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Sample records for ran inactive gdp-locked

  1. RAN Translation in Huntington Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bañez-Coronel, Monica; Ayhan, Fatma; Tarabochia, Alex D; Zu, Tao; Perez, Barbara A; Tusi, Solaleh Khoramian; Pletnikova, Olga; Borchelt, David R; Ross, Christopher A; Margolis, Russell L; Yachnis, Anthony T; Troncoso, Juan C; Ranum, Laura P W

    2015-11-18

    Huntington disease (HD) is caused by a CAG ⋅ CTG expansion in the huntingtin (HTT) gene. While most research has focused on the HTT polyGln-expansion protein, we demonstrate that four additional, novel, homopolymeric expansion proteins (polyAla, polySer, polyLeu, and polyCys) accumulate in HD human brains. These sense and antisense repeat-associated non-ATG (RAN) translation proteins accumulate most abundantly in brain regions with neuronal loss, microglial activation and apoptosis, including caudate/putamen, white matter, and, in juvenile-onset cases, also the cerebellum. RAN protein accumulation and aggregation are length dependent, and individual RAN proteins are toxic to neural cells independent of RNA effects. These data suggest RAN proteins contribute to HD and that therapeutic strategies targeting both sense and antisense genes may be required for efficacy in HD patients. This is the first demonstration that RAN proteins are expressed across an expansion located in an open reading frame and suggests RAN translation may also contribute to other polyglutamine diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. RAN GTPase and Osteopontin in Pancreatic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Shivam; Gandhi, Ankit; Lim, Pei-Wen; Relles, Daniel; Sarosiek, Konrad; Kang, Christopher; Chipitsyna, Galina; Sendecki, Jocelyn; Yeo, Charles J; Arafat, Hwyda A

    2013-04-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) has the worst prognosis among cancers, mainly due to the high incidence of early metastases. RAN small GTPase (RAN) is a protein that plays physiological roles in the regulation of nuclear transport and microtubule spindle assembly. RAN was recently shown to mediate the invasive functions of the prometastatic protein osteopontin (OPN) in breast cancer cells. We and others have shown previously that high levels of OPN are present in PDA. In this study, we analyzed the expression and correlation of RAN with OPN in human pancreatic lesions, and explored their regulation in PDA cell lines. Real time PCR was used to analyze RAN and OPN mRNA levels in PDA, adjacent non-malignant, and benign pancreatic tissues. Expression levels were correlated with survival and different clinicopathological parameters using different statistical methods. Transient transfection studies using OPN and RAN plasmids, and knockdown experiments using siRNA were used to examine their mutual regulation. OPN and RAN levels highly correlated with each other (pobesity, T stage, BMI, or survival. However, we found a significant association between RAN levels and perineural invasion (HR=0.79, 95% CI 0.59, 1.07; p=0.0378.). OPN and RAN colocalized in PDA tissues and cell lines. Increasing RAN expression in PDA cells induced OPN transcription and RAN silencing reduced total OPN levels. OPN did not have any significant effect on RAN transcription. The high levels of RAN in PDA and its correlation with OPN and with perineural invasion suggest that RAN may contribute to PDA metastasis and progression through the induction of OPN. RAN's role in the regulation of OPN in PDA is unique and could provide potential novel therapeutic strategies to combat PDA aggressiveness.

  3. Tackling complex turbulent flows with transient RANS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kenjeres, S.; Hanjalic, K.

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews some recent applications of the transient-Reynoldsaveraged Navier–Stokes (T-RANS) approach in simulating complex turbulent flows dominated by externally imposed body forces, primarily by thermal buoyancy and the Lorentz force. The T-RANS aims at numerical resolving unsteady

  4. The Ran pathway in Drosophila melanogaster mitosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James G Wakefield

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Over the last two decades, the small GTPase Ran has emerged as a central regulator of both mitosis and meiosis, particularly in the generation, maintenance and regulation of the microtubule (MT-based bipolar spindle. Ran-regulated pathways in mitosis bear many similarities to the well-characterized functions of Ran in nuclear transport and, as with transport, the majority of these mitotic effects are mediated through affecting the physical interaction between karyopherins and Spindle Assembly Factors (SAFs - a loose term describing proteins or protein complexes involved in spindle assembly through promoting nucleation, stabilization, and/or depolymerization of MTs, through anchoring MTs to specific structures such as centrosomes, chromatin or kinetochores, or through sliding MTs along each other to generate the force required to achieve bipolarity. As such, the Ran-mediated pathway represents a crucial functional module within the wider spindle assembly landscape. Research into mitosis using the model organism Drosophila melanogaster has contributed substantially to our understanding of centrosome and spindle function. However, in comparison to mammalian systems, very little is known about the contribution of Ran-mediated pathways in Drosophila mitosis. This article sets out to summarize our understanding of the roles of the Ran pathway components in Drosophila mitosis, focusing on the syncytial blastoderm embryo, arguing that, far from being superfluous, it can provide important insights into the conserved functions on Ran during spindle formation.

  5. Genomic organization, expression, and localization of murine Ran-binding protein 2 (RanBP2) gene.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fauser, S.; Aslanukov, A.; Roepman, R.; Ferreira, P.A.

    2001-01-01

    The Ran-binding protein 2 (RanBP2) is a giant scaffold and mosaic cyclophilin-related nucleoporin implicated in the Ran-GTPase cycle. There are no orthologs of the RanBP2 gene in yeast and Drosophila genomes. In humans, this bona fide gene is partially duplicated in a RanBP2 gene cluster and lies in

  6. PHYSICAL (INACTIVITY AND WOMEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Đukanović

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Physical activity simply means movement of the body that uses energy. Physical inactivity is more common among women than men. In women physical activity reduces the risk of dying from coronary heart disease and stroke and of developing high blood pressure, diabetes mellitus, reduces blood cholesterol level, helps control weight and reduce body fat, helps control and prevention osteoporosis and artritis, reduces symptoms of anxiety and depression, reduces the risk for breast cancer. From health benefits, physical activity should be moderate or vigorous and add up to at the least 30 minutes a day.

  7. Chromosomal association of Ran during meiotic and mitotic divisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkle, Beth; Slepchenko, Boris; Rolls, Melissa M; Walther, Tobias C; Stein, Pascal A; Mehlmann, Lisa M; Ellenberg, Jan; Terasaki, Mark

    2002-12-01

    Recent studies in Xenopus egg extracts indicate that the small G protein Ran has a central role in spindle assembly and nuclear envelope reformation. We determined Ran localization and dynamics in cells during M phase. By immunofluorescence, Ran is accumulated on the chromosomes of meiosis-II-arrested Xenopus eggs. In living cells, fluorescently labeled Ran associated with the chromosomes in Xenopus and remained associated during anaphase when eggs were artificially activated. Fluorescent Ran associated with chromosomes in mouse eggs, during meiotic maturation and early embryonic divisions in starfish, and to a lesser degree during mitosis of a cultured mammalian cell line. Chromosomal Ran undergoes constant flux. From photobleach experiments in immature starfish oocytes, chromosomal Ran has a k(off) of approximately 0.06 second(-1), and binding analysis suggests that there is a single major site. The chromosomal interactions may serve to keep Ran-GTP in the vicinity of the chromosomes for spindle assembly and nuclear envelope reformation.

  8. The pandemic of physical inactivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kohl, Harold W; Craig, Cora Lynn; Lambert, Estelle Victoria

    2012-01-01

    Physical inactivity is the fourth leading cause of death worldwide. We summarise present global efforts to counteract this problem and point the way forward to address the pandemic of physical inactivity. Although evidence for the benefits of physical activity for health has been available since ...

  9. Evaluation of energy and cost savings in mobile Cloud RAN

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Checko, Aleksandra; Christiansen, Henrik Lehrmann; Berger, Michael Stübert

    2013-01-01

    The load in mobile networks is subject to variations during the day, due to user mobility and varying network average usage. Therefore, the traditional or Distributed Radio Access Network (D-RAN) architecture, where the BaseBand processing Units (BBUs) are assigned statically to a number of cells...... using OPNET Modeler. A real case scenario is built upon the mobile traffic forecast for year 2017, a number of recommendations on traffic models and a proposed C-RAN implementation. The results achieved show that the maximum statistical multiplexing gain for user plane traffic in C-RAN architecture is 4......, is sub optimal, comparing to a novel, cloud based architecture called Cloud Radio Access Network (C-RAN). In C-RAN a group of cells shares processing resources, and hence benefit from statistical multiplexing gain is expected. In this paper, the energy and cost savings in C-RAN are evaluated numerically...

  10. Hepatitis B Virus: Inactive carriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saini Nitin

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Inactive carriers forms the largest group in chronic HBV infected patients. Around 300 million people are inactive carriers The inactive HBsAg carrier state is diagnosed by absence of HBeAg and presence of anti-HBe, undetectable or low levels of HBV DNA in PCR-based assays, repeatedly normal ALT levels, and minimal or no necroinflammation, slight fibrosis, or even normal histology on biopsy. Inactive cirrhosis may be present in patients who had active liver disease during the replicative phase of infection. The prognosis of the inactive HBsAg carrier state is usually benign. Long-term follow- up (up to 18 years of these carriers has indicated that the vast majority show sustained biochemical remission and very low risk of cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Rarely, patients, even noncirrhotics, may develop liver cancer during the inactive HBsAg carrier state. In addition, approximately 20 to 30% of persons in the inactive HBsAg carrier state may undergo spontaneous reactivation of hepatitis B during follow-up. Multiple episodes of reactivation or sustained reactivation can cause progressive hepatic damage and even hepatic decompensation. Introduction

  11. An Arabidopsis Ran-binding protein, AtRanBP1c, is a co-activator of Ran GTPase-activating protein and requires the C-terminus for its cytoplasmic localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo-Hwan; Roux, Stanley J.

    2003-01-01

    Ran-binding proteins (RanBPs) are a group of proteins that bind to Ran (Ras-related nuclear small GTP-binding protein), and thus either control the GTP/GDP-bound states of Ran or help couple the Ran GTPase cycle to a cellular process. AtRanBP1c is a Ran-binding protein from Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. that was recently shown to be critically involved in the regulation of auxin-induced mitotic progression [S.-H. Kim et al. (2001) Plant Cell 13:2619-2630]. Here we report that AtRanBP1c inhibits the EDTA-induced release of GTP from Ran and serves as a co-activator of Ran-GTPase-activating protein (RanGAP) in vitro. Transient expression of AtRanBP1c fused to a beta-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter reveals that the protein localizes primarily to the cytosol. Neither the N- nor C-terminus of AtRanBP1c, which flank the Ran-binding domain (RanBD), is necessary for the binding of PsRan1-GTP to the protein, but both are needed for the cytosolic localization of GUS-fused AtRanBP1c. These findings, together with a previous report that AtRanBP1c is critically involved in root growth and development, imply that the promotion of GTP hydrolysis by the Ran/RanGAP/AtRanBP1c complex in the cytoplasm, and the resulting concentration gradient of Ran-GDP to Ran-GTP across the nuclear membrane could be important in the regulation of auxin-induced mitotic progression in root tips of A. thaliana.

  12. The Anatomy of the RAN-Reading Relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiou, George K.; Parrila, Rauno; Papadopoulos, Timothy C.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to contrast three models of the RAN-reading relationship derived from the most prominent theoretical accounts of how RAN is related to reading: the phonological processing, the orthographic processing and the speed of processing accounts. Grade 4 Greek-speaking children (n = 208; 114 girls, 94 boys; mean…

  13. The RanBP2/RanGAP1*SUMO1/Ubc9 SUMO E3 ligase is a disassembly machine for Crm1-dependent nuclear export complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritterhoff, Tobias; Das, Hrishikesh; Hofhaus, Götz; Schröder, Rasmus R; Flotho, Annette; Melchior, Frauke

    2016-05-10

    Continuous cycles of nucleocytoplasmic transport require disassembly of transport receptor/Ran-GTP complexes in the cytoplasm. A basic disassembly mechanism in all eukaryotes depends on soluble RanGAP and RanBP1. In vertebrates, a significant fraction of RanGAP1 stably interacts with the nucleoporin RanBP2 at a binding site that is flanked by FG-repeats and Ran-binding domains, and overlaps with RanBP2's SUMO E3 ligase region. Here, we show that the RanBP2/RanGAP1*SUMO1/Ubc9 complex functions as an autonomous disassembly machine with a preference for the export receptor Crm1. We describe three in vitro reconstituted disassembly intermediates, which show binding of a Crm1 export complex via two FG-repeat patches, cargo-release by RanBP2's Ran-binding domains and retention of free Crm1 at RanBP2 after Ran-GTP hydrolysis. Intriguingly, all intermediates are compatible with SUMO E3 ligase activity, suggesting that the RanBP2/RanGAP1*SUMO1/Ubc9 complex may link Crm1- and SUMO-dependent functions.

  14. The contribution of lexical access speed to RAN and reading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Mads

    Purpose: The study investigated why and when rapid automatised naming is a predictor of reading. Specifically, we tested the hypotheses that (1) RAN-objects predicts reading because it is a measure of lexical (e.g. phonological) access speed, but (2) that RAN only becomes a predictor of reading...... development once a certain level of phonological recoding proficiency has been reached. Method: Forty Danish students without reading difficulties were administered tests of reading speed and accuracy, phoneme awareness, RAN-objects, timed confrontation picture naming, and visio-motor reaction time....... The students were sampled from two age groups representing two levels of recoding proficiency: Beginning readers in Grade 2-3 and proficient decoders in grade 5-6. We conducted hierarchical regression analyses on reading speed and accuracy to determine whether the relationship between RAN and reading...

  15. 5th Symposium on Hybrid RANS-LES Methods

    CERN Document Server

    Haase, Werner; Peng, Shia-Hui; Schwamborn, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    This book gathers the proceedings of the Fifth Symposium on Hybrid RANS-LES Methods, which was held on March 19-21 in College Station, Texas, USA. The different chapters, written by leading experts, reports on the most recent developments in flow physics modelling, and gives a special emphasis to industrially relevant applications of hybrid RANS-LES methods and other turbulence-resolving modelling approaches. The book addresses academic researchers, graduate students, industrial engineers, as well as industrial R&D managers and consultants dealing with turbulence modelling, simulation and measurement, and with multidisciplinary applications of computational fluid dynamics (CFD), such as flow control, aero-acoustics, aero-elasticity and CFD-based multidisciplinary optimization. It discusses in particular advanced hybrid RANS-LES methods. Further topics include wall-modelled Large Eddy Simulation (WMLES) methods, embedded LES, and a comparison of the LES methods with both hybrid RANS-LES and URANS methods. ...

  16. RanBPM, a scaffolding protein for gametogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puverel, Sandrine; Tessarollo, Lino

    2013-01-01

    RanBPM is a multimodular scaffold protein that interacts with a great variety of molecules including nuclear, cytoplasmic, and membrane proteins. By building multiprotein complexes, RanBPM is thought to regulate various signaling pathways, especially in the immune and nervous system. However, the diversity of these interactions does not facilitate the identification of its precise mechanism of action, and therefore the physiological role of RanBPM still remains unclear. Recently, RanBPM has been shown to be critical for the fertility of both genders in mouse. Although mechanistically it is still unclear how RanBPM affects gametogenesis, the data collected so far suggest that it is a key player in this process. Here, we examine the RanBPM sterility phenotype in the context of other genetic mutations affecting mouse gametogenesis to investigate whether this scaffold protein affects the function of other known proteins whose deficiency results in similar sterility phenotypes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Inactive ingredient Search for Approved Drug Products

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — According to 21 CFR 210.3(b)(8), an inactive ingredient is any component of a drug product other than the active ingredient. Only inactive ingredients in the final...

  18. Vascular adaption to physical inactivity in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bleeker, M.W.P.

    2006-01-01

    This thesis presents studies on vascular adaptation to physical inactivity and deconditioning. Although it is clear that physical inactivity is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease, the underlying physiological mechanisms have not yet been elucidated. In contrast to physical

  19. Health Risks of an Inactive Lifestyle

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may develop a hormonal imbalance What are the health risks of an inactive lifestyle? Having an inactive ... the more sedentary you are, the higher your health risks are. How can I get started with ...

  20. Are Discrepancies in RANS Modeled Reynolds Stresses Random?

    CERN Document Server

    Xiao, Heng; Wang, Jian-xun; Paterson, Eric G

    2016-01-01

    In the turbulence modeling community, significant efforts have been made to quantify the uncertainties in the Reynolds-Averaged Navier--Stokes (RANS) models and to improve their predictive capabilities. Of crucial importance in these efforts is the understanding of the discrepancies in the RANS modeled Reynolds stresses. However, to what extent these discrepancies can be predicted or whether they are completely random remains a fundamental open question. In this work we used a machine learning algorithm based on random forest regression to predict the discrepancies. The success of the regression--prediction procedure indicates that, to a large extent, the discrepancies in the modeled Reynolds stresses can be explained by the mean flow feature, and thus they are universal quantities that can be extrapolated from one flow to another, at least among different flows sharing the same characteristics such as separation. This finding has profound implications to the future development of RANS models, opening up new ...

  1. Social background, bullying, and physical inactivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, P W; Rayce, S B; Melkevik, O

    2016-01-01

    More children from lower social backgrounds are physically inactive than those from higher ones. We studied whether bullying was a mediating factor between lower social background and physical inactivity. We also examined the combined effect of low social class and exposure to bullying on physical...... inactivity among students from lower social classes and for students exposed to bullying. There was a combined effect of low social class and bullying on physical inactivity....... leaves 4.0% in the category physically inactive. The sex and age-adjusted OR (95% CI) for physical inactivity was 2.10 (1.39-3.18) among students with low social class and unclassifiable 3.53 (2.26-5.53). Exposure to bullying was associated with physical inactivity, sex and age-adjusted OR = 2.39 (1...

  2. Progress in Hybrid RANS-LES Modelling : Papers Contributed to the 4th Symposium on Hybrid RANS-LES Methods

    CERN Document Server

    Haase, Werner; Peng, Shia-Hui; Schwamborn, Dieter

    2013-01-01

    The present book contains contributions presented at the Fourth Symposium on Hybrid RANS-LES Methods, held in Beijing, China, 28-30 September 2011, being a continuation of symposia taking place in Stockholm (Sweden, 2005), in Corfu (Greece, 2007), and Gdansk (Poland, 2009). The contributions to the last two symposia were published as NNFM, Vol. 97 and Vol. 111. At the Beijing symposium, along with seven invited keynotes, another 46 papers (plus 5 posters) were presented addressing topics on Novel turbulence-resolving simulation and modelling, Improved hybrid RANS-LES methods, Comparative studies of difference modelling methods, Modelling-related numerical issues and Industrial applications.. The present book reflects recent activities and new progress made in the development and applications of hybrid RANS-LES methods in general.

  3. Cloud RAN for Mobile Networks - a Technology Overview

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Checko, Aleksandra; Christiansen, Henrik Lehrmann; Yan, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Pool for statistical multiplexing gain, while shifting the burden to the high-speed wireline transmission of In-phase and Quadrature (IQ) data. C-RAN enables energy efficient network operation and possible cost savings on base- band resources. Furthermore, it improves network capacity by performing...

  4. Envisioning Spectrum Management in Virtualised C-RAN

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Samman, Imad; Artuso, Matteo; Christiansen, Henrik Lehrmann

    2017-01-01

    Cloud Radio Access Network (C-RAN) has attracted a worldwide attention in both academia and industry. This network architecture re-forming has been considered as a potential solution to meet the increasing capacity demands for future mobile data traffic. In addition, Network Virtualisation is a p...

  5. Hybrid RANS-LES using high order numerical methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry de Frahan, Marc; Yellapantula, Shashank; Vijayakumar, Ganesh; Knaus, Robert; Sprague, Michael

    2017-11-01

    Understanding the impact of wind turbine wake dynamics on downstream turbines is particularly important for the design of efficient wind farms. Due to their tractable computational cost, hybrid RANS/LES models are an attractive framework for simulating separation flows such as the wake dynamics behind a wind turbine. High-order numerical methods can be computationally efficient and provide increased accuracy in simulating complex flows. In the context of LES, high-order numerical methods have shown some success in predictions of turbulent flows. However, the specifics of hybrid RANS-LES models, including the transition region between both modeling frameworks, pose unique challenges for high-order numerical methods. In this work, we study the effect of increasing the order of accuracy of the numerical scheme in simulations of canonical turbulent flows using RANS, LES, and hybrid RANS-LES models. We describe the interactions between filtering, model transition, and order of accuracy and their effect on turbulence quantities such as kinetic energy spectra, boundary layer evolution, and dissipation rate. This work was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Exascale Computing Project, under Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

  6. Eye-Movement Control in RAN and Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuperman, Victor; Van Dyke, Julie A.; Henry, Regina

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined the "visual scanning hypothesis", which suggests that fluent oculomotor control is an important component underlying the predictive relationship between Rapid Automatized Naming (RAN) tasks and reading ability. Our approach was to isolate components of saccadic planning, articulation, and lexical retrieval in 3…

  7. Characterization of RanBPM Molecular Determinants that Control Its Subcellular Localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salemi, Louisa M.; Loureiro, Sandra O.; Schild-Poulter, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    RanBPM/RanBP9 is a ubiquitous, nucleocytoplasmic protein that is part of an evolutionary conserved E3 ubiquitin ligase complex whose function and targets in mammals are still unknown. RanBPM itself has been implicated in various cellular processes that involve both nuclear and cytoplasmic functions. However, to date, little is known about how RanBPM subcellular localization is regulated. We have conducted a systematic analysis of RanBPM regions that control its subcellular localization using RanBPM shRNA cells to examine ectopic RanBPM mutant subcellular localization without interference from the endogenously expressed protein. We show that several domains and motifs regulate RanBPM nuclear and cytoplasmic localization. In particular, RanBPM comprises two motifs that can confer nuclear localization, one proline/glutamine-rich motif in the extreme N-terminus which has a dominant effect on RanBPM localization, and a second motif in the C-terminus which minimally contributes to RanBPM nuclear targeting. We also identified a nuclear export signal (NES) which mutation prevented RanBPM accumulation in the cytoplasm. Likewise, deletion of the central RanBPM conserved domains (SPRY and LisH/CTLH) resulted in the relocalization of RanBPM to the nucleus, suggesting that RanBPM cytoplasmic localization is also conferred by protein-protein interactions that promote its cytoplasmic retention. Indeed we found that in the cytoplasm, RanBPM partially colocalizes with microtubules and associates with α-tubulin. Finally, in the nucleus, a significant fraction of RanBPM is associated with chromatin. Altogether, these analyses reveal that RanBPM subcellular localization results from the combined effects of several elements that either confer direct transport through the nucleocytoplasmic transport machinery or regulate it indirectly, likely through interactions with other proteins and by intramolecular folding. PMID:25659156

  8. Vascular adaption to physical inactivity in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Bleeker, M.W.P.

    2006-01-01

    This thesis presents studies on vascular adaptation to physical inactivity and deconditioning. Although it is clear that physical inactivity is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease, the underlying physiological mechanisms have not yet been elucidated. In contrast to physical inactivity, exercise decreases the risk for cardiovascular disease. This beneficial effect of exercise is partly due to changes in vascular function and structure. However, far less is known about vascular ...

  9. Obesity and Physical Inactivity in Rural America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Paul Daniel; Moore, Charity G.; Probst, Janice C.; Shinogle, Judith Ann

    2004-01-01

    Context and Purpose: Obesity and physical inactivity are common in the United States, but few studies examine this issue within rural populations. The present study uses nationally representative data to study obesity and physical inactivity in rural populations. Methods: Data came from the 1998 National Health Interview Survey Sample Adult and…

  10. Tuisland. Karin Brynard. Kaapstad: Penguin Ran- dom House Suid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Karin Brynard. Kaapstad: Penguin Ran- dom House Suid-Afrika, 2016. 576 pp. ISBN 978-1-4152-0693-5,. ISBN 978-1-4152-0668-3,. ISBN 978-1-4125-0669-0. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.17159/tvl.v.54i1.29. Tuisland (2016) is oud-joernalis Karin. Brynard se derde spanningsroman. Haar debuut, Plaasmoord (2009), is met die.

  11. RanBP2 modulates Cox11 and hexokinase I activities and haploinsufficiency of RanBP2 causes deficits in glucose metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azamat Aslanukov

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available The Ran-binding protein 2 (RanBP2 is a large multimodular and pleiotropic protein. Several molecular partners with distinct functions interacting specifically with selective modules of RanBP2 have been identified. Yet, the significance of these interactions with RanBP2 and the genetic and physiological role(s of RanBP2 in a whole-animal model remain elusive. Here, we report the identification of two novel partners of RanBP2 and a novel physiological role of RanBP2 in a mouse model. RanBP2 associates in vitro and in vivo and colocalizes with the mitochondrial metallochaperone, Cox11, and the pacemaker of glycolysis, hexokinase type I (HKI via its leucine-rich domain. The leucine-rich domain of RanBP2 also exhibits strong chaperone activity toward intermediate and mature folding species of Cox11 supporting a chaperone role of RanBP2 in the cytosol during Cox11 biogenesis. Cox11 partially colocalizes with HKI, thus supporting additional and distinct roles in cell function. Cox11 is a strong inhibitor of HKI, and RanBP2 suppresses the inhibitory activity of Cox11 over HKI. To probe the physiological role of RanBP2 and its role in HKI function, a mouse model harboring a genetically disrupted RanBP2 locus was generated. RanBP2(-/- are embryonically lethal, and haploinsufficiency of RanBP2 in an inbred strain causes a pronounced decrease of HKI and ATP levels selectively in the central nervous system. Inbred RanBP2(+/- mice also exhibit deficits in growth rates and glucose catabolism without impairment of glucose uptake and gluconeogenesis. These phenotypes are accompanied by a decrease in the electrophysiological responses of photosensory and postreceptoral neurons. Hence, RanBP2 and its partners emerge as critical modulators of neuronal HKI, glucose catabolism, energy homeostasis, and targets for metabolic, aging disorders and allied neuropathies.

  12. Applicability of RANS, DES and LES in propeller flow noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LU Li

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available [Objectives] In order to study the applicability of different turbulence models in propeller flow noise prediction, taking the DTMB 4119 propeller as the research object, the numerical simulation method is used to calculate the frequency domain noise under the non-uniform flow field.[Methods] First, the hydrodynamic coefficient and surface pressure distribution coefficient are obtained via the RANS method and the accuracy of the flow field simulation is verified by comparing it with the experimental data. Next,the pulsating pressures obtained by RANS, DES and LES are considered as the sound source respectively, and combined with the acoustic boundary element method to predict the radiation noise.[Results] The results show that spectral noise is the main contributor to total noise; when noise on 1 BPF is predicted, the results obtained by the three methods are very similar, so we can use RANS to predict noise quickly; when noise on the high order of BPF needs to be predicted, the calculation results of LES are better.[Conclusions] In noise prediction, the appropriate turbulence simulation method can be selected according to the demand.

  13. AVHRR GAC SST Reanalysis Version 1 (RAN1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Ignatov

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In response to its users’ needs, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA initiated reanalysis (RAN of the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR Global Area Coverage (GAC; 4 km sea surface temperature (SST data employing its Advanced Clear Sky Processor for Oceans (ACSPO retrieval system. Initially, AVHRR/3 data from five NOAA and two Metop satellites from 2002 to 2015 have been reprocessed. The derived SSTs have been matched up with two reference SSTs—the quality controlled in situ SSTs from the NOAA in situ Quality Monitor (iQuam and the Canadian Meteorological Centre (CMC L4 SST analysis—and analyzed in the NOAA SST Quality Monitor (SQUAM online system. The corresponding clear-sky ocean brightness temperatures (BT in AVHRR bands 3b, 4 and 5 (centered at 3.7, 11, and 12 µm, respectively have been compared with the Community Radiative Transfer Model simulations in another NOAA online system, Monitoring of Infrared Clear-sky Radiances over Ocean for SST (MICROS. For some AVHRRs, the time series of “AVHRR minus reference” SSTs and “observed minus model” BTs are unstable and inconsistent, with artifacts in the SSTs and BTs strongly correlated. In the official “Reanalysis version 1” (RAN1, data from only five platforms—two midmorning (NOAA-17 and Metop-A and three afternoon (NOAA-16, -18 and -19—were included during the most stable periods of their operations. The stability of the SST time series was further improved using variable regression SST coefficients, similarly to how it was done in the NOAA/NASA Pathfinder version 5.2 (PFV5.2 dataset. For data assimilation applications, especially those blending satellite and in situ SSTs, we recommend bias-correcting the RAN1 SSTs using the newly developed sensor-specific error statistics (SSES, which are reported in the product files. Relative performance of RAN1 and PFV5.2 SSTs is discussed. Work is underway to improve the calibration of AVHRR/3s and

  14. Overexpression of Ran gene from Lepidium latifolium L. (LlaRan) renders transgenic tobacco plants hypersensitive to cold stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Vimlendu Bhushan; Grover, Atul; Singh, Sadhana; Pande, Veena; Ahmed, Zakwan

    2014-09-01

    Ran is a multifunctional small GTPase involved in important cellular activities like nucleocytoplasmic transport, mitotic spindle assembly, nuclear envelope formation, etc., but is also known to be differentially expressed in response to abiotic stress, particularly low temperature. We have over-expressed Lepidium latifolium (Fam. Brassicaceae) Ran gene in tobacco to study the response of the plants to cold stress (24 h; 4 °C). Transformation of the tobacco plants was verified using PCR targeting Ran gene and co-transformed selectable marker gene nptII. Segregation in Mendelian ratios was validated in five transgenic lines by germination of T1 and T2 seeds on moist filter papers containing 150 mg/l kanamycin. Higher levels of electrolyte leakage and lipid peroxidation pointed towards hypersensitivity of plants. Similarly, lesser proline accumulation compared to wild types also indicated susceptibility of plants to death under chilling conditions. Specific activity of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase and glutathione reductase was also measured under stressed and control conditions. A variation was observed across the different lines, and four out of five lines showed lesser specific activity compared to wild type plants, thus indicating reduced capability of scavenging free radicals. In totality, a strong evidence on induced hypersensitivity to cold stress has been collected which may further be helpful in designing appropriate strategies for engineering crop plants for survival under cold stress conditions.

  15. Autonomic responses to exercise: deconditioning/inactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughson, Richard L; Shoemaker, J Kevin

    2015-03-01

    Experimental models of physical inactivity associated with a sedentary lifestyle or extreme forms of inactivity with bed rest or spaceflight affect the balance between parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous system regulation of the cardiovascular system. Deconditioning effects are rapidly seen in the regulation of heart rate to compensate for physical modifications in blood volume and cardiac function. Reflex regulation of cardiovascular control during exercise by metaboreflex and baroreflex is altered by bed rest and spaceflight. These models of extreme inactivity provide a reference to guide physical activity requirements for optimal cardiovascular health. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. GAP Activity, but Not Subcellular Targeting, Is Required for Arabidopsis RanGAP Cellular and Developmental Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boruc, Joanna; Griffis, Anna H N; Rodrigo-Peiris, Thushani; Zhou, Xiao; Tilford, Bailey; Van Damme, Daniël; Meier, Iris

    2015-07-01

    The Ran GTPase activating protein (RanGAP) is important to Ran signaling involved in nucleocytoplasmic transport, spindle organization, and postmitotic nuclear assembly. Unlike vertebrate and yeast RanGAP, plant RanGAP has an N-terminal WPP domain, required for nuclear envelope association and several mitotic locations of Arabidopsis thaliana RanGAP1. A double null mutant of the two Arabidopsis RanGAP homologs is gametophyte lethal. Here, we created a series of mutants with various reductions in RanGAP levels by combining a RanGAP1 null allele with different RanGAP2 alleles. As RanGAP level decreases, the severity of developmental phenotypes increases, but nuclear import is unaffected. To dissect whether the GAP activity and/or the subcellular localization of RanGAP are responsible for the observed phenotypes, this series of rangap mutants were transformed with RanGAP1 variants carrying point mutations abolishing the GAP activity and/or the WPP-dependent subcellular localization. The data show that plant development is differentially affected by RanGAP mutant allele combinations of increasing severity and requires the GAP activity of RanGAP, while the subcellular positioning of RanGAP is dispensable. In addition, our results indicate that nucleocytoplasmic trafficking can tolerate both partial depletion of RanGAP and delocalization of RanGAP from the nuclear envelope. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  17. Hybrid RANS/LES applied to complex terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bechmann, Andreas; Sørensen, Niels N.

    2011-01-01

    Large Eddy Simulation (LES) of the wind in complex terrain is limited by computational cost. The number of computational grid points required to resolve the near-ground turbulent structures (eddies) are very high. The traditional solution to the problem has been to apply a wall function...... aspect ratio in the RANS layer and thereby resolve the mean near-wall velocity profile. The method is applicable to complex terrain and the benefits of traditional LES are kept intact. Using the hybrid method, simulations of the wind over a natural complex terrain near Wellington in New Zealand...

  18. Aggresome formation is regulated by RanBPM through an interaction with HDAC6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louisa M. Salemi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In conditions of proteasomal impairment, the build-up of damaged or misfolded proteins activates a cellular response leading to the recruitment of damaged proteins into perinuclear aggregates called aggresomes. Aggresome formation involves the retrograde transport of cargo proteins along the microtubule network and is dependent on the histone deacetylase HDAC6. Here we show that ionizing radiation (IR promotes Ran-Binding Protein M (RanBPM relocalization into discrete perinuclear foci where it co-localizes with aggresome components ubiquitin, dynein and HDAC6, suggesting that the RanBPM perinuclear clusters correspond to aggresomes. RanBPM was also recruited to aggresomes following treatment with the proteasome inhibitor MG132 and the DNA-damaging agent etoposide. Strikingly, aggresome formation by HDAC6 was markedly impaired in RanBPM shRNA cells, but was restored by re-expression of RanBPM. RanBPM was found to interact with HDAC6 and to inhibit its deacetylase activity. This interaction was abrogated by a RanBPM deletion of its LisH/CTLH domain, which also prevented aggresome formation, suggesting that RanBPM promotes aggresome formation through an association with HDAC6. Our results suggest that RanBPM regulates HDAC6 activity and is a central regulator of aggresome formation.

  19. Economic costs of obesity and inactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colditz, G A

    1999-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to assess the economic costs of inactivity (including those attributable to obesity). These costs represent one summary of the public health impact of increasingly sedentary populations in countries with established market economies. Components of the costs of illness include direct costs resulting from treatment of morbidity and indirect costs caused by lost productivity (work days lost) and forgone earnings caused by premature mortality. We searched the Medline database for studies reporting the economic costs of obesity or inactivity, or cost of illness. From the identified references those relating to obesity or conditions attributable to obesity were reviewed. Chronic conditions related to inactivity include coronary heart disease (CHD), hypertension, Type II diabetes, colon cancer, depression and anxiety, osteoporotic hip fractures, and also obesity. Increasing adiposity, or obesity, is itself a direct cause of Type II diabetes, hypertension, CHD, gallbladder disease, osteoarthritis and cancer of the breast, colon, and endometrium. The most up-to-date estimates were extracted. To estimate the proportion of disease that could be prevented by eliminating inactivity or obesity we calculated the population-attributable risk percent. Prevalence based cost of illness for the U.S. is in 1995 dollars. The direct costs of lack of physical activity, defined conservatively as absence of leisure-time physical activity, are approximately 24 billion dollars or 2.4% of the U.S. health care expenditures. Direct costs for obesity defined as body mass index greater than 30, in 1995 dollars, total 70 billion dollars. These costs are independent of those resulting from lack of activity. Overall, the direct costs of inactivity and obesity account for some 9.4% of the national health care expenditures in the United States. Inactivity, with its wide range of health consequences, represents a major avoidable contribution to the costs of illness in the

  20. A Taylor-Microscale Transport Model for RANS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israel, Daniel; Hsu, Abigail; Rudolph, Joshua

    2017-11-01

    Since the first development of complete two-equation RANS models, there have been a variety of proposals for the choice of a second scaling quantity. Some of the most popular have been a time-scale ω (Kolmogorov, 1942; Wilcox, 1998), the dissipation rate ɛ (Harlow et al., 1968), the integral length-scale L, and the product kl (Mellor et al., 1982). All of these are formally equivalent in the production and dissipation terms, and differ only in which quantity is turbulently diffused. They also all rely on an equilibrium assumption that links the dissipation rate at the small scales to the scale of the large eddies. We propose using the Taylor microscale as the second scale. This has several nice properties, and also exhibits some interesting mathematical differences from conventional models. We show results for some simple shear flows using the new model.

  1. How Is RAN Related to Reading Fluency? A Comprehensive Examination of the Prominent Theoretical Accounts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, Timothy C.; Spanoudis, George C.; Georgiou, George K.

    2016-01-01

    We examined the prominent theoretical explanations of the RAN-reading relationship in a relatively transparent language (Greek) in a sample of children (n = 286) followed from Grade 1 to Grade 2. Specifically, we tested the fit of eight different models, as defined by the type of reading performance predicted (oral vs. silent word reading fluency), the type of RAN tasks (non-alphanumeric vs. alphanumeric), and the RAN effects (direct vs. indirect). Working memory, attention, processing speed, and motor skills were used as “common cause” variables predicting both RAN and reading fluency and phonological awareness and orthographic processing were used as mediators of RAN's effects on reading fluency. The findings of both concurrent and longitudinal analyses indicated that RAN is a unique predictor of oral reading fluency, but not silent reading fluency. Using alphanumeric or non-alphanumeric RAN did not particularly affect the RAN-reading relationship. Both phonological awareness and orthographic processing partly mediated RAN's effects on reading fluency. Theoretical implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:27605918

  2. Encephalomyocarditis virus Leader protein hinge domain is responsible for interactions with Ran GTPase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacot-Davis, Valjean R., E-mail: bacotdavis@wisc.edu [Institute for Molecular Virology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, R.M. Bock Laboratories, 1525 Linden Dr. Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Palmenberg, Ann C., E-mail: acpalmen@wisc.edu [Institute for Molecular Virology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, R.M. Bock Laboratories, 1525 Linden Dr. Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Department of Biochemistry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, R.M. Bock Laboratories, 1525 Linden Dr. Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2013-08-15

    Encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV), a Cardiovirus, initiates its polyprotein with a short 67 amino acid Leader (L) sequence. The protein acts as a unique pathogenicity factor, with anti-host activities which include the triggering of nuclear pore complex hyperphosphorylation and direct binding inhibition of the active cellular transport protein, Ran GTPase. Chemical modifications and protein mutagenesis now map the Ran binding domain to the L hinge-linker region, and in particular, to amino acids 35–40. Large deletions affecting this region were shown previously to diminish Ran binding. New point mutations, especially K35Q, D37A and W40A, preserve the intact L structure, abolish Ran binding and are deficient for nucleoporin (Nup) hyperphosphorylation. Ran itself morphs through multiple configurations, but reacts most effectively with L when in the GDP format, preferably with an empty nucleotide binding pocket. Therefore, L:Ran binding, mediated by the linker-hinge, is a required step in L-induced nuclear transport inhibition. - Highlights: • The hinge domain provides critical residues in Cardiovirus L:Ran complex formation. • Leader prefers to bind Ran in a nucleotide free, GDP-conformation. • L-induced Nup62 phosphorylation is reduced with Ran-deficient binding mutations.

  3. How Is RAN Related to Reading Fluency? A Comprehensive Examination of the Prominent Theoretical Accounts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, Timothy C; Spanoudis, George C; Georgiou, George K

    2016-01-01

    We examined the prominent theoretical explanations of the RAN-reading relationship in a relatively transparent language (Greek) in a sample of children (n = 286) followed from Grade 1 to Grade 2. Specifically, we tested the fit of eight different models, as defined by the type of reading performance predicted (oral vs. silent word reading fluency), the type of RAN tasks (non-alphanumeric vs. alphanumeric), and the RAN effects (direct vs. indirect). Working memory, attention, processing speed, and motor skills were used as "common cause" variables predicting both RAN and reading fluency and phonological awareness and orthographic processing were used as mediators of RAN's effects on reading fluency. The findings of both concurrent and longitudinal analyses indicated that RAN is a unique predictor of oral reading fluency, but not silent reading fluency. Using alphanumeric or non-alphanumeric RAN did not particularly affect the RAN-reading relationship. Both phonological awareness and orthographic processing partly mediated RAN's effects on reading fluency. Theoretical implications of these findings are discussed.

  4. Effects of active, inactive and compounded Saccharomyces ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this research was to determine the effects of active, inactive and compounded Saccharomyces cerevisiae (SC) as natural feed additives on growth performance, visceral organs weight, insulin, thyroxin and growth hormone of Japanese quails. One day old Japanese quails allocated in 4 treatments by 4 ...

  5. Detrimental effects of physical inactivity on neurogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trenton Lippert

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients diagnosed with neurological disorders exhibit a variety of physical and psychiatric symptoms, including muscle atrophy, general immobility, and depression. Patients who participate in physical rehabilitation at times show unexpected clinical improvement, which includes diminished depression and other stress-related behaviors. Regenerative medicine has advanced two major stem cell-based therapies for central nervous system (CNS disorders, transplantation of exogenous stem cells, and enhancing the endogenous neurogenesis. The latter therapy utilizes a natural method of re-innervating the injured brain, which may mend neurological impairments. In this study, we examine how inactivity-induced atrophy, using the hindlimb suspension model, alters neurogenesis in rats. The hypothesis is that inactivity inhibits neurogenesis by decreasing circulation growth or trophic factors, such as vascular endothelial growth or neurotrophic factors. The restriction modifies neurogenesis and stem cell differentiation in the CNS, the stem cell microenvironment is examined by the trophic and growth factors, including stress-related proteins. Despite growing evidence revealing the benefits of "increased" exercise on neurogenesis, the opposing theory involving "physical inactivity," which simulates pathological states, continues to be neglected. This novel theory will allow us to explore the effects on neurogenesis by an intransigent stem cell microenvironment likely generated by inactivity. 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine labeling of proliferative cells, biochemical assays of serum, cerebrospinal fluid, and brain levels of trophic factors, growth factors, and stress-related proteins are suggested identifiers of neurogenesis, while evaluation of spontaneous movements will give insight into the psychomotor effects of inactivity. Investigations devised to show how in vivo stimulation, or lack thereof, affects the stem cell microenvironment are necessary to establish

  6. RAN as a predictor of reading skills, and vice versa: results from a randomised reading intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Ulrika

    2014-07-01

    Although phonemic awareness is a well-known factor predicting early reading development, there is also evidence that Rapid Automatized Naming (RAN) is an independent factor that contributes to early reading. The aim of this study is to examine phonemic awareness and RAN as predictors of reading speed, reading comprehension and spelling for children with reading difficulties. It also investigates a possible reciprocal relationship between RAN and reading skills, and the possibility of enhancing RAN by intervention. These issues are addressed by examining longitudinal data from a randomised reading intervention study carried out in Sweden for 9-year-old children with reading difficulties (N = 112). The intervention comprised three main elements: training of phonics, reading comprehension strategies and reading speed. The analysis of the data was carried out using structural equation modelling. The results demonstrated that after controlling for autoregressive effects and non-verbal IQ, RAN predicts reading speed whereas phonemic awareness predicts reading comprehension and spelling. RAN was significantly enhanced by training and a reciprocal relationship between reading speed and RAN was found. These findings contribute to support the view that both phonemic awareness and RAN independently influence early phases of reading, and that both are possible to enhance by training.

  7. RAN as a Predictor of Reading Skills, and Vice Versa: Results from a Randomised Reading Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Ulrika

    2014-01-01

    Although phonemic awareness is a well-known factor predicting early reading development, there is also evidence that Rapid Automatized Naming (RAN) is an independent factor that contributes to early reading. The aim of this study is to examine phonemic awareness and RAN as predictors of reading speed, reading comprehension and spelling for…

  8. Mesh Resolution Effect on 3D RANS Turbomachinery Flow Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Yershov, Sergiy

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents the study of the effect of a mesh refinement on numerical results of 3D RANS computations of turbomachinery flows. The CFD solver F, which based on the second-order accurate ENO scheme, is used in this study. The simplified multigrid algorithm and local time stepping permit decreasing computational time. The flow computations are performed for a number of turbine and compressor cascades and stages. In all flow cases, the successively refined meshes of H-type with an approximate orthogonalization near the solid walls were generated. The results obtained are compared in order to estimate their both mesh convergence and ability to resolve the transonic flow pattern. It is concluded that for thorough studying the fine phenomena of the 3D turbomachinery flows, it makes sense to use the computational meshes with the number of cells from several millions up to several hundred millions per a single turbomachinery blade channel, while for industrial computations, a mesh of about or less than one mil...

  9. Exploring human inactivity in computer power consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candrawati, Ria; Hashim, Nor Laily Binti

    2016-08-01

    Managing computer power consumption has become an important challenge in computer society and this is consistent with a trend where a computer system is more important to modern life together with a request for increased computing power and functions continuously. Unfortunately, previous approaches are still inadequately designed to handle the power consumption problem due to unpredictable workload of a system caused by unpredictable human behaviors. This is happens due to lack of knowledge in a software system and the software self-adaptation is one approach in dealing with this source of uncertainty. Human inactivity is handled by adapting the behavioral changes of the users. This paper observes human inactivity in the computer usage and finds that computer power usage can be reduced if the idle period can be intelligently sensed from the user activities. This study introduces Control, Learn and Knowledge model that adapts the Monitor, Analyze, Planning, Execute control loop integrates with Q Learning algorithm to learn human inactivity period to minimize the computer power consumption. An experiment to evaluate this model was conducted using three case studies with same activities. The result show that the proposed model obtained those 5 out of 12 activities shows the power decreasing compared to others.

  10. Blood Volume Response to Physical Activity and Inactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-07-01

    deconditioning effects of bed rest inactivity are independent of any disease state. The impor- tance of physical activity on reversing the effects of inactivity...Blood Volume Response to Physical Activity and Inactivity VICTOR A. CONVERTINO, PHD ABSTRACT: Data from both cross-sectional and longitu- dinal...studies provide compelling evidence that circulat- ing blood volume can be influenced by regular physical activity or inactivity. Expansion or contraction

  11. How is RAN Related to Reading Fluency? A Comprehensive Examination of the Prominent Theoretical Accounts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TIMOTHY C PAPADOPOULOS

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We examined the prominent theoretical explanations of the RAN-reading relationship in a relatively transparent language (Greek in a sample of children (n= 286 followed from Grade 1 to Grade 2. Specifically, we tested the fit of eight different models, as defined by the type of reading performance predicted (oral vs. silent word reading fluency, the type of RAN tasks (non-alphanumeric vs. alphanumeric, and the RAN effects (direct vs. indirect. Working memory, attention, processing speed, and motor skills were used as common cause variables predicting both RAN and reading fluency and phonological awareness and orthographic processing were used as mediators of RAN’s effects on reading fluency. The findings of both concurrent and longitudinal analyses indicated that RAN is a unique predictor of oral reading fluency, but not silent reading fluency. Using alphanumeric or non-alphanumeric RAN did not particularly affect the RAN-reading relationship. Both phonological awareness and orthographic processing partly mediated RAN’s effects on reading fluency. Theoretical implications of these findings are discussed.

  12. Impact of inactivity and exercise on the vasculature in humans.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thijssen, D.H.J.; Maiorana, A.J.; O'Driscoll, G.; Cable, N.T.; Hopman, M.T.E.; Green, D.J.

    2010-01-01

    The effects of inactivity and exercise training on established and novel cardiovascular risk factors are relatively modest and do not account for the impact of inactivity and exercise on vascular risk. We examine evidence that inactivity and exercise have direct effects on both vasculature function

  13. General and Specific Contributions of RAN to Reading and Arithmetic Fluency in First Graders: A Longitudinal Latent Variable Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Hornung

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, we opted for a longitudinal design and examined rapid automatized naming (RAN performance from two perspectives. In a first step, we examined the structure of RAN performance from a general cognitive perspective. We investigated whether rapid naming measures (e.g., digit RAN and color RAN reflect a mainly domain-general factor or domain-specific factors. In a second step, we examined how the best fitting RAN model was related to reading and arithmetic outcomes, assessed several months later. Finally in a third step we took a clinical perspective and investigated specific contributions of RAN measures to reading and arithmetic outcomes. While RAN has emerged as a promising predictor of reading, the relationship between RAN and arithmetic has been less examined in the past. Hundred and twenty-two first graders completed seven RAN tasks, each comprising visually familiar stimuli such as digits, vowels, consonants, dice, finger-numeral configurations, objects, and colors. Four months later the same children completed a range of reading and arithmetic tasks. From a general descriptive perspective, structural equation modeling supports a one-dimensional RAN factor in 6- to -7-year-old children. However, from a clinical perspective, our findings emphasize the specific contributions of RANs. Interestingly, alphanumeric RANs (i.e., vowel RAN were most promising when predicting reading skills and number-specific RANs (i.e., finger-numeral configuration RAN were most promising when predicting arithmetic fluency. The implications for clinical and educational practices will be discussed.

  14. Effect of Engine Installation on Jet Noise using a Hybrid LES/RANS Approach Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Installation effects arising from propulsion airframe interaction are known to produce substantial variations in the in-situ jet noise. A hybrid LES/RANS...

  15. Mesh Generation and Adaption for High Reynolds Number RANS Computations Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal offers to provide NASA with an automatic mesh generator for the simulation of aerodynamic flows using Reynolds-Averages Navier-Stokes (RANS) models....

  16. A dynamic hybrid RANS/LES modeling methodology for turbulent/transitional flow field prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Mohammad Faridul

    A dynamic hybrid Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS)-Large Eddy Simulation (LES) modeling framework has been investigated and further developed to improve the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) prediction of turbulent flow features along with laminar-to-turbulent transitional phenomena. In recent years, the use of hybrid RANS/LES (HRL) models has become more common in CFD simulations, since HRL models offer more accuracy than RANS in regions of flow separation at a reduced cost relative to LES in attached boundary layers. The first part of this research includes evaluation and validation of a dynamic HRL (DHRL) model that aims to address issues regarding the RANS-to-LES zonal transition and explicit grid dependence, both of which are inherent to most current HRL models. Simulations of two test cases---flow over a backward facing step and flow over a wing with leading-edge ice accretion---were performed to assess the potential of the DHRL model for predicting turbulent features involved in mainly unsteady separated flow. The DHRL simulation results are compared with experimental data, along with the computational results for other HRL and RANS models. In summary, these comparisons demonstrate that the DHRL framework does address many of the weaknesses inherent in most current HRL models. Although HRL models are widely used in turbulent flow simulations, they have limitations for transitional flow predictions. Most HRL models include a fully turbulent RANS component for attached boundary layer regions. The small number of HRL models that do include transition-sensitive RANS models have issues related to the RANS model itself and to the zonal transition between RANS and LES. In order to address those issues, a new transition-sensitive HRL modeling methodology has been developed that includes the DHRL methodology and a physics-based transition-sensitive RANS model. The feasibility of the transition-sensitive dynamic HRL (TDHRL) model has been investigated by

  17. Tuning a RANS k-e model for jet-in-crossflow simulations.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefantzi, Sophia; Ray, Jaideep; Arunajatesan, Srinivasan; DeChant, Lawrence Justin

    2013-09-01

    We develop a novel calibration approach to address the problem of predictive ke RANS simulations of jet-incrossflow. Our approach is based on the hypothesis that predictive ke parameters can be obtained by estimating them from a strongly vortical flow, specifically, flow over a square cylinder. In this study, we estimate three ke parameters, C%CE%BC, Ce2 and Ce1 by fitting 2D RANS simulations to experimental data. We use polynomial surrogates of 2D RANS for this purpose. We conduct an ensemble of 2D RANS runs using samples of (C%CE%BC;Ce2;Ce1) and regress Reynolds stresses to the samples using a simple polynomial. We then use this surrogate of the 2D RANS model to infer a joint distribution for the ke parameters by solving a Bayesian inverse problem, conditioned on the experimental data. The calibrated (C%CE%BC;Ce2;Ce1) distribution is used to seed an ensemble of 3D jet-in-crossflow simulations. We compare the ensemble's predictions of the flowfield, at two planes, to PIV measurements and estimate the predictive skill of the calibrated 3D RANS model. We also compare it against 3D RANS predictions using the nominal (uncalibrated) values of (C%CE%BC;Ce2;Ce1), and find that calibration delivers a significant improvement to the predictive skill of the 3D RANS model. We repeat the calibration using surrogate models based on kriging and find that the calibration, based on these more accurate models, is not much better that those obtained with simple polynomial surrogates. We discuss the reasons for this rather surprising outcome.

  18. An Enhanced OFDM Resource Allocation Algorithm in C-RAN Based 5G Public Safety Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Feng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Public Safety Network (PSN is the network for critical communication when disaster occurs. As a key technology in 5G, Cloud-Radio Access Network (C-RAN can play an important role in PSN instead of LTE-based RAN. This paper firstly introduces C-RAN based PSN architecture and models the OFDM resource allocation problem in C-RAN based PSN as an integer quadratic programming, which allows the trade-off between expected bitrates and allocating fairness of PSN Service User (PSU. However, C-RAN based PSN needs to improve the efficiency of allocating algorithm because of a mass of PSU-RRH associations when disaster occurs. To deal with it, the resources allocating problem with integer variables is relaxed into one with continuous variables in the first step and an algorithm based on Generalized Bender’s Decomposition (GBD is proposed to solve it. Then we use Feasible Pump (FP method to get a feasible integer solution on the original OFDM resources allocation problem. The final experiments show the total throughput achieved by C-RAN based PSN is at most higher by 19.17% than the LTE-based one. And the average computational time of the proposed GBD and FP algorithm is at most lower than Barrier by 51.5% and GBD with no relaxation by 30.1%, respectively.

  19. Graphite: An active or an inactive anode?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rueffer, Matthew; Bejan, Dorin [Electrochemical Technology Centre, Chemistry Department, University of Guelph, 50 Stone Road East, Guelph Ontario, N1G 2W1 (Canada); Bunce, Nigel J., E-mail: nbunce@uoguelph.c [Electrochemical Technology Centre, Chemistry Department, University of Guelph, 50 Stone Road East, Guelph Ontario, N1G 2W1 (Canada)

    2011-02-01

    Positive polarization of a graphite anode in aqueous solution functionalizes the surface and releases soluble organic carbon to the solution concurrent with the electrolysis of water. Mineralization of the anode occurs at more positive potentials, and can be explained as a repetitive sequence involving functionalization, oxidation to carboxyl, and Kolbe decarboxylation, without recourse to hydroxyl radicals. Other lines of evidence against the intermediacy of hydroxyl radicals include the resistance of p-benzoquinone towards oxidation at graphite - i.e., graphite does not function as an inactive anode towards the oxidation of added substrates. A direct electron transfer mechanism operates for substrates that are oxidizable in the range of water stability, such as acetaminophen and sulfide ion. In the potential range of oxygen evolution we propose that graphite behaves as a modified active anode, at which the oxygen atom to be transferred to an oxidizable substrate first becomes bonded to the previously functionalized surface.

  20. Determinants of Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier 1 (SUMO1) Protein Specificity, E3 Ligase, and SUMO-RanGAP1 Binding Activities of Nucleoporin RanBP2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gareau, Jaclyn R.; Reverter, David; Lima, Christopher D. (SKI)

    2012-02-16

    The RanBP2 nucleoporin contains an internal repeat domain (IR1-M-IR2) that catalyzes E3 ligase activity and forms a stable complex with SUMO-modified RanGAP1 and UBC9 at the nuclear pore complex. RanBP2 exhibits specificity for SUMO1 as RanGAP1-SUMO1/UBC9 forms a more stable complex with RanBP2 compared with RanGAP1-SUMO2 that results in greater protection of RanGAP-SUMO1 from proteases. The IR1-M-IR2 SUMO E3 ligase activity also shows a similar preference for SUMO1. We utilized deletions and domain swap constructs in protease protection assays and automodification assays to define RanBP2 domains responsible for RanGAP1-SUMO1 protection and SUMO1-specific E3 ligase activity. Our data suggest that elements in both IR1 and IR2 exhibit specificity for SUMO1. IR1 protects RanGAP1-SUMO1/UBC9 and functions as the primary E3 ligase of RanBP2, whereas IR2 retains the ability to interact with SUMO1 to promote SUMO1-specific E3 ligase activity. To determine the structural basis for SUMO1 specificity, a hybrid IR1 construct and IR1 were used to determine three new structures for complexes containing UBC9 with RanGAP1-SUMO1/2. These structures show more extensive contacts among SUMO, UBC9, and RanBP2 in complexes containing SUMO1 compared with SUMO2 and suggest that differences in SUMO specificity may be achieved through these subtle conformational differences.

  1. Quantifying Model Form Uncertainty in RANS Simulation of Wing-Body Junction Flow

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Jin-Long; Xiao, Heng

    2016-01-01

    Wing-body junction flows occur when a boundary layer encounters an airfoil mounted on the surface. The corner flow near the trailing edge is challenging for the linear eddy viscosity Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) models, due to the interaction of two perpendicular boundary layers which leads to highly anisotropic Reynolds stress at the near wall region. Recently, Xiao et al. proposed a physics-informed Bayesian framework to quantify and reduce the model-form uncertainties in RANS simulations by utilizing sparse observation data. In this work, we extend this framework to incorporate the use of wall function in RANS simulations, and apply the extended framework to the RANS simulation of wing-body junction flow. Standard RANS simulations are performed on a 3:2 elliptic nose and NACA0020 tail cylinder joined at their maximum thickness location. Current results show that both the posterior mean velocity and the Reynolds stress anisotropy show better agreement with the experimental data at the corner regio...

  2. Rapid automatized naming (RAN) in children with ADHD: An ex-Gaussian analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Matthew; Jacobson, Lisa A; Hague, Cole; Bellows, Alison; Denckla, Martha B; Mahone, E Mark

    2017-07-01

    Children with ADHD demonstrate increased frequent "lapses" in performance on tasks in which the stimulus presentation rate is externally controlled, leading to increased variability in response times. It is less clear whether these lapses are also evident during performance on self-paced tasks, e.g., rapid automatized naming (RAN), or whether RAN inter-item pause time variability uniquely predicts reading performance. A total of 80 children aged 9 to 14 years-45 children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and 35 typically developing (TD) children-completed RAN and reading fluency measures. RAN responses were digitally recorded for analyses. Inter-stimulus pause time distributions (excluding between-row pauses) were analyzed using traditional (mean, standard deviation [SD], coefficient of variation [CV]) and ex-Gaussian (mu, sigma, tau) methods. Children with ADHD were found to be significantly slower than TD children (p reading fluency. RAN response time distributions were also significantly more variable (SD, tau) in children with ADHD. Hierarchical regression revealed that the exponential component (tau) of the letter-naming response time distribution uniquely predicted reading fluency in children with ADHD (p reading, ADHD symptom severity and age. The findings suggest that children with ADHD (without word-level reading difficulties) manifest slowed performance on tasks of reading fluency; however, this "slowing" may be due in part to lapses from ongoing performance that can be assessed directly using ex-Gaussian methods that capture excessively long response times.

  3. Does ability to establish sound-symbol pairings mediate the RAN reading relationship?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Mads; Juul, Holger; Elbro, Carsten

    for animals in a paired associate learning task. These animals were then used in a rapid naming task. Results Preliminary results show that reading correlated with the amount of training required for learning the animal names (r=-.19, p=.06). RAN speed with the same animals did not correlate with reading......Performance on tests to rapidly name letters and digits has been shown to correlate with reading. One possible reason is that these tests probe the ability to learn and automatise symbol-sound associations. However, most studies have not controlled for the amount of experience with the RAN......-items, so it is unclear whether it is the experience or the ability to take advantage of the experience that is responsible for the correlation between RAN and reading. Paired associate learning tasks have been shown to differentiate dyslexics from controls, and to correlate with reading in unselected...

  4. Development of a Hybrid RANS/LES Method for Compressible Mixing Layer Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiadis, Nicholas J.; Alexander, J. Iwan D.; Reshotko, Eli

    2001-01-01

    A hybrid method has been developed for simulations of compressible turbulent mixing layers. Such mixing layers dominate the flows in exhaust systems of modem day aircraft and also those of hypersonic vehicles currently under development. The hybrid method uses a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) procedure to calculate wall bounded regions entering a mixing section, and a Large Eddy Simulation (LES) procedure to calculate the mixing dominated regions. A numerical technique was developed to enable the use of the hybrid RANS/LES method on stretched, non-Cartesian grids. The hybrid RANS/LES method is applied to a benchmark compressible mixing layer experiment. Preliminary two-dimensional calculations are used to investigate the effects of axial grid density and boundary conditions. Actual LES calculations, performed in three spatial directions, indicated an initial vortex shedding followed by rapid transition to turbulence, which is in agreement with experimental observations.

  5. Effects of Physical (Inactivity on Platelet Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Heber

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As platelet activation is closely related to the liberation of growth factors and inflammatory mediators, platelets play a central role in the development of CVD. Virtually all cardiovascular risk factors favor platelet hyperreactivity and, accordingly, also physical (inactivity affects platelet function. Within this paper, we will summarize and discuss the current knowledge on the impact of acute and habitual exercise on platelet function. Although there are apparent discrepancies regarding the reported effects of acute, strenuous exercise on platelet activation, a deeper analysis of the available literature reveals that the applied exercise intensity and the subjects’ cardiorespiratory fitness represent critical determinants for the observed effects. Consideration of these factors leads to the summary that (i acute, strenuous exercise can lead to platelet activation, (ii regular physical activity and/or physical fitness diminish or prevent platelet activation in response to acute exercise, and (iii habitual physical activity and/or physical fitness also favorably modulate platelet function at physical rest. Notably, these effects of exercise on platelet function show obvious similarities to the well-recognized relation between exercise and the risk for cardiovascular events where vigorous exercise transiently increases the risk for myocardial infarction and a physically active lifestyle dramatically reduces cardiovascular mortality.

  6. Estimating the burden of disease attributable to physical inactivity in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Overall in adults 2 15 years in 2000, 30% of ischaemic heart disease, 27% of colon cancer, 22% of ischaemic stroke, 20% of type 2 diabetes, and 17% of breast cancer were attributable to physical inactivity. Physical inactivity was estimated to have caused 17 037 (95% uncertainty interval 11 394 - 20 407), or 3.3% (95% ...

  7. Physical inactivity, depression, and risk of cardiovascular mortality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamphuis, M.H.; Geerlings, M.I.; Tijhuis, M.A.R.; Giampaoli, S.; Nissinen, A.; Grobbee, D.E.; Kromhout, D.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Studies indicate that depression may increase risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in addition to classical risk factors. One of the hypotheses to explain this relation is that depressed subjects become physically inactive. We set out to determine the role of physical inactivity in the

  8. Mobile App to Reduce Inactivity in Sedentary Overweight Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelstein, Joseph; Bedra, McKenzie; Li, Xuan; Wood, Jeffrey; Ouyang, Pamela

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies demonstrated that the duration of inactivity (sedentary state) is independently associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Our goal was to develop the technology that can measure the amount of inactivity in real time, remind a person that a preprogrammed period of inactivity has occurred and encourage a period of activity, and provide web-based feedback with tailored information to the participant and investigators. Once it was developed, we carried out a pilot study in a group of sedentary overweight women. The objective of the study was to assess potential of the mobile app to reduce inactivity in our target population. A randomized crossover design was employed with study subjects randomly assigned to a 4-week each "message-on" and "message-off" periods. Out of 30 enrolled subjects, 27 completed the study. The average age of particpants was 52±12; BMI: 37±6; 47% were white and 47% were African American. Overall, inactivity was significantly lower (p<0.02) during "message-on" periods (24.6%) as compared to the "message-off" periods (30.4%). We conluded that mobile app monitoring inactivity and providing a real-time notification when inactivity period exceeds healthy limits was able to significantly reduce inactivity periods in overweight sedentary women.

  9. Model-Invariant Hybrid LES-RANS Computation of Separated Flow Past Periodic Hills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    The requirement that physical quantities not vary with a hybrid LESRANS model's blending parameter imposes conditions on the computation that lead to better results across LES-RANS transitions. This promises to allow placement of those transitions so that LES is performed only where required by the physics, improving computational efficiency. The approach is applied to separated flow past periodic hills, where good predictions of separation-bubble size are seen due to the gradual, controlled, LES-RANS transition and the resulting enhanced near-wall eddy viscosity.

  10. RAN translation at C9orf72-associated repeat expansions is selectively enhanced by the integrated stress response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Katelyn M; Glineburg, M Rebecca; Kearse, Michael G; Flores, Brittany N; Linsalata, Alexander E; Fedak, Stephen J; Goldstrohm, Aaron C; Barmada, Sami J; Todd, Peter K

    2017-12-08

    Repeat-associated non-AUG (RAN) translation allows for unconventional initiation at disease-causing repeat expansions. As RAN translation contributes to pathogenesis in multiple neurodegenerative disorders, determining its mechanistic underpinnings may inform therapeutic development. Here we analyze RAN translation at G4C2 repeat expansions that cause C9orf72-associated amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia (C9RAN) and at CGG repeats that cause fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome. We find that C9RAN translation initiates through a cap- and eIF4A-dependent mechanism that utilizes a CUG start codon. C9RAN and CGG RAN are both selectively enhanced by integrated stress response (ISR) activation. ISR-enhanced RAN translation requires an eIF2α phosphorylation-dependent alteration in start codon fidelity. In parallel, both CGG and G4C2 repeats trigger phosphorylated-eIF2α-dependent stress granule formation and global translational suppression. These findings support a model whereby repeat expansions elicit cellular stress conditions that favor RAN translation of toxic proteins, creating a potential feed-forward loop that contributes to neurodegeneration.

  11. Modelling of sand transport under wave-generated sheet flows with a RANS diffusion model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hassan, Wael; Ribberink, Jan S.

    2010-01-01

    A 1DV-RANS diffusion model is used to study sand transport processes in oscillatory flat-bed/sheet flow conditions. The central aim is the verification of the model with laboratory data and to identify processes controlling the magnitude and direction (‘onshore’/‘offshore’) of the net time-averaged

  12. Computing the flow past Vortex Generators : Comparison between RANS Simulations and Experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manolesos, M.; Sorensen, NN; Troldborg, N.; Florentie, L.; Papadakis, G; Voutsinas, S.

    2016-01-01

    The flow around a wind turbine airfoil equipped with Vortex Generators (VGs) is examined. Predictions from three different Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) solvers with two different turbulence models and two different VG modelling approaches are compared between them and with experimental

  13. Computing the flow past Vortex Generators: Comparison between RANS Simulations and Experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manolesos, M.; Sørensen, Niels N.; Troldborg, Niels

    2016-01-01

    The flow around a wind turbine airfoil equipped with Vortex Generators (VGs) is examined. Predictions from three different Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) solvers with two different turbulence models and two different VG modelling approaches are compared between them and with experimental ...

  14. Inadequacy representation of flamelet-based RANS model for turbulent non-premixed flame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myoungkyu; Oliver, Todd; Moser, Robert

    2017-11-01

    Stochastic representations for model inadequacy in RANS-based models of non-premixed jet flames are developed and explored. Flamelet-based RANS models are attractive for engineering applications relative to higher-fidelity methods because of their low computational costs. However, the various assumptions inherent in such models introduce errors that can significantly affect the accuracy of computed quantities of interest. In this work, we develop an approach to represent the model inadequacy of the flamelet-based RANS model. In particular, we pose a physics-based, stochastic PDE for the triple correlation of the mixture fraction. This additional uncertain state variable is then used to construct perturbations of the PDF for the instantaneous mixture fraction, which is used to obtain an uncertain perturbation of the flame temperature. A hydrogen-air non-premixed jet flame is used to demonstrate the representation of the inadequacy of the flamelet-based RANS model. This work was supported by DARPA-EQUiPS(Enabling Quantification of Uncertainty in Physical Systems) program.

  15. Optimal Assignment of Cells in C-RAN Deployments with Multiple BBU Pools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Henrik; Checko, Aleksandra; Al-obaidi, Rami

    2015-01-01

    recommend to divide the area into multiple BBU Pools. In this paper we show how to optimally assign cells to different BBU Pools in such a scenario. By using Integer Linear Programming (ILP) method we derive engineering guidelines for minimizing the CAPital EXpenditure (CAPEX) of C-RAN deployment....

  16. Western Culture in Japanese Film: Kurosawa's "Throne of Blood" and "Ran."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Peter E.

    Akira Kurosawa, the most popular Asian film maker with audiences in the United States, has found in William Shakespeare's plays themes and plots that resonate within Japanese culture. While the translations of "Macbeth" into "Throne of Blood" and "King Lear" into "Ran" are quite direct and literal with only…

  17. Analysis of vegetation effect on waves using a vertical 2-D RANS model

    Science.gov (United States)

    A vertical two-dimensional (2-D) model has been applied in the simulation of wave propagation through vegetated water bodies. The model is based on an existing model SOLA-VOF which solves the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations with the finite difference method on a staggered rectangula...

  18. Optimizing Cloud-RAN Deployments in Real-life Scenarios Using Microwave Radio

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-obaidi, Rami; Checko, Aleksandra; Holm, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    derive engineering guidelines for minimizing the CAPital EXpenditure (CAPEX) of C-RAN deployment. We show for which population density and span of BBU Pool coverage usage of Microwave Radio (MWR) links is viable. For larger scale deployment we recommend to divide the area into multiple BBU Pools....

  19. Ardo Ran Varres elustab härra Tartüffi / Tiit Tuumalu

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tuumalu, Tiit, 1971-

    2005-01-01

    2.-9. septembrini Pärnus, Haapsalus, Tallinnas, Viljandis ja Tartus toimuvast tummfilmi ühe olulisema lavastaja F. W. Murnau "Tartüff" filmikontserdist "Tartüff live", esitaja Varrese ansambel ARV Ensemble. Ardo Ran Varrese töödest

  20. Physical inactivity: direct cost to a health plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Nancy A; Brasure, Michelle; Schmitz, Kathryn H; Schultz, Monica M; Huber, Michael R

    2004-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the total medical expenditures attributable to physical inactivity patterns among members of a large health plan, Blue Cross Blue Shield of Minnesota. The study used a cost-of-illness approach to attribute medical and pharmacy costs for specific diseases to physical inactivity in 2000. Relative risks come from the scientific literature, demonstrating that heart disease, stroke, hypertension, type 2 diabetes, colon cancer, breast cancer, osteoporosis, depression, and anxiety are directly related to individual physical activity patterns in adults. Data sources were the 2000 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System and medical claims incurred in 2000 among 1.5 million health plan members aged > or =18 years. Primary analysis was completed in 2002. Nearly 12% of depression and anxiety and 31% of colon cancer, heart disease, osteoporosis, and stroke cases were attributable to physical inactivity. Heart disease was the most expensive outcome of physical inactivity within the health plan population, costing US dollar 35.3 million in 2000. Total health plan expenditures attributable to physical inactivity were US dollar 83.6 million, or US dollar 56 per member. This study confirms the growing body of research quantifying physical inactivity as a serious and expensive public health problem. The costs associated with physical inactivity are borne by taxpayers, employers, and individuals in the form of higher taxes to subsidize public insurance programs and increased health insurance premiums.

  1. An exploratory study of inactive health information seekers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sujin

    2015-02-01

    This study aims to identify people who do not actively seek out health information and the demographic characteristics of Inactive Seekers. The possible determinants of inactive seeking behaviors are also explored. A total of 14,420 survey respondents were drawn from the 2009 Annenberg National Health Communication Survey (ANHCS) data. K-means clustering was used to discriminate Inactive Seekers from Active Seekers. The inactive information seeker group was formed based on their experience with health information seeking. The potential determinants that were tested to predict inactive seeking included the following: health condition, health service use, health media exposure, and computer/Internet activities. Within this national survey data, the respondents were more likely to be included in the Inactive Seekers (N=8312, 58.5%) compared to Active Seekers (N=5908, 41.5%). The demographic characteristics indicated that the Inactive Seekers were identified as younger, male, highly educated, White, and high household income people. The binary logistic regression results from the study model indicated that healthier people were less likely to seek out health information than their counterparts. In addition, those who were exposed to various media were almost 1.6 times more likely to seek out health information than those who were not exposed to such media. Within this study data, the statistically significant determinants identified were health condition and health media exposure while computer/Internet activities did not show strong indications in predicting inactive seeking behavior. The development of more generalizable measures for health literacy or behavioral patterns will bolster advanced study on inactive seeking relating to knowledge of technology and health context. Further study should be directed at estimating the negative aspects of information seeking such as information ignorance or information avoidance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All

  2. ran Bonde - landsköpman och bondeseglare på 1500-talet / Bengt Eriksson

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Eriksson, Bengt

    2012-01-01

    Üle Soome lahe kaubandusest 16. sajandil. Helsingi kihelkonnas tegutsenud kaupmehest Göran Bondest, kes käis aastas 5-6 korda kaubareisil Tallinnas. Tihedamad suhted sidusid Göran Bondet Tallinna kaupmehe Hemlich Fickega. "Läänemere valitsejast" Sören Norrbyst. Helsingi rajamisest Gustav I Vasa poolt vastukaaluks Tallinnale

  3. Chronic Recreational Physical Inactivity and Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cannioto, Rikki; LaMonte, Michael J.; Risch, Harvey A

    2016-01-01

    of EOC. This is largely due to use of common methodology in most studies that overlooks recreational physical inactivity as an independent risk factor for EOC. The aim of this study was to determine whether self-reported, chronic, recreational physical inactivity is an independent risk factor...... for increased risk of EOC. Individual-level data were obtained from a pooled analysis of 9 population-based case-control studies from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium. Seven of these studies were conducted in the United States and the remaining 2 in Europe. Women who reported no regular, weekly...... recreational physical activity were classified as inactive, according to the 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans. The association between physical inactivity exposure and EOC risk overall was assessed using multivariable logistic regression. Subgroup analysis was performed based upon EOC histotype...

  4. The cost of inaction for young children globally: workshop summary

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bogard, Kimber; Mellody, Maureen

    2014-01-01

    "The Cost of Inaction for Young Children Globally is the summary of a workshop hosted by the Institute of Medicine Forum on Investing in Young Children Globally in April 2014 to focus on investments...

  5. Impact of inactivity and exercise on the vasculature in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thijssen, Dick H J; Maiorana, Andrew J; O'Driscoll, Gerry; Cable, Nigel T; Hopman, Maria T E; Green, Daniel J

    2010-03-01

    The effects of inactivity and exercise training on established and novel cardiovascular risk factors are relatively modest and do not account for the impact of inactivity and exercise on vascular risk. We examine evidence that inactivity and exercise have direct effects on both vasculature function and structure in humans. Physical deconditioning is associated with enhanced vasoconstrictor tone and has profound and rapid effects on arterial remodelling in both large and smaller arteries. Evidence for an effect of deconditioning on vasodilator function is less consistent. Studies of the impact of exercise training suggest that both functional and structural remodelling adaptations occur and that the magnitude and time-course of these changes depends upon training duration and intensity and the vessel beds involved. Inactivity and exercise have direct "vascular deconditioning and conditioning" effects which likely modify cardiovascular risk.

  6. Chronic recreational physical inactivity and epithelial ovarian cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cannioto, Rikki; LaMonte, Michael J.; Risch, Harvey A

    2016-01-01

    Background: Despite a large body of literature evaluating the association between recreational physical activity and epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) risk, the extant evidence is inconclusive, and little is known about the independent association between recreational physical inactivity and EOC ri...

  7. The Ran GTPase-activating protein (RanGAP1 is critically involved in smooth muscle cell differentiation, proliferation and migration following vascular injury: implications for neointima formation and restenosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Vorpahl

    Full Text Available Differentiation and dedifferentiation, accompanied by proliferation play a pivotal role for the phenotypic development of vascular proliferative diseases (VPD, such as restenosis. Increasing evidence points to an essential role of regulated nucleoporin expression in the choice between differentiation and proliferation. However, whether components of the Ran GTPase cycle, which is of pivotal importance for both nucleocytoplasmic transport and for mitotic progression, are subject to similar regulation in VPD is currently unknown. Here, we show that differentiation of human coronary artery smooth muscle cell (CASMC to a contractile phenotype by stepwise serum depletion leads to significant reduction of RanGAP1 protein levels. The inverse event, dedifferentiation of cells, was assessed in the rat carotid artery balloon injury model, a well-accepted model for neointima formation and restenosis. As revealed by temporospatial analysis of RanGAP1 expression, neointima formation in rat carotid arteries was associated with a significant upregulation of RanGAP1 expression at 3 and 7 days after balloon injury. Of note, neointimal cells located at the luminal surface revealed persistent RanGAP1 expression, as opposed to cells in deeper layers of the neointima where RanGAP1 expression was less or not detectable at all. To gain first evidence for a direct influence of RanGAP1 levels on differentiation, we reduced RanGAP1 in human coronary artery smooth muscle cells by siRNA. Indeed, downregulation of the essential RanGAP1 protein by 50% induced a differentiated, spindle-like smooth muscle cell phenotype, accompanied by an upregulation of the differentiation marker desmin. Reduction of RanGAP1 levels also resulted in a reduction of mitogen induced cellular migration and proliferation as well as a significant upregulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27KIP1, without evidence for cellular necrosis. These findings suggest that RanGAP1 plays a critical

  8. The Ran GTPase-activating protein (RanGAP1) is critically involved in smooth muscle cell differentiation, proliferation and migration following vascular injury: implications for neointima formation and restenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorpahl, Marc; Schönhofer-Merl, Sabine; Michaelis, Cornelia; Flotho, Annette; Melchior, Frauke; Wessely, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    Differentiation and dedifferentiation, accompanied by proliferation play a pivotal role for the phenotypic development of vascular proliferative diseases (VPD), such as restenosis. Increasing evidence points to an essential role of regulated nucleoporin expression in the choice between differentiation and proliferation. However, whether components of the Ran GTPase cycle, which is of pivotal importance for both nucleocytoplasmic transport and for mitotic progression, are subject to similar regulation in VPD is currently unknown. Here, we show that differentiation of human coronary artery smooth muscle cell (CASMC) to a contractile phenotype by stepwise serum depletion leads to significant reduction of RanGAP1 protein levels. The inverse event, dedifferentiation of cells, was assessed in the rat carotid artery balloon injury model, a well-accepted model for neointima formation and restenosis. As revealed by temporospatial analysis of RanGAP1 expression, neointima formation in rat carotid arteries was associated with a significant upregulation of RanGAP1 expression at 3 and 7 days after balloon injury. Of note, neointimal cells located at the luminal surface revealed persistent RanGAP1 expression, as opposed to cells in deeper layers of the neointima where RanGAP1 expression was less or not detectable at all. To gain first evidence for a direct influence of RanGAP1 levels on differentiation, we reduced RanGAP1 in human coronary artery smooth muscle cells by siRNA. Indeed, downregulation of the essential RanGAP1 protein by 50% induced a differentiated, spindle-like smooth muscle cell phenotype, accompanied by an upregulation of the differentiation marker desmin. Reduction of RanGAP1 levels also resulted in a reduction of mitogen induced cellular migration and proliferation as well as a significant upregulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27KIP1, without evidence for cellular necrosis. These findings suggest that RanGAP1 plays a critical role in smooth

  9. Evaluating C-RAN Fronthaul Functional Splits in Terms of Network Level Energy and Cost Savings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Checko, Aleksandra; Popovska Avramova, Andrijana; Berger, Michael Stübert

    2016-01-01

    split in the baseband processing chain has been proposed to overcome these challenges. This paper evaluates, by mathematical and simulation methods, different splits with respect to network level energy and cost efficiency having in the mind the expected quality of service.The proposed mathematical......The placement of the complete baseband processing in a centralized pool results in high data rate requirement and inflexibility of the fronthaul network, which challenges the energy and cost effectiveness of the cloud radio access network (C-RAN). Recently, redesign of the C-RAN through functional...... model quantifies the multiplexing gains and the trade-offs between centralization and decentralization concerning the cost of the pool, fronthaul network capacity and resource utilization. The event-based simulation captures the influence of the traffic load dynamics and traffic type variation...

  10. Assessment of 3D-RANS models for the simulation of topographically forced shallow flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safarzadeh Akbar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work the performance of Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS simulations to predict the flow structure developed by the presence of a sidewall obstacle in a uniform open-channel shallow flow is discussed. The tested geometry was selected due to its important role in several fluvial applications, such as the control of riverbank erosion and the creation of improved ecological conditions in river restoration applications. The results are compared against experimental laboratory velocity fields obtained after Large Scale Particle Image Velocimetry (LSPIV measurements. It is shown that the length of reattachment of the separated shear layer generated by the obstacle is well predicted by a Reynolds Stress Model, while classical two-equation models show important limitations. All the performed RANS simulations are unable to properly predict the formation of a secondary gyre region, which develops immediately downstream the obstacle.

  11. Enhancing LTE with Cloud-RAN and Load-Controlled Parasitic Antenna Arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Artuso, Matteo; Boviz, Dora; Checko, Aleksandra

    2016-01-01

    implementations of C-RANs tackle fundamental technical and economic challenges. In this article, we present an end-to-end solution for practically implementable C-RANs by providing innovative solutions to key issues such as the design of cost-effective hardware and power-effective signals for RRHs, efficient...... design and distribution of data and control traffic for coordinated communications, and conception of a flexible and elastic architecture supporting dynamic allocation of both the densely distributed RRHs and the centralized processing resources in the cloud to create virtual base stations. More...... specifically, we propose a novel antenna array architecture called load-controlled parasitic antenna array (LCPAA) where multiple antennas are fed by a single RF chain. Energy- and spectral-efficient modulation as well as signaling schemes that are easy to implement are also provided. Additionally, the design...

  12. On the use of (U)RANS and LES approaches for turbulent incompressible single phase flows in nuclear engineering applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benhamadouche, Sofiane, E-mail: sofiane.benhamadouche@edf.fr

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • The paper deals with the use of (U)RANS and LES in nuclear engineering applications. • It gives some ideas and guidelines to run high quality computations. • Some perspectives are drawn concerning the development of (U)RANS and LES approaches in the future. - Abstract: The present paper gives some ideas and guidelines in order to run high quality (U)RANS or LES computations. The paper starts with (U)RANS approaches, advocating the use of Reynolds Stress Models for complex flows and recommending further work on modeling of turbulent heat fluxes, which remains today too basic in industry. The superiority of wall-resolved models vs. wall-modeled in RANS is recalled and the use of adaptive wall treatment is suggested. The concept of Unsteady RANS is finally questioned. Then, important issues around LES are raised. The mesh refinement criteria are recalled for wall-resolved LES and the use of wall models addressed. The production of DNS and wall-resolved LES calculations for flow understanding and RANS validation is encouraged.

  13. Computing the flow past Vortex Generators: Comparison between RANS Simulations and Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manolesos, M.; Sørensen, N. N.; Troldborg, N.; Florentie, L.; Papadakis, G.; Voutsinas, S.

    2016-09-01

    The flow around a wind turbine airfoil equipped with Vortex Generators (VGs) is examined. Predictions from three different Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) solvers with two different turbulence models and two different VG modelling approaches are compared between them and with experimental data. The best results are obtained with the more expensive fully resolved VG approach. The cost efficient BAY model can also provide acceptable results, if grid related numerical diffusion is minimized and only force coefficient polars are considered.

  14. A comparison between Smoothed-Particle Hydrodynamics and RANS Volume of Fluid method in modelling slamming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Sasson

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The oil and gas industry requires complex subsea infrastructure in order to develop offshore oil and gas fields. Upon installation, these components may encounter high slamming loads, stemming from impact with the water surface. This paper utilises two different numerical methods, the mesh-free Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH approach and Reynolds Averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS Volume of Fluid (VOF method to quantify these loads on a free-falling object. The investigation is also interested in conducting a parameter study and determining the effect of varying simulation parameters on the prediction of slamming event kinematics and forces. The surface impact of a freefalling wedge was introduced as a case study and has been simulated using SPH and RANS, with the results being compared to an experimental investigation. It was found from the SPH simulations that particle resolution and the size of the SPH particle kernel are very important, whilst the diffusion term does not play an important role. The latter is due to the very transient nature of slamming events, which do not allow sufficient time for diffusion in the fluid domain. For the RANS simulations, motion of the wedge was achieved using the overset grid technique, whereby varying the discretising time step was found to have a pronounced impact on the accuracy of the captured slamming event. Through analysing the numerical data, one can observe that the RANS results correlate slightly better with the experimental data as opposed to that obtained from the SPH modelling. However, considering the robustness and quick set up of the SPH simulations, both of these two numerical approaches are considered to be promising tools for modelling more complicated slamming problems, including those potentially involving more intricate structures.

  15. Propeller Analysis Using RANS/BEM Coupling Accounting for Blade Blockage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-04

    2000 and 2010 Gothenburg and 2005 Tokyo workshops on numerical ship hydrodynamics (Larrson et al., 2002, Larsson et al. 2013, Hino 2005). The KCS is...Workshop on Numerical Ship Hydrodynamics, Chalmers University of Technology. Larsson , L., Stern, F. and Visonneau, M. (eds.), (2013). Numerical ...B2Y 3Z7 ABSTRACT A popular method for analyzing a propeller operating behind a ship is to couple a Reynolds-averaged Navier- Stokes (RANS) solution

  16. RANS/CAA based Prediction of Jet Mixing Noise in Cruise Flight

    OpenAIRE

    Appel, Christina; Rossignol, Karl-Stéphane; Klabes, Alexander; Neifeld, Andrej; Herr, Michaela; Ewert, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Besides turbulent boundary layer induced excitation noise, jet noise is the second most important aeroacoustic source for aircraft cabin noise. A goal within the DLR project ECCO (Enhanced Cabin Comfort Computations) was to improve current cabin noise pre- diction approaches. Within the framework of the project ECCO RANS (Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes) and CAA (Computational Aero Acoustics) computations for jet noise at cruise conditions have been carried out. Especially at h...

  17. Application of Les, Pans and Rans to a Case of Intake Channel Steady Flow Test Bench

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vítek Oldřich

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with evaluation of intake channel flow properties (discharge coefficient, tumble and swirl ratio using both 3-D CFD simulation and measurement. Sensitivity of different calculation parameters was tested. The most important ones are mesh parameters and applied turbulence models (considered models: LES, PANS and RANS. Concerning the mesh, the critical parameter is a mesh configuration near a wall - a thickness of mesh boundary layer and an amount of these layers have significant impact on mass flow rate while tumble/swirl ratio is unaffected by that. Based on that, these mesh parameters can be considered as tuning constants for fine-tuning the CFD model. Regarding the mesh cell size, 2 different values were tested (0.6 and 0.3 mm. It was found out that neither mesh is fine enough to perform proper LES. Hence, PANS performance is close to RANS. Concerning the turbulence models, PANS seems to be the best one as it combines advantages of both LES and RANS. Generally speaking, mass flow rate prediction is relatively good while swirl/tumble one is more problematic as only qualitative agreement can be achieved.

  18. Accurate load prediction by BEM with airfoil data from 3D RANS simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Marc S.; Nitzsche, Jens; Hennings, Holger

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, two methods for the extraction of airfoil coefficients from 3D CFD simulations of a wind turbine rotor are investigated, and these coefficients are used to improve the load prediction of a BEM code. The coefficients are extracted from a number of steady RANS simulations, using either averaging of velocities in annular sections, or an inverse BEM approach for determination of the induction factors in the rotor plane. It is shown that these 3D rotor polars are able to capture the rotational augmentation at the inner part of the blade as well as the load reduction by 3D effects close to the blade tip. They are used as input to a simple BEM code and the results of this BEM with 3D rotor polars are compared to the predictions of BEM with 2D airfoil coefficients plus common empirical corrections for stall delay and tip loss. While BEM with 2D airfoil coefficients produces a very different radial distribution of loads than the RANS simulation, the BEM with 3D rotor polars manages to reproduce the loads from RANS very accurately for a variety of load cases, as long as the blade pitch angle is not too different from the cases from which the polars were extracted.

  19. Data-free and data-driven spectral perturbations for RANS UQ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edeling, Wouter; Mishra, Aashwin; Iaccarino, Gianluca

    2017-11-01

    Despite recent developments in high-fidelity turbulent flow simulations, RANS modeling is still vastly used by industry, due to its inherent low cost. Since accuracy is a concern in RANS modeling, model-form UQ is an essential tool for assessing the impacts of this uncertainty on quantities of interest. Applying the spectral decomposition to the modeled Reynolds-Stress Tensor (RST) allows for the introduction of decoupled perturbations into the baseline intensity (kinetic energy), shape (eigenvalues), and orientation (eigenvectors). This constitutes a natural methodology to evaluate the model form uncertainty associated to different aspects of RST modeling. In a predictive setting, one frequently encounters an absence of any relevant reference data. To make data-free predictions with quantified uncertainty we employ physical bounds to a-priori define maximum spectral perturbations. When propagated, these perturbations yield intervals of engineering utility. High-fidelity data opens up the possibility of inferring a distribution of uncertainty, by means of various data-driven machine-learning techniques. We will demonstrate our framework on a number of flow problems where RANS models are prone to failure. This research was partially supported by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency under the Enabling Quantification of Uncertainty in Physical Systems (EQUiPS) project (technical monitor: Dr Fariba Fahroo), and the DOE PSAAP-II program.

  20. Nuclear size is sensitive to NTF2 protein levels in a manner dependent on Ran binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuković, Lidija D.; Jevtić, Predrag; Zhang, Zhaojie; Stohr, Bradley A.; Levy, Daniel L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Altered nuclear size is associated with many cancers, and determining whether cancer-associated changes in nuclear size contribute to carcinogenesis necessitates an understanding of mechanisms of nuclear size regulation. Although nuclear import rates generally positively correlate with nuclear size, NTF2 levels negatively affect nuclear size, despite the role of NTF2 (also known as NUTF2) in nuclear recycling of the import factor Ran. We show that binding of Ran to NTF2 is required for NTF2 to inhibit nuclear expansion and import of large cargo molecules in Xenopus laevis egg and embryo extracts, consistent with our observation that NTF2 reduces the diameter of the nuclear pore complex (NPC) in a Ran-binding-dependent manner. Furthermore, we demonstrate that ectopic NTF2 expression in Xenopus embryos and mammalian tissue culture cells alters nuclear size. Finally, we show that increases in nuclear size during melanoma progression correlate with reduced NTF2 expression, and increasing NTF2 levels in melanoma cells is sufficient to reduce nuclear size. These results show a conserved capacity for NTF2 to impact on nuclear size, and we propose that NTF2 might be a new cancer biomarker. PMID:26823604

  1. Nercc1, a mammalian NIMA-family kinase, binds the Ran GTPase and regulates mitotic progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roig, Joan; Mikhailov, Alexei; Belham, Christopher; Avruch, Joseph

    2002-07-01

    The protein kinase NIMA is an indispensable pleiotropic regulator of mitotic progression in Aspergillus. Although several mammalian NIMA-like kinases (Neks) are known, none appears to have the broad importance for mitotic regulation attributed to NIMA. Nercc1 is a new NIMA-like kinase that regulates chromosome alignment and segregation in mitosis. Its NIMA-like catalytic domain is followed by a noncatalytic tail containing seven repeats homologous to those of the Ran GEF, RCC1, a Ser/Thr/Pro-rich segment, and a coiled-coil domain. Nercc1 binds to another NIMA-like kinase, Nek6, and also binds specifically to the Ran GTPase through both its catalytic and its RCC1-like domains, preferring RanGDP in vivo. Nercc1 exists as a homooligomer and can autoactivate in vitro by autophosphorylation. Nercc1 is a cytoplasmic protein that is activated during mitosis and is avidly phosphorylated by active p34(Cdc2). Microinjection of anti-Nercc1 antibodies in prophase results in spindle abnormalities and/or chromosomal misalignment. In Ptk2 cells the outcome is prometaphase arrest or aberrant chromosome segregation and aneuploidy, whereas in CFPAC-1 cells prolonged arrest in prometaphase is the usual response. Nercc1 and its partner Nek6 represent a new signaling pathway that regulates mitotic progression.

  2. Unsteady Three-Dimensional Simulation of a Shear Coaxial GO2/GH2 Rocket Injector with RANS and Hybrid-RAN-LES/DES Using Flamelet Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westra, Doug G.; West, Jeffrey S.; Richardson, Brian R.

    2015-01-01

    Historically, the analysis and design of liquid rocket engines (LREs) has relied on full-scale testing and one-dimensional empirical tools. The testing is extremely expensive and the one-dimensional tools are not designed to capture the highly complex, and multi-dimensional features that are inherent to LREs. Recent advances in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tools have made it possible to predict liquid rocket engine performance, stability, to assess the effect of complex flow features, and to evaluate injector-driven thermal environments, to mitigate the cost of testing. Extensive efforts to verify and validate these CFD tools have been conducted, to provide confidence for using them during the design cycle. Previous validation efforts have documented comparisons of predicted heat flux thermal environments with test data for a single element gaseous oxygen (GO2) and gaseous hydrogen (GH2) injector. The most notable validation effort was a comprehensive validation effort conducted by Tucker et al. [1], in which a number of different groups modeled a GO2/GH2 single element configuration by Pal et al [2]. The tools used for this validation comparison employed a range of algorithms, from both steady and unsteady Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (U/RANS) calculations, large-eddy simulations (LES), detached eddy simulations (DES), and various combinations. A more recent effort by Thakur et al. [3] focused on using a state-of-the-art CFD simulation tool, Loci/STREAM, on a two-dimensional grid. Loci/STREAM was chosen because it has a unique, very efficient flamelet parameterization of combustion reactions that are too computationally expensive to simulate with conventional finite-rate chemistry calculations. The current effort focuses on further advancement of validation efforts, again using the Loci/STREAM tool with the flamelet parameterization, but this time with a three-dimensional grid. Comparisons to the Pal et al. heat flux data will be made for both RANS and

  3. Assessing compliance: Active versus inactive trainees in a memory intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana K Bagwell

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Dana K Bagwell, Robin L WestDepartment of Psychology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USAAbstract: Extensive research on memory interventions has confirmed their success with older adults, but the individual difference factors that predict successful training outcomes remain relatively unexplored. In the current intervention, trainees were identified as active (compliant with training regimens or inactive using trainer ratings based on attendance, homework completion, and class participation. The active group showed significantly greater training-related gains than the inactive group and the control group on most measures. Compliance was predicted by health, education, and self-efficacy. Specifically, active trainees were more likely to have advanced degrees and somewhat higher self-efficacy, and to have higher vitality and fewer functional limitations than the inactive trainees. This research may assist future investigators to target interventions to those who will show the most benefit.Keywords: compliance, memory training, aging, intervention

  4. Phosphorylase phosphatase. Interconversion of active and inactive forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa-Moruzzi, E; Ballou, L M; Fischer, E H

    1984-05-10

    Phosphorylase phosphatase is isolated as an inactive Mr = 70,000 complex made up of a catalytic and a regulatory subunit (inhibitor 2). Separation of the two components yields the free catalytic subunit in a completely inactive state. It can be activated by Mn2+ or Co2+, not Mg2+ or Ca2+. No metal ion is incorporated during this process, as shown by the use of 54Mn2+. The inactive complex, but not the isolated catalytic subunit, can be activated by the protein kinase FA (Vandenheede, J.R., Yang, S.-D., Goris, J., and Merlevede, W. (1980) J. Biol. Chem. 255, 11768-11774), which causes the simultaneous phosphorylation of inhibitor 2 and conversion of the catalytic subunit to an active conformation. The activated enzyme undergoes autodephosphorylation to produce a complex that is inactive even though the catalytic subunit is still in the active form; in a slower step, it returns to its original inactive state. No such conversion occurs in the absence of inhibitor 2, indicating that the regulatory subunit is required for both the activation and inactivation reactions. Complexes were prepared by adding inhibitor 2 to various isolated catalytic subunits. Only the one reconstituted with the FA-activated species behaved like the native enzyme in that the catalytic subunit underwent transformation to the inactive form, then could be reactivated by FA. These data suggest that the two subunits must interact in a highly specific manner to allow the structural changes accompanying the activation-inactivation process. Models are proposed for the changes in conformation induced by Mn2+ or FA.

  5. Nuclear-cytoplasmic trafficking of NTF2, the nuclear import receptor for the RanGTPase, is subjected to regulation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chafe, Shawn C; Pierce, Jacqueline B; Mangroo, Dev

    2012-01-01

    .... Treatment of mammalian cells with polysorbitan monolaurate was found to inhibit nuclear export of tRNA and proteins, which are processes dependent on RanGTP in the nucleus, but not nuclear import...

  6. The economic benefits of reducing physical inactivity: an Australian example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cumming Toby B

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physical inactivity has major impacts on health and productivity. Our aim was to estimate the health and economic benefits of reducing the prevalence of physical inactivity in the 2008 Australian adult population. The economic benefits were estimated as 'opportunity cost savings', which represent resources utilized in the treatment of preventable disease that are potentially available for re-direction to another purpose from fewer incident cases of disease occurring in communities. Methods Simulation models were developed to show the effect of a 10% feasible, reduction target for physical inactivity from current Australian levels (70%. Lifetime cohort health benefits were estimated as fewer incident cases of inactivity-related diseases; deaths; and Disability Adjusted Life Years (DALYs by age and sex. Opportunity costs were estimated as health sector cost impacts, as well as paid and unpaid production gains and leisure impacts from fewer disease events associated with reduced physical inactivity. Workforce production gains were estimated by comparing surveyed participation and absenteeism rates of physically active and inactive adults, and valued using the friction cost approach. The impact of an improvement in health status on unpaid household production and leisure time were modeled from time use survey data, as applied to the exposed and non-exposed population subgroups and valued by suitable proxy. Potential costs associated with interventions to increase physical activity were not included. Multivariable uncertainty analyses and univariate sensitivity analyses were undertaken to provide information on the strength of the conclusions. Results A 10% reduction in physical inactivity would result in 6,000 fewer incident cases of disease, 2,000 fewer deaths, 25,000 fewer DALYs and provide gains in working days (114,000, days of home-based production (180,000 while conferring a AUD96 million reduction in health sector costs

  7. Beyond Rab GTPases Legionella activates the small GTPase Ran to promote microtubule polymerization, pathogen vacuole motility, and infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbi, Hubert; Rothmeier, Eva; Hoffmann, Christine; Harrison, Christopher F

    2014-01-01

    Legionella spp. are amoebae-resistant environmental bacteria that replicate in free-living protozoa in a distinct compartment, the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV). Upon transmission of Legionella pneumophila to the lung, the pathogens employ an evolutionarily conserved mechanism to grow in LCVs within alveolar macrophages, thus triggering a severe pneumonia termed Legionnaires' disease. LCV formation is a complex and robust process, which requires the bacterial Icm/Dot type IV secretion system and involves the amazing number of 300 different translocated effector proteins. LCVs interact with the host cell's endosomal and secretory vesicle trafficking pathway. Accordingly, in a proteomics approach as many as 12 small Rab GTPases implicated in endosomal and secretory vesicle trafficking were identified and validated as LCV components. Moreover, the small GTPase Ran and its effector protein RanBP1 have been found to decorate the pathogen vacuole. Ran regulates nucleo-cytoplasmic transport, spindle assembly, and cytokinesis, as well as the organization of non-centrosomal microtubules. In L. pneumophila-infected amoebae or macrophages, Ran and RanBP1 localize to LCVs, and the small GTPase is activated by the Icm/Dot substrate LegG1. Ran activation by LegG1 leads to microtubule stabilization and promotes intracellular pathogen vacuole motility and bacterial growth, as well as chemotaxis and migration of Legionella-infected cells.

  8. The nucleoporin MEL-28 promotes RanGTP-dependent γ-tubulin recruitment and microtubule nucleation in mitotic spindle formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Hideki; Koch, Birgit; Walczak, Rudolf; Ciray-Duygu, Fulya; González-Sánchez, Juan Carlos; Devos, Damien P; Mattaj, Iain W; Gruss, Oliver J

    2014-01-01

    The GTP-bound form of the Ran GTPase (RanGTP), produced around chromosomes, drives nuclear envelope and nuclear pore complex (NPC) re-assembly after mitosis. The nucleoporin MEL-28/ELYS binds chromatin in a RanGTP-regulated manner and acts to seed NPC assembly. Here we show that, upon mitotic NPC disassembly, MEL-28 dissociates from chromatin and re-localizes to spindle microtubules and kinetochores. MEL-28 directly binds microtubules in a RanGTP-regulated way via its C-terminal chromatin-binding domain. Using Xenopus egg extracts, we demonstrate that MEL-28 is essential for RanGTP-dependent microtubule nucleation and spindle assembly, independent of its function in NPC assembly. Specifically, MEL-28 interacts with the γ-tubulin ring complex and recruits it to microtubule nucleation sites. Our data identify MEL-28 as a RanGTP target that functions throughout the cell cycle. Its cell cycle-dependent binding to chromatin or microtubules discriminates MEL-28 functions in interphase and mitosis, and ensures that spindle assembly occurs only after NPC breakdown.

  9. Watch and Wait Management of Inactive Cystic Echinococcosis - Does the Path to Inactivity Matter - Analysis of a Prospective Patient Cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Stojkovic

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Overdiagnosis and overtreatment are rarely discussed in the context of NTDs despite their relevance for patients under the care of health services with limited resources where the risks of therapy induced complications are often disproportionate to the benefit. The advantages of cyst staging-based management of patients with cystic echinococcosis (CE are not yet fully explored. Questions are: Do inactive cysts (CE 4 and CE 5 need treatment and is there a difference between cysts which reach CE4 and CE5 naturally or by benzimidazole therapy?Analysis of long-term follow-up data from a prospective CE patient cohort of 223 patients of a national clinical center for echinococcosis. The event of interest "relapse" was defined as the reversal of a cyst from an inactive stage (CE4, CE5 back to an active stage. The watch &wait (ww group included 30 patients with 46 inactive cysts who never received medical treatment. The benzimidazole-treated (med group included 15 patients with 17 cysts. There was no relapse in the ww-group whereas 8/17 cysts showed relapse within 18 months after treatment in the med-group. Loss to follow-up was 15.5%.Data from the watch & wait group impressively show how stable naturally inactivated cysts are in contrast to cysts which reach inactivity through treatment with benzimidazoles. A substantial proportion of patients can be spared from treatment through cyst staging. Cysts which inactivated through a natural course do not relapse with very high likelihood. We recommend follow up of 5 years to confirm the stability of the inactive stage. Cysts driven into inactivity through benzimidazole therapy instead need careful monitoring to identify those which reactivate (around 50% within 18 months. 5 years follow-up appears safe to make a final decision on the need for further monitoring.

  10. Watch and Wait Management of Inactive Cystic Echinococcosis - Does the Path to Inactivity Matter - Analysis of a Prospective Patient Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojkovic, Marija; Rosenberger, Kerstin Daniela; Steudle, Franziska; Junghanss, Thomas

    2016-12-01

    Overdiagnosis and overtreatment are rarely discussed in the context of NTDs despite their relevance for patients under the care of health services with limited resources where the risks of therapy induced complications are often disproportionate to the benefit. The advantages of cyst staging-based management of patients with cystic echinococcosis (CE) are not yet fully explored. Questions are: Do inactive cysts (CE 4 and CE 5) need treatment and is there a difference between cysts which reach CE4 and CE5 naturally or by benzimidazole therapy? Analysis of long-term follow-up data from a prospective CE patient cohort of 223 patients of a national clinical center for echinococcosis. The event of interest "relapse" was defined as the reversal of a cyst from an inactive stage (CE4, CE5) back to an active stage. The watch &wait (ww) group included 30 patients with 46 inactive cysts who never received medical treatment. The benzimidazole-treated (med) group included 15 patients with 17 cysts. There was no relapse in the ww-group whereas 8/17 cysts showed relapse within 18 months after treatment in the med-group. Loss to follow-up was 15.5%. Data from the watch & wait group impressively show how stable naturally inactivated cysts are in contrast to cysts which reach inactivity through treatment with benzimidazoles. A substantial proportion of patients can be spared from treatment through cyst staging. Cysts which inactivated through a natural course do not relapse with very high likelihood. We recommend follow up of 5 years to confirm the stability of the inactive stage. Cysts driven into inactivity through benzimidazole therapy instead need careful monitoring to identify those which reactivate (around 50% within 18 months). 5 years follow-up appears safe to make a final decision on the need for further monitoring.

  11. Ivan Rančić: A forgotten painter of flowers and landscapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marković Kamenko M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ivan Rančić was born in the Kraljevo village, in eastern Serbia to a family of farmers on 19th, February, 1906. Very little data about him has been preserved, therefore, this paper is an attempt to make a reconstruction of his life and work. He attended primary school in his birth place, lower secondary school he finished in Knjazevac and Military Academy in Belgrade. After completing the National Academy in 1934, he was sent to Zagreb where he got his first post. He lived there with his wife and his son until the capitulation of the country in 1941. A few months after the collapse of the country, he was arrested and sent to Ljubljana and three months later to a concentration camp in Austria. He spent about fifteen months in that camp in during which time he intensively studied painting. He fled from the camp to Switzerland and stayed there until his death in 1987. According to some letters he sent to his wife in Nis, some of his paintings he created during his time in the camp, ne took to Switzerland where he eventually sold them. He did the toughest jobs there in order to survive and painted extensively. After World War II he graduated from the School of Fine Arts in Lausanne. Later on he had two exhibitions at the New Gallery of Modern Art. Ivan Rančić came a long way from an unknown beginner to a respected prominent artist. He left behind about 350 works, many of which he sold during his life, mainly landscapes and still life in oil, watercolor and pastel. He was neither concerned about styles and trends nor did he believe in the old and the new. If he came to a certain specific manner of painting, it is because at one point it was imposed on him as the only proper way of expression. The analysis of Rančić's paintings leads to the conclusion that his creation had gone through four phases. The first one (started in the concentration camp in Austria during which he painted still lifes without full sketches, previous studies, and the use

  12. İRAN VE REJİM İSTİKRARI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özgür ÜŞENMEZ

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available ÖZ: Bu çalışma, İran rejiminin son yıllarda Orta Doğu'yu sarsan isyanlar ve istikrarsızlıklara-Batı'daki beklentilerin aksine- geçmişten, özellikle 1979'daki devrimden miras kalan sosyal yapı ve politikaların etkisiyle direnebildiğini iddia ediyor. Tunus ve Mısır'daki halk isyanları, temel aktör olan alt sınıflar ve onların neo-liberal ekonomik politikalara muhalefetiyle yayılırken, İran’da devrim sonrası gelişen sosyal devlet mekanizması hala halk ile rejimin tamamen birbirine yabancılaşmasını önlemekte. Ancak son yıllarda ortaya çıkan yeni gerilimler ve İran'ın uyguladığı ekonomi politikaları rejimin krizini derinleştirebilir. Bu nedenledir ki Orta Doğu'yu ve özelde İran'ı anlamak için hegemonik blokların tarihsel değişimini inceleyen ucu açık bir analiz elzemdir. ABSTRACT: This article argues that contrary to the expectations of the Western World, Iranian regime successfully resisted the revolutionary tides of the Arab Spring. Most important determinant of this process for Iran was the legacy of the 1979 revolution and it's associated structures that relatively protects the most vulnerable parts of the population against the wide spread neo-liberal economic policies in the Middle East. So with that feature Iran differs from the Tunisian and the Egyptian examples. In order to understand these features further this essay adapts a historical analysis of changes in hegemonic blocs in Iran since 1979.

  13. Effects of probiotic (live and inactive Saccharomyces cerevisiae) on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    LORD

    2012-05-25

    May 25, 2012 ... The present work evaluated the effect of probiotic (live and inactive Saccharomyces cerevisiae) on meat and intestinal ... intestinal and meat microbial properties of Japanese quails, in the probiotic cases, a significant reduction in the ..... Temporal effects of lactic acid bacteria probiotic culture on Salmonella ...

  14. Estimating the burden of disease attributable to physical inactivity in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Attributable DALYs amounted to the loss of an estimated 176. 252 healthy years of life, or 1.1% (95% uncertainty interval 0.8. - 1.3%) of all DALYs. In both males and females YLL account for. 87% of the DALYs (data not presented here). The total deaths attributable to physical inactivity are presented by age and sex in Fig.

  15. Physical inactivity causes endothelial dysfunction in healthy young mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suvorava, Tatsiana; Lauer, Nadine; Kojda, Georg

    2004-09-15

    We sought to determine if physical inactivity affects endothelial function in young healthy individuals. Recent studies have linked exercise training to increased bioavailability of vascular nitric oxide (NO) and to improved endothelial function in patients with cardiovascular disorders. The effects of physical inactivity on normal vascular endothelial function are not known. Healthy young male C57Bl/6 mice living in groups of five in large cages, where they were running, climbing, and fighting during their active cycle, were randomly assigned to stay there or to live alone in small cages where they were predominantly resting. After five and nine weeks citrate synthase activity (a measure of mitochondrial respiratory chain activity), heart weight/body weight ratio, vascular reactivity, and protein expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) were assessed. Singularized mice showed a reduction of citrate synthase activity (p effect on aortic eNOS expression. In young healthy individuals physical inactivity induces endothelial dysfunction, which is completely reversible by a short period of moderate exercise training. We suggest that physical inactivity, the so-called sedentary lifestyle, increases cardiovascular risk in young healthy individuals by inducing endothelial dysfunction.

  16. The Body Image Of Physically Active And Inactive Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guszkowska Monika

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The aim of the study was to compare the image of the body, the level of its acceptance and satisfaction with it, as well as anxiety about one’s physical appearance and overall self-esteem in a group of adult women who did fitness exercise and those who were physically inactive.

  17. Effects of probiotic (live and inactive Saccharomyces cerevisiae ) on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present work evaluated the effect of probiotic (live and inactive Saccharomyces cerevisiae) on meat and intestinal microbial properties of Japanese quails. Twenty-four (24) 1-day-old Japanese quails were obtained from a commercial hatchery. The birds were randomly divided into 2 groups. The dietary treatments ...

  18. Physical inactivity and associated factors among university students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sociodemographic variables (gender, subjective wealth status) and health variables (subjective health status, depression, substance use, fruits and vegetables consumption and sleep duration) were not associated with low physical activity. The high prevalence of physical inactivity among university students found in this ...

  19. Motor proficiency and physical fitness in active and inactive girls ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In modern day society physical activity levels diminish rapidly among girls and may be a direct consequence of girls experiencing motor difficulties. Therefore the aim of the study was to compare motor proficiency levels and physical fitness levels among active and inactive girls (N=97), aged 12 to 13 years. The BOTMP ...

  20. Physical Inactivity, Obesity, and Type 2 Diabetes: An Evolutionary Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, S. Boyd; Eaton, Stanley B.

    2017-01-01

    Physical inactivity (and unhealthy nutrition) has distorted body composition and, in turn, reordered the proportions of myocyte and adipocyte insulin receptors. Insulin acting on adipocyte receptors produces less glucose uptake than does comparable interaction with myocyte receptors. Accordingly, in individuals with disproportionate muscle/fat…

  1. Home Delivery Medicament Program: access, inactivity and cardiovascular risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roque da Silva Araújo

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to verify causes of inactivity in the Home Delivery Medicament Program, as referred by users from a Primary Health Care Service in São Paulo, comparing them to the causes registered in the program and analyzing them in the theoretical model Concept of Access to Health. Methods: cross-sectional study, interviewing 111 inactive users; and documentary study in the program records. Results: half of the users did not know the condition of inactivity. Discrepancies were found between the user's and the program's information, observing different levels of agreement: Absence of physician and administrative staff member 0%; Transfer to other service 25%; Death 50%; Option to quit 50%; Address change 57% and Change in therapeutic schedule 80%. The users' feeling of accepting the program was observed. In the health access concept, inactivity can be explained in the information dimension, in the degree of asymmetry between the patient's and the health professional's knowledge, identified through the indicators: education, knowledge and information sources. Conclusions: due to the low education level, the user does not assimilate the information on the steps of the program flowchart, does not return for the assessment that guarantees its continuity. Consequently, (she stops receiving the medication and spends a long time without treatment, increasing the cardiovascular risk of hypertensive (92% of the sample, diabetic (44% and dyslipidemic patients (31%.

  2. Automatic Detection of Inactive Solar Cell Cracks in Electroluminescence Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spataru, Sergiu; Hacke, Peter; Sera, Dezso

    2017-01-01

    We propose an algorithm for automatic determination of the electroluminescence (EL) signal threshold level corresponding to inactive solar cell cracks, resulting from their disconnection from the electrical circuit of the cell. The method enables automatic quantification of the cell crack size an...

  3. OTN Transport of Baseband Radio Serial Protocols in C-RAN Architecture for Mobile Network Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Checko, Aleksandra; Kardaras, Georgios; Lanzani, Christian Fabio Alessandro

    This white paper presents a proof of concept implementation of digital baseband radio data transport over Optical Transport Network (OTN) compliant to 3GPP Long Term Evolution – Advanced (LTE-A) standard enabling Cloud Radio Access Network (C-RAN) architecture. The transport between the baseband...... module and a remote radio module is compliant to Common Public Radio Interface (CPRI) and to the OBSAI reference point 3 - 01 (RP3-01) interface protocols, respectively. The purpose is to demonstrate that data integrity and clocking performance at the radio node still meets the strict standard...

  4. Investigation on hydrodynamic performance of a marine propeller in oblique flow by RANS computations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianxi Yao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a numerical study on investigating on hydrodynamic characteristics of a marine propeller in oblique flow. The study is achieved by RANS simulations on an open source platform - OpenFOAM. A sliding grid approach is applied to compute the rotating motion of the propeller. Total force and moment acting on blades, as well as average force distributions in one revolution on propeller disk, are obtained for 70 cases of com- binations of advance ratios and oblique angles. The computed results are compared with available experimental data and discussed.

  5. Hybrid RANS/LES method for wind flow over complex terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bechmann, Andreas; Sørensen, Niels N.

    2010-01-01

    ), and this layer acts as wall model for the outer flow handled by LES. The well-known high Reynolds number two-equation k - turbulence model is used in the RANS layer and the model automatically switches to a two-equation k - subgrid scale stress model in the LES region. The approach can be used for flow over...... the turbulent kinetic energy, whereas the new method captures the high turbulence levels well but underestimates the mean velocity. The presented results are for a relative mild configuration of complex terrain, but the proposed method can also be used for highly complex terrain where the benefits of the new...

  6. Statistical Multiplexing of Computations in C-RAN with Tradeoffs in Latency and Energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalør, Anders Ellersgaard; Agurto Agurto, Mauricio Ignacio; Pratas, Nuno

    2017-01-01

    In the Cloud Radio Access Network (C-RAN) architecture, the baseband signals from multiple remote radio heads are processed in a centralized baseband unit (BBU) pool. This architecture allows network operators to adapt the BBU’s computational resources to the aggregate access load experienced...... frame duration, then this may result in additional access latency and limit the energy savings. In this paper we investigate the tradeoff by considering two extreme time-scales for the resource multiplexing: (i) long-term, where the computational resources are adapted over periods much larger than...

  7. Synchronization challenges in packet-based Cloud-RAN fronthaul for mobile networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Checko, Aleksandra; Juul, Anders Christian; Christiansen, Henrik Lehrmann

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we look at reusing existing packet-based network (e.g. Ethernet) to possibly decrease deployment costs of fronthaul Cloud Radio Access Network (C-RAN) network and cost of Baseband Unit (BBU) resources. The challenge of this solution is that it requires mobile traffic (until now...... transmitted over synchronous protocols) to traverse the asynchronous Ethernet without losing synchronization. We analyze synchronization requirements of mobile networks and present an overview of solutions that fulfill them in traditional mobile networks. Then we elaborate on challenges that packet...... bridge the gap between Ethernet and mobile network domains creating a comprehensive architectural analysis....

  8. Ran Involved in the Development and Reproduction Is a Potential Target for RNA-Interference-Based Pest Management in Nilaparvata lugens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai-Long Li

    Full Text Available Ran (RanGTPase in insects participates in the 20-hydroxyecdysone signal transduction pathway in which downstream genes, FTZ-F1, Krüppel-homolog 1 (Kr-h1 and vitellogenin, are involved. A putative Ran gene (NlRan was cloned from Nilaparvata lugens, a destructive phloem-feeding pest of rice. NlRan has the typical Ran primary structure features that are conserved in insects. NlRan showed higher mRNA abundance immediately after molting and peaked in newly emerged female adults. Among the examined tissues ovary had the highest transcript level, followed by fat body, midgut and integument, and legs. Three days after dsNlRan injection the NlRan mRNA abundance in the third-, fourth-, and fifth-instar nymphs was decreased by 94.3%, 98.4% and 97.0%, respectively. NlFTZ-F1 expression levels in treated third- and fourth-instar nymphs were reduced by 89.3% and 23.8%, respectively. In contrast, NlKr-h1 mRNA levels were up-regulated by 67.5 and 1.5 folds, respectively. NlRan knockdown significantly decreased the body weights, delayed development, and killed >85% of the nymphs at day seven. Two apparent phenotypic defects were observed: (1 Extended body form, and failed to molt; (2 The cuticle at the notum was split open but cannot completely shed off. The newly emerged female adults from dsNlRan injected fifth-instar nymphs showed lower levels of NlRan and vitellogenin, lower weight gain and honeydew excretion comparing with the blank control, and no offspring. Those results suggest that NlRan encodes a functional protein that was involved in development and reproduction. The study established proof of concept that NlRan could serve as a target for dsRNA-based pesticides for N. lugens control.

  9. Muscle activity and inactivity periods during normal daily life.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olli Tikkanen

    Full Text Available Recent findings suggest that not only the lack of physical activity, but also prolonged times of sedentary behaviour where major locomotor muscles are inactive, significantly increase the risk of chronic diseases. The purpose of this study was to provide details of quadriceps and hamstring muscle inactivity and activity during normal daily life of ordinary people. Eighty-four volunteers (44 females, 40 males, 44.1±17.3 years, 172.3±6.1 cm, 70.1±10.2 kg were measured during normal daily life using shorts measuring muscle electromyographic (EMG activity (recording time 11.3±2.0 hours. EMG was normalized to isometric MVC (EMG(MVC during knee flexion and extension, and inactivity threshold of each muscle group was defined as 90% of EMG activity during standing (2.5±1.7% of EMG(MVC. During normal daily life the average EMG amplitude was 4.0±2.6% and average activity burst amplitude was 5.8±3.4% of EMG(MVC (mean duration of 1.4±1.4 s which is below the EMG level required for walking (5 km/h corresponding to EMG level of about 10% of EMG(MVC. Using the proposed individual inactivity threshold, thigh muscles were inactive 67.5±11.9% of the total recording time and the longest inactivity periods lasted for 13.9±7.3 min (2.5-38.3 min. Women had more activity bursts and spent more time at intensities above 40% EMG(MVC than men (p<0.05. In conclusion, during normal daily life the locomotor muscles are inactive about 7.5 hours, and only a small fraction of muscle's maximal voluntary activation capacity is used averaging only 4% of the maximal recruitment of the thigh muscles. Some daily non-exercise activities such as stair climbing produce much higher muscle activity levels than brisk walking, and replacing sitting by standing can considerably increase cumulative daily muscle activity.

  10. Variation in the Gender Gap in Inactive and Active Life Expectancy by the Definition of Inactivity Among Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Rahul; Chan, Angelique; Ajay, Shweta; Ma, Stefan; Saito, Yasuhiko

    2016-10-01

    To assess variation in gender gap (female-male) in inactive life expectancy (IALE) and active life expectancy (ALE) by definition of inactivity. Inactivity, among older Singaporeans, was defined as follows: Scenario 1-health-related difficulty in activities of daily living (ADLs); Scenario 2-health-related difficulty in ADLs/instrumental ADLs (IADLs); Scenario 3-health-related difficulty in ADLs/IADLs or non-health-related non-performance of IADLs. Multistate life tables computed IALE and ALE at age 60, testing three hypotheses: In all scenarios, life expectancy, absolute and relative IALE, and absolute ALE are higher for females (Hypothesis 1 [H1]); gender gap in absolute and relative IALE expands, and in absolute ALE, it contracts in Scenario 2 versus 1 (Hypothesis 2 [H2]); gender gap in absolute and relative IALE decreases, and in absolute ALE, it increases in Scenario 3 versus 2 (Hypothesis 3 [H3]). H1 was supported in Scenarios 1 and 3 but not Scenario 2. Both H2 and H3 were supported. Definition of inactivity influences gender gap in IALE and ALE. © The Author(s) 2016.

  11. Canoe binds RanGTP to promote PinsTPR/Mud-mediated spindle orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, Brett; Johnston, Christopher A.

    2011-01-01

    Regulated spindle orientation maintains epithelial tissue integrity and stem cell asymmetric cell division. In Drosophila melanogaster neural stem cells (neuroblasts), the scaffolding protein Canoe (Afadin/Af-6 in mammals) regulates spindle orientation, but its protein interaction partners and mechanism of action are unknown. In this paper, we use our recently developed induced cell polarity system to dissect the molecular mechanism of Canoe-mediated spindle orientation. We show that a previously uncharacterized portion of Canoe directly binds the Partner of Inscuteable (Pins) tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain. The Canoe–PinsTPR interaction recruits Canoe to the cell cortex and is required for activation of the PinsTPR-Mud (nuclear mitotic apparatus in mammals) spindle orientation pathway. We show that the Canoe Ras-association (RA) domains directly bind RanGTP and that both the CanoeRA domains and RanGTP are required to recruit Mud to the cortex and activate the Pins/Mud/dynein spindle orientation pathway. PMID:22024168

  12. Comparisons of LES and RANS Computations with PIV Experiments on a Cylindrical Cavity Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Tao Su

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A comparison study on the numerical computations by large eddy simulation (LES and Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS methods with experiment on a cylindrical cavity flow was conducted in this paper. Numerical simulations and particle image velocimetry (PIV measurement were performed for two Reynolds numbers of the flow at a constant aspect ratio of H/R = 2.4 (R is the radius of the cylindrical cavity, and H is liquid level. The three components of velocity were extracted from 100 sequential PIV measured velocity frames with averaging, in order to illustrate the axial jet flow evolution and circulation distribution in the radial direction. The results show that LES can reproduce well the fine structure inside the swirling motions in both the meridional and the horizontal planes, as well as the distributions of velocity components and the circulation, in good agreement with experimental results, while the RANS method only provided a rough trend of inside vortex structure. Based on the analysis of velocity profiles at various locations, it indicates that LES is more suitable for predicting the complex flow characteristics inside complicated three-dimensional geometries.

  13. Validation of Heat Transfer and Film Cooling Capabilities of the 3-D RANS Code TURBO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyam, Vikram; Ameri, Ali; Chen, Jen-Ping

    2010-01-01

    The capabilities of the 3-D unsteady RANS code TURBO have been extended to include heat transfer and film cooling applications. The results of simulations performed with the modified code are compared to experiment and to theory, where applicable. Wilcox s k-turbulence model has been implemented to close the RANS equations. Two simulations are conducted: (1) flow over a flat plate and (2) flow over an adiabatic flat plate cooled by one hole inclined at 35 to the free stream. For (1) agreement with theory is found to be excellent for heat transfer, represented by local Nusselt number, and quite good for momentum, as represented by the local skin friction coefficient. This report compares the local skin friction coefficients and Nusselt numbers on a flat plate obtained using Wilcox's k-model with the theory of Blasius. The study looks at laminar and turbulent flows over an adiabatic flat plate and over an isothermal flat plate for two different wall temperatures. It is shown that TURBO is able to accurately predict heat transfer on a flat plate. For (2) TURBO shows good qualitative agreement with film cooling experiments performed on a flat plate with one cooling hole. Quantitatively, film effectiveness is under predicted downstream of the hole.

  14. Development of a Hybrid RANS/LES Method for Turbulent Mixing Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiadis, Nicholas J.; Alexander, J. Iwan D.; Reshotko, Eli

    2001-01-01

    Significant research has been underway for several years in NASA Glenn Research Center's nozzle branch to develop advanced computational methods for simulating turbulent flows in exhaust nozzles. The primary efforts of this research have concentrated on improving our ability to calculate the turbulent mixing layers that dominate flows both in the exhaust systems of modern-day aircraft and in those of hypersonic vehicles under development. As part of these efforts, a hybrid numerical method was recently developed to simulate such turbulent mixing layers. The method developed here is intended for configurations in which a dominant structural feature provides an unsteady mechanism to drive the turbulent development in the mixing layer. Interest in Large Eddy Simulation (LES) methods have increased in recent years, but applying an LES method to calculate the wide range of turbulent scales from small eddies in the wall-bounded regions to large eddies in the mixing region is not yet possible with current computers. As a result, the hybrid method developed here uses a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) procedure to calculate wall-bounded regions entering a mixing section and uses a LES procedure to calculate the mixing-dominated regions. A numerical technique was developed to enable the use of the hybrid RANS-LES method on stretched, non-Cartesian grids. With this technique, closure for the RANS equations is obtained by using the Cebeci-Smith algebraic turbulence model in conjunction with the wall-function approach of Ota and Goldberg. The LES equations are closed using the Smagorinsky subgrid scale model. Although the function of the Cebeci-Smith model to replace all of the turbulent stresses is quite different from that of the Smagorinsky subgrid model, which only replaces the small subgrid turbulent stresses, both are eddy viscosity models and both are derived at least in part from mixing-length theory. The similar formulation of these two models enables the RANS

  15. Ran GTPase-activating protein 1 is a therapeutic target in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kung-Chao Chang

    Full Text Available Lymphoma-specific biomarkers contribute to therapeutic strategies and the study of tumorigenesis. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL is the most common type of malignant lymphoma. However, only 50% of patients experience long-term survival after current treatment; therefore, developing novel therapeutic strategies is warranted. Comparative proteomic analysis of two DLBCL lines with a B-lymphoblastoid cell line (LCL showed differential expression of Ran GTPase-activating protein 1 (RanGAP1 between them, which was confirmed using immunoblotting. Immunostaining showed that the majority of DLBCLs (92%, 46/50 were RanGAP1(+, while reactive lymphoid hyperplasia (n = 12 was RanGAP1(+ predominantly in germinal centers. RanGAP1 was also highly expressed in other B-cell lymphomas (BCL, n = 180 with brisk mitotic activity (B-lymphoblastic lymphoma/leukemia: 93%, and Burkitt lymphoma: 95% or cell-cycle dysregulation (mantle cell lymphoma: 83%, and Hodgkin's lymphoma 91%. Interestingly, serum RanGAP1 level was higher in patients with high-grade BCL (1.71 ± 2.28 ng/mL, n = 62 than in low-grade BCL (0.75 ± 2.12 ng/mL, n = 52 and healthy controls (0.55 ± 1.58 ng/mL, n = 75 (high-grade BCL vs. low-grade BCL, p = 0.002; high-grade BCL vs. control, p < 0.001, Mann-Whitney U test. In vitro, RNA interference of RanGAP1 showed no effect on LCL but enhanced DLBCL cell death (41% vs. 60%; p = 0.035 and cell-cycle arrest (G0/G1: 39% vs. 49%, G2/M: 19.0% vs. 7.5%; p = 0.030 along with decreased expression of TPX2 and Aurora kinases, the central regulators of mitotic cell division. Furthermore, ON 01910.Na (Estybon, a multikinase inhibitor induced cell death, mitotic cell arrest, and hyperphosphorylation of RanGAP1 in DLBCL cell lines but no effects in normal B and T cells. Therefore, RanGAP1 is a promising marker and therapeutic target for aggressive B-cell lymphoma, especially DLBCL.

  16. Nuclear-cytoplasmic trafficking of NTF2, the nuclear import receptor for the RanGTPase, is subjected to regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shawn C Chafe

    Full Text Available NTF2 is a cytosolic protein responsible for nuclear import of Ran, a small Ras-like GTPase involved in a number of critical cellular processes, including cell cycle regulation, chromatin organization during mitosis, reformation of the nuclear envelope following mitosis, and controlling the directionality of nucleocytoplasmic transport. Herein, we provide evidence for the first time that translocation of the mammalian NTF2 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm to collect Ran in the GDP form is subjected to regulation. Treatment of mammalian cells with polysorbitan monolaurate was found to inhibit nuclear export of tRNA and proteins, which are processes dependent on RanGTP in the nucleus, but not nuclear import of proteins. Inhibition of the export processes by polysorbitan monolaurate is specific and reversible, and is caused by accumulation of Ran in the cytoplasm because of a block in translocation of NTF2 to the cytoplasm. Nuclear import of Ran and the nuclear export processes are restored in polysorbitan monolaurate treated cells overproducing NTF2. Moreover, increased phosphorylation of a phospho-tyrosine protein and several phospho-threonine proteins was observed in polysorbitan monolaurate treated cells. Collectively, these findings suggest that nucleocytoplasmic translocation of NTF2 is regulated in mammalian cells, and may involve a tyrosine and/or threonine kinase-dependent signal transduction mechanism(s.

  17. Emerging health problems among women: Inactivity, obesity, and metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Ju Tsai

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The increase in obesity and metabolic syndrome has been documented worldwide. However, few studies have investigated the risk of inactivity, obesity, and metabolic syndrome specifically in women. Hormone balance plays a crucial role in regulating metabolism and helps to maintain optimal health. It is likely that the sex difference in obesity may be due to the variation in hormone concentration throughout a woman's life, which predisposes them to weight gain. This paper reviews previous literature and discusses factors that influence the risk of adiposity-related health consequences among women for three critical biological transitions throughout a woman's life: puberty, menopause, and pregnancy. To improve quality of life and metabolic health for women, interventions are needed to target women at different transition stages and provide tailored health education programs. Interventions should raise awareness of physical inactivity, obesity, and metabolic syndrome, and promote healthy behavioral change in women.

  18. Segmented Capacitance Sensor with Partially Released Inactive Segments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lev Jakub

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Material throughput measurement is important for many applications, for example yield maps creation or control of mass flow in stationary lines. Quite perspective can be the capacitive throughput method. Segmented capacitance sensor (SCS is discussed in this paper. SCS is a compromise between simple capacitive throughput sensors and electrical capacitance tomography sensors. The SCS variant with partially released inactive segments is presented. The mathematical model of SCS was created and verified by measurements. A good correspondence between measured and computed values was found and it can be stated that the proposed mathematical model was verified. During measurement the voltage values on the inactive segments were monitored as well. On the basis of the measurement there was found that these values are significantly influenced by material distribution.

  19. Reasons for Physical Inactivity of Disengaged Students at Klaipeda University

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    Artūras Janauskas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present article analyses reasons for physical inactivity of disengaged students at Klaipeda University. A questionnaire was comprised with reference to an International Physical Activity Questionnaire. The sample chosen for the research comprised a number of 203 students being not engaged in sports. It has been observed that students of Klaipeda University dedicate a very slight portion of time for their individual sport related activities: the greatest majority of students (28,6 % of females and 25,2 % of males spend only 1-2 hours per week for exercising and sports. Results reveal that the main causes for students’ physical inactivity are the following: insufficient variety of sport clubs, lack of time and unwillingness to engage in exercising and sports

  20. Performance Evaluation of INACT - INDECT Advanced Image Cataloguing Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Libor Michalek

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we describe the performance evaluation of INACT tool which is developed for cataloguing of high-level and low-level metadata of the evidence material. INACT tool can be used by police forces in the cases of prosecution of such crimes as as possession and distribution of child pornography (CP. In live forensic cases, the time to first hit (time when the first image containing e.g. CP is found is important, as then further legal actions are justified (such as arrest of the suspect and his hardware. The performance evaluation of first hit was performed on real data with the cooperation of Czech Police, Department of Internet Crime.

  1. Physical inactivity among Egyptian and Saudi medical students

    OpenAIRE

    Abdel-Hady El-Gilany; Ragaa El-Masry

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Medical students, the future doctors, were presumed to be knowledgeable about physical activity and would have future influence on their patients. This study aims to describe the pattern of physical activity, predictors of physical inactivity and perceived barriers to and benefits of physical activity among a sample of Egyptian and Saudi medical students. Methods: A cross-sectional comparative study was carried out on 319 Egyptian and 297 Saudi medical students. The long form of t...

  2. Short-term Physical Inactivity Impairs Vascular Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosova, Emily V.; Yen, Priscilla; Chong, Karen C.; Alley, Hugh F.; Stock, Eveline O.; Quinn, Alex; Hellmann, Jason; Conte, Michael S.; Owens, Christopher D.; Spite, Matthew; Grenon, S. Marlene

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Sedentarism, also termed physical inactivity, is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. Mechanisms thought to be involved include insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and increased inflammation. It is unknown whether changes in vascular and endothelial function also contribute to this excess risk. We hypothesized that short-term exposure to inactivity would lead to endothelial dysfunction, arterial stiffening and increased vascular inflammation. Methods Five healthy subjects (4 males and 1 female) underwent 5 days of bed rest (BR) to simulate inactivity. Measurements of vascular function [flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD) to evaluate endothelial function; applanation tonometry to assess arterial resistance], inflammation and metabolism were made before BR, daily during BR and after 2 recovery days. Subjects maintained an isocaloric diet throughout. Results Bed rest led to significant decreases in brachial artery and femoral artery FMD [Brachial: 11 ± 3% pre-BR vs. 9 ± 2% end-BR, P=0.04; Femoral: 4 ± 1% vs. 2 ± 1%, P=0.04]. The central augmentation index increased with BR [−4 ± 9% vs. 5 ± 11%, P=0.03]. Diastolic blood pressure (DBP) increased [58 ± 7 mmHg vs. 62 ± 7 mmHg, P=0.02], while neither systolic blood pressure nor heart rate changed. 15-HETE, an arachidonic acid metabolite, increased but the other inflammatory and metabolic biomarkers were unchanged. Conclusions Our findings show that acute exposure to sedentarism results in decreased endothelial function, arterial stiffening, increased DBP, and an increase in 15-HETE. We speculate that inactivity promotes a vascular “deconditioning” state characterized by impaired endothelial function, leading to arterial stiffness and increased arterial tone. Although physiologically significant, the underlying mechanisms and clinical relevance of these findings need to be further explored. PMID:24630521

  3. Physical inactivity: the "Cinderella" risk factor for noncommunicable disease prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Fiona C; Bauman, Adrian E

    2011-08-01

    There is strong evidence demonstrating the direct and indirect pathways by which physical activity prevents many of the major noncommunicable diseases (NCD) responsible for premature death and disability. Physical inactivity was identified as the 4th leading risk factor for the prevention of NCD, preceded only by tobacco use, hypertension, and high blood glucose levels, and accounting for more than 3 million preventable deaths globally in 2010. Physical inactivity is a global public health priority but, in most countries, this has not yet resulted in widespread recognition nor specific physical activity-related policy action at the necessary scale. Instead, physical inactivity could be described as the Cinderella of NCD risk factors, defined as "poverty of policy attention and resourcing proportionate to its importance." The pressing question is "Why is this so?" The authors identify and discuss 8 possible explanations and the need for more effective communication on the importance of physical activity in the NCD prevention context. Although not all of the issues identified will be relevant for any 1 country, it is likely that at different times and in different combinations these 8 problems continue to delay national-level progress on addressing physical inactivity in many countries. The authors confirm that there is sufficient evidence to act, and that much better use of well-planned, coherent communication strategies are needed in most countries and at the international level. Significant opportunities exist. The Toronto Charter on Physical Activity and the Seven Investments that Work are 2 useful tools to support increased advocacy on physical activity within and beyond the context of the crucial 2011 UN High-Level Meeting on NCDs.

  4. Physical inactivity among Egyptian and Saudi medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel-Hady El-Gilany

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Medical students, the future doctors, were presumed to be knowledgeable about physical activity and would have future influence on their patients. This study aims to describe the pattern of physical activity, predictors of physical inactivity and perceived barriers to and benefits of physical activity among a sample of Egyptian and Saudi medical students. Methods: A cross-sectional comparative study was carried out on 319 Egyptian and 297 Saudi medical students. The long form of the international physical activity questionnaire (IPAQ was used to measure physical activity. Data was analyzed according to the guidelines for data processing and analysis of the IPAQ. Perceived barriers to and potential benefits of physical activity were reported. Results: Physical inactivity was significantly higher among Saudi than Egyptian medical students (41.1% versus 15.4%, respectively. Logistic regression analysis revealed that the independent predictors of physical inactivity were non-membership in sports clubs (OR =4.6 and use of private cars for transportation (OR=3.9. The most frequent barriers to physical activity are time limitation due to busy study schedule and lack of accessible and suitable sporting places. More than 70% of students perceived that physical activity promotes and maintains health. Conclusions: Because time and access are key barriers to medical student exercise, we believe that provision of free playgrounds in the college to practice sports during free times will promote physical activity in students. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2011; 10(1.000: 35-44

  5. Reconstituted IMPDH polymers accommodate both catalytically active and inactive conformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, Sajitha A; Burrell, Anika L; Johnson, Matthew C; Duong-Ly, Krisna C; Kuo, Yin-Ming; Simonet, Jacqueline C; Michener, Peter; Andrews, Andrew; Kollman, Justin M; Peterson, Jeffrey R

    2017-08-09

    Several metabolic enzymes undergo reversible polymerization into macromolecular assemblies. The function of these assemblies is often unclear but in some cases they regulate enzyme activity and metabolic homeostasis. The guanine nucleotide biosynthetic enzyme inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) forms octamers that polymerize into helical chains. In mammalian cells, IMPDH filaments can associate into micron-length assemblies. Polymerization and enzyme activity are regulated in part by binding of purine nucleotides to an allosteric regulatory domain. ATP promotes octamer polymerization, whereas GTP promotes a compact, inactive conformation whose ability to polymerize is unknown. Also unclear is whether polymerization directly alters IMPDH catalytic activity. To address this, we identified point mutants of human IMPDH2 that either prevent or promote polymerization. Unexpectedly, we found that polymerized and non-assembled forms of recombinant IMPDH have comparable catalytic activity, substrate affinity, and GTP sensitivity and validated this finding in cells. Electron microscopy revealed that substrates and allosteric nucleotides shift the equilibrium between active and inactive conformations in both the octamer and the filament. Unlike other metabolic filaments, which selectively stabilize active or inactive conformations, recombinant IMPDH filaments accommodate multiple states. These conformational states are finely tuned by substrate availability and purine balance, while polymerization may allow cooperative transitions between states. © 2017 by The American Society for Cell Biology.

  6. The pulsed migration of hydrocarbons across inactive faults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. D. Harris

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Geological fault zones are usually assumed to influence hydrocarbon migration either as high permeability zones which allow enhanced along- or across-fault flow or as barriers to the flow. An additional important migration process inducing along- or across-fault migration can be associated with dynamic pressure gradients. Such pressure gradients can be created by earthquake activity and are suggested here to allow migration along or across inactive faults which 'feel' the quake-related pressure changes; i.e. the migration barriers can be removed on inactive faults when activity takes place on an adjacent fault. In other words, a seal is viewed as a temporary retardation barrier which leaks when a fault related fluid pressure event enhances the buoyancy force and allows the entry pressure to be exceeded. This is in contrast to the usual model where a seal leaks because an increase in hydrocarbon column height raises the buoyancy force above the entry pressure of the fault rock. Under the new model hydrocarbons may migrate across the inactive fault zone for some time period during the earthquake cycle. Numerical models of this process are presented to demonstrate the impact of this mechanism and its role in filling traps bounded by sealed faults.

  7. Physics-Informed Machine Learning for Predictive Turbulence Modeling: Using Data to Improve RANS Modeled Reynolds Stresses

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Jian-Xun; Xiao, Heng

    2016-01-01

    Turbulence modeling is a critical component in numerical simulations of industrial flows based on Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations. However, after decades of efforts in the turbulence modeling community, universally applicable RANS models with predictive capabilities are still lacking. Recently, data-driven methods have been proposed as a promising alternative to the traditional approaches of turbulence model development. In this work we propose a data-driven, physics-informed machine learning approach for predicting discrepancies in RANS modeled Reynolds stresses. The discrepancies are formulated as functions of the mean flow features. By using a modern machine learning technique based on random forests, the discrepancy functions are first trained with benchmark flow data and then used to predict Reynolds stresses discrepancies in new flows. The method is used to predict the Reynolds stresses in the flow over periodic hills by using two training flow scenarios of increasing difficulties: (1) ...

  8. Physical inactivity affects skeletal muscle insulin signaling in a birth weight-dependent manner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Brynjulf; Friedrichsen, Martin; Andersen, Nicoline Resen

    2014-01-01

    We investigated whether physical inactivity could unmask defects in insulin and AMPK signaling in low birth weight (LBW) subjects.......We investigated whether physical inactivity could unmask defects in insulin and AMPK signaling in low birth weight (LBW) subjects....

  9. ERICA: leisure-time physical inactivity in Brazilian adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cureau, Felipe Vogt; da Silva, Thiago Luiz Nogueira; Bloch, Katia Vergetti; Fujimori, Elizabeth; Belfort, Dilson Rodrigues; de Carvalho, Kênia Mara Baiocchi; de Leon, Elisa Brosina; de Vasconcellos, Mauricio Teixeira Leite; Ekelund, Ulf; Schaan, Beatriz D

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To evaluate the prevalence of leisure-time physical inactivity in Brazilian adolescents and their association with geographical and sociodemographic variables. METHODS The sample was composed by 74,589 adolescents participating in the Study of Cardiovascular Risks in Adolescents (ERICA). This cross-sectional study of school basis with national scope involved adolescents aged from 12 to 17 years in Brazilian cities with more than 100 thousand inhabitants. The prevalence of leisure-time physical inactivity was categorized according to the volume of weekly practice (< 300; 0 min). The prevalences were estimated for the total sample and by sex. Poisson regression models were used to assess associated factors. RESULTS The prevalence of leisure-time physical inactivity was 54.3% (95%CI 53.4-55.2), and higher for the female sex (70.7%, 95%CI 69.5-71.9) compared to the male (38.0%, 95%CI 36.7-39.4). More than a quarter of adolescents (26.5%, 95%CI 25.8-27.3) reported not practicing physical activity in the leisure time, a condition more prevalent for girls (39.8%, 95%CI 38.8-40.9) than boys (13.4%, 95%CI 12.4-14.4). For girls, the variables that were associated with physical inactivity were: reside in the Northeast (RP = 1.13, 95%CI 1.08-1.19), Southeast (RP = 1.16, 95%CI 1.11-1.22) and South (RP = 1.12, 95%CI 1.06-1.18); have 16-17 years (RP = 1.06, 95%CI 1.12-1.15); and belong to the lower economic class (RP = 1.33, 95%CI 1.20-1.48). The same factors, except reside in the Southeast and South, were also associated with not practicing physical activity in the leisure time for the same group. In males, as well as the region, being older (p < 0.001) and declaring to be indigenous (RP = 0.37, 95%CI 0.19-0.73) were also associated with not practicing physical activities in the leisure time. CONCLUSIONS The prevalence of leisure-time physical inactivity in Brazilian adolescents is high. It presents regional variations and is associated with age and low

  10. GTPase Ran strongly accumulates at the kinetochores of somatic chromosomes in the spermatogonial mitoses of Acricotopus lucidus (Diptera, Chironomidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staiber, Wolfgang

    2014-07-01

    Unequal chromosome segregation and spindle formation occurs in the last gonial mitosis in the germ line of the chironomid Acricotopus lucidus. During this differential mitosis, all germ line-limited chromosomes (=Ks) migrate undivided to only one pole of the cell, while the somatic chromosomes (=Ss) first remain in the metaphase plane, and with the arrival of the Ks at the pole, they then separate equally. The evolutionarily conserved GTPase Ran plays a crucial role in many cellular processes. This includes the regulation of microtubule nucleation and stabilisation at kinetochores and of spindle assembly during mitosis, which is promoted by a RanGTP concentration gradient that forms around the mitotic chromosomes (Kalab et al. in Science 295:2452-2456, 2002, Nature 440:697-701, 2006). In the present study, a strong accumulation of Ran was detected by immunofluorescence at the kinetochores of the Ss in normal gonial and differential gonial mitoses of males of A. lucidus. In contrast, no Ran accumulation was observed at the kinetochores of the Ss in the metaphases of brain ganglia mitoses or of aberrant spermatocytes or in metaphases I and II of spermatocyte meiotic divisions. Likewise, there was no accumulation at the kinetochores of Drosophila melanogaster mitotic chromosomes from larval brains. The specific accumulation of Ran at the kinetochores of the Ss in differential gonial mitoses of A. lucidus strongly suggests that Ran is involved in a mechanism acting in this exceptional mitosis, which retains the Ss at the metaphase plane and prevents a premature separation and unequal segregation of the Ss during monopolar migration of the Ks.

  11. Rinfoform Usage As Update Request Media Articles In iRAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Untung Rahardja

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Ease of access to information made public should continue to improve his knowledge of information technology. As one of the Universities in the field of computers, Perguruan Tinggi Raharja has a lot of innovation to create pembelajalan unconventional media. For that create an information media that serve as a center of tutorial every innovation in Perguruan Tinggi Raharja. iRAN (iLeraning Prog Ask And News. In the implementation one that is still seen as less is a service request in Iran. Utilization of Cloud Computing RinfoApps as media RinfoForms one of them is deemed to cover deficiencies that affect the improvements in the services provided.This research was conducted using the method of data collection, including the method of observation, and literature study method. RinfoForm expected utilization associated with Cluod Computin can give effect to the service request is in Iran.

  12. RANS-based simulation of wave-induced sheet-flow transport of graded sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calistan, Ugur; Fuhrman, David R.

    2017-01-01

    A one-dimensional vertical (1DV) turbulence-closure flow model, coupled with sediment transport capabilities,is extended to incorporate graded sediment mixtures. The hydrodynamic model solves the horizontalcomponent of the incompressible Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS) equations coupled...... for each grain fraction, includingeffects associated with increased exposure of larger particles within a mixture. The suspended sedimenttransport model also makes use of modified reference concentration approach, wherein reference concentrationscomputed individually for each fraction are translated...... to a common level, conveniently enabling use of asingle computational grid for the simulation of suspended sediments. Parametric study shows that these twoeffects combine to help alleviate an otherwise systematic tendency towards over- (under-) predicted transportrates for fine (coarse) sand fractions...

  13. Rans-Based Numerical Simulation of Wave-Induced Sheet-Flow Transport of Graded Sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuhrman, David R.; Caliskan, Ugur

    An existing one-dimensional vertical (1DV) turbulence-closure flow model, coupled with sediment transport capabilities, is extended to incorporate graded sediment mixtures. The hydrodynamic model solves the horizontal component of the incompressible Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS) equations...... coupled with k–ω turbulence closure. In addition to standard bed and suspended load descriptions, the sediment transport model incorporates so-called high-concentration effects (turbulence damping and hindered settling velocities). The sediment transport model treats the bed and suspended load...... individually for each grain fraction within a mixture, and includes effects associated with increased exposure of larger particles within a mixture. The model also makes use of a modified reference concentration approach, with reference concentrations computed individually for each fraction...

  14. RANS-based simulation of turbulent wave boundary layer and sheet-flow sediment transport processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuhrman, David R.; Schløer, Signe; Sterner, Johanna

    2013-01-01

    A numerical model coupling the horizontal component of the incompressible Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS) equationswith two-equation k−ω turbulence closure is presented and used to simulate a variety of turbulent wave boundary layer processes. The hydrodynamic model is additionally coupled...... of a number of local factors important within cross-shore wave boundary layer and sediment transport dynamics. The hydrodynamic model is validated for both hydraulically smooth and rough conditions, based on wave friction factor diagrams and boundary layer streaming profiles, with the results in excellent...... agreement with experimental and/or previous numerical work. The sediment transport model is likewise validated against oscillatory tunnel experiments involving both velocity-skewed and acceleration-skewed flows, as well as against measurements beneath real progressive waves.Model capabilities are exploited...

  15. Investigation on the wake evolution of contra-rotating propeller using RANS computation and SPIV measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang-Jun Paik

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The wake characteristics of Contra-Rotating Propeller (CRP were investigated using numerical simulation and flow measurement. The numerical simulation was carried out with a commercial CFD code based on a Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS equations solver, and the flow measurement was performed with Stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry (SPIV system. The simulation results were validated through the comparison with the experiment results measured around the leading edge of rudder to investigate the effect of propeller operation under the conditions without propeller, with forward propeller alone, and with both forward and aft propellers. The evolution of CRP wake was analyzed through velocity and vorticity contours on three transverse planes and one longitudinal plane based on CFD results. The trajectories of propeller tip vortex core in the cases with and without aft propeller were also compared, and larger wake contraction with CRP was confirmed.

  16. RANS simulation of cavitation and hull pressure fluctuation for marine propeller operating behind-hull condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang-Jun Paik

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Simulations of cavitation flow and hull pressure fluctuation for a marine propeller operating behind a hull using the unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equations (RANS are presented. A full hull body submerged under the free surface is modeled in the computational domain to simulate directly the wake field of the ship at the propeller plane. Simulations are performed in design and ballast draught conditions to study the effect of cavitation number. And two propellers with slightly different geometry are simulated to validate the detectability of the numerical simulation. All simulations are performed using a commercial CFD software FLUENT. Cavitation patterns of the simulations show good agreement with the experimental results carried out in Samsung CAvitation Tunnel (SCAT. The simulation results for the hull pressure fluctuation induced by a propeller are also compared with the experimental results showing good agreement in the tendency and amplitude, especially, for the first blade frequency.

  17. A RANS modelling approach for predicting powering performance of ships in waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn Windén

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a modelling technique for simulating self-propelled ships in waves is presented. The flow is modelled using a RANS solver coupled with an actuator disk model for the propeller. The motion of the ship is taken into consideration in the definition of the actuator disk region as well as the advance ratio of the propeller. The RPM of the propeller is controlled using a PID-controller with constraints added on the maximum permissible RPM increase rate. Results are presented for a freely surging model in regular waves with different constraints put on the PID-controller. The described method shows promising results and allows for the studying of several factors relating to self-propulsion. However, more validation data is needed to judge the accuracy of the model.

  18. Optimizing small cell deployment by the use of C-RANs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Checko, Aleksandra; Holm, Henrik Laumand; Christiansen, Henrik Lehrmann

    2014-01-01

    conditions. Furthermore, based on theoretical calculations and Network simulations we present considerations on deployment scenarios to optimize green field deployments in terms of Total Cost of Ownership (TCO). This involves optimizing the mix of cells with different traffic profiles and the BBU Pool......A Cloud Radio Access Network (C-RAN) is a novel mobile network architecture that has the potential to support extremely dense mobile network deployments enhancing the network capacity while offering cost savings on baseband resources. In this work we analyze cell traffic profiles and evaluate...... the conditions that impact the statistical multiplexing gain in the Baseband Unit (BBU) Pool. We conclude on the set of parameters that maximize the statistical multiplexing gain, leading to the highest potential cost savings. We then propose a packet based architecture that can adapt to changing traffic...

  19. Galaxy evolution. Isolated compact elliptical galaxies: stellar systems that ran away.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilingarian, Igor; Zolotukhin, Ivan

    2015-04-24

    Compact elliptical galaxies form a rare class of stellar system (~30 presently known) characterized by high stellar densities and small sizes and often harboring metal-rich stars. They were thought to form through tidal stripping of massive progenitors, until two isolated objects were discovered where massive galaxies performing the stripping could not be identified. By mining astronomical survey data, we have now found 195 compact elliptical galaxies in all types of environment. They all share similar dynamical and stellar population properties. Dynamical analysis for nonisolated galaxies demonstrates the feasibility of their ejection from host clusters and groups by three-body encounters, which is in agreement with numerical simulations. Hence, isolated compact elliptical and isolated quiescent dwarf galaxies are tidally stripped systems that ran away from their hosts. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  20. Flow field analysis of a pentagonal-shaped bridge deck by unsteady RANS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Naimul Haque

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Long-span cable-stayed bridges are susceptible to dynamic wind effects due to their inherent flexibility. The fluid flow around the bridge deck should be well understood for the efficient design of an aerodynamically stable long-span bridge system. In this work, the aerodynamic features of a pentagonal-shaped bridge deck are explored numerically. The analytical results are compared with past experimental work to assess the capability of two-dimensional unsteady RANS simulation for predicting the aerodynamic features of this type of deck. The influence of the bottom plate slope on aerodynamic response and flow features was investigated. By varying the Reynolds number (2 × 104 to 20 × 104 the aerodynamic behavior at high wind speeds is clarified.

  1. A RANS/DES Numerical Procedure for Axisymmetric Flows with and without Strong Rotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Andrew Jacob [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    A RANS/DES numerical procedure with an extended Lax-Wendroff control-volume scheme and turbulence model is described for the accurate simulation of internal/external axisymmetric flow with and without strong rotation. This new procedure is an extension, from Cartesian to cylindrical coordinates, of (1) a second order accurate multi-grid, control-volume integration scheme, and (2) a k-ω turbulence model. This paper outlines both the axisymmetric corrections to the mentioned numerical schemes and the developments of techniques pertaining to numerical dissipation, multi-block connectivity, parallelization, etc. Furthermore, analytical and experimental case studies are presented to demonstrate accuracy and computational efficiency. Notes are also made toward numerical stability of highly rotational flows.

  2. A Synthesis of Hybrid RANS/LES CFD Results for F-16XL Aircraft Aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luckring, James M.; Park, Michael A.; Hitzel, Stephan M.; Jirasek, Adam; Lofthouse, Andrew J.; Morton, Scott A.; McDaniel, David R.; Rizzi, Arthur M.

    2015-01-01

    A synthesis is presented of recent numerical predictions for the F-16XL aircraft flow fields and aerodynamics. The computational results were all performed with hybrid RANS/LES formulations, with an emphasis on unsteady flows and subsequent aerodynamics, and results from five computational methods are included. The work was focused on one particular low-speed, high angle-of-attack flight test condition, and comparisons against flight-test data are included. This work represents the third coordinated effort using the F-16XL aircraft, and a unique flight-test data set, to advance our knowledge of slender airframe aerodynamics as well as our capability for predicting these aerodynamics with advanced CFD formulations. The prior efforts were identified as Cranked Arrow Wing Aerodynamics Project International, with the acronyms CAWAPI and CAWAPI-2. All information in this paper is in the public domain.

  3. Performance evaluation of RANS-based turbulence models in simulating a honeycomb heat sink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subasi, Abdussamet; Ozsipahi, Mustafa; Sahin, Bayram; Gunes, Hasan

    2017-07-01

    As well-known, there is not a universal turbulence model that can be used to model all engineering problems. There are specific applications for each turbulence model that make it appropriate to use, and it is vital to select an appropriate model and wall function combination that matches the physics of the problem considered. Therefore, in this study, performance of six well-known Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes ( RANS) based turbulence models which are the Standard k {{-}} ɛ, the Renormalized Group k- ɛ, the Realizable k- ɛ, the Reynolds Stress Model, the k- ω and the Shear Stress Transport k- ω and accompanying wall functions which are the standard, the non-equilibrium and the enhanced are evaluated via 3D simulation of a honeycomb heat sink. The CutCell method is used to generate grid for the part including heat sink called test section while a hexahedral mesh is employed to discretize to inlet and outlet sections. A grid convergence study is conducted for verification process while experimental data and well-known correlations are used to validate the numerical results. Prediction of pressure drop along the test section, mean base plate temperature of the heat sink and temperature at the test section outlet are regarded as a measure of the performance of employed models and wall functions. The results indicate that selection of turbulence models and wall functions has a great influence on the results and, therefore, need to be selected carefully. Hydraulic and thermal characteristics of the honeycomb heat sink can be determined in a reasonable accuracy using RANS- based turbulence models provided that a suitable turbulence model and wall function combination is selected.

  4. RANS based CFD methodology for a real scale 217-pin wire-wrapped fuel assembly of KAERI PGSFR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Jae-Ho, E-mail: jhjeong@kaeri.re.kr [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 989-111 Daedeok-daero, Yuseoung-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Song, Min-Seop [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, 559 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kwi-Lim [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 989-111 Daedeok-daero, Yuseoung-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • This paper presents a suitable way for a practical RANS based CFD methodology which is applicable to real scale 217-pin wire-wrapped fuel assembly of KAERI PGSFR. • A key point of differentiation of the RANS based CFD methodology in this study is adapting an innovative grid generation method using a fortran based in-house code with a GGI function in a general-purpose commercial CFD code, CFX. • The RANS based CFD methodology is implemented with high resolution scheme and SST turbulence model in the 7-pin 37-pin, and 127-pin wire-wrapped fuel assembly of PNC and JNC. Furthermore, the RANS based CFD methodology can be successfully extended to the real scale 217-pin wire-wrapped fuel bundles of KAERI PGSFR. • Three-dimensional thermal-hydraulic characteristics have been also investigated briefly. - Abstract: This paper presents a suitable way for a practical RANS (Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes simulation) based CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) methodology which is applicable to real scale 217-pin wire-wrapped fuel assembly of KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute) PGSFR (Prototype Gen-IV Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor). The main purpose of the current study is to support license issue for the KAERI PGSFR core safety and to elucidate thermal-hydraulic characteristics in a 217-pin wire-wrapped fuel assembly of KAERI PGSFR. A key point of differentiation of the RANS based CFD methodology in this study is adapting an innovative grid generation method using a fortran based in-house code with a GGI (General Grid Interface) function in a general-purpose commercial CFD code, CFX. The innovative grid generation method with GGI function can achieve to simulate a real wire shape with minimizing cell skewness. The RANS based CFD methodology is implemented with high resolution scheme in convection term and SST (Shear Stress Transport) turbulence model in the 7-pin 37-pin, and 127-pin wire-wrapped fuel assembly of PNC (Power reactor and Nuclear fuel

  5. Early Life Factors and Adult Leisure Time Physical Inactivity Stability and Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto Pereira, Snehal M; Li, Leah; Power, Chris

    2015-09-01

    Physical inactivity has a high prevalence and associated disease burden. A better understanding of influences on sustaining and changing inactive lifestyles is needed. We aimed to establish whether leisure time inactivity was stable in midadulthood and whether early life factors were associated with inactivity patterns. In the 1958 British birth cohort (n = 12,271), leisure time inactivity (frequency, less than once a week) assessed at 33 and 50 yr was categorized as "never inactive," "persistently inactive," "deteriorating," or "improving." Early life factors (birth to 16 yr) were categorized into three (physical, social, and behavioral) domains. Using multinomial logistic regression, we assessed associations with inactivity persistence and change of factors within each early life domain and the three domains combined with and without adjustment for adult factors. Inactivity prevalence was similar at 33 and 50 yr (approximately 31%), but 17% deteriorated and 18% improved with age. In models adjusted for all domains simultaneously, factors associated with inactivity persistence versus never inactive were prepubertal stature (8% lower risk/height SD), poor hand control/coordination (17% higher risk/increase on four-point scale), cognition (16% lower/SD in ability) (physical); parental divorce (25% higher), class at birth (7% higher/reduction on four-point scale), minimal parental education (16% higher), household amenities (2% higher/increase in 19-point score (high = poor)) (social); and inactivity (22% higher/reduction in activity on four-point scale), low sports aptitude (47% higher), smoking (30% higher) (behavioral). All except stature, parental education, sports aptitude, and smoking were associated also with inactivity deterioration. Poor hand control/coordination was the only factor associated with improved status (13% lower/increase on four-point scale) versus persistently inactive. Adult leisure time inactivity is moderately stable. Early life factors are

  6. 38 CFR 3.372 - Initial grant following inactivity of tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... inactivity of tuberculosis. 3.372 Section 3.372 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF... Considerations Relative to Specific Diseases § 3.372 Initial grant following inactivity of tuberculosis. When... tuberculosis and there is satisfactory evidence that the condition was active previously but is now inactive...

  7. RANS / LES coupling applied to high Reynolds number turbulent flows of the nuclear industry; Application du couplage RANS / LES aux ecoulements turbulents a haut nombre de Reynolds de l'industrie nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benarafa, Y

    2005-12-15

    The main issue to perform a computational study of high Reynolds numbered turbulent flows consists on predicting their unsteadiness without implying a tremendous computational cost. First, the main drawbacks of large-eddy simulation with standard wall model on a coarse mesh for a plane channel flow are highlighted. To correct these drawbacks two coupling RANS/LES methods have been proposed. The first one relies on a sophisticated wall model (TBLE) which consists on solving Thin Boundary Layer Equations with a RANS type turbulent closure in the near wall region. The second one consists on a RANS/LES methods have been proposed. The second one consists on a RANS/LES coupling method using a forcing term approach. These various approaches have been implemented in the TRIO-U code developed at CEA (French Atomic Center) at Grenoble, France. The studied flow configurations are the fully developed plane channel flow and a flow around a surface-mounted cubical obstacle. Both approaches provide encouraging results and allow a surface-mounted cubical obstacle. Both approaches provide encouraging results and allow unsteady simulations for a low computational cost. (author)

  8. Physical inactivity and muscle oxidative capacity in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram, Martin; Dahl, Rannvá; Dela, Flemming

    2014-01-01

    of proteins related to oxidative phosphorylation. With such a substantial down-regulation, it is likely that a range of adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-dependent pathways such as calcium signalling, respiratory capacity and apoptosis are affected by physical inactivity. However, this has not been investigated...... in humans, and further studies are required to substantiate this hypothesis, which could expand our knowledge of the potential link between lifestyle-related diseases and muscle oxidative capacity. Furthermore, even though a large body of literature reports the effect of physical training on muscle...

  9. 78 FR 34084 - Freeport-McMoRan Energy LLC; Application for Long-Term Authorization To Export Liquefied Natural...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-06

    ... Freeport-McMoRan Energy LLC; Application for Long-Term Authorization To Export Liquefied Natural Gas... natural gas (non-FTA countries) with which trade is not prohibited by U.S. law or policy. FME requests... Natural Gas Act (NGA), 15 U.S.C. 717b(c).\\3\\ In the current Application, FME requests both FTA and non...

  10. A comparison of RANS computations and wind tunnel tests for RMS pressures on a high-rise building model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalkman, I.M.; Bronkhorst, A.J.; Bentum, C.A. van; Franke, J.

    2012-01-01

    Five root-mean-square (RMS) pressure models are used in combination with different turbulence models to determine whether it is possible to obtain a conservative estimate of RMS pressures on a high-rise building model from a RANS calculation. When a precursor domain is used for the generation of

  11. HIV Integration Targeting: A Pathway Involving Transportin-3 and the Nuclear Pore Protein RanBP2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huegel, Alyssa; Roth, Shoshannah L.; Schaller, Torsten; James, Leo C.; Towers, Greg J.; Young, John A. T.; Chanda, Sumit K.; König, Renate; Malani, Nirav; Berry, Charles C.; Bushman, Frederic D.

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide siRNA screens have identified host cell factors important for efficient HIV infection, among which are nuclear pore proteins such as RanBP2/Nup358 and the karyopherin Transportin-3/TNPO3. Analysis of the roles of these proteins in the HIV replication cycle suggested that correct trafficking through the pore may facilitate the subsequent integration step. Here we present data for coupling between these steps by demonstrating that depletion of Transportin-3 or RanBP2 altered the terminal step in early HIV replication, the selection of chromosomal sites for integration. We found that depletion of Transportin-3 and RanBP2 altered integration targeting for HIV. These knockdowns reduced HIV integration frequency in gene-dense regions and near gene-associated features, a pattern that differed from that reported for depletion of the HIV integrase binding cofactor Psip1/Ledgf/p75. MLV integration was not affected by the Transportin-3 knockdown. Using siRNA knockdowns and integration targeting analysis, we also implicated several additional nuclear proteins in proper target site selection. To map viral determinants of integration targeting, we analyzed a chimeric HIV derivative containing MLV gag, and found that the gag replacement phenocopied the Transportin-3 and RanBP2 knockdowns. Thus, our data support a model in which Gag-dependent engagement of the proper transport and nuclear pore machinery mediate trafficking of HIV complexes to sites of integration. PMID:21423673

  12. HIV integration targeting: a pathway involving Transportin-3 and the nuclear pore protein RanBP2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen E Ocwieja

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide siRNA screens have identified host cell factors important for efficient HIV infection, among which are nuclear pore proteins such as RanBP2/Nup358 and the karyopherin Transportin-3/TNPO3. Analysis of the roles of these proteins in the HIV replication cycle suggested that correct trafficking through the pore may facilitate the subsequent integration step. Here we present data for coupling between these steps by demonstrating that depletion of Transportin-3 or RanBP2 altered the terminal step in early HIV replication, the selection of chromosomal sites for integration. We found that depletion of Transportin-3 and RanBP2 altered integration targeting for HIV. These knockdowns reduced HIV integration frequency in gene-dense regions and near gene-associated features, a pattern that differed from that reported for depletion of the HIV integrase binding cofactor Psip1/Ledgf/p75. MLV integration was not affected by the Transportin-3 knockdown. Using siRNA knockdowns and integration targeting analysis, we also implicated several additional nuclear proteins in proper target site selection. To map viral determinants of integration targeting, we analyzed a chimeric HIV derivative containing MLV gag, and found that the gag replacement phenocopied the Transportin-3 and RanBP2 knockdowns. Thus, our data support a model in which Gag-dependent engagement of the proper transport and nuclear pore machinery mediate trafficking of HIV complexes to sites of integration.

  13. RANS-VOF modeling of hydrodynamics and sand transport under full-scale non-breaking and breaking waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandez Mora, Maria de Los Angeles; Ribberink, Jan S.; van der Zanden, Joep; van der Werf, Jebbe J.; Jacobsen, N.G.; Lynett, P.; Lynett, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    A 2D RANS-VOF model is used to simulate the flow and sand transport for two different full-scale laboratory experiments: i) non-breaking waves over a horizontal sand bed (Schretlen et al., 2011) and ii) plunging breaking waves over a barred mobile bed profile (Van der Zanden et al., 2016). For the

  14. Repeat Associated Non-AUG Translation (RAN Translation Dependent on Sequence Downstream of the ATXN2 CAG Repeat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel R Scoles

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2 is a progressive autosomal dominant disorder caused by the expansion of a CAG tract in the ATXN2 gene. The SCA2 disease phenotype is characterized by cerebellar atrophy, gait ataxia, and slow saccades. ATXN2 mutation causes gains of toxic and normal functions of the ATXN2 gene product, ataxin-2, and abnormally slow Purkinje cell firing frequency. Previously we investigated features of ATXN2 controlling expression and noted expression differences for ATXN2 constructs with varying CAG lengths, suggestive of repeat associated non-AUG translation (RAN translation. To determine whether RAN translation occurs for ATXN2 we assembled various ATXN2 constructs with ATXN2 tagged by luciferase, HA or FLAG tags, driven by the CMV promoter or the ATXN2 promoter. Luciferase expression from ATXN2-luciferase constructs lacking the ATXN2 start codon was weak vs AUG translation, regardless of promoter type, and did not increase with longer CAG repeat lengths. RAN translation was detected on western blots by the anti-polyglutamine antibody 1C2 for constructs driven by the CMV promoter but not the ATXN2 promoter, and was weaker than AUG translation. Strong RAN translation was also observed when driving the ATXN2 sequence with the CMV promoter with ATXN2 sequence downstream of the CAG repeat truncated to 18 bp in the polyglutamine frame but not in the polyserine or polyalanine frames. Our data demonstrate that ATXN2 RAN translation is weak compared to AUG translation and is dependent on ATXN2 sequences flanking the CAG repeat.

  15. RANS Modeling of Stably Stratified Turbulent Boundary Layer Flows in OpenFOAM®

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Jordan M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantifying mixing processes relating to the transport of heat, momentum, and scalar quantities of stably stratified turbulent geophysical flows remains a substantial task. In a stably stratified flow, such as the stable atmospheric boundary layer (SABL, buoyancy forces have a significant impact on the flow characteristics. This study investigates constant and stability-dependent turbulent Prandtl number (Prt formulations linking the turbulent viscosity (νt and diffusivity (κt for modeling applications of boundary layer flows. Numerical simulations of plane Couette flow and pressure-driven channel flow are performed using the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS framework with the standard k-ε turbulence model. Results are compared with DNS data to evaluate model efficacy for predicting mean velocity and density fields. In channel flow simulations, a Prandtl number formulation for wall-bounded flows is introduced to alleviate overmixing of the mean density field. This research reveals that appropriate specification of Prt can improve predictions of stably stratified turbulent boundary layer flows.

  16. Validation of the simpleFoam (RANS solver for the atmospheric boundary layer in complex terrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peralta C.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We validate the simpleFoam (RANS solver in OpenFOAM (version 2.1.1 for simulating neutral atmospheric boundary layer flows in complex terrain. Initial and boundary conditions are given using Richards and Hoxey proposal [1]. In order to obtain stable simulation of the ABL, modified wall functions are used to set the near-wall boundary conditions, following Blocken et al remedial measures [2]. A structured grid is generated with the new library terrainBlockMesher [3,4], based on OpenFOAM's blockMesh native mesher. The new tool is capable of adding orographic features and the forest canopy. Additionally, the mesh can be refined in regions with complex orography. We study both the classical benchmark case of Askervein hill [5] and the more recent Bolund island data set [6]. Our purpose is two-folded: to validate the performance of OpenFOAM steady state solvers, and the suitability of the new meshing tool to generate high quality structured meshes, which will be used in the future for performing more computationally intensive LES simulations in complex terrain.

  17. A Game-Theoretical Approach for Spectrum Efficiency Improvement in Cloud-RAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuofu Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As tremendous mobile devices access to the Internet in the future, the cells which can provide high data rate and more capacity are expected to be deployed. Specifically, in the next generation of mobile communication 5G, cloud computing is supposed to be applied to radio access network. In cloud radio access network (Cloud-RAN, the traditional base station is divided into two parts, that is, remote radio heads (RRHs and base band units (BBUs. RRHs are geographically distributed and densely deployed, so as to achieve high data rate and low latency. However, the ultradense deployment inevitably deteriorates spectrum efficiency due to the severer intercell interference among RRHs. In this paper, the downlink spectrum efficiency can be improved through the cooperative transmission based on forming the coalitions of RRHs. We formulate the problem as a coalition formation game in partition form. In the process of coalition formation, each RRH can join or leave one coalition to maximize its own individual utility while taking into account the coalition utility at the same time. Moreover, the convergence and stability of the resulting coalition structure are studied. The numeric simulation result demonstrates that the proposed approach based on coalition formation game is superior to the noncooperative method in terms of the aggregate coalition utility.

  18. RANS SIMULATION OF HYDROFOIL EFFECTS ON HYDRODYNAMIC COEFFICIENTS OF A PLANING CATAMARAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Najafi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Determination of high-speed crafts’ hydrodynamic coefficients will help to analyze the dynamics of these kinds of vessels and the factors affecting their dynamic stabilities. Also, it can be useful and effective in controlling the vessel instabilities. The main purpose of this study is to determine the coefficients of longitudinal motions of a planing catamaran with and without a hydrofoil using RANS method to evaluate the foil effects on them. Determination of hydrodynamic coefficients by experimental approach is costly, and requires meticulous laboratory equipment; therefore, utilizing numerical methods and developing a virtual laboratory seems highly efficient. In the present study, the numerical results for hydrodynamic coefficients of a high-speed craft are verified against Troesch’s (1992 experimental results. In the following, after determination of hydrodynamic coefficients of a planing catamaran with and without foil, the foil effects on its hydrodynamic coefficients are evaluated. The results indicate that most of the coefficients are frequency independent especially at high frequencies.

  19. Aurora A phosphorylates MCAK to control ran-dependent spindle bipolarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Ems-McClung, Stephanie C; Walczak, Claire E

    2008-07-01

    During mitosis, mitotic centromere-associated kinesin (MCAK) localizes to chromatin/kinetochores, a cytoplasmic pool, and spindle poles. Its localization and activity in the chromatin region are regulated by Aurora B kinase; however, how the cytoplasmic- and pole-localized MCAK are regulated is currently not clear. In this study, we used Xenopus egg extracts to form spindles in the absence of chromatin and centrosomes and found that MCAK localization and activity are tightly regulated by Aurora A. This regulation is important to focus microtubules at aster centers and to facilitate the transition from asters to bipolar spindles. In particular, we found that MCAK colocalized with NuMA and XMAP215 at the center of Ran asters where its activity is regulated by Aurora A-dependent phosphorylation of S196, which contributes to proper pole focusing. In addition, we found that MCAK localization at spindle poles was regulated through another Aurora A phosphorylation site (S719), which positively enhances bipolar spindle formation. This is the first study that clearly defines a role for MCAK at the spindle poles as well as identifies another key Aurora A substrate that contributes to spindle bipolarity.

  20. Simulating wind and marine hydrokinetic turbines with actuator lines in RANS and LES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachant, Peter; Wosnik, Martin

    2015-11-01

    As wind and marine hydrokinetic (MHK) turbine designs mature, focus is shifting towards improving turbine array layouts for maximizing overall power output, i.e., minimizing wake interference for axial-flow or horizontal-axis turbines, or taking advantage of constructive wake interaction for cross-flow or vertical-axis turbines. Towards this goal, an actuator line model (ALM) was developed to provide a computationally feasible method for simulating full turbine arrays inside Navier-Stokes models. The ALM predicts turbine loading with the blade element method combined with sub-models for dynamic stall and flow curvature. The open-source software is written as an extension library for the OpenFOAM CFD package, which allows the ALM body force to be applied to their standard RANS and LES solvers. Turbine forcing is also applied to volume of fluid (VOF) models, e.g., for predicting free surface effects on submerged MHK devices. An additional sub-model is considered for injecting turbulence model scalar quantities based on actuator line element loading. Results are presented for the simulation of performance and wake dynamics of axial- and cross-flow turbines and compared with moderate Reynolds number experiments and body-fitted mesh, blade-resolving CFD. Work supported by NSF-CBET grant 1150797.

  1. Simulation of an Isolated Tiltrotor in Hover with an Unstructured Overset-Grid RANS Solver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Biedron, Robert T.

    2009-01-01

    An unstructured overset-grid Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) solver, FUN3D, is used to simulate an isolated tiltrotor in hover. An overview of the computational method is presented as well as the details of the overset-grid systems. Steady-state computations within a noninertial reference frame define the performance trends of the rotor across a range of the experimental collective settings. Results are presented to show the effects of off-body grid refinement and blade grid refinement. The computed performance and blade loading trends show good agreement with experimental results and previously published structured overset-grid computations. Off-body flow features indicate a significant improvement in the resolution of the first perpendicular blade vortex interaction with background grid refinement across the collective range. Considering experimental data uncertainty and effects of transition, the prediction of figure of merit on the baseline and refined grid is reasonable at the higher collective range- within 3 percent of the measured values. At the lower collective settings, the computed figure of merit is approximately 6 percent lower than the experimental data. A comparison of steady and unsteady results show that with temporal refinement, the dynamic results closely match the steady-state noninertial results which gives confidence in the accuracy of the dynamic overset-grid approach.

  2. Ras-Related Nuclear Protein Ran3B Gene Is Involved in Hormone Responses in the Embryogenic Callus of Dimocarpus longan Lour.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qilin Tian

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Ras-related guanosine triphosphate (GTP-binding nuclear protein (Ran GTPases function as molecular switches and regulate diverse cellular events in eukaryotes. Our previous work suggested that DlRan3B is active during longan (Dimocarpus longan Lour. somatic embryogenesis (SE processes. Herein, subcellular localization of DlRan3B was found to be localized in the nucleus and expression profiling of DlRan3B was performed during longan SE and after exposure to plant hormones (indoleacetic acid (IAA, gibberellin A3 (GA3, salicylic acid (SA, methyl jasmonte (MeJA, and abscisic acid (ABA. We cloned and sequenced 1569 bp of 5′-flanking sequence of DlRan3B (GenBank: JQ279697. Bioinformatic analysis indicated that the promoter contained plant hormone-related regulatory elements. Deletion analysis and responses to hormones identified stimulative and repressive regulatory elements in the DlRan3B promoter. The key elements included those responding to auxin, gibberellin, SA, MeJA, and ABA. DlRan3B was located in the nucleus and accumulated in the late stage of longan SE. The expression of DlRan3B was significantly induced by IAA, GA3, and ABA, but suppressed by SA and MeJA. Promoter transcription was induced by IAA and GA3, but suppressed by SA. Thus, DlRan3B might participate in auxin, gibberellin, and ABA responses during longan late SE, and DlRan3B is involved in phytohormone responsiveness.

  3. Social background, bullying, and physical inactivity: National study of 11- to 15-year-olds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, P W; Rayce, S B; Melkevik, O; Due, P; Holstein, B E

    2016-10-01

    More children from lower social backgrounds are physically inactive than those from higher ones. We studied whether bullying was a mediating factor between lower social background and physical inactivity. We also examined the combined effect of low social class and exposure to bullying on physical inactivity. The Danish sample of the Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) study 2006 included 6269 schoolchildren in three age groups: 11-, 13-, and 15-year-olds from a random sample of 80 schools. The students answered the internationally standardized HBSC questionnaire. The applied definition leaves 4.0% in the category physically inactive. The sex and age-adjusted OR (95% CI) for physical inactivity was 2.10 (1.39-3.18) among students with low social class and unclassifiable 3.53 (2.26-5.53). Exposure to bullying was associated with physical inactivity, sex and age-adjusted OR = 2.39 (1.67-3.41). Exposure to bullying did not explain the association between social class and physical inactivity. The association between social class and physical inactivity was more pronounced among participants also exposed to bullying. In conclusion, there was a significantly increased odds ratio for physical inactivity among students from lower social classes and for students exposed to bullying. There was a combined effect of low social class and bullying on physical inactivity. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Shifting the Physical Inactivity Curve Worldwide by Closing the Gender Gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielke, Grégore I; da Silva, Inacio Crochemore M; Kolbe-Alexander, Tracy L; Brown, Wendy J

    2017-06-24

    The aims of this study were to (i) examine gender differences in physical inactivity in countries with different levels of Human Development Index (HDI); and (ii) assess whether small changes in the prevalence of inactivity in women could achieve the World Health Organization's (WHO) global inactivity target. Data on inactivity were extracted for 142 countries for the year 2010 from the WHO Data Repository. Data for HDI were obtained for the year 2010 from the United Nations Development Program. Absolute and relative gender differences were calculated for countries according to four HDI categories. The potential effects of increasing women's activity levels on achievement of the WHO physical inactivity target were computed. Overall inactivity prevalence was higher in women (27%) than in men (20%). Women were more inactive than men in all except eight countries. Absolute gender differences [median 7.5% (range -10.1 to 33.2)] did not vary by HDI category, but there was a small negative correlation between relative gender difference in inactivity and HDI (rho -0.19; p = 0.02), which was mostly influenced by three outlier countries with low HDI. A decrease in inactivity levels of 4.8% points among women across the world would achieve the WHO target of reducing global levels of inactivity by 10%. Gender differences in the prevalence of physical inactivity were highly variable, both within and across categories of HDI. Interventions which result in small changes in inactivity prevalence in women would achieve the 2025 WHO global target for inactivity, without any change to the prevalence in men.

  5. Modeling the Relationship Between Social Network Activity, Inactivity, and Growth

    CERN Document Server

    Ribeiro, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Online Social Networks (OSNs) are multi-billion dollar enterprises. Surprisingly, little is known about the mechanisms that drive them to growth, stability, or death. This study sheds light on these mechanisms. We are particularly interested in OSNs where current subscribers can invite new users to join the network (e.g., Facebook, LinkedIn). Measuring the relationship between subscriber activity and network growth of a large OSN over five years, we formulate three hypotheses that together describe the observed OSN subscriber behavior. We then provide a model (and extensions) that simultaneously satisfies all three hypotheses. Our model provides deep insights into the dynamics of subscriber activity, inactivity, and network growth rates, even predicting four types of OSNs with respect to subscriber activity evolution. Finally, we present activity data of nearly thirty OSN websites, measured over five years, and show that the observed activity is well described by one of the four activity time series predicted...

  6. Mechanical properties and fiber type composition of chronically inactive muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, R. R.; Zhong, H.; Monti, R. J.; Vallance, K. A.; Kim, J. A.; Edgerton, V. R.

    2000-01-01

    A role for neuromuscular activity in the maintenance of skeletal muscle properties has been well established. However, the role of activity-independent factors is more difficult to evaluate. We have used the spinal cord isolation model to study the effects of chronic inactivity on the mechanical properties of the hindlimb musculature in cats and rats. This model maintains the connectivity between the motoneurons and the muscle fibers they innervate, but the muscle unit is electrically "silent". Consequently, the measured muscle properties are activity-independent and thus the advantage of using this model is that it provides a baseline level (zero activity) from which regulatory factors that affect muscle cell homeostasis can be defined. In the present paper, we will present a brief review of our findings using the spinal cord isolation model related to muscle mechanical and fiber type properties.

  7. KEPLER FLARES. I. ACTIVE AND INACTIVE M DWARFS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawley, Suzanne L.; Davenport, James R. A.; Kowalski, Adam F.; Wisniewski, John P.; Deitrick, Russell; Hilton, Eric J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Hebb, Leslie, E-mail: slhawley@uw.edu [Department of Physics, Hobart and William Smith Colleges, 300 Pulteney Street, Geneva, NY 14456 (United States)

    2014-12-20

    We analyzed Kepler short-cadence M dwarf observations. Spectra from the Astrophysical Research Consortium 3.5 m telescope identify magnetically active (Hα in emission) stars. The active stars are of mid-M spectral type, have numerous flares, and have well-defined rotational modulation due to starspots. The inactive stars are of early M type, exhibit less starspot signature, and have fewer flares. A Kepler to U-band energy scaling allows comparison of the Kepler flare frequency distributions with previous ground-based data. M dwarfs span a large range of flare frequency and energy, blurring the distinction between active and inactive stars designated solely by the presence of Hα. We analyzed classical and complex (multiple peak) flares on GJ 1243, finding strong correlations between flare energy, amplitude, duration, and decay time, with only a weak dependence on rise time. Complex flares last longer and have higher energy at the same amplitude, and higher energy flares are more likely to be complex. A power law fits the energy distribution for flares with log E{sub K{sub p}}> 31 erg, but the predicted number of low-energy flares far exceeds the number observed, at energies where flares are still easily detectable, indicating that the power-law distribution may flatten at low energy. There is no correlation of flare occurrence or energy with starspot phase, the flare waiting time distribution is consistent with flares occurring randomly in time, and the energies of consecutive flares are uncorrelated. These observations support a scenario where many independent active regions on the stellar surface are contributing to the observed flare rate.

  8. Calculating a checksum with inactive networking components in a computing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aho, Michael E; Chen, Dong; Eisley, Noel A; Gooding, Thomas M; Heidelberger, Philip; Tauferner, Andrew T

    2015-01-27

    Calculating a checksum utilizing inactive networking components in a computing system, including: identifying, by a checksum distribution manager, an inactive networking component, wherein the inactive networking component includes a checksum calculation engine for computing a checksum; sending, to the inactive networking component by the checksum distribution manager, metadata describing a block of data to be transmitted by an active networking component; calculating, by the inactive networking component, a checksum for the block of data; transmitting, to the checksum distribution manager from the inactive networking component, the checksum for the block of data; and sending, by the active networking component, a data communications message that includes the block of data and the checksum for the block of data.

  9. Low postprandial circulating inactive ghrelin: role of early satiety in undernourished children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najib, Khadijehsadat; Moghtaderi, Mozhgan; Farjadian, Shirin; Falahzadeh, Ebrahim

    2014-11-01

    To determine difference in the levels of circulating inactive ghrelin between undernourished and healthy children. The present cross-sectional study was conducted in undernourished children from southwestern Iran, from July 2011 through July 2012. Postprandial inactive ghrelin levels were measured in 40 undernourished children and sex- and age-matched healthy controls by enzyme immunoassay. The levels of postprandial inactive ghrelin were considerably lower in undernourished compared to the healthy children (6.4 vs. 12.9, P < 0.001). Among the undernourished children, the level of inactive ghrelin was significantly lower in girls than in boys (5.8 vs. 7.1, P = 0.032). Thus, the levels of inactive ghrelin was found to be low in undernourished children compared to healthy children. Early loss of appetite might be a result of low circulating inactive ghrelin levels in the postprandial state in undernourished children.

  10. [Physical inactivity in Galicia (Spain): trends and the impact of changes in the definition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Ríos, Mónica; Santiago-Pérez, María I; Rodríguez-Camacho, Elena; Malvar, Alberto; Suanzes, Jorge; Hervada, Xurxo

    2015-01-01

    To estimate the prevalence of physical inactivity during leisure time in Galicia (Spain) between 2007 and 2011 and to assess the impact of including non-leisure time activities in the definition of physical inactivity. A cross-sectional study was conducted in the population aged 16 years and older (n=19,235). Physical activity was assessed by the Minnesota Questionnaire. In 2011, inactivity was estimated by including daily activities. Between 2007 and 2011, the prevalence of inactivity in Galicia remained stable (p=0.249) and close to 50%. This prevalence was higher among women and those who worked or were in education. Inactivity decreased from 47% to 16% when non-leisure time activities were included in the definition. Between 2007 and 2011 in Galicia, the prevalence of inactivity remained high and stable. This prevalence was significantly decreased when non-leisure time activities were included in the definition. Copyright © 2014 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  11. Physical inactivity displays a mediator role in the association of diabetes and poverty: A spatiotemporal analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Lung-Chang Chien; Xiao Li; Amanda Staudt

    2017-01-01

    Physical inactivity is one of the risk factors of diabetes. In addition, physical inactivity is attributed to urbanization-related factors, such as poverty, which is also one of the risk factors of diabetes. We hypothesized that physical inactivity is a mediator in the association between diabetes and poverty, and that spatial heterogeneity exists in these relationships. This study adopted a spatiotemporal modelling approach to conduct this mediator analysis. From 2004-2011, data were collect...

  12. Antisense expression of an Arabidopsis ran binding protein renders transgenic roots hypersensitive to auxin and alters auxin-induced root growth and development by arresting mitotic progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S. H.; Arnold, D.; Lloyd, A.; Roux, S. J.

    2001-01-01

    We cloned a cDNA encoding an Arabidopsis Ran binding protein, AtRanBP1c, and generated transgenic Arabidopsis expressing the antisense strand of the AtRanBP1c gene to understand the in vivo functions of the Ran/RanBP signal pathway. The transgenic plants showed enhanced primary root growth but suppressed growth of lateral roots. Auxin significantly increased lateral root initiation and inhibited primary root growth in the transformants at 10 pM, several orders of magnitude lower than required to induce these responses in wild-type roots. This induction was followed by a blockage of mitosis in both newly emerged lateral roots and in the primary root, ultimately resulting in the selective death of cells in the tips of both lateral and primary roots. Given the established role of Ran binding proteins in the transport of proteins into the nucleus, these findings are consistent with a model in which AtRanBP1c plays a key role in the nuclear delivery of proteins that suppress auxin action and that regulate mitotic progress in root tips.

  13. The cyst nematode SPRYSEC protein RBP-1 elicits Gpa2- and RanGAP2-dependent plant cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Ann Sacco

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Plant NB-LRR proteins confer robust protection against microbes and metazoan parasites by recognizing pathogen-derived avirulence (Avr proteins that are delivered to the host cytoplasm. Microbial Avr proteins usually function as virulence factors in compatible interactions; however, little is known about the types of metazoan proteins recognized by NB-LRR proteins and their relationship with virulence. In this report, we demonstrate that the secreted protein RBP-1 from the potato cyst nematode Globodera pallida elicits defense responses, including cell death typical of a hypersensitive response (HR, through the NB-LRR protein Gpa2. Gp-Rbp-1 variants from G. pallida populations both virulent and avirulent to Gpa2 demonstrated a high degree of polymorphism, with positive selection detected at numerous sites. All Gp-RBP-1 protein variants from an avirulent population were recognized by Gpa2, whereas virulent populations possessed Gp-RBP-1 protein variants both recognized and non-recognized by Gpa2. Recognition of Gp-RBP-1 by Gpa2 correlated to a single amino acid polymorphism at position 187 in the Gp-RBP-1 SPRY domain. Gp-RBP-1 expressed from Potato virus X elicited Gpa2-mediated defenses that required Ran GTPase-activating protein 2 (RanGAP2, a protein known to interact with the Gpa2 N terminus. Tethering RanGAP2 and Gp-RBP-1 variants via fusion proteins resulted in an enhancement of Gpa2-mediated responses. However, activation of Gpa2 was still dependent on the recognition specificity conferred by amino acid 187 and the Gpa2 LRR domain. These results suggest a two-tiered process wherein RanGAP2 mediates an initial interaction with pathogen-delivered Gp-RBP-1 proteins but where the Gpa2 LRR determines which of these interactions will be productive.

  14. Association between Natural Resources for OutdoorActivities and Physical Inactivity

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — it includes available natural resources for outdoor activities, Physical inactivity and households income. This dataset is associated with the following publication:...

  15. Physical activity and social status in adolescence as predictors of physical inactivity in adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tammelin, Tuija; Näyhä, Simo; Laitinen, Jaana; Rintamäki, Hannu; Järvelin, Marjo Riitta

    2003-10-01

    Physical inactivity is related to an increased risk of certain chronic diseases. The aim here was to evaluate how physical activity and social status in adolescence are associated with physical inactivity in adulthood. The sample comprised 3664 males and 4130 females who answered questions on physical activity and social status at 14 and 31 years of age in follow-up surveys of the Northern Finland birth cohort of 1966. Associations between explanatory factors and physical inactivity in adulthood were analyzed using multivariable logistic regression. Infrequent participation in sports after school hours at 14 years of age and, in males, additionally a low grade in school sports, was associated with physical inactivity at the age of 31 years, independent of social circumstances in adulthood. Low social class of the childhood family was associated with physical inactivity in adolescence but not with inactivity at 31 years of age. Poor school achievement in adolescence was associated with adult inactivity independent of adolescent physical activity. Infrequent participation in sports, a low grade in school sports, and poor school achievements in adolescence were associated with physical inactivity in adulthood. Participation in sports is to be strongly supported among all adolescents because of its long-term beneficial effects on adult health through its tendency to reduce the probability of adult inactivity.

  16. A Priori Analysis of a Compressible Flamelet Model using RANS Data for a Dual-Mode Scramjet Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinlan, Jesse R.; Drozda, Tomasz G.; McDaniel, James C.; Lacaze, Guilhem; Oefelein, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    In an effort to make large eddy simulation of hydrocarbon-fueled scramjet combustors more computationally accessible using realistic chemical reaction mechanisms, a compressible flamelet/progress variable (FPV) model was proposed that extends current FPV model formulations to high-speed, compressible flows. Development of this model relied on observations garnered from an a priori analysis of the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) data obtained for the Hypersonic International Flight Research and Experimentation (HI-FiRE) dual-mode scramjet combustor. The RANS data were obtained using a reduced chemical mechanism for the combustion of a JP-7 surrogate and were validated using avail- able experimental data. These RANS data were then post-processed to obtain, in an a priori fashion, the scalar fields corresponding to an FPV-based modeling approach. In the current work, in addition to the proposed compressible flamelet model, a standard incompressible FPV model was also considered. Several candidate progress variables were investigated for their ability to recover static temperature and major and minor product species. The effects of pressure and temperature on the tabulated progress variable source term were characterized, and model coupling terms embedded in the Reynolds- averaged Navier-Stokes equations were studied. Finally, results for the novel compressible flamelet/progress variable model were presented to demonstrate the improvement attained by modeling the effects of pressure and flamelet boundary conditions on the combustion.

  17. Critical role of RanBP2-mediated SUMOylation of Small Heterodimer Partner in maintaining bile acid homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Hyun; Kwon, Sanghoon; Byun, Sangwon; Xiao, Zhen; Park, Sean; Wu, Shwu-Yuan; Chiang, Cheng-Ming; Kemper, Byron; Kemper, Jongsook Kim

    2016-01-01

    Bile acids (BAs) are recently recognized signalling molecules that profoundly affect metabolism. Because of detergent-like toxicity, BA levels must be tightly regulated. An orphan nuclear receptor, Small Heterodimer Partner (SHP), plays a key role in this regulation, but how SHP senses the BA signal for feedback transcriptional responses is not clearly understood. We show an unexpected function of a nucleoporin, RanBP2, in maintaining BA homoeostasis through SUMOylation of SHP. Upon BA signalling, RanBP2 co-localizes with SHP at the nuclear envelope region and mediates SUMO2 modification at K68, which facilitates nuclear transport of SHP and its interaction with repressive histone modifiers to inhibit BA synthetic genes. Mice expressing a SUMO-defective K68R SHP mutant have increased liver BA levels, and upon BA- or drug-induced biliary insults, these mice exhibit exacerbated cholestatic pathologies. These results demonstrate a function of RanBP2-mediated SUMOylation of SHP in maintaining BA homoeostasis and protecting from the BA hepatotoxicity. PMID:27412403

  18. MicroRNA-1301-Mediated RanGAP1 Downregulation Induces BCR-ABL Nuclear Entrapment to Enhance Imatinib Efficacy in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tsung-Yao; Chen, Ku-Chung; Liu, Hsing-Jin Eugene; Liu, Ann-Jeng; Wang, Kun-Li; Shih, Chwen-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a myeloproliferative disease. Imatinib (IM), the first line treatment for CML, is excessively expensive and induces various side effects in CML patients. Therefore, it is essential to investigate a new strategy for improving CML therapy. Our immunoblot data revealed that RanGTPase activating protein 1 (RanGAP1) protein levels increased by approximately 30-fold in K562 cells compared with those in normal cells. RanGAP1 is one of the important components of RanGTPase system, which regulates the export of nuclear protein. However, whether RanGAP1 level variation influences BCR-ABL nuclear export is still unknown. In this report, using shRNA to downregulate RanGAP1 expression level augmented K562 cell apoptosis by approximately 40% after treatment with 250 nM IM. Immunofluorescence assay also indicated that three-fold of nuclear BCR-ABL was detected. These data suggest that BCR-ABL nuclear entrapment induced by RanGAP1 downregulation can be used to improve IM efficacy. Moreover, our qRT-PCR data indicated a trend of inverse correlation between the RanGAP1 and microRNA (miR)-1301 levels in CML patients. MiR-1301, targeting the RanGAP1 3' untranslated region, decreased by approximately 100-fold in K562 cells compared with that in normal cells. RanGAP1 downregulation by miR-1301 transfection impairs BCR-ABL nuclear export to increase approximately 60% of cell death after treatment of 250 nM IM. This result was almost the same as treatment with 1000 nM IM alone. Furthermore, immunofluorescence assay demonstrated that Tyr-99 of nuclear P73 was phosphorylated accompanied with nuclear entrapment of BCR-ABL after transfection with RanGAP1 shRNA or miR-1301 in IM-treated K562 cells. Altogether, we demonstrated that RanGAP1 downregulation can mediate BCR-ABL nuclear entrapment to activate P73-dependent apoptosis pathway which is a novel strategy for improving current IM treatment for CML.

  19. Watch and Wait Management of Inactive Cystic Echinococcosis – Does the Path to Inactivity Matter – Analysis of a Prospective Patient Cohort

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stojkovic, Marija; Rosenberger, Kerstin Daniela; Steudle, Franziska; Junghanss, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    ...) are not yet fully explored. Questions are: Do inactive cysts (CE 4 and CE 5) need treatment and is there a difference between cysts which reach CE4 and CE5 naturally or by benzimidazole therapy...

  20. Mice with Catalytically Inactive Cathepsin A Display Neurobehavioral Alterations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Y. Calhan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The lysosomal carboxypeptidase A, Cathepsin A (CathA, is a serine protease with two distinct functions. CathA protects β-galactosidase and sialidase Neu1 against proteolytic degradation by forming a multienzyme complex and activates sialidase Neu1. CathA deficiency causes the lysosomal storage disease, galactosialidosis. These patients present with a broad range of clinical phenotypes, including growth retardation, and neurological deterioration along with the accumulation of the vasoactive peptide, endothelin-1, in the brain. Previous in vitro studies have shown that CathA has specific activity against vasoactive peptides and neuropeptides, including endothelin-1 and oxytocin. A mutant mouse with catalytically inactive CathA enzyme (CathAS190A shows increased levels of endothelin-1. In the present study, we elucidated the involvement of CathA in learning and long-term memory in 3-, 6-, and 12-month-old mice. Hippocampal endothelin-1 and oxytocin accumulated in CathAS190A mice, which showed learning impairments as well as long-term and spatial memory deficits compared with wild-type littermates, suggesting that CathA plays a significant role in learning and in memory consolidation through its regulatory role in vasoactive peptide processing.

  1. Physical Activity, Inactivity and Health During Youth-2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowlands, Alex V

    2017-02-01

    2016 has been an exciting year for research in physical activity, inactivity and health. Recognition of the importance of all physical behaviors (physical activity, sedentary time and sleep) across the 24-hr day continues to grow. Notable advances have included: applications of recent methodological innovations that account for the codependence of the behaviors in the finite 24-hr period showing that the balance of these behaviors is associated with health; methodological innovations focusing on the classification of behaviors and/or quantification of the 24-hr diurnal activity pattern; and a series of systematic reviews that helped provide the evidence base for the release of the innovative 24-hr movement guidelines earlier this year. This commentary focuses on just two of these papers: the first by Goldsmith and colleagues who demonstrate a new statistical method that exploits the time series nature of accelerometer data facilitating new insights into time-specific determinants of children's activity patterns and associations with health; the second by Tremblay and colleagues who describe the evidence base for associations between each physical behavior and children's health, the emerging evidence base for associations between the balance of behaviors and health, and development of the world's first 24-hr movement guidelines.

  2. Neighborhood safety and physical inactivity in adults from Curitiba, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rech, Cassiano Ricardo; Reis, Rodrigo Siqueira; Hino, Adriano Akira Ferreira; Rodriguez-Añez, Ciro Romélio; Fermino, Rogério Cesar; Gonçalves, Priscila Bezerra; Hallal, Pedro Curi

    2012-06-12

    Neighborhood safety is one of the environmental aspects that can influence physical activity. We analyzed the association between perceived neighborhood safety and physical inactivity (PI) in adults and examined effect modification according to sociodemographic variables. A cross-sectional study was conducted with 1,261 adults (62% women), age 18-69 years from Curitiba, Brazil. The perception of unsafe neighborhood was higher among women, older participants, those classified in the high socioeconomic (SES) group, overweighed and also among those reporting to have PA equipments and children. The association between perception safety of walking during the day and walking for leisure (women PR=1.12 CI95%=1.02-1.22; men PR=0.82 CI95%=0.64-1.05; interaction term PR=1.38 CI95%=1.03-1.83) and safe perception was associated with PI, just in the highest SES group (PR=1.09; CI95%=1.00-1.19; p trend=0.032) when compared with their counterparts (low SES PR=0.99; CI95%=0.90-1.04; p trend=0.785; interaction term PR=1.09; CI95%=1.03-1.15; p trend=0.007). The perception of safety in the neighborhood was associated with PI in transport, but this association varies across of sociodemographic variables.

  3. Home Delivery Medicament Program: access, inactivity and cardiovascular risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Roque da Silva; Arcuri, Edna Apparecida Moura; Lopes, Victor Cauê

    2016-10-10

    to verify causes of inactivity in the Home Delivery Medicament Program, as referred by users from a Primary Health Care Service in São Paulo, comparing them to the causes registered in the program and analyzing them in the theoretical model Concept of Access to Health. cross-sectional study, interviewing 111 inactive users; and documentary study in the program records. half of the users did not know the condition of inactivity. Discrepancies were found between the user's and the program's information, observing different levels of agreement: Absence of physician and administrative staff member 0%; Transfer to other service 25%; Death 50%; Option to quit 50%; Address change 57% and Change in therapeutic schedule 80%. The users' feeling of accepting the program was observed. In the health access concept, inactivity can be explained in the information dimension, in the degree of asymmetry between the patient's and the health professional's knowledge, identified through the indicators: education, knowledge and information sources. due to the low education level, the user does not assimilate the information on the steps of the program flowchart, does not return for the assessment that guarantees its continuity. Consequently, (s)he stops receiving the medication and spends a long time without treatment, increasing the cardiovascular risk of hypertensive (92% of the sample), diabetic (44%) and dyslipidemic patients (31%). verificar causas de inatividade no Programa Remédio em Casa, referidas por usuários de Unidade Básica de Saúde de São Paulo, comparando-as às registradas pelo programa e analisando-as no modelo teórico Conceito de Acesso à Saúde. estudo transversal entrevistando 111 usuários inativos; e documental, nos registros do programa. metade dos usuários desconhecia a condição de inatividade. Constatadas discrepâncias nas informações usuário versus programa, observando-se diferentes níveis de concordância: Falta de médico e funcion

  4. Nuclear-Cytoplasmic Trafficking of NTF2, the Nuclear Import Receptor for the RanGTPase, Is Subjected to Regulation: e42501

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shawn C Chafe; Jacqueline B Pierce; Dev Mangroo

    2012-01-01

    .... Treatment of mammalian cells with polysorbitan monolaurate was found to inhibit nuclear export of tRNA and proteins, which are processes dependent on RanGTP in the nucleus, but not nuclear import...

  5. Childhood adversities and socioeconomic position as predictors of leisure-time physical inactivity in early adulthood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kestilä, Laura; Mäki-Opas, Tomi; Kunst, Anton E.; Borodulin, Katja; Rahkonen, Ossi; Prättälä, Ritva

    2015-01-01

    Limited knowledge exists on how childhood social, health-related and economic circumstances predict adult physical inactivity. Our aim was a) to examine how various childhood adversities and living conditions predict leisure-time physical inactivity in early adulthood and b) to find out whether

  6. validity and reliability of a physical activity/inactivity questionnaire in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    validity and reliability of a physical activity/inactivity questionnaire in South African primary schoolgirls. Abstract. Objective. We sought to determine the validity and relia- bility of a self-report physical activity questionnaire (PAQ) measuring physical activity/inactivity in South African schoolgirls of different ethnic origins.

  7. Turbulence closure model "constants" and the problems of "inactive" atmospheric turbulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bottema, M

    1997-01-01

    Inactive turbulence is associated with waves and large eddies that are relatively ineffective in mixing. Many numerical models evaluate turbulent mixing using turbulent kinetic energy k, which may contain significant amounts of inactive turbulence (e.g., in real or simulated atmospheric boundary

  8. Associations of unhealthy lifestyle factors with sexual inactivity and sexual dysfunctions in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Birgitte S; Grønbaek, Morten; Pedersen, Bo V

    2011-01-01

    Studies have linked obesity, a sedentary lifestyle, and tobacco smoking to erectile dysfunction, but the evidence linking unhealthy lifestyle factors to other sexual dysfunctions or to sexual inactivity is conflicting.......Studies have linked obesity, a sedentary lifestyle, and tobacco smoking to erectile dysfunction, but the evidence linking unhealthy lifestyle factors to other sexual dysfunctions or to sexual inactivity is conflicting....

  9. RanBP9 overexpression down-regulates phospho-cofilin, causes early synaptic deficits and impaired learning, and accelerates accumulation of amyloid plaques in the mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palavicini, Juan Pablo; Wang, Hongjie; Minond, Dmitriy; Bianchi, Elisabetta; Xu, Shaohua; Lakshmana, Madepalli K

    2014-01-01

    Loss of synaptic proteins and functional synapses in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) as well as transgenic mouse models expressing amyloid-β protein precursor is now well established. However, the earliest age at which such loss of synapses occurs, and whether known markers of AD progression accelerate functional deficits is completely unknown. We previously showed that RanBP9 overexpression leads to enhanced amyloid plaque burden in a mouse model of AD. In this study, we found significant reductions in the levels of synaptophysin and spinophilin, compared with wild-type controls, in both the cortex and the hippocampus of 5- and 6-month old but not 3- or 4-month old APΔE9/RanBP9 triple transgenic mice, and not in APΔE9 double transgenic mice, nor in RanBP9 single transgenic mice. Interestingly, amyloid plaque burden was also increased in the APΔE9/RanBP9 mice at 5-6 months. Consistent with these results, we found significant deficits in learning and memory in the APΔE9/RanBP9 mice at 5 and 6 month. These data suggest that increased amyloid plaques and accelerated learning and memory deficits and loss of synaptic proteins induced by RanBP9 are correlated. Most importantly, APΔE9/RanBP9 mice also showed significantly reduced levels of the phosphorylated form of cofilin in the hippocampus. Taken together these data suggest that RanBP9 overexpression down-regulates cofilin, causes early synaptic deficits and impaired learning, and accelerates accumulation of amyloid plaques in the mouse brain.

  10. Volvo ja Ikea endine tegevjuht Göran Carstedt : Tänapäevane (personali)juhtimine peab sisaldama eeskätt looduslähedast mõtteviisi / Göran Carstedt ; interv. Tiina Saar

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Carstedt, Göran

    2008-01-01

    Juhtimiskonsultant ning Organisatsioonilise Õppimise Ühingu eestvedaja ja arendaja Göran Carsedt vastab küsimustele, mis puudutavad ettevõtte tegevust personali tööle pühendumise parendamiseks, ettevõtte jätkusuutlikku juhtimist ja tootlikkust, majanduslanguse mõju ettevõtete personalipoliitikale, talendijuhtimist, väikeste ettevõttete ellujäämist majanduslanguse ajal, IKEA kui hea tööandja mainet ning jätkusuutlikku personaliarendajat. Lisa: Jätkusuutlik juhtimine Rootsi moodi

  11. Selective Impairment of a Subset of Ran-GTP-binding Domains of Ran-binding Protein 2 (Ranbp2) Suffices to Recapitulate the Degeneration of the Retinal Pigment Epithelium (RPE) Triggered by Ranbp2 Ablation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Hemangi; Saha, Arjun; Senda, Eugene; Cho, Kyoung-in; Haque, MdEmdadul; Yu, Minzhong; Qiu, Sunny; Yoon, Dosuk; Hao, Ying; Peachey, Neal S.; Ferreira, Paulo A.

    2014-01-01

    Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) degeneration underpins diseases triggered by disparate genetic lesions, noxious insults, or both. The pleiotropic Ranbp2 controls the expression of intrinsic and extrinsic pathological stressors impinging on cellular viability. However, the physiological targets and mechanisms controlled by Ranbp2 in tissue homeostasis, such as RPE, are ill defined. We show that mice, RPE-cre::Ranbp2−/−, with selective Ranbp2 ablation in RPE develop pigmentary changes, syncytia, hypoplasia, age-dependent centrifugal and non-apoptotic degeneration of the RPE, and secondary leakage of choriocapillaris. These manifestations are accompanied by the development of F-actin clouds, metalloproteinase-11 activation, deregulation of expression or subcellular localization of critical RPE proteins, atrophic cell extrusions into the subretinal space, and compensatory proliferation of peripheral RPE. To gain mechanistic insights into what Ranbp2 activities are vital to the RPE, we performed genetic complementation analyses of transgenic lines of bacterial artificial chromosomes of Ranbp2 harboring loss of function of selective Ranbp2 domains expressed in a Ranbp2−/− background. Among the transgenic lines produced, only TgRBD2/3*-HA::RPE-cre::Ranbp2−/−-expressing mutations, which selectively impair binding of RBD2/3 (Ran-binding domains 2 and 3) of Ranbp2 to Ran-GTP, recapitulate RPE degeneration, as observed with RPE-cre::Ranbp2−/−. By contrast, TgRBD2/3*-HA expression rescues the degeneration of cone photoreceptors lacking Ranbp2. The RPE of RPE-cre::Ranbp2−/− and TgRBD2/3*-HA::RPE-cre::Ranbp2−/− share proteostatic deregulation of Ran GTPase, serotransferrin, and γ-tubulin and suppression of light-evoked electrophysiological responses. These studies unravel selective roles of Ranbp2 and its RBD2 and RBD3 in RPE survival and functions. We posit that the control of Ran GTPase by Ranbp2 emerges as a novel therapeutic target in diseases

  12. Selective impairment of a subset of Ran-GTP-binding domains of ran-binding protein 2 (Ranbp2) suffices to recapitulate the degeneration of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) triggered by Ranbp2 ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Hemangi; Saha, Arjun; Senda, Eugene; Cho, Kyoung-in; Haque, MdEmdadul; Yu, Minzhong; Qiu, Sunny; Yoon, Dosuk; Hao, Ying; Peachey, Neal S; Ferreira, Paulo A

    2014-10-24

    Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) degeneration underpins diseases triggered by disparate genetic lesions, noxious insults, or both. The pleiotropic Ranbp2 controls the expression of intrinsic and extrinsic pathological stressors impinging on cellular viability. However, the physiological targets and mechanisms controlled by Ranbp2 in tissue homeostasis, such as RPE, are ill defined. We show that mice, RPE-cre::Ranbp2(-/-), with selective Ranbp2 ablation in RPE develop pigmentary changes, syncytia, hypoplasia, age-dependent centrifugal and non-apoptotic degeneration of the RPE, and secondary leakage of choriocapillaris. These manifestations are accompanied by the development of F-actin clouds, metalloproteinase-11 activation, deregulation of expression or subcellular localization of critical RPE proteins, atrophic cell extrusions into the subretinal space, and compensatory proliferation of peripheral RPE. To gain mechanistic insights into what Ranbp2 activities are vital to the RPE, we performed genetic complementation analyses of transgenic lines of bacterial artificial chromosomes of Ranbp2 harboring loss of function of selective Ranbp2 domains expressed in a Ranbp2(-/-) background. Among the transgenic lines produced, only Tg(RBD2/3*-HA)::RPE-cre::Ranbp2(-/-)-expressing mutations, which selectively impair binding of RBD2/3 (Ran-binding domains 2 and 3) of Ranbp2 to Ran-GTP, recapitulate RPE degeneration, as observed with RPE-cre::Ranbp2(-/-). By contrast, Tg(RBD2/3*-HA) expression rescues the degeneration of cone photoreceptors lacking Ranbp2. The RPE of RPE-cre::Ranbp2(-/-) and Tg(RBD2/3*-HA)::RPE-cre::Ranbp2(-/-) share proteostatic deregulation of Ran GTPase, serotransferrin, and γ-tubulin and suppression of light-evoked electrophysiological responses. These studies unravel selective roles of Ranbp2 and its RBD2 and RBD3 in RPE survival and functions. We posit that the control of Ran GTPase by Ranbp2 emerges as a novel therapeutic target in diseases promoting

  13. Reduction of exportin 6 activity leads to actin accumulation via failure of RanGTP restoration and NTF2 sequestration in the nuclei of senescent cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Su Hyun; Park, Tae Jun; Lim, In Kyoung, E-mail: iklim@ajou.ac.kr

    2011-04-15

    We have previously reported that G-actin accumulation in nuclei is a universal phenomenon of cellular senescence. By employing primary culture of human diploid fibroblast (HDF) and stress-induced premature senescence (SIPS), we explored whether the failure of actin export to cytoplasm is responsible for actin accumulation in nuclei of senescent cells. Expression of exportin 6 (Exp6) and small G-protein, Ran, was significantly reduced in the replicative senescence, but not yet in SIPS, whereas nuclear import of actin by cofilin was already increased in SIPS. After treatment of young HDF cells with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, rapid reduction of nuclear RanGTP was observed along with cytoplasmic increase of RanGDP. Furthermore, significantly reduced interaction of Exp6 with RanGTP was found by GST-Exp6 pull-down analysis. Failure of RanGTP restoration was accompanied with inhibition of ATP synthesis and NTF2 sequestration in the nuclei along with accordant change of senescence morphology. Indeed, knockdown of Exp6 expression significantly increased actin molecule in the nuclei of young HDF cells. Therefore, actin accumulation in nuclei of senescent cells is most likely due to the failure of RanGTP restoration with ATP deficiency and NTF2 accumulation in nuclei, which result in the decrease of actin export via Exp6 inactivation, in addition to actin import by cofilin activation.

  14. Formation of a Trimeric Xpo1-Ran[GTP]-Ded1 Exportin Complex Modulates ATPase and Helicase Activities of Ded1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenn Hauk

    Full Text Available The DEAD-box RNA helicase Ded1, which is essential in yeast and known as DDX3 in humans, shuttles between the nucleus and cytoplasm and takes part in several basic processes including RNA processing and translation. A key interacting partner of Ded1 is the exportin Xpo1, which together with the GTP-bound state of the small GTPase Ran, facilitates unidirectional transport of Ded1 out of the nucleus. Here we demonstrate that Xpo1 and Ran[GTP] together reduce the RNA-stimulated ATPase and helicase activities of Ded1. Binding and inhibition of Ded1 by Xpo1 depend on the affinity of the Ded1 nuclear export sequence (NES for Xpo1 and the presence of Ran[GTP]. Association with Xpo1/Ran[GTP] reduces RNA-stimulated ATPase activity of Ded1 by increasing the apparent KM for the RNA substrate. Despite the increased KM, the Ded1:Xpo1:Ran[GTP] ternary complex retains the ability to bind single stranded RNA, suggesting that Xpo1/Ran[GTP] may modulate the substrate specificity of Ded1. These results demonstrate that, in addition to transport, exportins such as Xpo1 also have the capability to alter enzymatic activities of their cargo.

  15. Physical inactivity displays a mediator role in the association of diabetes and poverty: A spatiotemporal analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lung-Chang Chien

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Physical inactivity is one of the risk factors of diabetes. In addition, physical inactivity is attributed to urbanization-related factors, such as poverty, which is also one of the risk factors of diabetes. We hypothesized that physical inactivity is a mediator in the association between diabetes and poverty, and that spatial heterogeneity exists in these relationships. This study adopted a spatiotemporal modelling approach to conduct this mediator analysis. From 2004-2011, data were collected at the county level in 48 contiguous states (with a total of 3,109 counties from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS and American Community Survey. Poverty percentage significantly affected physical inactivity prevalence and diabetes prevalence in two separate models. Using a model with both physical inactivity and poverty percentages as independent variables, we verified that physical inactivity prevalence is a significant mediator. In this model, physical inactivity prevalence resulted in a significant positive association with diabetes prevalence, and the influence of poverty percentage on diabetes prevalence was significantly reduced (P=0.0009. An advanced spatiotemporal analysis revealed that 32.65% of counties having a significant positive association between diabetes prevalence and physical inactivity prevalence also had a significant positive association between physical inactivity prevalence and poverty percentage. Those counties were also likely located in the South and Southeast of USA. In summary, the findings of this study demonstrate the mediating effect of physical inactivity between diabetes and poverty. When implementing diabetes prevention in communities with higher poverty, appropriate strategies to reduce the cost burden of physical activity programmes should be considered.

  16. Factors associated with adolescents' physical inactivity in Xi'an City, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Dibley, Michael J; Sibbritt, David; Yan, Hong

    2006-12-01

    To explore the sociodemographic and environmental factors at community, school, and household levels associated with physical inactivity. In a cross-sectional study in 2004, physical activity level was assessed using a validated questionnaire in 1787 students. Physical inactivity was defined as less than 150 min.wk of moderate activity (4-6 METs) or less than 60 min.wk of vigorous activity (> 6 METs). Sociodemographic and environmental information was recorded on self-administered questionnaires. Hierarchical multiple logistic models were developed based on a conceptual framework of factors related to physical activity. Overall, girls were twice as likely to be inactive. Adolescents aged 14 yr were 30% less likely to be inactive compared with those younger than 13 yr (95% CI: 0.5-0.9). Paternal education was inversely associated with inactivity (OR: 0.6, 95% CI: 0.4-0.9). Adolescents living in neighborhoods without sidewalks were 1.3 times more likely to be inactive (95% CI: 1.0-1.6). At the school level, lack of extracurricular exercise (OR: 1.3, 95% CI: 1.1-1.6) and fewer sports meetings (OR: 2.0, 95% CI: 1.4-2.9) were associated with physical inactivity. Difficult access to community recreational facilities (moderate OR: 1.4, 95% CI: 1.0-1.9; difficult OR: 1.7, 95% CI: 1.2-2.4) and concerns about safety in the neighborhood (OR: 2.1, 95% CI: 1.1-4.1) were associated with inactivity. There were some differences associated with physical inactivity between boys and girls. Strategies to promote physical activity in Chinese adolescents should integrate associated factors at household, school, and community levels and address the important gender differences in factors associated with physical inactivity in youth.

  17. Race/ethnicity, social class, and leisure-time physical inactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Simon J; Jones, Deborah A; Ainsworth, Barbara E; Reis, Jared P; Levy, Susan S; Macera, Caroline A

    2007-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine 1) prevalence of leisure-time physical inactivity in a nationally representative sample of non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic black, and Hispanic men and women; 2) prevalence of leisure-time inactivity by racial/ethnic group across social class indicators; and 3) the relationship between leisure-time inactivity and occupational physical activity, independent of other social class indicators. The National Physical Activity and Weight Loss Survey was a telephone survey of noninstitutionalized U.S. adults (4695 men, 6516 women) conducted by random digit dialing between September and December 2002. Self-reported physical activity was assessed using questions from the 2001 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Respondents who reported no moderate- or vigorous-intensity physical activity during leisure time in a usual week were classified as inactive. Indicators of social class were education, family income, employment status, and marital status. Age-adjusted prevalence of leisure-time inactivity was 9.9% +/- 0.6 SE (standard error) and 12.0 +/- 0.6 for white men and women, respectively; 19.0 +/- 2.5 and 25.2 +/- 2.1 for non-Hispanic black men and women, and 20.9 +/- 2.1 and 27.3 +/- 2.5 for Hispanic men and women. Within each racial/ethnic group, prevalence of leisure-time inactivity was highest among participants of lower social class. Differences in inactivity by racial/ethnic group were less evident after adjustment for social class. Odds of inactivity were similar across quartiles of occupational physical activity after adjustment for age, sex, and social class. Non-Hispanic blacks and Hispanics were more inactive during their leisure time than were non-Hispanic whites. Social class but not occupational physical activity seems to moderate the relationship between race/ethnicity and leisure-time physical inactivity.

  18. Effects of physical activity and inactivity on muscle fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory C. Bogdanis

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this review was to examine the mechanisms by which physical activity and inactivity modify muscle fatigue. It is well known that acute or chronic increases in physical activity result in structural, metabolic, hormonal, neural and molecular adaptations that increase the level of force or power that can be sustained by a muscle. These adaptations depend on the type, intensity and volume of the exercise stimulus, but recent studies have highlighted the role of high intensity, short duration exercise as a time-efficient method to achieve both anaerobic and aerobic/endurance type adaptations. The factors that determine the fatigue profile of a muscle during intense exercise include muscle fibre composition, neuromuscular characteristics high energy metabolite stores, buffering capacity, ionic regulation, capillarization and mitochondrial density. Muscle fiber type transformation during exercise training is usually towards the intermediate type IIA at the expense of both type I and type IIx myosin heavy chain isoforms. High intensity training results in increases of both glycolyic and oxidative enzymes, muscle capilarization, improved phosphocreatine resynthesis and regulation of K+, H+ and lactate ions. Decreases of the habitual activity level due to injury or sedentary lifestyle result in partial or even compete reversal of the adaptations due to previous training, manifested by reductions in fibre cross-sectional area, decreased oxidative capacity and capillarization. Complete immobilization due to injury results in markedly decreased force output and fatigue resistance. Muscle unloading reduces electromyographic activity and causes muscle atrophy and significant decreases in capillarization and oxidative enzymes activity. The last part of the review discusses the beneficial effects of intermittent high intensity exercise training in patients with different health conditions to demonstrate the powerful effect exercise on health and well

  19. Comparison of RANS and IDDES solutions for turbulent flow and heat transfer past a backward-facing step

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, E. M.; Smirnovsky, A. A.; Schur, N. A.; Zaitsev, D. K.; Smirnov, P. E.

    2017-10-01

    Numerical simulations were carried out under conditions of the benchmark-quality experiments of Vogel&Eaton (1985), where nominally 2D fluid dynamics and heat transfer past a backward-facing step in a channel with expansion ratio of 1.25 was investigated at the Reynolds number of 28,000 (based on the step height and the upstream centreline velocity). Comparative computations were performed using an in-house finite-volume code SINF/Flag-S and the ANSYS Fluent, running the codes with same grids. Two approaches were used for turbulence modelling. First, the Menter SST turbulence model was used to perform refined 2D and 3D RANS steady-state computations. The 3D analysis was undertaken to evaluate influence of boundary layers developing on the sidewalls of the experimental channel. The data obtained has resulted in the conclusion that the side wall effects disturbing spanwise uniformity of wall friction and heated wall temperature in the test configuration were of the same order or less than the skin friction coefficient and the Stanton number measurement errors. Then, 3D time-dependent computations were carried out using the vortex-resolving IDDES method being a hybridization of RANS and LES. The IDDES results obtained with the two codes are in a satisfactory agreement, especially for the finer grid of 17.3 million cells. Comparing with the experimental data, the IDDES approach produces the best agreement for the wall friction, whereas the RANS solutions show superiority in predictions of the local Stanton number distribution.

  20. The proliferation marker pKi-67 organizes the nucleolus during the cell cycle depending on Ran and cyclin B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Mirko H H; Broll, Rainer; Bruch, Hans-Peter; Bögler, Oliver; Duchrow, Michael

    2003-01-01

    The proliferation marker pKi-67 ('Ki-67 antigen') is commonly used in clinical and research pathology to detect proliferating cells, as it is only expressed during cell-cycle progression. Despite the fact that this antigen has been known for nearly two decades, there is still no adequate understanding of its function. This study has therefore identified proteins that interact with pKi-67, using a yeast two-hybrid system. A mammalian two-hybrid system and immunoprecipitation studies were used to verify these interactions. Among other cell-cycle regulatory proteins, two binding partners associated with the small GTPase Ran were identified. In addition, DNA-structural and nucleolus-associated proteins binding to pKi-67 were found. Moreover, it was demonstrated that the N-terminal domain of pKi-67 is capable of self-binding to its own repeat region encoded by exon 13. Since RanBP, a protein involved in the transport of macromolecules over the nuclear lamina, was found to be a binding partner, a possible effect of pKi-67 on the localization of cell-cycle regulatory proteins was proposed. To test this hypothesis, a tetracycline-responsive gene expression system was used to induce the pKi-67 fragments previously used for the two-hybrid screens in HeLa cells. Subsequent immunostaining revealed the translocation of cyclin B1 from cytoplasm to nucleoli in response to this expression. It is suggested that pKi-67 is a Ran-associated protein with a role in the disintegration and reformation of the nucleolus and thereby in entry into and exit from the M-phase. Copyright 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Positive mood + action = negative mood + inaction: effects of general action and inaction concepts on decisions and performance as a function of affect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albarracin, Dolores; Hart, William

    2011-08-01

    General action and inaction concepts have been shown to produce broad, goal-mediated effects on cognitive and motor activity irrespective of the type of activity. The current research tested a model in which action and inaction goals interact with the valence of incidental moods to guide behavior. Over four experiments, participants' moods were manipulated to be positive (happy), neutral, or negative (angry or sad), and then general action, inaction, and neutral concepts were primed. In Experiment 1, action primes increased intellectual performance when participants experienced a positive (happy) or neutral mood, whereas inaction primes increased performance when participants experienced a negative (angry) mood. Including a control-prime condition, Experiments 2 and 3 replicated these results measuring the number of general interest articles participants were willing to read and participants' memory for pictures of celebrities. Experiment 4 replicated the results comparing happiness with sadness and suggested that the effect of the prime's adoption was automatic. Overall, the findings supported an interactive model by which action concepts and positive affect produce the same increases in active behavior as inaction concepts and negative affect. 2011 APA, all rights reserved

  2. Physical inactivity among older adults across Europe based on the SHARE database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Marcos; Figueiredo, Daniela; Teixeira, Laetitia; Poveda, Verónica; Paúl, Constança; Santos-Silva, Alice; Costa, Elísio

    2017-01-20

    Regular physical activity is one of the key components of a healthy lifestyle. It is associated with better physical and cognitive functioning in later life and with increased life expectancy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of, and factors related to, physical inactivity among older adults across Europe. In this cross-sectional analysis, we used data from participants aged 55 or older in Wave 4 of the Survey of Health, Ageing, and Retirement in Europe (SHARE) database, a multidisciplinary and cross-national panel database covering health, socioeconomic status, and social and family networks. Individuals included in this study were classified as physically active or physically inactive. Clinical, psychosocial and sociodemographic variables were evaluated for their association with physical inactivity. From the total of 58,489 individuals in SHARE, we selected 19,298 people age 55 or older (mean age 67.8 ± 8.9 years; 11,430 (59.2%) female). The overall prevalence of inactivity among individuals age 55 or older in the 16 included countries was 12.5%. The prevalence of physical inactivity varied between countries, ranging from 4.9% (Sweden) to 29% (Portugal). Increasing age, depression, physical limitations, poor sense of meaning in life, social support and memory loss were significant variables associated with physical inactivity. Physical inactivity can be explained by physical, cognitive and psychological conditions. Interventions aimed at promoting physical activity among older people are needed to address this diversity of factors.

  3. Inactive nurses in Taiwan: human capital, intention to return to hospital nursing, and incentives for returning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hsing-Yi; Tang, Fu-In; Chen, I-Ju; Yin, Teresa J C; Chen, Chu-Chieh; Yu, Shu

    2016-04-01

    To investigate inactive nurses' human capital, intention to return to hospital nursing and incentives for returning. Few studies have discussed the loss of human capital with regard to inactive nurses and how to attract them to return to clinical work. Systematic random sampling was used, with 328 subjects completing the mailed questionnaires, resulting in a response rate of 25.4%. Inactive nurses not only had moderate to high human capital (average years of nursing experience was 10.29, with moderate to high levels of nursing professional commitment and nursing competence) and were young. Forty-three percent of subjects reported intending to return to hospital nursing. Sufficient nurse staffing, greater safety in the working environment, and re-entry preparation programmes were incentives for returning. Recruiting inactive nurses back to hospital work is vital and feasible as inactive nurses had a moderate to high degree of human capital. The most feasible way is offering reasonable working conditions, in particular, providing sufficient staffing, a safe working environment and re-entry preparation programmes. The findings confirm the human capital of inactive nurses and provide concrete directions for nursing managers to follow when recruiting inactive nurses to hospital nursing. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Surface Mechanical and Rheological Behaviors of Biocompatible Poly((D,L-lactic acid-ran-glycolic acid)-block-ethylene glycol) (PLGA-PEG) and Poly((D,L-lactic acid-ran-glycolic acid-ran-ε-caprolactone)-block-ethylene glycol) (PLGACL-PEG) Block Copolymers at the Air-Water Interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun Chang; Lee, Hoyoung; Khetan, Jawahar; Won, You-Yeon [Purdue

    2016-02-01

    Air–water interfacial monolayers of poly((d,l-lactic acid-ran-glycolic acid)-block-ethylene glycol) (PLGA–PEG) exhibit an exponential increase in surface pressure under high monolayer compression. In order to understand the molecular origin of this behavior, a combined experimental and theoretical investigation (including surface pressure–area isotherm, X-ray reflectivity (XR) and interfacial rheological measurements, and a self-consistent field (SCF) theoretical analysis) was performed on air–water monolayers formed by a PLGA–PEG diblock copolymer and also by a nonglassy analogue of this diblock copolymer, poly((d,l-lactic acid-ran-glycolic acid-ran-caprolactone)-block-ethylene glycol) (PLGACL–PEG). The combined results of this study show that the two mechanisms, i.e., the glass transition of the collapsed PLGA film and the lateral repulsion of the PEG brush chains that occur simultaneously under lateral compression of the monolayer, are both responsible for the observed PLGA–PEG isotherm behavior. Upon cessation of compression, the high surface pressure of the PLGA–PEG monolayer typically relaxes over time with a stretched exponential decay, suggesting that in this diblock copolymer situation, the hydrophobic domain formed by the PLGA blocks undergoes glass transition in the high lateral compression state, analogously to the PLGA homopolymer monolayer. In the high PEG grafting density regime, the contribution of the PEG brush chains to the high monolayer surface pressure is significantly lower than what is predicted by the SCF model because of the many-body attraction among PEG segments (referred to in the literature as the “n-cluster” effects). The end-grafted PEG chains were found to be protein resistant even under the influence of the “n-cluster” effects.

  5. Surface Mechanical and Rheological Behaviors of Biocompatible Poly((D,L-lactic acid-ran-glycolic acid)-block-ethylene glycol) (PLGA-PEG) and Poly((D,L-lactic acid-ran-glycolic acid-ran-ε-caprolactone)-block-ethylene glycol) (PLGACL-PEG) Block Copolymers at the Air-Water Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Chang; Lee, Hoyoung; Khetan, Jawahar; Won, You-Yeon

    2015-12-29

    Air-water interfacial monolayers of poly((D,L-lactic acid-ran-glycolic acid)-block-ethylene glycol) (PLGA-PEG) exhibit an exponential increase in surface pressure under high monolayer compression. In order to understand the molecular origin of this behavior, a combined experimental and theoretical investigation (including surface pressure-area isotherm, X-ray reflectivity (XR) and interfacial rheological measurements, and a self-consistent field (SCF) theoretical analysis) was performed on air-water monolayers formed by a PLGA-PEG diblock copolymer and also by a nonglassy analogue of this diblock copolymer, poly((D,L-lactic acid-ran-glycolic acid-ran-caprolactone)-block-ethylene glycol) (PLGACL-PEG). The combined results of this study show that the two mechanisms, i.e., the glass transition of the collapsed PLGA film and the lateral repulsion of the PEG brush chains that occur simultaneously under lateral compression of the monolayer, are both responsible for the observed PLGA-PEG isotherm behavior. Upon cessation of compression, the high surface pressure of the PLGA-PEG monolayer typically relaxes over time with a stretched exponential decay, suggesting that in this diblock copolymer situation, the hydrophobic domain formed by the PLGA blocks undergoes glass transition in the high lateral compression state, analogously to the PLGA homopolymer monolayer. In the high PEG grafting density regime, the contribution of the PEG brush chains to the high monolayer surface pressure is significantly lower than what is predicted by the SCF model because of the many-body attraction among PEG segments (referred to in the literature as the "n-cluster" effects). The end-grafted PEG chains were found to be protein resistant even under the influence of the "n-cluster" effects.

  6. Watch and Wait Management of Inactive Cystic Echinococcosis – Does the Path to Inactivity Matter – Analysis of a Prospective Patient Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojkovic, Marija; Rosenberger, Kerstin Daniela; Steudle, Franziska; Junghanss, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Background Overdiagnosis and overtreatment are rarely discussed in the context of NTDs despite their relevance for patients under the care of health services with limited resources where the risks of therapy induced complications are often disproportionate to the benefit. The advantages of cyst staging-based management of patients with cystic echinococcosis (CE) are not yet fully explored. Questions are: Do inactive cysts (CE 4 and CE 5) need treatment and is there a difference between cysts which reach CE4 and CE5 naturally or by benzimidazole therapy? Methodology/Principal findings Analysis of long-term follow-up data from a prospective CE patient cohort of 223 patients of a national clinical center for echinococcosis. The event of interest “relapse” was defined as the reversal of a cyst from an inactive stage (CE4, CE5) back to an active stage. The watch &wait (ww) group included 30 patients with 46 inactive cysts who never received medical treatment. The benzimidazole-treated (med) group included 15 patients with 17 cysts. There was no relapse in the ww-group whereas 8/17 cysts showed relapse within 18 months after treatment in the med-group. Loss to follow-up was 15.5%. Conclusions Data from the watch & wait group impressively show how stable naturally inactivated cysts are in contrast to cysts which reach inactivity through treatment with benzimidazoles. A substantial proportion of patients can be spared from treatment through cyst staging. Cysts which inactivated through a natural course do not relapse with very high likelihood. We recommend follow up of 5 years to confirm the stability of the inactive stage. Cysts driven into inactivity through benzimidazole therapy instead need careful monitoring to identify those which reactivate (around 50% within 18 months). 5 years follow-up appears safe to make a final decision on the need for further monitoring. PMID:27992434

  7. Exploiting Statistical Methodologies and Controlled Vocabularies for Prioritized Functional Analysis of Genomic Experiments: the StRAnGER Web Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatziioannou, Aristotelis A; Moulos, Panagiotis

    2011-01-01

    StRAnGER is a web application for the automated statistical analysis of annotated gene profiling experiments, exploiting controlled biological vocabularies, like the Gene Ontology or the KEGG pathways terms. Starting from annotated lists of differentially expressed genes and gene enrichment scores, regarding the terms of each vocabulary, StRAnGER repartitions and reorders the initial distribution of terms to define a new distribution of elements. Each element pools terms holding the same enrichment score. The new distribution thus derived, is reordered in a decreasing order to the right, according to the observation score of the elements, while elements with the same score, are sorted again in a decreasing order of their enrichment scores. By applying bootstrapping techniques, a corrected measure of the statistical significance of these elements is derived, which enables the selection of terms mapped to these elements, unambiguously associated with respective significant gene sets. The selected terms are immunized against the bias infiltrating statistical enrichment analyses, producing technically very high statistical scores, due to the finite nature of the data population. Besides their high statistical score, another selection criterion for the terms is the number of their members, something that incurs a biological prioritization in line with a Systems Biology context. The output derived, represents a detailed ranked list of significant terms, which constitute a starting point for further functional analysis.

  8. Exploiting statistical methodologies and controlled vocabularies for prioritized functional analysis of genomic experiments: The StRAnGER web application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aristotle A Chatziioannou

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available StRAnGER is a web application for the automated statistical analysis of annotated gene profiling experiments, exploiting controlled biological vocabularies, like the Gene Ontology or the KEGG pathways terms. Starting from annotated lists of differentially expressed genes and gene enrichment scores, regarding the terms of each vocabulary, StRAnGER repartitions and reorders the initial distribution of terms to define a new distribution of elements. Each element pools terms holding the same enrichment score. The new distribution thus derived, is reordered in a decreasing order to the right, according to the observation score of the elements, while elements with the same score, are sorted again in a decreasing order of their enrichment scores. By applying bootstrapping techniques, a corrected measure of the statistical significance of these elements is derived, which enables the selection of terms mapped to these elements, unambiguously associated with respective significant gene sets. The selected terms are immunized against the bias infiltrating statistical enrichment analyses, producing technically very high statistical scores, due to the finite nature of the data population. Besides their high statistical score, another selection criterion for the terms is the number of their members, something that incurs a biological prioritization in line with a Systems Biology context. The output derived, represents a detailed ranked list of significant terms, which constitute a starting point for further functional analysis.

  9. c9RAN translation: a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendron, Tania F; Cosio, Danielle M; Petrucelli, Leonard

    2013-09-01

    A hexanucleotide (GGGGCC) repeat expansion within a non-coding region of the C9ORF72 gene is the most common mutation associated with both frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Elucidating how these expanded repeats (GGGGCCexp) cause 'c9FTD/ALS' has since become an important goal of the FTD/ALS field. GGGGCCexp transcripts aggregate into discrete nuclear structures, termed RNA foci. This phenomenon, observed in various repeat expansion disorders, is associated with RNA-binding protein sequestration. Of note, recent findings show that GGGGCCexp transcripts also succumb to an alternative fate: repeat-associated non-ATG translation (RAN translation). This unconventional mode of translation, which occurs in the absence of an initiating codon, results in the production of polyGA, polyGP and polyGR peptides. Antibodies generated against these peptides detect high molecular weight, insoluble material in brain homogenates, as well as neuronal inclusions throughout the central nervous system of c9FTD/ALS cases. Given that both foci formation and RAN translation in c9FTD/ALS require the synthesis of GGGGCCexp RNA, therapeutic strategies that target these transcripts and result in their neutralization or degradation could effectively block these two potential pathogenic mechanisms and provide a much needed treatment for c9FTD/ALS.

  10. Differences between Active and Inactive Quality Circles in Attendance and Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Thomas Li-Pang; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Discriminant analysis of differences between 32 active and 12 inactive quality circles on member participation and circle performance showed that active circles had a lower failure rate, higher attendance, and higher net savings in circle projects. (SK)

  11. The effects of exergaming on physical activity among inactive children in a physical education classroom

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fogel, Victoria A; Miltenberger, Raymond G; Graves, Rachel; Koehler, Shannon

    2010-01-01

    ... on the reinforcing effects of video games to increase physical activity in children. This study evaluated the effects of exergaming on physical activity among 4 inactive children in a physical education (PE) classroom...

  12. Prevalence and Predictors of Physical Inactivity in a Slum in Brazil

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Alves, João Guilherme Bezerra; Figueiroa, José Natal; Alves, Lucas Victor

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to ascertain the prevalence of physical inactivity and examine the role of potential predictors in a very low-income adult population in a slum located in Recife city, northeast of Brazil...

  13. Race/ethnicity, social class, and leisure-time physical inactivity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marshall, Simon J; Jones, Deborah A; Ainsworth, Barbara E; Reis, Jared P; Levy, Susan S; Macera, Caroline A

    2007-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine 1) prevalence of leisure-time physical inactivity in a nationally representative sample of non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic black, and Hispanic men and women; 2...

  14. The Defective Nuclear Lamina in Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome Disrupts the Nucleocytoplasmic Ran Gradient and Inhibits Nuclear Localization of Ubc9▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Joshua B.; Datta, Sutirtha; Snow, Chelsi J.; Chatterjee, Mandovi; Ni, Li; Spencer, Adam; Yang, Chun-Song; Cubeñas-Potts, Caelin; Matunis, Michael J.; Paschal, Bryce M.

    2011-01-01

    The mutant form of lamin A responsible for the premature aging disease Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (termed progerin) acts as a dominant negative protein that changes the structure of the nuclear lamina. How the perturbation of the nuclear lamina in progeria is transduced into cellular changes is undefined. Using patient fibroblasts and a variety of cell-based assays, we determined that progerin expression in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome inhibits the nucleocytoplasmic transport of several factors with key roles in nuclear function. We found that progerin reduces the nuclear/cytoplasmic concentration of the Ran GTPase and inhibits the nuclear localization of Ubc9, the sole E2 for SUMOylation, and of TPR, the nucleoporin that forms the basket on the nuclear side of the nuclear pore complex. Forcing the nuclear localization of Ubc9 in progerin-expressing cells rescues the Ran gradient and TPR import, indicating that these pathways are linked. Reducing nuclear SUMOylation decreases the nuclear mobility of the Ran nucleotide exchange factor RCC1 in vivo, and the addition of SUMO E1 and E2 promotes the dissociation of RCC1 and Ran from chromatin in vitro. Our data suggest that the cellular effects of progerin are transduced, at least in part, through reduced function of the Ran GTPase and SUMOylation pathways. PMID:21670151

  15. RANS simulations of wind turbine wakes: optimal tuning of turbulence closure and aerodynamic loads from LiDAR and SCADA data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letizia, Stefano; Puccioni, Matteo; Zhan, Lu; Viola, Francesco; Camarri, Simone; Iungo, Giacomo Valerio

    2017-11-01

    Numerical simulations of wakes produced by utility-scale wind turbines still present challenges related to the variability of the atmospheric conditions and, in the most of the cases, the lack of information about the geometry and aerodynamic performance of the wind turbine blades. In order to overcome the mentioned difficulties, we propose a RANS solver for which turbine aerodynamic forcing and turbulence closure are calibrated through LiDAR and SCADA data acquired for an onshore wind farm. The wind farm under examination is located in North Texas over a relatively flat terrain. The experimental data are leveraged to maximize accuracy of the RANS predictions in terms of wake velocity field and power capture for different atmospheric stability conditions and settings of the wind turbines. The optimization of the RANS parameters is performed through an adjoint-RANS formulation and a gradient-based procedure. The optimally-tuned aerodynamic forcing and turbulence closure are then analyzed in order to investigate effects of the atmospheric stability on the evolution of wind turbine wakes and power performance. The proposed RANS solver has low computational costs comparable to those of wake engineering models, which make it a compelling tool for wind farm control and optimization. Acknowledgments: NSF I/UCRC WindSTAR IIP 1362033 and TACC.

  16. Costameric proteins in human skeletal muscle during muscular inactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasi, Giuseppe; Cutroneo, Giuseppina; Santoro, Giuseppe; Arco, Alba; Rizzo, Giuseppina; Bramanti, Placido; Rinaldi, Carmen; Sidoti, Antonina; Amato, Aldo; Favaloro, Angelo

    2008-09-01

    -integrin appeared normal, or slightly increased, compared with that in normal skeletal muscle fibres. We also observed a lower level of alpha 7B- and beta 1D-integrin mRNA and a normal, or slightly higher than normal, level of alpha 7A-integrin mRNA in the skeletal muscle fibres of the patients with sensitive-motor polyneuropathy, compared with those in the skeletal muscle of normal patients. Additionally, transmission electron microscopy of transverse sections of skeletal muscle fibres indicated that the normal muscle fibre architecture was disrupted, with no myosin present inside the actin hexagons. Based on our results, we hypothesize that skeletal muscle inactivity, such as that found after denervation, could result in a reorganization of the costameres, with alpha 7B-integrin being replaced by alpha 7A-integrin. In this way, the viability of the skeletal muscle fibre is maintained. It will be interesting to clarify, by future experimentation, the mechanisms that lead to the down-regulation of integrins and agrin in muscular dystrophies.

  17. Prevalence and correlates of physical inactivity in community-dwelling older adults in Ireland.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine M Murtagh

    Full Text Available The public health challenges associated with rapid population ageing are likely to be exacerbated by poor physical activity levels. The purpose of this study was to identify correlates of physical inactivity in a population-representative sample of older adults in Ireland. This paper reports a secondary analysis of data from 4892 adults aged 60+ from the Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing (TILDA. TILDA includes an assessment of the mental and physical health, and social and financial circumstances of participants assessed in a home interview and self-completion questionnaire. Chi squared statistics and forced entry logistic regression were used to identify factors associated with physical inactivity. Females were over twice as likely to be inactive as their male counterparts (Odds Ratio 2.2. Increasing old age was associated with inactivity among males and females. Those who reported above secondary level education, no reported falls in the last year and no fear of falling were less likely to be physically inactive. While older adults who noted poor/fair self-reported health, that they did not look after grandchildren, did not own a car or did not attend a course were also more likely to be inactive than those who reported positively for these items. Gender displayed a strong but often contrasting influence on factors that affect physical activity among older adults. Among females, living alone or in a rural area, retirement, fair/poor emotional health and activity being limited by illness were all significantly associated with inactivity. While cohabiting, being employed and residing in an urban area were related to low levels of activity in males. Our findings identify specific groups of the older Irish population who may be at particular risk of physical inactivity and thereby the associated physiological and psychological hazards. These results can support the development of tailored interventions to promote healthy ageing.

  18. Imaging of Edge Inactive Layer in Micro Patterned Graphene Monolayer (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-28

    AFRL-RX-WP-JA-2017-0374 IMAGING OF EDGE INACTIVE LAYER IN MICRO- PATTERNED GRAPHENE MONOLAYER (POSTPRINT) K. Brockdorf, Z.Jia, N...MICRO- PATTERNED GRAPHENE MONOLAYER (POSTPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8650-11-D-5801-0013 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 62102F...electrically inactive layer (EIL) near the edge of micro-patterned graphene lines was investigated using both scanning microwave microscopy (SMM

  19. Motives for physical activity among active and inactive persons in their mid-30s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, S; Rottensteiner, M; Kaprio, J; Kujala, U M

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the motives for leisure-time physical activity among active and inactive men and women in their mid-30s. We used both cross-sectional and longitudinal designs. Altogether, 2308 participants (mean age 33.9 years, 53.4% women) were identified from the population-based FinnTwin16 Cohort. Physically active and inactive individuals were identified on the basis of their leisure-time MET h/day. We evaluated participants' physical activity motivation with a modified version of the Recreational Exercise Motivation Measure. Comparisons between active and inactive individuals were analysed using the Wald test for equality of means, and effect sizes were calculated as Cohen's d. Motives related to mastery, physical fitness, social aspect of physical activity, psychological state, enjoyment, willingness to be fitter/look better than others, and appearance were significantly more important for the active than inactive participants. Conforming to others' expectations was the only item on which the inactive persons scored higher than active persons. The longitudinal results for physical activity were parallel to the cross-sectional results. This study supports the view that motivation factors differ between active and inactive persons, and that intrinsic motives are associated with consistent leisure-time physical activity. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. A Mobility Management Using Follow-Me Cloud-Cloudlet in Fog-Computing-Based RANs for Smart Cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuh-Shyan; Tsai, Yi-Ting

    2018-02-06

    Mobility management for supporting the location tracking and location-based service (LBS) is an important issue of smart city by providing the means for the smooth transportation of people and goods. The mobility is useful to contribute the innovation in both public and private transportation infrastructures for smart cities. With the assistance of edge/fog computing, this paper presents a fully new mobility management using the proposed follow-me cloud-cloudlet (FMCL) approach in fog-computing-based radio access networks (Fog-RANs) for smart cities. The proposed follow-me cloud-cloudlet approach is an integration strategy of follow-me cloud (FMC) and follow-me edge (FME) (or called cloudlet). A user equipment (UE) receives the data, transmitted from original cloud, into the original edge cloud before the handover operation. After the handover operation, an UE searches for a new cloud, called as a migrated cloud, and a new edge cloud, called as a migrated edge cloud near to UE, where the remaining data is migrated from the original cloud to the migrated cloud and all the remaining data are received in the new edge cloud. Existing FMC results do not have the property of the VM migration between cloudlets for the purpose of reducing the transmission latency, and existing FME results do not keep the property of the service migration between data centers for reducing the transmission latency. Our proposed FMCL approach can simultaneously keep the VM migration between cloudlets and service migration between data centers to significantly reduce the transmission latency. The new proposed mobility management using FMCL approach aims to reduce the total transmission time if some data packets are pre-scheduled and pre-stored into the cache of cloudlet if UE is switching from the previous Fog-RAN to the serving Fog-RAN. To illustrate the performance achievement, the mathematical analysis and simulation results are examined in terms of the total transmission time, the

  1. A Mobility Management Using Follow-Me Cloud-Cloudlet in Fog-Computing-Based RANs for Smart Cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuh-Shyan Chen

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Mobility management for supporting the location tracking and location-based service (LBS is an important issue of smart city by providing the means for the smooth transportation of people and goods. The mobility is useful to contribute the innovation in both public and private transportation infrastructures for smart cities. With the assistance of edge/fog computing, this paper presents a fully new mobility management using the proposed follow-me cloud-cloudlet (FMCL approach in fog-computing-based radio access networks (Fog-RANs for smart cities. The proposed follow-me cloud-cloudlet approach is an integration strategy of follow-me cloud (FMC and follow-me edge (FME (or called cloudlet. A user equipment (UE receives the data, transmitted from original cloud, into the original edge cloud before the handover operation. After the handover operation, an UE searches for a new cloud, called as a migrated cloud, and a new edge cloud, called as a migrated edge cloud near to UE, where the remaining data is migrated from the original cloud to the migrated cloud and all the remaining data are received in the new edge cloud. Existing FMC results do not have the property of the VM migration between cloudlets for the purpose of reducing the transmission latency, and existing FME results do not keep the property of the service migration between data centers for reducing the transmission latency. Our proposed FMCL approach can simultaneously keep the VM migration between cloudlets and service migration between data centers to significantly reduce the transmission latency. The new proposed mobility management using FMCL approach aims to reduce the total transmission time if some data packets are pre-scheduled and pre-stored into the cache of cloudlet if UE is switching from the previous Fog-RAN to the serving Fog-RAN. To illustrate the performance achievement, the mathematical analysis and simulation results are examined in terms of the total transmission time

  2. In vivo FRET imaging revealed a regulatory role of RanGTP in kinetochore-microtubule attachments via Aurora B kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoke-Peng Lee

    Full Text Available Under the fluctuating circumstances provided by the innate dynamics of microtubules and opposing tensions resulted from microtubule-associated motors, it is vital to ensure stable kinetochore-microtubule attachments for accurate segregation. However, a comprehensive understanding of how this regulation is mechanistically achieved remains elusive. Using our newly designed live cell FRET time-lapse imaging, we found that post-metaphase RanGTP is crucial in the maintenance of stable kinetochore-microtubule attachments by regulating Aurora B kinase via the NES-bearing Mst1. More importantly, our study demonstrates that by ensuring stable alignment of metaphase chromosomes prior to segregation, RanGTP is indispensible in governing the genomic integrity and the fidelity of cell cycle progression. Our findings suggest an additional role of RanGTP beyond its known function in mitotic spindle assembly during the prometaphase-metaphase transition.

  3. Steady RANS methodology for calculating pressure drop in an in-line molten salt compact crossflow heat exchanger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carasik, Lane B.; Shaver, Dillon R.; Hassan, Yassin A.; Haefner, Jonah B.

    2017-11-01

    The development of molten salt cooled reactors (MSR) and fluoride-salt cooled high temperature reactors (FHR) requires the use of advanced design tools for the primary heat exchanger design. Due to geometric and flow characteristics, compact (pitch to diameter ratios equal to or less than 1.25) heat exchangers with a crossflow flow arrangement can become desirable for these reactors. Unfortunately, the available experimental data is limited for compact tube bundles or banks in crossflow. Computational Fluid Dynamics can be used to alleviate the lack of experimental data in these tube banks. Previous computational efforts have been primarily focused on large S/D ratios (larger than 1.4) using unsteady Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes and Large Eddy Simulation frameworks. These approaches are useful, but have large computational requirements that make comprehensive design studies impractical. A CFD study was conducted with steady RANS in an effort to provide a starting point for future design work. The study was performed for an in-line tube bank geometry with FLiBe (LiF-BeF2), a frequently selected molten salt, as the working fluid. Based on the estimated pressure drops, the pressure and velocity distributions in the domain, an appropriate meshing strategy was determined and presented. Periodic boundaries in the spanwise direction transverse flow were determined to be an appropriate boundary condition for reduced computational domains. The domain size was investigated and a minimum of 2-flow channels for a domain is recommended to ensure the behavior is accounted for. Lastly, the standard low Re κ-ε (Lien) turbulence model was determined to be the most appropriate for steady RANS of this case at the time of writing.

  4. Book Review: A History of the Czechoslovak Ocean Shipping Company, 1948–1989: How a Small, Landlocked Country Ran Maritime Business During the Cold War

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taudal Poulsen, René

    2016-01-01

    Review of: Lenka Krátká: A History of the Czechoslovak Ocean Shipping Company, 1948–1989: How a Small, Landlocked Country Ran Maritime Business During the Cold War. Stuttgart: Ibidem Verlag, 2015. x + 271 pp., tables, notes, bibliography. ISBN: 978-3-8382-0666-0, £23.90 (pbk).......Review of: Lenka Krátká: A History of the Czechoslovak Ocean Shipping Company, 1948–1989: How a Small, Landlocked Country Ran Maritime Business During the Cold War. Stuttgart: Ibidem Verlag, 2015. x + 271 pp., tables, notes, bibliography. ISBN: 978-3-8382-0666-0, £23.90 (pbk)....

  5. Associations of unhealthy lifestyle factors with sexual inactivity and sexual dysfunctions in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Birgitte S; Grønbaek, Morten; Pedersen, Bo V; Graugaard, Christian; Frisch, Morten

    2011-07-01

    Studies have linked obesity, a sedentary lifestyle, and tobacco smoking to erectile dysfunction, but the evidence linking unhealthy lifestyle factors to other sexual dysfunctions or to sexual inactivity is conflicting. To examine associations between unhealthy lifestyle factors and sexual inactivity with a partner and four specific sexual dysfunctions in each sex. We used nationally representative survey data from 5,552 Danish men and women aged 16-97 years in 2005. Cross-sectional associations of lifestyle factors with sexual inactivity and sexual dysfunctions were estimated by logistic regression-derived, confounder-adjusted odds ratios (ORs). We calculated ORs for sexual inactivity with a partner and for sexual dysfunction and sexual difficulties overall in both sexes, for erectile dysfunction, anorgasmia, premature ejaculation, and dyspareunia in men, and for lubrication insufficiency, anorgasmia, dyspareunia, and vaginismus in women. Obesity (body mass index [BMI]≥30 kg/m(2) ) or a substantially increased waist circumference (men ≥102 cm; women ≥88 cm), physical inactivity, and, among women, tobacco smoking were each significantly associated with sexual inactivity in the last year. Among sexually active men, both underweight (BMI 21 alcoholic beverages/week), tobacco smoking, and use of hard drugs were each significantly positively associated with one or more sexual dysfunctions (ORs between 1.71 and 22.0). Among sexually active women, the only significant positive association between an unhealthy lifestyle factor and sexual dysfunction was between hashish use and anorgasmia (OR 2.85). In both sexes, several unhealthy lifestyle factors were associated with sexual inactivity with a partner in the last year. Additionally, among sexually active participants, men with unhealthy lifestyles were significantly more likely to experience sexual dysfunctions. Considering the importance of a good sex life, our findings may be useful in attempts to promote healthier

  6. Marital Status, the Economic Benefits of Marriage, and Days of Inactivity due to Poor Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jim P. Stimpson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. This study explored whether the economic benefits of marriage mediate the association between marriage and health and if that relationship is conditional on the level of shared economic resources. Methods. Pooled, cross-sectional data from NHANES 2001–2006 were analyzed using multivariate zero-inflated negative binomial regression for the number of days of inactivity due to poor physical or mental health. Results. Persons that were divorced/separated reported the highest average number of days of inactivity (mean = 2.5 within a 30 day period, and married persons reported the lowest number of days of inactivity (mean = 1.4. Multivariate results indicated that widowed persons did not report significantly more days of inactivity than married persons. Income to poverty ratio reduced the size and eliminated statistical significance of the difference between divorced/separated and never married marital statuses compared to married persons. The interaction effect for marital status and income to poverty ratio was statistically significant suggesting that the relationship between marital status and inactivity is conditional on shared income. Conclusion. Marriage confers health protective benefits in part through pooled income relative to other marital statuses.

  7. Activity, inactivity, and screen time in relation to weight and fatness over adolescence in girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Must, Aviva; Bandini, Linda G; Tybor, David J; Phillips, Sarah M; Naumova, Elena N; Dietz, William H

    2007-07-01

    The impact of activity and inactivity on relative weight and fatness change are best evaluated longitudinally. We examined the longitudinal relationship of physical activity, inactivity, and screen time with relative weight status and percentage body fat (%BF) and explored how it differed by parental overweight status. Non-obese pre-menarcheal girls (173), 8 to 12 years old, were followed until 4 years post-menarche. %BF, BMI z-score, and time spent sleeping, sitting, standing, walking, and in vigorous activity were assessed annually. We developed a physical activity index to reflect time and intensity of activity. Inactivity was defined as the sum of time spent sleeping, sitting, and standing. Screen time was defined as time spent viewing television, videotapes, or playing video games. Parental overweight was defined as at least one parent with BMI>25. In separate linear mixed effects models, activity, inactivity, and screen time were unrelated to BMI z-score longitudinally, with and without accounting for parental overweight. After controlling for parental overweight, activity was inversely related (phistory of overweight represent a target population of high priority for interventions around physical activity and inactivity.

  8. Association between Natural Resources for Outdoor Activities and Physical Inactivity: Results from the Contiguous United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Jiang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Protected areas including national/state parks and recreational waters are excellent natural resources that promote physical activity and interaction with Nature, which can relieve stress and reduce disease risk. Despite their importance, however, their contribution to human health has not been properly quantified. This paper seeks to evaluate quantitatively how national/state parks and recreational waters are associated with human health and well-being, taking into account of the spatial dependence of environmental variables for the contiguous U.S., at the county level. First, we describe available natural resources for outdoor activities (ANROA, using national databases that include features from the Protected Areas Database, NAVSTREETS, and ATTAINSGEO 305(b Waters. We then use spatial regression techniques to explore the association of ANROA and socioeconomic status factors on physical inactivity rates. Finally, we use variance analysis to analyze ANROA’s influence on income-related health inequality. We found a significantly negative association between ANROA and the rate of physical inactivity: ANROA and the spatial effect explained 69%, nationwide, of the variation in physical inactivity. Physical inactivity rate showed a strong spatial dependence—influenced not only by its own in-county ANROA, but also by that of its neighbors ANROA. Furthermore, community groups at the same income level and with the highest ANROA, always had the lowest physical inactivity rate. This finding may help to guide future land use planning and community development that will benefit human health and well-being.

  9. Association between Natural Resources for Outdoor Activities and Physical Inactivity: Results from the Contiguous United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yan; Yuan, Yongping; Neale, Anne; Jackson, Laura; Mehaffey, Megan

    2016-08-17

    Protected areas including national/state parks and recreational waters are excellent natural resources that promote physical activity and interaction with Nature, which can relieve stress and reduce disease risk. Despite their importance, however, their contribution to human health has not been properly quantified. This paper seeks to evaluate quantitatively how national/state parks and recreational waters are associated with human health and well-being, taking into account of the spatial dependence of environmental variables for the contiguous U.S., at the county level. First, we describe available natural resources for outdoor activities (ANROA), using national databases that include features from the Protected Areas Database, NAVSTREETS, and ATTAINSGEO 305(b) Waters. We then use spatial regression techniques to explore the association of ANROA and socioeconomic status factors on physical inactivity rates. Finally, we use variance analysis to analyze ANROA's influence on income-related health inequality. We found a significantly negative association between ANROA and the rate of physical inactivity: ANROA and the spatial effect explained 69%, nationwide, of the variation in physical inactivity. Physical inactivity rate showed a strong spatial dependence-influenced not only by its own in-county ANROA, but also by that of its neighbors ANROA. Furthermore, community groups at the same income level and with the highest ANROA, always had the lowest physical inactivity rate. This finding may help to guide future land use planning and community development that will benefit human health and well-being.

  10. Anthropometric and lifestyle characteristics of active and inactive Saudi and British adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Michael J; Al-Hazzaa, Hazzaa M; Al-Nakeeb, Yahya; Al-Sobayel, Hana I; Abahussain, Nada A; Musaiger, Abdulrahman O; Lyons, Mark; Collins, Peter; Nevill, Alan

    2014-01-01

    To compare the anthropometric and lifestyle characteristics of active and inactive adolescents in Saudi Arabia and Britain. A school-based cross-sectional study was conducted at four cities in Saudi Arabia (Riyadh and Al-Khobar; N = 1,648) and Britain (Birmingham and Coventry; N = 1,158). The participants (14- to 18-year-olds) were randomly selected using a multistage stratified cluster sampling. Measurements included anthropometric [BMI, Waist circumference (WC), Waist to height ratio], screen time, validated physical activity questionnaire and dietary habits. British males were lighter (P = 0.04, 64.4 vs. 68.2 kg), and had lower values for WC (P = 0.003, 77.1 vs. 78.7 cm) than Saudi males. Males (P = 0.0001) were significantly more active than females but the difference between inactive Saudi and British females was greater than that between inactive Saudi and British males. Being female was significantly (P crosscultural differences and similarities in lifestyle habits in adolescents from Britain and Saudi Arabia. Activity status (active vs. inactive) appears to play an important role in other lifestyle related behaviors, with active adolescent more likely to engage in healthy dietary behavior than their inactive peers, irrespective of country of origin. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. RanBP9 overexpression accelerates loss of pre and postsynaptic proteins in the APΔE9 transgenic mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongjie; Wang, Ruizhi; Xu, Shaohua; Lakshmana, Madepalli K

    2014-01-01

    There is now compelling evidence that the neurodegenerative process in Alzheimer's disease (AD) begins in synapses. Loss of synaptic proteins and functional synapses in the amyloid precursor protein (APP) transgenic mouse models of AD is well established. However, what is the earliest age at which such loss of synapses occurs, and whether known markers of AD progression accelerate functional deficits is completely unknown. We previously showed that RanBP9 overexpression leads to robustly increased amyloid β peptide (Aβ) generation leading to enhanced amyloid plaque burden in a mouse model of AD. In this study we compared synaptic protein levels among four genotypes of mice, i.e., RanBP9 single transgenic (Ran), APΔE9 double transgenic (Dbl), APΔE9/RanBP9 triple transgenic (Tpl) and wild-type (WT) controls. We found significant reductions in the levels of synaptic proteins in both cortex and hippocampus of 5- and 6-months-old but not 3- or 4-months-old mice. Specifically, at 5-months of age, rab3A was reduced in the triple transgenic mice only in the cortex by 25% (pproteins in the mouse brain.

  12. Study of laminar separation bubble on low Reynolds number operating airfoils: RANS modelling by means of an high-accuracy solver and experimental verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crivellini, A.; D'Alessandro, V.; Di Benedetto, D.; Montelpare, S.; Ricci, R.

    2014-04-01

    This work is devoted to the Computational Fluid-Dynamics (CFD) simulation of laminar separation bubble (LSB) on low Reynolds number operating airfoils. This phenomenon is of large interest in several fields, such as wind energy, and it is characterised by slow recirculating flow at an almost constant pressure. Presently Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) methods, due to their limited computational requests, are the more efficient and feasible CFD simulation tool for complex engineering applications involving LSBs. However adopting RANS methods for LSB prediction is very challenging since widely used models assume a fully turbulent regime. For this reason several transitional models for RANS equations based on further Partial Differential Equations (PDE) have been recently introduced in literature. Nevertheless in some cases they show questionable results. In this work RANS equations and the standard Spalart-Allmaras (SA) turbulence model are used to deal with LSB problems obtaining promising results. This innovative result is related to: (i) a particular behaviour of the SA equation; (ii) a particular implementation of SA equation; (iii) the use of a high-order discontinuous Galerkin (DG) solver. The effectiveness of the proposed approach is tested on different airfoils at several angles of attack and Reynolds numbers. Numerical results were verified with both experimental measurements performed at the open circuit subsonic wind tunnel of Università Politecnica delle Marche (UNIVPM) and literature data.

  13. Ozsvath, Zsuzsanna: "When the Danube Ran Red"; Mandel, Eva Marika: "Le Livre de Mana"; Roth, Marika: "All the Pretty Shoes; A Memoir of Survival and the Feminine Spirit".

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evi Blaikie

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ozsvath, Zsuzsanna. When the Danube Ran Red. Syracuse University Press, 2010,171 pp., Illus.Mandel, Eva Marika. Le Livre de Mana. Paris, Glyphe 2009, 231 pp., Illus.Roth, Marika. All the Pretty Shoes; A Memoir of Survival and the Feminine SpiritWyatt McKenzy 2010, 254 pp., Illus.Reviewed by Evi Blaikie, Freelance Writer.

  14. Inactivity-induced modulation of Hsp20 and Hsp25 content in rat hindlimb muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huey, Kimberly A; Thresher, Jeffrey S; Brophy, Colleen M; Roy, Roland R

    2004-07-01

    Denervation decreases small heat shock protein (HSP) content in the rat soleus muscle; however, it is unknown whether this change is due to inactivity or absence of a nerve-muscle connection. Spinal cord isolation (SI) is a model of inactivity with an intact neuromuscular connection. After 7 days of SI, Hsp20 and Hsp25 levels in the soleus, plantaris, and adductor longus muscles were lower than in control rats, whereas Hsp20 was unchanged and Hsp25 increased in the tibialis anterior. The results for the soleus indicate that these small HSPs respond to inactivity and that this response is not influenced by neural activity-independent factors. Furthermore, the data indicate that these HSPs are impacted to a greater degree in muscles that are predominantly slow or have an antigravity function than in flexor muscles. Understanding the regulation of these HSPs during chronic reductions in neuromuscular activity may have valuable applications for conditions such as spinal cord injury.

  15. A lentiviral sponge for miR-101 regulates RanBP9 expression and amyloid precursor protein metabolism in hippocampal neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian eBarbato

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegeneration associated with amyloid β (Aβ peptide accumulation, synaptic loss, and memory impairment are pathophysiological features of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Numerous microRNAs regulate amyloid precursor protein (APP expression and metabolism. We previously reported that miR-101 is a negative regulator of APP expression in cultured hippocampal neurons. In this study, a search for predicted APP metabolism-associated miR-101 targets led to the identification of a conserved miR-101 binding site within the 3’ untranslated region (UTR of the mRNA encoding Ran-binding protein 9 (RanBP9. RanBP9 increases APP processing by β-amyloid converting enzyme 1 (BACE1, secretion of soluble APPβ (sAPPβ, and generation of Aβ. MiR-101 significantly reduced reporter gene expression when co-transfected with a RanBP9 3'-UTR reporter construct, while site-directed mutagenesis of the predicted miR-101 target site eliminated the reporter response. To investigate the effect of stable inhibition of miR-101 both in vitro and in vivo, a microRNA sponge was developed to bind miR-101 and derepress its targets. Four tandem bulged miR-101 responsive elements (REs, located downstream of the enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP open reading frame and driven by the synapsin promoter, were placed in a lentiviral vector to create the pLSyn-miR-101 sponge. Delivery of the sponge to primary hippocampal neurons significantly increased both APP and RanBP9 expression, as well as sAPPβ levels in the conditioned medium. Importantly, silencing of endogenous RanBP9 reduced sAPPβ levels in miR-101 sponge-containing hippocampal cultures, indicating that miR-101 inhibition may increase amyloidogenic processing of APP by RanBP9. Lastly, the impact of miR-101 on its targets was demonstrated in vivo by intrahippocampal injection of the pLSyn-miR-101 sponge into C57BL6 mice. This study thus provides the basis for studying the consequences of long-term miR-101 inhibition on

  16. Comprehensive Approaches to Multiphase Flows in Geophysics - Application to nonisothermal, nonhomogenous, unsteady, large-scale, turbulent dusty clouds I. Hydrodynamic and Thermodynamic RANS and LES Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Dartevelle

    2005-09-05

    The objective of this manuscript is to fully derive a geophysical multiphase model able to ''accommodate'' different multiphase turbulence approaches; viz., the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS), the Large Eddy Simulation (LES), or hybrid RANSLES. This manuscript is the first part of a larger geophysical multiphase project--lead by LANL--that aims to develop comprehensive modeling tools for large-scale, atmospheric, transient-buoyancy dusty jets and plume (e.g., plinian clouds, nuclear ''mushrooms'', ''supercell'' forest fire plumes) and for boundary-dominated geophysical multiphase gravity currents (e.g., dusty surges, diluted pyroclastic flows, dusty gravity currents in street canyons). LES is a partially deterministic approach constructed on either a spatial- or a temporal-separation between the large and small scales of the flow, whereas RANS is an entirely probabilistic approach constructed on a statistical separation between an ensemble-averaged mean and higher-order statistical moments (the so-called ''fluctuating parts''). Within this specific multiphase context, both turbulence approaches are built up upon the same phasic binary-valued ''function of presence''. This function of presence formally describes the occurrence--or not--of any phase at a given position and time and, therefore, allows to derive the same basic multiphase Navier-Stokes model for either the RANS or the LES frameworks. The only differences between these turbulence frameworks are the closures for the various ''turbulence'' terms involving the unknown variables from the fluctuating (RANS) or from the subgrid (LES) parts. Even though the hydrodynamic and thermodynamic models for RANS and LES have the same set of Partial Differential Equations, the physical interpretations of these PDEs cannot be the same, i.e., RANS models an averaged field, while LES simulates a

  17. Early adulthood determinants of mid-life leisure-time physical inactivity stability and change: Findings from a prospective birth cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto Pereira, Snehal M; Power, Chris

    2017-11-22

    Physical inactivity is highly prevalent. Knowledge is needed of influences on inactive lifestyles. We aimed to establish whether early adult factors predict subsequent inactivity patterns in mid-adulthood. Leisure-time inactivity (activity frequencylife. Copyright © 2017 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Linking geology and microbiology: inactive pockmarks affect sediment microbial community structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas H A Haverkamp

    Full Text Available Pockmarks are geological features that are found on the bottom of lakes and oceans all over the globe. Some are active, seeping oil or methane, while others are inactive. Active pockmarks are well studied since they harbor specialized microbial communities that proliferate on the seeping compounds. Such communities are not found in inactive pockmarks. Interestingly, inactive pockmarks are known to have different macrofaunal communities compared to the surrounding sediments. It is undetermined what the microbial composition of inactive pockmarks is and if it shows a similar pattern as the macrofauna. The Norwegian Oslofjord contains many inactive pockmarks and they are well suited to study the influence of these geological features on the microbial community in the sediment. Here we present a detailed analysis of the microbial communities found in three inactive pockmarks and two control samples at two core depth intervals. The communities were analyzed using high-throughput amplicon sequencing of the 16S rRNA V3 region. Microbial communities of surface pockmark sediments were indistinguishable from communities found in the surrounding seabed. In contrast, pockmark communities at 40 cm sediment depth had a significantly different community structure from normal sediments at the same depth. Statistical analysis of chemical variables indicated significant differences in the concentrations of total carbon and non-particulate organic carbon between 40 cm pockmarks and reference sample sediments. We discuss these results in comparison with the taxonomic classification of the OTUs identified in our samples. Our results indicate that microbial communities at the sediment surface are affected by the water column, while the deeper (40 cm sediment communities are affected by local conditions within the sediment.

  19. [Inequalities in physical inactivity according educational level in Spain, 1987 and 2007].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestre-Miquel, Clara; Martínez, David; Polonio, Begoña; Astasio, Paloma; Santos, Juana; Regidor, Enrique

    2014-12-01

    To compare the magnitude of inequalities in the frequency of physical inactivity in Spain in 1987 and 2007, and assess whether the magnitude of inequality varies depending on the wealth of the area of residence. Descriptive cross-sectional study, national scope. Data from the National Health Survey, 1987 and 2007, adult population between 25-64 years: 30,000 individuals (1987) and 29,478 (2006/7). Main outcomes variable, leisure-time physical inactivity; exposure factor, educational level. An analysis was made of the prevalence and association using odds ratio (OR). Adjustment for socioeconomic variables: age, marital status, employment status, social class of head of household, and household income. Physical inactivity prevalence decreased in the two decades. There were more than three times more inactive males among those with primary education or less, compared to those with university studies. The magnitude of inequalities has increased in time: in a 45-64 years old man with primary school education: OR 2.43 (1.91-3.09) in 1987, to OR 2.77 (2.17-3.54) in 2007, adjusted for all socioeconomic variables. The prevalence of physical inactivity decreased between 1987 and 2007, and the largest decreases were in individuals with university studies. The gap in the differences in prevalence and OR of leisure-time physical inactivity has increased over time. It's necessary to contribute, with health education strategies and equity promotion are needed to help reduce the inequalities in risk behaviors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Changes in diagnosed diabetes, obesity, and physical inactivity prevalence in US counties, 2004-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiss, Linda S; Kirtland, Karen; Lin, Ji; Shrestha, Sundar; Thompson, Ted; Albright, Ann; Gregg, Edward W

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that prevalence of diagnosed diabetes in the United States reached a plateau or slowed around 2008, and that this change coincided with obesity plateaus and increases in physical activity. However, national estimates can obscure important variations in geographic subgroups. We examine whether a slowing or leveling off in diagnosed diabetes, obesity, and leisure time physical inactivity prevalence is also evident across the 3143 counties of the United States. We used publicly available county estimates of the age-adjusted prevalence of diagnosed diabetes, obesity, and leisure-time physical inactivity, which were generated by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Using a Bayesian multilevel regression that included random effects by county and year and applied cubic splines to smooth these estimates over time, we estimated the average annual percentage point change (APPC) from 2004 to 2008 and from 2008 to 2012 for diabetes, obesity, and physical inactivity prevalence in each county. Compared to 2004-2008, the median APPCs for diabetes, obesity, and physical inactivity were lower in 2008-2012 (diabetes APPC difference = 0.16, 95%CI 0.14, 0.18; obesity APPC difference = 0.65, 95%CI 0.59, 0.70; physical inactivity APPC difference = 0.43, 95%CI 0.37, 0.48). APPCs and APPC differences between time periods varied among counties and U.S. regions. Despite improvements, levels of these risk factors remained high with most counties merely slowing rather than reversing, which suggests that all counties would likely benefit from reductions in these risk factors. The diversity of trajectories in the prevalence of these risk factors across counties underscores the continued need to identify high risk areas and populations for preventive interventions. Awareness of how these factors are changing might assist local policy makers in targeting and tracking the impact of efforts to reduce diabetes, obesity and physical inactivity.

  1. Changes in diagnosed diabetes, obesity, and physical inactivity prevalence in US counties, 2004-2012.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda S Geiss

    Full Text Available Recent studies suggest that prevalence of diagnosed diabetes in the United States reached a plateau or slowed around 2008, and that this change coincided with obesity plateaus and increases in physical activity. However, national estimates can obscure important variations in geographic subgroups. We examine whether a slowing or leveling off in diagnosed diabetes, obesity, and leisure time physical inactivity prevalence is also evident across the 3143 counties of the United States. We used publicly available county estimates of the age-adjusted prevalence of diagnosed diabetes, obesity, and leisure-time physical inactivity, which were generated by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC. Using a Bayesian multilevel regression that included random effects by county and year and applied cubic splines to smooth these estimates over time, we estimated the average annual percentage point change (APPC from 2004 to 2008 and from 2008 to 2012 for diabetes, obesity, and physical inactivity prevalence in each county. Compared to 2004-2008, the median APPCs for diabetes, obesity, and physical inactivity were lower in 2008-2012 (diabetes APPC difference = 0.16, 95%CI 0.14, 0.18; obesity APPC difference = 0.65, 95%CI 0.59, 0.70; physical inactivity APPC difference = 0.43, 95%CI 0.37, 0.48. APPCs and APPC differences between time periods varied among counties and U.S. regions. Despite improvements, levels of these risk factors remained high with most counties merely slowing rather than reversing, which suggests that all counties would likely benefit from reductions in these risk factors. The diversity of trajectories in the prevalence of these risk factors across counties underscores the continued need to identify high risk areas and populations for preventive interventions. Awareness of how these factors are changing might assist local policy makers in targeting and tracking the impact of efforts to reduce diabetes, obesity and physical inactivity.

  2. Depressive symptoms, physical inactivity and risk of cardiovascular mortality in older adults: the Cardiovascular Health Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Win, Sithu; Parakh, Kapil; Eze-Nliam, Chete M; Gottdiener, John S; Kop, Willem J

    2011-01-01

    Background Depressed older individuals have a higher mortality than older persons without depression. Depression is associated with physical inactivity, and low levels of physical activity have been shown in some cohorts to be a partial mediator of the relationship between depression and cardiovascular events and mortality. Methods A cohort of 5888 individuals (mean 72.8±5.6 years, 58% female, 16% African-American) from four US communities was followed for an average of 10.3 years. Self-reported depressive symptoms (10-item Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale) were assessed annually and self-reported physical activity was assessed at baseline and at 3 and 7 years. To estimate how much of the increased risk of cardiovascular mortality associated with depressive symptoms was due to physical inactivity, Cox regression with time-varying covariates was used to determine the percentage change in the log HR of depressive symptoms for cardiovascular mortality after adding physical activity variables. Results At baseline, 20% of participants scored above the cut-off for depressive symptoms. There were 2915 deaths (49.8%), of which 1176 (20.1%) were from cardiovascular causes. Depressive symptoms and physical inactivity each independently increased the risk of cardiovascular mortality and were strongly associated with each other (all p<0.001). Individuals with both depressive symptoms and physical inactivity had greater cardiovascular mortality than those with either individually (p<0.001, log rank test). Physical inactivity reduced the log HR of depressive symptoms for cardiovascular mortality by 26% after adjustment. This was similar for persons with (25%) and without (23%) established coronary heart disease. Conclusions Physical inactivity accounted for a significant proportion of the risk of cardiovascular mortality due to depressive symptoms in older adults, regardless of coronary heart disease status. PMID:21339320

  3. Linking geology and microbiology: inactive pockmarks affect sediment microbial community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haverkamp, Thomas H A; Hammer, Øyvind; Jakobsen, Kjetill S

    2014-01-01

    Pockmarks are geological features that are found on the bottom of lakes and oceans all over the globe. Some are active, seeping oil or methane, while others are inactive. Active pockmarks are well studied since they harbor specialized microbial communities that proliferate on the seeping compounds. Such communities are not found in inactive pockmarks. Interestingly, inactive pockmarks are known to have different macrofaunal communities compared to the surrounding sediments. It is undetermined what the microbial composition of inactive pockmarks is and if it shows a similar pattern as the macrofauna. The Norwegian Oslofjord contains many inactive pockmarks and they are well suited to study the influence of these geological features on the microbial community in the sediment. Here we present a detailed analysis of the microbial communities found in three inactive pockmarks and two control samples at two core depth intervals. The communities were analyzed using high-throughput amplicon sequencing of the 16S rRNA V3 region. Microbial communities of surface pockmark sediments were indistinguishable from communities found in the surrounding seabed. In contrast, pockmark communities at 40 cm sediment depth had a significantly different community structure from normal sediments at the same depth. Statistical analysis of chemical variables indicated significant differences in the concentrations of total carbon and non-particulate organic carbon between 40 cm pockmarks and reference sample sediments. We discuss these results in comparison with the taxonomic classification of the OTUs identified in our samples. Our results indicate that microbial communities at the sediment surface are affected by the water column, while the deeper (40 cm) sediment communities are affected by local conditions within the sediment.

  4. Depressive symptoms are associated with physical inactivity in patients with type 2 diabetes. The DIAZOB Primary Care Diabetes study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koopmans, Berber; Pouwer, Francois; de Bie, Robert A

    2009-01-01

    through decreased physical activity. OBJECTIVE: To test whether type 2 diabetes patients with elevated depression scores are more often physically inactive. METHODS: Demographic features, clinical factors, level of physical inactivity and depressive symptoms were assessed in 2646 primary care patients...... with type 2 diabetes. Sequential multiple logistic regression analyses [odds ratio, 95% confidence interval (CI)] were performed to test the association between depressive symptoms and physical inactivity. RESULTS: About 48% of the respondents were physically inactive. Elevated depressive symptoms were...... found in 14% of the respondents. After adjustment for potential confounders, the odds for being physically inactive were almost doubled in depressed patients with type 2 diabetes 1.74 (95% CI 1.32-2.31). CONCLUSIONS: Presence of depressive symptoms almost doubles the likelihood of physical inactivity...

  5. Trends in social inequality in physical inactivity among Danish adolescents 1991–2014

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, N F; Toftager, Mette; Melkevik, Ole

    2017-01-01

    -sectional studies of nationally representative samples of 11–15-year old adolescents. The available data consisted of weekly time (hours) spent on vigorous physical activity and parental occupation from 30,974 participants. In summary, 8.0% of the adolescents reported to be physically inactive, i.e. spend zero...... hours of vigorous leisure time physical activity per week. The proportion of physically inactive adolescents was 5.4% in high social class and 7.8% and 10.8%, respectively, in middle and low social class. The absolute social inequality measured as prevalence difference between low and high social class...

  6. Aerobic exercise and cold pressor test induce hypoalgesia in active and inactive men and women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vægter, Henrik Bjarke; Handberg, Gitte; Jørgensen, Maria N.

    2015-01-01

    . It was hypothesized that active subjects had more efficient pain inhibition compared with inactive subjects. DESIGN: A randomized, crossover study with 2 days of data collection. METHODS: Fifty-six (28 females) subjects participated in this study. Subjects were subgrouped into active (n = 30) and inactive (n = 26......). Conditioned pain modulation (CPM) was assessed by cold pressor testing. Exercise-induced hypoalgesia (EIH) was assessed after 15 minutes bicycling at a heart rate corresponding to 75% VO2max. A control session of 15 minutes quiet rest was also included. Pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) were recorded...

  7. Investigation of Synthetic Jets Efficiency to Control Cavity Flotation with Subsonic External Flow by High-Resolution RANS / ILES Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Lyubimov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cavities often found in airplanes: a niche for the landing gear, various weapons, etc. Reducing fluctuations of pressure and temperature in the cavity is a relevant practical problem. The article presents simulation results of external subsonic flow around the cavity (M = 0.85, T = 300K. . Calculations were performed using the high-resolution RANS/ILES (Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes - RANS, Implicit Large Eddy Simulation - ILES method. To control flow the authors propose to use synthetic jets. Synthetic jets are produced by periodic ejection and suction of fluid from a slot induced by the movement of a diaphragm (generator of synthetic jets inside a cavity. They are compact and efficient and do not require a special working body and the ways for its supply. Instead of calculating the flow in the synthetic jet generator was used the modified boundary condition on the wall where the output slots was positioned. Under consideration there were two variants of slots for synthetic jets output: in front of the cavity and inside the cavity on the front wall. The frequency and amplitude values of the synthetic jet specified a mode of each jet. For a jet inside the cavity two modes have been reviewed, namely: 100 Hz and 50m/s, 200Hz and 50m/s. For jet in front of the cavity three modes have been reviewed, specifically: 20Hz and 20m/s, 100Hz and 50m/s, 200Hz and 50m/s. Analysis of calculation results showed that for all modes under examination, the synthetic jets reduced fluctuation of static pressure and temperature on the bottom and back walls of the cavity. The mode with parameters 200Hz, 50 m/s and synthetic jet located in front of the cavity was the most efficient. Furthermore, we compared the results of calculations for two-and three-dimensional cavities, which have the same length and depth. Research has shown that the simplified quasi-two-dimensional calculations cannot be used to evaluate the pressure and temperature fluctuations. This is due to

  8. Physical Inactivity From Adolescence to Young Adulthood: The Relevance of Various Dimensions of Inequality in a Swedish Longitudinal Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Laura; Nermo, Magnus; Östberg, Viveca

    2017-06-01

    As physical inactivity may track from adolescence to adulthood, it is important to identify social determinants of physical inactivity in early life. However, most studies have measured socioeconomic position as one dimension. We examine whether multiple dimensions of socioeconomic position, in addition to other dimensions of inequality (i.e., gender, immigrant background), associate with physical inactivity at two time points in youth. Longitudinal data were drawn from the Swedish Level of Living Survey ( N = 765) and analysed by gender-stratified logistic regression. Among girls, low parental social class (odds ratio [OR] = 2.63, 95% confidence interval [CI; 1.28, 5.42]) and income (OR = 2.28, 95% [CI 1.12, 4.65]) were associated with physical inactivity, while immigrant background (OR = 2.33, 95% CI [1.03, 5.23]) and a low level of parental education (OR = 3.38, 95% CI [1.15, 9.95]) predicted physical inactivity among women. Among boys, low parental income (OR = 3.27, 95% CI [1.39, 7.69]) was associated with physical inactivity, whereas immigrant background (OR = 2.29, 95% CI [1.04, 5.03]) predicted physical inactivity among men. Our results suggest that physical inactivity is socially patterned, but different dimensions of social stratification should not be considered interchangeable as they may operate independently, through intersection with gender, and at different time points in youth in increasing the risk of physical inactivity.

  9. The communities of harvestmen (Opilionida of floodplain forest in the Ranšpurk National Nature Reserve and their fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hana Šejnohová

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available During the years 1993–2001 the monitoring of the soil surface fauna was carried out in a floodplain fo- rest in the Ranšpurk National Nature Reserve (south Moravia. The harvestmen assemblages fluctuation is described in detail in this paper. The method of pitfall traps was used. A total of 3174 individuals of seven harvestmen species were collected. The species composition was very similar to other research results from the southern Moravian floodplain forest. Only the dominance values differ from the values in the other localities. All of the registered species prefer moisture and shadow places. The highest abundance was observed in Astrobunus laevipes (Canestrini, 1872, Nemastoma lugubre (Müller, 1776, Oligolophus tridens (C. L. Koch, 1936 and Rilaena triangularis (Herbst, 1799. The dynamics of harvestmen occurrence during the year had a different development than in other groups of invertebrates. Harvestmen mostly occurred in pitfall traps in autumn and winter months. The highest abundance of harvestmen in traps was observed in December and January. In July 1997, disastrous flood affected all groups of invertebrates. The flood had a minimal impact on the abundance of harvestmen in pitfall traps.

  10. Proactive monitoring of an onshore wind farm through lidar measurements, SCADA data and a data-driven RANS solver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iungo, Giacomo Valerio; Camarri, Simone; Ciri, Umberto; El-Asha, Said; Leonardi, Stefano; Rotea, Mario A.; Santhanagopalan, Vignesh; Viola, Francesco; Zhan, Lu

    2016-11-01

    Site conditions, such as topography and local climate, as well as wind farm layout strongly affect performance of a wind power plant. Therefore, predictions of wake interactions and their effects on power production still remain a great challenge in wind energy. For this study, an onshore wind turbine array was monitored through lidar measurements, SCADA and met-tower data. Power losses due to wake interactions were estimated to be approximately 4% and 2% of the total power production under stable and convective conditions, respectively. This dataset was then leveraged for the calibration of a data driven RANS (DDRANS) solver, which is a compelling tool for prediction of wind turbine wakes and power production. DDRANS is characterized by a computational cost as low as that for engineering wake models, and adequate accuracy achieved through data-driven tuning of the turbulence closure model. DDRANS is based on a parabolic formulation, axisymmetry and boundary layer approximations, which allow achieving low computational costs. The turbulence closure model consists in a mixing length model, which is optimally calibrated with the experimental dataset. Assessment of DDRANS is then performed through lidar and SCADA data for different atmospheric conditions. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under the I/UCRC WindSTAR, NSF Award IIP 1362033.

  11. When Physical Activity Participation Promotes Inactivity: Negative Experiences of Spanish Adolescents in Physical Education and Sport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltran-Carrillo, Vicente J.; Devis-Devis, Jose; Peiro-Velert, Carmen; Brown, David H. K.

    2012-01-01

    This article analyses negative experiences in physical education and sport reported during qualitative interviews of a group of inactive adolescent Spanish boys and girls. The purpose of this analysis is twofold. First and most important, it seeks to give voice to these young people reporting negative experiences and connect them to contexts of…

  12. CONTRIBUTION OF AXIAL MOTOR IMPAIRMENT TO PHYSICAL INACTIVITY IN PARKINSON'S DISEASE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Mon S; Hou, Jyhgong Gabriel; Collins, Robert L; Protas, Elizabeth J

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationships between motor symptoms of Parkinson’s disease (PD) and activity limitations in persons with PD. Design/Methods Cross-sectional study of persons with mild to moderate PD (N=90). Associations among axial motor features, limb motor signs, the Physical Activity Scale for Elders (PASE), the ability to perform Activities of Daily Living (ADL) and level of ADL dependency were studied. A composite score of axial motor features included the following UPDRS items: speech, rigidity of the neck, arising from chair, posture, gait and postural stability. A composite score of limb motor signs included the following UPDRS items: tremor at rest of all extremities, action tremor, rigidity of all extremities, finger taps, hand movement, rapid alternating hand movements and foot tapping. Results Axial motor features of PD were significantly correlated with physical inactivity (pphysical inactivity. After controlling for age, gender, disease duration and comorbidity, axial motor features contributed significantly to physical inactivity, decreased ADL and increase in ADL dependency, whereas the limb motor signs did not. Conclusions Axial motor impairment contributed to physical inactivity and decreased ability to perform ADLs in persons with PD. PMID:26368837

  13. The inactive X chromosome in the human female is enriched in 5 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 82; Issue 1-2. The inactive X chromosome in the human female is enriched in 5-methylcytosine to an unusual degree and appears to contain more of this modified nucleotide than the remainder of the genome. Deepti D. Deobagkar H. Sharat Chandra. Volume 82 Issue 1-2 ...

  14. Peripheral aneurysm rupture in a patient with inactive systemic lupus erythematosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelke, Christoph; Sabharwal, Tarun; Reidy, John F. [Department of Radiology, Guy' s and St. Thomas' Hospital Trust, St. Thomas' Street, London SE1 9RT (United Kingdom); Mohan, Aarthi R. [Department of Chest Medicine, Guy' s and St. Thomas' Hospital Trust, St. Thomas' Street, London SE1 9RT (United Kingdom)

    2002-12-01

    We describe a patient with inactive systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) presenting with sudden haemothorax, due to a ruptured internal mammary artery (IMA) aneurysm 7 years after the corticosteroid treatment was terminated. The unusual imaging findings and the treatment with embolization are discussed with a view to the role of a regular vascular screening in this patient group. (orig.)

  15. 38 CFR 3.375 - Determination of inactivity (complete arrest) in tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... inactivity (complete arrest) in tuberculosis. 3.375 Section 3.375 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief...) in tuberculosis. (a) Pulmonary tuberculosis. A veteran shown to have had pulmonary tuberculosis will...) Nonpulmonary disease. Determination of complete arrest of nonpulmonary tuberculosis requires absence of...

  16. Wheelchair-specific fitness of inactive people with long-term spinal cord injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Scheer, Jan W.; de Groot, Sonja; Tepper, Marga; Gobets, David; Veeger, DirkJan H. E. J.; van der Woude, Lucas H. V.

    Objectives: To describe wheelchair-specific anaerobic work capacity, isometric strength and peak aerobic work capacity of physically inactive people with long-term spinal cord injury using outcomes of tests that are feasible for use in rehabilitation centres, and to determine associations among

  17. Socio-economic environment, area facilities and obesity and physical inactivity among children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva, Rosa; Albaladejo, Romana; Astasio, Paloma; Ortega, Paloma; Santos, Juana; Regidor, Enrique

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate whether the relationship between socio-economic environment and obesity and physical inactivity in children can be explained by household socio-economic position and area facilities. Two indicators of the socio-economic context of neighbourhood of residence based on wealth and deprivation were estimated in a sample of 727 children and adolescents residents in Madrid (Spain). Multilevel logit models were used to calculate the relationship between each indicator and obesity and physical inactivity. After adjusting for household socio-economic position, obesity prevalence was 3.79 times higher among subjects living in deprived areas than among those living in non-deprived areas (CI: 1.95-7.34), and 2.38 higher among subjects living in less wealthy areas than in those living in wealthier areas (CI: 0.85-6.65). Adjustment for the availability of retail shops in subjects' neighbourhood of residence failed to change the magnitude of the association. Neither neighbourhood socio-economic context nor availability of sports facilities was related to physical inactivity. In the city of Madrid, socio-economic context of neighbourhood of residence shows an inverse relationship with obesity but not with physical inactivity among children. The relationship observed with obesity is not explained by the availability of area facilities. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  18. Validity and reliability of a physical activity/inactivity questionnaire in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. We sought to determine the validity and reliability of a self-report physical activity questionnaire (PAQ) measuring physical activity/inactivity in South African schoolgirls of different ethnic origins. Methods. Construct validity of the PAQ was tested against physical activity energy expenditure estimated from an ...

  19. Effect of physical inactivity on major non-communicable diseases worldwide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, I-Min; Shiroma, Eric J; Lobelo, Felipe

    2012-01-01

    Strong evidence shows that physical inactivity increases the risk of many adverse health conditions, including major non-communicable diseases such as coronary heart disease, type 2 diabetes, and breast and colon cancers, and shortens life expectancy. Because much of the world's population is ina...

  20. Recreational physical inactivity and mortality in women with invasive epithelial ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cannioto, Rikki A.; LaMonte, Michael J.; Kelemen, Linda E

    2016-01-01

    Background: Little is known about modifiable behaviours that may be associated with epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) survival. We conducted a pooled analysis of 12 studies from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium to investigate the association between pre-diagnostic physical inactivity and m...

  1. Hypogonadism associated with muscle atrophy, physical inactivity and ESA hyporesponsiveness in men undergoing haemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Cobo

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Hypogonadism is common in our male haemodialysis population and is associated with higher ESA doses, reduced muscle mass and lower physical activity. The link between low testosterone levels and physical inactivity may conceivably relate to reduced muscle mass due to inadequate muscle protein synthesis.

  2. Living near the port area is associated with physical inactivity and sedentary behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evandro Fornias Sperandio

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: The impact of the port of Santos, Brazil, on the population’s health is unknown. We aimed to evaluate the association between living near the port area and physical inactivity and sedentary behavior. DESIGN AND SETTING: Cross-sectional study developed at a university laboratory and a diagnostic clinic. METHODS: 553 healthy adults were selected and their level of physical activity in daily life was assessed using accelerometers. Multiple linear and logistic regressions were performed using physical inactivity and sedentary behavior as the outcomes and living near the port area as the main risk factor, with adjustments for the main confounders. RESULTS: Among all the participants, 15% were resident near the port area. They took 699 steps/day and presented, weekly, 2.4% more sedentary physical activity, 2.0% less time in standing position and 0.9% more time lying down than residents of other regions. Additionally, living near the port area increased the risk of physical inactivity by 2.50 times and the risk of higher amounts of sedentary behavior (≥ 10 hours/day by 1.32 times. CONCLUSION: Living near the port of Santos is associated with physical inactivity and higher sedentary behavior among adults, regardless of confounders. The reasons for this association should be investigated in longitudinal studies.

  3. The cost of policy inaction : the case of not meeting the 2010 biodiversity target

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braat, L.C.; Brink, ten P.; Klok, T.C.

    2008-01-01

    The COPI methodology and valuation database. Change in land use, climate, pollution, water use; change in biodiversity; change in ecosystem functions; change in ecosystem services contributes to change in economic value. The Cost of Policy Inaction (COPI) is described in monitory terms. The outcome

  4. Exploring Socio-Ecological Factors Influencing Active and Inactive Spanish Students in Years 12 and 13

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devís-Devís, José; Beltrán-Carrillo, Vicente J.; Peiró-Velert, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores socio-ecological factors and their interplay that emerge from a qualitative study and influence adolescents' physical activity and sport participation. A total of 13 boys and 7 girls active and inactive adolescents, from years 12 and 13 and different types of school (state and private), participated in semi-structured…

  5. The association of physical inactivity with Type 2 diabetes among different ethnic groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Admiraal, W. M.; van Valkengoed, I. G. M.; L de Munter, J. S.; Stronks, K.; Hoekstra, J. B. L.; Holleman, F.

    2011-01-01

    Diabet. Med. 28, 668-672 (2011) ABSTRACT: Aims  To study differences in the association between physical inactivity and Type 2 diabetes among subjects from different ethnic groups. Methods  We analysed data on 508 Caucasian, 596 African-Surinamese and 339 Hindustani-Surinamese participants, aged

  6. Artist-Teachers' In-Action Mental Models While Teaching Visual Arts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo-Zimet, Gila

    2017-01-01

    Studies have examined the assumption that teachers have previous perceptions, beliefs and knowledge about learning (Cochran-Smith & Villegas, 2015). This study presented the In-Action Mental Model of twenty leading artist-teachers while teaching Visual Arts in three Israeli art institutions of higher Education. Data was collected in two…

  7. Unemployment, Employment and Inactivity in Denmark: An Analysis of Event History Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauzadyté, Agné

    disadvantaged. These give the evidence that the "Flexicurity"model makes the weakest individuals disadvantaged in the Danish labour market. And finally, I find that those, who survived in a job one year, tend to remain employed, while persons, longer than one year inactive, face much higher risk...

  8. Epidemiology of physical inactivity, sedentary behaviors, and unhealthy eating habits among brazilian adolescents: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valter Cordeiro Barbosa Filho

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This systematic review analyzed the prevalence of physical inactivity, sedentary behaviors and unhealthy eating habits among Brazilian adolescents. Searches were conducted in five databases (Lilacs, SciELO, Medline, Web of Science, and Google Scholar and in the references cited in the articles retrieved. The literature search yielded 5,872 potentially relevant titles and a total of 69 studies met all the inclusion criteria. The risk behavior most often evaluated was physical inactivity (48/69; 69.6%, and its prevalence rate ranged from 2.3% to 93.5%. Twenty-eight studies estimated the prevalence of physical inactivity at over 50%. Most studies observed the prevalence of greater physical inactivity among girls. The prevalence of sedentary behaviors (lengthy screen time or TV use was also frequently over 50%. Several variables were used to identify unhealthy eating habits, and some criteria/studies have indicated unhealthy eating habit estimates at close to 100% among adolescents. In conclusion, the estimates of these risk behaviors among Brazilians adolescents were very close to or even greater than those found in developed countries in several studies analyzed in this review.

  9. Social Cognitive Correlates of Physical Activity in Inactive Adults with Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dlugonski, Deirdre; Wojcicki, Thomas R.; McAuley, Edward; Motl, Robert W.

    2011-01-01

    Persons with multiple sclerosis (MS) are often physically inactive. This observation has prompted the search for modifiable constructs derived from established theories that act as correlates of physical activity. This study investigated self efficacy, outcome expectations, impediments, and goal setting as correlates of physical activity in…

  10. Self-Esteem in People with Physical Disabilities: Differences between Active and Inactive Individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nemček Dagmar

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine the status of SE in people with physical disabilities (PwPD and compare SE scores between active and inactive individuals. The sample of PwPD (n = 186 was divided into two groups of those who are regularly participating in sport (active; n = 88 and those who are not participating in any sport in their leisure (inactive; n = 98. The Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES was used as a primary research method. 10-item scale measures global self-worth by measuring positive and negative feelings about the self. Higher scores (from 10 to 40 points indicate higher SE. The Pearson chi-square test was used to determine the differences of 10 RSES items and total scores between active and inactive PwPD. We found that the mean score of RSES in PwPD was 28.83 points; active PwPD observed total score of RSES 30.01 points and group of inactive PwPD showed the lowest SE by achieving 27.76 points. Mean scores comparison of each RSES item between active and inactive PwPD revealed higher SE in the group of active PwPD. Significantly higher SE was presented by 4 from 10 RSES items and by total score in the group of active PwPD. The results of our study confirmed that actively living PwPD have significantly higher SE comparing those PwPD who are living sedentary life style.

  11. [Physical inactivity and anthropometric measures in school children from Paranavaí, Paraná, Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilherme, Flávio Ricardo; Molena-Fernandes, Carlos Alexandre; Guilherme, Vânia Renata; Fávero, Maria Teresa Martins; dos Reis, Eliane Josefa Barbosa; Rinaldi, Wilson

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the association between physical inactivity and anthropometric measurements in school children from Paranavaí-Paraná, Brazil. Cross-sectional survey, conducted in July and August 2013. Sample of 566 students (287 boys and 278 girls) from 6th to 9th grade aged 10 to 14 years of public and private schools from Paranavaí-PR, Southern Brazil. The variables analyzed were: time of weekly physical activity by a questionnaire (physical inactivity <300 minutes/week), body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC). In the statistical analysis the U Mann-Whitney and Student t test were used for comparison between genders. To identify factors associated with insufficient levels of physical activity, univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis was applied and expressed in Odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI). There was an association between physical inactivity and anthropometric measurements for BMI (p<0.001) and WC (p<0.001), with a prevalence rate of 56.1% and 52.7% of inactive adolescents, respectively. In the multivariate analysis, there was significant association of physical inactivity and overweight (OR 1.8, 95%CI: 1.1-3.0) and with increased waist circumference (OR 2.8, 95%CI: 1.4-3.8). Inadequate levels of physical activity is a determining factor for overweight and abdominal adiposity. Accordingly, preventive measures should be taken, especially in schools, emphasizing the importance of exercise in the control of body composition and reduction of weight. Copyright © 2014 Associação de Pediatria de São Paulo. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  12. Variants of human thymidylate synthase with loop 181-197 stabilized in the inactive conformation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lovelace, Leslie L.; Johnson, Saphronia R.; Gibson, Lydia M.; Bell, Brittnaie J.; Berger, Sondra H.; Lebioda, Lukasz; (SC)

    2009-08-31

    Loop 181-197 of human thymidylate synthase (hTS) populates two major conformations, essentially corresponding to the loop flipped by 180{sup o}. In one of the conformations, the catalytic Cys195 residue lies distant from the active site making the enzyme inactive. Ligands stabilizing this inactive conformation may function as allosteric inhibitors. To facilitate the search for such inhibitors, we have expressed and characterized several mutants designed to shift the equilibrium toward the inactive conformer. In most cases, the catalytic efficiency of the mutants was only somewhat impaired with values of k{sub cat}/K{sub m} reduced by factors in a 2-12 range. One of the mutants, M190K, is however unique in having the value of k{sub cat}/K{sub m} smaller by a factor of {approx}7500 than the wild type. The crystal structure of this mutant is similar to that of the wt hTS with loop 181-197 in the inactive conformation. However, the direct vicinity of the mutation, residues 188-194 of this loop, assumes a different conformation with the positions of C{sub {alpha}} shifted up to 7.2 {angstrom}. This affects region 116-128, which became ordered in M190K while it is disordered in wt. The conformation of 116-128 is however different than that observed in hTS in the active conformation. The side chain of Lys190 does not form contacts and is in solvent region. The very low activity of M190K as compared to another mutant with a charged residue in this position, M190E, suggests that the protein is trapped in an inactive state that does not equilibrate easily with the active conformer.

  13. Trends in social inequality in physical inactivity among Danish adolescents 1991–2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.F. Johnsen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate social inequality in physical inactivity among adolescents from 1991 to 2014 and to describe any changes in inequality during this period. The analyses were based on data from the Danish part of the HBSC study, which consists of seven comparable cross-sectional studies of nationally representative samples of 11–15-year old adolescents. The available data consisted of weekly time (hours spent on vigorous physical activity and parental occupation from 30,974 participants. In summary, 8.0% of the adolescents reported to be physically inactive, i.e. spend zero hours of vigorous leisure time physical activity per week. The proportion of physically inactive adolescents was 5.4% in high social class and 7.8% and 10.8%, respectively, in middle and low social class. The absolute social inequality measured as prevalence difference between low and high social class did not change systematically across the observation period from 1991 to 2014. Compared to high social class, OR (95% CI for physical inactivity was 1.48 (1.32–1.65 in middle social class and 2.18 (1.92–2.47 in lower social class. This relative social inequality was similar in the seven data collection waves (p=0.971. Although the gap in physical inactivity between social classes does not seem to be widening in Danish adolescents, there are still considerable differences in the activity levels between high, middle and low social class adolescents. Consequently, there is a need for a targeted physical activity intervention among adolescents from low (and middle social class.

  14. Inactive Mineral Filler as a Stiffness Modulus Regulator in Foamed Bitumen-Modified Recycled Base Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buczyński, Przemyslaw; Iwański, Marek

    2017-10-01

    The article presents the results of a cold recycled mix test with a foam bitumen including the addition of the inactive mineral filler as a dust of basalt. Basalt dust was derived from dedusting system by extraction of aggregates in the mine. Assessment of the impact of a basalt dust on the properties of a recycled base layer was carried out in terms of the amount of mineral filler (basalt) in the composition of the mineral mixture. This experiment involved a dosing of mineral filler in range from 5 to 20% with steps of 7.5% in the mineral mixture composition. The foamed bitumen was performed at optimum foaming process settings (ie. bitumen temperature, air pressure) and at 2.5% of the water content. The amount of a hydraulic binder as a Portland cement was 2.0%. The evaluation of rheological properties allowed to determine whether the addition of inactive mineral fillers can act as a stiffness modulus controller in the recycled base layer. The analysis of the rheological properties of a recycled base layer in terms of the amount of inactive fillers was performed in accordance with given standard EN 12697-26 Annex D. The study was carried out according to the direct tension-compression test methodology on cylindrical samples. The sample was subjected to the oscillatory sinusoidal strain ε0 allow to conclude that the use of an inactive filler can reduce the stiffness of an appropriate designed mixes of the cold recycled foundation. In addition, the analysis of the relation E‧-E″ showed a similar behaviour of a recycled base, regardless of the amount of inactive fillers in the mix composition, at high temperatures/high frequency of induced load.

  15. Origin of the nucleus and Ran-dependent transport to safeguard ribosome biogenesis in a chimeric cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jékely Gáspár

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The origin of the nucleus is a central problem about the origin of eukaryotes. The common ancestry of nuclear pore complexes (NPC and vesicle coating complexes indicates that the nucleus evolved via the modification of a pre-existing endomembrane system. Such an autogenous scenario is cell biologically feasible, but it is not clear what were the selective or neutral mechanisms that had led to the origin of the nuclear compartment. Results A key selective force during the autogenous origin of the nucleus could have been the need to segregate ribosome factories from the cytoplasm where ribosomal proteins (RPs of the protomitochondrium were synthesized. After its uptake by an anuclear cell the protomitochondrium transferred several of its RP genes to the host genome. Alphaproteobacterial RPs and archaebacterial-type host ribosomes were consequently synthesized in the same cytoplasm. This could have led to the formation of chimeric ribosomes. I propose that the nucleus evolved when the host cell compartmentalised its ribosome factories and the tightly linked genome to reduce ribosome chimerism. This was achieved in successive stages by first evolving karyopherin and RanGTP dependent chaperoning of RPs, followed by the evolution of a membrane network to serve as a diffusion barrier, and finally a hydrogel sieve to ensure selective permeability at nuclear pores. Computer simulations show that a gradual segregation of cytoplasm and nucleoplasm via these steps can progressively reduce ribosome chimerism. Conclusion Ribosome chimerism can provide a direct link between the selective forces for and the mechanisms of evolving nuclear transport and compartmentalisation. The detailed molecular scenario presented here provides a solution to the gradual evolution of nuclear compartmentalization from an anuclear stage. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Eugene V Koonin, Martijn Huynen, Anthony M. Poole and Patrick Forterre.

  16. Proactive monitoring of a wind turbine array with lidar measurements, SCADA data and a data-driven RANS solver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iungo, G.; Said, E. A.; Santhanagopalan, V.; Zhan, L.

    2016-12-01

    Power production of a wind farm and durability of wind turbines are strongly dependent on non-linear wake interactions occurring within a turbine array. Wake dynamics are highly affected by the specific site conditions, such as topography and local atmospheric conditions. Furthermore, contingencies through the life of a wind farm, such as turbine ageing and off-design operations, make prediction of wake interactions and power performance a great challenge in wind energy. In this work, operations of an onshore wind turbine array were monitored through lidar measurements, SCADA and met-tower data. The atmospheric wind field investing the wind farm was estimated by using synergistically the available data through five different methods, which are characterized by different confidence levels. By combining SCADA data and the lidar measurements, it was possible to estimate power losses connected with wake interactions. For this specific array, power losses were estimated to be 4% and 2% of the total power production for stable and convective atmospheric regimes, respectively. The entire dataset was then leveraged for the calibration of a data-driven RANS (DDRANS) solver for prediction of wind turbine wakes and power production. The DDRANS is based on a parabolic formulation of the Navier-Stokes equations with axisymmetry and boundary layer approximations, which allow achieving very low computational costs. Accuracy in prediction of wind turbine wakes and power production is achieved through an optimal tuning of the turbulence closure model. The latter is based on a mixing length model, which was developed based on previous wind turbine wake studies carried out through large eddy simulations and wind tunnel experiments. Several operative conditions of the wind farm under examination were reproduced through DDRANS for different stability regimes, wind directions and wind velocity. The results show that DDRANS is capable of achieving a good level of accuracy in prediction

  17. Patterns and Determinants of Physical Inactivity in Rural and Urban Areas in Peru: A Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, J Jaime; Carrillo-Larco, Rodrigo M; Gilman, Robert H; Avilez, Jose L; Smeeth, Liam; Checkley, William; Bernabe-Ortiz, Antonio

    2016-06-01

    Physical inactivity and sedentary behaviors have been linked with impaired health outcomes. Establishing the physical inactivity profiles of a given population is needed to establish program targets and to contribute to international monitoring efforts. We report the prevalence of, and explore sociodemographical and built environment factors associated with physical inactivity in 4 resource-limited settings in Peru: rural Puno, urban Puno, Pampas de San Juan de Miraflores (urban), and Tumbes (semiurban). Cross-sectional analysis of the CRONICAS Cohort Study's baseline assessment. Outcomes of interest were physical inactivity of leisure time (physical activity (not reporting walking or cycling trips) domains of the IPAQ, as well as watching TV, as a proxy of sedentarism (≥2 hours per day). Exposures included demographic factors and perceptions about neighborhood's safety. Associations were explored using Poisson regression models with robust standard errors. Prevalence ratios (PR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) are presented. Data from 3593 individuals were included: 48.5% males, mean age 55.1 (SD: 12.7) years. Physical inactivity was present at rates of 93.7% (95% CI 93.0%-94.5%) and 9.3% (95% CI 8.3%-10.2%) within the leisure time and transport domains, respectively. In addition, 41.7% (95% CI 40.1%-43.3%) of participants reported watching TV for more than 2 hours per day. Rates varied according to study settings (P time physical inactivity relative to highly urban Lima. The pattern was different for transport-related physical inactivity: both Puno sites had around 75% to 50% lower prevalence of physical inactivity. Too much traffic was associated with higher levels of transport-related physical inactivity (PR = 1.24; 95% CI 1.01-1.54). Our study showed high levels of inactivity and marked contrasting patterns by rural/urban sites. These findings highlight the need to generate synergies to expand nationwide physical activity surveillance systems.

  18. Analysis of multiuser mixed RF/FSO relay networks for performance improvements in Cloud Computing-Based Radio Access Networks (CC-RANs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimi, Isiaka A.; Monteiro, Paulo P.; Teixeira, António L.

    2017-11-01

    The key paths toward the fifth generation (5G) network requirements are towards centralized processing and small-cell densification systems that are implemented on the cloud computing-based radio access networks (CC-RANs). The increasing recognitions of the CC-RANs can be attributed to their valuable features regarding system performance optimization and cost-effectiveness. Nevertheless, realization of the stringent requirements of the fronthaul that connects the network elements is highly demanding. In this paper, considering the small-cell network architectures, we present multiuser mixed radio-frequency/free-space optical (RF/FSO) relay networks as feasible technologies for the alleviation of the stringent requirements in the CC-RANs. In this study, we use the end-to-end (e2e) outage probability, average symbol error probability (ASEP), and ergodic channel capacity as the performance metrics in our analysis. Simulation results show the suitability of deployment of mixed RF/FSO schemes in the real-life scenarios.

  19. Numerical investigation of the vortex-induced vibration of an elastically mounted circular cylinder at high Reynolds number (Re = 104 and low mass ratio using the RANS code.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niaz Bahadur Khan

    Full Text Available This study numerically investigates the vortex-induced vibration (VIV of an elastically mounted rigid cylinder by using Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS equations with computational fluid dynamic (CFD tools. CFD analysis is performed for a fixed-cylinder case with Reynolds number (Re = 104 and for a cylinder that is free to oscillate in the transverse direction and possesses a low mass-damping ratio and Re = 104. Previously, similar studies have been performed with 3-dimensional and comparatively expensive turbulent models. In the current study, the capability and accuracy of the RANS model are validated, and the results of this model are compared with those of detached eddy simulation, direct numerical simulation, and large eddy simulation models. All three response branches and the maximum amplitude are well captured. The 2-dimensional case with the RANS shear-stress transport k-w model, which involves minimal computational cost, is reliable and appropriate for analyzing the characteristics of VIV.

  20. The burden of abdominal obesity with physical inactivity on health expenditure in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamile S. Codogno

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to analyze the association between the clustering of physical inactivity with abdominal obesity and public health care expenditure in Brazilian adults. The sample was composed of 963 patients of both genders, randomly selected in the Brazilian Public Health care System during 2010. Entire health care expenditures during the last year were computed and stratified into: medical consultations, medication dispensing, laboratory tests and overall expenditure. Waist circumference was used to diagnose abdominal obesity and physical activity was assessed by previously validated questionnaire. Sedentary and abdominally obese patients (OR= 3.01 [OR95%CI= 1.81-4.99] had higher likelihood be inserted in the group of higher expenditures than only abdominally obese patients (OR= 1.66 [OR95%CI= 1.07-2.59]. There is a synergic effect between abdominal obesity and physical inactivity on overall health care expenditures.

  1. The effects of exergaming on physical activity among inactive children in a physical education classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Victoria A; Miltenberger, Raymond G; Graves, Rachel; Koehler, Shannon

    2010-01-01

    Childhood obesity, which is due in part to lack of physical activity, is a serious concern that requires the attention of the behavioral community. Although excessive video game play has been noted in the literature as a contributor to childhood obesity, newer video gaming technology, called exergaming, has been designed to capitalize on the reinforcing effects of video games to increase physical activity in children. This study evaluated the effects of exergaming on physical activity among 4 inactive children in a physical education (PE) classroom. Results showed that exergaming produced substantially more minutes of physical activity and more minutes of opportunity to engage in physical activity than did the standard PE program. In addition, exergaming was socially acceptable to both the students and the PE teacher. Exergaming appears to hold promise as a method for increasing physical activity among inactive children and might be a possible intervention for childhood obesity.

  2. Revegetation and rock cover for stabilization of inactive uranium mill tailings disposal sites. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beedlow, P.A.

    1984-05-01

    Guidelines for using vegetation and rock to protect inactive uranium mill tailings from erosion were developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory as part of the Department of Energy's Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP) Technology Development program. Information on soils, climate, and vegetation were collected for 20 inactive tailings sites in the western United States. Sites were grouped according to similarities in climate and vegetation. Soil loss for those sites was characterized using the Universal Soil Loss Equation. Test plots were used to evaluate (1) the interaction between vegetation and sealant barrier systems and (2) the effects of surface rock on soil water and vegetation. Lysimeter and simulation studies were used to direct and support field experiments. 49 references, 17 figures, 16 tables.

  3. Impairments in age-dependent ubiquitin proteostasis and structural integrity of selective neurons by uncoupling Ran GTPase from the Ran-binding domain 3 of Ranbp2 and identification of novel mitochondrial isoforms of ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2I (ubc9) and Ranbp2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Hemangi; Yoon, Dosuk; Bhowmick, Reshma; Cai, Yunfei; Cho, Kyoung-In; Ferreira, Paulo A

    2017-09-06

    The Ran-binding protein 2 (Ranbp2/Nup358) is a cytoplasmic and peripheral nucleoporin comprised of 4 Ran-GTP-binding domains (RBDs) that are interspersed among diverse structural domains with multifunctional activities. Our prior studies found that the RBD2 and RBD3 of Ranbp2 control mitochondrial motility independently of Ran-GTP-binding in cultured cells, whereas loss of Ran-GTP-binding to RBD2 and RBD3 are essential to support cone photoreceptor development and the survival of mature retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) in mice. Here, we uncover that loss of Ran-GTP-binding to RBD3 alone promotes the robust age-dependent increase of ubiquitylated substrates and S1 subunit (Pmsd1) of the 19S cap of the proteasome in the retina and RPE and that such loss in RBD3 also compromises the structural integrity of the outer segment compartment of cone photoreceptors only and without affecting the viability of these neurons. We also found that the E2-ligase and partner of Ranbp2, ubc9, is localized prominently in the mitochondrial-rich ellipsoid compartment of photoreceptors, where Ranbp2 is also known to localize with and modulate the activity of mitochondrial proteins. However, the natures of Ranbp2 and ubc9 isoforms to the mitochondria are heretofore elusive. Subcellular fractionation, co-immunolocalization and immunoaffinity purification of Ranbp2 complexes show that novel isoforms of Ranbp2 and ubc9 with molecular masses distinct from the large Ranbp2 and unmodified ubc9 isoforms localize specifically to the mitochondrial fraction or associate with mitochondrial components, whereas unmodified and SUMOylated Ran GTPase are excluded from the mitochondrial fraction. Further, liposome-mediated intracellular delivery of an antibody against a domain shared by the mitochondrial and nuclear pore isoforms of Ranbp2 causes the profound fragmentation of mitochondria and their delocalization from Ranbp2 and without affecting Ranbp2 localization at the nuclear pores. Collectively, the

  4. Explaining Labour Market Inactivity in Migrant-Sending Families: Housework, Hammock, or Higher Education

    OpenAIRE

    Görlich, Dennis; Omar Mahmoud, Toman; Trebesch, Christoph

    2007-01-01

    This article presents a new perspective on the impact of migration and remittances on labour market participation and time allocation in migrant-sending families. Departing from the common finding that labour market participation is lower in migrant households, we investigate whether the reasons for inactivity, i.e. leisure consumption, home production and higher education are affected by migration. Based on household survey data from Moldova, our results challenge the assertion that those wh...

  5. The use of periodization in exercise prescriptions for inactive adults: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelley Strohacker

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Although it is premature to conclude that periodized exercise is superior to non-periodized exercise for improving health outcomes, periodization appears to be a feasible means of prescribing exercise to inactive adults within an intervention setting. Further research is necessary to understand the effectiveness of periodizing aerobic exercise, the psychological effects of periodization, and the feasibility of implementing flexible non-linear methods.

  6. School social fragmentation, economic deprivation and social cohesion and adolescent physical inactivity: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabayo, Roman; Janosz, Michel; Bisset, Sherri; Kawachi, Ichiro

    2014-01-01

    To examine the independent influence of school economic deprivation, social fragmentation, and social cohesion on the likelihood of participating in no physical activity among students. Data are from a large-scale longitudinal study of schools based in disadvantaged communities in Quebec, Canada. Questionnaires were administered every year between 2002 and 2008 among n = 14,924 students aged 12 to 18 from a sample of 70 schools. Cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses were conducted. Multilevel modeling was utilized to account for the clustering of students within schools. Schools were categorized as being low, moderate or high economic deprivation, social fragmentation and social cohesion. Those who indicated that they do no participate in any physical activity during the week were identified as being physically inactive. In baseline multilevel cross-sectional analyses, adolescents attending schools in the highest (compared to the lowest) levels of socioeconomic deprivation and social fragmentation were more likely to be physically inactive (OR = 1.33, 95% CI = 1.03, 1.72; and OR = 1.24, 95% CI = 0.98, 1.56, respectively). Conversely, students attending schools with the highest cohesion were less likely to be physically inactive (OR = 0.78, 95% CI = 0.61, 0.99). In longitudinal analysis, physically active students who attended schools with the highest social fragmentation were more likely to become physically inactive over two years (OR = 1.65, 95% CI = 1.09, 2.51). The school socioeconomic environment appears to be an important contextual influence on participation in no physical activity among adolescents. Following adolescents beyond two years is necessary to determine if these environments have a lasting effect on physical activity behavior.

  7. Hip, thigh and calf muscle atrophy and bone loss after 5-week bedrest inactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Hans E; Eiken, Ola; Miklavcic, Lucijan; Mekjavic, Igor B

    2007-02-01

    Unloaded inactivity induces atrophy and functional deconditioning of skeletal muscle, especially in the lower extremities. Information is scarce, however, regarding the effect of unloaded inactivity on muscle size and function about the hip. Regional bone loss has been demonstrated in hips and knees of elderly orthopaedic patients, as quantified by computerized tomography (CT). This method remains to be validated in healthy individuals rendered inactive, including real or simulated weightlessness. In this study, ten healthy males were subjected to 5 weeks of experimental bedrest and five matched individuals served as ambulatory controls. Maximum voluntary isometric hip and knee extension force were measured using the strain gauge technique. Cross-sectional area (CSA) of hip, thigh and calf muscles, and radiological density (RD) of the proximal tibial bone were measured using CT. Bedrest decreased (P muscle strength by 20 (8)% in knee extension, and by 22 (12)% in hip extension. Bedrest induced atrophy (P muscles in the gluteal region, thigh and calf, ranging from 2 to 12%. Atrophy was more pronounced in the knee extensors [9 (4)%] and ankle plantar flexors [12 (3)%] than in the gluteal extensor muscles [2 (2)%]. Bone density of the proximal tibia decreased (P muscle or bone indices (P > 0.05), when examined at similar time intervals. The present findings of a substantial loss in hip extensor strength and a smaller, yet significant atrophy of these muscles, demonstrate that hip muscle deconditioning accompanies losses in thigh and calf muscle mass after bedrest. This suggests that comprehensive quantitative studies on impaired locomotor function after inactivity should include all joints of the lower extremity. Our results also demonstrate that a decreased RD, indicating bone mineral loss, can be shown already after 5 weeks of unloaded bedrest, using a standard CT technique.

  8. Muscle oxygenation profiles between active and inactive muscles with nitrate supplementation under hypoxic exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiuchi, Masahiro; Endo, Junko; Dobashi, Shohei; Handa, Yoko; Kiuchi, Masataka; Koyama, Katsuhiro

    2017-11-01

    Whether dietary nitrate supplementation improves exercise performance or not is still controversial. While redistribution of sufficient oxygen from inactive to active muscles is essential for optimal exercise performance, no study investigated the effects of nitrate supplementation on muscle oxygenation profiles between active and inactive muscles. Nine healthy males performed 25 min of submaximal (heart rate ~140 bpm; EXsub) and incremental cycling (EXmax) until exhaustion under three conditions: (A) normoxia without drink; (B) hypoxia (FiO2 = 13.95%) with placebo (PL); and (c) hypoxia with beetroot juice (BR). PL and BR were provided for 4 days. Oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin (HbO2 and HHb) were measured in vastus lateralis (active) and biceps brachii (inactive) muscles, and the oxygen saturation of skeletal muscle (StO2; HbO2/total Hb) were calculated. During EXsub, BR suppressed the HHb increases in active muscles during the last 5 min of exercise. During EXmax, time to exhaustion with BR (513 ± 24 sec) was significantly longer than with PL (490 ± 39 sec, P muscles, BR suppressed the HHb increases at moderate work rates during EXmax compared to PL (P muscles during EXmax Collectively, these findings indicate that short-term dietary nitrate supplementation improved hypoxic exercise tolerance, perhaps, due to suppressed increases in HHb in active muscles at moderate work rates. Moreover, nitrate supplementation caused greater reductions in oxygenation in inactive muscle at higher work rates during hypoxic exercise. © 2017 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  9. Screen time by different devices in adolescents: association with physical inactivity domains and eating habits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delfino, Leandro D; Dos Santos Silva, Diego A; Tebar, William R; Zanuto, Edner F; Codogno, Jamile S; Fernandes, Rômulo A; Christofaro, Diego G

    2017-04-28

    Sedentary behaviors in adolescents are associated with using screen devices, analyzed as the total daily time in television viewing, using the computer and video game. However, an independent and clustered analysis of devices allows greater understanding of associations with physical inactivity domains and eating habits in adolescents. Sample of adolescents aged 10-17 years (n=1011) from public and private schools, randomly selected. The use of screen devices was measured by hours per week spent in each device: TV, computer, videogames and mobile phone/tablet. Physical inactivity domains (school, leisure and sports), eating habits (weekly food consumption frequency) and socioeconomic status were assessed by questionnaire. The prevalence of high use of mobile phone/tablet was 70% among adolescents, 63% showed high use of TV or computer and 24% related high use of videogames. High use of videogames was greater among boys and high use of mobile phone/tablet was higher among girls. Significant associations of high use of TV [OR= 1.43 (95% CI=1.04-1.99)], computer [OR= 1.44 (95% CI=1.03-2.02)], videogames [OR= 1.65 (95% CI=1.13-2.69)] and consumption of snacks were observed. High use of computer was associated with fried foods consumption [OR= 1.32 (95% CI=1.01-1.75)] and physical inactivity [OR= 1.41 (95% CI=1.03-1.95)]. Mobile phone was associated with consumption of sweets [OR= 1.33 (95% CI=1.00-1.80)]. Cluster using screen devices showed associations with high consumption of snacks, fried foods and sweets, even after controlling for confounding variables. The high use of screen devices was associated with high consumption of snacks, fried foods, sweets and physical inactivity in adolescents.

  10. Mouse Plantar Flexor Muscle Size and Strength After Inactivity and Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    suspension. Keywords: eccentric contraction , microgravity , exercise . SPACEFLIGHT CAUSES atrophy and strength loss in antigravity skeletal muscles ...RB. Mouse plantar fl exor muscle size and strength after inactivity and training. Aviat Space Environ Med 2010; 81: 632 – 8 . Introduction: Losses...in muscle mass and strength may affect an astronaut’s safety; therefore, it is of utmost importance to optimize countermeasures to minimize atrophy

  11. The burden of abdominal obesity with physical inactivity on health expenditure in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Codogno, Jamile S. [UNESP; Turi,Bruna C.; Sarti,Flávia M.; Fernandes, Rômulo A; Monteiro, Henrique L.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the association between the clustering of physical inactivity with abdominal obesity and public health care expenditure in Brazilian adults. The sample was composed of 963 patients of both genders, randomly selected in the Brazilian Public Health care System during 2010. Entire health care expenditures during the last year were computed and stratified into: medical consultations, medication dispensing, laboratory tests and overall expenditure. Waist ci...

  12. Physical exercise minimizes the toxic triad for cancer: Physical inactivity, low fitness, and obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Morales Rojas, Javier Salvador; Lucía Mulas, Alejandro; Pareja Galeano, Helios

    2016-01-01

    The so-called toxic triad of factors linked to cancer, namely obesity, poor cardiorespiratory fitness and physical inactivity, increase the risk of cancer and, when cancer is present, worsen its prognosis. Thus, obesity and a sedentary lifestyle have been linked to an elevated cancer risk whereas regular physical exercise and good cardiorespiratory function (CRF) diminish this risk. Despite genetic risk factors, there is evidence to show that some lifestyle modifications are capable of reduci...

  13. LLAMA: nuclear stellar properties of Swift-BAT AGN and matched inactive galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ming-Yi; Davies, R. I.; Hicks, E. K. S.; Burtscher, L.; Contursi, A.; Genzel, R.; Koss, M.; Lutz, D.; Maciejewski, W.; Müller-Sánchez, F.; Orban de Xivry, G.; Ricci, C.; Riffel, R.; Riffel, R. A.; Rosario, D.; Schartmann, M.; Schnorr-Müller, A.; Shimizu, T.; Sternberg, A.; Sturm, E.; Storchi-Bergmann, T.; Tacconi, L.; Veilleux, S.

    2018-02-01

    In a complete sample of local 14-195 keV selected active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and inactive galaxies, matched by their host galaxy properties, we study the spatially resolved stellar kinematics and luminosity distributions at near-infrared wavelengths on scales of 10-150 pc, using SINFONI on the VLT. In this paper, we present the first half of the sample, which comprises 13 galaxies, eight AGNs and five inactive galaxies. The stellar velocity fields show a disc-like rotating pattern, for which the kinematic position angle is in agreement with the photometric position angle obtained from large scale images. For this set of galaxies, the stellar surface brightness of the inactive galaxy sample is generally comparable to the matched sample of AGN, but extends to lower surface brightness. After removal of the bulge contribution, we find a nuclear stellar light excess with an extended nuclear disc structure, which exhibits a size-luminosity relation. While we expect the excess luminosity to be associated with a dynamically cooler young stellar population, we do not typically see a matching drop in dispersion. This may be because these galaxies have pseudo-bulges in which the intrinsic dispersion increases towards the centre. And although the young stars may have an impact in the observed kinematics, their fraction is too small to dominate over the bulge and compensate the increase in dispersion at small radii, so no dispersion drop is seen. Finally, we find no evidence for a difference in the stellar kinematics and nuclear stellar luminosity excess between these active and inactive galaxies.

  14. CHANGES IN MENTAL HEALTH AND SATISFACTION WITH LIFE DURING PHYSICAL INACTIVITY INDUCED BY BED REST EXPERIMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tjaša Dimec Časar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Simulated weightlessness by bed rest model represents an important method to study the consequences of physical inactivity and sedentarism on the human body. The purpose of the study was to examine the effects of prolonged physical inactivity on psychological distress, depressive symptoms and satisfaction with life of healthy male adults. Participants were ten volunteers, aged between 21 and 28 years who were subjected to a 35-day head-down bed rest. Psychological state of the participants was measured with the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12, the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D, and the Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS. Participants completed psychological inventories before, during and after the experiment. The results revealed no significant differences in mental health and satisfaction with life of participants following the head-down bed rest, however there was a tendency towards an increase in neurotic and depressive symptoms at the end of the experiment. The obtained results are interpreted in the light of stimulative living conditions in which the experiment was carried out, as well as the amount and quality of social interactions during the period of extended physical inactivity.

  15. Inactive and active states and supramolecular organization of GPCRs: insights from computational modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanelli, Francesca; De Benedetti, Pier G.

    2006-08-01

    Herein we make an overview of the results of our computational experiments aimed at gaining insight into the molecular mechanisms of GPCR functioning either in their normal conditions or when hit by gain-of-function or loss-of-function mutations. Molecular simulations of a number of GPCRs in their wild type and mutated as well as free and ligand-bound forms were instrumental in inferring the structural features, which differentiate the mutation- and ligand-induced active from the inactive states. These features essentially reside in the interaction pattern of the E/DRY arginine and in the degree of solvent exposure of selected cytosolic domains. Indeed, the active states differ from the inactive ones in the weakening of the interactions made by the highly conserved arginine and in the increase in solvent accessibility of the cytosolic interface between helices 3 and 6. Where possible, the structural hallmarks of the active and inactive receptor states are translated into molecular descriptors useful for in silico functional screening of novel receptor mutants or ligands. Computational modeling of the supramolecular organization of GPCRs and their intracellular partners is the current challenge toward a deep understanding of their functioning mechanisms.

  16. Estimation of cancer incidence and mortality attributable to overweight, obesity, and physical inactivity in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ding; Zheng, Wei; Wang, Shao-Ming; Wang, Jian-Bing; Wei, Wen-Qiang; Liang, Hao; Qiao, You-Lin; Boffetta, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    The objective was to provide an evidence-based, systematic assessment of the burden of cancer due to overweight/obesity and physical inactivity in China. This study evaluated the proportion of cancers of colon, rectum, pancreas, breast (postmenopausal), endometrium, and kidney attributable to overweight [30 kg/m(2) > body mass index (BMI) ≥ 25 kg/m(2))/obesity (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2)) and physical inactivity in China in 2005. Data of prevalence of overweight/obesity and lack of physical activity were derived from cross-sectional surveys among representative samples of Chinese population, and data of relative risks on cancers were derived from meta-analyses or large-scale studies from China and East Asian populations. The attributable fractions were calculated by combining both data of prevalence and relative risks. In China in 2005, 0.32% of cancer deaths and 0.65% of cancer cases were attributable to overweight and obesity combined. Lack of physical activity was responsible for 0.27% of cancer deaths and 0.39% of cancer cases. Future projections indicate that the contribution of overweight and obesity to the overall cancer burden will increase in the next decades. The largest increased attributable fractions will be for endometrial cancer. The increase in attributable fractions would be greater in men and in rural populations. Although the current burden of cancer associated with overweight/obesity and physical inactivity is still relatively small in China, it is expected to increase in the future.

  17. Body Fat Percentage in Active and Inactive Students Using Anthropometric Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Ghane

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Complications of obesity and high fat in children are grave now and future. The aim of this research is comparing percentage of body fat in active and inactive girls using Anthropometric Parameters.Materials and Methods: This research is descriptive- correlation that 144 active(n= 70 and inactive(n= 74 girls aged 8 to 10 years old were selected by random cluster sampling method and studied the relationship between percentage of body fat and Anthropometric Parameters and Result analyzed by SPSS-18 software. data was analyzed by descriptive statistics and inferential statistics for example pearson correlation coefficient to investigate the relationship between composition variables . Confidence level for all tests was considered 95% . Results: The mean age of the subjects in this study were 8 to 10 years .Result indicated BMI from anthropometric indexes had significant recipe with percentage of body fat in both of groups and waist circumference to hip ratio (WHR was significant only in inactive group (p ≤ 0.05.Conclusion: Results of this research indicated percentage of fat influenced by level of activity.

  18. Inactive vaccine derived from velogenic strain of local Newcastle disease virus .

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darminto

    1996-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research is to evaluate an application of an inactive Newcastle disease (ND vaccine derived from velogenic strain of local Newcastle disease virus (NDV. In this research . the Ira strain of velogenic ND virus was grown in specific pathogen free (SPF eggs and then was inactivated by formalin at a final concentration of 1 :1,000 at 4°C. The inactive antigen was then emulsified with an oil adjuvant or aluminium hydroxide gel before being administered for vaccination in layers and compared to a commercial inactive ND vaccine . Results indicated that application of these inactivated ND vaccines for booster vaccination following vaccination with an active lentogenic ND virus in pullets nearly producing eggs, resulted in high antibody titre which persisted for considerable long period of time and capable of protecting layers from sick of ND and from reducing egg production . Hence, it could be concluded that the inactivated vaccine emulsified in either oil-adjuvant (lanolin-paraffin or aluminium hydroxide gel were considered to be highly immunogenic and capable of protecting layers from sick of ND and from reducing egg production

  19. A mononuclear non-heme manganese(IV)-oxo complex binding redox-inactive metal ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Junying; Lee, Yong-Min; Davis, Katherine M; Wu, Xiujuan; Seo, Mi Sook; Cho, Kyung-Bin; Yoon, Heejung; Park, Young Jun; Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Pushkar, Yulia N; Nam, Wonwoo

    2013-05-01

    Redox-inactive metal ions play pivotal roles in regulating the reactivities of high-valent metal-oxo species in a variety of enzymatic and chemical reactions. A mononuclear non-heme Mn(IV)-oxo complex bearing a pentadentate N5 ligand has been synthesized and used in the synthesis of a Mn(IV)-oxo complex binding scandium ions. The Mn(IV)-oxo complexes were characterized with various spectroscopic methods. The reactivities of the Mn(IV)-oxo complex are markedly influenced by binding of Sc(3+) ions in oxidation reactions, such as a ~2200-fold increase in the rate of oxidation of thioanisole (i.e., oxygen atom transfer) but a ~180-fold decrease in the rate of C-H bond activation of 1,4-cyclohexadiene (i.e., hydrogen atom transfer). The present results provide the first example of a non-heme Mn(IV)-oxo complex binding redox-inactive metal ions that shows a contrasting effect of the redox-inactive metal ions on the reactivities of metal-oxo species in the oxygen atom transfer and hydrogen atom transfer reactions.

  20. Effects of exercise and inactivity on intravascular volume and cardiovascular control mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Convertino, Victor A.

    Exercise, inactivity and confinement have been used as effective tools to assess the contributions of vascular volume and baroreflexes to orthostatic hypotension associated with exposure to microgravity. Prolonged exposure to bedrest, physical inactivity, or wheelchair confinement removes baroreceptor unloading caused by regular upright standing and induces attenuation of cardiovascular baroreflex responses. The magnitude of reduced baroreflex sensitivity following bedrest or wheelchair confinement is related to the degree of orthostatic hypotension. Reduction in vascular volume caused by bedrest or progressive hypovolemia does not affect carotid-cardiac baroreflex function. In contrast, intense exercise that increases arterial baroreceptor loading causes an acute increase in carotid baroreceptor sensitivity and has been associated with enhanced orthostatic stability following exposure to simulated microgravity. Endurance exercise training designed to enhance orthostatic stability was associated with increased blood volume and vasoconstrictive reserve, but no change in the carotid baroreflex response. Therefore, using models of exercise, inactivity and confinement, integrated and redundant roles for vascular volume and cardiovascular baroreflexes have been demonstrated as probable underlying mechanisms that contribute independently to the development of orthostatic hypotension following spaceflight. These data suggest that loading of arterial baroreceptors may be necessary to maintain baroreflex function.

  1. Active and Inactive Enhancers Cooperate to Exert Localized and Long-Range Control of Gene Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Proudhon

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available V(DJ recombination relies on the presence of proximal enhancers that activate the antigen receptor (AgR loci in a lineage- and stage-specific manner. Unexpectedly, we find that both active and inactive AgR enhancers cooperate to disseminate their effects in a localized and long-range manner. Here, we demonstrate the importance of short-range contacts between active enhancers that constitute an Igk super-enhancer in B cells. Deletion of one element reduces the interaction frequency between other enhancers in the hub, which compromises the transcriptional output of each component. Furthermore, we establish that, in T cells, long-range contact and cooperation between the inactive Igk enhancer MiEκ and the active Tcrb enhancer Eβ alters enrichment of CBFβ binding in a manner that impacts Tcrb recombination. These findings underline the complexities of enhancer regulation and point to a role for localized and long-range enhancer-sharing between active and inactive elements in lineage- and stage-specific control.

  2. Using gender-based analyses to understand physical inactivity among women in Yellowstone County, Montana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duin, Diane K; Golbeck, Amanda L; Keippel, April Ennis; Ciemins, Elizabeth; Hanson, Hillary; Neary, Tracy; Fink, Heather

    2015-08-01

    Physical inactivity contributes to many health problems. Gender, the socially constructed roles and activities deemed appropriate for men and women, is an important factor in women's physical inactivity. To better understand how gender influences participation in leisure-time physical activity, a gender analysis was conducted using sex-disaggregated data from a county-wide health assessment phone survey and a qualitative analysis of focus group transcripts. From this gender analysis, several gender-based constraints emerged, including women's roles as caregivers, which left little time or energy for physical activity, women's leisure time activities and hobbies, which were less active than men's hobbies, and expectations for women's appearance that made them uncomfortable sweating in front of strangers. Gender-based opportunities included women's enjoyment of activity as a social connection, less rigid gender roles for younger women, and a sense of responsibility to set a good example for their families. The gender analysis was used to gain a deeper understanding of gender-based constraints and opportunities related to physical activity. This understanding is being used in the next step of our research to develop a gender-specific intervention to promote physical activity in women that addresses the underlying causes of physical inactivity through accommodation or transformation of those gender norms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Job strain as a risk factor for leisure-time physical inactivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fransson, Eleonor I; Heikkilä, Katriina; Nyberg, Solja T

    2012-01-01

    Unfavorable work characteristics, such as low job control and too high or too low job demands, have been suggested to increase the likelihood of physical inactivity during leisure time, but this has not been verified in large-scale studies. The authors combined individual-level data from 14....... In cross-sectional analyses, the odds for physical inactivity were 26% higher (odds ratio = 1.26, 95% confidence interval: 1.15, 1.38) for employees with high-strain jobs (low control/high demands) and 21% higher (odds ratio = 1.21, 95% confidence interval: 1.11, 1.31) for those with passive jobs (low...... control/low demands) compared with employees in low-strain jobs (high control/low demands). In prospective analyses restricted to physically active participants, the odds of becoming physically inactive during follow-up were 21% and 20% higher for those with high-strain (odds ratio = 1.21, 95% confidence...

  4. The prevalence and correlates of physical inactivity among adults in Ho Chi Minh City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phongsavan Philayrath

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Socioeconomic changes have led to profound changes in individuals' lifestyles, including the adoption of unhealthy food consumption patterns, prevalent tobacco use, alcohol abuse and physical inactivity, especially in large cities like Ho Chi Minh City (HCMC. The Stepwise Approach to Surveillance of Non-communicable Disease Risk Factors survey was conducted to identify physical activity patterns and factors associated with 'insufficient' levels of physical activity for health in adults in HCMC. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 2005 among 1906 adults aged 25–64 years using a probability proportional to size cluster sampling method to estimate the prevalence of non-communicable disease risk factors including physical inactivity. Data on socioeconomic status, health behaviours, and time spent in physical activity during work, commuting and leisure time were collected. Physical activity was measured using the validated Global Physical Activity Questionnaire (GPAQ. Responders were classified as 'sufficiently active' or 'insufficiently active' using the GPAQ protocol. Correlates of insufficient physical activity were identified using multivariable logistic regression. Results A high proportion of adults were physically inactive, with only 56.2% (95% CI = 52.1–60.4 aged 25–64 years in HCMC achieving the minimum recommendation of 'doing 30 minutes moderate-intensity physical activity for at least 5 days per week'. The main contributors to total physical activity among adults were from working and active commuting. Leisure-time physical activity represented a very small proportion (9.4% of individuals' total activity level. Some differences in the pattern of physical activity between men and women were noted, with insufficient activity levels decreasing with age among women, but not among men. Physical inactivity was positively associated with high income (OR = 1.77, 95% CI = 1.05–2.97 and high household

  5. Is Moderate Red Wine Consumption Safe in Inactive Inflammatory Bowel Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Garth R.; Tieu, Vanessa; Shaikh, Maliha; Forsyth, Chris; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2011-01-01

    Background Alcohol consumption is a potential trigger for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) flare because of alcohol-induced oxidative stress and its deleterious effects on gut barrier function. Additionally, we have recently shown that alcohol consumption is associated with more symptoms in IBD. However, it is not known whether moderate daily alcohol consumption can modify IBD disease activity. To test what effects alcohol may have on patients with IBD, we evaluated the effect of moderate daily red wine for 1 week on two factors associated with recurrent IBD disease activity: intestinal permeability and stool calprotectin. Methods To assess the effects of moderate daily alcohol consumption on intestinal permeability and inflammation, we recruited 21 patients: 8 with inactive ulcerative colitis (UC), 6 with inactive Crohn's disease (CD), and 7 healthy controls. All participants with IBD completed a validated questionnaire on disease activity (Crohn's disease activity index or ulcerative colitis clinical activity index), to confirm they had inactive disease. All subjects then underwent a baseline assessment that included a blood draw, urine collection after sugar challenge, and stool collection. Subjects then consumed 1–3 glasses of red wine a day for 1 week (approx. 0.4 g EtOH/kg), and repeated the three measures. Results No subjects flared during the study. Moderate alcohol consumption did not significantly change either clinical disease activity scores or C-reactive protein. In contrast to healthy subjects, daily consumption of red wine significantly (1) decreased stool calprotectin in IBD subjects from baseline (p = 0.001) and (2) increased intestinal permeability as measured by urinary lactulose/mannitol excretion (marker of small bowel permeability) in CD (p = 0.028) or urinary sucralose secretion (marker of large bowel permeability) in UC (p = 0.012). Conclusions One week of moderate consumption of red wine in inactive IBD was associated with a significant

  6. COURAGE AND FEAR IN THE CONTEXT OF OPPOSITION OF HUMAN ACTIVITY AND INACTIVITY: EXISTENTIAL ASPECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmytro Yu. Snitko

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the article is to analyse fear and courage in the history of philosophy in the context of opposi-tion of human activity and inactivity that may lead to a profound understanding of the essence, causes and existen-tial aspects of human activity and inactivity. The implementation of the objective assumes the solution of the follow-ing tasks: analysis of philosophical interpretation of fear and courage; investigation of the relationship of fear and courage with active and passive forms of human being; revelation of existential dialectic of human activity and inac-tivity through the opposition of fear and courage. Methodology. The application of phenomenological approach and other methods of existential philosophy enabled to discover the importance of fear and courage for human existence. Significant contribution to the importance of the investigation of the fear-courage opposition in the context of hu-man activity and inactivity was made by M. Heidegger who pointed to the main modes of human being - «authen-tic» and «inauthentic» in the context of human activity and passivity. The application of hermeneutic method made possible the reconstruction of the reflection of fear-courage opposition in the history of philosophy. Scientific nov-elty. For the first time the analysis of the fear-courage opposition in the context of human activity and inactivity was carried out. Due to the analysis the fundamental existential character of the fear and courage opposition and its es-sential relationship with active and passive forms of human being were justified. Conclusions. In the course of this research it was found out that fear is closely connected with passive modes of human being. If classical philosophy placed emphasis on courage and associated fear with human mind and conscious decision, non-classical philosophy of the XIX century and existentialism focused on existential and ontological character of fear, its fundamental mean

  7. COURAGE AND FEAR IN THE CONTEXT OF OPPOSITION OF HUMAN ACTIVITY AND INACTIVITY: EXISTENTIAL ASPECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmytro Yu. Snitko

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the article is to analyse fear and courage in the history of philosophy in the context of opposition of human activity and inactivity that may lead to a profound understanding of the essence, causes and existential aspects of human activity and inactivity. The implementation of the objective assumes the solution of the following tasks: analysis of philosophical interpretation of  fear and courage; investigation of the relationship of fear and courage with active and passive forms of human being; revelation of existential dialectic of human activity and inactivity through the opposition of  fear and courage. Methodology. The application of phenomenological approach and other methods of existential philosophy enabled to discover the importance of fear and courage for human existence. Significant contribution to the importance of the investigation of the fear-courage opposition in the context of human activity and inactivity was made by M. Heidegger who pointed to the main modes of human being - «authentic» and «inauthentic» in the context of human activity and passivity. The application of hermeneutic method made possible the reconstruction of the reflection of fear-courage opposition in the history of philosophy. Scientific novelty. For the first time the analysis of the  fear-courage opposition in the context of human activity and inactivity was carried out. Due to the analysis the  fundamental existential character of the fear and courage opposition and its essential relationship with active and passive forms of human being were justified. Conclusions. In the course of this research it was found out that fear is closely connected with passive modes of human being.  If classical philosophy placed emphasis on courage and associated fear with  human mind and conscious decision,  non-classical philosophy of the XIX century and existentialism focused on existential and ontological character of fear, its fundamental meaning

  8. Preferential binding of allosteric modulators to active and inactive conformational states of metabotropic glutamate receptors

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    Klein-Seetharaman Judith

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs are G protein coupled receptors that play important roles in synaptic plasticity and other neuro-physiological and pathological processes. Allosteric mGluR ligands are particularly promising drug targets because of their modulatory effects – enhancing or suppressing the response of mGluRs to glutamate. The mechanism by which this modulation occurs is not known. Here, we propose the hypothesis that positive and negative modulators will differentially stabilize the active and inactive conformations of the receptors, respectively. To test this hypothesis, we have generated computational models of the transmembrane regions of different mGluR subtypes in two different conformations. The inactive conformation was modeled using the crystal structure of the inactive, dark state of rhodopsin as template and the active conformation was created based on a recent model of the light-activated state of rhodopsin. Ligands for which the nature of their allosteric effects on mGluRs is experimentally known were docked to the modeled mGluR structures using ArgusLab and Autodock softwares. We find that the allosteric ligand binding pockets of mGluRs are overlapping with the retinal binding pocket of rhodopsin, and that ligands have strong preferences for the active and inactive states depending on their modulatory nature. In 8 out of 14 cases (57%, the negative modulators bound the inactive conformations with significant preference using both docking programs, and 6 out of 9 cases (67%, the positive modulators bound the active conformations. Considering results by the individual programs only, even higher correlations were observed: 12/14 (86% and 8/9 (89% for ArgusLab and 10/14 (71% and 7/9 (78% for AutoDock. These findings strongly support the hypothesis that mGluR allosteric modulation occurs via stabilization of different conformations analogous to those identified in rhodopsin where they are induced by

  9. The Five-Factor Model of Personality and Physical Inactivity: A Meta-Analysis of 16 Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutin, Angelina R; Stephan, Yannick; Luchetti, Martina; Artese, Ashley; Oshio, Atsushi; Terracciano, Antonio

    2016-08-01

    A sedentary lifestyle is harmful for health; personality traits may contribute to physical (in)activity. With participant-level data from 16 samples (N>125,000), we examined the personality correlates of physical inactivity, frequency of physical activity, and sedentary behavior (in a subset of samples). Lower Neuroticism and higher Conscientiousness were associated with more physical activity and less inactivity and sedentary behavior. Extraversion and Openness were also associated with more physical activity and less inactivity, but these traits were mostly unrelated to specific sedentary behaviors (e.g., TV watching). The results generally did not vary by age or sex. The findings support the notion that the interest, motivational, emotional, and interpersonal processes assessed by five-factor model traits partly shape the individual's engagement in physical activity.

  10. Effect of inactive yeast cell wall on growth performance, survival rate and immune parameters in Pacific White Shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rutchanee Chotikachinda

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Effects of dietary inactive yeast cell wall on growth performance, survival rate, and immune parameters in pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei was investigated. Three dosages of inactive yeast cell wall (0, 1, and 2 g kg-1 were tested in three replicate groups of juvenile shrimps with an average initial weight of 7.15±0.05 g for four weeks. There was no significant difference in final weight, survival rate, specific growth rate, feed conversion ratio, feed intake, protein efficiency ratio, and apparent net protein utilization of each treatments. However, different levels of inactive yeast cell wall showed an effect on certain immune parameters (p<0.05. Total hemocyte counts, granular hemocyte count, and bacterial clearance were better in shrimp fed diets supplemented with 1 and 2 g kg-1 inactive yeast cell wall as compared with thecontrol group.

  11. Reciprocal Ia inhibition contributes to motoneuronal hyperpolarisation during the inactive phase of locomotion and scratching in the cat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geertsen, Svend Sparre; Stecina, Katinka; Meehan, Claire Francesca

    2011-01-01

    Despite decades of research, the classical idea that "reciprocal inhibition" is involved in the hyperpolarisation of motoneurones in their inactive phase during rhythmic activity is still under debate. Here, we investigated the contribution of reciprocal Ia inhibition to the hyperpolarisation...

  12. RATING CHANGES INTRODUCED IN SOME CHARACTERISTIC MORPHOLOGICAL AND BASIC-SPECIFIC MOTOR SKILLS TO YOUNG ACTIVE AND INACTIVE BASKETBALL PLAYERS

    OpenAIRE

    Qazim Elshani; Hazir Salihu

    2016-01-01

    The experiment deals with young people aged 13-14 years, male. Basketball team active and inactive, active group in addition to regular classes; they also practice basketball in clubs within the city. The experiment contains a total of eight morphological variables; five variables are the basic motor tests, while three tests of motor skills, situational. In this research, it applied test method T-group basketball between active and inactive, and morphological variables of specific movement sk...

  13. Childhood attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptoms are risk factors for obesity and physical inactivity in adolescence

    OpenAIRE

    Khalife, Natasha; Kantomaa, Marko; Glover, Vivette; Tammelin, Tuija; Laitinen, Jaana; Ebeling, Hanna; Hurtig, Tuula; Jarvelin, Marjo-riitta; Rodriguez, Alina

    2014-01-01

    Objective To prospectively investigate the association and directionality between attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms and obesity from childhood to adolescence in the general population. We examined whether obesogenic behaviors, namely, physical inactivity and binge eating, underlie the potential ADHD symptom–obesity association. We explored whether childhood conduct disorder (CD) symptoms are related to adolescent obesity/physical inactivity. Method At 7 to 8 ye...

  14. Factors Associated with Physical Inactivity among Adult Urban Population of Puducherry, India: A Population Based Cross-sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newtonraj, Ariarathinam; Murugan, Natesan; Singh, Zile; Chauhan, Ramesh Chand; Velavan, Anandan; Mani, Manikandan

    2017-05-01

    Physical inactivity is the fourth leading cause of death worldwide. Increase in physical activity decreases the incidence of cardiovascular diseases, Type 2 diabetes, stroke, and improves psychological wellbeing. To study the level of physical inactivity among the adult population in an urban area of Puducherry in India and its associated risk factors. This cross-sectional study was conducted among 569 adult participants from an urban area of Pondicherry. The level of physical inactivity was measured by using WHO standard Global Physical Activity Questionnaire (GPAQ). Overall prevalence of physical inactivity in our study was 49.7% (CI: 45.6-53.8). Among the physically active people, contribution of physical activity by work was 77.4%, leisure time activities were 11.6% and transport time was 11%. Both men and women were equally inactive {Physically inactive among women was 50% (CI:44.1-55.9)} and {Physically inactive among men was 49.5% (CI:43.8-55.2)}. Prevalence of physical inactivity was increasing with increasing age. Non tobacco users were two times more active than tobacco users {Adjusted Odds Ratio: 2.183 (1.175- 4.057)}. Employed were more active as compared to retired {Adjusted Odds Ratio: 0.412 (0.171-0.991)}, students {Adjusted Odds Ratio: 0.456 (0.196-1.060)}, house wives {Adjusted Odds Ratio: 0.757 (0.509-1.127)} and unemployed {Adjusted Odds Ratio: 0.538 (0.271-1.068)}. Non alcoholics were only 0.34 times as active as alcoholics. Level of physical activity was found to be insufficient among adult urban population of Puducherry. Working adult population found to be active, that too due to their work pattern. There is a need to promote leisure time and travelling time physical activity.

  15. The interaction of RNA helicase DDX3 with HIV-1 Rev-CRM1-RanGTP complex during the HIV replication cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahboobi, Seyed Hanif; Javanpour, Alex A; Mofrad, Mohammad R K

    2015-01-01

    Molecular traffic between the nucleus and the cytoplasm is regulated by the nuclear pore complex (NPC), which acts as a highly selective channel perforating the nuclear envelope in eukaryotic cells. The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) exploits the nucleocytoplasmic pathway to export its RNA transcripts across the NPC to the cytoplasm. Despite extensive study on the HIV life cycle and the many drugs developed to target this cycle, no current drugs have been successful in targeting the critical process of viral nuclear export, even though HIV's reliance on a single host protein, CRM1, to export its unspliced and partially spliced RNA transcripts makes it a tempting target. Due to recent findings implicating a DEAD-box helicase, DDX3, in HIV replication and a member of the export complex, it has become an appealing target for anti-HIV drug inhibition. In the present research, we have applied a hybrid computational protocol to analyze protein-protein interactions in the HIV mRNA export cycle. This method is based on molecular docking followed by molecular dynamics simulation and accompanied by approximate free energy calculation (MM/GBSA), computational alanine scanning, clustering, and evolutionary analysis. We highlight here some of the most likely binding modes and interfacial residues between DDX3 and CRM1 both in the absence and presence of RanGTP. This work shows that although DDX3 can bind to free CRM1, addition of RanGTP leads to more concentrated distribution of binding modes and stronger binding between CRM1 and RanGTP.

  16. Prediction of dosage-based parameters from the puff dispersion of airborne materials in urban environments using the CFD-RANS methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efthimiou, G. C.; Andronopoulos, S.; Bartzis, J. G.

    2018-02-01

    One of the key issues of recent research on the dispersion inside complex urban environments is the ability to predict dosage-based parameters from the puff release of an airborne material from a point source in the atmospheric boundary layer inside the built-up area. The present work addresses the question of whether the computational fluid dynamics (CFD)-Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) methodology can be used to predict ensemble-average dosage-based parameters that are related with the puff dispersion. RANS simulations with the ADREA-HF code were, therefore, performed, where a single puff was released in each case. The present method is validated against the data sets from two wind-tunnel experiments. In each experiment, more than 200 puffs were released from which ensemble-averaged dosage-based parameters were calculated and compared to the model's predictions. The performance of the model was evaluated using scatter plots and three validation metrics: fractional bias, normalized mean square error, and factor of two. The model presented a better performance for the temporal parameters (i.e., ensemble-average times of puff arrival, peak, leaving, duration, ascent, and descent) than for the ensemble-average dosage and peak concentration. The majority of the obtained values of validation metrics were inside established acceptance limits. Based on the obtained model performance indices, the CFD-RANS methodology as implemented in the code ADREA-HF is able to predict the ensemble-average temporal quantities related to transient emissions of airborne material in urban areas within the range of the model performance acceptance criteria established in the literature. The CFD-RANS methodology as implemented in the code ADREA-HF is also able to predict the ensemble-average dosage, but the dosage results should be treated with some caution; as in one case, the observed ensemble-average dosage was under-estimated slightly more than the acceptance criteria. Ensemble

  17. Prediction of dosage-based parameters from the puff dispersion of airborne materials in urban environments using the CFD-RANS methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efthimiou, G. C.; Andronopoulos, S.; Bartzis, J. G.

    2017-02-01

    One of the key issues of recent research on the dispersion inside complex urban environments is the ability to predict dosage-based parameters from the puff release of an airborne material from a point source in the atmospheric boundary layer inside the built-up area. The present work addresses the question of whether the computational fluid dynamics (CFD)-Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) methodology can be used to predict ensemble-average dosage-based parameters that are related with the puff dispersion. RANS simulations with the ADREA-HF code were, therefore, performed, where a single puff was released in each case. The present method is validated against the data sets from two wind-tunnel experiments. In each experiment, more than 200 puffs were released from which ensemble-averaged dosage-based parameters were calculated and compared to the model's predictions. The performance of the model was evaluated using scatter plots and three validation metrics: fractional bias, normalized mean square error, and factor of two. The model presented a better performance for the temporal parameters (i.e., ensemble-average times of puff arrival, peak, leaving, duration, ascent, and descent) than for the ensemble-average dosage and peak concentration. The majority of the obtained values of validation metrics were inside established acceptance limits. Based on the obtained model performance indices, the CFD-RANS methodology as implemented in the code ADREA-HF is able to predict the ensemble-average temporal quantities related to transient emissions of airborne material in urban areas within the range of the model performance acceptance criteria established in the literature. The CFD-RANS methodology as implemented in the code ADREA-HF is also able to predict the ensemble-average dosage, but the dosage results should be treated with some caution; as in one case, the observed ensemble-average dosage was under-estimated slightly more than the acceptance criteria. Ensemble

  18. Assessment of physical inactivity and perceived barriers to physical activity among health college students, south-western Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awadalla, N J; Aboelyazed, A E; Hassanein, M A; Khalil, S N; Aftab, R; Gaballa, I I; Mahfouz, A A

    2014-10-20

    Physical inactivity is a public health problem in Saudi Arabia. A cross-sectional study was carried out to evaluate the pattern of physical activity, predictors of physical inactivity and perceived barriers to physical activity among health college students in King Khalid University. A total of 1257 students (426 males and 831 females) were recruited. The Arabic short form of the International Physical Activity Questionnaire was used. Overall, 58.0% of the students were physically inactive. Only 13.4% of the students performed vigorous physical activity, 14.8% moderate-intensity physical activity and 29.9% walking activities which met World Health Organization criteria of health-enhancing physical activities. The prevalence of inactive leisure time was 47.5%. The independent predictors of physical inactivity were non-membership of sports clubs and being a medical student. The top reported barrier to physical activity among inactive students was time limitations (51.3%). Overcoming perceived barriers may increase physical activity among students.

  19. Anthropometric measurements of students athletes in relation to physically inactive students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namik Trtak

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Anthropometry is a method of anthropology that refers to the measuring and testing the human body and to the relationship between the size of its individual parts.The task of anthropometry is as accurately as possible quantitatively characterize the morphological features of the human body.Measurements are made due to the anthropometric points which can be: fixed (standard on the site of prominence and virtual (change due to the bodyposition. Goals of research: To evaluate the impact of basketball on the growth and development of seventeen years old adolescents and prevention of deformities of the spinal column and chest.Methods: The study included 40 respondents. Criteria for inclusion: male respondents aged 17 years who played basketball for more than one year, male respondents aged 17 years who are physically inactive. Criteria for exclusion: female respondents, respondents who played basketball for less than one year, respondents who are engaged in some other sport professionally or recreationally, respondents younger and olderthan 17 years. In the study,there were made measurements of thorax scope in the axillary and mamilar level, measurements of body weight and height and measurements of Body mass index.Results of research: Out of 40 respondents 20 are basketball players and 20 physically inactive. Compared to the average value between the two groups of respondents certain differences were observed, which aremost noticeable in body weight (basketball players had more weigh about, 5 kg on average and height (basketball players are taller, about 7 cm on average. During the anthropometric measurements of thoraxdeformities of the spinal column have been observed which affect the deformation of the thorax. Of the 20 players one has a deformity of the spinal column, and out of the same number of physically inactive studentseven 12 have deformed spine.Conclusion: Basketball has a positive effect on the proper growth and development

  20. Population-attributable causes of cancer in Korea: obesity and physical inactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sohee; Kim, Yeonju; Shin, Hai-Rim; Lee, Boram; Shin, Aesun; Jung, Kyu-Won; Jee, Sun Ha; Kim, Dong Hyun; Yun, Young Ho; Park, Sue Kyung; Boniol, Mathieu; Boffetta, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Changes in lifestyle including obesity epidemic and reduced physical activity influenced greatly to increase the cancer burden in Korea. The purpose of the current study was to perform a systematic assessment of cancers attributable to obesity and physical inactivity in Korea. Gender- and cancer site-specific population-attributable fractions (PAF) were estimated using the prevalence of overweight and obesity in 1992-1995 from a large-scale prospective cohort study, the prevalence of low physical activity in 1989 from a Korean National Health Examination Survey, and pooled relative risk estimates from Korean epidemiological studies. The overall PAF was then estimated using 2009 national cancer incidence data from the Korea Central Cancer Registry. Excess body weight was responsible for 1,444 (1.5%) and 2,004 (2.2%) cancer cases among men and women, respectively, in 2009 in Korea. Among men, 6.8% of colorectal, 2.9% of pancreatic, and 16.0% of kidney cancer was attributable to excess body weight. In women, 6.6% of colorectal, 3.9% of pancreatic, 18.7% of kidney, 8.2% of postmenopausal breast, and 32.7% of endometrial cancer was attributable to excess body weight. Low leisure-time physical activity accounted for 8.8% of breast cancer, whereas the PAF for overall cancer was low (0.1% in men, 1.4% in women). Projections suggest that cancers attributable to obesity will increase by 40% in men and 16% in women by 2020. With a significantly increasing overweight and physically inactive population, and increasing incidence of breast and colorectal cancers, Korea faces a large cancer burden attributable to these risk factors. Had the obese population of Korea remained stable, a large portion of obesity-related cancers could have been avoided. Efficient cancer prevention programs that aim to reduce obesity- and physical inactivity-related health problems are essential in Korea.

  1. Clustering of physical inactivity and low fruit and vegetables intake and associated factors in young adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Miranda Tassitano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the cluster of physical inactivity and low fruit and vegetable intake and the associated factors in university students. METHODS: This cross-sectional study included a representative sample (n=717 of Universidade Federal Rural de Pernambuco students. Low fruit and vegetable intake was defined as an intake of less than five servings a day and physical inactivity was defined as exercising less than 150 minutes a week. The independent variables were gender, age, socioeconomic status, school year, shift, and study time. Clustering was determined by comparing the observed prevalence with the expected prevalence for all possible risk-factor combinations. Logistic regression analysis, performed by the software Statistical Package for the Social Sciences 17.0 with a significance level of 5% (p<0.05, considered the presence of both risk behaviors adjusted to the independent variables. RESULTS: The prevalence of low fruit and vegetable intake was 81.7% (CI95%=78.1-84.3 and of physical inactivity was 65.8% (CI95%=62.2-69.4. Most students (58.6%, CI95%=55.3-62.2 were exposed to both risk factors simultaneously, while 11.0% (CI95%=8.9-13.5 were exposed to neither. Full-time students have a risk 1.45 times greater of simultaneous exposure. Juniors and seniors are, respectively, 1.88 and 2.80 times more likely to present both risk behaviors. CONCLUSION: Although complex, the behaviors are modifiable, and both the healthy and the unhealthy behaviors tend to cluster. The implementation of an intervention that targets both risk behaviors is needed. Different strategies can be used, such as providing areas for physical activity and for learning about healthy and risk behaviors.

  2. Daily pilates exercise or inactivity for patients with low back pain: a clinical prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notarnicola, A; Fischetti, F; Maccagnano, G; Comes, R; Tafuri, S; Moretti, B

    2014-02-01

    Studies have shown the effectiveness of a few weekly pilates sessions as helping to reduce lower back pain (LBP). However many patients fear that physical activity can actually make the pain and disability worse. We carried out this observational prospective clinical study to look at the effects that taking part in daily pilates has one on side and on the other the effects of LBP management without physical exercise. The volunteers who participated in this study were recruited from among some local cultural associations. Patients affected by LBP were evaluated. The subjects were 60 volunteers (27 males and 33 females) with a mean age of 51.2 years who had chronic low back pain (CLBP). They were allocated to pilates group (N.=30) or inactivity control group (N.=30). The pilates group performed one-hour lesson of pilates exercise, 5 lessons per week during the following 6 months. The inactivity group continued with their normal daily activities. The Roland-Morris Disability, the Oswestry, the SF-36 and the Spinal Functional Sort Questionaries of all subjects were measured at the baseline (T1) and at 6 months (T2). At T2 improvements were observed in the pilates group with increases in physical and social functioning, general health and vitality (Pmeasures at T2. We found an important improvement of pain, disability and physical and psychological perception of health in individuals who did the daily sessions of pilates. Some authors underlined the possible risk of a lack of adherence to an exercise program at home. This study suggests that a daily pilates program is effective for the management of CLBP. On the other hand, the inactivity contributes to further worsening, inducing a vicious cycle in which pain and physical activity intolerance follow each other.

  3. Population-attributable causes of cancer in Korea: obesity and physical inactivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohee Park

    Full Text Available Changes in lifestyle including obesity epidemic and reduced physical activity influenced greatly to increase the cancer burden in Korea. The purpose of the current study was to perform a systematic assessment of cancers attributable to obesity and physical inactivity in Korea.Gender- and cancer site-specific population-attributable fractions (PAF were estimated using the prevalence of overweight and obesity in 1992-1995 from a large-scale prospective cohort study, the prevalence of low physical activity in 1989 from a Korean National Health Examination Survey, and pooled relative risk estimates from Korean epidemiological studies. The overall PAF was then estimated using 2009 national cancer incidence data from the Korea Central Cancer Registry. Excess body weight was responsible for 1,444 (1.5% and 2,004 (2.2% cancer cases among men and women, respectively, in 2009 in Korea. Among men, 6.8% of colorectal, 2.9% of pancreatic, and 16.0% of kidney cancer was attributable to excess body weight. In women, 6.6% of colorectal, 3.9% of pancreatic, 18.7% of kidney, 8.2% of postmenopausal breast, and 32.7% of endometrial cancer was attributable to excess body weight. Low leisure-time physical activity accounted for 8.8% of breast cancer, whereas the PAF for overall cancer was low (0.1% in men, 1.4% in women. Projections suggest that cancers attributable to obesity will increase by 40% in men and 16% in women by 2020.With a significantly increasing overweight and physically inactive population, and increasing incidence of breast and colorectal cancers, Korea faces a large cancer burden attributable to these risk factors. Had the obese population of Korea remained stable, a large portion of obesity-related cancers could have been avoided. Efficient cancer prevention programs that aim to reduce obesity- and physical inactivity-related health problems are essential in Korea.

  4. Potential clinical translation of juvenile rodent inactivity models to study the onset of childhood obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Michael D; Company, Joseph M; Brown, Jacob D; Toedebusch, Ryan G; Padilla, Jaume; Jenkins, Nathan T; Laughlin, M Harold; Booth, Frank W

    2012-08-01

    According to the latest data from the Center for Disease Control and Prevention 17%, or 12.5 million, of children and adolescents aged 2-19 years in the United States are obese. Physical inactivity is designated as one of the actual causes of US deaths and undoubtedly contributes to the obesity epidemic in children and adults. Examining the effects of inactivity on physiological homeostasis during youth is crucial given that 58% of children between the ages 6-11 yr old fail to obtain the recommended 60 min/day of physical activity and 92% of adolescents fail to achieve this goal [Troiano et al. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 40, 2008]. Nonetheless, invasive mechanistic studies in children linking diminished physical activity with metabolic maladies are lacking for obvious ethical reasons. The rodent wheel lock (WL) model was adopted by our laboratory and others to study how different organ systems of juvenile rats respond to a cessation of daily physical activity. Our WL model houses rats in cages equipped with voluntary running wheels starting at 28 days of age. After a certain period of voluntary running (3 to 6 wk), the wheels are locked, thus preventing the rats' primary source of physical activity. The studies discussed herein suggest that obesity-associated maladies including skeletal muscle insulin resistance, hypothalamic leptin resistance, fatty acid oxidation impairments in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and endothelial dysfunction are initiated in juvenile animals that are restrained from voluntary exercise via WL. The use of the juvenile rodent WL or other inactivity models will continue to provide a powerful clinical translational tool that can be used for primordial prevention of human childhood obesity.

  5. Cardiovascular risk in active, insufficiently active and inactive users of public parks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Fernades de Oliveira

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1980-0037.2008v10n2p170 Physical activity has been recommended for heart disease prevention and rehabilitation. However, when performed incorrectly, which is more common when practiced without supervision and in public places, the risk of cardiovascular events increases. The objective of this study was to compare cardiovascular risk factors among users of São Paulo´s public parks with differing levels of physical activity – active, insuffi ciently active, and inactive. The evaluation consisted of a questionnaire about cardiovascular diseases, symptoms and risk factors; physical activity practice; and anthropometric and arterial blood pressure measurements. There was no difference between the groups in terms of the prevalence of cardiovascular disease or controllable risk factors. However, inactive people had a higher prevalence of cardiovascular symptoms (35%. With regard to uncontrollable cardiovascular risk factors, there was a higher prevalence of the gender/age factor among active (50% and insuffi ciently active (45% subjects, and heredity was more prevalent among inactive people (35%. There was no difference in obesity or blood pressure between the groups. The study also showed that active and insuffi ciently active subjects have a better knowledge of their health status, and a higher prevalence of being prescribed physical activity by physicians. The results demonstrate that most of the people who exercise in public parks are elderly and are at a moderate to high cardiovascular risk from this practice, which suggests that a physical education professional should be present.

  6. Physical inactivity is a disease synonymous for a non-permissive brain disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruimboom, Leo

    2011-11-01

    The evolution of human kind has taken millions of years in which environmental factors gradually shaped the actual genome adapted to those circumstances. One of the most vital behavioural adaptations of mammals in general and especially humans is their capability of self-sufficiency through physical activity. Physical activity abilities, including long distance running, jumping, climbing and carrying things have probably been necessary to outrun wild animals, search for food and hide for danger. In contrast, individuals physically or psychologically unable to "take care of themselves" were more susceptible for early death and therefore for genetic extinction. The actual society is characterized by sedentary instead of "moving" individuals. Physical inactivity is not just a possible factor related with chronic disease, but should be considered the actual cause of the majority of human illness. Individuals know that exercise is necessary and beneficial. Nevertheless almost 75% of the actual population does not reach the estimated minimum of necessary activity. Physical inactivity belongs to the characteristics of sickness behaviour; the latter which probably is protective for the organism. Sickness behaviour, including depressive mood, seems to protect against infection, injury, social conflict and facilitates energy conservation. Sickness behaviour is based on immune-brain mechanisms and can be defined as non-permissive behaviour. Long-term non-permissive behaviour can lead to chronic disease because of reduction of physical activity and self-defeating coping styles, converting non-permissive behaviour in a non-permissive brain disorder. We propose that physical inactivity disease is synonymous for a non-permissive brain disorder and that NPBD produces a so called "reptile phenotype", characterized by hypothermia, poor hair growth, decreased fertility and low basal metabolic rate. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Inflammatory, autoimmune, chronic diseases: bad diet and physical inactivity are causes or effects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gracia, M C

    2006-01-01

    It is now well established that most chronic diseases, especially those identified as inflammatory, are statistically correlated with some typical dietary excesses and physical inactivity. But do really these habits cause the diseases, or they result from them? Current opinion favours the first option, but fails to explain why the satisfaction of eating, naturally evolved in our brains to produce health, apparently induces countless millions of people to eat unrestrictedly until becoming mortally sick, whereas trying to keep a theoretically healthy diet is most often a real torture. The inverse explanation makes much more sense: since inflammation produces much heat, calorie-rich diets are required. An inflamed digestive tract lacks digestive power and is easily irritated or damaged by solid objects, therefore requiring a refined, concentrated, low-fibre diet. And inflamed or merely sick organisms are easily exhausted by physical effort, hence physical inactivity. This study confirms that, most probably, the primary causes of inflammatory diseases are always external inflammatory agents, like infectious micro-organisms or toxic substances, of which a particularly ubiquitous example is nicotine. High-calorie/low-fibre diets and physical inactivity are direct consequences of generalised inflammation. Inversely, in most cases, physical exercise and moderation in eating, by themselves, cannot substantially suppress inflammations, but they can prevent them from being further reinforced by the neural reward system. Moreover, diets and exercise causing important suffering will usually do more harm than good, especially to children and young people, not to mention pregnant or nursing women. Only the identification and elimination of the inflammatory agents can efficiently prevent and cure inflammatory diseases, and currently nicotine, absorbed intentionally or passively, from tobacco or other sources, must be considered the chief suspect because of its inflammatory power

  8. Role of Sleep Disturbance, Depression, Obesity, and Physical Inactivity in Fatigue in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Patricia; Margaretten, Mary; Trupin, Laura; Schmajuk, Gabriela; Yazdany, Jinoos; Yelin, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Fatigue is a major concern for individuals with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, in order to treat fatigue adequately, its sources need to be identified. Data were collected during a single home visit (number of participants = 158). All participants had physician-diagnosed RA. Assessments of self-reported sleep quality, depression, physical activity, RA disease activity, muscle strength, functional limitations, and body composition were made. Information on demographics, medications, and smoking was collected. The Fatigue Severity Inventory (FSI; measuring average fatigue over the past 7 days) was used as the primary outcome. Analyses were first conducted to evaluate bivariate relationships with fatigue. Correlations among risk factors were examined. Multivariate analyses identified independent predictors of fatigue. The mean ± SD age was 59 ± 11 years, the mean ± SD disease duration was 21 ± 13 years, and 85% of subjects were female. The mean ± SD FSI rating was 3.8 ± 2.0 (range 0-10). In multivariate analyses, self-reported disease activity, poor sleep, depression, and obesity were independently associated with fatigue. Physical inactivity was correlated with poor sleep, depression, and obesity. Mediation analyses indicated that physical inactivity had an indirect association with fatigue, mediated by poor sleep, depression, and obesity. This cross-sectional study suggests that fatigue may not be solely a result of RA disease activity, but may result from a constellation of factors that includes RA disease activity or pain, but also includes inactivity, depression, obesity, and poor sleep. The results suggest new avenues for interventions to improve fatigue in individuals with RA, such as increasing physical activity or addressing depression or obesity. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  9. Expression of genes from the human active and inactive X chromosomes.

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, C J; Carrel, L; Willard, H F

    1997-01-01

    X-chromosome inactivation results in the cis-limited inactivation of many, but not all, of the genes on one of the pair of X chromosomes in mammalian females. In addition to the genes from the pseudoautosomal region, which have long been anticipated to escape inactivation, genes from several other regions of the human X chromosome have now been shown to escape inactivation and to be expressed from both the active and inactive X chromosomes. The growing number of genes escaping inactivation em...

  10. NUTRITIVE VALUE OF DIETS WITH INACTIVE DRY YEAST FOR SAANEN GOATS IN THE PERIPARTUM PERIOD

    OpenAIRE

    BRUNA SUSAN DE LABIO MOLINA; LARISSA RIBAS DE LIMA; LUDMILA COUTO GOMES; LUCIANO SOARES DE LIMA; CLAUDETE REGINA ALCALDE

    2016-01-01

    The aim was to evaluate the replacement of soybean meal by inactive dry yeast ( Saccharomyces cerevisiae ) from sugar cane on nutritive value of diets for Saanen goats in the peripartum. Twenty - four Saanen goats (nine primiparous, 55.35 ± 4.55 kg and fifteen multiparous, 73.12 ± 8.51 kg) in prepartum and postpartum periods were distributed in a completely randomized design with a 3 × 2 (diet × parturition order) factorial arrangement. Diets were composed of soybean meal...

  11. NUTRITIVE VALUE OF DIETS WITH INACTIVE DRY YEAST FOR SAANEN GOATS IN THE PERIPARTUM PERIOD

    OpenAIRE

    Molina, Bruna Susan de Labio; Lima, Larissa Ribas de; Gomes,Ludmila Couto; Lima, Luciano Soares de; Alcalde,Claudete Regina

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The aim was to evaluate the replacement of soybean meal by inactive dry yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) from sugar cane on nutritive value of diets for Saanen goats in the peripartum. Twenty-four Saanen goats (nine primiparous, 55.35 ± 4.55 kg and fifteen multiparous, 73.12 ± 8.51 kg) in prepartum and postpartum periods were distributed in a completely randomized design with a 3 × 2 (diet × parturition order) factorial arrangement. Diets were composed of soybean meal, soybean meal ...

  12. Remedial action plan for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Monument Valley, Arizona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1986-02-01

    This Remedial Action Plan (RAP) has been developed to serve a two-fold purpose. It presents the series of activities which are proposed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to accomplish long-term stabilization and control of radioactive materials at the inactive uranium processing site located near Monument Valley, Arizona It also serves to document the concurrence of both the Navajo Nation and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in the remedial action. This agreement, upon execution by DOE and the Navajo Nation and concurrence by NRC, becomes Appendix B of the Cooperative Agreement.

  13. Depressive symptoms, physical inactivity and risk of cardiovascular mortality in older adults: the Cardiovascular Health Study

    OpenAIRE

    Win, Sithu; Parakh, Kapil; Eze-Nliam, Chete M.; Gottdiener, John S.; Kop, Willem J.; Ziegelstein, Roy C.

    2011-01-01

    Background Depressed older individuals have a higher mortality than older persons without depression. Depression is associated with physical inactivity, and low levels of physical activity have been shown in some cohorts to be a partial mediator of the relationship between depression and cardiovascular events and mortality. Methods A cohort of 5888 individuals (mean 72.8±5.6 years, 58% female, 16% African-American) from four US communities was followed for an average of 10.3 years. Self-repor...

  14. Current Trends in Pathogenesis, Diagnosis and Prognosis of Inactive Pituitary Adenomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z.Yu. Khalimova

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an analysis of data from 138 sources in recent years. The study of factors of the development of inactive pituitary adenomas remains one of the most urgent problems of modern medicine. The development of various methods of instrumental and laboratory diagnostics of pituitary masses, as well as the achievement of genetics and molecular biology have significantly changed concepts of the etiology and pathogenesis and, consequently, the possibility of diagnosis, treatment and prevention of many diseases of the brain tumor.

  15. [High prevalence of physical inactivity among adolescents living with HIV/Aids].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Luana Fiengo; Latorre, Maria do Rosário Dias de Oliveira; Silva, Aline Medeiros; Konstantyner, Thais Claudia Roma de Oliveira; Peres, Stela Verzinhasse; Marques, Heloisa Helena de Sousa

    2015-01-01

    To assess the prevalence of physical inactivity among adolescents with HIV/AIDS, as well as associated factors. Ninety-one adolescents (from 10 to 19 years old) with HIV/AIDS who are patients at a university follow-up service were interviewed. Anthropometric data (weight, height, and waist circumference) were measured twice; clinical information was obtained from medical records, and habitual physical activity was assessed by a questionnaire proposed by Florindo et al. The cutoff point for sedentariness was 300minutes/week. The prevalence of inadequate height for age, malnutrition, and overweight/obesity was 15.4%, 9.9% and 12.1%, respectively. The most common physical activities were soccer (44.4%), volleyball (14.4%) and cycling (7.8%). The median times spent with physical activity and walking/bicycling to school were 141minutes and 39minutes, respectively. Most adolescents (71.4%) were sedentary and this proportion was higher among girls (p=0.046). A high prevalence of physical inactivity among adolescents with HIV/AIDS was observed, similarly to the general population. Promoting physical activity among adolescents, especially among girls with HIV/AIDS, as well as monitoring it should be part of the follow-up routine of these patients. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade de Pediatria de São Paulo. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  16. Nutritive value of diets containing inactive dry yeast for lactating Saanen goats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludmila Couto Gomes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-four Saanen goats, 15 multiparous and nine primiparous, were distributed in a completely randomised design in a factorial arrangement (3 diets × 2 parities. The treatments were soybean meal (SB, soybean + dry yeast (SBDY, or dry yeast (DY as a protein source in the diet, and ground corn, mineral supplement, and corn silage (400 g/kg. The study was conducted to evaluate the nutritive value of diets containing inactive dry yeast as a protein source postpartum, postpeak, and during late lactation in dairy goats. To estimate the faecal excretion of indigestible material, neutral detergent fibre was used as an internal marker. The diets did not affect dry matter intake (DMI. However, DMI and nutrient intake were higher for multiparous goats compared with primiparous goats. The digestibility of dry matter and total digestible nutrients (TDN were higher for primiparous goats in the postpartum period. In the postpeak and late lactation periods, there were no differences in digestibility of DM and nutrient between parities. The TDN was similar in the diets in the postpeak period and at lactation end. The goats fed the DY diet had lower urea nitrogen in blood. The use of inactive dry yeast to substitute soybean meal in diets for primiparous and multiparous lactating Saanen goats is a good alternative for maintaining the nutritional value of diets.

  17. Detection of (Inactivity Periods in Human Body Motion Using Inertial Sensors: A Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Damas

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Determination of (inactivity periods when monitoring human body motion is a mandatory preprocessing step in all human inertial navigation and position analysis applications. Distinction of (inactivity needs to be established in order to allow the system to recompute the calibration parameters of the inertial sensors as well as the Zero Velocity Updates (ZUPT of inertial navigation. The periodical recomputation of these parameters allows the application to maintain a constant degree of precision. This work presents a comparative study among different well known inertial magnitude-based detectors and proposes a new approach by applying spectrum-based detectors and memory-based detectors. A robust statistical comparison is carried out by the use of an accelerometer and angular rate signal synthesizer that mimics the output of accelerometers and gyroscopes when subjects are performing basic activities of daily life. Theoretical results are verified by testing the algorithms over signals gathered using an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU. Detection accuracy rates of up to 97% are achieved.

  18. Engineered Mononuclear Variants in Bacillus cereus Metallo-beta-lactamase BcII Are Inactive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abriata,L.; Gonzalez, L.; Llarrull, L.; Tomatis, P.; Myers, W.; Costello, A.; Tierney, D.; Vila, A.

    2008-01-01

    Metallo-{beta}-lactamases (M{beta}Ls) are zinc enzymes able to hydrolyze almost all {beta}-lactam antibiotics, rendering them inactive, at the same time endowing bacteria high levels of resistance. The design of inhibitors active against all classes of M{beta}Ls has been hampered by their structural diversity and by the heterogeneity in metal content in enzymes from different sources. BcII is the metallo-{beta}-lactamase from Bacillus cereus, which is found in both the mononuclear and dinuclear forms. Despite extensive studies, there is still controversy about the nature of the active BcII species. Here we have designed two mutant enzymes in which each one of the metal binding sites was selectively removed. Both mutants were almost inactive, despite preserving most of the structural features of each metal site. These results reveal that neither site isolated in the M{beta}L scaffold is sufficient to render a fully active enzyme. This suggests that only the dinuclear species is active or that the mononuclear variants can be active only if aided by other residues that would be metal ligands in the dinuclear species.

  19. Major initiatives related to childhood obesity and physical inactivity in Canada: the year in review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Mark S

    2012-01-01

    This manuscript briefly reviews 15 significant initiatives related to childhood obesity and physical inactivity in Canada between September 2010 and September 2011. These include the: announcement of a Federal-Provincial-Territorial framework for action to promote healthy weights; implementation of the nutrition labeling initiative; launch of the CBC "Live Right Now" campaign; announcement of the Public Health Agency of Canada's innovation strategy funding related to obesity; publication of the Canadian Health Measures Survey physical activity findings; release of new Canadian physical activity and sedentary behaviour guidelines; launch of ParticipACTION's "Think Again" campaign; workshop on building trust to address the epidemic of obesity; start of the Canadian Pediatric Weight Management Registry; initiation of "Our Health Our Future: A National Dialogue on Healthy Weights"; release of the Active Healthy Kids Canada Report Card on Physical Activity for Children and Youth; National Obesity Summit; Nature Play Day and Sports Day in Canada; development of the Canadian Assessment of Physical Literacy; and the creation of Active Canada 20/20--A National Physical Activity Plan. The diversity and intensity of activity addressing the childhood obesity and physical inactivity "epidemic" in Canada is encouraging and must be maintained and enhanced.

  20. Relationships among physical inactivity, deconditioning, and walking impairment in persons with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandroff, Brian M; Klaren, Rachel E; Motl, Robert W

    2015-04-01

    We have previously proposed a conceptual model of physical inactivity, physiological deconditioning, and walking impairment in persons with multiple sclerosis (MS) that suggests engaging in physical activity and improving physiological conditioning may lead to improvements in walking performance. This cross-sectional study examined the nature of associations among physical activity, aerobic capacity, and walking performance in persons with MS and healthy controls. The sample included 31 persons with MS and 31 controls matched by age, sex, height, and weight. Participants completed the 6-minute walk (6MW), wore an ActiGraph model GT3X accelerometer for 7 days as an objective measure of physical activity (expressed as time spent in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity [MVPA]), and completed an incremental exercise test on a cycle ergometer as a measure of aerobic capacity (VO2peak). Hierarchical linear regression analyses indicated that MVPA and VO2peak partially explained group differences in 6MW performance (R = 0.782), although group remained a significant predictor of 6MW performance (β = 0.304; P deconditioning, perhaps occurring as a result of physical inactivity, may explain variability in walking impairment in persons with MS. These findings support the design and implementation of targeted interventions for improving walking impairment in this population. for more insights from the authors (see Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/JNPT/A93).

  1. Active life expectancy of Americans with diabetes: risks of heart disease, obesity, and inactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laditka, Sarah B; Laditka, James N

    2015-01-01

    Few researchers have studied whether diabetes itself is responsible for high rates of disability or mortality, or if factors associated with diabetes contribute importantly. We estimated associations of diabetes, heart disease, obesity, and physical inactivity with life expectancy (LE), the proportion of life with disability (DLE), and disability in the last year of life. Data were from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (1999-2011 and 1986, African American and white women and men ages 55+, n=1,980, 17,352 person-years). Activities of daily living defined disability. Multinomial logistic Markov models estimated disability transition probabilities adjusted for age, sex, race/ethnicity, education, and the health factors. Microsimulation measured outcomes. White women and men exemplify results. LE was, for women: 3.5 years less with diabetes than without (95% confidence interval, 3.1-4.0), 11.1 less (10.3-12.0) adding heart disease, 21.9 less with all factors (15.3-28.5), all pheart disease, 52.9% (38.9-66.8) with all factors, all pheart disease, obesity, and inactivity, risks that can be modified by health behaviors and medical care. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Inactive Hepatitis B Carrier and Pregnancy Outcomes: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keramat, Afsaneh; Younesian, Masud; Gholami Fesharaki, Mohammad; Hasani, Maryam; Mirzaei, Samaneh; Ebrahimi, Elham; Alavian, Seyed Moaed; Mohammadi, Fatemeh

    2017-04-01

    We aimed to explore whether maternal asymptomatic hepatitis B (HB) infection effects on pre-term rupture of membranous (PROM), stillbirth, preeclampsia, eclampsia, gestational hypertension, or antepartum hemorrhage. We searched the PubMed, Scopus, and ISI web of science from 1990 to Feb 2015. In addition, electronic literature searches supplemented by searching the gray literature (e.g., conference abstracts thesis and the result of technical reports) and scanning the reference lists of included studies and relevant systematic reviews. We explored statistical heterogeneity using the, I2 and tau-squared (Tau2) statistical tests. Eighteen studies were included. Preterm rupture of membranous (PROM), stillbirth, preeclampsia, eclampsia, gestational hypertension and antepartum hemorrhage were considerable outcomes in this survey. The results showed no significant association between inactive HB and these complications in pregnancy. The small amounts of P -value and chi-square and large amount of I2 suggested the probable heterogeneity in this part, which we tried to modify with statistical methods such as subgroup analysis. Inactive HB infection did not increase the risk of adversely mentioned outcomes in this study. Further, well-designed studies should be performed to confirm the results.

  3. Frequency of dental caries in active and inactive systemic lupus erythematous patients: salivary and bacterial factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyola Rodriguez, J P; Galvan Torres, L J; Martinez Martinez, R E; Abud Mendoza, C; Medina Solis, C E; Ramos Coronel, S; Garcia Cortes, J O; Domínguez Pérez, R A

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this study was to determine dental caries frequency and to analyze salivary and bacterial factors associated with active and inactive systemic lupus erythematous (SLE) patients. Also, a proposal to identify dental caries by a surface, teeth, and the patient was developed. A cross-sectional, blinded study that included 60 SLE patients divided into two groups of 30 subjects each, according to the Activity Index for Diagnosis of Systemic Lupus Erythematous (SLEDAI). The decayed, missing, and filled teeth (DMFT) index and Integrative Dental Caries Index (IDCI) were used for analyzing dental caries. The saliva variables recorded were: flow, pH, and buffer capacity. The DNA copies of Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus were estimated by real-time PCR. The caries frequency was 85% for SLE subjects (73.3% for inactive systemic lupus erythematous (ISLE) and 100% for active systemic lupus erythematous (ASLE)); DMFT for the SLE group was 12.6 ± 5.7 and the IDCI was (9.8 ± 5.9). The ASLE group showed a salivary flow of 0.65 compared with 0.97 ml/1 min from the ISLE group; all variables mentioned above showed a statistical difference (p dental caries in epidemiological studies. © The Author(s) 2016.

  4. Inactive Hepatitis B Carrier and Pregnancy Outcomes: A Systematic Review and Meta–analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    KERAMAT, Afsaneh; YOUNESIAN, Masud; GHOLAMI FESHARAKI, Mohammad; HASANI, Maryam; MIRZAEI, Samaneh; EBRAHIMI, Elham; ALAVIAN, Seyed Moaed; MOHAMMADI, Fatemeh

    2017-01-01

    Background: We aimed to explore whether maternal asymptomatic hepatitis B (HB) infection effects on pre-term rupture of membranous (PROM), stillbirth, preeclampsia, eclampsia, gestational hypertension, or antepartum hemorrhage. Methods: We searched the PubMed, Scopus, and ISI web of science from 1990 to Feb 2015. In addition, electronic literature searches supplemented by searching the gray literature (e.g., conference abstracts thesis and the result of technical reports) and scanning the reference lists of included studies and relevant systematic reviews. We explored statistical heterogeneity using the, I2 and tau-squared (Tau2) statistical tests. Results: Eighteen studies were included. Preterm rupture of membranous (PROM), stillbirth, preeclampsia, eclampsia, gestational hypertension and antepartum hemorrhage were considerable outcomes in this survey. The results showed no significant association between inactive HB and these complications in pregnancy. The small amounts of P-value and chi-square and large amount of I2 suggested the probable heterogeneity in this part, which we tried to modify with statistical methods such as subgroup analysis. Conclusion: Inactive HB infection did not increase the risk of adversely mentioned outcomes in this study. Further, well-designed studies should be performed to confirm the results. PMID:28540262

  5. A stable chemical SUMO1-Ubc9 conjugate specifically binds as a thioester mimic to the RanBP2-E3 ligase complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Stefanie; Ritterhoff, Tobias; Melchior, Frauke; Mootz, Henning D

    2015-05-26

    Ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like (Ubl) modifiers such as SUMO are conjugated to substrate proteins by E1, E2, and E3 enzymes. In the presence of an E3 ligase, the E2∼Ubl thioester intermediate becomes highly activated and is prone to chemical decomposition, thus making biochemical and structural studies difficult. Here we explored a stable chemical conjugate of the E2 enzyme from the SUMO pathway, Ubc9, with its modifier SUMO1 as a structural analogue of the Ubc9∼SUMO1 thioester intermediate, by introducing a triazole linkage by biorthogonal click chemistry. The chemical conjugate proved stable against proteolytic cleavage, in contrast to a Ubc9-SUMO1 isopeptide analogue obtained by auto-SUMOylation. Triazole-linked Ubc9-SUMO1 bound specifically to the preassembled E3 ligase complex RanBP2/RanGAP1*SUMO1/Ubc9, thus suggesting that it is a suitable thioester mimic. We anticipate interesting prospects for its use as a research tool to study protein complexes involving E2 and E3 enzymes. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Population-Attributable Causes of Cancer in Korea: Obesity and Physical Inactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hai-Rim; Lee, Boram; Shin, Aesun; Jung, Kyu-Won; Jee, Sun Ha; Kim, Dong Hyun; Yun, Young Ho; Park, Sue Kyung; Boniol, Mathieu; Boffetta, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Background Changes in lifestyle including obesity epidemic and reduced physical activity influenced greatly to increase the cancer burden in Korea. The purpose of the current study was to perform a systematic assessment of cancers attributable to obesity and physical inactivity in Korea. Methodology/Principal Findings Gender- and cancer site-specific population-attributable fractions (PAF) were estimated using the prevalence of overweight and obesity in 1992–1995 from a large-scale prospective cohort study, the prevalence of low physical activity in 1989 from a Korean National Health Examination Survey, and pooled relative risk estimates from Korean epidemiological studies. The overall PAF was then estimated using 2009 national cancer incidence data from the Korea Central Cancer Registry. Excess body weight was responsible for 1,444 (1.5%) and 2,004 (2.2%) cancer cases among men and women, respectively, in 2009 in Korea. Among men, 6.8% of colorectal, 2.9% of pancreatic, and 16.0% of kidney cancer was attributable to excess body weight. In women, 6.6% of colorectal, 3.9% of pancreatic, 18.7% of kidney, 8.2% of postmenopausal breast, and 32.7% of endometrial cancer was attributable to excess body weight. Low leisure-time physical activity accounted for 8.8% of breast cancer, whereas the PAF for overall cancer was low (0.1% in men, 1.4% in women). Projections suggest that cancers attributable to obesity will increase by 40% in men and 16% in women by 2020. Conclusions/Significance With a significantly increasing overweight and physically inactive population, and increasing incidence of breast and colorectal cancers, Korea faces a large cancer burden attributable to these risk factors. Had the obese population of Korea remained stable, a large portion of obesity-related cancers could have been avoided. Efficient cancer prevention programs that aim to reduce obesity- and physical inactivity-related health problems are essential in Korea. PMID:24722008

  7. Incorporation of inactive x chromosomes in micronuclei of X;9 translocation individuals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hando, J.; Nath, J. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States); Tucker, J.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1995-11-01

    Several studies on aneuploidy have shown that the X is the most frequently lost chromosome in females. Recent studies have shown a significant increase in the number of X chromosome-positive micronuclei with age in females. This study was to determine if the X chromosome observed in micronuclei was active or inactive. Blood samples were obtained from two females, each with balanced X;9 translocations. The first subject was 36 years of age with a karyotype of 46,XX,t(X;9) (q13;q32). The second subject was 33 years of age with a karyotype of 46,XX,t(X;9) (p11.2;q13). Ten thousand binucleated cells were scored for the 36 year old donor, while 9500 were scored for the 33 year old donor. The kinetochore status K{sup +} or K{sup {minus}} of each micronucleau (MN) was recorded. Slides were then hybridized with the X centromere specific probe pBamX7 and a whole chromosome painting probe specific for chromosome 9. The X centromere probe was labeled with biotinylated UTP and visualized with fluorescein conjugated avidin. The chromosome 9 painting probe was directly conjugated with SpectrumOrange. All micronucleated cells were relocated and scored as X+9+, X+9-, X-9+; or X-9- depending on their probe status. The results were pooled since there was no significant difference between micronucleus frequencies, K-MN, X+MN or X+9-Mn. A total 217 mocronuclei were scored. Kinetochore labeling showed that 28.6% (62/217) were kinetochore positive, while 71.4% (155/217) were kinetochore negative. Of the 217 micronuclei, 44.2%(96/217) contained the X chromosome. Among the 96 X chromosome-positive micronuclei, 83.3% (80/96) contained the inactive X chromosome (9-), while only 16.7% (16/96) contained an active X chromosome. These data clearly show that inclusion of the inactive X chromosome in micronuclei is preferential (p <0.005; {chi}2 analysis 1 df).

  8. Physical inactivity among physiotherapy undergraduates: exploring the knowledge-practice gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranasinghe, Chathuranga; Sigera, Chathurani; Ranasinghe, Priyanga; Jayawardena, Ranil; Ranasinghe, Ayodya C R; Hills, Andrew P; King, Neil

    2016-01-01

    Physical inactivity is a common risk factor for several non-communicable diseases (NCDs). Increasing physical activity could reduce the burden of disease due to major NCDs and increase life expectancy. Undergraduate physiotherapy students represent a group of young-adults expected to have a good knowledge of physical activity. We evaluated physical activity levels of undergraduate physiotherapy students of University of Colombo, Sri Lanka and determined their motives and barriers for participation in physical activity. All physiotherapy undergraduates studying at the University of Colombo, Sri Lanka in 2013 were invited for the study. Phase one was a quantitative study to evaluate the physical activity levels and phase two was a qualitative study to identify motives and barriers for physical activity and sports in the same cohort. Physical activity levels (phase 1) were assessed using the interviewer administered International Physical Activity Questionnaire (long-version). The qualitative study (phase 2) was conducted in the same population using Focus Group Discussions ( n  = 3) and individual In-depth Interviews ( n  = 5). Sample size in phase 1 and phase 2 were 113 (response rate = 98%; [N-115]) and 87 (response rat = 97%; [N-90]) respectively. Mean age (±SD) of participants was 23.4 ± 1 years. The mean weekly total MET minutes (±SD) of the study population was 1791.25 ± 3097. According to the IPAQ categorical score a higher percentage of participants were 'inactive' (48.7%), while only 15.9% were in the 'Highly active' group. Lack of support and encouragement received during childhood to engage in sports activity seem to have played an important role in continuing their exercise behavior through to the adult life. Academic activities were given priority by both parents and teachers. The environment and support from teachers, family and friends were important to initiate and adhere to sports and physical activity. A higher

  9. Sporting programs for inactive population groups: factors influencing implementation in the organized sports setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooms, Linda; Veenhof, Cindy; Schipper-van Veldhoven, Nicolette; de Bakker, Dinny H

    2015-01-01

    The organized sports sector has received increased attention as a setting to promote health-enhancing physical activity (HEPA) to the general population. For significant public health impact, it is important that successful HEPA programs are widely adopted, implemented and continued as ongoing practice. The importance of evaluating the context in which programs are implemented has been identified as critical. However, little research has focused on understanding the organized sports implementation context, including factors facilitating and impeding implementation. In this study, the main factors influencing implementation of HEPA programs in the organized sports setting were studied. Fourteen sporting programs in the Netherlands aimed at increasing participation in sports by inactive population groups and funded within the National Action Plan for Sport and Exercise (NAPSE) were investigated. The programs were developed by ten Dutch National Sports Federations (NSFs) and implemented by different sports clubs in the Netherlands over a 3-year implementation period (June 2008-June 2011). The qualitative research component involved yearly face-to-face interviews (i.e. fourteen interviews each year, n = 12 program coordinators) and a group meeting with the program coordinators of the NSFs (n = 8). Cross-case comparisons and thematic analyses were performed to identify and categorize important facilitating and impeding factors respectively. The quantitative research component, used to identify the most important facilitating and impeding factors across all sporting programs, consisted of ranking of factors according to importance by the program coordinators (n = 12). Different factors act during six identified (implementation) phases. When comparing factors across phases, several key learnings were evident. Successful implementation relied, for example, on program design and enthusiastic individuals within sporting organizations. On the other hand, inactive

  10. From DNS to RANS: A Multi-model workflow to understand the Influence of Hurricanes on Generating Turbidity Currents in the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syvitski, J. P.; Arango, H.; Harris, C. K.; Meiburg, E. H.; Jenkins, C. J.; Auad, G.; Hutton, E.; Kniskern, T. A.; Radhakrishnan, S.

    2016-12-01

    A loosely coupled numerical workflow is developed to address land-sea pathways for sediment routing from terrestrial and coastal sources, across the continental shelf and ultimately down the continental slope canyon system of the northern Gulf of Mexico (GOM). Model simulations represent a range of environmental conditions that might lead to the generation of turbidity-currents. The workflow comprises: 1) A simulator for the water and sediment discharged from rivers into the GOM with WMBsedv2 with calibration using USGS and USACE gauged river data; 2) Domain grids and bathymetry (ETOPO2) for the ocean models and realistic seabed sediment texture grids (dbSEABED) for the sediment transport models; 3) A spectral wave action simulator (10 km resolution) (WaveWatch III) driven by GFDL - GFS winds; 4) A simulator for ocean dynamics (ROMS) forced with ECMWF ERA winds; 5) A simulator for seafloor resuspension and transport (CSTMS); 6) Simulators (HurriSlip) of seafloor failure and flow ignition locations for boundary input to a turbidity current model; and 7) A RANS turbidity current model (TURBINS) to route sediment flows down GOM canyons, providing estimates of bottom shear stresses. TURBINS was developed first as a DNS model and then converted to an LES model wherein a dynamic turbulence closure scheme was employed. Like most DNS to LES model comparisons (these being done by the UCSB team), turbulence scaling allowed for higher Re applications but were found still not capable of simulating field scale (GOM continental canyons) environments. The LES model was next converted to a non-hydrostatic RANS model capable of field scale applications but only with a daisy-chain approach to multiple model runs along the simulated canyon floor. These model adaptations allowed the workflow to be tested for the year 1-Oct-2007 to 30-Sep-2008 that included two domain Hurricanes (Ike and Gustav). The RANS-TURBINS employed further boundary simplifications on both sediment erosion and

  11. Spectroelectrochemical insights into structural and redox properties of immobilized endonuclease III and its catalytically inactive mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moe, Elin; Rollo, Filipe; Silveira, Célia M; Sezer, Murat; Hildebrandt, Peter; Todorovic, Smilja

    2018-01-05

    Endonuclease III is a Fe-S containing bifunctional DNA glycosylase which is involved in the repair of oxidation damaged DNA. Here we employ surface enhanced IR spectroelectrochemistry and electrochemistry to study the enzyme from the highly radiation- and desiccation-resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans (DrEndoIII2). The experiments are designed to shed more light onto specific parameters that are currently proposed to govern damage search and recognition by endonucleases III. We demonstrate that electrostatic interactions required for the redox activation of DrEndoIII2 may result in high electric fields that alter its structural and thermodynamic properties. Analysis of inactive DrEndoIII2 (K132A/D150A double mutant) interacting with undamaged DNA, and the active enzyme interacting with damaged DNA also indicate that the electron transfer is modulated by subtle differences in the protein-DNA complex. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Inactive experiments for advanced separation processes prior to high activity trials in ATALANTE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duhamet, Jean; Lanoe, Jean-Yves; Rivalier, Patrick; Borda, Gilles [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (CEA), CEA/DEN/VRH/DTEC/SGCS, Centre de Marcoule - BP 17171, 302007 Bagnols-sur-Ceze cedex (France)

    2008-07-01

    Many trials have been performed in ATALANTE's shielded cells to demonstrate the technical feasibility of processes involving minor actinide separation. They required developments of new extractors as well as a step by step procedure have been used to lower the risks of malfunction during high active operation. The design of the extractors developed by Cea has included shielded cells restrictions, miniaturization to lower the quantity of high active material and wastes and the care for being representative of industrial equipment. After individual shake down inactive tests, with actual phases, each process experiment scheduled in ATALANTE has been tested at G1 Facility in Marcoule. The objective was to reproduce as much as possible all the equipment chosen for active tests. This procedure has demonstrated its efficiency to detect many problems that would have heavy impact if they have been discovered during active trials. It was also used for operators'training. (authors)

  13. Catecholaminergic challenge uncovers distinct Pavlovian and instrumental mechanisms of motivated (in)action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swart, Jennifer C; Froböse, Monja I; Cook, Jennifer L; Geurts, Dirk Em; Frank, Michael J; Cools, Roshan; den Ouden, Hanneke Em

    2017-05-15

    Catecholamines modulate the impact of motivational cues on action. Such motivational biases have been proposed to reflect cue-based, 'Pavlovian' effects. Here, we assess whether motivational biases may also arise from asymmetrical instrumental learning of active and passive responses following reward and punishment outcomes. We present a novel paradigm, allowing us to disentangle the impact of reward and punishment on instrumental learning from Pavlovian response biasing. Computational analyses showed that motivational biases reflect both Pavlovian and instrumental effects: reward and punishment cues promoted generalized (in)action in a Pavlovian manner, whereas outcomes enhanced instrumental (un)learning of chosen actions. These cue- and outcome-based biases were altered independently by the catecholamine enhancer melthylphenidate. Methylphenidate's effect varied across individuals with a putative proxy of baseline dopamine synthesis capacity, working memory span. Our study uncovers two distinct mechanisms by which motivation impacts behaviour, and helps refine current models of catecholaminergic modulation of motivated action.

  14. Revegetation/rock cover for stabilization of inactive uranium mill tailings disposal sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beedlow, P.A.; McShane, M.C.; Cadwell, L.L.

    1982-07-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory is developing design and performance guidelines for surface stabilization of inactive uranium mill tailings. In this work, vegetation and rock covers are being evaluated for maintaining long-term integrity of impoundment systems. Methods are being developed to estimate erosion rates associated with rock and/or vegetation covers, and to determine the effects of surface treatments on soil moisture. Interactions between surface treatments and barriers (radon and biological) are being studied as well. The product will be a set of guidelines to aid in designing surface covers. This report presents the status of this program and a discussion of considerations pertinent to the application of surface covers to tailings. Test plots located in Grand Junction, Colorado and Waterflow, New Mexico are being used to study: (1) the interactions between vegetation and radon and biological barriers, (2) the effects of surface covers on soil moisture, and (3) the effects of rock covers on vegetation.

  15. Prevalence and distribution of inactivity and weight excess in Spanish scholar children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arturo Rodríguez-Hernández

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This work aims to study the distribution of leisure time physical activity pattern and weight status of Spanish schoolchildren. The sample corresponds to 6,803 school-aged children (3,491 boys and 3,312 girls, who took part in the Spanish National Health Survey 2006, being representative of the Spanish scholar population. It has assessed their pattern of physical activity and weight status through international body mass index cut offs. The relationship between the variables studied has been established through a multinomial logistic regression analysis. Physical inactivity is more prevalent in children that exceed a healthy weight, and there are regional differences in the distribution of a sedentary lifestyle and weight excess, as well as in different age groups and sex. Globally, 49.7% of Spanish schoolchildren have an unhealthy leisure time physical activity pattern, and 28.9% of them exceed the recommended weight for their age.

  16. Hazardous waste site assessment: Inactive landfill, Site 300, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-01-01

    This report presents the results of an investigation of an inactive landfill (Pit 6) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) Site 300. The primary objectives were to: collect and review background information pertaining to past waste disposal practices and previous environmental characterization studies; conduct a geophysical survey of the landfill area to locate the buried wastes; conduct a hydrogeologic investigation to provide additional data on the rate and direction of groundwater flow, the extent of any groundwater contamination, and to investigate the connection, if any, of the shallow groundwater beneath the landfill with the local drinking water supply; conduct a risk assessment to identify the degree of threat posed by the landfill to the public health and environment; compile a preliminary list of feasible long-term remedial action alternatives for the landfill; and develop a list of recommendations for any interim measures necessary at the landfill should the long-term remedial action plan be needed.

  17. The development of social capital through football and running: studying an intervention program for inactive women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottesen, Laila; Jeppesen, Rikke Schou; Krustrup, Birgitte Rejkjær

    2010-01-01

    exercise, either in the form of football or running. The study shows a positive development of social capital in the two different types of physical activity. The I-stories show themselves to be central to bonding within the two groups and bridging outside the groups (developing and/or creating networks......This article examines the development of social capital through the use and dynamics of different types of stories (“I,”“we” and “they”) as described by Robert D. Putnam. The data come from a research project in which inactive women participated in a 16-week intervention program of physical......). The study also points to the importance of the activity itself for internal bonding illustrated through we- and they-stories. Our data indicate that team sports, such as football, may have an advantage over individual sports in the development of social capital....

  18. Sexual inactivity and occurrence of STIs in relation to weight status in women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunge, Vibeke B; Juul, Kirsten E; van den Brule, Adriaan Jc

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine sexual inactivity and occurrence of selected sexually transmitted infections in relation to body mass index. We used data from two large Danish population-based cross-sectional studies conducted in 1991-1995 (HPV study: 6869 women, aged 22-32 years) and in 2004...... no lifetime sexual partner or no sexual partner in the last year, e.g., obese women had a threefold (95 percent CI: 1.95-5.04) odds ratio of having had no sexual partner in the last year compared to normal weight women. Additionally, overweight and obese women had a lower likelihood of genital warts and high......-risk human papillomavirus infection. A similar tendency was found for self-reported Chlamydia, but not with presence of Chlamydia DNA. If higher likelihood of no lifetime or recent sexual partners among overweight and obese women reflects unmet sexual needs, it could give rise to concern because quality...

  19. First inactive conformation of CK2 alpha, the catalytic subunit of protein kinase CK2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raaf, Jennifer; Issinger, Olaf-Georg; Niefind, Karsten

    2009-01-01

    The Ser/Thr kinase casein kinase 2 (CK2) is a heterotetrameric enzyme composed of two catalytic chains (CK2alpha, catalytic subunit of CK2) attached to a dimer of two noncatalytic subunits (CK2beta, noncatalytic subunit of CK2). CK2alpha belongs to the superfamily of eukaryotic protein kinases...... and Tyr50, the space required by the triphospho moiety. We discuss some factors that may support or disfavor this inactive conformation, among them coordination of small molecules at a remote cavity at the CK2alpha/CK2beta interaction region and binding of a CK2beta dimer. The latter stabilizes...... of catalytic key elements. For CK2alpha, however, no strict physiological control of activity is known. Accordingly, CK2alpha was found so far exclusively in the characteristic conformation of active EPKs, which is, in this case, additionally stabilized by a unique intramolecular contact between the N...

  20. Radiological survey of the inactive uranium-mill tailings at Rifle, Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haywood, F.F.; Jacobs, D.J.; Ellis, B.S.; Hubbard, H.M. Jr.; Shinpaugh, W.H.

    1980-06-01

    Results of radiological surveys of two inactive uranium-mill sites near Rifle, Colorado, in May 1976 are presented. These sites are referred to as Old Rifle and New Rifle. The calculated /sup 226/Ra inventory of the latter site is much higher than at the older mill location. Data on above-ground measurements of gamma exposure rates, surface and near-surface concentration of /sup 226/Ra in soil and sediment samples, concentration of /sup 226/Ra in water, calculated subsurface distribution of /sup 226/Ra, and particulate radionuclide concentrations in air samples are given. The data serve to define the extent of contamination in the vicinity of the mill sites and their immediate surrounding areas with tailings particles. Results of these measurements were utilized as technical input for an engineering assessment of these two sites.

  1. LOXL2 catalytically inactive mutants mediate epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva P. Cuevas

    2014-01-01

    Lysyl-oxidase-like 2 (LOXL2 is a member of the lysyl oxidase family that catalyzes the cross-linking of collagens or elastins in the extracellular matrix, thus regulating the tensile strength of tissues. However, many reports have suggested different intracellular roles for LOXL2, including the ability to regulate gene transcription and tumor progression. We previously reported that LOXL2 mediates epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT by Snail1-dependent and independent mechanisms, related to E-cadherin silencing and downregulation of epidermal differentiation and cell polarity components, respectively. Whether or not the catalytic activity of LOXL2 is required to induce/sustain EMT is actually unknown. Here we show that LOXL2 catalytic inactive mutants collaborate with Snail1 in E-cadherin gene repression to trigger EMT and, in addition, promote FAK/Src pathway activation to support EMT. These findings reveal a non-conventional role of LOXL2 on regulating epithelial cell plasticity.

  2. "Spatial Energetics": Integrating Data From GPS, Accelerometry, and GIS to Address Obesity and Inactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Peter; Jankowska, Marta; Marx, Christine; Hart, Jaime E; Berrigan, David; Kerr, Jacqueline; Hurvitz, Philip M; Hipp, J Aaron; Laden, Francine

    2016-11-01

    To address the current obesity and inactivity epidemics, public health researchers have attempted to identify spatial factors that influence physical inactivity and obesity. Technologic and methodologic developments have led to a revolutionary ability to examine dynamic, high-resolution measures of temporally matched location and behavior data through GPS, accelerometry, and GIS. These advances allow the investigation of spatial energetics, high-spatiotemporal resolution data on location and time-matched energetics, to examine how environmental characteristics, space, and time are linked to activity-related health behaviors with far more robust and detailed data than in previous work. Although the transdisciplinary field of spatial energetics demonstrates promise to provide novel insights on how individuals and populations interact with their environment, there remain significant conceptual, technical, analytical, and ethical challenges stemming from the complex data streams that spatial energetics research generates. First, it is essential to better understand what spatial energetics data represent, the relevant spatial context of analysis for these data, and if spatial energetics can establish causality for development of spatially relevant interventions. Second, there are significant technical problems for analysis of voluminous and complex data that may require development of spatially aware scalable computational infrastructures. Third, the field must come to agreement on appropriate statistical methodologies to account for multiple observations per person. Finally, these challenges must be considered within the context of maintaining participant privacy and security. This article describes gaps in current practice and understanding and suggests solutions to move this promising area of research forward. Copyright © 2016 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. All rights reserved.

  3. Maternal inflammation during late pregnancy is lower in physically active compared with inactive obese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinius, Rachel A; Cahill, Alison G; Strand, Eric A; Cade, W Todd

    2016-02-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to compare maternal plasma inflammation between physically active and inactive obese women during late pregnancy. The secondary purpose was to examine the relationships between maternal plasma inflammation and lipid metabolism and maternal and neonatal metabolic health in these women. A cross-sectional, observational study design was performed in 16 obese-inactive (OBI; means ± SD; age, 25.0 ± 4.8 years; prepregnancy body mass index (BMI), 36.3 ± 4.3 kg/m(2); body fat percentage in late gestation, 37.7% ± 3.5%) and 16 obese-active (OBA; age, 28.9 ± 4.8 years; prepregnancy BMI, 34.0 ± 3.7 kg/m(2); body fat in late gestation, 36.6% ± 3.8%) women during the third trimester of pregnancy. Maternal plasma inflammation (C -reactive protein (CRP)) and insulin resistance (Homeostatic Model Assessment-Insulin Resistance) were measured at rest. Plasma lipid concentration and metabolism (lipid oxidation and lipolysis) were measured at rest, during a 30-min bout of low-intensity (40% peak oxygen uptake) exercise, and during a resting recovery period using indirect calorimetry. Umbilical cord blood was collected for measurement of neonatal plasma insulin resistance, inflammation, and lipid concentration. Neonatal body composition was measured via air displacement plethysmography. Maternal plasma CRP concentration was significantly higher in OBI compared with OBA women (9.1 ± 4.0 mg/L vs. 6.3 ± 2.5 mg/L, p = 0.02). Maternal plasma CRP concentration was significantly associated with maternal lipolysis (r = 0.43, p = 0.02), baseline lipid oxidation rate (r = 0.39, p = 0.03), and baseline plasma free fatty acid concentration (r = 0.36, p = 0.04). In conclusion, maternal physical activity may reduce inflammation during pregnancy in obese women. Maternal lipid metabolism is related to systemic inflammation.

  4. Chiropractic Care in the Management of Inactive Ankylosing Spondylitis: A Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelson, Stacey M; Beavers, David; Harvey, Allison; Hogarth, William; Kettner, Norman W

    2017-12-01

    This report describes chiropractic management for 3 cases of inactive ankylosing spondylitis (AS). A 25-year-old woman presented with chronic, mechanical neck pain and stiffness that was ultimately diagnosed as AS. A 23-year-old man presented with chronic low back and left hip pain that was diagnosed as AS. A 31-year-old man with low back pain presented with a known diagnosis of AS. Physical examination in 2 cases failed to identify systemic findings associated with AS. In the third case, examination revealed a history of ulcerative colitis. Laboratory examination of case 2 yielded a positive HLA-B27, but cases 1 and 3 were HLA-B27 negative. The acute reactants were negative in all 3 patients, indicating an inactive phase of disease. All 3 patients underwent spinal imaging including sacroiliac joint radiography. In case 3, magnetic resonance imaging of the sacroiliac joints was performed. All 3 imaging examinations revealed bilateral, symmetric sacroiliitis. Patients were managed by both a medical rheumatologist and a doctor of chiropractic. Chiropractic care ranged from instrument-assisted spinal manipulation to diversified spinal and soft tissue manipulation and Cox flexion-distraction. Patients were given home stretches and rehabilitation exercises. All 3 patients experienced some relief of their symptoms including pain reduction and improved activities of daily living. These 3 patients displayed differences and commonalities in clinical, laboratory, and imaging features. Chiropractic manipulation and rehabilitation seemed to be beneficial in reducing symptomatology and improving musculoskeletal function for these 3 patients. These findings suggest the potential for collaborative or integrative management in similar cases.

  5. Survey of active and inactive mines for possible use as in situ test facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-09-01

    A survey of active and inactive mines which might be useful for radioactive waste storage in situ test experiments was conducted. It was performed for Union Carbide Corporation, Nuclear Division, Office of Waste Isolation. The report covers available information gathered from literature, U.S. Bureau of Mines, the Mining Enforcement and Safety Agency, and a limited number of personal contacts with constructors or operators of facilities. This survey is preliminary in nature and the objective is to develop potential candidate facilities for in situ experiments which warrant further investigation. Included are descriptions of 244 facilities, with all the data about each one which was available within the time restraint of the study. These facility descriptions are additionally indexed by depth of mine, nature of the country rock, mineral mined, and type of entry. A total of 14 inactive mines and 34 active mines has been selected as those most worthy of further investigation for possible service as nuclear waste isolation test facilities. This investigation, being preliminary and having been performed in a very short time period, must be qualified, and the description of the qualification is presented in the body of this report. Qualifications deal primarily with the hazard of having omitted facilities and having incomplete data in some instances. Results indicate sedimentary rock mines of minerals of evaporite origin as a first ranking of preference for in situ testing, followed by other sedimentary rocks and then by mines producing minerals from any type rock where the mine is above the local water table. These are general rules and of course there can be exceptions to them.

  6. The diseasome of physical inactivity--and the role of myokines in muscle--fat cross talk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Bente K

    2009-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, colon cancer, breast cancer, dementia and depression constitute a cluster of diseases, which defines 'a diseasome of physical inactivity'. Both physical inactivity and abdominal adiposity, reflecting accumulation of visceral fat mass, are associated...... with the occurrence of the diseases within the diseasome. Physical inactivity appears to be an independent and strong risk factor for accumulation of visceral fat, which again is a source of systemic inflammation. Chronic inflammation is involved in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance, atherosclerosis......, neurodegeneration and tumour growth. Evidence suggests that the protective effect of exercise may to some extent be ascribed to the anti-inflammatory effect of regular exercise, which can be mediated via a reduction in visceral fat mass and/or by induction of an anti-inflammatory environment with each bout...

  7. Functional ability at age 75: is there an impact of physical inactivity from middle age to early old age?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Ulla; Støvring, N; Schultz-Larsen, K

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze the impact of physical inactivity from middle age to early old age on functional ability at age 75. Physical activity is measured both as cumulated activity from age 50 to 60 to 70 and at three separate points in time. Three hundred eighty-seven men and women...... born in 1914 and living in seven municipalities in the western part of the County of Copenhagen were followed for 25 years with examinations in 1964, 1974, 1984 and 1989. Analyses were conducted with physical inactivity as an independent variable (accumulated and separately for each point in time......) and smoking, sex, school education, household composition, chronic disease at baseline and functional ability at age 70 as possible confounders. There was a strong association between physical inactivity at age 70 and disability at age 75. However, the analyses showed no effect of cumulated physical...

  8. [Educational Inequality in Physical Inactivity in Leisure Time in Spanish Adult Population: differences in Ten Years (2002-2012)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestre-Miquel, Clara; Regidor, Enrique; Cuthill, Fiona; Martínez, David

    2015-01-01

    Social inequality in health is an increasing phenomenon in the world. The aim was to compare in 2002 and 2012, the magnitude of inequalities in leisure-time physical inactivity by educational level in Spain, but also the trends in health perception, in physically inactive people. A cross-sectional study from the National Health Survey in Spain in 2002 (n=21,650) and 2012 (n=21,007). The population aged from 25 to 64 years. At the first stage, physical inactivity in leisure-time was the dependent variable, and educational level was the independent variable. At the second stage, self-perception of health in last 12 months was the dependent variable. Logistic regression was adjusted using other variables: age, marital status, employment status and social class of the head of the family. Prevalence of leisure time physical inactivity was in 2012, up to 53.9% (men) and 67.5% (women), in the group aged between 25-44 with primary education. It declined in all age and sex groups in 2012, compared to 2002 (down to 18.7 percentage points). More than three times inactive women in between those who have primary or less education: OR 3.27 (2.35-4.55) in 2012. Bad health perceived in women with less educational level comparing with those with higher education. It also has declined over time: OR 1.45 in 2002 to OR 1.91, in 2012 (45-64 aged group). Although the prevalence of physical inactivity has decreased, inequalities in such behavior have increased in 2012 respect 2002.

  9. Desenvolvimento de um novo método RANS-based para a aeroacústica computacional de jatos de alta velocidade.

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos Roberto Ilário da Silva

    2011-01-01

    Uma nova ferramenta de aeroacústica computacional baseada em simulações RANS (Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes) foi desenvolvida para a predição do ruído gerado pelo escoamento tri-dimensional de jatos complexos. O método é denominado de LRT o qual surgiu da combinação da analogia acústica de Lighthill com o método de acústica geométrica Ray-Tracing. A grande vantagem da utilização do método LRT para predições de ruído é que este determina não apenas as fontes sonoras presentes...

  10. Effect of moderate versus high intensity interval exercise training on vascular function in inactive latin-american adults: a randomized clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Hernández Quiñonez, Paula Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Exercise training is effective for improving cardiometabolic health and physical fitness in inactive adults. However, limited research has been conducted on the optimal exercise training intensity for this population. We investigate the effect of moderate versus high intensity interval exercise training on vascular function and physical fitness in physically inactive adults. Twenty inactive adults were randomly allocated to receive either moderate intensity training (MCT group) or high intens...

  11. Manipulation and mobilisation for neck pain contrasted against an inactive control or another active treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Anita; Langevin, Pierre; Burnie, Stephen J; Bédard-Brochu, Marie-Sophie; Empey, Brian; Dugas, Estelle; Faber-Dobrescu, Michael; Andres, Cristy; Graham, Nadine; Goldsmith, Charles H; Brønfort, Gert; Hoving, Jan L; LeBlanc, Francis

    2015-09-23

    Manipulation and mobilisation are commonly used to treat neck pain. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2003, and previously updated in 2010. To assess the effects of manipulation or mobilisation alone compared wiith those of an inactive control or another active treatment on pain, function, disability, patient satisfaction, quality of life and global perceived effect in adults experiencing neck pain with or without radicular symptoms and cervicogenic headache (CGH) at immediate- to long-term follow-up. When appropriate, to assess the influence of treatment characteristics (i.e. technique, dosage), methodological quality, symptom duration and subtypes of neck disorder on treatment outcomes. Review authors searched the following computerised databases to November 2014 to identify additional studies: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL). We also searched ClinicalTrials.gov, checked references, searched citations and contacted study authors to find relevant studies. We updated this search in June 2015, but these results have not yet been incorporated. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) undertaken to assess whether manipulation or mobilisation improves clinical outcomes for adults with acute/subacute/chronic neck pain. Two review authors independently selected studies, abstracted data, assessed risk of bias and applied Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) methods (very low, low, moderate, high quality). We calculated pooled risk ratios (RRs) and standardised mean differences (SMDs). We included 51 trials (2920 participants, 18 trials of manipulation/mobilisation versus control; 34 trials of manipulation/mobilisation versus another treatment, 1 trial had two comparisons). Cervical manipulation versus inactive control: For subacute and chronic neck pain, a single manipulation (three trials, no meta

  12. Cardiovascular risk in active, insufficiently active and inactive users of public parks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taís Tinucci

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Physical activity has been recommended for heart disease prevention and rehabilitation. However, when performed incorrectly, which is more common when practiced without supervision and in public places, the risk of cardiovascular events increases. The objective of this study was to compare cardiovascular risk factors among users of São Paulo´s public parks with differing levels of physical activity – active, insuffi ciently active, and inactive. The evaluation consisted of a questionnaire about cardiovascular diseases, symptoms and risk factors; physical activity practice; and anthropometric and arterial blood pressure measurements. There was no difference between the groups in terms of the prevalence of cardiovascular disease or controllable risk factors. However, inactive people had a higher prevalence of cardiovascular symptoms (35%. With regard to uncontrollable cardiovascular risk factors, there was a higher prevalence of the gender/age factor among active (50% and insuffi ciently active (45% subjects, and heredity was more prevalent among inactive people (35%. There was no difference in obesity or blood pressure between the groups. The study also showed that active and insuffi ciently active subjects have a better knowledge of their health status, and a higher prevalence of being prescribed physical activity by physicians. The results demonstrate that most of the people who exercise in public parks are elderly and are at a moderate to high cardiovascular risk from this practice, which suggests that a physical education professional should be present. Resumo A prática de atividades físicas tem sido recomendada para a prevenção e reabilitação cardíacas. Porém, quando feita de maneira inadequada, o que ocorre mais freqüentemente na ausência de supervisão em locais públicos, esta prática pode se associar ao aumento do risco de acometimentos cardiovasculares. Comparar o risco cardiovascular de freqüentadores de parques p

  13. Self-reported physical inactivity and health complaints: a cross-sectional study of Lithuanian adolescent schoolgirls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romualdas Malinauskas

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to investigate the associations between physical inactivity and health complaints in relation to posttraumatic stress (PTS symptoms, behavioral and nutritional factors, and sense of coherence (SOC in eighth-grade girls enrolled in secondary schools in Kaunas, Lithuania. A random sample of girls (N = 862 was interviewed anonymously on health complaints, physical activity level, PTS symptoms, Antonovsky’s SOC scale, health behaviors, and dietary patterns. All health complaints were significantly associated with physical inactivity. Crude odds ratio (OR for physical inactivity and health complaints was 1.67 (95%CI: 1.09-2.56; after adjusting for PTS symptoms, the OR decreased to 1.57 (95%CI: 0.95-2.45; further adjustment for smoking, daily alcohol intake, daily consumption of fresh vegetables, and SOC decreased the OR to 1.25 (95%CI: 0.76-2.04. The effect of PTS symptoms and sense of coherence remained stable after all adjustments. The significant association between physical inactivity and health complaints was mediated by PTS symptoms.

  14. Determining the Rotation Periods of an Inactive LEO Satellite and the First Korean Space Debris on GEO, KOREASAT 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Choi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Inactive space objects are usually rotating and tumbling as a result of internal or external forces. KOREASAT 1 has been inactive since 2005, and its drift trajectory has been monitored with the optical wide-field patrol network (OWL-Net. However, a quantitative analysis of KOREASAT 1 in regard to the attitude evolution has never been performed. Here, two optical tracking systems were used to acquire raw measurements to analyze the rotation period of two inactive satellites. During the optical campaign in 2013, KOREASAT 1 was observed by a 0.6 m class optical telescope operated by the Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI. The rotation period of KOREASAT 1 was analyzed with the light curves from the photometry results. The rotation periods of the low Earth orbit (LEO satellite ASTRO-H after break-up were detected by OWL-Net on April 7, 2016. We analyzed the magnitude variation of each satellite by differential photometry and made comparisons with the star catalog. The illumination effect caused by the phase angle between the Sun and the target satellite was corrected with the system tool kit (STK and two line element (TLE technique. Finally, we determined the rotation period of two inactive satellites on LEO and geostationary Earth orbit (GEO with light curves from the photometry. The main rotation periods were determined to be 5.2 sec for ASTRO-H and 74 sec for KOREASAT 1.

  15. The effect of inactivity on reactive hyperaemia in the human calf: a study with strain gauge plethysmography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroese, A J

    1977-02-01

    In order to study the influence of muscular inactivity on reactive hyperaemia, postischaemic blood flow was measued with strain gauge plethysmography in the calf of twenty-nine patients, who had been treated with a plaster cast for a trauma of the lower limb. The contralateral leg served as a comparison. In all but two patients postischaemic maximal flow was lower in the immobilized calf. A negative correlation existed between maximal flow and the duration of immobilization. In the course of 6 weeks after removal of the cast, the difference in maximal flow between both sides became insignificant. Venous volume and venous emptying were not different in the two limbs. The effect of inactivity on reactive hyperaemic response may be explained by an effect of inactivity on the arterioles, muscle atrophy, a decrease in capillarization and in oxidative capacity of the muscle fibres. It is concluded that inactivity and atrophy of the lower limb musculature in patients with peripheral arterial disease may be a contributing factor to the low reactive hyperaemic response in the calf of such patients.

  16. Prevalence and time trends in diabetes and physical inactivity among adult West African populations: the epidemic has arrived

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abubakari, A. R.; Lauder, W.; Jones, M. C.; Kirk, A.; Agyemang, C.; Bhopal, R. S.

    2009-01-01

    To determine the prevalence and distribution of, and trends in, physical inactivity and diabetes in adult West African populations. Systematic review and meta-analysis. Literature searches were conducted using four electronic databases. Journal hand searches and examination of citations of relevant

  17. Physical inactivity among adults with diabetes mellitus and depressive symptoms: results from two independent national health surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geulayov, Galit; Goral, Aviva; Muhsen, Khitam; Lipsitz, Joshua; Gross, Raz

    2010-01-01

    To examine the association between depressive symptoms and physical inactivity in community samples of patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). Two representative samples of Israeli adults (age ≥21 years) were analyzed: The First Israeli National Health Interview Survey (INHIS-1) (n=9509) and the Israel National Health Survey (INHS) (n=4859). Information was obtained about past-month depressive symptoms, physician-diagnosed DM and physical activity. Multiple logistic regression models were used to examine the association between level of depressive symptoms and physical inactivity among individuals with DM, adjusting for potential confounders. Prevalence of DM ranged from 7.2% (INHIS-1) to 8.7% (INHS). In both samples, physical inactivity was significantly more prevalent among persons with significant depressive symptoms, compared to those without depressive symptoms [INHIS-1: 67.0% vs. 50.6%; adjusted odds ratio (AOR): 1.57; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.05-2.35, P=.03; INHS: 71.4% vs. 43.9%; AOR: 2.67; 95% CI, 1.67-4.27, Passociated with a higher likelihood of physical inactivity in persons with DM. Body mass index of patients reporting no regular physical activity was elevated compared to persons who were physically active. This finding supports the view that identification and management of depression should be part of interventions designed to improve self care behaviors in patients with DM. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Inactivity-induced respiratory plasticity: protecting the drive to breathe in disorders that reduce respiratory neural activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strey, K A; Baertsch, N A; Baker-Herman, T L

    2013-11-01

    Multiple forms of plasticity are activated following reduced respiratory neural activity. For example, in ventilated rats, a central neural apnea elicits a rebound increase in phrenic and hypoglossal burst amplitude upon resumption of respiratory neural activity, forms of plasticity called inactivity-induced phrenic and hypoglossal motor facilitation (iPMF and iHMF), respectively. Here, we provide a conceptual framework for plasticity following reduced respiratory neural activity to guide future investigations. We review mechanisms giving rise to iPMF and iHMF, present new data suggesting that inactivity-induced plasticity is observed in inspiratory intercostals (iIMF) and point out gaps in our knowledge. We then survey conditions relevant to human health characterized by reduced respiratory neural activity and discuss evidence that inactivity-induced plasticity is elicited during these conditions. Understanding the physiological impact and circumstances in which inactivity-induced respiratory plasticity is elicited may yield novel insights into the treatment of disorders characterized by reductions in respiratory neural activity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Inactivity-induced respiratory plasticity: Protecting the drive to breathe in disorders that reduce respiratory neural activity☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strey, K.A.; Baertsch, N.A.; Baker-Herman, T.L.

    2013-01-01

    Multiple forms of plasticity are activated following reduced respiratory neural activity. For example, in ventilated rats, a central neural apnea elicits a rebound increase in phrenic and hypoglossal burst amplitude upon resumption of respiratory neural activity, forms of plasticity called inactivity-induced phrenic and hypoglossal motor facilitation (iPMF and iHMF), respectively. Here, we provide a conceptual framework for plasticity following reduced respiratory neural activity to guide future investigations. We review mechanisms giving rise to iPMF and iHMF, present new data suggesting that inactivity-induced plasticity is observed in inspiratory intercostals (iIMF) and point out gaps in our knowledge. We then survey conditions relevant to human health characterized by reduced respiratory neural activity and discuss evidence that inactivity-induced plasticity is elicited during these conditions. Understanding the physiological impact and circumstances in which inactivity-induced respiratory plasticity is elicited may yield novel insights into the treatment of disorders characterized by reductions in respiratory neural activity. PMID:23816599

  20. The Foci of In-Action Professional Judgement and Decision-Making in High-Level Adventure Sports Coaching Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Loel; Collins, Dave

    2017-01-01

    This article continues a theme of previous investigations by the authors and examines the focus of in-action reflection as a component of professional judgement and decision-making (PJDM) processes in high-level adventure sports coaching. We utilised a thematic analysis approach to investigate the decision-making practices of a sample of…

  1. Impact of physical inactivity on subcutaneous adipose tissue metabolism in healthy young male offspring of patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højbjerre, Lise; Sonne, MP; Alibegovic, AC

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Physical inactivity is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes and may be more detrimental in first-degree relative (FDR) subjects, unmasking underlying defects of metabolism. Using a positive family history of type 2 diabetes as a marker of increased genetic risk, the aim of this study...

  2. Effects of a six-month walking intervention on depression in inactive post-menopausal women: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, P; Ninot, G; Bernard, P L; Picot, M C; Jaussent, A; Tallon, G; Blain, H

    2015-01-01

    Physical inactivity and advanced age are associated with risk of depressive disorders. Physical activity can reduce depressive symptoms in older subjects with depressive disorders. We investigated whether a walking intervention program may decrease the occurrence of depressive symptoms in inactive post-menopausal women without depression. A total of 121 participants aged 57-75 years were randomly assigned to a six-month moderate intensity walking intervention (three times a week, 40 minutes per session, supervised and home-based) or to a control group (waiting list). Inactivity was assessed using the Physical Activity Questionnaire for the Elderly. Depression levels were measured pre- and post-intervention with the Beck depression inventory (BDI). Several baseline measures were considered as possible predictors of post-intervention BDI score. Participants in the walking intervention showed a significant decrease in depression as compared with controls. Baseline cognitive-BDI subscore, subjective health status, body mass index and adherence were post-intervention BDI score predictors. A six-month, three-session per week, moderate intensity walking intervention with a minimal 50% adherence rate reduces depression in post-menopausal women at risk for depression due to physical inactivity. This type of walking intervention could be considered as a widely accessible prevention strategy to prevent depressive symptoms in post-menopausal women at risk of depression.

  3. Prevalence and Correlates of Physical Inactivity during Leisure-Time and Commuting among Beneficiaries of Government Welfare Assistance in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Kaleta

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Physical activity (PA has well-documented health benefits helping to prevent development of non-communicable diseases. The aim of the study was to examine the prevalence and factors associated with physical inactivity during leisure-time (LTPA and commuting (CPA among adult social assistance beneficiaries in Piotrkowski district. The studied sample consisted of 1817 respondents. Over 73% of the study population did not meet the recommended levels of LTPA. Fifty two % of the respondents had none leisure-time physical activity and 21.5% exercised occasionally. Main reasons for not taking up LTPA included: high general physical activity (36.4%, lack of time (28.1%, no willingness to exercise (25.4%. Close to 82% of the surveyed population did not practice commuting physical activity (CPA. The men had higher risk for inactivity during LTPA compared to the women (OR = 1.35; 95% CI: 1.11–1.65; p ≤ 0.05. Higher odds of CPA inactivity were associated with unemployment, moderate and heavy drinking and having a number of health problems. The prevalence of physical inactivity among the social assistance recipients is much higher than it is in the general population. Promotion of an active lifestyle should take into consideration substantial differences between the general population and disadvantaged individuals and their various needs.

  4. An inactive lifestyle and low physical fitness are associated with functional somatic symptoms in adolescents. The TRAILS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssens, Karin A. M.; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.; Bonvanie, Irma J.; Rosmalen, Judith G. M.

    Objective: An inactive lifestyle has been associated with functional somatic symptoms (FSS), but findings are contradictory. Moreover, mediating factors in this relationship are unclear. We examined whether low physical activity was related to FSS in adolescents, and whether this association was

  5. Meta-Analyses of the Effects of Habitual Running on Indices of Health in Physically Inactive Adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hespanhol, L.C.; Pillay, J.; van Mechelen, W.; Verhagen, E.A.L.M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: In order to implement running to promote physical activity, it is essential to quantify the extent to which running improves health. Objective: The aim was to summarise the literature on the effects of endurance running on biomedical indices of health in physically inactive adults. Data

  6. Regional variations in the economic burden attributable to excess weight, physical inactivity and tobacco smoking across British Columbia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krueger, Hartmut; Koot, J M; Rasali, D P; Gustin, S E; Pennock, M

    INTRODUCTION: Prevalence rates of excess weight, tobacco smoking and physical inactivity vary substantially by geographical region within British Columbia (B.C.). The purpose of this study is to determine the potential reduction in economic burden in B.C. if all regions in the province achieved

  7. Aerobics, quality of life, and physiological indicators of inactive male students' cardiovascular endurances, in kashan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahram, Mohammad Ebrahim; Akkasheh, Gudarz; Akkasheh, Negar

    2014-06-01

    Studies show that lack of exercise and physical activity during childhood and teenage years is directly related to different diseases in adulthood. The main purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of an eight-week aerobic exercise on the quality of life as well as physiological indicators of cardiovascular endurance of inactive high school male students in Kashan. The study was a field trial using pretest and post-test. Three hundred high school male students in Kashan, Iran, were recruited and interviewed by the researchers, using a questionnaire. Of the inactive ones, 30 who reached the highest criteria standards, were selected as samples and randomly divided to two equal groups. The maximum consumed oxygen (VO2max) and resting heart rate were measured by Quinn aerobic test, and the quality of life was measured by the World Health Organization Quality of Life (WHOQOL-26-Breef) questionnaire. The exercise program included an eight-week aerobic exercise, three times per week, with 60%-75% of the maximum heart beat. During the exercise, the subjects had no other sport activity. To check the normal distribution of the data, Kolmogorov-Smirnov test was used. To evaluate the pretest and post-test results, paired t-test was used and for comparing the groups, independent t-test was applied. All the analyses were performed by SPSS software version 16. The mean ages of intervention and control groups were 17.46 ± 1.30 and 17.53 ± 1.18, respectively. The mean weight of the intervention group was 56.73 ± 9.91 kg and its mean body mass index (BMI) was 19.88 ± 3.42. In the control group, the mean weigh and BMI were 60.06 ± 11.96 kg and 20.79 ± 3.51, respectively. The quality of life and its components improved significantly in the intervention group (physical (P = 0.0001), mental (P = 0.0001), social (P = 0.0001), and environmental (P = 0.0001) aspects). VO2max (P = 0.001) and the resting heart beat (P = 0.0001) significantly improved in the intervention

  8. Rethinking exercise identity: a qualitative study of physically inactive cancer patients' transforming process while undergoing chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamsen, Lis; Andersen, Christina; Lillelund, Christian; Bloomquist, Kira; Møller, Tom

    2017-08-23

    To explore physically inactive breast and colon cancer patients' prediagnosis exercise history and attitudes to physical activity (PA) and experiences in initiating PA while undergoing adjuvant chemotherapy. An explorative qualitative study guided the interpretive analysis of semistructured, open-ended interviews conducted at initiation of chemotherapy and after 12 weeks. The study was embedded in a pilot randomised controlled trial. Participants were recruited from the Oncological Department at a hospital in Copenhagen, Denmark. 33 patients with cancer, median age 49 years: 25 patients with breast cancer and 8 with colon cancer, 72% with a low cardiac respiratory fitness level and the majority with a high level of education. Patients received adjuvant chemotherapy, oncologist's PA recommendation and exercise, cancer nurse specialist's counselling prior to allocation to PA interventions or waitlist control group. Prediagnosis exercise had been excluded from patients' daily lives due to perceptions of exercise as boring, lack of discipline and stressful work conditions for both genders. Recommendations from oncologists and nurses inspired the patients to reconsider their attitudes and behaviour by accepting recruitment and participation in PA interventions during chemotherapy. Despite extensive side effects, most patients adhered to their PA commitment due to their perception of the bodily, emotional and social benefits and support of healthcare professionals, peers and family. The patients' attitude towards exercise transformed from having no priority in patients' daily lives prediagnosis to being highly prioritised. This study identified four important phases in the exercise transformation process during the patients' treatment trajectory of relevance to clinicians in identifying, motivating and supporting physically inactive patients with cancer at long-term risk. Clinicians should address young, highly educated patients with cancer at onset of adjuvant

  9. Radium-226 in vegetation and substrates at inactive uranium mill sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marple, M.L.

    1980-01-01

    Results of a study of the content of radium-226 in plants growing on inactive uranium mill tailings sites in the Four Corners Region of the southwestern United States and in plants grown under greenhouse conditions with minimal surficial contamination are reported. Field plant samples and associated substrates were analyzed from two carbonate tailings sites in the Grants Mineral Belt of New Mexico. Radium activities in air-cleaned samples ranged from 5 to 368 pCi/g (dry weight) depending on species and location: activities in plants growing on local soils averaged 1.0 pCi/g. The talings and local soils contain 140 to 1400 pCi/g and 2.1 pCi/g, respectively. An evaluation of cleaning methods on selected samples showed that from 17 to 79% of the radium activity measured in air-cleaned samples was due to surficial contamination, which varied with species and location. A survey of 18 inactive uranium mill sites in the Four Corners Region was performed. Radium activity in plant tissues from nine species ranged from 2 to 210 pCi/g on bare tailings and from 0.3 to 30 pCi/g on covered tailings The radium content in most of the soil overburdens on the covered tailings piles was 10 to 17 pCi/g. An experiment was performed to measure radium-226 uptake by two species grown on tailings covered with a shallow (5 cm) soil layer. A grass, Sporobolus airoides (alkali sacaton) and a shrub, Atriplex canescens (four-wing saltbush), were studied. The tailings were a mixture of sands and slimes from a carbonate pile. The tailings treatments were plants grown in a soil cover over tailings; the controls were plants grown only in soil. Three soil types, dune sand, clay loam, and loam, were used. The radium activity of the plant tissue from the tailings treatment compared to that of the appropriate control was 1 to 19 times greater for the grass and 4 to 27 times greater for the shrub.

  10. Prevalence and time trends in diabetes and physical inactivity among adult West African populations: the epidemic has arrived.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abubakari, A R; Lauder, W; Jones, M C; Kirk, A; Agyemang, C; Bhopal, R S

    2009-09-01

    To determine the prevalence and distribution of, and trends in, physical inactivity and diabetes in adult West African populations. Systematic review and meta-analysis. Literature searches were conducted using four electronic databases. Journal hand searches and examination of citations of relevant articles were also undertaken. To be included, studies had to be population based, use clearly defined criteria for measuring diabetes and physical inactivity, present data that allowed calculation of the prevalence of diabetes or physical inactivity, and sample adult participants. Studies retrieved were appraised critically. Meta-analysis was performed using the DerSimonian-Laird random effect model. Twenty-one reports were retrieved for diabetes and 15 reports were retrieved for physical in/activity. Most studies (10 for diabetes and six for physical activity) were conducted solely among urban populations. The prevalence of diabetes in West Africa was approximately 4.0% [95% confidence interval (CI) 2.0-9.0] in urban adults and 2.6% (95%CI 1.5-4.4) in rural adults, and was similar in men and women [prevalence ratio (PR) 1.36, 95%CI 0.96-1.92]. Cumulative time trend analyses suggested an increase in the prevalence of diabetes among adults in urban West Africa, from approximately 3.0% (95%CI 1.0-7.0) to 4.0% (95%CI 2.0-9.0) in the past 10 years. The prevalence of inactivity in West Africa was 13% (95%CI 9.0-18.0). An association was found between physical inactivity and being older (> or = 50 years) (PR 1.82, 95%CI 1.36-2.44), female gender (PR 1.62, 95%CI 1.41-1.87) and urban residence (PR 2.04, 95%CI 1.58-2.63). Diabetes and physical inactivity are important public health issues in urban West Africa, with similar prevalences to wealthy industrialized countries. There is an urgent need for policy makers, politicians and health promotion experts to put measures in place to encourage active lifestyles and control diabetes in urban West Africa.

  11. The association of lifetime physical inactivity with head and neck cancer: a hospital-based case-control analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platek, Alexis J; Cannioto, Rikki A; Etter, John Lewis; Kim, Jae; Joseph, Janine M; Gulati, Nicholas R; Schmitt, Kristina L; Callahan, Emily; Khachatryan, Edgar; Nagy, Ryan; Minlikeeva, Albina; Brian Szender, J; Singh, Anurag K; Danziger, Iris; Moysich, Kirsten B

    2017-10-01

    Despite mounting epidemiological evidence suggesting an inverse association between recreational physical activity and cancer risk, evidence associated with head and neck cancer is scant. We conducted a case-control analysis to examine the associations of lifetime physical inactivity with the risk of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). We utilized data from the Patient Epidemiology Data System at Roswell Park Cancer Institute (RPCI). Participants included 246 patients with HNSCC and 504 cancer-free controls who received medical services at RPCI between 1990 and 1998. Participants were considered physically inactive if they did not participate in any regular, weekly recreational physical activity throughout their lifetime, prior to diagnosis. Multivariate logistic regression models were utilized to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) representing the association between lifetime physical inactivity and HNSCC risk. We observed a significant positive association between recreational physical inactivity and HNSCC risk (OR = 2.73, 95% CI 1.87-3.99, p < 0.001). In subgroup analyses by body mass index (BMI) (underweight/normal-weight: OR = 3.40, 95% CI 1.89-6.12, p < 0.001; overweight/obese: OR = 2.40, 95% CI 1.43-4.02, p < 0.001) and smoking status (former smoker: OR = 3.12, 95% CI 1.89-5.14, p < 0.001; never smoker: OR = 2.71, 95% CI 1.21-6.05, p = 0.020; current smoker: OR = 1.61, 95% CI 0.66-3.95, p = 0.300), significant positive associations were also observed. Results of the current analyses suggest that lifetime physical inactivity associates with HNSCC independent of BMI. In addition, physical inactivity may be a modifiable risk factor among never smokers. These data add to the growing body of evidence suggesting that physical inactivity may be an independent risk factor for cancer.

  12. Loss of catalytically inactive lipid phosphatase myotubularin-related protein 12 impairs myotubularin stability and promotes centronuclear myopathy in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandana A Gupta

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available X-linked myotubular myopathy (XLMTM is a congenital disorder caused by mutations of the myotubularin gene, MTM1. Myotubularin belongs to a large family of conserved lipid phosphatases that include both catalytically active and inactive myotubularin-related proteins (i.e., "MTMRs". Biochemically, catalytically inactive MTMRs have been shown to form heteroligomers with active members within the myotubularin family through protein-protein interactions. However, the pathophysiological significance of catalytically inactive MTMRs remains unknown in muscle. By in vitro as well as in vivo studies, we have identified that catalytically inactive myotubularin-related protein 12 (MTMR12 binds to myotubularin in skeletal muscle. Knockdown of the mtmr12 gene in zebrafish resulted in skeletal muscle defects and impaired motor function. Analysis of mtmr12 morphant fish showed pathological changes with central nucleation, disorganized Triads, myofiber hypotrophy and whorled membrane structures similar to those seen in X-linked myotubular myopathy. Biochemical studies showed that deficiency of MTMR12 results in reduced levels of myotubularin protein in zebrafish and mammalian C2C12 cells. Loss of myotubularin also resulted in reduction of MTMR12 protein in C2C12 cells, mice and humans. Moreover, XLMTM mutations within the myotubularin interaction domain disrupted binding to MTMR12 in cell culture. Analysis of human XLMTM patient myotubes showed that mutations that disrupt the interaction between myotubularin and MTMR12 proteins result in reduction of both myotubularin and MTMR12. These studies strongly support the concept that interactions between myotubularin and MTMR12 are required for the stability of their functional protein complex in normal skeletal muscles. This work highlights an important physiological function of catalytically inactive phosphatases in the pathophysiology of myotubular myopathy and suggests a novel therapeutic approach through

  13. Impact of poor sleep quality and physical inactivity on cognitive function in community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakakubo, Sho; Makizako, Hyuma; Doi, Takehiko; Tsutsumimoto, Kota; Lee, Sangyoon; Lee, Sungchul; Hotta, Ryo; Bae, Seongryu; Suzuki, Takao; Shimada, Hiroyuki

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine whether the combination of subjective sleep quality and physical activity is associated with cognitive performance among community-dwelling older adults. Cross-sectional data on 5381 older adults who participated in part of the National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology - Study of Geriatric Syndromes were analyzed. We assessed general cognitive impairment using the Mini-Mental State Examination, and also assessed story memory, attention, executive function and processing speed using the National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology Functional Assessment Tool. Physical activity was assessed using two questionnaires, and participants were categorized as active or inactive. Sleep quality was assessed using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, and participants were categorized as having poor (PS) or good sleep quality (GS). Participants in the inactive + PS group had worse performances than those in the active + GS group in all cognitive measures (Mini-Mental State Examination: P = 0.008, story memory: P = 0.007, other cognitive measures: P performances than those in the inactive + GS and active + PS groups in the trail-making test, part B, and the symbol digit substitution test (P performances than in the active + GS in the trail-making test, part B, and the symbol digit substitution test (P = 0.002 and P = 0.001, respectively). Inactivity and poor sleep quality were associated with poor cognitive performance among community-dwelling older adults. The combination of poor sleep quality and physical inactivity also worsened cognitive performance. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; 17: 1823-1828. © 2017 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  14. Hepatogastroenterologists' knowledge of inactive carriers and immunotolerant hepatitis B virus patients in France: results of a practice survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Causse, Xavier; Cadranel, Jean-François; Potier, Pascal; Hanslik, Bertrand; Denis, Jacques; Renou, Christophe; Delasalle, Patrick

    2015-05-01

    Before the 2012 revision of the EASL guidelines for the management of hepatitis B virus infection, we conducted a survey to determine how French nonacademic hepatogastroenterologists defined inactive hepatitis B virus carriers and immunotolerant patients. We asked 680 hepatogastroenterologists to complete a simple survey consisting of 11 multiple-choice questions. The participation rate was 32%. HBeAg positivity was not identified as a key criterion for the diagnosis of immunotolerance by 61.9% of the respondents. A total of 82.5 and 75.9% of the respondents identified repeatedly normal alanine transaminase levels and repeatedly low viremia (<2000 IU/ml), respectively, as relevant criteria for the HBsAg inactive carrier state. The question on the biological monitoring of inactive carriers and immunotolerant patients was answered by 78% of the respondents, 97% of whom considered determinations of α-fetoprotein concentration and viremia every 6 (n=58, 35%) or 12 months (n=105, 63%) to be useful. Overall, 19% of the respondents declared never having treated an immunotolerant patient; 81% reported that they had treated such patients under some circumstances: 73% before immunosuppression or chemotherapy, 54% treated pregnant women in their third trimester when viremia was greater than 7 log IU/ml, 49% treated health professionals to prevent contamination, and 31% before medically assisted procreation. The definition of 'inactive carrier state' seems to have been well assimilated, but immunotolerance remains poorly understood. Biological monitoring was frequently carried out for inactive carriers and immunotolerant patients, but the diversity of the responses obtained highlights the lack of clear recommendations for the follow-up of these populations.

  15. NUTRITIVE VALUE OF DIETS WITH INACTIVE DRY YEAST FOR SAANEN GOATS IN THE PERIPARTUM PERIOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BRUNA SUSAN DE LABIO MOLINA

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim was to evaluate the replacement of soybean meal by inactive dry yeast ( Saccharomyces cerevisiae from sugar cane on nutritive value of diets for Saanen goats in the peripartum. Twenty - four Saanen goats (nine primiparous, 55.35 ± 4.55 kg and fifteen multiparous, 73.12 ± 8.51 kg in prepartum and postpartum periods were distributed in a completely randomized design with a 3 × 2 (diet × parturition order factorial arrangement. Diets were composed of soybean meal, soybean meal plus dry yeast or dry yeast as protein source, and other ingredients: ground corn, mineral supplement and limestone. The roughage source used was the whole plant corn silage (40% of the total diet. Diets were evaluated as dry matter intake and digestibility of nutrients. The diet with total dry yeast inclusion promoted a reduction on the ether extract intake (postpartum and ether extract digestibility (prepartum and postpartum, due its lower ether extract content when compared to the other diets. Multiparous goats presented higher intakes for dry matter, nutrients and total digestible nutrients in both evaluated periods due their higher intake capacity. Primiparous goats in postpartum had better coefficients of digestibility for dry matter, organic matter, crude protein and total carbohydrates, and so a higher energetic value, attributed to total digestible nutrients compared to multiparous ones. Dry yeast can replace soybean meal with no changes on nutritive value of diets for Saanen goats.

  16. Acceptability of mobile health interventions to reduce inactivity-related health risk in central Pennsylvania adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Hsiang Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Insufficient physical activity and excessive sedentary behavior elevate health risk. Mobile applications (apps provide one mode for delivering interventions to modify these behaviors and reduce health risk. The purpose of this study was to characterize the need for and acceptability of health behavior interventions among rural adults and evaluate the interest in and the value of app-based interventions in this population. Central Pennsylvania adults with smartphones (N = 258 completed a brief web survey in October–November 2012. Most adults report one or both inactivity-related behavioral risk factors, would use a free app to modify those risk behaviors, and would pay a small amount for that app. Low-cost, efficacious apps to increase physical activity or reduce sedentary behavior should be promoted in public health practice. User experience should be at the forefront of this process to increase value and minimize burden in the service of long-term engagement, behavior change, and health risk reduction.

  17. Myofibroblasts revert to an inactive phenotype during regression of liver fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisseleva, Tatiana; Cong, Min; Paik, YongHan; Scholten, David; Jiang, Chunyan; Benner, Chris; Iwaisako, Keiko; Moore-Morris, Thomas; Scott, Brian; Tsukamoto, Hidekazu; Evans, Sylvia M.; Dillmann, Wolfgang; Glass, Christopher K.; Brenner, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Myofibroblasts produce the fibrous scar in hepatic fibrosis. In the carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) model of liver fibrosis, quiescent hepatic stellate cells (HSC) are activated to become myofibroblasts. When the underlying etiological agent is removed, clinical and experimental fibrosis undergoes a remarkable regression with complete disappearance of these myofibroblasts. Although some myofibroblasts apoptose, it is unknown whether other myofibroblasts may revert to an inactive phenotype during regression of fibrosis. We elucidated the fate of HSCs/myofibroblasts during recovery from CCl4- and alcohol-induced liver fibrosis using Cre-LoxP–based genetic labeling of myofibroblasts. Here we demonstrate that half of the myofibroblasts escape apoptosis during regression of liver fibrosis, down-regulate fibrogenic genes, and acquire a phenotype similar to, but distinct from, quiescent HSCs in their ability to more rapidly reactivate into myofibroblasts in response to fibrogenic stimuli and strongly contribute to liver fibrosis. Inactivation of HSCs was associated with up-regulation of the anti-apoptotic genes Hspa1a/b, which participate in the survival of HSCs in culture and in vivo. PMID:22566629

  18. The dragons of inaction: psychological barriers that limit climate change mitigation and adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gifford, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Most people think climate change and sustainability are important problems, but too few global citizens engaged in high-greenhouse-gas-emitting behavior are engaged in enough mitigating behavior to stem the increasing flow of greenhouse gases and other environmental problems. Why is that? Structural barriers such as a climate-averse infrastructure are part of the answer, but psychological barriers also impede behavioral choices that would facilitate mitigation, adaptation, and environmental sustainability. Although many individuals are engaged in some ameliorative action, most could do more, but they are hindered by seven categories of psychological barriers, or "dragons of inaction": limited cognition about the problem, ideological world views that tend to preclude pro-environmental attitudes and behavior, comparisons with key other people, sunk costs and behavioral momentum, discredence toward experts and authorities, perceived risks of change, and positive but inadequate behavior change. Structural barriers must be removed wherever possible, but this is unlikely to be sufficient. Psychologists must work with other scientists, technical experts, and policymakers to help citizens overcome these psychological barriers.

  19. Alternative Path Communication in Wide-Scale Cluster-Tree Wireless Sensor Networks Using Inactive Periods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leão, Erico; Montez, Carlos; Moraes, Ricardo; Portugal, Paulo; Vasques, Francisco

    2017-05-06

    The IEEE 802.15.4/ZigBee cluster-tree topology is a suitable technology to deploy wide-scale Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs). These networks are usually designed to support convergecast traffic, where all communication paths go through the PAN (Personal Area Network) coordinator. Nevertheless, peer-to-peer communication relationships may be also required for different types of WSN applications. That is the typical case of sensor and actuator networks, where local control loops must be closed using a reduced number of communication hops. The use of communication schemes optimised just for the support of convergecast traffic may result in higher network congestion and in a potentially higher number of communication hops. Within this context, this paper proposes an Alternative-Route Definition (ARounD) communication scheme for WSNs. The underlying idea of ARounD is to setup alternative communication paths between specific source and destination nodes, avoiding congested cluster-tree paths. These alternative paths consider shorter inter-cluster paths, using a set of intermediate nodes to relay messages during their inactive periods in the cluster-tree network. Simulation results show that the ARounD communication scheme can significantly decrease the end-to-end communication delay, when compared to the use of standard cluster-tree communication schemes. Moreover, the ARounD communication scheme is able to reduce the network congestion around the PAN coordinator, enabling the reduction of the number of message drops due to queue overflows in the cluster-tree network.

  20. Factors associated with leisure time physical inactivity in black individuals: hierarchical model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco José Gondim Pitanga

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. A number of studies have shown that the black population exhibits higher levels of leisure-time physical inactivity (LTPI, but few have investigated the factors associated with this behavior.Objective. The aim of this study was to analyze associated factors and the explanatory model proposed for LTPI in black adults.Methods. The design was cross-sectional with a sample of 2,305 adults from 20–96 years of age, 902 (39.1% men, living in the city of Salvador, Brazil. LTPI was analyzed using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ. A hierarchical model was built with the possible factors associated with LTPI, distributed in distal (age and sex, intermediate 1 (socioeconomic status, educational level and marital status, intermediate 2 (perception of safety/violence in the neighborhood, racial discrimination in private settings and physical activity at work and proximal blocks (smoking and participation in Carnival block rehearsals. We estimated crude and adjusted odds ratio (OR using logistic regression.Results. The variables inversely associated with LTPI were male gender, socioeconomic status and secondary/university education, although the proposed model explains only 4.2% of LTPI.Conclusions. We conclude that male gender, higher education and socioeconomic status can reduce LTPI in black adults.

  1. Phospholipase C-related catalytically inactive protein can regulate obesity, a state of peripheral inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosuke Yamawaki

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is defined as abnormal or excessive fat accumulation. Chronic inflammation in fat influences the development of obesity-related diseases. Many reports state that obesity increases the risk of morbidity in many diseases, including hypertension, dyslipidemia, type 2 diabetes, coronary heart disease, stroke, sleep apnea, and breast, prostate and colon cancers, leading to increased mortality. Obesity is also associated with chronic neuropathologic conditions such as depression and Alzheimer's disease. However, there is strong evidence that weight loss reduces these risks, by limiting blood pressure and improving levels of serum triglycerides, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL-cholesterol, and high-density lipoprotein (HDL-cholesterol. Prevention and control of obesity is complex, and requires a multifaceted approach. The elucidation of molecular mechanisms driving fat metabolism (adipogenesis and lipolysis aims at developing clinical treatments to control obesity. We recently reported a new regulatory mechanism in fat metabolism: a protein phosphatase binding protein, phospholipase C-related catalytically inactive protein (PRIP, regulates lipolysis in white adipocytes and heat production in brown adipocytes via phosphoregulation. Deficiency of PRIP in mice led to reduced fat accumulation and increased energy expenditure, resulting in a lean phenotype. Here, we evaluate PRIP as a new therapeutic target for the control of obesity.

  2. Are depressive symptoms related to physical inactivity in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkata, Anand; DeDios, Angelo; ZuWallack, Richard; Lahiri, Bimalin

    2012-01-01

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are physically inactive, and this predicts poor outcome. Factors influencing activity levels in COPD patients are poorly understood. Depression is common in COPD patients and may influence activity. Accordingly, in this pilot study, we evaluated the relationship between depressive symptoms and activity in clinically stable COPD (forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV(1)]/forced vital capacity BodyMedia Inc, Pittsburgh, PA) worn on the arm. The mean age was 69 ± 9 years and the FEV(1) was 49 ± 16%. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale depression scores in DEPR and non-DEPR patients were 12.0 ± 2.3 and 3.7 ± 2.0, respectively. There were no significant between-group differences in age, gender, body mass index, FEV(1), supplemental oxygen requirement, and walk distance. DEPR and non-DEPR patients did not differ in estimated steps per day (3490 ± 2020 vs 3634 ± 2000; P = .83) or minutes per day, with activity >3 metabolic equivalents (11 ± 7 vs 13 ± 9; P = .42). Steps correlated with the FEV(1) (r = 0.49; P = .002) and the 6-minute walk distance (r = 0.69; P = .0001). We were unable to demonstrate a relationship between depressive symptoms and directly measured physical activity level in patients with COPD.

  3. Neighborhood street scale elements, sedentary time and cardiometabolic risk factors in inactive ethnic minority women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca E Lee

    Full Text Available Cardiometabolic risk factors such as obesity, excess percent body fat, high blood pressure, elevated resting heart rate and sedentary behavior have increased in recent decades due to changes in the environment and lifestyle. Neighborhood micro-environmental, street scale elements may contribute to health above and beyond individual characteristics of residents.To investigate the relationship between neighborhood street scale elements and cardiometabolic risk factors among inactive ethnic minority women.Women (N = 410 completed measures of BMI, percent body fat, blood pressure, resting heart rate, sedentary behavior and demographics. Trained field assessors completed the Pedestrian Environment Data Scan in participants' neighborhoods. Data were collected from 2006-2008. Multiple regression models were conducted in 2011 to estimate the effect of environmental factors on cardiometabolic risk factors.Adjusted regression models found an inverse association between sidewalk buffers and blood pressure, between traffic control devices and resting heart rate, and a positive association between presence of pedestrian crossing aids and BMI (ps<.05. Neighborhood attractiveness and safety for walking and cycling were related to more time spent in a motor vehicle (ps<.05.Findings suggest complex relationships among micro-environmental, street scale elements that may confer important cardiometabolic benefits and risks for residents. Living in the most attractive and safe neighborhoods for physical activity may be associated with longer times spent sitting in the car.

  4. Madumycin II inhibits peptide bond formation by forcing the peptidyl transferase center into an inactive state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osterman, Ilya A.; Khabibullina, Nelli F.; Komarova, Ekaterina S.; Kasatsky, Pavel; Kartsev, Victor G.; Bogdanov, Alexey A.; Dontsova, Olga A.; Konevega, Andrey L.; Sergiev, Petr V.; Polikanov, Yury S. (InterBioScreen); (UIC); (MSU-Russia); (Kurchatov)

    2017-05-13

    The emergence of multi-drug resistant bacteria is limiting the effectiveness of commonly used antibiotics, which spurs a renewed interest in revisiting older and poorly studied drugs. Streptogramins A is a class of protein synthesis inhibitors that target the peptidyl transferase center (PTC) on the large subunit of the ribosome. In this work, we have revealed the mode of action of the PTC inhibitor madumycin II, an alanine-containing streptogramin A antibiotic, in the context of a functional 70S ribosome containing tRNA substrates. Madumycin II inhibits the ribosome prior to the first cycle of peptide bond formation. It allows binding of the tRNAs to the ribosomal A and P sites, but prevents correct positioning of their CCA-ends into the PTC thus making peptide bond formation impossible. We also revealed a previously unseen drug-induced rearrangement of nucleotides U2506 and U2585 of the 23S rRNA resulting in the formation of the U2506•G2583 wobble pair that was attributed to a catalytically inactive state of the PTC. The structural and biochemical data reported here expand our knowledge on the fundamental mechanisms by which peptidyl transferase inhibitors modulate the catalytic activity of the ribosome.

  5. The Efficiency of Inactive Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Biomass on Removing Arsenic from Aqueous Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MH Ehrampoush

    2014-05-01

    Methods:This experimental study was performed in laboratory scale and was performed on 243 synthetic samples in a batch system. In this study the effect of parameters such as contact time (5,15,30,60,120,min and 24 h, pH (5,7,9, fluoride concentration (100, 250, 500, 750,1000 µg/l and absorbent dosages (0.5,1,2/5,5g/l was evaluated. Finally biosorption kinetic and equilibrium isotherms of adsorbent was investigated. Results: The removal efficiency of inactive Saccharomyces cerevisiae was 89.49% at pH 5, adsorbent dose of 1g/L and initial metal concentration of 100 mg/L. Maximum uptake was observed after the Contact time of 60 minutes. In addition absorption isotherm followed pseudo-second order model with a maximum R2 = 0.999. Conclusion:The results of study showed that biosorption efficiency decreases with increase in pH of solution. Optimum pH of biosorption was 5. The Removal efficiency of arsenic enhanced with increase in mass of Saccharomyces cerevisiae up to 1 g/L, but The Removal efficiency decreased with increase in initial concentration of arsenic. Maximum absorption was observed in 15 minutes.

  6. Latest Quaternary rapid river incision across an inactive fold in the northern Chinese Tian Shan foreland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Honghua; Cheng, Lu; Wang, Zhen; Zhang, Tianqi; Lü, Yanwu; Zhao, Junxiang; Li, Youli; Zheng, Xiangmin

    2018-01-01

    This work focuses on the incision process over the Tuostai anticline, a fold of the proximal structure Belt I in the northern Chinese Tian Shan foreland, where the Sikeshu River has incised deeply into the alluvial gravels and the fold's underlying bedrock strata. Field investigation and geomorphic mapping define five terraces of the Sikeshu River (designated as T1 to T5 from oldest to youngest) preserved within the Tuostai anticline. 10Be surface exposure dating and optically stimulated luminescence dating constrain stabilization of the highest three terrace surfaces at about 80 ka (T1), 16 ka (T2), and 15 ka (T3), respectively. Around 16 ka, the calculated river incision rates significantly increase from 6 mm/yr. Undeformed longitudinal profiles of terraces T2, T3 and T4 over the Tuostai anticline suggest that this structure may have been tectonically inactive since stabilization of these three terraces. We thus think that the observed rapid river incision over the Tuostai anticline has not been largely forced by tectonic uplift. Instead, the progressively warmer and wetter palaeoclimatic condition within the Tian Shan range and its surrounding area during the period of ∼20-10 ka may have enhanced river incision across the Tuostai anticline. A reduced sediment/water ratio might have lowered the gradient of the Sikeshu River.

  7. Effects of Tagetes patula on Active and Inactive Stages of Root-Knot Nematodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marahatta, Sharadchandra P.; Wang, Koon-Hui; Sipes, Brent S.; Hooks, Cerruti R. R.

    2012-01-01

    Although marigold (Tagetes patula) is known to produce allelopathic compounds toxic to plant-parasitic nematodes, suppression of Meloidogyne incognita can be inconsistent. Two greenhouse experiments were conducted to test whether marigold is more effective in suppressing Meloidogyne spp. when it is active rather than dormant. Soils infested with Meloidogyne spp. were collected and conditioned in the greenhouse either by 1) keeping the soil dry (DRY), 2) irrigating with water (IRR), or 3) drenching with cucumber (Cucumis sativus) leachate (CL) for 5 wk. These soils were then either planted with cucumber, marigold or remained bare for 10 wk. Suppression of nematode by marigold was then assayed using cucumber. DRY conditioning resulted in the highest number of inactive nematodes, whereas CL and IRR had higher numbers of active nematodes than DRY. At the end of the cucumber bioassay, marigold suppressed the numbers of Meloidogyne females in cucumber roots if the soil was conditioned in IRR or CL, but not in DRY. However, in separate laboratory assays, marigold root leachate slightly reduced M. incognita J2 activity but did not reduce egg hatch (P > 0.05). These finding suggest that marigold can only suppress Meloidogyne spp. when marigold is actively growing. This further suggests that marigold will more efficiently suppress Meloidogyne spp. if planted when these nematodes are in active stage. PMID:23482862

  8. Deletion of DXZ4 on the human inactive X chromosome alters higher-order genome architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrow, Emily M.; Huntley, Miriam H.; Dudchenko, Olga; Stamenova, Elena K.; Durand, Neva C.; Sun, Zhuo; Huang, Su-Chen; Sanborn, Adrian L.; Machol, Ido; Shamim, Muhammad; Seberg, Andrew P.; Lander, Eric S.; Chadwick, Brian P.; Aiden, Erez Lieberman

    2016-01-01

    During interphase, the inactive X chromosome (Xi) is largely transcriptionally silent and adopts an unusual 3D configuration known as the “Barr body.” Despite the importance of X chromosome inactivation, little is known about this 3D conformation. We recently showed that in humans the Xi chromosome exhibits three structural features, two of which are not shared by other chromosomes. First, like the chromosomes of many species, Xi forms compartments. Second, Xi is partitioned into two huge intervals, called “superdomains,” such that pairs of loci in the same superdomain tend to colocalize. The boundary between the superdomains lies near DXZ4, a macrosatellite repeat whose Xi allele extensively binds the protein CCCTC-binding factor. Third, Xi exhibits extremely large loops, up to 77 megabases long, called “superloops.” DXZ4 lies at the anchor of several superloops. Here, we combine 3D mapping, microscopy, and genome editing to study the structure of Xi, focusing on the role of DXZ4. We show that superloops and superdomains are conserved across eutherian mammals. By analyzing ligation events involving three or more loci, we demonstrate that DXZ4 and other superloop anchors tend to colocate simultaneously. Finally, we show that deleting DXZ4 on Xi leads to the disappearance of superdomains and superloops, changes in compartmentalization patterns, and changes in the distribution of chromatin marks. Thus, DXZ4 is essential for proper Xi packaging. PMID:27432957

  9. Radiological survey of the inactive uranium-mill tailings at Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haywood, F.F.; Christian, D.J.; Ellis, B.S.; Hubbard, H.M. Jr.; Lorenzo, D.; Shinpaugh, W.H.

    1980-06-01

    The inactive uranium-mill tailings pile at Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico, contains approximately 1520 Ci of /sup 226/Ra in 2.4 million metric tons of tailings covering an area of 43 hectares. All of the former mill buildings were intact and, at the time of this survey, several were in use. The tailings have not been stabilized, but the crusty surface is reported to be resistant to wind erosion. The average gamma-ray exposure rate 1 m above the tailings is 720 ..mu..R/h while the average rate in the former mill area is 150 ..mu..R/h. The adjacent area, between the mill site, ponds, and tailings pile, has an average exposure rate of 230 ..mu..R/h. Gamma radiation measurements outside these areas, as well as the results of analyses of surface or near-surface sediment and soil samples, show fairly wide dispersion of contamination around the site. The subsurface distribution of /sup 226/Ra in 18 holes drilled at the site, calculated from gamma-ray monitoring data, is presented graphically and compared with measured concentrations in two holes.

  10. Tackling of unhealthy diets, physical inactivity, and obesity: health effects and cost-effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecchini, Michele; Sassi, Franco; Lauer, Jeremy A; Lee, Yong Y; Guajardo-Barron, Veronica; Chisholm, Daniel

    2010-11-20

    The obesity epidemic is spreading to low-income and middle-income countries as a result of new dietary habits and sedentary ways of life, fuelling chronic diseases and premature mortality. In this report we present an assessment of public health strategies designed to tackle behavioural risk factors for chronic diseases that are closely linked with obesity, including aspects of diet and physical inactivity, in Brazil, China, India, Mexico, Russia, and South Africa. England was included for comparative purposes. Several population-based prevention policies can be expected to generate substantial health gains while entirely or largely paying for themselves through future reductions of health-care expenditures. These strategies include health information and communication strategies that improve population awareness about the benefits of healthy eating and physical activity; fiscal measures that increase the price of unhealthy food content or reduce the cost of healthy foods rich in fibre; and regulatory measures that improve nutritional information or restrict the marketing of unhealthy foods to children. A package of measures for the prevention of chronic diseases would deliver substantial health gains, with a very favourable cost-effectiveness profile. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in inactive Crohn’s disease: Influence of thiopurine and biological treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Montes, Cristina; Ortiz, Vicente; Bastida, Guillermo; Rodríguez, Ester; Yago, María; Beltrán, Belén; Aguas, Mariam; Iborra, Marisa; Garrigues, Vicente; Ponce, Julio; Nos, Pilar

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the influence of thiopurines and biological drugs on the presence of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) in patients with inactive Crohn’s disease (CD). METHODS: This was a prospective study in patients with CD in remission and without corticosteroid treatment, included consecutively from 2004 to 2010. SIBO was investigated using the hydrogen glucose breath test. RESULTS: One hundred and seven patients with CD in remission were included. Almost 58% of patients used maintenance immunosuppressant therapy and 19.6% used biological therapy. The prevalence of SIBO was 16.8%. No association was observed between SIBO and the use of thiopurine Immunosuppressant (12/62 patients), administration of biological drugs (2/21 patients), or with double treatment with an anti-tumor necrosis factor drugs plus thiopurine (1/13 patients). Half of the patients had symptoms that were suggestive of SIBO, though meteorism was the only symptom that was significantly associated with the presence of SIBO on univariate analysis (P meteorism and a fistulizing pattern were associated with the presence of SIBO (P meteorism are associated with SIBO. PMID:25320539

  12. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in inactive Crohn's disease: influence of thiopurine and biological treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Montes, Cristina; Ortiz, Vicente; Bastida, Guillermo; Rodríguez, Ester; Yago, María; Beltrán, Belén; Aguas, Mariam; Iborra, Marisa; Garrigues, Vicente; Ponce, Julio; Nos, Pilar

    2014-10-14

    To investigate the influence of thiopurines and biological drugs on the presence of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) in patients with inactive Crohn's disease (CD). This was a prospective study in patients with CD in remission and without corticosteroid treatment, included consecutively from 2004 to 2010. SIBO was investigated using the hydrogen glucose breath test. One hundred and seven patients with CD in remission were included. Almost 58% of patients used maintenance immunosuppressant therapy and 19.6% used biological therapy. The prevalence of SIBO was 16.8%. No association was observed between SIBO and the use of thiopurine Immunosuppressant (12/62 patients), administration of biological drugs (2/21 patients), or with double treatment with an anti-tumor necrosis factor drugs plus thiopurine (1/13 patients). Half of the patients had symptoms that were suggestive of SIBO, though meteorism was the only symptom that was significantly associated with the presence of SIBO on univariate analysis (P meteorism and a fistulizing pattern were associated with the presence of SIBO (P meteorism are associated with SIBO.

  13. Investigation of long period crustal deformation on the inactive branch of the North Anatolian Fault Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akay, G.; Ozener, H.

    2009-05-01

    The western part of North Anatolian Fault (NAF) bifurcates around Mudurnu into two fault segments: northern and southern branch. The latter bifurcates again at west of Pamukova and creates middle strand. This study aimed to analyze crustal movement along the middle strand near Iznik which is considered as inactive fault. We focused on a microgeodetic network called General Command of Mapping-Istanbul Technical University (GCM-ITU) network around this segment. In order to obtain displacement values, five campaigns performed on the network which were used in the study. The displacements of the stations were estimated relative to the fixed stations located at the south of the network. The coordinates of the stations were calculated from the triangulation measurements realized in 1941 and 1963, trilateration measurements in 1981, and GPS campaigns in 2004 and 2007. Then, mean displacements of the network ranging between 7 mm/yr and 18 mm/yr were obtained for these years. In the second part of the study, the GPS data were re-processed by adding three stations from Marmara Continuous GPS Network (MAGNET). Details of MAGNET can be found Ergintav et al. (2002). Estimated displacements were ranging between 3 mm/yr and 13 mm/yr for 2004 and 2007. TUBI station of IGS network was taken as stable.

  14. Investigation of long period crustal deformation on the inactive branch of the North Anatolian Fault Zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Akay

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The western part of North Anatolian Fault (NAF bifurcates around Mudurnu into two fault segments: northern and southern branch. The latter bifurcates again at west of Pamukova and creates middle strand. This study aimed to analyze crustal movement along the middle strand near Iznik which is considered as inactive fault. We focused on a microgeodetic network called General Command of Mapping-Istanbul Technical University (GCM-ITU network around this segment. In order to obtain displacement values, five campaigns performed on the network which were used in the study. The displacements of the stations were estimated relative to the fixed stations located at the south of the network. The coordinates of the stations were calculated from the triangulation measurements realized in 1941 and 1963, trilateration measurements in 1981, and GPS campaigns in 2004 and 2007. Then, mean displacements of the network ranging between 7 mm/yr and 18 mm/yr were obtained for these years.

    In the second part of the study, the GPS data were re-processed by adding three stations from Marmara Continuous GPS Network (MAGNET. Details of MAGNET can be found Ergintav et al. (2002. Estimated displacements were ranging between 3 mm/yr and 13 mm/yr for 2004 and 2007. TUBI station of IGS network was taken as stable.

  15. Prognostic signature and clonality pattern of recurrently mutated genes in inactive chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtado, A M; Chen-Liang, T-H; Przychodzen, B; Hamedi, C; Muñoz-Ballester, J; Dienes, B; García-Malo, M D; Antón, A I; de Arriba, F; Teruel-Montoya, R; Ortuño, F J; Vicente, V; Maciejewski, J P; Jerez, A

    2015-08-28

    An increasing numbers of patients are being diagnosed with asymptomatic early-stage chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), with no treatment indication at baseline. We applied a high-throughput deep-targeted analysis, especially designed for covering widely TP53 and ATM genes, in 180 patients with inactive disease at diagnosis, to test the independent prognostic value of CLL somatic recurrent mutations. We found that 40/180 patients harbored at least one acquired variant with ATM (n=17, 9.4%), NOTCH1 (n=14, 7.7%), TP53 (n=14, 7.7%) and SF3B1 (n=10, 5.5%) as most prevalent mutated genes. Harboring one 'sub-Sanger' TP53 mutation granted an independent 3.5-fold increase of probability of needing treatment. Those patients with a double-hit ATM lesion (mutation+11q deletion) had the shorter median time to first treatment (17 months). We found that a genomic variable: TP53 mutations, most of them under the sensitivity of conventional techniques; a cell phenotypic factor: CD38-positive expression; and a classical marker as β2-microglobulin, remained as the unique independent predictors of outcome. The high-throughput determination of TP53 status, particularly in this set of patients frequently lacking high-risk chromosomal aberrations, emerges as a key step, not only for prediction modeling, but also for exploring mutation-specific therapeutic approaches and minimal residual disease monitoring.

  16. Engineering study of 50 miscellaneous inactive underground radioactive waste tanks located at the Hanford Site, Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman-Pollard, J.R.

    1994-03-02

    This engineering study addresses 50 inactive underground radioactive waste tanks. The tanks were formerly used for the following functions associated with plutonium and uranium separations and waste management activities in the 200 East and 200 West Areas of the Hanford Site: settling solids prior to disposal of supernatant in cribs and a reverse well; neutralizing acidic process wastes prior to crib disposal; receipt and processing of single-shell tank (SST) waste for uranium recovery operations; catch tanks to collect water that intruded into diversion boxes and transfer pipeline encasements and any leakage that occurred during waste transfer operations; and waste handling and process experimentation. Most of these tanks have not been in use for many years. Several projects have, been planned and implemented since the 1970`s and through 1985 to remove waste and interim isolate or interim stabilize many of the tanks. Some tanks have been filled with grout within the past several years. Responsibility for final closure and/or remediation of these tanks is currently assigned to several programs including Tank Waste Remediation Systems (TWRS), Environmental Restoration and Remedial Action (ERRA), and Decommissioning and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Closure (D&RCP). Some are under facility landlord responsibility for maintenance and surveillance (i.e. Plutonium Uranium Extraction [PUREX]). However, most of the tanks are not currently included in any active monitoring or surveillance program.

  17. Annual status report on the inactive uranium mill tailings sites remedial action program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-12-01

    Assessments of inactive uranium mill tailings sites in the United States led to the designation of 25 processing sites for remedial action under the provisions of Section 102(a) Public Law 95-604. The Department of Energy assessed the potential health effects to the public from the residual radioactive materials on or near the 25 sites; and, with the advice of the Environmental Protection Agency, the Secretary established priorities for performing remedial action. In designating the 25 sites and establishing the priorities for performing remedial action, the Department of Energy consulted with the Environmental Protection Agency, Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Department of the Interior, governors of the affected States, Navajo Nation, and appropriate property owners. Public participation in this process was encouraged. During Fiscal Year 1980, Department of Energy will be conducting surveys to verify the radiological characterization at the designated processing sites; developing cooperative agreements with the affected States; and initiating the appropriate National Environmental Policy Act documentation prior to conducting specific remedial actions.

  18. Effects of age and inactivity due to prolonged bed rest on atrophy of trunk muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikezoe, Tome; Mori, Natsuko; Nakamura, Masatoshi; Ichihashi, Noriaki

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of age and inactivity due to being chronically bedridden on atrophy of trunk muscles. The subjects comprised 33 young women (young group) and 41 elderly women who resided in nursing homes or chronic care institutions. The elderly subjects were divided into two groups: independent elderly group who were able to perform activities of daily living involving walking independently (n = 28) and dependent elderly group who were chronically bedridden (n = 13). The thickness of the following six trunk muscles was measured by B-mode ultrasound: the rectus abdominis, external oblique, internal oblique, transversus abdominis, thoracic erector spinae (longissimus) and lumbar multifidus muscles. All muscles except for the transversus abdominis and lumbar multifidus muscles were significantly thinner in the independent elderly group compared with those in the young group. The thicknesses of all muscles in the dependent elderly group was significantly smaller than that in the young group, whereas there were no differences between the dependent elderly and independent elderly groups in the muscle thicknesses of the rectus abdominis and internal oblique muscles. In conclusion, our results suggest that: (1) age-related atrophy compared with young women was less in the deep antigravity trunk muscles than the superficial muscles in the independent elderly women; (2) atrophy associated with chronic bed rest was more marked in the antigravity muscles, such as the back and transversus abdominis.

  19. Anthropometric determinants of rowing ergometer performance in physically inactive collegiate females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podstawski, R; Choszcz, Dj; Konopka, S; Klimczak, J; Starczewski, M

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate anthropometric characteristics as determinants of 500 m rowing ergometer performance in physically inactive collegiate females. In this cross-sectional study, which included 196 collegiate females aged 19-23 years not participating in regular physical activities, body mass (BM), body height (BH), length of upper limbs (LA), length of lower limbs (LL), body mass index (BMI), slenderness index (SI), and the Choszcz-Podstawski index (CPI) were measured and a stepwise multiple regression analysis was performed. Participants performed 500 m maximal effort on a Concept II rowing ergometer. BM, BH, LA, LL, and the BMI, SI and CPI indices were found to be statistically significant determinants of 500 m performance. The best results (T) were achieved by females whose BH ranged from 170 to 180 cm, with LA and LL ranging from 75 to 80 cm and 85 to 90 cm, respectively. The best fitting statistical model was identified as: T = 11.6793 LR - 0.1130 LR (2) - 0.0589 LN (2) + 29.2157 CPI(2) + 0.1370 LR·LN - 2.6926 LR·CPI - 211.7796. This study supports a need for additional studies focusing on understanding the importance of anthropometric differences in rowing ergometer performance, which could lead to establishing a better quality reference for evaluation of cardiorespiratory fitness tested using a rowing ergometer in collegiate females.

  20. Propofol Anesthesia Is Reduced in Phospholipase C-Related Inactive Protein Type-1 Knockout Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikaido, Yoshikazu; Furukawa, Tomonori; Shimoyama, Shuji; Yamada, Junko; Migita, Keisuke; Koga, Kohei; Kushikata, Tetsuya; Hirota, Kazuyoshi; Kanematsu, Takashi; Hirata, Masato; Ueno, Shinya

    2017-06-01

    The GABA type A receptor (GABAA-R) is a major target of intravenous anesthetics. Phospholipase C-related inactive protein type-1 (PRIP-1) is important in GABAA-R phosphorylation and membrane trafficking. In this study, we investigated the role of PRIP-1 in general anesthetic action. The anesthetic effects of propofol, etomidate, and pentobarbital were evaluated in wild-type and PRIP-1 knockout (PRIP-1 KO) mice by measuring the latency and duration of loss of righting reflex (LORR) and loss of tail-pinch withdrawal response (LTWR). The effect of pretreatment with okadaic acid (OA), a protein phosphatase 1/2A inhibitor, on propofol- and etomidate-induced LORR was also examined. PRIP-1 deficiency provided the reduction of LORR and LTWR induced by propofol but not by etomidate or pentobarbital, indicating that PRIP-1 could determine the potency of the anesthetic action of propofol. Pretreatment with OA recovered the anesthetic potency induced by propofol in PRIP-1 KO mice. OA injection enhanced phosphorylation of cortical the GABAA-R β3 subunit in PRIP-1 KO mice. These results suggest that PRIP-1-mediated GABAA-R β3 subunit phosphorylation might be involved in the general anesthetic action induced by propofol but not by etomidate or pentobarbital. Copyright © 2017 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  1. Design of a randomized-controlled trial on low-intensity aerobic wheelchair exercise for inactive persons with chronic spinal cord injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Scheer, Jan W.; de Groot, Sonja; Postema, Klaas; Veeger, DirkJan H. E. J.; van der Woude, Lucas H. V.

    Purpose: To investigate effects and working mechanisms of low-intensity aerobic wheelchair exercise on fitness, (upper-body) health and active lifestyle in inactive persons with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI). Methods: A multicenter randomized-controlled trial (RCT) in 40 inactive manual

  2. Design of a randomized-controlled trial on low-intensity aerobic wheelchair exercise for inactive persons with chronic spinal cord injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Scheer, J.W.; De Groot, S.; Postema, K.; Veeger, H.E.J.; van der Woude, L.H.V.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate effects and working mechanisms of low-intensity aerobic wheelchair exercise on fitness, (upper-body) health and active lifestyle in inactive persons with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI). Methods: A multicenter randomized-controlled trial (RCT) in 40 inactive manual

  3. Changing educational inequalities in sporting inactivity among adults in Germany: a trend study from 2003 to 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoebel, Jens; Finger, Jonas D; Kuntz, Benjamin; Kroll, Lars E; Manz, Kristin; Lange, Cornelia; Lampert, Thomas

    2017-06-06

    Social inequalities in health can be explained in part by the social patterning of leisure-time physical activity, such as non-participation in sports. This study is the first to explore whether absolute and relative educational inequalities in sporting inactivity among adults have changed in Germany since the early 2000s. Data from four cross-sectional national health surveys conducted in 2003 (n = 6890), 2009 (n = 16,418), 2010 (n = 17,145) and 2012 (n = 13,744) were analysed. The study population was aged 25-69 years in each survey. Sporting inactivity was defined as no sports participation during the preceding 3 months. The regression-based Slope Index of Inequality (SII) and Relative Index of Inequality (RII) were calculated to estimate the extent of absolute and relative educational inequalities in sporting inactivity, respectively. Sporting inactivity was consistently more prevalent in less-educated groups. The overall prevalence of sporting inactivity declined significantly over time. However, the decline was observed only in the high and medium education groups, while no change was observed in the low education group. Both absolute and relative educational inequalities in sporting inactivity were found to have widened significantly between 2003 (SII = 0.30, 95% CI = 0.25-0.35; RII = 2.08, 95% CI = 1.83-2.38) and 2012 (SII = 0.41, 95% CI = 0.37-0.45; RII = 3.44, 95% CI = 3.03-3.91). Interaction analysis showed that these increases in inequalities were larger in the younger population under the age of 50 than among the elderly. The findings suggest that the gap in sports participation between adults with high and low educational attainment has widened in both absolute and relative terms because of an increase in sports participation among the better educated. Health-enhancing physical activity interventions specifically targeted to less-educated younger adults are needed to prevent future increases in social inequalities in health.

  4. Changing educational inequalities in sporting inactivity among adults in Germany: a trend study from 2003 to 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Hoebel

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Social inequalities in health can be explained in part by the social patterning of leisure-time physical activity, such as non-participation in sports. This study is the first to explore whether absolute and relative educational inequalities in sporting inactivity among adults have changed in Germany since the early 2000s. Methods Data from four cross-sectional national health surveys conducted in 2003 (n = 6890, 2009 (n = 16,418, 2010 (n = 17,145 and 2012 (n = 13,744 were analysed. The study population was aged 25–69 years in each survey. Sporting inactivity was defined as no sports participation during the preceding 3 months. The regression-based Slope Index of Inequality (SII and Relative Index of Inequality (RII were calculated to estimate the extent of absolute and relative educational inequalities in sporting inactivity, respectively. Results Sporting inactivity was consistently more prevalent in less-educated groups. The overall prevalence of sporting inactivity declined significantly over time. However, the decline was observed only in the high and medium education groups, while no change was observed in the low education group. Both absolute and relative educational inequalities in sporting inactivity were found to have widened significantly between 2003 (SII = 0.30, 95% CI = 0.25–0.35; RII = 2.08, 95% CI = 1.83–2.38 and 2012 (SII = 0.41, 95% CI = 0.37–0.45; RII = 3.44, 95% CI = 3.03–3.91. Interaction analysis showed that these increases in inequalities were larger in the younger population under the age of 50 than among the elderly. Conclusions The findings suggest that the gap in sports participation between adults with high and low educational attainment has widened in both absolute and relative terms because of an increase in sports participation among the better educated. Health-enhancing physical activity interventions specifically targeted to less-educated younger adults are

  5. Pelvic floor muscle training versus no treatment, or inactive control treatments, for urinary incontinence in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumoulin, Chantale; Hay-Smith, E Jean C; Mac Habée-Séguin, Gabrielle

    2014-05-14

    Pelvic floor muscle training is the most commonly used physical therapy treatment for women with stress urinary incontinence (SUI). It is sometimes also recommended for mixed and, less commonly, urgency urinary incontinence. To determine the effects of pelvic floor muscle training for women with urinary incontinence in comparison to no treatment, placebo or sham treatments, or other inactive control treatments. We searched the Cochrane Incontinence Group Specialised Register, which contains trials identified from the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (1999 onwards), MEDLINE (1966 onwards) and MEDLINE In-Process (2001 onwards), and handsearched journals and conference proceedings (searched 15 April 2013) and the reference lists of relevant articles. Randomised or quasi-randomised trials in women with stress, urgency or mixed urinary incontinence (based on symptoms, signs, or urodynamics). One arm of the trial included pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT). Another arm was a no treatment, placebo, sham, or other inactive control treatment arm. Trials were independently assessed by two review authors for eligibility and methodological quality. Data were extracted then cross-checked. Disagreements were resolved by discussion. Data were processed as described in the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. Trials were subgrouped by diagnosis of urinary incontinence. Formal meta-analysis was undertaken when appropriate. Twenty-one trials involving 1281 women (665 PFMT, 616 controls) met the inclusion criteria; 18 trials (1051 women) contributed data to the forest plots. The trials were generally small to moderate sized, and many were at moderate risk of bias, based on the trial reports. There was considerable variation in the interventions used, study populations, and outcome measures. There were no studies of women with mixed or urgency urinary incontinence alone.Women with SUI who were in the PFMT groups were 8 times more likely

  6. Dietary and physical activity/inactivity factors associated with obesity in school-aged children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Rodriguez, Marcela; Melendez, Guillermo; Nieto, Claudia; Aranda, Marisol; Pfeffer, Frania

    2012-07-01

    Diet and physical activity (PA) are essential components of nutritional status. Adequate nutrition and an active lifestyle are key factors during childhood, because food habits track into adulthood. Children spend more time in school than in any other environment away from home. Studying the diet factors and patterns of PA that affect obesity risk in children during school hours and the complete school day can help identify opportunities to lower this risk. We directly measured the time children spent performing moderate to vigorous PA (MVPA) at school, compared the amount and intensity of PA during school hours with after-school hours, and tried to determine if diet behaviors and PA or inactivity were associated with excess weight and body fat. This cross-sectional study included 143 normal-weight (NLW) and 48 obese children aged 8-10 y. Diet data were obtained from two 24-h recalls. Body composition was measured by bioimpedance. Screen time and sports participation data were self-reported. NLW children drank/ate more dairy servings than the obese children, who consumed more fruit-flavored water than the NLW group. Consumption of soft drinks, sugar-added juices, and fresh juices was low in both groups. Children were less active during school hours than after school. MVPA was lower during school hours in the obese group than in the NLW group. Schools, parents, and authorities should be more involved in promoting strategies to improve the dietary habits and PA levels of school-aged children, because this group is not achieving the recommended level of daily MVPA.

  7. The effect of exercise intensity on endothelial function in physically inactive lean and obese adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Hallmark

    Full Text Available To examine the effects of exercise intensity on acute changes in endothelial function in lean and obese adults.Sixteen lean (BMI 30, age 26 ± 6 yr physically inactive adults were studied during 3 randomized admissions [control (C, no exercise, moderate-intensity exercise (M, @ lactate threshold (LT and high-intensity exercise (H, midway between LT and VO2peak (30 min]. Endothelial function was assessed by flow-mediated dilation (FMD at baseline and 1, 2, and 4 h post-exercise.RM ANCOVA revealed significant main effects for group, time, and group x condition interaction (p<0.05. A diurnal increase in FMD was observed in lean but not obese subjects. Lean subjects exhibited greater increases in FMD than obese subjects (p = 0.0005. In the obese group a trend was observed for increases in FMD at 2- and 4-hr after M (p = 0.08. For lean subjects, FMD was significantly elevated at all time points after H. The increase in FMD after H in lean subjects (3.2 ± 0.5% was greater than after both C (1.7 ± 0.4%, p = 0.015 and M (1.4 ± 0.4%, p = 0.002. FMD responses of lean and obese subjects significantly differed after C and H, but not after M.In lean young adults, high-intensity exercise acutely enhances endothelial function, while moderate-intensity exercise has no significant effect above that seen in the absence of exercise. The FMD response of obese adults is blunted compared to lean adults. Diurnal variation should be considered when examining the effects of acute exercise on FMD.

  8. Fitness, Sleep-Disordered Breathing, Symptoms of Depression, and Cognition in Inactive Overweight Children: Mediation Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojek, Monika M K; Montoya, Amanda K; Drescher, Christopher F; Newberry, Andrew; Sultan, Zain; Williams, Celestine F; Pollock, Norman K; Davis, Catherine L

    We used mediation models to examine the mechanisms underlying the relationships among physical fitness, sleep-disordered breathing (SDB), symptoms of depression, and cognitive functioning. We conducted a cross-sectional secondary analysis of the cohorts involved in the 2003-2006 project PLAY (a trial of the effects of aerobic exercise on health and cognition) and the 2008-2011 SMART study (a trial of the effects of exercise on cognition). A total of 397 inactive overweight children aged 7-11 received a fitness test, standardized cognitive test (Cognitive Assessment System, yielding Planning, Attention, Simultaneous, Successive, and Full Scale scores), and depression questionnaire. Parents completed a Pediatric Sleep Questionnaire. We used bootstrapped mediation analyses to test whether SDB mediated the relationship between fitness and depression and whether SDB and depression mediated the relationship between fitness and cognition. Fitness was negatively associated with depression ( B = -0.041; 95% CI, -0.06 to -0.02) and SDB ( B = -0.005; 95% CI, -0.01 to -0.001). SDB was positively associated with depression ( B = 0.99; 95% CI, 0.32 to 1.67) after controlling for fitness. The relationship between fitness and depression was mediated by SDB (indirect effect = -0.005; 95% CI, -0.01 to -0.0004). The relationship between fitness and the attention component of cognition was independently mediated by SDB (indirect effect = 0.058; 95% CI, 0.004 to 0.13) and depression (indirect effect = -0.071; 95% CI, -0.01 to -0.17). SDB mediates the relationship between fitness and depression, and SDB and depression separately mediate the relationship between fitness and the attention component of cognition.

  9. Physical activity in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: prevalence of inactivity and perceived barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeting, Joanna; Ingles, Jodie; Timperio, Anna; Patterson, Jillian; Ball, Kylie; Semsarian, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to determine the prevalence of physical inactivity and perceived barriers to physical activity among individuals with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), and to determine potential demographic, clinical and health-related factors influencing likelihood of meeting physical activity guidelines. Methods This was a cross-sectional study of consecutive patients (n=198) with HCM attending a specialist HCM centre from July 2014 to November 2015. The primary outcome measure was physical activity (minutes per day), as measured by self-report (International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ)) and objective means (ActiGraph accelerometer). For both, participants were classified as meeting guidelines if they did at least 150 min per week of physical activity. Quality of life (Short Form-36 V.2, SF-36v2), barriers to exercise and clinical–demographic data were also collected. Results In total, 54.8% of participants did not meet physical activity recommendations based on IPAQ, and 12.7% did not meet guidelines based on accelerometer data. The most commonly identified barriers to exercise were ‘pain interferes with my exercise’ (33%) and ‘I have an injury/disability that stops me’ (29%). Independent factors associated with meeting guidelines included older age (OR 0.66, 95% CI 0.51 to 0.85, p=0.002), higher education level (OR 2.31, 95% CI 1.08 to 4.93, p=0.03), better physical quality of life (OR 1.05, 95% CI 1.0 to 1.09, p=0.05) and more reported barriers (OR 0.71, 95% CI 0.56 to 0.91, p=0.01). Conclusions More than half of the patients with HCM did not meet minimum physical activity recommendations. Several barriers to exercise among individuals with HCM exist, and provide the basis for targeted interventions to promote physical activity and improve overall health in patients with HCM. PMID:27547438

  10. Personalised Prescription of Scalable High Intensity Interval Training to Inactive Female Adults of Different Ages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline L Mair

    Full Text Available Stepping is a convenient form of scalable high-intensity interval training (HIIT that may lead to health benefits. However, the accurate personalised prescription of stepping is hampered by a lack of evidence on optimal stepping cadences and step heights for various populations. This study examined the acute physiological responses to stepping exercise at various heights and cadences in young (n = 14 and middle-aged (n = 14 females in order to develop an equation that facilitates prescription of stepping at targeted intensities. Participants completed a step test protocol consisting of randomised three-minute bouts at different step cadences (80, 90, 100, 110 steps·min-1 and step heights (17, 25, 30, 34 cm. Aerobic demand and heart rate values were measured throughout. Resting metabolic rate was measured in order to develop female specific metabolic equivalents (METs for stepping. Results revealed significant differences between age groups for METs and heart rate reserve, and within-group differences for METs, heart rate, and metabolic cost, at different step heights and cadences. At a given step height and cadence, middle-aged females were required to work at an intensity on average 1.9 ± 0.26 METs greater than the younger females. A prescriptive equation was developed to assess energy cost in METs using multilevel regression analysis with factors of step height, step cadence and age. Considering recent evidence supporting accumulated bouts of HIIT exercise for health benefits, this equation, which allows HIIT to be personally prescribed to inactive and sedentary women, has potential impact as a public health exercise prescription tool.

  11. Physical activity in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: prevalence of inactivity and perceived barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeting, Joanna; Ingles, Jodie; Timperio, Anna; Patterson, Jillian; Ball, Kylie; Semsarian, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the prevalence of physical inactivity and perceived barriers to physical activity among individuals with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), and to determine potential demographic, clinical and health-related factors influencing likelihood of meeting physical activity guidelines. This was a cross-sectional study of consecutive patients (n=198) with HCM attending a specialist HCM centre from July 2014 to November 2015. The primary outcome measure was physical activity (minutes per day), as measured by self-report (International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ)) and objective means (ActiGraph accelerometer). For both, participants were classified as meeting guidelines if they did at least 150 min per week of physical activity. Quality of life (Short Form-36 V.2, SF-36v2), barriers to exercise and clinical-demographic data were also collected. In total, 54.8% of participants did not meet physical activity recommendations based on IPAQ, and 12.7% did not meet guidelines based on accelerometer data. The most commonly identified barriers to exercise were 'pain interferes with my exercise' (33%) and 'I have an injury/disability that stops me' (29%). Independent factors associated with meeting guidelines included older age (OR 0.66, 95% CI 0.51 to 0.85, p=0.002), higher education level (OR 2.31, 95% CI 1.08 to 4.93, p=0.03), better physical quality of life (OR 1.05, 95% CI 1.0 to 1.09, p=0.05) and more reported barriers (OR 0.71, 95% CI 0.56 to 0.91, p=0.01). More than half of the patients with HCM did not meet minimum physical activity recommendations. Several barriers to exercise among individuals with HCM exist, and provide the basis for targeted interventions to promote physical activity and improve overall health in patients with HCM.

  12. Groundwater monitoring at three Oak Ridge National Laboratory inactive waste impoundments: results after one year

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francis, C. W.; Stansfield, R. G.

    1986-10-01

    To determine if the migration of potential contaminants from three inactive waste impoundments at Oak Ridge National Laboratory poses a threat to groundwater quality, at least one upgradient groundwater monitoring well and threee downgradient monitoring wells were installed at each impoundment in early 1985. These three unlined impoundments, formerly used to collect and, in some instances, treat wastewater are: the 3513 impoundment; the Old Hydrofracture Facility (OHF) impoundment; and the Homogeneous Reactor Experimnt No. 2 impoundment. Groundwater samples were collected quarterly for one year. Analyses were conducted for the groundwater protection parameters promulgated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. The groundwater samples were also analyzed for polychlorinated biphenyls, copper, nickel, zinc, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 137/Cs, and tritium. The contaminants found most often to affect groundwater quality at all three waste impoundments were radionuclides. For example, mean concentrations of gross beta and gross alpha activity exceeded drinking water limits at all three sites. The gross beta limit was exceeded at the 3513 and OHF impoundments by either /sup 90/Sr or tritium levels. At the 3513 impoundment, there was substantial evidence that the downgradient groundwater has been contaminated by chromium and lead and possibly by halogenated organic compounds. At the OHF impoundment, the mean level of tritium measured in the upgradient well (about 91,000 Bq/L as compared with 80,000 Bq/L in the downgradient wells) indicated that the groundwater quality has been affected by the radioactive wastes buried in the low-level radioactive waste burial ground solid waste storage area-5 upgradient of the impoundment. Testing for groundwater contamination, disclosed statistically significant contamination at all three sites.

  13. Dietary and Physical Activity/Inactivity Factors Associated with Obesity in School-Aged Children123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Rodriguez, Marcela; Melendez, Guillermo; Nieto, Claudia; Aranda, Marisol; Pfeffer, Frania

    2012-01-01

    Diet and physical activity (PA) are essential components of nutritional status. Adequate nutrition and an active lifestyle are key factors during childhood, because food habits track into adulthood. Children spend more time in school than in any other environment away from home. Studying the diet factors and patterns of PA that affect obesity risk in children during school hours and the complete school day can help identify opportunities to lower this risk. We directly measured the time children spent performing moderate to vigorous PA (MVPA) at school, compared the amount and intensity of PA during school hours with after-school hours, and tried to determine if diet behaviors and PA or inactivity were associated with excess weight and body fat. This cross-sectional study included 143 normal-weight (NLW) and 48 obese children aged 8–10 y. Diet data were obtained from two 24-h recalls. Body composition was measured by bioimpedance. Screen time and sports participation data were self-reported. NLW children drank/ate more dairy servings than the obese children, who consumed more fruit-flavored water than the NLW group. Consumption of soft drinks, sugar-added juices, and fresh juices was low in both groups. Children were less active during school hours than after school. MVPA was lower during school hours in the obese group than in the NLW group. Schools, parents, and authorities should be more involved in promoting strategies to improve the dietary habits and PA levels of school-aged children, because this group is not achieving the recommended level of daily MVPA. PMID:22798003

  14. [Obesity, physical activity and inactivity among adolescents in Morelos, Mexico: a longitudinal study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, Claudia; Hernández, Bernardo; Moreno, Hortensia; Hernández-Girón, Carlos; Campero, Lourdes; Cruz, Aurelio; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo

    2007-09-01

    The prevalence of obesity in childhood and adolescence has increased in Mexico. This increase can be explained partly by a decrease in physical activity. The objective of this study was to assess the association between the prevalence of obesity and overweight with physical activity and inactivity among Mexican adolescents. We analyzed data from a longitudinal study with baseline and follow-up measures in 446 adolescents 12 to 17 years old, attending public schools in Cuernavaca, Morelos, Mexico. We collected information on weight, physical activity and demographic characteristics. Obesity and overweight were determined using as indicador the body mass index, and the cutoff points proposed by the International Obesity Task Force. The baseline prevalence of obesity or overweight was 37.22% (42.99% for males and 30.95% for females), and in the final measure 34.30% (38.46% for males and 32.28% for females). The median time of TV viewing was 3.90 h/d, with 0.73 h/d dedicated to vigorous physical activity and 0.58 h/d to moderate physical activity. Using logistic regression, after adjustment for obesity in the baseline measure, sex and clustering by school, we found no significant associations between the prevalence of obesity or overweight with time dedicated to TV viewing, vigorous or moderate physical activity. However, when conducting the analysis with an interaction term by sex, we found significantly lower risk of obesity or overweight associated with an increase in vigorous physical activity among males only (beta = 0.22, 95% CI (0.05, 0.89). Results suggest that vigorous physical activity may reduce the risk of obesity or overweight among male adolescents.

  15. Employment status and health: understanding the health of the economically inactive population in Scotland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brown Judith

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the association between health and unemployment has been well examined, less attention has been paid to the health of the economically inactive (EI population. Scotland has one of the worst health records compared to any Western European country and the EI population account for 23% of the working age population. The aim of this study is to investigate and compare the health outcomes and behaviours of the employed, unemployed and the EI populations (further subdivided into the permanently sick, looking after home and family [LAHF] and others in Scotland. Methods Using data from the 2003 Scottish Health Survey, the differences in health and health behaviours among the employed, unemployed and the subgroups of the EI population were examined. Results Both low educational attainment and residence in a deprived community were more likely in the permanently sick group. The LAHF and the unemployed showed worse self-reported health and limiting longstanding illness compared to the employed but no significant differences were observed between these groups. The permanently sick group had significantly poorer health outcomes than all the other economic groups. Similar to the unemployed and LAHF they are more likely to smoke than the employed but less likely (along with LAHF and ‘others’ to exhibit heavy alcohol consumption. Interestingly, the LAHF showed better mental health than the rest of the EI group, but a similar mental health status to the unemployed. On the physical health element of lung function, the LAHF were no worse than the employed. Conclusion While on-going health promotion and vocational rehabilitation efforts need to be directed towards all, our data suggests that the EI group is at higher risk and policies and strategies directed at this group may need particular attention.

  16. Scabies mite inactive serine proteases are potent inhibitors of the human complement lectin pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone L Reynolds

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Scabies is an infectious skin disease caused by the mite Sarcoptes scabiei and has been classified as one of the six most prevalent epidermal parasitic skin diseases infecting populations living in poverty by the World Health Organisation. The role of the complement system, a pivotal component of human innate immunity, as an important defence against invading pathogens has been well documented and many parasites have an arsenal of anti-complement defences. We previously reported on a family of scabies mite proteolytically inactive serine protease paralogues (SMIPP-Ss thought to be implicated in host defence evasion. We have since shown that two family members, SMIPP-S D1 and I1 have the ability to bind the human complement components C1q, mannose binding lectin (MBL and properdin and are capable of inhibiting all three human complement pathways. This investigation focused on inhibition of the lectin pathway of complement activation as it is likely to be the primary pathway affecting scabies mites. Activation of the lectin pathway relies on the activation of MBL, and as SMIPP-S D1 and I1 have previously been shown to bind MBL, the nature of this interaction was examined using binding and mutagenesis studies. SMIPP-S D1 bound MBL in complex with MBL-associated serine proteases (MASPs and released the MASP-2 enzyme from the complex. SMIPP-S I1 was also able to bind MBL in complex with MASPs, but MASP-1 and MASP-2 remained in the complex. Despite these differences in mechanism, both molecules inhibited activation of complement components downstream of MBL. Mutagenesis studies revealed that both SMIPP-Ss used an alternative site of the molecule from the residual active site region to inhibit the lectin pathway. We propose that SMIPP-Ss are potent lectin pathway inhibitors and that this mechanism represents an important tool in the immune evasion repertoire of the parasitic mite and a potential target for therapeutics.

  17. Wave breaking in the surf zone and deep-water in a non-hydrostatic RANS model. Part 2: Turbulence and mean circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derakhti, Morteza; Kirby, James T.; Shi, Fengyan; Ma, Gangfeng

    2016-11-01

    Field-scale modeling of wave-breaking-induced turbulence and mean circulation is still challenging. Although Boussinesq-type models have been successfully used to study field-scale wave transformation and wave-breaking-driven circulation, they cannot provide turbulence or the vertical structure of the velocity field. In addition, the applicability of such models is limited to shallow water. In Part 1 (Derakhti et al., 2016b) of this study, we showed that the non-hydrostatic σ-coordinate RANS model NHWAVE, as described by Derakhti et al. (2016a), accurately predicts organized wave motions and total wave-breaking-induced energy dissipation from deep-water up to the swash zone using a few vertical σ-layers. In this paper, our goal is to examine what level of detail of wave-breaking-induced turbulence and mean circulation, both in depth- and steepness-limited breaking waves, can be reproduced by NHWAVE. Further, effects of modeled turbulent eddy viscosity on the predicted time-averaged velocity distribution is discussed. We establish that NHWAVE is capable of predicting the structure of the mean velocity and vorticity fields including large-scale breaking-induced coherent vortices in deep-water breaking events; where the absence of turbulence-induced eddy viscosity results in the overprediction of the velocity and vorticity field in the breaking region. We show that NHWAVE reduces the required CPU time up to two orders of magnitude in comparison with a comparable VOF-based simulation.

  18. Dependence of solvent quality on the composition of copolymers: experiment and theory for solutions of P(MMA-ran-t-BMA) in toluene and in chloroform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bercea, Maria; Wolf, Bernhard A

    2015-01-21

    The interaction of toluene with P(MMA-ran-t-BMA) and with the corresponding homopolymers was determined via vapor pressure measurements at 30, 50 and 70 °C. A unified thermodynamic approach served for the modeling of the results. It is capable of describing the behavior of the different solutions by means of two adjustable parameters, one representing the effective number of solvent segments and the other accounting for the interactions between the components. The solvent quality of toluene passes a maximum, a minimum and another maximum upon an increase of the t-BMA content of the copolymer at all temperatures. A similar behavior is discernable from vapor pressure data of chloroform published for the same copolymers. The heats of mixing for toluene depend strongly on temperature; at 50 °C they are all endothermal with the exception of PMMA, for which the value obtained from vapor pressures at 30 °C agrees very well with published caloric data.

  19. Partial budgeting assessment of the treatment of pyometra, follicular cysts and ovarian inactivity causing postpartum anoestrus in dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    el-Tahawy, Abd el-Gawad Salah; Fahmy, Mostafa Mohammed

    2011-02-01

    A total of 412 multiparous German Holstein cows were screened for postpartum pyometra, follicular cysts and ovarian inactivity to assess economic and productivity losses in relation to pharmaceutical expenditures. Our results show that cows treated for pyometra with prostaglandin f2 alpha (PGF2α) and oxytetracycline had significantly (Pcows or those treated with PGF2α+cephapirin or PGF2α alone. Milk yields from untreated cows affected by follicular cysts were significantly (Pcows treated with gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH)- and GnRH+PGF2α. In addition, the use of GnRH to treat cows with ovarian inactivity resulted in significantly (P<0.05) lower costs and greater total and net return values compared to untreated controls. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Personality, tobacco consumption, physical inactivity, obesity markers, and metabolic components as risk factors for cardiovascular disease in the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pocnet, Cornelia; Antonietti, Jean-Philippe; Strippoli, Marie-Pierre F; Glaus, Jennifer; Rossier, Jérôme; Preisig, Martin

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between personality traits, tobacco consumption, physical inactivity, obesity markers and metabolic components as cardiovascular risk factors (CVRFs). A total of 2543 participants from the general population (CoLaus|PsyCoLaus) had provided complete information on physical health and unhealthy behaviors and completed the Revised NEO Five-Factor Inventory. Our results show a strong cross-correlation between obesity markers and metabolic components suggesting that their combination could represent an important CVRF. Moreover, socio-demographic characteristics, tobacco consumption, and physical inactivity were associated with both obesity markers and metabolic components latent traits. The conscientiousness personality trait was significantly associated with obesity markers, but played a modest role. Indeed, higher conscientiousness was associated with lower level of obesity indicators. However, no link between personality and metabolic components were found. In sum, our data suggest that health related behaviours have more effect on the development of cardiovascular diseases than personality traits.

  1. Physical inactivity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: Data from twenty-one countries in a cross-sectional, international study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sokka, T.; Hakkinen, A.; Kautiainen, H.

    2008-01-01

    exercise: >80% in 7 countries, 60-80% in 12 countries, and 45% and 29% in 2 countries, respectively. Physical inactivity was associated with female sex, older age, lower education, obesity, comorbidity, low functional capacity, and higher levels of disease activity, pain, and fatigue. Conclusion. In many......Objective. Regular physical activity is associated with decreased morbidity and mortality. Traditionally, patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have been advised to limit physical exercise. We studied the prevalence of physical activity and associations with demographic and disease...... 58 sites in 21 countries were enrolled in QUEST-RA: 79% were women, >90% were white, mean age was 57 years, and mean disease duration was 11.6 years. Only 13.8% of all patients reported physical exercise >= 3 times weekly. The majority of the patients were physically inactive with no regular weekly...

  2. Pattern of active and inactive sequences of diabetes self-monitoring in mobile phone and paper diary users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padhye, Nikhil S; Jing Wang

    2015-01-01

    In a pilot randomized controlled trial involving overweight or obese participants with type 2 diabetes, we find that smartphone users have sharply higher adherence to self-monitoring of diet, physical activity, blood glucose, and body weight, as compared to paper diary users. By characterizing the pattern of adherence with the probability of continuation of active and inactive sequences of self-monitoring, we find that smartphone users have longer active sequences of self-monitoring of all four behaviors that were being monitored. Smartphone users are also quicker to resume self-monitoring of diet and physical activity after a lapse in self-monitoring, whereas paper diary users have shorter inactive sequences for monitoring blood glucose and body weight. The findings are informative for data collection methodology in this burgeoning area of research.

  3. Redox-inactive metal ions promoted the catalytic reactivity of non-heme manganese complexes towards oxygen atom transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Cholho; Yang, Ling; Lv, Zhanao; Mo, Wanling; Chen, Zhuqi; Li, Guangxin; Yin, Guochuan

    2015-05-21

    Redox-inactive metal ions can modulate the reactivity of redox-active metal ions in a variety of biological and chemical oxidations. Many synthetic models have been developed to help address the elusive roles of these redox-inactive metal ions. Using a non-heme manganese(II) complex as the model, the influence of redox-inactive metal ions as a Lewis acid on its catalytic efficiency in oxygen atom transfer was investigated. In the absence of redox-inactive metal ions, the manganese(II) catalyst is very sluggish, for example, in cyclooctene epoxidation, providing only 9.9% conversion with 4.1% yield of epoxide. However, addition of 2 equiv. of Al(3+) to the manganese(II) catalyst sharply improves the epoxidation, providing up to 97.8% conversion with 91.4% yield of epoxide. EPR studies of the manganese(II) catalyst in the presence of an oxidant reveal a 16-line hyperfine structure centered at g = 2.0, clearly indicating the formation of a mixed valent di-μ-oxo-bridged diamond core, Mn(III)-(μ-O)2-Mn(IV). The presence of a Lewis acid like Al(3+) causes the dissociation of this diamond Mn(III)-(μ-O)2-Mn(IV) core to form monomeric manganese(iv) species which is responsible for improved epoxidation efficiency. This promotional effect has also been observed in other manganese complexes bearing various non-heme ligands. The findings presented here have provided a promising strategy to explore the catalytic reactivity of some di-μ-oxo-bridged complexes by adding non-redox metal ions to in situ dissociate those dimeric cores and may also provide clues to understand the mechanism of methane monooxygenase which has a similar diiron diamond core as the intermediate.

  4. A comparison of cold and acid activation of big renin and of inactive renin in normal plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsueh, W A; Luetscher, J A; Carlson, E; Grislis, G; Elbaum, D; Chavarri, M

    1978-10-01

    Normal human plasma contains "inactive renin," whose ability to generate angiotensin I increases after exposure to pH 3.3. Big renin is a partially inactive enzyme of larger molecular weight, which is also activated at pH 3.3, and is found of pregnant women, and in amniotic fluid, but not in normal plasma. We have compared the effects of acid exposure and storage at 4 and -4 C on normal plasma and plasma containing big renin. The concentration of inactive renin in normal plasma was approximately equal to that of normal active renin, and its activity increased slowly on prolonged standing at -4 but not 4 C. In contrast, the activity of big renin increased by 50% as early as 1-3 days at 4 C and increased even more quickly at -4 C. Acid treatment of plasma containing big renin caused 4-10 times greater increase in active renin than similar treatment of normal plasma. During gel filtration, both cold-activated and previously acidified big renin coeluted with unactivated big renin. These data indicate that big renin is highly susceptible to cold or acid activation and that such activation of big renin does not result in a detectable decrease in its molecular weight of 60,000 daltons. Furthermore, acid and cold seem to activate the same pool of inactive renin in normal plasma. Although both normal and big renin are stable for long periods below -20 C, a serious overestimate of plasma renin activity can occur if plasma is stored just above its freezing point before assay.

  5. Physical inactivity and associated factors in Iranian children and adolescents: the Weight Disorders Survey of the CASPIAN-IV study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roya Kelishadi

    2017-03-01

    Conclusion: We found a considerably high prevalence of physical inactivity in Iranian children and adolescents, with higher rates among girls and older ages. However, we did not find correlation between PA and socioeconomic status (SES. Because of the positive relationship between PA and ST, future studies should consider the complex interaction of these two items. Multidisciplinary policies should be considered in increasing PA programs among children and adolescents.

  6. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings sites at Rifle, Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-02-01

    This appendix assesses the present conditions and data gathered about the two inactive uranium mill tailings sites near Rifle, Colorado, and the designated disposal site six miles north of Rifle in the area of Estes Gulch. It consolidates available engineering, radiological, geotechnical, hydrological, meteorological, and other information pertinent to the design of the Remedial Action Plan (RAP). The data characterize conditions at the mill, tailings, and disposal site so that the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC) may complete final designs for the remedial actions.

  7. High rates of endometrial cancer among Pacific women in New Zealand: the role of diabetes, physical inactivity, and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Ineke; Sarfati, Diana; Ikeda, Takayoshi; Atkinson, June; Blakely, Tony

    2012-06-01

    To determine the endometrial cancer rates, and the proportion attributable to diabetes mellitus (DM), physical inactivity, and overweight/obesity, by ethnicity with a focus on Pacific women in New Zealand. Linked census-cancer records (1981-2004) were used to determine incidence rates of endometrial cancer by ethnicity. Health survey data (2006-2007) were used to determine risk factor prevalence by ethnicity. Relative risks for the association between diabetes, obesity, physical inactivity and endometrial cancer were sourced from published studies. Population attributable risk (PAR) methods, with Monte Carlo simulation, were used to estimate the PAR% by ethnicity and applied to 2001-2004 cancer rates. Pacific women had 2.61 (95 % confidence interval 2.22-3.05) times the endometrial cancer rate of European/Other women pooled over time, and the most rapidly increasing rates over time with the rate ratio increasing from 1.96 (1.14-3.37) in 1981/1986 to 3.78 (3.03-4.71) in 2001/2004 (p for trend = 0.14). Pacific women had the highest PAR% for DM, physical inactivity, and overweight/obesity (63.1 %), followed by Māori (58.6 %) and European/Other (48.6 %). Applying these PAR% to 2001-2004 endometrial cancer rates, the rate ratio comparing Pacific to European/Other endometrial cancer reduced from 3.8 for total cancer (attributable plus non-attributable) to 2.3 for non-attributable cancer, and the rate difference reduced by 79 % from 51 to 11 per 100,000. Pacific women have high endometrial cancer rates in New Zealand. Some, but not all, of the ethnic inequalities were explained by measured differences in obesity/overweight, DM, and physical inactivity.

  8. Group studio cycling; an effective intervention to improve cardio-metabolic health in overweight physically inactive individuals

    OpenAIRE

    Faulkner, SH; Pugh, JK; Hood, TM; Menon, K; King, JA; Nimmo, MA

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Supervised, laboratory based studies of high intensity interval training (HIIT) is effective at improving health markers in groups at risk of cardiovascular and metabolic disease. Studio cycling, incorporating aerobic and high intensity exercise, may offer a platform for the implementation of HIIT within the wider community. \\ud Methods: Eight, overweight, physically inactive (95%. Mean and peak intensity were equivalent to 83% and 97% of HRmax·VO2max increased from 27.1 ± 4.7 m...

  9. Personality, tobacco consumption, physical inactivity, obesity markers, and metabolic components as risk factors for cardiovascular disease in the general population.

    OpenAIRE

    Pocnet, C.; Antonietti, J P; Strippoli, M.F.; Glaus, J.; Rossier, J.; Preisig, M

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between personality traits, tobacco consumption, physical inactivity, obesity markers and metabolic components as cardiovascular risk factors (CVRFs). A total of 2543 participants from the general population (CoLaus|PsyCoLaus) had provided complete information on physical health and unhealthy behaviors and completed the Revised NEO Five-Factor Inventory. Our results show a strong cross-correlation between obesity markers and metabolic ...

  10. Low Energy Turnover of Physically Inactive Participants as a Determinant of Insufficient Mineral and Vitamin Intake in NHANES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydenreich, Juliane; Melzer, Katarina; Flury, Céline; Kayser, Bengt

    2017-07-14

    Micronutrient requirements do not scale linearly with physical activity-related energy expenditure (AEE). Inactive persons may have insufficient micronutrient intake because of low energy intake (EI). We extracted data from NHANES 2003-2006 on 4015 adults (53 ± 18 years (mean ± SD), 29 ± 6 kg/m², 48% women) with valid physical activity (accelerometry) and food intake (2 × 24 h-dietary recall) measures. Total energy expenditure (TEE) was estimated by summing the basal metabolic rate (BMR, Harris-Benedict), AEE, and 10% of TEE for the thermic effect of food, to calculate the physical activity levels (PAL = TEE/BMR). Energy intake (EI) was scaled to match TEE assuming energy balance. Adjusted food intake was then analyzed for energy and micronutrient content and compared to estimated average requirements. The NHANES population was physically insufficiently active. There were 2440 inactive (PAL < 1.4), 1469 lightly to moderately active (PAL1.4 < 1.7), 94 sufficiently active (PAL1.7 < 2.0), and 12 very active participants (PAL ≥ 2.0). The inactive vs. active had significantly lower intake for all micronutrients apart from vitamin A, B12, C, K, and copper (p < 0.05). The inactive participants had insufficient intake for 6/19 micronutrients, while the active participants had insufficient intake for 5/19 (p < 0.05) micronutrients. Multiple linear regression indicated a lower risk for insufficient micronutrient intake for participants with higher PAL and BMI (p < 0.001). Symmetrical up-scaling of PAL and EI to recommended physical activity levels reduced the frequency of micronutrient insufficiencies. It follows that prevalence of insufficient micronutrient intake from food in NHANES might be partly determined by low energy turnover from insufficient PAL.

  11. Metaphase chromosome analysis by ligation-mediated PCR: heritable chromatin structure and a comparison of active and inactive X chromosomes.

    OpenAIRE

    Hershkovitz, M; Riggs, A D

    1995-01-01

    We report that ligation-mediated PCR (LMPCR) can be used for high-resolution study of metaphase chromosomes, and we discuss the role of metaphase chromatin structure in the preservation of differentiated cell states. The X chromosome-linked human PGK1 (phosphoglycerate kinase 1) promoter region was investigated, and euchromatic active X chromosome (Xa) metaphase chromatin was compared with interphase Xa chromatin and to heterochromatic inactive X chromosome (Xi) metaphase and interphase chrom...

  12. Climate change adaptation, damages and fossil fuel dependence. An RETD position paper on the costs of inaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katofsky, Ryan; Stanberry, Matt; Hagenstad, Marca; Frantzis, Lisa

    2011-07-15

    The Renewable Energy Technology Deployment (RETD) agreement initiated this project to advance the understanding of the ''Costs of Inaction'', i.e. the costs of climate change adaptation, damages and fossil fuel dependence. A quantitative estimate was developed as well as a better understanding of the knowledge gaps and research needs. The project also included some conceptual work on how to better integrate the analyses of mitigation, adaptation, damages and fossil fuel dependence in energy scenario modelling.

  13. THE EVOLUTION OF SOME BIOCHEMICAL PARAMETERS IN THE HONEYBEES’ HAEMOLYMPH (A. M. CARPATHICA COLLECTED IN THE INACTIVE SEASON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AGRIPINA SAPCALIU

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The biochemical analyses of the blood are largely used for the routine diagnosis and especially for the metabolic survey in farm animals. These facts conduct us to the idea that similar analyses, applied on honeybee hemolymph, could be used IN monitoring the healthy state of honeybee colonies. The present studies represent preliminary researches, which aimed to investigate the variability of the main biochemical parameters in the hemolymph of the healthy honeybees (Apis mellifera in inactive season. The researches were carried out on honeybee samples collected from 5 honeybee colonies belonging to a breeding apiary of the Institute for Beekeeping Research and Development from Bucharest. In order to perform the biochemical analyses, the honeybees samples, consisting in 50 individuals on sample (10 individuals/colony were randomly collected and their haemolimph collected, at different time intervals, in inactive season (fall-winter. Totally, there were collected 250 haemolyph samples in a 2 years interval and the following 21 biochemical parameters were analysed: GLU, HDL-c, ALP, T-cho, Tprot, Alb., BUN, LDH, CPK,, Mg, IP, GGT, GOT, GPT, Ca, Cre,, Amy, T–BIL, TG, UA.. The test was carried out after the collection and processing of the samples using the SPOTCHEM EZSP4430, equipment with dry kits, the slides technique, respectively .During the 2nd part of the inactive season, the values of most biochemical parameters increase in different proportions, their levels being maintained also in the first part of the active seasons (April, May, June.The values obtained for the main studied biochemical parameters in the haemolymph of the healthy honeybees collected from honeybee colonies kept in natural conditions show a highly variable evolution in the two consecutive years of experiments during the inactive season.

  14. Microbial community differentiation between active and inactive sulfide chimneys of the Kolumbo submarine volcano, Hellenic Volcanic Arc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christakis, Christos A; Polymenakou, Paraskevi N; Mandalakis, Manolis; Nomikou, Paraskevi; Kristoffersen, Jon Bent; Lampridou, Danai; Kotoulas, Georgios; Magoulas, Antonios

    2018-01-01

    Over the last decades, there has been growing interest about the ecological role of hydrothermal sulfide chimneys, their microbial diversity and associated biotechnological potential. Here, we performed dual-index Illumina sequencing of bacterial and archaeal communities on active and inactive sulfide chimneys collected from the Kolumbo hydrothermal field, situated on a geodynamic convergent setting. A total of 15,701 OTUs (operational taxonomic units) were assigned to 56 bacterial and 3 archaeal phyla, 133 bacterial and 16 archaeal classes. Active chimney communities were dominated by OTUs related to thermophilic members of Epsilonproteobacteria, Aquificae and Deltaproteobacteria. Inactive chimney communities were dominated by an OTU closely related to the archaeon Nitrosopumilus sp., and by members of Gammaproteobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria, Planctomycetes and Bacteroidetes. These lineages are closely related to phylotypes typically involved in iron, sulfur, nitrogen, hydrogen and methane cycling. Overall, the inactive sulfide chimneys presented highly diverse and uniform microbial communities, in contrast to the active chimney communities, which were dominated by chemolithoautotrophic and thermophilic lineages. This study represents one of the most comprehensive investigations of microbial diversity in submarine chimneys and elucidates how the dissipation of hydrothermal activity affects the structure of microbial consortia in these extreme ecological niches.

  15. Structural analyses of human thymidylate synthase reveal a site that may control conformational switching between active and inactive states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dan; Jansson, Anna; Sim, Daniel; Larsson, Andreas; Nordlund, Pär

    2017-08-11

    Thymidylate synthase (TS) is the sole enzyme responsible for de novo biosynthesis of thymidylate (TMP) and is essential for cell proliferation and survival. Inhibition of human TS (hTS) has been extensively investigated for cancer chemotherapy, but several aspects of its activity and regulation are still uncertain. In this study, we performed comprehensive structural and biophysical studies of hTS using crystallography and thermal shift assay and provided the first detailed structural information on the conformational changes induced by ligand binding to the hTS active site. We found that upon binding of the antifolate agents raltitrexed and nolatrexed, the two insert regions in hTS, the functions of which are unclear, undergo positional shifts toward the catalytic center. We investigated the inactive conformation of hTS and found that the two insert regions are also involved in the conformational transition between the active and inactive state of hTS. Moreover, we identified a ligand-binding site in the dimer interface, suggesting that the cavity in the dimer interface could serve as an allosteric site of hTS to regulate the conformational switching between the active and inactive states. On the basis of these findings, we propose a regulatory mechanism of hTS activity that involves allosteric regulation of interactions of hTS with its own mRNA depending on cellular demands for TMP. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Active and inactive enhancers co-operate to exert localized and long-range control of gene regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proudhon, Charlotte; Snetkova, Valentina; Raviram, Ramya; Lobry, Camille; Badri, Sana; Jiang, Tingting; Hao, Bingtao; Trimarchi, Thomas; Kluger, Yuval; Aifantis, Iannis; Bonneau, Richard; Skok, Jane A

    2016-01-01

    V(D)J recombination relies on the presence of proximal enhancers that activate the antigen receptor (AgR) loci in a lineage and stage specific manner. Unexpectedly we find that both active and inactive AgR enhancers co-operate to disseminate their effects in a localized and long-range manner. Here we demonstrate the importance of short-range contacts between active enhancers that constitute an Igk super-enhancer in B cells. Deletion of one element reduces the interaction frequency between other enhancers in the hub, which compromises the transcriptional output of each component. We further establish that in T cells long-range contact and co-operation between the inactive Igk enhancer, MiEκ and the active Tcrb enhancer, Eβ, alters enrichment of CBFβ binding in a manner that impacts Tcrb recombination. These findings underline the complexities of enhancer regulation and point to a role for localized and long-range enhancer-sharing between active and inactive elements in lineage and stage specific control. PMID:27239026

  17. Early loss of Xist RNA expression and inactive X chromosome associated chromatin modification in developing primordial germ cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana de Napoles

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The inactive X chromosome characteristic of female somatic lineages is reactivated during development of the female germ cell lineage. In mouse, analysis of protein products of X-linked genes and/or transgenes located on the X chromosome has indicated that reactivation occurs after primordial germ cells reach the genital ridges.We present evidence that the epigenetic reprogramming of the inactive X-chromosome is initiated earlier than was previously thought, around the time that primordial germ cells (PGCs migrate through the hindgut. Specifically, we find that Xist RNA expression, the primary signal for establishment of chromosome silencing, is extinguished in migrating PGCs. This is accompanied by displacement of Polycomb-group repressor proteins Eed and Suz(12, and loss of the inactive X associated histone modification, methylation of histone H3 lysine 27.We conclude that X reactivation in primordial germ cells occurs progressively, initiated by extinction of Xist RNA around the time that germ cells migrate through the hindgut to the genital ridges. The events that we observe are reminiscent of X reactivation of the paternal X chromosome in inner cell mass cells of mouse pre-implantation embryos and suggest a unified model in which execution of the pluripotency program represses Xist RNA thereby triggering progressive reversal of epigenetic silencing of the X chromosome.

  18. Structures of the inactive and active states of RIP2 kinase inform on the mechanism of activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Pellegrini

    Full Text Available Innate immune receptors NOD1 and NOD2 are activated by bacterial peptidoglycans leading to recruitment of adaptor kinase RIP2, which, upon phosphorylation and ubiquitination, becomes a scaffold for downstream effectors. The kinase domain (RIP2K is a pharmaceutical target for inflammatory diseases caused by aberrant NOD2-RIP2 signalling. Although structures of active RIP2K in complex with inhibitors have been reported, the mechanism of RIP2K activation remains to be elucidated. Here we analyse RIP2K activation by combining crystal structures of the active and inactive states with mass spectrometric characterization of their phosphorylation profiles. The active state has Helix αC inwardly displaced and the phosphorylated Activation Segment (AS disordered, whilst in the inactive state Helix αC is outwardly displaced and packed against the helical, non-phosphorylated AS. Biophysical measurements show that the active state is a stable dimer whilst the inactive kinase is in a monomer-dimer equilibrium, consistent with the observed structural differences at the dimer interface. We conclude that RIP2 kinase auto-phosphorylation is intimately coupled to dimerization, similar to the case of BRAF. Our results will help drug design efforts targeting RIP2 as a potential treatment for NOD2-RIP2 related inflammatory diseases.

  19. Blood donor to inactive donor transition in the Basel region between 1996 and 2011: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volken, T; Buser, A; Holbro, A; Bart, T; Infanti, L

    2015-08-01

    For the prevention of blood shortages, it is essential for blood banks to design and implement donor recruitment and donor retention strategies that take into account the determinants of donor return. We studied the behaviour of first-time blood donors in the region of Basel, Switzerland, between 1996 and 2011 and described factors associated with transition from active to inactive donor in two successive first-time donor cohorts (1996-2002, 2003-2008). The risk of becoming an inactive donor was associated with being younger and female, not being a 0-negative donor and living in an urban area. Over time, hazards of becoming an inactive donor were converging for individuals living in non-urban and urban areas as were those of younger and older donors. After their first donation, 73.6% and 67.5% of males in the 1996-2002 and 2003-2008 cohorts, respectively, donated at least once in the following 24 months. The proportion of returning female donors was 71.8% and 65.4%, respectively. The increased volatility of first-time blood donors suggests that marketing actions and strategies aimed at increasing return rates should be reinforced, especially for younger and female blood donors. © 2015 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  20. Hazard ranking system evaluation of CERCLA inactive waste sites at Hanford: Volume 2: Engineered-facility sites (HISS data base)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jette, S.J.; Lamar, D.A.; McLaughlin, T.J.; Sherwood, D.R.; Van Houten, N.C.; Stenner, R.D.; Cramer, K.H.; Higley, K.A.

    1988-10-01

    The purpose of this report is to formally document the assessment activities at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site. These activities were carried out pursuant to the DOE orders that address the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Program for the cleanup of inactive waste sites. The DOE orders incorporate the US Environmental Protection Agency methodology, which is based on the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986. This methodology includes: PA/SI, remedial investigation/feasibility study, record of decision, design and implementation of remedial action, operation and monitoring, and verification monitoring. Volume 1 of this report discusses the CERCLA inactive waste-site evaluation process, assumptions, and results of the Hazard Ranking System methodology employed. Volume 2 presents the data on the individual CERCLA engineered-facility sites at Hanford, as contained in the Hanford Inactive Site Surveillance (HISS) Data Base. Volume 3 presents the data on the individual CERCLA unplanned-release sites at Hanford, as contained in the HISS Data Base. 13 refs.

  1. THE EFFECTS OF PROLONGED PHYSICAL INACTIVITY INDUCED BY BED REST ON COGNITIVE FUNCTIONING IN HEALTHY MALE PARTICIPANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Dolenc

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A growing body of scientific evidence indicates that physical activity beneficially influences cognitive functioning. Less thoroughly investigated are the cognitive outcomes of reduced physical activity levels. The purpose of the study was to determine the effects of prolonged physical inactivity induced by bed rest on the participant’s cognitive functioning. Bed rest is a well-accepted method by which an acute stage of human adaptation to weightlessness in space flights is simulated, as well as an important model to study the consequences of extreme physical inactivity in humans. The subjects participating in the study consisted of fifteen healthy males aged between 19 and 65 years who were exposed to 14-day horizontal bed rest in a strict hospital environment. To assess the cognitive functions of the participants, a neuropsychological test battery was administered before and after the bed rest experiment. There was no significant impairment in cognitive performance after the 14-day bed rest on all tests, except in the measurements of delayed recall in the group of older adults. The results suggest that cognitive functions remained relatively stable during the period of physical immobilization. The obtained results have been discussed taking the possible contributing factors into account such as the practice effect, the relatively short duration of bed rest, and the choice of the cognitive measures administered. The study also provides evidence that favourable living and psychosocial conditions can protect one against cognitive decline in the case of extreme physical inactivity.

  2. Modification of the ATP inhibitory site of the Ascaris suum phosphofructokinase results in the stabilization of an inactive T state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, G.S.J.; Cook, P.F.; Harris, B.G. (Univ. of North Texas, Fort Worth (United States))

    1991-10-15

    Treatment of the Ascaris suum phosphofructokinase (PFK) with 2{prime},3{prime}-dialdehyde ATP (oATP) results in an enzyme form that is inactive. The conformational integrity of the active site, however, is preserved, suggesting that oATP modification locks the PFK into an inactive T state that cannot be activated. A rapid, irreversible first-order inactivation of the PFK is observed in the presence of oATP. The rate of inactivation is saturable and gives a K{sub oATP} of 1.07 {plus minus} 0.27 mM. Complete protection against inactivation is afforded by high concentrations of ATP. This desensitized enzyme incorporates only 0.2-0.3 mol of ({sup 3}H)oATP/subunit, suggesting that in te native enzyme inactivation perhaps results from the modification of the ATP inhibitory site rather than the catalytic site. Modification of an active-site thiol by 4,4{prime}-dithiodipyridine is prevented yb ATP before and after oATP treatment. Finally, gel filtration HPLC studies show that the oATP-modified enzyme retains its tetrameric state and neither the tryptophan fluorescence nor the circular dichroic spectra of the modified enzyme are affected by fructose 2,6-bisphosphate, suggesting that the enzyme is locked into a tetrameric inactive T state.

  3. Effects of different activity and inactivity paradigms on myosin heavy chain gene expression in striated muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, K. M.; Haddad, F.

    2001-01-01

    The goal of this mini-review is to summarize findings concerning the role that different models of muscular activity and inactivity play in altering gene expression of the myosin heavy chain (MHC) family of motor proteins in mammalian cardiac and skeletal muscle. This was done in the context of examining parallel findings concerning the role that thyroid hormone (T(3), 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine) plays in MHC expression. Findings show that both cardiac and skeletal muscles of experimental animals are initially undifferentiated at birth and then undergo a marked level of growth and differentiation in attaining the adult MHC phenotype in a T(3)/activity level-dependent fashion. Cardiac MHC expression in small mammals is highly sensitive to thyroid deficiency, diabetes, energy deprivation, and hypertension; each of these interventions induces upregulation of the beta-MHC isoform, which functions to economize circulatory function in the face of altered energy demand. In skeletal muscle, hyperthyroidism, as well as interventions that unload or reduce the weight-bearing activity of the muscle, causes slow to fast MHC conversions. Fast to slow conversions, however, are seen under hypothyroidism or when the muscles either become chronically overloaded or subjected to intermittent loading as occurs during resistance training and endurance exercise. The regulation of MHC gene expression by T(3) or mechanical stimuli appears to be strongly regulated by transcriptional events, based on recent findings on transgenic models and animals transfected with promoter-reporter constructs. However, the mechanisms by which T(3) and mechanical stimuli exert their control on transcriptional processes appear to be different. Additional findings show that individual skeletal muscle fibers have the genetic machinery to express simultaneously all of the adult MHCs, e.g., slow type I and fast IIa, IIx, and IIb, in unique combinations under certain experimental conditions. This degree of

  4. Childhood attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptoms are risk factors for obesity and physical inactivity in adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalife, Natasha; Kantomaa, Marko; Glover, Vivette; Tammelin, Tuija; Laitinen, Jaana; Ebeling, Hanna; Hurtig, Tuula; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Rodriguez, Alina

    2014-04-01

    To prospectively investigate the association and directionality between attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms and obesity from childhood to adolescence in the general population. We examined whether obesogenic behaviors, namely, physical inactivity and binge eating, underlie the potential ADHD symptom-obesity association. We explored whether childhood conduct disorder (CD) symptoms are related to adolescent obesity/physical inactivity. At 7 to 8 years (n = 8,106), teachers reported ADHD and CD symptoms, and parents reported body mass index (BMI) and physically active play. At 16 years (n = 6,934), parents reported ADHD symptoms; adolescents reported physical activity (transformed to metabolic equivalent of task [MET] hours per week) and binge eating; BMI and waist-hip ratio (WHR) were measured via clinical examination. Obesity was defined using the International Obesity Task Force (IOTF) cut-offs for BMI and the 95th percentile cut-off for WHR. Childhood ADHD symptoms significantly predicted adolescent obesity, rather than the opposite. Inattention-hyperactivity symptoms at 8 years were associated with indices of obesity at 16 years (obese BMI: odds ratio [OR] = 1.91, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.10-3.33; 95th percentile WHR: OR = 1.71, 95% CI = 1.05-2.78), adjusted for gender, baseline BMI, physical activity, family structure change, and maternal education. Child CD symptoms associated with indices of adolescent obesity. Reduced physically active play in childhood predicted adolescent inattention (OR = 1.61, 95% CI = 1.16-2.24). Childhood ADHD and CD symptoms were linked with physical inactivity in adolescence (inattention-hyperactivity; OR = 1.60, 95% CI = 1.20-2.13), but not binge eating. Physical inactivity mediated the associations. Children with ADHD or CD symptoms are at increased risk for becoming obese and physically inactive adolescents. Physical activity may be beneficial for both behavior problems and obesity

  5. Wave breaking in the surf zone and deep-water in a non-hydrostatic RANS model. Part 1: Organized wave motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derakhti, Morteza; Kirby, James T.; Shi, Fengyan; Ma, Gangfeng

    2016-11-01

    We examine wave-breaking predictions ranging from shallow- to deep-water conditions using a non-hydrostatic σ-coordinate RANS model NHWAVE as described in Derakhti et al. (2016a), comparing results both with corresponding experiments and with the results of a volume-of-fluid (VOF)/Navier-Stokes solver (Ma et al., 2011; Derakhti and Kirby, 2014a,b). Our study includes regular and irregular depth-limited breaking waves on planar and barred beaches as well as steepness-limited unsteady breaking focused wave packets in intermediate and deep water. In Part 1 of this paper, it is shown that the model resolves organized wave motions in terms of free-surface evolution, spectral evolution, organized wave velocity evolution and wave statistics, using a few vertical σ-levels. In addition, the relative contribution of modeled physical dissipation and numerical dissipation to the integral breaking-induced wave energy loss is discussed. In steepness-limited unsteady breaking focused wave packets, the turbulence model has not been triggered, and all the dissipation is imposed indirectly by the numerical scheme. Although the total wave-breaking-induced energy dissipation is underestimated in the unsteady wave packets, the model is capable of predicting the dispersive and nonlinear properties of different wave packet components before and after the break point, as well as the overall wave height decay and the evolution of organized wave velocity field and power spectrum density over the breaking region. In Part 2 (Derakhti et al., 2016b), model reproduction of wave-breaking-induced turbulence and mean circulation is examined in detail. The same equations and numerical methods are used for the various depth regimes, and no ad-hoc treatment, such as imposing hydrostatic conditions, is involved in triggering breaking. Vertical grid resolution in all simulated cases is at least an order of magnitude coarser than that of typical VOF-based simulations.

  6. Association between education and future leisure-time physical inactivity: a study of Finnish twins over a 35-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piirtola, Maarit; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kujala, Urho M; Heikkilä, Kauko; Koskenvuo, Markku; Svedberg, Pia; Silventoinen, Karri; Ropponen, Annina

    2016-08-04

    Education is associated with health related lifestyle choices including leisure-time physical inactivity. However, the longitudinal associations between education and inactivity merit further studies. We investigated the association between education and leisure-time physical inactivity over a 35-year follow-up with four time points controlling for multiple covariates including familial confounding. This study of the population-based Finnish Twin Cohort consisted of 5254 twin individuals born in 1945-1957 (59 % women), of which 1604 were complete same-sexed twin pairs. Data on leisure-time physical activity and multiple covariates was available from four surveys conducted in 1975, 1981, 1990 and 2011 (response rates 72 to 89 %). The association between years of education and leisure-time physical inactivity (education was investigated for 15-year and 35-year inactivity periods in the longitudinal analyses. The co-twin control design was used to analyse the potential familial confounding of the effects. All analyses were conducted with and without multiple covariates. Odds Ratios (OR) with 95 % Confidence Intervals (CI) were calculated using logistic and conditional (fixed-effects) regression models. Each additional year of education was associated with less inactivity (OR 0.94 to 0.95, 95 % CI 0.92, 0.99) in the cross-sectional age- and sex-adjusted analyses. The associations of education with inactivity in the 15- and 35-year follow-ups showed a similar trend: OR 0.97 (95 % CI 0.93, 1.00) and OR 0.94 (95 % CI 0.91, 0.98), respectively. In all co-twin control analyses, each year of higher education was associated with a reduced likelihood of inactivity suggesting direct effect (i.e. independent from familial confounding) of education on inactivity. However, the point estimates were lower than in the individual-level analyses. Adjustment for multiple covariates did not change these associations. Higher education is associated with lower odds of leisure

  7. Impact of physical inactivity on adipose tissue low-grade inflammation in first-degree relatives of type 2 diabetic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højbjerre, Lise; Sonne, Mette Paulli; Alibegovic, Amra Ciric

    2011-01-01

    First-degree relatives (FDRs) of patients with type 2 diabetes may exhibit a disproportionately elevated risk of developing insulin resistance, obesity, and type 2 diabetes when exposed to physical inactivity, which to some unknown extent may involve low-grade inflammation. We investigated whether...... subjects who are nonobese FDRs show signs of low-grade inflammation before or after exposure to short-term physical inactivity....

  8. Effects of active and inactive phospholipase D2 on signal transduction, adhesion, migration, invasion, and metastasis in EL4 lymphoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoepp, Stewart M; Chahal, Manpreet S; Xie, Yuhuan; Zhang, Zhihong; Brauner, Daniel J; Hallman, Mark A; Robinson, Stephanie A; Han, Shujie; Imai, Masaki; Tomlinson, Stephen; Meier, Kathryn E

    2008-09-01

    The phosphatidylcholine-using phospholipase D (PLD) isoform PLD2 is widely expressed in mammalian cells and is activated in response to a variety of promitogenic agonists. In this study, active and inactive hemagglutinin-tagged human PLD2 (HA-PLD2) constructs were stably expressed in an EL4 cell line lacking detectable endogenous PLD1 or PLD2. The overall goal of the study was to examine the roles of PLD2 in cellular signal transduction and cell phenotype. HA-PLD2 confers PLD activity that is activated by phorbol ester, ionomycin, and okadaic acid. Proliferation and Erk activation are unchanged in cells transfected with active PLD2; proliferation rate is decreased in cells expressing inactive PLD2. Basal tyrosine phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is increased in cells expressing active PLD2, as is phosphorylation of Akt; inactive PLD2 has no effect. Expression of active PLD2 is associated with increased spreading and elongation of cells on tissue culture plastic, whereas inactive PLD2 inhibits cell spreading. Inactive PLD2 also inhibits cell adhesion, migration, and serum-induced invasion. Cells expressing active PLD2 form metastases in syngeneic mice, as do the parental cells; cells expressing inactive PLD2 form fewer metastases than parental cells. In summary, active PLD2 enhances FAK phosphorylation, Akt activation, and cell invasion in EL4 lymphoma cells, whereas inactive PLD2 exerts inhibitory effects on adhesion, migration, invasion, and tumor formation. Overall, expression of active PLD2 enhances processes favorable to lymphoma cell metastasis, whereas expression of inactive PLD2 inhibits metastasis.

  9. Prevalence of physical inactivity and barriers to physical activity among obese attendants at a community health-care center in Karachi, Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khuwaja Ali Khan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Overweight and obesity are significant public health problems worldwide with serious health consequences. With increasing urbanization and modernization there has been an increase in prevalence of obesity that is attributed to reduced levels of physical activity (PA. However, little is known about the prevalence of physical inactivity and factors that prohibit physical activity among Pakistani population. This cross-sectional study is aimed at estimating the prevalence of physical inactivity, and determining associated barriers in obese attendants accompanying patients coming to a Community Health Center in Karachi, Pakistan. Findings PA was assessed by using international physical activity questionnaire (IPAQ. Barriers to PA were also assessed in inactive obese attendants. A pre-tested questionnaire was used to collect data from a total of 350 obese attendants. Among 350 study participants 254 (72.6% were found to be physically inactive (95% CI: 68.0%, 77.2%. Multivariable logistic regression analysis indicated that age greater than 33 years, BMI greater than 33 kg/m2 and family history of obesity were independently and significantly associated with physical inactivity. Moreover, there was a significant interaction between family structure and gender; females living in extended families were about twice more likely to be inactive, whereas males from extended families were six times more likely to be inactive relative to females from nuclear families. Lack of information, motivation and skills, spouse & family support, accessibility to places for physical activity, cost effective facilities and time were found to be important barriers to PA. Conclusions Considering the public health implications of physical inactivity it is essential to promote PA in context of an individual's health and environment. Findings highlight considerable barriers to PA among obese individuals that need to be addressed during counseling sessions

  10. Prevalence of physical inactivity and its relation to social class in U.S. adults: results from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1988-1994.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo, C J; Ainsworth, B E; Keteyian, S J; Heath, G W; Smit, E

    1999-12-01

    This study examines the prevalence of physical inactivity during leisure time in a national representative sample of U.S. adults. Data were obtained from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, conducted between 1988 and 1994. A total of 18,825 adults aged 20 yr and older participated in a home interview where information about physical activity, education, income, occupation, employment, and labor force participation was obtained. The prevalence of physical inactivity among U.S. adults was 23%, with more women (28%) than men (17%) reporting being inactive during their leisure time. Additionally, inactivity is more common among in social class such as persons who are less educated, living below the poverty line, living in households with income below 20,000 dollars, and who are retired. In every category of social class, women experienced a higher prevalence of physical inactivity than men. We conclude that social class is associated with physical inactivity and that more research is needed to better understand the effect that other social and environmental factors have on sedentary behaviors in our society.

  11. Effect of Eight Weeks of Aerobic Training and Green Tea Supplementation on Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Inactive Overweight Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Fathei

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Physical activities, as well as diet, are known as the truest scientific methods to reduce the signs of the cardio-vascular diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of 8–week aerobic trainings and green tea supplementation on some of the cardio-vascular risk factors in the obese inactive women. Materials & Methods: In the semi-experimental study, 40 obese inactive women, who were residents of Mashhad Township, were studied in 2015. The subjects, selected via purposeful available sampling method, were randomly divided into 4 groups (n=10 per group. The groups were green tea, aerobic training, aerobic training and green tea supplementation, and control groups. 8-week training program consisted of three 45- to 60-minute sessions per week. Green tea was consumed by green tea group three times a day after each meal. The composed group underwent both interventions, while control group underwent no intervention. Data was analyzed by SPSS 15 software using correlated T test and one-way ANOVA. Findings: Mean total cholesterol level was significantly changed in green tea, aerobic training, and composed groups in the posttest stage compared to the pretest stage (p<0.05. Mean triglyceride level was significantly changed in green tea and aerobic training groups in the posttest stage compared to the pretest stage (p<0.05. Mean low density lipoprotein was significantly changed in green tea and composed groups in the posttest stage compared to the pretest stage (p<0.05. Mean high-density lipoprotein was significantly changed only in aerobic group in posttest stage compared to the pretest stage (p<0.05. In addition, mean concentration of C-reactive protein was significantly reduced in aerobic training (p=0.01 and composed (p=0.04 groups. Conclusion: 8 weeks aerobic training, green tea consumption, and their composition reduce the cardiovascular risk factors in inactive obese women in a relatively similar manner.

  12. Peripheral brain-derived neurotrophic factor is related to cardiovascular risk factors in active and inactive elderly men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Zembron-Lacny

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Regular exercise plays an important preventive and therapeutic role in heart and vascular diseases, and beneficially affects brain function. In blood, the effects of exercise appear to be very complex and could include protection of vascular endothelial cells via neurotrophic factors and decreased oxidative stress. The purpose of this study was to identify the age-related changes in peripheral brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and its relationship to oxidative damage and conventional cardiovascular disease (CVD biomarkers, such as atherogenic index, C-reactive protein (hsCRP and oxidized LDL (oxLDL, in active and inactive men. Seventeen elderly males (61-80 years and 17 young males (20-24 years participated in this study. According to the 6-min Åstrand-Rhyming bike test, the subjects were classified into active and inactive groups. The young and elderly active men had a significantly better lipoprotein profile and antioxidant status, as well as reduced oxidative damage and inflammatory state. The active young and elderly men had significantly higher plasma BDNF levels compared to their inactive peers. BDNF was correlated with VO2max (r=0.765, P<0.001. In addition, we observed a significant inverse correlation of BDNF with atherogenic index (TC/HDL, hsCRP and oxLDL. The findings demonstrate that a high level of cardiorespiratory fitness reflected in VO2max was associated with a higher level of circulating BDNF, which in turn was related to common CVD risk factors and oxidative damage markers in young and elderly men.

  13. Regulation of Deinococcus radiodurans RecA protein function via modulation of active and inactive nucleoprotein filament states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Khanh V; Molzberger, Eileen T; Chitteni-Pattu, Sindhu; Cox, Michael M

    2013-07-19

    The RecA protein of Deinococcus radiodurans (DrRecA) has a central role in genome reconstitution after exposure to extreme levels of ionizing radiation. When bound to DNA, filaments of DrRecA protein exhibit active and inactive states that are readily interconverted in response to several sets of stimuli and conditions. At 30 °C, the optimal growth temperature, and at physiological pH 7.5, DrRecA protein binds to double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) and forms extended helical filaments in the presence of ATP. However, the ATP is not hydrolyzed. ATP hydrolysis of the DrRecA-dsDNA filament is activated by addition of single-stranded DNA, with or without the single-stranded DNA-binding protein. The ATPase function of DrRecA nucleoprotein filaments thus exists in an inactive default state under some conditions. ATPase activity is thus not a reliable indicator of DNA binding for all bacterial RecA proteins. Activation is effected by situations in which the DNA substrates needed to initiate recombinational DNA repair are present. The inactive state can also be activated by decreasing the pH (protonation of multiple ionizable groups is required) or by addition of volume exclusion agents. Single-stranded DNA-binding protein plays a much more central role in DNA pairing and strand exchange catalyzed by DrRecA than is the case for the cognate proteins in Escherichia coli. The data suggest a mechanism to enhance the efficiency of recombinational DNA repair in the context of severe genomic degradation in D. radiodurans.

  14. Perceived benefits and barriers to leisure-time physical activity during pregnancy in previously inactive and active women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Costa, Deborah; Ireland, Kierla

    2013-01-01

    This study compared perceived benefits and barriers to leisure-time physical activity during pregnancy among women who were insufficiently active or inactive before pregnancy. Eighty-two pregnant women completed questionnaires assessing leisure-time physical activity benefits/barriers, exercise self-efficacy, social support, depressed mood, pre-pregnancy and current physical activity and fatigue. Multivariable regression analyses identified factors associated with exercise benefits/barriers for the two pre-pregnancy leisure-time physical activity groups. Both pre-pregnancy leisure-time physical activity groups reported more benefits than barriers to exercise during pregnancy. Previously inactive women reported fewer perceived benefits and greater perceived barriers to leisure-time physical activity during pregnancy. Higher self-efficacy for exercise during pregnancy was significantly associated with greater benefits of leisure-time physical activity during pregnancy for both groups. Less family support for exercise and lower self-efficacy for exercise were significantly related to greater leisure-time physical activity barriers during pregnancy for previously inactive women. Lower self-efficacy for exercise, higher depressed mood scores, and younger age were associated with greater leisure-time physical activity barriers for active women. Findings suggest that the intensities of perceived leisure-time physical activity benefits and barriers during pregnancy differ for women, depending on their pre-pregnancy leisure-time physical activity status. Consideration of pre-pregnancy leisure-time physical activity status may thus be important when tailoring strategies to overcome barriers to promote initiation and maintenance of physical activity during pregnancy.

  15. Different Characteristics of the Female Sexual Function Index in a Sample of Sexually Active and Inactive Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hevesi, Krisztina; Mészáros, Veronika; Kövi, Zsuzsanna; Márki, Gabriella; Szabó, Marianna

    2017-09-01

    The Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) is a widely used measurement tool to assess female sexual function along the six dimensions of desire, arousal, lubrication, orgasm, satisfaction, and pain. However, the structure of the questionnaire is not clear, and several studies have found high correlations among the dimensions, indicating that a common underlying "sexual function" factor might be present. To investigate whether female sexual function is best understood as a multidimensional construct or, alternatively, whether a common underlying factor explains most of the variance in FSFI scores, and to investigate the possible effect of the common practice of including sexually inactive women in studies using the FSFI. The sample consisted of 508 women: 202 university students, 177 patients with endometriosis, and 129 patients with polycystic ovary syndrome. Participants completed the FSFI, and confirmatory factor analyses were used to test the underlying structure of this instrument in the total sample and in samples including sexually active women only. The FSFI is a multidimensional self-report questionnaire composed of 19 items. Strong positive correlations were found among five of the six original factors on the FSFI. Confirmatory factor analyses showed that in the total sample items loaded mainly on the general sexual function factor and very little variance was explained by the specific factors. However, when only sexually active women were included in the analyses, a clear factor structure emerged, with items loading on their six specific factors, and most of the variance in FSFI scores was explained by the specific factors, rather than the general factor. University students reported higher scores, indicating better functioning compared with the patient samples. The reliable and valid assessment of female sexual function can contribute to better understanding, prevention, and treatment of different sexual difficulties and dysfunctions. This study provides a

  16. Overcoming the risk of inaction from emissions uncertainty in smallholder agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, N. J.; Ryan, C. M.

    2013-03-01

    The potential for improving productivity and increasing the resilience of smallholder agriculture, while also contributing to climate change mitigation, has recently received considerable political attention (Beddington et al 2012). Financial support for improving smallholder agriculture could come from performance-based funding including sale of carbon credits or certified commodities, payments for ecosystem services, and nationally appropriate mitigation action (NAMA) budgets, as well as more traditional sources of development and environment finance. Monitoring the greenhouse gas fluxes associated with changes to agricultural practice is needed for performance-based mitigation funding, and efforts are underway to develop tools to quantify mitigation achieved and assess trade-offs and synergies between mitigation and other livelihood and environmental priorities (Olander 2012). High levels of small scale variability in carbon stocks and emissions in smallholder agricultural systems (Ziegler et al 2012) mean that data intensive approaches are needed for precise and unbiased mitigation monitoring. The cost of implementing such monitoring programmes is likely to be high, and this introduces the risk that projects will not be developed in areas where there is the greatest need for agricultural improvements, which are likely to correspond with areas where existing data or research infrastructure are lacking. When improvements to livelihoods and food security are expected as co-benefits of performance-based mitigation finance, the risk of inaction is borne by the rural poor as well as the global climate. In situ measurement of carbon accumulation in smallholders' soils are not usually feasible because of the costs associated with sampling in a heterogeneous landscape, although technological advances could improve the situation (Milori et al 2012). Alternatives to in situ measurement are to estimate greenhouse gas fluxes by extrapolating information from existing

  17. Insulin resistance induced by physical inactivity is associated with multiple transcriptional changes in skeletal muscle in young men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alibegovic, A C; Sonne, M P; Højbjerre, L

    2010-01-01

    Physical inactivity is a risk factor for insulin resistance. We examined the effect of 9 days of bed rest on basal and insulin-stimulated expression of genes potentially involved in insulin action by applying hypothesis-generating microarray in parallel with candidate gene real-time PCR approache...... contribute to the development of insulin resistance induced by bed rest. Lack of complete normalization of changes after 4 wk of retraining underscores the importance of maintaining a minimum of daily physical activity....... resistance, bed rest resulted in a paradoxically increased response to acute insulin stimulation in the general expression of genes, particularly those involved in inflammation and endoplasmatic reticulum (ER) stress. Furthermore, bed rest changed gene expressions of several insulin resistance and diabetes......Physical inactivity is a risk factor for insulin resistance. We examined the effect of 9 days of bed rest on basal and insulin-stimulated expression of genes potentially involved in insulin action by applying hypothesis-generating microarray in parallel with candidate gene real-time PCR approaches...

  18. Physical self-esteem and personality traits in Swedish physically inactive female high school students: an intervention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahlin, Yvonne; Werner, Suzanne; Edman, Gunnar; Raustorp, Anders; Alricsson, Marie

    2016-11-01

    Physical activity provides fundamental health benefits and plays a positive role in physical well-being. The aim of this present study was to investigate whether a 6-month physical activity program could influence physical self-esteem and frequency of physical activity in physically inactive female high school students in short- and long-term periods and whether personality traits were related to physical activity behaviour and compliance with the program. The study was a cluster-randomised controlled intervention study including 104 physically inactive female high school students aged 16-19 years, 60 females in an intervention group and 44 females in a control group. The intervention group exercised at sport centres at least once per week during a 6-month period. Questionnaires were used for evaluation. At a 6-month follow up, the intervention group improved physical self-perception in all subdomains and significantly improved physical condition, physical self-worth and self-related health compared to the control group. At 1-year follow up, 25 females out of 53 females were still physically active, and all ratings remained almost the same as at the 6-month follow up. There were no particular personality traits that were dominant in the groups. A 6-month physical activity program can positively influence physical self-esteem and the frequency of physical activity, both from a short- and long-term perspective.

  19. Does country-context matter? A cross-national analysis of gender and leisure time physical inactivity in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Tuyckom, Charlotte; Van de Velde, Sarah; Bracke, Piet

    2013-06-01

    It is well known that European women are less physically active in their leisure time than European men. Attempts to explain this gender difference often do not succeed in raising the problem above the individual level. However, the size of the disadvantage for women varies considerably across countries, proving that leisure time physical (in)activity takes place in a broader societal context and must also be approached as such. In this sense, some authors have explained women's lack of leisure time physical activity in terms of gendered power relations in society. Therefore, the present article postulates that over and above the individual effect of gender, there is an additional impact of a society's gender-based (in)equality distribution. By means of the 2005 Eurobarometer survey (comprising 25,745 adults from 27 European countries), gender differences in leisure time physical inactivity (LTPI) were analysed by means of multilevel logistic regression analysis. National gender-based (in)equality was measured by the Gender Empowerment Measure and the Gender Gap Index. Controlled for compositional effects, gender differences in LTPI varied as a function of gender-related characteristics at the macro-level. In particular, in countries characterized by high levels of gender-based equality, LTPI differences between men and women even disappeared. The findings underscore the need to adopt a society-level approach and to incorporate socio-contextual factors in the study of gender disparities in LTPI.

  20. Highly Conductive, Mechanically Robust, and Electrochemically Inactive TiC/C Nanofiber Scaffold for High-Performance Silicon Anode Batteries

    KAUST Repository

    Yao, Yan

    2011-10-25

    Silicon has a high specific capacity of 4200 mAh/g as lithium-ion battery anodes, but its rapid capacity fading due to >300% volume expansion and pulverization presents a significant challenge for practical applications. Here we report a core-shell TiC/C/Si inactive/active nanocomposite for Si anodes demonstrating high specific capacity and excellent electrochemical cycling. The amorphous silicon layer serves as the active material to store Li+, while the inactive TiC/C nanofibers act as a conductive and mechanically robust scaffold for electron transport during the Li-Si alloying process. The core-shell TiC/C/Si nanocomposite anode shows ∼3000 mAh g-1 discharge capacity and 92% capacity retention after 100 charge/discharge cycles. The excellent cycling stability and high rate performance could be attributed to the tapering of the nanofibers and the open structure that allows facile Li ion transport and the high conductivity and mechanical stability of the TiC/C scaffold. © 2011 American Chemical Society.