to prevent deterioration of renal function. The aim of our study is to evaluate NGAL as an early predictor of CIN and to investigate the clinical benefit of early post-procedural i.v. hydration. Methods/Design The study will follow a prospective, open-label, randomized controlled design. Patients requiring intra-arterial contrast media (CM application will be included and receive standardized, weight-based, intravenous hydration before investigation. Subjects with markedly increased urinary NGAL values after CM application will be randomized into one of two study groups. Group A will receive 3-4 ml/kg BW/h 0.9% saline intravenously for 6 hours. Group B will undergo only standard treatment consisting of unrestricted oral fluid intake. The primary outcome measure will be CIN defined by an increase greater than 25% of baseline serum creatinine. Secondary outcomes will include urinary NGAL values, cystatin C values, contrast media associated changes in cardiac parameters such as NT-pro-BNP/troponin T, changes in urinary cytology, need for renal replacement treatment, length of stay in hospital and death. We assume that 20% of the included patients will show a definite rise in urinary NGAL. Prospective statistical power calculations indicate that the study will have 80% statistical power to detect a clinically significant decrease of CIN of 40% in the

  1. Early detection and intervention using neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) may improve renal outcome of acute contrast media induced nephropathy: a randomized controlled trial in patients undergoing intra-arterial angiography (ANTI-CIN Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilcher, Gernot; Ribitsch, Werner; Otto, Ronald; Portugaller, Rupert H; Quehenberger, Franz; Truschnig-Wilders, Martini; Zweiker, Robert; Stiegler, Philipp; Brodmann, Marianne; Weinhandl, Klemens; Horina, Joerg H

    2011-08-17

    Patients with pre-existing impaired renal function are prone to develop acute contrast media induced nephropathy (CIN). Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), a new biomarker predictive for acute kidney injury (AKI), has been shown to be useful for earlier diagnosis of CIN; however, urinary NGAL values may be markedly increased in chronic renal failure at baseline. Results from those studies suggested that urinary NGAL values may not be helpful for the clinician. An intravenous volume load is a widely accepted prophylactic measure and possibly a reasonable intervention to prevent deterioration of renal function. The aim of our study is to evaluate NGAL as an early predictor of CIN and to investigate the clinical benefit of early post-procedural i.v. hydration. The study will follow a prospective, open-label, randomized controlled design. Patients requiring intra-arterial contrast media (CM) application will be included and receive standardized, weight-based, intravenous hydration before investigation. Subjects with markedly increased urinary NGAL values after CM application will be randomized into one of two study groups. Group A will receive 3-4 ml/kg BW/h 0.9% saline intravenously for 6 hours. Group B will undergo only standard treatment consisting of unrestricted oral fluid intake. The primary outcome measure will be CIN defined by an increase greater than 25% of baseline serum creatinine. Secondary outcomes will include urinary NGAL values, cystatin C values, contrast media associated changes in cardiac parameters such as NT-pro-BNP/troponin T, changes in urinary cytology, need for renal replacement treatment, length of stay in hospital and death.We assume that 20% of the included patients will show a definite rise in urinary NGAL. Prospective statistical power calculations indicate that the study will have 80% statistical power to detect a clinically significant decrease of CIN of 40% in the treatment arm if 1200 patients are recruited into the

  2. Stiff directed lines in random media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boltz, Horst-Holger; Kierfeld, Jan

    2013-07-01

    We investigate the localization of stiff directed lines with bending energy by a short-range random potential. We apply perturbative arguments, Flory scaling arguments, a variational replica calculation, and functional renormalization to show that a stiff directed line in 1+d dimensions undergoes a localization transition with increasing disorder for d>2/3. We demonstrate that this transition is accessible by numerical transfer matrix calculations in 1+1 dimensions and analyze the properties of the disorder-dominated phase in detail. On the basis of the two-replica problem, we propose a relation between the localization of stiff directed lines in 1+d dimensions and of directed lines under tension in 1+3d dimensions, which is strongly supported by identical free-energy distributions. This shows that pair interactions in the replicated Hamiltonian determine the nature of directed line localization transitions with consequences for the critical behavior of the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang equation. We support the proposed relation to directed lines via multifractal analysis, revealing an analogous Anderson transition-like scenario and a matching correlation length exponent. Furthermore, we quantify how the persistence length of the stiff directed line is reduced by disorder.

  3. Stability Analysis of Continuous Waves in Nonlocal Random Nonlinear Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxim A. Molchan

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of the competing cubic-quintic nonlinearity model, stability (instability of continuous waves in nonlocal random non-Kerr nonlinear media is studied analytically and numerically. Fluctuating media parameters are modeled by the Gaussian white noise. It is shown that for different response functions of a medium nonlocality suppresses, as a rule, both the growth rate peak and bandwidth of instability caused by random parameters. At the same time, for a special form of the response functions there can be an ''anomalous'' subjection of nonlocality to the instability development which leads to further increase of the growth rate. Along with the second-order moments of the modulational amplitude, higher-order moments are taken into account.

  4. Radiation Transport in Random Media With Large Fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Aaron; Prinja, Anil; Franke, Brian

    2017-09-01

    Neutral particle transport in media exhibiting large and complex material property spatial variation is modeled by representing cross sections as lognormal random functions of space and generated through a nonlinear memory-less transformation of a Gaussian process with covariance uniquely determined by the covariance of the cross section. A Karhunen-Loève decomposition of the Gaussian process is implemented to effciently generate realizations of the random cross sections and Woodcock Monte Carlo used to transport particles on each realization and generate benchmark solutions for the mean and variance of the particle flux as well as probability densities of the particle reflectance and transmittance. A computationally effcient stochastic collocation method is implemented to directly compute the statistical moments such as the mean and variance, while a polynomial chaos expansion in conjunction with stochastic collocation provides a convenient surrogate model that also produces probability densities of output quantities of interest. Extensive numerical testing demonstrates that use of stochastic reduced-order modeling provides an accurate and cost-effective alternative to random sampling for particle transport in random media.

  5. Digital ultrasonically encoded (DUE) optical focusing into random media

    CERN Document Server

    Tay, Jian Wei; Suzuki, Yuta; Wang, Lihong V

    2013-01-01

    Focusing light into opaque random or scattering media such as biological tissue is a much sought-after goal for biomedical applications such as photodynamic therapy, optical manipulation, and photostimulation. However, focusing with conventional lenses is restricted to one transport mean free path in scattering media, limiting both optical penetration depth and resolution. Focusing deeper is possible by using optical phase conjugation or wavefront shaping to compensate for the scattering. For practical applications, wavefront shaping offers the advantage of a robust optical system that is less sensitive to optical misalignment. Here, the phase of the incident light is spatially tailored using a phase-shifting array to pre-compensate for scattering. The challenge, then, is to determine the phase pattern which allows light to be optimally delivered to the target region. Optimization algorithms are typically employed for this purpose, with visible particles used as targets to generate feedback. However, using th...

  6. Propagation of multi-Gaussian Schell-model vortex beams in isotropic random media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Miaomiao; Zhao, Daomu

    2015-12-14

    The effect of isotropic and homogeneous random media on propagation characteristics of recently introduced multi-Gaussian Schell-model (MGSM) vortex beams is investigated. The analytical formula for the cross-spectral density function of such a beam propagating in random turbulent media is derived and used to explore the evolution of the spectral density, the degree of coherence and the turbulence-induced spreading. An example illustrates the fact that, at sufficiently large distance from the source, the source correlations modulation of the spectral distribution in free space is shown to be suppressed by the uniformly correlated turbulence. The impacts, arising from the index M, the correlation width of the source and the properties of the medium on such characteristics are analyzed in depth.

  7. Generalized Optical Theorem Detection in Random and Complex Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Jing

    The problem of detecting changes of a medium or environment based on active, transmit-plus-receive wave sensor data is at the heart of many important applications including radar, surveillance, remote sensing, nondestructive testing, and cancer detection. This is a challenging problem because both the change or target and the surrounding background medium are in general unknown and can be quite complex. This Ph.D. dissertation presents a new wave physics-based approach for the detection of targets or changes in rather arbitrary backgrounds. The proposed methodology is rooted on a fundamental result of wave theory called the optical theorem, which gives real physical energy meaning to the statistics used for detection. This dissertation is composed of two main parts. The first part significantly expands the theory and understanding of the optical theorem for arbitrary probing fields and arbitrary media including nonreciprocal media, active media, as well as time-varying and nonlinear scatterers. The proposed formalism addresses both scalar and full vector electromagnetic fields. The second contribution of this dissertation is the application of the optical theorem to change detection with particular emphasis on random, complex, and active media, including single frequency probing fields and broadband probing fields. The first part of this work focuses on the generalization of the existing theoretical repertoire and interpretation of the scalar and electromagnetic optical theorem. Several fundamental generalizations of the optical theorem are developed. A new theory is developed for the optical theorem for scalar fields in nonhomogeneous media which can be bounded or unbounded. The bounded media context is essential for applications such as intrusion detection and surveillance in enclosed environments such as indoor facilities, caves, tunnels, as well as for nondestructive testing and communication systems based on wave-guiding structures. The developed scalar

  8. An analysis of seismic attenuation in random porous media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The attenuation of seismic wave in rocks has been one of the interesting research topics, but till now no poroelasticity models can thoroughly explain the strong attenuation of wave in rocks. In this paper, a random porous medium model is designed to study the law of wave propagation in complex rocks based on the theory of Biot poroelasticity and the general theory of stochastic process. This model sets the density of grain, porosity, permeability and modulus of frame as random parameters in space, and only one fluid infiltrates in rocks for the sake of better simulation effect in line with real rocks in earth strata. Numerical simulations are implemented. Two different inverse quality factors of fast P-wave are obtained by different methods to assess attenuation through records of virtual detectors in wave field (One is amplitude decay method in time domain and the other is spectral ratio method in frequency domain). Comparing the attenuation results of random porous medium with those of homogeneous porous medium, we conclude that the attenuation of seismic wave of homogeneous porous medium is far weaker than that of random porous medium. In random porous media, the higher heterogeneous level is, the stronger the attenuation becomes, and when heterogeneity σ = 0.15 in simulation, the attenuation result is consistent with that by actual observation. Since the central frequency (50 Hz) of source in numerical simulation is in earthquake band, the numerical results prove that heterogeneous porous structure is one of the important factors causing strong attenuation in real stratum at intermediate and low frequency.

  9. Focusing Light through Random Photonic Media by Binary Amplitude Modulation

    CERN Document Server

    Akbulut, Duygu; van Putten, Elbert G; Vos, Willem L; Mosk, Allard P

    2011-01-01

    We study the focusing of light through random photonic materials using wavefront shaping. We explore a novel approach namely binary amplitude modulation. To this end, the light incident to a random photonic medium is spatially divided into a number of segments. We identify the segments that give rise to fields that are out of phase with the total field at the intended focus and assign these a zero amplitude, whereas the remaining segments maintain their original amplitude. Using 812 independently controlled segments of light, we find the intensity at the target to be 75 +/- 6 times enhanced over the average intensity behind the sample. We experimentally demonstrate focusing of light through random photonic media using both an amplitude only mode liquid crystal spatial light modulator and a MEMS-based spatial light modulator. Our use of Micro Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS)-based digital micromirror devices for the control of the incident light field opens an avenue to high speed implementations of wavefront ...

  10. Geometric Models for Isotropic Random Porous Media: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmut Hermann

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Models for random porous media are considered. The models are isotropic both from the local and the macroscopic point of view; that is, the pores have spherical shape or their surface shows piecewise spherical curvature, and there is no macroscopic gradient of any geometrical feature. Both closed-pore and open-pore systems are discussed. The Poisson grain model, the model of hard spheres packing, and the penetrable sphere model are used; variable size distribution of the pores is included. A parameter is introduced which controls the degree of open-porosity. Besides systems built up by a single solid phase, models for porous media with the internal surface coated by a second phase are treated. Volume fraction, surface area, and correlation functions are given explicitly where applicable; otherwise numerical methods for determination are described. Effective medium theory is applied to calculate physical properties for the models such as isotropic elastic moduli, thermal and electrical conductivity, and static dielectric constant. The methods presented are exemplified by applications: small-angle scattering of systems showing fractal-like behavior in limited ranges of linear dimension, optimization of nanoporous insulating materials, and improvement of properties of open-pore systems by atomic layer deposition of a second phase on the internal surface.

  11. Role of quenching on superdiffusive transport in two-dimensional random media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthelemy, Pierre; Bertolotti, Jacopo; Vynck, Kevin; Lepri, Stefano; Wiersma, Diederik S

    2010-07-01

    Transport in random media is known to be affected by quenched disorder. From the point of view of random walks, quenching induces correlations between steps that may alter the dynamical properties of the medium. This paper is intended to provide more insight into the role of quenched disorder on superdiffusive transport in two-dimensional random media. The systems under consideration are disordered materials called Lévy glasses that exhibit large spatial fluctuations in the density of scattering elements. We show that in an ideal Lévy glass the influence of quenching can be neglected, in the sense that transport follows to very good approximation that of a standard Lévy walk. We also show that, by changing sample parameters, quenching effects can be increased intentionally, thereby making it possible to investigate systematically diverse regimes of transport. In particular, we find that strong quenching induces local trapping effects which slow down superdiffusion and lead to a transient subdiffusivelike transport regime close to the truncation time of the system.

  12. Nonclassical Particle Transport in 1-D Random Periodic Media

    CERN Document Server

    Vasques, Richard; Slaybaugh, Rachel N

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the accuracy of the recently proposed nonclassical transport equation. This equation contains an extra independent variable compared to the classical transport equation (the path-length $s$), and models particle transport taking place in homogenized random media in which a particle's distance-to-collision is not exponentially distributed. To solve the nonclassical equation one needs to know the $s$-dependent ensemble-averaged total cross section, $\\Sigma_t(\\mu,s)$, or its corresponding path-length distribution function, $p(\\mu,s)$. We consider a 1-D spatially periodic system consisting of alternating solid and void layers, randomly placed in the $x$-axis. We obtain an analytical expression for $p(\\mu,s)$ and use this result to compute the corresponding $\\Sigma_t(\\mu,s)$. Then, we proceed to numerically solve the nonclassical equation for different test problems in rod geometry; that is, particles can move only in the directions $\\mu=\\pm 1$. To assess the accuracy of these solutions, we produce ...

  13. Using convex quadratic programming to model random media with Gaussian random fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintanilla, John A.; Jones, W. Max

    2007-04-01

    Excursion sets of Gaussian random fields (GRFs) have been frequently used in the literature to model two-phase random media with measurable phase autocorrelation functions. The goal of successful modeling is finding the optimal field autocorrelation function that best approximates the prescribed phase autocorrelation function. In this paper, we present a technique which uses convex quadratic programming to find the best admissible field autocorrelation function under a prescribed discretization. Unlike previous methods, this technique efficiently optimizes over all admissible field autocorrelation functions, instead of optimizing only over a predetermined parametrized family. The results from using this technique indicate that the GRF model is significantly more versatile than observed in previous studies. An application to modeling a base-catalyzed tetraethoxysilane aerogel system given small-angle neutron scattering data is also presented

  14. A numerical study of rays in random media. [Monte Carlo method simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youakim, M. Y.; Liu, C. H.; Yeh, K. C.

    1973-01-01

    Statistics of electromagnetic rays in a random medium are studied numerically by the Monte Carlo method. Two dimensional random surfaces with prescribed correlation functions are used to simulate the random media. Rays are then traced in these sample media. Statistics of the ray properties such as the ray positions and directions are computed. Histograms showing the distributions of the ray positions and directions at different points along the ray path as well as at given points in space are given. The numerical experiment is repeated for different cases corresponding to weakly and strongly random media with isotropic and anisotropic irregularities. Results are compared with those derived from theoretical investigations whenever possible.

  15. Temporal Mueller matrix solution for polarimetric scattering from inhomogeneous random media of non-spherical scatterers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Polarimetric scattering from inhomogeneous random media of non-spherical scatterers under a pulse incidence is studied. The time-dependent Mueller matrix solution of vector radiative transfer for layering random media is derived. Co-polarized and cross-polarized bistatic and back-scattering are numerically simulated. The shape and intensity of polarized echoes well depict the inhomogeneous fraction profile of random scatterers. Its functional dependence upon the fraction profile, layering thickness, and other parameters are discussed. This technique is applicable to reconstruction of inhomogeneous fraction profile and inversion of the media thickness.

  16. Can Babies Learn to Read? A Randomized Trial of Baby Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuman, Susan B.; Kaefer, Tanya; Pinkham, Ashley; Strouse, Gabrielle

    2014-01-01

    Targeted to children as young as 3 months old, there is a growing number of baby media products that claim to teach babies to read. This randomized controlled trial was designed to examine this claim by investigating the effects of a best-selling baby media product on reading development. One hundred and seventeen infants, ages 9 to 18 months,…

  17. Randomized Controlled Trial of Social Media: Effect of Increased Intensity of the Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Caroline S; Gurary, Ellen B; Ryan, John; Bonaca, Marc; Barry, Karen; Loscalzo, Joseph; Massaro, Joseph

    2016-04-27

    A prior randomized controlled trial of social media exposure at Circulation determined that social media did not increase 30-day page views. Whether insufficient social media intensity contributed to these results is uncertain. Original article manuscripts were randomized to social media exposure compared with no social media exposure (control) at Circulation beginning in January 2015. Social media exposure consisted of Facebook and Twitter posts on the journal's accounts. To increase social media intensity, a larger base of followers was built using advertising and organic growth, and posts were presented in triplicate and boosted on Facebook and retweeted on Twitter. The primary outcome was 30-day page views. Stopping rules were established at the point that 50% of the manuscripts were randomized and had 30-day follow-up to compare groups on 30-day page views. The trial was stopped for futility on September 26, 2015. Overall, 74 manuscripts were randomized to receive social media exposure, and 78 manuscripts were randomized to the control arm. The intervention and control arms were similar based on article type (P=0.85), geographic location of the corresponding author (P=0.33), and whether the manuscript had an editorial (P=0.80). Median number of 30-day page views was 499.5 in the social media arm and 450.5 in the control arm; there was no evidence of a treatment effect (P=0.38). There were no statistically significant interactions of treatment by manuscript type (P=0.86), by corresponding author (P=0.35), by trimester of publication date (P=0.34), or by editorial status (P=0.79). A more intensive social media strategy did not result in increased 30-day page views of original research. © 2016 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  18. Free energy fluctuations for directed polymers in random media in 1+1 dimension

    CERN Document Server

    Borodin, Alexei; Ferrari, Patrik

    2012-01-01

    We consider two models for directed polymers in space-time independent random media (the O'Connell-Yor semi-discrete directed polymer and the continuum directed random polymer) at positive temperature and prove their KPZ universality via asymptotic analysis of exact Fredholm determinant formulas for the Laplace transform of their partition functions. In particular, we show that for large time tau, the probability distributions for the free energy fluctuations, when rescaled by tau^{1/3}, converges to the GUE Tracy-Widom distribution. We also consider the effect of boundary perturbations to the quenched random media on the limiting free energy statistics. For the semi-discrete directed polymer, when the drifts of a finite number of the Brownian motions forming the quenched random media are critically tuned, the statistics are instead governed by the limiting Baik-Ben Arous-Peche distributions from spiked random matrix theory. For the continuum polymer, the boundary perturbations correspond to choosing the init...

  19. Video media-induced aggressiveness in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardwell, Michael Steven

    2013-09-01

    Transmission of aggressive behaviors to children through modeling by adults has long been a commonly held psychological concept; however, with the advent of technological innovations during the last 30 years, video media-television, movies, video games, and the Internet-has become the primary model for transmitting aggressiveness to children. This review explores the acquisition of aggressive behaviors by children through modeling behaviors in violent video media. The impact of aggressive behaviors on the child, the family, and society is addressed. Suggestive action plans to curb this societal ill are presented.

  20. Simulation of heterogeneous two-phase media using random fields and level sets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    George STEFANOU[1,2

    2015-01-01

    The accurate and efficient simulation of random heterogeneous media is important in the framework of modeling and design of complex materials across multiple length scales. It is usually assumed that the morphology of a random microstructure can be described as a non-Gaussian random field that is completely defined by its multivariate distribution. A particular kind of non-Gaussian random fields with great practical importance is that of translation fields resulting from a simple memory-less transformation of an underlying Gaussian field with known second-order statistics. This paper provides a critical examination of existing random field models of heterogeneous two-phase media with emphasis on level-cut random fields which are a special case of translation fields. The case of random level sets, often used to represent the geometry of physical systems, is also examined. Two numerical examples are provided to illustrate the basic features of the different approaches.

  1. Condition for invariant spectrum of an electromagnetic wave scattered from an anisotropic random media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jia; Wu, Pinghui; Chang, Liping

    2015-08-24

    Within the accuracy of the first-order Born approximation, sufficient conditions are derived for the invariance of spectrum of an electromagnetic wave, which is generated by the scattering of an electromagnetic plane wave from an anisotropic random media. We show that the following restrictions on properties of incident fields and the anisotropic media must be simultaneously satisfied: 1) the elements of the dielectric susceptibility matrix of the media must obey the scaling law; 2) the spectral components of the incident field are proportional to each other; 3) the second moments of the elements of the dielectric susceptibility matrix of the media are inversely proportional to the frequency.

  2. Unusual universality of branching interfaces in random media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kardar, Mehran; Stella, Attilio L.; Sartoni, Giovanni; Derrida, Bernard

    1995-08-01

    We study the criticality of a Potts interface by introducing a froth model which, unlike its solid-on-solid Ising counterpart, incorporates bubbles of different phases. The interface is fractal at the phase transition of a pure system. However, a position space approximation suggests that the probability of loop formation vanishes marginally at a transition dominated by strong random bond disorder. This implies a linear critical interface, and provides a mechanism for the conjectured equivalence of critical random Potts and Ising models.

  3. Manipulating spatiotemporal degrees of freedom of waves in random media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemoult, Fabrice; Lerosey, Geoffroy; de Rosny, Julien; Fink, Mathias

    2009-10-23

    We show that all the spatiotemporal degrees of freedom available in a complex medium can be harnessed and converted into spatial ones. This is demonstrated experimentally through an instantaneous spatial inversion, using broadband ultrasonic waves in a multiple scattering sample. We show theoretically that the inversion convergence is governed by the total number of degrees of freedom available in the medium for a fixed bandwidth and demonstrate experimentally its use for complex media investigation. We believe our approach has potential in sensing, imagery, focusing, and telecommunication.

  4. Disorder fingerprint: Intensity distributions in the near field of random media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naraghi, R. Rezvani; Sukhov, S.; Dogariu, A.

    2016-11-01

    The structural morphology of complex dielectric media determines their functionalities by driving the statistical properties of the electromagnetic fields. Our controlled experiments and full electromagnetic calculations that go beyond common dipolar approximations demonstrate that the specific characteristics of disorder lead to non-Rayleigh statistics of detected intensity, which can be directly accessed in the near field of random media and can be unambiguously related to the short-range correlations of disorder.

  5. Maximum relative height of elastic interfaces in random media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rambeau, Joachim; Bustingorry, Sebastian; Kolton, Alejandro B; Schehr, Grégory

    2011-10-01

    The distribution of the maximal relative height (MRH) of self-affine one-dimensional elastic interfaces in a random potential is studied. We analyze the ground-state configuration at zero driving force, and the critical configuration exactly at the depinning threshold, both for the random-manifold and random-periodic universality classes. These configurations are sampled by exact numerical methods, and their MRH distributions are compared with those with the same roughness exponent and boundary conditions, but produced by independent Fourier modes with normally distributed amplitudes. Using Pickands' theorem we derive an exact analytical description for the right tail of the latter. After properly rescaling the MRH distributions we find that corrections from the Gaussian independent modes approximation are, in general, small, as previously found for the average width distribution of depinning configurations. In the large size limit all corrections are finite except for the ground state in the random-periodic class whose MRH distribution becomes, for periodic boundary conditions, indistinguishable from the Airy distribution. We find that the MRH distributions are, in general, sensitive to changes of boundary conditions.

  6. Infinite range correlations of intensity in random media

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Retzker; B Shapiro

    2002-02-01

    We study a new type of long-range correlations for waves propagating in a random medium. These correlations originate from scattering events which take place close to a point source. The scattered waves propagate by diffusion to distant regions. In this way long range correlations, between any pair of distant points, are established.

  7. Reciprocity breaking during nonlinear propagation of adapted beams through random media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palastro, J P; Peñano, J; Nelson, W; DiComo, G; Helle, M; Johnson, L A; Hafizi, B

    2016-08-22

    Adaptive optics (AO) systems rely on the principle of reciprocity, or symmetry with respect to the interchange of point sources and receivers. These systems use the light received from a low power emitter on or near a target to compensate phase aberrations acquired by a laser beam during linear propagation through random media. If, however, the laser beam propagates nonlinearly, reciprocity is broken, potentially undermining AO correction. Here we examine the consequences of this breakdown, providing the first analysis of AO applied to high peak power laser beams. While discussed for general random and nonlinear media, we consider specific examples of Kerr-nonlinear, turbulent atmosphere.

  8. Observation of spatial fluctuations of the local density of states in random photonic media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birowosuto, M D; Skipetrov, S E; Vos, W L; Mosk, A P

    2010-07-02

    We experimentally study spatial fluctuations of the local density of states (LDOS) inside three-dimensional random photonic media. The LDOS is probed at many positions inside random photonic media by measuring emission rates of a large number of individual fluorescent nanospheres. The emission rates are observed to fluctuate spatially, and the variance of the fluctuations increases with the scattering strength. The measured variance of the emission rates agrees well with a model that takes into account the effect of the nearest scatterer only.

  9. Reciprocity breaking during nonlinear propagation of adapted beams through random media

    CERN Document Server

    Palastro, J P; Nelson, W; DiComo, G; Johnson, L A; Helle, M H; Hafizi, B

    2016-01-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) systems rely on the principle of reciprocity, or symmetry with respect to the interchange of point sources and receivers. These systems use the light received from a low power emitter on or near a target to compensate profile aberrations acquired by a laser beam during linear propagation through random media. If, however, the laser beam propagates nonlinearly, reciprocity is broken, potentially undermining AO correction. Here we examine the consequences of this breakdown. While discussed for general random and nonlinear media, we consider specific examples of Kerr-nonlinear, turbulent atmosphere.

  10. Simulation of the diffusion process in composite porous media by random walks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yong

    2005-01-01

    A new random-walk interpolation scheme was developed to simulate solute transport through composite porous media with different porosities as well as different diffusivities. The significant influences of the abrupt variations of porosity and diffusivity on solute transport were simulated by tracking random walkers through a linear interpolation domain across the heterogeneity interface. The displacements of the random walkers within the interpolation region were obtained explicitly by establishing the equivalence between the Fokker-Planck equation and the advection-dispersion equation. Applications indicate that the random-walk interpolation method can simulate one- and two-dimensional, 2nd-order diffusion processes in composite media without local mass conservation errors. In addition, both the theoretical derivations and the numerical simulations show that the drift and dispersion of particles depend on the type of Markov process selected to reflect the dynamics of random walkers. If the nonlinear Langevin equation is used, the gradient of porosity and the gradient of diffusivity strongly affect the drift displacement of particles. Therefore, random-walking particles driven by the gradient of porosity,the gradient of diffusivity, and the random diffusion, can imitate the transport of solute under only pure diffusion in composite porous media containing abrupt variations of porosity and diffusivity.

  11. Quenched Large Deviations for Interacting Diffusions in Random Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luçon, Eric

    2017-03-01

    The aim of the paper is to establish a large deviation principle (LDP) for the empirical measure of mean-field interacting diffusions in a random environment. The point is to derive such a result once the environment has been frozen (quenched model). The main theorem states that a LDP holds for every sequence of environment satisfying appropriate convergence condition, with a rate function that does not depend on the disorder and is different from the rate function in the averaged model. Similar results concerning the empirical flow and local empirical measures are provided.

  12. Diffusion of colloidal fluids in random porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez-Rojo, M A; Juárez-Maldonado, R; Medina-Noyola, M

    2008-04-01

    The diffusive relaxation of a colloidal fluid adsorbed in a porous medium depends on many factors, including the concentration and composition of the adsorbed colloidal fluid, the average structure of the porous matrix, and the nature of the colloid-colloid and colloid-substrate interactions. A simple manner to describe these effects is to model the porous medium as a set of spherical particles fixed in space at random positions with prescribed statistical structural properties. Within this model one may describe the relaxation of concentration fluctuations of the adsorbed fluid by simply setting to zero the short-time mobility of one species (the porous matrix) in a theory of the dynamics of equilibrium colloidal mixtures, or by extending such dynamic theory to explicitly consider the porous matrix as a random external field, as recently done in the framework of mode coupling theory [V. Krakoviack, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 065703 (2005)]. Here we consider the first approach and employ the self-consistent generalized Langevin equation (SCGLE) theory of the dynamics of equilibrium colloidal mixtures, to describe the dynamics of the mobile component. We focus on the short- and intermediate-time regimes, which we compare with Brownian dynamics simulations involving a binary mixture with screened Coulomb interactions for two models of the average static structure of the matrix: a porous matrix constructed by quenching configurations of an equilibrium mixture in which both species were first equilibrated together, and a preexisting matrix with prescribed average structure, in which we later add the mobile species. We conclude that in both cases, if the correct static structure factors are provided as input, the SCGLE theory correctly predicts the main features of the dynamics of the permeating fluid.

  13. Effect of Pump Area on Lasing Modes in Active Random Media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Ying-Mao; LIU Zheng-Dong

    2005-01-01

    @@ We investigate the effect of pump area on lasing modes in an active random medium. Considering the structure characteristics in a real experimental system, the random medium is divided into two regions, i.e. pump and non-pump areas. The dependence of lasing modes on the pump area is qualitatively explained by means of the model in which the lasing is ascribed to the interaction of the complex localized modes in the active random medium with local aperiodic quasi-structure with appropriate pump light. There exist different pump sizes for lasing with different modes. As the pump size decreases in this random system, the pump threshold of the lasing modes increases. There are different lasing modes in different excitation regions in this random system. This gives us some information about the dependence of lasing modes on pump areas in active random media.

  14. Two spatial light modulator system for laboratory simulation of random beam propagation in random media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fei; Toselli, Italo; Korotkova, Olga

    2016-02-10

    An optical system consisting of a laser source and two independent consecutive phase-only spatial light modulators (SLMs) is shown to accurately simulate a generated random beam (first SLM) after interaction with a stationary random medium (second SLM). To illustrate the range of possibilities, a recently introduced class of random optical frames is examined on propagation in free space and several weak turbulent channels with Kolmogorov and non-Kolmogorov statistics.

  15. Normalizing Social Media Texts by Combining Word Embeddings and Edit Distances in a Random Forest Regressor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Goot, Rob

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we adapt the traditional framework for spelling correction to the more novel task of normalization of social media content. To generate possible normalization candidates, we complement the traditional approach with a word embeddings model. To rank the candidates we will use a random fo

  16. Phase Behavior and Percolation Properties of the Patchy Colloidal Fluids in the Random Porous Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyuzhnyi, Y V; Holovko, M; Patsahan, T; Cummings, P T

    2014-12-18

    The lack of a simple analytical description of the hard-sphere fluid in a matrix with hard-core obstacles is limiting progress in the development of thermodynamic perturbation theories for the fluid in random porous media. We propose a simple and highly accurate analytical scheme, which allows us to calculate thermodynamic and percolation properties of a network-forming fluid confined in the random porous media, represented by the hard-sphere fluid and overlapping hard-sphere matrices, respectively. Our scheme is based on the combination of scaled-particle theory, Wertheim's thermodynamic perturbation theory for associating fluids and extension of the Flory-Stockmayer theory for percolation. The liquid-gas phase diagram and percolation threshold line for several versions of the patchy colloidal fluid model confined in a random porous media are calculated and discussed. The method presented enables calculation of the thermodynamic and percolation properties of a large variety of polymerizing and network-forming fluids confined in random porous media.

  17. Elliptic random-walk equation for suspension and tracer transport in porous media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shapiro, Alexander; Bedrikovetsky, P. G.

    2008-01-01

    We propose a new approach to transport of the suspensions and tracers in porous media. The approach is based on a modified version of the continuous time random walk (CTRW) theory. In the framework of this theory we derive an elliptic transport equation. The new equation contains the time...

  18. Normalizing Social Media Texts by Combining Word Embeddings and Edit Distances in a Random Forest Regressor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Goot, Rob

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we adapt the traditional framework for spelling correction to the more novel task of normalization of social media content. To generate possible normalization candidates, we complement the traditional approach with a word embeddings model. To rank the candidates we will use a random

  19. Effects of a brief school-based media literacy intervention on digital media use in adolescents: cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, Birte; Hanewinkel, Reiner; Morgenstern, Matthis

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a four-session school-based media literacy curriculum on adolescent computer gaming and Internet use behavior. The study comprised a cluster randomized controlled trial with three assessments (baseline, posttest, and 12-month follow-up). At baseline, a total of 2,303 sixth and seventh grade adolescents from 27 secondary schools were assessed. Of these, 1,843 (80%) could be reached at all three assessments (Mage=12.0 years; SD=0.83). Students of the intervention group received the media literacy program Vernetzte www.Welten ("Connected www.Worlds ") implemented by trained teachers during class time. The control group attended regular class. Main outcome measures were adolescents' computer gaming and Internet use: days per month, hours per day, and addictive use patterns. Parental media monitoring and rules at home were assessed as secondary outcomes. Results of multilevel growth-curve models revealed a significant intervention effect in terms of a lower increase in self-reported gaming frequency (β = -1.10 [95% CI -2.06, -0.13]), gaming time (β = -0.27 [95% CI -0.40, -0.14]), and proportion of excessive gamers (AOR=0.21 [95% CI 0.08, 0.57]) in the intervention group. There were also significant group-time interactions for the addictive gaming scale (β=-0.08 [95% CI -0.12, -0.04]), and the Internet Addiction Scale (β = -0.06 [95% CI -0.10, -0.01]). No effect was found for days and hours of Internet use or parental media behavior. The study shows that the program Vernetzte www.Welten can influence adolescents' media use behavior. Future research should address mediating and moderating variables of program effects.

  20. Strength and wave parameters for sound propagation in random media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostashev, Vladimir E; Wilson, D Keith

    2017-03-01

    Line-of-sight sound propagation of plane and spherical waves in a statistically isotropic, random moving medium is considered. The variances of the phase and log-amplitude fluctuations of these waves are expressed in terms of the strength and wave parameters for arbitrary spectra of temperature and velocity fluctuations, and results are then derived specifically for the Gaussian and generalized von Kármán spectra. This representation of the variances reduces significantly the number of independent parameters of the problem and enables better understanding of sound scattering by plane and spherical waves, and due to temperature and velocity fluctuations. Using this representation, the boundary between the weak and strong scattering regimes is determined in terms of the strength and wave parameters. The results obtained are compared with the Λ - Φ diagram adopted in ocean acoustics. Other statistical moments of plane and spherical waves in a medium with arbitrary spectra of temperature and velocity fluctuations such as the mean sound field, the spatial and temporal mutual coherence functions, the coherence bandwidth, and the variance of the angle-of-arrival fluctuations are expressed in terms of the strength parameter and length scale of the fluctuations.

  1. Dietary hypercholesterolemia aggravates contrast media-induced nephropathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨定位; 贾汝汉; 杨定平; 丁国华; 黄从新

    2004-01-01

    Background Contrast media administration can result in severe nephrotoxicity under pathological conditions such as diabetic nephropathy, congestive heart failure, dehydration, et al. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of dietary hypercholesterolemia on contrast media-induced changes in renal function, blood flow, and histopathology.Methods Rats were fed either on a normal rodent diet (group N) or a high-cholesterol supplemented diet (group H; 4% cholesterol and 1% cholic acid) for 8 weeks. Half of the animals (n =6) from each diet group were then given a tail vein injection of 60% diatrizoate (6 ml/kg; group NC and group HC)and the other half were administered saline. Total serum cholesterol, triglyceride, serum creatinine,creatinine clearance rate, fractional excretion of sodium and potassium, and cortical nitric oxide production were determined one day following contrast media administration. Renal blood flow was determined by color Doppler flow imaging and pulsed-mode Doppler. Renal histopathology was observed by light microscopy.Results Total serum cholesterol and resistance indices of renal blood vessels increased significantly,while creatinine clearance rate and production of nitric oxide in the renal cortex decreased markedly in group HC and group H when compared to group N and group NC. The creatinine clearance rate decreased significantly in group HC compared to group H. Serum creatinine levels and fractional excretion of sodium and potassium in group HC were significantly higher than those in the other three groups. Severe tubular degeneration and necrosis, protein cast accumulation, and medullary congestion were found in group HC.Conclusion Hypercholesterolemia is a risk factor for contrast media-induced nephropathy.Hypercholesterolemia aggravates contrast media-induced nephrotoxicity through the reduced production of nitric oxide.

  2. Random Boundary Simulation of Pumping Groundwater on Two-layer Soft Soil Structure with Porous Media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Based on random theory,fluid dynamics,porous media and soil mechanics,the porosity and random characteristic of the two-layer soft soil in Wuhan region were studied in this paper.The random seepage coefficient on the two-layer soft soil was analyzed,and the seepage model and its random distribution function were given.The groundwater flow differential equations related to the two layer soft soil structure were also established.The evaluation procedure of effect boundary on the pumping water in deep foundation pit was put forward.Moreover,with an engineering example,the probability distribution on random boundary prediction for pumping water of foundation pit was computed.

  3. Versatility and robustness of Gaussian random fields for modelling random media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintanilla, John A.; Chen, Jordan T.; Reidy, Richard F.; Allen, Andrew J.

    2007-06-01

    One of the authors (JAQ) has recently introduced a method of modelling random materials using excursion sets of Gaussian random fields. This method uses convex quadratic programming to find the optimal admissible field autocorrelation function, providing both theoretical and computational advantages over other techniques such as simulated annealing. In this paper, we discuss the application of this algorithm to model various aerogel systems given small-angle neutron scattering data. We also present new results concerning the robustness of this method.

  4. Echinacea purpurea and osteopathic manipulative treatment in children with recurrent otitis media: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, Richard A; Aldous, Michael B; Worden, Katherine A; Grant, Kathryn L

    2008-10-02

    Recurrent otitis media is a common problem in young children. Echinacea and osteopathic manipulative treatment have been proposed as preventive measures, but have been inadequately studied. This study was designed to assess the efficacy of Echinacea purpurea and/or osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT) for prevention of acute otitis media in otitis-prone children. A randomized, placebo-controlled, two-by-two factorial trial with 6-month follow-up, conducted 1999 - 2002 in Tucson, Arizona. Patients were aged 12-60 months with recurrent otitis media, defined as three or more separate episodes of acute otitis media within six months, or at least four episodes in one year. Ninety children (44% white non-Hispanic, 39% Hispanic, 57% male) were enrolled, of which 84 had follow-up for at least 3 months. Children were randomly assigned to one of four protocol groups: double placebo, echinacea plus sham OMT, true OMT (including cranial manipulation) plus placebo echinacea, or true echinacea plus OMT. An alcohol extract of Echinacea purpurea roots and seeds (or placebo) was administered for 10 days at the first sign of each common cold. Five OMT visits (or sham treatments) were offered over 3 months. No interaction was found between echinacea and OMT. Echinacea was associated with a borderline increased risk of having at least one episode of acute otitis media during 6-month follow-up compared to placebo (65% versus 41%; relative risk, 1.59, 95% CI 1.04, 2.42). OMT did not significantly affect risk compared to sham (44% versus 61%; relative risk, 0.72, 95% CI 0.48, 1.10). In otitis-prone young children, treating colds with this form of echinacea does not decrease the risk of acute otitis media, and may in fact increase risk. A regimen of up to five osteopathic manipulative treatments does not significantly decrease the risk of acute otitis media. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00010465.

  5. Information retrieval and cross-correlation function analysis of random noise radar signal through dispersive media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alejos, Ana Vazques; Dawood, Muhammad

    2012-06-01

    In this contribution we examine the propagation of an ultrawideband (UWB) random noise signal through dispersive media such as soil, vegetation, and water, using Fourier-based analysis. For such media, the propagated signal undergoes medium-specific impairments which degrade the received signal in a different way than the non-dispersive propagation media. Theoretically, larger penetration depths into a dispersive medium can be achieved by identifying and detecting the precursors, thereby offering significantly better signal-to-noise ratio and enhanced imaging. For a random noise signal, well defined precursors in term of peak-amplitude don't occur. The phenomenon must therefore be studied in terms of energy evolution. Additionally, the distortion undergone by the UWB random noise signal through a dispersive medium can introduce frequency-dependent uncertainty or noise in the received signal. This leads to larger degradation of the cross-correlation function (CCF), mainly in terms of sidelobe levels and main peak deformation, and consequently making the information retrieval difficult. We would further analyze one method to restore the shape and carrier frequency of the input UWB random noise signal, thereby, improving the CCF estimation.

  6. Adaptive control of the propagation of ultrafast light through random and nonlinear media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moores, Mark David

    2001-12-01

    Ultrafast light sources generate coherent pulses with durations of less than one picosecond, and represent the next generation of illuminators for medical imaging and optical communications applications. Such sources are already widely used experimentally. Correction of temporal widths or pulse envelopes after traversal of optically non-ideal materials is critical for the delivery of optimal ultrashort pulses. It is important to investigate the physical mechanisms that distort pulses and to develop and implement methods for minimizing these effects. In this work, we investigate methods for characterizing and manipulating pulse propagation dynamics in random (scattering) and nonlinear optical media. In particular, we use pulse shaping to manipulate the light field of ultrashort infrared pulses. Application of spectral phase by a liquid crystal spatial light modulator is used to control the temporal pulse shape. The applied phase is controlled by a genetic algorithm that adaptively responds to the feedback from previous phase profiles. Experiments are detailed that address related aspects of the character of ultrafast pulses-the short timescales and necessarily wide frequency bandwidths. Material dispersion is by definition frequency dependent. Passage through an inhomogeneous system of randomly situated boundaries (scatterers) causes additional distortion of ballistic pulses due to multiple reflections. The reflected rays accumulate phase shifts that depend on the separation of the reflecting boundaries and the photon frequency. Ultrafast bandwidths present a wide range of frequencies for dispersion and interaction with macroscopic dielectric structure. The shaper and adaptive learning algorithm are used to reduce these effects, lessening the impact of the scattering medium on propagating pulses. The timescale of ultrashort pulses results in peak intensities that interact with the electronic structure of optical materials to induce polarization that is no longer

  7. First-principles modeling of electromagnetic scattering by discrete and discretely heterogeneous random media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.; Dlugach, Janna M.; Yurkin, Maxim A.; Bi, Lei; Cairns, Brian; Liu, Li; Panetta, R. Lee; Travis, Larry D.; Yang, Ping; Zakharova, Nadezhda T.

    2016-05-01

    A discrete random medium is an object in the form of a finite volume of a vacuum or a homogeneous material medium filled with quasi-randomly and quasi-uniformly distributed discrete macroscopic impurities called small particles. Such objects are ubiquitous in natural and artificial environments. They are often characterized by analyzing theoretically the results of laboratory, in situ, or remote-sensing measurements of the scattering of light and other electromagnetic radiation. Electromagnetic scattering and absorption by particles can also affect the energy budget of a discrete random medium and hence various ambient physical and chemical processes. In either case electromagnetic scattering must be modeled in terms of appropriate optical observables, i.e., quadratic or bilinear forms in the field that quantify the reading of a relevant optical instrument or the electromagnetic energy budget. It is generally believed that time-harmonic Maxwell's equations can accurately describe elastic electromagnetic scattering by macroscopic particulate media that change in time much more slowly than the incident electromagnetic field. However, direct solutions of these equations for discrete random media had been impracticable until quite recently. This has led to a widespread use of various phenomenological approaches in situations when their very applicability can be questioned. Recently, however, a new branch of physical optics has emerged wherein electromagnetic scattering by discrete and discretely heterogeneous random media is modeled directly by using analytical or numerically exact computer solutions of the Maxwell equations. Therefore, the main objective of this Report is to formulate the general theoretical framework of electromagnetic scattering by discrete random media rooted in the Maxwell-Lorentz electromagnetics and discuss its immediate analytical and numerical consequences. Starting from the microscopic Maxwell-Lorentz equations, we trace the development of

  8. First-principles modeling of electromagnetic scattering by discrete and discretely heterogeneous random media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishchenko, Michael I., E-mail: michael.i.mishchenko@nasa.gov [NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, 2880 Broadway, New York, NY 10025 (United States); Dlugach, Janna M. [Main Astronomical Observatory of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 27 Zabolotny Str., 03680, Kyiv (Ukraine); Yurkin, Maxim A. [Voevodsky Institute of Chemical Kinetics and Combustion, SB RAS, Institutskaya str. 3, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Pirogova 2, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Bi, Lei [Department of Atmospheric Sciences, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Cairns, Brian [NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, 2880 Broadway, New York, NY 10025 (United States); Liu, Li [NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, 2880 Broadway, New York, NY 10025 (United States); Columbia University, 2880 Broadway, New York, NY 10025 (United States); Panetta, R. Lee [Department of Atmospheric Sciences, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Travis, Larry D. [NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, 2880 Broadway, New York, NY 10025 (United States); Yang, Ping [Department of Atmospheric Sciences, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Zakharova, Nadezhda T. [Trinnovim LLC, 2880 Broadway, New York, NY 10025 (United States)

    2016-05-16

    A discrete random medium is an object in the form of a finite volume of a vacuum or a homogeneous material medium filled with quasi-randomly and quasi-uniformly distributed discrete macroscopic impurities called small particles. Such objects are ubiquitous in natural and artificial environments. They are often characterized by analyzing theoretically the results of laboratory, in situ, or remote-sensing measurements of the scattering of light and other electromagnetic radiation. Electromagnetic scattering and absorption by particles can also affect the energy budget of a discrete random medium and hence various ambient physical and chemical processes. In either case electromagnetic scattering must be modeled in terms of appropriate optical observables, i.e., quadratic or bilinear forms in the field that quantify the reading of a relevant optical instrument or the electromagnetic energy budget. It is generally believed that time-harmonic Maxwell’s equations can accurately describe elastic electromagnetic scattering by macroscopic particulate media that change in time much more slowly than the incident electromagnetic field. However, direct solutions of these equations for discrete random media had been impracticable until quite recently. This has led to a widespread use of various phenomenological approaches in situations when their very applicability can be questioned. Recently, however, a new branch of physical optics has emerged wherein electromagnetic scattering by discrete and discretely heterogeneous random media is modeled directly by using analytical or numerically exact computer solutions of the Maxwell equations. Therefore, the main objective of this Report is to formulate the general theoretical framework of electromagnetic scattering by discrete random media rooted in the Maxwell–Lorentz electromagnetics and discuss its immediate analytical and numerical consequences. Starting from the microscopic Maxwell–Lorentz equations, we trace the development

  9. Adolescents' impressions of antismoking media literacy education: qualitative results from a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primack, Brian A; Fine, Danielle; Yang, Christopher K; Wickett, Dustin; Zickmund, Susan

    2009-08-01

    Although media literacy represents an innovative venue for school-based antismoking programming, studies have not systematically compared student impressions of these and traditional programs. This study utilized data from a randomized trial comparing these two types of programs. After each program, students responded to three open-ended questions related to their assigned curriculum. Two coders, blinded to student assignments, independently coded these data. Coders had strong inter-rater agreement (kappa = 0.77). Our primary measures were spontaneously noted overall assessment, enjoyment/interest and the likelihood of changing smoking behavior. Of the 531 participants, 255 (48.0%) were randomized to the intervention (media literacy) group. Intervention participants had more net positive responses [rate ratio (RR) = 1.27, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.05, 1.54], more responses rating the program as compelling (RR = 1.63, 95% CI = 1.16, 2.29) and fewer responses rating the program as non-compelling (RR = 0.62, 95% CI = 0.39, 0.97). However, the intervention group was not more likely to suggest that the curriculum was likely to change behavior positively (RR = 0.57, 95% CI = 0.30, 1.06). Findings suggest that although media literacy provides a compelling format for the delivery of anti-tobacco programming, integration of components of traditional programming may help media literacy programs achieve maximal efficacy.

  10. Directed polymer in random media, in two dimensions: numerical study of the aging dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Barrat, A.

    1997-01-01

    Following a recent work by Yoshino, we study the aging dynamics of a directed polymer in random media, in 1+1 dimensions. Through temperature quench, and temperature cycling numerical experiments similar to the experiments on real spin glasses, we show that the observed behaviour is comparable to the one of a well known mean field spin glass model. The observation of various quantities (correlation function, ``clonation'' overlap function) leads to an analysis of the phase space landscape.

  11. Mach-wave coherence in 3D media with random heterogeneities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Jagdish C.; Mai, P. Martin; Galis, Martin; Dunham, Eric M.; Imperatori, Walter

    2016-04-01

    We investigate Mach-waves coherence for complex super-shear ruptures embedded in 3D random media that lead to seismic scattering. We simulate Mach-wave using kinematic earthquake sources that include fault-regions over which the rupture propagates at super-shear speed. The local slip rate is modeled with the regularized Yoffe function. The medium heterogeneities are characterized by Von Karman correlation function. We consider various realizations of 3D random media from combinations of different values of correlation length (0.5 km, 2 km, 5 km), standard deviation (5%, 10%, 15%) and Hurst exponent (0.2). Simulations in a homogeneous medium serve as a reference case. The ground-motion simulations (maximum resolved frequency of 5 Hz) are conducted by solving the elasto-dynamic equations of motions using a generalized finite-difference method, assuming a vertical strike-slip fault. The seismic wavefield is sampled at numerous locations within the Mach-cone region to study the properties and evolution of the Mach-waves in scattering media. We find that the medium scattering from random heterogeneities significantly diminishes the coherence of Mach-wave in terms of both amplitude and frequencies. We observe that Mach-waves are considerably scattered at distances RJB > 20 km (and beyond) for random media with standard deviation 10%. The scattering efficiency of the medium for small Hurst exponents (H seismic scattering. We suggest that if an earthquake is recorded within 10-15 km fault perpendicular distance and has high PGA, then inversion should be carried out by allowing rupture speed variations from sub-Rayleigh to super-shear.

  12. Behaviour of light transmission channels in random media with inhomogeneous disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Yuchen; ZHANG Hao; Lin, Yujun; Zhu, Heyuan

    2016-01-01

    We present a numerical study on the light transport properties and statistics of transmission channels in random media with inhomogeneous disorder. For the case of longitudinal inhomogeneity of disorder we find that the statistics of the transmission channels is independent of the inhomogeneity and the system can be equivalent to a counterpart with homogeneous disorder strength, both of which have the same statistical distribution of the transmission channels. However, for the case of transve...

  13. Coherently controlling Raman-induced grating in atomic media

    CERN Document Server

    Arkhipkin, V G; Timofeev, I V

    2015-01-01

    We consider dynamically controllable periodic structures, called Raman induced gratings, in three- and four-level atomic media, resulting from Raman interaction in a standing-wave pump. These gratings are due to periodic spatial modulation of the Raman nonlinearity and fundamentally differ from the ones based on electromagnetically induced transparency. The transmission and reflection spectra of such gratings can be simultaneously amplified and controlled by varying the pump field intensity. It is shown that a transparent medium with periodic spatial modulation of the Raman gain can be opaque near the Raman resonance and yet at the same time it can be a non-linear amplifying mirror. We also show that spectral properties of the Raman induced grating can be controlled with the help of an additional weak control field.

  14. Statistics of resonances and delay times in random media: beyond random matrix theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kottos, Tsampikos [Department of Physics, Wesleyan University, Middletown, CT 06459-0155 (United States); Max-Planck-Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization, Bunsenstrasse 10, D-37073 Goettingen (Germany)

    2005-12-09

    We review recent developments in quantum scattering from mesoscopic systems. Various spatial geometries whose closed analogues show diffusive, localized or critical behaviour are considered. These are the features that cannot be described by the universal random matrix theory results. Instead, one has to go beyond this approximation and incorporate them in a non-perturbative way. Here, we pay particular attention to the traces of these non-universal characteristics, in the distribution of the Wigner delay times and resonance widths. The former quantity captures time-dependent aspects of quantum scattering while the latter is associated with the poles of the scattering matrix.

  15. The role of theophylline in prevention of radiocontrast media-induced nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malhis Mahmoud

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Contrast media induced nephropathy (CIN results in significant morbidity and mortality. We therefore investigated whether theophylline (adenosine antagonist reduces the inci-dence of contrast media induced nephropathy. Two hundred and eighty patients were randomly assigned to prophylactic administration of hydration with sodium bicarbonate plus theophylline (either orally or intravenously (n=128 or hydration with sodium bicarbonate only (n=152. Blood Urea, creatinine, and glomerular filtration rate (MDRD were measured before and after administration of contrast media. Both groups were similar in clinical characteristics and amount of contrast used. Theophylline prophylaxis significantly reduced the incidence of CIN (1.6% vs 7.9%; P= 0.015. Compared to low-risk patients, Theophylline prophylaxis significantly reduced the incidence of CIN in moderate and high-risk patients (0% vs 8.8%; P= 0.022 and 9.1% vs 42.1%; P= 0.014 respectively. In conclusion, prophylactic administration of theophylline re-duces the incidence of CIN in moderate and high-risk patients for CIN.

  16. First-principles modeling of electromagnetic scattering by discrete and discretely heterogeneous random media

    CERN Document Server

    Mishchenko, Michael I; Yurkin, Maxim A; Bi, Lei; Cairns, Brian; Liu, Li; Panetta, R Lee; Travis, Larry D; Yang, Ping; Zakharova, Nadezhda T

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this Report is to formulate the general theoretical framework of electromagnetic scattering by discrete random media rooted in the Maxwell-Lorentz electromagnetics and discuss its immediate analytical and numerical consequences. Starting from the microscopic Maxwell-Lorentz equations, we trace the development of the first-principles formalism enabling accurate calculations of monochromatic and quasi-monochromatic scattering by static and randomly varying multiparticle groups. We illustrate how this general framework can be coupled with state-of-the-art computer solvers of the Maxwell equations and applied to direct modeling of electromagnetic scattering by representative random multi-particle groups with arbitrary packing densities. This first-principles modeling yields general physical insights unavailable with phenomenological approaches. We discuss how the first-order-scattering approximation, the radiative transfer theory, and the theory of weak localization of electromagnetic waves ...

  17. Iterative, backscatter-analysis algorithms for increasing transmission and focusing light through highly-scattering random media

    CERN Document Server

    Jin, Curtis; Michielssen, Eric; Rand, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Scattering hinders the passage of light through random media and consequently limits the usefulness of optical techniques for sensing and imaging. Thus, methods for increasing the transmission of light through such random media are of interest. Against this backdrop, Dorokhov, Pendry and others theoretically predicted the existence of a few highly transmitting eigen-wavefronts with transmission coefficients close to one in strongly backscattering random media. The breakthrough experiments of Vellekoop and Mosk confirmed the existence of these highly transmitting eigen-wavefronts and demonstrated that they could be discovered by using information from the far side of the scattering medium. Here, we numerically analyze this phenomenon in 2-D with fully spectrally accurate simulators and provide rigorous numerical evidence confirming the existence of these highly transmitting eigen-wavefronts in random media composed of hundreds of thousands of non-absorbing scatterers. We then develop physically realizable algo...

  18. Polarization-dependent difference of the power spectra from two-dimensional random media with different shapes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hai; LIU JinSong; L(U) JianTao; WANG KeJia

    2009-01-01

    Polarization-dependent difference of the power spectra from a set of two-dimensional (2D) passive random media is investigated by simultaneously solving Maxwell's equations for both transverse magnetic (TM) and transverse electric (TE) fields. The random media have the same random constitution but different shapes. Results show that both two polarized states are morphology dependent,and the variety of the shapes has more influence on the selection of TM polarized modes than that of TE polarized modes. Such polarization-dependent difference of morphology property presents a new modeselecting technique for random lasers.

  19. The HOPE Social Media Intervention for Global HIV Prevention: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial in Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Sean D.; Cumberland, William G.; Nianogo, Roch; Menacho, Luis A.; Galea, Jerome T.; Coates, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Background Social media technologies are newly emerging tools that can be used for HIV prevention and testing in low- and middle-income countries, such as Peru. This study examined the efficacy of using the Harnessing Online Peer Education (HOPE) social media intervention to increase HIV testing among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Peru. Methods In a cluster randomized controlled trial with concealed allocation, Peruvian MSM from Greater Lima/Callao (N = 556) were randomly assigned to join private intervention or control groups on Facebook for 12 weeks. In the intervention condition, forty-nine Peruvian MSM were trained and randomly assigned to be HIV prevention mentors to participants via Facebook groups over 12 weeks. Control participants received an enhanced standard of care, including standard offline HIV prevention available in Peru as well as participation in Facebook groups (without peer leaders) that provided study updates and HIV testing information. After accepting a request to join the groups, continued participation was voluntary. Participants could request a free HIV test at a local community clinic, and completed questionnaires on HIV risk behaviors and social media use at baseline and 12-week follow-up. Findings Between March 19, 2012, and June 11, 2012, and Sept 26, 2012, and Dec 19, 2012, 556 participants were randomly assigned to intervention groups (N=278) or control groups (N=278); we analyse data for 252 and 246. 43 participants (17%) in the intervention group and 16 (7%) in the control groups got tested for HIV (adjusted odds ratio 2.61, 95% CI 1.55–4.38). No adverse events were reported. Retention at 12-week follow-up was 90%. Across conditions, 7 (87.5%) of the 8 participants who tested positive were linked to care at a local clinic. Interpretation Development of peer-mentored social media communities seemed to be an effective method to increase HIV testing among high-risk populations in Peru.: Results suggest that the HOPE social

  20. Echinacea purpurea and osteopathic manipulative treatment in children with recurrent otitis media: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Worden Katherine A

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recurrent otitis media is a common problem in young children. Echinacea and osteopathic manipulative treatment have been proposed as preventive measures, but have been inadequately studied. This study was designed to assess the efficacy of Echinacea purpurea and/or osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT for prevention of acute otitis media in otitis-prone children. Methods A randomized, placebo-controlled, two-by-two factorial trial with 6-month follow-up, conducted 1999 – 2002 in Tucson, Arizona. Patients were aged 12–60 months with recurrent otitis media, defined as three or more separate episodes of acute otitis media within six months, or at least four episodes in one year. Ninety children (44% white non-Hispanic, 39% Hispanic, 57% male were enrolled, of which 84 had follow-up for at least 3 months. Children were randomly assigned to one of four protocol groups: double placebo, echinacea plus sham OMT, true OMT (including cranial manipulation plus placebo echinacea, or true echinacea plus OMT. An alcohol extract of Echinacea purpurea roots and seeds (or placebo was administered for 10 days at the first sign of each common cold. Five OMT visits (or sham treatments were offered over 3 months. Results No interaction was found between echinacea and OMT. Echinacea was associated with a borderline increased risk of having at least one episode of acute otitis media during 6-month follow-up compared to placebo (65% versus 41%; relative risk, 1.59, 95% CI 1.04, 2.42. OMT did not significantly affect risk compared to sham (44% versus 61%; relative risk, 0.72, 95% CI 0.48, 1.10. Conclusion In otitis-prone young children, treating colds with this form of echinacea does not decrease the risk of acute otitis media, and may in fact increase risk. A regimen of up to five osteopathic manipulative treatments does not significantly decrease the risk of acute otitis media. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00010465

  1. Water-oil drainage dynamics in oil-wet random microfluidic porous media analogs

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Wei; Neeves, Keith; Yin, Xiaolong

    2012-01-01

    Displacement experiments carried out in microfluidic porous media analogs show that reduced surface tension leads to a more stable displacement, opposite to the process in Hele-Shaw cells where surface tension stabilizes the displacement of a more viscous fluid by a less viscous fluid. In addition, geometry of porous media is observed to play an important role. Three random microfluidic porous media analogs were made to study water-oil drainage dynamics, featuring a pattern of randomly connected channels with a uniform width, a pattern with Gaussian channel width distribution, and a pattern with large isolated pores. The microfluidic chips fabricated using Polydimenthylsiloxane with glass covers have the internal surface treated by Trichlorosilane to achieve a uniform oil-wet condition. The aqueous phase displaces the oil phase, with a viscosity ratio of about 1:40 and a density ratio of 1:0.85. Videos 1-3 show water flooding processes. It is observed that both channel size distribution (Video 2) and heteroge...

  2. Random anisotropy induced by structural disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, B.; Labarta, A.; Badia, F.; Tejada, J.

    1992-02-01

    As a direct consequence of the structural disorder, inherent to the amorphous state, local electrostatic fields are highly irregular. Due to the interplay between those highly irregular local electrostatic fields and the aspherical 4f electron clouds of the rare earth atoms, local anisotropy axis, directed along directions that vary randomly in space, may be generated. These directions are determined by the local arrangement of atoms; therefore, some information about amorphous structure may be obtained through the study of the magnetization curve.

  3. A continuous time random walk model for Darcy-scale anomalous transport in heterogeneous porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comolli, Alessandro; Hakoun, Vivien; Dentz, Marco

    2017-04-01

    Achieving the understanding of the process of solute transport in heterogeneous porous media is of crucial importance for several environmental and social purposes, ranging from aquifers contamination and remediation, to risk assessment in nuclear waste repositories. The complexity of this aim is mainly ascribable to the heterogeneity of natural media, which can be observed at all the scales of interest, from pore scale to catchment scale. In fact, the intrinsic heterogeneity of porous media is responsible for the arising of the well-known non-Fickian footprints of transport, including heavy-tailed breakthrough curves, non-Gaussian spatial density profiles and the non-linear growth of the mean squared displacement. Several studies investigated the processes through which heterogeneity impacts the transport properties, which include local modifications to the advective-dispersive motion of solutes, mass exchanges between some mobile and immobile phases (e.g. sorption/desorption reactions or diffusion into solid matrix) and spatial correlation of the flow field. In the last decades, the continuous time random walk (CTRW) model has often been used to describe solute transport in heterogenous conditions and to quantify the impact of point heterogeneity, spatial correlation and mass transfer on the average transport properties [1]. Open issues regarding this approach are the possibility to relate measurable properties of the medium to the parameters of the model, as well as its capability to provide predictive information. In a recent work [2] the authors have shed new light on understanding the relationship between Lagrangian and Eulerian dynamics as well as on their evolution from arbitrary initial conditions. On the basis of these results, we derive a CTRW model for the description of Darcy-scale transport in d-dimensional media characterized by spatially random permeability fields. The CTRW approach models particle velocities as a spatial Markov process, which is

  4. Cooperation induced by random sequential exclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kun; Cong, Rui; Wang, Long

    2016-06-01

    Social exclusion is a common and powerful tool to penalize deviators in human societies, and thus to effectively elevate collaborative efforts. Current models on the evolution of exclusion behaviors mostly assume that each peer excluder independently makes the decision to expel the defectors, but has no idea what others in the group would do or how the actual punishment effect will be. Thus, a more realistic model, random sequential exclusion, is proposed. In this mechanism, each excluder has to pay an extra scheduling cost and then all the excluders are arranged in a random order to implement the exclusion actions. If one free rider has already been excluded by an excluder, the remaining excluders will not participate in expelling this defector. We find that this mechanism can help stabilize cooperation under more unfavorable conditions than the normal peer exclusion can do, either in well-mixed population or on social networks. However, too large a scheduling cost may undermine the advantage of this mechanism. Our work validates the fact that collaborative practice among punishers plays an important role in further boosting cooperation.

  5. Probability distributions for directed polymers in random media with correlated noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Sherry; Kardar, Mehran

    2016-07-01

    The probability distribution for the free energy of directed polymers in random media (DPRM) with uncorrelated noise in d =1 +1 dimensions satisfies the Tracy-Widom distribution. We inquire if and how this universal distribution is modified in the presence of spatially correlated noise. The width of the distribution scales as the DPRM length to an exponent β , in good (but not full) agreement with previous renormalization group and numerical results. The scaled probability is well described by the Tracy-Widom form for uncorrelated noise, but becomes symmetric with increasing correlation exponent. We thus find a class of distributions that continuously interpolates between Tracy-Widom and Gaussian forms.

  6. Long-time behavior of a Hele-Shaw type problem in random media

    CERN Document Server

    Pozar, Norbert

    2010-01-01

    We study the long-time behavior of an exterior Hele-Shaw problem in random media with a free boundary velocity that depends on position in dimensions $n \\geq 2$. A natural rescaling of solutions that is compatible with the evolution of the free boundary leads to homogenization of the free boundary velocity. By studying a limit obstacle problem for a Hele-Shaw system with a point source, we are able to show uniform convergence of the rescaled solution to a self-similar limit profile and we deduce that the rescaled free boundary uniformly approaches a sphere.

  7. A coarse graining for the Fortuin-Kasteleyn measure in random media

    CERN Document Server

    Wouts, Marc

    2007-01-01

    By the mean of a multi-scale analysis we describe the typical geometrical structure of the clusters under the FK measure in random media. Our result holds in any dimension greater or equal to 2 provided that slab percolation occurs under the annealed measure, which should be the case in the whole supercritical phase. This work extends the one of Pisztora and provides an essential tool for the analysis of the supercritical regime in disordered FK models and in the corresponding disordered Ising and Potts models.

  8. Polarized Light in Random media: a formalism based on non commutative harmonic analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Said, Salem

    2007-01-01

    This is a note containing the most recent results we have arrived at in our work on polarized light in random media. After an introduction fixing the problem we are dealing with, we start by pointing out the connection between the Poincare sphere formalism and noncommutative harmonic analysis. This leads us to the main equations of our formalism. We use these equation to generalize the notions of Stokes vector, degree of polarization (DOP) and Mueller matrix to higher order statistics of the electric field. We also use them to give a formalism for the propagation of a state of polarisation (SOP) in a random medium. We show how a more detailed description of this propagation is then made possible.

  9. PSTD Simulations of Multiple Light Scattering in 3-D Macrocsopic Random Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tseng, S H; Taflove, A; Maitland, D; Backman, V

    2005-10-19

    We report a full-vector, three-dimensional, numerical solution of Maxwell's equations for optical propagation within, and scattering by, a random medium of macroscopic dimensions. The total scattering cross-section is determined using the pseudospectral time-domain technique. Specific results reported in this Paper indicate that multiply scattered light also contains information that can be extracted by the proposed cross-correlation analysis. On a broader perspective, our results demonstrate the feasibility of accurately determining the optical characteristics of arbitrary, macroscopic random media, including geometries with continuous variations of refractive index. Specifically, our results point toward the new possibilities of tissue optics--by numerically solving Maxwell's equations, the optical properties of tissue structures can be determined unambiguously.

  10. Analysis and Computation of Acoustic and Elastic Wave Equations in Random Media

    KAUST Repository

    Motamed, Mohammad

    2014-01-06

    We propose stochastic collocation methods for solving the second order acoustic and elastic wave equations in heterogeneous random media and subject to deterministic boundary and initial conditions [1, 4]. We assume that the medium consists of non-overlapping sub-domains with smooth interfaces. In each sub-domain, the materials coefficients are smooth and given or approximated by a finite number of random variable. One important example is wave propagation in multi-layered media with smooth interfaces. The numerical scheme consists of a finite difference or finite element method in the physical space and a collocation in the zeros of suitable tensor product orthogonal polynomials (Gauss points) in the probability space. We provide a rigorous convergence analysis and demonstrate different types of convergence of the probability error with respect to the number of collocation points under some regularity assumptions on the data. In particular, we show that, unlike in elliptic and parabolic problems [2, 3], the solution to hyperbolic problems is not in general analytic with respect to the random variables. Therefore, the rate of convergence is only algebraic. A fast spectral rate of convergence is still possible for some quantities of interest and for the wave solutions with particular types of data. We also show that the semi-discrete solution is analytic with respect to the random variables with the radius of analyticity proportional to the grid/mesh size h. We therefore obtain an exponential rate of convergence which deteriorates as the quantity h p gets smaller, with p representing the polynomial degree in the stochastic space. We have shown that analytical results and numerical examples are consistent and that the stochastic collocation method may be a valid alternative to the more traditional Monte Carlo method. Here we focus on the stochastic acoustic wave equation. Similar results are obtained for stochastic elastic equations.

  11. Induced Monoculture in Axelrod Model with Clever Mass Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Arezky H.; Del Castillo-Mussot, M.; Vázquez, G. J.

    A new model is proposed, in the context of Axelrod's model for the study of cultural dissemination, to include an external vector field (VF) which describes the effects of mass media on social systems. The VF acts over the whole system and it is characterized by two parameters: a nonnull overlap with each agent in the society and a confidence value of its information. Beyond a threshold value of the confidence, there is induced monocultural globalization of the system lined up with the VF. Below this value, the multicultural states are unstable and certain homogenization of the system is obtained in opposite line up according to that we have called negative publicity effect. Three regimes of behavior for the spread process of the VF information as a function of time are reported.

  12. Effect of ciprofloxacin/dexamethasone versus ciprofloxacin/hydrocortisone on lipopolysaccharide-induced experimental otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dattaray, Piali; Pudrith, Charles; Nyc, Mary Ann; Martin, Dusan; Kim, You Hyun; Jahng, Patrick; Chung, You Sun; Wall, G Michael; Jung, Timothy

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the effect of topical ciprofloxacin/dexamethasone versus topical ciprofloxacin/hydrocortisone on the outcome of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)–induced otitis media with effusion in chinchillas. A randomized experimental animal study. Jerry L. Pettis Veteran's Medical Center. Otitis media with effusion was induced in 5 groups of chinchillas, 6 per group, by injecting 0.3 mL (1 mg/mL) of Salmonella enteric LPS into the superior bullae of each chinchilla with a venting needle in place. Each group was treated with 0.2 mL of test substance at –2, 24, 48, and 72 hours relative to the 0-hour LPS induction. Group 1 was treated with vehicle control. Groups 2 to 5 received 0.3% ciprofloxacin with either 0.1% dexamethasone (group 2), 1% dexamethasone (group 3), 0.1% hydrocortisone (group 4), or 1% hydrocortisone (group 5). The outcome of each treatment was measured by the amount of middle ear effusion present and mucosal thickness at 120 hours posttreatment. Ciprofloxacin/dexamethasone 1% significantly (P = .0150) reduced middle ear effusion compared with control. Ciprofloxacin/dexamethasone 1% significantly reduced the mucosal thickness when compared with vehicle control (P = .0005), ciprofloxacin/dexamethasone 0.1% (P = .0240), and ciprofloxacin/hydrocortisone 0.1% (P = 1.00). Results also showed a dose-response effect between the ciprofloxacin/dexamethasone concentrations. This study demonstrated that treatment with a combination of topical ciprofloxacin and corticosteroid decreased the middle ear effusion when compared with the control group and that ciprofloxacin/dexamethasone suspension reduced the severity of LPS-induced experimental otitis media more than ciprofloxacin/hydrocortisone did.

  13. Acoustic localization in weakly compressible elastic media containing random air bubbles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Bin; Cheng, Jian-chun

    2007-01-01

    We study theoretically the propagation of longitudinal wave in weakly compressible elastic media containing random air bubbles by using a self-consistent method. By inspecting the scattering cross section of an individual bubble and estimating the mean free paths of the elastic wave propagating in the bubbly weakly compressible media, the mode conversion is numerically proved negligible as the longitudinal wave is scattered by the bubbles. On the basis of the bubble dynamic equation, the wave propagation is solved rigorously with the multiple scattering effects incorporated. In a range of frequency slightly above the bubble resonance frequency, the acoustic localization in such a class of media is theoretically identified with even a very small volume fraction of bubbles. We present a method by analyzing the spatial correlation of wave field to identify the phenomenon of localization, which turns out to be effective. The sensibility of the features of localization to the structure parameters is numerically investigated. The spatial distribution of acoustic energy is also studied and the results show that the waves are trapped within a spatial domain adjacent to the source when localization occurs.

  14. Random shortcuts induce phase synchronization in complex Chua systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Du-Qu; Luo Xiao-Shu; Qin Ying-Hua

    2009-01-01

    This paper studies how phase synchronization in complex networks depends on random shortcuts, using the piecewise-continuous chaotic Chua system as the nodes of the networks. It is found that for a given coupling strength,when the number of random shortcuts is greater than a threshold the phase synchronization is induced. Phase synchronization becomes evident and reaches its maximum as the number of random shortcuts is further increased. These phenomena imply that random shortcuts can induce and enhance the phase synchronization in complex Chua systems.Furthermore, the paper also investigates the effects of the coupling strength and it is found that stronger coupling makes it easier to obtain the complete phase synchronization.

  15. Bayesian and variational Bayesian approaches for flows in heterogeneous random media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Keren; Guha, Nilabja; Efendiev, Yalchin; Mallick, Bani K.

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we study porous media flows in heterogeneous stochastic media. We propose an efficient forward simulation technique that is tailored for variational Bayesian inversion. As a starting point, the proposed forward simulation technique decomposes the solution into the sum of separable functions (with respect to randomness and the space), where each term is calculated based on a variational approach. This is similar to Proper Generalized Decomposition (PGD). Next, we apply a multiscale technique to solve for each term (as in [1]) and, further, decompose the random function into 1D fields. As a result, our proposed method provides an approximation hierarchy for the solution as we increase the number of terms in the expansion and, also, increase the spatial resolution of each term. We use the hierarchical solution distributions in a variational Bayesian approximation to perform uncertainty quantification in the inverse problem. We conduct a detailed numerical study to explore the performance of the proposed uncertainty quantification technique and show the theoretical posterior concentration.

  16. Averaged Description of Flow (Steady and Transient) and Nonreactive Solute Transport in Random Porous Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schvidler, M.; Karasaki, K.

    2011-06-15

    In previous papers (Shvidler and Karasaki, 1999, 2001, 2005, and 2008) we presented and analyzed an approach for finding the general forms of exactly averaged equations of flow and transport in porous media. We studied systems of basic equations for steady flow with sources in unbounded domains with stochastically homogeneous conductivity fields. A brief analysis of exactly averaged equations of nonsteady flow and nonreactive solute transport was also presented. At the core of this approach is the existence of appropriate random Green's functions. For example, we showed that in the case of a 3-dimensional unbounded domain the existence of appropriate random Green's functions is sufficient for finding the exact nonlocal averaged equations for flow velocity using the operator with a unique kernel-vector. Examination of random fields with global symmetry (isotropy, transversal isotropy and orthotropy) makes it possible to describe significantly different types of averaged equations with nonlocal unique operators. It is evident that the existence of random Green's functions for physical linear processes is equivalent to assuming the existence of some linear random operators for appropriate stochastic equations. If we restricted ourselves to this assumption only, as we have done in this paper, we can study the processes in any dimensional bounded or unbounded fields and in addition, cases in which the random fields of conductivity and porosity are stochastically nonhomogeneous, nonglobally symmetrical, etc.. It is clear that examining more general cases involves significant difficulty and constricts the analysis of structural types for the processes being studied. Nevertheless, we show that we obtain the essential information regarding averaged equations for steady and transient flow, as well as for solute transport.

  17. Revisiting random walks in fractal media: on the occurrence of time discrete scale invariance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bab, M A; Fabricius, G; Albano, Ezequiel V

    2008-01-28

    This paper addresses the kinetic behavior of random walks in fractal media. We perform extensive numerical simulations of both single and annihilating random walkers on several Sierpinski carpets, in order to study the time behavior of three observables: the average number of distinct sites visited by a single walker, the mean-square displacement from the origin, and the density of annihilating random walkers. We found that the time behavior of those observables is given by a power law modulated by soft logarithmic-periodic oscillations. We conjecture that logarithmic-periodic oscillations are a manifestation of a time domain discrete scale iNvariance (DSI) that occurs as a consequence of the spatial DSI of the substrate. Our conjecture implies that the logarithmic periods of oscillations in space and time domains are linked by a dynamic exponent z, through z=log(tau)/log(b(1)), where tau and b(1) are the fundamental scaling ratios of the DSI symmetry in the time and space domains, respectively. We use this relationship in order to compute z for different observables and fractals. Furthermore, we check the values obtained with independent measurements provided by the power-law behavior of the mean-square displacement with time [R(2)(t) proportional variant t(2/z)]. The very good agreement obtained between both computations of the z exponent gives strong support to the idea of an intimate interplay between spatial and time symmetry properties that we expect will have a quite general scope. We expect that the application of the outlined concepts in the field of dynamic processes in fractal media will stimulate further research.

  18. Induced Ginibre ensemble of random matrices and quantum operations

    CERN Document Server

    Fischmann, J; Khoruzhenko, B A; Sommers, H -J; Zyczkowski, K

    2011-01-01

    A generalisation of the Ginibre ensemble of non-Hermitian random square matrices is introduced. The corresponding probability measure is induced by the ensemble of rectangular Gaussian matrices via a quadratisation procedure. We derive the joint probability density of eigenvalues for such induced Ginibre ensemble and study various spectral correlation functions for complex and real matrices, and analyse universal behaviour in the limit of large dimensions. In this limit the eigenvalues of the induced Ginibre ensemble cover uniformly a ring in the complex plane. The real induced Ginibre ensemble is shown to be useful to describe statistical properties of evolution operators associated with random quantum operations, for which the dimensions of the input state and the output state do differ.

  19. An efficient Monte Carlo interior penalty discontinuous Galerkin method for elastic wave scattering in random media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, X.; Lorton, C.

    2017-03-01

    This paper develops and analyzes an efficient Monte Carlo interior penalty discontinuous Galerkin (MCIP-DG) method for elastic wave scattering in random media. The method is constructed based on a multi-modes expansion of the solution of the governing random partial differential equations. It is proved that the mode functions satisfy a three-term recurrence system of partial differential equations (PDEs) which are nearly deterministic in the sense that the randomness only appears in the right-hand side source terms, not in the coefficients of the PDEs. Moreover, the same differential operator applies to all mode functions. A proven unconditionally stable and optimally convergent IP-DG method is used to discretize the deterministic PDE operator, an efficient numerical algorithm is proposed based on combining the Monte Carlo method and the IP-DG method with the $LU$ direct linear solver. It is shown that the algorithm converges optimally with respect to both the mesh size $h$ and the sampling number $M$, and practically its total computational complexity is only amount to solving very few deterministic elastic Helmholtz equations using the $LU$ direct linear solver. Numerically experiments are also presented to demonstrate the performance and key features of the proposed MCIP-DG method.

  20. Media Use and Source Trust among Muslims in Seven Countries: Results of a Large Random Sample Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven R. Corman

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite the perceived importance of media in the spread of and resistance against Islamist extremism, little is known about how Muslims use different kinds of media to get information about religious issues, and what sources they trust when doing so. This paper reports the results of a large, random sample survey among Muslims in seven countries Southeast Asia, West Africa and Western Europe, which helps fill this gap. Results show a diverse set of profiles of media use and source trust that differ by country, with overall low trust in mediated sources of information. Based on these findings, we conclude that mass media is still the most common source of religious information for Muslims, but that trust in mediated information is low overall. This suggests that media are probably best used to persuade opinion leaders, who will then carry anti-extremist messages through more personal means.

  1. Behaviour of light transmission channels in random media with inhomogeneous disorder

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Yuchen; Lin, Yujun; Zhu, Heyuan

    2016-01-01

    We present a numerical study on the light transport properties and statistics of transmission channels in random media with inhomogeneous disorder. For the case of longitudinal inhomogeneity of disorder we find that the statistics of the transmission channels is independent of the inhomogeneity and the system can be equivalent to a counterpart with homogeneous disorder strength, both of which have the same statistical distribution of the transmission channels. However, for the case of transverse inhomogeneity of disorder, such equivalence does not exist, moreover, the transmission eigenvalues are pushed to the two ends of the distribution and the distribution of the total transmission is broadened since the spatial structure gives rise to larger and smaller transmitted incident channels.

  2. Temporal Skewness of Electromagnetic Pulsed Waves Propagating Through Random Media with Embedded Irregularity Slab

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许正文; 吴健; 霍文平; 吴振森

    2003-01-01

    Electromagnetic pulsed waves can be distorted in the propagation through random media, and their energy dis tributions change along the leading and trailing edge of the waveform, which can be presented by the temporal skewness. The skewness presents asymmetry and is treated by the third-order temporal moment, in which an analytic solution for the two-frequency mutual coherence function is obtained recently. Then, transionospheric pulses are discussed in details. Both theoretical analysis and numerical computation indicate that the contri butions from scattering and dispersion of irregularities dominate over those of background, so the latter can be neglected in most cases. Also, the temporal skewness of a transionospheric pulse is negative and energy is shifted to the leading edge.

  3. Inexact Picard iterative scheme for steady-state nonlinear diffusion in random heterogeneous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, P Surya; Nair, Prasanth B; Keane, Andy J

    2009-04-01

    In this paper, we present a numerical scheme for the analysis of steady-state nonlinear diffusion in random heterogeneous media. The key idea is to iteratively solve the nonlinear stochastic governing equations via an inexact Picard iteration scheme, wherein the nonlinear constitutive law is linearized using the current guess of the solution. The linearized stochastic governing equations are then spatially discretized and approximately solved using stochastic reduced basis projection schemes. The approximation to the solution process thus obtained is used as the guess for the next iteration. This iterative procedure is repeated until an appropriate convergence criterion is met. Detailed numerical studies are presented for diffusion in a square domain for varying degrees of nonlinearity. The numerical results are compared against benchmark Monte Carlo simulations, and it is shown that the proposed approach provides good approximations for the response statistics at modest computational effort.

  4. Social Media and Peer-Reviewed Medical Journal Readership: A Randomized Prospective Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, C Matthew; Hunter, Makeba; Kolenic, Giselle E; Carlos, Ruth C

    2017-05-01

    To prospectively evaluate the impact of increasing levels of social media engagement on page visits and web-link clicks for content published in the Journal of the American College of Radiology. A three-arm prospective trial was designed using a control group, a basic Twitter intervention group (using only the Journal's @JACRJournal Twitter account), and an enhanced Twitter intervention group (using the personal Twitter accounts of editorial board members and trainees). Overall, 428 articles published between June 2013 and July 2015 were randomly assigned to the three groups. Article-specific tweets for both intervention arms were sent between September 14, 2015, and October 28, 2015. Primary end points included article-specific weekly and monthly page visits on the journal's Elsevier website (Amsterdam, Netherlands). For the two intervention groups, additional end points included 7-day and 30-day Twitter link clicks. Weekly page visits for the enhanced Twitter arm (mean 18.2; 95% confidence interval [CI] 15.6-20.7) were significantly higher when compared with the weekly page visits for the control arm (mean 7.6; 95% CI 1.7-13.6). However, there was no demonstrable increase in weekly page visits (mean 9.4; 95% CI 7.4-11.5) for the basic Twitter arm compared with the control arm. No intervention effects over control, regardless of Twitter arm assignment, were demonstrated for monthly page visits. The enhanced Twitter intervention resulted in a statistically significant increase in both 7-day and 30-day Twitter link clicks compared with the basic Twitter intervention group. An organized social media strategy, with focused social media activity from editorial board members, increased engagement with content published in a peer-reviewed radiology journal. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. On the pertinence to Physics of random walks induced by random dynamical systems: a survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petritis, Dimitri

    2016-08-01

    Let be an abstract space and a denumerable (finite or infinite) alphabet. Suppose that is a family of functions such that for all we have and a family of transformations . The pair ((Sa)a , (pa)a ) is termed an iterated function system with place dependent probabilities. Such systems can be thought as generalisations of random dynamical systems. As a matter of fact, suppose we start from a given ; we pick then randomly, with probability pa (x), the transformation Sa and evolve to Sa (x). We are interested in the behaviour of the system when the iteration continues indefinitely. Random walks of the above type are omnipresent in both classical and quantum Physics. To give a small sample of occurrences we mention: random walks on the affine group, random walks on Penrose lattices, random walks on partially directed lattices, evolution of density matrices induced by repeated quantum measurements, quantum channels, quantum random walks, etc. In this article, we review some basic properties of such systems and provide with a pathfinder in the extensive bibliography (both on mathematical and physical sides) where the main results have been originally published.

  6. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of the gas-solid adsorption process in reconstructed random porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, L.; Qu, Z. G.; Ding, T.; Miao, J. Y.

    2016-04-01

    The gas-solid adsorption process in reconstructed random porous media is numerically studied with the lattice Boltzmann (LB) method at the pore scale with consideration of interparticle, interfacial, and intraparticle mass transfer performances. Adsorbent structures are reconstructed in two dimensions by employing the quartet structure generation set approach. To implement boundary conditions accurately, all the porous interfacial nodes are recognized and classified into 14 types using a proposed universal program called the boundary recognition and classification program. The multiple-relaxation-time LB model and single-relaxation-time LB model are adopted to simulate flow and mass transport, respectively. The interparticle, interfacial, and intraparticle mass transfer capacities are evaluated with the permeability factor and interparticle transfer coefficient, Langmuir adsorption kinetics, and the solid diffusion model, respectively. Adsorption processes are performed in two groups of adsorbent media with different porosities and particle sizes. External and internal mass transfer resistances govern the adsorption system. A large porosity leads to an early time for adsorption equilibrium because of the controlling factor of external resistance. External and internal resistances are dominant at small and large particle sizes, respectively. Particle size, under which the total resistance is minimum, ranges from 3 to 7 μm with the preset parameters. Pore-scale simulation clearly explains the effect of both external and internal mass transfer resistances. The present paper provides both theoretical and practical guidance for the design and optimization of adsorption systems.

  7. A randomized crossover study of web-based media literacy to prevent smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shensa, Ariel; Phelps-Tschang, Jane; Miller, Elizabeth; Primack, Brian A

    2016-02-01

    Feasibly implemented Web-based smoking media literacy (SML) programs have been associated with improving SML skills among adolescents. However, prior evaluations have generally had weak experimental designs. We aimed to examine program efficacy using a more rigorous crossover design. Seventy-two ninth grade students completed a Web-based SML program based on health behavior theory and implemented using a two-group two-period crossover design. Students were randomly assigned by classroom to receive media literacy or control interventions in different sequences. They were assessed three times, at baseline (T0), an initial follow-up after the first intervention (T1) and a second follow-up after the second intervention (T2). Crossover analysis using analysis of variance demonstrated significant intervention coefficients, indicating that the SML condition was superior to control for the primary outcome of total SML (F = 11.99; P < 0.001) and for seven of the nine individual SML items. Results were consistent in sensitivity analyses conducted using non-parametric methods. There were changes in some exploratory theory-based outcomes including attitudes and normative beliefs but not others. In conclusion, while strength of the design of this study supports and extends prior findings around effectiveness of SML programs, influences on theory-based mediators of smoking should be further explored.

  8. Effects of ebselen on radiocontrast media-induced hepatotoxicity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basarslan, Fatmagul; Yilmaz, Nigar; Davarci, Isil; Akin, Mustafa; Ozgur, Mustafa; Yilmaz, Cahide; Ulutas, Kemal Turker

    2013-09-01

    Oxidative stress is accepted as a potential responsible mechanism in the pathogenesis of radiocontrast media (RCM)-induced hepatotoxicity. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the protective effects of ebselen against RCM-induced hepatotoxicity by measuring tissue oxidant/antioxidant parameters and histological changes in rats. Wistar albino rats were randomly separated into four groups consisting of eight rats per group. Normal saline was given to the rats in control group (group 1). RCM was given to the rats in group 2, and both RCM and ebselen were given to the rats in group 3. Only ebselen was given to the rats in group 4. Liver sections of the killed animals were analyzed to measure the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), as well as histopathological changes. In RCM group, SOD and CAT levels were found increased. In RCM-ebselen group, MDA, SOD and CAT levels were found decreased. In RCM-ebselen group, however, GSH-Px activities of liver tissue increased. All these results indicated that ebselen produced a protective mechanism against RCM-induced hepatotoxicity and took part in oxidative stress.

  9. Simulating propagation of coherent light in random media using the Fredholm type integral equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraszewski, Maciej; Pluciński, Jerzy

    2017-06-01

    Studying propagation of light in random scattering materials is important for both basic and applied research. Such studies often require usage of numerical method for simulating behavior of light beams in random media. However, if such simulations require consideration of coherence properties of light, they may become a complex numerical problems. There are well established methods for simulating multiple scattering of light (e.g. Radiative Transfer Theory and Monte Carlo methods) but they do not treat coherence properties of light directly. Some variations of these methods allows to predict behavior of coherent light but only for an averaged realization of the scattering medium. This limits their application in studying many physical phenomena connected to a specific distribution of scattering particles (e.g. laser speckle). In general, numerical simulation of coherent light propagation in a specific realization of random medium is a time- and memory-consuming problem. The goal of the presented research was to develop new efficient method for solving this problem. The method, presented in our earlier works, is based on solving the Fredholm type integral equation, which describes multiple light scattering process. This equation can be discretized and solved numerically using various algorithms e.g. by direct solving the corresponding linear equations system, as well as by using iterative or Monte Carlo solvers. Here we present recent development of this method including its comparison with well-known analytical results and a finite-difference type simulations. We also present extension of the method for problems of multiple scattering of a polarized light on large spherical particles that joins presented mathematical formalism with Mie theory.

  10. Finite-element method for calculation of the effective permittivity of random inhomogeneous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myroshnychenko, Viktor; Brosseau, Christian

    2005-01-01

    The challenge of designing new solid-state materials from calculations performed with the help of computers applied to models of spatial randomness has attracted an increasing amount of interest in recent years. In particular, dispersions of particles in a host matrix are scientifically and technologically important for a variety of reasons. Herein, we report our development of an efficient computer code to calculate the effective (bulk) permittivity of two-phase disordered composite media consisting of hard circular disks made of a lossless dielectric (permittivity ɛ2 ) randomly placed in a plane made of a lossless homogeneous dielectric (permittivity ɛ1 ) at different surface fractions. Specifically, the method is based on (i) a finite-element description of composites in which both the host and the randomly distributed inclusions are isotropic phases, and (ii) an ordinary Monte Carlo sampling. Periodic boundary conditions are employed throughout the simulation and various numbers of disks have been considered in the calculations. From this systematic study, we show how the number of Monte Carlo steps needed to achieve equilibrated distributions of disks increases monotonically with the surface fraction. Furthermore, a detailed study is made of the dependence of the results on a minimum separation distance between disks. Numerical examples are presented to connect the macroscopic property such as the effective permittivity to microstructural characteristics such as the mean coordination number and radial distribution function. In addition, several approximate effective medium theories, exact bounds, exact results for two-dimensional regular arrays, and the exact dilute limit are used to test and validate the finite-element algorithm. Numerical results indicate that the fourth-order bounds provide an excellent estimate of the effective permittivity for a wide range of surface fractions, in accordance with the fact that the bounds become progressively narrower as

  11. Envelope broadening and scattering attenuation of a scalar wavelet in random media having power-law spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Haruo

    2016-01-01

    Peak delay and envelope broadening of an S-wavelet with travel distance increasing are seen in short-period seismograms of small earthquakes. Those phenomena are results of scattering by random velocity inhomogeneities in the earth medium. As shown in sonic well-log data we may suppose that random velocity fluctuation has power-law spectra even in the seismic spectral range. As a simple mathematical model, we study how the envelope of a scalar wavelet varies in von Kármán-type random media, which have power-law spectra at large wavenumbers. Since the centre wavenumber of a wavelet is a unique scale in the power-law spectral range, using it as a reference, we divide the random media into the low-wavenumber spectral (long-scale) component and the high-wavenumber spectral (short-scale) component. For the wave propagation through the long-scale component of random media, we may apply the parabolic approximation to the wave equation. Using the Markov approximation, which is a stochastic extension of the phase screen method, we directly synthesize the energy density, which is the mean-square (MS) envelope of a wavelet in a given frequency band. The envelope duration increases according to the second power of travel distance. There is an additional factor, the wandering effect which increases the envelope duration according to the traveltime fluctuation. Wide angle scattering caused by the short-scale component of random media attenuates wave amplitude with travel distance increasing. We use the total scattering coefficient of the short-scale component as a measure of scattering attenuation per distance, which is well described by the Born approximation. Multiplying the exponential scattering attenuation factor by the MS envelope derived by the Markov approximation, we can synthesize the MS envelope reflecting all the spectral components of random media. When the random medium power spectra have a steep role-off at large wavenumbers, the envelope broadening is small and

  12. Modeling tracer transport in randomly heterogeneous porous media by nonlocal moment equations: Anomalous transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Casique, E.; Lezama-Campos, J. L.; Guadagnini, A.; Neuman, S. P.

    2013-05-01

    Modeling tracer transport in geologic porous media suffers from the corrupt characterization of the spatial distribution of hydrogeologic properties of the system and the incomplete knowledge of processes governing transport at multiple scales. Representations of transport dynamics based on a Fickian model of the kind considered in the advection-dispersion equation (ADE) fail to capture (a) the temporal variation associated with the rate of spreading of a tracer, and (b) the distribution of early and late arrival times which are often observed in field and/or laboratory scenarios and are considered as the signature of anomalous transport. Elsewhere we have presented exact stochastic moment equations to model tracer transport in randomly heterogeneous aquifers. We have also developed a closure scheme which enables one to provide numerical solutions of such moment equations at different orders of approximations. The resulting (ensemble) average and variance of concentration fields were found to display a good agreement against Monte Carlo - based simulation results for mildly heterogeneous (or well-conditioned strongly heterogeneous) media. Here we explore the ability of the moment equations approach to describe the distribution of early arrival times and late time tailing effects which can be observed in Monte-Carlo based breakthrough curves (BTCs) of the (ensemble) mean concentration. We show that BTCs of mean resident concentration calculated at a fixed space location through higher-order approximations of moment equations display long tailing features of the kind which is typically associated with anomalous transport behavior and are not represented by an ADE model with constant dispersive parameter, such as the zero-order approximation.

  13. Light propagation through random hyperbolic media: from a pile of sand to large scale structure of present day universe

    CERN Document Server

    Smolyaninov, Igor I

    2012-01-01

    We analyze electromagnetic field propagation through a random medium which consists of hyperbolic metamaterial domains separated by regions of normal "elliptic" space. This situation may occur in a problem as common as 9 micrometer light propagation through a pile of sand, or as exotic as electromagnetic field behavior in the early universe immediately after the electro-weak phase transition. We demonstrate that spatial field distributions in random hyperbolic and random "elliptic" media look strikingly different. This effect may potentially be used to evaluate the magnitude of magnetic fields which existed in the early universe.

  14. Comparison of Media Literacy and Usual Education to Prevent Tobacco Use: A Cluster-Randomized Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primack, Brian A.; Douglas, Erika L.; Land, Stephanie R.; Miller, Elizabeth; Fine, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Media literacy programs have shown potential for reduction of adolescent tobacco use. We aimed to determine if an anti-smoking media literacy curriculum improves students' media literacy and affects factors related to adolescent smoking. Methods: We recruited 1170 9th-grade students from 64 classrooms in 3 public urban high…

  15. Scaled Particle Theory for Multicomponent Hard Sphere Fluids Confined in Random Porous Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, W; Zhao, S L; Holovko, M; Chen, X S; Dong, W

    2016-06-23

    The formulation of scaled particle theory (SPT) is presented for a quite general model of fluids confined in a random porous media, i.e., a multicomponent hard sphere (HS) fluid in a multicomponent hard sphere or a multicomponent overlapping hard sphere (OHS) matrix. The analytical expressions for pressure, Helmholtz free energy, and chemical potential are derived. The thermodynamic consistency of the proposed theory is established. Moreover, we show that there is an isomorphism between the SPT for a multicomponent system and that for a one-component system. Results from grand canonical ensemble Monte Carlo simulations are also presented for a binary HS mixture in a one-component HS or a one-component OHS matrix. The accuracy of various variants derived from the basic SPT formulation is appraised against the simulation results. Scaled particle theory, initially formulated for a bulk HS fluid, has not only provided an analytical tool for calculating thermodynamic properties of HS fluid but also helped to gain very useful insight for elaborating other theoretical approaches such as the fundamental measure theory (FMT). We expect that the general SPT for multicomponent systems developed in this work can contribute to the study of confined fluids in a similar way.

  16. Impact of surface reflection on transmission eigenvalue statistics and energy distributions inside random media

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng, Xiaojun; Lowell, Zachary; Zhao, Liyi; Genack, Azriel Z

    2016-01-01

    The impact of surface reflection upon transmission through and energy distributions within random media has generally been described in terms of the boundary extrapolation lengths $z_b, z_b'$ at the input and output end of an open sample, which are the distance beyond the sample surfaces at which the energy density within the sample extrapolates to zeroThe importance of reflection at the sample boundaries plays a key role in the scaling of transmission. Here we consider the impact of surface reflection on the propagation of diffusive waves in terms of the modification of the distribution of transmission eigenvalues (DTE). We review our finding of a transition in the analytical form of the DTE at the point that the sample length equals $|z_b-z_b'|$. The highest transmission eigenvalue for stronger asymmetry in boundary reflection is strictly smaller than unity. The average transmission and profiles of energy density inside the sample can still be described in terms of the sample length, $L$, and the boundary e...

  17. Effects of media campaign messages targeting parents on adolescent sexual beliefs: a randomized controlled trial with a national sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palen, Lori-Ann; Ashley, Olivia Silber; Gard, Jennifer C; Kan, Marni L; Davis, Kevin C; Evans, W Douglas

    2011-01-01

    Using a randomized controlled trial, this study evaluated the effects of media messages targeting parents on the sexual beliefs of 404 adolescents. The messages aimed to increase parent-child communication about waiting to initiate sexual activity. Compared with children of unexposed parents, children of parents exposed to media messages were more likely to believe that teen sexual activity is psychologically harmful. However, effects varied by parent and adolescent gender; treatment effects were only significant among adolescents whose opposite-sex parent was exposed. Parent exposure strengthened beliefs that teen sexual activity is physically harmful only among adolescents with at least 1 sexually active friend.

  18. Influenza virus induces bacterial and nonbacterial otitis media.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Short, K.R.; Diavatopoulos, D.A.; Thornton, R.; Pedersen, J.; Strugnell, R.A.; Wise, A.K.; Reading, P.C.; Wijburg, O.L.

    2011-01-01

    Otitis media (OM) is one of the most common childhood diseases. OM can arise when a viral infection enables bacteria to disseminate from the nasopharynx to the middle ear. Here, we provide the first infant murine model for disease. Mice coinfected with Streptococcus pneumoniae and influenza virus ha

  19. Influenza virus induces bacterial and nonbacterial otitis media.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Short, K.R.; Diavatopoulos, D.A.; Thornton, R.; Pedersen, J.; Strugnell, R.A.; Wise, A.K.; Reading, P.C.; Wijburg, O.L.

    2011-01-01

    Otitis media (OM) is one of the most common childhood diseases. OM can arise when a viral infection enables bacteria to disseminate from the nasopharynx to the middle ear. Here, we provide the first infant murine model for disease. Mice coinfected with Streptococcus pneumoniae and influenza virus

  20. Induced optical metric in the non-impedance-matched media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavi, S. A.; Roknizadeh, R.; Sahebdivan, S.

    2016-11-01

    In non-magnetic anisotropic media, the behavior of electromagnetic waves depends on the polarization and direction of the incident light. Therefore, to tame the unwanted wave responses such as polarization dependent reflections, the artificial impedance-matched media are suggested to be used in optical devices like invisibility cloak or super lenses. Nevertheless, developing the impedance-matched media is far from trivial in practice. In this paper, we are comparing the samples of both impedance-matched and non-impedance-matched (non-magnetic) media regarding their electromagnetic response in constructing a well-defined optical metric. In the case of similar anisotropic patterns, we show that the optical metric in an impedance-matched medium for unpolarized light is the same as the optical metric of an electrical birefringent medium when the extraordinary mode is concerned. By comparing the eikonal equation in an empty curved space-time and its counterparts in the medium, we have shown that a non-impedance-matched medium can resemble an optical metric for a particular polarization. As an example of non-impedance-matched materials, we are studying a medium with varying optical axis profile. We show that such a medium can be an alternative to impedance-matched materials in various optical devices.

  1. N-acetylcysteine and contrast-induced nephropathy: a meta-analysis of 13 randomized trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagler, Axel; Azadpour, Maziar; Mercado, Carlos; Hennekens, Charles H

    2006-01-01

    Contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) following coronary angiography increases morbidity and mortality. Randomized trials of small sample size have evaluated whether N-acetylcysteine (NAC) prevents CIN in patients with renal dysfunction. To conduct a meta-analysis of the randomized trials the following databases were searched: MEDLINE (1966-2003), Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, ACP Journal Club online, published abstracts presented at the major cardiology and nephrology meetings, references from reviews. Two authors independently evaluated all relevant randomized trials. Eligibility criteria were (1) randomized placebo controlled trials of NAC, (2) patients with impaired renal function (creatinine >1.2 mg/dL) undergoing coronary angiography, (3) patients receiving intravenous fluids and low-osmolarity nonionic contrast media, (4) the primary outcome was CIN (increases in creatinine of either at least 0.5 mg/dL or 25% from baseline to 48 hours). Of 589 trials reviewed 3 disagreements were easily resolved by mutual discussion and 13 were selected. Data extraction included patient characteristics, intravenous fluid regimen, type and dose of contrast media, dosing regimen, creatinine at baseline and 48 hours and CIN requiring dialysis. Four of the 13 trials reported statistically significant results. In meta-analysis of the 13 trials, which included 1892 patients, the RR was 0.68 (95%CI, 0.46-1.01). The addition of the trial of patients undergoing computerized tomography, which had formulated the hypothesis, yielded a statistically significant reduction (RR 0.64 [95%CI 0.42-0.96]) as did an earlier meta-analysis of 7 trials. Our meta-analysis of the most currently available randomized data concerning NAC before coronary angiography to prevent CIN in patients with impaired renal function is neither conclusive nor provides proof beyond a reasonable doubt to influence clinical practice and public policy. The intervention has minimal toxicity but the width of the 95% CI

  2. Randomized Controlled Trial of a Computerized Interactive Media-Based Problem Solving Treatment for Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval, Luis R; Buckey, Jay C; Ainslie, Ricardo; Tombari, Martin; Stone, William; Hegel, Mark T

    2017-05-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of an interactive media-based, computer-delivered depression treatment program (imbPST) compared to a no-treatment control condition (NTC) in a parallel-group, randomized, controlled trial conducted in an outpatient psychiatric research clinic. 45 adult participants with major depressive disorder or dysthymia were randomized to receive either 6 weekly sessions of imbPST or no treatment (No Treatment Control; NTC). The primary outcome measure was the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II). There was a significant Group x Time interaction effect [F (1.73, 43)= 58.78; p<.001; η2=.58, Cohens d=1.94], such that the patients receiving imbPST had a significantly greater reduction in depressive symptoms compared to the patients in the NTC condition. Participants in the imbPST group improved their depression symptoms significantly from moderate (BDI-II=21.9±4.20) to mild levels of depression (BDI-II=17.9±4.0) after receiving 3 weekly sessions of imbPST (p<0.001), and progressed to still milder levels of depression after six weekly sessions (BDI-II=14.5±3.7, p<0.001). NTC participants showed no significant reduction in BDI-II scores (BDI-II=21.8±4.2 pre, BDI-II=21.5±5.2 post, N.S.). Additionally, 40% of the imbPST group showed a clinically significant and reliable change in depression levels while none of the NTC group met this criterion. imbPST participants rated the program highly usable on the system usability scale (SUS) after the first session (SUS Session 1=74.6±7.2) and usability scores increased significantly by the last session (SUS Session 6=85.4±5.6). We conclude that imbPST is an effective, engaging, and easily used depression treatment program that warrants further evaluation with heterogeneous depressed populations in a stand-alone, self-administered fashion. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Continuous-time random-walk model for anomalous diffusion in expanding media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Vot, F.; Abad, E.; Yuste, S. B.

    2017-09-01

    Expanding media are typical in many different fields, e.g., in biology and cosmology. In general, a medium expansion (contraction) brings about dramatic changes in the behavior of diffusive transport properties such as the set of positional moments and the Green's function. Here, we focus on the characterization of such effects when the diffusion process is described by the continuous-time random-walk (CTRW) model. As is well known, when the medium is static this model yields anomalous diffusion for a proper choice of the probability density function (pdf) for the jump length and the waiting time, but the behavior may change drastically if a medium expansion is superimposed on the intrinsic random motion of the diffusing particle. For the case where the jump length and the waiting time pdfs are long-tailed, we derive a general bifractional diffusion equation which reduces to a normal diffusion equation in the appropriate limit. We then study some particular cases of interest, including Lévy flights and subdiffusive CTRWs. In the former case, we find an analytical exact solution for the Green's function (propagator). When the expansion is sufficiently fast, the contribution of the diffusive transport becomes irrelevant at long times and the propagator tends to a stationary profile in the comoving reference frame. In contrast, for a contracting medium a competition between the spreading effect of diffusion and the concentrating effect of contraction arises. In the specific case of a subdiffusive CTRW in an exponentially contracting medium, the latter effect prevails for sufficiently long times, and all the particles are eventually localized at a single point in physical space. This "big crunch" effect, totally absent in the case of normal diffusion, stems from inefficient particle spreading due to subdiffusion. We also derive a hierarchy of differential equations for the moments of the transport process described by the subdiffusive CTRW model in an expanding medium

  4. A highly accurate and analytic equation of state for a hard sphere fluid in random porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holovko, M; Dong, W

    2009-05-07

    An analytical equation of state (EOS) for a hard sphere fluid confined in random porous media is derived by extending the scaled particle theory to such complex systems with quenched disorders. A simple empirical correction allows us to obtain a highly accurate EOS with errors within the simulation ones. These are the first analytical results for non trivial off-lattice quench-annealed systems.

  5. Contrast-media-induced nephrotoxicity: a consensus report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morcos, S.K.; Thomsen, H.S.; Webb, J.A.W. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Northern General Hospital NHS Trust, Sheffield (United Kingdom)

    1999-10-01

    The purpose of this study was, using consensus methodology, to document current understanding of contrast media nephrotoxicity (CMN) and to identify areas where there is disagreement or confusion. To draw up guidelines for avoiding CMN based on the current understanding of the condition established by the survey. One hundred sixty-four statements were mailed to 148 members of the European Society of Urogenital Radiology (ESUR) and to 48 experts in the field of CMN. They were asked about the definition, clinical features, predisposing factors and pathophysiology of CMN and about prophylactic measures. The importance of the statements was rated on a scale from 1 to 10 (1 least important, 10 most important). Fifty-three members (38 %) and 23 experts (48 %) responded. Both groups considered that an increase in serum creatinine that peaks within 3-4 days and a decrease in creatinine clearance are the most important (rating > 7) features of CMN. Enzymuria was not considered important (rating < 6). Pre-existing renal insufficiency, diabetic nephropathy, dehydration, congestive heart failure, concurrent administration of nephrotoxic drugs and the dose and type of contrast media were considered to be risk factors. Reduction in renal perfusion and damage to tubular cells were considered the main factors in the pathophysiology of CMN (rating > 6). Hydration and the use of low osmolar contrast media were thought to minimize the incidence of CMN (rating > 6). The majority of the responders (84.6 % of members and 95.5 % of experts) believe that the incidence of CMN in patients with normal renal function is less than 5 %. Of the members, 62.5 %, and 35.3 % of experts, believe that the incidence of CMN is 20-30 % in the presence of risk factors. There was disagreement about the definition of CMN, the threshold dose of contrast media above which renal complications may develop, the safe period between repeat injections, the relevance of contrast media renal retention shown on CT

  6. Comparison of finite difference and pseudo-spectral methods in forward modelling based on metal ore model of random media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Dongyu,HAN Liguo,ZHANG Pan; XU Dexin

    2016-01-01

    With more applications of seismic exploration in metal ore exploration,forward modelling of seismic wave has become more important in metal ore.Finite difference method and pseudo-spectral method are two im-portant methods of wave-field simulation.Results of previous studies show that both methods have distinct ad-vantages and disadvantages:Finite difference method has high precision but its dispersion is serious;pseudo-spectral method considers both computational efficiency and precision but has less precision than finite-diffe-rence.The authors consider the complex structural characteristics of the metal ore,furthermore add random media in order to simulate the complex effects produced by metal ore for wave field.First,the study introduced the theories of random media and two forward modelling methods.Second,it compared the simulation results of two methods on fault model.Then the authors established a complex metal ore model,added random media and compared computational efficiency and precision.As a result,it is found that finite difference method is better than pseudo-spectral method in precision and boundary treatment,but the computational efficiency of pseudo-spectral method is slightly higher than the finite difference method.

  7. Synthesis of wavelet envelope in 2-D random media having power-law spectra: comparison with FD simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Haruo; Fehler, Michael C.

    2016-10-01

    The envelope broadening and the peak delay of the S-wavelet of a small earthquake with increasing travel distance are results of scattering by random velocity inhomogeneities in the earth medium. As a simple mathematical model, Sato proposed a new stochastic synthesis of the scalar wavelet envelope in 3-D von Kármán type random media when the centre wavenumber of the wavelet is in the power-law spectral range of the random velocity fluctuation. The essential idea is to split the random medium spectrum into two components using the centre wavenumber as a reference: the long-scale (low-wavenumber spectral) component produces the peak delay and the envelope broadening by multiple scattering around the forward direction; the short-scale (high-wavenumber spectral) component attenuates wave amplitude by wide angle scattering. The former is calculated by the Markov approximation based on the parabolic approximation and the latter is calculated by the Born approximation. Here, we extend the theory for the envelope synthesis of a wavelet in 2-D random media, which makes it easy to compare with finite difference (FD) simulation results. The synthetic wavelet envelope is analytically written by using the random medium parameters in the angular frequency domain. For the case that the power spectral density function of the random velocity fluctuation has a steep roll-off at large wavenumbers, the envelope broadening is small and frequency independent, and scattering attenuation is weak. For the case of a small roll-off, however, the envelope broadening is large and increases with frequency, and the scattering attenuation is strong and increases with frequency. As a preliminary study, we compare synthetic wavelet envelopes with the average of FD simulation wavelet envelopes in 50 synthesized random media, which are characterized by the RMS fractional velocity fluctuation ε = 0.05, correlation scale a = 5 km and the background wave velocity V0 = 4 km s-1. We use the radiation

  8. Correlated multiplexity induces unusual connectivity in multiplex random networks

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Kyu-Min; Cho, Won-kuk; Goh, K -I; Kim, I -M

    2011-01-01

    Nodes in a complex networked system often engage in more than one type of interactions among them; they form a multiplex network with multiple types of links. In real-world complex systems, a node's degree for one type of links and that for the other are not randomly distributed but correlated, which we term correlated multiplexity. In this paper we study a simple model of multiplex random networks and show that the correlated multiplexity can induce unusual properties of giant component in the network. Specifically, when the degrees of a node for different interactions in a duplex Erdos-Renyi network are maximally correlated, the network contains the giant component for any nonzero link densities. On the contrary, when the degrees of a node are maximally anti-correlated, the emergence of giant component is significantly delayed, yet the entire network becomes connected into a single component at a finite link density. We also discuss the mixing patterns and the cases with imperfect correlated multiplexity.

  9. Hybridization Induced Transparency in composites of metamaterials and atomic media

    CERN Document Server

    Weis, Peter; Beigang, René; Rahm, Marco

    2011-01-01

    We report hybridization induced transparency (HIT) in a composite medium consisting of a metamaterial and a dielectric. We develop an analytic model that explains HIT by coherent coupling between the hybridized local fields of the metamaterial and the dielectric or an atomic system in general. In a proof-of-principle experiment, we evidence HIT in a split ring resonator metamaterial that is coupled to \\alpha-lactose monohydrate. Both, the analytic model and numerical calculations confirm and explain the experimental observations. HIT can be considered as a hybrid analogue to electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) and plasmon-induced transparency (PIT).

  10. Nonequilibrium transition induced by mass media in a model for social influence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Avella, J C; Cosenza, M G; Tucci, K

    2005-12-01

    We study the effect of mass media, modeled as an applied external field, on a social system based on Axelrod's model for the dissemination of culture. The numerical simulations show that the system undergoes a nonequilibrium phase transition between an ordered phase (homogeneous culture) specified by the mass media and a disordered (culturally fragmented) one. The critical boundary separating these phases is calculated on the parameter space of the system, given by the intensity of the mass media influence and the number of options per cultural attribute. Counterintuitively, mass media can induce cultural diversity when its intensity is above some threshold value. The nature of the phase transition changes from continuous to discontinuous at some critical value of the number of options.

  11. Influenza virus induces bacterial and nonbacterial otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Kirsty R; Diavatopoulos, Dimitri A; Thornton, Ruth; Pedersen, John; Strugnell, Richard A; Wise, Andrew K; Reading, Patrick C; Wijburg, Odilia L

    2011-12-15

    Otitis media (OM) is one of the most common childhood diseases. OM can arise when a viral infection enables bacteria to disseminate from the nasopharynx to the middle ear. Here, we provide the first infant murine model for disease. Mice coinfected with Streptococcus pneumoniae and influenza virus had high bacterial load in the middle ear, middle ear inflammation, and hearing loss. In contrast, mice colonized with S. pneumoniae alone had significantly less bacteria in the ear, minimal hearing loss, and no inflammation. Of interest, infection with influenza virus alone also caused some middle ear inflammation and hearing loss. Overall, this study provides a clinically relevant and easily accessible animal model to study the pathogenesis and prevention of OM. Moreover, we provide, to our knowledge, the first evidence that influenza virus alone causes middle ear inflammation in infant mice. This inflammation may then play an important role in the development of bacterial OM.

  12. Asymmetric transmission and optical low-pass filtering in a stack of random media with graded transport mean free path

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingi, J.; Hemalatha, M.; Anita, R. W.; Vijayan, C.; Murukeshan, V. M.

    2015-11-01

    Light transport and the physical phenomena related to light propagation in random media are very intriguing, they also provide scope for new paradigms of device functionality, most of which remain unexplored. Here we demonstrate, experimentally and by simulation, a novel kind of asymmetric light transmission (diffusion) in a stack of random media (SRM) with graded transport mean free path. The structure is studied in terms of transmission, of photons propagated through and photons generated within the SRM. It is observed that the SRM exhibits asymmetric transmission property with a transmission contrast of 0.25. In addition, it is shown that the SRM works as a perfect optical low-pass filter with a well-defined cutoff wavelength at 580 nm. Further, the photons generated within the SRM found to exhibit functionality similar to an optical diode with a transmission contrast of 0.62. The basis of this functionality is explained in terms of wavelength dependent photon randomization and the graded transport mean free path of SRM.

  13. Thermally induced magnetic switching in bit-patterned media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfau, B.; Günther, C. M.; Hauet, T.; Eisebitt, S.; Hellwig, O.

    2017-07-01

    We have studied the thermal variation of the switching field of magnetic islands at room temperature. A model bit-pattern media composed of an assembly of islands with 80 nm width was fabricated by sputter deposition onto a pre-patterned substrate. Using direct magnetic-contrast imaging of the islands under applied field, we extract the switching probabilities of individual islands. Based on an analytical model for the thermally activated switching of the islands, we are able to determine the intrinsic magnetic anisotropy of each island and, consequentially, a distribution of anisotropies for the island ensemble investigated. In the distribution, we identify a separated group of islands with a particularly small anisotropy. We attribute this group to islands containing misaligned grains triggering the magnetic reversal. At room temperature and slow field sweep rates, the observed thermal broadening of the switching-field distribution is small compared to the intrinsic broadening. However, we illustrate that thermal fluctuations play a crucial role at high sweep rates by extrapolating our results to technological relevant regimes.

  14. Beware of parotitis induced by iodine-containing contrast media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohat, A K; Jayantee, K; Phadke, R V; Muthu, R; Singh, V; Misra, U K

    2014-01-01

    Carotid stenting is being increasingly used for revascularization of the moderate to severe carotid stenosis and thus its complications are increasingly being recognized. We report a rare complication of induced by iodine contrast in a patient undergoing carotid stenting. s. A 51 year old man after the second stenting developed multiple small infarcts in spite of the distal device. He also had painful parotid swelling which improved within a week. One should be aware of iodine parotitis s in the patients undergoing iodinated contrast study.

  15. Stochastic description of geometric phase for polarized waves in random media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulanger, Jérémie; Le Bihan, Nicolas; Rossetto, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    We present a stochastic description of multiple scattering of polarized waves in the regime of forward scattering. In this regime, if the source is polarized, polarization survives along a few transport mean free paths, making it possible to measure an outgoing polarization distribution. We consider thin scattering media illuminated by a polarized source and compute the probability distribution function of the polarization on the exit surface. We solve the direct problem using compound Poisson processes on the rotation group SO(3) and non-commutative harmonic analysis. We obtain an exact expression for the polarization distribution which generalizes previous works and design an algorithm solving the inverse problem of estimating the scattering properties of the medium from the measured polarization distribution. This technique applies to thin disordered layers, spatially fluctuating media and multiple scattering systems and is based on the polarization but not on the signal amplitude. We suggest that it can be used as a non-invasive testing method.

  16. Induced sensitivity of Bacillus subtilis colony morphology to mechanical media compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica K. Polka

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria from several taxa, including Kurthia zopfii, Myxococcus xanthus, and Bacillus mycoides, have been reported to align growth of their colonies to small features on the surface of solid media, including anisotropies created by compression. While the function of this phenomenon is unclear, it may help organisms navigate on solid phases, such as soil. The origin of this behavior is also unknown: it may be biological (that is, dependent on components that sense the environment and regulate growth accordingly or merely physical.Here we show that B. subtilis, an organism that typically does not respond to media compression, can be induced to do so with two simple and synergistic perturbations: a mutation that maintains cells in the swarming (chained state, and the addition of EDTA to the growth media, which further increases chain length. EDTA apparently increases chain length by inducing defects in cell separation, as the treatment has only marginal effects on the length of individual cells.These results lead us to three conclusions. First, the wealth of genetic tools available to B. subtilis will provide a new, tractable chassis for engineering compression sensitive organisms. Second, the sensitivity of colony morphology to media compression in Bacillus can be modulated by altering a simple physical property of rod-shaped cells. And third, colony morphology under compression holds promise as a rapid, simple, and low-cost way to screen for changes in the length of rod-shaped cells or chains thereof.

  17. Two-phase flow in correlated pore-throat random porous media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田巨平; 姚凯伦

    2002-01-01

    We have constructed a porous media model in which there are percolation clusters with varying percolation probability P and correlated site-bonds. Taking into account both the pore and the throat geometry, the viscous fingering (VF) in porous media has been investigated by using the standard over-relaxed Gauss-Seidel scheme. The simulation results show that the VF structure varies with the correlation parameter ε, the viscosity ratio M and the percolation probability P. The smaller the correlation parameter ε, the greater thedeviation of the normalized size distribution of the invaded throat Ninv(r) from the truncated Rayleigh distribution.For a larger viscosity ratio M,the VF pattern looks like a diffusion-limited-aggregation structure in percolation clusters. The fractal dimension D increases with the increase of the percolation probability P and the correlation parameter e. The velocity distribution f(α) of VF in percolation clusters is of a parabola-like curve. The tail of the distribution (large α) is longer for a larger correlation parameter ε. For a smaller ε, the distribution is very sharp. The sweep efficiency E decreases along with the decrease of the correlation parameter ε and the increase of the network size Lnz. E has a minimum as Lnz increases up to the maximum no matter what the values of P, M and ε. The E ~ Lnz curve has a frozen zone and an active zone. The geometry and the topology of the porous media have strong effects on the displacement processes and the structure of VF.

  18. Numerical analysis of the advection-diffusion of a solute in random media

    OpenAIRE

    Charrier, Julia

    2011-01-01

    We consider the problem of numerically approximating the solution of the coupling of the flow equation in a random porous medium, with the advection-diffusion equation. More precisely, we present and analyse a numerical method to compute the mean value of the spread of a solute introduced at the initial time, and the mean value of the macro-dispersion, defined at the temporal derivative of the spread. We propose a Monte-Carlo method to deal with the uncertainty, i.e. with the randomness of th...

  19. Stochastic interference of fluorescence radiation in random media with large inhomogeneities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimnyakov, D. A.; Asharchuk, I. A.; Yuvchenko, S. A.; Sviridov, A. P.

    2017-03-01

    Stochastic interference of fluorescence light outgoing from a dye-doped coarse-grained random medium, which was pumped by the continuous-wave laser radiation, was experimentally studied. It was found that the contrast of random interference patterns highly correlates with the wavelength-dependent fluorescence intensity and reaches its minimum in the vicinity of the cusp of emission spectrum. The decay in the contrast of spectrally selected speckle patterns was interpreted in terms of the pathlength distribution broadening for fluorescence radiation propagating in the medium. This broadening is presumably caused by the wavelength-dependent negative absorption of the medium.

  20. Effects of two different growth media on the postantifungal effect induced by polyenes on Candida species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, M; Ellepola, A N; Samaranayake, L P

    2001-07-01

    There are no data on the effects of different growth media on polyene-induced postantifungal effect (PAFE) in Candida species. Hence, the nystatin- and amphotericin B-induced PAFEs in six Candida species (26 isolates) grown in Sabouraud's dextrose broth (SAB) and RPMI broth were evaluated, following limited exposure to the MICs of the two polyenes, using an automated turbidometric method. For nystatin, PAFE varied between 1.88 and 4.87 h in SAB and 0.66 and 6.89 h in RPMI, and for amphotericin B, the equivalent values were 3.13 to 10.98 h in SAB and 0.97 to 7.01 h in RPMI. These highly significant (P < 0.001) variations in the PAFE with both drugs, noted with most Candida strains grown in different media, call for standardization of intralaboratory methodology in measuring this parameter in order to obtain universally comparable data.

  1. Random variable transformation for generalized stochastic radiative transfer in finite participating slab media

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Wakil, S. A.; Sallah, M.; El-Hanbaly, A. M.

    2015-10-01

    The stochastic radiative transfer problem is studied in a participating planar finite continuously fluctuating medium. The problem is considered for specular- and diffusly-reflecting boundaries with linear anisotropic scattering. Random variable transformation (RVT) technique is used to get the complete average for the solution functions, that are represented by the probability-density function (PDF) of the solution process. In the RVT algorithm, a simple integral transformation to the input stochastic process (the extinction function of the medium) is applied. This linear transformation enables us to rewrite the stochastic transport equations in terms of the optical random variable (x) and the optical random thickness (L). Then the transport equation is solved deterministically to get a closed form for the solution as a function of x and L. So, the solution is used to obtain the PDF of the solution functions applying the RVT technique among the input random variable (L) and the output process (the solution functions). The obtained averages of the solution functions are used to get the complete analytical averages for some interesting physical quantities, namely, reflectivity and transmissivity at the medium boundaries. In terms of the average reflectivity and transmissivity, the average of the partial heat fluxes for the generalized problem with internal source of radiation are obtained and represented graphically.

  2. On the validity of the Carman-Kozeny equation in random fibrous media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yazdchi, K.; Srivastava, S.; Luding, Stefan; Onate, E; Owen, D.R.J

    2011-01-01

    The transverse permeability for creeping flow through unidirectional random arrays of fibers/cylinders has been studied numerically using the finite element method (FEM). A modified Carman-Kozeny (CK) relation is presented which takes into account the tortuosity (flow path) and the lubrication

  3. PIV-based investigation of the skin friction of the flow over random fibrous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirbod, Parisa; Gheisari, Reza

    2015-11-01

    Finite Reynolds number (Reflow over fibrous medium inside a rectangular duct was studied using a planar 2D PIV system. Three different fibrous materials with different porosities were used. Fibrous material lined the bottom wall of the duct along the length of the duct. The flow regime for all tests was laminar, and measurements were all done when the flow reached a steady state. Error and uncertainty sources in the experiments were also discussed. Shear rates were estimated at the surface of the fibrous media. As a conclusion to this study skin friction factor were calculated at the interface of all fibrous media at selected Reynolds number. Then using power function, curve fits with the Cf = a/Re form were found which could closely correlate skin friction and Reynolds number. To weaken the effect of near-wall errors in estimated shear rates and consequently skin friction, an average of shear rate estimation in a layer with thickness of 5 mm was calculated which was used to calculate an average skin friction. Correlations of average skin friction with average Reynolds number were also presented.

  4. Distance learning strategies for weight management utilizing social media: A comparison of phone conference call versus social media platform. Rationale and design for a randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Erik A; Szabo-Reed, Amanda N; Ptomey, Lauren T; Steger, Felicia L; Honas, Jeffery J; Al-Hihi, Eyad M; Lee, Robert; Vansaghi, Lisa; Washburn, Richard A; Donnelly, Joseph E

    2016-03-01

    Management of obesity in the context of the primary care physician visit is of limited efficacy in part because of limited ability to engage participants in sustained behavior change between physician visits. Therefore, healthcare systems must find methods to address obesity that reach beyond the walls of clinics and hospitals and address the issues of lifestyle modification in a cost-conscious way. The dramatic increase in technology and online social networks may present healthcare providers with innovative ways to deliver weight management programs that could have an impact on health care at the population level. A randomized study will be conducted on 70 obese adults (BMI 30.0-45.0 kg/m(2)) to determine if weight loss (6 months) is equivalent between weight management interventions utilizing behavioral strategies by either a conference call or social media approach. The primary outcome, body weight, will be assessed at baseline and 6 months. Secondary outcomes including waist circumference, energy and macronutrient intake, and physical activity will be assessed on the same schedule. In addition, a cost analysis and process evaluation will be completed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A randomized control comparison study of culture media (HTF versus P1) for human in vitro fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artini, Paolo G; Valentino, Valeria; Cela, Vito; Cristello, Francesca; Vitè, Alessandra; Genazzani, Andrea R

    2004-10-15

    It is now widely accepted that increasing the number of replacement embryos (>3 embryos per embryo transfer [ET]) is associated with an increased risk of multiple pregnancies. While embryo reduction is often proposed when there is a high risk of multiple pregnancies, it is a difficult decision for the couple. For this reason, different studies have focused on single embryo transfer, more precisely blastocyst transfer. The aim of the study is to confirm that phosphate-free culture media can be used to generate greater quality embryos. We carried out a study to compare the efficacy of human tubal fluid (HTF) versus preimplantation stage one (P1) as culture media for assisted reproductive therapy (ART). In 109 nonselected patients, we obtained an embryo fertilization rate with HTF and P1 culture media of 58.6 and 62.5% (P = 0.003), respectively. After 48 and 72 h, the morphology was similar for both P1 and HTF embryos in most patients. However, in the same patients, when HTF embryo quality was low (15.4%), P1 embryo quality was significantly higher 68.7% (P = 0.002). Some embryos were transferred at 48 h and some at 72 h after retrieval, in a randomized manner. We transferred a maximum of up to three embryos per ET. The implantation rate was significantly different; at 48 h, it was 6.8 and 12.2% for HTF and P1, respectively (P = 0.02). The pregnancy rate was 17.1% for HTF embryos and 23.7% for P1 embryos (P = 0.02). Therefore, we observed a significant difference between P1 and HTF in the fertilization rate, in embryo quality, in implantation rate and in pregnancy rate. But the most important difference between this study and others is that every patient was the control of herself, so we eliminated every variable.

  6. Correlation-based virtual source imaging in strongly scattering random media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnier, Josselin; Papanicolaou, George

    2012-07-01

    Array imaging in a strongly scattering medium is limited because coherent signals recorded at the array and coming from a reflector to be imaged are weak and dominated by incoherent signals coming from multiple scattering by the medium. If, however, an auxiliary passive array can be placed between the reflector to be imaged and the scattering medium then the cross correlations of the incoherent signals on this array can also be used to image the reflector. In this paper, we show both in the weakly scattering paraxial regime and in strongly scattering layered media that this cross-correlation approach produces images as if the medium between the sources and the passive array was homogeneous and the auxiliary passive array was an active one made up of both sources and receivers.

  7. Modification of light transmission channels by inhomogeneous absorption in random media

    CERN Document Server

    Liew, Seng Fatt

    2015-01-01

    Optical absorption is omnipresent and very often distributed non-uniformly in space. We present a numerical study on the effects of inhomogeneous absorption on transmission eigenchannels of light in highly scattering media. In the weak absorption regime, the spatial profile of a transmission channel remains very similar to that without absorption, and the effect of inhomogeneous absorption can be stronger or weaker than homogeneous absorption depending on the spatial overlap of the localized absorbing region with the field intensity maximum of the channel. In the strong absorption regime, the high transmission channels redirect the energy flows to circumvent the absorbing regions to minimize loss. The attenuation of high transmission channels by inhomogeneous absorption is lower than that by homogeneous absorption, regardless of the location of the absorbing region. The statistical distribution of transmission eigenvalues in the former becomes broader than that in the latter, due to a longer tail at high tran...

  8. Intensity moments by path integral techniques for wave propagation through random media, with application to sound in the ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, D. R.; Dashen, R.; Flatte, S. M.

    1983-01-01

    A theory is developed which describes intensity moments for wave propagation through random media. It is shown using the path integral technique that these moments are significantly different from those of a Rayleigh distribution in certain asymptotic regions. The path integral approach is extended to inhomogeneous, anisotropic media possessing a strong deterministic velocity profile. The behavior of the corrections to Rayleigh statistics is examined, and it is shown that the important characteristics can be attributed to a local micropath focusing function. The correction factor gamma is a micropath focusing parameter defined in terms of medium fluctuations. The value of gamma is calculated for three ocean acoustic experiments, using internal waves as the medium fluctuations. It is found that all three experiments show excellent agreement as to the relative values of the intensity moments. The full curved ray is found to yield results that are significantly different from the straight-line approximations. It is noted that these methods are applicable to a variety of experimental situations, including atmospheric optics and radio waves through plasmas.

  9. Polarization control of multiply-scattered light through random media by wavefront shaping

    CERN Document Server

    Guan, Yefeng; Small, Eran; Zhou, Jianying; Silberberg, Yaron

    2015-01-01

    We show that the polarization state of coherent light propagating through an optically thick multiple-scattering medium, can be controlled by wavefront shaping, i.e. by controlling only the spatial phase of the incoming field with a spatial light modulator. Any polarization state of light at any spatial position behind the scattering medium can be attained with this technique. Thus, transforming the random medium to an arbitrary optical polarization component becomes possible.

  10. Random Search with Memory in Patchy Media: Exploration-Exploitation Tradeoff

    CERN Document Server

    Chupeau, M; Redner, S

    2016-01-01

    How to best exploit patchy resources? This long-standing question belongs to the extensively studied class of explore/exploit problems that arise in a wide range of situations, from animal foraging, to robotic exploration, and to human decision processes. Despite its broad relevance, the issue of optimal exploitation has previously only been tackled through two paradigmatic limiting models---patch-use and random search---that do not account for the interplay between searcher motion within patches and resource depletion. Here, we bridge this gap by introducing a minimal patch exploitation model that incorporates this coupling: the searcher depletes the resources along its random-walk trajectory within a patch and travels to a new patch after it takes $\\mathcal{S}$ consecutive steps without finding resources. We compute the distribution of the amount of resources $F_t$ consumed by time $t$ for this non-Markovian random walker and show that exploring multiple patches is beneficial. In one dimension, we analytica...

  11. Induced Kerr effects and self-guided beams in quasi-phase-matched quadratic media [CBC4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Carl A. Balslev; Bang, Ole; Kivshar, Yuri S.

    1997-01-01

    We show that quasi-phase-matching of quadratic media induces Kerr effects, such as self- and cross-phase modulation, and leads to the existence of a novel class of solitary waves, QPM-solitons......We show that quasi-phase-matching of quadratic media induces Kerr effects, such as self- and cross-phase modulation, and leads to the existence of a novel class of solitary waves, QPM-solitons...

  12. A Peer-Led, Social Media-Delivered, Safer Sex Intervention for Chinese College Students: Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wai Han; Wong, Carlos King Ho; Wong, William Chi Wai

    2017-08-09

    The peer-led, social media-delivered intervention is an emerging method in sexual health promotion. However, no research has yet investigated its effectiveness as compared with other online channels or in an Asian population. The objective of this study is to compare a peer-led, social media-delivered, safer sex intervention with a sexual health website. Both conditions target Chinese college students in Hong Kong. A randomized controlled trial was conducted with a peer-led, safer sex Facebook group as the intervention and an existing online sexual health website as the control. The intervention materials were developed with peer input and followed the information-motivation-behavioral skills model; the intervention was moderated by peer educators. The participants filled out the online questionnaires before and after the 6-week intervention period. Outcome evaluations included safer sex attitudes, behavioral skills, and behaviors, while process evaluation focused on online experience, online-visiting frequency, and online engagement. The effect of online-visiting frequency and online engagement on outcome variables was investigated. Of 196 eligible participants-100 in the control group and 96 in the intervention group-who joined the study, 2 (1.0%) control participants joined the Facebook group and 24 of the remaining 194 participants (12.4%) were lost to follow-up. For the process evaluation, participants in the intervention group reported more satisfying online experiences (Psocial media-delivered, safer sex intervention was found to be feasible and effective in improving attitudes toward condom use and behavioral skills, but was not significantly more effective than a website. Future research may focus on the long-term effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of this popular method, as well as the potential cultural differences of using social media between different countries. Chinese Clinical Trial Registry (ChiCTR): ChiCTR-IOR-16009495; http

  13. Simulation of Dynamics in Two-Dimensional Vortex Systems in Random Media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wei; SUN Li-Zhen; LUO Meng-Bo

    2009-01-01

    Dynamics in two-dimensional vortex systems with random pinning centres is investigated using molecular dy-namical simulations. The driving force and temperature dependences of vortex velocity are investigated. Below the critical depinning force Fc, a creep motion of vortex is found at low temperature. At forces slightly above Fc, a part of vortices flow in winding channels at zero temperature. In the vortex channel flow region, we ob-serve the abnormal behaviour of vortex dynamics: the velocity is roughly independent of temperature or even decreases with temperature at low temperatures. A phase diagram that describes different dynamics of vortices is presented.

  14. Elliptic equation for random walks. Application to transport in microporous media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shapiro, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    We consider a process of random walks with arbitrary residence time distribution. We show that in many cases this process may not be described by the classical (Fick) parabolic diffusion equation, but an elliptic equation. An additional term proportional to the second time derivative takes...... into account the distribution of the residence times of molecules ill pores. The new elliptic diffusion equation is strictly derived by the operator approach. A criterion showing where the new equation should be applied instead of the standard diffusion equation is obtained. Boundary conditions are studied...

  15. Random matrix theory applied to acoustic backscattering and imaging in complex media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubry, Alexandre; Derode, Arnaud

    2009-02-27

    The singular values distribution of the propagation operator in a random medium is investigated in a backscattering configuration. Experiments are carried out with pulsed ultrasonic waves around 3 MHz, using an array of transducers. Coherent backscattering and field correlations are taken into account. Interestingly, the distribution of singular values shows a dramatically different behavior in the single and multiple-scattering regimes. Based on a matrix separation of single and multiple-scattered waves, an experimental illustration of imaging through a highly scattering slab is presented.

  16. Wave propagation through random media: A local method of small perturbations based on the Helmholtz equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosse, Ralf

    1990-01-01

    Propagation of sound through the turbulent atmosphere is a statistical problem. The randomness of the refractive index field causes sound pressure fluctuations. Although no general theory to predict sound pressure statistics from given refractive index statistics exists, there are several approximate solutions to the problem. The most common approximation is the parabolic equation method. Results obtained by this method are restricted to small refractive index fluctuations and to small wave lengths. While the first condition is generally met in the atmosphere, it is desirable to overcome the second. A generalization of the parabolic equation method with respect to the small wave length restriction is presented.

  17. Random lasing action in a polydimethylsiloxane wrinkle induced disordered structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Zhenhua; Wu, Leilei; Zhu, Shu; Zheng, Yuanlin; Chen, Xianfeng, E-mail: xfchen@sjtu.edu.cn [The State Key Laboratory of Advanced Optical Communication Systems and Networks, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2014-07-14

    This paper presents a chip-scale random lasing action utilizing polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) wrinkles with random periods as disordered medium. Nanoscale wrinkles with long range disorder structures are formed on the oxidized surface of a PDMS slab and confirmed by atomic force microscopy. Light multiply scattered at each PDMS wrinkle-dye interfaces is optically amplified in the presence of pump gain. The shift of laser emission wavelength when pumping at different regions indicates the randomness of the winkle period. In addition, a relatively low threshold of about 27 μJ/mm{sup 2} is realized, which is comparable with traditional optofluidic dye laser. This is due to the unique sinusoidal Bragg-grating-like random structure. Contrast to conventional microfluidic dye laser that inevitably requires the accurate design and implementation of microcavity to provide optical feedback, the convenience in both fabrication and operation makes PDMS wrinkle based random laser a promising underlying element in lab-on-a-chip systems and integrated microfluidic networks.

  18. Subquantum nonlocal correlations induced by the background random field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khrennikov, Andrei

    2011-10-01

    We developed a purely field model of microphenomena—prequantum classical statistical field theory (PCSFT). This model not only reproduces important probabilistic predictions of quantum mechanics (QM) including correlations for entangled systems, but also gives a possibility to go beyond QM, i.e. to make predictions of phenomena that could be observed at the subquantum level. In this paper, we discuss one such prediction—the existence of nonlocal correlations between prequantum random fields corresponding to all quantum systems. (And by PCSFT, quantum systems are represented by classical Gaussian random fields and quantum observables by quadratic forms of these fields.) The source of these correlations is the common background field. Thus all prequantum random fields are 'entangled', but in the sense of classical signal theory. On the one hand, PCSFT demystifies quantum nonlocality by reducing it to nonlocal classical correlations based on the common random background. On the other hand, it demonstrates total generality of such correlations. They exist even for distinguishable quantum systems in factorizable states (by PCSFT terminology—for Gaussian random fields with covariance operators corresponding to factorizable quantum states).

  19. The shape effect of Au particles on random laser action in disordered media of Rh6G dye doped with PMMA polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jiajia; Feng, Guoying; Zhou, Shouhuan; Zhang, Hong; Wang, Shutong; Zhang, Hua

    2016-10-01

    Random laser actions in a disordered media based on polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) polymer doped with Rh6G dye and Au nanoparticles have been demonstrated. It was observed that the shape of Au nanoparticles can tune the spectral central position of the random laser action. It was also seen that the shape of Au nanoparticles strongly affects the pump threshold. Comparing nanosphere- and nanorod-based systems, the nanorod-based one exhibited a lower threshold.

  20. Solvable continuous-time random walk model of the motion of tracer particles through porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouxon, Itzhak; Holzner, Markus

    2016-08-01

    We consider the continuous-time random walk (CTRW) model of tracer motion in porous medium flows based on the experimentally determined distributions of pore velocity and pore size reported by Holzner et al. [M. Holzner et al., Phys. Rev. E 92, 013015 (2015)PLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.92.013015]. The particle's passing through one channel is modeled as one step of the walk. The step (channel) length is random and the walker's velocity at consecutive steps of the walk is conserved with finite probability, mimicking that at the turning point there could be no abrupt change of velocity. We provide the Laplace transform of the characteristic function of the walker's position and reductions for different cases of independence of the CTRW's step duration τ, length l, and velocity v. We solve our model with independent l and v. The model incorporates different forms of the tail of the probability density of small velocities that vary with the model parameter α. Depending on that parameter, all types of anomalous diffusion can hold, from super- to subdiffusion. In a finite interval of α, ballistic behavior with logarithmic corrections holds, which was observed in a previously introduced CTRW model with independent l and τ. Universality of tracer diffusion in the porous medium is considered.

  1. Monte Carlo simulation and self-consistent integral equation theory for polymers in quenched random media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Bong June; Yethiraj, Arun

    2005-08-15

    The conformational properties and static structure of freely jointed hard-sphere chains in matrices composed of stationary hard spheres are studied using Monte Carlo simulations and integral equation theory. The simulations show that the chain size is a nonmonotonic function of the matrix density when the matrix spheres are the same size as the monomers. When the matrix spheres are of the order of the chain size the chain size decreases monotonically with increasing matrix volume fraction. The simulations are used to test the replica-symmetric polymer reference interaction site model (RSP) integral equation theory. When the simulation results for the intramolecular correlation functions are input into the theory, the agreement between theoretical predictions and simulation results for the pair-correlation functions is quantitative only at the highest fluid volume fractions and for small matrix sphere sizes. The RSP theory is also implemented in a self-consistent fashion, i.e., the intramolecular and intermolecular correlation functions are calculated self-consistently by combining a field theory with the integral equations. The theory captures qualitative trends observed in the simulations, such as the nonmonotonic dependence of the chain size on media fraction.

  2. Experimental added modal damping induced by confined granular media on a single degree of freedom system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternberger, Antoine; Pelat, Adrien; Génevaux, Jean-Michel

    2017-06-01

    The use of granular media to induce vibration energy's dissipation in lighter huge industrial structures permits to decrease the mass of the structure and consequently to spare the construction's cost and to satisfy oil consumption. In fact, when the structure in which the granular media is in contact overtakes an acceleration threshold, relative movements of the grains appears which lead to a dissipation of energy. When the grains are confined inside a cavity, the dissipation's level depends on several parameters (the acceleration's amplitude, the frequency, the grain's characteristics, the cavity's dimensions, the cavity's filling ratio, the fluid between the particles, etc.). This study quantifies the influence of several parameters by exciting uniformly a given volume of grains. A modal damping coefficient of a single degree of freedom system (SDOF) can be thus calculated as a function of the preceding parameters.

  3. Is office-based counseling about media use, timeouts, and firearm storage effective? Results from a cluster-randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkin, Shari L; Finch, Stacia A; Ip, Edward H; Scheindlin, Benjamin; Craig, Joseph A; Steffes, Jennifer; Weiley, Victoria; Slora, Eric; Altman, David; Wasserman, Richard C

    2008-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether patients' families' violence-prevention behaviors would be affected by their primary care practitioner's use of a violence-prevention clinical intervention during the routine well-child examination. In this cluster-randomized, controlled trial (2002-2006), 137 Pediatric Research in Office Settings practices were randomly assigned and initiated patient recruitment for either an office-based violence-prevention intervention or a control group (educational handout on literacy promotion provided). Primary caregivers of children who were aged 2 to 11 years and presented for a well-child visit were surveyed at baseline and 1 and 6 months. Practitioners were trained to (1) review a parent previsit summary regarding patient-family behavior and parental concern about media use, discipline strategies, and children's exposure to firearms, (2) counsel using brief principles of motivational interviewing, (3) identify and provide local agency resources for anger and behavior management when indicated, and (4) instruct patient-families on use of tangible tools (minute timers to monitor media time/timeouts and firearm cable locks to store firearms more safely where children live or play). Main outcomes were change over time in self-reported media use media use and safer firearm storage. The intervention group compared with the control group showed an increase in limiting media use to media exposure and increased safe firearm storage as a result of a brief office-based violence-prevention approach.

  4. Anomaly detection in random heterogeneous media Feynman-Kac formulae, stochastic homogenization and statistical inversion

    CERN Document Server

    Simon, Martin

    2015-01-01

    This monograph is concerned with the analysis and numerical solution of a stochastic inverse anomaly detection problem in electrical impedance tomography (EIT). Martin Simon studies the problem of detecting a parameterized anomaly in an isotropic, stationary and ergodic conductivity random field whose realizations are rapidly oscillating. For this purpose, he derives Feynman-Kac formulae to rigorously justify stochastic homogenization in the case of the underlying stochastic boundary value problem. The author combines techniques from the theory of partial differential equations and functional analysis with probabilistic ideas, paving the way to new mathematical theorems which may be fruitfully used in the treatment of the problem at hand. Moreover, the author proposes an efficient numerical method in the framework of Bayesian inversion for the practical solution of the stochastic inverse anomaly detection problem.   Contents Feynman-Kac formulae Stochastic homogenization Statistical inverse problems  Targe...

  5. Nonlinear propagation and decay of intense regular and random waves in relaxing media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurbatov, S. N.; Rudenko, O. V.; Demin, I. Yu.

    2015-10-01

    An integro-differential equation is written down that contains terms responsible for nonlinear absorption, visco-heat-conducting dissipation, and relaxation processes in a medium. A general integral expression is obtained for calculating energy losses of the wave with arbitrary characteristics—intensity, profile (frequency spectrum), and kernel describing the internal dynamics of the medium. Profiles of stationary solutions are constructed both for an exponential relaxation kernel and for other types of kernels. Energy losses at the front of week shock waves are calculated. General integral formulas are obtained for energy losses of intense noise, which are determined by the form of the kernel, the structure of the noise correlation function, and the mean square of the derivative of realization of a random process.

  6. Two- and three-phase equilibria of polydisperse Yukawa hard-sphere fluids confined in random porous media: high temperature approximation and scaled particle theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hvozd, Taras V; Kalyuzhnyi, Yurij V

    2017-02-15

    We have studied the phase behavior of polydisperse Yukawa hard-sphere fluid confined in random porous media using extension and combination of high temperature approximation and scaled particle theory. The porous media are represented by the matrix of randomly placed hard-sphere obstacles. Due to the confinement, polydispersity effects are substantially enhanced. At an intermediate degree of fluid polydispersity and low density of the matrix, we observe two-phase coexistence with two critical points, and cloud and shadow curves forming closed loops of ellipsoidal shape. With the increase of the matrix density and the constant degree of polydispersity, these two critical points merge and disappear, and at lower temperatures the system fractionates into three coexisting phases. A similar phase behavior was observed in the absence of the porous media caused, however, by the increase of the polydispersity.

  7. A white noise approach to the Feynman integrand for electrons in random media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grothaus, M.; Riemann, F.; Suryawan, H. P.

    2014-01-01

    Using the Feynman path integral representation of quantum mechanics it is possible to derive a model of an electron in a random system containing dense and weakly coupled scatterers [see F. Edwards and Y. B. Gulyaev, "The density of states of a highly impure semiconductor," Proc. Phys. Soc. 83, 495-496 (1964)]. The main goal of this paper is to give a mathematically rigorous realization of the corresponding Feynman integrand in dimension one based on the theory of white noise analysis. We refine and apply a Wick formula for the product of a square-integrable function with Donsker's delta functions and use a method of complex scaling. As an essential part of the proof we also establish the existence of the exponential of the self-intersection local times of a one-dimensional Brownian bridge. As a result we obtain a neat formula for the propagator with identical start and end point. Thus, we obtain a well-defined mathematical object which is used to calculate the density of states [see, e.g., F. Edwards and Y. B. Gulyaev, "The density of states of a highly impure semiconductor," Proc. Phys. Soc. 83, 495-496 (1964)].

  8. Envelope Synthesis In Random Media - Radiative Transfer Versus Finite Difference Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przybilla, J.; Korn, M.; Wegler, U.

    2004-12-01

    The analysis of the coda portion of seismograms is an effective strategy to investigate the heterogeneous structure of the Earth at small scales. Usually the shape of seismogram envelopes at high frequencies are studied. A powerful method to synthesize envelopes is based on the radiative transfer theory, which describes energy transport through a scattering medium. The radiative transfer equations can conveniently be solved by a Monte Carlo simulation of random walks of energy particles through such a medium. Between single scattering events each particle moves through the background medium along ray paths. The probability of a scattering event is determined by the mean free path length depending on the total scattering coefficient of the medium. Monte Carlo simulations have so far mostly assumed isotropic scattering and acoustic approximations, as well as isotropic source radiation. Here we present an extension of this method to the full elastic case including P and S waves, and for angular dependent scattering coefficients according to the Born approximation. In order to validate this procedure, the results of the simulations are compared to envelopes obtained from full wave field modeling in 2D employing a finite difference method. Envelope shapes agree remarkably well for both short and long lapse times and for a broad range of scattering parameters. This leads to the conclusion that the use of Born scattering coefficients does not pose severe limits to the validity range of Monte Carlo method. From the comparison between elastic and acoustic simulations it becomes apparent that wave type conversions should not be neglected, especially when both P and S coda are interpreted simultaneously. Additionally, the influence of density fluctuations on envelope shapes has also been studied. It appears that the amount of density variations has a large effect on the level of the late coda only, thus showing a possibility to discriminate between velocity and density

  9. Back-scatter analysis based algorithms for increasing transmission through highly-scattering random media using phase-only modulated wavefronts

    CERN Document Server

    Jin, Curtis; Michielssen, Eric; Rand, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental advances have shed light on the existence of so-called `perfectly transmitting' wavefronts with transmission coefficients close to 1 in strongly backscattering random media. These perfectly transmitting eigen-wavefronts can be synthesized by spatial amplitude and phase modulation. Here, we consider the problem of transmission enhancement using phase-only modulated wavefronts. We develop physically realizable iterative and non-iterative algorithms for increasing the transmission through such random media using backscatter analysis. We theoretically show that, despite the phase-only modulation constraint, the non-iterative algorithms will achieve at least about 25$\\pi$% or about 78.5% transmission assuming there is at least one perfectly transmitting eigen-wavefront and that the singular vectors of the transmission matrix obey a maximum entropy principle so that they are isotropically random. We numerically analyze the limits of phase-only modulated transmission in 2-D with f...

  10. Recovery of Topological Order Induced by Random Perturbations

    CERN Document Server

    Tsomokos, D I; Castelnovo, C

    2010-01-01

    We analyze the toric code model in presence of quenched disorder, which is introduced via different types of random magnetic fields. Remarkably, we find that topological order can be robust against arbitrarily strong disorder. In general, close to a quantum phase transition between a spin polarized phase and a topologically ordered one, increasing the amount of disorder favors the topological phase. For some realizations of disorder, a quantum spin glass phase borders the topological phase, thus leading to a peculiar transition between two quantum spin liquids, which differ purely by nonlocal properties.

  11. A Social Media Peer Group for Mothers To Prevent Obesity from Infancy: The Grow2Gether Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiks, Alexander G; Gruver, Rachel S; Bishop-Gilyard, Chanelle T; Shults, Justine; Virudachalam, Senbagam; Suh, Andrew W; Gerdes, Marsha; Kalra, Gurpreet K; DeRusso, Patricia A; Lieberman, Alexandra; Weng, Daniel; Elovitz, Michal A; Berkowitz, Robert I; Power, Thomas J

    2017-05-30

    Few studies have addressed obesity prevention among low-income families whose infants are at increased obesity risk. We tested a Facebook peer-group intervention for low-income mothers to foster behaviors promoting healthy infant growth. In this randomized controlled trial, 87 pregnant women (Medicaid insured, BMI ≥25 kg/m(2)) were randomized to the Grow2Gether intervention or text message appointment reminders. Grow2Gether participants joined a private Facebook group of 9-13 women from 2 months before delivery until infant age 9 months. A psychologist facilitated groups featuring a curriculum of weekly videos addressing feeding, sleep, parenting, and maternal well-being. Feasibility was assessed using the frequency and content of participation, and acceptability using surveys. Maternal beliefs and behaviors and infant growth were assessed at birth, 2, 4, 6, and 9 months. Differences in infant growth between study arms were explored. We conducted intention-to-treat analyses using quasi-least-squares regression. Eighty-eight percent (75/85) of intervention participants (42% (36/85) food insecure, 88% (75/85) black) reported the group was helpful. Participants posted 30 times/group/week on average. At 9 months, the intervention group had significant improvement in feeding behaviors (Infant Feeding Style Questionnaire) compared to the control group (p = 0.01, effect size = 0.45). Intervention group mothers were significantly less likely to pressure infants to finish food and, at age 6 months, give cereal in the bottle. Differences were not observed for other outcomes, including maternal feeding beliefs or infant weight-for-length. A social media peer-group intervention was engaging and significantly impacted certain feeding behaviors in families with infants at high risk of obesity.

  12. Electromagnetic fluctuation-induced interactions in randomly charged slabs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezvani, Vahid; Sarabadani, Jalal; Naji, Ali; Podgornik, Rudolf

    2012-09-01

    Randomly charged net-neutral dielectric slabs are shown to interact across a featureless dielectric continuum with long-range electrostatic forces that scale with the statistical variance of their quenched random charge distribution and inversely with the distance between their bounding surfaces. By accounting for the whole spectrum of electromagnetic field fluctuations, we show that this long-range disorder-generated interaction extends well into the retarded regime where higher order (non-zero) Matsubara frequencies contribute significantly. This occurs even for highly clean samples with only a trace amount of charge disorder and shows that disorder effects can be important down to the nanoscale. As a result, the previously predicted non-monotonic behavior for the total force between dissimilar slabs as a function of their separation distance is substantially modified by higher order contributions, and in almost all cases of interest, we find that the equilibrium inter-surface separation is shifted to substantially larger values compared to predictions based solely on the zero-frequency component. This suggests that the ensuing non-monotonic interaction is more easily amenable to experimental detection. The presence of charge disorder in the intervening dielectric medium between the two slabs is shown to lead to an additional force that can be repulsive or attractive depending on the system parameters and can, for instance, wash out the non-monotonic behavior of the total force when the intervening slab contains a sufficiently large amount of disorder charges.

  13. Electromagnetic fluctuation-induced interactions in randomly charged slabs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezvani, Vahid; Sarabadani, Jalal; Naji, Ali; Podgornik, Rudolf

    2012-09-21

    Randomly charged net-neutral dielectric slabs are shown to interact across a featureless dielectric continuum with long-range electrostatic forces that scale with the statistical variance of their quenched random charge distribution and inversely with the distance between their bounding surfaces. By accounting for the whole spectrum of electromagnetic field fluctuations, we show that this long-range disorder-generated interaction extends well into the retarded regime where higher order (non-zero) Matsubara frequencies contribute significantly. This occurs even for highly clean samples with only a trace amount of charge disorder and shows that disorder effects can be important down to the nanoscale. As a result, the previously predicted non-monotonic behavior for the total force between dissimilar slabs as a function of their separation distance is substantially modified by higher order contributions, and in almost all cases of interest, we find that the equilibrium inter-surface separation is shifted to substantially larger values compared to predictions based solely on the zero-frequency component. This suggests that the ensuing non-monotonic interaction is more easily amenable to experimental detection. The presence of charge disorder in the intervening dielectric medium between the two slabs is shown to lead to an additional force that can be repulsive or attractive depending on the system parameters and can, for instance, wash out the non-monotonic behavior of the total force when the intervening slab contains a sufficiently large amount of disorder charges.

  14. Numerical studies of the scattering of light from a two-dimensional randomly rough interface between two dielectric media

    CERN Document Server

    Hetland, Øyvind S; Nordam, Tor; Simonsen, Ingve

    2016-01-01

    The scattering of polarized light incident from one dielectric medium on its two-dimensional randomly rough interface with a second dielectric medium is studied. A reduced Rayleigh equation for the scattering amplitudes is derived for the case where p- or s-polarized light is incident on this interface, with no assumptions being made regarding the dielectric functions of the media. Rigorous, purely numerical, nonperturbative solutions of this equation are obtained. They are used to calculate the reflectivity and reflectance of the interface, the mean differential reflection coefficient, and the full angular distribution of the intensity of the scattered light. These results are obtained for both the case where the medium of incidence is the optically less dense medium, and in the case where it is the optically more dense medium. Optical analogues of the Yoneda peaks observed in the scattering of x-rays from metal surfaces are present in the results obtained in the latter case. Brewster scattering angles for d...

  15. An online randomized controlled trial evaluating HIV prevention digital media interventions for men who have sex with men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabina Hirshfield

    Full Text Available As HIV infection continues unabated, there is a need for effective interventions targeting at-risk men who have sex with men (MSM. Engaging MSM online where they meet sexual partners is critical for HIV prevention efforts.A randomized controlled trial (RCT conducted online among U.S. MSM recruited from several gay sexual networking websites assessed the impact of 2 HIV prevention videos and an HIV prevention webpage compared to a control condition for the study outcomes HIV testing, serostatus disclosure, and unprotected anal intercourse (UAI at 60-day follow-up. Video conditions were pooled due to reduced power from low retention (53%, n = 1,631. No participant incentives were provided.Follow-up was completed by 1,631 (53% of 3,092 eligible men. In the 60 days after the intervention, men in the pooled video condition were significantly more likely than men in the control to report full serostatus disclosure ('asked and told' with their last sexual partner (OR 1.32, 95% CI 1.01-1.74. Comparing baseline to follow-up, HIV-negative men in the pooled video (OR 0.70, 95% CI 0.54-0.91 and webpage condition (OR 0.43, 95% CI 0.25-0.72 significantly reduced UAI at follow-up. HIV-positive men in the pooled video condition significantly reduced UAI (OR 0.38, 95% CI 0.20-0.67 and serodiscordant UAI (OR 0.53, 95% CI 0.28-0.96 at follow-up.Findings from this online RCT of MSM recruited from sexual networking websites suggest that a low cost, brief digital media intervention designed to engage critical thinking can increase HIV disclosure to sexual partners and decrease sexual risk. Effective, brief HIV prevention interventions featuring digital media that are made widely available may serve as a complementary part of an overall behavioral and biomedical strategy for reducing sexual risk by addressing the specific needs and circumstances of the target population, and by changing individual knowledge, motivations, and community norms.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT

  16. Portable Video Media Versus Standard Verbal Communication in Surgical Information Delivery to Nurses: A Prospective Multicenter, Randomized Controlled Crossover Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kam, Jonathan; Ainsworth, Hannah; Handmer, Marcus; Louie-Johnsun, Mark; Winter, Matthew

    2016-10-01

    Continuing education of health professionals is important for delivery of quality health care. Surgical nurses are often required to understand surgical procedures. Nurses need to be aware of the expected outcomes and recognize potential complications of such procedures during their daily work. Traditional educational methods, such as conferences and tutorials or informal education at the bedside, have many drawbacks for delivery of this information in a universal, standardized, and timely manner. The rapid uptake of portable media devices makes portable video media (PVM) a potential alternative to current educational methods. To compare PVM to standard verbal communication (SVC) for surgical information delivery and educational training for nurses and evaluate its impact on knowledge acquisition and participant satisfaction. Prospective, multicenter, randomized controlled crossover trial. Two hospitals: Gosford District Hospital and Wyong Hospital. Seventy-two nursing staff (36 at each site). Information delivery via PVM--7-minute video compared to information delivered via SVC. Knowledge acquisition was measured by a 32-point questionnaire, and satisfaction with the method of education delivery was measured using the validated Client Satisfaction Questionnaire (CSQ-8). Knowledge acquisition was higher via PVM compared to SVC 25.9 (95% confidence interval [CI] 25.2-26.6) versus 24.3 (95% CI 23.5-25.1), p = .004. Participant satisfaction was higher with PVM 29.5 (95% CI 28.3-30.7) versus 26.5 (95% CI 25.1-27.9), p = .003. Following information delivery via SVC, participants had a 6% increase in knowledge scores, 24.3 (95% CI 23.5-25.1) versus 25.7 (95% CI 24.9-26.5) p = .001, and a 13% increase in satisfaction scores, 26.5 (95% CI 25.1-27.9) versus 29.9 (95% CI 28.8-31.0) p information delivery via PVM. PVM provides a novel method for providing education to nurses that improves knowledge retention and satisfaction with the educational process. © 2016 Sigma Theta

  17. Improving degradation of emerging organic compounds by applying chaotic advection in Managed Aquifer Recharge in randomly heterogeneous porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Escales, P.; Fernà ndez-Garcia, D.; Drechsel, J.; Folch, A.; Sanchez-Vila, X.

    2017-05-01

    Improving degradation rates of emerging organic compounds (EOCs) in groundwater is still a challenge. Although their degradation is not fully understood, it has been observed that some substances are preferably degraded under specific redox conditions. The coupling of Managed Aquifer Recharge with soil aquifer remediation treatment, by placing a reactive layer containing organic matter at the bottom of the infiltration pond, is a promising technology to improve the rate of degradation of EOCs. Its success is based on assuming that recharged water and groundwater get well mixed, which is not always true. It has been demonstrated that mixing can be enhanced by inducing chaotic advection through extraction-injection-engineering. In this work, we analyze how chaotic advection might enhance the spreading of redox conditions with the final aim of improving degradation of a mix of benzotriazoles: benzotriazole, 5-methyl-benzotriazole, and 5-chloro-benzotriazole. The degradation of the first two compounds was fastest under aerobic conditions whereas the third compound was best degraded under denitrification conditions. We developed a reactive transport model that describes how a recharged water rich in organic matter mixes with groundwater, how this organic matter is oxidized by different electron acceptors, and how the benzotriazoles are degraded attending for the redox state. The model was tested in different scenarios of recharge, both in homogenous and in heterogenous media. It was found that chaotic flow increases the spreading of the plume of recharged water. Consequently, different redox conditions coexist at a given time, facilitating the degradation of EOCs.

  18. Nutritional Online Information for Cancer Patients: a Randomized Trial of an Internet Communication Plus Social Media Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnagnarella, Patrizia; Misotti, Alessandro Maria; Santoro, Luigi; Akoumianakis, Demosthenes; Del Campo, Laura; De Lorenzo, Francesco; Lombardo, Claudio; Milolidakis, Giannis; Sullivan, Richard; McVie, John Gordon

    2016-09-01

    We hypothesized that cancer patients using an Internet website would show an improvement in the knowledge about healthy eating habits, and this might be enhanced by social media interaction. A 6-month randomized intervention was set up. Eligible subjects were allocated in intervention (IG) and control groups (CG). IG had access to the website, and CG was provided with printed versions. All enrolled participants filled in Nutrition Questionnaire (NQ), Quality of Life Questionnaire (QoL) and Psychological Distress Inventory (PDI), at baseline and after 6 months. The difference between post- vs pre-questionnaires was calculated. Seventy-four subjects (CG 39; IG 35) completed the study. There was an increase in the score after the intervention in both groups for the NQ, even if not statistically significant. Dividing the IG into three categories, no (NI), low (LI) and high interactions (HI), we found a decreased score (improvement) in the CG (-0.2) and in the HI (-1.7), and an increased score (worsening) in the NI (+3.3) (p = NS) analysing the PDI. We found an increased score in the QoL both in CG and IG (adjusted LSMeans +3.5 and +2.8 points, respectively; p = NS). This study represents an example for support cancer patients. Despite the lack of significant effects, critical points and problems encountered may be of interest to researchers and organization working in the cancer setting. Intervention strategies to support patients during the care process are needed in order to attain the full potential of patient-centred care on cancer outcomes.

  19. Thermodynamically Consistent Fluid Mixing in Porous Media Induced by Viscous Fingering and Channeling of Multiphase Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amooie, Mohammad Amin; Soltanian, Mohammad Reza; Moortgat, Joachim

    2016-11-01

    Fluid mixing and its interplay with viscous fingering as well as flow channeling through heterogeneous media have been traditionally studied for fully (im)miscible conditions in which a (two-) single-phase system is represented by two components, e.g. a solvent and a solute, with (zero) infinite mutual solubility. However, many subsurface problems, e.g. gas injection/migration in hydrocarbon reservoirs, involve multiple species transfer. Multicomponent fluid properties behave non-linearly, through an equation of state, as a function of temperature, pressure, and compositions. Depending on the minimum miscibility pressure, a two-phase region with finite, non-zero mutual solubility may develop, e.g. in a partially-miscible system. Here we study mixing of fluids with partial mutual solubility, induced by viscous flow fingering, channeling, and species transport within and between phases. We uncover non-linear mixing dynamics of a finite-size slug of a less viscous fluid attenuated by a carrier fluid during rectilinear displacement. We perform accurate numerical simulations that are thermodynamically-consistent to capture fingering patterns and complex phase behavior of mixtures. The results provide a broad perspective into how multiphase flow can alter fluid mixing in porous media.

  20. Investigating the thermally induced acoustoelastic effect in isotropic media with Lamb waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodson, Jacob C; Inman, Daniel J

    2014-11-01

    Elastic wave velocities in metallic structures are affected by variations in environmental conditions such as changing temperature. This paper extends the theory of acoustoelasticity by allowing thermally induced strains in unconstrained isotropic media, and it experimentally examines the velocity variation of Lamb waves in aluminum plates (AL-6061) due to isothermal temperature deviations. This paper presents both thermally induced acoustoelastic constants and thermally varying effective Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio which include the third order elastic material constants. The experimental thermal sensitivity of the phase velocity (∂v(P)/∂θ) for both the symmetric and antisymmetric modes are bounded by two theories, the acoustoelastic Lamb wave theory with thermo-acoustoelastic tensors and the thermoelastic Lamb wave theory using an effective thermo-acoustoelastic moduli. This paper shows the theoretical thermally induced acoustoelastic Lamb wave thermal sensitivity (∂v(P)/∂θ) is an upper bound approximation of the experimental thermal changes, but the acoustoelastic Lamb wave theory is not valid for predicting the antisymmetric (A0) phase velocity at low frequency-thickness values, <1.55 MHz mm for various temperatures.

  1. A possible role for cysteinyl-leukotrienes in non-ionic contrast media induced adverse reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehm, Ingrid [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund Freud Strasse 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany)]. E-mail: i.boehm@uni-bonn.de; Speck, Ulrich [Department of Radiology, Humboldt University (Charite) of Berlin (Germany); Schild, Hans [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund Freud Strasse 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany)

    2005-09-01

    Purpose: To test whether mono- or dimeric X-ray contrast media (CM) may induce the de novo production of cysteinyl-leukotriens (cys-LT), that could contribute to allergic/allergy-like side effects. Materials and methods: Leukocytes from 39 patients receiving iopromide or iotrolan for routine CT-examination were analyzed for the production of cys-LT. Histamine levels were analyzed in plasma specimens. One patient with a positive history of a previous CM-reaction did not receive CM-injection. Results: Three patients of the iopromide and five of the iotrolan group showed adverse reactions. Reactors had increased cys-LT values in samples obtained before CM-injection induced by the positive control (anti-Fc{epsilon}RI antibodies) (6763.7 pg/ml {+-} 1367.3 versus 2299.8 pg/ml {+-} 399.2; p < 0.007). Patients with versus without CM-reaction did not differ significantly with respect to their histamine values before CM-administeration. In vitro iopromide (p < 0.0002) and iotrolan (p < 0.0008) induced significant cys-LT production as compared to IL-3 stimulation. In vivo both CM induced a significant increase 6 h after CM administration (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Our findings suggest that both CM seem to induce cys-LT production. As to whether the observed increased values in pre-dose samples of patients with as compared to those without reactions could contribute to identify high risk patients should be investigated in larger patient groups in future.

  2. Efficacy and Safety of Ciprofloxacin Plus Fluocinolone in Otitis Media With Tympanostomy Tubes in Pediatric Patients: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spektor, Zorik; Pumarola, Felix; Ismail, Khaleed; Lanier, Brent; Hussain, Iftikhar; Ansley, John; Butehorn, Henry F; Esterhuizen, Kenneth; Byers, John; Douglis, Franklin; Lansford, Bryan; Hernández, F Javier

    2017-04-01

    Acute otitis media with tympanostomy tubes (AOMT) in children commonly presents with otorrhea and negatively affects their daily activities. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of topical ciprofloxacin, 0.3%, plus fluocinolone acetonide, 0.025%, otic solution relative to ciprofloxacin, 0.3%, otic solution alone and fluocinolone acetonide, 0.025%, otic solution alone in the treatment of AOMT in children. Two twin multicenter, randomized, double-blind clinical trials with identical designs were conducted from June 24, 2011, through June 23, 2014, at ear, nose, and throat pediatric practices, general practices, hospitals, and clinical research centers. The study population comprised 662 children (331 in each trial) with AOMT in at least 1 ear who presented with moderate or severe purulent otorrhea for 3 weeks or less. Data analyses were performed on an intention-to-treat basis. Patients were randomly assigned to receive ciprofloxacin plus fluocinolone, ciprofloxacin alone, or fluocinolone alone twice daily for 7 days and were evaluated on days 1 (baseline), 3 to 5 (undergoing therapy), 8 to 10 (end of therapy), and 18 to 22 (test of cure). The primary efficacy measure was time to cessation of otorrhea. The principal secondary end point was sustained microbiological cure, defined as eradication or presumed eradication at end-of-therapy and test-of-cure visits. A total of 662 children participating in the 2 studies were randomized to receive ciprofloxacin plus fluocinolone (n = 223), ciprofloxacin alone (n = 221), or fluocinolone alone (n = 218). The median age was 2.5 years (range, 0.6-12.7 years). The median time to cessation of otorrhea was 4.23 days (95% CI, 3.65-4.95 days) in patients receiving ciprofloxacin plus fluocinolone compared with 6.95 days (95% CI, 5.66-8.20 days) in those receiving ciprofloxacin and not estimable findings in those receiving fluocinolone alone (P ciprofloxacin plus fluocinolone group, 67.4% in the ciprofloxacin group

  3. Crowd-induced random vibration of footbridge and vibration control using multiple tuned mass dampers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Quan; Fan, Jiansheng; Nie, Jianguo; Li, Quanwang; Chen, Yu

    2010-09-01

    This paper investigates vibration characteristics of footbridge induced by crowd random walking, and presents the application of multiple tuned mass dampers (MTMD) in suppressing crowd-induced vibration. A single foot force model for the vertical component of walking-induced force is developed, avoiding the phase angle inaccessibility of the continuous walking force. Based on the single foot force model, the crowd-footbridge random vibration model, in which pedestrians are modeled as a crowd flow characterized with the average time headway, is developed to consider the worst vibration state of footbridge. In this random vibration model, an analytic formulation is developed to calculate the acceleration power spectral density in arbitrary position of footbridge with arbitrary span layout. Resonant effect is observed as the footbridge natural frequencies fall within the frequency bandwidth of crowd excitation. To suppress the excessive acceleration for human normal walking comfort, a MTMD system is used to improve the footbridge dynamic characteristics. According to the random vibration model, an optimization procedure, based on the minimization of maximum root-mean-square (rms) acceleration of footbridge, is introduced to determine the optimal design parameters of MTMD system. Numerical analysis shows that the proposed MTMD designed by random optimization procedure, is more effective than traditional MTMD design methodology in reducing dynamic response during crowd-footbridge resonance, and that the proper frequency spacing enlargement will effectively reduce the off-tuning effect of MTMD.

  4. Dynamic random links enhance diversity-induced coherence in strongly coupled neuronal systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Neeraj Kumar Kamal; Sudeshna Sinha

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the influence of diversity on the temporal regularity of spiking in a ring of coupled model neurons. We find diversity-induced coherence in the spike events, with an optimal amount of parametric heterogeneity at the nodal level yielding the greatest regularity in the spike train. Further, we investigate the system under random spatial connections, where the links are both dynamic and quenched, and in all the cases we observe marked diversity-induced coherence. We quantitatively find the effect of coupling strength and random rewiring probability, on the optimal coherence that can be achieved under diversity. Our results indicate that the largest coherence in the spike events emerge when the coupling strength is high, and when the underlying connections are mostly random and dynamically changing.

  5. Randomized controlled trial of primary care pediatric parenting programs: effect on reduced media exposure in infants, mediated through enhanced parent-child interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendelsohn, Alan L; Dreyer, Benard P; Brockmeyer, Carolyn A; Berkule-Silberman, Samantha B; Huberman, Harris S; Tomopoulos, Suzy

    2011-01-01

    To determine whether pediatric primary care-based programs to enhance parenting and early child development reduce media exposure and whether enhanced parenting mediates the effects. Randomized controlled trial. Urban public hospital pediatric primary care clinic. A total of 410 mother-newborn dyads enrolled after childbirth. Patients were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 interventions, the Video Interaction Project (VIP) and Building Blocks (BB) interventions, or to a control group. The VIP intervention comprised 1-on-1 sessions with a child development specialist who facilitated interactions in play and shared reading through review of videotapes made of the parent and child on primary care visit days; learning materials and parenting pamphlets were also provided. The BB intervention mailed parenting materials, including age-specific newsletters suggesting activities to facilitate interactions, learning materials, and parent-completed developmental questionnaires (Ages and Stages questionnaires). Electronic media exposure in the home using a 24-hour recall diary. The mean (SD) exposure at 6 months was 146.5 (125.0) min/d. Exposure to VIP was associated with reduced total duration of media exposure compared with the BB and control groups (mean [SD] min/d for VIP, 131.6 [118.7]; BB, 151.2 [116.7]; control, 155.4 [138.7]; P = .009). Enhanced parent-child interactions were found to partially mediate relations between VIP and media exposure for families with a ninth grade or higher literacy level (Sobel statistic = 2.49; P = .01). Pediatric primary care may represent an important venue for addressing the public health problem of media exposure in young children at a population level. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00212576.

  6. Development of a numerical model to characterize laser-induced plasmas in aqueous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehteshami, M. Z.; Salehi, M. R.; Abiri, E.

    2017-09-01

    A spatio-temporal model for investigating the characteristics of laser-induced plasmas in aqueous media is developed by modifying the general form of the well-known rate equation and simultaneously accounting for the influences of multiphoton and cascade ionization on the propagation of short laser pulses. In this model, the nonlinear absorption of laser pulse energy is considered to be time and space dependent inside the computational volume. The model is verified by comparing the results of three-dimensional axisymmetric numerical simulations with existing experimental data for laser pulses of 30 ps, 1064 nm at focusing angles between 4° and 28° with energies in the wide range between 0.1 to 6000 μJ. This model could reasonably predict the various characteristics of a laser-induced plasma, such as breakdown threshold, size, shape and energy transmitted through the plasma. Also the transmitted energy data obtained from the model is within 10% of the experimental data at the largest focusing angle and 20% at the smallest angle. To compare the calculations with plasma photographs, electron density values are transformed into a gray scale. The simulated plasma shapes correlate well with the existing experimental observations. The outcomes of the model, such as spatial distribution of plasma energy density, could be used as input for a hydrodynamic model to estimate the strength of the mechanical effects associated with plasma formation.

  7. An energy-based approach to estimate seismic attenuation due to wave-induced fluid flow in heterogeneous poroelastic media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solazzi, Santiago G.; Rubino, J. Germán; Müller, Tobias M.; Milani, Marco; Guarracino, Luis; Holliger, Klaus

    2016-11-01

    Wave-induced fluid flow (WIFF) due to the presence of mesoscopic heterogeneities is considered as one of the main seismic attenuation mechanisms in the shallower parts of the Earth's crust. For this reason, several models have been developed to quantify seismic attenuation in the presence of heterogeneities of varying complexity, ranging from periodically layered media to rocks containing fractures and highly irregular distributions of fluid patches. Most of these models are based on Biot's theory of poroelasticity and make use of the assumption that the upscaled counterpart of a heterogeneous poroelastic medium can be represented by a homogeneous viscoelastic solid. Under this dynamic-equivalent viscoelastic medium (DEVM) assumption, attenuation is quantified in terms of the ratio of the imaginary and real parts of a frequency-dependent, complex-valued viscoelastic modulus. Laboratory measurements on fluid-saturated rock samples also rely on this DEVM assumption when inferring attenuation from the phase shift between the applied stress and the resulting strain. However, whether it is correct to use an effective viscoelastic medium to represent the attenuation arising from WIFF at mesoscopic scales in heterogeneous poroelastic media remains largely unexplored. In this work, we present an alternative approach to estimate seismic attenuation due to WIFF. It is fully rooted in the framework of poroelasticity and is based on the quantification of the dissipated power and stored strain energy resulting from numerical oscillatory relaxation tests. We employ this methodology to compare different definitions of the inverse quality factor for a set of pertinent scenarios, including patchy saturation and fractured rocks. This numerical analysis allows us to verify the correctness of the DEVM assumption in the presence of different kinds of heterogeneities. The proposed methodology has the key advantage of providing the local contributions of energy dissipation to the overall

  8. Iodinated contrast media induce neutrophil apoptosis through a mitochondrial and caspase mediated pathway.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fanning, N F

    2012-02-03

    Iodinated contrast media (ICM) can induce apoptosis (programmed cell death) in renal, myocardial and endothelial cells. Following intravascular injection, circulating immune cells are exposed to high concentrations of ICM. As neutrophils constitutively undergo apoptosis we hypothesized that ICM may adversely affect neutrophil survival. Our aim was to investigate the effect of ICM on neutrophil apoptosis. Neutrophils were isolated from healthy subjects and cultured in vitro with ionic (diatrizoate and ioxaglate) and non-ionic (iohexol and iotrolan) ICM. The effect of ICM on neutrophil apoptosis in both unstimulated and lipopolysaccharide-stimulated neutrophils was determined by annexin V flow cytometry. The influence of physicochemical properties of the different ICM on apoptosis of neutrophils was also studied. We further investigated the effects of ICM on key intracellular signal pathways, including p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) by Western blotting, and mitochondrial depolarization and caspase activity by flow cytometry. Isoiodine concentrations (20 mg ml(-1)) of ionic (diatrizoate 69.6+\\/-2.9%; ioxaglate 58.9+\\/-2.0%) and non-ionic (iohexol 57.3+\\/-2.9%; iotrolan 57.1+\\/-2.6%) ICM significantly induced neutrophil apoptosis over control levels (47.7+\\/-1.4%). The apoptotic effect of ICM was influenced by their chemical structure, with ionic ICM having a more significant (p<0.01) apoptotic effect than non-ionic ICM (p<0.05). Furthermore, ICM reversed the anti-apoptotic effect of lipopolysaccharide (1000 ng ml(-1)) treated neutrophils to control levels (23.0+\\/-3.5% to 61.2+\\/-5.3%; n=4; p<0.05). These agents induce apoptosis through a p38 MAPK independent pathway that results in mitochondrial depolarization, and is dependent on caspase activation. As neutrophils play a central role in host response to infection and injury, ICM, through induction of neutrophil apoptosis, could have a significant deleterious effect on host immune defence and

  9. Efficacy of a randomized trial of a community and school-based anti-violence media intervention among small-town middle school youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaim, Randall C; Kelly, Kathleen

    2008-09-01

    In a community randomized controlled trial, intervention middle school students from small towns were exposed to a community and school-based anti-violence intervention ("Resolve It, Solve It"). The primary intervention was a media campaign in which local high school students served as models in print, radio, and television PSAs and spearheaded local school and community activities. The media campaign was supported with school and community events that reinforced campaign messages. Tests of recognition and recall indicated widespread exposure to the media intervention. Multiple group latent growth models indicated that relative to control students, intervention students reported significant differences in rates of growth for intent for violence, physical assault against people, verbal victimization, and perceived safety at school. No differences were found for verbal assault, physical assault against objects, physical victimization, or self-efficacy for avoiding violence. When examined by sex, it was determined that results for physical assault against people were obtained only among female students, and changes in verbal victimization and perceived school safety were observed only among male students. These results suggest that a media and reinforcing community intervention led by older peers can alter rates of growth for some measures of violence and associated factors among small-town youth. Further research is indicated to determine how different campaign messages influence students by sex.

  10. Induced Polarization Signature of Biofilms in Porous Media: From Laboratory Experiments to Theoretical Developments and Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atekwana, Estella [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States); Patrauchan, Marianna [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States); Revil, Andre [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-10-04

    Bioremediation strategies for mitigating the transport of heavy metals and radionuclides in subsurface sediments have largely targeted the use of dissimilatory metal and sulfate-reducing bacteria. Growth and metabolic activities from these organisms can significantly influence biogeochemical processes, including mineral dissolution/precipitation, fluctuating pH and redox potential (Eh) values, development of biofilms, and decreasing hydraulic conductivity. The Spectral Induced Polarization (SIP) technique has emerged as the technique most sensitive to the presence of microbial cells and biofilms in porous media; yet it is often difficult to unambiguously distinguish the impact of multiple and often competing processes that occur during in-situ biostimulation activities on the SIP signatures. The main goal of our project is to quantitatively characterize major components within bacterial biofilms (cells, DNA, metals, metabolites etc.) contributing to detectable SIP signatures. We specifically: (i) evaluated the contribution of biofilm components to SIP signatures, (ii) determined the contribution of biogenic minerals commonly found in biofilms to SIP signatures, (iii) determined if the SIP signatures can be used to quantify the rates of biofilm formation, (iv) developed models and a fundamental understanding of potential underlying polarization mechanisms at low frequencies (<40 kHz) resulting from the presence of microbial cells and biofilms

  11. A randomized trial of intravenous labetalol AND oral nifedipine in severe pregnancy induced hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Background: Hypertension is the most frequently encountered medical disorder in obstetrics practice & remain a major cause of maternal, fetal & neonatal morbidity & mortality. The present study was undertaken to compare the time taken to reach the therapeutic goal blood pressure after using intravenous labetalol & oral nifedipine in severe pregnancy induced hypertension. Methods: Randomly allocated patients received labetalol 20 mg initially, followed by escalating doses of 40, 80, 80 & 80 mg...

  12. Vertical random vibration analysis of adjacent building induced by highway traffic load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wentao Xu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Vehicle–pavement coupling systems may produce strong vertical random vibration due to the road surface unevenness and then further induce random vibration of adjacent buildings. It is usually difficult to numerical analyze efficiently as the model precision and calculation scale of complicated random analysis. In this article, a longitudinal infinite Kirchhoff plate with Kelvin foundation is employed to model the pavement system, and by proving the symplectic orthogonal characteristic for the damped chain substructure, the infinitely long road surface is regarded as a periodic chain-type substructure, the model is accurate, and computation scale is reduced. Models of a half vehicle and an adjacent building are coupled to the plate to produce a unified finite element model. The plate element stiffness matrix is formulated in the coordinate moving with the load, a typical model of road substructure is built, and the two-dimensional moving element method of vertical coupling random vibration is formulated, and then the time-varying non-stationary random vibration may be transformed into time-invariant stationary system. Using the pseudo-excitation method, vertical dynamic responses of the unified model of vibration source, supporting structure, and vibrated structure are analyzed. The computation efficiency of this method is numerically justified and some vibration influence rules of vehicle to building are drawn.

  13. Media Coverage, Journal Press Releases and Editorials Associated with Randomized and Observational Studies in High-Impact Medical Journals: A Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael T M Wang

    Full Text Available Publication of clinical research findings in prominent journals influences health beliefs and medical practice, in part by engendering news coverage. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs should be most influential in guiding clinical practice. We determined whether study design of clinical research published in high-impact journals influences media coverage.We compared the incidence and amount of media coverage of RCTs with that of observational studies published in the top 7 medical journals between 1 January 2013 and 31 March 2013. We specifically assessed media coverage of the most rigorous RCTs, those with >1000 participants that reported 'hard' outcomes. There was no difference between RCTs and observational studies in coverage by major newspapers or news agencies, or in total number of news stories generated (all P>0.63. Large RCTs reporting 'hard' outcomes did not generate more news coverage than small RCTs that reported surrogate outcomes and observational studies (all P>0.32. RCTs were more likely than observational studies to attract a journal editorial (70% vs 46%, P = 0.003, but less likely to be the subject of a journal press release (17% vs 50%, P0.99, nor were they more likely to be the subject of a journal press release (14% vs 38%, P = 0.14.The design of clinical studies whose results are published in high-impact medical journals is not associated with the likelihood or amount of ensuing news coverage.

  14. Adjunctive aripiprazole versus placebo for antipsychotic-induced hyperprolactinemia: meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianbin Li

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare the safety and efficacy of adjunctive aripiprazole versus placebo for antipsychotic-induced hyperprolactinemia. METHODS: POPULATION: adult patients presenting with antipsychotic-induced hyperprolactinemia diagnosed by prolactin level with or without prolactin-related symptoms. INTERVENTIONS: adjunctive aripiprazole vs. adjunctive placebo. OUTCOME MEASURES: adverse events and efficacy of treatment. STUDIES: randomized controlled trials. RESULTS: Five randomized controlled trials with a total of 639 patients (326 adjunctive aripiprazole, 313 adjunctive placebo met the inclusion criteria. Adjunctive aripiprazole was associated with a 79.11% (125/158 prolactin level normalization rate. Meta-analysis of insomnia, headache, sedation, psychiatric disorder, extrapyramidal symptom, dry mouth, and fatigue showed no significant differences in the adjunctive aripiprazole treatment group compared with the placebo group (risk difference (Mantel-Haenszel, random or fixed -0.05 to 0.04 (95% confidence interval -0.13 to 0.16; I(2 =0% to 68%, P=0.20 to 0.70. However, sedation, insomnia, and headache were more frequent when the adjunctive aripiprazole dose was higher than 15 mg/day. Meta-analysis of the prolactin level normalization indicated adjunctive aripiprazole was superior to placebo (risk difference (Mantel-Haenszel, random 0.76 (95% confidence interval 0.67 to 0.85; I(2 =43%, P<0.00001. The subgroup analysis confirmed that the subjects who received adjunctive aripiprazole 5 mg/day showed a degree of prolactin normalization similar to that of all participants. No significant differences between groups in discontinuation and improvements of psychiatric symptoms. CONCLUSION: Adjunctive aripiprazole is both safe and effective as a reasonable choice treatment for patients with antipsychotic-induced hyperprolactinemia. The appropriate dose of adjunctive aripiprazole may be 5 mg/day.

  15. Impact of biofilm-induced heterogeneities on solute transport in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kone, T.; Golfier, F.; Orgogozo, L.; Oltéan, C.; Lefèvre, E.; Block, J. C.; Buès, M. A.

    2014-11-01

    In subsurface systems, biofilm may degrade organic or organometallic pollutants contributing to natural attenuation and soil bioremediation techniques. This increase of microbial activity leads to change the hydrodynamic properties of aquifers. The purpose of this work was to investigate the influence of biofilm-induced heterogeneities on solute transport in porous media and more specifically on dispersivity. We pursued this goal by (i) monitoring both spatial concentration fields and solute breakthrough curves from conservative tracer experiments in a biofilm-supporting porous medium, (ii) characterizing in situ the changes in biovolume and visualizing the dynamics of the biological material at the mesoscale. A series of experiments was carried out in a flow cell system (60 cm3) with a silica sand (Φ = 50-70 mesh) as solid carrier and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 as bacterial strain. Biofilm growth was monitored by image acquisition with a digital camera. The biofilm volume fraction was estimated through tracer experiments with the Blue Dextran macromolecule as in size-exclusion chromatography, leading to a fair picture of the biocolonization within the flow cell. Biofilm growth was achieved in the whole flow cell in 29 days and up to 50% of void space volume was plugged. The influence of biofilm maturation on porous medium transport properties was evaluated from tracer experiments using Brilliant Blue FCF. An experimental correlation was found between effective (i.e., nonbiocolonized) porosity and biofilm-affected dispersivity. Comparison with values given by the theoretical model of Taylor and Jaffé (1990b) yields a fair agreement.

  16. Random mutagenesis and media optimisation for hyperproduction of cellulase from Bacillus species using proximally analysed Saccharum spontaneum in submerged fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Roheena; Zafar, Wajeeha; Nadeem, Muhammad; Iqtedar, Mehwish; Naz, Shagufta; Syed, Quratulain; Butt, Zahid Ali

    2015-01-01

    This study deals with the isolation of novel mutant of Bacillus and optimisation of media for the hyperproduction of cellulase. Cellulase-producing Bacillus PC-BC6 was subjected to physical and chemical mutagenesis to enhance the cellulolytic potential. Later, mutagenesis isolates were screened both qualitatively and quantitatively. Among all the tested isolates, Bacillus N3 yielded maximum (CMCase 1250 IU/mL/min and FPase 629 IU/mL/min) activity. The Bacillus N3 strain exhibited 1.7-fold more enzyme production as compared with the parental strain. Proximate analysis of untreated and pretreated Saccharum spontaneum was carried out to improve cellulase production. Three different media were tested for the production of cellulase, among which M2 medium containing MgSO4, pretreated S. spontaneum, K2HPO4, (NH4)2SO4 and peptone was found to be the best for maximum enzyme production by mutant Bacillus N3.

  17. Analysis of length distribution of short DNA fragments induced by 7Li ions using the random-breakage model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KONG Fuquan; ZHAO Kui; ZHAN Yong; CAO Tianguang; NI Meinan; SUI Li; CAI Minghui; ZHUO Yizhong

    2005-01-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is an important bio-macromolecule. DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) are considered to be the most important initial damage responsible for all biological effects induced by ionizing radiation. In this paper the length distribution of DNA fragments induced by 7Li ionizing radiation is fitted with the random breakage model. In this model, the parameter u is the average number of DSBs on every DNA molecule induced by ionizing radiation. The fitting result shows that the random breakage model cannot describe the distribution of DNA fragments in lower doses, while the random breakage model is in better accordance with the experimental data in higher doses. It is shown that the length distribution of DNA fragments has random statistical feature in higher doses. In this situation, the random breakage model looks like a model without any parameter since the u has specific physical meaning and can directly be obtained from experimental data.

  18. Vitamin E for prevention of oxaliplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy: a pilot randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Oliveira de Afonseca

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVEOxaliplatin is one of the chemotherapy regimens most used for treating colorectal cancer. One of the main limitations to its use is induction of peripheral neuropathy. Previous studies have shown that vitamin E can reduce the incidence of peripheral neuropathy by 50%. This study aimed to assess the effectiveness of vitamin E for prevention of oxaliplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy.DESIGN AND SETTINGProspective, phase II, randomized pilot study developed at a university hospital in the Greater ABC region.METHODSPatients were randomized five days before starting oxaliplatin treatment, to receive either vitamin E or placebo until the end of the chemotherapy regimen. The outcome was evaluated using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE, version 3, and specific gradation scales for oxaliplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy. Patients with colorectal and gastric cancer who had been scheduled to receive oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy were included. Both groups received calcium and magnesium supplementation before and after oxaliplatin infusions.RESULTSEighteen patients were randomized to the vitamin E group and 16 to the placebo group. Cumulative incidence of 83% with peripheral neuropathy grades 1/2 was observed in the vitamin E group, versus 68% in the placebo group (P = 0.45. A trend towards more diarrhea was observed among patients who received vitamin E (55.6% vs. 18.8%; P = 0.06. There were no other significant differences in toxicity between the groups.CONCLUSIONSNo significant decrease in the incidence of acute oxaliplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy was demonstrated through vitamin E use.CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATIONNCT01523574.

  19. Comparison of the effectiveness and safety of cefpodoxime and ciprofloxacin in acute exacerbation of chronic suppurative otitis media: A randomized, open-labeled, phase IV clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arijit Ghosh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective : To compare the effectiveness and safety of cefpodoxime and ciprofloxacin for the treatment of mild to moderate cases of acute exacerbation of chronic suppurative otitis media (AECSOM. Materials and Methods : Adult patients diagnosed with AECSOM were screened and patients fulfilling the inclusion criteria were randomized to receive either cefpodoxime 200 mg twice daily or ciprofloxacin 500 mg twice daily orally for 7 days. The primary outcome of this randomized, open-labeled, phase IV clinical trial (Registration Number - CTRI/2011/10/002079 was clinical success rate at day 14 visit and the secondary outcome was incidence of adverse events (AEs. Forty-six patients were enrolled: 23 in the cefpodoxime group and 23 in the ciprofloxacin group. Results : The clinical success rates were 95.6% in the cefpodoxime group versus 90.9% in the ciprofloxacin group. These rates are comparable, but no statistically significant difference was observed between the groups. Few mild and self-limiting AEs were observed and the tolerability of both the drugs was also good. Conclusion : The results of this randomized, open-labeled phase IV clinical trial showed that a 7-day course of cefpodoxime is therapeutically comparable to ciprofloxacin in terms of both clinical effectiveness and safety for the treatment of patients with AECSOM.

  20. A mouse model of otitis media identifies HB-EGF as a mediator of inflammation-induced mucosal proliferation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keigo Suzukawa

    Full Text Available Otitis media is one of the most common pediatric infections. While it is usually treated without difficulty, up to 20% of children may progress to long-term complications that include hearing loss, impaired speech and language development, academic underachievement, and irreversible disease. Hyperplasia of middle ear mucosa contributes to the sequelae of acute otitis media and is of important clinical significance. Understanding the role of growth factors in the mediation of mucosal hyperplasia could lead to the development of new therapeutic interventions for this disease and its sequelae.From a whole genome gene array analysis of mRNA expression during acute otitis media, we identified growth factors with expression kinetics temporally related to hyperplasia. We then tested these factors for their ability to stimulate mucosal epithelial growth in vitro, and determined protein levels and histological distribution in vivo for active factors.From the gene array, we identified seven candidate growth factors with upregulation of mRNA expression kinetics related to mucosal hyperplasia. Of the seven, only HB-EGF (heparin-binding-epidermal growth factor induced significant mucosal epithelial hyperplasia in vitro. Subsequent quantification of HB-EGF protein expression in vivo via Western blot analysis confirmed that the protein is highly expressed from 6 hours to 24 hours after bacterial inoculation, while immunohistochemistry revealed production by middle ear epithelial cells and infiltrating lymphocytes.Our data suggest an active role for HB-EGF in the hyperplasia of the middle ear mucosal epithelium during otitis media. These results imply that therapies targeting HB-EGF could ameliorate mucosal growth during otitis media, and thereby reduce detrimental sequelae of this childhood disease.

  1. Application of the Theory of Wave Propagation through Random Media to Phase and Amplitude Fluctuations of Seismic P-Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-10-18

    Mantle Boundary Inferred from Short-Period Scattered PKP Waves Recorded at the Global Digital Seismograph Network KLAUS BATAILLE AND STANILY M. F...Geophys. Res., 78, Osemov, L A., Wave Propagation in a Random Medium, Mc Graw - 6009--6020, 1973. Hill, New York, 1960. Morelli, A., and A. M

  2. Media arrangement impacts cell growth in anaerobic fixed-bed reactors treating sugarcane vinasse: Structured vs. randomic biomass immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Aquino, Samuel; Fuess, Lucas Tadeu; Pires, Eduardo Cleto

    2017-07-01

    This study reports on the application of an innovative structured-bed reactor (FVR) as an alternative to conventional packed-bed reactors (PBRs) to treat high-strength solid-rich wastewaters. Using the FVR prevents solids from accumulating within the fixed-bed, while maintaining the advantages of the biomass immobilization. The long-term operation (330days) of a FVR and a PBR applied to sugarcane vinasse under increasing organic loads (2.4-18.0kgCODm(-3)day(-1)) was assessed, focusing on the impacts of the different media arrangements over the production and retention of biomass. Much higher organic matter degradation rates, as well as long-term operational stability and high conversion efficiencies (>80%) confirmed that the FVR performed better than the PBR. Despite the equivalent operating conditions, the biomass growth yield was different in both reactors, i.e., 0.095gVSSg(-1)COD (FVR) and 0.066gVSSg(-1)COD (PBR), indicating a clear control of the media arrangement over the biomass production in fixed-bed reactors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Development of an inducible transposon system for efficient random mutagenesis in Clostridium acetobutylicum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Xu, Shu; Chai, Changsheng; Yang, Sheng; Jiang, Weihong; Minton, Nigel P.; Gu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium acetobutylicum is an industrially important Gram-positive organism, which is capable of producing economically important chemicals in the ABE (Acetone, Butanol and Ethanol) fermentation process. Renewed interests in the ABE process necessitate the availability of additional genetics tools to facilitate the derivation of a greater understanding of the underlying metabolic and regulatory control processes in operation through forward genetic strategies. In this study, a xylose inducible, mariner-based, transposon system was developed and shown to allow high-efficient random mutagenesis in the model strain ATCC 824. Of the thiamphenicol resistant colonies obtained, 91.9% were shown to be due to successful transposition of the catP-based mini-transposon element. Phenotypic screening of 200 transposon clones revealed a sporulation-defective clone with an insertion in spo0A, thereby demonstrating that this inducible transposon system can be used for forward genetic studies in C. acetobutylicum. PMID:27001972

  4. Emotionally anesthetized: media violence induces neural changes during emotional face processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockdale, Laura A; Morrison, Robert G; Kmiecik, Matthew J; Garbarino, James; Silton, Rebecca L

    2015-10-01

    Media violence exposure causes increased aggression and decreased prosocial behavior, suggesting that media violence desensitizes people to the emotional experience of others. Alterations in emotional face processing following exposure to media violence may result in desensitization to others' emotional states. This study used scalp electroencephalography methods to examine the link between exposure to violence and neural changes associated with emotional face processing. Twenty-five participants were shown a violent or nonviolent film clip and then completed a gender discrimination stop-signal task using emotional faces. Media violence did not affect the early visual P100 component; however, decreased amplitude was observed in the N170 and P200 event-related potentials following the violent film, indicating that exposure to film violence leads to suppression of holistic face processing and implicit emotional processing. Participants who had just seen a violent film showed increased frontal N200/P300 amplitude. These results suggest that media violence exposure may desensitize people to emotional stimuli and thereby require fewer cognitive resources to inhibit behavior. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Three-dimensional mixed-wet random pore-scale network modeling of two- and three-phase flow in porous media. II. Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piri, Mohammad; Blunt, Martin J

    2005-02-01

    We use the model described in Piri and Blunt [Phys. Rev. E 71, 026301 (2005)] to predict two- and three-phase relative permeabilities of Berea sandstone using a random network to represent the pore space. We predict measured relative permeabilities for two-phase flow in a water-wet system. We then successfully predict the steady-state oil, water, and gas three-phase relative permeabilities measured by Oak (Proceedings of the SPE/DOE Seventh Symposium on Enhanced Oil Recovery, Tulsa, OK, 1990). We also study secondary and tertiary gas injection into media of different wettability and initial oil saturation and interpret the results in terms of pore-scale displacement processes.

  6. A two-stage adaptive stochastic collocation method on nested sparse grids for multiphase flow in randomly heterogeneous porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Qinzhuo; Zhang, Dongxiao; Tchelepi, Hamdi

    2017-02-01

    A new computational method is proposed for efficient uncertainty quantification of multiphase flow in porous media with stochastic permeability. For pressure estimation, it combines the dimension-adaptive stochastic collocation method on Smolyak sparse grids and the Kronrod-Patterson-Hermite nested quadrature formulas. For saturation estimation, an additional stage is developed, in which the pressure and velocity samples are first generated by the sparse grid interpolation and then substituted into the transport equation to solve for the saturation samples, to address the low regularity problem of the saturation. Numerical examples are presented for multiphase flow with stochastic permeability fields to demonstrate accuracy and efficiency of the proposed two-stage adaptive stochastic collocation method on nested sparse grids.

  7. Enhancement of harmonics generation in hysteretic elastic media induced by conditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechri, C.; Scalerandi, M.; Bentahar, M.

    2017-04-01

    The physical origin of harmonics generation in non classical (hysteretic) elastic media and the mechanisms of energy transfer among harmonics are still not completely understood. Furthermore the well known conditioning effect observed in such materials is known to have a significant influence on the elastic response of consolidated granular media and damaged composites and metals. Here, we show that the elastic non linearity of samples belonging to these two categories increases after having been excited with a relatively low amplitude stress. The observed behaviours could be described by activation features intrinsically present in phenomenological multistate models proposed in the literature.

  8. Experiment and application of parameter-induced stochastic resonance in an over-damped random linear system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang Shi-Qi; Hou Min-Jie; Jia Chun-Hua; He Ji-Rong; Gu Tian-Xiang

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates the parameter-induced stochastic resonance using experimental methods in an over-damped random linear system with asymmetric dichotomous noise. Non-monotonic dependence of signal-to-noise ratio on the system parameter is observed. Several potential applications of parameter-induced stochastic resonance are given in circuits.

  9. Extreme nonlinearities in InAs/InP nanowire gain media: the two-photon induced laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Capua, Amir; Kami, Ouri; Eisenstein, Gadi;

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel laser oscillation scheme in an InAs / InP wire-like quantum dash gain medium. A short optical pulse excites carriers by two photon absorption which relax to the energy levels providing gain thereby enabling laser oscillations. The nonlinear dynamic interaction is analyzed...... and quantified using multi-color pump-probe measurements and shows a highly efficient nonlinear two photon excitation process which is larger by more than an order of magnitude compared to common quantum well and bulk gain media. The dynamic response of the nonlinearly induced laser line is characterized...

  10. The protective role of body appreciation against media-induced body dissatisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, Rachel; Tiggemann, Marika; Clark, Levina

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed to examine the protective role of positive body image against negative effects produced by viewing thin-idealised media. University women (N=68) completed trait measures of body appreciation and media protective strategies. At a subsequent session, participants viewed 11 thin-ideal advertisements. Body dissatisfaction was assessed before and after advertisement exposure, and state measures of self-objectification, appearance comparison, and media protective strategies were completed. Results indicated that body appreciation predicted less change in body dissatisfaction following exposure, such that participants with low body appreciation experienced increased body dissatisfaction, while those with high body appreciation did not. Although state appearance comparison predicted increased body dissatisfaction, neither state self-objectification nor appearance comparison accounted for body appreciation's protective effect. Trait and state media protective strategies positively correlated with body appreciation, but also did not account for body appreciation's protective effect. The results point to intervention targets and highlight future research directions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Poly(acrylic acid) coating induced 2-line ferrihydrite nanoparticle transport in saturated porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Aishuang; Yan, Weile; Koel, Bruce E.; Jaffé, Peter R.

    2013-07-01

    Iron oxide and iron nanoparticles (NPs) have been used effectively for environmental remediation, but are limited in their applications by strong retention in groundwater-saturated porous media. For example, delivery of NPs to large groundwater reservoirs would require large numbers of injection wells. To address this problem, we have explored polymer coatings as a surface engineering strategy to enhance transport of oxide nanoparticles in porous media. We report here on our studies of 2-line ferrihydrite NPs and the influence of poly (acrylic acid) (PAA) polymer coatings on the colloidal stability and transport in natural sand-packed column tests simulating flow in groundwater-saturated porous media. Measurements were also made of zeta potential, hydrodynamic diameter, and polymer adsorption and desorption properties. The coated NPs have a diameter range of 30-500 nm. We found that NP transport was improved by PAA coating and that the transport properties could be tuned by adjusting the polymer concentration. Our results demonstrate that a high stability of oxide particles and improved transport can be achieved in groundwater-saturated porous media by introducing negatively charged polyelectrolytes and optimizing polymer concentrations.

  12. Poly(acrylic acid) coating induced 2-line ferrihydrite nanoparticle transport in saturated porous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, Aishuang [Princeton University, Chemical and Biological Engineering Department (United States); Yan, Weile [Texas Tech University, Civil and Environmental Engineering (United States); Koel, Bruce E., E-mail: bkoel@princeton.edu [Princeton University, Chemical and Biological Engineering Department (United States); Jaffe, Peter R., E-mail: jaffe@princeton.edu [Princeton University, Civil and Environmental Engineering Department (United States)

    2013-07-15

    Iron oxide and iron nanoparticles (NPs) have been used effectively for environmental remediation, but are limited in their applications by strong retention in groundwater-saturated porous media. For example, delivery of NPs to large groundwater reservoirs would require large numbers of injection wells. To address this problem, we have explored polymer coatings as a surface engineering strategy to enhance transport of oxide nanoparticles in porous media. We report here on our studies of 2-line ferrihydrite NPs and the influence of poly (acrylic acid) (PAA) polymer coatings on the colloidal stability and transport in natural sand-packed column tests simulating flow in groundwater-saturated porous media. Measurements were also made of zeta potential, hydrodynamic diameter, and polymer adsorption and desorption properties. The coated NPs have a diameter range of 30-500 nm. We found that NP transport was improved by PAA coating and that the transport properties could be tuned by adjusting the polymer concentration. Our results demonstrate that a high stability of oxide particles and improved transport can be achieved in groundwater-saturated porous media by introducing negatively charged polyelectrolytes and optimizing polymer concentrations.

  13. Usefulness of cyclodextrin media for the determination of alpha-cypermethrin by photochemically induced fluorescence: analytical applications to natural waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbaye, Moussa; Gaye Seye, Mame Diabou; Coly, Atanasse; Tine, Alphonse; Aaron, Jean-Jacques

    2009-06-01

    The photochemically induced fluorescence (PIF) spectral properties of alpha-cypermethrin in organic solvents (hexane, dichloromethane, acetonitrile, ethanol) and in cyclodextrin aqueous solutions (beta-CD and 2-hydroxypropyl-beta-CD, 2-HP-beta-CD) were investigated. The photolysis kinetics of alpha-cypermethrin were evaluated in the various media. The PIF signal was found to be significantly enhanced in the CD media relative to the organic solvents. The stoichiometry and the formation constants of the alpha-cypermethrin inclusion complexes formed with the CDs were determined. The analytical performances of the PIF method were improved in the presence of HP-beta-CD relative to the other media, and a CD-enhanced PIF analytical method was developed. The limits of detection and limits of quantification ranged, respectively, between 6 and 98 ng/mL and between 24 and 343 ng/mL, depending on the medium. Application to the analysis of tap water and Senegal natural water samples collected close to agricultural areas and spiked with alpha-cypermethrin yielded satisfactory recoveries going from about 77% to 98%. An interference study of foreign species, including pesticides and inorganic ions likely to be present in natural waters, was also carried out.

  14. Multicomponent effective medium-correlated random walk theory for the diffusion of fluid mixtures through porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonilla, Mauricio R; Bhatia, Suresh K

    2012-01-10

    Molecular transport in nanoconfined spaces plays a key role in many emerging technologies for gas separation and storage, as well as in nanofluidics. The infiltration of fluid mixtures into the voids of porous frameworks having complex topologies is common place to these technologies, and optimizing their performance entails developing a deeper understanding of how the flow of these mixtures is affected by the morphology of the pore space, particularly its pore size distribution and pore connectivity. Although several techniques have been developed for the estimation of the effective diffusivity characterizing the transport of single fluids through porous materials, this is not the case for fluid mixtures, where the only alternatives rely on a time-consuming solution of the pore network equations or adaptations of the single fluid theories which are useful for a limited type of systems. In this paper, a hybrid multicomponent effective medium-correlated random walk theory for the calculation of the effective transport coefficients matrix of fluid mixtures diffusing through porous materials is developed. The theory is suitable for those systems in which component fluxes at the single pore level can be related to the potential gradients of the different species through linear flux laws and corresponds to a generalization of the classical single fluid effective medium theory for the analysis of random resistor networks. Comparison with simulation of the diffusion of binary CO(2)/H(2)S and ternary CO(2)/H(2)S/C(3)H(8) gas mixtures in membranes modeled as large networks of randomly oriented pores with both continuous and discrete pore size distributions demonstrates the power of the theory, which was tested using the well-known generalized Maxwell-Stefan model for surface diffusion at the single pore level.

  15. Sub-Doppler resonances in the back-scattered light from random porous media infused with Rb vapor

    CERN Document Server

    Villalba, S; Lenci, L; Bloch, D; Lezama, A; Failache, H

    2013-01-01

    We report on the observation of sub-Doppler resonances on the back-scattered light from a random porous glass medium with rubidium vapor filling its interstices. The sub-Doppler spectral lines are the consequence of saturated absorption where the incident laser beam saturates the atomic medium and the back-scattered light probes it. Some specificities of the observed spectra reflect the transient atomic evolution under confinement inside the pores. Simplicity, robustness and potential miniaturization are appealing features of this system as a spectroscopic reference.

  16. Random walks in fractal media: a theoretical evaluation of the periodicity of the oscillations in dynamic observables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maltz, Alberto L [Departamento de Matematica, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Casilla de Correo 172 (1900) La Plata (Argentina); Fabricius, Gabriel; Bab, Marisa A; Albano, Ezequiel V [Instituto de Investigaciones FisicoquImicas Teoricas y Aplicadas (INIFTA), CCT La Plata, UNLP, CONICET. Casilla de Correo 16, Sucursal 4, (1900) La Plata (Argentina)

    2008-12-12

    In this work we address the time evolution of random walks on a special type of Sierpinski carpets, which we call walk similar (WS). By considering highly symmetric fractals (symmetrically self-similar graphs (SSG)), very recently Kroen and Teufl (2003 Trans. Am. Math. Soc. 356 393) have developed a technique based on the fact that the random walk gives rise to an equivalent process in a similar subset. The method is used in order to obtain the time scaling factor ({tau}) as the average passing time (APT) of the walker from a site in the subset to any different site in the subset. For SSG, the APT is independent of the starting point. In the present work we generalize this technique under the less stringent symmetry conditions of the WS carpets, such that the APT depends on the starting point. Therefore, we calculate exactly the weighted APT ({tau}*). By performing Monte Carlo simulations on several WS carpets we verify that {tau}* plays the role of {tau} by setting the logarithmic period of the oscillatory asymptotic behaviour of dynamic observables.

  17. Herbal medicine Ninjinyoeito ameliorates ribavirin-induced anemia in chronic hepatitis C: A randomized controlled trial

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yoshiharu Motoo; Hisatsugu Mouri; Koushiro Ohtsubo; Yasushi Yamaguchi; Hiroyuki Watanabe; Norio Sawabu

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Ribavirin (RBV) shows a strong antiviral effect on hepatitis C virus when used in combination with interferon.However, RBV-induced anemia is a major problem in this therapy. It would be of great clinical importance to ameliorate the anemia without reducing the RBV dose.We report here that, Ninjinyoeito (NYT), a herbal medicine can reduce the RBV-induced anemia.METHODS: Twenty-three patients with chronic hepatitis C were treated with interferon alpha 2b plus RBV with (NYT group) or without (control group) NYT by a randomized selection. Eighteen patients completed the treatment schedule, and hemato-biochemical and virological effects were evaluated.RESULTS: There was no significant difference in biochemical and virological responses between the two groups. However, anemia was significantly reduced in the NYT group compared with the control group. The maximal decrease of Hb in the NYT group (2.59±1.10 g/dL)was significantly (P= 0.026) smaller than that in the control group (3.71±0.97 g/dL). There was no significant difference in serum glutathione peroxidase activity, serum RBV concentration, and Th1/Th2 balance between the two groups. There was no specific adverse effect in NYT administration.CONCLUSION: These results suggest that NYT could be used as a supportive remedy to reduce the RBV-induced anemia in the treatment of chronic hepatitis C.

  18. Microbial induced corrosion (MIC) on DHP copper by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans and Bacillus megaterium strains in media simulating heater waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zumelzu, E.; Cabezas, C.; Schoebitz, R.; Ugarte, R.; Rodriguez, E.D.; Rios, J. [Universidad Austral de Chile, Valdivia (Chile)

    2003-01-01

    The complexity and diversity of microbial populations in water heating systems of steam generators make it necessary to study the magnitude of the metabolic activity of bacteria and biofilm development that may lead to degradation of metal components through microbial induced corrosion (MIC). Electrolytes simulating the conditions found in heater water networks were used to induce biofilm formation on DHP copper coupons by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans DSMZ and Bacillus megaterium C10, a commercial strain and an isolate from these waters, respectively. In order to enhance their action, industrial waters enriched with the minimum nutrient content such as sodium lactate and sodium sulphite for the DSMZ strain and glucose, proteose peptone and starch for the C10 strain were employed. Biofilm formation was studied under controlled temperature, time, shaking, pH and concentrations of the media used in this study. Then, the samples were electrochemically tested in an artificial solution of sea water as control medium, based on the hypothesis that the action of an aggressive biofilm/electrolyte medium generates damaged and non-damaged areas on the metal surface, and assuming that the sea water trial can detect the latter. Hence, a higher anodic current was associated with a lower degradation of the metal surface by the action of one of the media under study. All these trials were performed along with bacterial count, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). Furthermore, it was possible to identify under which conditions MIC on DHP copper occurred and complex mechanisms from retention of cations to diffusion processes at the biofilm/tested media interface level were proposed. Surface corrosion by MIC took place on DHP copper; therefore, greater control on the treatment of industrial waters is highly desirable. (author)

  19. Anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative effects of alpha-lipoic acid in experimentally induced acute otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatar, A; Korkmaz, M; Yayla, M; Gozeler, M S; Mutlu, V; Halici, Z; Uslu, H; Korkmaz, H; Selli, J

    2016-07-01

    To investigate the anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative and tissue protective effects, as well as the potential therapeutic role, of alpha-lipoic acid in experimentally induced acute otitis media. Twenty-five guinea pigs were assigned to one of five groups: a control (non-otitis) group, and otitis-induced groups treated with saline, penicillin G, alpha-lipoic acid, or alpha-lipoic acid plus penicillin G. Tissue samples were histologically analysed, and oxidative parameters in tissue samples were measured and compared between groups. The epithelial integrity was better preserved, and histological signs of inflammation and secretory metaplasia were decreased, in all groups compared to the saline treated otitis group. In the alpha-lipoic acid plus penicillin G treated otitis group, epithelial integrity was well preserved and histological findings of inflammation were significantly decreased compared to the saline, penicillin G and alpha-lipoic acid treated otitis groups. The most favourable oxidative parameters were observed in the control group, followed by the alpha-lipoic acid plus penicillin G treated otitis group. Alpha-lipoic acid, with its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and tissue protective properties, may decrease the clinical sequelae and morbidity associated with acute otitis media.

  20. Two Photon Induced Lasing in 1550 nm Quantum Dash Optical Gain Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Capua, Amir; Saal, Abigael; Reithmaier, Johann Peter

    2011-01-01

    We report on a unique lasing mechanism observed in quantum dash Gain media. While the gain media is electrically pumped below lasing threshold, a strong optical pulse excites carriers by two photon absorption into high energy states of the quantum dashes and wetting layer. Fast inter band carrier...... by the XFROG scheme is performed. We show the lasing mechanism to be governed mainly by the wetting layer dynamics and extract a direct measurement of the carrier-carrier scattering time constant....... relaxation and capture processes into the ground states of the quantum dashes result in increased gain followed by lasing at the gain peak irrespective of the stimulating pulse wavelength. The temporal response of the lasing line is examined on a 40 GHz scope and full characterization of the pulse...

  1. Acute Otitis Media-Induced Gradenigo Syndrome, a Dramatic Response to Intravenous Antibiotic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayebeh Kazemi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Petrositis is a rare but severe complication of acute otitis media and mastoiditis. Despite efficient antibiotic therapy, there are still reports of both intratemporal and intracranial complications of otitis media with the potential risk of high morbidity and mortality. Petrositis has traditionally been treated with surgery, but recent advances in imaging, with improved antibiotic treatment, allow more conservative management.   Case Report: In this case report we describe the clinical course and treatment of a 33-year-old man with petrous apicitis who presented with severe otalgia, retro-orbital pain, and sixth cranial nerve palsy Gradenigo syndrome. Our patient showed a dramatic response to intravenous antibiotics only, without need for any surgical intervention, even myringotomy.   Conclusion: It seems that early detection and management of this syndrome before development of other intratemporal or intracranial complications may prevent the need for surgical intervention.

  2. Förster energy transfer induced random lasing at unconventional excitation wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadak Alee, K.; Barik, Sabyasachi; Mujumdar, Sushil

    2013-11-01

    We experimentally demonstrate efficient lasing from a Rhodamine-nanoscatterer random laser when pumped with unconventional wavelengths, at which the absorption of Rhodamine is negligible. Förster-type energy transfer was realized by using Coumarin molecules as donors. Explicit time-resolved spectroscopy provided direct evidence for the nonradiative transfer with ˜48% efficiency. We obtained lasing at reduced thresholds by a factor of over 3 and increased amplification rates by a factor of ˜4 in the Förster regime, even in samples with sub-diffusive disorder strength. We characterize the efficacy of the Förster transfer induced lasing over a range of unconventional wavelengths for the Rh-based system.

  3. Randomly distributed spin induced suppression of superconducting properties in Gd-123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, B.; Haldar, S.; Mukherjee, I.; Kumar Ghosh, Ajay

    2017-02-01

    Suppression of superconducting property in presence of inhomogeneous spin distribution in GdBa2Cu3-xCoxO6.9 has been studied. A superconducting sample without Co exhibits superconducting transition at 56.1 K. The current-voltage (I-V) characteristics exhibit nonlinear to linear transformation above a certain temperature. Two other samples (i) with Co and (ii) without Cu are found to be nonsuperconducting with very high resistive in nature at lower temperature. Localization length decreases with the increase in Co substitution. Suppression of the superconducting transition has been attributed to the change in the magnetic fluctuations induced by the randomness in spin substitution. An exponent has been extracted to understand the current-voltage behaviour. Kosterlitz-Thouless (KT) transition may be affected strongly by the shifting of magnetic fluctuations.

  4. A Randomized Clinical Trial of Schinus terebinthifolius Mouthwash to Treat Biofilm-Induced Gingivitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irlan de Almeida Freires

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. This study aimed to investigate the efficacy of a Schinus terebinthifolius (ST mouthwash in reducing gingival inflammation levels (GI and biofilm accumulation (BA in children with gingivitis. Methods. This was a randomized, controlled, triple blind, and phase II clinical trial, with children aged 9–13 years presenting with biofilm-induced gingivitis. The sample was randomized into experimental (0.3125% ST, and control (0.12% chlorhexidine/CHX, groups. Products were masked as regards color, flavor and aroma. Intervention protocol consisted in supervised rinsing of 10 mL/day for 01 minute for 10 days. Gingival bleeding and simplified oral hygiene indexes were used to assess the efficacy variables, measured at baseline and after intervention by calibrated examiners. Data were statistically treated with paired t-test, unpaired t-test, and Wilcoxon and Mann-Whitney tests (α = .05. Results. It was found that both ST and CHX were able to significantly reduce GI levels after 10 days and there was no significant difference between them . CHX was the only product able to significantly reduce BA after 10 days when compared to baseline . Conclusion. ST mouthwash showed significant anti-inflammatory activity (equivalent to CHX, but it was not able to reduce biofilm accumulation.

  5. Pattern selection and self-organization induced by random boundary initial values in a neuronal network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jun; Xu, Ying; Wang, Chunni; Jin, Wuyin

    2016-11-01

    Regular spatial patterns could be observed in spatiotemporal systems far from equilibrium states. Artificial networks with different topologies are often designed to reproduce the collective behaviors of nodes (or neurons) which the local kinetics of node is described by kinds of oscillator models. It is believed that the self-organization of network much depends on the bifurcation parameters and topology connection type. Indeed, the boundary effect is every important on the pattern formation of network. In this paper, a regular network of Hindmarsh-Rose neurons is designed in a two-dimensional square array with nearest-neighbor connection type. The neurons on the boundary are excited with random stimulus. It is found that spiral waves, even a pair of spiral waves could be developed in the network under appropriate coupling intensity. Otherwise, the spatial distribution of network shows irregular states. A statistical variable is defined to detect the collective behavior by using mean field theory. It is confirmed that regular pattern could be developed when the synchronization degree is low. The potential mechanism could be that random perturbation on the boundary could induce coherence resonance-like behavior thus spiral wave could be developed in the network.

  6. Does medically induced weight loss improve obstructive sleep apnoea in the obese: review of randomized trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmingsson, E

    2011-02-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea is characterized by repeated periods of breathing cessation during sleep. Obstructive sleep apnoea is both common and underdiagnosed in the obese. A recent study found that as many as 86% of older obese type 2 diabetics had obstructive sleep apnoea. Obesity is independently associated with developing obstructive sleep apnoea, and the reverse may also occur. The prevalence of obstructive sleep apnoea is therefore expected to rise in the wake of the obesity epidemic. The number of partial (hypopnoea) or complete (apnoea) airway obstructions per hour (apnoea-hypopnoea index) is used to classify obstructive sleep apnoea as mild (5-14 events per hour), moderate (15-30) or severe (>30). Severe obstructive sleep apnoea is associated with a two to sixfold increase in all-cause mortality; the impact of mild and moderate obstructive sleep apnoea is less clear. Until recently, the evidence supporting a beneficial effect of weight loss on obstructive sleep apnoea has been limited by a lack of randomized trials. In 2009, at least three randomized controlled trials evaluated whether medically induced weight loss improves obstructive sleep apnoea. The treatment effect ranged from 42% to 62% improvement, although the highest estimate was seen in a very short duration study (9 weeks). Patients who either lost 10-15 kg or more, or had severe obstructive sleep apnoea at baseline, benefited most from treatment.

  7. Drug-induced sleep endoscopy: conventional versus target controlled infusion techniques--a randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vito, Andrea; Agnoletti, Vanni; Berrettini, Stefano; Piraccini, Emanuele; Criscuolo, Armando; Corso, Ruggero; Campanini, Aldo; Gambale, Giorgio; Vicini, Claudio

    2011-03-01

    Understanding the sites of pharyngeal collapse is mandatory for surgical treatment decision-making in obstructive sleep-apnea-hypopnea syndrome patients. Drug-induced sleep endoscopy (DISE) allows for the direct observation of the upper airway during sedative-induced sleep. In order to re-create snoring and apnea patterns related to a spontaneous sleep situation, the authors used a target-controlled infusion (TCI) sleep endoscopy (DISE-TCI), comparing this technique to conventional DISE, in which sedation was reached by a manual bolus injection. The authors conducted a prospective, randomized, unicenter study. The apneic event observation and its correlation with pharyngeal collapse patterns is the primary endpoint; secondary endpoints are defined as stability and safety of sedation plans of DISE-TCI technique. From January 2009 to June 2009, 40 OSAHS patients were included in the study and randomized allocated in two groups: the bolus injection conventional DISE group and the DISE-TCI group. We recorded the complete apnea event at the oropharynx and hypopharynx levels in 4 patients of the conventional DISE group (20%) and in 17 patients of the DISE-TCI group (85%) (P DISE group because of severe desaturation that resulted from the first bolus of propofol (1 mg/kg) (P = 0.4872 ns). We recorded the instability of the sedation plan in 13 patients from the conventional DISE group (65%) and 1 patient from the DISE-TCI group (5%) (P = 0.0001). Our results suggest that the DISE-TCI technique should be the first choice in performing sleep endoscopy because of its increased accuracy, stability and safety.

  8. From random inhomogeneities to periodic nanostructures induced in bulk silica by ultrashort laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudenko, Anton; Colombier, Jean-Philippe; Itina, Tatiana E.

    2016-02-01

    Femtosecond laser-induced volume nanograting formation is numerically investigated. The developed model solves nonlinear Maxwell's equations coupled with multiple rate free carrier density equations in the presence of randomly distributed inhomogeneities in fused silica. As a result of the performed calculations, conduction band electron density is shown to form nanoplanes elongated perpendicular to the laser polarization. Two types of nanoplanes are identified. The structures of the first type have a characteristic period of the laser wavelength in glass and are attributed to the interference of the incident and the inhomogeneity-scattered light waves. Field components induced by coherent multiple scattering in directions perpendicular to the laser polarization are shown to be responsible for the formation of the second type of structures with a subwavelength periodicity. In this case, the influence of the inhomogeneity concentration on the period of nanoplanes is shown. The calculation results not only help to identify the physical origin of the self-organized nanogratings, but also explain their period and orientation.

  9. Deformation-induced splitting of isoscalar E0 giant resonance: Skyrme random-phase-approximation analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Kvasil, J; Repko, A; Kleinig, W; Reinhard, P -G

    2016-01-01

    The deformation-induced splitting of isoscalar giant monopole resonance (ISGMR) is systematically analyzed in a wide range of masses covering medium, rare-earth, actinide, and superheavy axial deformed nuclei. The study is performed within the fully self-consistent quasiparticle random-phase-approximation (QRPA) method based on the Skyrme functional. Two Skyrme forces, one with a large (SV-bas) and one with a small (SkP) nuclear incompressibility, are considered. The calculations confirm earlier results that, due to the deformation-induced E0-E2 coupling, the isoscalar E0 resonance attains a double-peak structure and significant energy upshift. Our results are compared with available analytic estimations. Unlike earlier studies, we get a smaller energy difference between the lower and upper peaks and thus a stronger E0-E2 coupling. This in turn results in more pumping of E0 strength into the lower peak and more pronounced splitting of ISGMR. We also discuss widths of the peaks and their negligible correlation...

  10. Fecal Microbiota Transplantation Induces Remission in Patients With Active Ulcerative Colitis in a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moayyedi, Paul; Surette, Michael G; Kim, Peter T; Libertucci, Josie; Wolfe, Melanie; Onischi, Catherine; Armstrong, David; Marshall, John K; Kassam, Zain; Reinisch, Walter; Lee, Christine H

    2015-07-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is difficult to treat, and standard therapy does not always induce remission. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is an alternative approach that induced remission in small series of patients with active UC. We investigated its safety and efficacy in a placebo-controlled randomized trial. We performed a parallel study of patients with active UC without infectious diarrhea. Participants were examined by flexible sigmoidoscopy when the study began and then were randomly assigned to groups that received FMT (50 mL, via enema, from healthy anonymous donors; n = 38) or placebo (50 mL water enema; n = 37) once weekly for 6 weeks. Patients, clinicians, and investigators were blinded to the groups. The primary outcome was remission of UC, defined as a Mayo score ≤2 with an endoscopic Mayo score of 0, at week 7. Patients provided stool samples when the study began and during each week of FMT for microbiome analysis. The trial was stopped early for futility by the Data Monitoring and Safety Committee, but all patients already enrolled in the trial were allowed to complete the study. Seventy patients completed the trial (3 dropped out from the placebo group and 2 from the FMT group). Nine patients who received FMT (24%) and 2 who received placebo (5%) were in remission at 7 weeks (a statistically significant difference in risk of 17%; 95% confidence interval, 2%-33%). There was no significant difference in adverse events between groups. Seven of the 9 patients in remission after FMT received fecal material from a single donor. Three of the 4 patients with UC ≤1 year entered remission, compared with 6 of 34 of those with UC >1 year (P = .04, Fisher's exact test). Stool from patients receiving FMT had greater microbial diversity, compared with baseline, than that of patients given the placebo (P = .02, Mann-Whitney U test). FMT induces remission in a significantly greater percentage of patients with active UC than placebo, with no difference in

  11. Inducing sadness and anxiousness through visual media: measurement techniques and persistence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre Kuijsters

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The persistence of negative moods (sadness and anxiousness induced by three visual Mood Induction Procedures (MIP was investigated. The evolution of the mood after the MIP was monitored for a period of 8 minutes with the Self-Assessment Manikin (every 2 minutes and with recordings of skin conductance level (SCL and electrocardiography (ECG. The SAM pleasure ratings showed that short and longer film fragments were effective in inducing a longer lasting negative mood, whereas the negative mood induced by the IAPS slideshow was short lived. The induced arousal during the anxious MIPs diminished quickly after the mood induction; nevertheless, the SCL data suggest longer lasting arousal effects for both movies. The decay of the induced mood follows a logarithmic function; diminishing quickly in the first minutes, thereafter returning slowly back to baseline. These results reveal that caution is needed when investigating the effects of the induced mood on a task or the effect of interventions on induced moods, because the induced mood diminishes quickly after the mood induction.

  12. Recirculation zones induce non-Fickian transport in three-dimensional periodic porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crevacore, Eleonora; Tosco, Tiziana; Sethi, Rajandrea; Boccardo, Gianluca; Marchisio, Daniele L.

    2016-11-01

    In this work, the influence of pore space geometry on solute transport in porous media is investigated performing computational fluid dynamics pore-scale simulations of fluid flow and solute transport. The three-dimensional periodic domains are obtained from three different pore structure configurations, namely, face-centered-cubic (fcc), body-centered-cubic (bcc), and sphere-in-cube (sic) arrangements of spherical grains. Although transport simulations are performed with media having the same grain size and the same porosity (in fcc and bcc configurations), the resulting breakthrough curves present noteworthy differences, such as enhanced tailing. The cause of such differences is ascribed to the presence of recirculation zones, even at low Reynolds numbers. Various methods to readily identify recirculation zones and quantify their magnitude using pore-scale data are proposed. The information gained from this analysis is then used to define macroscale models able to provide an appropriate description of the observed anomalous transport. A mass transfer model is applied to estimate relevant macroscale parameters (hydrodynamic dispersion above all) and their spatial variation in the medium; a functional relation describing the spatial variation of such macroscale parameters is then proposed.

  13. Remobilization Dynamics of Caffeine, Ciprofloxacin, and Propranolol following Evaporation-Induced Immobilization in Porous Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Normile, Hayley J; Papelis, Charalambos; Kibbey, Tohren C G

    2017-06-06

    Changing weather conditions can cause cycles of wetting and drying in the unsaturated zone. When porewater evaporates, any nonvolatile solutes present in the pores will be driven to adsorb and ultimately precipitate on solid surfaces. When media are subsequently resaturated through rainfall infiltration, the remobilization of solutes likely depends on both the hydraulics of resaturation and the dynamics of dissolution processes. The focus of this work was to study the dynamics of remobilization of three different emerging contaminants (caffeine, ciprofloxacin, and propranolol) and two model compounds (fluorescein and sulforhodamine B) from porous media following evaporation of porewater. Remobilization column experiments were conducted to study this phenomenon and were evaluated using a finite difference model developed to simulate the adsorption-desorption dynamics during resaturation and elution. Results indicate that dissolution dynamics become increasingly important with increasing adsorption affinity for solid surfaces. Trends in observed elution behavior are not well-predicted from chemical properties, such as solubility. One of the most significant observations of the work is the presence of spikes in elution concentrations well above initial porewater concentration, resulting from the hydraulics of the resaturation process. The effect is most significant in highly mobile compounds that exhibit low adsorption affinity for solid surfaces.

  14. Stochastic uncertainty analysis for solute transport in randomly heterogeneous media using a Karhunen-Loève-based moment equation approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gaisheng; Lu, Zhiming; Zhang, Dongxiao

    2007-01-01

    A new approach has been developed for solving solute transport problems in randomly heterogeneous media using the Karhunen-Loève-based moment equation (KLME) technique proposed by Zhang and Lu (2004). The KLME approach combines the Karhunen-Loève decomposition of the underlying random conductivity field and the perturbative and polynomial expansions of dependent variables including the hydraulic head, flow velocity, dispersion coefficient, and solute concentration. The equations obtained in this approach are sequential, and their structure is formulated in the same form as the original governing equations such that any existing simulator, such as Modular Three-Dimensional Multispecies Transport Model for Simulation of Advection, Dispersion, and Chemical Reactions of Contaminants in Groundwater Systems (MT3DMS), can be directly applied as the solver. Through a series of two-dimensional examples, the validity of the KLME approach is evaluated against the classical Monte Carlo simulations. Results indicate that under the flow and transport conditions examined in this work, the KLME approach provides an accurate representation of the mean concentration. For the concentration variance, the accuracy of the KLME approach is good when the conductivity variance is 0.5. As the conductivity variance increases up to 1.0, the mismatch on the concentration variance becomes large, although the mean concentration can still be accurately reproduced by the KLME approach. Our results also indicate that when the conductivity variance is relatively large, neglecting the effects of the cross terms between velocity fluctuations and local dispersivities, as done in some previous studies, can produce noticeable errors, and a rigorous treatment of the dispersion terms becomes more appropriate.

  15. Effects of emotional acceptance and rumination on media-induced body dissatisfaction in anorexia and bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumann, Eva; Tuschen-Caffier, Brunna; Voderholzer, Ulrich; Schäfer, Johanna; Svaldi, Jennifer

    2016-11-01

    Body dissatisfaction is an important risk and maintaining factor for eating disorders. The aim of the present study was to experimentally test the effects of two emotion regulation strategies - acceptance and rumination - on media-induced body dissatisfaction in eating disorders. After watching pictures of thin models, women with anorexia nervosa (AN; n = 39) and bulimia nervosa (BN; n = 39) were encouraged to either use emotional acceptance or rumination to cope with their feelings. Body dissatisfaction and mood were repeatedly assessed. Acceptance significantly improved body dissatisfaction in women with BN. Rumination led to a significant increase of body dissatisfaction in both eating disorder groups. Results were independent from mood changes. Findings highlight the importance ruminative thinking may have in the aggravation of dissatisfaction with the own body in AN and BN. Results suggest that emotional acceptance is a useful strategy to regulate body dissatisfaction after exposure to thin-ideal media in BN. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Nicotine therapy sampling to induce quit attempts among smokers unmotivated to quit: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Matthew J; Hughes, John R; Gray, Kevin M; Wahlquist, Amy E; Saladin, Michael E; Alberg, Anthony J

    2011-11-28

    Rates of smoking cessation have not changed in a decade, accentuating the need for novel approaches to prompt quit attempts. Within a nationwide randomized clinical trial (N = 849) to induce further quit attempts and cessation, smokers currently unmotivated to quit were randomized to a practice quit attempt (PQA) alone or to nicotine replacement therapy (hereafter referred to as nicotine therapy), sampling within the context of a PQA. Following a 6-week intervention period, participants were followed up for 6 months to assess outcomes. The PQA intervention was designed to increase motivation, confidence, and coping skills. The combination of a PQA plus nicotine therapy sampling added samples of nicotine lozenges to enhance attitudes toward pharmacotherapy and to promote the use of additional cessation resources. Primary outcomes included the incidence of any ever occurring self-defined quit attempt and 24-hour quit attempt. Secondary measures included 7-day point prevalence abstinence at any time during the study (ie, floating abstinence) and at the final follow-up assessment. Compared with PQA intervention, nicotine therapy sampling was associated with a significantly higher incidence of any quit attempt (49% vs 40%; relative risk [RR], 1.2; 95% CI, 1.1-1.4) and any 24-hour quit attempt (43% vs 34%; 1.3; 1.1-1.5). Nicotine therapy sampling was marginally more likely to promote floating abstinence (19% vs 15%; RR, 1.3; 95% CI, 1.0-1.7); 6-month point prevalence abstinence rates were no different between groups (16% vs 14%; 1.2; 0.9-1.6). Nicotine therapy sampling during a PQA represents a novel strategy to motivate smokers to make a quit attempt. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00706979.

  17. Auto-inducing media for uniform isotope labeling of proteins with {sup 15}N, {sup 13}C and {sup 2}H

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guthertz, Nicolas [Institute of Cancer Research, Division of Structural Biology (United Kingdom); Klopp, Julia; Winterhalter, Aurélie; Fernández, César; Gossert, Alvar D., E-mail: alvar.gossert@novartis.com [Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research (Switzerland)

    2015-06-15

    Auto-inducing media for protein expression offer many advantages like robust reproducibility, high yields of soluble protein and much reduced workload. Here, an auto-inducing medium for uniform isotope labelling of proteins with {sup 15}N, {sup 13}C and/or {sup 2}H in E. coli is presented. So far, auto-inducing media have not found widespread application in the NMR field, because of the prohibitively high cost of labeled lactose, which is an essential ingredient of such media. Here, we propose using lactose that is only selectively labeled on the glucose moiety. It can be synthesized from inexpensive and readily available substrates: labeled glucose and unlabeled activated galactose. With this approach, uniformly isotope labeled proteins were expressed in unattended auto-inducing cultures with incorporation of {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N of 96.6 % and {sup 2}H, {sup 15}N of 98.8 %. With the present protocol, the NMR community could profit from the many advantages that auto-inducing media offer.

  18. The relationship between chronic otitis media-induced hearing loss and the acquisition of social skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidadi, Sanam; Nejadkazem, Mohammad; Naderpour, Masoud

    2008-11-01

    To investigate the effects of hearing loss caused by chronic otitis media (COM) on acquiring social skills. A case-control study of 90 patients, including patients with COM, age range 15-30 years, was conducted in the otorhinolaryngology ward of Tabriz University Hospital. Social skills were assessed with a social skills questionnaire. Social skill scores were found to be lower in hearing-impaired COM patients compared with the control group (P Social skill disabilities in patients with bilateral COM were more severe than in patients with unilateral COM and the controls (P social skills score and degree of hearing loss was significantly negative (P = 0.014, rho = -0.314). These data indicate an inverse relationship between hearing loss and social skills. Social skills and educational level of COM patients are affected because of hearing impairment. This study suggests that COM has effects on social development and education.

  19. Elasticity-induced force reversal between active spinning particles in dense passive media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragones, J L; Steimel, J P; Alexander-Katz, A

    2016-04-26

    The self-organization of active particles is governed by their dynamic effective interactions. Such interactions are controlled by the medium in which such active agents reside. Here we study the interactions between active agents in a dense non-active medium. Our system consists of actuated, spinning, active particles embedded in a dense monolayer of passive, or non-active, particles. We demonstrate that the presence of the passive monolayer alters markedly the properties of the system and results in a reversal of the forces between active spinning particles from repulsive to attractive. The origin of such reversal is due to the coupling between the active stresses and elasticity of the system. This discovery provides a mechanism for the interaction between active agents in complex and structured media, opening up opportunities to tune the interaction range and directionality via the mechanical properties of the medium.

  20. [Induction of native platelets aggregation by incubation media of the UV irradiated leukocytes: possible role of the photo-induced ADP release].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anosov, A K; Gorbach, M M

    2014-01-01

    It is shown that during incubation after UV irradiation (22-24 hours at 7-9 degrees C) irradiated isolated rabbit leukocytes release the compound(s) which induces platelets aggregation in the native platelet rich plasma. Treatment of the incubation media of irradiated leukocytes by heat (5 minutes at 100 degrees C) does not significantly change its pro-aggregation activity. Treatment of the platelet-rich plasma by the incubation media of irradiated leukocytes without stirring induces the refractoriness of platelets to ADP. The platelets treated by ADP without stirring do not react to the incubation media of irradiated leukocytes. The absorption spectrum of the incubation media of irradiated leukocytes has the maximum at 260 nm similar to that of the absorption spectra of ADP. It is possible that UVradiation induces the ADP release from leukocytes during post-irradiation incubation. Accumulation of this substance in the incubation media may be the cause of its pro-aggregation activity for native blood platelets.

  1. Scattering of elastic waves from media with fracture-induced anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haugen, Geir Ultveit

    1996-12-31

    To characterize oil reservoirs, one must know the fracture systems even at large distances from the reservoir and this knowledge comes from seismic data. This thesis models and analyses wave propagation in fractured rocks. It uses effective medium theory to include the fracturing and obtains closed form solutions for the resulting stiffness coefficients for several geometries. A linearized expression provides a simple way of calculating the first-order effects of the fracturing. For isotropic media with one set of embedded fractures, their effect upon the directional velocities is quantified. Compact formulas are given for the plane-wave scattering matrix for amplitudes and for vertical energy flux. When the norm of the relative difference in the eigenvector matrices is assumed to be small, this enables a weak-contrast/weak-anisotropy approximation of the scattering matrix in anisotropic media to be found. To obtain this, a simple formula is derived for the inverse of the eigenvector matrix regardless of the normalization. The new formalism is used to derive a new analytical approximation of the P-wave reflection coefficient in the crack-strike and the crack-normal plane for a model consisting of shale over vertically fractured sandstone. These approximations show how the fracture information can be obtained from the azimuthal AVO response. Next, the impact of the fracturing on the properties of the sandstone layer is quantified. Finally, using a linear slip boundary condition to model the non-weldedness, it is shown that a fracture or fault may be thought of as having a set of characteristic widths, which roughly specify the wavelength range of acoustic energy that interacts with the fracture. Compact plane wave scattering coefficients are derived. These show that observation of reflected signals can provide significant information on the physical properties of the fracture, such as texture and the nature of the in filling fluids. 75 refs., 20 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Acupuncture compared with placebo acupuncture in radiotherapy-induced nausea--a randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enblom, A; Johnsson, A; Hammar, M; Onelöv, E; Steineck, G; Börjeson, S

    2012-05-01

    It is not known if verum (real) acupuncture is effective for nausea and vomiting (emesis) during radiotherapy. We randomly treated 215 blinded cancer patients with verum: penetrating 'deqi' creating acupuncture (n = 109) or non-penetrating sham needles (n = 106) two to three times per week. The patients documented emesis daily during the radiotherapy period. Primary end point was the number of patients with at least one episode of nausea. In the verum and the sham acupuncture group, 70% and 62% experienced nausea at least once during the radiotherapy period (relative risk 1.1, 95% CI 0.9-1.4) for a mean number of 10.1 and 8.7 days. Twenty five percent and 28% vomited, and 42% and 37% used antiemetic drugs at least once, respectively. Ninety-five percent in the verum acupuncture group and 96% in the sham acupuncture group believed that the treatment had been effective against nausea. In both groups, 67% experienced positive effects on relaxation, mood, sleep or pain reduction and 89% wished to receive the treatment again. Acupuncture creating deqi is not more effective than sham in radiotherapy-induced nausea, but in this study, nearly all patients in both groups experienced that the treatment was effective for nausea.

  3. On the Shaker Simulation of Wind-Induced Non-Gaussian Random Vibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Xu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Gaussian signal is produced by ordinary random vibration controllers to test the products in the laboratory, while the field data is usually non-Gaussian. Two methodologies are presented in this paper for shaker simulation of wind-induced non-Gaussian vibration. The first methodology synthesizes the non-Gaussian signal offline and replicates it on the shaker in the Time Waveform Replication (TWR mode. A new synthesis method is used to model the non-Gaussian signal as a Gaussian signal multiplied by an amplitude modulation function (AMF. A case study is presented to show that the synthesized non-Gaussian signal has the same power spectral density (PSD, probability density function (PDF, and loading cycle distribution (LCD as the field data. The second methodology derives a damage equivalent Gaussian signal from the non-Gaussian signal based on the fatigue damage spectrum (FDS and the extreme response spectrum (ERS and reproduces it on the shaker in the closed-loop frequency domain control mode. The PSD level and the duration time of the derived Gaussian signal can be manipulated for accelerated testing purpose. A case study is presented to show that the derived PSD matches the damage potential of the non-Gaussian environment for both fatigue and peak response.

  4. Spatial Solitons and Induced Kerr Effects in Quasi-Phase-Matched Quadratic Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Carl A. Balslev; Bang, Ole; Kivshar, Yu.S.

    1997-01-01

    We show that the evolution of the average intensity of cw beams in a quasi-phase-matched quadratic (or chi((2))) medium is strongly influenced by induced Kerr effects, such as self- and cross-phase modulation. We prove the existence of rapidly oscillating solitary waves (a spatial analog of the g......We show that the evolution of the average intensity of cw beams in a quasi-phase-matched quadratic (or chi((2))) medium is strongly influenced by induced Kerr effects, such as self- and cross-phase modulation. We prove the existence of rapidly oscillating solitary waves (a spatial analog...

  5. Effectiveness of triclosan in the management of radiation-induced oral mucositis: A randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satheeshkumar P

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Oral care in cancer patients is an important aspect in the quality of life of patients undergoing cancer therpay. Mucositis, trismus, salivary gland dysfunction are the main complications of the cancer therapy, which lead to long-term comlications such as radiation caries, poor oral hygiene and osteoradionecrosis. A timely oral evaluation and intervention in these patients can reduce the severity of the potential complications. Triclosan is an antibacterial agent widely used in periodontal therapy, the effectiveness of triclosan in the management of radiation induced oral mucositis is evaluated here. Aims: 1 To determine the effectiveness of triclosan in the management of radiation-induced oral mucositis. 2 To compare the effectiveness of triclosan mouth rinse with conventional sodium bicarbonate mouth rinse. Materials and Methods: Twenty-four patients who underwent radiation therapy for oral cancer and subsequently developed oral mucositis were included in the study. They were randomly allocated into two groups on noticing grade I mucositis (erythema. The study group was advised to use triclosan mouthwash containing triclosan 0.03% W/V and sodium bicarbonate 2 mg mouth wash for the control group. A weekly follow-up evaluation of body weight, food intake, pain and grading of mucositis were made during the radiation treatment period and post radiation treatment period. Results: Both the groups were statistically identical. All the 24 patients in both the groups passed through grade 3 mucositis on the last day of radiotherapy. However, 10 patients in the control group and only one patient in the study group entered to grade 4 mucositis. A definite change was noticed in the severity of the mucositis, food intake and weight loss. The control group took more than 45 days to resolve while the study group took only less than 28 days. Discussion: The results of the study were evaluated and tried to formulate a hypothesis so as to explain

  6. Curcumin and Piperine Supplementation and Recovery Following Exercise Induced Muscle Damage: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barthélémy Delecroix, Abd Elbasset Abaïdia, Cédric Leduc, Brian Dawson, Grégory Dupont

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of oral consumption of curcumin and piperine in combination on the recovery kinetics after exercise-induced muscle damage. Forty-eight hours before and following exercise-induced muscle damage, ten elite rugby players consumed curcumin and piperine (experimental condition or placebo. A randomized cross-over design was performed. Concentric and isometric peak torque for the knee extensors, one leg 6 seconds sprint performance on a non-motorized treadmill, counter movement jump performance, blood creatine kinase concentration and muscle soreness were assessed immediately after exercise, then at 24h, 48h and 72h post-exercise. There were moderate to large effects of the exercise on the concentric peak torque for the knee extensors (Effect size (ES = -1.12; Confidence interval at 90% (CI90%: -2.17 to -0.06, the one leg 6 seconds sprint performance (ES=-1.65; CI90% = -2.51to -0.80 and the counter movement jump performance (ES = -0.56; CI90% = -0.81 to -0.32 in the 48h following the exercise. There was also a large effect of the exercise on the creatine kinase level 72h after the exercise in the control group (ES = 3.61; CI90%: 0.24 to 6.98. This decrease in muscle function and this elevation in creatine kinase indicate that the exercise implemented was efficient to induce muscle damage. Twenty four hours post-exercise, the reduction (from baseline in sprint mean power output was moderately lower in the experimental condition (-1.77 ± 7.25%; 1277 ± 153W in comparison with the placebo condition (-13.6 ± 13.0%; 1130 ± 241W (Effect Size = -1.12; Confidence Interval 90%=-1.86 to -0.86. However, no other effect was found between the two conditions. Curcumin and piperine supplementation before and after exercise can attenuate some, but not all, aspects of muscle damage.

  7. Curcumin and Piperine Supplementation and Recovery Following Exercise Induced Muscle Damage: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delecroix, Barthélémy; Abaïdia, Abd Elbasset; Leduc, Cédric; Dawson, Brian; Dupont, Grégory

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of oral consumption of curcumin and piperine in combination on the recovery kinetics after exercise-induced muscle damage. Forty-eight hours before and following exercise-induced muscle damage, ten elite rugby players consumed curcumin and piperine (experimental condition) or placebo. A randomized cross-over design was performed. Concentric and isometric peak torque for the knee extensors, one leg 6 seconds sprint performance on a non-motorized treadmill, counter movement jump performance, blood creatine kinase concentration and muscle soreness were assessed immediately after exercise, then at 24h, 48h and 72h post-exercise. There were moderate to large effects of the exercise on the concentric peak torque for the knee extensors (Effect size (ES) = -1.12; Confidence interval at 90% (CI90%): -2.17 to -0.06), the one leg 6 seconds sprint performance (ES=-1.65; CI90% = -2.51to -0.80) and the counter movement jump performance (ES = -0.56; CI90% = -0.81 to -0.32) in the 48h following the exercise. There was also a large effect of the exercise on the creatine kinase level 72h after the exercise in the control group (ES = 3.61; CI90%: 0.24 to 6.98). This decrease in muscle function and this elevation in creatine kinase indicate that the exercise implemented was efficient to induce muscle damage. Twenty four hours post-exercise, the reduction (from baseline) in sprint mean power output was moderately lower in the experimental condition (-1.77 ± 7.25%; 1277 ± 153W) in comparison with the placebo condition (-13.6 ± 13.0%; 1130 ± 241W) (Effect Size = -1.12; Confidence Interval 90%=-1.86 to -0.86). However, no other effect was found between the two conditions. Curcumin and piperine supplementation before and after exercise can attenuate some, but not all, aspects of muscle damage.

  8. A cold-atom random laser

    CERN Document Server

    Baudouin, Quentin; Guarrera, Vera; Guerin, William; Kaiser, Robin

    2013-01-01

    Conventional lasers make use of optical cavities to provide feedback to gain media. Conversely, mirrorless lasers can be built by using disordered structures to induce multiple scattering, which increases the effective path length in the gain medium and thus provides the necessary feedback. These so-called random lasers potentially offer a new and simple mean to address applications such as lighting. To date, they are all based on condensed-matter media. Interestingly, light or microwave amplification by stimulated emission occurs also naturally in stellar gases and planetary atmospheres. The possibility of additional scattering-induced feedback (that is, random lasing) has been discussed and could explain unusual properties of some space masers. Here, we report the experimental observation of random lasing in a controlled, cold atomic vapour, taking advantage of Raman gain. By tuning the gain frequency in the vicinity of a scattering resonance, we observe an enhancement of the light emission of the cloud due...

  9. Inducing sadness and anxiousness through visual media: Measurement techniques and persistence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijsters, A.; Redi, J.; Ruyter, B.E.R. de; Heynderickx, I.

    2016-01-01

    The persistence of negative moods (sadness and anxiousness) induced by three visual Mood Induction Procedures (MIP) was investigated. The evolution of the mood after the MIP was monitored for a period of 8 minutes with the Self-Assessment Manikin (every 2 minutes) and with recordings of skin

  10. Inducing sadness and anxiousness through visual media: measurement techniques and persistence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Kuijsters (Andre); J.A. Redi (Judith); B. de Ruyter (Boris); I. Heynderickx (Ingrid)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThe persistence of negative moods (sadness and anxiousness) induced by three visual Mood Induction Procedures (MIP) was investigated. The evolution of the mood after the MIP was monitored for a period of 8 min with the Self-Assessment Manikin (SAM; every 2 min) and with recordings of

  11. Experimental and theoretical investigations of shock-induced flow of reactive porous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baer, M.R.; Graham, R.A.; Anderson, M.U. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sheffield, S.A.; Gustavsen, R.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1996-11-01

    In this work, the microscale processes of consolidation, deformation and reaction features of shocked porous materials are studied. Time- resolve particle velocities and stress fields associated with dispersive compaction waves are measured in gas-gun experiments. In these tests, a thin porous layer of HMX is shock-loaded at varied levels. At high impact, significant reaction is triggered by the rapid material distortion during compaction. In parallel modeling studies, continuum mixture theory is applied to describe the behavior of averaged wave-fields in heterogeneous media. One-dimensional simulations of gas-gun experiments demonstrate that the wave features and interactions with viscoelastic materials in the gauge package are well described by mixture theory, including reflected wave behavior and conditions where significant reaction is initiated. Numerical simulations of impact on a collection of discrete HMX `crystals` are also presented using shock physics analysis. Three-dimensional simulations indicate that rapid distortion occurs at material contact points; the nature of the dispersive fields includes large amplitude fluctuations of stress with wavelengths of several particle diameters. Localization of energy causes `hot-spots` due to shock focusing and plastic work as material flows into interstitial regions. These numerical experiments demonstrate that `hot-spots` are strongly influenced by multiple crystal interactions. This mesoscale study provides new insights into micromechanical behavior of heterogeneous energetic materials.

  12. BCG vaccination induces HIV target cell activation in HIV-exposed infants in a randomized trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasper, Melanie A.; Hesseling, Anneke C.; Mohar, Isaac; Myer, Landon; Azenkot, Tali; Passmore, Jo-Ann S.; Hanekom, Willem; Cotton, Mark F.; Crispe, I. Nicholas; Sodora, Donald L.; Jaspan, Heather B.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine is administered at birth to protect infants against tuberculosis throughout Africa, where most perinatal HIV-1 transmission occurs. We examined whether BCG vaccination alters the levels of activated HIV target T cells in HIV-exposed South African infants. METHODS. HIV-exposed infants were randomized to receive routine (at birth) or delayed (at 8 weeks) BCG vaccination. Activated and CCR5-expressing peripheral blood CD4+ T cell, monocyte, and NK cell frequencies were evaluated by flow cytometry and immune gene expression via PCR using Biomark (Fluidigm). RESULTS. Of 149 infants randomized, 92% (n = 137) were retained at 6 weeks: 71 in the routine BCG arm and 66 in the delayed arm. Routine BCG vaccination led to a 3-fold increase in systemic activation of HIV target CD4+CCR5+ T cells (HLA-DR+CD38+) at 6 weeks (0.25% at birth versus 0.08% in delayed vaccination groups; P = 0.029), which persisted until 8 weeks of age when the delayed arm was vaccinated. Vaccination of the infants in the delayed arm at 8 weeks resulted in a similar increase in activated CD4+CCR5+ T cells. The increase in activated T cells was associated with increased levels of MHC class II transactivator (CIITA), IL12RB1, and IFN-α1 transcripts within peripheral blood mononuclear cells but minimal changes in innate cells. CONCLUSION. BCG vaccination induces immune changes in HIV-exposed infants, including an increase in the proportion of activated CCR5+CD4+ HIV target cells. These findings provide insight into optimal BCG vaccine timing to minimize the risks of HIV transmissions to exposed infants while preserving potential benefits conferred by BCG vaccination. TRIAL REGISTRATION. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02062580. FUNDING. This trial was sponsored by the Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation (MV-00-9-900-01871-0-00) and the Thrasher Foundation (NR-0095); for details, see Acknowledgments. PMID:28405623

  13. Numerical analysis of wave-induced fluid flow effects related to mesoscopic heterogeneities for realistic models of porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubino, J. G.; Holliger, K.

    2010-12-01

    The classical version of the theory of poro-elasticity assumes that wave-induced fluid movements at the macroscopic scale, as defined by the prevailing wavelengths, are the only causes of seismic velocity dispersion and attenuation in porous media. Correspondingly, the probed material is implicitly supposed to be homogeneous at the microscopic and mesoscopic scales and all poro-elastic moduli are real-valued and independent of frequency. By now, there is, however, consistent evidence to demonstrate that, on their own, the physical mechanisms of classical poro-elasticity are unable to account for the attenuation behavior inferred from seismic observations. There is also increasing evidence indicating that structural and/or compositional heterogeneity at the mesoscopic scale is likely to be capable of explaining much of the excess attenuation observed in real data. Numerical modeling of poro-elastic seismic wave propagation in general and in the presence of mesoscopic heterogeneities in particular is inherently difficult. For this reason, most available work on this topic considers simplified geometries, such as periodically layered, binary distribution of the physical properties of the rock frame and/or the saturating pore fluids or mixtures of two porous phases characterized by a single dominant length scale. While such models have greatly contributed to a better conceptual understanding and quantification of the observed attenuation of seismic waves in porous media, they are often inadequate to account for specific geological and/or petrophysical details of a given situation. A primary reason for this is that to a first approximation many, if not most, typical porous rocks are characterized by continuous, scale-invariant distributions of the hydraulic and elastic material parameters as well as by continuously varying saturation levels. Mesoscopic heterogeneity of this type is not amenable to direct numerical modeling and we therefore address this problem through a

  14. A randomized, placebo-controlled trial of online cognitive behavioral therapy for chronic insomnia disorder delivered via an automated media-rich web application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espie, Colin A; Kyle, Simon D; Williams, Chris; Ong, Jason C; Douglas, Neil J; Hames, Peter; Brown, June S L

    2012-06-01

    The internet provides a pervasive milieu for healthcare delivery. The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of a novel web-based cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) course delivered by an automated virtual therapist, when compared with a credible placebo; an approach required because web products may be intrinsically engaging, and vulnerable to placebo response. Randomized, placebo-controlled trial comprising 3 arms: CBT, imagery relief therapy (IRT: placebo), treatment as usual (TAU). Online community of participants in the UK. One hundred sixty-four adults (120 F: [mean age 49y (18-78y)] meeting proposed DSM-5 criteria for Insomnia Disorder, randomly assigned to CBT (n = 55; 40 F), IRT placebo (n = 55; 42 F) or TAU (n = 54; 38 F). CBT and IRT each comprised 6 online sessions delivered by an animated personal therapist, with automated web and email support. Participants also had access to a video library/back catalogue of session content and Wikipedia style articles. Online CBT users had access to a moderated social network/community of users. TAU comprised no restrictions on usual care and access to an online sleep diary. Major assessments at baseline, post-treatment, and at follow-up 8-weeks post-treatment; outcomes appraised by online sleep diaries and clinical status. On the primary endpoint of sleep efficiency (SE; total time asleep expressed as a percentage of the total time spent in bed), online CBT was associated with sustained improvement at post-treatment (+20%) relative to both TAU (+6%; d = 0.95) and IRT (+6%: d = 1.06), and at 8 weeks (+20%) relative to IRT (+7%: d = 1.00) and TAU (+9%: d = 0.69) These findings were mirrored across a range of sleep diary measures. Clinical benefits of CBT were evidenced by modest superiority over placebo on daytime outcomes (d = 0.23-0.37) and by substantial improved sleep-wake functioning on the Sleep Condition Indicator (range of d = 0.77-1.20). Three-quarters of CBT participants (76% [CBT] vs. 29

  15. Psychophysiological effects of a web-based stress management system: A prospective, randomized controlled intervention study of IT and media workers [ISRCTN54254861

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theorell Töres

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the present study was to assess possible effects on mental and physical well-being and stress-related biological markers of a web-based health promotion tool. Methods A randomized, prospectively controlled study was conducted with before and after measurements, involving 303 employees (187 men and 116 women, age 23–64 from four information technology and two media companies. Half of the participants were offered web-based health promotion and stress management training (intervention lasting for six months. All other participants constituted the reference group. Different biological markers were measured to detect possible physiological changes. Results After six months the intervention group had improved statistically significantly compared to the reference group on ratings of ability to manage stress, sleep quality, mental energy, concentration ability and social support. The anabolic hormone dehydroepiandosterone sulphate (DHEA-S decreased significantly in the reference group as compared to unchanged levels in the intervention group. Neuropeptide Y (NPY increased significantly in the intervention group compared to the reference group. Chromogranin A (CgA decreased significantly in the intervention group as compared to the reference group. Tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα decreased significantly in the reference group compared to the intervention group. Logistic regression analysis revealed that group (intervention vs. reference remained a significant factor in five out of nine predictive models. Conclusion The results indicate that an automatic web-based system might have short-term beneficial physiological and psychological effects and thus might be an opportunity in counteracting some clinically relevant and common stress and health issues of today.

  16. Effect of a Mediterranean diet on endothelial progenitor cells and carotid intima-media thickness in type 2 diabetes: Follow-up of a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiorino, Maria Ida; Bellastella, Giuseppe; Petrizzo, Michela; Gicchino, Maurizio; Caputo, Mariangela; Giugliano, Dario; Esposito, Katherine

    2017-03-01

    Background We assessed the long-term effects of a Mediterranean diet on circulating levels of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and the carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) in patients with type 2 diabetes. Design This was a parallel, two-arm, single-centre trial. Methods Two hundred and fifteen men and women with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes were randomized to a Mediterranean diet ( n = 108) or a low-fat diet ( n = 107). The primary outcome measures were changes in the EPC count and the CIMT of the common carotid artery after the treatment period defined as the end of trial (EOT). Results At the EOT, both the CD34(+)KDR(+) and CD34(+)KDR(+)CD133(+) counts had increased with the Mediterranean diet compared with the low-fat diet ( p Mediterranean diet. Compared with the low-fat diet, the rate of regression in the CIMT was higher in the Mediterranean diet group (51 vs. 26%), whereas the rate of progression was lower (25 vs. 50%) ( p = 0.032 for both). Changes in the CIMT were inversely correlated with the changes in EPC levels (CD34(+)KDR(+), r = -0.24, p = 0.020; CD34(+)KDR(+)CD133(+), r = -0.28, p = 0.014). At the EOT, changes in levels of HbA1c, HOMA, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and systolic blood pressure were significantly greater with the Mediterranean diet than with the low-fat diet. Conclusion Compared with a low-fat diet, a long-term trial with Mediterranean diet was associated with an increase in circulating EPCs levels and prevention of the progression of subclinical atherosclerosis in patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes.

  17. Media from macrophages co-incubated with Enterococcus faecalis induces epithelial cell monolayer reassembly and altered cell morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belogortseva, Natalia; Krezalek, Monika; Guyton, Kristina; Labno, Christine; Poroyko, Valeriy; Zaborina, Olga; Alverdy, John C

    2017-01-01

    Signal exchange between intestinal epithelial cells, microbes and local immune cells is an important mechanism of intestinal homeostasis. Given that intestinal macrophages are in close proximity to both the intestinal epithelium and the microbiota, their pathologic interactions may result in epithelial damage. The present study demonstrates that co-incubation of murine macrophages with E. faecalis strains producing gelatinase (GelE) and serine protease (SprE) leads to resultant condition media (CM) capable of inducing reassembly of primary colonic epithelial cell monolayers. Following the conditioned media (CM) exposure, some epithelial cells are shed whereas adherent cells are observed to undergo dissolution of cell-cell junctions and morphologic transformation with actin cytoskeleton reorganization resulting in flattened and elongated shapes. These cells exhibit marked filamentous filopodia and lamellipodia formation. Cellular reorganization is not observed when epithelial monolayers are exposed to: CM from macrophages co-incubated with E. faecalis GelE/SprE-deficient mutants, CM from macrophages alone, or E. faecalis (GelE/SprE) alone. Flow cytometry analysis reveals increased expression of CD24 and CD44 in cells treated with macrophage/E. faecalis CM. This finding in combination with the appearance colony formation in matrigel demonstrate that the cells treated with macrophage/E. faecalis CM contain a higher proportion progenitor cells compared to untreated control. Taken together, these findings provide evidence for a triangulated molecular dialogue between E. faecalis, macrophages and colonic epithelial cells, which may have important implications for conditions in the gut that involve inflammation, injury or tumorigenesis.

  18. Media from macrophages co-incubated with Enterococcus faecalis induces epithelial cell monolayer reassembly and altered cell morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belogortseva, Natalia; Krezalek, Monika; Guyton, Kristina; Labno, Christine; Poroyko, Valeriy; Zaborina, Olga

    2017-01-01

    Signal exchange between intestinal epithelial cells, microbes and local immune cells is an important mechanism of intestinal homeostasis. Given that intestinal macrophages are in close proximity to both the intestinal epithelium and the microbiota, their pathologic interactions may result in epithelial damage. The present study demonstrates that co-incubation of murine macrophages with E. faecalis strains producing gelatinase (GelE) and serine protease (SprE) leads to resultant condition media (CM) capable of inducing reassembly of primary colonic epithelial cell monolayers. Following the conditioned media (CM) exposure, some epithelial cells are shed whereas adherent cells are observed to undergo dissolution of cell-cell junctions and morphologic transformation with actin cytoskeleton reorganization resulting in flattened and elongated shapes. These cells exhibit marked filamentous filopodia and lamellipodia formation. Cellular reorganization is not observed when epithelial monolayers are exposed to: CM from macrophages co-incubated with E. faecalis GelE/SprE-deficient mutants, CM from macrophages alone, or E. faecalis (GelE/SprE) alone. Flow cytometry analysis reveals increased expression of CD24 and CD44 in cells treated with macrophage/E. faecalis CM. This finding in combination with the appearance colony formation in matrigel demonstrate that the cells treated with macrophage/E. faecalis CM contain a higher proportion progenitor cells compared to untreated control. Taken together, these findings provide evidence for a triangulated molecular dialogue between E. faecalis, macrophages and colonic epithelial cells, which may have important implications for conditions in the gut that involve inflammation, injury or tumorigenesis. PMID:28793333

  19. Influence of hydrodynamic parameters on tsunami run-up uncertainty induced by earthquake random slip distribtutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Løvholt, Finn; Kim, Jihwan; Pedersen, Geir; Harbitz, Carl

    2016-04-01

    The standard approach in forward modeling of earthquake tsunamis usually assume a uniform slip pattern. This is assumption is used both in deterministic and probabilistic models. However, the slip distribution for an earthquake is subject to (aleatory) uncertainty, and consequently the induced tsunami run-up will have an uncertainty range even given the same moment magnitude and hypocentre earthquake location. Here, we present studies of run-up variability due to stochastic earthquake slip variation in both two and three dimensions. The approach taken is fully idealized, although we draw upon the experience from two of the most destructive events the last hundred years, namely the Mw8 1976 Moro Gulf earthquake and tsunami as well as the Mw9 2011 Tohoku earthquake tsunami. The former event is used to design the two-dimensional stochastic simulations, and the latter event the three-dimensional simulations. Our primary focus is not reproduce past run-up, but rather to investigate how the hydrodynamics influence uncertainty. These quantities include among others the non-hydrodynamic response during generation, frequency dispersion, friction from the seabed, and wave-breaking. We simulate tsunamis for an ensemble of synthetic random slip over an idealized shelf geometry broken into linear segments. The uncertainty propagation from source to run-up for the two different cases are discussed and compared. As demonstrated, both the dimensionality and the earthquake parameters influence the contributions of the hydrodynamic parameters on the uncertainty. Further work will be needed to explore the transitional behaviour between the two very different cases displayed here. The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under grant agreement 603839 (Project ASTARTE).

  20. Statistical mechanics of random geometric graphs: Geometry-induced first-order phase transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostilli, Massimo; Bianconi, Ginestra

    2015-04-01

    Random geometric graphs (RGGs) can be formalized as hidden-variables models where the hidden variables are the coordinates of the nodes. Here we develop a general approach to extract the typical configurations of a generic hidden-variables model and apply the resulting equations to RGGs. For any RGG, defined through a rigid or a soft geometric rule, the method reduces to a nontrivial satisfaction problem: Given N nodes, a domain D, and a desired average connectivity 〈k〉, find, if any, the distribution of nodes having support in D and average connectivity 〈k〉. We find out that, in the thermodynamic limit, nodes are either uniformly distributed or highly condensed in a small region, the two regimes being separated by a first-order phase transition characterized by a O(N) jump of 〈k〉. Other intermediate values of 〈k〉 correspond to very rare graph realizations. The phase transition is observed as a function of a parameter a∈[0,1] that tunes the underlying geometry. In particular, a=1 indicates a rigid geometry where only close nodes are connected, while a=0 indicates a rigid antigeometry where only distant nodes are connected. Consistently, when a=1/2 there is no geometry and no phase transition. After discussing the numerical analysis, we provide a combinatorial argument to fully explain the mechanism inducing this phase transition and recognize it as an easy-hard-easy transition. Our result shows that, in general, ad hoc optimized networks can hardly be designed, unless to rely to specific heterogeneous constructions, not necessarily scale free.

  1. 慢性化脓性中耳炎伴蛛网膜下腔出血病例分析%Chronic suppurative otitis media induced subarachnoid hemorrhage: case analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王冠楠; 杨文强; 张怡; 孙圣荣

    2012-01-01

    Summary We present a case of subarachnoid hemorrhage induced by chronic suppurative otitis media, and discuss the possible mechanism here. Chronic suppurnlive otitis media is a common suppurative inflammation of middle ear, which can cause sorts of extracranial and intracranial complications in the situation of lower resistance or higher virulence. However, the condition of subarachnoid heamorrhage casued by chronic suppurative otitis media is quite rare. According to this case and previously published articles, we consider that meningitis may be the main reason of subarachnoid hemorrhage induced by chronic suppurative otitis media.

  2. Molecular dynamics study of accelerated ion-induced shock waves in biological media

    CERN Document Server

    de Vera, Pablo; Currell, Fred J; Solov'yov, Andrey V

    2016-01-01

    We present a molecular dynamics study of the effects of carbon- and iron-ion induced shock waves in DNA duplexes in liquid water. We use the CHARMM force field implemented within the MBN Explorer simulation package to optimize and equilibrate DNA duplexes in liquid water boxes of different sizes and shapes. The translational and vibrational degrees of freedom of water molecules are excited according to the energy deposited by the ions and the subsequent shock waves in liquid water are simulated. The pressure waves generated are studied and compared with an analytical hydrodynamics model which serves as a benchmark for evaluating the suitability of the simulation boxes. The energy deposition in the DNA backbone bonds is also monitored as an estimation of biological damage, something which lies beyond the possibilities of the analytical model.

  3. Field-Induced Multiple Reentrant Quantum Phase Transitions in Randomly Dimerized Antiferromagnetic S=1/2 Heisenberg Chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hida, Kazuo

    2006-07-01

    The multiple reentrant quantum phase transitions in the S=1/2 antiferromagnetic Heisenberg chains with random bond alternation in the magnetic field are investigated by the density matrix renormalization group method combined with interchain mean field approximation. It is assumed that odd numbered bonds are antiferromagnetic with strength J and even numbered bonds can take the values JS and JW (JS > J > JW > 0) randomly with the probabilities p and 1- p, respectively. The pure version ( p=0 and 1) of this model has a spin gap but exhibits a field-induced antiferromagnetism in the presence of interchain coupling if Zeeman energy due to the magnetic field exceeds the spin gap. For 0 < p < 1, antiferromagnetism is induced by randomness at the small field region where the ground state is disordered due to the spin gap in the pure version. At the same time, this model exhibits randomness-induced plateaus at several values of magnetization. The antiferromagnetism is destroyed on the plateaus. As a consequence, we find a series of reentrant quantum phase transitions between transverse antiferromagnetic phases and disordered plateau phases with the increase of magnetic field for a moderate strength of interchain coupling. Above the main plateaus, the magnetization curve consists of a series of small plateaus and jumps between them. It is also found that antiferromagnetism is induced by infinitesimal interchain coupling at the jumps between the small plateaus. We conclude that this antiferromagnetism is supported by the mixing of low-lying excited states by the staggered interchain mean field even though the spin correlation function is short ranged in the ground state of each chain.

  4. Neuroprotective potentials of neurotrophin rich olfactory ensheathing cell's conditioned media against 6OHDA-induced oxidative damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, A; Mohapatra, T M; Parmar, D; Seth, K

    2014-05-01

    On the basis of recent reports, we propose that impaired neurotrophin signaling (PI3k/Akt), low antioxidant levels, and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) conjointly participate in the progressive events responsible for the dopaminergic cell loss in Parkinson's disease (PD). In the present study we tried to target these deficits collectively through multiple neurotrophic factors (NTFs) support in the form of Olfactory Ensheathing Cell's Conditioned Media (OEC CM) using human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cell line exposed to 6 hydroxydopamine (6OHDA). 6OHDA exposure induced, oxidative stress-mediated apoptotic cell death viz. enhanced ROS generation, diffused cytosolic cytochrome c (cyt c), impaired Bcl-2: Bax levels along with decrease in GSH content. These changes were accompanied by loss in Akt phosphorylation and TH levels in SH-SY5Y cells. OEC CM significantly checked apoptotic cell death by preserving pAkt levels which coincided with enhanced GSH and suppressed oxidative injury. Functional integrity of OEC CM supported cells was evident by maintained tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression. Intercepting Akt signaling by specific inhibitor LY294002 blocked the protective effect. Taken together our findings provide important evidence that the key to protective effect of multiple NTF support via OEC CM is enhanced Akt survival signaling which promotes antioxidant defense leading to suppression of oxidative damage.

  5. Adenosine A{sub 1} receptors in contrast media-induced renal dysfunction in the normal rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liss, Per; Palm, Fredrik [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital, 75185, Uppsala (Sweden); Department of Medical Cell Biology, University Hospital, 75185, Uppsala (Sweden); Carlsson, Per-Ola [Department of Medical Cell Biology, University Hospital, 75185, Uppsala (Sweden); Department of Medical Sciences, University Hospital, 75185, Uppsala (Sweden); Hansell, Peter [Department of Medical Cell Biology, University Hospital, 75185, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2004-07-01

    Renal vasoconstriction with resultant tissue hypoxia, especially in the renal medulla, has been suggested to play a role in contrast media (CM)-induced nephropathy. In this study we investigated the effects of injection of the non-ionic low-osmolar CM iopromide with and without pretreatment with the selective adenosine A{sub 1}-receptor antagonist DPCPX. The effects were evaluated on regional renal blood flow, outer medullary oxygen tension (PO{sub 2}) and urine output in normal anaesthetised rats. A laser-Doppler technique was used for recording haemodynamic changes while oxygen microelectrodes were used for oxygen measurements. The A{sub 1}-receptor antagonist per se elevated glomerular filtration rate (+44%), cortical blood flow (+15%) and urine output (threefold) while reducing outer medullary PO{sub 2} (-24%). Administration of CM reduced outer medullary blood flow (OMBF; -26%) and PO{sub 2} (-80%) but did not affect cortical blood flow. Urine output increased 28-fold by CM while arterial blood pressure was reduced. The CM-mediated effect on haemodynamics, PO{sub 2}, urine output and blood pressure was unaffected by the A{sub 1}-receptor antagonist. Adenosine A{sub 1}-receptors are not important mediators of the depression of outer medullary blood flow and PO{sub 2} caused by the CM iopromide in the normal rat; however, A{sub 1}-receptors are tonically active to regulate renal haemodynamics, PO{sub 2} and urine production during normal physiological conditions. (orig.)

  6. A randomized trial of intravenous labetalol AND oral nifedipine in severe pregnancy induced hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mousumi Mondal

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypertension is the most frequently encountered medical disorder in obstetrics practice & remain a major cause of maternal, fetal & neonatal morbidity & mortality. The present study was undertaken to compare the time taken to reach the therapeutic goal blood pressure after using intravenous labetalol & oral nifedipine in severe pregnancy induced hypertension. Methods: Randomly allocated patients received labetalol 20 mg initially, followed by escalating doses of 40, 80, 80 & 80 mg & a placebo tablet every 20 minutes or initially nifedipine tablet 10 mg orally with repeated doses of 20 mg every 20 minutes up to 5 doses & intravenous placebo 0.9% isotonic saline until the therapeutic goal blood pressure, Systolic ≤ 150 mmHg & diastolic ≤ 100 mmHg was achieved. Primary and secondary outcomes like the time interval required to achieve a blood pressure of ≤150/100 mmHg and urinary output, agent failure & adverse effects respectively were reported. Results: Patients received oral nifedipine achieved the goal therapeutic blood pressure more rapidly in 28.2±11.7 minutes (mean±SD as compared with 48.4±23.5 minutes in those received intravenous labetalol (p=0.001. The nifedipine group also required significantly fewer doses (3.5±0.5 vs 4.5±1.5; p=0.001 to reach the goal blood pressure. Urine output was significantly increased (p<0.001 at one hour after nifedipine therapy (95.6±1.2 compared with labetalol (41.9±1.6 ml & remained significantly increased at 4,8,16&24 hours after initial therapy. Few adverse effects were reported but not significant. No patients required cross over therapy. Conclusions: Oral nifedipine & intravenous labetalol regimens are effective in the management of severe hypertension in pregnancy; however nifedipine controls hypertension more rapidly & is associated with a significant increase in urinary output. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2012; 1(1.000: 42-46

  7. 随机介质内折射率分布对频谱特性的影响%Influence of Refractive Index Distribution on the Frequency Property in Random Media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘海; 吕健滔; 王可嘉; 刘劲松

    2011-01-01

    采用时域有限差分法数值求解Maxwell方程组,分析了随机介质折射率分布对其频谱特性的影响.结果表明,折射率空间分布越无序,介质内的局域化现象会增强,被激发的模式会增多,频谱强度也会变大.而散射颗粒的折射率随时间的微小变化也会使介质内模式变多,且折射率变化幅度越大、频率越大、变化越快,模式的频谱强度也会相应增大.各向异性的随机介质可以同时实现时间和空间上折射率的调制.这种理论仿真结果和实验观测现象的一致性将会进一步促进对随机系统物理机制的理解.%The influence of refractive index distribution on the frequency property of optical modes in random media is analyzed by using the finite difference time domain method to numerically solve Maxwell equations. The results indicate that the number and the spectral intensity of the modes existed in random media is growing up with the increase of the randomness intensity of the refractive index distribution. The minor variety of the refractive index of scattering granules also can conduce to the increase of the number of the modes in random media. The spectral intensity of these modes is also determined by the excursion, frequency, and velocity of the variety of refractive index of scattering granules. Anisotropic random media can achieve the modulation of the refractive index in terms of time and space. The agreement between experimental observations and simulations is helpful in understanding the physical mechanism in random systems.

  8. Probiotics and prebiotics in preventing episodes of acute otitis media in high-risk children: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Robert; Martin, Elvira; de La Rocque, France; Thollot, Franck; Pecquet, Sophie; Werner, Andreas; Boucherat, Michel; Varon, Emmanuelle; Bingen, Edouard; Levy, Corinne

    2013-08-01

    Several studies have suggested that probiotics (proB) and/or prebiotics (preB) could reduce the burden of infection in infants and toddlers. We aimed to determine whether follow-up formula supplemented with proB and preB could reduce the risk of acute otitis media (AOM). In this double-blind, placebo-controlled trial from November 2007 to April 2009, 37 pediatricians in France enrolled children 7 to 13 months of age with high risk of AOM who were randomly assigned to receive follow-up formula supplemented with proB (Streptococcus thermophilus NCC 2496, Streptococcus salivarius DSM 13084, Lactobacillus rhamnosus LPR CGMCC 1.3724) and preB (Raftilose/Raftiline) or follow-up formula alone (placebo). During 12 months, the 2 groups were compared for number of AOM episodes diagnosed (primary outcome) and secondary outcomes by the Poisson model (incidence rate ratio [IRR]) or logistic regression (odds ratio; and 95% confidence interval [95% CI]) after adjustment on covariates of interest. We enrolled 224 children (112 in each group). All children were vaccinated (4 doses) with the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine; demographic characteristics were similar in the 2 groups. In total, 486 AOM episodes were reported, 249 and 237 in the treatment and control groups, respectively. The treatment and control groups did not differ in incidence of AOM (IRR 1.0, 95% CI: 0.8-1.2), lower respiratory tract infections (IRR 0.9, 0.7-1.2) or number of antibiotic treatment courses (IRR = 1.0, 95% CI: 0.8-1.2). Treatment was not associated with recurrent AOM (odds ratio 1.0, 95% CI: 0.5-1.7). With regard to gastrointestinal disorders, both formulas were well tolerated. The proB and preB included in follow-up formula given to children at 7 to 13 months of age did not reduce the risk of AOM, recurrent AOM, antibiotic use or lower respiratory tract infections at 1 year.

  9. Evaluating the use of Spectral Induced Conductivity to Detect Biofilm Development within Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosier, C. L.; Atekwana, E. A.; Price, A.; Sharma, S.; Patrauchan, M.

    2015-12-01

    Microbial biomass accumulation in subsurface sediments dynamically alters porosity/permeability; factors critical to contaminant transport and management of bioremediation efforts. Current methodologies (i.e. plate counts, tracer/slug tests) offer some understanding of biofilm effect on subsurface hydrology, yet do not provide real-time information regarding biofilm development. Due to these limitations there is interest in assessing the near surface geophysical technique Spectral Induced Polarization (SIP), to measure biofilm formation. Our study assesses the influence of cell density and biofilm production on SIP response. Laboratory experiments monitored changes in SIP, measured colony forming units (CFU), and cellular protein levels on sand packed columns inoculated with either Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 (non-mucoid strain) or Pseudomonas aeruginosa FRD1 (biofilm-overproducing mucoid strain) cells over one month. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to confirm the presence of biofilm. Our results indicate that phase and imaginary conductivity remained stable in PAO1 treatments as cell densities and cellular protein levels remained low (1.7x105 CFUml-1; 111 μg ml-1). However, we observed a significant decrease in both phase (0.5 to -0.20 mrad) and imaginary conductivity (0.0 to -3.0x10-5 S m-1) when both cell densities and cellular protein levels increased. In FRD1 treatments we observed an immediate decrease in phase (0.1 mrad) and imaginary conductivity (-2.0x10-6 S m-1) as cell densities were an order of magnitude greater then PAO1 treatments and cellular protein levels surpassed 500 μg ml-1. CLSM and SEM analysis confirmed the presence of biofilm and cells within both PAO1 and FRD1 treatments. Our findings suggest that the ratio of cells to cellular protein production is an important factor influencing both phase and imaginary conductivity response. However, our results are not in agreement with

  10. Bobath Concept versus constraint-induced movement therapy to improve arm functional recovery in stroke patients: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huseyinsinoglu, Burcu Ersoz; Ozdincler, Arzu Razak; Krespi, Yakup

    2012-08-01

    To compare the effects of the Bobath Concept and constraint-induced movement therapy on arm functional recovery among stroke patients with a high level of function on the affected side. A single-blinded, randomized controlled trial. Outpatient physiotherapy department of a stroke unit. A total of 24 patients were randomized to constraint-induced movement therapy or Bobath Concept group. The Bobath Concept group was treated for 1 hour whereas the constraint-induced movement therapy group received training for 3 hours per day during 10 consecutive weekdays. Main measures were the Motor Activity Log-28, the Wolf Motor Function Test, the Motor Evaluation Scale for Arm in Stroke Patients and the Functional Independence Measure. The two groups were found to be homogeneous based on demographic variables and baseline measurements. Significant improvements were seen after treatment only in the 'Amount of use' and 'Quality of movement' subscales of the Motor Activity Log-28 in the constraint-induced movement therapy group over the the Bobath Concept group (P = 0.003; P = 0.01 respectively). There were no significant differences in Wolf Motor Function Test 'Functional ability' (P = 0.137) and 'Performance time' (P = 0.922), Motor Evaluation Scale for Arm in Stroke Patients (P = 0.947) and Functional Independence Measure scores (P = 0.259) between the two intervention groups. Constraint-induced movement therapy and the Bobath Concept have similar efficiencies in improving functional ability, speed and quality of movement in the paretic arm among stroke patients with a high level of function. Constraint-induced movement therapy seems to be slightly more efficient than the Bobath Concept in improving the amount and quality of affected arm use.

  11. Substrate-induced coagulation (SIC) of nano-disperse alumina in non-aqueous media: The dispersibility and stability of alumina in N-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone

    OpenAIRE

    Basch, Angelika; Strnad, Simona

    2011-01-01

    This work investigated colloidal properties such as the zeta-potential, the electrophoretic mobilities and the wetting behaviour of alumina dispersed in non-aqueous media. Non-aqueous dispersions of alumina were prepared in the solvent N-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone (NMP). The wetting behaviour of alumina in NMP was characterized by the powder contact angle method and the Wilhemy plate method. The behaviour of the dispersion should provide information for the development of a substrate-induced coag...

  12. Characterization of non-specific protein adsorption induced by triazole groups on the chromatography media using Cu (I)-catalyzed alkyne-azide cycloaddition reaction for ligand immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ming; Ren, Jun; Tian, Kaikai; Jia, Lingyun

    2016-12-09

    As an efficient and facile reaction, click chemistry has been growingly used in the preparation of chromatography media for immobilizing varying types of ligands. For the widely used Cu (I)-catalyzed alkyne-azide click reaction, a 1, 2, 3-triazole group will be inevitably introduced in the molecular linkage, which could give rise to unexpected non-specific adsorption especially for the media employing small compound ligands or high ligand density. Triazole-induced non-specific protein adsorption on sepharose resins was evaluated systematically in this work, by considering the effects of triazole content, length of spacer arm, and solution conditions. We found that triazole content of a resin played the key role. Protein adsorption became significant when the media was coupled with triazole at a medium density (about 60μmol/mL gel), and the binding amount further increased with triazole density. The resin with triazole content of about 100μmol/mL gel could adsorb human IgG, bovine serum albumin and lysozyme at the amount of 13.6, 30.0, and 5.1mg/mL respectively. Proteins tended to be adsorbed at higher amount as the pH of solution approached their isoelectric points, and increasing salt concentration could reduce triazole-induced adsorption but only within limited extent. This study can facilitate reasonable application of click chemistry in the synthesis of chromatography media, by providing some basic principles for optimizing structural properties of separation media and choosing suitable solution conditions.

  13. Microbially Induced Calcite Precipitation (MICP) - A Technology for Managing Flow and Transport in Porous and Fractured Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, A. J.; Hiebert, R.; Kirksey, J.; Lauchnor, E. G.; Rothman, A.; Spangler, L.; Esposito, R.; Gerlach, R.; Cunningham, A. B.

    2014-12-01

    Certain microorganisms e.g., Sporosarcina pasteurii contribute enzymes that catalyze reactions which in the presence of calcium, can create saturation conditions favorable for calcium carbonate precipitation (microbially-induced calcium carbonate precipitation (MICP)). MICP can be used for a number of engineering applications including securing geologic storage of CO2 or other fluids by sealing fractures, improving wellbore integrity, and stabilizing fractured and unstable porous media. MICP treatment has the advantage of the use of small microorganisms, ~2μm, suggesting applicability to treatment of small aperture fractures not accessible to traditional treatments, for example the use of fine cement. The promotion of MICP in the subsurface is a complex reactive transport problem coupling microbial, abiotic (geochemical), geomechanical and hydrodynamic processes. In the laboratory, MICP has been demonstrated to cement together heavily fractured shale and reduce the permeability of fractures in shale and sandstone cores up to five orders of magnitude under both ambient and subsurface relevant pressure conditions (Figure 1). Most recently, a MICP fracture treatment field study was performed at a well at the Southern Company Gorgas Steam Generation Plant (Alabama) (Figure 1). The Fayetteville Sandstone at approximately 1120' below ground surface was hydraulically fractured prior to MICP treatment. After 4 days of injection of 24 calcium pulses and 6 microbial inoculations, injectivity of brine into the formation was significantly reduced. The experiment also resulted in a reduction in pressure decay which is a measure of improved wellbore integrity. These promising results suggest the potential for MICP treatment to seal fractured pathways at the field scale to improve the long-term security of geologically-stored carbon dioxide or prevent leakage of shale gas or hydraulic fracturing fluids into functional overlying aquifers, reducing environmental impacts.

  14. Modified constraint-induced movement therapy versus intensive bimanual training for children with hemiplegia - a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deppe, Wolfgang; Thuemmler, Kerstin; Fleischer, Judith; Berger, Claudia; Meyer, Susanne; Wiedemann, Baerbel

    2013-10-01

    To clarify whether modified constraint-induced movement therapy provides greater improvement than intensive bimanual training both for motor functions and spontaneous use of the paretic arm and hand in everyday life activities. Randomized controlled, single-blind trial. Inpatient paediatric rehabilitation clinic. Forty-seven children with unilateral cerebral palsy or other non-progressive hemiplegia (aged 3.3-11.4 years) were randomly assigned to either a modified constraint-induced movement programme (kid-CIMT) or intensive bimanual training. Patients in the kid-CIMT group received 60 hours of unilateral constraint-induced and 20 hours of bimanual training over four weeks. Patients in the bimanual treatment group received 80 hours of bimanual training over four weeks. Melbourne Assessment of Unilateral Upper Limb Function and Assisting Hand Assessment. Modified constraint-induced therapy provided a significantly better outcome for isolated motor functions of the paretic arm than bimanual training (gain in Melbourne Assessment, percent score: 6.6 vs. 2.3, P= 0.033). Regarding spontaneous use both methods led to similar improvement (gain in Assisting Hand Assessment, percent score: 6.2 vs. 4.6, P= 0.579). More-disabled children showed greater improvement than less-disabled ones (correlation with Assisting Hand Assessment pretreatment score r = -0.40). Age did not affect treatment outcome. Modified constraint-induced movement therapy can improve isolated functions of the hemiplegic arm better than intensive bimanual training, but regarding spontaneous hand use in everyday life both methods lead to similar improvement. Improvements are generally greater in more impaired children. Age does not affect outcome.

  15. Reactive Transport Modeling of Induced Calcite Precipitation Reaction Fronts in Porous Media Using A Parallel, Fully Coupled, Fully Implicit Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, L.; Huang, H.; Gaston, D.; Redden, G. D.; Fox, D. T.; Fujita, Y.

    2010-12-01

    Inducing mineral precipitation in the subsurface is one potential strategy for immobilizing trace metal and radionuclide contaminants. Generating mineral precipitates in situ can be achieved by manipulating chemical conditions, typically through injection or in situ generation of reactants. How these reactants transport, mix and react within the medium controls the spatial distribution and composition of the resulting mineral phases. Multiple processes, including fluid flow, dispersive/diffusive transport of reactants, biogeochemical reactions and changes in porosity-permeability, are tightly coupled over a number of scales. Numerical modeling can be used to investigate the nonlinear coupling effects of these processes which are quite challenging to explore experimentally. Many subsurface reactive transport simulators employ a de-coupled or operator-splitting approach where transport equations and batch chemistry reactions are solved sequentially. However, such an approach has limited applicability for biogeochemical systems with fast kinetics and strong coupling between chemical reactions and medium properties. A massively parallel, fully coupled, fully implicit Reactive Transport simulator (referred to as “RAT”) based on a parallel multi-physics object-oriented simulation framework (MOOSE) has been developed at the Idaho National Laboratory. Within this simulator, systems of transport and reaction equations can be solved simultaneously in a fully coupled, fully implicit manner using the Jacobian Free Newton-Krylov (JFNK) method with additional advanced computing capabilities such as (1) physics-based preconditioning for solution convergence acceleration, (2) massively parallel computing and scalability, and (3) adaptive mesh refinements for 2D and 3D structured and unstructured mesh. The simulator was first tested against analytical solutions, then applied to simulating induced calcium carbonate mineral precipitation in 1D columns and 2D flow cells as analogs

  16. Modified Constraint-Induced Therapy for Children with Hemiplegic Cerebral Palsy: A Randomized Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallen, Margaret; Ziviani, Jenny; Naylor, Olivia; Evans, Ruth; Novak, Iona; Herbert, Robert D.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: Conventional constraint-based therapies are intensive and demanding to implement, particularly for children. Modified forms of constraint-based therapies that are family-centred may be more acceptable and feasible for families of children with cerebral palsy (CP)-but require rigorous evaluation using randomized trials. The aim of this study…

  17. The effect of pheniramine on fentanyl-induced cough: a randomized, double blinded, placebo controlled clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zakir Arslan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objectives: There are many studies conducted on reducing the frequency and severity of fentayl-induced cough during anesthesia induction. We propose that pheniramine maleate, an antihistaminic, may suppress this cough. We aim to observe the effect of pheniramine on fentanyl-induced cough during anesthesia induction. Methods: This is a double-blinded, prospective, three-arm parallel, randomized clinical trial of 120 patients with ASA (American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status III and IV who aged ≥18 and scheduled for elective open heart surgery during general anesthesia. Patients were randomly assigned to three groups of 40 patients, using computer-generated random numbers: placebo group, pheniramine group, and lidocaine group. Results: Cough incidence differed significantly between groups. In the placebo group, 37.5% of patients had cough, whereas the frequency was significantly decreased in pheniramine group (5% and lidocaine group (15% (Fischer exact test, p = 0.0007 and p = 0.0188, respectively. There was no significant change in cough incidence between pheniramine group (5% and lidocaine group (15% (Fischer exact test, p = 0.4325. Cough severity did also change between groups. Post Hoc tests with Bonferroni showed that mean cough severity in placebo differed significantly than that of pheniramine group and lidocaine group (p < 0.0001 and p = 0.009, respectively. There was no significant change in cough severity between pheniramine group and lidocaine group (p = 0.856. Conclusion: Intravenous pheniramine is as effective as lidocaine in preventing fentayl-induced cough. Our results emphasize that pheniramine is a convenient drug to decrease this cough.

  18. Expression of macrophage migration inhibitory factor and CD74 in the inner ear and middle ear in lipopolysaccharide-induced otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, Hisashi; Kariya, Shin; Okano, Mitsuhiro; Zhao, Pengfei; Maeda, Yukihide; Nishizaki, Kazunori

    2016-10-01

    Significant expression of macrophage migration inhibitory factor and its receptor (CD74) was observed in both the middle ear and inner ear in experimental otitis media in mice. Modulation of macrophage migration inhibitory factor and its signaling pathway might be useful in the management of inner ear inflammation due to otitis media. Inner ear dysfunction secondary to otitis media has been reported. However, the specific mechanisms involved are not clearly understood. The aim of this study is to investigate the expression of macrophage migration inhibitory factor and CD74 in the middle ear and inner ear in lipopolysaccharide-induced otitis media. BALB/c mice received a transtympanic injection of either lipopolysaccharide or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). The mice were sacrificed 24 h after injection, and temporal bones were processed for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis, histologic examination, and immunohistochemistry. PCR examination revealed that the lipopolysaccharide-injected mice showed a significant up-regulation of macrophage migration inhibitory factor in both the middle ear and inner ear as compared with the PBS-injected control mice. The immunohistochemical study showed positive reactions for macrophage migration inhibitory factor and CD74 in infiltrating inflammatory cells, middle ear mucosa, and inner ear in the lipopolysaccharide-injected mice.

  19. Pulsed Nd: YAG laser induces pulpal analgesia: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, A; Armati, P; Moorthy, A P

    2012-07-01

    This double-blind, randomized, clinical trial investigated the effectiveness and underlying mechanism of neural inhibition of pulsed Nd:YAG laser induction of pulpal analgesia compared with 5% EMLA anesthetic cream. Forty-four paired premolars from 44 orthodontic patients requiring bilateral premolar extraction from either dental arch were randomly assigned to the 'Laser plus Sham-EMLA' or 'EMLA plus Sham-Laser' treatment group. Analgesia was tested by an Electric Pulp Tester (EPT) and the cutting of a standardized cavity, which was terminated when participants reported sensitivity, and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and numbness were recorded. Statistical analyses were done by paired t test, McNemar's test, and a chi-squared test (p analgesia, by suppression of intradental nerve responses to electrical and mechanical stimuli. Such a laser provides an alternative for dental pain management (ANZ-Clinical Trial Registry: N12611001099910).

  20. Inertial particles distribute in turbulence as Poissonian points with random intensity inducing clustering and supervoiding

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, Lukas; Holzner, Markus

    2016-01-01

    This work considers the distribution of inertial particles in turbulence using the point-particle approximation. We demonstrate that the random point process formed by the positions of particles in space is a Poisson point process with log-normal random intensity ("log Gaussian Cox process" or LGCP). The probability of having a finite number of particles in a small volume is given in terms of the characteristic function of a log-normal distribution. Corrections due to discreteness of the number of particles to the previously derived statistics of particle concentration in the continuum limit are provided. These are relevant for dealing with experimental or numerical data. The probability of having regions without particles, i.e. voids, is larger for inertial particles than for tracer particles where voids are distributed according to Poisson processes. Further, the probability of having large voids decays only log-normally with size. This shows that particles cluster, leaving voids behind. At scales where the...

  1. Modeling of random wave transformation with strong wave-induced coastal currents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Jinhai; H. Mase; Li Tongfei

    2008-01-01

    The propagation and transformation of multi-directional and uni-directional random waves over a coast with complicated bathymetric and geometric features are studied experimentally and numerically. Laboratory investigation indicates that wave energy convergence and divergence cause strong coastal currents to develop and inversely modify the wave fields. A coastal spectral wave model, based on the wave action balance equation with diffraction effect (WABED), is used to simulate the transformation of random waves over the complicated bathymetry. The diffraction effect in the wave model is derived from a parabolic approximation of wave theory, and the mean energy dissipation rate per unit horizontal area due to wave breaking is parameterized by the bore-based formulation with a breaker index of 0.73. The numerically simulated wave field without considering coastal currents is different from that of experiments, whereas model results considering currents clearly reproduce the intensification of wave height in front of concave shorelines.

  2. Media Appropriation and Explicitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Laurenzo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel characterization of new media art together with an exploration of some key aspects of its practice: I propose that new media art’s defining characteristics are media appropriation and explicitation. With media appropriation I refer to the dialectal inscription into the art practice of the knowledge that allows for some particular technological production. I also propose that new media art’s language is constructed in part via the explicitation of certain aspects of more ‘traditional’ art, and that this explicitation allows for a construction of a new vocabulary. Examples of this are the explicitation of randomness, interaction, programming, or of the role that tools and instruments play, among others.

  3. Prediction of the spatial occurrence of fire induced spalling in concrete slabs using random fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Coile R.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available As the loss of concrete cover can significantly influence the reliability of concrete elements during fire, spalling should be taken into account when performing reliability calculations. However, the occurrence and spatial variation of spalling are highly uncertain. A first step towards a probabilistic analysis of spalling is made by combining existing deterministic models with a stochastic representation of the concrete tensile strength and by using random fields to model the tensile strength spatial variation.

  4. The Effectiveness Of Social Media (Facebook) Compared With More Traditional Advertising Methods for Recruiting Eligible Participants To Health Research Studies: A Randomized, Controlled Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thow, Megan; Ferguson, Stuart G

    2016-01-01

    Background Recruiting participants for research studies can be difficult and costly. The popularity of social media platforms (eg, Facebook) has seen corresponding growth in the number of researchers turning to social networking sites and their embedded advertising frameworks to locate eligible participants for studies. Compared with traditional recruitment strategies such as print media, social media advertising has been shown to be favorable in terms of its reach (especially with hard-to-reach populations), cost effectiveness, and usability. However, to date, no studies have examined how participants recruited via social media progress through a study compared with those recruited using more traditional recruitment strategies. Objectives (1) Examine whether visiting the study website prior to being contacted by researchers creates self-screened participants who are more likely to progress through all study phases (eligible, enrolled, completed); (2) compare conversion percentages and cost effectiveness of each recruitment method at each study phase; and, (3) compare demographic and smoking characteristics of participants recruited through each strategy to determine if they attract similar samples. Methods Participants recruited to a smoking cessation clinical trial were grouped by how they had become aware of the study: via social media (Facebook) or traditional media (eg, newspaper, flyers, radio, word of mouth). Groups were compared based on throughput data (conversion percentages and cost) as well as demographic and smoking characteristics. Results Visiting the study website did not result in individuals who were more likely to be eligible for (P=.24), enroll in (P=.20), or complete (P=.25) the study. While using social media was more cost effective than traditional methods when we examined earlier endpoints of the recruitment process (cost to obtain a screened respondent: AUD $22.73 vs $29.35; cost to obtain an eligible respondent: $37.56 vs $44.77), it was

  5. The Effectiveness Of Social Media (Facebook) Compared With More Traditional Advertising Methods for Recruiting Eligible Participants To Health Research Studies: A Randomized, Controlled Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frandsen, Mai; Thow, Megan; Ferguson, Stuart G

    2016-08-10

    Recruiting participants for research studies can be difficult and costly. The popularity of social media platforms (eg, Facebook) has seen corresponding growth in the number of researchers turning to social networking sites and their embedded advertising frameworks to locate eligible participants for studies. Compared with traditional recruitment strategies such as print media, social media advertising has been shown to be favorable in terms of its reach (especially with hard-to-reach populations), cost effectiveness, and usability. However, to date, no studies have examined how participants recruited via social media progress through a study compared with those recruited using more traditional recruitment strategies. (1) Examine whether visiting the study website prior to being contacted by researchers creates self-screened participants who are more likely to progress through all study phases (eligible, enrolled, completed); (2) compare conversion percentages and cost effectiveness of each recruitment method at each study phase; and, (3) compare demographic and smoking characteristics of participants recruited through each strategy to determine if they attract similar samples. Participants recruited to a smoking cessation clinical trial were grouped by how they had become aware of the study: via social media (Facebook) or traditional media (eg, newspaper, flyers, radio, word of mouth). Groups were compared based on throughput data (conversion percentages and cost) as well as demographic and smoking characteristics. Visiting the study website did not result in individuals who were more likely to be eligible for (P=.24), enroll in (P=.20), or complete (P=.25) the study. While using social media was more cost effective than traditional methods when we examined earlier endpoints of the recruitment process (cost to obtain a screened respondent: AUD $22.73 vs $29.35; cost to obtain an eligible respondent: $37.56 vs $44.77), it was less cost effective in later endpoints

  6. Azacytidine and decitabine induce gene-specific and non-random DNA demethylation in human cancer cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Hagemann

    Full Text Available The DNA methyltransferase inhibitors azacytidine and decitabine represent archetypal drugs for epigenetic cancer therapy. To characterize the demethylating activity of azacytidine and decitabine we treated colon cancer and leukemic cells with both drugs and used array-based DNA methylation analysis of more than 14,000 gene promoters. Additionally, drug-induced demethylation was compared to methylation patterns of isogenic colon cancer cells lacking both DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1 and DNMT3B. We show that drug-induced demethylation patterns are highly specific, non-random and reproducible, indicating targeted remethylation of specific loci after replication. Correspondingly, we found that CG dinucleotides within CG islands became preferentially remethylated, indicating a role for DNA sequence context. We also identified a subset of genes that were never demethylated by drug treatment, either in colon cancer or in leukemic cell lines. These demethylation-resistant genes were enriched for Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 components in embryonic stem cells and for transcription factor binding motifs not present in demethylated genes. Our results provide detailed insights into the DNA methylation patterns induced by azacytidine and decitabine and suggest the involvement of complex regulatory mechanisms in drug-induced DNA demethylation.

  7. Modeling of the pressure induced formation of a random network of a mixture of N2 and CO crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batyrev, Iskander G.

    2017-01-01

    First principles calculations were performed to understand pressure induced transition to extended solid of substitutional mixtures of N2 and CO in crystalline delta phase. The transition occurs at ˜7-9 GPa and has a hysteresis allowing to stabilize covalently bonded random network down to much lower pressures. Only two atoms of N out of 24 were found to be incorporated in random network formed mainly by C and O atoms in 128 atom unit cell. Here, in search of a new route for the synthesis of poly-nitrogen materials, higher concentrations of N atoms (37.5%, 50%, and 90.625%) in delta molecular crystal phases under compression up to 50 GPa were calculated using density functional theory. Presence of CO is found to facilitate formation of the random network. To understand the importance of initial molecular crystalline structure the calculations were performed for the mixtures of N2 and CO in delta phases and at different sites with spherical and disk shaped disorder. Results calculated in linear response theory to obtain IR and Raman spectra are compared with recent experimental results.

  8. Substrate-induced coagulation (SIC) of nano-disperse alumina in non-aqueous media: The dispersibility and stability of alumina in N-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basch, Angelika; Strnad, Simona

    2011-01-20

    This work investigated colloidal properties such as the zeta-potential, the electrophoretic mobilities and the wetting behaviour of alumina dispersed in non-aqueous media. Non-aqueous dispersions of alumina were prepared in the solvent N-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone (NMP). The wetting behaviour of alumina in NMP was characterized by the powder contact angle method and the Wilhemy plate method. The behaviour of the dispersion should provide information for the development of a substrate-induced coagulation (SIC) coating process of nano-sized alumina in non-aqeous media. SIC is a dip-coating process that coats pretreated but chemically different surfaces with nano-sized particles. It was found that the anionic surfactant dioctyl sulfosuccinate (AOT) had no stabilizing effect on alumina dispersed in NMP.

  9. Panax ginseng and salvia miltiorrhiza supplementation abolishes eccentric exercise-induced vascular stiffening: a double-blind randomized control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsin-Fu; Tung, Kang; Chou, Chun-Chung; Lin, Ching-Che; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Tanaka, Hirofumi

    2016-06-06

    Muscle damage induced by unaccustomed or eccentric exercise results in delayed onset vascular stiffening. We tested the hypothesis that a 7-day supplementation of panax ginseng and salvia miltiorrhiza prior to an acute eccentric exercise could attenuate arterial stiffening. By using a double-blind study placebo-controlled randomized design, subjects were randomly assigned to either the Chinese herb (N = 12) or the placebo group (N = 11) and performed a downhill running (eccentric exercise) trial and a control (seated rest) trial. Muscle soreness increased 1-2 days after exercise similarly in both groups, whereas the herb group demonstrated a faster recovery on active range of motion. Plasma creatine kinase concentration increased significantly at 24 h in both groups but the magnitude of increase was attenuated in the herb group. Arterial stiffness as measured by carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity increased significantly at 24 h in the placebo group but such increase was absent in the herb group. Flow-mediated dilation did not change in either group. Plasma concentrations of CRP and IL-6 increased in the placebo group but no such increases were observed in the herb group. Changes in arterial stiffness induced by eccentric exercise were associated with the corresponding changes in IL-6 (r = 0.46, P exercise. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02007304. Registered Dec. 5, 2013).

  10. Impact of induced aniseikonia on stereopsis with random-dot stereogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, J R; Ponce, A; del Barco, L Jiménez; Díaz, J A; Pérez-Ocón, F

    2002-02-01

    In this work, we evaluate the impact of induced aniseikonia on stereopsis. For this, we determined the disparity range (maximum disparity), a parameter related to the size of the physical region that can be perceived stereoscopically. A significant decline in the disparity range was detected with aniseikonia induced by size lenses of 3% for five of the seven observers tested; 5% was necessary for the other two observers. The data indicate the influence of aniseikonia in stereopsis and the need to minimize such impact. These results may be useful in surgical processes such as the correction of pseudophakic patients and refractive surgery in which aniseikonia can be induced to alter the binocular function of the patient.

  11. Comparison of the compact dry TC and 3M petrifilm ACP dry sheet media methods with the spiral plate method for the examination of randomly selected foods for obtaining aerobic colony counts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, P; Meldrum, R

    2002-02-01

    Two hundred thirty-six randomly selected food and milk samples were examined to obtain aerobic colony counts by two dry sheet media methods and a standard Public Health Laboratory Service spiral plate method. Results for 40 samples were outside the limits of detection for one or more of the tested methods and were not considered. (The limits of detection for the spiral plate method were 200 to 1 x 10(8) CFU/ml for the spiral plate method and 100 to 3 x 10(6) CFU/ml for the dry sheet media methods.) The remaining 196 sets of results were analyzed further. When the results from the three methods were compared, correlation coefficients were all >0.80 and slopes and intercepts were close to 1.0 and 0.0, respectively. Mean log values and standard deviations were very similar for all three methods. The results were evaluated according to published UK guidelines for ready-to-eat foods sampled at the point of sale, which include a quality acceptability assessment that is based on aerobic colony counts. Eighty-six percent of the comparable results gave the same verdict with regard to acceptability according to the aerobic colony count guidelines. Both dry sheet media methods were comparable to the spiral plate method and can be recommended for the examination of food.

  12. Inertial particles distribute in turbulence as Poissonian points with random intensity inducing clustering and supervoiding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Lukas; Fouxon, Itzhak; Holzner, Markus

    2017-07-01

    This work considers the distribution of discrete inertial particles in turbulence. We demonstrate that even for weak inertia the distribution can be strongly different from the Poisson distribution that holds for tracers. We study the cases of weak inertia or strong gravity where single-valued particle flow holds in space. In these cases, the particles distribute over a random multifractal attractor in space. This attractor is characterized by fractal dimensions describing scaling exponents of moments of number of particles inside a ball with size much smaller than the viscous scale of turbulence. Previous studies used a continuum approach to the moments which requires having a large number of particles below the viscous scale. This condition often does not hold in practice; for instance, for water droplets in clouds there is typically one droplet per viscous scale. This condition is also hard to realize in numerical simulations. In this work, we overcome this difficulty by deriving the probability pl(k ) of having k particles in a ball of small radius l for which the continuum approximation may not hold. We demonstrate that the random point process formed by positions of particles' centers in space is a Poisson point process with log-normal random intensity (the so-called log Gaussian Cox process or LGCP). This gives pl(k ) in terms of the characteristic function of a log-normal distribution from which the moments are derived. This allows finding the correlation dimension relevant for statistics of particles' collisions. The case of zero number of particles provides the statistics of the size of voids—regions without particles—that were not studied previously. The probability of voids is increased compared to a random distribution of particles because preferential concentration of inertial particles implies voids in the deserted regions. Thus voids and preferential concentration are different reflections of the same phenomena. In the limit of tracers with zero

  13. Treatment of Amiodarone-Induced Thyrotoxicosis Type 2 : A Randomized Clinical Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eskes, Silvia A.; Endert, Erik; Fliers, Eric; Geskus, Ronald B.; Dullaart, Robin P. F.; Links, Thera P.; Wiersinga, Wilmar M.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Amiodarone-induced thyrotoxicosis (AIT) type 2 is self-limiting in nature, but most physicians are reluctant to continue amiodarone. When prednisone fails to restore euthyroidism, possibly due to mixed cases of AIT type 1 and 2, perchlorate (ClO4) might be useful because ClO4 reduces the cy

  14. Randomness and Statistical Laws of Indentation-Induced Pop-Out in Single Crystal Silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hu; Zhao, Hongwei; Shi, Chengli; Zhang, Lin; Wan, Shunguang; Geng, Chunyang

    2013-04-12

    Randomness and discreteness for appearance of pop-out of the single crystal silicon with a (100) orientation were studied by a self-made indentation device. For a given maximum penetration load, the load Ppo for appearance of pop-out fluctuates in a relatively large range, which makes it hard to study the effect of the loading/unloading rate on the load Ppo. Experimental results with different maximum penetration loads indicate that the critical penetration load for appearance of pop-out is in the range of 15 mN~20 mN for the current used single crystal silicon. For a given maximum penetration load, the load Ppo for appearance of pop-out seems random and discrete, but in the point of statistics, it has an obviously increasing trend with increase of the maximum penetration load and also the fraction Ppo/Pmax approximately keeps in the range of 0.2~0.5 for different maximum penetration loads changing from 15 mN to 150 mN.

  15. Random lasing of microporous surface of Cr2+:ZnSe crystal induced by femtosecond laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianheng Yang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate a random lasing emission based on microporous surface of Cr2+:ZnSe crystal prepared by femtosecond pulsed laser ablation in high vacuum (below 5 × 10−4 Pa. The scanning electron microscope results show that there are a mass of micropores with an average size of ∼13 μm and smaller ones with ∼1.2 μm on the surface of Cr2+:ZnSe crystal. The adjacent micropore spacing of the smaller micropores ranges from 1 μm to 5 μm. Under 1750 nm excitation of Nd:YAG (355 nm pumped optical parametric oscillator, a random lasing emission with center wavelength of 2350 nm and laser-like threshold of 0.3 mJ/pulse is observed. The emission lifetime of 2350 nm laser reduces from 800 ns to 30 ns as the pump energy increases above threshold. The emission spectra and decay time of smooth surface, groove and microporous surface of Cr2+:ZnSe crystal are contrasted. The optional pump wavelength range is from 1500 nm to 1950 nm, which in accordance with the optical absorption property of Cr2+:ZnSe crystal. The peak position of excitation spectra is almost identical to the strongest absorption wavelength.

  16. VITAMINE E IN THE MANAGEMENT OF DRUG INDUCED TARDIVE DYSKINESIA: A DOUBLE BLIND RANDOMIZED CLINICAL TRIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M KAR AHMADI

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Expresssion of tardive dyskinesia as one of the side effects of antipsychotic drugs causes various problems in psychotic patients. It is the main cause of patient"s drug incompliance.Vitamine E with it"s antioxidants properties might be an effective treatment for tardive dyskinesia. Methods. In a randomized double blind clinical trial, thirty inpatients of the psychiatric hospital in Isfahan were studied. Patients were stratified according to their age, psychiatric disorder and duration, intensity of tardive dyskinesia and antipsychotic dosage. Then they were asssigned randomly into two groups. Vitamine E (600 mg/day was administered to interventional group (15 patients. Another group received placebo (15 patients. Treatment durated for 6 weeks. Abnormal Involuntary Movment Scale (AIMS was used to measure tardive dyskinesia intensity. Results. Average of disorder intensity in those who received vit. E, dropped down from 8.33/10 (befor treatment to 6.13/10 (after treatment. It means 26.3 percent reduction of tardive dyskinesia intensity. This difference was only 7.3 percent in control group. There were no statistical diffrence between two groups after treatment (P>0.05. Discussion. There is no statistical efficacy for vitamine E in the management of tardive dyskinesia. But it is recommended to make another study with more samples.

  17. Media education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasburger, Victor C

    2010-11-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics recognizes that exposure to mass media (eg, television, movies, video and computer games, the Internet, music lyrics and videos, newspapers, magazines, books, advertising) presents health risks for children and adolescents but can provide benefits as well. Media education has the potential to reduce the harmful effects of media and accentuate the positive effects. By understanding and supporting media education, pediatricians can play an important role in reducing harmful effects of media on children and adolescents.

  18. Contrast-induced nephropathy: are there differences between low osmolar and iso-osmolar iodinated contrast media?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morcos, S.K. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Northern General Hospital, Sheffield S5 7AU (United Kingdom)], E-mail: sameh.morcos@sth.nhs.uk

    2009-05-15

    It is acknowledged that high osmolar contrast media are more nephrotoxic than low (LOCM) or iso-osmolar contrast media (IOCM). However, it remains contentious whether the IOCM are less nephrotoxic in comparison with LOCM. This article reviews published clinical studies that investigated this issue and demonstrates there are no conclusive data to indicate that there is a definite difference in renal tolerance between LOCM and IOCM. All these agents are potentially nephrotoxic in patients with advanced renal impairment. In these patients the smallest possible dose of IOCM or LOCM should be used in addition to adequate hydration to minimize the risk of contrast nephropathy.

  19. Development of an inducible transposon system for efficient random mutagenesis in Clostridium acetobutylicum

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Ying; Xu, Shu; Chai, Changsheng; YANG, SHENG; Jiang, Weihong; Minton, Nigel P.; Gu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium acetobutylicum is an industrially important Gram-positive organism, which is capable of producing economically important chemicals in the ABE (Acetone, Butanol and Ethanol) fermentation process. Renewed interests in the ABE process necessitate the availability of additional genetics tools to facilitate the derivation of a greater understanding of the underlying metabolic and regulatory control processes in operation through forward genetic strategies. In this study, a xylose induc...

  20. Random magnetic fields inducing solar neutrino spin-flavor precession in a three generation context

    CERN Document Server

    Guzzo, M M; Peres, O L G

    2005-01-01

    We study the effect of random magnetic fields in the spin-flavor precession of solar neutrinos in a three generation context, when a non-vanishing transition magnetic moment is assumed. While this kind of precession is strongly constrained when the magnetic moment involves the first family, such constraints do not apply if we suppose a transition magnetic moment between the second and third families. In this scenario we can have a large non-electron anti-neutrino flux arriving on Earth, which can lead to some interesting phenomenological consequences, as, for instance, the suppression of day-night asymmetry. We have analyzed the high energy solar neutrino data and the KamLAND experiment to constrain the solar mixing angle, and solar mass difference, and we have found a larger shift of allowed values.

  1. Wheel-rail dynamic forces induced by random vertical track irregularities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiroiu, M. A.

    2016-08-01

    The present paper investigates the wheel-rail dynamic forces produced by railway vehicles in motion, which are an important issue especially for the high-speed rail transport from the point of view of traffic safety, ride quality and undesirable effects on vehicles, on track and on the land in the vicinity of railways. The research is carried out on a model which includes track system, vehicle unsprung mass, vehicle primary suspension and the bogie sprung mass. The wheel-rail dynamic overloads are evaluated assuming random vertical irregularities of the track. The estimation of wheel-rail dynamic forces is made for a range of vehicle speeds up to 300 km/h and the influence of track and vehicle various parameters is investigated.

  2. Transcranial Random Noise Stimulation-induced plasticity is NMDA-receptor independent but sodium-channel blocker and benzodiazepines sensitive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila eChaieb

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Application of transcranial random noise stimulation (tRNS between 0.1 and 640 Hz of the primary motor cortex (M1 for 10 minutes induces a persistent excitability increase lasting for at least 60 minutes. However, the mechanism of tRNS-induced cortical excitability alterations is not yet fully understood. Objective: The main aim of this study was to get first efficacy data with regard to the possible neuronal effect of tRNS. Methods: Single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS was used to measure levels of cortical excitability before and after combined application of tRNS at an intensity of 1mA for 10mins stimulation duration and a pharmacological agent (or sham on 8 healthy male participants. Results: The sodium channel blocker carbamazepine showed a tendency towards inhibiting MEPs 5-60 mins poststimulation. The GABAA agonist lorazepam suppressed tRNS-induced cortical excitability increases at 0-20 and 60 min time points. The partial NMDA receptor agonist D-cycloserine, the NMDA receptor antagonist dextromethorphan and the D2/D3 receptor agonist ropinirole had no significant effects on the excitability increases seen with tRNS.Conclusions: In contrast to transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS, aftereffects of tRNS are seem to be not NMDA receptor dependent and can be suppressed by benzodiazepines suggesting that tDCS and tRNS depend upon different mechanisms.

  3. In a randomized placebo-controlled add-on study orlistat significantly reduced clozapine-induced constipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chukhin, Evgeny; Takala, Pirjo; Hakko, Helinä; Raidma, Mirjam; Putkonen, Hanna; Räsänen, Pirkko; Terevnikov, Viacheslav; Stenberg, Jan-Henry; Eronen, Markku; Joffe, Grigori

    2013-03-01

    Constipation is a common and potentially fatal side effect of clozapine treatment. Another important side effect of clozapine may also be significant weight gain. Orlistat is a weight-control medication that is known to induce loose stools as a common side effect. This study aimed to explore whether orlistat used to control clozapine-induced weight gain can simultaneously tackle clozapine-related constipation. In this 16-week randomized-controlled study, clozapine-treated patients received add-on orlistat (n=30) or add-on placebo (n=24). Colonic function was measured using the Bristol Stool Form Scale. There was a significant (P=0.039) difference in the prevalence of constipation in favor of orlistat over placebo in completers (n=40) at the endpoint. A decrease in the prevalence of constipation within the orlistat group (P=0.035) was observed (vs. no statistically significant changes in the placebo group). In clozapine-treated patients, orlistat may be beneficial not only for weight control but also as a laxative. As no established treatments for clozapine-induced constipation exist, orlistat can be considered for this population, although more studies are required.

  4. Pneumococcal conjugate vaccination does not induce a persisting mucosal IgA response in children with recurrent acute otitis media.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogaert, D.; Veenhoven, R.H.; Ramdin, R.; Luijendijk, I.H.; Rijkers, G.T.; Sanders, E.A.M.; Groot, R. de; Hermans, P.W.M.

    2005-01-01

    AIM: In a prospective controlled study in young children with a history of recurrent acute otitis media, we analyzed the salivary IgA and IgG antibody titers upon vaccination with a 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) given once or twice, followed by a 23-valent polysaccharide booster vacc

  5. Compared to placebo, long-term antibiotics resolve otitis media with effusion (OME and prevent acute otitis media with perforation (AOMwiP in a high-risk population: A randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morris Peter S

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For children at high risk of chronic suppurative otitis media (CSOM, strategies to prevent acute otitis media with perforation (AOMwiP may reduce progression to CSOM. Methods In a double blind study in northern Australia, 103 Aboriginal infants with first detection of OME were randomised to receive either amoxicillin (50 mg/kg/d BD or placebo for 24 weeks, or until bilateral aerated middle ears were diagnosed at two successive monthly examinations (success. Standardised clinical assessments and international standards for microbiology were used. Results Five of 52 infants in the amoxicillin group and none of 51 infants in the placebo group achieved success at the end of therapy (Risk Difference = 9.6% [95% confidence interval 1.6,17.6]. Amoxicillin significantly reduced the proportion of children with i perforation at the end of therapy (27% to 12% RD = -16% [-31,-1], ii recurrent perforation during therapy (18% to 4% RD = -14% [-25,-2], and iii reduced the proportion of examinations with a diagnosis of perforation during therapy (20% to 8% adjusted risk ratio 0.36 [0.15,0.83] p = 0.017. During therapy, the proportion of examinations with penicillin non-susceptible (MIC > 0.1 microg/ml pneumococci was not significantly different between the amoxicillin group (34% and the placebo group (40%. Beta-lactamase positive non-capsular H. influenzae (NCHi were uncommon during therapy but more frequent in the amoxicillin group (10% than placebo (5%. Conclusion Aboriginal infants receiving continuous amoxicillin had more normal ears, fewer perforations, and less pneumococcal carriage. There was no statistically significant increase in resistant pneumococci or NCHi in amoxicillin children compared to placebo children who received regular paediatric care and antibiotic treatment for symptomatic illnesses.

  6. Effects of phlebotomy-induced reduction of body iron stores on metabolic syndrome: results from a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Houschyar Khosrow S

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metabolic syndrome (METS is an increasingly prevalent but poorly understood clinical condition characterized by insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and obesity. Increased oxidative stress catalyzed by accumulation of iron in excess of physiologic requirements has been implicated in the pathogenesis of METS, but the relationships between cause and effect remain uncertain. We tested the hypothesis that phlebotomy-induced reduction of body iron stores would alter the clinical presentation of METS, using a randomized trial. Methods In a randomized, controlled, single-blind clinical trial, 64 patients with METS were randomly assigned to iron reduction by phlebotomy (n = 33 or to a control group (n = 31, which was offered phlebotomy at the end of the study (waiting-list design. The iron-reduction patients had 300 ml of blood removed at entry and between 250 and 500 ml removed after 4 weeks, depending on ferritin levels at study entry. Primary outcomes were change in systolic blood pressure (SBP and insulin sensitivity as measured by Homeostatic Model Assessment (HOMA index after 6 weeks. Secondary outcomes included HbA1c, plasma glucose, blood lipids, and heart rate (HR. Results SBP decreased from 148.5 ± 12.3 mmHg to 130.5 ± 11.8 mmHg in the phlebotomy group, and from 144.7 ± 14.4 mmHg to 143.8 ± 11.9 mmHg in the control group (difference -16.6 mmHg; 95% CI -20.7 to -12.5; P Conclusions In patients with METS, phlebotomy, with consecutive reduction of body iron stores, lowered BP and resulted in improvements in markers of cardiovascular risk and glycemic control. Blood donation may have beneficial effects for blood donors with METS. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01328210 Please see related article: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7015/10/53

  7. Surgically induced astigmatism after phacoemulsification with and without correction for posture-related ocular cyclotorsion: randomized controlled study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dooley, Ian

    2012-02-01

    PURPOSE: To report the impact of posture-related ocular cyclotorsion on one surgeon\\'s surgically induced astigmatism (SIA) results and the variance in SIA. SETTING: Institute of Eye Surgery, Whitfield Clinic, Waterford, Ireland. METHODS: This prospective randomized controlled study included eyes that had phacoemulsification with intraocular lens implantation. Eyes were randomly assigned to have (intervention group) or not have (control group) correction for posture-related ocular cyclotorsion. In the intervention group, the clear corneal incision was placed precisely at the 120-degree meridian with instruments designed to correct posture-related ocular cyclotorsion. In the control group, the surgeon endeavored to place the incision at the 120-degree meridian, but without markings. RESULTS: The intervention group comprised 41 eyes and the control group, 61 eyes. The mean absolute SIA was 0.74 diopters (D) in the intervention group and 0.78 D in the control group; the difference between groups was not statistically significant (P>.5, unpaired 2-tailed Student t test). The variance in SIA was 0.29 D(2) and 0.31 D(2), respectively; the difference between groups was not statistically significant (P>.5, unpaired F test). CONCLUSIONS: Attempts to correct for posture-related ocular cyclotorsion did not influence SIA or its variance in a single-surgeon series. These results should be interpreted with full appreciation of the limitations of currently available techniques to correct for posture-related ocular cyclotorsion in the clinical setting.

  8. Randomized trial of opioids versus tricyclic antidepressants for radiation-induced mucositis pain in head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehrnrooth, E.; Grau, C.; Zachariae, R.; Andersen, Joern [Aarhus Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Oncology

    2001-11-01

    Patients who receive radiotherapy for head and neck cancer are likely to develop painful mucositis. The pain is characterized by a burning or stinging sensation similar to neuropathic pain sensations. The purpose of the present study was to compare the analgesic effect of a tricyclic antidepressant (TC), commonly used in the treatment of neuropathic pain, with the effect of opioids on radiation-induced mucositis pain. Forty-three patients receiving 66-68 Gy external radiation according to the DAHANCA guidelines (the Danish Head and Neck Cancer Study Group) were randomized to either morphine or TC when mucositis pain was insufficiently managed with weak analgesics. Patients with insufficient pain control in either treatment arm received supplementary medication from the opposite treatment arm. Pain was evaluated weekly using a VAS scale and the McGill Pain Questionnaire. The degree of mucositis and the degree of depression were measured at the same time intervals. Twenty-two patients entered the opioid arm and 21 the TC arm. Two patients in each arm were non-evaluable. VAS pain scores were significantly reduced in the opioid treatment arm one week after randomization (p=0.01). Eight patients in the TC arm were managed with TC alone, but for 11 patients it was necessary to add morphine. The 20 evaluable patients in the morphine arm required no additional treatment. There were no significant differences in side effects between the two groups. Higher pain scores in the TC arm, but not in the opioid arm, were significantly correlated with higher BDI scores. Some head and neck cancer patients with radiation-induced nucositis pain may have sufficient pain control on TC alone. This might be useful in patients with relative counter-indications to opioid treatment.

  9. Reversal of Pipecuronium-Induced Moderate Neuromuscular Block with Sugammadex in the Presence of a Sevoflurane Anesthetic: A Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassonyi, Edömér; Pongrácz, Adrienn; Nemes, Réka; Asztalos, László; Lengyel, Szabolcs; Fülesdi, Béla

    2015-08-01

    Pipecuronium is a steroidal neuromuscular blocking agent. Sugammadex, a relaxant binding γ-cyclodextrin derivative, reverses the effect of rocuronium, vecuronium, and pancuronium. We investigated whether sugammadex reverses moderate pipecuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade (NMB) and the doses required to achieve reversal. This single-center, randomized, double-blind, 5-group parallel-arm study comprised 50 patients undergoing general anesthesia with propofol, sevoflurane, fentanyl, and pipecuronium. Neuromuscular monitoring was performed with acceleromyography (TOF-Watch SX) according to international standards. When the NMB recovered spontaneously to train-of-four count 2, patients randomly received 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, or 4.0 mg/kg of sugammadex or placebo. Recovery time from sugammadex injection to normalized train-of-four (TOF) ratio 0.9 was the primary outcome variable. The recovery time from the sugammadex injection to final T1 was the secondary end point. Postoperative neuromuscular functions were also assessed. Each patient who received sugammadex recovered to a normalized TOF ratio of 0.9 within 5.0 minutes (95% lower confidence interval for the lowest dose 70.1%; for all doses 90.8%) and 79% of these patients reached a normalized TOF ratio 0.9 within 2.0 minutes (95% lower confidence interval for the lowest dose 26.7%; for all doses 63.7%). T1 recovered several minutes after the TOF ratio. No residual postoperative NMB was observed. Sugammadex adequately and rapidly reverses pipecuronium-induced moderate NMB during sevoflurane anesthesia. Once the train-of-four count has spontaneously returned to 2 responses following pipecuronium administration, a dose of 2.0 mg/kg of sugammadex is sufficient to reverse the NMB.

  10. Media Pedagogy: Media Education, Media Socialisation and Educational Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Qvortrup

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to examine the relationship between education and media. These two concepts can be combined in three ways: one can think of media education, i.e. education in the subject of mass media. One can think of media socialisation, i.e. education within the context of a media society in which pupils and students are experienced media users. Finally, one can think of educational media, i.e. media used for educational purposes.After having specified these three subject areas, the paper focuses on the third subject: Media used for educational purposes. According to the paper teaching can be defined as a specialised form of communication, and the basic point of the paper is that all communication is mediated. One cannot talk about such a thing as “non-mediated” communication. Also talking or touching implies media: Language or body language.Consequently, the introduction of new, digital media for teaching does not imply to make teaching more artificial or non-authentic. The introduction of new, digital media for teaching implies that other and older educational media are re-mediated.

  11. Media Komunitas dan Media Literacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawito .

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract:This essay deals with community media in relation to media literacy. After a short discussion on a number of community media characters is made the essay goes further with somewhat detail theoretical presumptions of the roles of media community with respect primarily to the development as Amartya Sen mentioned about. The author suggests that community media may play some significant roles in the development including (a disseminating information (from varieties of perspective, (b facilitating public discussion, (c helping to reach solutions of problems, (d encouraging participations, and (e encouraging the development of media literacy. Regarding the last point the author remarks that media community may have a dual-roles i.e facilitating community’s member in media participation and facilitating community’s member in media education.

  12. The potential of antimicrobials to induce thrombocytopenia in critically ill patients: data from a randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Egede Johansen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Antimicrobial-induced thrombocytopenia is frequently described in the literature among critically ill patients. Several antimicrobials have been implicated, although experimental evidence to demonstrate causality is limited. We report, using a randomized trial, the potential of antimicrobials to induce thrombocytopenia. METHODS: Randomized trial allocated patients to antimicrobial treatment according to standard- of-care (SOC group or drug-escalation in case of procalcitonin increases (high-exposure group. Patients were followed until death or day 28. Thrombocytopenia defined as absolute (platelet count ≤ 100 x 109/L or relative (≥ 20% decrease in platelet count. Analyses were performed in the two randomized groups and as a merged cohort. RESULTS: Of the 1147 patients with platelet data available, 18% had absolute thrombocytopenia within the first 24 hours after admission to intensive care unit and additional 17% developed this complication during follow-up; 57% developed relative thrombocytopenia during follow-up. Absolute and relative thrombocytopenia day 1-4 was associated with increased mortality (HR: 1.67 [95% CI: 1.30 to 2.14]; 1.71 [95% CI: 1.30 to 2.30], P<0.0001, respectively. Patients in the high-exposure group received more antimicrobials including piperacillin/tazobactam, meropenem and ciprofloxacin compared with the SOC group, whereas cefuroxime was used more frequently in the SOC group (p<0.05. Risk of absolute and relative thrombocytopenia (RR: 0.9 [0.7-1.3], p=0.7439; 1.2 [1.0-1.4], p=0.06; respectively, as well as absolute platelet count (daily difference, high-exposure vs. SOC -1.7 [-3.8-0.5], p=0.14 was comparable between groups. In observational analyses, use of ciprofloxacin and piperacillin/tazobactam predicted risk of relative thrombocytopenia (vs. cefuroxime, RR: 2.08 [1.48-2.92]; 1.44 [1.10-1.89], respectively, however only ciprofloxacin were associated with a reduction in absolute platelet count (p=0

  13. Synthesis of a scalar wavelet intensity propagating through von Kármán-type random media: joint use of the radiative transfer equation with the Born approximation and the Markov approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Haruo; Emoto, Kentaro

    2017-10-01

    In high-frequency seismograms of small earthquakes, we clearly see the excitation of long lasting coda waves and the envelope broadening of an S-wavelet with travel distance increasing. We can interpret those phenomena resulting from scattering by random inhomogeneities distributed in the earth medium. Those phenomena have been theoretically studied by stochastic methods, which deal with velocity inhomogeneities as random media. As a simple mathematical model, we study the propagation of a scalar wavelet for the spherical radiation from a point source in 3-D von Kármán-type random media, of which the power spectral density function (PSDF) decreases according to a power-law higher than the corner wavenumber. Our objective is to propose a method to synthesize the wavelet intensity time trace, the mean square amplitude trace, at a given travel distance by using statistical parameters characterizing the PSDF and the centre wavenumber of the wavelet. When the phase shift is small, we can use the Born approximation to calculate the non-isotropic scattering coefficient representing the scattering power per unit volume. Using the scattering coefficient in the radiative transfer equation (RTE), we are able to synthesize the wavelet intensity time trace. When the centre wavenumber increases in the power-law spectral range, however, we often face the situation of a large phase shift, where the Born approximation is inapplicable, but we are able to use the Markov approximation based on the parabolic approximation. It well explains the intensity time traces showing envelope broadening with peak delay due to multiple scattering around the forward direction and the wandering effect caused by travel time fluctuations; however, it fails to explain rich coda waves composed of scattered waves in wide angles. In such a case, here, we newly propose the spectrum division method as follows: at first, taking the centre wavenumber with a tuning parameter as a reference, we divide the

  14. Media violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasburger, V C

    1999-01-01

    For decades, media violence has been viewed as largely a Western problem. New studies indicate that Indian children have increasing access to the media and that media violence will subject them to the same problems as Western children: imitation, desensitization, fear, and inappropriate attitudes about violence and aggression. Solutions exist but will have to be implemented within the next decade to protect Indian children and adolescents from the harmful effects of media violence.

  15. Effect of active species on animal cells in culture media induced by DBD Plasma irradiation using air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsubo, Tetsuya; Ono, Reoto; Hayashi, Nobuya

    2015-09-01

    Little has been reported on action mechanism of active species produced by plasmas affecting living cells. In this study, active species in culture medium generated by torch type DBD and variations of animal cells are attempted to be clarified. Animal cells are irradiated by DBD plasma through various media such as DMEM, PBS and distilled water. Irradiation period is 1 to 15 min. The distance between the lower tip of plasma touch and the surface of the medium is 10 mm. Concentrations of NO2 -, O2 in liquid are measured. After the irradiation, the cells were cultivated in culture medium and their modifications are observed by microscope and some chemical reagents. Concentration of NO2 - and H2 O2 in all media increased with discharge period. Increase rate of NO2 -concentration is much higher than that of hydrogen peroxide. After plasma irradiation for 15 min, concentrations of NO2 were 80 mg/L in DMEM, 30 mg/L in PBS and 15 mg/L in distilled water. Also, the concentration of H2 O2 became 3mg/L in DMEM, 6.5 mg/L in PBS and 6.5mg/L in distilled water. The significant inactivation of cells was observed in the PBS. Above results indicate that, in this experiment, H2 O2 or OH radicals would affect animal cells in culture media.

  16. Administration of ascorbic acid to prevent bleaching-induced tooth sensitivity: a randomized triple-blind clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Paula, E A; Kossatz, S; Fernandes, D; Loguercio, A D; Reis, A

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of ascorbic acid, 500 mg every eight hours, on bleaching-induced tooth sensitivity. A triple-blind, parallel design, and placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial was conducted on 39 adults. The pills (placebo or ascorbic acid) were administered three times per day for 48 hours; the first dose was given one hour prior to each bleaching session. Two bleaching sessions with 35% hydrogen peroxide gel were performed with a one-week interval. Tooth sensitivity was recorded up to 48 hours after bleaching. The color evaluation was performed before and 30 days after bleaching. The absolute risk and intensity of tooth sensitivity were evaluated by Fisher exact and Mann-Whitney U-tests, respectively. Color changes were evaluated by unpaired t-test (α=0.05). There were no significant differences in the absolute risk and intensity of tooth sensitivity and color change between the groups. Both groups showed a similar risk of tooth sensitivity (p>0.05). The perioperative use of an antioxidant, such as ascorbic acid (500 mg, three times daily) perorally, was not able to prevent bleaching-induced tooth sensitivity or reduce its intensity.

  17. Randomized Multi-center Study of Baofuxin for Treatment of Bleeding Side-effect Induced by IUD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴尚纯; 王翠萍; 程渭玉; 韩学军; 王素贞; 戚娟芳; 刘莹; 付伟

    2000-01-01

    Objective To observe the efficacy of Baofuxin for treatment of bleeding side effect induced by IUD.Method The study is a multi-center trial. The subjects were randomly allocated into two groups, Baofuxin group ( 90 cases) and Indomethacin group ( 90 cases). In the Baofuxin group, the subjects took the medicine on the first day of menses, once a bag,twice a day for 10 days. In the Indomethacin group, only one capsule was taken once a time, twice a day for 7 days. The treatment was given for three menstrual cycles.The subjects were asked to record their bleeding~spotting by using menstrual diary card not only during the treatment cycles but also during the three months previous and after the treatment cycles. The menstrual profile was analyzed by using MDSv2. 3 program that was provided by WHO.Results Within each 90-day reference period of treatment and post-treatment cycles,the number of bleeding/spotting days decreased obviously and bleeding/spotting free days were greatly increased. Both medicines have little effect on number of episode of bleeding/spotting. The subjects who thought the treatment were highly effective were 81. 1% in the Baofuxin group and 56. 2% in the Indomethacin group respectively (P< 0.01).Conclusion Both Baofuxin and indomethacin are highly effective on treatment of bleeding side effect induced by IUD, but Baofuxin had longer effects and was more acceptable.

  18. An inducible tool for random mutagenesis in Aspergillus niger based on the transposon Vader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paun, Linda; Nitsche, Benjamin; Homan, Tim; Ram, Arthur F; Kempken, Frank

    2016-07-01

    The ascomycete Aspergillus niger is widely used in the biotechnology, for instance in producing most of the world's citric acid. It is also known as a major food and feed contaminant. While generation of gene knockouts for functional genomics has become feasible in ku70 mutants, analyzing gene functions or metabolic pathways remains a laborious task. An unbiased transposon-based mutagenesis approach may aid this process of analyzing gene functions by providing mutant libraries in a short time. The Vader transposon is a non-autonomous DNA-transposon, which is activated by the homologous tan1-transposase. However, in the most commonly used lab strain of A. niger (N400 strain and derivatives), we found that the transposase, encoded by the tan1 gene, is mutated and inactive. To establish a Vader transposon-based mutagenesis system in the N400 background, we expressed the functional transposase of A. niger strain CBS 513.88 under the control of an inducible promoter based on the Tet-on system, which is activated in the presence of the antibiotic doxycycline (DOX). Increasing amounts of doxycycline lead to higher Vader excision frequencies, whereas little to none activity of Vader was observed without addition of doxycycline. Hence, this system appears to be suitable for producing stable mutants in the A. niger N400 background.

  19. Effects of quenched randomness induced by car accidents on traffic flow in a cellular automata model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xian-Qing; Ma, Yu-Qiang; Zhao, Yue-Min

    2004-10-01

    In this paper we numerically study the impact of quenched disorder induced by car accidents on traffic flow in the Nagel-Schreckenberg (NS) model. Car accidents occur when the necessary conditions proposed by [Boccara J. Phys. A 30, 3329 (1997)] are satisfied. Two realistic situations of cars involved in car accidents have been considered. Model A is presented to consider that the accident cars become temporarily stuck. Our studies exhibit the “inverse- λ form” or the metastable state for traffic flow in the fundamental diagram and wide-moving waves of jams in the space-time pattern. Model B is proposed to take into account that the “wrecked” cars stay there forever and the cars behind will pass through the sites occupied by the “wrecked” cars with a transmission rate. Four-stage transitions from a maximum flow through a sharp decrease phase and a density-independent phase to a high-density jamming phase for traffic flow have been observed. The density profiles and the effects of transmission rate and probability of the occurrence of car accidents in model B are also discussed.

  20. The effect of Vaccinium uliginosum extract on tablet computer-induced asthenopia: randomized placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Choul Yong; Gu, Namyi; Lim, Chi-Yeon; Oh, Jong-Hyun; Chang, Minwook; Kim, Martha; Rhee, Moo-Yong

    2016-08-18

    To investigate the alleviation effect of Vaccinium uliginosum extract (DA9301) on tablet computer-induced asthenopia. This was a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind and parallel study (Trial registration number: 2013-95). A total 60 volunteers were randomized into DA9301 (n = 30) and control (n = 30) groups. The DA9301 group received DA9301 oral pill (1000 mg/day) for 4 weeks and the control group received placebo. Asthenopia was evaluated by administering a questionnaire containing 10 questions (responses were scored on a scales of 0-6; total score: 60) regarding ocular symptoms before (baseline) and 4 weeks after receiving pills (DA9301 or placebo). The participants completed the questionnaire before and after tablet computer (iPad Air, Apple Inc.) watching at each visit. The change in total asthenopia score (TAS) was calculated and compared between the groups TAS increased significantly after tablet computer watching at baseline in DA9301 group. (from 20.35 to 23.88; p = 0.031) However, after receiving DA9301 for 4 weeks, TAS remained stable after tablet computer watching. In the control group, TAS changes induced by tablet computer watching were not significant both at baseline and at 4 weeks after receiving placebo. Further analysis revealed the scores for "tired eyes" (p = 0.001), "sore/aching eyes" (p = 0.038), "irritated eyes" (p = 0.010), "watery eyes" (p = 0.005), "dry eyes" (p = 0.003), "eye strain" (p = 0.006), "blurred vision" (p = 0.034), and "visual discomfort" (p = 0.018) significantly improved in the DA9301 group. We found that oral intake of DA9301 (1000 mg/day for 4 weeks) was effective in alleviating asthenopia symptoms induced by tablet computer watching. The study is registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov (registration number: NCT02641470, date of registration December 30, 2015).

  1. Mass Media for Smoking Cessation in Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Laura J.; Bunn, Janice Y.; Flynn, Brian S.; Pirie, Phyllis L.; Worden, John K.; Ashikaga, Takamaru

    2009-01-01

    Theory-driven, mass media interventions prevent smoking among youth. This study examined effects of a media campaign on adolescent smoking cessation. Four matched pairs of media markets in four states were randomized to receive or not receive a 3-year television/radio campaign aimed at adolescent smoking cessation based on social cognitive theory.…

  2. Protective effects of dexmedetomidine combined with flurbiprofen axetil on remifentanil-induced hyperalgesia: A randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zenggui; Wu, Weilan; Wu, Xiaodan; Lei, Hongyi; Gong, Cansheng; Xu, Shiyuan

    2016-01-01

    High dosages of intra-operative remifentanil are associated with opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH). The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of combined dexmedetomidine and flurbiprofen axetil treatment on remifentanil-induced hyperalgesia. Patients with an American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status of I–II who were diagnosed with hysteromyoma and scheduled for laparoscopic assisted vaginal hysterectomy (LAVH) were randomly divided into three groups. Group hyperalgesia (Group H, n=29) received intra-operative remifentanil, Group hyperalgesia and dexmedetomidine (Group HD, n=28) received remifentanil and a continuous infusion of dexmedetomidine, and Group hyperalgesia, dexmedetomidine and flurbiprofen axetil (Group HDF, n=29) received remifentanil, flurbiprofen axetil and dexmedetomidine. Mechanical pain thresholds were measured during the preoperative visit and postoperatively at 1, 6 and 24-h time points. Visual analog scale (VAS) scores, time to analgesic requirement, total sufentanil consumption and side effects were assessed postoperatively. Mechanical pain threshold at the incision site was significantly lower in Group H compared with Groups HD and HDF (both P<0.05), and significantly higher in Group HDF than in Group HD (P<0.05). The area of secondary hyperalgesia at the incision site was greater in Group H than in the other two groups (both P<0.05), and significantly smaller in Group HDF compared with Group HD (P<0.05). VAS scores and total sufentanil consumption were significantly higher in Group H compared with the other two groups (both P<0.05), and were significantly lower in Group HDF compared with Group HD (P<0.05). Dexmedetomidine combined with flurbiprofen axetil exhibits synergetic effects in the prevention of remifentanil-induced hyperalgesia in patients undergoing LAVH. PMID:27698764

  3. Short-term Rosuvastatin Treatment for the Prevention of Contrast-induced Acute Kidney Injury in Patients Receiving Moderate or High Volumes of Contrast Media: A Sub-analysis of the TRACK-D Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Current randomized trials have demonstrated the effects of short-term rosuvastatin therapy in preventing contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CIAKI. However, the consistency of these effects on patients administered different volumes of contrast media is unknown. Methods: In the TRACK-D trial, 2998 patients with type 2 diabetes and concomitant chronic kidney disease (CKD who underwent coronary/peripheral arterial angiography with or without percutaneous intervention were randomized to short-term (2 days before and 3 days after procedure rosuvastatin therapy or standard-of-care. This prespecified analysis compared the effects of rosuvastatin versus standard therapy in patients exposed to (moderate contrast volume [MCV], 200-300 ml, n = 712 or (high contrast volume [HCV], ≥300 ml, n = 220. The primary outcome was the incidence of CIAKI. The secondary outcome was a composite of death, dialysis/hemofiltration or worsened heart failure at 30 days. Results: Rosuvastatin treatment was associated with a significant reduction in CIAKI compared with the controls (2.1% vs. 4.4%, P = 0.050 in the overall cohort and in patients with MCV (1.7% vs. 4.5%, P = 0.029, whereas no benefit was observed in patients with HCV (3.4% vs. 3.9%, P = 0.834. The incidence of secondary outcomes was significantly lower in the rosuvastatin group compared with control group (2.7% vs. 5.3%, P = 0.049 in the overall cohort, but it was similar between the patients with MCV (2.0% vs. 4.2%, P = 0.081 or HCV (5.1% vs. 8.8%, P = 0.273. Conclusions: Periprocedural short-term rosuvastatin treatment is effective in reducing CIAKI and adverse clinical events for patients with diabetes and CKD after their exposure to a moderate volume of contrast medium.

  4. Media Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Gang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern colleges are faced with the dual pressures of university reform and international competition, how to overcome difficulties, to play the role of modern English teaching in colleges and colleges to enhance the core competitiveness of colleges, colleges and colleges modern English teaching problems to be solved. Based on the current situation of modern colleges in the premise of the Modern media platform fully demonstrated the characteristics and viability of the Modern media English teaching, the necessity of modern English teaching of college Modern media. Discusses the Modern media targeting English teaching and important role is in the English teaching to guide the development of modern colleges modern media.

  5. Kinetic properties of fractal media

    CERN Document Server

    Chumak, Oleg V

    2016-01-01

    Kinetic processes in fractal stellar media are analyzed in terms of the approach developed in our earlier paper (Chumak, Rastorguev, 2016) involving a generalization of the nearest neighbor and random force distributions to fractal media. Diffusion is investigated in the approximation of scale-dependent conditional density based on an analysis of the solutions of the corresponding Langevin equations. It is shown that kinetic parameters (time scales, coefficients of dynamic friction, diffusion, etc.) for fractal stellar media can differ significantly both qualitatively and quantitatively from the corresponding parameters for a quasi-uniform random media with limited fluctuations. The most important difference is that in the fractal case kinetic parameters depend on spatial scale length and fractal dimension of the medium studied. A generalized kinetic equation for stellar media (fundamental equation of stellar dynamics) is derived in the Fokker-Planck approximation with the allowance for the fractal properties...

  6. Implications of surfactant-induced flow for miscible-displacement estimation of air-water interfacial areas in unsaturated porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costanza-Robinson, Molly S; Zheng, Zheng; Henry, Eric J; Estabrook, Benjamin D; Littlefield, Malcolm H

    2012-10-16

    Surfactant miscible-displacement experiments represent a conventional means of estimating air-water interfacial area (A(I)) in unsaturated porous media. However, changes in surface tension during the experiment can potentially induce unsaturated flow, thereby altering interfacial areas and violating several fundamental method assumptions, including that of steady-state flow. In this work, the magnitude of surfactant-induced flow was quantified by monitoring moisture content and perturbations to effluent flow rate during miscible-displacement experiments conducted using a range of surfactant concentrations. For systems initially at 83% moisture saturation (S(W)), decreases of 18-43% S(W) occurred following surfactant introduction, with the magnitude and rate of drainage inversely related to the surface tension of the surfactant solution. Drainage induced by 0.1 mM sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate, commonly used for A(I) estimation, resulted in effluent flow rate increases of up to 27% above steady-state conditions and is estimated to more than double the interfacial area over the course of the experiment. Depending on the surfactant concentration and the moisture content used to describe the system, A(I) estimates varied more than 3-fold. The magnitude of surfactant-induced flow is considerably larger than previously recognized and casts doubt on the reliability of A(I) estimation by surfactant miscible-displacement.

  7. Human Adipose Tissue Conditioned Media from Lean Subjects Is Protective against H2O2 Induced Neurotoxicity in Human SH-SY5Y Neuronal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongxiao Wan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Adipose tissue secretes numerous hormone-like factors, which are known as adipokines. Adipokine receptors have been identified in the central nervous system but the potential role of adipokine signaling in neuroprotection is unclear. The aim of this study is to determine (1 Whether adipokines secreted from cultured adipose tissue of lean humans is protective against oxidative stress-induced neurotoxicity in human SH-SY5Y neuronal cells; and (2 To explore potential signaling pathways involved in these processes. Adipose tissue conditioned media (ATCM from healthy lean subjects completely prevented H2O2 induced neurotoxicity, while this effect is lost after heating ATCM. ATCM activated the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, JNK and Akt at serine 308 in SH-SY5Y cells. PD98059 (25 µM, SP600125 (5 µM and LY29400 (20 µM partially blocked the protective effects of ATCM against H2O2 induced neurotoxicity. Findings demonstrate that heat-sensitive factors secreted from human adipose tissue of lean subjects are protective against H2O2 induced neurotoxicity and ERK1/2, JNK, and PI3K signaling pathways are involved in these processes. In conclusion, this study demonstrates preliminary but encouraging data to further support that adipose tissue secreted factors from lean human subjects might possess neuroprotective properties and unravel the specific roles of ERK1/2, JNK and PI3K in these processes.

  8. Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy in Cancer Patients: A Four-Arm Randomized Trial on the Effectiveness of Electroacupuncture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rostock

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN is a common and dose-limiting side effect of cytostatic drugs. Since there are no proven therapeutic procedures against CIPN, we were interested to define the role of electroacupuncture (EA from which preliminary data showed promising results. Methods. In a randomized trial with a group sequential adaptive design in patients with CIPN, we compared EA (LV3, SP9, GB41, GB34, LI4, LI11, SI3, and HT3; n=14 with hydroelectric baths (HB, n=14, vitamin B1/B6 capsules (300/300 mg daily; VitB, n=15, and placebo capsules (n=17. The statistical power in this trial was primarily calculated for proving EA only, so results of HB and VitB are pilot data. Results. CIPN complaints improved by 0.8±1.2 (EA, 1.7±1.7 (HB, 1.6±2.0 (VitB, and 1.3±1.3 points (placebo on a 10-point numeric rating scale without significant difference between treatment groups or placebo. In addition no significant differences in sensory nerve conduction studies or quality of life (EORTC QLQ-C30 were found. Conclusions. The used EA concept, HB, and VitB were not superior to placebo. Since, contrary to our results, studies with different acupuncture concepts showed a positive effect on CIPN, the effect of acupuncture on CIPN remains unclear. Further randomized, placebo controlled studies seem necessary. This trial is registered with DRKS00004448.

  9. Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy in Cancer Patients: A Four-Arm Randomized Trial on the Effectiveness of Electroacupuncture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostock, M.; Jaroslawski, K.; Guethlin, C.; Ludtke, R.; Schröder, S.; Bartsch, H. H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a common and dose-limiting side effect of cytostatic drugs. Since there are no proven therapeutic procedures against CIPN, we were interested to define the role of electroacupuncture (EA) from which preliminary data showed promising results. Methods. In a randomized trial with a group sequential adaptive design in patients with CIPN, we compared EA (LV3, SP9, GB41, GB34, LI4, LI11, SI3, and HT3; n = 14) with hydroelectric baths (HB, n = 14), vitamin B1/B6 capsules (300/300 mg daily; VitB, n = 15), and placebo capsules (n = 17). The statistical power in this trial was primarily calculated for proving EA only, so results of HB and VitB are pilot data. Results. CIPN complaints improved by 0.8 ± 1.2 (EA), 1.7 ± 1.7 (HB), 1.6 ± 2.0 (VitB), and 1.3 ± 1.3 points (placebo) on a 10-point numeric rating scale without significant difference between treatment groups or placebo. In addition no significant differences in sensory nerve conduction studies or quality of life (EORTC QLQ-C30) were found. Conclusions. The used EA concept, HB, and VitB were not superior to placebo. Since, contrary to our results, studies with different acupuncture concepts showed a positive effect on CIPN, the effect of acupuncture on CIPN remains unclear. Further randomized, placebo controlled studies seem necessary. This trial is registered with DRKS00004448. PMID:24066010

  10. The effect of Frankincense in the treatment of moderate plaque-induced gingivitis: a double blinded randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Chitsazan

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available "n  Background and the purpose of the Study: Extract of Boswellia Serrata species has been used in the Indian traditional medicine in the treatment of various inflammatory diseases. The present study was designed to evaluate anti-inflammatory effects of Frankincense in the treatment of gingivitis, which is a periodontal tissue inflammatory disease. "n  Methods: This double blind randomized placebo controlled trial was carried out among high school female students with moderate plaque-induced gingivitis. Based on either administration of 0.1 gram of Frankincense extract or 0.2 gram of its powder or placebo and whether the patients undergone scaling and root planning (SRP or not, they were randomly assigned to 6 groups. The primary efficacy outcome was changes in Gingival Index (Loe & Sillness and the secondary outcomes were alteration in plaque index (Sillness & Loe, bleeding index (Cowell and probing pocket depth (WHO probe. All indices were measured in the 0, 7th and 14th days of the study. "n  Results: Seventy five patients ranged of 15-18 years old were enrolled. At the end of the study, the indices in all groups showed significant decreases in comparison to the first day (p< 0.05, except for the bleeding index in the group without SRP and drug therapy (p=0.111. More precise analysis of data revealed that SRP in association with Frankincense application (either extract or powder can lead to remarkable decrease in inflammatory indices in comparison to the groups without SRP and drug therapy (p<0.001. In addition, no significant difference was observed between powder or extract therapy (p >0.05 and between patients received either SRP or treatment alone (p=0.169. "n  Conclusion: Frankincense, a safe and low-cost herbal medicine, may be feasibly applied to improve inflammation based disease of gingival as an adjunct to the conventional mechanical therapy.

  11. Rebamipide does not protect against naproxen-induced gastric damage: a randomized double-blind controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliano-Jucá, Thiago; Moreno, Ronilson A; Zaminelli, Tiago; Napolitano, Mauro; Magalhães, Antônio Frederico N; Carvalhaes, Aloísio; Trevisan, Miriam S; Wallace, John L; De Nucci, Gilberto

    2016-06-04

    Rebamipide is a gastroprotective agent with promising results against gastric damage induced by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The present study evaluated if rebamipide protects against naproxen-induced gastric damage in healthy volunteers. Changes in gastric PGE2 tissue concentration were also evaluated. After a preliminary endoscopy to rule out previous gastric macroscopic damage, twenty-four healthy volunteers of both sexes were divided into 2 groups. One group received sodium naproxen 550 mg b.i.d. plus placebo for 7 days, while the other group received sodium naproxen 550 mg b.i.d. plus rebamipide 100 mg b.i.d. At the end of treatment, a new endoscopy was performed. Gastric macroscopic damage was evaluated by the Cryer score and by the modified Lanza score. The primary outcome measure of the trial was the macroscopic damage observed in each treatment group at the end of treatment. Biopsies were collected at both endoscopies for PGE2 quantification and histopathological analysis (secondary outcomes). Tissue PGE2 was quantified by ELISA. The randomization sequence was generated using 3 blocks of 8 subjects each. Volunteers and endoscopists were blind to whether they were receiving rebamipide or placebo. All recruited volunteers completed the trial. Sodium naproxen induced gastric damage in both groups. At the end of the study, median Cryer score was 4 in both groups (Difference = 0; 95%CI = -1 to 0; p = 0.728). In the placebo group, the mean tissue PGE2 concentration was 1005 ± 129 pg/mL before treatment and 241 ± 41 pg/mL after treatment (p rebamipide group, the mean tissue PGE2 concentration was 999 ± 109 pg/mL before treatment, and 168 ± 13 pg/mL after treatment (p Rebamipide does not protect against naproxen-induced gastric damage in healthy volunteers. ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT02632812 . Registered 14 December 2015.

  12. Recovery from prolonged deep rocuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade: A randomized comparison of sugammadex reversal with spontaneous recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahe-Meyer, N; Berger, C; Wittmann, M; Solomon, C; Abels, E A M; Rietbergen, H; Reuter, D A

    2015-07-01

    Deep neuromuscular blockade (NMB) may not always be maintained to the end of surgery and the depth of block may be allowed to gradually diminish over time, particularly if reversal of NMB is not routinely performed. The current study aimed to assess recovery from deep rocuronium-induced NMB with sugammadex compared with placebo, provide data regarding the extent of residual blockade after deep rocuronium-induced NMB (placebo group), and to determine whether complete and reliable recovery could be provided by sugammadex (sugammadex group). This was a randomized, placebo-controlled, safety-assessor-blinded study in adult patients of American Society of Anesthesiologists Class I to III. Patients with clinically relevant kidney or liver insufficiency were excluded. Anesthesia was administered as routinely practiced at each study site. Rocuronium 0.6 mg/kg was administered for intubation, with maintenance doses of 0.1-0.2 mg/kg as needed. After the last rocuronium dose, at deep NMB (target depth 1-2 post-tetanic counts), patients received a single dose of sugammadex 4.0 mg/kg or placebo as randomized. The primary endpoint was time from sugammadex or placebo administration to recovery of the train-of-four (TOF) ratio to 0.9. Safety was assessed through monitoring of adverse events, vital signs and physical examination. Patients were also assessed for evidence of residual or recurrence of NMB. With this design, the study will provide data regarding the extent of residual blockade under these conditions (placebo group), and determine whether complete and reliable recovery could be provided by sugammadex (sugammadex group). Recovery to a TOF ratio of ≥ 0.9 with sugammadex was significantly faster (~ 40 times) than spontaneous recovery: geometric mean (95 % confidence interval) times were 2.2 (1.9-2.5) and 89.8 (80.1-100.7) min, respectively (p sugammadex, with median time to recovery > 1.5 h in the placebo group and one patient taking 4.8 h to achieve a

  13. Efficacy of constraint-induced therapy on functional performance and health-related quality of life for children with cerebral palsy: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsin, Yi-jung; Chen, Fei-Chuan; Lin, Keh-chung; Kang, Lin-ju; Chen, Chia-ling; Chen, Chung-yao

    2012-08-01

    To better generalize training effects to the context of daily living, home-based constraint-induced therapy has been proposed. Therapeutic success of constraint-induced therapy is limited as to whether the improvements in functional performance can be transferred to quality of life. This randomized controlled trial aimed to investigate the efficacy of home-based constraint-induced therapy on functional performance and health-related quality of life. Twenty-two children with spastic unilateral cerebral palsy (6-8 years, 10 boys) were randomly assigned to receive constraint-induced therapy or traditional rehabilitation. Home-based constraint-induced therapy had immediate and maintaining effects on motor efficacy and functional performance and induced greater gains in health-related quality of life in the long run than in the short term. The home-based constraint-induced therapy protocol (relatively moderate intensity and shortened constraint time), which might balance the effectiveness and compliance of participants and caregivers, may be an effective alternative to conventional constraint-induced therapy.

  14. Radiation-induced segregation and corrosion behavior on Σ3 coincidence site lattice and random grain boundaries in proton-irradiated type-316L austenitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakaguchi, N., E-mail: sakaguchi@eng.hokudai.ac.jp [Center for Advanced Research of Energy and Materials, Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8628, Hokkaido (Japan); Endo, M.; Watanabe, S. [Center for Advanced Research of Energy and Materials, Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8628, Hokkaido (Japan); Kinoshita, H. [Fukushima National College of Technology, Iwaki 970-8034, Fukushima (Japan); Yamashita, S. [Fuels and Materials Department, O-arai Research and Development Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan); Kokawa, H. [Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)

    2013-03-15

    The behavior of radiation-induced segregation (RIS) and intergranular corrosion at random grain boundaries and Σ3 coincidence site lattice (CSL) boundaries in proton-irradiated 316L stainless steel was examined. The frequency of the CSL boundaries was enhanced up to 86.6% by grain boundary engineering treatment prior to irradiation. Significant nickel enrichment and chromium depletion were induced at the random grain boundary owing to the RIS. At faceted Σ3 CSL boundaries, chromium depletion occurred at the asymmetrical boundary facet plane whereas no RIS was observed at the coherent twin boundary. After the electrochemical etching test, an intergranular corrosion groove was found along the random grain boundaries because of the low chromium concentration (∼12%) at the boundaries. At the faceted Σ3 CSL boundaries, the discontinuous groove along the asymmetric facet plane was completely disrupted by the non-corrosive coherent twin boundary.

  15. Nutrient composition of culture media induces different patterns of CO2 fixation from biogas and biomass production by the microalga Scenedesmus obliquus U169.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choix, Francisco J; Polster, Elena; Corona-González, Rosa Isela; Snell-Castro, Raúl; Méndez-Acosta, Hugo O

    2017-08-11

    Microalgae are considered as a promising biotechnological strategy to capture CO2 from biogas, producing biomass with valuable energetic compounds. This study has evaluated the biotechnological potential to fix CO2 from biogas and biomass production by Scenedesmus obliquus cultured in four different formulations of culture media, C30, Bristol, Bold 3N, and C30+M, as well as the effect of methane (CH4) of biogas during CO2 fixation and biomass production. The results obtained showed that different nutrient composition and concentration of culture media, mainly micronutrient and vitamin concentrations, induced different patterns of CO2 fixation from biogas and biomass production in S. obliquus. The highest CO2 fixation (23.03 ± 0.24%) and biomass production (4.63 ± 0.31 g L(-1)) were attained in the microalgae growing in C30+M medium, accumulating mainly proteins. Moreover, these results demonstrated that the CH4 of biogas did not affect CO2 fixation from biogas and biomass production by S. obliquus. Overall, these results demonstrated that a culture medium with a balanced nutrient supply is crucial to increasing the biotechnological potential of microalgae to fix CO2 from biogas.

  16. Effect of social media in improving knowledge among patients having fixed appliance orthodontic treatment: A single-center randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Silwadi, Fadi M; Gill, Daljit S; Petrie, Aviva; Cunningham, Susan J

    2015-08-01

    Research has shown that orthodontic patients are more likely to retain information presented in an audiovisual format. However, there has been little research on the effectiveness of audiovisual information provided through different routes such as the Internet. This parallel-group randomized controlled trial assessed whether provision of audiovisual information on the YouTube (Google, San Bruno, Calif) Web site to orthodontic patients undergoing fixed appliance treatment results in improved patient knowledge when compared with conventional methods of information provision. The effects of sex and ethnicity were also investigated. Participants were recruited from the Department of Orthodontics of the Eastman Dental Hospital, University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, United Kingdom. The patients were 13 years of age and over, with no history of orthodontic treatment, and patient and parental (where appropriate) consent were obtained. The participants were randomized into control (n = 34) and intervention (n = 33) groups using a random number table; there was stratification based on age group, with permuted blocks of 10 patients. Both groups were given routine verbal and written patient information related to fixed appliances, and the participants in the intervention group were sent 3 e-mails over 6 weeks requesting that they view a 6-minute YouTube video containing similar information but in audiovisual format. Patient knowledge was measured using identical questionnaires answered on the day of recruitment (baseline) and again 6 to 8 weeks later. The researchers were unaware of group allocations when enrolling patients and scoring questionnaires. Sixty participants (89.55%) completed the study. Those who completed the trial in the intervention group (n = 30) demonstrated significantly greater improvements in knowledge than did those in the control group (n = 30), scoring, on average, almost 1 point more (95% CI for the difference, 0.305-1.602; P = 0

  17. Sequential combination of robot-assisted therapy and constraint-induced therapy in stroke rehabilitation: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Yu-Wei; Lin, Keh-Chung; Horng, Yi-Shiung; Wu, Ching-Yi; Wu, Tai-Chieh; Ku, Fang-Ling

    2014-05-01

    Robot-assisted therapy (RT) and constraint-induced therapy (CIT) both show great promise to improve stroke rehabilitation outcomes. Although the respective treatment efficacy of RT and CIT has been validated, the additive effects of RT combined with CIT remain unknown. This study investigated the treatment effects of RT in sequential combination with a distributed form of CIT (RT + dCIT) compared with RT and conventional rehabilitation (CR). Forty-eight patients with stroke were enrolled and randomized to receive one of the three interventions for 4 weeks. Primary outcomes assessed the changes of motor impairment and motor function on the Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA) and Wolf Motor Function Test (WMFT). Secondary outcomes, including the Motor Activity Log (MAL) and accelerometers, examined functional performance during daily activities. The three treatment groups improved significantly on most primary and secondary outcomes over time. The combined RT + dCIT group exhibited significantly greater improvement on the FMA and functional ability subscale of the WMFT than the RT and CR groups. The improvements on the MAL and accelerometers were not significantly different among the three groups. RT in sequential combination with CIT led to additive effects on participants' motor ability and functional ability to perform motor tasks after stroke, which support that combined therapy can be an effective means to intensify outcomes. Further research investigating the potential long-term effects of combination therapy, especially on real-life performance, would be valuable.

  18. Salvianolic Acid B Prevents Iodinated Contrast Media-Induced Acute Renal Injury in Rats via the PI3K/Akt/Nrf2 Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tongqiang, Liu; Shaopeng, Liu; Xiaofang, Yu; Nana, Song; Xialian, Xu; Jiachang, Hu; Ting, Zhang; Xiaoqiang, Ding

    2016-01-01

    Contrast-induced acute renal injury (CI-AKI) has become a common cause of hospital-acquired renal failure. However, the development of prophylaxis strategies and approved therapies for CI-AKI is limited. Salvianolic acid B (SB) can treat cardiovascular-related diseases. The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of SB on prevention of CI-AKI and explore its underlying mechanisms. We examined its effectiveness of preventing renal injury in a novel CI-AKI rat model. Compared with saline, intravenous SB pretreatment significantly attenuated elevations in serum creatinine and the histological changes of renal tubular injuries, reduced the number of apoptosis-positive tubular cells, activated Nrf2, and lowered the levels of renal oxidative stress induced by iodinated contrast media. The above renoprotection of SB was abolished by the PI3K inhibitor (wortmannin). In HK-2 cells, SB activated Nrf2 and decreased the levels of oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide and subsequently improved cell viability. The above cytoprotection of SB was blocked by the PI3K inhibitor (wortmannin) or siNrf2. Thus, our results demonstrate that, due to its antioxidant properties, SB has the potential to effectively prevent CI-AKI via the PI3K/Akt/Nrf2 pathway.

  19. Salvianolic Acid B Prevents Iodinated Contrast Media-Induced Acute Renal Injury in Rats via the PI3K/Akt/Nrf2 Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Tongqiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Contrast-induced acute renal injury (CI-AKI has become a common cause of hospital-acquired renal failure. However, the development of prophylaxis strategies and approved therapies for CI-AKI is limited. Salvianolic acid B (SB can treat cardiovascular-related diseases. The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of SB on prevention of CI-AKI and explore its underlying mechanisms. We examined its effectiveness of preventing renal injury in a novel CI-AKI rat model. Compared with saline, intravenous SB pretreatment significantly attenuated elevations in serum creatinine and the histological changes of renal tubular injuries, reduced the number of apoptosis-positive tubular cells, activated Nrf2, and lowered the levels of renal oxidative stress induced by iodinated contrast media. The above renoprotection of SB was abolished by the PI3K inhibitor (wortmannin. In HK-2 cells, SB activated Nrf2 and decreased the levels of oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide and subsequently improved cell viability. The above cytoprotection of SB was blocked by the PI3K inhibitor (wortmannin or siNrf2. Thus, our results demonstrate that, due to its antioxidant properties, SB has the potential to effectively prevent CI-AKI via the PI3K/Akt/Nrf2 pathway.

  20. Scientists as communicators: A randomized experiment to assess public reactions to scientists' social media communication along the science-advocacy continuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotcher, J.; Vraga, E.; Myers, T.; Stenhouse, N.; Roser-Renouf, C.; Maibach, E.

    2014-12-01

    The question of what type of role scientists, or experts more generally, should play in policy debates is a perennial point of discussion within the scientific community. It is often thought that communication containing some form of policy advocacy is likely to compromise the perceived credibility of the individual scientist engaged in such behavior, with the possibility that it may also harm the credibility of the scientific community more broadly. Rather than evaluating statements in a binary fashion as representing either pure objectivity or pure advocacy, one recent model proposes that public communication by scientists should instead be thought of as falling along a continuum based upon the extent of normative judgment implicit in a statement. This approach predicts that as the extent of normative judgment increases, it poses a relatively greater risk to a scientist's perceived credibility. Though such a model is conceptually useful, little empirical social science research has systematically explored how individuals form judgments about different types of advocacy to examine common assumptions about the relative risks associated with such behaviors. In this presentation, we will report results from a national online experiment (N=1200) that examines audience responses to fictional social media posts written by either a climate scientist or a television weathercaster. Following the above model, the posts represent differing degrees of advocacy defined by the extent of normative judgment implicit in each statement. In instances where a specific policy is advocated, we examine whether participants' reactions are shaped by the extent to which the policy mentioned is congruent with one's political ideology. We hope this study will serve as an exemplar of applied science communication research that can begin to help inform scientists and other experts about the potential implications of different communication options they may choose from in deciding how to engage

  1. Media Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kabel, Lars

    2016-01-01

    News and other kinds of journalistic stories, 16-17 hours a day, all year round, on all platforms, also the moderated social media. The key research thesis behind this article is that the continuous and speedy stream of news stories and media content now is becoming the centre of the production...... processes and the value creation in converged multimedia newsrooms. The article identify new methods and discuss editorial challenges in handling media flow....

  2. Stochastic resonance induced by the novel random transitions of two-dimensional weak damping bistable duffing oscillator and bifurcation of moment equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Guangjun [School of Aerospace, Xi' an Jiao Tong University, Xi' an (China) and School of Life and Science and Technology, Xi' an Jiao Tong University, Xi' an (China) and School of Science, Air Force Engineering University, Xi' an (China)], E-mail: Zhanggj3@126.com; Xu Jianxue [School of Aerospace, Xi' an Jiao Tong University, Xi' an (China)], E-mail: jxxu@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Wang Jue [School of Life and Science and Technology, Xi' an Jiao Tong University, Xi' an (China); Yue Zhifeng; Zou Hailin [School of Aerospace, Xi' an Jiao Tong University, Xi' an (China)

    2009-11-30

    In this paper stochastic resonance induced by the novel random transitions of two-dimensional weak damping bistable Duffing oscillator is analyzed by moment method. This kind of novel transition refers to the one among three potential well on two sides of bifurcation point of original system at the presence of internal noise. Several conclusions are drawn. First, the semi-analytical result of stochastic resonance induced by the novel random transitions of two-dimensional weak damping bistable Duffing oscillator can be obtained, and the semi-analytical result is qualitatively compatible with the one of Monte Carlo simulation. Second, a bifurcation of double-branch fixed point curves occurs in the moment equations with noise intensity as their bifurcation parameter. Third, the bifurcation of moment equations corresponds to stochastic resonance of original system. Finally, the mechanism of stochastic resonance is presented from another viewpoint through analyzing the energy transfer induced by the bifurcation of moment equation.

  3. Mass Media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶全荣

    2006-01-01

    @@ Every day,we are all influenced by the mass media.Although some critics of the media claim that these means of communication are used mainly to control our thinking and get us to buy products that we don't need,the media also contribute to keeping people informed.In other words,while dangers do exist,the benefits of the media far outweigh(超过)the disadvantages.Most of the messages brought to viewers,listeners,and readers are designed either to inform or to entertain,and neither of these goals can be considered dangerous or harmful.

  4. Spiral ligament fibrocyte-derived MCP-1/CCL2 contributes to inner ear inflammation secondary to nontypeable H. influenzae-induced otitis media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lim David J

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Otitis media (OM, one of the most common pediatric infectious diseases, causes inner ear inflammation resulting in vertigo and sensorineural hearing loss. Previously, we showed that spiral ligament fibrocytes (SLFs recognize OM pathogens and up-regulate chemokines. Here, we aim to determine a key molecule derived from SLFs, contributing to OM-induced inner ear inflammation. Methods Live NTHI was injected into the murine middle ear through the tympanic membrane, and histological analysis was performed after harvesting the temporal bones. Migration assays were conducted using the conditioned medium of NTHI-exposed SLFs with and without inhibition of MCP-1/CCL2 and CCR2. qRT-PCR analysis was performed to demonstrate a compensatory up-regulation of alternative genes induced by the targeting of MCP-1/CCL2 or CCR2. Results Transtympanic inoculation of live NTHI developed serous and purulent labyrinthitis after clearance of OM. THP-1 cells actively migrated and invaded the extracellular matrix in response to the conditioned medium of NTHI-exposed SLFs. This migratory activity was markedly inhibited by the viral CC chemokine inhibitor and the deficiency of MCP-1/CCL2, indicating that MCP-1/CCL2 is a main attractant of THP-1 cells among the SLF-derived molecules. We further demonstrated that CCR2 deficiency inhibits migration of monocyte-like cells in response to NTHI-induced SLF-derived molecules. Immunolabeling showed an increase in MCP-1/CCL2 expression in the cochlear lateral wall of the NTHI-inoculated group. Contrary to the in vitro data, deficiency of MCP-1/CCL2 or CCR2 did not inhibit OM-induced inner ear inflammation in vivo. We demonstrated that targeting MCP-1/CCL2 enhances NTHI-induced up-regulation of MCP-2/CCL8 in SLFs and up-regulates the basal expression of CCR2 in the splenocytes. We also found that targeting CCR2 enhances NTHI-induced up-regulation of MCP-1/CCL2 in SLFs. Conclusions Taken together, we suggest that

  5. MediaQuotient[TM]: National Survey of Family Media Habits, Knowledge, and Attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentile, Douglas A.; Walsh, David A.

    This study examined family media habits, including the use of television, movies, videos, computer and video games, the Internet, music, and print media. The study was conducted by mail with telephone follow-ups, surveying a national random sample of 527 parents of 2- to 17-year-olds who completed MediaQuotient questionnaires. Findings were…

  6. Three-dimensional mixed-wet random pore-scale network modeling of two- and three-phase flow in porous media. I. Model description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piri, Mohammad; Blunt, Martin J

    2005-02-01

    We present a three-dimensional network model to simulate two- and three-phase capillary dominated processes at the pore level. The displacement mechanisms incorporated in the model are based on the physics of multiphase flow observed in micromodel experiments. All the important features of immiscible fluid flow at the pore scale, such as wetting layers, spreading layers of the intermediate-wet phase, hysteresis, and wettability alteration are implemented in the model. Wettability alteration allows any values for the advancing and receding oil-water, gas-water, and gas-oil contact angles to be assigned. Multiple phases can be present in each pore or throat (element), in wetting and spreading layers, as well as occupying the center of the pore space. In all, some 30 different generic fluid configurations for two- and three-phase flow are analyzed. Double displacement and layer formation are implemented as well as direct two-phase displacement and layer collapse events. Every element has a circular, square, or triangular cross section. A random network that represents the pore space in Berea sandstone is used in this study. The model computes relative permeabilities, saturation paths, and capillary pressures for any displacement sequence. A methodology to track a given three-phase saturation path is presented that enables us to compare predicted and measured relative permeabilities on a point-by-point basis. A robust displacement-based clustering algorithm is also presented.

  7. Media Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kabel, Lars

    2016-01-01

    News and other kinds of journalistic stories, 16-17 hours a day, all year round, on all platforms, also the moderated social media. The key research thesis behind this article is that the continuous and speedy stream of news stories and media content now is becoming the centre of the production...

  8. Mixed Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Erin

    2010-01-01

    While institutions do not often have a hook as compelling as an eagerly awaited movie, great content is critical for media relations success--and coupling it with the right distribution channel can ensure the story finds the right audience. Even better, retooling it for several media platforms can extend the life and reach of a story. The changes…

  9. Media places

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linde, Per; Messeter, Jörn

    for the Media places project, give some brief insights into the themes of setting up temporary digital streams of media and mobile games. Considering the work-in-progress character of the research and the smaller format of text, no real in-depth analysis will be carried out. The goal is rather to position...

  10. Mixed Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Erin

    2010-01-01

    While institutions do not often have a hook as compelling as an eagerly awaited movie, great content is critical for media relations success--and coupling it with the right distribution channel can ensure the story finds the right audience. Even better, retooling it for several media platforms can extend the life and reach of a story. The changes…

  11. Media darling

    CERN Multimedia

    Chalmers, Matthew

    2008-01-01

    He is the media-friendly face of particle physics, appearing on countless TV and radio shows in the run-up to the opening of CERN's Large Hadron Collider. Matthew Chalmers discovers how Brian Cox finds the time to be both a physicist and a media personality. (2 pages)

  12. Effect of sample preparation on the discrimination of bacterial isolates cultured in liquid nutrient media using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is used as the basis for discrimination between 2 genera of gram-negative bacteria and 2 genera of gram-positive bacteria representing pathogenic threats commonly found in poultry processing rinse waters. Because LIBS-based discrimination relies primarily ...

  13. Modeling and simulation of the chemically induced swelling behavior of anionic polyelectrolyte gels by applying the theory of porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leichsenring, Peter; Wallmersperger, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    Ionic hydrogels belong to the class of polyelectrolyte gels, also known as ionic gels. Their ability to swell or shrink under different environmental conditions such as change of pH, ion concentration or temperature make them promising materials for new sensoric or actuatoric devices. Numerical simulations play a crucial role for further developing hydrogel based devices. In the present contribution, a thermodynamically consistent continuum model based on the theory of porous media is derived. The governing field equations are solved on a one-dimensional domain by applying the finite element method. For the time discretization an Euler backward algorithm is implemented. The hydrogel swelling behavior is triggered by a chemical stimulus and is analyzed in space and time. Two mechanical configurations are considered: the hydrogel free swelling behavior and a mechanically clamped configuration, where the hydrogel swelling is hindered, are evaluated in detail. The presented results lead to a precise understanding of the chemo-electro-mechanical behavior and the driving pressure contributions.

  14. Study to assess the effectiveness of modified constraint-induced movement therapy in stroke subjects: A randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of modified constraint induced movement therapy (m-CIMT in stroke subjects. Materials and Methods: A total of forty sub-acute stroke subjects were randomly assigned to either a m-CIMT (n = 20 or in a control group (n = 20. The m-CIMT group (14 men, 6 women; mean age = 55.2 years consisted of structured 2 h therapy sessions emphasizing affected arm use, occurring 5 times/week for 2 weeks. A mitt was used to restrain the unaffected arm for 10 h/day for 2 week. The control group (11 men, 9 women; mean age = 56.4 years consisted of conventional rehabilitation for time-matched exercise program. The outcome measures were evaluated at pre- and post-intervention by using the Wolf Motor Function Test (WMFT and Fugl-Meyer assessment (FMA of motor recovery after stroke. Results: After intervention significant effects were observed in m-CIMT group on WMFT (pre-test and post-test score was 28.04 ± 6.58, 13.59 ± 2.86; P =0.003. Similarly on FMA (pre- and post-test score was 31.15 ± 6.37, 55.7 ± 6.4; P = 0.00. Conclusion: There is a significant improvem ent in upper extremity function so it indicates that m-CIMT is effective in improving the motor function of the affected arm in stroke subjects. However, its long-term effect has not proved since there was no follow-up after intervention.

  15. Acupuncture for Chemotherapy-Induced Neutropenia in Patients with Gynecologic Malignancies: A Pilot Randomized, Sham-Controlled Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Weidong; Matulonis, Ursula A.; Doherty-Gilman, Anne; Lee, Hang; Dean-Clower, Elizabeth; Rosulek, Andrew; Gibson, Carolyn; Goodman, Annekathryn; Davis, Roger B.; Buring, Julie E.; Wayne, Peter M.; Rosenthal, David S.; Penson, Richard T.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Objectives The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of acupuncture administered during myelosuppressive chemotherapy on white blood cell (WBC) count and absolute neutrophil count (ANC) in patients with ovarian cancer. Design This study is a pilot, randomized, sham-controlled clinical trial. Patients received active acupuncture versus sham acupuncture while undergoing chemotherapy. A standardized acupuncture protocol was employed with manual and electrostimulation. The frequency of treatment was 2–3 times per week for a total of 10 sessions, starting 1 week before the second cycle of chemotherapy. Setting The setting was two outpatient academic centers for patients with cancer. Subjects Twenty-one (21) newly diagnosed and recurrent ovarian cancer patients were the subjects. Outcome measures WBC count, ANC, and plasma granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) were assessed weekly. Results The median leukocyte value in the acupuncture arm at the first day of the third cycle of chemotherapy was significantly higher than in the control arm after adjusting for baseline value (8600 cells/μL, range: 4800–12,000 versus 4400 cell/μL, range: 2300–10,000) (p = 0.046). The incidence of grade 2–4 leukopenia was less in the acupuncture arm than in the sham arm (30% versus 90%; p = 0.02). However, the median leukocyte nadir, neutrophil nadir, and recovering ANC were all higher but not statistically significantly different (p = 0.116–0.16), after adjusting for baseline differences. There were no statistically significant differences in plasma G-CSF between the two groups. Conclusions We observed clinically relevant trends of higher WBC values during one cycle of chemotherapy in patients with ovarian cancer, which suggests a potential myeloprotective effect of acupuncture. A larger trial is warranted to more definitively determine the efficacy of acupuncture on clinically important outcomes of chemotherapy-induced neutropenia. PMID:19552597

  16. A randomized prospective study of rehabilitation therapy in the treatment of radiation-induced dysphagia and trismus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Y.; Shen, Q.; Lu, K.; Peng, Y. [Sun Yat-sen Univ., Guangzhou (China). Dept. of Neurology; Wang, Y. [Sun Yat-sen Univ., Guangzhou (China). Dept. of Internal Medicine; Wang, Y. [Sun Yat-sen Univ., Guangzhou (China). Dept. of Neurosurgery

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the therapeutic effect of rehabilitation therapy on radiation-induced dysphagia and trismus in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients after radiotherapy. Patients and Methods: 43 NPC patients after radiotherapy were included. Patients were randomly assigned to either the rehabilitation group or a control group. Both groups were subjected to routine treatment, while the rehabilitation group also received rehabilitation therapy for 3 months. The severity of dysphagia was assessed using the water swallow test, while trismus was evaluated with the LENT/SOMA score and the interincisor distance (IID). The water swallow test, the LENT/SOMA score, as well as IID for both groups before and after treatment were analyzed and compared. Results: After treatment, the rehabilitation group displayed a significant improvement in swallowing function, while the control group did not. The efficacy rate (percentage of patients with excellent or effective results) of rehabilitation group was higher than that of control group (77% vs. 43%), and the difference was statistically significant ({chi}{sup 2} = 5.32, p = 0.02). IID pretreatment and posttreatment did not show much difference in the rehabilitation group, while in the control group IID significantly decreased posttreatment (1.1 {+-} 0.36 cm vs.1.8 {+-} 0.56 cm, p = 0.001). Although the mean IID in patients of both groups decreased after the 3 month follow-up, the decrease in the rehabilitation group was less than that of the control group (0.19 {+-} 0.5 cm vs. 0.69 {+-} 0.56 cm, p = 0.004). The efficacy rate of trismus in the rehabilitation group was significantly higher than that of the control group (64% vs. 28%, {chi}{sup 2} = 5.31, p = 0.02). Conclusions: Rehabilitation training can improve swallow function and slow down the progress of trismus in NPC patients following radiotherapy. (orig.)

  17. A randomized prospective study of rehabilitation therapy in the treatment of radiation-induced dysphagia and trismus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Y; Shen, Q; Wang, Y; Lu, K; Wang, Y; Peng, Y

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the therapeutic effect of rehabilitation therapy on radiation-induced dysphagia and trismus in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients after radiotherapy. 43 NPC patients after radiotherapy were included. Patients were randomly assigned to either the rehabilitation group or a control group. Both groups were subjected to routine treatment, while the rehabilitation group also received rehabilitation therapy for 3 months. The severity of dysphagia was assessed using the water swallow test, while trismus was evaluated with the LENT/SOMA score and the interincisor distance (IID). The water swallow test, the LENT/SOMA score, as well as IID for both groups before and after treatment were analyzed and compared. After treatment, the rehabilitation group displayed a significant improvement in swallowing function, while the control group did not. The efficacy rate (percentage of patients with excellent or effective results) of rehabilitation group was higher than that of control group (77% vs. 43%), and the difference was statistically significant (ϰ(2) = 5.32, p = 0.02). IID pretreatment and posttreatment did not show much difference in the rehabilitation group, while in the control group IID significantly decreased posttreatment (1.1 ± 0.36 cm vs.1.8 ± 0.56 cm, p = 0.001). Although the mean IID in patients of both groups decreased after the 3 month follow-up, the decrease in the rehabilitation group was less than that of the control group (0.19 ± 0.5 cm vs. 0.69 ± 0.56 cm, p = 0.004 ). The efficacy rate of trismus in the rehabilitation group was significantly higher than that of the control group (64% vs. 28%, ϰ(2) = 5.31, p = 0.02). Rehabilitation training can improve swallow function and slow down the progress of trismus in NPC patients following radiotherapy.

  18. Media violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantor, J

    2000-08-01

    Research on the effects of media violence is not well understood by the general public. Despite this fact, there is an overwhelming consensus in the scientific literature about the unhealthy effects of media violence. Meta-analyses show that media-violence viewing consistently is associated with higher levels of antisocial behavior, ranging from the trivial (imitative violence directed against toys) to the serious (criminal violence), with many consequential outcomes in between (acceptance of violence as a solution to problems, increased feelings of hostility, and the apparent delivery of painful stimulation to another person). Desensitization is another well-documented effect of viewing violence, which is observable in reduced arousal and emotional disturbance while witnessing violence, the reduced tendency to intervene in a fight, and less sympathy for the victims of violence. Although there is evidence that youth who are already violent are more likely to seek out violent entertainment, there is strong evidence that the relationship between violence viewing and antisocial behavior is bidirectional. There is growing evidence that media violence also engenders intense fear in children which often lasts days, months, and even years. The media's potential role in solutions to these problems is only beginning to be explored, in investigations examining the uses and effects of movie ratings, television ratings, and the V-chip, and the effects of media literacy programs and public education efforts. Future research should explore important individual differences in responses to media violence and effective ways to intervene in the negative effects.

  19. Supplementation freeze-thawed media with selenium protect adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells from freeze-thawed induced injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valadbeygi, Arash; Naji, Tahere; Pirnia, Afshin; Gholami, Mohammadreza

    2016-10-01

    Successful freezed-thaw of adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADMSCs) could be a major step in regenerative medicine as well as in the cloning of animal breeds. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of selenium on the optimizing of freezed-thaw media in the ADMSCs. ADMSCs were extracted from NMRI mice and purified with positive selection Monoclonal CD105 Antibody (PE) and negative selection Monoclonal CD31 and CD45 Antibody using MACS method as well as differentiation to adipose and bone tissue. ADMSCs were divided into four groups. ADMSCs were freezed-thaw under standard condition with or without the addition of 5 ng/ml selenium to both the cryopreservation and thawing solutions. Frozen cells were thawed after four months and viability and cytotoxicity of the cells were analyzed by the Trypan blue test and MTT assay respectively. RNA was extracted and cDNA was synthesized and the expression of apoptotic genes (P53, Fas, Bax, Caspase3, and Bcl2) was examined using Real time-PCR Rotor gene 2009. This study compares slow and rapid methods of cryopreservation. After thawing, viability of the cells treated with selenium was higher than the control group in rapid and slow cryopreserved ADMSCs. Also, the percentage of living cells in the slow cooling method was considerably more than with the rapid cooling method. After analysis of the results using Real time-PCR, the Bcl2 gene was shown to be expressed in both the rapid and slow cooling methods. In the rapid cooling group in addition to the BCL-2 gene, p53 was also expressed. It appears that selenium prevented the apoptotic genes from expression due to its anti-apoptotic effects. The slow cooling method is better and more optimized for ADMSCs protecting them from oxidative damage to a greater extent compared to the rapid cooling method. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Comprehensive Proteomic and Metabolomic Signatures of Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae-Induced Acute Otitis Media Reveal Bacterial Aerobic Respiration in an Immunosuppressed Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Alistair; Dubois, Laura G; St John-Williams, Lisa; Moseley, M Arthur; Hardison, Rachael L; Heimlich, Derek R; Stoddard, Alexander; Kerschner, Joseph E; Justice, Sheryl S; Thompson, J Will; Mason, Kevin M

    2016-03-01

    A thorough understanding of the molecular details of the interactions between bacteria and host are critical to ultimately prevent disease. Recent technological advances allow simultaneous analysis of host and bacterial protein and metabolic profiles from a single small tissue sample to provide insight into pathogenesis. We used the chinchilla model of human otitis media to determine, for the first time, the most expansive delineation of global changes in protein and metabolite profiles during an experimentally induced disease. After 48 h of infection with nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae, middle ear tissue lysates were analyzed by high-resolution quantitative two-dimensional liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Dynamic changes in 105 chinchilla proteins and 66 metabolites define the early proteomic and metabolomic signature of otitis media. Our studies indicate that establishment of disease coincides with actin morphogenesis, suppression of inflammatory mediators, and bacterial aerobic respiration. We validated the observed increase in the actin-remodeling complex, Arp2/3, and experimentally showed a role for Arp2/3 in nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae invasion. Direct inhibition of actin branch morphology altered bacterial invasion into host epithelial cells, and is supportive of our efforts to use the information gathered to modify outcomes of disease. The twenty-eight nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae proteins identified participate in carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism, redox homeostasis, and include cell wall-associated metabolic proteins. Quantitative characterization of the molecular signatures of infection will redefine our understanding of host response driven developmental changes during pathogenesis. These data represent the first comprehensive study of host protein and metabolite profiles in vivo in response to infection and show the feasibility of extensive characterization of host protein profiles during disease. Identification of

  1. Preschool Teachers Can Use a Media-Rich Curriculum to Prepare Low-Income Children for School Success: Results of a Randomized Controlled Trial. Summative Evaluation of the "Ready to Learn Initiative"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penuel, William R.; Pasnik, Shelley; Bates, Lauren; Townsend, Eve; Gallagher, Lawrence P.; Llorente, Carlin; Hupert, Naomi

    2009-01-01

    Described here is a study on the efficacy of a media-rich curriculum based on the idea that children can learn best from "media synergy," that is, when children have opportunities to learn a focused set of skills by engaging in repeated practice with them in many different formats and media. Participants in this study were low-income children ages…

  2. A Method of Erasing Data Using Random Number Generators

    OpenAIRE

    井上,正人

    2012-01-01

    Erasing data is an indispensable step for disposal of computers or external storage media. Except physical destruction, erasing data means writing random information on entire disk drives or media. We propose a method which erases data safely using random number generators. These random number generators create true random numbers based on quantum processes.

  3. High concentration (400 mgI/mL) versus low concentration (320 mgI/mL) iodinated contrast media in multi detector computed tomography of the liver: A randomized, single centre, non-inferiority study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rengo, Marco, E-mail: marco.rengo@gmail.com [Department of Radiological Sciences, Oncology and Pathology, University of Rome ' SAPIENZA' , Polo Pontino, I.C.O.T., Via Franco Faggiana 34, 04100 Latina (Italy); Caruso, Damiano, E-mail: dcaruso85@gmail.com [Department of Radiological Sciences, Oncology and Pathology, University of Rome ' SAPIENZA' , Polo Pontino, I.C.O.T., Via Franco Faggiana 34, 04100 Latina (Italy); De Cecco, Carlo N., E-mail: carlodececco@gmail.com [Department of Radiological Sciences, Oncology and Pathology, University of Rome ' SAPIENZA' , Polo Pontino, I.C.O.T., Via Franco Faggiana 34, 04100 Latina (Italy); Lucchesi, Paola, E-mail: paola.lucchesi@email.it [Department of Radiological Sciences, Oncology and Pathology, University of Rome ' SAPIENZA' , Polo Pontino, I.C.O.T., Via Franco Faggiana 34, 04100 Latina (Italy); Bellini, Davide, E-mail: bellinidavide29@gmail.com [Department of Radiological Sciences, Oncology and Pathology, University of Rome ' SAPIENZA' , Polo Pontino, I.C.O.T., Via Franco Faggiana 34, 04100 Latina (Italy); Maceroni, Marco Maria, E-mail: marcom.maceroni@gmail.com [Department of Radiological Sciences, Oncology and Pathology, University of Rome ' SAPIENZA' , Polo Pontino, I.C.O.T., Via Franco Faggiana 34, 04100 Latina (Italy); Ferrari, Riccardo, E-mail: ferraririccardo@gmail.com [Department of Radiological Sciences, San Giovanni Hospital, Via dell' Amba Aradam 9, 00184 Rome (Italy); Paolantonio, Pasquale, E-mail: paolantoniopasquale@hotmail.com [Department of Radiological Sciences, San Giovanni Hospital, Via dell' Amba Aradam 9, 00184 Rome (Italy); and others

    2012-11-15

    Objectives: To compare vascular and parenchymal contrast enhancement in multidetector computed tomography of the liver using two contrast media with different iodine concentration (Iodixanol 320 mgI/mL and Iomeprol 400 mgI/mL) and similar viscosity, using fixed total iodine volume (40 gI) and iodine delivery rate (1.6 gI/s). Methods: 110 patients were prospectively randomized into two groups. Group A received 125 mL of Iodixanol 320 and group B 100 mL of Iomeprol 400. Attenuation values were measured at the level of the aorta, portal vein and liver parenchyma on unenhanced, arterial, portal and equilibrium phases. A non inferiority test was performed on the differences between the two groups. An independent reader evaluated image quality. Results: The equivalence of the two CM was demonstrated in all measurements. Higher, but not statistically significant, attenuation values were obtained with Iomeprol 400 in the aorta during the arterial phase (305.3 HU versus 288.4 HU; P = 0.32) and with Iodixanol 320 in the liver parenchyma, during both portal (59.8 HU versus 65.5 HU; P = 0.78) and equilibrium (40.4 HU versus 41.8 HU; P = 0.55) phases. Conclusions: Iodixanol 320 and Iomeprol 400 injected at the same iodine delivery rate (1.6 gI/s) and total iodine load (40 gI) did not provide statistically significant differences in liver parenchymal and vascular contrast enhancement.

  4. Mass transport in fracture media: impact of the random function model assumed for fractures conductivity; Transporte de masa en medio fracturado: impacto del modelo estocastico de conductividad en las fracturas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capilla, J. E.; Rodrigo, J.; Gomez Hernandez, J. J.

    2003-07-01

    Characterizing the uncertainty of flow and mass transport models requires the definition of stochastic models to describe hydrodynamic parameters. Porosity and hydraulic conductivity (K) are two of these parameters that exhibit a high degree of spatial variability. K is usually the parameter whose variability influence to a more extended degree solutes movement. In fracture media, it is critical to properly characterize K in the most altered zones where flow and solutes migration tends to be concentrated. However, K measurements use to be scarce and sparse. This fact calls to consider stochastic models that allow quantifying the uncertainty of flow and mass transport predictions. This paper presents a convective transport problem solved in a 3D block of fractured crystalline rock. the case study is defined based on data from a real geological formation. As the scarcity of K data in fractures does not allow supporting classical multi Gaussian assumptions for K in fractures, the non multi Gaussian hypothesis has been explored, comparing mass transport results for alternative Gaussian and non-Gaussian assumptions. The latter hypothesis allows reproducing high spatial connectivity for extreme values of K. This feature is present in nature, might lead to reproduce faster solute pathways, and therefore should be modeled in order to obtain reasonably safe prediction of contaminants migration in a geological formation. The results obtained for the two alternative hypotheses show a remarkable impact of the K random function model in solutes movement. (Author) 9 refs.

  5. Effect of therapist-based constraint-induced therapy at home on motor control, motor performance and daily function in children with cerebral palsy: a randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chia-ling; Kang, Lin-ju; Hong, Wei-Hsien; Chen, Fei-Chuan; Chen, Hsieh-Ching; Wu, Ching-yi

    2013-03-01

    To determine the effect of therapist-based constraint-induced therapy at home on motor performance, daily function and reaching control for children with cerebral palsy. A single-blinded, randomized controlled trial. Forty-seven children (23 boys; 24 girls) with unilateral cerebral palsy, aged 6-12 years, were randomized to constraint-induced therapy (n = 24) or traditional rehabilitation (n = 23). Constraint-induced therapy involved intensive functional training of the more affected arm while the less affected arm was restrained. Traditional rehabilitation involved functional unilateral and bilateral arm training. Both groups received individualized therapist-based interventions at home for 3.5-4 hours/day, two days a week for four weeks. Motor performance and daily function were measured by the Peabody Developmental Motor Scale, Second Edition and the Pediatric Motor Activity Log. Reaching control was assessed by the kinematics of reaction time, movement time, movement unit and peak velocity. There were larger effects in favour of constraint-induced therapy on motor performance, daily function, and some aspects of reaching control compared with traditional rehabilitation. Children receiving constraint-induced therapy demonstrated higher scores for Peabody Developmental Motor Scale, Second Edition - Grasping (pretest mean ± SD, 39.9 ± 3.1; posttest, 44.1 ± 2.8; P Motor Activity Log (pretest, 1.8 ± 0.3; posttest, 2.5 ± 0.3; P control of reaching in children with unilateral cerebral palsy than traditional rehabilitation.

  6. Muscle Recruitment and Coordination following Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy with Electrical Stimulation on Children with Hemiplegic Cerebral Palsy: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaishou Xu

    Full Text Available To investigate changes of muscle recruitment and coordination following constraint-induced movement therapy, constraint-induced movement therapy plus electrical stimulation, and traditional occupational therapy in treating hand dysfunction.In a randomized, single-blind, controlled trial, children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy were randomly assigned to receive constraint-induced movement therapy (n = 22, constraint-induced movement therapy plus electrical stimulation (n = 23, or traditional occupational therapy (n = 23. Three groups received a 2-week hospital-based intervention and a 6-month home-based exercise program following hospital-based intervention. Constraint-induced movement therapy involved intensive functional training of the involved hand during which the uninvolved hand was constrained. Electrical stimulation was applied on wrist extensors of the involved hand. Traditional occupational therapy involved functional unimanual and bimanual training. All children underwent clinical assessments and surface electromyography (EMG at baseline, 2 weeks, 3 and 6 months after treatment. Surface myoelectric signals were integrated EMG, root mean square and cocontraction ratio. Clinical measures were grip strength and upper extremity functional test.Constraint-induced movement therapy plus electrical stimulation group showed both a greater rate of improvement in integrated EMG of the involved wrist extensors and cocontraction ratio compared to the other two groups at 3 and 6 months, as well as improving in root mean square of the involved wrist extensors than traditional occupational therapy group (p<0.05. Positive correlations were found between both upper extremity functional test scores and integrated EMG of the involved wrist as well as grip strength and integrated EMG of the involved wrist extensors (p<0.05.Constraint-induced movement therapy plus electrical stimulation is likely to produce the best outcome in improving muscle recruitment

  7. Porous media geometry and transports

    CERN Document Server

    Adler, Pierre

    1992-01-01

    The goal of ""Porous Media: Geometry and Transports"" is to provide the basis of a rational and modern approach to porous media. This book emphasizes several geometrical structures (spatially periodic, fractal, and random to reconstructed) and the three major single-phase transports (diffusion, convection, and Taylor dispersion).""Porous Media"" serves various purposes. For students it introduces basic information on structure and transports. Engineers will find this book useful as a readily accessible assemblage of al the major experimental results pertaining to single-phase tr

  8. Conditioned Media from Human Adipose Tissue-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Umbilical Cord-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Efficiently Induced the Apoptosis and Differentiation in Human Glioma Cell Lines In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs have an intrinsic property for homing towards tumor sites and can be used as tumor-tropic vectors for tumor therapy. But very limited studies investigated the antitumor properties of MSCs themselves. In this study we investigated the antiglioma properties of two easily accessible MSCs, namely, human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs and umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSCs. We found (1 MSC conditioned media can significantly inhibit the growth of human U251 glioma cell line; (2 MSC conditioned media can significantly induce apoptosis in human U251 cell line; (3 real-time PCR experiments showed significant upregulation of apoptotic genes of both caspase-3 and caspase-9 and significant downregulation of antiapoptotic genes such as survivin and XIAP after MSC conditioned media induction in U 251 cells; (4 furthermore, MSCs conditioned media culture induced rapid and complete differentiation in U251 cells. These results indicate MSCs can efficiently induce both apoptosis and differentiation in U251 human glioma cell line. Whereas UC-MSCs are more efficient for apoptosis induction than ASCs, their capability of differentiation induction is not distinguishable from each other. Our findings suggest MSCs themselves have favorable antitumor characteristics and should be further explored in future glioma therapy.

  9. From Augmentation Media to Meme Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yuzuru

    Computers as meta media are now evolving from augmentation media vehicles to meme media vehicles. While an augmentation media system provides a seamlessly integrated environment of various tools and documents, meme media system provides further functions to edit and distribute tools and documents. Documents and tools on meme media can easily…

  10. Community Media: Muting the Democratic Media Discourse?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carpentier, N.; Lie, R.; Servaes, J.

    2003-01-01

    Focuses on the concept of community media. Components that construct the identity of community media; Multi-theoretical approaches for analysis of community media; Definition of community media based on the concept of alternative media; Link between community media and civil society; Problems faced

  11. OTITIS MEDIA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    to managers of Essential Medicines programmes. ... media (AOM) in children as an example of such a condition, in order Lo explore these challenges more closely. ... pain, fever or deafness) and the ... at 15 and 30 minutes after each morning.

  12. Media violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, E; Strasburger, V C

    1998-04-01

    American media are the most violent in the world, and American society is now paying a high price in terms of real life violence. Research has confirmed that mass media violence contributes to aggressive behavior, fear, and desensitization of violence. Television, movies, music videos, computer/video games are pervasive media and represent important influences on children and adolescents. Portraying rewards and punishments and showing the consequences of violence are probably the two most essential contextual factors for viewers as they interpret the meaning of what they are viewing on television. Public health efforts have emphasized public education, media literacy campaign for children and parents, and an increased use of technology to prevent access to certain harmful medial materials.

  13. Media democracy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pels, D.

    2008-01-01

    The present article compendiously presents the interlinked and abruptly developing processes of media democracy and political matters’ personalization. The writer expressly opts for these processes which can radically rejuvenate communication and trust among citizens and politicians and therefore

  14. Media Bias

    OpenAIRE

    Sendhil Mullainathan; Andrei Shleifer

    2002-01-01

    There are two different types of media bias. One bias, which we refer to as ideology, reflects a news outlet's desire to affect reader opinions in a particular direction. The second bias, which we refer to as spin, reflects the outlet's attempt to simply create a memorable story. We examine competition among media outlets in the presence of these biases. Whereas competition can eliminate the effect of ideological bias, it actually exaggerates the incentive to spin stories.

  15. Social Media

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Anlässlich der 10. Wissenschaftlichen Tagung „Soziale Medien“ am 27. und 28. Juni 2013 im Statistischen Bundesamt in Wiesbaden und in Fortsetzung des 2010 erschienenen Recherche Spezial Web 2.0 – Alle machen mit! werden in dieser Ausgabe in sechs Kapiteln Nachweise zu Veröffentlichungen und Forschungsprojekte der letzten drei Jahre zusammengestellt, die sich mit der Rolle von Social Media in verschiedenen Nutzungskontexten befassen. Social-Media-Dienste sind mittlerweile fester Bestandtei...

  16. Aerobic training abolishes ambulatory blood pressure increase induced by estrogen therapy: a double blind randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Crivaldo Gomes; Rosas, Fabrício Collares; Oneda, Bruna; Labes, Eliana; Tinucci, Taís; Abrahão, Sandra Balieiro; da Fonseca, Angela Maggio; Mion, Decio; Forjaz, Cláudia Lúcia de Moraes

    2011-06-01

    Emerging data reveal that oral estrogen therapy can increase clinic blood pressure (BP) in post-menopausal women; however, it is important to establish its effects on ambulatory BP, which is a better predictor for target-organ damage. Besides estrogen therapy, aerobic training is widely recommended for post-menopausal women, and it can decrease ambulatory BP levels. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of aerobic training and estrogen therapy on the ambulatory BP of post-menopausal women. Forty seven healthy hysterectomized women were randomly divided (in a double-blind manner) into 4 groups: placebo-control (PLA-CO=12), estrogen therapy-control (ET-CO=14), placebo-aerobic training (PLA-AT=12), and estrogen therapy-aerobic training (ET-AT=09). The ET groups received estradiol valerate (1 mg/day) and the AT groups performed cycle ergometer, 3×/week at moderate intensity. Hormonal status (blood analysis), maximal cardiopulmonary exercise test (VO(2) peak) and ambulatory BP (24-h, daytime and nighttime) was evaluated before and 6 months after interventions. A significant increase in VO(2) peak was observed only in women who participated in aerobic training groups (+4.6±1.0 ml kg(-1) min(-1), P=0.00). Follicle-stimulating hormone was a significant decreased in the ET groups (-18.65±5.19 pg/ml, P=0.00), and it was accompanied by an increase in circulating estrogen (56.1±6.6 pg/ml). A significant increase was observed in the ET groups for daytime (P=0.01) and nighttime systolic BP (P=0.01), as well as nighttime diastolic BP (P=0.02). However, daytime diastolic BP was increased only in the ET-CO group (+3.4±1.2 mmHg, P=0.04), and did not change in any other groups. No significant effect was found in ambulatory heart rate. In conclusion, aerobic training abolished the increase of daytime ambulatory BP induced by estrogen therapy in hysterectomized, healthy, normotensive and postmenopausal women. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Efficacy and safety of N-acetylcysteine in prevention of noise induced hearing loss: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopke, Richard; Slade, Martin D; Jackson, Ronald; Hammill, Tanisha; Fausti, Stephen; Lonsbury-Martin, Brenda; Sanderson, Alicia; Dreisbach, Laura; Rabinowitz, Peter; Torre, Peter; Balough, Ben

    2015-05-01

    Despite a robust hearing conservation program, military personnel continue to be at high risk for noise induced hearing loss (NIHL). For more than a decade, a number of laboratories have investigated the use of antioxidants as a safe and effective adjunct to hearing conservation programs. Of the antioxidants that have been investigated, N-acetylcysteine (NAC) has consistently reduced permanent NIHL in the laboratory, but its clinical efficacy is still controversial. This study provides a prospective, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trial investigating the safety profile and the efficacy of NAC to prevent hearing loss in a military population after weapons training. Of the 566 total study subjects, 277 received NAC while 289 were given placebo. The null hypothesis for the rate of STS was not rejected based on the measured results. While no significant differences were found for the primary outcome, rate of threshold shifts, the right ear threshold shift rate difference did approach significance (p = 0.0562). No significant difference was found in the second primary outcome, percentage of subjects experiencing an adverse event between placebo and NAC groups (26.7% and 27.4%, respectively, p = 0.4465). Results for the secondary outcome, STS rate in the trigger hand ear, did show a significant difference (34.98% for placebo-treated, 27.14% for NAC-treated, p-value = 0.0288). Additionally, post-hoc analysis showed significant differences in threshold shift rates when handedness was taken into account. While the secondary outcomes and post-hoc analysis suggest that NAC treatment is superior to the placebo, the present study design failed to confirm this. The lack of significant differences in overall hearing loss between the treatment and placebo groups may be due to a number of factors, including suboptimal dosing, premature post-exposure audiograms, or differences in risk between ears or subjects. Based on secondary outcomes and post hoc

  18. Short-term Rosuvastatin Treatment for the Prevention of Contrast-induced Acute Kidney Injury in Patients Receiving Moderate or High Volumes of Contrast Media: A Sub-analysis of the TRACK-D Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Zhang; Yi Li; Gui-Zhou Tao; Yun-Dai Chen; Tao-Hong Hu; Xue-Bin Cao; Quan-Min Jing

    2015-01-01

    Background:Current randomized trials have demonstrated the effects of short-term rosuvastatin therapy in preventing contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CIAKI).However,the consistency of these effects on patients administered different volumes of contrast media is unknown.Methods:In the TRACK-D trial,2998 patients with type 2 diabetes and concomitant chronic kidney disease (CKD) who underwent coronary/peripheral arterial angiography with or without percutaneous intervention were randomized to short-term (2 days before and 3 days after procedure) rosuvastatin therapy or standard-of-care.This prespecified analysis compared the effects of rosuvastatin versus standard therapy in patients exposed to (moderate contrast volume [MCV],200-300 ml,n =712) or (high contrast volume [HCV],≥300 ml,n =220).The primary outcome was the incidence of CIAKI.The secondary outcome was a composite of death,dialysis/hemofiltration or worsened heart failure at 30 days.Results:Rosuvastatin treatment was associated with a significant reduction in CIAKI compared with the controls (2.1% vs.4.4%,P =0.050) in the overall cohort and in patients with MCV (1.7% vs.4.5%,P =0.029),whereas no benefit was observed in patients with HCV (3.4% vs.3.9%,P =0.834).The incidence of secondary outcomes was significantly lower in the rosuvastatin group compared with control group (2.7% vs.5.3%,P =0.049) in the overall cohort,but it was similar between the patients with MCV (2.0% vs.4.2%,P =0.081) or HCV (5.1% vs.8.8%,P =0.273).Conclusions:Periprocedural short-term rosuvastatin treatment is effective in reducing CIAKI and adverse clinical events for patients with diabetes and CKD after their exposure to a moderate volume of contrast medium.

  19. Genetic Screening for Bacterial Mutants in Liquid Growth Media By Fluorescence-Activated Cell Sorting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuaita, Basel H.; Withey, Jeffrey H.

    2010-01-01

    Many bacterial pathogens have defined in vitro virulence inducing conditions in liquid media which lead to production of virulence factors important during an infection. Identifying mutants that no longer respond to virulence inducing conditions will increase our understanding of bacterial pathogenesis. However, traditional genetic screens require growth on solid media. Bacteria in a single colony are in every phase of the growth curve, which complicates the analysis and make screens for growth phase-specific mutants problematic. Here, we utilize fluorescence-activated cell sorting in conjunction with random transposon mutagenesis to isolate bacteria grown in liquid media that are defective in virulence activation. This method permits analysis of an entire bacterial population in real time and selection of individual bacterial mutants with the desired gene expression profile at any time point after induction. We have used this method to identify Vibrio cholerae mutants defective in virulence induction. PMID:21094189

  20. Controlling multi-wave mixing signals via photonic band gap of electromagnetically induced absorption grating in atomic media

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Yiqi; Yao, Xin; Zhang, Zhaoyang; Chen, Haixia; Zhang, Huaibin; Zhang, Yanpeng

    2013-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate dressed multi-wave mixing (MWM) and the reflection of the probe beam due to electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA) grating can coexist in a five-level atomic ensemble. The reflection is derived from the photonic band gap (PBG) of EIA grating, which is much broader than the PBG of EIT grating. Therefore, EIA-type PBG can reflect more energy from probe than EIT-type PBG does, which can effectively affect the MWM signal. The EIA-type as well as EIT-type PBG can be controlled by multiple parameters including the frequency detunings, propagation angles and powers of the involved light fields. Also, the EIA-type PBG by considering both the linear and third-order nonlinear refractive indices is also investigated. The theoretical analysis agrees well with the experimental results. This investigation has potential applications in all-optical communication and information processing.

  1. A network meta-analysis on randomized trials focusing on the preventive effect of statins on contrast-induced nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peruzzi, Mariangela; De Luca, Leonardo; Thomsen, Henrik S

    2014-01-01

    Contrast-induced nephropathy is a common complication of iodinated contrast administration. Statins may reduce the risk of contrast-induced nephropathy, but data remain inconclusive. We summarized the evidence based on statins for the prevention of contrast-induced nephropathy with a network meta...

  2. Inflammatory markers in meconium induced lung injury in neonates and effect of steroids on their levels: A randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Tripathi S; Saili A; Dutta R

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the levels of TNFα and IL-1β in tracheal aspirates of neonates with meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS) and to ascertain whether the use of steroids by systemic or nebulized routes suppresses the levels of these inflammatory markers. Methods: This was a double blind, randomized, controlled, prospective, interventional study done over one year period in the neonatal unit of the Lady Hardinge Medical College. Fifty-one babies of MAS which were randomly distr...

  3. Survival of primary human hepatocytes and death of induced pluripotent stem cells in media lacking glucose and arginine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minoru Tomizawa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tumorigenicity is an associated risk for transplantation of hepatocytes differentiated from human induced pluripotent stem (hiPS cells. Hepatocytes express the enzymes galactokinase and ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC to aid in their own survival. However, hiPS cells do not express these enzymes, and therefore, are not be expected to survive in a medium containing galactose and ornithine and lacking glucose and arginine. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR was performed to analyze the expression of galactokinase 1 (GALK11 and GALK2, ornithine carbamyltransferase, and phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH. The hiPS cell line 201B7 was cultured in hepatocyte selection medium (HSM, which lacks glucose and arginine but contains galactose and ornithine. Furthermore, microscopic analysis of the cultured cells was performed after hematoxylin and eosin (H&E staining, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL. The hiPS cells were immunostained to assess their pluripotency in HSM. In addition, the primary human hepatocytes were cultured with or without hiPS cells in HSM. RESULTS: The expression levels of GALK1, GALK2, OTC, and PAH in 201B7 were 22.2±5.0 (average ± standard deviation, 14.2% ±1.1%, 1.2% ±0.2%, and 8.4% ±0.7% respectively, compared with those in the adult liver. The hiPS cell population diminished when cultured in HSM and completely disappeared after 3 days. The cultured cells showed condensation or fragmentation of their nuclei, thereby suggesting apoptosis. TUNEL staining confirmed that the cells had undergone apoptosis. The 201B7 cells were positive for Nanog, SSEA-4, and TRA-1-60. The primary human hepatocytes survived when cultured alone in HSM and when co-cultured with hiPS cells. CONCLUSION: Therefore, HSM is and ideal medium for eliminating hiPS cells and purifying hepatocytes without inducing any damage.

  4. Calcium H & K and sodium D absorption induced by the interstellar and circumgalactic media of the Milky Way

    CERN Document Server

    Murga, Maria; Ménard, Brice; Lan, Ting-Wen

    2015-01-01

    We map out calcium II & sodium I absorption (Fraunhofer H, K & D lines) induced by both the interstellar medium and the circumgalactic medium of the Milky Way. Our measurements cover more than $9000$ deg$^2$ and make use of about $300,000$ extragalactic spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We present absorption maps for these two species and then compare their distributions to those of neutral hydrogen and dust. We show that the abundance of Na I with respect to neutral hydrogen stays roughly constant in different environments, while that of Ca II decreases with hydrogen column density. Studying how these tracers vary as a function of velocity, we show that, on average, the N(Na I)/N(Ca II) ratio decreases at higher velocity with respect to the local standard of rest, similar to the local Routly-Spitzer effect but seen on Galactic scale. We show that it is likely caused by higher gas/dust density at lower velocity. Finally, we show that Galactic Ca II and Na I absorption needs to be taken into a...

  5. Therapeutic effect of pirenzepine for clozapine-induced hypersalivation: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Y M; Lin, C C; Chen, J Y; Liu, W C

    2001-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the efficacy of pirenzepine in the treatment of clozapine-induced hypersalivation. Pirenzepine is reported to counteract hypersalivation by its selective antagonistic activity on the M4-muscarinic receptor, which is stimulated by clozapine. Twenty patients with clozapine-induced hypersalivation underwent a random-order, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over trial which lasted 8 weeks each for the pirenzepine and placebo investigations, with a 4-week washout period in between. The severity of hypersalivation was assessed using an objective measure: saliva production monitored through the diameter of wetted surface on tissue paper placed over the patient's pillow. Our study showed that pirenzepine had no significant therapeutic effect on hypersalivation compared with placebo, suggesting that hypersalivation induced by clozapine might have a neurobiological basis other than the M4-muscarinic receptor.

  6. Social media management and media environment

    OpenAIRE

    Šiđanin Iva

    2012-01-01

    The paper deals with the system of services that social media management can offer to a variety of users. As social media systems are emerging, social media management can strengthen teams in social media and help to manage numerous social channels and distribution of social information from one place. Social media management is a system of procedures that are used to manage the flow of information in the environment of social media. This involves connecting with social media like Facebook, T...

  7. A pore scale investigation of crude oil distribution and removal from homogeneous porous media during surfactant-induced remediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Jaydeep; Tick, Geoffrey R

    2013-12-01

    A pore-scale study was conducted to understand interfacial processes contributing to the removal of crude oils from a homogeneous porous medium during surfactant-induced remediation. Synchrotron X-ray microtomography (SXM) was used to obtain high-resolution three-dimensional images of the two-fluid-phase oil/water system, and quantify temporal changes in oil blob distribution, blob morphology, and blob surface area before and after sequential surfactant flooding events. The reduction of interfacial tension in conjunction with the sufficient increase in viscous forces as a result of surfactant flushing was most likely responsible for mobilization and recovery of the two lighter oil fractions. However, corresponding increases in viscous forces as a result of a reduction of interfacial tension were insufficient to initiate and maintain the displacement (recovery) of the heavy crude oil fraction during surfactant flushing. In contrast to the heavy oil system, changes in trapping number for the lighter fraction crude oils were sufficient to initiate mobilization as a result of surfactant flushing. Both light and medium oil fractions showed an increase in the number of blobs and total blob surface area, and a reduction in the total volume after 2 pore volumes (PVs) of surfactant flooding. This increase in surface area was attributed to the change in blob morphology from spherical to more complex non-spherical ganglia shape characteristics. Moreover, the increase in the number of oil blobs from larger to smaller particles after surfactant flushing may have contributed to the greater cumulative oil surface area. Complete recovery of light and medium oil fractions resulted after 5 PVs of surfactant flooding, whereas the displacement efficiency of heavy-oil fraction was severely limited, even after extended periods of flushing. The results of these experiments demonstrate the utility of SXM for quantifying pore-scale interfacial characteristics for specific crude

  8. Impacts on Breastfeeding Practices of At-Scale Strategies That Combine Intensive Interpersonal Counseling, Mass Media, and Community Mobilization: Results of Cluster-Randomized Program Evaluations in Bangladesh and Viet Nam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Purnima; Nguyen, Phuong Hong; Saha, Kuntal Kumar; Khaled, Adiba; Kennedy, Andrew; Tran, Lan Mai; Sanghvi, Tina; Hajeebhoy, Nemat; Baker, Jean; Alayon, Silvia; Afsana, Kaosar; Haque, Raisul; Frongillo, Edward A; Ruel, Marie T; Rawat, Rahul

    2016-10-01

    Despite recommendations supporting optimal breastfeeding, the number of women practicing exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) remains low, and few interventions have demonstrated implementation and impact at scale. Alive & Thrive was implemented over a period of 6 y (2009-2014) and aimed to improve breastfeeding practices through intensified interpersonal counseling (IPC), mass media (MM), and community mobilization (CM) intervention components delivered at scale in the context of policy advocacy (PA) in Bangladesh and Viet Nam. In Bangladesh, IPC was delivered through a large non-governmental health program; in Viet Nam, it was integrated into government health facilities. This study evaluated the population-level impact of intensified IPC, MM, CM, and PA (intensive) compared to standard nutrition counseling and less intensive MM, CM, and PA (non-intensive) on breastfeeding practices in these two countries. A cluster-randomized evaluation design was employed in each country. For the evaluation sample, 20 sub-districts in Bangladesh and 40 communes in Viet Nam were randomized to either the intensive or the non-intensive group. Cross-sectional surveys (n ~ 500 children 0-5.9 mo old per group per country) were implemented at baseline (June 7-August 29, 2010, in Viet Nam; April 28-June 26, 2010, in Bangladesh) and endline (June 16-August 30, 2014, in Viet Nam; April 20-June 23, 2014, in Bangladesh). Difference-in-differences estimates (DDEs) of impact were calculated, adjusting for clustering. In Bangladesh, improvements were significantly greater in the intensive compared to the non-intensive group for the proportion of women who reported practicing EBF in the previous 24 h (DDE 36.2 percentage points [pp], 95% CI 21.0-51.5, p breastfeeding (EIBF) (16.7 pp, 95% CI 2.8-30.6, p = 0.021; 63.7% to 94.2%). In Viet Nam, EBF increases were greater in the intensive group (27.9 pp, 95% CI 17.7-38.1, p breastfeeding practices in Bangladesh and Viet Nam than standard counseling with

  9. Scattering and Propagation in Random Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    analyasur do front Wondo. Lintenait6 a2,(r) data la pupill* 3o calculo & partir des danukea issues Vun aaaalysour do Hartmsar-Shack come Ie moyonnne des...harmoniques apatileux at 1cmn suppose done lax calculo quo Is ,-ugositli d, la, surface eat intdrleurea Isb imgueur d’ando do champ, dlectromaqndtique in’ýLdent...k 10 An(P.z)dx (3) an eat Is fluctuation do lindico du milieu caus~o par Ion variations do I& donsito Glectroniquo ANg. an so calculo do I& faqon

  10. Media Training

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2009-01-01

    With the LHC starting up soon, the world's media are again turning their attention to CERN. We're all likely to be called upon to explain what is happening at CERN to media, friends and neighbours. The seminar will be given by BBC television news journalists Liz Pike and Nadia Marchant, and will deal with the kind of questions we're likely to be confronted with through the restart period. The training is open for everybody. Make sure you arrive early enough to get a seat - there are only 200 seats in the Globe. The session will also be webcast: http://webcast.cern.ch/

  11. Graphene random laser

    CERN Document Server

    Marini, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Manipulating and controlling the optical energy flow inside random media is a research frontier of photonics and the basis of novel laser designs. In particular, light amplification in randomly dispersed active inclusions under external pumping has been extensively investigated, although it still lacks external tunability, reproducibility, and control over the beam spatial pattern, thus hindering its application in practical devices. Here we show that a graphene random metamaterial provides the means to overcome these limitations through its extraordinarily-low threshold for saturable absorption. The nonlinear properties of nano-graphene combined with an optically pumped gain medium allow us to controllably tune the system from chaotic to stable single-mode lasing. Our results hold great potential for the development of single-mode cavity-free lasers with engineered beam patterns in disordered media.

  12. Efficacy of Sucralfate Mouth Wash in Prevention of 5-fluorouracil Induced Oral Mucositis: A Prospective, Randomized, Double-Blind, Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ala, Shahram; Saeedi, Majid; Janbabai, Ghasem; Ganji, Reza; Azhdari, Elham; Shiva, Afshin

    2016-01-01

    Sucralfate has been used for the prevention and treatment of radiotherapy- and chemotherapy-induced stomatitis and mucositis in a number of studies, but the results are contradictory. To answer such discrepancies, the present study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of sucralfate mouthwash in prevention of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-induced oral mucositis in patients with gastrointestinal malignancies. Patients with gastrointestinal cancers receiving 5-FU-based chemotherapy regimens were included in this randomized, blinded, controlled trial and were randomly allocated to either sucralfate mouthwash (every 6 h) or placebo. The patients were visited at fifth and tenth day of trial; the presence and severity of oral mucositis and the intensity of pain were assessed. The patients receiving sucralfate experienced lower frequency and severity of mucositis (76% vs. 38.5%, P = 0.005 and 84 vs. 38.5%, P oral mucositis in patients with gastrointestinal malignancies compared with placebo, indicating its efficacy in the prevention of chemotherapy-induced mucositis.

  13. Prophylactic use of pregabalin for prevention of succinylcholine-induced fasciculation and myalgia: a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinit K. Srivastava

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: Succinylcholine is commonly used to achieve profound neuromuscular blockade of rapid onset and short duration. OBJECTIVE: The present study compared the efficacy of pregabalin for prevention of succinylcholine-induced fasciculation and myalgia. DESIGN: Prospective, randomized, placebo controlled, double blinded study. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients of both genders undergoing elective spine surgery were randomly assigned to two groups. Patients in Group P (pregabalin group received 150 mg of pregabalin orally 1 h prior to induction of anesthesia with sips of water and patients in Group C (control group received placebo. Anesthesia was induced with fentanyl 1.5 mcg/kg, propofol 1.5-2.0 mg/kg followed by succinylcholine 1.5 mg/kg. The intensity of fasciculations was assessed by an observer blinded to the group allotment of the patient on a 4-point scale. A blinded observer recorded postoperative myalgia grade after 24 h of surgery. Patients were provided patient-controlled analgesia with fentanyl for postoperative pain relief. RESULTS: Demographic data of both groups were comparable (p > 0.05. The incidence of muscle fasciculation's was not significant between two groups (p = 0.707, while more patients in group C had moderate to severe fasciculation's compared to group P (p = 0.028. The incidence and severity of myalgia were significantly lower in group P (p < 0.05. CONCLUSION: Pregabalin 150 mg prevents succinylcholine-induced fasciculations and myalgia and also decreases the fentanyl consumption in elective sine surgery.

  14. Effectiveness of polaprezinc for low-dose aspirin-induced small-bowel mucosal injuries as evaluated by capsule endoscopy: a pilot randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watari, Ikue; Oka, Shiro; Tanaka, Shinji; Aoyama, Taiki; Imagawa, Hiroki; Shishido, Takayoshi; Yoshida, Shigeto; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2013-07-04

    Treatment of low-dose aspirin (LDA)-induced small-bowel injury has not been established. Polaprezinc, a chelate of zinc and L-carnosine, may be efficacious for such injury. We conducted a pilot randomized controlled study to investigate whether polaprezinc is effective against LDA-induced small-bowel injuries. Consecutive patients under long-term (>3 months) LDA treatment and who agreed to participate in our study underwent initial capsule endoscopy (CE). Patients with LDA-induced small-bowel injury apparent upon initial CE (n = 20) were randomized into a polaprezinc (150 mg/day for 4 weeks) group and a control (no polaprezinc treatment) group. All underwent follow-up CE after 4 weeks. Changes in the number and characteristics of small-bowel mucosal injuries were compared within and between the two groups. The median number of reddened lesions and erosions/ulcers upon follow-up CE in the polaprezinc group significantly decreased (P < 0.05). However, there was no significant difference in the median number of reddened lesions and erosions/ulcers upon follow-up CE in the control group. Co-administration of polaprezinc may be effective against small-bowel mucosal injury associated with long-term LDA therapy.

  15. Intradermally Administered Yellow Fever Vaccine at Reduced Dose Induces a Protective Immune Response: A Randomized Controlled Non-Inferiority Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.G. Roukens (Guy); A.C.Th.M. Vossen (Ann); P.J. Bredenbeek (Peter); J.T. van Dissel (Jaap); L.G. Visser

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground:Implementation of yellow fever vaccination is currently hampered by limited supply of vaccine. An alternative route of administration with reduced amounts of vaccine but without loss of vaccine efficacy would boost vaccination programmes.Methods and Findings:A randomized, cont

  16. An Ecological Approach of Constraint Induced Movement Therapy for 2-3-Year-Old Children: A Randomized Control Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliasson, Ann-Christin; Shaw, Karin; Berg, Elisabeth; Krumlinde-Sundholm, Lena

    2011-01-01

    The aim was to evaluate the effect of Eco-CIMT in young children with unilateral cerebral palsy in a randomized controlled crossover design. The training was implemented within the regular pediatric services, provided by the child's parents and/or preschool teacher and supervised by the child's regular therapist. Methods: Twenty-five children…

  17. Diet-induced weight loss, exercise, and chronic inflammation in older, obese adults: a randomized controlled clinical trial

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nicklas, Barbara J; Ambrosius, Walter; Messier, Stephen P; Miller, Gary D; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Loeser, Richard F; Palla, Shana; Bleecker, Eugene; Pahor, Marco

    2004-01-01

    .... Three hundred sixteen community-dwelling, older (> or = 60 y), overweight or obese [body mass index (in kg/m2) > or = 28], sedentary men and women with radiographic evidence of knee osteoarthritis were randomly assigned to four 18-mo treatments...

  18. An Ecological Approach of Constraint Induced Movement Therapy for 2-3-Year-Old Children: A Randomized Control Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliasson, Ann-Christin; Shaw, Karin; Berg, Elisabeth; Krumlinde-Sundholm, Lena

    2011-01-01

    The aim was to evaluate the effect of Eco-CIMT in young children with unilateral cerebral palsy in a randomized controlled crossover design. The training was implemented within the regular pediatric services, provided by the child's parents and/or preschool teacher and supervised by the child's regular therapist. Methods: Twenty-five children…

  19. Coincident resection at both ends of random, γ-induced double-strand breaks requires MRX (MRN, Sae2 (Ctp1, and Mre11-nuclease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James W Westmoreland

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Resection is an early step in homology-directed recombinational repair (HDRR of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs. Resection enables strand invasion as well as reannealing following DNA synthesis across a DSB to assure efficient HDRR. While resection of only one end could result in genome instability, it has not been feasible to address events at both ends of a DSB, or to distinguish 1- versus 2-end resections at random, radiation-induced "dirty" DSBs or even enzyme-induced "clean" DSBs. Previously, we quantitatively addressed resection and the role of Mre11/Rad50/Xrs2 complex (MRX at random DSBs in circular chromosomes within budding yeast based on reduced pulsed-field gel electrophoretic mobility ("PFGE-shift". Here, we extend PFGE analysis to a second dimension and demonstrate unique patterns associated with 0-, 1-, and 2-end resections at DSBs, providing opportunities to examine coincidence of resection. In G2-arrested WT, Δrad51 and Δrad52 cells deficient in late stages of HDRR, resection occurs at both ends of γ-DSBs. However, for radiation-induced and I-SceI-induced DSBs, 1-end resections predominate in MRX (MRN null mutants with or without Ku70. Surprisingly, Sae2 (Ctp1/CtIP and Mre11 nuclease-deficient mutants have similar responses, although there is less impact on repair. Thus, we provide direct molecular characterization of coincident resection at random, radiation-induced DSBs and show that rapid and coincident initiation of resection at γ-DSBs requires MRX, Sae2 protein, and Mre11 nuclease. Structural features of MRX complex are consistent with coincident resection being due to an ability to interact with both DSB ends to directly coordinate resection. Interestingly, coincident resection at clean I-SceI-induced breaks is much less dependent on Mre11 nuclease or Sae2, contrary to a strong dependence on MRX complex, suggesting different roles for these functions at "dirty" and clean DSB ends. These approaches apply to resection at

  20. Coincident resection at both ends of random, γ-induced double-strand breaks requires MRX (MRN, Sae2 (Ctp1, and Mre11-nuclease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James W Westmoreland

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Resection is an early step in homology-directed recombinational repair (HDRR of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs. Resection enables strand invasion as well as reannealing following DNA synthesis across a DSB to assure efficient HDRR. While resection of only one end could result in genome instability, it has not been feasible to address events at both ends of a DSB, or to distinguish 1- versus 2-end resections at random, radiation-induced "dirty" DSBs or even enzyme-induced "clean" DSBs. Previously, we quantitatively addressed resection and the role of Mre11/Rad50/Xrs2 complex (MRX at random DSBs in circular chromosomes within budding yeast based on reduced pulsed-field gel electrophoretic mobility ("PFGE-shift". Here, we extend PFGE analysis to a second dimension and demonstrate unique patterns associated with 0-, 1-, and 2-end resections at DSBs, providing opportunities to examine coincidence of resection. In G2-arrested WT, Δrad51 and Δrad52 cells deficient in late stages of HDRR, resection occurs at both ends of γ-DSBs. However, for radiation-induced and I-SceI-induced DSBs, 1-end resections predominate in MRX (MRN null mutants with or without Ku70. Surprisingly, Sae2 (Ctp1/CtIP and Mre11 nuclease-deficient mutants have similar responses, although there is less impact on repair. Thus, we provide direct molecular characterization of coincident resection at random, radiation-induced DSBs and show that rapid and coincident initiation of resection at γ-DSBs requires MRX, Sae2 protein, and Mre11 nuclease. Structural features of MRX complex are consistent with coincident resection being due to an ability to interact with both DSB ends to directly coordinate resection. Interestingly, coincident resection at clean I-SceI-induced breaks is much less dependent on Mre11 nuclease or Sae2, contrary to a strong dependence on MRX complex, suggesting different roles for these functions at "dirty" and clean DSB ends. These approaches apply to resection at

  1. Streaming Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulley, John

    2009-01-01

    At a time when the evolutionary pace of new media resembles the real-time mutation of certain microorganisms, the age-old question of how best to connect with constituents can seem impossibly complex--even for an elite institution plugged into the motherboard of Silicon Valley. Identifying the most effective vehicle for reaching a particular…

  2. Otitis media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rovers, MM; Schilder, AGM; Zielhuis, GA; Rosenfeld, RM

    2004-01-01

    Otitis media (OM) continues to be one of the most common childhood infections and is a major cause of morbidity in children. The pathogenesis of OM is multifactorial, involving the adaptive and native immune system, Eustachian-tube dysfunction, viral and bacterial load, and genetic and environmental

  3. Streaming Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulley, John

    2009-01-01

    At a time when the evolutionary pace of new media resembles the real-time mutation of certain microorganisms, the age-old question of how best to connect with constituents can seem impossibly complex--even for an elite institution plugged into the motherboard of Silicon Valley. Identifying the most effective vehicle for reaching a particular…

  4. On Random Rough Sets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weizhi Wu

    2006-01-01

    In this paper,the concept of a random rough set which includes the mechanisms of numeric and non-numeric aspects of uncertain knowledge is introduced. It is proved that for any belief structure and its inducing belief and plausibility measures there exists a random approximation space such that the associated lower and upper probabilities are respectively the given belief and plausibility measures, and vice versa. And for a random approximation space generated from a totally random set, its inducing lower and upper probabilities are respectively a pair of necessity and possibility measures.

  5. Development of contrast-induced acute kidney injury after elective contrast media exposure in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: effect of albuminuria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-qing Yang

    Full Text Available The influence of albuminuria and urinary pH on the development of contrast-induced acute kidney disease (CI-AKI in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM after elective coronary angiography (CAG or percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI is unknown.CI-AKI was defined as an increase in serum creatinine >26.4 µmol/L or ≥50% of baseline value within 48 hours after contrast media exposure. Demographics, traditional risk factors, clinical outcomes and CI-AKI incidence were compared between groups. Univariate analysis and multivariate logistic regression were performed to assess risk factors of CI-AKI.We observed 597 patients with T2DM after CAG or PCI. Patients were divided into 3 groups based on early morning urinary albumin: negative group (urine dipstick negative, n = 483, trace group (urine dipstick trace, n = 60, and positive group (urine dipstick ≥1+, n = 54. CI-AKI occurred in 33 (5.5% patients, including 19 (3.9% in the negativealbuminuria group, 4 (6.7% in the trace group, and 10 (18.5% in the positive group (p< 0.001, respectively. After adjusting for potential confounding risk factors, positive albuminuria (OR = 3.8, 95% CI: 1.5 to 9.2, p = 0.004 and urinary pH<6 (OR = 2.4, 95% CI: 1.1 to 5.1, p = 0.020 remained significantly associated with CI-AKI.Preprocedural albuminuria and urinary pH <6 are independent risk factors of CI-AKI in patients with T2DM undergoing elective cardiac catheterization, and may be used to identify patients at high risk of post-procedural CI-AKI.

  6. Effect of Sample Preparation on the Discrimination of Bacterial Isolates Cultured in Liquid Nutrient Media Using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamble, Gary R; Park, Bosoon; Yoon, Seung-Chul; Lawrence, Kurt C

    2016-03-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is used as the basis for discrimination between two genera of gram-negative bacteria and two genera of gram-positive bacteria representing pathogenic threats commonly found in poultry processing rinse waters. Because LIBS-based discrimination relies primarily upon the relative proportions of inorganic cell components including Na, K, Mg, and Ca, this study aims to determine the effects of trace mineral content and pH found in the water source used to isolate the bacteria upon the reliability of the resulting discriminant analysis. All four genera were cultured using tryptic soy agar (TSA) as the nutrient medium, and were grown under identical environmental conditions. The only variable introduced is the source water used to isolate the cultured bacteria. Cultures of each bacterium were produced using deionized (DI) water under two atmosphere conditions, reverse osmosis (RO) water, tap water, phosphate buffered saline (PBS) water, and TRIS buffered water. After 3 days of culture growth, the bacteria were centrifuged and washed three times in the same water source. Bacteria were then freeze dried, mixed with microcrystalline cellulose, and a pellet was made for LIBS analysis. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to extract related variations in LIBS spectral data among the four bacteria genera and six water types used to isolate the bacteria, and Mahalanobis discriminant analysis (MDA) was used for classification. Results indicate not only that the four genera can be discriminated from each other in each water type, but that each genus can be discriminated by water type used for isolation. It is concluded that in order for LIBS to be a reliable and repeatable method for discrimination of bacteria grown in liquid nutrient media, care must be taken to insure that the water source used in purification of the culture be precisely controlled regarding pH, ionic strength, and proportionate amounts of mineral cations

  7. Early reversal of profound rocuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade by sugammadex in a randomized multicenter study - Efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sparr, Harald J.; Vermeyen, Karel M.; Beaufort, Anton M.; Rietbergen, Henk; Proost, Johannes H.; Saldien, Vera; Velik-Salchner, Corinna; Wierda, J. Mark K. H.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Sugammadex reverses the neuromuscular blocking effects of rocuronium by chemical encapsulation. The efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics of sugammadex for reversal of profound rocuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade were evaluated. Methods: Ninety-eight male adult patients were rando

  8. Early reversal of profound rocuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade by sugammadex in a randomized multicenter study - Efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sparr, Harald J.; Vermeyen, Karel M.; Beaufort, Anton M.; Rietbergen, Henk; Proost, Johannes H.; Saldien, Vera; Velik-Salchner, Corinna; Wierda, J. Mark K. H.

    Background: Sugammadex reverses the neuromuscular blocking effects of rocuronium by chemical encapsulation. The efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics of sugammadex for reversal of profound rocuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade were evaluated. Methods: Ninety-eight male adult patients were

  9. [Chronic otitis mediaChronic Otitis Media].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohles, N; Schulz, T; Eßer, D

    2015-11-01

    There are 2 different kinds of chronic otitis media: Otitis media chronica mesotympanalis and otitis media chronica epitympanalis (cholesteatoma). The incidence of chronic otitis media as reported in literature differs in a wide range. The incidence rates vary between 0.45 and 46%. Both, otitis media chronica mesotympanalis and cholesteatoma, lead to eardrum perforation due to lengthy and recurring inflammations. Furthermore, chronic otitis media is characterized by frequently recurring otorrhea and conductive hearing loss. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Numerical upscaling of the seismic characteristics of fractured media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caspari, Eva; Milani, Marco; Rubino, German; Quintal, Beatriz; Mueller, Tobias; Holliger, Klaus

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the effects of fractures in seismic wave propagation, notably with regard to attenuation and velocity dispersion associated with wave-induced fluid pressure diffusion, may provide valuable insights with regard to the mechanical and hydraulic properties of such media. For complex distributions of fractures, these seismic characteristics are difficult to explore through analytical methods. To overcome this limitation, we use numerical upscaling procedures based on the theory of poroelasticity. In these numerical approaches, a homogeneous oscillating displacement or stress field is applied to a subvolume of a heterogeneous poroelastic medium, which via the equivalent complex plane-wave modulus allows for estimating the seismic velocity dispersion and attenuation characteristics of a corresponding dynamic-equivalent viscoelastic medium. The thus inferred seismic characteristics are, however, only meaningful, if the considered sample has at least the size of a representative elementary volume or REV. In analogy to the classical definition for elastic media, we assume an REV to corresponding to the minimum volume for which attenuation and velocity dispersion are independent of the applied boundary conditions. The importance of choosing an adequate REV for estimating the effective seismic characteristics was recently investigated for periodically fractured media. Here, we extend this analysis to media containing randomly distributed parallel fractures. The corresponding media are composed of side-by-side assemblies of fundamental blocks, each containing one randomly positioned horizontal fracture. The fractures themselves are represented as strongly compliant poroelastic features of very high porosity and permeability. The size of the fractures is assumed to lie in the mesoscopic scale range, which implies that they are much larger than the pore size but much smaller than the dominant wavelength. Our results indicate that for an applied homogeneous

  11. Use and Acceptance of Social Media among Health Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Carl; West, Joshua; Neiger, Brad; Thackeray, Rosemary; Barnes, Michael; McIntyre, Emily

    2011-01-01

    Background: As social media use grows in popularity, health educators are challenged to think differently about how to communicate with audiences. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore social media use and factors that determine acceptance of social media use among health educators. Methods: A random sample of Certified Health…

  12. A prospective, randomized study of empirical antifungal therapy for the treatment of chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caselli, Désirée; Cesaro, Simone; Ziino, Ottavio; Ragusa, Pietro; Pontillo, Alfredo; Pegoraro, Anna; Santoro, Nicola; Zanazzo, Giulio; Poggi, Vincenzo; Giacchino, Mareva; Livadiotti, Susanna; Melchionda, Fraia; Chiodi, Marcello; Aricò, Maurizio

    2012-07-01

    Given that the rationale for empirical antifungal therapy in neutropenic children is limited and based on adult patient data, we performed a prospective, randomized, controlled trial that evaluated 110 neutropenic children with persistent fever. Those at high risk for invasive fungal infections (IFI) received caspofungin (Arm C) or liposomal amphotericinB (Arm B); those with a lower risk were randomized to receive Arm B, C, or no antifungal treatment (Arm A). Complete response to empirical antifungal therapy was achieved in 90/104 patients (86·5%): 48/56 at high risk (85·7%) [88·0% in Arm B; 83·9% in Arm C (P = 0·72)], and 42/48 at low risk (87·5%) [87·5% in control Arm A, 80·0% Arm B, 94·1% Arm C; (P = 0·41)]. None of the variables tested by multiple logistic regression analysis showed a significant effect on the probability to achieve complete response. IFI was diagnosed in nine patients (8·2%, 95% confidence interval, 3·8-15·0). This randomized controlled study showed that empirical antifungal therapy was of no advantage in terms of survival without fever and IFI in patients aged <18 years and defined with low risk of IFI. Higher risk patients, including those with relapsed cancer, appear to be the target for empirical antifungal therapy during protracted febrile neutropenia.

  13. Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy Combined with Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation over Premotor Cortex Improves Motor Function in Severe Stroke: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Larissa M.; Nogueira, Lídia L. R. F.; de Oliveira, Eliane A.; de Carvalho, Antonio G. C.; Lima, Soriano S.; Santana, Jordânia R. M.; de Lima, Emerson C. C.; Fernández-Calvo, Bernardino

    2017-01-01

    Objective. We compared the effects of transcranial direct current stimulation at different cortical sites (premotor and motor primary cortex) combined with constraint-induced movement therapy for treatment of stroke patients. Design. Sixty patients were randomly distributed into 3 groups: Group A, anodal stimulation on premotor cortex and constraint-induced movement therapy; Group B, anodal stimulation on primary motor cortex and constraint-induced movement therapy; Group C, sham stimulation and constraint-induced movement therapy. Evaluations involved analysis of functional independence, motor recovery, spasticity, gross motor function, and muscle strength. Results. A significant improvement in primary outcome (functional independence) after treatment in the premotor group followed by primary motor group and sham group was observed. The same pattern of improvement was highlighted among all secondary outcome measures regarding the superior performance of the premotor group over primary motor and sham groups. Conclusions. Premotor cortex can contribute to motor function in patients with severe functional disabilities in early stages of stroke. This study was registered in ClinicalTrials.gov database (NCT 02628561). PMID:28250992

  14. Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy Combined with Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation over Premotor Cortex Improves Motor Function in Severe Stroke: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Suellen M; Batista, Larissa M; Nogueira, Lídia L R F; de Oliveira, Eliane A; de Carvalho, Antonio G C; Lima, Soriano S; Santana, Jordânia R M; de Lima, Emerson C C; Fernández-Calvo, Bernardino

    2017-01-01

    Objective. We compared the effects of transcranial direct current stimulation at different cortical sites (premotor and motor primary cortex) combined with constraint-induced movement therapy for treatment of stroke patients. Design. Sixty patients were randomly distributed into 3 groups: Group A, anodal stimulation on premotor cortex and constraint-induced movement therapy; Group B, anodal stimulation on primary motor cortex and constraint-induced movement therapy; Group C, sham stimulation and constraint-induced movement therapy. Evaluations involved analysis of functional independence, motor recovery, spasticity, gross motor function, and muscle strength. Results. A significant improvement in primary outcome (functional independence) after treatment in the premotor group followed by primary motor group and sham group was observed. The same pattern of improvement was highlighted among all secondary outcome measures regarding the superior performance of the premotor group over primary motor and sham groups. Conclusions. Premotor cortex can contribute to motor function in patients with severe functional disabilities in early stages of stroke. This study was registered in ClinicalTrials.gov database (NCT 02628561).

  15. Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy Combined with Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation over Premotor Cortex Improves Motor Function in Severe Stroke: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suellen M. Andrade

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. We compared the effects of transcranial direct current stimulation at different cortical sites (premotor and motor primary cortex combined with constraint-induced movement therapy for treatment of stroke patients. Design. Sixty patients were randomly distributed into 3 groups: Group A, anodal stimulation on premotor cortex and constraint-induced movement therapy; Group B, anodal stimulation on primary motor cortex and constraint-induced movement therapy; Group C, sham stimulation and constraint-induced movement therapy. Evaluations involved analysis of functional independence, motor recovery, spasticity, gross motor function, and muscle strength. Results. A significant improvement in primary outcome (functional independence after treatment in the premotor group followed by primary motor group and sham group was observed. The same pattern of improvement was highlighted among all secondary outcome measures regarding the superior performance of the premotor group over primary motor and sham groups. Conclusions. Premotor cortex can contribute to motor function in patients with severe functional disabilities in early stages of stroke. This study was registered in ClinicalTrials.gov database (NCT 02628561.

  16. Media Education Initiatives by Media Organizations: The Uses of Media Literacy in Hong Kong Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Donna; Lee, Alice Y. L.

    2014-01-01

    As more media organizations have engaged in media education, this paper investigates the goals and practices of these activities. This article coins media education initiatives by media organizations with the term "media-organization media literac"y (MOML). Four MOML projects in Hong Kong were selected for examination. Built on critical…

  17. Media matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, L M

    1995-01-01

    The impact of the mass media on woman's status was addressed at two 1995 conferences: the Fourth World Conference on Women, held in Beijing, China, and the Congress of the World Association for Christian Communication, held in Puebla, Mexico. The globalization process facilitated by the mass media has served to increase the power of patriarchy, with no advantages to the cause of women's rights. Coverage of popular movements has been suppressed out of deference to male-controlled governments. Coverage of the Beijing Conference highlighted celebrities and personal stories, to the exclusion of the economic and political issues under debate. Television has commodified women, reinforcing their oppression. On the other hand, the alternative media, which tend to be decentralized, democratic, low-cost, and low in technology, are presenting women as subjects rather than objects and deconstructing gender stereotypes. Of concern, however, is the tendency of computer technology to widen the gap between social classes and developed and developing countries. Women must use information networks to disseminate information on women's rights and strengthen the links between women throughout the world.

  18. Effect of Kangfuxin Solution on Chemo/Radiotherapy-Induced Mucositis in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Patients: A Multicenter, Prospective Randomized Phase III Clinical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yangkun Luo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of Kangfuxin Solution, a pure Chinese herbal medicine, on mucositis induced by chemoradiotherapy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients. Methods. A randomized, parallel-group, multicenter clinical study was performed. A total of 240 patients were randomized to receive either Kangfuxin Solution (test group or compound borax gargle (control group during chemoradiotherapy. Oral mucositis, upper gastrointestinal mucositis, and oral pain were evaluated by Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE v3.0 and the Verbal Rating Scale (VRS. Results. Of 240 patients enrolled, 215 were eligible for efficacy analysis. Compared with the control group, the incidence and severity of oral mucositis in the test group were significantly reduced (P=0.01. The time to different grade of oral mucositis occurrence (grade 1, 2, or 3 was longer in test group (P<0.01, and the accumulated radiation dose was also higher in test group comparing to the control group (P<0.05. The test group showed lower incidence of oral pain and gastrointestinal mucositis than the control group (P<0.01. No significant adverse events were observed. Conclusion. Kangfuxin Solution demonstrated its superiority to compound borax gargle on mucositis induced by chemoradiotherapy. Its safety is acceptable for clinical application.

  19. Preventing and Therapeutic Effect of Propolis in Radiotherapy Induced Mucositis of Head and Neck Cancers: A Triple-Blind, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadzadeh Bolouri, Abbas; Pakfetrat, Atessa; Tonkaboni, Arghavan; Aledavood, Seyed Amir; Fathi Najafi, Mohsen; Delavarian, Zahra; Shakeri, Mohammad Taghi; Mohtashami, Azade

    2015-01-01

    Background: Mucositis is one of the acute complications of radiotherapy which can ulcerate oral mucosa and cause severe pain and discomfort which can affect oral normal function. Propolis is a natural source of flavenoid which has antiulcer, antibacterial, antifungal, healing and anti-inflammatory effects. Using such an affordable compound without any bad smell or taste that has reasonable price can help the radiotherapy undergoing patients. Objectives: Our goal is assessing the preventing and therapeutic effect of propolis in radiotherapy induced mucositis in patients with head and neck cancer. Patients and Methods: In a randomized triple blind clinical trial, 20 patient were selected randomly to swish and swallow 15 ml of water based extract of propolis mouth wash 3 times a day in the case group (n = 10) and 15 ml placebo mouth wash in control group (n = 10). we use NIC-CTC scale for determining mucositis grading. Results: We use T-test, Man-Whitney, Chi-square, and Friedman as analyzing tests. Case group had significantly (P 0.05). Conclusions: This is a pilot study which shows water based extract of propolis efficiently prevents and heals radiotherapy induced mucositis. PMID:26634113

  20. Efficacy of Topical Compound Danxiong Granules for Treatment of Dermatologic Toxicities Induced by Targeted Anticancer Therapy: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Aiping; Zhou, Aiping; Bi, Xinyu; Hu, Shangying; Jiang, Zhichao; Zhang, Wen; Huang, Zhen; Shi, Hongzhe; Yang, Boyan; Chen, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Dermatologic toxicities resulting in dose reduction or discontinuation of treatment pose challenges for targeted anticancer therapies. We conducted this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to investigate the efficacy of topical application of Compound Danxiong Granules (CDG) for treatment of dermatologic toxicities associated with targeted anticancer therapies. One hundred and ten patients with dermatologic toxicities induced by targeted anticancer therapies were randomly assigned to CDG or placebo group. Each crude herb (Rhizoma Chuanxiong, Paeonia suffruticosa Andr., Cortex Phellodendri, Geranium sibiricum L., and Flos Carthami) was prepared as an instant herbal powder. Application of the CDG via topical washes lasted 20 minutes, twice daily, for 10 days. The primary outcome was the total effective rate, defined as reduction in at least one grade of skin toxicity. The total effective rate was 77.61% (52/67) in the CDG group and 27.27% (9/33) in the placebo group (P dermatologic toxicities induced by targeted anticancer therapies. The effect of CDG was more pronounced in hand-foot skin reaction.

  1. Intravenous lipid and heparin infusion-induced elevation in free fatty acids and triglycerides modifies circulating androgen levels in women: a randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, K; Bobbert, T; Reinecke, F; Andres, J; Maser-Gluth, C; Wudy, S A; Möhlig, M; Weickert, M O; Hartmann, M F; Schulte, H M; Diederich, S; Pfeiffer, A F H; Spranger, J

    2008-10-01

    The polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is characterized by hyperandrogenism and associated with obesity and impaired glucose metabolism. Despite the high prevalence of PCOS and the considerable clinical impact, the precise interplay between metabolism and hyperandrogenemia is not entirely clear. The objective of the study was to analyze the effects of iv lipid and heparin infusion on circulating androgen levels in healthy women. This was a randomized, controlled, crossover trial. The study was conducted at an endocrinology center. Patients included 12 healthy young women during the early follicular phase of two subsequent cycles. After an overnight fast, a 20% lipid/heparin or a saline/heparin infusion was administered in random order for 330 min. A detailed characterization of androgen metabolism was performed. Elevations in free fatty acids and triglycerides, induced by lipid/heparin infusion, elevates the levels of androstenedione, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS), testosterone, 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone, estrone, and 17beta-estradiol. Urinary excretion of DHEA, DHEAS, 5-androstene-3beta,17beta-diol, and the sum of urinary excreted DHEA and its 16-hydroxylated downstream metabolites, 16alpha-hydroxy-DHEA and 5-androstene-3beta,16alpha,17beta-triol, were reduced. The mechanism of iv lipid and heparin infusion-induced elevation of circulating androgens described here might contribute to the development of hyperandrogenism in women with PCOS and suggests that lowering of hyperlipidemia might be a potential therapeutic target in patients with PCOS to treat hyperandrogenemia.

  2. Effectiveness of modified constraint-induced movement therapy in children with unilateral spastic cerebral palsy: a randomized controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarts, P.B.M.; Jongerius, P.H.; Geerdink, Y.A.; Limbeek, J. van; Geurts, A.C.H.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In children with unilateral spastic cerebral palsy (CP), there is only limited evidence for the effectiveness of modified constraint-induced movement therapy (mCIMT). OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether 6 weeks of mCIMT followed by 2 weeks of bimanual task-specific training (mCIMT-BiT) in

  3. Risk of contrast-medium-induced nephropathy in high-risk patients undergoing MDCT - A pooled analysis of two randomized trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomsen, Henrik S. [University of Copenhagen, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Copenhagen University Hospital Herlev, and Department of Diagnostic Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Herlev (Denmark); Morcos, Sameh K. [University of Sheffield, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Northern General Hospital, Sheffield (United Kingdom)

    2009-04-15

    The incidence of contrast-medium-induced nephropathy (CIN) following intravenous (IV) CM administration of contrast media to renally impaired patients undergoing multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) is not well characterized. Our objective was to investigate the incidence of CIN in patients with glomerular filtration rate (GFR) <60 ml/min undergoing contrast-enhanced MDCT examinations and to compare the rates of CIN following the IV administration of low-osmolar contrast media (LOCM, iopamidol and iomeprol) and an iso-osmolar contrast medium (IOCM, iodixanol). A total of 301 adult patients with moderate-to-severe renal failure received a similar IV contrast dose (40 gI). Serum creatinine (SCr) was measured at screening, baseline and 48-72 {+-} 6 h after the MDCT examination. Primary CIN outcome was an increase in SCr {>=}0.5 mg/dl ({>=}44.2 {mu}mol/l) from baseline. The CIN rates were 2.3% in the total population, 0.6% when GFR >40 ml/min, 4.6% when GFR <40 ml/min and 7.8% in patients with GFR <30 ml/min. The incidence of CIN was significantly higher after iodixanol than after LOCM (seven patients, 4.7% following IOCM, no CIN cases following the LOCM; p = 0.007). Significant differences in favor of the LOCM were also observed in patients with GFR <40 ml/min and GFR <30 ml/min. Following the IV administration of nonionic contrast agents in patients with moderate-to-severe renal insufficiency, the risk of significant CIN seems to be low. The IOCM iodixanol caused a higher rate of CIN than the LOCM iopamidol and iomeprol, especially in high-risk patients. Differences in osmolality between these LOCM and iodixanol do not play a role in the genesis of CIN. (orig.)

  4. Randomization tests

    CERN Document Server

    Edgington, Eugene

    2007-01-01

    Statistical Tests That Do Not Require Random Sampling Randomization Tests Numerical Examples Randomization Tests and Nonrandom Samples The Prevalence of Nonrandom Samples in Experiments The Irrelevance of Random Samples for the Typical Experiment Generalizing from Nonrandom Samples Intelligibility Respect for the Validity of Randomization Tests Versatility Practicality Precursors of Randomization Tests Other Applications of Permutation Tests Questions and Exercises Notes References Randomized Experiments Unique Benefits of Experiments Experimentation without Mani

  5. Effects of Mass Media and Cultural Drift in a Nonequilibrium Model for Social Influence

    CERN Document Server

    Mazzitello, K I; Dossetti, V; Candia, Juli\\'an; Mazzitello, Karina I.

    2006-01-01

    In the context of an extension of Axelrod's nonequilibrium model for social influence, we study the interplay and competition between the cultural drift, represented as random perturbations, and mass media, introduced by means of an external homogeneous field. Unlike previous studies [J. C. Gonz\\'alez-Avella {\\it et al}, Phys. Rev. E {\\bf 72}, 065102(R) (2005)], the mass media coupling proposed here is capable of affecting the cultural traits of any individual in the society, including those who do not share any features with the external message. A noise-driven transition is found: for large noise rates, both the ordered (culturally polarized) phase and the disordered (culturally fragmented) phase are observed, while, for lower noise rates, the ordered phase prevails. In the former case, the external field is found to induce cultural ordering, a behavior opposite to that reported in previous studies using a different prescription for the mass media interaction. We compare the predictions of this model to sta...

  6. Effects of creatine monohydrate supplementation on exercise-induced apoptosis in athletes: A randomized, double-blind, and placebo-controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahman Rahimi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Creatine monohydrate (CrM has been shown to be beneficial to health due to its antioxidant potential. Strenuous exercise is associated with oxidative stress, which could lead to apoptosis. We investigated the ability of CrM in amelioration of apoptosis induced by incremental aerobic exercise (AE to exhaustion in young athletes. Materials and Methods: In a placebo-controlled, double-blind, randomized, parallel study, 31 young athletes (age 19.52 ± 2.75 years, body mass 79.24 ± 16.13 kg, height 1.73 ± 6.49 m, body fat 16.37% ± 5.92% were randomly assigned to CrM (4 × 5 g/day, n = 15 or placebo (PL: 4 × 5 g/day of maltodextrine powder; n = 16 to investigate the effect of 7 days CrM on serum p53 and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1 concentration after acute incremental AE test to exhaustion. Subjects performed AE before (test 1 and after 7 days of supplementation (test 2. Results: Before supplementation, AE to exhaustion induced a significant increase in serum p53 and IGF-1 concentrations at both CrM and PL groups (P 0.05. Conclusion: Our results suggest that supplementation with CrM prevents apoptosis, as measured by decreases in p53 concentration, induced by AE to exhaustion in young athletes. However, CrM had no effect on IGF-1 concentration after AE to exhaustion in young athletes.

  7. Random Raman lasing

    CERN Document Server

    Hokr, Brett H; Mason, John D; Beier, Hope T; Rockwll, Benjamin A; Thomas, Robert J; Noojin, Gary D; Petrov, Georgi I; Golovan, Leonid A; Yakovlev, Vladislav V

    2013-01-01

    Propagation of light in a highly scattering medium is among the most fascinating optical effect that everyone experiences on an everyday basis and possesses a number of fundamental problems which have yet to be solved. Conventional wisdom suggests that non-linear effects do not play a significant role because the diffusive nature of scattering acts to spread the intensity, dramatically weakening these effects. We demonstrate the first experimental evidence of lasing on a Raman transition in a bulk three-dimensional random media. From a practical standpoint, Raman transitions allow for spectroscopic analysis of the chemical makeup of the sample. A random Raman laser could serve as a bright Raman source allowing for remote, chemically specific, identification of powders and aerosols. Fundamentally, the first demonstration of this new light source opens up an entire new field of study into non-linear light propagation in turbid media, with the most notable application related to non-invasive biomedical imaging.

  8. Random codon re-encoding induces stable reduction of replicative fitness of Chikungunya virus in primate and mosquito cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine Nougairede

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale codon re-encoding represents a powerful method of attenuating viruses to generate safe and cost-effective vaccines. In contrast to specific approaches of codon re-encoding which modify genome-scale properties, we evaluated the effects of random codon re-encoding on the re-emerging human pathogen Chikungunya virus (CHIKV, and assessed the stability of the resultant viruses during serial in cellulo passage. Using different combinations of three 1.4 kb randomly re-encoded regions located throughout the CHIKV genome six codon re-encoded viruses were obtained. Introducing a large number of slightly deleterious synonymous mutations reduced the replicative fitness of CHIKV in both primate and arthropod cells, demonstrating the impact of synonymous mutations on fitness. Decrease of replicative fitness correlated with the extent of re-encoding, an observation that may assist in the modulation of viral attenuation. The wild-type and two re-encoded viruses were passaged 50 times either in primate or insect cells, or in each cell line alternately. These viruses were analyzed using detailed fitness assays, complete genome sequences and the analysis of intra-population genetic diversity. The response to codon re-encoding and adaptation to culture conditions occurred simultaneously, resulting in significant replicative fitness increases for both re-encoded and wild type viruses. Importantly, however, the most re-encoded virus failed to recover its replicative fitness. Evolution of these viruses in response to codon re-encoding was largely characterized by the emergence of both synonymous and non-synonymous mutations, sometimes located in genomic regions other than those involving re-encoding, and multiple convergent and compensatory mutations. However, there was a striking absence of codon reversion (<0.4%. Finally, multiple mutations were rapidly fixed in primate cells, whereas mosquito cells acted as a brake on evolution. In conclusion, random

  9. Randomized controlled trial of dietary fiber for the prevention of radiation-induced gastrointestinal toxicity during pelvic radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedlake, Linda; Shaw, Clare; McNair, Helen; Lalji, Amyn; Mohammed, Kabir; Klopper, Tanya; Allan, Lindsey; Tait, Diana; Hawkins, Maria; Somaiah, Navita; Lalondrelle, Susan; Taylor, Alexandra; VanAs, Nicholas; Stewart, Alexandra; Essapen, Sharadah; Gage, Heather; Whelan, Kevin; Andreyev, H Jervoise N

    2017-09-01

    Background: Therapeutic radiotherapy is an important treatment of pelvic cancers. Historically, low-fiber diets have been recommended despite a lack of evidence and potentially beneficial mechanisms of fiber.Objective: This randomized controlled trial compared low-, habitual-, and high-fiber diets for the prevention of gastrointestinal toxicity in patients undergoing pelvic radiotherapy.Design: Patients were randomly assigned to low-fiber [≤10 g nonstarch polysaccharide (NSP)/d], habitual-fiber (control), or high-fiber (≥18 g NSP/d) diets and received individualized counseling at the start of radiotherapy to achieve these targets. The primary endpoint was the difference between groups in the change in the Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire-Bowel Subset (IBDQ-B) score between the starting and nadir (worst) score during treatment. Other measures included macronutrient intake, stool diaries, and fecal short-chain fatty acid concentrations.Results: Patients were randomly assigned to low-fiber (n = 55), habitual-fiber (n = 55), or high-fiber (n = 56) dietary advice. Fiber intakes were significantly different between groups (P fiber group (mean ± SD: -3.7 ± 12.8) than in the habitual-fiber group (-10.8 ± 13.5; P = 0.011). At 1-y postradiotherapy (n = 126) the difference in IBDQ-B scores between the high-fiber (+0.1 ± 14.5) and the habitual-fiber (-8.4 ± 13.3) groups was significant (P = 0.004). No significant differences were observed in stool frequency or form or in short-chain fatty acid concentrations. Significant reductions in energy, protein, and fat intake occurred in the low- and habitual-fiber groups only.Conclusions: Dietary advice to follow a high-fiber diet during pelvic radiotherapy resulted in reduced gastrointestinal toxicity both acutely and at 1 y compared with habitual-fiber intake. Restrictive, non-evidence-based advice to reduce fiber intake in this setting should be abandoned. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT

  10. Investigating the mechanisms of hallucinogen-induced visions using 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA: a randomized controlled trial in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Baggott

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The mechanisms of drug-induced visions are poorly understood. Very few serotonergic hallucinogens have been studied in humans in decades, despite widespread use of these drugs and potential relevance of their mechanisms to hallucinations occurring in psychiatric and neurological disorders. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We investigated the mechanisms of hallucinogen-induced visions by measuring the visual and perceptual effects of the hallucinogenic serotonin 5-HT2AR receptor agonist and monoamine releaser, 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA, in a double-blind placebo-controlled study. We found that MDA increased self-report measures of mystical-type experience and other hallucinogen-like effects, including reported visual alterations. MDA produced a significant increase in closed-eye visions (CEVs, with considerable individual variation. Magnitude of CEVs after MDA was associated with lower performance on measures of contour integration and object recognition. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Drug-induced visions may have greater intensity in people with poor sensory or perceptual processing, suggesting common mechanisms with other hallucinatory syndromes. MDA is a potential tool to investigate mystical experiences and visual perception. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00823407.

  11. A Randomized Trial on the Effect of Bone Tissue on Vibration-induced Muscle Strength Gain and Vibration-induced Reflex Muscle Activity

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Background: Whole-body vibration (WBV) induces reflex muscle activity and leads to increased muscle strength. However, little is known about the physiological mechanisms underlying the effects of whole-body vibration on muscular performance. Tonic vibration reflex is the most commonly cited mechanism to explain the effects of whole-body vibration on muscular performance, although there is no conclusive evidence that tonic vibration reflex occurs. The bone myoregulation reflex is another neuro...

  12. Effect of acupuncture for radioactive-iodine-induced anorexia in thyroid cancer patients: a randomized, double-blinded, sham-controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Ju-Hyun; Yoon, Jeungwon; Cho, Chong-Kwan; Jung, In-Chul; Kim, Sungchul; Lee, Suk-Hoon; Yoo, Hwa-Seung

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of acupuncture for radioactive iodine (RAI)-induced anorexia in thyroid cancer patients. Fourteen thyroid cancer patients with RAI-induced anorexia were randomized to a true acupuncture or sham acupuncture group. Both groups were given 6 true or sham acupuncture treatments in 2 weeks. Outcome measures included the change of the Functional Assessment of Anorexia and Cachexia Treatment (FAACT; Anorexia/Cachexia Subscale [ACS], Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General [FACT-G]), Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), weight, body mass index (BMI), ACTH, and cortisol levels. The mean FAACT ACS scores of the true and sham acupuncture groups increased from baseline to exit in intention-to-treat (ITT) and per protocol (PP) analyses; the true acupuncture group showed higher increase but with no statistical significance. Between groups, from baseline to the last treatment, statistically significant differences were found in ITT analysis of the Table of Index (TOI) score (P = .034) and in PP analysis of the TOI (P = .016), FACT-G (P = .045), FAACT (P = .037) scores. There was no significant difference in VAS, weight, BMI, ACTH, and cortisol level changes between groups. Although the current study is based on a small sample of participants, our findings support the safety and potential use of acupuncture for RAI-induced anorexia and quality of life in thyroid cancer patients. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. Effect of Paracetamol Pretreatment on Rocuronium-Induced Injection Pain: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Comparison with Lidocaine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulnaz Ates

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To compare the effect of intravenous paracetamol on rocuronium-induced injection pain with that of lidocaine. Material and Method: One hundred and eighty patients scheduled for elective surgery under general anesthesia were recruited to this prospective, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study. A 20-gauge cannula was inserted into a vein on the dorsum of the patient%u2019s left hand and lactated Ringer%u2019s solution was infused at 100 ml/h. After 5 minutes, infusion was stopped and the left arm of the patient%u2019s was elevated for 15 seconds for gravity of venous blood. While venous occlusion was applied to the left upper arm using a pneumatic tourniquet, one of the pretreatment solutions (normal saline 5 mL, lidocaine 40 mg, paracetamol 50 mg was injected over a period of 10 seconds. The intensity of the pain patients experienced was assessed using a 4-point verbal rating scale in Group C (normal saline 5 mL, n=60, Group L (lidocaine 40 mg, n=60 and Group P (paracetamol 50 mg, n=60. After 2 minutes, the venous occlusion was released and the patients received 0.06 mg/kg rocuronim bromide over 10 seconds and the rocuronim-induced pain was assessed. Results: The overall incidence of rocuronium-induced injection pain was significantly more in Group C than the other groups (p

  14. Honey and a mixture of honey, beeswax, and olive oil-propolis extract in treatment of chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis: a randomized controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulrhman, Mamdouh; Elbarbary, Nancy Samir; Ahmed Amin, Dina; Saeid Ebrahim, Rania

    2012-04-01

    In spite of being one of the most investigated subjects among supportive care in cancer, no therapy has been found effective in treatment of chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis. Based on the observations that honey bees products have anti-inflammatory and wound healing effects, the present study tried to evaluate the effect of topical application of honey and a mixture of honey, olive oil-propolis extract, and beeswax (HOPE) in treatment of oral mucositis. This was a randomized controlled clinical trial conducted on 90 patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and oral mucositis grades 2 and 3. The mean age of enrolled patients was 6.9 years. The patients were assigned into 3 equal treatment groups: Honey, HOPE, and control groups. Topical treatment for each patient consists of honey, HOPE, and benzocaine gel for honey, HOPE, and control groups, respectively. Recovery time in grade 2 mucositis was significantly reduced in the honey group as compared with either HOPE or controls (P < .05). In grade 3 mucositis, recovery time did not differ significantly between honey and HOPE (P = 0.61) but compared with controls, healing was faster with either honey or HOPE (P < .01). Generally, in both grades of mucositis, honey produced faster healing than either HOPE or controls (P < .05). Based on our results that showed that honey produced faster healing in patients with grade 2/3 chemotherapy-induced mucositis, we recommend using honey and possibly other bee products and olive oil in future therapeutic trials targeting chemotherapy-induced mucositis.

  15. RAD50 is required for efficient initiation of resection and recombinational repair at random, gamma-induced double-strand break ends.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jim Westmoreland

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Resection of DNA double-strand break (DSB ends is generally considered a critical determinant in pathways of DSB repair and genome stability. Unlike for enzymatically induced site-specific DSBs, little is known about processing of random "dirty-ended" DSBs created by DNA damaging agents such as ionizing radiation. Here we present a novel system for monitoring early events in the repair of random DSBs, based on our finding that single-strand tails generated by resection at the ends of large molecules in budding yeast decreases mobility during pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE. We utilized this "PFGE-shift" to follow the fate of both ends of linear molecules generated by a single random DSB in circular chromosomes. Within 10 min after gamma-irradiation of G2/M arrested WT cells, there is a near-synchronous PFGE-shift of the linearized circular molecules, corresponding to resection of a few hundred bases. Resection at the radiation-induced DSBs continues so that by the time of significant repair of DSBs at 1 hr there is about 1-2 kb resection per DSB end. The PFGE-shift is comparable in WT and recombination-defective rad52 and rad51 strains but somewhat delayed in exo1 mutants. However, in rad50 and mre11 null mutants the initiation and generation of resected ends at radiation-induced DSB ends is greatly reduced in G2/M. Thus, the Rad50/Mre11/Xrs2 complex is responsible for rapid processing of most damaged ends into substrates that subsequently undergo recombinational repair. A similar requirement was found for RAD50 in asynchronously growing cells. Among the few molecules exhibiting shift in the rad50 mutant, the residual resection is consistent with resection at only one of the DSB ends. Surprisingly, within 1 hr after irradiation, double-length linear molecules are detected in the WT and rad50, but not in rad52, strains that are likely due to crossovers that are largely resection- and RAD50-independent.

  16. RAD50 is required for efficient initiation of resection and recombinational repair at random, gamma-induced double-strand break ends.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jim Westmoreland

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Resection of DNA double-strand break (DSB ends is generally considered a critical determinant in pathways of DSB repair and genome stability. Unlike for enzymatically induced site-specific DSBs, little is known about processing of random "dirty-ended" DSBs created by DNA damaging agents such as ionizing radiation. Here we present a novel system for monitoring early events in the repair of random DSBs, based on our finding that single-strand tails generated by resection at the ends of large molecules in budding yeast decreases mobility during pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE. We utilized this "PFGE-shift" to follow the fate of both ends of linear molecules generated by a single random DSB in circular chromosomes. Within 10 min after gamma-irradiation of G2/M arrested WT cells, there is a near-synchronous PFGE-shift of the linearized circular molecules, corresponding to resection of a few hundred bases. Resection at the radiation-induced DSBs continues so that by the time of significant repair of DSBs at 1 hr there is about 1-2 kb resection per DSB end. The PFGE-shift is comparable in WT and recombination-defective rad52 and rad51 strains but somewhat delayed in exo1 mutants. However, in rad50 and mre11 null mutants the initiation and generation of resected ends at radiation-induced DSB ends is greatly reduced in G2/M. Thus, the Rad50/Mre11/Xrs2 complex is responsible for rapid processing of most damaged ends into substrates that subsequently undergo recombinational repair. A similar requirement was found for RAD50 in asynchronously growing cells. Among the few molecules exhibiting shift in the rad50 mutant, the residual resection is consistent with resection at only one of the DSB ends. Surprisingly, within 1 hr after irradiation, double-length linear molecules are detected in the WT and rad50, but not in rad52, strains that are likely due to crossovers that are largely resection- and RAD50-independent.

  17. RAD50 Is Required for Efficient Initiation of Resection and Recombinational Repair at Random, γ-Induced Double-Strand Break Ends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westmoreland, Jim; Ma, Wenjian; Yan, Yan; Van Hulle, Kelly; Malkova, Anna; Resnick, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    Resection of DNA double-strand break (DSB) ends is generally considered a critical determinant in pathways of DSB repair and genome stability. Unlike for enzymatically induced site-specific DSBs, little is known about processing of random “dirty-ended” DSBs created by DNA damaging agents such as ionizing radiation. Here we present a novel system for monitoring early events in the repair of random DSBs, based on our finding that single-strand tails generated by resection at the ends of large molecules in budding yeast decreases mobility during pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). We utilized this “PFGE-shift” to follow the fate of both ends of linear molecules generated by a single random DSB in circular chromosomes. Within 10 min after γ-irradiation of G2/M arrested WT cells, there is a near-synchronous PFGE-shift of the linearized circular molecules, corresponding to resection of a few hundred bases. Resection at the radiation-induced DSBs continues so that by the time of significant repair of DSBs at 1 hr there is about 1–2 kb resection per DSB end. The PFGE-shift is comparable in WT and recombination-defective rad52 and rad51 strains but somewhat delayed in exo1 mutants. However, in rad50 and mre11 null mutants the initiation and generation of resected ends at radiation-induced DSB ends is greatly reduced in G2/M. Thus, the Rad50/Mre11/Xrs2 complex is responsible for rapid processing of most damaged ends into substrates that subsequently undergo recombinational repair. A similar requirement was found for RAD50 in asynchronously growing cells. Among the few molecules exhibiting shift in the rad50 mutant, the residual resection is consistent with resection at only one of the DSB ends. Surprisingly, within 1 hr after irradiation, double-length linear molecules are detected in the WT and rad50, but not in rad52, strains that are likely due to crossovers that are largely resection- and RAD50-independent. PMID:19763170

  18. L-carnitine ameliorated fasting-induced fatigue, hunger, and metabolic abnormalities in patients with metabolic syndrome: a randomized controlled study

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Jun-Jie; Wu, Zhi-bing; Cai, You-jin; Ke, Bin; Huang, Ying-juan; Qiu, Chao-ping; Yang, Yu-bing; Shi, Lan-Ying; QIN, JIAN

    2014-01-01

    Background The present study aimed to determine that whether L-carnitine infusion could ameliorate fasting-induced adverse effects and improve outcomes. Method In this 7-day, randomized, single-blind, placebo-controlled, pilot study, 15 metabolic syndrome (MetS) patients (11/4 F/M; age 46.9 ± 9.14 years; body mass index [BMI] 28.2 ± 1.8 kg/m2) were in the L-carnitine group (LC) and 15 (10/5 F/M; age 46.8 ± 10.9 years; BMI 27.1 ± 2.3 kg/m2) were in the control group (CT). All participants unde...

  19. Transient cold pain has no effect on cutaneous vasodilatation induced by capsaicin: a randomized-control-crossover study in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pud, Dorit; Andersen, Ole Kaeseler; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Yarnitsky, David

    2006-05-01

    Cooling the skin induces sympathetically driven vasoconstriction, along with some vasoparalytic dilatation at lowermost temperatures. Neurogenic inflammation, on the other hand, entails vasodilatation. In the present study, we examined the dynamic vasomotor balance of capsaicin-induced vasodilatation within the area of the induced neurogenic inflammation, with and without superimposed cooling. In a randomized-control-crossover fashion, a sample of 14 healthy volunteers participated in three experiments: (1) exposure to each 0 degrees C cold pain stimulus and a neutral 30 degrees C stimulus (control) for 30 s to the volar forearms by contact thermal thermode (1.6x1.6 cm(2)), (2) injection of 50 microg intradermal capsaicin without cooling and (3) injection of capsaicin followed by application of 0 degrees C cold pain stimulation for 30 s within the area of the secondary hyperalgesia. Repetitive vascular measurements over skin area of 4.0x4.0 cm(2) of blood flux (BF) were acquired before and during the 5 min after stimulation. A marked increase in BF (i.e. vasodilatation) at the location of the cold stimulus in comparison to control (30 degrees C) (F=11.97, p=0.004) within the first 3 min was demonstrated. Two-way repeated-measures ANOVA indicated no interaction between the experimental conditions (capsaicin with or without cold) and time (F=0.934, p=0.454). The cold pain stimulation was found to be insignificant in its influence on BF evoked by capsaicin (F=0.018, p=0.894). The results of our study indicate that (1) transient cooling causes significant vasodilatation, (2) intradermal injection of capsaicin is dominant in inducing vasodilatation, and (3) the cold-pain-evoked vasodilatation has no modulative effect on the capsaicin-evoked cutaneous vasodilatation.

  20. Influence of the Chungkookjang on histamine-induced wheal and flare skin response: a randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwon Dae-Young

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstracts Background Allergic disease is a consequence of exposure to normally innocuous substances that elicit the activation of mast cells. Mast-cell-mediated allergic response is involved in many diseases such as anaphylaxis, urticaria, allergic rhinitis, asthma and allergic dermatitis. The development of food products for the prevention of allergic disease is an important subject in human health. The chungkookjang (CKJ has been reported to exhibit antiallergic inflammatory activity. Therefore, the aim of the study is to examine the effects of the CKJ to reduce histamine-induced wheal and flare skin responses. Methods/Design A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study in 60 healthy subjects will be carried out. Sixty volunteers (aged 20-80 who gave a written consent before entering the study will be randomized in two groups of thirty subjects each. The skin prick test with histamine solution of 10 mg/ml will be performed on the ventral forearm, 10 cm from the elbow. The subjects will be instructed to take 35 g per day of either the CKJ pills or a placebo pills for a period of 3 months. Diameters of wheal and flare will be assessing 15 minutes after performing the above-mentioned skin prick test. The primary outcome is change in wheal and flare responses. Secondary outcomes will be include change in serum histamine, immunoglobulin E, cytokines (interferon-gamma, interleukin-4, -10, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and eosinophil cationic protein. Discussion This study will show the potential anti-inflammatory properties of the CKJ in their skin activity when histamine is the challenging agent as occurs in the clinical situation. And the present protocol will confirm the efficacy and safety of the CKJ for allergy symptoms, suggesting more basic knowledge to conduct further randomized controlled trials (RCT. If this study will be successfully performed, the CKJ will be an alternative dietary supplemental remedy for allergy patients

  1. Non-random spatial coupling induces desynchronization, chaos and multistability in a predator-prey-resource system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Kenta; Yoshida, Takehito

    2012-05-07

    The metacommunity perspective has attracted much attention recently, but the understanding of how dispersal between local communities alters their ecological dynamics is still limited, especially regarding the effect of non-random, unequal dispersal of organisms. This is a study of a three-trophic-level (predator-prey-resource) system that is connected by different manners of dispersal. The model is based on a well-studied experimental system cultured in chemostats (continuous flow-through culture), which consists of rotifer predator, algal prey and nutrient. In the model, nutrient dispersal can give rise to multistability when the two systems are connected by nutrient dispersal, whereas three-trophic-level systems tend to show a rich dynamical behavior, e.g. antisynchronous or asynchronous oscillations including chaos. Although the existence of multistability was already known in two-trophic-level (predator-prey) systems, it was confined to a small range of dispersal rate. In contrast, the multistability in the three-trophic-level system is found in a broader range of dispersal rate. The results suggest that, in three-trophic-level systems, the dispersal of nutrient not only alters population dynamics of local systems but can also cause regime shifts such as a transition to different oscillation phases.

  2. Geographic Media Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukinbeal, Chris

    2014-01-01

    While the use of media permeates geographic research and pedagogic practice, the underlying literacies that link geography and media remain uncharted. This article argues that geographic media literacy incorporates visual literacy, information technology literacy, information literacy, and media literacy. Geographic media literacy is the ability…

  3. Measuring News Media Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksl, Adam; Ashley, Seth; Craft, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    News media literacy refers to the knowledge and motivations needed to identify and engage with journalism. This study measured levels of news media literacy among 500 teenagers using a new scale measure based on Potter's model of media literacy and adapted to news media specifically. The adapted model posits that news media literate individuals…

  4. Random bistochastic matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cappellini, Valerio [' Mark Kac' Complex Systems Research Centre, Uniwersytet Jagiellonski, ul. Reymonta 4, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Sommers, Hans-Juergen [Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Duisburg-Essen, Campus Duisburg, 47048 Duisburg (Germany); Bruzda, Wojciech; Zyczkowski, Karol [Instytut Fizyki im. Smoluchowskiego, Uniwersytet Jagiellonski, ul. Reymonta 4, 30-059 Krakow (Poland)], E-mail: valerio@ictp.it, E-mail: h.j.sommers@uni-due.de, E-mail: w.bruzda@uj.edu.pl, E-mail: karol@cft.edu.pl

    2009-09-11

    Ensembles of random stochastic and bistochastic matrices are investigated. While all columns of a random stochastic matrix can be chosen independently, the rows and columns of a bistochastic matrix have to be correlated. We evaluate the probability measure induced into the Birkhoff polytope of bistochastic matrices by applying the Sinkhorn algorithm to a given ensemble of random stochastic matrices. For matrices of order N = 2 we derive explicit formulae for the probability distributions induced by random stochastic matrices with columns distributed according to the Dirichlet distribution. For arbitrary N we construct an initial ensemble of stochastic matrices which allows one to generate random bistochastic matrices according to a distribution locally flat at the center of the Birkhoff polytope. The value of the probability density at this point enables us to obtain an estimation of the volume of the Birkhoff polytope, consistent with recent asymptotic results.

  5. Random Bistochastic Matrices

    CERN Document Server

    Cappellini, V; Bruzda, W; Zyczkowski, K

    2009-01-01

    Ensembles of random stochastic and bistochastic matrices are investigated. While all columns of a random stochastic matrix can be chosen independently, the rows and columns of a bistochastic matrix have to be correlated. We evaluate the probability measure induced into the Birkhoff polytope of bistochastic matrices by applying the Sinkhorn algorithm to a given ensemble of random stochastic matrices. For matrices of order N=2 we derive explicit formulae for the probability distributions induced by random stochastic matrices with columns distributed according to the Dirichlet distribution. For arbitrary $N$ we construct an initial ensemble of stochastic matrices which allows one to generate random bistochastic matrices according to a distribution locally flat at the center of the Birkhoff polytope. The value of the probability density at this point enables us to obtain an estimation of the volume of the Birkhoff polytope, consistent with recent asymptotic results.

  6. Randomized controlled trial comparing ondansetron and placebo for the reduction of spinal anesthesia-induced hypotension during elective cesarean delivery in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Khouly, Nabih I; Meligy, Ashraf M

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate the effect of prophylactic ondansetron on spinal anesthesia-induced hypotension and bradycardia among patients undergoing elective cesarean deliveries. A prospective, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial enrolled patients aged 20-40years scheduled for elective cesarean delivery under spinal anesthesia between January 1, 2015 and January 31, 2016 at Menoufia University Hospital, Egypt. Patients were randomized to receive intravenous ondansetron 4mg in 10mL of saline or 10mL of saline. Participants and investigators were masked to group assignments. The primary outcomes were systolic and diastolic blood pressure, mean arterial pressure, and heart rate, measured at baseline, 10-minute intervals to 60minutes, and at 2hours. Per-protocol analyses were performed including patients who delivered under spinal anesthesia. The analyses included 50 patients in each group. Decreases in systolic blood pressure were reduced among patients receiving ondansetron at all time points (P0.05). Among patients who received ondansetron, mean arterial pressure was higher immediately and 30minutes after spinal anesthesia (Panesthesia (Pspinal anesthesia. Pan African Clinical Trials Registry: PACTR 201601001397193. Copyright © 2016 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Safety of primed repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and modified constraint-induced movement therapy in a randomized controlled trial in pediatric hemiparesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillick, Bernadette T; Krach, Linda E; Feyma, Tim; Rich, Tonya L; Moberg, Kelli; Menk, Jeremiah; Cassidy, Jessica; Kimberley, Teresa; Carey, James R

    2015-04-01

    To investigate the safety of combining a 6-Hz primed low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) intervention in the contralesional hemisphere with a modified constraint-induced movement therapy (mCIMT) program in children with congenital hemiparesis. Phase 1 randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled pretest/posttest trial. University academic facility and pediatric specialty hospital. Subjects (N = 19; age range, 8-17 y) with congenital hemiparesis caused by ischemic stroke or periventricular leukomalacia. No subject withdrew because of adverse events. All subjects included completed the study. Subjects were randomized to 1 of 2 groups: either real rTMS plus mCIMT (n = 10) or sham rTMS plus mCIMT (n = 9). Adverse events, physician assessment, ipsilateral hand function, stereognosis, cognitive function, subject report of symptoms assessment, and subject questionnaire. No major adverse events occurred. Minor adverse events were found in both groups. The most common events were headaches (real: 50%, sham: 89%; P = .14) and cast irritation (real: 30%, sham: 44%; P = .65). No differences between groups in secondary cognitive and unaffected hand motor measures were found. Primed rTMS can be used safely with mCIMT in congenital hemiparesis. We provide new information on the use of rTMS in combination with mCIMT in children. These findings could be useful in research and future clinical applications in advancing function in congenital hemiparesis. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A phase III, randomized, non-inferiority study comparing the efficacy and safety of biosimilar filgrastim versus originator filgrastim for chemotherapy-induced neutropenia in breast cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Hegg

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To compare the efficacy and safety of two filgrastim formulations for controlling chemotherapy-induced neutropenia and to evaluate the non-inferiority of the test drug relative to the originator. METHODS: This phase III non-inferiority study had a randomized, multicenter, and open-label design. The patients were randomized at a ratio of 1:1 with a follow-up period of 6 weeks for each patient. In both study arms, filgrastim was administered subcutaneously at a daily dose of 5 mg/kg body weight. The primary endpoint was the rate of grade 4 neutropenia in the first treatment cycle. The secondary endpoints were the duration of grade 4 neutropenia, the generation of anti-filgrastim antibodies, and the rates of adverse events, laboratory abnormalities, febrile neutropenia, and neutropenia of any grade. RESULTS: The primary efficacy analysis demonstrated the non-inferiority of the test drug compared with the originator drug; the upper limit of the 90% confidence interval (CI for the rate of neutropenia between the two groups (12.61% was lower than the established margin of non-inferiority. The two treatments were similar with respect to the secondary endpoints and safety. CONCLUSION: The efficacy and safety profile of the test drug were similar to those of the originator product based on the rate of grade 4 neutropenia in the first treatment cycle. This study supports Anvisa’s approval of the first biosimilar drug manufactured by the Brazilian industry (Fiprima¯.

  9. A phase III, randomized, non-inferiority study comparing the efficacy and safety of biosimilar filgrastim versus originator filgrastim for chemotherapy-induced neutropenia in breast cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegg, Roberto; Mattar, André; de Matos, João Nunes; Pedrini, José Luiz; Aleixo, Sabina Bandeira; Rocha, Roberto Odebrecht; Cramer, Renato Peixoto; van-Eyll-Rocha, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare the efficacy and safety of two filgrastim formulations for controlling chemotherapy-induced neutropenia and to evaluate the non-inferiority of the test drug relative to the originator. METHODS: This phase III non-inferiority study had a randomized, multicenter, and open-label design. The patients were randomized at a ratio of 1:1 with a follow-up period of 6 weeks for each patient. In both study arms, filgrastim was administered subcutaneously at a daily dose of 5 mg/kg body weight. The primary endpoint was the rate of grade 4 neutropenia in the first treatment cycle. The secondary endpoints were the duration of grade 4 neutropenia, the generation of anti-filgrastim antibodies, and the rates of adverse events, laboratory abnormalities, febrile neutropenia, and neutropenia of any grade. RESULTS: The primary efficacy analysis demonstrated the non-inferiority of the test drug compared with the originator drug; the upper limit of the 90% confidence interval (CI) for the rate of neutropenia between the two groups (12.61%) was lower than the established margin of non-inferiority. The two treatments were similar with respect to the secondary endpoints and safety. CONCLUSION: The efficacy and safety profile of the test drug were similar to those of the originator product based on the rate of grade 4 neutropenia in the first treatment cycle. This study supports Anvisa's approval of the first biosimilar drug manufactured by the Brazilian industry (Fiprima®). PMID:27759847

  10. Adjunctive aripiprazole in the treatment of risperidone-induced hyperprolactinemia: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-response study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing-Xu; Su, Yun-Ai; Bian, Qing-Tao; Wei, Li-He; Zhang, Rong-Zhen; Liu, Yan-Hong; Correll, Christoph; Soares, Jair C; Yang, Fu-De; Wang, Shao-Li; Zhang, Xiang-Yang

    2015-08-01

    Hyperprolactinemia is an unwanted adverse effect associated with several antipsychotics. The addition of partial dopamine receptor agonist aripiprazole may attenuate antipsychotic-induced hyperprolactinemia effectively. However, the ideal dosing regimen for this purpose is unknown. We aimed to evaluate the dose effects of adjunctive treatment with aripiprazole on prolactin levels and hyperprolactinemia in schizophrenia patients. Stable subjects 18-45 years old with schizophrenia and hyperprolactinemia (i.e., >24 ng/ml for females and >20 ng/ml for males) were randomly assigned to receive 8 weeks of placebo (n=30) or oral aripiprazole 5mg/day (n=30), 10mg/day (n=29), or 20mg/day (n=30) added on to fixed dose risperidone treatment. Serum prolactin levels were measured at baseline and after 2, 4 and 8 weeks; clinical symptoms and side effects were assessed at baseline and week 8 using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, Clinical Global Impressions Severity scale, Barnes Akathisia Scale, Simpson-Angus Scale and UKU Side Effects Rating Scale. Of 119 randomized patients, 107 (89.9%) completed the 8-week study. At study end, all three aripiprazole doses resulted in significantly lower prolactin levels (beginning at week 2), higher response rates (≥30% prolactin reduction) and higher prolactin normalization rates than placebo. Effects were significantly greater in the 10 and 20mg/day groups than the 5mg/day group. No significant changes were observed in any treatment groups regarding psychopathology and adverse effect ratings. Adjunctive aripiprazole treatment was effective and safe for resolving risperidone-induced hyperprolactinemia, producing significant and almost maximal improvements by week 2 without significant effects on psychopathology and side effects.

  11. Prophylactic use of gabapentin for prevention of succinylcholine-induced fasciculation and myalgia: A randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C K Pandey

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Succinylcholine is used for rapid-sequence induction of anesthesia. Fasciculations and myalgia are adverse effects. The pretreatment modalities prevent or minimize its adverse effects. Aims: The present study is designed to evaluate the efficacy of gabapentin on the incidence of fasciculation and succinylcholine-induced myalgia. Settings and Design: The study was conducted at a tertiary care teaching hospital in a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled manner. Materials and Methods: Patients of both genders undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy were randomly assigned to two groups. Patients in Group I (Gabapentin group received 600 mg of gabapentin orally 2 h prior to surgery and patients in Group II (placebo group received matching placebo. Anesthesia was induced with fentanyl 3 μg/kg, thiopentone 3-5 mg/kg and succinylcholine 1.5 mg/kg. All patients were observed and graded for fasciculations by a blinded observer and patients were intubated. Anesthesia was maintained with oxygen in air, sevoflurane and intermittent vecuronium bromide. After completion of surgery, neuromuscular blockade was reversed. A blinded observer recorded myalgia grade at 24 h. Patients were provided patient-controlled analgesia with fentanyl for postoperative pain relief. Statistical analysis: Demographic data, fasciculation grade, fentanyl consumption, and myalgia grade were compared using student t test and test of proportions. Results: The study included 76 American Society of Anesthesiologists′ Grade I or II patients of either gender undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy. But only 70 patients completed the study. Results demonstrated that the prophylactic use of gabapentin significantly decreases the incidence and the severity of myalgia (20/35 vs. 11/35 (P<0.05 and decreases fentanyl consumption significantly in the study group (620+164 μg vs. 989+238 μg (P<0.05 without any effects on the incidence and severity of fasciculations

  12. Evaluation of antiplaque and antigingivitis effect of herbal mouthwash in treatment of plaque induced gingivitis: A randomized, clinical trial

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    Shivanand Aspalli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ayurvedic drugs have been used since ancient times to treat diseases including periodontal diseases. Oral rinses made from ayurvedic medicines are used in periodontal therapy to control bleeding and reduce inflammation. The aim of this clinical study is to verify the efficacy of herbal mouthwash containing Pilu, Bibhitaka, Nagavalli, Gandhapura taila, Ela, Peppermint satva, and Yavani satva on reduction of plaque and gingivitis. Materials and Methods: A total of 100 volunteers with clinical signs of mild to moderate gingivitis were selected and assigned to Group A (only scaling done and Group B (scaling along with the use of herbal mouthwash. After recording the clinical parameters, the patients were instructed to use herbal mouthwash 15 ml for 30 s twice daily after food in Group B and oral hygiene instructions were given to all patients. Plaque and gingivitis assessment were carried out using the plaque index (Silness nd Loe, 1964, Gingival index (Loe And Silness, 1963, Gingival bleeding index (Ainamo and Bay, 1975 at baseline and at 21 days of the herbal mouthwash use. Statistically analysis was carried out using the student′s t-test for normally distributed data and Wilcoxson test or Mann-Whitney U-test for skewed data. Results: Our results showed that herbal mouthwash was effective in treatment of plaque induced gingivitis in Group B when compared with the Group A. Conclusion: Herbal mouthwash is effective in treatment of plaque induced gingivitis and can be effectively used as an adjunct to mechanical therapy with lesser side-effects.

  13. The effect of clove-based herbal mouthwash on radiation-induced oral mucositis in patients with head and neck cancer: a single-blind randomized preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kong M

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Moonkyoo Kong,1 Deok-Sang Hwang,2 Seong Woo Yoon,3 Jinsung Kim4 1Department of Radiation Oncology, Kyung Hee University Medical Center, Kyung Hee University School of Medicine, 2Department of Korean Medicine Obstetrics & Gynecology, Kyung Hee University Medical Center, 3Department of Korean Internal Medicine, Korean Medicine Cancer Center, Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, 4Department of Korean Internal Medicine, Kyung Hee University Medical Center, College of Korean Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, Republic of Korea Purpose: This study was performed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of clove-based herbal mouthwash in ameliorating radiation-induced oral mucositis in patients with head and neck cancer. Methods: Fourteen patients were prospectively enrolled in this study and randomized to either an experimental group or a control group. The patients of the experimental group swished their mouths with a clove-based herbal mouthwash during radiotherapy (RT, while the patients of the control group swished with clear water. The primary end point of this study was incidence of radiation-induced oral mucositis. The secondary end points were time to onset of radiation-induced oral mucositis, duration of radiation-induced oral mucositis, incidence of supplemental nutrition through feeding tube, maximum pain score, body weight loss, incidence of RT interruption, and duration of RT interruption. Results: The use of clove-based herbal mouthwash shortened the duration of grade ≥2 mucositis (24.3 days vs 37.1 days, P=0.044 and reduced body weight loss during RT (3.1% vs 7.4%, P=0.023 compared with clear water. The use of clove-based herbal mouthwash also reduced the incidence of grade 3 mucositis (28.6% vs 57.1%, supplemental nutrition (0% vs 28.6%, and RT interruption (14.3% vs 28.6%, and reduced the duration of grade 3 mucositis (5.1 days vs 17.7 days and RT interruption (1 days vs 8.5 days. In addition, clove-based herbal mouthwash

  14. Acute cocoa Flavanols intake has minimal effects on exercise-induced oxidative stress and nitric oxide production in healthy cyclists: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decroix, Lieselot; Tonoli, Cajsa; Soares, Danusa Dias; Descat, Amandine; Drittij-Reijnders, Marie-José; Weseler, Antje R; Bast, Aalt; Stahl, Wilhelm; Heyman, Elsa; Meeusen, Romain

    2017-01-01

    Cocoa flavanols (CF) can stimulate vasodilation by improved nitric oxide (NO) synthesis and have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory capacities. This study aimed to examine whether acute CF intake can affect exercise-induced changes in antioxidant capacity, oxidative stress, inflammation and NO production, as well as exercise performance and recovery in well-trained cyclists. Twelve well-trained male cyclists (mean ± SD age, VO2max: 30 ± 3 years, 63.0 ± 3.5 ml/kg/min) participated in this randomized, double-blind, cross over study. On 2 separate occasions, subjects performed two 30-min time trials 1.5 (TT1) and 3 (TT2) hours after CF (900 mg CF) or placebo (PL, 13 mg CF) intake, interposed by passive rest. Lactate, glucose, heartrate, rating of perceived exertion (RPE) and power output were measured during the TTs. Blood was drawn at baseline, before and after each TT and analyzed for epicatechin serum concentrations, trolox equivalent antioxidative capacity (TEAC), uric acid (UA), malonaldehyde (MDA), L-arginine/ADMA, citrulline, interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α plasma concentrations. Relative changes in blood markers and pacing strategy during TT were analysed by repeated measured ANOVA. TT performance was compared between PL and CF by paired t-test. Epicatechin concentrations were increased by CF intake. Exercise-induced increase in TEAC/UA was improved by CF intake (F(1) = 5.57; p = .038) (post-TT1: PL: 113.34 ± 3.9%, CF: 117.64 ± 3.96%, post-TT2: PL: 108.59 ± 3.95%, CF: 123.72 ± 7.4% to baseline), while exercise-induced increases in MDA, IL-1 and IL-6 were not affected by CF intake. TNF-α was unaltered by exercise and by CF. Exercise-induced decreases in L-arginine/ADMA and increases in citrulline were not affected by CF intake. TT1 and TT2 performance and exercise-induced physiological changes were unaffected by CF intake. Acute CF intake increased total antioxidant capacity in rest and during exercise

  15. [Total knee replacement induces peripheral blood lymphocytes apoptosis and it is not prevented by regional anesthesia - a randomized study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosel, Juliusz; Rusak, Małgorzata; Gołembiewski, Łukasz; Dąbrowska, Milena; Siemiątkowski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Among the many changes caused by a surgical insult one of the least studied is postoperative immunosuppression. This phenomenon is an important cause of infectious complications of surgery such as surgical site infection or hospital acquired pneumonia. One of the mechanisms leading to postoperative immunosuppression is the apoptosis of immunological cells. Anesthesia during surgery is intended to minimize harmful changes and maintain perioperative homeostasis. The aim of the study was evaluation the effect of the anesthetic technique used for total knee replacement on postoperative peripheral blood lymphocyte apoptosis. 34 patients undergoing primary total knee replacement were randomly assigned to two regional anesthetic protocols: spinal anesthesia and combined spinal-epidural anesthesia. 11 patients undergoing total knee replacement under general anesthesia served as control group. Before surgery, immediately after surgery, during first postoperative day and seven days after the surgery venous blood samples were taken and the immunological status of the patient was assessed with the use of flow cysts 87 m, along with lymphocyte apoptosis using fluorescent microscopy. Peripheral blood lymphocyte apoptosis was seen immediately in the postoperative period and was accompanied by a decrease of the number of T cells and B cells. There were no significant differences in the number of apoptotic lymphocytes according to the anesthetic protocol. Changes in the number of T CD3/8 cells and the number of apoptotic lymphocytes were seen on the seventh day after surgery. Peripheral blood lymphocyte apoptosis is an early event in the postoperative period lasts up to seven days and is not affected by the choice of the anesthetic technique. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  16. Total knee replacement induces peripheral blood lymphocytes apoptosis and it is not prevented by regional anesthesia - a randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosel, Juliusz; Rusak, Małgorzata; Gołembiewski, Łukasz; Dąbrowska, Milena; Siemiątkowski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Among the many changes caused by a surgical insult one of the least studied is postoperative immunosuppression. This phenomenon is an important cause of infectious complications of surgery such as surgical site infection or hospital acquired pneumonia. One of the mechanisms leading to postoperative immunosuppression is the apoptosis of immunological cells. Anesthesia during surgery is intended to minimize harmful changes and maintain perioperative homeostasis. The aim of the study was evaluation of the effect of the anesthetic technique used for total knee replacement on postoperative peripheral blood lymphocyte apoptosis. 34 patients undergoing primary total knee replacement were randomly assigned to two regional anesthetic protocols: spinal anesthesia and combined spinal-epidural anesthesia. 11 patients undergoing total knee replacement under general anesthesia served as control group. Before surgery, immediately after surgery, during first postoperative day and seven days after the surgery venous blood samples were taken and the immunological status of the patient was assessed with the use of flow cytometry, along with lymphocyte apoptosis using fluorescent microscopy. Peripheral blood lymphocyte apoptosis was seen immediately in the postoperative period and was accompanied by a decrease of the number of T cells and B cells. There were no significant differences in the number of apoptotic lymphocytes according to the anesthetic protocol. Changes in the number of T CD3/8 cells and the number of apoptotic lymphocytes were seen on the seventh day after surgery. Peripheral blood lymphocyte apoptosis is an early event in the postoperative period that lasts up to seven days and is not affected by the choice of the anesthetic technique. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of clonidine as adjuvant in bupivacaine-induced supraclavicular brachial plexus block: A randomized controlled trial

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    Chakraborty Susmita

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Clonidine has been used as adjuvant to local anesthetics in order to extend the duration of analgesia in various regional and central neuraxial blocks. It is previously reported that clonidine added to bupivacaine increases analgesia duration in brachial plexus block. We evaluated the effect of this combination in supraclavicular brachial plexus block for upper limb orthopedic procedures. Materials and Methods: A randomized double-blind placebo controlled trial was done with 70 patients of American Society of Anesthesiologists Grade I or II status undergoing upper limb orthopedic procedures. Group A (n = 35 patients received 25 ml of 0.5% bupivacaine and 0.2 ml (30 mcg clonidine, whereas group B (n = 35 received 25 ml of 0.5% bupivacaine and 0.2 ml normal saline through a supraclavicular approach for brachial plexus block. Vital parameters were recorded 10 min prior to block placement and every 3 min thereafter till the end of the procedure. Onset and duration of both sensory and motor blocks and sedation score were recorded. All patients were observed in postanesthesia care unit and received tramadol injection as soon as they complained of pain as rescue analgesic. Duration of analgesia was taken as the time from placement of block till injection of rescue analgesic. Results: Analgesia duration was 415.4 ± 38.18 min (mean ± standard deviation in Group A (clonidine compared to 194.2 ± 28.74 min in Group B (control. No clinically significant difference was observed in heart rate, blood pressure, and oxygen saturation. Sedation score was higher in the clonidine group. Conclusion: Addition of a small dose of clonidine to 0.5% bupivacaine significantly prolonged the duration of analgesia without producing any clinically important adverse reactions other than sedation.

  18. Media Literacy in Times of Media Divides

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    Kaja Žuran

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We live in a post-modern society, an information society, a society based around knowledge and participation, and above all in a media society. In a media culture where media holds a dominant position, we cannot overlook the emerging idea of a ‘media divide’ within the frame of media education, media literate individuals and the expansion of the traditional concept of media literacy. Firstly, we are in an era of technological revolution, and it is time to consider the meaning and function of media and how we experience it in our everyday life. Secondly, as a society we are subject to intense media invasion and we all need to learn how to use it to our benefit and apply a critical and autonomous perspective towards selecting media content. Otherwise the media divide between the media literate and illiterate will widen; but is there even a chance to overcome the supposed divide between those who are formally media educated and those who are not?

  19. Prophylaxis of Radiation-Induced Nausea and Vomiting Using 5-Hydroxytryptamine-3 Serotonin Receptor Antagonists: A Systematic Review of Randomized Trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvo, Nadia; Doble, Brett [Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Khan, Luluel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Amirthevasar, Gayathri [Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Dennis, Kristopher [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Pasetka, Mark; DeAngelis, Carlo [Department of Oncology Pharmacy, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Tsao, May [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Chow, Edward, E-mail: Edward.Chow@sunnybrook.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To systematically review the effectiveness and safety of 5-hydroxytryptamine-3 receptor antagonists (5-HT3 RAs) compared with other antiemetic medication or placebo for prophylaxis of radiation-induced nausea and vomiting. Methods and Materials: We searched the following electronic databases: MEDLINE, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Clinical Trials, and Web of Science. We also hand-searched reference lists of included studies. Randomized, controlled trials that compared a 5-HT3 RA with another antiemetic medication or placebo for preventing radiation-induced nausea and vomiting were included. We excluded studies recruiting patients receiving concomitant chemotherapy. When appropriate, meta-analysis was conducted using Review Manager (v5) software. Relative risks were calculated using inverse variance as the statistical method under a random-effects model. We assessed the quality of evidence by outcome using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation approach. Results: Eligibility screening of 47 articles resulted in 9 included in the review. The overall methodologic quality was moderate. Meta-analysis of 5-HT3 RAs vs. placebo showed significant benefit for 5-HT3 RAs (relative risk [RR] 0.70; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.57-0.86 for emesis; RR 0.84, 95% CI 0.73-0.96 for nausea). Meta-analysis comparing 5-HT3 RAs vs. metoclopramide showed a significant benefit of the 5-HT3 RAs for emetic control (RR 0.27, 95% CI 0.15-0.47). Conclusion: 5-Hydroxytryptamine-3 RAs are superior to placebo and other antiemetics for prevention of emesis, but little benefit was identified for nausea prevention. 5-Hydroxytryptamine-3 RAs are suggested for prevention of emesis. Limited evidence was found regarding delayed emesis, adverse events, quality of life, or need for rescue medication. Future randomized, controlled trials should evaluate different 5-HT3 antiemetics and new agents with novel mechanisms of action such at the NK

  20. Immediate hypersensitivity reactions induced by iodinated contrast media%碘造影剂所致速发型过敏反应

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周细平; 李宏

    2011-01-01

    Iodinated contrast media (ICM) are the most commonly used drugs in diagnostic visualisation technique.ICM may be classified as ionic and nonionic according to their chemical structure or high-osmolar, low-osmolar.and iso-osmolar according to their osmoWity.ICM are generally considered to be relatively safe.but serious adverse reactions may occur, such as severe immediate hypersensitivity reactions.Severe immediate hypersensitivity reactions may lead to angioedema, unconsciousness, profound hypotension, arrhythmias, respiratory arrest and cardiac arrest, and so on.The incidence rates of severe immediate hypensensitivity reactions to ionic and nonionic ICM are O.1%- 0.4% and 0.02%- 0.04% , respectively.The most significant risk factor for an immediate hypersensitivity reaction is a history of a hypersensitivity reaction to contrast media.Other risk factors are the history of asthma and allergic history to drug or food, and so on.The mechanism of ICM-induced immediate hypersensitivity reactions may be reWed to histamine release from basophil and mast cells.Histamine release might be due to a direct membrane effect associated with the solution osmolarity or the chemical structure of ICM, an activation of the complement system, as well as the formation of bradykinin and the activation of antigen-antibody reactions mediated by IgE.The preventive and therapeutic measures are as follows: (1) application of Iow-osmolar or iso-osmolar and noruonic ICM as far as possible; (2) the skin test and the premedication such as glucocorticoid and antihistamine to the patients with risk factors should be recommended; (3) the patients with moderate or severe hypersensitivity reactions to ICM should receive the symptomatic and supportive treatments.%碘造影剂是影像学诊断中最常用的药物,根据分子结构可分为离子和非离子型,根据渗透压可分为高渗、低渗和等渗型.碘造影剂通常较为安全,但也可发生严重不良反

  1. Study of volatile compounds induced in fat-containing media by various treatments: application to detection of radiation treatment; Etude de la fraction volatile d'une matrice alimentaire riche en lipides en fonction de divers traitements. Application a la detection du traitement ionisant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lassoued Ben Miled, G.

    1998-07-01

    A methodology has been developed to study the volatile fractions of fat-containing media by a dynamic headspace system followed by a gas chromatography. This methodology has been applied to the volatile fractions of many food media to study the radiolysis mechanism of fat-containing products function of their physical state. A study on the volatile fraction induced by thermolysis of edible oils, has been realized. A comparative study of the thermal-induced and radio-induced hydrocarbons allowed to distinguish these two elements. A detection protocol of ionized food, quick, simple and economic has also been validated on yolk powder and dried fruits. (A.L.B.)

  2. Oral tolerance inhibits pulmonary eosinophilia in a cockroach allergen induced model of asthma: a randomized laboratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natarajan Sudha

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antigen desensitization through oral tolerance is becoming an increasingly attractive treatment option for allergic diseases. However, the mechanism(s by which tolerization is achieved remain poorly defined. In this study we endeavored to induce oral tolerance to cockroach allergen (CRA: a complex mixture of insect components in order to ameliorate asthma-like, allergic pulmonary inflammation. Methods We compared the pulmonary inflammation of mice which had received four CRA feedings prior to intratracheal allergen sensitization and challenge to mice fed PBS on the same time course. Respiratory parameters were assessed by whole body unrestrained plethysmography and mechanical ventilation with forced oscillation. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL and lung homogenate (LH were assessed for cytokines and chemokines by ELISA. BAL inflammatory cells were also collected and examined by light microscopy. Results CRA feeding prior to allergen sensitization and challenge led to a significant improvement in respiratory health. Airways hyperreactivity measured indirectly via enhanced pause (Penh was meaningfully reduced in the CRA-fed mice compared to the PBS fed mice (2.3 ± 0.4 vs 3.9 ± 0.6; p = 0.03. Directly measured airways resistance confirmed this trend when comparing the CRA-fed to the PBS-fed animals (2.97 ± 0.98 vs 4.95 ± 1.41. This effect was not due to reduced traditional inflammatory cell chemotactic factors, Th2 or other cytokines and chemokines. The mechanism of improved respiratory health in the tolerized mice was due to significantly reduced eosinophil numbers in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (43300 ± 11445 vs 158786 ± 38908; p = 0.007 and eosinophil specific peroxidase activity in the lung homogenate (0.59 ± 0.13 vs 1.19 ± 0.19; p = 0.017. The decreased eosinophilia was likely the result of increased IL-10 in the lung homogenate of the tolerized mice (6320 ± 354 ng/mL vs 5190 ± 404 ng/mL, p = 0

  3. A randomized trial of two doses of granisetron in the treatment of chemotherapy-induced emesis. Dutch results within a multinational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bots, M W; Dijkstra, H J; Blijham, G H; van der Wall, E; Fehmers, M C; Keizer, H J; Nortier, J W; Siegenbeek van Heukelom, L; Slee, P H; Veenhof, C H

    1992-06-01

    Granisetron is a new serotonin-receptor antagonist with considerable activity in preclinical models and early clinical studies against drug-induced nausea and vomiting. In a randomized, double-blind trial, two dose levels of granisetron were compared with regard to their efficacy and safety if given to patients receiving emetogenic chemotherapy with or without cisplatin. The present paper reports the Dutch experience with 125 patients included in this international trial. The two dose levels (40 and 160 micrograms/kg given once i.v. prior to chemotherapy) were equally effective in preventing acute emesis and nausea (within the first 24 h); in the group receiving cisplatin doses of 50 mg/m2 or more, 39% of patients had a complete response (no vomiting and mild nausea at most), with a complete response rate of 82% in the patients receiving moderately emetogenic chemotherapy. Sixty-three percent of patients receiving highly emetogenic chemotherapy with a complete response within 24 h lost this response during the next 6 days, as did 20% of the other patients. Headache was the most frequently reported adverse event (18%), followed by constipation (6%) and dizziness (4%). All adverse events were mild and occurred equally frequently at both dose levels. Granisetron at 40 micrograms/kg i.v. given once is effective in the prevention of acute chemotherapy-induced emesis and nausea, in particular in patients receiving moderately emetogenic therapy.

  4. Gluten-free vegan diet induces decreased LDL and oxidized LDL levels and raised atheroprotective natural antibodies against phosphorylcholine in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkan, Ann-Charlotte; Sjöberg, Beatrice; Kolsrud, Björn; Ringertz, Bo; Hafström, Ingiäld; Frostegård, Johan

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of vegan diet in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) on blood lipids oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) and natural atheroprotective antibodies against phosphorylcholine (anti-PCs). Sixty-six patients with active RA were randomly assigned to either a vegan diet free of gluten (38 patients) or a well-balanced non-vegan diet (28 patients) for 1 year. Thirty patients in the vegan group completed more than 3 months on the diet regimen. Blood lipids were analyzed by routine methods, and oxLDL and anti-PCs were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Data and serum samples were obtained at baseline and after 3 and 12 months. Mean ages were 50.0 years for the vegan group and 50.8 years for controls. Gluten-free vegan diet induced lower body mass index (BMI) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and higher anti-PC IgM than control diet (p vegan group, BMI, LDL, and cholesterol decreased after both 3 and 12 months (p vegan patients into clinical responders and non-responders at 12 months, the effects on oxLDL and anti-PC IgA were seen only in responders (p vegan diet in RA induces changes that are potentially atheroprotective and anti-inflammatory, including decreased LDL and oxLDL levels and raised anti-PC IgM and IgA levels.

  5. Effect of eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acid on resting and exercise-induced inflammatory and oxidative stress biomarkers: a randomized, placebo controlled, cross-over study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galpin Andrew J

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of the present investigation was to determine the effects of EPA/DHA supplementation on resting and exercise-induced inflammation and oxidative stress in exercise-trained men. Fourteen men supplemented with 2224 mg EPA+2208 mg DHA and a placebo for 6 weeks in a random order, double blind cross-over design (with an 8 week washout prior to performing a 60 minute treadmill climb using a weighted pack. Blood was collected pre and post exercise and analyzed for a variety of oxidative stress and inflammatory biomarkers. Blood lactate, muscle soreness, and creatine kinase activity were also measured. Results Treatment with EPA/DHA resulted in a significant increase in blood levels of both EPA (18 ± 2 μmol·L-1 vs. 143 ± 23 μmol·L-1; p -1 vs. 157 ± 13 μmol·L-1; p 0.05. There was a mild increase in oxidative stress in response to exercise (XO and H2O2 (p Conclusion EPA/DHA supplementation increases blood levels of these fatty acids and results in decreased resting levels of inflammatory biomarkers in exercise-trained men, but does not appear necessary for exercise-induced attenuation in either inflammation or oxidative stress. This may be due to the finding that trained men exhibit a minimal increase in both inflammation and oxidative stress in response to moderate duration (60 minute aerobic exercise.

  6. Media literacy education for elementary school substance use prevention: study of media detective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupersmidt, Janis B; Scull, Tracy M; Austin, Erica Weintraub

    2010-09-01

    Media Detective is a 10-lesson elementary school substance use prevention program developed on the basis of the message interpretation processing model designed to increase children's critical thinking skills about media messages and reduce intent to use tobacco and alcohol products. The purpose of this study was to conduct a short-term, randomized, controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of Media Detective for achieving these goals. Elementary schools were randomly assigned to conditions to either receive the Media Detective program (n=344) or serve in a waiting list control group (n=335). Boys in the Media Detective group reported significantly less interest in alcohol-branded merchandise than boys in the control group. Also, students who were in the Media Detective group and had used alcohol or tobacco in the past reported significantly less intention to use and more self-efficacy to refuse substances than students who were in the control group and had previously used alcohol or tobacco. This evaluation provides evidence that Media Detective can be effective for substance use prevention in elementary school-aged children. Notably, media-related cognitions about alcohol and tobacco products are malleable and relevant to the development and maintenance of substance use behaviors during late childhood. The findings from this study suggest that media literacy-based interventions may serve as both a universal and a targeted prevention program that has potential for assisting elementary school children in making healthier, more informed decisions about use of alcohol and tobacco products.

  7. Predictive Toxicology: Modeling Chemical Induced Toxicological Response Combining Circular Fingerprints with Random Forest and Support Vector Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexios eKoutsoukas

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Modern drug discovery and toxicological research are under pressure, as the cost of developing and testing new chemicals for potential toxicological risk is rising. Extensive evaluation of chemical products for potential adverse effects is a challenging task, due to the large number of chemicals and the possible hazardous effects on human health. Safety regulatory agencies around the world are dealing with two major challenges. First, the growth of chemicals introduced every year in household products and medicines that need to be tested, and second the need to protect public welfare. Hence, alternative and more efficient toxicological risk assessment methods are in high demand. The Toxicology in the 21st Century (Tox21 consortium a collaborative effort was formed to develop and investigate alternative assessment methods. A collection of 10,000 compounds composed of environmental chemicals and approved drugs were screened for interference in biochemical pathways and released for crowdsourcing data analysis. The physicochemical space covered by Tox21 library was explored, measured by Molecular Weight (MW and the octanol/water partition coefficient (cLogP. It was found that on average chemical structures had MW of 272.6 Daltons. In case of cLogP the average value was 2.476. Next relationships between assays were examined based on compounds activity profiles across the assays utilizing the Pearson correlation coefficient r. A cluster was observed between the Androgen and Estrogen Receptors and their ligand bind domains accordingly indicating presence of cross talks among the receptors. The highest correlations observed were between NR.AR and NR.AR_LBD, where it was r=0.66 and between NR.ER and NR.ER_LBD, where it was r=0.5.Our approach to model the Tox21 data consisted of utilizing circular molecular fingerprints combined with Random Forest and Support Vector Machine by modeling each assay independently. In all of the 12 sub-challenges our modeling

  8. Social media metrics

    OpenAIRE

    Balvín, Radek

    2013-01-01

    With growing amount of data produced by users on social media the need of extraction of relevant data for marketing, research and other uses grows as well. The bachelor thesis named "Social media metrics" presents the issues of monitoring, measurement and metrics of social media. In the research part it also maps and captures the present Czech practice in measurement and monitoring of social media. I also rate the use of social media monitoring tools and usual methods of social media measurem...

  9. Psychophysical outcomes from a randomized pilot study of manual, electro, and sham acupuncture treatment on experimentally induced thermal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Jian; Fufa, Duretti T; Gerber, Andrew J; Rosman, Ilana S; Vangel, Mark G; Gracely, Richard H; Gollub, Randy L

    2005-01-01

    In this pilot study comparing the analgesic effects of three acupuncture modes--manual, electro, and placebo (with Streitberger placebo needles)--in a cohort of healthy subjects, we found that verum acupuncture treatment, but not placebo, lowered pain ratings in response to calibrated noxious thermal stimuli. This finding was mainly the result of highly significant analgesia in 5 of the 11 subjects who completed the 5-session study. Of the 5 responders, 2 responded only to electroacupuncture and 3 only to manual acupuncture, suggesting that acupuncture's analgesic effects on experimental pain may be dependent on both subject and mode. We developed a simple quantitative assessment tool, the Subjective Acupuncture Sensation Scale (SASS), comprised of 9 descriptors and an anxiety measure to study the relationship between the deqi sensation induced by acupuncture and the putative therapeutic effects of acupuncture. The SASS results confirm that the deqi sensation is complex, with all subjects rating multiple descriptors during each mode. We found significant correlations of analgesia with SASS ratings of numbness and soreness, but not with ratings of stabbing, throbbing, tingling, burning, heaviness, fullness, or aching. This suggests that attributes of the deqi sensation may be useful clinical indicators of effective treatment. The results of this study indicate the existence of both individual subject and acupuncture mode variability in the analgesic effects of acupuncture. This suggests that switching acupuncture mode may be a treatment option for unresponsive patients.

  10. Rebamipide has the potential to reduce the intensity of NSAID-induced small intestinal injury: a double-blind, randomized, controlled trial evaluated by capsule endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimori, Shunji; Takahashi, Yoko; Gudis, Katya; Seo, Tsuguhiko; Ehara, Akihito; Kobayashi, Tsuyoshi; Mitsui, Keigo; Yonezawa, Masaoki; Tanaka, Shu; Tatsuguchi, Atsushi; Sakamoto, Choitsu

    2011-01-01

    A study reported that rebamipide was effective at reducing short-term nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-induced enteropathy. The purpose of this study was to re-evaluate the effect of the co-administration of rebamipide on small intestinal injuries induced by short-term NSAID treatment. Eighty healthy male volunteers were randomly assigned to two study groups: a control group (N = 40), which received NSAID (diclofenac sodium, 75 mg/day) and omeprazole (20 mg/day) treatment along with a placebo; and a rebamipide group, which received NSAID, omeprazole and rebamipide (300 mg/day). Small intestinal injuries (mucosal breaks plus denuded areas) were evaluated by capsule endoscopy before and after 14 days of treatment. A total of 38 control subjects and 34 rebamipide subjects completed the treatment and were evaluated by capsule endoscopy. NSAID therapy increased the mean number of mucosal injuries per subject from a basal level of 0.1 ± 0.3 to 16 ± 71 and 4.2 ± 7.8 in the control and rebamipide groups, respectively, but the difference was not significant. The difference in the percentage of subjects with at least one mucosal injury post-treatment was also not significant (control 63%; rebamipide 47%). Limiting our analysis to subjects with mucosal injuries, rebamipide co-treatment had the tendency to reduce the mean number of mucosal injuries per subject from 25 in the control group to 8.9 in the rebamipide group (multiple comparisons test; p = 0.088, Mann-Whitney U test; p = 0.038). Rebamipide co-therapy had the potential to reduce the intensity of small intestinal injury induced by 2-week administration of diclofenac.

  11. Social media management and media environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šiđanin Iva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the system of services that social media management can offer to a variety of users. As social media systems are emerging, social media management can strengthen teams in social media and help to manage numerous social channels and distribution of social information from one place. Social media management is a system of procedures that are used to manage the flow of information in the environment of social media. This involves connecting with social media like Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Plaxo, Ecademy, YouTube and many others, then the aggregation and management of social data. Social media management services are analysed through various fields, such as managing multiple social media profiles, mail scheduling and filtering, reporting and analytics. Social media management enables managing personal business through social media, which contributes to a significant reduction in expenditures. The paper also discusses the importance of social media management in marketing activities and various forms of social promotion, which allow companies to easily reach their customers.

  12. Comparison of the Effect of PRP, PRF and Induced Bleeding in the Revascularization of Teeth with Necrotic Pulp and Open Apex: A Triple Blind Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivashankar, Vasundara Yayathi; Johns, Dexton Antony; Maroli, Ramesh Kumar; Sekar, Mahalaxmi; Chandrasekaran, Rathinavel; Karthikeyan, Shanmugavel; Renganathan, Senthil Kumar

    2017-06-01

    Treatment of a tooth with necrotic pulp and open apex is a special challenge to the clinicians. Apexification with calcium hydroxide and MTA barrier technique fails to induce continued root maturation which makes the tooth susceptible to root fracture. Hence, an ideal outcome for such a tooth should be regeneration of pulp like tissue into the root canal capable of continuing normal root maturation. This study aims to compare the effect of Platelet Rich Fibrin (PRF), induced bleeding technique and Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) in the revascularization of tooth with necrotic pulp and open apex. The main objectives of the study were to: (a) Radiographically evaluate the continuation of root development, increase in the dentin wall thickness and narrowing of canal space, apical closure and resolution of the periapical lesion; and to (b) To clinically evaluate the response to pulp sensibility testing and response to percussion and palpation tests. Sixty patients (6 to 28 years) with necrotic immature permanent tooth were randomly categorised into three groups after the root canal disinfection procedure. PRF as scaffolding material (Group A: n=20), revascularization with conventional induced bleeding technique (Group B: n=20), and PRP as the biomaterial (Group C: n=20). The primary outcome variable was measured using Periapical Index (PAI) (for periapical healing), Chen and Chen index (for apical responses), Schei's ruler (for root lengthening and root thickening) and other clinical parameters. The Chi-square test was used to interpret the data among the three groups at the end of 12 months for the variables root lengthening and lateral wall thickness. ANOVA test was performed to compare the mean of the PAI scores of the three groups at preoperative stage and 12 months. If statistically significant, Bonferroni test was done to compare the outcome among the three groups. The significant level was set at pPRF and induced bleeding technique with respect to periapical wound

  13. Optimization of Scatterer Concentration in High-Gain Scattering Media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Jiu-Gao; ZHU He-Yuan; SUN Die-Chi; DU Ge-Guo; LI Fu-Ming

    2001-01-01

    We report the scatterer concentration-dependent behaviour of laser action in high-gain scattering media. Amodified model of a random laser is proposed to explain the experimental results in good agreement. We mayuse this modified model to design and optimize the random laser system. A further detailed model is needed toquantitatively analyse the far-field distribution of random laser action.

  14. Circular polarization memory in polydisperse scattering media

    CERN Document Server

    Macdonald, Callum M; Meglinski, Igor

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the survival of circularly polarized light in random scattering media. The surprising persistence of this form of polarization has a known dependence on the size and refractive index of scattering particles, however a general description regarding polydisperse media is lacking. Through analysis of Mie theory, we present a means of calculating the magnitude of circular polarization memory in complex media, with total generality in the distribution of particle sizes and refractive indices. Quantification of this memory effect enables an alternate pathway towards recovering particle size distribution, based on measurements of diffusing circularly polarized light.

  15. Random duality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO TieXin; CHEN XinXiang

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide a random duality theory for the further development of the theory of random conjugate spaces for random normed modules.First,the complicated stratification structure of a module over the algebra L(μ,K) frequently makes our investigations into random duality theory considerably different from the corresponding ones into classical duality theory,thus in this paper we have to first begin in overcoming several substantial obstacles to the study of stratification structure on random locally convex modules.Then,we give the representation theorem of weakly continuous canonical module homomorphisms,the theorem of existence of random Mackey structure,and the random bipolar theorem with respect to a regular random duality pair together with some important random compatible invariants.

  16. Random duality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide a random duality theory for the further development of the theory of random conjugate spaces for random normed modules. First, the complicated stratification structure of a module over the algebra L(μ, K) frequently makes our investigations into random duality theory considerably difierent from the corresponding ones into classical duality theory, thus in this paper we have to first begin in overcoming several substantial obstacles to the study of stratification structure on random locally convex modules. Then, we give the representation theorem of weakly continuous canonical module homomorphisms, the theorem of existence of random Mackey structure, and the random bipolar theorem with respect to a regular random duality pair together with some important random compatible invariants.

  17. Advertising on social media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumit Goyal

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This communication reports the latest trends of advertising on social media. Social media advertising means to gain traffic or attention of online users through social media sites. Today, when a user thinks about buying something, he first comes to the internet, searches for that product, compares its price with other competing brands and takes a decision, which one to buy. In this write-up, author has discussed many aspects concerning advertising through social media, viz., what is social media? What is the impact of social media on mainstream media, why to advertise on social media? and what should be the strategy for advertising on social media. The author is of the view that in the year 2013, $4 billion will be spent on social media advertising across the globe and social media industry will generate over 1,00,000 new jobs all around the world.

  18. Efficacy of short-term high-dose statin in preventing contrast-induced nephropathy: a meta-analysis of seven randomized controlled trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongchuan Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A few studies focused on statin therapy as specific prophylactic measures of contrast-induced nephropathy have been published with conflicting results. In this meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials, we aimed to assess the effectiveness of short-term high-dose statin treatment for the prevention of CIN and clinical outcomes and re-evaluate of the potential benefits of statin therapy. METHODS: We searched PubMed, OVID, EMBASE, Web of science and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases for randomized controlled trials comparing short-term high-dose statin treatment versus low-dose statin treatment or placebo for preventing CIN. Our outcome measures were the risk of CIN within 2-5 days after contrast administration and need for dialysis. RESULTS: Seven randomized controlled trials with a total of 1,399 patients were identified and analyzed. The overall results based on fixed-effect model showed that the use of short-term high-dose statin treatment was associated with a significant reduction in risk of CIN (RR =0.51, 95% CI 0.34-0.76, p =0.001; I(2 = 0%. The incidence of acute renal failure requiring dialysis was not significant different after the use of statin (RR = 0.33, 95% CI 0.05-2.10, p = 0.24; I(2 = 0%. The use of statin was not associated with a significant decrease in the plasma C-reactive protein level (SMD -0.64, 95% CI: -1.57 to 0.29, P = 0.18, I(2 = 97%. CONCLUSIONS: Although this meta-analysis supports the use of statin to reduce the incidence of CIN, it must be considered in the context of variable patient demographics. Only a limited recommendation can be made in favour of the use of statin based on current data. Considering the limitations of included studies, a large, well designed trial that incorporates the evaluation of clinically relevant outcomes in participants with different underlying risks of CIN is required to more adequately assess the role for statin in CIN prevention.

  19. Intranasal administration of a therapeutic HIV vaccine (Vacc-4x induces dose-dependent systemic and mucosal immune responses in a randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin Brekke

    Full Text Available Vacc-4x, a Gag p24-based therapeutic HIV vaccine, has been shown to reduce viral load set-points after intradermal administration. In this randomized controlled pilot study we investigate intranasal administration of Vacc-4x with Endocine as adjuvant.Safety and immunogenicity were tested in patients on effective ART. They were randomized to low, medium or high dose Vacc-4x or adjuvant alone, administered four times at weekly intervals with no booster. Vacc-4x-specific T cell responses were measured in vitro by proliferation and in vivo by a single DTH skin test at the end of study. Nasal and rectal mucosal secretions were analyzed for Vacc-4x-specific antibodies by ELISA. Immune regulation induced by Vacc-4x was assessed by functional blockade of the regulatory cytokines IL-10 and TGF-β.Vacc-4x proliferative T cell responses increased only among the vaccinated (p ≤ 0.031. The low dose group showed the greatest increase in Vacc-4x CD8+T cell responses (p = 0.037 and developed larger DTH (p = 0.005 than the adjuvant group. Rectal (distal Vacc-4x IgA and IgG antibodies also increased (p = 0.043 in this group. In contrast, the high dose generated higher nasal (local Vacc-4x IgA (p = 0.028 and serum IgG (p = 0.030 antibodies than the adjuvant. Irrespective of dose, increased Vacc-4x CD4+T cell responses were associated with low proliferation (r = -0.82, p < 0.001 and high regulation (r = 0.61, p = 0.010 at baseline.Intranasal administration of Vacc-4x with Endocine was safe and induced dose-dependent vaccine-specific T cell responses and both mucosal and systemic humoral responses. The clinical significance of dose, immune regulation and mucosal immunity warrants further investigation.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01473810.

  20. Reversal of Vecuronium-induced Neuromuscular Blockade with Low-dose Sugammadex at Train-of-four Count of Four: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asztalos, László; Szabó-Maák, Zoltán; Gajdos, András; Nemes, Réka; Pongrácz, Adrienn; Lengyel, Szabolcs; Fülesdi, Béla; Tassonyi, Edömér

    2017-09-01

    Rocuronium-induced neuromuscular block that spontaneously recovered to a train-of-four count of four can be reversed with sugammadex 0.5 or 1.0 mg/kg. We investigated whether these doses of sugammadex can also reverse vecuronium at a similar level of block. Sixty-five patients were randomly assigned, and 64 were analyzed in this controlled, superiority study. Participants received general anesthesia with propofol, sevoflurane, fentanyl, and vecuronium. Measurement of neuromuscular function was performed with acceleromyography (TOF-Watch-SX, Organon Teknika B.V., The Netherlands ). Once the block recovered spontaneously to four twitches in response to train-of-four stimulation, patients were randomly assigned to receive sugammadex 0.5, 1.0, or 2.0 mg/kg; neostigmine 0.05 mg/kg; or placebo. Time from study drug injection to normalized train-of-four ratio 0.9 and the incidence of incomplete reversal within 30 min were the primary outcome variables. Secondary outcome was the incidence of reparalysis (normalized train-of-four ratio less than 0.9). Sugammadex, in doses of 1.0 and 2.0 mg/kg, reversed a threshold train-of-four count of four to normalized train-of-four ratio of 0.9 or higher in all patients in 4.4 ± 2.3 min (mean ± SD) and 2.6 ± 1.6 min, respectively. Sugammadex 0.5 mg/kg reversed the block in 6.8 ± 4.1 min in 70% of patients (P 0.05 vs. sugammadex 0.5 mg/kg). The overall frequency of reparalysis was 18.7%, but this incidence varied from group to group. Sugammadex 1.0 mg/kg, unlike 0.5 mg/kg, properly reversed a threshold train-of-four count of four vecuronium-induced block but did not prevent reparalysis.

  1. Parametric wave interaction in quadratic crystal with randomized distribution of ferroelectric domains

    CERN Document Server

    Kalinowski, Ksawery; Łukasiewicz, Tadeusz; Świrkowicz, Marek; Sheng, Yan; Krolikowski, Wieslaw

    2012-01-01

    We study the parametric wave interaction in qua- dratic nonlinear media with randomized distribution of the ferroelectric domains. In particular, we discuss properties of second and cascaded third harmonic generation. We derive analytical formulas describing emission properties of the second and third harmonics in the presence of domain disorder and show that the latter process is governed by the characteristics of the constituent processes, i.e. second harmonic generation and sum frequency mixing. We demonstrate the role of randomness on various second and third harmonic generation regimes such as Raman-Nath and \\v{C}erenkov nonlinear diffraction. We show that the randomness-induced incoherence in the wave interaction leads to deterioration of conversion efficiency and angular spreading of harmonic generated in the processes relying on transverse phase matching such as Raman-Nath. On the other hand forward and \\v{C}erenkov frequency generation are basically insensitive to the domain randomness.

  2. Otitis media with effusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    OME; Secretory otitis media; Serous otitis media; Silent otitis media; Silent ear infection; Glue ear ... Kerschner JE, Preciado D. Otitis media. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St. Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  3. Why Media Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locatis, Craig

    2007-01-01

    Whether media affect learning has been debated for decades. The discussion of media's effectiveness has raised questions about the usefulness of comparison studies, not only in assessing applications of technology but in other areas as well. Arguments that media do not affect learning are re-examined and issues concerning media effects on expert…

  4. Media Violence and Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groebel, Jo

    1998-01-01

    Presents the results of the UNESCO global study on media violence and children which was conducted between 1996 and 1997. Highlights include the role of the media, media heroes as role models, media violence and aggression, differences by gender, rural versus urban environments, the pervasiveness of television, and recommendations. (Author/LRW)

  5. A randomized, double-blind, multicentre study comparing daily 2 and 5 mg of tropisetron for the control of nausea and vomiting induced by low-dose cisplatin- or non-cisplatin-containing chemotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wymenga, ANM; vanderGraaf, WTA; Wils, JA; vanHeukelom, LS; vanderLinden, GHM; DullemondWestland, AC; Nooy, M; vanderHeul, C; deBruijn, KM; deVries, EGE

    1996-01-01

    Background: This study compares efficacy safety and tolerability of 2 and 5 mg tropisetron in prevention of nausea and vomiting induced by low-dose cisplatin- or non-cisplatin-containing chemotherapy. Patients and methods: 152 chemotherapy-naive cancer patients were randomized in a double-blind mann

  6. Curvature-induced dissipation

    CERN Document Server

    Debus, J -D; Succi, S; Herrmann, H J

    2015-01-01

    By inspecting the effect of curvature on a moving fluid, we find that local sources of curvature not only exert inertial forces on the flow, but also generate viscous stresses as a result of the departure of streamlines from the idealized geodesic motion. The curvature-induced viscous forces are shown to cause an indirect and yet appreciable energy dissipation. As a consequence, the flow converges to a stationary equilibrium state solely by virtue of curvature-induced dissipation. In addition, we show that flow through randomly-curved media satisfies a non-linear transport law, resembling Darcy-Forchheimer's law, due to the viscous forces generated by the spatial curvature. It is further shown that the permeability can be characterized in terms of the average metric perturbation.

  7. Impact of moderate intensity aerobic exercise on chemotherapy-induced anemia in elderly women with breast cancer: A randomized controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heba M. Mohamady

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Exercises are often recommended for patients suffering from anemia to improve physical conditioning and hematologic parameters. Hence, the present study aimed to investigate the impact of moderate intensity aerobic exercise on chemotherapy-induced anemia. Thirty elderly women with breast cancer underwent chemotherapy and were randomly assigned into two equal groups; Group A received aerobic exercise for 25–40 min at 50–70% of the maximum heart rate, 3 times/week for 12 weeks in addition to usual daily living activities, medication and nutritional support. Group B who did not train served as controls. Hemoglobin (Hb, and red blood cell count (RBCs were evaluated pre-treatment and after 12 weeks of training. There were significant declines of both Hb (t = 16.30; P < 0.001 and RBCs (t = 10.38; P < 0.001 in group B relative to group A. Regarding group A, Hb increased from 11.52 ± 0.62 to 12.10 ± 0.59 g/dL with a 5.03% change, while RBCs increased from 4.24 ± 0.37 to 4.49 ± 0.42 million cells/μL with a 5.89% change. Between-group differences were noteworthy regarding Hb (t = −5.34; P < 0.001 and RBCs (t = −5.314; P < 0.001. The results indicate that regular participation in moderate intensity aerobic exercise can enhance chemotherapy-induced anemia.

  8. Antioxidant Capacity of Calendula Officinalis Flowers Extract and Prevention of Radiation Induced Oropharyngeal Mucositis in Patients with Head and Neck Cancers: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Taghi Kazemi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to determine the effect of Calendula officinalis flowers extract mouthwash as oral gel on radiation-induced oropharyngeal mucositis (OM in patients with head-and-neck cancer. Forty patients with neck and head cancers under radiotherapy or concurrent chemoradiotherapy protocols were randomly assigned to receive either 2% calendula extract mouthwash or placebo (20 patients in each group. Patients were treated with telecobalt radiotherapy at conventional fractionation (200 cGy/fraction, five fractions weekly, 30–35 fractions within 4–7 weeks. The oropharyngeal mucositis was evaluated by two clinical investigators (a radiation oncologist and a dentist, using the oral mucositis assessment scale (OMAS. Trying to find out the possible mechanism of action of the treatment, total antioxidant, polyphenol and flavonoid contents, and quercetin concentration of the mouth wash were measured. Calendula mouthwash significantly decreased the intensity of OM compared to placebo at week 2 (score: 5.5 vs. 6.8, p = 0.019, week 3 (score: 8.25 vs. 10.95, p < 0.0001 and week 6 (score: 11.4 vs. 13.35, p = 0.031. Total antioxidant, polyphenol and flavonoid contents and quercetin concentration of the 2% extract were 2353.4 ± 56.5 μM, 313.40 ± 6.52 mg/g, 76.66 ± 23.24 mg/g, and 19.41 ± 4.34 mg/l, respectively. Calendula extract gel could be effective on decreasing the intensity of radiotherapy- induced OM during the treatment and antioxidant capacity may be partly responsible for the effect.

  9. Effects on muscle performance of NSAID treatment with Piroxicam versus placebo in geriatric patients with acute infection-induced inflammation. a double blind randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beyer Ingo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inflammation is the main cause of disease-associated muscle wasting. In a previous single blind study we have demonstrated improved recovery of muscle endurance following celecoxib treatment in hospitalized geriatric patients with acute infection. Here we further evaluate NSAID treatment with piroxicam in a double blind RCT and investigate the role of cytokines and heat shock proteins (Hsp with respect to muscle performance. We hypothesized that NSAID treatment would preserve muscle performance better than antibiotic treatment alone, by reducing infection-associated inflammation and by increasing expression of cytoprotective Hsp. Methods Consecutive admissions to the geriatric ward were screened. 30 Caucasian patients, median age 84.5 years, with acute infection-induced inflammation and serum levels of CRP > 10 mg/L were included and randomized to active treatment with 10 mg piroxicam daily or placebo. Assessment comprised general clinical and biochemical parameters, 25 cytokines in serum, intra-and extracellular Hsp27 and Hsp70, Elderly Mobility Scale (EMS scores, grip strength (GS, fatigue resistance (FR and lean body mass (LBM. Patients were evaluated until discharge with a maximum of 3 weeks after treatment allocation. Results EMS scores, FR and grip work (GW, a measure taking into account GS and FR, significantly improved with piroxicam, but not with placebo. Early decreases in IL-6 serum levels with piroxicam correlated with better muscle performance at week 2. Basal expression of Hsp27 in monocytes without heat challenge (WHC was positively correlated with FR at baseline and significantly increased by treatment with piroxicam compared to placebo. Profound modifications in the relationships between cytokines or Hsp and changes in muscle parameters were observed in the piroxicam group. Conclusions Piroxicam improves clinically relevant measures of muscle performance and mobility in geriatric patients hospitalized with

  10. Effects of probiotic Lactobacillus casei DN-114 001 in prevention of radiation-induced diarrhea: results from multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled nutritional trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giralt, Jordi; Regadera, José Perez; Verges, Ramona; Romero, Jesus; de la Fuente, Isabel; Biete, Albert; Villoria, Jesús; Cobo, Jose Maria; Guarner, Francisco

    2008-07-15

    To determine whether a probiotic drink containing Lactobacillus casei DN-114 001 reduces the incidence of radiation-induced diarrhea in patients with gynecologic cancer. Patients who were undergoing pelvic radiotherapy (45-50 Gy, conventional fractionation) for either cervical carcinoma (radiotherapy and weekly cisplatin) or endometrial adenocarcinoma (postoperative radiotherapy) were randomly assigned to a probiotic drink or placebo, in a double-blind fashion. The probiotic drink consisted of liquid yogurt containing L. casei DN-114 001 at 10(8) CFU/g. The patients recorded the daily the number of bowel movements and scored the stool consistency using the Bristol scale. Diarrhea was graded weekly according the Common Toxicity Criteria system. The primary endpoint was to reduce the incidence of diarrhea, defined by a Common Toxicity Criteria Grade of 2 or greater or the need for loperamide. A total of 85 patients were enrolled. Grade 2 or greater diarrhea and/or the use of loperamide was observed in 24 of 41 patients in the placebo group and 30 of 44 in the probiotic group (p = 0.568). No differences were found in the median time to the presentation of the primary endpoint. Probiotic intervention had a significant effect on stool consistency (p = 0.04). The median time for patients to present with Bristol scale stools of Type 6 or greater was 14 days for patients receiving the probiotic drink vs. 10 days for those receiving placebo. Nutritional intervention with the probiotic drink containing L. casei DN-114 001 does not reduce the incidence of radiation-induced diarrhea as defined by a Common Toxicity Criteria Grade 2 or greater. However, it had a significant effect on stool consistency as measured by the Bristol scale.

  11. Guar gum solutions for improved delivery of iron particles in porous media (Part 1): Porous medium rheology and guar gum-induced clogging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastone, Francesca; Tosco, Tiziana; Sethi, Rajandrea

    2014-10-01

    The present work is the first part of a comprehensive study on the use of guar gum to improve delivery of microscale zero-valent iron particles in contaminated aquifers. Guar gum solutions exhibit peculiar shear thinning properties, with high viscosity in static conditions and lower viscosity in dynamic conditions: this is beneficial both for the storage of MZVI dispersions, and also for the injection in porous media. In the present paper, the processes associated with guar gum injection in porous media are studied performing single-step and multi-step filtration tests in sand-packed columns. The experimental results of single-step tests performed by injecting guar gum solutions prepared at several concentrations and applying different dissolution procedures evidenced that the presence of residual undissolved polymeric particles in the guar gum solution may have a relevant negative impact on the permeability of the porous medium, resulting in evident clogging. The most effective preparation procedure which minimizes the presence of residual particles is dissolution in warm water (60 °C) followed by centrifugation (procedure T60C). The multi-step tests (i.e. injection of guar gum at constant concentration with a step increase of flow velocity), performed at three polymer concentrations (1.5, 3 and 4 g/l) provided information on the rheological properties of guar gum solutions when flowing through a porous medium at variable discharge rates, which mimic the injection in radial geometry. An experimental protocol was defined for the rheological characterization of the fluids in porous media, and empirical relationships were derived for the quantification of rheological properties and clogging with variable injection rate. These relationships will be implemented in the second companion paper (Part II) in a radial transport model for the simulation of large-scale injection of MZVI-guar gum slurries.

  12. Dependence of pressure-induced phase transitions on pressure-transmitting media in the heavy-electron superconductor URu{sub 2}Si{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amitsuka, H. [Department of Physics, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan)], E-mail: amiami@phys.sci.hokudai.ac.jp; Matsuda, K. [Department of Physics, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Yokoyama, M. [Faculty of Science, Ibaraki University, Mito 310-8512 (Japan); Kawasaki, I.; Takayama, S.; Ishihara, Y. [Department of Physics, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Tenya, K. [Faculty of Education, Shinshu University, Nagano 380-8544 (Japan); Tateiwa, N. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai 319-1195 (Japan); Kobayashi, T.C. [Department of Physics, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Yoshizawa, H. [Neutron Science Laboratory, ISSP, The University of Tokyo, Tokai 319-1106 (Japan)

    2008-04-01

    Elastic neutron-scattering and ac-susceptibility measurements have been performed on a 2{phi} single crystal of URu{sub 2}Si{sub 2} under hydrostatic pressure up to {approx}1.1GPa using Fluorinert 70 and 77 and Daphne oil 7373 as pressure-transmitting media. Daphne oil produces better hydrostaticity of the applied pressure than Fluorinert, resulting in a slight shift of the phase boundary between hidden order and antiferromagnetic order to a lower pressure. The superconducting phase is also influenced, but never overlaps with the antiferromagnetic phase.

  13. Understanding social media logic

    OpenAIRE

    José van Dijck; Thomas Poell

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade, social media platforms have penetrated deeply into the mech­anics of everyday life, affecting people's informal interactions, as well as institutional structures and professional routines. Far from being neutral platforms for everyone, social media have changed the conditions and rules of social interaction. In this article, we examine the intricate dynamic between social media platforms, mass media, users, and social institutions by calling attention to social media lo...

  14. Social media influencer marketing

    OpenAIRE

    Isosuo, Heli

    2016-01-01

    The marketing field is changing simultaneously with the digital world. Social media is getting more and more important to marketers, and there is a need to stand out in the social media noise. Social media influencer marketing could be a good alternative to other types of marketing. A need from the consignor and the interest of the author were the motivations for conducting the study. Sääskilahti Consulting has a social media influencer network Somevaikuttajat, which is offering social media ...

  15. The effect of three mouthwashes on radiation-induced oral mucositis in patients with head and neck malignancies: A randomized control trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madan Kumar P

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The present study was done to assess the effect of three alcohol-free mouthwashes on radiation-induced oral mucositis in patients with head and neck malignancies. Materials and Methods: Eighty patients with head and neck malignancies, scheduled to undergo curative radiotherapy, were randomly assigned to receive one of the three alcohol-free test mouthwashes (0.12% chlorhexidine, 1% povidone-iodine, or salt/soda or a control. The patients were instructed to rinse with 10 ml of the mouthwash, twice a day, for a period of 6 weeks. Mucositis was assessed at baseline and at weekly intervals during radiation therapy, using the World Health Organization criteria for grading of mucositis. The baseline demography of the four groups was matched for age, sex, stage of cancer, and whether the patient had cancer of oral or extraoral regions. A post hoc test for repeated measures was used to find the difference of mean mucositis scores between the groups at various week intervals. Results: Among the 76 patients who completed the study, patients in the povidone-iodine group had significantly lower mucositis scores when compared to the control group from the first week of radiotherapy. Their scores were also significantly lower when compared to the salt/soda and chlorhexidine groups from the fourth and fifth week, respectively, after radiotherapy. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that use of alcohol-free povidone-iodine mouthwash can reduce the severity and delay the onset of oral mucositis due to antineoplastic radiotherapy.

  16. A single serving of blueberry (V. corymbosum) modulates peripheral arterial dysfunction induced by acute cigarette smoking in young volunteers: a randomized-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Bo', Cristian; Porrini, Marisa; Fracassetti, Daniela; Campolo, Jonica; Klimis-Zacas, Dorothy; Riso, Patrizia

    2014-12-01

    Cigarette smoking causes oxidative stress, hypertension and endothelial dysfunction. Polyphenol-rich foods may prevent these conditions. We investigated the effect of a single serving of fresh-frozen blueberry intake on peripheral arterial function and arterial stiffness in young smokers. Sixteen male smokers were recruited for a 3-armed randomized-controlled study with the following experimental conditions: smoking treatment (one cigarette); blueberry treatment (300 g of blueberry) + smoking; control treatment (300 mL of water with sugar) + smoking. Each treatment was separated by one week of wash-out period. The blood pressure, heart rate, peripheral arterial function (reactive hyperemia and Framingham reactive hyperemia), and arterial stiffness (digital augmentation index, digital augmentation index normalized for a heart rate of 75 bpm) were measured before and 20 min after smoking with Endo-PAT2000. Smoking impaired the blood pressure, heart rate and peripheral arterial function, but did not affect the arterial stiffness. Blueberry consumption counteracted the impairment of the reactive hyperemia index induced by smoking (-4.4 ± 0.8% blueberry treatment vs. -22.0 ± 1.1% smoking treatment, p smoking treatment, p smoking treatment, mmHg, p smoking. No effect was observed for arterial stiffness and other vital signs. In conclusion, data obtained suggest a protective role of blueberry on reactive hyperemia, Framingham reactive hyperemia, and systolic blood pressure in subjects exposed to smoke of one cigarette. Future studies are necessary to elucidate the mechanisms involved.

  17. A pilot randomized controlled trial of D-cycloserine and distributed practice as adjuvants to constraint-induced movement therapy after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeau, Stephen E; Davis, Sandra E; Wu, Samuel S; Dai, Yunfeng; Richards, Lorie G

    2014-01-01

    Background. Phase III trials of rehabilitation of paresis after stroke have proven the effectiveness of intensive and extended task practice, but they have also shown that many patients do not qualify, because of severity of impairment, and that many of those who are treated are left with clinically significant deficits. Objective. To test the value of 2 potential adjuvants to normal learning processes engaged in constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT): greater distribution of treatment over time and the coadministration of d-cycloserine, a competitive agonist at the glycine site of the N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptor. Methods. A prospective randomized single-blind parallel-group trial of more versus less condensed therapy (2 vs