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Sample records for randall-sundrum model ii

  1. Little Randall-Sundrum model and a multiply warped spacetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, Kristian L.

    2008-01-01

    A recent work has investigated the possibility that the mass scale for the ultraviolet (UV) brane in the Randall-Sundrum (RS) model is of the order 10 3 TeV. In this so called 'little Randall-Sundrum' (LRS) model the bounds on the gauge sector are less severe, permitting a lower Kaluza-Klein scale and cleaner discovery channels. However employing a low UV scale nullifies one major appeal of the RS model, namely, the elegant explanation of the hierarchy between the Planck and weak scales. In this work we show that by localizing the gauge, fermion, and scalar sector of the LRS model on a five dimensional slice of a doubly warped spacetime one may obtain the low UV brane scale employed in the LRS model and motivate the weak-Planck hierarchy. We also consider the generalization to an n-warped spacetime

  2. Warm intermediate inflation in the Randall-Sundrum II model in the light of Planck 2015 and BICEP2 results: a general dissipative coefficient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrera, Ramon [Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso, Instituto de Fisica, Valparaiso (Chile); Videla, Nelson [FCFM, Universidad de Chile, Departamento de Fisica, Santiago (Chile); Olivares, Marco [Universidad Diego Portales, Facultad de Ingenieria, Santiago (Chile)

    2015-05-15

    A warm inflationary Universe in the Randall- Sundrum II model during intermediate inflation is studied. For this purpose, we consider the general form for the dissipative coefficient Γ(T, φ) = C{sub φ}(T{sup m})/(φ{sup m-T}), and also we analyze this inflationary model in the weak and strong dissipative regimes. We study the evolution of the Universe under the slow-roll approximation and find solutions to the full effective Friedmann equation in the brane-world framework. In order to constrain the parameters in our model, we consider the recent data from the BICEP2 to Planck 2015 data together with the necessary condition for warm inflation T > H, and also the condition from the weak (or strong) dissipative regime. (orig.)

  3. Randall-Sundrum models vs. supersymmetry. The different flavor signatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gori, Stefania

    2010-07-01

    The Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model based on flavor symmetries and models with a warped extra dimension as first proposed by Randall and Sundrum represent two of the best founded theories beyond the Standard Model. They provide two appealing solutions both to the gauge hierarchy problem and to the Standard Model flavor hierarchy problems. In this thesis we focus on a particular Randall-Sundrum model based on the custodial symmetry SU(2) L x SU(2) R x P LR in the bulk and on two Supersymmetric flavor models: the one based on a U(1) abelian flavor symmetry, the other on a SU(3) non abelian flavor symmetry. We first analyze and compare the flavor structure of the two frameworks, showing two possible ways to address the New Physics flavor problem: warped geometry and custodial protection vs. flavor symmetry. Subsequently, we study the impact of the new particles (Kaluza-Klein states in the Randall-Sundrum model and superpartners in Supersymmetry) in the K and B meson mixings and rare decays. We perform a global numerical analysis of the new physics effects in the models in question and we show that it is possible to naturally be in agreement with all the available data on ΔF=2 observables, even fixing the energy scale of the models to the TeV range, in order to have new particles in the reach of the LHC. We then study distinctive patterns of flavor violation which can enable future experiments to distinguish the two frameworks. In particular, the specific correlations between the CP violating asymmetry in the B s 0 - anti B s 0 system, the rare decays B s,d →μ + μ - and K→πνanti ν allow in principle for an experimental test of the Randall-Sundrum model and of the two Supersymmetric flavor models and a clear distinction between the two frameworks, once new data will be available. (orig.)

  4. Randall-Sundrum models vs. supersymmetry. The different flavor signatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gori, Stefania

    2010-07-15

    The Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model based on flavor symmetries and models with a warped extra dimension as first proposed by Randall and Sundrum represent two of the best founded theories beyond the Standard Model. They provide two appealing solutions both to the gauge hierarchy problem and to the Standard Model flavor hierarchy problems. In this thesis we focus on a particular Randall-Sundrum model based on the custodial symmetry SU(2){sub L} x SU(2){sub R} x P{sub LR} in the bulk and on two Supersymmetric flavor models: the one based on a U(1) abelian flavor symmetry, the other on a SU(3) non abelian flavor symmetry. We first analyze and compare the flavor structure of the two frameworks, showing two possible ways to address the New Physics flavor problem: warped geometry and custodial protection vs. flavor symmetry. Subsequently, we study the impact of the new particles (Kaluza-Klein states in the Randall-Sundrum model and superpartners in Supersymmetry) in the K and B meson mixings and rare decays. We perform a global numerical analysis of the new physics effects in the models in question and we show that it is possible to naturally be in agreement with all the available data on {delta}F=2 observables, even fixing the energy scale of the models to the TeV range, in order to have new particles in the reach of the LHC. We then study distinctive patterns of flavor violation which can enable future experiments to distinguish the two frameworks. In particular, the specific correlations between the CP violating asymmetry in the B{sub s}{sup 0}- anti B{sub s}{sup 0} system, the rare decays B{sub s,d}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} and K{yields}{pi}{nu}anti {nu} allow in principle for an experimental test of the Randall-Sundrum model and of the two Supersymmetric flavor models and a clear distinction between the two frameworks, once new data will be available. (orig.)

  5. Vacuum Expectation Value Profiles of the Bulk Scalar Field in the Generalized Randall-Sundrum Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moazzen, M.; Tofighi, A.; Farokhtabar, A.

    2015-01-01

    In the generalized Randall-Sundrum warped brane-world model the cosmological constant induced on the visible brane can be positive or negative. In this paper we investigate profiles of vacuum expectation value of the bulk scalar field under general Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions in the generalized warped brane-world model. We show that the VEV profiles generally depend on the value of the brane cosmological constant. We find that the VEV profiles of the bulk scalar field for a visible brane with negative cosmological constant and positive tension are quite distinct from those of Randall-Sundrum model. In addition we show that the VEV profiles for a visible brane with large positive cosmological constant are also different from those of the Randall-Sundrum model. We also verify that Goldberger and Wise mechanism can work under nonzero Dirichlet boundary conditions in the generalized Randall-Sundrum model.

  6. Randall-Sundrum model with λ<0 and bulk brane viscosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lepe, Samuel; Pena, Francisco; Saavedra, Joel

    2008-01-01

    We study the effect of the inclusion of bulk brane viscosity on brane world (BW) cosmology in the framework of the Eckart's theory, we focus in the Randall-Sundrum model with negative tension on the brane

  7. Randall-Sundrum model with {lambda}<0 and bulk brane viscosity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepe, Samuel [Instituto de Fisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso, Casilla 4950, Valparaiso (Chile); Pena, Francisco [Departamento de Ciencias Fisicas, Facultad de Ingenieria, Ciencias y Administracion, Universidad de la Frontera, Avda. Francisco Salazar 01145, Casilla 54-D, Temuco (Chile); Saavedra, Joel [Instituto de Fisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso, Casilla 4950, Valparaiso (Chile)], E-mail: joel.saavedra@ucv.cl

    2008-04-17

    We study the effect of the inclusion of bulk brane viscosity on brane world (BW) cosmology in the framework of the Eckart's theory, we focus in the Randall-Sundrum model with negative tension on the brane.

  8. Black Hole Formation in Randall-Sundrum II Braneworlds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Daoyan; Choptuik, Matthew W

    2016-07-01

    We present the first numerical study of the full dynamics of a braneworld scenario, working within the framework of the single brane model of Randall and Sundrum. In particular, we study the process of gravitational collapse driven by a massless scalar field which is confined to the brane. Imposing spherical symmetry on the brane, we show that the evolutions of sufficiently strong initial configurations of the scalar field result in black holes that have finite extension into the bulk. Furthermore, we find preliminary evidence that the black holes generated form a unique sequence, irrespective of the details of the initial data. The black hole solutions we obtain from dynamical evolutions are consistent with those previously computed from a static vacuum ansatz.

  9. Radius stabilization and brane running in the Randall-Sundrum type 1 model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brevik, Iver; Ghoroku, Kazuo; Yahiro, Masanobu

    2004-01-01

    We study the effective potential of a scalar field based on the 5D gauged supergravity for the Randall-Sundrum type one brane model in terms of the brane running method. The scalar couples to the brane such that the Bogomolnyi-Prasad-Sommerfield conditions are satisfied for the bulk configuration. The resulting effective potential implies that the interbrane distance is undetermined in this case, and we need a small Bogomolnyi-Prasad-Sommerfield breaking term on the brane to stabilize the interbrane distance at a finite length. We also discuss the relationship to the Goldberger-Wise model

  10. Flavor alignment via shining in Randall-Sundrum models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csaki, Csaba; Perez, Gilad; Surujon, Ze'ev; Weiler, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    We present a class of warped extra dimensional models whose flavor violating interactions are much suppressed compared to the usual anarchic case due to flavor alignment. Such suppression can be achieved in models where part of the global flavor symmetry is gauged in the bulk and broken in a controlled manner. We show that the bulk masses can be aligned with the down-type Yukawa couplings by an appropriate choice of bulk flavon field representations and TeV brane dynamics. This alignment could reduce the flavor violating effects to levels that allow for a Kaluza-Klein scale as low as 2-3 TeV, making the model observable at the LHC. However, the up-type Yukawa couplings on the IR brane, which are bounded from below by recent bounds on CP violation in the D system, induce flavor misalignment radiatively. Off-diagonal down-type Yukawa couplings and kinetic mixings for the down quarks are both consequences of this effect. These radiative Yukawa corrections can be reduced by raising the flavon vacuum expectation value on the IR brane (at the price of some moderate tuning), or by extending the Higgs sector. The flavor changing effects from the radiatively induced Yukawa mixing terms are at around the current upper experimental bounds. We also show the generic bounds on UV-brane induced flavor violating effects, and comment on possible additional flavor violations from bulk flavor gauge bosons and the bulk Yukawa scalars.

  11. Brane dynamics in the Randall-Sundrum model, inflation and graceful exit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharya, Somdatta; Choudhury, Debajyoti; Jatkar, Dileep P; Sen, Anjan Ananda

    2002-01-01

    We study the averaged action of the Randall-Sundrum model with a time-dependent metric ansatz. It can be reformulated in terms of a Brans-Dicke action with time-dependent Newton's constant. We show that the physics of the early universe, particularly inflation, is governed by the Brans-Dicke theory. The Brans-Dicke scalar, however, quickly settles to its equilibrium value and decouples from the post-inflationary cosmology. The deceleration parameter is negative to start with but changes sign before the Brans-Dicke scalar settles to its equilibrium value. Consequently, the brane metric smoothly exits inflation. We have also studied the slow-roll inflation in our model and investigated the spectra of the density perturbation generated by the radion field and find them consistent with the current observations

  12. The Proca equation in the Randall-Sundrum II background and unparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedland, Alexander [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Giannotti, Maurizio [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Graesser, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Recently Grinstein, Intriligator and Rothstein (GIR) found a number of important effects in the context of unparticle physics. They showed that coupling CFT vector operators to Standard Model (SM) currents necessarily leads, in a weakly coupled CFT, to contact interactions between the SM currents. These contact interactions are physically important, since in exclusive scattering of SM initial states to SM final states they are found to dominate over the pure and novel CFT contribution. Such interactions are also necessary to resolve certain divergences that appear in the two-point function at integer scaling dimension. We show that all of these features can be obtained when the SM currents are coupled to a massive vector field living in a five-dimensional warped background of the Randall-Sundrum 2 (RS2) scenario, which by the AdS/CFT duality must exhibit certain properties of the CFT. Within the RS2 model we also examine and contrast in detail the scalar and vector position-space correlators at intermediate and large distances. These issues are also considered in the Lykken-Randall model in which the Standard Model fields are assumed to be confined to a tensionless brane in the AdS background geometry. Our results can be seen as a generalization of those results of GIR that do not follow from symmetries to large N, strongly coupled CFTs.

  13. Minimal flavor violation in the lepton sector of the Randall-Sundrum model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Muchun; Yu Haibo

    2009-01-01

    We propose a realization of Minimal Flavor Violation in the lepton sector of the Randall-Sundrum model. With the MFV assumption, the only source of flavor violation are the 5D Yukawa couplings, and the usual two independent sources of flavor violation are related. In the limit of massless neutrinos, the bulk mass matrices and 5D Yukawa matrices are simultaneously diagonalized, and hence the absence of FCNCs. In the case of massive neutrinos, the contributions to FCNCs in the charged lepton sector are highly suppressed, due to the smallness of neutrino masses. In addition, the MFV assumption also allows suppressing one-loop charged current contributions to flavor changing processes by reducing the size of the Yukawa couplings, which is not possible in the generic anarchical case. We found that the first KK mass scale as low as ∼3 TeV can be allowed. In both cases, we present a set of numerical results that give rise to realistic lepton masses and mixing angles. Mild hierarchy in the 5D Yukawa matrix of O(25) in our numerical example is required to be consistent with two large and one small mixing angles. This tuning could be improved by having a more thorough search of the parameter space

  14. The custodially protected Randall-Sundrum model. Theoretical aspects and flavour phenomenology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanke, Monika

    2009-01-01

    Models with a warped extra dimension, so-called Randall-Sundrum models, provide an appealing solution to the gauge and flavour hierarchy problems of the Standard Model. After introducing the theoretical basics of such models, we concentrate on a specific model whose symmetry structure is extended to protect the T parameter and the Zb L anti b L coupling from large corrections. We introduce the basic action and discuss in detail effects of electroweak symmetry breaking and the flavour structure of the model. Then we analyse meson-antimeson mixing and rare decays that are affected by new tree level contributions from the Kaluza-Klein modes of the gauge bosons and from the Z boson in an important manner. After deriving analytic expressions for the most important K and B physics observables, we perform a global numerical analysis of the new effects in the model in question. We confirm the recent findings that a stringent constraint on the model is placed by CP-violation in K 0 - anti K 0 mixing. However, even for Kaluza-Klein particles in the reach of the LHC an agreement with all available data can be obtained without significant fine-tuning. We find possible large effects in either CP-violating effects in the B s - anti B s system or in the rare K decays, but not simultaneously. In any case the deviations from the Standard Model predictions in the rare B decays are small and difficult to measure. The specific pattern of new flavour effects allows to distinguish this model from other New Physics frameworks, which we demonstrate explicitly for the case of models with Minimal Flavour Violation and for the Littlest Higgs model with T-parity. (orig.)

  15. The custodially protected Randall-Sundrum model. Theoretical aspects and flavour phenomenology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanke, Monika

    2009-07-24

    Models with a warped extra dimension, so-called Randall-Sundrum models, provide an appealing solution to the gauge and flavour hierarchy problems of the Standard Model. After introducing the theoretical basics of such models, we concentrate on a specific model whose symmetry structure is extended to protect the T parameter and the Zb{sub L} anti b{sub L} coupling from large corrections. We introduce the basic action and discuss in detail effects of electroweak symmetry breaking and the flavour structure of the model. Then we analyse meson-antimeson mixing and rare decays that are affected by new tree level contributions from the Kaluza-Klein modes of the gauge bosons and from the Z boson in an important manner. After deriving analytic expressions for the most important K and B physics observables, we perform a global numerical analysis of the new effects in the model in question. We confirm the recent findings that a stringent constraint on the model is placed by CP-violation in K{sup 0} - anti K{sup 0} mixing. However, even for Kaluza-Klein particles in the reach of the LHC an agreement with all available data can be obtained without significant fine-tuning. We find possible large effects in either CP-violating effects in the B{sub s} - anti B{sub s} system or in the rare K decays, but not simultaneously. In any case the deviations from the Standard Model predictions in the rare B decays are small and difficult to measure. The specific pattern of new flavour effects allows to distinguish this model from other New Physics frameworks, which we demonstrate explicitly for the case of models with Minimal Flavour Violation and for the Littlest Higgs model with T-parity. (orig.)

  16. The custodially protected Randall-Sundrum model. Global features and distinct flavor signatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duling, Bjoern

    2010-04-19

    Models with a warped extra dimension as first proposed by Randall and Sundrum offer possible solutions to the gauge hierarchy and flavor hierarchy problems. In this thesis we concentrate on the particularly well-motivated Randall-Sundrum model with custodial protection of the T parameter and the Zb{sub L} anti b{sub L} vertex and carefully work out its flavor structure. Based on these results we study how the presence of additional Kaluza-Klein states affects particle-antiparticle oscillations and rare decays and derive analytic expressions for the most relevant K and B physics observables. In the course of the ensuing global numerical analysis we conform the stringent bound on the Kaluza-Klein mass scale which is imposed by indirect CP violation in K{sup 0} - anti K{sup 0} oscillations. Yet, we are able to show that agreement with all available data on {delta}F=2 observables can be obtained for TeV-scale Kaluza-Klein masses without significant fine tuning. Furthermore we find large possible effects in CP violation in B{sub s}- anti B{sub s} oscillations as well as in rare K decays, which however are mutually exclusive. The impact on rare decay branching ratios of B mesons on the other hand turns out to be small and very challenging to measure in the near future. In addition we identify a number of distinct correlations between different observables and find that a very specific pattern of flavor violation is present. This pattern can be used to distinguish the model under consideration from other frameworks of new physics, as we demonstrate explicitly for the Littlest Higgs model with T-parity and the Standard Model with a sequential fourth generation of quarks and leptons. (orig.)

  17. The custodially protected Randall-Sundrum model. Global features and distinct flavor signatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duling, Bjoern

    2010-01-01

    Models with a warped extra dimension as first proposed by Randall and Sundrum offer possible solutions to the gauge hierarchy and flavor hierarchy problems. In this thesis we concentrate on the particularly well-motivated Randall-Sundrum model with custodial protection of the T parameter and the Zb L anti b L vertex and carefully work out its flavor structure. Based on these results we study how the presence of additional Kaluza-Klein states affects particle-antiparticle oscillations and rare decays and derive analytic expressions for the most relevant K and B physics observables. In the course of the ensuing global numerical analysis we conform the stringent bound on the Kaluza-Klein mass scale which is imposed by indirect CP violation in K 0 - anti K 0 oscillations. Yet, we are able to show that agreement with all available data on ΔF=2 observables can be obtained for TeV-scale Kaluza-Klein masses without significant fine tuning. Furthermore we find large possible effects in CP violation in B s - anti B s oscillations as well as in rare K decays, which however are mutually exclusive. The impact on rare decay branching ratios of B mesons on the other hand turns out to be small and very challenging to measure in the near future. In addition we identify a number of distinct correlations between different observables and find that a very specific pattern of flavor violation is present. This pattern can be used to distinguish the model under consideration from other frameworks of new physics, as we demonstrate explicitly for the Littlest Higgs model with T-parity and the Standard Model with a sequential fourth generation of quarks and leptons. (orig.)

  18. Flavor physics in the Randall-Sundrum model I. Theoretical setup and electroweak precision tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casagrande, S.; Goertz, F.; Haisch, U.; Neubert, M.; Pfoh, T.

    2008-01-01

    A complete discussion of tree-level flavor-changing effects in the Randall-Sundrum (RS) model with brane-localized Higgs sector and bulk gauge and matter fields is presented. The bulk equations of motion for the gauge and fermion fields, supplemented by boundary conditions taking into account the couplings to the Higgs sector, are solved exactly. For gauge fields the Kaluza-Klein (KK) decomposition is performed in a covariant R ξ gauge. For fermions the mixing between different generations is included in a completely general way. The hierarchies observed in the fermion spectrum and the quark mixing matrix are explained naturally in terms of anarchic five-dimensional Yukawa matrices and wave-function overlap integrals. Detailed studies of the flavor-changing couplings of the Higgs boson and of gauge bosons and their KK excitations are performed, including in particular the couplings of the standard W ± and Z 0 bosons. A careful analysis of electroweak precision observables including the S and T parameters and the Z 0 b b-bar couplings shows that the simplest RS model containing only Standard Model particles and their KK excitations is consistent with all experimental bounds for a KK scale as low as a few TeV, if one allows for a heavy Higgs boson (m h ∼ ± bosons, tree-level flavor-changing neutral current couplings of the Z 0 and Higgs bosons, the rare decays t → c(u)Z 0 and t → c(u)h, and the flavor mixing among KK fermions. The results obtained in this work form the basis for general calculations of flavor-changing processes in the RS model and its extensions.

  19. Neutral $Z$ boson pair production due to radion resonance in the Randall-Sundrum model: prospects at the CERN LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Das-Prasanta, Kumar

    2005-01-01

    The Neutral $Z$ boson pair production due to radion resonance at the Large Hadron Collider is an interesting process to explore the notion of warped geometry (Randall-Sundrum model). Because of the enhanced coupling of radion with a pair of gluons due to trace enomaly and top(quark)-loop, the radion can provide larger event rate possibility as compared to any New Physics effect. Using the proper radion-top-antitop (with the quarks being off-shell) coupling, we obtain the correct radion production rate at LHC and explore several features of a heavier radion decaying into a pair of real Z bosons which subsequently decays into charged 4 l (l=e, \\mu) leptons (the gold-plated mode). Using the signal and background event rate, we obtain bounds on radion mass $m_\\phi$ and radion vev $\\vphi$ at the $5\\sigma$, $10\\sigma$ discovery level.

  20. Off-the-Wall Higgs in the universal Randall-Sundrum model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davoudiasl, Hooman; Lillie, Ben; Rizzo, Thomas G.

    2006-01-01

    We outline a consistent Randall-Sundrum (RS) framework in which a fundamental 5-dimensional Higgs doublet induces electroweak symmetry breaking (EWSB). In this framework of a warped Universal Extra Dimension, the lightest Kaluza-Klein (KK) mode of the bulk Higgs is tachyonic leading to a vacuum expectation value (vev) at the TeV scale. The consistency of this picture imposes a set of constraints on the parameters in the Higgs sector. A novel feature of our scenario is the emergence of an adjustable bulk profile for the Higgs vev. We also find a tower of non-tachyonic Higgs KK modes at the weak scale. We consider an interesting implementation of this 'Off-the-Wall Higgs' mechanism where the 5-dimensional curvature-scalar coupling alone generates the tachyonic mode responsible for EWSB. In this case, additional relations among the parameters of the Higgs and gravitational sectors are established. We discuss the experimental signatures of the bulk Higgs in general, and those of the 'Gravity-Induced' EWSB in particular

  1. A Search for High Mass Diphoton Resonances in the Context of the Randall-Sundrum Model in √s = 7 TeV pp Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    A search has been performed for evidence of a narrow resonance in the diphoton invariant mass spectrum. The analysis uses the full ATLAS 2010 data set of proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of √s = 7 TeV, which corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 36 pb−1 . No evidence of a narrow resonance above the Standard Model background is observed. The results are used to set limits on the production of Randall-Sundrum gravitons decaying into diphoton final states. The results exclude at 95% CL Randall-Sundrum graviton masses below 520 GeV (972 GeV), for values of the dimension less coupling k/MPl of 0.02 (0.1).

  2. Charged Randall-Sundrum Braneworld Type II with Higher Order Curvature Corrections from Superstring Arguments and Dominated by Quintessence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rami, El-nabulsi Ahmad

    2010-01-01

    We discuss a new class of RSII braneworld cosmology exhibiting accelerated expansion and dominated by quintessence. It is explicitly demonstrated that the universe expansion history (transition from inflation to deceleration epoch to acceleration and effective quintessence era) may naturally occur in such unified theory for some classes of inverse scalar potentials. Besides a decaying effective cosmological constant, the model incorporates an increasing black hole mass, an increasing Maxwellian electrical charge with cosmic time and a time-dependent brane tension. The cosmological model exhibits several features of cosmological and astrophysical interest for both the early and late universe consistent with recent observations, in particular the ones concerned with the gravitational constants, black holes masses and charges and variation of the gauge coupling parameters with cosmic time. One interesting mark of the constructed model concerns the fact that a black hole mass surrounded by quintessence energy may increase with time even if the horizon disappears. (general)

  3. Search for Kaluza-Klein gravitons of the Randall-Sundrum model in the dimuon channel with the D0 detector at Tevatron; Etude de la production de graviton de Kaluza-Klein dans ses desintegrations en paires de muons dans le modele de Randall-Sundrum aupres de l'experience D0 au Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lahrichi, N

    2004-07-01

    In this thesis we have put the first constraints on the fundamental parameters of the Randall-Sundrum model of extra dimensions, k/M{sub Pl} which is proportional to the coupling of the graviton to the standard model fields and M{sub G} which is the mass of the first excited state of the Kaluza-Klein graviton. The analysis performed on Monte Carlo sample of the signal allowed to find an error in the PYTHIA generator. The elaboration of an independent generator dedicated for this special analysis helped to find out and correct the error. The data sample used for the analysis covers the period running from november 2002 up to july 2003 taken by the D0 collaboration at Tevatron, which corresponds to an accumulated luminosity of 107,8 pb{sup -1}. The search for the graviton in the dimuon channel allowed to measure the Z production cross-section multiplied by the branching ratio in dimuons. (author)

  4. Search for high-mass diphoton states and limits on Randall-Sundrum gravitons at CDF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T; Abulencia, A; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carrillo, S; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Cilijak, M; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Coca, M; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; DaRonco, S; Datta, M; D'Auria, S; Davies, T; Dagenhart, D; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'Orso, M; Delli Paoli, F; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Dörr, C; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Forrester, S; 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    2007-10-26

    We have performed a search for new particles which decay to two photons using 1.2 fb(-1) of integrated luminosity from pp[over] collisions at square root s = 1.96 TeV collected using the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. We find the diphoton mass spectrum to be in agreement with the standard model expectation, and set limits on the cross section times branching ratio for the Randall-Sundrum graviton, as a function of diphoton mass. We subsequently derive lower limits for the graviton mass of 230 GeV/c(2) and 850 GeV/c(2), at the 95% confidence level, for coupling parameters (k/M[over](Pl)) of 0.01 and 0.1, respectively.

  5. Probing the Randall-Sundrum geometric origin of flavor with lepton flavor violation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Blechman, Andrew E.; Petriello, Frank

    2006-01-01

    The anarchic Randall-Sundrum model of flavor is a low energy solution to both the electroweak hierarchy and flavor problems. Such models have a warped, compact extra dimension with the standard model fermions and gauge bosons living in the bulk, and the Higgs living on or near the TeV brane. In this paper we consider bounds on these models set by lepton flavor-violation constraints. We find that loop-induced decays of the form l→l ' γ are ultraviolet sensitive and incalculable when the Higgs field is localized on a four-dimensional brane; this drawback does not occur when the Higgs field propagates in the full five-dimensional space-time. We find constraints at the few TeV level throughout the natural range of parameters, arising from μ-e conversion in the presence of nuclei, rare μ decays, and rare τ decays. A tension exists between loop-induced dipole decays such as μ→eγ and tree-level processes such as μ-e conversion; they have opposite dependences on the five-dimensional Yukawa couplings, making it difficult to decouple flavor-violating effects. We emphasize the importance of the future experiments MEG and PRIME. These experiments will definitively test the Randall-Sundrum geometric origin of hierarchies in the lepton sector at the TeV scale

  6. Dirac relaxation of the Israel junction conditions: Unified Randall-Sundrum brane theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, Aharon; Gurwich, Ilya

    2006-01-01

    Following Dirac's brane variation prescription, the brane must not be deformed during the variation process, or else the linearity of the variation may be lost. Alternatively, the variation of the brane is done, in a special Dirac frame, by varying the bulk coordinate system itself. Imposing appropriate Dirac-style boundary conditions on the constrained 'sandwiched' gravitational action, we show how Israel junction conditions get relaxed, but remarkably, all solutions of the original Israel equations are still respected. The Israel junction conditions are traded, in the Z 2 -symmetric case, for a generalized Regge-Teitelboim type equation (plus a local conservation law), and in the generic Z 2 -asymmetric case, for a pair of coupled Regge-Teitelboim equations. The Randall-Sundrum model and its derivatives, such as the Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati and the Collins-Holdom models, get generalized accordingly. Furthermore, Randall-Sundrum and Regge-Teitelboim brane theories appear now to be two different faces of the one and the same unified brane theory. Within the framework of unified brane cosmology, we examine the dark matter/energy interpretation of the effective energy/momentum deviations from general relativity

  7. Gravity in the Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet theory with the Randall-Sundrum background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jihn E.; Lee, Hyun Min

    2001-01-01

    We obtain the full 5D graviton propagator in the Randall-Sundrum model with the Gauss-Bonnet interaction. From the decomposition of the graviton propagator on the brane, we show that localization of gravity arises in the presence of the Gauss-Bonnet term. We also obtain the metric perturbation for observers on the brane with considering the brane bending and compute the amplitude of one massless graviton exchange. For the positive definite amplitude or no ghost states, the sign of the Gauss-Bonnet term should be negative in our convention, which is compatible with string amplitude computations. In that case, the ghost-free condition is sufficient for obtaining the Newtonian gravity. For a vanishing Gauss-Bonnet coefficient, the brane bending allows us to reproduce the correct graviton polarizations for the effective 4D Einstein gravity

  8. Entropy of the Randall-Sundrum black brane world to all orders in the Planck length

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nouicer, Khireddine [Frankfurt Institute of Advanced Studies, Johann Wolfgang Goethe Universitaet, Ruth-Moufang-Str. 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)], E-mail: nouicer@fias.uni-frankfurt.de

    2008-04-07

    We study the effects, to all orders in the Planck length from a generalized uncertainty principle (GUP), on the statistical entropy of massive scalar bulk fields in the Randall-Sundrum black brane world. We show that the Bekenstein-Hawking area law is not preserved, and contains a correction term proportional to the black hole inverse area.

  9. Proposal for an experiment to search for Randall-Sundrum-type corrections to Newton's law of gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azam, Mofazzal; Sami, M.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Shiromizu, T.

    2008-01-01

    String theory, as well as the string inspired brane-world models such as the Randall-Sundrum (RS) one, suggest a modification of Newton's law of gravitation at small distance scales. Search for modifications of standard gravity is an active field of research in this context. It is well known that short range corrections to gravity would violate the Newton-Birkhoff theorem. Based on calculations of RS-type non-Newtonian forces for finite size spherical bodies, we propose a torsion balance based experiment to search for the effects of violation of this theorem valid in Newtonian gravity as well as in the general theory of relativity. We explain the main principle behind the experiment and provide detailed calculations suggesting optimum values of the parameters of the experiment. The projected sensitivity is sufficient to probe the RS parameter up to 10 microns

  10. Production of the Randall-Sundrum Type Kaluza-Klein Excitations at Future e+e-, ep and pp Colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billur, A. A.; Ciftci, A. K.; Ciftci, R.; Inan, S. C.; Sultansoy, S.

    2007-01-01

    Possible production of Randall-Sundrum type Kaluza-Klein excitations are investigated at future high energy e+e-, ep and pp colliders. Discovery limits and signatures of such excitations are discussed at above colliders comparatively

  11. Holographic Ricci dark energy in Randall-Sundrum braneworld: Avoidance of big rip and steady state future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Chaojun; Zhang Xin

    2009-01-01

    In the holographic Ricci dark energy (RDE) model, the parameter α plays an important role in determining the evolutionary behavior of the dark energy. When α<1/2, the RDE will exhibit a quintom feature, i.e., the equation of state of dark energy will evolve across the cosmological constant boundary w=-1. Observations show that the parameter α is indeed smaller than 1/2, so the late-time evolution of RDE will be really like a phantom energy. Therefore, it seems that the big rip is inevitable in this model. On the other hand, the big rip is actually inconsistent with the theoretical framework of the holographic model of dark energy. To avoid the big rip, we appeal to the extra dimension physics. In this Letter, we investigate the cosmological evolution of the RDE in the braneworld cosmology. It is of interest to find that for the far future evolution of RDE in a Randall-Sundrum braneworld, there is an attractor solution where the steady state (de Sitter) finale occurs, in stead of the big rip.

  12. 7D Randall-Sundrum cosmology, brane-bulk energy exchange, and holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazzanti, Liuba

    2008-01-01

    We discuss the cosmological implications and the holographic dual theory of the 7D Randall-Sundrum gravitational setup. Adding generic matter in the bulk on the 7D gravity side, we study the cosmological evolution inferred by the nonvanishing value of the brane-bulk energy exchange parameter. This analysis is achieved in detail for specific assumptions on the internal space evolution, including analytical considerations and numerical results. The dual theory is then constructed, making use of the holographic renormalization procedure. The resulting renormalized 6D conformal field theory is anomalous and coupled to 6D gravity plus higher order corrections. The critical point analysis on the brane is performed. Finally, we sketch a comparison between the two dual descriptions. We moreover generalize the Ads/CFT dual theory to the nonconformal and interacting case, relating the energy exchange parameter of the bulk gravity description to the new interactions between hidden and visible sectors.

  13. Search for Randall-Sundrum gravitons in the dielectron and diphoton final states with 5.4  fb(-1) of data from pp collisions at square root(s) = 1.96  TeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

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Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Luna-Garcia, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madar, R; Magaña-Villalba, R; Mal, P K; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Maravin, Y; Martínez-Ortega, J; McCarthy, R; McGivern, C L; Meijer, M M; Melnitchouk, A; Menezes, D; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Mondal, N K; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulhearn, M; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Nayyar, R; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; Obrant, G; Onoprienko, D; Orduna, J; Osman, N; Osta, J; Otero y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padilla, M; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Parihar, V; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Petrillo, G; Pétroff, P; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pol, M-E; Polozov, P; Popov, A V; Prewitt, M; Price, D; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Razumov, I; Renkel, P; Rich, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Rominsky, M; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Sanghi, B; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schliephake, T; Schlobohm, S; Schwanenberger, C; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strang, M A; Strauss, E; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Stutte, L; Svoisky, P; Takahashi, M; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Tiller, B; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Vesterinen, M; Vilanova, D; Vint, P; Vokac, P; Wahl, H D; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, G; Weber, M; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Williams, M R J; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Xu, C; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yang, W-C; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Ye, Z; Yin, H; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Zelitch, S; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhou, N; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zivkovic, L

    2010-06-18

    Using 5.4  fb(-1) of integrated luminosity from pp collisions at square root(s)=1.96  TeV collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, we search for decays of the lightest Kaluza-Klein mode of the graviton in the Randall-Sundrum model to ee and γγ. We set 95% C.L. lower limits on the mass of the lightest graviton between 560 and 1050 GeV for values of the coupling k/M(Pl) between 0.01 and 0.1.

  14. Search for Randall-Sundrum Gravitons in Dilepton and Diphoton Final States with 1 fb-1 of Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Amitabha [Boston Univ., MA (United States)

    2007-05-01

    The work presented in this thesis is the search for Randall-Sundrum (RS) gravitons from an analysis of approximately 1 fb-1 data collected with the D0 detector at Fermilab. The standard model has been a great success in explaining all experimental observations in particle physics. However, we also know that it has fundamental problems. One of these problems, called the hierarchy problem, is related to the large difference between the electroweak scale and the Planck scale. The model proposed by Randall and Sundrum presents a possible solution to the hierarchy problem by introducing physics beyond the standard model. Randall and Sundrum's theory postulates the existence of a 4th spatial dimension in addition to the conventional (3+1)-dimensional space. Gravity is localized on a 3+1 dimensional subspace, called a brane (Planck brane) that is separated in this new 4th spatial dimension from the standard model brane. As one moves away from this Planck brane, gravity is exponentially suppressed and this explains why gravity appears so weak at the standard model brane. In the simplest RS model, the only particles that propagate in the extra dimension are gravitons. The graviton manifests itself on the standard model brane as a series of excited states that couple to standard model particles with similar strength as the electroweak interaction. The ground state is the massless graviton and the order of magnitude of the mass of the lowest excited state is expected to be one TeV. The first excited mode of the graviton might be produced resonantly at the Tevatron. Gravitons can decay into fermion-antifermion or diboson pairs. Here I search for gravitons through their decay to e+e- and γγ final states. These final states have similar signatures in our detector and can thus be treated together. After analyzing the data I do not find any excess over standard model expectations and set an upper limit on the production rate of such

  15. Flavor changing neutral current constraints from Kaluza-Klein gluons and quark mass matrices in the Randall-Sundrum I framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, W.-F.; Ng, John N.; Wu, Jackson M. S.

    2009-01-01

    We continue our previous study on what are the allowed forms of quark mass matrices in the Randall-Sundrum framework that can reproduce the experimentally observed quark mass spectrum and the pattern of Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa mixing. We study the constraints the ΔF=2 processes in the neutral meson sector placed on the admissible forms found there, and we found only the asymmetrical type of quark mass matrices arising from anarchical Yukawa structures remain viable at the few TeV scale reachable at the LHC. We study also the decay of the first Kaluza-Klein (KK) excitation of the gluon. We give the decay branching ratios of the first KK gluon into quark pairs, and we point out that measurements of the decay width and just one of the quark spins in the dominant tt decays can be used to extract the effective coupling of the first KK gluon to top quarks for both chiralities. This provides a further probe into the flavor structure of the Randall-Sundrum framework.

  16. Brane world model and hierarchy problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alba, V.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper I wrote description of Kaluza-Klein model. Also I wrote how we can solve the hierarchy problem in Randall-Sundrum model. In fact, it's my motivation to study this part of theoretical physics

  17. Impact of flavor and Higgs physics on theories beyond the standard model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casagrande, Sandro

    2013-02-13

    Quantum effects of physics beyond the Standard Model receive strong indirect constraints from precisely measured collider observables. In the conceptual part of this thesis, we apply the generic relations between particle interactions in perturbatively unitary theories to calculate one-loop amplitudes for flavor physics. We provide template results applicable for any model of this class. We also investigate example models that are partly and such that are not perturbatively unitary: the Littlest Higgs model and Randall-Sundrum models. The latter have a unique coupling structure, which we cover exhaustively. We find strong constraints on the Randall-Sundrum models and numerically compare those from flavor, electroweak precision, and Higgs physics by performing detailed parameter scans. We observe interesting correlations between flavor observables, and we find that constraints from Higgs production and decays are already competitive.

  18. Impact of flavor and Higgs physics on theories beyond the standard model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casagrande, Sandro

    2013-01-01

    Quantum effects of physics beyond the Standard Model receive strong indirect constraints from precisely measured collider observables. In the conceptual part of this thesis, we apply the generic relations between particle interactions in perturbatively unitary theories to calculate one-loop amplitudes for flavor physics. We provide template results applicable for any model of this class. We also investigate example models that are partly and such that are not perturbatively unitary: the Littlest Higgs model and Randall-Sundrum models. The latter have a unique coupling structure, which we cover exhaustively. We find strong constraints on the Randall-Sundrum models and numerically compare those from flavor, electroweak precision, and Higgs physics by performing detailed parameter scans. We observe interesting correlations between flavor observables, and we find that constraints from Higgs production and decays are already competitive.

  19. Goldberger-Wise variations: stabilizing brane models with a bulk scalar

    CERN Document Server

    Sorbo, L; Lesgourgues, Julien; Sorbo, Lorenzo

    2004-01-01

    Braneworld scenarios with compact extra-dimensions need the volume of the extra space to be stabilized. Goldberger and Wise have introduced a simple mechanism, based on the presence of a bulk scalar field, able to stabilize the radius of the Randall-Sundrum model. Here, we transpose the same mechanism to generic single-brane and two-brane models, with one extra dimension and arbitrary scalar potentials in the bulk and on the branes. The single-brane construction turns out to be always unstable, independently of the bulk and brane potentials. In the case of two branes, we derive some generic criteria ensuring the stabilization or destabilization of the system.

  20. Goldberger-Wise variations: Stabilizing brane models with a bulk scalar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesgourgues, Julien; Sorbo, Lorenzo

    2004-01-01

    Braneworld scenarios with compact extra dimensions need the volume of the extra space to be stabilized. Goldberger and Wise have introduced a simple mechanism, based on the presence of a bulk scalar field, able to stabilize the radius of the Randall-Sundrum model. Here, we transpose the same mechanism to generic single-brane and two-brane models, with one extra dimension and arbitrary scalar potentials in the bulk and on the branes. The single-brane construction turns out to be always unstable, independently of the bulk and brane potentials. In the case of two branes, we derive some generic criteria ensuring the stabilization or destabilization of the system

  1. Primordial braneworld black holes: significant enhancement of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The Randall-Sundrum (RS-II) braneworld cosmological model with a frac- tion of the total energy density in primordial black holes is considered. Due to their 5d geometry, these black holes undergo modified Hawking evaporation. It is shown that dur- ing the high-energy regime, accretion from the surrounding ...

  2. Étude de la Production de Gravitation de Kaluza-Klein dans ses Désintégrations en Paires de Muons dans le Modèl de Randall-Sundrum auprès de l'Expérience D0 au Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lahrichi, Nadia [UPMC, Paris (main)

    2004-06-01

    In this thesis we have put the first constraints on t he fundamental parameters of the Randall-Sundnun model of extra dimensions, $k / M_{pl}$ which is proportional to the coupling of the graviton to the standard model fields and $M_G$ which is the mass of the first excited state of t he Kaluza-Klein graviton. The analysis perfomed on Monte carlo sample of the sign al allowed to find an error in the PYTHIA generator. The elaboration of an independent generator dedicated for this special analysis helped to find out and correct the error. The data sample used for the an alysis covers the period running fron1 november 2002 up to July 2002 taken by the Dzero collaboration at Tevatron, which corresponds to an accumulated lumninosity of 107,8 pb-1 . The search for the graviton in the dinmon channel allowed to rnea.sure the Z production cross-section t irnes the branching ratio in dimuons.

  3. On braneworld inverse power-law inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Es-Sobbahi, H.; Nach, M.

    2018-04-01

    In the framework of the braneworld Randall-Sundrum type II model, we investigate an inflationary scalar model in the high-energy regime. In this regime, the slow-roll parameters and the perturbation spectrum of the model are derived. The corresponding results are dealt with according to the known observational data. Then the solutions to the equations of motion on the brane are given.

  4. Moose models with vanishing S parameter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casalbuoni, R.; De Curtis, S.; Dominici, D.

    2004-01-01

    In the linear moose framework, which naturally emerges in deconstruction models, we show that there is a unique solution for the vanishing of the S parameter at the lowest order in the weak interactions. We consider an effective gauge theory based on K SU(2) gauge groups, K+1 chiral fields, and electroweak groups SU(2) L and U(1) Y at the ends of the chain of the moose. S vanishes when a link in the moose chain is cut. As a consequence one has to introduce a dynamical nonlocal field connecting the two ends of the moose. Then the model acquires an additional custodial symmetry which protects this result. We examine also the possibility of a strong suppression of S through an exponential behavior of the link couplings as suggested by the Randall Sundrum metric

  5. Electrostatics in the Surroundings of a Topologically Charged Black Hole in the Brane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexis Larrañaga

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We determine the expression for the electrostatic potential generated by a point charge held stationary in the topologically charged black hole spacetime arising from the Randall-Sundrum II braneworld model. We treat the static electric point charge as a linear perturbation on the black hole background and an expression for the electrostatic multipole solution is given: PACS: 04.70.-s, 04.50.Gh, 11.25.-w, 41.20.-q, 41.90.+e.

  6. Search for new physics in high-mass electron-positron events in pp[over] collisions at square root s = 1.96 TeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T; Abulencia, A; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carrillo, S; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Cilijak, M; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Coca, M; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; DaRonco, S; Datta, M; D'Auria, S; Davies, T; Dagenhart, D; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'Orso, M; Delli Paoli, F; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Dörr, C; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Forrester, S; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia, J E; Garberson, F; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kraan, A C; Kraus, J; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhlmann, S E; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lecompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, Y J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; Macqueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marginean, R; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M E; Mazini, R; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M; Fernandez, P Movilla; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagliarone, C; 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Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spinella, F; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; Staveris-Polykalas, A; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sun, H; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tsuno, S; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vazquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Veramendi, G; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Vollrath, I; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, J; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, T; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zhang, X; Zhou, J; Zucchelli, S

    2007-10-26

    We report the results of a search for a narrow resonance in electron-positron events in the invariant mass range of 150-950 GeV/c(2) using 1.3 fb(-1) of pp[over] collision data at square root s = 1.96 TeV collected by the CDF II detector at Fermilab. No significant evidence of such a resonance is observed and we interpret the results to exclude the standard-model-like Z' with a mass below 923 GeV/c(2) and the Randall-Sundrum graviton with a mass below 807 GeV/c(2) for k/M[over](pl) = 0.1, both at the 95% confidence level. Combining with diphoton data excludes the Randall-Sundrum graviton for masses below 889 GeV/c(2) for k/M[over](pl) = 0.1.

  7. Stabilization of the extra dimension size in RS model by bulk Higgs field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egorov, V O; Volobuev, I P

    2017-01-01

    An extension of the Standard Model is considered, which is built on the basis of a stabilized Randall-Sundrum model with two branes. The stabilization of the extra dimension size is achieved with the help of a five-dimensional Higgs field, which plays the role of the Goldberger-Wise field. The stabilization makes the radion massive, and all the fermion fields, which are assumed to be localized on the TeV brane, get their masses due to the interaction with the boundary value of the Higgs field. The gauge invariance of the theory demands that the electroweak gauge fields also live in the bulk. The equations of motion for the background field configurations and for the field fluctuations against a background solution are obtained. The interaction of the bulk Higgs field with the multidimensional gauge field is studied and possible values of the model parameters are estimated. (paper)

  8. Lepton flavour violation in RS models with a brane- or nearly brane-localized Higgs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beneke, M.; Moch, P.; Rohrwild, J.

    2016-05-01

    We perform a comprehensive study of charged lepton flavour violation in Randall-Sundrum (RS) models in a fully 5D quantum-field-theoretical framework. We consider the RS model with minimal field content and a ;custodially protected; extension as well as three implementations of the IR-brane localized Higgs field, including the non-decoupling effect of the KK excitations of a narrow bulk Higgs. Our calculation provides the first complete result for the flavour-violating electromagnetic dipole operator in Randall-Sundrum models. It contains three contributions with different dependence on the magnitude of the anarchic 5D Yukawa matrix, which can all be important in certain parameter regions. We study the typical range for the branching fractions of μ → eγ, μ → 3 e, μN → eN as well as τ → μγ, τ → 3 μ and the electron electric dipole moment by a numerical scan in both the minimal and the custodial RS model. The combination of μ → eγ and μN → eN currently provides the most stringent constraint on the parameter space of the model. A typical lower limit on the KK scale T is around 2 TeV in the minimal model (up to 4 TeV in the bulk Higgs case with large Yukawa couplings), and around 4 TeV in the custodially protected model, which corresponds to a mass of about 10 TeV for the first KK excitations, far beyond the lower limit from the non-observation of direct production at the LHC.

  9. The hoop conjecture and cosmic censorship in the brane-world

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakao, Ken-ichi; Nakamura, Kouji; Mishima, Takashi

    2003-07-03

    The initial data of gravity for a cylindrical matter distribution confined on the brane is studied in the framework of the single brane Randall-Sundrum scenario. We numerically found that the sufficiently thin configuration of matter leads to the formation of the marginal surface on the brane in the Randall-Sundrum model, even if the configuration is infinitely long. This means that the hoop conjecture proposed by Thorne does not hold in the Randall-Sundrum scenario; Even if a mass M does not get compacted into a region whose circumference (C) in every direction is C{approx}<4{pi}GM, black holes with horizons can form on the brane-world of the Randall-Sundrum scenario.

  10. First law of thermodynamics and Friedmann-like equations in braneworld cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ge Xianhui

    2007-01-01

    We derive the Friedmann-like equations in braneworld cosmology by imposing the first law of thermodynamics and Bekenstein's area-entropy formula on the apparent horizon of a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe in both Randall-Sundrum II gravity and Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati gravity models. Israel's boundary condition plays an important role in our calculations in both cases, besides the first law of thermodynamics and Bekenstein's area-entropy formula. The results indicate that thermodynamics on the brane world knows the behaviors of gravity

  11. Exploring holographic Composite Higgs models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croon, Djuna [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sussex,BN1 9QH Brighton (United Kingdom); Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics,Waterloo, ON (Canada); Dillon, Barry M.; Huber, Stephan J.; Sanz, Veronica [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sussex,BN1 9QH Brighton (United Kingdom)

    2016-07-13

    Simple Composite Higgs models predict new vector-like fermions not too far from the electroweak scale, yet LHC limits are now sensitive to the TeV scale. Motivated by this tension, we explore the holographic dual of the minimal model, MCHM{sub 5}, to try and alleviate this tension without increasing the fine-tuning in the Higgs potential. Interestingly, we find that lowering the UV cutoff in the 5D picture allows for heavier top partners and less fine-tuning. In the 4D dual this corresponds to increasing the number of “colours” N, thus increasing the decay constant of the Goldstone Higgs. This is essentially a ‘Little Randall-Sundrum Model’, which are known to reduce some flavour and electroweak constraints. Furthermore, in anticipation of the ongoing efforts at the LHC to put bounds on the top Yukawa, we demonstrate that deviations from the SM can be suppressed or enhanced with respect to what is expected from mere symmetry arguments in 4D. We conclude that the 5D holographic realisation of the MCHM{sub 5} with a small UV cutoff is not in tension with the current experimental data.

  12. A flavor protection for warped Higgsless models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csaki, Csaba; Curtin, David

    2009-01-01

    We examine various possibilities for realistic 5D Higgsless models on a Randall-Sundrum (RS) background, and construct a full quark sector featuring next-to-minimal flavor violation (with an exact bulk SU(2) protecting the first two generations) which satisfies electroweak and flavor constraints. The 'new custodially protected representation' is used for the third generation to protect the light quarks from flavor violations induced due to the heavy top. A combination of flavor symmetries, and an 'RS-GIM' mechanism for the right-handed quarks suppresses flavor-changing neutral currents below experimental bounds, assuming Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa-type mixing on the UV brane. In addition to the usual Higgsless RS signals, this model predicts an exotic charge-5/3 quark with mass of about 0.5 TeV which should show up at the LHC very quickly, as well as nonzero flavor-changing neutral currents which could be detected in the next generation of flavor experiments. In the course of our analysis, we also find quantitative estimates for the errors of the fermion zero-mode approximation, which are significant for Higgsless-type models.

  13. Fermions in five-dimensional brane world models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smolyakov, Mikhail N. [Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University,119991, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2016-06-28

    In the present paper the fermion fields, living in the background of five-dimensional warped brane world models with compact extra dimension, are thoroughly examined. The Kaluza-Klein decomposition and isolation of the physical degrees of freedom is performed for those five-dimensional fermion field Lagrangians, which admit such a decomposition to be performed in a mathematically consistent way and provide a physically reasonable four-dimensional effective theory. It is also shown that for the majority of five-dimensional fermion field Lagrangians there are no (at least rather obvious) ways to perform the Kaluza-Klein decomposition consistently. Moreover, in these cases one may expect the appearance of various pathologies in the four-dimensional effective theory. Among the cases, for which the Kaluza-Klein decomposition can be performed in a mathematically consistent way, the case, which reproduces the Standard Model by the zero Kaluza-Klein modes most closely regardless of the size of the extra dimension, is examined in detail in the background of the Randall-Sundrum model.

  14. On the Flavor Structure of Natural Composite Higgs Models & Top Flavor Violation

    CERN Document Server

    Azatov, Aleksandr; Perez, Gilad; Soreq, Yotam

    2014-01-01

    We explore the up flavor structure of composite pseudo Nambu-Goldstone-boson Higgs models, where we focus on the flavor anarchic minimal $SO(5)$ case. We identify the different sources of flavor violation in this framework and emphasise the differences from the anarchic Randall-Sundrum scenario. In particular, the fact that the flavor symmetry does not commute with the symmetries that stabilize the Higgs potential may constrain the flavor structure of the theory. In addition, we consider the interplay between the fine tuning of the model and flavor violation. We find that generically the tuning of this class of models is worsen in the anarchic case due to the contributions from the additional fermion resonances. We show that, even in the presence of custodial symmetry, large top flavor violating rate are naturally expected. In particular, $t\\to cZ$ branching ratio of order of $10^{-5}$ is generic for this class of models. Thus, this framework can be tested in the next run of the LHC as well as in other future...

  15. Realistic D-brane models on warped throats: Fluxes, hierarchies and moduli stabilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cascales, J.F.G.; Garcia del Moral, M.P.; Quevedo, F.; Uranga, A.

    2004-01-01

    We describe the construction of string theory models with semirealistic spectrum in a sector of (anti) D3-branes located at an orbifold singularity at the bottom of a highly warped throat geometry, which is a generalisation of the Klebanov-Strassler deformed conifold. These models realise the Randall-Sundrum proposal to naturally generate the Planck/electroweak hierarchy in a concrete string theory embedding, and yielding interesting chiral open string spectra. We describe examples with Standard Model gauge group (or left-right symmetric extensions) and three families of SM fermions, with correct quantum numbers including hypercharge. The dilaton and complex structure moduli of the geometry are stabilised by the 3-form fluxes required to build the throat. We describe diverse issues concerning the stabilisation of geometric Kahler moduli, like blow-up modes of the orbifold singularities, via D term potentials and gauge theory non-perturbative effects, like gaugino condensation. This local geometry, once embedded in a full compactification, could give rise to models with all moduli stabilised, and with the potential to lead to de Sitter vacua. Issues of gauge unification, proton stability, supersymmetry breaking and Yukawa couplings are also discussed. (author)

  16. Models for the brane-bulk interaction: Toward understanding braneworld cosmological perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binétruy, Pierre; Bucher, Martin; Carvalho, Carla

    2004-08-01

    Using some simple toy models, we explore the nature of the brane-bulk interaction for cosmological models with a large extra dimension. We are in particular interested in understanding the role of the bulk gravitons, which from the point of view of an observer on the brane will appear to generate dissipation and nonlocality, effects that cannot be incorporated into an effective (3+1)-dimensional Lagrangian field theoretic description. We explicitly work out the dynamics of several discrete systems consisting of a finite number of degrees of freedom on the boundary coupled to a (1+1)-dimensional field theory subject to a variety of wave equations. Systems both with and without time translation invariance are considered and moving boundaries are discussed as well. The models considered contain all the qualitative features of quantized linearized cosmological perturbations for a Randall-Sundrum universe having an arbitrary expansion history, with the sole exception of gravitational gauge invariance, which will be treated in a later paper.

  17. Search for physics beyond the standard model in the high-mass diphoton spectrum at $13~\\mathrm{TeV}$

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2018-01-01

    A search is performed for physics beyond the standard model in high-mass diphoton events from proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 13~\\mathrm{TeV}$, using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of $35.9~\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$, delivered in 2016 to the CMS detector by the CERN Large Hadron Collider. Both resonant and nonresonant new physics signatures are searched for, using different techniques to estimate the background. Constraints are placed on the mass of the first graviton excitation in the Randall--Sundrum warped extra dimension model in the range of $2$ to $4~\\mathrm{TeV}$, for values of the associated coupling parameter between $0.01$ and $0.2$. Limits on the production of scalar resonances and model-independent fiducial cross section upper limits are also provided. For the large extra dimension model of Arkani--Hamed, Dimopoulos, and Dvali, lower limits are set on the ultraviolet cutoff scale $M_S$ ranging from $5.6$ to $9.7~\\mathrm{TeV}$, depending on the model parameters. Limits are also set ...

  18. Resolving the AFBb puzzle in an extra dimensional model with an extended gauge structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djouadi, Abdelhak; Moreau, Gregory; Richard, Francois

    2006-10-01

    It is notorious that, contrary to all other precision electroweak data, the forward-backward asymmetry for b quarks A FB b measured in Z decays at LEP1 is nearly three standard deviations away from the predicted value in the Standard Model; significant deviations also occur in measurements of the asymmetry off the Z pole. We show that these discrepancies can be resolved in a variant of the Randall-Sundrum extra- dimensional model in which the gauge structure is extended to SU(2) L xSU(2) R xU(1) X to allow for relatively light Kaluza-Klein excitations of the gauge bosons. In this scenario, the fermions are localized differently along the extra dimension, in order to generate the fermion mass hierarchies, so that the electroweak interactions for the heavy third generation fermions are naturally different from the light fermion ones. We show that the mixing between the Z boson with the Kaluza-Klein excitations allows to explain the A FB b anomaly without affecting (and even improving) the agreement of the other precision observables, including the Z → bb-bar partial decay width, with experimental data. Some implications of this scenario for the ILC are summarized. (authors)

  19. Quantum self-consistency of AdSxΣ brane models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flachi, Antonino; Pujolas, Oriol

    2003-01-01

    Continuing our previous work, we consider a class of higher dimensional brane models with the topology of AdS D 1 +1 xΣ, where Σ is a one-parameter compact manifold and two branes of codimension one are located at the orbifold fixed points. We consider a setup where such a solution arises from Einstein-Yang-Mills theory and evaluate the one-loop effective potential induced by gauge fields and by a generic bulk scalar field. We show that this type of brane model resolves the gauge hierarchy between the Planck and electroweak scales through redshift effects due to the warp factor a=e -πkr . The value of a is then fixed by minimizing the effective potential. We find that, as in the Randall-Sundrum case, the gauge field contribution to the effective potential stabilizes the hierarchy without fine-tuning as long as the Laplacian Δ Σ on Σ has a zero eigenvalue. Scalar fields can stabilize the hierarchy depending on the mass and the nonminimal coupling. We also address the quantum self-consistency of the solution, showing that the classical brane solution is not spoiled by quantum effects

  20. Search for physics beyond the standard model in dilepton mass spectra in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Khachatryan, Vardan; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Fabjan, Christian; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hartl, Christian; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Kiesenhofer, Wolfgang; Knünz, Valentin; Krammer, Manfred; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Mikulec, Ivan; Rabady, Dinyar; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Herbert; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Taurok, Anton; Treberer-Treberspurg, Wolfgang; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Alderweireldt, Sara; Bansal, Monika; Bansal, Sunil; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Knutsson, Albert; Luyckx, Sten; Ochesanu, Silvia; Rougny, Romain; Van De Klundert, Merijn; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Blekman, Freya; Blyweert, Stijn; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Daci, Nadir; Heracleous, Natalie; Keaveney, James; Lowette, Steven; Maes, Michael; Olbrechts, Annik; Python, Quentin; Strom, Derek; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Villella, Ilaria; Caillol, Cécile; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Dobur, Didar; Favart, Laurent; Gay, Arnaud; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Léonard, Alexandre; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Perniè, Luca; Reis, Thomas; Seva, Tomislav; Thomas, Laurent; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Wang, Jian; Zenoni, Florian; Adler, Volker; Beernaert, Kelly; Benucci, Leonardo; Cimmino, Anna; Costantini, Silvia; Crucy, Shannon; Dildick, Sven; Fagot, Alexis; Garcia, Guillaume; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Sigamani, Michael; Strobbe, Nadja; Thyssen, Filip; Tytgat, Michael; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Beluffi, Camille; Bruno, Giacomo; Castello, Roberto; Caudron, Adrien; Ceard, Ludivine; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; Delaere, Christophe; Du Pree, Tristan; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Jafari, Abideh; Jez, Pavel; Komm, Matthias; Lemaitre, Vincent; Nuttens, Claude; Pagano, Davide; Perrini, Lucia; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Popov, Andrey; Quertenmont, Loic; Selvaggi, Michele; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Beliy, Nikita; Caebergs, Thierry; Daubie, Evelyne; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Alves, Gilvan; Brito, Lucas; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; Dos Reis Martins, Thiago; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Pol, Maria Elena; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Custódio, Analu; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Malbouisson, Helena; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santaolalla, Javier; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; Dogra, Sunil; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Aleksandrov, Aleksandar; Genchev, Vladimir; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Marinov, Andrey; Piperov, Stefan; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Glushkov, Ivan; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Kozhuharov, Venelin; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Du, Ran; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Plestina, Roko; Romeo, Francesco; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Zheng; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Li, Qiang; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Zou, Wei; Avila, Carlos; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Mekterovic, Darko; Sudic, Lucija; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Bodlak, Martin; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Assran, Yasser; Elgammal, Sherif; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Radi, Amr; Kadastik, Mario; Murumaa, Marion; Raidal, Martti; Tiko, Andres; Eerola, Paula; Fedi, Giacomo; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Kortelainen, Matti J; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Peltola, Timo; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Wendland, Lauri; Talvitie, Joonas; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Couderc, Fabrice; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Favaro, Carlotta; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Locci, Elizabeth; Malcles, Julie; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Titov, Maksym; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Busson, Philippe; Charlot, Claude; Dahms, Torsten; Dalchenko, Mykhailo; Dobrzynski, Ludwik; Filipovic, Nicolas; Florent, Alice; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Mastrolorenzo, Luca; Miné, Philippe; Mironov, Camelia; Naranjo, Ivo Nicolas; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Paganini, Pascal; Regnard, Simon; Salerno, Roberto; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Sirois, Yves; Veelken, Christian; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Zabi, Alexandre; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Aubin, Alexandre; Bloch, Daniel; Brom, Jean-Marie; Chabert, Eric Christian; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Goetzmann, Christophe; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Van Hove, Pierre; Gadrat, Sébastien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Beaupere, Nicolas; Boudoul, Gaelle; Bouvier, Elvire; Brochet, Sébastien; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Chasserat, Julien; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fan, Jiawei; Fay, Jean; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Ille, Bernard; Kurca, Tibor; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Perries, Stephane; Ruiz Alvarez, José David; Sabes, David; Sgandurra, Louis; Sordini, Viola; Vander Donckt, Muriel; Verdier, Patrice; Viret, Sébastien; Xiao, Hong; Tsamalaidze, Zviad; Autermann, Christian; Beranek, Sarah; Bontenackels, Michael; Edelhoff, Matthias; Feld, Lutz; Hindrichs, Otto; Klein, Katja; Ostapchuk, Andrey; Perieanu, Adrian; Raupach, Frank; Sammet, Jan; Schael, Stefan; Weber, Hendrik; Wittmer, Bruno; Zhukov, Valery; Ata, Metin; Brodski, Michael; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Erdmann, Martin; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Klingebiel, Dennis; Knutzen, Simon; Kreuzer, Peter; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Millet, Philipp; Olschewski, Mark; Padeken, Klaas; Papacz, Paul; Pook, Tobias; Reithler, Hans; Schmitz, Stefan Antonius; Sonnenschein, Lars; Teyssier, Daniel; Thüer, Sebastian; Weber, Martin; Cherepanov, Vladimir; Erdogan, Yusuf; Flügge, Günter; Geenen, Heiko; Geisler, Matthias; Haj Ahmad, Wael; Heister, Arno; Hoehle, Felix; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Kuessel, Yvonne; Künsken, Andreas; Lingemann, Joschka; Nowack, Andreas; Nugent, Ian Michael; Perchalla, Lars; Pooth, Oliver; Stahl, Achim; Asin, Ivan; Bartosik, Nazar; Behr, Joerg; Behrenhoff, Wolf; Behrens, Ulf; Bell, Alan James; Bergholz, Matthias; Bethani, Agni; Borras, Kerstin; Burgmeier, Armin; Cakir, Altan; Calligaris, Luigi; Campbell, Alan; Choudhury, Somnath; Costanza, Francesco; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Dooling, Samantha; Dorland, Tyler; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Eichhorn, Thomas; Flucke, Gero; Garay Garcia, Jasone; Geiser, Achim; Gunnellini, Paolo; Hauk, Johannes; Hempel, Maria; Horton, Dean; Jung, Hannes; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Kasemann, Matthias; Katsas, Panagiotis; Kieseler, Jan; Kleinwort, Claus; Krücker, Dirk; Lange, Wolfgang; Leonard, Jessica; Lipka, Katerina; Lobanov, Artur; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Lutz, Benjamin; Mankel, Rainer; Marfin, Ihar; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mittag, Gregor; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Naumann-Emme, Sebastian; Nayak, Aruna; Novgorodova, Olga; Ntomari, Eleni; Perrey, Hanno; Pitzl, Daniel; Placakyte, Ringaile; Raspereza, Alexei; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Roland, Benoit; Ron, Elias; Sahin, Mehmet Özgür; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Saxena, Pooja; Schmidt, Ringo; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Schröder, Matthias; Seitz, Claudia; Spannagel, Simon; Vargas Trevino, Andrea Del Rocio; Walsh, Roberval; Wissing, Christoph; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Blobel, Volker; Centis Vignali, Matteo; Draeger, Arne-Rasmus; Erfle, Joachim; Garutti, Erika; Goebel, Kristin; Görner, Martin; Haller, Johannes; Hoffmann, Malte; Höing, Rebekka Sophie; Kirschenmann, Henning; Klanner, Robert; Kogler, Roman; Lange, Jörn; Lapsien, Tobias; Lenz, Teresa; Marchesini, Ivan; Ott, Jochen; Peiffer, Thomas; Pietsch, Niklas; Poehlsen, Jennifer; Pöhlsen, Thomas; Rathjens, Denis; Sander, Christian; Schettler, Hannes; Schleper, Peter; Schlieckau, Eike; Schmidt, Alexander; Seidel, Markus; Sola, Valentina; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Troendle, Daniel; Usai, Emanuele; Vanelderen, Lukas; Vanhoefer, Annika; Barth, Christian; Baus, Colin; Berger, Joram; Böser, Christian; Butz, Erik; Chwalek, Thorsten; De Boer, Wim; Descroix, Alexis; Dierlamm, Alexander; Feindt, Michael; Frensch, Felix; Giffels, Manuel; Hartmann, Frank; Hauth, Thomas; Husemann, Ulrich; Katkov, Igor; Kornmayer, Andreas; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Lobelle Pardo, Patricia; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Müller, Thomas; Nürnberg, Andreas; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Ratnikov, Fedor; Röcker, Steffen; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Ulrich, Ralf; Wagner-Kuhr, Jeannine; Wayand, Stefan; Weiler, Thomas; Wolf, Roger; Anagnostou, Georgios; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Giakoumopoulou, Viktoria Athina; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Markou, Athanasios; Markou, Christos; Psallidas, Andreas; Topsis-Giotis, Iasonas; Agapitos, Antonis; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Stiliaris, Efstathios; Aslanoglou, Xenofon; Evangelou, Ioannis; Flouris, Giannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paradas, Evangelos; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Hidas, Pàl; Horvath, Dezso; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Zsigmond, Anna Julia; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Karancsi, János; Molnar, Jozsef; Palinkas, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Swain, Sanjay Kumar; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Gupta, Ruchi; Bhawandeep, Bhawandeep; Kalsi, Amandeep Kaur; Kaur, Manjit; Kumar, Ramandeep; Mittal, Monika; Nishu, Nishu; Singh, Jasbir; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Ahuja, Sudha; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Kumar, Ajay; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Varun; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Chatterjee, Kalyanmoy; Dutta, Suchandra; Gomber, Bhawna; Jain, Sandhya; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Modak, Atanu; Mukherjee, Swagata; Roy, Debarati; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Dutta, Dipanwita; Kailas, Swaminathan; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Topkar, Anita; Aziz, Tariq; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Bhowmik, Sandeep; Chatterjee, Rajdeep Mohan; Dewanjee, Ram Krishna; Dugad, Shashikant; Ganguly, Sanmay; Ghosh, Saranya; Guchait, Monoranjan; Gurtu, Atul; Kole, Gouranga; Kumar, Sanjeev; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Parida, Bibhuti; Sudhakar, Katta; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Behnamian, Hadi; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Fahim, Ali; Goldouzian, Reza; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Naseri, Mohsen; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, Ferdos; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Felcini, Marta; Grunewald, Martin; Abbrescia, Marcello; Barbone, Lucia; Calabria, Cesare; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Radogna, Raffaella; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Sharma, Archana; Silvestris, Lucia; Venditti, Rosamaria; Zito, Giuseppe; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Benvenuti, Alberto; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Campanini, Renato; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Perrotta, Andrea; Primavera, Federica; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Tosi, Nicolò; Travaglini, Riccardo; Albergo, Sebastiano; Cappello, Gigi; Chiorboli, Massimiliano; Costa, Salvatore; Giordano, Ferdinando; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Gallo, Elisabetta; Gonzi, Sandro; Gori, Valentina; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Tropiano, Antonio; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Ferretti, Roberta; Ferro, Fabrizio; Lo Vetere, Maurizio; Robutti, Enrico; Tosi, Silvano; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Gerosa, Raffaele; Ghezzi, Alessio; Govoni, Pietro; Lucchini, Marco Toliman; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Martelli, Arabella; Marzocchi, Badder; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Ragazzi, Stefano; Redaelli, Nicola; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Cavallo, Nicola; Di Guida, Salvatore; Fabozzi, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Merola, Mario; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Bisello, Dario; Branca, Antonio; Carlin, Roberto; Checchia, Paolo; Dall'Osso, Martino; Dorigo, Tommaso; Dosselli, Umberto; Galanti, Mario; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gasparini, Ugo; Giubilato, Piero; Gozzelino, Andrea; Kanishchev, Konstantin; Lacaprara, Stefano; Margoni, Martino; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Pazzini, Jacopo; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Tosi, Mia; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zucchetta, Alberto; Zumerle, Gianni; Gabusi, Michele; Ratti, Sergio P; Re, Valerio; Riccardi, Cristina; Salvini, Paola; Vitulo, Paolo; Biasini, Maurizio; Bilei, Gian Mario; Ciangottini, Diego; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Saha, Anirban; Santocchia, Attilio; Spiezia, Aniello; Androsov, Konstantin; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bernardini, Jacopo; Boccali, Tommaso; Broccolo, Giuseppe; Castaldi, Rino; Ciocci, Maria Agnese; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Donato, Silvio; Fiori, Francesco; Foà, Lorenzo; Giassi, Alessandro; Grippo, Maria Teresa; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Moon, Chang-Seong; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Serban, Alin Titus; Spagnolo, Paolo; Squillacioti, Paola; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Vernieri, Caterina; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; D'imperio, Giulia; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Grassi, Marco; Jorda, Clara; Longo, Egidio; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Meridiani, Paolo; Micheli, Francesco; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Organtini, Giovanni; Paramatti, Riccardo; Rahatlou, Shahram; Rovelli, Chiara; Santanastasio, Francesco; Soffi, Livia; Traczyk, Piotr; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Bellan, Riccardo; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Casasso, Stefano; Costa, Marco; Degano, Alessandro; Demaria, Natale; Finco, Linda; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Musich, Marco; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Ortona, Giacomo; Pacher, Luca; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Pinna Angioni, Gian Luca; Potenza, Alberto; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Tamponi, Umberto; Belforte, Stefano; Candelise, Vieri; Casarsa, Massimo; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Gobbo, Benigno; La Licata, Chiara; Marone, Matteo; Schizzi, Andrea; Umer, Tomo; Zanetti, Anna; Chang, Sunghyun; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Nam, Soon-Kwon; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Min Suk; Kong, Dae Jung; Lee, Sangeun; Oh, Young Do; Park, Hyangkyu; Sakharov, Alexandre; Son, Dong-Chul; Kim, Tae Jeong; Kim, Jae Yool; Song, Sanghyeon; Choi, Suyong; Gyun, Dooyeon; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Mihee; Kim, Hyunchul; Kim, Yongsun; Lee, Byounghoon; Lee, Kyong Sei; Park, Sung Keun; Roh, Youn; Choi, Minkyoo; Kim, Ji Hyun; Park, Inkyu; Ryu, Geonmo; Ryu, Min Sang; Choi, Young-Il; Choi, Young Kyu; Goh, Junghwan; Kim, Donghyun; Kwon, Eunhyang; Lee, Jongseok; Seo, Hyunkwan; Yu, Intae; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Md Ali, Mohd Adli Bin; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-de La Cruz, Ivan; Hernandez-Almada, Alberto; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Sánchez Hernández, Alberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Pedraza, Isabel; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Casimiro Linares, Edgar; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Krofcheck, David; Butler, Philip H; Reucroft, Steve; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmad, Muhammad; Hassan, Qamar; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khalid, Shoaib; Khan, Wajid Ali; Khurshid, Taimoor; Shah, Mehar Ali; Shoaib, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Bluj, Michal; Boimska, Bożena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Zalewski, Piotr; Brona, Grzegorz; Bunkowski, Karol; Cwiok, Mikolaj; Dominik, Wojciech; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Misiura, Maciej; Olszewski, Michał; Wolszczak, Weronika; Bargassa, Pedrame; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, Cristóvão; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Nguyen, Federico; Rodrigues Antunes, Joao; Seixas, Joao; Varela, Joao; Vischia, Pietro; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbunov, Ilya; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Konoplyanikov, Viktor; Kozlov, Guennady; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Matveev, Viktor; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Savina, Maria; Shmatov, Sergey; Shulha, Siarhei; Skatchkov, Nikolai; Smirnov, Vitaly; Zarubin, Anatoli; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Andrey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Safronov, Grigory; Semenov, Sergey; Spiridonov, Alexander; Stolin, Viatcheslav; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Mesyats, Gennady; Rusakov, Sergey V; Vinogradov, Alexey; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Bunichev, Viacheslav; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Gribushin, Andrey; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Obraztsov, Stepan; Perfilov, Maxim; Savrin, Viktor; Snigirev, Alexander; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Kachanov, Vassili; Kalinin, Alexey; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Tourtchanovitch, Leonid; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Ekmedzic, Marko; Milosevic, Jovan; Rekovic, Vladimir; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Battilana, Carlo; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Domínguez Vázquez, Daniel; Escalante Del Valle, Alberto; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Navarro De Martino, Eduardo; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, Antonio María; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Quintario Olmeda, Adrián; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Senghi Soares, Mara; Albajar, Carmen; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Missiroli, Marino; Moran, Dermot; Brun, Hugues; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Folgueras, Santiago; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Duarte Campderros, Jordi; Fernandez, Marcos; Gomez, Gervasio; Graziano, Alberto; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Marco, Rafael; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Matorras, Francisco; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Rodrigo, Teresa; Rodríguez-Marrero, Ana Yaiza; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Auzinger, Georg; Bachtis, Michail; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Benaglia, Andrea; Bendavid, Joshua; Benhabib, Lamia; Benitez, Jose F; Bernet, Colin; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Bonato, Alessio; Bondu, Olivier; Botta, Cristina; Breuker, Horst; Camporesi, Tiziano; Cerminara, Gianluca; Colafranceschi, Stefano; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; D'Enterria, David; Dabrowski, Anne; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; De Guio, Federico; De Roeck, Albert; De Visscher, Simon; Di Marco, Emanuele; Dobson, Marc; Dordevic, Milos; Dorney, Brian; Dupont-Sagorin, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Eugster, Jürg; Franzoni, Giovanni; Funk, Wolfgang; Gigi, Dominique; Gill, Karl; Giordano, Domenico; Girone, Maria; Glege, Frank; Guida, Roberto; Gundacker, Stefan; Guthoff, Moritz; Hammer, Josef; Hansen, Magnus; Harris, Philip; Hegeman, Jeroen; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janot, Patrick; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Krajczar, Krisztian; Lecoq, Paul; Lourenco, Carlos; Magini, Nicolo; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Marrouche, Jad; Masetti, Lorenzo; Meijers, Frans; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Moortgat, Filip; Morovic, Srecko; Mulders, Martijn; Musella, Pasquale; Orsini, Luciano; Pape, Luc; Perez, Emmanuelle; Perrozzi, Luca; Petrilli, Achille; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Pierini, Maurizio; Pimiä, Martti; Piparo, Danilo; Plagge, Michael; Racz, Attila; Rolandi, Gigi; Rovere, Marco; Sakulin, Hannes; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Sharma, Archana; Siegrist, Patrice; Silva, Pedro; Simon, Michal; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Spiga, Daniele; Steggemann, Jan; Stieger, Benjamin; Stoye, Markus; Takahashi, Yuta; Treille, Daniel; Tsirou, Andromachi; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Wardle, Nicholas; Wöhri, Hermine Katharina; Wollny, Heiner; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Renker, Dieter; Rohe, Tilman; Bachmair, Felix; Bäni, Lukas; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Buchmann, Marco-Andrea; Casal, Bruno; Chanon, Nicolas; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Donegà, Mauro; Dünser, Marc; Eller, Philipp; Grab, Christoph; Hits, Dmitry; Hoss, Jan; Lustermann, Werner; Mangano, Boris; Marini, Andrea Carlo; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Masciovecchio, Mario; Meister, Daniel; Mohr, Niklas; Nägeli, Christoph; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pandolfi, Francesco; Pauss, Felicitas; Peruzzi, Marco; Quittnat, Milena; Rebane, Liis; Rossini, Marco; Starodumov, Andrei; Takahashi, Maiko; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Wallny, Rainer; Weber, Hannsjoerg Artur; Amsler, Claude; Canelli, Maria Florencia; Chiochia, Vincenzo; De Cosa, Annapaola; Hinzmann, Andreas; Hreus, Tomas; Kilminster, Benjamin; Lange, Clemens; Millan Mejias, Barbara; Ngadiuba, Jennifer; Robmann, Peter; Ronga, Frederic Jean; Taroni, Silvia; Verzetti, Mauro; Yang, Yong; Cardaci, Marco; Chen, Kuan-Hsin; Ferro, Cristina; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Lin, Willis; Lu, Yun-Ju; Volpe, Roberta; Yu, Shin-Shan; Chang, Paoti; Chang, You-Hao; Chang, Yu-Wei; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Chen, Po-Hsun; Dietz, Charles; Grundler, Ulysses; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Kao, Kai-Yi; Lei, Yeong-Jyi; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Majumder, Devdatta; Petrakou, Eleni; Tzeng, Yeng-Ming; Wilken, Rachel; Asavapibhop, Burin; Singh, Gurpreet; Srimanobhas, Norraphat; Suwonjandee, Narumon; Adiguzel, Aytul; Bakirci, Mustafa Numan; Cerci, Salim; Dozen, Candan; Dumanoglu, Isa; Eskut, Eda; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Gurpinar, Emine; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Kayis Topaksu, Aysel; Onengut, Gulsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Ozturk, Sertac; Polatoz, Ayse; Sunar Cerci, Deniz; Tali, Bayram; Topakli, Huseyin; Vergili, Mehmet; Akin, Ilina Vasileva; Bilin, Bugra; Bilmis, Selcuk; Gamsizkan, Halil; Karapinar, Guler; Ocalan, Kadir; Sekmen, Sezen; Surat, Ugur Emrah; Yalvac, Metin; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Gülmez, Erhan; Isildak, Bora; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Cankocak, Kerem; Vardarli, Fuat Ilkehan; Levchuk, Leonid; Sorokin, Pavel; Brooke, James John; Clement, Emyr; Cussans, David; Flacher, Henning; Goldstein, Joel; Grimes, Mark; Heath, Greg P; Heath, Helen F; Jacob, Jeson; Kreczko, Lukasz; Lucas, Chris; Meng, Zhaoxia; Newbold, Dave M; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Poll, Anthony; Senkin, Sergey; Smith, Vincent J; Williams, Thomas; Bell, Ken W; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M; Cockerill, David JA; Coughlan, John A; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Thea, Alessandro; Tomalin, Ian R; Womersley, William John; Worm, Steven; Baber, Mark; Bainbridge, Robert; Buchmuller, Oliver; Burton, Darren; Colling, David; Cripps, Nicholas; Cutajar, Michael; Dauncey, Paul; Davies, Gavin; Della Negra, Michel; Dunne, Patrick; Ferguson, William; Fulcher, Jonathan; Futyan, David; Gilbert, Andrew; Hall, Geoffrey; Iles, Gregory; Jarvis, Martyn; Karapostoli, Georgia; Kenzie, Matthew; Lane, Rebecca; Lucas, Robyn; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Malik, Sarah; Mathias, Bryn; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Pela, Joao; Pesaresi, Mark; Petridis, Konstantinos; Raymond, David Mark; Rogerson, Samuel; Rose, Andrew; Seez, Christopher; Sharp, Peter; Tapper, Alexander; Vazquez Acosta, Monica; Virdee, Tejinder; Zenz, Seth Conrad; Cole, Joanne; Hobson, Peter R; Khan, Akram; Kyberd, Paul; Leggat, Duncan; Leslie, Dawn; Martin, William; Reid, Ivan; Symonds, Philip; Teodorescu, Liliana; Turner, Mark; Dittmann, Jay; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Kasmi, Azeddine; Liu, Hongxuan; Scarborough, Tara; Charaf, Otman; Cooper, Seth; Henderson, Conor; Rumerio, Paolo; Avetisyan, Aram; Bose, Tulika; Fantasia, Cory; Lawson, Philip; Richardson, Clint; Rohlf, James; St John, Jason; Sulak, Lawrence; Alimena, Juliette; Berry, Edmund; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Christopher, Grant; Cutts, David; Demiragli, Zeynep; Dhingra, Nitish; Ferapontov, Alexey; Garabedian, Alex; Heintz, Ulrich; Kukartsev, Gennadiy; Laird, Edward; Landsberg, Greg; Luk, Michael; Narain, Meenakshi; Segala, Michael; Sinthuprasith, Tutanon; Speer, Thomas; Swanson, Joshua; Breedon, Richard; Breto, Guillermo; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Chauhan, Sushil; Chertok, Maxwell; Conway, John; Conway, Rylan; Cox, Peter Timothy; Erbacher, Robin; Gardner, Michael; Ko, Winston; Lander, Richard; Miceli, Tia; Mulhearn, Michael; Pellett, Dave; Pilot, Justin; Ricci-Tam, Francesca; Searle, Matthew; Shalhout, Shalhout; Smith, John; Squires, Michael; Stolp, Dustin; Tripathi, Mani; Wilbur, Scott; Yohay, Rachel; Cousins, Robert; Everaerts, Pieter; Farrell, Chris; Hauser, Jay; Ignatenko, Mikhail; Rakness, Gregory; Takasugi, Eric; Valuev, Vyacheslav; Weber, Matthias; Burt, Kira; Clare, Robert; Ellison, John Anthony; Gary, J William; Hanson, Gail; Heilman, Jesse; Ivova Rikova, Mirena; Jandir, Pawandeep; Kennedy, Elizabeth; Lacroix, Florent; Long, Owen Rosser; Luthra, Arun; Malberti, Martina; Nguyen, Harold; Olmedo Negrete, Manuel; Shrinivas, Amithabh; Sumowidagdo, Suharyo; Wimpenny, Stephen; Andrews, Warren; Branson, James G; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Cittolin, Sergio; D'Agnolo, Raffaele Tito; Evans, David; Holzner, André; Kelley, Ryan; Klein, Daniel; Lebourgeois, Matthew; Letts, James; Macneill, Ian; Olivito, Dominick; Padhi, Sanjay; Palmer, Christopher; Pieri, Marco; Sani, Matteo; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Sudano, Elizabeth; Tadel, Matevz; Tu, Yanjun; Vartak, Adish; Welke, Charles; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Barge, Derek; Bradmiller-Feld, John; Campagnari, Claudio; Danielson, Thomas; Dishaw, Adam; Dutta, Valentina; Flowers, Kristen; Franco Sevilla, Manuel; Geffert, Paul; George, Christopher; Golf, Frank; Gouskos, Loukas; Incandela, Joe; Justus, Christopher; Mccoll, Nickolas; Richman, Jeffrey; Stuart, David; To, Wing; West, Christopher; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Apresyan, Artur; Bornheim, Adolf; Bunn, Julian; Chen, Yi; Duarte, Javier; Mott, Alexander; Newman, Harvey B; Pena, Cristian; Rogan, Christopher; Spiropulu, Maria; Timciuc, Vladlen; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Wilkinson, Richard; Xie, Si; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Azzolini, Virginia; Calamba, Aristotle; Carlson, Benjamin; Ferguson, Thomas; Iiyama, Yutaro; Paulini, Manfred; Russ, James; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Cumalat, John Perry; Ford, William T; Gaz, Alessandro; Luiggi Lopez, Eduardo; Nauenberg, Uriel; Smith, James; Stenson, Kevin; Ulmer, Keith; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Alexander, James; Chatterjee, Avishek; Chu, Jennifer; Dittmer, Susan; Eggert, Nicholas; Mirman, Nathan; Nicolas Kaufman, Gala; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Ryd, Anders; Salvati, Emmanuele; Skinnari, Louise; Sun, Werner; Teo, Wee Don; Thom, Julia; Thompson, Joshua; Tucker, Jordan; Weng, Yao; Winstrom, Lucas; Wittich, Peter; Winn, Dave; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Anderson, Jacob; Apollinari, Giorgio; Bauerdick, Lothar AT; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bolla, Gino; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Cihangir, Selcuk; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Fisk, Ian; Freeman, Jim; Gao, Yanyan; Gottschalk, Erik; Gray, Lindsey; Green, Dan; Grünendahl, Stefan; Gutsche, Oliver; Hanlon, Jim; Hare, Daryl; Harris, Robert M; Hirschauer, James; Hooberman, Benjamin; Jindariani, Sergo; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Kaadze, Ketino; Klima, Boaz; Kreis, Benjamin; Kwan, Simon; Linacre, Jacob; Lincoln, Don; Lipton, Ron; Liu, Tiehui; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Marraffino, John Michael; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena Ingrid; Maruyama, Sho; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; Merkel, Petra; Mishra, Kalanand; Mrenna, Stephen; Musienko, Yuri; Nahn, Steve; Newman-Holmes, Catherine; O'Dell, Vivian; Prokofyev, Oleg; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Sharma, Seema; Soha, Aron; Spalding, William J; Spiegel, Leonard; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Tran, Nhan Viet; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vidal, Richard; Whitbeck, Andrew; Whitmore, Juliana; Yang, Fan; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Carver, Matthew; Cheng, Tongguang; Curry, David; Das, Souvik; De Gruttola, Michele; Di Giovanni, Gian Piero; Field, Richard D; Fisher, Matthew; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Hugon, Justin; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Kypreos, Theodore; Low, Jia Fu; Matchev, Konstantin; Milenovic, Predrag; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Muniz, Lana; Rinkevicius, Aurelijus; Shchutska, Lesya; Snowball, Matthew; Sperka, David; Yelton, John; Zakaria, Mohammed; Hewamanage, Samantha; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Martinez, German; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Bochenek, Joseph; Diamond, Brendan; Haas, Jeff; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Johnson, Kurtis F; Prosper, Harrison; Veeraraghavan, Venkatesh; Weinberg, Marc; Baarmand, Marc M; Hohlmann, Marcus; Kalakhety, Himali; Yumiceva, Francisco; Adams, Mark Raymond; Apanasevich, Leonard; Bazterra, Victor Eduardo; Berry, Douglas; Betts, Russell Richard; Bucinskaite, Inga; Cavanaugh, Richard; Evdokimov, Olga; Gauthier, Lucie; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hofman, David Jonathan; Khalatyan, Samvel; Kurt, Pelin; Moon, Dong Ho; O'Brien, Christine; Silkworth, Christopher; Turner, Paul; Varelas, Nikos; Albayrak, Elif Asli; Bilki, Burak; Clarida, Warren; Dilsiz, Kamuran; Duru, Firdevs; Haytmyradov, Maksat; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Ogul, Hasan; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Penzo, Aldo; Rahmat, Rahmat; Sen, Sercan; Tan, Ping; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Yetkin, Taylan; Yi, Kai; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Blumenfeld, Barry; Bolognesi, Sara; Fehling, David; Gritsan, Andrei; Maksimovic, Petar; Martin, Christopher; Swartz, Morris; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Benelli, Gabriele; Bruner, Christopher; Kenny III, Raymond Patrick; Malek, Magdalena; Murray, Michael; Noonan, Daniel; Sanders, Stephen; Sekaric, Jadranka; Stringer, Robert; Wang, Quan; Wood, Jeffrey Scott; Chakaberia, Irakli; Ivanov, Andrew; Khalil, Sadia; Makouski, Mikhail; Maravin, Yurii; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Shrestha, Shruti; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Svintradze, Irakli; Gronberg, Jeffrey; Lange, David; Rebassoo, Finn; Wright, Douglas; Baden, Drew; Belloni, Alberto; Calvert, Brian; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Gomez, Jaime; Hadley, Nicholas John; Kellogg, Richard G; Kolberg, Ted; Lu, Ying; Marionneau, Matthieu; Mignerey, Alice; Pedro, Kevin; Skuja, Andris; Tonjes, Marguerite; Tonwar, Suresh C; Apyan, Aram; Barbieri, Richard; Bauer, Gerry; Busza, Wit; Cali, Ivan Amos; Chan, Matthew; Di Matteo, Leonardo; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Gulhan, Doga; Klute, Markus; Lai, Yue Shi; Lee, Yen-Jie; Levin, Andrew; Luckey, Paul David; Ma, Teng; Paus, Christoph; Ralph, Duncan; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Stephans, George; Stöckli, Fabian; Sumorok, Konstanty; Velicanu, Dragos; Veverka, Jan; Wyslouch, Bolek; Yang, Mingming; Zanetti, Marco; Zhukova, Victoria; Dahmes, Bryan; Gude, Alexander; Kao, Shih-Chuan; Klapoetke, Kevin; Kubota, Yuichi; Mans, Jeremy; Pastika, Nathaniel; Rusack, Roger; Singovsky, Alexander; Tambe, Norbert; Turkewitz, Jared; Acosta, John Gabriel; Oliveros, Sandra; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bloom, Kenneth; Bose, Suvadeep; Claes, Daniel R; Dominguez, Aaron; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Keller, Jason; Knowlton, Dan; Kravchenko, Ilya; Lazo-Flores, Jose; Malik, Sudhir; Meier, Frank; Snow, Gregory R; Zvada, Marian; Dolen, James; Godshalk, Andrew; Iashvili, Ia; Kharchilava, Avto; Kumar, Ashish; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Baumgartel, Darin; Chasco, Matthew; Haley, Joseph; Massironi, Andrea; Morse, David Michael; Nash, David; Orimoto, Toyoko; Trocino, Daniele; Wang, Ren-Jie; Wood, Darien; Zhang, Jinzhong; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Kubik, Andrew; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Pollack, Brian; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Schmitt, Michael Henry; Stoynev, Stoyan; Sung, Kevin; Velasco, Mayda; Won, Steven; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Chan, Kwok Ming; Drozdetskiy, Alexey; Hildreth, Michael; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kellams, Nathan; Lannon, Kevin; Luo, Wuming; Lynch, Sean; Marinelli, Nancy; Pearson, Tessa; Planer, Michael; Ruchti, Randy; Valls, Nil; Wayne, Mitchell; Wolf, Matthias; Woodard, Anna; Antonelli, Louis; Brinson, Jessica; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Flowers, Sean; Hart, Andrew; Hill, Christopher; Hughes, Richard; Kotov, Khristian; Ling, Ta-Yung; Puigh, Darren; Rodenburg, Marissa; Smith, Geoffrey; Winer, Brian L; Wolfe, Homer; Wulsin, Howard Wells; Driga, Olga; Elmer, Peter; Hebda, Philip; Hunt, Adam; Koay, Sue Ann; Lujan, Paul; Marlow, Daniel; Medvedeva, Tatiana; Mooney, Michael; Olsen, James; Piroué, Pierre; Quan, Xiaohang; Saka, Halil; Stickland, David; Tully, Christopher; Werner, Jeremy Scott; Zuranski, Andrzej; Brownson, Eric; Mendez, Hector; Ramirez Vargas, Juan Eduardo; Barnes, Virgil E; Benedetti, Daniele; Bortoletto, Daniela; De Mattia, Marco; Gutay, Laszlo; Hu, Zhen; Jha, Manoj; Jones, Matthew; Jung, Kurt; Kress, Matthew; Leonardo, Nuno; Lopes Pegna, David; Maroussov, Vassili; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Shi, Xin; Shipsey, Ian; Silvers, David; Svyatkovskiy, Alexey; Wang, Fuqiang; Xie, Wei; Xu, Lingshan; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Zablocki, Jakub; Zheng, Yu; Parashar, Neeti; Stupak, John; Adair, Antony; Akgun, Bora; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Geurts, Frank JM; Li, Wei; Michlin, Benjamin; Padley, Brian Paul; Redjimi, Radia; Roberts, Jay; Zabel, James; Betchart, Burton; Bodek, Arie; Covarelli, Roberto; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Eshaq, Yossof; Ferbel, Thomas; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Goldenzweig, Pablo; Han, Jiyeon; Harel, Amnon; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Petrillo, Gianluca; Vishnevskiy, Dmitry; Ciesielski, Robert; Demortier, Luc; Goulianos, Konstantin; Lungu, Gheorghe; Mesropian, Christina; Arora, Sanjay; Barker, Anthony; Chou, John Paul; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Contreras-Campana, Emmanuel; Duggan, Daniel; Ferencek, Dinko; Gershtein, Yuri; Gray, Richard; Halkiadakis, Eva; Hidas, Dean; Kaplan, Steven; Lath, Amitabh; Panwalkar, Shruti; Park, Michael; Patel, Rishi; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Thomassen, Peter; Walker, Matthew; Rose, Keith; Spanier, Stefan; York, Andrew; Bouhali, Othmane; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo; Eusebi, Ricardo; Flanagan, Will; Gilmore, Jason; Kamon, Teruki; Khotilovich, Vadim; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Montalvo, Roy; Osipenkov, Ilya; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Perloff, Alexx; Roe, Jeffrey; Rose, Anthony; Safonov, Alexei; Sakuma, Tai; Suarez, Indara; Tatarinov, Aysen; Akchurin, Nural; Cowden, Christopher; Damgov, Jordan; Dragoiu, Cosmin; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Faulkner, James; Kovitanggoon, Kittikul; Kunori, Shuichi; Lee, Sung Won; Libeiro, Terence; Volobouev, Igor; Appelt, Eric; Delannoy, Andrés G; Greene, Senta; Gurrola, Alfredo; Johns, Willard; Maguire, Charles; Mao, Yaxian; Melo, Andrew; Sharma, Monika; Sheldon, Paul; Snook, Benjamin; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Boutle, Sarah; Cox, Bradley; Francis, Brian; Goodell, Joseph; Hirosky, Robert; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Li, Hengne; Lin, Chuanzhe; Neu, Christopher; Wood, John; Clarke, Christopher; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, Chamath; Lamichhane, Pramod; Sturdy, Jared; Belknap, Donald; Carlsmith, Duncan; Cepeda, Maria; Dasu, Sridhara; Dodd, Laura; Duric, Senka; Friis, Evan; Hall-Wilton, Richard; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Klabbers, Pamela; Lanaro, Armando; Lazaridis, Christos; Levine, Aaron; Loveless, Richard; Mohapatra, Ajit; Ojalvo, Isabel; Perry, Thomas; Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Polese, Giovanni; Ross, Ian; Sarangi, Tapas; Savin, Alexander; Smith, Wesley H; Taylor, Devin; Verwilligen, Piet; Vuosalo, Carl; Woods, Nathaniel

    2015-04-07

    Dimuon and dielectron mass spectra, obtained from data resulting from proton-proton collisions at 8 TeV and recorded by the CMS experiment, are used to search for both narrow resonances and broad deviations from standard model predictions. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 20.6 (19.7) fb$^{-1}$ for the dimuon (dielectron) channel. No evidence for non-standard-model physics is observed and 95% confidence level limits are set on parameters from a number of new physics models. The narrow resonance analyses exclude a Sequential Standard Model $\\mathrm{Z'_{SSM}}$ resonance lighter than 2.90 TeV, a superstring-inspired $\\mathrm{Z'_{\\psi}}$ lighter than 2.57 TeV and Randall--Sundrum Kaluza--Klein gravitons with masses below 2.73, 2.35, and 1.27 TeV for couplings of 0.10, 0.05, and 0.01, respectively. A notable feature is that the limits have been calculated in a model-independent way to enable straightforward reinterpretation in any model predicting a resonance structure. The observed events are als...

  1. A scalar-tensor bimetric brane world cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youm, Donam

    2001-08-01

    We study a scalar-tensor bimetric cosmology in the Randall-Sundrum model with one positive tension brane, where the biscalar field is assumed to be confined on the brane. The effective Friedmann equations on the brane are obtained and analyzed. We comment on resolution of cosmological problems in this bimetric model. (author)

  2. Mass of the Stabilized Radion in the Limit of Finite Quartic Coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Tofighi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an exact treatment of the modulus stabilization condition with the general boundary conditions of the bulk scalar field in the Randall-Sundrum model. We find analytical expressions for the value of the modulus and the mass of the radion.

  3. Search for new phenomena in the WW to ℓνℓ' ν' final state in pp collisions at √s = 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aad, G.; Abajyan, T.; Abbott, B.; Böhm, Jan; Chudoba, Jiří; Gallus, Petr; Gunther, Jaroslav; Jakoubek, Tomáš; Juránek, Vojtěch; Kepka, Oldřich; Kupčo, Alexander; Kůs, Vlastimil; Lokajíček, Miloš; Marčišovský, Michal; Mikeštíková, Marcela; Myška, Miroslav; Němeček, Stanislav; Růžička, P.; Schovancová, J.; Šícho, Petr; Staroba, Pavel; Svatoš, Michal; Taševský, Marek; Tic, Tomáš; Valenta, J.; Vrba, Václav; Zeman, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 718, č. 3 (2013), s. 860-878 ISSN 0370-2693 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LA08032 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : CERN * leptonic decay * postulated particle * heavy * scattering * Randall-Sundrum model * ATLAS * mass spectrum * transverse * resonance * search for Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 6.019, year: 2013

  4. Low-scale gravity mediation in warped extra dimension and collider ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We propose a new scenario of gravity-mediated supersymmetry breaking (gravity mediation) in a supersymmetric Randall-Sundrum model, where the gravity mediation takes place at a low scale due to the warped metric. We investigate collider phenomenology involving the hidden sector field, and find a possibility that the ...

  5. Searches for heavy diboson resonances in pp collisions at √s =13 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Chudoba, Jiří; Havránek, Miroslav; Hejbal, Jiří; Jakoubek, Tomáš; Kepka, Oldřich; Kupčo, Alexander; Kůs, Vlastimil; Lokajíček, Miloš; Lysák, Roman; Marčišovský, Michal; Mikeštíková, Marcela; Němeček, Stanislav; Penc, Ondřej; Šícho, Petr; Staroba, Pavel; Svatoš, Michal; Taševský, Marek; Vrba, Václav

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 2016, č. 9 (2016), 1-46, č. článku 173. ISSN 1029-8479 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : Hadron-Hadron scattering (experiments) * ATLAS * channel cross section * upper limit * Randall-Sundrum model * CERN LHC Coll Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 6.063, year: 2016

  6. Search for high-mass dilepton resonances in pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Böhm, Jan; Chudoba, Jiří; Havránek, Miroslav; Hejbal, Jiří; Jakoubek, Tomáš; Kepka, Oldřich; Kupčo, Alexander; Kůs, Vlastimil; Lokajíček, Miloš; Lysák, Roman; Marčišovský, Michal; Mikeštíková, Marcela; Myška, Miroslav; Němeček, Stanislav; Šícho, Petr; Staroba, Pavel; Svatoš, Michal; Taševský, Marek; Vrba, Václav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 90, č. 5 (2014), "052005-1"-"052005-18" ISSN 1550-7998 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LG13009 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : black hole * quantum * scattering * ATLAS * Randall-Sundrum model * narrow resonance * CERN LHC Coll * technicolor Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 4.643, year: 2014

  7. Braneworld gravastars admitting conformal motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banerjee, Ayan; Rahaman, Farook; Islam, Sayeedul [Jadavpur University, Department of Mathematics, Kolkata, West Bengal (India); Govender, Megan [Durban University of Technology, Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Durban (South Africa)

    2016-01-15

    In this paper, we propose the braneworld gravastar configuration which is an alternative to the braneworld black hole. We study the Mazur and Mottola gravastar model within the context of the Randall-Sundrum type II braneworld scenario, based on the fact that our four dimensional spacetime is a three-brane, embedded in a five dimensional bulk. We present exact solutions of the modified field equations in each of the three regions making up the gravastar, namely, (I) the core, (II) the shell, and (III) the vacuum exterior. The junction conditions at each interface are fulfilled and we further explore interesting physical properties such as length, energy and entropy of the spherical distribution. (orig.)

  8. Measurement of the top-antitop quark pair differential cross section with respect to the invariant mass of the pair in proton-antiproton collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bridgeman, Alice Patricia [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)

    2008-01-01

    I present a measurement of the t$\\bar{t}$ differential cross section, dσ/dMt$\\bar{t}$, in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV using 2.7 fb-1 of CDF II data. I find that dσ/dMt$\\bar{t}$ is consistent with the Standard Model expectation, as modeled by PYTHIA with CTEQ5L parton distribution functions. I set limits on the ratio Κ/MPl in the Randall-Sundrum model by looking for Kaluza Klein gravitons which decay to top quarks. I find Κ/MPl > 0.16 at the 95% confidence level.

  9. Search for high-mass e+e- resonances in pp collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

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Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, H W; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kurata, M; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, S W; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C-S; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lovas, L; Lucchesi, D; Luci, C; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Macqueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Mathis, M; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyake, H; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlok, J; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Nett, J; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Neubauer, S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norman, M; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Griso, S Pagan; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Peiffer, T; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Pueschel, E; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Renz, M; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Saltó, O; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M A; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sforza, F; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shiraishi, S; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Strycker, G L; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Ttito-Guzmán, P; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Tourneur, S; Trovato, M; Tsai, S-Y; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, C; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Weinelt, J; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilbur, S; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Würthwein, F; Wynne, S M; Xie, S; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zhang, X; Zheng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2009-01-23

    A search for high-mass resonances in the e+e- final state is presented based on 2.5 fb(-1) of sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV pp collision data from the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The largest excess over the standard model prediction is at an e+e- invariant mass of 240 GeV/c2. The probability of observing such an excess arising from fluctuations in the standard model anywhere in the mass range of 150-1000 GeV/c2 is 0.6% (equivalent to 2.5sigma). We exclude the standard model coupling Z' and the Randall-Sundrum graviton for k/MPl=0.1 with masses below 963 and 848 GeV/c2 at the 95% credibility level, respectively.

  10. Search for high-mass resonances decaying to dimuons at CDF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T; Adelman, J; Akimoto, T; Alvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Azzurri, P; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Beecher, D; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bridgeman, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burke, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calancha, C; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Chwalek, T; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Dagenhart, D; Datta, M; Davies, T; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'Orso, M; Deluca, C; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; Derwent, P F; di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Frank, M J; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Genser, K; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Gessler, A; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Hussein, M; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jha, M K; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, H W; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kurata, M; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, S W; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C-S; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lovas, L; Lucchesi, D; Luci, C; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Mathis, M; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyake, H; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlok, J; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Nett, J; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Neubauer, S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norman, M; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Pagan Griso, S; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Peiffer, T; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Pueschel, E; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Renton, P; Renz, M; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Saltó, O; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M A; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sforza, F; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shiraishi, S; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Strycker, G L; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Ttito-Guzmán, P; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Tourneur, S; Trovato, M; Tsai, S-Y; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Weinelt, J; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilbur, S; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Würthwein, F; Wynne, S M; Xie, S; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zhang, X; Zheng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2009-03-06

    We present a search for high-mass neutral resonances using dimuon data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.3 fb(-1) collected in pp[over ] collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. No significant excess above the standard model expectation is observed in the dimuon invariant-mass spectrum. We set 95% confidence level upper limits on sigmaBR(pp-->X-->micromicro), where X is a boson with spin-0, 1, or 2. Using these cross section limits, we determine lower mass limits on sneutrinos in R-parity-violating supersymmetric models, Z' bosons, and Kaluza-Klein gravitons in the Randall-Sundrum model.

  11. NMC and the Fine-Tuning Problem on the Brane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Safsafi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new solution to the fine-tuning problem related to coupling constant λ of the potential. We study a quartic potential of the form λϕ4 in the framework of the Randall-Sundrum type II braneworld model in the presence of a Higgs field which interacts nonminimally with gravity via a possible interaction term of the form -(ξ/2ϕ2R. Using the conformal transformation techniques, the slow-roll parameters in high energy limit are reformulated in the case of a nonminimally coupled scalar field. We show that, for some value of a coupling parameter ξ and brane tension T, we can eliminate the fine-tuning problem. Finally, we present graphically the solutions of several values of the free parameters of the model.

  12. Pre-big-bang model on the brane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foffa, Stefano

    2002-01-01

    The equations of motion and junction conditions for a gravidilaton brane world scenario are studied in the string frame. It is shown that they allow Kasner-like solutions on the brane, which makes the dynamics of the brane very similar to the low curvature phase of pre-big-bang cosmology. Analogies and differences of this scenario with the Randall-Sundrum one and with the standard bulk pre-big-bang dynamics are also discussed

  13. River water quality modelling: II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shanahan, P.; Henze, Mogens; Koncsos, L.

    1998-01-01

    The U.S. EPA QUAL2E model is currently the standard for river water quality modelling. While QUAL2E is adequate for the regulatory situation for which it was developed (the U.S. wasteload allocation process), there is a need for a more comprehensive framework for research and teaching. Moreover......, QUAL2E and similar models do not address a number of practical problems such as stormwater-flow events, nonpoint source pollution, and transient streamflow. Limitations in model formulation affect the ability to close mass balances, to represent sessile bacteria and other benthic processes......, and to achieve robust model calibration. Mass balance problems arise from failure to account for mass in the sediment as well as in the water column and due to the fundamental imprecision of BOD as a state variable. (C) 1998 IAWQ Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved....

  14. On the long-range gravity in warped backgrounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smolyakov, Mikhail N.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper the Randall-Sundrum model with brane-localized curvature terms is considered. Within some range of parameters a compact extra dimension in this model can be astronomically large. In this case the model predicts small deviation from Newton's law at astronomical scales, caused by the massive modes. The existence of this deviation can result in a slight affection on the planetary motion trajectories

  15. Search for resonant diboson production in the $WW/WZ \\to l\

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abbott, Brad; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdel Khalek, Samah; Abdelalim, Ahmed Ali; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Addy, Tetteh; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adragna, Paolo; Adye, Tim; Aefsky, Scott; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Agustoni, Marco; Aharrouche, Mohamed; Ahlen, Steven; Ahles, Florian; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahsan, Mahsana; Aielli, Giulio; Akdogan, Taylan; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Alam, Mohammad; Alam, Muhammad Aftab; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alessandria, Franco; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Aliev, Malik; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alison, John; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allport, Phillip; Allwood-Spiers, Sarah; Almond, John; Aloisio, Alberto; Alon, Raz; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; Amelung, Christoph; Ammosov, Vladimir; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amram, Nir; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Andrieux, Marie-Laure; Anduaga, Xabier; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonaki, Ariadni; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aoun, Sahar; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Apolle, Rudi; Arabidze, Giorgi; Aracena, Ignacio; Arai, Yasuo; Arce, Ayana; Arfaoui, Samir; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Arik, Engin; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arnault, Christian; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Arutinov, David; Asai, Shoji; Ask, Stefan; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astbury, Alan; Atkinson, Markus; Aubert, Bernard; Auge, Etienne; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Avramidou, Rachel Maria; Axen, David; Azuelos, Georges; Azuma, Yuya; Baak, Max; Baccaglioni, Giuseppe; Bacci, Cesare; Bach, Andre; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Backus Mayes, John; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bahinipati, Seema; Bai, Yu; Bailey, David; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baker, Mark; Baker, Sarah; Balek, Petr; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Piyali; Banerjee, Swagato; Banfi, Danilo; Bangert, Andrea Michelle; Bansal, Vikas; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barbaro Galtieri, Angela; Barber, Tom; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Bardin, Dmitri; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Barrillon, Pierre; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartsch, Valeria; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batkova, Lucia; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Andreas; Battistin, Michele; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beale, Steven; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Anne Kathrin; Becker, Sebastian; Beckingham, Matthew; Becks, Karl-Heinz; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bedikian, Sourpouhi; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Begel, Michael; Behar Harpaz, Silvia; Behera, Prafulla; Beimforde, Michael; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belloni, Alberto; Beloborodova, Olga; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Benoit, Mathieu; Bensinger, James; Benslama, Kamal; Bentvelsen, Stan; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Berglund, Elina; Beringer, Jürg; Bernat, Pauline; Bernhard, Ralf; Bernius, Catrin; Berry, Tracey; Bertella, Claudia; Bertin, Antonio; Bertolucci, Federico; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Besson, Nathalie; Bethke, Siegfried; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Bierwagen, Katharina; Biesiada, Jed; Biglietti, Michela; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Biscarat, Catherine; Bittner, Bernhard; Black, Kevin; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blanchot, Georges; Blazek, Tomas; Bloch, Ingo; Blocker, Craig; Blocki, Jacek; Blondel, Alain; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Boddy, Christopher Richard; Boehler, Michael; Boek, Jennifer; Boek, Thorsten Tobias; Boelaert, Nele; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bogouch, Andrei; Bohm, Christian; Bohm, Jan; Boisvert, Veronique; Bold, Tomasz; Boldea, Venera; Bolnet, Nayanka Myriam; Bomben, Marco; Bona, Marcella; Boonekamp, Maarten; Bordoni, Stefania; Borer, Claudia; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Borjanovic, Iris; Borri, Marcello; Borroni, Sara; Bortfeldt, Jonathan; Bortolotto, Valerio; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Boterenbrood, Hendrik; Bouchami, Jihene; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; Bourdarios, Claire; Bousson, Nicolas; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, Ivanka; Bracinik, Juraj; Branchini, Paolo; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Braun, Helmut; Brazzale, Simone Federico; Brelier, Bertrand; Bremer, Johan; Brendlinger, Kurt; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Britton, Dave; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Broggi, Francesco; Bromberg, Carl; Bronner, Johanna; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, Timothy; Brooks, William; Brown, Gareth; Brown, Heather; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Brunet, Sylvie; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruschi, Marco; Buanes, Trygve; Buat, Quentin; Bucci, Francesca; Buchanan, James; Buchholz, Peter; Buckingham, Ryan; Buckley, Andrew; Buda, Stelian Ioan; Budagov, Ioulian; Budick, Burton; Bugge, Lars; Bulekov, Oleg; Bundock, Aaron Colin; Bunse, Moritz; Buran, Torleiv; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burgess, Thomas; Burke, Stephen; Busato, Emmanuel; Büscher, Volker; Bussey, Peter; Buszello, Claus-Peter; Butler, Bart; Butler, John; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Buttinger, William; Byszewski, Marcin; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cakir, Orhan; Calafiura, Paolo; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Calkins, Robert; Caloba, Luiz; Caloi, Rita; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camarri, Paolo; Cameron, David; Caminada, Lea Michaela; Caminal Armadans, Roger; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Canale, Vincenzo; Canelli, Florencia; Canepa, Anadi; Cantero, Josu; Cantrill, Robert; Capasso, Luciano; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capriotti, Daniele; Capua, Marcella; Caputo, Regina; Cardarelli, Roberto; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carminati, Leonardo; Caron, Bryan; Caron, Sascha; Carquin, Edson; Carrillo-Montoya, German D; Carter, Antony; Carter, Janet; Carvalho, João; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Cascella, Michele; Caso, Carlo; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo Martin; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Cataldi, Gabriella; Catastini, Pierluigi; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Cattani, Giordano; Caughron, Seth; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cavalleri, Pietro; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Ceradini, Filippo; Santiago Cerqueira, Augusto; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chalupkova, Ina; Chan, Kevin; Chang, Philip; Chapleau, Bertrand; Chapman, John Derek; Chapman, John Wehrley; Chareyre, Eve; Charlton, Dave; Chavda, Vikash; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Cheatham, Susan; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Xin; Chen, Yujiao; Cheng, Yangyang; Cheplakov, Alexander; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Cheung, Sing-Leung; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiefari, Giovanni; Chikovani, Leila; Childers, John Taylor; Chilingarov, Alexandre; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chisholm, Andrew; Chislett, Rebecca Thalatta; Chitan, Adrian; Chizhov, Mihail; Choudalakis, Georgios; Chouridou, Sofia; Christidi, Ilektra-Athanasia; Christov, Asen; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chu, Ming-Lee; Chudoba, Jiri; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Ciftci, Rena; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirilli, Manuela; Cirkovic, Predrag; Citron, Zvi Hirsh; Citterio, Mauro; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Philip James; Clarke, Robert; Cleland, Bill; Clemens, Jean-Claude; Clement, Benoit; Clement, Christophe; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Coffey, Laurel; Cogan, Joshua Godfrey; Coggeshall, James; Cogneras, Eric; Colas, Jacques; Cole, Stephen; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collins, Neil; Collins-Tooth, Christopher; Collot, Johann; Colombo, Tommaso; Colon, German; Compostella, Gabriele; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Conidi, Maria Chiara; Consonni, Sofia Maria; Consorti, Valerio; Constantinescu, Serban; Conta, Claudio; Conti, Geraldine; Conventi, Francesco; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Copic, Katherine; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Corso-Radu, Alina; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Côté, David; Courneyea, Lorraine; Cowan, Glen; Cowden, Christopher; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Crescioli, Francesco; Cristinziani, Markus; Crosetti, Giovanni; Cuciuc, Constantin-Mihai; Cuenca Almenar, Cristóbal; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Cummings, Jane; Curatolo, Maria; Curtis, Chris; Cuthbert, Cameron; Cwetanski, Peter; Czirr, Hendrik; Czodrowski, Patrick; Czyczula, Zofia; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; D'Orazio, Alessia; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, Mario Jose; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dafinca, Alexandru; Dai, Tiesheng; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Dameri, Mauro; Damiani, Daniel; Danielsson, Hans Olof; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darlea, Georgiana Lavinia; Dassoulas, James; Davey, Will; Davidek, Tomas; Davidson, Nadia; Davidson, Ruth; Davies, Eleanor; Davies, Merlin; Davignon, Olivier; Davison, Adam; Davygora, Yuriy; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Daya-Ishmukhametova, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Castro, Stefano; De Cecco, Sandro; de Graat, Julien; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De La Taille, Christophe; De la Torre, Hector; De Lorenzi, Francesco; de Mora, Lee; De Nooij, Lucie; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; De Zorzi, Guido; Dearnaley, William James; Debbe, Ramiro; Debenedetti, Chiara; Dechenaux, Benjamin; Dedovich, Dmitri; Degenhardt, James; Del Papa, Carlo; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Delemontex, Thomas; Deliyergiyev, Maksym; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Deluca, Carolina; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demirkoz, Bilge; Deng, Jianrong; Denisov, Sergey; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Devetak, Erik; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; DeWilde, Burton; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Dhullipudi, Ramasudhakar; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Donato, Camilla; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Luise, Silvestro; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Dietzsch, Thorsten; Diglio, Sara; Dindar Yagci, Kamile; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dinut, Florin; Dionisi, Carlo; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; Barros do Vale, Maria Aline; Do Valle Wemans, André; Doan, Thi Kieu Oanh; Dobbs, Matt; Dobos, Daniel; Dobson, Ellie; Dodd, Jeremy; Doglioni, Caterina; Doherty, Tom; Dohmae, Takeshi; Doi, Yoshikuni; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolenc, Irena; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dolgoshein, Boris; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dos Anjos, Andre; Dotti, Andrea; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Doxiadis, Alexander; Doyle, Tony; Dressnandt, Nandor; Dris, Manolis; Dubbert, Jörg; Dube, Sourabh; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Duda, Dominik; Dudarev, Alexey; Dudziak, Fanny; Duerdoth, Ian; Duflot, Laurent; Dufour, Marc-Andre; Duguid, Liam; Dührssen, Michael; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Düren, Michael; Duxfield, Robert; Dwuznik, Michal; Dydak, Friedrich; Ebenstein, William; Ebke, Johannes; Eckweiler, Sebastian; Edmonds, Keith; Edson, William; Edwards, Clive; Edwards, Nicholas Charles; Ehrenfeld, Wolfgang; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Eisenhandler, Eric; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Ellis, Katherine; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Engelmann, Roderich; Engl, Albert; Epp, Brigitte; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Eriksson, Daniel; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Ernwein, Jean; Errede, Deborah; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Esch, Hendrik; Escobar, Carlos; Espinal Curull, Xavier; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienne, Francois; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evangelakou, Despoina; Evans, Hal; Fabbri, Laura; Fabre, Caroline; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farley, Jason; Farooque, Trisha; Farrell, Steven; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassi, Farida; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Fatholahzadeh, Baharak; Favareto, Andrea; Fayard, Louis; Fazio, Salvatore; Febbraro, Renato; Federic, Pavol; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Wojciech; Fehling-Kaschek, Mirjam; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Fellmann, Denis; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Fenyuk, Alexander; Ferencei, Jozef; Fernando, Waruna; Ferrag, Samir; Ferrando, James; Ferrara, Valentina; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferreira de Lima, Danilo Enoque; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Ferretto Parodi, Andrea; Fiascaris, Maria; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Gordon; Fisher, Matthew; Flechl, Martin; Fleck, Ivor; Fleckner, Johanna; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fleischmann, Sebastian; Flick, Tobias; Floderus, Anders; Flores Castillo, Luis; Flowerdew, Michael; Fonseca Martin, Teresa; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Fortin, Dominique; Fournier, Daniel; Fowler, Andrew; Fox, Harald; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchini, Matteo; Franchino, Silvia; Francis, David; Frank, Tal; Franklin, Melissa; Franz, Sebastien; Fraternali, Marco; Fratina, Sasa; French, Sky; Friedrich, Conrad; Friedrich, Felix; Froeschl, Robert; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fulsom, Bryan Gregory; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gadfort, Thomas; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Galhardo, Bruno; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallo, Valentina Santina; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Gan, KK; Gao, Yongsheng; Gaponenko, Andrei; Garberson, Ford; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garitaonandia, Hegoi; Garonne, Vincent; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gaur, Bakul; Gauthier, Lea; Gauzzi, Paolo; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gazis, Evangelos; Ge, Peng; Gecse, Zoltan; Gee, Norman; Geerts, Daniël Alphonsus Adrianus; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Gellerstedt, Karl; Gemme, Claudia; Gemmell, Alistair; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Gentile, Simonetta; George, Matthias; George, Simon; Gershon, Avi; Geweniger, Christoph; Ghazlane, Hamid; Ghodbane, Nabil; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giakoumopoulou, Victoria; Giangiobbe, Vincent; Gianotti, Fabiola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Adam; Gibson, Stephen; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gillberg, Dag; Gillman, Tony; Gingrich, Douglas; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giordano, Raffaele; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giovannini, Paola; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giugni, Danilo; Giunta, Michele; Giusti, Paolo; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glazov, Alexandre; Glitza, Karl-Walter; Glonti, George; Goddard, Jack Robert; Godfrey, Jennifer; Godlewski, Jan; Goebel, Martin; Goeringer, Christian; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Gomes, Agostinho; Gomez Fajardo, Luz Stella; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Laura; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Parra, Garoe; Gonzalez Silva, Laura; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goodson, Jeremiah Jet; Goossens, Luc; Göpfert, Thomas; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorfine, Grant; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Gosdzik, Bjoern; Goshaw, Alfred; Gosselink, Martijn; Gössling, Claus; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Gough Eschrich, Ivo; Gouighri, Mohamed; Goujdami, Driss; Goulette, Marc Phillippe; Goussiou, Anna; Goy, Corinne; Gozpinar, Serdar; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Grafström, Per; Grahn, Karl-Johan; Gramstad, Eirik; Grancagnolo, Francesco; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Grassi, Valerio; Gratchev, Vadim; Grau, Nathan; Gray, Heather; Gray, Julia Ann; Graziani, Enrico; Grebenyuk, Oleg; Greenshaw, Timothy; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Griffiths, Justin; Grigalashvili, Nugzar; Grillo, Alexander; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Philippe Luc Yves; Grishkevich, Yaroslav; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Groth-Jensen, Jacob; Grybel, Kai; Guest, Daniel; Guicheney, Christophe; Guindon, Stefan; Gul, Umar; Gunther, Jaroslav; Guo, Bin; Guo, Jun; Gutierrez, Phillip; Guttman, Nir; Gutzwiller, Olivier; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haas, Stefan; Haber, Carl; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Hadley, David; Haefner, Petra; Hahn, Ferdinand; Haider, Stefan; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Hall, David; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamano, Kenji; Hamer, Matthias; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamilton, Samuel; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hanawa, Keita; Hance, Michael; Handel, Carsten; Hanke, Paul; Hansen, John Renner; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hansson, Per; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hare, Gabriel; Harenberg, Torsten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harper, Devin; Harrington, Robert; Harris, Orin; Hartert, Jochen; Hartjes, Fred; Haruyama, Tomiyoshi; Harvey, Alex; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hassani, Samira; Haug, Sigve; Hauschild, Michael; Hauser, Reiner; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hawkins, Anthony David; Hayakawa, Takashi; Hayashi, Takayasu; Hayden, Daniel; Hays, Chris; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Head, Simon; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heinemann, Beate; Heisterkamp, Simon; Helary, Louis; Heller, Claudio; Heller, Matthieu; Hellman, Sten; Hellmich, Dennis; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, Robert; Henke, Michael; Henrichs, Anna; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Hensel, Carsten; Henß, Tobias; Medina Hernandez, Carlos; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herrberg, Ruth; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; Hessey, Nigel; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, John; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillert, Sonja; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hirose, Minoru; Hirsch, Florian; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoffman, Julia; Hoffmann, Dirk; Hohlfeld, Marc; Holder, Martin; Holmgren, Sven-Olof; Holy, Tomas; Holzbauer, Jenny; Hong, Tae Min; Hooft van Huysduynen, Loek; Horner, Stephan; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howard, Jacob; Howarth, James; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hu, Diedi; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huettmann, Antje; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Huhtinen, Mika; Hurwitz, Martina; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibbotson, Michael; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Idarraga, John; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikeno, Masahiro; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Ince, Tayfun; Inigo-Golfin, Joaquin; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Iordanidou, Kalliopi; Ippolito, Valerio; Irles Quiles, Adrian; Isaksson, Charlie; Ishino, Masaya; Ishitsuka, Masaki; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Ivashin, Anton; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, John; Jackson, Paul; Jaekel, Martin; Jain, Vivek; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakoubek, Tomas; Jakubek, Jan; Jamin, David Olivier; Jana, Dilip; Jansen, Eric; Jansen, Hendrik; Jantsch, Andreas; Janus, Michel; Jared, Richard; Jarlskog, Göran; Jeanty, Laura; Jen-La Plante, Imai; Jennens, David; Jenni, Peter; Jež, Pavel; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Jha, Manoj Kumar; Ji, Haoshuang; Ji, Weina; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Yi; Jimenez Belenguer, Marcos; Jin, Shan; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Joergensen, Morten Dam; Joffe, David; Johansen, Marianne; Johansson, Erik; Johansson, Per; Johnert, Sebastian; Johns, Kenneth; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Tim; Joram, Christian; Jorge, Pedro; Joshi, Kiran Daniel; Jovicevic, Jelena; Jovin, Tatjana; Ju, Xiangyang; Jung, Christian; Jungst, Ralph Markus; Juranek, Vojtech; Jussel, Patrick; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Kabana, Sonja; Kaci, Mohammed; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kadlecik, Peter; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalinin, Sergey; Kalinovskaya, Lidia; Kama, Sami; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneda, Michiru; Kaneti, Steven; Kanno, Takayuki; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kapliy, Anton; Kaplon, Jan; Kar, Deepak; Karagounis, Michael; Karakostas, Konstantinos; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kashif, Lashkar; Kasieczka, Gregor; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Yousuke; Katsoufis, Elias; Katzy, Judith; Kaushik, Venkatesh; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kayl, Manuel; Kazama, Shingo; Kazanin, Vassili; Kazarinov, Makhail; Keeler, Richard; Keener, Paul; Kehoe, Robert; Keil, Markus; Kekelidze, George; Keller, John; Kenyon, Mike; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerschen, Nicolas; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Kessoku, Kohei; Keung, Justin; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khandanyan, Hovhannes; Khanov, Alexander; Kharchenko, Dmitri; Khodinov, Alexander; Khomich, Andrei; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khoriauli, Gia; Khoroshilov, Andrey; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kim, Hyeon Jin; Kim, Shinhong; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Robert Steven Beaufoy; Kirk, Julie; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kitamura, Takumi; Kittelmann, Thomas; Kiuchi, Kenji; Kladiva, Eduard; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klemetti, Miika; Klier, Amit; Klimek, Pawel; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinger, Joel Alexander; Klinkby, Esben; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Klok, Peter; Klous, Sander; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluge, Thomas; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Ko, Byeong Rok; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Koenig, Sebastian; Koetsveld, Folkert; Koevesarki, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Kogan, Lucy Anne; Kohlmann, Simon; Kohn, Fabian; Kohout, Zdenek; Kohriki, Takashi; Koi, Tatsumi; Kolachev, Guennady; Kolanoski, Hermann; Kolesnikov, Vladimir; Koletsou, Iro; Koll, James; Komar, Aston; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; Kono, Takanori; Kononov, Anatoly; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kopeliansky, Revital; Koperny, Stefan; Köpke, Lutz; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Korotkov, Vladislav; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotov, Sergey; Kotov, Vladislav; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Koutsman, Alex; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kral, Vlastimil; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, Jana; Kreiss, Sven; Krejci, Frantisek; Kretzschmar, Jan; Krieger, Nina; Krieger, Peter; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Kruker, Tobias; Krumnack, Nils; Krumshteyn, Zinovii; Kubota, Takashi; Kuday, Sinan; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kuhn, Dietmar; Kukhtin, Victor; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kummer, Christian; Kuna, Marine; Kunkle, Joshua; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurata, Masakazu; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuwertz, Emma Sian; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; Kwee, Regina; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rotonda, Laura; Labarga, Luis; Labbe, Julien; Lablak, Said; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacey, James; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Laisne, Emmanuel; Lamanna, Massimo; Lambourne, Luke; Lampen, Caleb; Lampl, Walter; Lançon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lang, Valerie Susanne; Lange, Clemens; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Lanza, Agostino; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Larner, Aimee; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavorini, Vincenzo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Laycock, Paul; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Menedeu, Eve; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Hurng-Chun; Lee, Jason; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Michel; Legendre, Marie; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehmacher, Marc; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lemmer, Boris; Lendermann, Victor; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatiana; Lenzen, Georg; Lenzi, Bruno; Leonhardt, Kathrin; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Lepold, Florian; Leroy, Claude; Lessard, Jean-Raphael; Lester, Christopher; Lester, Christopher Michael; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Lewis, Adrian; Lewis, George; Leyko, Agnieszka; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bo; Li, Haifeng; Li, Ho Ling; Li, Shu; Li, Xuefei; Liang, Zhijun; Liao, Hongbo; Liberti, Barbara; Lichard, Peter; Lichtnecker, Markus; Lie, Ki; Liebig, Wolfgang; Limbach, Christian; Limosani, Antonio; Limper, Maaike; Lin, Simon; Linde, Frank; Linnemann, James; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipniacka, Anna; Liss, Tony; Lissauer, David; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Chuanlei; Liu, Dong; Liu, Hao; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Lulu; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Livermore, Sarah; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Loddenkoetter, Thomas; Loebinger, Fred; Loevschall-Jensen, Ask Emil; Loginov, Andrey; Loh, Chang Wei; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Lombardo, Vincenzo Paolo; Long, Robin Eamonn; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Lorenz, Jeanette; Lorenzo Martinez, Narei; Losada, Marta; Loscutoff, Peter; Losty, Michael; Lou, XinChou; Lounis, Abdenour; Loureiro, Karina; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lowe, Andrew; Lu, Feng; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Ludwig, Andreas; Ludwig, Dörthe; Ludwig, Inga; Ludwig, Jens; Luehring, Frederick; Luijckx, Guy; Lukas, Wolfgang; Luminari, Lamberto; Lund, Esben; Lundberg, Björn; Lundberg, Johan; Lundberg, Olof; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lundquist, Johan; Lungwitz, Matthias; Lynn, David; Lytken, Else; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Maček, Boštjan; Machado Miguens, Joana; Mackeprang, Rasmus; Madaras, Ronald; Maddocks, Harvey Jonathan; Mader, Wolfgang; Maenner, Reinhard; Maeno, Mayuko; Maeno, Tadashi; Magnoni, Luca; Magradze, Erekle; Mahboubi, Kambiz; Mahlstedt, Joern; Mahmoud, Sara; Mahout, Gilles; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Mal, Prolay; Malaescu, Bogdan; Malecki, Pawel; Malecki, Piotr; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Caitlin; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyshev, Vladimir; Malyukov, Sergei; Mameghani, Raphael; Mamuzic, Judita; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Mandrysch, Rocco; Maneira, José; Manfredini, Alessandro; Mangeard, Pierre-Simon; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, Luciano; Manjarres Ramos, Joany Andreina; Mann, Alexander; Manning, Peter; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Mapelli, Alessandro; Mapelli, Livio; March, Luis; Marchand, Jean-Francois; Marchese, Fabrizio; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marino, Christopher; Marroquim, Fernando; Marshall, Zach; Martens, Kalen; Marti, Lukas Fritz; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Brian; Martin, Brian Thomas; Martin, Jean-Pierre; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martinez, Mario; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena; Martin-Haugh, Stewart; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzano, Francesco; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Ignazio; Massaro, Graziano; Massol, Nicolas; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Matricon, Pierre; Matsunaga, Hiroyuki; Matsushita, Takashi; Mättig, Peter; Mättig, Stefan; Mattravers, Carly; Maurer, Julien; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; Mayne, Anna; Mazini, Rachid; Mazur, Michael; Mazzaferro, Luca; Mazzanti, Marcello; Mc Donald, Jeffrey; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McCubbin, Norman; McFarlane, Kenneth; Mcfayden, Josh; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; Mclaughlan, Tom; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Meade, Andrew; Mechnich, Joerg; Mechtel, Markus; Medinnis, Mike; Meera-Lebbai, Razzak; Meguro, Tatsuma; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meirose, Bernhard; Melachrinos, Constantinos; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Meloni, Federico; Mendoza Navas, Luis; Meng, Zhaoxia; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Meoni, Evelin; Mercurio, Kevin Michael; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Merritt, Hayes; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Christopher; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Meyer, Joerg; Meyer, Thomas Christian; Michal, Sebastien; Middleton, Robin; Migas, Sylwia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Miller, David; Miller, Robert; Mills, Bill; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Milstein, Dmitry; Minaenko, Andrey; Miñano Moya, Mercedes; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mirabelli, Giovanni; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Mitsui, Shingo; Miyagawa, Paul; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Moeller, Victoria; Mohapatra, Soumya; Mohr, Wolfgang; Moles-Valls, Regina; Molfetas, Angelos; Mönig, Klaus; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montejo Berlingen, Javier; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Moorhead, Gareth; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Moraes, Arthur; Morange, Nicolas; Morel, Julien; Morello, Gianfranco; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Morgenstern, Marcus; Morii, Masahiro; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morris, John; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Möser, Nicolas; Moser, Hans-Guenther; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Klemens; Mueller, Timo; Muenstermann, Daniel; Müller, Thomas; Munwes, Yonathan; Murray, Bill; Mussche, Ido; Musto, Elisa; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nackenhorst, Olaf; Nadal, Jordi; Nagai, Koichi; Nagai, Ryo; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagarkar, Advait; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nagel, Martin; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Nanava, Gizo; Napier, Austin; Narayan, Rohin; Nash, Michael; Nattermann, Till; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Neal, Homer; Nechaeva, Polina; Neep, Thomas James; Negri, Andrea; Negri, Guido; Negrini, Matteo; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nelson, Andrew; Nelson, Timothy Knight; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neumann, Manuel; Neusiedl, Andrea; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newcomer, Mitchel; Newman, Paul; Nguyen Thi Hong, Van; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nicquevert, Bertrand; Niedercorn, Francois; Nielsen, Jason; Nikiforou, Nikiforos; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolics, Katalin; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsen, Henrik; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nisius, Richard; Nobe, Takuya; Nodulman, Lawrence; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Norberg, Scarlet; Nordberg, Markus; Norton, Peter; Novakova, Jana; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozka, Libor; Nugent, Ian Michael; Nuncio-Quiroz, Adriana-Elizabeth; Nunes Hanninger, Guilherme; Nunnemann, Thomas; Nurse, Emily; O'Brien, Brendan Joseph; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Shea, Val; Oakes, Louise Beth; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Odier, Jerome; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohshima, Takayoshi; Okamura, Wataru; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olariu, Albert; Olchevski, Alexander; Olivares Pino, Sebastian Andres; Oliveira, Miguel Alfonso; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Oliver Garcia, Elena; Olivito, Dominick; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Onofre, António; Onyisi, Peter; Oram, Christopher; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlando, Nicola; Orlov, Iliya; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Osuna, Carlos; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Ottersbach, John; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ouellette, Eric; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Ouyang, Qun; Ovcharova, Ana; Owen, Mark; Owen, Simon; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paganis, Efstathios; Pahl, Christoph; Paige, Frank; Pais, Preema; Pajchel, Katarina; Palacino, Gabriel; Paleari, Chiara; Palestini, Sandro; Pallin, Dominique; Palma, Alberto; Palmer, Jody; Pan, Yibin; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Panduro Vazquez, William; Pani, Priscilla; Panikashvili, Natalia; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Papadelis, Aras; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Paramonov, Alexander; Paredes Hernandez, Daniela; Park, Woochun; Parker, Michael Andrew; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pashapour, Shabnaz; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passaggio, Stefano; Passeri, Antonio; Pastore, Fernanda; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Patel, Nikhul; Pater, Joleen; Patricelli, Sergio; Pauly, Thilo; Pecsy, Martin; Pedraza Lopez, Sebastian; Pedraza Morales, Maria Isabel; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Pelikan, Daniel; Peng, Haiping; Penning, Bjoern; Penson, Alexander; Penwell, John; Perantoni, Marcelo; Perez, Kerstin; Perez Cavalcanti, Tiago; Perez Codina, Estel; Pérez García-Estañ, María Teresa; Perez Reale, Valeria; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrino, Roberto; Perrodo, Pascal; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Krisztian; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Jorgen; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Petschull, Dennis; Petteni, Michele; Pezoa, Raquel; Phan, Anna; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Picazio, Attilio; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Piec, Sebastian Marcin; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pignotti, David; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pina, João Antonio; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinder, Alex; Pinfold, James; Pinto, Belmiro; Pizio, Caterina; Plamondon, Mathieu; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Plotnikova, Elena; Poblaguev, Andrei; Poddar, Sahill; Podlyski, Fabrice; Poggioli, Luc; Pohl, David-leon; Pohl, Martin; Polesello, Giacomo; Policicchio, Antonio; Polini, Alessandro; Poll, James; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pomeroy, Daniel; Pommès, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Popovic, Dragan; Poppleton, Alan; Portell Bueso, Xavier; Pospelov, Guennady; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Pozdnyakov, Valery; Prabhu, Robindra; Pralavorio, Pascal; Pranko, Aliaksandr; Prasad, Srivas; Pravahan, Rishiraj; Prell, Soeren; Pretzl, Klaus Peter; Price, Darren; Price, Joe; Price, Lawrence; Prieur, Damien; Primavera, Margherita; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Prudent, Xavier; Przybycien, Mariusz; Przysiezniak, Helenka; Psoroulas, Serena; Ptacek, Elizabeth; Pueschel, Elisa; Purdham, John; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Pylypchenko, Yuriy; Qian, Jianming; Quadt, Arnulf; Quarrie, David; Quayle, William; Quinonez, Fernando; Raas, Marcel; Radeka, Veljko; Radescu, Voica; Radloff, Peter; Rador, Tonguc; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Rahimi, Amir; Rahm, David; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rammensee, Michael; Rammes, Marcus; Randle-Conde, Aidan Sean; Randrianarivony, Koloina; Rauscher, Felix; Rave, Tobias Christian; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reeves, Kendall; Reinherz-Aronis, Erez; Reinsch, Andreas; Reisinger, Ingo; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Zhongliang; Renaud, Adrien; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Resende, Bernardo; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richter, Robert; Richter-Was, Elzbieta; Ridel, Melissa; Rijpstra, Manouk; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Rios, Ryan Randy; Riu, Imma; Rivoltella, Giancesare; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robson, Aidan; Rocha de Lima, Jose Guilherme; Roda, Chiara; Roda Dos Santos, Denis; Roe, Adam; Roe, Shaun; Røhne, Ole; Rolli, Simona; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romano, Marino; Romeo, Gaston; Romero Adam, Elena; Rompotis, Nikolaos; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rosbach, Kilian; Rose, Anthony; Rose, Matthew; Rosenbaum, Gabriel; Rosenberg, Eli; Rosendahl, Peter Lundgaard; Rosenthal, Oliver; Rosselet, Laurent; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rousseau, David; Royon, Christophe; Rozanov, Alexandre; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubbo, Francesco; Rubinskiy, Igor; Ruckstuhl, Nicole; Rud, Viacheslav; Rudolph, Christian; Rudolph, Gerald; Rühr, Frederik; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rumyantsev, Leonid; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Ruschke, Alexander; Rutherfoord, John; Ruzicka, Pavel; Ryabov, Yury; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryder, Nick; Saavedra, Aldo; Sadeh, Iftach; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salamon, Andrea; Saleem, Muhammad; Salek, David; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, José; Salvachua Ferrando, Belén; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salvucci, Antonio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Samset, Björn Hallvard; Sanchez, Arturo; Sánchez, Javier; Sanchez Martinez, Victoria; Sandaker, Heidi; Sander, Heinz Georg; Sanders, Michiel; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandoval, Tanya; Sandoval, Carlos; Sandstroem, Rikard; Sankey, Dave; Sansoni, Andrea; Santoni, Claudio; Santonico, Rinaldo; Santos, Helena; Saraiva, João; Sarangi, Tapas; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, Edward; Sarri, Francesca; Sartisohn, Georg; Sasaki, Osamu; Sasaki, Yuichi; Sasao, Noboru; Satsounkevitch, Igor; Sauvage, Gilles; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Savard, Pierre; Savinov, Vladimir; Savu, Dan Octavian; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, David; Saxon, James; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scannicchio, Diana; Scarcella, Mark; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schaefer, Douglas; Schaelicke, Andreas; Schaepe, Steffen; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schäfer, Uli; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R. Dean; Schamov, Andrey; Scharf, Veit; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Schernau, Michael; Scherzer, Max; Schiavi, Carlo; Schieck, Jochen; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schmidt, Evelyn; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitt, Sebastian; Schmitz, Martin; Schneider, Basil; Schnoor, Ulrike; Schoeffel, Laurent; Schoening, Andre; Schorlemmer, Andre Lukas; Schott, Matthias; Schouten, Doug; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schram, Malachi; Schroeder, Christian; Schroer, Nicolai; Schultens, Martin Johannes; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schulz, Holger; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schwegler, Philipp; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwierz, Rainer; Schwindling, Jerome; Schwindt, Thomas; Schwoerer, Maud; Sciolla, Gabriella; Scott, Bill; Searcy, Jacob; Sedov, George; Sedykh, Evgeny; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seifert, Frank; Seixas, José; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Sekula, Stephen; Selbach, Karoline Elfriede; Seliverstov, Dmitry; Sellers, Graham; Seman, Michal; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Serkin, Leonid; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shamim, Mansoora; Shan, Lianyou; Shank, James; Shao, Qi Tao; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaw, Kate; Sherman, Daniel; Sherwood, Peter; Shimizu, Shima; Shimojima, Makoto; Shin, Taeksu; Shiyakova, Mariya; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shochet, Mel; Short, Daniel; Shrestha, Suyog; Shulga, Evgeny; Shupe, Michael; Sicho, Petr; Sidoti, Antonio; Siegert, Frank; Sijacki, Djordje; Silbert, Ohad; Silva, José; Silver, Yiftah; Silverstein, Daniel; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simard, Olivier; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simioni, Eduard; Simmons, Brinick; Simoniello, Rosa; Simonyan, Margar; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Sipica, Valentin; Siragusa, Giovanni; Sircar, Anirvan; Sisakyan, Alexei; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Sjursen, Therese; Skinnari, Louise Anastasia; Skottowe, Hugh Philip; Skovpen, Kirill; Skubic, Patrick; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smart, Ben; Smestad, Lillian; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnov, Yury; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Ben Campbell; Smith, Douglas; Smith, Kenway; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snow, Joel; Snyder, Scott; Sobie, Randall; Sodomka, Jaromir; Soffer, Abner; Soh, Dart-yin; Solans, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Solc, Jaroslav; Soldatov, Evgeny; Soldevila, Urmila; Solfaroli Camillocci, Elena; Solodkov, Alexander; Solovyanov, Oleg; Solovyev, Victor; Soni, Nitesh; Sopko, Vit; Sopko, Bruno; Sosebee, Mark; Soualah, Rachik; Soukharev, Andrey; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spanò, Francesco; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spiwoks, Ralf; Spousta, Martin; Spreitzer, Teresa; Spurlock, Barry; St Denis, Richard Dante; Stahlman, Jonathan; Stamen, Rainer; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanek, Robert; Stanescu, Cristian; Stanescu-Bellu, Madalina; Stanitzki, Marcel Michael; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Staszewski, Rafal; Staude, Arnold; Stavina, Pavel; Steele, Genevieve; Steinbach, Peter; Steinberg, Peter; Stekl, Ivan; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stern, Sebastian; Stewart, Graeme; Stillings, Jan Andre; Stockton, Mark; Stoerig, Kathrin; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stonjek, Stefan; Strachota, Pavel; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strang, Michael; Strauss, Emanuel; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Strong, John; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Stugu, Bjarne; Stumer, Iuliu; Stupak, John; Sturm, Philipp; Styles, Nicholas Adam; Su, Dong; Subramania, Halasya Siva; Subramaniam, Rajivalochan; Succurro, Antonella; Sugaya, Yorihito; Suhr, Chad; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Xiaohu; Sundermann, Jan Erik; Suruliz, Kerim; Susinno, Giancarlo; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Yu; Suzuki, Yuta; Svatos, Michal; Swedish, Stephen; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Ta, Duc; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takahashi, Yuta; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Tohru; Takubo, Yosuke; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tamsett, Matthew; Tan, Kong Guan; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Satoshi; Tanaka, Shuji; Tanasijczuk, Andres Jorge; Tani, Kazutoshi; Tannoury, Nancy; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tardif, Dominique; Tarem, Shlomit; Tarrade, Fabien; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tassi, Enrico; Tatarkhanov, Mous; Tayalati, Yahya; Taylor, Christopher; Taylor, Frank; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Wendy; Teinturier, Marthe; Teischinger, Florian Alfred; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, Matilde; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temming, Kim Katrin; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Therhaag, Jan; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothée; Thoma, Sascha; Thomas, Juergen; Thompson, Emily; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Peter; Thompson, Stan; Thomsen, Lotte Ansgaard; Thomson, Evelyn; Thomson, Mark; Thong, Wai Meng; Thun, Rudolf; Tian, Feng; Tibbetts, Mark James; Tic, Tomáš; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timoshenko, Sergey; Tiouchichine, Elodie; Tipton, Paul; Tisserant, Sylvain; Todorov, Theodore; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Toggerson, Brokk; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tollefson, Kirsten; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Tonoyan, Arshak; Topfel, Cyril; Topilin, Nikolai; Torchiani, Ingo; Torrence, Eric; Torres, Heberth; Torró Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Trefzger, Thomas; Tremblet, Louis; Tricoli, Alessandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Tripiana, Martin; Triplett, Nathan; Trischuk, William; Trocmé, Benjamin; Troncon, Clara; Trottier-McDonald, Michel; True, Patrick; Trzebinski, Maciej; Trzupek, Adam; Tsarouchas, Charilaos; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiakiris, Menelaos; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsionou, Dimitra; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Tsiskaridze, Shota; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsung, Jieh-Wen; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tua, Alan; Tudorache, Alexandra; Tudorache, Valentina; Tuggle, Joseph; Turala, Michal; Turecek, Daniel; Turk Cakir, Ilkay; Turlay, Emmanuel; Turra, Ruggero; Tuts, Michael; Tykhonov, Andrii; Tylmad, Maja; Tyndel, Mike; Tzanakos, George; Uchida, Kirika; Ueda, Ikuo; Ueno, Ryuichi; Ugland, Maren; Uhlenbrock, Mathias; Uhrmacher, Michael; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Unno, Yoshinobu; Urbaniec, Dustin; Urquijo, Phillip; Usai, Giulio; Uslenghi, Massimiliano; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Vahsen, Sven; Valenta, Jan; Valentinetti, Sara; Valero, Alberto; Valkar, Stefan; Valladolid Gallego, Eva; Vallecorsa, Sofia; Valls Ferrer, Juan Antonio; Van Berg, Richard; Van Der Deijl, Pieter; van der Geer, Rogier; van der Graaf, Harry; Van Der Leeuw, Robin; van der Poel, Egge; van der Ster, Daniel; van Eldik, Niels; van Gemmeren, Peter; van Vulpen, Ivo; Vanadia, Marco; Vandelli, Wainer; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vankov, Peter; Vannucci, Francois; Vari, Riccardo; Varnes, Erich; Varol, Tulin; Varouchas, Dimitris; Vartapetian, Armen; Varvell, Kevin; Vassilakopoulos, Vassilios; Vazeille, Francois; Vazquez Schroeder, Tamara; Vegni, Guido; Veillet, Jean-Jacques; Veloso, Filipe; Veness, Raymond; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, Andrea; Ventura, Daniel; Venturi, Manuela; Venturi, Nicola; Vercesi, Valerio; Verducci, Monica; Verkerke, Wouter; Vermeulen, Jos; Vest, Anja; Vetterli, Michel; Vichou, Irene; Vickey, Trevor; Vickey Boeriu, Oana Elena; Viehhauser, Georg; Viel, Simon; Villa, Mauro; Villaplana Perez, Miguel; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Vincter, Manuella; Vinek, Elisabeth; Vinogradov, Vladimir; Virchaux, Marc; Virzi, Joseph; Vitells, Ofer; Viti, Michele; Vivarelli, Iacopo; Vives Vaque, Francesc; Vlachos, Sotirios; Vladoiu, Dan; Vlasak, Michal; Vogel, Adrian; Vokac, Petr; Volpi, Guido; Volpi, Matteo; Volpini, Giovanni; von der Schmitt, Hans; von Radziewski, Holger; von Toerne, Eckhard; Vorobel, Vit; Vorwerk, Volker; Vos, Marcel; Voss, Rudiger; Vossebeld, Joost; Vranjes, Nenad; Vranjes Milosavljevic, Marija; Vrba, Vaclav; Vreeswijk, Marcel; Vu Anh, Tuan; Vuillermet, Raphael; Vukotic, Ilija; Wagner, Wolfgang; Wagner, Peter; Wahrmund, Sebastian; Wakabayashi, Jun; Walch, Shannon; Walder, James; Walker, Rodney; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Wall, Richard; Waller, Peter; Walsh, Brian; Wang, Chiho; Wang, Haichen; Wang, Hulin; Wang, Jike; Wang, Jin; Wang, Rui; Wang, Song-Ming; Wang, Tan; Warburton, Andreas; Ward, Patricia; Wardrope, David Robert; Warsinsky, Markus; Washbrook, Andrew; Wasicki, Christoph; Watanabe, Ippei; Watkins, Peter; Watson, Alan; Watson, Ian; Watson, Miriam; Watts, Gordon; Watts, Stephen; Waugh, Anthony; Waugh, Ben; Weber, Michele; Weber, Pavel; Webster, Jordan S; Weidberg, Anthony; Weigell, Philipp; Weingarten, Jens; Weiser, Christian; Wells, Phillippa; Wenaus, Torre; Wendland, Dennis; Weng, Zhili; Wengler, Thorsten; Wenig, Siegfried; Wermes, Norbert; Werner, Matthias; Werner, Per; Werth, Michael; Wessels, Martin; Wetter, Jeffrey; Weydert, Carole; Whalen, Kathleen; White, Andrew; White, Martin; White, Sebastian; Whitehead, Samuel Robert; Whiteson, Daniel; Whittington, Denver; Wicek, Francois; Wicke, Daniel; Wickens, Fred; Wiedenmann, Werner; Wielers, Monika; Wienemann, Peter; Wiglesworth, Craig; Wiik-Fuchs, Liv Antje Mari; Wijeratne, Peter Alexander; Wildauer, Andreas; Wildt, Martin Andre; Wilhelm, Ivan; Wilkens, Henric George; Will, Jonas Zacharias; Williams, Eric; Williams, Hugh; Willis, William; Willocq, Stephane; Wilson, John; Wilson, Michael Galante; Wilson, Alan; Wingerter-Seez, Isabelle; Winkelmann, Stefan; Winklmeier, Frank; Wittgen, Matthias; Wollstadt, Simon Jakob; Wolter, Marcin Wladyslaw; Wolters, Helmut; Wong, Wei-Cheng; Wooden, Gemma; Wosiek, Barbara; Wotschack, Jorg; Woudstra, Martin; Wozniak, Krzysztof; Wraight, Kenneth; Wright, Michael; Wrona, Bozydar; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, Xin; Wu, Yusheng; Wulf, Evan; Wynne, Benjamin; Xella, Stefania; Xiao, Meng; Xie, Song; Xu, Chao; Xu, Da; Yabsley, Bruce; Yacoob, Sahal; Yamada, Miho; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Kyoko; Yamamoto, Shimpei; Yamamura, Taiki; Yamanaka, Takashi; Yamazaki, Takayuki; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Un-Ki; Yang, Yi; Yang, Zhaoyu; Yanush, Serguei; Yao, Liwen; Yao, Yushu; Yasu, Yoshiji; Ybeles Smit, Gabriel Valentijn; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yilmaz, Metin; Yoosoofmiya, Reza; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Rikutaro; Yoshihara, Keisuke; Young, Charles; Young, Christopher John; Youssef, Saul; Yu, Dantong; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jie; Yuan, Li; Yurkewicz, Adam; Zabinski, Bartlomiej; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zajacova, Zuzana; Zanello, Lucia; Zanzi, Daniele; Zaytsev, Alexander; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeman, Martin; Zemla, Andrzej; Zendler, Carolin; Zenin, Oleg; Ženiš, Tibor; Zenz, Seth; Zerwas, Dirk; Zevi della Porta, Giovanni; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Huaqiao; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Long; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Ning; Zhou, Yue; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Junjie; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zhuravlov, Vadym; Zibell, Andre; Zieminska, Daria; Zimin, Nikolai; Zimmermann, Robert; Zimmermann, Simone; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Zinonos, Zinonas; Ziolkowski, Michael; Zitoun, Robert; Živković, Lidija; Zmouchko, Viatcheslav; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; zur Nedden, Martin; Zutshi, Vishnu; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2013-06-17

    A search for resonant diboson production using a data sample corresponding to 4.7 fb$^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity collected by the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV is presented. The search for a narrow resonance in the WW or WZ mass distribution is conducted in a final state with an electron or a muon, missing transverse energy and at least two jets. No significant excess is observed and limits are set using three benchmark models: WW resonance masses below 940 and 710 GeV are excluded at 95% confidence level for spin-2 Randall-Sundrum and Bulk Randall-Sundrum gravitons, respectively; WZ resonance masses below 950 GeV are excluded at 95% confidence level for a spin-1 Extended Gauge Model W' boson.

  16. Search for Randall-Sundrum gravitons with 1 fb.sup.-1./sup. of data from p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96 TeV

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Kupčo, Alexander; Lokajíček, Miloš

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 100, č. 9 (2008), 091802/1-091802/7 ISSN 0031-9007 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC527; GA MŠk LA08047; GA MŠk 1P05LA257 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100502 Keywords : D0 * Tevatron Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 7.180, year: 2008

  17. A static world model. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundman, S.

    1981-01-01

    The static particle model of Part I requires creation of ether proportional to the energy of the particle. It is shown that this ether creation leads to gravitation and a forever expanding universe in agreement with the large-number hypothesis. The age, mass and size of the universe are calculated from atomic constants and G. The model predicts scale-invariance with different scales for gravitational matter, nucleons and electrons. This leads to a fine structure constant decreasing very slowly with time. For each scale there is a different type of dynamic balance governing the expansion of the universe. The model indicates that the universe was initially densely packed with (tau) leptons. It suggests a program for calculating the gravitational constant and the muon-electron mass ratio from other universal constants. Tentative numerological derivation gives these quantities with a higher accuracy than has been achieved experimentally. (Auth.)

  18. Supo Thermal Model Development II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wass, Alexander Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-07-14

    This report describes the continuation of the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model of the Supo cooling system described in the report, Supo Thermal Model Development1, by Cynthia Buechler. The goal for this report is to estimate the natural convection heat transfer coefficient (HTC) of the system using the CFD results and to compare those results to remaining past operational data. Also, the correlation for determining radiolytic gas bubble size is reevaluated using the larger simulation sample size. The background, solution vessel geometry, mesh, material properties, and boundary conditions are developed in the same manner as the previous report. Although, the material properties and boundary conditions are determined using the appropriate experiment results for each individual power level.

  19. Shadow cast by rotating braneworld black holes with a cosmological constant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eiroa, Ernesto F.; Sendra, Carlos M. [Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio (IAFE, CONICET-UBA), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Universidad de Buenos Aires, Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2018-02-15

    In this article, we study the shadow produced by rotating black holes having a tidal charge in a Randall-Sundrum braneworld model, with a cosmological constant. We obtain the apparent shape and the corresponding observables for different values of the tidal charge and the rotation parameter, and we analyze the influence of the presence of the cosmological constant. We also discuss the observational prospects for this optical effect. (orig.)

  20. Search for Higgs boson pair production in the bb¯bb¯ final state from pp collisions at √s = 8 TeVwith the ATLAS detector

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Chudoba, Jiří; Havránek, Miroslav; Hejbal, Jiří; Jakoubek, Tomáš; Kepka, Oldřich; Kupčo, Alexander; Kůs, Vlastimil; Lokajíček, Miloš; Lysák, Roman; Marčišovský, Michal; Mikeštíková, Marcela; Němeček, Stanislav; Šícho, Petr; Staroba, Pavel; Svatoš, Michal; Taševský, Marek; Vrba, Václav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 75, č. 9 (2015), s. 412 ISSN 1434-6044 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LG13009 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : ATLAS * higher-dimensional * Randall-Sundrum model * channel cross section * upper limit * CERN LHC Coll * gravitation * structure * graviton * warped Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 4.912, year: 2015

  1. Search for resonant diboson production in the WW/WZ→ℓνjj decay channels with the ATLAS detector at s√=7  TeV

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aad, G.; Abajyan, T.; Abbott, B.; Böhm, Jan; Chudoba, Jiří; Gallus, Petr; Gunther, Jaroslav; Jakoubek, Tomáš; Juránek, Vojtěch; Kepka, Oldřich; Kupčo, Alexander; Kůs, Vlastimil; Lokajíček, Miloš; Marčišovský, Michal; Mikeštíková, Marcela; Myška, Miroslav; Němeček, Stanislav; Růžička, Pavel; Schovancová, Jaroslava; Šícho, Petr; Staroba, Pavel; Svatoš, Michal; Taševský, Marek; Tic, Tomáš; Vrba, Václav

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 87, č. 11 (2013), "112006-1"-"112006-22" ISSN 1550-7998 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LG13009 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : W' * spin * transverse momentum * missing-energy * scattering * Randall-Sundrum model * ATLAS * narrow resonance * CERN LHC Coll * mass spectrum Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 4.864, year: 2013

  2. A search for ttˉ resonances in the lepton plus jets final state with ATLAS using 4.7 fb.sup.-1./sup. of pp collisions at √s = 7 TeV

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aad, G.; Abajyan, T.; Abbott, B.; Böhm, Jan; Gunther, Jaroslav; Chudoba, Jiří; Jakoubek, Tomáš; Juránek, Vojtěch; Kepka, Oldřich; Kupčo, Alexander; Kůs, Vlastimil; Lokajíček, Miloš; Lysák, Roman; Marčišovský, Michal; Mikeštíková, Marcela; Myška, Miroslav; Němeček, Stanislav; Růžička, Pavel; Schovancová, Jaroslava; Šícho, Petr; Staroba, Pavel; Svatoš, Michal; Taševský, Marek; Tic, Tomáš; Vrba, Václav

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 88, č. 1 (2013), "012004-1"-"012004-16" ISSN 1550-7998 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LG13009 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : ATLAS * CERN * pair production * gluon * Kaluza-Klein * scattering * shape analysis * jet * ATLAS * Randall-Sundrum model * channel cross section * branching Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 4.864, year: 2013

  3. Implications of the absence of high-mass radion signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Aqeel; Dillon, Barry M.; Grzadkowski, Bohdan; Gunion, John F.; Jiang, Yun

    2017-05-01

    Given the disappearance of the 750 GeV diphoton LHC signal and the absence of signals at high mass in this and other channels, significant constraints on the mixed Higgs-radion of the five-dimensional Randall-Sundrum model arise. By combining all channels, these constraints place a significant radion-mass-dependent lower bound on the radion vacuum expectation value that is fairly independent of the amount of Higgs radion mixing.

  4. Search for production of WW/WZ resonances decaying to a lepton, neutrino and jets in pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Chudoba, Jiří; Havránek, Miroslav; Hejbal, Jiří; Jakoubek, Tomáš; Kepka, Oldřich; Kupčo, Alexander; Kůs, Vlastimil; Lokajíček, Miloš; Lysák, Roman; Marčišovský, Michal; Mikeštíková, Marcela; Němeček, Stanislav; Šícho, Petr; Staroba, Pavel; Svatoš, Michal; Taševský, Marek; Vrba, Václav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 75, č. 5 (2015), s. 209 ISSN 1434-6044 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LG13009 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : ATLAS * Randall-Sundrum model * coupling constant * transverse momentum * missing-energy * mass * lower limit * CERN LHC Coll * graviton * experimental Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 4.912, year: 2015

  5. Low-scale gravity mediation in warped extra dimension and collider phenomenology on hidden sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, H.; Okada, N.; Yamashita, T.

    2007-01-01

    We propose a new scenario of gravity-mediated supersymmetry breaking (gravity mediation) in a supersymmetric Randall-Sundrum model, where the gravity mediation takes place at a low scale due to the warped metric. We investigate collider phenomenology involving the hidden sector field, and find a possibility that the hidden sector field can be produced at the LHC and the ILC. The hidden sector may no longer be hidden. (author)

  6. Warped extra dimensions. Flavor, precision tests and Higgs physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goertz, Florian

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis, the phenomenology of the Randall-Sundrum setup is investigated. In this context models with and without an enlarged SU(2) L x SU(2) R x U(1) X x P LR gauge symmetry, which removes corrections to the T parameter and to the Zb L b L coupling, are compared with each other. The Kaluza-Klein decomposition is formulated within the mass basis, which allows for a clear understanding of various model-specific features. A complete discussion of tree-level flavor-changing effects is presented. Exact expressions for five dimensional propagators are derived, including Yukawa interactions that mediate flavor-off-diagonal transitions. The symmetry that reduces the corrections to the left-handed Zbb coupling is analyzed in detail. In the literature, Randall-Sundrum models have been used to address the measured anomaly in the tt forward-backward asymmetry. However, it is shown that this is not possible within a natural approach to flavor. The rare decays t→cZ and t→ch are investigated, where in particular the latter could be observed at the LHC. A calculation of Γ B s 12 in the presence of new physics is presented. It is shown that the Randall-Sundrum setup allows for an improved agreement with measurements of A s SL , S ψφ , and ΔΓ s . For the first time, a complete one-loop calculation of all relevant Higgs-boson production and decay channels in the custodial Randall-Sundrum setup is performed, revealing a sensitivity to large new-physics scales at the LHC.

  7. Warped extra dimensions. Flavor, precision tests and Higgs physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goertz, Florian

    2011-07-01

    In this thesis, the phenomenology of the Randall-Sundrum setup is investigated. In this context models with and without an enlarged SU(2){sub L} x SU(2){sub R} x U(1){sub X} x P{sub LR} gauge symmetry, which removes corrections to the T parameter and to the Zb{sub L}b{sub L} coupling, are compared with each other. The Kaluza-Klein decomposition is formulated within the mass basis, which allows for a clear understanding of various model-specific features. A complete discussion of tree-level flavor-changing effects is presented. Exact expressions for five dimensional propagators are derived, including Yukawa interactions that mediate flavor-off-diagonal transitions. The symmetry that reduces the corrections to the left-handed Zbb coupling is analyzed in detail. In the literature, Randall-Sundrum models have been used to address the measured anomaly in the tt forward-backward asymmetry. However, it is shown that this is not possible within a natural approach to flavor. The rare decays t{yields}cZ and t{yields}ch are investigated, where in particular the latter could be observed at the LHC. A calculation of {gamma}{sup B}{sub s12} in the presence of new physics is presented. It is shown that the Randall-Sundrum setup allows for an improved agreement with measurements of A{sup s}{sub SL}, S{sub {psi}}{sub {phi}}, and {delta}{gamma}{sub s}. For the first time, a complete one-loop calculation of all relevant Higgs-boson production and decay channels in the custodial Randall-Sundrum setup is performed, revealing a sensitivity to large new-physics scales at the LHC.

  8. Search for radions at LEP2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbiendi, G.; Ainsley, C.; Akesson, P.F.

    2005-01-01

    A new scalar resonance, called the radion, with couplings to fermions and bosons similar to those of the Higgs boson, is predicted in the framework of Randall-Sundrum models, proposed solutions to the hierarchy problem with one extra dimension. An important distinction between the radion and the Higgs boson is that the radion would couple directly to gluon pairs, and in particular its decay products would include a significant fraction of gluon jets. The radion has the same quantum numbers as the Standard Model (SM) Higgs boson, and therefore they can mix, with the resulting mass eigenstates having properties different from those of the SM Higgs boson. Existing searches for the Higgs bosons are sensitive to the possible production and decay of radions and Higgs bosons in these models. For the first time, searches for the SM Higgs boson and flavour-independent and decay-mode independent searches for a neutral Higgs boson are used in combination to explore the parameter space of the Randall-Sundrum model. In the dataset recorded by the OPAL experiment at LEP, no evidence for radion or Higgs particle production was observed in any of those searches at centre-of-mass energies up to 209 GeV. The results are used to set limits on the radion and Higgs boson masses. For all parameters of the Randall-Sundrum model, the data exclude masses below 58 GeV for the mass eigenstate which becomes the Higgs boson in the no-mixing limit

  9. Busca por dimensões extras no detector CMS do large hadron collider

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R

    We present the results of a search for experimental evidence of extra space dimensions in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV, furnished by the Large Hadron Collider accelerator. We analyzed the data taken by the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment during 2011, which total an integrated luminosity of 4.7 fb−1. The Randall-Sundrum warped extra dimensions model was used as a standard benchmark for the experimental signatures which could be observed in the data, in the presence of extra dimensions. The studied reaction is pp → G∗→ ZZ→ qqνν, where G∗ is the first Randall-Sundrum graviton resonance. The observations agree witht he Standard Model predictions. In the absence of experimental signals of extra dimensions, we put limits on the parameters of the Randall-Sundrum model. Upper limits, with 95% confidence, for the cross-section of processes which would raise the event yield in the channel considered are in the [0.047 – 0.021] pb range, for resonance masses in the [1000...

  10. Cosmological evolution of Yukawa couplings: the 5D perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harling, Benedict von [DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Servant, Géraldine [DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); II. Institute of Theoretical Physics, University of Hamburg, 22761 Hamburg (Germany)

    2017-05-15

    The cosmological evolution of standard model Yukawa couplings may have major implications for baryogenesis. In particular, as highlighted recently, the CKM matrix alone could be the source of CP-violation during electroweak baryogenesis provided that the Yukawa couplings were large and varied during the electroweak phase transition. We provide a natural realisation of this idea in the context of Randall-Sundrum models and show that the geometrical warped approach to the fermion mass hierarchy may naturally display the desired cosmological dynamics. The key ingredient is the coupling of the Goldberger-Wise scalar, responsible for the IR brane stabilisation, to the bulk fermions, which modifies the fermionic profiles. This also helps alleviating the usually tight constraints from CP-violation in Randall-Sundrum scenarios. We study how the Yukawa couplings vary during the stabilisation of the Randall-Sundrum geometry and can thus induce large CP-violation during the electroweak phase transition. Using holography, we discuss the 4D interpretation of this dynamical interplay between flavour and electroweak symmetry breaking.

  11. Cosmological evolution of Yukawa couplings. The 5D perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harling, Benedict von [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Servant, Geraldine [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik

    2017-02-15

    The cosmological evolution of standard model Yukawa couplings may have major implications for baryogenesis. In particular, as highlighted recently, the CKM matrix alone could be the source of CP-violation during electroweak baryogenesis provided that the Yukawa couplings were large and varied during the electroweak phase transition. We provide a natural realisation of this idea in the context of Randall-Sundrum models and show that the geometrical warped approach to the fermion mass hierarchy may naturally display the desired cosmological dynamics. The key ingredient is the coupling of the Goldberger-Wise scalar, responsible for the IR brane stabilisation, to the bulk fermions, which modifies the fermionic profiles. This also helps alleviating the usually tight constraints from CP-violation in Randall-Sundrum scenarios. We study how the Yukawa couplings vary during the stabilisation of the Randall-Sundrum geometry and can thus induce large CP-violation during the electroweak phase transition. Using holography, we discuss the 4D interpretation of this dynamical interplay between flavour and electroweak symmetry breaking.

  12. Cosmological evolution of Yukawa couplings. The 5D perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harling, Benedict von; Servant, Geraldine; Hamburg Univ.

    2017-02-01

    The cosmological evolution of standard model Yukawa couplings may have major implications for baryogenesis. In particular, as highlighted recently, the CKM matrix alone could be the source of CP-violation during electroweak baryogenesis provided that the Yukawa couplings were large and varied during the electroweak phase transition. We provide a natural realisation of this idea in the context of Randall-Sundrum models and show that the geometrical warped approach to the fermion mass hierarchy may naturally display the desired cosmological dynamics. The key ingredient is the coupling of the Goldberger-Wise scalar, responsible for the IR brane stabilisation, to the bulk fermions, which modifies the fermionic profiles. This also helps alleviating the usually tight constraints from CP-violation in Randall-Sundrum scenarios. We study how the Yukawa couplings vary during the stabilisation of the Randall-Sundrum geometry and can thus induce large CP-violation during the electroweak phase transition. Using holography, we discuss the 4D interpretation of this dynamical interplay between flavour and electroweak symmetry breaking.

  13. Brane-Localized Gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregory, Ruth

    2007-01-01

    The study of braneworlds has been an area of intense activity over the past decade, with thousands of papers being written, and many important technical advances being made. This book focuses on a particular aspect of braneworlds, namely perturbative gravity in one specific model: the Randall-Sundrum model. The book starts with an overview of the Randall-Sundrum model, discussing anti-de Sitter (AdS) space and the Israel equations in some detail. It then moves on to discuss cosmological branes, focusing on branes with constant curvature. The book then turns to brane gravity, i.e. what do we, as brane observers, perceive the gravitational interaction to be on the brane as derived from the actual five-dimensional gravitational physics? After a derivation of the general brane equations from the Israel equations, the remainder of the book deals with perturbative gravity. This part of the book is extremely detailed, with calculations given explicitly. Overall, the book is quite pedagogical in style, with the aim being to explain in detail the topics it chooses to cover. While it is not unusual to have books written on current and extremely popular research areas, it is unusual to have calculations written so explicitly. This is both a strength and a weakness of this book. It is a strength because the calculations are presented in a detail that students learning the topic will definitely appreciate; however, the narrow focus of the book also means that it lacks perspective and fails to present the broader context. In choosing to focus on one particular aspect of Randall-Sundrum branes, the book has not managed to communicate why a large number of theorists have worked so intensively on this model. In its early stages, the explicit detail of the Randall-Sundrum model would be extremely useful for a student starting out in this research area. In addition, the calculational detail later in the computation of the graviton propagator on the brane would also be welcome not

  14. Solar photocatalytic removal of Cu(II), Ni(II), Zn(II) and Pb(II): Speciation modeling of metal-citric acid complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabra, Kavita; Chaudhary, Rubina; Sawhney, R.L.

    2008-01-01

    The present study is targeted on solar photocatalytic removal of metal ions from wastewater. Photoreductive deposition and dark adsorption of metal ions Cu(II), Ni(II), Pb(II) and Zn(II), using solar energy irradiated TiO 2 , has been investigated. Citric acid has been used as a hole scavenger. Modeling of metal species has been performed and speciation is used as a tool for discussing the photodeposition trends. Ninety-seven percent reductive deposition was obtained for copper. The deposition values of other metals were significantly low [nickel (36.4%), zinc (22.2%) and lead (41.4%)], indicating that the photocatalytic treatment process, using solar energy, was more suitable for wastewater containing Cu(II) ions. In absence of citric acid, the decreasing order deposition was Cu(II) > Ni(II) > Pb(II) > Zn(II), which proves the theoretical thermodynamic predictions about the metals

  15. Brane worlds theories with one or two extra dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Salvio, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    This book is roughly divided in three parts. The first one is a general introduction to theories with extra dimensions and, more specifically, to brane worlds. Both old-fashioned topics (such as Kaluza-Klein theories) and more modern aspects (e.g. Large Extra Dimensions and Randall-Sundrum models) are discussed. The second and third parts (which we refer to as Part I and II respectively) are essentially two monographs. There, the reader is guided through the construction of the 4D effective field theory derived from higher dimensional (in particular five-dimensional and six-dimensional) models. Part I is devoted to the study of how the heavy Kaluza-Klein modes contribute to the low energy dynamics of the light modes. Part II concerns instead the analysis of the spectrum arising from non-standard compactifications of six-dimensional (supersymmetric) theories, involving a warp factor and conical defects in the internal manifold. Several applications of the above mentioned topics are discussed, providing an up t...

  16. Kaluza-Klein gluon + jets associated production at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Iyer, A.M.; Manglani, N.; Sridhar, K.

    2016-08-10

    The Kaluza-Klein excitations of gluons offer the exciting possibility of probing bulk Randall-Sundrum (RS) models. In these bulk models either a custodial symmetry or a deformation of the metric away from AdS is invoked in order to deal with electroweak precision tests. Addressing both these models, we suggest a new channel in which to study the production of KK-gluons ($g_{KK}$): one where it is produced in association with one or more hard jets. The cross-section for the $g_{KK}+$ jets channel is significant because of several contributing sub-processes. In particular, the 1-jet and the 2-jet associated processes are important because at these orders in QCD the $qg$ and the $gg$ initial states respectively come into play. We have performed a hadron-level simulation of the signal and present strategies to effectively extract the signal from what could potentially be a huge background. We present results for the kinematic reach of the LHC Run-II for different $g_{KK}$ masses in bulk-RS models.

  17. Search for heavy ZZ resonances in the ℓ ^+ℓ ^-ℓ ^+ℓ ^- and ℓ ^+ℓ ^-ν \\bar{ν } final states using proton-proton collisions at √{s}= 13 {TeV} with the ATLAS detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaboud, M.; Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Abidi, S. H.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abraham, N. L.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adachi, S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adelman, J.; Adersberger, M.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Afik, Y.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agheorghiesei, C.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akatsuka, S.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akilli, E.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albicocco, P.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Alderweireldt, S. C.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Ali, B.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allen, B. W.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Alshehri, A. A.; Alstaty, M. I.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amoroso, S.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Angerami, A.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antel, C.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antrim, D. J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Araujo Ferraz, V.; Arce, A. T. H.; Ardell, R. E.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Armitage, L. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Artz, S.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Bagnaia, P.; Bahmani, M.; Bahrasemani, H.; Baines, J. T.; Bajic, M.; Baker, O. K.; Bakker, P. J.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Bandyopadhyay, A.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisits, M.-S.; Barkeloo, J. T.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska-Blenessy, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barranco Navarro, L.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Beck, H. C.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bedognetti, M.; Bee, C. P.; Beermann, T. A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Bell, A. S.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Belyaev, N. L.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez, J.; Benjamin, D. P.; Benoit, M.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Bergsten, L. J.; Beringer, J.; Berlendis, S.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernardi, G.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertram, I. A.; Bertsche, C.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Bethani, A.; Bethke, S.; Betti, A.; Bevan, A. J.; Beyer, J.; Bianchi, R. M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bielski, R.; Bierwagen, K.; Biesuz, N. V.; Biglietti, M.; Billoud, T. R. V.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bisanz, T.; Bittrich, C.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blair, R. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blue, A.; Blumenschein, U.; Blunier, Dr.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Boerner, D.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bokan, P.; Bold, T.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bolz, A. E.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortoletto, D.; Bortolotto, V.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Bossio Sola, J. D.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Boutle, S. K.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozson, A. J.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Braren, F.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Briglin, D. L.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Broughton, J. H.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruni, L. S.; Bruno, S.; Brunt, BH; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryant, P.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bullock, D.; Burch, T. J.; Burdin, S.; Burgard, C. D.; Burger, A. M.; Burghgrave, B.; Burka, K.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Burr, J. T. P.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Butler, J. M.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Li, C.-Q.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cai, H.; Cairo, V. M.; Cakir, O.; Calace, N.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Callea, G.; Caloba, L. P.; CalventeLopez, S.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Calvet, T. P.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Camincher, C.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Camplani, A.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Carbone, R. M.; Cardarelli, R.; Cardillo, F.; Carli, I.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carlson, B. T.; Carminati, L.; Carney, R. M. D.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrá, S.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casha, A. F.; Casolino, M.; Casper, D. W.; Castelijn, R.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavallaro, E.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Celebi, E.; Ceradini, F.; Cerda Alberich, L.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, S. K.; Chan, W. S.; Chan, Y. L.; Chang, P.; Chapman, J. D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Che, S.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, J.; Chen, S.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, H. J.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Cheu, E.; Cheung, K.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiarelli, G.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chitan, A.; Chiu, Y. H.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choi, K.; Chomont, A. R.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, Y. S.; Christodoulou, V.; Chu, M. C.; Chudoba, J.; Chuinard, A. J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Cioara, I. A.; Ciocio, A.; Cirotto, F.; Citron, Z. H.; Citterio, M.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, B. L.; Clark, M. R.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Colasurdo, L.; Cole, B.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Constantinescu, S.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cormier, F.; Cormier, K. J. R.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Crawley, S. J.; Creager, R. A.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cueto, A.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cukierman, A. R.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cúth, J.; Czekierda, S.; Czodrowski, P.; D'amen, G.; D'Auria, S.; D'eramo, L.; D'Onofrio, M.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; DaVia, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dado, T.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dandoy, J. R.; Daneri, M. F.; Dang, N. P.; Daniells, A. C.; Dann, N. S.; Danninger, M.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J.; Dattagupta, A.; Daubney, T.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davis, D. R.; Davison, P.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Benedetti, A.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Maria, A.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vasconcelos Corga, K.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dedovich, D. V.; Dehghanian, N.; Deigaard, I.; Del Gaudio, M.; Del Peso, J.; Delgove, D.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. M.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Dell'Orso, M.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delporte, C.; Delsart, P. A.; DeMarco, D. A.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Denisov, S. P.; Denysiuk, D.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deterre, C.; Dette, K.; Devesa, M. R.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dhaliwal, S.; DiBello, F. A.; DiCiaccio, A.; DiCiaccio, L.; DiClemente, W. K.; DiDonato, C.; DiGirolamo, A.; DiGirolamo, B.; DiMicco, B.; DiNardo, R.; DiPetrillo, K. F.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; DiValentino, D.; Diaconu, C.; Diamond, M.; Dias, F. A.; Diaz, M. A.; Dickinson, J.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Díez Cornell, S.; Dimitrievska, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Djuvsland, J. I.; doVale, M. A. B.; Dobos, D.; Dobre, M.; Dodsworth, D.; Doglioni, C.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Donadelli, M.; Donati, S.; Dondero, P.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. T.; Drechsler, E.; Dris, M.; Du, Y.; Duarte-Campderros, J.; Dubinin, F.; Dubreuil, A.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Ducourthial, A.; Ducu, O. A.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Dudder, A. Chr.; Duffield, E. M.; Duflot, L.; Dührssen, M.; Dulsen, C.; Dumancic, M.; Dumitriu, A. E.; Duncan, A. K.; Dunford, M.; Duperrin, A.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Düren, M.; Durglishvili, A.; Duschinger, D.; Dutta, B.; Duvnjak, D.; Dyndal, M.; Dziedzic, B. S.; Eckardt, C.; Ecker, K. M.; Edgar, R. C.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; El Kosseifi, R.; Ellajosyula, V.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Elliot, A. A.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Enari, Y.; Ennis, J. S.; Epland, M. B.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Ernst, M.; Errede, S.; Escalier, M.; Escobar, C.; Esposito, B.; EstradaPastor, O.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Ezhilov, A.; Ezzi, M.; Fabbri, F.; Fabbri, L.; Fabiani, V.; Facini, G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Falla, R. J.; Faltova, J.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farina, C.; Farina, E. M.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Faucci Giannelli, M.; Favareto, A.; Fawcett, W. J.; Fayard, L.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Feigl, S.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Fenton, M. J.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Feremenga, L.; Fernandez Martinez, P.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira de Lima, D. E.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filipuzzi, M.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Finelli, K. D.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Fischer, A.; Fischer, C.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, W. 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S.; Neumann, M.; Newman, P. R.; Ng, T. Y.; Ng, Y. S.; Nguyen Manh, T.; Nickerson, R. B.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nielsen, J.; Nikiforou, N.; Nikolaenko, V.; Nikolic-Audit, I.; Nikolopoulos, K.; Nilsson, P.; Ninomiya, Y.; Nisati, A.; Nishu, N.; Nisius, R.; Nitsche, I.; Nitta, T.; Nobe, T.; Noguchi, Y.; Nomachi, M.; Nomidis, I.; Nomura, M. A.; Nooney, T.; Nordberg, M.; Norjoharuddeen, N.; Novgorodova, O.; Nozaki, M.; Nozka, L.; Ntekas, K.; Nurse, E.; Nuti, F.; O'connor, K.; O'Neil, D. C.; O'Rourke, A. A.; O'Shea, V.; Oakham, F. G.; Oberlack, H.; Obermann, T.; Ocariz, J.; Ochi, A.; Ochoa, I.; Ochoa-Ricoux, J. P.; Oda, S.; Odaka, S.; Oh, A.; Oh, S. H.; Ohm, C. C.; Ohman, H.; Oide, H.; Okawa, H.; Okumura, Y.; Okuyama, T.; Olariu, A.; OleiroSeabra, L. F.; OlivaresPino, S. A.; Oliveira Damazio, D.; Olsson, M. J. R.; Olszewski, A.; Olszowska, J.; Onofre, A.; Onogi, K.; Onyisi, P. U. E.; Oppen, H.; Oreglia, M. J.; Oren, Y.; Orestano, D.; Orlando, N.; Orr, R. S.; Osculati, B.; Ospanov, R.; Otero y Garzon, G.; Otono, H.; Ouchrif, M.; Ould-Saada, F.; Ouraou, A.; Oussoren, K. P.; Ouyang, Q.; Owen, M.; Owen, R. E.; Ozcan, V. E.; Ozturk, N.; Pachal, K.; Pacheco Pages, A.; Pacheco Rodriguez, L.; Padilla Aranda, C.; Pagan Griso, S.; Paganini, M.; Paige, F.; Palacino, G.; Palazzo, S.; Palestini, S.; Palka, M.; Pallin, D.; Panagiotopoulou, E. St.; Panagoulias, I.; Pandini, C. E.; PanduroVazquez, J. G.; Pani, P.; Panitkin, S.; Pantea, D.; Paolozzi, L.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Papageorgiou, K.; Paramonov, A.; ParedesHernandez, D.; Parker, A. J.; Parker, M. A.; Parker, K. A.; Parodi, F.; Parsons, J. A.; Parzefall, U.; Pascuzzi, V. R.; Pasner, J. M.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passaggio, S.; Pastore, Fr.; Pataraia, S.; Pater, J. R.; Pauly, T.; Pearson, B.; Pedraza Lopez, S.; Pedro, R.; Peleganchuk, S. V.; Penc, O.; Peng, C.; Peng, H.; Penwell, J.; Peralva, B. S.; Perego, M. M.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Peri, F.; Perini, L.; Pernegger, H.; Perrella, S.; Peschke, R.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; Peters, K.; Peters, R. F. Y.; Petersen, B. A.; Petersen, T. C.; Petit, E.; Petridis, A.; Petridou, C.; Petroff, P.; Petrolo, E.; Petrov, M.; Petrucci, F.; Pettersson, N. E.; Peyaud, A.; Pezoa, R.; Phillips, F. H.; Phillips, P. W.; Piacquadio, G.; Pianori, E.; Picazio, A.; Pickering, M. A.; Piegaia, R.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pilkington, A. D.; Pinamonti, M.; Pinfold, J. L.; Pirumov, H.; Pitt, M.; Plazak, L.; Pleier, M.-A.; Pleskot, V.; Plotnikova, E.; Pluth, D.; Podberezko, P.; Poettgen, R.; Poggi, R.; Poggioli, L.; Pogrebnyak, I.; Pohl, D.; Pokharel, I.; Polesello, G.; Poley, A.; Policicchio, A.; Polifka, R.; Polini, A.; Pollard, C. S.; Polychronakos, V.; Pommès, K.; Ponomarenko, D.; Pontecorvo, L.; Popeneciu, G. A.; Portillo Quintero, D. M.; Pospisil, S.; Potamianos, K.; Potrap, I. N.; Potter, C. J.; Potti, H.; Poulsen, T.; Poveda, J.; Pozo Astigarraga, M. E.; Pralavorio, P.; Pranko, A.; Prell, S.; Price, D.; Primavera, M.; Prince, S.; Proklova, N.; Prokofiev, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Protopopescu, S.; Proudfoot, J.; Przybycien, M.; Puri, A.; Puzo, P.; Qian, J.; Qin, G.; Qin, Y.; Quadt, A.; Queitsch-Maitland, M.; Quilty, D.; Raddum, S.; Radeka, V.; Radescu, V.; Radhakrishnan, S. K.; Radloff, P.; Rados, P.; Ragusa, F.; Rahal, G.; Raine, J. A.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rangel-Smith, C.; Rashid, T.; Raspopov, S.; Ratti, M. G.; Rauch, D. M.; Rauscher, F.; Rave, S.; Ravinovich, I.; Rawling, J. H.; Raymond, M.; Read, A. L.; Readioff, N. P.; Reale, M.; Rebuzzi, D. M.; Redelbach, A.; Redlinger, G.; Reece, R.; Reed, R. G.; Reeves, K.; Rehnisch, L.; Reichert, J.; Reiss, A.; Rembser, C.; Ren, H.; Rescigno, M.; Resconi, S.; Resseguie, E. D.; Rettie, S.; Reynolds, E.; Rezanova, O. L.; Reznicek, P.; Rezvani, R.; Richter, R.; Richter, S.; Richter-Was, E.; Ricken, O.; Ridel, M.; Rieck, P.; Riegel, C. J.; Rieger, J.; Rifki, O.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rimoldi, A.; Rimoldi, M.; Rinaldi, L.; Ripellino, G.; Ristić, B.; Ritsch, E.; Riu, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rizvi, E.; Rizzi, C.; Roberts, R. T.; Robertson, S. H.; Robichaud-Veronneau, A.; Robinson, D.; Robinson, J. E. M.; Robson, A.; Rocco, E.; Roda, C.; Rodina, Y.; RodriguezBosca, S.; RodriguezPerez, A.; RodriguezRodriguez, D.; Roe, S.; Rogan, C. S.; Røhne, O.; Roloff, J.; Romaniouk, A.; Romano, M.; Romano Saez, S. M.; Romero Adam, E.; Rompotis, N.; Ronzani, M.; Roos, L.; Rosati, S.; Rosbach, K.; Rose, P.; Rosien, N.-A.; Rossi, E.; Rossi, L. P.; Rosten, J. H. N.; Rosten, R.; Rotaru, M.; Rothberg, J.; Rousseau, D.; Roy, D.; Rozanov, A.; Rozen, Y.; Ruan, X.; Rubbo, F.; Rühr, F.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakovich, N. A.; Russell, H. L.; Rutherfoord, J. P.; Ruthmann, N.; Rüttinger, E. M.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Rybar, M.; Rybkin, G.; Ryu, S.; Ryzhov, A.; Rzehorz, G. F.; Saavedra, A. F.; Sabato, G.; Sacerdoti, S.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sadykov, R.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Saha, P.; Sahinsoy, M.; Saimpert, M.; Saito, M.; Saito, T.; Sakamoto, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Salamanna, G.; Salazar Loyola, J. E.; Salek, D.; Sales De Bruin, P. H.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sammel, D.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sampsonidou, D.; Sánchez, J.; Sanchez Martinez, V.; Sanchez Pineda, A.; Sandaker, H.; Sandbach, R. L.; Sander, C. O.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandoval, C.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sannino, M.; Sano, Y.; Sansoni, A.; Santoni, C.; Santos, H.; Santoyo Castillo, I.; Sapronov, A.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarrazin, B.; Sasaki, O.; Sato, K.; Sauvan, E.; Savage, G.; Savard, P.; Savic, N.; Sawyer, C.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, J.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scanlon, T.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schachtner, B. M.; Schaefer, D.; Schaefer, L.; Schaefer, R.; Schaeffer, J.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schäfer, U.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schenck, F.; Schernau, M.; Schiavi, C.; Schier, S.; Schildgen, L. K.; Schillo, C.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmidt-Sommerfeld, K. R.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, S.; Schnoor, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoening, A.; Schoenrock, B. D.; Schopf, E.; Schott, M.; Schouwenberg, J. F. P.; Schovancova, J.; Schramm, S.; Schuh, N.; Schulte, A.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwarz, T. A.; Schweiger, H.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Sciandra, A.; Sciolla, G.; Scornajenghi, M.; Scuri, F.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Seema, P.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekhon, K.; Sekula, S. J.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Senkin, S.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Sessa, M.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Šfiligoj, T.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shaikh, N. W.; Shan, L. Y.; Shang, R.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Shaw, S. M.; Shcherbakova, A.; Shehu, C. Y.; Shen, Y.; Sherafati, N.; Sherman, A. D.; Sherwood, P.; Shi, L.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shipsey, I. P. J.; Shirabe, S.; Shiyakova, M.; Shlomi, J.; Shmeleva, A.; Shoaleh Saadi, D.; Shochet, M. J.; Shojaii, S.; Shope, D. R.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Sicho, P.; Sickles, A. M.; Sidebo, P. E.; Sideras Haddad, E.; Sidiropoulou, O.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silva, J.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simic, L.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simon, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sioli, M.; Siragusa, G.; Siral, I.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Skinner, M. B.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Slawinska, M.; Sliwa, K.; Slovak, R.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smiesko, J.; Smirnov, N.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, J. W.; Smith, M. N. K.; Smith, R. W.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snyder, I. M.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Søgaard, A.; Soh, D. A.; Sokhrannyi, G.; SolansSanchez, C. A.; Solar, M.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Son, H.; Sopczak, A.; Sosa, D.; Sotiropoulou, C. L.; Sottocornola, S.; Soualah, R.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Sowden, B. C.; Spagnolo, S.; Spalla, M.; Spangenberg, M.; Spanò, F.; Sperlich, D.; Spettel, F.; Spieker, T. M.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; St. Denis, R. D.; Stabile, A.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapf, B. S.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, G. H.; Stark, J.; Stark, S. H.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Stärz, S.; Staszewski, R.; Stegler, M.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stevenson, T. J.; Stewart, G. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Suchek, S.; Sugaya, Y.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultan, DMS; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Suruliz, K.; Suster, C. J. E.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Svatos, M.; Swiatlowski, M.; Swift, S. P.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Tahirovic, E.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takasugi, E. H.; Takeda, K.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, M.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanioka, R.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tapia Araya, S.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, A. C.; Taylor, A. J.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, P. T. E.; Taylor, W.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temple, D.; TenKate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Thais, S. J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thiele, F.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Tian, Y.; Tibbetts, M. J.; TicseTorres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todome, K.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Todt, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tong, B.; Tornambe, P.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; TorróPastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Treado, C. J.; Trefzger, T.; Tresoldi, F.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Trofymov, A.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsang, K. W.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tu, Y.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tulbure, T. T.; Tuna, A. N.; Turchikhin, S.; Turgeman, D.; TurkCakir, I.; Turra, R.; Tuts, P. M.; Ucchielli, G.; Ueda, I.; Ughetto, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Uno, K.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usui, J.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Vadla, K. O. H.; Vaidya, A.; Valderanis, C.; Valdes Santurio, E.; Valente, M.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valéry, L.; Valkar, S.; Vallier, A.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; van der Graaf, H.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varni, C.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vasquez, J. G.; Vasquez, G. A.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Furelos, D.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Veloce, L. 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P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Washbrook, A.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, A. F.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. M.; Weber, S. W.; Weber, S. A.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weirich, M.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M. D.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Weston, T. D.; Whalen, K.; Whallon, N. L.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A. S.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; Whiteson, D.; Whitmore, B. W.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilk, F.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winkels, E.; Winklmeier, F.; Winston, O. J.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wobisch, M.; Wolf, A.; Wolf, T. M. H.; Wolff, R.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wong, V. W. S.; Woods, N. L.; Worm, S. D.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xi, Z.; Xia, L.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Xu, T.; Xu, W.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yamaguchi, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamane, F.; Yamatani, M.; Yamazaki, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W.-M.; Yap, Y. C.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; YauWong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yigitbasi, E.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Yu, J.; Yu, J.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zacharis, G.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zakharchuk, N.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zemaityte, G.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, J. C.; Zeng, Q.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, P.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; Zou, R.; zur Nedden, M.; Zwalinski, L.

    2018-04-01

    A search for heavy resonances decaying into a pair of Z bosons leading to ℓ ^+ℓ ^-ℓ ^+ℓ ^- and ℓ ^+ℓ ^-ν \\bar{ν } final states, where ℓ stands for either an electron or a muon, is presented. The search uses proton-proton collision data at a centre-of-mass energy of 13 {TeV} corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 36.1 fb^{-1} collected with the ATLAS detector during 2015 and 2016 at the Large Hadron Collider. Different mass ranges for the hypothetical resonances are considered, depending on the final state and model. The different ranges span between 200 and 2000 {GeV}. The results are interpreted as upper limits on the production cross section of a spin-0 or spin-2 resonance. The upper limits for the spin-0 resonance are translated to exclusion contours in the context of Type-I and Type-II two-Higgs-doublet models, while those for the spin-2 resonance are used to constrain the Randall-Sundrum model with an extra dimension giving rise to spin-2 graviton excitations.

  18. PARALLEL MEASUREMENT AND MODELING OF TRANSPORT IN THE DARHT II BEAMLINE ON ETA II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chambers, F W; Raymond, B A; Falabella, S; Lee, B S; Richardson, R A; Weir, J T; Davis, H A; Schultze, M E

    2005-01-01

    To successfully tune the DARHT II transport beamline requires the close coupling of a model of the beam transport and the measurement of the beam observables as the beam conditions and magnet settings are varied. For the ETA II experiment using the DARHT II beamline components this was achieved using the SUICIDE (Simple User Interface Connecting to an Integrated Data Environment) data analysis environment and the FITS (Fully Integrated Transport Simulation) model. The SUICIDE environment has direct access to the experimental beam transport data at acquisition and the FITS predictions of the transport for immediate comparison. The FITS model is coupled into the control system where it can read magnet current settings for real time modeling. We find this integrated coupling is essential for model verification and the successful development of a tuning aid for the efficient convergence on a useable tune. We show the real time comparisons of simulation and experiment and explore the successes and limitations of this close coupled approach

  19. Testing of a one dimensional model for Field II calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bæk, David; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Willatzen, Morten

    2008-01-01

    Field II is a program for simulating ultrasound transducer fields. It is capable of calculating the emitted and pulse-echoed fields for both pulsed and continuous wave transducers. To make it fully calibrated a model of the transducer’s electro-mechanical impulse response must be included. We...... examine an adapted one dimensional transducer model originally proposed by Willatzen [9] to calibrate Field II. This model is modified to calculate the required impulse responses needed by Field II for a calibrated field pressure and external circuit current calculation. The testing has been performed...... to the calibrated Field II program for 1, 4, and 10 cycle excitations. Two parameter sets were applied for modeling, one real valued Pz27 parameter set, manufacturer supplied, and one complex valued parameter set found in literature, Alguer´o et al. [11]. The latter implicitly accounts for attenuation. Results show...

  20. Asymmetric Gepner models II. Heterotic weight lifting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gato-Rivera, B. [NIKHEF Theory Group, Kruislaan 409, 1098 SJ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Instituto de Fisica Fundamental, CSIC, Serrano 123, Madrid 28006 (Spain); Schellekens, A.N., E-mail: t58@nikhef.n [NIKHEF Theory Group, Kruislaan 409, 1098 SJ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Instituto de Fisica Fundamental, CSIC, Serrano 123, Madrid 28006 (Spain); IMAPP, Radboud Universiteit, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2011-05-21

    A systematic study of 'lifted' Gepner models is presented. Lifted Gepner models are obtained from standard Gepner models by replacing one of the N=2 building blocks and the E{sub 8} factor by a modular isomorphic N=0 model on the bosonic side of the heterotic string. The main result is that after this change three family models occur abundantly, in sharp contrast to ordinary Gepner models. In particular, more than 250 new and unrelated moduli spaces of three family models are identified. We discuss the occurrence of fractionally charged particles in these spectra.

  1. Asymmetric Gepner models II. Heterotic weight lifting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gato-Rivera, B.; Schellekens, A.N.

    2011-01-01

    A systematic study of 'lifted' Gepner models is presented. Lifted Gepner models are obtained from standard Gepner models by replacing one of the N=2 building blocks and the E 8 factor by a modular isomorphic N=0 model on the bosonic side of the heterotic string. The main result is that after this change three family models occur abundantly, in sharp contrast to ordinary Gepner models. In particular, more than 250 new and unrelated moduli spaces of three family models are identified. We discuss the occurrence of fractionally charged particles in these spectra.

  2. Integrating Seasonal Oscillations into Basel II Behavioural Scoring Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran Klepac

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The article introduces a new methodology of temporal influence measurement (seasonal oscillations, temporal patterns for behavioural scoring development purposes. The paper shows how significant temporal variables can be recognised and then integrated into the behavioural scoring models in order to improve model performance. Behavioural scoring models are integral parts of the Basel II standard on Internal Ratings-Based Approaches (IRB. The IRB approach much more precisely reflects individual risk bank profile.A solution of the problem of how to analyze and integrate macroeconomic and microeconomic factors represented in time series into behavioural scorecard models will be shown in the paper by using the REF II model.

  3. Extra dimensions and micro black holes at the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valuev, V.

    2009-01-01

    Models with extra dimensions have been proposed to solve outstanding problems of the Standard Model. In some of those models the strength of gravity is increased at TeV energies and unified with the electroweak interaction. New studies are presented on the sensitivity to searches for new gauge bosons, such as W' and Z' bosons and other high mass resonances, as predicted e.g. by Randall-Sundrum models; to searches for large (ADD) extra dimensions in channels with missing transverse energy; to searches with di-photon final states; to searches for universal extra dimensions, and to searches for micro black hole production at the LHC. (author)

  4. Predictive Models and Computational Toxicology (II IBAMTOX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA’s ‘virtual embryo’ project is building an integrative systems biology framework for predictive models of developmental toxicity. One schema involves a knowledge-driven adverse outcome pathway (AOP) framework utilizing information from public databases, standardized ontologies...

  5. Nyala and Bushbuck II: A Harvesting Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fay, Temple H.; Greeff, Johanna C.

    1999-01-01

    Adds a cropping or harvesting term to the animal overpopulation model developed in Part I of this article. Investigates various harvesting strategies that might suggest a solution to the overpopulation problem without actually culling any animals. (ASK)

  6. Base Flow Model Validation, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The program focuses on turbulence modeling enhancements for predicting high-speed rocket base flows. A key component of the effort is the collection of high-fidelity...

  7. Searching for new physics at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shreyber, Irina; /Moscow, ITEP

    2006-11-01

    We present recent results on searches for physics beyond the Standard Model obtained from the analysis of 1 fb{sup -1} of data collected at the Tevatron Collider by the CDF Collaboration. We report on model-independent studies for anomalous production of {ell}{gamma} + X, {ell}{gamma}bE{sub T} and {gamma}{gamma} + E{sub T}, Standard Model t{bar t}{gamma} production. We also present results for the Randall-Sundrum Gravitons, the same-sign dileptons and the trileptons searches. No significant excess of data over the predicted background is observed.

  8. Mineral vein dynamics modelling (FRACS II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urai, J.; Virgo, S.; Arndt, M.

    2016-08-01

    The Mineral Vein Dynamics Modeling group ''FRACS'' started out as a team of 7 research groups in its first phase and continued with a team of 5 research groups at the Universities of Aachen, Tuebingen, Karlsruhe, Mainz and Glasgow during its second phase ''FRACS 11''. The aim of the group was to develop an advanced understanding of the interplay between fracturing, fluid flow and fracture healing with a special emphasis on the comparison of field data and numerical models. Field areas comprised the Oman mountains in Oman (which where already studied in detail in the first phase), a siliciclastic sequence in the Internal Ligurian Units in Italy (closed to Sestri Levante) and cores of Zechstein carbonates from a Lean Gas reservoir in Northern Germany. Numerical models of fracturing, sealing and interaction with fluid that were developed in phase I where expanded in phase 11. They were used to model small scale fracture healing by crystal growth and the resulting influence on flow, medium scale fracture healing and its influence on successive fracturing and healing, as well as large scale dynamic fluid flow through opening and closing fractures and channels as a function of fluid overpressure. The numerical models were compared with structures in the field and we were able to identify first proxies for mechanical vein-hostrock properties and fluid overpressures versus tectonic stresses. Finally we propose a new classification of stylolites based on numerical models and observations in the Zechstein cores and continued to develop a new stress inversion tool to use stylolites to estimate depth of their formation.

  9. Mineral vein dynamics modelling (FRACS II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urai, J.; Virgo, S.; Arndt, M. [RWTH Aachen (Germany); and others

    2016-08-15

    The Mineral Vein Dynamics Modeling group ''FRACS'' started out as a team of 7 research groups in its first phase and continued with a team of 5 research groups at the Universities of Aachen, Tuebingen, Karlsruhe, Mainz and Glasgow during its second phase ''FRACS 11''. The aim of the group was to develop an advanced understanding of the interplay between fracturing, fluid flow and fracture healing with a special emphasis on the comparison of field data and numerical models. Field areas comprised the Oman mountains in Oman (which where already studied in detail in the first phase), a siliciclastic sequence in the Internal Ligurian Units in Italy (closed to Sestri Levante) and cores of Zechstein carbonates from a Lean Gas reservoir in Northern Germany. Numerical models of fracturing, sealing and interaction with fluid that were developed in phase I where expanded in phase 11. They were used to model small scale fracture healing by crystal growth and the resulting influence on flow, medium scale fracture healing and its influence on successive fracturing and healing, as well as large scale dynamic fluid flow through opening and closing fractures and channels as a function of fluid overpressure. The numerical models were compared with structures in the field and we were able to identify first proxies for mechanical vein-hostrock properties and fluid overpressures versus tectonic stresses. Finally we propose a new classification of stylolites based on numerical models and observations in the Zechstein cores and continued to develop a new stress inversion tool to use stylolites to estimate depth of their formation.

  10. NGC1300 dynamics - II. The response models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalapotharakos, C.; Patsis, P. A.; Grosbøl, P.

    2010-10-01

    We study the stellar response in a spectrum of potentials describing the barred spiral galaxy NGC1300. These potentials have been presented in a previous paper and correspond to three different assumptions as regards the geometry of the galaxy. For each potential we consider a wide range of Ωp pattern speed values. Our goal is to discover the geometries and the Ωp supporting specific morphological features of NGC1300. For this purpose we use the method of response models. In order to compare the images of NGC1300 with the density maps of our models, we define a new index which is a generalization of the Hausdorff distance. This index helps us to find out quantitatively which cases reproduce specific features of NGC1300 in an objective way. Furthermore, we construct alternative models following a Schwarzschild-type technique. By this method we vary the weights of the various energy levels, and thus the orbital contribution of each energy, in order to minimize the differences between the response density and that deduced from the surface density of the galaxy, under certain assumptions. We find that the models corresponding to Ωp ~ 16 and 22 kms-1kpc-1 are able to reproduce efficiently certain morphological features of NGC1300, with each one having its advantages and drawbacks. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Chile: programme ESO 69.A-0021. E-mail: ckalapot@phys.uoa.gr (CK); patsis@academyofathens.gr (PAP); pgrosbol@eso.org (PG)

  11. Ultra-large distance modification of gravity from Lorentz symmetry breaking at the Planck scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorbunov, Dmitry S.; Sibiryakov, Sergei M.

    2005-01-01

    We present an extension of the Randall-Sundrum model in which, due to spontaneous Lorentz symmetry breaking, graviton mixes with bulk vector fields and becomes quasilocalized. The masses of KK modes comprising the four-dimensional graviton are naturally exponentially small. This allows to push the Lorentz breaking scale to as high as a few tenth of the Planck mass. The model does not contain ghosts or tachyons and does not exhibit the van Dam-Veltman-Zakharov discontinuity. The gravitational attraction between static point masses becomes gradually weaker with increasing of separation and gets replaced by repulsion (antigravity) at exponentially large distances

  12. Ultra-large distance modification of gravity from Lorentz symmetry breaking at the Planck scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorbunov, Dmitry S. [Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 60th October Anniversary prospect, 7a, 117312 Moscow (Russian Federation); Sibiryakov, Sergei M. [Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 60th October Anniversary prospect, 7a, 117312 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2005-09-15

    We present an extension of the Randall-Sundrum model in which, due to spontaneous Lorentz symmetry breaking, graviton mixes with bulk vector fields and becomes quasilocalized. The masses of KK modes comprising the four-dimensional graviton are naturally exponentially small. This allows to push the Lorentz breaking scale to as high as a few tenth of the Planck mass. The model does not contain ghosts or tachyons and does not exhibit the van Dam-Veltman-Zakharov discontinuity. The gravitational attraction between static point masses becomes gradually weaker with increasing of separation and gets replaced by repulsion (antigravity) at exponentially large distances.

  13. Cosmic microwave background radiation anisotropies in brane worlds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Kazuya

    2003-11-28

    We propose a new formulation to calculate the cosmic microwave background (CMB) spectrum in the Randall-Sundrum two-brane model based on recent progress in solving the bulk geometry using a low energy approximation. The evolution of the anisotropic stress imprinted on the brane by the 5D Weyl tensor is calculated. An impact of the dark radiation perturbation on the CMB spectrum is investigated in a simple model assuming an initially scale-invariant adiabatic perturbation. The dark radiation perturbation induces isocurvature perturbations, but the resultant spectrum can be quite different from the prediction of simple mixtures of adiabatic and isocurvature perturbations due to Weyl anisotropic stress.

  14. Simulation modeling and analysis in safety. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayoub, M.A.

    1981-01-01

    The paper introduces and illustrates simulation modeling as a viable approach for dealing with complex issues and decisions in safety and health. The author details two studies: evaluation of employee exposure to airborne radioactive materials and effectiveness of the safety organization. The first study seeks to define a policy to manage a facility used in testing employees for radiation contamination. An acceptable policy is one that would permit the testing of all employees as defined under regulatory requirements, while not exceeding available resources. The second study evaluates the relationship between safety performance and the characteristics of the organization, its management, its policy, and communication patterns among various functions and levels. Both studies use models where decisions are reached based on the prevailing conditions and occurrence of key events within the simulation environment. Finally, several problem areas suitable for simulation studies are highlighted. (Auth.)

  15. System modeling and simulation at EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dean, E.M.; Lehto, W.K.; Larson, H.A.

    1986-01-01

    The codes being developed and verified using EBR-II data are the NATDEMO, DSNP and CSYRED. NATDEMO is a variation of the Westinghouse DEMO code coupled to the NATCON code previously used to simulate perturbations of reactor flow and inlet temperature and loss-of-flow transients leading to natural convection in EBR-II. CSYRED uses the Continuous System Modeling Program (CSMP) to simulate the EBR-II core, including power, temperature, control-rod movement reactivity effects and flow and is used primarily to model reactivity induced power transients. The Dynamic Simulator for Nuclear Power Plants (DSNP) allows a whole plant, thermal-hydraulic simulation using specific component and system models called from libraries. It has been used to simulate flow coastdown transients, reactivity insertion events and balance-of-plant perturbations

  16. Argonne Bubble Experiment Thermal Model Development II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buechler, Cynthia Eileen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-07-01

    This report describes the continuation of the work reported in “Argonne Bubble Experiment Thermal Model Development”. The experiment was performed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in 2014. A rastered 35 MeV electron beam deposited power in a solution of uranyl sulfate, generating heat and radiolytic gas bubbles. Irradiations were performed at three beam power levels, 6, 12 and 15 kW. Solution temperatures were measured by thermocouples, and gas bubble behavior was observed. This report will describe the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model that was developed to calculate the temperatures and gas volume fractions in the solution vessel during the irradiations. The previous report described an initial analysis performed on a geometry that had not been updated to reflect the as-built solution vessel. Here, the as-built geometry is used. Monte-Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) calculations were performed on the updated geometry, and these results were used to define the power deposition profile for the CFD analyses, which were performed using Fluent, Ver. 16.2. CFD analyses were performed for the 12 and 15 kW irradiations, and further improvements to the model were incorporated, including the consideration of power deposition in nearby vessel components, gas mixture composition, and bubble size distribution. The temperature results of the CFD calculations are compared to experimental measurements.

  17. Horns Rev II, 2-D Model Tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Lykke; Frigaard, Peter

    This report present the results of 2D physical model tests carried out in the shallow wave flume at Dept. of Civil Engineering, Aalborg University (AAU), on behalf of Energy E2 A/S part of DONG Energy A/S, Denmark. The objective of the tests was: to investigate the combined influence of the pile...... diameter to water depth ratio and the wave hight to water depth ratio on wave run-up of piles. The measurements should be used to design access platforms on piles....

  18. PEP-II vacuum system pressure profile modeling using EXCEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nordby, M.; Perkins, C.

    1994-06-01

    A generic, adaptable Microsoft EXCEL program to simulate molecular flow in beam line vacuum systems is introduced. Modeling using finite-element approximation of the governing differential equation is discussed, as well as error estimation and program capabilities. The ease of use and flexibility of the spreadsheet-based program is demonstrated. PEP-II vacuum system models are reviewed and compared with analytical models

  19. Search for extra dimensions using diphoton events in 7 TeV proton-proton collisions with the ATLAS detector

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Chudoba, Jiří; Gallus, Petr; Gunther, Jaroslav; Hruška, I.; Juránek, Vojtěch; Kepka, Oldřich; Kupčo, Alexander; Kůs, Vlastimil; Lipinský, L.; Lokajíček, Miloš; Marčišovský, Michal; Mikeštíková, Marcela; Myška, Miroslav; Němeček, Stanislav; Panušková, M.; Růžička, Pavel; Schovancová, Jaroslava; Šícho, Petr; Staroba, Pavel; Svatoš, Michal; Taševský, Marek; Tic, Tomáš; Valenta, J.; Vrba, Václav; Zeman, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 710, 4-5 (2012), s. 538-556 ISSN 0370-2693 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LA08032 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100502 Keywords : graviton mass * Planck scale * p p scattering * ATLAS * Randall-Sundrum model * space-time: higher-dimensional * CERN LHC Coll * mass Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 4.569, year: 2012 http://www. science direct.com/ science /article/pii/S0370269312002869

  20. Particle creation and reheating in a braneworld inflationary scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilić, Neven; Domazet, Silvije; Djordjevic, Goran S.

    2017-10-01

    We study the cosmological particle creation in the tachyon inflation based on the D-brane dynamics in the Randall-Sundrum (RSII) model extended to include matter in the bulk. The presence of matter modifies the warp factor which results in two effects: a modification of the RSII cosmology and a modification of the tachyon potential. Besides, a string theory D-brane supports among other fields a U(1) gauge field reflecting open strings attached to the brane. We demonstrate how the interaction of the tachyon with the U(1) gauge field drives cosmological creation of massless particles and estimate the resulting reheating at the end of inflation.

  1. Rotating black string and the effective Teukolsky equation in the braneworld

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanno, Sugumi; Soda, Jiro

    2004-01-01

    In the Randall-Sundrum two-brane (RS1) model, a large Kerr black hole on the brane can be naturally identified with a section of a rotating black string. To estimate Kaluza-Klein (KK) corrections on gravitational waves emitted by perturbed rotating black strings, we give the effective Teukolsky equation on the brane, which is a separable equation and hence numerically manageable. In this process, we derive the master equation for the electric part of the Weyl tensor, E μν , which is also useful in discussing the transition from black strings to localized black holes triggered by Gregory-Laflamme instability

  2. Radion cosmology and stabilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, Sumanta; SenGupta, Soumitra

    2014-01-01

    We solve the Einstein equation in five-dimensional space-time for Randall-Sundrum Brane world model with time dependent radion field to study the variation of brane scale factor with time. We have shown that as the radion field decreases with time compactifying the extra dimension, the scale factor increases exponentially with time leading to an inflationary scenario. We have also proposed a time dependent generalization of the Goldberger-Wise moduli stabilization mechanism to explain the time evolution of the radion field to reach a stable value, after which the scale factor on the brane exits from inflationary expansion. (orig.)

  3. Cosmic no-hair theorem with a varying cosmological constant on brane scenario

    CERN Document Server

    Chakraborty, S

    2002-01-01

    In this work, we have studied cosmic no-hair theorem for homogeneous anisotropic Bianchi models with a varying cosmological constant (LAMBDA) in Randall-Sundrum braneworld-type scenarios. The matter fields are confined over the 3-brane onto which the five-dimensional Weyl tensor has a non-vanishing projection. The variation of LAMBDA is taken to be the recently proposed form of Vishwakarma and its generalization. In the first case, the universe will isotropize after power-law inflation while there is exponential expansion in the second case.

  4. Computing Models of CDF and D0 in Run II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lammel, S.

    1997-05-01

    The next collider run of the Fermilab Tevatron, Run II, is scheduled for autumn of 1999. Both experiments, the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) and the D0 experiment are being modified to cope with the higher luminosity and shorter bunchspacing of the Tevatron. New detector components, higher event complexity, and an increased data volume require changes from the data acquisition systems up to the analysis systems. In this paper we present a summary of the computing models of the two experiments for Run II

  5. Computing Models of CDF and D0 in Run II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lammel, S.

    1997-01-01

    The next collider run of the Fermilab Tevatron, Run II, is scheduled for autumn of 1999. Both experiments, the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) and the D0 experiment are being modified to cope with the higher luminosity and shorter bunch spacing of the Tevatron. New detector components, higher event complexity, and an increased data volume require changes from the data acquisition systems up to the analysis systems. In this paper we present a summary of the computing models of the two experiments for Run II

  6. Modeling Fe II Emission and Revised Fe II (UV) Empirical Templates for the Seyfert 1 Galaxy I Zw 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruhweiler, F.; Verner, E.

    2008-03-01

    We use the narrow-lined broad-line region (BLR) of the Seyfert 1 galaxy, I Zw 1, as a laboratory for modeling the ultraviolet (UV) Fe II 2100-3050 Å emission complex. We calculate a grid of Fe II emission spectra representative of BLR clouds and compare them with the observed I Zw 1 spectrum. Our predicted spectrum for log [nH/(cm -3) ] = 11.0, log [ΦH/(cm -2 s-1) ] = 20.5, and ξ/(1 km s-1) = 20, using Cloudy and an 830 level model atom for Fe II with energies up to 14.06 eV, gives a better fit to the UV Fe II emission than models with fewer levels. Our analysis indicates (1) the observed UV Fe II emission must be corrected for an underlying Fe II pseudocontinuum; (2) Fe II emission peaks can be misidentified as that of other ions in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with narrow-lined BLRs possibly affecting deduced physical parameters; (3) the shape of 4200-4700 Å Fe II emission in I Zw 1 and other AGNs is a relative indicator of narrow-line region (NLR) and BLR Fe II emission; (4) predicted ratios of Lyα, C III], and Fe II emission relative to Mg II λ2800 agree with extinction corrected observed I Zw 1 fluxes, except for C IV λ1549 (5) the sensitivity of Fe II emission strength to microturbulence ξ casts doubt on existing relative Fe/Mg abundances derived from Fe II (UV)/Mg II flux ratios. Our calculated Fe II emission spectra, suitable for BLRs in AGNs, are available at http://iacs.cua.edu/people/verner/FeII. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 05-26555.

  7. SDSS-II: Determination of shape and color parameter coefficients for SALT-II fit model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dojcsak, L.; Marriner, J.; /Fermilab

    2010-08-01

    In this study we look at the SALT-II model of Type IA supernova analysis, which determines the distance moduli based on the known absolute standard candle magnitude of the Type IA supernovae. We take a look at the determination of the shape and color parameter coefficients, {alpha} and {beta} respectively, in the SALT-II model with the intrinsic error that is determined from the data. Using the SNANA software package provided for the analysis of Type IA supernovae, we use a standard Monte Carlo simulation to generate data with known parameters to use as a tool for analyzing the trends in the model based on certain assumptions about the intrinsic error. In order to find the best standard candle model, we try to minimize the residuals on the Hubble diagram by calculating the correct shape and color parameter coefficients. We can estimate the magnitude of the intrinsic errors required to obtain results with {chi}{sup 2}/degree of freedom = 1. We can use the simulation to estimate the amount of color smearing as indicated by the data for our model. We find that the color smearing model works as a general estimate of the color smearing, and that we are able to use the RMS distribution in the variables as one method of estimating the correct intrinsic errors needed by the data to obtain the correct results for {alpha} and {beta}. We then apply the resultant intrinsic error matrix to the real data and show our results.

  8. Spike Neural Models Part II: Abstract Neural Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson, Melissa G.

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Neurons are complex cells that require a lot of time and resources to model completely. In spiking neural networks (SNN though, not all that complexity is required. Therefore simple, abstract models are often used. These models save time, use less computer resources, and are easier to understand. This tutorial presents two such models: Izhikevich's model, which is biologically realistic in the resulting spike trains but not in the parameters, and the Leaky Integrate and Fire (LIF model which is not biologically realistic but does quickly and easily integrate input to produce spikes. Izhikevich's model is based on Hodgkin-Huxley's model but simplified such that it uses only two differentiation equations and four parameters to produce various realistic spike patterns. LIF is based on a standard electrical circuit and contains one equation. Either of these two models, or any of the many other models in literature can be used in a SNN. Choosing a neural model is an important task that depends on the goal of the research and the resources available. Once a model is chosen, network decisions such as connectivity, delay, and sparseness, need to be made. Understanding neural models and how they are incorporated into the network is the first step in creating a SNN.

  9. Theoretical models for Type I and Type II supernova

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woosley, S.E.; Weaver, T.A.

    1985-01-01

    Recent theoretical progress in understanding the origin and nature of Type I and Type II supernovae is discussed. New Type II presupernova models characterized by a variety of iron core masses at the time of collapse are presented and the sensitivity to the reaction rate 12 C(α,γ) 16 O explained. Stars heavier than about 20 M/sub solar/ must explode by a ''delayed'' mechanism not directly related to the hydrodynamical core bounce and a subset is likely to leave black hole remnants. The isotopic nucleosynthesis expected from these massive stellar explosions is in striking agreement with the sun. Type I supernovae result when an accreting white dwarf undergoes a thermonuclear explosion. The critical role of the velocity of the deflagration front in determining the light curve, spectrum, and, especially, isotopic nucleosynthesis in these models is explored. 76 refs., 8 figs

  10. Anisotropic Bianchi II cosmological models with matter and electromagnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, D.

    1978-01-01

    A class of solutions of Einstein-Maxwell equations is presented, which corresponds to anisotropic Bianchi II spatially homogeneous cosmological models with perfect fluid and electromagnetic field. A particular model is examined and shown to be unstable for perturbations of the electromagnetic field strength parameter about a particular value. This value defines a limiar unstable case in which the ratio epsilon, of the fluid density to the e.m. energy density is monotonically increasing with a minimum finite value at the singularity. Beyond this limiar, the model has a matter dominated singularity, and a characteristic stage appears where epsilon has a minimum, at a finite time from the singularity. For large times, the models tend to an exact solution for zero electromagnetic field and fluid with p = (1/5)p. Some cosmological features of the models are calculated, as the effect of anisotropy on matter density and expansion time scale factors, as compared to the corresponding Friedmann model [pt

  11. An Analysis Plan for the ARCOMS II (Armor Combat Operations Model Support II) Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-06-01

    In order to facilitate Armor Combat Modeling, the data analysis shculd focus upon the methods which transform the data intc descriptive or predictive ...discussed in Chapter III tc predict the Farameter for probability of detection in time ŕt. This should be compared with the results of the N.4gh -t Vision...J 6A 46.) I-I 0 f U-CL 0~ z o -Z 06 09 03 v 0 0 SJldnYS 10 ON Ipgr Cp o LSTm n at emn itgas 4AA rI z ;A (AZ - 090.0 UlA0 -O ON 404 Fiur CAd &P CC

  12. Exploring extra dimensions with scalar fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Katherine; Mathur, Harsh; Verostek, Mike

    2018-05-01

    This paper provides a pedagogical introduction to the physics of extra dimensions by examining the behavior of scalar fields in three landmark models: the ADD, Randall-Sundrum, and DGP spacetimes. Results of this analysis provide qualitative insights into the corresponding behavior of gravitational fields and elementary particles in each of these models. In these "brane world" models, the familiar four dimensional spacetime of everyday experience is called the brane and is a slice through a higher dimensional spacetime called the bulk. The particles and fields of the standard model are assumed to be confined to the brane, while gravitational fields are assumed to propagate in the bulk. For all three spacetimes, we calculate the spectrum of propagating scalar wave modes and the scalar field produced by a static point source located on the brane. For the ADD and Randall-Sundrum models, at large distances, the field looks like that of a point source in four spacetime dimensions, but at short distances, it crosses over to a form appropriate to the higher dimensional spacetime. For the DGP model, the field has the higher dimensional form at long distances rather than short. The behavior of these scalar fields, derived using only undergraduate level mathematics, closely mirror the results that one would obtain by performing the far more difficult task of analyzing the behavior of gravitational fields in these spacetimes.

  13. Kinetic modelling for zinc (II) ions biosorption onto Luffa cylindrica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oboh, I.; Aluyor, E.; Audu, T.

    2015-01-01

    The biosorption of Zinc (II) ions onto a biomaterial - Luffa cylindrica has been studied. This biomaterial was characterized by elemental analysis, surface area, pore size distribution, scanning electron microscopy, and the biomaterial before and after sorption, was characterized by Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR) spectrometer. The kinetic nonlinear models fitted were Pseudo-first order, Pseudo-second order and Intra-particle diffusion. A comparison of non-linear regression method in selecting the kinetic model was made. Four error functions, namely coefficient of determination (R 2 ), hybrid fractional error function (HYBRID), average relative error (ARE), and sum of the errors squared (ERRSQ), were used to predict the parameters of the kinetic models. The strength of this study is that a biomaterial with wide distribution particularly in the tropical world and which occurs as waste material could be put into effective utilization as a biosorbent to address a crucial environmental problem

  14. Search with the CMS detector for heavy resonances decaying into an electron pair

    CERN Document Server

    Clerbaux, Barbara; Collard, Caroline; Miné, Philippe

    2006-01-01

    This note presents the CMS experiment potential to discover heavy resonances decaying into an electron-positron pair, such as Kaluza-Klein excitations of a Z or graviton boson predicted in extra dimension models (the TeV^-1 model and the Randall-Sundrum model), or as neutral heavy Z' boson predicted by Grand Unified Theories. Full and fast simulation and reconstruction are used to investigate these productions, with the pileup condition corresponding to a luminosity equal to 2 times 10^ 33; mathrm cm ^ -2 mathrm s ^ -1 . For an integrated luminosity of 60 fbinv, a 5 sigma discovery limit has been obtained for a mass of 5.9 tevct in the case of Kaluza-Klein excitation Z boson production. For the Randall-Sundrum graviton production, the limit is found for graviton masses of 1.8 tevct with a coupling parameter constant c=0.01 and 4.1 tevct for c=0.1 . For the six Z' models considered here, the 5 sigma discovery limit ranges for masses from 3.6 tevct (rm Z_psi) to 4.6 tevct (rm Z_ALRM).

  15. Search for Radions at LEP2

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Amaral, P.; Anagnostou, G.; Anderson, K.J.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Bailey, I.; Barberio, E.; Barillari, T.; Barlow, R.J.; Batley, R.J.; Bechtle, P.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bell, P.J.; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Benelli, G.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Boeriu, O.; Bock, P.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Campana, S.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, D.G.; Ciocca, C.; Csilling, A.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Donkers, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, John William; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giunta, Marina; Goldberg, J.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gunther, P.O.; Gupta, A.; Hajdu, C.; Hamann, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Harel, A.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Horvath, D.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jeremie, H.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanzaki, J.; Karlen, D.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kramer, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kuhl, T.; Kupper, M.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Lellouch, D.; Lettso, J.; Levinson, L.; Lillich, J.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, A.; Ludwig, J.; Mader, W.; Marcellini, S.; Martin, A.J.; Masetti, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McKenna, J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menges, W.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, Niels T.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mohr, W.; Mori, T.; Mutter, A.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Nanjo, H.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oh, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pahl, C.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Pooth, O.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rabbertz, K.; Rembser, C.; Renkel, P.; Roney, J.M.; Rossi, A.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sarkisyan, E.K.G.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schorner-Sadenius, T.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Sherwood, P.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spano, F.; Stahl, A.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Tarem, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Teuscher, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Toya, D.; Tran, P.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Ujvari, B.; Vollmer, C.F.; Vannerem, P.; Vertesi, R.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zer-Zion, D.; Zivkovic, Lidija

    2005-01-01

    A new scalar resonance, called the radion, with couplings to fermions and bosons similar to those of the Higgs boson, is predicted in the framework of Randall-Sundrum models, proposed solutions to the hierarchy problem with one extra dimension. An important distinction between the radion and the Higgs boson is that the radion would couple directly to gluon pairs, and in particular its decay products would include a significant fraction of gluon jets. The radion had the same quantum numbers as the Standard Model (SM) Higgs boson, and therefore they can mix, with the resulting mass eigenstates having properties different from those of the SM Higgs boson. Existing searches for the Higgs boson are sensitive to the possible production and decay of radions and Higgs bosons in these models. For the first time, searches for the SM Higgs boson and flavour-independent and decay-mode independent searches for a neutral Higgs boson are used in combination to explore the parameter space of the Randall-Sundrum model. In the...

  16. Brane big bang brought on by a bulk bubble

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gen, Uchida; Ishibashi, Akihiro; Tanaka, Takahiro

    2002-01-01

    We propose an alternative inflationary universe scenario in the context of Randall-Sundrum braneworld cosmology. In this new scenario the existence of extra dimension(s) plays an essential role. First, the brane universe is initially in the inflationary phase driven by the effective cosmological constant induced by a small mismatch between the vacuum energy in the five-dimensional bulk and the brane tension. This mismatch arises since the bulk is initially in a false vacuum. Then, false vacuum decay occurs, nucleating a true vacuum bubble with negative energy inside the bulk. The nucleated bubble expands in the bulk and consequently hits the brane, causing a hot big-bang brane universe of the Randall-Sundrum type. Here, the termination of the inflationary phase is due to the change of the bulk vacuum energy. The bubble kinetic energy heats up the universe. As a simple realization, we propose a model in which we assume an interaction between the brane and the bubble. We derive the constraints on the model parameters taking into account the following requirements: solving the flatness problem, no force which prohibits the bubble from colliding with the brane, a sufficiently high reheating temperature for the standard nucleosynthesis to work, and the recovery of Newton's law up to 1 mm. We find that a fine-tuning is needed in order to satisfy the first and the second requirements simultaneously, although the other constraints are satisfied in a wide range of the model parameters

  17. Modeling the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule II using non-parametric item response models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo-Garre, Francisca; Hidalgo, María Dolores; Guilera, Georgina; Pino, Oscar; Rojo, J Emilio; Gómez-Benito, Juana

    2015-03-01

    The World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule II (WHO-DAS II) is a multidimensional instrument developed for measuring disability. It comprises six domains (getting around, self-care, getting along with others, life activities and participation in society). The main purpose of this paper is the evaluation of the psychometric properties for each domain of the WHO-DAS II with parametric and non-parametric Item Response Theory (IRT) models. A secondary objective is to assess whether the WHO-DAS II items within each domain form a hierarchy of invariantly ordered severity indicators of disability. A sample of 352 patients with a schizophrenia spectrum disorder is used in this study. The 36 items WHO-DAS II was administered during the consultation. Partial Credit and Mokken scale models are used to study the psychometric properties of the questionnaire. The psychometric properties of the WHO-DAS II scale are satisfactory for all the domains. However, we identify a few items that do not discriminate satisfactorily between different levels of disability and cannot be invariantly ordered in the scale. In conclusion the WHO-DAS II can be used to assess overall disability in patients with schizophrenia, but some domains are too general to assess functionality in these patients because they contain items that are not applicable to this pathology. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Search for high-mass dielectron resonances with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Heim, Sarah; Pope, Bernard; Pratt, Scott; Repko, Wayne; Mahanti, Bhanu

    This thesis describes a search for new heavy particles decaying into electron-positron pairs. The search utilizes 1.08 inverse femtobarn of proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of sqrt(s) = 7 TeV, produced in 2011 by the Large Hadron Collider and recorded with the ATLAS detector at the CERN laboratory in Switzerland. The reconstructed dielectron invariant mass spectrum is compared to Standard Model expectations. Since no significant excess is found, upper limits on the cross-section times branching ratio of Z' bosons and Randall-Sundrum gravitons are determined at the 95% confidence level using a Bayesian approach. These limits are combined with limits obtained by a parallel analysis in the muon channel and converted into lower limits on the masses of the Sequential Standard Model Z' boson (1.88 TeV), E6 Z' bosons (1.54 - 1.68 TeV) as well as the Randall-Sundrum graviton (1.67 TeV for k/MPl = 0.1).

  19. Search for dilepton resonances in pp collisions at √s=7 TeV with the ATLAS detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

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Zolnierowski, Y; Zsenei, A; zur Nedden, M; Zutshi, V; Zwalinski, L

    2011-12-30

    This Letter reports on a search for narrow high-mass resonances decaying into dilepton final states. The data were recorded by the ATLAS experiment in pp collisions at √s=7  TeV at the Large Hadron Collider and correspond to a total integrated luminosity of 1.08 (1.21)  fb(-1) in the e(+)e(-) (μ(+)μ(-)) channel. No statistically significant excess above the standard model expectation is observed and upper limits are set at the 95% C.L. on the cross section times branching fraction of Z' resonances and Randall-Sundrum gravitons decaying into dileptons as a function of the resonance mass. A lower mass limit of 1.83 TeV on the sequential standard model Z' boson is set. A Randall-Sundrum graviton with coupling k/M(Pl)=0.1 is excluded at 95% C.L. for masses below 1.63 TeV.

  20. Modelling of the PROTO-II crossover network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proulx, G.A.; Lackner, H.; Spence, P.; Wright, T.P.

    1985-01-01

    In order to drive a double ring, symmetrically fed bremsstrahlung diode, the PROTO II accelerator was redesigned. The radially converging triplate water line was reconfigured to drive two radial converging triplate lines in parallel. The four output lines were connected to the two input lines via an electrically enclosed tubular crossover network. Low-voltage Time Domain Reflectrometry (TDR) experiments were conducted on a full scale water immersed model of one section of the crossover network as an aid in this design. A lumped element analysis of the power flow through the network was inadequate in explaining the observed wave transmission and reflection characteristics. A more detailed analysis was performed with a circuit code in which we considered both localized lump-element and transmission line features of the crossover network. Experimental results of the model tests are given and compared with the circuit simulations. 7 figs

  1. System modeling of spent fuel transfers at EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imel, G.R.; Houshyar, A.

    1994-01-01

    The unloading of spent fuel from the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) for interim storage and subsequent processing in the Fuel Cycle Facility (FCF) is a multi-stage process, involving complex operations at a minimum of four different facilities at the Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) site. Each stage typically has complicated handling and/or cooling equipment that must be periodically maintained, leading to both planned and unplanned downtime. A program was initiated in October, 1993 to replace the 330 depleted uranium blanket subassemblies (S/As) with stainless steel reflectors. Routine operation of the reactor for fuels performance and materials testing occurred simultaneously in FY 1994 with the blanket unloading. In the summer of 1994, Congress dictated the October 1, 1994 shutdown of EBR-2. Consequently, all blanket S/As and fueled drivers will be removed from the reactor tank and replaced with stainless steel assemblies (which are needed to maintain a precise configuration within the grid so that the under sodium fuel handling equipment can function). A system modeling effort was conducted to determine the means to achieve the objective for the blanket and fuel unloading program, which under the current plan requires complete unloading of the primary tank of all fueled assemblies in 2 1/2 years. A simulation model of the fuel handling system at ANL-W was developed and used to analyze different unloading scenarios; the model has provided valuable information about required resources and modifications to equipment and procedures. This paper reports the results of this modeling effort

  2. Search for high-mass diphoton resonances in proton-proton collisions at 13 TeV and combination with 8 TeV search

    CERN Document Server

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Python, Quentin; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Parijs, Isis; Brun, Hugues; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Delannoy, Hugo; Fasanella, Giuseppe; Favart, Laurent; Goldouzian, Reza; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Karapostoli, Georgia; Lenzi, Thomas; Léonard, Alexandre; Luetic, Jelena; Maerschalk, Thierry; Marinov, Andrey; Randle-conde, Aidan; Seva, Tomislav; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Vannerom, David; Yonamine, Ryo; Zenoni, Florian; Zhang, Fengwangdong; Cimmino, Anna; Cornelis, Tom; Dobur, Didar; Fagot, Alexis; Garcia, Guillaume; Gul, Muhammad; Khvastunov, Illia; Poyraz, Deniz; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Schöfbeck, Robert; Sharma, Archana; Tytgat, Michael; Van Driessche, Ward; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Beluffi, Camille; Bondu, Olivier; Brochet, Sébastien; Bruno, Giacomo; Caudron, Adrien; De Visscher, Simon; Delaere, Christophe; Delcourt, Martin; Francois, Brieuc; Giammanco, Andrea; Jafari, Abideh; Jez, Pavel; Komm, Matthias; Krintiras, Georgios; Lemaitre, Vincent; Magitteri, Alessio; Mertens, Alexandre; Musich, Marco; Nuttens, Claude; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Quertenmont, Loic; Selvaggi, Michele; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Wertz, Sébastien; Beliy, Nikita; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Alves, Fábio Lúcio; Alves, Gilvan; Brito, Lucas; Hensel, Carsten; Moraes, Arthur; Pol, Maria Elena; Rebello Teles, Patricia; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, Ewerton; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Custódio, Analu; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Huertas Guativa, Lina Milena; Malbouisson, Helena; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Ahuja, Sudha; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; Dogra, Sunil; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Moon, Chang-Seong; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Romero Abad, David; Ruiz Vargas, José Cupertino; Aleksandrov, Aleksandar; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Glushkov, Ivan; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Fang, Wenxing; Ahmad, Muhammad; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Chen, Ye; Cheng, Tongguang; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Leggat, Duncan; Liu, Zhenan; Romeo, Francesco; Shaheen, Sarmad Masood; Spiezia, Aniello; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Chunjie; Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Huaqiao; Zhao, Jingzhou; Ban, Yong; Chen, Geng; Li, Qiang; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Xu, Zijun; Avila, Carlos; Cabrera, Andrés; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; González Hernández, Carlos Felipe; Ruiz Alvarez, José David; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Puljak, Ivica; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Sculac, Toni; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Ferencek, Dinko; Kadija, Kreso; Micanovic, Sasa; Sudic, Lucija; Susa, Tatjana; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Rykaczewski, Hans; Tsiakkouri, Demetra; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Carrera Jarrin, Edgar; Abdelalim, Ahmed Ali; El-khateeb, Esraa; Salama, Elsayed; Kadastik, Mario; Murumaa, Marion; Perrini, Lucia; Raidal, Martti; Tiko, Andres; Veelken, Christian; Eerola, Paula; Pekkanen, Juska; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Jarvinen, Terhi; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Wendland, Lauri; Talvitie, Joonas; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Couderc, Fabrice; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Favaro, Carlotta; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Ghosh, Saranya; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Kucher, Inna; Locci, Elizabeth; Machet, Martina; Malcles, Julie; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Titov, Maksym; Zghiche, Amina; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Antropov, Iurii; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Busson, Philippe; Cadamuro, Luca; Chapon, Emilien; Charlot, Claude; Davignon, Olivier; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Jo, Mihee; Lisniak, Stanislav; Miné, Philippe; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Ortona, Giacomo; Paganini, Pascal; Pigard, Philipp; Regnard, Simon; Salerno, Roberto; Sirois, Yves; Strebler, Thomas; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Zabi, Alexandre; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Aubin, Alexandre; Bloch, Daniel; Brom, Jean-Marie; Buttignol, Michael; Chabert, Eric Christian; Chanon, Nicolas; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Coubez, Xavier; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Skovpen, Kirill; Van Hove, Pierre; Gadrat, Sébastien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Bernet, Colin; Boudoul, Gaelle; Bouvier, Elvire; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Courbon, Benoit; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fan, Jiawei; Fay, Jean; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Grenier, Gérald; Ille, Bernard; Lagarde, Francois; Laktineh, Imad Baptiste; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Pequegnot, Anne-Laure; Perries, Stephane; Popov, Andrey; Sabes, David; Sordini, Viola; Vander Donckt, Muriel; Verdier, Patrice; Viret, Sébastien; Toriashvili, Tengizi; Tsamalaidze, Zviad; Autermann, Christian; Beranek, Sarah; Feld, Lutz; Heister, Arno; Kiesel, Maximilian Knut; Klein, Katja; Lipinski, Martin; Ostapchuk, Andrey; Preuten, Marius; Raupach, Frank; Schael, Stefan; Schomakers, Christian; Schulz, Johannes; Verlage, Tobias; Weber, Hendrik; Zhukov, Valery; Albert, Andreas; Brodski, Michael; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Endres, Matthias; Erdmann, Martin; Erdweg, Sören; Esch, Thomas; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hamer, Matthias; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Knutzen, Simon; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Millet, Philipp; Mukherjee, Swagata; Olschewski, Mark; Padeken, Klaas; Pook, Tobias; Radziej, Markus; Reithler, Hans; Rieger, Marcel; Scheuch, Florian; Sonnenschein, Lars; Teyssier, Daniel; Thüer, Sebastian; Cherepanov, Vladimir; Flügge, Günter; Hoehle, Felix; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Künsken, Andreas; Lingemann, Joschka; Müller, Thomas; Nehrkorn, Alexander; Nowack, Andreas; Nugent, Ian Michael; Pistone, Claudia; Pooth, Oliver; Stahl, Achim; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Arndt, Till; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Beernaert, Kelly; Behnke, Olaf; Behrens, Ulf; Bin Anuar, Afiq Aizuddin; Borras, Kerstin; Campbell, Alan; Connor, Patrick; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Costanza, Francesco; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Dolinska, Ganna; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Eichhorn, Thomas; Eren, Engin; Gallo, Elisabetta; Garay Garcia, Jasone; Geiser, Achim; Gizhko, Andrii; Grados Luyando, Juan Manuel; Gunnellini, Paolo; Harb, Ali; Hauk, Johannes; Hempel, Maria; Jung, Hannes; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Karacheban, Olena; Kasemann, Matthias; Keaveney, James; Kleinwort, Claus; Korol, Ievgen; Krücker, Dirk; Lange, Wolfgang; Lelek, Aleksandra; Leonard, Jessica; Lipka, Katerina; Lobanov, Artur; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Mankel, Rainer; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mittag, Gregor; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Ntomari, Eleni; Pitzl, Daniel; Placakyte, Ringaile; Raspereza, Alexei; Roland, Benoit; Sahin, Mehmet Özgür; Saxena, Pooja; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Seitz, Claudia; Spannagel, Simon; Stefaniuk, Nazar; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Walsh, Roberval; Wissing, Christoph; Blobel, Volker; Centis Vignali, Matteo; Draeger, Arne-Rasmus; Dreyer, Torben; Garutti, Erika; Gonzalez, Daniel; Haller, Johannes; Hoffmann, Malte; Junkes, Alexandra; Klanner, Robert; Kogler, Roman; Kovalchuk, Nataliia; Lapsien, Tobias; Lenz, Teresa; Marchesini, Ivan; Marconi, Daniele; Meyer, Mareike; Niedziela, Marek; Nowatschin, Dominik; Pantaleo, Felice; Peiffer, Thomas; Perieanu, Adrian; Poehlsen, Jennifer; Sander, Christian; Scharf, Christian; Schleper, Peter; Schmidt, Alexander; Schumann, Svenja; Schwandt, Joern; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Stöver, Marc; Tholen, Heiner; Troendle, Daniel; Usai, Emanuele; Vanelderen, Lukas; Vanhoefer, Annika; Vormwald, Benedikt; Akbiyik, Melike; Barth, Christian; Baur, Sebastian; Baus, Colin; Berger, Joram; Butz, Erik; Caspart, René; Chwalek, Thorsten; Colombo, Fabio; De Boer, Wim; Dierlamm, Alexander; Fink, Simon; Freund, Benedikt; Friese, Raphael; Giffels, Manuel; Gilbert, Andrew; Goldenzweig, Pablo; Haitz, Dominik; Hartmann, Frank; Heindl, Stefan Michael; Husemann, Ulrich; Katkov, Igor; Kudella, Simon; Lobelle Pardo, Patricia; Mildner, Hannes; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Müller, Thomas; Plagge, Michael; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Röcker, Steffen; Roscher, Frank; Schröder, Matthias; Shvetsov, Ivan; Sieber, Georg; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Ulrich, Ralf; Wagner-Kuhr, Jeannine; Wayand, Stefan; Weber, Marc; Weiler, Thomas; Williamson, Shawn; Wöhrmann, Clemens; Wolf, Roger; Anagnostou, Georgios; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Giakoumopoulou, Viktoria Athina; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Topsis-Giotis, Iasonas; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Tziaferi, Eirini; Evangelou, Ioannis; Flouris, Giannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Loukas, Nikitas; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paradas, Evangelos; Filipovic, Nicolas; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Horvath, Dezso; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Zsigmond, Anna Julia; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Karancsi, János; Makovec, Alajos; Molnar, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Bartók, Márton; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Bahinipati, Seema; Choudhury, Somnath; Mal, Prolay; Mandal, Koushik; Nayak, Aruna; Sahoo, Deepak Kumar; Sahoo, Niladribihari; Swain, Sanjay Kumar; Bansal, Sunil; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Chawla, Ridhi; Bhawandeep, Bhawandeep; Kalsi, Amandeep Kaur; Kaur, Anterpreet; Kaur, Manjit; Kumar, Ramandeep; Kumari, Priyanka; Mehta, Ankita; Mittal, Monika; Singh, Jasbir; Walia, Genius; Kumar, Ashok; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Garg, Rocky Bala; Keshri, Sumit; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Nishu, Nishu; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Ramkrishna; Sharma, Varun; Bhattacharya, Rajarshi; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Chatterjee, Kalyanmoy; Dey, Sourav; Dutt, Suneel; Dutta, Suchandra; Ghosh, Shamik; Majumdar, Nayana; Modak, Atanu; Mondal, Kuntal; Mukhopadhyay, Supratik; Nandan, Saswati; Purohit, Arnab; Roy, Ashim; Roy, Debarati; Roy Chowdhury, Suvankar; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Thakur, Shalini; Behera, Prafulla Kumar; Chudasama, Ruchi; Dutta, Dipanwita; Jha, Vishwajeet; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Netrakanti, Pawan Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Topkar, Anita; Aziz, Tariq; Dugad, Shashikant; Kole, Gouranga; Mahakud, Bibhuprasad; Mitra, Soureek; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Parida, Bibhuti; Sur, Nairit; Sutar, Bajrang; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Bhowmik, Sandeep; Dewanjee, Ram Krishna; Ganguly, Sanmay; Guchait, Monoranjan; Jain, Sandhya; Kumar, Sanjeev; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Sarkar, Tanmay; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Chauhan, Shubhanshu; Dube, Sourabh; Hegde, Vinay; Kapoor, Anshul; Kothekar, Kunal; Pandey, Shubham; Rane, Aditee; Sharma, Seema; Behnamian, Hadi; Chenarani, Shirin; Eskandari Tadavani, Esmaeel; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Fahim, Ali; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Naseri, Mohsen; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, Ferdos; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Felcini, Marta; Grunewald, Martin; Abbrescia, Marcello; Calabria, Cesare; Caputo, Claudio; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; Cristella, Leonardo; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; Miniello, Giorgia; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Radogna, Raffaella; Ranieri, Antonio; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Silvestris, Lucia; Venditti, Rosamaria; Verwilligen, Piet; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Battilana, Carlo; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Campanini, Renato; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Perrotta, Andrea; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Tosi, Nicolò; Albergo, Sebastiano; Costa, Salvatore; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Giordano, Ferdinando; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Viliani, Lorenzo; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Primavera, Federica; Calvelli, Valerio; Ferro, Fabrizio; Lo Vetere, Maurizio; Monge, Maria Roberta; Robutti, Enrico; Tosi, Silvano; Brianza, Luca; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Ghezzi, Alessio; Govoni, Pietro; Malberti, Martina; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Pigazzini, Simone; Ragazzi, Stefano; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Cavallo, Nicola; De Nardo, Guglielmo; Di Guida, Salvatore; Esposito, Marco; Fabozzi, Francesco; Fienga, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lanza, Giuseppe; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Sciacca, Crisostomo; Thyssen, Filip; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Benato, Lisa; Bisello, Dario; Boletti, Alessio; Carlin, Roberto; Carvalho Antunes De Oliveira, Alexandra; Checchia, Paolo; Dall'Osso, Martino; De Castro Manzano, Pablo; Dorigo, Tommaso; Dosselli, Umberto; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gasparini, Ugo; Gozzelino, Andrea; Lacaprara, Stefano; Margoni, Martino; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Pazzini, Jacopo; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Zanetti, Marco; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zumerle, Gianni; Braghieri, Alessandro; Magnani, Alice; Montagna, Paolo; Ratti, Sergio P; Re, Valerio; Riccardi, Cristina; Salvini, Paola; Vai, Ilaria; Vitulo, Paolo; Alunni Solestizi, Luisa; Bilei, Gian Mario; Ciangottini, Diego; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Leonardi, Roberto; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Saha, Anirban; Santocchia, Attilio; Androsov, Konstantin; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bernardini, Jacopo; Boccali, Tommaso; Castaldi, Rino; Ciocci, Maria Agnese; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Donato, Silvio; Fedi, Giacomo; Giassi, Alessandro; Grippo, Maria Teresa; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Spagnolo, Paolo; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; Cipriani, Marco; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Gelli, Simone; Longo, Egidio; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Marzocchi, Badder; Meridiani, Paolo; Organtini, Giovanni; Paramatti, Riccardo; Preiato, Federico; Rahatlou, Shahram; Rovelli, Chiara; Santanastasio, Francesco; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Bartosik, Nazar; Bellan, Riccardo; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Cenna, Francesca; Costa, Marco; Covarelli, Roberto; Degano, Alessandro; Demaria, Natale; Finco, Linda; Kiani, Bilal; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Monteil, Ennio; Monteno, Marco; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pacher, Luca; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Pinna Angioni, Gian Luca; Ravera, Fabio; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Shchelina, Ksenia; Sola, Valentina; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Traczyk, Piotr; Belforte, Stefano; Casarsa, Massimo; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Zanetti, Anna; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Min Suk; Lee, Sangeun; Lee, Seh Wook; Oh, Young Do; Sekmen, Sezen; Son, Dong-Chul; Yang, Yu Chul; Lee, Ari; Kim, Hyunchul; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Kim, Tae Jeong; Cho, Sungwoong; Choi, Suyong; Go, Yeonju; Gyun, Dooyeon; Ha, Seungkyu; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Youngkwon; Kim, Yongsun; Lee, Byounghoon; Lee, Kisoo; Lee, Kyong Sei; Lee, Songkyo; Lim, Jaehoon; Park, Sung Keun; Roh, Youn; Almond, John; Kim, Junho; Lee, Haneol; Oh, Sung Bin; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Seo, Seon-hee; Yang, Unki; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Yu, Geum Bong; Choi, Minkyoo; Kim, Hyunyong; Kim, Ji Hyun; Lee, Jason Sang Hun; Park, Inkyu; Ryu, Geonmo; Ryu, Min Sang; Choi, Young-Il; Goh, Junghwan; Hwang, Chanwook; Lee, Jongseok; Yu, Intae; Dudenas, Vytautas; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Vaitkus, Juozas; Ahmed, Ijaz; Ibrahim, Zainol Abidin; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Md Ali, Mohd Adli Bin; Mohamad Idris, Faridah; Wan Abdullah, Wan Ahmad Tajuddin; Yusli, Mohd Nizam; Zolkapli, Zukhaimira; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-De La Cruz, Ivan; Hernandez-Almada, Alberto; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Magaña Villalba, Ricardo; Mejia Guisao, Jhovanny; Sánchez Hernández, Alberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Carpinteyro, Severiano; Pedraza, Isabel; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Uribe Estrada, Cecilia; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Krofcheck, David; Butler, Philip H; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmad, Muhammad; Hassan, Qamar; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khan, Wajid Ali; Saddique, Asif; Shah, Mehar Ali; Shoaib, Muhammad; Waqas, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Bluj, Michal; Boimska, Bożena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Zalewski, Piotr; Bunkowski, Karol; Byszuk, Adrian; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Misiura, Maciej; Olszewski, Michal; Walczak, Marek; Bargassa, Pedrame; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, Cristóvão; Calpas, Betty; Di Francesco, Agostino; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Hollar, Jonathan; Leonardo, Nuno; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Nemallapudi, Mythra Varun; Rodrigues Antunes, Joao; Seixas, Joao; Toldaiev, Oleksii; Vadruccio, Daniele; Varela, Joao; Vischia, Pietro; Afanasiev, Serguei; Bunin, Pavel; Gavrilenko, Mikhail; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbunov, Ilya; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Matveev, Viktor; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Shmatov, Sergey; Shulha, Siarhei; Skatchkov, Nikolai; Smirnov, Vitaly; Voytishin, Nikolay; Zarubin, Anatoli; Chtchipounov, Leonid; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Sulimov, Valentin; Vorobyev, Alexey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Karneyeu, Anton; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Pozdnyakov, Ivan; Safronov, Grigory; Spiridonov, Alexander; Toms, Maria; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Bylinkin, Alexander; Chadeeva, Marina; Chistov, Ruslan; Polikarpov, Sergey; Rusinov, Vladimir; Zhemchugov, Evgenii; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Terkulov, Adel; Baskakov, Alexey; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Bunichev, Viacheslav; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Ershov, Alexander; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Miagkov, Igor; Obraztsov, Stepan; Petrushanko, Sergey; Savrin, Viktor; Snigirev, Alexander; Blinov, Vladimir; Skovpen, Yuri; Shtol, Dmitry; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Elumakhov, Dmitry; Kachanov, Vassili; Kalinin, Alexey; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Cirkovic, Predrag; Devetak, Damir; Dordevic, Milos; Milosevic, Jovan; Rekovic, Vladimir; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Barrio Luna, Mar; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Escalante Del Valle, Alberto; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Navarro De Martino, Eduardo; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, Antonio María; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Quintario Olmeda, Adrián; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Senghi Soares, Mara; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Missiroli, Marino; Moran, Dermot; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; González Fernández, Juan Rodrigo; Palencia Cortezon, Enrique; Sanchez Cruz, Sergio; Suárez Andrés, Ignacio; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Castiñeiras De Saa, Juan Ramon; Curras, Esteban; Fernandez, Marcos; Garcia-Ferrero, Juan; Gomez, Gervasio; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Matorras, Francisco; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Rodrigo, Teresa; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Trevisani, Nicolò; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Auzinger, Georg; Bachtis, Michail; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Bonato, Alessio; Botta, Cristina; Camporesi, Tiziano; Castello, Roberto; Cepeda, Maria; Cerminara, Gianluca; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; D'Enterria, David; Dabrowski, Anne; Daponte, Vincenzo; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; De Gruttola, Michele; De Roeck, Albert; Di Marco, Emanuele; Dobson, Marc; Dorney, Brian; Du Pree, Tristan; Duggan, Daniel; Dünser, Marc; Dupont, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Fartoukh, Stephane; Franzoni, Giovanni; Fulcher, Jonathan; Funk, Wolfgang; Gigi, Dominique; Gill, Karl; Girone, Maria; Glege, Frank; Gulhan, Doga; Gundacker, Stefan; Guthoff, Moritz; Hammer, Josef; Harris, Philip; Hegeman, Jeroen; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janot, Patrick; Kieseler, Jan; Kirschenmann, Henning; Knünz, Valentin; Kornmayer, Andreas; Kortelainen, Matti J; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Krammer, Manfred; Lange, Clemens; Lecoq, Paul; Lourenco, Carlos; Lucchini, Marco Toliman; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Martelli, Arabella; Meijers, Frans; Merlin, Jeremie Alexandre; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Milenovic, Predrag; Moortgat, Filip; Morovic, Srecko; Mulders, Martijn; Neugebauer, Hannes; Orfanelli, Styliani; Orsini, Luciano; Pape, Luc; Perez, Emmanuelle; Peruzzi, Marco; Petrilli, Achille; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Pierini, Maurizio; Racz, Attila; Reis, Thomas; Rolandi, Gigi; Rovere, Marco; Ruan, Manqi; Sakulin, Hannes; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Seidel, Markus; Sharma, Archana; Silva, Pedro; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Steggemann, Jan; Stoye, Markus; Takahashi, Yuta; Tosi, Mia; Treille, Daniel; Triossi, Andrea; Tsirou, Andromachi; Veckalns, Viesturs; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Verweij, Marta; Wardle, Nicholas; Wöhri, Hermine Katharina; Zagoździńska, Agnieszka; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Rohe, Tilman; Bachmair, Felix; Bäni, Lukas; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Casal, Bruno; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Donegà, Mauro; Grab, Christoph; Heidegger, Constantin; Hits, Dmitry; Hoss, Jan; Kasieczka, Gregor; Lecomte, Pierre; Lustermann, Werner; Mangano, Boris; Marionneau, Matthieu; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Masciovecchio, Mario; Meinhard, Maren Tabea; Meister, Daniel; Micheli, Francesco; Musella, Pasquale; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pandolfi, Francesco; Pata, Joosep; Pauss, Felicitas; Perrin, Gaël; Perrozzi, Luca; Quittnat, Milena; Rossini, Marco; Schönenberger, Myriam; Starodumov, Andrei; Tavolaro, Vittorio Raoul; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Wallny, Rainer; Aarrestad, Thea Klaeboe; Amsler, Claude; Caminada, Lea; Canelli, Maria Florencia; De Cosa, Annapaola; Galloni, Camilla; Hinzmann, Andreas; Hreus, Tomas; Kilminster, Benjamin; Ngadiuba, Jennifer; Pinna, Deborah; Rauco, Giorgia; Robmann, Peter; Salerno, Daniel; Yang, Yong; Zucchetta, Alberto; Candelise, Vieri; Doan, Thi Hien; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Konyushikhin, Maxim; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Lin, Willis; Lu, Yun-Ju; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Yu, Shin-Shan; Kumar, Arun; Chang, Paoti; Chang, You-Hao; Chang, Yu-Wei; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Chen, Po-Hsun; Dietz, Charles; Fiori, Francesco; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Hsiung, Yee; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Miñano Moya, Mercedes; Paganis, Efstathios; Psallidas, Andreas; Tsai, Jui-fa; Tzeng, Yeng-Ming; Asavapibhop, Burin; Singh, Gurpreet; Srimanobhas, Norraphat; Suwonjandee, Narumon; Adiguzel, Aytul; Cerci, Salim; Damarseckin, Serdal; Demiroglu, Zuhal Seyma; Dozen, Candan; Dumanoglu, Isa; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Guler, Yalcin; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Kara, Ozgun; Kayis Topaksu, Aysel; Kiminsu, Ugur; Oglakci, Mehmet; Onengut, Gulsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Sunar Cerci, Deniz; Tali, Bayram; Turkcapar, Semra; Zorbakir, Ibrahim Soner; Zorbilmez, Caglar; Bilin, Bugra; Bilmis, Selcuk; Isildak, Bora; Karapinar, Guler; Yalvac, Metin; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Gülmez, Erhan; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Yetkin, Elif Asli; Yetkin, Taylan; Cakir, Altan; Cankocak, Kerem; Sen, Sercan; Grynyov, Boris; Levchuk, Leonid; Sorokin, Pavel; Aggleton, Robin; Ball, Fionn; Beck, Lana; Brooke, James John; Burns, Douglas; Clement, Emyr; Cussans, David; Flacher, Henning; Goldstein, Joel; Grimes, Mark; Heath, Greg P; Heath, Helen F; Jacob, Jeson; Kreczko, Lukasz; Lucas, Chris; Newbold, Dave M; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Poll, Anthony; Sakuma, Tai; Seif El Nasr-storey, Sarah; Smith, Dominic; Smith, Vincent J; Bell, Ken W; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M; Calligaris, Luigi; Cieri, Davide; Cockerill, David JA; Coughlan, John A; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Thea, Alessandro; Tomalin, Ian R; Williams, Thomas; Baber, Mark; Bainbridge, Robert; Buchmuller, Oliver; Bundock, Aaron; Burton, Darren; Casasso, Stefano; Citron, Matthew; Colling, David; Corpe, Louie; Dauncey, Paul; Davies, Gavin; De Wit, Adinda; Della Negra, Michel; Di Maria, Riccardo; Dunne, Patrick; Elwood, Adam; Futyan, David; Haddad, Yacine; Hall, Geoffrey; Iles, Gregory; James, Thomas; Lane, Rebecca; Laner, Christian; Lucas, Robyn; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Malik, Sarah; Mastrolorenzo, Luca; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Pela, Joao; Penning, Bjoern; Pesaresi, Mark; Raymond, David Mark; Richards, Alexander; Rose, Andrew; Seez, Christopher; Summers, Sioni; Tapper, Alexander; Uchida, Kirika; Vazquez Acosta, Monica; Virdee, Tejinder; Wright, Jack; Zenz, Seth Conrad; Cole, Joanne; Hobson, Peter R; Khan, Akram; Kyberd, Paul; Leslie, Dawn; Reid, Ivan; Symonds, Philip; Teodorescu, Liliana; Turner, Mark; Borzou, Ahmad; Call, Kenneth; Dittmann, Jay; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Liu, Hongxuan; Pastika, Nathaniel; Cooper, Seth; Henderson, Conor; Rumerio, Paolo; West, Christopher; Arcaro, Daniel; Avetisyan, Aram; Bose, Tulika; Gastler, Daniel; Rankin, Dylan; Richardson, Clint; Rohlf, James; Sulak, Lawrence; Zou, David; Benelli, Gabriele; Berry, Edmund; Cutts, David; Garabedian, Alex; Hakala, John; Heintz, Ulrich; Hogan, Julie Managan; Jesus, Orduna; Kwok, Ka Hei Martin; Laird, Edward; Landsberg, Greg; Mao, Zaixing; Narain, Meenakshi; Piperov, Stefan; Sagir, Sinan; Spencer, Eric; Syarif, Rizki; Breedon, Richard; Breto, Guillermo; Burns, Dustin; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Chauhan, Sushil; Chertok, Maxwell; Conway, John; Conway, Rylan; Cox, Peter Timothy; Erbacher, Robin; Flores, Chad; Funk, Garrett; Gardner, Michael; Ko, Winston; Lander, Richard; Mclean, Christine; Mulhearn, Michael; Pellett, Dave; Pilot, Justin; Shalhout, Shalhout; Smith, John; Squires, Michael; Stolp, Dustin; Tripathi, Mani; Bravo, Cameron; Cousins, Robert; Dasgupta, Abhigyan; Everaerts, Pieter; Florent, Alice; Hauser, Jay; Ignatenko, Mikhail; Mccoll, Nickolas; Saltzberg, David; Schnaible, Christian; Takasugi, Eric; Valuev, Vyacheslav; Weber, Matthias; Burt, Kira; Clare, Robert; Ellison, John Anthony; Gary, J William; Ghiasi Shirazi, Seyyed Mohammad Amin; Hanson, Gail; Heilman, Jesse; Jandir, Pawandeep; Kennedy, Elizabeth; Lacroix, Florent; Long, Owen Rosser; Olmedo Negrete, Manuel; Paneva, Mirena Ivova; Shrinivas, Amithabh; Si, Weinan; Wei, Hua; Wimpenny, Stephen; Yates, Brent; Branson, James G; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Cittolin, Sergio; Derdzinski, Mark; Holzner, André; Klein, Daniel; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Letts, James; Macneill, Ian; Olivito, Dominick; Padhi, Sanjay; Pieri, Marco; Sani, Matteo; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Tadel, Matevz; Vartak, Adish; Wasserbaech, Steven; Welke, Charles; Wood, John; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Zevi Della Porta, Giovanni; Amin, Nick; Bhandari, Rohan; Bradmiller-Feld, John; Campagnari, Claudio; Dishaw, Adam; Dutta, Valentina; Franco Sevilla, Manuel; George, Christopher; Golf, Frank; Gouskos, Loukas; Gran, Jason; Heller, Ryan; Incandela, Joe; Mullin, Sam Daniel; Ovcharova, Ana; Qu, Huilin; Richman, Jeffrey; Stuart, David; Suarez, Indara; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Anderson, Dustin; Apresyan, Artur; Bendavid, Joshua; Bornheim, Adolf; Bunn, Julian; Chen, Yi; Duarte, Javier; Lawhorn, Jay Mathew; Mott, Alexander; Newman, Harvey B; Pena, Cristian; Spiropulu, Maria; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Xie, Si; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Andrews, Michael Benjamin; Azzolini, Virginia; Ferguson, Thomas; Paulini, Manfred; Russ, James; Sun, Menglei; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Weinberg, Marc; Cumalat, John Perry; Ford, William T; Jensen, Frank; Johnson, Andrew; Krohn, Michael; Mulholland, Troy; Stenson, Kevin; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Alexander, James; Chaves, Jorge; Chu, Jennifer; Dittmer, Susan; Mcdermott, Kevin; Mirman, Nathan; Nicolas Kaufman, Gala; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Rinkevicius, Aurelijus; Ryd, Anders; Skinnari, Louise; Soffi, Livia; Tan, Shao Min; Tao, Zhengcheng; Thom, Julia; Tucker, Jordan; Wittich, Peter; Zientek, Margaret; Winn, Dave; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Apollinari, Giorgio; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bauerdick, Lothar AT; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bolla, Gino; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Cihangir, Selcuk; Cremonesi, Matteo; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Fisk, Ian; Freeman, Jim; Gottschalk, Erik; Gray, Lindsey; Green, Dan; Grünendahl, Stefan; Gutsche, Oliver; Hare, Daryl; Harris, Robert M; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hirschauer, James; Hu, Zhen; Jayatilaka, Bodhitha; Jindariani, Sergo; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Klima, Boaz; Kreis, Benjamin; Lammel, Stephan; Linacre, Jacob; Lincoln, Don; Lipton, Ron; Liu, Tiehui; Lopes De Sá, Rafael; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Magini, Nicolo; Marraffino, John Michael; Maruyama, Sho; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; Merkel, Petra; Mrenna, Stephen; Nahn, Steve; Newman-Holmes, Catherine; O'Dell, Vivian; Pedro, Kevin; Prokofyev, Oleg; Rakness, Gregory; Ristori, Luciano; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Soha, Aron; Spalding, William J; Spiegel, Leonard; Stoynev, Stoyan; Strobbe, Nadja; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Tran, Nhan Viet; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vernieri, Caterina; Verzocchi, Marco; Vidal, Richard; Wang, Michael; Weber, Hannsjoerg Artur; Whitbeck, Andrew; Wu, Yujun; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Carnes, Andrew; Carver, Matthew; Curry, David; Das, Souvik; Field, Richard D; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Low, Jia Fu; Ma, Peisen; Matchev, Konstantin; Mei, Hualin; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Rank, Douglas; Shchutska, Lesya; Sperka, David; Thomas, Laurent; Wang, Jian; Wang, Sean-Jiun; Yelton, John; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Martinez, German; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Ackert, Andrew; Adams, Jordon Rowe; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Bein, Samuel; Diamond, Brendan; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Johnson, Kurtis F; Khatiwada, Ajeeta; Prosper, Harrison; Santra, Arka; Yohay, Rachel; Baarmand, Marc M; Bhopatkar, Vallary; Colafranceschi, Stefano; Hohlmann, Marcus; Noonan, Daniel; Roy, Titas; Yumiceva, Francisco; Adams, Mark Raymond; Apanasevich, Leonard; Berry, Douglas; Betts, Russell Richard; Bucinskaite, Inga; Cavanaugh, Richard; Evdokimov, Olga; Gauthier, Lucie; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hofman, David Jonathan; Jung, Kurt; Kurt, Pelin; O'Brien, Christine; Sandoval Gonzalez, Irving Daniel; Turner, Paul; Varelas, Nikos; Wang, Hui; Wu, Zhenbin; Zakaria, Mohammed; Zhang, Jingyu; Bilki, Burak; Clarida, Warren; Dilsiz, Kamuran; Durgut, Süleyman; Gandrajula, Reddy Pratap; Haytmyradov, Maksat; Khristenko, Viktor; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Ogul, Hasan; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Penzo, Aldo; Snyder, Christina; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Yi, Kai; Anderson, Ian; Blumenfeld, Barry; Cocoros, Alice; Eminizer, Nicholas; Fehling, David; Feng, Lei; Gritsan, Andrei; Maksimovic, Petar; Martin, Christopher; Osherson, Marc; Roskes, Jeffrey; Sarica, Ulascan; Swartz, Morris; Xiao, Meng; Xin, Yongjie; You, Can; Al-bataineh, Ayman; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Boren, Samuel; Bowen, James; Bruner, Christopher; Castle, James; Forthomme, Laurent; Kenny III, Raymond Patrick; Khalil, Sadia; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Majumder, Devdatta; Mcbrayer, William; Murray, Michael; Sanders, Stephen; Stringer, Robert; Tapia Takaki, Daniel; Wang, Quan; Ivanov, Andrew; Kaadze, Ketino; Maravin, Yurii; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Toda, Sachiko; Rebassoo, Finn; Wright, Douglas; Anelli, Christopher; Baden, Drew; Baron, Owen; Belloni, Alberto; Calvert, Brian; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Ferraioli, Charles; Gomez, Jaime; Hadley, Nicholas John; Jabeen, Shabnam; Kellogg, Richard G; Kolberg, Ted; Kunkle, Joshua; Lu, Ying; Mignerey, Alice; Ricci-Tam, Francesca; Shin, Young Ho; Skuja, Andris; Tonjes, Marguerite; Tonwar, Suresh C; Abercrombie, Daniel; Allen, Brandon; Apyan, Aram; Barbieri, Richard; Baty, Austin; Bi, Ran; Bierwagen, Katharina; Brandt, Stephanie; Busza, Wit; Cali, Ivan Amos; Demiragli, Zeynep; Di Matteo, Leonardo; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Hsu, Dylan; Iiyama, Yutaro; Innocenti, Gian Michele; Klute, Markus; Kovalskyi, Dmytro; Krajczar, Krisztian; Lai, Yue Shi; Lee, Yen-Jie; Levin, Andrew; Luckey, Paul David; Maier, Benedikt; Marini, Andrea Carlo; Mcginn, Christopher; Mironov, Camelia; Narayanan, Siddharth; Niu, Xinmei; Paus, Christoph; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Stephans, George; Sumorok, Konstanty; Tatar, Kaya; Varma, Mukund; Velicanu, Dragos; Veverka, Jan; Wang, Jing; Wang, Ta-Wei; Wyslouch, Bolek; Yang, Mingming; Zhukova, Victoria; Benvenuti, Alberto; Chatterjee, Rajdeep Mohan; Evans, Andrew; Finkel, Alexey; Gude, Alexander; Hansen, Peter; Kalafut, Sean; Kao, Shih-Chuan; Kubota, Yuichi; Lesko, Zachary; Mans, Jeremy; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Ruckstuhl, Nicole; Rusack, Roger; Tambe, Norbert; Turkewitz, Jared; Acosta, John Gabriel; Oliveros, Sandra; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bartek, Rachel; Bloom, Kenneth; Claes, Daniel R; Dominguez, Aaron; Fangmeier, Caleb; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Kamalieddin, Rami; Kravchenko, Ilya; Malta Rodrigues, Alan; Meier, Frank; Monroy, Jose; Siado, Joaquin Emilo; Snow, Gregory R; Stieger, Benjamin; Alyari, Maral; Dolen, James; George, Jimin; Godshalk, Andrew; Harrington, Charles; Iashvili, Ia; Kaisen, Josh; Kharchilava, Avto; Kumar, Ashish; Parker, Ashley; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Roozbahani, Bahareh; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Hortiangtham, Apichart; Massironi, Andrea; Morse, David Michael; Nash, David; Orimoto, Toyoko; Teixeira De Lima, Rafael; Trocino, Daniele; Wang, Ren-Jie; Wood, Darien; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Charaf, Otman; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Kubik, Andrew; Kumar, Ajay; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Pollack, Brian; Schmitt, Michael Henry; Sung, Kevin; Trovato, Marco; Velasco, Mayda; Dev, Nabarun; Hildreth, Michael; Hurtado Anampa, Kenyi; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kellams, Nathan; Lannon, Kevin; Marinelli, Nancy; Meng, Fanbo; Mueller, Charles; Musienko, Yuri; Planer, Michael; Reinsvold, Allison; Ruchti, Randy; Smith, Geoffrey; Taroni, Silvia; Wayne, Mitchell; Wolf, Matthias; Woodard, Anna; Alimena, Juliette; Antonelli, Louis; Brinson, Jessica; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Flowers, Sean; Francis, Brian; Hart, Andrew; Hill, Christopher; Hughes, Richard; Ji, Weifeng; Liu, Bingxuan; Luo, Wuming; Puigh, Darren; Winer, Brian L; Wulsin, Howard Wells; Cooperstein, Stephane; Driga, Olga; Elmer, Peter; Hardenbrook, Joshua; Hebda, Philip; Lange, David; Luo, Jingyu; Marlow, Daniel; Mc Donald, Jeffrey; Medvedeva, Tatiana; Mei, Kelvin; Mooney, Michael; Olsen, James; Palmer, Christopher; Piroué, Pierre; Stickland, David; Svyatkovskiy, Alexey; Tully, Christopher; Zuranski, Andrzej; Malik, Sudhir; Barker, Anthony; Barnes, Virgil E; Folgueras, Santiago; Gutay, Laszlo; Jha, Manoj; Jones, Matthew; Jung, Andreas Werner; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Schulte, Jan-Frederik; Shi, Xin; Sun, Jian; Wang, Fuqiang; Xie, Wei; Parashar, Neeti; Stupak, John; Adair, Antony; Akgun, Bora; Chen, Zhenyu; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Geurts, Frank JM; Guilbaud, Maxime; Li, Wei; Michlin, Benjamin; Northup, Michael; Padley, Brian Paul; Redjimi, Radia; Roberts, Jay; Rorie, Jamal; Tu, Zhoudunming; Zabel, James; Betchart, Burton; Bodek, Arie; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Duh, Yi-ting; Ferbel, Thomas; Galanti, Mario; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Han, Jiyeon; Hindrichs, Otto; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Lo, Kin Ho; Tan, Ping; Verzetti, Mauro; Agapitos, Antonis; Chou, John Paul; Contreras-Campana, Emmanuel; Gershtein, Yuri; Gómez Espinosa, Tirso Alejandro; Halkiadakis, Eva; Heindl, Maximilian; Hidas, Dean; Hughes, Elliot; Kaplan, Steven; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, Raghav; Kyriacou, Savvas; Lath, Amitabh; Nash, Kevin; Saka, Halil; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Sheffield, David; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Thomassen, Peter; Walker, Matthew; Delannoy, Andrés G; Foerster, Mark; Heideman, Joseph; Riley, Grant; Rose, Keith; Spanier, Stefan; Thapa, Krishna; Bouhali, Othmane; Celik, Ali; Dalchenko, Mykhailo; De Mattia, Marco; Delgado, Andrea; Dildick, Sven; Eusebi, Ricardo; Gilmore, Jason; Huang, Tao; Juska, Evaldas; Kamon, Teruki; Mueller, Ryan; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Patel, Rishi; Perloff, Alexx; Perniè, Luca; Rathjens, Denis; Rose, Anthony; Safonov, Alexei; Tatarinov, Aysen; Ulmer, Keith; Akchurin, Nural; Cowden, Christopher; Damgov, Jordan; De Guio, Federico; Dragoiu, Cosmin; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Faulkner, James; Gurpinar, Emine; Kunori, Shuichi; Lamichhane, Kamal; Lee, Sung Won; Libeiro, Terence; Peltola, Timo; Undleeb, Sonaina; Volobouev, Igor; Wang, Zhixing; Greene, Senta; Gurrola, Alfredo; Janjam, Ravi; Johns, Willard; Maguire, Charles; Melo, Andrew; Ni, Hong; Sheldon, Paul; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Xu, Qiao; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Barria, Patrizia; Cox, Bradley; Goodell, Joseph; Hirosky, Robert; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Li, Hengne; Neu, Christopher; Sinthuprasith, Tutanon; Sun, Xin; Wang, Yanchu; Wolfe, Evan; Xia, Fan; Clarke, Christopher; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Sturdy, Jared; Belknap, Donald; Caillol, Cécile; Dasu, Sridhara; Dodd, Laura; Duric, Senka; Gomber, Bhawna; Grothe, Monika; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Klabbers, Pamela; Lanaro, Armando; Levine, Aaron; Long, Kenneth; Loveless, Richard; Ojalvo, Isabel; Perry, Thomas; Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Polese, Giovanni; Ruggles, Tyler; Savin, Alexander; Smith, Nicholas; Smith, Wesley H; Taylor, Devin; Woods, Nathaniel

    2017-04-10

    The results of a search are presented for the resonant production of high-mass photon pairs, specifically spin-0 and spin-2 resonances with an invariant mass between 0.5 and 4.5 TeV, and with a width, relative to the mass, between $ 1.4 \\times 10^{-4} $ and $ 5.6 \\times 10^{-2} $. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 12.9 fb$^{-1}$ of proton-proton collisions collected with the CMS detector in 2016 at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV. No significant excess is observed relative to the standard model expectation. The results of the search are combined statistically with those previously obtained in 2012 and 2015 at $\\sqrt{s}=$ 8 and 13 TeV, respectively, corresponding to integrated luminosities of 19.7 and 3.3 fb$^{-1}$, to derive exclusion limits on scalar resonances produced through gluon-gluon fusion, and on Randall-Sundrum gravitons. The lower mass limits for Randall-Sundrum gravitons range from 1.95 to 4.45 TeV for coupling parameters between 0.01 and 0.2. These are the most stringen...

  3. Search For New Physics In The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) Experiment And The Response Of The CMS Calorimeters To Particles And Jets

    CERN Document Server

    Gumus, Kazim Ziya

    2008-01-01

    A Monte Carlo study of a generic search for new resonances beyond the Standard Model (SM) in the CMS experiment is presented. The resonances are axigluon, coloron, E6 diquark, excited quark, W', Z', and the Randall-Sundrum graviton which decay to dijets. The dijet resonance cross section that the CMS can expect to discover at a 5s significance or to exclude at 95% confidence level for integrated luminosities of 100 pb-1, 1 fb-1, and 10 fb-1 is evaluated. It is shown that a 5s discovery of a multi-TeV dijet resonance is possible for an axigluon, excited quark, and E6 diquark. However, a 5s discovery can not be projected with confidence for a W', Z' and the Randall-Sundrum graviton. On the other hand, 95% CL exclusion mass regions can be measured for all resonances at high luminosities. In the second part of this dissertation, the analyses of the 2006 test beam data from the combined electromagnetic and hadronic barrel calorimeters are presented. The CMS barrel calorimeters' response to a variety of beam partic...

  4. Higgs potential in the type II seesaw model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arhrib, A.; Benbrik, R.; Chabab, M.; Rahili, L.; Ramadan, J.; Moultaka, G.; Peyranere, M. C.

    2011-01-01

    The standard model Higgs sector, extended by one weak gauge triplet of scalar fields with a very small vacuum expectation value, is a very promising setting to account for neutrino masses through the so-called type II seesaw mechanism. In this paper we consider the general renormalizable doublet/triplet Higgs potential of this model. We perform a detailed study of its main dynamical features that depend on five dimensionless couplings and two mass parameters after spontaneous symmetry breaking, and highlight the implications for the Higgs phenomenology. In particular, we determine (i) the complete set of tree-level unitarity constraints on the couplings of the potential and (ii) the exact tree-level boundedness from below constraints on these couplings, valid for all directions. When combined, these constraints delineate precisely the theoretically allowed parameter space domain within our perturbative approximation. Among the seven physical Higgs states of this model, the mass of the lighter (heavier) CP even state h 0 (H 0 ) will always satisfy a theoretical upper (lower) bound that is reached for a critical value μ c of μ (the mass parameter controlling triple couplings among the doublet/triplet Higgses). Saturating the unitarity bounds, we find an upper bound m h 0 or approx. μ c and μ c . In the first regime the Higgs sector is typically very heavy, and only h 0 that becomes SM-like could be accessible to the LHC. In contrast, in the second regime, somewhat overlooked in the literature, most of the Higgs sector is light. In particular, the heaviest state H 0 becomes SM-like, the lighter states being the CP odd Higgs, the (doubly) charged Higgses, and a decoupled h 0 , possibly leading to a distinctive phenomenology at the colliders.

  5. Observational tests for H II region models - A 'champagne party'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alloin, D; Tenorio-Tagle, G

    1979-09-01

    Observations of several neighboring H II regions associated with a molecular cloud were performed in order to test the champagne model of H II region-molecular cloud interaction leading to the supersonic expansion of molecular cloud gas. Nine different positions in the Gum 61 nebula were observed using an image dissector scanner attached to a 3.6-m telescope, and it is found that the area corresponds to a low excitation, high density nebula, with electron densities ranging between 1400 and 2800/cu cm and larger along the boundary of the ionized gas. An observed increase in pressure and density located in an interior region of the nebula is interpreted in terms of an area between two rarefaction waves generated together with a strong isothermal shock, responsible for the champagne-like streaming, by a pressure discontinuity between the ionized molecular cloud in which star formation takes place and the intercloud gas. It is noted that a velocity field determination would provide the key in understanding the evolution of such a region.

  6. EMPIRE-II statistical model code for nuclear reaction calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herman, M [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

    2001-12-15

    EMPIRE II is a nuclear reaction code, comprising various nuclear models, and designed for calculations in the broad range of energies and incident particles. A projectile can be any nucleon or Heavy Ion. The energy range starts just above the resonance region, in the case of neutron projectile, and extends up to few hundreds of MeV for Heavy Ion induced reactions. The code accounts for the major nuclear reaction mechanisms, such as optical model (SCATB), Multistep Direct (ORION + TRISTAN), NVWY Multistep Compound, and the full featured Hauser-Feshbach model. Heavy Ion fusion cross section can be calculated within the simplified coupled channels approach (CCFUS). A comprehensive library of input parameters covers nuclear masses, optical model parameters, ground state deformations, discrete levels and decay schemes, level densities, fission barriers (BARFIT), moments of inertia (MOMFIT), and {gamma}-ray strength functions. Effects of the dynamic deformation of a fast rotating nucleus can be taken into account in the calculations. The results can be converted into the ENDF-VI format using the accompanying code EMPEND. The package contains the full EXFOR library of experimental data. Relevant EXFOR entries are automatically retrieved during the calculations. Plots comparing experimental results with the calculated ones can be produced using X4TOC4 and PLOTC4 codes linked to the rest of the system through bash-shell (UNIX) scripts. The graphic user interface written in Tcl/Tk is provided. (author)

  7. AN ANALYTIC MODEL OF DUSTY, STRATIFIED, SPHERICAL H ii REGIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodríguez-Ramírez, J. C.; Raga, A. C. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ap. 70-543, 04510 D.F., México (Mexico); Lora, V. [Astronomisches Rechen-Institut, Zentrum für Astronomie der Universität, Mönchhofstr. 12-14, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Cantó, J., E-mail: juan.rodriguez@nucleares.unam.mx [Instituto de Astronomía, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ap. 70-468, 04510 D. F., México (Mexico)

    2016-12-20

    We study analytically the effect of radiation pressure (associated with photoionization processes and with dust absorption) on spherical, hydrostatic H ii regions. We consider two basic equations, one for the hydrostatic balance between the radiation-pressure components and the gas pressure, and another for the balance among the recombination rate, the dust absorption, and the ionizing photon rate. Based on appropriate mathematical approximations, we find a simple analytic solution for the density stratification of the nebula, which is defined by specifying the radius of the external boundary, the cross section of dust absorption, and the luminosity of the central star. We compare the analytic solution with numerical integrations of the model equations of Draine, and find a wide range of the physical parameters for which the analytic solution is accurate.

  8. Equilibrium modeling of mono and binary sorption of Cu(II and Zn(II onto chitosan gel beads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nastaj Józef

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the work are in-depth experimental studies of Cu(II and Zn(II ion removal on chitosan gel beads from both one- and two-component water solutions at the temperature of 303 K. The optimal process conditions such as: pH value, dose of sorbent and contact time were determined. Based on the optimal process conditions, equilibrium and kinetic studies were carried out. The maximum sorption capacities equaled: 191.25 mg/g and 142.88 mg/g for Cu(II and Zn(II ions respectively, when the sorbent dose was 10 g/L and the pH of a solution was 5.0 for both heavy metal ions. One-component sorption equilibrium data were successfully presented for six of the most useful three-parameter equilibrium models: Langmuir-Freundlich, Redlich-Peterson, Sips, Koble-Corrigan, Hill and Toth. Extended forms of Langmuir-Freundlich, Koble-Corrigan and Sips models were also well fitted to the two-component equilibrium data obtained for different ratios of concentrations of Cu(II and Zn(II ions (1:1, 1:2, 2:1. Experimental sorption data were described by two kinetic models of the pseudo-first and pseudo-second order. Furthermore, an attempt to explain the mechanisms of the divalent metal ion sorption process on chitosan gel beads was undertaken.

  9. Research on mouse model of grade II corneal alkali burn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Qiang Bai

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To choose appropriate concentration of sodium hydroxide (NaOH solution to establish a stable and consistent corneal alkali burn mouse model in grade II. METHODS: The mice (n=60 were randomly divided into four groups and 15 mice each group. Corneal alkali burns were induced by placing circle filter paper soaked with NaOH solutions on the right central cornea for 30s. The concentrations of NaOH solutions of groups A, B, C, and D were 0.1 mol/L, 0.15 mol/L , 0.2 mol/L, and 1.0 mol/L respectively. Then these corneas were irrigated with 20 mL physiological saline (0.9% NaCl. On day 7 postburn, slit lamp microscope was used to observe corneal opacity, corneal epithelial sodium fluorescein staining positive rate, incidence of corneal ulcer and corneal neovascularization, meanwhile pictures of the anterior eyes were taken. Cirrus spectral domain optical coherence tomography was used to scan cornea to observe corneal epithelial defect and corneal ulcer. RESULTS: Corneal opacity scores ( were not significantly different between the group A and group B (P=0.097. Incidence of corneal ulcer in group B was significantly higher than that in group A (P=0.035. Incidence of corneal ulcer and perforation rate in group B was lower than that in group C. Group C and D had corneal neovascularization, and incidence of corneal neovascularization in group D was significantly higher than that in group C (P=0.000. CONCLUSION: Using 0.15 mol/L NaOH can establish grade II mouse model of corneal alkali burns.

  10. Life system modeling and intelligent computing. Pt. II. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Kang; Irwin, George W. (eds.) [Belfast Queen' s Univ. (United Kingdom). School of Electronics, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science; Fei, Minrui; Jia, Li [Shanghai Univ. (China). School of Mechatronical Engineering and Automation

    2010-07-01

    This book is part II of a two-volume work that contains the refereed proceedings of the International Conference on Life System Modeling and Simulation, LSMS 2010 and the International Conference on Intelligent Computing for Sustainable Energy and Environment, ICSEE 2010, held in Wuxi, China, in September 2010. The 194 revised full papers presented were carefully reviewed and selected from over 880 submissions and recommended for publication by Springer in two volumes of Lecture Notes in Computer Science (LNCS) and one volume of Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics (LNBI). This particular volume of Lecture Notes in Computer Science (LNCS) includes 55 papers covering 7 relevant topics. The 56 papers in this volume are organized in topical sections on advanced evolutionary computing theory and algorithms; advanced neural network and fuzzy system theory and algorithms; modeling and simulation of societies and collective behavior; biomedical signal processing, imaging, and visualization; intelligent computing and control in distributed power generation systems; intelligent methods in power and energy infrastructure development; intelligent modeling, monitoring, and control of complex nonlinear systems. (orig.)

  11. Biosorption optimization of lead(II), cadmium(II) and copper(II) using response surface methodology and applicability in isotherms and thermodynamics modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Rajesh; Chadetrik, Rout; Kumar, Rajender; Bishnoi, Kiran; Bhatia, Divya; Kumar, Anil; Bishnoi, Narsi R.; Singh, Namita

    2010-01-01

    The present study was carried out to optimize the various environmental conditions for biosorption of Pb(II), Cd(II) and Cu(II) by investigating as a function of the initial metal ion concentration, temperature, biosorbent loading and pH using Trichoderma viride as adsorbent. Biosorption of ions from aqueous solution was optimized in a batch system using response surface methodology. The values of R 2 0.9716, 0.9699 and 0.9982 for Pb(II), Cd(II) and Cu(II) ions, respectively, indicated the validity of the model. The thermodynamic properties ΔG o , ΔH o , ΔE o and ΔS o by the metal ions for biosorption were analyzed using the equilibrium constant value obtained from experimental data at different temperatures. The results showed that biosorption of Pb(II) ions by T. viride adsorbent is more endothermic and spontaneous. The study was attempted to offer a better understating of representative biosorption isotherms and thermodynamics with special focuses on binding mechanism for biosorption using the FTIR spectroscopy.

  12. Biosorption optimization of lead(II), cadmium(II) and copper(II) using response surface methodology and applicability in isotherms and thermodynamics modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Rajesh; Chadetrik, Rout; Kumar, Rajender; Bishnoi, Kiran; Bhatia, Divya; Kumar, Anil [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Guru Jambheshwar University of Science and Technology, Hisar 125001, Haryana (India); Bishnoi, Narsi R., E-mail: nrbishnoi@gmail.com [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Guru Jambheshwar University of Science and Technology, Hisar 125001, Haryana (India); Singh, Namita [Department of Bio and Nanotechnology, Guru Jambheshwar University of Science and Technology, Hisar 125001, Haryana (India)

    2010-02-15

    The present study was carried out to optimize the various environmental conditions for biosorption of Pb(II), Cd(II) and Cu(II) by investigating as a function of the initial metal ion concentration, temperature, biosorbent loading and pH using Trichoderma viride as adsorbent. Biosorption of ions from aqueous solution was optimized in a batch system using response surface methodology. The values of R{sup 2} 0.9716, 0.9699 and 0.9982 for Pb(II), Cd(II) and Cu(II) ions, respectively, indicated the validity of the model. The thermodynamic properties {Delta}G{sup o}, {Delta}H{sup o}, {Delta}E{sup o} and {Delta}S{sup o} by the metal ions for biosorption were analyzed using the equilibrium constant value obtained from experimental data at different temperatures. The results showed that biosorption of Pb(II) ions by T. viride adsorbent is more endothermic and spontaneous. The study was attempted to offer a better understating of representative biosorption isotherms and thermodynamics with special focuses on binding mechanism for biosorption using the FTIR spectroscopy.

  13. On unified field theories, dynamical torsion and geometrical models: II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cirilo-Lombardo, D.J.

    2011-01-01

    We analyze in this letter the same space-time structure as that presented in our previous reference (Part. Nucl, Lett. 2010. V.7, No.5. P.299-307), but relaxing now the condition a priori of the existence of a potential for the torsion. We show through exact cosmological solutions from this model, where the geometry is Euclidean RxO 3 ∼ RxSU(2), the relation between the space-time geometry and the structure of the gauge group. Precisely this relation is directly connected with the relation of the spin and torsion fields. The solution of this model is explicitly compared with our previous ones and we find that: i) the torsion is not identified directly with the Yang-Mills type strength field, ii) there exists a compatibility condition connected with the identification of the gauge group with the geometric structure of the space-time: this fact leads to the identification between derivatives of the scale factor a with the components of the torsion in order to allow the Hosoya-Ogura ansatz (namely, the alignment of the isospin with the frame geometry of the space-time), and iii) of two possible structures of the torsion the 'tratorial' form (the only one studied here) forbid wormhole configurations, leading only to cosmological instanton space-time in eternal expansion

  14. Probing the size of extra dimensions with gravitational wave astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagi, Kent; Tanahashi, Norihiro; Tanaka, Takahiro

    2011-01-01

    In the Randall-Sundrum II braneworld model, it has been conjectured, according to the AdS/CFT correspondence, that a brane-localized black hole (BH) larger than the bulk AdS curvature scale l cannot be static, and it is dual to a four-dimensional BH emitting Hawking radiation through some quantum fields. In this scenario, the number of the quantum field species is so large that this radiation changes the orbital evolution of a BH binary. We derived the correction to the gravitational waveform phase due to this effect and estimated the upper bounds on l by performing Fisher analyses. We found that the Deci-Hertz Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory and the Big Bang Observatory (DECIGO/BBO) can give a stronger constraint than the current tabletop result by detecting gravitational waves from small mass BH/BH and BH/neutron star (NS) binaries. Furthermore, DECIGO/BBO is expected to detect 10 5 BH/NS binaries per year. Taking this advantage, we find that DECIGO/BBO can actually measure l down to l=0.33 μm for a 5 yr observation if we know that binaries are circular a priori. This is about 40 times smaller than the upper bound obtained from the tabletop experiment. On the other hand, when we take eccentricities into binary parameters, the detection limit weakens to l=1.5 μm due to strong degeneracies between l and eccentricities. We also derived the upper bound on l from the expected detection number of extreme mass ratio inspirals with LISA and BH/NS binaries with DECIGO/BBO, extending the discussion made recently by McWilliams [Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 141601 (2010)]. We found that these less robust constraints are weaker than the ones from phase differences.

  15. User's Guide To CHEAP0 II-Economic Analysis of Stand Prognosis Model Outputs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph E. Horn; E. Lee Medema; Ervin G. Schuster

    1986-01-01

    CHEAP0 II provides supplemental economic analysis capability for users of version 5.1 of the Stand Prognosis Model, including recent regeneration and insect outbreak extensions. Although patterned after the old CHEAP0 model, CHEAP0 II has more features and analytic capabilities, especially for analysis of existing and uneven-aged stands....

  16. Modeling transducer impulse responses for predicting calibrated pressure pulses with the ultrasound simulation program Field II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bæk, David; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Willatzen, Morten

    2010-01-01

    FIELD II is a simulation software capable of predicting the field pressure in front of transducers having any complicated geometry. A calibrated prediction with this program is, however, dependent on an exact voltage-to-surface acceleration impulse response of the transducer. Such impulse response...... is not calculated by FIELD II. This work investigates the usability of combining a one-dimensional multilayer transducer modeling principle with the FIELD II software. Multilayer here refers to a transducer composed of several material layers. Measurements of pressure and current from Pz27 piezoceramic disks...... transducer model and the FIELD II software in combination give good agreement with measurements....

  17. Reference methodologies for radioactive controlled discharges an activity within the IAEA's Program Environmental Modelling for Radiation Safety II (EMRAS II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stocki, T.J.; Bergman, L.; Tellería, D.M.; Proehl, G.; Amado, V.; Curti, A.; Bonchuk, I.; Boyer, P.; Mourlon, C.; Chyly, P.; Heling, R.; Sági, L.; Kliaus, V.; Krajewski, P.; Latouche, G.; Lauria, D.C.; Newsome, L.; Smith, J.

    2011-01-01

    In January 2009, the IAEA EMRAS II (Environmental Modelling for Radiation Safety II) program was launched. The goal of the program is to develop, compare and test models for the assessment of radiological impacts to the public and the environment due to radionuclides being released or already existing in the environment; to help countries build and harmonize their capabilities; and to model the movement of radionuclides in the environment. Within EMRAS II, nine working groups are active; this paper will focus on the activities of Working Group 1: Reference Methodologies for Controlling Discharges of Routine Releases. Within this working group environmental transfer and dose assessment models are tested under different scenarios by participating countries and the results compared. This process allows each participating country to identify characteristics of their models that need to be refined. The goal of this working group is to identify reference methodologies for the assessment of exposures to the public due to routine discharges of radionuclides to the terrestrial and aquatic environments. Several different models are being applied to estimate the transfer of radionuclides in the environment for various scenarios. The first phase of the project involves a scenario of nuclear power reactor with a coastal location which routinely (continuously) discharges 60Co, 85Kr, 131I, and 137Cs to the atmosphere and 60Co, 137Cs, and 90Sr to the marine environment. In this scenario many of the parameters and characteristics of the representative group were given to the modelers and cannot be altered. Various models have been used by the different participants in this inter-comparison (PC-CREAM, CROM, IMPACT, CLRP POSEIDON, SYMBIOSE and others). This first scenario is to enable a comparison of the radionuclide transport and dose modelling. These scenarios will facilitate the development of reference methodologies for controlled discharges. (authors)

  18. Carbon footprint estimator, phase II : volume I - GASCAP model & volume II - technical appendices [technical brief].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    This study resulted in the development of the GASCAP model (the Greenhouse Gas Assessment : Spreadsheet for Transportation Capital Projects). This spreadsheet model provides a user-friendly interface for determining the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions...

  19. NSLS-II: Nonlinear Model Calibration for Synchrotrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bengtsson, J.

    2010-10-08

    This tech note is essentially a summary of a lecture we delivered to the Acc. Phys. Journal Club Apr, 2010. However, since the estimated accuracy of these methods has been naive and misleading in the field of particle accelerators, i.e., ignores the impact of noise, we will elaborate on this in some detail. A prerequisite for a calibration of the nonlinear Hamiltonian is that the quadratic part has been understood, i.e., that the linear optics for the real accelerator has been calibrated. For synchrotron light source operations, this problem has been solved by the interactive LOCO technique/tool (Linear Optics from Closed Orbits). Before that, in the context of hadron accelerators, it has been done by signal processing of turn-by-turn BPM data. We have outlined how to make a basic calibration of the nonlinear model for synchrotrons. In particular, we have shown how this was done for LEAR, CERN (antiprotons) in the mid-80s. Specifically, our accuracy for frequency estimation was {approx} 1 x 10{sup -5} for 1024 turns (to calibrate the linear optics) and {approx} 1 x 10{sup -4} for 256 turns for tune footprint and betatron spectrum. For a comparison, the estimated tune footprint for stable beam for NSLS-II is {approx}0.1. Since the transverse damping time is {approx}20 msec, i.e., {approx}4,000 turns. There is no fundamental difference for: antiprotons, protons, and electrons in this case. Because the estimated accuracy for these methods in the field of particle accelerators has been naive, i.e., ignoring the impact of noise, we have also derived explicit formula, from first principles, for a quantitative statement. For e.g. N = 256 and 5% noise we obtain {delta}{nu} {approx} 1 x 10{sup -5}. A comparison with the state-of-the-arts in e.g. telecomm and electrical engineering since the 60s is quite revealing. For example, Kalman filter (1960), crucial for the: Ranger, Mariner, and Apollo (including the Lunar Module) missions during the 60s. Or Claude Shannon et al

  20. NSLS-II: Nonlinear Model Calibration for Synchrotrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bengtsson, J.

    2010-01-01

    This tech note is essentially a summary of a lecture we delivered to the Acc. Phys. Journal Club Apr, 2010. However, since the estimated accuracy of these methods has been naive and misleading in the field of particle accelerators, i.e., ignores the impact of noise, we will elaborate on this in some detail. A prerequisite for a calibration of the nonlinear Hamiltonian is that the quadratic part has been understood, i.e., that the linear optics for the real accelerator has been calibrated. For synchrotron light source operations, this problem has been solved by the interactive LOCO technique/tool (Linear Optics from Closed Orbits). Before that, in the context of hadron accelerators, it has been done by signal processing of turn-by-turn BPM data. We have outlined how to make a basic calibration of the nonlinear model for synchrotrons. In particular, we have shown how this was done for LEAR, CERN (antiprotons) in the mid-80s. Specifically, our accuracy for frequency estimation was ∼ 1 x 10 -5 for 1024 turns (to calibrate the linear optics) and ∼ 1 x 10 -4 for 256 turns for tune footprint and betatron spectrum. For a comparison, the estimated tune footprint for stable beam for NSLS-II is ∼0.1. Since the transverse damping time is ∼20 msec, i.e., ∼4,000 turns. There is no fundamental difference for: antiprotons, protons, and electrons in this case. Because the estimated accuracy for these methods in the field of particle accelerators has been naive, i.e., ignoring the impact of noise, we have also derived explicit formula, from first principles, for a quantitative statement. For e.g. N = 256 and 5% noise we obtain (delta)ν ∼ 1 x 10 -5 . A comparison with the state-of-the-arts in e.g. telecomm and electrical engineering since the 60s is quite revealing. For example, Kalman filter (1960), crucial for the: Ranger, Mariner, and Apollo (including the Lunar Module) missions during the 60s. Or Claude Shannon et al since the 40s for that matter. Conclusion: what

  1. Scaled Model Technology for Flight Research of General Aviation Aircraft, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Our proposed future Phase II activities are aimed at developing a scientifically based "tool box" for flight research using scaled models. These tools will be of...

  2. Lanchester-Type Models of Warfare. Volume II

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-10-01

    ii7 L HOWES and THRALL (1972) ,HT n HTY HT m HTX jini ijl HOLTER (1973) and ANDERSON (1979) CHA HAx Y tAs in the preceding table, SPUDICH (1968) - the...detail can one afford? A recent U. S. General Accounting Office ( GAO ) report [150, pp. 28-29] points out that there is a strong inconsistency between...further details). 65. A recent U. S. Getueral Accounting Office ( GAO ) [1501 study has emphasized that empirical study is necessary to strengthen the

  3. Lanchester-Type Models of Warfare, Volume II

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, James G.

    1980-01-01

    This monograph is a comprehensive treatist on Lanchester-type models of warfare, i.e. differential-equation models of attrition in force-on-force combat operations. Its goal is to provide both an introduction to and current-state-of-the-art overview of Lanchester-type models of warfare as well as a comprehensive and unified in-depth treatment of them. Both deterministic as well as stochastic models are considered. Such models have been widely used in the United States and elsewhere for the...

  4. Development of nonfibrotic left ventricular hypertrophy in an ANG II-induced chronic ovine hypertension model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klatt, Niklas; Scherschel, Katharina; Schad, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    setting. Therefore, the aim of this study was to establish a minimally invasive ovine hypertension model using chronic angiotensin II (ANG II) treatment and to characterize its effects on cardiac remodeling after 8 weeks. Sheep were implanted with osmotic minipumps filled with either vehicle control (n...... = 7) or ANG II (n = 9) for 8 weeks. Mean arterial blood pressure in the ANG II-treated group increased from 87.4 ± 5.3 to 111.8 ± 6.9 mmHg (P = 0.00013). Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging showed an increase in left ventricular mass from 112 ± 12.6 g to 131 ± 18.7 g after 7 weeks (P = 0...... any differences in epicardial conduction velocity and heterogeneity. These data demonstrate that chronic ANG II treatment using osmotic minipumps presents a reliable, minimally invasive approach to establish hypertension and nonfibrotic LVH in sheep....

  5. Dynamic modeling and simulation of EBR-II steam generator system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkan, R.C.; Upadhyaya, B.R.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents a low order dynamic model of the Experimental breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) steam generator system. The model development includes the application of energy, mass and momentum balance equations in state-space form. The model also includes a three-element controller for the drum water level control problem. The simulation results for low-level perturbations exhibit the inherently stable characteristics of the steam generator. The predictions of test transients also verify the consistency of this low order model

  6. Simple inflationary quintessential model. II. Power law potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Haro, Jaume; Amorós, Jaume; Pan, Supriya

    2016-09-01

    The present work is a sequel of our previous work [Phys. Rev. D 93, 084018 (2016)] which depicted a simple version of an inflationary quintessential model whose inflationary stage was described by a Higgs-type potential and the quintessential phase was responsible due to an exponential potential. Additionally, the model predicted a nonsingular universe in past which was geodesically past incomplete. Further, it was also found that the model is in agreement with the Planck 2013 data when running is allowed. But, this model provides a theoretical value of the running which is far smaller than the central value of the best fit in ns , r , αs≡d ns/d l n k parameter space where ns, r , αs respectively denote the spectral index, tensor-to-scalar ratio and the running of the spectral index associated with any inflationary model, and consequently to analyze the viability of the model one has to focus in the two-dimensional marginalized confidence level in the allowed domain of the plane (ns,r ) without taking into account the running. Unfortunately, such analysis shows that this model does not pass this test. However, in this sequel we propose a family of models runs by a single parameter α ∈[0 ,1 ] which proposes another "inflationary quintessential model" where the inflation and the quintessence regimes are respectively described by a power law potential and a cosmological constant. The model is also nonsingular although geodesically past incomplete as in the cited model. Moreover, the present one is found to be more simple compared to the previous model and it is in excellent agreement with the observational data. In fact, we note that, unlike the previous model, a large number of the models of this family with α ∈[0 ,1/2 ) match with both Planck 2013 and Planck 2015 data without allowing the running. Thus, the properties in the current family of models compared to its past companion justify its need for a better cosmological model with the successive

  7. Computational Models for Nonlinear Aeroelastic Systems, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Clear Science Corp. and Duke University propose to develop and demonstrate new and efficient computational methods of modeling nonlinear aeroelastic systems. The...

  8. Physical Modeling for Anomaly Diagnostics and Prognostics, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Ridgetop developed an innovative, model-driven anomaly diagnostic and fault characterization system for electromechanical actuator (EMA) systems to mitigate...

  9. Model Updating Nonlinear System Identification Toolbox, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ZONA Technology (ZONA) proposes to develop an enhanced model updating nonlinear system identification (MUNSID) methodology that utilizes flight data with...

  10. The Adsorption of Cd(II on Manganese Oxide Investigated by Batch and Modeling Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoming Huang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Manganese (Mn oxide is a ubiquitous metal oxide in sub-environments. The adsorption of Cd(II on Mn oxide as function of adsorption time, pH, ionic strength, temperature, and initial Cd(II concentration was investigated by batch techniques. The adsorption kinetics showed that the adsorption of Cd(II on Mn oxide can be satisfactorily simulated by pseudo-second-order kinetic model with high correlation coefficients (R2 > 0.999. The adsorption of Cd(II on Mn oxide significantly decreased with increasing ionic strength at pH < 5.0, whereas Cd(II adsorption was independent of ionic strength at pH > 6.0, which indicated that outer-sphere and inner-sphere surface complexation dominated the adsorption of Cd(II on Mn oxide at pH < 5.0 and pH > 6.0, respectively. The maximum adsorption capacity of Mn oxide for Cd(II calculated from Langmuir model was 104.17 mg/g at pH 6.0 and 298 K. The thermodynamic parameters showed that the adsorption of Cd(II on Mn oxide was an endothermic and spontaneous process. According to the results of surface complexation modeling, the adsorption of Cd(II on Mn oxide can be satisfactorily simulated by ion exchange sites (X2Cd at low pH and inner-sphere surface complexation sites (SOCd+ and (SO2CdOH− species at high pH conditions. The finding presented herein plays an important role in understanding the fate and transport of heavy metals at the water–mineral interface.

  11. Surface complexation modeling calculation of Pb(II) adsorption onto the calcined diatomite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Shu-Cui; Zhang, Ji-Lin; Sun, De-Hui; Liu, Gui-Xia

    2015-12-01

    Removal of noxious heavy metal ions (e.g. Pb(II)) by surface adsorption of minerals (e.g. diatomite) is an important means in the environmental aqueous pollution control. Thus, it is very essential to understand the surface adsorptive behavior and mechanism. In this work, the Pb(II) apparent surface complexation reaction equilibrium constants on the calcined diatomite and distributions of Pb(II) surface species were investigated through modeling calculations of Pb(II) based on diffuse double layer model (DLM) with three amphoteric sites. Batch experiments were used to study the adsorption of Pb(II) onto the calcined diatomite as a function of pH (3.0-7.0) and different ionic strengths (0.05 and 0.1 mol L-1 NaCl) under ambient atmosphere. Adsorption of Pb(II) can be well described by Freundlich isotherm models. The apparent surface complexation equilibrium constants (log K) were obtained by fitting the batch experimental data using the PEST 13.0 together with PHREEQC 3.1.2 codes and there is good agreement between measured and predicted data. Distribution of Pb(II) surface species on the diatomite calculated by PHREEQC 3.1.2 program indicates that the impurity cations (e.g. Al3+, Fe3+, etc.) in the diatomite play a leading role in the Pb(II) adsorption and dominant formation of complexes and additional electrostatic interaction are the main adsorption mechanism of Pb(II) on the diatomite under weak acidic conditions.

  12. Multiscale geometric modeling of macromolecules II: Lagrangian representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xin; Xia, Kelin; Chen, Zhan; Tong, Yiying; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Geometric modeling of biomolecules plays an essential role in the conceptualization of biolmolecular structure, function, dynamics and transport. Qualitatively, geometric modeling offers a basis for molecular visualization, which is crucial for the understanding of molecular structure and interactions. Quantitatively, geometric modeling bridges the gap between molecular information, such as that from X-ray, NMR and cryo-EM, and theoretical/mathematical models, such as molecular dynamics, the Poisson-Boltzmann equation and the Nernst-Planck equation. In this work, we present a family of variational multiscale geometric models for macromolecular systems. Our models are able to combine multiresolution geometric modeling with multiscale electrostatic modeling in a unified variational framework. We discuss a suite of techniques for molecular surface generation, molecular surface meshing, molecular volumetric meshing, and the estimation of Hadwiger’s functionals. Emphasis is given to the multiresolution representations of biomolecules and the associated multiscale electrostatic analyses as well as multiresolution curvature characterizations. The resulting fine resolution representations of a biomolecular system enable the detailed analysis of solvent-solute interaction, and ion channel dynamics, while our coarse resolution representations highlight the compatibility of protein-ligand bindings and possibility of protein-protein interactions. PMID:23813599

  13. Simplicial models for trace spaces II: General higher dimensional automata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raussen, Martin

    of directed paths with given end points in a pre-cubical complex as the nerve of a particular category. The paper generalizes the results from Raussen [19, 18] in which we had to assume that the HDA in question arises from a semaphore model. In particular, important for applications, it allows for models...

  14. LP II--A GOAL PROGRAMMING MODEL FOR MEDIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHARNES, A.; AND OTHERS

    A GOAL PROGRAMING MODEL FOR SELECTING MEDIA IS PRESENTED WHICH ALTERS THE OBJECTIVE AND EXTENDS PREVIOUS MEDIA MODELS BY ACCOUNTING FOR CUMULATIVE DUPLICATING AUDIENCES OVER A VARIETY OF TIME PERIODS. THIS PERMITS DETAILED CONTROL OF THE DISTRIBUTION OF MESSAGE FREQUENCIES DIRECTED AT EACH OF NUMEROUS MARKETING TARGETS OVER A SEQUENCE OF…

  15. Validation of the CAR II model for Flanders, Belgium; Validatie van het model CAR II voor Vlaanderen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marien, S.; Celis, D.; Roekens, E.

    2013-04-15

    In Flanders, Belgium, the CAR model (Calculation of Air pollution from Road traffic) for air quality along urban roads was recently extensively validated for NO2. More clarity has been gained about the quality and accuracy of this model [Dutch] In Vlaanderen is het CAR-model (Calculation of Air pollution from Road traffic) voor de luchtkwaliteit langs binnenstedelijke wegen onlangs uitvoerig gevalideerd voor NO2. Er is nu meer duidelijkheid over de kwaliteit en nauwkeurigheid van dit model.

  16. [Collaboration among health professionals (II). Usefulness of a model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amour, Danielle; San Martín Rodríguez, Leticia

    2006-09-01

    This second article provides a model which helps one to better understand the process of collaboration by interprofessional teams and makes it possible to evaluate the quality of the aforementioned collaboration. To this end, the authors first present a structural model of inter-professional collaboration followed by a typology of collaboration which is derived from the functionality of said model. This model is composed by four interrelated dimensions; the functionality of these has given rise to a typology of collaboration at three intensities: in action, in construction and collaboration during inertia. The model and the typology constitute a useful tool for managers and for health professionals since they help to better understand, manage and develop collaboration among the distinct professionals inside of the same organization as among those who belong to distinct organizations.

  17. Carbonate-mediated Fe(II) oxidation in the air-cathode fuel cell: a kinetic model in terms of Fe(II) speciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wei; Zhai, Lin-Feng; Cui, Yu-Zhi; Sun, Min; Jiang, Yuan

    2013-06-06

    Due to the high redox activity of Fe(II) and its abundance in natural waters, the electro-oxidation of Fe(II) can be found in many air-cathode fuel cell systems, such as acid mine drainage fuel cells and sediment microbial fuel cells. To deeply understand these iron-related systems, it is essential to elucidate the kinetics and mechanisms involved in the electro-oxidation of Fe(II). This work aims to develop a kinetic model that adequately describes the electro-oxidation process of Fe(II) in air-cathode fuel cells. The speciation of Fe(II) is incorporated into the model, and contributions of individual Fe(II) species to the overall Fe(II) oxidation rate are quantitatively evaluated. The results show that the kinetic model can accurately predict the electro-oxidation rate of Fe(II) in air-cathode fuel cells. FeCO3, Fe(OH)2, and Fe(CO3)2(2-) are the most important species determining the electro-oxidation kinetics of Fe(II). The Fe(II) oxidation rate is primarily controlled by the oxidation of FeCO3 species at low pH, whereas at high pH Fe(OH)2 and Fe(CO3)2(2-) are the dominant species. Solution pH, carbonate concentration, and solution salinity are able to influence the electro-oxidation kinetics of Fe(II) through changing both distribution and kinetic activity of Fe(II) species.

  18. Origin and structures of solar eruptions II: Magnetic modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yang; Cheng, Xin; Ding, MingDe

    2017-07-01

    The topology and dynamics of the three-dimensional magnetic field in the solar atmosphere govern various solar eruptive phenomena and activities, such as flares, coronal mass ejections, and filaments/prominences. We have to observe and model the vector magnetic field to understand the structures and physical mechanisms of these solar activities. Vector magnetic fields on the photosphere are routinely observed via the polarized light, and inferred with the inversion of Stokes profiles. To analyze these vector magnetic fields, we need first to remove the 180° ambiguity of the transverse components and correct the projection effect. Then, the vector magnetic field can be served as the boundary conditions for a force-free field modeling after a proper preprocessing. The photospheric velocity field can also be derived from a time sequence of vector magnetic fields. Three-dimensional magnetic field could be derived and studied with theoretical force-free field models, numerical nonlinear force-free field models, magnetohydrostatic models, and magnetohydrodynamic models. Magnetic energy can be computed with three-dimensional magnetic field models or a time series of vector magnetic field. The magnetic topology is analyzed by pinpointing the positions of magnetic null points, bald patches, and quasi-separatrix layers. As a well conserved physical quantity, magnetic helicity can be computed with various methods, such as the finite volume method, discrete flux tube method, and helicity flux integration method. This quantity serves as a promising parameter characterizing the activity level of solar active regions.

  19. Conceptual Modeling in the Time of the Revolution: Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mylopoulos, John

    Conceptual Modeling was a marginal research topic at the very fringes of Computer Science in the 60s and 70s, when the discipline was dominated by topics focusing on programs, systems and hardware architectures. Over the years, however, the field has moved to centre stage and has come to claim a central role both in Computer Science research and practice in diverse areas, such as Software Engineering, Databases, Information Systems, the Semantic Web, Business Process Management, Service-Oriented Computing, Multi-Agent Systems, Knowledge Management, and more. The transformation was greatly aided by the adoption of standards in modeling languages (e.g., UML), and model-based methodologies (e.g., Model-Driven Architectures) by the Object Management Group (OMG) and other standards organizations. We briefly review the history of the field over the past 40 years, focusing on the evolution of key ideas. We then note some open challenges and report on-going research, covering topics such as the representation of variability in conceptual models, capturing model intentions, and models of laws.

  20. Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes, Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solomon, P.R.; Serio, M.A.; Hamblen, D.G. [and others

    1993-06-01

    A two dimensional, steady-state model for describing a variety of reactive and nonreactive flows, including pulverized coal combustion and gasification, is presented. The model, referred to as 93-PCGC-2 is applicable to cylindrical, axi-symmetric systems. Turbulence is accounted for in both the fluid mechanics equations and the combustion scheme. Radiation from gases, walls, and particles is taken into account using a discrete ordinates method. The particle phase is modeled in a lagrangian framework, such that mean paths of particle groups are followed. A new coal-general devolatilization submodel (FG-DVC) with coal swelling and char reactivity submodels has been added.

  1. Search for high-mass resonances in the dilepton final state in p-p collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 13 TeV with 2016 and 2017 data sets with the CMS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Errico, Filippo

    2018-01-01

    A search for new high-mass resonances decaying into electron or muon pairs has been performed using data collected at a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV by the CMS experiment at the CERN LHC in 2016, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 36 fb$^{-1}$; preliminary results using 2017 data, corresponding to 43 fb$^{-1}$ are shown. Upper limits on the product of production cross section and branching fraction are calculated in a model-independent manner which permits the interpretation of the limits in all models predicting a narrow dielectron or dimuon resonance structure, including the Sequential Standard Model, a Superstring inspired model or the Randall-Sundrum Model with the Kaluza-Klein graviton. Limits are set on the masses of hypothetical particles that could appear in new-physics scenarios.

  2. Searches for New Physics in Multijet Final States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vuosalo Carl

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A variety of new physics models predict heavy resonances that decay to multiple hadronic jets. These models include axigluons, colorons, diquarks, excited quarks, Randall-Sundrum gravitons, string resonances, and Z’ models, among others. Other models make the prediction that high-pT jets will be suppressed, resulting in jet extinction. Using the data collected in 2012 at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV, the CMS collaboration has made a baseline inclusive jet cross section measurement for comparison with new-physics searches, and then performed searches for jet extinction and resonances that decay to two hadronic jets. The results of these searches will be presented. No evidence of new physics has been observed, and these results set new limits on the parameters of these models.

  3. Extra dimensions hypothesis in high energy physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volobuev Igor

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the history of the extra dimensions hypothesis and the physics and phenomenology of models with large extra dimensions with an emphasis on the Randall- Sundrum (RS model with two branes. We argue that the Standard Model extension based on the RS model with two branes is phenomenologically acceptable only if the inter-brane distance is stabilized. Within such an extension of the Standard Model, we study the influence of the infinite Kaluza-Klein (KK towers of the bulk fields on collider processes. In particular, we discuss the modification of the scalar sector of the theory, the Higgs-radion mixing due to the coupling of the Higgs boson to the radion and its KK tower, and the experimental restrictions on the mass of the radion-dominated states.

  4. Integrated Visualization Environment for Science Mission Modeling, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA is emphasizing the use of larger, more integrated models in conjunction with systems engineering tools and decision support systems. These tools place a...

  5. Supersymmetric standard model from the heterotic string (II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchmueller, W.; Hamaguchi, K.; Tokyo Univ.; Lebedev, O.; Ratz, M.

    2006-06-01

    We describe in detail a Z 6 orbifold compactification of the heterotic E 8 x E 8 string which leads to the (supersymmetric) standard model gauge group and matter content. The quarks and leptons appear as three 16-plets of SO(10), two of which are localized at fixed points with local SO(10) symmetry. The model has supersymmetric vacua without exotics at low energies and is consistent with gauge coupling unification. Supersymmetry can be broken via gaugino condensation in the hidden sector. The model has large vacuum degeneracy. Certain vacua with approximate B-L symmetry have attractive phenomenological features. The top quark Yukawa coupling arises from gauge interactions and is of the order of the gauge couplings. The other Yukawa couplings are suppressed by powers of standard model singlet fields, similarly to the Froggatt-Nielsen mechanism. (Orig.)

  6. Physics-Based Pneumatic Hammer Instability Model, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this project is to develop a physics-based pneumatic hammer instability model that accurately predicts the stability of hydrostatic bearings...

  7. Fixed site neutralization model programmer's manual. Volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engi, D.; Chapman, L.D.; Judnick, W.; Blum, R.; Broegler, L.; Lenz, J.; Weinthraub, A.; Ballard, D.

    1979-12-01

    This report relates to protection of nuclear materials at nuclear facilities. This volume presents the source listings for the Fixed Site Neutralization Model and its supporting modules, the Plex Preprocessor and the Data Preprocessor

  8. Artificial neural network (ANN) approach for modeling Zn(II) adsorption in batch process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yildiz, Sayiter [Engineering Faculty, Cumhuriyet University, Sivas (Turkmenistan)

    2017-09-15

    Artificial neural networks (ANN) were applied to predict adsorption efficiency of peanut shells for the removal of Zn(II) ions from aqueous solutions. Effects of initial pH, Zn(II) concentrations, temperature, contact duration and adsorbent dosage were determined in batch experiments. The sorption capacities of the sorbents were predicted with the aid of equilibrium and kinetic models. The Zn(II) ions adsorption onto peanut shell was better defined by the pseudo-second-order kinetic model, for both initial pH, and temperature. The highest R{sup 2} value in isotherm studies was obtained from Freundlich isotherm for the inlet concentration and from Temkin isotherm for the sorbent amount. The high R{sup 2} values prove that modeling the adsorption process with ANN is a satisfactory approach. The experimental results and the predicted results by the model with the ANN were found to be highly compatible with each other.

  9. Artificial neural network (ANN) approach for modeling Zn(II) adsorption in batch process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yildiz, Sayiter

    2017-01-01

    Artificial neural networks (ANN) were applied to predict adsorption efficiency of peanut shells for the removal of Zn(II) ions from aqueous solutions. Effects of initial pH, Zn(II) concentrations, temperature, contact duration and adsorbent dosage were determined in batch experiments. The sorption capacities of the sorbents were predicted with the aid of equilibrium and kinetic models. The Zn(II) ions adsorption onto peanut shell was better defined by the pseudo-second-order kinetic model, for both initial pH, and temperature. The highest R"2 value in isotherm studies was obtained from Freundlich isotherm for the inlet concentration and from Temkin isotherm for the sorbent amount. The high R"2 values prove that modeling the adsorption process with ANN is a satisfactory approach. The experimental results and the predicted results by the model with the ANN were found to be highly compatible with each other.

  10. Search for $WW$, $WZ$, and $ZZ$ resonances in $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 8$ \\tev with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    A search for new heavy bosons decaying to WW, WZ, and ZZ is presented, using a data sample with 20.3 fb−1 of pp collisions collected with the ATLAS detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. The analysis is a combination of individual searches in all-leptonic, semi-leptonic, and all-hadronic final states. No significant excess is observed in the com- bined analysis. Limits at 95% confidence level are set within the context of three bench- mark models: an extended gauge model with a heavy W boson; a bulk Randall-Sundrum model with a heavy spin-2 graviton; and a simplified model predicting a heavy vector triplet.

  11. A perturbative RS I cosmological phase transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bunk, Don [Skidmore College, Department of Physics, Saratoga Springs, NY (United States); Hubisz, Jay [Syracuse University, Department of Physics, Syracuse, NY (United States); Jain, Bithika [Korea Institute for Advanced Study, School of Physics, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2018-01-15

    We identify a class of Randall-Sundrum type models with a successful first order cosmological phase transition during which a 5D dual of approximate conformal symmetry is spontaneously broken. Our focus is on soft-wall models that naturally realize a light radion/dilaton and suppressed dynamical contribution to the cosmological constant. We discuss phenomenology of the phase transition after developing a theoretical and numerical analysis of these models both at zero and finite temperature. We demonstrate a model with a TeV-Planck hierarchy and with a successful cosmological phase transition where the UV value of the curvature corresponds, via AdS/CFT, to an N of 20, where 5D gravity is expected to be firmly in the perturbative regime. (orig.)

  12. Search for high-mass dilepton resonances in 20/fb of pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 8 TeV with the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Coggeshall, J; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The ATLAS detector is used to search for heavy neutral gauge bosons (Z′) decaying to an electron-positron pair or a muon-antimuon pair. Results are presented based on the analysis of pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of approximately 20 fb−1. A Z′ with Standard Model Z couplings to fermions is excluded at 95\\% C.L. for masses below 2.79 TeV in the electron channel, 2.48 TeV in the muon channel, and 2.86 TeV in the two channels combined. Limits on other model interpretations are also presented, including a Grand Unification model based on the E6 gauge group, a Randall-Sundrum graviton and a technicolor model with a composite Higgs boson.

  13. Programming Models for Three-Dimensional Hydrodynamics on the CM-5 (Part II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amala, P.A.K.; Rodrigue, G.H.

    1994-01-01

    This is a two-part presentation of a timing study on the Thinking Machines CORP. CM-5 computer. Part II is given in this study and represents domain-decomposition and message-passing models. Part I described computational problems using a SIMD model and connection machine FORTRAN (CMF)

  14. Discriminating neutrino mass models using Type-II see-saw formula

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    though a fuller analysis needs the full matrix form when all terms are present. This is followed by the normal hierarchical model (Type [III]) and inverted hierarchical model with opposite CP phase (Type [IIB]). γ ≃ 10−2 for both of them. Our main results on neutrino masses and mixings in Type-II see-saw formula are presented ...

  15. Shunted-Josephson-junction model. II. The nonautonomous case

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belykh, V. N.; Pedersen, Niels Falsig; Sørensen, O. H.

    1977-01-01

    The shunted-Josephson-junction model with a monochromatic ac current drive is discussed employing the qualitative methods of the theory of nonlinear oscillations. As in the preceding paper dealing with the autonomous junction, the model includes a phase-dependent conductance and a shunt capacitance....... The mathematical discussion makes use of the phase-space representation of the solutions to the differential equation. The behavior of the trajectories in phase space is described for different characteristic regions in parameter space and the associated features of the junction IV curve to be expected are pointed...... out. The main objective is to provide a qualitative understanding of the junction behavior, to clarify which kinds of properties may be derived from the shunted-junction model, and to specify the relative arrangement of the important domains in the parameter-space decomposition....

  16. Production, decay, and mixing models of the iota meson. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, W.F.; Pinsky, S.S.

    1987-01-01

    A five-channel mixing model for the ground and radially excited isoscalar pseudoscalar states and a glueball is presented. The model extends previous work by including two-body unitary corrections, following the technique of Toernqvist. The unitary corrections include contributions from three classes of two-body intermediate states: pseudoscalar-vector, pseudoscalar-scalar, and vector-vector states. All necessary three-body couplings are extracted from decay data. The solution of the mixing model provides information about the bare mass of the glueball and the fundamental quark-glue coupling. The solution also gives the composition of the wave function of the physical states in terms of the bare quark and glue states. Finally, it is shown how the coupling constants extracted from decay data can be used to calculate the decay rates of the five physical states to all two-body channels

  17. Horns Rev II, 2D-Model Tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Lykke; Frigaard, Peter

    This report present the results of 2D physical model tests carried out in the shallow wave flume at Dept. of Civil Engineering, Aalborg University (AAU). The objective of the tests was: To investigate the combined influence of the pile diameter to water depth ratio and the wave height to water...... depth ratio on wave run-up of piles. The measurements should be used to design access platforms on piles. The Model tests include: Calibration of regular and irregular sea states at the location of the pile (without structure in place). Measurement of wave run-up for the calibrated sea states...... on the front side of the pile (0 to 90 degrees). These tests have been conducted at Aalborg University from 9. October, 2006 to 8. November, 2006. Unless otherwise mentioned, all values given in this report are in model scale....

  18. GSTARS computer models and their applications, Part II: Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoes, F.J.M.; Yang, C.T.

    2008-01-01

    In part 1 of this two-paper series, a brief summary of the basic concepts and theories used in developing the Generalized Stream Tube model for Alluvial River Simulation (GSTARS) computer models was presented. Part 2 provides examples that illustrate some of the capabilities of the GSTARS models and how they can be applied to solve a wide range of river and reservoir sedimentation problems. Laboratory and field case studies are used and the examples show representative applications of the earlier and of the more recent versions of GSTARS. Some of the more recent capabilities implemented in GSTARS3, one of the latest versions of the series, are also discussed here with more detail. ?? 2008 International Research and Training Centre on Erosion and Sedimentation and the World Association for Sedimentation and Erosion Research.

  19. Contact Modelling in Resistance Welding, Part II: Experimental Validation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Quanfeng; Zhang, Wenqi; Bay, Niels

    2006-01-01

    Contact algorithms in resistance welding presented in the previous paper are experimentally validated in the present paper. In order to verify the mechanical contact algorithm, two types of experiments, i.e. sandwich upsetting of circular, cylindrical specimens and compression tests of discs...... with a solid ring projection towards a flat ring, are carried out at room temperature. The complete algorithm, involving not only the mechanical model but also the thermal and electrical models, is validated by projection welding experiments. The experimental results are in satisfactory agreement...

  20. The Adsorption of Cd(II) on Manganese Oxide Investigated by Batch and Modeling Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaoming; Chen, Tianhu; Zou, Xuehua; Zhu, Mulan; Chen, Dong; Pan, Min

    2017-09-28

    Manganese (Mn) oxide is a ubiquitous metal oxide in sub-environments. The adsorption of Cd(II) on Mn oxide as function of adsorption time, pH, ionic strength, temperature, and initial Cd(II) concentration was investigated by batch techniques. The adsorption kinetics showed that the adsorption of Cd(II) on Mn oxide can be satisfactorily simulated by pseudo-second-order kinetic model with high correlation coefficients (R² > 0.999). The adsorption of Cd(II) on Mn oxide significantly decreased with increasing ionic strength at pH adsorption was independent of ionic strength at pH > 6.0, which indicated that outer-sphere and inner-sphere surface complexation dominated the adsorption of Cd(II) on Mn oxide at pH 6.0, respectively. The maximum adsorption capacity of Mn oxide for Cd(II) calculated from Langmuir model was 104.17 mg/g at pH 6.0 and 298 K. The thermodynamic parameters showed that the adsorption of Cd(II) on Mn oxide was an endothermic and spontaneous process. According to the results of surface complexation modeling, the adsorption of Cd(II) on Mn oxide can be satisfactorily simulated by ion exchange sites (X₂Cd) at low pH and inner-sphere surface complexation sites (SOCd⁺ and (SO)₂CdOH - species) at high pH conditions. The finding presented herein plays an important role in understanding the fate and transport of heavy metals at the water-mineral interface.

  1. The Adsorption of Cd(II) on Manganese Oxide Investigated by Batch and Modeling Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaoming; Chen, Tianhu; Zou, Xuehua; Zhu, Mulan; Chen, Dong

    2017-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) oxide is a ubiquitous metal oxide in sub-environments. The adsorption of Cd(II) on Mn oxide as function of adsorption time, pH, ionic strength, temperature, and initial Cd(II) concentration was investigated by batch techniques. The adsorption kinetics showed that the adsorption of Cd(II) on Mn oxide can be satisfactorily simulated by pseudo-second-order kinetic model with high correlation coefficients (R2 > 0.999). The adsorption of Cd(II) on Mn oxide significantly decreased with increasing ionic strength at pH adsorption was independent of ionic strength at pH > 6.0, which indicated that outer-sphere and inner-sphere surface complexation dominated the adsorption of Cd(II) on Mn oxide at pH 6.0, respectively. The maximum adsorption capacity of Mn oxide for Cd(II) calculated from Langmuir model was 104.17 mg/g at pH 6.0 and 298 K. The thermodynamic parameters showed that the adsorption of Cd(II) on Mn oxide was an endothermic and spontaneous process. According to the results of surface complexation modeling, the adsorption of Cd(II) on Mn oxide can be satisfactorily simulated by ion exchange sites (X2Cd) at low pH and inner-sphere surface complexation sites (SOCd+ and (SO)2CdOH− species) at high pH conditions. The finding presented herein plays an important role in understanding the fate and transport of heavy metals at the water–mineral interface. PMID:28956849

  2. Homology modeling and docking of AahII-Nanobody complexes reveal the epitope binding site on AahII scorpion toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ksouri, Ayoub; Ghedira, Kais; Ben Abderrazek, Rahma; Shankar, B A Gowri; Benkahla, Alia; Bishop, Ozlem Tastan; Bouhaouala-Zahar, Balkiss

    2018-02-19

    Scorpion envenoming and its treatment is a public health problem in many parts of the world due to highly toxic venom polypeptides diffusing rapidly within the body of severely envenomed victims. Recently, 38 AahII-specific Nanobody sequences (Nbs) were retrieved from which the performance of NbAahII10 nanobody candidate, to neutralize the most poisonous venom compound namely AahII acting on sodium channels, was established. Herein, structural computational approach is conducted to elucidate the Nb-AahII interactions that support the biological characteristics, using Nb multiple sequence alignment (MSA) followed by modeling and molecular docking investigations (RosettaAntibody, ZDOCK software tools). Sequence and structural analysis showed two dissimilar residues of NbAahII10 CDR1 (Tyr27 and Tyr29) and an inserted polar residue Ser30 that appear to play an important role. Indeed, CDR3 region of NbAahII10 is characterized by a specific Met104 and two negatively charged residues Asp115 and Asp117. Complex dockings reveal that NbAahII17 and NbAahII38 share one common binding site on the surface of the AahII toxin divergent from the NbAahII10 one's. At least, a couple of NbAahII10 - AahII residue interactions (Gln38 - Asn44 and Arg62, His64, respectively) are mainly involved in the toxic AahII binding site. Altogether, this study gives valuable insights in the design and development of next generation of antivenom. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Open Business Models (Latin America) - Phase II | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    English · Français ... Open business is a different way of doing business related to information, knowledge and culture, in which intellectual ... Open business models include, for example, making content or services available free of charge and ...

  4. Modeling multibody systems with uncertainties. Part II: Numerical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandu, Corina; Sandu, Adrian; Ahmadian, Mehdi

    2006-01-01

    This study applies generalized polynomial chaos theory to model complex nonlinear multibody dynamic systems operating in the presence of parametric and external uncertainty. Theoretical and computational aspects of this methodology are discussed in the companion paper 'Modeling Multibody Dynamic Systems With Uncertainties. Part I: Theoretical and Computational Aspects .In this paper we illustrate the methodology on selected test cases. The combined effects of parametric and forcing uncertainties are studied for a quarter car model. The uncertainty distributions in the system response in both time and frequency domains are validated against Monte-Carlo simulations. Results indicate that polynomial chaos is more efficient than Monte Carlo and more accurate than statistical linearization. The results of the direct collocation approach are similar to the ones obtained with the Galerkin approach. A stochastic terrain model is constructed using a truncated Karhunen-Loeve expansion. The application of polynomial chaos to differential-algebraic systems is illustrated using the constrained pendulum problem. Limitations of the polynomial chaos approach are studied on two different test problems, one with multiple attractor points, and the second with a chaotic evolution and a nonlinear attractor set. The overall conclusion is that, despite its limitations, generalized polynomial chaos is a powerful approach for the simulation of multibody dynamic systems with uncertainties

  5. Modeling multibody systems with uncertainties. Part II: Numerical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandu, Corina, E-mail: csandu@vt.edu; Sandu, Adrian; Ahmadian, Mehdi [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Mechanical Engineering Department (United States)

    2006-04-15

    This study applies generalized polynomial chaos theory to model complex nonlinear multibody dynamic systems operating in the presence of parametric and external uncertainty. Theoretical and computational aspects of this methodology are discussed in the companion paper 'Modeling Multibody Dynamic Systems With Uncertainties. Part I: Theoretical and Computational Aspects .In this paper we illustrate the methodology on selected test cases. The combined effects of parametric and forcing uncertainties are studied for a quarter car model. The uncertainty distributions in the system response in both time and frequency domains are validated against Monte-Carlo simulations. Results indicate that polynomial chaos is more efficient than Monte Carlo and more accurate than statistical linearization. The results of the direct collocation approach are similar to the ones obtained with the Galerkin approach. A stochastic terrain model is constructed using a truncated Karhunen-Loeve expansion. The application of polynomial chaos to differential-algebraic systems is illustrated using the constrained pendulum problem. Limitations of the polynomial chaos approach are studied on two different test problems, one with multiple attractor points, and the second with a chaotic evolution and a nonlinear attractor set. The overall conclusion is that, despite its limitations, generalized polynomial chaos is a powerful approach for the simulation of multibody dynamic systems with uncertainties.

  6. Bianchi Type-II inflationary models with constant deceleration ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ginning of the 1980s, nowadays receives a great deal of attention. Guth [1] proposed inflationary model in the context of grand unified theory (GUT), which has been accepted soon as the ..... where m1(> 0) is a constant of integration and n = 3. .... interesting feature of the present solution is that it is possible to exit from expo-.

  7. Demonstrations in Solute Transport Using Dyes: Part II. Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butters, Greg; Bandaranayake, Wije

    1993-01-01

    A solution of the convection-dispersion equation is used to describe the solute breakthrough curves generated in the demonstrations in the companion paper. Estimation of the best fit model parameters (solute velocity, dispersion, and retardation) is illustrated using the method of moments for an example data set. (Author/MDH)

  8. Multilayer piezoelectric transducer models combined with Field II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bæk, David; Willatzen, Morten; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2012-01-01

    One-dimensional and three-dimensional axisymmetric transducer model have been compared to determine their feasibility to predict the volt-to-surface impulse response of a circular Pz27 piezoceramic disc. The ceramic is assumed mounted with silver electrodes, bounded at the outer circular boundary...

  9. PHYSICS OF ECLIPSING BINARIES. II. TOWARD THE INCREASED MODEL FIDELITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prša, A.; Conroy, K. E.; Horvat, M.; Kochoska, A.; Hambleton, K. M. [Villanova University, Dept. of Astrophysics and Planetary Sciences, 800 E Lancaster Avenue, Villanova PA 19085 (United States); Pablo, H. [Université de Montréal, Pavillon Roger-Gaudry, 2900, boul. Édouard-Montpetit Montréal QC H3T 1J4 (Canada); Bloemen, S. [Radboud University Nijmegen, Department of Astrophysics, IMAPP, P.O. Box 9010, 6500 GL, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Giammarco, J. [Eastern University, Dept. of Astronomy and Physics, 1300 Eagle Road, St. Davids, PA 19087 (United States); Degroote, P. [KU Leuven, Instituut voor Sterrenkunde, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium)

    2016-12-01

    The precision of photometric and spectroscopic observations has been systematically improved in the last decade, mostly thanks to space-borne photometric missions and ground-based spectrographs dedicated to finding exoplanets. The field of eclipsing binary stars strongly benefited from this development. Eclipsing binaries serve as critical tools for determining fundamental stellar properties (masses, radii, temperatures, and luminosities), yet the models are not capable of reproducing observed data well, either because of the missing physics or because of insufficient precision. This led to a predicament where radiative and dynamical effects, insofar buried in noise, started showing up routinely in the data, but were not accounted for in the models. PHOEBE (PHysics Of Eclipsing BinariEs; http://phoebe-project.org) is an open source modeling code for computing theoretical light and radial velocity curves that addresses both problems by incorporating missing physics and by increasing the computational fidelity. In particular, we discuss triangulation as a superior surface discretization algorithm, meshing of rotating single stars, light travel time effects, advanced phase computation, volume conservation in eccentric orbits, and improved computation of local intensity across the stellar surfaces that includes the photon-weighted mode, the enhanced limb darkening treatment, the better reflection treatment, and Doppler boosting. Here we present the concepts on which PHOEBE is built and proofs of concept that demonstrate the increased model fidelity.

  10. Simulation of reactive nanolaminates using reduced models: II. Normal propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salloum, Maher; Knio, Omar M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218-2686 (United States)

    2010-03-15

    Transient normal flame propagation in reactive Ni/Al multilayers is analyzed computationally. Two approaches are implemented, based on generalization of earlier methodology developed for axial propagation, and on extension of the model reduction formalism introduced in Part I. In both cases, the formulation accommodates non-uniform layering as well as the presence of inert layers. The equations of motion for the reactive system are integrated using a specially-tailored integration scheme, that combines extended-stability, Runge-Kutta-Chebychev (RKC) integration of diffusion terms with exact treatment of the chemical source term. The detailed and reduced models are first applied to the analysis of self-propagating fronts in uniformly-layered materials. Results indicate that both the front velocities and the ignition threshold are comparable for normal and axial propagation. Attention is then focused on analyzing the effect of a gap composed of inert material on reaction propagation. In particular, the impacts of gap width and thermal conductivity are briefly addressed. Finally, an example is considered illustrating reaction propagation in reactive composites combining regions corresponding to two bilayer widths. This setup is used to analyze the effect of the layering frequency on the velocity of the corresponding reaction fronts. In all cases considered, good agreement is observed between the predictions of the detailed model and the reduced model, which provides further support for adoption of the latter. (author)

  11. Storm Water Management Model Reference Manual Volume II – Hydraulics

    Science.gov (United States)

    SWMM is a dynamic rainfall-runoff simulation model used for single event or long-term (continuous) simulation of runoff quantity and quality from primarily urban areas. The runoff component of SWMM operates on a collection of subcatchment areas that receive precipitation and gene...

  12. Modeling Degradation in Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells - Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manohar Motwani

    2011-09-01

    Idaho National Laboratory has an ongoing project to generate hydrogen from steam using solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs). To accomplish this, technical and degradation issues associated with the SOECs will need to be addressed. This report covers various approaches being pursued to model degradation issues in SOECs. An electrochemical model for degradation of SOECs is presented. The model is based on concepts in local thermodynamic equilibrium in systems otherwise in global thermodynamic non-equilibrium. It is shown that electronic conduction through the electrolyte, however small, must be taken into account for determining local oxygen chemical potential,, within the electrolyte. The within the electrolyte may lie out of bounds in relation to values at the electrodes in the electrolyzer mode. Under certain conditions, high pressures can develop in the electrolyte just near the oxygen electrode/electrolyte interface, leading to oxygen electrode delamination. These predictions are in accordance with the reported literature on the subject. Development of high pressures may be avoided by introducing some electronic conduction in the electrolyte. By combining equilibrium thermodynamics, non-equilibrium (diffusion) modeling, and first-principles, atomic scale calculations were performed to understand the degradation mechanisms and provide practical recommendations on how to inhibit and/or completely mitigate them.

  13. PULSATING REVERSE DETONATION MODELS OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE. II. EXPLOSION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bravo, Eduardo; Garcia-Senz, Domingo; Cabezon, Ruben M.; DomInguez, Inmaculada

    2009-01-01

    Observational evidences point to a common explosion mechanism of Type Ia supernovae based on a delayed detonation of a white dwarf (WD). However, all attempts to find a convincing ignition mechanism based on a delayed detonation in a destabilized, expanding, white dwarf have been elusive so far. One of the possibilities that has been invoked is that an inefficient deflagration leads to pulsation of a Chandrasekhar-mass WD, followed by formation of an accretion shock that confines a carbon-oxygen rich core, while transforming the kinetic energy of the collapsing halo into thermal energy of the core, until an inward moving detonation is formed. This chain of events has been termed Pulsating Reverse Detonation (PRD). In this work, we present three-dimensional numerical simulations of PRD models from the time of detonation initiation up to homologous expansion. Different models characterized by the amount of mass burned during the deflagration phase, M defl , give explosions spanning a range of kinetic energies, K ∼ (1.0-1.2) x 10 51 erg, and 56 Ni masses, M( 56 Ni) ∼ 0.6-0.8 M sun , which are compatible with what is expected for typical Type Ia supernovae. Spectra and light curves of angle-averaged spherically symmetric versions of the PRD models are discussed. Type Ia supernova spectra pose the most stringent requirements on PRD models.

  14. Search for heavy resonances in two-particle final states with leptons, jets and photons at CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Gueth, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    At the LHC, the production of heavy resonances decaying into a pair of particles can be probed at unprecedented centre-of-mass energies. Two-particle resonances are predicted in a variety of BSM models and can be searched for in a largely model-independent fashion. Results from searches for resonances in final states with leptons, jets and photons based on the full dataset of 20/fb taken by the CMS detector in 2012 in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV are presented. They are interpreted in terms of various theories of BSM physics ranging from generic heavy resonances such as the Z' to excited quarks or Randall-Sundrum gravitons. In the absence of a significant deviation from the expected SM background 95\\% CL limits are set on model parameters of the theories under study.

  15. Search for ttbar resonances in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Camacho, R; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    There are many theories trying to remedy the weaknesses of the Standard Model (SM). Some of these theories include new phenomena that couple preferentially with the top quark, due to its large mass of about 173 GeV. Predicting, for example, the existence of new resonances decaying into top quark pairs. A search for new heavy particles decaying into ttbar pairs in the lepton plus jets channel using ~200 pb-1 pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy of √s=7 TeV collected at the beginning of 2011 with the ATLAS detector has been performed. The models of new physics used as benchmarks in this search are a topcolor Z' boson and a Kaluza-Klein gluon gKK in Randall-Sundrum model. The main results are presented.

  16. Higgs couplings and phenomenology in a warped extra dimension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malm, Raoul; Neubert, Matthias; Schmell, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    We present a comprehensive description of the Higgs-boson couplings to Standard Model fermions and bosons in Randall-Sundrum (RS) models with a Higgs sector localized on or near the infra-red brane. The analytic results for all relevant Higgs couplings including the loop-induced couplings to gluons and photons are summarized for both the minimal and the custodial RS model. The RS predictions for all relevant Higgs decays are compared with current LHC data, which already exclude significant portions of the parameter space. We show that the latest measurements are sensitive to KK gluon masses up to 22.7 TeV×(y ⋆ /3) at 95% confidence level for anarchic 5D Yukawa couplings bounded from above by |(Y f ) ij |≤y ⋆ . We also derive the sensitivity levels attainable in the high-luminosity run of the LHC and at a future linear collider.

  17. Search for new phenomena in high-mass diphoton state with ATLAS at $\\sqrt{s}$ =13 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Meideck, Thomas; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    After the discovery of the Higgs boson, one of the most important task of high energy physics at the LHC is to look for signatures of new physics beyond the Standard Model (SM). In various extensions of the SM, new high mass states are decaying into two photons. Searches for such states in the ATLAS experiment at the LHC are described in this poster. The analysis is based on pp collisions data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 36.7 fb-1 at $\\sqrt{s}$ =13 TeV recorded in 2015 and 2016. Two different studies are performed, one targeted for the search of a spin-2 particle, using the Randall-Sundrum and the ADD extra-dimension model as benchmark models, and one optimized for the search of a spin-0 particle.

  18. RS-A{sub 4} relaxation of flavor and CP violation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadosh, Avihay, E-mail: a.kadosh@rug.nl [University of Groningen, Centre for Theoretical Physics (Netherlands)

    2013-03-15

    I discuss a model based on an A{sub 4} bulk flavor symmetry in the Randall-Sundrum (RS) setup. After discussing the setup and leading order results for the masses and mixings of quarks and leptons, I elaborate on the effect of higher order 'cross-talk' corrections, their contributions to flavor violating processes and the resulting constraints on the model parameter space and the Kaluza-Klein (KK) mass scale. In addition, I present a systematic study of higher order corrections to the PMNS matrix in light of the recent measurements of {theta}{sub 13} > 0 by RENO and Daya Bay. Finally, I also comment on the model new physics contributions to B{sub s,d} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} and {mu} {yields} e{gamma}, in light of the new upper bounds recently set by the LHCb and MEG experiment.

  19. On the flavor problem in strongly coupled theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Martin

    2012-11-28

    This thesis is on the flavor problem of Randall Sundrum models and their strongly coupled dual theories. These models are particularly well motivated extensions of the Standard Model, because they simultaneously address the gauge hierarchy problem and the hierarchies in the quark masses and mixings. In order to put this into context, special attention is given to concepts underlying the theories which can explain the hierarchy problem and the flavor structure of the Standard Model (SM). The AdS/CFT duality is introduced and its implications for the Randall Sundrum model with fermions in the bulk and general bulk gauge groups is investigated. It is shown that the different terms in the general 5D propagator of a bulk gauge field can be related to the corresponding diagrams of the strongly coupled dual, which allows for a deeper understanding of the origin of flavor changing neutral currents generated by the exchange of the Kaluza Klein excitations of these bulk fields. In the numerical analysis, different observables which are sensitive to corrections from the tree-level exchange of these resonances will be presented on the basis of updated experimental data from the Tevatron and LHC experiments. This includes electroweak precision observables, namely corrections to the S and T parameters followed by corrections to the Zb anti b vertex, flavor changing observables with flavor changes at one vertex, viz. B(B{sub d}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}) and B(B{sub s}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}), and two vertices, viz. S{sub {psi}{phi}} and vertical stroke {epsilon}{sub K} vertical stroke, as well as bounds from direct detection experiments. The analysis will show that all of these bounds can be brought in agreement with a new physics scale {Lambda}{sub NP} in the TeV range, except for the CP violating quantity vertical stroke {epsilon}{sub K} vertical stroke, which requires {Lambda}{sub NP}=O(10) TeV in the absence of fine-tuning. The numerous modifications of the

  20. On the flavor problem in strongly coupled theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, Martin

    2012-01-01

    This thesis is on the flavor problem of Randall Sundrum models and their strongly coupled dual theories. These models are particularly well motivated extensions of the Standard Model, because they simultaneously address the gauge hierarchy problem and the hierarchies in the quark masses and mixings. In order to put this into context, special attention is given to concepts underlying the theories which can explain the hierarchy problem and the flavor structure of the Standard Model (SM). The AdS/CFT duality is introduced and its implications for the Randall Sundrum model with fermions in the bulk and general bulk gauge groups is investigated. It is shown that the different terms in the general 5D propagator of a bulk gauge field can be related to the corresponding diagrams of the strongly coupled dual, which allows for a deeper understanding of the origin of flavor changing neutral currents generated by the exchange of the Kaluza Klein excitations of these bulk fields. In the numerical analysis, different observables which are sensitive to corrections from the tree-level exchange of these resonances will be presented on the basis of updated experimental data from the Tevatron and LHC experiments. This includes electroweak precision observables, namely corrections to the S and T parameters followed by corrections to the Zb anti b vertex, flavor changing observables with flavor changes at one vertex, viz. B(B d →μ + μ - ) and B(B s →μ + μ - ), and two vertices, viz. S ψφ and vertical stroke ε K vertical stroke, as well as bounds from direct detection experiments. The analysis will show that all of these bounds can be brought in agreement with a new physics scale Λ NP in the TeV range, except for the CP violating quantity vertical stroke ε K vertical stroke, which requires Λ NP =O(10) TeV in the absence of fine-tuning. The numerous modifications of the Randall Sundrum model in the literature, which try to attenuate this bound are reviewed and categorized

  1. Solving seismological problems using sgraph program: II-waveform modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelwahed, Mohamed F.

    2012-01-01

    One of the seismological programs to manipulate seismic data is SGRAPH program. It consists of integrated tools to perform advanced seismological techniques. SGRAPH is considered a new system for maintaining and analyze seismic waveform data in a stand-alone Windows-based application that manipulate a wide range of data formats. SGRAPH was described in detail in the first part of this paper. In this part, I discuss the advanced techniques including in the program and its applications in seismology. Because of the numerous tools included in the program, only SGRAPH is sufficient to perform the basic waveform analysis and to solve advanced seismological problems. In the first part of this paper, the application of the source parameters estimation and hypocentral location was given. Here, I discuss SGRAPH waveform modeling tools. This paper exhibits examples of how to apply the SGRAPH tools to perform waveform modeling for estimating the focal mechanism and crustal structure of local earthquakes.

  2. Unified model of current-hadronic interactions. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moffat, J.W.; Wright, A.C.D.

    1975-01-01

    An analytic model of current-hadronic interactions is used to make predictions which are compared with recent data for vector-meson electroproduction and for the spin density matrix of photoproduced rho 0 mesons. The rho 0 and ω electroproduction cross sections are predicted to behave differently as the mass of the virtual photon varies; the diffraction peak broadens with increasing -q 2 at fixed ν and narrows with increasing energy. The predicted rho 0 density matrix elements do not possess the approximate s-channel helicity conservation seen experimentally. The model is continued to the inclusive electron-positron annihilation region, where parameter-free predictions are given for the inclusive prosess e + + e - → p + hadrons. The annihilation structure functions are found to have nontrivial scale-invariance limits. By using total cross-section data for e + e - annihilation into hardrons, we predict the mean multiplicity for the production of nucleons

  3. MODELING OF TARGETED DRUG DELIVERY PART II. MULTIPLE DRUG ADMINISTRATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Zaborovskiy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In oncology practice, despite significant advances in early cancer detection, surgery, radiotherapy, laser therapy, targeted therapy, etc., chemotherapy is unlikely to lose its relevance in the near future. In this context, the development of new antitumor agents is one of the most important problems of cancer research. In spite of the importance of searching for new compounds with antitumor activity, the possibilities of the “old” agents have not been fully exhausted. Targeted delivery of antitumor agents can give them a “second life”. When developing new targeted drugs and their further introduction into clinical practice, the change in their pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics plays a special role. The paper describes a pharmacokinetic model of the targeted drug delivery. The conditions under which it is meaningful to search for a delivery vehicle for the active substance were described. Primary screening of antitumor agents was undertaken to modify them for the targeted delivery based on underlying assumptions of the model.

  4. Differential geometry based solvation model II: Lagrangian formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhan; Baker, Nathan A; Wei, G W

    2011-12-01

    Solvation is an elementary process in nature and is of paramount importance to more sophisticated chemical, biological and biomolecular processes. The understanding of solvation is an essential prerequisite for the quantitative description and analysis of biomolecular systems. This work presents a Lagrangian formulation of our differential geometry based solvation models. The Lagrangian representation of biomolecular surfaces has a few utilities/advantages. First, it provides an essential basis for biomolecular visualization, surface electrostatic potential map and visual perception of biomolecules. Additionally, it is consistent with the conventional setting of implicit solvent theories and thus, many existing theoretical algorithms and computational software packages can be directly employed. Finally, the Lagrangian representation does not need to resort to artificially enlarged van der Waals radii as often required by the Eulerian representation in solvation analysis. The main goal of the present work is to analyze the connection, similarity and difference between the Eulerian and Lagrangian formalisms of the solvation model. Such analysis is important to the understanding of the differential geometry based solvation model. The present model extends the scaled particle theory of nonpolar solvation model with a solvent-solute interaction potential. The nonpolar solvation model is completed with a Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) theory based polar solvation model. The differential geometry theory of surfaces is employed to provide a natural description of solvent-solute interfaces. The optimization of the total free energy functional, which encompasses the polar and nonpolar contributions, leads to coupled potential driven geometric flow and PB equations. Due to the development of singularities and nonsmooth manifolds in the Lagrangian representation, the resulting potential-driven geometric flow equation is embedded into the Eulerian representation for the purpose of

  5. Statistical models of a gas diffusion electrode: II. Current resistent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Proksch, D B; Winsel, O W

    1965-07-01

    The authors describe an apparatus for measuring the flow resistance of gas diffusion electrodes which is a mechanical analog of the Wheatstone bridge for measuring electric resistance. The flow resistance of a circular DSK electrode sheet, consisting of two covering layers and a working layer between them, was measured as a function of the gas pressure. While the pressure first was increased and then decreased, a hysteresis occurred, which is discussed and explained by a statistical model of a porous electrode.

  6. Physics Of Eclipsing Binaries. II. Towards the Increased Model Fidelity

    OpenAIRE

    Prša, Andrej; Conroy, Kyle E.; Horvat, Martin; Pablo, Herbert; Kochoska, Angela; Bloemen, Steven; Giammarco, Joseph; Hambleton, Kelly M.; Degroote, Pieter

    2016-01-01

    The precision of photometric and spectroscopic observations has been systematically improved in the last decade, mostly thanks to space-borne photometric missions and ground-based spectrographs dedicated to finding exoplanets. The field of eclipsing binary stars strongly benefited from this development. Eclipsing binaries serve as critical tools for determining fundamental stellar properties (masses, radii, temperatures and luminosities), yet the models are not capable of reproducing observed...

  7. Horns Rev II, 2D-Model Tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Lykke; Brorsen, Michael

    This report present the results of 2D physical model tests carried out in the shallow wave flume at Dept. of Civil Engineering, Aalborg University (AAU), Denmark. The starting point for the present report is the previously carried out run-up tests described in Lykke Andersen & Frigaard, 2006. The......-shaped access platforms on piles. The Model tests include mainly regular waves and a few irregular wave tests. These tests have been conducted at Aalborg University from 9. November, 2006 to 17. November, 2006.......This report present the results of 2D physical model tests carried out in the shallow wave flume at Dept. of Civil Engineering, Aalborg University (AAU), Denmark. The starting point for the present report is the previously carried out run-up tests described in Lykke Andersen & Frigaard, 2006....... The objective of the tests was to investigate the impact pressures generated on a horizontal platform and a cone platform for selected sea states calibrated by Lykke Andersen & Frigaard, 2006. The measurements should be used for assessment of slamming coefficients for the design of horizontal and cone...

  8. Model of comet comae. II. Effects of solar photodissociative ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huebner, W.F.; Giguere, P.T.

    1980-01-01

    Improvements to our computer model of coma plotochemistry are described. These include an expansion of the chemical reactions network and new rate constants that have been measured only recently. Photolytic reactions of additional molecules are incorporated, and photolytic branching ratios are treated in far greater detail than in our previous work. A total of 25 photodissociative ionization (PDI) reactions are now considered (as compared to only 3 PDI reactions previously). Solar PDI of the mother molecule CO 2 is shown to compete effectively with photoionization of CO in the production of observed CO + . The CO + density peak predicted by our improved model, for COP 2 or CO mother molecules, is deep in the inner coma, in better agreement with observation than our old CO 2 model. However, neither CO 2 nor CO mother molecule calculations reproduce the CO + /H 2 O + ratio observed in comet Kohoutek. PDI products of CO 2 , CO, CH 4 , and NH 3 mother molecules fuel a complex chemistry scheme, producing inner coma abundances of CN, C 2 , and C 3 much greater than previously calculated

  9. Slag Behavior in Gasifiers. Part II: Constitutive Modeling of Slag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massoudi, Mehrdad [National Energy Technology Laboratory; Wang, Ping

    2013-02-07

    The viscosity of slag and the thermal conductivity of ash deposits are among two of the most important constitutive parameters that need to be studied. The accurate formulation or representations of the (transport) properties of coal present a special challenge of modeling efforts in computational fluid dynamics applications. Studies have indicated that slag viscosity must be within a certain range of temperatures for tapping and the membrane wall to be accessible, for example, between 1,300 °C and 1,500 °C, the viscosity is approximately 25 Pa·s. As the operating temperature decreases, the slag cools and solid crystals begin to form. Since slag behaves as a non-linear fluid, we discuss the constitutive modeling of slag and the important parameters that must be studied. We propose a new constitutive model, where the stress tensor not only has a yield stress part, but it also has a viscous part with a shear rate dependency of the viscosity, along with temperature and concentration dependency, while allowing for the possibility of the normal stress effects. In Part I, we reviewed, identify and discuss the key coal ash properties and the operating conditions impacting slag behavior.

  10. A GLOBAL MAGNETIC TOPOLOGY MODEL FOR MAGNETIC CLOUDS. II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hidalgo, M. A., E-mail: miguel.hidalgo@uah.es [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Alcala, Apartado 20, E-28871 Alcala de Henares, Madrid (Spain)

    2013-04-01

    In the present work, we extensively used our analytical approach to the global magnetic field topology of magnetic clouds (MCs), introduced in a previous paper, in order to show its potential and to study its physical consistency. The model assumes toroidal topology with a non-uniform (variable maximum radius) cross-section along them. Moreover, it has a non-force-free character and also includes the expansion of its cross-section. As is shown, the model allows us, first, to analyze MC magnetic structures-determining their physical parameters-with a variety of magnetic field shapes, and second, to reconstruct their relative orientation in the interplanetary medium from the observations obtained by several spacecraft. Therefore, multipoint spacecraft observations give the opportunity to infer the structure of this large-scale magnetic flux rope structure in the solar wind. For these tasks, we use data from Helios (A and B), STEREO (A and B), and Advanced Composition Explorer. We show that the proposed analytical model can explain quite well the topology of several MCs in the interplanetary medium and is a good starting point for understanding the physical mechanisms under these phenomena.

  11. Tachyon with an inverse power-law potential in a braneworld cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilić, Neven; Domazet, Silvije; Djordjevic, Goran S.

    2017-08-01

    We study a tachyon cosmological model based on the dynamics of a 3-brane in the bulk of the second Randall-Sundrum model extended to more general warp functions. A well known prototype of such a generalization is the bulk with a selfinteracting scalar field. As a consequence of a generalized bulk geometry the cosmology on the observer brane is modified by the scale dependent four-dimensional gravitational constant. In particular, we study a power law warp factor which generates an inverse power-law potential V\\propto \\varphi-n of the tachyon field φ. We find a critical power n cr that divides two subclasses with distinct asymptotic behaviors: a dust universe for n>n_cr and a quasi de Sitter universe for 0.

  12. Cosmological and theoretical aspects of higher dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fairbairn, M.

    2001-01-01

    This thesis deals with various aspects of higher dimensional particle physics theories. First we consider varying constant models where the size of the extra dimensions changes over time. In particular we focus on the effect of a time varying strong coupling constant and its implications for carbon burning in supernovae and the stability of the deuteron. Next we look at cosmological constraints on the size of large extra dimensions which come from the necessity to avoid the over-production of massive Kaluza-Klein modes which might instigate an early matter domination and decrease the age of the universe unacceptably. Finally we consider the possibility of embedding the 2nd Randall-Sundrum model within a supersymmetric theory inspired by M-theory. (author)

  13. Modified Friedmann equation and inflation in a warped codimension-two braneworld

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Fang; Cline, James M.; Kanno, Sugumi

    2008-01-01

    We study the Friedmann equation for the warped codimension-two braneworld background which most closely resembles the Randall-Sundrum model. Extra matter on the (Planck) 4-brane, with equation of state p θ =(α-1)ρ for the azimuthal pressure, is required to satisfy the junction conditions. For 1 5 the model is intrinsically stable, without the need for a GW field, and in this case we show that inflationary predictions can be modified by the nonstandard Friedmann equation; in particular, it is possible to get an upper limit on the spectral index, large deviations from the consistency condition between the tensor spectrum and ratio r, and large running of the spectral index even though the slow-roll parameters remain small.

  14. Three-body model of deuteron breakup and stripping, II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Austern, N.; Vincent, C.M.; Farrell, J.P. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    A previously investigated three-body model of the deuteron-nucleus system, limited to relative angular momentum l=0 for the two active nucleons, is reevaluated. Full attention is given to self-consistency between elastic and breakup channels. Introduction of the reaction of breakup on the elastic channel now reduces the elastic reflection coefficients in low partial waves by nearly a factor of 2 and causes substantial shifts in phase. Breakup amplitudes in low partial waves are also greatly reduced. As before, the breakup part of the wavefunction contains a broad specteum of n-p continuum states. The breakup part of the wavefunction at zero n-p separation is localized at small radii, within and just outside the target nucleus, where it is comparable in magnitude with the projected elastic channel wavefunction. As a result, the projected elastic channel wavefuntion is a poor approximation to the full wavefunction at n-p coincidence. Deuteron stripping theories that use the projected elastic wavefunction in a truncated distorted waves Born series must correspondingly be quite misleading. To investigate deuteron stripping further, the exact result of the coupled channels calculation is compared with several standard approximate models. Although there is a close qualitative resemblance among the results of all the approaches, the best single approximation to the coupled channels result is found from the familiar phenomenological approach, in which a local optical potential is fitted to the elastic scattering ''observed'' in the coupled channels calculation. The coupled channels results are also used to analyze the approximations in the Johnson-Soper method. Several formal aspects of the three-body model are discussed

  15. Modeling of the core of Atucha II nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco, Anibal

    2007-01-01

    This work is part of a Nuclear Engineer degree thesis of the Instituto Balseiro and it is carried out under the development of an Argentinean Nuclear Power Plant Simulator. To obtain the best representation of the reactor physical behavior using the state of the art tools this Simulator should couple a 3D neutronics core calculation code with a thermal-hydraulics system code. Focused in the neutronic nature of this job, using PARCS, we modeled and performed calculations of the nuclear power plant Atucha 2 core. Whenever it is possible, we compare our results against results obtained with PUMA (the official core code for Atucha 2). (author) [es

  16. Modern EMC analysis techniques II models and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Kantartzis, Nikolaos V

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this two-volume book is the systematic and comprehensive description of the most competitive time-domain computational methods for the efficient modeling and accurate solution of modern real-world EMC problems. Intended to be self-contained, it performs a detailed presentation of all well-known algorithms, elucidating on their merits or weaknesses, and accompanies the theoretical content with a variety of applications. Outlining the present volume, numerical investigations delve into printed circuit boards, monolithic microwave integrated circuits, radio frequency microelectro

  17. PIO I-II tendencies. Part 2. Improving the pilot modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan URSU

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The study is conceived in two parts and aims to get some contributions to the problem ofPIO aircraft susceptibility analysis. Part I, previously published in this journal, highlighted the mainsteps of deriving a complex model of human pilot. The current Part II of the paper considers a properprocedure of the human pilot mathematical model synthesis in order to analyze PIO II typesusceptibility of a VTOL-type aircraft, related to the presence of position and rate-limited actuator.The mathematical tools are those of semi global stability theory developed in recent works.

  18. Tropospheric ozone and the environment II. Effects, modeling and control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berglund, R.L.

    1992-01-01

    This was the sixth International Specialty Conference on ozone for the Air ampersand Waste Management Association since 1978 and the first to be held in the Southeast. Of the preceding five conferences, three were held in Houston, one in New England, and one in Los Angeles. The changing location continues to support the understanding that tropospheric ozone is a nationwide problem, requiring understanding and participation by representatives of all regions. Yet, questions such as the following continue to be raised over all aspects of the nation's efforts to control ozone. Are the existing primary and secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for ozone the appropriate targets for the ozone control strategy, or should they be modified to more effectively accommodate new health or ecological effects information, or better fit statistical analyses of ozone modeling data? Are the modeling tools presently available adequate to predict ozone concentrations for future precursor emission trends? What ozones attainment strategy will be the best means of meeting the ozone standard? To best answer these and other questions there needs to be a continued sharing of information among researchers working on these and other questions. While answers to these questions will often be qualitative and location specific, they will help focus future research programs and assist in developing future regulatory strategies

  19. MODELING THE 1958 LITUYA BAY MEGA-TSUNAMI, II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles L. Mader

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Lituya Bay, Alaska is a T-Shaped bay, 7 miles long and up to 2 miles wide. The two arms at the head of the bay, Gilbert and Crillon Inlets, are part of a trench along the Fairweather Fault. On July 8, 1958, an 7.5 Magnitude earthquake occurred along the Fairweather fault with an epicenter near Lituya Bay.A mega-tsunami wave was generated that washed out trees to a maximum altitude of 520 meters at the entrance of Gilbert Inlet. Much of the rest of the shoreline of the Bay was denuded by the tsunami from 30 to 200 meters altitude.In the previous study it was determined that if the 520 meter high run-up was 50 to 100 meters thick, the observed inundation in the rest of Lituya Bay could be numerically reproduced. It was also concluded that further studies would require full Navier-Stokes modeling similar to those required for asteroid generated tsunami waves.During the Summer of 2000, Hermann Fritz conducted experiments that reproduced the Lituya Bay 1958 event. The laboratory experiments indicated that the 1958 Lituya Bay 524 meter run-up on the spur ridge of Gilbert Inlet could be caused by a landslide impact.The Lituya Bay impact landslide generated tsunami was modeled with the full Navier- Stokes AMR Eulerian compressible hydrodynamic code called SAGE with includes the effect of gravity.

  20. Spin and Wind Directions II: A Bell State Quantum Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aerts, Diederik; Arguëlles, Jonito Aerts; Beltran, Lester; Geriente, Suzette; Sassoli de Bianchi, Massimiliano; Sozzo, Sandro; Veloz, Tomas

    2018-01-01

    In the first half of this two-part article (Aerts et al. in Found Sci. doi:10.1007/s10699-017-9528-9, 2017b), we analyzed a cognitive psychology experiment where participants were asked to select pairs of directions that they considered to be the best example of Two Different Wind Directions , and showed that the data violate the CHSH version of Bell's inequality, with same magnitude as in typical Bell-test experiments in physics. In this second part, we complete our analysis by presenting a symmetrized version of the experiment, still violating the CHSH inequality but now also obeying the marginal law, for which we provide a full quantum modeling in Hilbert space, using a singlet state and suitably chosen product measurements. We also address some of the criticisms that have been recently directed at experiments of this kind, according to which they would not highlight the presence of genuine forms of entanglement. We explain that these criticisms are based on a view of entanglement that is too restrictive, thus unable to capture all possible ways physical and conceptual entities can connect and form systems behaving as a whole. We also provide an example of a mechanical model showing that the violations of the marginal law and Bell inequalities are generally to be associated with different mechanisms.

  1. Multiphoton production at high energies in the standard model. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahlon, G.

    1993-01-01

    We examine multiphoton production in the electroweak sector of the standard model in the high-energy limit using the equivalence theorem in combination with spinor helicity techniques. We utilize currents consisting of a charged scalar, spinor, or vector line that radiates n photons. Only one end of the charged line is off shell in these currents, which are known for the cases of like-helicity and one unlike-helicity photons. We obtain a wide variety of helicity amplitudes for processes involving two pairs of charged particles by considering combinations of four currents. We examine the situation with respect to currents which have both ends of the charged line off shell, and present solutions for the case of like-helicity photons. These new currents may be combined with two of the original currents to produce additional amplitudes involving Higgs bosons, longitudinal Z, or neutrino pairs

  2. PENERAPAN MODEL THINK-PAIR-SHARE UNTUK MENINGKATKAN KETERAMPILAN MENULIS KELAS II SDN 3 BANJAR JAWA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ningsi Soisana Lakilaf

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk meningkatkan keterampilan menulis siswa  setelah penerapan model pembelajaran Think-Pear-Share bermediakan gambar pada siswa kelas II Semester I di SD Negeri 3 Banjar Jawa, Tahun Pelajaran 2017/2018.Pelaksanaan penelitian ini menggunakan penelitian tindakan kelas (PTK yang dilaksanakan dalam 2 silklus,  setiap siklus  terdiri dari 2 pertemua, dengan tahapan yang terdiri dari (1 perencanaan, (2 pelaksanaan, (3 pengamatan, dan (4 refleksi. Subjek penelitian ini adalah guru dan siswa kelas II SD Negeri 3 Banjar Jawa  dalam penelitian ini adalah teknik tes dan nontes.Hasil penelitian ini menunjukan bahwa dengan menggunakan model pembelajaran Think-Pair-Share bermedia gamabar diketahui bahwa ketuntasan hasil belajar siswa mengalami peningkatan dalam pembelajaran dengan hasil presentasi mendeskripsikan secara tertulis sebelum pelaksanaan tindakan 27%, siklus I 77% dan Siklus II 90 %. Pembelajaran dengan menerapkan model Think-Pair-Share bermedia gambar dapat meningkatkan keterampilan menulis. Kesimpulan dari penelitian ini adalah melalui penerapan model Think- Pair-Share bermedia gambar dapat meningkatkan keterampilan  menulis siswa kelas II SD Negeri 3 Banjar Jawa,. Saran yang dapat diberikan adalah sebaiknya guru lebih aktif dan kreatif dalam melaksanakan pembelajaran yang inovatif dan menyenangkan.   Kata Kunci : Keterampilan menulis, model Think-Pair-Share

  3. Scalar fields and higher-derivative gravity in brane worlds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pichler, S.

    2004-01-01

    We consider the brane world picture in the context of higher-derivative theories of gravity and tackle the problematic issues fine-tuning and brane-embedding. First, we give an overview of extra-dimensional physics, from the Kaluza-Klein picture up to modern brane worlds with large extra dimensions. We describe the different models and their physical impact on future experiments. We work within the framework of Randall-Sundrum models in which the brane is a gravitating object, which warps the background metric. We add scalar fields to the original model and find new and self-consistent solutions for quadratic potentials of the fields. This gives us the tools to investigate higher-derivative gravity theories in brane world models. Specifically, we take gravitational Lagrangians that depend on an arbitrary function of the Ricci scalar only, so-called f(R)-gravity. We make use of the conformal equivalence between f(R)-gravity and Einstein-Hilbert gravity with an auxiliary scalar field. We find that the solutions in the higher-derivative gravity framework behave very differently from the original Randall-Sundrum model: the metric functions do not have the typical kink across the brane. Furthermore, we present solutions that do not rely on a cosmological constant in the bulk and so avoid the fine-tuning problem. We address the issue of brane-embedding, which is important in perturbative analyses. We consider the embedding of codimension one hypersurfaces in general and derive a new equation of motion with which the choice for the embedding has to comply. In particular, this allows for a consistent consideration of brane world perturbations in the case of higher-derivative gravity. We use the newly found background solutions for quadratic potentials and find that gravity is still effectively localized on the brane, i.e that the Newtonian limit holds

  4. Modulus stabilization in a non-flat warped braneworld scenario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banerjee, Indrani [S.N. Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, Department of Astrophysics and Cosmology, Kolkata (India); SenGupta, Soumitra [Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Department of Theoretical Physics, Kolkata (India)

    2017-05-15

    The stability of the modular field in a warped brane world scenario has been a subject of interest for a long time. Goldberger and Wise (GW) proposed a mechanism to achieve this by invoking a massive scalar field in the bulk space-time neglecting the back-reaction. In this work, we examine the possibility of stabilizing the modulus without bringing about any external scalar field. We show that instead of flat 3-branes as considered in Randall-Sundrum (RS) warped braneworld model, if one considers a more generalized version of warped geometry with de Sitter 3-brane, then the brane vacuum energy automatically leads to a modulus potential with a metastable minimum. Our result further reveals that in this scenario the gauge hierarchy problem can also be resolved for an appropriate choice of the brane's cosmological constant. (orig.)

  5. Brick walls on the brane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medved, A J M

    2002-01-01

    The so-called 'brick-wall model' is a semiclassical approach that has been used to explain black hole entropy in terms of thermal matter fields. Here, we apply the brick-wall formalism to thermal bulk fields in a Randall-Sundrum brane world scenario. In this case, the black hole entity is really a string-like object in the anti-de Sitter bulk, while appearing as a Schwarzchild black hole to observers living on the brane. In spite of these exotic circumstances, we establish that the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy law is preserved. Although a similar calculation was recently considered in the literature, this prior study invoked a simplifying assumption (which we avoid) that cannot be adequately justified

  6. Dark matter and dark radiation in brane world cosmology and its observational test in the BBN, CMB and supernovae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajino, T.; Ichiki, F.K.; Garnavich, P.M.; Mathews, G.J.; Yahiro, M.

    2005-01-01

    A massive cold dark matter particle is likely to disappear when it is quantized in a Randall-Sundrum noncompact higher dimensional AdS 5 spacetime. To distinguish disappearance of our dark matter particle from the previous decaying particles, we refer to it as disappearing cold dark matter (DCDM). We look for cosmological evidence for this new paradigm and show that this new model is consistent with all data at the 95% C.L., satisfying all sorts of presently available observational constraints from the redshift-luminosity relation of Type Ia supernovae, the mass-to-light ratios of galaxy clusters, and the power spectrum of cosmic microwave background [Phys. Rev. D 68 (2003) 083518

  7. Search for heavy resonances in the $\\ell\\ell qq$ final state in pp collisions at $\\sqrt s =13$ TeV with ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Bachas, Konstantinos; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    A search for heavy resonances decaying to a pair of $Z$ bosons is performed using proton-proton collision data produced at $\\sqrt{s}=13$ TeV and recorded by the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 3.2 fb$^{-1}$. Diboson resonant production is expected in several Standard Model extension scenarios. The $ZZ$ decay mode considered corresponds to one $Z$ boson decaying to a pair of charged leptons and the other decaying to a pair of quarks. No evidence for the production of resonances decaying to a $ZZ$ pair is observed. Upper bounds on the production cross sections at $\\sqrt{s}=13$ TeV times their decay branching ratios to $ZZ$ pairs are derived for a heavy Higgs boson and a spin-2 Randall-Sundrum graviton scenario.

  8. Brane world cosmologies with varying speed of light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youm, Donam

    2001-02-01

    We study cosmologies in the Randall-Sundrum models, incorporating the possibility of time-varying speed of light and Newton's constant. The cosmologies with varying speed of light (VSL) were proposed by Moffat and by Albrecht and Magueijo as an alternative to inflation for solving the cosmological problems. We consider the case in which the speed of light varies with time after the radion or the scale of the extra dimension has been stabilized. We elaborate on the conditions under which the flatness problem and the cosmological constant problem can be resolved. Particularly, the VSL cosmologies may provide a possible mechanism for bringing the quantum corrections to the fine-tuned brane tensions after the SUSY breaking under control. (author)

  9. On the existence and dynamics of braneworld black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitzpatrick, Andrew Liam; Randall, Lisa; Wiseman, Toby

    2006-01-01

    Based on holographic arguments Tanaka and Emparan et al have claimed that large localized static black holes do not exist in the one-brane Randall-Sundrum model. If such black holes are time-dependent as they propose, there are potentially significant phenomenological and theoretical consequences. We revisit the issue, arguing that their reasoning does not take into account the strongly coupled nature of the holographic theory. We claim that static black holes with smooth metrics should indeed exist in these theories, and give a simple example. However, although the existence of such solutions is relevant to exact and numerical solution searches, such static solutions might be dynamically unstable, again leading to time dependence with phenomenological consequences. We explore a plausible instability, suggested by Tanaka, analogous to that of Gregory and Laflamme, but argue that there is no reliable reason at this point to assume it must exist

  10. A Search for $t\\bar{t}$ Resonances in the Lepton Plus Jets Channel using 2.05 fb$^{-1}$ of $pp$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 7$ TeV

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    A search for top quark pair ($t\\bar{t}$) resonances in the lepton plus jets final states has been performed with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. The search uses a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.05 fb$^{-1}$, and was recorded in 2011 at a proton-proton centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. Limits are set on the production cross-section times branching ratio to top quark pairs of such resonances, ranging from approximately 9.3 pb at $m=$ 500~GeV to 0.95 pb at $m=$ 1300~GeV, excluding a leptophobic topcolour $Z'$ boson with 500~GeV $< m_{\\rm Z'} <$ 860 GeV at 95\\% probability. In Randall-Sundrum models, Kaluza-Klein gluons with masses between 500 and 1025 GeV are excluded at 95\\% probability.

  11. Heisenberg saturation of the Froissart bound from AdS-CFT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Kyungsik; Nastase, Horatiu

    2005-01-01

    In a previous paper, we have analyzed high energy QCD from AdS-CFT and proved the saturation of the Froissart bound (a purely QCD proof of which is still lacking). In this Letter we describe the calculation in more physical terms and map it to QCD language. We find a remarkable agreement with the 1952 Heisenberg description of the saturation (pre-QCD!) in terms of shockwave collisions of pion field distributions. It provides a direct map between gauge theory physics and the gravitational physics on the IR brane of the Randall-Sundrum model. Saturation occurs through black hole production on the IR brane, which is in QCD production of a nonlinear pion field soliton of a Born-Infeld action in the hadron collision, that decays into free pions

  12. A Search for Heavy Resonances in the Dilepton Channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayden Daniel

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available There are many extensions to the Standard Model of particle physics which predict the addition of a U(1 symmetry, and/or extra spatial dimensions, which give rise to new high mass resonances such as the Z′ and Randall-Sundrum graviton. The LHC provides a unique opportunity to explore the TeV scale where these phenomena may become apparent, and can be searched for using the precision tracking and high energy resolution calorimetry of the ATLAS detector. This poster presents the search for high mass resonances in the dilepton channel, and was conducted with an integrated luminosity of 1.08/1.21 fb−1 in the dielectron/dimuon channel respectively, at a centre of mass energy √s = 7 TeV.

  13. Search for heavy resonances in the ℓℓqq final state in pp collisions at p √s = 13 TeV with ATLAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bachas Konstantinos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A search for heavy resonances decaying to a pair of Z bosons is performed using proton–proton collision data produced at √s = 13 TeV and recorded by the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 3.2 fb−1. Diboson resonant production is expected in several Standard Model extension scenarios. The ZZ decay mode considered corresponds to one Z boson decaying to a pair of charged leptons and the other decaying to a pair of quarks. No evidence for the production of resonances decaying to a ZZ pair is observed. Upper bounds on the production cross sections at √s = 13 TeV times their decay branching ratios to ZZ pairs are derived for a heavy Higgs boson and a spin–2 Randall-Sundrum graviton scenario.

  14. Gravity on a little warped space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, Damien P.; McDonald, Kristian L.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the consistent inclusion of 4D Einstein gravity on a truncated slice of AdS 5 whose bulk-gravity and UV scales are much less than the 4D Planck scale, M * Pl . Such 'Little Warped Spaces' have found phenomenological utility and can be motivated by string realizations of the Randall-Sundrum framework. Using the interval approach to brane-world gravity, we show that the inclusion of a large UV-localized Einstein-Hilbert term allows one to consistently incorporate 4D Einstein gravity into the low-energy theory. We detail the spectrum of Kaluza-Klein metric fluctuations and, in particular, examine the coupling of the little radion to matter. Furthermore, we show that Goldberger-Wise stabilization can be successfully implemented on such spaces. Our results demonstrate that realistic low-energy effective theories can be constructed on these spaces, and have relevance for existing models in the literature.

  15. Biomimetic model systems of rigid hair beds: Part II - Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jammalamadaka, Mani S. S.; Hood, Kaitlyn; Hosoi, Anette

    2017-11-01

    Crustaceans - such as lobsters, crabs and stomapods - have hairy appendages that they use to recognize and track odorants in the surrounding fluid. An array of rigid hairs impedes flow at different rates depending on the spacing between hairs and the Reynolds number, Re. At larger Reynolds number (Re>1), fluid travels through the hairs rather than around them, a phenomenon called leakiness. Crustaceans flick their appendages at different speeds in order to manipulate the leakiness between the hairs, allowing the hairs to either detect the odors in a sample of fluid or collect a new sample. Theoretical and numerical studies predict that there is a fast flow region near the hairs that moves closer to the hairs as Re increases. Here, we test this theory experimentally. We 3D printed rigid hairs with an aspect ratio of 30:1 in rectangular arrays with different hair packing fractions. We custom built an experimental setup which establishes poiseuille flow at intermediate Re, Re <=200. We track the flow dynamics through the hair beds using tracer particles and Particle Imaging Velocimetry. We will then compare the modelling predictions with the experimental outcomes.

  16. Modeling of Cd(II) sorption on mixed oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waseem, M.; Mustafa, S.; Naeem, A.; Shah, K.H.; Hussain, S.Y.; Safdar, M.

    2011-01-01

    Mixed oxide of iron and silicon (0.75 M Fe(OH)3:0.25 M SiO/sub 2/) was synthesized and characterized by various techniques like surface area analysis, point of zero charge (PZC), energy dispersive X-rays (EDX) spectroscopy, Thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-rays diffraction (XRD) analysis. The uptake of Cd/sup 2+/ ions on mixed oxide increased with pH, temperature and metal ion concentration. Sorption data have been interpreted in terms of both Langmuir and Freundlich models. The Xm values at pH 7 are found to be almost twice as compared to pH 5. The values of both DH and DS were found to be positive indicating that the sorption process was endothermic and accompanied by the dehydration of Cd/sup 2+/. Further, the negative value of DG confirms the spontaneity of the reaction. The ion exchange mechanism was suggested to take place for each Cd/sup 2+/ ions at pH 5, whereas ion exchange was found coupled with non specific adsorption of metal cations at pH 7. (author)

  17. First results of GERDA Phase II and consistency with background models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostini, M.; Allardt, M.; Bakalyarov, A. M.; Balata, M.; Barabanov, I.; Baudis, L.; Bauer, C.; Bellotti, E.; Belogurov, S.; Belyaev, S. T.; Benato, G.; Bettini, A.; Bezrukov, L.; Bode1, T.; Borowicz, D.; Brudanin, V.; Brugnera, R.; Caldwell, A.; Cattadori, C.; Chernogorov, A.; D'Andrea, V.; Demidova, E. V.; Di Marco, N.; Domula, A.; Doroshkevich, E.; Egorov, V.; Falkenstein, R.; Frodyma, N.; Gangapshev, A.; Garfagnini, A.; Gooch, C.; Grabmayr, P.; Gurentsov, V.; Gusev, K.; Hakenmüller, J.; Hegai, A.; Heisel, M.; Hemmer, S.; Hofmann, W.; Hult, M.; Inzhechik, L. V.; Janicskó Csáthy, J.; Jochum, J.; Junker, M.; Kazalov, V.; Kihm, T.; Kirpichnikov, I. V.; Kirsch, A.; Kish, A.; Klimenko, A.; Kneißl, R.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Kochetov, O.; Kornoukhov, V. N.; Kuzminov, V. V.; Laubenstein, M.; Lazzaro, A.; Lebedev, V. I.; Lehnert, B.; Liao, H. Y.; Lindner, M.; Lippi, I.; Lubashevskiy, A.; Lubsandorzhiev, B.; Lutter, G.; Macolino, C.; Majorovits, B.; Maneschg, W.; Medinaceli, E.; Miloradovic, M.; Mingazheva, R.; Misiaszek, M.; Moseev, P.; Nemchenok, I.; Palioselitis, D.; Panas, K.; Pandola, L.; Pelczar, K.; Pullia, A.; Riboldi, S.; Rumyantseva, N.; Sada, C.; Salamida, F.; Salathe, M.; Schmitt, C.; Schneider, B.; Schönert, S.; Schreiner, J.; Schulz, O.; Schütz, A.-K.; Schwingenheuer, B.; Selivanenko, O.; Shevzik, E.; Shirchenko, M.; Simgen, H.; Smolnikov, A.; Stanco, L.; Vanhoefer, L.; Vasenko, A. A.; Veresnikova, A.; von Sturm, K.; Wagner, V.; Wegmann, A.; Wester, T.; Wiesinger, C.; Wojcik, M.; Yanovich, E.; Zhitnikov, I.; Zhukov, S. V.; Zinatulina, D.; Zuber, K.; Zuzel, G.

    2017-01-01

    The GERDA (GERmanium Detector Array) is an experiment for the search of neutrinoless double beta decay (0νββ) in 76Ge, located at Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso of INFN (Italy). GERDA operates bare high purity germanium detectors submersed in liquid Argon (LAr). Phase II of data-taking started in Dec 2015 and is currently ongoing. In Phase II 35 kg of germanium detectors enriched in 76Ge including thirty newly produced Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) detectors is operating to reach an exposure of 100 kg·yr within about 3 years data taking. The design goal of Phase II is to reduce the background by one order of magnitude to get the sensitivity for T1/20ν = O≤ft( {{{10}26}} \\right){{ yr}}. To achieve the necessary background reduction, the setup was complemented with LAr veto. Analysis of the background spectrum of Phase II demonstrates consistency with the background models. Furthermore 226Ra and 232Th contamination levels consistent with screening results. In the first Phase II data release we found no hint for a 0νββ decay signal and place a limit of this process T1/20ν > 5.3 \\cdot {1025} yr (90% C.L., sensitivity 4.0·1025 yr). First results of GERDA Phase II will be presented.

  18. Modeling the distribution of Mg II absorbers around galaxies using background galaxies and quasars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bordoloi, R.; Lilly, S. J. [Institute for Astronomy, ETH Zürich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 27, 8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Kacprzak, G. G. [Swinburne University of Technology, Victoria 3122 (Australia); Churchill, C. W., E-mail: rongmonb@phys.ethz.ch [New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States)

    2014-04-01

    We present joint constraints on the distribution of Mg II absorption around high redshift galaxies obtained by combining two orthogonal probes, the integrated Mg II absorption seen in stacked background galaxy spectra and the distribution of parent galaxies of individual strong Mg II systems as seen in the spectra of background quasars. We present a suite of models that can be used to predict, for different two- and three-dimensional distributions, how the projected Mg II absorption will depend on a galaxy's apparent inclination, the impact parameter b and the azimuthal angle between the projected vector to the line of sight and the projected minor axis. In general, we find that variations in the absorption strength with azimuthal angles provide much stronger constraints on the intrinsic geometry of the Mg II absorption than the dependence on the inclination of the galaxies. In addition to the clear azimuthal dependence in the integrated Mg II absorption that we reported earlier in Bordoloi et al., we show that strong equivalent width Mg II absorbers (W{sub r} (2796) ≥ 0.3 Å) are also asymmetrically distributed in azimuth around their host galaxies: 72% of the absorbers in Kacprzak et al., and 100% of the close-in absorbers within 35 kpc of the center of their host galaxies, are located within 50° of the host galaxy's projected semi minor axis. It is shown that either composite models consisting of a simple bipolar component plus a spherical or disk component, or a single highly softened bipolar distribution, can well represent the azimuthal dependencies observed in both the stacked spectrum and quasar absorption-line data sets within 40 kpc. Simultaneously fitting both data sets, we find that in the composite model the bipolar cone has an opening angle of ∼100° (i.e., confined to within 50° of the disk axis) and contains about two-thirds of the total Mg II absorption in the system. The single softened cone model has an exponential fall off with

  19. Quantum field theory on brane backgrounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flachi, A.

    2001-11-01

    The development of higher dimensional quantum field theories is reviewed from the older Kaluza-Klein theory to the new brane models, emphasising their relevance in modern particle physics. The issue of spontaneous symmetry breaking in the Randall-Sundrum model is considered. The role of the coupling between bulk fields and the curvature is investigated and a model in favour of bulk symmetry breaking is presented. The lowest order quantum corrections arising from a quantized scalar field in the Randall-Sundrum spacetime are computed. A careful discussion of the boundary conditions as well as the renormalization is provided. The massless case is also discussed and a proof of the vanishing of the conformal anomaly in this model is given. An analysis of the self-consistency is presented and the radius stabilization problem studied. It is shown that quantum effects may provide a stabilization of the radius, nevertheless, when the hierarchy problem is simultaneously solved, fine tuning of the brane tensions is necessary. The previous results are extended in order to include the contribution to the one-loop effective action from fermions. The boundary conditions are discussed and their relation with gauge invariance accurately examined. The possibility of breaking the gauge symmetries by using Wilson-loops is investigated. The analysis of the self- consistency is extended when the contribution of fermions is included, and it is shown that also in this case it is not possible to stabilize the radius and simultaneously solving the hierarchy problem, unless the brane tensions are fine tuned to a high degree. (author)

  20. Modelling the Galactic bar using OGLE-II red clump giant stars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rattenbury, Nicholas J.; Mao, Shude; Sumi, Takahiro; Smith, Martin C.

    2007-01-01

    Red clump giant (RCG) stars can be used as distance indicators to trace the mass distribution of the Galactic bar. We use RCG stars from 44 bulge fields from the OGLE-II microlensing collaboration data base to constrain analytic triaxial models for the Galactic bar. We find the bar major-axis is

  1. Mathematical models and illustrative results for the RINGBEARER II monopole/dipole beam-propagation code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chambers, F.W.; Masamitsu, J.A.; Lee, E.P.

    1982-01-01

    RINGBEARER II is a linearized monopole/dipole particle simulation code for studying intense relativistic electron beam propagation in gas. In this report the mathematical models utilized for beam particle dynamics and pinch field computation are delineated. Difficulties encountered in code operations and some remedies are discussed. Sample output is presented detailing the diagnostics and the methods of display and analysis utilized

  2. A Parameter Study for Modeling Mg ii h and k Emission during Solar Flares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubio da Costa, Fatima [Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Kleint, Lucia, E-mail: frubio@stanford.edu [University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, 5210, Windisch (Switzerland)

    2017-06-20

    Solar flares show highly unusual spectra in which the thermodynamic conditions of the solar atmosphere are encoded. Current models are unable to fully reproduce the spectroscopic flare observations, especially the single-peaked spectral profiles of the Mg ii h and k lines. We aim to understand the formation of the chromospheric and optically thick Mg ii h and k lines in flares through radiative transfer calculations. We take a flare atmosphere obtained from a simulation with the radiative hydrodynamic code RADYN as input for a radiative transfer modeling with the RH code. By iteratively changing this model atmosphere and varying thermodynamic parameters such as temperature, electron density, and velocity, we study their effects on the emergent intensity spectra. We reproduce the typical single-peaked Mg ii h and k flare spectral shape and approximate the intensity ratios to the subordinate Mg ii lines by increasing either densities, temperatures, or velocities at the line core formation height range. Additionally, by combining unresolved upflows and downflows up to ∼250 km s{sup −1} within one resolution element, we reproduce the widely broadened line wings. While we cannot unambiguously determine which mechanism dominates in flares, future modeling efforts should investigate unresolved components, additional heat dissipation, larger velocities, and higher densities and combine the analysis of multiple spectral lines.

  3. Understanding variability of the Southern Ocean overturning circulation in CORE-II models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downes, S. M.; Spence, P.; Hogg, A. M.

    2018-03-01

    The current generation of climate models exhibit a large spread in the steady-state and projected Southern Ocean upper and lower overturning circulation, with mechanisms for deep ocean variability remaining less well understood. Here, common Southern Ocean metrics in twelve models from the Coordinated Ocean-ice Reference Experiment Phase II (CORE-II) are assessed over a 60 year period. Specifically, stratification, surface buoyancy fluxes, and eddies are linked to the magnitude of the strengthening trend in the upper overturning circulation, and a decreasing trend in the lower overturning circulation across the CORE-II models. The models evolve similarly in the upper 1 km and the deep ocean, with an almost equivalent poleward intensification trend in the Southern Hemisphere westerly winds. However, the models differ substantially in their eddy parameterisation and surface buoyancy fluxes. In general, models with a larger heat-driven water mass transformation where deep waters upwell at the surface ( ∼ 55°S) transport warmer waters into intermediate depths, thus weakening the stratification in the upper 2 km. Models with a weak eddy induced overturning and a warm bias in the intermediate waters are more likely to exhibit larger increases in the upper overturning circulation, and more significant weakening of the lower overturning circulation. We find the opposite holds for a cool model bias in intermediate depths, combined with a more complex 3D eddy parameterisation that acts to reduce isopycnal slope. In summary, the Southern Ocean overturning circulation decadal trends in the coarse resolution CORE-II models are governed by biases in surface buoyancy fluxes and the ocean density field, and the configuration of the eddy parameterisation.

  4. A primer for biomedical scientists on how to execute model II linear regression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludbrook, John

    2012-04-01

    1. There are two very different ways of executing linear regression analysis. One is Model I, when the x-values are fixed by the experimenter. The other is Model II, in which the x-values are free to vary and are subject to error. 2. I have received numerous complaints from biomedical scientists that they have great difficulty in executing Model II linear regression analysis. This may explain the results of a Google Scholar search, which showed that the authors of articles in journals of physiology, pharmacology and biochemistry rarely use Model II regression analysis. 3. I repeat my previous arguments in favour of using least products linear regression analysis for Model II regressions. I review three methods for executing ordinary least products (OLP) and weighted least products (WLP) regression analysis: (i) scientific calculator and/or computer spreadsheet; (ii) specific purpose computer programs; and (iii) general purpose computer programs. 4. Using a scientific calculator and/or computer spreadsheet, it is easy to obtain correct values for OLP slope and intercept, but the corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) are inaccurate. 5. Using specific purpose computer programs, the freeware computer program smatr gives the correct OLP regression coefficients and obtains 95% CI by bootstrapping. In addition, smatr can be used to compare the slopes of OLP lines. 6. When using general purpose computer programs, I recommend the commercial programs systat and Statistica for those who regularly undertake linear regression analysis and I give step-by-step instructions in the Supplementary Information as to how to use loss functions. © 2011 The Author. Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology and Physiology. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  5. Line profile studies of hydrodynamical models of cometary compact H II regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Feng-Yao; Zhu, Qing-Feng

    2015-01-01

    We simulate the evolution of cometary H II regions based on several champagne flow models and bow shock models, and calculate the profiles of the [Ne II] fine-structure line at 12.81 μm, the H30α recombination line and the [Ne III] fine-structure line at 15.55 μm for these models at different inclinations of 0°, 30° and 60°. We find that the profiles in the bow shock models are generally different from those in the champagne flow models, but the profiles in the bow shock models with lower stellar velocity (≤ 5 km s −1 ) are similar to those in the champagne flow models. In champagne flow models, both the velocity of peak flux and the flux weighted central velocities of all three lines point outward from molecular clouds. In bow shock models, the directions of these velocities depend on the speed of stars. The central velocities of these lines are consistent with the stellar motion in the high stellar speed cases, but they are opposite directions from the stellar motion in the low speed cases. We notice that the line profiles from the slit along the symmetrical axis of the projected 2D image of these models are useful for distinguishing bow shock models from champagne flow models. It is also confirmed by the calculation that the flux weighted central velocity and the line luminosity of the [Ne III] line can be estimated from the [Ne II] line and the H30α line. (paper)

  6. Cosmological parameter uncertainties from SALT-II type Ia supernova light curve models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosher, J.; Sako, M.; Guy, J.; Astier, P.; Betoule, M.; El-Hage, P.; Pain, R.; Regnault, N.; Kessler, R.; Frieman, J. A.; Marriner, J.; Biswas, R.; Kuhlmann, S.; Schneider, D. P.

    2014-01-01

    We use simulated type Ia supernova (SN Ia) samples, including both photometry and spectra, to perform the first direct validation of cosmology analysis using the SALT-II light curve model. This validation includes residuals from the light curve training process, systematic biases in SN Ia distance measurements, and a bias on the dark energy equation of state parameter w. Using the SN-analysis package SNANA, we simulate and analyze realistic samples corresponding to the data samples used in the SNLS3 analysis: ∼120 low-redshift (z < 0.1) SNe Ia, ∼255 Sloan Digital Sky Survey SNe Ia (z < 0.4), and ∼290 SNLS SNe Ia (z ≤ 1). To probe systematic uncertainties in detail, we vary the input spectral model, the model of intrinsic scatter, and the smoothing (i.e., regularization) parameters used during the SALT-II model training. Using realistic intrinsic scatter models results in a slight bias in the ultraviolet portion of the trained SALT-II model, and w biases (w input – w recovered ) ranging from –0.005 ± 0.012 to –0.024 ± 0.010. These biases are indistinguishable from each other within the uncertainty; the average bias on w is –0.014 ± 0.007.

  7. Cosmological Parameter Uncertainties from SALT-II Type Ia Supernova Light Curve Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosher, J. [Pennsylvania U.; Guy, J. [LBL, Berkeley; Kessler, R. [Chicago U., KICP; Astier, P. [Paris U., VI-VII; Marriner, J. [Fermilab; Betoule, M. [Paris U., VI-VII; Sako, M. [Pennsylvania U.; El-Hage, P. [Paris U., VI-VII; Biswas, R. [Argonne; Pain, R. [Paris U., VI-VII; Kuhlmann, S. [Argonne; Regnault, N. [Paris U., VI-VII; Frieman, J. A. [Fermilab; Schneider, D. P. [Penn State U.

    2014-08-29

    We use simulated type Ia supernova (SN Ia) samples, including both photometry and spectra, to perform the first direct validation of cosmology analysis using the SALT-II light curve model. This validation includes residuals from the light curve training process, systematic biases in SN Ia distance measurements, and a bias on the dark energy equation of state parameter w. Using the SN-analysis package SNANA, we simulate and analyze realistic samples corresponding to the data samples used in the SNLS3 analysis: ~120 low-redshift (z < 0.1) SNe Ia, ~255 Sloan Digital Sky Survey SNe Ia (z < 0.4), and ~290 SNLS SNe Ia (z ≤ 1). To probe systematic uncertainties in detail, we vary the input spectral model, the model of intrinsic scatter, and the smoothing (i.e., regularization) parameters used during the SALT-II model training. Using realistic intrinsic scatter models results in a slight bias in the ultraviolet portion of the trained SALT-II model, and w biases (w (input) – w (recovered)) ranging from –0.005 ± 0.012 to –0.024 ± 0.010. These biases are indistinguishable from each other within the uncertainty, the average bias on w is –0.014 ± 0.007.

  8. LRS Bianchi Type II Massive String Cosmological Models with Magnetic Field in Lyra's Geometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raj Bali

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bianchi type II massive string cosmological models with magnetic field and time dependent gauge function ( in the frame work of Lyra's geometry are investigated. The magnetic field is in -plane. To get the deterministic solution, we have assumed that the shear ( is proportional to the expansion (. This leads to , where and are metric potentials and is a constant. We find that the models start with a big bang at initial singularity and expansion decreases due to lapse of time. The anisotropy is maintained throughout but the model isotropizes when . The physical and geometrical aspects of the model in the presence and absence of magnetic field are also discussed.

  9. The theoretical and computational models of the GASFLOW-II code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Travis, J.R.

    1999-01-01

    GASFLOW-II is a finite-volume computer code that solves the time-dependent compressible Navier-Stokes equations for multiple gas species in a dispersed liquid water two-phase medium. The fluid-dynamics algorithm is coupled to the chemical kinetics of combusting gases to simulate diffusion or propagating flames in complex geometries of nuclear containments. GASFLOW-II is therefore able to predict gaseous distributions and thermal and pressure loads on containment structures and safety related equipment in the event combustion occurs. Current developments of GASFLOW-II are focused on hydrogen distribution, mitigation measures including carbon dioxide inerting, and possible combustion events in nuclear reactor containments. Fluid turbulence is calculated to enhance the transport and mixing of gases in rooms and volumes that may be connected by a ventilation system. Condensation, vaporization, and heat transfer to walls, floors, ceilings, internal structures, and within the fluid are calculated to model the appropriate mass and energy sinks. (author)

  10. Biokinetic modelling development and analysis of arsenic dissolution into the gastrointestinal tract using SAAM II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perama, Yasmin Mohd Idris; Siong, Khoo Kok

    2018-04-01

    A mathematical model comprising 8 compartments were designed to describe the kinetic dissolution of arsenic (As) from water leach purification (WLP) waste samples ingested into the gastrointestinal system. A totally reengineered software system named Simulation, Analysis and Modelling II (SAAM II) was employed to aid in the experimental design and data analysis. As a powerful tool that creates, simulate and analyze data accurately and rapidly, SAAM II computationally creates a system of ordinary differential equations according to the specified compartmental model structure and simulates the solutions based upon the parameter and model inputs provided. The experimental design of in vitro DIN approach was applied to create an artificial gastric and gastrointestinal fluids. These synthetic fluids assay were produced to determine the concentrations of As ingested into the gastrointestinal tract. The model outputs were created based upon the experimental inputs and the recommended fractional transfer rates parameter. As a result, the measured and predicted As concentrations in gastric fluids were much similar against the time of study. In contrast, the concentrations of As in the gastrointestinal fluids were only similar during the first hour and eventually started decreasing until the fifth hours of study between the measured and predicted values. This is due to the loss of As through the fractional transfer rates of q2 compartment to corresponding compartments of q3 and q5 which are involved with excretion and distribution to the whole body, respectively. The model outputs obtained after best fit to the data were influenced significantly by the fractional transfer rates between each compartment. Therefore, a series of compartmental model created with the association of fractional transfer rates parameter with the aid of SAAM II provides better estimation that simulate the kinetic behavior of As ingested into the gastrointestinal system.

  11. Atucha II NPP full scope simulator modelling with the thermal hydraulic code TRACRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, Pablo Rey; Ruiz, Jose Antonio; Rivero, Norberto

    2011-01-01

    In February 2010 NA-SA (Nucleoelectrica Argentina S.A.) awarded Tecnatom the Atucha II full scope simulator project. NA-SA is a public company owner of the Argentinean nuclear power plants. Atucha II is due to enter in operation shortly. Atucha II NPP is a PHWR type plant cooled by the water of the Parana River and has the same design as the Atucha I unit, doubling its power capacity. Atucha II will produce 745 MWe utilizing heavy water as coolant and moderator, and natural uranium as fuel. A plant singular feature is the permanent core refueling. TRAC R T is the first real time thermal hydraulic six-equations code used in the training simulation industry for NSSS modeling. It is the result from adapting to real time the best estimate code TRACG. TRAC R T is based on first principle conservation equations for mass, energy and momentum for liquid and steam phases, with two phase flows under non homogeneous and non equilibrium conditions. At present, it has been successfully implemented in twelve full scope replica simulators in different training centers throughout the world. To ease the modeling task, TRAC R T includes a graphical pre-processing tool designed to optimize this process and alleviate the burden of entering alpha numerical data in an input file. (author)

  12. Reactive Transport Modeling of Microbe-mediated Fe (II) Oxidation for Enhanced Oil Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surasani, V.; Li, L.

    2011-12-01

    Microbially Enhanced Oil Recovery (MEOR) aims to improve the recovery of entrapped heavy oil in depleted reservoirs using microbe-based technology. Reservoir ecosystems often contain diverse microbial communities those can interact with subsurface fluids and minerals through a network of nutrients and energy fluxes. Microbe-mediated reactions products include gases, biosurfactants, biopolymers those can alter the properties of oil and interfacial interactions between oil, brine, and rocks. In addition, the produced biomass and mineral precipitates can change the reservoir permeability profile and increase sweeping efficiency. Under subsurface conditions, the injection of nitrate and Fe (II) as the electron acceptor and donor allows bacteria to grow. The reaction products include minerals such as Fe(OH)3 and nitrogen containing gases. These reaction products can have large impact on oil and reservoir properties and can enhance the recovery of trapped oil. This work aims to understand the Fe(II) oxidation by nitrate under conditions relevant to MEOR. Reactive transport modeling is used to simulate the fluid flow, transport, and reactions involved in this process. Here we developed a complex reactive network for microbial mediated nitrate-dependent Fe (II) oxidation that involves both thermodynamic controlled aqueous reactions and kinetic controlled Fe (II) mineral reaction. Reactive transport modeling is used to understand and quantify the coupling between flow, transport, and reaction processes. Our results identify key parameter controls those are important for the alteration of permeability profile under field conditions.

  13. Regulatory activity based risk model identifies survival of stage II and III colorectal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gang; Dong, Chuanpeng; Wang, Xing; Hou, Guojun; Zheng, Yu; Xu, Huilin; Zhan, Xiaohui; Liu, Lei

    2017-11-17

    Clinical and pathological indicators are inadequate for prognosis of stage II and III colorectal carcinoma (CRC). In this study, we utilized the activity of regulatory factors, univariate Cox regression and random forest for variable selection and developed a multivariate Cox model to predict the overall survival of Stage II/III colorectal carcinoma in GSE39582 datasets (469 samples). Patients in low-risk group showed a significant longer overall survival and recurrence-free survival time than those in high-risk group. This finding was further validated in five other independent datasets (GSE14333, GSE17536, GSE17537, GSE33113, and GSE37892). Besides, associations between clinicopathological information and risk score were analyzed. A nomogram including risk score was plotted to facilitate the utilization of risk score. The risk score model is also demonstrated to be effective on predicting both overall and recurrence-free survival of chemotherapy received patients. After performing Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) between high and low risk groups, we found that several cell-cell interaction KEGG pathways were identified. Funnel plot results showed that there was no publication bias in these datasets. In summary, by utilizing the regulatory activity in stage II and III colorectal carcinoma, the risk score successfully predicts the survival of 1021 stage II/III CRC patients in six independent datasets.

  14. Application of Zr/Ti-Pic in the adsorption process of Cu(II), Co(II) and Ni(II) using adsorption physico-chemical models and thermodynamics of the process; Aplicacao de Zr/Ti-PILC no processo de adsorcao de Cu(II), Co(II) e Ni(II) utilizando modelos fisico-quimicos de adsorcao e termodinamica do processo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerra, Denis Lima; Airoldi, Claudio [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica. Dept. de Quimica Inorganica]. E-mail: dlguerra@iqm.unicamp.br; Lemos, Vanda Porpino; Angelica, Romulo Simoes [Universidade Federal do Para (UFPa), Belem (Brazil); Viana, Rubia Ribeiro [Universidade Federal do Mato Grosso (UFMT), Cuiaba (Brazil). Inst. de Ciencias Exatas e da Terra. Dept. de Recursos Minerais

    2008-07-01

    The aim of this investigation is to study how Zr/Ti-Pic adsorbs metals. The physico-chemical proprieties of Zr/Ti-Pic have been optimized with pillarization processes and Cu(II), Ni(II) and Co(II) adsorption from aqueous solution has been carried out, with maximum adsorption values of 8.85, 8.30 and 7.78 x-1 mmol g{sup -1}, respectively. The Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin adsorption isotherm models have been applied to fit the experimental data with a linear regression process. The energetic effect caused by metal interaction was determined through calorimetric titration at the solid-liquid interface and gave a net thermal effect that enabled the calculation of the exothermic values and the equilibrium constant. (author)

  15. Computerized transportation model for the NRC Physical Protection Project. Versions I and II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, G.M.

    1978-01-01

    Details on two versions of a computerized model for the transportation system of the NRC Physical Protection Project are presented. The Version I model permits scheduling of all types of transport units associated with a truck fleet, including truck trailers, truck tractors, escort vehicles and crews. A fixed-fleet itinerary construction process is used in which iterations on fleet size are required until the service requirements are satisfied. The Version II model adds an aircraft mode capability and provides for a more efficient non-fixed-fleet itinerary generation process. Test results using both versions are included

  16. Interactions between copper(II) and DOM in the urban stormwater runoff: modeling and characterizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chen; Wang, Chong-Chen; Li, Jun-Qi; Wang, Peng; Ou, Jia-Qi; Cui, Jing-Rui

    2018-01-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) can strongly interact with both organic and inorganic contaminants to influence their transportation, transformation, bioavailability, toxicity and even their ultimate fate. Within this work, DOM was extracted from urban stormwater runoff samples collected from a regular sampling site of a typical residential area in Beijing, China. Copper(II) ions were selected as model to investigate the interactions between DOM and typical heavy metals. Both ultraviolet (UV) absorbance and fluorescence titration methods were introduced to determine the complex capacities (C L ) and conditional stability constants (log K M ) of bonding between DOM and copper (II) ions, which revealed that the values of C L were 85.62 and 87.23 μmol mg -1 and the log K M values were 5.37 and 5.48, respectively. The results suggested the successful complexation between DOM and copper(II) ions. Furthermore, morphology of the DOM binding to copper(II) ions was confirmed by both energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), which can facilitate to clarify the corresponding mechanism. The Cu 2p 3/2 peak at 933.7 eV and the characteristic shake-up peaks of Cu-O were found in the XPS spectra, implying that copper(II) ions might coordinate with hydroxyl (aliphatic or phenolic) or carboxyl groups. With these profitable results, it can be concluded that DOM in urban stormwater runoff has a strong binding affinity with copper(II) ions, which may further lead to potentially significant influence on their migration and transformation.

  17. Modeling Type II-P/II-L Supernovae Interacting with Recent Episodic Mass Ejections from Their Presupernova Stars with MESA and SNEC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sanskriti; Ray, Alak

    2017-12-01

    We show how dense, compact, discrete shells of circumstellar gas immediately outside of red supergiants affect the optical light curves of Type II-P/II-L supernovae (SNe), using the example of SN 2013ej. Earlier efforts in the literature had used an artificial circumstellar medium (CSM) stitched to the surface of an evolved star that had not gone through a phase of late-stage heavy mass loss, which, in essence, is the original source of the CSM. In contrast, we allow enhanced mass-loss rate from the modeled star during the 16O and 28Si burning stages and construct the CSM from the resulting mass-loss history in a self-consistent way. Once such evolved pre-SN stars are exploded, we find that the models with early interaction between the shock and the dense CSM reproduce light curves far better than those without that mass loss and, hence, having no nearby dense CSM. The required explosion energy for the progenitors with a dense CSM is reduced by almost a factor of two compared to those without the CSM. Our model, with a more realistic CSM profile and presupernova and explosion parameters, fits observed data much better throughout the rise, plateau, and radioactive tail phases as compared to previous studies. This points to an intermediate class of supernovae between Type II-P/II-L and Type II-n SNe with the characteristics of simultaneous UV and optical peak, slow decline after peak, and a longer plateau.

  18. Simulation model for wind energy storage systems. Volume II. Operation manual. [SIMWEST code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, A.W.; Edsinger, R.W.; Burroughs, J.D.

    1977-08-01

    The effort developed a comprehensive computer program for the modeling of wind energy/storage systems utilizing any combination of five types of storage (pumped hydro, battery, thermal, flywheel and pneumatic). An acronym for the program is SIMWEST (Simulation Model for Wind Energy Storage). The level of detail of SIMWEST is consistent with a role of evaluating the economic feasibility as well as the general performance of wind energy systems. The software package consists of two basic programs and a library of system, environmental, and load components. Volume II, the SIMWEST operation manual, describes the usage of the SIMWEST program, the design of the library components, and a number of simple example simulations intended to familiarize the user with the program's operation. Volume II also contains a listing of each SIMWEST library subroutine.

  19. A Novel Mouse Model of a Patient Mucolipidosis II Mutation Recapitulates Disease Pathology*

    OpenAIRE

    Paton, Leigh; Bitoun, Emmanuelle; Kenyon, Janet; Priestman, David A.; Oliver, Peter L.; Edwards, Benjamin; Platt, Frances M.; Davies, Kay E.

    2014-01-01

    Mucolipidosis II (MLII) is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by loss of N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphotransferase, which tags lysosomal enzymes with a mannose 6-phosphate marker for transport to the lysosome. In MLII, the loss of this marker leads to deficiency of multiple enzymes and non-enzymatic proteins in the lysosome, leading to the storage of multiple substrates. Here we present a novel mouse model of MLII homozygous for a patient mutation in the GNPTAB gene. Whereas the current gene ...

  20. Comparison of vibration test results for Atucha II NPP and large scale concrete block models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iizuka, S.; Konno, T.; Prato, C.A.

    2001-01-01

    In order to study the soil structure interaction of reactor building that could be constructed on a Quaternary soil, a comparison study of the soil structure interaction springs was performed between full scale vibration test results of Atucha II NPP and vibration test results of large scale concrete block models constructed on Quaternary soil. This comparison study provides a case data of soil structure interaction springs on Quaternary soil with different foundation size and stiffness. (author)

  1. Neutrinoless double beta decay in type I+II seesaw models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borah, Debasish [Department of Physics, Tezpur University,Tezpur-784028 (India); Dasgupta, Arnab [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg,Bhubaneshwar-751005 (India)

    2015-11-30

    We study neutrinoless double beta decay in left-right symmetric extension of the standard model with type I and type II seesaw origin of neutrino masses. Due to the enhanced gauge symmetry as well as extended scalar sector, there are several new physics sources of neutrinoless double beta decay in this model. Ignoring the left-right gauge boson mixing and heavy-light neutrino mixing, we first compute the contributions to neutrinoless double beta decay for type I and type II dominant seesaw separately and compare with the standard light neutrino contributions. We then repeat the exercise by considering the presence of both type I and type II seesaw, having non-negligible contributions to light neutrino masses and show the difference in results from individual seesaw cases. Assuming the new gauge bosons and scalars to be around a TeV, we constrain different parameters of the model including both heavy and light neutrino masses from the requirement of keeping the new physics contribution to neutrinoless double beta decay amplitude below the upper limit set by the GERDA experiment and also satisfying bounds from lepton flavor violation, cosmology and colliders.

  2. System modelling to support accelerated fuel transfer rate at EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imel, G.R.; Houshyar, A.; Planchon, H.P.; Cutforth, D.C.

    1995-01-01

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) ia a 62.5 MW(th) liquid metal reactor operated by Argonne National Laboratory for The United States Department of Energy. The reactor is located near Idaho Falls, Idaho at the Argonne-West site (ANL-W). Full power operation was achieved in 1964,- the reactor operated continuously since that time until October 1994 in a variety of configurations depending on the programmatic mission. A three year program was initiated in October, 1993 to replace the 330 depleted uranium blanket subassemblies (S/As) with stainless steel reflectors. It was intended to operate the reactor during the three year blanket unloading program, followed by about a half year of driver fuel unloading. However, in the summer of 1994, Congress dictacted that EBR-II be shut down October 1, and complete defueling without operation. To assist in the planning for resources needed for this defueling campaign, a mathematical model of the fuel handling sequence was developed utilizing the appropriate reliability factors and inherent mm constraints of each stage of the process. The model allows predictions of transfer rates under different scenarios. Additionally, it has facilitated planning of maintenance activities, as well as optimization of resources regarding manpower and modification effort. The model and its application is described in this paper

  3. A model for photothermal responses of flowering in rice. II. Model evaluation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yin, X.; Kropff, M.J.; Nakagawa, H.; Horie, T.; Goudriaan, J.

    1997-01-01

    A detailed nonlinear model, the 3s-Beta model, for photothermal responses of flowering in rice (Oryza sativa L.) was evaluated for predicting rice flowering date in field conditions. This model was compared with other three models: a three-plane linear model and two nonlinear models, viz, the

  4. Studying the highly bent spectra of FR II-type radio galaxies with the KDA EXT model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuligowska, Elżbieta

    2018-04-01

    Context. The Kaiser, Dennett-Thorpe & Alexander (KDA, 1997, MNRAS, 292, 723) EXT model, that is, the extension of the KDA model of Fanaroff & Riley (FR) II-type source evolution, is applied and confronted with the observational data for selected FR II-type radio sources with significantly aged radio spectra. Aim. A sample of FR II-type radio galaxies with radio spectra strongly bent at their highest frequencies is used for testing the usefulness of the KDA EXT model. Methods: The dynamical evolution of FR II-type sources predicted with the KDA EXT model is briefly presented and discussed. The results are then compared to the ones obtained with the classical KDA approach, assuming the source's continuous injection and self-similarity. Results: The results and corresponding diagrams obtained for the eight sample sources indicate that the KDA EXT model predicts the observed radio spectra significantly better than the best spectral fit provided by the original KDA model.

  5. Modelling Zn(II) sorption onto clayey sediments using a multi-site ion-exchange model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tertre, E.; Beaucaire, C.; Coreau, N.; Juery, A.

    2009-01-01

    In environmental studies, it is necessary to be able to predict the behaviour of contaminants in more or less complex physico-chemical contexts. The improvement of this prediction partly depends on establishing thermodynamic models that can describe the behaviour of these contaminants and, in particular, the sorption reactions on mineral surfaces. In this way, based on the mass action law, it is possible to use surface complexation models and ion exchange models. Therefore, the aim of this study is (i) to develop an ion-exchange model able to describe the sorption of transition metal onto pure clay minerals and (ii) to test the ability of this approach to predict the sorption of these elements onto natural materials containing clay minerals (i.e. soils/sediments) under various chemical conditions. This study is focused on the behaviour of Zn(II) in the presence of clayey sediments. Considering that clay minerals are cation exchangers containing multiple sorption sites, it is possible to interpret the sorption of Zn(II), as well as competitor cations, by ion-exchange equilibria with the clay minerals. This approach is applied with success to interpret the experimental data obtained previously in the Zn(II)-H + -Na + -montmorillonite system. The authors' research team has already studied the behaviour of Na + , K + , Ca 2+ and Mg 2+ versus pH in terms of ion exchange onto pure montmorillonite, leading to the development of a thermodynamic database including the exchange site concentrations associated with montmorillonite and the selectivity coefficients of Na + , K + , Ca 2+ , Mg 2+ , and Zn 2+ versus H + . In the present study, experimental isotherms of Zn(II) on two different sediments in batch reactors at different pH and ionic strengths, using NaCl and CaSO 4 as electrolytes are reported. Assuming clay minerals are the main ion-exchanging phases, it is possible to predict Zn(II) sorption onto sediments under different experimental conditions, using the previously

  6. A thermoelectric power generating heat exchanger: Part II – Numerical modeling and optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarhadi, Ali; Bjørk, Rasmus; Lindeburg, N.

    2016-01-01

    In Part I of this study, the performance of an experimental integrated thermoelectric generator (TEG)-heat exchanger was presented. In the current study, Part II, the obtained experimental results are compared with those predicted by a finite element (FE) model. In the simulation of the integrated...... TEG-heat exchanger, the thermal contact resistance between the TEG and the heat exchanger is modeled assuming either an ideal thermal contact or using a combined Cooper–Mikic–Yovanovich (CMY) and parallel plate gap formulation, which takes into account the contact pressure, roughness and hardness...

  7. Product-Improvement Test (Phase II), Jetcal Tester, Model H119A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1969-03-05

    Ao—A0 51 113 ARMY AVIATION ‘Cs’ BOARD FORT tUCKER ALA — P*OOUCTeII ROVEMCNT TEST ( FHAS ~ I I ) . JETCAL TESTER, MODEL M119A~~’ETC(U) MAR S9...Phase i i ) , Jetcal Tester , Model H 119A , USATECOM Project No. 4-6-5011-03 b . No fur ther consideration be given to the TEMPCAL heater probe as a...essen t i a l component of the Jetcal Tester. e. The service manual instruct ions for con t inu i ty te s t ing of EG1 thermocouples be revised to

  8. Tools for system validation. Dynamic modelling of the direct condenser at Sandvik II in Vaexjoe; Hjaelpmedel foer systemvalidering. Dynamisk modellering av direktkondensorn paa Sandvik II i Vaexjoe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raaberg, Martin [Dynasim AB, Lund (Sweden); Tuszynski, Jan [Sycon Energikonsult AB, Malmoe (Sweden)

    2002-04-01

    The project reported here aimed to test the suitability of existing computer tools for modelling of energy processes. The suggested use for the models are at the early tests and validations of new, refurbished or modernised thermal plants. The technique presented in this report should be applicable for clarification of the scope of delivery and testing for both the process and tile control system. The validation process can thus be simplified, allowing risk reduction and predictability of the commissioning. The main delays and economical misfortune often occurs during commissioning. This report should prove the feasibility of the purchase routines where purchaser, vendor and quality inspection will use a common model of the process to validate system requirements and specifications. Later on it is used to validate structure and predefine testing. Thanks to agreement on the common model, early tests can be conducted on complex systems, minimizing the investment risks. The modelling reported here concerns the direct condenser at Sandvik 11, power and heating plant owned by Vaexjoe Energi AB in Sweden. We have chosen the direct condenser because it is an existing, well-documented and well-defined subsystem of high complexity in both structure and operation. Heavy transients made commissioning and test runs of similar condensers throughout Sweden costly and troublesome. The work resulted in an open, general, and physically correct model. The model can easily be re-dimensioned through physical parameters of common use. The control system modelled corresponds to the actual control system at the Sandvik II plant. Any improvement or deep validation of the controllers was not included in this work. The suitability is shown through four simulation cases. Three cases are based on a registered plant operation during a turbine trip. The first test case uses present plant data, the second an old steam valve actuator and the third uses the old actuator and an error in level

  9. Large-scale Validation of AMIP II Land-surface Simulations: Preliminary Results for Ten Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, T J; Henderson-Sellers, A; Irannejad, P; McGuffie, K; Zhang, H

    2005-12-01

    This report summarizes initial findings of a large-scale validation of the land-surface simulations of ten atmospheric general circulation models that are entries in phase II of the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP II). This validation is conducted by AMIP Diagnostic Subproject 12 on Land-surface Processes and Parameterizations, which is focusing on putative relationships between the continental climate simulations and the associated models' land-surface schemes. The selected models typify the diversity of representations of land-surface climate that are currently implemented by the global modeling community. The current dearth of global-scale terrestrial observations makes exacting validation of AMIP II continental simulations impractical. Thus, selected land-surface processes of the models are compared with several alternative validation data sets, which include merged in-situ/satellite products, climate reanalyses, and off-line simulations of land-surface schemes that are driven by observed forcings. The aggregated spatio-temporal differences between each simulated process and a chosen reference data set then are quantified by means of root-mean-square error statistics; the differences among alternative validation data sets are similarly quantified as an estimate of the current observational uncertainty in the selected land-surface process. Examples of these metrics are displayed for land-surface air temperature, precipitation, and the latent and sensible heat fluxes. It is found that the simulations of surface air temperature, when aggregated over all land and seasons, agree most closely with the chosen reference data, while the simulations of precipitation agree least. In the latter case, there also is considerable inter-model scatter in the error statistics, with the reanalyses estimates of precipitation resembling the AMIP II simulations more than to the chosen reference data. In aggregate, the simulations of land-surface latent and

  10. Parameter sensitivity study of a Field II multilayer transducer model on a convex transducer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bæk, David; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Willatzen, Morten

    2009-01-01

    A multilayer transducer model for predicting a transducer impulse response has in earlier works been developed and combined with the Field II software. This development was tested on current, voltage, and intensity measurements on piezoceramics discs (Bæk et al. IUS 2008) and a convex 128 element...... ultrasound imaging transducer (Bæk et al. ICU 2009). The model benefits from its 1D simplicity and hasshown to give an amplitude error around 1.7‐2 dB. However, any prediction of amplitude, phase, and attenuation of pulses relies on the accuracy of manufacturer supplied material characteristics, which may...... is a quantitative calibrated model for a complete ultrasound system. This includes a sensitivity study aspresented here.Statement of Contribution/MethodsThe study alters 35 different model parameters which describe a 128 element convex transducer from BK Medical Aps. The changes are within ±20 % of the values...

  11. A GLOBAL MODEL OF THE LIGHT CURVES AND EXPANSION VELOCITIES OF TYPE II-PLATEAU SUPERNOVAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pejcha, Ondřej [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, 4 Ivy Lane, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States); Prieto, Jose L., E-mail: pejcha@astro.princeton.edu [Núcleo de Astronomía de la Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Diego Portales, Av. Ejército 441 Santiago (Chile)

    2015-02-01

    We present a new self-consistent and versatile method that derives photospheric radius and temperature variations of Type II-Plateau supernovae based on their expansion velocities and photometric measurements. We apply the method to a sample of 26 well-observed, nearby supernovae with published light curves and velocities. We simultaneously fit ∼230 velocity and ∼6800 mag measurements distributed over 21 photometric passbands spanning wavelengths from 0.19 to 2.2 μm. The light-curve differences among the Type II-Plateau supernovae are well modeled by assuming different rates of photospheric radius expansion, which we explain as different density profiles of the ejecta, and we argue that steeper density profiles result in flatter plateaus, if everything else remains unchanged. The steep luminosity decline of Type II-Linear supernovae is due to fast evolution of the photospheric temperature, which we verify with a successful fit of SN 1980K. Eliminating the need for theoretical supernova atmosphere models, we obtain self-consistent relative distances, reddenings, and nickel masses fully accounting for all internal model uncertainties and covariances. We use our global fit to estimate the time evolution of any missing band tailored specifically for each supernova, and we construct spectral energy distributions and bolometric light curves. We produce bolometric corrections for all filter combinations in our sample. We compare our model to the theoretical dilution factors and find good agreement for the B and V filters. Our results differ from the theory when the I, J, H, or K bands are included. We investigate the reddening law toward our supernovae and find reasonable agreement with standard R{sub V}∼3.1 reddening law in UBVRI bands. Results for other bands are inconclusive. We make our fitting code publicly available.

  12. Oral administration of undenatured native chicken type II collagen (UC-II) diminished deterioration of articular cartilage in a rat model of osteoarthritis (OA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagi, C M; Berryman, E R; Teo, S; Lane, N E

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the ability of undenatured native chicken type II collagen (UC-II) to prevent excessive articular cartilage deterioration in a rat model of osteoarthritis (OA). Twenty male rats were subjected to partial medial meniscectomy tear (PMMT) surgery to induce OA. Immediately after the surgery 10 rats received vehicle and another 10 rats oral daily dose of UC-II at 0.66 mg/kg for a period of 8 weeks. In addition 10 naïve rats were used as an intact control and another 10 rats received sham surgery. Study endpoints included a weight-bearing capacity of front and hind legs, serum biomarkers of bone and cartilage metabolism, analyses of subchondral and cancellous bone at the tibial epiphysis and metaphysis, and cartilage pathology at the medial tibial plateau using histological methods. PMMT surgery produced moderate OA at the medial tibial plateau. Specifically, the deterioration of articular cartilage negatively impacted the weight bearing capacity of the operated limb. Immediate treatment with the UC-II preserved the weight-bearing capacity of the injured leg, preserved integrity of the cancellous bone at tibial metaphysis and limited the excessive osteophyte formation and deterioration of articular cartilage. Study results demonstrate that a clinically relevant daily dose of UC-II when applied immediately after injury can improve the mechanical function of the injured knee and prevent excessive deterioration of articular cartilage. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Visual imagery and the user model applied to fuel handling at EBR-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown-VanHoozer, S.A.

    1995-06-01

    The material presented in this paper is based on two studies involving visual display designs and the user`s perspective model of a system. The studies involved a methodology known as Neuro-Linguistic Programming (NLP), and its use in expanding design choices which included the ``comfort parameters`` and ``perspective reality`` of the user`s model of the world. In developing visual displays for the EBR-II fuel handling system, the focus would be to incorporate the comfort parameters that overlap from each of the representation systems: visual, auditory and kinesthetic then incorporate the comfort parameters of the most prominent group of the population, and last, blend in the other two representational system comfort parameters. The focus of this informal study was to use the techniques of meta-modeling and synesthesia to develop a virtual environment that closely resembled the operator`s perspective of the fuel handling system of Argonne`s Experimental Breeder Reactor - II. An informal study was conducted using NLP as the behavioral model in a v reality (VR) setting.

  14. Visual imagery and the user model applied to fuel handling at EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown-VanHoozer, S.A.

    1995-01-01

    The material presented in this paper is based on two studies involving visual display designs and the user's perspective model of a system. The studies involved a methodology known as Neuro-Linguistic Programming (NLP), and its use in expanding design choices which included the ''comfort parameters'' and ''perspective reality'' of the user's model of the world. In developing visual displays for the EBR-II fuel handling system, the focus would be to incorporate the comfort parameters that overlap from each of the representation systems: visual, auditory and kinesthetic then incorporate the comfort parameters of the most prominent group of the population, and last, blend in the other two representational system comfort parameters. The focus of this informal study was to use the techniques of meta-modeling and synesthesia to develop a virtual environment that closely resembled the operator's perspective of the fuel handling system of Argonne's Experimental Breeder Reactor - II. An informal study was conducted using NLP as the behavioral model in a v reality (VR) setting

  15. Testing lowered isothermal models with direct N-body simulations of globular clusters - II. Multimass models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peuten, M.; Zocchi, A.; Gieles, M.; Hénault-Brunet, V.

    2017-09-01

    Lowered isothermal models, such as the multimass Michie-King models, have been successful in describing observational data of globular clusters. In this study, we assess whether such models are able to describe the phase space properties of evolutionary N-body models. We compare the multimass models as implemented in limepy (Gieles & Zocchi) to N-body models of star clusters with different retention fractions for the black holes and neutron stars evolving in a tidal field. We find that multimass models successfully reproduce the density and velocity dispersion profiles of the different mass components in all evolutionary phases and for different remnants retention. We further use these results to study the evolution of global model parameters. We find that over the lifetime of clusters, radial anisotropy gradually evolves from the low- to the high-mass components and we identify features in the properties of observable stars that are indicative of the presence of stellar-mass black holes. We find that the model velocity scale depends on mass as m-δ, with δ ≃ 0.5 for almost all models, but the dependence of central velocity dispersion on m can be shallower, depending on the dark remnant content, and agrees well with that of the N-body models. The reported model parameters, and correlations amongst them, can be used as theoretical priors when fitting these types of mass models to observational data.

  16. Risk Factors Accompanied with Nephropathy in Patients with Type II Diabetes; Test of the Biopsychosocial Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Rahimian Boogar

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: The study of biopsychosocial factors influencing nephropathy as a most serious complication of type II diabetes is important. This study aimed to investigate risk factors accompanied with nephropathy in patients with type II diabetes based on the biopsychosocial model. Materials & Methods: In a cross-sectional descriptive study, 295 patients with type II diabetes were selected by convenience sampling in Tehran Shariati hospital outpatient clinics. The data were collected by demographical information questionnaire along with disease characteristics and depression anxiety stress scales (dass, quality of life scale (who- qol- bref, diabetes self-management scale (dsms, and diabetes knowledge scale (dks, then analyzed by chi-square, independent t-test and logistic regression with pasw software. Results: Hypertension (OR=3.841 & P0.05.Conclusion: It is important to pay attention to hypertension, glycated hemoglobin, body mass index, diabetes self-management, depression, quality of life, and diabetes knowledge for therapeutic intervention programming and diabetes complications control protocols for diabetic patients.(Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2012;19(2:44-53

  17. Anticonvulsant activity of DNS II fraction in the acute seizure models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raza, Muhammad Liaquat; Zeeshan, Mohammad; Ahmad, Manzoor; Shaheen, Farzana; Simjee, Shabana U

    2010-04-21

    Delphinium nordhagenii belongs to family Ranunculaceae, it is widely found in tropical areas of Pakistan. Other species of Delphinium are reported as anticonvulsant and are traditionally used in the treatment of epilepsy. Delphinium nordhagenii is used by local healer in Pakistan but never used for scientific investigation as anticonvulsant. Thus, Delphinium nordhagenii was subjected to bioassay-guided fractionation and the most active fraction, i.e. DNS II acetone was chosen for further testing in the acute seizure models of epilepsy to study the antiepileptic potential in male mice. Different doses (60, 65 and 70mg/kg, i.p.) of DNS II acetone fraction of Delphinium nordhagenii was administered 30min prior the chemoconvulsant's injection in the male mice. Convulsive doses of chemoconvulsants (pentylenetetrazole 90mg/kg, s.c. and picrotoxin 3.15mg/kg, s.c.) were used. The mice were observed 45-90min for the presence of seizures. Moreover, four different doses of DNS II (60, 65, 70 and 100mg/kg, i.p.) were tested in the MES test. The DNS II acetone fraction of Delphinium nordhagenii has exhibited the anticonvulsant actions by preventing the seizures against PTZ- and picrotoxin-induced seizure as well as 100% seizure protection in MES test. The results are comparable with standard AEDs (diazepam 7.5mg/kg, i.p. and phenytoin 20mg/kg, i.p.). These findings suggest that the Delphinium nordhagenii possesses the anticonvulsant activity. Further analysis is needed to confirm the structure and target the extended activity profile. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Hierarchical competition models with the Allee effect II: the case of immigration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assas, Laila; Dennis, Brian; Elaydi, Saber; Kwessi, Eddy; Livadiotis, George

    2015-01-01

    This is part II of an earlier paper that dealt with hierarchical models with the Allee effect but with no immigration. In this paper, we greatly simplify the proofs in part I and provide a proof of the global dynamics of the non-hyperbolic cases that were previously conjectured. Then, we show how immigration to one of the species or to both would, drastically, change the dynamics of the system. It is shown that if the level of immigration to one or to both species is above a specified level, then there will be no extinction region where both species go to extinction.

  19. A multimedia fate and chemical transport modeling system for pesticides: II. Model evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Rong; Yang Fuquan; Sloan, James J; Trevor Scholtz, M

    2011-01-01

    Pesticides have adverse health effects and can be transported over long distances to contaminate sensitive ecosystems. To address problems caused by environmental pesticides we developed a multimedia multi-pollutant modeling system, and here we present an evaluation of the model by comparing modeled results against measurements. The modeled toxaphene air concentrations for two sites, in Louisiana (LA) and Michigan (MI), are in good agreement with measurements (average concentrations agree to within a factor of 2). Because the residue inventory showed no soil residues at these two sites, resulting in no emissions, the concentrations must be caused by transport; the good agreement between the modeled and measured concentrations suggests that the model simulates atmospheric transport accurately. Compared to the LA and MI sites, the measured air concentrations at two other sites having toxaphene soil residues leading to emissions, in Indiana and Arkansas, showed more pronounced seasonal variability (higher in warmer months); this pattern was also captured by the model. The model-predicted toxaphene concentration fraction on particles (0.5-5%) agrees well with measurement-based estimates (3% or 6%). There is also good agreement between modeled and measured dry (1:1) and wet (within a factor of less than 2) depositions in Lake Ontario. Additionally this study identified erroneous soil residue data around a site in Texas in a published US toxaphene residue inventory, which led to very low modeled air concentrations at this site. Except for the erroneous soil residue data around this site, the good agreement between the modeled and observed results implies that both the US and Mexican toxaphene soil residue inventories are reasonably good. This agreement also suggests that the modeling system is capable of simulating the important physical and chemical processes in the multimedia compartments.

  20. Material correlations and models for the irradiation behavior of fissile and fertile material in SNR-300, Mark-II and KNK II, third core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenneker; Steinmetz; Toebbe

    1986-07-01

    The report contains the material correlations and models used in the fuel pin design code IAMBUS for the irradiation behavior of PuO 2 -UO 2 fissile materials and UO 2 fertile materials of the SNR-300 Mark-II reload and the KNK II third core. They are applicable for pellet densities of more than 90 % of the theoretical density. The presented models of the fuel behavior and the applied material correlations have been derived either from single experiments or from the comparison of theoretically predicted integral fuel behavior with the results of fuel pin irradiation experiments. The material correlations have been examined and extended in the frame of the collaborations INTERATOM/KWU and INTERATOM/KfK. French and British results were included, when available from the European fast reactor knowledge exchange [de

  1. 78 FR 32224 - Availability of Version 3.1.2 of the Connect America Fund Phase II Cost Model; Additional...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-29

    ... Version 3.1.2 of the Connect America Fund Phase II Cost Model; Additional Discussion Topics in Connect America Cost Model Virtual Workshop AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Proposed rule... America Cost Model (CAM v3.1.2), which allows Commission staff and interested parties to calculate costs...

  2. Modeling of "Stripe" Wave Phenomena Seen by the CHARM II and ACES Sounding Rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dombrowski, M. P.; Labelle, J. W.

    2010-12-01

    Two recent sounding-rocket missions—CHARM II and ACES—have been launched from Poker Flat Research Range, carrying the Dartmouth High-Frequency Experiment (HFE) among their primary instruments. The HFE is a receiver system which effectively yields continuous (100% duty cycle) E-field waveform measurements up to 5 MHz. The CHARM II sounding rocket was launched 9:49 UT on 15 February 2010 into a substorm, while the ACES mission consisted of two rockets, launched into quiet aurora at 9:49 and 9:50 UT on 29 January 2009. At approximately 350 km on CHARM II and the ACES High-Flyer, the HFE detected short (~2s) bursts of broadband (200-500 kHz) noise with a 'stripe' pattern of nulls imposed on it. These nulls have 10 to 20 kHz width and spacing, and many show a regular, non-linear frequency-time relation. These events are different from the 'stripes' discussed by Samara and LaBelle [2006] and Colpitts et al. [2010], because of the density of the stripes, the non-linearity, and the appearance of being an absorptive rather than emissive phenomenon. These events are similar to 'stripe' features reported by Brittain et al. [1983] in the VLF range, explained as an interference pattern between a downward-traveling whistler-mode wave and its reflection off the bottom of the ionosphere. Following their analysis method, we modeled our stripes as higher-frequency interfering whistlers reflecting off of a density gradient. This model predicts the near-hyperbolic frequency-time curves and high density of the nulls, and therefore shows promise at explaining the new observations.

  3. Modeling of free radical polymerization up to high conversion. II. Development of a mathematical model.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tefera shibeshe, N.; Tefera, N.; Weickert, G.; Westerterp, K.R.

    1997-01-01

    In free radical polymerization diffusion-controlled processes take place simultaneously to the normal chemical reactions. Despite extensive efforts to model such processes a consistent model for the design of a polymerization reactor has not yet been established. In this article a semiempirical

  4. Critical Analysis of Underground Coal Gasification Models. Part II: Kinetic and Computational Fluid Dynamics Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Żogała

    2014-01-01

    Originality/value: This paper presents state of art in the field of coal gasification modeling using kinetic and computational fluid dynamics approach. The paper also presents own comparative analysis (concerned with mathematical formulation, input data and parameters, basic assumptions, obtained results etc. of the most important models of underground coal gasification.

  5. The status of world biosphere modelling for waste disposal assessments following BIOMOVS II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klos, R.; Reid, J.A.K.; Santucci, P.; Bergstrom, U.

    1996-01-01

    Biosphere modelling for radioactive waste disposal assessments faces unique problems. Models for such applications tend to be quite distinct from other similar environmental assessment tools. Over the past few years, two of the Working Groups in the second international biosphere model validation study (BIOMOVS II) have been considering the special requirements for such models. The BIOMOVS II Reference Biospheres Working Group has concentrated on the elaboration of the methodology for the definition of models for such assessments. lie Complementary Studies Working Group has dealt with how the Features, Events and Processes (FEPS) included in the participating models are represented, in the context of the representation of a temperate inland biosphere. The aim of Complementary Studies was to move forward from the first phase of BIOMOVS, with the analysis going further and deeper into principles on which the participating models are based. Ten of the leading models from around the world have participated in the Complementary Studies model intercomparison exercise. This paper presents some key findings using the international biosphere FEP-list produced by the Reference Biospheres Working Group as a framework for discussing the current state-of-the-art. Common features of the models as well as reasons for the model differences are discussed. Areas where the international community could benefit from a harmonisation of approaches are also identified, setting out possible future requirements and developments. In the Complementary Studies intercomparison, the hypothetical release of radionuclides to an inland valley biosphere was considered. The radionuclides considered in the study were selected because of their relevance for underground repositories for long-lived radioactive wastes and because their individual properties made them suitable probes for many of the important Features, Events and Processes (FEPS) in long timescale biosphere modelling. The data

  6. Application of blocking diagnosis methods to general circulation models. Part II: model simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barriopedro, D.; Trigo, R.M. [Universidade de Lisboa, CGUL-IDL, Faculdade de Ciencias, Lisbon (Portugal); Garcia-Herrera, R.; Gonzalez-Rouco, J.F. [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Departamento de Fisica de la Tierra II, Facultad de C.C. Fisicas, Madrid (Spain)

    2010-12-15

    A previously defined automatic method is applied to reanalysis and present-day (1950-1989) forced simulations of the ECHO-G model in order to assess its performance in reproducing atmospheric blocking in the Northern Hemisphere. Unlike previous methodologies, critical parameters and thresholds to estimate blocking occurrence in the model are not calibrated with an observed reference, but objectively derived from the simulated climatology. The choice of model dependent parameters allows for an objective definition of blocking and corrects for some intrinsic model bias, the difference between model and observed thresholds providing a measure of systematic errors in the model. The model captures reasonably the main blocking features (location, amplitude, annual cycle and persistence) found in observations, but reveals a relative southward shift of Eurasian blocks and an overall underestimation of blocking activity, especially over the Euro-Atlantic sector. Blocking underestimation mostly arises from the model inability to generate long persistent blocks with the observed frequency. This error is mainly attributed to a bias in the basic state. The bias pattern consists of excessive zonal winds over the Euro-Atlantic sector and a southward shift at the exit zone of the jet stream extending into in the Eurasian continent, that are more prominent in cold and warm seasons and account for much of Euro-Atlantic and Eurasian blocking errors, respectively. It is shown that other widely used blocking indices or empirical observational thresholds may not give a proper account of the lack of realism in the model as compared with the proposed method. This suggests that in addition to blocking changes that could be ascribed to natural variability processes or climate change signals in the simulated climate, attention should be paid to significant departures in the diagnosis of phenomena that can also arise from an inappropriate adaptation of detection methods to the climate of the

  7. FISPACT-II: An Advanced Simulation System for Activation, Transmutation and Material Modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sublet, J.-Ch., E-mail: jean-christophe.sublet@ukaea.uk [United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Eastwood, J.W.; Morgan, J.G. [Culham Electromagnetics Ltd, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Gilbert, M.R.; Fleming, M.; Arter, W. [United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2017-01-15

    Fispact-II is a code system and library database for modelling activation-transmutation processes, depletion-burn-up, time dependent inventory and radiation damage source terms caused by nuclear reactions and decays. The Fispact-II code, written in object-style Fortran, follows the evolution of material irradiated by neutrons, alphas, gammas, protons, or deuterons, and provides a wide range of derived radiological output quantities to satisfy most needs for nuclear applications. It can be used with any ENDF-compliant group library data for nuclear reactions, particle-induced and spontaneous fission yields, and radioactive decay (including but not limited to TENDL-2015, ENDF/B-VII.1, JEFF-3.2, JENDL-4.0u, CENDL-3.1 processed into fine-group-structure files, GEFY-5.2 and UKDD-16), as well as resolved and unresolved resonance range probability tables for self-shielding corrections and updated radiological hazard indices. The code has many novel features including: extension of the energy range up to 1 GeV; additional neutron physics including self-shielding effects, temperature dependence, thin and thick target yields; pathway analysis; and sensitivity and uncertainty quantification and propagation using full covariance data. The latest ENDF libraries such as TENDL encompass thousands of target isotopes. Nuclear data libraries for Fispact-II are prepared from these using processing codes PREPRO, NJOY and CALENDF. These data include resonance parameters, cross sections with covariances, probability tables in the resonance ranges, PKA spectra, kerma, dpa, gas and radionuclide production and energy-dependent fission yields, supplemented with all 27 decay types. All such data for the five most important incident particles are provided in evaluated data tables. The Fispact-II simulation software is described in detail in this paper, together with the nuclear data libraries. The Fispact-II system also includes several utility programs for code-use optimisation

  8. Explaining dark matter and neutrino mass in the light of TYPE-II seesaw model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Anirban; Shaw, Avirup

    2018-02-01

    With the motivation of simultaneously explaining dark matter and neutrino masses, mixing angles, we have invoked the Type-II seesaw model extended by an extra SU(2) doublet Φ. Moreover, we have imposed a Z2 parity on Φ which remains unbroken as the vacuum expectation value of Φ is zero. Consequently, the lightest neutral component of Φ becomes naturally stable and can be a viable dark matter candidate. On the other hand, light Majorana masses for neutrinos have been generated following usual Type-II seesaw mechanism. Further in this framework, for the first time we have derived the full set of vacuum stability and unitarity conditions, which must be satisfied to obtain a stable vacuum as well as to preserve the unitarity of the model respectively. Thereafter, we have performed extensive phenomenological studies of both dark matter and neutrino sectors considering all possible theoretical and current experimental constraints. Finally, we have also discussed a qualitative collider signatures of dark matter and associated odd particles at the 13 TeV Large Hadron Collider.

  9. Relativistic model-potential oscillator strengths and transition probabilities for 4fsup(n)6s-4fsup(n)6p transitions in Eu(II), Tb(II), and Ho(II) in J1j coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Migdalek, J.

    1984-01-01

    The lowest 4fsup(n)6s-4fsup(n)6p transitions are studied for the Eu(II) (n=7), Tb(II) (n=9), and Ho(II) (n=11) spectra, where the J 1 J coupling is an acceptable approximation. The relativistic radial integrals, required to evaluate the oscillator strengths and transition probabilities, are calculated with the model-potential method, which includes also core-polarization effects. The similarities observed in oscillator strengths for transitions with given ΔJ but different J values are discussed and explained. The computed oscillator strengths are compared with those obtained with the Coulomb approximation and it is found that the latter are only 11-12% lower. The core polarization influence on oscillator strengths is also investigated and the 19-21% decrease in oscillator strengths due to this effect is predicted. This result may, however, be overestimated because of some deficiencies in our procedure. (author)

  10. TRACER-II: a complete computational model for mixing and propagation of vapor explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang, K.H. [School of Mechanical Engineering, Korea Maritime Univ., Pusan (Korea, Republic of); Park, I.G.; Park, G.C.

    1998-01-01

    A vapor explosion is a physical process in which very rapid energy transfer occurs between a hot liquid and a volatile, colder liquid when the two liquids come into a sudden contact. For the analyses of potential impacts from such explosive events, a computer program, TRACER-II, has been developed, which contains a complete description of mixing and propagation phases of vapor explosions. The model consists of fuel, fragmented fuel (debris), coolant liquid, and coolant vapor in two-dimensional Eulerian coordinates. The set of governing equations are solved numerically using finite difference method. The results of this numerical simulation of vapor explosions are discussed in comparison with the recent experimental data of FARO and KROTOS tests. When compared to some selected FARO and KROTOS data, the fuel-coolant mixing and explosion propagation behavior agree reasonably with the data, although the results are yet sensitive primarily to the melt breakup and fragmentation modeling. (author)

  11. Re-modeling Chara action potential: II. The action potential form under salinity stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Jane Beilby

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In part I we established Thiel-Beilby model of the Chara action potential (AP. In part II the AP is investigated in detail at the time of saline stress. Even very short exposure of salt-sensitive Chara cells to artificial pond water with 50 mM NaCl (Saline APW modified the AP threshold and drastically altered the AP form. Detailed modeling of 14 saline APs from 3 cells established that both the Ca2+ pump and the Ca2+ channels on internal stores seem to be affected, with the changes sometimes cancelling and sometimes re-enforcing each other, leading to APs with long durations and very complex forms. The exposure to salinity offers further insights into AP mechanism and suggests future experiments. The prolonged APs lead to greater loss of chloride and potassium ions, compounding the effects of saline stress.

  12. A mediational model of PTSD in World War II veterans exposed to mustard gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowski, M Kay; Schnurr, Paula P; Adams, Gary A; Green, Bonnie L; Ford, Julian D; Friedman, Matthew J

    2004-08-01

    Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to examine associations among trauma-related contextual factors, initial psychological reactions, social support, and subsequent disclosure on posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in a sample of World War II (WWII) veterans exposed to mustard gas (N = 305). A structural model suggested that initial psychological reaction mediated the relationship between variables related to the context of mustard gas exposure and severity of PTSD symptoms 50 years later. Unexpectedly, social support appeared to be positively related to PTSD symptoms, and not related to the contextual variables or initial psychological reactions. These findings contribute to our understanding of PTSD in older veterans, and have relevance for early intervention services to prevent PTSD among those at risk for exposure to toxic agents.

  13. Electric field obtained from an elliptic critical-state model for anisotropic type-II superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero-Salazar, C., E-mail: cromeros@ifuap.buap.mx; Hernández-Flores, O.A.

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • An anisotropic critical state model that incorporates a non-zero electric field is proposed. • The critical current density is driven by the electric field. • To determinate the magnetic properties is not required a material law for the electric field magnitude. - Abstract: The conventional elliptic critical-state models (ECSM) establish that the electric field vector is zero when it flows a critical current density in a type-II superconductor. This proposal incorporates a finite electric field on the ECSM to study samples with anisotropic-current-carrying capacity. Our theoretical scheme has the advantage of being able to dispense of a material law which drives the electric field magnitude, however, it does not consider the magnetic history of the superconductor.

  14. Mixture modeling methods for the assessment of normal and abnormal personality, part II: longitudinal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Aidan G C; Hallquist, Michael N

    2014-01-01

    Studying personality and its pathology as it changes, develops, or remains stable over time offers exciting insight into the nature of individual differences. Researchers interested in examining personal characteristics over time have a number of time-honored analytic approaches at their disposal. In recent years there have also been considerable advances in person-oriented analytic approaches, particularly longitudinal mixture models. In this methodological primer we focus on mixture modeling approaches to the study of normative and individual change in the form of growth mixture models and ipsative change in the form of latent transition analysis. We describe the conceptual underpinnings of each of these models, outline approaches for their implementation, and provide accessible examples for researchers studying personality and its assessment.

  15. Analysis and Design Environment for Large Scale System Models and Collaborative Model Development, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — As NASA modeling efforts grow more complex and more distributed among many working groups, new tools and technologies are required to integrate their efforts...

  16. Advanced Pavement Design: Finite Element Modeling for Rigid Pavement Joints, Report II: Model Development

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hammons, Michael

    1998-01-01

    .... The objective of this research was to obtain data on the response of the ng'id pavement slab-joint-foundation system by conducting laboratory-scale experiments on jointed rigid pavement models...

  17. Excessive activity of cathepsin K is associated with cartilage defects in a zebrafish model of mucolipidosis II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron C. Petrey

    2012-03-01

    The severe pediatric disorder mucolipidosis II (ML-II; also known as I-cell disease is caused by defects in mannose 6-phosphate (Man-6-P biosynthesis. Patients with ML-II exhibit multiple developmental defects, including skeletal, craniofacial and joint abnormalities. To date, the molecular mechanisms that underlie these clinical manifestations are poorly understood. Taking advantage of a zebrafish model of ML-II, we previously showed that the cartilage morphogenesis defects in this model are associated with altered chondrocyte differentiation and excessive deposition of type II collagen, indicating that aspects of development that rely on proper extracellular matrix homeostasis are sensitive to decreases in Man-6-P biosynthesis. To further investigate the molecular bases for the cartilage phenotypes, we analyzed the transcript abundance of several genes in chondrocyte-enriched cell populations isolated from wild-type and ML-II zebrafish embryos. Increased levels of cathepsin and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP transcripts were noted in ML-II cell populations. This increase in transcript abundance corresponded with elevated and sustained activity of several cathepsins (K, L and S and MMP-13 during early development. Unlike MMP-13, for which higher levels of protein were detected, the sustained activity of cathepsin K at later stages seemed to result from its abnormal processing and activation. Inhibition of cathepsin K activity by pharmacological or genetic means not only reduced the activity of this enzyme but led to a broad reduction in additional protease activity, significant correction of the cartilage morphogenesis phenotype and reduced type II collagen staining in ML-II embryos. Our findings suggest a central role for excessive cathepsin K activity in the developmental aspects of ML-II cartilage pathogenesis and highlight the utility of the zebrafish system to address the biochemical underpinnings of metabolic disease.

  18. Computer augumented modelling studies of Pb(II, Cd(II, Hg(II, Co(II, Ni(II, Cu(II and Zn(II complexes of L-glutamic acid in 1,2-propanediol–water mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAHESWARA RAO VEGI

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Chemical speciation of Pb(II, Cd(II, Hg(II, Co(II, Ni(II, Cu(II and Zn(II complexes of L-glutamic acid was studied at 303 K in 0–60 vol. % 1,2-propanediol–water mixtures, whereby the ionic strength was maintained at 0.16 mol dm-3. The active forms of the ligand are LH3+, LH2 and LH–. The predominant detected species were ML, ML2, MLH, ML2H and ML2H2. The trend of the variation in the stability constants with changing dielectric constant of the medium is explained based on the cation stabilizing nature of the co-solvents, specific solvent–water interactions, charge dispersion and specific interactions of the co-solvent with the solute. The effect of systematic errors in the concentrations of the substances on the stability constants is in the order alkali > > acid > ligand > metal. The bioavailability and transportation of metals are explained based on distribution diagrams and stability constants.

  19. Predictive Modeling of a Paradigm Mechanical Cooling Tower Model: II. Optimal Best-Estimate Results with Reduced Predicted Uncertainties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruixian Fang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This work uses the adjoint sensitivity model of the counter-flow cooling tower derived in the accompanying PART I to obtain the expressions and relative numerical rankings of the sensitivities, to all model parameters, of the following model responses: (i outlet air temperature; (ii outlet water temperature; (iii outlet water mass flow rate; and (iv air outlet relative humidity. These sensitivities are subsequently used within the “predictive modeling for coupled multi-physics systems” (PM_CMPS methodology to obtain explicit formulas for the predicted optimal nominal values for the model responses and parameters, along with reduced predicted standard deviations for the predicted model parameters and responses. These explicit formulas embody the assimilation of experimental data and the “calibration” of the model’s parameters. The results presented in this work demonstrate that the PM_CMPS methodology reduces the predicted standard deviations to values that are smaller than either the computed or the experimentally measured ones, even for responses (e.g., the outlet water flow rate for which no measurements are available. These improvements stem from the global characteristics of the PM_CMPS methodology, which combines all of the available information simultaneously in phase-space, as opposed to combining it sequentially, as in current data assimilation procedures.

  20. Aerosols at the poles: an AeroCom Phase II multi-model evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sand

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric aerosols from anthropogenic and natural sources reach the polar regions through long-range transport and affect the local radiation balance. Such transport is, however, poorly constrained in present-day global climate models, and few multi-model evaluations of polar anthropogenic aerosol radiative forcing exist. Here we compare the aerosol optical depth (AOD at 550 nm from simulations with 16 global aerosol models from the AeroCom Phase II model intercomparison project with available observations at both poles. We show that the annual mean multi-model median is representative of the observations in Arctic, but that the intermodel spread is large. We also document the geographical distribution and seasonal cycle of the AOD for the individual aerosol species: black carbon (BC from fossil fuel and biomass burning, sulfate, organic aerosols (OAs, dust, and sea-salt. For a subset of models that represent nitrate and secondary organic aerosols (SOAs, we document the role of these aerosols at high latitudes.The seasonal dependence of natural and anthropogenic aerosols differs with natural aerosols peaking in winter (sea-salt and spring (dust, whereas AOD from anthropogenic aerosols peaks in late spring and summer. The models produce a median annual mean AOD of 0.07 in the Arctic (defined here as north of 60° N. The models also predict a noteworthy aerosol transport to the Antarctic (south of 70° S with a resulting AOD varying between 0.01 and 0.02. The models have estimated the shortwave anthropogenic radiative forcing contributions to the direct aerosol effect (DAE associated with BC and OA from fossil fuel and biofuel (FF, sulfate, SOAs, nitrate, and biomass burning from BC and OA emissions combined. The Arctic modelled annual mean DAE is slightly negative (−0.12 W m−2, dominated by a positive BC FF DAE in spring and a negative sulfate DAE in summer. The Antarctic DAE is governed by BC FF. We perform sensitivity

  1. Multiscale modeling, simulations, and experiments of coating growth on nanofibers. Part II. Deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buldum, A.; Clemons, C.B.; Dill, L.H.; Kreider, K.L.; Young, G.W.; Zheng, X.; Evans, E.A.; Zhang, G.; Hariharan, S.I.

    2005-01-01

    This work is Part II of an integrated experimental/modeling investigation of a procedure to coat nanofibers and core-clad nanostructures with thin-film materials using plasma-enhanced physical vapor deposition. In the experimental effort, electrospun polymer nanofibers are coated with aluminum materials under different operating conditions to observe changes in the coating morphology. This procedure begins with the sputtering of the coating material from a target. Part I [J. Appl. Phys. 98, 044303 (2005)] focused on the sputtering aspect and transport of the sputtered material through the reactor. That reactor level model determines the concentration field of the coating material. This field serves as input into the present species transport and deposition model for the region surrounding an individual nanofiber. The interrelationships among processing factors for the transport and deposition are investigated here from a detailed modeling approach that includes the salient physical and chemical phenomena. Solution strategies that couple continuum and atomistic models are used. At the continuum scale, transport dynamics near the nanofiber are described. At the atomic level, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used to study the deposition and sputtering mechanisms at the coating surface. Ion kinetic energies and fluxes are passed from the continuum sheath model to the MD simulations. These simulations calculate sputtering and sticking probabilities that in turn are used to calculate parameters for the continuum transport model. The continuum transport model leads to the definition of an evolution equation for the coating-free surface. This equation is solved using boundary perturbation and level set methods to determine the coating morphology as a function of operating conditions

  2. Modeling of pheromone communication system of forest Lepidopterous insects. II. Model of female searching by male

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Kovalev

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We propose an agent­based simulation model search. This model allows us to evaluate the effectiveness of different males­females pheromone search strategies for Lepidoptera. In the model, we consider the simplest case of the search, when the pheromone has only one chemical component. It is assumed that the insects are able to detect the pheromone molecules and the sensory cells generate action potentials in contact with the pheromone for some time. Thereafter pheromone molecule is inactivated. This behavior can be regarded as a memory of individual. Proportion of individuals who have reached the source is selected as an integral indicator of the search efficiency. To evaluate the effectiveness, numeric experiments were performed in different conditions: random walk, search algorithm without memory, and algorithm with memory and return mechanism. The resulting effectiveness of source localization by insects for flight in turbulent flows is ~ 70 %, which corresponds to experiments with live specimens in literature. In this case, proposed pheromone search algorithm is quite simple, which makes it biologically correct. Conducted modeling calculations can be the starting point for planning of field observations and pest monitoring systems using pheromone traps.

  3. Multi-model study of HTAP II on sulfur and nitrogen deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jiani; Fu, Joshua S.; Dentener, Frank; Sun, Jian; Emmons, Louisa; Tilmes, Simone; Sudo, Kengo; Flemming, Johannes; Eiof Jonson, Jan; Gravel, Sylvie; Bian, Huisheng; Davila, Yanko; Henze, Daven K.; Lund, Marianne T.; Kucsera, Tom; Takemura, Toshihiko; Keating, Terry

    2018-05-01

    This study uses multi-model ensemble results of 11 models from the second phase of Task Force Hemispheric Transport of Air Pollution (HTAP II) to calculate the global sulfur (S) and nitrogen (N) deposition in 2010. Modeled wet deposition is evaluated with observation networks in North America, Europe and East Asia. The modeled results agree well with observations, with 76-83 % of stations being predicted within ±50 % of observations. The models underestimate SO42-, NO3- and NH4+ wet depositions in some European and East Asian stations but overestimate NO3- wet deposition in the eastern United States. Intercomparison with previous projects (PhotoComp, ACCMIP and HTAP I) shows that HTPA II has considerably improved the estimation of deposition at European and East Asian stations. Modeled dry deposition is generally higher than the inferential data calculated by observed concentration and modeled velocity in North America, but the inferential data have high uncertainty, too. The global S deposition is 84 Tg(S) in 2010, with 49 % in continental regions and 51 % in the ocean (19 % of which coastal). The global N deposition consists of 59 Tg(N) oxidized nitrogen (NOy) deposition and 64 Tg(N) reduced nitrogen (NHx) deposition in 2010. About 65 % of N is deposited in continental regions, and 35 % in the ocean (15 % of which coastal). The estimated outflow of pollution from land to ocean is about 4 Tg(S) for S deposition and 18 Tg(N) for N deposition. Comparing our results to the results in 2001 from HTAP I, we find that the global distributions of S and N deposition have changed considerably during the last 10 years. The global S deposition decreases 2 Tg(S) (3 %) from 2001 to 2010, with significant decreases in Europe (5 Tg(S) and 55 %), North America (3 Tg(S) and 29 %) and Russia (2 Tg(S) and 26 %), and increases in South Asia (2 Tg(S) and 42 %) and the Middle East (1 Tg(S) and 44 %). The global N deposition increases by 7 Tg(N) (6 %), mainly contributed by South Asia

  4. Compromise between neutrino masses and collider signatures in the type-II seesaw model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao Wei; Luo Shu; Xing Zhizhong; Zhou Shun

    2008-01-01

    A natural extension of the standard SU(2) L xU(1) Y gauge model to accommodate massive neutrinos is to introduce one Higgs triplet and three right-handed Majorana neutrinos, leading to a 6x6 neutrino mass matrix which contains three 3x3 submatrices, M L , M D and M R . We show that three light Majorana neutrinos (i.e., the mass eigenstates of ν e , ν μ , and ν τ ) are exactly massless in this model, if and only if M L =M D M R -1 M D T exactly holds. This no-go theorem implies that small but nonvanishing neutrino masses may result from a significant but incomplete cancellation between M L and M D M R -1 M D T terms in the Type-II seesaw formula, provided three right-handed Majorana neutrinos are of O(1) TeV and experimentally detectable at the LHC. We propose three simple Type-II seesaw scenarios with the A 4 xU(1) X flavor symmetry and its explicit breaking to interpret the observed neutrino mass spectrum and neutrino mixing pattern. Such a TeV-scale neutrino model can be tested in two complementary ways: (1) searching for possible collider signatures of lepton number violation induced by the right-handed Majorana neutrinos and doubly-charged Higgs particles; and (2) searching for possible consequences of unitarity violation of the 3x3 neutrino mixing matrix in the future long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments

  5. Thermodynamic model of Ni(II) solubility, hydrolysis and complex formation with ISA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Siso, Maria Rosa; Duro, Lara; Bruno, Jordi [Amphos21, Barcelona (Spain); Gaona, Xavier; Altmaier, Marcus [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany). Inst. for Nuclear Waste Disposal

    2018-04-01

    The solubility of β-Ni(OH){sub 2}(cr) was investigated at T=(22±2) C in the absence and presence of α-isosaccharinic acid (ISA), the main degradation product of cellulose under alkaline pH conditions. Batch solubility experiments were performed from undersaturation conditions under inert gas (Ar) atmosphere. Solubility experiments in the absence of ISA were conducted in 0.5 and 3.0 M NaCl-NaOH solutions at 7.5 ≤ pH{sub m} ≤ 13 (with pH{sub m} = -log{sub 10}[H{sup +}]). XRD analyses of selected solid phases collected after completing the solubility experiments (∼300 days) confirmed that β-Ni(OH){sub 2}(cr) remains as solid phase controlling the solubility of Ni(II) in all investigated conditions. Based on the slope analysis (log{sub 10}[Ni] vs. pH{sub m}) of the solubility data and solid phase characterization, the equilibrium reactions β-Ni(OH){sub 2}(cr)+2 H{sup +} <=> Ni{sup 2+}+2 H{sub 2}O(l) and β-Ni(OH){sub 2}(cr) <=> Ni(OH){sub 2}(aq) were identified as controlling the solubility of Ni(II) within the investigated pH{sub m} region. The conditional equilibrium constants determined from the solubility experiments at different ionic strengths were evaluated with the specific ion interaction theory (SIT). In contrast to the current thermodynamic selection in the NEA-TDB, solubility data collected in the present work does not support the formation of the anionic hydrolysis species Ni(OH){sub 3}{sup -} up to pH{sub m} ≤ 13.0. Solubility experiments in the presence of ISA were conducted in 0.5 M NaCl-NaOH-NaISA solutions with 0.01 M ≤ [NaISA] ≤ 0.2 M and 9 ≤ pH{sub m} ≤ 13. XRD analyses confirmed that β-Ni(OH){sub 2}(cr) is also the solid phase controlling the solubility of Ni(II) in the presence of ISA. Solubility data of all investigated systems can be properly explained with chemical and thermodynamic models including the formation of the complexes NiOHISA(aq), Ni(OH){sub 2}ISA{sup -} and Ni(OH){sub 3}ISA{sup 2-}. The reported data confirm

  6. Atomistic modeling of structure II gas hydrate mechanics: Compressibility and equations of state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas M. Vlasic

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This work uses density functional theory (DFT to investigate the poorly characterized structure II gas hydrates, for various guests (empty, propane, butane, ethane-methane, propane-methane, at the atomistic scale to determine key structure and mechanical properties such as equilibrium lattice volume and bulk modulus. Several equations of state (EOS for solids (Murnaghan, Birch-Murnaghan, Vinet, Liu were fitted to energy-volume curves resulting from structure optimization simulations. These EOS, which can be used to characterize the compressional behaviour of gas hydrates, were evaluated in terms of their robustness. The three-parameter Vinet EOS was found to perform just as well if not better than the four-parameter Liu EOS, over the pressure range in this study. As expected, the Murnaghan EOS proved to be the least robust. Furthermore, the equilibrium lattice volumes were found to increase with guest size, with double-guest hydrates showing a larger increase than single-guest hydrates, which has significant implications for the widely used van der Waals and Platteeuw thermodynamic model for gas hydrates. Also, hydrogen bonds prove to be the most likely factor contributing to the resistance of gas hydrates to compression; bulk modulus was found to increase linearly with hydrogen bond density, resulting in a relationship that could be used predictively to determine the bulk modulus of various structure II gas hydrates. Taken together, these results fill a long existing gap in the material chemical physics of these important clathrates.

  7. Atomistic modeling of structure II gas hydrate mechanics: Compressibility and equations of state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlasic, Thomas M.; Servio, Phillip; Rey, Alejandro D., E-mail: alejandro.rey@mcgill.ca [Department of Chemical Engineering, McGill University, Montreal H3A 0C5 (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    This work uses density functional theory (DFT) to investigate the poorly characterized structure II gas hydrates, for various guests (empty, propane, butane, ethane-methane, propane-methane), at the atomistic scale to determine key structure and mechanical properties such as equilibrium lattice volume and bulk modulus. Several equations of state (EOS) for solids (Murnaghan, Birch-Murnaghan, Vinet, Liu) were fitted to energy-volume curves resulting from structure optimization simulations. These EOS, which can be used to characterize the compressional behaviour of gas hydrates, were evaluated in terms of their robustness. The three-parameter Vinet EOS was found to perform just as well if not better than the four-parameter Liu EOS, over the pressure range in this study. As expected, the Murnaghan EOS proved to be the least robust. Furthermore, the equilibrium lattice volumes were found to increase with guest size, with double-guest hydrates showing a larger increase than single-guest hydrates, which has significant implications for the widely used van der Waals and Platteeuw thermodynamic model for gas hydrates. Also, hydrogen bonds prove to be the most likely factor contributing to the resistance of gas hydrates to compression; bulk modulus was found to increase linearly with hydrogen bond density, resulting in a relationship that could be used predictively to determine the bulk modulus of various structure II gas hydrates. Taken together, these results fill a long existing gap in the material chemical physics of these important clathrates.

  8. Atomistic modeling of structure II gas hydrate mechanics: Compressibility and equations of state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasic, Thomas M.; Servio, Phillip; Rey, Alejandro D.

    2016-08-01

    This work uses density functional theory (DFT) to investigate the poorly characterized structure II gas hydrates, for various guests (empty, propane, butane, ethane-methane, propane-methane), at the atomistic scale to determine key structure and mechanical properties such as equilibrium lattice volume and bulk modulus. Several equations of state (EOS) for solids (Murnaghan, Birch-Murnaghan, Vinet, Liu) were fitted to energy-volume curves resulting from structure optimization simulations. These EOS, which can be used to characterize the compressional behaviour of gas hydrates, were evaluated in terms of their robustness. The three-parameter Vinet EOS was found to perform just as well if not better than the four-parameter Liu EOS, over the pressure range in this study. As expected, the Murnaghan EOS proved to be the least robust. Furthermore, the equilibrium lattice volumes were found to increase with guest size, with double-guest hydrates showing a larger increase than single-guest hydrates, which has significant implications for the widely used van der Waals and Platteeuw thermodynamic model for gas hydrates. Also, hydrogen bonds prove to be the most likely factor contributing to the resistance of gas hydrates to compression; bulk modulus was found to increase linearly with hydrogen bond density, resulting in a relationship that could be used predictively to determine the bulk modulus of various structure II gas hydrates. Taken together, these results fill a long existing gap in the material chemical physics of these important clathrates.

  9. Emergency Response Equipment and Related Training: Airborne Radiological Computer System (Model II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David P. Colton

    2007-02-28

    The materials included in the Airborne Radiological Computer System, Model-II (ARCS-II) were assembled with several considerations in mind. First, the system was designed to measure and record the airborne gamma radiation levels and the corresponding latitude and longitude coordinates, and to provide a first overview look of the extent and severity of an accident's impact. Second, the portable system had to be light enough and durable enough that it could be mounted in an aircraft, ground vehicle, or watercraft. Third, the system must control the collection and storage of the data, as well as provide a real-time display of the data collection results to the operator. The notebook computer and color graphics printer components of the system would only be used for analyzing and plotting the data. In essence, the provided equipment is composed of an acquisition system and an analysis system. The data can be transferred from the acquisition system to the analysis system at the end of the data collection or at some other agreeable time.

  10. Emergency Response Equipment and Related Training: Airborne Radiological Computer System (Model II) user's manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David P. Colton

    2007-01-01

    The materials included in the Airborne Radiological Computer System, Model-II (ARCS-II) were assembled with several considerations in mind. First, the system was designed to measure and record the airborne gamma radiation levels and the corresponding latitude and longitude coordinates, and to provide a first overview look of the extent and severity of an accident's impact. Second, the portable system had to be light enough and durable enough that it could be mounted in an aircraft, ground vehicle, or watercraft. Third, the system must control the collection and storage of the data, as well as provide a real-time display of the data collection results to the operator. The notebook computer and color graphics printer components of the system would only be used for analyzing and plotting the data. In essence, the provided equipment is composed of an acquisition system and an analysis system. The data can be transferred from the acquisition system to the analysis system at the end of the data collection or at some other agreeable time

  11. Predictive validity of the Hendrich fall risk model II in an acute geriatric unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivziku, Dhurata; Matarese, Maria; Pedone, Claudio

    2011-04-01

    Falls are the most common adverse events reported in acute care hospitals, and older patients are the most likely to fall. The risk of falling cannot be completely eliminated, but it can be reduced through the implementation of a fall prevention program. A major evidence-based intervention to prevent falls has been the use of fall-risk assessment tools. Many tools have been increasingly developed in recent years, but most instruments have not been investigated regarding reliability, validity and clinical usefulness. This study intends to evaluate the predictive validity and inter-rater reliability of Hendrich fall risk model II (HFRM II) in order to identify older patients at risk of falling in geriatric units and recommend its use in clinical practice. A prospective descriptive design was used. The study was carried out in a geriatric acute care unit of an Italian University hospital. All over 65 years old patients consecutively admitted to a geriatric acute care unit of an Italian University hospital over 8-month period were enrolled. The patients enrolled were screened for the falls risk by nurses with the HFRM II within 24h of admission. The falls occurring during the patient's hospital stay were registered. Inter-rater reliability, area under the ROC curve, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values and time for the administration were evaluated. 179 elderly patients were included. The inter-rater reliability was 0.87 (95% CI 0.71-1.00). The administration time was about 1min. The most frequently reported risk factors were depression, incontinence, vertigo. Sensitivity and specificity were respectively 86% and 43%. The optimal cut-off score for screening at risk patients was 5 with an area under the ROC curve of 0.72. The risk factors more strongly associated with falls were confusion and depression. As falls of older patients are a common problem in acute care settings it is necessary that the nurses use specific validate and reliable

  12. Survey of non-linear hydrodynamic models of type-II Cepheids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolec, R.

    2016-03-01

    We present a grid of non-linear convective type-II Cepheid models. The dense model grids are computed for 0.6 M⊙ and a range of metallicities ([Fe/H] = -2.0, -1.5, -1.0), and for 0.8 M⊙ ([Fe/H] = -1.5). Two sets of convective parameters are considered. The models cover the full temperature extent of the classical instability strip, but are limited in luminosity; for the most luminous models, violent pulsation leads to the decoupling of the outermost model shell. Hence, our survey reaches only the shortest period RV Tau domain. In the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram, we detect two domains in which period-doubled pulsation is possible. The first extends through the BL Her domain and low-luminosity W Vir domain (pulsation periods ˜2-6.5 d). The second domain extends at higher luminosities (W Vir domain; periods >9.5 d). Some models within these domains display period-4 pulsation. We also detect very narrow domains (˜10 K wide) in which modulation of pulsation is possible. Another interesting phenomenon we detect is double-mode pulsation in the fundamental mode and in the fourth radial overtone. Fourth overtone is a surface mode, trapped in the outer model layers. Single-mode pulsation in the fourth overtone is also possible on the hot side of the classical instability strip. The origin of the above phenomena is discussed. In particular, the role of resonances in driving different pulsation dynamics as well as in shaping the morphology of the radius variation curves is analysed.

  13. A thermoelectric power generating heat exchanger: Part II – Numerical modeling and optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarhadi, Ali; Bjørk, Rasmus; Lindeburg, Niels; Viereck, Peter; Pryds, Nini

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A comprehensive model was developed to optimize the integrated TEG-heat exchanger. • The developed model was validated with the experimental data. • The effect of using different interface materials on the output power was assessed. • The influence of TEG arrangement on the power production was investigated. • Optimized geometrical parameters and proper interface materials were suggested. - Abstract: In Part I of this study, the performance of an experimental integrated thermoelectric generator (TEG)-heat exchanger was presented. In the current study, Part II, the obtained experimental results are compared with those predicted by a finite element (FE) model. In the simulation of the integrated TEG-heat exchanger, the thermal contact resistance between the TEG and the heat exchanger is modeled assuming either an ideal thermal contact or using a combined Cooper–Mikic–Yovanovich (CMY) and parallel plate gap formulation, which takes into account the contact pressure, roughness and hardness of the interface surfaces as well as the air gap thermal resistance at the interface. The combined CMY and parallel plate gap model is then further developed to simulate the thermal contact resistance for the case of an interface material. The numerical results show good agreement with the experimental data with an average deviation of 17% for the case without interface material and 12% in the case of including additional material at the interfaces. The model is then employed to evaluate the power production of the integrated system using different interface materials, including graphite, aluminum (Al), tin (Sn) and lead (Pb) in a form of thin foils. The numerical results show that lead foil at the interface has the best performance, with an improvement in power production of 34% compared to graphite foil. Finally, the model predicts that for a certain flow rate, increasing the parallel TEG channels for the integrated systems with 4, 8, and 12 TEGs

  14. Testing the Predictive Validity of the Hendrich II Fall Risk Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Hyesil; Park, Hyeoun-Ae

    2018-03-01

    Cumulative data on patient fall risk have been compiled in electronic medical records systems, and it is possible to test the validity of fall-risk assessment tools using these data between the times of admission and occurrence of a fall. The Hendrich II Fall Risk Model scores assessed during three time points of hospital stays were extracted and used for testing the predictive validity: (a) upon admission, (b) when the maximum fall-risk score from admission to falling or discharge, and (c) immediately before falling or discharge. Predictive validity was examined using seven predictive indicators. In addition, logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors that significantly affect the occurrence of a fall. Among the different time points, the maximum fall-risk score assessed between admission and falling or discharge showed the best predictive performance. Confusion or disorientation and having a poor ability to rise from a sitting position were significant risk factors for a fall.

  15. Development of a new monitor for tritium in air model TAM-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Bin; Yang Hailan; Wen Xuelian; Zhao Yi; Yang Huaiyuan

    2001-01-01

    The author introduces development of a real-time continuous tritium monitor model TAM-II. The detector of the instrument is comprised of four geometric-symmetry open wall ionization chamber with the effective volume of 2 L, which enables to minimize the remember effect of the ionization chamber due to contamination by the monitored tritium. It is γ background compensation rate is better than 97% in almost all direction. The detector is equipped with a FET static electrometer working in micro-current integration mode. The measurement process of the tritium monitor can be controlled automatically by a micro-processor sheet, such as automatic range changing, data displaying and storing, and data processing. The measuring range is 6 - 10 6 Bq/L. It is especially application for monitoring tritium in off-gas effluence from glove-box or stack of tritium facility and laboratory

  16. Models of infrared emission from dusty and diffuse H II regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aannestad, P.A.

    1978-01-01

    Models for the infrared emission from amorphous core-mantle dust within diffuse (n/sub e/ 3 cm -3 ) H II regions with neutral shells that are optically thin in the infrared have been calculated. The icy mantles sublimate only within a fractional radius of 0.2--0.5, affecting the overall gas-to-dust ratio only slightly. A region with variable grain composition may have a much smaller infrared luminosity than a similar region with uniform grain properties. Calculations of the total infrared luminosity, the relative contribution by Lα photons, the infrared spectral distribution, and the size of the dust-depleted regions are presented as functions of the ultraviolet optical depths in the ionized and neutral regions and for stellar temperatures of 35,000 and 48,000 K. Comparison with observations indicate that at least 20% of the Lyman-continuum photons are absorbed by the dust, and that the dust optical depth in the Lyman continuum is likely to be of the order of unity. For core-mantle grains most of the infrared energy is emitted between 30 and 70 μm, relatively independent of whether the dust is within or outside the H II region. Amorphous silicate particles tend to emit more energy below 30 μm, but also emit efficiently at far-infrared wavelengths. In order to illustrate the model calculations, we present infrared spectra for the Orion A region and compare them with observed fluxed, accounting for beam-width effects. A reasonable agreement is obtained with most of the near- to middle-infrared observations if the total ultraviolet optical depth is about unity and about equally divided between the ionized region and an outside neutral shell. Intensity profiles for Orion A are presented for wavelengths in the ragne 20--1000 μm, and show a strong increase in width beyond 20 μm

  17. Modelling and observation of transionospheric propagation results from ISIS II in preparation for ePOP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. G. Gillies

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The enhanced Polar Outflow Probe (ePOP is scheduled to be launched as part of the Cascade Demonstrator Small-Sat and Ionospheric Polar Explorer (CASSIOPE satellite in early 2008. A Radio Receiver Instrument (RRI on ePOP will receive HF transmissions from various ground-based transmitters. In preparation for the ePOP mission, data from a similar transionospheric experiment performed by the International Satellites for Ionospheric Studies (ISIS II satellite has been studied. Prominent features in the received 9.303-MHz signal were periodic Faraday fading of signal intensity at rates up to 13 Hz and a time of arrival delay between the O- and X-modes of up to 0.8 ms. Both features occurred when the satellite was above or south of the Ottawa transmitter. Ionospheric models for ray tracing were constructed using both International Reference Ionosphere (IRI profiles and local peak electron density values from ISIS ionograms. Values for fade rate and differential mode delay were computed and compared to the values observed in the ISIS II data. The computed values showed very good agreement to the observed values of both received signal parameters when the topside sounding foF2 values were used to scale IRI profiles, but not when strictly modelled IRI profiles were used. It was determined that the primary modifier of the received signal parameters was the foF2 density and not the shape of the profile. This dependence was due to refraction, at the 9.303-MHz signal frequency, causing the rays to travel larger distances near the peak density where essentially all the mode splitting occurred. This study should assist in interpretation of ePOP RRI data when they are available.

  18. Heun equation in a 5D sine-Gordon brane-world model with dilaton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunha, M.S.; Christiansen, H.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: In a brane-world scenario we find the propagation modes of the gauge field in a five-dimensional space-time. We adopt warping factors of the Randall-Sundrum type which are appropriate to regularize the hierarchy problem without imposing finite compactified extra dimensions. The existence and localization of gauge particles in the ordinary four-dimensional world is studied in detail on a thick brane derived out from the equations of motion of an action with a sine-Gordon potential contribution. Maxwell zero modes together with torsion effective fields are then obtained in a gravity-dilaton background inspired in close string theories. The dilaton plays a crucial role in order that the gauge field gets localized in a conformally invariant context. Kaluza-Klein massive states are also computed and, depending on certain parameters like dilaton coupling constant and asymptotic curvature, we are able to do it fully analytically. In a general approach we find that the solutions are of the Heun type. In some specific cases we can show that the Heun general solutions can be transformed into hypergeometric functions. In others, confluent Heun solutions can be transformed into simpler functions like Mathieu functions. Exact mass spectra are found in several cases. In others, we performed numerical calculations that show a well behaved phenomenology as well. In all the cases, Kaluza-Klein modes are strongly suppressed on the brane in the effective four-dimensional theory. (author)

  19. FutureTox II: in vitro data and in silico models for predictive toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, Thomas B; Keller, Douglas A; Sander, Miriam; Carney, Edward W; Doerrer, Nancy G; Eaton, David L; Fitzpatrick, Suzanne Compton; Hastings, Kenneth L; Mendrick, Donna L; Tice, Raymond R; Watkins, Paul B; Whelan, Maurice

    2015-02-01

    FutureTox II, a Society of Toxicology Contemporary Concepts in Toxicology workshop, was held in January, 2014. The meeting goals were to review and discuss the state of the science in toxicology in the context of implementing the NRC 21st century vision of predicting in vivo responses from in vitro and in silico data, and to define the goals for the future. Presentations and discussions were held on priority concerns such as predicting and modeling of metabolism, cell growth and differentiation, effects on sensitive subpopulations, and integrating data into risk assessment. Emerging trends in technologies such as stem cell-derived human cells, 3D organotypic culture models, mathematical modeling of cellular processes and morphogenesis, adverse outcome pathway development, and high-content imaging of in vivo systems were discussed. Although advances in moving towards an in vitro/in silico based risk assessment paradigm were apparent, knowledge gaps in these areas and limitations of technologies were identified. Specific recommendations were made for future directions and research needs in the areas of hepatotoxicity, cancer prediction, developmental toxicity, and regulatory toxicology. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Viscoelastic Model for Lung Parenchyma for Multi-Scale Modeling of Respiratory System, Phase II: Dodecahedral Micro-Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freed, Alan D.; Einstein, Daniel R.; Carson, James P.; Jacob, Rick E.

    2012-03-01

    In the first year of this contractual effort a hypo-elastic constitutive model was developed and shown to have great potential in modeling the elastic response of parenchyma. This model resides at the macroscopic level of the continuum. In this, the second year of our support, an isotropic dodecahedron is employed as an alveolar model. This is a microscopic model for parenchyma. A hopeful outcome is that the linkage between these two scales of modeling will be a source of insight and inspiration that will aid us in the final year's activity: creating a viscoelastic model for parenchyma.

  1. Identification of age-dependent motor and neuropsychological behavioural abnormalities in a mouse model of Mucopolysaccharidosis Type II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleitz, Hélène F. E.; O’Leary, Claire; Holley, Rebecca J.

    2017-01-01

    Severe mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPS II) is a progressive lysosomal storage disease caused by mutations in the IDS gene, leading to a deficiency in the iduronate-2-sulfatase enzyme that is involved in heparan sulphate and dermatan sulphate catabolism. In constitutive form, MPS II is a multi-system disease characterised by progressive neurocognitive decline, severe skeletal abnormalities and hepatosplenomegaly. Although enzyme replacement therapy has been approved for treatment of peripheral organs, no therapy effectively treats the cognitive symptoms of the disease and novel therapies are in development to remediate this. Therapeutic efficacy and subsequent validation can be assessed using a variety of outcome measures that are translatable to clinical practice, such as behavioural measures. We sought to consolidate current knowledge of the cognitive, skeletal and motor abnormalities present in the MPS II mouse model by performing time course behavioural examinations of working memory, anxiety, activity levels, sociability and coordination and balance, up to 8 months of age. Cognitive decline associated with alterations in spatial working memory is detectable at 8 months of age in MPS II mice using spontaneous alternation, together with an altered response to novel environments and anxiolytic behaviour in the open-field. Coordination and balance on the accelerating rotarod were also significantly worse at 8 months, and may be associated with skeletal changes seen in MPS II mice. We demonstrate that the progressive nature of MPS II disease is also seen in the mouse model, and that cognitive and motor differences are detectable at 8 months of age using spontaneous alternation, the accelerating rotarod and the open-field tests. This study establishes neurological, motor and skeletal measures for use in pre-clinical studies to develop therapeutic approaches in MPS II. PMID:28207863

  2. Towards multi-resolution global climate modeling with ECHAM6-FESOM. Part II: climate variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rackow, T.; Goessling, H. F.; Jung, T.; Sidorenko, D.; Semmler, T.; Barbi, D.; Handorf, D.

    2018-04-01

    This study forms part II of two papers describing ECHAM6-FESOM, a newly established global climate model with a unique multi-resolution sea ice-ocean component. While part I deals with the model description and the mean climate state, here we examine the internal climate variability of the model under constant present-day (1990) conditions. We (1) assess the internal variations in the model in terms of objective variability performance indices, (2) analyze variations in global mean surface temperature and put them in context to variations in the observed record, with particular emphasis on the recent warming slowdown, (3) analyze and validate the most common atmospheric and oceanic variability patterns, (4) diagnose the potential predictability of various climate indices, and (5) put the multi-resolution approach to the test by comparing two setups that differ only in oceanic resolution in the equatorial belt, where one ocean mesh keeps the coarse 1° resolution applied in the adjacent open-ocean regions and the other mesh is gradually refined to 0.25°. Objective variability performance indices show that, in the considered setups, ECHAM6-FESOM performs overall favourably compared to five well-established climate models. Internal variations of the global mean surface temperature in the model are consistent with observed fluctuations and suggest that the recent warming slowdown can be explained as a once-in-one-hundred-years event caused by internal climate variability; periods of strong cooling in the model (`hiatus' analogs) are mainly associated with ENSO-related variability and to a lesser degree also to PDO shifts, with the AMO playing a minor role. Common atmospheric and oceanic variability patterns are simulated largely consistent with their real counterparts. Typical deficits also found in other models at similar resolutions remain, in particular too weak non-seasonal variability of SSTs over large parts of the ocean and episodic periods of almost absent

  3. Post-BEMUSE Reflood Model Input Uncertainty Methods (PREMIUM) Benchmark Phase II: Identification of Influential Parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovtonyuk, A.; Petruzzi, A.; D'Auria, F.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the Post-BEMUSE Reflood Model Input Uncertainty Methods (PREMIUM) benchmark is to progress on the issue of the quantification of the uncertainty of the physical models in system thermal-hydraulic codes by considering a concrete case: the physical models involved in the prediction of core reflooding. The PREMIUM benchmark consists of five phases. This report presents the results of Phase II dedicated to the identification of the uncertain code parameters associated with physical models used in the simulation of reflooding conditions. This identification is made on the basis of the Test 216 of the FEBA/SEFLEX programme according to the following steps: - identification of influential phenomena; - identification of the associated physical models and parameters, depending on the used code; - quantification of the variation range of identified input parameters through a series of sensitivity calculations. A procedure for the identification of potentially influential code input parameters has been set up in the Specifications of Phase II of PREMIUM benchmark. A set of quantitative criteria has been as well proposed for the identification of influential IP and their respective variation range. Thirteen participating organisations, using 8 different codes (7 system thermal-hydraulic codes and 1 sub-channel module of a system thermal-hydraulic code) submitted Phase II results. The base case calculations show spread in predicted cladding temperatures and quench front propagation that has been characterized. All the participants, except one, predict a too fast quench front progression. Besides, the cladding temperature time trends obtained by almost all the participants show oscillatory behaviour which may have numeric origins. Adopted criteria for identification of influential input parameters differ between the participants: some organisations used the set of criteria proposed in Specifications 'as is', some modified the quantitative thresholds

  4. Anisotropic Bianchi Type-I and Type-II Bulk Viscous String Cosmological Models Coupled with Zero Mass Scalar Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkateswarlu, R.; Sreenivas, K.

    2014-06-01

    The LRS Bianchi type-I and type-II string cosmological models are studied when the source for the energy momentum tensor is a bulk viscous stiff fluid containing one dimensional strings together with zero-mass scalar field. We have obtained the solutions of the field equations assuming a functional relationship between metric coefficients when the metric is Bianchi type-I and constant deceleration parameter in case of Bianchi type-II metric. The physical and kinematical properties of the models are discussed in each case. The effects of Viscosity on the physical and kinematical properties are also studied.

  5. A stochastic model for the synthesis and degradation of natural organic matter. Part III: Modeling Cu(II) complexation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabaniss, Stephen E. [Department of Chemistry, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States)], E-mail: cabaniss@unm.edu; Maurice, Patricia A. [Department of Geology and Civil Engineering, University of Notre Dame (United States); Madey, Greg [Department of Computer Science, University of Notre Dame (United States)

    2007-08-15

    An agent-based biogeochemical model has been developed which begins with biochemical precursor molecules and simulates the transformation and degradation of natural organic matter (NOM). This manuscript presents an empirical quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) which uses the numbers of ligand groups, charge density and heteroatom density of a molecule to estimate Cu-binding affinity (K{sub Cu}{sup '}) at pH 7.0 and ionic strength 0.10 for the molecules in this model. Calibration of this QSAR on a set of 41 model compounds gives a root mean square error of 0.88 log units and r{sup 2} 0.93. Two simulated NOM assemblages, one beginning with small molecules (tannins, terpenoids, flavonoids) and one with biopolymers (protein, lignin), give markedly different distributions of logK{sub Cu}{sup '}. However, calculations based on these logK{sub Cu}{sup '} distributions agree qualitatively with published experimental Cu(II) titration data from river and lake NOM samples.

  6. Model of automatic fuel management for the Atucha II nuclear central with the PUMA IV code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marconi G, J.F.; Tarazaga, A.E.; Romero, L.D.

    2007-01-01

    The Atucha II central is a heavy water power station and natural uranium. For this reason and due to the first floor reactivity excess that have this type of reactors, it is necessary to carry out a continuous fuel management and with the central in power (for the case of Atucha II every 0.7 days approximately). To maintain in operation these centrals and to achieve a good fuels economy, different types of negotiate of fuels that include areas and roads where the fuels displace inside the core are proved; it is necessary to prove the great majority of these managements in long periods in order to corroborate the behavior of the power station and the burnt of extraction of the fuel elements. To carry out this work it is of great help that a program implements the approaches to continue in each replacement, using the roads and areas of each administration type to prove, and this way to obtain as results the one regulations execution in the time and the average burnt of extraction of the fuel elements, being fundamental this last data for the operator company of the power station. To carry out the previous work it is necessary that a physicist with experience in fuel management proves each one of the possible managements, even those that quickly can be discarded if its don't fulfill with the regulatory standards or its possess an average extraction burnt too much low. For this it is of fundamental help that with an automatic model the different administrations are proven and lastly the physicist analyzes the more important cases. The pattern in question not only allows to program different types of roads and areas of fuel management, but rather it also foresees the possibility to disable some of the approaches. (Author)

  7. Evaluation of type II thyroplasty on phonatory physiology in an excised canine larynx model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devine, Erin E.; Hoffman, Matthew R.; McCulloch, Timothy M.; Jiang, Jack J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Type II thyroplasty is an alternative treatment for spasmodic dysphonia, addressing hyperadduction by incising and lateralizing the thyroid cartilage. We quantified the effect of lateralization width on phonatory physiology using excised canine larynges. Methods Normal closure, hyperadduction, and type II thyroplasty (lateralized up to 5mm at 1mm increments with hyperadducted arytenoids) were simulated in excised larynges (N=7). Aerodynamic, acoustic, and videokymographic data were recorded at three subglottal pressures relative to phonation threshold pressure (PTP). One-way repeated measures ANOVA assessed effect of condition on aerodynamic parameters. Random intercepts linear mixed effects models assessed effects of condition and subglottal pressure on acoustic and videokymographic parameters. Results PTP differed across conditions (p<0.001). Condition affected percent shimmer (p<0.005) but not percent jitter. Both pressure (p<0.03) and condition (p<0.001) affected fundamental frequency. Pressure affected vibratory amplitude (p<0.05) and intra-fold phase difference (p<0.05). Condition affected phase difference between the vocal folds (p<0.001). Conclusions Hyperadduction increased PTP and worsened perturbation compared to normal, with near normal physiology restored with 1mm lateralization. Further lateralization deteriorated voice quality and increased PTP. Acoustic and videokymographic results indicate that normal physiologic relationships between subglottal pressure and vibration are preserved at optimal lateralization width, but then degrade with further lateralization. The 1mm optimal width observed here is due to the small canine larynx size. Future human trials would likely demonstrate a greater optimal width, with patient-specific value potentially determined based on larynx size and symptom severity. PMID:27223665

  8. Infertility and recurrent miscarriage with complex II deficiency-dependent mitochondrial oxidative stress in animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Takamasa; Yasuda, Kayo; Miyazawa, Masaki; Mitsushita, Junji; Johnson, Thomas E; Hartman, Phil S; Ishii, Naoaki

    2016-04-01

    Oxidative stress is associated with some forms of both male and female infertility. However, there is insufficient knowledge of the influence of oxidative stress on the maintenance of a viable pregnancy, including pregnancy complications and fetal development. There are a number of animal models for understanding age-dependent decrease of reproductive ability and diabetic embryopathy, especially abnormal spermatogenesis, oogenesis and embryogenesis with mitochondrial dysfunctions. Several important processes occur in mitochondria, including ATP synthesis, calcium ion storage, induction of apoptosis and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). These events have different effects on the several aspects of reproductive function. Tet-mev-1 conditional transgenic mice, developed after studies with the mev-1 mutant of the nematode C. elegans, offer the ability to carefully regulate expression of doxycycline-induced mutated SDHC(V69E) levels and hence modulate endogenous oxidative stress. The mev-1 models have served to illuminate the effects of complex II deficiency-dependent mitochondrial ROS production, although interestingly they maintain normal mitochondrial and intracellular ATP levels. In this review, the reproductive dysfunctions are presented focusing on fertility potentials in each gamete, early embryogenesis, maternal conditions with placental function and neonatal development. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  9. Simulation and modeling of the Gamble II self-pinched ion beam transport experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, D.V.; Ottinger, P.F.; Hinshelwood, D.D.

    1999-01-01

    Progress in numerical simulations and modeling of the self-pinched ion beam transport experiment at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) is reviewed. In the experiment, a 1.2-MeV, 100-kA proton beam enters a 1-m long, transport region filled with a low pressure gas (30--250 mTorr helium, or 1 Torr air). The time-dependent velocity distribution function of the injected ion beam is determined from an orbit code that uses a pinch-reflex ion diode model and the measured voltage and current from this diode on the Gamble II generator at NRL. This distribution function is used as the beam input condition for numerical simulations carried out using the hybrid particle-in-cell code IPROP. Results of the simulations will be described, and detailed comparisons will be made with various measurements, including line-integrated electron-density, proton-fluence, and beam radial-profile measurements. As observed in the experiment, the simulations show evidence of self-pinching for helium pressures between 35 and 80 mTorr. Simulations and measurements in 1 Torr air show ballistic transport. The relevance of these results to ion-driven inertial confinement fusion will be discussed

  10. What to expect from dynamical modelling of galactic haloes - II. The spherical Jeans equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenting; Han, Jiaxin; Cole, Shaun; More, Surhud; Frenk, Carlos; Schaller, Matthieu

    2018-06-01

    The spherical Jeans equation (SJE) is widely used in dynamical modelling of the Milky Way (MW) halo potential. We use haloes and galaxies from the cosmological Millennium-II simulation and hydrodynamical APOSTLE (A Project of Simulations of The Local Environment) simulations to investigate the performance of the SJE in recovering the underlying mass profiles of MW mass haloes. The best-fitting halo mass and concentration parameters scatter by 25 per cent and 40 per cent around their input values, respectively, when dark matter particles are used as tracers. This scatter becomes as large as a factor of 3 when using star particles instead. This is significantly larger than the estimated statistical uncertainty associated with the use of the SJE. The existence of correlated phase-space structures that violate the steady-state assumption of the SJE as well as non-spherical geometries is the principal source of the scatter. Binary haloes show larger scatter because they are more aspherical in shape and have a more perturbed dynamical state. Our results confirm that the number of independent phase-space structures sets an intrinsic limiting precision on dynamical inferences based on the steady-state assumption. Modelling with a radius-independent velocity anisotropy, or using tracers within a limited outer radius, result in significantly larger scatter, but the ensemble-averaged measurement over the whole halo sample is approximately unbiased.

  11. [Opiate dependence type II or antisocial: Cloninger's Psychobiological Model and its usefullness in addictions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benito, Ana; Haro, Gonzalo; Orengo, Teresa; González, Marisa; Fornés, Teresa; Mateu, César

    2012-01-01

    The aim was to analyze the relationship between Cloninger's dimensions and Personality Disorders (PD) (with DSM-IV criteria) in opiate dependents. The study was Cross-sectional. The sampling of 196 patients with opiate dependence was consecutive. All were receiving treatment in an inpatient detoxification unit. Cloninger's Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI), International Personality Disorders Examination (IPDE) and a Substance Use Questionnaire were used. Character's dimensions as Self-directness and Cooperation were related with PD when scored low. Opposite to Cloninger descriptions, high scores of Self-transcendence were related with presence of PD. Related to temperamental dimensions, cluster A was related with low scores of Reward Dependence (RD) and cluster C with high scores of Harm Avoidance (HA). Otherwise, in cluster B, while Borderline PD had high scores of Novelty Seeking (as high HA), the Antisocial PD only were related to low scores of RD. RD dimension seems useful to differ from presence or absence of Antisocial PD, also when alcohol consumption is considered. Cloninger's Model of Personality is useful in drug dependents for the definition of the different PD, as well as for probable PD's aggregation. This model also helps to create subtypes in opiate dependents as the antisocial or type II.

  12. Two-loop renormalization in the standard model, part II. Renormalization procedures and computational techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Actis, S. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Passarino, G. [Torino Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica Teorica; INFN, Sezione di Torino (Italy)

    2006-12-15

    In part I general aspects of the renormalization of a spontaneously broken gauge theory have been introduced. Here, in part II, two-loop renormalization is introduced and discussed within the context of the minimal Standard Model. Therefore, this paper deals with the transition between bare parameters and fields to renormalized ones. The full list of one- and two-loop counterterms is shown and it is proven that, by a suitable extension of the formalism already introduced at the one-loop level, two-point functions suffice in renormalizing the model. The problem of overlapping ultraviolet divergencies is analyzed and it is shown that all counterterms are local and of polynomial nature. The original program of 't Hooft and Veltman is at work. Finite parts are written in a way that allows for a fast and reliable numerical integration with all collinear logarithms extracted analytically. Finite renormalization, the transition between renormalized parameters and physical (pseudo-)observables, are discussed in part III where numerical results, e.g. for the complex poles of the unstable gauge bosons, are shown. An attempt is made to define the running of the electromagnetic coupling constant at the two-loop level. (orig.)

  13. Effect of changes over time in the performance of a customized SAPS-II model on the quality of care assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minne, Lilian; Eslami, Saeid; de Keizer, Nicolette; de Jonge, Evert; de Rooij, Sophia E.; Abu-Hanna, Ameen

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of our study was to explore, using an innovative method, the effect of temporal changes in the mortality prediction performance of an existing model on the quality of care assessment. The prognostic model (rSAPS-II) was a recalibrated Simplified Acute Physiology Score-II model

  14. Kinetic and isotherm modeling of Cd (II) adsorption by L-cysteine functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes as adsorbent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghavi, Mahmoud; Zazouli, Mohammad Ali; Yousefi, Zabihollah; Akbari-adergani, Behrouz

    2015-11-01

    In this study, multi-walled carbon nanotubes were functionalized by L-cysteine to show the kinetic and isotherm modeling of Cd (II) ions onto L-cysteine functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes. The adsorption behavior of Cd (II) ion was studied by varying parameters including dose of L-MWCNTs, contact time, and cadmium concentration. Equilibrium adsorption isotherms and kinetics were also investigated based on Cd (II) adsorption tests. The results showed that an increase in contact time and adsorbent dosage resulted in increase of the adsorption rate. The optimum condition of the Cd (II) removal process was found at pH=7.0, 15 mg/L L-MWCNTs dosage, 6 mg/L cadmium concentration, and contact time of 60 min. The removal percent was equal to 89.56 at optimum condition. Langmuir and Freundlich models were employed to analyze the experimental data. The data showed well fitting with the Langmuir model (R2=0.994) with q max of 43.47 mg/g. Analyzing the kinetic data by the pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order equations revealed that the adsorption of cadmium using L-MWSNTs following the pseudo-second-order kinetic model with correlation coefficients (R2) equals to 0.998, 0.992, and 0.998 for 3, 6, and 9 mg/L Cd (II) concentrations, respectively. The experimental data fitted very well with the pseudo-second-order. Overall, treatment of polluted solution to Cd (II) by adsorption process using L-MWCNT can be considered as an effective technology.

  15. Experiment, modeling and optimization of liquid phase adsorption of Cu(II) using dried and carbonized biomass of Lyngbya majuscula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushwaha, Deepika; Dutta, Susmita

    2017-05-01

    The present work aims at evaluation of the potential of cyanobacterial biomass to remove Cu(II) from simulated wastewater. Both dried and carbonized forms of Lyngbya majuscula, a cyanobacterial strain, have been used for such purpose. The influences of different experimental parameters viz., initial Cu(II) concentration, solution pH and adsorbent dose have been examined on sorption of Cu(II). Kinetic and equilibrium studies on Cu(II) removal from simulated wastewater have been done using both dried and carbonized biomass individually. Pseudo-second-order model and Langmuir isotherm have been found to fit most satisfactorily to the kinetic and equilibrium data, respectively. Maximum 87.99 and 99.15 % of Cu(II) removal have been achieved with initial Cu(II) concentration of 10 and 25 mg/L for dried and carbonized algae, respectively, at an adsorbent dose of 10 g/L for 20 min of contact time and optimum pH 6. To optimize the removal process, Response Surface Methodology has been employed using both the dried and carbonized biomass. Removal with initial Cu(II) concentration of 20 mg/L, with 0.25 g adsorbent dose in 50 mL solution at pH 6 has been found to be optimum with both the adsorbents. This is the first ever attempt to make a comparative study on Cu(II) removal using both dried algal biomass and its activated carbon. Furthermore, regeneration of matrix was attempted and more than 70% and 80% of the adsorbent has been regenerated successfully in the case of dried and carbonized biomass respectively upto the 3rd cycle of regeneration study.

  16. Coordination of two high-affinity hexamer peptides to copper(II) and palladium(II) models of the peptide-metal chelation site on IMAC resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y; Pasquinelli, R; Ataai, M; Koepsel, R R; Kortes, R A; Shepherd, R E

    2000-03-20

    The coordination of peptides Ser-Pro-His-His-Gly-Gly (SPHHGG) and (His)6 (HHHHHH) to [PdII(mida)(D2O)] (mida2- = N-methyliminodiacetate) was studied by 1H NMR as model reactions for CuII(iminodiacetate)-immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) sites. This is the first direct physical description of peptide coordination for IMAC. A three-site coordination is observed which involves the first, third, and fourth residues along the peptide chain. The presence of proline in position 2 of SPHHGG achieves the best molecular mechanics and bonding angles in the coordinated peptide and enhances the interaction of the serine amino nitrogen. Histidine coordination of H1, H3, and H4 of (His)6 and H3 and H4 of SPHHGG was detected by 1H NMR contact shifts and H/D exchange of histidyl protons. The EPR spectra of SPHHGG and HHHHHH attached to the [CuII(mida)] unit were obtained for additional modeling of IMAC sites. EPR parameters of the parent [Cu(mida)(H2O)2] complex are representative: gzz = 2.31; gyy = 2.086; gxx = 2.053; A parallel = 161G; AN = 19G (three line, one N coupling). Increased rhombic distortion is detected relative to the starting aqua complex in the order of [Cu(mida)L] for distortion of HHHHHH > SPHHGG > (H2O)2. The lowering of symmetry is also seen in the decrease in the N-shf coupling, presumably to the imino nitrogen of mida2- in the order 19 G (H2O), 16 G (SPHHGG) and 11 G (HHHHHH). Visible spectra of the [Cu(mida)(SPHHGG)] and [Cu(mida)(HHHHHH)] as a function of pH indicate coordination of one histidyl donor at ca. 4.5, two in the range of pH 5-7, and two chelate ring attachments involving the terminal amino donor for SPHHGG or another histidyl donor of HHHHHH in the pH domain of 7-8 in agreement with the [PdII(mida)L] derivatives which form the two-chelate-ring attachment even at lower pH as shown by the 1H NMR methods.

  17. Spectroscopic properties of reaction center pigments in photosystem II core complexes: revision of the multimer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raszewski, Grzegorz; Diner, Bruce A; Schlodder, Eberhard; Renger, Thomas

    2008-07-01

    Absorbance difference spectra associated with the light-induced formation of functional states in photosystem II core complexes from Thermosynechococcus elongatus and Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (e.g., P(+)Pheo(-),P(+)Q(A)(-),(3)P) are described quantitatively in the framework of exciton theory. In addition, effects are analyzed of site-directed mutations of D1-His(198), the axial ligand of the special-pair chlorophyll P(D1), and D1-Thr(179), an amino-acid residue nearest to the accessory chlorophyll Chl(D1), on the spectral properties of the reaction center pigments. Using pigment transition energies (site energies) determined previously from independent experiments on D1-D2-cytb559 complexes, good agreement between calculated and experimental spectra is obtained. The only difference in site energies of the reaction center pigments in D1-D2-cytb559 and photosystem II core complexes concerns Chl(D1). Compared to isolated reaction centers, the site energy of Chl(D1) is red-shifted by 4 nm and less inhomogeneously distributed in core complexes. The site energies cause primary electron transfer at cryogenic temperatures to be initiated by an excited state that is strongly localized on Chl(D1) rather than from a delocalized state as assumed in the previously described multimer model. This result is consistent with earlier experimental data on special-pair mutants and with our previous calculations on D1-D2-cytb559 complexes. The calculations show that at 5 K the lowest excited state of the reaction center is lower by approximately 10 nm than the low-energy exciton state of the two special-pair chlorophylls P(D1) and P(D2) which form an excitonic dimer. The experimental temperature dependence of the wild-type difference spectra can only be understood in this model if temperature-dependent site energies are assumed for Chl(D1) and P(D1), reducing the above energy gap from 10 to 6 nm upon increasing the temperature from 5 to 300 K. At physiological temperature, there are

  18. IGF-II promotes neuroprotection and neuroplasticity recovery in a long-lasting model of oxidative damage induced by glucocorticoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Montañez, E; Millon, C; Boraldi, F; Garcia-Guirado, F; Pedraza, C; Lara, E; Santin, L J; Pavia, J; Garcia-Fernandez, M

    2017-10-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II) is a naturally occurring hormone that exerts neurotrophic and neuroprotective properties in a wide range of neurodegenerative diseases and ageing. Accumulating evidence suggests that the effects of IGF-II in the brain may be explained by its binding to the specific transmembrane receptor, IGFII/M6P receptor (IGF-IIR). However, relatively little is known regarding the role of IGF-II through IGF-IIR in neuroprotection. Here, using adult cortical neuronal cultures, we investigated whether IGF-II exhibits long-term antioxidant effects and neuroprotection at the synaptic level after oxidative damage induced by high and transient levels of corticosterone (CORT). Furthermore, the involvement of the IGF-IIR was also studied to elucidate its role in the neuroprotective actions of IGF-II. We found that neurons treated with IGF-II after CORT incubation showed reduced oxidative stress damage and recovered antioxidant status (normalized total antioxidant status, lipid hydroperoxides and NAD(P) H:quinone oxidoreductase activity). Similar results were obtained when mitochondria function was analysed (cytochrome c oxidase activity, mitochondrial membrane potential and subcellular mitochondrial distribution). Furthermore, neuronal impairment and degeneration were also assessed (synaptophysin and PSD-95 expression, presynaptic function and FluoroJade B® stain). IGF-II was also able to recover the long-lasting neuronal cell damage. Finally, the effects of IGF-II were not blocked by an IGF-IR antagonist, suggesting the involvement of IGF-IIR. Altogether these results suggest that, in or model, IGF-II through IGF-IIR is able to revert the oxidative damage induced by CORT. In accordance with the neuroprotective role of the IGF-II/IGF-IIR reported in our study, pharmacotherapy approaches targeting this pathway may be useful for the treatment of diseases associated with cognitive deficits (i.e., neurodegenerative disorders, depression, etc

  19. Chicken collagen type II reduces articular cartilage destruction in a model of osteoarthritis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, D; Shen, W

    2007-06-01

    To evaluate the therapeutic effects of domestic chicken collagen type II (CCII) on rat osteoarthritis (OA) and analyze concomitant changes in the level of Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13, MMP-9, Cathepsin K and their mRNA as well as the tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 mRNA in articular cartilage of osteoarthritic rats. Osteoarthritis models were surgically induced. Morphology of articular cartilage was done by haematoxylin and eosin staining and Mankin score was calculated, immunohistochemistry of MMP-13, MMP-9 and Cathepsin K was done by ABC method while the mRNA level for MMP-13, MMP-9, cathepsin K as well as TIMP-1 was evaluated by RT-PCR method. Oral administration of CCII reduced the morphological changes of osteoarthritic cartilage (shown by Mankin score), decreased levels of MMP-13, MMP-9, cathepsin K as well as their mRNA in articular cartilage from osteoarthritic rats while it exhibited no effect on TIMP-1 mRNA. Oral CCII reduced articular cartilage degradation of osteoarthritic rats and may probably be a potent drug candidate for OA treatment.

  20. Outcomes of different Class II treatments : Comparisons using the American Board of Orthodontics Model Grading System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinci Cansunar, Hatice; Uysal, Tancan

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcomes of three different Class II treatment modalities followed by fixed orthodontic therapy, using the American Board of Orthodontics Model Grading System (ABO-MGS). As a retrospective study, files of patients treated at postgraduate orthodontic  clinics in different cities in Turkey was randomly selected. From 1684 posttreatment records, 669 patients were divided into three groups: 269 patients treated with extraction of two upper premolars, 198 patients treated with cervical headgear, and 202 patients treated with functional appliances. All the cases were evaluated by one researcher using ABO-MGS. The χ (2), Z test, and multivariate analysis of variance were used for statistical evaluation (p < 0.05). No significant differences were found among the groups in buccolingual inclination, overjet, occlusal relationship, and root angulation. However, there were significant differences in alignment, marginal ridge height, occlusal contact, interproximal contact measurements, and overall MGS average scores. The mean treatment time between the extraction and functional appliance groups was significantly different (p = 0.017). According to total ABO-MGS scores, headgear treatment had better results than functional appliances. The headgear group had better tooth alignment than the extraction group. Headgear treatment resulted in better occlusal contacts than the functional appliances and had lower average scores for interproximal contact measurements. Functional appliances had the worst average scores for marginal ridge height. Finally, the functional appliance group had the longest treatment times.

  1. Simulation and verification of the EBR-II automatic control rod drive system with continuous system modeling codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, H.A.; Dean, E.M.

    1985-01-01

    The two computer programs are successful in modeling the EBR-II ACRDS. In fact, this is very convenient for a presampling of the consequences of a desired power movement. The ACRDS is to be modified so that the error signal is a comparison between demand position and measured position. Purpose of this change is to permit pseudo-random binary types of reactivity transfer function experiments at EBR-II. Questions asked about the computer software and hardware to accommodate this change can be quickly answered with either of the verified codes discussed here

  2. Search for non-standard model signatures in the WZ/ZZ final state at CDF run II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norman, Matthew [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2009-01-01

    This thesis discusses a search for non-Standard Model physics in heavy diboson production in the dilepton-dijet final state, using 1.9 fb -1 of data from the CDF Run II detector. New limits are set on the anomalous coupling parameters for ZZ and WZ production based on limiting the production cross-section at high š. Additionally limits are set on the direct decay of new physics to ZZ andWZ diboson pairs. The nature and parameters of the CDF Run II detector are discussed, as are the influences that it has on the methods of our analysis.

  3. Search for non-standard model signatures in the WZ/ZZ final state at CDF Run II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norman, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    This thesis discusses a search for non-Standard Model physics in heavy diboson production in the dilepton-dijet final state, using 1.9 fb -1 of data from the CDF Run II detector. New limits are set on the anomalous coupling parameters for ZZ and WZ production based on limiting the production cross-section at high (cflx s). Additionally limits are set on the direct decay of new physics to ZZ andWZ diboson pairs. The nature and parameters of the CDF Run II detector are discussed, as are the influences that it has on the methods of our analysis.

  4. Biosorption of Cu (II onto chemically modified waste mycelium of Aspergillus awamori: Equilibrium, kinetics and modeling studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZDRAVKA VELKOVA

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The biosorption potential of chemically modified waste mycelium of industrial xylanase-producing strain Aspergillus awamori for Cu (II removal from aqueous solutions was evaluated. The influence of pH, contact time and initial Cu (II concentration on the removal efficiency was evaluated. Maximum biosorption capacity was reached by sodium hydroxide treated waste fungal mycelium at pH 5.0. The Langmuir adsorption equation matched very well the adsorption equilibrium data in the studied conditions. The process kinetic followed the pseudo-firs order model.

  5. Validated Competing Event Model for the Stage I-II Endometrial Cancer Population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmona, Ruben; Gulaya, Sachin; Murphy, James D. [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Rose, Brent S. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Wu, John; Noticewala, Sonal [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); McHale, Michael T. [Department of Reproductive Medicine, Division of Gynecologic Oncology, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Yashar, Catheryn M. [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Vaida, Florin [Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, University of California San Diego Medical Center, San Diego, California (United States); Mell, Loren K., E-mail: lmell@ucsd.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose/Objectives(s): Early-stage endometrial cancer patients are at higher risk of noncancer mortality than of cancer mortality. Competing event models incorporating comorbidity could help identify women most likely to benefit from treatment intensification. Methods and Materials: 67,397 women with stage I-II endometrioid adenocarcinoma after total hysterectomy diagnosed from 1988 to 2009 were identified in Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) and linked SEER-Medicare databases. Using demographic and clinical information, including comorbidity, we sought to develop and validate a risk score to predict the incidence of competing mortality. Results: In the validation cohort, increasing competing mortality risk score was associated with increased risk of noncancer mortality (subdistribution hazard ratio [SDHR], 1.92; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.60-2.30) and decreased risk of endometrial cancer mortality (SDHR, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.55-0.78). Controlling for other variables, Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) = 1 (SDHR, 1.62; 95% CI, 1.45-1.82) and CCI >1 (SDHR, 3.31; 95% CI, 2.74-4.01) were associated with increased risk of noncancer mortality. The 10-year cumulative incidences of competing mortality within low-, medium-, and high-risk strata were 27.3% (95% CI, 25.2%-29.4%), 34.6% (95% CI, 32.5%-36.7%), and 50.3% (95% CI, 48.2%-52.6%), respectively. With increasing competing mortality risk score, we observed a significant decline in omega (ω), indicating a diminishing likelihood of benefit from treatment intensification. Conclusion: Comorbidity and other factors influence the risk of competing mortality among patients with early-stage endometrial cancer. Competing event models could improve our ability to identify patients likely to benefit from treatment intensification.

  6. Validated Competing Event Model for the Stage I-II Endometrial Cancer Population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carmona, Ruben; Gulaya, Sachin; Murphy, James D.; Rose, Brent S.; Wu, John; Noticewala, Sonal; McHale, Michael T.; Yashar, Catheryn M.; Vaida, Florin; Mell, Loren K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives(s): Early-stage endometrial cancer patients are at higher risk of noncancer mortality than of cancer mortality. Competing event models incorporating comorbidity could help identify women most likely to benefit from treatment intensification. Methods and Materials: 67,397 women with stage I-II endometrioid adenocarcinoma after total hysterectomy diagnosed from 1988 to 2009 were identified in Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) and linked SEER-Medicare databases. Using demographic and clinical information, including comorbidity, we sought to develop and validate a risk score to predict the incidence of competing mortality. Results: In the validation cohort, increasing competing mortality risk score was associated with increased risk of noncancer mortality (subdistribution hazard ratio [SDHR], 1.92; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.60-2.30) and decreased risk of endometrial cancer mortality (SDHR, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.55-0.78). Controlling for other variables, Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) = 1 (SDHR, 1.62; 95% CI, 1.45-1.82) and CCI >1 (SDHR, 3.31; 95% CI, 2.74-4.01) were associated with increased risk of noncancer mortality. The 10-year cumulative incidences of competing mortality within low-, medium-, and high-risk strata were 27.3% (95% CI, 25.2%-29.4%), 34.6% (95% CI, 32.5%-36.7%), and 50.3% (95% CI, 48.2%-52.6%), respectively. With increasing competing mortality risk score, we observed a significant decline in omega (ω), indicating a diminishing likelihood of benefit from treatment intensification. Conclusion: Comorbidity and other factors influence the risk of competing mortality among patients with early-stage endometrial cancer. Competing event models could improve our ability to identify patients likely to benefit from treatment intensification

  7. Modelling of Biota Dose Effects. Report of Working Group 6 Biota Dose Effects Modelling of EMRAS II Topical Heading Reference Approaches for Biota Dose Assessment. Environmental Modelling for RAdiation Safety (EMRAS II) Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-07-01

    Environmental assessment models are used for evaluating the radiological impact of actual and potential releases of radionuclides to the environment. They are essential tools for use in the regulatory control of routine discharges to the environment and in planning the measures to be taken in the event of accidental releases. They are also used for predicting the impact of releases which may occur far into the future, for example, from underground radioactive waste repositories. It is important to verify, to the extent possible, the reliability of the predictions of such models by a comparison with measured values in the environment or with the predictions of other models. The IAEA has been organizing programmes on international model testing since the 1980s. These programmes have contributed to a general improvement in models, in the transfer of data and in the capabilities of modellers in Member States. IAEA publications on this subject over the past three decades demonstrate the comprehensive nature of the programmes and record the associated advances which have been made. From 2009 to 2011, the IAEA organized a project entitled Environmental Modelling for RAdiation Safety (EMRAS II), which concentrated on the improvement of environmental transfer models and the development of reference approaches to estimate the radiological impacts on humans, as well as on flora and fauna, arising from radionuclides in the environment. Different aspects were addressed by nine working groups covering three themes: reference approaches for human dose assessment, reference approaches for biota dose assessment and approaches for addressing emergency situations. This publication describes the work of the Biota Effects Modelling Working Group

  8. Modelling of Biota Dose Effects. Report of Working Group 6 Biota Dose Effects Modelling of EMRAS II Topical Heading Reference Approaches for Biota Dose Assessment. Environmental Modelling for RAdiation Safety (EMRAS II) Programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-07-15

    Environmental assessment models are used for evaluating the radiological impact of actual and potential releases of radionuclides to the environment. They are essential tools for use in the regulatory control of routine discharges to the environment and in planning the measures to be taken in the event of accidental releases. They are also used for predicting the impact of releases which may occur far into the future, for example, from underground radioactive waste repositories. It is important to verify, to the extent possible, the reliability of the predictions of such models by a comparison with measured values in the environment or with the predictions of other models. The IAEA has been organizing programmes on international model testing since the 1980s. These programmes have contributed to a general improvement in models, in the transfer of data and in the capabilities of modellers in Member States. IAEA publications on this subject over the past three decades demonstrate the comprehensive nature of the programmes and record the associated advances which have been made. From 2009 to 2011, the IAEA organized a project entitled Environmental Modelling for RAdiation Safety (EMRAS II), which concentrated on the improvement of environmental transfer models and the development of reference approaches to estimate the radiological impacts on humans, as well as on flora and fauna, arising from radionuclides in the environment. Different aspects were addressed by nine working groups covering three themes: reference approaches for human dose assessment, reference approaches for biota dose assessment and approaches for addressing emergency situations. This publication describes the work of the Biota Effects Modelling Working Group.

  9. Calcium-manganese oxides as structural and functional models for active site in oxygen evolving complex in photosystem II: lessons from simple models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafpour, Mohammad Mahdi

    2011-01-01

    The oxygen evolving complex in photosystem II which induces the oxidation of water to dioxygen in plants, algae and certain bacteria contains a cluster of one calcium and four manganese ions. It serves as a model to split water by sunlight. Reports on the mechanism and structure of photosystem II provide a more detailed architecture of the oxygen evolving complex and the surrounding amino acids. One challenge in this field is the development of artificial model compounds to study oxygen evolution reaction outside the complicated environment of the enzyme. Calcium-manganese oxides as structural and functional models for the active site of photosystem II are explained and reviewed in this paper. Because of related structures of these calcium-manganese oxides and the catalytic centers of active site of the oxygen evolving complex of photosystem II, the study may help to understand more about mechanism of oxygen evolution by the oxygen evolving complex of photosystem II. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Equilibrium and kinetic modelling of Cd(II) biosorption by algae Gelidium and agar extraction algal waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilar, Vítor J P; Botelho, Cidália M S; Boaventura, Rui A R

    2006-01-01

    In this study an industrial algal waste from agar extraction has been used as an inexpensive and effective biosorbent for cadmium (II) removal from aqueous solutions. This biosorbent was compared with the algae Gelidium itself, which is the raw material for agar extraction. Equilibrium data follow both Langmuir and Redlich-Peterson models. The parameters of Langmuir equilibrium model are q(max)=18.0 mgg(-1), b=0.19 mgl(-1) and q(max)=9.7 mgg(-1), b=0.16 mgl(-1), respectively for Gelidium and the algal waste. Kinetic experiments were conducted at initial Cd(II) concentrations in the range 6-91 mgl(-1). Data were fitted to pseudo-first- and second-order Lagergren models. For an initial Cd(II) concentration of 91 mgl(-1) the parameters of the pseudo-first-order Lagergren model are k(1,ads)=0.17 and 0.87 min(-1); q(eq)=16.3 and 8.7 mgg(-1), respectively, for Gelidium and algal waste. Kinetic constants vary with the initial metal concentration. The adsorptive behaviour of biosorbent particles was modelled using a batch reactor mass transfer kinetic model. The model successfully predicts Cd(II) concentration profiles and provides significant insights on the biosorbents performance. The homogeneous diffusivity, D(h), is in the range 0.5-2.2 x10(-8) and 2.1-10.4 x10(-8)cm(2)s(-1), respectively, for Gelidium and algal waste.

  11. Corpuls cpr resuscitation device generates superior emulated flows and pressures than LUCAS II in a mechanical thorax model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichhorn, S; Mendoza Garcia, A; Polski, M; Spindler, J; Stroh, A; Heller, M; Lange, R; Krane, M

    2017-06-01

    The provision of sufficient chest compression is among the most important factors influencing patient survival during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). One approach to optimize the quality of chest compressions is to use mechanical-resuscitation devices. The aim of this study was to compare a new device for chest compression (corpuls cpr) with an established device (LUCAS II). We used a mechanical thorax model consisting of a chest with variable stiffness and an integrated heart chamber which generated blood flow dependent on the compression depth and waveform. The method of blood-flow generation could be changed between direct cardiac-compression mode and thoracic-pump mode. Different chest-stiffness settings and compression modes were tested to generate various blood-flow profiles. Additionally, an endurance test at high stiffness was performed to measure overall performance and compression consistency. Both resuscitation machines were able to compress the model thorax with a frequency of 100/min and a depth of 5 cm, independent of the chosen chest stiffness. Both devices passed the endurance test without difficulty. The corpuls cpr device was able to generate about 10-40% more blood flow than the LUCAS II device, depending on the model settings. In most scenarios, the corpuls cpr device also generated a higher blood pressure than the LUCAS II. The peak compression forces during CPR were about 30% higher using the corpuls cpr device than with the LUCAS II. In this study, the corpuls cpr device had improved blood flow and pressure outcomes than the LUCAS II device. Further examination in an animal model is required to prove the findings of this preliminary study.

  12. New LUX and PandaX-II results illuminating the simplest Higgs-portal dark matter models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Xiao-Gang; Tandean, Jusak

    2016-01-01

    Direct searches for dark matter (DM) by the LUX and PandaX-II Collaborations employing xenon-based detectors have recently come up with the most stringent limits to date on the spin-independent elastic scattering of DM off nucleons. For Higgs-portal scalar DM models, the new results have precluded any possibility of accommodating low-mass DM as suggested by the DAMA and CDMS II Si experiments utilizing other target materials, even after invoking isospin-violating DM interactions with nucleons. In the simplest model, SM+D, which is the standard model plus a real singlet scalar named darkon acting as the DM candidate, the LUX and PandaX-II limits rule out DM masses roughly from 4 to 450 GeV, except a small range around the resonance point at half of the Higgs mass where the interaction cross-section is near the neutrino-background floor. In the THDM II+D, which is the type-II two-Higgs-doublet model combined with a darkon, the region excluded in the SM+D by the direct searches can be recovered due to suppression of the DM effective interactions with nucleons at some values of the ratios of Higgs couplings to the up and down quarks, making the interactions significantly isospin-violating. However, in either model, if the 125-GeV Higgs boson is the portal between the dark and SM sectors, DM masses less than 50 GeV or so are already ruled out by the LHC constraint on the Higgs invisible decay. In the THDM II+D, if the heavier CP-even Higgs boson is the portal, theoretical restrictions from perturbativity, vacuum stability, and unitarity requirements turn out to be important instead and exclude much of the region below 100 GeV. For larger DM masses, the THDM II+D has plentiful parameter space that corresponds to interaction cross-sections under the neutrino-background floor and therefore is likely to be beyond the reach of future direct searches without directional sensitivity.

  13. Angiotensin II, hypertension and angiotensin II receptor antagonism: Roles in the behavioural and brain pathology of a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiesmann, M.; Roelofs, M.; Lugt, R. Van Der; Heerschap, A.; Kiliaan, A.J.; Claassen, J.A.H.R.

    2017-01-01

    Elevated angiotensin II causes hypertension and contributes to Alzheimer's disease by affecting cerebral blood flow. Angiotensin II receptor blockers may provide candidates to reduce (vascular) risk factors for Alzheimer's disease. We studied effects of two months of angiotensin II-induced

  14. Study of experimentally undetermined neutrino parameters in the light of baryogenesis considering type I and type II Seesaw models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalita, Rupam

    2017-01-01

    We study to connect all the experimentally undetermined neutrino parameters namely lightest neutrino mass, neutrino CP phases and baryon asymmetry of the Universe within the framework of a model where both type I and type II seesaw mechanisms can contribute to tiny neutrino masses. In this work we study the effects of Dirac and Majorana neutrino phases in the origin of matter-antimatter asymmetry through the mechanism of leptogenesis. Type I seesaw mass matrix considered to a tri-bimaximal (TBM) type neutrino mixing which always gives non zero reactor mixing angle. The type II seesaw mass matrix is then considered in such a way that the necessary deviation from TBM mixing and the best fit values of neutrino parameters can be obtained when both type I and type II seesaw contributions are taken into account. We consider different contribution from type I and type II seesaw mechanism to study the effects of neutrino CP phases in the baryon asymmetry of the universe. We further study to connect all these experimentally undetermined neutrino parameters by considering various contribution of type I and type II seesaw. (author)

  15. Dynamic Flight Simulation Utilizing High Fidelity CFD-Based Nonlinear Reduced Order Model, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Nonlinear Dynamic Flight Simulation (NL-DFS) system will be developed in the Phase II project by combining the classical nonlinear rigid-body flight dynamics...

  16. Finite Element Models for Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication Process, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Small Business Innovation Research Phase II proposal offers to develop a comprehensive computer simulation methodology based on the finite element method for...

  17. Two-dimensional numerical modeling and solution of convection heat transfer in turbulent He II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Burt X.; Karr, Gerald R.

    1991-01-01

    Numerical schemes are employed to investigate heat transfer in the turbulent flow of He II. FEM is used to solve a set of equations governing the heat transfer and hydrodynamics of He II in the turbulent regime. Numerical results are compared with available experimental data and interpreted in terms of conventional heat transfer parameters such as the Prandtl number, the Peclet number, and the Nusselt number. Within the prescribed Reynolds number domain, the Gorter-Mellink thermal counterflow mechanism becomes less significant, and He II acts like an ordinary fluid. The convection heat transfer characteristics of He II in the highly turbulent regime can be successfully described by using the conventional turbulence and heat transfer theories.

  18. Extreme Environment Damage Index and Accumulation Model for CMC Laminate Fatigue Life Prediction, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Materials Research & Design (MR&D) is proposing in the SBIR Phase II an effort to develop a tool for predicting the fatigue life of C/SiC composite...

  19. From Realistic to Simple Models of Associating Fluids. II. Primitive Models of Ammonia, Ethanol and Models of Water Revisited

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vlček, Lukáš; Nezbeda, Ivo

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 102, č. 5 (2004), s. 485-497 ISSN 0026-8976 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/02/0764; GA AV ČR IAA4072303; GA AV ČR IAA4072309 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4072921 Keywords : primitive model * association fluids * ethanol Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.406, year: 2004

  20. Final Report: Phase II Nevada Water Resources Data, Modeling, and Visualization (DMV) Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackman, Thomas [Desert Research Institute; Minor, Timothy [Desert Research Institute; Pohll, Gregory [Desert Research Institute

    2013-07-22

    Water is unquestionably a critical resource throughout the United States. In the semi-arid west -- an area stressed by increase in human population and sprawl of the built environment -- water is the most important limiting resource. Crucially, science must understand factors that affect availability and distribution of water. To sustain growing consumptive demand, science needs to translate understanding into reliable and robust predictions of availability under weather conditions that could be average but might be extreme. These predictions are needed to support current and long-term planning. Similar to the role of weather forecast and climate prediction, water prediction over short and long temporal scales can contribute to resource strategy, governmental policy and municipal infrastructure decisions, which are arguably tied to the natural variability and unnatural change to climate. Change in seasonal and annual temperature, precipitation, snowmelt, and runoff affect the distribution of water over large temporal and spatial scales, which impact the risk of flooding and the groundwater recharge. Anthropogenic influences and impacts increase the complexity and urgency of the challenge. The goal of this project has been to develop a decision support framework of data acquisition, digital modeling, and 3D visualization. This integrated framework consists of tools for compiling, discovering and projecting our understanding of processes that control the availability and distribution of water. The framework is intended to support the analysis of the complex interactions between processes that affect water supply, from controlled availability to either scarcity or deluge. The developed framework enables DRI to promote excellence in water resource management, particularly within the Lake Tahoe basin. In principle, this framework could be replicated for other watersheds throughout the United States. Phase II of this project builds upon the research conducted during

  1. cobalt (ii), nickel (ii)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    Department of Chemistry Bayero University, P. M. B. 3011, Kano, Nigeria. E-mail: hnuhu2000@yahoo.com. ABSTRACT. The manganese (II), cobalt (II), nickel (II) and .... water and common organic solvents, but are readily soluble in acetone. The molar conductance measurement [Table 3] of the complex compounds in.

  2. Atucha II NPP full scope simulator modelling with the thermal hydraulic code TRAC{sub R}T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, Pablo Rey; Ruiz, Jose Antonio; Rivero, Norberto, E-mail: prey@tecnatom.e, E-mail: jaruiz@tecnatom.e, E-mail: nrivero@tecnatom.e [Tecnatom S.A., Madrid (Spain)

    2011-07-01

    In February 2010 NA-SA (Nucleoelectrica Argentina S.A.) awarded Tecnatom the Atucha II full scope simulator project. NA-SA is a public company owner of the Argentinean nuclear power plants. Atucha II is due to enter in operation shortly. Atucha II NPP is a PHWR type plant cooled by the water of the Parana River and has the same design as the Atucha I unit, doubling its power capacity. Atucha II will produce 745 MWe utilizing heavy water as coolant and moderator, and natural uranium as fuel. A plant singular feature is the permanent core refueling. TRAC{sub R}T is the first real time thermal hydraulic six-equations code used in the training simulation industry for NSSS modeling. It is the result from adapting to real time the best estimate code TRACG. TRAC{sub R}T is based on first principle conservation equations for mass, energy and momentum for liquid and steam phases, with two phase flows under non homogeneous and non equilibrium conditions. At present, it has been successfully implemented in twelve full scope replica simulators in different training centers throughout the world. To ease the modeling task, TRAC{sub R}T includes a graphical pre-processing tool designed to optimize this process and alleviate the burden of entering alpha numerical data in an input file. (author)

  3. Numerical models of protoneutron stars and type-II supernovae - recent developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janka, H T [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astrophysik, Garching (Germany)

    1996-11-01

    The results of recent multi-dimensional simulations of type-II supernovae are reviewed. They show that convective instabilities in the collapsed stellar core might play an important role already during the first second after the formation of the supernovae shock. Convectively unstable situations occur below and near the neutrinosphere as well as in the neutrino-heated region between the nascent neutron star and the supernova shock after the latter has stalled at a radiums of typically 100-200 km. While convective overturn in the layer of neutrino energy deposition clearly helps the explosion to develop and potentially provides an explanation of strong mantle and envelope mixing, asphericities, and non-uniform {sup 56}Ni distribution observed in supernova SN 1987A, its presence and importance depends on the strength of the neutrino heating and thus on the size of the neutrino fluxes from the neutrino star. Convection in the hot-bubble region can only be developed if the growth timescale of the instabilities and the heating timescale are both shorter than the accretion timescale of the matter advected through the stagnant shock. For too small neutrino luminosities this requirement is not fulfilled and convective activity cannot develop, leading to very weak explosions or even fizzling models, just as in the one-dimensional situations. Convectively enhanced neutrino luminosities from the protoneutron star can therefore provide an essential condition for the explosion of the star. Very recent two-dimensional, self-consistent, general relativistic simulations of the cooling of a newly-formed neutron star demonstrate and confirm the possibility that Ledoux convection, driven by negative lepton number and entropy gradients, may encompass the whole protoneutron star within less than one second and can lead to an increase of the neutrino fluxes by up to a factor of two. (author) 9 figs., refs.

  4. Relationship between Disease Activity and Circulating Level of Collagen II C-Telopeptide Fragments in Papain Induced Osteoarthritis Rat Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humaira Majeed Khan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is a progressive degeneration of articular cartilage leading to failure in functional mobility of joints. It is characterized by morphological, biochemical and molecular changes in histology of cartilage. Different biological markers are used as indicators to precisely predict the stage of cartilage destruction of joints in OA patients and to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of drugs used for OA. The present research was chalked out to establish relationship between disease activity and serum level of C-terminal telopeptide of type II collagen (CTX-II in experimentally induced OA rat model. Out of 30 male Wistar rats, 25 were used to induce OA by injecting papain (10mg/0.5mL of 0.05M sodium acetate in right knee joints whereas five (control were injected with sterile normal saline solution on day 0. Blood samples (5mL each were collected on weekly basis up to 28th days of post papain injection. Sera were separated and subjected to perform ELISA for estimating CTX-II fragments as cartilage biomarker (CartiLaps ® ELISA kit in experimental groups. Maximum level of CTX–II (pg/mL (40.44±3.07 was observed in sera samples of day 14 post papain injection followed by days 21 (40.22±2.01, 28 (36.82±3.81, 7 (34.48±4.17, 1 (15.08±4.22 and day 0 (2.55±0.10. The early changes in serum CTX-II from day 0 to 14 showed significant association with cartilage damage. Later on, no significant difference was observed in CTX-II level on day 14, 21 and 28 post papain injection. It is concluded that elevation in serum CTX-II level was concomitant with the onset of disease and degradation of cartilage. Moreover, CTX-II is a sensitive diagnostic biomarker to monitor joint disorder severity in papain induced OA rat experimental model on different days. These findings may be used as base line for early diagnosis of disease and initiation of therapy for successful outcome.

  5. A model of nitrous oxide evolution from soil driven by rainfall events. I - Model structure and sensitivity. II - Model applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Changsheng, LI; Frolking, Steve; Frolking, Tod A.

    1992-01-01

    Simulations of N2O and CO2 emissions from soils were conducted with a rain-event driven, process-oriented model (DNDC) of nitrogen and carbon cycling processes in soils. The magnitude and trends of simulated N2O (or N2O + N2) and CO2 emissions were consistent with the results obtained in field experiments. The successful simulation of these emissions from the range of soil types examined demonstrates that the DNDC will be a useful tool for the study of linkages among climate, soil-atmosphere interactions, land use, and trace gas fluxes.

  6. keV right-handed neutrinos from type II seesaw mechanism in a 3-3-1 model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cogollo, D.; Diniz, H.; Pires, C.A. de S

    2009-01-01

    We adapt the type II seesaw mechanism to the framework of the 3-3-1 model with right-handed neutrinos. We emphasize that the mechanism is capable of generating small masses for the left-handed and right-handed neutrinos and the structure of the model allows that both masses arise from the same Yukawa coupling. For typical values of the free parameters of the model we may obtain at least one right-handed neutrino with mass in the keV range. Right-handed neutrino with mass in this range is a viable candidate for the warm component of the dark matter existent in the universe.

  7. An exploratory study of proficient undergraduate Chemistry II students' application of Lewis's model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Sumudu R.

    This exploratory study was based on the assumption that proficiency in chemistry must not be determined exclusively on students' declarative and procedural knowledge, but it should be also described as the ability to use variety of reasoning strategies that enrich and diversify procedural methods. The study furthermore assumed that the ability to describe the structure of a molecule using Lewis's model and use it to predict its geometry as well as some of its properties is indicative of proficiency in the essential concepts of covalent bonding and molecule structure. The study therefore inquired into the reasoning methods and procedural techniques of proficient undergraduate Chemistry II students when solving problems, which require them to use Lewis's model. The research design included an original survey, designed by the researcher for this study, and two types of interviews, with students and course instructors. The purpose of the survey was two-fold. First and foremost, the survey provided a base for the student interview selection, and second it served as the foundation for the inquiry into the strategies the student use when solving survey problems. Twenty two students were interviewed over the course of the study. The interview with six instructors allowed to identify expected prior knowledge and skills, which the students should have acquired upon completion of the Chemistry I course. The data, including videos, audios, and photographs of the artifacts produced by students during the interviews, were organized and analyzed manually and using QSR NVivo 10. The research found and described the differences between proficient and non-proficient students' reasoning and procedural strategies when using Lewis's model to describe the structure of a molecule. One of the findings clearly showed that the proficient students used a variety of cues to reason, whereas other students used one memorized cue, or an algorithm, which often led to incorrect representations in

  8. EMPIRE-II 2.18, Comprehensive Nuclear Model Code, Nucleons, Ions Induced Cross-Sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herman, Michal Wladyslaw; Panini, Gian Carlo

    2003-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: EMPIRE-II is a flexible code for calculation of nuclear reactions in the frame of combined optical, Multi-step Direct (TUL), Multi-step Compound (NVWY) and statistical (Hauser-Feshbach) models. Incident particle can be a nucleon or any nucleus(Heavy Ion). Isomer ratios, residue production cross sections and emission spectra for neutrons, protons, alpha-particles, gamma-rays, and one type of Light Ion can be calculated. The energy range starts just above the resonance region for neutron induced reactions and extends up to several hundreds of MeV for the Heavy Ion induced reactions. IAEA1169/06: This version corrects an error in the Absoft compile procedure. 2 - Method of solution: For projectiles with A<5 EMPIRE calculates fusion cross section using spherical optical model transmission coefficients. In the case of Heavy Ion induced reactions the fusion cross section can be determined using various approaches including simplified coupled channels method (code CCFUS). Pre-equilibrium emission is treated in terms of quantum-mechanical theories (TUL-MSD and NVWY-MSC). MSC contribution to the gamma emission is taken into account. These calculations are followed by statistical decay with arbitrary number of subsequent particle emissions. Gamma-ray competition is considered in detail for every decaying compound nucleus. Different options for level densities are available including dynamical approach with collective effects taken into account. EMPIRE contains following third party codes converted into subroutines: - SCAT2 by O. Bersillon, - ORION and TRISTAN by H. Lenske and H. Wolter, - CCFUS by C.H. Dasso and S. Landowne, - BARMOM by A. Sierk. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The code can be easily adjusted to the problem by changing dimensions in the dimensions.h file. The actual limits are set by the available memory. In the current formulation up to 4 ejectiles plus gamma are allowed. This limit can be relaxed

  9. Theoretical modeling of the electronic structure and exchange interactions in Cu(II)Pc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei; Fisher, A. J.; Harrison, N. M.; Wang, Hai; Wu, Zhenlin; Gardener, Jules; Heutz, Sandrine; Jones, Tim; Aeppli, Gabriel

    2012-12-01

    We calculate the electronic structure and exchange interactions in a copper(II)phthalocyanine (Cu(II)Pc) crystal as a one-dimensional molecular chain using hybrid exchange density functional theory (DFT). In addition, the intermolecular exchange interactions are also calculated in a molecular dimer using Green's function perturbation theory (GFPT) to illustrate the underlying physics. We find that the exchange interactions depend strongly on the stacking angle, but weakly on the sliding angle (defined in the text). The hybrid DFT calculations also provide an insight into the electronic structure of the Cu(II)Pc molecular chain and demonstrate that on-site electron correlations have a significant effect on the nature of the ground state, the band gap and magnetic excitations. The exchange interactions predicted by our DFT calculations and GFPT calculations agree qualitatively with the recent experimental results on newly found η-Cu(II)Pc and the previous results for the α- and β-phases. This work provides a reliable theoretical basis for the further application of Cu(II)Pc to molecular spintronics and organic-based quantum information processing.

  10. Animal model for angiotensin II effects in the internal anal sphincter smooth muscle: mechanism of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Ya-Ping; Puri, Rajinder N; Rattan, Satish

    2002-03-01

    Effect of ANG II was investigated in in vitro smooth muscle strips and in isolated smooth muscle cells (SMC). Among different species, rat internal and sphincter (IAS) smooth muscle showed significant and reproducible contraction that remained unmodified by different neurohumoral inhibitors. The AT(1) antagonist losartan but not AT(2) antagonist PD-123319 antagonized ANG II-induced contraction of the IAS smooth muscle and SMC. ANG II-induced contraction of rat IAS smooth muscle and SMC was attenuated by tyrosine kinase inhibitors genistein and tyrphostin, protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor H-7, Ca(2+) channel blocker nicardipine, Rho kinase inhibitor Y-27632 or p(44/42) mitogen-activating protein kinase (MAPK(44/42)) inhibitor PD-98059. Combinations of nicardipine and H-7, Y-27632, and PD-98059 caused further attenuation of the ANG II effects. Western blot analyses revealed the presence of both AT(1) and AT(2) receptors. We conclude that ANG II causes contraction of rat IAS smooth muscle by the activation of AT(1) receptors at the SMC and involves multiple intracellular pathways, influx of Ca(2+), and activation of PKC, Rho kinase, and MAPK(44/42).

  11. Biosorption of cobalt(II) with sunflower biomass from aqueous solutions in a fixed bed column and neural networks modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguz, Ensar; Ersoy, Muhammed

    2014-01-01

    The effects of inlet cobalt(II) concentration (20-60 ppm), feed flow rate (8-19 ml/min) and bed height (5-15 cm), initial solution pH (3-5) and particle size (0.25shells of sunflower biomass was found to be 1.82 m(2)/g. A relationship between the predicted results of the ANN model and experimental data was conducted. The ANN model yielded determination coefficient of (R(2) 0.972), standard deviation ratio (0.166), mean absolute error (0.0158) and root mean square error (0.0141). The results indicated that the shells of the sunflower biomass is a suitable biosorbent for the uptake of cobalt(II) in fixed bed columns. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Local fractional variational iteration algorithm II for non-homogeneous model associated with the non-differentiable heat flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Zhang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we begin with the non-homogeneous model for the non-differentiable heat flow, which is described using the local fractional vector calculus, from the first law of thermodynamics in fractal media point view. We employ the local fractional variational iteration algorithm II to solve the fractal heat equations. The obtained results show the non-differentiable behaviors of temperature fields of fractal heat flow defined on Cantor sets.

  13. Preliminary Modelling of Radiation Levels at the Fermilab PIP-II Linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lari, L. [CERN; Cerutti, F. [CERN; Esposito, L. S. [CERN; Baffes, C. [Fermilab; Dixon, S. J. [Fermilab; Mokhov, N. V. [Fermilab; Rakhno, I. [Fermilab; Tropin, I. S. [Fermilab

    2018-04-01

    PIP-II is the Fermilab's flagship project for providing powerful, high-intensity proton beams to the laboratory's experiments. The heart of PIP-II is an 800-MeV superconducting linac accelerator. It will be located in a new tunnel with new service buildings and connected to the present Booster through a new transfer line. To support the design of civil engineering and mechanical integration, this paper provides preliminary estimation of radiation level in the gallery at an operational beam loss limit of 0.1 W/m, by means of Monte Carlo calculations with FLUKA and MARS15 codes.

  14. Preliminary Modeling Of Radiation Levels At The Fermilab PIP-II Linac arXiv

    CERN Document Server

    Lari, L.; Esposito, L.S.; Baffes, C.; Dixon, S.J.; Mokhov, N.V.; Rakhno, I.; Tropin, I.S.

    PIP-II is the Fermilab's flagship project for providing powerful, high-intensity proton beams to the laboratory's experiments. The heart of PIP-II is an 800-MeV superconducting linac accelerator. It will be located in a new tunnel with new service buildings and connected to the present Booster through a new transfer line. To support the design of civil engineering and mechanical integration, this paper provides preliminary estimation of radiation level in the gallery at an operational beam loss limit of 0.1 W/m, by means of Monte Carlo calculations with FLUKA and MARS15 codes.

  15. In Situ Monitoring and Modeling of the Solution-Mediated Polymorphic Transformation of Rifampicin: From Form II to Form I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Nannan; Hou, Baohong; Wang, Na; Xiao, Yan; Huang, Jingjing; Guo, Yanmei; Zong, Shuyi; Hao, Hongxun

    2018-01-01

    In this article, the solution-mediated polymorphic transformation of rifampicin was investigated and simulated in 3 solvents at 30°C. The solid-state form I and form II of rifampicin was characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, Raman spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). To explore the relative stability, solubility data of form I and form II of rifampicin in butan-1-ol were determined using a dynamical method. In addition, Raman spectroscopy and focused beam reflectance measurement were used to in situ monitor the transformation of rifampicin from form II to form I. The liquid state concentration of rifampicin was measured by UV spectroscopic method. To investigate the effect of solvent on transformation, the transformation experiments were carried out in 3 solvents. Furthermore, a mathematical model was built to describe the kinetics of dissolution, nucleation, and growth processes during transformation by using experimental data. By combination of experimental and simulation results, it was found that the transformation process of rifampicin is controlled by dissolution of form II in heptane, whereas the transformation in hexane and octane was firstly controlled by dissolution of solid-state form and then controlled by growth of form I. Copyright © 2018 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Magnetoelastic plane waves in rotating media in thermoelasticity of type II (G-N model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Roychoudhuri

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A study is made of the propagation of time-harmonic plane waves in an infinite, conducting, thermoelastic solid permeated by a uniform primary external magnetic field when the entire medium is rotating with a uniform angular velocity. The thermoelasticity theory of type II (G-N model (1993 is used to study the propagation of waves. A more general dispersion equation is derived to determine the effects of rotation, thermal parameters, characteristic of the medium, and the external magnetic field. If the primary magnetic field has a transverse component, it is observed that the longitudinal and transverse motions are linked together. For low frequency (χ≪1, χ being the ratio of the wave frequency to some standard frequency ω∗, the rotation and the thermal field have no effect on the phase velocity to the first order of χ and then this corresponds to only one slow wave influenced by the electromagnetic field only. But to the second order of χ, the phase velocity, attenuation coefficient, and the specific energy loss are affected by rotation and depend on the thermal parameters cT, cT being the nondimensional thermal wave speed of G-N theory, and the thermoelastic coupling εT, the electromagnetic parameters εH, and the transverse magnetic field RH. Also for large frequency, rotation and thermal field have no effect on the phase velocity, which is independent of primary magnetic field to the first order of (1/χ (χ≫1, and the specific energy loss is a constant, independent of any field parameter. However, to the second order of (1/χ, rotation does exert influence on both the phase velocity and the attenuation factor, and the specific energy loss is affected by rotation and depends on the thermal parameters cT and εT, electromagnetic parameter εH, and the transverse magnetic field RH, whereas the specific energy loss is independent of any field parameters to the first order of (1/χ.

  17. Results of the project 'combustion modelling' (BKM II); Ergebnisse des Projekts 'Brennkammermodellierung' (BKM II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noll, B.; Rachner, M.; Frank, P.; Schmitz, G.; Geigle, K.P.; Meier, W.; Schuetz, H.; Aigner, M. [DLR Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V., Stuttgart (Germany). Inst. fuer Verbrennungstechnik; Kessler, R. [DLR Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V., Goettingen (Germany). Inst. fuer Aerodynamik und Stroemungstechnik; Lehmann, B. [DLR Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V., Koeln (Germany). Inst. fuer Antriebstechnik; Forkert, T. [DLR Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V., Koeln (Germany). Simulation und Softwaretechnik

    2002-07-01

    In the year 1996 the spheres of competence of several DLR-Institutes working in the areas of fluid dynamics, reaction kinetics, combustion, numerical methods and laser measuring techniques have been brought together while contributing to the internal DLR project 'combustion chamber modelling (BKM)', in order to proceed with the computational simulation of combustion processes in combustion chambers of gas turbines. The main issue was the development of a research code for numerical simulation of fluid flow in real combustion chambers. Here the development of computational models of physical and chemical processes was emphasized, among other processes the formation of soot was treated. Moreover, a worldwide outstanding database of measured data for the purpose of code validation has been created within the framework of the BKM project using the laboratory facilities of the DLR, which are in Germany unique for the experimental investigation of the various processes in combustion chambers of gas turbines. The project BKM is part of the specific DLR-programme 'energy'. With the successful completion of the first phase of the project in 1998, a second project phase of three years (BKM II) has been launched at the beginning of 1999. Here the work of the first phase continued and new topics were tackled. The second phase of the project was partly founded by the DLR-programme 'aeronautics'. (orig.) [German] Im Jahr 1996 wurden die Faehigkeiten mehrerer DLR-Institute auf den Gebieten Stroemungsmechanik, Reaktionskinetik, Verbrennung sowie Numerische Verfahren und Laser-Messverfahren in dem DLR-internen Projekt 'Brennkammermodellierung' (BKM) zusammengefuehrt, um die rechnerische Simulation der Verbrennungsvorgaenge in Gasturbinen-Brennkammern voranzutreiben. Dabei war die Entwicklung eines Forschungscodes zur numerischen Simulation von realen Brennkammerstroemungen das vorrangige Ziel der Arbeiten. Ein besonderes Schwergewicht lag

  18. Methods and Model Development for Coupled RELAP5/PARCS Analysis of the Atucha-II Nuclear Power Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew M. Ward

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to analyze the steady state and transient behavior of CNA-II, several tasks were required. Methods and models were developed in several areas. HELIOS lattice models were developed and benchmarked against WIMS/MCNP5 results generated by NA-SA. Cross-sections for the coupled RELAP5/PARCS calculation were extracted from HELIOS within the GenPMAXS framework. The validation of both HELIOS and PARCS was performed primarily by comparisons to WIMS/PUMA and MCNP for idealized models. Special methods were developed to model the control rods and boron injection systems of CNA-II. The insertion of the rods is oblique, and a special routine was added to PARCS to treat this effect. CFD results combined with specialized mapping routines were used to model the boron injection system. In all cases there was good agreement in the results which provided confidence in the neutronics methods and modeling. A coupled code benchmark between U of M and U of Pisa is ongoing and results are still preliminary. Under a LOCA transient, the best estimate behavior of the core appears to be acceptable.

  19. Methods and Model Development for Coupled RELAP5/PARCS Analysis of the Atucha-II Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, A.M.; Collins, B.S.; Xu, Y.; Downar, Th.J.; Madariaga, M.

    2011-01-01

    In order to analyze the steady state and transient behavior of CNA-II, several tasks were required. Methods and models were developed in several areas. HELIOS lattice models were developed and benchmarked against WIMS/MCNP5 results generated by NA-SA. Cross-sections for the coupled RELAP5/PARCS calculation were extracted from HELIOS within the Gen PMAXS framework. The validation of both HELIOS and PARCS was performed primarily by comparisons to WIMS/PUMA and MCNP for idealized models. Special methods were developed to model the control rods and boron injection systems of CNA-II. The insertion of the rods is oblique, and a special routine was added to PARCS to treat this effect. CFD results combined with specialized mapping routines were used to model the boron injection system. In all cases there was good agreement in the results which provided confidence in the neutronics methods and modeling. A coupled code benchmark between U of M and U of Pisa is ongoing and results are still preliminary. Under a LOCA transient, the best estimate behavior of the core appears to be acceptable

  20. Theory of extended stellar atmospheres. II. A grid of static spherical models for O stars and planetary nebula nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunasz, P.B.; Hummer, D.G.; Mihalas, D.

    1975-01-01

    Spherical static non-LTE model atmospheres are presented for stars with M/M/sub sun/=30 and 60 at various points on their evolutionary tracks, and for some nuclei of planetary nebulae at two points of a modified Harman-Seaton sequence. The method of Mihalas and Hummer was employed, which uses a parametrized radiation force multiplier to simulate the force of radiation arising from the entire line spectrum. However, in the present work the density structure computed in the LTE models was held fixed in the calculation of the corresponding non-LTE models; in addition, the opacity of an ''average light ion'' was taken into account. The temperatures for the non-LTE models are generally lower, at a given depth, than for the corresponding LTE models when T/sub eff/<45,000 K, while the situation is reversed at higher temperatures. The continuous energy distributions are generally flattened by extension. The Lyman jump is in emission for extended models of massive stars, but never for the models of nuclei of planetary nebulae (this is primarily a temperature effect). The Balmer jumps are always in absorption. The Lyman lines are in emission, and the Balmer lines in absorption; He ii lambda4686 comes into emission in the most extended models without hydrogen line pumping, showing that it is an indicator of atmospheric extension. Very severe limb darkening is found for extended models, which have apparent angular sized significantly smaller than expected from the geometrical size of the star. Extensive tables are given of monochromatic magnitudes, continuum jumps and gra