WorldWideScience

Sample records for ran mobile clinics

  1. Evaluation of energy and cost savings in mobile Cloud RAN

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Checko, Aleksandra; Christiansen, Henrik Lehrmann; Berger, Michael Stübert

    2013-01-01

    The load in mobile networks is subject to variations during the day, due to user mobility and varying network average usage. Therefore, the traditional or Distributed Radio Access Network (D-RAN) architecture, where the BaseBand processing Units (BBUs) are assigned statically to a number of cells...... using OPNET Modeler. A real case scenario is built upon the mobile traffic forecast for year 2017, a number of recommendations on traffic models and a proposed C-RAN implementation. The results achieved show that the maximum statistical multiplexing gain for user plane traffic in C-RAN architecture is 4......, is sub optimal, comparing to a novel, cloud based architecture called Cloud Radio Access Network (C-RAN). In C-RAN a group of cells shares processing resources, and hence benefit from statistical multiplexing gain is expected. In this paper, the energy and cost savings in C-RAN are evaluated numerically...

  2. Cloud RAN for Mobile Networks - a Technology Overview

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Checko, Aleksandra; Christiansen, Henrik Lehrmann; Yan, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Pool for statistical multiplexing gain, while shifting the burden to the high-speed wireline transmission of In-phase and Quadrature (IQ) data. C-RAN enables energy efficient network operation and possible cost savings on base- band resources. Furthermore, it improves network capacity by performing...

  3. Synchronization challenges in packet-based Cloud-RAN fronthaul for mobile networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Checko, Aleksandra; Juul, Anders Christian; Christiansen, Henrik Lehrmann

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we look at reusing existing packet-based network (e.g. Ethernet) to possibly decrease deployment costs of fronthaul Cloud Radio Access Network (C-RAN) network and cost of Baseband Unit (BBU) resources. The challenge of this solution is that it requires mobile traffic (until now...... transmitted over synchronous protocols) to traverse the asynchronous Ethernet without losing synchronization. We analyze synchronization requirements of mobile networks and present an overview of solutions that fulfill them in traditional mobile networks. Then we elaborate on challenges that packet...... bridge the gap between Ethernet and mobile network domains creating a comprehensive architectural analysis....

  4. OTN Transport of Baseband Radio Serial Protocols in C-RAN Architecture for Mobile Network Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Checko, Aleksandra; Kardaras, Georgios; Lanzani, Christian Fabio Alessandro

    This white paper presents a proof of concept implementation of digital baseband radio data transport over Optical Transport Network (OTN) compliant to 3GPP Long Term Evolution – Advanced (LTE-A) standard enabling Cloud Radio Access Network (C-RAN) architecture. The transport between the baseband...... module and a remote radio module is compliant to Common Public Radio Interface (CPRI) and to the OBSAI reference point 3 - 01 (RP3-01) interface protocols, respectively. The purpose is to demonstrate that data integrity and clocking performance at the radio node still meets the strict standard...

  5. A Mobility Management Using Follow-Me Cloud-Cloudlet in Fog-Computing-Based RANs for Smart Cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuh-Shyan; Tsai, Yi-Ting

    2018-02-06

    Mobility management for supporting the location tracking and location-based service (LBS) is an important issue of smart city by providing the means for the smooth transportation of people and goods. The mobility is useful to contribute the innovation in both public and private transportation infrastructures for smart cities. With the assistance of edge/fog computing, this paper presents a fully new mobility management using the proposed follow-me cloud-cloudlet (FMCL) approach in fog-computing-based radio access networks (Fog-RANs) for smart cities. The proposed follow-me cloud-cloudlet approach is an integration strategy of follow-me cloud (FMC) and follow-me edge (FME) (or called cloudlet). A user equipment (UE) receives the data, transmitted from original cloud, into the original edge cloud before the handover operation. After the handover operation, an UE searches for a new cloud, called as a migrated cloud, and a new edge cloud, called as a migrated edge cloud near to UE, where the remaining data is migrated from the original cloud to the migrated cloud and all the remaining data are received in the new edge cloud. Existing FMC results do not have the property of the VM migration between cloudlets for the purpose of reducing the transmission latency, and existing FME results do not keep the property of the service migration between data centers for reducing the transmission latency. Our proposed FMCL approach can simultaneously keep the VM migration between cloudlets and service migration between data centers to significantly reduce the transmission latency. The new proposed mobility management using FMCL approach aims to reduce the total transmission time if some data packets are pre-scheduled and pre-stored into the cache of cloudlet if UE is switching from the previous Fog-RAN to the serving Fog-RAN. To illustrate the performance achievement, the mathematical analysis and simulation results are examined in terms of the total transmission time, the

  6. A Mobility Management Using Follow-Me Cloud-Cloudlet in Fog-Computing-Based RANs for Smart Cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuh-Shyan Chen

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Mobility management for supporting the location tracking and location-based service (LBS is an important issue of smart city by providing the means for the smooth transportation of people and goods. The mobility is useful to contribute the innovation in both public and private transportation infrastructures for smart cities. With the assistance of edge/fog computing, this paper presents a fully new mobility management using the proposed follow-me cloud-cloudlet (FMCL approach in fog-computing-based radio access networks (Fog-RANs for smart cities. The proposed follow-me cloud-cloudlet approach is an integration strategy of follow-me cloud (FMC and follow-me edge (FME (or called cloudlet. A user equipment (UE receives the data, transmitted from original cloud, into the original edge cloud before the handover operation. After the handover operation, an UE searches for a new cloud, called as a migrated cloud, and a new edge cloud, called as a migrated edge cloud near to UE, where the remaining data is migrated from the original cloud to the migrated cloud and all the remaining data are received in the new edge cloud. Existing FMC results do not have the property of the VM migration between cloudlets for the purpose of reducing the transmission latency, and existing FME results do not keep the property of the service migration between data centers for reducing the transmission latency. Our proposed FMCL approach can simultaneously keep the VM migration between cloudlets and service migration between data centers to significantly reduce the transmission latency. The new proposed mobility management using FMCL approach aims to reduce the total transmission time if some data packets are pre-scheduled and pre-stored into the cache of cloudlet if UE is switching from the previous Fog-RAN to the serving Fog-RAN. To illustrate the performance achievement, the mathematical analysis and simulation results are examined in terms of the total transmission time

  7. Mobile technology in clinical teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, B J; Anderson, J; Harding, T

    2017-01-01

    Technology is having a profound effect on education in the 21st century and nurse educators are being challenged to integrate technological innovation to assist students in their learning. This paper reports a study on the introduction of smart mobile technology to support student learning in the clinical environment. In a climate of collaborative inquiry, clinical lecturers and two researchers from the same department carried out a project in three phases: formation, implementation and analysis. Following the formation phase, six clinical lecturers adopted iPads to support their clinical teaching (implementation phase). At this time they also kept reflective journals. In the analysis phase a thematic analysis of the data from the journals and from a focus group found both enabling and constraining factors influenced the use of iPads by clinical lecturers. The themes categorised as enablers were: resources and technology; and, management and technology support. Those identified as barriers or constraining factors were: clinical staff engagement; and lecturer experience with technology. Student engagement and learning, and connectivity were both enabling and constraining factors. This paper concludes that the use of a mobile device such as an iPad can enhance teaching in clinical settings but that in order for such devices to be successfully integrated into clinical teaching consideration needs to be given to professional development needs, adequate resourcing and technology support. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Mobile clinics for women's and children's health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Aleem, Hany; El-Gibaly, Omaima M H; El-Gazzar, Amira F E-S; Al-Attar, Ghada S T

    2016-08-11

    The accessibility of health services is an important factor that affects the health outcomes of populations. A mobile clinic provides a wide range of services but in most countries the main focus is on health services for women and children. It is anticipated that improvement of the accessibility of health services via mobile clinics will improve women's and children's health. To evaluate the impact of mobile clinic services on women's and children's health. For related systematic reviews, we searched the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effectiveness (DARE), CRD; Health Technology Assessment Database (HTA), CRD; NHS Economic Evaluation Database (NHS EED), CRD (searched 20 February 2014).For primary studies, we searched ISI Web of Science, for studies that have cited the included studies in this review (searched 18 January 2016); WHO ICTRP, and ClinicalTrials.gov (searched 23 May 2016); Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), part of The Cochrane Library. www.cochranelibrary.com (including the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care (EPOC) Group Specialised Register) (searched 7 April 2015); MEDLINE, OvidSP (searched 7 April 2015); Embase, OvidSP (searched 7 April 2015); CINAHL, EbscoHost (searched 7 April 2015); Global Health, OvidSP (searched 8 April 2015); POPLINE, K4Health (searched 8 April 2015); Science Citation Index and Social Sciences Citation Index, ISI Web of Science (searched 8 April 2015); Global Health Library, WHO (searched 8 April 2015); PAHO, VHL (searched 8 April 2015); WHOLIS, WHO (searched 8 April 2015); LILACS, VHL (searched 9 April 2015). We included individual- and cluster-randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and non-RCTs. We included controlled before-and-after (CBA) studies provided they had at least two intervention sites and two control sites. Also, we included interrupted time series (ITS) studies if there was a clearly defined point in time when the intervention occurred and at least three data points

  9. Technological choices for mobile clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrler, Frederic; Issom, David; Lovis, Christian

    2011-01-01

    The rise of cheaper and more powerful mobile devices make them a new and attractive platform for clinical applications. The interaction paradigm and portability of the device facilitates bedside human-machine interactions. The better accessibility to information and decision-support anywhere in the hospital improves the efficiency and the safety of care processes. In this study, we attempt to find out what are the most appropriate Operating System (OS) and Software Development Kit (SDK) to support the development of clinical applications on mobile devices. The Android platform is a Linux-based, open source platform that has many advantages. Two main SDKs are available on this platform: the native Android and the Adobe Flex SDK. Both of them have interesting features, but the latter has been preferred due its portability at comparable performance and ease of development.

  10. RAN Translation in Huntington Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bañez-Coronel, Monica; Ayhan, Fatma; Tarabochia, Alex D; Zu, Tao; Perez, Barbara A; Tusi, Solaleh Khoramian; Pletnikova, Olga; Borchelt, David R; Ross, Christopher A; Margolis, Russell L; Yachnis, Anthony T; Troncoso, Juan C; Ranum, Laura P W

    2015-11-18

    Huntington disease (HD) is caused by a CAG ⋅ CTG expansion in the huntingtin (HTT) gene. While most research has focused on the HTT polyGln-expansion protein, we demonstrate that four additional, novel, homopolymeric expansion proteins (polyAla, polySer, polyLeu, and polyCys) accumulate in HD human brains. These sense and antisense repeat-associated non-ATG (RAN) translation proteins accumulate most abundantly in brain regions with neuronal loss, microglial activation and apoptosis, including caudate/putamen, white matter, and, in juvenile-onset cases, also the cerebellum. RAN protein accumulation and aggregation are length dependent, and individual RAN proteins are toxic to neural cells independent of RNA effects. These data suggest RAN proteins contribute to HD and that therapeutic strategies targeting both sense and antisense genes may be required for efficacy in HD patients. This is the first demonstration that RAN proteins are expressed across an expansion located in an open reading frame and suggests RAN translation may also contribute to other polyglutamine diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Envisioning Spectrum Management in Virtualised C-RAN

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Samman, Imad; Artuso, Matteo; Christiansen, Henrik Lehrmann

    2017-01-01

    Cloud Radio Access Network (C-RAN) has attracted a worldwide attention in both academia and industry. This network architecture re-forming has been considered as a potential solution to meet the increasing capacity demands for future mobile data traffic. In addition, Network Virtualisation is a p...

  12. RAN GTPase and Osteopontin in Pancreatic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Shivam; Gandhi, Ankit; Lim, Pei-Wen; Relles, Daniel; Sarosiek, Konrad; Kang, Christopher; Chipitsyna, Galina; Sendecki, Jocelyn; Yeo, Charles J; Arafat, Hwyda A

    2013-04-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) has the worst prognosis among cancers, mainly due to the high incidence of early metastases. RAN small GTPase (RAN) is a protein that plays physiological roles in the regulation of nuclear transport and microtubule spindle assembly. RAN was recently shown to mediate the invasive functions of the prometastatic protein osteopontin (OPN) in breast cancer cells. We and others have shown previously that high levels of OPN are present in PDA. In this study, we analyzed the expression and correlation of RAN with OPN in human pancreatic lesions, and explored their regulation in PDA cell lines. Real time PCR was used to analyze RAN and OPN mRNA levels in PDA, adjacent non-malignant, and benign pancreatic tissues. Expression levels were correlated with survival and different clinicopathological parameters using different statistical methods. Transient transfection studies using OPN and RAN plasmids, and knockdown experiments using siRNA were used to examine their mutual regulation. OPN and RAN levels highly correlated with each other (pobesity, T stage, BMI, or survival. However, we found a significant association between RAN levels and perineural invasion (HR=0.79, 95% CI 0.59, 1.07; p=0.0378.). OPN and RAN colocalized in PDA tissues and cell lines. Increasing RAN expression in PDA cells induced OPN transcription and RAN silencing reduced total OPN levels. OPN did not have any significant effect on RAN transcription. The high levels of RAN in PDA and its correlation with OPN and with perineural invasion suggest that RAN may contribute to PDA metastasis and progression through the induction of OPN. RAN's role in the regulation of OPN in PDA is unique and could provide potential novel therapeutic strategies to combat PDA aggressiveness.

  13. Library support of mobile resources during clinical clerkships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, Alice; Light, Jeanene; Haines, Laura L

    2014-01-01

    In response to frequent use of mobile devices among medical students, Dana Medical Library at the University of Vermont provided mobile resource support to medical students preparing for clerkships. The librarians offered group instruction, individual assistance, and an online subject guide. These activities were assessed through evaluations, web statistics, and a survey. Survey questions gathered data on access to mobile devices, use of library-licensed mobile resources, and benefits and barriers to use in the clinical setting. The majority of survey respondents believed access to mobile resources improved their clerkship experience and contributed to comparable educational experiences across clerkship sites. Researchers found that library support affected student perception of the value of mobile resources in the clerkship experience.

  14. General and Specific Contributions of RAN to Reading and Arithmetic Fluency in First Graders: A Longitudinal Latent Variable Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Hornung

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, we opted for a longitudinal design and examined rapid automatized naming (RAN performance from two perspectives. In a first step, we examined the structure of RAN performance from a general cognitive perspective. We investigated whether rapid naming measures (e.g., digit RAN and color RAN reflect a mainly domain-general factor or domain-specific factors. In a second step, we examined how the best fitting RAN model was related to reading and arithmetic outcomes, assessed several months later. Finally in a third step we took a clinical perspective and investigated specific contributions of RAN measures to reading and arithmetic outcomes. While RAN has emerged as a promising predictor of reading, the relationship between RAN and arithmetic has been less examined in the past. Hundred and twenty-two first graders completed seven RAN tasks, each comprising visually familiar stimuli such as digits, vowels, consonants, dice, finger-numeral configurations, objects, and colors. Four months later the same children completed a range of reading and arithmetic tasks. From a general descriptive perspective, structural equation modeling supports a one-dimensional RAN factor in 6- to -7-year-old children. However, from a clinical perspective, our findings emphasize the specific contributions of RANs. Interestingly, alphanumeric RANs (i.e., vowel RAN were most promising when predicting reading skills and number-specific RANs (i.e., finger-numeral configuration RAN were most promising when predicting arithmetic fluency. The implications for clinical and educational practices will be discussed.

  15. Do mobile family planning clinics facilitate vasectomy use in Nepal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padmadas, Sabu S; Amoako Johnson, Fiifi; Leone, Tiziana; Dahal, Govinda P

    2014-06-01

    Nepal has a distinct topography that makes reproductive health and family planning services difficult to access, particularly in remote mountain and hill regions where over a quarter of modern contraceptive users rely exclusively on vasectomy. A three-level random intercept logistic regression analysis was applied on data from the 2011 Nepal Demographic and Health Survey to investigate the extent of influence of mobile family planning clinics on the odds of a male or a female sterilization, adjusting for relevant characteristics including ecological differences and random effects. The analyses included a sample of 2014 sterilization users, considering responses from currently married women of reproductive ages. The odds of a male sterilization were significantly higher in a mobile clinic than those in a government hospital (odds ratio, 1.65; 95% confidence interval, 1.21-2.25). The effects remained unaltered and statistically significant after adjusting for sociodemographic and clustering effects. Random effects were highly significant, which suggest the extent of heterogeneity in vasectomy use at the community and district levels. The odds of vasectomy use in mobile clinics were significantly higher among couples residing in hill and mountain regions and among those with three or more sons or those with only daughters. Mobile clinics significantly increase the uptake of vasectomy in hard-to-reach areas of Nepal. Reproductive health interventions should consider mobile clinics as an effective strategy to improve access to male-based modern methods and enhance gender equity in family planning. Family planning interventions in hard-to-reach communities could consider mobile clinic as an effective strategy to promote male-based modern methods. Improving access to vasectomy could substantially reduce unmet need for family planning in countries experiencing rapid fertility transition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Clinical Simulation: A Protocol for Evaluation of Mobile Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, Carey; Jensen, Sanne; Cummings, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    For mobile technology to be accepted at point of care in healthcare environments there is a need to demonstrate benefits whilst ameliorating the risks and challenges. To provide a standardised approach to evaluation of mobile technology a simulation protocol was developed to provide guidance for its use in healthcare environments. Simulated conditions provide the opportunity to assess intended and unintended consequences and identify potential workarounds when using technology. The protocol can also be used to demonstrate the importance of the development of digital professionalism by end-users prior to students entering the clinical practice setting. The mobile technology protocol was adapted from a health information systems protocol developed and used at the ITX Lab, Denmark for use in other simulation laboratories. Use case scenarios were developed to enable evaluation of mobile technology for mobile learning of nurses, nurse supervisors, students and patients. The scenarios can be used in a range of simulated environments including hospital bedside, outpatient clinic or community settings. A case study exemplar of a nurse and patient is included to demonstrate how the mobile technology protocol can be applied.

  17. Tackling complex turbulent flows with transient RANS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kenjeres, S.; Hanjalic, K.

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews some recent applications of the transient-Reynoldsaveraged Navier–Stokes (T-RANS) approach in simulating complex turbulent flows dominated by externally imposed body forces, primarily by thermal buoyancy and the Lorentz force. The T-RANS aims at numerical resolving unsteady

  18. The Ran pathway in Drosophila melanogaster mitosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James G Wakefield

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Over the last two decades, the small GTPase Ran has emerged as a central regulator of both mitosis and meiosis, particularly in the generation, maintenance and regulation of the microtubule (MT-based bipolar spindle. Ran-regulated pathways in mitosis bear many similarities to the well-characterized functions of Ran in nuclear transport and, as with transport, the majority of these mitotic effects are mediated through affecting the physical interaction between karyopherins and Spindle Assembly Factors (SAFs - a loose term describing proteins or protein complexes involved in spindle assembly through promoting nucleation, stabilization, and/or depolymerization of MTs, through anchoring MTs to specific structures such as centrosomes, chromatin or kinetochores, or through sliding MTs along each other to generate the force required to achieve bipolarity. As such, the Ran-mediated pathway represents a crucial functional module within the wider spindle assembly landscape. Research into mitosis using the model organism Drosophila melanogaster has contributed substantially to our understanding of centrosome and spindle function. However, in comparison to mammalian systems, very little is known about the contribution of Ran-mediated pathways in Drosophila mitosis. This article sets out to summarize our understanding of the roles of the Ran pathway components in Drosophila mitosis, focusing on the syncytial blastoderm embryo, arguing that, far from being superfluous, it can provide important insights into the conserved functions on Ran during spindle formation.

  19. Genomic organization, expression, and localization of murine Ran-binding protein 2 (RanBP2) gene.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fauser, S.; Aslanukov, A.; Roepman, R.; Ferreira, P.A.

    2001-01-01

    The Ran-binding protein 2 (RanBP2) is a giant scaffold and mosaic cyclophilin-related nucleoporin implicated in the Ran-GTPase cycle. There are no orthologs of the RanBP2 gene in yeast and Drosophila genomes. In humans, this bona fide gene is partially duplicated in a RanBP2 gene cluster and lies in

  20. Using Mobile Health Clinics to Reach College Students: A National Demonstration Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fennell, Reginald; Escue, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Background: The mobile health unit (MHU) was a grant-funded national initiative to explore the utilization of a mobile clinic to provide health promotion and clinical services for college students in the United States. Purpose: In 2010 and 2011, a 38-foot mobile clinic tested the feasibility of utilizing the clinic to deliver health promotion and…

  1. Mobile phone based clinical microscopy for global health applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breslauer, David N; Maamari, Robi N; Switz, Neil A; Lam, Wilbur A; Fletcher, Daniel A

    2009-07-22

    Light microscopy provides a simple, cost-effective, and vital method for the diagnosis and screening of hematologic and infectious diseases. In many regions of the world, however, the required equipment is either unavailable or insufficiently portable, and operators may not possess adequate training to make full use of the images obtained. Counterintuitively, these same regions are often well served by mobile phone networks, suggesting the possibility of leveraging portable, camera-enabled mobile phones for diagnostic imaging and telemedicine. Toward this end we have built a mobile phone-mounted light microscope and demonstrated its potential for clinical use by imaging P. falciparum-infected and sickle red blood cells in brightfield and M. tuberculosis-infected sputum samples in fluorescence with LED excitation. In all cases resolution exceeded that necessary to detect blood cell and microorganism morphology, and with the tuberculosis samples we took further advantage of the digitized images to demonstrate automated bacillus counting via image analysis software. We expect such a telemedicine system for global healthcare via mobile phone -- offering inexpensive brightfield and fluorescence microscopy integrated with automated image analysis -- to provide an important tool for disease diagnosis and screening, particularly in the developing world and rural areas where laboratory facilities are scarce but mobile phone infrastructure is extensive.

  2. Clinical practice models in nursing education: implication for students' mobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrowolska, B; McGonagle, I; Jackson, C; Kane, R; Cabrera, E; Cooney-Miner, D; Di Cara, V; Pajnkihar, M; Prlić, N; Sigurdardottir, A K; Kekuš, D; Wells, J; Palese, A

    2015-03-01

    In accordance with the process of nursing globalization, issues related to the increasing national and international mobility of student and qualified nurses are currently being debated. Identifying international differences and comparing similarities for mutual understanding, development and better harmonization of clinical training of undergraduate nursing students is recommended. The aim of the study was to describe and compare the nature of the nursing clinical practice education models adopted in different countries. A qualitative approach involving an expert panel of nurses was adopted. The Nominal Group Technique was employed to develop the initial research instrument for data collection. Eleven members of the UDINE-C network, representing institutions engaged in the process of professional nursing education and research (universities, high schools and clinical institutes), participated. Three data collection rounds were implemented. An analysis of the findings was performed, assuring rigour. Differences and homogeneity are reported and discussed regarding: (a) the clinical learning requirements across countries; (b) the prerequisites and clinical learning process patterns; and (c) the progress and final evaluation of the competencies achieved. A wider discussion is needed regarding nursing student exchange and internalization of clinical education in placements across European and non-European countries. A clear strategy for nursing education accreditation and harmonization of patterns of organization of clinical training at placements, as well as strategies of student assessment during this training, are recommended. There is also a need to develop international ethical guidelines for undergraduate nursing students gaining international experience. © 2015 International Council of Nurses.

  3. Vertical mobile and reducible atlantoaxial dislocation. Clinical article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Atul; Shah, Abhidha; Rajan, Sanjay

    2009-07-01

    The authors' experience with treatment of 8 patients with "vertical mobile and reducible" atlantoaxial dislocation is reviewed. The probable pathogenesis, radiological and clinical features, and management issues in such cases are discussed. Between January 2006 and March 2008, 8 patients who presented with vertical mobile and reducible atlantoaxial dislocations were treated at the Department of Neurosurgery at King Edward Memorial Hospital in Mumbai, India. The vertical atlantoaxial dislocation/basilar invagination reduced completely on extension of the neck, with no need of any cervical traction. According to the extent of superior migration of the odontoid process, and measurements based on the vertical atlantoaxial instability index, the dislocation was graded as mild, moderate, or severe. All patients were treated using the C-1 lateral mass and C-2 pars plate and screw method of fixation. The study group was composed of 5 male and 3 female patients (mean age 24 years, age range 8-54 years). All patients presented with the physical features of short neck, torticollis, pain in the nape of the neck, and varying degrees of quadriparesis. In 6 patients there was a history of trauma prior to the onset of major neurological symptoms. The dislocation was mild in 3 cases, moderate in 1, and severe in 4. All patients had clinical neurological improvement following surgery. The follow-up duration ranged from 4 to 30 months (mean 18 months). Vertical mobile and reducible atlantoaxial dislocation is a discrete clinical entity. Abnormal inclination and incompetence of the facet joint appears to be the primary causative factor that resulted in vertical dislocation or basilar invagination. Posterior fixation in the reduced dislocation position forms the basis of treatment.

  4. Mobile phone based clinical microscopy for global health applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Breslauer, David N; Maamari, Robi N; Switz, Neil A; Lam, Wilbur A; Fletcher, Daniel A

    2009-01-01

    .... Counterintuitively, these same regions are often well served by mobile phone networks, suggesting the possibility of leveraging portable, camera-enabled mobile phones for diagnostic imaging and telemedicine...

  5. Communication skills for mobile remote presence technology in clinical interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestel, Debra; Sains, Parvinder; Wetzel, Cordula M; Nolan, Carmel; Tay, Ann; Kneebone, Roger L; Darzi, Ara W

    2007-01-01

    The use of mobile robotic units for teleconsultation means that the clinician's cognitive and attention skills are divided between tele-operation of the robotic unit and the consultation with the patient. We developed a communication guide based on evidence-based patient-centred interviewing and telephone conferencing skills. The communication guide was tested by five trainee surgeons in a pre- and post-test design. Each surgeon completed three simulated patient consultations. After reading the communication guide, trainees completed three further consultations. The trainees rated authenticity, degree of difficulty, familiarity of clinical presentation and confidence in using telepresence to manage the consultations. Their mean scores were 3.0-4.6, 2.2-4.0, 4.4-4.8 and 3.2-4.2 respectively (maximum possible score 5). The simulated patients rated their satisfaction with communication. Their ratings suggested that there were areas for communication skills development with mean scores ranging from 8.2 to 11.4 (maximum possible score = 15). Although we do not yet know enough about communicating with real patients using mobile robotic units, the communication guide appeared to be useful in our simulated interactions.

  6. Chromosomal association of Ran during meiotic and mitotic divisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkle, Beth; Slepchenko, Boris; Rolls, Melissa M; Walther, Tobias C; Stein, Pascal A; Mehlmann, Lisa M; Ellenberg, Jan; Terasaki, Mark

    2002-12-01

    Recent studies in Xenopus egg extracts indicate that the small G protein Ran has a central role in spindle assembly and nuclear envelope reformation. We determined Ran localization and dynamics in cells during M phase. By immunofluorescence, Ran is accumulated on the chromosomes of meiosis-II-arrested Xenopus eggs. In living cells, fluorescently labeled Ran associated with the chromosomes in Xenopus and remained associated during anaphase when eggs were artificially activated. Fluorescent Ran associated with chromosomes in mouse eggs, during meiotic maturation and early embryonic divisions in starfish, and to a lesser degree during mitosis of a cultured mammalian cell line. Chromosomal Ran undergoes constant flux. From photobleach experiments in immature starfish oocytes, chromosomal Ran has a k(off) of approximately 0.06 second(-1), and binding analysis suggests that there is a single major site. The chromosomal interactions may serve to keep Ran-GTP in the vicinity of the chromosomes for spindle assembly and nuclear envelope reformation.

  7. Co-Designing Mobile Apps to Assist in Clinical Nursing Education: A Study Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Siobhan; Andrews, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Mobile applications (apps) to train health professionals is gaining momentum as the benefits of mobile learning (mLearning) are becoming apparent in complex clinical environments. However, most educational apps are generic, off-the-shelf pieces of software that do not take into consideration the unique needs of nursing students. The proposed study will apply a user-centred design process to create a tailored mobile app for nursing students to learn and apply clinical skills in practice. The app will be piloted and evaluated to understand how nursing students use mobile technology in clinical settings to support their learning and educational needs.

  8. Doctors' use of mobile devices in the clinical setting: a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerminathan, Arany; Harrison, Amanda; Phelps, Megan; Alexander, Shirley; Scott, Karen M

    2017-03-01

    Mobile device use has become almost ubiquitous in daily life and therefore includes use by doctors in clinical settings. There has been little study as to the patterns of use and impact this has on doctors in the workplace and how negatively or positively it impacts at the point of care. To explore how doctors use mobile devices in the clinical setting and understand drivers for use. A mixed methods study was used with doctors in a paediatric and adult teaching hospital in 2013. A paper-based survey examined mobile device usage data by doctors in the clinical setting. Focus groups explored doctors' reasons for using or refraining from using mobile devices in the clinical setting, and their attitudes about others' use. The survey, completed by 109 doctors, showed that 91% owned a smartphone and 88% used their mobile devices frequently in the clinical setting. Trainees were more likely than consultants to use their mobile devices for learning and accessing information related to patient care, as well as for personal communication unrelated to work. Focus group data highlighted a range of factors that influenced doctors to use personal mobile devices in the clinical setting, including convenience for medical photography, and factors that limited use. Distraction in the clinical setting due to use of mobile devices was a key issue. Personal experience and confidence in using mobile devices affected their use, and was guided by role modelling and expectations within a medical team. Doctors use mobile devices to enhance efficiency in the workplace. In the current environment, doctors are making their own decisions based on balancing the risks and benefits of using mobile devices in the clinical setting. There is a need for guidelines around acceptable and ethical use that is patient-centred and that respects patient privacy. © 2016 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  9. Mobile Clinical Decision Support Systems in Our Hands - Great Potential but also a Concern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masic, Izet; Begic, Edin

    2016-01-01

    Due to the powerful computer resources as well as the availability of today's mobile devices, a special field of mobile systems for clinical decision support in medicine has been developed. The benefits of these applications (systems) are: availability of necessary hardware (mobile phones, tablets and phablets are widespread, and can be purchased at a relatively affordable price), availability of mobile applications (free or for a "small" amount of money) and also mobile applications are tailored for easy use and save time of clinicians in their daily work. In these systems lies a huge potential, and certainly a great economic benefit, so this issue must be approached multidisciplinary.

  10. Mobile applications for handheld devices to screen and randomize acute stroke patients in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Ai; Connelly, B; Abbott, Ei; Maland, E; Kim, J; Blake, J

    2012-08-01

    The availability of internet connectivity and mobile application software used by low-power handheld devices makes smart phones of unique value in time-sensitive clinical trials. Trial-specific applications can be downloaded by investigators from various mobile software distribution platforms or web applications delivered over HTTP. The Antihypertensive Treatment in Acute Cerebral Hemorrhage (ATACH) II investigators in collaboration with MentorMate released the ATACH-II Patient Recruitment mobile application available on iPhone, Android, and Blackberry in 2011. The mobile application provides tools for pre-screening, assessment of eligibility, and randomization of patients. Since the release of ATACH-II mobile application, the CLEAR-IVH (Clot Lysis Evaluating Accelerated Resolution of Intraventricular Hemorrhage) trial investigators have also adopted such a mobile application. The video-conferencing capabilities of the most recent mobile devices open up additional opportunities to involve central coordinating centers in the recruitment process in real time.

  11. Self-reported mobile phone use and semen parameters among men from a fertility clinic

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, Ryan C.; Mínguez-Alarcón, Lidia; Meeker, John D.; Williams, Paige L.; Mezei, Gabor; Ford, Jennifer B.; Hauser, Russ

    2016-01-01

    There is increasing concern that use of mobile phones, a source of low-level radio-frequency electromagnetic fields, may be associated with poor semen quality, but the epidemiologic evidence is limited and conflicting. The relationship between mobile phone use patterns and markers of semen quality was explored in a longitudinal cohort study of 153 men that attended an academic fertility clinic in Boston, Massachusetts. Information on mobile phone use duration, headset or earpiece use, and the...

  12. VARK Learning Preferences and Mobile Anatomy Software Application Use in Pre-Clinical Chiropractic Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Amanda J.; Stomski, Norman J.; Innes, Stanley I.; Armson, Anthony J.

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquitous smartphone ownership and reduced face-to-face teaching time may lead to students making greater use of mobile technologies in their learning. This is the first study to report on the prevalence of mobile gross anatomy software applications (apps) usage in pre-clinical chiropractic students and to ascertain if a relationship exists…

  13. An Arabidopsis Ran-binding protein, AtRanBP1c, is a co-activator of Ran GTPase-activating protein and requires the C-terminus for its cytoplasmic localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo-Hwan; Roux, Stanley J.

    2003-01-01

    Ran-binding proteins (RanBPs) are a group of proteins that bind to Ran (Ras-related nuclear small GTP-binding protein), and thus either control the GTP/GDP-bound states of Ran or help couple the Ran GTPase cycle to a cellular process. AtRanBP1c is a Ran-binding protein from Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. that was recently shown to be critically involved in the regulation of auxin-induced mitotic progression [S.-H. Kim et al. (2001) Plant Cell 13:2619-2630]. Here we report that AtRanBP1c inhibits the EDTA-induced release of GTP from Ran and serves as a co-activator of Ran-GTPase-activating protein (RanGAP) in vitro. Transient expression of AtRanBP1c fused to a beta-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter reveals that the protein localizes primarily to the cytosol. Neither the N- nor C-terminus of AtRanBP1c, which flank the Ran-binding domain (RanBD), is necessary for the binding of PsRan1-GTP to the protein, but both are needed for the cytosolic localization of GUS-fused AtRanBP1c. These findings, together with a previous report that AtRanBP1c is critically involved in root growth and development, imply that the promotion of GTP hydrolysis by the Ran/RanGAP/AtRanBP1c complex in the cytoplasm, and the resulting concentration gradient of Ran-GDP to Ran-GTP across the nuclear membrane could be important in the regulation of auxin-induced mitotic progression in root tips of A. thaliana.

  14. RANS-VOF modeling of hydrodynamics and sand transport under full-scale non-breaking and breaking waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandez Mora, Maria de Los Angeles; Ribberink, Jan S.; van der Zanden, Joep; van der Werf, Jebbe J.; Jacobsen, N.G.; Lynett, P.; Lynett, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    A 2D RANS-VOF model is used to simulate the flow and sand transport for two different full-scale laboratory experiments: i) non-breaking waves over a horizontal sand bed (Schretlen et al., 2011) and ii) plunging breaking waves over a barred mobile bed profile (Van der Zanden et al., 2016). For the

  15. Assessing the Use of Mobile Health Technology by Patients: An Observational Study in Primary Care Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Veronica; Johnson, Emily; Gonzalez, Cesar; Ramirez, Vanessa; Rubino, Barbara; Rossetti, Gina

    2016-04-19

    There is significant potential for mobile health technology to improve health outcomes for patients with chronic diseases. However, there is a need for further development of mobile health technology that would help to improve the health of lower-income communities. The study objective was to assess mobile phone and app usage among a culturally diverse patient population, and to determine whether patients would be interested in using mobile health technology to help manage their chronic diseases. An observational study was conducted with patients of the Internal Medicine resident primary care clinics of Los Angeles County and University of Southern California (LAC+USC) Medical Center. Self-reported information regarding demographics, current mobile phone usage, current mobile health app and social media usage, barriers to using mobile phones or mobile health apps, and interest in using a mobile health app was collected. Ninety-one percent of patients owned a mobile phone, with 76% (169/223) of these reporting having a mobile phone with Internet capability. Fifty-seven percent of subjects used mobile apps on their mobile phones, and 32% (41/130) of these used mobile apps related to their health. Eighty-six percent (207/241) of respondents voiced interest in using a mobile app to improve their health, and 40% (88/221) stated they would use such an app daily. Patients stated they would find the mobile health app most useful for nutrition, exercise, and obtaining general information on medical conditions. Despite the fact that the majority of our primary care patients were of lower socioeconomic status, they utilized mobile phones with Internet and mobile app capabilities to a great extent. There was substantial interest among our patients in using mobile health technology to both manage chronic disease and improve overall health. Given that cultural, educational, and socioeconomic disparities strongly correlate with higher rates of chronic diseases such as obesity

  16. Assessing the Use of Mobile Health Technology by Patients: An Observational Study in Primary Care Clinics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Emily; Gonzalez, Cesar; Ramirez, Vanessa; Rubino, Barbara; Rossetti, Gina

    2016-01-01

    Background There is significant potential for mobile health technology to improve health outcomes for patients with chronic diseases. However, there is a need for further development of mobile health technology that would help to improve the health of lower-income communities. Objective The study objective was to assess mobile phone and app usage among a culturally diverse patient population, and to determine whether patients would be interested in using mobile health technology to help manage their chronic diseases. Methods An observational study was conducted with patients of the Internal Medicine resident primary care clinics of Los Angeles County and University of Southern California (LAC+USC) Medical Center. Self-reported information regarding demographics, current mobile phone usage, current mobile health app and social media usage, barriers to using mobile phones or mobile health apps, and interest in using a mobile health app was collected. Results Ninety-one percent of patients owned a mobile phone, with 76% (169/223) of these reporting having a mobile phone with Internet capability. Fifty-seven percent of subjects used mobile apps on their mobile phones, and 32% (41/130) of these used mobile apps related to their health. Eighty-six percent (207/241) of respondents voiced interest in using a mobile app to improve their health, and 40% (88/221) stated they would use such an app daily. Patients stated they would find the mobile health app most useful for nutrition, exercise, and obtaining general information on medical conditions. Conclusions Despite the fact that the majority of our primary care patients were of lower socioeconomic status, they utilized mobile phones with Internet and mobile app capabilities to a great extent. There was substantial interest among our patients in using mobile health technology to both manage chronic disease and improve overall health. Given that cultural, educational, and socioeconomic disparities strongly correlate with

  17. Self-reported mobile phone use and semen parameters among men from a fertility clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Ryan C; Mínguez-Alarcón, Lidia; Meeker, John D; Williams, Paige L; Mezei, Gabor; Ford, Jennifer B; Hauser, Russ

    2017-01-01

    There is increasing concern that use of mobile phones, a source of low-level radio-frequency electromagnetic fields, may be associated with poor semen quality, but the epidemiologic evidence is limited and conflicting. The relationship between mobile phone use patterns and markers of semen quality was explored in a longitudinal cohort study of 153 men that attended an academic fertility clinic in Boston, Massachusetts. Information on mobile phone use duration, headset or earpiece use, and the body location in which the mobile phone was carried was ascertained via nurse-administered questionnaire. Semen samples (n=350) were collected and analyzed onsite. To account for multiple semen samples per man, linear mixed models with random intercepts were used to investigate the association between mobile phone use and semen parameters. Overall, there was no evidence for a relationship between mobile phone use and semen quality. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Orientation and mobility assessment in retinal prosthetic clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geruschat, Duane R; Bittner, Ava K; Dagnelie, Gislin

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an orientation and mobility (O&M) assessment protocol to implement in subjects who have been implanted with an artificial silicon retina (ASR), and to use this experience to propose a research agenda for O&M with prosthetic vision. A controlled and naturalistic assessment was developed that included walking a prescribed obstacle course and travel to and from a hospital cafeteria. Subjects were tested before and 3 and 6 months after being implanted with the ASR. Outcome measures were walking speed and number of contacts with obstacles. The experiences from this study led to a proposed research agenda in O&M. Eight subjects with retinitis pigmentosa participated in this study. The vision status of the subjects ranged from mobility after implantation. Three subjects self-reported enhancements of travel after implantation, but this enhancement was not observed. This study demonstrates that mobility might not be improved with prosthetic vision. The proposed research agenda emphasizes the importance of developing individualized assessments, identifying specific items of orientation rather than mobility for measuring the effect of prosthetic vision, and to develop and evaluate instructional programs that may be needed to obtain the full benefit of the technology.

  19. Mobilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    to social networks, personal identities, and our relationship to the built environment. The omnipresence of mobilities within everyday life, high politics, technology, and tourism (to mention but a few) all point to a key insight harnessed by the ‘mobilities turn’. Namely that mobilities is much more than...... and environmental degradation. The spaces and territories marked by mobilities as well as the sites marked by the bypassing of such are explored. Moreover, the architectural and technological dimensions to infrastructures and sites of mobilities will be included as well as the issues of power, social exclusion......, consumption, surveillance and mobilities history to mention some of the many themes covered by this reference work. This new title will focus on the academic contributions to this understanding by primarily focusing on works and publications in the aftermath of the seminal book and landmark text ‘Sociology...

  20. Mobile applications in clinical practice: What is needed in the pharmacy scenario?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Hassan Elnaem

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pharmacy informatics is demonstrated to have a positive effect on pharmacy practice. The incorporation of pharmacy informatics in academic programs is a common feature in the pharmacy curriculum. This work aims to provide an overview of the current and potential role of mobile applications (apps in pharmacy education and practice. Mobile apps are the most common informatics tools used by medical and pharmacy practitioners as well as students. Both students and practitioners have overall positive perceptions toward using mobile apps in their daily clinical training and practice although the fact that the number of pharmacy apps is still small relatively in comparison with other medical-related apps. There are many potential roles for mobile apps in pharmacy practice and education. The future efforts of educational uses of mobile apps in pharmacy should target playing a role in the provision of customized tools for clinical pharmacy education.

  1. The Anatomy of the RAN-Reading Relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiou, George K.; Parrila, Rauno; Papadopoulos, Timothy C.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to contrast three models of the RAN-reading relationship derived from the most prominent theoretical accounts of how RAN is related to reading: the phonological processing, the orthographic processing and the speed of processing accounts. Grade 4 Greek-speaking children (n = 208; 114 girls, 94 boys; mean…

  2. The introduction of mobile plant clinics to Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Solveig; Mutebi, Emmanuel

    , Makerere University and CABI. The purpose of this study was to gather results and lessons learned from the pilot period to inform future plant clinic interventions. The study covers issues of organisation and management, clinic operation and performance as well as clinic use and preliminary evidence...

  3. Electronic data capture platform for clinical research based on mobile phones and near field communication technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morak, Jürgen; Schwetz, Verena; Hayn, Dieter; Fruhwald, Friedrich; Schreier, Gunter

    2008-01-01

    Electronic data capture systems support data acquisition for clinical research and enable the evaluation of new investigational medical devices. In case of evaluating a device the most challenging part is the user interface i.e. the solution how to acquire the data within a clinical setting and to synchronize them with a web-based data centre. The aim of this paper is to describe the development of an electronic data capture system with a mobile data input solution based on mobile phones and Near Field Communication technology. This system was evaluated within a real clinical setting and demonstrated high usability, security and reliability.

  4. Comparative costs of mobile and fixed-clinic primary health care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These include, for mobile clinic services, the total staff costs. (including salaries, benefrts and subsistence payments). transport costs. medicines, furniture, equipment and value- added tax. For fixed clinics the costs of electricity. stationery, water. sanitation, refuse removal, repairs and maintenance of buildings and furniture, ...

  5. Clinical validation of nursing outcome mobility in patients with cerebrovascular accidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Rafaella Pessoa; Araujo, Thelma Leite de; Lopes, Marcos Venicios de Oliveira; Cavalcante, Tahissa Frota; Guedes, Nirla Gomes; Chaves, Emília Soares; Portela, Regiane Campos; Holanda, Rose-Eloise

    2016-12-15

    To clinically validate the nursing outcome Mobility in patients with cerebrovascular accidents. Descriptive study, conducted in July 2011, with 38 outpatients, in northeastern Brazil. Data collection took place by evaluating two pairs of specialist nurses, where one pair used the instrument containing the constitutive and operational definitions of the indicators and magnitudes of the Mobility Outcome and the other pair without such definitions. When analyzing the evaluations among nurses, all indicators showed significant differences by the Friedman test (p cerebrovascular accident patient's mobility state.

  6. Mobile health: the power of wearables, sensors, and apps to transform clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munos, Bernard; Baker, Pamela C; Bot, Brian M; Crouthamel, Michelle; de Vries, Glen; Ferguson, Ian; Hixson, John D; Malek, Linda A; Mastrototaro, John J; Misra, Veena; Ozcan, Aydogan; Sacks, Leonard; Wang, Pei

    2016-07-01

    Mobile technology has become a ubiquitous part of everyday life, and the practical utility of mobile devices for improving human health is only now being realized. Wireless medical sensors, or mobile biosensors, are one such technology that is allowing the accumulation of real-time biometric data that may hold valuable clues for treating even some of the most devastating human diseases. From wearable gadgets to sophisticated implantable medical devices, the information retrieved from mobile technology has the potential to revolutionize how clinical research is conducted and how disease therapies are delivered in the coming years. Encompassing the fields of science and engineering, analytics, health care, business, and government, this report explores the promise that wearable biosensors, along with integrated mobile apps, hold for improving the quality of patient care and clinical outcomes. The discussion focuses on groundbreaking device innovation, data optimization and validation, commercial platform integration, clinical implementation and regulation, and the broad societal implications of using mobile health technologies. © 2016 New York Academy of Sciences.

  7. The RanBP2/RanGAP1*SUMO1/Ubc9 SUMO E3 ligase is a disassembly machine for Crm1-dependent nuclear export complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritterhoff, Tobias; Das, Hrishikesh; Hofhaus, Götz; Schröder, Rasmus R; Flotho, Annette; Melchior, Frauke

    2016-05-10

    Continuous cycles of nucleocytoplasmic transport require disassembly of transport receptor/Ran-GTP complexes in the cytoplasm. A basic disassembly mechanism in all eukaryotes depends on soluble RanGAP and RanBP1. In vertebrates, a significant fraction of RanGAP1 stably interacts with the nucleoporin RanBP2 at a binding site that is flanked by FG-repeats and Ran-binding domains, and overlaps with RanBP2's SUMO E3 ligase region. Here, we show that the RanBP2/RanGAP1*SUMO1/Ubc9 complex functions as an autonomous disassembly machine with a preference for the export receptor Crm1. We describe three in vitro reconstituted disassembly intermediates, which show binding of a Crm1 export complex via two FG-repeat patches, cargo-release by RanBP2's Ran-binding domains and retention of free Crm1 at RanBP2 after Ran-GTP hydrolysis. Intriguingly, all intermediates are compatible with SUMO E3 ligase activity, suggesting that the RanBP2/RanGAP1*SUMO1/Ubc9 complex may link Crm1- and SUMO-dependent functions.

  8. The contribution of lexical access speed to RAN and reading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Mads

    Purpose: The study investigated why and when rapid automatised naming is a predictor of reading. Specifically, we tested the hypotheses that (1) RAN-objects predicts reading because it is a measure of lexical (e.g. phonological) access speed, but (2) that RAN only becomes a predictor of reading...... development once a certain level of phonological recoding proficiency has been reached. Method: Forty Danish students without reading difficulties were administered tests of reading speed and accuracy, phoneme awareness, RAN-objects, timed confrontation picture naming, and visio-motor reaction time....... The students were sampled from two age groups representing two levels of recoding proficiency: Beginning readers in Grade 2-3 and proficient decoders in grade 5-6. We conducted hierarchical regression analyses on reading speed and accuracy to determine whether the relationship between RAN and reading...

  9. 5th Symposium on Hybrid RANS-LES Methods

    CERN Document Server

    Haase, Werner; Peng, Shia-Hui; Schwamborn, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    This book gathers the proceedings of the Fifth Symposium on Hybrid RANS-LES Methods, which was held on March 19-21 in College Station, Texas, USA. The different chapters, written by leading experts, reports on the most recent developments in flow physics modelling, and gives a special emphasis to industrially relevant applications of hybrid RANS-LES methods and other turbulence-resolving modelling approaches. The book addresses academic researchers, graduate students, industrial engineers, as well as industrial R&D managers and consultants dealing with turbulence modelling, simulation and measurement, and with multidisciplinary applications of computational fluid dynamics (CFD), such as flow control, aero-acoustics, aero-elasticity and CFD-based multidisciplinary optimization. It discusses in particular advanced hybrid RANS-LES methods. Further topics include wall-modelled Large Eddy Simulation (WMLES) methods, embedded LES, and a comparison of the LES methods with both hybrid RANS-LES and URANS methods. ...

  10. RanBPM, a scaffolding protein for gametogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puverel, Sandrine; Tessarollo, Lino

    2013-01-01

    RanBPM is a multimodular scaffold protein that interacts with a great variety of molecules including nuclear, cytoplasmic, and membrane proteins. By building multiprotein complexes, RanBPM is thought to regulate various signaling pathways, especially in the immune and nervous system. However, the diversity of these interactions does not facilitate the identification of its precise mechanism of action, and therefore the physiological role of RanBPM still remains unclear. Recently, RanBPM has been shown to be critical for the fertility of both genders in mouse. Although mechanistically it is still unclear how RanBPM affects gametogenesis, the data collected so far suggest that it is a key player in this process. Here, we examine the RanBPM sterility phenotype in the context of other genetic mutations affecting mouse gametogenesis to investigate whether this scaffold protein affects the function of other known proteins whose deficiency results in similar sterility phenotypes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A review of a GP registrar-run mobile health clinic for homeless people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Carroll, A; Irving, N; O'Neill, J; Flanagan, E

    2017-08-01

    Homeless people have excessively high morbidity and mortality rates, yet they face barriers accessing primary care. A mobile health clinic, staffed by GP registrars, was developed to provide services to homeless people, particularly rough sleepers and sex workers. The aims were to improve access to primary care and to challenge the stereotypes and prejudices of GP registrars through direct contact with homeless people. This was a qualitative study; questionnaires were completed on the mobile health clinic and two focus groups were conducted. All service users were asked to complete a questionnaire over a 3 month period. Two focus groups were conducted with 6 and 14 GP registrars who had worked on the bus. There was an 80% response rate (116 of 145). Fifty-two percent had no Medical Card meaning that they had no way to access the free primary care to which they are entitled. Had the clinic not been available, over half would not have sought further treatment and 16% would have gone to an Emergency Department. Ninety-one percent of users rated the service 10/10. The focus groups found that GP registrars who worked on the mobile health clinic had decreased negative stereotypes, increased empathy, and more knowledge of homeless issues. Furthermore, they intended to ensure that homeless people will not face discrimination in their future practice. A GP Registrar-run Mobile Health Clinic achieved its aims of improving access to primary care for rough sleepers and sex workers, and challenging stereotypes of GP Registrars.

  12. Development of Hypertension Management Mobile Application based on Clinical Practice Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, H; Park, H A

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to develop and evaluate a mobile application for hypertension management based on Clinical Practice Guidelines. The application was developed according to Web-Roadmap methodology. In planning phase, we defined the tasks and product of each phase, selected clinical practice guidelines and extracted intervention items for hypertension management. In analysis phase, we analysed intervention items and made data dictionary, rules, use-case diagram, hypertension management ontology and tailored recommendations for the application. In design phase, we developed an entity-relations diagram, algorithm, and user interface and coded them in the implementation phase. In evaluation phase, first, the knowledge-base was evaluated for its accuracy by experts and they proposed three more detailed recommendations, which were added to the application. Second, mobile heuristics were evaluated. The evaluators pointed out 33 usability-related problems on mobile heuristics items. Out of these, three problems were solved by reflecting evaluators' comments.

  13. Mobile Access to Clinical Information at the Point of Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mncube-Barnes, Fatima M; Lee, Ben; Esuruoso, Olumuyiwa; Gona, Phil N; Daphnis, Stephane

    2016-01-01

    Using library subscriptions and accessible on handheld devices, this study sought to promote authoritative health information apps, and evidence-based point-of-care resources. Three cohorts of internal medicine residents were issued iPads at the beginning of their second year, and were trained to skillfully access resources from the digital library. Pre- and post-intervention surveys were respectively administered at the beginning of the second year and end of the third year of training. The residents' computer experience and computer knowledge was assessed. Additionally, before and after formal introduction to iPads, perceptions on the use of computers to access clinical information were assessed. Survey responses were compared using two sample methods and summarized through descriptive statistics. Sixty-eight residents completed the pre-survey questionnaires and 45 completed the post-surveys. There were significant improvements in the residents' level of computer experience, and familiarity with medical apps. Furthermore, there was increased knowledge obtained in accessing clinical information through electronic medical records. Residents positively perceived the potential effects of computers and electronic medical records in medicine. Study findings suggested that health science libraries can be instrumental in providing search skills to health professionals, especially residents in training. Participants showed appreciation of iPads and library support that facilitated successful completion of their related tasks. Replicating this study with a larger sample derived from multiple sites is recommended for future studies. Participation of mid-level healthcare professionals, such as Physician Assistants and Nurse Practitioners is suggested.

  14. Open-source mobile digital platform for clinical trial data collection in low-resource settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dam, Joris; Omondi Onyango, Kevin; Midamba, Brian; Groosman, Nele; Hooper, Norman; Spector, Jonathan; Pillai, Goonaseelan Colin; Ogutu, Bernhards

    2017-02-01

    Governments, universities and pan-African research networks are building durable infrastructure and capabilities for biomedical research in Africa. This offers the opportunity to adopt from the outset innovative approaches and technologies that would be challenging to retrofit into fully established research infrastructures such as those regularly found in high-income countries. In this context we piloted the use of a novel mobile digital health platform, designed specifically for low-resource environments, to support high-quality data collection in a clinical research study. Our primary aim was to assess the feasibility of a using a mobile digital platform for clinical trial data collection in a low-resource setting. Secondarily, we sought to explore the potential benefits of such an approach. The investigative site was a research institute in Nairobi, Kenya. We integrated an open-source platform for mobile data collection commonly used in the developing world with an open-source, standard platform for electronic data capture in clinical trials. The integration was developed using common data standards (Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium (CDISC) Operational Data Model), maximising the potential to extend the approach to other platforms. The system was deployed in a pharmacokinetic study involving healthy human volunteers. The electronic data collection platform successfully supported conduct of the study. Multidisciplinary users reported high levels of satisfaction with the mobile application and highlighted substantial advantages when compared with traditional paper record systems. The new system also demonstrated a potential for expediting data quality review. This pilot study demonstrated the feasibility of using a mobile digital platform for clinical research data collection in low-resource settings. Sustainable scientific capabilities and infrastructure are essential to attract and support clinical research studies. Since many research structures

  15. Mobile clinical decision support systems and applications: a literature and commercial review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Pérez, Borja; de la Torre-Díez, Isabel; López-Coronado, Miguel; Sainz-de-Abajo, Beatriz; Robles, Montserrat; García-Gómez, Juan Miguel

    2014-01-01

    The latest advances in eHealth and mHealth have propitiated the rapidly creation and expansion of mobile applications for health care. One of these types of applications are the clinical decision support systems, which nowadays are being implemented in mobile apps to facilitate the access to health care professionals in their daily clinical decisions. The aim of this paper is twofold. Firstly, to make a review of the current systems available in the literature and in commercial stores. Secondly, to analyze a sample of applications in order to obtain some conclusions and recommendations. Two reviews have been done: a literature review on Scopus, IEEE Xplore, Web of Knowledge and PubMed and a commercial review on Google play and the App Store. Five applications from each review have been selected to develop an in-depth analysis and to obtain more information about the mobile clinical decision support systems. Ninety-two relevant papers and 192 commercial apps were found. Forty-four papers were focused only on mobile clinical decision support systems. One hundred seventy-one apps were available on Google play and 21 on the App Store. The apps are designed for general medicine and 37 different specialties, with some features common in all of them despite of the different medical fields objective. The number of mobile clinical decision support applications and their inclusion in clinical practices has risen in the last years. However, developers must be careful with their interface or the easiness of use, which can impoverish the experience of the users.

  16. Virtual reality for mobility devices: training applications and clinical research: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erren-Wolters, Cathelijne V.; van Dijk, Henk; de Kort, Alexander C.; IJzerman, Maarten Joost; Jannink, M.J.A.

    2007-01-01

    Virtual reality technology is an emerging technology that possibly can address the problems encountered in training (elderly) people to handle a mobility device. The objective of this review was to study different virtual reality training applications as well as their clinical implication for

  17. Spina Bifida Care In Kenya Through A Network Of Mobile Clinics ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Children with spina bifida require ongoing multidisciplinary care in order to prevent complications and improve quality of life. Bethany Crippled Children's Centre of Kenya and BethanyKids at Kijabe Hospital have been providing such care for spina bifida patients through a network of mobile clinics throughout ...

  18. Reliability and Clinical Significance of Mobility and Balance Assessments in Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learmonth, Yvonne C.; Paul, Lorna; McFadyen, Angus K.; Mattison, Paul; Miller, Linda

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to establish the test-retest reliability, clinical significance and precision of four mobility and balance measures--the Timed 25-Foot Walk, Six-minute Walk, Timed Up and Go and the Berg Balance Scale--in individuals moderately affected by multiple sclerosis. Twenty four participants with multiple sclerosis (Extended…

  19. Sensor-based supporting mobile system Parkinson disease clinical tests utilising biomedical and RFID technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chmielewski Mariusz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses method and tool for assisting clinical tests of pharmaceutical drugs utilising sensors and mobile technologies. Emerging sensor and mobile technologies deliver new opportunities to gather and process medical data. Presented analytical approach implements such observations and delivers new, convenient means for remote patient monitoring. Clinical tests are highly specialised process requiring methodology and tools to support such research. Currently available methods rely mostly on analogue approach (booklets, requiring the clinical test participant to fill in health state daily. Such approach often can be biased by unpunctual, not precise reporting. The mobile device can support this process by automatic scheduling and recording an actual time of reports and most of all it can record the inertial and biometric sensor data during the survey process. Presented analytical method (tremors recognition and mobile tool offers consistent approach to clinical test assistance transforming and Android smartphone into remote reporting and notification tool. The tool offers additionally features for sensor based diagnostics support for PD tremor recognition as well as specific clonic and tonic symptoms (dedicated for further system extensions towards epilepsy. Capabilities of the system delivers also RFID mechanisms for efficient on-site clinical test authorisation and configuration. This feature simplifies application installation and automatic set-up considering the participant, clinical test configuration, schedule, smartphone and sensor data. Such a composition delivers convenient and reliable tool which can assist patients and medical staff during the process objectifying the clinical tests results and helping to ensure good quality of the data, quickly available and easily accessible.

  20. Optimizing small cell deployment by the use of C-RANs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Checko, Aleksandra; Holm, Henrik Laumand; Christiansen, Henrik Lehrmann

    2014-01-01

    conditions. Furthermore, based on theoretical calculations and Network simulations we present considerations on deployment scenarios to optimize green field deployments in terms of Total Cost of Ownership (TCO). This involves optimizing the mix of cells with different traffic profiles and the BBU Pool......A Cloud Radio Access Network (C-RAN) is a novel mobile network architecture that has the potential to support extremely dense mobile network deployments enhancing the network capacity while offering cost savings on baseband resources. In this work we analyze cell traffic profiles and evaluate...... the conditions that impact the statistical multiplexing gain in the Baseband Unit (BBU) Pool. We conclude on the set of parameters that maximize the statistical multiplexing gain, leading to the highest potential cost savings. We then propose a packet based architecture that can adapt to changing traffic...

  1. Are Discrepancies in RANS Modeled Reynolds Stresses Random?

    CERN Document Server

    Xiao, Heng; Wang, Jian-xun; Paterson, Eric G

    2016-01-01

    In the turbulence modeling community, significant efforts have been made to quantify the uncertainties in the Reynolds-Averaged Navier--Stokes (RANS) models and to improve their predictive capabilities. Of crucial importance in these efforts is the understanding of the discrepancies in the RANS modeled Reynolds stresses. However, to what extent these discrepancies can be predicted or whether they are completely random remains a fundamental open question. In this work we used a machine learning algorithm based on random forest regression to predict the discrepancies. The success of the regression--prediction procedure indicates that, to a large extent, the discrepancies in the modeled Reynolds stresses can be explained by the mean flow feature, and thus they are universal quantities that can be extrapolated from one flow to another, at least among different flows sharing the same characteristics such as separation. This finding has profound implications to the future development of RANS models, opening up new ...

  2. The Asthma Mobile Health Study, a large-scale clinical observational study using ResearchKit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Yu-Feng Yvonne; Wang, Pei; Rogers, Linda; Tignor, Nicole; Zweig, Micol; Hershman, Steven G; Genes, Nicholas; Scott, Erick R; Krock, Eric; Badgeley, Marcus; Edgar, Ron; Violante, Samantha; Wright, Rosalind; Powell, Charles A; Dudley, Joel T; Schadt, Eric E

    2017-04-01

    The feasibility of using mobile health applications to conduct observational clinical studies requires rigorous validation. Here, we report initial findings from the Asthma Mobile Health Study, a research study, including recruitment, consent, and enrollment, conducted entirely remotely by smartphone. We achieved secure bidirectional data flow between investigators and 7,593 participants from across the United States, including many with severe asthma. Our platform enabled prospective collection of longitudinal, multidimensional data (e.g., surveys, devices, geolocation, and air quality) in a subset of users over the 6-month study period. Consistent trending and correlation of interrelated variables support the quality of data obtained via this method. We detected increased reporting of asthma symptoms in regions affected by heat, pollen, and wildfires. Potential challenges with this technology include selection bias, low retention rates, reporting bias, and data security. These issues require attention to realize the full potential of mobile platforms in research and patient care.

  3. Effectiveness of a mobile cooperation intervention during the clinical practicum of nursing students: a parallel group randomized controlled trial protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strandell-Laine, Camilla; Saarikoski, Mikko; Löyttyniemi, Eliisa; Salminen, Leena; Suomi, Reima; Leino-Kilpi, Helena

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to describe a study protocol for a study evaluating the effectiveness of a mobile cooperation intervention to improve students' competence level, self-efficacy in clinical performance and satisfaction with the clinical learning environment. Nursing student-nurse teacher cooperation during the clinical practicum has a vital role in promoting the learning of students. Despite an increasing interest in using mobile technologies to improve the clinical practicum of students, there is limited robust evidence regarding their effectiveness. A multicentre, parallel group, randomized, controlled, pragmatic, superiority trial. Second-year pre-registration nursing students who are beginning a clinical practicum will be recruited from one university of applied sciences. Eligible students will be randomly allocated to either a control group (engaging in standard cooperation) or an intervention group (engaging in mobile cooperation) for the 5-week the clinical practicum. The complex mobile cooperation intervention comprises of a mobile application-assisted, nursing student-nurse teacher cooperation and a training in the functions of the mobile application. The primary outcome is competence. The secondary outcomes include self-efficacy in clinical performance and satisfaction with the clinical learning environment. Moreover, a process evaluation will be undertaken. The ethical approval for this study was obtained in December 2014 and the study received funding in 2015. The results of this study will provide robust evidence on mobile cooperation during the clinical practicum, a research topic that has not been consistently studied to date. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Awareness and using of medical students about mobile health technology in clinical areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehteshami, Asghar; Hachesu, Peyman Rezaei; Esfahani, Mahtab Kasayi; Rezazadeh, Esmaeil

    2013-01-01

    NONE DECLARED. Necessity of data transmission and getting contact with specialists is so evident in impassable regions. In order to solve such problems, there are different solutions one of which is mobile health technology. Being small and user-friendly, easy to enter data and having low expense are some of its advantages. This study aims to define the association between awareness of medical students in clinical stage about mobile health technology application and the rate of their using this technology in educational hospital of Isfahan in 2011. The study is a cross-sectional analytical application research. Sixty medical students were selected as samples from a society of 240 medical students. A researcher-made questionnaire was used. The questionnaire included 21 multiple choice and 15 yes no questions, which were corrected to reach a score. A researcher-made checklist with 5-fold Likert scale was used to define the rate of applying such technology. The reliability of questionnaire was confirmed through a test-retest. The collected data were analyzed with the help of SPSS software in descriptive and deductive statistics level. The highest percentage of awareness about mobile health technology among medical students in the clinical stage of Azzahra educational hospital is 45.6 in nature areas, and their lowest percentage of awareness is 17.8 in the infrastructure area. In addition, their mean awareness of all areas is 54.4. The highest percentage of using mobile health technology by medical students is 14.6 in the education area, and their lowest percentage of usage is 6.8 in the treatment area. Their mean usage of all areas is 9.4 as well. The rate of awareness and application of mobile health technology is not favorable. Except for treatment, there is no significant association between the rate of awareness and application of mobile health technology.

  5. Applications for self-administered mobile cognitive assessments in clinical research: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Raeanne C; Swendsen, Joel; Depp, Colin A

    2017-12-01

    Frequent, brief and repeated self-administered mobile assessments of cognitive function, conducted in everyday life settings, are a promising complementary tool to traditional assessment approaches. Mobile cognitive assessments promote patient-centered care and might enhance capacity to inform individual-level outcomes over time (i.e. detecting subtle declines in cognitive function), as well as in assessing cognition and its correlates in the naturalistic environment. The goal of this systematic review was to assess the feasibility and psychometric properties of mobile cognitive assessments. Through a comprehensive search, we identified 12 articles using self-administered, mobile phone-based cognitive assessments. Studies sampled participants between 1 and 6 times per day for 1-14 days. Samples ranged in age from 14 to 83 years old and were generally healthy populations without cognitive impairment. Working memory was the most frequently-assessed cognitive domain (n = 7), followed by attention/reaction time (n = 4). Seven studies reported adherence, with mean adherence rates of 79.2%. In addition to positive evidence of feasibility, there was general support for high levels of between- and within-person reliability and construct validity. While research has only begun to explore the utility of mobile cognitive assessments, studies to-date indicate they may be a promising complementary tool to traditional assessment methods with potential to improve clinical care and research. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Mobile-Based Video Learning Outcomes in Clinical Nursing Skill Education: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Nam-Ju; Chae, Sun-Mi; Kim, Haejin; Lee, Ji-Hye; Min, Hyojin Jennifer; Park, Da-Eun

    2016-01-01

    Mobile devices are a regular part of daily life among the younger generations. Thus, now is the time to apply mobile device use to nursing education. The purpose of this study was to identify the effects of a mobile-based video clip on learning motivation, competence, and class satisfaction in nursing students using a randomized controlled trial with a pretest and posttest design. A total of 71 nursing students participated in this study: 36 in the intervention group and 35 in the control group. A video clip of how to perform a urinary catheterization was developed, and the intervention group was able to download it to their own mobile devices for unlimited viewing throughout 1 week. All of the students participated in a practice laboratory to learn urinary catheterization and were blindly tested for their performance skills after participation in the laboratory. The intervention group showed significantly higher levels of learning motivation and class satisfaction than did the control. Of the fundamental nursing competencies, the intervention group was more confident in practicing catheterization than their counterparts. Our findings suggest that video clips using mobile devices are useful tools that educate student nurses on relevant clinical skills and improve learning outcomes.

  7. Clinical Benefits of Joint Mobilization on Ankle Sprains: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weerasekara, Ishanka; Osmotherly, Peter; Snodgrass, Suzanne; Marquez, Jodie; de Zoete, Rutger; Rivett, Darren A

    2017-09-04

    To assess the clinical benefits of joint mobilization for ankle sprains. MEDLINE, MEDLINE In-Process, Embase, AMED, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, PEDro, Scopus, SPORTDiscus, and Dissertations and Theses were searched from inception to June 2017. Studies investigating humans with grade I or II lateral or medial sprains of the ankle in any pathologic state from acute to chronic, who had been treated with joint mobilization were considered for inclusion. Any conservative intervention was considered as a comparator. Commonly reported clinical outcomes were considered such as ankle range of movement, pain, and function. After screening of 1530 abstracts, 56 studies were selected for full-text screening, and 23 were eligible for inclusion. Eleven studies on chronic sprains reported sufficient data for meta-analysis. Data were extracted using the participants, interventions, comparison, outcomes, and study design approach. Clinically relevant outcomes (dorsiflexion range, proprioception, balance, function, pain threshold, pain intensity) were assessed at immediate, short-term, and long-term follow-up points. Methodological quality was assessed independently by 2 reviewers, and most studies were found to be of moderate quality, with no studies rated as poor. Meta-analysis revealed significant immediate benefits of joint mobilization compared with comparators on improving posteromedial dynamic balance (P=.0004), but not for improving dorsiflexion range (P=.16), static balance (P=.96), or pain intensity (P=.45). Joint mobilization was beneficial in the short-term for improving weight-bearing dorsiflexion range (P=.003) compared with a control. Joint mobilization appears to be beneficial for improving dynamic balance immediately after application, and dorsiflexion range in the short-term. Long-term benefits have not been adequately investigated. Copyright © 2017 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Assessment of Semi-Structured Clinical Interview for Mobile Phone Addiction Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavi, Seyyed Salman; Mohammadi, Mohammad Reza; Jannatifard, Fereshteh; Mohammadi Kalhori, Soroush; Sepahbodi, Ghazal; BabaReisi, Mohammad; Sajedi, Sahar; Farshchi, Mojtaba; KhodaKarami, Rasul; Hatami Kasvaee, Vahid

    2016-04-01

    The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR) classified mobile phone addiction disorder under "impulse control disorder not elsewhere classified". This study surveyed the diagnostic criteria of DSM-IV-TR for the diagnosis of mobile phone addiction in correspondence with Iranian society and culture. Two hundred fifty students of Tehran universities were entered into this descriptive-analytical and cross-sectional study. Quota sampling method was used. At first, semi- structured clinical interview (based on DSM-IV-TR) was performed for all the cases, and another specialist reevaluated the interviews. Data were analyzed using content validity, inter-scorer reliability (Kappa coefficient) and test-retest via SPSS18 software. The content validity of the semi- structured clinical interview matched the DSM-IV-TR criteria for behavioral addiction. Moreover, their content was appropriate, and two items, including "SMS pathological use" and "High monthly cost of using the mobile phone" were added to promote its validity. Internal reliability (Kappa) and test-retest reliability were 0.55 and r = 0.4 (p<0. 01) respectively. The results of this study revealed that semi- structured diagnostic criteria of DSM-IV-TR are valid and reliable for diagnosing mobile phone addiction, and this instrument is an effective tool to diagnose this disorder.

  9. Progress in Hybrid RANS-LES Modelling : Papers Contributed to the 4th Symposium on Hybrid RANS-LES Methods

    CERN Document Server

    Haase, Werner; Peng, Shia-Hui; Schwamborn, Dieter

    2013-01-01

    The present book contains contributions presented at the Fourth Symposium on Hybrid RANS-LES Methods, held in Beijing, China, 28-30 September 2011, being a continuation of symposia taking place in Stockholm (Sweden, 2005), in Corfu (Greece, 2007), and Gdansk (Poland, 2009). The contributions to the last two symposia were published as NNFM, Vol. 97 and Vol. 111. At the Beijing symposium, along with seven invited keynotes, another 46 papers (plus 5 posters) were presented addressing topics on Novel turbulence-resolving simulation and modelling, Improved hybrid RANS-LES methods, Comparative studies of difference modelling methods, Modelling-related numerical issues and Industrial applications.. The present book reflects recent activities and new progress made in the development and applications of hybrid RANS-LES methods in general.

  10. Spinal Mobility in Axial Spondyloarthritis: A Cross-Sectional Clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogard, Elisabeth; Lindqvist, Elisabet; Bergman, Stefan; Bremander, Ann

    2017-03-01

    Research concerning spinal mobility in axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA) has focused on ankylosing spondylitis (AS), and data on the clinical diagnosis of undifferentiated spondyloarthritis (USpA) are limited. The objective was to study differences in spinal mobility between axSpA subgroups AS and USpA, including gender differences. A total of 183 patients with axSpA from a rheumatology clinic were included in the study. The earliest recorded spinal mobility measures (cervical rotation/flexion/extension/lateral flexion, tragus-to-wall distance, vital capacity, chest expansion, thoracic flexion, thoracolumbar flexion, lateral spinal flexion, lumbar flexion and intermalleolar distance) were obtained by specialized physiotherapists. Differences between subgroups were analysed using analysis of covariance, controlled for gender and disease duration. In the USpA group (n = 57), the mean [standard deviation (SD)] age was 41.6 (11.4) years, and disease duration was 13 (10.6) years, with 54% men. In the AS group (n = 126), the mean (SD) age was 48.4 (13.5) years, and disease duration 24.6 (13.3) years, with 77% men. Spinal mobility was less restricted in USpA versus AS patients (p ≤ 0.05), with a median (interquartile range) tragus-to-wall distance of 11 (10-12) cm versus 13 (11.3-18.5) cm; thoracolumbar flexion 9 (7-10) cm versus 6.5 (4-9) cm; lateral spinal flexion 29 (25-36) cm versus 21.3 (12-31) cm; lumbar flexion 4.5 (3.5-5.0) cm versus 3.5 (2.0-4.5) cm and intermalleolar distance 113 (102-121) cm versus 101 (86-114) cm. There were no differences between the subgroups in cervical mobility, vital capacity, chest expansion or thoracic flexion, and there were few gender differences, besides anthropometric measures. Patients with USpA and AS had similar cervical and chest mobility, while thoracic and lumbar mobility were more severely restricted in AS. There were few gender differences in either subgroup. Further studies, to understand the full impact of USp

  11. Mobile Learning in a Rural Medical School: Feasibility and Educational Benefits in Campus and Clinical Settings

    OpenAIRE

    Debra Nestel; Katherine Gray; Andre Ng; Matthew McGrail; George Kotsanas; Elmer Villanueva

    2014-01-01

    Students in a new medical school were provided with laptops. This study explored the feasibility and educational benefits of mobile learning for two cohorts of students learning in two settings—university campus (first-year students) and rural clinical placements (second-year students). Evaluation involved questionnaires, focus groups (faculty and students), and document analysis. Descriptive statistics were computed. Focus groups were audio-recorded, transcribed, and analysed thematically. R...

  12. Hybrid RANS-LES using high order numerical methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry de Frahan, Marc; Yellapantula, Shashank; Vijayakumar, Ganesh; Knaus, Robert; Sprague, Michael

    2017-11-01

    Understanding the impact of wind turbine wake dynamics on downstream turbines is particularly important for the design of efficient wind farms. Due to their tractable computational cost, hybrid RANS/LES models are an attractive framework for simulating separation flows such as the wake dynamics behind a wind turbine. High-order numerical methods can be computationally efficient and provide increased accuracy in simulating complex flows. In the context of LES, high-order numerical methods have shown some success in predictions of turbulent flows. However, the specifics of hybrid RANS-LES models, including the transition region between both modeling frameworks, pose unique challenges for high-order numerical methods. In this work, we study the effect of increasing the order of accuracy of the numerical scheme in simulations of canonical turbulent flows using RANS, LES, and hybrid RANS-LES models. We describe the interactions between filtering, model transition, and order of accuracy and their effect on turbulence quantities such as kinetic energy spectra, boundary layer evolution, and dissipation rate. This work was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Exascale Computing Project, under Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

  13. Eye-Movement Control in RAN and Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuperman, Victor; Van Dyke, Julie A.; Henry, Regina

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined the "visual scanning hypothesis", which suggests that fluent oculomotor control is an important component underlying the predictive relationship between Rapid Automatized Naming (RAN) tasks and reading ability. Our approach was to isolate components of saccadic planning, articulation, and lexical retrieval in 3…

  14. Using mobile clinics to deliver HIV testing and other basic health services in rural Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgren, T G; Deutsch, K; Schell, E; Bvumbwe, A; Hart, K B; Laviwa, J; Rankin, S H

    2011-01-01

    The majority of Malawians are impoverished and primarily dependant on subsistence farming, with 85% of the population living in a rural area. The country is highly affected by HIV and under-resourced rural health centers struggle to meet the government's goal of expanding HIV testing, antiretroviral treatment, and other basic services. This report describes the work of two four-wheel drive mobile clinics launched in 2008 to fill an identified service gap in the remote areas of Mulanje District, Malawi. The program was developed by an international non-governmental organization, Global AIDS Interfaith Alliance (GAIA), and the Mulanje District Health Office, with funding from the Elizabeth Taylor HIV/AIDS Foundation. The clinics provide: (1) rapid HIV testing and treatment referral; (2) diagnosis and treatment of malaria; (3) sputum collection for TB screening; (4) diagnosis and treatment of sexually transmitted and opportunistic infections; and (5) pre-natal care. The clinic vehicles provide medical supplies and personnel (a clinical officer, nurse, and nurse aide) to set up clinics in community buildings such as churches or schools. In such a project, the implementation process and schedule can be affected by medication, supply chain and infrastructural issues, as well as governmental and non-governmental requirements. Timelines should be sufficiently flexible to accommodate unexpected delays. Once established, service scheduling should be flexible and responsive; for instance, malaria treatment rather than HIV testing was most urgently needed in the season when these services were launched. Assessing the impact of healthcare delivery in Malawi is challenging. Although mobile clinic and the government Health Management Information System (HMIS) data were matched, inconsistent variables and gaps in data made direct comparisons difficult. Data collection was compromised by the competing demand of high patient volume; however, rather than reducing the burden on

  15. Predictors of Social Mobilization Speed

    CERN Document Server

    Alstott, Jeff; Velu, Chander

    2013-01-01

    Mobilization across social networks is becoming increasingly influential, but little is known about what traits of individuals and their relationships affect their speed of mobilization between them. We ran a global social mobilization contest and recorded personal traits of the participants and those they mobilized. We examined how those traits influenced the speed of mobilization. Individuals mobilized faster when they heard about the contest directly from the contest organization, and decreased in speed when hearing from less personal source types (e.g. family vs. media). Mobilization was faster when the mobilizer and the mobilized heard about the contest through the same source type, and slower when both individuals were in different countries. Females mobilized other females faster than males mobilized other males. Mobilization was faster with young recruiters and old recruits, and slower with old recruiters and young recruits. These findings suggest ways to optimize the speed of social mobilization.

  16. Characterization of RanBPM Molecular Determinants that Control Its Subcellular Localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salemi, Louisa M.; Loureiro, Sandra O.; Schild-Poulter, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    RanBPM/RanBP9 is a ubiquitous, nucleocytoplasmic protein that is part of an evolutionary conserved E3 ubiquitin ligase complex whose function and targets in mammals are still unknown. RanBPM itself has been implicated in various cellular processes that involve both nuclear and cytoplasmic functions. However, to date, little is known about how RanBPM subcellular localization is regulated. We have conducted a systematic analysis of RanBPM regions that control its subcellular localization using RanBPM shRNA cells to examine ectopic RanBPM mutant subcellular localization without interference from the endogenously expressed protein. We show that several domains and motifs regulate RanBPM nuclear and cytoplasmic localization. In particular, RanBPM comprises two motifs that can confer nuclear localization, one proline/glutamine-rich motif in the extreme N-terminus which has a dominant effect on RanBPM localization, and a second motif in the C-terminus which minimally contributes to RanBPM nuclear targeting. We also identified a nuclear export signal (NES) which mutation prevented RanBPM accumulation in the cytoplasm. Likewise, deletion of the central RanBPM conserved domains (SPRY and LisH/CTLH) resulted in the relocalization of RanBPM to the nucleus, suggesting that RanBPM cytoplasmic localization is also conferred by protein-protein interactions that promote its cytoplasmic retention. Indeed we found that in the cytoplasm, RanBPM partially colocalizes with microtubules and associates with α-tubulin. Finally, in the nucleus, a significant fraction of RanBPM is associated with chromatin. Altogether, these analyses reveal that RanBPM subcellular localization results from the combined effects of several elements that either confer direct transport through the nucleocytoplasmic transport machinery or regulate it indirectly, likely through interactions with other proteins and by intramolecular folding. PMID:25659156

  17. Mobile Learning in a Rural Medical School: Feasibility and Educational Benefits in Campus and Clinical Settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debra Nestel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Students in a new medical school were provided with laptops. This study explored the feasibility and educational benefits of mobile learning for two cohorts of students learning in two settings—university campus (first-year students and rural clinical placements (second-year students. Evaluation involved questionnaires, focus groups (faculty and students, and document analysis. Descriptive statistics were computed. Focus groups were audio-recorded, transcribed, and analysed thematically. Response rates for questionnaires exceeded 84%. Compared with second-year students, significantly more first-year students (60% took their laptops to campus daily (P=0.14 and used their laptops for more hours each day (P=0.031. All students used laptops most frequently to access the internet (85% and 97% and applications (Microsoft Word (80% and 61% and Microsoft PowerPoint (80% and 63%. Focus groups with students revealed appreciation for the laptops but frustration with the initial software image. Focus groups with faculty identified enthusiasm for mobile learning but acknowledged its limitations. Physical infrastructure and information technology support influenced mobile learning. Document analysis revealed significant costs and issues with maintenance. If adequately resourced, mobile learning through university-issued laptops would be feasible and have educational benefits, including equitable access to learning resources, when and where they are needed. However, barriers remain for full implementation.

  18. The scope and impact of mobile health clinics in the United States: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Stephanie W Y; Hill, Caterina; Ricks, Mariesa L; Bennet, Jennifer; Oriol, Nancy E

    2017-10-05

    As the U.S. healthcare system transforms its care delivery model to increase healthcare accessibility and improve health outcomes, it is undergoing changes in the context of ever-increasing chronic disease burdens and healthcare costs. Many illnesses disproportionately affect certain populations, due to disparities in healthcare access and social determinants of health. These disparities represent a key area to target in order to better our nation's overall health and decrease healthcare expenditures. It is thus imperative for policymakers and health professionals to develop innovative interventions that sustainably manage chronic diseases, promote preventative health, and improve outcomes among communities disenfranchised from traditional healthcare as well as among the general population. This article examines the available literature on Mobile Health Clinics (MHCs) and the role that they currently play in the U.S. healthcare system. Based on a search in the PubMed database and data from the online collaborative research network of mobile clinics MobileHealthMap.org , the authors evaluated 51 articles with evidence on the strengths and weaknesses of the mobile health sector in the United States. Current literature supports that MHCs are successful in reaching vulnerable populations, by delivering services directly at the curbside in communities of need and flexibly adapting their services based on the changing needs of the target community. As a link between clinical and community settings, MHCs address both medical and social determinants of health, tackling health issues on a community-wide level. Furthermore, evidence suggest that MHCs produce significant cost savings and represent a cost-effective care delivery model that improves health outcomes in underserved groups. Even though MHCs can fulfill many goals and mandates in alignment with our national priorities and have the potential to help combat some of the largest healthcare challenges of this era, there

  19. Development and clinical study of mobile 12-lead electrocardiography based on cloud computing for cardiac emergency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Hideo; Uchimura, Yuji; Waki, Kayo; Omae, Koji; Takeuchi, Ichiro; Ohe, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    To improve emergency services for accurate diagnosis of cardiac emergency, we developed a low-cost new mobile electrocardiography system "Cloud Cardiology®" based upon cloud computing for prehospital diagnosis. This comprises a compact 12-lead ECG unit equipped with Bluetooth and Android Smartphone with an application for transmission. Cloud server enables us to share ECG simultaneously inside and outside the hospital. We evaluated the clinical effectiveness by conducting a clinical trial with historical comparison to evaluate this system in a rapid response car in the real emergency service settings. We found that this system has an ability to shorten the onset to balloon time of patients with acute myocardial infarction, resulting in better clinical outcome. Here we propose that cloud-computing based simultaneous data sharing could be powerful solution for emergency service for cardiology, along with its significant clinical outcome.

  20. Implementation of clinical research trials using web-based and mobile devices: challenges and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy Eagleson

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the increasing implementation of web-based, mobile health interventions in clinical trials, it is crucial for researchers to address the security and privacy concerns of patient information according to high ethical standards. The full process of meeting these standards is often made more complicated due to the use of internet-based technology and smartphones for treatment, telecommunication, and data collection; however, this process is not well-documented in the literature. Results The Smart Heart Trial is a single-arm feasibility study that is currently assessing the effects of a web-based, mobile lifestyle intervention for overweight and obese children and youth with congenital heart disease in Southwestern Ontario. Participants receive telephone counseling regarding nutrition and fitness; and complete goal-setting activities on a web-based application. This paper provides a detailed overview of the challenges the study faced in meeting the high standards of our Research Ethics Board, specifically regarding patient privacy. Conclusion We outline our solutions, successes, limitations, and lessons learned to inform future similar studies; and model much needed transparency in ensuring high quality security and protection of patient privacy when using web-based and mobile devices for telecommunication and data collection in clinical research.

  1. Implementation of clinical research trials using web-based and mobile devices: challenges and solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagleson, Roy; Altamirano-Diaz, Luis; McInnis, Alex; Welisch, Eva; De Jesus, Stefanie; Prapavessis, Harry; Rombeek, Meghan; Seabrook, Jamie A; Park, Teresa; Norozi, Kambiz

    2017-03-17

    With the increasing implementation of web-based, mobile health interventions in clinical trials, it is crucial for researchers to address the security and privacy concerns of patient information according to high ethical standards. The full process of meeting these standards is often made more complicated due to the use of internet-based technology and smartphones for treatment, telecommunication, and data collection; however, this process is not well-documented in the literature. The Smart Heart Trial is a single-arm feasibility study that is currently assessing the effects of a web-based, mobile lifestyle intervention for overweight and obese children and youth with congenital heart disease in Southwestern Ontario. Participants receive telephone counseling regarding nutrition and fitness; and complete goal-setting activities on a web-based application. This paper provides a detailed overview of the challenges the study faced in meeting the high standards of our Research Ethics Board, specifically regarding patient privacy. We outline our solutions, successes, limitations, and lessons learned to inform future similar studies; and model much needed transparency in ensuring high quality security and protection of patient privacy when using web-based and mobile devices for telecommunication and data collection in clinical research.

  2. The Cancer Genome Atlas Clinical Explorer: a web and mobile interface for identifying clinical-genomic driver associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, HoJoon; Palm, Jennifer; Grimes, Susan M; Ji, Hanlee P

    2015-10-27

    include clinical stage or smoking history. The Cancer Genome Atlas Clinical Explorer enables the cancer research community and others to explore clinically relevant associations inferred from TCGA data. With its accessible web and mobile interface, users can examine queries and test hypothesis regarding genomic/proteomic alterations across a broad spectrum of malignancies.

  3. Utilizing three years of epidemiological data from medical missions in Cambodia to shape the mobile medical clinic formulary

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jeany Kim Jun; Junia S Koo; Amy Y Kang; Deborah B Chien; Albert Shim; Dale Knutson; Eda M Kim

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this project was to gather epidemiological data on common diseases and medications dispensed during medical mission trips to Cambodia to shape the mobile medical clinic formulary. Methods...

  4. Smartphone mobile application delivering personalized, real-time sun protection advice: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buller, David B; Berwick, Marianne; Lantz, Kathy; Buller, Mary Klein; Shane, James; Kane, Ilima; Liu, Xia

    2015-05-01

    Mobile smartphones are rapidly emerging as an effective means of communicating with many Americans. Using mobile applications (apps), they can access remote databases, track time and location, and integrate user input to provide tailored health information. A smartphone mobile app providing personalized, real-time sun protection advice was evaluated in a randomized clinical trial. The trial was conducted in 2012 and had a randomized pretest-posttest controlled design with a 10-week follow-up. Data were collected from a nationwide population-based survey panel. A sample of 604 non-Hispanic and Hispanic adults from the Knowledge Panel 18 years or older who owned an Android smartphone were enrolled. The mobile app provided advice on sun protection (ie, protection practices and risk of sunburn) and alerts (to apply or reapply sunscreen and get out of the sun), hourly UV Index, and vitamin D production based on the forecast UV Index, the phone's time and location, and user input. Percentage of days using sun protection and time spent outdoors (days and minutes) in the midday sun and number of sunburns in the past 3 months were collected. Individuals in the treatment group reported more shade use (mean days staying in the shade, 41.0% vs 33.7%; P = .03) but less sunscreen use (mean days, 28.6% vs 34.5%; P = .048) than controls. There was no significant difference in number of sunburns in the past 3 months (mean, 0.60 in the treatment group vs 0.62 for controls; P = .87). Those who used the mobile app reported spending less time in the sun (mean days keeping time in the sun to a minimum, 60.4% for app users vs 49.3% for nonusers; P = .04) and using all protection behaviors combined more (mean days, 39.4% vs 33.8%; P = .04). The mobile app improved some sun protection. Use of the mobile app was lower than expected but associated with increased sun protection. Providing personalized advice when and where people are in the sun may help reduce sun exposure.

  5. Assessment of Semi-Structured Clinical Interview for Mobile ‎Phone ‎Addiction Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyyed Salman Alavi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR classified mobile phone addiction disorder under ‎‎"impulse control disorder not elsewhere classified". This study surveyed the ‎diagnostic criteria of DSM-IV-TR for the diagnosis of mobile phone ‎addiction in correspondence with Iranian society and culture.‎Method: Two hundred fifty students of Tehran universities were entered into this ‎descriptive-analytical and cross-sectional study. Quota sampling method ‎was used. At first, semi- structured clinical interview (based on DSM-IV-‎TR was performed for all the cases, and another specialist re-evaluated the ‎interviews. Data were analyzed using content validity, inter-scorer reliability (Kappa coefficient and test-retest via SPSS18 software.Results: The content validity of the semi- structured clinical interview matched the ‎DSM –IV-TR criteria for behavioral addiction. Moreover, their content was ‎appropriate, and two items, including "SMS pathological use" and "High ‎monthly cost of using the mobile phone” were added to promote its validity. ‎Internal reliability (Kappa and test –retest reliability were 0.55 and r = 0.4 ‎‎(p<0. 01 respectively.‎Conclusion: The results of this study revealed that semi- structured diagnostic criteria of ‎DSM-IV-TR are valid and reliable for diagnosing mobile phone addiction, ‎and this instrument is an effective tool to diagnose this disorder.‎

  6. In the Palm of Your Hand - Normalizing the Use of Mobile Technology for Nurse Practitioner Education and Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamarche, Kimberley; Park, Caroline; Fraser, Shawn; Rich, Mariann; MacKenzie, Susan

    2016-01-01

    The use of mobile devices by nurse practitioners (NPs) to meet an evolving technological landscape is expanding rapidly. A longitudinal study of the ways NP students "normalize" the use of mobile devices in clinical education was completed. This study used researcher-designed survey tools, including sociodemographic questions, and the numerical picture was augmented and interpreted in light of the textual data in the form of selected interviews. Data indicate that mobile technology is normalized in the social realm but still developing in the clinical realm. Progress is hindered by non-modelling by faculty, inconsistent healthcare policy and lack of understanding of the affordances available through this technology. Overall, mobile technology is utilized and normalized in practice; this in turn has influenced their ability to prepare students for practice. Data presented can assist educators and clinicians alike in developing a more fulsome understanding on how to appropriately incorporate mobile technology into education and practice.

  7. Tuisland. Karin Brynard. Kaapstad: Penguin Ran- dom House Suid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Karin Brynard. Kaapstad: Penguin Ran- dom House Suid-Afrika, 2016. 576 pp. ISBN 978-1-4152-0693-5,. ISBN 978-1-4152-0668-3,. ISBN 978-1-4125-0669-0. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.17159/tvl.v.54i1.29. Tuisland (2016) is oud-joernalis Karin. Brynard se derde spanningsroman. Haar debuut, Plaasmoord (2009), is met die.

  8. The Defective Nuclear Lamina in Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome Disrupts the Nucleocytoplasmic Ran Gradient and Inhibits Nuclear Localization of Ubc9▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Joshua B.; Datta, Sutirtha; Snow, Chelsi J.; Chatterjee, Mandovi; Ni, Li; Spencer, Adam; Yang, Chun-Song; Cubeñas-Potts, Caelin; Matunis, Michael J.; Paschal, Bryce M.

    2011-01-01

    The mutant form of lamin A responsible for the premature aging disease Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (termed progerin) acts as a dominant negative protein that changes the structure of the nuclear lamina. How the perturbation of the nuclear lamina in progeria is transduced into cellular changes is undefined. Using patient fibroblasts and a variety of cell-based assays, we determined that progerin expression in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome inhibits the nucleocytoplasmic transport of several factors with key roles in nuclear function. We found that progerin reduces the nuclear/cytoplasmic concentration of the Ran GTPase and inhibits the nuclear localization of Ubc9, the sole E2 for SUMOylation, and of TPR, the nucleoporin that forms the basket on the nuclear side of the nuclear pore complex. Forcing the nuclear localization of Ubc9 in progerin-expressing cells rescues the Ran gradient and TPR import, indicating that these pathways are linked. Reducing nuclear SUMOylation decreases the nuclear mobility of the Ran nucleotide exchange factor RCC1 in vivo, and the addition of SUMO E1 and E2 promotes the dissociation of RCC1 and Ran from chromatin in vitro. Our data suggest that the cellular effects of progerin are transduced, at least in part, through reduced function of the Ran GTPase and SUMOylation pathways. PMID:21670151

  9. RanBP2 modulates Cox11 and hexokinase I activities and haploinsufficiency of RanBP2 causes deficits in glucose metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azamat Aslanukov

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available The Ran-binding protein 2 (RanBP2 is a large multimodular and pleiotropic protein. Several molecular partners with distinct functions interacting specifically with selective modules of RanBP2 have been identified. Yet, the significance of these interactions with RanBP2 and the genetic and physiological role(s of RanBP2 in a whole-animal model remain elusive. Here, we report the identification of two novel partners of RanBP2 and a novel physiological role of RanBP2 in a mouse model. RanBP2 associates in vitro and in vivo and colocalizes with the mitochondrial metallochaperone, Cox11, and the pacemaker of glycolysis, hexokinase type I (HKI via its leucine-rich domain. The leucine-rich domain of RanBP2 also exhibits strong chaperone activity toward intermediate and mature folding species of Cox11 supporting a chaperone role of RanBP2 in the cytosol during Cox11 biogenesis. Cox11 partially colocalizes with HKI, thus supporting additional and distinct roles in cell function. Cox11 is a strong inhibitor of HKI, and RanBP2 suppresses the inhibitory activity of Cox11 over HKI. To probe the physiological role of RanBP2 and its role in HKI function, a mouse model harboring a genetically disrupted RanBP2 locus was generated. RanBP2(-/- are embryonically lethal, and haploinsufficiency of RanBP2 in an inbred strain causes a pronounced decrease of HKI and ATP levels selectively in the central nervous system. Inbred RanBP2(+/- mice also exhibit deficits in growth rates and glucose catabolism without impairment of glucose uptake and gluconeogenesis. These phenotypes are accompanied by a decrease in the electrophysiological responses of photosensory and postreceptoral neurons. Hence, RanBP2 and its partners emerge as critical modulators of neuronal HKI, glucose catabolism, energy homeostasis, and targets for metabolic, aging disorders and allied neuropathies.

  10. Applicability of RANS, DES and LES in propeller flow noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LU Li

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available [Objectives] In order to study the applicability of different turbulence models in propeller flow noise prediction, taking the DTMB 4119 propeller as the research object, the numerical simulation method is used to calculate the frequency domain noise under the non-uniform flow field.[Methods] First, the hydrodynamic coefficient and surface pressure distribution coefficient are obtained via the RANS method and the accuracy of the flow field simulation is verified by comparing it with the experimental data. Next,the pulsating pressures obtained by RANS, DES and LES are considered as the sound source respectively, and combined with the acoustic boundary element method to predict the radiation noise.[Results] The results show that spectral noise is the main contributor to total noise; when noise on 1 BPF is predicted, the results obtained by the three methods are very similar, so we can use RANS to predict noise quickly; when noise on the high order of BPF needs to be predicted, the calculation results of LES are better.[Conclusions] In noise prediction, the appropriate turbulence simulation method can be selected according to the demand.

  11. Promoting Nursing Students' Clinical Learning Through a Mobile e-Portfolio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chin-Yuan; Wu, Cheng-Chih

    2016-11-01

    Portfolios have been advocated in nursing education to help student link theory and practice. In this study, we document the development of a mobile e-portfolio-based system, which was used to improve nursing education. The e-portfolio-based system has the advantage of allowing students to record, assess, and reflect upon their learning whether at school, a clinical site, or at home. This e-portfolio system was field tested in a 3-week psychiatric nursing practicum session involving 10 female students who were enrolled in a junior nursing college. A mixed-methods study combining qualitative and quantitative data was conducted to investigate the effects of using the system. The results of the study demonstrated that students made professional progress in both theory and practice after using the e-portfolio system. The system could also promote self-regulated learning in clinical context. Students displayed very positive attitudes overall when using the system, although there were some occasional stresses and technical difficulties. Important factors when implementing such a system included the following: adopting the proper mobile device, providing students with clear guidance on constructing the e-portfolio, and how to use the e-portfolio in a clinical setting.

  12. Use of mobile devices in nursing student-nurse teacher cooperation during the clinical practicum: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strandell-Laine, Camilla; Stolt, Minna; Leino-Kilpi, Helena; Saarikoski, Mikko

    2015-03-01

    To identify and appraise study findings on the use of mobile devices, in particular for what purposes and how, in nursing student-nurse teacher cooperation during the clinical practicum. A systematic literature search was conducted using the PubMed/Medline, CINAHL, PsycINFO and ERIC for primary empirical studies published in English. An integrative literature review was undertaken. Quality appraisal of the included studies was conducted using design-specific standardized checklists. Studies were thematically analyzed. Based on the inclusion and exclusion criteria, eleven studies were included in the review. Weaknesses in designs, samples, questionnaires and results, compromised comparison and/or generalization of the findings of the studies. Three main themes were identified: (1) features of mobile devices (2) utility of mobile devices and (3) barriers to the use of mobile devices. Problems of connectivity were the main challenges reported in the use of mobile devices. Participants used mobile devices primarily as reference tools, but less frequently as tools for reflection, assessment or cooperation during the clinical practicum. Interest in mobile device use during the clinical practicum was reported, but training and ongoing support are needed. As only a small number of eligible primary empirical studies were found, it is not possible to draw firm conclusions on the results. In the future, rigorous primary empirical studies are needed to explore the potential of mobile devices in providing a supplementary pedagogical method in nursing student-nurse teacher cooperation during the clinical practicum. Robust study designs, including experimental ones, are clearly needed to assess the effectiveness of mobile devices in nursing student-nurse teacher cooperation during the clinical practicum. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The Vision Van, a mobile eye clinic, aids relief efforts in tsunami-stricken areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, Catherine Ross; Yuki, Kenya; Uchida, Atsuro; Dogru, Murat; Koto, Takashi; Ozawa, Yoko; Tsubota, Kazuo

    2012-01-01

    In the wake of the devastating earthquake and tsunami of March 11, our group at Keio University worked diligently to bring the Vision Van, a mobile eye clinic, from Miami, Florida, to disaster areas where medicines, eyeglasses, and indeed all other ophthalmological supplies and services, were nonexistent, thereby assisting many tsunami survivors suffering from eye problems. This act was encouraging not only to the patients and those working in the disaster-hit areas but also to ophthalmologists who wanted to use their medical specialty to assist those in need.

  14. Mobile Clinical Decision Support System for Acid-base Balance Diagnosis and Treatment Recommendation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandzuka, Mensur; Begic, Edin; Boskovic, Dusanka; Begic, Zijo; Masic, Izet

    2017-06-01

    This paper presents mobile application implementing a decision support system for acid-base disorder diagnosis and treatment recommendation. The application was developed using the official integrated development environment for the Android platform (to maximize availability and minimize investments in specialized hardware) called Android Studio. The application identifies disorder, based on the blood gas analysis, evaluates whether the disorder has been compensated, and based on additional input related to electrolyte imbalance, provides recommendations for treatment. The application is a tool in the hands of the user, which provides assistance during acid-base disorders treatment. The application will assist the physician in clinical practice and is focused on the treatment in intensive care.

  15. Mobile phone-based clinical guidance for rural health providers in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautham, Meenakshi; Iyengar, M Sriram; Johnson, Craig W

    2015-12-01

    There are few tried and tested mobile technology applications to enhance and standardize the quality of health care by frontline rural health providers in low-resource settings. We developed a media-rich, mobile phone-based clinical guidance system for management of fevers, diarrhoeas and respiratory problems by rural health providers. Using a randomized control design, we field tested this application with 16 rural health providers and 128 patients at two rural/tribal sites in Tamil Nadu, Southern India. Protocol compliance for both groups, phone usability, acceptability and patient feedback for the experimental group were evaluated. Linear mixed-model analyses showed statistically significant improvements in protocol compliance in the experimental group. Usability and acceptability among patients and rural health providers were very high. Our results indicate that mobile phone-based, media-rich procedural guidance applications have significant potential for achieving consistently standardized quality of care by diverse frontline rural health providers, with patient acceptance. © The Author(s) 2014.

  16. Barriers to health care in rural Mozambique: a rapid ethnographic assessment of planned mobile health clinics for ART.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwitters, Amee; Lederer, Philip; Zilversmit, Leah; Gudo, Paula Samo; Ramiro, Isaias; Cumba, Luisa; Mahagaja, Epifanio; Jobarteh, Kebba

    2015-03-01

    In Mozambique, 1.6 million people are living with HIV, and over 60% of the population lives in rural areas lacking access to health services. Mobile health clinics, implemented in 2013 in 2 provinces, are beginning to offer antiretroviral therapy (ART) and basic primary care services. Prior to introduction of the mobile health clinics in the communities, we performed a rapid ethnographic assessment to understand barriers to accessing HIV care and treatment services and acceptability and potential use of the mobile health clinics as an alternative means of service delivery. We conducted assessments in Gaza province in January 2013 and in Zambezia Province in April-May 2013 in districts where mobile health clinic implementation was planned. Community leaders served as key informants, and chain-referral sampling was used to recruit participants. Interviews were conducted with community leaders, health care providers, traditional healers, national health system patients, and traditional healer patients. Interviewees were asked about barriers to health services and about mobile health clinic acceptance. In-depth interviews were conducted with 117 participants (Gaza province, n = 57; Zambezia Province, n = 60). Barriers to accessing health services included transportation and distance-related issues (reliability, cost, and travel time). Participants reported concurrent use of traditional and national health systems. The decision to use a particular health system depended on illness type, service distance, and lack of confidence in the national health system. Overall, participants were receptive to using mobile health clinics for their health care and ability to increase access to ART. Hesitations concerning mobile health clinics included potentially long wait times due to high patient loads. Participants emphasized the importance of regular and published visit schedules and inclusion of community members in planning mobile health clinic services. Mobile health clinics

  17. AVHRR GAC SST Reanalysis Version 1 (RAN1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Ignatov

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In response to its users’ needs, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA initiated reanalysis (RAN of the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR Global Area Coverage (GAC; 4 km sea surface temperature (SST data employing its Advanced Clear Sky Processor for Oceans (ACSPO retrieval system. Initially, AVHRR/3 data from five NOAA and two Metop satellites from 2002 to 2015 have been reprocessed. The derived SSTs have been matched up with two reference SSTs—the quality controlled in situ SSTs from the NOAA in situ Quality Monitor (iQuam and the Canadian Meteorological Centre (CMC L4 SST analysis—and analyzed in the NOAA SST Quality Monitor (SQUAM online system. The corresponding clear-sky ocean brightness temperatures (BT in AVHRR bands 3b, 4 and 5 (centered at 3.7, 11, and 12 µm, respectively have been compared with the Community Radiative Transfer Model simulations in another NOAA online system, Monitoring of Infrared Clear-sky Radiances over Ocean for SST (MICROS. For some AVHRRs, the time series of “AVHRR minus reference” SSTs and “observed minus model” BTs are unstable and inconsistent, with artifacts in the SSTs and BTs strongly correlated. In the official “Reanalysis version 1” (RAN1, data from only five platforms—two midmorning (NOAA-17 and Metop-A and three afternoon (NOAA-16, -18 and -19—were included during the most stable periods of their operations. The stability of the SST time series was further improved using variable regression SST coefficients, similarly to how it was done in the NOAA/NASA Pathfinder version 5.2 (PFV5.2 dataset. For data assimilation applications, especially those blending satellite and in situ SSTs, we recommend bias-correcting the RAN1 SSTs using the newly developed sensor-specific error statistics (SSES, which are reported in the product files. Relative performance of RAN1 and PFV5.2 SSTs is discussed. Work is underway to improve the calibration of AVHRR/3s and

  18. Upper thoracic spine mobilization and mobility exercise versus upper cervical spine mobilization and stabilization exercise in individuals with forward head posture: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Juchul; Lee, Eunsang; Lee, Seungwon

    2017-12-12

    Although upper cervical and upper thoracic spine mobilization plus therapeutic exercises are common interventions for the management of forward head posture (FHP), no study has directly compared the effectiveness of cervical spine mobilization and stabilization exercise with that of thoracic spine mobilization and mobility exercise in individuals with FHP. Thirty-two participants with FHP were randomized into the cervical group or the thoracic group. The treatment period was 4 weeks, with follow-up assessment at 4 and 6 weeks after the initial examination. Outcome measures including the craniovertebral angle (CVA), cervical range of motion, numeric pain rating scale (NPRS), pressure pain threshold, neck disability index (NDI), and global rating of change (GRC) were collected. Data were examined with a two-way repeated-measures analysis of variance (group × time). Participants in the thoracic group demonstrated significant improvements (p mobilization and mobility exercise demonstrated better overall short-term outcomes in CVA (standing position), cervical extension, NPRS, NDI, and GRC compared with upper cervical spine mobilization and stabilization exercise in individuals with FHP. KCT0002307 , April 11, 2017 (retrospectively registered).

  19. Overexpression of Ran gene from Lepidium latifolium L. (LlaRan) renders transgenic tobacco plants hypersensitive to cold stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Vimlendu Bhushan; Grover, Atul; Singh, Sadhana; Pande, Veena; Ahmed, Zakwan

    2014-09-01

    Ran is a multifunctional small GTPase involved in important cellular activities like nucleocytoplasmic transport, mitotic spindle assembly, nuclear envelope formation, etc., but is also known to be differentially expressed in response to abiotic stress, particularly low temperature. We have over-expressed Lepidium latifolium (Fam. Brassicaceae) Ran gene in tobacco to study the response of the plants to cold stress (24 h; 4 °C). Transformation of the tobacco plants was verified using PCR targeting Ran gene and co-transformed selectable marker gene nptII. Segregation in Mendelian ratios was validated in five transgenic lines by germination of T1 and T2 seeds on moist filter papers containing 150 mg/l kanamycin. Higher levels of electrolyte leakage and lipid peroxidation pointed towards hypersensitivity of plants. Similarly, lesser proline accumulation compared to wild types also indicated susceptibility of plants to death under chilling conditions. Specific activity of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase and glutathione reductase was also measured under stressed and control conditions. A variation was observed across the different lines, and four out of five lines showed lesser specific activity compared to wild type plants, thus indicating reduced capability of scavenging free radicals. In totality, a strong evidence on induced hypersensitivity to cold stress has been collected which may further be helpful in designing appropriate strategies for engineering crop plants for survival under cold stress conditions.

  20. Falls and mobility in Parkinson's disease: protocol for a randomised controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murphy Anna T

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although physical therapy and falls prevention education are argued to reduce falls and disability in people with idiopathic Parkinson's disease, this has not yet been confirmed with a large scale randomised controlled clinical trial. The study will investigate the effects on falls, mobility and quality of life of (i movement strategy training combined with falls prevention education, (ii progressive resistance strength training combined with falls prevention education, (iii a generic life-skills social program (control group. Methods/Design People with idiopathic Parkinson's disease who live at home will be recruited and randomly allocated to one of three groups. Each person shall receive therapy in an out-patient setting in groups of 3-4. Each group shall be scheduled to meet once per week for 2 hours for 8 consecutive weeks. All participants will also have a structured 2 hour home practice program for each week during the 8 week intervention phase. Assessments will occur before therapy, after the 8 week therapy program, and at 3 and 12 months after the intervention. A falls calendar will be kept by each participant for 12 months after outpatient therapy. Consistent with the recommendations of the Prevention of Falls Network Europe group, three falls variables will be used as the primary outcome measures: the number of fallers, the number of multiple fallers and the falls rate. In addition to quantifying falls, we shall measure mobility, activity limitations and quality of life as secondary outcomes. Discussion This study has the potential to determine whether outpatient movement strategy training combined with falls prevention education or progressive resistance strength training combined with falls prevention education are effective for reducing falls and improving mobility and life quality in people with Parkinson's disease who live at home. Trial registration Australia and New Zealand Clinical Trials Register (ANZCTR

  1. Integrating Social Media and Mobile Sensor Data for Clinical Decision Support: Concept and Requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denecke, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    Social media are increasingly used by individuals for the purpose of collecting data and reporting on the personal health status, on health issues, symptoms and experiences with treatments. Beyond, fitness trackers are more used by individuals to monitor their fitness and health. The health data that is becoming available due to these developments could provide a valuable source for continuous health monitoring, prevention of unexpected health events and clinical decision making since it gives insights into behavior and life habits. However, an integration of the data is challenging. This paper aims triggering the discussion about this current topic. We present a concept for integrating social media data with mobile sensor data and clinical data using digital patient modelling. Further, we collect requirements and challenges for a possible realization of the concept. Challenges include the data volume, reliability and semantic interoperability.

  2. Design, development, and clinical evaluation of the electronic mobility cane for vision rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatlawande, Shripad; Mahadevappa, Manjunatha; Mukherjee, Jayanta; Biswas, Mukul; Das, Debabrata; Gupta, Somedeb

    2014-11-01

    This paper proposes a new electronic mobility cane (EMC) for providing obstacle detection and way-finding assistance to the visually impaired people. The main feature of this cane is that it constructs the logical map of the surrounding environment to deduce the priority information. It provides a simplified representation of the surrounding environment without causing any information overload. It conveys this priority information to the subject by using intuitive vibration, audio or voice feedback. The other novel features of the EMC are staircase detection and nonformal distance scaling scheme. It also provides information about the floor status. It consists of a low power embedded system with ultrasonic sensors and safety indicators. The EMC was subjected to series of clinical evaluations in order to verify its design and to assess its ability to assist the subjects in their daily-life mobility. Clinical evaluations were performed with 16 totally blind and four low vision subjects. All subjects walked controlled and the real-world test environments with the EMC and the traditional white cane. The evaluation results and significant scores of subjective measurements have shown the usefulness of the EMC in vision rehabilitation services.

  3. Exploration of the affordances of mobile devices in integrating theory and clinical practice in an undergraduate nursing programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willemse, Juliana J; Bozalek, Vivienne

    2015-09-28

    Promoting the quality and effectiveness of nursing education is an important factor, given the increased demand for nursing professionals. It is important to establish learning environments that provide personalised guidance and feedback to students about their practical skills and application of their theoretical knowledge. To explore and describe the knowledge and points of view of students and educators about introduction of new technologies into an undergraduate nursing programme. The qualitative design used Tesch's (1990) steps of descriptive data analysis to complete thematic analysis of the data collected in focus group discussions (FGDs) andindividual interviews to identify themes. Themes identified from the students' FGDs and individual interviews included:mobile devices as a communication tool; email, WhatsApp and Facebook as methods of communication; WhatsApp as a method of communication; nurses as role-models in the clinical setting; setting personal boundaries; and impact of mobile devices in clinical practiceon professionalism. Themes identified from the FGD, individual interviews and a discussion session held with educators included: peer learning via mobile devices; email, WhatsApp and Facebook as methods of communication; the mobile device as a positive learning method; students need practical guidance; and ethical concerns in clinical facilities about Internet access and use of mobile devices. The research project established an understanding of the knowledge and points of view of students and educators regarding introduction of new technologies into an undergraduate nursing programme with the aim of enhancing integration of theory and clinical practice through use of mobile devices.

  4. Outpatient Tinnitus Clinic, Self-Help Web Platform, or Mobile Application to Recruit Tinnitus Study Samples?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Probst, Thomas; Pryss, Rüdiger C; Langguth, Berthold; Spiliopoulou, Myra; Landgrebe, Michael; Vesala, Markku; Harrison, Stephen; Schobel, Johannes; Reichert, Manfred; Stach, Michael; Schlee, Winfried

    2017-01-01

    For understanding the heterogeneity of tinnitus, large samples are required. However, investigations on how samples recruited by different methods differ from each other are lacking. In the present study, three large samples each recruited by different means were compared: N = 5017 individuals registered at a self-help web platform for tinnitus (crowdsourcing platform Tinnitus Talk), N = 867 users of a smart mobile application for tinnitus (crowdsensing platform TrackYourTinnitus), and N = 3786 patients contacting an outpatient tinnitus clinic (Tinnitus Center of the University Hospital Regensburg). The three samples were compared regarding age, gender, and duration of tinnitus (month or years perceiving tinnitus; subjective report) using chi-squared tests. The three samples significantly differed from each other in age, gender and tinnitus duration (p platform were younger, users of the Tinnitus Talk crowdsourcing platform had more often female gender, and users of both newer technologies (crowdsourcing and crowdsensing) had more frequently acute/subacute tinnitus (20 years). The implications of these findings for clinical research are that newer technologies such as crowdsourcing and crowdsensing platforms offer the possibility to reach individuals hard to get in contact with at an outpatient tinnitus clinic. Depending on the aims and the inclusion/exclusion criteria of a given study, different recruiting strategies (clinic and/or newer technologies) offer different advantages and disadvantages. In general, the representativeness of study results might be increased when tinnitus study samples are recruited in the clinic as well as via crowdsourcing and crowdsensing.

  5. Assessment of Mobility in Older People Hospitalized for Medical Illness Using de Morton Mobility Index and Cumulated Ambulation Score-Validity and Minimal Clinical Important Difference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trøstrup, Jeanette; Andersen, Helle; Kam, Charlotte Agger Meiner; Magnusson, S Peter; Beyer, Nina

    2017-12-15

    Older adults acutely hospitalized for medical illness typically have comorbidity and disability, and inhospital physical inactivity greatly increases the likelihood of developing new disability. Thus, assessment of the patients' mobility status is crucial for planning and carrying out targeted interventions that ensure mobilization during hospital admission. The aim of this study was to determine convergent validity, known group validity, floor and ceiling effects, and anchor-based minimal clinically important difference (MCID) of the more time-consuming de Morton Mobility Index (DEMMI) and the less time-consuming Cumulated Ambulation Score (CAS) in older adults acutely hospitalized for medical illness. In this multicenter cohort study, 235 older hospitalized adults, with a mean (standard deviation) age of 84.8 (7.1) years, were consecutively included. Assessments of mobility using the DEMMI (score range 0-100), the CAS (score range 0-6), and the Barthel Index (BI, score range 0-100) were performed by physical or occupational therapists at hospital admission and discharge. In addition, at discharge patients and therapists were independently asked to assess the patients' current mobility status compared with their mobility status at hospital admission using the Global Rating of Change scale. Complete data sets were obtained for 155 patients. Baseline characteristics of those with complete data sets did not differ from those with incomplete data sets, except for the number of secondary diagnoses, which was lower in the latter. Significant and moderate relationships existed both at admission and at discharge between scores in the DEMMI and the BI (rs = 0.68, P mobility and can be considered to have the required properties for measuring mobility in older adults who are hospitalized in medical and geriatric wards. In contrast, the CAS appears to be appropriate to identify whether a patient is independently mobile or needs assistance, while the measure is less suitable

  6. GAP Activity, but Not Subcellular Targeting, Is Required for Arabidopsis RanGAP Cellular and Developmental Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boruc, Joanna; Griffis, Anna H N; Rodrigo-Peiris, Thushani; Zhou, Xiao; Tilford, Bailey; Van Damme, Daniël; Meier, Iris

    2015-07-01

    The Ran GTPase activating protein (RanGAP) is important to Ran signaling involved in nucleocytoplasmic transport, spindle organization, and postmitotic nuclear assembly. Unlike vertebrate and yeast RanGAP, plant RanGAP has an N-terminal WPP domain, required for nuclear envelope association and several mitotic locations of Arabidopsis thaliana RanGAP1. A double null mutant of the two Arabidopsis RanGAP homologs is gametophyte lethal. Here, we created a series of mutants with various reductions in RanGAP levels by combining a RanGAP1 null allele with different RanGAP2 alleles. As RanGAP level decreases, the severity of developmental phenotypes increases, but nuclear import is unaffected. To dissect whether the GAP activity and/or the subcellular localization of RanGAP are responsible for the observed phenotypes, this series of rangap mutants were transformed with RanGAP1 variants carrying point mutations abolishing the GAP activity and/or the WPP-dependent subcellular localization. The data show that plant development is differentially affected by RanGAP mutant allele combinations of increasing severity and requires the GAP activity of RanGAP, while the subcellular positioning of RanGAP is dispensable. In addition, our results indicate that nucleocytoplasmic trafficking can tolerate both partial depletion of RanGAP and delocalization of RanGAP from the nuclear envelope. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  7. Hybrid RANS/LES applied to complex terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bechmann, Andreas; Sørensen, Niels N.

    2011-01-01

    Large Eddy Simulation (LES) of the wind in complex terrain is limited by computational cost. The number of computational grid points required to resolve the near-ground turbulent structures (eddies) are very high. The traditional solution to the problem has been to apply a wall function...... aspect ratio in the RANS layer and thereby resolve the mean near-wall velocity profile. The method is applicable to complex terrain and the benefits of traditional LES are kept intact. Using the hybrid method, simulations of the wind over a natural complex terrain near Wellington in New Zealand...

  8. Mobile phones in clinical practice: reducing the risk of bacterial contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, D; Leonard, C; Breen, H; Graydon, R; O'Gorman, C; Kirk, S

    2014-09-01

    Mobile smart phones have become increasingly integrated into the practice of doctors and allied medical professionals. Recent studies suggest them to represent reservoirs for pathogens with potential to cause nosocomial infections. This study aimed to investigate the level of contamination on phones used on surgical wards and identify strategies for their safe use within clinical areas. Fifty mobile phones were taken from members of the multidisciplinary team working in a surgical unit. Phones were swabbed by two trained investigators using a standardised technique and samples streaked out using an automated specimen inoculator onto two types of culture media (Columbia blood agar and MacConkey agar). Colonies were identified and counted by a single trained investigator in a blinded fashion. Simultaneously a questionnaire investigating usage levels of phones was given to 150 healthcare workers. Sixty per cent of phones sampled had some form of contaminant isolated from their phone. Thirty-one (62%) of phones had only three colonies or less isolated on medium. No pathogenic or drug resistant strains of bacteria were identified. A total of 88% of individuals sampled by questionnaire used their phone within the workplace of which 55% used it for clinical purposes. Sixty-three per cent expected there to be some form of contaminant on their phone with only 37% admitting to cleaning it regularly. Seventy-five per cent of people did not view a ban on phones as a practical solution was they found to be an infection risk. Touch screen smart phones may be used safely in a clinical environment, with a low risk of cross-contamination of nosocomial bacteria to patients, in the setting of effective adherence to hand hygiene policies. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. A Mobile App for Hypertension Management Based on Clinical Practice Guidelines: Development and Deployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hannah; Park, Hyeoun-Ae

    2016-02-02

    Hypertension is a chronic and lifestyle-related disease that requires continuous preventive care. Although there are many evidence-based clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) for hypertension management, applying them to daily management can be difficult for patients with hypertension. A mobile app, based on CPGs, could help patients with hypertension manage their disease. To develop a mobile app for hypertension management based on CPGs and evaluate its effectiveness in patients with hypertension with respect to perceived usefulness, user satisfaction, and medication adherence. The hypertension management app (HMA) was developed according to the Web-Roadmap methodology, which includes planning, analysis, design, implementation, and evaluation phases. The HMA was provided to individuals (N=38) with hypertension. Medication adherence was measured before and after using the HMA for 4 weeks. The perceived usefulness and user satisfaction were surveyed in the patients who completed the medication adherence survey. Of the 38 study participants, 29 (76%) participated in medical adherence assessment. Medication adherence, as measured by the Modified Morisky Scale, was significantly improved in these patients after they had used the HMA (P=.001). The perceived usefulness score was 3.7 out of 5. The user satisfaction scores, with respect to using the HMA for blood pressure recording, medication recording, data sending, alerting, recommending, and educating about medication were 4.3, 3.8, 3.1, 3.2, 3.4, and 3.8 out of 5, respectively, in the 19 patients. This study showed that a mobile app for hypertension management based on CPGs is effective at improving medication adherence.

  10. Mobile learning app: A novel method to teach clinical decision making in prosthodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Saee; Chahande, Jaishree; Rathi, Akhil

    2017-01-01

    Prosthodontics involves replacing lost dentofacial structures using artificial substitutes. Due to availability of many materials and techniques, clinician's clinical decision-making regarding appropriate selection of prosthesis requires critical thinking abilities and is demanding. Especially during graduate training years, learners do not receive the exposure to a variety of cases, thus their clinical reasoning skills are not developed optimally. Therefore, using the trend of incorporating technology in education, we developed a mobile learning app for this purpose. The aim of this study was to evaluate learners' perceptions of this app's utility and impact on their clinical decision-making skills. After taking informed consent, interns of the Department of Prosthodontics of VSPM Dental College, Nagpur, India, during the academic year May 2015-May 2016 were sent the link for the app to be installed in their Android smartphones. Their perceptions were recorded on a feedback questionnaire using 5-point Likert scale. The script concordance test (SCT) was used to check for changes in clinical reasoning abilities. Out of 120 students who were sent the link, 102 downloaded the link and 92 completed the feedback questionnaire and appeared for the SCT (response rate: 76%). The overall response to the app was positive for more than two-thirds of interns, who reported a greater confidence in their clinical decision-making around prostheses through this app and 94% of the students felt that this app should be regularly used along with conventional teaching techniques. Mean SCT scores were pretest 41.5 (±1.7) and posttest 63 (±2.4) (P learning app, is an effective way to improve clinical reasoning skills for planning prosthodontic rehabilitation. It is well received by students.

  11. Glenohumeral posterior mobilization versus conventional physiotherapy for primary adhesive capsulitis: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez Espinoza, Héctor Joaquín; Pavez, Francisco; Guajardo, Cristopher; Acosta, Manuel

    2015-09-22

    To compare the short-term efficacy of a glenohumeral posterior mobilization technique versus conventional physiotherapy for the improvement of the range of external rotation in patients with primary adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder. This is a randomized clinical trial conducted at Hospital Clinico San Borja Arriaran in Chile. Fifty-seven patients with an age range of 50 to 58 years old were enrolled in two groups. Both groups were randomized to receive a treatment of 10 sessions: the experimental group (n=29) received a glenohumeral posterior mobilization technique after training with a cycle ergometer, and the control group (n=28) received conventional physiotherapy. The primary outcome measure was range of passive movement in external rotation; secondary outcomes were forward flexion and shoulder abduction, pain perception using the visual analogue scale and functionality test using the Constant-Murley Score. The study had the statistical power to detect a difference of four degrees between the groups in the improvement of the range of external rotation at the end of the treatment period. The experimental group showed a significant improvement with a mean difference of 46.3 degrees (SD=8.7) compared to 18.1 (SD=7.2) in the control group (pphysiotherapy treatment. The degree of increase in shoulder external rotation is more than 20 degrees beyond the increase achieved with conventional treatment.

  12. Comparision of Fixed-Bearing and Mobile-Bearing Total Knee Arthroplasties: Short-Term Clinical Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burak Kaymaz

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Mobile-bearing knee replacements were introduced as an alternative to fixed-bearing prosthesis to decrease the wear. Despite theoretical advantages of mobile bearings prosthesis, it is still controversial whether there is any clinically significant difference between the patients treated with fixed and mobile bearing prosthesis. The aim of this study is to compare the short-term clinical outcomes of fixed  versus mobile-bearing prosthesises.Methodology: Patients who were diagnosed as grade 4 gonartrosis and operated for total knee arthroplasty between years 2010-2014 were evaluated and 33 patients (40 knees were included in the study. From hospital medical and radiological databases, age and gender of the patients, duration of operation, number of blood tranfusions postoperatively and pre-operative range of motions (ROM of the operated knees were recorded and all the patients were assessed with  Knee Society Knee Score. Results:  Twenty-two knees (12 female, 10 male were present in fixed bearing group (Group I and 18 knees (13 female, 5 male were present in mobile bearing group (Group II. There was no statistically significant difference between the groups in terms of pre-operative range of motions (ROM, post-operative range of motions (ROM, number of blood transfusions. Knee Society Knee Score was 167.7±23.4 in Group I and 178.1±22.4 in Group II. Mobile bearing prosthesis group was found to have better knee score and this difference was near to statistically significance (p=0.055.Conclusions: Clinical outcomes of mobile bearing prosthesis seems to be better in short-term follow-up but long-term results should also be investigated before recommending the mobile bearing prosthesises.

  13. Médecins Sans Frontières' Clinical Guidance mobile application: analysis of a new electronic health tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, V; Dalwai, M; Smith, R Vincent; Jemmy, J-P

    2015-12-21

    Many health care workers lack access to clinical support tools in rural and resource-limited settings. To address this gap, the Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) Clinical Guidelines manual was converted into a static mobile health reference application (app) entitled MSF Guidance. The app's utility and growth was examined, and within 6 months of its launch 150 countries had downloaded the app, with demonstrated retention among new and existing users. With over 3500 downloads and 36 000 sessions amounting to 250 000 screen views, MSF Guidance is a new mobile health platform with widely demonstrated utility, including potential use as an epidemiological tool, where clinical conditions investigated by app users were found to correlate with geographical outbreaks. These findings show that mobile apps can be used to disseminate health information effectively.

  14. The Use and Effectiveness of Mobile Apps for Depression: Results From a Fully Remote Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arean, Patricia A; Hallgren, Kevin A; Jordan, Joshua T; Gazzaley, Adam; Atkins, David C; Heagerty, Patrick J; Anguera, Joaquin A

    2016-12-20

    Mobile apps for mental health have the potential to overcome access barriers to mental health care, but there is little information on whether patients use the interventions as intended and the impact they have on mental health outcomes. The objective of our study was to document and compare use patterns and clinical outcomes across the United States between 3 different self-guided mobile apps for depression. Participants were recruited through Web-based advertisements and social media and were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 mood apps. Treatment and assessment were conducted remotely on each participant's smartphone or tablet with minimal contact with study staff. We enrolled 626 English-speaking adults (≥18 years old) with mild to moderate depression as determined by a 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) score ≥5, or if their score on item 10 was ≥2. The apps were (1) Project: EVO, a cognitive training app theorized to mitigate depressive symptoms by improving cognitive control, (2) iPST, an app based on an evidence-based psychotherapy for depression, and (3) Health Tips, a treatment control. Outcomes were scores on the PHQ-9 and the Sheehan Disability Scale. Adherence to treatment was measured as number of times participants opened and used the apps as instructed. We randomly assigned 211 participants to iPST, 209 to Project: EVO, and 206 to Health Tips. Among the participants, 77.0% (482/626) had a PHQ-9 score >10 (moderately depressed). Among the participants using the 2 active apps, 57.9% (243/420) did not download their assigned intervention app but did not differ demographically from those who did. Differential treatment effects were present in participants with baseline PHQ-9 score >10, with the cognitive training and problem-solving apps resulting in greater effects on mood than the information control app (χ22=6.46, P=.04). Mobile apps for depression appear to have their greatest impact on people with more moderate levels of depression. In

  15. A Game-Theoretical Approach for Spectrum Efficiency Improvement in Cloud-RAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuofu Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As tremendous mobile devices access to the Internet in the future, the cells which can provide high data rate and more capacity are expected to be deployed. Specifically, in the next generation of mobile communication 5G, cloud computing is supposed to be applied to radio access network. In cloud radio access network (Cloud-RAN, the traditional base station is divided into two parts, that is, remote radio heads (RRHs and base band units (BBUs. RRHs are geographically distributed and densely deployed, so as to achieve high data rate and low latency. However, the ultradense deployment inevitably deteriorates spectrum efficiency due to the severer intercell interference among RRHs. In this paper, the downlink spectrum efficiency can be improved through the cooperative transmission based on forming the coalitions of RRHs. We formulate the problem as a coalition formation game in partition form. In the process of coalition formation, each RRH can join or leave one coalition to maximize its own individual utility while taking into account the coalition utility at the same time. Moreover, the convergence and stability of the resulting coalition structure are studied. The numeric simulation result demonstrates that the proposed approach based on coalition formation game is superior to the noncooperative method in terms of the aggregate coalition utility.

  16. Aggresome formation is regulated by RanBPM through an interaction with HDAC6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louisa M. Salemi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In conditions of proteasomal impairment, the build-up of damaged or misfolded proteins activates a cellular response leading to the recruitment of damaged proteins into perinuclear aggregates called aggresomes. Aggresome formation involves the retrograde transport of cargo proteins along the microtubule network and is dependent on the histone deacetylase HDAC6. Here we show that ionizing radiation (IR promotes Ran-Binding Protein M (RanBPM relocalization into discrete perinuclear foci where it co-localizes with aggresome components ubiquitin, dynein and HDAC6, suggesting that the RanBPM perinuclear clusters correspond to aggresomes. RanBPM was also recruited to aggresomes following treatment with the proteasome inhibitor MG132 and the DNA-damaging agent etoposide. Strikingly, aggresome formation by HDAC6 was markedly impaired in RanBPM shRNA cells, but was restored by re-expression of RanBPM. RanBPM was found to interact with HDAC6 and to inhibit its deacetylase activity. This interaction was abrogated by a RanBPM deletion of its LisH/CTLH domain, which also prevented aggresome formation, suggesting that RanBPM promotes aggresome formation through an association with HDAC6. Our results suggest that RanBPM regulates HDAC6 activity and is a central regulator of aggresome formation.

  17. How to identify, assess and utilise mobile medical applications in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aungst, T D; Clauson, K A; Misra, S; Lewis, T L; Husain, I

    2014-02-01

    There are thousands of medical applications for mobile devices targeting use by healthcare professionals. However, several factors related to the structure of the existing market for medical applications create significant barriers preventing practitioners from effectively identifying mobile medical applications for individual professional use. To define existing market factors relevant to selection of medical applications and describe a framework to empower clinicians to identify, assess and utilise mobile medical applications in their own practice. Resources available on the Internet regarding mobile medical applications, guidelines and published research on mobile medical applications. Mobile application stores (e.g. iTunes, Google Play) are not effective means of identifying mobile medical applications. Users of mobile devices that desire to implement mobile medical applications into practice need to carefully assess individual applications prior to utilisation. Searching and identifying mobile medical applications requires clinicians to utilise multiple references to determine what application is best for their individual practice methods. This can be done with a cursory exploration of mobile application stores and then moving onto other available resources published in the literature or through Internet resources (e.g. blogs, medical websites, social media). Clinicians must also take steps to ensure that an identified mobile application can be integrated into practice after carefully reviewing it themselves. Clinicians seeking to identify mobile medical application for use in their individual practice should use a combination of app stores, published literature, web-based resources, and personal review to ensure safe and appropriate use. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Role of the Vision Van, a mobile ophthalmic outpatient clinic, in the Great East Japan Earthquake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki K

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Kenya Yuki,1 Toru Nakazawa,2 Daijiro Kurosaka,3 Tsunehiko Yoshida,4–6 Eduardo C Alfonso,7 Richard K Lee,7 Shigeru Takano,8 Kazuo Tsubota1 1Department of Ophthalmology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan; 2Department of Ophthalmology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Miyagi, Japan; 3Department of Ophthalmology, Iwate Medical University, Iwate, Japan; 4The House of Representatives of Japan, Tokyo, Japan; 5Nagoya University Hospital, Aichi, Japan; 6Aichi Medical University Hospital, Aichi, Japan; 7Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, USA; 8Japan Ophthalmological Association, Tokyo, Japan Purpose: The Great East Japan Earthquake of March 11, 2011 triggered powerful tsunami waves off the northeastern Pacific coast of Japan that destroyed almost all of the built-up areas along the coast. The study reported here examined the role played by the Vision Van, a mobile outpatient ophthalmological clinic, in providing eye care to disaster evacuees. Methods: This was a retrospective case-series study of 2,070 victims (male: 732, female: 1,338 who visited the Vision Van. The subjects' medical records were examined retrospectively and analyzed in terms of age, sex, and date of visit to the Vision Van. Information regarding each patient's chief complaint, diagnosis, medication(s prescribed, and eyeglasses and contact lenses provided, was also examined. Results: The Vision Van was used to conduct medical examinations on 39 days between April 23 and June 29, 2011. The average number of subjects visiting the Vision Van each day was 53±31 (range: 7–135, with examinations carried out in Miyagi Prefecture and Iwate Prefecture. The most frequent complaint was a need for eye drops (871/2,070 [42.1%]. The second and third most frequent complaints, respectively, were the need for contact lenses (294/2,070 [14.2%] and eyeglasses (280/2,070 [13.5%]. The most frequent ocular disease diagnosis

  19. Outpatient Tinnitus Clinic, Self-Help Web Platform, or Mobile Application to Recruit Tinnitus Study Samples?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Probst

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available For understanding the heterogeneity of tinnitus, large samples are required. However, investigations on how samples recruited by different methods differ from each other are lacking. In the present study, three large samples each recruited by different means were compared: N = 5017 individuals registered at a self-help web platform for tinnitus (crowdsourcing platform Tinnitus Talk, N = 867 users of a smart mobile application for tinnitus (crowdsensing platform TrackYourTinnitus, and N = 3786 patients contacting an outpatient tinnitus clinic (Tinnitus Center of the University Hospital Regensburg. The three samples were compared regarding age, gender, and duration of tinnitus (month or years perceiving tinnitus; subjective report using chi-squared tests. The three samples significantly differed from each other in age, gender and tinnitus duration (p < 0.05. Users of the TrackYourTinnitus crowdsensing platform were younger, users of the Tinnitus Talk crowdsourcing platform had more often female gender, and users of both newer technologies (crowdsourcing and crowdsensing had more frequently acute/subacute tinnitus (<3 months and 4–6 months as well as a very long tinnitus duration (>20 years. The implications of these findings for clinical research are that newer technologies such as crowdsourcing and crowdsensing platforms offer the possibility to reach individuals hard to get in contact with at an outpatient tinnitus clinic. Depending on the aims and the inclusion/exclusion criteria of a given study, different recruiting strategies (clinic and/or newer technologies offer different advantages and disadvantages. In general, the representativeness of study results might be increased when tinnitus study samples are recruited in the clinic as well as via crowdsourcing and crowdsensing.

  20. Mobile Medical Education (MoMEd) - how mobile information resources contribute to learning for undergraduate clinical students - a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Bethany S; Rafique, Jethin; Vincent, Tim R; Fairclough, Jil; Packer, Mark H; Vincent, Richard; Haq, Inam

    2012-01-12

    Mobile technology is increasingly being used by clinicians to access up-to-date information for patient care. These offer learning opportunities in the clinical setting for medical students but the underlying pedagogic theories are not clear. A conceptual framework is needed to understand these further. Our initial questions were how the medical students used the technology, how it enabled them to learn and what theoretical underpinning supported the learning. 387 medical students were provided with a personal digital assistant (PDA) loaded with medical resources for the duration of their clinical studies. Outcomes were assessed by a mixed-methods triangulation approach using qualitative and quantitative analysis of surveys, focus groups and usage tracking data. Learning occurred in context with timely access to key facts and through consolidation of knowledge via repetition. The PDA was an important addition to the learning ecology rather than a replacement. Contextual factors impacted on use both positively and negatively. Barriers included concerns of interrupting the clinical interaction and of negative responses from teachers and patients. Students preferred a future involving smartphone platforms. This is the first study to describe the learning ecology and pedagogic basis behind the use of mobile learning technologies in a large cohort of undergraduate medical students in the clinical environment. We have developed a model for mobile learning in the clinical setting that shows how different theories contribute to its use taking into account positive and negative contextual factors.The lessons from this study are transferable internationally, to other health care professions and to the development of similar initiatives with newer technology such as smartphones or tablet computers.

  1. Mobile Medical Education (MoMEd - how mobile information resources contribute to learning for undergraduate clinical students - a mixed methods study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davies Bethany S

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mobile technology is increasingly being used by clinicians to access up-to-date information for patient care. These offer learning opportunities in the clinical setting for medical students but the underlying pedagogic theories are not clear. A conceptual framework is needed to understand these further. Our initial questions were how the medical students used the technology, how it enabled them to learn and what theoretical underpinning supported the learning. Methods 387 medical students were provided with a personal digital assistant (PDA loaded with medical resources for the duration of their clinical studies. Outcomes were assessed by a mixed-methods triangulation approach using qualitative and quantitative analysis of surveys, focus groups and usage tracking data. Results Learning occurred in context with timely access to key facts and through consolidation of knowledge via repetition. The PDA was an important addition to the learning ecology rather than a replacement. Contextual factors impacted on use both positively and negatively. Barriers included concerns of interrupting the clinical interaction and of negative responses from teachers and patients. Students preferred a future involving smartphone platforms. Conclusions This is the first study to describe the learning ecology and pedagogic basis behind the use of mobile learning technologies in a large cohort of undergraduate medical students in the clinical environment. We have developed a model for mobile learning in the clinical setting that shows how different theories contribute to its use taking into account positive and negative contextual factors. The lessons from this study are transferable internationally, to other health care professions and to the development of similar initiatives with newer technology such as smartphones or tablet computers.

  2. Do mobile clinics provide high-quality antenatal care? A comparison of care delivery, knowledge outcomes and perception of quality of care between fixed and mobile clinics in central Haiti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Erica; Stoltzfus, Rebecca J; Michaud, Lesly; Pierre, Gracia Lionel Fils; Vermeylen, Francoise; Pelletier, David

    2017-10-16

    Antenatal care (ANC) is an important health service for women in developing countries, with numerous proven benefits. Global coverage of ANC has steadily increased over the past 30 years, in part due to increased community-based outreach. However, commensurate improvements in health outcomes such as reductions in the prevalence of maternal anemia and infants born small-for-gestational age have not been achieved, even with increased coverage, indicating that quality of care may be inadequate. Mobile clinics are one community-based strategy used to further improve coverage of ANC, but their quality of care delivery has rarely been evaluated. To determine the quality of care of ANC in central Haiti, we compared adherence to national guidelines between fixed and mobile clinics by performing direct observations of antenatal care consultations and exit interviews with recipients of care using a multi-stage random sampling procedure. Outcome variables were eight components of care, and women's knowledge and perception of care quality. There were significant differences in the predicted proportion or probability of recommended services for four of eight care components, including intake, laboratory examinations, infection control, and supplies, iron folic acid supplements and Tetanus Toxoid vaccine provided to women. These care components were more likely performed in fixed clinics, except for distribution of supplies, iron-folic acid supplements, and Tetanus Toxoid vaccine, more likely provided in mobile clinics. There were no differences between clinic type for the proportion of total physical exam procedures performed, health and communication messages delivered, provider communication or documentation. Women's knowledge about educational topics was poor, but women perceived extremely high quality of care in both clinic models. Although adherence to guidelines differed by clinic type for half of the care components, both clinics had a low percentage of overall services

  3. Assessing the Use of Mobile Health Technology by Patients: An Observational Study in Primary Care Clinics

    OpenAIRE

    Ramirez, Veronica; Johnson, Emily; Gonzalez, Cesar; Ramirez, Vanessa; Rubino, Barbara; Rossetti, Gina

    2016-01-01

    Background There is significant potential for mobile health technology to improve health outcomes for patients with chronic diseases. However, there is a need for further development of mobile health technology that would help to improve the health of lower-income communities. Objective The study objective was to assess mobile phone and app usage among a culturally diverse patient population, and to determine whether patients would be interested in using mobile health technology to help manag...

  4. Anticoagulation manager: development of a clinical decision support mobile application for management of anticoagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chih-Wen Cheng; Hang Wu; Thompson, Pamela J; Taylor, Julie R; Zehnbauer, Barbara A; Wilson, Karlyn K; Wang, May D

    2016-08-01

    Patients with certain clotting disorders or conditions have a greater risk of developing arterial or venous clots and downstream embolisms, strokes, and arterial insufficiency. These patients need prescription anticoagulant drugs to reduce the possibility of clot formation. However, historically, the clinical decision making workflow in determining the correct type and dosage of anticoagulant(s) is part science and part art. To address this problem, we developed Anticoagulation Manager, an intelligent clinical decision workflow management system on iOS-based mobile devices to help clinicians effectively choose the most appropriate and helpful follow-up clotting tests for patients with a common clotting profile. The app can provide physicians guidance to prescribe the most appropriate medication for patients in need of anticoagulant drugs. This intelligent app was jointly designed and developed by medical professionals in CDC and engineers at Georgia Tech, and will be evaluated by physicians for ease-of-use, robustness, flexibility, and scalability. Eventually, it will be deployed and shared in both physician community and developer community.

  5. Mobile devices for the remote acquisition of physiological and behavioral biomarkers in psychiatric clinical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    W Adams, Zachary; McClure, Erin A; Gray, Kevin M; Danielson, Carla Kmett; Treiber, Frank A; Ruggiero, Kenneth J

    2017-02-01

    Psychiatric disorders are linked to a variety of biological, psychological, and contextual causes and consequences. Laboratory studies have elucidated the importance of several key physiological and behavioral biomarkers in the study of psychiatric disorders, but much less is known about the role of these biomarkers in naturalistic settings. These gaps are largely driven by methodological barriers to assessing biomarker data rapidly, reliably, and frequently outside the clinic or laboratory. Mobile health (mHealth) tools offer new opportunities to study relevant biomarkers in concert with other types of data (e.g., self-reports, global positioning system data). This review provides an overview on the state of this emerging field and describes examples from the literature where mHealth tools have been used to measure a wide array of biomarkers in the context of psychiatric functioning (e.g., psychological stress, anxiety, autism, substance use). We also outline advantages and special considerations for incorporating mHealth tools for remote biomarker measurement into studies of psychiatric illness and treatment and identify several specific opportunities for expanding this promising methodology. Integrating mHealth tools into this area may dramatically improve psychiatric science and facilitate highly personalized clinical care of psychiatric disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A Taylor-Microscale Transport Model for RANS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israel, Daniel; Hsu, Abigail; Rudolph, Joshua

    2017-11-01

    Since the first development of complete two-equation RANS models, there have been a variety of proposals for the choice of a second scaling quantity. Some of the most popular have been a time-scale ω (Kolmogorov, 1942; Wilcox, 1998), the dissipation rate ɛ (Harlow et al., 1968), the integral length-scale L, and the product kl (Mellor et al., 1982). All of these are formally equivalent in the production and dissipation terms, and differ only in which quantity is turbulently diffused. They also all rely on an equilibrium assumption that links the dissipation rate at the small scales to the scale of the large eddies. We propose using the Taylor microscale as the second scale. This has several nice properties, and also exhibits some interesting mathematical differences from conventional models. We show results for some simple shear flows using the new model.

  7. Development of a wheelchair mobility skills test for children and adolescents: combining evidence with clinical expertise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sol, Marleen Elisabeth; Verschuren, Olaf; de Groot, Laura; de Groot, Janke Frederike

    2017-02-13

    Wheelchair mobility skills (WMS) training is regarded by children using a manual wheelchair and their parents as an important factor to improve participation and daily physical activity. Currently, there is no outcome measure available for the evaluation of WMS in children. Several wheelchair mobility outcome measures have been developed for adults, but none of these have been validated in children. Therefore the objective of this study is to develop a WMS outcome measure for children using the current knowledge from literature in combination with the clinical expertise of health care professionals, children and their parents. Mixed methods approach. Phase 1: Item identification of WMS items through a systematic review using the 'COnsensus-based Standards for the selection of health Measurement Instruments' (COSMIN) recommendations. Phase 2: Item selection and validation of relevant WMS items for children, using a focus group and interviews with children using a manual wheelchair, their parents and health care professionals. Phase 3: Feasibility of the newly developed Utrecht Pediatric Wheelchair Mobility Skills Test (UP-WMST) through pilot testing. Phase 1: Data analysis and synthesis of nine WMS related outcome measures showed there is no widely used outcome measure with levels of evidence across all measurement properties. However, four outcome measures showed some levels of evidence on reliability and validity for adults. Twenty-two WMS items with the best clinimetric properties were selected for further analysis in phase 2. Phase 2: Fifteen items were deemed as relevant for children, one item needed adaptation and six items were considered not relevant for assessing WMS in children. Phase 3: Two health care professionals administered the UP-WMST in eight children. The instructions of the UP-WMST were clear, but the scoring method of the height difference items needed adaptation. The outdoor items for rolling over soft surface and the side slope item were

  8. Exploration of the affordances of mobile devices in integrating theory and clinical practice in an undergraduate nursing programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana J. Willemse

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Promoting the quality and effectiveness of nursing education is an important factor, given the increased demand for nursing professionals. It is important to establish learning environments that provide personalised guidance and feedback to students about their practical skills and application of their theoretical knowledge.Objective: To explore and describe the knowledge and points of view of students and educators about introduction of new technologies into an undergraduate nursing programme.Method: The qualitative design used Tesch’s (1990 steps of descriptive data analysis to complete thematic analysis of the data collected in focus group discussions (FGDs andindividual interviews to identify themes.Results: Themes identified from the students’ FGDs and individual interviews included:mobile devices as a communication tool; email, WhatsApp and Facebook as methods of communication; WhatsApp as a method of communication; nurses as role-models in the clinical setting; setting personal boundaries; and impact of mobile devices in clinical practiceon professionalism. Themes identified from the FGD, individual interviews and a discussion session held with educators included: peer learning via mobile devices; email, WhatsApp and Facebook as methods of communication; the mobile device as a positive learning method; students need practical guidance; and ethical concerns in clinical facilities about Internet access and use of mobile devices.Conclusion: The research project established an understanding of the knowledge and points of view of students and educators regarding introduction of new technologies into an undergraduate nursing programme with the aim of enhancing integration of theory and clinical practice through use of mobile devices.

  9. How Is RAN Related to Reading Fluency? A Comprehensive Examination of the Prominent Theoretical Accounts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, Timothy C.; Spanoudis, George C.; Georgiou, George K.

    2016-01-01

    We examined the prominent theoretical explanations of the RAN-reading relationship in a relatively transparent language (Greek) in a sample of children (n = 286) followed from Grade 1 to Grade 2. Specifically, we tested the fit of eight different models, as defined by the type of reading performance predicted (oral vs. silent word reading fluency), the type of RAN tasks (non-alphanumeric vs. alphanumeric), and the RAN effects (direct vs. indirect). Working memory, attention, processing speed, and motor skills were used as “common cause” variables predicting both RAN and reading fluency and phonological awareness and orthographic processing were used as mediators of RAN's effects on reading fluency. The findings of both concurrent and longitudinal analyses indicated that RAN is a unique predictor of oral reading fluency, but not silent reading fluency. Using alphanumeric or non-alphanumeric RAN did not particularly affect the RAN-reading relationship. Both phonological awareness and orthographic processing partly mediated RAN's effects on reading fluency. Theoretical implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:27605918

  10. Encephalomyocarditis virus Leader protein hinge domain is responsible for interactions with Ran GTPase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacot-Davis, Valjean R., E-mail: bacotdavis@wisc.edu [Institute for Molecular Virology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, R.M. Bock Laboratories, 1525 Linden Dr. Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Palmenberg, Ann C., E-mail: acpalmen@wisc.edu [Institute for Molecular Virology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, R.M. Bock Laboratories, 1525 Linden Dr. Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Department of Biochemistry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, R.M. Bock Laboratories, 1525 Linden Dr. Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2013-08-15

    Encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV), a Cardiovirus, initiates its polyprotein with a short 67 amino acid Leader (L) sequence. The protein acts as a unique pathogenicity factor, with anti-host activities which include the triggering of nuclear pore complex hyperphosphorylation and direct binding inhibition of the active cellular transport protein, Ran GTPase. Chemical modifications and protein mutagenesis now map the Ran binding domain to the L hinge-linker region, and in particular, to amino acids 35–40. Large deletions affecting this region were shown previously to diminish Ran binding. New point mutations, especially K35Q, D37A and W40A, preserve the intact L structure, abolish Ran binding and are deficient for nucleoporin (Nup) hyperphosphorylation. Ran itself morphs through multiple configurations, but reacts most effectively with L when in the GDP format, preferably with an empty nucleotide binding pocket. Therefore, L:Ran binding, mediated by the linker-hinge, is a required step in L-induced nuclear transport inhibition. - Highlights: • The hinge domain provides critical residues in Cardiovirus L:Ran complex formation. • Leader prefers to bind Ran in a nucleotide free, GDP-conformation. • L-induced Nup62 phosphorylation is reduced with Ran-deficient binding mutations.

  11. How Is RAN Related to Reading Fluency? A Comprehensive Examination of the Prominent Theoretical Accounts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, Timothy C; Spanoudis, George C; Georgiou, George K

    2016-01-01

    We examined the prominent theoretical explanations of the RAN-reading relationship in a relatively transparent language (Greek) in a sample of children (n = 286) followed from Grade 1 to Grade 2. Specifically, we tested the fit of eight different models, as defined by the type of reading performance predicted (oral vs. silent word reading fluency), the type of RAN tasks (non-alphanumeric vs. alphanumeric), and the RAN effects (direct vs. indirect). Working memory, attention, processing speed, and motor skills were used as "common cause" variables predicting both RAN and reading fluency and phonological awareness and orthographic processing were used as mediators of RAN's effects on reading fluency. The findings of both concurrent and longitudinal analyses indicated that RAN is a unique predictor of oral reading fluency, but not silent reading fluency. Using alphanumeric or non-alphanumeric RAN did not particularly affect the RAN-reading relationship. Both phonological awareness and orthographic processing partly mediated RAN's effects on reading fluency. Theoretical implications of these findings are discussed.

  12. Mobilized dental pulp stem cells for pulp regeneration: initiation of clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Misako; Iohara, Koichiro

    2014-04-01

    Stem cell therapy is a potential strategy to regenerate the dentin-pulp complex, enabling the conservation and restoration of functional teeth. We assessed the efficacy and safety of pulp stem cell transplantation as a prelude before the initiation of clinical trials. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) induces subsets of dental pulp stem cells to form mobilized dental pulp stem cells (MDPSCs). Good manufacturing practice is a prerequisite for the isolation and expansion of MDPSCs that are enriched in stem cells, expressing a high level of trophic factors with properties of high proliferation, migration, and antiapoptotic effects and endowed with regenerative potential. The quality of clinical-grade MDPSCs was assured by the absence of abnormalities/aberrations in karyotype and the lack of tumor formation after transplantation in immunodeficient mice. Autologous transplantation of MDPSCs with G-CSF in pulpectomized teeth in dogs augmented the regeneration of pulp tissue. The combinatorial trophic effects of MDPSCs and G-CSF on cell migration, antiapoptosis, immunosuppression, and neurite outgrowth were also confirmed in vitro. Furthermore, MDPSCs from the aged donors were as potent as the young donors. It is noteworthy that there were no significant age-related changes in biological properties such as stability, regenerative potential, and expression of the senescence markers in MDPSCs. On the other hand, autologous transplantation of MDPSCs with G-CSF induced less regenerated pulp tissue in the aged dogs compared with the young dogs. In conclusion, the preclinical safety, feasibility, and efficacy of pulp regeneration by MDPSCs and G-CSF were established. Therefore, the standardization and establishment of regulatory guidelines for stem cell therapy in clinical endodontics is now a reality. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Student use and perceptions of mobile technology in clinical clerkships - Guidance for curriculum design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Joanna K; Thome, Parker A; Lindeman, Brenessa; Jackson, Daren C; Lidor, Anne O

    2017-01-30

    We examined the types of technology used by medical students in clinical clerkships, and the perception of technology implementation into the curriculum. An online survey about technology use was completed prior to general surgery clinical clerkship. Types of devices and frequency/comfort of use were recorded. Perceptions of the benefits and barriers to technology use in clerkship learning were elicited. 125/131 (95.4%) students responded. Most students owned a smart phone (95.2%), tablet (52.8%), or both (50%); 61.6% spent > 11 h/week learning on a device at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine for educational purposes. Technology use was seen as beneficial by 97.6% of students. Classes that used technology extensively were preferred by 54% of students, although 47.2% perceived decreased faculty/classmate interaction. Students use mobile technology to improve how they learn new material, and prefer taking classes that incorporate information technology. However, in-person/blended curricula are preferable to completely online courses. We examined medical students' use and perceptions of technology in the classroom via online survey (N = 125 students prior to general surgery clinical clerkship). A majority of students owned a smart phone, tablet, or both, and spent >11 h each week learning on one of these devices in the hospital setting. Classes that used technology extensively were preferred by 54% of students, although 47.2% perceived decreased faculty/classmate interaction. Students preferred taking classes that incorporated information technology, but found in-person/blended curricula preferable to completely online courses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. High mobility group box-1 and its clinical value in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun S

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Shanping Sun,1,2 Wei Zhang,2 Zhaoqing Cui,2 Qi Chen,2 Panpan Xie,2 Changxin Zhou,2 Baoguo Liu,2 Xiangeng Peng,2 Yang Zhang21Department of Breast Surgery, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Shandong, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Breast and Thyroid Surgery, Liaocheng People’s Hospital, Liaocheng, Shandong Province, People’s Republic of ChinaBackground: High mobility group box-1 (HMGB1 is a factor regulating malignant tumorigenesis, proliferation, and metastasis, and is associated with poor clinical pathology in various human cancers. We investigated the differential concentrations of HMGB1 in tissues and sera, and their clinical value for diagnosis in patients with breast cancer, benign breast disease, and healthy individuals.Methods: HMGB1 levels in tumor tissues, adjacent normal tissues, and benign breast disease tissues was detected via immunohistochemistry. Serum HMGB1 was measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in 56 patients with breast cancer, 25 patients with benign breast disease, and 30 healthy control subjects. The clinicopathological features of the patients were compared. Tissues were evaluated histopathologically by pathologists.Results: HMGB1 levels in the tissues and sera of patients with breast cancer were significantly higher than those in patients with benign breast disease or normal individuals. The 56 cancer patients were classified as having high tissue HMGB1 levels (n=41 or low tissue HMGB1 levels (n=15, but the corresponsive serum HMGB1 in these two groups was not significantly different. HMGB1 levels in breast cancer tissues significantly correlated with differentiation grade, lymphatic metastasis, and tumor-node-metastasis stage, but not patient age, tumor size, or HER-2/neu expression; no association between serum HMGB1 levels and these clinicopathological parameters was found. The sensitivity and specificity of tissue HMGB1 levels for the diagnosis of breast cancer were 73.21% and 84

  15. Short-term Clinical and Radiographic Results of the Salto Mobile Total Ankle Prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Dong Dong; Choi, Woo Jin; Shim, Dong Woo; Hwang, Yeokgu; Park, Yoo Jung; Lee, Jin Woo

    2017-11-01

    The mobile-bearing Salto total ankle prosthesis has been reported to have promising outcomes. However, clinical reports on this prosthesis are few, and most have been published by the inventors and disclosed consultants. We retrospectively reviewed 59 patients who received Salto prosthesis unilaterally. The average follow-up was 35.9 (range, 6-56) months. Clinical and radiologic results were evaluated. Clinical results were evaluated according to visual analog scale (VAS), American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) ankle-hindfoot score, Ankle Osteoarthritis Scale (AOS) pain and disability score, and ankle range of motion (ROM) in dorsiflexion/plantarflexion. In the radiographic evaluation, we measured the tibial angle (TA), talar angle (TAL), tibial slope, and talocalcaneal angle (TCA) on weightbearing radiographs. By the last follow-up, 7 of 59 patients (11.9%) had undergone reoperation, and 3 of 59 implants (5.1%) had been removed. The prosthesis survival was 94.9% (95% CI, 89.1%-100%). With any reoperation as the endpoint of follow-up, the clinical success rate was 88.1% (95% CI, 79.4%-96.9%). The mean postoperative visual analog scale score, AOFAS ankle-hindfoot score, and Ankle Osteoarthritis Scale pain and disability score improved significantly ( P < .001). The ankle range of motion also improved from preoperative 33.4 ± 16.6 to 40.3 ± 15.5 postoperatively ( P < .001); however, there was no statistically significant change in plantarflexion ( P = .243). Radiolucent areas and osteolysis were found in 28 (47.5%) and 27 (45.8%) patients, respectively. Heterotopic ossification was observed in 13 patients (22.0%). In this series, early clinical and radiographic outcomes of this prosthesis were promising. We believe the early radiolucent lines were probably due to the gap at the implant and bone interface, and they disappeared at the time of osseous integration. However, longer follow-up is necessary to determine the long-term durability and survivorship

  16. ICT and mobile health to improve clinical process delivery. a research project for therapy management process innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locatelli, Paolo; Montefusco, Vittorio; Sini, Elena; Restifo, Nicola; Facchini, Roberta; Torresani, Michele

    2013-01-01

    The volume and the complexity of clinical and administrative information make Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) essential for running and innovating healthcare. This paper tells about a project aimed to design, develop and implement a set of organizational models, acknowledged procedures and ICT tools (Mobile & Wireless solutions and Automatic Identification and Data Capture technologies) to improve actual support, safety, reliability and traceability of a specific therapy management (stem cells). The value of the project is to design a solution based on mobile and identification technology in tight collaboration with physicians and actors involved in the process to ensure usability and effectivenes in process management.

  17. Cloud Radio Access Network architecture. Towards 5G mobile networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Checko, Aleksandra

    Cloud Radio Access Network (C-RAN) is a novel mobile network architecture which can address a number of challenges that mobile operators face while trying to support ever-growing end-users’ needs towards 5th generation of mobile networks (5G). The main idea behind C-RAN is to split the base......, and for the analyzed scenario it can assure synchronization on the nanosecond level, fulfilling mobile network requirements. Furthermore, mechanisms to lower delay and jitter have been identified, namely: source scheduling and preemption. An innovative source scheduling scheme which can minimize jitter has been...

  18. Clinical applicability of nursing outcomes in the evolution of orthopedic patients with Impaired Physical Mobility

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    da Silva, Marcos Barragan; Almeida, Miriam de Abreu; Panato, Bruna Paulsen; Siqueira, Ana Paula de Oliveira; da Silva, Mariana Palma; Reisderfer, Letícia

    2015-01-01

    ...) in the evolution of orthopedic patients with Impaired Physical Mobility longitudinal study conducted in 2012 in a university hospital, with 21 patients undergoing Total Hip Arthroplasty, evaluated...

  19. Contributions of high mobility group box protein in experimental and clinical acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Hiroshi; Matsuda, Tomoyuki; Hashimoto, Satoru; Amaya, Fumimasa; Kitamura, Yoshihiro; Tanaka, Masaki; Kobayashi, Atsuko; Maruyama, Ikuro; Yamada, Shingo; Hasegawa, Naoki; Soejima, Junko; Koh, Hidefumi; Ishizaka, Akitoshi

    2004-12-15

    This study was performed to examine the putative role of high mobility group box (HMGB) protein in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury (ALI). Observations were made (1) in 21 patients who were septic with ALI and 15 patients with normal lung function and (2) in a mouse model 24 hours after intratracheal instillation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The concentrations of HMGB1 were increased in plasma and lung epithelial lining fluid of patients with ALI and mice instilled with LPS. LPS-induced ALI was mitigated by anti-HMGB1 antibody. Although this protein was not detected in the plasma of control humans or mice, the concentrations of HMGB1 in lung epithelial lining fluid or in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were unexpectedly high. The nuclear expression of HMGB1 was apparent in epithelial cells surrounding terminal bronchioles in normal mice, whereas its nuclear and cytoplasmic expression was observed in alveolar macrophages in LPS-instilled mice. Lung instillation of HMGB2 did not cause as much inflammation as HMGB1. Extracellular HMGB1 may play a key role in the pathogenesis of clinical and experimental ALI. However, its expression in normal airways is noteworthy and suggests that it also plays a physiologic role in the lung.

  20. What Clinical Information Is Valuable to Doctors Using Mobile Electronic Medical Records and When?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Junetae; Lee, Yura; Lim, Sanghee; Kim, Jeong Hoon; Lee, Byungtae; Lee, Jae-Ho

    2017-10-18

    There has been a lack of understanding on what types of specific clinical information are most valuable for doctors to access through mobile-based electronic medical records (m-EMRs) and when they access such information. Furthermore, it has not been clearly discussed why the value of such information is high. The goal of this study was to investigate the types of clinical information that are most valuable to doctors to access through an m-EMR and when such information is accessed. Since 2010, an m-EMR has been used in a tertiary hospital in Seoul, South Korea. The usage logs of the m-EMR by doctors were gathered from March to December 2015. Descriptive analyses were conducted to explore the overall usage patterns of the m-EMR. To assess the value of the clinical information provided, the usage patterns of both the m-EMR and a hospital information system (HIS) were compared on an hourly basis. The peak usage times of the m-EMR were defined as continuous intervals having normalized usage values that are greater than 0.5. The usage logs were processed as an indicator representing specific clinical information using factor analysis. Random intercept logistic regression was used to explore the type of clinical information that is frequently accessed during the peak usage times. A total of 524,929 usage logs from 653 doctors (229 professors, 161 fellows, and 263 residents; mean age: 37.55 years; males: 415 [63.6%]) were analyzed. The highest average number of m-EMR usage logs (897) was by medical residents, whereas the lowest (292) was by surgical residents. The usage amount for three menus, namely inpatient list (47,096), lab results (38,508), and investigation list (25,336), accounted for 60.1% of the peak time usage. The HIS was used most frequently during regular hours (9:00 AM to 5:00 PM). The peak usage time of the m-EMR was early in the morning (6:00 AM to 10:00 AM), and the use of the m-EMR from early evening (5:00 PM) to midnight was higher than during regular

  1. RAN as a predictor of reading skills, and vice versa: results from a randomised reading intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Ulrika

    2014-07-01

    Although phonemic awareness is a well-known factor predicting early reading development, there is also evidence that Rapid Automatized Naming (RAN) is an independent factor that contributes to early reading. The aim of this study is to examine phonemic awareness and RAN as predictors of reading speed, reading comprehension and spelling for children with reading difficulties. It also investigates a possible reciprocal relationship between RAN and reading skills, and the possibility of enhancing RAN by intervention. These issues are addressed by examining longitudinal data from a randomised reading intervention study carried out in Sweden for 9-year-old children with reading difficulties (N = 112). The intervention comprised three main elements: training of phonics, reading comprehension strategies and reading speed. The analysis of the data was carried out using structural equation modelling. The results demonstrated that after controlling for autoregressive effects and non-verbal IQ, RAN predicts reading speed whereas phonemic awareness predicts reading comprehension and spelling. RAN was significantly enhanced by training and a reciprocal relationship between reading speed and RAN was found. These findings contribute to support the view that both phonemic awareness and RAN independently influence early phases of reading, and that both are possible to enhance by training.

  2. RAN as a Predictor of Reading Skills, and Vice Versa: Results from a Randomised Reading Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Ulrika

    2014-01-01

    Although phonemic awareness is a well-known factor predicting early reading development, there is also evidence that Rapid Automatized Naming (RAN) is an independent factor that contributes to early reading. The aim of this study is to examine phonemic awareness and RAN as predictors of reading speed, reading comprehension and spelling for…

  3. Mobile Devices, Learning and Clinical Workplaces: Medical Student Use of Smartphones in Parisian Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, Megan; Scott, Karen M.; Chauffeté-Manillier, Martine; Lenne, Frédéric; Le Jeunne, Claire

    2017-01-01

    Mobile devices are ubiquitous worldwide, including in hospitals. "Just in time" learning provided by these devices is important for students. We investigated current use of, and learning with, smartphones and other mobile devices by medical students in Parisian hospitals. A survey with quantitative and qualitative items previously used…

  4. Mesh Resolution Effect on 3D RANS Turbomachinery Flow Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Yershov, Sergiy

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents the study of the effect of a mesh refinement on numerical results of 3D RANS computations of turbomachinery flows. The CFD solver F, which based on the second-order accurate ENO scheme, is used in this study. The simplified multigrid algorithm and local time stepping permit decreasing computational time. The flow computations are performed for a number of turbine and compressor cascades and stages. In all flow cases, the successively refined meshes of H-type with an approximate orthogonalization near the solid walls were generated. The results obtained are compared in order to estimate their both mesh convergence and ability to resolve the transonic flow pattern. It is concluded that for thorough studying the fine phenomena of the 3D turbomachinery flows, it makes sense to use the computational meshes with the number of cells from several millions up to several hundred millions per a single turbomachinery blade channel, while for industrial computations, a mesh of about or less than one mil...

  5. Effective Synchronization of EEG and EMG for Mobile Brain/Body Imaging in Clinical Settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiorenzo Artoni

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Mobile Brain/Body Imaging (MoBI is rapidly gaining traction as a new imaging modality to study how cognitive processes support locomotion. Electroencephalogram (EEG and electromyogram (EMG, due to their time resolution, non-invasiveness and portability are the techniques of choice for MoBI, but synchronization requirements among others restrict its use to high-end research facilities. Here we test the effectiveness of a technique that enables us to achieve MoBI-grade synchronization of EEG and EMG, even when other strategies (such as Lab Streaming Layer (LSL cannot be used e.g., due to the unavailability of proprietary Application Programming Interfaces (APIs, which is often the case in clinical settings. The proposed strategy is that of aligning several spikes at the beginning and end of the session. We delivered a train of spikes to the EEG amplifier and EMG electrodes every 2 s over a 10-min time period. We selected a variable number of spikes (from 1 to 10 both at the beginning and end of the time series and linearly resampled the data so as to align them. We then compared the misalignment of the “middle” spikes over the whole recording to test for jitter and synchronization drifts, highlighting possible nonlinearities (due to hardware filters and estimated the maximum length of the recording to achieve a [−5 to 5] ms misalignment range. We demonstrate that MoBI-grade synchronization can be achieved within 10-min recordings with a 1.7 ms jitter and [−5 5] ms misalignment range. We show that repeated spike delivery can be used to test online synchronization options and to troubleshoot synchronization issues over EEG and EMG. We also show that synchronization cannot rely only on the equipment sampling rate advertised by manufacturers. The synchronization strategy described can be used virtually in every clinical environment, and may increase the interest among a broader spectrum of clinicians and researchers in the MoBI framework

  6. Usability and clinical efficacy of diabetes mobile applications for adults with type 2 diabetes: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Helen; McMahon, Siobhan K; Gross, Cynthia R; Adam, Terrence J; Wyman, Jean F

    2017-09-01

    To assess the usability and clinical effectiveness of diabetes mobile applications (diabetes apps) developed for adults with type 2 diabetes. A systematic review of the usability and effectiveness of diabetes apps was conducted. Searches were performed using MEDLINE, EMBASE, COMPENDEX, and IEEE XPLORE for articles published from January 1, 2011, to January 17, 2017. Search terms included: diabetes, mobile apps, and mobile health (mHealth). The search yielded 723 abstracts of which seven usability studies and ten clinical effectiveness studies met the inclusion criteria from 20 publications. Usability, as measured by satisfaction ratings from experts and patients, ranged from 38% to 80%. Usability problem ratings ranged from moderate to catastrophic. Top usability problems are multi-steps task, limited functionality and interaction, and difficult system navigation. Clinical effectiveness, measured by reductions in HbA1c, ranged from 0.15% to 1.9%. Despite meager satisfaction ratings and major usability problems, there is some limited evidence supporting the effectiveness of diabetes apps to improve glycemic control for adults with type 2 diabetes. Findings strongly suggest that efforts to improve user satisfaction, incorporate established principles of health behavior change, and match apps to user characteristics will increase the therapeutic impact of diabetes apps. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. A systematic review of the psychometric properties, usability and clinical impacts of mobile mood-monitoring applications in young people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubad, M; Winsper, C; Meyer, C; Livanou, M; Marwaha, S

    2018-01-01

    Mobile mood-monitoring applications are increasingly used by mental health providers, widely advocated within research, and a potentially effective method to engage young people. However, little is known about their efficacy and usability in young populations. A systematic review addressing three research questions focused on young people: (1) what are the psychometric properties of mobile mood-monitoring applications; (2) what is their usability; and (3) what are their positive and negative clinical impacts? Findings were synthesised narratively, study quality assessed and compared with evidence from adult studies. We reviewed 25 articles. Studies on the psychometric properties of mobile mood-monitoring applications were sparse, but indicate questionable to excellent internal consistency, moderate concurrent validity and good usability. Participation rates ranged from 30% to 99% across studies, and appeared to be affected by methodological factors (e.g. payments) and individual characteristics (e.g. IQ score). Mobile mood-monitoring applications are positively perceived by youth, may reduce depressive symptoms by increasing emotional awareness, and could aid in the detection of mental health and substance use problems. There was very limited evidence on potential negative impacts. Evidence for the use of mood-monitoring applications in youth is promising but limited due to a lack of high-quality studies. Future work should explicate the effects of mobile mood-monitoring applications on effective self-regulation, clinical outcomes across disorders and young people's engagement with mental health services. Potential negative impacts in this population should also be investigated, as the adult literature suggests that application use could potentially increase negativity and depression symptoms.

  8. A framework for resources allocation in virtualised C-RAN

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Samman, Imad; Artuso, Matteo; Christiansen, Henrik Lehrmann

    2016-01-01

    The vast growth in mobile data traffic with its increasing capacity demands necessitates investigating future solutions to cope with these challenges. Network Virtualisation is considered one potential solution to simplify the current wireless networks. Recently efforts have been made to show....... Simulation results show improvements in the throughput of the mobile video traffic and reduction in end-to-end delay for delay sensitive applications. In addition, an assessment of fairness guarantee is considered across all users. Note that this paper considers the impact of the proposed schemes...

  9. Use of mobile phones, computers and internet among clients of an inner-city community psychiatric clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carras, Michelle Colder; Mojtabai, Ramin; Furr-Holden, C Debra; Eaton, William; Cullen, Bernadette A M

    2014-03-01

    Recent years have witnessed an expansion of Internet- and mobile-phone-based interventions for health promotion, yet few studies have focused on the use of technology by individuals with mental illness. This study examined the extent to which patients at an inner-city community psychiatry clinic had access to information and communications technology (ICT) and how they used those resources. Patients of an outpatient, inner-city community psychiatry program (N=189) completed a survey that included questions about demographics and ICT use which were adapted from an existing local population-based health survey (community sample, N=968). Frequencies of ICT use were assessed for the clinic sample and questions common to both the surveys completed by the clinic and community samples were compared using logistic regression. Among clinic cases, 105 (55.6%) reported owning or using a computer, 162 (85.7%) reported owning or using a mobile phone, and 112 (59.3%) reportedf using the Internet. Among those who used mobile phones, the majority reported using them daily; 42% of those who used the Internet reported using it several times per day. Differences in frequency of Internet use between samples were not significant, but clinic participants used the Internet more intensively to email, instant message, access health information, and use social media sites. A majority of patients in this community psychiatry clinic sample use ICT. Greater access to and use of the Internet by those with mental illness has important implications for the feasibility and impact of technology-based interventions.

  10. How is RAN Related to Reading Fluency? A Comprehensive Examination of the Prominent Theoretical Accounts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TIMOTHY C PAPADOPOULOS

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We examined the prominent theoretical explanations of the RAN-reading relationship in a relatively transparent language (Greek in a sample of children (n= 286 followed from Grade 1 to Grade 2. Specifically, we tested the fit of eight different models, as defined by the type of reading performance predicted (oral vs. silent word reading fluency, the type of RAN tasks (non-alphanumeric vs. alphanumeric, and the RAN effects (direct vs. indirect. Working memory, attention, processing speed, and motor skills were used as common cause variables predicting both RAN and reading fluency and phonological awareness and orthographic processing were used as mediators of RAN’s effects on reading fluency. The findings of both concurrent and longitudinal analyses indicated that RAN is a unique predictor of oral reading fluency, but not silent reading fluency. Using alphanumeric or non-alphanumeric RAN did not particularly affect the RAN-reading relationship. Both phonological awareness and orthographic processing partly mediated RAN’s effects on reading fluency. Theoretical implications of these findings are discussed.

  11. Interpretive Flexibility in Mobile Health:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agger Nielsen, Jeppe; Mathiassen, Lars

    2013-01-01

    -sponsored program, mobile technology proved to have considerable interpretive flexibility with variation in perceived nature of technology, technology strategy, and technology use between agencies. What was first seen as a very promising innovation across the Danish home care sector subsequently became the topic...... of debate as technology use arrangements ran counter to existing norms and values in individual agencies. Conclusions: Government-sponsored programs can have both positive and negative results, and managers need to be aware of this and the interpretive flexibility of mobile technology. Mobile technology...

  12. Evaluation of immediate and 12-week effects of a smartphone sun-safety mobile application: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buller, David B; Berwick, Marianne; Lantz, Kathy; Buller, Mary Klein; Shane, James; Kane, Ilima; Liu, Xia

    2015-05-01

    Mobile applications on smartphones can communicate a large amount of personalized, real-time health information, including advice on skin cancer prevention, but their effectiveness may be affected by whether recipients can be convinced to use them. To evaluate a smartphone mobile application (Solar Cell) delivering real-time advice about sun protection for a second time in a randomized clinical trial. A previous trial conducted in 2012 used a randomized pretest-posttest design. For the present trial, we collected data from a volunteer sample of 202 adults 18 years or older who owned a smartphone. Participants were recruited nationwide through online promotions. Screening procedures and a 3-week run-in period were added to increase the use of the mobile application. We conducted follow-ups at 3 and 8 weeks after randomization to examine the immediate and the longer-term effects of the intervention. Use of the mobile application. The application gave feedback on sun protection (ie, sun-safety practices and the risk for sunburn) and alerted users to apply or to reapply sunscreen and to get out of the sun. The application also displayed the hourly UV Index and vitamin D production based on the forecast UV Index, time, and location. Percentage of days with the use of sun protection, time spent outdoors in the midday sun (days and hours), and the number of sunburns in the last 3 months. Participants in the intervention group used wide-brimmed hats more at 7 weeks than control participants (23.8% vs 17.4%; F = 4.07; P = .045). Women who used the mobile application reported using all sun protection combined more than men (46.4% vs 43.3%; F = 1.49; P = .04), whereas men and older individuals reported less use of sunscreen (32.7% vs 35.5%; F = 5.36; P = .02) and hats (15.6% vs 17.9%; F = 4.72; P = .03). The mobile application initially appeared to confer weak improvement of sun protection. Use of the mobile application was greater than in a previous trial and was

  13. A framework for resources allocation in virtualised C-RAN

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Samman, Imad; Artuso, Matteo; Christiansen, Henrik Lehrmann

    2016-01-01

    . Simulation results show improvements in the throughput of the mobile video traffic and reduction in end-to-end delay for delay sensitive applications. In addition, an assessment of fairness guarantee is considered across all users. Note that this paper considers the impact of the proposed schemes...... on the transmission/data plane....

  14. Improvement of the clinical use of computed radiography for mobile chest imaging: Image quality and patient dose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rill, Lynn Neitzey

    Chest radiography is technically difficult because of the wide variation of tissue attenuations in the chest and limitations of screen-film systems. Mobile chest radiography, performed bedside on hospital inpatients, presents additional difficulties due to geometrical and equipment limitations inherent to mobile x-ray procedures and the severity of illness in patients. Computed radiography (CR) offers a new approach for mobile chest radiography by utilizing a photostimulable phosphor. Photostimulable phosphors are more efficient in absorbing lower-energy x-rays than standard intensifying screens and overcome some image quality limitations of mobile chest imaging, particularly because of the inherent latitude. This study evaluated changes in imaging parameters for CR to take advantage of differences between CR and screen-film radiography. Two chest phantoms, made of acrylic and aluminum, simulated x-ray attenuation for average-sized and large- sized adult chests. The phantoms contained regions representing the lungs, heart and subdiaphragm. Acrylic and aluminum disks (1.9 cm diameter) were positioned in the chest regions to make signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) measurements for different combinations of imaging parameters. Disk thicknesses (contrast) were determined from disk visibility. Effective dose to the phantom was also measured for technique combinations. The results indicated that using an anti-scatter grid and lowering x- ray tube potential improved the SNR significantly; however, the dose to the phantom also increased. An evaluation was performed to examine the clinical applicability of the observed improvements in SNR. Parameter adjustments that improved phantom SNRs by more than 50% resulted in perceived image quality improvements in the lung region of clinical mobile chest radiographs. Parameters that produced smaller improvements in SNR had no apparent effect on clinical image quality. Based on this study, it is recommended that a 3:1 grid be used for

  15. Mobile phone hygiene: potential risks posed by use in the clinics of an Indian dental school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sweta; Acharya, Shashidhar; Bhat, Meghashyam; Rao, SreeVidya Krishna; Pentapati, Kalyana Chakravarthy

    2010-10-01

    The objectives of this cross-sectional study were to determine the level and type of bacterial contamination of the mobile phones of dental personnel involved in direct patient care and to determine the usefulness of cleaning with 70 percent isopropyl alcohol for decontamination. Dental faculty and trainees in an Indian dental school were asked to participate in a study in which a questionnaire concerning patterns of mobile phone use and disinfection was administered. Swabs from mobile phones of the participants were taken using moist sterile swabs and plated on blood agar plates. The bacteria isolated were identified by biochemical tests. Eighteen percent of the participants (n=9) reported using their phones while attending patients. Nearly 64 percent (n=32) used their mobiles for checking time, and 64 percent (n=42) reported never cleaning their phones. In total, fifty mobile phones were cultured for microorganisms: 98 percent (n=49) were culture-positive, and 34 percent (n=17) grew potentially pathogenic bacteria. There was significant reduction in the mean number of colony-forming units after decontamination with alcohol (pphones may act as an important source of nosocomial pathogens in the dental setting. Therefore, it is important for dental school administrators to encourage higher compliance with hand-washing practices and routine surface disinfection through framing of strict protocols to reduce the chances of occurrence of nosocomial infections.

  16. Using mobile phones to improve clinic attendance amongst an antiretroviral treatment cohort in rural Uganda: a cross-sectional and prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunutsor, Setor; Walley, John; Katabira, Elly; Muchuro, Simon; Balidawa, Hudson; Namagala, Elizabeth; Ikoona, Eric

    2010-12-01

    We aimed to assess the patterns and dynamics of mobile phone usage amongst an antiretroviral treatment (ART) cohort in rural Uganda and ascertain its feasibility for improving clinic attendance. A cross-sectional study of clients on ART exploring their access to mobile phones and patterns of use was employed. Clinic attendances for antiretroviral drug refills were then monitored prospectively over 28 weeks in 176 patients identified in the cross-sectional survey who had access to mobile phones and had given consent to be contacted. Patients were contacted via voice calls or text messages to remind them about their missed clinic appointments. Of the 276 patients surveyed, 177 (64%) had access to mobile phones with all but one were willing to be contacted for missed visits reminders. Of the 560 total scheduled clinic appointments, 62 (11%) were missed visits. In 79% of episodes in which visits were missed, patients presented for treatment within a mean duration of 2.2 days (SD = 1.2 days) after mobile phone recall. Access to mobile phones was high in this setting. Privacy and confidentiality issues were not considered deterrents. Mobile phones have a potential for use in resource-constrained settings to substantially improve the clinical management of HIV/AIDS.

  17. Assessment of Semi-Structured Clinical Interview for Mobile ‎Phone ‎Addiction Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Seyyed Salman Alavi; Mohammad Reza Mohammadi; Fereshteh Jannatifard; Soroush Mohammadi Kalhori; Ghazal Sepahbodi; Mohammad BabaReisi; Sahar Sajedi‎; Mojtaba Farshchi‎; Rasul KhodaKarami‎; Vahid Hatami Kasvaee‎

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR) classified mobile phone addiction disorder under ‎‎"impulse control disorder not elsewhere classified". This study surveyed the ‎diagnostic criteria of DSM-IV-TR for the diagnosis of mobile phone ‎addiction in correspondence with Iranian society and culture.‎Method: Two hundred fifty students of Tehran universities were entered into this ‎descriptive-analytical and cross-sectional s...

  18. Challenges in the Implementation of a Mobile Application in Clinical Practice: Case Study in the Context of an Application that Manages the Daily Interventions of Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrler, Frederic; Wipfli, Rolf; Teodoro, Douglas; Sarrey, Everlyne; Walesa, Magali; Lovis, Christian

    2013-06-12

    Working in a clinical environment requires unfettered mobility. This is especially true for nurses who are always on the move providing patients' care in different locations. Since the introduction of clinical information systems in hospitals, this mobility has often been considered hampered by interactions with computers. The popularity of personal mobile assistants such as smartphones makes it possible to gain easy access to clinical data anywhere. To identify the challenges involved in the deployment of clinical applications on handheld devices and to share our solutions to these problems. A team of experts underwent an iterative development process of a mobile application prototype that aimed to improve the mobility of nurses during their daily clinical activities. Through the process, challenges inherent to mobile platforms have emerged. These issues have been classified, focusing on factors related to ensuring information safety and quality, as well as pleasant and efficient user experiences. The team identified five main challenges related to the deployment of clinical mobile applications and presents solutions to overcome each of them: (1) Financial: Equipping every care giver with a new mobile device requires substantial investment that can be lowered if users use their personal device instead, (2) Hardware: The constraints inherent to the clinical environment made us choose the mobile device with the best tradeoff between size and portability, (3) Communication: the connection of the mobile application with any existing clinical information systems (CIS) is insured by a bridge formatting the information appropriately, (4) Security: In order to guarantee the confidentiality and safety of the data, the amount of data stored on the device is minimized, and (5) User interface: The design of our user interface relied on homogeneity, hierarchy, and indexicality principles to prevent an increase in data acquisition errors. The introduction of nomadic computing

  19. Effect of Engine Installation on Jet Noise using a Hybrid LES/RANS Approach Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Installation effects arising from propulsion airframe interaction are known to produce substantial variations in the in-situ jet noise. A hybrid LES/RANS...

  20. Mesh Generation and Adaption for High Reynolds Number RANS Computations Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal offers to provide NASA with an automatic mesh generator for the simulation of aerodynamic flows using Reynolds-Averages Navier-Stokes (RANS) models....

  1. Use of Mobile Phone Technology to Improve follow-up at a Community Mental Health Clinic: A Randomized Control Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gaurav; Manjunatha, Narayana; Rao, Sabina; Shashidhara, H N; Moirangthem, Sydney; Madegowda, Rajendra K; Binukumar, B; Varghese, Mathew

    2017-01-01

    Mobile phone technology is being used worldwide to improve follow-ups in health care. Aim of the study is to evaluate whether the use of mobile technology will improve or not the follow-up of Indian patients from a community mental health center. Patients or caregivers having mobile phones and consenting for study were enrolled, and sociodemographic and clinical details of patients were taken. Participants were randomized into two groups (short message service [SMS] vs. non-SMS group). At first intervention level, a SMS was sent to SMS group (not in non-SMS group) 1 day before their appointment. At second-level intervention (voice call level), patients from both groups who missed their first appointment were given a voice call requesting them to come for follow-up, and the reasons for first missed appointments (MA) were also elicited. The effect of these two intervention levels (first SMS for SMS group and next voice calls for both groups) on follow-up was evaluated. A total of 214 patients were enrolled in the study. At first SMS intervention level of SMS group (n = 106), 62.26% of participants reached appointment-on-time (RA), while in the non-SMS/as usual group (n = 108), 45.37% of patients RA. The difference of these groups is statistically significant. At second-level intervention (voice call), 66 of 88 (another 15 were unable to contact) were came for follow-up consultation within 2 days of MA. Distance and diagnosis of alcohol dependence were significantly associated with MA. Social reasons were most common reasons for first MA. The use of mobile phone technology in an outpatient community psychiatric clinic improved follow-up significantly.

  2. A dynamic hybrid RANS/LES modeling methodology for turbulent/transitional flow field prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Mohammad Faridul

    A dynamic hybrid Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS)-Large Eddy Simulation (LES) modeling framework has been investigated and further developed to improve the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) prediction of turbulent flow features along with laminar-to-turbulent transitional phenomena. In recent years, the use of hybrid RANS/LES (HRL) models has become more common in CFD simulations, since HRL models offer more accuracy than RANS in regions of flow separation at a reduced cost relative to LES in attached boundary layers. The first part of this research includes evaluation and validation of a dynamic HRL (DHRL) model that aims to address issues regarding the RANS-to-LES zonal transition and explicit grid dependence, both of which are inherent to most current HRL models. Simulations of two test cases---flow over a backward facing step and flow over a wing with leading-edge ice accretion---were performed to assess the potential of the DHRL model for predicting turbulent features involved in mainly unsteady separated flow. The DHRL simulation results are compared with experimental data, along with the computational results for other HRL and RANS models. In summary, these comparisons demonstrate that the DHRL framework does address many of the weaknesses inherent in most current HRL models. Although HRL models are widely used in turbulent flow simulations, they have limitations for transitional flow predictions. Most HRL models include a fully turbulent RANS component for attached boundary layer regions. The small number of HRL models that do include transition-sensitive RANS models have issues related to the RANS model itself and to the zonal transition between RANS and LES. In order to address those issues, a new transition-sensitive HRL modeling methodology has been developed that includes the DHRL methodology and a physics-based transition-sensitive RANS model. The feasibility of the transition-sensitive dynamic HRL (TDHRL) model has been investigated by

  3. The proliferation marker pKi-67 organizes the nucleolus during the cell cycle depending on Ran and cyclin B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Mirko H H; Broll, Rainer; Bruch, Hans-Peter; Bögler, Oliver; Duchrow, Michael

    2003-01-01

    The proliferation marker pKi-67 ('Ki-67 antigen') is commonly used in clinical and research pathology to detect proliferating cells, as it is only expressed during cell-cycle progression. Despite the fact that this antigen has been known for nearly two decades, there is still no adequate understanding of its function. This study has therefore identified proteins that interact with pKi-67, using a yeast two-hybrid system. A mammalian two-hybrid system and immunoprecipitation studies were used to verify these interactions. Among other cell-cycle regulatory proteins, two binding partners associated with the small GTPase Ran were identified. In addition, DNA-structural and nucleolus-associated proteins binding to pKi-67 were found. Moreover, it was demonstrated that the N-terminal domain of pKi-67 is capable of self-binding to its own repeat region encoded by exon 13. Since RanBP, a protein involved in the transport of macromolecules over the nuclear lamina, was found to be a binding partner, a possible effect of pKi-67 on the localization of cell-cycle regulatory proteins was proposed. To test this hypothesis, a tetracycline-responsive gene expression system was used to induce the pKi-67 fragments previously used for the two-hybrid screens in HeLa cells. Subsequent immunostaining revealed the translocation of cyclin B1 from cytoplasm to nucleoli in response to this expression. It is suggested that pKi-67 is a Ran-associated protein with a role in the disintegration and reformation of the nucleolus and thereby in entry into and exit from the M-phase. Copyright 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Development of a wheelchair mobility skills test for children and adolescents: combining evidence with clinical expertise.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sol, M.E.; Vershuren, O.; Groot, L. de; Groot, J.F. de

    2017-01-01

    Background: Wheelchair mobility skills (WMS) training is regarded by children using a manual wheelchair and their parents as an important factor to improve participation and daily physical activity. Currently, there is no outcome measure available for the evaluation of WMS in children. Several

  5. Validating Mobile Electroencephalographic Systems for Integration into the PhyCORE and Application in Clinical Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-26

    literature review , site visits to the vendors, and general technical inquiries, three mobile EEG systems were selected for testing and evaluation...military-relevant scenarios (bottom left), and multiple biosensors providing real-time monitoring and measurements (bottom right...institutional review board at NHRC (Protocol NHRC.2014.0017). Preliminary analyses from this study were published in the 2015 I/ITSEC conference

  6. Tuning a RANS k-e model for jet-in-crossflow simulations.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefantzi, Sophia; Ray, Jaideep; Arunajatesan, Srinivasan; DeChant, Lawrence Justin

    2013-09-01

    We develop a novel calibration approach to address the problem of predictive ke RANS simulations of jet-incrossflow. Our approach is based on the hypothesis that predictive ke parameters can be obtained by estimating them from a strongly vortical flow, specifically, flow over a square cylinder. In this study, we estimate three ke parameters, C%CE%BC, Ce2 and Ce1 by fitting 2D RANS simulations to experimental data. We use polynomial surrogates of 2D RANS for this purpose. We conduct an ensemble of 2D RANS runs using samples of (C%CE%BC;Ce2;Ce1) and regress Reynolds stresses to the samples using a simple polynomial. We then use this surrogate of the 2D RANS model to infer a joint distribution for the ke parameters by solving a Bayesian inverse problem, conditioned on the experimental data. The calibrated (C%CE%BC;Ce2;Ce1) distribution is used to seed an ensemble of 3D jet-in-crossflow simulations. We compare the ensemble's predictions of the flowfield, at two planes, to PIV measurements and estimate the predictive skill of the calibrated 3D RANS model. We also compare it against 3D RANS predictions using the nominal (uncalibrated) values of (C%CE%BC;Ce2;Ce1), and find that calibration delivers a significant improvement to the predictive skill of the 3D RANS model. We repeat the calibration using surrogate models based on kriging and find that the calibration, based on these more accurate models, is not much better that those obtained with simple polynomial surrogates. We discuss the reasons for this rather surprising outcome.

  7. A cross-sectional, clinical study to evaluate mobility of teeth during pregnancy using periotest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poonam Sujeet Mishra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Over a century, an increased prevalence of gingival diseases associated with increasing plasma sex steroid hormone levels has been reported. These situations present unique challenges to the oral health-care professional. It is believed that hormonal fluctuations such as those associated with pregnancy, menstruation, and use of hormonal contraceptives lead to an increase in tooth mobility. However, this effect of female sex hormones on periodontal ligament and tooth-supporting alveolar bone has rarely been investigated. Hence, this study was conducted to understand the effect of hormonal changes during pregnancy on tooth mobility. Materials and Methods: Mobility of index teeth 16, 13, 21, 23, 24, 36, 33, 41, 43, and 44 was measured with periotest for fifty pregnant females at first trimester (12th week, second trimester (24th week, and third trimester (35th week. Simplified oral hygiene index, plaque index, Gingival index (GI, and probing depth were also evaluated during the three trimesters of pregnancy for each subject participating in the study. Statistical Analysis: The results of the study were subjected to statistical analysis. Data analysis was done by applying Z-test for comparing difference between two sample means. Results: A small but statistically significant influence on the periotest value was seen during the three trimesters of pregnancy. GI scores significantly increased throughout pregnancy despite no significant change in plaque levels. Conclusion: Pregnancy had a significant influence on tooth mobility. Highest value of tooth mobility was seen in the last month of pregnancy. The maximum severity of gingivitis was also seen during the third trimester of pregnancy.

  8. Disseminating a Clinically Effective Physical Activity Program to Preserve Mobility in a Community Setting for Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laussen, J; Kowaleski, C; Martin, K; Hickey, C; Fielding, R A; Reid, K F

    2016-01-01

    As the population of older adults continues to increase, the dissemination of strategies to maintain independence of older persons is of critical public health importance. Recent large-scale clinical trial evidence has definitively shown intervention of moderate-intensity physical activity (PA) reduces major mobility disability in at-risk older adults. However, it remains unknown whether structured PA interventions, with demonstrated efficacy in controlled, clinical environments, can be successfully disseminated into community settings to benefit wider populations of older adults. To assess the dissemination of an evidence-based PA program for older adults by evaluating program participation and its impact on mobility, strength and quality of life. An urban senior center. Fifty older adults (71.2 ± 8 years aged; BMI: 30.1 ± 7 kg/m2). Average of 8.0 ± 1.8 months of participation in the Fit-4-Life Program, a community-based PA and nutrition counseling intervention. Mobility (Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB)), self-reported physical activity (CHAMPS questionnaire), leg strength, grip strength, and quality of life (Quality of Well-Being Self-Administered (QWB-SA) scale) were assessed at baseline and follow-up. Mean attendance was 55.8%. Fourteen participants were lost to follow-up. Those who dropped-out engaged in less PA at baseline (78 ± 108 mins/wk) compared to those who completed follow-up (203 ± 177 mins/wk, P=0.01). Participants exhibited sustained increases of PA (65 ± 153 mins/wk, P= 0.08), and there were meaningful improvements in SPPB (0.5 ± 0.2, P< 0.01), knee extensor strength (2.6 ± 4.4 kg, P< 0.01) and QWB-SA (0.04 ± 0.09, P= 0.05). The dissemination of a clinically efficacious PA intervention into a community-based setting can improve mobility, strength and quality of life for older adults. This knowledge may be helpful for the design and implementation of larger-scale PA intervention studies designed to preserve mobility in older

  9. A mobile app for securely capturing and transferring clinical images to the electronic health record: description and preliminary usability study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landman, Adam; Emani, Srinivas; Carlile, Narath; Rosenthal, David I; Semakov, Simon; Pallin, Daniel J; Poon, Eric G

    2015-01-02

    Photographs are important tools to record, track, and communicate clinical findings. Mobile devices with high-resolution cameras are now ubiquitous, giving clinicians the opportunity to capture and share images from the bedside. However, secure and efficient ways to manage and share digital images are lacking. The aim of this study is to describe the implementation of a secure application for capturing and storing clinical images in the electronic health record (EHR), and to describe initial user experiences. We developed CliniCam, a secure Apple iOS (iPhone, iPad) application that allows for user authentication, patient selection, image capture, image annotation, and storage of images as a Portable Document Format (PDF) file in the EHR. We leveraged our organization's enterprise service-oriented architecture to transmit the image file from CliniCam to our enterprise clinical data repository. There is no permanent storage of protected health information on the mobile device. CliniCam also required connection to our organization's secure WiFi network. Resident physicians from emergency medicine, internal medicine, and dermatology used CliniCam in clinical practice for one month. They were then asked to complete a survey on their experience. We analyzed the survey results using descriptive statistics. Twenty-eight physicians participated and 19/28 (68%) completed the survey. Of the respondents who used CliniCam, 89% found it useful or very useful for clinical practice and easy to use, and wanted to continue using the app. Respondents provided constructive feedback on location of the photos in the EHR, preferring to have photos embedded in (or linked to) clinical notes instead of storing them as separate PDFs within the EHR. Some users experienced difficulty with WiFi connectivity which was addressed by enhancing CliniCam to check for connectivity on launch. CliniCam was implemented successfully and found to be easy to use and useful for clinical practice. CliniCam is

  10. An Enhanced OFDM Resource Allocation Algorithm in C-RAN Based 5G Public Safety Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Feng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Public Safety Network (PSN is the network for critical communication when disaster occurs. As a key technology in 5G, Cloud-Radio Access Network (C-RAN can play an important role in PSN instead of LTE-based RAN. This paper firstly introduces C-RAN based PSN architecture and models the OFDM resource allocation problem in C-RAN based PSN as an integer quadratic programming, which allows the trade-off between expected bitrates and allocating fairness of PSN Service User (PSU. However, C-RAN based PSN needs to improve the efficiency of allocating algorithm because of a mass of PSU-RRH associations when disaster occurs. To deal with it, the resources allocating problem with integer variables is relaxed into one with continuous variables in the first step and an algorithm based on Generalized Bender’s Decomposition (GBD is proposed to solve it. Then we use Feasible Pump (FP method to get a feasible integer solution on the original OFDM resources allocation problem. The final experiments show the total throughput achieved by C-RAN based PSN is at most higher by 19.17% than the LTE-based one. And the average computational time of the proposed GBD and FP algorithm is at most lower than Barrier by 51.5% and GBD with no relaxation by 30.1%, respectively.

  11. Internet and mobile technology use among urban African American parents: survey study of a clinical population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Stephanie J; Godoy, Leandra; Shabazz, Kanya; Horn, Ivor B

    2014-01-13

    There is considerable potential for mobile technologies to empower pediatric patients and families by improving their communication with health professionals. National surveys suggest minority parents frequently communicate via mobile technology, but it is uncertain how amenable they are to receiving health care information in this format. Although the low cost and far reach characteristics of mobile health (mHealth) technology makes it advantageous for communication with minority parents, data on acceptance are needed. The objective of the study was to determine utilization of mobile and Internet technology by African American parents in an urban, underserved population, and to assess their interest in receiving health information via text messaging or other technologies (eg, social media and the Internet). A survey was administered to parents of children aged 1-12 years covered by public insurance receiving care at 3 pediatric primary care centers in Washington, DC. The African American sample (N=302) was composed of primarily single (75.8%, 229/302) mothers. Almost half had more than a high school education (47.7%, 144/302) and incomes above US $25,000 per year (43.0%, 130/302). Most (97.0%, 293/302) reported owning a cell phone, of which 91.1% (275/302) used it to text and 78.5% (237/302) used it to access the Internet. Most had service plans with unlimited text and data, but 26.5% (80/302) experienced service interruptions in the previous year. Home Internet access was more prevalent among those with higher income (86.2%, 112/130), but it was still relatively pervasive among lower income families (66.9%, 83/124). In adjusted logistic regression models, African American mothers with income greater than US $25,000 annually were 4 times as likely to own a tablet computer than their lower income counterparts. Of the participants, 80.8% (244/302) used social networking, primarily Facebook, and 74.2% (224/302) were interested in joining a social networking group

  12. Open-source mobile digital platform for clinical trial data collection in low-resource settings

    OpenAIRE

    van Dam, Joris; Omondi Onyango, Kevin; Midamba, Brian; Groosman, Nele; Hooper, Norman; Spector, Jonathan; Pillai, Goonaseelan; Ogutu, Bernhards

    2017-01-01

    Background Governments, universities and pan-African research networks are building durable infrastructure and capabilities for biomedical research in Africa. This offers the opportunity to adopt from the outset innovative approaches and technologies that would be challenging to retrofit into fully established research infrastructures such as those regularly found in high-income countries. In this context we piloted the use of a novel mobile digital health platform, designed specifically for ...

  13. A Clinical Trial of Translation of Evidence Based Interventions to Mobile Tablets and Illness Specific Internet Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Carol E; Piamjariyakul, Ubolrat; Werkowitch, Marilyn; Yadrich, Donna Macan; Thompson, Noreen; Hooper, Dedrick; Nelson, Eve-Lynn

    2016-03-01

    This article describes a method to translate an evidence based health care intervention to the mobile environment. This translation assisted patient participants to: avoid life threatening infections; monitor emotions and fatigue; keep involved in healthy activities. The mobile technology also decreased costs by reducing for example travel to visit health care providers. Testing of this translation method and its use by comparison groups of patients adds to the knowledge base for assessing technology for its impact on health outcome measures. The challenges and workflow of designing materials for the mobile format are described. Transitioning clinical trial verified interventions, previously provided in person to patients, onto tablet and internet platforms is an important process that must be evaluated. In this study, our evidence based guide's intravenous (IV) homeCare interventions (IVhomeCare) were delivered via Apple iPad mini™ tablet audiovisual instruction / discussion sessions and on a website. Each iPad audiovisual session (n = 41), included three to five families, a mental health specialist, and healthcare professionals. Patients and their family caregivers readily learned to use the wireless mobile tablets, and the IVhomeCare interventions, as described here, were successfully translated onto these mobile technology platforms. Using Likert scale responses on a questionnaire (1 = not helpful and 5 = very helpful) participants indicated that they gained problem solving skills for home care through iPad group discussion (M = 4.60, SD = 0.60). The firewall protected videoconferencing in real time with multiple healthcare professionals effectively allowed health history taking and visual inspection of the patient's IV insertion site for signs of infection. Supportive interactions with peer families on videoconferencing were documented during discussions. Discussion topics included low moods, fatigue, infection worry, how to maintain independence, and need

  14. Clinical and radiographic outcomes of the mobility total ankle arthroplasty system: early results from a prospective multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sproule, J A; Chin, T; Amin, A; Daniels, T; Younger, A S; Boyd, G; Glazebrook, M A

    2013-04-01

    The Mobility Total Ankle System is a third-generation design consisting of a 3-component, cementless, unconstrained, mobile-bearing prosthesis. This study reports the early results of a prospective multicenter study of the Mobility prosthesis. Eighty-eight Mobility total ankle arthroplasties (TAAs) were implanted in 85 patients. The most common underlying diagnosis was posttraumatic arthritis (53%). Ankles were classified according to the Canadian Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (COFAS) end-stage ankle arthritis classification system. Coronal plane deformity was quantified preoperatively. Patients were reviewed at regular intervals postoperatively, with clinical and radiographic assessment. The mean follow-up time was 40 months (range, 30-60 months). Type 1 ankle arthritis was demonstrated in 44 ankles (50%). No patient had preoperative coronal plane angulation greater than 20 degrees. In 32 ankles (36%) the preoperative coronal alignment was neutral, and in 34 ankles (39%) the deformity was less than 10 degrees. The mean American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) Ankle-Hindfoot score improved from 38.2 (range, 12-59) preoperatively to 74.8 (range, 46-100) postoperatively. Bone-implant interface abnormalities were identified in 33 ankles with a retained prostheses (43%). Thirty (91%) of these involved zones around the tibial plate. In total, 8 TAAs required revision, 6 for aseptic loosening, 1 for talar migration, and 1 for deep infection. There was 1 conversion to arthrodesis for component malpositioning and 1 transtibial amputation for chronic regional pain syndrome. Six patients were being investigated for ongoing pain. The cumulative survival was 89.6% (95% confidence interval, 80.8-94.8) at 3 years and 88.4% (95% confidence interval, 79.3-93.9) at 4 years. Early results of the Mobility TAA for independent researchers do not match those reported by other surgeons. Good pain relief and improved function were achieved postoperatively in 72 ankles (82

  15. Systemic signs of neutrophil mobilization during clinically stable periods and during exacerbations in smokers with obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andelid K

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Kristina Andelid,1 Anders Andersson,1 Shigemi Yoshihara,2 Christina Åhrén,4 Pernilla Jirholt,3 Ann Ekberg-Jansson,1 Anders Lindén1,51Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; 2Department of Pediatrics, Dokkyo Medical University, Japan; 3Department of Rheumatology and Inflammation Research, Institute of Medicine, 4Department of Bacteriology, Institute of Laboratory Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg; 5Unit for Lung and Airway Research, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, SwedenBackground: It is still unclear whether signs of neutrophil mobilization in the blood of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease represent true systemic events and how these relate to bacterial colonization in the airways. In this study, we evaluated these issues during clinically stable periods and during exacerbations in smokers with obstructive pulmonary disease and chronic bronchitis (OPD-CB.Methods: Over a period of 60 weeks for each subject, blood samples were repeatedly collected from 60 smokers with OPD-CB during clinically stable periods, as well as during and after exacerbations. Myeloperoxidase (MPO and neutrophil elastase (NE protein and mRNA, growth of bacteria in sputum, and clinical parameters were analyzed. Ten asymptomatic smokers and ten never-smokers were included as controls.Results: We found that, during clinically stable periods, neutrophil and NE protein concentrations were increased in smokers with OPD-CB and in the asymptomatic smokers when compared with never-smokers. During exacerbations, neutrophil and MPO protein concentrations were further increased in smokers with OPD-CB, without a detectable increase in the corresponding mRNA during exacerbations. However, MPO and NE protein and mRNA displayed positive correlations. During exacerbations, only increased neutrophil

  16. Determinants of Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier 1 (SUMO1) Protein Specificity, E3 Ligase, and SUMO-RanGAP1 Binding Activities of Nucleoporin RanBP2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gareau, Jaclyn R.; Reverter, David; Lima, Christopher D. (SKI)

    2012-02-16

    The RanBP2 nucleoporin contains an internal repeat domain (IR1-M-IR2) that catalyzes E3 ligase activity and forms a stable complex with SUMO-modified RanGAP1 and UBC9 at the nuclear pore complex. RanBP2 exhibits specificity for SUMO1 as RanGAP1-SUMO1/UBC9 forms a more stable complex with RanBP2 compared with RanGAP1-SUMO2 that results in greater protection of RanGAP-SUMO1 from proteases. The IR1-M-IR2 SUMO E3 ligase activity also shows a similar preference for SUMO1. We utilized deletions and domain swap constructs in protease protection assays and automodification assays to define RanBP2 domains responsible for RanGAP1-SUMO1 protection and SUMO1-specific E3 ligase activity. Our data suggest that elements in both IR1 and IR2 exhibit specificity for SUMO1. IR1 protects RanGAP1-SUMO1/UBC9 and functions as the primary E3 ligase of RanBP2, whereas IR2 retains the ability to interact with SUMO1 to promote SUMO1-specific E3 ligase activity. To determine the structural basis for SUMO1 specificity, a hybrid IR1 construct and IR1 were used to determine three new structures for complexes containing UBC9 with RanGAP1-SUMO1/2. These structures show more extensive contacts among SUMO, UBC9, and RanBP2 in complexes containing SUMO1 compared with SUMO2 and suggest that differences in SUMO specificity may be achieved through these subtle conformational differences.

  17. Wearable Therapy - Detecting Information from Wearables and Mobiles that are Relevant to Clinical and Self-directed Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnrich, Bert; Ersoy, Cem; Mayora, Oscar; Dey, Anind; Berthouze, Nadia; Kunze, Kai

    2017-01-09

    This accompanying editorial provides a brief introduction into the focus theme "Wearable Therapy". The focus theme "Wearable Therapy" aims to present contributions which target wearable and mobile technologies to support clinical and self-directed therapy. A call for papers was announced to all participants of the "9th International Conference on Pervasive Computing Technologies for Healthcare" and was published in November 2015. A peer review process was conducted to select the papers for the focus theme. Six papers were selected to be included in this focus theme. The paper topics cover a broad range including an approach to build a health informatics research program, a comprehensive literature review of self-quantification for health self-management, methods for affective state detection of informal care givers, social-aware handling of falls, smart shoes for supporting self-directed therapy of alcohol addicts, and reference information model for pervasive health systems. More empirical evidence is needed that confirms sustainable effects of employing wearable and mobile technology for clinical and self-directed therapy. Inconsistencies between different conceptual approaches need to be revealed in order to enable more systematic investigations and comparisons.

  18. Clinical Evaluation of a Mobile Sensor-Based Gait Analysis Method for Outcome Measurement after Knee Arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tilman Calliess

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Clinical scores and motion-capturing gait analysis are today’s gold standard for outcome measurement after knee arthroplasty, although they are criticized for bias and their ability to reflect patients’ actual quality of life has been questioned. In this context, mobile gait analysis systems have been introduced to overcome some of these limitations. This study used a previously developed mobile gait analysis system comprising three inertial sensor units to evaluate daily activities and sports. The sensors were taped to the lumbosacral junction and the thigh and shank of the affected limb. The annotated raw data was evaluated using our validated proprietary software. Six patients undergoing knee arthroplasty were examined the day before and 12 months after surgery. All patients reported a satisfactory outcome, although four patients still had limitations in their desired activities. In this context, feasible running speed demonstrated a good correlation with reported impairments in sports-related activities. Notably, knee flexion angle while descending stairs and the ability to stop abruptly when running exhibited good correlation with the clinical stability and proprioception of the knee. Moreover, fatigue effects were displayed in some patients. The introduced system appears to be suitable for outcome measurement after knee arthroplasty and has the potential to overcome some of the limitations of stationary gait labs while gathering additional meaningful parameters regarding the force limits of the knee.

  19. Enhancing Mobility: Integrating New Services into Your Library's Mobile Platform to Increase Traffic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felts, John W., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    Kimbel Library launched its mobile environment and ran it in full production for several months yet usage patterns were quite low and flat. The library only saw a substantial increase in usage when new, value-added services were integrated into this platform. Upon implementing and integrating discovery services, chat and SMS capabilities, and…

  20. Quantifying Model Form Uncertainty in RANS Simulation of Wing-Body Junction Flow

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Jin-Long; Xiao, Heng

    2016-01-01

    Wing-body junction flows occur when a boundary layer encounters an airfoil mounted on the surface. The corner flow near the trailing edge is challenging for the linear eddy viscosity Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) models, due to the interaction of two perpendicular boundary layers which leads to highly anisotropic Reynolds stress at the near wall region. Recently, Xiao et al. proposed a physics-informed Bayesian framework to quantify and reduce the model-form uncertainties in RANS simulations by utilizing sparse observation data. In this work, we extend this framework to incorporate the use of wall function in RANS simulations, and apply the extended framework to the RANS simulation of wing-body junction flow. Standard RANS simulations are performed on a 3:2 elliptic nose and NACA0020 tail cylinder joined at their maximum thickness location. Current results show that both the posterior mean velocity and the Reynolds stress anisotropy show better agreement with the experimental data at the corner regio...

  1. Rapid automatized naming (RAN) in children with ADHD: An ex-Gaussian analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Matthew; Jacobson, Lisa A; Hague, Cole; Bellows, Alison; Denckla, Martha B; Mahone, E Mark

    2017-07-01

    Children with ADHD demonstrate increased frequent "lapses" in performance on tasks in which the stimulus presentation rate is externally controlled, leading to increased variability in response times. It is less clear whether these lapses are also evident during performance on self-paced tasks, e.g., rapid automatized naming (RAN), or whether RAN inter-item pause time variability uniquely predicts reading performance. A total of 80 children aged 9 to 14 years-45 children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and 35 typically developing (TD) children-completed RAN and reading fluency measures. RAN responses were digitally recorded for analyses. Inter-stimulus pause time distributions (excluding between-row pauses) were analyzed using traditional (mean, standard deviation [SD], coefficient of variation [CV]) and ex-Gaussian (mu, sigma, tau) methods. Children with ADHD were found to be significantly slower than TD children (p reading fluency. RAN response time distributions were also significantly more variable (SD, tau) in children with ADHD. Hierarchical regression revealed that the exponential component (tau) of the letter-naming response time distribution uniquely predicted reading fluency in children with ADHD (p reading, ADHD symptom severity and age. The findings suggest that children with ADHD (without word-level reading difficulties) manifest slowed performance on tasks of reading fluency; however, this "slowing" may be due in part to lapses from ongoing performance that can be assessed directly using ex-Gaussian methods that capture excessively long response times.

  2. Assessing the feasibility of mobile phones for follow-up of acutely unwell children presenting to village clinics in rural northern Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Victoria; Hsieh, Jenny; Chirambo, Baxter; Wu, Tsung-Shu Joseph; O'Donoghue, John; Muula, Adamson S; Thompson, Matthew

    2017-03-01

    Patient follow-up is a routine component of clinical practice and valuable for evaluating the effectiveness of interventions, but because of the broad dispersion of health facilities and lack of standardised medical reporting in Malawi, collecting patient outcome data can be challenging. Increasing accessibility and affordability of mobile technology in resource-poor settings may facilitate patient follow-up in the community. The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential utility of mobile phones for collecting follow-up clinical data from parents or caregivers of acutely unwell under-5 children, for intervention evaluation purposes. Parents' or caregivers' mobile phone numbers were obtained by health surveillance assistants (HSAs) during study enrollment. Guardians who provided a telephone number were contacted by the study team to establish re-consultations or hospitalisations of their child(ren) within 14 days of recruitment. Health records at village clinics and higher-level health facilities were hand-searched to identify or confirm presentations and abstract clinical data. 87 out of 149 (58.4%) guardians provided a mobile telephone number, of whom the study team could contact 44 (29.5%). Seven guardians stated they took their child for further treatment: three of these returned to village clinics and four presented to secondary care facilities; attendance could only be confirmed from health records for one child. With continued expansion of cellular network coverage and mobile ownership in Malawi, mobile phones may facilitate collection of patient outcomes for intervention evaluation purposes. Future consideration should also be given to integrating mobile technologies into HSA clinical practice.

  3. The Economic and Clinical Impact of Sustained Use of a Progressive Mobility Program in a Neuro-ICU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hester, Jeannette M; Guin, Peggy R; Danek, Gale D; Thomas, Jaime R; Titsworth, William L; Reed, Richard K; Vasilopoulos, Terrie; Fahy, Brenda G

    2017-06-01

    To investigate a progressive mobility program in a neurocritical care population with the hypothesis that the benefits and outcomes of the program (e.g., decreased length of stay) would have a significant positive economic impact. Retrospective analysis of economic and clinical outcome data before, immediately following, and 2 years after implementation of the Progressive Upright Mobility Protocol Plus program (UF Health Shands Hospital, Gainesville, FL) involving a series of planned movements in a sequential manner with an additional six levels of rehabilitation in the neuro-ICU at UF Health Shands Hospital. Thirty-bed neuro-ICU in an academic medical center. Adult neurologic and neurosurgical patients: 1,118 patients in the pre period, 731 patients in the post period, and 796 patients in the sustained period. Implementation of Progressive Upright Mobility Protocol Plus. ICU length of stay decreased from 6.5 to 5.8 days in the immediate post period and 5.9 days in the sustained period (F(2,2641) = 3.1; p = 0.045). Hospital length of stay was reduced from 11.3 ± 14.1 days to 8.6 ± 8.8 post days and 8.8 ± 9.3 days sustained (F(2,2641) = 13.0; p ICU length of stay (p = 0.031) and hospital length of stay (p < 0.001) remained after adjustment for age, sex, diagnoses, sedation, and ventilation. Hospital-acquired infections were reduced by 50%. Average total cost per patient after adjusting for inflation was significantly reduced by 16% (post period) and 11% (sustained period) when compared with preintervention (F(2,2641) = 3.1; p = 0.045). Overall, these differences translated to an approximately $12.0 million reduction in direct costs from February 2011 through the end of 2013. An ongoing progressive mobility program in the neurocritical care population has clinical and financial benefits associated with its implementation and should be considered.

  4. Does ability to establish sound-symbol pairings mediate the RAN reading relationship?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Mads; Juul, Holger; Elbro, Carsten

    for animals in a paired associate learning task. These animals were then used in a rapid naming task. Results Preliminary results show that reading correlated with the amount of training required for learning the animal names (r=-.19, p=.06). RAN speed with the same animals did not correlate with reading......Performance on tests to rapidly name letters and digits has been shown to correlate with reading. One possible reason is that these tests probe the ability to learn and automatise symbol-sound associations. However, most studies have not controlled for the amount of experience with the RAN......-items, so it is unclear whether it is the experience or the ability to take advantage of the experience that is responsible for the correlation between RAN and reading. Paired associate learning tasks have been shown to differentiate dyslexics from controls, and to correlate with reading in unselected...

  5. Development of a Hybrid RANS/LES Method for Compressible Mixing Layer Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiadis, Nicholas J.; Alexander, J. Iwan D.; Reshotko, Eli

    2001-01-01

    A hybrid method has been developed for simulations of compressible turbulent mixing layers. Such mixing layers dominate the flows in exhaust systems of modem day aircraft and also those of hypersonic vehicles currently under development. The hybrid method uses a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) procedure to calculate wall bounded regions entering a mixing section, and a Large Eddy Simulation (LES) procedure to calculate the mixing dominated regions. A numerical technique was developed to enable the use of the hybrid RANS/LES method on stretched, non-Cartesian grids. The hybrid RANS/LES method is applied to a benchmark compressible mixing layer experiment. Preliminary two-dimensional calculations are used to investigate the effects of axial grid density and boundary conditions. Actual LES calculations, performed in three spatial directions, indicated an initial vortex shedding followed by rapid transition to turbulence, which is in agreement with experimental observations.

  6. [CLINICAL APPLICATION OF OXFORD MOBILE-BEARING BIPOLAR PROSTHESIS UNICOMPARTMENTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY FOR SINGLE COMPARTMENTAL KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shangzeng; Cheng, Shao; Wang, Yisheng

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of Oxford mobile-bearing bipolar prosthesis unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) in the treatment of single compartmental knee osteoarthritis. Between June 2011 and July 2013, 22 cases of single compartmental knee osteoarthritis were treated by Oxford mobile-bearing bipolar prosthesis UKA. Of 22 cases, 8 were male and 14 were female with an average age of 65 years (range, 45-80 years); the left knee was involved in 12 cases, and the right knee in 10 cases, with a mean disease duration of 32.5 months (range, 8-90 months). The mean weight was 55.2 kg (range, 50-65 kg), and the mean body mass index was 20.8 kg/m2 (range, 17-25 kg/m2). Osteoarthritis involved in the single knee medial compartment in all patients. Knee society score (KSS) and range of motion (ROM) were measured to evaluate the knee joint function. Primary healing of incision was obtained in all patients, and there was no complication of infection, bedsore, or deep venous thrombosis. Postoperative follow-up was 2-4 years (mean, 3.2 years). The X-ray films showed good position of prosthesis, no prosthesis dislocation, or periprosthetic infection during follow-up. Knee ROM, KSS function score, and KSS clinical score were significantly improved at 1 week after operation and at last follow-up when compared with preoperative ones (P 0.05). Oxford mobile-bearing bipolar prosthesis UKA is an effective method to treat single compartmental knee osteoarthritis, with the advantages of less trauma, earlier rehabilitation exercise, near physiological state in joint function, and less risk of complications.

  7. Clinical Effectiveness Of Dynamic Out-Patient Control Technology Over Hypertensive Patients Based On Computer System And Mobile Phone Connection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.M. Posnenkova

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available A new follow-up technology of dynamic out-patient control based on system of mobile monitoring of patients with arterial hypertension (SMMAH has been created in Saratov Scientific Research Institute of Cardiology. SMMAH is based on exchange of information between patient and doctor with the help of Internet and standard short mobile messages. The aim of the present work is to study the effectiveness of SMMAH for follow-up control of hypertensive patients for the period of 12 months. 79 patients with hypertension aged 49±11 were included in the investigation. Control period lasted 12 months. Control visits were made in the 1st, 6th and 12th months. The number of patients became out of control, its causes, percentage of patients who achieved and maintained target blood pressure (BP were analyzed after each visit. Data were presented as M (95% confidence interval. As a result in 1 month period of investigation 88,6% of patients regularly used mobile messages, 11% of patients were out of control. In 6 months period 68,4% of participants were under control, 31,6% of patients dropped out. In 12 months period — 67% and 33% of patients accordingly. Target BP was maintained in 87% (77%-96% of patients in 1 month period, in 78% (66%-90% of patients in 6 months period and in 68% of patients (53%-84% in 12 months period. High clinical effectiveness of SMMAH has been proved during the study: 67% of patients have followed prescribed therapy after the investigation period and 68% of them have maintained target BP level.

  8. Utilizing three years of epidemiological data from medical missions in Cambodia to shape the mobile medical clinic formulary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeany Kim Jun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this project was to gather epidemiological data on common diseases and medications dispensed during medical mission trips to Cambodia to shape the mobile medical clinic formulary. Methods: Data for patients seen during week-long mobile medical clinics was collected in Cambodia during Septembers 2012 to 2014. Each patient’s gender, age, weight, blood pressure, glucose, pertinent laboratory values, diagnoses, and medications dispensed were collected. Blood pressure and glucose levels were measured in patients 18 years and above. Data collected onto paper intake forms were transferred onto spreadsheets without patient identifying information and analyzed for aggregate means, common diseases, and most dispensed medications. This project received institutional review board approval. Results: A total of 1,015 patients were seen over three years. Women made up 61.4%, and the mean age was 41.8 years. The most common diagnosis was gastrointestinal disorders (22.9% that included gastroesophageal reflux disease and intestinal parasites. Next, 20.1% of patients had hypertension (BP>140/90, 18.0% had presbyopia, 15.4% had back and joint pain, followed by 8.8% with headache, including migraines. Approximately 8.4% of patients had hyperglycemia (RPG >140 mg/dl. The top five medications dispensed were acetaminophen, omeprazole, multivitamin, ibuprofen, and metformin. For hypertension, amlodipine and lisinopril were dispensed. Conclusion: Cambodia lacks systematic public health collection of epidemiological data for prevalence of diseases. Hence, investigators collected and analyzed information from week-long mobile medical clinics over three years. Proton-pump inhibitors and H. pylori lab tests were recommended for gastrointestinal disorders. Acetaminophen and ibuprofen were recommended for pain. Angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors and dihydropyridine calcium channel blockers were recommended over diuretics since patients were

  9. Assessment of Mobility in Older People Hospitalized for Medical Illness Using de Morton Mobility Index and Cumulated Ambulation Score-Validity and Minimal Clinical Important Difference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trøstrup, Jeanette; Andersen, Helle; Kam, Charlotte Agger Meiner

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Older adults acutely hospitalized for medical illness typically have comorbidity and disability, and inhospital physical inactivity greatly increases the likelihood of developing new disability. Thus, assessment of the patients' mobility status is crucial for planning and ...

  10. Use of a mobile device in mental health rehabilitation: A clinical and comprehensive analysis of 11 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briand, Catherine; Sablier, Juliette; Therrien, Julie-Anne; Charbonneau, Karine; Pelletier, Jean-François; Weiss-Lambrou, Rhoda

    2015-11-17

    This study aimed to test the feasibility of using a mobile device (Apple technology: iPodTouch®, iPhone® or iPad®) among people with severe mental illness (SMI) in a rehabilitation and recovery process and to document the parameters to be taken into account and the issues involved in implementing this technology in living environments and mental health care settings. A qualitative multiple case study design and multiple data sources were used to understand each case in depth. A clinical and comprehensive analysis of 11 cases was conducted with exploratory and descriptive aims (and the beginnings of explanation building). The multiple-case analysis brought out four typical profiles to illustrate the extent of integration of a personal digital assistant (PDA) as a tool to support mental health rehabilitation and recovery. Each profile highlights four categories of variables identified as determining factors in this process: (1) state of health and related difficulties (cognitive or functional); (2) relationship between comfort level with technology, motivation and personal effort deployed; (3) relationship between support required and support received; and (4) the living environment and follow-up context. This study allowed us to consider the contexts and conditions to be put in place for the successful integration of mobile technology in a mental health rehabilitation and recovery process.

  11. Model-Invariant Hybrid LES-RANS Computation of Separated Flow Past Periodic Hills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    The requirement that physical quantities not vary with a hybrid LESRANS model's blending parameter imposes conditions on the computation that lead to better results across LES-RANS transitions. This promises to allow placement of those transitions so that LES is performed only where required by the physics, improving computational efficiency. The approach is applied to separated flow past periodic hills, where good predictions of separation-bubble size are seen due to the gradual, controlled, LES-RANS transition and the resulting enhanced near-wall eddy viscosity.

  12. RAN translation at C9orf72-associated repeat expansions is selectively enhanced by the integrated stress response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Katelyn M; Glineburg, M Rebecca; Kearse, Michael G; Flores, Brittany N; Linsalata, Alexander E; Fedak, Stephen J; Goldstrohm, Aaron C; Barmada, Sami J; Todd, Peter K

    2017-12-08

    Repeat-associated non-AUG (RAN) translation allows for unconventional initiation at disease-causing repeat expansions. As RAN translation contributes to pathogenesis in multiple neurodegenerative disorders, determining its mechanistic underpinnings may inform therapeutic development. Here we analyze RAN translation at G4C2 repeat expansions that cause C9orf72-associated amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia (C9RAN) and at CGG repeats that cause fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome. We find that C9RAN translation initiates through a cap- and eIF4A-dependent mechanism that utilizes a CUG start codon. C9RAN and CGG RAN are both selectively enhanced by integrated stress response (ISR) activation. ISR-enhanced RAN translation requires an eIF2α phosphorylation-dependent alteration in start codon fidelity. In parallel, both CGG and G4C2 repeats trigger phosphorylated-eIF2α-dependent stress granule formation and global translational suppression. These findings support a model whereby repeat expansions elicit cellular stress conditions that favor RAN translation of toxic proteins, creating a potential feed-forward loop that contributes to neurodegeneration.

  13. Integrating mobile-phone based assessment for psychosis into people’s everyday lives and clinical care: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palmier-Claus Jasper E

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over the past decade policy makers have emphasised the importance of healthcare technology in the management of long-term conditions. Mobile-phone based assessment may be one method of facilitating clinically- and cost-effective intervention, and increasing the autonomy and independence of service users. Recently, text-message and smartphone interfaces have been developed for the real-time assessment of symptoms in individuals with schizophrenia. Little is currently understood about patients’ perceptions of these systems, and how they might be implemented into their everyday routine and clinical care. Method 24 community based individuals with non-affective psychosis completed a randomised repeated-measure cross-over design study, where they filled in self-report questions about their symptoms via text-messages on their own phone, or via a purpose designed software application for Android smartphones, for six days. Qualitative interviews were conducted in order to explore participants’ perceptions and experiences of the devices, and thematic analysis was used to analyse the data. Results Three themes emerged from the data: i the appeal of usability and familiarity, ii acceptability, validity and integration into domestic routines, and iii perceived impact on clinical care. Although participants generally found the technology non-stigmatising and well integrated into their everyday activities, the repetitiveness of the questions was identified as a likely barrier to long-term adoption. Potential benefits to the quality of care received were seen in terms of assisting clinicians, faster and more efficient data exchange, and aiding patient-clinician communication. However, patients often failed to see the relevance of the systems to their personal situations, and emphasised the threat to the person centred element of their care. Conclusions The feedback presented in this paper suggests that patients are conscious of the

  14. Anamnesis project- development of a mobile and web application to manage a unified clinical history in Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Armando Cobo Campo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The problems of the Colombian health sector are diverse and have unique features. These problems can be of different types showing lack of health services coverage, deep economic crisis of national health institutions as well as their managerial insufficiency. In 2004, the Department of Sciences, Technology and Innovation launched the 675 Call which looked for the strengthening of ICT innovation nodes in public health institutions and it was under this call that a project was made to solve one of these problems such as accessing information contained in the clinical histories of Colombian patients in a unified and fast way. This article aims at describing a solution which suggests the implementation of a mobile and web app toconsult primary medical information of patients in emergency by using their identity card number to accessit, thus guaranteeing organizational efficiency.

  15. Dental caries among children visiting a mobile dental clinic in South Central Kentucky: a pooled cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Dental caries is one of the most common chronic childhood diseases affecting a large portion of children in the United States. The prevalence of childhood dental caries in Kentucky is among the highest in the nation. The purposes of this study are to (1) compare sociodemographic differences between caries and no caries groups and (2) investigate factors associated with untreated dental caries among children who visited a mobile dental clinic in South Central Kentucky. Methods Study subjects were children aged 6 to 15 years who participated in the school-based dental sealant program through the mobile dental clinic operated by the Institute for Rural Health at Western Kentucky University between September 2006 and May 2011 (n = 2,453). Descriptive statistics were calculated for sociodemographic factors (age, gender, race/ethnicity, insurance status, and urban versus rural residential location) and caries status. We used chi-square tests to compare sociodemographic differences of children stratified by caries and no caries status as well as three levels of caries severity. We developed a logistic regression model to investigate factors associated with untreated dental caries while controlling for sociodemographic characteristics. Results The proportion of children having untreated dental caries was 49.7% and the mean number of untreated dental caries was 2.0. The proportion of untreated dental caries was higher in older children, children with no insurance and living in rural residential locations, and caries severity was also higher in these groups. Odds ratio indicated that older ages, not having private insurance (having only public, government-sponsored insurance or no insurance at all) and rural residential location were associated with having untreated dental caries after controlling for sociodemographic characteristics of children. Conclusions Untreated dental caries was more likely to be present in older children living in rural areas without

  16. Dental caries among children visiting a mobile dental clinic in South Central Kentucky: a pooled cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawkins, Erika; Michimi, Akihiko; Ellis-Griffith, Gregory; Peterson, Tina; Carter, Daniel; English, Gary

    2013-05-02

    Dental caries is one of the most common chronic childhood diseases affecting a large portion of children in the United States. The prevalence of childhood dental caries in Kentucky is among the highest in the nation. The purposes of this study are to (1) compare sociodemographic differences between caries and no caries groups and (2) investigate factors associated with untreated dental caries among children who visited a mobile dental clinic in South Central Kentucky. Study subjects were children aged 6 to 15 years who participated in the school-based dental sealant program through the mobile dental clinic operated by the Institute for Rural Health at Western Kentucky University between September 2006 and May 2011 (n = 2,453). Descriptive statistics were calculated for sociodemographic factors (age, gender, race/ethnicity, insurance status, and urban versus rural residential location) and caries status. We used chi-square tests to compare sociodemographic differences of children stratified by caries and no caries status as well as three levels of caries severity. We developed a logistic regression model to investigate factors associated with untreated dental caries while controlling for sociodemographic characteristics. The proportion of children having untreated dental caries was 49.7% and the mean number of untreated dental caries was 2.0. The proportion of untreated dental caries was higher in older children, children with no insurance and living in rural residential locations, and caries severity was also higher in these groups. Odds ratio indicated that older ages, not having private insurance (having only public, government-sponsored insurance or no insurance at all) and rural residential location were associated with having untreated dental caries after controlling for sociodemographic characteristics of children. Untreated dental caries was more likely to be present in older children living in rural areas without insurance. Health interventionists may use

  17. Criterion Validation Testing of Clinical Metrology Instruments for Measuring Degenerative Joint Disease Associated Mobility Impairment in Cats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruen, Margaret E.; Griffith, Emily H.; Thomson, Andrea E.; Simpson, Wendy; Lascelles, B. Duncan X.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Degenerative joint disease and associated pain are common in cats, particularly in older cats. There is a need for treatment options, however evaluation of putative therapies is limited by a lack of suitable, validated outcome measures that can be used in the target population of client owned cats. The objectives of this study were to evaluate low-dose daily meloxicam for the treatment of pain associated with degenerative joint disease in cats, and further validate two clinical metrology instruments, the Feline Musculoskeletal Pain Index (FMPI) and the Client Specific Outcome Measures (CSOM). Methods Sixty-six client owned cats with degenerative joint disease and owner-reported impairments in mobility were screened and enrolled into a double-masked, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial. Following a run-in baseline period, cats were given either placebo or meloxicam for 21 days, then in a masked washout, cats were all given placebo for 21 days. Subsequently, cats were given the opposite treatment, placebo or meloxicam, for 21 days. Cats wore activity monitors throughout the study, owners completed clinical metrology instruments following each period. Results Activity counts were increased in cats during treatment with daily meloxicam (pcats with degenerative joint disease. PMID:26162101

  18. Hip and fragility fracture prediction by 4-item clinical risk score and mobile heel BMD: a women cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thulesius Hans

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One in four Swedish women suffers a hip fracture yielding high morbidity and mortality. We wanted to revalidate a 4-item clinical risk score and evaluate a portable heel bone mineral density (BMD technique regarding hip and fragility fracture risk among elderly women. Methods In a population-based prospective cohort study we used clinical risk factors from a baseline questionnaire and heel BMD to predict a two-year hip and fragility fracture outcome for women, in a fracture preventive program. Calcaneal heel BMD was measured by portable dual X-ray laser absorptiometry (DXL and compared to hip BMD, measured with stationary dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA technique. Results Seven women suffered hip fracture and 14 women fragility fracture/s (at hip, radius, humerus and pelvis among 285 women; 60% having heel BMD ≤ -2.5 SD. The 4-item FRAMO (Fracture and Mortality Index combined the clinical risk factors age ≥80 years, weight Conclusions In a follow-up study we identified high risk groups for hip and fragility fracture with our plain 4-item risk model. Increased fracture risk was also related to decreasing heel BMD in calcaneal bone, measured with a mobile DXL technique. A combination of high FRAMO Index, prior fragility fracture, and very low BMD restricted the high risk group to 11%, among whom most hip fractures occurred (71%. These practical screening methods could eventually reduce hip fracture incidence by concentrating preventive resources to high fracture risk women.

  19. Criterion Validation Testing of Clinical Metrology Instruments for Measuring Degenerative Joint Disease Associated Mobility Impairment in Cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruen, Margaret E; Griffith, Emily H; Thomson, Andrea E; Simpson, Wendy; Lascelles, B Duncan X

    2015-01-01

    Degenerative joint disease and associated pain are common in cats, particularly in older cats. There is a need for treatment options, however evaluation of putative therapies is limited by a lack of suitable, validated outcome measures that can be used in the target population of client owned cats. The objectives of this study were to evaluate low-dose daily meloxicam for the treatment of pain associated with degenerative joint disease in cats, and further validate two clinical metrology instruments, the Feline Musculoskeletal Pain Index (FMPI) and the Client Specific Outcome Measures (CSOM). Sixty-six client owned cats with degenerative joint disease and owner-reported impairments in mobility were screened and enrolled into a double-masked, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial. Following a run-in baseline period, cats were given either placebo or meloxicam for 21 days, then in a masked washout, cats were all given placebo for 21 days. Subsequently, cats were given the opposite treatment, placebo or meloxicam, for 21 days. Cats wore activity monitors throughout the study, owners completed clinical metrology instruments following each period. Activity counts were increased in cats during treatment with daily meloxicam (pmetrology instrument for use in detecting therapeutic efficacy in cats with degenerative joint disease.

  20. The role of functional, social, and mobility dynamics in facilitating older African Americans participation in clinical research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shapiro ET

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Eve T Shapiro,1,2 Jay T Schamel,2 Kimberly A Parker,3 Laura A Randall,1,2 Paula M Frew1,2,4 1Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, 2Department of Behavioral Sciences and Health Education, Emory University Rollins School of Public Health, Atlanta, GA, 3Department of Health Studies, Texas Women’s University, Denton, TX, 4Hubert Department of Global Health, Emory University Rollins School of Public Health, Atlanta, GA, USA Purpose: Older African Americans experience disproportionately higher incidence of morbidity and mortality related to chronic and infectious diseases, yet are significantly underrepresented in clinical research compared to other racial and ethnic groups. This study aimed to understand the extent to which social support, transportation access, and physical impediments function as barriers or facilitators to clinical trial recruitment of older African Americans.Methods: Participants (N=221 were recruited from six African American churches in Atlanta and surveyed on various influences on clinical trial participation.Results: Logistic regression models demonstrated that greater transportation mobility (odds ratio [OR]=2.10; p=0.007 and social ability (OR=1.77; p=0.02 were associated with increased intentions of joining a clinical trial, as was greater basic daily living ability (OR=3.25; p=0.03, though only among single participants. Among adults age ≥65 years, those with lower levels of support during personal crises were more likely to join clinical trials (OR=0.57; p=0.04.Conclusion: To facilitate clinical trial entry, recruitment efforts need to consider the physical limitations of their potential participants, particularly basic physical abilities and disabilities. Crisis support measures may be acting as a proxy for personal health issues among those aged >65 years, who would then be more likely to seek clinical trials for the personal health benefits. Outreach to

  1. Innovative island mobile vet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forster, Dan

    2016-06-11

    One of the UK's first mobile veterinary clinics was recently awarded a Queen's Award for Innovation. Mobile Vet was launched on the Isle of Wight in 2013 by Dan Forster and his wife Kirsty, a veterinary nurse. British Veterinary Association.

  2. PTT Advisor: A CDC-supported initiative to develop a mobile clinical laboratory decision support application for the iOS platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savel, Thomas G; Lee, Brian A; Ledbetter, Greg; Brown, Sara; Lavalley, Dale; Taylor, Julie; Thompson, Pam

    2013-01-01

    This manuscript describes the development of PTT (Partial Thromboplastin Time) Advisor, one of the first of a handful of iOS-based mobile applications to be released by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). PTT Advisor has been a collaboration between two groups at CDC (Informatics R&D and Laboratory Science), and one partner team (Clinical Laboratory Integration into Healthcare Collaborative - CLIHC). The application offers clinicians a resource to quickly select the appropriate follow-up tests to evaluate patients with a prolonged PTT and a normal Prothrombin Time (PT) laboratory result. The application was designed leveraging an agile methodology, and best practices in user experience (UX) design and mobile application development. As it is an open-source project, the code to PTT Advisor was made available to the public under the Apache Software License. On July 6, 2012, the free app was approved by Apple, and was published to their App Store. Regardless of the complexity of the mobile application, the level of effort required in the development process should not be underestimated. There are several issues that make designing the UI for a mobile phone challenging (not just small screen size): the touchscreen, users' mobile mindset (tasks need to be quick and focused), and the fact that mobile UI conventions/expectations are still being defined and refined (due to the maturity level of the field of mobile application development).

  3. Clinical Training at Remote Sites Using Mobile Technology: An India-USA Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, R.; Albright, S.; Walker, D.; Zachariah, A.; Lee, M. Y.

    2010-01-01

    Christian Medical College (CMC), India, and Tufts University School of Medicine, USA, have developed an "institutional hub and spokes" model (campus-based e-learning supporting m-learning in the field) to facilitate clinical education and training at remote secondary hospital sites across India. Iterative research, design, development,…

  4. Extending remote patient monitoring with mobile real time clinical decision support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermens, Hermanus J.; Jones, Valerie M.; Veltink, Petrus H.; Eberle, W.

    Large scale implementation of telemedicine services such as telemonitoring and teletreatment will generate huge amounts of clinical data. Even small amounts of data from continuous patient monitoring cannot be scrutinised in real time and round the clock by health professionals. In future huge

  5. Modelling of sand transport under wave-generated sheet flows with a RANS diffusion model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hassan, Wael; Ribberink, Jan S.

    2010-01-01

    A 1DV-RANS diffusion model is used to study sand transport processes in oscillatory flat-bed/sheet flow conditions. The central aim is the verification of the model with laboratory data and to identify processes controlling the magnitude and direction (‘onshore’/‘offshore’) of the net time-averaged

  6. Computing the flow past Vortex Generators : Comparison between RANS Simulations and Experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manolesos, M.; Sorensen, NN; Troldborg, N.; Florentie, L.; Papadakis, G; Voutsinas, S.

    2016-01-01

    The flow around a wind turbine airfoil equipped with Vortex Generators (VGs) is examined. Predictions from three different Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) solvers with two different turbulence models and two different VG modelling approaches are compared between them and with experimental

  7. Computing the flow past Vortex Generators: Comparison between RANS Simulations and Experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manolesos, M.; Sørensen, Niels N.; Troldborg, Niels

    2016-01-01

    The flow around a wind turbine airfoil equipped with Vortex Generators (VGs) is examined. Predictions from three different Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) solvers with two different turbulence models and two different VG modelling approaches are compared between them and with experimental ...

  8. Inadequacy representation of flamelet-based RANS model for turbulent non-premixed flame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myoungkyu; Oliver, Todd; Moser, Robert

    2017-11-01

    Stochastic representations for model inadequacy in RANS-based models of non-premixed jet flames are developed and explored. Flamelet-based RANS models are attractive for engineering applications relative to higher-fidelity methods because of their low computational costs. However, the various assumptions inherent in such models introduce errors that can significantly affect the accuracy of computed quantities of interest. In this work, we develop an approach to represent the model inadequacy of the flamelet-based RANS model. In particular, we pose a physics-based, stochastic PDE for the triple correlation of the mixture fraction. This additional uncertain state variable is then used to construct perturbations of the PDF for the instantaneous mixture fraction, which is used to obtain an uncertain perturbation of the flame temperature. A hydrogen-air non-premixed jet flame is used to demonstrate the representation of the inadequacy of the flamelet-based RANS model. This work was supported by DARPA-EQUiPS(Enabling Quantification of Uncertainty in Physical Systems) program.

  9. Optimal Assignment of Cells in C-RAN Deployments with Multiple BBU Pools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Henrik; Checko, Aleksandra; Al-obaidi, Rami

    2015-01-01

    recommend to divide the area into multiple BBU Pools. In this paper we show how to optimally assign cells to different BBU Pools in such a scenario. By using Integer Linear Programming (ILP) method we derive engineering guidelines for minimizing the CAPital EXpenditure (CAPEX) of C-RAN deployment....

  10. Western Culture in Japanese Film: Kurosawa's "Throne of Blood" and "Ran."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Peter E.

    Akira Kurosawa, the most popular Asian film maker with audiences in the United States, has found in William Shakespeare's plays themes and plots that resonate within Japanese culture. While the translations of "Macbeth" into "Throne of Blood" and "King Lear" into "Ran" are quite direct and literal with only…

  11. Analysis of vegetation effect on waves using a vertical 2-D RANS model

    Science.gov (United States)

    A vertical two-dimensional (2-D) model has been applied in the simulation of wave propagation through vegetated water bodies. The model is based on an existing model SOLA-VOF which solves the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations with the finite difference method on a staggered rectangula...

  12. Optimizing Cloud-RAN Deployments in Real-life Scenarios Using Microwave Radio

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-obaidi, Rami; Checko, Aleksandra; Holm, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    derive engineering guidelines for minimizing the CAPital EXpenditure (CAPEX) of C-RAN deployment. We show for which population density and span of BBU Pool coverage usage of Microwave Radio (MWR) links is viable. For larger scale deployment we recommend to divide the area into multiple BBU Pools....

  13. Ardo Ran Varres elustab härra Tartüffi / Tiit Tuumalu

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tuumalu, Tiit, 1971-

    2005-01-01

    2.-9. septembrini Pärnus, Haapsalus, Tallinnas, Viljandis ja Tartus toimuvast tummfilmi ühe olulisema lavastaja F. W. Murnau "Tartüff" filmikontserdist "Tartüff live", esitaja Varrese ansambel ARV Ensemble. Ardo Ran Varrese töödest

  14. Criterion Validation Testing of Clinical Metrology Instruments for Measuring Degenerative Joint Disease Associated Mobility Impairment in Cats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret E Gruen

    Full Text Available Degenerative joint disease and associated pain are common in cats, particularly in older cats. There is a need for treatment options, however evaluation of putative therapies is limited by a lack of suitable, validated outcome measures that can be used in the target population of client owned cats. The objectives of this study were to evaluate low-dose daily meloxicam for the treatment of pain associated with degenerative joint disease in cats, and further validate two clinical metrology instruments, the Feline Musculoskeletal Pain Index (FMPI and the Client Specific Outcome Measures (CSOM.Sixty-six client owned cats with degenerative joint disease and owner-reported impairments in mobility were screened and enrolled into a double-masked, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial. Following a run-in baseline period, cats were given either placebo or meloxicam for 21 days, then in a masked washout, cats were all given placebo for 21 days. Subsequently, cats were given the opposite treatment, placebo or meloxicam, for 21 days. Cats wore activity monitors throughout the study, owners completed clinical metrology instruments following each period.Activity counts were increased in cats during treatment with daily meloxicam (p<0.0001 compared to baseline. The FMPI results and activity count data offer concurrent validation for the FMPI, though the relationship between baseline activity counts and FMPI scores at baseline was poor (R2=0.034. The CSOM did not show responsiveness for improvement in this study, and the relationship between baseline activity counts and CSOM scores at baseline was similarly poor (R2=0.042.Refinements to the FMPI, including abbreviation of the instrument and scoring as percent of possible score are recommended. This study offered further validation of the FMPI as a clinical metrology instrument for use in detecting therapeutic efficacy in cats with degenerative joint disease.

  15. Mobile Device-Based Electronic Data Capture System Used in a Clinical Randomized Controlled Trial: Advantages and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Sun, Lei; Liu, Yu; Wang, Hongyi; Sun, Ningling; Zhang, Puhong

    2017-03-08

    Electronic data capture (EDC) systems have been widely used in clinical research, but mobile device-based electronic data capture (mEDC) system has not been well evaluated. The aim of our study was to evaluate the feasibility, advantages, and challenges of mEDC in data collection, project management, and telemonitoring in a randomized controlled trial (RCT). We developed an mEDC to support an RCT called "Telmisartan and Hydrochlorothiazide Antihypertensive Treatment (THAT)" study, which was a multicenter, double-blinded, RCT, with the purpose of comparing the efficacy of telmisartan and hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ) monotherapy in high-sodium-intake patients with mild to moderate hypertension during a 60 days follow-up. Semistructured interviews were conducted during and after the trial to evaluate the feasibility, advantage, and challenge of mEDC. Nvivo version 9.0 (QSR International) was used to analyze records of interviews, and a thematic framework method was used to obtain outcomes. The mEDC was successfully used to support the data collection and project management in all the 14 study hospitals. A total of 1333 patients were recruited with support of mEDC, of whom 1037 successfully completed all 4 visits. Across all visits, the average time needed for 141 questions per patient was 53 min, which were acceptable to both doctors and patients. All the interviewees, including 24 doctors, 53 patients, 1 clinical research associate (CRA), 1 project manager (PM), and 1 data manager (DM), expressed their satisfaction to nearly all the functions of the innovative mEDC in randomization, data collection, project management, quality control, and remote monitoring in real time. The average satisfaction score was 9.2 (scale, 0-10). The biggest challenge came from the stability of the mobile or Wi-Fi signal although it was not a problem in THAT study. The innovative mEDC has many merits and is well acceptable in supporting data collection and project management in a timely

  16. Tablet computers with mobile electronic medical records enhance clinical routine and promote bedside time: a controlled prospective crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischmann, Robert; Duhm, Julian; Hupperts, Hagen; Brandt, Stephan A

    2015-03-01

    Demographic changes require physicians to deliver needed services with fewer resources. Neurology as an interdisciplinary domain involves complex diagnostic procedures and time-consuming data handling. Tablet PCs might streamline clinical workflow through mobile access to patient data. This study examined the impact of tablets running an electronic medical record on ward round performance. We hypothesised that tablet use should reduce ward round time and decrease the time needed to check medical records thereby increasing physicians' bedside availability. Nine resident neurologists participated in a controlled prospective crossover trial over 14 weeks. In the experimental condition, tablets were used in addition to the established medical record. In the control condition, physicians used established systems only. The combined primary outcome measure included changes in total ward round time and relative time shifts between associated work processes. The secondary outcome measure was physicians' time required to check a medical record vs. physicians' bedside time. There was a significant main effect on the primary outcome measure (p = 0.01). Tablet use accelerated preparing (p = 0.004) and post-processing (p Time for conducting ward rounds was unaffected (p = 0.19). Checking medical records was faster with tablets (p = 0.001) increasing physicians' bedside time (p time savings during preparing and post-processing of ward rounds. It was further associated with time savings during checking medical data and an increase in physicians' bedside time. Tablets may facilitate clinical data handling and promote workflow.

  17. Foot ulcer risk and location in relation to prospective clinical assessment of foot shape and mobility among persons with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowley, Matthew S; Boyko, Edward J; Shofer, Jane B; Ahroni, Jessie H; Ledoux, William R

    2008-11-01

    We assessed baseline clinical foot shape for 2939 feet of diabetic subjects who were monitored prospectively for foot ulceration. Assessments included hammer/claw toes, hallux valgus, hallux limitus, prominent metatarsal heads, bony prominences, Charcot deformity, plantar callus, foot type, muscle atrophy, ankle and hallux mobility, and neuropathy. Risk factors were linked to ulcer occurrence and location via a Cox proportional hazards model. Hammer/claw toes (hazard ratio [HR] (95% confidence interval [CI])=1.43 (1.06, 1.94) p=0.02), marked hammer/claw toes (HR=1.77 (1.18, 2.66) p=0.006), bony prominences (HR=1.38 (1.02, 1.88), p=0.04), and foot type (Charcot or drop foot vs. neutrally aligned) (HR=2.34 (1.33, 4.10), p=0.003) were significant risk factors for ulceration adjusting for age, body mass index, insulin medication, ulcer history and amputation history. With adjustment for neuropathy only hammer/claw toes (HR=1.40 (1.03, 1.90), p=0.03) and foot type (HR=1.76 (1.04, 3.04), p=0.05) were significantly related to ulceration. However, there was no relationship between ulcer location and foot deformity. Certain foot deformities were predictive of ulceration, although there was no relationship between clinical foot deformity and ulcer location.

  18. ran Bonde - landsköpman och bondeseglare på 1500-talet / Bengt Eriksson

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Eriksson, Bengt

    2012-01-01

    Üle Soome lahe kaubandusest 16. sajandil. Helsingi kihelkonnas tegutsenud kaupmehest Göran Bondest, kes käis aastas 5-6 korda kaubareisil Tallinnas. Tihedamad suhted sidusid Göran Bondet Tallinna kaupmehe Hemlich Fickega. "Läänemere valitsejast" Sören Norrbyst. Helsingi rajamisest Gustav I Vasa poolt vastukaaluks Tallinnale

  19. Periparturition alterations to liver ultrasonographic echo-texture and fat mobilization parameters in clinically healthy Holstein cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafia, Saman; Taghipour-Bazargani, Taghi; Asadi, Farzad; Vajhi, Alireza; Bokaie, Saied

    2011-12-01

    The objective of present study was to record the sequential alterations in liver echo-texture through digital analyzing of the B-mode ultrasonography in three groups of under-conditioned (UC), moderate-conditioned (MC), and over-conditioned (OC) clinically healthy Holstein cows from 30 days to calving until 30 days in milk. Furthermore, to compare their changes in association with the changes of fat mobilization parameters of non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA), betahydroxybutyric acid (BHBA), and body condition score (BCS). Although the cows lost significant (P < 0.05) BCS from calving and the NEFA values showed an increasing trend near calving and the BHBA values significantly inclined postparturition, the mean grey scale histogram (MGSH) of liver images did not reveal significant fluctuations unless a significant decrease on calving day (P < 0.05). The MGSH drop was predicted to be the result of anatomical changes in abdominal cavity, related to delivery and liver's blood flow. OC cows had higher NEFA on day +20 than UC and MC cows (P < 0.05). UC cows showed higher MGSH values on day -30 than MC cows and again on day -10 comparing to MC and OC cows (P < 0.05). MGSH values correlated with BCS values (rUC = -0.186; rMC = -0.283; rOC = -0.158). It was concluded that the studied cows did not show significant alterations in textural changes in their liver ultrasound whilst going through fat mobilization. As quantitative ultrasonography has shown the potential to detect cases of fatty liver, it could gain the attention to become a feasible device for liver health monitoring on a herd basis.

  20. Utilizing mobile networks for the detection of clinically relevant interactions between chemotherapy regimens and complementary and alternative medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Kevin Yi-Lwern; See, Cheng Shang; Kuo, En Yi; Chui, Wai Keung; Chan, Alexandre

    2012-02-01

    Patients with cancer who use complementary and alternative medicines (CAMs) in conjunction with chemotherapy treatment are at risk of manifesting anticancer drug-CAM interactions (DCIs), which may lead to negative therapeutic outcomes. This article describes a novel iPhone application developed for the Mobile Internet, called OncoRx-MI, which identifies DCIs of single-agent and multiple-agent chemotherapy regimen (CReg) prescriptions. Drug-, CAM-, and DCI-related information was compiled from various hardcopy and softcopy sources, and published literature from PubMed. Overall management plans for the CRegs were then developed. The iPhone Web documents were constructed using Adobe software and programming scripts, and mounted onto a third-party server. DCI searches are based on CReg acronyms, and OncoRx-MI is designed to fit the iPhone screen configuration for improved usability. A small usability study was also carried out and the user feedback presented. OncoRx-MI is able to detect over 2700 interactions between 256 CRegs and 166 CAMs, making up a total of over 4400 DCI pairs. The CAMs are classified into seven categories based on their uses in supportive care, and non-cancer-related CAMs are also included. The majority of the DCIs are pharmacokinetic in nature (79%), involving the induction and inhibition of the cytochrome P450 isozymes and p-glycoprotein. Pharmacodynamic DCIs include hepatotoxicity (39%), altered corticosteroid efficacies (30%), and increased risks of hypoglycemia (4%), hypertensive crisis (2%), bleeding, and serotonin syndrome (1% each). OncoRx-MI is the first mobile application of its kind that allows searching of DCIs for CRegs through 3G networks, and is intended to improve pharmaceutical care of patients with cancer by assisting health care practitioners in managing CReg interactions in their clinical practices.

  1. CLINICAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    although allowance was made for initiating ART in HIV antibody-positive infants with severe disease before confirmation by HIV DNA polymerase chain reaction. (PCR). The decision on when to initiate ART in infants ... early ART arms, recommended that no infants be ran- domised to deferred ART and that data until this ...

  2. Pre-operative functional mobility as an independent determinant of inpatient functional recovery after total knee arthroplasty during three periods that coincided with changes in clinical pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluis, G. van der; Goldbohm, R.A.; Elings, J.E.; Nijhuis-Van der Sanden, M.W.G.; Akkermans, R.P.; Bimmel, R.; Hoogeboom, T.J.; Meeteren, N.L. van

    2017-01-01

    AIMS: To investigate whether pre-operative functional mobility is a determinant of delayed inpatient recovery of activities (IRoA) after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in three periods that coincided with changes in the clinical pathway. PATIENTS AND METHODS: All patients (n = 682, 73% women, mean

  3. The combined effect of lower-limb multilevel botulinum toxin type A and comprehensive rehabilitation on mobility in children with cerebral palsy: A randomized clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtes, V.A.; Dallmeijer, A.J.; Knol, D.L.; Speth, L.A.; Maathuis, C.G.; Jongerius, P.H.; Becher, J.G.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the combined effect on mobility of treatment with multilevel botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) and comprehensive rehabilitation in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Design: Randomized clinical trial using a multiple baseline design. The intervention group was treated 6 weeks

  4. The combined effect of lower-limb multilevel botulinum toxin type A and comprehensive rehabilitation on mobility in children with cerebral palsy : A randomized clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtes, Vanessa A.; Dallmeijer, Annet J.; Knol, Dirk L.; Speth, Lucianne A.; Maathuis, Carel G.; Jongerius, Peter H.; Becher, Jules G.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the combined effect on mobility of treatment with multilevel botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) and comprehensive rehabilitation in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Design: Randomized clinical trial using a multiple baseline design. The intervention group was treated 6 weeks

  5. Mobility disorders and pain, interrelations that need new research concepts and advanced clinical commitments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sascha Sajer

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This Perspective will discuss topics recently suggested by Prof. Helmut Kern, Vienna, Austria, to advance the research activities of his team, that is: Topic A, 10 years post RISE; Topic B, New research for new solutions on old research questions; Topic C, Working groups on nerve regeneration, training-parameters of seniors in different ages, muscle adaptation; and studies of connective tissue and cartilage. This Perspective summarizes some of the basic concepts and of the evidence-based tools for developing further translational research activities. Clinically relevant results will ask for continuous interests of Basic and Applied Myologists and for the support during the next five to ten years of public and private granting agencies. All together, they will end in protocols, devices and multidisciplinary managements for persons suffering with muscle denervation, neuromuscular-related or non-related pain and for the increasing population of old, older and oldest senior citizens in Europe and beyond.

  6. A preliminary case series evaluating the safety and immediate to short-term clinical benefits of joint mobilization in hemophilic arthritis of the lower limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaddan, Emma; Rowell, John; O'Leary, Shaun

    2017-09-01

    Arthritis resulting from recurrent intra-articular bleeding in individuals with hemophilia can be severely debilitating due to joint pain and stiffness with subsequent loss of mobility and function. Very limited studies have investigated the potential benefits of joint mobilization for this condition. This case series is a preliminary investigation of safety, as well as immediate and short-term clinical benefits, associated with gentle knee and ankle joint mobilization in people with hemophilic arthropathy. A single intervention of joint mobilization was applied to the affected knees and/or ankles of 16 individuals with severe or moderate hemophilia within a public hospital setting. Adverse events, as well as immediate (pain-free passive joint range, Timed Up and Go Test with maximum pain numerical rating scale) and short-term (Lower Extremity Functional Scale) effects of the intervention were evaluated with a repeated measures ANOVA. There were no adverse events. An immediate significant increase was observed in pain-free passive ankle joint range of motion ( p  mobilization intervention. The findings of this case series suggest that gentle joint mobilization techniques may be safely considered as part of a multimodal management approach for hemophilic arthropathy.

  7. Meeting fronthaul challenges of future mobile network deployments — The HARP approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dittmann, Lars; Christiansen, Henrik Lehrmann; Checko, Aleksandra

    2014-01-01

    In future mobile networks aggregation at different levels is necessary but at the same time imposes challenges that mandate looking into new architectures. This paper presents the design consideration approach for a C-RAN based mobile aggregation network used in the EU HARP project. With this arc...

  8. The Effect of Nursing Quality Improvement and Mobile Health Interventions on Infant Sleep Practices: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Rachel Y; Hauck, Fern R; Colson, Eve R; Kellams, Ann L; Geller, Nicole L; Heeren, Timothy; Kerr, Stephen M; Drake, Emily E; Tanabe, Kawai; McClain, Mary; Corwin, Michael J

    2017-07-25

    Inadequate adherence to recommendations known to reduce the risk of sudden unexpected infant death has contributed to a slowing in the decline of these deaths. To assess the effectiveness of 2 interventions separately and combined to promote infant safe sleep practices compared with control interventions. Four-group cluster randomized clinical trial of mothers of healthy term newborns who were recruited between March 2015 and May 2016 at 16 US hospitals with more than 100 births annually. Data collection ended in October 2016. All participants were beneficiaries of a nursing quality improvement campaign in infant safe sleep practices (intervention) or breastfeeding (control), and then received a 60-day mobile health program, in which mothers received frequent emails or text messages containing short videos with educational content about infant safe sleep practices (intervention) or breastfeeding (control) and queries about infant care practices. The primary outcome was maternal self-reported adherence to 4 infant safe sleep practices of sleep position (supine), sleep location (room sharing without bed sharing), soft bedding use (none), and pacifier use (any); data were collected by maternal survey when the infant was aged 60 to 240 days. Of the 1600 mothers who were randomized to 1 of 4 groups (400 per group), 1263 completed the survey (78.9%). The mean (SD) maternal age was 28.1 years (5.8 years) and 32.8% of respondents were non-Hispanic white, 32.3% Hispanic, 27.2% non-Hispanic black, and 7.7% other race/ethnicity. The mean (SD) infant age was 11.2 weeks (4.4 weeks) and 51.2% were female. In the adjusted analyses, mothers receiving the safe sleep mobile health intervention had higher prevalence of placing their infants supine compared with mothers receiving the control mobile health intervention (89.1% vs 80.2%, respectively; adjusted risk difference, 8.9% [95% CI, 5.3%-11.7%]), room sharing without bed sharing (82.8% vs 70.4%; adjusted risk difference, 12

  9. The FORGE AHEAD clinical readiness consultation tool: a validated tool to assess clinical readiness for chronic disease care mobilization in Canada's First Nations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, Mariam Naqshbandi; Mequanint, Selam; Paquette-Warren, Jann; Bailie, Ross; Chirila, Alexandra; Dyck, Roland; Green, Michael; Hanley, Anthony; Tompkins, Jordan; Harris, Stewart

    2017-03-23

    Given the astounding rates of diabetes and related complications, and the barriers to providing care present in Indigenous communities in Canada, intervention strategies that take into account contextual factors such as readiness to mobilize are needed to maximize improvements and increase the likelihood of success and sustainment. As part of the national FORGE AHEAD Program, we sought to develop, test and validate a clinical readiness consultation tool aimed at assessing the readiness of clinical teams working on-reserve in First Nations communities to participate in quality improvement (QI) to enhance diabetes care in Canada. A literature review was conducted to identify existing readiness tools. The ABCD - SAT was adapted using a consensus approach that emphasized a community-based participatory approach and prioritized the knowledge and wisdom held by community members. The tool was piloted with a group of 16 people from 7 provinces and 11 partnering communities to assess language use, clarity, relevance, format, and ease of completion using examples. Internal reliability analysis and convergence validity were conducted with data from 53 clinical team members from 11 First Nations communities (3-5 per community) who have participated in the FORGE AHEAD program. The 27-page Clinical Readiness Consultation Tool (CRCT) consists of five main components, 21 sub-components, and 74 items that are aligned with the Expanded Chronic Care Model. Five-point Likert scale feedback from the pilot ranged from 3.25 to 4.5. Length of the tool was reported as a drawback but respondents noted that all the items were needed to provide a comprehensive picture of the healthcare system. Results for internal consistency showed that all sub-components except for two were within acceptable ranges (0.77-0.93). The Team Structure and Function sub-component scale had a moderately significant positive correlation with the validated Team Climate Inventory, r = 0.45, p communities have

  10. Practicability of hygienic wrapping of touchscreen operated mobile devices in a clinical setting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Hammon

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To prove effectiveness of wrapping tablet computers in order to reduce microbiological contamination and to evaluate whether a plastic bag-covered tablet leads to impaired user satisfaction or touchscreen functionality. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Within a period of 11 days 115 patients were provided with a tablet computer while waiting for their magnetic resonance imaging examination. Every day the contamination of the surface of the tablet was determined before the first and after the final use. Before the device was handed over to a patient, it was enclosed in a customized single-use plastic bag, which was analyzed for bacterial contamination after each use. A questionnaire was applied to determine whether the plastic bag impairs the user satisfaction and the functionality of the touchscreen. RESULTS: Following the use by patients the outside of the plastic bags was found to be contaminated with various bacteria (657.5 ± 368.5 colony forming units/day; some of them were potentially pathogenic. In contrast, the plastic bag covered surface of the tablet was significantly less contaminated (1.7 ± 1.9 colony forming units/day. Likewise, unused plastic bags did not show any contamination. 11% of the patients reported problems with the functionality of the touchscreen. These patients admitted that they had never used a tablet or a smartphone before. CONCLUSIONS: Tablets get severely contaminated during usage in a clinical setting. Wrapping with a customized single-use plastic bag significantly reduces microbiological contamination of the device, protects patients from the acquisition of potentially pathogenic bacteria and hardly impairs the user satisfaction and the functionality of the touchscreen.

  11. Clinical significance of mobile health assessed sleep duration and variability in bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Christopher N; Gershon, Anda; Eyler, Lisa T; Depp, Colin A

    2016-10-01

    Sleep disturbances are prevalent, persistent, and impairing features of bipolar disorder. However, the near-term and cumulative impact of the severity and variability of sleep disturbances on symptoms and functioning remains unclear. We examined self-reported daily sleep duration and variability in relation to mood symptoms, medication adherence, cognitive functioning, and concurrent daily affect. Forty-one outpatients diagnosed with bipolar disorder were asked to provide daily reports of sleep duration and affect collected via ecological momentary assessment with smartphones over eleven weeks. Measures of depressive and manic symptoms, medication adherence, and cognitive function were collected at baseline and concurrent assessment of affect were collected daily. Analyses examined whether sleep duration or variability were associated with baseline measures and changes in same-day or next-day affect. Greater sleep duration variability (but not average sleep duration) was associated with greater depressive and manic symptom severity, and lower medication adherence at baseline, and with lower and more variable ratings of positive affect and higher ratings of negative affect. Sleep durations shorter than 7-8 h were associated with lower same-day ratings of positive and higher same-day ratings of negative affect, however this did not extend to next-day affect. Greater cumulative day-to-day sleep duration variability, but not average sleep duration, was related to more severe mood symptoms, lower self-reported medication adherence and higher levels of negative affect. Bouts of short- or long-duration sleep had transient impact on affect. Day-to-day sleep variability may be important to incorporate into clinical assessment of sleep disturbances in bipolar disorder. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Röttinger approach with dual-mobility cup to improve functional recovery in hip osteoarthritis patients: biomechanical and clinical follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martz, Pierre; Bourredjem, Abderrahmane; Laroche, Davy; Arcens, Marc; Labattut, Ludovic; Binquet, Christine; Maillefert, Jean-Francis; Baulot, Emmanuel; Ornetti, Paul

    2017-03-01

    We assumed that the combination of dual-mobility total hip arthroplasty (THA) using the minimally-invasive Röttinger anterolateral approach could guarantee hip stability with faster functional recovery. We objectively analyzed functional improvement after dual-mobility THA by quantitative gait analysis. We compared the results achieved following two different surgical approaches: Röttinger's versus Moore's approach (posterolateral approach). We included 70 patients in an open prospective single-centre study: 38 by Rottinger's approach (age = 67yo) and 32 by Moores's approach (age = 68yo). Clinical and biomechanical analysis (kinematic and kinetic parameters of the hip) were conducted at the pre-operative period and at six months post-op RESULTS: We found a significant improvement in all clinical scores and all biomechanical parameters but no difference was found between the two approaches. However, the study showed marked clinical, biomechanical and functional improvements for patients treated with dual-mobility THA for osteoarthritis without complete hip recovery compared with a control group. The combination of the Röttinger approach with a dual-mobility cup remains a valid choice for primary THA without functional advantage at midterm.

  13. Staging Mobilities / Designing Mobilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.

    2015-01-01

    asks: what are the physical, social, technical, and cultural conditions to the staging of contemporary urban mobilities? The theoretical framing in the Staging mobilities book is applied to four in-depth cases in the accompanying volume Designing mobilities.This book explore how places, sites......In recent years, urban research has taken a ‘mobilities turn’. There has been a developing realisation that mobilities do not ‘just happen.’ Mobilities are carefully and meticulously designed, planned and staged (from above). However, they are equally importantly acted out, performed and lived......, and systems 'hosting' these multiple and complex mobilities are designed and how they are staging these in terms of their physical layout. By analysing specific cases of ‘mobilities design’ related to the four modes of moving; Walk, Bike, Train, and Car, the book uncover important and until now neglected...

  14. Home-based versus mobile clinic HIV testing and counseling in rural Lesotho: a cluster-randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labhardt, Niklaus Daniel; Motlomelo, Masetsibi; Cerutti, Bernard; Pfeiffer, Karolin; Kamele, Mashaete; Hobbins, Michael A; Ehmer, Jochen

    2014-12-01

    The success of HIV programs relies on widely accessible HIV testing and counseling (HTC) services at health facilities as well as in the community. Home-based HTC (HB-HTC) is a popular community-based approach to reach persons who do not test at health facilities. Data comparing HB-HTC to other community-based HTC approaches are very limited. This trial compares HB-HTC to mobile clinic HTC (MC-HTC). The trial was powered to test the hypothesis of higher HTC uptake in HB-HTC campaigns than in MC-HTC campaigns. Twelve clusters were randomly allocated to HB-HTC or MC-HTC. The six clusters in the HB-HTC group received 30 1-d multi-disease campaigns (five villages per cluster) that delivered services by going door-to-door, whereas the six clusters in MC-HTC group received campaigns involving community gatherings in the 30 villages with subsequent service provision in mobile clinics. Time allocation and human resources were standardized and equal in both groups. All individuals accessing the campaigns with unknown HIV status or whose last HIV test was >12 wk ago and was negative were eligible. All outcomes were assessed at the individual level. Statistical analysis used multivariable logistic regression. Odds ratios and p-values were adjusted for gender, age, and cluster effect. Out of 3,197 participants from the 12 clusters, 2,563 (80.2%) were eligible (HB-HTC: 1,171; MC-HTC: 1,392). The results for the primary outcomes were as follows. Overall HTC uptake was higher in the HB-HTC group than in the MC-HTC group (92.5% versus 86.7%; adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 2.06; 95% CI: 1.18-3.60; p = 0. 011). Among adolescents and adults ≥ 12 y, HTC uptake did not differ significantly between the two groups; however, in children HTC uptake was higher in the HB-HTC arm (87.5% versus 58.7%; aOR: 4.91; 95% CI: 2.41-10.0; pHTC, 114 (4.9%) tested HIV-positive, 39 (3.6%) in the HB-HTC arm and 75 (6.2%) in the MC-HTC arm (aOR: 0.64; 95% CI: 0.48-0.86; p = 0.002). Ten (25.6%) and 19 (25

  15. Mobilization with movement and kinesiotaping compared with a supervised exercise program for painful shoulder: results of a clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djordjevic, Olivera C; Vukicevic, Danijela; Katunac, Ljiljana; Jovic, Stevan

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of Mobilization with Movement (MWM) and kinesiotaping (KT) techniques with a supervised exercise program in participants with patients with shoulder pain. Twenty subjects with shoulder pain were included if subjects were diagnosed by the referring physician with either rotator cuff lesion with impingement syndrome or impingement shoulder syndrome. Participants were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 groups after clinical and radiologic assessment: group 1 was treated with MWM and KT techniques, whereas group 2 was treated with a supervised exercise program. The main outcome measures were active pain-free shoulder abduction and flexion tested on days 0, 5, and 10. Improvement in active pain-free shoulder range of motion was significantly higher in the group treated with MWM and KT. Repeated-measures analysis of variance indicated significant effects of treatment, time, and treatment×time interaction. This study suggests that MWM and KT may be an effective and useful treatment in range of motion augmentation of subjects with rotator cuff lesion and impingement syndrome or impingement shoulder syndrome. Copyright © 2012 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The Ran GTPase-activating protein (RanGAP1 is critically involved in smooth muscle cell differentiation, proliferation and migration following vascular injury: implications for neointima formation and restenosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Vorpahl

    Full Text Available Differentiation and dedifferentiation, accompanied by proliferation play a pivotal role for the phenotypic development of vascular proliferative diseases (VPD, such as restenosis. Increasing evidence points to an essential role of regulated nucleoporin expression in the choice between differentiation and proliferation. However, whether components of the Ran GTPase cycle, which is of pivotal importance for both nucleocytoplasmic transport and for mitotic progression, are subject to similar regulation in VPD is currently unknown. Here, we show that differentiation of human coronary artery smooth muscle cell (CASMC to a contractile phenotype by stepwise serum depletion leads to significant reduction of RanGAP1 protein levels. The inverse event, dedifferentiation of cells, was assessed in the rat carotid artery balloon injury model, a well-accepted model for neointima formation and restenosis. As revealed by temporospatial analysis of RanGAP1 expression, neointima formation in rat carotid arteries was associated with a significant upregulation of RanGAP1 expression at 3 and 7 days after balloon injury. Of note, neointimal cells located at the luminal surface revealed persistent RanGAP1 expression, as opposed to cells in deeper layers of the neointima where RanGAP1 expression was less or not detectable at all. To gain first evidence for a direct influence of RanGAP1 levels on differentiation, we reduced RanGAP1 in human coronary artery smooth muscle cells by siRNA. Indeed, downregulation of the essential RanGAP1 protein by 50% induced a differentiated, spindle-like smooth muscle cell phenotype, accompanied by an upregulation of the differentiation marker desmin. Reduction of RanGAP1 levels also resulted in a reduction of mitogen induced cellular migration and proliferation as well as a significant upregulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27KIP1, without evidence for cellular necrosis. These findings suggest that RanGAP1 plays a critical

  17. The Ran GTPase-activating protein (RanGAP1) is critically involved in smooth muscle cell differentiation, proliferation and migration following vascular injury: implications for neointima formation and restenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorpahl, Marc; Schönhofer-Merl, Sabine; Michaelis, Cornelia; Flotho, Annette; Melchior, Frauke; Wessely, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    Differentiation and dedifferentiation, accompanied by proliferation play a pivotal role for the phenotypic development of vascular proliferative diseases (VPD), such as restenosis. Increasing evidence points to an essential role of regulated nucleoporin expression in the choice between differentiation and proliferation. However, whether components of the Ran GTPase cycle, which is of pivotal importance for both nucleocytoplasmic transport and for mitotic progression, are subject to similar regulation in VPD is currently unknown. Here, we show that differentiation of human coronary artery smooth muscle cell (CASMC) to a contractile phenotype by stepwise serum depletion leads to significant reduction of RanGAP1 protein levels. The inverse event, dedifferentiation of cells, was assessed in the rat carotid artery balloon injury model, a well-accepted model for neointima formation and restenosis. As revealed by temporospatial analysis of RanGAP1 expression, neointima formation in rat carotid arteries was associated with a significant upregulation of RanGAP1 expression at 3 and 7 days after balloon injury. Of note, neointimal cells located at the luminal surface revealed persistent RanGAP1 expression, as opposed to cells in deeper layers of the neointima where RanGAP1 expression was less or not detectable at all. To gain first evidence for a direct influence of RanGAP1 levels on differentiation, we reduced RanGAP1 in human coronary artery smooth muscle cells by siRNA. Indeed, downregulation of the essential RanGAP1 protein by 50% induced a differentiated, spindle-like smooth muscle cell phenotype, accompanied by an upregulation of the differentiation marker desmin. Reduction of RanGAP1 levels also resulted in a reduction of mitogen induced cellular migration and proliferation as well as a significant upregulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27KIP1, without evidence for cellular necrosis. These findings suggest that RanGAP1 plays a critical role in smooth

  18. Clinically relevant weakness in diverse populations of older adults participating in the International Mobility in Aging Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza Barbosa, Juliana Fernandes; Zepeda, Mario Ulises Perez; Béland, François; Guralnik, Jack M; Zunzunegui, Maria Victoria; Guerra, Ricardo Oliveira

    2016-02-01

    The aims of this study were to compare cut points for weakness proposed by Foundation for the National Institutes of Health (FNIH) Sarcopenia Project with cut points estimated with our own data; to assess the prevalence of clinically relevant handgrip strength (HGS) weakness according to published criteria across distinct populations of older adults; to estimate the ability of HGS weakness to identify slowness. This is a cross-sectional analysis of International Mobility in Aging Study (IMIAS) involving 1935 community-dwelling older adults, between 65 and 74 years, who completed HGS and gait speed assessment. We used baseline data from Tirana (Albania), Natal (Brazil), Manizales (Colombia), Kingston (Ontario, Canada), and Saint-Hyacinthe (Quebec, Canada). Weakness was defined according to sex-specific HGS cut points associated with slowness proposed by FNIH Sarcopenia Project. Slowness was defined as gait speed <0.8 m/s. IMIAS cut points for clinical weakness had good agreement with those proposed by FNIH. Weakness prevalence across the research sites ranged from 1.1 % (Saint-Hyacinthe) to 19.2 % (Manizales) among men. Women from Manizales (13.5 %) and Natal (19.3 %) had higher prevalence of weakness than their counterparts. FNIH cut points had a strong association with slowness, for both sexes. The IMIAS population generated cut points which were close to those proposed by FNIH. There was large variability in prevalence of weakness across our research sites. The HGS cut points for weakness proposed by FNIH performed well in IMIAS populations, providing a useful tool for screening older adults at risk for functional problems.

  19. Evaluating C-RAN Fronthaul Functional Splits in Terms of Network Level Energy and Cost Savings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Checko, Aleksandra; Popovska Avramova, Andrijana; Berger, Michael Stübert

    2016-01-01

    split in the baseband processing chain has been proposed to overcome these challenges. This paper evaluates, by mathematical and simulation methods, different splits with respect to network level energy and cost efficiency having in the mind the expected quality of service.The proposed mathematical......The placement of the complete baseband processing in a centralized pool results in high data rate requirement and inflexibility of the fronthaul network, which challenges the energy and cost effectiveness of the cloud radio access network (C-RAN). Recently, redesign of the C-RAN through functional...... model quantifies the multiplexing gains and the trade-offs between centralization and decentralization concerning the cost of the pool, fronthaul network capacity and resource utilization. The event-based simulation captures the influence of the traffic load dynamics and traffic type variation...

  20. Assessment of 3D-RANS models for the simulation of topographically forced shallow flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safarzadeh Akbar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work the performance of Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS simulations to predict the flow structure developed by the presence of a sidewall obstacle in a uniform open-channel shallow flow is discussed. The tested geometry was selected due to its important role in several fluvial applications, such as the control of riverbank erosion and the creation of improved ecological conditions in river restoration applications. The results are compared against experimental laboratory velocity fields obtained after Large Scale Particle Image Velocimetry (LSPIV measurements. It is shown that the length of reattachment of the separated shear layer generated by the obstacle is well predicted by a Reynolds Stress Model, while classical two-equation models show important limitations. All the performed RANS simulations are unable to properly predict the formation of a secondary gyre region, which develops immediately downstream the obstacle.

  1. Enhancing LTE with Cloud-RAN and Load-Controlled Parasitic Antenna Arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Artuso, Matteo; Boviz, Dora; Checko, Aleksandra

    2016-01-01

    implementations of C-RANs tackle fundamental technical and economic challenges. In this article, we present an end-to-end solution for practically implementable C-RANs by providing innovative solutions to key issues such as the design of cost-effective hardware and power-effective signals for RRHs, efficient...... design and distribution of data and control traffic for coordinated communications, and conception of a flexible and elastic architecture supporting dynamic allocation of both the densely distributed RRHs and the centralized processing resources in the cloud to create virtual base stations. More...... specifically, we propose a novel antenna array architecture called load-controlled parasitic antenna array (LCPAA) where multiple antennas are fed by a single RF chain. Energy- and spectral-efficient modulation as well as signaling schemes that are easy to implement are also provided. Additionally, the design...

  2. On the use of (U)RANS and LES approaches for turbulent incompressible single phase flows in nuclear engineering applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benhamadouche, Sofiane, E-mail: sofiane.benhamadouche@edf.fr

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • The paper deals with the use of (U)RANS and LES in nuclear engineering applications. • It gives some ideas and guidelines to run high quality computations. • Some perspectives are drawn concerning the development of (U)RANS and LES approaches in the future. - Abstract: The present paper gives some ideas and guidelines in order to run high quality (U)RANS or LES computations. The paper starts with (U)RANS approaches, advocating the use of Reynolds Stress Models for complex flows and recommending further work on modeling of turbulent heat fluxes, which remains today too basic in industry. The superiority of wall-resolved models vs. wall-modeled in RANS is recalled and the use of adaptive wall treatment is suggested. The concept of Unsteady RANS is finally questioned. Then, important issues around LES are raised. The mesh refinement criteria are recalled for wall-resolved LES and the use of wall models addressed. The production of DNS and wall-resolved LES calculations for flow understanding and RANS validation is encouraged.

  3. Computing the flow past Vortex Generators: Comparison between RANS Simulations and Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manolesos, M.; Sørensen, N. N.; Troldborg, N.; Florentie, L.; Papadakis, G.; Voutsinas, S.

    2016-09-01

    The flow around a wind turbine airfoil equipped with Vortex Generators (VGs) is examined. Predictions from three different Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) solvers with two different turbulence models and two different VG modelling approaches are compared between them and with experimental data. The best results are obtained with the more expensive fully resolved VG approach. The cost efficient BAY model can also provide acceptable results, if grid related numerical diffusion is minimized and only force coefficient polars are considered.

  4. A comparison between Smoothed-Particle Hydrodynamics and RANS Volume of Fluid method in modelling slamming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Sasson

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The oil and gas industry requires complex subsea infrastructure in order to develop offshore oil and gas fields. Upon installation, these components may encounter high slamming loads, stemming from impact with the water surface. This paper utilises two different numerical methods, the mesh-free Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH approach and Reynolds Averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS Volume of Fluid (VOF method to quantify these loads on a free-falling object. The investigation is also interested in conducting a parameter study and determining the effect of varying simulation parameters on the prediction of slamming event kinematics and forces. The surface impact of a freefalling wedge was introduced as a case study and has been simulated using SPH and RANS, with the results being compared to an experimental investigation. It was found from the SPH simulations that particle resolution and the size of the SPH particle kernel are very important, whilst the diffusion term does not play an important role. The latter is due to the very transient nature of slamming events, which do not allow sufficient time for diffusion in the fluid domain. For the RANS simulations, motion of the wedge was achieved using the overset grid technique, whereby varying the discretising time step was found to have a pronounced impact on the accuracy of the captured slamming event. Through analysing the numerical data, one can observe that the RANS results correlate slightly better with the experimental data as opposed to that obtained from the SPH modelling. However, considering the robustness and quick set up of the SPH simulations, both of these two numerical approaches are considered to be promising tools for modelling more complicated slamming problems, including those potentially involving more intricate structures.

  5. Propeller Analysis Using RANS/BEM Coupling Accounting for Blade Blockage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-04

    2000 and 2010 Gothenburg and 2005 Tokyo workshops on numerical ship hydrodynamics (Larrson et al., 2002, Larsson et al. 2013, Hino 2005). The KCS is...Workshop on Numerical Ship Hydrodynamics, Chalmers University of Technology. Larsson , L., Stern, F. and Visonneau, M. (eds.), (2013). Numerical ...B2Y 3Z7 ABSTRACT A popular method for analyzing a propeller operating behind a ship is to couple a Reynolds-averaged Navier- Stokes (RANS) solution

  6. RANS/CAA based Prediction of Jet Mixing Noise in Cruise Flight

    OpenAIRE

    Appel, Christina; Rossignol, Karl-Stéphane; Klabes, Alexander; Neifeld, Andrej; Herr, Michaela; Ewert, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Besides turbulent boundary layer induced excitation noise, jet noise is the second most important aeroacoustic source for aircraft cabin noise. A goal within the DLR project ECCO (Enhanced Cabin Comfort Computations) was to improve current cabin noise pre- diction approaches. Within the framework of the project ECCO RANS (Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes) and CAA (Computational Aero Acoustics) computations for jet noise at cruise conditions have been carried out. Especially at h...

  7. Using Mobile Sensing to Test Clinical Models of Depression, Social Anxiety, State Affect, and Social Isolation Among College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Philip I; Fua, Karl; Huang, Yu; Bonelli, Wesley; Xiong, Haoyi; Barnes, Laura E; Teachman, Bethany A

    2017-03-03

    Research in psychology demonstrates a strong link between state affect (moment-to-moment experiences of positive or negative emotionality) and trait affect (eg, relatively enduring depression and social anxiety symptoms), and a tendency to withdraw (eg, spending time at home). However, existing work is based almost exclusively on static, self-reported descriptions of emotions and behavior that limit generalizability. Despite adoption of increasingly sophisticated research designs and technology (eg, mobile sensing using a global positioning system [GPS]), little research has integrated these seemingly disparate forms of data to improve understanding of how emotional experiences in everyday life are associated with time spent at home, and whether this is influenced by depression or social anxiety symptoms. We hypothesized that more time spent at home would be associated with more negative and less positive affect. We recruited 72 undergraduate participants from a southeast university in the United States. We assessed depression and social anxiety symptoms using self-report instruments at baseline. An app (Sensus) installed on participants' personal mobile phones repeatedly collected in situ self-reported state affect and GPS location data for up to 2 weeks. Time spent at home was a proxy for social isolation. We tested separate models examining the relations between state affect and time spent at home, with levels of depression and social anxiety as moderators. Models differed only in the temporal links examined. One model focused on associations between changes in affect and time spent at home within short, 4-hour time windows. The other 3 models focused on associations between mean-level affect within a day and time spent at home (1) the same day, (2) the following day, and (3) the previous day. Overall, we obtained many of the expected main effects (although there were some null effects), in which higher social anxiety was associated with more time or greater

  8. Clinically defined non-specific symptoms in the vicinity of mobile phone base stations: A retrospective before-after study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baliatsas, Christos, E-mail: c.baliatsas@nivel.nl [Netherlands Institute for Health Services Research (NIVEL), Utrecht (Netherlands); Kamp, Irene van, E-mail: irene.van.kamp@rivm.nl [National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Bolte, John, E-mail: john.bolte@rivm.nl [National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Kelfkens, Gert, E-mail: gert.kelfkens@rivm.nl [National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Dijk, Christel van, E-mail: Christel.Van.Dijk@amsterdam.nl [Department of Research, Information and Statistics (OIS), Municipality of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Spreeuwenberg, Peter, E-mail: p.spreeuwenberg@nivel.nl [Netherlands Institute for Health Services Research (NIVEL), Utrecht (Netherlands); Hooiveld, Mariette, E-mail: m.hooiveld@nivel.nl [Netherlands Institute for Health Services Research (NIVEL), Utrecht (Netherlands); Lebret, Erik, E-mail: erik.lebret@rivm.nl [National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences (IRAS), Utrecht University, Utrecht (Netherlands); Yzermans, Joris, E-mail: J.Yzermans@nivel.nl [Netherlands Institute for Health Services Research (NIVEL), Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2016-09-15

    The number of mobile phone base station(s) (MPBS) has been increasing to meet the rapid technological changes and growing needs for mobile communication. The primary objective of the present study was to test possible changes in prevalence and number of NSS in relation to MPBS exposure before and after increase of installed MPBS antennas. A retrospective cohort study was conducted, comparing two time periods with high contrast in terms of number of installed MPBS. Symptom data were based on electronic health records from 1069 adult participants, registered in 9 general practices in different regions in the Netherlands. All participants were living within 500 m from the nearest bases station. Among them, 55 participants reported to be sensitive to MPBS at T1. A propagation model combined with a questionnaire was used to assess indoor exposure to RF-EMF from MPBS at T1. Estimation of exposure at T0 was based on number of antennas at T0 relative to T1. At T1, there was a > 30% increase in the total number of MPBS antennas. A higher prevalence for most NSS was observed in the MPBS-sensitive group at T1 compared to baseline. Exposure estimates were not associated with GP-registered NSS in the total sample. Some significant interactions were observed between MPBS-sensitivity and exposure estimates on risk of symptoms. Using clinically defined outcomes and a time difference of > 6 years it was demonstrated that RF-EMF exposure to MPBS was not associated with the development of NSS. Nonetheless, there was some indication for a higher risk of NSS for the MPBS-sensitive group, mainly in relation to exposure to UMTS, but this should be interpreted with caution. Results have to be verified by future longitudinal studies with a particular focus on potentially susceptible population subgroups of large sample size and integrated exposure assessment. - Highlights: • There was an important increase in the total number of MPBS at T1 compared to T0. • Prevalence of NSS was

  9. Application of Les, Pans and Rans to a Case of Intake Channel Steady Flow Test Bench

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vítek Oldřich

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with evaluation of intake channel flow properties (discharge coefficient, tumble and swirl ratio using both 3-D CFD simulation and measurement. Sensitivity of different calculation parameters was tested. The most important ones are mesh parameters and applied turbulence models (considered models: LES, PANS and RANS. Concerning the mesh, the critical parameter is a mesh configuration near a wall - a thickness of mesh boundary layer and an amount of these layers have significant impact on mass flow rate while tumble/swirl ratio is unaffected by that. Based on that, these mesh parameters can be considered as tuning constants for fine-tuning the CFD model. Regarding the mesh cell size, 2 different values were tested (0.6 and 0.3 mm. It was found out that neither mesh is fine enough to perform proper LES. Hence, PANS performance is close to RANS. Concerning the turbulence models, PANS seems to be the best one as it combines advantages of both LES and RANS. Generally speaking, mass flow rate prediction is relatively good while swirl/tumble one is more problematic as only qualitative agreement can be achieved.

  10. Accurate load prediction by BEM with airfoil data from 3D RANS simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Marc S.; Nitzsche, Jens; Hennings, Holger

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, two methods for the extraction of airfoil coefficients from 3D CFD simulations of a wind turbine rotor are investigated, and these coefficients are used to improve the load prediction of a BEM code. The coefficients are extracted from a number of steady RANS simulations, using either averaging of velocities in annular sections, or an inverse BEM approach for determination of the induction factors in the rotor plane. It is shown that these 3D rotor polars are able to capture the rotational augmentation at the inner part of the blade as well as the load reduction by 3D effects close to the blade tip. They are used as input to a simple BEM code and the results of this BEM with 3D rotor polars are compared to the predictions of BEM with 2D airfoil coefficients plus common empirical corrections for stall delay and tip loss. While BEM with 2D airfoil coefficients produces a very different radial distribution of loads than the RANS simulation, the BEM with 3D rotor polars manages to reproduce the loads from RANS very accurately for a variety of load cases, as long as the blade pitch angle is not too different from the cases from which the polars were extracted.

  11. Data-free and data-driven spectral perturbations for RANS UQ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edeling, Wouter; Mishra, Aashwin; Iaccarino, Gianluca

    2017-11-01

    Despite recent developments in high-fidelity turbulent flow simulations, RANS modeling is still vastly used by industry, due to its inherent low cost. Since accuracy is a concern in RANS modeling, model-form UQ is an essential tool for assessing the impacts of this uncertainty on quantities of interest. Applying the spectral decomposition to the modeled Reynolds-Stress Tensor (RST) allows for the introduction of decoupled perturbations into the baseline intensity (kinetic energy), shape (eigenvalues), and orientation (eigenvectors). This constitutes a natural methodology to evaluate the model form uncertainty associated to different aspects of RST modeling. In a predictive setting, one frequently encounters an absence of any relevant reference data. To make data-free predictions with quantified uncertainty we employ physical bounds to a-priori define maximum spectral perturbations. When propagated, these perturbations yield intervals of engineering utility. High-fidelity data opens up the possibility of inferring a distribution of uncertainty, by means of various data-driven machine-learning techniques. We will demonstrate our framework on a number of flow problems where RANS models are prone to failure. This research was partially supported by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency under the Enabling Quantification of Uncertainty in Physical Systems (EQUiPS) project (technical monitor: Dr Fariba Fahroo), and the DOE PSAAP-II program.

  12. Nuclear size is sensitive to NTF2 protein levels in a manner dependent on Ran binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuković, Lidija D.; Jevtić, Predrag; Zhang, Zhaojie; Stohr, Bradley A.; Levy, Daniel L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Altered nuclear size is associated with many cancers, and determining whether cancer-associated changes in nuclear size contribute to carcinogenesis necessitates an understanding of mechanisms of nuclear size regulation. Although nuclear import rates generally positively correlate with nuclear size, NTF2 levels negatively affect nuclear size, despite the role of NTF2 (also known as NUTF2) in nuclear recycling of the import factor Ran. We show that binding of Ran to NTF2 is required for NTF2 to inhibit nuclear expansion and import of large cargo molecules in Xenopus laevis egg and embryo extracts, consistent with our observation that NTF2 reduces the diameter of the nuclear pore complex (NPC) in a Ran-binding-dependent manner. Furthermore, we demonstrate that ectopic NTF2 expression in Xenopus embryos and mammalian tissue culture cells alters nuclear size. Finally, we show that increases in nuclear size during melanoma progression correlate with reduced NTF2 expression, and increasing NTF2 levels in melanoma cells is sufficient to reduce nuclear size. These results show a conserved capacity for NTF2 to impact on nuclear size, and we propose that NTF2 might be a new cancer biomarker. PMID:26823604

  13. Nercc1, a mammalian NIMA-family kinase, binds the Ran GTPase and regulates mitotic progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roig, Joan; Mikhailov, Alexei; Belham, Christopher; Avruch, Joseph

    2002-07-01

    The protein kinase NIMA is an indispensable pleiotropic regulator of mitotic progression in Aspergillus. Although several mammalian NIMA-like kinases (Neks) are known, none appears to have the broad importance for mitotic regulation attributed to NIMA. Nercc1 is a new NIMA-like kinase that regulates chromosome alignment and segregation in mitosis. Its NIMA-like catalytic domain is followed by a noncatalytic tail containing seven repeats homologous to those of the Ran GEF, RCC1, a Ser/Thr/Pro-rich segment, and a coiled-coil domain. Nercc1 binds to another NIMA-like kinase, Nek6, and also binds specifically to the Ran GTPase through both its catalytic and its RCC1-like domains, preferring RanGDP in vivo. Nercc1 exists as a homooligomer and can autoactivate in vitro by autophosphorylation. Nercc1 is a cytoplasmic protein that is activated during mitosis and is avidly phosphorylated by active p34(Cdc2). Microinjection of anti-Nercc1 antibodies in prophase results in spindle abnormalities and/or chromosomal misalignment. In Ptk2 cells the outcome is prometaphase arrest or aberrant chromosome segregation and aneuploidy, whereas in CFPAC-1 cells prolonged arrest in prometaphase is the usual response. Nercc1 and its partner Nek6 represent a new signaling pathway that regulates mitotic progression.

  14. Transforming Clinical Imaging and 3D Data for Virtual Reality Learning Objects: HTML5 and Mobile Devices Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trelease, Robert B.; Nieder, Gary L.

    2013-01-01

    Web deployable anatomical simulations or "virtual reality learning objects" can easily be produced with QuickTime VR software, but their use for online and mobile learning is being limited by the declining support for web browser plug-ins for personal computers and unavailability on popular mobile devices like Apple iPad and Android…

  15. Clinically defined non-specific symptoms in the vicinity of mobile phone base stations: A retrospective before-after study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baliatsas, C.; Kamp, I. van; Bolte, J.; Kelfkens, G.; Dijk, C. van; Spreeuwenberg, P.; Hooiveld, M.; Lebret, E.; Yzermans, J.

    2016-01-01

    The number of mobile phone base station(s) (MPBS) has been increasing to meet the rapid technological changes and growing needs for mobile communication. The primary objective of the present study was to test possible changes in prevalence and number of NSS in relation to MPBS exposure before and

  16. Clinically defined non-specific symptoms in the vicinity of mobile phone base stations : A retrospective before-after study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baliatsas, Christos; van Kamp, Irene; Bolte, John; Kelfkens, Gert; van Dijk, Christel; Spreeuwenberg, Peter; Hooiveld, Mariette; Lebret, Erik; Yzermans, Joris

    2016-01-01

    The number of mobile phone base station(s) (MPBS) has been increasing to meet the rapid technological changes and growing needs for mobile communication. The primary objective of the present study was to test possible changes in prevalence and number of NSS in relation to MPBS exposure before and

  17. Unsteady Three-Dimensional Simulation of a Shear Coaxial GO2/GH2 Rocket Injector with RANS and Hybrid-RAN-LES/DES Using Flamelet Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westra, Doug G.; West, Jeffrey S.; Richardson, Brian R.

    2015-01-01

    Historically, the analysis and design of liquid rocket engines (LREs) has relied on full-scale testing and one-dimensional empirical tools. The testing is extremely expensive and the one-dimensional tools are not designed to capture the highly complex, and multi-dimensional features that are inherent to LREs. Recent advances in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tools have made it possible to predict liquid rocket engine performance, stability, to assess the effect of complex flow features, and to evaluate injector-driven thermal environments, to mitigate the cost of testing. Extensive efforts to verify and validate these CFD tools have been conducted, to provide confidence for using them during the design cycle. Previous validation efforts have documented comparisons of predicted heat flux thermal environments with test data for a single element gaseous oxygen (GO2) and gaseous hydrogen (GH2) injector. The most notable validation effort was a comprehensive validation effort conducted by Tucker et al. [1], in which a number of different groups modeled a GO2/GH2 single element configuration by Pal et al [2]. The tools used for this validation comparison employed a range of algorithms, from both steady and unsteady Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (U/RANS) calculations, large-eddy simulations (LES), detached eddy simulations (DES), and various combinations. A more recent effort by Thakur et al. [3] focused on using a state-of-the-art CFD simulation tool, Loci/STREAM, on a two-dimensional grid. Loci/STREAM was chosen because it has a unique, very efficient flamelet parameterization of combustion reactions that are too computationally expensive to simulate with conventional finite-rate chemistry calculations. The current effort focuses on further advancement of validation efforts, again using the Loci/STREAM tool with the flamelet parameterization, but this time with a three-dimensional grid. Comparisons to the Pal et al. heat flux data will be made for both RANS and

  18. Upper cervical and upper thoracic thrust manipulation versus nonthrust mobilization in patients with mechanical neck pain: a multicenter randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunning, James R; Cleland, Joshua A; Waldrop, Mark A; Arnot, Cathy F; Young, Ian A; Turner, Michael; Sigurdsson, Gisli

    2012-01-01

    Randomized clinical trial. To compare the short-term effects of upper cervical and upper thoracic high-velocity low-amplitude (HVLA) thrust manipulation to nonthrust mobilization in patients with neck pain. Although upper cervical and upper thoracic HVLA thrust manipulation and nonthrust mobilization are common interventions for the management of neck pain, no studies have directly compared the effects of both upper cervical and upper thoracic HVLA thrust manipulation to nonthrust mobilization in patients with neck pain. Patients completed the Neck Disability Index, the numeric pain rating scale, the flexion-rotation test for measurement of C1-2 passive rotation range of motion, and the craniocervical flexion test for measurement of deep cervical flexor motor performance. Following the baseline evaluation, patients were randomized to receive either HVLA thrust manipulation or nonthrust mobilization to the upper cervical (C1-2) and upper thoracic (T1-2) spines. Patients were reexamined 48-hours after the initial examination and again completed the outcome measures. The effects of treatment on disability, pain, C1-2 passive rotation range of motion, and motor performance of the deep cervical flexors were examined with a 2-by-2 mixed-model analysis of variance (ANOVA). One hundred seven patients satisfied the eligibility criteria, agreed to participate, and were randomized into the HVLA thrust manipulation (n = 56) and nonthrust mobilization (n = 51) groups. The 2-by-2 ANOVA demonstrated that patients with mechanical neck pain who received the combination of upper cervical and upper thoracic HVLA thrust manipulation experienced significantly (Ppain (58.5%) than those of the nonthrust mobilization group (12.8% and 12.6%, respectively) following treatment. In addition, the HVLA thrust manipulation group had significantly (PNeck Disability Index cut scores, respectively. The combination of upper cervical and upper thoracic HVLA thrust manipulation is appreciably more

  19. Treating childhood pneumonia in hard-to-reach areas: A model-based comparison of mobile clinics and community-based care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pitt Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Where hard-to-access populations (such as those living in insecure areas lack access to basic health services, relief agencies, donors, and ministries of health face a dilemma in selecting the most effective intervention strategy. This paper uses a decision mathematical model to estimate the relative effectiveness of two alternative strategies, mobile clinics and fixed community-based health services, for antibiotic treatment of childhood pneumonia, the world's leading cause of child mortality. Methods A "Markov cycle tree" cohort model was developed in Excel with Visual Basic to compare the number of deaths from pneumonia in children aged 1 to 59 months expected under three scenarios: 1 No curative services available, 2 Curative services provided by a highly-skilled but intermittent mobile clinic, and 3 Curative services provided by a low-skilled community health post. Parameter values were informed by literature and expert interviews. Probabilistic sensitivity analyses were conducted for several plausible scenarios. Results We estimated median pneumonia-specific under-5 mortality rates of 0.51 (95% credible interval: 0.49 to 0.541 deaths per 10,000 child-days without treatment, 0.45 (95% CI: 0.43 to 0.48 with weekly mobile clinics, and 0.31 (95% CI: 0.29 to 0.32 with CHWs in fixed health posts. Sensitivity analyses found the fixed strategy superior, except when mobile clinics visited communities daily, where rates of care-seeking were substantially higher at mobile clinics than fixed posts, or where several variables simultaneously differed substantially from our baseline assumptions. Conclusions Current evidence does not support the hypothesis that mobile clinics are more effective than CHWs. A CHW strategy therefore warrants consideration in high-mortality, hard-to-access areas. Uncertainty remains, and parameter values may vary across contexts, but the model allows preliminary findings to be updated as new or context

  20. Treating childhood pneumonia in hard-to-reach areas: a model-based comparison of mobile clinics and community-based care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitt, Catherine; Roberts, Bayard; Checchi, Francesco

    2012-01-10

    Where hard-to-access populations (such as those living in insecure areas) lack access to basic health services, relief agencies, donors, and ministries of health face a dilemma in selecting the most effective intervention strategy. This paper uses a decision mathematical model to estimate the relative effectiveness of two alternative strategies, mobile clinics and fixed community-based health services, for antibiotic treatment of childhood pneumonia, the world's leading cause of child mortality. A "Markov cycle tree" cohort model was developed in Excel with Visual Basic to compare the number of deaths from pneumonia in children aged 1 to 59 months expected under three scenarios: 1) No curative services available, 2) Curative services provided by a highly-skilled but intermittent mobile clinic, and 3) Curative services provided by a low-skilled community health post. Parameter values were informed by literature and expert interviews. Probabilistic sensitivity analyses were conducted for several plausible scenarios. We estimated median pneumonia-specific under-5 mortality rates of 0.51 (95% credible interval: 0.49 to 0.541) deaths per 10,000 child-days without treatment, 0.45 (95% CI: 0.43 to 0.48) with weekly mobile clinics, and 0.31 (95% CI: 0.29 to 0.32) with CHWs in fixed health posts. Sensitivity analyses found the fixed strategy superior, except when mobile clinics visited communities daily, where rates of care-seeking were substantially higher at mobile clinics than fixed posts, or where several variables simultaneously differed substantially from our baseline assumptions. Current evidence does not support the hypothesis that mobile clinics are more effective than CHWs. A CHW strategy therefore warrants consideration in high-mortality, hard-to-access areas. Uncertainty remains, and parameter values may vary across contexts, but the model allows preliminary findings to be updated as new or context-specific evidence becomes available. Decision analytic modelling

  1. Clinical Usefulness of a Mobile Application for the Appropriate Selection of the Antiarrhythmic Device in Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curcio, Antonio; DE Rosa, Salvatore; Sabatino, Jolanda; DE Luca, Simona; Bochicchio, Angela; Polimeni, Alberto; Santarpia, Giuseppe; Ricci, Pietrantonio; Indolfi, Ciro

    2016-07-01

    Appropriate selection of implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) or cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) device can be challenging in patients with left ventricular (LV) dysfunction. In this setting, limited information exists about the role of medical applications in helping physicians to choose the most useful device. We developed a medical application that provides guidelines-based algorithms for helping doctors in decision process using the Apache Cordova application programming interface. e-CRTD App was tested in 36 consecutive patients (age 66.4 ± 8.5 years, 31 males) with diagnosis of heart failure (HF) addressed to electrophysiology laboratory for evaluation of ICD (N = 18) or CRT with defibrillator device (CRT-D; N = 18) implantation. Two separate teams evaluated each patient independently: expert electrophysiologists (Group A); cardiologists in training using the App (Group B). The outcomes of the clinical evaluation performed by Groups A and B were similar in 100% of patients in terms of classes of recommendations to device (Class I in eight cases, Class IIa in seven cases, Class III in the remaining 21). Surprisingly, the majority of indications from the general practitioners to cardiac device were inappropriate (N = 17 ICD, and N = 4 CRT-D, Class III); nevertheless, e-CRTD App helped Group B (nonexpert cardiologists) in excluding all these cases. This study describes and validates a mobile application realized to help the decision-making process in HF patients candidate to ICD/CRT-D. This application supports physicians to assess the eligibility for ICD or CRT-D according to current guidelines in patients with LV dysfunction. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Nuclear-cytoplasmic trafficking of NTF2, the nuclear import receptor for the RanGTPase, is subjected to regulation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chafe, Shawn C; Pierce, Jacqueline B; Mangroo, Dev

    2012-01-01

    .... Treatment of mammalian cells with polysorbitan monolaurate was found to inhibit nuclear export of tRNA and proteins, which are processes dependent on RanGTP in the nucleus, but not nuclear import...

  3. Genotyping of human parvovirus B19 in clinical samples from Brazil and Paraguay using heteroduplex mobility assay, single-stranded conformation polymorphism and nucleotide sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos César Lima de Mendonça

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Heteroduplex mobility assay, single-stranded conformation polymorphism and nucleotide sequencing were utilised to genotype human parvovirus B19 samples from Brazil and Paraguay. Ninety-seven serum samples were collected from individuals presenting with abortion or erythema infectiosum, arthropathies, severe anaemia and transient aplastic crisis; two additional skin samples were collected by biopsy. After the procedure, all clinical samples were classified as genotype 1.

  4. [Clinical observation on the effect of joint mobilization in treating elderly patients after distal radius fractures operation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xue-Feng; Cai, Hong-Xin; Lin, Ge-Sheng; Fang, Ji-Shi; Wang, Yong; Wu, Zhi-Yong; Tu, Xu-Hui

    2017-07-25

    To investigate the effect of joint mobilization on postoperative wrist joint function, pain and grip strength for elderly patients with distal radius fracture. From January 2015 to June 2016, a total of 67 elderly patients with distal radius fracture were randomly divided into routine exercise group and joint mobilization group. Among them, 37 patients in the routine exercise group underwent conventional distal radius fracture postoperative joint function exercise regimen, including 16 males and 21 females with a mean age of (67.8±3.2) years old ranging from 60 to 72 years old;the injured side was dominant in 23 cases and non-dominant in 14 cases;injury mechanism was fall in 26 cases, traffic accident in 11 cases; for AO type, 6 cases were type B3, 18 cases were type C1, 7 cases were type C2, 6 cases was type C3. Other 30 patients in the joint mobilization group underwent joint mobilization on the basis of the routine exercise group including 14 males and 16 females with a mean age of (67.1±4.0) years old ranging from 61 to 74 years old; the injured side was dominant in 21 cases and non-dominant in 9 cases;injury mechanism was fall in 25 cases, traffic accident in 5 cases;for AO type, 8 cases were type B3, 13 cases were type C1, 6 cases were type C2, 9 cases were type C3. The wrist joint activity, Gartland-Werley wrist joint function score, VAS pain score and grip strength were observed at 3 months afrer treatment. After 3 months' treatment, the VAS in the routine exercise group was higher than that of the joint mobilization group ( P mobilization group was higher than that in routine exercise group( P mobilization group( P mobilization group had no significant difference ( P >0.05). In the comparison of each item of Gartland-Werley, there was no significant difference between two groups in residual deformity and complication( P >0.05); the average score of subjective score, objective score and total score in routine exercise group were significantly higher than

  5. Early intraprosthetic dislocation of a total hip replacement with dual mobility socket: clinical presentation and update review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loubignac, François; Felts, Emmanuel; Allal, Raphaël

    2012-11-01

    Intraprosthetic dislocation is a rare complication in dual mobility hip prostheses, which usually occurs after the third postoperative year due to wear of the polyethylene retentive rim. We report a rare and non-described case of a patient who presented disassembly of the polyethylene insert from his dual mobility socket at nine postoperative months, secondary to several reduction attempts of a posterior dislocation of his prosthesis.

  6. Mobile connection of veneer crowns after orthodontic closure of a wide diastema in the maxillae. A clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planert, J; Schwestka, R

    1989-10-01

    A new, mobile splint for artificial crowns is suggested after orthodontic closure of a wide diastema mediale. A smooth mandibular movement in all excursions in considered essential. This approach sustains a physiologic load on the periodontium and prevents a recurrence of the diastema. The restorations in Fig. 6 have been stable and comfortable for 2 1/2 years with independent mobility of each tooth. Similar splinted prosthodontic devices inserted have also been successful.

  7. The usefulness of mobile insulator sheets for the optimisation of deep heating area for regional hyperthermia using a capacitively coupled heating method: phantom, simulation and clinical prospective studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomura, Kyosuke; Ohguri, Takayuki; Mulder, Hendrik Thijmen; Murakami, Motohiro; Nakahara, Sota; Yahara, Katsuya; Korogi, Yukunori

    2017-11-20

    To evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of deep regional hyperthermia with the use of mobile insulator sheets in a capacitively coupled heating device. The heat was applied using an 8-MHz radiofrequency-capacitive device. The insulator sheet was inserted between the regular bolus and cooled overlay bolus in each of upper and lower side of the electrode. Several settings using the insulator sheets were investigated in an experimental study using an agar phantom to evaluate the temperature distributions. The specific absorption rate (SAR) distributions in several organs were also computed for the three-dimensional patient model. In a clinical prospective study, a total of five heating sessions were scheduled for the pelvic tumours, to assess the thermal parameters. The conventional setting was used during the first, third and fifth treatment sessions, and insulator sheets were used during the second and fourth treatment sessions. In the phantom study, the higher heating area improved towards the centre when the mobile insulator sheets were used. The subcutaneous fat/target ratios for the averaged SARs in the setting with the mobile insulator (median, 2.5) were significantly improved compared with those in the conventional setting (median, 3.4). In the clinical study, the thermal dose parameters of CEM43°CT90 in the sessions with the mobile insulator sheets (median, 1.9 min) were significantly better than those in the sessions using a conventional setting (median, 1.0 min). Our novel heating method using mobile insulator sheets was thus found to improve the thermal dose parameters. Further investigations are expected.

  8. Mobility Impact in Initializing Ring-Based P2P Systems over MANETs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Ding

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available With the encouragement from success of P2P systems in real world application, recently we have seen active research on synergy of P2P systems and mobile ad hoc networks. The paper proposes a solution for mobility disturbance problem in initialization of ring-based P2P systems over ad hoc networks. It is a decentralized ring construction protocol in presence of mobility. A Mobile Ring Ad-hoc Networks (MRAN protocol is presented. MRAN is an extension of RAN [1] under the mobile condition. Simulation result shows MRAN works well with mobility. Upper bound of maximum speed of moving nodes is investigated in simulation.

  9. Beyond Rab GTPases Legionella activates the small GTPase Ran to promote microtubule polymerization, pathogen vacuole motility, and infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbi, Hubert; Rothmeier, Eva; Hoffmann, Christine; Harrison, Christopher F

    2014-01-01

    Legionella spp. are amoebae-resistant environmental bacteria that replicate in free-living protozoa in a distinct compartment, the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV). Upon transmission of Legionella pneumophila to the lung, the pathogens employ an evolutionarily conserved mechanism to grow in LCVs within alveolar macrophages, thus triggering a severe pneumonia termed Legionnaires' disease. LCV formation is a complex and robust process, which requires the bacterial Icm/Dot type IV secretion system and involves the amazing number of 300 different translocated effector proteins. LCVs interact with the host cell's endosomal and secretory vesicle trafficking pathway. Accordingly, in a proteomics approach as many as 12 small Rab GTPases implicated in endosomal and secretory vesicle trafficking were identified and validated as LCV components. Moreover, the small GTPase Ran and its effector protein RanBP1 have been found to decorate the pathogen vacuole. Ran regulates nucleo-cytoplasmic transport, spindle assembly, and cytokinesis, as well as the organization of non-centrosomal microtubules. In L. pneumophila-infected amoebae or macrophages, Ran and RanBP1 localize to LCVs, and the small GTPase is activated by the Icm/Dot substrate LegG1. Ran activation by LegG1 leads to microtubule stabilization and promotes intracellular pathogen vacuole motility and bacterial growth, as well as chemotaxis and migration of Legionella-infected cells.

  10. The nucleoporin MEL-28 promotes RanGTP-dependent γ-tubulin recruitment and microtubule nucleation in mitotic spindle formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Hideki; Koch, Birgit; Walczak, Rudolf; Ciray-Duygu, Fulya; González-Sánchez, Juan Carlos; Devos, Damien P; Mattaj, Iain W; Gruss, Oliver J

    2014-01-01

    The GTP-bound form of the Ran GTPase (RanGTP), produced around chromosomes, drives nuclear envelope and nuclear pore complex (NPC) re-assembly after mitosis. The nucleoporin MEL-28/ELYS binds chromatin in a RanGTP-regulated manner and acts to seed NPC assembly. Here we show that, upon mitotic NPC disassembly, MEL-28 dissociates from chromatin and re-localizes to spindle microtubules and kinetochores. MEL-28 directly binds microtubules in a RanGTP-regulated way via its C-terminal chromatin-binding domain. Using Xenopus egg extracts, we demonstrate that MEL-28 is essential for RanGTP-dependent microtubule nucleation and spindle assembly, independent of its function in NPC assembly. Specifically, MEL-28 interacts with the γ-tubulin ring complex and recruits it to microtubule nucleation sites. Our data identify MEL-28 as a RanGTP target that functions throughout the cell cycle. Its cell cycle-dependent binding to chromatin or microtubules discriminates MEL-28 functions in interphase and mitosis, and ensures that spindle assembly occurs only after NPC breakdown.

  11. Ivan Rančić: A forgotten painter of flowers and landscapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marković Kamenko M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ivan Rančić was born in the Kraljevo village, in eastern Serbia to a family of farmers on 19th, February, 1906. Very little data about him has been preserved, therefore, this paper is an attempt to make a reconstruction of his life and work. He attended primary school in his birth place, lower secondary school he finished in Knjazevac and Military Academy in Belgrade. After completing the National Academy in 1934, he was sent to Zagreb where he got his first post. He lived there with his wife and his son until the capitulation of the country in 1941. A few months after the collapse of the country, he was arrested and sent to Ljubljana and three months later to a concentration camp in Austria. He spent about fifteen months in that camp in during which time he intensively studied painting. He fled from the camp to Switzerland and stayed there until his death in 1987. According to some letters he sent to his wife in Nis, some of his paintings he created during his time in the camp, ne took to Switzerland where he eventually sold them. He did the toughest jobs there in order to survive and painted extensively. After World War II he graduated from the School of Fine Arts in Lausanne. Later on he had two exhibitions at the New Gallery of Modern Art. Ivan Rančić came a long way from an unknown beginner to a respected prominent artist. He left behind about 350 works, many of which he sold during his life, mainly landscapes and still life in oil, watercolor and pastel. He was neither concerned about styles and trends nor did he believe in the old and the new. If he came to a certain specific manner of painting, it is because at one point it was imposed on him as the only proper way of expression. The analysis of Rančić's paintings leads to the conclusion that his creation had gone through four phases. The first one (started in the concentration camp in Austria during which he painted still lifes without full sketches, previous studies, and the use

  12. İRAN VE REJİM İSTİKRARI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özgür ÜŞENMEZ

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available ÖZ: Bu çalışma, İran rejiminin son yıllarda Orta Doğu'yu sarsan isyanlar ve istikrarsızlıklara-Batı'daki beklentilerin aksine- geçmişten, özellikle 1979'daki devrimden miras kalan sosyal yapı ve politikaların etkisiyle direnebildiğini iddia ediyor. Tunus ve Mısır'daki halk isyanları, temel aktör olan alt sınıflar ve onların neo-liberal ekonomik politikalara muhalefetiyle yayılırken, İran’da devrim sonrası gelişen sosyal devlet mekanizması hala halk ile rejimin tamamen birbirine yabancılaşmasını önlemekte. Ancak son yıllarda ortaya çıkan yeni gerilimler ve İran'ın uyguladığı ekonomi politikaları rejimin krizini derinleştirebilir. Bu nedenledir ki Orta Doğu'yu ve özelde İran'ı anlamak için hegemonik blokların tarihsel değişimini inceleyen ucu açık bir analiz elzemdir. ABSTRACT: This article argues that contrary to the expectations of the Western World, Iranian regime successfully resisted the revolutionary tides of the Arab Spring. Most important determinant of this process for Iran was the legacy of the 1979 revolution and it's associated structures that relatively protects the most vulnerable parts of the population against the wide spread neo-liberal economic policies in the Middle East. So with that feature Iran differs from the Tunisian and the Egyptian examples. In order to understand these features further this essay adapts a historical analysis of changes in hegemonic blocs in Iran since 1979.

  13. Investigation on hydrodynamic performance of a marine propeller in oblique flow by RANS computations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianxi Yao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a numerical study on investigating on hydrodynamic characteristics of a marine propeller in oblique flow. The study is achieved by RANS simulations on an open source platform - OpenFOAM. A sliding grid approach is applied to compute the rotating motion of the propeller. Total force and moment acting on blades, as well as average force distributions in one revolution on propeller disk, are obtained for 70 cases of com- binations of advance ratios and oblique angles. The computed results are compared with available experimental data and discussed.

  14. Hybrid RANS/LES method for wind flow over complex terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bechmann, Andreas; Sørensen, Niels N.

    2010-01-01

    ), and this layer acts as wall model for the outer flow handled by LES. The well-known high Reynolds number two-equation k - turbulence model is used in the RANS layer and the model automatically switches to a two-equation k - subgrid scale stress model in the LES region. The approach can be used for flow over...... the turbulent kinetic energy, whereas the new method captures the high turbulence levels well but underestimates the mean velocity. The presented results are for a relative mild configuration of complex terrain, but the proposed method can also be used for highly complex terrain where the benefits of the new...

  15. Statistical Multiplexing of Computations in C-RAN with Tradeoffs in Latency and Energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalør, Anders Ellersgaard; Agurto Agurto, Mauricio Ignacio; Pratas, Nuno

    2017-01-01

    In the Cloud Radio Access Network (C-RAN) architecture, the baseband signals from multiple remote radio heads are processed in a centralized baseband unit (BBU) pool. This architecture allows network operators to adapt the BBU’s computational resources to the aggregate access load experienced...... frame duration, then this may result in additional access latency and limit the energy savings. In this paper we investigate the tradeoff by considering two extreme time-scales for the resource multiplexing: (i) long-term, where the computational resources are adapted over periods much larger than...

  16. Ran Involved in the Development and Reproduction Is a Potential Target for RNA-Interference-Based Pest Management in Nilaparvata lugens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai-Long Li

    Full Text Available Ran (RanGTPase in insects participates in the 20-hydroxyecdysone signal transduction pathway in which downstream genes, FTZ-F1, Krüppel-homolog 1 (Kr-h1 and vitellogenin, are involved. A putative Ran gene (NlRan was cloned from Nilaparvata lugens, a destructive phloem-feeding pest of rice. NlRan has the typical Ran primary structure features that are conserved in insects. NlRan showed higher mRNA abundance immediately after molting and peaked in newly emerged female adults. Among the examined tissues ovary had the highest transcript level, followed by fat body, midgut and integument, and legs. Three days after dsNlRan injection the NlRan mRNA abundance in the third-, fourth-, and fifth-instar nymphs was decreased by 94.3%, 98.4% and 97.0%, respectively. NlFTZ-F1 expression levels in treated third- and fourth-instar nymphs were reduced by 89.3% and 23.8%, respectively. In contrast, NlKr-h1 mRNA levels were up-regulated by 67.5 and 1.5 folds, respectively. NlRan knockdown significantly decreased the body weights, delayed development, and killed >85% of the nymphs at day seven. Two apparent phenotypic defects were observed: (1 Extended body form, and failed to molt; (2 The cuticle at the notum was split open but cannot completely shed off. The newly emerged female adults from dsNlRan injected fifth-instar nymphs showed lower levels of NlRan and vitellogenin, lower weight gain and honeydew excretion comparing with the blank control, and no offspring. Those results suggest that NlRan encodes a functional protein that was involved in development and reproduction. The study established proof of concept that NlRan could serve as a target for dsRNA-based pesticides for N. lugens control.

  17. Initiating pain and palliative care outpatient services for the suburban underserved in Montgomery County, Maryland: Lessons learned at the NIH Clinical Center and MobileMed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Sunil K; Ghosh, Amrita; Cheng, M Jennifer; Luton, Kathleen; Lowet, Peter F; Berger, Ann

    2016-08-01

    With the ongoing expansion of palliative care services throughout the United States, meeting the needs of socioeconomically marginalized populations, as in all domains of healthcare, continues to be a challenge. Our specific aim here was to help meet some of these needs through expanding delivery of pain and palliative care services by establishing a new clinic for underserved patients and collecting descriptive data about its operation. In November of 2014, the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center's Pain and Palliative Care Service (PPCS) launched a bimonthly offsite pain and palliative care outpatient clinic in collaboration with Mobile Medical Care Inc. (MobileMed), a private not-for-profit primary care provider in Montgomery County, Maryland, serving underserved area residents since 1968. Staffed by NIH hospice and palliative medicine clinical fellows and faculty, the clinic provides specialty pain and palliative care consultation services to patients referred by their primary care healthcare providers. A patient log was maintained, charts reviewed, and referring providers surveyed on their satisfaction with the service. The clinic had 27 patient encounters with 10 patients (6 males, 4 females, aged 23-67) during its first 7 months of operation. The reason for referral for all but one patient was chronic pain of multiple etiologies. Patients had numerous psychosocial stressors and comorbidities. All primary care providers who returned surveys (n = 4) rated their level of satisfaction with the consultation service as "very satisfied" or "extremely satisfied." This brief descriptive report outlines the steps taken and logistical issues addressed to launch and continue the clinic, the characteristics of patients treated, and the results of quality-improvement projects. Lessons learned are highlighted and future directions suggested for the clinic and others that may come along like it.

  18. Pre-operative functional mobility as an independent determinant of inpatient functional recovery after total knee arthroplasty during three periods that coincided with changes in clinical pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Sluis, G; Goldbohm, R A; Elings, J E; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, M W; Akkermans, R P; Bimmel, R; Hoogeboom, T J; van Meeteren, N L

    2017-02-01

    To investigate whether pre-operative functional mobility is a determinant of delayed inpatient recovery of activities (IRoA) after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in three periods that coincided with changes in the clinical pathway. All patients (n = 682, 73% women, mean age 70 years, standard deviation 9) scheduled for TKA between 2009 and 2015 were pre-operatively screened for functional mobility by the Timed-up-and-Go test (TUG) and De Morton mobility index (DEMMI). The cut-off point for delayed IRoA was set on the day that 70% of the patients were recovered, according to the Modified Iowa Levels of Assistance Scale (mILAS) (a 5-item activity scale). In a multivariable logistic regression analysis, we added either the TUG or the DEMMI to a reference model including established determinants. Both the TUG (Odds Ratio (OR) 1.10 per second, 95% confidence intervals (CI) 1.06 to 1.15) and the DEMMI (OR 0.96 per point on the 100-point scale, 95% CI 0.95 to 0.98) were statistically significant determinants of delayed IRoA in a model that also included age, BMI, ASA score and ISAR score. These associations did not depend on the time period during which the TKA took place, as assessed by tests for interaction. Functional mobility, as assessed pre-operatively by the TUG and DEMMI, is an independent and stable determinant of delayed inpatient recovery of activities after TKA. Future research, focusing on improvement of pre-operative functional mobility through tailored physiotherapy intervention, should indicate whether such intervention enhances post-operative recovery among high-risk patients. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2017;99-B:211-17. ©2017 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  19. Mobile-assisted ESP learning in technical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šimonová Ivana

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents research results from the field of mobile-assisted instruction of English for specific purposes for technical and engineering students. The research was structured in three phases: (1 Questionnaire 1 was applied to detect what sources of information students use in higher education, what types of mobile devices they own, what purposes they use them for, (2 how the process of instruction, particularly students´ autonomous work supported by mobile devices ran, (3 students´ feedback was collected by Questionnaire 2 to evaluate the mobile-assisted learning and provide proposals for future exploitation of mobile devices in higher technical language education. The results show students are sufficiently equipped with mobile technologies and exploit them for various purposes, including education and ESP. At the end, examples of helpful mobile applications are presented.

  20. Canoe binds RanGTP to promote PinsTPR/Mud-mediated spindle orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, Brett; Johnston, Christopher A.

    2011-01-01

    Regulated spindle orientation maintains epithelial tissue integrity and stem cell asymmetric cell division. In Drosophila melanogaster neural stem cells (neuroblasts), the scaffolding protein Canoe (Afadin/Af-6 in mammals) regulates spindle orientation, but its protein interaction partners and mechanism of action are unknown. In this paper, we use our recently developed induced cell polarity system to dissect the molecular mechanism of Canoe-mediated spindle orientation. We show that a previously uncharacterized portion of Canoe directly binds the Partner of Inscuteable (Pins) tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain. The Canoe–PinsTPR interaction recruits Canoe to the cell cortex and is required for activation of the PinsTPR-Mud (nuclear mitotic apparatus in mammals) spindle orientation pathway. We show that the Canoe Ras-association (RA) domains directly bind RanGTP and that both the CanoeRA domains and RanGTP are required to recruit Mud to the cortex and activate the Pins/Mud/dynein spindle orientation pathway. PMID:22024168

  1. Comparisons of LES and RANS Computations with PIV Experiments on a Cylindrical Cavity Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Tao Su

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A comparison study on the numerical computations by large eddy simulation (LES and Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS methods with experiment on a cylindrical cavity flow was conducted in this paper. Numerical simulations and particle image velocimetry (PIV measurement were performed for two Reynolds numbers of the flow at a constant aspect ratio of H/R = 2.4 (R is the radius of the cylindrical cavity, and H is liquid level. The three components of velocity were extracted from 100 sequential PIV measured velocity frames with averaging, in order to illustrate the axial jet flow evolution and circulation distribution in the radial direction. The results show that LES can reproduce well the fine structure inside the swirling motions in both the meridional and the horizontal planes, as well as the distributions of velocity components and the circulation, in good agreement with experimental results, while the RANS method only provided a rough trend of inside vortex structure. Based on the analysis of velocity profiles at various locations, it indicates that LES is more suitable for predicting the complex flow characteristics inside complicated three-dimensional geometries.

  2. Validation of Heat Transfer and Film Cooling Capabilities of the 3-D RANS Code TURBO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyam, Vikram; Ameri, Ali; Chen, Jen-Ping

    2010-01-01

    The capabilities of the 3-D unsteady RANS code TURBO have been extended to include heat transfer and film cooling applications. The results of simulations performed with the modified code are compared to experiment and to theory, where applicable. Wilcox s k-turbulence model has been implemented to close the RANS equations. Two simulations are conducted: (1) flow over a flat plate and (2) flow over an adiabatic flat plate cooled by one hole inclined at 35 to the free stream. For (1) agreement with theory is found to be excellent for heat transfer, represented by local Nusselt number, and quite good for momentum, as represented by the local skin friction coefficient. This report compares the local skin friction coefficients and Nusselt numbers on a flat plate obtained using Wilcox's k-model with the theory of Blasius. The study looks at laminar and turbulent flows over an adiabatic flat plate and over an isothermal flat plate for two different wall temperatures. It is shown that TURBO is able to accurately predict heat transfer on a flat plate. For (2) TURBO shows good qualitative agreement with film cooling experiments performed on a flat plate with one cooling hole. Quantitatively, film effectiveness is under predicted downstream of the hole.

  3. Effect of Home Monitoring via Mobile App on the Number of In-Person Visits Following Ambulatory Surgery: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Kathleen A; Coyte, Peter C; Brown, Mitchell; Beber, Brett; Semple, John L

    2017-07-01

    In the age of information and patient-centered care, new methods of delivering postoperative care must be developed and evaluated. To determine whether follow-up care delivered via a mobile app can be used to avert in-person follow-up care visits compared with conventional, in-person follow-up care in the first 30 days following ambulatory surgery. A randomized clinical trial was conducted from February 1 to August 31, 2015, among ambulatory patients undergoing breast reconstruction at an academic ambulatory care hospital. Patients were randomly assigned to receive follow-up care via a mobile app or at an in-person visit during the first 30 days after the operation. Analysis was intention-to-treat. The primary end point was the number of in-person follow-up visits during the first 30 days after the operation. Secondary end points were the number of telephone calls and emails to health care professionals, patient-reported convenience and satisfaction scores, and rates of complications. Of the 65 women in the study (mean [SD] age, 47.7 [13.4] years), 32 (49%) were in the mobile app group, and 33 (51%) were in the in-person follow-up care group. Those in the mobile app group attended a mean of 0.66 in-person visits, vs 1.64 in-person visits in the in-person follow-up care group, for a difference of 0.40 times fewer in-person visits (95% CI, 0.24-0.66; P mobile app group reported higher convenience scores than the in-person follow-up care group (incidence rate ratio, 1.39; 95% CI, 1.09-1.77; P = .008). There was no difference between groups in the number of telephone communications, satisfaction scores, or complication rates. Patients undergoing ambulatory breast reconstruction can use follow-up care via a mobile app to avert in-person follow-up visits during the first 30 days after the operation. Mobile app follow-up care affects neither complication rates nor patient-reported satisfaction scores, but it improves patient-reported convenience scores

  4. Mobile phone use for a social strategy to improve antiretroviral refill experience at a low-resource HIV clinic: patient responses from Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adetunji, Adedotun A; Muyibi, Sufiyan A; Imhansoloeva, Martins; Ibraheem, Olusola M; Sunmola, Adegbenga; Kolawole, Olubunmi O; Akinrinsola, Oluwasina O; Ojo-Osagie, James O; Mosuro, Olusola A; Abiolu, Josephine O; Irabor, Achiaka E; Okonkwo, Prosper; Adewole, Isaac F; Taiwo, Babafemi O

    2017-05-01

    In sub-Saharan African areas where antiretroviral (ARV) drugs are not available through community pharmacies, clinic-based pharmacies are often the primary source of ARV drug refills. Social pressure is mounting on treatment providers to adjust ARV refill services towards user-friendly approaches which prioritize patients' convenience and engage their resourcefulness. By this demand, patients may be signalling dissatisfaction with the current provider-led model of monthly visits to facility-based pharmacies for ARV refill. Mobile phones are increasingly popular in sub-Saharan Africa, and have been used to support ARV treatment goals in this setting. A patient-centred response to on-going social pressure requires treatment providers to view ARV refill activities through the eyes of patients who are negotiating the challenges of day-to-day life while contemplating their next refill appointment. Using focus groups of five categories of adult patients receiving combination ARV therapy, we conducted this cross-sectional qualitative study to provide insight into modifiable gaps between patients' expectations and experiences of the use of mobile phones in facility-based ARV refill service at a public HIV clinic in Nigeria. A notable finding was patients' preference for harnessing informal social support (through intermediaries with mobile phones) to maintain adherence to ARV refill appointments when they could not present in person. This evolving social support strategy also has the potential to enhance defaulter tracking. Our study findings may inform the development of ARV refill strategies and the design of future qualitative studies on client-provider communication by mobile phones in under-resourced HIV treatment programmes.

  5. Development of a Hybrid RANS/LES Method for Turbulent Mixing Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiadis, Nicholas J.; Alexander, J. Iwan D.; Reshotko, Eli

    2001-01-01

    Significant research has been underway for several years in NASA Glenn Research Center's nozzle branch to develop advanced computational methods for simulating turbulent flows in exhaust nozzles. The primary efforts of this research have concentrated on improving our ability to calculate the turbulent mixing layers that dominate flows both in the exhaust systems of modern-day aircraft and in those of hypersonic vehicles under development. As part of these efforts, a hybrid numerical method was recently developed to simulate such turbulent mixing layers. The method developed here is intended for configurations in which a dominant structural feature provides an unsteady mechanism to drive the turbulent development in the mixing layer. Interest in Large Eddy Simulation (LES) methods have increased in recent years, but applying an LES method to calculate the wide range of turbulent scales from small eddies in the wall-bounded regions to large eddies in the mixing region is not yet possible with current computers. As a result, the hybrid method developed here uses a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) procedure to calculate wall-bounded regions entering a mixing section and uses a LES procedure to calculate the mixing-dominated regions. A numerical technique was developed to enable the use of the hybrid RANS-LES method on stretched, non-Cartesian grids. With this technique, closure for the RANS equations is obtained by using the Cebeci-Smith algebraic turbulence model in conjunction with the wall-function approach of Ota and Goldberg. The LES equations are closed using the Smagorinsky subgrid scale model. Although the function of the Cebeci-Smith model to replace all of the turbulent stresses is quite different from that of the Smagorinsky subgrid model, which only replaces the small subgrid turbulent stresses, both are eddy viscosity models and both are derived at least in part from mixing-length theory. The similar formulation of these two models enables the RANS

  6. Using Mobile Devices for Learning in Clinical Settings: A Mixed-Methods Study of Medical Student, Physician and Patient Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Karen M.; Nerminathan, Arany; Alexander, Shirley; Phelps, Megan; Harrison, Amanda

    2017-01-01

    This study was conducted with medical students, physicians, patients and carers in a paediatric and an adult hospital to determine use of mobile devices for learning, and beliefs and attitudes about others' use. Awareness of ethical, patient privacy and data security concerns was explored. The research was conducted using a mixed-methods…

  7. Comparison of Mobilizing and Immobilizing Splints on Hand Motor Function in Stroke Patients: A Randomize Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahimi Fard H

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Among several methods for the treatment of wrist-fingers motor function impairment after stroke, splinting is a method commonly used as complementary option. But there are so many controversies surrounding its efficacy. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of mobilizing and immobilizing splints on wrist-fingers motor function after stroke.Methods: In this experimental study, 31 stroke patients were selected and divided randomly into three groups including: mobilizing splint, immobilizing splint and control group. Participants in intervention groups wore their own splints for eight weeks, five days per week and on average six hours per day. Motor function was measured at baseline and the eighth week by fugl-meyer (FM scale. The one-way ANOVA was used to compare scores of FM scale between three groups.Results: Data analysis showed significant increase in motor function only in mobilizing splint group (p=0/001 and this increase was significant compared with other groups (p=0/001.Conclusion: Based on these findings, using a mobilizing splint compared with immobilizing splint could have better functional results for treating wrist and finger motor impairment in post-stroke patients.

  8. Ran GTPase-activating protein 1 is a therapeutic target in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kung-Chao Chang

    Full Text Available Lymphoma-specific biomarkers contribute to therapeutic strategies and the study of tumorigenesis. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL is the most common type of malignant lymphoma. However, only 50% of patients experience long-term survival after current treatment; therefore, developing novel therapeutic strategies is warranted. Comparative proteomic analysis of two DLBCL lines with a B-lymphoblastoid cell line (LCL showed differential expression of Ran GTPase-activating protein 1 (RanGAP1 between them, which was confirmed using immunoblotting. Immunostaining showed that the majority of DLBCLs (92%, 46/50 were RanGAP1(+, while reactive lymphoid hyperplasia (n = 12 was RanGAP1(+ predominantly in germinal centers. RanGAP1 was also highly expressed in other B-cell lymphomas (BCL, n = 180 with brisk mitotic activity (B-lymphoblastic lymphoma/leukemia: 93%, and Burkitt lymphoma: 95% or cell-cycle dysregulation (mantle cell lymphoma: 83%, and Hodgkin's lymphoma 91%. Interestingly, serum RanGAP1 level was higher in patients with high-grade BCL (1.71 ± 2.28 ng/mL, n = 62 than in low-grade BCL (0.75 ± 2.12 ng/mL, n = 52 and healthy controls (0.55 ± 1.58 ng/mL, n = 75 (high-grade BCL vs. low-grade BCL, p = 0.002; high-grade BCL vs. control, p < 0.001, Mann-Whitney U test. In vitro, RNA interference of RanGAP1 showed no effect on LCL but enhanced DLBCL cell death (41% vs. 60%; p = 0.035 and cell-cycle arrest (G0/G1: 39% vs. 49%, G2/M: 19.0% vs. 7.5%; p = 0.030 along with decreased expression of TPX2 and Aurora kinases, the central regulators of mitotic cell division. Furthermore, ON 01910.Na (Estybon, a multikinase inhibitor induced cell death, mitotic cell arrest, and hyperphosphorylation of RanGAP1 in DLBCL cell lines but no effects in normal B and T cells. Therefore, RanGAP1 is a promising marker and therapeutic target for aggressive B-cell lymphoma, especially DLBCL.

  9. Increasing conclusiveness of clinical breath analysis by improved baseline correction of multi capillary column - ion mobility spectrometry (MCC-IMS) data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymańska, Ewa; Tinnevelt, Gerjen H; Brodrick, Emma; Williams, Mark; Davies, Antony N; van Manen, Henk-Jan; Buydens, Lutgarde M C

    2016-08-05

    Current challenges of clinical breath analysis include large data size and non-clinically relevant variations observed in exhaled breath measurements, which should be urgently addressed with competent scientific data tools. In this study, three different baseline correction methods are evaluated within a previously developed data size reduction strategy for multi capillary column - ion mobility spectrometry (MCC-IMS) datasets. Introduced for the first time in breath data analysis, the Top-hat method is presented as the optimum baseline correction method. A refined data size reduction strategy is employed in the analysis of a large breathomic dataset on a healthy and respiratory disease population. New insights into MCC-IMS spectra differences associated with respiratory diseases are provided, demonstrating the additional value of the refined data analysis strategy in clinical breath analysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Nuclear-cytoplasmic trafficking of NTF2, the nuclear import receptor for the RanGTPase, is subjected to regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shawn C Chafe

    Full Text Available NTF2 is a cytosolic protein responsible for nuclear import of Ran, a small Ras-like GTPase involved in a number of critical cellular processes, including cell cycle regulation, chromatin organization during mitosis, reformation of the nuclear envelope following mitosis, and controlling the directionality of nucleocytoplasmic transport. Herein, we provide evidence for the first time that translocation of the mammalian NTF2 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm to collect Ran in the GDP form is subjected to regulation. Treatment of mammalian cells with polysorbitan monolaurate was found to inhibit nuclear export of tRNA and proteins, which are processes dependent on RanGTP in the nucleus, but not nuclear import of proteins. Inhibition of the export processes by polysorbitan monolaurate is specific and reversible, and is caused by accumulation of Ran in the cytoplasm because of a block in translocation of NTF2 to the cytoplasm. Nuclear import of Ran and the nuclear export processes are restored in polysorbitan monolaurate treated cells overproducing NTF2. Moreover, increased phosphorylation of a phospho-tyrosine protein and several phospho-threonine proteins was observed in polysorbitan monolaurate treated cells. Collectively, these findings suggest that nucleocytoplasmic translocation of NTF2 is regulated in mammalian cells, and may involve a tyrosine and/or threonine kinase-dependent signal transduction mechanism(s.

  11. Multihoming for Mobile Internet of Multimedia Things

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Titus Balan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mobility, redundancy, and bandwidth requirements are transforming the communication models used for IoT, mainly in case of Critical Communications and multimedia streaming (“IoMT, Internet of Multimedia Things”, as wireless video traffic is expected to be 60–75% of the global mobile traffic by 2020. One of the characteristics of 5G networks will be the proliferation of different/heterogeneous radio networks (virtualized radio access networks, RAN, new energy-efficient radios, femtocells, and offloading capabilities and the possibility for IoT objects to connect and load-balance between dual and multiple RANs. This paper focuses on the possibility of using LISP (Locator Identifier Separation Protocol for multihoming and load-balancing purposes and presents an illustrative scenario for the case of mobile IoT (e.g., the “things” part of vehicular or public transportation systems, PTS that are also intensive bandwidth consumers, like the case of connected multimedia “things.” We have implemented and tested a demonstrator of a mobile LISP IoT gateway that is also integrated with Cloud-based video analytics.

  12. Determining 1-Yr Prosthetic Use for Mobility Prognoses for Community-Dwelling Adults with Lower-Limb Amputation: Development of a Clinical Prediction Rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Christopher Kevin; Young, Rebecca S; Ow-Wing, Carlyn; Karimi, Parisa

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a prognostic clinical prediction rule to identify people not achieving community walking level prosthetic use after 1 yr. This is a prospective longitudinal cohort study of community-dwelling adults with lower-limb amputations recruited from support groups and prosthetic clinics. Participants completed Activities-specific Balance Confidence and Houghton prosthetic use for mobility self-report scales and the Berg Balance Scale. The clinical prediction rule was developed using multivariate logistic regression, receiver operating curves, and probability statistics to identify people not achieving community walking level prosthetic use (Houghton scores prosthetic walking level with excellent accuracy (area under the curve >0.96) using four criteria: initial Houghton, Activities-specific Balance Confidence, and Berg Balance Scale tasks 9 (retrieve object from floor) and 10 (look behind over shoulders). Failure to exceed cutoff scores in two or more criteria yielded posttest probability of not reaching community walking prosthetic use 1 yr later for 90% of participants or higher. Accurate 1-yr prosthetic use for mobility prognoses can be obtained by screening prosthetic use, balance confidence, and balance ability to identify community-dwelling people with lower-limb amputations unlikely to achieve community walking prosthetic use.

  13. Validity, responsiveness and the minimal clinically important difference for the de Morton Mobility Index (DEMMI in an older acute medical population

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    Davidson Megan

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The de Morton Mobility Index (DEMMI is a new mobility instrument that overcomes the limitations of existing instruments. It is the first mobility instrument that accurately measures the mobility of all older adults. The aim of this study was to provide a detailed report of investigations of the validity, responsiveness to change and minimal clinically important difference (MCID of the DEMMI during its development in an older acute medical population. Methods This study was conducted using a head to head comparison design in two independent samples of older acute medical patients (development sample, n = 86; validation sample, n = 106. Consecutive patients (≥ 65 years were assessed using the DEMMI, Barthel Index (BI and Hierarchical Assessment of Balance and Mobility (HABAM within 48 hours of hospital admission and discharge. Convergent and discriminant validity were investigated using Spearman's rho and known groups validity was investigated using a independent t test to compare DEMMI scores for patients who were discharged to home compared to inpatient rehabilitation. Criterion and distribution based methods were employed for estimating instrument responsiveness to change and the MCID. Results Significant moderate to high correlations were identified between DEMMI and BI scores (r = 0.76 and r = 0.68 and DEMMI and HABAM scores (r = 0.91 and r = 0.92 in both samples. In both samples, DEMMI scores for patients who were discharged to home were significantly higher than for patients discharged to inpatient rehabilitation and provided evidence of known groups validity. Patients who were discharged to inpatient rehabilitation (n = 8 had a mean DEMMI score of 50.75 (sd = 11.29 at acute hospital discharge compared to patients who were discharged to home (n = 70 with a mean DEMMI score of 62.14 (sd = 18.41. MCID estimates were similar across samples using distribution and criterion based methods. The MCID for the DEMMI was 10

  14. Physics-Informed Machine Learning for Predictive Turbulence Modeling: Using Data to Improve RANS Modeled Reynolds Stresses

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Jian-Xun; Xiao, Heng

    2016-01-01

    Turbulence modeling is a critical component in numerical simulations of industrial flows based on Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations. However, after decades of efforts in the turbulence modeling community, universally applicable RANS models with predictive capabilities are still lacking. Recently, data-driven methods have been proposed as a promising alternative to the traditional approaches of turbulence model development. In this work we propose a data-driven, physics-informed machine learning approach for predicting discrepancies in RANS modeled Reynolds stresses. The discrepancies are formulated as functions of the mean flow features. By using a modern machine learning technique based on random forests, the discrepancy functions are first trained with benchmark flow data and then used to predict Reynolds stresses discrepancies in new flows. The method is used to predict the Reynolds stresses in the flow over periodic hills by using two training flow scenarios of increasing difficulties: (1) ...

  15. User interface design for mobile-based sexual health interventions for young people: design recommendations from a qualitative study on an online Chlamydia clinical care pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gkatzidou, Voula; Hone, Kate; Sutcliffe, Lorna; Gibbs, Jo; Sadiq, Syed Tariq; Szczepura, Ala; Sonnenberg, Pam; Estcourt, Claudia

    2015-08-26

    The increasing pervasiveness of mobile technologies has given potential to transform healthcare by facilitating clinical management using software applications. These technologies may provide valuable tools in sexual health care and potentially overcome existing practical and cultural barriers to routine testing for sexually transmitted infections. In order to inform the design of a mobile health application for STIs that supports self-testing and self-management by linking diagnosis with online care pathways, we aimed to identify the dimensions and range of preferences for user interface design features among young people. Nine focus group discussions were conducted (n = 49) with two age-stratified samples (16 to 18 and 19 to 24 year olds) of young people from Further Education colleges and Higher Education establishments. Discussions explored young people's views with regard to: the software interface; the presentation of information; and the ordering of interaction steps. Discussions were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim. Interview transcripts were analysed using thematic analysis. Four over-arching themes emerged: privacy and security; credibility; user journey support; and the task-technology-context fit. From these themes, 20 user interface design recommendations for mobile health applications are proposed. For participants, although privacy was a major concern, security was not perceived as a major potential barrier as participants were generally unaware of potential security threats and inherently trusted new technology. Customisation also emerged as a key design preference to increase attractiveness and acceptability. Considerable effort should be focused on designing healthcare applications from the patient's perspective to maximise acceptability. The design recommendations proposed in this paper provide a valuable point of reference for the health design community to inform development of mobile-based health interventions for the diagnosis

  16. GTPase Ran strongly accumulates at the kinetochores of somatic chromosomes in the spermatogonial mitoses of Acricotopus lucidus (Diptera, Chironomidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staiber, Wolfgang

    2014-07-01

    Unequal chromosome segregation and spindle formation occurs in the last gonial mitosis in the germ line of the chironomid Acricotopus lucidus. During this differential mitosis, all germ line-limited chromosomes (=Ks) migrate undivided to only one pole of the cell, while the somatic chromosomes (=Ss) first remain in the metaphase plane, and with the arrival of the Ks at the pole, they then separate equally. The evolutionarily conserved GTPase Ran plays a crucial role in many cellular processes. This includes the regulation of microtubule nucleation and stabilisation at kinetochores and of spindle assembly during mitosis, which is promoted by a RanGTP concentration gradient that forms around the mitotic chromosomes (Kalab et al. in Science 295:2452-2456, 2002, Nature 440:697-701, 2006). In the present study, a strong accumulation of Ran was detected by immunofluorescence at the kinetochores of the Ss in normal gonial and differential gonial mitoses of males of A. lucidus. In contrast, no Ran accumulation was observed at the kinetochores of the Ss in the metaphases of brain ganglia mitoses or of aberrant spermatocytes or in metaphases I and II of spermatocyte meiotic divisions. Likewise, there was no accumulation at the kinetochores of Drosophila melanogaster mitotic chromosomes from larval brains. The specific accumulation of Ran at the kinetochores of the Ss in differential gonial mitoses of A. lucidus strongly suggests that Ran is involved in a mechanism acting in this exceptional mitosis, which retains the Ss at the metaphase plane and prevents a premature separation and unequal segregation of the Ss during monopolar migration of the Ks.

  17. Rinfoform Usage As Update Request Media Articles In iRAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Untung Rahardja

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Ease of access to information made public should continue to improve his knowledge of information technology. As one of the Universities in the field of computers, Perguruan Tinggi Raharja has a lot of innovation to create pembelajalan unconventional media. For that create an information media that serve as a center of tutorial every innovation in Perguruan Tinggi Raharja. iRAN (iLeraning Prog Ask And News. In the implementation one that is still seen as less is a service request in Iran. Utilization of Cloud Computing RinfoApps as media RinfoForms one of them is deemed to cover deficiencies that affect the improvements in the services provided.This research was conducted using the method of data collection, including the method of observation, and literature study method. RinfoForm expected utilization associated with Cluod Computin can give effect to the service request is in Iran.

  18. RANS-based simulation of wave-induced sheet-flow transport of graded sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calistan, Ugur; Fuhrman, David R.

    2017-01-01

    A one-dimensional vertical (1DV) turbulence-closure flow model, coupled with sediment transport capabilities,is extended to incorporate graded sediment mixtures. The hydrodynamic model solves the horizontalcomponent of the incompressible Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS) equations coupled...... for each grain fraction, includingeffects associated with increased exposure of larger particles within a mixture. The suspended sedimenttransport model also makes use of modified reference concentration approach, wherein reference concentrationscomputed individually for each fraction are translated...... to a common level, conveniently enabling use of asingle computational grid for the simulation of suspended sediments. Parametric study shows that these twoeffects combine to help alleviate an otherwise systematic tendency towards over- (under-) predicted transportrates for fine (coarse) sand fractions...

  19. Rans-Based Numerical Simulation of Wave-Induced Sheet-Flow Transport of Graded Sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuhrman, David R.; Caliskan, Ugur

    An existing one-dimensional vertical (1DV) turbulence-closure flow model, coupled with sediment transport capabilities, is extended to incorporate graded sediment mixtures. The hydrodynamic model solves the horizontal component of the incompressible Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS) equations...... coupled with k–ω turbulence closure. In addition to standard bed and suspended load descriptions, the sediment transport model incorporates so-called high-concentration effects (turbulence damping and hindered settling velocities). The sediment transport model treats the bed and suspended load...... individually for each grain fraction within a mixture, and includes effects associated with increased exposure of larger particles within a mixture. The model also makes use of a modified reference concentration approach, with reference concentrations computed individually for each fraction...

  20. RANS-based simulation of turbulent wave boundary layer and sheet-flow sediment transport processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuhrman, David R.; Schløer, Signe; Sterner, Johanna

    2013-01-01

    A numerical model coupling the horizontal component of the incompressible Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS) equationswith two-equation k−ω turbulence closure is presented and used to simulate a variety of turbulent wave boundary layer processes. The hydrodynamic model is additionally coupled...... of a number of local factors important within cross-shore wave boundary layer and sediment transport dynamics. The hydrodynamic model is validated for both hydraulically smooth and rough conditions, based on wave friction factor diagrams and boundary layer streaming profiles, with the results in excellent...... agreement with experimental and/or previous numerical work. The sediment transport model is likewise validated against oscillatory tunnel experiments involving both velocity-skewed and acceleration-skewed flows, as well as against measurements beneath real progressive waves.Model capabilities are exploited...

  1. Investigation on the wake evolution of contra-rotating propeller using RANS computation and SPIV measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang-Jun Paik

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The wake characteristics of Contra-Rotating Propeller (CRP were investigated using numerical simulation and flow measurement. The numerical simulation was carried out with a commercial CFD code based on a Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS equations solver, and the flow measurement was performed with Stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry (SPIV system. The simulation results were validated through the comparison with the experiment results measured around the leading edge of rudder to investigate the effect of propeller operation under the conditions without propeller, with forward propeller alone, and with both forward and aft propellers. The evolution of CRP wake was analyzed through velocity and vorticity contours on three transverse planes and one longitudinal plane based on CFD results. The trajectories of propeller tip vortex core in the cases with and without aft propeller were also compared, and larger wake contraction with CRP was confirmed.

  2. RANS simulation of cavitation and hull pressure fluctuation for marine propeller operating behind-hull condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang-Jun Paik

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Simulations of cavitation flow and hull pressure fluctuation for a marine propeller operating behind a hull using the unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equations (RANS are presented. A full hull body submerged under the free surface is modeled in the computational domain to simulate directly the wake field of the ship at the propeller plane. Simulations are performed in design and ballast draught conditions to study the effect of cavitation number. And two propellers with slightly different geometry are simulated to validate the detectability of the numerical simulation. All simulations are performed using a commercial CFD software FLUENT. Cavitation patterns of the simulations show good agreement with the experimental results carried out in Samsung CAvitation Tunnel (SCAT. The simulation results for the hull pressure fluctuation induced by a propeller are also compared with the experimental results showing good agreement in the tendency and amplitude, especially, for the first blade frequency.

  3. A RANS modelling approach for predicting powering performance of ships in waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn Windén

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a modelling technique for simulating self-propelled ships in waves is presented. The flow is modelled using a RANS solver coupled with an actuator disk model for the propeller. The motion of the ship is taken into consideration in the definition of the actuator disk region as well as the advance ratio of the propeller. The RPM of the propeller is controlled using a PID-controller with constraints added on the maximum permissible RPM increase rate. Results are presented for a freely surging model in regular waves with different constraints put on the PID-controller. The described method shows promising results and allows for the studying of several factors relating to self-propulsion. However, more validation data is needed to judge the accuracy of the model.

  4. Galaxy evolution. Isolated compact elliptical galaxies: stellar systems that ran away.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilingarian, Igor; Zolotukhin, Ivan

    2015-04-24

    Compact elliptical galaxies form a rare class of stellar system (~30 presently known) characterized by high stellar densities and small sizes and often harboring metal-rich stars. They were thought to form through tidal stripping of massive progenitors, until two isolated objects were discovered where massive galaxies performing the stripping could not be identified. By mining astronomical survey data, we have now found 195 compact elliptical galaxies in all types of environment. They all share similar dynamical and stellar population properties. Dynamical analysis for nonisolated galaxies demonstrates the feasibility of their ejection from host clusters and groups by three-body encounters, which is in agreement with numerical simulations. Hence, isolated compact elliptical and isolated quiescent dwarf galaxies are tidally stripped systems that ran away from their hosts. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  5. Flow field analysis of a pentagonal-shaped bridge deck by unsteady RANS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Naimul Haque

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Long-span cable-stayed bridges are susceptible to dynamic wind effects due to their inherent flexibility. The fluid flow around the bridge deck should be well understood for the efficient design of an aerodynamically stable long-span bridge system. In this work, the aerodynamic features of a pentagonal-shaped bridge deck are explored numerically. The analytical results are compared with past experimental work to assess the capability of two-dimensional unsteady RANS simulation for predicting the aerodynamic features of this type of deck. The influence of the bottom plate slope on aerodynamic response and flow features was investigated. By varying the Reynolds number (2 × 104 to 20 × 104 the aerodynamic behavior at high wind speeds is clarified.

  6. A RANS/DES Numerical Procedure for Axisymmetric Flows with and without Strong Rotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Andrew Jacob [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    A RANS/DES numerical procedure with an extended Lax-Wendroff control-volume scheme and turbulence model is described for the accurate simulation of internal/external axisymmetric flow with and without strong rotation. This new procedure is an extension, from Cartesian to cylindrical coordinates, of (1) a second order accurate multi-grid, control-volume integration scheme, and (2) a k-ω turbulence model. This paper outlines both the axisymmetric corrections to the mentioned numerical schemes and the developments of techniques pertaining to numerical dissipation, multi-block connectivity, parallelization, etc. Furthermore, analytical and experimental case studies are presented to demonstrate accuracy and computational efficiency. Notes are also made toward numerical stability of highly rotational flows.

  7. A Synthesis of Hybrid RANS/LES CFD Results for F-16XL Aircraft Aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luckring, James M.; Park, Michael A.; Hitzel, Stephan M.; Jirasek, Adam; Lofthouse, Andrew J.; Morton, Scott A.; McDaniel, David R.; Rizzi, Arthur M.

    2015-01-01

    A synthesis is presented of recent numerical predictions for the F-16XL aircraft flow fields and aerodynamics. The computational results were all performed with hybrid RANS/LES formulations, with an emphasis on unsteady flows and subsequent aerodynamics, and results from five computational methods are included. The work was focused on one particular low-speed, high angle-of-attack flight test condition, and comparisons against flight-test data are included. This work represents the third coordinated effort using the F-16XL aircraft, and a unique flight-test data set, to advance our knowledge of slender airframe aerodynamics as well as our capability for predicting these aerodynamics with advanced CFD formulations. The prior efforts were identified as Cranked Arrow Wing Aerodynamics Project International, with the acronyms CAWAPI and CAWAPI-2. All information in this paper is in the public domain.

  8. Mobile Learning Using Mobile Phones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente, Paula

    2013-01-01

    The participation in mobile learning programs is conditioned by having/using mobile communication technology. Those who do not have or use such technology cannot participate in mobile learning programs. This study evaluates who are the most likely participants of mobile learning programs by examining the demographic profile and mobile phone usage…

  9. Performance evaluation of RANS-based turbulence models in simulating a honeycomb heat sink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subasi, Abdussamet; Ozsipahi, Mustafa; Sahin, Bayram; Gunes, Hasan

    2017-07-01

    As well-known, there is not a universal turbulence model that can be used to model all engineering problems. There are specific applications for each turbulence model that make it appropriate to use, and it is vital to select an appropriate model and wall function combination that matches the physics of the problem considered. Therefore, in this study, performance of six well-known Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes ( RANS) based turbulence models which are the Standard k {{-}} ɛ, the Renormalized Group k- ɛ, the Realizable k- ɛ, the Reynolds Stress Model, the k- ω and the Shear Stress Transport k- ω and accompanying wall functions which are the standard, the non-equilibrium and the enhanced are evaluated via 3D simulation of a honeycomb heat sink. The CutCell method is used to generate grid for the part including heat sink called test section while a hexahedral mesh is employed to discretize to inlet and outlet sections. A grid convergence study is conducted for verification process while experimental data and well-known correlations are used to validate the numerical results. Prediction of pressure drop along the test section, mean base plate temperature of the heat sink and temperature at the test section outlet are regarded as a measure of the performance of employed models and wall functions. The results indicate that selection of turbulence models and wall functions has a great influence on the results and, therefore, need to be selected carefully. Hydraulic and thermal characteristics of the honeycomb heat sink can be determined in a reasonable accuracy using RANS- based turbulence models provided that a suitable turbulence model and wall function combination is selected.

  10. RANS based CFD methodology for a real scale 217-pin wire-wrapped fuel assembly of KAERI PGSFR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Jae-Ho, E-mail: jhjeong@kaeri.re.kr [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 989-111 Daedeok-daero, Yuseoung-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Song, Min-Seop [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, 559 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kwi-Lim [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 989-111 Daedeok-daero, Yuseoung-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • This paper presents a suitable way for a practical RANS based CFD methodology which is applicable to real scale 217-pin wire-wrapped fuel assembly of KAERI PGSFR. • A key point of differentiation of the RANS based CFD methodology in this study is adapting an innovative grid generation method using a fortran based in-house code with a GGI function in a general-purpose commercial CFD code, CFX. • The RANS based CFD methodology is implemented with high resolution scheme and SST turbulence model in the 7-pin 37-pin, and 127-pin wire-wrapped fuel assembly of PNC and JNC. Furthermore, the RANS based CFD methodology can be successfully extended to the real scale 217-pin wire-wrapped fuel bundles of KAERI PGSFR. • Three-dimensional thermal-hydraulic characteristics have been also investigated briefly. - Abstract: This paper presents a suitable way for a practical RANS (Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes simulation) based CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) methodology which is applicable to real scale 217-pin wire-wrapped fuel assembly of KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute) PGSFR (Prototype Gen-IV Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor). The main purpose of the current study is to support license issue for the KAERI PGSFR core safety and to elucidate thermal-hydraulic characteristics in a 217-pin wire-wrapped fuel assembly of KAERI PGSFR. A key point of differentiation of the RANS based CFD methodology in this study is adapting an innovative grid generation method using a fortran based in-house code with a GGI (General Grid Interface) function in a general-purpose commercial CFD code, CFX. The innovative grid generation method with GGI function can achieve to simulate a real wire shape with minimizing cell skewness. The RANS based CFD methodology is implemented with high resolution scheme in convection term and SST (Shear Stress Transport) turbulence model in the 7-pin 37-pin, and 127-pin wire-wrapped fuel assembly of PNC (Power reactor and Nuclear fuel

  11. Evaluation of a mobile clinical pathology laboratory developed for the home care of pediatric patients following transplantation of peripheral blood precursor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facco, Fabio; Agazzi, Alessia; Manfredini, Luca; Dallorso, Sandro; Melioli, Giovanni

    2013-08-01

    A mobile clinical pathology laboratory (MoLab) was designed, outfitted and evaluated to improve the turnaround time (TAT) of laboratory tests performed in patients who receive follow-up care at home. Full blood counts (FBCs), basic clinical biochemistry tests on blood and urine, and basic coagulation and blood gases were measured using bench-top laboratory analyzers to perform point-of-care tests in a mobile setting. The quality of the results was evaluated on the instruments both while the vehicle was at rest and following movement during the course of routine activity. The equivalence of the values produced by the point-of-care testing (POCT) and central laboratory (CL) measurement procedures was demonstrated and remained stable after movement in city traffic. The TATs ranged from a few minutes for FBCs to home care patients in a matter of minutes. This approach not only allowed for real-time modifications in therapy but also reduced the number of second visits by the home care medical team. Point-of-care tests performed on the MoLab were significantly more expensive than the same tests performed in the CL. However, the savings in patient hospitalization expenses and the reduced costs resulting from fewer second daily visits completely offset the costs of using the MoLab during the first 6-month pilot phase.

  12. Experimental protocol of a randomized controlled clinical trial investigating exercise, subclinical atherosclerosis, and walking mobility in persons with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Garett; Klaren, Rachel E; Motl, Robert W; Baynard, Tracy; Fernhall, Bo

    2015-03-01

    This randomized controlled trial (RCT) will investigate the effects of a home-based aerobic exercise training regimen (i.e., cycle ergometry) on subclinical atherosclerosis and walking mobility in persons with multiple sclerosis (MS) and minimal disability. This RCT will recruit 54 men and women who have an Expanded Disability Status Scale characteristic of the 1st stage of MS (i.e., 0-4.0) to participate in a 3 month exercise or stretching intervention, with assessments of subclinical atherosclerosis and walking mobility conducted at baseline, week 6 (midpoint), and week 12 (conclusion) of the program. The exercise intervention will consist of 3 days/week of cycling, with a gradual increase of duration followed by an increase in intensity across the 3 month period. The attention-control condition will incorporate stretching activities and will require the same contact time commitment as the exercise condition. Both study groups will participate in weekly video chat sessions with study personnel in order to monitor and track program adherence. Primary outcomes will consist of assessments of vascular structure and function, as well as several walking tasks. Additional outcomes will include questionnaires, cardiorespiratory fitness assessment, and a 1-week free-living physical activity assessment. This investigation will increase understanding of the role of aerobic exercise as part of a treatment plan for managing subclinical atherosclerosis and improving walking mobility persons in the 1st stage of MS. Overall, this study design has the potential to lead to effective aerobic exercise intervention strategies for this population and improve program adherence. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. RANS / LES coupling applied to high Reynolds number turbulent flows of the nuclear industry; Application du couplage RANS / LES aux ecoulements turbulents a haut nombre de Reynolds de l'industrie nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benarafa, Y

    2005-12-15

    The main issue to perform a computational study of high Reynolds numbered turbulent flows consists on predicting their unsteadiness without implying a tremendous computational cost. First, the main drawbacks of large-eddy simulation with standard wall model on a coarse mesh for a plane channel flow are highlighted. To correct these drawbacks two coupling RANS/LES methods have been proposed. The first one relies on a sophisticated wall model (TBLE) which consists on solving Thin Boundary Layer Equations with a RANS type turbulent closure in the near wall region. The second one consists on a RANS/LES methods have been proposed. The second one consists on a RANS/LES coupling method using a forcing term approach. These various approaches have been implemented in the TRIO-U code developed at CEA (French Atomic Center) at Grenoble, France. The studied flow configurations are the fully developed plane channel flow and a flow around a surface-mounted cubical obstacle. Both approaches provide encouraging results and allow a surface-mounted cubical obstacle. Both approaches provide encouraging results and allow unsteady simulations for a low computational cost. (author)

  14. Frailty and Mobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eeles, Eamonn; Low Choy, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    Frailty represents a state of heightened vulnerability. Mobility impairment contributes to the construct of frailty and channels adverse events. While mobility disorder is universal at a high burden of frailty, neither mobility nor balance dysfunction is sufficient to fully define frailty. Frailty represents proximity to complex system failure, with higher-order disturbance, such as mobility and balance disturbance, as a consequence. Impairment of mobility and balance is a common manifestation of illness in the frail individual and is therefore a sensitive marker of acute disease, putatively also in delirium. Clinical measurement of mobility and balance should be prioritized. Consequently, assessment tools, such as the de Morton Mobility Index and the Hierarchical Assessment of Balance and Mobility, are being explored, with the sensitivity of the latter illustrated in the acute hospital setting. Walking with speed and under dual/multi-task conditions better differentiates healthier and frail ambulant adults, providing a basis for screening older adults for pre-emptive interventions. Specific mobility and balance interventions reduce falls risk. However, patients with dementia walk too fast for their level of frailty, creating an ethical dimension to rehabilitation and risk. Overall, there is no need for reduced mobility to reinforce the frailty stereotype; both are potentially modifiable and amenable to intervention strategies. 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. A Mobile App to Stabilize Daily Functional Activity of Breast Cancer Patients in Collaboration With the Physician: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egbring, Marco; Far, Elmira; Roos, Malgorzata; Dietrich, Michael; Brauchbar, Mathis; Kullak-Ublick, Gerd A; Trojan, Andreas

    2016-09-06

    The well-being of breast cancer patients and reporting of adverse events require close monitoring. Mobile apps allow continuous recording of disease- and medication-related symptoms in patients undergoing chemotherapy. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of a mobile app on patient-reported daily functional activity in a supervised and unsupervised setting. We conducted a randomized controlled study of 139 breast cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. Patient status was self-measured using Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group scoring and Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events. Participants were randomly assigned to a control group, an unsupervised group that used a mobile app to record data, or a supervised group that used the app and reviewed data with a physician. Primary outcome variables were change in daily functional activity and symptoms over three outpatient visits. Functional activity scores declined in all groups from the first to second visit. However, from the second to third visit, only the supervised group improved, whereas the others continued to decline. Overall, the supervised group showed no significant difference from the first (median 90.85, IQR 30.67) to third visit (median 84.76, IQR 18.29, P=.72). Both app-using groups reported more distinct adverse events in the app than in the questionnaire (supervised: n=1033 vs n=656; unsupervised: n=852 vs n=823), although the unsupervised group reported more symptoms overall (n=4808) in the app than the supervised group (n=4463). The mobile app was associated with stabilized daily functional activity when used under collaborative review. App-using participants could more frequently report adverse events, and those under supervision made fewer and more precise entries than unsupervised participants. Our findings suggest that patient well-being and awareness of chemotherapy adverse effects can be improved by using a mobile app in collaboration with the treating physician. Clinical

  16. A mobile and web-based clinical decision support and monitoring system for diabetes mellitus patients in primary care: a study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kart, Özge; Mevsim, Vildan; Kut, Alp; Yürek, İsmail; Altın, Ayşe Özge; Yılmaz, Oğuz

    2017-11-29

    Physicians' guideline use rates for diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of diabetes mellitus (DM) is very low. Time constraints, patient overpopulation, and complex guidelines require alternative solutions for real time patient monitoring. Rapidly evolving e-health technology combined with clinical decision support and monitoring systems (CDSMS) provides an effective solution to these problems. The purpose of the study is to develop a user-friendly, comprehensive, fully integrated web and mobile-based Clinical Decision Support and Monitoring System (CDSMS) for the screening, diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring of DM diseases which is used by physicians and patients in primary care and to determine the effectiveness of the system. The CDSMS will be based on evidence-based guidelines for DM disease. A web and mobile-based application will be developed in which the physician will remotely monitor patient data through mobile applications in real time. The developed CDSMS will be tested in two stages. In the first stage, the usability, understandability, and adequacy of the application will be determined. Five primary care physicians will use the developed application for at least 16 DM patients. Necessary improvements will be made according to physician feedback. In the second phase, a parallel, single-blind, randomized controlled trial will be implemented. DM diagnosed patients will be recruited for the CDSMS trial by their primary care physicians. Ten physicians and their 439 patients will be involved in the study. Eligible participants will be assigned to intervention and control groups with simple randomization. The significance level will be accepted as p system will make recommendations on patient monitoring, diagnosis, and treatment. These recommendations will be implemented at the physician's discretion. Patients in the control group will be treated by physicians according to current DM treatment standards. Patients in both groups will be monitored for 6

  17. 78 FR 34084 - Freeport-McMoRan Energy LLC; Application for Long-Term Authorization To Export Liquefied Natural...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-06

    ... Freeport-McMoRan Energy LLC; Application for Long-Term Authorization To Export Liquefied Natural Gas... natural gas (non-FTA countries) with which trade is not prohibited by U.S. law or policy. FME requests... Natural Gas Act (NGA), 15 U.S.C. 717b(c).\\3\\ In the current Application, FME requests both FTA and non...

  18. A comparison of RANS computations and wind tunnel tests for RMS pressures on a high-rise building model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalkman, I.M.; Bronkhorst, A.J.; Bentum, C.A. van; Franke, J.

    2012-01-01

    Five root-mean-square (RMS) pressure models are used in combination with different turbulence models to determine whether it is possible to obtain a conservative estimate of RMS pressures on a high-rise building model from a RANS calculation. When a precursor domain is used for the generation of

  19. HIV Integration Targeting: A Pathway Involving Transportin-3 and the Nuclear Pore Protein RanBP2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huegel, Alyssa; Roth, Shoshannah L.; Schaller, Torsten; James, Leo C.; Towers, Greg J.; Young, John A. T.; Chanda, Sumit K.; König, Renate; Malani, Nirav; Berry, Charles C.; Bushman, Frederic D.

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide siRNA screens have identified host cell factors important for efficient HIV infection, among which are nuclear pore proteins such as RanBP2/Nup358 and the karyopherin Transportin-3/TNPO3. Analysis of the roles of these proteins in the HIV replication cycle suggested that correct trafficking through the pore may facilitate the subsequent integration step. Here we present data for coupling between these steps by demonstrating that depletion of Transportin-3 or RanBP2 altered the terminal step in early HIV replication, the selection of chromosomal sites for integration. We found that depletion of Transportin-3 and RanBP2 altered integration targeting for HIV. These knockdowns reduced HIV integration frequency in gene-dense regions and near gene-associated features, a pattern that differed from that reported for depletion of the HIV integrase binding cofactor Psip1/Ledgf/p75. MLV integration was not affected by the Transportin-3 knockdown. Using siRNA knockdowns and integration targeting analysis, we also implicated several additional nuclear proteins in proper target site selection. To map viral determinants of integration targeting, we analyzed a chimeric HIV derivative containing MLV gag, and found that the gag replacement phenocopied the Transportin-3 and RanBP2 knockdowns. Thus, our data support a model in which Gag-dependent engagement of the proper transport and nuclear pore machinery mediate trafficking of HIV complexes to sites of integration. PMID:21423673

  20. HIV integration targeting: a pathway involving Transportin-3 and the nuclear pore protein RanBP2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen E Ocwieja

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide siRNA screens have identified host cell factors important for efficient HIV infection, among which are nuclear pore proteins such as RanBP2/Nup358 and the karyopherin Transportin-3/TNPO3. Analysis of the roles of these proteins in the HIV replication cycle suggested that correct trafficking through the pore may facilitate the subsequent integration step. Here we present data for coupling between these steps by demonstrating that depletion of Transportin-3 or RanBP2 altered the terminal step in early HIV replication, the selection of chromosomal sites for integration. We found that depletion of Transportin-3 and RanBP2 altered integration targeting for HIV. These knockdowns reduced HIV integration frequency in gene-dense regions and near gene-associated features, a pattern that differed from that reported for depletion of the HIV integrase binding cofactor Psip1/Ledgf/p75. MLV integration was not affected by the Transportin-3 knockdown. Using siRNA knockdowns and integration targeting analysis, we also implicated several additional nuclear proteins in proper target site selection. To map viral determinants of integration targeting, we analyzed a chimeric HIV derivative containing MLV gag, and found that the gag replacement phenocopied the Transportin-3 and RanBP2 knockdowns. Thus, our data support a model in which Gag-dependent engagement of the proper transport and nuclear pore machinery mediate trafficking of HIV complexes to sites of integration.

  1. Molecular characteristics of clinical methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius harboring arginine catabolic mobile element (ACME) from dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ching; Wan, Min-Tao; Lauderdale, Tsai-Ling; Yeh, Kuang-Sheng; Chen, Charles; Hsiao, Yun-Hsia; Chou, Chin-Cheng

    2017-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate the presence of arginine catabolic mobile element (ACME) and its associated molecular characteristics in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP). Among the 72 S. pseudintermedius recovered from various infection sites of dogs and cats, 52 (72.2%) were MRSP. ACME-arcA was detected commonly (69.2%) in these MRSP isolates, and was more frequently detected in those from the skin than from other body sites (P=0.047). There was a wide genetic diversity among the ACME-arcA-positive MRSP isolates, which comprised three SCCmec types (II-III, III and V) and 15 dru types with two predominant clusters (9a and 11a). Most MRSP isolates were multidrug-resistant. Since S. pseudintermedius could serve as a reservoir of ACME, further research on this putative virulence factor is recommended. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Repeat Associated Non-AUG Translation (RAN Translation Dependent on Sequence Downstream of the ATXN2 CAG Repeat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel R Scoles

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2 is a progressive autosomal dominant disorder caused by the expansion of a CAG tract in the ATXN2 gene. The SCA2 disease phenotype is characterized by cerebellar atrophy, gait ataxia, and slow saccades. ATXN2 mutation causes gains of toxic and normal functions of the ATXN2 gene product, ataxin-2, and abnormally slow Purkinje cell firing frequency. Previously we investigated features of ATXN2 controlling expression and noted expression differences for ATXN2 constructs with varying CAG lengths, suggestive of repeat associated non-AUG translation (RAN translation. To determine whether RAN translation occurs for ATXN2 we assembled various ATXN2 constructs with ATXN2 tagged by luciferase, HA or FLAG tags, driven by the CMV promoter or the ATXN2 promoter. Luciferase expression from ATXN2-luciferase constructs lacking the ATXN2 start codon was weak vs AUG translation, regardless of promoter type, and did not increase with longer CAG repeat lengths. RAN translation was detected on western blots by the anti-polyglutamine antibody 1C2 for constructs driven by the CMV promoter but not the ATXN2 promoter, and was weaker than AUG translation. Strong RAN translation was also observed when driving the ATXN2 sequence with the CMV promoter with ATXN2 sequence downstream of the CAG repeat truncated to 18 bp in the polyglutamine frame but not in the polyserine or polyalanine frames. Our data demonstrate that ATXN2 RAN translation is weak compared to AUG translation and is dependent on ATXN2 sequences flanking the CAG repeat.

  3. A pilot study to assess the utility of a freely downloadable mobile application simulator for undergraduate clinical skills training: a single-blinded, randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Richard D; Radenkovic, Dina; Mitrasinovic, Stefan; Cole, Andrew; Pavkovic, Iva; Denn, Peyton Cheong Phey; Hussain, Mahrukh; Kogler, Magdalena; Koutsopodioti, Natalia; Uddin, Wasima; Beckley, Ivan; Abubakar, Hana; Gill, Deborah; Smith, Daron

    2017-12-11

    Medical simulators offer an invaluable educational resource for medical trainees. However, owing to cost and portability restrictions, they have traditionally been limited to simulation centres. With the advent of sophisticated mobile technology, simulators have become cheaper and more accessible. Touch Surgery is one such freely downloadable mobile application simulator (MAS) used by over one million healthcare professionals worldwide. Nevertheless, to date, it has never been formally validated as an adjunct in undergraduate medical education. Medical students in the final 3 years of their programme were recruited and randomised to one of three revision interventions: 1) no formal revision resources, 2) traditional revision resources, or 3) MAS. Students completed pre-test questionnaires and were then assessed on their ability to complete an undisclosed male urinary catheterisation scenario. Following a one-hour quarantined revision period, all students repeated the scenario. Both attempts were scored by allocation-blinded examiners against an objective 46-point mark scheme. A total of 27 medical students were randomised (n = 9 per group). Mean scores improved between baseline and post-revision attempts by 8.7% (p = 0.003), 19.8% (p = 0.0001), and 15.9% (p = 0.001) for no resources, traditional resources, and MAS, respectively. However, when comparing mean score improvements between groups there were no significant differences. Mobile simulators offer an unconventional, yet potentially useful adjunct to enhance undergraduate clinical skills education. Our results indicate that MAS's perform comparably to current gold-standard revision resources; however, they may confer significant advantages in terms of cost-effectiveness and practice flexibility. Not applicable.

  4. Investigating the clinical feasibility of an adapted early mobility readiness protocol for critical ill patients: A non-randomised experimental pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conradie, Elmarie; Fourie, Catharina E; Hanekom, Susan D

    2017-10-01

    Uncertainty exists whether a therapeutic early mobility position will affect the outcome of a critically ill patient. To evaluate the feasibility of an existing protocol to identify patients who would tolerate this position. A non-randomised experimental pilot trail was performed. Twice weekly, all patients nursed in surgical and respiratory units were screened with the protocol. Haemodynamic parameters, mean arterial pressure and central venous oxygen saturation of included patients were tested in the baseline position followed by the testing position at 0, 3 and 10minutes. We screened 138 patients. Eleven patients passed the protocol, male/female (9/2) with a median (range) age of 47 (20-67) years. Placement from the 10minutes baseline position to the 0min testing position resulted in a mean difference of the mean arterial pressure of 2.03 (95% Confidence interval -1.12 to 5.18), and the mean difference of central venous oxygen saturation was 0.79 (95% Confidence interval -3.15 to 4.74). One adverse event was noted. The protocol provides healthcare professionals with an interim tool to identify patients who would tolerate a therapeutic upright position. While the results question the clinical feasibility of protocol. The effect of incorporating a therapeutic early mobility position into standard nursing care, on patient outcome can now be investigated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Mobile learning in medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serkan Güllüoüǧlu, Sabri

    2013-03-01

    This paper outlines the main infrastructure for implicating mobile learning in medicine and present a sample mobile learning application for medical learning within the framework of mobile learning systems. Mobile technology is developing nowadays. In this case it will be useful to develop different learning environments using these innovations in internet based distance education. M-learning makes the most of being on location, providing immediate access, being connected, and acknowledges learning that occurs beyond formal learning settings, in places such as the workplace, home, and outdoors. Central to m-learning is the principle that it is the learner who is mobile rather than the device used to deliver m learning. The integration of mobile technologies into training has made learning more accessible and portable. Mobile technologies make it possible for a learner to have access to a computer and subsequently learning material and activities; at any time and in any place. Mobile devices can include: mobile phone, personal digital assistants (PDAs), personal digital media players (eg iPods, MP3 players), portable digital media players, portable digital multimedia players. Mobile learning (m-learning) is particularly important in medical education, and the major users of mobile devices are in the field of medicine. The contexts and environment in which learning occurs necessitates m-learning. Medical students are placed in hospital/clinical settings very early in training and require access to course information and to record and reflect on their experiences while on the move. As a result of this paper, this paper strives to compare and contrast mobile learning with normal learning in medicine from various perspectives and give insights and advises into the essential characteristics of both for sustaining medical education.

  6. RANS Modeling of Stably Stratified Turbulent Boundary Layer Flows in OpenFOAM®

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Jordan M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantifying mixing processes relating to the transport of heat, momentum, and scalar quantities of stably stratified turbulent geophysical flows remains a substantial task. In a stably stratified flow, such as the stable atmospheric boundary layer (SABL, buoyancy forces have a significant impact on the flow characteristics. This study investigates constant and stability-dependent turbulent Prandtl number (Prt formulations linking the turbulent viscosity (νt and diffusivity (κt for modeling applications of boundary layer flows. Numerical simulations of plane Couette flow and pressure-driven channel flow are performed using the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS framework with the standard k-ε turbulence model. Results are compared with DNS data to evaluate model efficacy for predicting mean velocity and density fields. In channel flow simulations, a Prandtl number formulation for wall-bounded flows is introduced to alleviate overmixing of the mean density field. This research reveals that appropriate specification of Prt can improve predictions of stably stratified turbulent boundary layer flows.

  7. Validation of the simpleFoam (RANS solver for the atmospheric boundary layer in complex terrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peralta C.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We validate the simpleFoam (RANS solver in OpenFOAM (version 2.1.1 for simulating neutral atmospheric boundary layer flows in complex terrain. Initial and boundary conditions are given using Richards and Hoxey proposal [1]. In order to obtain stable simulation of the ABL, modified wall functions are used to set the near-wall boundary conditions, following Blocken et al remedial measures [2]. A structured grid is generated with the new library terrainBlockMesher [3,4], based on OpenFOAM's blockMesh native mesher. The new tool is capable of adding orographic features and the forest canopy. Additionally, the mesh can be refined in regions with complex orography. We study both the classical benchmark case of Askervein hill [5] and the more recent Bolund island data set [6]. Our purpose is two-folded: to validate the performance of OpenFOAM steady state solvers, and the suitability of the new meshing tool to generate high quality structured meshes, which will be used in the future for performing more computationally intensive LES simulations in complex terrain.

  8. RANS SIMULATION OF HYDROFOIL EFFECTS ON HYDRODYNAMIC COEFFICIENTS OF A PLANING CATAMARAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Najafi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Determination of high-speed crafts’ hydrodynamic coefficients will help to analyze the dynamics of these kinds of vessels and the factors affecting their dynamic stabilities. Also, it can be useful and effective in controlling the vessel instabilities. The main purpose of this study is to determine the coefficients of longitudinal motions of a planing catamaran with and without a hydrofoil using RANS method to evaluate the foil effects on them. Determination of hydrodynamic coefficients by experimental approach is costly, and requires meticulous laboratory equipment; therefore, utilizing numerical methods and developing a virtual laboratory seems highly efficient. In the present study, the numerical results for hydrodynamic coefficients of a high-speed craft are verified against Troesch’s (1992 experimental results. In the following, after determination of hydrodynamic coefficients of a planing catamaran with and without foil, the foil effects on its hydrodynamic coefficients are evaluated. The results indicate that most of the coefficients are frequency independent especially at high frequencies.

  9. Aurora A phosphorylates MCAK to control ran-dependent spindle bipolarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Ems-McClung, Stephanie C; Walczak, Claire E

    2008-07-01

    During mitosis, mitotic centromere-associated kinesin (MCAK) localizes to chromatin/kinetochores, a cytoplasmic pool, and spindle poles. Its localization and activity in the chromatin region are regulated by Aurora B kinase; however, how the cytoplasmic- and pole-localized MCAK are regulated is currently not clear. In this study, we used Xenopus egg extracts to form spindles in the absence of chromatin and centrosomes and found that MCAK localization and activity are tightly regulated by Aurora A. This regulation is important to focus microtubules at aster centers and to facilitate the transition from asters to bipolar spindles. In particular, we found that MCAK colocalized with NuMA and XMAP215 at the center of Ran asters where its activity is regulated by Aurora A-dependent phosphorylation of S196, which contributes to proper pole focusing. In addition, we found that MCAK localization at spindle poles was regulated through another Aurora A phosphorylation site (S719), which positively enhances bipolar spindle formation. This is the first study that clearly defines a role for MCAK at the spindle poles as well as identifies another key Aurora A substrate that contributes to spindle bipolarity.

  10. Simulating wind and marine hydrokinetic turbines with actuator lines in RANS and LES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachant, Peter; Wosnik, Martin

    2015-11-01

    As wind and marine hydrokinetic (MHK) turbine designs mature, focus is shifting towards improving turbine array layouts for maximizing overall power output, i.e., minimizing wake interference for axial-flow or horizontal-axis turbines, or taking advantage of constructive wake interaction for cross-flow or vertical-axis turbines. Towards this goal, an actuator line model (ALM) was developed to provide a computationally feasible method for simulating full turbine arrays inside Navier-Stokes models. The ALM predicts turbine loading with the blade element method combined with sub-models for dynamic stall and flow curvature. The open-source software is written as an extension library for the OpenFOAM CFD package, which allows the ALM body force to be applied to their standard RANS and LES solvers. Turbine forcing is also applied to volume of fluid (VOF) models, e.g., for predicting free surface effects on submerged MHK devices. An additional sub-model is considered for injecting turbulence model scalar quantities based on actuator line element loading. Results are presented for the simulation of performance and wake dynamics of axial- and cross-flow turbines and compared with moderate Reynolds number experiments and body-fitted mesh, blade-resolving CFD. Work supported by NSF-CBET grant 1150797.

  11. Simulation of an Isolated Tiltrotor in Hover with an Unstructured Overset-Grid RANS Solver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Biedron, Robert T.

    2009-01-01

    An unstructured overset-grid Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) solver, FUN3D, is used to simulate an isolated tiltrotor in hover. An overview of the computational method is presented as well as the details of the overset-grid systems. Steady-state computations within a noninertial reference frame define the performance trends of the rotor across a range of the experimental collective settings. Results are presented to show the effects of off-body grid refinement and blade grid refinement. The computed performance and blade loading trends show good agreement with experimental results and previously published structured overset-grid computations. Off-body flow features indicate a significant improvement in the resolution of the first perpendicular blade vortex interaction with background grid refinement across the collective range. Considering experimental data uncertainty and effects of transition, the prediction of figure of merit on the baseline and refined grid is reasonable at the higher collective range- within 3 percent of the measured values. At the lower collective settings, the computed figure of merit is approximately 6 percent lower than the experimental data. A comparison of steady and unsteady results show that with temporal refinement, the dynamic results closely match the steady-state noninertial results which gives confidence in the accuracy of the dynamic overset-grid approach.

  12. Sialidosis type 1: cherry red spot-myoclonus syndrome with sialidase deficiency and altered electrophoretic mobilities of some enzymes known to be glycoproteins. 1. Clinical findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, P K; Abrams, J D; Swallow, D; Stewart, G

    1979-01-01

    A family is described with three affected brothers, two of whom were examined, born to consanguineous parent, who in early adult life began to experience ataxia, intention myoclonus, and progressive visual failure. The brothers examined had cherry red spots at the maculae and cataracts. They were of normal intelligence. The intention myoclonus responded partially to treatment with clonazepam and pheneturide, but not to 5-hydroxytryptophan in combination with carbidopa or to sodium valproate. Studies in one patient showed the excretion of large quantities of sialylated oligosaccharides in the urine. Both patients showed deficient sialidase activity in their cultured fibroblasts. Further studies on cultured skin fibroblasts revealed increased electrophoretic mobility of six glycoprotein enzymes that was returned approximately to normal by treatment with sialidase. The clinical and biochemical findings indicate that these patients are further cases of the newly described condition sialidosis type 1. Images PMID:512662

  13. Ras-Related Nuclear Protein Ran3B Gene Is Involved in Hormone Responses in the Embryogenic Callus of Dimocarpus longan Lour.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qilin Tian

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Ras-related guanosine triphosphate (GTP-binding nuclear protein (Ran GTPases function as molecular switches and regulate diverse cellular events in eukaryotes. Our previous work suggested that DlRan3B is active during longan (Dimocarpus longan Lour. somatic embryogenesis (SE processes. Herein, subcellular localization of DlRan3B was found to be localized in the nucleus and expression profiling of DlRan3B was performed during longan SE and after exposure to plant hormones (indoleacetic acid (IAA, gibberellin A3 (GA3, salicylic acid (SA, methyl jasmonte (MeJA, and abscisic acid (ABA. We cloned and sequenced 1569 bp of 5′-flanking sequence of DlRan3B (GenBank: JQ279697. Bioinformatic analysis indicated that the promoter contained plant hormone-related regulatory elements. Deletion analysis and responses to hormones identified stimulative and repressive regulatory elements in the DlRan3B promoter. The key elements included those responding to auxin, gibberellin, SA, MeJA, and ABA. DlRan3B was located in the nucleus and accumulated in the late stage of longan SE. The expression of DlRan3B was significantly induced by IAA, GA3, and ABA, but suppressed by SA and MeJA. Promoter transcription was induced by IAA and GA3, but suppressed by SA. Thus, DlRan3B might participate in auxin, gibberellin, and ABA responses during longan late SE, and DlRan3B is involved in phytohormone responsiveness.

  14. Joint mobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Deborah Gross; Walker, J Randy; Levine, David

    2005-11-01

    Therapeutic touch has been used in human beings to soothe aches and pains. Most dogs also seem to enjoy being touched. Manual therapy techniques are skilled hand movements intended to improve tissue extensibility; increase range of motion; induce relaxation; mobilize or manipulate soft tissue and joints; modulate pain; and reduce soft tissue swelling, inflammation, or restriction. The intent of this article is to provide an overview of the principles of manual therapy, followed by selected treatment techniques for the hip, stifle, elbow, shoulder, carpus.and thoracic and lumbar spine. The techniques of G.D. Maitland, an Australian physical therapist who developed a clinically based approach in the 1960s and 1970s, are emphasized.

  15. Clinical Implications of High-mobility Group Box-1 (HMGB1) and the Receptor for Advanced Glycation End-products (RAGE) in Cutaneous Malignancy: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Austin Huy; Detty, Shannon Q; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2017-01-01

    Inflammation and the immune system play a role in the development and progression of melanoma, basal cell carcinoma (BCC), and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). The pro-inflammatory and tumor-promoting effects of the high-mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) protein and the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) have been investigated in these cutaneous malignancies. The clinical implication of these molecules is not fully described. The National Library of Medicine database was searched for articles addressing the clinical relevance of HMGB1 and RAGE in melanoma, BCC, and SCC. This systematic review includes nine articles, with six summarizing RAGE in cutaneous malignancies and three involving HMGB1. RAGE has been found to be up-regulated in SCC lesions, as well as melanoma. Levels of RAGE were highest in stage IV melanomas. Lower levels of soluble RAGE have been associated with poor overall survival in melanoma. Sporadic extracellular expression of HMGB1 was evident in BCC and SCC lesions, which could be released by necrotic tumor cells. HMGB1 was found to be a prognostic marker in melanoma, and HMGB1 levels were elevated in patients who were non-responders to ipilimumab treatment. HMGB1 and RAGE could serve as potential prognostic markers or therapeutic targets in treating melanoma, BCC, and SCC, but further research regarding the clinical utility of the HMGB1-RAGE axis in cutaneous malignancies is warranted. Copyright© 2017 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  16. Clinic-Based Mobile Health Decision Support to Enhance Adult Epilepsy Self-Management: An Intervention Mapping Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shegog, Ross; Begley, Charles E

    2017-01-01

    Epilepsy is a neurological disorder involving recurrent seizures. It affects approximately 5 million people in the U.S. To optimize their quality of life people with epilepsy are encouraged to engage in self-management (S-M) behaviors. These include managing their treatment (e.g., adhering to anti-seizure medication and clinical visit schedules), managing their seizures (e.g., responding to seizure episodes), managing their safety (e.g., monitoring and avoiding environmental seizure triggers), and managing their co-morbid conditions (e.g., anxiety, depression). The clinic-based Management Information Decision Support Epilepsy Tool (MINDSET) is a decision-support system founded on theory and empirical evidence. It is designed to increase awareness by adult patients (≥18 years) and their health-care provider regarding the patient's epilepsy S-M behaviors, facilitate communication during the clinic visit to prioritize S-M goals and strategies commensurate with the patient's needs, and increase the patient's self-efficacy to achieve those goals. The purpose of this paper is to describe the application of intervention mapping (IM) to develop, implement, and formatively evaluate the clinic-based MINDSET prototype and in developing implementation and evaluation plans. Deliverables comprised a logic model of the problem (IM Step 1); matrices of program objectives (IM Step 2); a program planning document comprising scope, sequence, theory-based methods, and practical strategies (IM Step 3); a functional MINDSET program prototype (IM Step 4); plans for implementation (IM Step 5); and evaluation (IM Step 6). IM provided a logical and systematic approach to developing and evaluating clinic-based decision support toward epilepsy S-M.

  17. Clinic-Based Mobile Health Decision Support to Enhance Adult Epilepsy Self-Management: An Intervention Mapping Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross Shegog

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionEpilepsy is a neurological disorder involving recurrent seizures. It affects approximately 5 million people in the U.S. To optimize their quality of life people with epilepsy are encouraged to engage in self-management (S-M behaviors. These include managing their treatment (e.g., adhering to anti-seizure medication and clinical visit schedules, managing their seizures (e.g., responding to seizure episodes, managing their safety (e.g., monitoring and avoiding environmental seizure triggers, and managing their co-morbid conditions (e.g., anxiety, depression. The clinic-based Management Information Decision Support Epilepsy Tool (MINDSET is a decision-support system founded on theory and empirical evidence. It is designed to increase awareness by adult patients (≥18 years and their health-care provider regarding the patient’s epilepsy S-M behaviors, facilitate communication during the clinic visit to prioritize S-M goals and strategies commensurate with the patient’s needs, and increase the patient’s self-efficacy to achieve those goals.MethodsThe purpose of this paper is to describe the application of intervention mapping (IM to develop, implement, and formatively evaluate the clinic-based MINDSET prototype and in developing implementation and evaluation plans. Deliverables comprised a logic model of the problem (IM Step 1; matrices of program objectives (IM Step 2; a program planning document comprising scope, sequence, theory-based methods, and practical strategies (IM Step 3; a functional MINDSET program prototype (IM Step 4; plans for implementation (IM Step 5; and evaluation (IM Step 6. IM provided a logical and systematic approach to developing and evaluating clinic-based decision support toward epilepsy S-M.

  18. Controlled clinical trial of how mobile health applications affect blue-collar men’s physical health as well as thoughts and actions in relation to their own physical health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levisen, Vinie Diana Hvidbak; Castaño, Francisco Mansilla; Jensen, Camilla Skovbjerg

    2017-01-01

    Background: Blue collar men have both the lowest average life and longest patient delay, and currently no research has been conducted with mobile health applications as health promotion interventions for this target group. This study wants to contribute with knowledge about how mobile health...... applications affect the level of physical activity amongst blue collar men as well as the frequency of how often they think and do something for their own physical health. Methods: Controlled clinical trial, men, aged 19–62 years, working in industrial companies, who are assigned to an intervention group (n=35......) or a control group (n=35) are allocated based on mobile phone type/model. Baseline and effect measurement is carried out in both groups. Intervention period of 6 months in which the intervention group uses mobile applications that record the number of steps, and they receive a health-promoting text message...

  19. Mobile payment

    CERN Document Server

    Lerner, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Paying with mobile devices such as mobile phones or smart phones will expand worldwide in the coming years. This development provides opportunities for various industries (banking, telecommunications, credit card business, manufacturers, suppliers, retail) and for consumers.

  20. Mobile Lexicography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Køhler Simonsen, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Mobile phones are ubiquitous and have completely transformed the way we live, work, learn and conduct our everyday activities. Mobile phones have also changed the way users access lexicographic data. In fact, it can be argued that mobile phones and lexicography are not yet compatible. Modern users...... are already mobile – but lexicography is not yet fully ready for the mobile challenge, mobile users and mobile user situations. The article is based on empirical data from two surveys comprising 10 medical doctors, who were asked to look up five medical substances with the medical dictionary app Medicin...... and that lexicographic innovation is needed. A new type of users, new user situations and new access methods call for new lexicographic solutions, and this article proposes a six-pointed hexagram model, which can be used during dictionary app design to lexicographically calibrate the six dimensions in mobile...

  1. Mobility and quality of life after discharge from a clinical geriatric setting focused on gender and age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strupeit, Steve; Wolf-Ostermann, Karin; Buss, Arne; Dassen, Theo

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the long-term functional status and quality of life of older individuals with functional mobility impairment. A prospective longitudinal study was conducted. The study sample consisted of elderly patients who had been admitted to a rehabilitation facility in Hamburg, Germany. Data were collected from February 2008 to August 2009 in the rehabilitation center and the living environment of the participants after discharge. Quality of life was assessed using the WHO Quality of Life-BREF; activities of daily living were measured using the Barthel-Index (BI). Functional status and overall quality of life increased from admission (BI = 73.33) to 6 months postadmission (BI = 89.29) but decreased at 12 months postadmission (BI = 85.71). Quality of life significantly increased in the psychological domain from admission (57.85) to 6 months follow-up (67.85) (p = .010). Men showed a better functional status over time (p = .010) than women. Higher quality of life scores were associated with higher MMSE (p = .031) and self-efficacy scores (p = .019) at admission. The findings of this study suggest a need for interventions to improve functional status and quality of life in this population, especially following 6 months after discharge. Special interventions should address physical quality of life and physical functioning. Gender differences should be considered in planning and implementing programs. © 2013 Association of Rehabilitation Nurses.

  2. Mobile marketing

    OpenAIRE

    Klečková, Zuzana

    2013-01-01

    The main aim of this thesis was to provide a comprehensive overview of the mobile marketing and analyze selected campaigns of Czech mobile marketing in comparison to world successful campaigns. The research contained studying of available literature about the theme to gain general knowledge about the issue. The theoretical part of the thesis contains predominantly various definitions of mobile marketing and its tools, advantages of these tools and some information about Mobile Marketing Assoc...

  3. Bringing antiretroviral therapy (ART) closer to the end-user through mobile clinics and home-based ART: systematic review shows more evidence on the effectiveness and cost effectiveness is needed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mdege, Noreen Dadirai; Chindove, Stanley

    2014-01-01

    Home-based antiretroviral therapy (ART) and ART through mobile clinics can potentially increase access to ART for large numbers of people, including hard-to-reach populations. We reviewed literature on the effectiveness and cost implications of the home-based ART and mobile clinic ART models. We searched Medline, Embase, PsycInfo, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, Web of Knowledge and Current Controlled Trials Register for articles published up to March 2012. We included non-randomised and randomised controlled clinical trials that recruited HIV/AIDS positive adults with or without prior exposure to ART. Six studies were included in the review, with only four effectiveness studies (all evaluating home-based ART and none for mobile clinic ART) and four studies reporting on the cost implications. The evidence suggests home-based ART is as effective as health facility-based ART, including on clinical outcomes, viral load and CD4+ count. However, three of these studies were very small. Studies suggest health facility-based ART is the most cost-effective, followed by mobile-clinic ART, with home-based ART being the least cost-effective. Evidence on the effectiveness and cost implications of mobile clinic and home-based ART is currently limited. Although the few available studies suggest home-based ART can potentially be as effective as health facility-based ART, there is need for more research before robust conclusions can be made. Results from the few available studies also suggest that health facility-based ART is the most cost-effective. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Mobile Lexicography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Køhler Simonsen, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Users are already mobile, but the question is to which extent knowledge-based dictionary apps are designed for the mobile user situation. The objective of this article is to analyse the characteristics of the mobile user situation and to look further into the stationary user situation...

  5. Staging Mobilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.

    and lived as people are “staging themselves” (from below). Staging mobilities is a dynamic process between “being staged” (for example, being stopped at traffic lights) and the “mobile staging” of interacting individuals (negotiating a passage on the pavement). Staging Mobilities is about the fact...

  6. Mobile computing for radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auffermann, William F; Chetlen, Alison L; Sharma, Arjun; Colucci, Andrew T; DeQuesada, Ivan M; Grajo, Joseph R; Kung, Justin W; Loehfelm, Thomas W; Sherry, Steven J

    2013-12-01

    The rapid advances in mobile computing technology have the potential to change the way radiology and medicine as a whole are practiced. Several mobile computing advances have not yet found application to the practice of radiology, while others have already been applied to radiology but are not in widespread clinical use. This review addresses several areas where radiology and medicine in general may benefit from adoption of the latest mobile computing technologies and speculates on potential future applications. Copyright © 2013 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Antisense expression of an Arabidopsis ran binding protein renders transgenic roots hypersensitive to auxin and alters auxin-induced root growth and development by arresting mitotic progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S. H.; Arnold, D.; Lloyd, A.; Roux, S. J.

    2001-01-01

    We cloned a cDNA encoding an Arabidopsis Ran binding protein, AtRanBP1c, and generated transgenic Arabidopsis expressing the antisense strand of the AtRanBP1c gene to understand the in vivo functions of the Ran/RanBP signal pathway. The transgenic plants showed enhanced primary root growth but suppressed growth of lateral roots. Auxin significantly increased lateral root initiation and inhibited primary root growth in the transformants at 10 pM, several orders of magnitude lower than required to induce these responses in wild-type roots. This induction was followed by a blockage of mitosis in both newly emerged lateral roots and in the primary root, ultimately resulting in the selective death of cells in the tips of both lateral and primary roots. Given the established role of Ran binding proteins in the transport of proteins into the nucleus, these findings are consistent with a model in which AtRanBP1c plays a key role in the nuclear delivery of proteins that suppress auxin action and that regulate mitotic progress in root tips.

  8. The cyst nematode SPRYSEC protein RBP-1 elicits Gpa2- and RanGAP2-dependent plant cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Ann Sacco

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Plant NB-LRR proteins confer robust protection against microbes and metazoan parasites by recognizing pathogen-derived avirulence (Avr proteins that are delivered to the host cytoplasm. Microbial Avr proteins usually function as virulence factors in compatible interactions; however, little is known about the types of metazoan proteins recognized by NB-LRR proteins and their relationship with virulence. In this report, we demonstrate that the secreted protein RBP-1 from the potato cyst nematode Globodera pallida elicits defense responses, including cell death typical of a hypersensitive response (HR, through the NB-LRR protein Gpa2. Gp-Rbp-1 variants from G. pallida populations both virulent and avirulent to Gpa2 demonstrated a high degree of polymorphism, with positive selection detected at numerous sites. All Gp-RBP-1 protein variants from an avirulent population were recognized by Gpa2, whereas virulent populations possessed Gp-RBP-1 protein variants both recognized and non-recognized by Gpa2. Recognition of Gp-RBP-1 by Gpa2 correlated to a single amino acid polymorphism at position 187 in the Gp-RBP-1 SPRY domain. Gp-RBP-1 expressed from Potato virus X elicited Gpa2-mediated defenses that required Ran GTPase-activating protein 2 (RanGAP2, a protein known to interact with the Gpa2 N terminus. Tethering RanGAP2 and Gp-RBP-1 variants via fusion proteins resulted in an enhancement of Gpa2-mediated responses. However, activation of Gpa2 was still dependent on the recognition specificity conferred by amino acid 187 and the Gpa2 LRR domain. These results suggest a two-tiered process wherein RanGAP2 mediates an initial interaction with pathogen-delivered Gp-RBP-1 proteins but where the Gpa2 LRR determines which of these interactions will be productive.

  9. Mobile Probes in Mobile Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørngreen, Rikke; Blomhøj, Ulla; Duvaa, Uffe

    In this paper experiences from using mobile probes in educational design of a mobile learning application is presented. The probing process stems from the cultural probe method, and was influenced by qualitative interview and inquiry approaches. In the project, the mobile phone was not only acting...... as an agent for acquiring empirical data (as the situation in hitherto mobile probe settings) but was also the technological medium for which data should say something about (mobile learning). Consequently, not only the content of the data but also the ways in which data was delivered and handled, provided...... a valuable dimension for investigating mobile use. The data was collected at the same time as design activities took place and the collective data was analysed based on user experience goals and cognitive processes from interaction design and mobile learning. The mobile probe increased the knowledge base...

  10. Mobile phone reminders and peer counseling improve adherence and treatment outcomes of patients on ART in Malaysia: A randomized clinical trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surajudeen Abiola Abdulrahman

    Full Text Available Adherence to treatment remains the cornerstone of long term viral suppression and successful treatment outcomes among patients receiving Antiretroviral Therapy (ART.Evaluate the effectiveness of mobile phone reminders and peer counseling in improving adherence and treatment outcomes among HIV positive patients on ART in Malaysia.A single-blind, parallel group RCT conducted in Hospital Sungai Buloh, Malaysia in which 242 adult Malaysian patients were randomized to intervention or control groups. Intervention consisted of a reminder module delivered through SMS and telephone call reminders by trained research assistants for 24 consecutive weeks (starting from date of ART initiation, in addition to adherence counseling at every clinic visit. The length of intended follow up for each patient was 6 months. Data on adherence behavior of patients was collected using specialized, pre-validated Adult AIDS Clinical Trial Group (AACTG adherence questionnaires. Data on weight, clinical symptoms, CD4 count and viral load tests were also collected. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 22 and R software. Repeated measures ANOVA, Friedman's ANOVA and Multivariate regression models were used to evaluate efficacy of the intervention.The response rate after 6 months follow up was 93%. There were no significant differences at baseline in gender, employment status, income distribution and residential location of respondents between the intervention and control group. After 6 months follow up, the mean adherence was significantly higher in the intervention group (95.7; 95% CI: 94.39-96.97 as compared to the control group (87.5; 95% CI: 86.14-88.81. The proportion of respondents who had Good (>95% adherence was significantly higher in the intervention group (92.2% compared to the control group (54.6%. A significantly lower frequency in missed appointments (14.0% vs 35.5% (p = 0.001, lower viral load (p = 0.001, higher rise in CD4 count (p = 0.017, lower incidence of

  11. The challenges and opportunities of conducting a clinical trial in a low resource setting: The case of the Cameroon mobile phone SMS (CAMPS trial, an investigator initiated trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ongolo-Zogo Pierre

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Conducting clinical trials in developing countries often presents significant ethical, organisational, cultural and infrastructural challenges to researchers, pharmaceutical companies, sponsors and regulatory bodies. Globally, these regions are under-represented in research, yet this population stands to gain more from research in these settings as the burdens on health are greater than those in developed resourceful countries. However, developing countries also offer an attractive setting for clinical trials because they often have larger treatment naive populations with higher incidence rates of disease and more advanced stages. These factors can present a reduction in costs and time required to recruit patients. So, balance needs to be found where research can be encouraged and supported in order to bring maximum public health benefits to these communities. The difficulties with such trials arise from problems with obtaining valid informed consent, ethical compensation mechanisms for extremely poor populations, poor health infrastructure and considerable socio-economic and cultural divides. Ethical concerns with trials in developing countries have received attention, even though many other non-ethical issues may arise. Local investigator initiated trials also face a variety of difficulties that have not been adequately reported in literature. This paper uses the example of the Cameroon Mobile Phone SMS trial to describe in detail, the specific difficulties encountered in an investigator-initiated trial in a developing country. It highlights administrative, ethical, financial and staff related issues, proposes solutions and gives a list of additional documentation to ease the organisational process.

  12. A Priori Analysis of a Compressible Flamelet Model using RANS Data for a Dual-Mode Scramjet Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinlan, Jesse R.; Drozda, Tomasz G.; McDaniel, James C.; Lacaze, Guilhem; Oefelein, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    In an effort to make large eddy simulation of hydrocarbon-fueled scramjet combustors more computationally accessible using realistic chemical reaction mechanisms, a compressible flamelet/progress variable (FPV) model was proposed that extends current FPV model formulations to high-speed, compressible flows. Development of this model relied on observations garnered from an a priori analysis of the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) data obtained for the Hypersonic International Flight Research and Experimentation (HI-FiRE) dual-mode scramjet combustor. The RANS data were obtained using a reduced chemical mechanism for the combustion of a JP-7 surrogate and were validated using avail- able experimental data. These RANS data were then post-processed to obtain, in an a priori fashion, the scalar fields corresponding to an FPV-based modeling approach. In the current work, in addition to the proposed compressible flamelet model, a standard incompressible FPV model was also considered. Several candidate progress variables were investigated for their ability to recover static temperature and major and minor product species. The effects of pressure and temperature on the tabulated progress variable source term were characterized, and model coupling terms embedded in the Reynolds- averaged Navier-Stokes equations were studied. Finally, results for the novel compressible flamelet/progress variable model were presented to demonstrate the improvement attained by modeling the effects of pressure and flamelet boundary conditions on the combustion.

  13. Critical role of RanBP2-mediated SUMOylation of Small Heterodimer Partner in maintaining bile acid homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Hyun; Kwon, Sanghoon; Byun, Sangwon; Xiao, Zhen; Park, Sean; Wu, Shwu-Yuan; Chiang, Cheng-Ming; Kemper, Byron; Kemper, Jongsook Kim

    2016-01-01

    Bile acids (BAs) are recently recognized signalling molecules that profoundly affect metabolism. Because of detergent-like toxicity, BA levels must be tightly regulated. An orphan nuclear receptor, Small Heterodimer Partner (SHP), plays a key role in this regulation, but how SHP senses the BA signal for feedback transcriptional responses is not clearly understood. We show an unexpected function of a nucleoporin, RanBP2, in maintaining BA homoeostasis through SUMOylation of SHP. Upon BA signalling, RanBP2 co-localizes with SHP at the nuclear envelope region and mediates SUMO2 modification at K68, which facilitates nuclear transport of SHP and its interaction with repressive histone modifiers to inhibit BA synthetic genes. Mice expressing a SUMO-defective K68R SHP mutant have increased liver BA levels, and upon BA- or drug-induced biliary insults, these mice exhibit exacerbated cholestatic pathologies. These results demonstrate a function of RanBP2-mediated SUMOylation of SHP in maintaining BA homoeostasis and protecting from the BA hepatotoxicity. PMID:27412403

  14. Feasibility of the "Bring Your Own Device" Model in Clinical Research: Results from a Randomized Controlled Pilot Study of a Mobile Patient Engagement Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugliese, Laura; Woodriff, Molly; Crowley, Olga; Lam, Vivian; Sohn, Jeremy; Bradley, Scott

    2016-03-16

    Rising rates of smartphone ownership highlight opportunities for improved mobile application usage in clinical trials. While current methods call for device provisioning, the "bring your own device" (BYOD) model permits participants to use personal phones allowing for improved patient engagement and lowered operational costs. However, more evidence is needed to demonstrate the BYOD model's feasibility in research settings. To assess if CentrosHealth, a mobile application designed to support trial compliance, produces different outcomes in medication adherence and application engagement when distributed through study-provisioned devices compared to the BYOD model. 87 participants were randomly selected to use the mobile application or no intervention for a 28-day pilot study at a 2:1 randomization ratio (2 intervention: 1 control) and asked to consume a twice-daily probiotic supplement. The application users were further randomized into two groups: receiving the application on a personal "BYOD" or study-provided smartphone. In-depth interviews were performed in a randomly-selected subset of the intervention group (five BYOD and five study-provided smartphone users). The BYOD subgroup showed significantly greater engagement than study-provided phone users, as shown by higher application use frequency and duration over the study period. The BYOD subgroup also demonstrated a significant effect of engagement on medication adherence for number of application sessions (unstandardized regression coefficient beta=0.0006, p=0.02) and time spent therein (beta=0.00001, p=0.03). Study-provided phone users showed higher initial adherence rates, but greater decline (5.7%) than BYOD users (0.9%) over the study period. In-depth interviews revealed that participants preferred the BYOD model over using study-provided devices. Results indicate that the BYOD model is feasible in health research settings and improves participant experience, calling for further BYOD model validity

  15. Feasibility of the “Bring Your Own Device” Model in Clinical Research: Results from a Randomized Controlled Pilot Study of a Mobile Patient Engagement Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugliese, Laura; Woodriff, Molly; Crowley, Olga; Sohn, Jeremy; Bradley, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Background Rising rates of smartphone ownership highlight opportunities for improved mobile application usage in clinical trials. While current methods call for device provisioning, the "bring your own device” (BYOD) model permits participants to use personal phones allowing for improved patient engagement and lowered operational costs. However, more evidence is needed to demonstrate the BYOD model’s feasibility in research settings. Objective To assess if CentrosHealth, a mobile application designed to support trial compliance, produces different outcomes in medication adherence and application engagement when distributed through study-provisioned devices compared to the BYOD model. Methods 87 participants were randomly selected to use the mobile application or no intervention for a 28-day pilot study at a 2:1 randomization ratio (2 intervention: 1 control) and asked to consume a twice-daily probiotic supplement. The application users were further randomized into two groups: receiving the application on a personal "BYOD” or study-provided smartphone. In-depth interviews were performed in a randomly-selected subset of the intervention group (five BYOD and five study-provided smartphone users). Results The BYOD subgroup showed significantly greater engagement than study-provided phone users, as shown by higher application use frequency and duration over the study period. The BYOD subgroup also demonstrated a significant effect of engagement on medication adherence for number of application sessions (unstandardized regression coefficient beta=0.0006, p=0.02) and time spent therein (beta=0.00001, p=0.03). Study-provided phone users showed higher initial adherence rates, but greater decline (5.7%) than BYOD users (0.9%) over the study period. In-depth interviews revealed that participants preferred the BYOD model over using study-provided devices.  Conclusions Results indicate that the BYOD model is feasible in health research settings and improves participant

  16. Enhancing LTE with Cloud-RAN and Load-Controlled Parasitic Antenna Arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Artuso, Matteo; Boviz, Dora; Checko, Aleksandra

    2016-01-01

    Cloud radio access network systems, consisting of remote radio heads densely distributed in a coverage area and connected by optical fibers to a cloud infrastructure with large computational capabilities, have the potential to meet the ambitious objectives of next generation mobile networks. Actu...

  17. MicroRNA-1301-Mediated RanGAP1 Downregulation Induces BCR-ABL Nuclear Entrapment to Enhance Imatinib Efficacy in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tsung-Yao; Chen, Ku-Chung; Liu, Hsing-Jin Eugene; Liu, Ann-Jeng; Wang, Kun-Li; Shih, Chwen-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a myeloproliferative disease. Imatinib (IM), the first line treatment for CML, is excessively expensive and induces various side effects in CML patients. Therefore, it is essential to investigate a new strategy for improving CML therapy. Our immunoblot data revealed that RanGTPase activating protein 1 (RanGAP1) protein levels increased by approximately 30-fold in K562 cells compared with those in normal cells. RanGAP1 is one of the important components of RanGTPase system, which regulates the export of nuclear protein. However, whether RanGAP1 level variation influences BCR-ABL nuclear export is still unknown. In this report, using shRNA to downregulate RanGAP1 expression level augmented K562 cell apoptosis by approximately 40% after treatment with 250 nM IM. Immunofluorescence assay also indicated that three-fold of nuclear BCR-ABL was detected. These data suggest that BCR-ABL nuclear entrapment induced by RanGAP1 downregulation can be used to improve IM efficacy. Moreover, our qRT-PCR data indicated a trend of inverse correlation between the RanGAP1 and microRNA (miR)-1301 levels in CML patients. MiR-1301, targeting the RanGAP1 3' untranslated region, decreased by approximately 100-fold in K562 cells compared with that in normal cells. RanGAP1 downregulation by miR-1301 transfection impairs BCR-ABL nuclear export to increase approximately 60% of cell death after treatment of 250 nM IM. This result was almost the same as treatment with 1000 nM IM alone. Furthermore, immunofluorescence assay demonstrated that Tyr-99 of nuclear P73 was phosphorylated accompanied with nuclear entrapment of BCR-ABL after transfection with RanGAP1 shRNA or miR-1301 in IM-treated K562 cells. Altogether, we demonstrated that RanGAP1 downregulation can mediate BCR-ABL nuclear entrapment to activate P73-dependent apoptosis pathway which is a novel strategy for improving current IM treatment for CML.

  18. Mobile health and patient engagement in the safety net: a survey of community health centers and clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broderick, Andrew; Haque, Farshid

    2015-05-01

    Patient-centered technologies have emerged as a way to actively engage patients in care. The reach and potential of cell phones to engage diverse patient populations is great. Evidence of their effectiveness in improving health-related outcomes is limited. Researchers conducted an online survey of community health centers and clinics to assess if and how health care providers in the safety net use cell phones to support patient engagement. The findings indicate that the use of cell phones in patient care is at an early stage of deployment across the safety net. Organizations identify chronic disease management as an area where cell phones offer considerable potential to effectively engage patients. To promote widespread adoption and use, technical assistance to support the implementation and management of interventions, evidence-based or best practice models that highlight successful implementation strategies in care delivery, and the introduction of new payment or reimbursement policies will be essential.

  19. Use of a Novel Artificial Intelligence Platform on Mobile Devices to Assess Dosing Compliance in a Phase 2 Clinical Trial in Subjects With Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Earle E; Shafner, Laura; Walling, David P; Othman, Ahmed A; Chuang-Stein, Christy; Hinkle, John; Hanina, Adam

    2017-02-21

    Accurately monitoring and collecting drug adherence data can allow for better understanding and interpretation of the outcomes of clinical trials. Most clinical trials use a combination of pill counts and self-reported data to measure drug adherence, despite the drawbacks of relying on these types of indirect measures. It is assumed that doses are taken, but the exact timing of these events is often incomplete and imprecise. The objective of this pilot study was to evaluate the use of a novel artificial intelligence (AI) platform (AiCure) on mobile devices for measuring medication adherence, compared with modified directly observed therapy (mDOT) in a substudy of a Phase 2 trial of the α7 nicotinic receptor agonist (ABT-126) in subjects with schizophrenia. AI platform generated adherence measures were compared with adherence inferred from drug concentration measurements. The mean cumulative pharmacokinetic adherence over 24 weeks was 89.7% (standard deviation [SD] 24.92) for subjects receiving ABT-126 who were monitored using the AI platform, compared with 71.9% (SD 39.81) for subjects receiving ABT-126 who were monitored by mDOT. The difference was 17.9% (95% CI -2 to 37.7; P=.08). Using drug levels, this substudy demonstrates the potential of AI platforms to increase adherence, rapidly detect nonadherence, and predict future nonadherence. Subjects monitored using the AI platform demonstrated a percentage change in adherence of 25% over the mDOT group. Subjects were able to use the technology successfully for up to 6 months in an ambulatory setting with early termination rates that are comparable to subjects outside of the substudy. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01655680 https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01655680?term=NCT01655680.

  20. Prevalence and genetic diversity of arginine catabolic mobile element (ACME) in clinical isolates of coagulase-negative staphylococci: identification of ACME type I variants in Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishi, Mayumi; Urushibara, Noriko; Kawaguchiya, Mitsuyo; Ghosh, Souvik; Shinagawa, Masaaki; Watanabe, Naoki; Kobayashi, Nobumichi

    2013-12-01

    Arginine catabolic mobile element (ACME), a genomic island consisting of the arc and/or opp3 gene clusters found in staphylococcal species, is related to increased bacterial adaptability to hosts. Staphylococcus epidermidis is considered a major ACME reservoir; however, prevalence and genetic diversity of ACME in coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) have not yet been well characterized for clinical isolates in Japan. A total of 271 clinical isolates of CNS in a Japanese hospital were investigated for the presence and genotype of ACME and SCCmec. The prevalence of ACME-arcA was significantly higher (pepidermidis (45.8%) than in other CNS species (3.7%). ACME in S. epidermidis isolates (n=87) were differentiated into type I (n=33), variant forms of type I (ΔI, n=26) newly identified in this study, type II (n=6), and type ΔII (n=19). ACME-type ΔI, which were further classified into three subtypes, lacked some genetic components between the arc and opp3 clusters in archetypal type I, whereas the arc and opp3 clusters were intact. The arc cluster exhibited high sequence identity (95.8-100%) to that of type I ACME; in contrast, the opp3 cluster was highly diverse, and showed relatively lower identities (94.8-98.7%) to the identical regions in type I ACME. Twenty-one isolates of ΔI ACME-carrying S. epidermidis possessed SCCmec IVa and belonged to ST5 (clonal complex 2). Phylogenetic analysis revealed that isolates harboring ACME ΔI in this study clustered with previously reported S. epidermidis strains with other lineges, suggesting that S. epidermidis originally had some genetic variations in the opp3 cluster. In summary, ACME type ΔI, a truncated variant of ACME-I, was first identified in S. epidermidis, and revealed to be prevalent in ST5 MRSE clinical isolates with SCCmec IVa. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Mobilities Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.; Lanng, Ditte Bendix

    Contemporary society is marked and defined by the ways in which mobile goods, bodies, vehicles, objects, and data are organized, moved and staged. On the background of the ‘mobilities turn’ (e.g. Cresswell 2006, Urry 2007) this book articulates a new and emerging research field, namely that of ‘m......Contemporary society is marked and defined by the ways in which mobile goods, bodies, vehicles, objects, and data are organized, moved and staged. On the background of the ‘mobilities turn’ (e.g. Cresswell 2006, Urry 2007) this book articulates a new and emerging research field, namely...... that of ‘mobilities design’. The book revolves around the following research question: How are design decisions and interventions staging mobilities? It builds upon the Staging Mobilities model (Jensen 2013) in an explorative inquiry into the problems and potentials of the design of mobilities. The exchange value...... between mobilities and design research is twofold. To mobilities research this means getting closer to the ‘material’, and to engage in the creative, explorative and experimental approaches of the design world which offer new potentials for innovative research. Design research, on the other hand, might...

  2. Homophily and the Speed of Social Mobilization: The Effect of Acquired and Ascribed Traits

    CERN Document Server

    Alstott, Jeff; Velu, Chander

    2014-01-01

    Large-scale mobilization of individuals across social networks is becoming increasingly prevalent in society. However, little is known about what affects the speed of social mobilization. Here we use a framed field experiment to identify and measure properties of individuals and their relationships that predict mobilization speed. We ran a global social mobilization contest and recorded personal traits of the participants and those they recruited. We studied the effects of ascribed traits (gender, age) and acquired traits (geography, and information source) on the speed of mobilization. We found that homophily, a preference for interacting with other individuals with similar traits, had a mixed role in social mobilization. Homophily was present for acquired traits, in which mobilization speed was faster when the recuiter and recruit had the same trait compared to different traits. In contrast, we did not find support for homophily for the ascribed traits. Instead, those traits had other, non-homophily effects...

  3. New Algorithm for Managing Childhood Illness Using Mobile Technology (ALMANACH: A Controlled Non-Inferiority Study on Clinical Outcome and Antibiotic Use in Tanzania.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amani Flexson Shao

    Full Text Available The decline of malaria and scale-up of rapid diagnostic tests calls for a revision of IMCI. A new algorithm (ALMANACH running on mobile technology was developed based on the latest evidence. The objective was to ensure that ALMANACH was safe, while keeping a low rate of antibiotic prescription.Consecutive children aged 2-59 months with acute illness were managed using ALMANACH (2 intervention facilities, or standard practice (2 control facilities in Tanzania. Primary outcomes were proportion of children cured at day 7 and who received antibiotics on day 0.130/842 (15∙4% in ALMANACH and 241/623 (38∙7% in control arm were diagnosed with an infection in need for antibiotic, while 3∙8% and 9∙6% had malaria. 815/838 (97∙3%;96∙1-98.4% were cured at D7 using ALMANACH versus 573/623 (92∙0%;89∙8-94∙1% using standard practice (p<0∙001. Of 23 children not cured at D7 using ALMANACH, 44% had skin problems, 30% pneumonia, 26% upper respiratory infection and 13% likely viral infection at D0. Secondary hospitalization occurred for one child using ALMANACH and one who eventually died using standard practice. At D0, antibiotics were prescribed to 15∙4% (12∙9-17∙9% using ALMANACH versus 84∙3% (81∙4-87∙1% using standard practice (p<0∙001. 2∙3% (1∙3-3.3 versus 3∙2% (1∙8-4∙6% received an antibiotic secondarily.Management of children using ALMANACH improve clinical outcome and reduce antibiotic prescription by 80%. This was achieved through more accurate diagnoses and hence better identification of children in need of antibiotic treatment or not. The building on mobile technology allows easy access and rapid update of the decision chart.Pan African Clinical Trials Registry PACTR201011000262218.

  4. Mobilities Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.; Lanng, Ditte Bendix

    2016-01-01

    of increasing concern and societal importance, regardless if the focus is on new inequalities, environmental sustainability, or the meaning of vernacular mobilities design to the everyday life. The theme of ‘mobilities design’ opens up the agenda of architectural research into infrastructure spaces as ‘spaces...... of the perspective in the direction of a material and design oriented turn. In order to fulfill this purpose we articulate a new and emerging research field, namely that of ‘mobilities design’. In our understanding time has come to articulate ‘Mobilities Design’ as a dedicated research field in and of its own....... There is a need for research targeting the material, physical and design-oriented dimensions of the multiple mobilities from the local to the global. Despite its cross-disciplinary identity the ‘mobilities turn’ has not sufficiently capitalized from the potential in exploring issues of material design...

  5. Mobility Divides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.

    Contemporary mobilities are cultural and social manifestations, and the mobile practices in the everyday life of billions of humans are re-configuring senses of place, self, other and relationships to the built environment. The way ‘mobile situations’ are staged in designed and built environments......’ in the everyday life and cast light on how design and ‘materialities of mobilites’ are creating differential mobilities across societies, social networks, and communities of practices....... are increasingly becoming ‘second nature’ but also expressions of power, exclusion, and difference. In this talk I will be applying a perspective of ‘mobile situationism’ illustrating how mobile everyday life practices are staged ‘from above’ in planning and policy frameworks, design codes and architectural...

  6. Mobilities Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.; Lanng, Ditte Bendix; Wind, Simon

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we identify the nexus between design (architecture, urban design, service design, etc.) and mobilities as a new and emerging research field. In this paper, we apply a “situational mobilities” perspective and take point of departure in the pragmatist question: “What design decisions...... and interventions affords this particular mobile situation?” The paper presents the contours of an emerging research agenda within mobilities research. The advent of “mobilities design” as an emerging research field points towards a critical interest in the material as well as practical consequences of contemporary......-making. The paper proposes that increased understanding of the material affordances facilitated through design provides important insight to planning and policymaking that at times might be in risk of becoming too detached from the everyday life of the mobile subject within contemporary mobilities landscapes....

  7. Mobilities Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lanng, Ditte Bendix; Wind, Simon; Jensen, Ole B.

    2017-01-01

    is a relevant field of knowledge for urban design, because of its focus on a nuanced conceptualization of the daily journeys that we all undertake in mobilities spaces. Second, the mobilities turn aids a theoretical “mobilization” of the design of mobilities spaces with a point of departure in a fused theory...... field with particular attention to actor-network theory (ANT), which offers tools to understand the embeddedness of mobilities spaces in hybrid and dynamic relationships. Through these linkages between the mobilities turn and urban design, the article suggests a pathway for a carefully radical...... for urban designers and architects to address mobilities spaces in relation not only to technical demands, but also to the wide host of social, cultural, political, economic, and affective formations in which they are embedded and which they influence....

  8. Mobility Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardram, Jakob Eyvind; Bossen, Claus

    2005-01-01

    We posit the concept of Mobility Work to describe efforts of moving about people and things as part of accomplishing tasks. Mobility work can be seen as a spatial parallel to the concept of articulation work proposed by the sociologist Anselm Strauss. Articulation work describes efforts...... of coordination necessary in cooperative work, but focuses, we argue, mainly on the temporal aspects of cooperative work. As a supplement, the concept of mobility work focuses on the spatial aspects of cooperative work. Whereas actors seek to diminish the amount of articulation work needed in collaboration...... by constructing Standard Operation Procedures (SOPs), actors minimise mobility work by constructing Standard Operation Configurations (SOCs). We apply the concept of mobility work to the ethnography of hospital work, and argue that mobility arises because of the need to get access to people, places, knowledge and...

  9. Nuclear-Cytoplasmic Trafficking of NTF2, the Nuclear Import Receptor for the RanGTPase, Is Subjected to Regulation: e42501

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shawn C Chafe; Jacqueline B Pierce; Dev Mangroo

    2012-01-01

    .... Treatment of mammalian cells with polysorbitan monolaurate was found to inhibit nuclear export of tRNA and proteins, which are processes dependent on RanGTP in the nucleus, but not nuclear import...

  10. Mobile Semiotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.

    2013-01-01

    is a ‘mobile sense making’ where signs and materially situated meanings connect to the moving human body and thus create particular challenges and complexities of making sense of the world. The chapter includes notions of mobility systems and socio-technical networks in order to show how a ‘semiotic layer’ may......This chapter aims to understand the mobile condition of contemporary life with a particular view to the signifying dimension of the environment and its ‘readability’. The chapter explores the potentials of semiotics and its relationship to the new mobilities literature. What takes place...

  11. RanBP9 overexpression down-regulates phospho-cofilin, causes early synaptic deficits and impaired learning, and accelerates accumulation of amyloid plaques in the mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palavicini, Juan Pablo; Wang, Hongjie; Minond, Dmitriy; Bianchi, Elisabetta; Xu, Shaohua; Lakshmana, Madepalli K

    2014-01-01

    Loss of synaptic proteins and functional synapses in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) as well as transgenic mouse models expressing amyloid-β protein precursor is now well established. However, the earliest age at which such loss of synapses occurs, and whether known markers of AD progression accelerate functional deficits is completely unknown. We previously showed that RanBP9 overexpression leads to enhanced amyloid plaque burden in a mouse model of AD. In this study, we found significant reductions in the levels of synaptophysin and spinophilin, compared with wild-type controls, in both the cortex and the hippocampus of 5- and 6-month old but not 3- or 4-month old APΔE9/RanBP9 triple transgenic mice, and not in APΔE9 double transgenic mice, nor in RanBP9 single transgenic mice. Interestingly, amyloid plaque burden was also increased in the APΔE9/RanBP9 mice at 5-6 months. Consistent with these results, we found significant deficits in learning and memory in the APΔE9/RanBP9 mice at 5 and 6 month. These data suggest that increased amyloid plaques and accelerated learning and memory deficits and loss of synaptic proteins induced by RanBP9 are correlated. Most importantly, APΔE9/RanBP9 mice also showed significantly reduced levels of the phosphorylated form of cofilin in the hippocampus. Taken together these data suggest that RanBP9 overexpression down-regulates cofilin, causes early synaptic deficits and impaired learning, and accelerates accumulation of amyloid plaques in the mouse brain.

  12. Nutritional status of children after a food-supplementation program integrated with routine health care through mobile clinics in migrant communities in the Dominican Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Kavita; Marein-Efron, Gabriela; Huang, Shirley; O'Hare, Geraldine; Finalle, Rodney; Shah, Samir S

    2010-09-01

    The objective of this study was to compare acute and chronic undernutrition rates before and after the introduction of a food-supplementation program as an adjunct to routine health care for children of migrant workers in the Dominican Republic. The cross-sectional study was conducted in five rural communities in the Dominican Republic. Children 18 years and younger were eligible if they received routine health care from local mobile clinics. Data were obtained before (2005) and after (2006) initiation of a food-supplementation program. chi(2) or Fisher exact tests were used for analysis. Among 175 children in 2005, 52% were female, and 59% were supplementation program. Rates of chronic undernutrition decreased from 33% to 18% after the initiation of the food-supplementation program (P = 0.003). Food supplementation in the context of routine health-care visits improved the nutritional status of children, and it warrants further exploration as a way to reduce childhood undernutrition in resource-scarce areas.

  13. Designing and Developing a Mobile Smartphone Application for Women with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus Followed-Up at Diabetes Outpatient Clinics in Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Maria Garnweidner-Holme

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM is increasing worldwide. Controlling blood sugar levels is fundamental to the management of GDM. Current practice in Norway includes patients registering blood sugar levels in a booklet and receiving verbal and/or written health information. A smartphone application may provide patients individually targeted and easily available advice to control blood sugar levels. The aim of this paper is to document the process of designing and developing a smartphone application (the Pregnant+ app that automatically transfers blood sugar levels from the glucometer and has information about healthy eating and physical activity. This formative research included expert-group discussions among health professionals, researchers and experts in data privacy and security. User-involvement studies were conducted to discuss prototypes of the app. Results indicated that the content of the application should be easy to understand given the varying degree of patients’ literacy and in line with the information they receive at clinics. The final version of the app incorporated behavior change techniques such as self-monitoring and cues to action. Results from the first round of interactions show the importance of involving expert groups and patients when developing a mobile health-care device.

  14. Immediate Effects of Mobilization With Movement vs Sham Technique on Range of Motion, Strength, and Function in Patients With Shoulder Impingement Syndrome: Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, João Flávio; Salvini, Tania Fátima; Siqueira, Aristides Leite; Ribeiro, Ivana Leão; Camargo, Paula Rezende; Alburquerque-Sendín, Francisco

    The purpose of this study was to compare the immediate effects of mobilization with movement (MWM) with sham technique on range of motion (ROM), muscle strength, and function in patients with shoulder impingement syndrome. A randomized clinical study was performed. Participants (mean age ± standard deviation, 31 ± 8 years; 56% women) were divided into 2 groups: group 1 (n = 14), which received the MWM technique in the first 4 sessions and the sham technique in the last 4 sessions; and group 2 (n = 13), which was treated with the opposite order of treatment conditions described for group 1. Shoulder ROM, isometric peak force assessed with a handheld dynamometer, and function as determined through the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand and Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI) questionnaires were collected at preintervention, interchange, and postintervention moments. Two-way analysis of variance revealed no significant group-by-time interaction for any outcome but did reveal a main time effect for shoulder external rotation (P = .04) and abduction (P = .01) ROM, Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (P shoulder ROM during external rotation and abduction, pain, and function in patients with shoulder impingement syndrome. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Designing and Developing a Mobile Smartphone Application for Women with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus Followed-Up at Diabetes Outpatient Clinics in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnweidner-Holme, Lisa Maria; Borgen, Iren; Garitano, Iñaki; Noll, Josef; Lukasse, Mirjam

    2015-05-21

    The prevalence of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) is increasing worldwide. Controlling blood sugar levels is fundamental to the management of GDM. Current practice in Norway includes patients registering blood sugar levels in a booklet and receiving verbal and/or written health information. A smartphone application may provide patients individually targeted and easily available advice to control blood sugar levels. The aim of this paper is to document the process of designing and developing a smartphone application (the Pregnant+ app) that automatically transfers blood sugar levels from the glucometer and has information about healthy eating and physical activity. This formative research included expert-group discussions among health professionals, researchers and experts in data privacy and security. User-involvement studies were conducted to discuss prototypes of the app. Results indicated that the content of the application should be easy to understand given the varying degree of patients' literacy and in line with the information they receive at clinics. The final version of the app incorporated behavior change techniques such as self-monitoring and cues to action. Results from the first round of interactions show the importance of involving expert groups and patients when developing a mobile health-care device.

  16. The Prevalence of Astigmatism and its Determinants in a Rural Population of Iran: The “Nooravaran Salamat” Mobile Eye Clinic Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, Hassan; Rezvan, Farhad; Yekta, Abbas Ali; Hashemi, Maryam; Norouzirad, Reza; Khabazkhoob, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The prevalence of astigmatism, and the astigmatic axis, and their determinants were evaluated in a rural population of Iran. Materials and Methods: In a cross-sectional study conducted from May to August 2011, 13 villages in the vicinity of the city of Khaf in northeast Iran were investigated in this study. All the examinations including visual acuity, refraction, slit-lamp biomicroscopy and fundoscopy were performed in a Mobile Eye Clinic. Written informed consent was obtained from all participants. Only phakic eye that could be reliably refracted without a previous history of ocular surgery were included. Results: Out of 2635 participants who were screened, 2124 were analysed for this study of whom 52% were female. The prevalence of astigmatism was 32.2% (95% confidence intervals (CI): 30.2-34.2). Astigmatism significantly increased from 14.3% in the under 15-year-old age group to 67.2% in the age group of over 65-years old (P prevalence of With-The-Rule (WTR), Against-The-Rule (ATR), and oblique astigmatism was 11.7%, 18.1%, and 2.4 %, respectively. ATR significantly increased with age (P prevalence. Further studies are suggested to discover the role of the environmental and genetic factors. It seems that environmental and occupational factors in the villages cause a significant increase in the prevalence of astigmatism with age. A high percentage of participants had ATR astigmatism, which was more common at older ages. PMID:24791111

  17. Volvo ja Ikea endine tegevjuht Göran Carstedt : Tänapäevane (personali)juhtimine peab sisaldama eeskätt looduslähedast mõtteviisi / Göran Carstedt ; interv. Tiina Saar

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Carstedt, Göran

    2008-01-01

    Juhtimiskonsultant ning Organisatsioonilise Õppimise Ühingu eestvedaja ja arendaja Göran Carsedt vastab küsimustele, mis puudutavad ettevõtte tegevust personali tööle pühendumise parendamiseks, ettevõtte jätkusuutlikku juhtimist ja tootlikkust, majanduslanguse mõju ettevõtete personalipoliitikale, talendijuhtimist, väikeste ettevõttete ellujäämist majanduslanguse ajal, IKEA kui hea tööandja mainet ning jätkusuutlikku personaliarendajat. Lisa: Jätkusuutlik juhtimine Rootsi moodi

  18. Selective Impairment of a Subset of Ran-GTP-binding Domains of Ran-binding Protein 2 (Ranbp2) Suffices to Recapitulate the Degeneration of the Retinal Pigment Epithelium (RPE) Triggered by Ranbp2 Ablation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Hemangi; Saha, Arjun; Senda, Eugene; Cho, Kyoung-in; Haque, MdEmdadul; Yu, Minzhong; Qiu, Sunny; Yoon, Dosuk; Hao, Ying; Peachey, Neal S.; Ferreira, Paulo A.

    2014-01-01

    Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) degeneration underpins diseases triggered by disparate genetic lesions, noxious insults, or both. The pleiotropic Ranbp2 controls the expression of intrinsic and extrinsic pathological stressors impinging on cellular viability. However, the physiological targets and mechanisms controlled by Ranbp2 in tissue homeostasis, such as RPE, are ill defined. We show that mice, RPE-cre::Ranbp2−/−, with selective Ranbp2 ablation in RPE develop pigmentary changes, syncytia, hypoplasia, age-dependent centrifugal and non-apoptotic degeneration of the RPE, and secondary leakage of choriocapillaris. These manifestations are accompanied by the development of F-actin clouds, metalloproteinase-11 activation, deregulation of expression or subcellular localization of critical RPE proteins, atrophic cell extrusions into the subretinal space, and compensatory proliferation of peripheral RPE. To gain mechanistic insights into what Ranbp2 activities are vital to the RPE, we performed genetic complementation analyses of transgenic lines of bacterial artificial chromosomes of Ranbp2 harboring loss of function of selective Ranbp2 domains expressed in a Ranbp2−/− background. Among the transgenic lines produced, only TgRBD2/3*-HA::RPE-cre::Ranbp2−/−-expressing mutations, which selectively impair binding of RBD2/3 (Ran-binding domains 2 and 3) of Ranbp2 to Ran-GTP, recapitulate RPE degeneration, as observed with RPE-cre::Ranbp2−/−. By contrast, TgRBD2/3*-HA expression rescues the degeneration of cone photoreceptors lacking Ranbp2. The RPE of RPE-cre::Ranbp2−/− and TgRBD2/3*-HA::RPE-cre::Ranbp2−/− share proteostatic deregulation of Ran GTPase, serotransferrin, and γ-tubulin and suppression of light-evoked electrophysiological responses. These studies unravel selective roles of Ranbp2 and its RBD2 and RBD3 in RPE survival and functions. We posit that the control of Ran GTPase by Ranbp2 emerges as a novel therapeutic target in diseases

  19. Selective impairment of a subset of Ran-GTP-binding domains of ran-binding protein 2 (Ranbp2) suffices to recapitulate the degeneration of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) triggered by Ranbp2 ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Hemangi; Saha, Arjun; Senda, Eugene; Cho, Kyoung-in; Haque, MdEmdadul; Yu, Minzhong; Qiu, Sunny; Yoon, Dosuk; Hao, Ying; Peachey, Neal S; Ferreira, Paulo A

    2014-10-24

    Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) degeneration underpins diseases triggered by disparate genetic lesions, noxious insults, or both. The pleiotropic Ranbp2 controls the expression of intrinsic and extrinsic pathological stressors impinging on cellular viability. However, the physiological targets and mechanisms controlled by Ranbp2 in tissue homeostasis, such as RPE, are ill defined. We show that mice, RPE-cre::Ranbp2(-/-), with selective Ranbp2 ablation in RPE develop pigmentary changes, syncytia, hypoplasia, age-dependent centrifugal and non-apoptotic degeneration of the RPE, and secondary leakage of choriocapillaris. These manifestations are accompanied by the development of F-actin clouds, metalloproteinase-11 activation, deregulation of expression or subcellular localization of critical RPE proteins, atrophic cell extrusions into the subretinal space, and compensatory proliferation of peripheral RPE. To gain mechanistic insights into what Ranbp2 activities are vital to the RPE, we performed genetic complementation analyses of transgenic lines of bacterial artificial chromosomes of Ranbp2 harboring loss of function of selective Ranbp2 domains expressed in a Ranbp2(-/-) background. Among the transgenic lines produced, only Tg(RBD2/3*-HA)::RPE-cre::Ranbp2(-/-)-expressing mutations, which selectively impair binding of RBD2/3 (Ran-binding domains 2 and 3) of Ranbp2 to Ran-GTP, recapitulate RPE degeneration, as observed with RPE-cre::Ranbp2(-/-). By contrast, Tg(RBD2/3*-HA) expression rescues the degeneration of cone photoreceptors lacking Ranbp2. The RPE of RPE-cre::Ranbp2(-/-) and Tg(RBD2/3*-HA)::RPE-cre::Ranbp2(-/-) share proteostatic deregulation of Ran GTPase, serotransferrin, and γ-tubulin and suppression of light-evoked electrophysiological responses. These studies unravel selective roles of Ranbp2 and its RBD2 and RBD3 in RPE survival and functions. We posit that the control of Ran GTPase by Ranbp2 emerges as a novel therapeutic target in diseases promoting

  20. Mobile technology and social media in the clinical practice of young radiation oncologists: results of a comprehensive nationwide cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibault, Jean-Emmanuel; Leroy, Thomas; Blanchard, Pierre; Biau, Julian; Cervellera, Mathilde; Diaz, Olivia; Faivre, Jean Christophe; Fumagalli, Ingrid; Lescut, Nicolas; Martin, Valentine; Pichon, Baptiste; Riou, Olivier; Thureau, Sébastien; Giraud, Philippe

    2014-09-01

    Social media and mobile technology are transforming the way in which young physicians are learning and practicing medicine. The true impact of such technologies has yet to be evaluated. We performed a nationwide cross-sectional survey to better assess how young radiation oncologists used these technologies. An online survey was sent out between April 24, 2013, and June 1, 2013. All residents attending the 2013 radiation oncology French summer course were invited to complete the survey. Logistic regressions were performed to assess predictors of use of these tools in the hospital on various clinical endpoints. In all, 131 of 140 (93.6%) French young radiation oncologists answered the survey. Of these individuals, 93% owned a smartphone and 32.8% owned a tablet. The majority (78.6%) of the residents owning a smartphone used it to work in their department. A total of 33.5% had more than 5 medical applications installed. Only 60.3% of the residents verified the validity of the apps that they used. In all, 82.9% of the residents had a social network account. Most of the residents in radiation oncology use their smartphone to work in their department for a wide variety of tasks. However, the residents do not consistently check the validity of the apps that they use. Residents also use social networks, with only a limited impact on their relationship with their patients. Overall, this study highlights the irruption and the risks of new technologies in the clinical practice and raises the question of a possible regulation of their use in the hospital. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Mobile Health Intervention to Increase Oral Cancer Therapy Adherence in Patients With Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (The REMIND System): Clinical Feasibility and Acceptability Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira-Salgado, Amanda; Westwood, Jennifer A; Russell, Lahiru; Ugalde, Anna; Ortlepp, Bronwen; Seymour, John F; Butow, Phyllis; Cavedon, Lawrence; Ong, Kevin; Aranda, Sanchia; Breen, Sibilah; Kirsa, Suzanne; Dunlevie, Andrew; Schofield, Penelope

    2017-12-06

    Optimal dosing of oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy is critical to treatment success and survival of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Drug intolerance secondary to toxicities and nonadherence are significant factors in treatment failure. The objective of this study was to develop and pilot-test the clinical feasibility and acceptability of a mobile health system (REMIND) to increase oral drug adherence and patient symptom self-management among people with CML (chronic phase). A multifaceted intervention was iteratively developed using the intervention development framework by Schofield and Chambers, consisting of defining the patient problem and iteratively refining the intervention. The clinical feasibility and acceptability were examined via patient and intervention nurse interviews, which were audiotaped, transcribed, and deductively content analyzed. The intervention comprised 2 synergistically operating elements: (1) daily medication reminders and routine assessment of side effects with evidence-based self-care advice delivered in real time and (2) question prompt list (QPL) questions and routinely collected individual patient adherence and side effect profile data used to shape nurses' consultations, which employed motivational interviewing to support adoption of self-management behaviors. A total of 4 consultations and daily alerts and advice were delivered over 10 weeks. In total, 58% (10/17) of patients and 2 nurses participated in the pilot study. Patients reported several benefits of the intervention: help in establishing medication routines, resolution of symptom uncertainty, increased awareness of self-care, and informed decision making. Nurses also endorsed the intervention: it assisted in establishing pill-taking routines and patients developing effective solutions to adherence challenges. The REMIND system with nurse support was usable and acceptable to both patients and nurses. It has the potential to improve adherence and side

  2. Mobile Technology and Social Media in the Clinical Practice of Young Radiation Oncologists: Results of a Comprehensive Nationwide Cross-sectional Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bibault, Jean-Emmanuel, E-mail: jebibault@gmail.com [Academic Radiation Oncology Department, Oscar Lambret Center, Lille (France); French Society of Young Radiation Oncologists (SFjRO), Centre Antoine-Béclère, Paris (France); Leroy, Thomas [Academic Radiation Oncology Department, Oscar Lambret Center, Lille (France); French Society of Young Radiation Oncologists (SFjRO), Centre Antoine-Béclère, Paris (France); Blanchard, Pierre [Academic Radiation Oncology Department, Gustave Roussy Institute, Villejuif Cedex (France); Biostatistics and Epidemiology Department, Gustave Roussy, Villejuif Cedex (France); Biau, Julian [Radiation Oncology Department, Jean-Perrin Center, Clermont-Ferrand cedex (France); French Society of Young Radiation Oncologists (SFjRO), Centre Antoine-Béclère, Paris (France); Cervellera, Mathilde [Radiation Oncology Department, Jean-Godinot Center, Reims (France); French Society of Young Radiation Oncologists (SFjRO), Centre Antoine-Béclère, Paris (France); Diaz, Olivia [Radiation Oncology Department, Lyon Sud University Hospital, Pierre-Bénite Cedex (France); French Society of Young Radiation Oncologists (SFjRO), Centre Antoine-Béclère, Paris (France); Faivre, Jean Christophe [Academic Radiation Oncology and Brachytherapy Departement, Alexis-Vautrin Center, Avenue de Bourgogne, 54511 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy (France); French Society of Young Radiation Oncologists (SFjRO), Centre Antoine-Béclère, Paris (France); and others

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: Social media and mobile technology are transforming the way in which young physicians are learning and practicing medicine. The true impact of such technologies has yet to be evaluated. Methods and Materials: We performed a nationwide cross-sectional survey to better assess how young radiation oncologists used these technologies. An online survey was sent out between April 24, 2013, and June 1, 2013. All residents attending the 2013 radiation oncology French summer course were invited to complete the survey. Logistic regressions were performed to assess predictors of use of these tools in the hospital on various clinical endpoints. Results: In all, 131 of 140 (93.6%) French young radiation oncologists answered the survey. Of these individuals, 93% owned a smartphone and 32.8% owned a tablet. The majority (78.6%) of the residents owning a smartphone used it to work in their department. A total of 33.5% had more than 5 medical applications installed. Only 60.3% of the residents verified the validity of the apps that they used. In all, 82.9% of the residents had a social network account. Conclusions: Most of the residents in radiation oncology use their smartphone to work in their department for a wide variety of tasks. However, the residents do not consistently check the validity of the apps that they use. Residents also use social networks, with only a limited impact on their relationship with their patients. Overall, this study highlights the irruption and the risks of new technologies in the clinical practice and raises the question of a possible regulation of their use in the hospital.

  3. Reduction of exportin 6 activity leads to actin accumulation via failure of RanGTP restoration and NTF2 sequestration in the nuclei of senescent cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Su Hyun; Park, Tae Jun; Lim, In Kyoung, E-mail: iklim@ajou.ac.kr

    2011-04-15

    We have previously reported that G-actin accumulation in nuclei is a universal phenomenon of cellular senescence. By employing primary culture of human diploid fibroblast (HDF) and stress-induced premature senescence (SIPS), we explored whether the failure of actin export to cytoplasm is responsible for actin accumulation in nuclei of senescent cells. Expression of exportin 6 (Exp6) and small G-protein, Ran, was significantly reduced in the replicative senescence, but not yet in SIPS, whereas nuclear import of actin by cofilin was already increased in SIPS. After treatment of young HDF cells with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, rapid reduction of nuclear RanGTP was observed along with cytoplasmic increase of RanGDP. Furthermore, significantly reduced interaction of Exp6 with RanGTP was found by GST-Exp6 pull-down analysis. Failure of RanGTP restoration was accompanied with inhibition of ATP synthesis and NTF2 sequestration in the nuclei along with accordant change of senescence morphology. Indeed, knockdown of Exp6 expression significantly increased actin molecule in the nuclei of young HDF cells. Therefore, actin accumulation in nuclei of senescent cells is most likely due to the failure of RanGTP restoration with ATP deficiency and NTF2 accumulation in nuclei, which result in the decrease of actin export via Exp6 inactivation, in addition to actin import by cofilin activation.

  4. Formation of a Trimeric Xpo1-Ran[GTP]-Ded1 Exportin Complex Modulates ATPase and Helicase Activities of Ded1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenn Hauk

    Full Text Available The DEAD-box RNA helicase Ded1, which is essential in yeast and known as DDX3 in humans, shuttles between the nucleus and cytoplasm and takes part in several basic processes including RNA processing and translation. A key interacting partner of Ded1 is the exportin Xpo1, which together with the GTP-bound state of the small GTPase Ran, facilitates unidirectional transport of Ded1 out of the nucleus. Here we demonstrate that Xpo1 and Ran[GTP] together reduce the RNA-stimulated ATPase and helicase activities of Ded1. Binding and inhibition of Ded1 by Xpo1 depend on the affinity of the Ded1 nuclear export sequence (NES for Xpo1 and the presence of Ran[GTP]. Association with Xpo1/Ran[GTP] reduces RNA-stimulated ATPase activity of Ded1 by increasing the apparent KM for the RNA substrate. Despite the increased KM, the Ded1:Xpo1:Ran[GTP] ternary complex retains the ability to bind single stranded RNA, suggesting that Xpo1/Ran[GTP] may modulate the substrate specificity of Ded1. These results demonstrate that, in addition to transport, exportins such as Xpo1 also have the capability to alter enzymatic activities of their cargo.

  5. Mobile Semiotics - signs and mobilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.

    This paper is about how to comprehend the mobile condition of contemporary life with a particular view to the signifying dimension of the environment and its ‘readability’. The paper explores the potentials of semiotics and its relationship to the new mobilities literature. The theoretical scope...... is therefore an attempt to mobilize semiotics by drawing on a central body of theory within and adjacent to the discipline. For instance the founding works of C. S. Peirce will be related to the contemporary notions of ‘geosemiotics’ by Scollon & Scollon. The paper’s theoretical claim is that semiotics hold...... a potential for mobilities studies if the awareness of seeing the environment as a semiotic layer and system can be sensitized to the insights of the ‘mobilities turn’. Empirically the paper tentatively explores the usefulness of a mobile semiotics approach to cases such as street signage, airport design...

  6. Mobile phones and mobile communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ling, Richard; Donner, Jonathan

    With staggering swiftness, the mobile phone has become a fixture of daily life in almost every society on earth. In 2007, the world had over 3 billion mobile subscriptions. Prosperous nations boast of having more subscriptions than people. In the developing world, hundreds of millions of people who...... could never afford a landline telephone now have a mobile number of their own. With a mobile in our hand many of us feel safer, more productive, and more connected to loved ones, but perhaps also more distracted and less involved with things happening immediately around us. Written by two leading...... researchers in the field, this volume presents an overview of the mobile telephone as a social and cultural phenomenon. Research is summarized and made accessible though detailed descriptions of ten mobile users from around the world. These illustrate popular debates, as well as deeper social forces at work...

  7. Resource Mobilization

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    This practical guidebook supports and promotes new and creative thinking on resource mobilization for ... sources and come up with creative resource mobilization strategies to ensure survival. The Importance of ...... funds had already been earmarked for buying new classroom facilities. Maintain integrity of auction. 2.

  8. Comparison of RANS and IDDES solutions for turbulent flow and heat transfer past a backward-facing step

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, E. M.; Smirnovsky, A. A.; Schur, N. A.; Zaitsev, D. K.; Smirnov, P. E.

    2017-10-01

    Numerical simulations were carried out under conditions of the benchmark-quality experiments of Vogel&Eaton (1985), where nominally 2D fluid dynamics and heat transfer past a backward-facing step in a channel with expansion ratio of 1.25 was investigated at the Reynolds number of 28,000 (based on the step height and the upstream centreline velocity). Comparative computations were performed using an in-house finite-volume code SINF/Flag-S and the ANSYS Fluent, running the codes with same grids. Two approaches were used for turbulence modelling. First, the Menter SST turbulence model was used to perform refined 2D and 3D RANS steady-state computations. The 3D analysis was undertaken to evaluate influence of boundary layers developing on the sidewalls of the experimental channel. The data obtained has resulted in the conclusion that the side wall effects disturbing spanwise uniformity of wall friction and heated wall temperature in the test configuration were of the same order or less than the skin friction coefficient and the Stanton number measurement errors. Then, 3D time-dependent computations were carried out using the vortex-resolving IDDES method being a hybridization of RANS and LES. The IDDES results obtained with the two codes are in a satisfactory agreement, especially for the finer grid of 17.3 million cells. Comparing with the experimental data, the IDDES approach produces the best agreement for the wall friction, whereas the RANS solutions show superiority in predictions of the local Stanton number distribution.

  9. Homophily and the speed of social mobilization: the effect of acquired and ascribed traits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeff Alstott

    Full Text Available Large-scale mobilization of individuals across social networks is becoming increasingly prevalent in society. However, little is known about what affects the speed of social mobilization. Here we use a framed field experiment to identify and measure properties of individuals and their relationships that predict mobilization speed. We ran a global social mobilization contest and recorded personal traits of the participants and those they recruited. We studied the effects of ascribed traits (gender, age and acquired traits (geography, and information source on the speed of mobilization. We found that homophily, a preference for interacting with other individuals with similar traits, had a mixed role in social mobilization. Homophily was present for acquired traits, in which mobilization speed was faster when the recuiter and recruit had the same trait compared to different traits. In contrast, we did not find support for homophily for the ascribed traits. Instead, those traits had other, non-homophily effects: Females mobilized other females faster than males mobilized other males. Younger recruiters mobilized others faster, and older recruits mobilized slower. Recruits also mobilized faster when they first heard about the contest directly from the contest organization, and decreased in speed when hearing from less personal source types (e.g. family vs. media. These findings show that social mobilization includes dynamics that are unlike other, more passive forms of social activity propagation. These findings suggest relevant factors for engineering social mobilization tasks for increased speed.

  10. Homophily and the speed of social mobilization: the effect of acquired and ascribed traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alstott, Jeff; Madnick, Stuart; Velu, Chander

    2014-01-01

    Large-scale mobilization of individuals across social networks is becoming increasingly prevalent in society. However, little is known about what affects the speed of social mobilization. Here we use a framed field experiment to identify and measure properties of individuals and their relationships that predict mobilization speed. We ran a global social mobilization contest and recorded personal traits of the participants and those they recruited. We studied the effects of ascribed traits (gender, age) and acquired traits (geography, and information source) on the speed of mobilization. We found that homophily, a preference for interacting with other individuals with similar traits, had a mixed role in social mobilization. Homophily was present for acquired traits, in which mobilization speed was faster when the recuiter and recruit had the same trait compared to different traits. In contrast, we did not find support for homophily for the ascribed traits. Instead, those traits had other, non-homophily effects: Females mobilized other females faster than males mobilized other males. Younger recruiters mobilized others faster, and older recruits mobilized slower. Recruits also mobilized faster when they first heard about the contest directly from the contest organization, and decreased in speed when hearing from less personal source types (e.g. family vs. media). These findings show that social mobilization includes dynamics that are unlike other, more passive forms of social activity propagation. These findings suggest relevant factors for engineering social mobilization tasks for increased speed.

  11. Homophily and the Speed of Social Mobilization: The Effect of Acquired and Ascribed Traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alstott, Jeff; Madnick, Stuart; Velu, Chander

    2014-01-01

    Large-scale mobilization of individuals across social networks is becoming increasingly prevalent in society. However, little is known about what affects the speed of social mobilization. Here we use a framed field experiment to identify and measure properties of individuals and their relationships that predict mobilization speed. We ran a global social mobilization contest and recorded personal traits of the participants and those they recruited. We studied the effects of ascribed traits (gender, age) and acquired traits (geography, and information source) on the speed of mobilization. We found that homophily, a preference for interacting with other individuals with similar traits, had a mixed role in social mobilization. Homophily was present for acquired traits, in which mobilization speed was faster when the recuiter and recruit had the same trait compared to different traits. In contrast, we did not find support for homophily for the ascribed traits. Instead, those traits had other, non-homophily effects: Females mobilized other females faster than males mobilized other males. Younger recruiters mobilized others faster, and older recruits mobilized slower. Recruits also mobilized faster when they first heard about the contest directly from the contest organization, and decreased in speed when hearing from less personal source types (e.g. family vs. media). These findings show that social mobilization includes dynamics that are unlike other, more passive forms of social activity propagation. These findings suggest relevant factors for engineering social mobilization tasks for increased speed. PMID:24740123

  12. Mobility at a medical ward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kanstrup, Anne Marie; Christiansen, Ellen

    2006-01-01

    The paper reports from the MINI-project in which the authors are currently designing a mobile e-learning service for physicians in clinical training. The paper presents results from the analysis trying to grasp what mobility means in this specific context and which design challenges and decisions...

  13. Mobility Challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.; Lassen, Claus

    2011-01-01

    This article takes point of departure in the challenges to understand the importance of contemporary mobility. The approach advocated is a cross-disciplinary one drawing on sociology, geography, urban planning and design, and cultural studies. As such the perspective is to be seen as a part...... mobilities. In particular the article discusses 1) the physical city, its infrastructures and technological hardware/software, 2) policies and planning strategies for urban mobility and 3) the lived everyday life in the city and the region....... of the so-called ‘mobility turn’ within social science. The perspective is illustrative for the research efforts at the Centre for Mobility and Urban Studies (C-MUS), Aalborg University. The article presents the contours of a theoretical perspective meeting the challenges to research into contemporary urban...

  14. Intensive mobilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vannini, Phillip; Bissell, David; Jensen, Ole B.

    which relate to transport, housing and employment. Yet we argue that the experiential dimensions of long distance mobilities have not received the attention that they deserve within geographical research on mobilities. This paper combines ideas from mobilities research and contemporary social theory......This paper explores the intensities of long distance commuting journeys as a way of exploring how bodily sensibilities are being changed by the mobilities that they undertake. The context of this paper is that many people are travelling further to work than ever before owing to a variety of factors...... with fieldwork conducted in Canada, Denmark and Australia to develop our understanding of the experiential politics of long distance workers. Rather than focusing on the extensive dimensions of mobilities that are implicated in patterns and trends, our paper turns to the intensive dimensions of this experience...

  15. Mobilities Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.; Lanng, Ditte Bendix

    2016-01-01

    and physical form. The exchange value with design is twofold; first this means getting closer to the ‘material’ which is needed if mobilities research can claim to have understood contemporary mobilities, second it means that the creative, explorative and experimental approaches of the design world becomes...... insights, concepts of space and place, and relations between fixities and flows. The new and emerging field of ‘mobilities design’ will be exploring the borderlines between architecture, urban design, urban planning, and infrastructure design. The field will address the ‘gap’ in research on an issue...... of increasing concern and societal importance, regardless if the focus is on new inequalities, environmental sustainability, or the meaning of vernacular mobilities design to the everyday life. The theme of ‘mobilities design’ opens up the agenda of architectural research into infrastructure spaces as ‘spaces...

  16. Mobile Clouds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fitzek, Frank; Katz, Marcos

    networks, creating a vast fertile ground for novel developments in both research and practical applications Considers research directions, emerging trends and visions This book is an excellent resource for wireless/networking researchers in industry and academia, students and mobile phone programmers...... users in very different ways and for various purposes. The book provides many stimulating examples of resource-sharing applications. Enabling technologies for mobile clouds are also discussed, highlighting the key role of network coding. Mobile clouds have the potential to enhance communications...... examples of mobile clouds applications, based on both existing commercial initiatives as well as proof-of-concept test-beds. Visions and prospects are also discussed, paving the way for further development. As mobile networks and social networks become more and more reliant on each other, the concept...

  17. Examining perceptions of the usefulness and usability of a mobile-based system for pharmacogenomics clinical decision support: a mixed methods study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrin Blagec

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background. Pharmacogenomic testing has the potential to improve the safety and efficacy of pharmacotherapy, but clinical application of pharmacogenetic knowledge has remained uncommon. Clinical Decision Support (CDS systems could help overcome some of the barriers to clinical implementation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the perception and usability of a web- and mobile-enabled CDS system for pharmacogenetics-guided drug therapy–the Medication Safety Code (MSC system–among potential users (i.e., physicians and pharmacists. Furthermore, this study sought to collect data on the practicability and comprehensibility of potential layouts of a proposed personalized pocket card that is intended to not only contain the machine-readable data for use with the MSC system but also human-readable data on the patient’s pharmacogenomic profile. Methods. We deployed an emergent mixed methods design encompassing (1 qualitative interviews with pharmacists and pharmacy students, (2 a survey among pharmacogenomics experts that included both qualitative and quantitative elements and (3 a quantitative survey among physicians and pharmacists. The interviews followed a semi-structured guide including a hypothetical patient scenario that had to be solved by using the MSC system. The survey among pharmacogenomics experts focused on what information should be printed on the card and how this information should be arranged. Furthermore, the MSC system was evaluated based on two hypothetical patient scenarios and four follow-up questions on the perceived usability. The second survey assessed physicians’ and pharmacists’ attitude towards the MSC system. Results. In total, 101 physicians, pharmacists and PGx experts coming from various relevant fields evaluated the MSC system. Overall, the reaction to the MSC system was positive across all investigated parameters and among all user groups. The majority of participants were able to solve the patient

  18. Success of a comprehensive school-based asthma intervention on clinical markers and resource utilization for inner-city children with asthma in Chicago: the Mobile C.A.R.E. Foundation's asthma management program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Bina; Sheridan, Phil; Detjen, Paul; Donnersberger, David; Gluck, Eric; Malamut, Karen; Whyte, Stephanie; Miller, Amy; Qing, Harshaw

    2007-03-01

    Children with asthma in low-income households in Chicago were participants in a school-based mobile van clinic, Mobile C.A.R.E. Our objective was to investigate whether long-term follow-up changed clinical markers and resource utilization. Children were evaluated by a pediatrician in a mobile allergy clinic and classified and treated based on National Asthma Education and Prevention Program (NAEPP) guidelines. Intervention consisted of assessment of allergic environment with avoidance recommendations, institution of appropriate controller therapy and inhaler technique, education on asthma and asthma management, and expectations for asthma control. Over 20,000 children were screened, 2041 were examined at least once, and 677 children had four follow-up visits. With follow-up, there was a decrease in hospitalizations and emergency room visits. Symptomatic markers (daytime and nighttime cough, wheezing, and dyspnea symptoms), frequency of rescue inhaler use, and a quality-of-life score improved from baseline. These findings suggest that ongoing school interventions may reduce resource utilization and improve clinical symptoms. Primary care physicians may be able to deliver specialized care to large numbers of inner-city children with asthma.

  19. Surface Mechanical and Rheological Behaviors of Biocompatible Poly((D,L-lactic acid-ran-glycolic acid)-block-ethylene glycol) (PLGA-PEG) and Poly((D,L-lactic acid-ran-glycolic acid-ran-ε-caprolactone)-block-ethylene glycol) (PLGACL-PEG) Block Copolymers at the Air-Water Interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun Chang; Lee, Hoyoung; Khetan, Jawahar; Won, You-Yeon [Purdue

    2016-02-01

    Air–water interfacial monolayers of poly((d,l-lactic acid-ran-glycolic acid)-block-ethylene glycol) (PLGA–PEG) exhibit an exponential increase in surface pressure under high monolayer compression. In order to understand the molecular origin of this behavior, a combined experimental and theoretical investigation (including surface pressure–area isotherm, X-ray reflectivity (XR) and interfacial rheological measurements, and a self-consistent field (SCF) theoretical analysis) was performed on air–water monolayers formed by a PLGA–PEG diblock copolymer and also by a nonglassy analogue of this diblock copolymer, poly((d,l-lactic acid-ran-glycolic acid-ran-caprolactone)-block-ethylene glycol) (PLGACL–PEG). The combined results of this study show that the two mechanisms, i.e., the glass transition of the collapsed PLGA film and the lateral repulsion of the PEG brush chains that occur simultaneously under lateral compression of the monolayer, are both responsible for the observed PLGA–PEG isotherm behavior. Upon cessation of compression, the high surface pressure of the PLGA–PEG monolayer typically relaxes over time with a stretched exponential decay, suggesting that in this diblock copolymer situation, the hydrophobic domain formed by the PLGA blocks undergoes glass transition in the high lateral compression state, analogously to the PLGA homopolymer monolayer. In the high PEG grafting density regime, the contribution of the PEG brush chains to the high monolayer surface pressure is significantly lower than what is predicted by the SCF model because of the many-body attraction among PEG segments (referred to in the literature as the “n-cluster” effects). The end-grafted PEG chains were found to be protein resistant even under the influence of the “n-cluster” effects.

  20. Surface Mechanical and Rheological Behaviors of Biocompatible Poly((D,L-lactic acid-ran-glycolic acid)-block-ethylene glycol) (PLGA-PEG) and Poly((D,L-lactic acid-ran-glycolic acid-ran-ε-caprolactone)-block-ethylene glycol) (PLGACL-PEG) Block Copolymers at the Air-Water Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Chang; Lee, Hoyoung; Khetan, Jawahar; Won, You-Yeon

    2015-12-29

    Air-water interfacial monolayers of poly((D,L-lactic acid-ran-glycolic acid)-block-ethylene glycol) (PLGA-PEG) exhibit an exponential increase in surface pressure under high monolayer compression. In order to understand the molecular origin of this behavior, a combined experimental and theoretical investigation (including surface pressure-area isotherm, X-ray reflectivity (XR) and interfacial rheological measurements, and a self-consistent field (SCF) theoretical analysis) was performed on air-water monolayers formed by a PLGA-PEG diblock copolymer and also by a nonglassy analogue of this diblock copolymer, poly((D,L-lactic acid-ran-glycolic acid-ran-caprolactone)-block-ethylene glycol) (PLGACL-PEG). The combined results of this study show that the two mechanisms, i.e., the glass transition of the collapsed PLGA film and the lateral repulsion of the PEG brush chains that occur simultaneously under lateral compression of the monolayer, are both responsible for the observed PLGA-PEG isotherm behavior. Upon cessation of compression, the high surface pressure of the PLGA-PEG monolayer typically relaxes over time with a stretched exponential decay, suggesting that in this diblock copolymer situation, the hydrophobic domain formed by the PLGA blocks undergoes glass transition in the high lateral compression state, analogously to the PLGA homopolymer monolayer. In the high PEG grafting density regime, the contribution of the PEG brush chains to the high monolayer surface pressure is significantly lower than what is predicted by the SCF model because of the many-body attraction among PEG segments (referred to in the literature as the "n-cluster" effects). The end-grafted PEG chains were found to be protein resistant even under the influence of the "n-cluster" effects.

  1. Sustainable Mobility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærulff, Aslak Aamot

    This paper combines strands of mobilities theory and planning theory, and develops a qualitative approach to look across emerging planning practices. By actively following 8 Danish urban and transport planners, over the course of 2 years, we learn how their practices have changed, inspired...... by mobility management, a concept aiming to reduce carbon emissions from transportation in western societies. The article focuses on how municipal planners formulate the role of mobility management activities organized around private companies, and how their practices are connected to wider ideas on planning....

  2. Going Mobile?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tallon, Loic; Froes, Isabel Cristina G.

    2011-01-01

    If the future is mobile, how is the museum community developing within that future? What are the challenges museums face within it? In which directions should we be seeking to evolve our collective knowledge share? It was to gain observations on questions such as these that the 2011 Museums...... & Mobile survey was developed: 660 museum professionals responded. In this paper the authors highlight nine survey observations that they believe are important to the museum community’s increased understanding of and continued progress within mobile interpretation....

  3. Neurodynamic mobilization and foam rolling improved delayed-onset muscle soreness in a healthy adult population: a randomized controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanca Romero-Moraleda

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives Compare the immediate effects of a Neurodynamic Mobilization (NM treatment or foam roller (FR treatment after DOMS. Design Double blind randomised clinical trial. Setting The participants performed 100 drop jumps (5 sets of 20 repetitions, separated by 2 min rests from a 0.5-m high box in a University biomechanics laboratory to induce muscle soreness. The participants were randomly assigned in a counter-balanced fashion to either a FR or NM treatment group. Participants Thirty-two healthy subjects (21 males and 11 females, mean age 22.6 ± 2.2 years were randomly assigned into the NM group (n = 16 or the FR group (n = 16. Main Outcome Measures The numeric pain rating scale (NPRS; 0–10, isometric leg strength with dynamometry, surface electromyography at maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC and muscle peak activation (MPA upon landing after a test jump were measured at baseline, 48 h after baseline before treatment, and immediately after treatment. Results Both groups showed significant reduction in NPRS scores after treatment (NM: 59%, p  .05. The percentage change improvement in the MVIC for the rectus femoris was the only significant difference between the groups (p < 0.05 at post-treatment. After treatment, only the FR group had a statistically significant improvement (p < 0.01 in strength compared to pre-treatment. Conclusion Our results illustrate that both treatments are effective in reducing pain perception after DOMS whereas only FR application showed differences for the MVIC in the rectus femoris and strength.

  4. Ecological Assessment of Clinicians’ Antipsychotic Prescription Habits in Psychiatric Inpatients: A Novel Web- and Mobile Phone–Based Prototype for a Dynamic Clinical Decision Support System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrigón, Maria Luisa; Brandt, Sara A; Nitzburg, George C; Ovejero, Santiago; Alvarez-Garcia, Raquel; Carballo, Juan; Walter, Michel; Billot, Romain; Lenca, Philippe; Delgado-Gomez, David; Ropars, Juliette; de la Calle Gonzalez, Ivan; Courtet, Philippe; Baca-García, Enrique

    2017-01-01

    Background Electronic prescribing devices with clinical decision support systems (CDSSs) hold the potential to significantly improve pharmacological treatment management. Objective The aim of our study was to develop a novel Web- and mobile phone–based application to provide a dynamic CDSS by monitoring and analyzing practitioners’ antipsychotic prescription habits and simultaneously linking these data to inpatients’ symptom changes. Methods We recruited 353 psychiatric inpatients whose symptom levels and prescribed medications were inputted into the MEmind application. We standardized all medications in the MEmind database using the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) classification system and the defined daily dose (DDD). For each patient, MEmind calculated an average for the daily dose prescribed for antipsychotics (using the N05A ATC code), prescribed daily dose (PDD), and the PDD to DDD ratio. Results MEmind results found that antipsychotics were used by 61.5% (217/353) of inpatients, with the largest proportion being patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders (33.4%, 118/353). Of the 217 patients, 137 (63.2%, 137/217) were administered pharmacological monotherapy and 80 (36.8%, 80/217) were administered polytherapy. Antipsychotics were used mostly in schizophrenia spectrum and related psychotic disorders, but they were also prescribed in other nonpsychotic diagnoses. Notably, we observed polypharmacy going against current antipsychotics guidelines. Conclusions MEmind data indicated that antipsychotic polypharmacy and off-label use in inpatient units is commonly practiced. MEmind holds the potential to create a dynamic CDSS that provides real-time tracking of prescription practices and symptom change. Such feedback can help practitioners determine a maximally therapeutic drug treatment while avoiding unproductive overprescription and off-label use. PMID:28126703

  5. The immediate effects of soft tissue mobilization versus therapeutic ultrasound for patients with neck and arm pain with evidence of neural mechanosensitivity: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, Michael; Puentedura, Emilio 'Louie' J; Cleland, Josh; Ciccone, Charles D

    2016-07-01

    Randomized clinical trial. To investigate the immediate effects of soft tissue mobilization (STM) versus therapeutic ultrasound (US) in patients with neck and arm pain who demonstrate neural mechanical sensitivity. While experts have suggested that individuals with neck and arm pain associated with neural tissue mechanical sensitivity may benefit from STM, there has been little research to investigate this hypothesis. Twenty-three patients with neck and arm pain and a positive upper limb neurodynamic test (ULNT) were randomly assigned to receive STM or therapeutic US during a single session. Outcome measures were collected immediately before and after treatment, and at 2-4 day follow-up. Primary outcomes were the Global Rating of Change (GROC), range of motion (ROM) during the ULNT, and pain rating during the ULNT. Secondary measures included the Neck Disability Index (NDI), Patient-Specific Functional Scale (PSFS), Numeric Pain Rating Scale (NPRS), and active range of shoulder abduction motion combined with the wrist neutral or wrist extension. A greater proportion of patients in the STM group reported a significant improvement on the GROC immediately after treatment (P = 0·003, STM = 75%, US = 9%), and at 2-4 day follow-up (P = 0·027, STM = 58%, US = 9%). Patients who received STM demonstrated greater improvements in ROM during ULNT (P = 0·026), PSFS (P = 0·007), and shoulder active ROM combined with wrist extension (P = 0·028). Improvements in Numeric Pain Rating Scale and pain during the ULNT were observed only in the STM group. There was no difference between groups for the NDI or shoulder abduction ROM with wrist neutral. Patients with neck and arm pain demonstrated greater improvements in ULNT ROM, GROC, and PSFS, and pain following STM than after receiving therapeutic US. Therapy, level 1b.

  6. Neurodynamic mobilization and foam rolling improved delayed-onset muscle soreness in a healthy adult population: a randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Moraleda, Blanca; La Touche, Roy; Lerma-Lara, Sergio; Ferrer-Peña, Raúl; Paredes, Víctor; Peinado, Ana Belén; Muñoz-García, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Compare the immediate effects of a Neurodynamic Mobilization (NM) treatment or foam roller (FR) treatment after DOMS. Double blind randomised clinical trial. The participants performed 100 drop jumps (5 sets of 20 repetitions, separated by 2 min rests) from a 0.5-m high box in a University biomechanics laboratory to induce muscle soreness. The participants were randomly assigned in a counter-balanced fashion to either a FR or NM treatment group. Thirty-two healthy subjects (21 males and 11 females, mean age 22.6 ± 2.2 years) were randomly assigned into the NM group (n = 16) or the FR group (n = 16). The numeric pain rating scale (NPRS; 0-10), isometric leg strength with dynamometry, surface electromyography at maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) and muscle peak activation (MPA) upon landing after a test jump were measured at baseline, 48 h after baseline before treatment, and immediately after treatment. Both groups showed significant reduction in NPRS scores after treatment (NM: 59%, p  .05). The percentage change improvement in the MVIC for the rectus femoris was the only significant difference between the groups (p < 0.05) at post-treatment. After treatment, only the FR group had a statistically significant improvement (p < 0.01) in strength compared to pre-treatment. Our results illustrate that both treatments are effective in reducing pain perception after DOMS whereas only FR application showed differences for the MVIC in the rectus femoris and strength.

  7. The immediate effects of soft tissue mobilization versus therapeutic ultrasound for patients with neck and arm pain with evidence of neural mechanosensitivity: a randomized clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, Michael; Puentedura, Emilio ‘Louie’ J.; Cleland, Josh; Ciccone, Charles D.

    2016-01-01

    Study design Randomized clinical trial. Objectives To investigate the immediate effects of soft tissue mobilization (STM) versus therapeutic ultrasound (US) in patients with neck and arm pain who demonstrate neural mechanical sensitivity. Background While experts have suggested that individuals with neck and arm pain associated with neural tissue mechanical sensitivity may benefit from STM, there has been little research to investigate this hypothesis. Methods Twenty-three patients with neck and arm pain and a positive upper limb neurodynamic test (ULNT) were randomly assigned to receive STM or therapeutic US during a single session. Outcome measures were collected immediately before and after treatment, and at 2–4 day follow-up. Primary outcomes were the Global Rating of Change (GROC), range of motion (ROM) during the ULNT, and pain rating during the ULNT. Secondary measures included the Neck Disability Index (NDI), Patient-Specific Functional Scale (PSFS), Numeric Pain Rating Scale (NPRS), and active range of shoulder abduction motion combined with the wrist neutral or wrist extension. Results A greater proportion of patients in the STM group reported a significant improvement on the GROC immediately after treatment (P = 0·003, STM = 75%, US = 9%), and at 2–4 day follow-up (P = 0·027, STM = 58%, US = 9%). Patients who received STM demonstrated greater improvements in ROM during ULNT (P = 0·026), PSFS (P = 0·007), and shoulder active ROM combined with wrist extension (P = 0·028). Improvements in Numeric Pain Rating Scale and pain during the ULNT were observed only in the STM group. There was no difference between groups for the NDI or shoulder abduction ROM with wrist neutral. Conclusion Patients with neck and arm pain demonstrated greater improvements in ULNT ROM, GROC, and PSFS, and pain following STM than after receiving therapeutic US. Level of evidence Therapy, level 1b. PMID:27559283

  8. Exploiting Statistical Methodologies and Controlled Vocabularies for Prioritized Functional Analysis of Genomic Experiments: the StRAnGER Web Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatziioannou, Aristotelis A; Moulos, Panagiotis

    2011-01-01

    StRAnGER is a web application for the automated statistical analysis of annotated gene profiling experiments, exploiting controlled biological vocabularies, like the Gene Ontology or the KEGG pathways terms. Starting from annotated lists of differentially expressed genes and gene enrichment scores, regarding the terms of each vocabulary, StRAnGER repartitions and reorders the initial distribution of terms to define a new distribution of elements. Each element pools terms holding the same enrichment score. The new distribution thus derived, is reordered in a decreasing order to the right, according to the observation score of the elements, while elements with the same score, are sorted again in a decreasing order of their enrichment scores. By applying bootstrapping techniques, a corrected measure of the statistical significance of these elements is derived, which enables the selection of terms mapped to these elements, unambiguously associated with respective significant gene sets. The selected terms are immunized against the bias infiltrating statistical enrichment analyses, producing technically very high statistical scores, due to the finite nature of the data population. Besides their high statistical score, another selection criterion for the terms is the number of their members, something that incurs a biological prioritization in line with a Systems Biology context. The output derived, represents a detailed ranked list of significant terms, which constitute a starting point for further functional analysis.

  9. Exploiting statistical methodologies and controlled vocabularies for prioritized functional analysis of genomic experiments: The StRAnGER web application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aristotle A Chatziioannou

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available StRAnGER is a web application for the automated statistical analysis of annotated gene profiling experiments, exploiting controlled biological vocabularies, like the Gene Ontology or the KEGG pathways terms. Starting from annotated lists of differentially expressed genes and gene enrichment scores, regarding the terms of each vocabulary, StRAnGER repartitions and reorders the initial distribution of terms to define a new distribution of elements. Each element pools terms holding the same enrichment score. The new distribution thus derived, is reordered in a decreasing order to the right, according to the observation score of the elements, while elements with the same score, are sorted again in a decreasing order of their enrichment scores. By applying bootstrapping techniques, a corrected measure of the statistical significance of these elements is derived, which enables the selection of terms mapped to these elements, unambiguously associated with respective significant gene sets. The selected terms are immunized against the bias infiltrating statistical enrichment analyses, producing technically very high statistical scores, due to the finite nature of the data population. Besides their high statistical score, another selection criterion for the terms is the number of their members, something that incurs a biological prioritization in line with a Systems Biology context. The output derived, represents a detailed ranked list of significant terms, which constitute a starting point for further functional analysis.

  10. c9RAN translation: a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendron, Tania F; Cosio, Danielle M; Petrucelli, Leonard

    2013-09-01

    A hexanucleotide (GGGGCC) repeat expansion within a non-coding region of the C9ORF72 gene is the most common mutation associated with both frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Elucidating how these expanded repeats (GGGGCCexp) cause 'c9FTD/ALS' has since become an important goal of the FTD/ALS field. GGGGCCexp transcripts aggregate into discrete nuclear structures, termed RNA foci. This phenomenon, observed in various repeat expansion disorders, is associated with RNA-binding protein sequestration. Of note, recent findings show that GGGGCCexp transcripts also succumb to an alternative fate: repeat-associated non-ATG translation (RAN translation). This unconventional mode of translation, which occurs in the absence of an initiating codon, results in the production of polyGA, polyGP and polyGR peptides. Antibodies generated against these peptides detect high molecular weight, insoluble material in brain homogenates, as well as neuronal inclusions throughout the central nervous system of c9FTD/ALS cases. Given that both foci formation and RAN translation in c9FTD/ALS require the synthesis of GGGGCCexp RNA, therapeutic strategies that target these transcripts and result in their neutralization or degradation could effectively block these two potential pathogenic mechanisms and provide a much needed treatment for c9FTD/ALS.

  11. A Framework for Joint Optical-Wireless Resource Management in Multi-RAT, Heterogeneous Mobile Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zakrzewska, Anna; Popovska Avramova, Andrijana; Christiansen, Henrik Lehrmann

    2013-01-01

    to be always connected to a high-quality service (high bit rates, low latency), thus causing a very complex network control task from an operator’s point of view. We thus propose a framework allowing joint overall network resource management. This scheme covers different types of network heterogeneity (multi......Mobile networks are constantly evolving: new Radio Access Technologies (RATs) are being introduced, and backhaul architectures like Cloud-RAN (C-RAN) and distributed base stations are being proposed. Furthermore, small cells are being deployed to enhance network capacity. The end-users wish......-RAT, multi-layer, multi-architecture) by introducing a novel, hierarchical approach to network resource management. Self-Organizing Networks (SON) and cognitive network behaviors are covered as well as more traditional mobile network features. The framework is applicable to all phases of network operation...

  12. Development of a Weight Loss Mobile App Linked With an Accelerometer for Use in the Clinic: Usability, Acceptability, and Early Testing of its Impact on the Patient-Doctor Relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Seryung; Kim, Ju Young; Jung, Se Young; Kim, Sarah; Kim, Jeong Eun; Han, Jong Soo; Kim, Sohye; Kim, Jeong Hyun; Kim, Jeehye; Kim, Yongseok; Kim, Dongouk; Steinhubl, Steve

    2016-03-31

    Although complications of obesity are well acknowledged and managed by clinicians, management of obesity itself is often difficult, which leads to its underdiagnosis and undertreatment in hospital settings. However, tools that could improve the management of obesity, including self-monitoring, engagement with a social network, and open channels of communication between the patient and doctor, are limited in a clinic-based setting. The objective of our study was to evaluate the usability and acceptability of a newly developed mobile app linked with an accelerometer and its early effects on patient-doctor relationships. From September 2013 to February 2014, we developed a mobile app linked with an accelerometer as a supportive tool for a clinic-based weight loss program. The app used information from electronic health records and delivered tailored educational material. Personal goal setting, as well as monitoring of weight changes and physical activity combined with feedback, are key features of the app. We also incorporated an interactive message board for patients and doctors. During the period of March 2014 to May 2014, we tested our mobile app for 1 month in participants in a hospital clinic setting. We assessed the app's usability and acceptability, as well as the patient-doctor relationship, via questionnaires and analysis of app usage data. We recruited 30 individuals (18 male and 12 female) for the study. The median number of log-ins per day was 1.21, with the most frequently requested item being setting goals, followed by track physical activities and view personal health status. Scales of the depth of the patient-doctor relationship decreased from 27.6 (SD 4.8) to 25.1 (SD 4.5) by a Wilcoxon signed rank test (P=.02). A mobile phone app linked with an accelerometer for a clinic-based weight loss program is useful and acceptable for weight management but exhibited less favorable early effects on patient-doctor relationships.

  13. Restricted Mobilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette; Lassen, Claus

    2012-01-01

    communities and shopping centres through mobility lenses. The article shows how different mobility systems enable and restrict the public access to private-public spaces, and it points out that proprietary communities create an unequal potential for human movement and access in the city. The main argument......Privatisation of public spaces in the contemporary city has increased during the last decades but only few studies have approached this field from a mobility perspective. Therefore the article seeks to rectify this by exploring two Australian examples of private spaces in the city; gated...... in the article is that the many mobility systems enable specialization of places that are targeted at a special section of the population. This means that various forms of motilities not only create new opportunities for urban life but it is also one of the most critical components of production of new exclusion...

  14. Staying Mobile

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... favorite. People who use scooters and wheelchairs bowl, fish, ski, and play golf, tennis or basketball. Enable ... the Independent Care System of NY addresses the importance of selecting the wheeled mobility device that best ...

  15. Mobile museology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baggesen, Rikke Haller

    Drawing together perspectives from museology, digital culture studies and fashion theory, this thesis considers changes in and challenges for current - day museums as related to ‘mobile museology’. This concept is developed for and elucidated in the thesis to describe an orientation towards...... the fashionable, the ephemeral, and towards an (ideal) state of change and changeability. This orientation is characterised with the triplet concepts of mobile, mobility, and mobilisation, as related to mobile media and movability; to ‘trans - museal’ mediation; and to the mobilisation of collections, audiences...... and institutional mindsets. The research project’s transdisciplinary and exploratory approach takes inspiration from critical design, minding Latour’s (2004a) call for rethink ing critical approaches in the humanities. Through a creative process, focused on designs for framing fashion in everyday contexts...

  16. Mobile Commerce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina Enache

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Mobile commerce, or m-commerce, refers to the use of wireless digital devices to enable transactions on the Web. Described more fully in Chapter 3, m-commerce involves the use of wireless networks to connect cell phones, handheld devices such Blackberries, and personal computers to the Web. Once connected, mobile consumers can conduct transactions, including stock trades, in-store price comparisons, banking, travel reservations, and more.

  17. RANS simulations of wind turbine wakes: optimal tuning of turbulence closure and aerodynamic loads from LiDAR and SCADA data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letizia, Stefano; Puccioni, Matteo; Zhan, Lu; Viola, Francesco; Camarri, Simone; Iungo, Giacomo Valerio

    2017-11-01

    Numerical simulations of wakes produced by utility-scale wind turbines still present challenges related to the variability of the atmospheric conditions and, in the most of the cases, the lack of information about the geometry and aerodynamic performance of the wind turbine blades. In order to overcome the mentioned difficulties, we propose a RANS solver for which turbine aerodynamic forcing and turbulence closure are calibrated through LiDAR and SCADA data acquired for an onshore wind farm. The wind farm under examination is located in North Texas over a relatively flat terrain. The experimental data are leveraged to maximize accuracy of the RANS predictions in terms of wake velocity field and power capture for different atmospheric stability conditions and settings of the wind turbines. The optimization of the RANS parameters is performed through an adjoint-RANS formulation and a gradient-based procedure. The optimally-tuned aerodynamic forcing and turbulence closure are then analyzed in order to investigate effects of the atmospheric stability on the evolution of wind turbine wakes and power performance. The proposed RANS solver has low computational costs comparable to those of wake engineering models, which make it a compelling tool for wind farm control and optimization. Acknowledgments: NSF I/UCRC WindSTAR IIP 1362033 and TACC.

  18. Effectiveness of a Timing and Coordination Group Exercise Program to Improve Mobility in Community-Dwelling Older Adults: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brach, Jennifer S; Perera, Subashan; Gilmore, Sandra; VanSwearingen, Jessie M; Brodine, Deborah; Nadkarni, Neelesh K; Ricci, Edmund

    2017-10-01

    = .03). Attendance was greater in the usual-care program compared with On the Move (95 [65.1%] vs 76 [50.0%] attended ≥20 classes; P = .03). There were no significant differences in any of the other primary or secondary outcomes. The On the Move group exercise program was more effective at improving mobility than a usual-care exercise program, despite lower attendance. Additional research examining the impact of the intervention on long-term disability outcomes is needed before recommending routine implementation into clinical practice. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT01986647.

  19. In vivo FRET imaging revealed a regulatory role of RanGTP in kinetochore-microtubule attachments via Aurora B kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoke-Peng Lee

    Full Text Available Under the fluctuating circumstances provided by the innate dynamics of microtubules and opposing tensions resulted from microtubule-associated motors, it is vital to ensure stable kinetochore-microtubule attachments for accurate segregation. However, a comprehensive understanding of how this regulation is mechanistically achieved remains elusive. Using our newly designed live cell FRET time-lapse imaging, we found that post-metaphase RanGTP is crucial in the maintenance of stable kinetochore-microtubule attachments by regulating Aurora B kinase via the NES-bearing Mst1. More importantly, our study demonstrates that by ensuring stable alignment of metaphase chromosomes prior to segregation, RanGTP is indispensible in governing the genomic integrity and the fidelity of cell cycle progression. Our findings suggest an additional role of RanGTP beyond its known function in mitotic spindle assembly during the prometaphase-metaphase transition.

  20. Mobile healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Stephen A; Agee, Nancy Howell

    2012-01-01

    Mobile technology's presence in healthcare has exploded over the past five years. The increased use of mobile devices by all segments of the US population has driven healthcare systems, providers, and payers to accept this new form of communication and to develop strategies to implement and leverage the use of mobile healthcare (mHealth) within their organizations and practices. As healthcare systems move toward a more value-driven model of care, patient centeredness and engagement are the keys to success. Mobile healthcare will provide the medium to allow patients to participate more in their care. Financially, mHealth brings to providers the ability to improve efficiency and deliver savings to both them and the healthcare consumer. However, mHealth is not without challenges. Healthcare IT departments have been reluctant to embrace this shift in technology without fully addressing security and privacy concerns. Providers have been hesitant to adopt mHealth as a form of communication with patients because it breaks with traditional models. Our healthcare system has just started the journey toward the development of mHealth. We offer an overview of the mobile healthcare environment and our approach to solving the challenges it brings to healthcare organizations.

  1. Use of and Beliefs About Mobile Phone Apps for Diabetes Self-Management: Surveys of People in a Hospital Diabetes Clinic and Diabetes Health Professionals in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Leah; Grainger, Rebecca; Hall, Rosemary M; Krebs, Jeremy D

    2017-06-30

    People with diabetes mellitus (DM) are using mobile phone apps to support self-management. The numerous apps available to assist with diabetes management have a variety of functions. Some functions, like insulin dose calculators, have significant potential for harm. The study aimed to establish (1) whether people with DM in Wellington, New Zealand, use apps for DM self-management and evaluate desirable features of apps and (2) whether health professionals (HPs) in New Zealand treating people with DM recommend apps to patients, the features HPs regard as important, and their confidence with recommending apps. A survey of patients seen at a hospital diabetes clinic over 12 months (N=539) assessed current app use and desirable features. A second survey of HPs attending a diabetes conference (n=286) assessed their confidence with app recommendations and perceived usefulness. Of the 189 responders (35.0% response rate) to the patient survey, 19.6% (37/189) had used a diabetes app. App users were younger and in comparison to other forms of diabetes mellitus, users prominently had type 1 DM. The most favored feature of the app users was a glucose diary (87%, 32/37), and an insulin calculator was the most desirable function for a future app (46%, 17/37). In non-app users, the most desirable feature for a future app was a glucose diary (64.4%, 98/152). Of the 115 responders (40.2% response rate) to the HPs survey, 60.1% (68/113) had recommended a diabetes app. Diaries for blood glucose levels and carbohydrate counting were considered the most useful app features and the features HPs felt most confident to recommend. HPs were least confident in recommending insulin calculation apps. The use of apps to record blood glucose was the most favored function in apps used by people with diabetes, with interest in insulin dose calculating function. HPs do not feel confident in recommending insulin dose calculators. There is an urgent need for an app assessment process to give

  2. New agents in HSC mobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingues, Mélanie J; Nilsson, Susan K; Cao, Benjamin

    2017-02-01

    Mobilized peripheral blood (PB) is the most common source of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) for autologous transplantation. Granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is the most commonly used mobilization agent, yet despite its widespread use, a considerable number of patients still fail to mobilize. Recently, a greater understanding of the interactions that regulate HSC homeostasis in the bone marrow (BM) microenvironment has enabled the development of new molecules that mobilize HSC through specific inhibition, modulation or perturbation of these interactions. AMD3100 (plerixafor), a small molecule that selectively inhibits the chemokine receptor CXCR4 is approved for mobilization in combination with G-CSF in patients with Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and multiple myeloma. Nevertheless, identifying mobilization strategies that not only enhance HSC number, but are rapid and generate an optimal "mobilized product" for improved transplant outcomes remains an area of clinical importance. In recent times, new agents based on recombinant proteins, peptides and small molecules have been identified as potential candidates for therapeutic HSC mobilization. In this review, we describe the most recent developments in HSC mobilization agents and their potential impact in HSC transplantation.

  3. Evaluating the impact of a mobile oral telemedicine system on medical management and clinical outcomes of patients with complicated oral lesions in Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesfalul, Martha; Littman-Quinn, Ryan; Antwi, Cynthia; Ndlovu, Siphiwo; Motsepe, Didintle; Phuthego, Motsholathebe; Tau, Boitumelo; Mohutsiwa-Dibe, Neo; Kovarik, Carrie

    2013-01-01

    Mobile telemedicine, which involves the use of cellular phone telecommunications to facilitate exchange of information between parties in different locations to assist in the management of patients, has become increasingly popular, particularly in resource-limited settings. In Botswana, small studies of mobile telemedicine programs suggest access to these services positively affect patients, but these programs' impact is difficult to capture given limitations of baseline and comparative data. Our observational study uses each patient receiving mobile oral telemedicine services in Botswana as his/her own control to assess the impact of these services on his/her diagnosis and management plan. At month 5 of 12 total, preliminary analysis of eligible cases (n = 27) reveals management plan discordance between clinicians submitting cases and the specialist was 68.0% (17/25), suggesting that telemedicine can result in significant changes in management of patients.

  4. Designing Mobilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.

    are often still not engaged with in a sufficiently manner. Often social sciences keep distance to the physical and material as if the social was still to be understood as a realm separate of technology, architecture, and design (for a critique of this see; Latour 2005 and Urry 2000). This paper takes point...... of departure in the sociological perspective termed ‘Staging Mobilities’ (Jensen 2013a) and utilizes this as an analytical frame for exploring cases of mobility design. The paper put focus on how the material shape, design and architectures of technologies, spaces and sites influence mobilities practices......, mobilitiy technologies or urban sites of movement we get much closer to understanding the meaning of mobilities to social interaction and culture. The cases are still representing work-in-progress but will be reported in the book ‘Designing Mobilites’ (Jensen 2013b) and will cover the four cases of...

  5. Steady RANS methodology for calculating pressure drop in an in-line molten salt compact crossflow heat exchanger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carasik, Lane B.; Shaver, Dillon R.; Hassan, Yassin A.; Haefner, Jonah B.

    2017-11-01

    The development of molten salt cooled reactors (MSR) and fluoride-salt cooled high temperature reactors (FHR) requires the use of advanced design tools for the primary heat exchanger design. Due to geometric and flow characteristics, compact (pitch to diameter ratios equal to or less than 1.25) heat exchangers with a crossflow flow arrangement can become desirable for these reactors. Unfortunately, the available experimental data is limited for compact tube bundles or banks in crossflow. Computational Fluid Dynamics can be used to alleviate the lack of experimental data in these tube banks. Previous computational efforts have been primarily focused on large S/D ratios (larger than 1.4) using unsteady Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes and Large Eddy Simulation frameworks. These approaches are useful, but have large computational requirements that make comprehensive design studies impractical. A CFD study was conducted with steady RANS in an effort to provide a starting point for future design work. The study was performed for an in-line tube bank geometry with FLiBe (LiF-BeF2), a frequently selected molten salt, as the working fluid. Based on the estimated pressure drops, the pressure and velocity distributions in the domain, an appropriate meshing strategy was determined and presented. Periodic boundaries in the spanwise direction transverse flow were determined to be an appropriate boundary condition for reduced computational domains. The domain size was investigated and a minimum of 2-flow channels for a domain is recommended to ensure the behavior is accounted for. Lastly, the standard low Re κ-ε (Lien) turbulence model was determined to be the most appropriate for steady RANS of this case at the time of writing.

  6. Book Review: A History of the Czechoslovak Ocean Shipping Company, 1948–1989: How a Small, Landlocked Country Ran Maritime Business During the Cold War

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taudal Poulsen, René

    2016-01-01

    Review of: Lenka Krátká: A History of the Czechoslovak Ocean Shipping Company, 1948–1989: How a Small, Landlocked Country Ran Maritime Business During the Cold War. Stuttgart: Ibidem Verlag, 2015. x + 271 pp., tables, notes, bibliography. ISBN: 978-3-8382-0666-0, £23.90 (pbk).......Review of: Lenka Krátká: A History of the Czechoslovak Ocean Shipping Company, 1948–1989: How a Small, Landlocked Country Ran Maritime Business During the Cold War. Stuttgart: Ibidem Verlag, 2015. x + 271 pp., tables, notes, bibliography. ISBN: 978-3-8382-0666-0, £23.90 (pbk)....

  7. Linking Immunity to Atherosclerosis: Implications for Vascular Pharmacology - A tribute to Göran K. Hansson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Yong-Jian; Jonasson, Lena

    2011-01-01

    For the past decade, we have deepened our understanding of the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, a chronic arterial disease that causes cardiac and cerebral infarction and peripheral vascular disorders. Because of this extended understanding, more effective strategies for prevention and treatment of this disease are emerging. One of the fundamental mechanisms that lead to progress or regression in atherosclerosis, thus influencing its life-threatening complications, occurs through functional changes in vascular immunity and inflammation. This review briefly summarized the discoveries in basic and translational sciences in this area and recent advances in clinical medicine against atherosclerotic vascular diseases. PMID:22120836

  8. Mobility impairment is associated with reduced microstructural integrity of the inferior and superior cerebellar peduncles in elderly with no clinical signs of cerebellar dysfunction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cavallari, Michele; Moscufo, Nicola; Skudlarski, Pawel; Meier, Dominik; Panzer, Victoria P; Pearlson, Godfrey D; White, William B; Wolfson, Leslie; Guttmann, Charles R G

    2013-01-01

    .... Based on the short physical performance battery (SPPB) score, we defined mobility status of the subjects in the study as normal (score 11-12, n = 26), intermediate (score 9-10, n = 27) or impaired (score n = 32...

  9. IncA/C Conjugative Plasmids Mobilize a New Family of Multidrug Resistance Islands in Clinical Vibrio cholerae Non-01/Non-0139 Isolates from Haiti

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carraro, N.; Rivard, N.; Ceccarelli, Daniela; Colwell, R.R.; Burrus, V.

    2016-01-01

    Mobile genetic elements play a pivotal role in the adaptation of bacterial populations, allowing them to rapidly cope with hostile conditions, including the presence of antimicrobial compounds. IncA/C conjugative plasmids (ACPs) are efficient vehicles for dissemination of multidrug resistance genes

  10. Mobile probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørngreen, Rikke; Jørgensen, Anna Neustrup; Noesgaard, Signe Schack

    2016-01-01

    to in an interview. This method provided valuable insight into the contextual use, i.e. how did the online resource transfer to the work practice. However, the research team also found that mobile probes may provide the scaffolding necessary for individual and peer learning at a very local (intra-school) community...

  11. Designing Mobilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.

    How is the width of the pavement shaping the urban experience? How is the material design of transport infrastructure and mobile technology affording social interaction in everyday life spaces? How do people inhabit these spaces with their bodies and in accordance to social and cultural norms...

  12. Mobile Misfortune

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigh, Henrik Erdman

    2015-01-01

    of the mobility it enables. This article, thus, looks at the motives and manners in which young men in Bissau become caught up in transnational flows of cocaine. It shows how motion is emotively anchored and affectively bound: tied to and directed toward a feeling of worth and realisation of being, and how...

  13. Mobile IP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijenk, Geert; Sallent, S.; Pras, Aiko

    1999-01-01

    The Internet is growing exponentially, both in the amount of traffic carried, and in the amount of hosts connected. IP technology is becoming more and more important, in company networks (Intranets), and also in the core networks for the next generation mobile networks. Further, wireless access to

  14. Development of a clinical prediction rule for identifying women with tension-type headache who are likely to achieve short-term success with joint mobilization and muscle trigger point therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-de-las-Peñas, César; Cleland, Joshua A; Palomeque-del-Cerro, Luis; Caminero, Ana Belén; Guillem-Mesado, Amparo; Jiménez-García, Rodrigo

    2011-02-01

    To identify prognostic factors from the history and physical examination in women with tension-type headache (TTH) who are likely to experience self-perceived clinical improvement following a multimodal physical therapy session including joint mobilization and muscle trigger point (TrP) therapies. No definitive therapeutic intervention is available for TTH. It would be useful for clinicians to have a clinical prediction rule for selecting which TTH patients may experience improved outcomes following a multimodal physical therapy program. Women diagnosed with pure TTH by 3 experienced neurologists according to the International Headache Society criteria from different neurology departments were included. They underwent a standardized examination (neck mobility, pressure pain thresholds, total tenderness score, presence of muscle TrPs, Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form, the Neck Disability Index [NDI], the Beck Depression Inventory, and the Headache Disability Inventory) and then a multimodal physical therapy session including joint mobilization and TrP therapies. The treatment session included a 30-second grade III or IV central posterior-anterior nonthrust mobilization applied from T4 to T1 thoracic vertebrae, at C7-T1 cervico-thoracic junction and C1-C2 vertebrae for an overall intervention time of 5 minutes Different TrP techniques, particularly soft tissue stroke, pressure release, or muscle energy were applied to head and neck-shoulder muscles (temporalis, suboccipital, upper trapezius, splenius capitis, semispinalis capitis, sternocleidomastoid) to inactivate active muscle TrPs. Participants were classified as having achieved a successful outcome 1 week after the session based on their self-perceived recovery. Potential prognostic variables were entered into a stepwise logistic regression model to determine the most accurate set of variables for prediction of success. Data for 76 subjects were included in the analysis, of which 36 experienced a

  15. Mobile-to-mobile wireless channels

    CERN Document Server

    Zajic, Alenka

    2013-01-01

    Present-day mobile communications systems can be classified as fixed-to-mobile because they allow mobility on only one end (e.g. the mobile phone to a fixed mobile operator's cell tower). In answer to the consumer demand for better coverage and quality of service, emerging mobile-to-mobile (M-to-M) communications systems allow mobile users or vehicles to directly communicate with each other. This practical book provides a detailed introduction to state-of-the-art M-to-M wireless propagation. Moreover, the book offers professionals guidance for rapid implementation of these communications syste

  16. Mobile Customer Relationship Management and Mobile Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanayei, Ali; Mirzaei, Abas

    The purpose of this study is twofold. First, in order to guarantee a coherent discussion about mobile customer relationship management (mCRM), this paper presents a conceptualization of mCRM delineating its unique characteristics because of Among the variety of mobile services, considerable attention has been devoted to mobile marketing and in particular to mobile customer relationship management services. Second, the authors discusses the security risks in mobile computing in different level(user, mobile device, wireless network,...) and finally we focus on enterprise mobile security and it's subgroups with a series of suggestion and solution for improve mobile computing security.

  17. RanBP9 overexpression accelerates loss of pre and postsynaptic proteins in the APΔE9 transgenic mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongjie; Wang, Ruizhi; Xu, Shaohua; Lakshmana, Madepalli K

    2014-01-01

    There is now compelling evidence that the neurodegenerative process in Alzheimer's disease (AD) begins in synapses. Loss of synaptic proteins and functional synapses in the amyloid precursor protein (APP) transgenic mouse models of AD is well established. However, what is the earliest age at which such loss of synapses occurs, and whether known markers of AD progression accelerate functional deficits is completely unknown. We previously showed that RanBP9 overexpression leads to robustly increased amyloid β peptide (Aβ) generation leading to enhanced amyloid plaque burden in a mouse model of AD. In this study we compared synaptic protein levels among four genotypes of mice, i.e., RanBP9 single transgenic (Ran), APΔE9 double transgenic (Dbl), APΔE9/RanBP9 triple transgenic (Tpl) and wild-type (WT) controls. We found significant reductions in the levels of synaptic proteins in both cortex and hippocampus of 5- and 6-months-old but not 3- or 4-months-old mice. Specifically, at 5-months of age, rab3A was reduced in the triple transgenic mice only in the cortex by 25% (pproteins in the mouse brain.

  18. Study of laminar separation bubble on low Reynolds number operating airfoils: RANS modelling by means of an high-accuracy solver and experimental verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crivellini, A.; D'Alessandro, V.; Di Benedetto, D.; Montelpare, S.; Ricci, R.

    2014-04-01

    This work is devoted to the Computational Fluid-Dynamics (CFD) simulation of laminar separation bubble (LSB) on low Reynolds number operating airfoils. This phenomenon is of large interest in several fields, such as wind energy, and it is characterised by slow recirculating flow at an almost constant pressure. Presently Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) methods, due to their limited computational requests, are the more efficient and feasible CFD simulation tool for complex engineering applications involving LSBs. However adopting RANS methods for LSB prediction is very challenging since widely used models assume a fully turbulent regime. For this reason several transitional models for RANS equations based on further Partial Differential Equations (PDE) have been recently introduced in literature. Nevertheless in some cases they show questionable results. In this work RANS equations and the standard Spalart-Allmaras (SA) turbulence model are used to deal with LSB problems obtaining promising results. This innovative result is related to: (i) a particular behaviour of the SA equation; (ii) a particular implementation of SA equation; (iii) the use of a high-order discontinuous Galerkin (DG) solver. The effectiveness of the proposed approach is tested on different airfoils at several angles of attack and Reynolds numbers. Numerical results were verified with both experimental measurements performed at the open circuit subsonic wind tunnel of Università Politecnica delle Marche (UNIVPM) and literature data.

  19. Ozsvath, Zsuzsanna: "When the Danube Ran Red"; Mandel, Eva Marika: "Le Livre de Mana"; Roth, Marika: "All the Pretty Shoes; A Memoir of Survival and the Feminine Spirit".

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evi Blaikie

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ozsvath, Zsuzsanna. When the Danube Ran Red. Syracuse University Press, 2010,171 pp., Illus.Mandel, Eva Marika. Le Livre de Mana. Paris, Glyphe 2009, 231 pp., Illus.Roth, Marika. All the Pretty Shoes; A Memoir of Survival and the Feminine SpiritWyatt McKenzy 2010, 254 pp., Illus.Reviewed by Evi Blaikie, Freelance Writer.

  20. A lentiviral sponge for miR-101 regulates RanBP9 expression and amyloid precursor protein metabolism in hippocampal neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian eBarbato

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegeneration associated with amyloid β (Aβ peptide accumulation, synaptic loss, and memory impairment are pathophysiological features of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Numerous microRNAs regulate amyloid precursor protein (APP expression and metabolism. We previously reported that miR-101 is a negative regulator of APP expression in cultured hippocampal neurons. In this study, a search for predicted APP metabolism-associated miR-101 targets led to the identification of a conserved miR-101 binding site within the 3’ untranslated region (UTR of the mRNA encoding Ran-binding protein 9 (RanBP9. RanBP9 increases APP processing by β-amyloid converting enzyme 1 (BACE1, secretion of soluble APPβ (sAPPβ, and generation of Aβ. MiR-101 significantly reduced reporter gene expression when co-transfected with a RanBP9 3'-UTR reporter construct, while site-directed mutagenesis of the predicted miR-101 target site eliminated the reporter response. To investigate the effect of stable inhibition of miR-101 both in vitro and in vivo, a microRNA sponge was developed to bind miR-101 and derepress its targets. Four tandem bulged miR-101 responsive elements (REs, located downstream of the enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP open reading frame and driven by the synapsin promoter, were placed in a lentiviral vector to create the pLSyn-miR-101 sponge. Delivery of the sponge to primary hippocampal neurons significantly increased both APP and RanBP9 expression, as well as sAPPβ levels in the conditioned medium. Importantly, silencing of endogenous RanBP9 reduced sAPPβ levels in miR-101 sponge-containing hippocampal cultures, indicating that miR-101 inhibition may increase amyloidogenic processing of APP by RanBP9. Lastly, the impact of miR-101 on its targets was demonstrated in vivo by intrahippocampal injection of the pLSyn-miR-101 sponge into C57BL6 mice. This study thus provides the basis for studying the consequences of long-term miR-101 inhibition on

  1. Comprehensive Approaches to Multiphase Flows in Geophysics - Application to nonisothermal, nonhomogenous, unsteady, large-scale, turbulent dusty clouds I. Hydrodynamic and Thermodynamic RANS and LES Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Dartevelle

    2005-09-05

    The objective of this manuscript is to fully derive a geophysical multiphase model able to ''accommodate'' different multiphase turbulence approaches; viz., the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS), the Large Eddy Simulation (LES), or hybrid RANSLES. This manuscript is the first part of a larger geophysical multiphase project--lead by LANL--that aims to develop comprehensive modeling tools for large-scale, atmospheric, transient-buoyancy dusty jets and plume (e.g., plinian clouds, nuclear ''mushrooms'', ''supercell'' forest fire plumes) and for boundary-dominated geophysical multiphase gravity currents (e.g., dusty surges, diluted pyroclastic flows, dusty gravity currents in street canyons). LES is a partially deterministic approach constructed on either a spatial- or a temporal-separation between the large and small scales of the flow, whereas RANS is an entirely probabilistic approach constructed on a statistical separation between an ensemble-averaged mean and higher-order statistical moments (the so-called ''fluctuating parts''). Within this specific multiphase context, both turbulence approaches are built up upon the same phasic binary-valued ''function of presence''. This function of presence formally describes the occurrence--or not--of any phase at a given position and time and, therefore, allows to derive the same basic multiphase Navier-Stokes model for either the RANS or the LES frameworks. The only differences between these turbulence frameworks are the closures for the various ''turbulence'' terms involving the unknown variables from the fluctuating (RANS) or from the subgrid (LES) parts. Even though the hydrodynamic and thermodynamic models for RANS and LES have the same set of Partial Differential Equations, the physical interpretations of these PDEs cannot be the same, i.e., RANS models an averaged field, while LES simulates a

  2. The African Mobile Story

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book identifies the factors that has enabled the growth of mobile telephony in Africa. The book covers the regulatory factors, the development and usage of mobile application, mobile security and sustainable power source for mobile networks......This book identifies the factors that has enabled the growth of mobile telephony in Africa. The book covers the regulatory factors, the development and usage of mobile application, mobile security and sustainable power source for mobile networks...

  3. Urban Mobility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    This anthology is the proceedings publication from the 2015 NAF Symposium in Malmö, Sweden. The aim of the 2015 NAF Symposium “Urban Mobility – Architectures, Geographies and Social Space” was to facilitate a cross-disciplinary discussion on urban mobility in which the juxtaposition of different...... discursive perceptions of the concept would foster greater insight into and understanding of both the challenges and potentials that it represents. It focused on some of the key themes currently facing cities and the urban: the transformation of the city and our built environment; migration; rural decline......; the interaction between city, architecture, and inhabitants; the role of architects and architecture in the creation of democratic and sustainable urban contexts; the city and its representation; the politics of intervention; and the actions of governing and developing. This proceedings publication from...

  4. Comparison of incisor mobility after insertion of canine-to-canine lingual retainers bonded to two or to six teeth. A clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watted, N; Wieber, M; Teuscher, T; Schmitz, N

    2001-09-01

    Fixed appliance therapy often extends over several years. Debonding is warmly welcomed and is often seen by the patient as the end of treatment. Yet both patients and parents often underestimate the importance of the subsequent retention period and the speed at which negligence in this treatment phase results in relapse. Bonded retainers guarantee excellent long-term stability at least while they are in situ. The reliable attachment of lingual retainers with modern bonding techniques has led to widespread application of this retention method. The present study investigated its influence on tooth mobility and on the damping properties of the periodontal tissue, by means of a dynamic measuring method (Periotest). For this purpose two groups with mandibular bonded retainers and one control group were formed. The control group wore removable retention appliances. In all groups, active treatment with fixed appliances had been completed at least half a year before baseline. The results showed that bonded retainers had a negative impact on the damping properties of the periodontal tissue and thus in the broader sense on tooth mobility. Tooth mobility decreased with the number of teeth to which the retainer was bonded but remained, as in the control group, within the physiologic range.

  5. Effect of slump stretching versus lumbar mobilization with exercise in subjects with non-radicular low back pain: a randomized clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagrale, Amit Vinayak; Patil, Shubhangi Pandurang; Gandhi, Rita Amarchand; Learman, Ken

    2012-01-01

    Previous case reports, case series, and pilot studies have suggested that slump stretching may enhance the effects of spinal mobilization and stabilization exercises in patients with non-radicular low back pain (NRLBP). The purpose of this trial was to determine if slump stretching results in improvements in pain, disability, and fear and avoidance beliefs in patients with NRLBP with neural mechanosensitivity. Sixty patients, 18–60 years of age presenting with NRLBP with symptom duration >3 months, were randomized into one of two, 3-week physical therapy programs. Group one received lumbar spinal mobilization with stabilization exercises while group two received slump stretching in addition to lumbar spinal mobilization with exercise. Outcomes including the modified Oswestry disability index (ODI), numeric pain rating scale (NPRS), and the fear–avoidance belief questionnaire (FABQ) were collected at baseline, and at weeks 1, 2, 3, and 6. A doubly multivariate analysis of variance revealed a significant group–time interaction for ODI, NPRS, and FABQ. There were large within-group changes for all outcomes with Pmobilization and stabilization exercises when treating NRLBP. PMID:23372392

  6. Effect of slump stretching versus lumbar mobilization with exercise in subjects with non-radicular low back pain: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagrale, Amit Vinayak; Patil, Shubhangi Pandurang; Gandhi, Rita Amarchand; Learman, Ken

    2012-02-01

    Previous case reports, case series, and pilot studies have suggested that slump stretching may enhance the effects of spinal mobilization and stabilization exercises in patients with non-radicular low back pain (NRLBP). The purpose of this trial was to determine if slump stretching results in improvements in pain, disability, and fear and avoidance beliefs in patients with NRLBP with neural mechanosensitivity. Sixty patients, 18-60 years of age presenting with NRLBP with symptom duration >3 months, were randomized into one of two, 3-week physical therapy programs. Group one received lumbar spinal mobilization with stabilization exercises while group two received slump stretching in addition to lumbar spinal mobilization with exercise. Outcomes including the modified Oswestry disability index (ODI), numeric pain rating scale (NPRS), and the fear-avoidance belief questionnaire (FABQ) were collected at baseline, and at weeks 1, 2, 3, and 6. A doubly multivariate analysis of variance revealed a significant group-time interaction for ODI, NPRS, and FABQ. There were large within-group changes for all outcomes with Pmobilization and stabilization exercises when treating NRLBP.

  7. Structural Mobility, Exchange Mobility and Subgroup Consistent Mobility Measurement – US–German Mobility Measurements Revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Schluter, C.; D. VAN DE GAER

    2008-01-01

    We formalize the concept of structural mobility and use the framework of subgroup consistent mobility measurement to derive a relative and an absolute measure of mobility that is increasing both in upward structural mobility and exchange mobility. In our empirical illustration, we contribute substantively to the ongoing debate about mobility rankings between the USA and Germany.

  8. Effect of transcranial direct current stimulation combined with gait and mobility training on functionality in children with cerebral palsy: study protocol for a double-blind randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grecco, Luanda André Collange; Duarte, Natália de Almeida Carvalho; de Mendonça, Mariana Emerenciano; Pasini, Hugo; Lima, Vânia Lúcia Costa de Carvalho; Franco, Renata Calhes; de Oliveira, Luis Vicente Franco; de Carvalho, Paulo de Tarso Camilo; Corrêa, João Carlos Ferrari; Collange, Nelci Zanon; Sampaio, Luciana Maria Malosá; Galli, Manuela; Fregni, Felipe; Oliveira, Claudia Santos

    2013-10-11

    The project proposes three innovative intervention techniques (treadmill training, mobility training with virtual reality and transcranial direct current stimulation that can be safely administered to children with cerebral palsy. The combination of transcranial stimulation and physical therapy resources will provide the training of a specific task with multiple rhythmic repetitions of the phases of the gait cycle, providing rich sensory stimuli with a modified excitability threshold of the primary motor cortex to enhance local synaptic efficacy and potentiate motor learning. A prospective, double-blind, randomized, controlled, analytical, clinical trial will be carried out.Eligible participants will be children with cerebral palsy classified on levels I, II and III of the Gross Motor Function Classification System between four and ten years of age. The participants will be randomly allocated to four groups: 1) gait training on a treadmill with placebo transcranial stimulation; 2) gait training on a treadmill with active transcranial stimulation; 3) mobility training with virtual reality and placebo transcranial stimulation; 4) mobility training with virtual reality and active transcranial stimulation. Transcranial direct current stimulation will be applied with the anodal electrode positioned in the region of the dominant hemisphere over C3, corresponding to the primary motor cortex, and the cathode positioned in the supraorbital region contralateral to the anode. A 1 mA current will be applied for 20 minutes. Treadmill training and mobility training with virtual reality will be performed in 30-minute sessions five times a week for two weeks (total of 10 sessions). Evaluations will be performed on four occasions: one week prior to the intervention; one week following the intervention; one month after the end of the intervention;and 3 months after the end of the intervention. The evaluations will involve three-dimensional gait analysis, analysis of cortex

  9. Investigation of Synthetic Jets Efficiency to Control Cavity Flotation with Subsonic External Flow by High-Resolution RANS / ILES Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Lyubimov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cavities often found in airplanes: a niche for the landing gear, various weapons, etc. Reducing fluctuations of pressure and temperature in the cavity is a relevant practical problem. The article presents simulation results of external subsonic flow around the cavity (M = 0.85, T = 300K. . Calculations were performed using the high-resolution RANS/ILES (Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes - RANS, Implicit Large Eddy Simulation - ILES method. To control flow the authors propose to use synthetic jets. Synthetic jets are produced by periodic ejection and suction of fluid from a slot induced by the movement of a diaphragm (generator of synthetic jets inside a cavity. They are compact and efficient and do not require a special working body and the ways for its supply. Instead of calculating the flow in the synthetic jet generator was used the modified boundary condition on the wall where the output slots was positioned. Under consideration there were two variants of slots for synthetic jets output: in front of the cavity and inside the cavity on the front wall. The frequency and amplitude values of the synthetic jet specified a mode of each jet. For a jet inside the cavity two modes have been reviewed, namely: 100 Hz and 50m/s, 200Hz and 50m/s. For jet in front of the cavity three modes have been reviewed, specifically: 20Hz and 20m/s, 100Hz and 50m/s, 200Hz and 50m/s. Analysis of calculation results showed that for all modes under examination, the synthetic jets reduced fluctuation of static pressure and temperature on the bottom and back walls of the cavity. The mode with parameters 200Hz, 50 m/s and synthetic jet located in front of the cavity was the most efficient. Furthermore, we compared the results of calculations for two-and three-dimensional cavities, which have the same length and depth. Research has shown that the simplified quasi-two-dimensional calculations cannot be used to evaluate the pressure and temperature fluctuations. This is due to

  10. Avaliação clínico-radiográfica da mobilidade da lordose lombar Radiographic and clinical mobility evaluation in lumbar lordosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio Vítor de Abreu

    2007-10-01

    , respectivamente. A média do ângulo de acunhamento de L5 foi de 8,6°, 7,6° e 4,4° em neutro e de 5,9°, 6,1° e 3,6° em flexão, para os grupos I, II e III, respectivamente. Exercício abdominal com os membros inferiores estendidos foi realizado por 100% dos indivíduos no grupo I, 70% no II e 48% no III, enquanto que com os membros inferiores fletidos foi executado por 96% do grupo I, 46% do II e 16% do III. CONCLUSÃO: Decrescem concomitantemente a mobilidade em flexão da coluna lombossacra e a força dos músculos abdominais com o aumento da idade.The objective of this paper was to establish a normal standard for the values of angles for lumbar lordosis, to determine the clinical and radiological mobility in the sagittal (flexion-extension of the lumbar spine and to test the strength of abdominal muscles in individuals of both genders and three different age brackets. METHODS: 150 individuals who had no pain complaints or vertebral deformities were evaluated, all of them chosen at random. The participants were divided into three groups of 50 individuals according to the age bracket I 0 to 20; II 21 to 40, and III 41 to 60 in a total of 79 males and 71 females. All of them were submitted to radiographic exams of the lumbar spine in orthostatism, in profile, with the trunk in maximum flexion and in the neutral position. The research subjects were also evaluated for their capacity of performing abdominal exercises with extended and flectioned lower limbs in order to investigate the performance of lordogenic and anti-lordogenic muscles, respectively. On the X-rays, the following angles were measured: a between the top of L1 and the top of L5; b top of L1 and base of L5; c top of L1 and top of S1; d base of L5 and top of S1 (angle of the lumbosacral joint and e top of L5 and base of L5 (wedging of de L5. RESULTS: In the three groups, the mean results for angles a, b and c were, respectively, 37°, 44°, and 57° in neutral position, and -1°, 6°, and 11° in maximum flexion

  11. Mobile termination and mobile penetration

    OpenAIRE

    Hurkens, Sjaak; Jeon, Doh-Shin

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we study how access pricing affects network competition when subscription demand is elastic and each network uses non-linear prices and can apply termination-based price discrimination. In the case of a fixed per minute termination charge, we find that a reduction of the termination charge below cost has two oppos- ing effects: it softens competition but helps to internalize network externalities. The former reduces mobile penetration while the latter boosts it. We find that fi...

  12. The communities of harvestmen (Opilionida of floodplain forest in the Ranšpurk National Nature Reserve and their fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hana Šejnohová

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available During the years 1993–2001 the monitoring of the soil surface fauna was carried out in a floodplain fo- rest in the Ranšpurk National Nature Reserve (south Moravia. The harvestmen assemblages fluctuation is described in detail in this paper. The method of pitfall traps was used. A total of 3174 individuals of seven harvestmen species were collected. The species composition was very similar to other research results from the southern Moravian floodplain forest. Only the dominance values differ from the values in the other localities. All of the registered species prefer moisture and shadow places. The highest abundance was observed in Astrobunus laevipes (Canestrini, 1872, Nemastoma lugubre (Müller, 1776, Oligolophus tridens (C. L. Koch, 1936 and Rilaena triangularis (Herbst, 1799. The dynamics of harvestmen occurrence during the year had a different development than in other groups of invertebrates. Harvestmen mostly occurred in pitfall traps in autumn and winter months. The highest abundance of harvestmen in traps was observed in December and January. In July 1997, disastrous flood affected all groups of invertebrates. The flood had a minimal impact on the abundance of harvestmen in pitfall traps.

  13. Proactive monitoring of an onshore wind farm through lidar measurements, SCADA data and a data-driven RANS solver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iungo, Giacomo Valerio; Camarri, Simone; Ciri, Umberto; El-Asha, Said; Leonardi, Stefano; Rotea, Mario A.; Santhanagopalan, Vignesh; Viola, Francesco; Zhan, Lu

    2016-11-01

    Site conditions, such as topography and local climate, as well as wind farm layout strongly affect performance of a wind power plant. Therefore, predictions of wake interactions and their effects on power production still remain a great challenge in wind energy. For this study, an onshore wind turbine array was monitored through lidar measurements, SCADA and met-tower data. Power losses due to wake interactions were estimated to be approximately 4% and 2% of the total power production under stable and convective conditions, respectively. This dataset was then leveraged for the calibration of a data driven RANS (DDRANS) solver, which is a compelling tool for prediction of wind turbine wakes and power production. DDRANS is characterized by a computational cost as low as that for engineering wake models, and adequate accuracy achieved through data-driven tuning of the turbulence closure model. DDRANS is based on a parabolic formulation, axisymmetry and boundary layer approximations, which allow achieving low computational costs. The turbulence closure model consists in a mixing length model, which is optimally calibrated with the experimental dataset. Assessment of DDRANS is then performed through lidar and SCADA data for different atmospheric conditions. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under the I/UCRC WindSTAR, NSF Award IIP 1362033.

  14. Mobility Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-11-01

    IV-419 Strauss, A.M. - V-55 Stuller, J. - IV-470 Stuller, J.G. - IV-457 Sugarman , R.C. - IV-707 Suhier, S.A. - IV-540 Sullivan, E. - 111-214 Sullivan...military vehicle mobility 148 110. AU - Brannon, W.; David , R.H.; Hodges, W., Jr.; Janowski, W.R. TI - Design and development of the twister testbed SO...OS - Aluminum Co of America Alcoa Center PA, David W. Taylor Naval Ship Research and Development Center, Bethesda, MD SO - 20 Feb 76, 59 p, ADA024262

  15. Downwardly mobile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-01-01

    P & H Mining Equipment has produced the 250XP rotary blasthole drill, its first `clean sheet` drill after eight years of upgrading the line of large rotaries it acquired from Gardner Denver in 1991. A prototype has been working on an Australian coal mine since June 1998. A further two units of the 250XP are being erected at a diamond mine in Botswana for start-up in January 1999 and another will begin drilling at a Wyoming, USA coal mine in February. The drill is a highly mobile, heavy duty, highly reliable diesel/hydraulic drill weighing 113,500 kg and can drill holes at angles up to 30 degrees.

  16. Wapice News Mobile Application

    OpenAIRE

    Söylemez, Ilke

    2017-01-01

    Since the mobile phones started to have an increasingly significant role in daily life, the mobile application development also started to be an important area in the software industry. The problem for mobile application developers is to develop a mobile application which supports all the devices and platforms on the market. This issue created a need for cross platform mobile applications. The cross platform mobile development refers to the development of mobile applications that could be use...

  17. Going mobile: free and easy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klatt, Carolyn A

    2011-01-01

    After almost two decades, mobile technologies are now such a part of the fabric of the hospital environment that hospital libraries must take this opportunity to continue to positively impact health outcomes by providing health professionals with valuable information and services via personal digital assistants (PDAs) and smartphones. This article provides background information on mobile technology use and handheld devices. It describes how hospital librarians, regardless of staff, budget, or access to technology, can position the hospital library to connect health professionals to clinically relevant mobile resources and library services. Suggestions for the promotion of mobile resources are included, as well as tips for keeping current. A significant amount of free content is identified.

  18. Clinical relevance of the modified physical performance test versus the short physical performance battery for detecting mobility impairments in older men with peripheral arterial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addison, Odessa; Kundi, Rishi; Ryan, Alice S; Goldberg, Andrew P; Patel, Richa; Lal, Brajesh K; Prior, Steven J

    2017-08-23

    The study is to compare the Modified Physical Performance Test (MPPT) and Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB) as metrics of mobility and function in older men with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). A total of 51 men (55-87 years) with PAD underwent functional testing including the SPPB, MPPT, Walking Impairment Questionnaire (WIQ), stair ascent, and 6-min walk distance. Individuals were grouped according to SPPB and MPPT scores as not limited on either, limited only on the MPPT, or limited on both. The MPPT identified a higher proportion of patients as being functionally limited than the SPPB (p < 0.001). Men identified as limited only by the MPPT, and not the SPPB, were subsequently confirmed to have lower function on all measures compared to those not identified as limited by either the SPPB or the MPPT (p < 0.02). These findings suggest the MPPT is an appropriate measure to identify early declines in men with PAD and may identify global disability better than SPPB. Implications for rehabilitation Individuals with peripheral arterial disease have low activity levels and are at risk for a loss of independence and global disability. Early detection of decline in mobility and global function would allow for interventions before large changes in ambulatory ability or a loss of functional independence occur. This study shows the Modified Physical Performance Test may be an appropriate test to identify early decline in function in men with peripheral arterial disease.

  19. Advertising on mobile applications

    OpenAIRE

    Sobolevsky, Alexandr

    2015-01-01

    The article analyzes the new method of mobile advertising. Advertising in mobile applications - a subspecies of mobile marketing, where advertising is distributed using mobile phones and smartphones. Ad placement is going on inside of applications and games for smartphones. It has a high potential due to the large number of mobile phone users (over 6.5 billion in 2013).

  20. Mobile video with mobile IPv6

    CERN Document Server

    Minoli, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Increased reliance on mobile devices and streaming of video content are two of the most recent changes that have led those in the video distribution industry to be concerned about the shifting or erosion of traditional advertising revenues. Infrastructure providers also need to position themselves to take advantage of these trends. Mobile Video with Mobile IPv6provides an overview of the current mobile landscape, then delves specifically into the capabilities and operational details of IPv6. The book also addresses 3G and 4G services, the application of Mobile IPv6 to streaming and other mobil

  1. Origin of the nucleus and Ran-dependent transport to safeguard ribosome biogenesis in a chimeric cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jékely Gáspár

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The origin of the nucleus is a central problem about the origin of eukaryotes. The common ancestry of nuclear pore complexes (NPC and vesicle coating complexes indicates that the nucleus evolved via the modification of a pre-existing endomembrane system. Such an autogenous scenario is cell biologically feasible, but it is not clear what were the selective or neutral mechanisms that had led to the origin of the nuclear compartment. Results A key selective force during the autogenous origin of the nucleus could have been the need to segregate ribosome factories from the cytoplasm where ribosomal proteins (RPs of the protomitochondrium were synthesized. After its uptake by an anuclear cell the protomitochondrium transferred several of its RP genes to the host genome. Alphaproteobacterial RPs and archaebacterial-type host ribosomes were consequently synthesized in the same cytoplasm. This could have led to the formation of chimeric ribosomes. I propose that the nucleus evolved when the host cell compartmentalised its ribosome factories and the tightly linked genome to reduce ribosome chimerism. This was achieved in successive stages by first evolving karyopherin and RanGTP dependent chaperoning of RPs, followed by the evolution of a membrane network to serve as a diffusion barrier, and finally a hydrogel sieve to ensure selective permeability at nuclear pores. Computer simulations show that a gradual segregation of cytoplasm and nucleoplasm via these steps can progressively reduce ribosome chimerism. Conclusion Ribosome chimerism can provide a direct link between the selective forces for and the mechanisms of evolving nuclear transport and compartmentalisation. The detailed molecular scenario presented here provides a solution to the gradual evolution of nuclear compartmentalization from an anuclear stage. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Eugene V Koonin, Martijn Huynen, Anthony M. Poole and Patrick Forterre.

  2. Proactive monitoring of a wind turbine array with lidar measurements, SCADA data and a data-driven RANS solver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iungo, G.; Said, E. A.; Santhanagopalan, V.; Zhan, L.

    2016-12-01

    Power production of a wind farm and durability of wind turbines are strongly dependent on non-linear wake interactions occurring within a turbine array. Wake dynamics are highly affected by the specific site conditions, such as topography and local atmospheric conditions. Furthermore, contingencies through the life of a wind farm, such as turbine ageing and off-design operations, make prediction of wake interactions and power performance a great challenge in wind energy. In this work, operations of an onshore wind turbine array were monitored through lidar measurements, SCADA and met-tower data. The atmospheric wind field investing the wind farm was estimated by using synergistically the available data through five different methods, which are characterized by different confidence levels. By combining SCADA data and the lidar measurements, it was possible to estimate power losses connected with wake interactions. For this specific array, power losses were estimated to be 4% and 2% of the total power production for stable and convective atmospheric regimes, respectively. The entire dataset was then leveraged for the calibration of a data-driven RANS (DDRANS) solver for prediction of wind turbine wakes and power production. The DDRANS is based on a parabolic formulation of the Navier-Stokes equations with axisymmetry and boundary layer approximations, which allow achieving very low computational costs. Accuracy in prediction of wind turbine wakes and power production is achieved through an optimal tuning of the turbulence closure model. The latter is based on a mixing length model, which was developed based on previous wind turbine wake studies carried out through large eddy simulations and wind tunnel experiments. Several operative conditions of the wind farm under examination were reproduced through DDRANS for different stability regimes, wind directions and wind velocity. The results show that DDRANS is capable of achieving a good level of accuracy in prediction

  3. Mobile shearography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalms, Michael; Jueptner, Werner

    2005-04-01

    By reason of their sensitivity, accuracy and non-contact as well as non-destructive characteristics, modern optical methods such as digital speckle shearography have found an increasing interest for NDT applications on the factory floor. With new carbon filter technologies and other lightweight constructions in aircraft and automotive manufacturing, adapted examination designs and especially developed testing methods are necessary. Shearography as a coherent optical method has been widely accepted as an useful NDT tool. It is a robust interferometric method to determine locations with maximum stress on various material structures. However, limitations of this technique can be found in the bulky equipment components, the interpretation of the complex sherographic result images and at the work with non-cooperative surfaces (dark absorber, bright shining reflectors). We report a mobile shearography system that was especially designed for investigations at aircraft and automotive constructions.

  4. Social networks for improving healthy weight loss behaviors for overweight and obese adults: A randomized clinical trial of the social pounds off digitally (Social POD) mobile app.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hales, Sarah; Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle M; Wilcox, Sara; Fahim, Arjang; Davis, Rachel E; Huhns, Michael; Valafar, Homayoun

    2016-10-01

    To test the efficacy of a weight loss mobile app based on recommender systems and developed by experts in health promotion and computer science to target social support and self-monitoring of diet, physical activity (PA), and weight (Social POD app), compared to a commercially available diet and PA tracking app (standard). Overweight adults [N=51] were recruited and randomly assigned to either the experimental group [n=26; theory-based podcasts (TBP)+Social POD app] or the comparison group (n=25; TBP+standard app). The Social POD app issued notifications to encourage users to self-monitor and send theory-based messages to support users who had not self-monitored in the previous 48h. Independent samples t-test were used to examine group differences in kilograms lost and change in BMI. Analysis of covariance was used to analyze secondary outcomes while controlling for baseline values. Participant attrition was 12% (n=3 experimental and n=3 comparison). Experimental group participants lost significantly more weight (-5.3kg, CI: -7.5, -3.0) than comparison group (-2.23kg, CI: -3.6, -1.0; d=0.8, r=0.4, p=0.02) and had a greater reduction in BMI (p=0.02). While there were significant differences in positive outcome expectations between groups (p=0.04) other secondary outcomes (e.g., caloric intake and social support) were not significant. Use of the Social POD app resulted in significantly greater weight loss than use of a commercially available tracking app. This mobile health intervention has the potential to be widely disseminated to reduce the risk of chronic disease associated with overweight and obesity. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  5. [Social mobilization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bop, C

    1990-04-01

    One of the principal recommendations from Alma Ata and the Bamako Initiative was the need for communities to take responsibility for their own health--a recommendation that still remains unmet and in need of reform in Africa because of the severe economic recession and lack of resources allocated for health care in the region. The mobilization of communities "is the opposite of passivity and submission." People must demystify the notion that health care is the exclusive right of health professionals and should realize that they themselves can bring about changes from the household to the village levels; community mobilization is an integral component of development planning. African societies have developed very centralized structures requiring changes that only their own communities can bring about. Because women remain the principal agents for the family's health they should be informed, about the multiple dimensions leading to good health care to enable them to provide the rest of the family with good nourishment and health care follow-up. Children are a vulnerable and important group that require preventive care. A UNICEF experiment in Senegal is training 10-13 year old school children to visit the parents of 5 children, inform them about vaccinating their children, and to follow-up on their activities with these "adopted families." The need for short and long-term IEC interventions in Africa are a priority and effective strategies must be found to reach the majority of the rural populations where all obstacles such as the lack of infrastructure and illiteracy exist. Mali has used traditional theatre "Koteba" to reach the rural populations on a variety of health issues such as oral rehydration and diarrhea as well as the Rural Audio Library (it used cassettes rather than books) to reach villagers in their own languages. The worst obstacle facing Africa today is the refusal of officials in power to allow people to manage their own lives, of which health is a

  6. Strategies for safeguarding security of mobile computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Hays

    2013-02-01

    An effective mobile health strategy should comprise, in the very least, six key steps: Conduct a mobile security risk assessment. Establish policies and procedures. Develop a training program. Implement measures to prevent unauthorized access. Perform a clinical workflow analysis. Establish the organization's approach for responding to a breach.

  7. Analysis of multiuser mixed RF/FSO relay networks for performance improvements in Cloud Computing-Based Radio Access Networks (CC-RANs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimi, Isiaka A.; Monteiro, Paulo P.; Teixeira, António L.

    2017-11-01

    The key paths toward the fifth generation (5G) network requirements are towards centralized processing and small-cell densification systems that are implemented on the cloud computing-based radio access networks (CC-RANs). The increasing recognitions of the CC-RANs can be attributed to their valuable features regarding system performance optimization and cost-effectiveness. Nevertheless, realization of the stringent requirements of the fronthaul that connects the network elements is highly demanding. In this paper, considering the small-cell network architectures, we present multiuser mixed radio-frequency/free-space optical (RF/FSO) relay networks as feasible technologies for the alleviation of the stringent requirements in the CC-RANs. In this study, we use the end-to-end (e2e) outage probability, average symbol error probability (ASEP), and ergodic channel capacity as the performance metrics in our analysis. Simulation results show the suitability of deployment of mixed RF/FSO schemes in the real-life scenarios.

  8. Numerical investigation of the vortex-induced vibration of an elastically mounted circular cylinder at high Reynolds number (Re = 104 and low mass ratio using the RANS code.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niaz Bahadur Khan

    Full Text Available This study numerically investigates the vortex-induced vibration (VIV of an elastically mounted rigid cylinder by using Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS equations with computational fluid dynamic (CFD tools. CFD analysis is performed for a fixed-cylinder case with Reynolds number (Re = 104 and for a cylinder that is free to oscillate in the transverse direction and possesses a low mass-damping ratio and Re = 104. Previously, similar studies have been performed with 3-dimensional and comparatively expensive turbulent models. In the current study, the capability and accuracy of the RANS model are validated, and the results of this model are compared with those of detached eddy simulation, direct numerical simulation, and large eddy simulation models. All three response branches and the maximum amplitude are well captured. The 2-dimensional case with the RANS shear-stress transport k-w model, which involves minimal computational cost, is reliable and appropriate for analyzing the characteristics of VIV.

  9. Mobile Inquiry Based Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Specht, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    Specht, M. (2012, 8 November). Mobile Inquiry Based Learning. Presentation given at the Workshop "Mobile inquiry-based learning" at the Mobile Learning Day 2012 at the Fernuniversität Hagen, Hagen, Germany.

  10. MOBILITY: A SYSTEMS APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mykola I. Striuk

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive study on the problem of mobility in the socio-educational and technical systems was carried out: the evolution of the concept of mobility in scientific sources of XIX–XXI centuries was analyzed and the new sources on the issue of mobility introduced into scientific circulation, the interrelation of the types of mobility in the socio-pedagogical and technical systems are theoretically grounded, an integrative model of mobility in the information society is proposed. The major trends in academic mobility are identified (the transition from student mobility to mobility programs and educational services providers, the new mobility programs (franchising, double/joint degrees, combinations, nostrification etc. are characterized. The new types of mobility providers are reviewed and attention is focused on virtual universities that are now the basis of virtual mobility of students and activities which are based on the use of new ICT in higher education, especially – the Internet and mobile learning environments.

  11. Micro Mobility Marketing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hosbond, Jens Henrik; Skov, Mikael B.

    2008-01-01

    Mobile marketing refers to marketing of services or goods using mobile technology and mobile marketing holds potentially great economical opportunities. Traditionally, mobile marketing has been viewed as mobility in the large taking place virtually anywhere, anytime. Further, research shows...... considerable number of studies on push-based SMS mobile marketing campaigns. This paper explores a related yet different form of mobile marketing namely micro mobility marketing. Micro mobility marketing denotes mobility in the small, meaning that promotion of goods takes place within a circumscribed location......, in our case a medium-sized retail supermarket. Two prototypes based on push and pull marketing strategies are implemented and evaluated. Taking outset in a synthesis of central issues in contemporary research on mobile marketing, we discuss their role in micro mobility marketing to point to similarities...

  12. Abrechnung mobiler Dienste im Mobile Payment Referenzmodell

    OpenAIRE

    Pousttchi, Key

    2006-01-01

    Abrechnung mobiler Dienste im Mobile Payment Referenzmodell / K. Pousttchi, D. G. Wiedemann. - In: Handbuch E-Money, E-Payment & M-Payment / Thomas Lammer (Hrsg.). - Heidelberg : Physica-Verl., 2006. - S. 363-377

  13. Cooperating mobile robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, John J.; Eskridge, Steven E.; Hurtado, John E.; Byrne, Raymond H.

    2004-02-03

    A miniature mobile robot provides a relatively inexpensive mobile robot. A mobile robot for searching an area provides a way for multiple mobile robots in cooperating teams. A robotic system with a team of mobile robots communicating information among each other provides a way to locate a source in cooperation. A mobile robot with a sensor, a communication system, and a processor, provides a way to execute a strategy for searching an area.

  14. Impairments in age-dependent ubiquitin proteostasis and structural integrity of selective neurons by uncoupling Ran GTPase from the Ran-binding domain 3 of Ranbp2 and identification of novel mitochondrial isoforms of ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2I (ubc9) and Ranbp2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Hemangi; Yoon, Dosuk; Bhowmick, Reshma; Cai, Yunfei; Cho, Kyoung-In; Ferreira, Paulo A

    2017-09-06

    The Ran-binding protein 2 (Ranbp2/Nup358) is a cytoplasmic and peripheral nucleoporin comprised of 4 Ran-GTP-binding domains (RBDs) that are interspersed among diverse structural domains with multifunctional activities. Our prior studies found that the RBD2 and RBD3 of Ranbp2 control mitochondrial motility independently of Ran-GTP-binding in cultured cells, whereas loss of Ran-GTP-binding to RBD2 and RBD3 are essential to support cone photoreceptor development and the survival of mature retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) in mice. Here, we uncover that loss of Ran-GTP-binding to RBD3 alone promotes the robust age-dependent increase of ubiquitylated substrates and S1 subunit (Pmsd1) of the 19S cap of the proteasome in the retina and RPE and that such loss in RBD3 also compromises the structural integrity of the outer segment compartment of cone photoreceptors only and without affecting the viability of these neurons. We also found that the E2-ligase and partner of Ranbp2, ubc9, is localized prominently in the mitochondrial-rich ellipsoid compartment of photoreceptors, where Ranbp2 is also known to localize with and modulate the activity of mitochondrial proteins. However, the natures of Ranbp2 and ubc9 isoforms to the mitochondria are heretofore elusive. Subcellular fractionation, co-immunolocalization and immunoaffinity purification of Ranbp2 complexes show that novel isoforms of Ranbp2 and ubc9 with molecular masses distinct from the large Ranbp2 and unmodified ubc9 isoforms localize specifically to the mitochondrial fraction or associate with mitochondrial components, whereas unmodified and SUMOylated Ran GTPase are excluded from the mitochondrial fraction. Further, liposome-mediated intracellular delivery of an antibody against a domain shared by the mitochondrial and nuclear pore isoforms of Ranbp2 causes the profound fragmentation of mitochondria and their delocalization from Ranbp2 and without affecting Ranbp2 localization at the nuclear pores. Collectively, the

  15. The use of mobile applications to support self-management for people with asthma: a systematic review of controlled studies to identify features associated with clinical effectiveness and adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Chi Yan; Walton, Robert; McKinstry, Brian; Jackson, Tracy; Parker, Richard; Pinnock, Hilary

    2017-05-01

    Telehealth is promoted as a strategy to support self-management of long-term conditions. The aim of this systematic review is to identify which information and communication technology features implemented in mobile apps to support asthma self-management are associated with adoption, adherence to usage, and clinical effectiveness. We systematically searched 9 databases, scanned reference lists, and undertook manual searches (January 2000 to April 2016). We include randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and quasiexperimental studies with adults. All eligible papers were assessed for quality, and we extracted data on the features included, health-related outcomes (asthma control, exacerbation rate), process/intermediate outcomes (adherence to monitoring or treatment, self-efficacy), and level of adoption of and adherence to use of technology. Meta-analysis and narrative synthesis were used. We included 12 RCTs employing a range of technologies. A meta-analysis (n = 3) showed improved asthma control (mean difference -0.25 [95% CI, -0.37 to -0.12]). Included studies incorporated 10 features grouped into 7 categories (education, monitoring/electronic diary, action plans, medication reminders/prompts, facilitating professional support, raising patient awareness of asthma control, and decision support for professionals). The most successful interventions included multiple features, but effects on health-related outcomes were inconsistent. No studies explicitly reported adoption of and adherence to the technology system. Meta-analysis of data from 3 trials showed improved asthma control, though overall the clinical effectiveness of apps, typically incorporating multiple features, varied. Further studies are needed to identify the features that are associated with adoption of and adherence to use of the mobile app and those that improve health outcomes.

  16. Gliadin-Specific T-Cells Mobilized in the Peripheral Blood of Coeliac Patients by Short Oral Gluten Challenge: Clinical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Picascia

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD is a common lifelong food intolerance triggered by dietary gluten affecting 1% of the general population. Gliadin-specific T-cell lines and T-cell clones obtained from intestinal biopsies have provided great support in the investigation of immuno-pathogenesis of CD. In the early 2000 a new in vivo, less invasive, approach was established aimed to evaluate the adaptive gliadin-specific T-cell response in peripheral blood of celiac patients on a gluten free diet. In fact, it has been demonstrated that three days of ingestion of wheat-containing food induces the mobilization of memory T lymphocytes reactive against gliadin from gut-associated lymphoid tissue into peripheral blood of CD patients. Such antigen-specific T-cells releasing interferon-γ can be transiently detected by using the enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT assays or by flow cytometry tetramer technology. This paper discusses the suitability of this in vivo tool to investigate the repertoire of gluten pathogenic peptides, to support CD diagnosis, and to assess the efficacy of novel therapeutic strategies. A systematic review of all potential applications of short oral gluten challenge is provided.

  17. The Conventional Non-Articulated SACH or a Multiaxial Prosthetic Foot for Hypomobile Transtibial Amputees? A Clinical Comparison on Mobility, Balance, and Quality of Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Paradisi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of a non-articulated SACH and a multiaxial foot-ankle mechanism on the performance of low-activity users are of great interest for practitioners in amputee rehabilitation. The aim of this study is to compare these two prosthetic feet and assess possible improvements introduced by the increased degrees of freedom provided by the multiaxial foot. For this purpose, a group of 20 hypomobile transtibial amputees (TTAs had their usual SACH replaced with a multiaxial foot. Participants’ functional mobility, involving ambulatory skills in overground level walking, ramps, and stairs, was evaluated by performing Six-Minute Walking Test (6MWT, Locomotor Capability Index-5 (LCI-5, Hill Assessment Index (HAI, and Stair Assessment Index (SAI. Balance performances were assessed using Berg Balance Scale (BBS and analysing upper body accelerations during gait. Moreover, the Prosthesis Evaluation Questionnaire (PEQ was performed to indicate the prosthesis-related quality of life. Results showed that participants walked faster using the multiaxial foot (p<0.05 maintaining the same upright gait stability. Significant improvements with the multiaxial foot were also observed in BBS, LCI-5, and SAI times and 4 of 9 subscales of the PEQ. Our findings demonstrate that a multiaxial foot represents a considerable alternative solution with respect to the conventional SACH in the prosthetic prescription for hypomobile TTAs.

  18. Mobile Technology for the Practice of Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Douglas J

    2016-03-01

    Recently, several technological advances have been introduced to mobile phones leading some people to refer to them as "smartphones." These changes have led to widespread consumer adoption. A similar adoption has occurred within the medical field and this revolution is changing the practice of medicine, including pathology. Several mobile applications have been published for dermatology, orthopedics, ophthalmology, neurosurgery, and clinical pathology. The applications are wide ranging, including mobile technology to increase patient engagement, self-monitoring by patients, clinical algorithm calculation, facilitation between experts to resource-poor environments. These advances have been received with mixed reviews. For anatomic pathology, mobile technology applications can be broken into 4 broad categories: (a) educational uses, (b) microscope with mobile phone, (c) mobile phone as microscope/acquisition device, and (d) miscellaneous. Using a mobile phone as an acquisition device paired with a microscope seems to be the most interesting current application because of the need for expert consultation with resource-poor environments. However, several emerging uses for mobile technology may become more prominent as the technology matures including image analysis, alternative light sources, and increased opportunities for clinician and patient engagement. The flexibility represented by mobile technology represents a burgeoning field in pathology informatics.

  19. Lentivector Iterations and Pre-Clinical Scale-Up/Toxicity Testing: Targeting Mobilized CD34+ Cells for Correction of Fabry Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju Huang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Fabry disease is a rare lysosomal storage disorder (LSD. We designed multiple recombinant lentivirus vectors (LVs and tested their ability to engineer expression of human α-galactosidase A (α-gal A in transduced Fabry patient CD34+ hematopoietic cells. We further investigated the safety and efficacy of a clinically directed vector, LV/AGA, in both ex vivo cell culture studies and animal models. Fabry mice transplanted with LV/AGA-transduced hematopoietic cells demonstrated α-gal A activity increases and lipid reductions in multiple tissues at 6 months after transplantation. Next we found that LV/AGA-transduced Fabry patient CD34+ hematopoietic cells produced even higher levels of α-gal A activity than normal CD34+ hematopoietic cells. We successfully transduced Fabry patient CD34+ hematopoietic cells with “near-clinical grade” LV/AGA in small-scale cultures and then validated a clinically directed scale-up transduction process in a GMP-compliant cell processing facility. LV-transduced Fabry patient CD34+ hematopoietic cells were subsequently infused into NOD/SCID/Fabry (NSF mice; α-gal A activity corrections and lipid reductions were observed in several tissues 12 weeks after the xenotransplantation. Additional toxicology studies employing NSF mice xenotransplanted with the therapeutic cell product demonstrated minimal untoward effects. These data supported our successful clinical trial application (CTA to Health Canada and opening of a “first-in-the-world” gene therapy trial for Fabry disease.

  20. TYPOLOGIES OF MOBILE APPLICATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Ion Ivan; Alin Zamfiroiu; Dragoş Palaghiţă3

    2013-01-01

    Mobile applications and their particularities are analyzed. Mobile application specific characteristics are defined. Types of applications are identified and analyzed. The paper established differences between mobile applications and mobile application categories. For each identified type the specific structures and development model are identified.

  1. Next generation mobile broadcasting

    CERN Document Server

    Gómez-Barquero, David

    2013-01-01

    Next Generation Mobile Broadcasting provides an overview of the past, present, and future of mobile multimedia broadcasting. The first part of the book-Mobile Broadcasting Worldwide-summarizes next-generation mobile broadcasting technologies currently available. This part covers the evolutions of the Japanese mobile broadcasting standard ISDB-T One-Seg, ISDB-Tmm and ISDB-TSB; the evolution of the South Korean T-DMB mobile broadcasting technology AT-DMB; the American mobile broadcasting standard ATSC-M/H; the Chinese broadcasting technologies DTMB and CMMB; second-generation digital terrestrial

  2. Mobile platform security

    CERN Document Server

    Asokan, N; Dmitrienko, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    Recently, mobile security has garnered considerable interest in both the research community and industry due to the popularity of smartphones. The current smartphone platforms are open systems that allow application development, also for malicious parties. To protect the mobile device, its user, and other mobile ecosystem stakeholders such as network operators, application execution is controlled by a platform security architecture. This book explores how such mobile platform security architectures work. We present a generic model for mobile platform security architectures: the model illustrat

  3. Using Adobe Flash Lite on mobile phones for psychological research: Reaction time measurement reliability and interdevice variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimers, Stian; Stewart, Neil

    2008-11-01

    Mobile telephones have significant potential for use in psychological research, possessing unique characteristics-not least their ubiquity--that may make them useful tools for psychologists. We examined whether it is possible to measure reaction times (RTs) accurately using Adobe Flash Lite on mobile phones. We ran simple and choice RT experiments on two widely available mobile phones, a Nokia 6110 Navigator and a Sony Ericsson W810i, using a wireless application protocol (WAP) connection to access the Internet from the devices. RTs were compared within subjects with those obtained using a Linux-based millisecond-accurate measurement system. Results show that measured RTs were significantly longer on mobile devices, and that overall RTs and distribution of RTs varied across devices.

  4. The interaction of RNA helicase DDX3 with HIV-1 Rev-CRM1-RanGTP complex during the HIV replication cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahboobi, Seyed Hanif; Javanpour, Alex A; Mofrad, Mohammad R K

    2015-01-01

    Molecular traffic between the nucleus and the cytoplasm is regulated by the nuclear pore complex (NPC), which acts as a highly selective channel perforating the nuclear envelope in eukaryotic cells. The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) exploits the nucleocytoplasmic pathway to export its RNA transcripts across the NPC to the cytoplasm. Despite extensive study on the HIV life cycle and the many drugs developed to target this cycle, no current drugs have been successful in targeting the critical process of viral nuclear export, even though HIV's reliance on a single host protein, CRM1, to export its unspliced and partially spliced RNA transcripts makes it a tempting target. Due to recent findings implicating a DEAD-box helicase, DDX3, in HIV replication and a member of the export complex, it has become an appealing target for anti-HIV drug inhibition. In the present research, we have applied a hybrid computational protocol to analyze protein-protein interactions in the HIV mRNA export cycle. This method is based on molecular docking followed by molecular dynamics simulation and accompanied by approximate free energy calculation (MM/GBSA), computational alanine scanning, c