WorldWideScience

Sample records for random kinetic energy

  1. Kinetic energy budget details

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. This paper presents the detailed turbulent kinetic energy budget and higher order statistics of flow behind a surface-mounted rib with and without superimposed acoustic excitation. Pattern recognition technique is used to determine the large-scale structure magnitude. It is observed that most of the turbulence ...

  2. Dimensional enhancement of kinetic energies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schleich, W.P.; Dahl, Jens Peder

    2002-01-01

    Simple thermodynamics considers kinetic energy to be an extensive variable which is proportional to the number N of particles. We present a quantum state of N noninteracting particles for which the kinetic energy increases quadratically with N. This enhancement effect is tied to the quantum centr...

  3. Superconductivity by kinetic energy saving?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Marel, D; Molegraaf, HJA; Presura, C; Santoso, [No Value; Hewson, AC; Zlatic,

    2003-01-01

    A brief introduction is given in the generic microscopic framework of superconductivity. The consequences for the temperature dependence of the kinetic energy, and the correlation energy are discussed for two cases: The BCS scenario and the non-Fermi liquid scenario. A quantitative comparison is

  4. Kinetic energy equations for the average-passage equation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Richard W.; Adamczyk, John J.

    1989-01-01

    Important kinetic energy equations derived from the average-passage equation sets are documented, with a view to their interrelationships. These kinetic equations may be used for closing the average-passage equations. The turbulent kinetic energy transport equation used is formed by subtracting the mean kinetic energy equation from the averaged total instantaneous kinetic energy equation. The aperiodic kinetic energy equation, averaged steady kinetic energy equation, averaged unsteady kinetic energy equation, and periodic kinetic energy equation, are also treated.

  5. Kinetic energy driven pairing in cuprate superconductors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maier, TA; Jarrell, M; Macridin, A; Slezak, C

    2004-01-01

    Pairing occurs in conventional superconductors through a reduction of the electronic potential energy accompanied by an increase in kinetic energy. In the underdoped cuprates, optical experiments show that pairing is driven by a reduction of the electronic kinetic energy. Using the dynamical cluster

  6. Effect of mastication on lipid bioaccessibility of almonds in a randomized human study and its implications for digestion kinetics, metabolizable energy, and postprandial lipemia1234

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundy, Myriam ML; Grassby, Terri; Mandalari, Giuseppina; Waldron, Keith W; Butterworth, Peter J; Berry, Sarah EE

    2015-01-01

    Background: The particle size and structure of masticated almonds have a significant impact on nutrient release (bioaccessibility) and digestion kinetics. Objectives: The goals of this study were to quantify the effects of mastication on the bioaccessibility of intracellular lipid of almond tissue and examine microstructural characteristics of masticated almonds. Design: In a randomized, subject-blind, crossover trial, 17 healthy subjects chewed natural almonds (NAs) or roasted almonds (RAs) in 4 separate mastication sessions. Particle size distributions (PSDs) of the expectorated boluses were measured by using mechanical sieving and laser diffraction (primary outcome). The microstructure of masticated almonds, including the structural integrity of the cell walls (i.e., dietary fiber), was examined with microscopy. Lipid bioaccessibility was predicted by using a theoretical model, based on almond particle size and cell dimensions, and then compared with empirically derived release data. Results: Intersubject variations (n = 15; 2 subjects withdrew) in PSDs of both NA and RA samples were small (e.g., laser diffraction; CV: 12% and 9%, respectively). Significant differences in PSDs were found between these 2 almond forms (P masticated particles, as predicted by using the mathematical model (8.5% and 11.3% for NAs and RAs, respectively). This low percentage of lipid bioaccessibility is attributable to the high proportion (35–40%) of large particles (>500 μm) in masticated almonds. Microstructural examination of the almonds indicated that most intracellular lipid remained undisturbed in intact cells after mastication. No adverse events were recorded. Conclusions: Following mastication, most of the almond cells remained intact with lipid encapsulated by cell walls. Thus, most of the lipid in masticated almonds is not immediately bioaccessible and remains unavailable for early stages of digestion. The lipid encapsulation mechanism provides a convincing explanation for

  7. Effect of mastication on lipid bioaccessibility of almonds in a randomized human study and its implications for digestion kinetics, metabolizable energy, and postprandial lipemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundy, Myriam M L; Grassby, Terri; Mandalari, Giuseppina; Waldron, Keith W; Butterworth, Peter J; Berry, Sarah E E; Ellis, Peter R

    2015-01-01

    The particle size and structure of masticated almonds have a significant impact on nutrient release (bioaccessibility) and digestion kinetics. The goals of this study were to quantify the effects of mastication on the bioaccessibility of intracellular lipid of almond tissue and examine microstructural characteristics of masticated almonds. In a randomized, subject-blind, crossover trial, 17 healthy subjects chewed natural almonds (NAs) or roasted almonds (RAs) in 4 separate mastication sessions. Particle size distributions (PSDs) of the expectorated boluses were measured by using mechanical sieving and laser diffraction (primary outcome). The microstructure of masticated almonds, including the structural integrity of the cell walls (i.e., dietary fiber), was examined with microscopy. Lipid bioaccessibility was predicted by using a theoretical model, based on almond particle size and cell dimensions, and then compared with empirically derived release data. Intersubject variations (n = 15; 2 subjects withdrew) in PSDs of both NA and RA samples were small (e.g., laser diffraction; CV: 12% and 9%, respectively). Significant differences in PSDs were found between these 2 almond forms (P masticated particles, as predicted by using the mathematical model (8.5% and 11.3% for NAs and RAs, respectively). This low percentage of lipid bioaccessibility is attributable to the high proportion (35-40%) of large particles (>500 μm) in masticated almonds. Microstructural examination of the almonds indicated that most intracellular lipid remained undisturbed in intact cells after mastication. No adverse events were recorded. Following mastication, most of the almond cells remained intact with lipid encapsulated by cell walls. Thus, most of the lipid in masticated almonds is not immediately bioaccessible and remains unavailable for early stages of digestion. The lipid encapsulation mechanism provides a convincing explanation for why almonds have a low metabolizable energy content and

  8. Concepts of radial and angular kinetic energies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jens Peder; Schleich, W.P.

    2002-01-01

    We consider a general central-field system in D dimensions and show that the division of the kinetic energy into radial and angular parts proceeds differently in the wave-function picture and the Weyl-Wigner phase-space picture, Thus, the radial and angular kinetic energies are different quantities...

  9. Kinetic Models with Randomly Perturbed Binary Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassetti, Federico; Ladelli, Lucia; Toscani, Giuseppe

    2011-02-01

    We introduce a class of Kac-like kinetic equations on the real line, with general random collisional rules which, in some special cases, identify models for granular gases with a background heat bath (Carrillo et al. in Discrete Contin. Dyn. Syst. 24(1):59-81, 2009), and models for wealth redistribution in an agent-based market (Bisi et al. in Commun. Math. Sci. 7:901-916, 2009). Conditions on these collisional rules which guarantee both the existence and uniqueness of equilibrium profiles and their main properties are found. The characterization of these stationary states is of independent interest, since we show that they are stationary solutions of different evolution problems, both in the kinetic theory of rarefied gases (Cercignani et al. in J. Stat. Phys. 105:337-352, 2001; Villani in J. Stat. Phys. 124:781-822, 2006) and in the econophysical context (Bisi et al. in Commun. Math. Sci. 7:901-916, 2009).

  10. Nonextensive kinetics of fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolinski, Olaf J; Birch, David J S

    2008-10-14

    Some fluorescence dyes in complex media, such as those found in biology, demonstrate nonextensive kinetics, which implies representing their fluorescence decays in terms of lifetime distributions rather than simple exponentials. Complex kinetics usually discourage application to lifetime sensors, as it is believed, that additional molecular mechanisms employed for detection of an analyte will make the resulting kinetics ambiguous and the sensor response inconclusive. In this paper we investigate theoretically the applicability of complex dye kinetics as a fluorescence resonance energy transfer based lifetime sensor and demonstrate that the nonextensive nature of its kinetics does not decrease the sensing performance, and indeed even provides richer structural information than a simple exponential behavior.

  11. Budgets of divergent and rotational kinetic energy during two periods of intense convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buechler, D. E.; Fuelberg, H. E.

    1986-01-01

    The derivations of the energy budget equations for divergent and rotational components of kinetic energy are provided. The intense convection periods studied are: (1) synoptic scale data of 3 or 6 hour intervals and (2) mesoalphascale data every 3 hours. Composite energies and averaged budgets for the periods are presented; the effects of random data errors on derived energy parameters is investigated. The divergent kinetic energy and rotational kinetic energy budgets are compared; good correlation of the data is observed. The kinetic energies and budget terms increase with convective development; however, the conversion of the divergent and rotational energies are opposite.

  12. Kinetic energy budgets in areas of convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuelberg, H. E.

    1979-01-01

    Synoptic scale budgets of kinetic energy are computed using 3 and 6 h data from three of NASA's Atmospheric Variability Experiments (AVE's). Numerous areas of intense convection occurred during the three experiments. Large kinetic energy variability, with periods as short as 6 h, is observed in budgets computed over each entire experiment area and over limited volumes that barely enclose the convection and move with it. Kinetic energy generation and transport processes in the smaller volumes are often a maximum when the enclosed storms are near peak intensity, but the nature of the various energy processes differs between storm cases and seems closely related to the synoptic conditions. A commonly observed energy budget for peak storm intensity indicates that generation of kinetic energy by cross-contour flow is the major energy source while dissipation to subgrid scales is the major sink. Synoptic scale vertical motion transports kinetic energy from lower to upper levels of the atmosphere while low-level horizontal flux convergence and upper-level horizontal divergence also occur. Spatial fields of the energy budget terms show that the storm environment is a major center of energy activity for the entire area.

  13. Nanostructured energy devices equilibrium concepts and kinetics

    CERN Document Server

    Bisquert, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Due to the pressing needs of society, low cost materials for energy devices have experienced an outstanding development in recent times. In this highly multidisciplinary area, chemistry, material science, physics, and electrochemistry meet to develop new materials and devices that perform required energy conversion and storage processes with high efficiency, adequate capabilities for required applications, and low production cost. Nanostructured Energy Devices: Equilibrium Concepts and Kinetics introduces the main physicochemical principles that govern the operation of energy devices. It inclu

  14. Turbulence kinetic energy equation for dilute suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Arab, T. W.; Roco, M. C.

    1989-01-01

    A multiphase turbulence closure model is presented which employs one transport equation, namely the turbulence kinetic energy equation. The proposed form of this equation is different from the earlier formulations in some aspects. The power spectrum of the carrier fluid is divided into two regions, which interact in different ways and at different rates with the suspended particles as a function of the particle-eddy size ratio and density ratio. The length scale is described algebraically. A mass/time averaging procedure for the momentum and kinetic energy equations is adopted. The resulting turbulence correlations are modeled under less retrictive assumptions comparative to previous work. The closures for the momentum and kinetic energy equations are given. Comparisons of the predictions with experimental results on liquid-solid jet and gas-solid pipe flow show satisfactory agreement.

  15. Lower bound for the nuclear kinetic energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dehesa, J.S. (Granada Univ. (Spain). Dept. de Fisica Nuclear); Galvez, F.J. (Granada Univ. (Spain). Dept. de Fisica Teorica)

    1985-06-27

    We argue that the kinetic energy of a many-fermion system is bounded from below by Kqsup(-2/3)A sup(5/3) / , with K = 0.565 where q is the number of spin states available to each particle and sup(1/2) is the root mean square radius of the single-particle density. A simple lower bound for the nuclear kinetic energy is found. Numerical values of the bound for several nuclei are shown, and a comparison with some self-consistent calculations and some pseudo-empirical values is made.

  16. Electric Vehicles Mileage Extender Kinetic Energy Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jivkov, Venelin; Draganov, Vutko; Stoyanova, Yana

    2015-03-01

    The proposed paper considers small urban vehicles with electric hybrid propulsion systems. Energy demands are examined on the basis of European drive cycle (NEUDC) and on an energy recuperation coefficient and are formulated for description of cycle energy transfers. Numerical simulation results show real possibilities for increasing in achievable vehicle mileage at the same energy levels of a main energy source - the electric battery. Kinetic energy storage (KES), as proposed to be used as an energy buffer and different structural schemes of the hybrid propulsion system are commented. Minimum energy levels for primary (the electric battery) and secondary (KES) sources are evaluated. A strategy for reduced power flows control is examined, and its impact on achievable vehicle mileage is investigated. Results show an additional increase in simulated mileage at the same initial energy levels.

  17. Filamentary and hierarchical pictures - Kinetic energy criterion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klypin, Anatoly A.; Melott, Adrian L.

    1992-01-01

    We present a new criterion for formation of second-generation filaments. The criterion called the kinetic energy ratio, KR, is based on comparison of peculiar velocities at different scales. We suggest that the clumpiness of the distribution in some cases might be less important than the 'coldness' or 'hotness' of the flow for formation of coherent structures. The kinetic energy ratio is analogous to the Mach number except for one essential difference. If at some scale KR is greater than 1, as estimated at the linear stage, then when fluctuations of this scale reach nonlinearity, the objects they produce must be anisotropic ('filamentary'). In the case of power-law initial spectra the kinetic ratio criterion suggests that the border line is the power-spectrum with the slope n = -1.

  18. Kinetic energy transfer during the tennis serve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.L. de Subijana

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have established the pattern used in the over arm hitting and throwing movements, however to date there has not been one which statistically expresses the Kinetic Link Principle of the tennis serve. The main goals of this study were: first to investigate the kinetic energy transmission pattern using a complete mechanical body model and second, to create a tool which could help evaluating the individual technique of a tennis player. This tool was a statistical procedure which expressed the individual technique of a player as a mathematical function. Fourteen and twelve flat tennis serves of two top tennis players landing in an aiming area were recorded with two synchronized video cameras at 125 Hz. The experimental technique was 3D photogrammetry. A 28 points body model with five solid-rigid (the pelvis, the thorax, the upper arms and the racquet was built. The kinetic energies from the body segments were considered the biomechanical parameters. The mean speeds of the balls were 41.9 m/s (150.9 km/hr and 38.1 m/s (137.2 km/hr. A Kinetic Sequential Action Muscle principle based on the kinetic energy transfer was probed statistically by mean a correlation analysis [3]. This pattern showed the existence of a proximal to distal sequence of kinetic energy maximums. A significant (p<0.05 discriminant function for each player could predict the category of the serve (“good” or “bad” in the 78.6% and 100% of the cases. This function facilitated the understanding of the individual technique of a tennis player showing that this could be a tool for the tennis training complementary to the qualitative (observational analysis.

  19. Aircraft Measurements of Atmospheric Kinetic Energy Spectra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundtang Petersen, Erik; Lilly, D. K.

    1983-01-01

    Wind velocity data obtained from a jet airliner are used to construct kinetic energy spectra over the range of wavelengths from 2.5 to 2500 km. The spectra exhibit an approximate -5/3 slope for wavelengths of less than about 150 km, steepening to about -2.2 at larger scales. These results support...

  20. Energy transfer and kinetics in mechanochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhiliang; Lu, Shengyong; Mao, Qiongjing; Buekens, Alfons; Wang, Yuting; Yan, Jianhua

    2017-11-01

    Mechanochemistry (MC) exerts extraordinary degradation and decomposition effects on many chlorinated, brominated, and even fluorinated persistent organic pollutants (POPs). However, its application is still limited by inadequate study of its reaction kinetic aspects. In the present work, the ball motion and energy transfer in planetary ball mill are investigated in some detail. Almost all milling parameters are summarised in a single factor-total effective impact energy. Furthermore, the MC kinetic between calcium oxide/Al and hexachlorobenzene is well established and modelled. The results indicate that total effective impact energy and reagent ratio are the two factors sufficient for describing the MC degradation degree of POPs. The reaction rate constant only depends on the chemical properties of reactants, so it could be used as an important index to appraise the quality of MC additives. This model successfully predicts the reaction rate for different operating conditions, indicating that it could be suitably applied for conducting MC reactions in other reactors.

  1. Evaluation of kinetic energy in flowing rivers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faure, T. [National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Canadian Hydraulics Centre

    2008-07-01

    New methods of evaluating the kinetic energy in rivers were discussed. Developed by the National Research Council's Canadian Hydraulics Centre, the numerical models were designed to generate hydrographs of river flow from dams; accommodate power density anomalies caused by the presence of islands in a river; and assess mean kinetic power rates. This presentation provided details of a simulation of 6 turbines located in close proximity to each other. The model was used to calculate velocity fields downstream of the turbines as well as changes in water surface elevation due to power production by the 6 75 kW turbines. Turbine power extraction and kinetic power in the upstream cross-section was assessed. The model showed that the turbines extracted 9 per cent of the river's 17,000 kW of estimated energy potential. The turbines were modelled by considering the porosity of the numerical elements at the location of the turbine and extracting known quantities of energy from the flow. The model was also used to calculate new hydrodynamics of the whole region with the turbines in place by assuming that energy was extracted over the entire depth of the location. The presentation included detailed charts of rivers modelled during the study. tabs., figs.

  2. Equivalence principle and bound kinetic energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohensee, Michael A; Müller, Holger; Wiringa, R B

    2013-10-11

    We consider the role of the internal kinetic energy of bound systems of matter in tests of the Einstein equivalence principle. Using the gravitational sector of the standard model extension, we show that stringent limits on equivalence principle violations in antimatter can be indirectly obtained from tests using bound systems of normal matter. We estimate the bound kinetic energy of nucleons in a range of light atomic species using Green's function Monte Carlo calculations, and for heavier species using a Woods-Saxon model. We survey the sensitivities of existing and planned experimental tests of the equivalence principle, and report new constraints at the level of between a few parts in 10(6) and parts in 10(8) on violations of the equivalence principle for matter and antimatter.

  3. A note on the maintenance of the atmospheric kinetic energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, T.-C.; Lee, Y.-H.

    1982-01-01

    The winter simulations of the GLAS climate model and the NCAR community climate model are used to examine the maintenance of the atmospheric kinetic energy. It is found that the kinetic energy is generated in the lower latitudes south of the maximum westerlies, transported northward and then, destroyed in the midlatitudes north of the maximum westerlies. Therefore, the atmospheric kinetic energy is maintained by the counterbalance between the divergence (convergence) of kinetic energy flux and generation (destruction) of kinetic energy in lower (middle) latitudes.

  4. Kinetic energy recovery systems in motor vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Śliwiński, C.

    2016-09-01

    The article draws attention to the increasing environmental pollution caused by the development of vehicle transport and motorization. Different types of design solutions used in vehicles for the reduction of fuel consumption, and thereby emission of toxic gasses into the atmosphere, were specified. Historical design solutions concerning energy recovery devices in mechanical vehicles which used flywheels to accumulate kinetic energy were shown. Developmental tendencies in the area of vehicle manufacturing in the form of hybrid electric and electric devices were discussed. Furthermore, designs of energy recovery devices with electrical energy storage from the vehicle braking and shock absorbing systems were presented. A mechanical energy storing device using a flywheel operating under vacuum was presented, as were advantages and disadvantages of both systems, the limitations they impose on individual constructions and safety issues. The paper also discusses a design concept of an energy recovery device in mechanical vehicles which uses torsion springs as the main components of energy accumulation during braking. The desirability of a cooperation of both the mechanical- and electrical energy recovery devices was indicated.

  5. On Kinetics Modeling of Vibrational Energy Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, John O.; Sharma, Surendra P.; Cavolowsky, John A. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Two models of vibrational energy exchange are compared at equilibrium to the elementary vibrational exchange reaction for a binary mixture. The first model, non-linear in the species vibrational energies, was derived by Schwartz, Slawsky, and Herzfeld (SSH) by considering the detailed kinetics of vibrational energy levels. This model recovers the result demanded at equilibrium by the elementary reaction. The second model is more recent, and is gaining use in certain areas of computational fluid dynamics. This model, linear in the species vibrational energies, is shown not to recover the required equilibrium result. Further, this more recent model is inconsistent with its suggested rate constants in that those rate constants were inferred from measurements by using the SSH model to reduce the data. The non-linear versus linear nature of these two models can lead to significant differences in vibrational energy coupling. Use of the contemporary model may lead to significant misconceptions, especially when integrated in computer codes considering multiple energy coupling mechanisms.

  6. Conversion of laser energy to gas kinetic energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caledonia, G. E.

    1977-01-01

    Techniques for the gas-phase absorption of laser energy with ultimate conversion to heat or directed kinetic energy are reviewed. It is shown that the efficiency of resonance absorption by the vibration/rotation bands of the working gas can be enhanced by operating at sufficiently high pressures so that the linewidths of the absorbing transition exceed the line spacing. Within this limit, the gas can absorb continuously over the full spectral region of the band, and bleaching can be minimized since the manifold of molecular vibrational levels can simultaneously absorb the laser radiation.

  7. Kinetic energy budget studies of areas of convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuelberg, H. E.

    1979-01-01

    Synoptic-scale kinetic energy budgets are being computed for three cases when large areas of intense convection occurred over the Central United States. Major energy activity occurs in the storm areas.

  8. Preliminary study on mechanics-based rainfall kinetic energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Jiuqin Ms.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A raindrop impact power observation system was employed to observe the real-time raindrop impact power during a rainfall event and to analyze the corresponding rainfall characteristics. The experiments were conducted at different simulated rainfall intensities. As rainfall intensity increased, the observed impact power increased linearly indicating the power observation system would be satisfactory for characterizing rainfall erosivity. Momentum is the product of mass and velocity (Momentum=MV, which is related to the observed impact power value. Since there is no significant difference between momentum and impact power, observed impact power can represent momentum for different rainfall intensities. The relationship between momentum and the observed impact power provides a convenient way to calculate rainfall kinetic energy. The value of rainfall kinetic energy based on the observed impact power was higher than the classic rainfall kinetic energy. The rainfall impact power based kinetic energy and the classic rainfall kinetic energy showed linear correlation, which indicates that the raindrop impact power observation system can characterize rainfall kinetic energy. The article establishes a preliminary way to calculate rainfall kinetic energy by using the real-time observed momentum, providing a foundation for replacing the traditional methods for estimating kinetic energy of rainstorms.

  9. The Kinetic Energy of a Rotating Figure Skater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei R.; Troelstra, Arne A.

    1998-01-01

    When a rotating figure skater's fully extended arms are pulled back toward the torso, the angular velocity is noticeably increased and the kinetic energy of the skater can also be shown to increase. Discusses the change of the kinetic energy during such a process, and the work necessary for such an increase is derived using a dynamic equilibrium…

  10. Kinetic energy budgets in areas of intense convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuelberg, H. E.; Berecek, E. M.; Ebel, D. M.; Jedlovec, G. J.

    1980-01-01

    A kinetic energy budget analysis of the AVE-SESAME 1 period which coincided with the deadly Red River Valley tornado outbreak is presented. Horizontal flux convergence was found to be the major kinetic energy source to the region, while cross contour destruction was the major sink. Kinetic energy transformations were dominated by processes related to strong jet intrusion into the severe storm area. A kinetic energy budget of the AVE 6 period also is presented. The effects of inherent rawinsonde data errors on widely used basic kinematic parameters, including velocity divergence, vorticity advection, and kinematic vertical motion are described. In addition, an error analysis was performed in terms of the kinetic energy budget equation. Results obtained from downward integration of the continuity equation to obtain kinematic values of vertical motion are described. This alternate procedure shows promising results in severe storm situations.

  11. Towards a kinetic energy density functional for the water molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akin-Ojo, Omololu; Shittu, Doyin

    Development of an accurate kinetic energy kinetic energy density functional (KEDF) is a holy grail. In this work, local KEDFS are parameterized for the water molecule in order to reproduce Kohn-Sham density functional theory (KS-DFT) results. Energies, forces and dipole moments from these KEDFs are presented. Problems with the convergence of the self-consistent-field (SCF) calculations are discussed together with possible solutions. and: Theoretical and Applied Physics Dept. African Univ. of Science and Technology (AUST) Abuja, Nigeria.

  12. On the Linearly-Balanced Kinetic Energy Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Huei,-Iin; Robertson, F. R.

    1999-01-01

    It is well known that the earth's atmospheric motion can generally be characterized by the two dimensional quasi-geostrophic approximation, in which the constraints on global integrals of kinetic energy, entrophy and potential vorticity play very important roles in redistributing the wave energy among different scales of motion. Assuming the hypothesis of Kolmogrov's local isotropy, derived a -3 power law of the equilibrium two-dimensional kinetic energy spectrum that entails constant vorticity and zero energy flows from the energy-containing wave number up to the viscous cutoff. In his three dimensional quasi-geostrophic theory, showed that the spectrum function of the vertical scale turbulence - expressible in terms of the available potential energy - possesses the same power law as the two dimensional kinetic energy spectrum. As the slope of kinetic energy spectrum in the inertial range is theoretically related to the predictability of the synoptic scales (Lorenz, 1969), many general circulation models includes a horizontal diffusion to provide reasonable kinetic energy spectra, although the actual power law exhibited in the atmospheric general circulation is controversial. Note that in either the atmospheric modeling or the observational analyses, the proper choice of wave number Index to represent the turbulence scale Is the degree of the Legendre polynomial.

  13. Simulating RNA folding kinetics on approximated energy landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xinyu; Thomas, Shawna; Tapia, Lydia; Giedroc, David P; Amato, Nancy M

    2008-09-12

    We present a general computational approach to simulate RNA folding kinetics that can be used to extract population kinetics, folding rates and the formation of particular substructures that might be intermediates in the folding process. Simulating RNA folding kinetics can provide unique insight into RNA whose functions are dictated by folding kinetics and not always by nucleotide sequence or the structure of the lowest free-energy state. The method first builds an approximate map (or model) of the folding energy landscape from which the population kinetics are analyzed by solving the master equation on the map. We present results obtained using an analysis technique, map-based Monte Carlo simulation, which stochastically extracts folding pathways from the map. Our method compares favorably with other computational methods that begin with a comprehensive free-energy landscape, illustrating that the smaller, approximate map captures the major features of the complete energy landscape. As a result, our method scales to larger RNAs. For example, here we validate kinetics of RNA of more than 200 nucleotides. Our method accurately computes the kinetics-based functional rates of wild-type and mutant ColE1 RNAII and MS2 phage RNAs showing excellent agreement with experiment.

  14. Overlap Synchronisation in Multipartite Random Energy Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genovese, Giuseppe; Tantari, Daniele

    2017-12-01

    In a multipartite random energy model, made of a number of coupled generalised random energy models (GREMs), we determine the joint law of the overlaps in terms of the ones of the single GREMs. This provides the simplest example of the so-called overlap synchronisation.

  15. Renormalizing the kinetic energy operator in elementary quantum mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coutinho, F A B [Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de Sao Paulo e LIM 01-HCFMUSP, 05405-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Amaku, M [Faculdade de Medicina Veterinaria e Zootecnia, Universidade de Sao Paulo, 05508-970 Sao Paulo (Brazil)], E-mail: coutinho@dim.fm.usp.br

    2009-09-15

    In this paper, we consider solutions to the three-dimensional Schroedinger equation of the form {psi}(r) = u(r)/r, where u(0) {ne} 0. The expectation value of the kinetic energy operator for such wavefunctions diverges. We show that it is possible to introduce a potential energy with an expectation value that also diverges, exactly cancelling the kinetic energy divergence. This renormalization procedure produces a self-adjoint Hamiltonian. We solve some problems with this new Hamiltonian to illustrate its usefulness.

  16. Renormalizing the Kinetic Energy Operator in Elementary Quantum Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutinho, F. A. B.; Amaku, M.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we consider solutions to the three-dimensional Schrodinger equation of the form [psi](r) = u(r)/r, where u(0) [is not equal to] 0. The expectation value of the kinetic energy operator for such wavefunctions diverges. We show that it is possible to introduce a potential energy with an expectation value that also diverges, exactly…

  17. Abnormal Kinetic Energy of Charged Dust Particles in Plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Norman, G.; Stegailov, V.; Timofeev, A.

    A mechanism of the increase of the average kinetic energy of charged dust particles in gas discharge plasmas is suggested. Particle charge fluctuation is the reason for the appearance of forced resonance, which heals vertical oscillations. The energy transfer from vertical oscillations to the

  18. The quantum mechanics based on a general kinetic energy

    CERN Document Server

    Wei, Yuchuan

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce the Schrodinger equation with a general kinetic energy operator. The conservation law is proved and the probability continuity equation is deducted in a general sense. Examples with a Hermitian kinetic energy operator include the standard Schrodinger equation, the relativistic Schrodinger equation, the fractional Schrodinger equation, the Dirac equation, and the deformed Schrodinger equation. We reveal that the Klein-Gordon equation has a hidden non-Hermitian kinetic energy operator. The probability continuity equation with sources indicates that there exists a different way of probability transportation, which is probability teleportation. An average formula is deducted from the relativistic Schrodinger equation, the Dirac equation, and the K-G equation.

  19. Reaction wheels for kinetic energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studer, P. A.

    1984-01-01

    In contrast to all existing reaction wheel implementations, an order of magnitude increase in speed can be obtained efficiently if power to the actuators can be recovered. This allows a combined attitude control-energy storage system to be developed with structure mounted reaction wheels. The feasibility of combining reaction wheels with energy storage wwheels is demonstrated. The power required for control torques is a function of wheel speed but this energy is not dissipated; it is stored in the wheel. The I(2)R loss resulting from a given torque is shown to be constant, independent of the design speed of the motor. What remains, in order to efficiently use high speed wheels (essential for energy storage) for control purposes, is to reduce rotational losses to acceptable levels. Progress was made in permanent magnet motor design for high speed operation. Variable field motors offer more control flexibility and efficiency over a broader speed range.

  20. Kinetic energy recovery and power management for hybrid electric vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    Suntharalingam, P.

    2011-01-01

    The major contribution of the work presented in this thesis is a thorough investigation of the constraints on regenerative braking and kinetic energy recovery enhancement for electric/hybrid electric vehicles during braking. Regenerative braking systems provide an opportunity to recycle the braking energy, which is otherwise dissipated as heat in the brake pads. However, braking energy harnessing is a relatively new concept in the automotive sector which still requires further research and de...

  1. Fragment Kinetic Energies and Modes of Fragment Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odeh, T.; Bassini, R.; Begemann-Blaich, M.; Fritz, S.; Gaff-Ejakov, S. J.; Gourio, D.; Groß, C.; Immé, G.; Iori, I.; Kleinevoß, U.; Kunde, G. J.; Kunze, W. D.; Lynen, U.; Maddalena, V.; Mahi, M.; Möhlenkamp, T.; Moroni, A.; Müller, W. F.; Nociforo, C.; Ocker, B.; Petruzzelli, F.; Pochodzalla, J.; Raciti, G.; Riccobene, G.; Romano, F. P.; Saija, A.; Schnittker, M.; Schüttauf, A.; Schwarz, C.; Seidel, W.; Serfling, V.; Sfienti, C.; Trautmann, W.; Trzcinski, A.; Verde, G.; Wörner, A.; Xi, Hongfei; Zwieglinski, B.

    2000-05-01

    Kinetic energies of light fragments ( A<=10) from the decay of target spectators in 197Au+197Au collisions at 1000 MeV per nucleon have been measured with high-resolution telescopes at backward angles. Except for protons and apart from the observed evaporation components, the kinetic-energy spectra exhibit slope temperatures of about 17 MeV, independent of the particle species, but not corresponding to the thermal or chemical degrees of freedom at breakup. It is suggested that these slope temperatures may reflect the intrinsic Fermi motion and thus the bulk density of the spectator system at the instant of becoming unstable.

  2. A Note on Kinetic Energy, Dissipation and Enstrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jie-Zhi; Zhou, Ye; Fan, Meng

    1998-01-01

    The dissipation rate of a Newtonian fluid with constant shear viscosity can be shown to include three constituents: dilatation, vorticity, and surface strain. The last one is found to make no contributions to the change of kinetic energy. These dissipation constituents arc used to identify typical compact turbulent flow structures at high Reynolds numbers. The incompressible version of the simplified kinetic-energy equation is then cast to a novel form, which is free from the work rate done by surface stresses but in which the full dissipation re-enters.

  3. Kinetic-energy functionals studied by surface calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vitos, Levente; Skriver, Hans Lomholt; Kollár, J.

    1998-01-01

    The self-consistent jellium model of metal surfaces is used to study the accuracy of a number of semilocal kinetic-energy functionals for independent particles. It is shown that the poor accuracy exhibited by the gradient expansion approximation and most of the semiempirical functionals in the low...... density, high gradient limit may be subtantially improved by including locally a von Weizsacker term. Based on this, we propose a simple one-parameter Pade's approximation, which reproduces the exact Kohn-Sham surface kinetic energy over the entire range of metallic densities....

  4. Expressions For Total Energy And Relativistic Kinetic Energy At Low Speeds In Special Relativity Must Include Rotational And Vibrational As Well As Linear Kinetic Energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brekke, Stewart

    2017-09-01

    Einstein calculated the total energy at low speeds in the Special Theory of Relativity to be Etotal =m0c2 + 1 / 2m0v2 . However, the total energy must include the rotational and vibrational kinetic energies as well as the linear kinetic energies. If 1 / 2 Iω2 is the expression for the rotational kinetic energy of mass and 1 / 2 kx02 is the vibrational kinetic energy expression of a typical mass, the expression for the total energy of a mass at low speeds must be Etotal =m0c2 + 1 / 2m0v2 + 1 / 2 Iω2 + 1 / 2 kx02 . If this expression is correct, the relativistic kinetic energy of a mass. at low speeds must include the rotational and vibrational kinetic energies as well as the linear kinetic energies since according to Einstein K = (m -m0) c2 and therefore, K = 1 / 2m0v2 + 1 / 2 Iω2 + 1 / 2 kx02 .

  5. Contributions of divergent and nondivergent winds to the kinetic energy balance of a severe storm environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, P. A.; Fuelberg, H. E.

    1983-01-01

    Divergent and rotational components of the synoptic scale kinetic energy balance are presented using rawinsonde data at 3 and 6 h intervals from the Atmospheric Variability Experiment (AVE 4). Two intense thunderstorm complexes occurred during the period. Energy budgets are described for the entire computational region and for limited volumes that enclose and move with the convection. Although small in magnitude, the divergent wind component played an important role in the cross contour generation and horizontal flux divergence of kinetic energy. The importance of V sub D appears directly to the presence and intensity of convection within the area. Although K sub D usually comprised less than 10 percent of the total kinetic energy content within the storm environment, as much as 87 percent of the total horizontal flux divergence and 68 percent of the total cross contour generation was due to the divergent component in the upper atmosphere. Generation of kinetic energy by the divergent component appears to be a major factor in the creation of an upper level wind maximum on the poleward side of one of the complexes. A random error analysis is presented to assess confidence limits in the various energy parameters.

  6. Energy landscapes, folding mechanisms, and kinetics of RNA tetraloop hairpins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Debayan; Collepardo-Guevara, Rosana; Wales, David J

    2014-12-31

    RNA hairpins play a pivotal role in a diverse range of cellular functions, and are integral components of ribozymes, mRNA, and riboswitches. However, the mechanistic and kinetic details of RNA hairpin folding, which are key determinants of most of its biological functions, are poorly understood. In this work, we use the discrete path sampling (DPS) approach to explore the energy landscapes of two RNA tetraloop hairpins, and provide insights into their folding mechanisms and kinetics in atomistic detail. Our results show that the potential energy landscapes have a distinct funnel-like bias toward the folded hairpin state, consistent with efficient structure-seeking properties. Mechanistic and kinetic information is analyzed in terms of kinetic transition networks. We find microsecond folding times, consistent with temperature jump experiments, for hairpin folding initiated from relatively compact unfolded states. This process is essentially driven by an initial collapse, followed by rapid zippering of the helix stem in the final phase. Much lower folding rates are predicted when the folding is initiated from extended chains, which undergo longer excursions on the energy landscape before nucleation events can occur. Our work therefore explains recent experiments and coarse-grained simulations, where the folding kinetics exhibit precisely this dependency on the initial conditions.

  7. The eddy kinetic energy budget in the Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Zhan, Peng

    2016-06-09

    The budget of eddy kinetic energy (EKE) in the Red Sea, including the sources, redistributions and sink, is examined using a high-resolution eddy-resolving ocean circulation model. A pronounced seasonally varying EKE is identified, with its maximum intensity occurring in winter, and the strongest EKE is captured mainly in the central and northern basins within the upper 200 m. Eddies acquire kinetic energy from conversion of eddy available potential energy (EPE), from transfer of mean kinetic energy (MKE), and from direct generation due to time-varying (turbulent) wind stress, the first of which contributes predominantly to the majority of the EKE. The EPE-to-EKE conversion occurs almost in the entire basin, while the MKE-to-EKE transfer appears mainly along the shelf boundary of the basin (200 miso-bath) where high horizontal shear interacts with topography. The EKE generated by the turbulent wind stress is relatively small and limited to the southern basin. All these processes are intensified during winter, when the rate of energy conversion is about four to five times larger than that in summer. The EKE is redistributed by the vertical and horizontal divergence of energy flux and the advection of the mean flow. As a main sink of EKE, dissipation processes is ubiquitously found in the basin. The seasonal variability of these energy conversion terms can explain the significant seasonality of eddy activities in the Red Sea. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  8. Mass, Momentum and Kinetic Energy of a Relativistic Particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanchini, Enzo

    2010-01-01

    A rigorous definition of mass in special relativity, proposed in a recent paper, is recalled and employed to obtain simple and rigorous deductions of the expressions of momentum and kinetic energy for a relativistic particle. The whole logical framework appears as the natural extension of the classical one. Only the first, second and third laws of…

  9. Momentum and Kinetic Energy: Confusable Concepts in Secondary School Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryce, T. G. K.; MacMillan, K.

    2009-01-01

    Researchers and practitioners alike express concerns about the conceptual difficulties associated with the concepts of momentum and kinetic energy currently taught in school physics. This article presents an in-depth analysis of the treatment given to them in 44 published textbooks written for UK secondary school certificate courses. This is set…

  10. Local kinetic-energy density of the Airy gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vitos, Levente; Johansson, B.; Kollár, J.

    2000-01-01

    The Airy gas model is used to derive an expression for the local kinetic energy in the linear potential approximation. The expression contains an explicit Laplacian term 2/5((h) over bar(2)/2m)del(mu)(2)(r) that, according to jellium surface calculations, must be a universal feature of any accurate...

  11. Rainfall intensity - rainfall kinetic energy relationships: a critical literature appraisal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, A.I.J.M.; Bruijnzeel, L.A.; Rosewell, C.J.

    2002-01-01

    Knowledge of the relationship between rainfall intensity and kinetic energy and its variations in time and space is important for erosion prediction. However, between studies considerable variations exist in the reported shape and coefficients of this relationship. Some differences can be explained

  12. Ion-kinetic-energy measurements and energy balance in a Z-pinch plasma at stagnation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroupp, E; Osin, D; Starobinets, A; Fisher, V; Bernshtam, V; Maron, Y; Uschmann, I; Förster, E; Fisher, A; Deeney, C

    2007-03-16

    The ion-kinetic energy throughout K emission in a stagnating plasma was determined from the Doppler contribution to the shapes of optically thin lines. X-ray spectroscopy with a remarkably high spectral resolution, together with simultaneous imaging along the pinch, was employed. Over the emission period, a drop of the ion-kinetic energy down to the electron thermal energy was seen. Axially resolved time-dependent electron-density measurements and absolute intensities of line and continuum allowed for investigating, for the first time, each segment of the pinch, the balance between the ion-kinetic energy at the stagnating plasma, and the total radiation emitted. Within the experimental uncertainties, the ion-kinetic energy is shown to account for the total radiation.

  13. Systems engineering analysis of kinetic energy weapon concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senglaub, M.

    1996-06-01

    This study examines, from a systems engineering design perspective, the potential of kinetic energy weapons being used in the role of a conventional strategic weapon. Within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex, strategic weapon experience falls predominantly in the nuclear weapons arena. The techniques developed over the years may not be the most suitable methodologies for use in a new design/development arena. For this reason a more fundamental approach was pursued with the objective of developing an information base from which design decisions might be made concerning the conventional strategic weapon system concepts. The study examined (1) a number of generic missions, (2) the effects of a number of damage mechanisms from a physics perspective, (3) measures of effectiveness (MOE`s), and (4) a design envelope for kinetic energy weapon concepts. With the base of information a cut at developing a set of high-level system requirements was made, and a number of concepts were assessed against these requirements.

  14. Kinetics with deactivation of methylcyclohexane dehydrogenation for hydrogen energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maria, G.; Marin, A.; Wyss, C.; Mueller, S.; Newson, E. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    The methylcyclohexane dehydrogenation step to recycle toluene and release hydrogen is being studied as part of a hydrogen energy storage project. The reaction is performed catalytically in a fixed bed reactor, and the efficiency of this step significantly determines overall system economics. The fresh catalyst kinetics and the deactivation of the catalyst by coke play an important role in the process analysis. The main reaction kinetics were determined from isothermal experiments using a parameter sensitivity analysis for model discrimination. An activation energy for the main reaction of 220{+-}11 kJ/mol was obtained from a two-parameter model. From non-isothermal deactivation in PC-controlled integral reactors, an activation energy for deactivation of 160 kJ/mol was estimated. A model for catalyst coke content of 3-17 weight% was compared with experimental data. (author) 3 figs., 6 refs.

  15. Turbulent Kinetic Energy in the Energy Balance of a Solar Flare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontar, E P; Perez, J E; Harra, L K; Kuznetsov, A A; Emslie, A G; Jeffrey, N L S; Bian, N H; Dennis, B R

    2017-04-14

    The energy released in solar flares derives from a reconfiguration of magnetic fields to a lower energy state, and is manifested in several forms, including bulk kinetic energy of the coronal mass ejection, acceleration of electrons and ions, and enhanced thermal energy that is ultimately radiated away across the electromagnetic spectrum from optical to x rays. Using an unprecedented set of coordinated observations, from a suite of instruments, we here report on a hitherto largely overlooked energy component-the kinetic energy associated with small-scale turbulent mass motions. We show that the spatial location of, and timing of the peak in, turbulent kinetic energy together provide persuasive evidence that turbulent energy may play a key role in the transfer of energy in solar flares. Although the kinetic energy of turbulent motions accounts, at any given time, for only ∼(0.5-1)% of the energy released, its relatively rapid (∼1-10  s) energization and dissipation causes the associated throughput of energy (i.e., power) to rival that of major components of the released energy in solar flares, and thus presumably in other astrophysical acceleration sites.

  16. Plasmadynamics and ionization kinetics of thermionic energy conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawless, J.L. Jr.; Lam, S.H.

    1982-02-01

    To reduce the plasma arc-drop, thermionic energy conversion is studied with both analytical and numerical tools. Simplifications are made in both the plasmadynamic and ionization-recombination theories. These are applied to a scheme proposed presently using laser irradiation to enhance the ionization kinetics of the thermionic plasma and thereby reduce the arc-drop. It is also predicted that it is possible to generate the required laser light from a thermionic-type cesium plasma. The analysis takes advantage of theoretical simplifications derived for the ionization-recombination kinetics. It is shown that large laser ionization enhancements can occur and that collisional cesium recombination lasing is expected. To complement the kinetic theory, a numerical method is developed to solve the thermionic plasma dynamics. To combine the analysis of ionization-recombination kinetics with the plasma dynamics of thermionic conversion, a finite difference computer program is constructed. It is capable of solving for both unsteady and steady thermionic converter behavior including possible laser ionization enhancement or atomic recombination lasing. A proposal to improve thermionic converter performance using laser radiation is considered. In this proposed scheme, laser radiation impinging on a thermionic plasma enhances the ionization process thereby raising the plasma density and reducing the plasma arc-drop. A source for such radiation may possibly be a cesium recombination laser operating in a different thermionic converter. The possibility of this being an energy efficient process is discussed. (WHK)

  17. Rotational and divergent kinetic energy in the mesoscale model ALADIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Blažica

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Kinetic energy spectra from the mesoscale numerical weather prediction (NWP model ALADIN with horizontal resolution 4.4 km are split into divergent and rotational components which are then compared at horizontal scales below 300 km and various vertical levels. It is shown that about 50% of kinetic energy in the free troposphere in ALADIN is divergent energy. The percentage increases towards 70% near the surface and in the upper troposphere towards 100 hPa. The maximal percentage of divergent energy is found at stratospheric levels around 100 hPa and at scales below 100 km which are not represented by the global models. At all levels, the divergent energy spectra are characterised by shallower slopes than the rotational energy spectra, and the difference increases as horizontal scales become larger. A very similar vertical distribution of divergent energy is obtained by using the standard ALADIN approach for the computation of spectra based on the extension zone and by applying detrending approach commonly used in mesoscale NWP community.

  18. Kinetic energy budgets during the life cycle of intense convective activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuelberg, H. E.; Scoggins, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    Synoptic-scale data at three- and six-hour intervals are employed to study the relationship between changing kinetic energy variables and the life cycles of two severe squall lines. The kinetic energy budgets indicate a high degree of kinetic energy generation, especially pronounced near the jet-stream level. Energy losses in the storm environment are due to the transfer of kinetic energy from grid to subgrid scales of motion; large-scale upward vertical motion carries aloft the kinetic energy generated by storm activity at lower levels. In general, the time of maximum storm intensity is also the time of maximum energy conversion and transport.

  19. A study of the kinetic energy generation with general circulation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, T.-C.; Lee, Y.-H.

    1983-01-01

    The history data of winter simulation by the GLAS climate model and the NCAR community climate model are used to examine the generation of atmospheric kinetic energy. The contrast between the geographic distributions of the generation of kinetic energy and divergence of kinetic energy flux shows that kinetic energy is generated in the upstream side of jets, transported to the downstream side and destroyed there. The contributions from the time-mean and transient modes to the counterbalance between generation of kinetic energy and divergence of kinetic energy flux are also investigated. It is observed that the kinetic energy generated by the time-mean mode is essentially redistributed by the time-mean flow, while that generated by the transient flow is mainly responsible for the maintenance of the kinetic energy of the entire atmospheric flow.

  20. Nonequilibrium electron energy-loss kinetics in metal clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Guillon, C; Fatti, N D; Vallee, F

    2003-01-01

    Ultrafast energy exchanges of a non-Fermi electron gas with the lattice are investigated in silver clusters with sizes ranging from 4 to 26 nm using a femtosecond pump-probe technique. The results yield evidence for a cluster-size-dependent slowing down of the short-time energy losses of the electron gas when it is strongly athermal. A constant rate is eventually reached after a few hundred femtoseconds, consistent with the electron gas internal thermalization kinetics, this behaviour reflecting evolution from an individual to a collective electron-lattice type of coupling. The timescale of this transient regime is reduced in small nanoparticles, in agreement with speeding up of the electron-electron interactions with size reduction. The experimental results are in quantitative agreement with numerical simulations of the electron kinetics.

  1. Piezoelectric energy harvesting from broadband random vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, S.; Friswell, M. I.; Inman, D. J.

    2009-11-01

    Energy harvesting for the purpose of powering low power electronic sensor systems has received explosive attention in the last few years. Most works using deterministic approaches focusing on using the piezoelectric effect to harvest ambient vibration energy have concentrated on cantilever beams at resonance using harmonic excitation. Here, using a stochastic approach, we focus on using a stack configuration and harvesting broadband vibration energy, a more practically available ambient source. It is assumed that the ambient base excitation is stationary Gaussian white noise, which has a constant power-spectral density across the frequency range considered. The mean power acquired from a piezoelectric vibration-based energy harvester subjected to random base excitation is derived using the theory of random vibrations. Two cases, namely the harvesting circuit with and without an inductor, have been considered. Exact closed-form expressions involving non-dimensional parameters of the electromechanical system have been given and illustrated using numerical examples.

  2. Determination of kinetic energy release from metastable peak widths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Allan Christian; Sølling, Theis I.

    2017-01-01

    The kinetic energy that is released upon bond rupture is often represented as T1/2. A value that is derived from the FWHM of a fragment peak by the use of two different conversion formulas. The choice of formula depends on whether the peak is recorded by scanning a magnetic sector...... that are obtained from magnet scans compared to the peaks that are obtained by scanning an electrostatic analyzer. The E scans (MIKE experiments) give rise to the same values for both of the employed mass spectrometers. The results are explained in terms of energy defocusing when the reactions take place too far...

  3. Kinetic energy budget during strong jet stream activity over the eastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuelberg, H. E.; Scoggins, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    Kinetic energy budgets are computed during a cold air outbreak in association with strong jet stream activity over the eastern United States. The period is characterized by large generation of kinetic energy due to cross-contour flow. Horizontal export and dissipation of energy to subgrid scales of motion constitute the important energy sinks. Rawinsonde data at 3 and 6 h intervals during a 36 h period are used in the analysis and reveal that energy fluctuations on a time scale of less than 12 h are generally small even though the overall energy balance does change considerably during the period in conjunction with an upper level trough which moves through the region. An error analysis of the energy budget terms suggests that this major change in the budget is not due to random errors in the input data but is caused by the changing synoptic situation. The study illustrates the need to consider the time and space scales of associated weather phenomena in interpreting energy budgets obtained through use of higher frequency data.

  4. Decay and Spatial Diffusion of Turbulent Kinetic Energy In The Presence of a Linear Kinetic Energy Gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneveau, Charles

    2015-11-01

    A topic that elicited the interest of John Lumley is pressure transport in turbulence. In 1978 (JL, in Advances in Applied Mechanics, pages 123-176) he showed that pressure transport likely acts in the opposite direction to the spatial flux of kinetic energy due to triple velocity correlations. Here we examine a flow in which the interplay of turbulent decay and spatial transport is particularly relevant. Specifically, using a specially designed active grid and screens placed in the Corrsin wind tunnel, such a flow is realized. Data are acquired using X-wire thermal anemometry at different spanwise and downstream locations. In order to resolve the dissipation rate accurately, measurements are also acquired using the NSTAP probe developed and manufactured by Princeton researchers and kindly provided to us (M. Hultmark, Y. Fan, L. Smits). The results show power-law decay with downstream distance, with a decay exponent that becomes larger in the high kinetic energy side of the flow. Measurements of the dissipation enable us to obtain the spanwise gradient of the spatial flux. One possible explanation for the observations is upgrading transport of kinetic energy due to pressure-velocity correlations, although its magnitude required to close the budget appears very large. Absence of simultaneous pressure velocity measurement preclude us to fully elucidate the observed trends. In collaboration with Adrien Thormann, Johns Hopkins University. Financial support: National Science Foundation.

  5. Nowcasting of kinetic energy of hail precipitation using radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, J. L.; López, L.; García-Ortega, E.; Gil, B.

    2013-04-01

    The detection of hail precipitation generated by a storm is a complicated task due to the limited spatial extension and the space-time irregularity of impacts generated on the ground. Some of the most extensive methods to create climatology of these impacts are observer networks or hailpad networks. Both methods are affected by numerous inconveniences, overall when it is necessary to work with an extensive area, in which it is necessary to maintain an operating network that has numerous maintenance costs. In this sense, there are numerous works done that have developed different models with the objective of detecting hail precipitation using meteorological radar. Some of these methods use discriminant statistic techniques that, through the combination of different radar parameters, can achieve very satisfactory results. On the other hand, it would be very interesting to know not only the probability of hail, but also some of the characteristics of the hailstones precipitated, such as the number or their kinetic energy, since these parameters are directly related to the damage generated in infrastructures and/or crops. The estimation of kinetic energy of hail precipitation using meteorological radar has caught the interest of some authors. In our case, we used the databases obtained by hailpad networks and the databases of C-band and S-Band radar to build an algorithm to estimate the vertical component of kinetic energy produced by a hail precipitation. In order to carry out this study, data on hail was gathered and analyzed from the hailpad networks in the province of Zaragoza (in the north-east of Spain) and the province of Mendoza (in Argentina, close to the Andes range on the border with Chile). These are two geographically distant regions, but which share a common characteristic: a high frequency of storms with hail precipitation, mainly during the summer months (Sánchez et al., 2009a). In order to compile the database, we have established two categories of

  6. A Detailed Level Kinetics Model of NO Vibrational Energy Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Surendra P.; Gilmore, John; Cavolowsky, John A. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Several contemporary problems have pointed to the desirability of a detailed level kinetics approach to modeling the distribution of vibrational energy in NO. Such a model is necessary when vibrational redistribution reactions are insufficient to maintain a Boltzmann distribution over the vibrational energy states. Recent calculations of the rate constant for the first reaction of the Zeldovich mechanism (N2 + O (goes to) NO + N) have suggested that the product NO is formed in high vibrational states. In shock layer flowfields, the product NO molecules may experience an insufficient number of collisions to establish a Boltzmann distribution over vibrational states, thus necessitating a level kinetics model. In other flows, such as expansions of high temperature air, fast, near-resonance vibrational energy exchanges with N2 and O2 may also require a level specific model for NO because of the relative rates of vibrational exchange and redistribution. The proposed report will integrate computational and experimental components to construct such a model for the NO molecule.

  7. Discrete kinetic models from funneled energy landscape simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, Nicholas P; Hoffman, Ryan M B; Burger, Anat; Craig, Patricio O; Komives, Elizabeth A; Wolynes, Peter G

    2012-01-01

    A general method for facilitating the interpretation of computer simulations of protein folding with minimally frustrated energy landscapes is detailed and applied to a designed ankyrin repeat protein (4ANK). In the method, groups of residues are assigned to foldons and these foldons are used to map the conformational space of the protein onto a set of discrete macrobasins. The free energies of the individual macrobasins are then calculated, informing practical kinetic analysis. Two simple assumptions about the universality of the rate for downhill transitions between macrobasins and the natural local connectivity between macrobasins lead to a scheme for predicting overall folding and unfolding rates, generating chevron plots under varying thermodynamic conditions, and inferring dominant kinetic folding pathways. To illustrate the approach, free energies of macrobasins were calculated from biased simulations of a non-additive structure-based model using two structurally motivated foldon definitions at the full and half ankyrin repeat resolutions. The calculated chevrons have features consistent with those measured in stopped flow chemical denaturation experiments. The dominant inferred folding pathway has an "inside-out", nucleation-propagation like character.

  8. Discrete kinetic models from funneled energy landscape simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas P Schafer

    Full Text Available A general method for facilitating the interpretation of computer simulations of protein folding with minimally frustrated energy landscapes is detailed and applied to a designed ankyrin repeat protein (4ANK. In the method, groups of residues are assigned to foldons and these foldons are used to map the conformational space of the protein onto a set of discrete macrobasins. The free energies of the individual macrobasins are then calculated, informing practical kinetic analysis. Two simple assumptions about the universality of the rate for downhill transitions between macrobasins and the natural local connectivity between macrobasins lead to a scheme for predicting overall folding and unfolding rates, generating chevron plots under varying thermodynamic conditions, and inferring dominant kinetic folding pathways. To illustrate the approach, free energies of macrobasins were calculated from biased simulations of a non-additive structure-based model using two structurally motivated foldon definitions at the full and half ankyrin repeat resolutions. The calculated chevrons have features consistent with those measured in stopped flow chemical denaturation experiments. The dominant inferred folding pathway has an "inside-out", nucleation-propagation like character.

  9. Modeling the turbulent kinetic energy equation for compressible, homogeneous turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aupoix, B.; Blaisdell, G. A.; Reynolds, William C.; Zeman, Otto

    1990-01-01

    The turbulent kinetic energy transport equation, which is the basis of turbulence models, is investigated for homogeneous, compressible turbulence using direct numerical simulations performed at CTR. It is shown that the partition between dilatational and solenoidal modes is very sensitive to initial conditions for isotropic decaying turbulence but not for sheared flows. The importance of the dilatational dissipation and of the pressure-dilatation term is evidenced from simulations and a transport equation is proposed to evaluate the pressure-dilatation term evolution. This transport equation seems to work well for sheared flows but does not account for initial condition sensitivity in isotropic decay. An improved model is proposed.

  10. Flywheels for Low-Speed Kinetic Energy Storage Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Portnov, G.; Cruz, I.; Arias, F.; Fiffe, R. P.

    2003-07-01

    A brief overview of different steel disc-type flywheels is presented. It contents the analysis of relationship between stress-state and kinetic energy of rotating body, comparison of the main characteristics of flywheels and description of their optimization procedures. It is shown that profiles of the discs calculated on a basis of plane stress-state assumption may be considered only as a starting point for its further improvement using 3-D approach. The aim of the review is to provide a designer for a insight into problem of shaping of steel flywheels. (Author) 19 refs.

  11. Tunneling and reflection in unimolecular reaction kinetic energy release distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, K.

    2018-02-01

    The kinetic energy release distributions in unimolecular reactions is calculated with detailed balance theory, taking into account the tunneling and the reflection coefficient in three different types of transition states; (i) a saddle point corresponding to a standard RRKM-type theory, (ii) an attachment Langevin cross section, and (iii) an absorbing sphere potential at short range, without long range interactions. Corrections are significant in the one dimensional saddle point states. Very light and lightly bound absorbing systems will show measurable effects in decays from the absorbing sphere, whereas the Langevin cross section is essentially unchanged.

  12. Cardiorespiratory Kinetics Determined by Pseudo-Random Binary Sequences - Comparisons between Walking and Cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koschate, J; Drescher, U; Thieschäfer, L; Heine, O; Baum, K; Hoffmann, U

    2016-12-01

    This study aims to compare cardiorespiratory kinetics as a response to a standardised work rate protocol with pseudo-random binary sequences between cycling and walking in young healthy subjects. Muscular and pulmonary oxygen uptake (V̇O2) kinetics as well as heart rate kinetics were expected to be similar for walking and cycling. Cardiac data and V̇O2 of 23 healthy young subjects were measured in response to pseudo-random binary sequences. Kinetics were assessed applying time series analysis. Higher maxima of cross-correlation functions between work rate and the respective parameter indicate faster kinetics responses. Muscular V̇O2 kinetics were estimated from heart rate and pulmonary V̇O2 using a circulatory model. Muscular (walking vs. cycling [mean±SD in arbitrary units]: 0.40±0.08 vs. 0.41±0.08) and pulmonary V̇O2 kinetics (0.35±0.06 vs. 0.35±0.06) were not different, although the time courses of the cross-correlation functions of pulmonary V̇O2 showed unexpected biphasic responses. Heart rate kinetics (0.50±0.14 vs. 0.40±0.14; P=0.017) was faster for walking. Regarding the biphasic cross-correlation functions of pulmonary V̇O2 during walking, the assessment of muscular V̇O2 kinetics via pseudo-random binary sequences requires a circulatory model to account for cardio-dynamic distortions. Faster heart rate kinetics for walking should be considered by comparing results from cycle and treadmill ergometry. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Energy landscape and diffusion kinetics of lithiated silicon: A kinetic activation-relaxation technique study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trochet, Mickaël; Mousseau, Normand

    2017-10-01

    With large specific and volumetric capacity, lithiated silicon is an excellent anode for lithium-ion batteries. Its application is challenged today, however, by the formation of an amorphous a -LixSi phase associated with a large volume change that occurs at relatively low Li concentration and remains only very partly understood at the microscopic level. In this paper, we characterize the full energy landscape associated with the onset of Li insertion in crystalline Si as a first step for understanding the lithiation process. We identify the diffusion mechanisms and migration energies for one to ten Li atoms in a Si crystal as well as the average lifetime of small lithium aggregates, using the kinetic activation-relaxation technique (kART), an off-lattice kinetic Monte-Carlo method with on-the-fly catalog building capabilities coupled to a newly developed force field (ReaxFF) used as potential based on ab initio results. We show that the short lifetimes of the bound states (from meV to ten meV) mean that Li atoms move in the interstitial sublattice with little interactions, explaining how high Li concentration in Si can be reached.

  14. Influence of the standard free energy on swelling kinetics of gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keener, James P; Sircar, Sarthok; Fogelson, Aaron L

    2011-04-01

    Classical theories of gel swelling employ the mixing free energy, thereby ignoring any effects of the free energy of the pure phases,i.e., the polymer standard free energy. In this paper we present a model for the swelling kinetics of gels that incorporates the free energy, including the polymer standard free energy. We provide a complete analysis of how the swelling kinetics and stable states and sizes of the swelled gel depends on the free energy parameters and show that theories that use only the mixing free energy cannot correctly describe equilibrium states or the swelling kinetics. ©2011 American Physical Society

  15. Sensible Heat Flux Related to Variations in Atmospheric Turbulence Kinetic Energy on a Sandy Beach

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    FLUX RELATED TO VARIATIONS IN ATMOSPHERIC TURBULENCE KINETIC ENERGY ON A SANDY BEACH by Jessica S. Koscinski June 2017 Thesis Advisor...KINETIC ENERGY ON A SANDY BEACH 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) Jessica S. Koscinski 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Naval...Sensible heat flux, turbulence kinetic energy , surf zone 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 57 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF REPORT

  16. Utilization of rotor kinetic energy storage for hybrid vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, John S [Oak Ridge, TN

    2011-05-03

    A power system for a motor vehicle having an internal combustion engine, the power system comprises an electric machine (12) further comprising a first excitation source (47), a permanent magnet rotor (28) and a magnetic coupling rotor (26) spaced from the permanent magnet rotor and at least one second excitation source (43), the magnetic coupling rotor (26) also including a flywheel having an inertial mass to store kinetic energy during an initial acceleration to an operating speed; and wherein the first excitation source is electrically connected to the second excitation source for power cycling such that the flywheel rotor (26) exerts torque on the permanent magnet rotor (28) to assist braking and acceleration of the permanent magnet rotor (28) and consequently, the vehicle. An axial gap machine and a radial gap machine are disclosed and methods of the invention are also disclosed.

  17. Mass independent kinetic energy reducing inlet system for vacuum environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Peter T.A.

    2013-12-03

    A particle inlet system comprises a first chamber having a limiting orifice for an incoming gas stream and a micrometer controlled expansion slit. Lateral components of the momentum of the particles are substantially cancelled due to symmetry of the configuration once the laminar flow converges at the expansion slit. The particles and flow into a second chamber, which is maintained at a lower pressure than the first chamber, and then moves into a third chamber including multipole guides for electromagnetically confining the particle. The vertical momentum of the particles descending through the center of the third chamber is minimized as an upward stream of gases reduces the downward momentum of the particles. The translational kinetic energy of the particles is near-zero irrespective of the mass of the particles at an exit opening of the third chamber, which may be advantageously employed to provide enhanced mass resolution in mass spectrometry.

  18. Mass independent kinetic energy reducing inlet system for vacuum environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Peter T. A. [Knoxville, TN

    2010-12-14

    A particle inlet system comprises a first chamber having a limiting orifice for an incoming gas stream and a micrometer controlled expansion slit. Lateral components of the momentum of the particles are substantially cancelled due to symmetry of the configuration once the laminar flow converges at the expansion slit. The particles and flow into a second chamber, which is maintained at a lower pressure than the first chamber, and then moves into a third chamber including multipole guides for electromagnetically confining the particle. The vertical momentum of the particles descending through the center of the third chamber is minimized as an upward stream of gases reduces the downward momentum of the particles. The translational kinetic energy of the particles is near-zero irrespective of the mass of the particles at an exit opening of the third chamber, which may be advantageously employed to provide enhanced mass resolution in mass spectrometry.

  19. Analogies between colored Lévy noise and random channel approach to disordered kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlad, Marcel O.; Velarde, Manuel G.; Ross, John

    2004-02-01

    We point out some interesting analogies between colored Lévy noise and the random channel approach to disordered kinetics. These analogies are due to the fact that the probability density of the Lévy noise source plays a similar role as the probability density of rate coefficients in disordered kinetics. Although the equations for the two approaches are not identical, the analogies can be used for deriving new, useful results for both problems. The random channel approach makes it possible to generalize the fractional Uhlenbeck-Ornstein processes (FUO) for space- and time-dependent colored noise. We describe the properties of colored noise in terms of characteristic functionals, which are evaluated by using a generalization of Huber's approach to complex relaxation [Phys. Rev. B 31, 6070 (1985)]. We start out by investigating the properties of symmetrical white noise and then define the Lévy colored noise in terms of a Langevin equation with a Lévy white noise source. We derive exact analytical expressions for the various characteristic functionals, which characterize the noise, and a functional fractional Fokker-Planck equation for the probability density functional of the noise at a given moment in time. Second, by making an analogy between the theory of colored noise and the random channel approach to disordered kinetics, we derive fractional equations for the evolution of the probability densities of the random rate coefficients in disordered kinetics. These equations serve as a basis for developing methods for the evaluation of the statistical properties of the random rate coefficients from experimental data. Special attention is paid to the analysis of systems for which the observed kinetic curves can be described by linear or nonlinear stretched exponential kinetics.

  20. Understanding the Pulsar High Energy Emission: Macroscopic and Kinetic Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalapotharakos, Constantinos; Brambilla, Gabriele; Timokhin, Andrey; Kust Harding, Alice; Kazanas, Demos

    2017-08-01

    Pulsars are extraordinary objects powered by the rotation of magnetic fields of order 10^8, 10^12G anchored onto neutron stars and rotating with periods 10^(-3)-10s. These fields mediate the conversion of their rotational energy into MHD winds and at the same time accelerate particles to energies sufficiently high to produce GeV photons. Fermi, since its launch in 2008, has established several trends among the observed gamma-ray pulsar properties playing a catalytic role in the current modeling of the high energy emission in pulsar magnetospheres. We judiciously use the guidance provided by the Fermi data to yield meaningful constraints on the macroscopic parameters of our global dissipative pulsar magnetosphere models. Our FIDO (Force-Free Inside, Dissipative Outside) models indicate that the dissipative regions lie outside the light cylinder near the equatorial current sheet. Our models reproduce the light-curve phenomenology while a detailed comparison of the model spectral properties with those observed by Fermi reveals the dependence of the macroscopic conductivity parameter on the spin-down rate providing a unique insight into the understanding of the physical mechanisms behind the high-energy emission in pulsar magnetospheres. Finally, we further exploit these important results by building self-consistent 3D global kinetic particle-in-cell (PIC) models which, eventually, provide the dependence of the macroscopic parameter behavior (e.g. conductivity) on the microphysical properties (e.g. particle multiplicities, particle injection rates). Our PIC models provide field structures and particle distributions that are not only consistent with each other but also able to reproduce a broad range of the observed gamma-ray phenomenology (light curves and spectral properties) of both young and millisecond pulsars.

  1. Detailed Kinetic Modeling of Processes Relevant To Fusion Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehl, Marco; Armstrong, Michael; Zaug, Joseph; Crowhurst, Jonathan; Radousky, Harry; Stavrou, Elissaios

    2016-10-01

    Carbon based materials have been proposed as candidates for the fabrication of plasma-facing components in the design of fusion energy devices. Although these components are not supposed to be in direct contact with the core fusion plasma, plasma instabilities and the harsh environment they are exposed to can cause the degradation of plasma-exposed components and the transfer of contaminants into the plasma followed by deposition of byproducts. In order to investigate the chemistry involved in these processes and to assist the development of models suitable to understand the long term consequences of the carbon ablation/deposition cycle, an inductively coupled plasma flow reactor (ICPFR) has been developed. The ICPFR allows the atomization of carbon containing precursors to high temperatures (in the order of 10000K) and the characterization of the gas and solid species formed downsteam from the plasma source through spectroscopic techniques. In parallel to the experimental analysis a comprehensive set of fluid dynamic and detailed kinetic simulations are used to analyze the data. The combination of these two approaches resulted in a validated and comprehensive chemical model for the formation of carbon deposits in carbon contaminated cooling plasmas. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  2. RNA folding pathways and kinetics using 2D energy landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senter, Evan; Dotu, Ivan; Clote, Peter

    2015-01-01

    RNA folding pathways play an important role in various biological processes, such as (i) the hok/sok (host-killing/suppression of killing) system in E. coli to check for sufficient plasmid copy number, (ii) the conformational switch in spliced leader (SL) RNA from Leptomonas collosoma, which controls trans splicing of a portion of the '5 exon, and (iii) riboswitches--portions of the 5' untranslated region of messenger RNA that regulate genes by allostery. Since RNA folding pathways are determined by the energy landscape, we describe a novel algorithm, FFTbor2D, which computes the 2D projection of the energy landscape for a given RNA sequence. Given two metastable secondary structures A, B for a given RNA sequence, FFTbor2D computes the Boltzmann probability p(x, y) = Z(x,y)/Z that a secondary structure has base pair distance x from A and distance y from B. Using polynomial interpolationwith the fast Fourier transform,we compute p(x, y) in O(n(5)) time and O(n(2)) space, which is an improvement over an earlier method, which runs in O(n(7)) time and O(n(4)) space. FFTbor2D has potential applications in synthetic biology, where one might wish to design bistable switches having target metastable structures A, B with favorable pathway kinetics. By inverting the transition probability matrix determined from FFTbor2D output, we show that L. collosoma spliced leader RNA has larger mean first passage time from A to B on the 2D energy landscape, than 97.145% of 20,000 sequences, each having metastable structures A, B. Source code and binaries are freely available for download at http://bioinformatics.bc.edu/clotelab/FFTbor2D. The program FFTbor2D is implemented in C++, with optional OpenMP parallelization primitives.

  3. Key role of molecular kinetic energy in early stages of pentacene island growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Yu; Toccoli, Tullio; Zhang, Jian; Koch, Norbert; Iacob, Erica; Pallaoro, Alessia; Iannotta, Salvatore; Rudolf, Petra

    Organic molecular beam deposition is studied systematically at thermal and hyperthermal regimes aiming at investigating the role of molecular kinetic energy on the growth mechanism of pentacene submonolayers on SiO (x) /Si. We show that the kinetic energy of the impinging molecule (E (k) ) plays a

  4. A Comparison of Kinetic Energy and Momentum in Special Relativity and Classical Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggs, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Kinetic energy and momentum are indispensable dynamical quantities in both the special theory of relativity and in classical mechanics. Although momentum and kinetic energy are central to understanding dynamics, the differences between their relativistic and classical notions have not always received adequate treatment in undergraduate teaching.…

  5. A calculation of internal kinetic energy and polarizability of compressed argon from the statistical atom model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seldam, C.A. ten; Groot, S.R. de

    1952-01-01

    From Jensen's and Gombás' modification of the statistical Thomas-Fermi atom model, a theory for compressed atoms is developed by changing the boundary conditions. Internal kinetic energy and polarizability of argon are calculated as functions of pressure. At 1000 atm. an internal kinetic energy of

  6. NonBoussinesq effects on vorticity and kinetic energy production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravichandran, S.; Dixit, Harish; Govindarajan, Rama

    2015-11-01

    The Boussinesq approximation, commonly employed in weakly compressible or incompressible flows, neglects changes in inertia due to changes in the density. However, the nonBoussinesq terms can lead to a kind of centrifugal instability for small but sharp density variations, and therefore cannot be neglected under such circumstances (see, e.g., DIXIT & GOVINDARAJAN, JFM , 2010, 415). Here, we study the evolution of a light-cored Gaussian vortex and find that the nonBoussinesq terms can lead to significant changes in how vortices evolve. The problem is governed by three nondimensional numbers--Reynolds number (i.e. viscosity), Atwood number, and a ratio of gravitational and centrifugal Froude numbers. We find that the production of kinetic energy and vorticity in a light-cored Gaussian vortex are affected significantly by the nonBoussinesq terms, and varies non-monotonically with the parameters of the problem. In general, these nonBoussinesq effects depend both on the strength of gravity and on the Reynolds number associated with the initial vortex.

  7. Kinetic Energy Dissipation on Labyrinth Configuration Stepped Spillway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaafar S. Maatooq

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In present work a labyrinth (zigzag, in shape has been used to configure the steps of stepped spillway by using the physical model. This configuration does not introduce previously by investigators or in construction techniques of dams or cascades. It would be expected to improve the flow over chute. A magnifying the width path of each step to become, LT, instead of, W, will induce the interlocking between the mainstream and that spread laterally due to labyrinth path. This phenomenon leads to reduce the jet velocities near the surfaces, thus minimizing the ability of cavitation and with increasing a circulation regions the ability of air entrainment be maximized. The results were encouraging, (e.g., the reverse performance has recorded for spillway slope. From the evaluation of outcome, the average recorded of percentage profits of kinetic energy dissipation with a labyrinth shape compared with the results of traditional shape were ranged between (13- 44%. Different predictive formulas have been proposed based on iteration analysis, can be recommended for evaluation and design.

  8. Relationship between the kinetic energy budget and intensity of convection. [in atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuelberg, H. E.; Scoggins, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    Synoptic data collected over the eastern United States during the fourth Atmospheric Variability Experiment, April 24 and 25, 1975, is used to study the relationship between the kinetic energy budget and the intensity of convective activity. It is found that areas of intense convective activity are also major centers of kinetic energy activity. Energy processes increase in magnitude with an increase in convection intensity. Large generation of kinetic energy is associated with intense convection, but large quantities of energy are transported out of the area of convection. The kinetic energy budget associated with grid points having no convection differs greatly from the budgets of the three categories of convection. Weak energy processes are not associated with convection.

  9. HOMO energy gap dependence of hole-transfer kinetics in DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Kiyohiko; Hayashi, Mitsuo; Majima, Tetsuro

    2012-03-14

    DNA consists of two type of base-pairs, G-C and A-T, in which the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) localizes on the purine bases G and A. While the hole transfer through consecutive Gs or As occurs faster than 10(9) s(-1), a significant drop in the hole transfer rate was observed for G-C and A-T mixed random sequences. In this study, by using various natural and artificial nucleobases having different HOMO levels, the effect of the HOMO-energy gap between bases (Δ(HOMO)) on the hole-transfer kinetics in DNA was investigated. The results demonstrated that the hole transfer rate can be increased by decreasing the Δ(HOMO) and can be finely tuned over 3 orders of magnitude by varying the Δ(HOMO).

  10. Spectral study of wintertime kinetic energy of the Northern Hemisphere in the troposphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H. N.; Zhao, Z.; Kao, S. K.

    1983-01-01

    Characteristics of the kinetic energy of wind fields at various pressure levels were analyzed, and significant wavenumbers in the wavenumber-frequency domain were identified. The nonlinear interaction terms of the kinetic energy equation were examined, and the distribution of the kinetic energy at the 850 mb, 500 mb, and 200 mb levels was calculated. A 5 deg latitude-longitude square grid was used, with NMC data for the 1975-1976 winter in the 20-60 deg N at 500 mb and 20-85 deg N for the 200 mb and 850 mb levels. The kinetic energy distribution was determined to be geography-dependent, with wavenumbers 6-9 westerly waves in the midfrequency range contributing significantly to kinetic energy maxima over the North Pacific and the east coast of North America. The contribution of the nonlinear interactions of these waves, which correspond to the longitudinal convergence of the kinetic energy flux, was found to be larger than the meridional convergence of the kinetic energy flux, and to occur mainly between 30-50 deg N. The nonlinear interactions were a negative contribution over the North Pacific at the 200 mb level.

  11. Turbulent Kinetic Energy (TKE) Budgets Using 5-beam Doppler Profilers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, M. A.; Thomson, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    Field observations of turbulence parameters are important for the development of hydrodynamic models, understanding contaminant mixing, and predicting sediment transport. The turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) budget quantifies where turbulence is being produced, dissipated or transported at a specific site. The Nortek Signature 5-beam AD2CP was used to measure velocities at high sampling rates (up to 8 Hz) at Admiralty Inlet and Rich Passage in Puget Sound, WA, USA. Raw along-beam velocity data is quality controlled and is used to estimate TKE spectra, spatial structure functions, and Reynolds stress tensors. Exceptionally low Doppler noise in the data enables clear observations of the inertial sub-range of isotropic turbulence in both the frequency TKE spectra and the spatial structure functions. From these, TKE dissipation rates are estimated following Kolmogorov's theory of turbulence. The TKE production rates are estimated using Reynolds stress tensors together with the vertical shear in the mean flow. The Reynolds stress tensors are estimated following the methodology of Dewey and Stinger (2007), which is significantly improved by inclusion of the 5th beam (as opposed to the conventional 4). These turbulence parameters are used to study the TKE budget along the water column at the two sites. Ebb and flood production and dissipation rates are compared through the water column at both sites. At Admiralty Inlet, dissipation exceeds production during ebb while the opposite occurs during flood because the proximity to a lateral headland. At Rich Passage, production exceeds dissipation through the water column for all tidal conditions due to a vertical sill in the vicinity of the measurement site.

  12. Bidirectional Energy Cascades and the Origin of Kinetic Alfvenic and Whistler Turbulence in the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, H.; Goldstein, M. L.; Vinas, A. F.

    2014-01-01

    The observed steep kinetic scale turbulence spectrum in the solar wind raises the question of how that turbulence originates. Observations of keV energetic electrons during solar quiet time suggest them as a possible source of free energy to drive kinetic turbulence. Using particle-in-cell simulations, we explore how the free energy released by an electron two-stream instability drives Weibel-like electromagnetic waves that excite wave-wave interactions. Consequently, both kinetic Alfvénic and whistler turbulence are excited that evolve through inverse and forward magnetic energy cascades.

  13. Variational energy principle for compressible, baroclinic flow. 1: First and second variations of total kinetic action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, L. A.

    1977-01-01

    The case of a cold gas in the absence of external force fields is considered. Since the only energy involved is kinetic energy, the total kinetic action (i.e., the space-time integral of the kinetic energy density) should serve as the total free-energy functional in this case, and as such should be a local minimum for all possible fluctuations about stable flow. This conjecture is tested by calculating explicit, manifestly covariant expressions for the first and second variations of the total kinetic action in the context of Lagrangian kinematics. The general question of the correlation between physical stability and the convexity of any action integral that can be interpreted as the total free-energy functional of the flow is discussed and illustrated for the cases of rectillinear and rotating shearing flows.

  14. The role of latent heat in kinetic energy conversions of South Pacific cyclones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kann, Deirdre M.; Vincent, Dayton G.

    1986-01-01

    The four-dimensional behavior of cyclone systems in the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ) is analyzed. Three cyclone systems, which occurred during the period from January 10-16, 1979, are examined using the data collected during the first special observing period of the FGGE. The effects of latent heating on the life cycles of the cyclones are investigated. Particular attention is given to the conversions of eddy available potential energy to eddy kinetic energy and of mean kinetic energy to eddy kinetic energy. The net radiation profile, sensible heat flux, total field of vertical motion, and latent heat component were computed. The life cycles of the cyclones are described. It is observed that the latent heating component accounts for nearly all the conversion in the three cyclones, and latent heating within the SPCZ is the major source of eddy kinetic energy for the cyclones.

  15. Leading-order nonlocal kinetic energy in peridynamics for consistent energetics and wave dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayal, Kaushik

    2017-08-01

    This work considers the approximation of peridynamics by strain-gradient models in the linear, one-dimensional setting. Strain-gradient expansions that approximate the peridynamic dispersion relation using Taylor series are compared to strain-gradient models that approximate the peridynamic elastic energy. The dynamic and energetic expansions differ from each other, and neither captures an important feature of peridynamics that mimics atomic-scale dynamics, namely that the frequency of short waves is bounded and non-zero. The paper next examines peridynamics as the limit model along a sequence of strain-gradient models that consistently approximate both the energetics and the dispersion properties of peridynamics. Formally examining the limit suggests that the inertial term in the dynamical equation of peridynamics - or equivalently, the peridynamic kinetic energy - is necessarily nonlocal in space to balance the spatial nonlocality in the elastic energy. The nonlocality in the kinetic energy is of leading-order in the following sense: classical elasticity is the zeroth-order theory in both the kinetically nonlocal peridynamics and the classical peridynamics, but once nonlocality in the elastic energy is introduced, it must be balanced by nonlocality in the kinetic energy at the same order. In that sense, the kinetic nonlocality is not a higher-order correction; rather, the kinetic nonlocality is essential for consistent energetics and dynamics even in the simplest setting. The paper then examines the implications of kinetically nonlocal peridynamics in the context of stationary and propagating discontinuities of the kinematic fields.

  16. On the Equipartition of Kinetic Energy in an Ideal Gas Mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peliti, L.

    2007-01-01

    A refinement of an argument due to Maxwell for the equipartition of translational kinetic energy in a mixture of ideal gases with different masses is proposed. The argument is elementary, yet it may work as an illustration of the role of symmetry and independence postulates in kinetic theory. (Contains 1 figure.)

  17. Energy Conservation Tests of a Coupled Kinetic-kinetic Plasma-neutral Transport Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stotler, D. P.; Chang, C. S.; Ku, S. H.; Lang, J.; Park, G.

    2012-08-29

    A Monte Carlo neutral transport routine, based on DEGAS2, has been coupled to the guiding center ion-electron-neutral neoclassical PIC code XGC0 to provide a realistic treatment of neutral atoms and molecules in the tokamak edge plasma. The DEGAS2 routine allows detailed atomic physics and plasma-material interaction processes to be incorporated into these simulations. The spatial pro le of the neutral particle source used in the DEGAS2 routine is determined from the uxes of XGC0 ions to the material surfaces. The kinetic-kinetic plasma-neutral transport capability is demonstrated with example pedestal fueling simulations.

  18. Raindrop Kinetic Energy Piezoelectric Harvesters and Relevant Interface Circuits: Review, Issues and Outlooks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kok Gnee CHUA

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available As an ecological source of renewable energy, the available kinetic energy of rainfall is not trifling, especially in tropical countries at the equators. The research on the use of piezoelectric transducer to harvest raindrop kinetic energy is gaining more and more attention recently. This article reviews the state-of-the-art energy harvesting technology from the conversion of raindrop kinetic energy using piezoelectric transducers as well as its interface circuits for vibration-based energy harvesters. Performance of different types of piezoelectric harvesters in terms of power output, area power density and energy conversion efficiency are compared. Summaries of key problems and suggestions on the optimization of the performance of the piezoelectric harvesters are also provided for future works.

  19. New Ro-Vibrational Kinetic Energy Operators using Polyspherical Coordinates for Polyatomic Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwenke, David W.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We illustrate how one can easily derive kinetic energy operators for polyatomic molecules using polyspherical coordinates with very general choices for z-axis embeddings arid angles used to specify relative orientations of internal vectors. Computer algebra is not required.

  20. Seasonal variability in the vertical current structure and kinetic energy in the Central Indian Ocean Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Murty, V.S.N.; Savin, M.; RameshBabu, V.; Suryanarayana, A.

    apart, indicates the existence of anticyclonic gyral circulation. The depth variation of kinetic energy (KE) emphasises the bottom intensification of currents with minimum KE at deeper depths followed by relatively higher KE at abyssal depths...

  1. Near-surface circulation and kinetic energy in the tropical Indian Ocean derived from lagrangian drifters

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shenoi, S.S.C.; Saji, P.K.; Almeida, A.M.

    Trajectories of 412 satellite-tracked drifting buoys deployed in the tropical Indian Ocean have been analyzed to document the surface circulation and kinetic energy field. Only drifters drogued at 15 m depth and having drag area ratio greater than...

  2. Limiting Energy Dissipation Induces Glassy Kinetics in Single-Cell High-Precision Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Jayajit

    2016-03-08

    Single cells often generate precise responses by involving dissipative out-of-thermodynamic-equilibrium processes in signaling networks. The available free energy to fuel these processes could become limited depending on the metabolic state of an individual cell. How does limiting dissipation affect the kinetics of high-precision responses in single cells? I address this question in the context of a kinetic proofreading scheme used in a simple model of early-time T cell signaling. Using exact analytical calculations and numerical simulations, I show that limiting dissipation qualitatively changes the kinetics in single cells marked by emergence of slow kinetics, large cell-to-cell variations of copy numbers, temporally correlated stochastic events (dynamic facilitation), and ergodicity breaking. Thus, constraints in energy dissipation, in addition to negatively affecting ligand discrimination in T cells, can create a fundamental difficulty in determining single-cell kinetics from cell-population results. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Kinetic Energy Corrections for Slip-Stick Behavior in Brittle Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macon, David J.; Anderson, Greg L.; McCool, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Fracture mechanics is the study of the failure of a body that contains a flaw. In the energy balance approach to fracture mechanics, contributions from the external work and elastic strain energy are accounted for but rarely are corrections for the kinetic energy given. Under slip-stick conditions, part of the external work is expended as kinetic energy. The magnitude of this kinetic energy depends upon the shape of the crack. A specimen with a blunt crack will fail at a high load and the crack will catastrophically travel through the material until the kinetic energy is dissipated. Material with a sharp crack will fail at a lower load but will still be catastrophic in nature. A kinetic term is incorporated into the energy balance approach. This term accounts for the velocity of the crack after failure and how far the crack travels before arresting. This correction makes the shape of the initiation crack irrelevant. When applied to data generated by tapered double cantilever beam specimens under slip-stick conditions, the scatter in the measured critical strain energy release rate is significantly reduced.

  4. Determination of the activation energy of silicone rubbers using different kinetic analysis methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ou Huibin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The solidification of silicone rubbers is a crosslinking reaction called vulcanization. It follows that the physical and mechanical properties of silicone rubbers increase significantly due to the growth of molecular weight and were affected strongly by the vulcanization process, such as the temperatures and times for curing. In this study, the kinetics of the crosslinking reaction of silicone rubbers was investigated by two current techniques: differential scanning calorimeter (DSC and oscillating disk rheometry (ODR. From the kinetic experimental data, different kinetic analysis methods were used to determine the activation energy of silicone rubbers, such as the Kissinger, the Ozawa, the Friedman, the Flynn-Wall-Ozawa, the Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose and the integral methods. The results show the influence of the chemical composition of silicone rubbers, the current technique used and the applied kinetic analysis methods on the activation energy and the evolution of activation energy during the crosslinking reaction.

  5. Effect of kinetic energy on the doping efficiency of cesium cations into superfluid helium droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Zhang, Jie; Freund, William M; Kong, Wei

    2015-07-28

    We present an experimental investigation of the effect of kinetic energy on the ion doping efficiency of superfluid helium droplets using cesium cations from a thermionic emission source. The kinetic energy of Cs(+) is controlled by the bias voltage of a collection grid collinearly arranged with the droplet beam. Efficient doping from ions with kinetic energies from 20 eV up to 480 V has been observed in different sized helium droplets. The relative ion doping efficiency is determined by both the kinetic energy of the ions and the average size of the droplet beam. At a fixed source temperature, the number of doped droplets increases with increasing grid voltage, while the relative ion doping efficiency decreases. This result implies that not all ions are captured upon encountering with a sufficiently large droplet, a deviation from the near unity doping efficiency for closed shell neutral molecules. We propose that this drop in ion doping efficiency with kinetic energy is related to the limited deceleration rate inside a helium droplet. When the source temperature changes from 14 K to 17 K, the relative ion doping efficiency decreases rapidly, perhaps due to the lack of viable sized droplets. The size distribution of the Cs(+)-doped droplet beam can be measured by deflection and by energy filtering. The observed doped droplet size is about 5 × 10(6) helium atoms when the source temperature is between 14 K and 17 K.

  6. Proper Orthogonal Decomposition analysis of kinetic energy entrainment in large wind farms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhulst, Claire; Meneveau, Charles

    2012-11-01

    Vertical entrainment of kinetic energy is thought to play an important role in the dynamics of very large wind farms (Calaf et al., Phys Fluids 2010; and Cal et al. J. Ren. Sust. Energy 2010). To elucidate dominant mechanisms and flow physics of this vertical transfer of kinetic energy, we use Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) to extract dominant flow structures from snapshots of velocity fields generated using Large Eddy Simulation of flow in an infinite turbine array in the atmospheric boundary layer. The POD analysis shows that the dominant modes are large streamwise counter-rotating vortices located above the turbines. The contribution of each POD mode to kinetic energy entrainment at the turbine level is then quantified and the modes are ordered by this contribution. Interestingly, the number of POD modes needed to represent dominant portions of the kinetic energy entrainment is less that the number needed to represent similar portions of the kinetic energy in the turbulent field. This suggests that understanding and controlling only a small number of flow structures may be relevant to the design of very large wind farms. In addition, to understand how the array layout affects the POD modes, several turbine orientations (aligned, staggered, etc) will be discussed. This research is supported by a NSF Graduate Fellowship and by NSF-CBET 1133800. Computer time by NCAR is also appreciated.

  7. Modeling on the Effect of Coal Loads on Kinetic Energy of Balls for Ball Mills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Bai

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a solution for the detection and control of coal loads that is more accurate and convenient than those currently used. To date, no research has addressed the use of a grinding medium as the controlled parameter. To improve the accuracy of the coal load detection based on the kinetic energy of balls in a tubular ball mill, a Discrete Element Method (DEM model for ball kinematics based on coal loads is proposed. The operating process for a ball mill and the ball motion, as influenced by the coal quality and the coal load, was analyzed carefully. The relationship between the operating efficiency of a coal pulverizing system, coal loads, and the balls’ kinetic energy was obtained. Origin and Matlab were utilized to draw the variation of parameters with increasing coal loads in the projectile and cascading motion states. The parameters include the balls’ real-time kinetic energy, the friction energy consumption, and the mill’s total work. Meanwhile, a method of balanced adjacent degree and a physical experiment were proposed to verify the considerable effect of the balls’ kinetic energy on coal loads. The model and experiment results indicate that a coal load control method based on the balls’ kinetic energy is therefore feasible for the optimized operation of a coal pulverizing system.

  8. A random energy model for size dependence : recurrence vs. transience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Külske, Christof

    1998-01-01

    We investigate the size dependence of disordered spin models having an infinite number of Gibbs measures in the framework of a simplified 'random energy model for size dependence'. We introduce two versions (involving either independent random walks or branching processes), that can be seen as

  9. kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. E. Panayotounakos

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the construction of the general solutions concerning the one-dimensional (1D fully dynamic nonlinear partial differential equations (PDEs, for the erosion kinetics. After an uncoupling procedure of the above mentioned equations a second–order nonlinear PDE of the Monge type governing the porosity is derived, the general solution of which is constructed in the sense that a full complement of arbitrary functions (as many as the order is introduced. Afterwards, we specify the above solution according to convenient initial conditions.

  10. A kinetic energy analysis of the meso beta-scale severe storm environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuelberg, H. E.; Printy, M. F.

    1984-01-01

    Analyses are performed of the meso beta-scale (20-200 km wavelengths and several hours to one-day periods) severe storm kinetic energy balance on the fifth day of the AVE SESAME campaign of May 1979. A 24-hr interval covering the antecedent, active and post-convective outbreak activity over Oklahoma are considered. Use is made of the kinetic energy budget equation (KEBE) for a finite volume in an isobaric coordinate system. Rawindsonde data with 75 km resolution were treated. The KEBE model covered changes in kinetic energy due to the cross contour flows, horizontal and vertical components of flux divergence, and volumic mass changes on synoptic and subsynoptic scales. The greatest variability was concentrated above 400 mb height and over the most intense storm activity. Energy was generated at the highest rates in divergence and decreased the most in convection. The meso beta-scale lacked sufficient resolution for analyzing mesoscale activity.

  11. Relativistic Momentum and Kinetic Energy, and E = mc[superscript 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ben Yu-Kuang

    2009-01-01

    Based on relativistic velocity addition and the conservation of momentum and energy, I present simple derivations of the expressions for the relativistic momentum and kinetic energy of a particle, and for the formula E = mc[superscript 2]. (Contains 5 footnotes and 2 figures.)

  12. Role of kinetic energy of impinging molecules in the α-sexithiophene growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tonezzer, M.; Rigo, E.; Gottardi, S.; Bettotti, P.; Pavesi, L.; Iannotta, S.; Toccoli, T.

    2011-01-01

    We report on the α-sexithiophene sub-monolayer growth with supersonic molecular beam deposition by investigating how the kinetic energy of the impinging molecules influences the growth on substrates with different surface wettabilities and temperatures. The results show that the energy of the

  13. Limiting Energy Dissipation Induces Glassy Kinetics in Single-Cell High-Precision Responses

    OpenAIRE

    Das, Jayajit

    2016-01-01

    Single cells often generate precise responses by involving dissipative out-of-thermodynamic equilibrium processes in signaling networks. The available free energy to fuel these processes could become limited depending on the metabolic state of an individual cell. How does limiting dissipation affect the kinetics of high precision responses in single cells? I address this question in the context of a kinetic proofreading scheme used in a simple model of early time T cell signaling. I show usin...

  14. Simulations of eddy kinetic energy transport in barotropic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grooms, Ian

    2017-11-01

    Eddy energy transport in rotating two-dimensional turbulence is investigated using numerical simulation. Stochastic forcing is used to generate an inhomogeneous field of turbulence and the time-mean energy profile is diagnosed. An advective-diffusive model for the transport is fit to the simulation data by requiring the model to accurately predict the observed time-mean energy distribution. Isotropic harmonic diffusion of energy is found to be an accurate model in the case of uniform, solid-body background rotation (the f plane), with a diffusivity that scales reasonably well with a mixing-length law κ ∝V ℓ , where V and ℓ are characteristic eddy velocity and length scales. Passive tracer dynamics are added and it is found that the energy diffusivity is 75 % of the tracer diffusivity. The addition of a differential background rotation with constant vorticity gradient β leads to significant changes to the energy transport. The eddies generate and interact with a mean flow that advects the eddy energy. Mean advection plus anisotropic diffusion (with reduced diffusivity in the direction of the background vorticity gradient) is moderately accurate for flows with scale separation between the eddies and mean flow, but anisotropic diffusion becomes a much less accurate model of the transport when scale separation breaks down. Finally, it is observed that the time-mean eddy energy does not look like the actual eddy energy distribution at any instant of time. In the future, stochastic models of the eddy energy transport may prove more useful than models of the mean transport for predicting realistic eddy energy distributions.

  15. Assessment of Kinetic Tidal Energy Resources Using SELFE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manasa Ranjan Behera

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available An investigation is carried out to study the theoretical tidal stream energy resource in the Singapore Strait to support the search for renewable energy in the effort to reduce the carbon footprints in the Southeast Asia. The tidal hydrodynamics in the Singapore Strait has been simulated using a Semi-implicit Eulerian-Lagrangian Finite-Element (SELFE model solving the 3D shallow water equations with Boussinesq approximations. Potential sites, with high tidal current (2.5 m/s and suitable for Tidal Energy Converter (TEC array installation to generate sustainable energy, have been identified. Further, various operational factors for installation of Tidal Energy Converters are considered before computing the theoretical power output for a typical TEC array. An approximate estimation of the possible theoretical power extraction from a TEC array shows an energy potential of up to 4.36% of the total energy demand of Singapore in 2011. Thus, the study suggests a detailed investigation of potential sites to quantify the total tidal stream energy potential in the Singapore Strait.

  16. Numerical Simulations of the Kinetic Energy Transfer in the Bath of a BOF Converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaobin; Ersson, Mikael; Zhong, Liangcai; Jönsson, Pär

    2016-02-01

    The paper focuses on the fundamental aspects of the kinetic energy transfer from a top and bottom gas injection to the bath of the basic oxygen furnace (BOF) by applying a mathematical model. The analyses revealed that the energy transfer is less efficient when top lance height is lowered or the flowrate is increased in the top blowing operations. However, an inverse trend was found that the kinetic energy transfer is increased when the bottom flowrate is increased for the current bottom blowing operation conditions. The kinetic energy transfer index results indicated that the energy transfer for the bottom blowing is much more efficient than that of the top blowing operations. To understand the effects of the upper buoyant phase on the energy dissipation of the bulk liquid in the bath, different mass and physical properties of slag and foam were considered in the bottom blowing simulations. The slag on top of the bath is found to dissipate by 6.6, 9.4, and 11.2 pct for slag mass values of 5, 9, and 15 t compared to the case without slag atop the surface of the bath, respectively. The results showed that the kinetic energy transfer is not largely influenced by the viscosity of the upper slag or the foaming phases.

  17. Efficiency and Optimality of 2-period Gait from Kinetic Energy Point of View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, Fumihiko

    This paper investigates the efficiency of a 2-period limit-cycle gait from the kinetic energy viewpoint. First, we formulate a steady 2-period gait by using simple recurrence formulas for the kinetic energy of an asymmetric rimless wheel. Second, we theoretically show that, in the case that the mean value of the hip angle is constant, the generated 2-period steady gait is less efficient than a 1-period symmetric one in terms of kinetic energy. Furthermore, we show that the symmetric gait is not always optimal from another viewpoint. Finally, we investigate the validity of the derived theory through numerical simulations of virtual passive dynamic walking using a compass-like biped robot.

  18. Numerical simulation and decomposition of kinetic energy in the Central Mediterranean: insight on mesoscale circulation and energy conversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sorgente

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The spatial and temporal variability of eddy and mean kinetic energy of the Central Mediterranean region has been investigated, from January 2008 to December 2010, by mean of a numerical simulation mainly to quantify the mesoscale dynamics and their relationships with physical forcing. In order to understand the energy redistribution processes, the baroclinic energy conversion has been analysed, suggesting hypotheses about the drivers of the mesoscale activity in this area. The ocean model used is based on the Princeton Ocean Model implemented at 1/32° horizontal resolution. Surface momentum and buoyancy fluxes are interactively computed by mean of standard bulk formulae using predicted model Sea Surface Temperature and atmospheric variables provided by the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecast operational analyses. At its lateral boundaries the model is one-way nested within the Mediterranean Forecasting System operational products.

    The model domain has been subdivided in four sub-regions: Sardinia channel and southern Tyrrhenian Sea, Sicily channel, eastern Tunisian shelf and Libyan Sea. Temporal evolution of eddy and mean kinetic energy has been analysed, on each of the four sub-regions, showing different behaviours. On annual scales and within the first 5 m depth, the eddy kinetic energy represents approximately the 60 % of the total kinetic energy over the whole domain, confirming the strong mesoscale nature of the surface current flows in this area. The analyses show that the model well reproduces the path and the temporal behaviour of the main known sub-basin circulation features. New mesoscale structures have been also identified, from numerical results and direct observations, for the first time as the Pantelleria Vortex and the Medina Gyre.

    The classical kinetic energy decomposition (eddy and mean allowed to depict and to quantify the permanent and fluctuating parts of the circulation in the region, and

  19. Large-scale kinetic energy spectra from Eulerian analysis of EOLE wind data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desbois, M.

    1975-01-01

    A data set of 56,000 winds determined from the horizontal displacements of EOLE balloons at the 200 mb level in the Southern Hemisphere during the period October 1971-February 1972 is utilized for the computation of planetary- and synoptic-scale kinetic energy space spectra. However, the random distribution of measurements in space and time presents some problems for the spectral analysis. Two different approaches are used, i.e., a harmonic analysis of daily wind values at equi-distant points obtained by space-time interpolation of the data, and a correlation method using the direct measurements. Both methods give similar results for small wavenumbers, but the second is more accurate for higher wavenumbers (k above or equal to 10). The spectra show a maximum at wavenumbers 5 and 6 due to baroclinic instability and then decrease for high wavenumbers up to wavenumber 35 (which is the limit of the analysis), according to the inverse power law k to the negative p, with p close to 3.

  20. Connecting the kinetics and energy landscape of tRNA translocation on the ribosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitford, Paul C; Blanchard, Scott C; Cate, Jamie H D; Sanbonmatsu, Karissa Y

    2013-01-01

    Functional rearrangements in biomolecular assemblies result from diffusion across an underlying energy landscape. While bulk kinetic measurements rely on discrete state-like approximations to the energy landscape, single-molecule methods can project the free energy onto specific coordinates. With measures of the diffusion, one may establish a quantitative bridge between state-like kinetic measurements and the continuous energy landscape. We used an all-atom molecular dynamics simulation of the 70S ribosome (2.1 million atoms; 1.3 microseconds) to provide this bridge for specific conformational events associated with the process of tRNA translocation. Starting from a pre-translocation configuration, we identified sets of residues that collectively undergo rotary rearrangements implicated in ribosome function. Estimates of the diffusion coefficients along these collective coordinates for translocation were then used to interconvert between experimental rates and measures of the energy landscape. This analysis, in conjunction with previously reported experimental rates of translocation, provides an upper-bound estimate of the free-energy barriers associated with translocation. While this analysis was performed for a particular kinetic scheme of translocation, the quantitative framework is general and may be applied to energetic and kinetic descriptions that include any number of intermediates and transition states.

  1. Eddy kinetic energy study of the snowstorm over Southern China in January 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Qunjie; Gao, Shouting; Lü, Daren

    2014-07-01

    The energetics of the third stage of a snowstorm over China was analyzed using ECWMF data. The analysis of the energy budget for the Middle East trough and the western Pacific trough that developed toward China on 25-28 January 2008 showed the advection of the geopotential by the ageostrophic wind to be both a crucial source and the primary sink of the eddy kinetic energy centers associated with the troughs. The magnitudes of the energy conversion terms, interaction kinetic energy conversion and baroclinic conversion, were too small to explain the development of the energy centers and the jet streaks. The energy centers gained energy at their entrance regions via the convergence of the ageostrophic geopotential fluxes, and then lost energy at their exit regions by the same fluxes. At the entrance regions, the fluxes converged, increasing the geopotential gradient, which generated a stronger geostrophic wind and higher kinetic energy, resulting in an ascending motion in this area. When the troughs moved to China, the ascending motion caused by the convergence of the fluxes at entrance region intensified the snowstorms over central and southern China.

  2. On the estimation of cooperativity in ion channel kinetics: activation free energy and kinetic mechanism of Shaker K+ channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Kinshuk; Das, Biswajit; Gangopadhyay, Gautam

    2013-04-28

    In this paper, we have explored generic criteria of cooperative behavior in ion channel kinetics treating it on the same footing with multistate receptor-ligand binding in a compact theoretical framework. We have shown that the characterization of cooperativity of ion channels in terms of the Hill coefficient violates the standard Hill criteria defined for allosteric cooperativity of ligand binding. To resolve the issue, an alternative measure of cooperativity is proposed here in terms of the cooperativity index that sets a unified criteria for both the systems. More importantly, for ion channel this index can be very useful to describe the cooperative kinetics as it can be readily determined from the experimentally measured ionic current combined with theoretical modelling. We have analyzed the correlation between the voltage value and slope of the voltage-activation curve at the half-activation point and consequently determined the standard free energy of activation of the ion channel using two well-established mechanisms of cooperativity, namely, Koshland-Nemethy-Filmer (KNF) and Monod-Wyman-Changeux (MWC) models. Comparison of the theoretical results for both the models with appropriate experimental data of mutational perturbation of Shaker K(+) channel supports the experimental fact that the KNF model is more suitable to describe the cooperative behavior of this class of ion channels, whereas the performance of the MWC model is unsatisfactory. We have also estimated the mechanistic performance through standard free energy of channel activation for both the models and proposed a possible functional disadvantage in the MWC scheme.

  3. On the estimation of cooperativity in ion channel kinetics: Activation free energy and kinetic mechanism of Shaker K+ channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Kinshuk; Das, Biswajit; Gangopadhyay, Gautam

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, we have explored generic criteria of cooperative behavior in ion channel kinetics treating it on the same footing with multistate receptor-ligand binding in a compact theoretical framework. We have shown that the characterization of cooperativity of ion channels in terms of the Hill coefficient violates the standard Hill criteria defined for allosteric cooperativity of ligand binding. To resolve the issue, an alternative measure of cooperativity is proposed here in terms of the cooperativity index that sets a unified criteria for both the systems. More importantly, for ion channel this index can be very useful to describe the cooperative kinetics as it can be readily determined from the experimentally measured ionic current combined with theoretical modelling. We have analyzed the correlation between the voltage value and slope of the voltage-activation curve at the half-activation point and consequently determined the standard free energy of activation of the ion channel using two well-established mechanisms of cooperativity, namely, Koshland-Nemethy-Filmer (KNF) and Monod-Wyman-Changeux (MWC) models. Comparison of the theoretical results for both the models with appropriate experimental data of mutational perturbation of Shaker K^+ channel supports the experimental fact that the KNF model is more suitable to describe the cooperative behavior of this class of ion channels, whereas the performance of the MWC model is unsatisfactory. We have also estimated the mechanistic performance through standard free energy of channel activation for both the models and proposed a possible functional disadvantage in the MWC scheme.

  4. The Kinetic Energy of Hydrocarbons as a Function of Electron Density and Convolutional Neural Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Yao, Kun

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a convolutional neural network trained to reproduce the Kohn-Sham kinetic energy of hydrocarbons from electron density. The output of the network is used as a non-local correction to the conventional local and semi-local kinetic functionals. We show that this approximation qualitatively reproduces Kohn-Sham potential energy surfaces when used with conventional exchange correlation functionals. Numerical noise inherited from the non-linearity of the neural network is identified as the major challenge for the model. Finally we examine the features in the density learned by the neural network to anticipate the prospects of generalizing these models.

  5. A multiscale numerical study into the cascade of kinetic energy leading to severe local storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paine, D. A.; Kaplan, M. L.

    1977-01-01

    The cascade of kinetic energy from macro- through mesoscales is studied on the basis of a nested grid system used to solve a set of nonlinear differential equations. The kinetic energy cascade and the concentration of vorticity through the hydrodynamic spectrum provide a means for predicting the location and intensity of severe weather from large-scale data sets. A mechanism described by the surface pressure tendency equation proves to be important in explaining how initial middle-tropospheric mass-momentum imbalances alter the low-level pressure field.

  6. Optimisation of dynamic vibration absorbers to minimise kinetic energy and maximise internal power dissipation

    OpenAIRE

    Zilletti, Michele; Elliott, Stephen J.; Rustighi, Emiliano

    2012-01-01

    The tuning of a dynamic vibration absorber is considered such that either the kinetic energy of the host structure is minimised or the power dissipation within the absorber is maximised. If the host structure is approximated as a damped single degree of freedom, the optimal values for the ratio of the absorber's natural frequency to the host structure and the optimal damping ratio of the absorber are shown to be the same whether the kinetic energy of the host structure is minimised or the pow...

  7. On random search: Collection kinetics of Paramecia into a trap embedded in a closed domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deforet, Maxime; Duplat, Jérôme; Vandenberghe, Nicolas; Villermaux, Emmanuel

    2010-06-01

    We study the kinetics of a large number of organisms initially spread uniformly in a circular two-dimensional medium, at the center of which a smaller circular trap has been introduced. We take advantage of the acidophily of Paramecium caudatum, which, coming from a neutral medium, penetrates a region of moderate acidity but moves back in the opposite situation when it meets a sharp negative acidity gradient to quantify its rate of irreversible aggregation into a spot of acidified medium in water. Two regimes are distinguished: A ballistic regime characteristic of "fresh" paramecia where the organisms swim in a straight path with a well defined velocity and a Brownian regime characteristic of older paramecia where the mean free path of the organisms is smaller than the system size. Both regimes are characterized by distinct aggregation laws. They both result from a pure random trapping process that appears to have no adaptive strategy.

  8. Time-of-flight electron spectrometer for a broad range of kinetic energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kothe, Alexander; Metje, Jan; Wilke, Martin; Moguilevski, Alexandre; Engel, Nicholas; Al-Obaidi, Ruba; Richter, Clemens; Golnak, Ronny; Kiyan, Igor Yu.; Aziz, Emad F. [Joint Ultrafast Dynamics Lab in Solutions and at Interfaces (JULiq), Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie (HZB), Albert-Einstein-Str. 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany) and Freie Universitaet Berlin, Fachbereich Physik, Arnimallee 14, 14195 Berlin (Germany)

    2013-02-15

    A newly constructed time-of-flight electron spectrometer of the magnetic bottle type is characterized for electron detection in a broad range of kinetic energies. The instrument is designed to measure the energy spectra of electrons generated from liquids excited by strong laser fields and photons in the range of extreme ultra violet and soft X-rays. Argon inner shell electrons were recorded to calibrate the spectrometer and investigate its characteristics, such as energy resolution and collection efficiency. Its energy resolution {Delta}E/E of 1.6% allows resolving the Ar 2p spin orbit structure at kinetic energies higher than 100 eV. The collection efficiency is determined and compared to that of the spectrometer in its field-free configuration.

  9. Influence of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability on the kinetic energy spectrum.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Christopher R. (University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI)

    2010-09-01

    The fluctuating kinetic energy spectrum in the region near the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) is experimentally investigated using particle image velocimetry (PIV). The velocity field is measured at a high spatial resolution in the light gas to observe the effects of turbulence production and dissipation. It is found that the RMI acts as a source of turbulence production near the unstable interface, where energy is transferred from the scales of the perturbation to smaller scales until dissipation. The interface also has an effect on the kinetic energy spectrum farther away by means of the distorted reflected shock wave. The energy spectrum far from the interface initially has a higher energy content than that of similar experiments with a flat interface. These differences are quick to disappear as dissipation dominates the flow far from the interface.

  10. Bio-kinetic energy harvesting using electroactive polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slade, Jeremiah R.; Bowman, Jeremy; Kornbluh, Roy

    2012-06-01

    In hybrid vehicles, electric motors are used on each wheel to not only propel the car but also to decelerate the car by acting as generators. In the case of the human body, muscles spend about half of their time acting as a brake, absorbing energy, or doing what is known as negative work. Using dielectric elastomers it is possible to use the "braking" phases of walking to generate power without restricting or fatiguing the Warfighter. Infoscitex and SRI have developed and demonstrated methods for using electroactive polymers (EAPs) to tap into the negative work generated at the knee during the deceleration phase of the human gait cycle and convert it into electrical power that can be used to support wearable information systems, including display and communication technologies. The specific class of EAP that has been selected for these applications is termed dielectric elastomers. Because dielectric elastomers dissipate very little mechanical energy into heat, greater amounts of energy can be converted into electricity than by any other method. The long term vision of this concept is to have EAP energy harvesting cells located in components of the Warfighter ensemble, such as the boot uppers, knee pads and eventually even the clothing itself. By properly locating EAPs at these sites it will be possible to not only harvest power from the negative work phase but to actually reduce the amount of work done by the Warfighter's muscles during this phase, thereby reducing fatigue and minimizing the forces transmitted to the joints.

  11. Analysis of the total kinetic energy of fission fragments with the Langevin equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usang, M. D.; Ivanyuk, F. A.; Ishizuka, C.; Chiba, S.

    2017-12-01

    We analyzed the total kinetic energy (TKE) of fission fragments with three-dimensional Langevin calculations for a series of actinides and Fm isotopes at various excitation energies. This allowed us to establish systematic trends of TKE with Z2/A1 /3 of the fissioning system and as a function of excitation energy. In the mass-energy distributions of fission fragments we see the contributions from the standard, super-long, and super-short (in the case of 258Fm) fission modes. For the fission fragments mass distribution of 258Fm we obtained a single peak mass distribution. The decomposition of TKE into the prescission kinetic energy and Coulomb repulsion showed that decrease of TKE with growing excitation energy is accompanied by a decrease of prescission kinetic energy. It was also found that transport coefficients (friction and inertia tensors) calculated by a microscopic model and by macroscopic models give drastically different behaviors of TKE as a function of excitation energy. The results obtained with microscopic transport coefficients are much closer to experimental data than those calculated with macroscopic ones.

  12. An Estimation of Turbulent Kinetic Energy and Energy Dissipation Rate Based on Atmospheric Boundary Layer Similarity Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jongil; Arya, S. Pal; Shaohua, Shen; Lin, Yuh-Lang; Proctor, Fred H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Algorithms are developed to extract atmospheric boundary layer profiles for turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) and energy dissipation rate (EDR), with data from a meteorological tower as input. The profiles are based on similarity theory and scalings for the atmospheric boundary layer. The calculated profiles of EDR and TKE are required to match the observed values at 5 and 40 m. The algorithms are coded for operational use and yield plausible profiles over the diurnal variation of the atmospheric boundary layer.

  13. Simulations of thermodynamics and kinetics on rough energy landscapes with milestoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello-Rivas, Juan M; Elber, Ron

    2016-03-05

    We investigated by computational means the kinetics and stationary behavior of stochastic dynamics on an ensemble of rough two-dimensional energy landscapes. There are no obvious separations of temporal scales in these systems, which constitute a simple model for the behavior of glasses and some biomaterials. Even though there are significant computational challenges present in these systems due to the large number of metastable states, the Milestoning method is able to compute their kinetic and thermodynamic properties exactly. We observe two clearly distinguished regimes in the overall kinetics: one in which diffusive behavior dominates and another that follows an Arrhenius law (despite the absence of a dominant barrier). We compare our results with those obtained with an exactly-solvable one-dimensional model, and with the results from the rough one-dimensional energy model introduced by Zwanzig. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. The influence of energy migration on luminescence kinetics parameters in upconversion nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alyatkin, Sergey; Asharchuk, Ilya; Khaydukov, Kirill; Nechaev, Andrey; Lebedev, Oleg; Vainer, Yuri; Semchishen, Vladimir; Khaydukov, Evgeny

    2017-01-20

    The mechanism of upconversion at the nanoscale is still under discussion. In this paper, we report on the experimental results of anti-Stokes luminescence kinetics in the upconversion nanoparticles of β-NaYF4: 20%Yb3+; 0.6%Tm3+. The parameters of the luminescence kinetics were found to be unambiguously dependent on the number of excitation quanta n, which are necessary for certain transitions between the energy states of thulium ions. The observed correlation has been explained by means of the long-lasting energy migration between the ytterbium ions. The spread in time between the luminescent maxima of the corresponding thulium transitions not only shows the nonlinear character of upconversion, but also reveals the time scale of energy migration as well. From these, we derive that the conventional Förster formalism applied to the estimation of energy transfer efficiency in UCNP-fluorophore pairs can provide misleading results.

  15. Effect of microwave-assisted heating on chalcopyrite leaching of kinetics, interface temperature and surface energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Wen

    Full Text Available The microwave-assisted leaching was a new approach to intensify the copper recovery from chalcopyrite by hydrometallurgy. In this work, the effect of microwave-assisted heating on chalcopyrite leaching of kinetics, interfacial reaction temperature and surface energy were investigated. The activation energy of chalcopyrite leaching was affected indistinctively by the microwave-assisted heating (39.1 kJ/mol compared with the conventional heating (43.9 kJ/mol. However, the boiling point of the leaching system increased through microwave-assisted heating. Because of the improved boiling point and the selective heating of microwave, the interfacial reaction temperature increased significantly, which gave rise to the increase of the leaching recovery of copper. Moreover, the surface energy of the chalcopyrite through microwave-assisted heating was also enhanced, which was beneficial to strengthen the leaching of chalcopyrite. Keywords: Microwave-assisted heating, Chalcopyrite, Leaching kinetics, Interface temperature, Surface energy

  16. The influence of energy migration on luminescence kinetics parameters in upconversion nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alyatkin, Sergey; Asharchuk, Ilya; Khaydukov, Kirill; Nechaev, Andrey; Lebedev, Oleg; Vainer, Yuri; Semchishen, Vladimir; Khaydukov, Evgeny

    2017-01-01

    The mechanism of upconversion at the nanoscale is still under discussion. In this paper, we report on the experimental results of anti-Stokes luminescence kinetics in the upconversion nanoparticles of β-NaYF4: 20%Yb3+; 0.6%Tm3+. The parameters of the luminescence kinetics were found to be unambiguously dependent on the number of excitation quanta n, which are necessary for certain transitions between the energy states of thulium ions. The observed correlation has been explained by means of the long-lasting energy migration between the ytterbium ions. The spread in time between the luminescent maxima of the corresponding thulium transitions not only shows the nonlinear character of upconversion, but also reveals the time scale of energy migration as well. From these, we derive that the conventional Förster formalism applied to the estimation of energy transfer efficiency in UCNP-fluorophore pairs can provide misleading results.

  17. A Kinetic Study of Marginal Soil Energy Plant Helianthus annuus Stalk Pyrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huaxiao Yan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The pyrolytic characteristics and kinetics of new marginal soil energy plant Helianthus annuus stalk were investigated using thermogravimetric (TG method from 50 to 800°C in an inert argon atmosphere at different heating rates of 5, 10, 20, and 30°C min−1. The kinetic parameters of activation energy and pre-exponential factor were deduced by Popescu, Flynn-Wall-Ozawa (FWO, and Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose (KAS methods, respectively. The results showed that three stages appeared in the thermal degradation process. The primary devolatilization stage of H. annuus stalk can be described by the Avrami-Erofeev function (n=4. The average activation energy of H. annuus stalk was only 142.9 kJ mol−1. There were minor kinetic compensation effects between the pre-exponential factor and the activation energy. The results suggest that H. annuus stalk is suitable for pyrolysis, and more importantly, the experimental results and kinetic parameters provided useful information for the design of pyrolytic processing system using H. annuus stalk as feedstock.

  18. Similarity between turbulent kinetic energy and temperature spectra in the near-wall region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonia, R. A.; Kim, J.

    1991-01-01

    The similarity between turbulent kinetic energy and temperature spectra, previously confirmed using experimental data in various turbulent shear flows, is validated in the near-wall region using direct numerical simulation data in a fully developed turbulent channel flow. The dependence of this similarity on the molecular Prandtl number is also examined.

  19. Measurement of the Turbulence Kinetic Energy Budget of a Turbulent Planar Wake Flow in Pressure Gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-Feng; Thomas, Flint O.; Nelson, Robert C.

    2001-01-01

    Turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) is a very important quantity for turbulence modeling and the budget of this quantity in its transport equation can provide insight into the flow physics. Turbulence kinetic energy budget measurements were conducted for a symmetric turbulent wake flow subjected to constant zero, favorable and adverse pressure gradients in year-three of research effort. The purpose of this study is to clarify the flow physics issues underlying the demonstrated influence of pressure gradient on wake development and provide experimental support for turbulence modeling. To ensure the reliability of these notoriously difficult measurements, the experimental procedure was carefully designed on the basis of an uncertainty analysis. Four different approaches, based on an isotropic turbulence assumption, a locally axisymmetric homogeneous turbulence assumption, a semi-isotropy assumption and a forced balance of the TKE equation, were applied for the estimate of the dissipation term. The pressure transport term is obtained from a forced balance of the turbulence kinetic energy equation. This report will present the results of the turbulence kinetic energy budget measurement and discuss their implication on the development of strained turbulent wakes.

  20. Employing Magnetic Levitation to Monitor Reaction Kinetics and Measure Activation Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benz, Lauren; Cesafsky, Karen E.; Le, Tran; Park, Aileen; Malicky, David

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a simple and inexpensive undergraduate-level kinetics experiment that uses magnetic levitation to monitor the progress and determine the activation energy of a condensation reaction on a polymeric solid support. The method employs a cuvette filled with a paramagnetic solution positioned between two strong magnets. The…

  1. Kinetic energy and added mass of hydrodynamically interacting gas bubbles in liquid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, Jacobus B.W.

    1988-01-01

    By averaging the basic equations on microscale, expressions are derived for the effective added mass density and the kinetic energy density of a mixture of liquid and gas bubbles. Due to hydrodynamic interaction between the bubbles there appears to be a difference between the effective added mass

  2. Releasable Kinetic Energy-Based Inertial Control of a DFIG Wind Power Plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Jinsik; Muljadi, Eduard; Sørensen, Poul Ejnar

    2016-01-01

    Wind turbine generators (WTGs) in a wind power plant (WPP) contain different levels of releasable kinetic energy (KE) because of the wake effects. This paper proposes a releasable KE-based inertial control scheme for a doubly fed induction generator (DFIG) WPP that differentiates the contributions...

  3. Dissociation of CO induced by He2+ ions : I. Fragmentation and kinetic energy release spectra

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bliek, FW; de Jong, MC; Hoekstra, R; Morgenstern, R

    1997-01-01

    The dissociation of COq+ ions (q less than or equal to 3) produced in collisions of keV amu(-1) He2+ ions with CO has been studied by time-of-flight measurements. Both singles and coincidence time-of-flight techniques have been used to determine the kinetic energy release of the dissociating CO

  4. [Upper extremity kinetics and energy expenditure during walker-assisted gait in children with cerebral palsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konop, Katherine A; Strifling, Kelly M B; Wang, Mei; Cao, Kevin; Eastwood, Daniel; Jackson, Scott; Ackman, Jeffrey; Altiok, Haluk; Schwab, Jeffrey; Harris, Gerald F

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated the relationships between upper extremity (UE) kinetics and the energy expenditure index during anterior and posterior walker-assisted gait in children with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy (CP). Ten children (3 boys, 7 girls; mean age 12.1 years; range 8 to 18 years) with spastic diplegic CP, who ambulated with a walker underwent gait analyses that included UE kinematics and kinetics. Upper extremity kinetics were obtained using instrumented walker handles. Energy expenditure index was obtained using the heart rate method (EEIHR) by subtracting resting heart rate from walking heart rate, and dividing by the walking speed. Correlations were sought between the kinetic variables and the EEIHR and temporal and stride parameters. In general, anterior walker use was associated with a higher EEIHR. Several kinetic variables correlated well with temporal and stride parameters, as well as the EEIHR. All of the significant correlations (r>0.80; p<0.005) occurred during anterior walker use and involved joint reaction forces (JRF) rather than moments. Some variables showed multiple strong correlations during anterior walker use, including the medial JRF in the wrist, the posterior JRF in the elbow, and the inferior and superior JRFs in the shoulder. The observed correlations may indicate a relationship between the force used to advance the body forward within the walker frame and an increased EEIHR. More work is needed to refine the correlations, and to explore relationships with other variables, including the joint kinematics.

  5. Turbulent kinetic energy spectrum in very anisothermal flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serra, Sylvain, E-mail: sylvain_serra@bbox.fr [PROcedes, Materiaux et Energie Solaire, UPR CNRS 8521, Rambla de la thermodynamique, Tecnosud, 66100 Perpignan (France); Toutant, Adrien, E-mail: adrien.toutant@univ-Perp.fr [PROcedes, Materiaux et Energie Solaire, UPR CNRS 8521, Rambla de la thermodynamique, Tecnosud, 66100 Perpignan (France); Bataille, Françoise, E-mail: francoise.bataille@promes.cnrs.fr [PROcedes, Materiaux et Energie Solaire, UPR CNRS 8521, Rambla de la thermodynamique, Tecnosud, 66100 Perpignan (France); Zhou, Ye, E-mail: yezhou@llnl.gov [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)

    2012-10-01

    In this Letter, we find that the Kolmogorov scaling law is no longer valid when the flow is submitted to strong dilatational effects caused by high temperature gradients. As a result, in addition to the nonlinear time scale, there is a much shorter “temperature gradients” time scale. We propose a model that estimates the time scale of the triple decorrelation incorporating the influences of the temperature gradient. The model agrees with the results from the thermal large-eddy simulations of different Reynolds numbers and temperature gradients. This Letter provides a better understanding of the very anisothermal turbulent flow. -- Highlights: ► Turbulent flows subject to high temperature gradients are considered. ► The new “temperature gradients” time scale is determined. ► A generalized energy spectrum is developed to incorporate the effects of temperature gradient.

  6. Changes in cholesterol kinetics following sugar cane policosanol supplementation: a randomized control trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones Peter JH

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sugar cane policosanols (SCP have been shown to exert cholesterol-modulating properties in various studies conducted in Cuba by substantially reducing cholesterol synthesis. Independent research examining changes in cholesterol kinetics in response to SCP is limited to few studies, none of which was able to replicate findings of the original research. Moreover, no data are available on the effect of SCP on cholesterol absorption to date. The present study was undertaken to determine effects on cholesterol kinetics, namely synthesis and absorption, within hypercholesterolemic individuals consuming a SCP treatment. Twenty-one otherwise healthy hypercholesterolemic subjects participated in a randomized double-blind crossover study where they received 10 mg/day of policosanols or a placebo incorporated in margarine as an evening snack for a period of 28 days. The last week of the study phase, subjects were given 13C labelled cholesterol and deuterated water for the measurement of cholesterol absorption and synthesis respectively. Blood was collected on the first two and last five days of the trial. Cholesterol absorption and synthesis were determined by measuring red cell cholesterol 13C and deuterium enrichment, respectively. Results There was no significant change in LDL cholesterol levels as compared to control. In addition, the area under the curve for red cell cholesterol 13C enrichment across 96 hours was not significantly different in the SCP group as compared to control. Similarly, no difference was observed in the fractional rate of cholesterol synthesis over the period of 24 hours between the two treatment groups. Conclusion The findings of the present study fail to support previous research concerning efficacy and mechanism of action for policosanols.

  7. Turbulent Kinetic Energy in the Oklahoma City Urban Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundquist, J; Leach, M; Gouveia, F

    2004-06-24

    A major field experiment, Joint URBAN 2003 (JU2003), was conducted in Oklahoma City in July 2003 to collect meteorological and tracer data sets for evaluating dispersion models in urban areas. The Department of Homeland Security and the Defense Threat Reduction Agency were the primary sponsors of JU2003. Investigators from five Department of Energy national laboratories, several other government agencies, universities, private companies, and international agencies conducted the experiment. Observations to characterize the meteorology in and around the urban area complemented the observation of the dispersion of SF6, an inert tracer gas. Over one hundred threedimensional sonic anemometers were deployed in and around the urban area to monitor wind speed, direction, and turbulence fluxes during releases of SF6. Sonic deployment locations included a profile of eight sonic anemometers mounted on a crane less than 1 km north of the central business district (CBD). Using data from these and other sonic anemometers deployed in the urban area, we can quantify the effect of the urban area on atmospheric turbulence and compare results seen in OKC to those in other urban areas to assess the parameters typically used in parameterizations of urban turbulence.

  8. Measurement of turbulent spatial structure and kinetic energy spectrum by exact temporal-to-spatial mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchhave, Preben; Velte, Clara Marika

    2017-01-01

    and spatial structure functions in a way that completely bypasses the need for Taylor’s hypothesis. The spatial statistics agree with the classical counterparts, such as the total kinetic energy spectrum, at least for spatial extents up to the Taylor microscale. The requirements for applying the method......We present a method for converting a time record of turbulent velocity measured at a point in a flow to a spatial velocity record consisting of consecutive convection elements. The spatial record allows computation of dynamic statistical moments such as turbulent kinetic wavenumber spectra...

  9. Statistical properties of kinetic and total energy densities in reverberant spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Finn; Molares, Alfonso Rodriguez

    2010-01-01

    . With the advent of a three-dimensional particle velocity transducer, it has become somewhat easier to measure total rather than only potential energy density in a sound field. This paper examines the ensemble statistics of kinetic and total sound energy densities in reverberant enclosures theoretically......Many acoustical measurements, e.g., measurement of sound power and transmission loss, rely on determining the total sound energy in a reverberation room. The total energy is usually approximated by measuring the mean-square pressure (i.e., the potential energy density) at a number of discrete...... positions. The idea of measuring the total energy density instead of the potential energy density on the assumption that the former quantity varies less with position than the latter goes back to the 1930s. However, the phenomenon was not analyzed until the late 1970s and then only for the region of high...

  10. Buoyant production and consumption of turbulence kinetic energy in cloud-topped mixed layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    It is pointed out that studies of the entraining planetary boundary layer (PBL) have generally emphasized the role of buoyancy fluxes in driving entrainment. The buoyancy flux is proportional to the rate of conversion of the potential energy of the mean flow into the kinetic energy of the turbulence. It is not unusual for conversion to proceed in both directions simultaneously. This occurs, for instance, in both clear and cloudy convective mixed layers which are capped by inversions. A partitioning of the net conversion into positive parts, generating turbulence kinetic energy (TKE), and negative parts (TKE-consuming), would make it possible to include the positive part in the gross production rate, and closure would be achieved. Three different approaches to partitioning have been proposed. The present investigation is concerned with a comparison of the three partitioning theories. Particular attention is given to the cloud-topped mixed layer because in this case the differences between two partitioning approaches are most apparent.

  11. Kinetic energy spectra in thermionic emission from small tungsten cluster anions: evidence for nonclassical electron capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concina, Bruno; Baguenard, Bruno; Calvo, Florent; Bordas, Christian

    2010-03-14

    The delayed electron emission from small mass-selected anionic tungsten clusters W(n)(-) has been studied for sizes in the range 9 < or = n < or = 21. Kinetic energy spectra have been measured for delays of about 100 ns after laser excitation by a velocity-map imaging spectrometer. They are analyzed in the framework of microreversible statistical theories. The low-energy behavior shows some significant deviations with respect to the classical Langevin capture model, which we interpret as possibly due to the influence of quantum dynamical effects such as tunneling through the centrifugal barrier, rather than shape effects. The cluster temperature has been extracted from both the experimental kinetic energy spectrum and the absolute decay rate. Discrepancies between the two approaches suggest that the sticking probability can be as low as a few percent for the smallest clusters.

  12. Kinetic energy of throughfall in a highly diverse forest ecosystem in the humid subtropics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geißler, Christian; Kühn, Peter; Scholten, Thomas

    2010-05-01

    After decades of research it is generally accepted that vegetation is a key factor in controlling soil erosion. Therefore, in ecosystems where erosion is a serious problem, afforestation is a common measure against erosion. Most of the studies in the last decades focused on agricultural systems and less attention was paid to natural systems. To understand the mechanisms preventing soil erosion in natural systems the processes have to be studied in detail and gradually. The first step and central research question is on how the canopies of the tree layer alter the properties of rainfall and generate throughfall. Kinetic energy is a widely used parameter to estimate the erosion potential of open field rainfall and throughfall. In the past, numerous studies have shown that vegetation of a certain height enhances the kinetic energy under the canopy (Chapman 1948, Mosley 1982, Vis 1986, Hall & Calder 1993, Nanko et al. 2006, Nanko et al. 2008) in relation to open field rainfall. This is mainly due to a shift in the drop size distribution to less but larger drops possessing a higher amount of kinetic energy. In vital forest ecosystems lower vegetation (shrubs, herbs) as well as a continuous litter layer protects the forest soil from the impact of large drops. The influence of biodiversity, specific forest stands or single species in this process system is still in discussion. In the present study calibrated splash cups (after Ellison 1947, Geißler et al. under review) have been used to detect differences in kinetic energy on the scale of specific species and on the scale of forest stands of contrasting age and biodiversity in a natural forest ecosystem. The splash cups have been calibrated experimentally using a laser disdrometer. The results show that the kinetic energy of throughfall produced by the tree layer increases with the age of the specific forest stand. The average throughfall kinetic energy (J m-2) is about 2.6 times higher in forests than under open field

  13. Energy deposition by heavy ions: Additivity of kinetic and potential energy contributions in hillock formation on CaF2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y. Y.; Grygiel, C.; Dufour, C.; Sun, J. R.; Wang, Z. G.; Zhao, Y. T.; Xiao, G. Q.; Cheng, R.; Zhou, X. M.; Ren, J. R.; Liu, S. D.; Lei, Y.; Sun, Y. B.; Ritter, R.; Gruber, E.; Cassimi, A.; Monnet, I.; Bouffard, S.; Aumayr, F.; Toulemonde, M.

    2014-01-01

    Modification of surface and bulk properties of solids by irradiation with ion beams is a widely used technique with many applications in material science. In this study, we show that nano-hillocks on CaF2 crystal surfaces can be formed by individual impact of medium energy (3 and 5 MeV) highly charged ions (Xe22+ to Xe30+) as well as swift (kinetic energies between 12 and 58 MeV) heavy xenon ions. For very slow highly charged ions the appearance of hillocks is known to be linked to a threshold in potential energy (Ep) while for swift heavy ions a minimum electronic energy loss per unit length (Se) is necessary. With our results we bridge the gap between these two extreme cases and demonstrate, that with increasing energy deposition via Se the Ep-threshold for hillock production can be lowered substantially. Surprisingly, both mechanisms of energy deposition in the target surface seem to contribute in an additive way, which can be visualized in a phase diagram. We show that the inelastic thermal spike model, originally developed to describe such material modifications for swift heavy ions, can be extended to the case where both kinetic and potential energies are deposited into the surface. PMID:25034006

  14. Energy deposition by heavy ions: additivity of kinetic and potential energy contributions in hillock formation on CaF2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y Y; Grygiel, C; Dufour, C; Sun, J R; Wang, Z G; Zhao, Y T; Xiao, G Q; Cheng, R; Zhou, X M; Ren, J R; Liu, S D; Lei, Y; Sun, Y B; Ritter, R; Gruber, E; Cassimi, A; Monnet, I; Bouffard, S; Aumayr, F; Toulemonde, M

    2014-07-18

    Modification of surface and bulk properties of solids by irradiation with ion beams is a widely used technique with many applications in material science. In this study, we show that nano-hillocks on CaF2 crystal surfaces can be formed by individual impact of medium energy (3 and 5 MeV) highly charged ions (Xe(22+) to Xe(30+)) as well as swift (kinetic energies between 12 and 58 MeV) heavy xenon ions. For very slow highly charged ions the appearance of hillocks is known to be linked to a threshold in potential energy (Ep) while for swift heavy ions a minimum electronic energy loss per unit length (Se) is necessary. With our results we bridge the gap between these two extreme cases and demonstrate, that with increasing energy deposition via Se the Ep-threshold for hillock production can be lowered substantially. Surprisingly, both mechanisms of energy deposition in the target surface seem to contribute in an additive way, which can be visualized in a phase diagram. We show that the inelastic thermal spike model, originally developed to describe such material modifications for swift heavy ions, can be extended to the case where both kinetic and potential energies are deposited into the surface.

  15. Proton Kinetic Effects and Turbulent Energy Cascade Rate in the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, K.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Kiyani, K. H.; Hnat, B.; Chapman, S. C.

    2013-12-01

    The first observed connection between kinetic instabilities driven by proton temperature anisotropy and estimated energy cascade rates in the turbulent solar wind is reported using measurements from the Wind spacecraft at 1 AU. We find enhanced cascade rates are concentrated along the boundaries of the (β‖,T⊥/T‖)-plane, which includes regions theoretically unstable to the mirror and firehose instabilities. A strong correlation is observed between the estimated cascade rates and kinetic effects such as temperature anisotropy and plasma heating, resulting in protons 5-6 times hotter and 70-90% more anisotropic than under typical isotropic plasma conditions. These results offer new insights into kinetic processes in a turbulent regime.

  16. R. O. Kinetic, energy saver for desalination plants by reverse osmosis; R. O: Kinetic, sistema de ahorro de energia en las plantas de osmosis inversa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plasencia Rodriguez, J. P.

    2003-07-01

    The R. O. Kinetic is a novel system of energy saving, for desalination plants by reverse osmosis, based on the isobaric chambers. With this system it is able to obtain values of specific consumption of energy during the process, around 2, 1-2,2 kWh/m''3, reducing the operation cost of these facilities. (Author)

  17. Kinetic energy recovery turbine technology: resource assessment and site development strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briand, Marie-Helene; Ng, Karen

    2010-09-15

    New technologies to extract readily available energy from waves, tides and river flow are being developed and are promising but are still at the demonstration stage. Harnessing kinetic energy from currents (hydrokinetic power) is considered an attractive and cost-effective renewable energy solution to replace thermal generation without requiring construction of a dam or large civil works. The nature of this innovative hydrokinetic technology requires an adaptation of conventional approach to project engineering and environmental impact studies. This paper presents the approach developed by RSW to design a hydrokinetic site in the riverine environment, from resource assessment to detailed engineering design.

  18. Effects of crystal-melt interfacial energy anisotropy on dendritic morphology and growth kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glicksman, M. E.; Singh, N. B.

    1989-01-01

    Morphological and kinetic studies of succinonitrile, a BCC crystal with a low (0.5 percent) anisotropy and pivalic acid, and FCC crystal with relatively large (5 percent) anisotropy in solid-liquid interfacial energy, show clearly that anisotropy in the solid-liquid interfacial energy does not affect the tip radius-velocity relationship, but has a profound influence on the tip region and the rate of amplification of branching waves. Anisotropy of the solid-liquid interfacial energy may be one of the key factors by which the microstructural characteristics of cast structures reflect individual material behavior, especially crystal symmetry.

  19. Random Forests Are Able to Identify Differences in Clotting Dynamics from Kinetic Models of Thrombin Generation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayavel Arumugam

    Full Text Available Current methods for distinguishing acute coronary syndromes such as heart attack from stable coronary artery disease, based on the kinetics of thrombin formation, have been limited to evaluating sensitivity of well-established chemical species (e.g., thrombin using simple quantifiers of their concentration profiles (e.g., maximum level of thrombin concentration, area under the thrombin concentration versus time curve. In order to get an improved classifier, we use a 34-protein factor clotting cascade model and convert the simulation data into a high-dimensional representation (about 19000 features using a piecewise cubic polynomial fit. Then, we systematically find plausible assays to effectively gauge changes in acute coronary syndrome/coronary artery disease populations by introducing a statistical learning technique called Random Forests. We find that differences associated with acute coronary syndromes emerge in combinations of a handful of features. For instance, concentrations of 3 chemical species, namely, active alpha-thrombin, tissue factor-factor VIIa-factor Xa ternary complex, and intrinsic tenase complex with factor X, at specific time windows, could be used to classify acute coronary syndromes to an accuracy of about 87.2%. Such a combination could be used to efficiently assay the coagulation system.

  20. On the ultrafast kinetics of the energy and electron transfer reactions in photosystem I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slavov, Chavdar Lyubomirov

    2009-07-09

    The subject of the current work is one of the main participants in the light-dependent phase of oxygenic photosynthesis, Photosystem I (PS I). This complex carries an immense number of cofactors: chlorophylls (Chl), carotenoids, quinones, etc, which together with the protein entity exhibit several exceptional properties. First, PS I has an ultrafast light energy trapping kinetics with a nearly 100% quantum efficiency. Secondly, both of the electron transfer branches in the reaction center are suggested to be active. Thirdly, there are some so called 'red' Chls in the antenna system of PS I, absorbing light with longer wavelengths than the reaction center. These 'red' Chls significantly modify the trapping kinetics of PS I. The purpose of this thesis is to obtain better understanding of the above-mentioned, specific features of PS I. This will not merely cast more light on the mechanisms of energy and electron transfer in the complex, but also will contribute to the future developments of optimized artificial light-harvesting systems. In the current work, a number of PS I complexes isolated from different organisms (Thermosynechococcus elongatus, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Arabidopsis thaliana) and possessing distinctive features (different macroorganisation, monomers, trimers, monomers with a semibelt of peripheral antenna attached; presence of 'red' Chls) is investigated. The studies are primarily focused on the electron transfer kinetics in each of the cofactor branches in the PS I reaction center, as well as on the effect of the antenna size and the presence of 'red' Chls on the trapping kinetics of PS I. These aspects are explored with the help of several ultrafast optical spectroscopy methods: (i) time-resolved fluorescence ? single photon counting and synchroscan streak camera; and (ii) ultrafast transient absorption. Physically meaningful information about the molecular mechanisms of the energy trapping in PS I is

  1. Adaptive coarse graining method for energy transfer and dissociation kinetics of polyatomic species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahai, A; Lopez, B; Johnston, C O; Panesi, M

    2017-08-07

    A novel reduced-order method is presented for modeling reacting flows characterized by strong non-equilibrium of the internal energy level distribution of chemical species in the gas. The approach seeks for a reduced-order representation of the distribution function by grouping individual energy states into macroscopic bins, and then reconstructing state population using the maximum entropy principle. This work introduces an adaptive grouping methodology to identify and lump together groups of states that are likely to equilibrate faster with respect to each other. To this aim, two algorithms have been considered: the modified island algorithm and the spectral clustering method. Both methods require a measure of dissimilarity between internal energy states. This is achieved by defining "metrics" based on the strength of the elementary rate coefficients included in the state-specific kinetic mechanism. Penalty terms are used to avoid grouping together states characterized by distinctively different energies. The two methods are used to investigate excitation and dissociation of N2 (Σg+1) molecules due to interaction with N(Su4) atoms in an ideal chemical reactor. The results are compared with a direct numerical simulation of the state-specific kinetics obtained by solving the master equations for the complete set of energy levels. It is found that adaptive grouping techniques outperform the more conventional uniform energy grouping algorithm by providing a more accurate description of the distribution function, mole fraction and energy profiles during non-equilibrium relaxation.

  2. Effect of heating rate and kinetic model selection on activation energy of nonisothermal crystallization of amorphous felodipine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattoraj, Sayantan; Bhugra, Chandan; Li, Zheng Jane; Sun, Changquan Calvin

    2014-12-01

    The nonisothermal crystallization kinetics of amorphous materials is routinely analyzed by statistically fitting the crystallization data to kinetic models. In this work, we systematically evaluate how the model-dependent crystallization kinetics is impacted by variations in the heating rate and the selection of the kinetic model, two key factors that can lead to significant differences in the crystallization activation energy (Ea ) of an amorphous material. Using amorphous felodipine, we show that the Ea decreases with increase in the heating rate, irrespective of the kinetic model evaluated in this work. The model that best describes the crystallization phenomenon cannot be identified readily through the statistical fitting approach because several kinetic models yield comparable R(2) . Here, we propose an alternate paired model-fitting model-free (PMFMF) approach for identifying the most suitable kinetic model, where Ea obtained from model-dependent kinetics is compared with those obtained from model-free kinetics. The most suitable kinetic model is identified as the one that yields Ea values comparable with the model-free kinetics. Through this PMFMF approach, nucleation and growth is identified as the main mechanism that controls the crystallization kinetics of felodipine. Using this PMFMF approach, we further demonstrate that crystallization mechanism from amorphous phase varies with heating rate. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  3. VARIATION OF KINETIC ENERGY AND MOMENTUM CORRECTION FACTORS IN UNIFORM CIRCULAR PIPE FLOWS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet ATILGAN

    1996-02-01

    Full Text Available The effect of viscosity on the flow is generally very complex and not suitable for mathematical analysis. The shear stresses due to viscosity affect the flow velocities in pipe. On the other hand, the partial differential equations governing the flow (Navier Stokes equations do not have general solutions. When the movement of incompressible fluids in one dimensional system is considered, the velocity of fluid at inlet and outlet sections are not one dimensional. The velocities are increasing from wall to the center and reach a maximum value at the center. So, the error in kinetic energy calculation per unit mass because of using average velocity can be corrected by a correction factor. For similar reasons, average momentum flows must also be corrected by a momentum correction factor. In this study, in uniform circular pipe flows, the kinetic energy correction factor and momentum correction factor have been investigated with respect to Reynolds number.

  4. Analysis of atmospheric flow over a surface protrusion using the turbulence kinetic energy equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, W.; Harper, W. L.; Fichtl, G. H.

    1975-01-01

    Atmospheric flow fields resulting from a semi-elliptical surface obstruction in an otherwise horizontally homogeneous statistically stationary flow are modelled with the boundary-layer/Boussinesq-approximation of the governing equation of fluid mechanics. The turbulence kinetic energy equation is used to determine the dissipative effects of turbulent shear on the mean flow. Mean-flow results are compared with those given in a previous paper where the same problem was attacked using a Prandtl mixing-length hypothesis. Iso-lines of turbulence kinetic energy and turbulence intensity are plotted in the plane of the flow. They highlight regions of high turbulence intensity in the stagnation zone and sharp gradients in intensity along the transition from adverse to favourable pressure gradient.

  5. The kinetic energy operator for distance-dependent effective nuclear masses: Derivation for a triatomic molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoma, Mykhaylo; Jaquet, Ralph

    2017-09-21

    The kinetic energy operator for triatomic molecules with coordinate or distance-dependent nuclear masses has been derived. By combination of the chain rule method and the analysis of infinitesimal variations of molecular coordinates, a simple and general technique for the construction of the kinetic energy operator has been proposed. The asymptotic properties of the Hamiltonian have been investigated with respect to the ratio of the electron and proton mass. We have demonstrated that an ad hoc introduction of distance (and direction) dependent nuclear masses in Cartesian coordinates preserves the total rotational invariance of the problem. With the help of Wigner rotation functions, an effective Hamiltonian for nuclear motion can be derived. In the derivation, we have focused on the effective trinuclear Hamiltonian. All necessary matrix elements are given in closed analytical form. Preliminary results for the influence of non-adiabaticity on vibrational band origins are presented for H3+.

  6. Budget of Turbulent Kinetic Energy in a Shock Wave Boundary-Layer Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Manan A.; Waindim, Mbu; Gaitonde, Datta V.

    2016-01-01

    Implicit large-eddy simulation (ILES) of a shock wave/boundary-layer interaction (SBLI) was performed. Quantities present in the exact equation of the turbulent kinetic energy transport were accumulated and used to calculate terms like production, dissipation, molecular diffusion, and turbulent transport. The present results for a turbulent boundary layer were validated by comparison with direct numerical simulation data. It was found that a longer development domain was necessary for the boundary layer to reach an equilibrium state and a finer mesh resolution would improve the predictions. In spite of these findings, trends of the present budget match closely with that of the direct numerical simulation. Budgets for the SBLI region are presented at key axial stations. These budgets showed interesting dynamics as the incoming boundary layer transforms and the terms of the turbulent kinetic energy budget change behavior within the interaction region.

  7. Many-body localization in the quantum random energy model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laumann, Chris; Pal, Arijeet

    2014-03-01

    The quantum random energy model is a canonical toy model for a quantum spin glass with a well known phase diagram. We show that the model exhibits a many-body localization-delocalization transition at finite energy density which significantly alters the interpretation of the statistical ``frozen'' phase at lower temperature in isolated quantum systems. The transition manifests in many-body level statistics as well as the long time dynamics of on-site observables. CRL thanks the Perimeter Institute for hospitality and support.

  8. Energy and Protein Supplementation Does Not Affect Protein and Amino Acid Kinetics or Pregnancy Outcomes in Underweight Indian Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwarkanath, Pratibha; Hsu, Jean W; Tang, Grace J; Anand, Pauline; Thomas, Tinku; Thomas, Annamma; Sheela, C N; Kurpad, Anura V; Jahoor, Farook

    2016-02-01

    In India, the prevalence of low birth weight is high in women with a low body mass index (BMI), suggesting that underweight women are not capable of providing adequate energy and protein for fetal growth. Furthermore, as pregnancy progresses, there is increased need to provide methyl groups for methylation reactions associated with the synthesis of new proteins and, unlike normal-BMI American women, low-BMI Indian women are unable to increase methionine transmethylation and remethylation rates as pregnancy progresses from trimester 1 to 3. This also negatively influences birth weight. The aim was to determine the effect of dietary supplementation with energy and protein from 12 ± 1 wk of gestation to time of delivery compared with no supplement on pregnancy outcomes, protein kinetics, and the fluxes of the methyl group donors serine and glycine. Protein kinetics and serine and glycine fluxes were measured by using standard stable isotope tracer methods in the fasting and postprandial states in 24 pregnant women aged 22.9 ± 0.7 y with low BMIs [BMI (in kg/m(2)) ≤18.5] at 12 ± 1 wk (trimester 1) and 30 ± 1 wk (trimester 3) of gestation. After the first measurement, subjects were randomly assigned to either receive the supplement (300 kcal/d, 15 g protein/d) or no supplement. Supplementation had no significant effect on any variable of pregnancy outcome, and except for fasting state decreases in leucine flux (125 ± 7.14 compared with 113 ± 5.06 μmol ⋅ kg(-1) ⋅ h(-1); P = 0.04) and nonoxidative disposal (110 ± 6.97 compared with 101 ± 3.69 μmol ⋅ kg(-1) ⋅ h(-1); P = 0.02) from trimesters 1 to 3, it had no effect on any other leucine kinetic variable or urea, glycine, and serine fluxes. We conclude that in Indian women with a low BMI, supplementation with energy and protein from week 12 of pregnancy to time of delivery does not improve pregnancy outcome, whole-body protein kinetics, or serine and glycine fluxes. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  9. Design of an experimental setup for hydro-kinetic energy conversion

    OpenAIRE

    Grabbe, Mårten; Yuen, Katarina; Goude, Anders; Lalander, Emilia; Leijon, Mats

    2009-01-01

    A hydro-kinetic energy project has been underway in Sweden since 2000, and an in-stream prototype setup for experiments at a site in a Swedish river is now in progress. The system comprises a vertical axis turbine and a directly driven permanent magnet generator. Methods and choices used in designing the system are described here. The turbine and generator are evaluated based on measurements and CFD simulations of conditions at the site for the experimental setup.

  10. Electrochemical oxidation of COD from real textile wastewaters: Kinetic study and energy consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Jiaxiu; Peng, Xiaolan; Li, Miao; Xiong, Ying; Wang, Bing; Dong, Faqin; Wang, Bin

    2017-03-01

    In the present study, the electrochemical oxidation of real wastewaters discharged by textile industry was carried out using a boron-doped diamond (BDD) anode. The effect of operational variables, such as applied current density (20-100 mA·cm-2), NaCl concentration added to the real wastewaters (0-3 g·L-1), and pH value (2.0-10.0), on the kinetics of COD oxidation and on the energy consumption was carefully investigated. The obtained experimental results could be well matched with a proposed kinetic model, in which the indirect oxidation mediated by electrogenerated strong oxidants would be described through a pseudo-first-order kinetic constant k. Values of k exhibited a linear increase with increasing applied current density and decreasing pH value, and an exponential increase with NaCl concentration. Furthermore, high oxidation kinetics resulted in low specific energy consumption, but this conclusion was not suitable to the results obtained under different applied current density. Under the optimum operational conditions, it only took 3 h to complete remove the COD in the real textile wastewaters and the specific energy consumption could be as low as 11.12 kWh·kg-1 COD. The obtained results, low energy consumption and short electrolysis time, allowed to conclude that the electrochemical oxidation based on BDD anodes would have practical industrial application for the treatment of real textile wastewater. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Evidence for cluster shape effects on the kinetic energy spectrum in thermionic emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, F; Lépine, F; Baguenard, B; Pagliarulo, F; Concina, B; Bordas, C; Parneix, P

    2007-11-28

    Experimental kinetic energy release distributions obtained for the thermionic emission from C(n) (-) clusters, 10< or =n< or =20, exhibit significant non-Boltzmann variations. Using phase space theory, these different features are analyzed and interpreted as the consequence of contrasting shapes in the daughter clusters; linear and nonlinear isomers have clearly distinct signatures. These results provide a novel indirect structural probe for atomic clusters associated with their thermionic emission spectra.

  12. Kinetic Energy Distribution of H(2p) Atoms from Dissociative Excitation of H2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajello, Joseph M.; Ahmed, Syed M.; Kanik, Isik; Multari, Rosalie

    1995-01-01

    The kinetic energy distribution of H(2p) atoms resulting from electron impact dissociation of H2 has been measured for the first time with uv spectroscopy. A high resolution uv spectrometer was used for the measurement of the H Lyman-alpha emission line profiles at 20 and 100 eV electron impact energies. Analysis of the deconvolved 100 eV line profile reveals the existence of a narrow line peak and a broad pedestal base. Slow H(2p) atoms with peak energy near 80 meV produce the peak profile, which is nearly independent of impact energy. The wings of H Lyman-alpha arise from dissociative excitation of a series of doubly excited Q(sub 1) and Q(sub 2) states, which define the core orbitals. The fast atom energy distribution peaks at 4 eV.

  13. State-to-State Internal Energy Relaxation Following the Quantum-Kinetic Model in DSMC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liechty, Derek S.

    2014-01-01

    A new model for chemical reactions, the Quantum-Kinetic (Q-K) model of Bird, has recently been introduced that does not depend on macroscopic rate equations or values of local flow field data. Subsequently, the Q-K model has been extended to include reactions involving charged species and electronic energy level transitions. Although this is a phenomenological model, it has been shown to accurately reproduce both equilibrium and non-equilibrium reaction rates. The usefulness of this model becomes clear as local flow conditions either exceed the conditions used to build previous models or when they depart from an equilibrium distribution. Presently, the applicability of the relaxation technique is investigated for the vibrational internal energy mode. The Forced Harmonic Oscillator (FHO) theory for vibrational energy level transitions is combined with the Q-K energy level transition model to accurately reproduce energy level transitions at a reduced computational cost compared to the older FHO models.

  14. Measuring kinetic energy changes in the mesoscale with low acquisition rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roldán, É. [ICFO–Institut de Ciències Fotòniques, Mediterranean Technology Park, Av. Carl Friedrich Gauss 3, 08860 Castelldefels (Barcelona) (Spain); GISC–Grupo Interdisciplinar de Sistemas Complejos, Madrid (Spain); Martínez, I. A.; Rica, R. A., E-mail: rul@ugr.es [ICFO–Institut de Ciències Fotòniques, Mediterranean Technology Park, Av. Carl Friedrich Gauss 3, 08860 Castelldefels (Barcelona) (Spain); Dinis, L. [GISC–Grupo Interdisciplinar de Sistemas Complejos, Madrid (Spain); Departamento de Física Atómica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-06-09

    We report on the measurement of the average kinetic energy changes in isothermal and non-isothermal quasistatic processes in the mesoscale, realized with a Brownian particle trapped with optical tweezers. Our estimation of the kinetic energy change allows to access to the full energetic description of the Brownian particle. Kinetic energy estimates are obtained from measurements of the mean square velocity of the trapped bead sampled at frequencies several orders of magnitude smaller than the momentum relaxation frequency. The velocity is tuned applying a noisy electric field that modulates the amplitude of the fluctuations of the position and velocity of the Brownian particle, whose motion is equivalent to that of a particle in a higher temperature reservoir. Additionally, we show that the dependence of the variance of the time-averaged velocity on the sampling frequency can be used to quantify properties of the electrophoretic mobility of a charged colloid. Our method could be applied to detect temperature gradients in inhomogeneous media and to characterize the complete thermodynamics of biological motors and of artificial micro and nanoscopic heat engines.

  15. Quasiperiodic energy dependence of exciton relaxation kinetics in the sexithiophene crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petelenz, Piotr; Zak, Emil

    2014-10-16

    Femtosecond kinetics of fluorescence rise in the sexithiophene crystal is studied on a microscopic model of intraband relaxation, where exciton energy is assumed to be dissipated by phonon-accompanied scattering, with the rates calculated earlier. The temporal evolution of the exciton population is described by a set of kinetic equations, solved numerically to yield the population buildup at the band bottom. Not only the time scale but also the shape of the rise curves is found to be unusually sensitive to excitation energy, exhibiting unique quasiperiodic dependence thereon, which is rationalized in terms of the underlying model. Further simulations demonstrate that the main conclusions are robust with respect to experimental factors such as finite temperature and inherent spectral broadening of the exciting pulse, while the calculated fluorescence rise times are found to be in excellent agreement with experimental data available to date. As the rise profiles are composed of a number of exponential contributions, which varies with excitation energy, the common practice of characterizing the population buildup in the emitting state by a single value of relaxation time turns out to be an oversimplification. New experiments giving further insight into the kinetics and mechanism of intraband exciton relaxation are suggested.

  16. How is initial soil erosion affected by rainfall intensity and kinetic energy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Martin; Iserloh, Thomas; Rodrigo Comino, Jesús; Kavka, Petr; Seeger, Manuel; Ries, Johannes B.

    2017-04-01

    Rainfall simulation with small scale simulators is a method used worldwide to assess the generation of overland flow and initial soil erosion. For a thorough interpretation of the obtained experimental data, it is necessary to know detailed information of the rainfall characteristics. This study presents the effect of different rainfall intensities and kinetic energies on initial soil erosion rates under controlled experimental conditions. For this research the small portable rainfall simulator of Trier University was used. The experimental plot is 0.28 m2 and the height of the nozzle is 2 m above ground. We applied a wide range of rainfall intensities (20, 40, 60 and 80 mm h-1) and kinetic energies (0.4 - 9 J m2 mm-1). For this purpose, a set of various nozzles were tested under laboratory conditions. First, the spatial distribution of the artificial rainfall on the plot surface was measured to ensure the reproducibility of the experiments with constant rainfall intensity. Second, the drop size distribution was tested to control and adjust its similarity to the one measured in natural events. With the selected nozzles and rainfall intensities, 54 rainfall simulations were performed on prepared surface at the experimental site of Trier University. With the measured values a 3D matrix of rainfall intensity, kinetic energy and soil loss were calculated. This method allows an accurate estimation of soil erodibility for a wide range of rainfall characteristics. The presentation was funded by Ministry of agriculture of the Czech Republic (research project QJ1520265).

  17. Monte-Carlo simulation for fragment mass and kinetic energy distributions from neutron induced fission of 235U

    CERN Document Server

    Montoya, M; Rojas, J

    2007-01-01

    The mass and kinetic energy distribution of nuclear fragments from thermal neutron induced fission of 235U have been studied using a Monte-Carlo simulation. Besides reproducing the pronounced broadening on the standard deviation of the final fragment kinetic energy distribution $\\sigma_{e}(m)$ around the mass number m = 109, our simulation also produces a second broadening around m = 125, that is in agreement with the experimental data obtained by Belhafaf et al. These results are consequence of the characteristics of the neutron emission, the variation in the primary fragment mean kinetic energy and the yield as a function of the mass.

  18. Extended Thomas-Fermi kinetic energy density functional with spatially varying effective mass in d=1,2,3 dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkane, K.; Bencheikh, K.

    2005-08-01

    For first-principles density functional theory of a many fermion system, the determination of the kinetic energy functional is important. We consider N independent fermions with spatially varying effective mass in two dimensions, we derive the corresponding kinetic energy density using the ℏ semiclassical approach. Our result reduces, as expected, to the one obtained in the literature for a constant effective mass. We examine the analytical expressions of the position dependent effective mass terms in the kinetic energy density functional with respect to the dimensionality d=1,2,3 of the space.

  19. Kinetic energy in the collective quadrupole Hamiltonian from the experimental data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.V. Jolos

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Dependence of the kinetic energy term of the collective nuclear Hamiltonian on collective momentum is considered. It is shown that the fourth order in collective momentum term of the collective quadrupole Hamiltonian generates a sizable effect on the excitation energies and the matrix elements of the quadrupole moment operator. It is demonstrated that the results of calculation are sensitive to the values of some matrix elements of the quadrupole moment. It stresses the importance for a concrete nucleus to have the experimental data for the reduced matrix elements of the quadrupole moment operator taken between all low lying states with the angular momenta not exceeding 4.

  20. Nonexponential Kinetics of Loop Formation in Proteins and Peptides: A Signature of Rugged Free Energy Landscapes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowdy, James; Batchelor, Matthew; Neelov, Igor; Paci, Emanuele

    2017-10-19

    The kinetics of loop formation, i.e., the occurrence of contact between two atoms of a polypeptide, remains the focus of continuing interest. One of the reasons is that contact formation is the elementary event underlying processes such as folding and binding. More importantly, it is experimentally measurable and can be predicted theoretically for ideal polymers. Deviations from single exponential kinetics have sometimes been interpreted as a signature of rugged, protein-like, free energy landscapes. Here we present simulations, with different atomistic models, of short peptides with varied structural propensity, and of a structured protein. Results show exponential contact formation kinetics (or relaxation) at long times, and a power law relaxation at very short times. At intermediate times, a deviation from either power law or simple exponential kinetics is observed that appears to be characteristic of polypeptides with either specific or nonspecific attractive interactions but disappears if attractive interactions are absent. Our results agree with recent experimental measurements on peptides and proteins and offer a comprehensive interpretation for them.

  1. Convective kinetic energy equation under the mass-flux subgrid-scale parameterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Jun-Ichi

    2015-03-01

    The present paper originally derives the convective kinetic energy equation under mass-flux subgrid-scale parameterization in a formal manner based on the segmentally-constant approximation (SCA). Though this equation is long since presented by Arakawa and Schubert (1974), a formal derivation is not known in the literature. The derivation of this formulation is of increasing interests in recent years due to the fact that it can explain basic aspects of the convective dynamics such as discharge-recharge and transition from shallow to deep convection. The derivation is presented in two manners: (i) for the case that only the vertical component of the velocity is considered and (ii) the case that both the horizontal and vertical components are considered. The equation reduces to the same form as originally presented by Arakwa and Schubert in both cases, but with the energy dissipation term defined differently. In both cases, nevertheless, the energy "dissipation" (loss) term consists of the three principal contributions: (i) entrainment-detrainment, (ii) outflow from top of convection, and (iii) pressure effects. Additionally, inflow from the bottom of convection contributing to a growth of convection is also formally counted as a part of the dissipation term. The eddy dissipation is also included for a completeness. The order-of-magnitude analysis shows that the convective kinetic energy "dissipation" is dominated by the pressure effects, and it may be approximately described by Rayleigh damping with a constant time scale of the order of 102-103 s. The conclusion is also supported by a supplementary analysis of a cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulation. The Appendix discusses how the loss term ("dissipation") of the convective kinetic energy is qualitatively different from the conventional eddy-dissipation process found in turbulent flows.

  2. Random versus Deterministic Descent in RNA Energy Landscape Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke Day

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Identifying sets of metastable conformations is a major research topic in RNA energy landscape analysis, and recently several methods have been proposed for finding local minima in landscapes spawned by RNA secondary structures. An important and time-critical component of such methods is steepest, or gradient, descent in attraction basins of local minima. We analyse the speed-up achievable by randomised descent in attraction basins in the context of large sample sets where the size has an order of magnitude in the region of ~106. While the gain for each individual sample might be marginal, the overall run-time improvement can be significant. Moreover, for the two nongradient methods we analysed for partial energy landscapes induced by ten different RNA sequences, we obtained that the number of observed local minima is on average larger by 7.3% and 3.5%, respectively. The run-time improvement is approximately 16.6% and 6.8% on average over the ten partial energy landscapes. For the large sample size we selected for descent procedures, the coverage of local minima is very high up to energy values of the region where the samples were randomly selected from the partial energy landscapes; that is, the difference to the total set of local minima is mainly due to the upper area of the energy landscapes.

  3. Notepad-like triboelectric generator for efficiently harvesting low-velocity motion energy by interconversion between kinetic energy and elastic potential energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guanlin; Leng, Qiang; Lian, Jiawei; Guo, Hengyu; Yi, Xi; Hu, Chenguo

    2015-01-21

    Great attention has been paid to nanogenerators that harvest energy from ambient environments lately. In order to give considerable output current, most nanogenerators require high-velocity motion that in most cases can hardly be provided in our daily life. Here we report a notepad-like triboelectric generator (NTEG), which uses simple notepad-like structure to generate elastic deformation so as to turn a low-velocity kinetic energy into high-velocity kinetic energy through the conversion of elastic potential energy. Therefore, the NTEG can achieve high current output under low-velocity motion, which completely distinguishes it from tribogenerators previously reported. The factors that may affect the output performance are explored, including the number of slices, active length of slice, press speed, and vertical displacement. In addition, the working mechanism is systematically studied, indicating that the efficiency of the generator can be greatly enhanced by interconversion between kinetic energy and elastic potential energy. The short-circuit current, the open-circuit voltage, and power density are 205 μA and 470 V and 9.86 W/m(2), respectively, which is powerful enough to light up hundreds of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and charge a commercial capacitor. Besides, NTEGs have been successfully applied to a self-powered door monitor.

  4. Anisotropic kinetic energy release and gyroscopic behavior of CO2 super rotors from an optical centrifuge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Matthew J.; Ogden, Hannah M.; Mullin, Amy S.

    2017-10-01

    An optical centrifuge is used to generate an ensemble of CO2 super rotors with oriented angular momentum. The collision dynamics and energy transfer behavior of the super rotor molecules are investigated using high-resolution transient IR absorption spectroscopy. New multipass IR detection provides improved sensitivity to perform polarization-dependent transient studies for rotational states with 76 ≤ J ≤ 100. Polarization-dependent measurements show that the collision-induced kinetic energy release is spatially anisotropic and results from both near-resonant energy transfer between super rotor molecules and non-resonant energy transfer between super rotors and thermal molecules. J-dependent studies show that the extent and duration of the orientational anisotropy increase with rotational angular momentum. The super rotors exhibit behavior akin to molecular gyroscopes, wherein molecules with larger amounts of angular momentum are less likely to change their angular momentum orientation through collisions.

  5. Classical trajectory studies of gas phase reaction dynamics and kinetics using ab initio potential energy surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Richard L.; Pattengill, Merle D.; Schwenke, David W.

    1989-01-01

    Strategies for constructing global potential energy surfaces from a limited number of accurate ab initio electronic energy calculations are discussed. Generally, these data are concentrated in small regions of configuration space (e.g., in the vicinity of saddle points and energy minima) and difficulties arise in generating a potential function that is globally well-behaved. Efficient computer codes for carrying out classical trajectory calculations on vector and parallel processors are also described. Illustrations are given from recent work on the following chemical systems: Ca + HF yields CaF + H, H + H + H2 yields H2 + H2, N + O2 yields NO + O and O + N2 yields NO + N. The dynamics and kinetics of metathesis, dissociation, recombination, energy transfer and complex formation processes will be discussed.

  6. Exploring the Invisible Renormalon Renormalization of the Heavy-Quark Kinetic Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Neubert, M

    1997-01-01

    Using the virial theorem of the heavy-quark effective theory, we show that the mixing of the operator for the heavy-quark kinetic energy with the identity operator is forbidden at the one-loop order by Lorentz invariance. This explains why such a mixing was not observed in several one-loop calculations using regularization schemes with a Lorentz-invariant UV regulator, and why no UV renormalon singularity was found in the matrix elements of the kinetic operator in the bubble approximation (the ``invisible renormalon''). On the other hand, we show that the mixing is not protected in general by any symmetry, and it indeed occurs at the two-loop order. This implies that the parameter $\\lambda_1^H$ of the heavy-quark effective theory is not directly a physical quantity, but requires a non-perturbative subtraction.

  7. Kinetic Energy Recovery from the Chimney Flue Gases Using Ducted Turbine System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Harjeet S.; Singh, Pradeep K.

    2017-03-01

    An innovative idea of extracting kinetic energy from man-made wind resources using ducted turbine system for on-site power generation is introduced in this paper. A horizontal axis ducted turbine is attached to the top of the chimney to harness the kinetic energy of flue gases for producing electricity. The turbine system is positioned beyond the chimney outlet, to avoid any negative impact on the chimney performance. The convergent-divergent duct causes increase in the flue gas velocity and hence enhances the performance of the turbine. It also acts as a safety cover to the energy recovery system. The results from the CFD based simulation analysis indicate that significant power 34 kW can be harnessed from the chimney exhaust. The effect of airfoils NACA4412 and NACA4416 and the diffuser angle on the power extraction by the energy recovery system using a 6-bladed ducted turbine has been studied with the CFD simulation. It is observed that the average flue gas velocity in the duct section at the throat is approximately twice that of the inlet velocity, whereas maximum velocity achieved is 2.6 times the inlet velocity. The simulated results show that about power may be extracted from the chimney flue gases of 660 MW power plant. The system can be retrofitted to existing chimneys of thermal power plants, refineries and other industries.

  8. Kinetic study of solid waste pyrolysis using distributed activation energy model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhavanam, Anjireddy; Sastry, R C

    2015-02-01

    The pyrolysis characteristics of municipal solid waste, agricultural residues such as ground nut shell, cotton husk and their blends are investigated using non-isothermal thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) with in a temperature range of 30-900 °C at different heating rates of 10 °C, 30 °C and 50 °C/min in inert atmosphere. From the thermograms obtained from TGA, it is observed that the maximum rate of degradation occurred in the second stage of the pyrolysis process for all the solid wastes. The distributed activation energy model (DAEM) is used to study the pyrolysis kinetics of the solid wastes. The kinetic parameters E (activation energy), k0 (frequency factor) are calculated from this model. It is found that the range of activation energies for agricultural residues are lower than the municipal solid waste. The activation energies for the municipal solid waste pyrolysis process drastically decreased with addition of agricultural residues. The proposed DAEM is successfully validated with TGA experimental data. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Quantifying the Nucleation and Growth Kinetics of Microwave Nanochemistry Enabled by in Situ High-Energy X-ray Scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qi; Gao, Min-Rui; Liu, Yuzi; Okasinski, John S; Ren, Yang; Sun, Yugang

    2016-01-13

    The fast reaction kinetics presented in the microwave synthesis of colloidal silver nanoparticles was quantitatively studied, for the first time, by integrating a microwave reactor with in situ X-ray diffraction at a high-energy synchrotron beamline. Comprehensive data analysis reveals two different types of reaction kinetics corresponding to the nucleation and growth of the Ag nanoparticles. The formation of seeds (nucleation) follows typical first-order reaction kinetics with activation energy of 20.34 kJ/mol, while the growth of seeds (growth) follows typical self-catalytic reaction kinetics. Varying the synthesis conditions indicates that the microwave colloidal chemistry is independent of concentration of surfactant. These discoveries reveal that the microwave synthesis of Ag nanoparticles proceeds with reaction kinetics significantly different from the synthesis present in conventional oil bath heating. The in situ X-ray diffraction technique reported in this work is promising to enable further understanding of crystalline nanomaterials formed through microwave synthesis.

  10. Total kinetic energy release in 239Pu(n ,f ) post-neutron emission from 0.5 to 50 MeV incident neutron energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meierbachtol, K.; Tovesson, F.; Duke, D. L.; Geppert-Kleinrath, V.; Manning, B.; Meharchand, R.; Mosby, S.; Shields, D.

    2016-09-01

    The average total kinetic energy (T K E ¯) in 239Pu(n ,f ) has been measured for incident neutron energies between 0.5 and 50 MeV. The experiment was performed at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) using the neutron time-of-flight technique, and the kinetic energy of fission fragments post-neutron emission was measured in a double Frisch-gridded ionization chamber. This represents the first experimental study of the energy dependence of T K E ¯ in 239Pu above neutron energies of 6 MeV.

  11. Randomized tree construction algorithm to explore energy landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaillet, Léonard; Corcho, Francesc J; Pérez, Juan-Jesús; Cortés, Juan

    2011-12-01

    In this work, a new method for exploring conformational energy landscapes is described. The method, called transition-rapidly exploring random tree (T-RRT), combines ideas from statistical physics and robot path planning algorithms. A search tree is constructed on the conformational space starting from a given state. The tree expansion is driven by a double strategy: on the one hand, it is naturally biased toward yet unexplored regions of the space; on the other, a Monte Carlo-like transition test guides the expansion toward energetically favorable regions. The balance between these two strategies is automatically achieved due to a self-tuning mechanism. The method is able to efficiently find both energy minima and transition paths between them. As a proof of concept, the method is applied to two academic benchmarks and the alanine dipeptide. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Effect of microwave-assisted heating on chalcopyrite leaching of kinetics, interface temperature and surface energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Tong; Zhao, Yunliang; Xiao, Qihang; Ma, Qiulin; Kang, Shichang; Li, Hongqiang; Song, Shaoxian

    The microwave-assisted leaching was a new approach to intensify the copper recovery from chalcopyrite by hydrometallurgy. In this work, the effect of microwave-assisted heating on chalcopyrite leaching of kinetics, interfacial reaction temperature and surface energy were investigated. The activation energy of chalcopyrite leaching was affected indistinctively by the microwave-assisted heating (39.1 kJ/mol) compared with the conventional heating (43.9 kJ/mol). However, the boiling point of the leaching system increased through microwave-assisted heating. Because of the improved boiling point and the selective heating of microwave, the interfacial reaction temperature increased significantly, which gave rise to the increase of the leaching recovery of copper. Moreover, the surface energy of the chalcopyrite through microwave-assisted heating was also enhanced, which was beneficial to strengthen the leaching of chalcopyrite.

  13. Sensory Agreement Guides Kinetic Energy Optimization of Arm Movements during Object Manipulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Farshchiansadegh

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The laws of physics establish the energetic efficiency of our movements. In some cases, like locomotion, the mechanics of the body dominate in determining the energetically optimal course of action. In other tasks, such as manipulation, energetic costs depend critically upon the variable properties of objects in the environment. Can the brain identify and follow energy-optimal motions when these motions require moving along unfamiliar trajectories? What feedback information is required for such optimal behavior to occur? To answer these questions, we asked participants to move their dominant hand between different positions while holding a virtual mechanical system with complex dynamics (a planar double pendulum. In this task, trajectories of minimum kinetic energy were along curvilinear paths. Our findings demonstrate that participants were capable of finding the energy-optimal paths, but only when provided with veridical visual and haptic information pertaining to the object, lacking which the trajectories were executed along rectilinear paths.

  14. Potential to kinetic energy conversion in wave number domain for the Southern Hemisphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, H.-J.; Vincent, D. G.

    1984-01-01

    Preliminary results of a wave number study conducted for the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ) using FGGE data for the period January 10-27, 1979 are reported. In particular, three variables (geomagnetic height, z, vertical p-velocity, omega, and temperature, T) and one energy conversion quantity, omega-alpha (where alpha is the specific volume), are shown. It is demonstrated that wave number 4 plays an important role in the conversion from available potential energy to kinetic energy in the Southern Hemisphere tropics, particularly in the vicinity of the SPCZ. It is therefore suggested that the development and movement of wave number 4 waves be carefully monitored in making forecasts for the South Pacific region.

  15. The analysis and kinetic energy balance of an upper-level wind maximum during intense convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuelberg, H. E.; Jedlovec, G. J.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to analyze the formation and maintenance of the upper-level wind maximum which formed between 1800 and 2100 GMT, April 10, 1979, during the AVE-SESAME I period, when intense storms and tornadoes were experienced (the Red River Valley tornado outbreak). Radiosonde stations participating in AVE-SESAME I are plotted (centered on Oklahoma). National Meteorological Center radar summaries near the times of maximum convective activity are mapped, and height and isotach plots are given, where the formation of an upper-level wind maximum over Oklahoma is the most significant feature at 300 mb. The energy balance of the storm region is seen to change dramatically as the wind maximum forms. During much of its lifetime, the upper-level wind maximum is maintained by ageostrophic flow that produces cross-contour generation of kinetic energy and by the upward transport of midtropospheric energy. Two possible mechanisms for the ageostrophic flow are considered.

  16. Gravitational attraction until relativistic equipartition of internal and translational kinetic energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulyzhenkov, I. E.

    2018-02-01

    Translational ordering of the internal kinematic chaos provides the Special Relativity referents for the geodesic motion of warm thermodynamical bodies. Taking identical mathematics, relativistic physics of the low speed transport of time-varying heat-energies differs from Newton's physics of steady masses without internal degrees of freedom. General Relativity predicts geodesic changes of the internal heat-energy variable under the free gravitational fall and the geodesic turn in the radial field center. Internal heat variations enable cyclic dynamics of decelerated falls and accelerated takeoffs of inertial matter and its structural self-organization. The coordinate speed of the ordered spatial motion takes maximum under the equipartition of relativistic internal and translational kinetic energies. Observable predictions are discussed for verification/falsification of the principle of equipartition as a new basic for the ordered motion and self-organization in external fields, including gravitational, electromagnetic, and thermal ones.

  17. Analysis of heart rate and oxygen uptake kinetics studied by two different pseudo-random binary sequence work rate amplitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drescher, U; Koschate, J; Schiffer, T; Schneider, S; Hoffmann, U

    2017-06-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the kinetics responses of heart rate (HR), pulmonary (V˙O2pulm) and predicted muscular (V˙O2musc) oxygen uptake between two different pseudo-random binary sequence (PRBS) work rate (WR) amplitudes both below anaerobic threshold. Eight healthy individuals performed two PRBS WR protocols implying changes between 30W and 80W and between 30W and 110W. HR and V˙O2pulm were measured beat-to-beat and breath-by-breath, respectively. V˙O2musc was estimated applying the approach of Hoffmann et al. (Eur J Appl Physiol 113: 1745-1754, 2013) considering a circulatory model for venous return and cross-correlation functions (CCF) for the kinetics analysis. HR and V˙O2musc kinetics seem to be independent of WR intensity (p>0.05). V˙O2pulm kinetics show prominent differences in the lag of the CCF maximum (39±9s; 31±4s; pkinetics remain unchanged. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Total Kinetic Energy and Fragment Mass Distribution of Neutron-Induced Fission of U-233

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higgins, Daniel James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Schmitt, Kyle Thomas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mosby, Shea Morgan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Tovesson, Fredrik [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-09-29

    Properties of fission in U-233 were studied at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) at incident neutron energies from thermal to 40 MeV at both the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center flight path 12 and at WNR flight path 90-Left from Dec 2016 to Jan 2017. Fission fragments are observed in coincidence using a twin ionization chamber with Frisch grids. The average total kinetic energy (TKE) released from fission and fragment mass distributions are calculated from observations of energy deposited in the detector and conservation of mass and momentum. Accurate experimental measurements of these parameters are necessary to better understand the fission process and obtain data necessary for calculating criticality. The average TKE released from fission has been well characterized for several isotopes at thermal neutron energy, however, few measurements have been made at fast neutron energies. This experiment expands on previous successful experiments using an ionization chamber to measure TKE and fragment mass distributions of U-235, U-238, and Pu-239. This experiment requires the full spectrum of neutron energies and can therefore only be performed at a small number of facilities in the world. The required full neutron energy spectrum is obtained by combining measurements from WNR 90L and Lujan FP12 at LANSCE.

  19. Asymptotic domination of cold relativistic MHD winds by kinetic energy flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begelman, Mitchell C.; Li, Zhi-Yun

    1994-01-01

    We study the conditions which lead to the conversion of most Poynting flux into kinetic energy flux in cold, relativistic hydromagnetic winds. It is shown that plasma acceleration along a precisely radial flow is extremely inefficient due to the near cancellation of the toroidal magnetic pressure and tension forces. However, if the flux tubes in a flow diverge even slightly faster than radially, the fast magnetosonic point moves inward from infinity to a few times the light cylinder radius. Once the flow becomes supermagnetosonic, further divergence of the flux tubes beyond the fast point can accelerate the flow via the 'magnetic nozzle' effect, thereby further converting Poynting flux to kinetic energy flux. We show that the Grad-Shafranov equation admits a generic family of kinetic energy-dominated asymptotic wind solutions with finite total magnetic flux. The Poynting flux in these solutions vanishes logarithmically with distance. The way in which the flux surfaces are nested within the flow depends only on the ratio of angular velocity to poliodal 4-velocity as a function of magnetic flux. Radial variations in flow structure can be expressed in terms of a pressure boundary condition on the outermost flux surface, provided that no external toriodal field surrounds the flow. For a special case, we show explicitly how the flux surfaces merge gradually to their asymptotes. For flows confined by an external medium of pressure decreasing to zero at infinity we show that, depending on how fast the ambient pressure declines, the final flow state could be either a collimated jet or a wind that fills the entire space. We discuss the astrophysical implications of our results for jets from active galactic nuclei and for free pulsar winds such as that believed to power the Crab Nebula.

  20. Microwave treatment of dairy manure for resource recovery: Reaction kinetics and energy analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Asha; Liao, Ping H; Lo, Kwang V

    2016-12-01

    A newly designed continuous-flow 915 MHz microwave wastewater treatment system was used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the microwave enhanced advanced oxidation process (MW/H2O2-AOP) for treating dairy manure. After the treatment, about 84% of total phosphorus and 45% of total chemical oxygen demand were solubilized with the highest H2O2 dosage (0.4% H2O2 per %TS). The reaction kinetics of soluble chemical oxygen demand revealed activation energy to be in the range of 5-22 kJ mole-1. The energy required by the processes was approximately 0.16 kWh per liter of dairy manure heated. A higher H2O2 dosage used in the system had a better process performance in terms of solids solubilization, reaction kinetics, and energy consumption. Cost-benefit analysis for a farm-scale MW/H2O2-AOP treatment system was also presented. The results obtained from this study would provide the basic knowledge for designing an effective farm-scale dairy manure treatment system.

  1. A Hamiltonian theory for an elastic earth - Canonical variables and kinetic energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getino, Juan; Ferrandiz, Jose M.

    1990-09-01

    This paper describes the first part of a project dedicated to elaborating a Hamiltonian theory for the rotational motion of a deformable earth. Here only the perturbation due to the deformation of the elastic mantle by tidal body force is studied. Two canonical systems of variables are developed, known as elastic variables of Euler and Andoyer, respectively. Next, they are used to obtain the canonical expression of rotational kinetic energy, which is valid for any earth model satisfying hypotheses as general as those established here.

  2. Kinetic Energy of a Non-Spherical Elastic Earth Mantle with Andoyer Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getino, Juan

    1995-01-01

    Continuing the study of the rotation of a deformable Earth begun by Getino and Ferrandiz (1990, 1991a, 1991b, 1993, 1994) for an Earth model with an elastic spherical mantle, in this paper on one hand we deal with the effect of the ellipticity, and on the other hand, we include the toroidal solution of the displacement vector. Taking an axis symmetrical, slightly ellipsoidal Earth, the modification due to the ellipticity is introduced into the solution of the displacement vector for both spheroidal and toroidal modes, and, after defining the adequate variables, we give the canonical formulation of the corresponding increase in the kinetic energy.

  3. Effect of mean velocity shear on the dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizawa, Akira; Liou, Meng-Sing

    1992-01-01

    The dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy in incompressible turbulence is investigated using a two-scale DIA. The dissipation rate is shown to consist of two parts; one corresponds to the dissipation rate used in the current turbulence models of eddy-viscosity type, and another comes from the viscous effect that is closely connected with mean velocity shear. This result can elucidate the physical meaning of the dissipation rate used in the current turbulence models and explain part of the discrepancy in the near-wall dissipation rates between the current turbulence models and direct numerical simulation of the Navier-Stokes equation.

  4. Surface-catalyzed recombination into excited electronic, vibrational, rotational, and kinetic energy states: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofsky, I. L.; Barrett, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    Laboratory experiments in which recombined CO, CO2, D2O, OH, N2, H2, and O2 molecules desorb from surfaces in excited internal and translational states are briefly reviewed. Unequilibrated distributions predominate from the principally catalytic metal substrates so far investigated. Mean kinetic energies have been observed up to approx. 3x, and in some cases less than, wall-thermal; the velocity distributions generally vary with emission angle, with non-Lambertian particle fluxes. The excitation state populations are found to depend on surface impurities, in an as yet unexplained way.

  5. Kinetic energy dependence of fission fragment isomeric ratios for spherical nuclei 132Sn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chebboubi, A.; Kessedjian, G.; Litaize, O.; Serot, O.; Faust, H.; Bernard, D.; Blanc, A.; Köster, U.; Méplan, O.; Mutti, P.; Sage, C.

    2017-12-01

    Isomeric ratios are a powerful observable to investigate fission fragment total angular momenta. A recent experimental campaign achieved at the LOHENGRIN spectrometer, shows a kinetic energy dependence of μs isomeric ratios from fission fragments populated in neutron induced fission of 235U. For the first time, this dependence was measured for the isomeric ratio of the doubly magic 132Sn. A Bayesian assessment of the angular momentum distribution of 132Sn is proposed according to calculations performed with the FIFRELIN code and interpreted with spin generation models.

  6. Numerical simulations of gun-launched kinetic energy projectiles subjected to asymmetric projectile base pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabern, D.A.

    1991-12-31

    Three-dimensional numerical simulations were performed to determine the effect of an asymmetric base pressure on kinetic energy projectiles during launch. A matrix of simulations was performed in two separate launch environments. One launch environment represented a severe lateral load environment, while the other represented a nonsevere lateral load environment based on the gun tube straightness. The orientation of the asymmetric pressure field, its duration, the projectile`s initial position, and the tube straightness were altered to determine the effects of each parameter. The pressure asymmetry translates down the launch tube to exit parameters and is washed out by tube profile. Results from the matrix of simulations are presented.

  7. Numerical simulations of gun-launched kinetic energy projectiles subjected to asymmetric projectile base pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabern, D.A.

    1991-01-01

    Three-dimensional numerical simulations were performed to determine the effect of an asymmetric base pressure on kinetic energy projectiles during launch. A matrix of simulations was performed in two separate launch environments. One launch environment represented a severe lateral load environment, while the other represented a nonsevere lateral load environment based on the gun tube straightness. The orientation of the asymmetric pressure field, its duration, the projectile's initial position, and the tube straightness were altered to determine the effects of each parameter. The pressure asymmetry translates down the launch tube to exit parameters and is washed out by tube profile. Results from the matrix of simulations are presented.

  8. Vibrational Energy Levels via Finite-Basis Calculations Using a Quasi-Analytic Form of the Kinetic Energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez, Juana; Harding, Michael E; Stanton, John F; Gauss, Jürgen

    2011-05-10

    A variational method for the calculation of low-lying vibrational energy levels of molecules with small amplitude vibrations is presented. The approach is based on the Watson Hamiltonian in rectilinear normal coordinates and characterized by a quasi-analytic integration over the kinetic energy operator (KEO). The KEO beyond the harmonic approximation is represented by a Taylor series in terms of the rectilinear normal coordinates around the equilibrium configuration. This formulation of the KEO enables its extension to arbitrary order until numerical convergence is reached for those states describing small amplitude motions and suitably represented with a rectilinear system of coordinates. A Gauss-Hermite quadrature grid representation of the anharmonic potential is used for all the benchmark examples presented. Results for a set of molecules with linear and nonlinear configurations, i.e., CO2, H2O, and formyl fluoride (HFCO), illustrate the performance of the method and the versatility of our implementation.

  9. Effects of supplemental energy and protein on forage digestion and urea kinetics in growing beef cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, E A; Titgemeyer, E C; Olson, K C; Brake, D W; Jones, M L; Anderson, D E

    2012-10-01

    Effects of supplemental energy sources on nutrient digestion and urea kinetics at 2 levels of degradable intake protein were evaluated in cattle (Bos taurus). Six ruminally and duodenally cannulated steers (208 ± 17 kg) were used in a 6 × 6 Latin square with treatments arranged as a 3 × 2 factorial. Energy treatments included a control, 600 g glucose dosed ruminally once daily, and 480 g VFA infused ruminally over 8 h daily. Casein (120 or 240 g) was dosed ruminally once daily. Steers had ad libitum access to prairie hay (5.8% CP). Jugular infusion of (15)N(15)N-urea with measurement of enrichment in urine was used to measure urea kinetics. Infusing VFA decreased (P energy decreased (P = 0.03) plasma urea-N concentration, but casein level did not affect it (P = 0.16). Microbial N flow was greater (P energy (P = 0.23). Urea-N entry rate and gut entry of urea-N were not affected (P ≥ 0.12) by supplemental energy or casein, but the proportion of urea production that was recycled to the gut was less (P = 0.01) when 240 g/d rather than 120 g/d casein was provided. Compared with VFA, glucose tended (P = 0.07) to increase the proportion of urea-N entry rate that was recycled to the gut. Supplementation with glucose led to more (P = 0.01) microbial uptake of recycled urea than did supplementation with VFA. Urea recycling did not differ greatly among treatments despite impacts on ruminal pH and NH(3) and on plasma urea-N that were expected to alter urea transport across ruminal epithelium. Lack of treatment effects on urea production indicate that the complete diets did not provide excessive amounts of N and that increases of intestinally available AA were used efficiently by cattle for protein deposition.

  10. An ocean kinetic energy converter for low-power applications using piezoelectric disk elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viñolo, C.; Toma, D.; Mànuel, A.; del Rio, J.

    2013-09-01

    The main problem facing long-term electronic system deployments in the sea, is to find a feasible way to supply them with the power they require. Harvesting mechanical energy from the ocean wave oscillations and converting it into electrical energy, provides an alternative method for creating self-contained power sources. However, the very low and varying frequency of ocean waves, which generally varies from 0.1 Hz to 2 Hz, presents a hurdle which has to be overcome if this mechanical energy is to be harvested. In this paper, a new sea wave kinetic energy converter is described using low-cost disk piezoelectric elements, which has no dependence on their excitement frequency, to feed low-consumption maritime-deployed electronic devices. The operating principles of the piezoelectric device technique are presented, including analytical formulations describing the transfer of energy. Finally, a prototypical design, which generates electrical energy from the motion of a buoy, is introduced. The paper concludes with the the behavior study of the piezoelectric prototype device as a power generator.

  11. Design and kinetic analysis of piezoelectric energy harvesters with self-adjusting resonant frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu-Jen, Wang; Tsung-Yi, Chuang; Jui-Hsin, Yu

    2017-09-01

    Vibration-based energy harvesters have been developed as power sources for wireless sensor networks. Because the vibration frequency of the environment is varied with surrounding conditions, how to design an adaptive energy harvester is a practical topic. This paper proposes a design for a piezoelectric energy harvester possessing the ability to self-adjust its resonant frequency in rotational environments. The effective length of a trapezoidal cantilever is extended by centrifugal force from a rotating wheel to vary its area moment of inertia. The analytical solution for the natural frequency of the piezoelectric energy harvester was derived from the parameter design process, which could specify a structure approaching resonance at any wheel rotating frequency. The kinetic equation and electrical damping induced by power generation were derived from a Lagrange method and a mechanical-electrical coupling model, respectively. An energy harvester with adequate parameters can generate power at a wide range of car speeds. The output power of an experimental prototype composed of piezoelectric thin films and connected to a 3.3 MΩ external resistor was approximately 70-140 μW at wheel speeds ranging from 200 to 700 RPM. These results demonstrate that the proposed piezoelectric energy harvester can be applied as a power source for the wireless tire pressure monitoring sensor.

  12. Electronic coherence and the kinetics of inter-complex energy transfer in light-harvesting systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Pengfei; Miller, Thomas F

    2015-12-14

    We apply real-time path-integral dynamics simulations to characterize the role of electronic coherence in inter-complex excitation energy transfer (EET) processes. The analysis is performed using a system-bath model that exhibits the essential features of light-harvesting networks, including strong intra-complex electronic coupling and weak inter-complex coupling. Strong intra-complex coupling is known to generate both static and dynamic electron coherences, which delocalize the exciton over multiple chromophores and potentially influence the inter-complex EET dynamics. With numerical results from partial linearized density matrix (PLDM) real-time path-integral calculations, it is found that both static and dynamic coherence are correlated with the rate of inter-complex EET. To distinguish the impact of these two types of intra-complex coherence on the rate of inter-complex EET, we use Multi-Chromophore Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (MC-FRET) theory to map the original parameterization of the system-bath model to an alternative parameterization for which the effects of static coherence are preserved while the effects of dynamic coherence are largely eliminated. It is then shown that both parameterizations of the model (i.e., the original that supports dynamic coherence and the alternative that eliminates it), exhibit nearly identical EET kinetics and population dynamics over a wide range of parameters. These observations are found to hold for cases in which either the EET donor or acceptor is a dimeric complex and for cases in which the dimeric complex is either symmetric or asymmetric. The results from this study suggest that dynamic coherence plays only a minor role in the actual kinetics of inter-complex EET, whereas static coherence largely governs the kinetics of incoherent inter-complex EET in light-harvesting networks.

  13. Kinetic modeling and energy efficiency of UV/H₂O₂ treatment of iodinated trihalomethanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yongjun; Zhang, Lifeng; Yue, Junqi; Webster, Richard D; Lim, Teik-Thye

    2015-05-15

    Photodegradation of I-THMs including CHCl2I and CHI3 by the UV/H2O2 system was investigated in this study. CHCl2I and CHI3 react rapidly with hydroxyl radical (OH) produced by the UV/H2O2 system, with second-order rate constants of 8.0 × 10(9) and 8.9 × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1), respectively. A fraction of CHCl2I could be completely mineralized within 15 min and the remaining fraction was mainly converted to formic acid (HCO2H). Cl(-) and I(-) were identified as the predominant end-products. No ClO3(-) was observed during the photodegradation process, while IO3(-) was detected but at less than 2% of the total liberated iodine species at the end of the reaction. The effects of pH, H2O2 dose, and matrix species such as humic acid (HA), HCO3(-), SO4(2-), Cl(-), NO3(-) on the photodegradation kinetics were evaluated. The steady-state kinetic model has been proven to successfully predict the destruction of CHCl2I and CHI3 by UV/H2O2 in different water matrices. On this basis, the kinetic model combined with electrical energy per order (EE/O) concept was applied to evaluate the efficiency of the photodegradation process and to optimize the H2O2 dose for different scenarios. The optimal H2O2 doses in deionized (DI) water, model natural water, and surface water are estimated at 5, 12, and 16 mg L(-1), respectively, which correspond to the lowest total energy consumption (EE/Ototal) of 0.2, 0.31, and 0.45 kWhm(-3)order(-1). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Current redistribution and generation of kinetic energy in the stagnated Z pinch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, V V; Anderson, A A; Papp, D; Astanovitskiy, A L; Talbot, B R; Chittenden, J P; Niasse, N

    2013-07-01

    The structure of magnetic fields was investigated in stagnated wire-array Z pinches using a Faraday rotation diagnostic at the wavelength of 266 nm. The distribution of current in the pinch and trailing material was reconstructed. A significant part of current can switch from the main pinch to the trailing plasma preheated by x-ray radiation of the pinch. Secondary implosions of trailing plasma generate kinetic energy and provide enhanced heating and radiation of plasma at stagnation. Hot spots in wire-array Z pinches also provide enhanced radiation of the Z pinch. A collapse of a single hot spot radiates 1%-3% of x-ray energy of the Z pinch with a total contribution of hot spots of 10%-30%.

  15. Damage detection via closed-form sensitivity matrix of modal kinetic energy change ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjian Shahri, A. H.; Ghorbani-Tanha, A. K.

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, a new damage detection method based on a damage sensitive feature parameter named Modal Kinetic Energy Change Ratio has been proposed. The sensitivity matrix for the damage identification procedure is calculated by making use of the closed-form sensitivity of eigenvalues of the structure. Numerical simulations and experimental tests were carried out on a beam-like structure in order to examine the reliability and feasibility of the proposed method. System Equivalent Reduction Expansion Technique is employed to omit rotational degrees of freedom of the model. It is demonstrated that this method locates and quantifies structural damage(s) with acceptable accuracy. The best advantage of the proposed method comparing to the ones which are based on modal strain energy is that it is not sensitive to mode shape noise and yields favorable results under moderate noise in natural frequencies.

  16. Kinetic and geometric isotope effects originating from different adsorption potential energy surfaces: Cyclohexane on Rh(111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koitaya, Takanori; Shimizu, Sumera; Mukai, Kozo; Yoshimoto, Shinya; Yoshinobu, Jun

    2012-06-01

    Novel isotope effects were observed in desorption kinetics and adsorption geometry of cyclohexane on Rh(111) by the use of infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy, temperature programmed desorption, photoelectron spectroscopy, and spot-profile-analysis low energy electron diffraction. The desorption energy of deuterated cyclohexane (C6D12) is lower than that of C6H12. In addition, the work function change by adsorbed C6D12 is smaller than that by adsorbed C6H12. These results indicate that C6D12 has a shallower adsorption potential than C6H12 (vertical geometric isotope effect). The lateral geometric isotope effect was also observed in the two-dimensional cyclohexane superstructures as a result of the different repulsive interaction between interfacial dipoles. The observed isotope effects should be ascribed to the quantum nature of hydrogen involved in the C-H...metal interaction.

  17. Energy Transfer Kinetics in Photosynthesis as an Inspiration for Improving Organic Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nganou, Collins; Lackner, Gerhard; Teschome, Bezu; Deen, M Jamal; Adir, Noam; Pouhe, David; Lupascu, Doru C; Mkandawire, Martin

    2017-06-07

    Clues to designing highly efficient organic solar cells may lie in understanding the architecture of light-harvesting systems and exciton energy transfer (EET) processes in very efficient photosynthetic organisms. Here, we compare the kinetics of excitation energy tunnelling from the intact phycobilisome (PBS) light-harvesting antenna system to the reaction center in photosystem II in intact cells of the cyanobacterium Acaryochloris marina with the charge transfer after conversion of photons into photocurrent in vertically aligned carbon nanotube (va-CNT) organic solar cells with poly(3-hexyl)thiophene (P3HT) as the pigment. We find that the kinetics in electron hole creation following excitation at 600 nm in both PBS and va-CNT solar cells to be 450 and 500 fs, respectively. The EET process has a 3 and 14 ps pathway in the PBS, while in va-CNT solar cell devices, the charge trapping in the CNT takes 11 and 258 ps. We show that the main hindrance to efficiency of va-CNT organic solar cells is the slow migration of the charges after exciton formation.

  18. Kinetic energy classification and smoothing for compact B-spline basis sets in quantum Monte Carlo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krogel, Jaron T.; Reboredo, Fernando A.

    2018-01-01

    Quantum Monte Carlo calculations of defect properties of transition metal oxides have become feasible in recent years due to increases in computing power. As the system size has grown, availability of on-node memory has become a limiting factor. Saving memory while minimizing computational cost is now a priority. The main growth in memory demand stems from the B-spline representation of the single particle orbitals, especially for heavier elements such as transition metals where semi-core states are present. Despite the associated memory costs, splines are computationally efficient. In this work, we explore alternatives to reduce the memory usage of splined orbitals without significantly affecting numerical fidelity or computational efficiency. We make use of the kinetic energy operator to both classify and smooth the occupied set of orbitals prior to splining. By using a partitioning scheme based on the per-orbital kinetic energy distributions, we show that memory savings of about 50% is possible for select transition metal oxide systems. For production supercells of practical interest, our scheme incurs a performance penalty of less than 5%.

  19. A kinetic energy model of two-vehicle crash injury severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobhani, Amir; Young, William; Logan, David; Bahrololoom, Sareh

    2011-05-01

    An important part of any model of vehicle crashes is the development of a procedure to estimate crash injury severity. After reviewing existing models of crash severity, this paper outlines the development of a modelling approach aimed at measuring the injury severity of people in two-vehicle road crashes. This model can be incorporated into a discrete event traffic simulation model, using simulation model outputs as its input. The model can then serve as an integral part of a simulation model estimating the crash potential of components of the traffic system. The model is developed using Newtonian Mechanics and Generalised Linear Regression. The factors contributing to the speed change (ΔV(s)) of a subject vehicle are identified using the law of conservation of momentum. A Log-Gamma regression model is fitted to measure speed change (ΔV(s)) of the subject vehicle based on the identified crash characteristics. The kinetic energy applied to the subject vehicle is calculated by the model, which in turn uses a Log-Gamma Regression Model to estimate the Injury Severity Score of the crash from the calculated kinetic energy, crash impact type, presence of airbag and/or seat belt and occupant age. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Measurement of kinetic energy dissipation with gelatine fissure formation with special reference to gelatine validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jussila, Jorma

    2005-05-28

    Various methods for calculating the amount of kinetic energy dissipated by a bullet into ballistic gelatine have been suggested in literature. These methods were compared using the results of thirteen 9 mmx19 mm pistol and five 7.62 mmx 39 mm rifle bullets shot into 10% ballistic gelatine. The Wound Profile Method gave the highest correlation, 0.89, with the measured amounts of dissipated kinetic energy. The Fissure surface area and total crack length method gained 0.51 and 0.52, respectively. The experimental results were also compared with those from pig tests with the same bullet types. Using the z-test at 95% level of confidence no difference between impact velocity normalized bullet decelerations could be determined for the 9 mm bullet used. The same test showed significant difference for 7.62 mm bullets. That, however, can be considered to be the result of the bullet's tendency to tumble in non-homogenous living tissue causing significant dispersion of observed deceleration values. The results add further evidence supporting the validity of 10% gelatine at +4 degrees C as wound ballistic tissue simulant. The study also introduces the use of an elastic "shroud" to hold the gelatine in place, to some extent reduce the effects of asymmetric expansion of the gelatine and to simulate the expansion suppression effect of surrounding tissues.

  1. Effective atomic numbers, electron densities and kinetic energy released in matter of vitamins for photon interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shantappa, A.; Hanagodimath, S. M.

    2014-01-01

    Effective atomic numbers, electron densities of some vitamins (Retinol, Riboflavin, Niacin, Biotin, Folic acid, Cobalamin, Phylloquinone and Flavonoids) composed of C, H, O, N, Co, P and S have been calculated for total and partial photon interactions by the direct method for energy range 1 keV-100 GeV by using WinXCOM and kinetic energy released in matter (Kerma) relative to air is calculated in energy range of 1 keV-20 MeV. Change in effective atomic number and electron density with energy is calculated for all photon interactions. Variation of photon mass attenuation coefficients with energy are shown graphically only for total photon interaction. It is observed that change in mass attenuation coefficient with composition of different chemicals is very large below 100 keV and moderate between 100 keV and 10 MeV and negligible above 10 MeV. Behaviour of vitamins is almost indistinguishable except biotin and cobalamin because of large range of atomic numbers from 1(H) to 16 (S) and 1(H) to 27(Co) respectively. K a value shows a peak due to the photoelectric effect around K-absorption edge of high- Z constituent of compound for biotin and cobalamin.

  2. Power-law distribution as a result of asynchronous random switching between Malthus and Verhulst kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zygadło, Ryszard

    2008-02-01

    It is shown analytically that the flashing annihilation term of a Verhulst kinetic leads to the power-law distribution in the stationary state. For the frequency of switching slower than twice the free growth rate this provides the quasideterministic source of a Lévy noise at the macroscopic level.

  3. Kinetic energy release of dissociating CO3+ ions produced in collisions of multiply charged ions with CO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlatholter, T; Hoekstra, R; Morgenstern, R

    1997-01-01

    We investigate fragmentation of CO molecules by collisions of He2+ ions at energies between 2 and 11 keV/amu by means of a reflectron time-of-flight (TOF) spectrometer. The kinetic-energy-release (KER) in the center of mass system of the molecule can be determined from the flight times of these

  4. CFD modelling of small particle dispersion: The influence of the turbulence kinetic energy in the atmospheric boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorlé, C.; van Beeck, J.; Rambaud, P.; Van Tendeloo, G.

    When considering the modelling of small particle dispersion in the lower part of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) using Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes simulations, the particle paths depend on the velocity profile and on the turbulence kinetic energy, from which the fluctuating velocity components are derived to predict turbulent dispersion. It is therefore important to correctly reproduce the ABL, both for the velocity profile and the turbulence kinetic energy profile. For RANS simulations with the standard k- ɛ model, Richards and Hoxey (1993. Appropriate boundary conditions for computational wind engineering models using the k-ɛ turbulence model. Journal of Wind Engineering and Industrial Aerodynamics 46-47, 145-153.) proposed a set of boundary conditions which result in horizontally homogeneous profiles. The drawback of this method is that it assumes a constant profile of turbulence kinetic energy, which is not always consistent with field or wind tunnel measurements. Therefore, a method was developed which allows the modelling of a horizontally homogeneous turbulence kinetic energy profile that is varying with height. By comparing simulations performed with the proposed method to simulations performed with the boundary conditions described by Richards and Hoxey (1993. Appropriate boundary conditions for computational wind engineering models using the k-ɛ turbulence model. Journal of Wind Engineering and Industrial Aerodynamics 46-47, 145-153.), the influence of the turbulence kinetic energy on the dispersion of small particles over flat terrain is quantified.

  5. Energy analyses and drying kinetics of chamomile leaves in microwave-convective dryer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Motevali

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Drying characteristics and energy aspects as well as mathematical modeling of thin layer drying kinetics of chamomile in a microwave-convective dryer are reported in this article. Drying experiments were carried out at 8 microwave power levels (200–900 W, air temperature of 50 °C, and air velocity of 0.5 m/s. Increasing the microwave output power from 200 to 900 W, decreased the drying time from 40 to 10 min. The drying process took place in the falling rate period. The Midilli et al. model showed the best fit to the experimental drying data. Moisture diffusivity values increase with decreasing moisture content down to 1.70 (kg water kg−1 dry matter but decrease with a further decrease in moisture content from 1.72 to 0.96 (kg water kg−1 dry matter. The average values of Deff increased with microwave power from 5.46 to 39.63 × 10−8 (m2 s−1. Energy consumption increased and energy efficiency decreased with moisture content of chamomile samples. Average specific energy consumption, energy efficiency and energy loss varied in the range 18.93–28.15 MJ kg−1 water, 8.25–13.07% and 16.79–26.01 MJ kg−1 water, respectively, while the best energy results were obtained at 400 W, 50 °C and 0.5 m s−1.

  6. Controlling drug delivery kinetics from mesoporous titania thin films by pore size and surface energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Johan; Atefyekta, Saba; Andersson, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The osseointegration capacity of bone-anchoring implants can be improved by the use of drugs that are administrated by an inbuilt drug delivery system. However, to attain superior control of drug delivery and to have the ability to administer drugs of varying size, including proteins, further material development of drug carriers is needed. Mesoporous materials have shown great potential in drug delivery applications to provide and maintain a drug concentration within the therapeutic window for the desired period of time. Moreover, drug delivery from coatings consisting of mesoporous titania has shown to be promising to improve healing of bone-anchoring implants. Here we report on how the delivery of an osteoporosis drug, alendronate, can be controlled by altering pore size and surface energy of mesoporous titania thin films. The pore size was varied from 3.4 nm to 7.2 nm by the use of different structure-directing templates and addition of a swelling agent. The surface energy was also altered by grafting dimethylsilane to the pore walls. The drug uptake and release profiles were monitored in situ using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) and it was shown that both pore size and surface energy had a profound effect on both the adsorption and release kinetics of alendronate. The QCM-D data provided evidence that the drug delivery from mesoporous titania films is controlled by a binding-diffusion mechanism. The yielded knowledge of release kinetics is crucial in order to improve the in vivo tissue response associated to therapeutic treatments.

  7. A flexible electrostatic kinetic energy harvester based on electret films of electrospun nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Y.; Capo-Chichi, M.; Leprince-Wang, Y.; Basset, P.

    2018-01-01

    This paper reports a paper-based electrostatic kinetic energy harvester (e-KEH) implementing multilayered electret films based on electrospun nanofibrous material. It is the first time that a fully flexible electret-based e-KEH is reported. The proposed electret, PVDF-PTFD nanofibrous covered by Parylene C, has a faster stabilization of surface potential than a planar thin film of Parylene C, and a higher stability of charge storage. With a maximum force of 0.5 N and a 3-layer electret, the device capacitance increases from 25 to 100 pF during a pressing operation. Working with the optimal resistive load of 16 MΩ, the device pressed manually delivers a peak instantaneous power up to 45.6 μW and an average energy of 54 nJ/stroke, corresponding to a peak instantaneous power density of 7.3 μW cm‑2 and an average energy density of 8.6 nJ cm‑2/stroke. Within 450 manual strokes, a 10 nF capacitor is charged up to 8.5 V by the prototype through a full-wave diode bridge. On a 1 μF capacitor, the energy delivery of 9.9 nJ/stroke has been obtained with a 10 Hz pressing movement excited by a vibrator with a maximum force of 0.5 N.

  8. Kinetic model for the vibrational energy exchange in flowing molecular gas mixtures. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offenhaeuser, F.

    1987-01-01

    The present study is concerned with the development of a computational model for the description of the vibrational energy exchange in flowing gas mixtures, taking into account a given number of energy levels for each vibrational degree of freedom. It is possible to select an arbitrary number of energy levels. The presented model uses values in the range from 10 to approximately 40. The distribution of energy with respect to these levels can differ from the equilibrium distribution. The kinetic model developed can be employed for arbitrary gaseous mixtures with an arbitrary number of vibrational degrees of freedom for each type of gas. The application of the model to CO2-H2ON2-O2-He mixtures is discussed. The obtained relations can be utilized in a study of the suitability of radiation-related transitional processes, involving the CO2 molecule, for laser applications. It is found that the computational results provided by the model agree very well with experimental data obtained for a CO2 laser. Possibilities for the activation of a 16-micron and 14-micron laser are considered.

  9. Proton transfer pathways, energy landscape, and kinetics in creatine-water systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivchenko, Olga; Whittleston, Chris S; Carr, Joanne M; Imhof, Petra; Goerke, Steffen; Bachert, Peter; Wales, David J

    2014-02-27

    We study the exchange processes of the metabolite creatine, which is present in both tumorous and normal tissues and has NH2 and NH groups that can transfer protons to water. Creatine produces chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) contrast in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The proton transfer pathway from zwitterionic creatine to water is examined using a kinetic transition network constructed from the discrete path sampling approach and an approximate quantum-chemical energy function, employing the self-consistent-charge density-functional tight-binding (SCC-DFTB) method. The resulting potential energy surface is visualized by constructing disconnectivity graphs. The energy landscape consists of two distinct regions corresponding to the zwitterionic creatine structures and deprotonated creatine. The activation energy that characterizes the proton transfer from the creatine NH2 group to water was determined from an Arrhenius fit of rate constants as a function of temperature, obtained from harmonic transition state theory. The result is in reasonable agreement with values obtained in water exchange spectroscopy (WEX) experiments.

  10. A subsynoptic-scale kinetic energy study of the Red River Valley tornado outbreak (AVE-SESAME 1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedlovec, G. J.; Fuelberg, H. E.

    1981-01-01

    The subsynoptis-scale kinetic energy balance during the Red River Valley tornado outbreak is presented in order to diagnose storm environment interactions. Area-time averaged energetics indicate that horizontal flux convergence provides the major energy source to the region, while cross contour flow provides the greatest sink. Maximum energy variability is found in the upper levels in association with jet stream activity. Area averaged energetics at individual observation times show that the energy balance near times of maximum storm activity differs considerably from that of the remaining periods. The local kinetic energy balance over Oklahoma during the formation of a limited jet streak receives special attention. Cross contour production of energy is the dominant local source for jet development. Intense convection producing the Red River Valley tornadoes may have contributed to this local development by modifying the surrounding environment.

  11. Pseudo spectral collocation with Maxwell polynomials for kinetic equations with energy diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Vizuet, Tonatiuh; Cerfon, Antoine J.

    2018-02-01

    We study the approximation and stability properties of a recently popularized discretization strategy for the speed variable in kinetic equations, based on pseudo-spectral collocation on a grid defined by the zeros of a non-standard family of orthogonal polynomials called Maxwell polynomials. Taking a one-dimensional equation describing energy diffusion due to Fokker–Planck collisions with a Maxwell–Boltzmann background distribution as the test bench for the performance of the scheme, we find that Maxwell based discretizations outperform other commonly used schemes in most situations, often by orders of magnitude. This provides a strong motivation for their use in high-dimensional gyrokinetic simulations. However, we also show that Maxwell based schemes are subject to a non-modal time stepping instability in their most straightforward implementation, so that special care must be given to the discrete representation of the linear operators in order to benefit from the advantages provided by Maxwell polynomials.

  12. Temperature dependence of the kinetic energy in the Zr40Be60 amorphous alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syrykh, G. F.; Stolyarov, A. A.; Krzystyniak, M.; Romanelli, G.; Sadykov, R. A.

    2017-05-01

    The average kinetic energy of the atomic nucleus for each element of the amorphous alloy Zr40Be60 in the temperature range 10-300 K has been measured for the first time using VESUVIO spectrometer (ISIS). The experimental values of have been compared to the partial ZrBe spectra refined by a recursion method based on the data obtained with thermal neutron scattering. The satisfactory agreement has been reached with the calculations using partial spectra based on thermal neutron spectra obtained with recursion method. In addition, the experimental data have been compared to the Debye model. The measurements at different temperatures (10, 200, and 300 K) will provide an opportunity to evaluate the significance of anharmonicity in the dynamics of metallic glasses.

  13. Initiation and modification of reaction by energy addition: Kinetic and transport phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fendell, Francis E.; Chou, Mau-Song

    1993-10-01

    Work has been pursued, by application of the fundamental principles of chemical kinetics and fluid transport, on a 'proof-of-principle' for a novel oblique-detonation-wave-engine (ODWE) as an alternative to a mixing-controlled supersonic combustor. The concept involves the nonintrusive stabilization of a conical detonation wave. Laser technology permits the rapidly repeated pulsed deposition of energy at a fixed site on the axis of symmetry of a supersonically flowing, combustible mixture. Each pulse suffices for the direct initiation of a radially-, outwardly-propagating, Chapman-Jouguet detonation wave. The interaction of the individual spherical waves, as the periodic train is convected by the flow, results in a nonintrusively stabilized conical wave as the time interval between the very brief pulses decreases. The detonated gas may be expanded in a supersonic nozzle (of practical length) for discharge at ambient pressure, such that thrust is generated.

  14. Kinetic-energy release of fragments from electron-impact dissociation of the molecular hydrogen ion and its isotopologues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarlett, Liam H.; Zammit, Mark C.; Fursa, Dmitry V.; Bray, Igor

    2017-08-01

    We calculate the kinetic-energy release distributions of fragments produced for electron-impact dissociation of the vibrationally excited molecular hydrogen ion H2 + and its isotopologues D2 + and T2 +. Here we apply the adiabatic-nuclei convergent close-coupling method and compare results with several different methods, including the δ approximation. Results are presented for a number of dissociative excitation transitions and dissociative ionization as a function of the initial vibrational state of the molecule. We confirm that the square root approximation is a good approximation for the adiabatic-nuclei kinetic-energy release cross sections of H2 +. Agreement with experiment, where available, is good.

  15. The extended Thomas Fermi kinetic energy density functional with position-dependent effective mass in one dimension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencheikh, K.; Berkane, K.; Bouizane, S.

    2004-11-01

    The point canonical transformations map the Schrödinger equation with constant mass to a wave equation with a position-dependent effective mass. Using such a technique we derive, for a one-dimensional inhomogeneous system of noninteracting fermions with density ρ(x) and spatially dependent effective mass distribution m(x), the semiclassical kinetic energy density functional τ(ρ) in the so-called extended Thomas-Fermi model up to order planck2. For a given position-dependent mass, we compare numerically the total semiclassical kinetic energy with its exact quantum mechanical counterpart. The qualitative agreement is excellent.

  16. Measurement of turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rates in the mesosphere by a 3 MHz Doppler radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latteck, R.; Singer, W.; Hocking, W. K.

    A new narrow beam Doppler radar operating at 3.17 MHz has been installed close to the Andøya Rocket Range in Andenes, Norway in summer 2002 in order to improve the ground based capabilities for measurements of turbulence in the mesosphere. The main feature of the radar is a Mills Cross transmitting/receiving antenna consisting of 29 crossed half-wave dipoles. In combination with the modular transceiver system this provides high flexibility in beam forming and pointing. In general, vertical and oblique beams with a minimum one way half-power full-beam width (HPFW) of 6.6° are used. The observations are usually performed with a height resolution of 1 km and with off-zenith beams at 7.3° directed towards NW, NE, SE, and SW. Turbulence intensities have been estimated from the width of the observed signal spectra using an computationally intensive correction method which requires precise knowledge of the antenna radiation pattern. The program uses real-time measurements of the wind field in all determinations. Turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rates based on radar observations are presented and compared with corresponding climatological summer and winter profiles from rocket measurements, as well as with single profiles from model runs for selected periods from September 2003 to Summer 2004. The mean turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rates based on these radar measurements are about 5 mW/kg at 60 km altitude and about 20 mW/kg at 80 km, in reasonable agreement with mean turbulence intensities obtained from previous rocket soundings at Andenes.

  17. Reduction of axial kinetic energy induced perturbations on observed cyclotron frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Nathan K; Weisbrod, Chad R; Webb, Brian N; Bruce, James E

    2008-04-01

    With Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometry one determines the mass-to-charge ratio of an ion by measuring its cyclotron frequency. However, the need to confine ions to the trapping region of the ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) cell with electric fields induces deviations from the unperturbed cyclotron frequency. Additional perturbations to the observed cyclotron frequency are often attributed to changes in space charge conditions. This study presents a detailed investigation of the observed ion cyclotron frequency as a function of ion z-axis kinetic energy. In a perfect three-dimensional quadrupolar field, cyclotron frequency is independent of position within the trap. However, in most ICR cell designs, this ideality is approximated only near the trap center and deviations arise from this ideal quadrupolar field as the ion moves both radially and axially from the center of the trap. To allow differentiation between deviations in observed cyclotron frequency caused from changes in space charge conditions or differences in oscillation amplitude, ions with identical molecular weights but different axial kinetic energy, and thus amplitude of z-axis motion, were simultaneously trapped within the ICR cell. This allows one to attribute deviations in observed cyclotron frequency to differences in the average force from the radial electric field experienced by ions of different axial amplitude. Experimentally derived magnetron frequency is compared with the magnetron frequency calculated using SIMION 7.0 for ions of different axial amplitude. Electron promoted ion coherence, or EPIC, is used to reduce the differences in radial electric fields at different axial positions. Thus with the application of EPIC, the differences in observed cyclotron frequencies are minimized for ions of different axial oscillation amplitudes.

  18. Unified dark energy and dust dark matter dual to quadratic purely kinetic K-essence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guendelman, Eduardo [Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Department of Physics, Beersheba (Israel); Nissimov, Emil; Pacheva, Svetlana [Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2016-02-15

    We consider a modified gravity plus single scalar-field model, where the scalar Lagrangian couples symmetrically both to the standard Riemannian volume-form (spacetime integration measure density) given by the square root of the determinant of the Riemannian metric, as well as to another non-Riemannian volume-form in terms of an auxiliary maximal-rank antisymmetric tensor gauge field. As shown in a previous paper, the pertinent scalar-field dynamics provides an exact unified description of both dark energy via dynamical generation of a cosmological constant, and dark matter as a ''dust'' fluid with geodesic flow as a result of a hidden Noether symmetry. Here we extend the discussion by considering a non-trivial modification of the purely gravitational action in the form of f(R) = R -αR{sup 2} generalized gravity. Upon deriving the corresponding ''Einstein-frame'' effective action of the latter modified gravity-scalar-field theory we find explicit duality (in the sense of weak versus strong coupling) between the original model of unified dynamical dark energy and dust fluid dark matter, on one hand, and a specific quadratic purely kinetic ''k-essence'' gravity-matter model with special dependence of its coupling constants on only two independent parameters, on the other hand. The canonical Hamiltonian treatment and Wheeler-DeWitt quantization of the dual purely kinetic ''k-essence'' gravity-matter model is also briefly discussed. (orig.)

  19. The energy landscape, folding pathways and the kinetics of a knotted protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael C Prentiss

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The folding pathway and rate coefficients of the folding of a knotted protein are calculated for a potential energy function with minimal energetic frustration. A kinetic transition network is constructed using the discrete path sampling approach, and the resulting potential energy surface is visualized by constructing disconnectivity graphs. Owing to topological constraints, the low-lying portion of the landscape consists of three distinct regions, corresponding to the native knotted state and to configurations where either the N or C terminus is not yet folded into the knot. The fastest folding pathways from denatured states exhibit early formation of the N terminus portion of the knot and a rate-determining step where the C terminus is incorporated. The low-lying minima with the N terminus knotted and the C terminus free therefore constitute an off-pathway intermediate for this model. The insertion of both the N and C termini into the knot occurs late in the folding process, creating large energy barriers that are the rate limiting steps in the folding process. When compared to other protein folding proteins of a similar length, this system folds over six orders of magnitude more slowly.

  20. Total kinetic energy release in the fast neutron-induced fission of $^{235}$U

    CERN Document Server

    Yanez, R; King, J; Barrett, J S; Fotiades, N; Lee, H Y

    2016-01-01

    We have measured the total kinetic energy (TKE) release for the $^{235}$U(n,f) reaction for $E_{n}$=2-100 MeV using the 2E method with an array of Si PIN diode detectors. The neutron energies were determined by time of flight measurements using the white spectrum neutron beam at the LANSCE facility. To benchmark the TKE measurement, the TKE release for $^{235}$U(n$_{th}$,f) was also measured using a thermal neutron beam from the Oregon State University TRIGA reactor, giving pre-neutron emission $E^*_{TKE}=170.7\\pm0.4$ MeV in good agreement with known values. Our measurements are thus absolute measurements. The TKE in $^{235}$U(n,f) decreases non-linearly from 169.0 MeV to 161.4 MeV for $E_{n}$=2-90 MeV. Comparison of the data with the multi-modal fission model of Brosa indicates the TKE decrease is a consequence of the growth of symmetric fission and the corresponding decrease of asymmetric fission with increasing neutron energy. The average TKE associated with the Brosa superlong, standard I and standard II ...

  1. Cascade of kinetic energy and scalar variance in DC electrokinetic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei; Wang, Guiren

    2017-11-01

    Turbulent flow can be generated by DC electrokinetic (EK) force based on the electric conductivity and permittivity variations in fluids, as have been demonstrated by Varshney et al (2016), where a -1.4 slope of velocity power spectrum is observed. Here, we theoretically found the scaling exponents of velocity and scalar structures in the electric-body-force (EBF) dominant subregion of DC EK turbulence were 2/5 (equivalent to the -7/5 slope of velocity power spectrum) and 4/5 respectively. The theory perfectly explains the experimental results of Varshney et al. (2016). Based on Kármán-Howarth equation with forcing terms, the energy cascade process of DC EK turbulence was also investigated. Depending on the electric Rayleigh number (Rae) , two different energy cascade processes may happen. When Rae is small, the kinetic energy cascades along inertial subregion and EBF dominant subregion in sequence, before it is dissipated by fluid viscosity. When Rae is sufficiently large, the inertial subregion may be absent with EBF dominant subregion left. This investigation is very important on understand EK turbulence, which could be widely existed in nature and applied in engineerings. The work was supported by NSFC (11672229), and NSF (CAREER CBET-0954977 and MRI CBET-1040227).

  2. The energy landscape, folding pathways and the kinetics of a knotted protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prentiss, Michael C; Wales, David J; Wolynes, Peter G

    2010-07-01

    The folding pathway and rate coefficients of the folding of a knotted protein are calculated for a potential energy function with minimal energetic frustration. A kinetic transition network is constructed using the discrete path sampling approach, and the resulting potential energy surface is visualized by constructing disconnectivity graphs. Owing to topological constraints, the low-lying portion of the landscape consists of three distinct regions, corresponding to the native knotted state and to configurations where either the N or C terminus is not yet folded into the knot. The fastest folding pathways from denatured states exhibit early formation of the N terminus portion of the knot and a rate-determining step where the C terminus is incorporated. The low-lying minima with the N terminus knotted and the C terminus free therefore constitute an off-pathway intermediate for this model. The insertion of both the N and C termini into the knot occurs late in the folding process, creating large energy barriers that are the rate limiting steps in the folding process. When compared to other protein folding proteins of a similar length, this system folds over six orders of magnitude more slowly.

  3. Effect of landing height on frontal plane kinematics, kinetics and energy dissipation at lower extremity joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeow, C H; Lee, P V S; Goh, J C H

    2009-08-25

    Lack of the necessary magnitude of energy dissipation by lower extremity joint muscles may be implicated in elevated impact stresses present during landing from greater heights. These increased stresses are experienced by supporting tissues like cartilage, ligaments and bones, thus aggravating injury risk. This study sought to investigate frontal plane kinematics, kinetics and energetics of lower extremity joints during landing from different heights. Eighteen male recreational athletes were instructed to perform drop-landing tasks from 0.3- to 0.6-m heights. Force plates and motion-capture system were used to capture ground reaction force and kinematics data, respectively. Joint moment was calculated using inverse dynamics. Joint power was computed as a product of joint moment and angular velocity. Work was defined as joint power integrated over time. Hip and knee joints delivered significantly greater joint power and eccentric work (p<0.05) than the ankle joint at both landing heights. Substantial increase (p<0.05) in eccentric work was noted at the hip joint in response to increasing landing height. Knee and hip joints acted as key contributors to total energy dissipation in the frontal plane with increase in peak ground reaction force (GRF). The hip joint was the top contributor to energy absorption, which indicated a hip-dominant strategy in the frontal plane in response to peak GRF during landing. Future studies should investigate joint motions that can maximize energy dissipation or reduce the need for energy dissipation in the frontal plane at the various joints, and to evaluate their effects on the attenuation of lower extremity injury risk during landing.

  4. Kinetic study of the heterogeneous photocatalysis of porous nanocrystalline TiO₂ assemblies using a continuous random walk simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Baoshun; Zhao, Xiujian

    2014-10-28

    The continuous time random walk (CTRW) simulation was used to study the photocatalytic kinetics of nanocrystalline (nc)-TiO2 assemblies in this research. nc-TiO2 assemblies, such as nc-TiO2 porous films and nc-TiO2 hierarchical structures, are now widely used in photocatalysis. The nc-TiO2 assemblies have quasi-disordered networks consisting of many tiny nanoparticles, so the charge transport within them can be studied by CTRW simulation. We considered the experimental facts that the holes can be quickly trapped and transferred to organic species just after photogeneration, and the electrons transfer to O2 slowly and accumulate in the conduction band of TiO2, which is believed to be the rate-limiting process of the photocatalysis under low light intensity and low organic concentration. Due to the existence of numerous traps, the electron transport within the nc-TiO2 assemblies follows a multi-trapping (MT) mechanism, which significantly limits the electron diffusion speed. The electrons need to undergo several steps of MT transport before transferring to oxygen, so it is highly important that the electron transport in nc-TiO2 networks is determined for standard photocatalytic reactions. Based on the MT transport model, the transient decays of photocurrents during the photocatalytic oxidation of formic acid were studied by CTRW simulation, and are in good accordance with experiments. The steady state photocatalysis was also simulated. The effects of organic concentration, light intensity, temperature, and nc-TiO2 crystallinity on the photocatalytic kinetics were investigated, and were also consistent with the experimental results. Due to the agreement between the simulation and the experiments for both the transient and the steady state photocatalysis, the MT charge transport should be an important mechanism that controls the kinetics of recombination and photocatalysis in nc-TiO2 assemblies. Also, our research provides a new methodology to study the photocatalytic

  5. The kinetic energy spectrum of protons produced by the dissociative ionization of H2 by electron impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khakoo, M. A.; Srivastava, S. K.

    1985-01-01

    The kinetic energy spectra of protons resulting from the dissociative ionization of H2 by electron impact have been measured for electron impact energies from threshold (approximately 17 eV) to 160 eV at 90 deg and 30 deg detection angles, using a crossed-beam experimental arrangement. To check reliability, two separate proton energy analysis methods have been employed, i.e., a time-of-flight proton energy analysis and an electrostatic hemispherical energy analyzer. The present results are compared with previous measurements.

  6. Kinetic mean field theories: Results of energy constraint in maximizing entropy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stell, G.; Karkheck, J.; Beijeren, H. van

    1983-01-01

    Structure of liquids and solids; crystallography Classical, semiclassical, and quantum theories of liquid structure Statistical theories of liquid structure - Kinetic and transport theory of fluids; physical properties of gases Kinetic and transport theory

  7. Multifractal scaling of the kinetic energy flux in solar wind turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsch, E.; Rosenbauer, H.; Tu, C.-Y.

    1995-01-01

    The geometrical and scaling properties of the energy flux of the turbulent kinetic energy in the solar wind have been studied. By present experimental technology in solar wind measurements, we cannot directly measure the real volumetric dissipation rate, epsilon(t), but are constrained to represent it by surrogating the energy flux near the dissipation range at the proton gyro scales. There is evidence for the multifractal nature of the so defined dissipation field epsilon(t), a result derived from the scaling exponents of its statistical q-th order moments. The related generalized dimension D(q) has been determined and reveals that the dissipation field has a multifractal structure. which is not compatible with a scale-invariant cascade. The associated multifractal spectrum f(alpha) has been estimated for the first time for MHD turbulence in the solar wind. Its features resemble those obtained for turbulent fluids and other nonlinear multifractal systems. The generalized dimension D(q) can, for turbulence in high-speed streams, be fitted well by the functional dependence of the p-model with a comparatively large parameter, p = 0.87. indicating a strongly intermittent multifractal energy cascade. The experimental value for D(p)/3, if used in the scaling exponent s(p) of the velocity structure function, gives an exponent that can describe some of the observations. The scaling exponent mu of the auto correlation function of epsilon(t) has also been directly evaluated. It has the value of 0.37. Finally. the mean dissipation rate was determined, which could be used in solar wind heating models.

  8. Oxygen uptake kinetics and energy system's contribution around maximal lactate steady state swimming intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelarigo, Jailton Gregório; Machado, Leandro; Fernandes, Ricardo Jorge; Greco, Camila Coelho; Vilas-Boas, João Paulo

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the oxygen uptake ([Formula: see text]) kinetics and the energy systems' contribution at 97.5, 100 and 102.5% of the maximal lactate steady state (MLSS) swimming intensity. Ten elite female swimmers performed three-to-five 30 min submaximal constant swimming bouts at imposed paces for the determination of the swimming velocity (v) at 100%MLSS based on a 7 x 200 m intermittent incremental protocol until voluntary exhaustion to find the v associated at the individual anaerobic threshold. [Formula: see text] kinetics (cardiodynamic, primary and slow component phases) and the aerobic and anaerobic energy contributions were assessed during the continuous exercises, which the former was studied for the beginning and second phase of exercise. Subjects showed similar time delay (TD) (mean = 11.5-14.3 s) and time constant (τp) (mean = 13.8-16.3 s) as a function of v, but reduced amplitude of the primary component for 97.5% (35.7 ± 7.3 mL.kg.min-1) compared to 100 and 102.5%MLSS (41.0 ± 7.0 and 41.3 ± 5.4 mL.kg.min-1, respectively), and τp decreased (mean = 9.6-10.8 s) during the second phase of exercise. Despite the slow component did not occur for all swimmers at all swim intensities, when observed it tended to increase as a function of v. Moreover, the total energy contribution was almost exclusively aerobic (98-99%) at 97.5, 100 and 102.5%MLSS. We suggest that well-trained endurance swimmers with a fast TD and τp values may be able to adjust faster the physiological requirements to minimize the amplitude of the slow component appearance, parameter associated with the fatigue delay and increase in exhaustion time during performance, however, these fast adjustments were not able to control the progressive fatigue occurred slightly above MLSS, and most of swimmers reached exhaustion before 30min swam.

  9. Impact of ion binding on poly-L-lysine (un)folding energy landscape and kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Kan; Asher, Sanford A

    2012-06-21

    We utilize T-jump UV resonance Raman spectroscopy (UVRR) to study the impact of ion binding on the equilibrium energy landscape and on (un)folding kinetics of poly-L-lysine (PLL). We observe that the relaxation rates of the folded conformations (including π-helix (bulge), pure α-helix, and turns) of PLL are slower than those of short alanine-based peptides. The PLL pure α-helix folding time is similar to that of short alanine-based peptides. We for the first time have directly observed that turn conformations are α-helix and π-helix (bulge) unfolding intermediates. ClO(4)(-) binding to the Lys side chain -NH(3)(+) groups and the peptide backbone slows the α-helix unfolding rate compared to that in pure water, but little impacts the folding rate, resulting in an increased α-helix stability. ClO(4)(-) binding significantly increases the PLL unfolding activation barrier but little impacts the folding barrier. Thus, the PLL folding coordinate(s) differs from the unfolding coordinate(s). The-π helix (bulge) unfolding and folding coordinates do not directly go through the α-helix energy well. Our results clearly demonstrate that PLL (un)folding is not a two-state process.

  10. Size, Kinetics, and Free Energy of Clusters Formed by Ultraweak Carbohydrate-Carbohydrate Bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Hannes; Savić, Filip; Oelkers, Marieelen; Awan, Shahid I; Werz, Daniel B; Geil, Burkhard; Janshoff, Andreas

    2016-04-12

    Weak noncovalent intermolecular interactions play a pivotal role in many biological processes such as cell adhesion or immunology, where the overall binding strength is controlled through bond association and dissociation dynamics as well as the cooperative action of many parallel bonds. Among the various molecules participating in weak bonds, carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions are probably the most ancient ones allowing individual cells to reversibly enter the multicellular state and to tell apart self and nonself cells. Here, we scrutinized the kinetics and thermodynamics of small homomeric Lewis X-Lewis X ensembles formed in the contact zone of a membrane-coated colloidal probe and a solid supported membrane ensuring minimal nonspecific background interactions. We used an atomic force microscope to measure force distance curves at Piconewton resolution, which allowed us to measure the force due to unbinding of the colloidal probe and the planar membrane as a function of contact time. Applying a contact model, we could estimate the free binding energy of the formed adhesion cluster as a function of dwell time and thereby determine the precise size of the contact zone, the number of participating bonds, and the intrinsic rates of association and dissociation in the presence of calcium ions. The unbinding energy per bond was found to be on the order of 1 kBT. Approximately 30 bonds were opened simultaneously at an off-rate of koff = 7 ± 0.2 s(-1). Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The horizontal planar structure of kinetic energy in a model vertical-axis wind turbine array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Anna; Zeller, Robert; Zarama, Francisco; Weitzman, Joel; Dabiri, John; Koseff, Jeffrey

    2013-11-01

    Recent studies have indicated that arrays of vertical axis wind turbines (VAWTs) could potentially harvest significantly more power per unit land area than arrays composed of conventional horizontal axis wind turbines. However, to design VAWT arrays for optimal power conversion, a more comprehensive understanding of inter-turbine energy transfer is needed. In the presented study, a geometrically scaled array of rotating circular cylinders is used to model a VAWT array. The horizontal inter-cylinder mean fluid velocities and Reynolds stresses are measured on several cross-sections using 2D particle image velocimetry in a flume. Two orientations of the array relative to the incoming flow are tested. The results indicate that cylinder rotation drives asymmetric mean flow patterns within and above the array, resulting in non-uniform distributions of turbulent kinetic energy. The variability is observed to be directly related to the ratio of the cylinder rotation speed to the streamwise water velocity. Emphasis is placed on the implications of the asymmetries for power production. Work supported by a Stanford Graduate Fellowship to A.E.C, by funding to J.O.D. from ONR N000141211047 and the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation through Grant GBMF2645, and by funding from the Environmental Fluid Mechanics Laboratory, Stanford University.

  12. Maximizing kinetic energy transfer in one-dimensional many-body collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricardo, Bernard; Lee, Paul

    2015-03-01

    The main problem discussed in this paper involves a simple one-dimensional two-body collision, in which the problem can be extended into a chain of one-dimensional many-body collisions. The result is quite interesting, as it provides us with a thorough mathematical understanding that will help in designing a chain system for maximum energy transfer for a range of collision types. In this paper, we will show that there is a way to improve the kinetic energy transfer between two masses, and the idea can be applied recursively. However, this method only works for a certain range of collision types, which is indicated by a range of coefficients of restitution. Although the concept of momentum, elastic and inelastic collision, as well as Newton’s laws, are taught in junior college physics, especially in Singapore schools, students in this level are not expected to be able to do this problem quantitatively, as it requires rigorous mathematics, including calculus. Nevertheless, this paper provides nice analytical steps that address some common misconceptions in students’ way of thinking about one-dimensional collisions.

  13. Modulation of a ligand's energy landscape and kinetics by the chemical environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Held, Martin; Imhof, Petra; Keller, Bettina G; Noé, Frank

    2012-11-26

    Understanding how the chemical environment modulates the predominant conformations and kinetics of flexible molecules is a core interest of biochemistry and a prerequisite for the rational design of synthetic catalysts. This study combines molecular dynamics simulation and Markov state models (MSMs) to a systematic computational strategy for investigating the effect of the chemical environment of a molecule on its conformations and kinetics. MSMs allow quantities to be computed that are otherwise difficult to access, such as the metastable sets, their free energies, and the relaxation time scales related to the rare transitions between metastable states. Additionally, MSMs are useful to identify observables that may act as sensors for the conformational or binding state of the molecule, thus guiding the design of experiments. In the present study, the conformation dynamics of UDP-GlcNAc are studied in vacuum, water, water + Mg(2+), and in the protein UDP-GlcNAc 2-epimerase. It is found that addition of Mg(2+) significantly affects the conformational stability, thermodynamics, and kinetics of UDP-GlcNAc. In particular, the slowest structural process, puckering of the GlcNAc sugar, depends on the overall conformation of UDP-GlcNAc and may thus act as a sensor of whether Mg(2+) is bound or not. Interestingly, transferring the molecule from vacuum to water makes the protein-binding conformations UDP-GlcNAc first accessible, while adding Mg(2+) further stabilizes them by specifically associating to binding-competent conformations. While Mg(2+) is not cocrystallized in the UDP-GlcNAc 2-epimerase complex, the selectively stabilized Mg(2+)/UDP-GlcNAc complex may be a template for the bound state, and Mg(2+) may accompany the binding-competent ligand conformation to the binding pocket. This serves as a possible explanation of the enhanced epimerization rate in the presence of Mg(2+). This role of Mg(2+) has previously not been described and opens the question whether

  14. Measurement of turbulent spatial structure and kinetic energy spectrum by exact temporal-to-spatial mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchhave, Preben; Velte, Clara M.

    2017-08-01

    We present a method for converting a time record of turbulent velocity measured at a point in a flow to a spatial velocity record consisting of consecutive convection elements. The spatial record allows computation of dynamic statistical moments such as turbulent kinetic wavenumber spectra and spatial structure functions in a way that completely bypasses the need for Taylor's hypothesis. The spatial statistics agree with the classical counterparts, such as the total kinetic energy spectrum, at least for spatial extents up to the Taylor microscale. The requirements for applying the method are access to the instantaneous velocity magnitude, in addition to the desired flow quantity, and a high temporal resolution in comparison to the relevant time scales of the flow. We map, without distortion and bias, notoriously difficult developing turbulent high intensity flows using three main aspects that distinguish these measurements from previous work in the field: (1) The measurements are conducted using laser Doppler anemometry and are therefore not contaminated by directional ambiguity (in contrast to, e.g., frequently employed hot-wire anemometers); (2) the measurement data are extracted using a correctly and transparently functioning processor and are analysed using methods derived from first principles to provide unbiased estimates of the velocity statistics; (3) the exact mapping proposed herein has been applied to the high turbulence intensity flows investigated to avoid the significant distortions caused by Taylor's hypothesis. The method is first confirmed to produce the correct statistics using computer simulations and later applied to measurements in some of the most difficult regions of a round turbulent jet—the non-equilibrium developing region and the outermost parts of the developed jet. The proposed mapping is successfully validated using corresponding directly measured spatial statistics in the fully developed jet, even in the difficult outer regions of

  15. Improved energy kinetics following high protein diet in McArdle's syndrome. A 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, K E; Jakobsen, J; Thomsen, C

    1990-01-01

    A patient with McArdle's syndrome was examined using bicycle ergometry and 31P NMR spectroscopy during exercise. The patients working capacity was approximately half the expected capacity of controls. Muscle energy kinetics improved significantly during intravenous glucose infusion and after 6 we...

  16. Turbulent Kinetic Energy Production in the Vane of a Low-Pressure Linear Turbine Cascade with Incoming Wakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Michelassi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Incompressible large eddy simulation and direct numerical simulation of a low-pressure turbine at Re=5.18×104 and 1.48×105 with discrete incoming wakes are analyzed to identify the turbulent kinetic energy generation mechanism outside of the blade boundary layer. The results highlight the growth of turbulent kinetic energy at the bow apex of the wake and correlate it to the stress-strain tensors relative orientation. The production rate is analytically split according to the principal axes, and then terms are computed by using the simulation results. The analysis of the turbulent kinetic energy is followed both along the discrete incoming wakes and in the stationary frame of reference. Both direct numerical and large eddy simulation concur in identifying the same production mechanism that is driven by both a growth of strain rate in the wake, first, followed by the growth of turbulent shear stress after. The peak of turbulent kinetic energy diffuses and can eventually reach the suction side boundary layer for the largest Reynolds number investigated here with higher incidence angle. As a consequence, the local turbulence intensity outside the boundary layer can grow significantly above the free-stream level with a potential impact on the suction side boundary layer transition mechanism.

  17. Climatic variability of a fire-weather index based on turbulent kinetic energy and the Haines Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren E. Heilman; Xindi Bian

    2010-01-01

    Combining the Haines Index (HI) with near-surface turbulent kinetic energy (TKEs) through a product of the two values (HITKEs) has shown promise as an indicator of the atmospheric potential for extreme and erratic fire behavior in the U.S. Numerical simulations of fire-weather evolution during past wildland fire episodes in...

  18. Frequency Activated Fast Power Reserve for Wind Power Plant Delivered from Stored Kinetic Energy in the Wind Turbine Inertia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knüppel, Thyge; Thuring, P.; Kumar, S

    2011-01-01

    is proposed that delivers a short-term power reserve from the kinetic energy in the wind turbine (WT) inertia, while considering the inherent characteristics of a wind power plant. The aim is to contribute with a fast power reserve to stabilize the frequency drop during large and sudden production deficits...

  19. Climatic variability of near-surface turbulent kinetic energy over the United States: implications for fire-weather predications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren E. Heilman; Xindi. Bain

    2013-01-01

    Recent research suggests that high levels of ambient near-surface atmospheric turbulence are often associated with rapid and sometimes erratic wildland fire spread that may eventually lead to large burn areas. Previous research has also examined the feasibility of using near-surface atmospheric turbulent kinetic energy (TKEs) alone or in...

  20. Jet energy loss in quark-gluon plasma. Kinetic theory with a Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook collisional kernel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Cheng; Hou, De-fu; Li, Jia-rong [Central China Normal University, Key Laboratory of Quark and Lepton Physics (MOE) and Institute of Particle Physics, Wuhan, Hubei (China); Jiang, Bing-feng [Hubei University for Nationalities, Center for Theoretical Physics and School of Sciences, Enshi, Hubei (China)

    2017-10-15

    The dielectric functions ε{sub L}, ε{sub T} of the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) are derived within the framework of the kinetic theory with BGK-type collisional kernel. The collision effect manifested by the collision rate is encoded in the dielectric functions. Based on the derived dielectric functions we study the collisional energy loss suffered by a fast parton traveling through the QGP. The numerical results show that the collision rate increases the energy loss. (orig.)

  1. Maximal Rashba-like spin splitting via kinetic-energy-coupled inversion-symmetry breaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunko, Veronika; Rosner, H.; Kushwaha, P.; Khim, S.; Mazzola, F.; Bawden, L.; Clark, O. J.; Riley, J. M.; Kasinathan, D.; Haverkort, M. W.; Kim, T. K.; Hoesch, M.; Fujii, J.; Vobornik, I.; MacKenzie, A. P.; King, P. D. C.

    2017-09-01

    Engineering and enhancing the breaking of inversion symmetry in solids—that is, allowing electrons to differentiate between ‘up’ and ‘down’—is a key goal in condensed-matter physics and materials science because it can be used to stabilize states that are of fundamental interest and also have potential practical applications. Examples include improved ferroelectrics for memory devices and materials that host Majorana zero modes for quantum computing. Although inversion symmetry is naturally broken in several crystalline environments, such as at surfaces and interfaces, maximizing the influence of this effect on the electronic states of interest remains a challenge. Here we present a mechanism for realizing a much larger coupling of inversion-symmetry breaking to itinerant surface electrons than is typically achieved. The key element is a pronounced asymmetry of surface hopping energies—that is, a kinetic-energy-coupled inversion-symmetry breaking, the energy scale of which is a substantial fraction of the bandwidth. Using spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we demonstrate that such a strong inversion-symmetry breaking, when combined with spin–orbit interactions, can mediate Rashba-like spin splittings that are much larger than would typically be expected. The energy scale of the inversion-symmetry breaking that we achieve is so large that the spin splitting in the CoO2- and RhO2-derived surface states of delafossite oxides becomes controlled by the full atomic spin–orbit coupling of the 3d and 4d transition metals, resulting in some of the largest known Rashba-like spin splittings. The core structural building blocks that facilitate the bandwidth-scaled inversion-symmetry breaking are common to numerous materials. Our findings therefore provide opportunities for creating spin-textured states and suggest routes to interfacial control of inversion-symmetry breaking in designer heterostructures of oxides and other material classes.

  2. A randomized controlled study for evaluation of psyllium effects on kinetics of carbohydrate absorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansour Siavash

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available

    BACKGROUND: This study was performed to evaluate the effects of psyllium on kinetics of alimentary carbohydrate absorption in diet-treated type 2 diabetic patients.
    METHODS: This was a double blind, prospective, controlled clinical trial. Twelve patients (6 in each group participated in the present study. After an overnight fast, a standard 435 kcal breakfast was given to participants. Fasting, 1- and 2- hour postprandial plasma glucose was measured in the case and control groups. Cow’s milk containing 5 grams of psyllium granules for the case and without psyllium for the control groups was also delivered.
    RESULTS: Plasma glucose changes in the first hour were significantly different between control and case groups (53.8 versus 17.8 respectively, P = 0.037. Also, mean 2-hour postprandial plasma glucose was 167.67 and 117.67 mg/dl for control and case groups, respectively (P = 0.05.
    CONCLUSIONS: This pilot study revealed that psyllium may effectively reduce postprandial plasma glucose possibly by retarding GI carbohydrate absorption. Larger studies are needed to confirm the results of this study and define its role compared to acarbose or meglitinides.
    KEYWORDS: Psyllium, postprandial hyperglycemia, type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  3. Molecular dynamics study of the nanosized droplet spreading: The effect of the contact line forces on the kinetic energy dissipation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Hong Min [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kondaraju, Sasidhar [Department of Mechanical Science, Indian Institute of Technology Bhubaneswar, Bhubaneswar, Odisha 751013 (India); Lee, Jung Shin [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Youngho; Lee, Joonho H. [Samsung Electronics, Mechatronics R& D Center, Hwaseong-si, Gyeonggi-do 445-330 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Joon Sang, E-mail: joonlee@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-07-01

    Highlights: • Contact line forces, including friction and spreading forces are directly calculated. • Overall trends of variations in contact line forces during droplet spreading process show characteristics of contact line forces. • Detail relations of contact line forces and atomic kinetics in the contact line provide a clear evidence of the possible energy dissipation mechanism in droplet spreading process. - Abstract: Recent studies have revealed that contact line forces play an important role in the droplet spreading process. Despite their significance, the physics related to them has been studied only indirectly and the effect of contact line forces is still being disputed. We performed a molecular dynamics simulation and mimicked the droplet spreading process at the nanoscale. Based on the results of the simulation, the contact line forces were directly calculated. We found that the forces acting on the bulk and the contact line region showed different trends. Distinct positive and negative forces, contact line spreading, and friction forces were observed near the contact line. We also observed a strong dependency of the atomic kinetics in the contact line region on the variations in the contact line forces. The atoms of the liquid in the contact line region lost their kinetic energy due to the contact line friction force and became partially immobile on the solid surface. The results of the current study will be useful for understanding the role of the contact line forces on the kinetic energy dissipation in the contact line region.

  4. Decay of C60 by delayed ionization and C2 emission: experiment and statistical modeling of kinetic energy release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebeault, M-A; Baguenard, B; Concina, B; Calvo, F; Climen, B; Lépine, F; Bordas, C

    2012-08-07

    C(60) molecules highly excited in the nanosecond regime decay following ionization and dissociation by emitting a series of carbon dimers, as well as other small fragments if excitation is strong enough. The fragmentation mass spectrum and kinetic energy release of all charged fragments obtained in these experiments are interpreted within the framework of the Weisskopf theory, using a realistic Monte Carlo procedure in which the rates of all relevant decay channels are modeled using Arrhenius expressions. Comparison between the measurements and the simulated spectra allows the distribution of deposited energy to be accurately estimated. The dependence of the fragment kinetic energies on the laser fluence, found in the simulation but not observed in the experimental results, indicates that the small fragments are not necessarily emitted from small fullerenes resulting from C(60) by sequential decay. Rather, direct multifragmentation of C(60) is invoked to interpret the observed patterns. The possible role of post-ionization of neutral emitted fragments is discussed.

  5. On the mean kinetic energy of the proton in strong hydrogen bonded systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finkelstein, Y. [Nuclear Research Center–Negev, Beer-Sheva 84190 (Israel); Moreh, R. [Physics Department, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel); Shang, S. L.; Wang, Y.; Liu, Z. K. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Shchur, Ya. [Institute for Condensed Matter Physics, 1 Svientsitskii str., L’viv 79011 (Ukraine)

    2016-02-07

    The mean atomic kinetic energies of the proton, Ke(H), and of the deuteron, Ke(D), were calculated in moderate and strongly hydrogen bonded (HB) systems, such as the ferro-electric crystals of the KDP type (XH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}, X = K, Cs, Rb, Tl), the DKDP (XD{sub 2}PO{sub 4}, X = K, Cs, Rb) type, and the X{sub 3}H(SO{sub 4}){sub 2} superprotonic conductors (X = K, Rb). All calculations utilized the simulated partial phonon density of states, deduced from density functional theory based first-principle calculations and from empirical lattice dynamics simulations in which the Coulomb, short range, covalent, and van der Waals interactions were accounted for. The presently calculated Ke(H) values for the two systems were found to be in excellent agreement with published values obtained by deep inelastic neutron scattering measurements carried out using the VESUVIO instrument of the Rutherford Laboratory, UK. The Ke(H) values of the M{sub 3}H(SO{sub 4}){sub 2} compounds, in which the hydrogen bonds are centro-symmetric, are much lower than those of the KDP type crystals, in direct consistency with the oxygen-oxygen distance R{sub OO}, being a measure of the HB strength.

  6. A nonlinear MEMS electrostatic kinetic energy harvester for human-powered biomedical devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Y.; Cottone, F.; Marty, F.; Basset, P., E-mail: p.basset@esiee.fr [Université Paris-Est/ESYCOM/ESIEE Paris, Noisy-le-Grand 93162 (France); Boisseau, S. [CEA, Leti, Minatec Campus, Grenoble 38054 (France); Galayko, D. [UPMC-Sorbonne Université/LIP 6, CNRS, Paris 75005 (France)

    2015-12-21

    This article proposes a silicon-based electrostatic kinetic energy harvester with an ultra-wide operating frequency bandwidth from 1 Hz to 160 Hz. This large bandwidth is obtained, thanks to a miniature tungsten ball impacting with a movable proof mass of silicon. The motion of the silicon proof mass is confined by nonlinear elastic stoppers on the fixed part standing against two protrusions of the proof mass. The electrostatic transducer is made of interdigited-combs with a gap-closing variable capacitance that includes vertical electrets obtained by corona discharge. Below 10 Hz, the e-KEH offers 30.6 nJ per mechanical oscillation at 2 g{sub rms}, which makes it suitable for powering biomedical devices from human motion. Above 10 Hz and up to 162 Hz, the harvested power is more than 0.5 μW with a maximum of 4.5 μW at 160 Hz. The highest power of 6.6 μW is obtained without the ball at 432 Hz, in accordance with a power density of 142 μW/cm{sup 3}. We also demonstrate the charging of a 47-μF capacitor to 3.5 V used to power a battery-less wireless temperature sensor node.

  7. Connectivity of Marine Protected Areas and Its Relation with Total Kinetic Energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Agostini, Andressa; Gherardi, Douglas Francisco Marcolino; Pezzi, Luciano Ponzi

    2015-01-01

    The East Continental Shelf (ECS) of Brazil is a hotspot of endemism and biodiversity of reef biota in the South Atlantic, hosting a number of Marine Protected Areas (MPAs). Connectivity of MPAs through larval dispersal influences recruitment, population dynamics, genetic structure and biogeography in coral reef ecosystems. Connectivity of protected reef ecosystem in the ECS was investigated with a hydrodynamic model (ROMS) forcing an Individual Based Model (IBM-Ichthyop), and used groupers (genus Mycteroperca) as functional group. The hydrodynamic output from ROMS was compared with satellite data and showed good agreement with observed surface fields. Eggs were released, in IBM experiments, from April to September along six years (2002-2007) in five MPAs along the ECS. Intrannual variability in recruitment and self-recruitment of grouper larvae was observed, as well as a negative correlation of these population parameters with total Kinetic Energy (KE) used as a metric of the physical environment. Higher KE leads to increased offshore advection of larvae, reduced total recruitment and connectivity of MPAs. Our results indicate high and uni-directional connectivity between MPAs from north to south influenced by the Brazil Current flowing in the same direction. Results also showed that some MPAs act predominantly as "sink" while others are mainly "source" areas.

  8. Total kinetic energy in four global eddying ocean circulation models and over 5000 current meter records

    KAUST Repository

    Scott, Robert B.

    2010-01-01

    We compare the total kinetic energy (TKE) in four global eddying ocean circulation simulations with a global dataset of over 5000, quality controlled, moored current meter records. At individual mooring sites, there was considerable scatter between models and observations that was greater than estimated statistical uncertainty. Averaging over all current meter records in various depth ranges, all four models had mean TKE within a factor of two of observations above 3500. m, and within a factor of three below 3500. m. With the exception of observations between 20 and 100. m, the models tended to straddle the observations. However, individual models had clear biases. The free running (no data assimilation) model biases were largest below 2000. m. Idealized simulations revealed that the parameterized bottom boundary layer tidal currents were not likely the source of the problem, but that reducing quadratic bottom drag coefficient may improve the fit with deep observations. Data assimilation clearly improved the model-observation comparison, especially below 2000. m, despite assimilated data existing mostly above this depth and only south of 47°N. Different diagnostics revealed different aspects of the comparison, though in general the models appeared to be in an eddying-regime with TKE that compared reasonably well with observations. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Turbulent kinetic energy budgets in wall bounded flows with pressure gradients and separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiavo, Luiz A. C. A.; Wolf, William Roberto; Azevedo, João Luiz F.

    2017-11-01

    Numerical simulations are employed to investigate the turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) budgets in turbulent channel flows with pressure gradients and separation. Incompressible, highly resolved large eddy simulations are performed for Reτ = 170 and 615 to investigate the flow developing along a convergent-divergent channel. The aim of this work is to analyze the TKE budgets both in physical and Fourier spaces to characterize the important scales in the individual processes in such turbulent flows. The study is performed for different positions along the channel where favorable and adverse pressure gradients are present. Proper orthogonal decomposition is employed to understand the role of the most energetic structures in the TKE budgets. Results indicate that such structures account for most of the turbulent effects present in the flow, except for the transport term. A spectral TKE equation in Fourier space is developed for flows with one homogeneous direction to characterize the turbulent processes as a function of the wavelength in the channel spanwise direction. The results show that viscous effects occur at the same range of wavelengths for which production is found and that TKE is transported to the near-wall region, being dissipated by large spanwise scale motion. They also show that favorable pressure gradients change the distribution of processes along the spanwise wavelengths. In the adverse pressure gradient region, TKE is transported both toward the wall and toward the center of the channel, where it is balanced by the advection term.

  10. The Kinetics of Integrilin Limited by Obesity (KILO): A Multicenter Randomized Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavalle, John P.; Stevens, Susanna R.; Hassinger, Nancy; Cohen, Mauricio G.; Arnold, Anita; Kandzari, David E.; Aguirre, Frank V.; Gretler, Daniel D.; Alexander, John H.

    2013-01-01

    Background KILO tested 2 novel weight-based eptifibatide dosing strategies compared with standard dosing in obese patients undergoing elective percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Eptifibatide dosing is weight-adjusted for patients up to 121 kg. Patients above this weight receive the same maximal dose, although it is unknown if this provides adequate eptifibatide concentration or platelet inhibition. Methods Sixty-seven patients weighing ≥125 kg undergoing elective PCI were randomized to 1 of 3 eptifibatide dosing regimens: standard dosing using a weight of 121 kg, actual body weight-based (ABW) dosing with no upper limit, or ideal body weight-based (IBW) dosing. Boluses of 180 μg/kg were given 10 minutes apart, followed by a 2.0 μg/kg/min infusion. Plasma eptifibatide concentrations were drawn at 12–18 hours after initiating the infusion. Platelet aggregation was assessed at baseline and 10 minutes after the second bolus. Results Sixty-seven patients were randomized to standard (n=22), ABW (n=23), or IBW (n=22) dosing. The median (25th, 75th) steady-state plasma eptifibatide concentrations were 1740 ng/mL (1350, 2350), 1780 ng/mL (1510, 2350), and 1055 ng/mL (738, 1405), respectively (Peptifibatide dosing leads to higher plasma concentrations and greater platelet inhibition than standard or IBW dosing in obese patients undergoing PCI. Current recommendations for eptifibatide dosing may be inadequate in patients >121 kg. Further study is warranted to define the optimal dosing of eptifibatide and other medications in obese patients. PMID:22137072

  11. Influence of kinetic effects on particle and energy flows in the ITER divertor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batischev, O.V. (M.V. Keldysh Institute of Applied Mathematics, Moscow (Russian Federation)); Krasheninnikov, S.I. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge (United States) Russian Scientific Center, Kurchatov Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation)); Sigmar, D.J. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge (United States)); Sigov, Yu.S. (M.V. Keldysh Institute of Applied Mathematics, Moscow (Russian Federation)); Soboleva, T.K. (Russian Scientific Center, Kurchatov Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation))

    1994-01-01

    A kinetic modelling of 1d collisional and 2d Vlasov magnetic SOL's using the W1 and W2 particle codes is presented. Deviation of the distribution function from the equilibrium one is shown, as well as the possibility of kinetic instability in diverted plasmas. (orig.)

  12. A KDE-Based Random Walk Method for Modeling Reactive Transport With Complex Kinetics in Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sole-Mari, Guillem; Fernà ndez-Garcia, Daniel; Rodríguez-Escales, Paula; Sanchez-Vila, Xavier

    2017-11-01

    In recent years, a large body of the literature has been devoted to study reactive transport of solutes in porous media based on pure Lagrangian formulations. Such approaches have also been extended to accommodate second-order bimolecular reactions, in which the reaction rate is proportional to the concentrations of the reactants. Rather, in some cases, chemical reactions involving two reactants follow more complicated rate laws. Some examples are (1) reaction rate laws written in terms of powers of concentrations, (2) redox reactions incorporating a limiting term (e.g., Michaelis-Menten), or (3) any reaction where the activity coefficients vary with the concentration of the reactants, just to name a few. We provide a methodology to account for complex kinetic bimolecular reactions in a fully Lagrangian framework where each particle represents a fraction of the total mass of a specific solute. The method, built as an extension to the second-order case, is based on the concept of optimal Kernel Density Estimator, which allows the concentrations to be written in terms of particle locations, hence transferring the concept of reaction rate to that of particle location distribution. By doing so, we can update the probability of particles reacting without the need to fully reconstruct the concentration maps. The performance and convergence of the method is tested for several illustrative examples that simulate the Advection-Dispersion-Reaction Equation in a 1-D homogeneous column. Finally, a 2-D application example is presented evaluating the need of fully describing non-bilinear chemical kinetics in a randomly heterogeneous porous medium.

  13. Large eddy simulation study of the kinetic energy entrainment by energetic turbulent flow structures in large wind farms

    Science.gov (United States)

    VerHulst, Claire; Meneveau, Charles

    2014-02-01

    In this study, we address the question of how kinetic energy is entrained into large wind turbine arrays and, in particular, how large-scale flow structures contribute to such entrainment. Previous research has shown this entrainment to be an important limiting factor in the performance of very large arrays where the flow becomes fully developed and there is a balance between the forcing of the atmospheric boundary layer and the resistance of the wind turbines. Given the high Reynolds numbers and domain sizes on the order of kilometers, we rely on wall-modeled large eddy simulation (LES) to simulate turbulent flow within the wind farm. Three-dimensional proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) analysis is then used to identify the most energetic flow structures present in the LES data. We quantify the contribution of each POD mode to the kinetic energy entrainment and its dependence on the layout of the wind turbine array. The primary large-scale structures are found to be streamwise, counter-rotating vortices located above the height of the wind turbines. While the flow is periodic, the geometry is not invariant to all horizontal translations due to the presence of the wind turbines and thus POD modes need not be Fourier modes. Differences of the obtained modes with Fourier modes are documented. Some of the modes are responsible for a large fraction of the kinetic energy flux to the wind turbine region. Surprisingly, more flow structures (POD modes) are needed to capture at least 40% of the turbulent kinetic energy, for which the POD analysis is optimal, than are needed to capture at least 40% of the kinetic energy flux to the turbines. For comparison, we consider the cases of aligned and staggered wind turbine arrays in a neutral atmospheric boundary layer as well as a reference case without wind turbines. While the general characteristics of the flow structures are robust, the net kinetic energy entrainment to the turbines depends on the presence and relative

  14. Kinetic control over pathway complexity in supramolecular polymerization through modulating the energy landscape by rational molecular design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogi, Soichiro; Fukui, Tomoya; Jue, Melinda L; Takeuchi, Masayuki; Sugiyasu, Kazunori

    2014-12-22

    Far-from-equilibrium thermodynamic systems that are established as a consequence of coupled equilibria are the origin of the complex behavior of biological systems. Therefore, research in supramolecular chemistry has recently been shifting emphasis from a thermodynamic standpoint to a kinetic one; however, control over the complex kinetic processes is still in its infancy. Herein, we report our attempt to control the time evolution of supramolecular assembly in a process in which the supramolecular assembly transforms from a J-aggregate to an H-aggregate over time. The transformation proceeds through a delicate interplay of these two aggregation pathways. We have succeeded in modulating the energy landscape of the respective aggregates by a rational molecular design. On the basis of this understanding of the energy landscape, programming of the time evolution was achieved through adjusting the balance between the coupled equilibria. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. The Temporal and Spatial Evolution of Momentum, Kinetic Energy and Force in Tsunami Waves during Breaking and Inundation

    CERN Document Server

    Marivela, Roberto; Synolakis, Costas

    2016-01-01

    A plethora of studies in the past decade describe tsunami hazards and study their evolution from the source to the target coastline, but mainly focus on coastal inundation and maximum runup. Nonetheless, anecdotal reports from eyewitnesses, photographs and videos suggest counterintuitive flow dynamics, for example rapid initial acceleration when the wave first strikes the initial shoreline. Further, the details of the flow field at or within tens of meters of the shoreline are exquisitely important in determining damage to structures and evacuation times. Based on a set of three-dimensional numerical simulations using solitary waves as a model, we show the spatial-temporal distribution of the flow momentum, kinetic energy and force during the breaking process. We infer that the flow reaches its highest destructive capacity not when flow momentum or kinetic energy reach their maxima, but when flow force reaches its. This occurs in the initial shoreline environment, which needs to be considered in nearshore str...

  16. Mechanism of kinetic energy transfer in homogeneous bidisperse gas-solid flow and its implications for segregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrabadi, Mohammad; Subramaniam, Shankar

    2017-02-01

    Most gas-solid flows encountered in nature and industrial applications are polydisperse, and the segregation or mixing of particle classes in polydisperse gas-solid flows is a phenomenon of great practical importance. A statistically homogeneous gas-solid flow with a bidisperse distribution (in size or density) of particles is a canonical representation of polydisperse flows. A key feature that distinguishes the bidisperse flow from its monodisperse counterpart is the exchange of momentum and kinetic energy between the particle classes due to collisions, which are important for applications outside the very dilute regime. The average exchange of linear momentum between particle classes due to collisions occurs through the particle-particle drag term. The conservation equations for average momentum corresponding to each particle class can be used to deduce the average slip velocity between the particle size and density classes, which is the signature of particle segregation. In this canonical problem, the steady value of particle mean slip velocity results from a balance between three terms, each in turn involving the body force or the mean fluid pressure gradient, the gas-particle drag, and the particle-particle drag. The particle-particle drag depends on the particle velocity fluctuations in each class [Louge, M. Y. et al., "The role of particle collisions in pneumatic transport," J. Fluid Mech. 231, 345-359 (1991)], thereby coupling the mean and second-moment equations. For monodisperse gas-solid flows the transfer of kinetic energy from the mean to second-moment equations was explained by Subramaniam and co-workers who proposed the conservation of interphase turbulent kinetic energy transfer principle [Xu, Y. and Subramaniam, S., "Consistent modeling of interphase turbulent kinetic energy transfer in particle-laden turbulent flows," Phys. Fluids 19(8), 085101 (2007)], and this was subsequently verified by particle-resolved direct numerical simulation [Mehrabadi

  17. Stereodynamical Origin of Anti-Arrhenius Kinetics: Negative Activation Energy and Roaming for a Four-Atom Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutinho, Nayara D; Silva, Valter H C; de Oliveira, Heibbe C B; Camargo, Ademir J; Mundim, Kleber C; Aquilanti, Vincenzo

    2015-05-07

    The OH + HBr → H2O + Br reaction, prototypical of halogen-atom liberating processes relevant to mechanisms for atmospheric ozone destruction, attracted frequent attention of experimental chemical kinetics: the nature of the unusual reactivity drop from low to high temperatures eluded a variety of theoretical efforts, ranking this one among the most studied four-atom reactions. Here, inspired by oriented molecular-beams experiments, we develop a first-principles stereodynamical approach. Thermalized sets of trajectories, evolving on a multidimensional potential energy surface quantum mechanically generated on-the-fly, provide a map of most visited regions at each temperature. Visualizations of rearrangements of bonds along trajectories and of the role of specific angles of reactants' mutual approach elucidate the mechanistic change from the low kinetic energy regime (where incident reactants reorient to find the propitious alignment leading to reaction) to high temperature (where speed hinders adjustment of directionality and roaming delays reactivity).

  18. Laser sustained discharge nozzle apparatus for the production of an intense beam of high kinetic energy atomic species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Jon B.; Cremers, David A.

    1988-01-01

    Laser sustained discharge apparatus for the production of intense beams of high kinetic energy atomic species. A portion of the plasma resulting from a laser sustained continuous optical discharge which generates energetic atomic species from a gaseous source thereof is expanded through a nozzle into a region of low pressure. The expanded plasma contains a significant concentration of the high kinetic energy atomic species which may be used to investigate the interaction of surfaces therewith. In particular, O-atoms having velocities in excess of 3.5 km/s can be generated for the purpose of studying their interaction with materials in order to develop protective materials for spacecraft which are exposed to such energetic O-atoms during operation in low earth orbit.

  19. Analysis and prediction of integrated kinetic energy in Atlantic tropical cyclones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozar, Michael E.

    Integrated kinetic energy (IKE) is a recently developed metric that approximates the destructive potential of a tropical cyclone by assessing the size and strength of its wind field. Despite the potential usefulness of the IKE metric, there are few, if any, operational tools that are specifically designed to forecast IKE in real-time. Therefore, IKE and tropical cyclone structure are analyzed within historical Atlantic tropical cyclones from the past two decades in order to develop an understanding of the environmental and internal storm-driven processes that govern IKE variability. This analysis concurs with past research that IKE growth and decay is influenced by both traditional tropical cyclone development mechanisms and by other features such as extratropical transition and trough interactions. Using this framework, a series of statistical prediction tools are created in an effort to project IKE in Atlantic tropical cyclones from a series of relevant normalized input parameters. The resulting IKE prediction schemes are titled the "Statistical Prediction of Integrated Kinetic Energy (SPIKE)". The first version of SPIKE utilizes simple linear regression to project historical IKE quantities in a perfect prognostic mode for all storms between 1990 and 2011. This primitive model acts as a proof of concept, revealing that IKE can be skillfully forecasted relative to persistence out to 72 hours by even the simplest of statistical models if given accurate estimates of various metrics measured throughout the storm and its environment. The proof-of-concept version of SPIKE is improved upon in its second version, SPIKE2, by incorporating a more sophisticated system of adaptive statistical models. A system of artificial neural networks replaces the linear regression model to better capture the nonlinear relationships in the TC-environment system. In a perfect prognostic approach with analyzed input parameters, the neural networks outperform the linear models in nearly

  20. Extensive strain along gradient trajectories in the turbulent kinetic energy field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gampert, Markus; Goebbert, Jens Henrik; Schaefer, Philip; Gauding, Michael; Peters, Norbert [Institut fuer Technische Verbrennung, RWTH Aachen, Templergraben 64, 52056 Aachen (Germany); Aldudak, Fettah; Oberlack, Martin, E-mail: m.gampert@itv.rwth-aachen.de [Fachgebiet fuer Stroemungsdynamik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Petersenstrasse 30, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2011-04-15

    Based on direct numerical simulations of forced turbulence, shear turbulence, decaying turbulence, a turbulent channel flow as well as a Kolmogorov flow with Taylor-based Reynolds numbers Re{sub {lambda}} between 69 and 295, the normalized probability density function of the length distribution P-tilde(l-tilde) of dissipation elements, the conditional mean scalar difference ({Delta}k|l) at the extreme points as well as the scaling of the two-point velocity difference along gradient trajectories ({Delta}u{sub n}) are studied. Using the field of the instantaneous turbulent kinetic energy k as a scalar, we find good agreement between the model equation for P-tilde(l-tilde) as proposed by Wang and Peters (2008 J. Fluid Mech. 608 113-38) and the results obtained in the different direct numerical simulation cases. This confirms the independence of the model solution from both the Reynolds number and the type of turbulent flow, so that it can be considered universally valid. In addition, we show a 2/3 scaling for the mean conditional scalar difference. In the second part of the paper, we examine the scaling of the conditional two-point velocity difference along gradient trajectories. In particular, we compare the linear s/{tau} scaling, where {tau} denotes an integral time scale and s the separation arclength along a gradient trajectory in the inertial range as derived by Wang (2009 Phys. Rev. E 79 046325) with the s{center_dot}a{sub {infinity}} scaling, where a{sub {infinity}} denotes the asymptotic value of the conditional mean strain rate of large dissipation elements.

  1. Buoyant Turbulent Kinetic Energy Production in Steep-Slope Katabatic Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldroyd, Holly J.; Pardyjak, Eric R.; Higgins, Chad W.; Parlange, Marc B.

    2016-12-01

    We develop several critical concepts that should be considered when interpreting, modelling and designing future experiments for flows over sloping terrain. Vertical buoyancy fluxes in katabatic flows can be positive and a source of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) despite the statically stable, thermal stratification that drives these flows. This phenomenon occurs when the ratio of along-slope to slope-normal kinematic heat fluxes is greater than the cotangent of the slope angle, suggesting a critical value of slope-angle steepness found in earlier studies. We provide field-data-based evidence that the along-slope heat flux may dominate the variables in this inequality, and therefore in generating buoyant TKE production or suppression over a steep slope. These data show the along-slope heat flux can be more variable and significantly larger in magnitude than the slope-normal component. The gradient Richardson number does not include the effects of the along-slope buoyancy; furthermore, none of the canonical stability parameters can properly reflect the TKE redistribution from turbulent transport divergence and the sink of TKE in cases of counter-gradient momentum fluxes, which we frequently observe near the peak of the katabatic jet. In such cases, canonical stability parameters inadequately represent the physical mechanisms associated with stability. These results have broad implications related to accurately modelling turbulence and surface exchanges over sloping terrain and illustrate the need to more thoroughly investigate the along-slope heat flux and its drivers, the meaning and definitions of stability, and the effects of non-local turbulent transport.

  2. A Three-Dimensional Scale-adaptive Turbulent Kinetic Energy Model in ARW-WRF Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xu; Bao, Jian-Wen; Chen, Baode

    2017-04-01

    A new three-dimensional (3D) turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) subgrid mixing model is developed to address the problem of simulating the convective boundary layer (CBL) across the terra incognita in the Advanced Research version of the Weather Research and Forecasting Model (ARW-WRF). The new model combines the horizontal and vertical subgrid turbulent mixing into a single energetically consistent framework, in contrast to the convectional one-dimensional (1D) planetary boundary layer (PBL) schemes. The transition between large-eddy simulation (LES) and mesoscale limit is accomplished in the new scale-adaptive model. A series of dry CBL and real-time simulations using the WRF model are carried out, in which the newly-developed, scale-adaptive, more general and energetically consistent TKE-based model is compared with the conventional 1D TKE-based PBL schemes for parameterizing vertical subgrid turbulent mixing against the WRF LES dataset and observations. The characteristics of the WRF-simulated results using the new and conventional schemes are compared. The importance of including the nonlocal component in the vertical buoyancy specification in the newly-developed general TKE-based scheme is illustrated. The improvements of the new scheme over convectional PBL schemes across the terra incognita can be seen in the partitioning of vertical flux profiles. Through comparing the results from the simulations against the WRF LES dataset and observations, we will show the feasibility of using the new scheme in the WRF model in the lieu of the conventional PBL parameterization schemes.

  3. Variational perturbation and extended Plefka approaches to dynamics on random networks: the case of the kinetic Ising model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachschmid-Romano, L.; Battistin, C.; Opper, M.; Roudi, Y.

    2016-10-01

    We describe and analyze some novel approaches for studying the dynamics of Ising spin glass models. We first briefly consider the variational approach based on minimizing the Kullback-Leibler divergence between independent trajectories and the real ones and note that this approach only coincides with the mean field equations from the saddle point approximation to the generating functional when the dynamics is defined through a logistic link function, which is the case for the kinetic Ising model with parallel update. We then spend the rest of the paper developing two ways of going beyond the saddle point approximation to the generating functional. In the first one, we develop a variational perturbative approximation to the generating functional by expanding the action around a quadratic function of the local fields and conjugate local fields whose parameters are optimized. We derive analytical expressions for the optimal parameters and show that when the optimization is suitably restricted, we recover the mean field equations that are exact for the fully asymmetric random couplings (Mézard and Sakellariou 2011 J. Stat. Mech. 2011 L07001). However, without this restriction the results are different. We also describe an extended Plefka expansion in which in addition to the magnetization, we also fix the correlation and response functions. Finally, we numerically study the performance of these approximations for Sherrington-Kirkpatrick type couplings for various coupling strengths and the degrees of coupling symmetry, for both temporally constant but random, as well as time varying external fields. We show that the dynamical equations derived from the extended Plefka expansion outperform the others in all regimes, although it is computationally more demanding. The unconstrained variational approach does not perform well in the small coupling regime, while it approaches dynamical TAP equations of (Roudi and Hertz 2011 J. Stat. Mech. 2011 P03031) for strong couplings.

  4. Random Matrix Theory Approach to Indonesia Energy Portfolio Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahardhika, Alifian; Purqon, Acep

    2017-07-01

    In a few years, Indonesia experienced difficulties in maintaining energy security, the problem is the decline in oil production from 1.6 million barrels per day to 861 thousand barrels per day in 2012. However, there is a difference condition in 2015 until the third week in 2016, world oil prices actually fell at the lowest price level since last 12 years. The decline in oil prices due to oversupply of oil by oil-producing countries of the world due to the instability of the world economy. Wave of layoffs in Indonesia is a response to the decline in oil prices, this led to the energy and mines portfolios Indonesia feared would not be more advantageous than the portfolio in other countries. In this research, portfolio analysis will be done on energy and mining in Indonesia by using stock price data of energy and mines in the period 26 November 2010 until April 1, 2016. It was found that the results have a wide effect of the market potential is high in the determination of the return on the portfolio energy and mines. Later, it was found that there are eight of the thirty stocks in the energy and mining portfolio of Indonesia which have a high probability of return relative to the average return of stocks in a portfolio of energy and mines.

  5. Improving the enzymolysis efficiency of potato protein by simultaneous dual-frequency energy-gathered ultrasound pretreatment: Thermodynamics and kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yu; Liu, Yun; Wu, Juan; Ofori Donkor, Prince; Li, Ting; Ma, Haile

    2017-07-01

    The thermodynamics and kinetics of traditional and simultaneous dual frequency energy-gathered ultrasound (SDFU) assisted enzymolysis of potato protein were investigated to get the knowledge of the mechanisms on the SDFU's promoting efficiency during enzymolysis. The concentration of potato protein hydrolysate and parameters of thermodynamic and kinetic during traditional and SDFU assisted enzymolysis were determined. The results showed that potato protein hydrolysate concentration of SDFU assisted enzymolysis was higher than traditional enzymolysis at the hydrolysis time of 60min (p0.05). In some cases, SDFU assisted enzymolysis took less hydrolysis time than traditional enzymolysis when the similar conversion rates of potato protein were obtained. The thermodynamic papameters including the energy of activation (Ea), enthalpy of activation (△H), entropy of activation (△S) were reduced by ultrasound pretreatment while Gibbs free energy of activation (△G) increased little (1.6%). Also, kinetic papameters including Michaelis constant (KM) and catalytic rate constant (kcat) decreased by ultrasound pretreatment. On the contrary, reaction rate constants (k) of SDFU assisted enzymolysis were higher than that of traditional enzymolysis (penergy barrier between ground and active state and increasing affinity between substrate and enzyme. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Between-species variation in the kinetic stability of TIM proteins linked to solvation-barrier free energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costas, Miguel; Rodríguez-Larrea, David; De Maria, Leonardo; Borchert, Torben V; Gómez-Puyou, Armando; Sanchez-Ruiz, Jose M

    2009-01-23

    Theoretical, computational, and experimental studies have suggested the existence of solvation barriers in protein unfolding and denaturation processes. These barriers are related to the finite size of water molecules and can be envisioned as arising from the asynchrony between water penetration and breakup of internal interactions. Solvation barriers have been proposed to play roles in protein cooperativity and kinetic stability; therefore, they may be expected to be subject to natural selection. We study the thermal denaturation, in the presence and in the absence of chemical denaturants, of triosephosphate isomerases (TIMs) from three different species: Trypanosoma cruzi, Trypanosoma brucei, and Leishmania mexicana. In all cases, denaturation was irreversible and kinetically controlled. Surprisingly, however, we found large differences between the kinetic denaturation parameters, with T. cruzi TIM showing a much larger activation energy value (and, consequently, much lower room-temperature, extrapolated denaturation rates). This disparity cannot be accounted for by variations in the degree of exposure to solvent in transition states (as measured by kinetic urea m values) and is, therefore, to be attributed mainly to differences in solvation-barrier contributions. This was supported by structure-energetics analyses of the transition states and by application of a novel procedure to estimate from experimental data the solvation-barrier impact at the entropy and free-energy levels. These analyses were actually performed with an extended protein set (including six small proteins plus seven variants of lipase from Thermomyces lanuginosus and spanning a wide range of activation parameters), allowing us to delineate the general trends of the solvation-barrier contributions. Overall, this work supports that proteins sharing the same structure and function but belonging to different organisms may show widely different solvation barriers, possibly as a result of different

  7. Exploration of near the origin and the asymptotic behaviors of the Kohn-Sham kinetic energy density for two-dimensional quantum dot systems with parabolic confinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jana, Subrata; Samal, Prasanjit

    2018-01-14

    The behaviors of the positive definite Kohn-Sham kinetic energy density near the origin and at the asymptotic region play a major role in designing meta-generalized gradient approximations (meta-GGAs) for exchange in low-dimensional quantum systems. It is shown that near the origin of the parabolic quantum dot, the Kohn-Sham kinetic energy differs from its von Weizsäcker counterpart due to the p orbital contributions, whereas in the asymptotic region, the difference between the above two kinetic energy densities goes as ∼ρ(r)r2. All these behaviors have been explored using the two-dimensional isotropic quantum harmonic oscillator as a test case. Several meta-GGA ingredients are then studied by making use of the above findings. Also, the asymptotic conditions for the exchange energy density and the potential at the meta-GGA level are proposed using the corresponding behaviors of the two kinetic energy densities.

  8. Full-dimensional analytical potential energy surface describing the gas-phase Cl + C2H6reaction and kinetics study of rate constants and kinetic isotope effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel, Cipriano; Espinosa-Garcia, Joaquin

    2018-02-07

    Within the Born-Oppenheimer approximation a full-dimensional analytical potential energy surface, PES-2017, was developed for the gas-phase hydrogen abstraction reaction between the chlorine atom and ethane, which is a nine body system. This surface presents a valence-bond/molecular mechanics functional form dependent on 60 parameters and is fitted to high-level ab initio calculations. This reaction presents little exothermicity, -2.30 kcal mol -1 , with a low height barrier, 2.44 kcal mol -1 , and intermediate complexes in the entrance and exit channels. We found that the energetic description was strongly dependent on the ab initio level used and it presented a very flat topology in the entrance channel, which represents a theoretical challenge in the fitting process. In general, PES-2017 reproduces the ab initio information used as input, which is merely a test of self-consistency. As a first test of the quality of the PES-2017, a theoretical kinetics study was performed in the temperature range 200-1400 K using two approaches, i.e. the variational transition-state theory and quasi-classical trajectory calculations, with spin-orbit effects. The rate constants show reasonable agreement with experiments in the whole temperature range, with the largest differences at the lowest temperatures, and this behaviour agrees with previous theoretical studies, thus indicating the inherent difficulties in the theoretical simulation of the kinetics of the title reaction. Different sources of error were analysed, such as the limitations of the PES and theoretical methods, recrossing effects, and the tunnelling effect, which is negligible in this reaction, and the manner in which the spin-orbit effects were included in this non-relativistic study. We found that the variation of spin-orbit coupling along the reaction path, and the influence of the reactivity of the excited Cl( 2 P 1/2 ) state, have relative importance, but do not explain the whole discrepancy. Finally, the

  9. Delocalization at Small Energy for Heavy-Tailed Random Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordenave, Charles; Guionnet, Alice

    2017-08-01

    We prove that the eigenvectors associated to small enough eigenvalues of a heavy-tailed symmetric random matrix are delocalized with probability tending to one as the size of the matrix grows to infinity. The delocalization is measured thanks to a simple criterion related to the inverse participation ratio which computes an average ratio of {L^4} and {L^2}-norms of vectors. In contrast, as a consequence of a previous result, for random matrices with sufficiently heavy tails, the eigenvectors associated to large enough eigenvalues are localized according to the same criterion. The proof is based on a new analysis of the fixed point equation satisfied asymptotically by the law of a diagonal entry of the resolvent of this matrix.

  10. A kinetic energy fitting metric for resolution of the identity second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambrecht, Daniel S; Brandhorst, Kai; Miller, William H; McCurdy, C William; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2011-04-07

    A kinetic-energy-based fitting metric for application in the context of resolution of the identity second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory is presented, which is derived from the Poisson equation. Preliminary tests of the applicability include the evaluation of the error in the correlation energy, compared to standard Møller-Plesset perturbation theory, with respect to the auxiliary basis set employed. We comment on the potential merits of this fitting metric, compared to standard resolution of the identity second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory, and discuss its scaling behavior in the limit of large molecules.

  11. Maternal Dietary Counseling Reduces Consumption of Energy-Dense Foods among Infants: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitolo, Marcia Regina; Bortolini, Gisele Ane; Campagnolo, Paula Dal Bo; Hoffman, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the impact of a dietary counseling in reducing the intake of energy-dense foods by infants. Design: A randomized controlled trial. Setting and Participants: Sao Leopoldo, Brazil. Mothers and infants of a low-income-group population were randomized into intervention (n = 163) and received dietary counseling during 10 home…

  12. Heat and turbulent kinetic energy budgets for surface layer cooling induced by the passage of Hurricane Frances (2004)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Peisheng; Sanford, Thomas B.; Imberger, JöRg

    2009-12-01

    Heat and turbulent kinetic energy budgets of the ocean surface layer during the passage of Hurricane Frances were examined using a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model. In situ data obtained with the Electromagnetic-Autonomous Profiling Explorer (EM-APEX) floats were used to set up the initial conditions of the model simulation and to compare to the simulation results. The spatial heat budgets reveal that during the hurricane passage, not only the entrainment in the bottom of surface mixed layer but also the horizontal water advection were important factors determining the spatial pattern of sea surface temperature. At the free surface, the hurricane-brought precipitation contributed a negligible amount to the air-sea heat exchange, but the precipitation produced a negative buoyancy flux in the surface layer that overwhelmed the instability induced by the heat loss to the atmosphere. Integrated over the domain within 400 km of the hurricane eye on day 245.71 of 2004, the rate of heat anomaly in the surface water was estimated to be about 0.45 PW (1 PW = 1015 W), with about 20% (0.09 PW in total) of this was due to the heat exchange at the air-sea interface, and almost all the remainder (0.36 PW) was downward transported by oceanic vertical mixing. Shear production was the major source of turbulent kinetic energy amounting 88.5% of the source of turbulent kinetic energy, while the rest (11.5%) was attributed to the wind stirring at sea surface. The increase of ocean potential energy due to vertical mixing represented 7.3% of the energy deposited by wind stress.

  13. Disentangling random thermal motion of particles and collective expansion of source from transverse momentum spectra in high energy collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hua-Rong; Liu, Fu-Hu; Lacey, Roy A.

    2016-12-01

    In the framework of a multisource thermal model, we describe experimental results of the transverse momentum spectra of final-state light flavor particles produced in gold-gold (Au-Au), copper-copper (Cu-Cu), lead-lead (Pb-Pb), proton-lead (p-Pb), and proton-proton (p -p) collisions at various energies, measured by the PHENIX, STAR, ALICE, and CMS Collaborations, by using the Tsallis-standard (Tsallis form of Fermi-Dirac or Bose-Einstein), Tsallis, and two- or three-component standard distributions which can be in fact regarded as different types of ‘thermometers’ or ‘thermometric scales’ and ‘speedometers’. A central parameter in the three distributions is the effective temperature which contains information on the kinetic freeze-out temperature of the emitting source and reflects the effects of random thermal motion of particles as well as collective expansion of the source. To disentangle both effects, we extract the kinetic freeze-out temperature from the intercept of the effective temperature (T) curve as a function of particle’s rest mass (m 0) when plotting T versus m 0, and the mean transverse flow velocity from the slope of the mean transverse momentum ( ) curve as a function of mean moving mass (\\overline{m}) when plotting versus \\overline{m}.

  14. Biomolecular inflammatory response to surgical energy usage in laparoscopic surgery: results of a randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Brij B; Nanavati, Juhil D; Agarwal, Nayan; Sharma, Naveen; Agarwal, Krishna A; Manish, Kumar; Saluja, Satish; Agarwal, Sneh

    2016-05-01

    Use of surgical energy is integral to laparoscopic surgery (LS). Energized dissection (ED) has a potential to impact the biomolecular expression of inflammation due to ED-induced collateral inflammation. We did this triple-blind randomized controlled (RCT) study to assess this biomolecular footprint in an index LS, i.e., laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC). This RCT was conducted in collaboration with tertiary-level institutions, from January 2014 to December 2014 with institutional review board clearance. Consecutive, unselected, consenting candidates for LC were randomized (after anesthesia induction) into group I (ED) and group II (non-ED). They were managed with compliance to universal protocols for ethics, informed consent, anesthesia, drug usage and clinical pathway with blinded observers. Biomolecular inflammatory markers, i.e., interleukin 6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and highly sensitive CRP (HS-CRP), were measured with blood drawn juxta-preoperatively (H0), at 4 h (H4) and at 24 h (H24). The quantitative changes induced by ED on IL-6, TNF-α and HS-CRP at H0, H4 and H24 with their kinetic behavior were the study endpoint. Prospective data were analyzed statistically with a p value of biomolecular variables. There was a significant increase in IL-6, TNF-α and HS-CRP from H0 to H4 in both the groups (p values <0.001). From H4 to H24, all three cytokines showed significant increase in ED group (p < 0.05), whereas in the non-ED group, IL-6 showed significant fall (p = 0.004) and TNF-α showed no significant change (p = 0.063). Both the groups showed H4-H24 elevation of HS-CRP (p = 0.000). Energized dissection adds to the cytokine-mediated postoperative inflammation. The additional ED-induced inflammation can be measured objectively by IL-6 and TNF-α levels. Clinical Trials Registry, India (REF/2014/06/007153).

  15. On the use of kinetic energy preserving DG-schemes for large eddy simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flad, David; Gassner, Gregor

    2017-12-01

    -grid-scale models on top doesn't change much or in worst case decreases the fidelity even more. Finally, the core of this work is a novel LES strategy based on split form DG methods that are kinetic energy preserving. The scheme offers excellent stability with full control over the amount and shape of the added artificial dissipation. This premise is the main idea of the work and we will assess the LES capabilities of the novel split form DG approach when applied to shock-free, moderate Mach number turbulence. We will demonstrate that the novel DG LES strategy offers similar accuracy as the iLES methodology for well resolved cases, but strongly increases fidelity in case of more realistic coarse resolutions.

  16. Solar Sailing Kinetic Energy Interceptor (KEI) Mission for Impacting/Deflecting Near-Earth Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wie, Bong

    2005-01-01

    A solar sailing mission architecture, which requires a t least ten 160-m, 300-kg solar sail spacecraft with a characteristic acceleration of 0.5 mm/sqs, is proposed as a realistic near- term option for mitigating the threat posed by near-Earth asteroids (NEAs). Its mission feasibility is demonstrated for a fictional asteroid mitigation problem created by AIAA. This problem assumes that a 200-m asteroid, designated 2004WR, was detected on July 4, 2004, and that the expected impact will occur on January 14, 2015. The solar sailing phase of the proposed mission for the AIAA asteroid mitigation problem is comprised of the initial cruise phase from 1 AU t o 0.25 AU (1.5 years), the cranking orbit phase (3.5 years), and the retrograde orbit phase (1 year) prior to impacting the target asteroid at its perihelion (0.75 AU from the sun) on January 1, 2012. The proposed mission will require at least ten kinetic energy interceptor (KEI) solar sail spacecraft. Each KEI sailcraft consists of a 160- m, 150-kg solar sail and a 150-kg microsatellite impactor. The impactor is to be separated from a large solar sail prior to impacting the 200-m target asteroid at its perihelion. Each 150-kg microsatellite impactor, with a relative impact velocity of at least 70 km/s, will cause a conservatively estimated AV of 0.3 cm/s in the trajectory of the 200-m target asteroid, due largely to the impulsive effect of material ejected from the newly-formed crater. The deflection caused by a single impactor will increase the Earth-miss-distance by 0.45Re (where Re denotes the Earth radius of 6,378 km). Therefore, at least ten KEI sailcraft will be required for consecutive impacts, but probably without causing fragmentation, to increase the total Earth-miss-distance by 4.5Re. This miss-distance increase of 29,000 km is outside of a typical uncertainty/error of about 10,000 km in predicting the Earth-miss- distance. A conventional Delta I1 2925 launch vehicle is capable of injecting at least two KEI

  17. Spatial-frequency variability of the eddy kinetic energy in the South Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecilio, C. M.; Gherardi, D. F.; Souza, R.; Correa-Ramirez, M.

    2013-05-01

    In the South Atlantic Ocean (SAO) part of the inter-oceanic flow is accomplished through the issuance of anticyclonic eddies by the Agulhas Retroflection. This region, known as Agulhas Leakage (AL), is responsible by the intermittent shedding of eddies in the SAO. The propagation of these eddies into the SAO induces wave processes that allows the interaction between modes of variability of different basins, ranging from high to low frequency. Modelling studies suggests that the Indian-Atlantic inter-ocean exchange is strongly related to the structure of the wind field, in particular with the position of the maximum Southern Hemisphere westerly winds. This study aims to investigate the variations of the large-scale and regional mesoscale eddy field over the SAO using a frequency domain technique, Multiple Taper Method with Singular Value Decomposition (MTM-SVD). The MTM-SVD approach is applied to examine the individual and joint spatiotemporal variability modes of eddy kinetic energy (EKE) and winds stress. The EKE is estimated from geostrophic velocity anomalies data distributed by Aviso and winds stress from winds dataset of Cross-Calibrated Multi-Platform (CCMP) project from PO.DAAC. The impact of the AL in the SAO, was assessed first for the entire region and subsequently applied in the regions of higher mesoscale activity, which are the Brazil-Malvinas Confluence (BMC), the AL, and the Brazilian Current (BC) region. The results of local fractional variance (LFV) of EKE obtained by the MTM-SVD method show a strong significant annual variability in SAO and BC region while in BMC and in AL this frequency is weaker. In the most energetic mesoscale activity regions (BMC and AL) the pattern of variability is distinct. In the BMC region the interannual variability is dominated while in the AL region the most part of variability is associated by high frequency. The joint LFV spectrum of wind and EKE show an out-of-phase relationship between the AL region and BMC region

  18. Kinetic-Energy Distribution of D(2p) Atoms from Analysis of the D Lyman-Alpha Line Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciocca, M.; Ajello, Joseph M.; Liu, Xianming; Maki, Justin

    1997-01-01

    The kinetic-energy distribution of D(2p) atoms resulting from electron-impact dissociation of D2 has been measured. A high-resolution vacuum ultraviolet spectrometer was employed for the first measurement of the D Lyman-alpha (D L(alpha)) emission line profiles at 20- and 100-eV excitation energies. Analysis of the deconvoluted line profile of D L(alpha) at 100 eV reveals the existence of a narrow line central peak of 29+/-2 mA full width at half maximum and a broad pedestal wing structure about 190 mA wide. The wings of the line can be used to determine the fast atom distribution. The wings of D L(alpha) arise from dissociative excitation of a series of doubly excited states that cross the Franck-Condon region between 23 and 40 eV. The fast atom distribution at 100-eV electron impact energy spans the energy range from 1 to 10 eV with a peak value near 6 eV. Slow D(2p) atoms characterized by a distribution function with peak energy near 100 meV produce the central peak profile, which is nearly independent of the impact energy. The deconvoluted line profiles of the central peak at 20 eV for dissociative excitation of D2 and H2 are fitted with an analytical function for use in calibration of space flight instrumentation equipped with a D/H absorption cell. The kinetic-energy and line profile results are compared to similar measurements for H2. The absolute cross sections for the line center (slow atoms) and wings (fast atoms) and total emission line profile were measured from threshold to 400 eV. Analytical model coefficients are given for the energy dependence of the measured slow atom cross section.

  19. Mineral solubility and free energy controls on microbial reaction kinetics: Application to contaminant transport in the subsurface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taillefert, Martial [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Van Cappellen, Philippe [Univ. of Waterloo, ON (Canada)

    2016-11-14

    Recent developments in the theoretical treatment of geomicrobial reaction processes have resulted in the formulation of kinetic models that directly link the rates of microbial respiration and growth to the corresponding thermodynamic driving forces. The overall objective of this project was to verify and calibrate these kinetic models for the microbial reduction of uranium(VI) in geochemical conditions that mimic as much as possible field conditions. The approach combined modeling of bacterial processes using new bioenergetic rate laws, laboratory experiments to determine the bioavailability of uranium during uranium bioreduction, evaluation of microbial growth yield under energy-limited conditions using bioreactor experiments, competition experiments between metabolic processes in environmentally relevant conditions, and model applications at the field scale. The new kinetic descriptions of microbial U(VI) and Fe(III) reduction should replace those currently used in reactive transport models that couple catabolic energy generation and growth of microbial populations to the rates of biogeochemical redox processes. The above work was carried out in collaboration between the groups of Taillefert (batch reactor experiments and reaction modeling) at Georgia Tech and Van Cappellen (retentostat experiments and reactive transport modeling) at University of Waterloo (Canada).

  20. Crystallization kinetics and excess free energy of H2O and D2O nanoscale films of amorphous solid water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R Scott; Matthiesen, Jesper; Knox, Jake; Kay, Bruce D

    2011-06-16

    Temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS) are used to investigate the crystallization kinetics and measure the excess free energy of metastable amorphous solid water films (ASW) of H(2)O and D(2)O grown using molecular beams. The desorption rates from the amorphous and crystalline phases of ASW are distinct, and as such, crystallization manifests can be observed in the TPD spectrum. The crystallization kinetics were studied by varying the TPD heating rate from 0.001 to 3 K/s. A coupled desorption-crystallization kinetic model accurately simulates the desorption spectra and accurately predicts the observed temperature shifts in the crystallization. Isothermal crystallization studies using RAIRS are in agreement with the TPD results. Furthermore, highly sensitive measurements of the desorption rates were used to determine the excess free energy of ASW near 150 K. The excess entropy obtained from these data is consistent with there being a thermodynamic continuity between ASW and supercooled liquid water. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  1. Molecular dynamics study of the nanosized droplet spreading: The effect of the contact line forces on the kinetic energy dissipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hong Min; Kondaraju, Sasidhar; Lee, Jung Shin; Suh, Youngho; Lee, Joonho H.; Lee, Joon Sang

    2017-07-01

    Recent studies have revealed that contact line forces play an important role in the droplet spreading process. Despite their significance, the physics related to them has been studied only indirectly and the effect of contact line forces is still being disputed. We performed a molecular dynamics simulation and mimicked the droplet spreading process at the nanoscale. Based on the results of the simulation, the contact line forces were directly calculated. We found that the forces acting on the bulk and the contact line region showed different trends. Distinct positive and negative forces, contact line spreading, and friction forces were observed near the contact line. We also observed a strong dependency of the atomic kinetics in the contact line region on the variations in the contact line forces. The atoms of the liquid in the contact line region lost their kinetic energy due to the contact line friction force and became partially immobile on the solid surface. The results of the current study will be useful for understanding the role of the contact line forces on the kinetic energy dissipation in the contact line region.

  2. Kinetic study of low-temperature CO2 plasmas under non-equilibrium conditions. I. Relaxation of vibrational energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, T.; Grofulović, M.; Klarenaar, B. L. M.; Morillo-Candas, A. S.; Guaitella, O.; Engeln, R.; Pintassilgo, C. D.; Guerra, V.

    2018-01-01

    A kinetic model describing the time evolution of ∼70 individual CO2(X1Σ+) vibrational levels during the afterglow of a pulsed DC glow discharge is developed in order to contribute to the understanding of vibrational energy transfer in CO2 plasmas. The results of the simulations are compared against in situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy data obtained in a pulsed DC glow discharge and its afterglow at pressures of a few Torr and discharge currents of around 50 mA. The very good agreement between the model predictions and the experimental results validates the kinetic scheme considered here and the corresponding vibration–vibration and vibration–translation rate coefficients. In this sense, it establishes a reaction mechanism for the vibrational kinetics of these CO2 energy levels and offers a firm basis to understand the vibrational relaxation in CO2 plasmas. It is shown that first-order perturbation theories, namely, the Schwartz–Slawsky–Herzfeld and Sharma–Brau methods, provide a good description of CO2 vibrations under low excitation regimes.

  3. CFD Simulation of Flow in an Abrasive Water Suspension Jet: The Effect of Inlet Operating Pressure and Volume Fraction on Skin Friction and Exit Kinetic Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Deepak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abrasive particles in the suspension mixture in an abrasive water suspension jet (AWSJ machining causes acute skin friction effect thereby effectively changing the jet diameter due to wear, which in turn influences jet exit kinetic energy. This results in lowering the life of the jet for effective machining. In consideration of this aspect, the present work examines the effect of inlet pressure on skin friction coefficient and jet exit kinetic energy. It is inferred from the analysis that an increase in inlet pressure causes a significant increase in skin friction coefficient and also results in proportional increase in the exit kinetic energy of the jet. Further, it is revealed from the analysis that an increase volume fraction of abrasive (abrasive concentration in water results in significant decrease in the skin friction coefficient and jet exit kinetic energy.

  4. Reshaping the Energy Landscape Transforms the Mechanism and Binding Kinetics of DNA Threading Intercalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Andrew G; Naufer, M Nabuan; Westerlund, Fredrik; Lincoln, Per; Rouzina, Ioulia; Paramanathan, Thayaparan; Williams, Mark C

    2018-01-05

    Molecules that bind DNA via threading intercalation show high binding affinity as well as slow dissociation kinetics, properties ideal for the development of anticancer drugs. To this end, it is critical to identify the specific molecular characteristics of threading intercalators that result in optimal DNA interactions. Using single-molecule techniques, we quantify the binding of a small metal-organic ruthenium threading intercalator (Δ,Δ-B) and compare its binding characteristics to a similar molecule with significantly larger threading moieties (Δ,Δ-P). The binding affinities of the two molecules are the same, while comparison of the binding kinetics reveals significantly faster kinetics for Δ,Δ-B. However, the kinetics is still much slower than that observed for conventional intercalators. Comparison of the two threading intercalators shows that the binding affinity is modulated independently by the intercalating section and the binding kinetics is modulated by the threading moiety. In order to thread DNA, Δ,Δ-P requires a "lock mechanism", in which a large length increase of the DNA duplex is required for both association and dissociation. In contrast, measurements of the force-dependent binding kinetics show that Δ,Δ-B requires a large DNA length increase for association but no length increase for dissociation from DNA. This contrasts strongly with conventional intercalators, for which almost no DNA length change is required for association but a large DNA length change must occur for dissociation. This result illustrates the fundamentally different mechanism of threading intercalation compared with conventional intercalation and will pave the way for the rational design of therapeutic drugs based on DNA threading intercalation.

  5. Core-Shell Al-Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) Configurations to Enhance Reaction Kinetics and Energy Performance for Nanoenergetic Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Qiao, Zhiqiang; Yang, Yuntao; Shen, Jinpeng; Long, Zhang; Li, Zhaoqian; Cui, Xudong; Yang, Guangcheng

    2016-01-04

    The energy performance of solid energetic materials (Al, Mg, etc.) is typically restricted by a natural passivation layer and the diffusion-limited kinetics between the oxidizer and the metal. In this work, we use polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) as the fluorine carrier and the shielding layer to construct a new type of nano-Al based fuels. The PTFE shell not only prevents nano-Al layers from oxidation, but also assists in enhancing the reaction kinetics, greatly improving the stability and reactivity of fuels. An in situ chemical vapor deposition combined with the electrical explosion of wires (EEW) method is used to fabricate core-shell nanostructures. Studies show that by controlling the stoichiometric ratio of the precursors, the morphology of the PTFE shell and the energy performance can be easily tuned. The resultant composites exhibit superior energy output characters than that of their physically mixed Al/PTFE counterparts. This synthetic strategy might provide a general approach to prepare other high-energy fuels (Mg, Si). © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Foland, Andrew Dean

    2007-01-01

    Energy is the central concept of physics. Unable to be created or destroyed but transformable from one form to another, energy ultimately determines what is and isn''t possible in our universe. This book gives readers an appreciation for the limits of energy and the quantities of energy in the world around them. This fascinating book explores the major forms of energy: kinetic, potential, electrical, chemical, thermal, and nuclear.

  7. A new model of protein adsorption kinetics derived from simultaneous measurement of mass loading and changes in surface energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Alison J; Kotlicki, Andrzej; Haynes, Charles A; Whitehead, Lorne A

    2007-05-08

    We describe a novel technology based on changes in the resonant frequency of an acoustically actuated surface and use it to measure temporal changes in the surface energy gamma (N m(-1)) of an elastomeric polymer membrane due to the adsorption of macromolecules from aqueous solution. The resonant elastomeric surface-tension (REST) sensor permits simultaneous determination of mass loading kinetics and gamma(t) for a given adsorption process, thereby providing a multivariable data set from which to build and test models of the kinetics of adsorption at solid-liquid interfaces. The technique is used to measure gamma(t) during the adsorption of either sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) or hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL) onto an acrylic polymer membrane. The adsorption of SDS is reversible and is characterized by a decrease in gamma over a time period that coincides with that required for the mass loading of the membrane. For the adsorption of HEWL labeled with Alexa Fluor 532 dye, gamma continues to change long after the surface concentration of labeled HEWL, measured by using the elastomeric polymer membrane as an optical waveguide, reaches steady state. Gradual but significant changes in gamma(t) are observed as long as the concentration of protein in the bulk solution, c(b), remains nonzero. HEWL remains adsorbed to the membrane when c(b) = 0, but changes in gamma(t) are not observed under this condition, indicating that the interaction of bound protein molecules with those free in solution contribute to the prolonged change in the surface energy. This observation has been used to define a new model for the kinetics of globular protein adsorption to a solid-liquid interface that includes a mechanism by which the molecules in the bulk can facilitate the desorption of a sorbate molecule or change the energetic states of adsorbed molecules and, thus, the overall surface energy. The model is shown to capture the unique features of protein adsorption kinetics, including the

  8. High order magnetic optics for high dynamic range proton radiography at a kinetic energy of 800 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sjue, S. K. L., E-mail: sjue@lanl.gov; Mariam, F. G.; Merrill, F. E.; Morris, C. L.; Saunders, A. [Physics Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Flash radiography with 800 MeV kinetic energy protons at Los Alamos National Laboratory is an important experimental tool for investigations of dynamic material behavior driven by high explosives or pulsed power. The extraction of quantitative information about density fields in a dynamic experiment from proton generated images requires a high fidelity model of the proton imaging process. It is shown that accurate calculations of the transmission through the magnetic lens system require terms beyond second order for protons far from the tune energy. The approach used integrates the correlated multiple Coulomb scattering distribution simultaneously over the collimator and the image plane. Comparison with a series of static calibration images demonstrates the model’s accurate reproduction of both the transmission and blur over a wide range of tune energies in an inverse identity lens that consists of four quadrupole electromagnets.

  9. Turbulent kinetic energy budget in the boundary layer developing over an urban-like rough wall using PIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackman, Karin; Perret, Laurent; Calmet, Isabelle; Rivet, Cédric

    2017-08-01

    In the present work, a boundary layer developing over a rough-wall consisting of staggered cubes with a plan area packing density λp = 25% is studied within the wind tunnel using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) to investigate the Turbulent Kinetic Energy (TKE) budget. To access the full TKE budget, an estimation of the dissipation (ɛ) using both the transport equation of the resolved-scale kinetic energy and Large-Eddy (LE) PIV models based on the use of a subgrid-scale model following the methodology used in large-eddy simulations is employed. A low-pass filter, larger than the Taylor microscale, is applied to the data prior to the computation of the velocity gradients ensuring a clear cutoff in the inertial range where the models are valid. The presence of the cube roughness elements has a significant influence on the TKE budget due to the region of strong shear that develops over the cubes. The shear layer is shown to produce and dissipate energy, as well as transport energy through advection, turbulent transport, and pressure transport. The recirculation region that forms through the interaction of the shear layer and the canopy layer, which is the region below the height of the cube roughness, creates rapid longitudinal evolution of the mean flow thereby inducing weak production. Finally, through stochastic estimation of the conditional average, it is shown that localized regions of backscatter (energy transfer from unresolved to resolved scales) and forward scatter (energy transfer from resolved to unresolved scales) occur as a result of coherent vortical structures.

  10. Kinetic energy of Throughfall in subtropical forests of SE China - effects of tree canopy structure, functional traits, and biodiversity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Geißler

    Full Text Available Throughfall kinetic energy (TKE plays an important role in soil erosion in forests. We studied TKE as a function of biodiversity, functional diversity as well as structural stand variables in a secondary subtropical broad-leaved forest in the Gutianshan National Nature Reserve (GNNR in south-east China, a biodiversity hotspot in the northern hemisphere with more than 250 woody species present. Using a mixed model approach we could identify significant effects of all these variables on TKE: TKE increased with rarefied tree species richness and decreased with increasing proportion of needle-leaved species and increasing leaf area index (LAI. Furthermore, for average rainfall amounts TKE was decreasing with tree canopy height whereas for high rainfall amounts this was not the case. The spatial pattern of throughfall was stable across several rain events. The temporal variation of TKE decreased with rainfall intensity and increased with tree diversity. Our results show that more diverse forest stands over the season have to cope with higher cumulative raindrop energy than less diverse stands. However, the kinetic energy (KE of one single raindrop is less predictable in diverse stands since the variability in KE is higher. This paper is the first to contribute to the understanding of the ecosystem function of soil erosion prevention in diverse subtropical forests.

  11. Current-voltage and kinetic energy flux relations for relativistic field-aligned acceleration of auroral electrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. W. H. Cowley

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent spectroscopic observations of Jupiter's "main oval" auroras indicate that the primary auroral electron beam is routinely accelerated to energies of ~100 keV, and sometimes to several hundred keV, thus approaching the relativistic regime. This suggests the need to re-examine the classic non-relativistic theory of auroral electron acceleration by field-aligned electric fields first derived by Knight (1973, and to extend it to cover relativistic situations. In this paper we examine this problem for the case in which the source population is an isotropic Maxwellian, as also assumed by Knight, and derive exact analytic expressions for the field-aligned current density (number flux and kinetic energy flux of the accelerated population, for arbitrary initial electron temperature, acceleration potential, and field strength beneath the acceleration region. We examine the limiting behaviours of these expressions, their regimes of validity, and their implications for auroral acceleration in planetary magnetospheres (and like astrophysical systems. In particular, we show that for relativistic accelerating potentials, the current density increases as the square of the minimum potential, rather than linearly as in the non-relativistic regime, while the kinetic energy flux then increases as the cube of the potential, rather than as the square.

  12. Kinetic energy dependence of carrier diffusion in a GaAs epilayer studied by wavelength selective PL imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, S.; Su, L. Q.; Kon, J.; Gfroerer, T.; Wanlass, M. W.; Zhang, Y.

    2017-05-01

    Photoluminescence (PL) imaging has been shown to be an efficient technique for investigating carrier diffusion in semiconductors. In the past, the measurement was typically carried out by measuring at one wavelength (e.g., at the band gap) or simply the whole emission band. At room temperature in a semiconductor like GaAs, the band-to-band PL emission may occur in a spectral range over 200 meV, vastly exceeding the average thermal energy of about 26 meV. To investigate the potential dependence of the carrier diffusion on the carrier kinetic energy, we performed wavelength selective PL imaging on a GaAs double hetero-structure in a spectral range from about 70 meV above to 50 meV below the bandgap, extracting the carrier diffusion lengths at different PL wavelengths by fitting the imaging data to a theoretical model. The results clearly show that the locally generated carriers of different kinetic energies mostly diffuse together, maintaining the same thermal distribution throughout the diffusion process. Potential effects related to carrier density, self-absorption, lateral wave-guiding, and local heating are also discussed.

  13. Kinetic energy of Throughfall in subtropical forests of SE China - effects of tree canopy structure, functional traits, and biodiversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geißler, Christian; Nadrowski, Karin; Kühn, Peter; Baruffol, Martin; Bruelheide, Helge; Schmid, Bernhard; Scholten, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Throughfall kinetic energy (TKE) plays an important role in soil erosion in forests. We studied TKE as a function of biodiversity, functional diversity as well as structural stand variables in a secondary subtropical broad-leaved forest in the Gutianshan National Nature Reserve (GNNR) in south-east China, a biodiversity hotspot in the northern hemisphere with more than 250 woody species present. Using a mixed model approach we could identify significant effects of all these variables on TKE: TKE increased with rarefied tree species richness and decreased with increasing proportion of needle-leaved species and increasing leaf area index (LAI). Furthermore, for average rainfall amounts TKE was decreasing with tree canopy height whereas for high rainfall amounts this was not the case. The spatial pattern of throughfall was stable across several rain events. The temporal variation of TKE decreased with rainfall intensity and increased with tree diversity. Our results show that more diverse forest stands over the season have to cope with higher cumulative raindrop energy than less diverse stands. However, the kinetic energy (KE) of one single raindrop is less predictable in diverse stands since the variability in KE is higher. This paper is the first to contribute to the understanding of the ecosystem function of soil erosion prevention in diverse subtropical forests.

  14. Gradient corrections to the kinetic energy density functional of a two-dimensional Fermi gas at finite temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zyl, B. P.; Berkane, K.; Bencheikh, K.; Farrell, A.

    2011-05-01

    We examine the leading-order semiclassical gradient corrections to the noninteracting kinetic-energy density functional of a two-dimensional Fermi gas by applying the extended Thomas-Fermi theory at finite temperature. We find a nonzero von Weizsäcker-like gradient correction, which in the high-temperature limit goes over to the functional form (ℏ2/24m)(∇ρ)2/ρ. Our work provides a theoretical justification for the inclusion of gradient corrections in applications of density-functional theory to inhomogeneous two-dimensional Fermi systems at any finite temperature.

  15. Improved energy kinetics following high protein diet in McArdle's syndrome. A 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, K E; Jakobsen, J; Thomsen, C

    1990-01-01

    A patient with McArdle's syndrome was examined using bicycle ergometry and 31P NMR spectroscopy during exercise. The patients working capacity was approximately half the expected capacity of controls. Muscle energy kinetics improved significantly during intravenous glucose infusion and after 6...... weeks of high protein diet. During intravenous infusion of amino acids, no changes in working capacity could be detected. No decrease was seen in intracellular muscle pH during aerobic exercise. A significant decrease in muscle pH during aerobic exercise was detected in all controls....

  16. Hybrid Fluid/Kinetic Modeling Of Magnetized High Energy Density Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, David; Held, Eric; King, Jacob; Stoltz, Peter; Masti, Robert; Srinivasan, Bhuvana

    2017-10-01

    MHD modeling with an equation of state (EOS) of the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instabily in Z indicates that it is seeded by the electro-thermal instability. Large thermodynamic drives associated with gradients at the interface between the liner and the coronal regions distort distribution functions and likely lead to non-local transport effects in a plasma which varies from weakly to strongly coupled. In this work, we discuss using effective potential theory along with a Chapman-Ensksog-like (CEL) formalism to develop hybrid fluid/kinetic modeling capabilities for these plasmas. Effective potential theory addresses the role of Coulomb collisions on transport across coupling regimes and the CEL approach bridges the gap between full-blow kinetic simulations and the EOS tables, which only depend locally on density and temperature. Quantitative results on the Spitzer problem across coupling coupling regimes will be presented as a first step. DOE Grant No. DE-SC0016525.

  17. Altered Right Ventricular Kinetic Energy Work Density and Viscous Energy Dissipation in Patients with Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension: A Pilot Study Using 4D Flow MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q Joyce Han

    Full Text Available Right ventricular (RV function has increasingly being recognized as an important predictor for morbidity and mortality in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH. The increased RV after-load increase RV work in PAH. We used time-resolved 3D phase contrast MRI (4D flow MRI to derive RV kinetic energy (KE work density and energy loss in the pulmonary artery (PA to better characterize RV work in PAH patients.4D flow and standard cardiac cine images were obtained in ten functional class I/II patients with PAH and nine healthy subjects. For each individual, we calculated the RV KE work density and the amount of viscous dissipation in the PA.PAH patients had alterations in flow patterns in both the RV and the PA compared to healthy subjects. PAH subjects had significantly higher RV KE work density than healthy subjects (94.7±33.7 mJ/mL vs. 61.7±14.8 mJ/mL, p = 0.007 as well as a much greater percent PA energy loss (21.1±6.4% vs. 2.2±1.3%, p = 0.0001 throughout the cardiac cycle. RV KE work density and percent PA energy loss had mild and moderate correlations with RV ejection fraction.This study has quantified two kinetic energy metrics to assess RV function using 4D flow. RV KE work density and PA viscous energy loss not only distinguished healthy subjects from patients, but also provided distinction amongst PAH patients. These metrics hold promise as imaging markers for RV function.

  18. Time-varying output performances of piezoelectric vibration energy harvesting under nonstationary random vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Heonjun; Kim, Miso; Park, Choon-Su; Youn, Byeng D.

    2018-01-01

    Piezoelectric vibration energy harvesting (PVEH) has received much attention as a potential solution that could ultimately realize self-powered wireless sensor networks. Since most ambient vibrations in nature are inherently random and nonstationary, the output performances of PVEH devices also randomly change with time. However, little attention has been paid to investigating the randomly time-varying electroelastic behaviors of PVEH systems both analytically and experimentally. The objective of this study is thus to make a step forward towards a deep understanding of the time-varying performances of PVEH devices under nonstationary random vibrations. Two typical cases of nonstationary random vibration signals are considered: (1) randomly-varying amplitude (amplitude modulation; AM) and (2) randomly-varying amplitude with randomly-varying instantaneous frequency (amplitude and frequency modulation; AM-FM). In both cases, this study pursues well-balanced correlations of analytical predictions and experimental observations to deduce the relationships between the time-varying output performances of the PVEH device and two primary input parameters, such as a central frequency and an external electrical resistance. We introduce three correlation metrics to quantitatively compare analytical prediction and experimental observation, including the normalized root mean square error, the correlation coefficient, and the weighted integrated factor. Analytical predictions are in an excellent agreement with experimental observations both mechanically and electrically. This study provides insightful guidelines for designing PVEH devices to reliably generate electric power under nonstationary random vibrations.

  19. THE ENERGY SPECTRA OF RANDOM PROCESSES OF TRACTION VOLTAGES AND CURRENTS OF ELECTRIC TRANSPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. O. Kostin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Spectral analysis of traction voltages and currents are the basis for assessing energy electromagnetic processes in systems of electric traction, in particular, DC. The latter is due to the fact that the DC system is not in consequence of nonstationary random character of change of traction voltage and current. Nonperiodic stochastic nature of the change of voltage and current calls for study of their spectral composition using probabilistic methods based on spectral correlation theory of random processes. The theoretical assumptions and the relations of connection of the energy spectrum of a random process with his correlating function are set out. The results of the numerical calculations of the spectra of traction voltages and currents actually operating electrical subsystems transport are given; they are: feeder voltage at the traction substation; currents in modes of traction and recuperation of electric locomotives in accordance with DE 1 and VL 8; the voltage on the current collector of the city tram. It is established that energy spectra of random processes traction and recuperative voltages and currents are probabilistic in nature, depending on technological factors of the system, and the energy of the random process is numerically greater in traction mode than in the regenerative braking modes

  20. Kinetics of Hypotension during 50 Sessions of Resistance and Aerobic Training in Hypertensive Patients: a Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damorim, Igor Rodrigues; Santos, Tony Meireles; Barros, Gustavo Willames Pimentel; Carvalho, Paulo Roberto Cavalcanti

    2017-04-01

    Resistance and aerobic training are recommended as an adjunctive treatment for hypertension. However, the number of sessions required until the hypotensive effect of the exercise has stabilized has not been clearly established. To establish the adaptive kinetics of the blood pressure (BP) responses as a function of time and type of training in hypertensive patients. We recruited 69 patients with a mean age of 63.4 ± 2.1 years, randomized into one group of resistance training (n = 32) and another of aerobic training (n = 32). Anthropometric measurements were obtained, and one repetition maximum (1RM) testing was performed. BP was measured before each training session with a digital BP arm monitor. The 50 training sessions were categorized into quintiles. To compare the effect of BP reduction with both training methods, we used two-way analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) adjusted for the BP values obtained before the interventions. The differences between the moments were established by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). The reductions in systolic (SBP) and diastolic BP (DBP) were 6.9 mmHg and 5.3 mmHg, respectively, with resistance training and 16.5 mmHg and 11.6 mmHg, respectively, with aerobic training. The kinetics of the hypotensive response of the SBP showed significant reductions until the 20th session in both groups. Stabilization of the DBP occurred in the 20th session of resistance training and in the 10th session of aerobic training. A total of 20 sessions of resistance or aerobic training are required to achieve the maximum benefits of BP reduction. The methods investigated yielded distinct adaptive kinetic patterns along the 50 sessions. Os treinamentos de força e aeróbio são indicados para o tratamento adjuvante da hipertensão. Entretanto, o número de sessões necessárias até estabilização do efeito hipotensor com o exercício ainda não está claramente estabelecido. Estabelecer a cinética adaptativa das respostas tensionais em função do

  1. Dual resonant structure for energy harvesting from random vibration sources at low frequency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanshan Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a design with dual resonant structure which can harvest energy from random vibration sources at low frequency range. The dual resonant structure consists of two spring-mass subsystems with different frequency responses, which exhibit strong coupling and broad bandwidth when the two masses collide with each other. Experiments with piezoelectric elements show that the energy harvesting device with dual resonant structure can generate higher power output than the sum of the two separate devices from random vibration sources.

  2. Field ionization of free helium atoms: Correlation between the kinetic energy of ionized atoms and probability of their field ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piskur, J.; Borg, L. [Institute of Experimental Physics, Graz University of Technology, Petersgasse 16, 8010 Graz (Austria); Stupnik, A.; Leisch, M. [Institute of Solid State Physics, Graz University of Technology, Petersgasse 16, 8010 Graz (Austria); Ernst, W.E. [Institute of Experimental Physics, Graz University of Technology, Petersgasse 16, 8010 Graz (Austria); Holst, B. [Institute of Experimental Physics, Graz University of Technology, Petersgasse 16, 8010 Graz (Austria)], E-mail: bodil@cantab.net

    2008-05-15

    In this paper the correlation between the kinetic energy of helium atoms and the probability of field ionization is investigated by exploiting the narrow velocity distribution of supersonic molecular beams. Field ionization measurements were carried out on supersonic helium beams at 298 K and 95 K corresponding to energies of about 65 meV and 20 meV, respectively, for the individual atoms. The field ionization was performed with a tungsten tip, radius of curvature 12 nm, kept at room temperature. The ionization probability was found to increase by about a factor 10 when the beam was cooled from 298 K to 95 K. The results presented in this paper are of importance for improving the understanding of field ionization and for the development of a new detector for helium and other molecular beams.

  3. A Study on the Kinetic Energy and Dispersion Behavior of High-velocity Impact-induced Debris Using SPH Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakong, Jae; Woo, Sung-Choong; Kim, Tae-Won [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    In this study, we investigate the dispersion behavior of debris and debris cloud generated by high-velocity impacts using the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) technique. The projectile and target plate were made of aluminum, and we confirm the validity of the SPH technique by comparing the measured major and minor axis lengths of the debris cloud in the reference with the predicted values obtained through the SPH analysis. We perform high-velocity impact and fracture analysis based on the verified SPH technique within the velocity ranges of 1.5~4 km/s, and we evaluate the dispersion behavior of debris induced by the impact in terms of its kinetic energy. The maximum dispersion radius of the debris on the witness plates located behind the target plate was increased with increasing impact velocity. We derive an empirical equation that is capable of predicting the dispersion radius, and we found that 95% of the total kinetic energy of the debris was concentrated within 50% of the maximum dispersion radius.

  4. A multiple-time-scale turbulence model based on variable partitioning of the turbulent kinetic energy spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S.-W.; Chen, C.-P.

    1989-01-01

    A multiple-time-scale turbulence model of a single point closure and a simplified split-spectrum method is presented. In the model, the effect of the ratio of the production rate to the dissipation rate on eddy viscosity is modeled by use of the multiple-time-scales and a variable partitioning of the turbulent kinetic energy spectrum. The concept of a variable partitioning of the turbulent kinetic energy spectrum and the rest of the model details are based on the previously reported algebraic stress turbulence model. Example problems considered include: a fully developed channel flow, a plane jet exhausting into a moving stream, a wall jet flow, and a weakly coupled wake-boundary layer interaction flow. The computational results compared favorably with those obtained by using the algebraic stress turbulence model as well as experimental data. The present turbulence model, as well as the algebraic stress turbulence model, yielded significantly improved computational results for the complex turbulent boundary layer flows, such as the wall jet flow and the wake boundary layer interaction flow, compared with available computational results obtained by using the standard kappa-epsilon turbulence model.

  5. The histone H3 N-terminal tail: a computational analysis of the free energy landscape and kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yuqing; Cui, Qiang

    2015-05-28

    Histone tails are the short peptide protrusions outside of the nucleosome core particle and they play a critical role in regulating chromatin dynamics and gene activity. A histone H3 N-terminal tail, like other histone tails, can be covalently modified on different residues to activate or repress gene expression. Previous studies have indicated that, despite its intrinsically disordered nature, the histone H3 N-terminal tail has regions of notable secondary structural propensities. To further understand the structure-dynamics-function relationship in this system, we have carried out 75.6 μs long implicit solvent simulations and 29.3 μs long explicit solvent simulations. The extensive samplings allow us to better characterize not only the underlying free energy landscape but also kinetic properties through Markov state models (MSM). Dihedral principal component analysis (dPCA) and locally scaled diffusion map (LSDMap) analysis yield consistent results that indicate an overall flat free energy surface with several shallow basins that correspond to conformations with a high α-helical propensity in two regions of the peptide. Kinetic information extracted from Markov state models reveals rapid transitions between different metastable states with mean first passage times spanning from several hundreds of nanoseconds to hundreds of microseconds. These findings shed light on how the dynamical nature of the histone H3 N-terminal tail is related to its function. The complementary nature of dPCA, LSDMap and MSM for the analysis of biomolecules is also discussed.

  6. Direct measurement of the kinetics of CBM9 fusion-tag bioprocessing using luminescence resonance energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavoosi, Mojgan; Creagh, A Louise; Turner, Robin F B; Kilburn, Douglas G; Haynes, Charles A

    2009-01-01

    The economics of affinity-tagging technologies, particularly at preparative scales, depends in part on the cost and efficiency of the bioprocessing step used to remove the affinity tag and obtain the final purified product (Lowe et al., J Biochem Biophys Methods. 2001;49:561-574). When CBM9, the family 9 cellulose binding module from Thermotoga maritima, serves as the affinity tag, the overall efficiency of tag removal is a function of the choice of processing enzyme and the local structure of the cleavage site, most notably the linker sequence flanking the bioprocessing recognition site on the tag side. A novel spectroscopic method is reported and used to rapidly and accurately measure CBM9 fusion-tag bioprocessing kinetics and their dependence on the choice of linker sequence. The assay monitors energy transfer between a lanthanide-based donor bound to the CBM9 tag and an acceptor fluorophore presented on the target protein or peptide. Enzyme-catalyzed cleavage of the fusion tag terminates this resonance energy transfer, resulting in a change in fluorescence intensity that can be monitored to quantify substrate concentration over time. The assay is simple, fast and accurate, providing k(cat)/K(M) values that contain standard errors of less than 3%. As a result, both substantial and subtle differences in bioprocessing kinetics can be measured and used to guide bioproduct design. 2009 American Institute of Chemical Engineers

  7. Novel approaches to estimating the turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate from low- and moderate-resolution velocity fluctuation time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wacławczyk, Marta; Ma, Yong-Feng; Kopeć, Jacek M.; Malinowski, Szymon P.

    2017-11-01

    In this paper we propose two approaches to estimating the turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) dissipation rate, based on the zero-crossing method by Sreenivasan et al. (1983). The original formulation requires a fine resolution of the measured signal, down to the smallest dissipative scales. However, due to finite sampling frequency, as well as measurement errors, velocity time series obtained from airborne experiments are characterized by the presence of effective spectral cutoffs. In contrast to the original formulation the new approaches are suitable for use with signals originating from airborne experiments. The suitability of the new approaches is tested using measurement data obtained during the Physics of Stratocumulus Top (POST) airborne research campaign as well as synthetic turbulence data. They appear useful and complementary to existing methods. We show the number-of-crossings-based approaches respond differently to errors due to finite sampling and finite averaging than the classical power spectral method. Hence, their application for the case of short signals and small sampling frequencies is particularly interesting, as it can increase the robustness of turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate retrieval.

  8. Novel approaches to estimating the turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate from low- and moderate-resolution velocity fluctuation time series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Wacławczyk

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we propose two approaches to estimating the turbulent kinetic energy (TKE dissipation rate, based on the zero-crossing method by Sreenivasan et al. (1983. The original formulation requires a fine resolution of the measured signal, down to the smallest dissipative scales. However, due to finite sampling frequency, as well as measurement errors, velocity time series obtained from airborne experiments are characterized by the presence of effective spectral cutoffs. In contrast to the original formulation the new approaches are suitable for use with signals originating from airborne experiments. The suitability of the new approaches is tested using measurement data obtained during the Physics of Stratocumulus Top (POST airborne research campaign as well as synthetic turbulence data. They appear useful and complementary to existing methods. We show the number-of-crossings-based approaches respond differently to errors due to finite sampling and finite averaging than the classical power spectral method. Hence, their application for the case of short signals and small sampling frequencies is particularly interesting, as it can increase the robustness of turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate retrieval.

  9. Kinetic modeling of ultrasound-assisted extraction of phenolic compounds from grape marc: influence of acoustic energy density and temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Yang; Zhang, Zhihang; Sun, Da-Wen

    2014-07-01

    The effects of acoustic energy density (6.8-47.4 W/L) and temperature (20-50 °C) on the extraction yields of total phenolics and tartaric esters during ultrasound-assisted extraction from grape marc were investigated in this study. The ultrasound treatment was performed in a 25-kHz ultrasound bath system and the 50% aqueous ethanol was used as the solvent. The initial extraction rate and final extraction yield increased with the increase of acoustic energy density and temperature. The two site kinetic model was used to simulate the kinetics of extraction process and the diffusion model based on the Fick's second law was employed to determine the effective diffusion coefficient of phenolics in grape marc. Both models gave satisfactory quality of data fit. The diffusion process was divided into one fast stage and one slow stage and the diffusion coefficients in both stages were calculated. Within the current experimental range, the diffusion coefficients of total phenolics and tartaric esters for both diffusion stages increased with acoustic energy density. Meanwhile, the rise of temperature also resulted in the increase of diffusion coefficients of phenolics except the diffusion coefficient of total phenolics in the fast stage, the value of which being the highest at 40 °C. Moreover, an empirical equation was suggested to correlate the effective diffusion coefficient of phenolics in grape marc with acoustic energy density and temperature. In addition, the performance comparison of ultrasound-assisted extraction and convention methods demonstrates that ultrasound is an effective and promising technology to extract bioactive substances from grape marc. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rates in the polar mesosphere measured by a 3-MHz-Doppler radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latteck, R.; Singer, W.; Hocking, W. K.

    2005-08-01

    Turbulence produces changes in the spectral width of a backscattered radar signal which can be used to deduce turbulent energy dissipation rates at the region of the scatter. Since the radar signal spectrum is also influenced by the background wind field causing broadening effects of the spectrum, a system with a relative small beam width as well as corresponding methods to correct for the non-turbulent broadening of the spectrum are necessary for the estimation of reliable energy dissipation rates. The new narrow beam MF radar at Saura on Andøya island in northern Norway has got a Mills-Cross antenna with a minimum beam width of θ = 6.6° (Half-Power-Full-Width, one way) and a modular transceiver system which provides high flexibility in beam pointing as well as beam forming. An correction method for non-turbulent spectral broadening effects has been implemented for the estimation of turbulence intensities from the width of the observed signal spectra. The method requires the precise knowledge of the antenna radiation pattern and real-time measurements of the wind field. The critical steps of the estimation of the turbulent part of the signal spectrum are discussed. Turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rates based on the spectral width method are obtained with the Saura MF radar since September 2003. The radar results are compared with corresponding data from rocket measurements at Andenes under summer and winter conditions, as well as with the results from the Kühlungsborn Mechanistic Circulation Model (KMCM). The mean turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rates basing on these radar measurements are about 5 mW/kg at 60 km altitude and about 20 mW/kg at 80 km, in reasonable agreement with mean turbulence intensities obtained from previous rocket soundings at Andenes.

  11. Reconciling disparate views of template-directed nucleation through measurement of calcite nucleation kinetics and binding energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, Laura M; Giuffre, Anthony J; Han, Nizhou; Tao, Jinhui; Wang, Debin; De Yoreo, James J; Dove, Patricia M

    2014-01-28

    The physical basis for how macromolecules regulate the onset of mineral formation in calcifying tissues is not well established. A popular conceptual model assumes the organic matrix provides a stereochemical match during cooperative organization of solute ions. In contrast, another uses simple binding assays to identify good promoters of nucleation. Here, we reconcile these two views and provide a mechanistic explanation for template-directed nucleation by correlating heterogeneous nucleation barriers with crystal-substrate-binding free energies. We first measure the kinetics of calcite nucleation onto model substrates that present different functional group chemistries (carboxyl, thiol, phosphate, and hydroxyl) and conformations (C11 and C16 chain lengths). We find rates are substrate-specific and obey predictions of classical nucleation theory at supersaturations that extend above the solubility of amorphous calcium carbonate. Analysis of the kinetic data shows the thermodynamic barrier to nucleation is reduced by minimizing the interfacial free energy of the system, γ. We then use dynamic force spectroscopy to independently measure calcite-substrate-binding free energies, ΔGb. Moreover, we show that within the classical theory of nucleation, γ and ΔGb should be linearly related. The results bear out this prediction and demonstrate that low-energy barriers to nucleation correlate with strong crystal-substrate binding. This relationship is general to all functional group chemistries and conformations. These findings provide a physical model that reconciles the long-standing concept of templated nucleation through stereochemical matching with the conventional wisdom that good binders are good nucleators. The alternative perspectives become internally consistent when viewed through the lens of crystal-substrate binding.

  12. Kinetics and heterogeneity of energy transfer from light harvesting complex II to photosystem I in the supercomplex isolated from Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santabarbara, Stefano; Tibiletti, Tania; Remelli, William; Caffarri, Stefano

    2017-03-29

    State transitions are a phenomenon that maintains the excitation balance between photosystem II (PSII) and photosystem I (PSI-LHCI) by controlling their relative absorption cross-sections. Under light conditions exciting PSII preferentially, a trimeric LHCII antenna moves from PSII to PSI-LHCI to form the PSI-LHCI-LHCII supercomplex. In this work, the excited state dynamics in the PSI-LHCI and PSI-LHCI-LHCII supercomplexes isolated from Arabidopsis have been investigated by picosecond time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. The excited state decays were analysed using two approaches based on either (i) a sum of discrete exponentials or (ii) a continuous distribution of lifetimes. The results indicate that the energy transfer from LHCII to the bulk of the PSI antenna occurs with an average macroscopic transfer rate in the 35-65 ns-1 interval. Yet, the most satisfactory description of the data is obtained when considering a heterogeneous population containing two PSI-LHCI-LHCII supercomplexes characterised by a transfer time of ∼15 and ∼60 ns-1, likely due to the differences in the strength and orientation of LHCII harboured to PSI. Both these values are of the same order of magnitude of those estimated for the average energy transfer rates from the low energy spectral forms of LHCI to the bulk of the PSI antenna (15-40 ns-1), but they are slower than the transfer from the bulk antenna of PSI to the reaction centre (>150 ns-1), implying a relatively small kinetics bottleneck for the energy transfer from LHCII. Nevertheless, the kinetic limitation imposed by excited state diffusion has a negligible impact on the photochemical quantum efficiency of the supercomplex, which remains about 98% in the case of PSI-LHCI.

  13. Use of latent heat storage to conserve energy during drying and its effect on drying kinetics of a food product

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devahastin, Sakamon; Pitaksuriyarat, Saovakhon [Department of Food Engineering, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, 91 Pracha u-tid Road, Bangkok 10140 (Thailand)

    2006-10-15

    The present study aimed at investigating the feasibility of using a latent heat storage (LHS) with paraffin wax as a phase change material (PCM) to store excess solar energy and release it when the energy availability is inadequate or not available. First, attention was given on the heat transfer characteristics of the PCM during the charge and discharge periods of the LHS. The effects of inlet hot air temperature in the range of 70-90{sup o}C and inlet air velocities of 1 and 2ms{sup -1} on the charge time were determined, while during the discharge period only the effect of inlet ambient air velocity was considered. The effect of the use of LHS on the drying kinetics of sweet potato and the ability of the LHS to conserve energy during drying of sweet potato were also determined. It was found that the drying rate of sweet potato increased with a decrease of the inlet ambient air velocity. The amount of the energy extractable from the LHS was 1920 and 1386kJminkg{sup -1} and the energy savings was 40% and 34% when using an inlet ambient air velocity of 1 and 2ms{sup -1}, respectively. (author)

  14. Bi-Directional Energy Cascades and the Origin of Kinetic Alfvénic and Whistler Turbulence in the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, M. L.; Che, H.; Vinas, A. F.

    2014-12-01

    The observed ion-kinetic scale turbulence spectrum in the solar wind raises the question of how that turbulence originates. Observations of keV energetic electrons during solar quiet-time suggest them as possible source of free energy to drive the turbulence. Using particle-in-cell simulations, we explore how free energy in energetic electrons, released by an electron two-stream instability drives Weibel-like electromagnetic waves that excite wave-wave interactions. Consequently, both kinetic Alfvénic and whistler turbulence are excited that evolve through inverse and forward magnetic energy cascades.

  15. PFI-ZEKE (Pulsed Field Ionization-Zero Electron Kinetic Energy) para el estudio de iones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castaño, F.; Fernández, J. A.; Basterretxea, A. Longarte. F.; Sánchez Rayo, M. N.; Martínez, R.

    Entre las áreas hacia donde ha evolucionado la Química en los últimos años están los estudios de sistemas con especies reactivas de alta energía y los dominados por fuerzas intermoleculares débiles, con energías de unas pocas kcal/mol. En efecto, el estudio de las propiedades de los iones, comenzando por su relación con la molécula neutra de la que procede, la energía de ionización, los estados vibracionales y rotacionales, energías de enlace de Van der Waals entre el ión y una amplia variedad de otras moléculas, sus confórmeros o isómeros y sus reacciones o semi-reacciones químicas están en la raíz de la necesidad de la espectroscopía conocida como PFI-ZEKE, Pulsed Field Ionization-Zero Electron Kinetic Energy. Entre las aplicaciones que requieren estos conocimientos se encuentran la generación de plasmas para la fabricación de semiconductores, memorias magnéticas, etc, así como los sistemas astrofísicos, la ionosfera terrestre, etc. La espectroscopía ZEKE es una evolución de las de fluorescencia inducida por láser, LIF, ionización multifotónica acrecentada por resonancia, REMPI, con uno y dos colores y acoplada a un sistema de tiempo de vuelo, REMPI-TOF-MS, y las espectroscopías de doble resonancia IR-UV y UV-UV. Sus espectros y la ayuda de cálculos ab inicio permite determinar las energías de enlace de complejos de van der Waals en estados fundamental y excitados, identificar confórmeros e isómeros, obtener energías de ionización experimentales aproximadas (100 cm-1) y otras variables de interés. Al igual que con LIF, REMPI y dobles resonancias, es posible utilizar muestras gaseosas, pero los espectros están muy saturados de bandas y su interpretación es difícil o imposible. Se evitan estas dificultades estudiando las moléculas o complejos en expansiones supersónicas, donde la T de los grados de libertad solo alcanzan unos pocos K. Para realizar experimentos de ZEKE hay que utilizar una propiedad recientemente

  16. Influence of the height of the vegetation cover in the variation of the kinetic energy of raindrops intercepted; Influencia de la altura de la cubierta vegetal en la variacion de la energia cinetica de las gotas de lluvia interceptadas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roldan Soriano, M.

    2009-07-01

    The erosive capacity of raindrops is function of mass (size) and terminal velocity. Drop mass and velocity govern the inherent erosivity of rainfall through kinetic energy. Kinetic energy is a very important property of the rainfall because it is one of the sources of energy in the process of water erosion. Vegetative canopy intercepts the raindrops and causes a variation on this rainfall kinetic energy due to modification of diameters and velocities distributions. If the height of canopy is enough, the bigger intercepted drops could achieve high velocities and their kinetic energies can increases. In this paper a quantitative evaluation of the increase of kinetic energy of intercepted drops is obtained and it is showed that this kinetic energy increases exponentially with vegetation height. (Author) 9 refs.

  17. Interfacial mixing in high-energy-density matter with a multiphysics kinetic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haack, Jeffrey R; Hauck, Cory D; Murillo, Michael S

    2017-12-01

    We have extended a recently developed multispecies, multitemperature Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook model [Haack et al., J. Stat. Phys. 168, 822 (2017)JSTPBS0022-471510.1007/s10955-017-1824-9], to include multiphysics capabilities that enable modeling of a wider range of physical conditions. In terms of geometry, we have extended from the spatially homogeneous setting to one spatial dimension. In terms of the physics, we have included an atomic ionization model, accurate collision physics across coupling regimes, self-consistent electric fields, and degeneracy in the electronic screening. We apply the model to a warm dense matter scenario in which the ablator-fuel interface of an inertial confinement fusion target is heated, but for larger length and time scales and for much higher temperatures than can be simulated using molecular dynamics. Relative to molecular dynamics, the kinetic model greatly extends the temperature regime and the spatiotemporal scales over which we are able to model. In our numerical results we observe hydrogen from the ablator material jetting into the fuel during the early stages of the implosion and compare the relative size of various diffusion components (Fickean diffusion, electrodiffusion, and barodiffusion) that drive this process. We also examine kinetic effects, such as anisotropic distributions and velocity separation, in order to determine when this problem can be described with a hydrodynamic model.

  18. Interfacial mixing in high-energy-density matter with a multiphysics kinetic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haack, Jeffrey R.; Hauck, Cory D.; Murillo, Michael S.

    2017-12-01

    We have extended a recently developed multispecies, multitemperature Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook model [Haack et al., J. Stat. Phys. 168, 822 (2017), 10.1007/s10955-017-1824-9], to include multiphysics capabilities that enable modeling of a wider range of physical conditions. In terms of geometry, we have extended from the spatially homogeneous setting to one spatial dimension. In terms of the physics, we have included an atomic ionization model, accurate collision physics across coupling regimes, self-consistent electric fields, and degeneracy in the electronic screening. We apply the model to a warm dense matter scenario in which the ablator-fuel interface of an inertial confinement fusion target is heated, but for larger length and time scales and for much higher temperatures than can be simulated using molecular dynamics. Relative to molecular dynamics, the kinetic model greatly extends the temperature regime and the spatiotemporal scales over which we are able to model. In our numerical results we observe hydrogen from the ablator material jetting into the fuel during the early stages of the implosion and compare the relative size of various diffusion components (Fickean diffusion, electrodiffusion, and barodiffusion) that drive this process. We also examine kinetic effects, such as anisotropic distributions and velocity separation, in order to determine when this problem can be described with a hydrodynamic model.

  19. Evaluation of the kinetic energy of the torso by magneto-inertial measurement unit during the sit-to-stand movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepetit, Kevin; Ben Mansour, Khalil; Boudaoud, Sofiane; Kinugawa-Bourron, Kiyoka; Marin, Frédéric

    2018-01-23

    Sit-to-stand tests are used in geriatrics as a qualitative issue in order to evaluate motor control and stability. In terms of measured indicators, it is traditionally the duration of the task that is reported, however it appears that the use of the kinetic energy as a new quantitative criterion allows getting a better understanding of musculoskeletal deficits of elderly subjects. The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility to obtain the measure of kinetic energy using magneto-inertial measurement units (MIMU) during sit-to-stand movements at various paces. 26 healthy subjects contributed to this investigation. Measured results were compared to a marker-based motion capture using the correlation coefficient and the normalized root mean square error (nRMSE). nRMSE were below 10% and correlation coefficients were over 0.97. In addition, errors on the mean kinetic energy were also investigated using Bland-Altman 95% limits of agreement (0.63 J-0.77 J), RMSE (0.29 J-0.38 J) and correlation coefficient (0.96-0.98). The results obtained highlighted that the method based on MIMU data could be an alternative to optoelectronic data acquisition to assess the kinetic energy of the torso during the sit-to-stand test, suggesting this method as being a promising alternative to determine kinetic energy during the sit-to-stand movement. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Generalized essential energy space random walks to more effectively accelerate solute sampling in aqueous environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Chao; Zheng, Lianqing; Yang, Wei

    2012-01-28

    Molecular dynamics sampling can be enhanced via the promoting of potential energy fluctuations, for instance, based on a Hamiltonian modified with the addition of a potential-energy-dependent biasing term. To overcome the diffusion sampling issue, which reveals the fact that enlargement of event-irrelevant energy fluctuations may abolish sampling efficiency, the essential energy space random walk (EESRW) approach was proposed earlier. To more effectively accelerate the sampling of solute conformations in aqueous environment, in the current work, we generalized the EESRW method to a two-dimension-EESRW (2D-EESRW) strategy. Specifically, the essential internal energy component of a focused region and the essential interaction energy component between the focused region and the environmental region are employed to define the two-dimensional essential energy space. This proposal is motivated by the general observation that in different conformational events, the two essential energy components have distinctive interplays. Model studies on the alanine dipeptide and the aspartate-arginine peptide demonstrate sampling improvement over the original one-dimension-EESRW strategy; with the same biasing level, the present generalization allows more effective acceleration of the sampling of conformational transitions in aqueous solution. The 2D-EESRW generalization is readily extended to higher dimension schemes and employed in more advanced enhanced-sampling schemes, such as the recent orthogonal space random walk method. © 2012 American Institute of Physics

  1. Fission Fragment Mass Distributions and Total Kinetic Energy Release of 235-Uranium and 238-Uranium in Neutron-Induced Fission at Intermediate and Fast Neutron Energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duke, Dana Lynn [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-11-12

    This Ph.D. dissertation describes a measurement of the change in mass distributions and average total kinetic energy (TKE) release with increasing incident neutron energy for fission of 235U and 238U. Although fission was discovered over seventy-five years ago, open questions remain about the physics of the fission process. The energy of the incident neutron, En, changes the division of energy release in the resulting fission fragments, however, the details of energy partitioning remain ambiguous because the nucleus is a many-body quantum system. Creating a full theoretical model is difficult and experimental data to validate existing models are lacking. Additional fission measurements will lead to higher-quality models of the fission process, therefore improving applications such as the development of next-generation nuclear reactors and defense. This work also paves the way for precision experiments such as the Time Projection Chamber (TPC) for fission cross section measurements and the Spectrometer for Ion Determination in Fission (SPIDER) for precision mass yields.

  2. Cars and Kinetic Energy--Some Simple Physics with Real-World Relevance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parthasarathy, Raghuveer

    2012-01-01

    Understanding energy usage is crucial to understanding modern civilization, as well as many of the challenges it faces. Energy-related issues also offer real-world examples of important physical concepts, and as such have been the focus of several articles in "The Physics Teacher" in the past few decades (e.g., Refs. 1-5, noted further below).…

  3. N-point free energy distribution function in one dimensional random directed polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Dotsenko

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Explicit expression for the N-point free energy distribution function in one dimensional directed polymers in a random potential is derived in terms of the Bethe ansatz replica technique. The obtained result is equivalent to the one derived earlier by Prolhac and Spohn [J. Stat. Mech., 2011, P03020].

  4. Energy loss and set-up due to breaking random waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Battjes, J.A.; Janssen, J.P.F.M.

    1978-01-01

    A description is given of a model developed for the prediction of the dissipation of energy in random waves breaking on a beach. The dissipation rate per breaking wave is estimated from that in a bore of corresponding height, while the probability of occurrence of breaking waves is estimated on the

  5. Internal calibration Förster resonance energy transfer assay: a real-time approach for determining protease kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ling; Liu, Yan; Song, Yang; Saavedra, Amanda N; Pan, Songqin; Xiang, Wensheng; Liao, Jiayu

    2013-04-08

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) technology has been widely used in biological and biomedical research. This powerful tool can elucidate protein interactions in either a dynamic or steady state. We recently developed a series of FRET-based technologies to determine protein interaction dissociation constant and for use in high-throughput screening assays of SUMOylation. SUMO (small ubiquitin-like modifier) is conjugated to substrates through an enzymatic cascade. This important posttranslational protein modification is critical for multiple biological processes. Sentrin/SUMO-specific proteases (SENPs) act as endopeptidases to process the pre-SUMO or as isopeptidases to deconjugate SUMO from its substrate. Here, we describe a novel quantitative FRET-based protease assay for determining the kinetics of SENP1. Our strategy is based on the quantitative analysis and differentiation of fluorescent emission signals at the FRET acceptor emission wavelengths. Those fluorescent emission signals consist of three components: the FRET signal and the fluorescent emissions of donor (CyPet) and acceptor (YPet). Unlike our previous method in which donor and acceptor direct emissions were excluded by standard curves, the three fluorescent emissions were determined quantitatively during the SENP digestion process from onesample. New mathematical algorithms were developed to determine digested substrate concentrations directly from the FRET signal and donor/acceptor direct emissions. The kinetic parameters, kcat, KM, and catalytic efficiency (kcat/KM) of SENP1 catalytic domain for pre-SUMO1/2/3 were derived. Importantly, the general principles of this new quantitative methodology of FRET-based protease kinetic determinations can be applied to other proteases in a robust and systems biology approach.

  6. Internal Calibration Förster Resonance Energy Transfer Assay: A Real-Time Approach for Determining Protease Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ling; Liu, Yan; Song, Yang; Saavedra, Amanda N.; Pan, Songqin; Xiang, Wensheng; Liao, Jiayu

    2013-01-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) technology has been widely used in biological and biomedical research. This powerful tool can elucidate protein interactions in either a dynamic or steady state. We recently developed a series of FRET-based technologies to determine protein interaction dissociation constant and for use in high-throughput screening assays of SUMOylation. SUMO (small ubiquitin-like modifier) is conjugated to substrates through an enzymatic cascade. This important posttranslational protein modification is critical for multiple biological processes. Sentrin/SUMO-specific proteases (SENPs) act as endopeptidases to process the pre-SUMO or as isopeptidases to deconjugate SUMO from its substrate. Here, we describe a novel quantitative FRET-based protease assay for determining the kinetics of SENP1. Our strategy is based on the quantitative analysis and differentiation of fluorescent emission signals at the FRET acceptor emission wavelengths. Those fluorescent emission signals consist of three components: the FRET signal and the fluorescent emissions of donor (CyPet) and acceptor (YPet). Unlike our previous method in which donor and acceptor direct emissions were excluded by standard curves, the three fluorescent emissions were determined quantitatively during the SENP digestion process from onesample. New mathematical algorithms were developed to determine digested substrate concentrations directly from the FRET signal and donor/acceptor direct emissions. The kinetic parameters, kcat, KM, and catalytic efficiency (kcat/KM) of SENP1 catalytic domain for pre-SUMO1/2/3 were derived. Importantly, the general principles of this new quantitative methodology of FRET-based protease kinetic determinations can be applied to other proteases in a robust and systems biology approach. PMID:23567524

  7. Quantitative FRET (Förster Resonance Energy Transfer) analysis for SENP1 protease kinetics determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Liao, Jiayu

    2013-02-21

    Reversible posttranslational modifications of proteins with ubiquitin or ubiquitin-like proteins (Ubls) are widely used to dynamically regulate protein activity and have diverse roles in many biological processes. For example, SUMO covalently modifies a large number or proteins with important roles in many cellular processes, including cell-cycle regulation, cell survival and death, DNA damage response, and stress response 1-5. SENP, as SUMO-specific protease, functions as an endopeptidase in the maturation of SUMO precursors or as an isopeptidase to remove SUMO from its target proteins and refresh the SUMOylation cycle (1,3,6,7). The catalytic efficiency or specificity of an enzyme is best characterized by the ratio of the kinetic constants, kcat/KM. In several studies, the kinetic parameters of SUMO-SENP pairs have been determined by various methods, including polyacrylamide gel-based western-blot, radioactive-labeled substrate, fluorescent compound or protein labeled substrate (8-13). However, the polyacrylamide-gel-based techniques, which used the "native" proteins but are laborious and technically demanding, that do not readily lend themselves to detailed quantitative analysis. The obtained kcat/KM from studies using tetrapeptides or proteins with an ACC (7-amino-4-carbamoylmetylcoumarin) or AMC (7-amino-4-methylcoumarin) fluorophore were either up to two orders of magnitude lower than the natural substrates or cannot clearly differentiate the iso- and endopeptidase activities of SENPs. Recently, FRET-based protease assays were used to study the deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) or SENPs with the FRET pair of cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) (9,10,14,15). The ratio of acceptor emission to donor emission was used as the quantitative parameter for FRET signal monitor for protease activity determination. However, this method ignored signal cross-contaminations at the acceptor and donor emission wavelengths by acceptor and donor

  8. Solar energy dryer kinetics using flat-plate finned collector and forced convection for potato drying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batubara, Fatimah; Misran, Erni; Dina, Sari Farah; Heppy

    2017-06-01

    Research on potato drying using the indirect solar dryer with flat-plate finned collector and forced convection has been done. The research was conducted at the outdoor field of Laboratory of Institute for Research and Standardization of Industry on June 14th-23rd, 2016 from 9:00 am to 4:00 pm. This research aims to obtain the drying kinetics model of potato (Solanumtuberosum L.) using an indirect solar dryer's (ISD) with flat plate-finned collector and forced convection. The result will be compared to the open sun drying (OSD) method. Weather conditions during the drying process took place as follows; surrounding air temperature was in the range 27 to 34.7 °C, relative humidity (RH) 29.5 to 61.0% and the intensity of solar radiation 105.6 to 863.1 Watt/m2. The dried potato thicknesses were 1.0 cm, 1.5 cm and 2.0 cm, with the average initial water content of 76.46%. The average temperature in the collector chamber ranged from 42.2 to 57.4 °C and the drying chamber was at 46.2 °C. The best drying result was obtained from a sample size of 1 cm thickness using the IDS method with an average drying rate of 0.018 kg H2O per kg dry-weight.hour and the water content was constant at 5.02% in 21 hours of drying time. The most suitable kinetics model is Page model, equation MR = exp (-0.049 t1,336) for 1.0 cm thickness, exp (-0.066 t1,222) for 1.5 cm thickness and exp (-0.049 t1,221) for 2.0 cm thickness. The quality of potato drying using ISD method is better than using OSD which can be seen from the color produced.

  9. Enzymolysis kinetics and structural characteristics of rice protein with energy-gathered ultrasound and ultrasound assisted alkali pretreatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Suyun; Yang, Xue; Zhang, Yanyan; Ma, Haile; Qu, Wenjuan; Ye, Xiaofei; Muatasim, Rahma; Oladejo, Ayobami Olayemi

    2016-07-01

    This research investigated the structural characteristics and enzymolysis kinetics of rice protein which was pretreated by energy-gathered ultrasound and ultrasound assisted alkali. The structural characteristics of rice protein before and after the pretreatment were performed with surface hydrophobicity and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR). There was an increase in the intensity of fluorescence spectrum and changes in functional groups after the pretreatment on rice protein compared with the control (without ultrasound and ultrasound assisted alkali processed), thus significantly enhancing efficiency of the enzymatic hydrolysis. A simplified kinetic equation for the enzymolysis model with the impeded reaction of enzyme was deduced to successfully describe the enzymatic hydrolysis of rice protein by different pretreatments. The initial observed rate constants (Kin,0) as well as ineffective coefficients (kimp) were proposed and obtained based on the experimental observation. The results showed that the parameter of kin,0 increased after ultrasound and ultrasound assisted alkali pretreatments, which proved the effects of the pretreatments on the substrate enhancing the enzymolysis process and had relation to the structure changes of the pretreatments on the substrate. Furthermore, the applicability of the simplified model was demonstrated by the enzymatic hydrolysis process for other materials. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Nine-month results of the BIOHELIX-I clinical trial study: Evaluation of the PRO-Kinetic Energy cobalt chromium bare-metal stent system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Tesfaldet T; Richardt, Gert; Lansky, Alexandra; Carney, Robert J; Khan, Muhammad Akram; Shehadeh, Abbas; Zeymer, Uwe; Gupta, Saurabh

    2017-12-22

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of the PRO-Kinetic Energy (PKE) Cobalt Chromium Coronary Stent System (BIOTRONIK AG, Switzerland). Percutaneous coronary intervention is a mainstay treatment for symptomatic coronary artery disease (CAD). While drug-eluting stents constitute a majority of implants, bare-metal stents (BMS) remain important for a subset of patients. Newer generation BMS offer advantages due to stent design improvements. The BIOHELIX-I study was a prospective, multicenter, non-randomized, single arm clinical trial designed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the PKE bare metal stent. Thirty-three study centers (US, Columbia, Europe) enrolled 329 patients for treatment of one target lesion (≤31 mm). Eligible patients received a PKE stent(s), at least one month of dual antiplatelet therapy and were followed for 36-months. The primary endpoint was the 9-month rate of target vessel failure (TVF) compared with a prespecified performance goal of 18.7% derived from prior BMS trials. The mean patient age was 69 years, 28.6% with diabetes. The mean lesion length was 13.7 ± 6.0 mm. The 9-month TVF rate was 9.06% and met the primary endpoint (P stent was comparable to other BMS and is a viable option for treating CAD. The low observed rate of ischemia-driven TVR supports the safety and efficacy of the novel BMS design. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Thermal chemiluminescence from γ-irradiated polytetrafluoroethylene and its emission mechanism: Kinetic analysis and bond dissociation energy of fluoroperoxide group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Emi; Noguchi, Tsuyoshi; Akai, Nobuyuki; Ishii, Hiroshi; Satoh, Chikahiro; Hironiwa, Takayuki; Millington, Keith R.; Nakata, Munetaka

    2014-11-01

    Temperature dependence of the time evolution of chemiluminescence intensity from γ-irradiated polytetrafluoroethylene was examined by heating isothermally in the range of 150 and 200 °C. Kinetic analysis was carried out to estimate the rate constants, from which the dissociation energy of the Osbnd O bond in the fluoroperoxide group was determined to be 97 ± 4 kJ mol-1, being consistent with the corresponding value for small fluorocarbon model systems obtained by quantum chemical calculations. This strongly supports the emission mechanism [sbnd CF(OOF)sbnd CF2sbnd → sbnd COsbnd CF2sbnd + OF2 + hν] proposed in our previous paper to explain chemiluminescence from the γ-irradiated polytetrafluoroethylene.

  12. Free Energy Profile and Kinetics Studies of Paclitaxel Internalization from the Outer to the Inner Wall of Microtubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccari, Giorgio; Mori, Mattia; Rodríguez-Salarichs, Javier; Fang, Weishuo; Díaz, José Fernando; Botta, Maurizio

    2013-01-08

    Several pieces of experimental evidence led us to hypothesize that the mechanism of action of paclitaxel (Taxol) could involve a two-steps binding process, with paclitaxel first binding within the outer wall of microtubules and then moving into the inner binding site. In this work, we first used multiply targeted molecular dynamics (MTMD) for steering paclitaxel from the outer toward the inner binding site. This rough trajectory was then submitted to a refinement procedure in the path collective variables space. Paclitaxel binding energy was monitored along the refined pathway, highlighting the relevance of residues belonging to the H6-H7 and the M- loops. Computational results were supported by kinetics studies performed on fluorescent paclitaxel derivatives.

  13. Dipolar electrostatic energy effect on relaxation process of monolayers at air-water interface: analysis of thermodynamics and kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou-Yang, Wei; Weis, Martin; Lee, Keanchuan; Manaka, Takaaki; Iwamoto, Mitsumasa

    2009-12-28

    In order to understand the effect of electrostatic energy on phase transition from monolayer to multilayer, isobaric relaxation process of Langmuir monolayers composed of stearic acid or ferroelectric polyvinylidene fluoride and trifluoroethylene copolymer with various vinylidene fluoride (VDF) ratios is investigated in terms of thermodynamic and kinetic analysis. A monotonous decreasing tendency of material loss with respect to temperature is observed for stearic acid monolayer, which is due to thermal activation effect on phase transition from monolayer to multilayer. In contrast, for the ferroelectric monolayer it presents a nonmonotonous behavior of losing materials with a peak position near the Curie temperature, which is not only owing to thermal activation but also dipole moment change. This observation is confirmed for the copolymer monolayers with other VDF content ratios. Amazingly, for the ferroelectric monolayers a good correspondence is found for critical temperatures evaluated from several independent methods including the analysis on slow collapse. This finding again tells the fact that the relaxation process, namely phase transition from monolayer to multilayer, is greatly influenced by dipolar electrostatic energy. Moreover, the study of time dependent relaxation process reveals a diffusionlike behavior of multilayer structure formation, which cannot be interpreted by classical models. Hence a new model based on diffusion-driven material transfer is proposed and diffusivity of the copolymer molecules is estimated with a value of 0.4x10(-5) cm(2)/s. As a whole, this research reflects the importance of dipolar electrostatic energy for phase transition of monolayers at air-water interface.

  14. Kinetics of ultrasound-assisted extraction of antioxidant polyphenols from food by-products: Extraction and energy consumption optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradal, Delphine; Vauchel, Peggy; Decossin, Stéphane; Dhulster, Pascal; Dimitrov, Krasimir

    2016-09-01

    Ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) of antioxidant polyphenols from chicory grounds was studied in order to propose a suitable valorization of this food industry by-product. The main parameters influencing the extraction process were identified. A new mathematical model for multi-criteria optimization of UAE was proposed. This kinetic model permitted the following and the prediction of the yield of extracted polyphenols, the antioxidant activity of the obtained extracts and the energy consumption during the extraction process in wide ranges of temperature (20-60°C), ethanol content in the solvent (0-60% (vol.) in ethanol-water mixtures) and ultrasound power (0-100W). After experimental validation of the model, several simulations at different technological restrictions were performed to illustrate the potentiality of the model to find the optimal conditions for obtaining a given yield within minimal process duration or with minimal energy consumption. The advantage of ultrasound assistance was clearly demonstrated both for the reduction of extraction duration and for the reduction of energy consumption. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Parameters of the protein energy landscapes of several light-harvesting complexes probed via spectral hole growth kinetics measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herascu, Nicoleta; Najafi, Mehdi; Amunts, Alexey; Pieper, Jörg; Irrgang, Klaus-Dieter; Picorel, Rafael; Seibert, Michael; Zazubovich, Valter

    2011-03-31

    The parameters of barrier distributions on the protein energy landscape in the excited electronic state of the pigment/protein system have been determined by means of spectral hole burning for the lowest-energy pigments of CP43 core antenna complex and CP29 minor antenna complex of spinach Photosystem II (PS II) as well as of trimeric and monomeric LHCII complexes transiently associated with the pea Photosystem I (PS I) pool. All of these complexes exhibit sixty to several hundred times lower spectral hole burning yields as compared with molecular glassy solids previously probed by means of the hole growth kinetics measurements. Therefore, the entities (groups of atoms), which participate in conformational changes in protein, appear to be significantly larger and heavier than those in molecular glasses. No evidence of a small (∼1 cm(-1)) spectral shift tier of the spectral diffusion dynamics has been observed. Therefore, our data most likely reflect the true barrier distributions of the intact protein and not those related to the interface or surrounding host. Possible applications of the barrier distributions as well as the assignments of low-energy states of CP29 and LHCII are discussed in light of the above results.

  16. ION KINETIC ENERGY CONSERVATION AND MAGNETIC FIELD STRENGTH CONSTANCY IN MULTI-FLUID SOLAR WIND ALFVÉNIC TURBULENCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matteini, L.; Horbury, T. S.; Schwartz, S. J. [The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Pantellini, F. [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, UPMC, Universit Paris-Diderot, 5 Place Jules Janssen, F-92195 Meudon (France); Velli, M. [Department of Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences, UCLA, California (United States)

    2015-03-20

    We investigate the properties of plasma fluid motion in the large-amplitude, low-frequency fluctuations of highly Alfvénic fast solar wind. We show that protons locally conserve total kinetic energy when observed from an effective frame of reference comoving with the fluctuations. For typical properties of the fast wind, this frame can be reasonably identified by alpha particles which, due to their drift with respect to protons at about the Alfvén speed along the magnetic field, do not partake in the fluid low-frequency fluctuations. Using their velocity to transform the proton velocity into the frame of Alfvénic turbulence, we demonstrate that the resulting plasma motion is characterized by a constant absolute value of the velocity, zero electric fields, and aligned velocity and magnetic field vectors as expected for unidirectional Alfvénic fluctuations in equilibrium. We propose that this constraint, via the correlation between velocity and magnetic field in Alfvénic turbulence, is the origin of the observed constancy of the magnetic field; while the constant velocity corresponding to constant energy can only be observed in the frame of the fluctuations, the corresponding constant total magnetic field, invariant for Galilean transformations, remains the observational signature in the spacecraft frame of the constant total energy in the Alfvén turbulence frame.

  17. Enhancing Understanding of Magnetized High Energy Density Plasmas from Solid Liner Implosions Using Fluid Modeling with Kinetic Closures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masti, Robert; Srinivasan, Bhuvana; King, Jacob; Stoltz, Peter; Hansen, David; Held, Eric

    2017-10-01

    Recent results from experiments and simulations of magnetically driven pulsed power liners have explored the role of early-time electrothermal instability in the evolution of the MRT (magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor) instability. Understanding the development of these instabilities can lead to potential stabilization mechanisms; thereby providing a significant role in the success of fusion concepts such as MagLIF (Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion). For MagLIF the MRT instability is the most detrimental instability toward achieving fusion energy production. Experiments of high-energy density plasmas from wire-array implosions have shown the requirement for more advanced physics modeling than that of ideal magnetohydrodynamics. The overall focus of this project is on using a multi-fluid extended-MHD model with kinetic closures for thermal conductivity, resistivity, and viscosity. The extended-MHD model has been updated to include the SESAME equation-of-state tables and numerical benchmarks with this implementation will be presented. Simulations of MRT growth and evolution for MagLIF-relevant parameters will be presented using this extended-MHD model with the SESAME equation-of-state tables. This work is supported by the Department of Energy Office of Science under Grant Number DE-SC0016515.

  18. Kinetic and energy production analysis of pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass using a three-parallel Gaussian reaction model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tianju; Zhang, Jinzhi; Wu, Jinhu

    2016-07-01

    The kinetic and energy productions of pyrolysis of a lignocellulosic biomass were investigated using a three-parallel Gaussian distribution method in this work. The pyrolysis experiment of the pine sawdust was performed using a thermogravimetric-mass spectroscopy (TG-MS) analyzer. A three-parallel Gaussian distributed activation energy model (DAEM)-reaction model was used to describe thermal decomposition behaviors of the three components, hemicellulose, cellulose and lignin. The first, second and third pseudocomponents represent the fractions of hemicellulose, cellulose and lignin, respectively. It was found that the model is capable of predicting the pyrolysis behavior of the pine sawdust. The activation energy distribution peaks for the three pseudo-components were centered at 186.8, 197.5 and 203.9kJmol(-1) for the pine sawdust, respectively. The evolution profiles of H2, CH4, CO, and CO2 were well predicted using the three-parallel Gaussian distribution model. In addition, the chemical composition of bio-oil was also obtained by pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry instrument (Py-GC/MS). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A self-supporting wireless IoT node that uses kinetic energy harvesting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynggaard, Per

    2017-01-01

    The Internet-of-Things (IoT) is expected to be the next revolution of the internet where trillions of IoT nodes will be deployed on a global scale. It is foreseen that a considerable part of these will be deployed in smart buildings and smart homes where they will provide innovative solutions......, products, and services. However, this vision contains one major challenge in terms of providing energy to the wireless part of the IoT nodes. This paper proposes a specific solution in form of harvesting energy from a vibrating cantilever beam that has been set into vibration by some user activity...

  20. A stochastic study of electron transfer kinetics in nano-particulate photocatalysis: a comparison of the quasi-equilibrium approximation with a random walking model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Baoshun; Zhao, Xiujian; Yu, Jiaguo; Fujishima, Akira; Nakata, Kazuya

    2016-11-23

    In the photocatalysis of porous nano-crystalline materials, the transfer of electrons to O 2 plays an important role, which includes the electron transport to photocatalytic active centers and successive interfacial transfer to O 2 . The slowest of them will determine the overall speed of electron transfer in the photocatalysis reaction. Considering the photocatalysis of porous nano-crystalline TiO 2 as an example, although some experimental results have shown that the electron kinetics are limited by the interfacial transfer, we still lack the depth of understanding the microscopic mechanism from a theoretical viewpoint. In the present research, a stochastic quasi-equilibrium (QE) theoretical model and a stochastic random walking (RW) model were established to discuss the electron transport and electron interfacial transfer by taking the electron multi-trapping transport and electron interfacial transfer from the photocatalytic active centers to O 2 into consideration. By carefully investigating the effect of the electron Fermi level (E F ) and the photocatalytic center number on electron transport, we showed that the time taken for an electron to transport to a photocatalytic center predicated by the stochastic RW model was much lower than that predicted by the stochastic QE model, indicating that the electrons cannot reach a QE state during their transport to photocatalytic centers. The stochastic QE model predicted that the electron kinetics of a real photocatalysis for porous nano-crystalline TiO 2 should be limited by electron transport, whereas the stochastic RW model showed that the electron kinetics of a real photocatalysis can be limited by the interfacial transfer. Our simulation results show that the stochastic RW model was more in line with the real electron kinetics that have been observed in experiments, therefore it is concluded that the photoinduced electrons cannot reach a QE state before transferring to O 2 .

  1. Kinetics and

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Ahmadi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The aqueous degradation of Reactive Yellow 84 (RY84 by potassium peroxydisulfate (K2S2O8 has been studied in laboratory scale experiments. The effect of the initial concentrations of potassium peroxydisulfate and RY84, pH and temperature on RY84 degradation were also examined. Experimental data were analyzed using first and second-order kinetics. The degradation kinetics of RY84 of the potassium peroxydisulfate process followed the second-order reaction kinetics. These rate constants have an extreme values similar to of 9.493 mM−1min−1 at a peroxydisulfate dose of 4 mmol/L. Thermodynamic parameters such as activation (Ea and Gibbs free energy (ΔG° were also evaluated. The negative value of ΔGo and Ea shows the spontaneous reaction natural conditions and exothermic nature.

  2. No evidence that mRNAs have lower folding free energies than random sequences with the same dinucleotide distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Workman, Christopher; Krogh, Anders Stærmose

    1999-01-01

    This work investigates whether mRNA has a lower estimated folding free energy than random sequences. The free energy estimates are calculated by the mfold program for prediction of RNA secondary structures. For a set of 46 mRNAs it is shown that the predicted free energy is not significantly...... different from random sequences with the same dinucleotide distribution. For random sequences with the same mononucleotide distribution it has previously been shown that the native mRNA sequences have a lower predicted free energy, which indicates a more stable structure than random sequences. However......, dinucleotide content is important when assessing the significance of predicted free energy as the physical stability of RNA secondary structure is known to depend on dinucleotide base stacking energies. Even known RNA secondary structures, like tRNAs, can be shown to have predicted free energies...

  3. Across-phase biomass pyrolysis stoichiometry, energy balance, and product formation kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Predictive correlations between reactions occurring in the gas-, liquid- and solid-phases are necessary to economically utilize the thermochemical conversion of agricultural wastes impacting the food, water, and energy nexus. On the basis of an empirical mass balance (99.7%), this study established...

  4. Effects of microwave - fluidized bed drying on quality, energy consumption and drying kinetics of soybean kernels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshtaghaza, Mohammad Hadi; Darvishi, Hosain; Minaei, Saeid

    2015-08-01

    Moisture content of soybean kernel at harvest time is too high for storage, and needs to be reduced. In this research, drying characteristics, quality and energy requirement for microwave-fluidized bed drying of soybean kernels were studied. The results showed that air temperature (80-140 °C), velocity (1.8-4.5 m/s) and microwave power (200-500 W) significantly influenced drying time, moisture diffusivity, rehydration capacity, cracking, and specific energy consumption (P ≤ 0.05). Among the applied models, Page's model has the best performance to estimate the microwave-fluidized bed drying behavior of the soybean kernels. Moisture diffusivity values increased (6.25 × 10(-10) to 42.14 × 10(-10) m(2)/s) as the air velocity decreased and air temperature and microwave power increased. Activation energy was foundto be between 3.33 and 17.70 kJ/mol. Minimum cracking percentage of soybean kernels (12.96 %) was obtained at 80 °C, 1.8 m/s and 200 W treatments. The increase in microwave power and decrease in air velocity level decreased the rehydration capacity. Specific energy consumption varied from 50.94 to 338.76 MJ/kg water and the lowest specific energy consumption were obtained at 80 °C, 4.5 m/s and 500 W.

  5. Equilibrium and kinetics of DNA overstretching modeled with a quartic energy landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argudo, David; Purohit, Prashant K

    2014-11-04

    It is well known that the dsDNA molecule undergoes a phase transition from B-DNA into an overstretched state at high forces. For some time, the structure of the overstretched state remained unknown and highly debated, but recent advances in experimental techniques have presented evidence of more than one possible phase (or even a mixed phase) depending on ionic conditions, temperature, and basepair sequence. Here, we present a theoretical model to study the overstretching transition with the possibility that the overstretched state is a mixture of two phases: a structure with portions of inner strand separation (melted or M-DNA), and an extended phase that retains the basepair structure (S-DNA). We model the double-stranded DNA as a chain composed of n segments of length l, where the transition is studied by means of a Landau quartic potential with statistical fluctuations. The length l is a measure of cooperativity of the transition and is key to characterizing the overstretched phase. By analyzing the different values of l corresponding to a wide spectrum of experiments, we find that for a range of temperatures and ionic conditions, the overstretched form is likely to be a mix of M-DNA and S-DNA. For a transition close to a pure S-DNA state, where the change in extension is close to 1.7 times the original B-DNA length, we find l ? 25 basepairs regardless of temperature and ionic concentration. Our model is fully analytical, yet it accurately reproduces the force-extension curves, as well as the transient kinetic behavior, seen in DNA overstretching experiments.

  6. Design, analysis and testing of a piezoelectric flex transducer for harvesting bio-kinetic energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, A.; Zhu, M.; Tiwari, A.

    2013-12-01

    The increasing prevalence of low power consuming electronics brings greater potential to mobile energy harvesting devices as a possible power source. A new piezoelectric energy harvesting device, called the piezoelectric flex transducer (PFT), is presented and developed. A Finite Element Model (FEM) was developed to design and analyse the PFT. The PFT consists of a piezoelectric element sandwiched between substrate layers and metal endcaps that are able to amplify the axial force on the piezoelectric element. Based on the concept of the Cymbal transducer, the PFT can withstand higher forces, was retrofitted into a shoe and used to power a wireless sensor module whilst the subject with a body weight of 760N was wearing the shoe and ran at 3.1mph (1.4HZ on shoe), the PFT produced an average maximum power of 2.5mW (over 2MΩ load).

  7. Production of low kinetic energy electrons and energetic ion pairs by Intermolecular Coulombic Decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hergenhahn, Uwe

    2012-12-01

    The paper gives an introduction into Interatomic and Intermolecular Coulombic Decay (ICD). ICD is an autoionization process, which contrary to Auger decay involves neighbouring sites of the initial vacancy as an integral part of the decay transition. As a result of ICD, slow electrons are produced which generally are known to be active in radiation damage. The author summarizes the properties of ICD and reviews a number of important experiments performed in recent years. Intermolecular Coulombic Decay can generally take place in weakly bonded aggregates in the presence of ionizing particles or ionizing radiation. Examples collected here mostly use soft X-rays produced by synchrotron radiation to ionize, and use rare-gas clusters, water clusters or solutes in a liquid jet to observe ICD after irradiation. Intermolecular Coulombic Decay is initiated by single ionization into an excited state. The subsequent relaxation proceeds via an ultra-fast energy transfer to a neighbouring site, where a second ionization occurs. Secondary electrons from ICD have clearly been identified in numerous systems. ICD can take place after primary ionization, as the second step of a decay cascade which also involves Auger decay, or after resonant excitation with an energy which exceeds the ionization potential of the system. ICD is expected to play a role whenever particles or radiation with photon energies above the ionization energies for inner valence electrons are present in weakly bonded matter, e.g., biological tissue. The process produces at the same time a slow electron and two charged atomic or molecular fragments, which will lead to structural changes around the ionized site.

  8. High energy X-ray phase and dark-field imaging using a random absorption mask.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongchang; Kashyap, Yogesh; Cai, Biao; Sawhney, Kawal

    2016-07-28

    High energy X-ray imaging has unique advantage over conventional X-ray imaging, since it enables higher penetration into materials with significantly reduced radiation damage. However, the absorption contrast in high energy region is considerably low due to the reduced X-ray absorption cross section for most materials. Even though the X-ray phase and dark-field imaging techniques can provide substantially increased contrast and complementary information, fabricating dedicated optics for high energies still remain a challenge. To address this issue, we present an alternative X-ray imaging approach to produce transmission, phase and scattering signals at high X-ray energies by using a random absorption mask. Importantly, in addition to the synchrotron radiation source, this approach has been demonstrated for practical imaging application with a laboratory-based microfocus X-ray source. This new imaging method could be potentially useful for studying thick samples or heavy materials for advanced research in materials science.

  9. Dielectric matrix formulation of correlation energies in the Random Phase Approximation (RPA): inclusion of exchange effects

    CERN Document Server

    Mussard, Bastien; Jansen, Georg; Angyan, Janos

    2016-01-01

    Starting from the general expression for the ground state correlation energy in the adiabatic connection fluctuation dissipation theorem (ACFDT) framework, it is shown that the dielectric matrix formulation, which is usually applied to calculate the direct random phase approximation (dRPA) correlation energy, can be used for alternative RPA expressions including exchange effects. Within this famework, the ACFDT analog of the second order screened exchange (SOSEX) approximation leads to a logarithmic formula for the correlation energy similar to the direct RPA expression. Alternatively, the contribution of the exchange can be included in the kernel used to evaluate the response functions. In this case the use of an approximate kernel is crucial to simplify the formalism and to obtain a correlation energy in logarithmic form. Technical details of the implementation of these methods are discussed and it is shown that one can take advantage of density fitting or Cholesky decomposition techniques to improve the co...

  10. Cross-Scale Energy Transport and Kinetic Wave Properties Associated with Kelvin-Helmholtz Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Thomas W.

    In the Earth's magnetosphere, the magnetotail plasma sheet ions are much hotter than in the shocked solar wind. On the dawn-sector, the cold-component ions are more abundant and hotter by 30-40 percent when compared to the dusk sector. Recent statistical studies of the flank magnetopause and magnetosheath have shown that the level of temperature asymmetry of the magnetosheath is unable to account for this (Dimmock et al., 2015), so additional physical mechanisms must be at play, either at the magnetopause or plasma sheet, that contribute to this asymmetry. This thesis focuses on ion heating across the magnetopause boundary separating the magnetosheath and the magnetospheric plasmas, which is driven by mechanisms operating on fluid, ion and electron scales. One of the pending problems in collisionless astrophysical plasmas is to understand the plasma heating and transport across three fundamental scales: fluid, ion and electron. Presented here is evidence of the energy transport between the fluid and ion scales: energy is provided by a velocity shear at the magnetopause generating fluid-scale Kelvin-Helmholtz Instability and their rolled-up vortices, where an ion-scale fast magnetosonic wave packet located in the center of a Kelvin-Helmholtz vortex has sufficient energy to account for observed cold-component ion heating. In addition, a statistical analysis is performed on the ion-scale wave properties in the three main plasma regimes common to flank magnetopause boundary crossings when the boundary is unstable to KHI: hot and tenuous magnetospheric, cold and dense magnetosheath and mixed (H. Hasegawa, Fujimoto, Phan, et al., 2004). The statistical analysis shows that during KH events there is enhanced non-adiabatic heating calculated during ion scale wave intervals when compared to non-KH events. This suggests that during KH events there is more free energy for ion-scale wave generation, which in turn can heat ions more effectively when compared to cases when KH

  11. High Voltage-Cylinder Sector Analyzer 300/15: a cylindrical sector analyzer for electron kinetic energies up to 15 keV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio-Zuazo, J; Escher, M; Merkel, M; Castro, G R

    2010-04-01

    We have developed an energy analyzer, High Voltage-Cylinder Sector Analyzer 300/15, for electron kinetic energies up to 15 keV. It is especially suited for hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, but also for ultraviolet and soft x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy, x-ray photoemission spectroscopy), Auger electron spectroscopy, and reflection high energy electron spectroscopy. The analyzer is based on a cylinder sector with 90 degrees deflection, 300 mm slit-to-slit distance, and a four-element pre-retarding lens system with 50 mm sample-to-lens distance. The result is a very compact design of the analyzer that is easily integrated into a multipurpose experiment with different techniques. A low noise/low drift electronics is capable of continuous energy scans from 0 to 15 keV using nonlinear lens curves. The first analyzer is allocated at the Spanish CRG SpLine beamline at the ESRF at an end station where simultaneous surface x-ray diffraction is possible. The analyzer is operated routinely since 2006 up to 15 keV electron kinetic energy, expanding the achievable electron kinetic energy range compared to other commercial analyzers. In this work we present a detailed description of the developed electron analyzer. The analyzer capabilities, in terms of energy resolution and transmission, are shown by using an electron gun, an ultraviolet-discharge lamp, and hard x-ray synchrotron radiation as excitation sources.

  12. Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Robertson, William C

    2002-01-01

    Confounded by kinetic energy? Suspect that teaching about simple machines isn t really so simple? Exasperated by electricity? If you fear the study of energy is beyond you, this entertaining book will do more than introduce you to the topic. It will help you actually understand it. At the book s heart are easy-to-grasp explanations of energy basics work, kinetic energy, potential energy, and the transformation of energy and energy as it relates to simple machines, heat energy, temperature, and heat transfer. Irreverent author Bill Robertson suggests activities that bring the basic concepts of energy to life with common household objects. Each chapter ends with a summary and an applications section that uses practical examples such as roller coasters and home heating systems to explain energy transformations and convection cells. The final chapter brings together key concepts in an easy-to-grasp explanation of how electricity is generated. Energy is the second book in the Stop Faking It! series published by NS...

  13. Inclusive dielectron spectra in p+p collisions at 3.5 GeV kinetic beam energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agakishiev, G.; Balanda, A.; Belver, D.; Belyaev, A.; Blanco, A.; Böhmer, M.; Boyard, J. L.; Cabanelas, P.; Castro, E.; Chen, J. C.; Chernenko, S.; Christ, T.; Destefanis, M.; Dohrmann, F.; Dybczak, A.; Epple, E.; Fabbietti, L.; Fateev, O.; Finocchiaro, P.; Fonte, P.; Friese, J.; Fröhlich, I.; Galatyuk, T.; Garzón, J. A.; Gernhäuser, R.; Gilardi, C.; Golubeva, M.; González-Díaz, D.; Guber, F.; Gumberidze, M.; Heinz, T.; Hennino, T.; Holzmann, R.; Ierusalimov, A.; Iori, I.; Ivashkin, A.; Jurkovic, M.; Kämpfer, B.; Kanaki, K.; Karavicheva, T.; Koenig, I.; Koenig, W.; Kolb, B. W.; Kotte, R.; Krása, A.; Krizek, F.; Krücken, R.; Kuc, H.; Kühn, W.; Kugler, A.; Kurepin, A.; Lalik, R.; Lang, S.; Lange, J. S.; Lapidus, K.; Liu, T.; Lopes, L.; Lorenz, M.; Maier, L.; Mangiarotti, A.; Markert, J.; Metag, V.; Michalska, B.; Michel, J.; Morinière, E.; Mousa, J.; Müntz, C.; Naumann, L.; Otwinowski, J.; Pachmayer, Y. C.; Palka, M.; Parpottas, Y.; Pechenov, V.; Pechenova, O.; Pietraszko, J.; Przygoda, W.; Ramstein, B.; Reshetin, A.; Rustamov, A.; Sadovsky, A.; Salabura, P.; Schmah, A.; Schwab, E.; Siebenson, J.; Sobolev, Yu. G.; Spataro, S.; Spruck, B.; Ströbele, H.; Stroth, J.; Sturm, C.; Tarantola, A.; Teilab, K.; Tlusty, P.; Traxler, M.; Trebacz, R.; Tsertos, H.; Wagner, V.; Weber, M.; Wendisch, C.; Wüstenfeld, J.; Yurevich, S.; Zanevsky, Y.

    2012-05-01

    We present the inclusive invariant mass, transverse momentum and rapidity distributions of dielectrons (e+e- pairs) in p+p interactions at 3.5GeV beam kinetic energy. In the vector meson mass region, a distinct peak corresponding to direct ω decays is reconstructed with a 2% mass resolution. The data is compared to predictions from three model calculations. Due to the large acceptance of the HADES apparatus for e+e- invariant masses above 0.2 GeV/ c 2 and for transverse pair momenta p t < 1 GeV/ c, acceptance corrections are, to a large extent, model independent. This allows us to extract from dielectron data for the first time at this energy the inclusive production cross-sections for light vector mesons. Inclusive production cross-sections for π0 and η mesons are also reported. The obtained results will serve as an important reference for the study of vector meson production in proton-nucleus and heavy-ion collisions. Furthermore, using this data, an improved value for the upper bound of the branching ratio for direct η decays into the electron-positron channel is obtained.

  14. Effect of anaerobic digestion on sequential pyrolysis kinetics of organic solid wastes using thermogravimetric analysis and distributed activation energy model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaowei; Mei, Qingqing; Dai, Xiaohu; Ding, Guoji

    2017-03-01

    Thermogravimetric analysis, Gaussian-fit-peak model (GFPM), and distributed activation energy model (DAEM) were firstly used to explore the effect of anaerobic digestion on sequential pyrolysis kinetic of four organic solid wastes (OSW). Results showed that the OSW weight loss mainly occurred in the second pyrolysis stage relating to organic matter decomposition. Compared with raw substrate, the weight loss of corresponding digestate was lower in the range of 180-550°C, but was higher in 550-900°C. GFPM analysis revealed that organic components volatized at peak temperatures of 188-263, 373-401 and 420-462°C had a faster degradation rate than those at 274-327°C during anaerobic digestion. DAEM analysis showed that anaerobic digestion had discrepant effects on activation energy for four OSW pyrolysis, possibly because of their different organic composition. It requires further investigation for the special organic matter, i.e., protein-like and carbohydrate-like groups, to confirm the assumption. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. High energy efficiency and high power density proton exchange membrane fuel cells: Electrode kinetics and mass transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Supramaniam; Velev, Omourtag A.; Parthasathy, Arvind; Manko, David J.; Appleby, A. John

    1991-01-01

    The development of proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell power plants with high energy efficiencies and high power densities is gaining momentum because of the vital need of such high levels of performance for extraterrestrial (space, underwater) and terrestrial (power source for electric vehicles) applications. Since 1987, considerable progress has been made in achieving energy efficiencies of about 60 percent at a current density of 200 mA/sq cm and high power densities (greater than 1 W/sq cm) in PEM fuel cells with high (4 mg/sq cm) or low (0.4 mg/sq cm) platinum loadings in electrodes. The following areas are discussed: (1) methods to obtain these high levels of performance with low Pt loading electrodes - by proton conductor impregnation into electrodes, localization of Pt near front surface; (2) a novel microelectrode technique which yields electrode kinetic parameters for oxygen reduction and mass transport parameters; (3) demonstration of lack of water transport from anode to cathode; (4) modeling analysis of PEM fuel cell for comparison with experimental results and predicting further improvements in performance; and (5) recommendations of needed research and development for achieving the above goals.

  16. Analytical study on different blade-shape design of HAWT for wasted kinetic energy recovery system (WKERS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, J. B.; Jamaludin, Z.; Jafar, F. A.; Mat Ali, M.; Mokhtar, M. N. Ali; Tan, C. H.

    2017-06-01

    Wasted kinetic energy recovery system (WKERS) is a wind renewable gadget installed above a cooling tower outlet to harvest the discharged wind for electrical regeneration purpose. The previous WKERS is operated by a horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT) with delta blade design but the performance is still not at the optimum level. Perhaps, a better blade-shape design should be determined to obtain the optimal performance, as it is believed that the blade-shape design plays a critical role in HAWT. Hence, to determine a better blade-shape design for a new generation of WKERS, elliptical blade, swept blade and NREL Phase IV blade are selected for this benchmarking process. NREL Phase IV blade is a modern HAWT’s blade design by National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) research lab. During the process of benchmarking, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis was ran by using SolidWorks design software, where all the designs are simulated with linear flow simulation. The wind speed in the simulation is set at 10.0 m/s, which is compatible with the average wind speed produced by a standard size cooling tower. The result is obtained by flow trajectories of air motion, surface plot and cut plot of the applied blade-shape. Besides, the aspect ratio of each blade is calculated and included as one of the reference in the comparison. Hence, the final selection of the best blade-shape design will bring to the new generation of WKERS.

  17. Estimation of rain kinetic energy from radar reflectivity and/or rain rate based on a scaling formulation of the raindrop size distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, N.; Boudevillain, B.; Delrieu, G.; Uijlenhoet, R.

    2012-01-01

    This study offers an approach to estimate the rainfall kinetic energy (KE) by rain intensity (R) and radar reflectivity factor (Z) separately or jointly on the basis of a one- or two-moment scaled raindrop size distribution (DSD) formulation, which contains (1) R and/or Z observations and (2) the

  18. Turbulent kinetic energy of the ocean winds over the Kuroshio Extension from QuikSCAT winds (1999-2009)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kai; Dong, Changming; King, Gregory P.

    2017-06-01

    We investigate mesoscale turbulence (10-1000 km) in the ocean winds over the Kuroshio Extension (28°N-40°N, 140°E-180°E) using the QuikSCAT data set (November 1999 to October 2009). We calculate the second (Djj) and third-order structure functions (Djjj) and the spatial variance (Vj) as a function of scale r (j=L,T denotes, respectively, the longitudinal (divergent) and transverse (vortical) component). The most interesting results of the analysis follow. Although both Vj>(r>) and Djj>(r>) measure the turbulent kinetic energy (TKE), we find that Vj>(r>) is the more robust measure. The spatial variance density (dVj/dr) has a broad peak near 450 km (close to the midlatitude Rossby radius of deformation). On interannual time scales, TKE correlates well with the El Niño 3.4 index. According to turbulence theory, the kinetic energy cascades downscale (upscale) if DLLL>(r>) (also skewness SL=DLLL/DLL3/2) is negative (positive). Our results for the Kuroshio Extension are consistent with a downscale cascade (indicating convergence dominates). Furthermore, classical turbulence theory predicts that SL=-0.3 and independent of r; however, we find SL varies strongly with r, from -4 at small scales to -0.3 at large scales. This nonclassical behavior implies strong-scale interaction, which we attribute to the rapid, and sometimes explosive, growth of storms in the region through baroclinic instability. Finally, we find that ST (a measure of cyclonic/anticyclonic asymmetry) is positive (cyclonic) and also varies strongly with r, from 4 at small scales to 0.5 at large scales. New turbulence models are needed to explain these results, and that will benefit Weather Prediction and climate modeling.Plain Language SummaryThe turbulent winds near the ocean surface give rise to air-sea heat and momentum exchange. The turbulence is caused by convective processes - processes generated at weather fronts, in squalls, tropical disturbances and extra-tropical cyclones. In order to improve

  19. Trajectory Approach to Two-State Kinetics of Single Particles on Sculpted Energy Landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, David; Ghosh, Kingshuk; Inamdar, Mandar; Lee, Heun Jin; Fraser, Scott; Dill, Ken; Phillips, Rob

    2009-07-01

    We study the trajectories of a single colloidal particle as it hops between two energy wells which are sculpted using optical traps. Whereas the dynamical behaviors of such systems are often treated by master-equation methods that focus on particles as actors, we analyze them instead using a trajectory-based variational method called maximum caliber (MaxCal). We show that the MaxCal strategy accurately predicts the full dynamics that we observe in the experiments: From the observed averages, it predicts second and third moments and covariances, with no free parameters. The covariances are the dynamical equivalents of Maxwell-like equilibrium reciprocal relations and Onsager-like dynamical relations.

  20. Coherent control using kinetic energy and the geometric phase of a conical intersection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liekhus-Schmaltz, Chelsea; McCracken, Gregory A; Kaldun, Andreas; Cryan, James P; Bucksbaum, Philip H

    2016-10-14

    Conical intersections (CIs) between molecular potential energy surfaces with non-vanishing non-adiabatic couplings generally occur in any molecule consisting of at least three atoms. They play a fundamental role in describing the molecular dynamics beyond the Born-Oppenheimer approximation and have been used to understand a large variety of effects, from photofragmentation and isomerization to more exotic applications such as exciton fission in semiconductors. However, few studies have used the features of a CI as a tool for coherent control. Here we demonstrate two modes of control around a conical intersection. The first uses a continuous light field to control the population on the two intersecting electronic states in the vicinity of a CI. The second uses a pulsed light field to control wavepackets that are subjected to the geometric phase shift in transit around a CI. This second technique is likely to be useful for studying the role of nuclear dynamics in electronic coherence phenomena.

  1. Kinetics and energy efficiency for the degradation of 1,4-dioxane by electro-peroxone process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huijiao; Bakheet, Belal; Yuan, Shi; Li, Xiang; Yu, Gang; Murayama, Seiichi; Wang, Yujue

    2015-08-30

    Degradation of 1,4-dioxane by ozonation, electrolysis, and their combined electro-peroxone (E-peroxone) process was investigated. The E-peroxone process used a carbon-polytetrafluorethylene cathode to electrocatalytically convert O2 in the sparged ozone generator effluent (O2 and O3 gas mixture) to H2O2. The electro-generated H2O2 then react with sparged O3 to yield aqueous OH, which can in turn oxidize pollutants rapidly in the bulk solution. Using p-chlorobenzoic acid as OH probe, the pseudo-steady concentration of OH was determined to be ∼0.744×10(-9)mM in the E-peroxone process, which is approximately 10 and 186 times of that in ozonation and electrolysis using a Pt anode. Thanks to its higher OH concentration, the E-peroxone process eliminated 96.6% total organic carbon (TOC) from a 1,4-dioxane solution after 2h treatment with a specific energy consumption (SEC) of 0.376kWhg(-1) TOCremoved. In comparison, ozonation and electrolysis using a boron-doped diamond anode removed only ∼6.1% and 26.9% TOC with SEC of 2.43 and 0.558kWhg(-1) TOCremoved, respectively. The results indicate that the E-peroxone process can significantly improve the kinetics and energy efficiency for 1,4-dioxane mineralization as compared to the two individual processes. The E-peroxone process may thus offer a highly effective and energy-efficient alternative to treat 1,4-dioxane wastewater. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Energy conservation for fatigue management in multiple sclerosis: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Jalón, E Guiomar; Lennon, Sheila; Peoples, Louise; Murphy, Sam; Lowe-Strong, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    To develop and test the feasibility of an energy conservation programme to manage fatigue in multiple sclerosis. A pilot randomized controlled trial. Community setting. People with multiple sclerosis reporting fatigue. An energy conservation programme was compared to a peer support group. Both interventions were delivered in group format with 2-hour sessions once a week for five weeks. Patients' views about the interventions were sought in discussion groups one week post intervention. The primary feasibility outcomes were recruitment and adherence. Other outcome measures were the Fatigue Impact Scale, Fatigue Severity Scale, MS-Impact Scale-29, MS Self-efficacy Scale, Beck's Depression Scale-Fast Screen and Epworth Sleepiness Scale. Outcomes were administered at baseline, post intervention, 6-week and 3-month follow-up. Almost 30% of the people approached to take part in the study did not commit to participation because of transport/time issues. Twenty-three patients took part in the study. Three patients dropped out, one reporting adverse effects. A power calculation indicated that a sample of 56 (28 per group) would be required for a main randomized controlled trial. Patients valued peer support and those in the energy conservation group described the programme as useful, but reported difficulties completing some practice activities. An energy conservation programme in the community is feasible and welcomed by people with multiple sclerosis. However, future research needs to consider longer follow-ups and practical issues to improve recruitment rate by accommodating to patients' needs.

  3. Activated aging dynamics and effective trap model description in the random energy model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baity-Jesi, M.; Biroli, G.; Cammarota, C.

    2018-01-01

    We study the out-of-equilibrium aging dynamics of the random energy model (REM) ruled by a single spin-flip Metropolis dynamics. We focus on the dynamical evolution taking place on time-scales diverging with the system size. Our aim is to show to what extent the activated dynamics displayed by the REM can be described in terms of an effective trap model. We identify two time regimes: the first one corresponds to the process of escaping from a basin in the energy landscape and to the subsequent exploration of high energy configurations, whereas the second one corresponds to the evolution from a deep basin to the other. By combining numerical simulations with analytical arguments we show why the trap model description does not hold in the former but becomes exact in the second.

  4. Energy harvesting in a quad-stable harvester subjected to random excitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-yong Zhou

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In response to the defects of bi-stable energy harvester (BEH, we develop a novel quad-stable energy harvester (QEH to improve harvesting efficiency. The device is made up of a bimorph cantilever beam having a tip magnet and three external fixed magnets. By adjusting the positions of the fixed magnets and the distances between the tip magnet and the fixed ones, the quad-stable equilibrium positions can emerge. The potential energy shows that the barriers of the QEH are lower than those of the BEH for the same separation distance. Experiment results reveal that the QEH can realize snap-through easier and make a dense snap-through in response under random excitation. Moreover, its strain and voltage both become large for snap-through between the nonadjacent stable positions. There exists an optimal separation distance for different excitation intensities.

  5. Statistics of energy dissipation and stress relaxation in a crumpling network of randomly folded aluminum foils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balankin, Alexander S.; Susarrey Huerta, Orlando; Tapia, Viktor

    2013-09-01

    We study stress relaxation in hand folded aluminum foils subjected to the uniaxial compression force F(λ). We found that once the compression ratio is fixed (λ=const) the compression force decreases in time as F∝F0P(t), where P(t) is the survival probability time distribution belonging to the domain of attraction of max-stable distribution of the Fréchet type. This finding provides a general physical picture of energy dissipation in the crumpling network of a crushed elastoplastic foil. The difference between energy dissipation statistics in crushed viscoelastic papers and elastoplastic foils is outlined. Specifically, we argue that the dissipation of elastic energy in crushed aluminum foils is ruled by a multiplicative Poisson process governed by the maximum waiting time distribution. The mapping of this process into the problem of transient random walk on a fractal crumpling network is suggested.

  6. Solubility and dissimilatory reduction kinetics of iron(III) oxyhydroxides: A linear free energy relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonneville, Steeve; Behrends, Thilo; Van Cappellen, Philippe

    2009-09-01

    Rates of reduction of Fe(III) oxyhydroxides by the bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens were measured as a function of the bacterial density and the Fe(III) substrate concentration. The results show that an earlier reported positive correlation between the solubility products ( ∗K so) and the maximum cell-specific reduction rates ( vmax) of predominantly poorly crystalline Fe(III) oxyhydroxides also applies to insoluble and crystalline Fe(III) oxyhydroxides. The mineral solubilities were measured by a dialysis bag technique under acidic conditions (pH 1 up to 2.5) at 25 °C. Initial iron reduction rates by S. putrefaciens were determined in the presence of excess lactate as electron donor. In all cases, the microbial reduction rate exhibited saturation behavior with respect to the Fe(III) oxyhydroxide concentration. On a double logarithmic scale, the maximum rates vmax and the solubility products defined a single linear free energy relationship (LFER) for all the Fe(III) oxyhydroxides considered. The solubility provided a better predictor of vmax than the specific surface area of the mineral phase. A rate limitation by the electron transfer between an iron reductase and a Fe(III) center, or by the subsequent desorption of Fe 2+ from the iron oxide mineral surface, are both consistent with the observed LFER.

  7. Unified Dark Energy and Dust Dark Matter Dual to Quadratic Purely Kinetic K-Essence

    CERN Document Server

    Guendelman, Eduardo; Pacheva, Svetlana

    2015-01-01

    We consider a modified gravity plus single-scalar-field model, where the scalar Lagrangian couples symmetrically both to the standard Riemannian volume-form (spacetime integration measure density) given by the square-root of the determinant of the Riemannian metric, as well as to another non-Riemannian volume-form in terms of an auxiliary maximal-rank antisymmetric tensor gauge field. As shown in a previous paper, the pertinent scalar field dynamics provides an exact unified description of both dark energy via dynamical generation of a cosmological constant, and dark matter as a "dust" fluid with geodesic flow as a result of a hidden Noether symmetry. Here we extend the discussion by considering a non-trivial modification of the purely gravitational action in the form of f(R) = R - \\alpha R^2 generalized gravity. Upon deriving the corresponding "Einstein-frame" effective action of the latter modified gravity-scalar-field theory we find explicit duality (in the sense of weak versus strong coupling) between the...

  8. Take-Off Efficiency: Transformation of Mechanical Work Into Kinetic Energy During the Bosco Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jandova Sona

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The aim of the study is to present a new method for determining the efficiency of take-off during a 60-s Bosco repeated vertical jump test. Method. The study involved 15 physical education students (age: 21.5 ± 2.4 years; height: 1.81 ± 0.08 m; mass: 76 ± 9 kg. The data were collected with the use of a pedobarographical system (Pedar-x; Novel, Munich, Germany. The statistical analysis utilized a simple linear regression model. Results. Owing to possible fatigue, flight time and flight height decreased. The average flight height was 0.260 ± 0.063 m, and the average contact time equalled 0.54 ± 0.16 s. The average anaerobic power values calculated for the 60-s work period had the mean value of 21.9 ± 6.7 W · kgBW-1; there was a statistically significant (p < 0.05 decrease in anaerobic power during the 60-s Bosco test. Conclusions. The efficiency of mechanical work was highest at the beginning of the test, reaching values of up to 50%. The efficiency of mechanical work conversion into mechanical energy seems to be an appropriate determinant of rising fatigue during the 60-s Bosco jumping test.

  9. Kinetics of the interaction of azomethane with low-energy electrons on Ag(111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, M. E.; Pressley, Laura A.; White, J. M.

    1991-10-01

    The thermal and electron-induced chemistry of CH 3N 2CH 3 on Ag(111) has been studied using temperature programmed desorption (TPD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). CH 3N 2CH 3 adsorption on Ag(111) is completely reversible, with desorption peaks at 180 and 130 K for monolayer and multilayer, respectively. Electron irradiation on 1 ML of CH 3N 2CH 3 results in almost quantitative electron stimulated desorption (ESD) of N 2. ESD of CH 3 and CH 4, as well as traces of C 2H 6 and C 2H 2, is also observed. The retained fragments desorb in TPD mainly as H 2 and CH 4. At 54.7 ± 0.3 eV, the electron-induced decomposition (EID) cross section is about 7 × 10 -17 cm 2. The EID cross section increases with electron energy and has a threshold of about 10 eV. The EID is attributed to ionization of chemisorbed azomethane.

  10. Oxygen self-diffusion mechanisms in monoclinic Zr O2 revealed and quantified by density functional theory, random walk analysis, and kinetic Monte Carlo calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jing; Youssef, Mostafa; Yildiz, Bilge

    2018-01-01

    In this work, we quantify oxygen self-diffusion in monoclinic-phase zirconium oxide as a function of temperature and oxygen partial pressure. A migration barrier of each type of oxygen defect was obtained by first-principles calculations. Random walk theory was used to quantify the diffusivities of oxygen interstitials by using the calculated migration barriers. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations were used to calculate diffusivities of oxygen vacancies by distinguishing the threefold- and fourfold-coordinated lattice oxygen. By combining the equilibrium defect concentrations obtained in our previous work together with the herein calculated diffusivity of each defect species, we present the resulting oxygen self-diffusion coefficients and the corresponding atomistically resolved transport mechanisms. The predicted effective migration barriers and diffusion prefactors are in reasonable agreement with the experimentally reported values. This work provides insights into oxygen diffusion engineering in Zr O2 -related devices and parametrization for continuum transport modeling.

  11. Simultaneous application of microwave energy and hot air to whole drying process of apple slices: drying kinetics, modeling, temperature profile and energy aspect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horuz, Erhan; Bozkurt, Hüseyin; Karataş, Haluk; Maskan, Medeni

    2017-09-01

    Drying kinetics, modeling, temperature profile and energy indices were investigated in apple slices during drying by a specially designed microwave-hot air domestic hybrid oven at the following conditions: 120, 150 and 180 W microwave powers coupled with 50, 60 and 70 °C air temperatures. Both sources of energy were applied simultaneously during the whole drying processes. The drying process continued until the moisture content of apple slices reached to 20% from 86.3% (wet basis, w.b). Drying times ranged from 330 to 800 min and decreased with increasing microwave power and air temperatures. The constant rate period was only observed at low microwave powers and air temperatures. Two falling rate periods were observed. Temperature of apple slices sharply increased within the first 60 min, then reached equilibrium with drying medium and finally increased at the end of the drying process. In order to describe drying behavior of apple slices nine empirical models were applied. The Modified Logistic Model fitted the best our experimental data (R 2 = 0.9955-0.9998; χ 2 = 3.46 × 10-5-7.85 × 10-4 and RMSE = 0.0052-0.0221). The effective moisture and thermal diffusivities were calculated by Fick's second law and ranged from 1.42 × 10-9 to 3.31 × 10-9 m2/s and 7.70 × 10-9 to 12.54 × 10-9 m2/s, respectively. The activation energy (Ea) values were calculated from effective moisture diffusivity (Deff), thermal diffusivity (α) and the rate constant of the best model (k). The Ea values found from these three terms were similar and varied from 13.04 to 33.52 kJ/mol. Energy consumption and specific energy requirement of the hybrid drying of apple slices decreased and energy efficiency of the drying system increased with increasing microwave power and air temperature. Apples can be dried rapidly and effectively by use of the hybrid technique.

  12. Particle dynamics in two-dimensional random-energy landscapes: Experiments and simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evers, Florian; Zunke, Christoph; Hanes, Richard D. L.; Bewerunge, Jörg; Ladadwa, Imad; Heuer, Andreas; Egelhaaf, Stefan U.

    2013-08-01

    The dynamics of individual colloidal particles in random potential energy landscapes was investigated experimentally and by Monte Carlo simulations. The value of the potential at each point in the two-dimensional energy landscape follows a Gaussian distribution. The width of the distribution, and hence the degree of roughness of the energy landscape, was varied and its effect on the particle dynamics studied. This situation represents an example of Brownian dynamics in the presence of disorder. In the experiments, the energy landscapes were generated optically using a holographic setup with a spatial light modulator, and the particle trajectories were followed by video microscopy. The dynamics is characterized using, e.g., the time-dependent diffusion coefficient, the mean squared displacement, the van Hove function, and the non-Gaussian parameter. In both experiments and simulations the dynamics is initially diffusive, showing an extended subdiffusive regime at intermediate times before diffusive motion is recovered at very long times. The dependence of the long-time diffusion coefficient on the width of the Gaussian distribution agrees with theoretical predictions. Compared to the dynamics in a one-dimensional potential energy landscape, the localization at intermediate times is weaker and the diffusive regime at long times reached earlier, which is due to the possibility to avoid local maxima in two-dimensional energy landscapes.

  13. Low kinetic energy photoelectron diffractions for C 1s and O 1s electrons of free CO molecules in the EXAFS region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adachi, Jun-ichi; Yamazaki, Masakazu; Kimura, Yasuyuki; Yagishita, Akira [Photon Factory, IMSS, KEK, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan); Kazama, Misato; Ohori, Yusuke; Fujikawa, Takashi [Graduate School of Advanced Integration Science, Chiba University, 1-33 Yayoi-cho, Inage 263-8522 (Japan); Teramoto, Takahiro, E-mail: jun-ichi.adachi@kek.j [Graduate School of Science, University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-0033 (Japan)

    2009-11-15

    We have measured molecular-frame photoelectron angular distributions from carbon 1s and oxygen 1s levels of CO molecules up to a photoelectron kinetic energy (KE) of {approx}150 eV. The backward-scattering intensities exhibited a strong modulation as a function of the kinetic energy of the photoelectrons, whereas the intensities for the forward-scattering gradually increased and then became nearly constant over KE {approx}100 eV. Multiple scattering calculations with a muffin-tin potential qualitatively reproduced the experimental results. The present results may be considered as the observation of low-energy photoelectron diffraction patterns for gaseous free CO molecules, which are involved in modulations in extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra.

  14. A kinetic energy study of the meso beta-scale storm environment during AVE-SESAME 5 (20-21 May 1979)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Printy, M. F.; Fuelberg, H. E.

    1984-01-01

    Kinetic energy of the near storm environment was analyzed by meso beta scale data. It was found that horizontal winds in the 400 to 150 mb layer strengthen rapidly north of the developing convection. Peak values then decrease such that the maximum disappears 6 h later. Southeast of the storms, wind speeds above 300 mb decrease nearly 50% during the 3 h period of most intense thunderstorm activity. When the convection dissipates, wind patterns return to prestorm conditions. The mesoscale storm environment of AVE-SESAME 5 is characterized by large values of cross contour generation of kinetic energy, transfers of energy to nonresolvable scales of motion, and horizontal flux divergence. These processes are maximized within the upper troposphere and are greatest during times of strongest convection. It is shown that patterns agree with observed weather features. The southeast area of the network is examined to determine causes for vertical wind variations.

  15. Effectiveness of energy conservation management on fatigue and participation in multiple sclerosis: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blikman, Lyan Jm; van Meeteren, Jetty; Twisk, Jos Wr; de Laat, Fred Aj; de Groot, Vincent; Beckerman, Heleen; Stam, Henk J; Bussmann, Johannes Bj

    2017-10-01

    Fatigue is a frequently reported and disabling symptom in multiple sclerosis (MS). To investigate the effectiveness of an individual energy conservation management (ECM) intervention on fatigue and participation in persons with primary MS-related fatigue. A total of 86 severely fatigued and ambulatory adults with a definite diagnosis of MS were randomized in a single-blind, two-parallel-arm randomized clinical trial to the ECM group or the information-only control group in outpatient rehabilitation departments. Blinded assessments were carried out at baseline and at 8, 16, 26 and 52 weeks after randomization. Primary outcomes were fatigue (fatigue subscale of Checklist Individual Strength - CIS20r) and participation (Impact on Participation and Autonomy scale - IPA). Modified intention-to-treat analysis was based on 76 randomized patients (ECM, n = 36; MS nurse, n=40). No significant ECM effects were found for fatigue (overall difference CIS20r between the groups = -0.81; 95% confidence interval (CI), -3.71 to 2.11) or for four out of five IPA domains. An overall unfavourable effect was found in the ECM group for the IPA domain social relations (difference between the groups = 0.19; 95% CI, 0.03 to 0.35). The individual ECM format used in this study did not reduce MS-related fatigue and restrictions in participation more than an information-only control condition.

  16. The interaction of C60 on Si(111 7x7 studied by Supersonic Molecular Beams: interplay between precursor kinetic energy and substrate temperature in surface activated processes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucrezia eAversa

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Buckminsterfullerene (C60 is a molecule fully formed of carbon that can be used, owing to its electronic and mechanical properties, as clean precursor for the growth of carbon-based materials, ranging from -conjugated systems (graphenes to synthesized species, e.g. carbides such as silicon carbide (SiC. To this goal, C60 cage rupture is the main physical process that triggers material growth. Cage breaking can be obtained either thermally by heating up the substrate to high temperatures (630°C, after C60 physisorption, or kinetically by using Supersonic Molecular Beam Epitaxy (SuMBE techniques. In this work, aiming at demonstrating the growth of SiC thin films by C60 supersonic beams, we present the experimental investigation of C60 impacts on Si(111 7x7 kept at 500°C for translational kinetic energies ranging from 18 to 30 eV. The attained kinetically activated synthesis of SiC submonolayer films is probed by in-situ surface electron spectroscopies (XPS and UPS. Furthermore, in these experimental conditions the C60-Si(111 7×7 collision has been studied by computer simulations based on a tight-binding approximation to Density Functional Theory, DFT. Our theoretical and experimental findings point towards a kinetically driven growth of SiC on Si, where C60 precursor kinetic energy plays a crucial role, while temperature is relevant only after cage rupture to enhance Si and carbon reactivity. In particular, we observe a counterintuitive effect in which for low kinetic energy (below 22 eV, C60 bounces back without breaking more effectively at high temperature due to energy transfer from excited phonons. At higher kinetic energy (22 < K < 30 eV, for which cage rupture occurs, temperature enhances reactivity without playing a major role in the cage break. These results are in good agreement with ab-initio molecular dynamics simulations. SuMBE is thus a technique able to drive materials growth at low temperature regime.

  17. INVESTIGATION OF THE KINETICS OF DRYING SEEDS THISTLE IN VORTEX CHAMBER WITH MICROWAVE ENERGY SUPPLY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Kazartsev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the study of the current state of the theory, techniques and technologies for processing of milk thistle showed up a number of problems. One of those moments - the need to promptly provide quality and efficient process for drying seeds, but Russia has not produced special equipment for postharvest processing of seeds of milk thistle, and used for drying grain domestic appliances, represented mainly by mining and drum dryers, it is not suitable for thistle. This is due to the fact that, firstly, in the dewatering process is necessary to provide a relatively low final moisture drying product (5-6 %, and, secondly, to keep their beneficial substance in full, which imposes additional restrictions on the conditions of drying. One way of creating a new drying technology development and implementation in the industry of high-intensive devices with active hydrodynamic regimes with microwave energy supply, providing in many cases, higher technical and economic indicators. Therefore, the use of devices with swirling flow of heat-carrier for the intensification of the process of drying of dispersed materials is both theoretical interest and practical value. Microwave drying is based on the fact that the dielectric properties of water and dry food substances are different: the wet material is heated much faster than dry. During the microwave drying temperature wetter internal layers higher than the exterior more dehydrated (which creates a "right" - from the inner to the outer layers of the product - the gradient of moisture mass transfer is not realizable in any of the other known methods of drying. Milk thistle seeds have a unique composition: 25-32 % fatty oil, 15-17 % protein, 26 % fat, in the-soluble (B group and fat-soluble (A, D, E, K, F vitamins, mono- and disaccharides, macro- and trace elements (copper, zinc, selenium, dietary fiber and enzymes, mucus, up to 5 % (glucose, etc., phenolic compounds including flaviolignans 2-3% (silibinin

  18. Anisotropy of the proton kinetic energy in CsH2PO4 and KH2PO4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelstein, Y.; Moreh, R.; Shchur, Ya.

    2018-02-01

    The strong anisotropy of the proton mean kinetic energy, Ke(H), in a single crystal of KH2PO4 (KDP), measured by deep inelastic neutron scattering (DINS), is compared with that calculated for its Cs analogue, CsH2PO4 (CDP) in the ferroelectric (FE) and paraelectric (PE) phases. Empirical lattice dynamics (LD) calculations were used to simulate the partial vibrational density of states shared by the protons (H-VDOS), from which Ke(H) values were deduced. Good agreement was found between the measured and calculated Ke(H) values of the two samples despite the different hydrogen bond dynamics. However, the directional components of Ke(H) in the two samples were quite different. In both cases, the Ke(H) tensor is nearly an ellipsoid of rotation: in KDP the shape is oblate around the major axis while being prolate in CDP. By resolving the directional Ke(H) values of the two non-equivalent protons of CDP, a possible signature of competing quantum effects is indicated.

  19. Effects of Karlovitz number on turbulent kinetic energy transport in turbulent lean premixed methane/air flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiyan; Abraham, John

    2017-08-01

    Direct numerical simulations of lean methane/air flames are carried out to study the effects of premixed combustion on turbulence. The equivalence ratio of the flame is 0.5 and non-dimensional turbulence intensities (urms/SL) are between 2 and 25. The mixture pressure is 20 bars and temperature is 810 K to simulate approximate conditions in lean-burn natural gas engines. The Karlovitz number (Ka) varies from 1.1 to 49.4, and the Damköhler number (Da) varies from 0.26 to 3.2 corresponding to turbulent premixed combustion in the thin reaction zone (TRZ) regime. It is found that turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) and its dissipation rate decrease monotonically across the flame brush while the integral length scale increases monotonically for flames in the TRZ regime. The transport equation of TKE is then examined, and the scaling of the terms in the equation is discussed. It is found that the sink term which represents molecular diffusion and viscous dissipation is the dominant term in the TKE balance and it scales with the square of Ka. The relative importance of the other terms with respect to the dissipation term is studied. With increasing Ka, the other terms in the TKE balance become less important compared to the dissipation term.

  20. Spatiotemporal Variability of Turbulence Kinetic Energy Budgets in the Convective Boundary Layer over Both Simple and Complex Terrain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rai, Raj K. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington; Berg, Larry K. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington; Pekour, Mikhail [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington; Shaw, William J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington; Kosovic, Branko [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado; Mirocha, Jeffrey D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California; Ennis, Brandon L. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    2017-12-01

    The assumption of sub-grid scale (SGS) horizontal homogeneity within a model grid cell, which forms the basis of SGS turbulence closures used by mesoscale models, becomes increasingly tenuous as grid spacing is reduced to a few kilometers or less, such as in many emerging high-resolution applications. Herein, we use the turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) budget equation to study the spatio-temporal variability in two types of terrain—complex (Columbia Basin Wind Energy Study [CBWES] site, north-eastern Oregon) and flat (ScaledWind Farm Technologies [SWiFT] site, west Texas) using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. In each case six-nested domains (three domains each for mesoscale and large-eddy simulation [LES]) are used to downscale the horizontal grid spacing from 10 km to 10 m using the WRF model framework. The model output was used to calculate the values of the TKE budget terms in vertical and horizontal planes as well as the averages of grid cells contained in the four quadrants (a quarter area) of the LES domain. The budget terms calculated along the planes and the mean profile of budget terms show larger spatial variability at CBWES site than at the SWiFT site. The contribution of the horizontal derivative of the shear production term to the total production shear was found to be 45% and 15% of the total shear, at the CBWES and SWiFT sites, respectively, indicating that the horizontal derivatives applied in the budget equation should not be ignored in mesoscale model parameterizations, especially for cases with complex terrain with <10 km scale.

  1. Derrida's Generalized Random Energy models; 4, Continuous state branching and coalescents

    CERN Document Server

    Bovier, A

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we conclude our analysis of Derrida's Generalized Random Energy Models (GREM) by identifying the thermodynamic limit with a one-parameter family of probability measures related to a continuous state branching process introduced by Neveu. Using a construction introduced by Bertoin and Le Gall in terms of a coherent family of subordinators related to Neveu's branching process, we show how the Gibbs geometry of the limiting Gibbs measure is given in terms of the genealogy of this process via a deterministic time-change. This construction is fully universal in that all different models (characterized by the covariance of the underlying Gaussian process) differ only through that time change, which in turn is expressed in terms of Parisi's overlap distribution. The proof uses strongly the Ghirlanda-Guerra identities that impose the structure of Neveu's process as the only possible asymptotic random mechanism.

  2. Electrostatic energy harvesting device with dual resonant structure for wideband random vibration sources at low frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yulong; Wang, Tianyang; Zhang, Ai; Peng, Zhuoteng; Luo, Dan; Chen, Rui; Wang, Fei

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we present design and test of a broadband electrostatic energy harvester with a dual resonant structure, which consists of two cantilever-mass subsystems each with a mass attached at the free edge of a cantilever. Comparing to traditional devices with single resonant frequency, the proposed device with dual resonant structure can resonate at two frequencies. Furthermore, when one of the cantilever-masses is oscillating at resonance, the vibration amplitude is large enough to make it collide with the other mass, which provides strong mechanical coupling between the two subsystems. Therefore, this device can harvest a decent power output from vibration sources at a broad frequency range. During the measurement, continuous power output up to 6.2-9.8 μW can be achieved under external vibration amplitude of 9.3 m/s2 at a frequency range from 36.3 Hz to 48.3 Hz, which means the bandwidth of the device is about 30% of the central frequency. The broad bandwidth of the device provides a promising application for energy harvesting from the scenarios with random vibration sources. The experimental results indicate that with the dual resonant structure, the vibration-to-electricity energy conversion efficiency can be improved by 97% when an external random vibration with a low frequency filter is applied.

  3. Active video games and energy balance in male adolescents: a randomized crossover trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribbon, Aidan; McNeil, Jessica; Jay, Ollie; Tremblay, Mark S; Chaput, Jean-Philippe

    2015-06-01

    Active video games (AVGs) have been shown to acutely increase energy expenditure when compared with seated video games; however, the influence of AVGs on compensatory adjustments in energy intake and expenditure is largely unknown. The aim was to examine the acute effects of AVGs on energy intake and expenditure. With the use of a randomized crossover design, 26 male adolescents (mean ± SD age: 14.5 ± 1.4 y) completed three 1-h experimental conditions: resting control, seated video game play (Xbox 360; Microsoft), and AVG play (Kinect Adventures on Xbox 360) followed by an ad libitum lunch. A validated food menu was used to assess food intake immediately after the conditions and for the remainder of the day, and a dietary record was used for the subsequent 3-d period. Energy expenditure was measured by using portable indirect calorimetry throughout each experimental condition, and an accelerometer was used to assess the subsequent 3-d period. Appetite sensations were assessed by using visual analog scales at different time points during the testing day. The primary outcomes were acute (immediately after the conditions and 24-h) and short-term (3-d) energy intake and expenditure. Energy expenditure was significantly higher (~145%; P video game conditions; however, no significant differences in energy expenditure were observed 24 h (~6%; P > 0.49) and 3 d after the experimental conditions (~3%; P > 0.82). No significant differences were observed in absolute energy intake immediately after the conditions (~2%; P > 0.94) or in absolute energy intake 24 h (~5%; P > 0.63) and 3 d (~9%; P > 0.53) after the experimental conditions. Finally, appetite sensations were similar between conditions at all time points (P > 0.05). The increase in energy expenditure promoted by a single session of Kinect AVG play is not associated with increased food intake but is compensated for after the intervention, resulting in no measurable change in energy balance after 24 h. These results

  4. Design of Energy Aware Adder Circuits Considering Random Intra-Die Process Variations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Lanuzza

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Energy consumption is one of the main barriers to current high-performance designs. Moreover, the increased variability experienced in advanced process technologies implies further timing yield concerns and therefore intensifies this obstacle. Thus, proper techniques to achieve robust designs are a critical requirement for integrated circuit success. In this paper, the influence of intra-die random process variations is analyzed considering the particular case of the design of energy aware adder circuits. Five well known adder circuits were designed exploiting an industrial 45 nm static complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS standard cell library. The designed adders were comparatively evaluated under different energy constraints. As a main result, the performed analysis demonstrates that, for a given energy budget, simpler circuits (which are conventionally identified as low-energy slow architectures operating at higher power supply voltages can achieve a timing yield significantly better than more complex faster adders when used in low-power design with supply voltages lower than nominal.

  5. Madelung energy for random metallic alloys in the coherent potential approximation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korzhavyi, P. A.; Ruban, Andrei; Abrikosov, I. A.

    1995-01-01

    Within the conventional single-site coherent potential approximation (CPA) used to calculate thermodynamic properties of random alloys, the effect of charge transfer is neglected. We discuss a number of recent models based on the same mathematical form but with a different prefactor β which allow...... one to include charge-transfer effects in the framework of the CPA. We show how the models work in actual calculations for selected metallic alloy systems, Al-Li, Li-Mg, and Ni-Pt, which exhibit charge transfer. We find that the so-called screened impurity model (β=1), which is derived completely...... within the mean-field single-site approximation, leads to the best agreement with experimental lattice parameter and mixing energy data for Al-Li and Li-Mg alloys. However, for the Ni-Pt system exhibiting strong ordering tendency this model seems to overestimate the Madelung energy of the completely...

  6. Isotope partitioning for NAD-malic enzyme from Ascaris suum confirms a steady-state random kinetic mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, C.Y.; Harris, B.G.; Cook, P.F.

    1988-01-12

    Isotope partitioning studies beginning with E-(/sup 14/C)NAD, E-(/sup 14/C) malate, E-(/sup 14/C) NAD-Mg/sup 2 +/, and E-Mg-(/sup 14/C)malate suggest a steady-state random mechanism for the NAD-malic enzyme. Isotope trapping beginning with E-(/sup 14/C)NAD and with varying concentrations of Mg/sup 2 +/ and malate in the chase solution indicates that Mg/sup 2 +/ is added in rapid equilibrium and must be added prior to malate for productive ternary complex formation. Equal percentage trapping from E-(/sup 14/C)NAD-Mg and E-Mg-(/sup 14/C) malate indicates the mechanism is steady-state random with equal off-rates for NAD and malate from E-NAD-Mg-malate. The off-rates for both do not change significantly in the ternary E-Mg-malate and E-NAD-Mg complexes, nor does the off-rate change for NAD from E-NAD. No trapping of malate was obtained from E-(/sup 14/C) malate, suggesting that this complex is nonproductive. A quantitative analysis of the data allows an estimation of values for a number of the rate constants along the reaction pathway.

  7. Random free energy barrier hopping model for ac conduction in chalcogenide glasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ram Murti

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The random free energy barrier hopping model is proposed to explain the ac conductivity (σac of chalcogenide glasses. The Coulomb correlation is consistently accounted for in the polarizability and defect distribution functions and the relaxation time is augmented to include the overlapping of hopping particle wave functions. It is observed that ac and dc conduction in chalcogenides are due to same mechanism and Meyer-Neldel (MN rule is the consequence of temperature dependence of hopping barriers. The exponential parameter s is calculated and it is found that s is subjected to sample preparation and measurement conditions and its value can be less than or greater than one. The calculated results for a − Se, As2S3, As2Se3 and As2Te3 are found in close agreement with the experimental data. The bipolaron and single polaron hopping contributions dominates at lower and higher temperatures respectively and in addition to high energy optical phonons, low energy optical and high energy acoustic phonons also contribute to the hopping process. The variations of hopping distance with temperature is also studied. The estimated defect number density and static barrier heights are compared with other existing calculations.

  8. Linear kinetic theory and particle transport in stochastic mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pomraning, G.C. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    We consider the formulation of linear transport and kinetic theory describing energy and particle flow in a random mixture of two or more immiscible materials. Following an introduction, we summarize early and fundamental work in this area, and we conclude with a brief discussion of recent results.

  9. Flow-Induced New Channels of Energy Exchange in Multi-Scale Plasma Dynamics – Revisiting Perturbative Hybrid Kinetic-MHD Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Junya; Miyato, Naoaki; Matsunaga, Go

    2016-01-01

    It is found that new channels of energy exchange between macro- and microscopic dynamics exist in plasmas. They are induced by macroscopic plasma flow. This finding is based on the kinetic-magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory, which analyses interaction between macroscopic (MHD-scale) motion and microscopic (particle-scale) dynamics. The kinetic-MHD theory is extended to include effects of macroscopic plasma flow self-consistently. The extension is realised by generalising an energy exchange term due to wave-particle resonance, denoted by δ WK. The first extension is generalisation of the particle’s Lagrangian, and the second one stems from modification to the particle distribution function due to flow. These extensions lead to a generalised expression of δ WK, which affects the MHD stability of plasmas. PMID:27160346

  10. Flow-Induced New Channels of Energy Exchange in Multi-Scale Plasma Dynamics - Revisiting Perturbative Hybrid Kinetic-MHD Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Junya; Miyato, Naoaki; Matsunaga, Go

    2016-05-10

    It is found that new channels of energy exchange between macro- and microscopic dynamics exist in plasmas. They are induced by macroscopic plasma flow. This finding is based on the kinetic-magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory, which analyses interaction between macroscopic (MHD-scale) motion and microscopic (particle-scale) dynamics. The kinetic-MHD theory is extended to include effects of macroscopic plasma flow self-consistently. The extension is realised by generalising an energy exchange term due to wave-particle resonance, denoted by δ WK. The first extension is generalisation of the particle's Lagrangian, and the second one stems from modification to the particle distribution function due to flow. These extensions lead to a generalised expression of δ WK, which affects the MHD stability of plasmas.

  11. Comparing large eddy simulations and measurements of the turbulent kinetic energy budget in an urban canopy layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parlange, M. B.; Giometto, M. G.; Meneveau, C. V.; Fang, J.; Christen, A.

    2013-12-01

    Local turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) in the Urban Canopy Layer (UCL) is highly dependent on the actual configuration of obstacles relative to mean wind and stability. For many applications, building-resolving information is neither required nor feasible, and simply beyond the numerical capabilities of operational systems. Common urban canopy parameterizations (UCP) used in dispersion and mesoscale forecasting models hence rely on a horizontally averaged approach, where the UCL is represented as a 1D column, often for simplified geometries such as infinite street canyons. We use Large Eddy Simulations (LES) of the airflow over and within a realistic urban geometry in the city of Basel, Switzerland to determine all terms of the TKE budget in order to guide and validate current approaches used in UCPs. A series of high-resolution LES runs of the fully developed flow are performed in order to characterize the TKE budget terms in a horizontally averaged frame of view for various directions of the approaching flow under neutral conditions. Equations are solved on a regular domain with a horizontal resolution of 2 m. A Lagrangian scale-dependent LES model is adopted to parametrize the subgrid-scale stresses and buildings are taken into account adopting an immersed boundary approach with the geometry taken from a highly accurate digital building model. The modeled (periodic) domain is centered on the location of a 32 m tall tower, where measurements of turbulence were performed, during the BUBBLE program in 2001/02 (Rotach et al., Theor. Appl. Clim., 82, 231-261, 2005). Selected terms of the TKE budget were inferred from six levels of ultrasonic anemometer measurements operated over nearly a full year between ground level and two times the mean building height. This contribution answers the questions: (1) How well do TKE budget terms calculated by the LES at the exact tower location match the single point measurements on the tower under comparable conditions? (2) How

  12. Eating dark and milk chocolate: a randomized crossover study of effects on appetite and energy intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, L B; Astrup, A

    2011-12-05

    To compare the effect of dark and milk chocolate on appetite sensations and energy intake at an ad libitum test meal in healthy, normal-weight men. A total of 16 young, healthy, normal-weight men participated in a randomized, crossover study. Test meals were 100 g of either milk (2285 kJ) or dark chocolate (2502 kJ). Visual-analogue scales were used to record appetite sensations before and after the test meal was consumed and subsequently every 30 min for 5 h. An ad libitum meal was served 2 h after the test meal had been consumed. The participants felt more satiated, less hungry, and had lower ratings of prospective food consumption after consumption of the dark chocolate than after the milk chocolate. Ratings of the desire to eat something sweet, fatty or savoury were all lower after consumption of the dark chocolate. Energy intake at the ad libitum meal was 17% lower after consumption of the dark chocolate than after the milk chocolate (P=0.002). If the energy provided by the chocolate is included in the calculation, the energy intake after consumption of the dark chocolate was still 8% lower than after the milk chocolate (P=0.01). The dark chocolate load resulted in an overall energy difference of -584 kJ (95% confidence interval (-1027;-141)) during the test period. In the present study, dark chocolate promotes satiety, lowers the desire to eat something sweet, and suppresses energy intake compared with milk chocolate.

  13. Eating dark and milk chocolate: a randomized crossover study of effects on appetite and energy intake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, L B; Astrup, A

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To compare the effect of dark and milk chocolate on appetite sensations and energy intake at an ad libitum test meal in healthy, normal-weight men. Subjects/methods: A total of 16 young, healthy, normal-weight men participated in a randomized, crossover study. Test meals were 100 g of either milk (2285 kJ) or dark chocolate (2502 kJ). Visual-analogue scales were used to record appetite sensations before and after the test meal was consumed and subsequently every 30 min for 5 h. An ad libitum meal was served 2 h after the test meal had been consumed. Results: The participants felt more satiated, less hungry, and had lower ratings of prospective food consumption after consumption of the dark chocolate than after the milk chocolate. Ratings of the desire to eat something sweet, fatty or savoury were all lower after consumption of the dark chocolate. Energy intake at the ad libitum meal was 17% lower after consumption of the dark chocolate than after the milk chocolate (P=0.002). If the energy provided by the chocolate is included in the calculation, the energy intake after consumption of the dark chocolate was still 8% lower than after the milk chocolate (P=0.01). The dark chocolate load resulted in an overall energy difference of −584 kJ (95% confidence interval (−1027;−141)) during the test period. Conclusion: In the present study, dark chocolate promotes satiety, lowers the desire to eat something sweet, and suppresses energy intake compared with milk chocolate. PMID:23455041

  14. An Experimental Study of Structural Identification of Bridges Using the Kinetic Energy Optimization Technique and the Direct Matrix Updating Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwanghee Heo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to develop an SI (structural identification technique using the KEOT and the DMUM to decide on optimal location of sensors and to update FE model, respectively, which ultimately contributes to a composition of more effective SHM. Owing to the characteristic structural flexing behavior of cable bridges (e.g., cable-stayed bridges and suspension bridges, which makes them vulnerable to any vibration, systematic and continuous structural health monitoring (SHM is pivotal for them. Since it is necessary to select optimal measurement locations with the fewest possible measurements and also to accurately assess the structural state of a bridge for the development of an effective SHM, an SI technique is as much important to accurately determine the modal parameters of the current structure based on the data optimally obtained. In this study, the kinetic energy optimization technique (KEOT was utilized to determine the optimal measurement locations, while the direct matrix updating method (DMUM was utilized for FE model updating. As a result of experiment, the required number of measurement locations derived from KEOT based on the target mode was reduced by approximately 80% compared to the initial number of measurement locations. Moreover, compared to the eigenvalue of the modal experiment, an improved FE model with a margin of error of less than 1% was derived from DMUM. Thus, the SI technique for cable-stayed bridges proposed in this study, which utilizes both KEOT and DMUM, is proven effective in minimizing the number of sensors while accurately determining the structural dynamic characteristics.

  15. Species-Specific Effects on Throughfall Kinetic Energy in Subtropical Forest Plantations Are Related to Leaf Traits and Tree Architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebes, Philipp; Bruelheide, Helge; Härdtle, Werner; Kröber, Wenzel; Kühn, Peter; Li, Ying; Seitz, Steffen; von Oheimb, Goddert; Scholten, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Soil erosion is a key threat to many ecosystems, especially in subtropical China where high erosion rates occur. While the mechanisms that induce soil erosion on agricultural land are well understood, soil erosion processes in forests have rarely been studied. Throughfall kinetic energy (TKE) is influenced in manifold ways and often determined by the tree's leaf and architectural traits. We investigated the role of species identity in mono-specific stands on TKE by asking to what extent TKE is species-specific and which leaf and architectural traits account for variation in TKE. We measured TKE of 11 different tree species planted in monocultures in a biodiversity-ecosystem-functioning experiment in subtropical China, using sand-filled splash cups during five natural rainfall events in summer 2013. In addition, 14 leaf and tree architectural traits were measured and linked to TKE. Our results showed that TKE was highly species-specific. Highest TKE was found below Choerospondias axillaris and Sapindus saponaria, while Schima superba showed lowest TKE. These species-specific effects were mediated by leaf habit, leaf area (LA), leaf pinnation, leaf margin, stem diameter at ground level (GD), crown base height (CBH), tree height, number of branches and leaf area index (LAI) as biotic factors and throughfall as abiotic factor. Among these, leaf habit, tree height and LA showed the highest effect sizes on TKE and can be considered as major drivers of TKE. TKE was positively influenced by LA, GD, CBH, tree height, LAI, and throughfall amount while it was negatively influenced by the number of branches. TKE was lower in evergreen, simple leaved and dentate leaved than in deciduous, pinnated or entire leaved species. Our results clearly showed that soil erosion in forest plantations can be mitigated by the appropriate choice of tree species.

  16. Species-Specific Effects on Throughfall Kinetic Energy in Subtropical Forest Plantations Are Related to Leaf Traits and Tree Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruelheide, Helge; Härdtle, Werner; Kröber, Wenzel; Li, Ying; von Oheimb, Goddert

    2015-01-01

    Soil erosion is a key threat to many ecosystems, especially in subtropical China where high erosion rates occur. While the mechanisms that induce soil erosion on agricultural land are well understood, soil erosion processes in forests have rarely been studied. Throughfall kinetic energy (TKE) is influenced in manifold ways and often determined by the tree’s leaf and architectural traits. We investigated the role of species identity in mono-specific stands on TKE by asking to what extent TKE is species-specific and which leaf and architectural traits account for variation in TKE. We measured TKE of 11 different tree species planted in monocultures in a biodiversity-ecosystem-functioning experiment in subtropical China, using sand-filled splash cups during five natural rainfall events in summer 2013. In addition, 14 leaf and tree architectural traits were measured and linked to TKE. Our results showed that TKE was highly species-specific. Highest TKE was found below Choerospondias axillaris and Sapindus saponaria, while Schima superba showed lowest TKE. These species-specific effects were mediated by leaf habit, leaf area (LA), leaf pinnation, leaf margin, stem diameter at ground level (GD), crown base height (CBH), tree height, number of branches and leaf area index (LAI) as biotic factors and throughfall as abiotic factor. Among these, leaf habit, tree height and LA showed the highest effect sizes on TKE and can be considered as major drivers of TKE. TKE was positively influenced by LA, GD, CBH, tree height, LAI, and throughfall amount while it was negatively influenced by the number of branches. TKE was lower in evergreen, simple leaved and dentate leaved than in deciduous, pinnated or entire leaved species. Our results clearly showed that soil erosion in forest plantations can be mitigated by the appropriate choice of tree species. PMID:26079260

  17. Species-Specific Effects on Throughfall Kinetic Energy in Subtropical Forest Plantations Are Related to Leaf Traits and Tree Architecture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Goebes

    Full Text Available Soil erosion is a key threat to many ecosystems, especially in subtropical China where high erosion rates occur. While the mechanisms that induce soil erosion on agricultural land are well understood, soil erosion processes in forests have rarely been studied. Throughfall kinetic energy (TKE is influenced in manifold ways and often determined by the tree's leaf and architectural traits. We investigated the role of species identity in mono-specific stands on TKE by asking to what extent TKE is species-specific and which leaf and architectural traits account for variation in TKE. We measured TKE of 11 different tree species planted in monocultures in a biodiversity-ecosystem-functioning experiment in subtropical China, using sand-filled splash cups during five natural rainfall events in summer 2013. In addition, 14 leaf and tree architectural traits were measured and linked to TKE. Our results showed that TKE was highly species-specific. Highest TKE was found below Choerospondias axillaris and Sapindus saponaria, while Schima superba showed lowest TKE. These species-specific effects were mediated by leaf habit, leaf area (LA, leaf pinnation, leaf margin, stem diameter at ground level (GD, crown base height (CBH, tree height, number of branches and leaf area index (LAI as biotic factors and throughfall as abiotic factor. Among these, leaf habit, tree height and LA showed the highest effect sizes on TKE and can be considered as major drivers of TKE. TKE was positively influenced by LA, GD, CBH, tree height, LAI, and throughfall amount while it was negatively influenced by the number of branches. TKE was lower in evergreen, simple leaved and dentate leaved than in deciduous, pinnated or entire leaved species. Our results clearly showed that soil erosion in forest plantations can be mitigated by the appropriate choice of tree species.

  18. Insights of ibuprofen electro-oxidation on metal-oxide-coated Ti anodes: Kinetics, energy consumption and reaction mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chong; Yu, Yanxin; Yin, Lifeng; Niu, Junfeng; Hou, Li-An

    2016-11-01

    Electrochemical degradation of ibuprofen (IBP) was performed on three types of Ti-based metal oxide electrodes. The degradation of IBP followed pseudo-first-order kinetics and the electrochemical degradation rate constant (k) over Ti/SnO2-Sb/Ce-PbO2 (9.4 × 10(-2) min(-1)) was 2.0 and 1.7 times of the values over Ti/Ce-PbO2 (4.7 × 10(-2) min(-1)) and Ti/SnO2-Sb (5.6 × 10(-2) min(-1)), respectively. The removal of total organic carbon and the energy consumption per order for IBP degradation were 93.2% and 13.1 Wh L(-1), respectively, under the optimal conditions using Ti/SnO2-Sb/Ce-PbO2 anode. Six aromatic intermediate products of IBP were identified by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with a quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The electrochemical mineralization mechanism of IBP was proposed. It was supposed that OH radicals produced on the surface of anode attacked IBP to form hydroxylated IBP derivatives that were then followed by a series of hydroxylation, loss of isopropanol and isopropyl, decarboxylation and benzene ring cleavage processes to form simple linear carboxylic acids. By successive hydroxylation, these carboxylic acids were then oxidized to CO2 and H2O, achieving the complete mineralization of IBP. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Altering Kinetic Energy Entrainment in Large Eddy Simulations of Large Wind Farms Using Unconventional Wind Turbine Actuator Forcing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire VerHulst

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, horizontally periodic large eddy simulations (LES are utilized to study turbulent atmospheric boundary-layer flow over wind turbines in the far-downstream portion of a large wind farm where the wakes have merged and the flow is fully developed. In an attempt to increase power generation by enhancing the mean kinetic energy (MKE entrainment to the wind turbines, hypothetical synthetic forcing is applied to the flow at the turbine rotor locations. The synthetic forcing is not meant to represent any existing devices or control schemes, but rather acts as a proof of concept to inform future designs. The turbines are modeled using traditional actuator disks, and the unconventional synthetic forcing is applied in the vertical direction with the magnitude and direction dependent on the instantaneous velocity fluctuation at the rotor disk; in one set of LES meant to enhance the vertical entrainment of MKE, a downward force is prescribed in conjunction with a positive axial velocity fluctuation, whereas a negative axial velocity fluctuation results in an upward force. The magnitude of the forcing is proportional to the instantaneous thrust force with prefactors ranging from 0.1 to 1. The synthetic vertical forcing is found to have a significant effect on the power generated by the wind farm. Consistent with previous findings, the MKE flux to the level of the turbines is found to vary along with the total power produced by the wind turbine array. The reverse strategy of downward forcing of slow axial velocity flow is found to have almost no effect on the power output or entrainment. Several of the scenarios tested, e.g., where the vertical force is of similar magnitude to the horizontal thrust, would be very difficult to implement in practice, but the simulations serve the purpose of identifying trends and bounds on possible power increases from flow modifications through action at the turbine rotor.

  20. Dynamical influence of gravity waves generated by the Vestfjella Mountains in Antarctica: radar observations, fine-scale modelling and kinetic energy budget analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Arnault

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Gravity waves generated by the Vestfjella Mountains (in western Droning Maud Land, Antarctica, southwest of the Finnish/Swedish Aboa/Wasa station have been observed with the Moveable atmospheric radar for Antarctica (MARA during the SWEDish Antarctic Research Programme (SWEDARP in December 2007/January 2008. These radar observations are compared with a 2-month Weather Research Forecast (WRF model experiment operated at 2 km horizontal resolution. A control simulation without orography is also operated in order to separate unambiguously the contribution of the mountain waves on the simulated atmospheric flow. This contribution is then quantified with a kinetic energy budget analysis computed in the two simulations. The results of this study confirm that mountain waves reaching lower-stratospheric heights break through convective overturning and generate inertia gravity waves with a smaller vertical wavelength, in association with a brief depletion of kinetic energy through frictional dissipation and negative vertical advection. The kinetic energy budget also shows that gravity waves have a strong influence on the other terms of the budget, i.e. horizontal advection and horizontal work of pressure forces, so evaluating the influence of gravity waves on the mean-flow with the vertical advection term alone is not sufficient, at least in this case. We finally obtain that gravity waves generated by the Vestfjella Mountains reaching lower stratospheric heights generally deplete (create kinetic energy in the lower troposphere (upper troposphere–lower stratosphere, in contradiction with the usual decelerating effect attributed to gravity waves on the zonal circulation in the upper troposphere–lower stratosphere.

  1. Isotope partitioning in the adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate dependent protein kinase reaction indicates a steady-state random kinetic mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, C.T.; Cook, P.F.

    1988-06-28

    Isotope partitioning beginning with the binary E.MgATP and E.N-acetyl-Leu-Arg-Arg-Ala-Ser-Leu-Gly (Ser-peptide) complexes indicates that the kinetic mechanism for the adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate dependent protein kinase is steady-state random. A total of 100% of the initial radioactive E.MgATP complex is trapped as phospho-Ser-peptide at infinite Ser-peptide concentration at both low and high concentration of uncomplexed Mg2+, suggesting that the off-rate of MgATP from the E.MgATP.Ser-peptide complex is slow relative to the catalytic steps. Km for Ser-peptide in the trapping reaction decreases from 17 microM at low Mg2+ to 2 microM at high Mg2+, indicating that Mg2+ decreases the off-rate for MgATP from the E.MgATP complex. A total of 100% of the radioactive E.Ser-peptide complex is trapped as phospho-Ser-peptide at low Mg2+, but only 40% is trapped at high Mg2+ in the presence of an infinite concentration of MgATP, suggesting that the off-rate for Ser-peptide from the central complex is much less than catalysis at low but not at high Mg2+. In support of this finding, the Ki for Leu-Arg-Arg-Ala-Ala-Leu-Gly (Ala-peptide) increases from 0.27 mM at low Mg2+ to 2.4 mM at high Mg2+. No trapping was observed at either high or low Mg2+ for the E.MgADP complex up to a phospho-Ser-peptide concentration of 5 mM. Thus, it is likely that in the slow-reaction direction the kinetic mechanism is rapid equilibrium.

  2. Distribution of mean kinetic energy around an isolated wind turbine and a characteristic wind turbine of a very large wind farm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortina, Gerard; Calaf, Marc; Cal, Raúl Bayoán

    2016-11-01

    An isolated wind turbine and a very large wind farm are introduced into large-eddy simulations of an atmospheric boundary layer. The atmospheric flow is forced with a constant geostrophic wind and a time-varying surface temperature extracted from a selected period of the CASES-99 field experiment. A control volume approach is used to directly compare the transfer of mean kinetic energy around a characteristic wind turbine throughout a diurnal cycle considering both scenarios. For the very large wind farm case, results illustrate that the recovery of mean kinetic energy around a wind turbine is dominated by the vertical flux, regardless of atmospheric stratification. Contrarily, for an isolated wind turbine, the recovery is dependent on the background atmospheric stratification and it is produced by a combination of advection, vertical flux, and pressure redistribution. The analysis also illustrates that during the unstable stratification periods vertical entrainment of mean kinetic energy dominates, whereas during the stable regime horizontal entrainment is predominant. Finally, it is observed that in both scenarios, the single wind turbine and the large wind farm cases, turbulent mixing is driven by the background convective stratification during the unstable period and by the effect of the wind turbine during the stable regime.

  3. A one-dimensional free energy surface does not account for two-probe folding kinetics of protein alpha(3)D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feng; Dumont, Charles; Zhu, Yongjin; DeGrado, William F; Gai, Feng; Gruebele, Martin

    2009-02-14

    We present fluorescence-detected measurements of the temperature-jump relaxation kinetics of the designed three-helix bundle protein alpha(3)D taken under solvent conditions identical to previous infrared-detected kinetics. The fluorescence-detected rate is similar to the IR-detected rate only at the lowest temperature where we could measure it (326 K). The fluorescence-detected rate decreases by a factor of 3 over the 326-344 K temperature range, whereas the IR-detected rate remains nearly constant over the same range. To investigate this probe dependence, we tested an extensive set of physically reasonable one-dimensional (1D) free energy surfaces by Langevin dynamics simulation. The simulations included coordinate- and temperature-dependent roughness, diffusion coefficients, and IR/fluorescence spectroscopic signatures. None of these can reproduce the IR and fluorescence data simultaneously, forcing us to the conclusion that a 1D free energy surface cannot accurately describe the folding of alpha(3)D. This supports the hypothesis that alpha(3)D has a multidimensional free energy surface conducive to downhill folding at 326 K, and that it is already an incipient downhill folder with probe-dependent kinetics near its melting point.

  4. Cardiovascular Effects of Energy Drinks in Familial Long QT Syndrome: A Randomized Cross-Over Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Belinda; Ingles, Jodie; Medi, Caroline; Driscoll, Timothy; Semsarian, Christopher

    2017-03-15

    Caffeinated energy drinks may trigger serious cardiac effects. The aim of this study was to determine the cardiovascular effects of caffeinated energy drink consumption in patients with familial long QT syndrome (LQTS). From 2014-2016, 24 LQTS patients aged 16-50 years were recruited to a randomized, double-blind, cross-over study of energy drink (ED) versus control (CD) with participants acting as their own controls (one week washout). The primary study outcome was an increase in corrected QT interval (QTc) by >20ms. Secondary outcomes were changes in systolic and diastolic blood pressure. In 24 patients with LQTS (no dropout), mean age was 29±9 years, 13/24 (54%) were female, and 8/24 (33%) were probands. Intention to treat analysis revealed no significant change in QTc with ED compared with CD (12±28ms vs 16±27ms, 3% vs 4%, p=0.71). The systolic and diastolic blood pressure significantly increased with ED compared to CD (peak change 7±16mmHg vs 1±16mmHg, 6% vs 0.8%, p=0.046 and 8±10 vs 2±9mmHg, 11% vs 3% p=0.01 respectively). These changes correlated with significant increases in serum caffeine (14.6±11.3 vs 0.5±0.1μmol/L, penergy drink consumption. Caffeinated energy drinks have significant haemodynamic effects in patients with LQTS, especifically an acute increase in blood pressure. Since dangerous QTc prolongation was seen in some LQTS patients, we recommend caution in young patients with LQTS consuming energy drinks. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Thermal Rate Coefficients and Kinetic Isotope Effects for the Reaction OH + CH4→ H2O + CH3on an Ab Initio Based Potential Energy Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Guo, Hua

    2018-02-26

    Thermal rate coefficients for the title reaction and its various isotopologues are computed using a tunneling-corrected transition-state theory on a global potential energy surface recently developed by fitting a large number of high-level ab initio points. The calculated rate coefficients are found to agree well with the measured ones in a wide temperature range, validating the accuracy of the potential energy surface. Strong non-Arrhenius effects are found at low temperatures. In addition, the calculations reproduced the primary and secondary kinetic isotope effects. These results confirm the strong influence of tunneling to this heavy-light-heavy hydrogen abstraction reaction.

  6. Factorial design for the evaluation of the interaction effect between particle size and heating rate in the kinetic energy of coal combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avila, Ivonete; Silva, Eugenio A.G.; Mortari, Daniela A.; Crnkovic, Paula M.; Milioli, Fernando E. [University of Sao Paulo (EESC/USP), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Engineering School. Group of Thermal and Fluids Engineering], Emails: iavila@sc.usp.br, eugenio.silva@usp.br, paulam@sc.usp.br, milioli@sc.usp.br

    2010-07-01

    This paper evaluates the behavior of kinetic energy for different heating rates ({alpha}) and particle sizes of the material in the study of the coal combustion process. It aims to obtain a response surface in a large range of particle size, using heating rates between the minimum and maximum values allowed by the equipment. Therefore it searches for a model to evaluate the interaction effect between particle size and the heating rate and to predict the activation energy of the process studied. The activation energy of the process was determined using the isoconversional model Model Free Kinetics. In this model, the activation energy (E{sub {alpha}}) is obtained as a function of the reaction extent ({alpha}). The subscript in E{sub {alpha}} designates the values related to a given value of conversion ({alpha}). All experiments were conducted in thermogravimetric balance using samples of a Brazilian coal (EC4500) witch average particle size between 163 to 650 {mu}m and heating rates between 10 and 40 deg C min{sup -1} in dynamic atmosphere of air. A central rotatable composite design was applied for the 2{sup 2} factorial design including 4 tests under the axial conditions and 3 repetitions in the central point. As expected, the results show that both the particle size and the heating rate affected significantly the values of activation energy of the coal combustion process obtained by the model used. (author)

  7. Single-Use Energy Sources and Operating Room Time for Laparoscopic Hysterectomy: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloran-Schwartz, M Brigid; Gavard, Jeffrey A; Martin, Jared C; Blaskiewicz, Robert J; Yeung, Patrick P

    2016-01-01

    To compare the intraoperative direct costs of a single-use energy device with reusable energy devices during laparoscopic hysterectomy. A randomized controlled trial (Canadian Task Force Classification I). An academic hospital. Forty-six women who underwent laparoscopic hysterectomy from March 2013 to September 2013. Each patient served as her own control. One side of the uterine attachments was desiccated and transected with the single-use device (Ligasure 5-mm Blunt Tip LF1537 with the Force Triad generator). The other side was desiccated and transected with reusable bipolar forceps (RoBi 5 mm), and transected with monopolar scissors using the same Covidien Force Triad generator. The instrument approach used was randomized to the attending physician who was always on the patient's left side. Resident physicians always operated on the patient's right side and used the converse instruments of the attending physician. Start time was recorded at the utero-ovarian pedicle and end time was recorded after transection of the uterine artery on the same side. Costs included the single-use device; amortized costs of the generator, reusable instruments, and cords; cleaning and packaging of reusable instruments; and disposal of the single-use device. Operating room time was $94.14/min. We estimated that our single use-device cost $630.14 and had a total time savings of 6.7 min per case, or 3.35 min per side, which could justify the expense of the device. The single-use energy device had significant median time savings (-4.7 min per side, p energy device that both desiccates and cuts significantly reduced operating room time to justify its own cost, and it also reduced total intraoperative direct costs during laparoscopic hysterectomy in our institution. Operating room cost per minute varies between institutions and must be considered before generalizing our results. Copyright © 2016 AAGL. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. An energy transfer kinetic probe for OH-quenchers in the Nd(3+):YPO4 nanocrystals suitable for imaging in the biological tissue transparency window.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samsonova, Elena V; Popov, Alexandr V; Vanetsev, Alexander S; Keevend, Kerda; Orlovskaya, Elena O; Kiisk, Valter; Lange, Sven; Joost, Urmas; Kaldvee, Kaarel; Mäeorg, Uno; Glushkov, Nikolay A; Ryabova, Anastasiya V; Sildos, Ilmo; Osiko, Vyacheslav V; Steiner, Rudolf; Loschenov, Victor B; Orlovskii, Yurii V

    2014-12-28

    Tetragonal xenotime-type yttrium orthophosphate (YPO4) Nd(3+) doped nanoparticles suitable for biomedical applications were prepared by microwave-hydrothermal treatment. We applied the energy transfer probing based on the analysis of kinetics of impurity quenching to determine the presence and spatial position of -OH fluorescence quenching acceptors in the impurity-containing nanoparticles. We show that the impurity quenching kinetics of the 0.1 at% Nd(3+) doped YPO4 nanoparticles is a two stage (ordered and disordered) static kinetics, determined by a direct energy transfer to the -OH acceptors. Analyzing the ordered stage, we assume that the origin of the -OH groups is the protonation of the phosphate groups, while analyzing the disordered stage, we assume the presence of water molecules in the mesopores. We determine the dimension of the space of the -OH acceptors as d = 3 and quantify their absolute concentration using the disordered Förster stage of kinetics. We use the late stage of kinetics of fluorescence hopping (CDD ≫ CDA) quenching (the fluctuation asymptotics) at 1 at% Nd(3+) concentration as an energy transfer probe to quantify the relative concentration of -OH molecular groups compared to an optically active rare-earth dopant in the volume of NPs, when energy migration over Nd(3+) donors to the -OH acceptors accelerates fluorescence quenching. In doing so we use just one parameter α = γ(A)/γ(D) = n(A)√[C(DA)]/n(D)√[C(DD)], defined by the relation of concentration of the -OH acceptors to the concentration of an optically active dopant. The higher is the α, the higher is the relative concentration of -OH acceptors in the volume of nanoparticles. We find α = 2.95 for the 1 at% Nd(3+):YPO4 NPs that, according to the equation for α, and the results obtained for the values of the microparameters CDD(Nd-Nd) = 24.6 nm(6) ms(-1) and CDA(Nd-OH) = 0.6 nm(6) ms(-1), suggests twenty times higher concentration for acceptors other than donors. As the

  9. Development of a modified independent parallel reactions kinetic model and comparison with the distributed activation energy model for the pyrolysis of a wide variety of biomass fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sfakiotakis, Stelios; Vamvuka, Despina

    2015-12-01

    The pyrolysis of six waste biomass samples was studied and the fuels were kinetically evaluated. A modified independent parallel reactions scheme (IPR) and a distributed activation energy model (DAEM) were developed and their validity was assessed and compared by checking their accuracy of fitting the experimental results, as well as their prediction capability in different experimental conditions. The pyrolysis experiments were carried out in a thermogravimetric analyzer and a fitting procedure, based on least squares minimization, was performed simultaneously at different experimental conditions. A modification of the IPR model, considering dependence of the pre-exponential factor on heating rate, was proved to give better fit results for the same number of tuned kinetic parameters, comparing to the known IPR model and very good prediction results for stepwise experiments. Fit of calculated data to the experimental ones using the developed DAEM model was also proved to be very good. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Why do the Togni reagent and some of its derivatives exist in the high-energy hypervalent iodine form? New insight into the origins of their kinetic stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koichi, Shungo; Leuthold, Benjamin; Lüthi, Hans P

    2017-12-13

    In a recent study published in ChemComm, H. F. Schaefer and coworkers showed that the Togni trifluoromethyltation reagent and some of its derivatives appear in a high-energy hypervalent form. The (kinetic) stability of these reagents is granted by the five-membered ring of their benziodoxole-based scaffold, which prevents isomerization to the (inactive) acyclic ether form. Whereas the thermodynamic stability of these reagents can be predicted on the basis of the trans influence of the electrophilic substituent, no such descriptor was found for their kinetic stability. In this study, we explore an array of Togni-type reagents, and show that the barrier to isomerization can be predicted based on the bond length between the iodine atom and the electrophilic substituent. For compounds, where this correlation does not hold, we have a reliable indication that the structure of the transition state is at variance with those in the series.

  11. Restricted second random phase approximations and Tamm-Dancoff approximations for electronic excitation energy calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Degao; Yang, Yang; Zhang, Peng [Department of Chemistry, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Yang, Weitao, E-mail: weitao.yang@duke.edu [Department of Chemistry and Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States)

    2014-12-07

    In this article, we develop systematically second random phase approximations (RPA) and Tamm-Dancoff approximations (TDA) of particle-hole and particle-particle channels for calculating molecular excitation energies. The second particle-hole RPA/TDA can capture double excitations missed by the particle-hole RPA/TDA and time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT), while the second particle-particle RPA/TDA recovers non-highest-occupied-molecular-orbital excitations missed by the particle-particle RPA/TDA. With proper orbital restrictions, these restricted second RPAs and TDAs have a formal scaling of only O(N{sup 4}). The restricted versions of second RPAs and TDAs are tested with various small molecules to show some positive results. Data suggest that the restricted second particle-hole TDA (r2ph-TDA) has the best overall performance with a correlation coefficient similar to TDDFT, but with a larger negative bias. The negative bias of the r2ph-TDA may be induced by the unaccounted ground state correlation energy to be investigated further. Overall, the r2ph-TDA is recommended to study systems with both single and some low-lying double excitations with a moderate accuracy. Some expressions on excited state property evaluations, such as 〈S{sup ^2}〉 are also developed and tested.

  12. Restricted second random phase approximations and Tamm-Dancoff approximations for electronic excitation energy calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Degao; Yang, Yang; Zhang, Peng; Yang, Weitao

    2014-12-01

    In this article, we develop systematically second random phase approximations (RPA) and Tamm-Dancoff approximations (TDA) of particle-hole and particle-particle channels for calculating molecular excitation energies. The second particle-hole RPA/TDA can capture double excitations missed by the particle-hole RPA/TDA and time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT), while the second particle-particle RPA/TDA recovers non-highest-occupied-molecular-orbital excitations missed by the particle-particle RPA/TDA. With proper orbital restrictions, these restricted second RPAs and TDAs have a formal scaling of only O(N4). The restricted versions of second RPAs and TDAs are tested with various small molecules to show some positive results. Data suggest that the restricted second particle-hole TDA (r2ph-TDA) has the best overall performance with a correlation coefficient similar to TDDFT, but with a larger negative bias. The negative bias of the r2ph-TDA may be induced by the unaccounted ground state correlation energy to be investigated further. Overall, the r2ph-TDA is recommended to study systems with both single and some low-lying double excitations with a moderate accuracy. Some expressions on excited state property evaluations, such as < hat{S}2rangle are also developed and tested.

  13. Bounds on the vibrational energy that can be harvested from random base motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langley, R. S.

    2015-03-01

    This paper is concerned with the development of upper bounds on the energy harvesting performance of a general multi-degree-of-freedom nonlinear electromechanical system that is subjected to random base motion and secondary applied periodic forces. The secondary forces are applied with the aim of enhancing the energy harvested from the base motion, and they may constitute direct excitation, or they may produce parametric terms in the equations of motion. It is shown that when the base motion has white noise acceleration then the power input by the base is always πS0 M / 2 where S0 is the single sided spectral density of the acceleration, and M is the mass of the system. This implies that although the secondary forces may enhance the energy harvested by causing a larger fraction of the power input from the base to be harvested rather than dissipated, there is an upper limit on the power that can be harvested. Attention is then turned to narrow band excitation, and it is found that in the absence of secondary forces a bound can be derived for a single degree of freedom system with linear damping and arbitrary nonlinear stiffness. The upper bound on the power input by the base is πM max [ S (ω) ] / 2, where S (ω) is the single sided base acceleration spectrum. The validity of this result for more general systems is found to be related to the properties of the first Wiener kernel, and this issue is explored analytically and by numerical simulation.

  14. Electronic Effects versus Distortion Energies During Strain-Promoted Alkyne-Azide Cycloadditions: A Theoretical Tool to Predict Reaction Kinetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia-Hartjes, J.; Dommerholt, J.; Wennekes, T.; Delft, van F.L.; Zuilhof, H.

    2013-01-01

    Second-order reaction kinetics of known strain-promoted azide–alkyne cycloaddition (SPAAC) reactions were compared with theoretical data from a range of ab initio methods. This produced both detailed insights into the factors determining the reaction rates and two straightforward theoretical tools

  15. MANAGING THE LOAD SCHEDULE OF THE ADMINISTRATIVE BUILDING TAKING INTO ACCOUNT EMERGING RISKS WHEN CONNECTING THE KINETIC ENERGY STORAGE TO THE POWER SUPPLY SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Yu. Shevchenko

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The purpose of the paper is to analyze load schedules of the administrative building and develop a structural scheme for connecting the kinetic energy storage in the power supply system of this building, which will allow using it as a consumer regulator, as well as a theoretical study of the risks that arise. Methodology. To conduct the research, the theory of designing internal electrical networks of buildings, the theory of plotting electric load graphs, methods of the theory of electromechanical systems and for analyzing the risk system, the T. Saati method of hierarchies were used. Results. The structure of kinetic energy storage (KES connection to the power supply system of the administrative building is developed and the structural diagram of the KES proposed for installation is given, the average daily winter and summer load schedules are presented, a set of groups and subgroups of risks and their influence on the work of the power supply system of the building are connected with the connection of the KES. Originality. For the first time, the application of the kinetic energy storage in the power supply system of the building with the analysis of emerging risks is considered, which makes it possible to improve the reliability of the developed system and the efficiency of load regulation. Practical value. The application of the proposed scheme will make it possible to use administrative buildings as load regulators of the external power supply system, and also effectively manage the load in the internal power supply system of the building.

  16. The effect of the physical properties of the substrate on the kinetics of cell adhesion and crawling studied by an axisymmetric diffusion-energy balance coupled model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samadi-Dooki, Aref; Shodja, Hossein M; Malekmotiei, Leila

    2015-05-14

    In this paper an analytical approach to study the effect of the substrate physical properties on the kinetics of adhesion and motility behavior of cells is presented. Cell adhesion is mediated by the binding of cell wall receptors and substrate's complementary ligands, and tight adhesion is accomplished by the recruitment of the cell wall binders to the adhesion zone. The binders' movement is modeled as their axisymmetric diffusion in the fluid-like cell membrane. In order to preserve the thermodynamic consistency, the energy balance for the cell-substrate interaction is imposed on the diffusion equation. Solving the axisymmetric diffusion-energy balance coupled equations, it turns out that the physical properties of the substrate (substrate's ligand spacing and stiffness) have considerable effects on the cell adhesion and motility kinetics. For a rigid substrate with uniform distribution of immobile ligands, the maximum ligand spacing which does not interrupt adhesion growth is found to be about 57 nm. It is also found that as a consequence of the reduction in the energy dissipation in the isolated adhesion system, cell adhesion is facilitated by increasing substrate's stiffness. Moreover, the directional movement of cells on a substrate with gradients in mechanical compliance is explored with an extension of the adhesion formulation. It is shown that cells tend to move from soft to stiff regions of the substrate, but their movement is decelerated as the stiffness of the substrate increases. These findings based on the proposed theoretical model are in excellent agreement with the previous experimental observations.

  17. Holographic kinetic k-essence model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz, Norman [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencia, Universidad de Santiago de Chile, Casilla 307, Santiago (Chile)], E-mail: ncruz@lauca.usach.cl; Gonzalez-Diaz, Pedro F.; Rozas-Fernandez, Alberto [Colina de los Chopos, Instituto de Fisica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: a.rozas@cfmac.csic.es; Sanchez, Guillermo [Departamento de Matematica y Ciencia de la Computacion, Facultad de Ciencia, Universidad de Santiago de Chile, Casilla 307, Santiago (Chile)], E-mail: gsanchez@usach.cl

    2009-08-31

    We consider a connection between the holographic dark energy density and the kinetic k-essence energy density in a flat FRW universe. With the choice c{>=}1, the holographic dark energy can be described by a kinetic k-essence scalar field in a certain way. In this Letter we show this kinetic k-essential description of the holographic dark energy with c{>=}1 and reconstruct the kinetic k-essence function F(X)

  18. Sidecut radius and kinetic energy: equipment designed to reduce risk of severe traumatic knee injuries in alpine giant slalom ski racing.

    OpenAIRE

    Kröll, Josef; Spörri, Jörg; Gilgien, Matthias; Schwameder, Hermann; Müller, Erich

    2016-01-01

    This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/ licenses/by-nc/4.0/ Background: Kinetic energy (Ekin) increases with speed by the power of 2...

  19. A novel robust quantitative Förster resonance energy transfer assay for protease SENP2 kinetics determination against its all natural substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Shen, Yali; Zheng, Shasha; Liao, Jiayu

    2015-12-01

    SUMOylation (the process of adding the SUMO [small ubiquitin-like modifier] to substrates) is an important post-translational modification of critical proteins in multiple processes. Sentrin/SUMO-specific proteases (SENPs) act as endopeptidases to process the pre-SUMO or as isopeptidases to deconjugate the SUMO from its substrate. Determining the kinetics of SENPs is important for understanding their activities. Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) technology has been widely used in biomedical research and is a powerful tool for elucidating protein interactions. In this paper we report a novel quantitative FRET-based protease assay for SENP2 endopeptidase activity that accounts for the self-fluorescent emissions of the donor (CyPet) and the acceptor (YPet). The kinetic parameters, k(cat), K(M), and catalytic efficiency (k(cat)/K(M)) of catalytic domain SENP2 toward pre-SUMO1/2/3, were obtained by this novel design. Although we use SENP2 to demonstrate our method, the general principles of this quantitative FRET-based protease kinetic determination can be readily applied to other proteases.

  20. Systems approach to excitation-energy and electron transfer reaction networks in photosystem II complex: model studies for chlorophyll a fluorescence induction kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Takeshi; Tanaka, Shigenori; Ebina, Kuniyoshi

    2015-09-07

    Photosystem II (PS II) is a protein complex which evolves oxygen and drives charge separation for photosynthesis employing electron and excitation-energy transfer processes over a wide timescale range from picoseconds to milliseconds. While the fluorescence emitted by the antenna pigments of this complex is known as an important indicator of the activity of photosynthesis, its interpretation was difficult because of the complexity of PS II. In this study, an extensive kinetic model which describes the complex and multi-timescale characteristics of PS II is analyzed through the use of the hierarchical coarse-graining method proposed in the authors׳ earlier work. In this coarse-grained analysis, the reaction center (RC) is described by two states, open and closed RCs, both of which consist of oxidized and neutral special pairs being in quasi-equilibrium states. Besides, the PS II model at millisecond scale with three-state RC, which was studied previously, could be derived by suitably adjusting the kinetic parameters of electron transfer between tyrosine and RC. Our novel coarse-grained model of PS II can appropriately explain the light-intensity dependent change of the characteristic patterns of fluorescence induction kinetics from O-J-I-P, which shows two inflection points, J and I, between initial point O and peak point P, to O-J-D-I-P, which shows a dip D between J and I inflection points. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Sunflower shells utilization for energetic purposes in an integrated approach of energy crops: laboratory study pyrolysis and kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabaniotou, A A; Kantarelis, E K; Theodoropoulos, D C

    2008-05-01

    Sunflower is a traditional crop which can be used for the production of bioenergy and liquid biofuels. A study of the pyrolytic behaviour of sunflower residues at temperatures from 300 to 600 degrees C has been carried out. The experiments were performed in a captive sample reactor under atmospheric pressure and helium as sweeping gas. The yields of the derived pyrolysis products were determined in relation to temperature, with constant sweeping gas flow of 50 cm3 min(-1) and heating rate of 40 degrees Cs(-1). The maximum gas yield of around 53 wt.% was obtained at 500 degrees C, whereas maximum oil yield of about 21 wt.% was obtained at 400 degrees C. A simple first order kinetic model has been applied for the devolatilization of biomass. Kinetic constants have been estimated: E=78.15 kJ mol(-1); k(0)=1.03 x 10(3)s(-1).

  2. The effects of short work vs. longer work periods within intermittent exercise on V̇o2p kinetics, muscle deoxygenation, and energy system contribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrudden, Michael C; Keir, Daniel A; Belfry, Glen R

    2017-06-01

    We examined the effects of inserting 3-s recovery periods during high-intensity cycling exercise at 25-s and 10-s intervals on pulmonary oxygen uptake (V̇o2p), muscle deoxygenation [deoxyhemoglobin (HHb)], their associated kinetics (τ), and energy system contributions. Eleven men (24 ± 3 yr) completed two trials of three cycling protocols: an 8-min continuous protocol (CONT) and two 8-min intermittent exercise protocols with work-to-rest periods of 25 s to 3 s (25INT) and 10 s to 3 s (10INT). Each protocol began with a step-transition from a 20-W baseline to a power output (PO) of 60% between lactate threshold and maximal V̇o2p (Δ60). This PO was maintained for 8 min in CONT, whereas 3-s periods of 20-W cycling were inserted every 10 s and 25 s after the transition to Δ60 in 10INT and 25INT, respectively. Breath-by-breath gas exchange measured by mass spectrometry and turbine and vastus lateralis [HHb] measured by near-infrared spectroscopy were recorded throughout. Arterialized-capillary lactate concentration ([Lac-]) was obtained before and 2 min postexercise. The τV̇o2p was lowest (P kinetics did not differ (P > 0.05) between conditions. Postexercise [Lac-] was lowest (P kinetics and reduced overall V̇o2p, suggesting an increased reliance on PCr-derived phosphorylation during the work period of INT compared with an identical PO performed continuously.NEW & NOTEWORTHY We report novel observations on the effects of differing heavy-intensity work durations between 3-s recovery periods on pulmonary oxygen uptake (V̇o2p) kinetics, muscle deoxygenation, and energy system contributions. Relative to continuous exercise, V̇o2p kinetics are faster in intermittent exercise, and increased frequency of 3-s recovery periods improves microvascular O2 delivery and reduces V̇o2p and arterialized-capillary lactate concentration. The metabolic burden of identical intensity work is altered when performed intermittently vs. continuously. Copyright © 2017 the

  3. An instrument for fast acquisition of fluorescence decay curves at picosecond resolution designed for "double kinetics" experiments: application to fluorescence resonance excitation energy transfer study of protein folding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishay, Eldad Ben; Hazan, Gershon; Rahamim, Gil; Amir, Dan; Haas, Elisha

    2012-08-01

    The information obtained by studying fluorescence decay of labeled biopolymers is a major resource for understanding the dynamics of their conformations and interactions. The lifetime of the excited states of probes attached to macromolecules is in the nanosecond time regime, and hence, a series of snapshot decay curves of such probes might - in principle - yield details of fast changes of ensembles of labeled molecules down to sub-microsecond time resolution. Hence, a major current challenge is the development of instruments for the low noise detection of fluorescence decay curves within the shortest possible time intervals. Here, we report the development of an instrument, picosecond double kinetics apparatus, that enables recording of multiple fluorescence decay curves with picosecond excitation pulses over wide spectral range during microsecond data collection for each curve. The design is based on recording and averaging multiphoton pulses of fluorescence decay using a fast 13 GHz oscilloscope during microsecond time intervals at selected time points over the course of a chemical reaction or conformational transition. We tested this instrument in a double kinetics experiment using reference probes (N-acetyl-tryptophanamide). Very low stochastic noise level was attained, and reliable multi-parameter analysis such as derivation of distance distributions from time resolved FRET (fluorescence resonance excitation energy transfer) measurements was achieved. The advantage of the pulse recording and averaging approach used here relative to double kinetics methods based on the established time correlated single photon counting method, is that in the pulse recording approach, averaging of substantially fewer kinetic experiments is sufficient for obtaining the data. This results in a major reduction in the consumption of labeled samples, which in many cases, enables the performance of important experiments that were not previously feasible.

  4. Bi-resonant structure with piezoelectric PVDF films for energy harvesting from random vibration sources at low frequency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liang, Shanshan; Crovetto, Andrea; Peng, Zhuoteng

    2016-01-01

    and experiments with piezoelectric elements show that the energy harvesting device with the bi-resonant structure can generate higher power output than that of the sum of the two separate devices from random vibration sources at low frequency, and hence significantly improves the vibration-to- electricity...

  5. Theoretical Kinetics Analysis for Ḣ Atom Addition to 1,3-Butadiene and Related Reactions on the Ċ4H7Potential Energy Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Klippenstein, Stephen J; Zhou, Chong-Wen; Curran, Henry J

    2017-10-12

    The oxidation chemistry of the simplest conjugated hydrocarbon, 1,3-butadiene, can provide a first step in understanding the role of polyunsaturated hydrocarbons in combustion and, in particular, an understanding of their contribution toward soot formation. On the basis of our previous work on propene and the butene isomers (1-, 2-, and isobutene), it was found that the reaction kinetics of Ḣ-atom addition to the C═C double bond plays a significant role in fuel consumption kinetics and influences the predictions of high-temperature ignition delay times, product species concentrations, and flame speed measurements. In this study, the rate constants and thermodynamic properties for Ḣ-atom addition to 1,3-butadiene and related reactions on the Ċ 4 H 7 potential energy surface have been calculated using two different series of quantum chemical methods and two different kinetic codes. Excellent agreement is obtained between the two different kinetics codes. The calculated results including zero-point energies, single-point energies, rate constants, barrier heights, and thermochemistry are systematically compared among the two quantum chemical methods. 1-Methylallyl (Ċ 4 H 7 1-3) and 3-buten-1-yl (Ċ 4 H 7 1-4) radicals and C 2 H 4 + Ċ 2 H 3 are found to be the most important channels and reactivity-promoting products, respectively. We calculated that terminal addition is dominant (>80%) compared to internal Ḣ-atom addition at all temperatures in the range 298-2000 K. However, this dominance decreases with increasing temperature. The calculated rate constants for the bimolecular reaction C 4 H 6 + Ḣ → products and C 2 H 4 + Ċ 2 H 3 → products are in excellent agreement with both experimental and theoretical results from the literature. For selected C 4 species, the calculated thermochemical values are also in good agreement with literature data. In addition, the rate constants for H atom abstraction by Ḣ atoms have also been calculated, and it is

  6. Size-dependent piezoelectric energy-harvesting analysis of micro/nano bridges subjected to random ambient excitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radgolchin, Moeen; Moeenfard, Hamid

    2018-02-01

    The construction of self-powered micro-electro-mechanical units by converting the mechanical energy of the systems into electrical power has attracted much attention in recent years. While power harvesting from deterministic external excitations is state of the art, it has been much more difficult to derive mathematical models for scavenging electrical energy from ambient random vibrations, due to the stochastic nature of the excitations. The current research concerns analytical modeling of micro-bridge energy harvesters based on random vibration theory. Since classical elasticity fails to accurately predict the mechanical behavior of micro-structures, strain gradient theory is employed as a powerful tool to increase the accuracy of the random vibration modeling of the micro-harvester. Equations of motion of the system in the time domain are derived using the Lagrange approach. These are then utilized to determine the frequency and impulse responses of the structure. Assuming the energy harvester to be subjected to a combination of broadband and limited-band random support motion and transverse loading, closed-form expressions for mean, mean square, correlation and spectral density of the output power are derived. The suggested formulation is further exploited to investigate the effect of the different design parameters, including the geometric properties of the structure as well as the properties of the electrical circuit on the resulting power. Furthermore, the effect of length scale parameters on the harvested energy is investigated in detail. It is observed that the predictions of classical and even simple size-dependent theories (such as couple stress) appreciably differ from the findings of strain gradient theory on the basis of random vibration. This study presents a first-time modeling of micro-scale harvesters under stochastic excitations using a size-dependent approach and can be considered as a reliable foundation for future research in the field of

  7. Kinetic Typography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Leeuwen, Theo; Djonov, Emilia

    2014-01-01

    After discussing broad cultural drivers behind the development of kinetic typography, the chapter outlines an approach to analysing kinetic typography which is based on Halliday's theory of transitivity, as applied by Kress and Van Leeuwen to visual images....

  8. Kinetics of coffee industrial residue pyrolysis using distributed activation energy model and components separation of bio-oil by sequencing temperature-raising pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Nanwei; Ren, Jie; Ye, Ziwei; Xu, Qizhi; Liu, Jingyong; Sun, Shuiyu

    2016-12-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the kinetics of coffee industrial residue (CIR) pyrolysis, the effect of pyrolysis factors on yield of bio-oil component and components separation of bio-oil. The kinetics of CIR pyrolysis was analyzed using distributed activation energy model (DAEM), based on the experiments in thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA), and it indicated that the average of activation energy (E) is 187.86kJ·mol-1. The bio-oils were prepared from CIR pyrolysis in vacuum tube furnace, and its components were determined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Among pyrolysis factors, pyrolysis temperature is the most influential factor on components yield of bio-oil, directly concerned with the volatilization and yield of components (palmitic acid, linoleic acid, oleic acid, octadecanoic acid and caffeine). Furthermore, a new method (sequencing temperature-raising pyrolysis) was put forward and applied to the components separation of bio-oil. Based on experiments, a solution of components separation of bio-oil was come out. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Assessment of duration of the drive operation in the mode of kinetic energy recovery under power supply voltage sags in electrical grids of mechanical engineering enterprises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shonin, O. B.; Novozhilov, N. G.

    2017-02-01

    Voltage sags in electric grids of mechanical engineering enterprises may lead to disconnection of important power consumers with variable frequency drives from the power grid and further interruption of the production process. The paper considers a sensorless V/f control system of еру induction motor drive under normal conditions and under voltage sags on the basis of a computer model of the drive and derivation of a formula for assessment of possible duration of the drive operation in the mode of controlled recovery of kinetic energy accumulated in rotating mass of the drive. Results of simulations have been used to validate results of calculations of the rotor velocity deceleration made in a closed form obtained from the equation reflecting the balance of torques. It is shown that results of calculations practically coincide with results of simulations in the range up to 5% of the velocity initial value. The proposed formula may be useful for estimation of the duration of the drive operation in the mode of recovery of kinetic energy depending on parameters of the motor and driven mechanisms.

  10. Supplementing energy and protein source at different rate of degradability to mixture of corn waste and coffee pod as basal diet on rumen fermentation kinetic of beef cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dicky Pamungkas

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of corn waste and coffee pod as basal diet needs energy and protein supplementation in order to optimize rumen microbial growth. A research was done to study the appropriate supplement which is suitable based on the result of rumen fermentation kinetics. Four ruminally canulated cows, (205-224 kg of live weight were placed in individual cages. The basal diet (BD offered were corn waste and coffee pod mixture (80:20. Source of high degradable energy (HDE was cassava pomace; while the low degradable energy (LDE was arenga piñata waste. The high degradable protein (HDP was mixed-concentrate while the low degradable protein (LDP was leucaena leave meal. The supplementation of energy and protein to basal diet was in ratio of 50:50 based on dry matter. Feed offered were basal diet and the supplement at ratio of 60: 40 (3 % of LW. Observation was carried out for 4 periods (10 days/period. In each period, animal was fed one of the following diets: A = BD, B = BD+ HDE+LDP, C = BD+LDE+LDP, and D = BD+HDE+HDP. Rumen kinetics observed were: pH, and VFA, NH3 and rumen microbial protein concentrations. Rumen fluid was taken at the end of each period gradually along the course of 24 hours fermentation. The results showed that the diets gave significant effect (P < 0.05 on rumen pH. The lowest rumen pH (5.76 was observed on diet D at 2:00, 12 hours after feeding. Meanwhile, the highest pH (7.22 was found in animal fed diet A at 16:00. The total VFA on diet D of periode:1, 3 and 4 showed the highest level: 68.1 mmol/l; 75.37 mmol/l and 85.14 mmol/l respectively. The highest NH3 concentration was found in diet D followed by diet C, B and A. At 12:00 observation or at 4 h after morning feeding the highest NH3 was observed from diet D (41.94 mg/100 ml. It is concluded that diet D resulted in the best rumen fermentation kinetic, therefore it could be used in feed formulation in cattle diets.

  11. Energy Contents of Frequently Ordered Restaurant Meals and Comparison with Human Energy Requirements and US Department of Agriculture Database Information: A Multisite Randomized Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Lorien E.; Weber, Judith L.; Heyman, Melvin B.; Schichtl, Rachel L.; Verstraete, Sofia; Lowery, Nina S.; Das, Sai Krupa; Schleicher, Molly M.; Rogers, Gail; Economos, Christina; Masters, William A.; Roberts, Susan B.

    2017-01-01

    Background Excess energy intake from meals consumed away from home is implicated as a major contributor to obesity, and ~50% of US restaurants are individual or small-chain (non–chain) establishments that do not provide nutrition information. Objective To measure the energy content of frequently ordered meals in non–chain restaurants in three US locations, and compare with the energy content of meals from large-chain restaurants, energy requirements, and food database information. Design A multisite random-sampling protocol was used to measure the energy contents of the most frequently ordered meals from the most popular cuisines in non–chain restaurants, together with equivalent meals from large-chain restaurants. Setting Meals were obtained from restaurants in San Francisco, CA; Boston, MA; and Little Rock, AR, between 2011 and 2014. Main outcome measures Meal energy content determined by bomb calorimetry. Statistical analysis performed Regional and cuisine differences were assessed using a mixed model with restaurant nested within region×cuisine as the random factor. Paired t tests were used to evaluate differences between non–chain and chain meals, human energy requirements, and food database values. Results Meals from non–chain restaurants contained 1,205±465 kcal/meal, amounts that were not significantly different from equivalent meals from large-chain restaurants (+5.1%; P=0.41). There was a significant effect of cuisine on non–chain meal energy, and three of the four most popular cuisines (American, Italian, and Chinese) had the highest mean energy (1,495 kcal/meal). Ninety-two percent of meals exceeded typical energy requirements for a single eating occasion. Conclusions Non–chain restaurants lacking nutrition information serve amounts of energy that are typically far in excess of human energy requirements for single eating occasions, and are equivalent to amounts served by the large-chain restaurants that have previously been criticized

  12. Energy Contents of Frequently Ordered Restaurant Meals and Comparison with Human Energy Requirements and U.S. Department of Agriculture Database Information: A Multisite Randomized Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Lorien E; Weber, Judith L; Heyman, Melvin B; Schichtl, Rachel L; Verstraete, Sofia; Lowery, Nina S; Das, Sai Krupa; Schleicher, Molly M; Rogers, Gail; Economos, Christina; Masters, William A; Roberts, Susan B

    2016-04-01

    Excess energy intake from meals consumed away from home is implicated as a major contributor to obesity, and ∼50% of US restaurants are individual or small-chain (non-chain) establishments that do not provide nutrition information. To measure the energy content of frequently ordered meals in non-chain restaurants in three US locations, and compare with the energy content of meals from large-chain restaurants, energy requirements, and food database information. A multisite random-sampling protocol was used to measure the energy contents of the most frequently ordered meals from the most popular cuisines in non-chain restaurants, together with equivalent meals from large-chain restaurants. Meals were obtained from restaurants in San Francisco, CA; Boston, MA; and Little Rock, AR, between 2011 and 2014. Meal energy content determined by bomb calorimetry. Regional and cuisine differences were assessed using a mixed model with restaurant nested within region×cuisine as the random factor. Paired t tests were used to evaluate differences between non-chain and chain meals, human energy requirements, and food database values. Meals from non-chain restaurants contained 1,205±465 kcal/meal, amounts that were not significantly different from equivalent meals from large-chain restaurants (+5.1%; P=0.41). There was a significant effect of cuisine on non-chain meal energy, and three of the four most popular cuisines (American, Italian, and Chinese) had the highest mean energy (1,495 kcal/meal). Ninety-two percent of meals exceeded typical energy requirements for a single eating occasion. Non-chain restaurants lacking nutrition information serve amounts of energy that are typically far in excess of human energy requirements for single eating occasions, and are equivalent to amounts served by the large-chain restaurants that have previously been criticized for providing excess energy. Restaurants in general, rather than specific categories of restaurant, expose patrons to

  13. Additivity of kinetic and potential energy contributions in modification of graphene supported on SiO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xitong; Zhao, Shijun; Wang, Yuyu; Xue, Jianming

    2017-04-01

    The damage production induced by MeV highly charged ions (HCI) irradiations in graphene supported on a SiO2 substrate is investigated using molecular dynamics method. We get results in agreement with our recent experiments. We find that the electronic energy loss and potential energy deposition have similar effects on the defects creation in SiO2 substrate-supported graphene and both mechanisms of energy deposition seem to contribute in an additive way. The influences of the energy deposition depth and radius are studied. Only the energy deposited below the surface within 2.5 nm will induce the damage in graphene. Hence, the HCI can be a powerful tool to induce defects in graphene without causing deep damage of the substrate. When charge of incident Xeq+ is above 30, a nanopore is formed and the size of nanopore in graphene can be controlled by changing the incident charge state.

  14. Kinetic parameters, collision rates, energy exchanges and transport coefficients of non-thermal electrons in premixed flames at sub-breakdown electric field strengths

    KAUST Repository

    Bisetti, Fabrizio

    2014-01-02

    The effects of an electric field on the collision rates, energy exchanges and transport properties of electrons in premixed flames are investigated via solutions to the Boltzmann kinetic equation. The case of high electric field strength, which results in high-energy, non-thermal electrons, is analysed in detail at sub-breakdown conditions. The rates of inelastic collisions and the energy exchange between electrons and neutrals in the reaction zone of the flame are characterised quantitatively. The analysis includes attachment, ionisation, impact dissociation, and vibrational and electronic excitation processes. Our results suggest that Townsend breakdown occurs for E/N = 140 Td. Vibrational excitation is the dominant process up to breakdown, despite important rates of electronic excitation of CO, CO2 and N2 as well as impact dissociation of O2 being apparent from 50 Td onwards. Ohmic heating in the reaction zone is found to be negligible (less than 2% of peak heat release rate) up to breakdown field strengths for realistic electron densities equal to 1010 cm-3. The observed trends are largely independent of equivalence ratio. In the non-thermal regime, electron transport coefficients are insensitive to mixture composition and approximately constant across the flame, but are highly dependent on the electric field strength. In the thermal limit, kinetic parameters and transport coefficients vary substantially across the flame due to the spatially inhomogeneous concentration of water vapour. A practical approach for identifying the plasma regime (thermal versus non-thermal) in studies of electric field effects on flames is proposed. © 2014 Taylor & Francis.

  15. Highly efficient hybrid energy generator: coupled organic photovoltaic device and randomly oriented electrospun poly(vinylidene fluoride) nanofiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Boongik; Lee, Kihwan; Park, Jongjin; Kim, Jongmin; Kim, Ohyun

    2013-03-01

    A hybrid architecture consisting of an inverted organic photovoltaic device and a randomly-oriented electrospun PVDF piezoelectric device was fabricated as a highly-efficient energy generator. It uses the inverted photovoltaic device with coupled electrospun PVDF nanofibers as tandem structure to convert solar and mechanical vibrations energy to electricity simultaneously or individually. The power conversion efficiency of the photovoltaic device was also significantly improved up to 4.72% by optimized processes such as intrinsic ZnO, MoO3 and active layer. A simple electrospinning method with the two electrode technique was adopted to achieve a high voltage of - 300 mV in PVDF piezoelectric fibers. Highly-efficient HEG using voltage adder circuit provides the conceptual possibility of realizing multi-functional energy generator whenever and wherever various energy sources are available.

  16. Single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer shows uniformity in TATA binding protein-induced DNA bending and heterogeneity in bending kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Rebecca H; Goodrich, James A; Kugel, Jennifer F

    2012-09-25

    TATA binding protein (TBP) is a key component of the eukaryotic RNA polymerase II transcription machinery that binds to TATA boxes located in the core promoter regions of many genes. Structural and biochemical studies have shown that when TBP binds DNA, it sharply bends the DNA. We used single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) to study DNA bending by human TBP on consensus and mutant TATA boxes in the absence and presence of TFIIA. We found that the state of the bent DNA within populations of TBP-DNA complexes is homogeneous; partially bent intermediates were not observed. In contrast to the results of previous ensemble studies, TBP was found to bend a mutant TATA box to the same extent as the consensus TATA box. Moreover, in the presence of TFIIA, the extent of DNA bending was not significantly changed, although TFIIA did increase the fraction of DNA molecules bound by TBP. Analysis of the kinetics of DNA bending and unbending revealed that on the consensus TATA box two kinetically distinct populations of TBP-DNA complexes exist; however, the bent state of the DNA is the same in the two populations. Our smFRET studies reveal that human TBP bends DNA in a largely uniform manner under a variety of different conditions, which was unexpected given previous ensemble biochemical studies. Our new observations led to us to revise the model for the mechanism of DNA binding by TBP and for how DNA bending is affected by TATA sequence and TFIIA.

  17. Energy transfer dynamics and kinetics of elementary processes (promoted) by gas-phase CO2 -N2 collisions: Selectivity control by the anisotropy of the interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Andrea; Pirani, Fernando; Laganà, Antonio; Bartolomei, Massimiliano

    2016-06-15

    In this work, we exploit a new formulation of the potential energy and of the related computational procedures, which embodies the coupling between the intra and intermolecular components, to characterize possible propensities of the collision dynamics in energy transfer processes of interest for simulation and control of phenomena occurring in a variety of equilibrium and nonequilibrium environments. The investigation reported in the paper focuses on the prototype CO2 -N2 system, whose intramolecular component of the interaction is modeled in terms of a many body expansion while the intermolecular component is modeled in terms of a recently developed bonds-as-interacting-molecular-centers' approach. The main advantage of this formulation of the potential energy surface is that of being (a) truly full dimensional (i.e., all the variations of the coordinates associated with the molecular vibrations and rotations on the geometrical and electronic structure of the monomers, are explicitly taken into account without freezing any bonds or angles), (b) more flexible than other usual formulations of the interaction and (c) well suited for fitting procedures better adhering to accurate ab initio data and sensitive to experimental arrangement dependent information. Specific attention has been given to the fact that a variation of vibrational and rotational energy has a higher (both qualitative and quantitative) impact on the energy transfer when a more accurate formulation of the intermolecular interaction (with respect to that obtained when using rigid monomers) is adopted. This makes the potential energy surface better suited for the kinetic modeling of gaseous mixtures in plasma, combustion and atmospheric chemistry computational applications. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Bose condensation in (random traps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.A. Zagrebnov

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We study a non-interacting (perfect Bose-gas in random external potentials (traps. It is shown that a generalized Bose-Einstein condensation in the random eigenstates manifests if and only if the same occurs in the one-particle kinetic-energy eigenstates, which corresponds to the generalized condensation of the free Bose-gas. Moreover, we prove that the amounts of both condensate densities are equal. This statement is relevant for justification of the Bogoliubov approximation} in the theory of disordered boson systems.

  19. Differential effects of macronutrient content in 2 energy-restricted diets on cardiovascular risk factors and adipose tissue cell size in moderately obese individuals: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizkalla, Salwa W; Prifti, Edi; Cotillard, Aurélie; Pelloux, Veronique; Rouault, Christine; Allouche, Reginald; Laromiguière, Muriel; Kong, LingChun; Darakhshan, Froogh; Massiera, Florence; Clement, Karine

    2012-01-01

    The most effective and safe dietary approach for weight loss and its impact on the metabolic functions and morphology of adipose tissue remain unclear. We evaluated whether an energy-restricted high-protein diet with a low glycemic index and soluble fiber (LC-P-LGI) would be more effective than a low-calorie conventional diet (LC-CONV) on weight loss and related metabolic risk factors. We further determined factors that may influence adipocyte size during energy restriction. Thirteen obese participants were randomly assigned in a crossover design to 2 periods of a 4-wk hypocaloric diet as either LC-P-LGI or LC-CONV, separated by 8-wk washout intervals. In comparison with the LC-CONV diet, the main effect of the LC-P-LGI diet was a greater decrease in adipocyte diameter (P = 0.048), plasma plasminogen activator inhibitor protein-1 (P = 0.019), vascular endothelial growth factor (P = 0.032), and interferon-γ inducible protein 10 (P = 0.010). Whereas fasting plasma glucose and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein decreased only after the LC-P-LGI diet, with no differences between diets, fasting plasma insulin and insulin resistance were lower after the LC-CONV diet. The diet results did not differ for body composition and lipid variables. Kinetic modifications in adipocyte diameter were associated with metabolic variables and genes implicated in adipocyte proliferation, apoptosis, and angiogenesis. In comparison with the LC-CONV diet, the LC-P-LGI diet was associated with improvement in some cardiometabolic risk factors and greater reduction in adipocyte size. Profiles of genes involved in inhibiting adipogenesis and angiogenesis, but increasing apoptosis, were correlated with decreased adipocyte size. This study provides insight into the adipose tissue-remodeling changes that induce regulation of adipocyte size during dietary weight loss. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01312740.

  20. IMFIT Integrated Modeling Applications Supporting Experimental Analysis: Multiple Time-Slice Kinetic EFIT Reconstructions, MHD Stability Limits, and Energy and Momentum Flux Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, A.; Lao, L. L.; Abla, G.; Chu, M. S.; Prater, R.; Smith, S. P.; St. John, H. E.; Guo, W.; Li, G.; Pan, C.; Ren, Q.; Park, J. M.; Bisai, N.; Srinivasan, R.; Sun, A. P.; Liu, Y.; Worrall, M.

    2010-11-01

    This presentation summarizes several useful applications provided by the IMFIT integrated modeling framework to support DIII-D and EAST research. IMFIT is based on Python and utilizes modular task-flow architecture with a central manager and extensive GUI support to coordinate tasks among component modules. The kinetic-EFIT application allows multiple time-slice reconstructions by fetching pressure profile data directly from MDS+ or from ONETWO or PTRANSP. The stability application analyzes a given reference equilibrium for stability limits by performing parameter perturbation studies with MHD codes such as DCON, GATO, ELITE, or PEST3. The transport task includes construction of experimental energy and momentum fluxes from profile analysis and comparison against theoretical models such as MMM95, GLF23, or TGLF.

  1. Relative contribution of combined kinetic and exchange energy terms vs the electronic component of molecular electrostatic potential in hardness potential derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Rituparna; Roy, Ram Kinkar

    2013-11-14

    The relative contribution of the sum of kinetic [(10/9)CFρ(r)2/3] and exchange energy [(4/9)CXρ(r)1/3] terms to that of the electronic part of the molecular electrostatic potential [Vel(r)] in the variants of hardness potential is investigated to assess the proposed definition of Δ+h(k) = −[VelN+1(k) – VelN(k)] and Δ–h(k) = −[VelN(k) – VelN–1(k)] (Saha; et al. J. Comput. Chem. 2013, 34, 662). Some substituted benzenes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) (undergoing electrophilic aromatic substitution), carboxylic acids, and their derivatives are chosen to carry out the theoretical investigation as stated above. Intra- and intermolecular reactivity trends generated by Δ+h(k) and Δ–h(k) are found to be satisfactory and are correlated reasonably well with experimental results.

  2. Study of Pair and many-body interactions in rare-gas halide atom clusters using negative ion zero electron kinetic energy (ZEKE) and threshold photodetachment spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yourshaw, Ivan [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1998-07-09

    The diatomic halogen atom-rare gas diatomic complexes KrBr-, XeBr-, and KrCl- are studied in this work by zero electron kinetic energy (ZEKE) spectroscopy in order to characterize the weak intermolecular diatomic potentials of these species. Also, the ZEKE and threshold photodetachment spectra of the polyatomic clusters ArnBr- (n = 2-9) and ArnI- (n = 2-19) are studied to obtain information about the non-additive effects on the interactions among the atoms. This work is part of an ongoing effort to characterize the pair and many-body potentials of the complete series of rare gas halide clusters. In these studies we obtain information about both the anionic and neutral clusters.

  3. Design of a reusable kinetic energy absorber for an astronaut safety tether to be used during extravehicular activities on the Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borthwick, Dawn E.; Cronch, Daniel F.; Nixon, Glen R.

    1991-01-01

    The goal of this project is to design a reusable safety device for a waist tether which will absorb the kinetic energy of an astronaut drifting away from the Space Station. The safety device must limit the tension of the tether line in order to prevent damage to the astronaut's space suit or to the structure of the spacecraft. The tether currently used on shuttle missions must be replaced after the safety feature has been developed. A reusable tether for the Space Station would eliminate the need for replacement tethers, conserving space and mass. This report presents background information, scope and limitations, methods of research and development, alternative designs, a final design solution and its evaluation, and recommendations for further work.

  4. The Fisher-information-based uncertainty relation, Cramer-Rao inequality and kinetic energy for the D-dimensional central problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dehesa, J S [Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad de Granada, 18071-Granada (Spain); Gonzalez-Ferez, R [Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad de Granada, 18071-Granada (Spain); Sanchez-Moreno, P [Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad de Granada, 18071-Granada (Spain)

    2007-02-23

    The inequality >= (l+1/2){sup 2}, with L being the grand orbital quantum number, and its conjugate relation for ((r{sup 2}) (p{sup -2})) are shown to be fulfilled in the D-dimensional central problem. Their use has allowed us to improve the Fisher-information-based uncertainty relation (I{sub {rho}}I{sub {gamma}}{>=} const) and the Cramer-Rao inequalities ((r{sup 2})I{sub {rho}} {>=} D{sup 2}; (p{sup 2})I{sub {gamma}} {>=} D{sup 2}). In addition, the kinetic energy and the radial expectation value (r{sup 2}) are shown to be bounded from below by the Fisher information in position and momentum spaces, denoted by I{sub {rho}} and I{sub {gamma}}, respectively.

  5. Analysis of Flow Cytometry DNA Damage Response Protein Activation Kinetics Following X-rays and High Energy Iron Nuclei Exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Universities Space Research Association; Chappell, Lori J.; Whalen, Mary K.; Gurai, Sheena; Ponomarev, Artem; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Pluth, Janice M.

    2010-12-15

    We developed a mathematical method to analyze flow cytometry data to describe the kinetics of {gamma}H2AX and pATF2 phosphorylations ensuing various qualities of low dose radiation in normal human fibroblast cells. Previously reported flow cytometry kinetic results for these DSB repair phospho-proteins revealed that distributions of intensity were highly skewed, severely limiting the detection of differences in the very low dose range. Distributional analysis reveals significant differences between control and low dose samples when distributions are compared using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. Radiation quality differences are found in the distribution shapes and when a nonlinear model is used to relate dose and time to the decay of the mean ratio of phosphoprotein intensities of irradiated samples to controls. We analyzed cell cycle phase and radiation quality dependent characteristic repair times and residual phospho-protein levels with these methods. Characteristic repair times for {gamma}H2AX were higher following Fe nuclei as compared to X-rays in G1 cells (4.5 {+-} 0.46 h vs 3.26 {+-} 0.76 h, respectively), and in S/G2 cells (5.51 {+-} 2.94 h vs 2.87 {+-} 0.45 h, respectively). The RBE in G1 cells for Fe nuclei relative to X-rays for {gamma}H2AX was 2.05 {+-} 0.61 and 5.02 {+-} 3.47, at 2 h and 24-h postirradiation, respectively. For pATF2, a saturation effect is observed with reduced expression at high doses, especially for Fe nuclei, with much slower characteristic repair times (>7 h) compared to X-rays. RBEs for pATF2 were 0.66 {+-} 0.13 and 1.66 {+-} 0.46 at 2 h and 24 h, respectively. Significant differences in {gamma}H2AX and pATF2 levels comparing irradiated samples to control were noted even at the lowest dose analyzed (0.05 Gy) using these methods of analysis. These results reveal that mathematical models can be applied to flow cytometry data to uncover important and subtle differences following exposure to various qualities of low dose radiation.

  6. Measurement of both the equilibrium constant and rate constant for electronic energy transfer by control of the limiting kinetic regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vagnini, Michael T; Rutledge, W Caleb; Wagenknecht, Paul S

    2010-02-01

    Electronic energy transfer can fall into two limiting cases. When the rate of the energy transfer back reaction is much faster than relaxation of the acceptor excited state, equilibrium between the donor and acceptor excited states is achieved and only the equilibrium constant for the energy transfer can be measured. When the rate of the back reaction is much slower than relaxation of the acceptor, the energy transfer is irreversible and only the forward rate constant can be measured. Herein, we demonstrate that with trans-[Cr(d(4)-cyclam)(CN)(2)](+) as the donor and either trans-[Cr([15]ane-ane-N(4))(CN)(2)](+) or trans-[Cr(cyclam)(CN)(2)](+) as the acceptor, both limits can be obtained by control of the donor concentration. The equilibrium constant and rate constant for the case in which trans-[Cr([15]ane-ane-N(4))(CN)(2)](+) is the acceptor are 0.66 and 1.7 x 10(7) M(-1) s(-1), respectively. The equilibrium constant is in good agreement with the value of 0.60 determined using the excited state energy gap between the donor and acceptor species. For the thermoneutral case in which trans-[Cr(cyclam)(CN)(2)](+) is the acceptor, an experimental equilibrium constant of 0.99 was reported previously, and the rate constant has now been measured as 4.0 x 10(7) M(-1) s(-1).

  7. Research on the kinetic energy ratio of return air entrainment in the form of low supply–middle return in the large space of brine experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Wang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduced in this article is a 1:15 brine model experiment rig with an actual large space building as the research object, which provides different concentration brine for a simulation of the stratified air conditioning in the steady-state flow field featured with columnar air supply in the bottom, heat source on the ground, the central air return, and air exhaust from roof in a large space. According to the similarity theory, it is concluded that the similarity criterion numbers applied here are Reynolds number (Re and Archimedes number (Ar for designation of experiment rig size, choosing device type, and confirming experiment condition. In the designation of key components of experiment rig, the application of automation control makes brine recovery and recycling in the process; designation of electrical control system makes a centralized control of experiment start–stop and the adjustment of the pipeline flow, realizing automation in the whole experiment process. Particle image velocimetry testing technology is used to get velocity vector field of air return mouth area in the model under various working conditions, and also proper orthogonal decomposition method is applied to analyze flow field structure of air return mouth area and reconstruct it. Consequently, we can get a kinetic energy ratio of return air entrainment of lower air-conditioning section and upper non-air-conditioning section in large space. Experiments show that under the conditions of same air supply, indoor environment temperature difference, and height and direction of return air inlet, fastening the speed of return air suction, the entrainment of flow field around it strengthens accordingly. The entrainment of return air inlet has more kinetic energy in the lower air-conditioning section than the upper non-air-conditioning section.

  8. Source spectra of the gravity waves obtained from momentum flux and kinetic energy over Indian region: Comparison between observations and model results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramitha, M.; Venkat Ratnam, M.; Krishna Murthy, B. V.; Vijaya Bhaskar Rao, S.

    2017-02-01

    Using 8 years (May 2006 to March 2014) of high resolution and high accuracy GPS radiosonde observations available from a tropical station Gadanki (13.5°N, 79.2°E), India, we have investigated the climatology of gravity wave energy and zonal momentum fluxes in the lower stratosphere. We also obtained best fit spectrum model for the gravity waves (GWs) for this tropical station. In general, strong annual variation in the energy and momentum flux with maximum during Indian summer monsoon is observed in the lower stratospheric region (18-25 km). By considering different source spectra, we have applied Gravitywave Regional or Global RAy Tracer (GROGRAT) model run on monthly basis using the source spectrum values at different altitudes on the ERA-Interim background fields to obtain the kinetic energy and zonal momentum fluxes for each of the spectra considered. These simulated fluxes are compared with the observed fluxes to arrive at the best fit spectrum model. It is found that the spectrum which represents the convection transient mountain mechanism that is purely anti-symmetric and anisotropic in nature is the best fit model for Gadanki location. This information would be useful in parameterization of the GWs in numerical models over Indian region.

  9. Performance of electrochemical oxidation and photocatalysis in terms of kinetics and energy consumption. New insights into the p-cresol degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escudero, Carlos J; Iglesias, Olalla; Dominguez, Sara; Rivero, Maria J; Ortiz, Inmaculada

    2017-06-15

    This work reports the comparative performance of two Advanced Oxidation Processes (AOPs), electrochemical oxidation and photocatalysis, as individual technological alternatives for the treatment of effluents containing p-cresol. First, the influence of operating parameters in the oxidation and mineralization yield was carried out together with kinetic analysis. Boron Doped Diamond (BDD), RuO 2 and Pt as anodic materials, Na 2 SO 4 and NaCl as supporting electrolytes and different current densities were evaluated in electrochemical oxidation whereas the effect of TiO 2 concentration and radiation was studied in the photocatalytic degradation. Then, the parameter Electrical Energy per Order (E EO ) was calculated to compare the energy consumption in both AOPs, concluding that under the studied conditions the electrochemical treatment with BDD, Na 2 SO 4 and 125 A m -2 showed the best energy efficiency, with an E EO of 5.83 kW h m -3 order -1 for p-cresol and 58.05 kW h m -3 order -1 for DOC removal, respectively. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Analyses of Levofloxacin Adsorption on Pretreated Barley Straw with Respect to Temperature: Kinetics, π-π Electron-Donor-Acceptor Interaction and Site Energy Distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Bei; Niu, Catherine Hui; Wang, Jian

    2017-07-18

    Levofloxacin, representative of an important class of fluoroquinolone antibiotics, has been considered to be one of the emerging pollutants in various water sources. In this paper, adsorption of levofloxacin from artificial contaminated water was done by pretreated barley straw adsorbent obtained from raw barley straw after modification by H3PO4 impregnation and microwave heating. The adsorption kinetics was investigated at various temperatures and levofloxacin concentrations, and the activation energy was determined. In addition, site energy distribution of the pretreated barley straw for levofloxacin adsorption was estimated based on the equilibrium adsorption data. The average site energy and standard deviation of the distribution were determined and applied to analyze the interaction strength between the adsorbent and adsorbate, and adsorption site heterogeneity. The π-π electron-donor-acceptor interactions between the π* aromatic C═C of pretreated barley straw adsorbent and π* carbon atom in benzene ring attached to fluorine of levofloxacin was investigated by C K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy. The results and methodologies in this work could be transferrable to investigate extended systems of water treatment.

  11. Rupturing the hemi-fission intermediate in membrane fission under tension: Reaction coordinates, kinetic pathways, and free-energy barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guojie; Müller, Marcus

    2017-08-01

    Membrane fission is a fundamental process in cells, involved inter alia in endocytosis, intracellular trafficking, and virus infection. Its underlying molecular mechanism, however, is only incompletely understood. Recently, experiments and computer simulation studies have revealed that dynamin-mediated membrane fission is a two-step process that proceeds via a metastable hemi-fission intermediate (or wormlike micelle) formed by dynamin's constriction. Importantly, this hemi-fission intermediate is remarkably metastable, i.e., its subsequent rupture that completes the fission process does not occur spontaneously but requires additional, external effects, e.g., dynamin's (unknown) conformational changes or membrane tension. Using simulations of a coarse-grained, implicit-solvent model of lipid membranes, we investigate the molecular mechanism of rupturing the hemi-fission intermediate, such as its pathway, the concomitant transition states, and barriers, as well as the role of membrane tension. The membrane tension is controlled by the chemical potential of the lipids, and the free-energy landscape as a function of two reaction coordinates is obtained by grand canonical Wang-Landau sampling. Our results show that, in the course of rupturing, the hemi-fission intermediate undergoes a "thinning → local pinching → rupture/fission" pathway, with a bottle-neck-shaped cylindrical micelle as a transition state. Although an increase of membrane tension facilitates the fission process by reducing the corresponding free-energy barrier, for biologically relevant tensions, the free-energy barriers still significantly exceed the thermal energy scale kBT.

  12. Kinetic Energy Distribution of D(2p) Atoms From Analysis of the D Lyman-a Line Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciocca, Marco; Ajello, Joseph M.; Liu, Xianming; Maki, Justin

    1997-01-01

    The absolute cross sections of the line center (slow atoms) and wings (fast atoms) and total emission line profile were measured from threshold to 400 eV. Analytical model coeffiecients are given for the energy dependence of the measured slow atom cross section.

  13. A Unified Kinetics and Equilibrium Experiment: Rate Law, Activation Energy, and Equilibrium Constant for the Dissociation of Ferroin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattar, Simeen

    2011-01-01

    Tris(1,10-phenanthroline)iron(II) is the basis of a suite of four experiments spanning 5 weeks. Students determine the rate law, activation energy, and equilibrium constant for the dissociation of the complex ion in acid solution and base dissociation constant for phenanthroline. The focus on one chemical system simplifies a daunting set of…

  14. A Correction of Random Incidence Absorption Coefficients for the Angular Distribution of Acoustic Energy under Measurement Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeong, Cheol-Ho

    2009-01-01

    discrepancies between the measured value and the theoretical random incidence absorption coefficient. Therefore the angular distribution of the incident acoustic energy onto an absorber sample should be taken into account. The angular distribution of the incident energy density was simulated using the beam...... tracing method for various room shapes and source positions. The averaged angular distribution is found to be similar to a Gaussian distribution. As a result, an angle-weighted absorption coefficient was proposed by considering the angular energy distribution to improve the agreement between...... the theoretical absorption coefficient and the reverberation room measurement. The angle-weighted absorption coefficient, together with the size correction, agrees satisfactorily with the measured absorption data by the reverberation chamber method. At high frequencies and for large samples, the averaged...

  15. Gas Phase Molecular Spectroscopy: Electronic Spectroscopy of Combustion Intermediates, Chlorine Azide kinetics, and Rovibrational Energy Transfer in Acetylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freel, Keith A.

    This dissertation is composed of three sections. The first deals with the electronic spectroscopy of combustion intermediates that are related to the formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Absorption spectra for phenyl, phenoxy, benzyl, and phenyl peroxy radicals were recorded using the technique of cavity ring-down spectroscopy. When possible, molecular constants, vibrational frequencies, and excited state lifetimes for these radicals were derived from these data. The results were supported by theoretical predictions. The second section presents a study of electron attachment to chlorine azide (ClN3) using a flowing-afterglow Langmuir-probe apparatus. Electron attachment rates were measured to be 3.5x10-8 and 4.5x10-8 cm3s-1 at 298 and 400 K respectively. The reactions of ClN3 with eighteen cations and seventeen anions were characterized. Rate constants were measured using a selected ion flow tube. The ionization energy (>9.6eV), proton affinity (713+/-41 kJ mol-1), and electron affinity (2.48+/-0.2 eV) for ClN 3 were determined from these data. The third section demonstrates the use of double resonance spectroscopy to observe state-selected rovibrational energy transfer from the first overtone asymmetric stretch of acetylene. The total population removal rate constants from various rotational levels of the (1,0,1,00,00) vibrational state were determined to be in the range of (9-17) x 10 -10 cm3s-1. Rotational energy transfer accounted for approximately 90% of the total removal rate from each state. Therefore, the upper limit of vibrational energy transfer from the (1,0,1,0 0,00) state was 10%.

  16. Kinetic analysis of growth rate, ATP, and pigmentation suggests an energy-spilling function for the pigment prodigiosin of Serratia marcescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddix, Pryce L; Jones, Sarah; Patel, Pratik; Burnham, Sarah; Knights, Kaori; Powell, Joan N; LaForm, Amber

    2008-11-01

    Serratia marcescens is a gram-negative environmental bacterium and opportunistic pathogen. S. marcescens expresses prodigiosin, a bright red and cell-associated pigment which has no known biological function for producing cells. We present here a kinetic model relating cell, ATP, and prodigiosin concentration changes for S. marcescens during cultivation in batch culture. Cells were grown in a variety of complex broth media at temperatures which either promoted or essentially prevented pigmentation. High growth rates were accompanied by large decreases in cellular prodigiosin concentration; low growth rates were associated with rapid pigmentation. Prodigiosin was induced most strongly during limited growth as the population transitioned to stationary phase, suggesting a negative effect of this pigment on biomass production. Mathematically, the combined rate of formation of biomass and bioenergy (as ATP) was shown to be equivalent to the rate of prodigiosin production. Studies with cyanide inhibition of both oxidative phosphorylation and pigment production indicated that rates of biomass and net ATP synthesis were actually higher in the presence of cyanide, further suggesting a negative regulatory role for prodigiosin in cell and energy production under aerobic growth conditions. Considered in the context of the literature, these results suggest that prodigiosin reduces ATP production by a process termed energy spilling. This process may protect the cell by limiting production of reactive oxygen compounds. Other possible functions for prodigiosin as a mediator of cell death at population stationary phase are discussed.

  17. Departures of the electron energy distribution from a Maxwellian in hydrogen. I - Formulation and solution of the electron kinetic equation. II - Consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoub, E. C.

    1977-01-01

    The problem of calculating the steady-state free-electron energy distribution in a hydrogen gas is considered in order to study departures of that distribution from a Maxwellian at sufficiently low degrees of ionization. A model kinetic equation is formulated and solved analytically for the one-particle electron distribution function in a steady-state partially ionized hydrogen gas, and it is shown that the formal solution can be accurately approximated by using the WKB method. The solutions obtained indicate that the high-energy tail of the distribution is susceptible to distortion by imbalanced inelastic collisions for ionization fractions not exceeding about 0.1 and that such departures from a Maxwellian can lead to significant changes in the collisional excitation and ionization rates of ground-state hydrogen atoms. Expressions for the electron-hydrogen collision rates are derived which explicitly display their dependence on the hydrogen departure coefficients. The results are applied in order to compare self-consistent predictions with those based on the a priori assumption of a Maxwellian distribution for models of the thermal ionization equilibrium of hydrogen in the optically thin limit, spectral-line formation by a gas consisting of two-level atoms, and radiative transfer in finite slabs by a gas of four-level hydrogen atoms.

  18. Single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer studies of the human telomerase RNA pseudoknot: temperature-/urea-dependent folding kinetics and thermodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmstrom, Erik D; Nesbitt, David J

    2014-04-10

    The ribonucleoprotein telomerase is an RNA-dependent DNA polymerase that catalyzes the repetitive addition of a short, species-specific, DNA sequence to the ends of linear eukaryotic chromosomes. The single RNA component of telomerase contains both the template sequence for DNA synthesis and a functionally critical pseudoknot motif, which can also exist as a less stable hairpin. Here we use a minimal version of the human telomerase RNA pseudoknot to study this hairpin-pseudoknot structural equilibrium using temperature-controlled single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) experiments. The urea dependence of these experiments aids in determination of the folding kinetics and thermodynamics. The wild-type pseudoknot behavior is compared and contrasted to a mutant pseudoknot sequence implicated in a genetic disorder-dyskeratosis congenita. These findings clearly identify that this 2nt noncomplementary mutation destabilizes the folding of the wild-type pseudoknot by substantially reducing the folding rate constant (≈ 400-fold) while only nominally increasing the unfolding rate constant (≈ 5-fold). Furthermore, the urea dependence of the equilibrium and rate constants is used to develop a free energy landscape for this unimolecular equilibrium and propose details about the structure of the transition state. Finally, the urea-dependent folding experiments provide valuable physical insights into the mechanism for destabilization of RNA pseudoknots by such chemical denaturants.

  19. Characterization of charge and kinetic energy distribution of ions emitted during nanosecond pulsed laser ablation of several metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogar, A. H.; Ullah, S.; Qayyum, H.; Rehman, Z. U.; Qayyum, A.

    2017-09-01

    The ion flux from various metals (Al, Ti, Cu, Sn and W) ablated with 20 ns Nd:YAG laser radiation at a wavelength of 1064 nm was investigated by an ion collector operating in time-of-flight (TOF) configuration. The laser irradiance at the target was varied in the range of 1.7  ×  108-5.73  ×  108 W cm-2. Ion yield from various metals showed a linearly increasing trend with increasing laser irradiance, whereas ion yield was found to decrease with an increasing atomic mass of the target. Our results clearly indicate that ion yield is not a function of the volatility of the metal. TOF ion spectra showed at least two groups of low intensity peaks due to fast ions. The first group of ion peaks, which was present in the spectra of all five metals, was due to surface contamination. The additional fast ion structures in the spectra of Sn and W can be related to the ion acceleration due to the prompt electron emission from these high-Z metals. The ion velocity follows the anticipated inverse square root dependence on the ion mass. For the range of laser irradiance investigated here, the most probable energy of the Cu ions increases from about 100-600 eV. The fast increase in ion energy above ~3  ×  108 W cm-2 is related to the increase of the Columb part of the ion energy due to the production of multiply charged ions.

  20. Electrocardiographic and blood pressure effects of energy drinks and Panax ginseng in healthy volunteers: A randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Sachin A; Occiano, Andrew; Nguyen, Tinh An; Chan, Amanda; Sky, Joseph C; Bhattacharyya, Mouchumi; O'Dell, Kate M; Shek, Allen; Nguyen, Nancy N

    2016-09-01

    Energy drink usage has been linked to emergency room visits and deaths. The objective of the study is to assess the electrocardiographic and blood pressure effects of energy drinks, Panax ginseng and placebo in healthy individuals. This was a randomized, double blinded, placebo controlled, crossover study. Young healthy volunteers with no comorbid conditions consumed 32oz of an energy drink, control drink with 800mg of Panax ginseng or matching placebo-control drink over 45min. Primary endpoints were QTc interval and systolic blood pressure. Secondary endpoints included QT interval, PR interval, QRS duration, heart rate, and diastolic blood pressure. All endpoints were assessed at baseline, 1, 2, 3.5, and 5.5h. A significant increase in QTc interval 2h post energy drink consumption was evident when compared to placebo (3.37±10.7ms and -3.19±11.8ms respectively; p=0.030). Similarly, systolic blood pressure 2h post energy drink consumption increased when compared to placebo (2.00±6.37mmHg and -2.67±5.83mmHg respectively; p=0.014). The PR interval significantly reduced over a 2h period post energy drink use in a clinically non-meaningful manner. Heart rate at 2h was not significantly higher in the energy drink group when compared to others. The QT interval, QRS interval and diastolic blood pressure were not impacted at any time point. Certain energy drinks consumed at a high volume significantly increase the QTc interval and systolic blood pressure by over 6ms and 4mmHg respectively. Panax ginseng does not have a significant impact on ECG or blood pressure parameters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Randomized Controlled Trial of High-Volume Energy Drink Versus Caffeine Consumption on ECG and Hemodynamic Parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Emily A; Lacey, Carolyn S; Aaron, Melenie; Kolasa, Mark; Occiano, Andrew; Shah, Sachin A

    2017-04-26

    Caffeine in doses energy drinks. We evaluated the ECG and blood pressure (BP) effects of high-volume energy drink consumption compared with caffeine alone. This was a randomized, double-blind, controlled, crossover study in 18 young, healthy volunteers. Participants consumed either 946 mL (32 ounces) of energy drink or caffeinated control drink, both of which contained 320 mg of caffeine, separated by a 6-day washout period. ECG, peripheral BP, and central BP measurements were obtained at baseline and 1, 2, 4, 6, and 24 hours post study drink consumption. The time-matched, baseline-adjusted changes were compared. The change in corrected QT interval from baseline in the energy drink arm was significantly higher than the caffeine arm at 2 hours (0.44±18.4 ms versus -10.4±14.8 ms, respectively; P=0.02). The QTc changes were not different at other time points. While both the energy drink and caffeine arms raised systolic BP in a similar fashion initially, the systolic BP was significantly higher at 6 hours when compared with the caffeine arm (4.72±4.67 mm Hg versus 0.83±6.09 mm Hg, respectively; P=0.01). Heart rate, diastolic BP, central systolic BP, and central diastolic BP showed no evidence of a difference between groups at any time point. Post energy drink, augmentation index was lower at 6 hours. The corrected QT interval and systolic BP were significantly higher post high-volume energy drink consumption when compared with caffeine alone. Larger clinical trials validating these findings and evaluation of noncaffeine ingredients within energy drinks are warranted. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT02023723. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  2. Intramolecular fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) sensors of the orexin OX1 and OX2 receptors identify slow kinetics of agonist activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tian-Rui; Ward, Richard J; Pediani, John D; Milligan, Graeme

    2012-04-27

    Intramolecular fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) sensors able to detect changes in distance or orientation between the 3rd intracellular loop and C-terminal tail of the human orexin OX(1) and OX(2) G protein-coupled receptors following binding of agonist ligands were produced and expressed stably. These were directed to the plasma membrane and, despite the substantial sequence alterations introduced, in each case were able to elevate [Ca(2+)](i), promote phosphorylation of the ERK1/2 MAP kinases and become internalized effectively upon addition of the native orexin peptides. Detailed characterization of the OX(1) sensor demonstrated that it was activated with rank order of potency orexin A > orexin B > orexin A 16-33, that it bound antagonist ligands with affinity similar to the wild-type receptor, and that mutation of a single residue, D203A, greatly reduced the binding and function of orexin A but not antagonist ligands. Addition of orexin A to individual cells expressing an OX(1) sensor resulted in a time- and concentration-dependent reduction in FRET signal consistent with mass-action and potency/affinity estimates for the peptide. Compared with the response kinetics of a muscarinic M(3) acetylcholine receptor sensor upon addition of agonist, response of the OX(1) and OX(2) sensors to orexin A was slow, consistent with a multistep binding and activation process. Such sensors provide means to assess the kinetics of receptor activation and how this may be altered by mutation and sequence variation of the receptors.

  3. Full atomistic reaction mechanism with kinetics for CO reduction on Cu(100) from ab initio molecular dynamics free-energy calculations at 298 K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Tao; Xiao, Hai; Goddard, William A

    2017-02-21

    A critical step toward the rational design of new catalysts that achieve selective and efficient reduction of CO2 to specific hydrocarbons and oxygenates is to determine the detailed reaction mechanism including kinetics and product selectivity as a function of pH and applied potential for known systems. To accomplish this, we apply ab initio molecular metadynamics simulations (AIMμD) for the water/Cu(100) system with five layers of the explicit solvent under a potential of -0.59 V [reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE)] at pH 7 and compare with experiment. From these free-energy calculations, we determined the kinetics and pathways for major products (ethylene and methane) and minor products (ethanol, glyoxal, glycolaldehyde, ethylene glycol, acetaldehyde, ethane, and methanol). For an applied potential (U) greater than -0.6 V (RHE) ethylene, the major product, is produced via the Eley-Rideal (ER) mechanism using H2O + e- The rate-determining step (RDS) is C-C coupling of two CO, with ΔG‡ = 0.69 eV. For an applied potential less than -0.60 V (RHE), the rate of ethylene formation decreases, mainly due to the loss of CO surface sites, which are replaced by H*. The reappearance of C2H4 along with CH4 at U less than -0.85 V arises from *CHO formation produced via an ER process of H* with nonadsorbed CO (a unique result). This *CHO is the common intermediate for the formation of both CH4 and C2H4 These results suggest that, to obtain hydrocarbon products selectively and efficiency at pH 7, we need to increase the CO concentration by changing the solvent or alloying the surface.

  4. Quantitative Connection between Ensemble Thermodynamics and Single-Molecule Kinetics: A Case Study Using Cryogenic Electron Microscopy and Single-Molecule Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer Investigations of the Ribosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Colin D Kinz; Sharma, Ajeet K; Frank, Joachim; Gonzalez, Ruben L; Chowdhury, Debashish

    2015-08-27

    At equilibrium, thermodynamic and kinetic information can be extracted from biomolecular energy landscapes by many techniques. However, while static, ensemble techniques yield thermodynamic data, often only dynamic, single-molecule techniques can yield the kinetic data that describe transition-state energy barriers. Here we present a generalized framework based upon dwell-time distributions that can be used to connect such static, ensemble techniques with dynamic, single-molecule techniques, and thus characterize energy landscapes to greater resolutions. We demonstrate the utility of this framework by applying it to cryogenic electron microscopy (cryo-EM) and single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) studies of the bacterial ribosomal pre-translocation complex. Among other benefits, application of this framework to these data explains why two transient, intermediate conformations of the pre-translocation complex, which are observed in a cryo-EM study, may not be observed in several smFRET studies.

  5. Electrochemically enhanced reduction of hexavalent chromium in contaminated clay: Kinetics, energy consumption, and application of pulse current

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Tian Ran; Pamukcu, Sibel; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.

    2015-01-01

    Electrochemically enhanced reduction of Cr(VI) in clay medium is a technique based on inputting extra energy into the clay to drive the favorable redox reaction. In this study, the reducing reagent Fe(II) was transported into Cr(VI) spiked kaolinite clay by direct current to investigate...... 0.002min-1 at current density of 0mA/cm2 to 0.016min-1 at current density of 0.6mA/cm2, and the corresponding reduction efficiency after 60min experimental time was increased from 8.5% to 57.5%. Mass transport process of Fe(II) in clay pore fluid was determined as the rate controlling step......,Fe)(OH)3] precipitates. XRD analysis suggested that the [(Cr,Fe)(OH)3] formed at the clay surface and grew into the pore fluid. SEM-EDX results indicated that the overall Fe(III):Cr(III) ratio of the precipitates was approximately 1.26:1. Application of pulse current decreased the non-productive energy...

  6. The causal role of breakfast in energy balance and health: a randomized controlled trial in obese adults12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Enhad A; Richardson, Judith D; Holman, Geoffrey D; Tsintzas, Kostas; Thompson, Dylan; Betts, James A

    2016-01-01

    Background: The causal nature of associations between breakfast and health remain unclear in obese individuals. Objective: We sought to conduct a randomized controlled trial to examine causal links between breakfast habits and components of energy balance in free-living obese humans. Design: The Bath Breakfast Project is a randomized controlled trial with repeated measures at baseline and follow-up among a cohort in South West England aged 21–60 y with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry–derived fat mass indexes of ≥13 kg/m2 for women (n = 15) and ≥9 kg/m2 for men (n = 8). Components of energy balance (resting metabolic rate, physical activity thermogenesis, diet-induced thermogenesis, and energy intake) were measured under free-living conditions with random allocation to daily breakfast (≥700 kcal before 1100) or extended fasting (0 kcal until 1200) for 6 wk, with baseline and follow-up measures of health markers (e.g., hematology/adipose biopsies). Results: Breakfast resulted in greater physical activity thermogenesis during the morning than when fasting during that period (difference: 188 kcal/d; 95% CI: 40, 335) but without any consistent effect on 24-h physical activity thermogenesis (difference: 272 kcal/d; 95% CI: −254, 798). Energy intake was not significantly greater with breakfast than fasting (difference: 338 kcal/d; 95% CI: −313, 988). Body mass increased across both groups over time but with no treatment effects on body composition or any change in resting metabolic rate (stable within 8 kcal/d). Metabolic/cardiovascular health also did not respond to treatments, except for a reduced insulinemic response to an oral-glucose-tolerance test over time with daily breakfast relative to an increase with daily fasting (P = 0.05). Conclusions: In obese adults, daily breakfast leads to greater physical activity during the morning, whereas morning fasting results in partial dietary compensation (i.e., greater energy intake) later in the day. There were

  7. The causal role of breakfast in energy balance and health: a randomized controlled trial in lean adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betts, James A; Richardson, Judith D; Chowdhury, Enhad A; Holman, Geoffrey D; Tsintzas, Kostas; Thompson, Dylan

    2014-08-01

    Popular beliefs that breakfast is the most important meal of the day are grounded in cross-sectional observations that link breakfast to health, the causal nature of which remains to be explored under real-life conditions. The aim was to conduct a randomized controlled trial examining causal links between breakfast habits and all components of energy balance in free-living humans. The Bath Breakfast Project is a randomized controlled trial with repeated-measures at baseline and follow-up in a cohort in southwest England aged 21-60 y with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry-derived fat mass indexes ≤11 kg/m² in women (n = 21) and ≤7.5 kg/m² in men (n = 12). Components of energy balance (resting metabolic rate, physical activity thermogenesis, energy intake) and 24-h glycemic responses were measured under free-living conditions with random allocation to daily breakfast (≥700 kcal before 1100) or extended fasting (0 kcal until 1200) for 6 wk, with baseline and follow-up measures of health markers (eg, hematology/biopsies). Contrary to popular belief, there was no metabolic adaptation to breakfast (eg, resting metabolic rate stable within 11 kcal/d), with limited subsequent suppression of appetite (energy intake remained 539 kcal/d greater than after fasting; 95% CI: 157, 920 kcal/d). Rather, physical activity thermogenesis was markedly higher with breakfast than with fasting (442 kcal/d; 95% CI: 34, 851 kcal/d). Body mass and adiposity did not differ between treatments at baseline or follow-up and neither did adipose tissue glucose uptake or systemic indexes of cardiovascular health. Continuously measured glycemia was more variable during the afternoon and evening with fasting than with breakfast by the final week of the intervention (CV: 3.9%; 95% CI: 0.1%, 7.8%). Daily breakfast is causally linked to higher physical activity thermogenesis in lean adults, with greater overall dietary energy intake but no change in resting metabolism. Cardiovascular health

  8. The causal role of breakfast in energy balance and health: a randomized controlled trial in obese adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Enhad A; Richardson, Judith D; Holman, Geoffrey D; Tsintzas, Kostas; Thompson, Dylan; Betts, James A

    2016-03-01

    The causal nature of associations between breakfast and health remain unclear in obese individuals. We sought to conduct a randomized controlled trial to examine causal links between breakfast habits and components of energy balance in free-living obese humans. The Bath Breakfast Project is a randomized controlled trial with repeated measures at baseline and follow-up among a cohort in South West England aged 21-60 y with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry-derived fat mass indexes of ≥13 kg/m(2) for women (n = 15) and ≥9 kg/m(2) for men (n = 8). Components of energy balance (resting metabolic rate, physical activity thermogenesis, diet-induced thermogenesis, and energy intake) were measured under free-living conditions with random allocation to daily breakfast (≥700 kcal before 1100) or extended fasting (0 kcal until 1200) for 6 wk, with baseline and follow-up measures of health markers (e.g., hematology/adipose biopsies). Breakfast resulted in greater physical activity thermogenesis during the morning than when fasting during that period (difference: 188 kcal/d; 95% CI: 40, 335) but without any consistent effect on 24-h physical activity thermogenesis (difference: 272 kcal/d; 95% CI: -254, 798). Energy intake was not significantly greater with breakfast than fasting (difference: 338 kcal/d; 95% CI: -313, 988). Body mass increased across both groups over time but with no treatment effects on body composition or any change in resting metabolic rate (stable within 8 kcal/d). Metabolic/cardiovascular health also did not respond to treatments, except for a reduced insulinemic response to an oral-glucose-tolerance test over time with daily breakfast relative to an increase with daily fasting (P = 0.05). In obese adults, daily breakfast leads to greater physical activity during the morning, whereas morning fasting results in partial dietary compensation (i.e., greater energy intake) later in the day. There were no differences between groups in weight change and most

  9. Cardio- and cerebrovascular responses to the energy drink Red Bull in young adults: a randomized cross-over study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasser, Erik K; Yepuri, Gayathri; Dulloo, Abdul G; Montani, Jean-Pierre

    2014-10-01

    Energy drinks are beverages containing vasoactive metabolites, usually a combination of caffeine, taurine, glucuronolactone and sugars. There are concerns about the safety of energy drinks with some countries banning their sales. We determined the acute effects of a popular energy drink, Red Bull, on cardiovascular and hemodynamic variables, cerebrovascular parameters and microvascular endothelial function. Twenty-five young non-obese and healthy subjects attended two experimental sessions on separate days according to a randomized crossover study design. During each session, primary measurements included beat-to-beat blood pressure measurements, impedance cardiography and transcranial Doppler measurements for at least 20 min baseline and for 2 h following the ingestion of either 355 mL of the energy drink or 355 mL of tap water; the endothelial function test was performed before and two hours after either drink. Unlike the water control load, Red Bull consumption led to increases in both systolic and diastolic blood pressure (p energy drink Red Bull, in particular an elevated blood pressure and double product and a lower cerebral blood flow velocity.

  10. Sexual function following high energy microwave thermotherapy: results of a randomized controlled study comparing transurethral microwave thermotherapy to transurethral prostatic resection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Francisca, E. A.; D'Ancona, F. C.; Meuleman, E. J.; Debruyne, F. M.; de la Rosette, J. J.

    1999-01-01

    We evaluate changes in sexual function in patients treated with high energy transurethral microwave thermotherapy compared to transurethral resection of the prostate. A total of 147 patients randomized to undergo transurethral microwave thermotherapy or transurethral resection of the prostate were

  11. Dairy Intake Enhances Body Weight and Composition Changes during Energy Restriction in 18-50-Year-Old Adults-A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stonehouse, Welma; Wycherley, Thomas; Luscombe-Marsh, Natalie; Taylor, Pennie; Brinkworth, Grant; Riley, Malcolm

    2016-01-01

    A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was performed to investigate the effects of dairy food or supplements during energy restriction on body weight and composition in 18-50-year-old. RCTs...

  12. A randomized, controlled trial to assess short-term black pepper consumption on 24-hour energy expenditure and substrate utilization

    OpenAIRE

    Annalouise O’Connor; Corbin, Karen D.; Nieman, David C.; Swick, Andrew G.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACTBackground: Thermogenic ingredients may play a role in weight management. In vitro and rodent work suggests that components of black pepper may impact energy expenditure, and in humans, other TPRV1 agonists e.g. capsaicin, augment EE. Objectives: To determine the impact of BP on 24-hour EE, respiratory quotient, and biochemical markers of metabolism and satiety, a randomized, controlled, cross-over study of black pepper (0.5mg/meal) versus no pepper control was conducted in post-menop...

  13. Kinematic rotations for four-centre reactions: mapping tetra-atomic potential energy surfaces on the kinetic sphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquilanti, Vincenzo; Bonnet, Laurent; Cavalli, Simonetta

    Kinematic rotations for four body processes canbe conveniently represented as arcs connecting the different reactive rearrangements, (T + UVW, TU + VW, TUV + W and all permutations). The arcs can be considered as forming great circles on a sphere, which is therefore a convenient manifold for setting up symmetric coordinates in asymptotic rearrangement channels: in the particular cases where the reactions are collinearly dominated, the sphere provides the full chart for the (fixed moment of inertia or hyperradial) mapping of the potential energy surface. Also,the representations can be extended to include connections to a formulation where two particles are symmetrically treated with respect to a third one-as introduced in the Journal of Chemical Physics (1986, 85, 1355)-and to encompass the asymptotic situation of the four body system decomposing into three fragments (T + U + VW, T + UV + W, etc...). Comments are made on other cases pertaining to the symmetric parametrizations of four centre processes.

  14. Exploring the Potential of Fulvalene Dimetals as Platforms for Molecular Solar Thermal Energy Storage: Computations, Syntheses, Structures, Kinetics, and Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borjesson, K; Coso, D; Gray, V; Grossman, JC; Guan, JQ; Harris, CB; Hertkorn, N; Hou, ZR; Kanai, Y; Lee, D; Lomont, JP; Majumdar, A; Meier, SK; Moth-Poulsen, K; Myrabo, RL; Nguyen, SC; Segalman, RA; Srinivasan, V; Tolman, WB; Vinokurov, N; Vollhardt, KPC; Weidman, TW

    2014-10-03

    A study of the scope and limitations of varying the ligand framework around the dinuclear core of FvRu(2) in its function as a molecular solar thermal energy storage framework is presented. It includes DFT calculations probing the effect of substituents, other metals, and CO exchange for other ligands on Delta H-storage. Experimentally, the system is shown to be robust in as much as it tolerates a number of variations, except for the identity of the metal and certain substitution patterns. Failures include 1,1',3,3'-tetra-tert-butyl (4), 1,2,2',3'-tetraphenyl (9), diiron (28), diosmium (24), mixed iron-ruthenium (27), dimolybdenum (29), and di-tungsten (30) derivatives. An extensive screen of potential catalysts for the thermal reversal identified AgNO3-SiO2 as a good candidate, although catalyst decomposition remains a challenge.

  15. Near-infrared fluorescence energy transfer imaging of nanoparticle accumulation and dissociation kinetics in tumor-bearing mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yiming; van Rooy, Inge; Hak, Sjoerd; Fay, Francois; Tang, Jun; Davies, Catharina de Lange; Skobe, Mihaela; Fisher, Edward Allen; Radu, Aurelian; Fayad, Zahi A; de Mello Donegá, Celso; Meijerink, Andries; Mulder, Willem J M

    2013-11-26

    In the current study we show the dissociation and tumor accumulation dynamics of dual-labeled near-infrared quantum dot core self-assembled lipidic nanoparticles (SALNPs) in a mouse model upon intravenous administration. Using advanced in vivo fluorescence energy transfer imaging techniques, we observed swift exchange with plasma protein components in the blood and progressive SALNP dissociation and subsequent trafficking of individual SALNP components following tumor accumulation. Our results suggest that upon intravenous administration SALNPs quickly transform, which may affect their functionality. The presented technology provides a modular in vivo tool to visualize SALNP behavior in real time and may contribute to improving the therapeutic outcome or molecular imaging signature of SALNPs.

  16. Exploring the potential of fulvalene dimetals as platforms for molecular solar thermal energy storage: computations, syntheses, structures, kinetics, and catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Börjesson, Karl; Ćoso, Dušan; Gray, Victor; Grossman, Jeffrey C; Guan, Jingqi; Harris, Charles B; Hertkorn, Norbert; Hou, Zongrui; Kanai, Yosuke; Lee, Donghwa; Lomont, Justin P; Majumdar, Arun; Meier, Steven K; Moth-Poulsen, Kasper; Myrabo, Randy L; Nguyen, Son C; Segalman, Rachel A; Srinivasan, Varadharajan; Tolman, Willam B; Vinokurov, Nikolai; Vollhardt, K Peter C; Weidman, Timothy W

    2014-11-17

    A study of the scope and limitations of varying the ligand framework around the dinuclear core of FvRu2 in its function as a molecular solar thermal energy storage framework is presented. It includes DFT calculations probing the effect of substituents, other metals, and CO exchange for other ligands on ΔHstorage . Experimentally, the system is shown to be robust in as much as it tolerates a number of variations, except for the identity of the metal and certain substitution patterns. Failures include 1,1',3,3'-tetra-tert-butyl (4), 1,2,2',3'-tetraphenyl (9), diiron (28), diosmium (24), mixed iron-ruthenium (27), dimolybdenum (29), and ditungsten (30) derivatives. An extensive screen of potential catalysts for the thermal reversal identified AgNO3 -SiO2 as a good candidate, although catalyst decomposition remains a challenge. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. High Kinetic Energy Penetrator Shielding and High Wear Resistance Materials Fabricated with Boron Nitride Nanotubes (BNNTS) and BNNT Polymer Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jin Ho (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Sauti, Godfrey (Inventor); Smith, Michael W. (Inventor); Jordan, Kevin C. (Inventor); Lowther, Sharon E. (Inventor); Bryant, Robert George (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs), boron nitride nanoparticles (BNNPs), carbon nanotubes (CNTs), graphites, or combinations, are incorporated into matrices of polymer, ceramic or metals. Fibers, yarns, and woven or nonwoven mats of BNNTs are used as toughening layers in penetration resistant materials to maximize energy absorption and/or high hardness layers to rebound or deform penetrators. They can be also used as reinforcing inclusions combining with other polymer matrices to create composite layers like typical reinforcing fibers such as Kevlar.RTM., Spectra.RTM., ceramics and metals. Enhanced wear resistance and usage time are achieved by adding boron nitride nanomaterials, increasing hardness and toughness. Such materials can be used in high temperature environments since the oxidation temperature of BNNTs exceeds 800.degree. C. in air. Boron nitride based composites are useful as strong structural materials for anti-micrometeorite layers for spacecraft and space suits, ultra strong tethers, protective gear, vehicles, helmets, shields and safety suits/helmets for industry.

  18. Energy aAnalysis and Kinetics of Mint Leaves Dehydration Using Vibro-Fluidized Bed Heat Pump Dryer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M Ataei Ardestani

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Fluidized bed dryers have not yet been used for drying products such as mint leaves. This could be due to high porosity and low mechanical resistance resulting in poor quality of fluidization. Applying vibration has been recommended to overcome problems such as channeling and defluidization, and hence improving the fluidization quality. In this research, a laboratory scale vibro-fluidized bed heat pump dryer was designed and constructed for drying mint leaves. The experiments were conducted at vibration frequency of 80 Hz and amplitude of 3 mm. The velocity and temperature of the inlet air was controlled by an automatic control system. Experiments were carried out at 40, 50 and 60 °C, and two methods: heat pump drying (HPD and non-heat pump drying (NHPD. The results revealed that drying process primarily occurred in the falling rate period. Effective moisture diffusivity of the samples increased with increase in drying air temperature and varied from 4.26656×10-11 to 2.95872×10-10 m2 s-1 for the HPD method, and 3.71918×10-11 to 1.29196×10-10 m2 s-1 for the NHPD method and was within the reported range of 10-9 to 10-11 m2 s-1 for drying of food materials. The activation energy was determined to be 84 kJ mol-1 for the HPD and 54.34 kJ mol-1 for the NHPD, both have very good agreement with the results of other investigators. The coefficient of performance and specific moisture evaporation rate showed the acceptable performance of the heat pump system. Moreover, the energy consumption of the dryer for the NHPD method was more than the HPD method.

  19. Kinetic Interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    A kinetic interface for orientation detection in a video training system is disclosed. The interface includes a balance platform instrumented with inertial motion sensors. The interface engages a participant's sense of balance in training exercises.......A kinetic interface for orientation detection in a video training system is disclosed. The interface includes a balance platform instrumented with inertial motion sensors. The interface engages a participant's sense of balance in training exercises....

  20. Magnetic force analysis and performance of a tri-stable piezoelectric energy harvester under random excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Yonggang; Tan, Dan; Liu, Jinjun; Zhang, Yuyang; Fan, Shengbo

    2017-10-01

    Recently, harvesting energy from environment has attracted lots of researchers' interests. Ambient vibrations are deemed as a promising power supply since it can be found almost everywhere. Piezoelectric effect has been exploited to convert mechanical energy to electricity. Nonlinearity techniques are favorable for improving the performance of piezoelectric energy harvesters. This paper focuses on a tri-stable piezoelectric energy harvester (TPEH) with two fixed external magnets. The lumped-parameter method is used to investigate the large-amplitude and broadband voltage response. A method based on equivalent magnetizing current theory is first applied to calculate the magnetic force and the potential function with triple wells. We find that this calculation method for magnetic force is more applicable for different magnet intervals compared with the magnetic dipoles method used before. Once the system parameters are chosen appropriately, large-amplitude interwell motion among three wells can be achieved. In our study, a filtered Gaussian noise within the frequency of 0-120 Hz is selected as harvester's excitation, which is similar with the realistic low-frequency vibration in environment. Simulation and experimental results demonstrate that the TPEH enhances the output voltage significantly compared to the conventional bi-stable piezoelectric energy harvester (BPEH). Also, the TPEH's frequency bandwidth is further broadened. Besides, it has been proved that the corresponding optimum magnet interval only changes slightly when the excitation intensity varies, therefore there is no need of adjusting the system parameters to meet practical conditions.