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Sample records for ran gtpase activating

  1. Beyond Rab GTPases Legionella activates the small GTPase Ran to promote microtubule polymerization, pathogen vacuole motility, and infection.

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    Hilbi, Hubert; Rothmeier, Eva; Hoffmann, Christine; Harrison, Christopher F

    2014-01-01

    Legionella spp. are amoebae-resistant environmental bacteria that replicate in free-living protozoa in a distinct compartment, the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV). Upon transmission of Legionella pneumophila to the lung, the pathogens employ an evolutionarily conserved mechanism to grow in LCVs within alveolar macrophages, thus triggering a severe pneumonia termed Legionnaires' disease. LCV formation is a complex and robust process, which requires the bacterial Icm/Dot type IV secretion system and involves the amazing number of 300 different translocated effector proteins. LCVs interact with the host cell's endosomal and secretory vesicle trafficking pathway. Accordingly, in a proteomics approach as many as 12 small Rab GTPases implicated in endosomal and secretory vesicle trafficking were identified and validated as LCV components. Moreover, the small GTPase Ran and its effector protein RanBP1 have been found to decorate the pathogen vacuole. Ran regulates nucleo-cytoplasmic transport, spindle assembly, and cytokinesis, as well as the organization of non-centrosomal microtubules. In L. pneumophila-infected amoebae or macrophages, Ran and RanBP1 localize to LCVs, and the small GTPase is activated by the Icm/Dot substrate LegG1. Ran activation by LegG1 leads to microtubule stabilization and promotes intracellular pathogen vacuole motility and bacterial growth, as well as chemotaxis and migration of Legionella-infected cells.

  2. An Arabidopsis Ran-binding protein, AtRanBP1c, is a co-activator of Ran GTPase-activating protein and requires the C-terminus for its cytoplasmic localization

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    Kim, Soo-Hwan; Roux, Stanley J.

    2003-01-01

    Ran-binding proteins (RanBPs) are a group of proteins that bind to Ran (Ras-related nuclear small GTP-binding protein), and thus either control the GTP/GDP-bound states of Ran or help couple the Ran GTPase cycle to a cellular process. AtRanBP1c is a Ran-binding protein from Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. that was recently shown to be critically involved in the regulation of auxin-induced mitotic progression [S.-H. Kim et al. (2001) Plant Cell 13:2619-2630]. Here we report that AtRanBP1c inhibits the EDTA-induced release of GTP from Ran and serves as a co-activator of Ran-GTPase-activating protein (RanGAP) in vitro. Transient expression of AtRanBP1c fused to a beta-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter reveals that the protein localizes primarily to the cytosol. Neither the N- nor C-terminus of AtRanBP1c, which flank the Ran-binding domain (RanBD), is necessary for the binding of PsRan1-GTP to the protein, but both are needed for the cytosolic localization of GUS-fused AtRanBP1c. These findings, together with a previous report that AtRanBP1c is critically involved in root growth and development, imply that the promotion of GTP hydrolysis by the Ran/RanGAP/AtRanBP1c complex in the cytoplasm, and the resulting concentration gradient of Ran-GDP to Ran-GTP across the nuclear membrane could be important in the regulation of auxin-induced mitotic progression in root tips of A. thaliana.

  3. RAN GTPase and Osteopontin in Pancreatic Cancer.

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    Saxena, Shivam; Gandhi, Ankit; Lim, Pei-Wen; Relles, Daniel; Sarosiek, Konrad; Kang, Christopher; Chipitsyna, Galina; Sendecki, Jocelyn; Yeo, Charles J; Arafat, Hwyda A

    2013-04-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) has the worst prognosis among cancers, mainly due to the high incidence of early metastases. RAN small GTPase (RAN) is a protein that plays physiological roles in the regulation of nuclear transport and microtubule spindle assembly. RAN was recently shown to mediate the invasive functions of the prometastatic protein osteopontin (OPN) in breast cancer cells. We and others have shown previously that high levels of OPN are present in PDA. In this study, we analyzed the expression and correlation of RAN with OPN in human pancreatic lesions, and explored their regulation in PDA cell lines. Real time PCR was used to analyze RAN and OPN mRNA levels in PDA, adjacent non-malignant, and benign pancreatic tissues. Expression levels were correlated with survival and different clinicopathological parameters using different statistical methods. Transient transfection studies using OPN and RAN plasmids, and knockdown experiments using siRNA were used to examine their mutual regulation. OPN and RAN levels highly correlated with each other (pobesity, T stage, BMI, or survival. However, we found a significant association between RAN levels and perineural invasion (HR=0.79, 95% CI 0.59, 1.07; p=0.0378.). OPN and RAN colocalized in PDA tissues and cell lines. Increasing RAN expression in PDA cells induced OPN transcription and RAN silencing reduced total OPN levels. OPN did not have any significant effect on RAN transcription. The high levels of RAN in PDA and its correlation with OPN and with perineural invasion suggest that RAN may contribute to PDA metastasis and progression through the induction of OPN. RAN's role in the regulation of OPN in PDA is unique and could provide potential novel therapeutic strategies to combat PDA aggressiveness.

  4. Ran GTPase-activating protein 1 is a therapeutic target in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

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    Kung-Chao Chang

    Full Text Available Lymphoma-specific biomarkers contribute to therapeutic strategies and the study of tumorigenesis. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL is the most common type of malignant lymphoma. However, only 50% of patients experience long-term survival after current treatment; therefore, developing novel therapeutic strategies is warranted. Comparative proteomic analysis of two DLBCL lines with a B-lymphoblastoid cell line (LCL showed differential expression of Ran GTPase-activating protein 1 (RanGAP1 between them, which was confirmed using immunoblotting. Immunostaining showed that the majority of DLBCLs (92%, 46/50 were RanGAP1(+, while reactive lymphoid hyperplasia (n = 12 was RanGAP1(+ predominantly in germinal centers. RanGAP1 was also highly expressed in other B-cell lymphomas (BCL, n = 180 with brisk mitotic activity (B-lymphoblastic lymphoma/leukemia: 93%, and Burkitt lymphoma: 95% or cell-cycle dysregulation (mantle cell lymphoma: 83%, and Hodgkin's lymphoma 91%. Interestingly, serum RanGAP1 level was higher in patients with high-grade BCL (1.71 ± 2.28 ng/mL, n = 62 than in low-grade BCL (0.75 ± 2.12 ng/mL, n = 52 and healthy controls (0.55 ± 1.58 ng/mL, n = 75 (high-grade BCL vs. low-grade BCL, p = 0.002; high-grade BCL vs. control, p < 0.001, Mann-Whitney U test. In vitro, RNA interference of RanGAP1 showed no effect on LCL but enhanced DLBCL cell death (41% vs. 60%; p = 0.035 and cell-cycle arrest (G0/G1: 39% vs. 49%, G2/M: 19.0% vs. 7.5%; p = 0.030 along with decreased expression of TPX2 and Aurora kinases, the central regulators of mitotic cell division. Furthermore, ON 01910.Na (Estybon, a multikinase inhibitor induced cell death, mitotic cell arrest, and hyperphosphorylation of RanGAP1 in DLBCL cell lines but no effects in normal B and T cells. Therefore, RanGAP1 is a promising marker and therapeutic target for aggressive B-cell lymphoma, especially DLBCL.

  5. The Ran GTPase-activating protein (RanGAP1 is critically involved in smooth muscle cell differentiation, proliferation and migration following vascular injury: implications for neointima formation and restenosis.

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    Marc Vorpahl

    Full Text Available Differentiation and dedifferentiation, accompanied by proliferation play a pivotal role for the phenotypic development of vascular proliferative diseases (VPD, such as restenosis. Increasing evidence points to an essential role of regulated nucleoporin expression in the choice between differentiation and proliferation. However, whether components of the Ran GTPase cycle, which is of pivotal importance for both nucleocytoplasmic transport and for mitotic progression, are subject to similar regulation in VPD is currently unknown. Here, we show that differentiation of human coronary artery smooth muscle cell (CASMC to a contractile phenotype by stepwise serum depletion leads to significant reduction of RanGAP1 protein levels. The inverse event, dedifferentiation of cells, was assessed in the rat carotid artery balloon injury model, a well-accepted model for neointima formation and restenosis. As revealed by temporospatial analysis of RanGAP1 expression, neointima formation in rat carotid arteries was associated with a significant upregulation of RanGAP1 expression at 3 and 7 days after balloon injury. Of note, neointimal cells located at the luminal surface revealed persistent RanGAP1 expression, as opposed to cells in deeper layers of the neointima where RanGAP1 expression was less or not detectable at all. To gain first evidence for a direct influence of RanGAP1 levels on differentiation, we reduced RanGAP1 in human coronary artery smooth muscle cells by siRNA. Indeed, downregulation of the essential RanGAP1 protein by 50% induced a differentiated, spindle-like smooth muscle cell phenotype, accompanied by an upregulation of the differentiation marker desmin. Reduction of RanGAP1 levels also resulted in a reduction of mitogen induced cellular migration and proliferation as well as a significant upregulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27KIP1, without evidence for cellular necrosis. These findings suggest that RanGAP1 plays a critical

  6. The Ran GTPase-activating protein (RanGAP1) is critically involved in smooth muscle cell differentiation, proliferation and migration following vascular injury: implications for neointima formation and restenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorpahl, Marc; Schönhofer-Merl, Sabine; Michaelis, Cornelia; Flotho, Annette; Melchior, Frauke; Wessely, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    Differentiation and dedifferentiation, accompanied by proliferation play a pivotal role for the phenotypic development of vascular proliferative diseases (VPD), such as restenosis. Increasing evidence points to an essential role of regulated nucleoporin expression in the choice between differentiation and proliferation. However, whether components of the Ran GTPase cycle, which is of pivotal importance for both nucleocytoplasmic transport and for mitotic progression, are subject to similar regulation in VPD is currently unknown. Here, we show that differentiation of human coronary artery smooth muscle cell (CASMC) to a contractile phenotype by stepwise serum depletion leads to significant reduction of RanGAP1 protein levels. The inverse event, dedifferentiation of cells, was assessed in the rat carotid artery balloon injury model, a well-accepted model for neointima formation and restenosis. As revealed by temporospatial analysis of RanGAP1 expression, neointima formation in rat carotid arteries was associated with a significant upregulation of RanGAP1 expression at 3 and 7 days after balloon injury. Of note, neointimal cells located at the luminal surface revealed persistent RanGAP1 expression, as opposed to cells in deeper layers of the neointima where RanGAP1 expression was less or not detectable at all. To gain first evidence for a direct influence of RanGAP1 levels on differentiation, we reduced RanGAP1 in human coronary artery smooth muscle cells by siRNA. Indeed, downregulation of the essential RanGAP1 protein by 50% induced a differentiated, spindle-like smooth muscle cell phenotype, accompanied by an upregulation of the differentiation marker desmin. Reduction of RanGAP1 levels also resulted in a reduction of mitogen induced cellular migration and proliferation as well as a significant upregulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27KIP1, without evidence for cellular necrosis. These findings suggest that RanGAP1 plays a critical role in smooth

  7. Encephalomyocarditis virus Leader protein hinge domain is responsible for interactions with Ran GTPase

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    Bacot-Davis, Valjean R., E-mail: bacotdavis@wisc.edu [Institute for Molecular Virology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, R.M. Bock Laboratories, 1525 Linden Dr. Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Palmenberg, Ann C., E-mail: acpalmen@wisc.edu [Institute for Molecular Virology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, R.M. Bock Laboratories, 1525 Linden Dr. Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Department of Biochemistry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, R.M. Bock Laboratories, 1525 Linden Dr. Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2013-08-15

    Encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV), a Cardiovirus, initiates its polyprotein with a short 67 amino acid Leader (L) sequence. The protein acts as a unique pathogenicity factor, with anti-host activities which include the triggering of nuclear pore complex hyperphosphorylation and direct binding inhibition of the active cellular transport protein, Ran GTPase. Chemical modifications and protein mutagenesis now map the Ran binding domain to the L hinge-linker region, and in particular, to amino acids 35–40. Large deletions affecting this region were shown previously to diminish Ran binding. New point mutations, especially K35Q, D37A and W40A, preserve the intact L structure, abolish Ran binding and are deficient for nucleoporin (Nup) hyperphosphorylation. Ran itself morphs through multiple configurations, but reacts most effectively with L when in the GDP format, preferably with an empty nucleotide binding pocket. Therefore, L:Ran binding, mediated by the linker-hinge, is a required step in L-induced nuclear transport inhibition. - Highlights: • The hinge domain provides critical residues in Cardiovirus L:Ran complex formation. • Leader prefers to bind Ran in a nucleotide free, GDP-conformation. • L-induced Nup62 phosphorylation is reduced with Ran-deficient binding mutations.

  8. Nercc1, a mammalian NIMA-family kinase, binds the Ran GTPase and regulates mitotic progression.

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    Roig, Joan; Mikhailov, Alexei; Belham, Christopher; Avruch, Joseph

    2002-07-01

    The protein kinase NIMA is an indispensable pleiotropic regulator of mitotic progression in Aspergillus. Although several mammalian NIMA-like kinases (Neks) are known, none appears to have the broad importance for mitotic regulation attributed to NIMA. Nercc1 is a new NIMA-like kinase that regulates chromosome alignment and segregation in mitosis. Its NIMA-like catalytic domain is followed by a noncatalytic tail containing seven repeats homologous to those of the Ran GEF, RCC1, a Ser/Thr/Pro-rich segment, and a coiled-coil domain. Nercc1 binds to another NIMA-like kinase, Nek6, and also binds specifically to the Ran GTPase through both its catalytic and its RCC1-like domains, preferring RanGDP in vivo. Nercc1 exists as a homooligomer and can autoactivate in vitro by autophosphorylation. Nercc1 is a cytoplasmic protein that is activated during mitosis and is avidly phosphorylated by active p34(Cdc2). Microinjection of anti-Nercc1 antibodies in prophase results in spindle abnormalities and/or chromosomal misalignment. In Ptk2 cells the outcome is prometaphase arrest or aberrant chromosome segregation and aneuploidy, whereas in CFPAC-1 cells prolonged arrest in prometaphase is the usual response. Nercc1 and its partner Nek6 represent a new signaling pathway that regulates mitotic progression.

  9. GAP Activity, but Not Subcellular Targeting, Is Required for Arabidopsis RanGAP Cellular and Developmental Functions.

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    Boruc, Joanna; Griffis, Anna H N; Rodrigo-Peiris, Thushani; Zhou, Xiao; Tilford, Bailey; Van Damme, Daniël; Meier, Iris

    2015-07-01

    The Ran GTPase activating protein (RanGAP) is important to Ran signaling involved in nucleocytoplasmic transport, spindle organization, and postmitotic nuclear assembly. Unlike vertebrate and yeast RanGAP, plant RanGAP has an N-terminal WPP domain, required for nuclear envelope association and several mitotic locations of Arabidopsis thaliana RanGAP1. A double null mutant of the two Arabidopsis RanGAP homologs is gametophyte lethal. Here, we created a series of mutants with various reductions in RanGAP levels by combining a RanGAP1 null allele with different RanGAP2 alleles. As RanGAP level decreases, the severity of developmental phenotypes increases, but nuclear import is unaffected. To dissect whether the GAP activity and/or the subcellular localization of RanGAP are responsible for the observed phenotypes, this series of rangap mutants were transformed with RanGAP1 variants carrying point mutations abolishing the GAP activity and/or the WPP-dependent subcellular localization. The data show that plant development is differentially affected by RanGAP mutant allele combinations of increasing severity and requires the GAP activity of RanGAP, while the subcellular positioning of RanGAP is dispensable. In addition, our results indicate that nucleocytoplasmic trafficking can tolerate both partial depletion of RanGAP and delocalization of RanGAP from the nuclear envelope. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  10. Nuclear-cytoplasmic trafficking of NTF2, the nuclear import receptor for the RanGTPase, is subjected to regulation.

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    Shawn C Chafe

    Full Text Available NTF2 is a cytosolic protein responsible for nuclear import of Ran, a small Ras-like GTPase involved in a number of critical cellular processes, including cell cycle regulation, chromatin organization during mitosis, reformation of the nuclear envelope following mitosis, and controlling the directionality of nucleocytoplasmic transport. Herein, we provide evidence for the first time that translocation of the mammalian NTF2 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm to collect Ran in the GDP form is subjected to regulation. Treatment of mammalian cells with polysorbitan monolaurate was found to inhibit nuclear export of tRNA and proteins, which are processes dependent on RanGTP in the nucleus, but not nuclear import of proteins. Inhibition of the export processes by polysorbitan monolaurate is specific and reversible, and is caused by accumulation of Ran in the cytoplasm because of a block in translocation of NTF2 to the cytoplasm. Nuclear import of Ran and the nuclear export processes are restored in polysorbitan monolaurate treated cells overproducing NTF2. Moreover, increased phosphorylation of a phospho-tyrosine protein and several phospho-threonine proteins was observed in polysorbitan monolaurate treated cells. Collectively, these findings suggest that nucleocytoplasmic translocation of NTF2 is regulated in mammalian cells, and may involve a tyrosine and/or threonine kinase-dependent signal transduction mechanism(s.

  11. GTPase Ran strongly accumulates at the kinetochores of somatic chromosomes in the spermatogonial mitoses of Acricotopus lucidus (Diptera, Chironomidae).

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    Staiber, Wolfgang

    2014-07-01

    Unequal chromosome segregation and spindle formation occurs in the last gonial mitosis in the germ line of the chironomid Acricotopus lucidus. During this differential mitosis, all germ line-limited chromosomes (=Ks) migrate undivided to only one pole of the cell, while the somatic chromosomes (=Ss) first remain in the metaphase plane, and with the arrival of the Ks at the pole, they then separate equally. The evolutionarily conserved GTPase Ran plays a crucial role in many cellular processes. This includes the regulation of microtubule nucleation and stabilisation at kinetochores and of spindle assembly during mitosis, which is promoted by a RanGTP concentration gradient that forms around the mitotic chromosomes (Kalab et al. in Science 295:2452-2456, 2002, Nature 440:697-701, 2006). In the present study, a strong accumulation of Ran was detected by immunofluorescence at the kinetochores of the Ss in normal gonial and differential gonial mitoses of males of A. lucidus. In contrast, no Ran accumulation was observed at the kinetochores of the Ss in the metaphases of brain ganglia mitoses or of aberrant spermatocytes or in metaphases I and II of spermatocyte meiotic divisions. Likewise, there was no accumulation at the kinetochores of Drosophila melanogaster mitotic chromosomes from larval brains. The specific accumulation of Ran at the kinetochores of the Ss in differential gonial mitoses of A. lucidus strongly suggests that Ran is involved in a mechanism acting in this exceptional mitosis, which retains the Ss at the metaphase plane and prevents a premature separation and unequal segregation of the Ss during monopolar migration of the Ks.

  12. Impairments in age-dependent ubiquitin proteostasis and structural integrity of selective neurons by uncoupling Ran GTPase from the Ran-binding domain 3 of Ranbp2 and identification of novel mitochondrial isoforms of ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2I (ubc9) and Ranbp2.

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    Patil, Hemangi; Yoon, Dosuk; Bhowmick, Reshma; Cai, Yunfei; Cho, Kyoung-In; Ferreira, Paulo A

    2017-09-06

    The Ran-binding protein 2 (Ranbp2/Nup358) is a cytoplasmic and peripheral nucleoporin comprised of 4 Ran-GTP-binding domains (RBDs) that are interspersed among diverse structural domains with multifunctional activities. Our prior studies found that the RBD2 and RBD3 of Ranbp2 control mitochondrial motility independently of Ran-GTP-binding in cultured cells, whereas loss of Ran-GTP-binding to RBD2 and RBD3 are essential to support cone photoreceptor development and the survival of mature retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) in mice. Here, we uncover that loss of Ran-GTP-binding to RBD3 alone promotes the robust age-dependent increase of ubiquitylated substrates and S1 subunit (Pmsd1) of the 19S cap of the proteasome in the retina and RPE and that such loss in RBD3 also compromises the structural integrity of the outer segment compartment of cone photoreceptors only and without affecting the viability of these neurons. We also found that the E2-ligase and partner of Ranbp2, ubc9, is localized prominently in the mitochondrial-rich ellipsoid compartment of photoreceptors, where Ranbp2 is also known to localize with and modulate the activity of mitochondrial proteins. However, the natures of Ranbp2 and ubc9 isoforms to the mitochondria are heretofore elusive. Subcellular fractionation, co-immunolocalization and immunoaffinity purification of Ranbp2 complexes show that novel isoforms of Ranbp2 and ubc9 with molecular masses distinct from the large Ranbp2 and unmodified ubc9 isoforms localize specifically to the mitochondrial fraction or associate with mitochondrial components, whereas unmodified and SUMOylated Ran GTPase are excluded from the mitochondrial fraction. Further, liposome-mediated intracellular delivery of an antibody against a domain shared by the mitochondrial and nuclear pore isoforms of Ranbp2 causes the profound fragmentation of mitochondria and their delocalization from Ranbp2 and without affecting Ranbp2 localization at the nuclear pores. Collectively, the

  13. Nuclear-cytoplasmic trafficking of NTF2, the nuclear import receptor for the RanGTPase, is subjected to regulation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chafe, Shawn C; Pierce, Jacqueline B; Mangroo, Dev

    2012-01-01

    .... Treatment of mammalian cells with polysorbitan monolaurate was found to inhibit nuclear export of tRNA and proteins, which are processes dependent on RanGTP in the nucleus, but not nuclear import...

  14. Formation of a Trimeric Xpo1-Ran[GTP]-Ded1 Exportin Complex Modulates ATPase and Helicase Activities of Ded1.

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    Glenn Hauk

    Full Text Available The DEAD-box RNA helicase Ded1, which is essential in yeast and known as DDX3 in humans, shuttles between the nucleus and cytoplasm and takes part in several basic processes including RNA processing and translation. A key interacting partner of Ded1 is the exportin Xpo1, which together with the GTP-bound state of the small GTPase Ran, facilitates unidirectional transport of Ded1 out of the nucleus. Here we demonstrate that Xpo1 and Ran[GTP] together reduce the RNA-stimulated ATPase and helicase activities of Ded1. Binding and inhibition of Ded1 by Xpo1 depend on the affinity of the Ded1 nuclear export sequence (NES for Xpo1 and the presence of Ran[GTP]. Association with Xpo1/Ran[GTP] reduces RNA-stimulated ATPase activity of Ded1 by increasing the apparent KM for the RNA substrate. Despite the increased KM, the Ded1:Xpo1:Ran[GTP] ternary complex retains the ability to bind single stranded RNA, suggesting that Xpo1/Ran[GTP] may modulate the substrate specificity of Ded1. These results demonstrate that, in addition to transport, exportins such as Xpo1 also have the capability to alter enzymatic activities of their cargo.

  15. RanBP2 modulates Cox11 and hexokinase I activities and haploinsufficiency of RanBP2 causes deficits in glucose metabolism.

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    Azamat Aslanukov

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available The Ran-binding protein 2 (RanBP2 is a large multimodular and pleiotropic protein. Several molecular partners with distinct functions interacting specifically with selective modules of RanBP2 have been identified. Yet, the significance of these interactions with RanBP2 and the genetic and physiological role(s of RanBP2 in a whole-animal model remain elusive. Here, we report the identification of two novel partners of RanBP2 and a novel physiological role of RanBP2 in a mouse model. RanBP2 associates in vitro and in vivo and colocalizes with the mitochondrial metallochaperone, Cox11, and the pacemaker of glycolysis, hexokinase type I (HKI via its leucine-rich domain. The leucine-rich domain of RanBP2 also exhibits strong chaperone activity toward intermediate and mature folding species of Cox11 supporting a chaperone role of RanBP2 in the cytosol during Cox11 biogenesis. Cox11 partially colocalizes with HKI, thus supporting additional and distinct roles in cell function. Cox11 is a strong inhibitor of HKI, and RanBP2 suppresses the inhibitory activity of Cox11 over HKI. To probe the physiological role of RanBP2 and its role in HKI function, a mouse model harboring a genetically disrupted RanBP2 locus was generated. RanBP2(-/- are embryonically lethal, and haploinsufficiency of RanBP2 in an inbred strain causes a pronounced decrease of HKI and ATP levels selectively in the central nervous system. Inbred RanBP2(+/- mice also exhibit deficits in growth rates and glucose catabolism without impairment of glucose uptake and gluconeogenesis. These phenotypes are accompanied by a decrease in the electrophysiological responses of photosensory and postreceptoral neurons. Hence, RanBP2 and its partners emerge as critical modulators of neuronal HKI, glucose catabolism, energy homeostasis, and targets for metabolic, aging disorders and allied neuropathies.

  16. Nuclear-Cytoplasmic Trafficking of NTF2, the Nuclear Import Receptor for the RanGTPase, Is Subjected to Regulation: e42501

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shawn C Chafe; Jacqueline B Pierce; Dev Mangroo

    2012-01-01

    .... Treatment of mammalian cells with polysorbitan monolaurate was found to inhibit nuclear export of tRNA and proteins, which are processes dependent on RanGTP in the nucleus, but not nuclear import...

  17. Genomic organization, expression, and localization of murine Ran-binding protein 2 (RanBP2) gene.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fauser, S.; Aslanukov, A.; Roepman, R.; Ferreira, P.A.

    2001-01-01

    The Ran-binding protein 2 (RanBP2) is a giant scaffold and mosaic cyclophilin-related nucleoporin implicated in the Ran-GTPase cycle. There are no orthologs of the RanBP2 gene in yeast and Drosophila genomes. In humans, this bona fide gene is partially duplicated in a RanBP2 gene cluster and lies in

  18. Characterization of the activation of small GTPases by their GEFs on membranes using artificial membrane tethering.

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    Peurois, François; Veyron, Simon; Ferrandez, Yann; Ladid, Ilham; Benabdi, Sarah; Zeghouf, Mahel; Peyroche, Gérald; Cherfils, Jacqueline

    2017-03-23

    Active, GTP-bound small GTPases need to be attached to membranes by post-translational lipid modifications in order to process and propagate information in cells. However, generating and manipulating lipidated GTPases has remained difficult, which has limited our quantitative understanding of their activation by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) and their termination by GTPase-activating proteins. Here, we replaced the lipid modification by a histidine tag in 11 full-length, human small GTPases belonging to the Arf, Rho and Rab families, which allowed to tether them to nickel-lipid-containing membranes and characterize the kinetics of their activation by GEFs. Remarkably, this strategy uncovered large effects of membranes on the efficiency and/or specificity in all systems studied. Notably, it recapitulated the release of autoinhibition of Arf1, Arf3, Arf4, Arf5 and Arf6 GTPases by membranes and revealed that all isoforms are efficiently activated by two GEFs with different regulatory regimes, ARNO and Brag2. It demonstrated that membranes stimulate the GEF activity of Trio toward RhoG by ∼30 fold and Rac1 by ∼10 fold, and uncovered a previously unknown broader specificity toward RhoA and Cdc42 that was undetectable in solution. Finally, it demonstrated that the exceptional affinity of the bacterial RabGEF DrrA for the phosphoinositide PI(4)P delimits the activation of Rab1 to the immediate vicinity of the membrane-bound GEF. Our study thus validates the histidine-tag strategy as a potent and simple means to mimic small GTPase lipidation, which opens a variety of applications to uncover regulations brought about by membranes. © 2017 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  19. Rho GTPases and cancer

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    Li, Hui; Peyrollier, Karine; Kilic, Gülcan

    2014-01-01

    are involved in growth and survival of tumor cells, in the interaction of tumor cells with their environment, and they are vital for the cancer supporting functions of the tumor stroma. Recent research has significantly improved our understanding of the regulation of Rho GTPase activity, the specificity of Rho......Rho GTPases are a family of small GTPases, which play an important role in the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. Not surprisingly, Rho GTPases are crucial for cell migration and therefore highly important for cancer cell invasion and the formation of metastases. In addition, Rho GTPases...

  20. Determinants of Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier 1 (SUMO1) Protein Specificity, E3 Ligase, and SUMO-RanGAP1 Binding Activities of Nucleoporin RanBP2

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    Gareau, Jaclyn R.; Reverter, David; Lima, Christopher D. (SKI)

    2012-02-16

    The RanBP2 nucleoporin contains an internal repeat domain (IR1-M-IR2) that catalyzes E3 ligase activity and forms a stable complex with SUMO-modified RanGAP1 and UBC9 at the nuclear pore complex. RanBP2 exhibits specificity for SUMO1 as RanGAP1-SUMO1/UBC9 forms a more stable complex with RanBP2 compared with RanGAP1-SUMO2 that results in greater protection of RanGAP-SUMO1 from proteases. The IR1-M-IR2 SUMO E3 ligase activity also shows a similar preference for SUMO1. We utilized deletions and domain swap constructs in protease protection assays and automodification assays to define RanBP2 domains responsible for RanGAP1-SUMO1 protection and SUMO1-specific E3 ligase activity. Our data suggest that elements in both IR1 and IR2 exhibit specificity for SUMO1. IR1 protects RanGAP1-SUMO1/UBC9 and functions as the primary E3 ligase of RanBP2, whereas IR2 retains the ability to interact with SUMO1 to promote SUMO1-specific E3 ligase activity. To determine the structural basis for SUMO1 specificity, a hybrid IR1 construct and IR1 were used to determine three new structures for complexes containing UBC9 with RanGAP1-SUMO1/2. These structures show more extensive contacts among SUMO, UBC9, and RanBP2 in complexes containing SUMO1 compared with SUMO2 and suggest that differences in SUMO specificity may be achieved through these subtle conformational differences.

  1. Interaction between the p21ras GTPase activating protein and the insulin receptor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pronk, G.J.; Medema, R.H.; Burgering, B.M.T.; Clark, R.; McCormick, F.; Bos, J.L.

    1992-01-01

    We investigated the involvement of the p21ras-GTPase activating protein (GAP) in insulin-induced signal transduction. In cells overexpressing the insulin receptor, we did not observe association between GAP and the insulin receptor after insulin treatment nor the phosphorylation of GAP on tyrosine

  2. The Rab-GTPase-activating protein TBC1D1 regulates skeletal muscle glucose metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szekeres, Ferenc; Chadt, Alexandra; Tom, Robby Z

    2012-01-01

    The Rab-GTPase-activating protein TBC1D1 has emerged as a novel candidate involved in metabolic regulation. Our aim was to determine whether TBC1D1 is involved in insulin as well as energy-sensing signals controlling skeletal muscle metabolism. TBC1D1-deficient congenic B6.SJL-Nob1.10 (Nob1.10(SJ...

  3. GTPase activity plays a key role in the pathobiology of LRRK2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulan Xiong

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2 gene are associated with late-onset, autosomal-dominant, familial Parkinson's disease (PD and also contribute to sporadic disease. The LRRK2 gene encodes a large protein with multiple domains, including functional Roc GTPase and protein kinase domains. Mutations in LRRK2 most likely cause disease through a toxic gain-of-function mechanism. The expression of human LRRK2 variants in cultured primary neurons induces toxicity that is dependent on intact GTP binding or kinase activities. However, the mechanism(s underlying LRRK2-induced neuronal toxicity is poorly understood, and the contribution of GTPase and/or kinase activity to LRRK2 pathobiology is not well defined. To explore the pathobiology of LRRK2, we have developed a model of LRRK2 cytotoxicity in the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Protein domain analysis in this model reveals that expression of GTPase domain-containing fragments of human LRRK2 are toxic. LRRK2 toxicity in yeast can be modulated by altering GTPase activity and is closely associated with defects in endocytic vesicular trafficking and autophagy. These truncated LRRK2 variants induce similar toxicity in both yeast and primary neuronal models and cause similar vesicular defects in yeast as full-length LRRK2 causes in primary neurons. The toxicity induced by truncated LRRK2 variants in yeast acts through a mechanism distinct from toxicity induced by human alpha-synuclein. A genome-wide genetic screen identified modifiers of LRRK2-induced toxicity in yeast including components of vesicular trafficking pathways, which can also modulate the trafficking defects caused by expression of truncated LRRK2 variants. Our results provide insight into the basic pathobiology of LRRK2 and suggest that the GTPase domain may contribute to the toxicity of LRRK2. These findings may guide future therapeutic strategies aimed at attenuating LRRK2-mediated neurodegeneration.

  4. Novel Activities of Select NSAID R-Enantiomers against Rac1 and Cdc42 GTPases.

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    Tudor I Oprea

    Full Text Available Rho family GTPases (including Rac, Rho and Cdc42 collectively control cell proliferation, adhesion and migration and are of interest as functional therapeutic targets in numerous epithelial cancers. Based on high throughput screening of the Prestwick Chemical Library® and cheminformatics we identified the R-enantiomers of two approved drugs (naproxen and ketorolac as inhibitors of Rac1 and Cdc42. The corresponding S-enantiomers are considered the active component in racemic drug formulations, acting as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs with selective activity against cyclooxygenases. Here, we show that the S-enantiomers of naproxen and ketorolac are inactive against the GTPases. Additionally, more than twenty other NSAIDs lacked inhibitory action against the GTPases, establishing the selectivity of the two identified NSAIDs. R-naproxen was first identified as a lead compound and tested in parallel with its S-enantiomer and the non-chiral 6-methoxy-naphthalene acetic acid (active metabolite of nabumetone, another NSAID as a structural series. Cheminformatics-based substructure analyses-using the rotationally constrained carboxylate in R-naproxen-led to identification of racemic [R/S] ketorolac as a suitable FDA-approved candidate. Cell based measurement of GTPase activity (in animal and human cell lines demonstrated that the R-enantiomers specifically inhibit epidermal growth factor stimulated Rac1 and Cdc42 activation. The GTPase inhibitory effects of the R-enantiomers in cells largely mimic those of established Rac1 (NSC23766 and Cdc42 (CID2950007/ML141 specific inhibitors. Docking predicts that rotational constraints position the carboxylate moieties of the R-enantiomers to preferentially coordinate the magnesium ion, thereby destabilizing nucleotide binding to Rac1 and Cdc42. The S-enantiomers can be docked but are less favorably positioned in proximity to the magnesium. R-naproxen and R-ketorolac have potential for rapid

  5. A Burkholderia Type VI Effector Deamidates Rho GTPases to Activate the Pyrin Inflammasome and Trigger Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubert, Daniel F; Xu, Hao; Yang, Jieling; Shi, Xuyan; Gao, Wenqing; Li, Lin; Bisaro, Fabiana; Chen, She; Valvano, Miguel A; Shao, Feng

    2016-05-11

    Burkholderia cenocepacia is an opportunistic pathogen of the cystic fibrosis lung that elicits a strong inflammatory response. B. cenocepacia employs a type VI secretion system (T6SS) to survive in macrophages by disarming Rho-type GTPases, causing actin cytoskeletal defects. Here, we identified TecA, a non-VgrG T6SS effector responsible for actin disruption. TecA and other bacterial homologs bear a cysteine protease-like catalytic triad, which inactivates Rho GTPases by deamidating a conserved asparagine in the GTPase switch-I region. RhoA deamidation induces caspase-1 inflammasome activation, which is mediated by the familial Mediterranean fever disease protein Pyrin. In mouse infection, the deamidase activity of TecA is necessary and sufficient for B. cenocepacia-triggered lung inflammation and also protects mice from lethal B. cenocepacia infection. Therefore, Burkholderia TecA is a T6SS effector that modifies a eukaryotic target through an asparagine deamidase activity, which in turn elicits host cell death and inflammation through activation of the Pyrin inflammasome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The pathway to GTPase activation of elongation factor SelB on the ribosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Niels; Neumann, Piotr; Bock, Lars V; Maracci, Cristina; Wang, Zhe; Paleskava, Alena; Konevega, Andrey L; Schröder, Gunnar F; Grubmüller, Helmut; Ficner, Ralf; Rodnina, Marina V; Stark, Holger

    2016-12-01

    In all domains of life, selenocysteine (Sec) is delivered to the ribosome by selenocysteine-specific tRNA (tRNA(Sec)) with the help of a specialized translation factor, SelB in bacteria. Sec-tRNA(Sec) recodes a UGA stop codon next to a downstream mRNA stem-loop. Here we present the structures of six intermediates on the pathway of UGA recoding in Escherichia coli by single-particle cryo-electron microscopy. The structures explain the specificity of Sec-tRNA(Sec) binding by SelB and show large-scale rearrangements of Sec-tRNA(Sec). Upon initial binding of SelB-Sec-tRNA(Sec) to the ribosome and codon reading, the 30S subunit adopts an open conformation with Sec-tRNA(Sec) covering the sarcin-ricin loop (SRL) on the 50S subunit. Subsequent codon recognition results in a local closure of the decoding site, which moves Sec-tRNA(Sec) away from the SRL and triggers a global closure of the 30S subunit shoulder domain. As a consequence, SelB docks on the SRL, activating the GTPase of SelB. These results reveal how codon recognition triggers GTPase activation in translational GTPases.

  7. Insight into Temperature Dependence of GTPase Activity in Human Guanylate Binding Protein-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Safikur; Deep, Shashank; Sau, Apurba Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Interferon-γ induced human guanylate binding protein-1(hGBP1) belongs to a family of dynamin related large GTPases. Unlike all other GTPases, hGBP1 hydrolyzes GTP to a mixture of GDP and GMP with GMP being the major product at 37°C but GDP became significant when the hydrolysis reaction was carried out at 15°C. The hydrolysis reaction in hGBP1 is believed to involve with a number of catalytic steps. To investigate the effect of temperature in the product formation and on the different catalytic complexes of hGBP1, we carried out temperature dependent GTPase assays, mutational analysis, chemical and thermal denaturation studies. The Arrhenius plot for both GDP and GMP interestingly showed nonlinear behaviour, suggesting that the product formation from the GTP-bound enzyme complex is associated with at least more than one step. The negative activation energy for GDP formation and GTPase assay with external GDP together indicate that GDP formation occurs through the reversible dissociation of GDP-bound enzyme dimer to monomer, which further reversibly dissociates to give the product. Denaturation studies of different catalytic complexes show that unlike other complexes the free energy of GDP-bound hGBP1 decreases significantly at lower temperature. GDP formation is found to be dependent on the free energy of the GDP-bound enzyme complex. The decrease in the free energy of this complex at low temperature compared to at high is the reason for higher GDP formation at low temperature. Thermal denaturation studies also suggest that the difference in the free energy of the GTP-bound enzyme dimer compared to its monomer plays a crucial role in the product formation; higher stability favours GMP but lower favours GDP. Thus, this study provides the first thermodynamic insight into the effect of temperature in the product formation of hGBP1. PMID:22859948

  8. Insight into temperature dependence of GTPase activity in human guanylate binding protein-1.

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    Anjana Rani

    Full Text Available Interferon-γ induced human guanylate binding protein-1(hGBP1 belongs to a family of dynamin related large GTPases. Unlike all other GTPases, hGBP1 hydrolyzes GTP to a mixture of GDP and GMP with GMP being the major product at 37°C but GDP became significant when the hydrolysis reaction was carried out at 15°C. The hydrolysis reaction in hGBP1 is believed to involve with a number of catalytic steps. To investigate the effect of temperature in the product formation and on the different catalytic complexes of hGBP1, we carried out temperature dependent GTPase assays, mutational analysis, chemical and thermal denaturation studies. The Arrhenius plot for both GDP and GMP interestingly showed nonlinear behaviour, suggesting that the product formation from the GTP-bound enzyme complex is associated with at least more than one step. The negative activation energy for GDP formation and GTPase assay with external GDP together indicate that GDP formation occurs through the reversible dissociation of GDP-bound enzyme dimer to monomer, which further reversibly dissociates to give the product. Denaturation studies of different catalytic complexes show that unlike other complexes the free energy of GDP-bound hGBP1 decreases significantly at lower temperature. GDP formation is found to be dependent on the free energy of the GDP-bound enzyme complex. The decrease in the free energy of this complex at low temperature compared to at high is the reason for higher GDP formation at low temperature. Thermal denaturation studies also suggest that the difference in the free energy of the GTP-bound enzyme dimer compared to its monomer plays a crucial role in the product formation; higher stability favours GMP but lower favours GDP. Thus, this study provides the first thermodynamic insight into the effect of temperature in the product formation of hGBP1.

  9. The GTPase activating Rap/RanGAP domain-like 1 gene is associated with chicken reproductive traits.

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    Xu Shen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Abundant evidence indicates that chicken reproduction is strictly regulated by the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonad (HPG axis, and the genes included in the HPG axis have been studied extensively. However, the question remains as to whether any other genes outside of the HPG system are involved in regulating chicken reproduction. The present study was aimed to identify, on a genome-wide level, novel genes associated with chicken reproductive traits. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: Suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH, genome-wide association study (GWAS, and gene-centric GWAS were used to identify novel genes underlying chicken reproduction. Single marker-trait association analysis with a large population and allelic frequency spectrum analysis were used to confirm the effects of candidate genes. Using two full-sib Ningdu Sanhuang (NDH chickens, GARNL1 was identified as a candidate gene involved in chicken broodiness by SSH analysis. Its expression levels in the hypothalamus and pituitary were significantly higher in brooding chickens than in non-brooding chickens. GWAS analysis with a NDH two tail sample showed that 2802 SNPs were significantly associated with egg number at 300 d of age (EN300. Among the 2802 SNPs, 2 SNPs composed a block overlapping the GARNL1 gene. The gene-centric GWAS analysis with another two tail sample of NDH showed that GARNL1 was strongly associated with EN300 and age at first egg (AFE. Single marker-trait association analysis in 1301 female NDH chickens confirmed that variation in this gene was related to EN300 and AFE. The allelic frequency spectrum of the SNP rs15700989 among 5 different populations supported the above associations. Western blotting, RT-PCR, and qPCR were used to analyze alternative splicing of the GARNL1 gene. RT-PCR detected 5 transcripts and revealed that the transcript, which has a 141 bp insertion, was expressed in a tissue-specific manner. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings demonstrate that the GARNL1 gene contributes to chicken reproductive traits.

  10. GTPase activity and neuronal toxicity of Parkinson's disease-associated LRRK2 is regulated by ArfGAP1.

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    Klodjan Stafa

    Full Text Available Mutations in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2 gene are the most common cause of autosomal dominant familial Parkinson's disease (PD and also contribute to idiopathic PD. LRRK2 encodes a large multi-domain protein with GTPase and kinase activity. Initial data indicates that an intact functional GTPase domain is critically required for LRRK2 kinase activity. PD-associated mutations in LRRK2, including the most common G2019S variant, have variable effects on enzymatic activity but commonly alter neuronal process morphology. The mechanisms underlying the intrinsic and extrinsic regulation of LRRK2 GTPase and kinase activity, and the pathogenic effects of familial mutations, are incompletely understood. Here, we identify a novel functional interaction between LRRK2 and ADP-ribosylation factor GTPase-activating protein 1 (ArfGAP1. LRRK2 and ArfGAP1 interact in vitro in mammalian cells and in vivo in brain, and co-localize in the cytoplasm and at Golgi membranes. PD-associated and functional mutations that alter the GTPase activity of LRRK2 modulate the interaction with ArfGAP1. The GTP hydrolysis activity of LRRK2 is markedly enhanced by ArfGAP1 supporting a role for ArfGAP1 as a GTPase-activating protein for LRRK2. Unexpectedly, ArfGAP1 promotes the kinase activity of LRRK2 suggesting a potential role for GTP hydrolysis in kinase activation. Furthermore, LRRK2 robustly and directly phosphorylates ArfGAP1 in vitro. Silencing of ArfGAP1 expression in primary cortical neurons rescues the neurite shortening phenotype induced by G2019S LRRK2 overexpression, whereas the co-expression of ArfGAP1 and LRRK2 synergistically promotes neurite shortening in a manner dependent upon LRRK2 GTPase activity. Neurite shortening induced by ArfGAP1 overexpression is also attenuated by silencing of LRRK2. Our data reveal a novel role for ArfGAP1 in regulating the GTPase activity and neuronal toxicity of LRRK2; reciprocally, LRRK2 phosphorylates ArfGAP1 and is

  11. A novel role for the GTPase-activating protein Bud2 in the spindle position checkpoint.

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    Scott A Nelson

    Full Text Available The spindle position checkpoint (SPC ensures correct mitotic spindle position before allowing mitotic exit in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In a candidate screen for checkpoint genes, we identified bud2Δ as deficient for the SPC. Bud2 is a GTPase activating protein (GAP, and the only known substrate of Bud2 was Rsr1/Bud1, a Ras-like GTPase and a central component of the bud-site-selection pathway. Mutants lacking Rsr1/Bud1 had no checkpoint defect, as did strains lacking and overexpressing Bud5, a guanine-nucleotide exchange factor (GEF for Rsr1/Bud1. Thus, the checkpoint function of Bud2 is distinct from its role in bud site selection. The catalytic activity of the Bud2 GAP domain was required for the checkpoint, based on the failure of the known catalytic point mutant Bud2(R682A to function in the checkpoint. Based on assays of heterozygous diploids, bud2(R682A, was dominant for loss of checkpoint but recessive for bud-site-selection failure, further indicating a separation of function. Tem1 is a Ras-like protein and is the critical regulator of mitotic exit, sitting atop the mitotic exit network (MEN. Tem1 is a likely target for Bud2, supported by genetic analyses that exclude other Ras-like proteins.

  12. The Conformation of Bound GMPPNP Suggests a Mechanism for Gating the Active Site of the SRP GTPase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padmanabhan, S.; Freymann, D. (NWU)

    2010-03-08

    The signal recognition particle (SRP) is a phylogenetically conserved ribonucleoprotein that mediates cotranslational targeting of secreted and membrane proteins to the membrane. Targeting is regulated by GTP binding and hydrolysis events that require direct interaction between structurally homologous 'NG' GTPase domains of the SRP signal recognition subunit and its membrane-associated receptor, SR{alpha}. Structures of both the apo and GDP bound NG domains of the prokaryotic SRP54 homolog, Ffh, and the prokaryotic receptor homolog, FtsY, have been determined. The structural basis for the GTP-dependent interaction between the two proteins, however, remains unknown. We report here two structures of the NG GTPase of Ffh from Thermus aquaticus bound to the nonhydrolyzable GTP analog GMPPNP. Both structures reveal an unexpected binding mode in which the {beta}-phosphate is kinked away from the binding site and magnesium is not bound. Binding of the GTP analog in the canonical conformation found in other GTPase structures is precluded by constriction of the phosphate binding P loop. The structural difference between the Ffh complex and other GTPases suggests a specific conformational change that must accompany movement of the nucleotide from an inactive to an active binding mode. Conserved side chains of the GTPase sequence motifs unique to the SRP subfamily may function to gate formation of the active GTP bound conformation. Exposed hydrophobic residues provide an interaction surface that may allow regulation of the GTP binding conformation, and thus activation of the GTPase, during the association of SRP with its receptor.

  13. Guanine nucleotide exchange factor αPIX leads to activation of the Rac 1 GTPase/glycogen phosphorylase pathway in interleukin (IL)-2-stimulated T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Llavero, Francisco; Urzelai, Bakarne; Osinalde, Nerea

    2015-01-01

    Recently, we have reported that the active form of Rac 1 GTPase binds to the glycogen phosphorylase muscle isoform (PYGM) and modulates its enzymatic activity leading to T cell proliferation. In the lymphoid system, Rac 1 and in general other small GTPases of the Rho family participate in the sig...

  14. A GTPase chimera illustrates an uncoupled nucleotide affinity and release rate, Providing insight into the activation mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guilfoyle, Amy P.; Deshpande, Chandrika N.; Font Sadurni, Josep

    2014-01-01

    The release of GDP from GTPases signals the initiation of a GTPase cycle, where the association of GTP triggers conformational changes promoting binding of downstream effector molecules. Studies have implicated the nucleotide-binding G5 loop to be involved in the GDP release mechanism. For example...... for GDP release, or, alternatively, the movement is a consequence of release. To gain additional insight into the sequence of events leading to GDP release, we have created a chimeric protein comprised of Escherichia coli NFeoB and the G5 loop from the human Giα1 protein. The protein chimera retains...... GTPase activity at a similar level to wild-type NFeoB, and structural analyses of the nucleotide-free and GDP-bound proteins show that the G5 loop adopts conformations analogous to that of the human nucleotide-bound Giα1 protein in both states. Interestingly, isothermal titration calorimetry and stopped...

  15. GTPase-activating protein SH2-SH3 domains induce gene expression in a Ras-dependent fashion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Medema, R.H.; Laat, W.L. de; Martin, G.A.; Mccormick, F.; Bos, J.L.

    1992-01-01

    The p21ras GTPase-activating protein (GAP) is thought to function as both a negative regulator and a downstream target of p21ras. Here, we have investigated the role of GAP by using a transient expression assay with a fos luciferase reporter plasmid. We used GAP deletion mutants that lack the domain

  16. Structural Dynamics Control Allosteric Activation of Cytohesin Family Arf GTPase Exchange Factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malaby, Andrew W.; Das, Sanchaita; Chakravarthy, Srinivas; Irving, Thomas C.; Bilsel, Osman; Lambright, David G.

    2018-01-01

    Membrane dynamic processes including vesicle biogenesis depend on Arf guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) activation by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) containing a catalytic Sec7 domain and a membrane-targeting module such as a pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. The catalytic output of cytohesin family Arf GEFs is controlled by autoinhibitory interactions that impede accessibility of the exchange site in the Sec7 domain. These restraints can be relieved through activator Arf-GTP binding to an allosteric site comprising the PH domain and proximal autoinhibitory elements (Sec7-PH linker and C-terminal helix). Small-angle X-ray scattering and negative-stain electron microscopy were used to investigate the structural organization and conformational dynamics of cytohesin-3 (Grp1) in autoinhibited and active states. The results support a model in which hinge dynamics in the autoinhibited state expose the activator site for Arf-GTP binding, while subsequent C-terminal helix unlatching and repositioning unleash conformational entropy in the Sec7-PH linker to drive exposure of the exchange site.

  17. RIT1 GTPase Regulates Sox2 Transcriptional Activity and Hippocampal Neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mir, Sajad; Cai, Weikang; Andres, Douglas A

    2017-02-10

    Adult neurogenesis, the process of generating mature neurons from neuronal progenitor cells, makes critical contributions to neural circuitry and brain function in both healthy and disease states. Neurogenesis is a highly regulated process in which diverse environmental and physiological stimuli are relayed to resident neural stem cell populations to control the transcription of genes involved in self-renewal and differentiation. Understanding the molecular mechanisms governing neurogenesis is necessary for the development of translational strategies to harness this process for neuronal repair. Here we report that the Ras-related GTPase RIT1 serves to control the sequential proliferation and differentiation of adult hippocampal neural progenitor cells, with in vivo expression of active RIT1 driving robust adult neurogenesis. Gene expression profiling analysis demonstrates increased expression of a specific set of transcription factors known to govern adult neurogenesis in response to active RIT1 expression in the hippocampus, including sex-determining region Y-related HMG box 2 (Sox2), a well established regulator of stem cell self-renewal and neurogenesis. In adult hippocampal neuronal precursor cells, RIT1 controls an Akt-dependent signaling cascade, resulting in the stabilization and transcriptional activation of phosphorylated Sox2. This study supports a role for RIT1 in relaying niche-derived signals to neural/stem progenitor cells to control transcription of genes involved in self-renewal and differentiation. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Defect in the GTPase activating protein (GAP) function of eIF5 causes repression of GCN4 translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antony A, Charles; Alone, Pankaj V

    2017-05-13

    In eukaryotes, the eIF5 protein plays an important role in translation start site selection by providing the GAP (GTPase activating protein) function. However, in yeast translation initiation fidelity defective eIF5G31R mutant causes preferential utilization of UUG as initiation codon and is termed as Suppressor of initiation codon (Sui-) phenotype due to its hyper GTPase activity. The eIF5G31R mutant dominantly represses GCN4 expression and confers sensitivity to 3-Amino-1,2,4-Trizole (3AT) induced starvation. The down-regulation of the GCN4 expression (Gcn- phenotype) in the eIF5G31R mutant was not because of leaky scanning defects; rather was due to the utilization of upUUG initiation codons at the 5' regulatory region present between uORF1 and the main GCN4 ORF. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The Rab2A GTPase Promotes Breast Cancer Stem Cells and Tumorigenesis via Erk Signaling Activation

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    Man-Li Luo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Proline-directed phosphorylation is regulated by the prolyl isomerase Pin1, which plays a fundamental role in driving breast cancer stem-like cells (BCSCs. Rab2A is a small GTPase critical for vesicle trafficking. Here, we show that Pin1 increases Rab2A transcription to promote BCSC expansion and tumorigenesis in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistically, Rab2A directly interacts with and prevents dephosphorylation/inactivation of Erk1/2 by the MKP3 phosphatase, resulting in Zeb1 upregulation and β-catenin nuclear translocation. In cancer cells, Rab2A is activated via gene amplification, mutation or Pin1 overexpression. Rab2A overexpression or mutation endows BCSC traits to primary normal human breast epithelial cells, whereas silencing Rab2A potently inhibits the expansion and tumorigenesis of freshly isolated BCSCs. Finally, Rab2A overexpression correlates with poor clinical outcome in breast cancer patients. Thus, Pin1/Rab2A/Erk drives BCSC expansion and tumorigenicity, suggesting potential drug targets.

  20. The Ran pathway in Drosophila melanogaster mitosis

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    James G Wakefield

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Over the last two decades, the small GTPase Ran has emerged as a central regulator of both mitosis and meiosis, particularly in the generation, maintenance and regulation of the microtubule (MT-based bipolar spindle. Ran-regulated pathways in mitosis bear many similarities to the well-characterized functions of Ran in nuclear transport and, as with transport, the majority of these mitotic effects are mediated through affecting the physical interaction between karyopherins and Spindle Assembly Factors (SAFs - a loose term describing proteins or protein complexes involved in spindle assembly through promoting nucleation, stabilization, and/or depolymerization of MTs, through anchoring MTs to specific structures such as centrosomes, chromatin or kinetochores, or through sliding MTs along each other to generate the force required to achieve bipolarity. As such, the Ran-mediated pathway represents a crucial functional module within the wider spindle assembly landscape. Research into mitosis using the model organism Drosophila melanogaster has contributed substantially to our understanding of centrosome and spindle function. However, in comparison to mammalian systems, very little is known about the contribution of Ran-mediated pathways in Drosophila mitosis. This article sets out to summarize our understanding of the roles of the Ran pathway components in Drosophila mitosis, focusing on the syncytial blastoderm embryo, arguing that, far from being superfluous, it can provide important insights into the conserved functions on Ran during spindle formation.

  1. Secretory pathway-dependent localization of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rho GTPase-activating protein Rgd1p at growth sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefèbvre, Fabien; Prouzet-Mauléon, Valérie; Hugues, Michel; Crouzet, Marc; Vieillemard, Aurélie; McCusker, Derek; Thoraval, Didier; Doignon, François

    2012-05-01

    Establishment and maintenance of cell polarity in eukaryotes depends upon the regulation of Rho GTPases. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the Rho GTPase activating protein (RhoGAP) Rgd1p stimulates the GTPase activities of Rho3p and Rho4p, which are involved in bud growth and cytokinesis, respectively. Consistent with the distribution of Rho3p and Rho4p, Rgd1p is found mostly in areas of polarized growth during cell cycle progression. Rgd1p was mislocalized in mutants specifically altered for Golgi apparatus-based phosphatidylinositol 4-P [PtdIns(4)P] synthesis and for PtdIns(4,5)P(2) production at the plasma membrane. Analysis of Rgd1p distribution in different membrane-trafficking mutants suggested that Rgd1p was delivered to growth sites via the secretory pathway. Rgd1p may associate with post-Golgi vesicles by binding to PtdIns(4)P and then be transported by secretory vesicles to the plasma membrane. In agreement, we show that Rgd1p coimmunoprecipitated and localized with markers specific to secretory vesicles and cofractionated with a plasma membrane marker. Moreover, in vivo imaging revealed that Rgd1p was transported in an anterograde manner from the mother cell to the daughter cell in a vectoral manner. Our data indicate that secretory vesicles are involved in the delivery of RhoGAP Rgd1p to the bud tip and bud neck.

  2. Overexpression of Ran gene from Lepidium latifolium L. (LlaRan) renders transgenic tobacco plants hypersensitive to cold stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Vimlendu Bhushan; Grover, Atul; Singh, Sadhana; Pande, Veena; Ahmed, Zakwan

    2014-09-01

    Ran is a multifunctional small GTPase involved in important cellular activities like nucleocytoplasmic transport, mitotic spindle assembly, nuclear envelope formation, etc., but is also known to be differentially expressed in response to abiotic stress, particularly low temperature. We have over-expressed Lepidium latifolium (Fam. Brassicaceae) Ran gene in tobacco to study the response of the plants to cold stress (24 h; 4 °C). Transformation of the tobacco plants was verified using PCR targeting Ran gene and co-transformed selectable marker gene nptII. Segregation in Mendelian ratios was validated in five transgenic lines by germination of T1 and T2 seeds on moist filter papers containing 150 mg/l kanamycin. Higher levels of electrolyte leakage and lipid peroxidation pointed towards hypersensitivity of plants. Similarly, lesser proline accumulation compared to wild types also indicated susceptibility of plants to death under chilling conditions. Specific activity of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase and glutathione reductase was also measured under stressed and control conditions. A variation was observed across the different lines, and four out of five lines showed lesser specific activity compared to wild type plants, thus indicating reduced capability of scavenging free radicals. In totality, a strong evidence on induced hypersensitivity to cold stress has been collected which may further be helpful in designing appropriate strategies for engineering crop plants for survival under cold stress conditions.

  3. Ras GTPase-activating protein regulation of actin cytoskeleton and hyphal polarity in Aspergillus nidulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harispe, Laura; Portela, Cecilia; Scazzocchio, Claudio; Peñalva, Miguel A; Gorfinkiel, Lisette

    2008-01-01

    Aspergillus nidulans gapA1, a mutation leading to compact, fluffy colonies and delayed polarity establishment, maps to a gene encoding a Ras GTPase-activating protein. Domain organization and phylogenetic analyses strongly indicate that GapA regulates one or more "true" Ras proteins. A gapADelta strain is viable. gapA colonies are more compact than gapA1 colonies and show reduced conidiation. gapADelta strains have abnormal conidiophores, characterized by the absence of one of the two layers of sterigmata seen in the wild type. gapA transcript levels are very low in conidia but increase during germination and reach their maximum at a time coincident with germ tube emergence. Elevated levels persist in hyphae. In germinating conidiospores, gapADelta disrupts the normal coupling of isotropic growth, polarity establishment, and mitosis, resulting in a highly heterogeneous cell population, including malformed germlings and a class of giant cells with no germ tubes and a multitude of nuclei. Unlike wild-type conidia, gapADelta conidia germinate without a carbon source. Giant multinucleated spores and carbon source-independent germination have been reported in strains carrying a rasA dominant active allele, indicating that GapA downregulates RasA. gapADelta cells show a polarity maintenance defect characterized by apical swelling and subapical branching. The strongly polarized wild-type F-actin distribution is lost in gapADelta cells. As GapA-green fluorescent protein shows cortical localization with strong predominance at the hyphal tips, we propose that GapA-mediated downregulation of Ras signaling at the plasma membrane of these tips is involved in the polarization of the actin cytoskeleton that is required for hyphal growth and, possibly, for asexual morphogenesis.

  4. Ras GTPase-Activating Protein Regulation of Actin Cytoskeleton and Hyphal Polarity in Aspergillus nidulans▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harispe, Laura; Portela, Cecilia; Scazzocchio, Claudio; Peñalva, Miguel A.; Gorfinkiel, Lisette

    2008-01-01

    Aspergillus nidulans gapA1, a mutation leading to compact, fluffy colonies and delayed polarity establishment, maps to a gene encoding a Ras GTPase-activating protein. Domain organization and phylogenetic analyses strongly indicate that GapA regulates one or more “true” Ras proteins. A gapAΔ strain is viable. gapA colonies are more compact than gapA1 colonies and show reduced conidiation. gapAΔ strains have abnormal conidiophores, characterized by the absence of one of the two layers of sterigmata seen in the wild type. gapA transcript levels are very low in conidia but increase during germination and reach their maximum at a time coincident with germ tube emergence. Elevated levels persist in hyphae. In germinating conidiospores, gapAΔ disrupts the normal coupling of isotropic growth, polarity establishment, and mitosis, resulting in a highly heterogeneous cell population, including malformed germlings and a class of giant cells with no germ tubes and a multitude of nuclei. Unlike wild-type conidia, gapAΔ conidia germinate without a carbon source. Giant multinucleated spores and carbon source-independent germination have been reported in strains carrying a rasA dominant active allele, indicating that GapA downregulates RasA. gapAΔ cells show a polarity maintenance defect characterized by apical swelling and subapical branching. The strongly polarized wild-type F-actin distribution is lost in gapAΔ cells. As GapA-green fluorescent protein shows cortical localization with strong predominance at the hyphal tips, we propose that GapA-mediated downregulation of Ras signaling at the plasma membrane of these tips is involved in the polarization of the actin cytoskeleton that is required for hyphal growth and, possibly, for asexual morphogenesis. PMID:18039943

  5. Aldynoglia cells and modulation of RhoGTPase activity as useful tools for spinal cord injury repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doncel-Pérez, Ernesto; Nieto-Sampedro, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    A combined approach in spinal cord injury (SCI) therapy is the modulation of the cellular and molecular processes involved in glial scarring. Aldaynoglial cells are neural cell precursors with a high capacity to differentiate into neurons, promote axonal growth, wrapping and myelination of resident neurons. These important characteristics of aldaynoglia can be combined with specific inhibition of the RhoGTPase activity in astroglia and microglia that cause reduction of glial proliferation, retraction of glial cell processes and myelin production by oligodendrocytes. Previously we used experimental central nervous system (CNS) injury models, like spinal cord contusion and striatal lacunar infarction and observed that administration of RhoGTPase glycolipid inhibitor or aldaynoglial cells, respectively, produced a significant gain of functional recovery in treated animals. The combined therapy with neuro-regenerative properties strategy is highly desirable to treat SCI for functional potentiation of neurons and oligodendrocytes, resulting in better locomotor recovery. Here we suggest that treatment of spinal lesions with aldaynoglia from neurospheres plus local administration of a RhoGTPase inhibitor could have an additive effect and promote recovery from SCI. PMID:27630672

  6. Reduction of exportin 6 activity leads to actin accumulation via failure of RanGTP restoration and NTF2 sequestration in the nuclei of senescent cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Su Hyun; Park, Tae Jun; Lim, In Kyoung, E-mail: iklim@ajou.ac.kr

    2011-04-15

    We have previously reported that G-actin accumulation in nuclei is a universal phenomenon of cellular senescence. By employing primary culture of human diploid fibroblast (HDF) and stress-induced premature senescence (SIPS), we explored whether the failure of actin export to cytoplasm is responsible for actin accumulation in nuclei of senescent cells. Expression of exportin 6 (Exp6) and small G-protein, Ran, was significantly reduced in the replicative senescence, but not yet in SIPS, whereas nuclear import of actin by cofilin was already increased in SIPS. After treatment of young HDF cells with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, rapid reduction of nuclear RanGTP was observed along with cytoplasmic increase of RanGDP. Furthermore, significantly reduced interaction of Exp6 with RanGTP was found by GST-Exp6 pull-down analysis. Failure of RanGTP restoration was accompanied with inhibition of ATP synthesis and NTF2 sequestration in the nuclei along with accordant change of senescence morphology. Indeed, knockdown of Exp6 expression significantly increased actin molecule in the nuclei of young HDF cells. Therefore, actin accumulation in nuclei of senescent cells is most likely due to the failure of RanGTP restoration with ATP deficiency and NTF2 accumulation in nuclei, which result in the decrease of actin export via Exp6 inactivation, in addition to actin import by cofilin activation.

  7. The jaw of the worm: GTPase-activating protein EAT-17 regulates grinder formation in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straud, Sarah; Lee, Inhwan; Song, Bomi; Avery, Leon; You, Young-Jai

    2013-09-01

    Constitutive transport of cellular materials is essential for cell survival. Although multiple small GTPase Rab proteins are required for the process, few regulators of Rabs are known. Here we report that EAT-17, a novel GTPase-activating protein (GAP), regulates RAB-6.2 function in grinder formation in Caenorhabditis elegans. We identified EAT-17 as a novel RabGAP that interacts with RAB-6.2, a protein that presumably regulates vesicle trafficking between Golgi, the endoplasmic reticulum, and plasma membrane to form a functional grinder. EAT-17 has a canonical GAP domain that is critical for its function. RNA interference against 25 confirmed and/or predicted RABs in C. elegans shows that RNAi against rab-6.2 produces a phenotype identical to eat-17. A directed yeast two-hybrid screen using EAT-17 as bait and each of the 25 RAB proteins as prey identifies RAB-6.2 as the interacting partner of EAT-17, confirming that RAB-6.2 is a specific substrate of EAT-17. Additionally, deletion mutants of rab-6.2 show grinder defects identical to those of eat-17 loss-of-function mutants, and both RAB-6.2 and EAT-17 are expressed in the terminal bulb of the pharynx where the grinder is located. Collectively, these results suggest that EAT-17 is a specific GTPase-activating protein for RAB-6.2. Based on the conserved function of Rab6 in vesicular transport, we propose that EAT-17 regulates the turnover rate of RAB-6.2 activity in cargo trafficking for grinder formation.

  8. HIV signaling through CD4 and CCR5 activates Rho family GTPases that are required for optimal infection of primary CD4+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucera, Mark B; Fleissner, Zach; Tabler, Caroline O; Schlatzer, Daniela M; Troyer, Zach; Tilton, John C

    2017-01-24

    HIV-1 hijacks host cell machinery to ensure successful replication, including cytoskeletal components for intracellular trafficking, nucleoproteins for pre-integration complex import, and the ESCRT pathway for assembly and budding. It is widely appreciated that cellular post-translational modifications (PTMs) regulate protein activity within cells; however, little is known about how PTMs influence HIV replication. Previously, we reported that blocking deacetylation of tubulin using histone deacetylase inhibitors promoted the kinetics and efficiency of early post-entry viral events. To uncover additional PTMs that modulate entry and early post-entry stages in HIV infection, we employed a flow cytometric approach to assess a panel of small molecule inhibitors on viral fusion and LTR promoter-driven gene expression. While viral fusion was not significantly affected, early post-entry viral events were modulated by drugs targeting multiple processes including histone deacetylation, methylation, and bromodomain inhibition. Most notably, we observed that inhibitors of the Rho GTPase family of cytoskeletal regulators-including RhoA, Cdc42, and Rho-associated kinase signaling pathways-significantly reduced viral infection. Using phosphoproteomics and a biochemical GTPase activation assay, we found that virion-induced signaling via CD4 and CCR5 activated Rho family GTPases including Rac1 and Cdc42 and led to widespread modification of GTPase signaling-associated factors. Together, these data demonstrate that HIV signaling activates members of the Rho GTPase family of cytoskeletal regulators that are required for optimal HIV infection of primary CD4+ T cells.

  9. RAN Translation in Huntington Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bañez-Coronel, Monica; Ayhan, Fatma; Tarabochia, Alex D; Zu, Tao; Perez, Barbara A; Tusi, Solaleh Khoramian; Pletnikova, Olga; Borchelt, David R; Ross, Christopher A; Margolis, Russell L; Yachnis, Anthony T; Troncoso, Juan C; Ranum, Laura P W

    2015-11-18

    Huntington disease (HD) is caused by a CAG ⋅ CTG expansion in the huntingtin (HTT) gene. While most research has focused on the HTT polyGln-expansion protein, we demonstrate that four additional, novel, homopolymeric expansion proteins (polyAla, polySer, polyLeu, and polyCys) accumulate in HD human brains. These sense and antisense repeat-associated non-ATG (RAN) translation proteins accumulate most abundantly in brain regions with neuronal loss, microglial activation and apoptosis, including caudate/putamen, white matter, and, in juvenile-onset cases, also the cerebellum. RAN protein accumulation and aggregation are length dependent, and individual RAN proteins are toxic to neural cells independent of RNA effects. These data suggest RAN proteins contribute to HD and that therapeutic strategies targeting both sense and antisense genes may be required for efficacy in HD patients. This is the first demonstration that RAN proteins are expressed across an expansion located in an open reading frame and suggests RAN translation may also contribute to other polyglutamine diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Exercise modulates redox-sensitive small GTPase activity in the brain microvasculature in a model of brain metastasis formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gretchen Wolff

    Full Text Available Tumor cell extravasation into the brain requires passage through the blood-brain barrier (BBB. There is evidence that exercise can alter the oxidation status of the brain microvasculature and protect against tumor cell invasion into the brain, although the mechanisms are not well understood. In the current study, we focused on the role of microenvironment generated by exercise and metastasizing tumor cells at the levels of brain microvessels, influencing oxidative stress-mediated responses and activation of redox-sensitive small GTPases. Mature male mice were exercised for four weeks using a running wheel with the average voluntary running distance 9.0 ± 0.3 km/day. Mice were then infused with 1.0 × 10(6 D122 (murine Lewis lung carcinoma cells into the brain microvasculature, and euthanized either 48 hours (in short-term studies or 2-3 weeks (in long-term studies post tumor cell administration. A significant increase in the level of reactive oxygen species was observed following 48 hours or 3 weeks of tumor cells growth, which was accompanied by a reduction in MnSOD expression in the exercised mice. Activation of the small GTPase Rho was negatively correlated with running distance in the tumor cell infused mice. Together, these data suggest that exercise may play a significant role during aggressive metastatic invasion, especially at higher intensities in pre-trained individuals.

  11. Sustained delivery of activated Rho GTPases and BDNF promotes axon growth in CSPG-rich regions following spinal cord injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjana Jain

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury (SCI often results in permanent functional loss. This physical trauma leads to secondary events, such as the deposition of inhibitory chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG within astroglial scar tissue at the lesion.We examined whether local delivery of constitutively active (CA Rho GTPases, Cdc42 and Rac1 to the lesion site alleviated CSPG-mediated inhibition of regenerating axons. A dorsal over-hemisection lesion was created in the rat spinal cord and the resulting cavity was conformally filled with an in situ gelling hydrogel combined with lipid microtubes that slowly released constitutively active (CA Cdc42, Rac1, or Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF. Treatment with BDNF, CA-Cdc42, or CA-Rac1 reduced the number of GFAP-positive astrocytes, as well as CSPG deposition, at the interface of the implanted hydrogel and host tissue. Neurofilament 160kDa positively stained axons traversed the glial scar extensively, entering the hydrogel-filled cavity in the treatments with BDNF and CA-Rho GTPases. The treated animals had a higher percentage of axons from the corticospinal tract that traversed the CSPG-rich regions located proximal to the lesion site.Local delivery of CA-Cdc42, CA-Rac1, and BDNF may have a significant therapeutic role in overcoming CSPG-mediated regenerative failure after SCI.

  12. Expression and cytoprotective activity of the small GTPase RhoB induced by the Escherichia coli cytotoxic necrotizing factor 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huelsenbeck, Stefanie C; Roggenkamp, Dennis; May, Martin

    2013-01-01

    B expression, based on the inactivation of Rho/Ras proteins. In this study, we report on a long lasting expression of RhoB in cultured cells upon activation of Rho proteins by the cytotoxic necrotizing factor 1 (CNF1) from Escherichia coli. The observations of this study highlight a new pathway involving Rac1......RhoB is the only member of the Rho subfamily of small GTPases, which is classified as an immediate early gene product. RhoB is up-regulated in response to growth factors as well as cytotoxic and genotoxic agents. Clostridial glucosylating toxins have been reported to evoke pronounced Rho......, which positively regulates the activity of the rhoB promoter and RhoB expression. Conversely, the isomeric cytotoxic necrotizing factor from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis (CNFy) drives GTP-loading of basal RhoB but fails to cause activation of the rhoB promoter and thus its expression. CNF1 inhibits...

  13. MicroRNA-1301-Mediated RanGAP1 Downregulation Induces BCR-ABL Nuclear Entrapment to Enhance Imatinib Efficacy in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tsung-Yao; Chen, Ku-Chung; Liu, Hsing-Jin Eugene; Liu, Ann-Jeng; Wang, Kun-Li; Shih, Chwen-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a myeloproliferative disease. Imatinib (IM), the first line treatment for CML, is excessively expensive and induces various side effects in CML patients. Therefore, it is essential to investigate a new strategy for improving CML therapy. Our immunoblot data revealed that RanGTPase activating protein 1 (RanGAP1) protein levels increased by approximately 30-fold in K562 cells compared with those in normal cells. RanGAP1 is one of the important components of RanGTPase system, which regulates the export of nuclear protein. However, whether RanGAP1 level variation influences BCR-ABL nuclear export is still unknown. In this report, using shRNA to downregulate RanGAP1 expression level augmented K562 cell apoptosis by approximately 40% after treatment with 250 nM IM. Immunofluorescence assay also indicated that three-fold of nuclear BCR-ABL was detected. These data suggest that BCR-ABL nuclear entrapment induced by RanGAP1 downregulation can be used to improve IM efficacy. Moreover, our qRT-PCR data indicated a trend of inverse correlation between the RanGAP1 and microRNA (miR)-1301 levels in CML patients. MiR-1301, targeting the RanGAP1 3' untranslated region, decreased by approximately 100-fold in K562 cells compared with that in normal cells. RanGAP1 downregulation by miR-1301 transfection impairs BCR-ABL nuclear export to increase approximately 60% of cell death after treatment of 250 nM IM. This result was almost the same as treatment with 1000 nM IM alone. Furthermore, immunofluorescence assay demonstrated that Tyr-99 of nuclear P73 was phosphorylated accompanied with nuclear entrapment of BCR-ABL after transfection with RanGAP1 shRNA or miR-1301 in IM-treated K562 cells. Altogether, we demonstrated that RanGAP1 downregulation can mediate BCR-ABL nuclear entrapment to activate P73-dependent apoptosis pathway which is a novel strategy for improving current IM treatment for CML.

  14. Deciphering the signaling networks underlying simvastatin-induced apoptosis in human cancer cells: evidence for non-canonical activation of RhoA and Rac1 GTPases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Y; Casey, P J; Kumar, A P; Pervaiz, S

    2013-01-01

    Although statins are known to inhibit proliferation and induce death in a number of cancer cell types, the mechanisms through which downregulation of the mevalonate (MVA) pathway activates death signaling remain poorly understood. Here we set out to unravel the signaling networks downstream of the MVA pathway that mediate the death-inducing activity of simvastatin. Consistent with previous reports, exogenously added geranylgeranylpyrophosphate, but not farnesylpyrophosphate, prevented simvastatin's growth-inhibitory effect, thereby suggesting the involvement of geranylgeranylated proteins such as Rho GTPases in the anticancer activity of simvastatin. Indeed, simvastatin treatment led to increased levels of unprenylated Ras homolog gene family, member A (RhoA), Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1) and cell division cycle 42 (Cdc42). Intriguingly, instead of inhibiting the functions of Rho GTPases as was expected with loss of prenylation, simvastatin caused a paradoxical increase in the GTP-bound forms of RhoA, Rac1 and Cdc42. Furthermore, simvastatin disrupted the binding of Rho GTPases with the cytosolic inhibitor Rho GDIα, which provides a potential mechanism for GTP loading of the cytosolic Rho GTPases. We also show that the unprenylated RhoA- and Rac1-GTP retained at least part of their functional activities, as evidenced by the increase in intracellular superoxide production and JNK activation in response to simvastatin. Notably, blocking superoxide production attenuated JNK activation as well as cell death induced by simvastatin. Finally, we provide evidence for the involvement of the B-cell lymphoma protein 2 family, Bcl-2-interacting mediator (Bim), in a JNK-dependent manner, in the apoptosis-inducing activity of simvastatin. Taken together, our data highlight the critical role of non-canonical regulation of Rho GTPases and involvement of downstream superoxide-mediated activation of JNK pathway in the anticancer activity of simvastatin, which

  15. Ras-Related Nuclear Protein Ran3B Gene Is Involved in Hormone Responses in the Embryogenic Callus of Dimocarpus longan Lour.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qilin Tian

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Ras-related guanosine triphosphate (GTP-binding nuclear protein (Ran GTPases function as molecular switches and regulate diverse cellular events in eukaryotes. Our previous work suggested that DlRan3B is active during longan (Dimocarpus longan Lour. somatic embryogenesis (SE processes. Herein, subcellular localization of DlRan3B was found to be localized in the nucleus and expression profiling of DlRan3B was performed during longan SE and after exposure to plant hormones (indoleacetic acid (IAA, gibberellin A3 (GA3, salicylic acid (SA, methyl jasmonte (MeJA, and abscisic acid (ABA. We cloned and sequenced 1569 bp of 5′-flanking sequence of DlRan3B (GenBank: JQ279697. Bioinformatic analysis indicated that the promoter contained plant hormone-related regulatory elements. Deletion analysis and responses to hormones identified stimulative and repressive regulatory elements in the DlRan3B promoter. The key elements included those responding to auxin, gibberellin, SA, MeJA, and ABA. DlRan3B was located in the nucleus and accumulated in the late stage of longan SE. The expression of DlRan3B was significantly induced by IAA, GA3, and ABA, but suppressed by SA and MeJA. Promoter transcription was induced by IAA and GA3, but suppressed by SA. Thus, DlRan3B might participate in auxin, gibberellin, and ABA responses during longan late SE, and DlRan3B is involved in phytohormone responsiveness.

  16. RAB10 Interacts with the Male Germ Cell-Specific GTPase-Activating Protein during Mammalian Spermiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Hung Lin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available According to recent estimates, 2%–15% of couples are sterile, and approximately half of the infertility cases are attributed to male reproductive factors. However, the reasons remain undefined in approximately 25% of male infertility cases, and most infertility cases exhibit spermatogenic defects. Numerous genes involved in spermatogenesis still remain unknown. We previously identified Male Germ Cells Rab GTPase-Activating Proteins (MGCRABGAPs through cDNA microarray analysis of human testicular tissues with spermatogenic defects. MGCRABGAP contains a conserved RABGAP catalytic domain, TBC (Tre2/Bub2/Cdc16. RABGAP family proteins regulate cellular function (e.g., cytoskeletal remodeling, vesicular trafficking, and cell migration by inactivating RAB proteins. MGCRABGAP is a male germ cell-specific protein expressed in elongating and elongated spermatids during mammalian spermiogenesis. The purpose of this study was to identify proteins that interact with MGCRABGAP during mammalian spermiogenesis using a proteomic approach. We found that MGCRABGAP exhibited GTPase-activating bioability, and several MGCRABGAP interactors, possible substrates (e.g., RAB10, RAB5C, and RAP1, were identified using co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP and nano liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (nano LC-MS/MS. We confirmed the binding ability between RAB10 and MGCRABGAP via co-IP. Additionally, MGCRABGAP–RAB10 complexes were specifically colocalized in the manchette structure, a critical structure for the formation of spermatid heads, and were slightly expressed at the midpiece of mature spermatozoa. Based on these results, we propose that MGCRABGAP is involved in mammalian spermiogenesis by modulating RAB10.

  17. Structural basis for the recruitment and activation of the Legionella phospholipase VipD by the host GTPase Rab5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, María; Gaspar, Andrew H.; Pallara, Chiara; Rojas, Adriana Lucely; Fernández-Recio, Juan; Machner, Matthias P.; Hierro, Aitor

    2014-01-01

    A challenge for microbial pathogens is to assure that their translocated effector proteins target only the correct host cell compartment during infection. The Legionella pneumophila effector vacuolar protein sorting inhibitor protein D (VipD) localizes to early endosomal membranes and alters their lipid and protein composition, thereby protecting the pathogen from endosomal fusion. This process requires the phospholipase A1 (PLA1) activity of VipD that is triggered specifically on VipD binding to the host cell GTPase Rab5, a key regulator of endosomes. Here, we present the crystal structure of VipD in complex with constitutively active Rab5 and reveal the molecular mechanism underlying PLA1 activation. An active site-obstructing loop that originates from the C-terminal domain of VipD is repositioned on Rab5 binding, thereby exposing the catalytic pocket within the N-terminal PLA1 domain. Substitution of amino acid residues located within the VipD–Rab5 interface prevented Rab5 binding and PLA1 activation and caused a failure of VipD mutant proteins to target to Rab5-enriched endosomal structures within cells. Experimental and computational analyses confirmed an extended VipD-binding interface on Rab5, explaining why this L. pneumophila effector can compete with cellular ligands for Rab5 binding. Together, our data explain how the catalytic activity of a microbial effector can be precisely linked to its subcellular localization. PMID:25114243

  18. Breast cancer cell migration is regulated through junctional adhesion molecule-A-mediated activation of Rap1 GTPase.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McSherry, Elaine A

    2011-03-23

    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: The adhesion protein junctional adhesion molecule-A (JAM-A) regulates epithelial cell morphology and migration, and its over-expression has recently been linked with increased risk of metastasis in breast cancer patients. As cell migration is an early requirement for tumor metastasis, we sought to identify the JAM-A signalling events regulating migration in breast cancer cells. METHODS: MCF7 breast cancer cells (which express high endogenous levels of JAM-A) and primary cultures from breast cancer patients were used for this study. JAM-A was knocked down in MCF7 cells using siRNA to determine the consequences for cell adhesion, cell migration and the protein expression of various integrin subunits. As we had previously demonstrated a link between the expression of JAM-A and β1-integrin, we examined activation of the β1-integrin regulator Rap1 GTPase in response to JAM-A knockdown or functional antagonism. To test whether JAM-A, Rap1 and β1-integrin lie in a linear pathway, we tested functional inhibitors of all three proteins separately or together in migration assays. Finally we performed immunoprecipitations in MCF7 cells and primary breast cells to determine the binding partners connecting JAM-A to Rap1 activation. RESULTS: JAM-A knockdown in MCF7 breast cancer cells reduced adhesion to, and migration through, the β1-integrin substrate fibronectin. This was accompanied by reduced protein expression of β1-integrin and its binding partners αV- and α5-integrin. Rap1 activity was reduced in response to JAM-A knockdown or inhibition, and pharmacological inhibition of Rap1 reduced MCF7 cell migration. No additive anti-migratory effect was observed in response to simultaneous inhibition of JAM-A, Rap1 and β1-integrin, suggesting that they lie in a linear migratory pathway. Finally, in an attempt to elucidate the binding partners putatively linking JAM-A to Rap1 activation, we have demonstrated the formation of a complex between JAM-A, AF

  19. Breast cancer cell migration is regulated through junctional adhesion molecule-A-mediated activation of Rap1 GTPase.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McSherry, Elaine A

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: The adhesion protein junctional adhesion molecule-A (JAM-A) regulates epithelial cell morphology and migration, and its over-expression has recently been linked with increased risk of metastasis in breast cancer patients. As cell migration is an early requirement for tumor metastasis, we sought to identify the JAM-A signalling events regulating migration in breast cancer cells. METHODS: MCF7 breast cancer cells (which express high endogenous levels of JAM-A) and primary cultures from breast cancer patients were used for this study. JAM-A was knocked down in MCF7 cells using siRNA to determine the consequences for cell adhesion, cell migration and the protein expression of various integrin subunits. As we had previously demonstrated a link between the expression of JAM-A and beta1-integrin, we examined activation of the beta1-integrin regulator Rap1 GTPase in response to JAM-A knockdown or functional antagonism. To test whether JAM-A, Rap1 and beta1-integrin lie in a linear pathway, we tested functional inhibitors of all three proteins separately or together in migration assays. Finally we performed immunoprecipitations in MCF7 cells and primary breast cells to determine the binding partners connecting JAM-A to Rap1 activation. RESULTS: JAM-A knockdown in MCF7 breast cancer cells reduced adhesion to, and migration through, the beta1-integrin substrate fibronectin. This was accompanied by reduced protein expression of beta1-integrin and its binding partners alphaV- and alpha5-integrin. Rap1 activity was reduced in response to JAM-A knockdown or inhibition, and pharmacological inhibition of Rap1 reduced MCF7 cell migration. No additive anti-migratory effect was observed in response to simultaneous inhibition of JAM-A, Rap1 and beta1-integrin, suggesting that they lie in a linear migratory pathway. Finally, in an attempt to elucidate the binding partners putatively linking JAM-A to Rap1 activation, we have demonstrated the formation of a complex between

  20. Breast cancer cell migration is regulated through junctional adhesion molecule-A-mediated activation of Rap1 GTPase

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McSherry, Elaine A

    2011-03-23

    Abstract Introduction The adhesion protein junctional adhesion molecule-A (JAM-A) regulates epithelial cell morphology and migration, and its over-expression has recently been linked with increased risk of metastasis in breast cancer patients. As cell migration is an early requirement for tumor metastasis, we sought to identify the JAM-A signalling events regulating migration in breast cancer cells. Methods MCF7 breast cancer cells (which express high endogenous levels of JAM-A) and primary cultures from breast cancer patients were used for this study. JAM-A was knocked down in MCF7 cells using siRNA to determine the consequences for cell adhesion, cell migration and the protein expression of various integrin subunits. As we had previously demonstrated a link between the expression of JAM-A and β1-integrin, we examined activation of the β1-integrin regulator Rap1 GTPase in response to JAM-A knockdown or functional antagonism. To test whether JAM-A, Rap1 and β1-integrin lie in a linear pathway, we tested functional inhibitors of all three proteins separately or together in migration assays. Finally we performed immunoprecipitations in MCF7 cells and primary breast cells to determine the binding partners connecting JAM-A to Rap1 activation. Results JAM-A knockdown in MCF7 breast cancer cells reduced adhesion to, and migration through, the β1-integrin substrate fibronectin. This was accompanied by reduced protein expression of β1-integrin and its binding partners αV- and α5-integrin. Rap1 activity was reduced in response to JAM-A knockdown or inhibition, and pharmacological inhibition of Rap1 reduced MCF7 cell migration. No additive anti-migratory effect was observed in response to simultaneous inhibition of JAM-A, Rap1 and β1-integrin, suggesting that they lie in a linear migratory pathway. Finally, in an attempt to elucidate the binding partners putatively linking JAM-A to Rap1 activation, we have demonstrated the formation of a complex between JAM-A, AF-6

  1. Gain-of-function mutant p53 activates small GTPase Rac1 through SUMOylation to promote tumor progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Xuetian; Zhang, Cen; Zhao, Yuhan; Liu, Juan; Lin, Alan W; Tan, Victor M; Drake, Justin M; Liu, Lianxin; Boateng, Michael N; Li, Jun; Feng, Zhaohui; Hu, Wenwei

    2017-08-15

    Tumor suppressor p53 is frequently mutated in human cancer. Mutant p53 often promotes tumor progression through gain-of-function (GOF) mechanisms. However, the mechanisms underlying mutant p53 GOF are not well understood. In this study, we found that mutant p53 activates small GTPase Rac1 as a critical mechanism for mutant p53 GOF to promote tumor progression. Mechanistically, mutant p53 interacts with Rac1 and inhibits its interaction with SUMO-specific protease 1 (SENP1), which in turn inhibits SENP1-mediated de-SUMOylation of Rac1 to activate Rac1. Targeting Rac1 signaling by RNAi, expression of the dominant-negative Rac1 (Rac1 DN), or the specific Rac1 inhibitor NSC23766 greatly inhibits mutant p53 GOF in promoting tumor growth and metastasis. Furthermore, mutant p53 expression is associated with enhanced Rac1 activity in clinical tumor samples. These results uncover a new mechanism for Rac1 activation in tumors and, most importantly, reveal that activation of Rac1 is an unidentified and critical mechanism for mutant p53 GOF in tumorigenesis, which could be targeted for therapy in tumors containing mutant p53. © 2017 Yue et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  2. Inhibition of the RhoA GTPase Activity Increases Sensitivity of Melanoma Cells to UV Radiation Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisele Espinha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultraviolet radiation is the main cause of DNA damage to melanocytes and development of melanoma, one of the most lethal human cancers, which leads to metastasis due to uncontrolled cell proliferation and migration. These phenotypes are mediated by RhoA, a GTPase overexpressed or overactivated in highly aggressive metastatic tumors that plays regulatory roles in cell cycle progression and cytoskeleton remodeling. This work explores whether the effects of UV on DNA damage, motility, proliferation, and survival of human metastatic melanoma cells are mediated by the RhoA pathway. Mutant cells expressing dominant-negative (MeWo-RhoA-N19 or constitutively active RhoA (MeWo-RhoA-V14 were generated and subjected to UV radiation. A slight reduction in migration and invasion was observed in MeWo and MeWo-RhoA-V14 cells but not in MeWo-RhoA-N19 cells, which presented inefficient motility and invasiveness associated with stress fibers fragmentation. Proliferation and survival of RhoA-deficient cells were drastically reduced by UV compared to cells displaying normal or high RhoA activity, suggesting increased sensitivity to UV. Loss of RhoA activity also caused less efficient DNA repair, with elevated levels of DNA lesions such as strand breaks and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs. Thus, RhoA mediates genomic stability and represents a potential target for sensitizing metastatic tumors to genotoxic agents.

  3. Arf3p GTPase is a key regulator of Bud2p activation for invasive growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Jia-Wei; Lee, Fang-Jen S

    2013-08-01

    The regulation and signaling pathways involved in the invasive growth of yeast have been studied extensively because of their general applicability to fungal pathogenesis. Bud2p, which functions as a GTPase-activating protein (GAP) for Bud1p/Rsr1p, is required for appropriate budding patterns and filamentous growth. The regulatory mechanisms leading to Bud2p activation, however, are poorly understood. In this study, we report that ADP-ribosylation factor 3p (Arf3p) acts as a regulator of Bud2p activation during invasive growth. Arf3p binds directly to the N-terminal region of Bud2p and promotes its GAP activity both in vitro and in vivo. Genetic analysis shows that deletion of BUD1 suppresses the defect of invasive growth in arf3Δ or bud2Δ cells. Lack of Arf3p, like that of Bud2p, causes the intracellular accumulation of Bud1p-GTP. The Arf3p-Bud2p interaction is important for invasive growth and facilitates the Bud2p-Bud1p association in vivo. Finally, we show that under glucose depletion-induced invasion conditions in yeast, more Arf3p is activated to the GTP-bound state, and the activation is independent of Arf3p guanine nucleotide-exchange factor Yel1p. Thus we demonstrate that a novel spatial activation of Arf3p plays a role in regulating Bud2p activation during glucose depletion-induced invasive growth.

  4. RAC GTPases in Tobacco and Arabidopsis Mediate Auxin-Induced Formation of Proteolytically Active Nuclear Protein Bodies That Contain AUX/IAA ProteinsW⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Li-zhen; Cheung, Alice Y.; Nibau, Candida; Wu, Hen-ming

    2005-01-01

    Auxin signaling relies on ubiquitin ligase SCFTIR1-mediated 26S proteasome-dependent proteolysis of a large family of short-lived transcription regulators, auxin/indole acetic acid (Aux/IAA), resulting in the derepression of auxin-responsive genes. We have shown previously that a subset of Rac GTPases is activated by auxin, and they in turn stimulate auxin-responsive gene expression. We show here that increasing Rac signaling activity promotes Aux/IAA degradation, whereas downregulating that activity results in the reduction of auxin-accelerated Aux/IAA proteolysis. Observations reported here reveal a novel function for these Rac GTPases as regulators for ubiquitin/26S proteasome-mediated proteolysis and further consolidate their role in auxin signaling. Moreover, our study reveals a cellular process whereby auxin induces and Rac GTPases mediate the recruitment of nucleoplasmic Aux/IAAs into proteolytically active nuclear protein bodies, into which components of the SCFTIR1, COP9 signalosome, and 26S proteasome are also recruited. PMID:15994909

  5. The small GTPase Rac1 is a novel binding partner of Bcl-2 and stabilizes its antiapoptotic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velaithan, Rathiga; Kang, Jia; Hirpara, Jayshree L; Loh, Thomas; Goh, Boon Cher; Le Bras, Morgane; Brenner, Catherine; Clement, Marie-Veronique; Pervaiz, Shazib

    2011-06-09

    The small GTPase Rac1 is involved in the activation of the reduced NAD phosphate oxidase complex resulting in superoxide production. We recently showed that Bcl-2 overexpression inhibited apoptosis in leukemia cells by creating a pro-oxidant intracellular milieu, and that inhibiting intracellular superoxide production sensitized Bcl-2-overexpressing cells to apoptotic stimuli. We report here that silencing and functional inhibition of Rac1 block Bcl-2-mediated increase in intracellular superoxide levels in tumor cells. Using confocal, electron microscopy and coimmunoprecipitation, as well as glutathione S-transferase-fusion proteins, we provide evidence for a colocalization and physical interaction between the 2 proteins. This interaction is blocked in vitro and in vivo by the BH3 mimetics as well as by synthetic Bcl-2 BH3 domain peptides. That this interaction is functionally relevant is supported by the ability of the Bcl-2 BH3 peptide as well as the silencing and functional inhibition of Rac1 to inhibit intracellular superoxide production as well as overcome Bcl-2-mediated drug resistance in human leukemia cells and cervical cancer cells. Notably, the interaction was observed in primary cells derived from patients with B-cell lymphoma overexpressing Bcl-2 but not in noncancerous tissue. These data provide a novel facet in the biology of Bcl-2 with potential implications for targeted anticancer drug design.

  6. Friend leukemia virus integration 1 activates the Rho GTPase pathway and is associated with metastasis in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wei; Li, Wei; Li, Lingyu; Zhang, Shilin; Yan, Xu; Wen, Xue; Zhang, Xiaoying; Tian, Huimin; Li, Ailing; Hu, Ji-Fan; Cui, Jiuwei

    2015-09-15

    Breast cancer is the most prevalent malignant disease in women worldwide. In patients with breast cancer, metastasis to distant sites directly determines the survival outcome. However, the molecular mechanism underlying metastasis in breast cancer remains to be defined. In this report, we found that Friend leukemia virus integration 1 (FLI1) proto-oncogene was differentially expressed between the aggressive MDA-MB231 and the non-aggressive MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Congruently, immunohistochemical staining of clinical samples revealed that FLI1 was overexpressed in breast cancers as compared with the adjacent tissues. The abundance of FLI1 protein was strongly correlated with the advanced stage, poor differentiation, and lymph node metastasis in breast cancer patients. Knockdown of FLI1 with small interfering RNAs significantly attenuated the potential of migration and invasion in highly metastatic human breast cancer cells. FLI1 oncoprotein activated the Rho GTPase pathway that is known to play a role in tumor metastasis. This study for the first time identifies FLI1 as a clinically and functionally important target gene of metastasis, providing a rationale for developing FLI1 inhibitors in the treatment of breast cancer.

  7. Chromosomal association of Ran during meiotic and mitotic divisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkle, Beth; Slepchenko, Boris; Rolls, Melissa M; Walther, Tobias C; Stein, Pascal A; Mehlmann, Lisa M; Ellenberg, Jan; Terasaki, Mark

    2002-12-01

    Recent studies in Xenopus egg extracts indicate that the small G protein Ran has a central role in spindle assembly and nuclear envelope reformation. We determined Ran localization and dynamics in cells during M phase. By immunofluorescence, Ran is accumulated on the chromosomes of meiosis-II-arrested Xenopus eggs. In living cells, fluorescently labeled Ran associated with the chromosomes in Xenopus and remained associated during anaphase when eggs were artificially activated. Fluorescent Ran associated with chromosomes in mouse eggs, during meiotic maturation and early embryonic divisions in starfish, and to a lesser degree during mitosis of a cultured mammalian cell line. Chromosomal Ran undergoes constant flux. From photobleach experiments in immature starfish oocytes, chromosomal Ran has a k(off) of approximately 0.06 second(-1), and binding analysis suggests that there is a single major site. The chromosomal interactions may serve to keep Ran-GTP in the vicinity of the chromosomes for spindle assembly and nuclear envelope reformation.

  8. Rapid activation of Rac GTPase in living cells by force is independent of Src.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeh-Chuin Poh

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that mechanical forces are crucial in regulating functions of every tissue and organ in a human body. However, it remains unclear how mechanical forces are transduced into biochemical activities and biological responses at the cellular and molecular level. Using the magnetic twisting cytometry technique, we applied local mechanical stresses to living human airway smooth muscle cells with a magnetic bead bound to the cell surface via transmembrane adhesion molecule integrins. The temporal and spatial activation of Rac, a small guanosine triphosphatase, was quantified using a fluorescent resonance energy transfer (FRET method that measures changes in Rac activity in response to mechanical stresses by quantifying intensity ratios of ECFP (enhanced cyan fluorescent protein as a donor and YPet (a variant yellow fluorescent protein as an acceptor of the Rac biosensor. The applied stress induced rapid activation (less than 300 ms of Rac at the cell periphery. In contrast, platelet derived growth factor (PDGF induced Rac activation at a much later time (>30 sec. There was no stress-induced Rac activation when a mutant form of the Rac biosensor (RacN17 was transfected or when the magnetic bead was coated with transferrin or with poly-L-lysine. It is known that PDGF-induced Rac activation depends on Src activity. Surprisingly, pre-treatment of the cells with specific Src inhibitor PP1 or knocking-out Src gene had no effects on stress-induced Rac activation. In addition, eliminating lipid rafts through extraction of cholesterol from the plasma membrane did not prevent stress-induced Rac activation, suggesting a raft-independent mechanism in governing the Rac activation upon mechanical stimulation. Further evidence indicates that Rac activation by stress depends on the magnitudes of the applied stress and cytoskeletal integrity. Our results suggest that Rac activation by mechanical forces is rapid, direct and does not depend on Src

  9. Opposing roles for RhoH GTPase during T-cell migration and activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, Christina M; Comrie, William A; Hyun, Young-Min

    2012-01-01

    as prolonged T:APC conjugates. RT-PCR analyses of activated CD4(+) T cells and live images of T-cell migration and immunological synapse (IS) formation revealed that functions of RhoH took place primarily at the levels of transcription and intracellular distribution. Thus, we conclude that RhoH expression......T cells spend the majority of their time perusing lymphoid organs in search of cognate antigen presented by antigen presenting cells (APCs) and then quickly recirculate through the bloodstream to another lymph node. Therefore, regulation of a T-cell response is dependent upon the ability of cells...... to arrive in the correct location following chemokine gradients ("go" signal) as well as to receive appropriate T-cell receptor (TCR) activation signals upon cognate antigen recognition ("stop" signal). However, the mechanisms by which T cells regulate these go and stop signals remain unclear. We found...

  10. Inhibition of RhoA GTPase and the subsequent activation of PTP1B protects cultured hippocampal neurons against amyloid β toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodriguez-Tebar Alfredo

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amyloid beta (Aβ is the main agent responsible for the advent and progression of Alzheimer's disease. This peptide can at least partially antagonize nerve growth factor (NGF signalling in neurons, which may be responsible for some of the effects produced by Aβ. Accordingly, better understanding the NGF signalling pathway may provide clues as to how to protect neurons from the toxic effects of Aβ. Results We show here that Aβ activates the RhoA GTPase by binding to p75NTR, thereby preventing the NGF-induced activation of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B that is required for neuron survival. We also show that the inactivation of RhoA GTPase and the activation of PTP1B protect cultured hippocampal neurons against the noxious effects of Aβ. Indeed, either pharmacological inhibition of RhoA with C3 ADP ribosyl transferase or the transfection of cultured neurons with a dominant negative form of RhoA protects cultured hippocampal neurons from the effects of Aβ. In addition, over-expression of PTP1B also prevents the deleterious effects of Aβ on cultured hippocampal neurons. Conclusion Our findings indicate that potentiating the activity of NGF at the level of RhoA inactivation and PTP1B activation may represent a new means to combat the noxious effects of Aβ in Alzheimer's disease.

  11. LAT-independent Erk activation via Bam32-PLC-γ1-Pak1 complexes: GTPase-independent Pak1 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouquette-Jazdanian, Alexandre K; Sommers, Connie L; Kortum, Robert L; Morrison, Deborah K; Samelson, Lawrence E

    2012-10-26

    In T cells, the adaptor Bam32 is coupled to Erk activation downstream of the TCR by an unknown mechanism. We characterized in Jurkat cells and primary T lymphocytes a pathway dependent on Bam32-PLC-γ1-Pak1 complexes, in which Pak1 kinase activates Raf-1 and Mek-1, both upstream of Erk. In the Bam32-PLC-γ1-Pak1 complex, catalytically inactive PLC-γ1 is used as a scaffold linking Bam32 to Pak1. PLC-γ1(C-SH2) directly binds S141 of Bam32, preventing LAT-mediated activation of Ras by PLC-γ1. The Bam32-PLC-γ1 interaction enhances the binding of the SH3 domain of the phospholipase with Pak1. The PLC-γ1(SH3)-Pak1 interaction activates Pak1 independently of the small GTPases Rac1/Cdc42, previously described as being the only activators of Pak1 in T cells. Direct binding of the SH3 domain of PLC-γ1 to Pak1 dissociates inactive Pak1 homodimers, a mechanism required for Pak1 activation. We have thus uncovered a LAT/Ras-independent, Bam32-nucleated pathway that activates Erk signaling in T cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The yeast vacuolar Rab GTPase Ypt7p has an activity beyond membrane recruitment of the homotypic fusion and protein sorting-Class C Vps complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroupe, Christopher

    2012-04-01

    A previous report described lipid mixing of reconstituted proteoliposomes made using lipid mixtures that mimic the composition of yeast vacuoles. This lipid mixing required SNARE {SNAP [soluble NSF (N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor)-attachment protein] receptor} proteins, Sec18p and Sec17p (yeast NSF and α-SNAP) and the HOPS (homotypic fusion and protein sorting)-Class C Vps (vacuole protein sorting) complex, but not the vacuolar Rab GTPase Ypt7p. The present study investigates the activity of Ypt7p in proteoliposome lipid mixing. Ypt7p is required for the lipid mixing of proteoliposomes lacking cardiolipin [1,3-bis-(sn-3'-phosphatidyl)-sn-glycerol]. Omission of other lipids with negatively charged and/or small head groups does not cause Ypt7p dependence for lipid mixing. Yeast vacuoles made from strains disrupted for CRD1 (cardiolipin synthase) fuse to the same extent as vacuoles from strains with functional CRD1. Disruption of CRD1 does not alter dependence on Rab GTPases for vacuole fusion. It has been proposed that the recruitment of the HOPS complex to membranes is the main function of Ypt7p. However, Ypt7p is still required for lipid mixing even when the concentration of HOPS complex in lipid-mixing reactions is adjusted such that cardiolipin-free proteoliposomes with or without Ypt7p bind to equal amounts of HOPS. Ypt7p therefore must stimulate membrane fusion by a mechanism that is in addition to recruitment of HOPS to the membrane. This is the first demonstration of such a stimulatory activity--that is, beyond bulk effector recruitment--for a Rab GTPase.

  13. The RanBP2/RanGAP1*SUMO1/Ubc9 SUMO E3 ligase is a disassembly machine for Crm1-dependent nuclear export complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritterhoff, Tobias; Das, Hrishikesh; Hofhaus, Götz; Schröder, Rasmus R; Flotho, Annette; Melchior, Frauke

    2016-05-10

    Continuous cycles of nucleocytoplasmic transport require disassembly of transport receptor/Ran-GTP complexes in the cytoplasm. A basic disassembly mechanism in all eukaryotes depends on soluble RanGAP and RanBP1. In vertebrates, a significant fraction of RanGAP1 stably interacts with the nucleoporin RanBP2 at a binding site that is flanked by FG-repeats and Ran-binding domains, and overlaps with RanBP2's SUMO E3 ligase region. Here, we show that the RanBP2/RanGAP1*SUMO1/Ubc9 complex functions as an autonomous disassembly machine with a preference for the export receptor Crm1. We describe three in vitro reconstituted disassembly intermediates, which show binding of a Crm1 export complex via two FG-repeat patches, cargo-release by RanBP2's Ran-binding domains and retention of free Crm1 at RanBP2 after Ran-GTP hydrolysis. Intriguingly, all intermediates are compatible with SUMO E3 ligase activity, suggesting that the RanBP2/RanGAP1*SUMO1/Ubc9 complex may link Crm1- and SUMO-dependent functions.

  14. Catalysis of GTP hydrolysis by small GTPases at atomic detail by integration of X-ray crystallography, experimental, and theoretical IR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudack, Till; Jenrich, Sarah; Brucker, Sven; Vetter, Ingrid R; Gerwert, Klaus; Kötting, Carsten

    2015-10-02

    Small GTPases regulate key processes in cells. Malfunction of their GTPase reaction by mutations is involved in severe diseases. Here, we compare the GTPase reaction of the slower hydrolyzing GTPase Ran with Ras. By combination of time-resolved FTIR difference spectroscopy and QM/MM simulations we elucidate that the Mg(2+) coordination by the phosphate groups, which varies largely among the x-ray structures, is the same for Ran and Ras. A new x-ray structure of a Ran·RanBD1 complex with improved resolution confirmed this finding and revealed a general problem with the refinement of Mg(2+) in GTPases. The Mg(2+) coordination is not responsible for the much slower GTPase reaction of Ran. Instead, the location of the Tyr-39 side chain of Ran between the γ-phosphate and Gln-69 prevents the optimal positioning of the attacking water molecule by the Gln-69 relative to the γ-phosphate. This is confirmed in the RanY39A·RanBD1 crystal structure. The QM/MM simulations provide IR spectra of the catalytic center, which agree very nicely with the experimental ones. The combination of both methods can correlate spectra with structure at atomic detail. For example the FTIR difference spectra of RasA18T and RanT25A mutants show that spectral differences are mainly due to the hydrogen bond of Thr-25 to the α-phosphate in Ran. By integration of x-ray structure analysis, experimental, and theoretical IR spectroscopy the catalytic center of the x-ray structural models are further refined to sub-Å resolution, allowing an improved understanding of catalysis. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. GTPases and the origin of the ribosome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Temple F

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper is an attempt to trace the evolution of the ribosome through the evolution of the universal P-loop GTPases that are involved with the ribosome in translation and with the attachment of the ribosome to the membrane. The GTPases involved in translation in Bacteria/Archaea are the elongation factors EFTu/EF1, the initiation factors IF2/aeIF5b + aeIF2, and the elongation factors EFG/EF2. All of these GTPases also contain the OB fold also found in the non GTPase IF1 involved in initiation. The GTPase involved in the signal recognition particle in most Bacteria and Archaea is SRP54. Results 1 The Elongation Factors of the Archaea based on structural considerations of the domains have the following evolutionary path: EF1→ aeIF2 → EF2. The evolution of the aeIF5b was a later event; 2 the Elongation Factors of the Bacteria based on the topological considerations of the GTPase domain have a similar evolutionary path: EFTu→ IF→2→EFG. These evolutionary sequences reflect the evolution of the LSU followed by the SSU to form the ribosome; 3 the OB-fold IF1 is a mimic of an ancient tRNA minihelix. Conclusion The evolution of translational GTPases of both the Archaea and Bacteria point to the evolution of the ribosome. The elongation factors, EFTu/EF1, began as a Ras-like GTPase bringing the activated minihelix tRNA to the Large Subunit Unit. The initiation factors and elongation factor would then have evolved from the EFTu/EF1 as the small subunit was added to the evolving ribosome. The SRP has an SRP54 GTPase and a specific RNA fold in its RNA component similar to the PTC. We consider the SRP to be a remnant of an ancient form of an LSU bound to a membrane. Reviewers This article was reviewed by George Fox, Leonid Mirny and Chris Sander.

  16. Functional studies of TcRjl, a novel GTPase of Trypanosoma cruzi, reveals phenotypes related with MAPK activation during parasite differentiation and after heterologous expression in Drosophila model system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reis Monteiro dos-Santos, Guilherme Rodrigo [Laboratório de Parasitologia Molecular, Instituto de Biofísica Carlos Chagas Filho, CCS, UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Fontenele, Marcio Ribeiro [Laboratório de Biologia Molecular do Desenvolvimento Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas, CCS, UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Dias, Felipe de Almeida [Laboratório de Bioquímica de Artrópodes Hematófagos, Instituto de Bioquímica Médica, CCS, UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Oliveira, Pedro Lagerblad de [Laboratório de Bioquímica de Artrópodes Hematófagos, Instituto de Bioquímica Médica, CCS, UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia em Entomologia Molecular (INCT-EM) (Brazil); Nepomuceno-Silva, José Luciano [Laboratório Integrado de Bioquímica Hatisaburo Masuda, NUPEM/UFRJ, Pólo Barreto, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Campus Macaé, Macaé (Brazil); and others

    2015-11-06

    The life cycle of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi comprises rounds of proliferative cycles and differentiation in distinct host environments. Ras GTPases are molecular switches that play pivotal regulatory functions in cell fate. Rjl is a novel GTPase with unknown function. Herein we show that TcRjl blocks in vivo cell differentiation. The forced expression of TcRjl leads to changes in the overall tyrosine protein phosphorylation profile of parasites. TcRjl expressing parasites sustained DNA synthesis regardless the external stimuli for differentiation. Heterologous expression in the Drosophila melanogaster genetic system strongly suggests a role from TcRjl protein in RTK-dependent pathways and MAPK activation.

  17. cDNA cloning and chromosomal mapping of a novel human GAP (GAP1M), GTPase-activating protein of Ras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Shaowei; Nakamura, Shun; Hattori, Seisuke [National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Kodaira, Tokyo (Japan)] [and others

    1996-08-01

    We have previously isolated a novel Ras GTPase-activating protein (Ras GAP), Gapl{sup m}, from rat brain. Gap1{sup m} is considered to be a negative regulator of the Ras signaling pathways, like other Ras GAPs, neurofibromin, which is a gene product of the neurofibromatosis type I gene, and p120GAP. In this study we have isolated a human cDNA of this Gap and mapped the gene. The gene encodes a protein of 853 amino acids that shows 89% sequence identity to rat Gapl{sup m}. The human gene was mapped to chromosome 3 by PCR analysis on a panel of human-mouse hybrid cells. FISH analysis refined the location of the gene further to 3q22-q23. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  18. Loss of the interferon-γ-inducible regulatory immunity-related GTPase (IRG), Irgm1, causes activation of effector IRG proteins on lysosomes, damaging lysosomal function and predicting the dramatic susceptibility of Irgm1-deficient mice to infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maric-Biresev, Jelena; Hunn, Julia P; Krut, Oleg; Helms, J Bernd; Martens, Sascha; Howard, Jonathan C

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The interferon-γ (IFN-γ)-inducible immunity-related GTPase (IRG), Irgm1, plays an essential role in restraining activation of the IRG pathogen resistance system. However, the loss of Irgm1 in mice also causes a dramatic but unexplained susceptibility phenotype upon infection with a

  19. Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Neuronal Infection Perturbs Golgi Apparatus Integrity through Activation of Src Tyrosine Kinase and Dyn-2 GTPase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Martin

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 is a ubiquitous pathogen that establishes a latent persistent neuronal infection in humans. The pathogenic effects of repeated viral reactivation in infected neurons are still unknown. Several studies have reported that during HSV-1 epithelial infection, the virus could modulate diverse cell signaling pathways remodeling the Golgi apparatus (GA membranes, but the molecular mechanisms implicated, and the functional consequences to neurons is currently unknown. Here we report that infection of primary neuronal cultures with HSV-1 triggers Src tyrosine kinase activation and subsequent phosphorylation of Dynamin 2 GTPase, two players with a role in GA integrity maintenance. Immunofluorescence analyses showed that HSV-1 productive neuronal infection caused a scattered and fragmented distribution of the GA through the cytoplasm, contrasting with the uniform perinuclear distribution pattern observed in control cells. In addition, transmission electron microscopy revealed swollen cisternae and disorganized stacks in HSV-1 infected neurons compared to control cells. Interestingly, PP2, a selective inhibitor for Src-family kinases markedly reduced these morphological alterations of the GA induced by HSV-1 infection strongly supporting the possible involvement of Src tyrosine kinase. Finally, we showed that HSV-1 tegument protein VP11/12 is necessary but not sufficient to induce Dyn2 phosphorylation. Altogether, these results show that HSV-1 neuronal infection triggers activation of Src tyrosine kinase, phosphorylation of Dynamin 2 GTPase, and perturbation of GA integrity. These findings suggest a possible neuropathogenic mechanism triggered by HSV-1 infection, which could involve dysfunction of the secretory system in neurons and central nervous system.

  20. The cyst nematode SPRYSEC protein RBP-1 elicits Gpa2- and RanGAP2-dependent plant cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Ann Sacco

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Plant NB-LRR proteins confer robust protection against microbes and metazoan parasites by recognizing pathogen-derived avirulence (Avr proteins that are delivered to the host cytoplasm. Microbial Avr proteins usually function as virulence factors in compatible interactions; however, little is known about the types of metazoan proteins recognized by NB-LRR proteins and their relationship with virulence. In this report, we demonstrate that the secreted protein RBP-1 from the potato cyst nematode Globodera pallida elicits defense responses, including cell death typical of a hypersensitive response (HR, through the NB-LRR protein Gpa2. Gp-Rbp-1 variants from G. pallida populations both virulent and avirulent to Gpa2 demonstrated a high degree of polymorphism, with positive selection detected at numerous sites. All Gp-RBP-1 protein variants from an avirulent population were recognized by Gpa2, whereas virulent populations possessed Gp-RBP-1 protein variants both recognized and non-recognized by Gpa2. Recognition of Gp-RBP-1 by Gpa2 correlated to a single amino acid polymorphism at position 187 in the Gp-RBP-1 SPRY domain. Gp-RBP-1 expressed from Potato virus X elicited Gpa2-mediated defenses that required Ran GTPase-activating protein 2 (RanGAP2, a protein known to interact with the Gpa2 N terminus. Tethering RanGAP2 and Gp-RBP-1 variants via fusion proteins resulted in an enhancement of Gpa2-mediated responses. However, activation of Gpa2 was still dependent on the recognition specificity conferred by amino acid 187 and the Gpa2 LRR domain. These results suggest a two-tiered process wherein RanGAP2 mediates an initial interaction with pathogen-delivered Gp-RBP-1 proteins but where the Gpa2 LRR determines which of these interactions will be productive.

  1. Selective Impairment of a Subset of Ran-GTP-binding Domains of Ran-binding Protein 2 (Ranbp2) Suffices to Recapitulate the Degeneration of the Retinal Pigment Epithelium (RPE) Triggered by Ranbp2 Ablation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Hemangi; Saha, Arjun; Senda, Eugene; Cho, Kyoung-in; Haque, MdEmdadul; Yu, Minzhong; Qiu, Sunny; Yoon, Dosuk; Hao, Ying; Peachey, Neal S.; Ferreira, Paulo A.

    2014-01-01

    Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) degeneration underpins diseases triggered by disparate genetic lesions, noxious insults, or both. The pleiotropic Ranbp2 controls the expression of intrinsic and extrinsic pathological stressors impinging on cellular viability. However, the physiological targets and mechanisms controlled by Ranbp2 in tissue homeostasis, such as RPE, are ill defined. We show that mice, RPE-cre::Ranbp2−/−, with selective Ranbp2 ablation in RPE develop pigmentary changes, syncytia, hypoplasia, age-dependent centrifugal and non-apoptotic degeneration of the RPE, and secondary leakage of choriocapillaris. These manifestations are accompanied by the development of F-actin clouds, metalloproteinase-11 activation, deregulation of expression or subcellular localization of critical RPE proteins, atrophic cell extrusions into the subretinal space, and compensatory proliferation of peripheral RPE. To gain mechanistic insights into what Ranbp2 activities are vital to the RPE, we performed genetic complementation analyses of transgenic lines of bacterial artificial chromosomes of Ranbp2 harboring loss of function of selective Ranbp2 domains expressed in a Ranbp2−/− background. Among the transgenic lines produced, only TgRBD2/3*-HA::RPE-cre::Ranbp2−/−-expressing mutations, which selectively impair binding of RBD2/3 (Ran-binding domains 2 and 3) of Ranbp2 to Ran-GTP, recapitulate RPE degeneration, as observed with RPE-cre::Ranbp2−/−. By contrast, TgRBD2/3*-HA expression rescues the degeneration of cone photoreceptors lacking Ranbp2. The RPE of RPE-cre::Ranbp2−/− and TgRBD2/3*-HA::RPE-cre::Ranbp2−/− share proteostatic deregulation of Ran GTPase, serotransferrin, and γ-tubulin and suppression of light-evoked electrophysiological responses. These studies unravel selective roles of Ranbp2 and its RBD2 and RBD3 in RPE survival and functions. We posit that the control of Ran GTPase by Ranbp2 emerges as a novel therapeutic target in diseases

  2. Selective impairment of a subset of Ran-GTP-binding domains of ran-binding protein 2 (Ranbp2) suffices to recapitulate the degeneration of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) triggered by Ranbp2 ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Hemangi; Saha, Arjun; Senda, Eugene; Cho, Kyoung-in; Haque, MdEmdadul; Yu, Minzhong; Qiu, Sunny; Yoon, Dosuk; Hao, Ying; Peachey, Neal S; Ferreira, Paulo A

    2014-10-24

    Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) degeneration underpins diseases triggered by disparate genetic lesions, noxious insults, or both. The pleiotropic Ranbp2 controls the expression of intrinsic and extrinsic pathological stressors impinging on cellular viability. However, the physiological targets and mechanisms controlled by Ranbp2 in tissue homeostasis, such as RPE, are ill defined. We show that mice, RPE-cre::Ranbp2(-/-), with selective Ranbp2 ablation in RPE develop pigmentary changes, syncytia, hypoplasia, age-dependent centrifugal and non-apoptotic degeneration of the RPE, and secondary leakage of choriocapillaris. These manifestations are accompanied by the development of F-actin clouds, metalloproteinase-11 activation, deregulation of expression or subcellular localization of critical RPE proteins, atrophic cell extrusions into the subretinal space, and compensatory proliferation of peripheral RPE. To gain mechanistic insights into what Ranbp2 activities are vital to the RPE, we performed genetic complementation analyses of transgenic lines of bacterial artificial chromosomes of Ranbp2 harboring loss of function of selective Ranbp2 domains expressed in a Ranbp2(-/-) background. Among the transgenic lines produced, only Tg(RBD2/3*-HA)::RPE-cre::Ranbp2(-/-)-expressing mutations, which selectively impair binding of RBD2/3 (Ran-binding domains 2 and 3) of Ranbp2 to Ran-GTP, recapitulate RPE degeneration, as observed with RPE-cre::Ranbp2(-/-). By contrast, Tg(RBD2/3*-HA) expression rescues the degeneration of cone photoreceptors lacking Ranbp2. The RPE of RPE-cre::Ranbp2(-/-) and Tg(RBD2/3*-HA)::RPE-cre::Ranbp2(-/-) share proteostatic deregulation of Ran GTPase, serotransferrin, and γ-tubulin and suppression of light-evoked electrophysiological responses. These studies unravel selective roles of Ranbp2 and its RBD2 and RBD3 in RPE survival and functions. We posit that the control of Ran GTPase by Ranbp2 emerges as a novel therapeutic target in diseases promoting

  3. A mouse homologue of the Drosophila tumor suppressor l(2)tid gene defines a novel Ras GTPase-activating protein (RasGAP)-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trentin, G A; Yin, X; Tahir, S; Lhotak, S; Farhang-Fallah, J; Li, Y; Rozakis-Adcock, M

    2001-04-20

    p120 GTPase-activating protein (GAP) down-regulates Ras by stimulating GTP hydrolysis of active Ras. In addition to its association with Ras, GAP has been shown to bind to several tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins in cells stimulated by growth factors or expressing transforming tyrosine kinase variants. Here we report the cloning and characterization of a novel GAP-binding protein, mTid-1, a DnaJ chaperone protein that represents the murine homolog of the Drosophila tumor suppressor l(2)tid gene. Three alternatively spliced variants of mTid-1 were isolated, two of which correspond to the recently identified hTid-1(L) and hTid-1(S) forms of the human TID1 gene that exhibit opposing effects on apoptosis. We demonstrate that both cytoplasmic precursor and mitochondrial mature forms of mTid-1 associate with GAP in vivo. Interestingly, although mTid-1 is found tyrosine-phosphorylated in v-src-transformed fibroblast cells, GAP selectively binds to the unphosphorylated form of mTid-1. In immunofluorescence experiments, GAP and Tid-1 were shown to colocalize at perinuclear mitochondrial membranes in response to epidermal growth factor stimulation. These findings raise the possibility that Tid chaperone proteins may play a role in governing the conformation, activity, and/or subcellular distribution of GAP, thereby influencing its biochemical and biological activity within cells.

  4. Rho GTPase signaling complexes in cell migration and invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Campbell D; Ridley, Anne J

    2017-12-12

    Cell migration is dependent on the dynamic formation and disassembly of actin filament-based structures, including lamellipodia, filopodia, invadopodia, and membrane blebs, as well as on cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix adhesions. These processes all involve Rho family small guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases), which are regulated by the opposing actions of guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) and GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs). Rho GTPase activity needs to be precisely tuned at distinct cellular locations to enable cells to move in response to different environments and stimuli. In this review, we focus on the ability of RhoGEFs and RhoGAPs to form complexes with diverse binding partners, and describe how this influences their ability to control localized GTPase activity in the context of migration and invasion. © 2018 Lawson and Ridley.

  5. Induction of human microsomal prostaglandin E synthase 1 by activated oncogene RhoA GTPase in A549 human epithelial cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hye Jin [Laboratory of Systems Mucosal Biomodulation, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dong-Hyung [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medical Research Institute, Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Seong-Hwan; Kim, Juil; Do, Kee Hun [Laboratory of Systems Mucosal Biomodulation, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of); An, Tae Jin; Ahn, Young Sup; Park, Chung Berm [Department of Herbal Crop Research, NIHHS, RDA, Eumseong (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Yuseok, E-mail: moon@pnu.edu [Laboratory of Systems Mucosal Biomodulation, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of); Medical Research Institute and Research Institute for Basic Sciences, Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-30

    Highlights: {yields} As a target of oncogene RhoA-linked signal, a prostaglandin metabolism is assessed. {yields} RhoA activation increases PGE{sub 2} levels and its metabolic enzyme mPGES-1. {yields} RhoA-activated NF-{kappa}B and EGR-1 are positively involved in mPGES-1 induction. -- Abstract: Oncogenic RhoA GTPase has been investigated as a mediator of pro-inflammatory responses and aggressive carcinogenesis. Among the various targets of RhoA-linked signals, pro-inflammatory prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}), a major prostaglandin metabolite, was assessed in epithelial cancer cells. RhoA activation increased PGE{sub 2} levels and gene expression of the rate-limiting PGE{sub 2} producing enzymes, cyclooxygenase-2 and microsomal prostaglandin E synthase 1 (mPGES-1). In particular, human mPGES-1 was induced by RhoA via transcriptional activation in control and interleukin (IL)-1{beta}-activated cancer cells. To address the involvement of potent signaling pathways in RhoA-activated mPGES-1 induction, various signaling inhibitors were screened for their effects on mPGES-1 promoter activity. RhoA activation enhanced basal and IL-1{beta}-mediated phosphorylated nuclear factor-{kappa}B and extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 proteins, all of which were positively involved in RhoA-induced gene expression of mPGES-1. As one potent down-stream transcription factor of ERK1/2 signals, early growth response gene 1 product also mediated RhoA-induced gene expression of mPGES-1 by enhancing transcriptional activity. Since oncogene-triggered PGE{sub 2} production is a critical modulator of epithelial tumor cells, RhoA-associated mPGES-1 represents a promising chemo-preventive or therapeutic target for epithelial inflammation and its associated cancers.

  6. MglC, a Paralog of Myxococcus xanthus GTPase-Activating Protein MglB, Plays a Divergent Role in Motility Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLoon, Anna L.; Wuichet, Kristin; Häsler, Michael; Keilberg, Daniela; Szadkowski, Dobromir

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In order to optimize interactions with their environment and one another, bacteria regulate their motility. In the case of the rod-shaped cells of Myxococcus xanthus, regulated motility is essential for social behaviors. M. xanthus moves over surfaces using type IV pilus-dependent motility and gliding motility. These two motility systems are coordinated by a protein module that controls cell polarity and consists of three polarly localized proteins, the small G protein MglA, the cognate MglA GTPase-activating protein MglB, and the response regulator RomR. Cellular reversals are induced by the Frz chemosensory system, and the output response regulator of this system, FrzZ, interfaces with the MglA/MglB/RomR module to invert cell polarity. Using a computational approach, we identify a paralog of MglB, MXAN_5770 (MglC). Genetic epistasis experiments demonstrate that MglC functions in the same pathway as MglA, MglB, RomR, and FrzZ and is important for regulating cellular reversals. Like MglB, MglC localizes to the cell poles asymmetrically and with a large cluster at the lagging pole. Correct polar localization of MglC depends on RomR and MglB. Consistently, MglC interacts directly with MglB and the C-terminal output domain of RomR, and we identified a surface of MglC that is necessary for the interaction with MglB and for MglC function. Together, our findings identify an additional member of the M. xanthus polarity module involved in regulating motility and demonstrate how gene duplication followed by functional divergence can add a layer of control to the complex cellular processes of motility and motility regulation. IMPORTANCE Gene duplication and the subsequent divergence of the duplicated genes are important evolutionary mechanisms for increasing both biological complexity and regulation of biological processes. The bacterium Myxococcus xanthus is a soil bacterium with an unusually large genome that carries out several social processes, including

  7. Identification of the GTPase-activating protein DEP domain containing 1B (DEPDC1B) as a transcriptional target of Pitx2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Di; Zhu, Xiaoxi; Jimenez-Cowell, Kevin; Mold, Alexander J; Sollecito, Christopher C; Lombana, Nicholas; Jiao, Meng; Wei, Qize

    2015-04-10

    Pitx2 is a bicoid-related homeobox transcription factor implicated in regulating left-right patterning and organogenesis. However, only a limited number of Pitx2 downstream target genes have been identified and characterized. Here we demonstrate that Pitx2 is a transcriptional repressor of DEP domain containing 1B (DEPDC1B). The first intron of the human and mouse DEP domain containing 1B genes contains multiple consensus DNA-binding sites for Pitx2. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that Pitx2, along with histone deacetylase 1, was recruited to the first intron of Depdc1b. In contrast, RNAi-mediated depletion of Pitx2 not only enhanced the acetylation of histone H4 in the first intron of Depdc1b, but also increased the protein level of Depdc1b. Luciferase reporter assays also showed that Pitx2 could repress the transcriptional activity mediated by the first intron of human DEPDC1B. The GAP domain of DEPDC1B interacted with nucleotide-bound forms of RAC1 in vitro. In addition, exogenous expression of DEPDC1B suppressed RAC1 activation and interfered with actin polymerization induced by the guanine nucleotide exchange factor TRIO. Moreover, DEPDC1B interacted with various signaling molecules such as U2af2, Erh, and Salm. We propose that Pitx2-mediated repression of Depdc1b expression contributes to the regulation of multiple molecular pathways, such as Rho GTPase signaling. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Major Host Factors Involved in Epithelial Cell Invasion of Campylobacter jejuni: Role of Fibronectin, Integrin Beta1, FAK, Tiam-1, and DOCK180 in Activating Rho GTPase Rac1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, Manja; Krause-Gruszczynska, Malgorzata; Rohde, Manfred; Tegtmeyer, Nicole; Takahashi, Seiichiro; Oyarzabal, Omar A.; Backert, Steffen

    2011-01-01

    Host cell entry by the food-borne pathogen Campylobacter jejuni has been reported as one of the primary reasons of tissue damage in infected humans, however, molecular invasion mechanisms and cellular factors involved in this process are widely unclear. Here we used knockout cell lines derived from fibronectin−/−, integrin beta1−/−, and focal adhesion kinase (FAK)−/− deficient mice and corresponding wild-type (WT) controls, to study C. jejuni-induced signaling cascades involved in the bacterial invasion process. Using high resolution scanning electron microscopy, GTPase pull-downs, G-LISA, and gentamicin protection assays we found that each of these host cell factors is indeed required for activation of the small Rho GTPase member Rac1 and maximal host cell invasion of this pathogen. Interestingly, membrane ruffling, tight engulfment of bacteria and invasion were only seen during infection of WT control cells, but not in fibronectin−/−, integrin beta1−/−, and FAK−/− knockout cell lines. We also demonstrate that C. jejuni activates FAK autophosphorylation activity at Y-397 and phosphorylation of Y-925, which is required for stimulating two downstream guanine exchange factors, DOCK180 and Tiam-1, which are upstream of Rac1. Small interfering (si) RNA studies further show that DOCK180 and Tiam-1 act cooperatively to trigger Rac1 activation and C. jejuni invasion. Moreover, mutagenesis data indicate that the bacterial fibronectin-binding protein CadF and the intact flagellum are involved in Rho GTPase activation and host cell invasion. Collectively, our results suggest that C. jejuni infection of host epithelial target cells hijacks a major fibronectin → integrin beta1 → FAK → DOCK180/Tiam-1 signaling cascade, which has a crucial role for Rac1 GTPase activity and bacterial entry into host target cells. PMID:22919583

  9. Mammalian Mon2/Ysl2 regulates endosome-to-Golgi trafficking but possesses no guanine nucleotide exchange activity toward Arl1 GTPase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Divyanshu; Boh, Boon Kim; Zhou, Yan; Chen, Li; Cornvik, Tobias Carl; Hong, Wanjin; Lu, Lei

    2013-11-01

    Arl1 is a member of Arf family small GTPases that is essential for the organization and function of Golgi complex. Mon2/Ysl2, which shares significant homology with Sec7 family Arf guanine nucleotide exchange factors, was poorly characterized in mammalian cells. Here, we report the first in depth characterization of mammalian Mon2. We found that Mon2 localized to trans-Golgi network which was dependent on both its N and C termini. The depletion of Mon2 did not affect the Golgi localized or cellular active form of Arl1. Furthermore, our in vitro assay demonstrated that recombinant Mon2 did not promote guanine nucleotide exchange of Arl1. Therefore, our results suggest that Mon2 could be neither necessary nor sufficient for the guanine nucleotide exchange of Arl1. We demonstrated that Mon2 was involved in endosome-to-Golgi trafficking as its depletion accelerated the delivery of furin and CI-M6PR to Golgi after endocytosis.

  10. Comparative study of two immunity-related GTPase genes in Chinese soft-shell turtle reveals their molecular characteristics and functional activity in immune defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yan; Shen, Sixian; Hu, Sufei; Ding, Tie; Hong, Xiaoyou; Chen, Chen; Zhu, Xinping; Zhao, Zhe

    2018-04-01

    The immunity-related GTPases (IRGs) are a family of proteins that play critical roles in innate resistance to intracellular pathogens. The number and diversity of IRG genes differ greatly in different species. Although IRG proteins have been well studies in mammals, they remain poorly characterized in lower vertebrates. In this study, we cloned two IRG genes, PsIRG5 and PsIRG8, from the Chinese soft-shelled turtle and compared their characterization and functional activity with mammalian IRGs. The PsIRG5 is a gene of 1896 bp that encodes a protein of 413 amino acid and PsIRG8 is 1543 bp in length encoding another 413 aa protein. Sequence alignment between all turtle IRG-like genes and mammalian IRGs showed that both PsIRG5 and PsIRG8 were conserved with mammalian GKS IRGs, while PsIRG5 appeared a closer evolutionary relationship with mammalian GMS IRGs. The expression and subcellular characterization revealed that PsIRG5 was dramatically upregulated under Aeromonas hydrophila challenge and exhibited co-localization with lysosomes in cells; whereas PsIRG8 was downregulated and has no distinct localization. Functional activity assay demonstrated that PsIRG5 plays a role in autophagy induction and IFN-γ contributes to enhance the induction, since it has IFN-inducible elements in its promoter region. These data above unravel the molecular characterization and functional activity of IRGs in lower vertebrate for the first time and will provide insights into the comparative immunity and evolutionary relationships of IRGs between mammals and reptiles. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Dexras1 a unique ras-GTPase interacts with NMDA receptor activity and provides a novel dissociation between anxiety, working memory and sensory gating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, G C; Lin, R E; Chen, Y; Brookshire, B R; White, R S; Lucki, I; Siegel, S J; Kim, S F

    2016-05-13

    Dexras1 is a novel GTPase that acts at a confluence of signaling mechanisms associated with psychiatric and neurological disease including NMDA receptors, NOS1AP and nNOS. Recent work has shown that Dexras1 mediates iron trafficking and NMDA-dependent neurodegeneration but a role for Dexras1 in normal brain function or psychiatric disease has not been studied. To test for such a role, mice with germline knockout (KO) of Dexras1 were assayed for behavioral abnormalities as well as changes in NMDA receptor subunit protein expression. Because Dexras1 is up-regulated during stress or by dexamethasone treatment, we included measures associated with emotion including anxiety and depression. Baseline anxiety-like measures (open field and zero maze) were not altered, nor were depression-like behavior (tail suspension). Measures of memory function yielded mixed results, with no changes in episodic memory (novel object recognition) but a significant decrement on working memory (T-maze). Alternatively, there was an increase in pre-pulse inhibition (PPI), without concomitant changes in either startle amplitude or locomotor activity. PPI data are consistent with the direction of change seen following exposure to dopamine D2 antagonists. An examination of NMDA subunit expression levels revealed an increased expression of the NR2A subunit, contrary to previous studies demonstrating down-regulation of the receptor following antipsychotic exposure (Schmitt et al., 2003) and up-regulation after exposure to isolation rearing (Turnock-Jones et al., 2009). These findings suggest a potential role for Dexras1 in modulating a selective subset of psychiatric symptoms, possibly via its interaction with NMDARs and/or other disease-related binding-partners. Furthermore, data suggest that modulating Dexras1 activity has contrasting effects on emotional, sensory and cognitive domains. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Therapeutic IMC-C225 antibody inhibits breast cancer cell invasiveness via Vav2-dependent activation of RhoA GTPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molli, Poonam R; Adam, Liana; Kumar, Rakesh

    2008-10-01

    Abnormalities in the expression and signaling pathways downstream of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) contribute to progression, invasion, and maintenance of the malignant phenotype in human cancers. Accordingly, biological agents, such as the EGFR-blocking antibody IMC-C225 have promising anticancer potential and are currently in various stages of clinical development. Because use of IMC-C225 is limited, at present, only for treatment of cancer with high EGFR expression, the goal of the present study was to determine the effect of IMC-C225 on the invasiveness of breast cancer cells with high and low levels of EGFR expression. The effect of IMC-C225 on invasion was studied using breast cancer cell lines with high and low levels of EGFR expression. The addition of EGF led to progressive stress fiber dissolution. In contrast, cells treated with IMC-C225 showed reduced invasiveness and increased stress-fiber formation. Interestingly, IMC-C225 pretreatment was accompanied by EGFR phosphorylation, as detected using an anti-phosphorylated tyrosine antibody (PY99), which correlated with phosphorylation of Vav2 guanine nucleotide exchange factor and activation of RhoA GTPase irrespective of EGFR level, and Vav2 interacted with EGFR only in IMC-C225-treated cells. The underlying mechanism involved an enhanced interaction between beta1 integrins and EGFR upon IMC-C225 treatment. Here, we defined a new mechanism for IMC-C225 that cross-links integrins with EGFR, leading to activation of RhoA and inhibition of breast cancer cell invasion irrespective of the level of EGFR in the cells, thus providing a rationale for using IMC-C225 in the metastatic setting independent of the levels of EGFR.

  13. Reverse engineering GTPase programming languages with reconstituted signaling networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle, Scott M

    2016-07-02

    The Ras superfamily GTPases represent one of the most prolific signaling currencies used in Eukaryotes. With these remarkable molecules, evolution has built GTPase networks that control diverse cellular processes such as growth, morphology, motility and trafficking. (1-4) Our knowledge of the individual players that underlie the function of these networks is deep; decades of biochemical and structural data has provided a mechanistic understanding of the molecules that turn GTPases ON and OFF, as well as how those GTPase states signal by controlling the assembly of downstream effectors. However, we know less about how these different activities work together as a system to specify complex dynamic signaling outcomes. Decoding this molecular "programming language" would help us understand how different species and cell types have used the same GTPase machinery in different ways to accomplish different tasks, and would also provide new insights as to how mutations to these networks can cause disease. We recently developed a bead-based microscopy assay to watch reconstituted H-Ras signaling systems at work under arbitrary configurations of regulators and effectors. (5) Here we highlight key observations and insights from this study and propose extensions to our method to further study this and other GTPase signaling systems.

  14. Regulation of Gβγi-dependent PLC-β3 activity in smooth muscle: inhibitory phosphorylation of PLC-β3 by PKA and PKG and stimulatory phosphorylation of Gαi-GTPase-activating protein RGS2 by PKG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalli, Ancy D; Kumar, Divya P; Al-Shboul, Othman; Mahavadi, Sunila; Kuemmerle, John F; Grider, John R; Murthy, Karnam S

    2014-11-01

    In gastrointestinal smooth muscle, agonists that bind to Gi-coupled receptors activate preferentially PLC-β3 via Gβγ to stimulate phosphoinositide (PI) hydrolysis and generate inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) leading to IP3-dependent Ca(2+) release and muscle contraction. In the present study, we identified the mechanism of inhibition of PLC-β3-dependent PI hydrolysis by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) and cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG). Cyclopentyl adenosine (CPA), an adenosine A1 receptor agonist, caused an increase in PI hydrolysis in a concentration-dependent fashion; stimulation was blocked by expression of the carboxyl-terminal sequence of GRK2(495-689), a Gβγ-scavenging peptide, or Gαi minigene but not Gαq minigene. Isoproterenol and S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) induced phosphorylation of PLC-β3 and inhibited CPA-induced PI hydrolysis, Ca(2+) release, and muscle contraction. The effect of isoproterenol on all three responses was inhibited by PKA inhibitor, myristoylated PKI, or AKAP inhibitor, Ht-31, whereas the effect of GSNO was selectively inhibited by PKG inhibitor, Rp-cGMPS. GSNO, but not isoproterenol, also phosphorylated Gαi-GTPase-activating protein, RGS2, and enhanced association of Gαi3-GTP and RGS2. The effect of GSNO on PI hydrolysis was partly reversed in cells (i) expressing constitutively active GTPase-resistant Gαi mutant (Q204L), (ii) phosphorylation-site-deficient RGS2 mutant (S46A/S64A), or (iii) siRNA for RGS2. We conclude that PKA and PKG inhibit Gβγi-dependent PLC-β3 activity by direct phosphorylation of PLC-β3. PKG, but not PKA, also inhibits PI hydrolysis indirectly by a mechanism involving phosphorylation of RGS2 and its association with Gαi-GTP. This allows RGS2 to accelerate Gαi-GTPase activity, enhance Gαβγi trimer formation, and inhibit Gβγi-dependent PLC-β3 activity.

  15. Ran Involved in the Development and Reproduction Is a Potential Target for RNA-Interference-Based Pest Management in Nilaparvata lugens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai-Long Li

    Full Text Available Ran (RanGTPase in insects participates in the 20-hydroxyecdysone signal transduction pathway in which downstream genes, FTZ-F1, Krüppel-homolog 1 (Kr-h1 and vitellogenin, are involved. A putative Ran gene (NlRan was cloned from Nilaparvata lugens, a destructive phloem-feeding pest of rice. NlRan has the typical Ran primary structure features that are conserved in insects. NlRan showed higher mRNA abundance immediately after molting and peaked in newly emerged female adults. Among the examined tissues ovary had the highest transcript level, followed by fat body, midgut and integument, and legs. Three days after dsNlRan injection the NlRan mRNA abundance in the third-, fourth-, and fifth-instar nymphs was decreased by 94.3%, 98.4% and 97.0%, respectively. NlFTZ-F1 expression levels in treated third- and fourth-instar nymphs were reduced by 89.3% and 23.8%, respectively. In contrast, NlKr-h1 mRNA levels were up-regulated by 67.5 and 1.5 folds, respectively. NlRan knockdown significantly decreased the body weights, delayed development, and killed >85% of the nymphs at day seven. Two apparent phenotypic defects were observed: (1 Extended body form, and failed to molt; (2 The cuticle at the notum was split open but cannot completely shed off. The newly emerged female adults from dsNlRan injected fifth-instar nymphs showed lower levels of NlRan and vitellogenin, lower weight gain and honeydew excretion comparing with the blank control, and no offspring. Those results suggest that NlRan encodes a functional protein that was involved in development and reproduction. The study established proof of concept that NlRan could serve as a target for dsRNA-based pesticides for N. lugens control.

  16. Aggresome formation is regulated by RanBPM through an interaction with HDAC6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louisa M. Salemi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In conditions of proteasomal impairment, the build-up of damaged or misfolded proteins activates a cellular response leading to the recruitment of damaged proteins into perinuclear aggregates called aggresomes. Aggresome formation involves the retrograde transport of cargo proteins along the microtubule network and is dependent on the histone deacetylase HDAC6. Here we show that ionizing radiation (IR promotes Ran-Binding Protein M (RanBPM relocalization into discrete perinuclear foci where it co-localizes with aggresome components ubiquitin, dynein and HDAC6, suggesting that the RanBPM perinuclear clusters correspond to aggresomes. RanBPM was also recruited to aggresomes following treatment with the proteasome inhibitor MG132 and the DNA-damaging agent etoposide. Strikingly, aggresome formation by HDAC6 was markedly impaired in RanBPM shRNA cells, but was restored by re-expression of RanBPM. RanBPM was found to interact with HDAC6 and to inhibit its deacetylase activity. This interaction was abrogated by a RanBPM deletion of its LisH/CTLH domain, which also prevented aggresome formation, suggesting that RanBPM promotes aggresome formation through an association with HDAC6. Our results suggest that RanBPM regulates HDAC6 activity and is a central regulator of aggresome formation.

  17. Rho GTPases in ameloblast differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsu, Keishi; Harada, Hidemitsu

    2016-05-01

    During tooth development, ameloblasts differentiate from inner enamel epithelial cells to enamel-forming cells by modulating the signal pathways mediating epithelial-mesenchymal interaction and a cell-autonomous gene network. The differentiation process of epithelial cells is characterized by marked changes in their morphology and polarity, accompanied by dynamic cytoskeletal reorganization and changes in cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion over time. Functional ameloblasts are tall, columnar, polarized cells that synthesize and secrete enamel-specific proteins. After deposition of the full thickness of enamel matrix, ameloblasts become smaller and regulate enamel maturation. Recent significant advances in the fields of molecular biology and genetics have improved our understanding of the regulatory mechanism of the ameloblast cell life cycle, mediated by the Rho family of small GTPases. They act as intracellular molecular switch that transduce signals from extracellular stimuli to the actin cytoskeleton and the nucleus. In our review, we summarize studies that provide current evidence for Rho GTPases and their involvement in ameloblast differentiation. In addition to the Rho GTPases themselves, their downstream effectors and upstream regulators have also been implicated in ameloblast differentiation.

  18. Rho GTPases in ameloblast differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keishi Otsu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available During tooth development, ameloblasts differentiate from inner enamel epithelial cells to enamel-forming cells by modulating the signal pathways mediating epithelial–mesenchymal interaction and a cell-autonomous gene network. The differentiation process of epithelial cells is characterized by marked changes in their morphology and polarity, accompanied by dynamic cytoskeletal reorganization and changes in cell–cell and cell–matrix adhesion over time. Functional ameloblasts are tall, columnar, polarized cells that synthesize and secrete enamel-specific proteins. After deposition of the full thickness of enamel matrix, ameloblasts become smaller and regulate enamel maturation. Recent significant advances in the fields of molecular biology and genetics have improved our understanding of the regulatory mechanism of the ameloblast cell life cycle, mediated by the Rho family of small GTPases. They act as intracellular molecular switch that transduce signals from extracellular stimuli to the actin cytoskeleton and the nucleus. In our review, we summarize studies that provide current evidence for Rho GTPases and their involvement in ameloblast differentiation. In addition to the Rho GTPases themselves, their downstream effectors and upstream regulators have also been implicated in ameloblast differentiation.

  19. Tackling complex turbulent flows with transient RANS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kenjeres, S.; Hanjalic, K.

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews some recent applications of the transient-Reynoldsaveraged Navier–Stokes (T-RANS) approach in simulating complex turbulent flows dominated by externally imposed body forces, primarily by thermal buoyancy and the Lorentz force. The T-RANS aims at numerical resolving unsteady

  20. Progress in Hybrid RANS-LES Modelling : Papers Contributed to the 4th Symposium on Hybrid RANS-LES Methods

    CERN Document Server

    Haase, Werner; Peng, Shia-Hui; Schwamborn, Dieter

    2013-01-01

    The present book contains contributions presented at the Fourth Symposium on Hybrid RANS-LES Methods, held in Beijing, China, 28-30 September 2011, being a continuation of symposia taking place in Stockholm (Sweden, 2005), in Corfu (Greece, 2007), and Gdansk (Poland, 2009). The contributions to the last two symposia were published as NNFM, Vol. 97 and Vol. 111. At the Beijing symposium, along with seven invited keynotes, another 46 papers (plus 5 posters) were presented addressing topics on Novel turbulence-resolving simulation and modelling, Improved hybrid RANS-LES methods, Comparative studies of difference modelling methods, Modelling-related numerical issues and Industrial applications.. The present book reflects recent activities and new progress made in the development and applications of hybrid RANS-LES methods in general.

  1. The nucleoporin MEL-28 promotes RanGTP-dependent γ-tubulin recruitment and microtubule nucleation in mitotic spindle formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Hideki; Koch, Birgit; Walczak, Rudolf; Ciray-Duygu, Fulya; González-Sánchez, Juan Carlos; Devos, Damien P; Mattaj, Iain W; Gruss, Oliver J

    2014-01-01

    The GTP-bound form of the Ran GTPase (RanGTP), produced around chromosomes, drives nuclear envelope and nuclear pore complex (NPC) re-assembly after mitosis. The nucleoporin MEL-28/ELYS binds chromatin in a RanGTP-regulated manner and acts to seed NPC assembly. Here we show that, upon mitotic NPC disassembly, MEL-28 dissociates from chromatin and re-localizes to spindle microtubules and kinetochores. MEL-28 directly binds microtubules in a RanGTP-regulated way via its C-terminal chromatin-binding domain. Using Xenopus egg extracts, we demonstrate that MEL-28 is essential for RanGTP-dependent microtubule nucleation and spindle assembly, independent of its function in NPC assembly. Specifically, MEL-28 interacts with the γ-tubulin ring complex and recruits it to microtubule nucleation sites. Our data identify MEL-28 as a RanGTP target that functions throughout the cell cycle. Its cell cycle-dependent binding to chromatin or microtubules discriminates MEL-28 functions in interphase and mitosis, and ensures that spindle assembly occurs only after NPC breakdown.

  2. Regulation of bacterial cell polarity by small GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keilberg, Daniela; Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte

    2014-04-01

    Bacteria are polarized with many proteins localizing dynamically to specific subcellular sites. Two GTPase families have important functions in the regulation of bacterial cell polarity, FlhF homologues and small GTPases of the Ras superfamily. The latter consist of only a G domain and are widespread in bacteria. The rod-shaped Myxococcus xanthus cells have two motility systems, one for gliding and one that depends on type IV pili. The function of both systems hinges on proteins that localize asymmetrically to the cell poles. During cellular reversals, these asymmetrically localized proteins are released from their respective poles and then bind to the opposite pole, resulting in an inversion of cell polarity. Here, we review genetic, cell biological, and biochemical analyses that identified two modules containing small Ras-like GTPases that regulate the dynamic polarity of motility proteins. The GTPase SofG interacts directly with the bactofilin cytoskeletal protein BacP to ensure polar localization of type IV pili proteins. In the second module, the small GTPase MglA, its cognate GTPase activating protein (GAP) MglB, and the response regulator RomR localize asymmetrically to the poles and sort dynamically localized motility proteins to the poles. During reversals, MglA, MglB, and RomR switch poles, in that way inducing the relocation of dynamically localized motility proteins. Structural analyses have demonstrated that MglB has a Roadblock/LC7 fold, the central β2 strand in MglA undergoes an unusual screw-type movement upon GTP binding, MglA contains an intrinsic Arg finger required for GTP hydrolysis, and MglA and MglB form an unusual G protein/GAP complex with a 1:2 stoichiometry.

  3. Molecular mechanisms of Sar/Arf GTPases in vesicular trafficking in yeast and plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiro eYorimitsu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Small GTPase proteins play essential roles in the regulation of vesicular trafficking systems in eukaryotic cells. Two types of small GTPases, secretion-associated Ras-related protein (Sar and ADP-ribosylation factor (Arf, act in the biogenesis of transport vesicles. Sar/Arf GTPases function as molecular switches by cycling between active, GTP-bound and inactive, GDP-bound forms, catalyzed by guanine nucleotide exchange factors and GTPase-activating proteins, respectively. Activated Sar/Arf GTPases undergo a conformational change, exposing the N-terminal amphipathic α-helix for insertion into membranes. The process triggers the recruitment and assembly of coat proteins to the membranes, followed by coated vesicle formation and scission. In higher plants, Sar/Arf GTPases also play pivotal roles in maintaining the dynamic identity of organelles in the secretory pathway. Sar1 GTPase strictly controls anterograde transport from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER through the recruitment of plant COPII coat components onto membranes. COPII vesicle transport is responsible for the organization of highly conserved polygonal ER networks. In contrast, Arf GTPases contribute to the regulation of multiple trafficking routes, including transport through the Golgi complex and endocytic transport. These transport systems have diversified in the plant kingdom independently and exhibit several plant-specific features with respect to Golgi organization, endocytic cycling, cell polarity and cytokinesis. The functional diversification of vesicular trafficking systems ensures the multicellular development of higher plants. This review focuses on the current knowledge of Sar/Arf GTPases, highlighting the molecular details of GTPase regulation in vesicle formation in yeast and advances in knowledge of the characteristics of vesicle trafficking in plants.

  4. Identification and differential expression dynamics of peach small GTPases encoding genes during fruit development and ripening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falchi, Rachele; Cipriani, Guido; Marrazzo, Teresa; Nonis, Alberto; Vizzotto, Giannina; Ruperti, Benedetto

    2010-01-01

    The function of monomeric GTPases of the RAS superfamily in fruit development and ripening has been partially characterized. Here the identification of peach (Prunus persica) small GTPases of the RAS superfamily expressed in fruit and the characterization of their expression profiles during fruit development are described. Extensive searches on expressed sequence tag (EST) databases led to the selection of a total of 24 genes from peach encoding proteins with significant similarity to Arabidopsis small GTPases. Sequence similarity analyses and identification of conserved motifs, diagnostic of specific RAS families and subfamilies, enabled bona fide assignment of fourteen PpRAB, seven PpARF/ARL/SAR, two PpROP and one PpRAN GTPases. Transcriptional expression profiles of peach monomeric GTPases, analysed by real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR, were obtained for mesocarp samples, collected in two consecutive years. Reproducible patterns of expression could be identified for five peach RAB-encoding genes (PpRABA1-1, PpRABA2, PpRABD2-1, PpRABD2-2, and PpRABC2), two ARFs (PpARFA1-1 and PpARLB1), and two ROPs (PpROP3 and PpROP4). Interestingly, the transient transcriptional up-regulation of PpARF genes and of PpRAB genes of the A and D clades, putatively controlling the exocytic delivery of cell wall components and modifying enzymes, appeared to coincide with peaks of growth speed and sugar accumulation and with the final phases of ripening. To our knowledge, this is the first description of the co-ordinated differential expression of a set of genes encoding small GTPases of the ARF and RAB families which takes place during key moments of fruit development and maturation. PMID:20501747

  5. Small GTPases and Stress Responses of vvran1 in the Straw Mushroom Volvariella volvacea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Jie Yan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Small GTPases play important roles in the growth, development and environmental responses of eukaryotes. Based on the genomic sequence of the straw mushroom Volvariella volvacea, 44 small GTPases were identified. A clustering analysis using human small GTPases as the references revealed that V. volvacea small GTPases can be grouped into five families: nine are in the Ras family, 10 are in the Rho family, 15 are in the Rab family, one is in the Ran family and nine are in the Arf family. The transcription of vvran1 was up-regulated upon hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 stress, and could be repressed by diphenyleneiodonium chloride (DPI, a NADPH oxidase-specific inhibitor. The number of vvran1 transcripts also increased upon cold stress. Diphenyleneiodonium chloride, but not the superoxide dismutase (SOD inhibitor diethy dithiocarbamate (DDC, could suppress the up-regulation of vvran1 gene expression to cold stress. These results combined with the high correlations between gene expression and superoxide anion (O2− generation indicated that vvran1 could be one of the candidate genes in the downstream of O2− mediated pathways that are generated by NADPH oxidase under low temperature and oxidative stresses.

  6. Intrinsic protein fluorescence assays for GEF, GAP and post-translational modifications of small GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goody, Philip R

    2016-12-15

    Evidence and arguments are summarized that suggest that intrinsic (tryptophan) protein fluorescence provides an excellent and convenient signal for monitoring both GEF (guanine nucleotide exchange factor) and GAP (GTPase activating protein) activity of a large number of small GTPases. In addition, post-translational modifications of Rab proteins occurring in a region known to be a hot spot for such modifications also lead to fluorescence changes that can be accurately monitored in a time-dependent manner. It is suggested that intrinsic fluorescence should be the first method chosen for monitoring such reactions of tryptophan-containing small GTPases. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Functional Mapping of Human Dynamin-1-Like GTPase Domain Based on X-ray Structure Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröhlich, Chris; Eibl, Clarissa; Gimeno, Ana; Hessenberger, Manuel; Puehringer, Sandra; Daumke, Oliver; Goettig, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Human dynamin-1-like protein (DNM1L) is a GTP-driven molecular machine that segregates mitochondria and peroxisomes. To obtain insights into its catalytic mechanism, we determined crystal structures of a construct comprising the GTPase domain and the bundle signaling element (BSE) in the nucleotide-free and GTP-analogue-bound states. The GTPase domain of DNM1L is structurally related to that of dynamin and binds the nucleotide 5′-Guanylyl-imidodiphosphate (GMP-PNP) via five highly conserved motifs, whereas the BSE folds into a pocket at the opposite side. Based on these structures, the GTPase center was systematically mapped by alanine mutagenesis and kinetic measurements. Thus, residues essential for the GTPase reaction were characterized, among them Lys38, Ser39 and Ser40 in the phosphate binding loop, Thr59 from switch I, Asp146 and Gly149 from switch II, Lys216 and Asp218 in the G4 element, as well as Asn246 in the G5 element. Also, mutated Glu81 and Glu82 in the unique 16-residue insertion of DNM1L influence the activity significantly. Mutations of Gln34, Ser35, and Asp190 in the predicted assembly interface interfered with dimerization of the GTPase domain induced by a transition state analogue and led to a loss of the lipid-stimulated GTPase activity. Our data point to related catalytic mechanisms of DNM1L and dynamin involving dimerization of their GTPase domains. PMID:23977156

  8. The Defective Nuclear Lamina in Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome Disrupts the Nucleocytoplasmic Ran Gradient and Inhibits Nuclear Localization of Ubc9▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Joshua B.; Datta, Sutirtha; Snow, Chelsi J.; Chatterjee, Mandovi; Ni, Li; Spencer, Adam; Yang, Chun-Song; Cubeñas-Potts, Caelin; Matunis, Michael J.; Paschal, Bryce M.

    2011-01-01

    The mutant form of lamin A responsible for the premature aging disease Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (termed progerin) acts as a dominant negative protein that changes the structure of the nuclear lamina. How the perturbation of the nuclear lamina in progeria is transduced into cellular changes is undefined. Using patient fibroblasts and a variety of cell-based assays, we determined that progerin expression in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome inhibits the nucleocytoplasmic transport of several factors with key roles in nuclear function. We found that progerin reduces the nuclear/cytoplasmic concentration of the Ran GTPase and inhibits the nuclear localization of Ubc9, the sole E2 for SUMOylation, and of TPR, the nucleoporin that forms the basket on the nuclear side of the nuclear pore complex. Forcing the nuclear localization of Ubc9 in progerin-expressing cells rescues the Ran gradient and TPR import, indicating that these pathways are linked. Reducing nuclear SUMOylation decreases the nuclear mobility of the Ran nucleotide exchange factor RCC1 in vivo, and the addition of SUMO E1 and E2 promotes the dissociation of RCC1 and Ran from chromatin in vitro. Our data suggest that the cellular effects of progerin are transduced, at least in part, through reduced function of the Ran GTPase and SUMOylation pathways. PMID:21670151

  9. Insights into the classification of small GTPases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominik Heider

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Dominik Heider1, Sascha Hauke3, Martin Pyka4, Daniel Kessler21Department of Bioinformatics, Center for Medical Biotechnology, 2Institute of Cell Biology (Cancer Research, University of Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany; 3Institute of Computer Science, University of Münster, Münster, Germany; 4Interdisciplinary Center for Clinical Research, University Hospital of Münster, Münster, GermanyAbstract: In this study we used a Random Forest-based approach for an assignment of small guanosine triphosphate proteins (GTPases to specific subgroups. Small GTPases represent an important functional group of proteins that serve as molecular switches in a wide range of fundamental cellular processes, including intracellular transport, movement and signaling events. These proteins have further gained a special emphasis in cancer research, because within the last decades a huge variety of small GTPases from different subgroups could be related to the development of all types of tumors. Using a random forest approach, we were able to identify the most important amino acid positions for the classification process within the small GTPases superfamily and its subgroups. These positions are in line with the results of earlier studies and have been shown to be the essential elements for the different functionalities of the GTPase families. Furthermore, we provide an accurate and reliable software tool (GTPasePred to identify potential novel GTPases and demonstrate its application to genome sequences.Keywords: cancer, machine learning, classification, Random Forests, proteins

  10. Rab GTPase regulation of membrane identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeffer, Suzanne R

    2013-08-01

    A fundamental question in cell biology is how cells determine membrane compartment identity and the directionality with which cargoes pass through the secretory and endocytic pathways. The discovery of so-called 'Rab cascades' provides a satisfying molecular mechanism that helps to resolve this paradox. One Rab GTPase has the ability to template the localization of the subsequent acting Rab GTPase along a given transport pathway. Thus, in addition to determining compartment identity and functionality, Rab GTPases are likely able to order the events of membrane trafficking. This review will highlight recent advances in our understanding of Rabs and Rab cascades. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Molecular mechanisms of Sar/Arf GTPases in vesicular trafficking in yeast and plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorimitsu, Tomohiro; Sato, Ken; Takeuchi, Masaki

    2014-01-01

    Small GTPase proteins play essential roles in the regulation of vesicular trafficking systems in eukaryotic cells. Two types of small GTPases, secretion-associated Ras-related protein (Sar) and ADP-ribosylation factor (Arf), act in the biogenesis of transport vesicles. Sar/Arf GTPases function as molecular switches by cycling between active, GTP-bound and inactive, GDP-bound forms, catalyzed by guanine nucleotide exchange factors and GTPase-activating proteins, respectively. Activated Sar/Arf GTPases undergo a conformational change, exposing the N-terminal amphipathic α-helix for insertion into membranes. The process triggers the recruitment and assembly of coat proteins to the membranes, followed by coated vesicle formation and scission. In higher plants, Sar/Arf GTPases also play pivotal roles in maintaining the dynamic identity of organelles in the secretory pathway. Sar1 protein strictly controls anterograde transport from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) through the recruitment of plant COPII coat components onto membranes. COPII vesicle transport is responsible for the organization of highly conserved polygonal ER networks. In contrast, Arf proteins contribute to the regulation of multiple trafficking routes, including transport through the Golgi complex and endocytic transport. These transport systems have diversified in the plant kingdom independently and exhibit several plant-specific features with respect to Golgi organization, endocytic cycling, cell polarity and cytokinesis. The functional diversification of vesicular trafficking systems ensures the multicellular development of higher plants. This review focuses on the current knowledge of Sar/Arf GTPases, highlighting the molecular details of GTPase regulation in vesicle formation in yeast and advances in knowledge of the characteristics of vesicle trafficking in plants.

  12. Rab GTPases in Immunity and Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prashar, Akriti; Schnettger, Laura; Bernard, Elliott M.; Gutierrez, Maximiliano G.

    2017-01-01

    Strict spatiotemporal control of trafficking events between organelles is critical for maintaining homeostasis and directing cellular responses. This regulation is particularly important in immune cells for mounting specialized immune defenses. By controlling the formation, transport and fusion of intracellular organelles, Rab GTPases serve as master regulators of membrane trafficking. In this review, we discuss the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which Rab GTPases regulate immunity and inflammation. PMID:29034219

  13. Rab GTPases in Immunity and Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akriti Prashar

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Strict spatiotemporal control of trafficking events between organelles is critical for maintaining homeostasis and directing cellular responses. This regulation is particularly important in immune cells for mounting specialized immune defenses. By controlling the formation, transport and fusion of intracellular organelles, Rab GTPases serve as master regulators of membrane trafficking. In this review, we discuss the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which Rab GTPases regulate immunity and inflammation.

  14. ADP-ribosylation factor-like GTPase 15 enhances insulin-induced AKT phosphorylation in the IR/IRS1/AKT pathway by interacting with ASAP2 and regulating PDPK1 activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jie; Wang, Min; Deng, Wuquan; Zhong, Daping; Jiang, Youzhao; Liao, Yong; Chen, Bing; Zhang, Xiaoli

    2017-05-13

    Decreased phosphorylation in the insulin signalling pathway is a hallmark of insulin resistance. The causes of this phenomenon are complicated and multifactorial. Recently, genomic analyses have identified ARL15 as a new candidate gene related to diabetes. However, the ARL15 protein function remains unclear. Here, we show that ARL15 is upregulated by insulin stimulation. This effect was impaired in insulin-resistant pathophysiology in TNF-α-treated C2C12 myotubes and in the skeletal muscles of leptin knockout mice. In addition, ARL15 localized to the cytoplasm in the resting state and accumulated in the Golgi apparatus around the nucleus upon insulin stimulation. ARL15 overexpression can enhance the phosphorylation of the key insulin signalling pathway molecules IR, IRS1 and AKT in C2C12 myotubes. Moreover, ARL15 knockdown can also specifically inhibit the phosphorylation of PDPK1 Ser241, thereby reducing PDPK1 activity and its downstream phosphorylation of AKT Thr308. Co-immunoprecipitation assays identified ASAP2 as an ARL15-interacting protein. In conclusion, we have identified that ARL15 acts as an insulin-sensitizing effector molecule to upregulate the phosphorylation of members of the canonical IR/IRS1/PDPK1/AKT insulin pathway by interacting with its GAP ASAP2 and activating PDPK1. This research may provide new insights into GTPase-mediated insulin signalling regulation and facilitate the development of new pharmacotherapeutic targets for insulin sensitization. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Bayesian classification of residues associated with protein functional divergence: Arf and Arf-like GTPases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neuwald Andrew F

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Certain residues within proteins are highly conserved across very distantly related organisms, yet their (presumably critical structural or mechanistic roles are completely unknown. To obtain clues regarding such residues within Arf and Arf-like (Arf/Arl GTPases--which function as on/off switches regulating vesicle trafficking, phospholipid metabolism and cytoskeletal remodeling--I apply a new sampling procedure for comparative sequence analysis, termed multiple category Bayesian Partitioning with Pattern Selection (mcBPPS. Results The mcBPPS sampler classified sequences within the entire P-loop GTPase class into multiple categories by identifying those evolutionarily-divergent residues most likely to be responsible for functional specialization. Here I focus on categories of residues that most distinguish various Arf/Arl GTPases from other GTPases. This identified residues whose specific roles have been previously proposed (and in some cases corroborated experimentally and that thus serve as positive controls, as well as several categories of co-conserved residues whose possible roles are first hinted at here. For example, Arf/Arl/Sar GTPases are most distinguished from other GTPases by a conserved aspartate residue within the phosphate binding loop (P-loop and by co-conserved residues nearby that, together, can form a network of salt-bridge and hydrogen bond interactions centered on the GTPase active site. Residues corresponding to an N-[VI] motif that is conserved within Arf/Arl GTPases may play a role in the interswitch toggle characteristic of the Arf family, whereas other, co-conserved residues may modulate the flexibility of the guanine binding loop. Arl8 GTPases conserve residues that strikingly diverge from those typically found in other Arf/Arl GTPases and that form structural interactions suggestive of a novel interswitch toggle mechanism. Conclusions This analysis suggests specific mutagenesis experiments to

  16. Unique Structural and Nucleotide Exchange Features of the Rho1 GTPase of Entamoeba histolytica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosch, Dustin E.; Wittchen, Erika S.; Qiu, Connie; Burridge, Keith; Siderovski, David P. (UNC)

    2012-08-10

    The single-celled human parasite Entamoeba histolytica possesses a dynamic actin cytoskeleton vital for its intestinal and systemic pathogenicity. The E. histolytica genome encodes several Rho family GTPases known to regulate cytoskeletal dynamics. EhRho1, the first family member identified, was reported to be insensitive to the Rho GTPase-specific Clostridium botulinum C3 exoenzyme, raising the possibility that it may be a misclassified Ras family member. Here, we report the crystal structures of EhRho1 in both active and inactive states. EhRho1 is activated by a conserved switch mechanism, but diverges from mammalian Rho GTPases in lacking a signature Rho insert helix. EhRho1 engages a homolog of mDia, EhFormin1, suggesting a role in mediating serum-stimulated actin reorganization and microtubule formation during mitosis. EhRho1, but not a constitutively active mutant, interacts with a newly identified EhRhoGDI in a prenylation-dependent manner. Furthermore, constitutively active EhRho1 induces actin stress fiber formation in mammalian fibroblasts, thereby identifying it as a functional Rho family GTPase. EhRho1 exhibits a fast rate of nucleotide exchange relative to mammalian Rho GTPases due to a distinctive switch one isoleucine residue reminiscent of the constitutively active F28L mutation in human Cdc42, which for the latter protein, is sufficient for cellular transformation. Nonconserved, nucleotide-interacting residues within EhRho1, revealed by the crystal structure models, were observed to contribute a moderating influence on fast spontaneous nucleotide exchange. Collectively, these observations indicate that EhRho1 is a bona fide member of the Rho GTPase family, albeit with unique structural and functional aspects compared with mammalian Rho GTPases.

  17. RAN translation at C9orf72-associated repeat expansions is selectively enhanced by the integrated stress response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Katelyn M; Glineburg, M Rebecca; Kearse, Michael G; Flores, Brittany N; Linsalata, Alexander E; Fedak, Stephen J; Goldstrohm, Aaron C; Barmada, Sami J; Todd, Peter K

    2017-12-08

    Repeat-associated non-AUG (RAN) translation allows for unconventional initiation at disease-causing repeat expansions. As RAN translation contributes to pathogenesis in multiple neurodegenerative disorders, determining its mechanistic underpinnings may inform therapeutic development. Here we analyze RAN translation at G4C2 repeat expansions that cause C9orf72-associated amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia (C9RAN) and at CGG repeats that cause fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome. We find that C9RAN translation initiates through a cap- and eIF4A-dependent mechanism that utilizes a CUG start codon. C9RAN and CGG RAN are both selectively enhanced by integrated stress response (ISR) activation. ISR-enhanced RAN translation requires an eIF2α phosphorylation-dependent alteration in start codon fidelity. In parallel, both CGG and G4C2 repeats trigger phosphorylated-eIF2α-dependent stress granule formation and global translational suppression. These findings support a model whereby repeat expansions elicit cellular stress conditions that favor RAN translation of toxic proteins, creating a potential feed-forward loop that contributes to neurodegeneration.

  18. RhoA GTPase inhibition organizes contraction during epithelial morphogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Frank M.; Xie, Shicong; Vasquez, Claudia G.; Tworoger, Michael

    2016-01-01

    During morphogenesis, contraction of the actomyosin cytoskeleton within individual cells drives cell shape changes that fold tissues. Coordination of cytoskeletal contractility is mediated by regulating RhoA GTPase activity. Guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) activate and GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) inhibit RhoA activity. Most studies of tissue folding, including apical constriction, have focused on how RhoA is activated by GEFs to promote cell contractility, with little investigation as to how GAPs may be important. Here, we identify a critical role for a RhoA GAP, Cumberland GAP (C-GAP), which coordinates with a RhoA GEF, RhoGEF2, to organize spatiotemporal contractility during Drosophila melanogaster apical constriction. C-GAP spatially restricts RhoA pathway activity to a central position in the apical cortex. RhoGEF2 pulses precede myosin, and C-GAP is required for pulsation, suggesting that contractile pulses result from RhoA activity cycling. Finally, C-GAP expression level influences the transition from reversible to irreversible cell shape change, which defines the onset of tissue shape change. Our data demonstrate that RhoA activity cycling and modulating the ratio of RhoGEF2 to C-GAP are required for tissue folding. PMID:27551058

  19. Signaling by Small GTPases at Cell-Cell junctions: Protein Interactions Building Control and Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, Vania

    2017-09-11

    A number of interesting reports highlight the intricate network of signaling proteins that coordinate formation and maintenance of cell-cell contacts. We have much yet to learn about how the in vitro binding data is translated into protein association inside the cells and whether such interaction modulates the signaling properties of the protein. What emerges from recent studies is the importance to carefully consider small GTPase activation in the context of where its activation occurs, which upstream regulators are involved in the activation/inactivation cycle and the GTPase interacting partners that determine the intracellular niche and extent of signaling. Data discussed here unravel unparalleled cooperation and coordination of functions among GTPases and their regulators in supporting strong adhesion between cells. Copyright © 2017 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  20. Computer vision profiling of neurite outgrowth dynamics reveals spatiotemporal modularity of Rho GTPase signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusco, Ludovico; Lefort, Riwal; Smith, Kevin; Benmansour, Fethallah; Gonzalez, German; Barillari, Caterina; Rinn, Bernd; Fleuret, Francois; Fua, Pascal; Pertz, Olivier

    2016-01-04

    Rho guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) control the cytoskeletal dynamics that power neurite outgrowth. This process consists of dynamic neurite initiation, elongation, retraction, and branching cycles that are likely to be regulated by specific spatiotemporal signaling networks, which cannot be resolved with static, steady-state assays. We present NeuriteTracker, a computer-vision approach to automatically segment and track neuronal morphodynamics in time-lapse datasets. Feature extraction then quantifies dynamic neurite outgrowth phenotypes. We identify a set of stereotypic neurite outgrowth morphodynamic behaviors in a cultured neuronal cell system. Systematic RNA interference perturbation of a Rho GTPase interactome consisting of 219 proteins reveals a limited set of morphodynamic phenotypes. As proof of concept, we show that loss of function of two distinct RhoA-specific GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) leads to opposite neurite outgrowth phenotypes. Imaging of RhoA activation dynamics indicates that both GAPs regulate different spatiotemporal Rho GTPase pools, with distinct functions. Our results provide a starting point to dissect spatiotemporal Rho GTPase signaling networks that regulate neurite outgrowth. © 2016 Fusco et al.

  1. Targeting and localized signalling by small GTPases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Klooster, Jean Paul; Hordijk, Peter L.

    2007-01-01

    Polarized cellular responses, for example, cell migration, require the co-ordinated assembly of signalling complexes at a particular subcellular location, such as the leading edge of cells. Small GTPases of the Ras superfamily play central roles in many (polarized) responses to growth factors,

  2. Rho GTPases in collective cell migration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zegers, M.M.; Friedl, P.

    2014-01-01

    The family of Rho GTPases are intracellular signal transducers that link cell surface signals to multiple intracellular responses. They are best known for their role in regulating actin dynamics required for cell migration, but in addition control cell-cell adhesion, polarization, vesicle

  3. NADPH oxidase is internalized by clathrin-coated pits and localizes to a Rab27A/B GTPase-regulated secretory compartment in activated macrophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejlerskov, Patrick; Christensen, Dan Ploug; Beyaie, David

    2012-01-01

    Here, we report that activation of different types of tissue macrophages, including microglia, by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or GM-CSF stimulation correlates with the quantitative redistribution of NADPH oxidase (cyt b(558)) from the plasma membrane to an intracellular stimulus-responsive storage c...

  4. The small GTPase ARF6 stimulates β-catenin transcriptional activity during WNT5A-mediated melanoma invasion and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossmann, Allie H; Yoo, Jae Hyuk; Clancy, James; Sorensen, Lise K; Sedgwick, Alanna; Tong, Zongzhong; Ostanin, Kirill; Rogers, Aaron; Grossmann, Kenneth F; Tripp, Sheryl R; Thomas, Kirk R; D'Souza-Schorey, Crislyn; Odelberg, Shannon J; Li, Dean Y

    2013-03-05

    β-Catenin has a dual function in cells: fortifying cadherin-based adhesion at the plasma membrane and activating transcription in the nucleus. We found that in melanoma cells, WNT5A stimulated the disruption of N-cadherin and β-catenin complexes by activating the guanosine triphosphatase adenosine diphosphate ribosylation factor 6 (ARF6). Binding of WNT5A to the Frizzled 4-LRP6 (low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 6) receptor complex activated ARF6, which liberated β-catenin from N-cadherin, thus increasing the pool of free β-catenin, enhancing β-catenin-mediated transcription, and stimulating invasion. In contrast to WNT5A, the guidance cue SLIT2 and its receptor ROBO1 inhibited ARF6 activation and, accordingly, stabilized the interaction of N-cadherin with β-catenin and reduced transcription and invasion. Thus, ARF6 integrated competing signals in melanoma cells, thereby enabling plasticity in the response to external cues. Moreover, small-molecule inhibition of ARF6 stabilized adherens junctions, blocked β-catenin signaling and invasiveness of melanoma cells in culture, and reduced spontaneous pulmonary metastasis in mice, suggesting that targeting ARF6 may provide a means of inhibiting WNT/β-catenin signaling in cancer.

  5. Enucleation of cultured mouse fetal erythroblasts requires Rac GTPases and mDia2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Peng; Jayapal, Senthil Raja; Lodish, Harvey F

    2008-03-01

    Mammalian erythroid cells undergo enucleation, an asymmetric cell division involving extrusion of a pycnotic nucleus enveloped by the plasma membrane. The mechanisms that power and regulate the enucleation process have remained obscure. Here, we show that deregulation of Rac GTPase during a late stage of erythropoiesis completely blocks enucleation of cultured mouse fetal erythroblasts without affecting their proliferation or differentiation. Formation of the contractile actin ring (CAR) on the plasma membrane of enucleating erythroblasts was disrupted by inhibition of Rac GTPases. Furthermore, we demonstrate that mDia2, a downstream effector of Rho GTPases and a formin protein required for nucleation of unbranched actin filaments, is also required for enucleation of mouse fetal erythroblasts. We show that Rac1 and Rac2 bind to mDia2 in a GTP-dependent manner and that downregulation of mDia2, but not mDia1, by small interfering RNA (siRNA) during the late stages of erythropoiesis blocked both CAR formation and erythroblast enucleation. Additionally, overexpression of a constitutively active mutant of mDia2 rescued the enucleation defects induced by the inhibition of Rac GTPases. These results reveal important roles for Rac GTPases and their effector mDia2 in enucleation of mammalian erythroblasts.

  6. Sequential regulation of the small GTPase Rap1 in human platelets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franke, B; van Triest, M; de Bruijn, KMT; van Willligen, G; Nieuwenhuis, HK; Negrier, C; Akkerman, JWN; Bos, JL

    Rap1, a small GTPase of the Ras family, is ubiquitously expressed and particularly abundant in platelets. Previously we have shown that Rap1 is rapidly activated after stimulation of human platelets with alpha-thrombin. For this activation, a phospholipase C-mediated increase in intracellular

  7. ROS-mediated enhanced transcription of CYP38 promotes the plant tolerance to high light stress by suppressing GTPase Activation of PsbO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongqiang eWang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available As a member of the Immunophilin family, cyclophilin38 (CYP38 is discovered to be localized in the thylakoid lumen, and is reported to be a participant in the function regulation of thylakoid membrane protein. However, the molecule mechanisms remain unclear. We found that, CYP38 plays an important role in the process of regulating and protecting the plant to resist high light (HL stress. Under HL condition, the gene expression of CYP38 is enhanced, and if CYP38 gene is deficient, photochemistry efficiency and chlorophyll content falls distinctly, and excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS synthesis occurs in the chloroplast. Western blot results showed that the D1 degradation rate of cyp38 mutant plants is faster than that of wide type (WT plants. Interestingly, both gene expression and activity of PsbO2 were drastically enhanced in cyp38 mutant plants and less changed when the deleted gene of CYP38 was restored under HL treatment. This indicates that CYP38 may impose a negative regulation effect on PsbO2, which exerts a positive regulation effect in facilitating the dephosphorylation and subsequent degradation of D1. It is also found that, under HL condition, the cytoplasmic calcium ([Ca2+]cyt concentration and the gene expression level of calmodulin 3 (CaM3 arose markedly, which occurs upstream of CYP38 gene expression. In conclusion, our results indicate that CYP38 plays an important role in plant strengthening HL resistibility, which provides a new insight in the research of mechanisms of CYP38 protein in plants.

  8. Rho GTPases in animal cell cytokinesis: an occupation by the one percent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Shawn N; Canman, Julie C

    2012-11-01

    Rho GTPases are molecular switches that elicit distinct effects on the actomyosin cytoskeleton to accurately promote cytokinesis. Although they represent less than 1% of the human genome, Rho GTPases exert disproportionate control over cell division. Crucial to this master regulatory role is their localized occupation of specific domains of the cell to ensure the assembly of a contractile ring at the proper time and place. RhoA occupies the division plane and is the central positive Rho family regulator of cytokinesis. Rac1 is a negative regulator of cytokinesis and is inactivated within the division plane while active Rac1 occupies the cell poles. Cdc42 regulation during cytokinesis is less studied, but thus far a clear role has only been shown during polar body emission. Here we review what is known about the function of Rho family GTPases during cell division, as well as their upstream regulators and known downstream cytokinetic effectors. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Two-Step Forward Genetic Screen in Mice Identifies Ral GTPase-Activating Proteins as Suppressors of Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, Takahiro; Bard-Chapeau, Emilie A; Newberg, Justin Y; Kodama, Michiko; Rangel, Roberto; Yoshihara, Kosuke; Ward, Jerrold M; Jenkins, Nancy A; Copeland, Neal G

    2016-08-01

    High-throughput sequencing technologies have identified thousands of infrequently mutated genes in hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs). However, high intratumor and intertumor heterogeneity, combined with large numbers of passenger mutations, have made it difficult to identify driver mutations that contribute to the development of HCC. We combined transposon mutagenesis with a high-throughput screen of a small-hairpin RNA (shRNA) library to identify genes and pathways that contribute to HCC development. Sleeping beauty transposons were mobilized in livers of transgenic mice predisposed to develop hepatocellular adenoma and HCC owing to expression of the hepatitis B virus surface antigen. This whole-genome mutagenesis technique was used to generate an unbiased catalogue of candidate cancer genes (CCGs). Pooled shRNA libraries targeting 250 selected CCGs then were introduced into immortalized mouse liver cells and the cells were monitored for their tumor-forming ability after injection into nude mice. Transposon-mediated mutagenesis identified 1917 high-confident CCGs and highlighted the importance of Ras signaling in the development of HCC. Subsequent pooled shRNA library screening of 250 selected CCGs validated 27 HCC tumor-suppressor genes. Individual shRNA knockdown of 4 of these genes (Acaa2, Hbs1l, Ralgapa2, and Ubr2) increased the proliferation of multiple human HCC cell lines in culture and accelerated the formation of xenograft tumors in nude mice. The ability of Ralgapa2 to promote HCC cell proliferation and tumor formation required its inhibition of Rala and Ralb. Dual inhibition of Ras signaling via Ral and Raf, using a combination of small-molecule inhibitor RBC8 and sorafenib, reduced the proliferation of HCC cells in culture and completely inhibited their growth as xenograft tumors in nude mice. In a 2-step forward genetic screen in mice, we identified members of the Ral guanosine triphosphatase-activating protein pathway and other proteins as suppressors

  10. Evaluation of energy and cost savings in mobile Cloud RAN

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Checko, Aleksandra; Christiansen, Henrik Lehrmann; Berger, Michael Stübert

    2013-01-01

    The load in mobile networks is subject to variations during the day, due to user mobility and varying network average usage. Therefore, the traditional or Distributed Radio Access Network (D-RAN) architecture, where the BaseBand processing Units (BBUs) are assigned statically to a number of cells...... using OPNET Modeler. A real case scenario is built upon the mobile traffic forecast for year 2017, a number of recommendations on traffic models and a proposed C-RAN implementation. The results achieved show that the maximum statistical multiplexing gain for user plane traffic in C-RAN architecture is 4......, is sub optimal, comparing to a novel, cloud based architecture called Cloud Radio Access Network (C-RAN). In C-RAN a group of cells shares processing resources, and hence benefit from statistical multiplexing gain is expected. In this paper, the energy and cost savings in C-RAN are evaluated numerically...

  11. Biophysical analysis of the interaction of Rab6a GTPase with its effector domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergbrede, Tim; Chuky, Nam; Schoebel, Stefan; Blankenfeldt, Wulf; Geyer, Matthias; Fuchs, Evelyn; Goody, Roger S; Barr, Francis; Alexandrov, Kirill

    2009-01-30

    Rab GTPases are key regulators of intracellular vesicular transport that control vesicle budding, cargo sorting, transport, tethering, and fusion. In the inactive (GDP-bound) conformation, Rab GTPases are targeted to intracellular compartments where they are converted into the active GTP-bound form and recruit effector domain containing proteins. Rab6a has been implicated in dynein-mediated vesicle movement at the Golgi apparatus and shown to interact with a plethora of effector proteins. In this study, we identify minimal Rab6a binding domains of three Rab6a effector proteins: PIST, BicaudalD2, and p150(glued). All three domains are >15-kDa fragments predicted to form coiled-coil structures that display no sequence homology to each other. Complex formation with BicaudalD2 and p150 has a moderate inhibitory effect on the intrinsic GTPase activity of Rab6a, while interaction with PIST has no influence on the hydrolysis rate. The effectors bind activated Rab6a with comparable affinities with K(d) values ranging from high nanomolar to low micromolar. Transient kinetic analysis revealed that effectors bind to Rab6a in an apparent single-step reaction characterized by relatively rapid on- and off-rates. We propose that the high off-rates of Rab6.effector complexes enable GTPase-activating protein-mediated net dissociation, which would not be possible if the off-rate were significantly slower.

  12. Role of Rho GTPase in astrocyte morphology and migratory response during in vitro wound healing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holtje, M.; Hoffmann, A.; Hofmann, F.; Mucke, C.; Grosse, G.; van Rooijen, N.; Kettenmann, H.; Just, I.; Ahnert-Hilger, G.

    2005-01-01

    Small Rho GTPases are key regulators of the cytoskeleton in a great variety of cells. Rho function mediates morphological changes as well as locomotor activity. Using astrocyte cultures established from neonatal mice we investigated the role of Rho in process formation during astrocyte stellation.

  13. The conserved GTPase HflX is a ribosome splitting factor that binds to the E-site of the bacterial ribosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coatham, Mackenzie L.; Brandon, Harland E.; Fischer, Jeffrey J.; Schümmer, Tobias; Wieden, Hans-Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Using a combination of biochemical, structural probing and rapid kinetics techniques we reveal for the first time that the universally conserved translational GTPase (trGTPase) HflX binds to the E-site of the 70S ribosome and that its GTPase activity is modulated by peptidyl transferase centre (PTC) and peptide exit tunnel (PET) binding antibiotics, suggesting a previously undescribed mode of action for these antibiotics. Our rapid kinetics studies reveal that HflX functions as a ribosome splitting factor that disassembles the 70S ribosomes into its subunits in a nucleotide dependent manner. Furthermore, our probing and hydrolysis studies show that the ribosome is able to activate trGTPases bound to its E-site. This is, to our knowledge, the first case in which the hydrolytic activity of a translational GTPase is not activated by the GTPase activating centre (GAC) in the ribosomal A-site. Furthermore, we provide evidence that the bound state of the PTC is able to regulate the GTPase activity of E-site bound HflX. PMID:26733579

  14. Loss of Dynamin 2 GTPase function results in microcytic anaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Fiona C; Collett, Michael; Tremblay, Cedric S; Rank, Gerhard; De Camilli, Pietro; Booth, Carmen J; Bitoun, Marc; Robinson, Phillip J; Kile, Benjamin T; Jane, Stephen M; Curtis, David J

    2017-08-01

    In a dominant mouse ethylnitrosurea mutagenesis screen for genes regulating erythropoiesis, we identified a pedigree with a novel microcytic hypochromia caused by a V235G missense mutation in Dynamin 2 (Dnm2). Mutations in Dnm2, a GTPase, are highly disease-specific and have been implicated in four forms of human diseases: centronuclear myopathy, Charcot-Marie Tooth neuropathy and, more recently, T-cell leukaemia and Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia, but red cell abnormalities have not been reported to date. The V235G mutation lies within a crucial GTP nucleotide-binding pocket of Dnm2, and resulted in defective GTPase activity and incompatibility with life in the homozygous state. Dnm2 is an essential mediator of clathrin-mediated endocytosis, which is required for the uptake of transferrin (Tf) into red cells for incorporation of haem. Accordingly, we observed significantly reduced Tf uptake by Dnm2(+/V235G) cells, which led to impaired endosome formation. Despite these deficiencies, surprisingly all iron studies were unchanged, suggesting an unexplained alternative mechanism underlies microcytic anaemia in Dnm2(+/V235G) mice. This study provides the first in vivo evidence for the requirements of Dnm2 in normal erythropoiesis. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. 18 wheeler regulates apical constriction of salivary gland cells via the Rho-GTPase-signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesnikov, Tereza; Beckendorf, Steven K

    2007-07-01

    Rho GTPase and its upstream activator, guanine nucleotide exchange factor 2 (RhoGEF2), have emerged as key regulators of actin rearrangements during epithelial folding and invagination (Nikolaidou, K.K., Barrett, K. (2004). A Rho-GTPase-signaling pathway is used reiteratively in epithelial folding and potentially selects the outcome of Rho activation. Curr. Biol. 14, 1822-1826). Here, we show that Drosophila 18 wheeler (18W), a Toll-like receptor protein, is a novel component of the Rho-signaling pathway involved in epithelial morphogenesis. 18w Mutant embryos have salivary gland invagination defects similar to embryos that lack components of the Rho pathway, and ubiquitous expression of 18W results in an upregulation of Rho signaling. Transheterozygous genetic interactions and double mutant analysis suggest that 18W affects the Rho-GTPase-signaling pathway not through Fog and RhoGEF2, but rather by inhibiting Rho GTPase activating proteins (RhoGAPs). We show that RhoGAP5A and RhoGAP88C/Crossveinless-c (CV-C) are required for proper salivary gland morphogenesis, implicating them as potential targets of 18W.

  16. Small GTPases and phosphoinositides in the regulatory mechanisms of macropinosome formation and maturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youhei eEgami

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Macropinosome formation requires the sequential activation of numerous signaling pathways that coordinate the actin-driven formation of plasma membrane protrusions (ruffles and circular ruffles (macropinocytic cups, followed by the closure of these macropinocytic cups into macropinosomes. In the process of macropinosome formation, localized productions of phosphoinositides such as PI(4,5P2 and PI(3,4,5P3 spatiotemporally orchestrate actin polymerization and rearrangement through recruiting and activating a variety of actin-associated proteins. In addition, the sequential activation of small GTPases, which are known to be master regulators of the actin cytoskeleton, plays a pivotal role in parallel with phosphoinositides. To complete macropinosome formation, phosphoinositide breakdown and Rho GTPase deactivation must occur in appropriate timings. After the nascent macropinosomes are formed, phosphoinositides and several Rab GTPases control macropinosome maturation by regulating vesicle trafficking and membrane fusion. In this review, we summarize recent advances in our understanding of the critical functions of phosphoinositide metabolism and small GTPases in association with their downstream effectors in macropinocytosis.

  17. Small GTPases and phosphoinositides in the regulatory mechanisms of macropinosome formation and maturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egami, Youhei; Taguchi, Tomohiko; Maekawa, Masashi; Arai, Hiroyuki; Araki, Nobukazu

    2014-01-01

    Macropinosome formation requires the sequential activation of numerous signaling pathways that coordinate the actin-driven formation of plasma membrane protrusions (ruffles) and circular ruffles (macropinocytic cups), followed by the closure of these macropinocytic cups into macropinosomes. In the process of macropinosome formation, localized productions of phosphoinositides such as PI(4,5)P2 and PI(3,4,5)P3 spatiotemporally orchestrate actin polymerization and rearrangement through recruiting and activating a variety of actin-associated proteins. In addition, the sequential activation of small GTPases, which are known to be master regulators of the actin cytoskeleton, plays a pivotal role in parallel with phosphoinositides. To complete macropinosome formation, phosphoinositide breakdown and Rho GTPase deactivation must occur in appropriate timings. After the nascent macropinosomes are formed, phosphoinositides and several Rab GTPases control macropinosome maturation by regulating vesicle trafficking and membrane fusion. In this review, we summarize recent advances in our understanding of the critical functions of phosphoinositide metabolism and small GTPases in association with their downstream effectors in macropinocytosis. PMID:25324782

  18. The Anatomy of the RAN-Reading Relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiou, George K.; Parrila, Rauno; Papadopoulos, Timothy C.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to contrast three models of the RAN-reading relationship derived from the most prominent theoretical accounts of how RAN is related to reading: the phonological processing, the orthographic processing and the speed of processing accounts. Grade 4 Greek-speaking children (n = 208; 114 girls, 94 boys; mean…

  19. The immunity-related GTPase Irga6 dimerizes in a parallel head-to-head fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Kathrin; Pawlowski, Nikolaus; Faelber, Katja; Fröhlich, Chris; Howard, Jonathan; Daumke, Oliver

    2016-03-02

    The immunity-related GTPases (IRGs) constitute a powerful cell-autonomous resistance system against several intracellular pathogens. Irga6 is a dynamin-like protein that oligomerizes at the parasitophorous vacuolar membrane (PVM) of Toxoplasma gondii leading to its vesiculation. Based on a previous biochemical analysis, it has been proposed that the GTPase domains of Irga6 dimerize in an antiparallel fashion during oligomerization. We determined the crystal structure of an oligomerization-impaired Irga6 mutant bound to a non-hydrolyzable GTP analog. Contrary to the previous model, the structure shows that the GTPase domains dimerize in a parallel fashion. The nucleotides in the center of the interface participate in dimerization by forming symmetric contacts with each other and with the switch I region of the opposing Irga6 molecule. The latter contact appears to activate GTP hydrolysis by stabilizing the position of the catalytic glutamate 106 in switch I close to the active site. Further dimerization contacts involve switch II, the G4 helix and the trans stabilizing loop. The Irga6 structure features a parallel GTPase domain dimer, which appears to be a unifying feature of all dynamin and septin superfamily members. This study contributes important insights into the assembly and catalytic mechanisms of IRG proteins as prerequisite to understand their anti-microbial action.

  20. A GTPase controls cell-substrate adhesion in Xenopus XTC fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symons, M H; Mitchison, T J

    1992-09-01

    Cell-substrate adhesion is crucial at various stages of development and for the maintenance of normal tissues. Little is known about the regulation of these adhesive interactions. To investigate the role of GTPases in the control of cell morphology and cell-substrate adhesion we have injected guanine nucleotide analogs into Xenopus XTC fibroblasts. Injection of GTP gamma S inhibited ruffling and increased spreading, suggesting an increase in adhesion. To further investigate this, we made use of GRGDSP, a peptide which inhibits binding of integrins to vitronectin and fibronectin. XTC fibroblasts injected with non-hydrolyzable analogs of GTP took much more time to round up than mock-injected cells in response to treatment with GRGDSP, while GDP beta S-injected cells rounded up in less time than controls. Injection with GTP gamma S did not inhibit cell rounding induced by trypsin however, showing that cell contractility is not significantly affected by the activation of GTPases. These data provide evidence for the existence of a GTPase which can control cell-substrate adhesion from the cytoplasm. Treatment of XTC fibroblasts with the phorbol ester 12-o-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate reduced cell spreading and accelerated cell rounding in response to GRGDSP, which is essentially opposite to the effect exerted by non-hydrolyzable GTP analogs. These results suggest the existence of at least two distinct pathways controlling cell-substrate adhesion in XTC fibroblasts, one depending on a GTPase and another one involving protein kinase C.

  1. The tRNA-modifying function of MnmE is controlled by post-hydrolysis steps of its GTPase cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, Silvia; Villarroya, Magda; Medina, Milagros; Armengod, M.-Eugenia

    2013-01-01

    MnmE is a homodimeric multi-domain GTPase involved in tRNA modification. This protein differs from Ras-like GTPases in its low affinity for guanine nucleotides and mechanism of activation, which occurs by a cis, nucleotide- and potassium-dependent dimerization of its G-domains. Moreover, MnmE requires GTP hydrolysis to be functionally active. However, how GTP hydrolysis drives tRNA modification and how the MnmE GTPase cycle is regulated remains unresolved. Here, the kinetics of the MnmE GTPase cycle was studied under single-turnover conditions using stopped- and quench-flow techniques. We found that the G-domain dissociation is the rate-limiting step of the overall reaction. Mutational analysis and fast kinetics assays revealed that GTP hydrolysis, G-domain dissociation and Pi release can be uncoupled and that G-domain dissociation is directly responsible for the ‘ON’ state of MnmE. Thus, MnmE provides a new paradigm of how the ON/OFF cycling of GTPases may regulate a cellular process. We also demonstrate that the MnmE GTPase cycle is negatively controlled by the reaction products GDP and Pi. This feedback mechanism may prevent inefficacious GTP hydrolysis in vivo. We propose a biological model whereby a conformational change triggered by tRNA binding is required to remove product inhibition and initiate a new GTPase/tRNA-modification cycle. PMID:23630314

  2. The contribution of lexical access speed to RAN and reading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Mads

    Purpose: The study investigated why and when rapid automatised naming is a predictor of reading. Specifically, we tested the hypotheses that (1) RAN-objects predicts reading because it is a measure of lexical (e.g. phonological) access speed, but (2) that RAN only becomes a predictor of reading...... development once a certain level of phonological recoding proficiency has been reached. Method: Forty Danish students without reading difficulties were administered tests of reading speed and accuracy, phoneme awareness, RAN-objects, timed confrontation picture naming, and visio-motor reaction time....... The students were sampled from two age groups representing two levels of recoding proficiency: Beginning readers in Grade 2-3 and proficient decoders in grade 5-6. We conducted hierarchical regression analyses on reading speed and accuracy to determine whether the relationship between RAN and reading...

  3. 5th Symposium on Hybrid RANS-LES Methods

    CERN Document Server

    Haase, Werner; Peng, Shia-Hui; Schwamborn, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    This book gathers the proceedings of the Fifth Symposium on Hybrid RANS-LES Methods, which was held on March 19-21 in College Station, Texas, USA. The different chapters, written by leading experts, reports on the most recent developments in flow physics modelling, and gives a special emphasis to industrially relevant applications of hybrid RANS-LES methods and other turbulence-resolving modelling approaches. The book addresses academic researchers, graduate students, industrial engineers, as well as industrial R&D managers and consultants dealing with turbulence modelling, simulation and measurement, and with multidisciplinary applications of computational fluid dynamics (CFD), such as flow control, aero-acoustics, aero-elasticity and CFD-based multidisciplinary optimization. It discusses in particular advanced hybrid RANS-LES methods. Further topics include wall-modelled Large Eddy Simulation (WMLES) methods, embedded LES, and a comparison of the LES methods with both hybrid RANS-LES and URANS methods. ...

  4. Miro's N-Terminal GTPase Domain Is Required for Transport of Mitochondria into Axons and Dendrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babic, Milos; Russo, Gary J.; Wellington, Andrea J.; Sangston, Ryan M.; Gonzalez, Migdalia

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are dynamically transported in and out of neuronal processes to maintain neuronal excitability and synaptic function. In higher eukaryotes, the mitochondrial GTPase Miro binds Milton/TRAK adaptor proteins linking microtubule motors to mitochondria. Here we show that Drosophila Miro (dMiro), which has previously been shown to be required for kinesin-driven axonal transport, is also critically required for the dynein-driven distribution of mitochondria into dendrites. In addition, we used the loss-of-function mutations dMiroT25N and dMiroT460N to determine the significance of dMiro's N-terminal and C-terminal GTPase domains, respectively. Expression of dMiroT25N in the absence of endogenous dMiro caused premature lethality and arrested development at a pupal stage. dMiroT25N accumulated mitochondria in the soma of larval motor and sensory neurons, and prevented their kinesin-dependent and dynein-dependent distribution into axons and dendrites, respectively. dMiroT25N mutant mitochondria also were severely fragmented and exhibited reduced kinesin and dynein motility in axons. In contrast, dMiroT460N did not impair viability, mitochondrial size, or the distribution of mitochondria. However, dMiroT460N reduced dynein motility during retrograde mitochondrial transport in axons. Finally, we show that substitutions analogous to the constitutively active Ras-G12V mutation in dMiro's N-terminal and C-terminal GTPase domains cause neomorphic phenotypic effects that are likely unrelated to the normal function of each GTPase domain. Overall, our analysis indicates that dMiro's N-terminal GTPase domain is critically required for viability, mitochondrial size, and the distribution of mitochondria out of the neuronal soma regardless of the employed motor, likely by promoting the transition from a stationary to a motile state. PMID:25855186

  5. RanBPM, a scaffolding protein for gametogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puverel, Sandrine; Tessarollo, Lino

    2013-01-01

    RanBPM is a multimodular scaffold protein that interacts with a great variety of molecules including nuclear, cytoplasmic, and membrane proteins. By building multiprotein complexes, RanBPM is thought to regulate various signaling pathways, especially in the immune and nervous system. However, the diversity of these interactions does not facilitate the identification of its precise mechanism of action, and therefore the physiological role of RanBPM still remains unclear. Recently, RanBPM has been shown to be critical for the fertility of both genders in mouse. Although mechanistically it is still unclear how RanBPM affects gametogenesis, the data collected so far suggest that it is a key player in this process. Here, we examine the RanBPM sterility phenotype in the context of other genetic mutations affecting mouse gametogenesis to investigate whether this scaffold protein affects the function of other known proteins whose deficiency results in similar sterility phenotypes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The proliferation marker pKi-67 organizes the nucleolus during the cell cycle depending on Ran and cyclin B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Mirko H H; Broll, Rainer; Bruch, Hans-Peter; Bögler, Oliver; Duchrow, Michael

    2003-01-01

    The proliferation marker pKi-67 ('Ki-67 antigen') is commonly used in clinical and research pathology to detect proliferating cells, as it is only expressed during cell-cycle progression. Despite the fact that this antigen has been known for nearly two decades, there is still no adequate understanding of its function. This study has therefore identified proteins that interact with pKi-67, using a yeast two-hybrid system. A mammalian two-hybrid system and immunoprecipitation studies were used to verify these interactions. Among other cell-cycle regulatory proteins, two binding partners associated with the small GTPase Ran were identified. In addition, DNA-structural and nucleolus-associated proteins binding to pKi-67 were found. Moreover, it was demonstrated that the N-terminal domain of pKi-67 is capable of self-binding to its own repeat region encoded by exon 13. Since RanBP, a protein involved in the transport of macromolecules over the nuclear lamina, was found to be a binding partner, a possible effect of pKi-67 on the localization of cell-cycle regulatory proteins was proposed. To test this hypothesis, a tetracycline-responsive gene expression system was used to induce the pKi-67 fragments previously used for the two-hybrid screens in HeLa cells. Subsequent immunostaining revealed the translocation of cyclin B1 from cytoplasm to nucleoli in response to this expression. It is suggested that pKi-67 is a Ran-associated protein with a role in the disintegration and reformation of the nucleolus and thereby in entry into and exit from the M-phase. Copyright 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. The small GTPase RhoH is an atypical regulator of haematopoietic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kubatzky Katharina F

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Rho GTPases are a distinct subfamily of the superfamily of Ras GTPases. The best-characterised members are RhoA, Rac and Cdc42 that regulate many diverse actions such as actin cytoskeleton reorganisation, adhesion, motility as well as cell proliferation, differentiation and gene transcription. Among the 20 members of that family, only Rac2 and RhoH show an expression restricted to the haematopoietic lineage. RhoH was first discovered in 1995 as a fusion transcript with the transcriptional repressor LAZ3/BCL6. It was therefore initially named translation three four (TTF but later on renamed RhoH due to its close relationship to the Ras/Rho family of GTPases. Since then, RhoH has been implicated in human cancer as the gene is subject to somatic hypermutation and by the detection of RHOH as a translocation partner for LAZ3/BCL6 or other genes in human lymphomas. Underexpression of RhoH is found in hairy cell leukaemia and acute myeloid leukaemia. Some of the amino acids that are crucial for GTPase activity are mutated in RhoH so that the protein is a GTPase-deficient, so-called atypical Rho GTPase. Therefore other mechanisms of regulating RhoH activity have been described. These include regulation at the mRNA level and tyrosine phosphorylation of the protein's unique ITAM-like motif. The C-terminal CaaX box of RhoH is mainly a target for farnesyl-transferase but can also be modified by geranylgeranyl-transferase. Isoprenylation of RhoH and changes in subcellular localisation may be an additional factor to fine-tune signalling. Little is currently known about its signalling, regulation or interaction partners. Recent studies have shown that RhoH negatively influences the proliferation and homing of murine haematopoietic progenitor cells, presumably by acting as an antagonist for Rac1. In leukocytes, RhoH is needed to keep the cells in a resting, non-adhesive state, but the exact mechanism has yet to be elucidated. RhoH has also been

  8. Are Discrepancies in RANS Modeled Reynolds Stresses Random?

    CERN Document Server

    Xiao, Heng; Wang, Jian-xun; Paterson, Eric G

    2016-01-01

    In the turbulence modeling community, significant efforts have been made to quantify the uncertainties in the Reynolds-Averaged Navier--Stokes (RANS) models and to improve their predictive capabilities. Of crucial importance in these efforts is the understanding of the discrepancies in the RANS modeled Reynolds stresses. However, to what extent these discrepancies can be predicted or whether they are completely random remains a fundamental open question. In this work we used a machine learning algorithm based on random forest regression to predict the discrepancies. The success of the regression--prediction procedure indicates that, to a large extent, the discrepancies in the modeled Reynolds stresses can be explained by the mean flow feature, and thus they are universal quantities that can be extrapolated from one flow to another, at least among different flows sharing the same characteristics such as separation. This finding has profound implications to the future development of RANS models, opening up new ...

  9. Roles of Aspergillus nidulans Cdc42/Rho GTPase regulators in hyphal morphogenesis and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Haoyu; Rittenour, William R; Harris, Steven D

    2016-01-01

    The Rho-related family of GTPases are pivotal regulators of morphogenetic processes in diverse eukaryotic organisms. In the filamentous fungi two related members of this family, Cdc42 and Rac1, perform particularly important roles in the establishment and maintenance of hyphal polarity. The activity of these GTPases is tightly controlled by two sets of regulators: guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) and GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs). Despite the importance of Cdc42 and Rac1 in polarized hyphal growth, the morphogenetic functions of their cognate GEFs and GAPs have not been widely characterized in filamentous fungi outside the Saccharomycotina. Here we present a functional analysis of the Aspergillus nidulans homologs of the yeast GEF Cdc24 and the yeast GAP Rga1. We show that Cdc24 is required for the establishment of hyphal polarity and localizes to hyphal tips. We also show that Rga1 is necessary for the suppression of branching in developing conidiophores. During asexual development Rga1 appears to act primarily via Cdc42 and in doing so serves as a critical determinant of conidiophore architecture. Our results provide new insight into the roles of Cdc42 during development in A nidulans. © 2016 by The Mycological Society of America.

  10. 18 wheeler Regulates Apical Constriction of Salivary Gland Cells via the Rho-GTPase Signaling Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesnikov, Tereza; Beckendorf, Steven K.

    2007-01-01

    Rho GTPase and its upstream activator, guanine nucleotide exchange factor 2 (RhoGEF2), have emerged as key regulators of actin rearrangements during epithelial folding and invagination (Nikolaidou and Barrett, 2004). Here, we show that Drosophila 18 wheeler (18W), a Toll-like receptor protein, is a novel component of the Rho-signaling pathway involved in epithelial morphogenesis. 18w mutant embryos have salivary gland invagination defects similar to embryos that lack components of the Rho pathway, and ubiquitous expression of 18W results in an upregulation of Rho signaling. Transheterozygous genetic interactions and double mutant analysis suggest that 18W affects the Rho GTPase signaling pathway not through Fog and RhoGEF2, but rather by inhibiting Rho GTPase activating proteins (RhoGAPs). We show that RhoGAP5A and RhoGAP88C/Crossveinless-c (CV-C) are required for proper salivary gland morphogenesis, implicating them as potential targets of 18W. PMID:17512518

  11. Interaction of LRRK2 with kinase and GTPase signaling cascades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joon Y Boon

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available LRRK2 is a protein that interacts with a plethora of signaling molecules, but the complexity of LRRK2 function presents a challenge for understanding the role of LRRK2 in the pathophysiology of Parkinson’s disease. Studies of LRRK2 using over-expression in transgenic mice have been disappointing, however studies using invertebrate systems have yielded a much clearer picture, with clear effects of LRRK2 expression, knockdown or deletion in C. elegans and Drosophila on modulation of survival of dopaminergic neurons. Recent studies have begun to focus attention on particular signaling cascades that are a target of LRRK2 function. LRRK2 interacts with members of the MAPK pathway and might regulate the pathway action by acting as a scaffold that directs the location of MAPK pathway activity, without strongly affecting the amount of MAPK pathway activity. Binding to GTPases, GAPs and GEFs are another strong theme in LRRK2 biology, with LRRK2 binding to Rac1, cdc42, rab5, rab7L1, endoA, RGS2, ArfGAP1 and ArhGEF7. All of these molecules appear to feed into a function output for LRRK2 that modulates cytoskeletal outgrowth and vesicular dynamics, including autophagy. These functions likely impact modulation of α-synuclein aggregation and associated toxicity eliciting the disease processes that we term Parkinson’s disease.

  12. Structure of the ribosomal interacting GTPase YjeQ from the enterobacterial species Salmonella typhimurium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, C. E. [Division of Structural Biology, The Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, University of Oxford, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Johnson, C.; Lamb, H. K. [Institute of Cell and Molecular Biosciences, Catherine Cookson Building, Medical School, Framlington Place, Newcastle University, Newcastle-upon-Tyne NE2 4HH (United Kingdom); Lockyer, M. [Arrow Therapeutics Ltd, Britannia House, Trinity Street, Borough, London SE1 1DA (United Kingdom); Charles, I. G. [The Wolfson Institute for Biomedical Research, The Cruciform Building, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Hawkins, A. R. [Institute of Cell and Molecular Biosciences, Catherine Cookson Building, Medical School, Framlington Place, Newcastle University, Newcastle-upon-Tyne NE2 4HH (United Kingdom); Stammers, D. K., E-mail: daves@strubi.ox.ac.uk [Division of Structural Biology, The Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, University of Oxford, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom)

    2007-11-01

    The X-ray crystal structure of the GTPase YjeQ from S. typhimurium is presented and compared with those of orthologues from T. maritima and B. subtilis. The YjeQ class of P-loop GTPases assist in ribosome biogenesis and also bind to the 30S subunit of mature ribosomes. YjeQ ribosomal binding is GTP-dependent and thought to specifically direct protein synthesis, although the nature of the upstream signal causing this event in vivo is as yet unknown. The attenuating effect of YjeQ mutants on bacterial growth in Escherichia coli makes it a potential target for novel antimicrobial agents. In order to further explore the structure and function of YjeQ, the isolation, crystallization and structure determination of YjeQ from the enterobacterial species Salmonella typhimurium (StYjeQ) is reported. Whilst the overall StYjeQ fold is similar to those of the previously reported Thematoga maritima and Bacillus subtilis orthologues, particularly the GTPase domain, there are larger differences in the three OB folds. Although the zinc-finger secondary structure is conserved, significant sequence differences alter the nature of the external surface in each case and may reflect varying signalling pathways. Therefore, it may be easier to develop YjeQ-specific inhibitors that target the N- and C-terminal regions, disrupting the metabolic connectivity rather than the GTPase activity. The availability of coordinates for StYjeQ will provide a significantly improved basis for threading Gram-negative orthologue sequences and in silico compound-screening studies, with the potential for the development of species-selective drugs.

  13. Cloud RAN for Mobile Networks - a Technology Overview

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Checko, Aleksandra; Christiansen, Henrik Lehrmann; Yan, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Pool for statistical multiplexing gain, while shifting the burden to the high-speed wireline transmission of In-phase and Quadrature (IQ) data. C-RAN enables energy efficient network operation and possible cost savings on base- band resources. Furthermore, it improves network capacity by performing...

  14. Envisioning Spectrum Management in Virtualised C-RAN

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Samman, Imad; Artuso, Matteo; Christiansen, Henrik Lehrmann

    2017-01-01

    Cloud Radio Access Network (C-RAN) has attracted a worldwide attention in both academia and industry. This network architecture re-forming has been considered as a potential solution to meet the increasing capacity demands for future mobile data traffic. In addition, Network Virtualisation is a p...

  15. Hybrid RANS-LES using high order numerical methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry de Frahan, Marc; Yellapantula, Shashank; Vijayakumar, Ganesh; Knaus, Robert; Sprague, Michael

    2017-11-01

    Understanding the impact of wind turbine wake dynamics on downstream turbines is particularly important for the design of efficient wind farms. Due to their tractable computational cost, hybrid RANS/LES models are an attractive framework for simulating separation flows such as the wake dynamics behind a wind turbine. High-order numerical methods can be computationally efficient and provide increased accuracy in simulating complex flows. In the context of LES, high-order numerical methods have shown some success in predictions of turbulent flows. However, the specifics of hybrid RANS-LES models, including the transition region between both modeling frameworks, pose unique challenges for high-order numerical methods. In this work, we study the effect of increasing the order of accuracy of the numerical scheme in simulations of canonical turbulent flows using RANS, LES, and hybrid RANS-LES models. We describe the interactions between filtering, model transition, and order of accuracy and their effect on turbulence quantities such as kinetic energy spectra, boundary layer evolution, and dissipation rate. This work was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Exascale Computing Project, under Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

  16. Eye-Movement Control in RAN and Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuperman, Victor; Van Dyke, Julie A.; Henry, Regina

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined the "visual scanning hypothesis", which suggests that fluent oculomotor control is an important component underlying the predictive relationship between Rapid Automatized Naming (RAN) tasks and reading ability. Our approach was to isolate components of saccadic planning, articulation, and lexical retrieval in 3…

  17. Characterization of RanBPM Molecular Determinants that Control Its Subcellular Localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salemi, Louisa M.; Loureiro, Sandra O.; Schild-Poulter, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    RanBPM/RanBP9 is a ubiquitous, nucleocytoplasmic protein that is part of an evolutionary conserved E3 ubiquitin ligase complex whose function and targets in mammals are still unknown. RanBPM itself has been implicated in various cellular processes that involve both nuclear and cytoplasmic functions. However, to date, little is known about how RanBPM subcellular localization is regulated. We have conducted a systematic analysis of RanBPM regions that control its subcellular localization using RanBPM shRNA cells to examine ectopic RanBPM mutant subcellular localization without interference from the endogenously expressed protein. We show that several domains and motifs regulate RanBPM nuclear and cytoplasmic localization. In particular, RanBPM comprises two motifs that can confer nuclear localization, one proline/glutamine-rich motif in the extreme N-terminus which has a dominant effect on RanBPM localization, and a second motif in the C-terminus which minimally contributes to RanBPM nuclear targeting. We also identified a nuclear export signal (NES) which mutation prevented RanBPM accumulation in the cytoplasm. Likewise, deletion of the central RanBPM conserved domains (SPRY and LisH/CTLH) resulted in the relocalization of RanBPM to the nucleus, suggesting that RanBPM cytoplasmic localization is also conferred by protein-protein interactions that promote its cytoplasmic retention. Indeed we found that in the cytoplasm, RanBPM partially colocalizes with microtubules and associates with α-tubulin. Finally, in the nucleus, a significant fraction of RanBPM is associated with chromatin. Altogether, these analyses reveal that RanBPM subcellular localization results from the combined effects of several elements that either confer direct transport through the nucleocytoplasmic transport machinery or regulate it indirectly, likely through interactions with other proteins and by intramolecular folding. PMID:25659156

  18. Rac and Rho GTPases in cancer cell motility control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parri Matteo

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Rho GTPases represent a family of small GTP-binding proteins involved in cell cytoskeleton organization, migration, transcription, and proliferation. A common theme of these processes is a dynamic reorganization of actin cytoskeleton which has now emerged as a major switch control mainly carried out by Rho and Rac GTPase subfamilies, playing an acknowledged role in adaptation of cell motility to the microenvironment. Cells exhibit three distinct modes of migration when invading the 3 D environment. Collective motility leads to movement of cohorts of cells which maintain the adherens junctions and move by photolytic degradation of matrix barriers. Single cell mesenchymal-type movement is characterized by an elongated cellular shape and again requires extracellular proteolysis and integrin engagement. In addition it depends on Rac1-mediated cell polarization and lamellipodia formation. Conversely, in amoeboid movement cells have a rounded morphology, the movement is independent from proteases but requires high Rho GTPase to drive elevated levels of actomyosin contractility. These two modes of cell movement are interconvertible and several moving cells, including tumor cells, show an high degree of plasticity in motility styles shifting ad hoc between mesenchymal or amoeboid movements. This review will focus on the role of Rac and Rho small GTPases in cell motility and in the complex relationship driving the reciprocal control between Rac and Rho granting for the opportunistic motile behaviour of aggressive cancer cells. In addition we analyse the role of these GTPases in cancer progression and metastatic dissemination.

  19. Mechanisms and functions of guanylate-binding proteins and related interferon-inducible GTPases: Roles in intracellular lysis of pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Chinh C; Man, Si Ming

    2017-10-03

    Guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs) are a group interferon-inducible GTPases within the constellation of the dynamin GTPase superfamily. These proteins restrict the replication of intracellular pathogens in both immune and non-immune cells. GBPs and their related family members immunity-related GTPases target and lyse the membrane of the pathogen-containing vacuole, destroying the residential niche of vacuolar protozoal and bacterial pathogens. They also prevent virion infectivity and target replication complexes of ribonucleic acid viruses. The exciting concept that GBPs and immunity-related GTPases can directly target the membrane of bacteria and protozoa has emerged. Rupture and lysis of the pathogen membrane mediates liberation of concealed microbial ligands for activation of innate immune sensing pathways and the inflammasome. Further studies have demonstrated a capacity of GBPs to recruit additional antimicrobial factors, highlighting the complexity of the molecular mechanisms involved in pathogen killing. In this mini-review, we discuss recent advances describing the localisation and functions of GBPs on the host and pathogen membrane. We also highlight unresolved questions related to the regulation of GBPs in cell-autonomous immunity to intracellular pathogens. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Tuisland. Karin Brynard. Kaapstad: Penguin Ran- dom House Suid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Karin Brynard. Kaapstad: Penguin Ran- dom House Suid-Afrika, 2016. 576 pp. ISBN 978-1-4152-0693-5,. ISBN 978-1-4152-0668-3,. ISBN 978-1-4125-0669-0. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.17159/tvl.v.54i1.29. Tuisland (2016) is oud-joernalis Karin. Brynard se derde spanningsroman. Haar debuut, Plaasmoord (2009), is met die.

  1. Applicability of RANS, DES and LES in propeller flow noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LU Li

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available [Objectives] In order to study the applicability of different turbulence models in propeller flow noise prediction, taking the DTMB 4119 propeller as the research object, the numerical simulation method is used to calculate the frequency domain noise under the non-uniform flow field.[Methods] First, the hydrodynamic coefficient and surface pressure distribution coefficient are obtained via the RANS method and the accuracy of the flow field simulation is verified by comparing it with the experimental data. Next,the pulsating pressures obtained by RANS, DES and LES are considered as the sound source respectively, and combined with the acoustic boundary element method to predict the radiation noise.[Results] The results show that spectral noise is the main contributor to total noise; when noise on 1 BPF is predicted, the results obtained by the three methods are very similar, so we can use RANS to predict noise quickly; when noise on the high order of BPF needs to be predicted, the calculation results of LES are better.[Conclusions] In noise prediction, the appropriate turbulence simulation method can be selected according to the demand.

  2. Targeting the Dbl and dock-family RhoGEFs: a yeast-based assay to identify cell-active inhibitors of Rho-controlled pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blangy, Anne; Fort, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    The Ras-like superfamily of low molecular weight GTPases is made of five major families (Arf/Sar, Rab, Ran, Ras, and Rho), highly conserved across evolution. This is in keeping with their roles in basic cellular functions (endo/exocytosis, vesicular trafficking, nucleocytoplasmic trafficking, cell signaling, proliferation and apoptosis, gene regulation, F-actin dynamics), whose alterations are associated with various types of diseases, in particular cancer, neurodegenerative, cardiovascular, and infectious diseases. For these reasons, Ras-like pathways are of great potential in therapeutics and identifying inhibitors that decrease signaling activity is under intense research. Along this line, guanine exchange factors (GEFs) represent attractive targets. GEFs are proteins that promote the active GTP-bound state of GTPases and represent the major entry points whereby extracellular cues are converted into Ras-like signaling. We previously developed the yeast exchange assay (YEA), an experimental setup in the yeast in which activity of a mammalian GEF can be monitored by auxotrophy and color reporter genes. This assay was further engineered for medium-throughput screening of GEF inhibitors, which can readily select for cell-active and specific compounds. We report here on the successful identification of inhibitors against Dbl and CZH/DOCK-family members, GEFs for Rho GTPases, and on the experimental setup to screen for inhibitors of GEFs of the Arf family. We also discuss on inhibitors developed using virtual screening (VS), which target the GEF/GTPase interface with high efficacy and specificity. We propose that using VS and YEA in combination may represent a method of choice for identifying specific and cell-active GEF inhibitors. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. AVHRR GAC SST Reanalysis Version 1 (RAN1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Ignatov

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In response to its users’ needs, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA initiated reanalysis (RAN of the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR Global Area Coverage (GAC; 4 km sea surface temperature (SST data employing its Advanced Clear Sky Processor for Oceans (ACSPO retrieval system. Initially, AVHRR/3 data from five NOAA and two Metop satellites from 2002 to 2015 have been reprocessed. The derived SSTs have been matched up with two reference SSTs—the quality controlled in situ SSTs from the NOAA in situ Quality Monitor (iQuam and the Canadian Meteorological Centre (CMC L4 SST analysis—and analyzed in the NOAA SST Quality Monitor (SQUAM online system. The corresponding clear-sky ocean brightness temperatures (BT in AVHRR bands 3b, 4 and 5 (centered at 3.7, 11, and 12 µm, respectively have been compared with the Community Radiative Transfer Model simulations in another NOAA online system, Monitoring of Infrared Clear-sky Radiances over Ocean for SST (MICROS. For some AVHRRs, the time series of “AVHRR minus reference” SSTs and “observed minus model” BTs are unstable and inconsistent, with artifacts in the SSTs and BTs strongly correlated. In the official “Reanalysis version 1” (RAN1, data from only five platforms—two midmorning (NOAA-17 and Metop-A and three afternoon (NOAA-16, -18 and -19—were included during the most stable periods of their operations. The stability of the SST time series was further improved using variable regression SST coefficients, similarly to how it was done in the NOAA/NASA Pathfinder version 5.2 (PFV5.2 dataset. For data assimilation applications, especially those blending satellite and in situ SSTs, we recommend bias-correcting the RAN1 SSTs using the newly developed sensor-specific error statistics (SSES, which are reported in the product files. Relative performance of RAN1 and PFV5.2 SSTs is discussed. Work is underway to improve the calibration of AVHRR/3s and

  4. Use of the Ras binding domain of c-Raf for biochemical and live-cell analysis of Ras activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio, I

    2005-08-01

    Small modular GBDs (GTPase-binding domains) derived from GTPase-effector proteins are useful tools for the selective detection of the active GTP-loaded GTPase conformation, be it in biochemical assays or for imaging purposes. Use of GBD probes requires careful consideration of all features of the GDB-GTPase interaction. It is innate to the strong and specific interaction with the GTP-loaded GTPase, that GBDs will protect their partner GTPases from GAP (GTPase-activating protein) action. This feature is likely to cause an increase in cellular Ras-GTP levels, in particular in leucocytes and other cells with high steady-state Ras-GDP/GTP cycling rates. By the same token, high levels of GBD expression will interrupt GTPase-initiated signalling, with implications for the activation of the very same GTPase since feedback regulatory mechanisms can impinge on this process.

  5. Hybrid RANS/LES applied to complex terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bechmann, Andreas; Sørensen, Niels N.

    2011-01-01

    Large Eddy Simulation (LES) of the wind in complex terrain is limited by computational cost. The number of computational grid points required to resolve the near-ground turbulent structures (eddies) are very high. The traditional solution to the problem has been to apply a wall function...... aspect ratio in the RANS layer and thereby resolve the mean near-wall velocity profile. The method is applicable to complex terrain and the benefits of traditional LES are kept intact. Using the hybrid method, simulations of the wind over a natural complex terrain near Wellington in New Zealand...

  6. Inhibition of the GTPase Rac1 mediates the antimigratory effects of metformin in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirat, Béatrice; Ader, Isabelle; Golzio, Muriel; Massa, Fabienne; Mettouchi, Amel; Laurent, Kathiane; Larbret, Frédéric; Malavaud, Bernard; Cormont, Mireille; Lemichez, Emmanuel; Cuvillier, Olivier; Tanti, Jean François; Bost, Frédéric

    2015-02-01

    Cell migration is a critical step in the progression of prostate cancer to the metastatic state, the lethal form of the disease. The antidiabetic drug metformin has been shown to display antitumoral properties in prostate cancer cell and animal models; however, its role in the formation of metastases remains poorly documented. Here, we show that metformin reduces the formation of metastases to fewer solid organs in an orthotopic metastatic prostate cancer cell model established in nude mice. As predicted, metformin hampers cell motility in PC3 and DU145 prostate cancer cells and triggers a radical reorganization of the cell cytoskeleton. The small GTPase Rac1 is a master regulator of cytoskeleton organization and cell migration. We report that metformin leads to a major inhibition of Rac1 GTPase activity by interfering with some of its multiple upstream signaling pathways, namely P-Rex1 (a Guanine nucleotide exchange factor and activator of Rac1), cAMP, and CXCL12/CXCR4, resulting in decreased migration of prostate cancer cells. Importantly, overexpression of a constitutively active form of Rac1, or P-Rex, as well as the inhibition of the adenylate cyclase, was able to reverse the antimigratory effects of metformin. These results establish a novel mechanism of action for metformin and highlight its potential antimetastatic properties in prostate cancer. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  7. Mutant K-RAS Promotes Invasion and Metastasis in Pancreatic Cancer Through GTPase Signaling Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padavano, Julianna; Henkhaus, Rebecca S; Chen, Hwudaurw; Skovan, Bethany A; Cui, Haiyan; Ignatenko, Natalia A

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is one of the most aggressive malignancies, characterized by the local invasion into surrounding tissues and early metastasis to distant organs. Oncogenic mutations of the K-RAS gene occur in more than 90% of human pancreatic cancers. The goal of this study was to investigate the functional significance and downstream effectors of mutant K-RAS oncogene in the pancreatic cancer invasion and metastasis. We applied the homologous recombination technique to stably disrupt K-RAS oncogene in the human pancreatic cell line MiaPaCa-2, which carries the mutant K-RASG12C oncogene in both alleles. Using in vitro assays, we found that clones with disrupted mutant K-RAS gene exhibited low RAS activity, reduced growth rates, increased sensitivity to the apoptosis inducing agents, and suppressed motility and invasiveness. In vivo assays showed that clones with decreased RAS activity had reduced tumor formation ability in mouse xenograft model and increased survival rates in the mouse orthotopic pancreatic cancer model. We further examined molecular pathways downstream of mutant K-RAS and identified RhoA GTP activating protein 5, caveolin-1, and RAS-like small GTPase A (RalA) as key effector molecules, which control mutant K-RAS-dependent migration and invasion in MiaPaCa-2 cells. Our study provides rational for targeting RhoA and RalA GTPase signaling pathways for inhibition of pancreatic cancer metastasis. PMID:26512205

  8. Canoe binds RanGTP to promote PinsTPR/Mud-mediated spindle orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, Brett; Johnston, Christopher A.

    2011-01-01

    Regulated spindle orientation maintains epithelial tissue integrity and stem cell asymmetric cell division. In Drosophila melanogaster neural stem cells (neuroblasts), the scaffolding protein Canoe (Afadin/Af-6 in mammals) regulates spindle orientation, but its protein interaction partners and mechanism of action are unknown. In this paper, we use our recently developed induced cell polarity system to dissect the molecular mechanism of Canoe-mediated spindle orientation. We show that a previously uncharacterized portion of Canoe directly binds the Partner of Inscuteable (Pins) tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain. The Canoe–PinsTPR interaction recruits Canoe to the cell cortex and is required for activation of the PinsTPR-Mud (nuclear mitotic apparatus in mammals) spindle orientation pathway. We show that the Canoe Ras-association (RA) domains directly bind RanGTP and that both the CanoeRA domains and RanGTP are required to recruit Mud to the cortex and activate the Pins/Mud/dynein spindle orientation pathway. PMID:22024168

  9. Ethanol impairs Rho GTPase signaling and differentiation of cerebellar granule neurons in a rodent model of fetal alcohol syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, S; Guleria, R S; Pan, J; Bayless, K J; Davis, G E; Dipette, D; Singh, U S

    2006-12-01

    Developmental exposure to ethanol impairs fetal brain development and causes fetal alcohol syndrome. Although the cerebellum is one of the most alcohol-sensitive brain areas, signaling mechanisms underlying the deleterious effects of ethanol on developing cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) are largely unknown. Here we describe the effects of in vivo ethanol exposure on neurite formation in CGNs and on the activation of Rho GTPases (RhoA and Rac1), regulators of neurite formation. Exposure of 7-day-old rat pups to ethanol for 3 h moderately increased blood alcohol concentration (BAC) ( approximately 40 mM) and inhibited neurite formation and Rac1 activation in CGNs. Longer exposure to ethanol for 5 h resulted in higher BAC ( approximately 80 mM), induced apoptosis, inhibited Rac1, and activated RhoA. Studies demonstrated a regulatory role of Rho GTPases in differentiation of cerebellar neurons, and indicated that ethanol-associated impairment of Rho GTPase signaling might contribute to brain defects observed in fetal alcohol syndrome.

  10. Functional role(s) of phagosomal Rab GTPases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Maximiliano Gabriel

    2013-01-01

    Rab GTPases are at the central node of the machinery that regulates trafficking of organelles, including phagosomes. Thanks to the unique combination of high quality phagosome purification with highly sensitive proteomic studies, the network of Rab proteins that are dynamically associated with phagosomes during the process of maturation of this organelle is relatively well known. Whereas the phagosomal functions of many of the Rab proteins associated with phagosomes are characterized, the role(s) of most of these trafficking regulators remains to be identified. In some cases, even when the function in the context of phagosome biology is described, phagosomal Rab proteins seem to have similar roles. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the identity and function of phagosomal Rab GTPases, with a particular emphasis on new evidence that clarify these seemingly overlapping Rab functions during phagosome maturation. PMID:24088602

  11. RHOA GTPase Controls YAP-Mediated EREG Signaling in Small Intestinal Stem Cell Maintenance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Liu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Summary: RHOA, a founding member of the Rho GTPase family, is critical for actomyosin dynamics, polarity, and morphogenesis in response to developmental cues, mechanical stress, and inflammation. In murine small intestinal epithelium, inducible RHOA deletion causes a loss of epithelial polarity, with disrupted villi and crypt organization. In the intestinal crypts, RHOA deficiency results in reduced cell proliferation, increased apoptosis, and a loss of intestinal stem cells (ISCs that mimic effects of radiation damage. Mechanistically, RHOA loss reduces YAP signaling of the Hippo pathway and affects YAP effector epiregulin (EREG expression in the crypts. Expression of an active YAP (S112A mutant rescues ISC marker expression, ISC regeneration, and ISC-associated Wnt signaling, but not defective epithelial polarity, in RhoA knockout mice, implicating YAP in RHOA-regulated ISC function. EREG treatment or active β-catenin Catnblox(ex3 mutant expression rescues the RhoA KO ISC phenotypes. Thus, RHOA controls YAP-EREG signaling to regulate intestinal homeostasis and ISC regeneration. : In this article, Zheng and colleagues show that inducible RHOA deletion in mice causes defects in intestine epithelial polarity and deficiencies in intestinal stem cell proliferation, survival, and regeneration. They further demonstrate by genetic rescues that RHOA controls a YAP-EREG axis to mediate canonical Wnt signaling, intestinal stem cell function, and intestinal homeostasis. Keywords: mouse model, intestinal stem cell, regeneration, Rho GTPase, RhoA, Hippo signaling, YAP, Wnt signaling

  12. A thirty-year quest for a role of R-Ras in cancer: from an oncogene to a multitasking GTPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wai Nam; Yan, Mingfei; Chan, Andrew M

    2017-09-10

    Since the identification of R-Ras, which is the first Ras-related GTPase isolated based on sequence similarity to the classical RAS oncogene, more than 160 members of the Ras superfamily of GTPases have been identified and classified into the Ras, Rho, Rap, Rab, Ran, Arf, Rheb, RGK, Rad, Rit, and Miro subfamilies. R-Ras belongs to the Ras subfamily of small G-proteins, which are frequently implicated in cell growth and differentiation. Although the roles of R-Ras in cellular transformation and integrin-mediated cell adhesion have been extensively studied, the physiological function of this enigmatic G-protein was only revealed when a mouse strain deficient in R-Ras was generated. In parallel, a plethora of research findings also linked R-Ras with processes including tumor angiogenesis, axon guidance, and immune cell trafficking. Several upstream factors that modulate R-Ras GTP-binding were identified including Notch, semaphorin, and chemokine C-C motif ligand 21. A review of our evolving understanding of the role of R-Ras in oncogenesis is timely, as this year marks the 30th anniversary of the publication describing the cloning of R-Ras. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Orthogonal ring-closing alkyne and olefin metathesis for the synthesis of small GTPase-targeting bicyclic peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cromm, Philipp M; Schaubach, Sebastian; Spiegel, Jochen; Fürstner, Alois; Grossmann, Tom N; Waldmann, Herbert

    2016-04-14

    Bicyclic peptides are promising scaffolds for the development of inhibitors of biological targets that proved intractable by typical small molecules. So far, access to bioactive bicyclic peptide architectures is limited due to a lack of appropriate orthogonal ring-closing reactions. Here, we report chemically orthogonal ring-closing olefin (RCM) and alkyne metathesis (RCAM), which enable an efficient chemo- and regioselective synthesis of complex bicyclic peptide scaffolds with variable macrocycle geometries. We also demonstrate that the formed alkyne macrocycle can be functionalized subsequently. The orthogonal RCM/RCAM system was successfully used to evolve a monocyclic peptide inhibitor of the small GTPase Rab8 into a bicyclic ligand. This modified peptide shows the highest affinity for an activated Rab GTPase that has been reported so far. The RCM/RCAM-based formation of bicyclic peptides provides novel opportunities for the design of bioactive scaffolds suitable for the modulation of challenging protein targets.

  14. Regulatory properties of statins and rho gtpases prenylation inhibitiors to stimulate melanoma immunogenicity and promote anti-melanoma immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarrabayrouse, Guillaume; Pich, Christine; Teiti, Iotefa; Tilkin-Mariame, Anne Françoise

    2017-02-15

    Melanoma is a highly lethal cutaneous tumor, killing affected patients through development of multiple poorly immunogenic metastases. Suboptimal activation of immune system by melanoma cells is often due to molecular modifications occurring during tumor progression that prevent efficient recognition of melanoma cells by immune effectors. Statins are HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, which block the mevalonate synthesis pathway, used by millions of people as hypocholesterolemic agents in cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. They are also known to inhibit Rho GTPase activation and Rho dependent signaling pathways. Rho GTPases are regarded as molecular switches that regulate a wide spectrum of cellular functions and their dysfunction has been characterized in various oncogenic process notably in melanoma progression. Moreover, these molecules can modulate the immune response. Since 10 years we have demonstrated that Statins and other Rho GTPases inhibitors are critical regulators of molecules involved in adaptive and innate anti-melanoma immune response. In this review we summarize our major observations demonstrating that these pharmacological agents stimulate melanoma immunogenicity and suggest a potential use of these molecules to promote anti-melanoma immune response. © 2016 UICC.

  15. A Rac1 GTPase is a critical factor in the immune response of shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) to Vibrio alginolyticus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Gui-Hong; Wang, Wei-Na; Peng, Ting; Huang, Ming-Zhu; Liu, Yuan

    2015-08-01

    The small GTPase Rac1 acts as a molecular switch for signal transduction that regulates various cellular functions. However, its functions in crustaceans remain unclear. In this study, a cDNA encoding a RAS GTPase (LvRac1) in the Pacific white shrimp (L. vannamei) was identified and characterized. A recombinant variant of this GTPase, rLvRac1, was expressed in the model organism P. pastoris and its expression was confirmed by mass spectrometry. Biochemical assays indicated that the recombinant protein retained GTPase activity and was expressed in all of the organism's tested tissues. Injection of the bacterium V. alginolyticus into L. vannamei induced hepatopancreatic upregulation of LvRac1 expression. Moreover, knocking down LvRac1 in vivo significantly reduced the expression of the L. vannamei p53 and Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase genes (Lvp53 and LvCu/Zn SOD, respectively) while increasing that of the galectin gene (Lvgal). Hemolymph samples from control and LvRac1-silenced L. vannamei individuals were analyzed by flow cytometry, revealing that the latter exhibited significantly reduced respiratory burst activity and total hemocyte counts. Cumulative mortality in shrimp lacking LvRac1 was significantly greater than in control groups following V. alginolyticus challenge. The silencing of LvRac1 by double-stranded RNA injection thus increased the V. alginolyticus challenge sensitivity of L. vannamei and weakened its bacterial clearance ability in vivo. Suppressing LvRac1 also promoted the upregulation of Lvp53, LvCu/ZnSOD, and Lvgal following V. alginolyticus injection. Taken together, these results suggest that LvRac1 is important in the innate immune response of shrimp to V. alginolyticus infection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Ribosomal protein L7/L12 is required for GTPase translation factors EF-G, RF3, and IF2 to bind in their GTP state to 70S ribosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Markus A; Haddad, Bassam G; Weis, Amanda J; Blackwood, Colby S; Shelton, Catherine D; Wuerth, Michelle E; Walter, Justin D; Spiegel, Paul Clint

    2017-06-01

    Ribosomal protein L7/L12 is associated with translation initiation, elongation, and termination by the 70S ribosome. The guanosine 5' triphosphate hydrolase (GTPase) activity of elongation factor G (EF-G) requires the presence of L7/L12, which is critical for ribosomal translocation. Here, we have developed new methods for the complete depletion of L7/L12 from Escherichia coli 70S ribosomes to analyze the effect of L7/L12 on the activities of the GTPase factors EF-G, RF3, IF2, and LepA. Upon removal of L7/L12 from ribosomes, the GTPase activities of EF-G, RF3, and IF2 decreased to basal levels, while the activity of LepA decreased marginally. Upon reconstitution of ribosomes with recombinant L12, the GTPase activities of all GTPases returned to full activity. Moreover, ribosome binding assays indicated that EF-G, RF3, and IF2 require L7/L12 for stable binding in the GTP state, and LepA retained > 50% binding. Lastly, an EF-G∆G' truncation mutant possessed ribosome-dependent GTPase activity, which was insensitive to L7/L12. Our results indicate that L7/L12 is required for stable binding of ribosome-dependent GTPases that harbor direct interactions to the L7/L12 C-terminal domains, either through a G' domain (EF-G, RF3) or a unique N-terminal domain (IF2). Furthermore, we hypothesize this interaction is concomitant with counterclockwise ribosomal intersubunit rotation, which is required for translocation, initiation, and post-termination. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  17. Structural and functional analysis of FIP2 binding to the endosome-localised Rab25 GTPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lall, Patrick; Horgan, Conor P; Oda, Shunichiro; Franklin, Edward; Sultana, Azmiri; Hanscom, Sara R; McCaffrey, Mary W; Khan, Amir R

    2013-12-01

    Rab small GTPases are the master regulators of intracellular trafficking in eukaryotes. They mediate spatial and temporal recruitment of effector proteins to distinct cellular compartments through GTP-induced changes in their conformation. Despite numerous structural studies, the molecular basis for Rab/effector specificity and subsequent biological activity remains poorly understood. Rab25, also known as Rab11c, which is epithelial-specific, has been heavily implicated in ovarian cancer development and independently appears to act as a tumour suppressor in the context of a distinct subset of carcinomas. Here, we show that Rab25 associates with FIP2 and can recruit this effector protein to endosomal membranes. We report the crystal structure of Rab25 in complex with the C-terminal region of FIP2, which consists of a central dimeric FIP2 coiled-coil that mediates a heterotetrameric Rab25-(FIP2)2-Rab25 complex. Thermodynamic analyses show that, despite a relatively conserved interface, FIP2 binds to Rab25 with an approximate 3-fold weaker affinity than to Rab11a. Reduced affinity is mainly associated with lower enthalpic gains for Rab25:FIP2 complex formation, and can be attributed to subtle differences in the conformations of switch 1 and switch 2. These cellular, structural and thermodynamic studies provide insight into the Rab11/Rab25 subfamily of small GTPases that regulate endosomal trafficking pathways in eukaryotes. © 2013.

  18. Two small GTPases act in concert with the bactofilin cytoskeleton to regulate dynamic bacterial cell polarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulyha, Iryna; Lindow, Steffi; Lin, Lin; Bolte, Kathrin; Wuichet, Kristin; Kahnt, Jörg; van der Does, Chris; Thanbichler, Martin; Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte

    2013-04-29

    Cell polarity is essential for many bacterial activities, but the mechanisms responsible for its establishment are poorly understood. In Myxococcus xanthus, the type IV pili (T4P) motor ATPases PilB and PilT localize to opposite cell poles and switch poles during cellular reversals. We demonstrate that polar localization of PilB and PilT depends on the small GTPase SofG and BacP, a bactofilin cytoskeletal protein. Polymeric BacP localizes in both subpolar regions. SofG interacts directly with polymeric BacP and associates with one of these patches, forming a cluster that shuttles to the pole to establish localization of PilB and PilT at the same pole. Next, the small GTPase MglA sorts PilB and PilT to opposite poles to establish their correct polarity. During reversals, the Frz chemosensory system induces the inversion of PilB and PilT polarity. Thus, three hierarchically organized systems function in a cascade to regulate dynamic bacterial cell polarity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A Taylor-Microscale Transport Model for RANS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israel, Daniel; Hsu, Abigail; Rudolph, Joshua

    2017-11-01

    Since the first development of complete two-equation RANS models, there have been a variety of proposals for the choice of a second scaling quantity. Some of the most popular have been a time-scale ω (Kolmogorov, 1942; Wilcox, 1998), the dissipation rate ɛ (Harlow et al., 1968), the integral length-scale L, and the product kl (Mellor et al., 1982). All of these are formally equivalent in the production and dissipation terms, and differ only in which quantity is turbulently diffused. They also all rely on an equilibrium assumption that links the dissipation rate at the small scales to the scale of the large eddies. We propose using the Taylor microscale as the second scale. This has several nice properties, and also exhibits some interesting mathematical differences from conventional models. We show results for some simple shear flows using the new model.

  20. How Is RAN Related to Reading Fluency? A Comprehensive Examination of the Prominent Theoretical Accounts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, Timothy C.; Spanoudis, George C.; Georgiou, George K.

    2016-01-01

    We examined the prominent theoretical explanations of the RAN-reading relationship in a relatively transparent language (Greek) in a sample of children (n = 286) followed from Grade 1 to Grade 2. Specifically, we tested the fit of eight different models, as defined by the type of reading performance predicted (oral vs. silent word reading fluency), the type of RAN tasks (non-alphanumeric vs. alphanumeric), and the RAN effects (direct vs. indirect). Working memory, attention, processing speed, and motor skills were used as “common cause” variables predicting both RAN and reading fluency and phonological awareness and orthographic processing were used as mediators of RAN's effects on reading fluency. The findings of both concurrent and longitudinal analyses indicated that RAN is a unique predictor of oral reading fluency, but not silent reading fluency. Using alphanumeric or non-alphanumeric RAN did not particularly affect the RAN-reading relationship. Both phonological awareness and orthographic processing partly mediated RAN's effects on reading fluency. Theoretical implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:27605918

  1. How Is RAN Related to Reading Fluency? A Comprehensive Examination of the Prominent Theoretical Accounts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, Timothy C; Spanoudis, George C; Georgiou, George K

    2016-01-01

    We examined the prominent theoretical explanations of the RAN-reading relationship in a relatively transparent language (Greek) in a sample of children (n = 286) followed from Grade 1 to Grade 2. Specifically, we tested the fit of eight different models, as defined by the type of reading performance predicted (oral vs. silent word reading fluency), the type of RAN tasks (non-alphanumeric vs. alphanumeric), and the RAN effects (direct vs. indirect). Working memory, attention, processing speed, and motor skills were used as "common cause" variables predicting both RAN and reading fluency and phonological awareness and orthographic processing were used as mediators of RAN's effects on reading fluency. The findings of both concurrent and longitudinal analyses indicated that RAN is a unique predictor of oral reading fluency, but not silent reading fluency. Using alphanumeric or non-alphanumeric RAN did not particularly affect the RAN-reading relationship. Both phonological awareness and orthographic processing partly mediated RAN's effects on reading fluency. Theoretical implications of these findings are discussed.

  2. Crystal Structures of Human TBC1D1 and TBC1D4 (AS160) RabGTPase-activating Protein (RabGAP) Domains Reveal Critical Elements for GLUT4 Translocation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S Park; W Jin; S Shoelson

    2011-12-31

    We have solved the x-ray crystal structures of the RabGAP domains of human TBC1D1 and human TBC1D4 (AS160), at 2.2 and 3.5 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. Like the yeast Gyp1p RabGAP domain, whose structure was solved previously in complex with mouse Rab33B, the human TBC1D1 and TBC1D4 domains both have 16 {alpha}-helices and no {beta}-sheet elements. We expected the yeast Gyp1p RabGAP/mouse Rab33B structure to predict the corresponding interfaces between cognate mammalian RabGAPs and Rabs, but found that residues were poorly conserved. We further tested the relevance of this model by Ala-scanning mutagenesis, but only one of five substitutions within the inferred binding site of the TBC1D1 RabGAP significantly perturbed catalytic efficiency. In addition, substitution of TBC1D1 residues with corresponding residues from Gyp1p did not enhance catalytic efficiency. We hypothesized that biologically relevant RabGAP/Rab partners utilize additional contacts not described in the yeast Gyp1p/mouse Rab33B structure, which we predicted using our two new human TBC1D1 and TBC1D4 structures. Ala substitution of TBC1D1 Met{sup 930}, corresponding to a residue outside of the Gyp1p/Rab33B contact, substantially reduced catalytic activity. GLUT4 translocation assays confirmed the biological relevance of our findings. Substitutions with lowest RabGAP activity, including catalytically dead RK and Met{sup 930} and Leu{sup 1019} predicted to perturb Rab binding, confirmed that biological activity requires contacts between cognate RabGAPs and Rabs beyond those in the yeast Gyp1p RabGAP/mouse Rab33B structure.

  3. Iron-56 irradiation diminishes muscarinic but not {alpha}{sub 1}-adrenergic-stimulated low-K{sub m} GTPase in rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villalobos-Molina, R.; Joseph, J.A.; Rabin, B.M. [National Institute on Aging, Baltimore, MD (United States); Kandasamy, S.B.; Dalton, T.K.; Roth, G.S. [Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Initial findings from our laboratory have indicated that muscarinic enhancement of K{sup +}-evoked release of dopamine from perifused striatal slices is reduced after exposure to {sup 56}Fe-particle irradiation. This finding suggested that there is a radiation-induced deficit in muscarinic receptor sensitivity. Subsequent findings have indicated that at least part of the loss in sensitivity may occur as a result of alterations in the initial steps of the signal transduction process and involve muscarinic receptor-G protein coupling/uncoupling. The present study was carried out to localize this deficit further by determining carbachol-stimulated low-K{sub m} guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) activity in striatal and hippocampal tissue obtained from rats exposed to 0, 0.1 or 1.0 Gy of {sup 56}Fe-particle irradiation. In addition, to examine the specificity of the effect of {sup 56}Fe-particle irradiation, {alpha}{sub 1}-adrenergic-stimulated low-K{sub m} GTPase activity was also examined in these tissues. The results showed that there was a high degree of specificity in the effects of {sup 56}Fe particles. Decrements were observed in muscarinic-stimulated low-K{sub m} GTPase in striatum but not in hippocampus, and {sup 56}Fe-particle irradiation did not affect {alpha}{sub 1}-adrenergic low-K{sub m} GTPase activity in either brain tissue. 24 refs., 2 figs.

  4. Modulation of Rho GTPases rescues brain mitochondrial dysfunction, cognitive deficits and aberrant synaptic plasticity in female mice modeling Rett syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Filippis, Bianca; Valenti, Daniela; Chiodi, Valentina; Ferrante, Antonella; de Bari, Lidia; Fiorentini, Carla; Domenici, Maria Rosaria; Ricceri, Laura; Vacca, Rosa Anna; Fabbri, Alessia; Laviola, Giovanni

    2015-06-01

    Rho GTPases are molecules critically involved in neuronal plasticity and cognition. We have previously reported that modulation of brain Rho GTPases by the bacterial toxin CNF1 rescues the neurobehavioral phenotype in MeCP2-308 male mice, a model of Rett syndrome (RTT). RTT is a rare X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder and a genetic cause of intellectual disability, for which no effective therapy is available. Mitochondrial dysfunction has been proposed to be involved in the mechanism of the disease pathogenesis. Here we demonstrate that modulation of Rho GTPases by CNF1 rescues the reduced mitochondrial ATP production via oxidative phosphorylation in the brain of MeCP2-308 heterozygous female mice, the condition which more closely recapitulates that of RTT patients. In RTT mouse brain, CNF1 also restores the alterations in the activity of the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) complexes and of ATP synthase, the molecular machinery responsible for the majority of cell energy production. Such effects were achieved through the upregulation of the protein content of those MRC complexes subunits, which were defective in RTT mouse brain. Restored mitochondrial functionality was accompanied by the rescue of deficits in cognitive function (spatial reference memory in the Barnes maze), synaptic plasticity (long-term potentiation) and Tyr1472 phosphorylation of GluN2B, which was abnormally enhanced in the hippocampus of RTT mice. Present findings bring into light previously unknown functional mitochondrial alterations in the brain of female mice modeling RTT and provide the first evidence that RTT brain mitochondrial dysfunction can be rescued by modulation of Rho GTPases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  5. Functional characterization of Rho GTPases in Aspergillus niger uncovers conserved and diverged roles of Rho proteins within filamentous fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Min Jin; Arentshorst, Mark; Roos, Eelke D; van den Hondel, Cees A M J J; Meyer, Vera; Ram, Arthur F J

    2011-03-01

    Rho GTPases are signalling molecules regulating morphology and multiple cellular functions including metabolism and vesicular trafficking. To understand the connection between polarized growth and secretion in the industrial model organism Aspergillus niger, we investigated the function of all Rho family members in this organism. We identified six Rho GTPases in its genome and used loss-of-function studies to dissect their functions. While RhoA is crucial for polarity establishment and viability, RhoB and RhoD ensure cell wall integrity and septum formation respectively. RhoC seems to be dispensable for A. niger. RacA governs polarity maintenance via controlling actin but not microtubule dynamics, which is consistent with its localization at the hyphal apex. Both deletion and dominant activation of RacA (Rac(G18V)) provoke an actin localization defect and thereby loss of polarized tip extension. Simultaneous deletion of RacA and CftA (Cdc42) is lethal; however, conditional overexpression of RacA in this strain can substitute for CftA, indicating that both proteins concertedly control actin dynamics. We finally identified NoxR as a RacA-specific effector, which however, is not important for apical dominance as reported for A. nidulans but for asexual development. Overall, the data show that individual Rho GTPases contribute differently to growth and morphogenesis within filamentous fungi. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Crystal structure of the GTPase domain and the bundle signalling element of dynamin in the GDP state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anand, Roopsee; Eschenburg, Susanne; Reubold, Thomas F., E-mail: Reubold.Thomas@mh-hannover.de

    2016-01-01

    Dynamin is the prototype of a family of large multi-domain GTPases. The 100 kDa protein is a key player in clathrin-mediated endocytosis, where it cleaves off vesicles from membranes using the energy from GTP hydrolysis. We have solved the high resolution crystal structure of a fusion protein of the GTPase domain and the bundle signalling element (BSE) of dynamin 1 liganded with GDP. The structure provides a hitherto missing snapshot of the GDP state of the hydrolytic cycle of dynamin and reveals how the switch I region moves away from the active site after GTP hydrolysis and release of inorganic phosphate. Comparing our structure of the GDP state with the known structures of the GTP state, the transition state and the nucleotide-free state of dynamin 1 we describe the structural changes through the hydrolytic cycle. - Highlights: • High resolution crystal structure of the GDP-state of a dynamin 1 GTPase-BSE fusion. • Visualizes one of the key states of the hydrolytic cycle of dynamin. • The dynamin-specific loop forms a helix as soon as a guanine base is present.

  7. The Era GTPase recognizes the GAUCACCUCC sequence and binds helix 45 near the 3; end of 16S rRNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tu, Chao; Zhou, Xiaomei; Tarasov, Sergey G.; Tropea, Joseph E.; Austin, Brian P.; Waugh, David S.; Court, Donald L.; Ji, Xinhua (NCI)

    2012-03-26

    Era, composed of a GTPase domain and a K homology domain, is essential for bacterial cell viability. It is required for the maturation of 16S rRNA and assembly of the 30S ribosomal subunit. We showed previously that the protein recognizes nine nucleotides (1531{sup AUCACCUCC}1539) near the 3{prime} end of 16S rRNA, and that this recognition stimulates GTP-hydrolyzing activity of Era. In all three kingdoms of life, the 1530{sup GAUCA}1534 sequence and helix 45 (h45) (nucleotides 1506-1529) are highly conserved. It has been shown that the 1530{sup GA}1531 to 1530{sup AG}1531 double mutation severely affects the viability of bacteria. However, whether Era interacts with G1530 and/or h45 and whether such interactions (if any) contribute to the stimulation of Era's GTPase activity were not known. Here, we report two RNA structures that contain nucleotides 1506-1542 (RNA301), one in complex with Era and GDPNP (GNP), a nonhydrolysable GTP-analogue, and the other in complex with Era, GNP, and the KsgA methyltransferase. The structures show that Era recognizes 10 nucleotides, including G1530, and that Era also binds h45. Moreover, GTPase assay experiments show that G1530 does not stimulate Era's GTPase activity. Rather, A1531 and A1534 are most important for stimulation and h45 further contributes to the stimulation. Although G1530 does not contribute to the intrinsic GTPase activity of Era, its interaction with Era is important for binding and is essential for the protein to function, leading to the discovery of a new cold-sensitive phenotype of Era.

  8. The puzzle of chloroplast vesicle transport – involvement of GTPases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sazzad eKarim

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In the cytosol of plant cells vesicle transport occurs via secretory pathways among the endoplasmic reticulum (ER network, Golgi bodies, secretory granules, endosome and plasma membrane. Three systems transfer lipids, proteins and other important molecules through aqueous spaces to membrane-enclosed compartments, via vesicles that bud from donor membranes, being coated and uncoated before tethered and fused with acceptor membranes. In addition, molecular, biochemical and ultrastructural evidence indicates presence of a vesicle transport system in chloroplasts. Little is known about the protein components of this system. However, as chloroplasts harbour the photosynthetic apparatus that ultimately supports most organisms on the planet, close attention to their pathways is warranted. This may also reveal novel diversification and/or distinct solutions to the problems posed by the targeted intra-cellular trafficking of important molecules. To date two homologues to well-known yeast cytosolic vesicle transport proteins, CPSAR1 and CPRabA5e, have been shown to have roles in chloroplast vesicle transport, both being GTPases. Bioinformatic data indicate that several homologues of cytosolic vesicle transport system components are putatively chloroplast-localized and in addition other proteins have been implicated to participate in chloroplast vesicle transport, including vesicle-inducing protein in plastids 1 (VIPP1, thylakoid formation 1 (THF1, snowy cotyledon 2/cotyledon chloroplast biogenesis factor (SCO2/CYO1, curvature thylakoid 1 (CURT1 proteins, and a dynamin like GTPase FZO-like (FZL protein. Several putative potential cargo proteins have also been identified, including building blocks of the photosynthetic apparatus. Here we discuss details of the largely unknown putative chloroplast vesicle transport system, focusing on GTPase-related components.

  9. The 'invisible hand': regulation of RHO GTPases by RHOGDIs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Mata, Rafael; Boulter, Etienne; Burridge, Keith

    2011-07-22

    The 'invisible hand' is a term originally coined by Adam Smith in The Theory of Moral Sentiments to describe the forces of self-interest, competition and supply and demand that regulate the resources in society. This metaphor continues to be used by economists to describe the self-regulating nature of a market economy. The same metaphor can be used to describe the RHO-specific guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor (RHOGDI) family, which operates in the background, as an invisible hand, using similar forces to regulate the RHO GTPase cycle.

  10. The invisible hand: regulation of RHO GTPases by RHOGDIs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Mata, Rafael; Boulter, Etienne; Burridge, Keith

    2011-01-01

    Preface The 'invisible hand' is a term originally coined by Adam Smith in the Theory of Moral Sentiments to describe the forces of self-interest, competition, and supply and demand that regulate the resources in society. This metaphor continues to be used by economists to describe the self-regulating nature of a market economy. The same metaphor can be used to describe the RHO-specific guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor (RHOGDI) family, which operates in the background, as an invisible hand, using similar forces to regulate the RHO GTPase cycle. PMID:21779026

  11. RAN as a predictor of reading skills, and vice versa: results from a randomised reading intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Ulrika

    2014-07-01

    Although phonemic awareness is a well-known factor predicting early reading development, there is also evidence that Rapid Automatized Naming (RAN) is an independent factor that contributes to early reading. The aim of this study is to examine phonemic awareness and RAN as predictors of reading speed, reading comprehension and spelling for children with reading difficulties. It also investigates a possible reciprocal relationship between RAN and reading skills, and the possibility of enhancing RAN by intervention. These issues are addressed by examining longitudinal data from a randomised reading intervention study carried out in Sweden for 9-year-old children with reading difficulties (N = 112). The intervention comprised three main elements: training of phonics, reading comprehension strategies and reading speed. The analysis of the data was carried out using structural equation modelling. The results demonstrated that after controlling for autoregressive effects and non-verbal IQ, RAN predicts reading speed whereas phonemic awareness predicts reading comprehension and spelling. RAN was significantly enhanced by training and a reciprocal relationship between reading speed and RAN was found. These findings contribute to support the view that both phonemic awareness and RAN independently influence early phases of reading, and that both are possible to enhance by training.

  12. RAN as a Predictor of Reading Skills, and Vice Versa: Results from a Randomised Reading Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Ulrika

    2014-01-01

    Although phonemic awareness is a well-known factor predicting early reading development, there is also evidence that Rapid Automatized Naming (RAN) is an independent factor that contributes to early reading. The aim of this study is to examine phonemic awareness and RAN as predictors of reading speed, reading comprehension and spelling for…

  13. Mesh Resolution Effect on 3D RANS Turbomachinery Flow Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Yershov, Sergiy

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents the study of the effect of a mesh refinement on numerical results of 3D RANS computations of turbomachinery flows. The CFD solver F, which based on the second-order accurate ENO scheme, is used in this study. The simplified multigrid algorithm and local time stepping permit decreasing computational time. The flow computations are performed for a number of turbine and compressor cascades and stages. In all flow cases, the successively refined meshes of H-type with an approximate orthogonalization near the solid walls were generated. The results obtained are compared in order to estimate their both mesh convergence and ability to resolve the transonic flow pattern. It is concluded that for thorough studying the fine phenomena of the 3D turbomachinery flows, it makes sense to use the computational meshes with the number of cells from several millions up to several hundred millions per a single turbomachinery blade channel, while for industrial computations, a mesh of about or less than one mil...

  14. Identification of the GTPase superfamily in Mycoplasma synoviae and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clayton Luiz Borges

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycoplasmas are the smallest known prokaryotes with self-replication ability. They are obligate parasites, taking up many molecules of their hosts and acting as pathogens in men, animals, birds and plants. Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is the infective agent of swine mycoplasmosis and Mycoplasma synoviae is responsible for subclinical upper respiratory infections that may result in airsacculitis and synovitis in chickens and turkeys. These highly infectious organisms present a worldwide distribution and are responsible for major economic problems. Proteins of the GTPase superfamily occur in all domains of life, regulating functions such as protein synthesis, cell cycle and differentiation. Despite their functional diversity, all GTPases are believed to have evolved from a single common ancestor. In this work we have identified mycoplasma GTPases by searching the complete genome databases of Mycoplasma synoviae and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, J (non-pathogenic and 7448 (pathogenic strains. Fifteen ORFs encoding predicted GTPases were found in M. synoviae and in the two strains of M. hyopneumoniae. Searches for conserved G domains in GTPases were performed and the sequences were classified into families. The GTPase phylogenetic analysis showed that the subfamilies were well resolved into clades. The presence of GTPases in the three strains suggests the importance of GTPases in 'minimalist' genomes.

  15. Rho GTPases and Nox dependent ROS production in skin. Is there a connection?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stanley, Alanna; Hynes, Ailish; Brakebusch, Cord Herbert

    2012-01-01

    Rho GTPases are a family of small GTP binding proteins most commonly known for the regulation of many cellular processes, including actin cytoskeleton re-organisation, cell proliferation, signal transduction and regulation of apoptosis. Additionally, a link between Rho GTPases and reactive oxygen...

  16. The Role of Rho GTPase Proteins in CNS Neuronal Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govek, Eve-Ellen; Hatten, Mary E.; Van Aelst, Linda

    2011-01-01

    The architectonics of the mammalian brain arise from a remarkable range of directed cell migrations, which orchestrate the emergence of cortical neuronal layers and pattern brain circuitry. At different stages of cortical histogenesis, specific modes of cell motility are essential to the stepwise formation of cortical architecture. These movements range from interkinetic nuclear movements at the ventricular zone (VZ), to migrations of early-born, postmitotic polymorphic cells into the preplate, to the radial migration of precursors of cortical output neurons across the thickening cortical wall, and the vast, tangential migrations of interneurons from the basal forebrain into the emerging cortical layers. In all cases, acto-myosin motors act in concert with cell adhesion receptor systems to provide the force and traction needed for forward movement. As key regulators of actin and microtubule cytoskeletons, cell polarity, and adhesion, the Rho GTPases play a critical role in CNS neuronal migration. This review will focus on the different types of migration in the developing neocortex and cerebellar cortex, and the role of the Rho GTPases, their regulators and effectors in these CNS migrations, with particular emphasis on their involvement in radial migration. PMID:21557504

  17. Regulation of the Cdc42/Cdc24 GTPase module during Candida albicans hyphal growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassilana, Martine; Hopkins, Julie; Arkowitz, Robert A

    2005-03-01

    The Rho G protein Cdc42 and its exchange factor Cdc24 are required for hyphal growth of the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans. Previously, we reported that strains ectopically expressing Cdc24 or Cdc42 are unable to form hyphae in response to serum. Here we investigated the role of these two proteins in hyphal growth, using quantitative real-time PCR to measure induction of hypha-specific genes together with time lapse microscopy. Expression of the hypha-specific genes examined depends on the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A pathway culminating in the Efg1 and Tec1 transcription factors. We show that strains with reduced levels of CDC24 or CDC42 transcripts induce hypha-specific genes yet cannot maintain their expression in response to serum. Furthermore, in serum these mutants form elongated buds compared to the wild type and mutant budding cells, as observed by time lapse microscopy. Using Cdc24 fused to green fluorescent protein, we also show that Cdc24 is recruited to and persists at the germ tube tip during hyphal growth. Altogether these data demonstrate that the Cdc24/Cdc42 GTPase module is required for maintenance of hyphal growth. In addition, overexpression studies indicate that specific levels of Cdc24 and Cdc42 are important for invasive hyphal growth. In response to serum, CDC24 transcript levels increase transiently in a Tec1-dependent fashion, as do the G-protein RHO3 and the Rho1 GTPase activating protein BEM2 transcript levels. These results suggest that a positive feedback loop between Cdc24 and Tec1 contributes to an increase in active Cdc42 at the tip of the germ tube which is important for hypha formation.

  18. RhoA GTPase regulates radiation-induced alterations in endothelial cell adhesion and migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rousseau, Matthieu; Gaugler, Marie-Helene; Rodallec, Audrey; Bonnaud, Stephanie; Paris, Francois [Inserm UMR U892, Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie Nantes-Angers CRCNA, Institut de Recherche Therapeutique IRT-UN, Universite de Nantes, 8 Quai Moncousu, BP 70721, F-44007 (France); Corre, Isabelle, E-mail: icorre@nantes.inserm.fr [Inserm UMR U892, Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie Nantes-Angers CRCNA, Institut de Recherche Therapeutique IRT-UN, Universite de Nantes, 8 Quai Moncousu, BP 70721, F-44007 (France)

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We explore the role of RhoA in endothelial cell response to ionizing radiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RhoA is rapidly activated by single high-dose of radiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Radiation leads to RhoA/ROCK-dependent actin cytoskeleton remodeling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Radiation-induced apoptosis does not require the RhoA/ROCK pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Radiation-induced alteration of endothelial adhesion and migration requires RhoA/ROCK. -- Abstract: Endothelial cells of the microvasculature are major target of ionizing radiation, responsible of the radiation-induced vascular early dysfunctions. Molecular signaling pathways involved in endothelial responses to ionizing radiation, despite being increasingly investigated, still need precise characterization. Small GTPase RhoA and its effector ROCK are crucial signaling molecules involved in many endothelial cellular functions. Recent studies identified implication of RhoA/ROCK in radiation-induced increase in endothelial permeability but other endothelial functions altered by radiation might also require RhoA proteins. Human microvascular endothelial cells HMEC-1, either treated with Y-27632 (inhibitor of ROCK) or invalidated for RhoA by RNA interference were exposed to 15 Gy. We showed a rapid radiation-induced activation of RhoA, leading to a deep reorganisation of actin cytoskeleton with rapid formation of stress fibers. Endothelial early apoptosis induced by ionizing radiation was not affected by Y-27632 pre-treatment or RhoA depletion. Endothelial adhesion to fibronectin and formation of focal adhesions increased in response to radiation in a RhoA/ROCK-dependent manner. Consistent with its pro-adhesive role, ionizing radiation also decreased endothelial cells migration and RhoA was required for this inhibition. These results highlight the role of RhoA GTPase in ionizing radiation-induced deregulation of essential endothelial

  19. How is RAN Related to Reading Fluency? A Comprehensive Examination of the Prominent Theoretical Accounts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TIMOTHY C PAPADOPOULOS

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We examined the prominent theoretical explanations of the RAN-reading relationship in a relatively transparent language (Greek in a sample of children (n= 286 followed from Grade 1 to Grade 2. Specifically, we tested the fit of eight different models, as defined by the type of reading performance predicted (oral vs. silent word reading fluency, the type of RAN tasks (non-alphanumeric vs. alphanumeric, and the RAN effects (direct vs. indirect. Working memory, attention, processing speed, and motor skills were used as common cause variables predicting both RAN and reading fluency and phonological awareness and orthographic processing were used as mediators of RAN’s effects on reading fluency. The findings of both concurrent and longitudinal analyses indicated that RAN is a unique predictor of oral reading fluency, but not silent reading fluency. Using alphanumeric or non-alphanumeric RAN did not particularly affect the RAN-reading relationship. Both phonological awareness and orthographic processing partly mediated RAN’s effects on reading fluency. Theoretical implications of these findings are discussed.

  20. Coxiella burnetii Phagocytosis Is Regulated by GTPases of the Rho Family and the RhoA Effectors mDia1 and ROCK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Distel, Jesús S.; Aguilera, Milton O.; Colombo, María I.; Berón, Walter

    2015-01-01

    The GTPases belonging to the Rho family control the actin cytoskeleton rearrangements needed for particle internalization during phagocytosis. ROCK and mDia1 are downstream effectors of RhoA, a GTPase involved in that process. Coxiella burnetii, the etiologic agent of Q fever, is internalized by the host´s cells in an actin-dependent manner. Nevertheless, the molecular mechanism involved in this process has been poorly characterized. This work analyzes the role of different GTPases of the Rho family and some downstream effectors in the internalization of C. burnetii by phagocytic and non-phagocytic cells. The internalization of C. burnetii into HeLa and RAW cells was significantly inhibited when the cells were treated with Clostridium difficile Toxin B which irreversibly inactivates members of the Rho family. In addition, the internalization was reduced in HeLa cells that overexpressed the dominant negative mutants of RhoA, Rac1 or Cdc42 or that were knocked down for the Rho GTPases. The pharmacological inhibition or the knocking down of ROCK diminished bacterium internalization. Moreover, C. burnetii was less efficiently internalized in HeLa cells overexpressing mDia1-N1, a dominant negative mutant of mDia1, while the overexpression of the constitutively active mutant mDia1-ΔN3 increased bacteria uptake. Interestingly, when HeLa and RAW cells were infected, RhoA, Rac1 and mDia1 were recruited to membrane cell fractions. Our results suggest that the GTPases of the Rho family play an important role in C. burnetii phagocytosis in both HeLa and RAW cells. Additionally, we present evidence that ROCK and mDia1, which are downstream effectors of RhoA, are involved in that process. PMID:26674774

  1. Nuclear/nucleolar GTPase 2 proteins as a subfamily of YlqF/YawG GTPases function in pre-60S ribosomal subunit maturation of mono- and dicotyledonous plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Chak Han; Hwang, Sung Min; Son, Young Sim; Heo, Jae Bok; Bang, Woo Young; Suwastika, I Nengah; Shiina, Takashi; Bahk, Jeong Dong

    2011-03-11

    The YlqF/YawG families are important GTPases involved in ribosome biogenesis, cell proliferation, or cell growth, however, no plant homologs have yet to be characterized. Here we isolated rice (Oryza sativa) and Arabidopsis nuclear/nucleolar GTPase 2 (OsNug2 and AtNug2, respectively) that belong to the YawG subfamily and characterized them for pre-60S ribosomal subunit maturation. They showed typical intrinsic YlqF/YawG family GTPase activities in bacteria and yeasts with k(cat) values 0.12 ± 0.007 min(-1) (n = 6) and 0.087 ± 0.002 min(-1) (n = 4), respectively, and addition of 60S ribosomal subunits stimulated their activities in vitro. In addition, OsNug2 rescued the lethality of the yeast nug2 null mutant through recovery of 25S pre-rRNA processing. By yeast two-hybrid screening five clones, including a putative one of 60S ribosomal proteins, OsL10a, were isolated. Subcellular localization and pulldown assays resulted in that the N-terminal region of OsNug2 is sufficient for nucleolar/nuclear targeting and association with OsL10a. OsNug2 is physically associated with pre-60S ribosomal complexes highly enriched in the 25S, 5.8S, and 5S rRNA, and its interaction was stimulated by exogenous GTP. Furthermore, the AtNug2 knockdown mutant constructed by the RNAi method showed defective growth on the medium containing cycloheximide. Expression pattern analysis revealed that the distribution of AtNug2 mainly in the meristematic region underlies its potential role in active plant growth. Finally, it is concluded that Nug2/Nog2p GTPase from mono- and didicotyledonous plants is linked to the pre-60S ribosome complex and actively processed 27S into 25S during the ribosomal large subunit maturation process, i.e. prior to export to the cytoplasm.

  2. Evidence for Lateral gene Transfer (LGT in the evolution of eubacteria-derived small GTPases in plant organelles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Nengah Suwastika

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The genomes of free-living bacteria frequently exchange genes via lateral gene transfer (LGT, which has played a major role in bacterial evolution. LGT also played a significant role in the acquisition of genes from non-cyanobacterial bacteria to the lineage of ‘primary’ algae and land plants. Small GTPases are widely distributed among prokaryotes and eukaryotes. In this study, we inferred the evolutionary history of organelle-targeted small GTPases in plants. Arabidopsis thaliana contains at least one ortholog in seven subfamilies of OBG-HflX-like and TrmE-Era-EngA-YihA-Septin-like GTPase superfamilies (together referred to as Era-like GTPases. Subcellular localization analysis of all Era-like GTPases in Arabidopsis revealed that all thirteen eubacteria-related GTPases are localized to chloroplasts and/or mitochondria, whereas archaea-related DRG and NOG1 are localized to the cytoplasm and nucleus, respectively, suggesting that chloroplast- and mitochondrion-localized GTPases are derived from the ancestral cyanobacterium and α-proteobacterium, respectively, through endosymbiotic gene transfer (EGT. However, phylogenetic analyses revealed that plant organelle GTPase evolution is rather complex. Among the eubacterium-related GTPases, only four localized to chloroplasts (including one dual targeting GTPase and two localized to mitochondria were derived from cyanobacteria and α-proteobacteria, respectively. Three other chloroplast-targeted GTPases were related to α-proteobacterial proteins, rather than to cyanobacterial GTPases. Furthermore, we found that four other GTPases showed neither cyanobacterial nor α-proteobacterial affiliation. Instead, these GTPases were closely related to clades from other eubacteria, such as Bacteroides (Era1, EngB-1, and EngB-2 and green non-sulfur bacteria (HflX. This study thus provides novel evidence that LGT significantly contributed to the evolution of organelle-targeted Era-like GTPases in plants.

  3. Evidence for lateral gene transfer (LGT) in the evolution of eubacteria-derived small GTPases in plant organelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwastika, I Nengah; Denawa, Masatsugu; Yomogihara, Saki; Im, Chak Han; Bang, Woo Young; Ohniwa, Ryosuke L; Bahk, Jeong Dong; Takeyasu, Kunio; Shiina, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    The genomes of free-living bacteria frequently exchange genes via lateral gene transfer (LGT), which has played a major role in bacterial evolution. LGT also played a significant role in the acquisition of genes from non-cyanobacterial bacteria to the lineage of "primary" algae and land plants. Small GTPases are widely distributed among prokaryotes and eukaryotes. In this study, we inferred the evolutionary history of organelle-targeted small GTPases in plants. Arabidopsis thaliana contains at least one ortholog in seven subfamilies of OBG-HflX-like and TrmE-Era-EngA-YihA-Septin-like GTPase superfamilies (together referred to as Era-like GTPases). Subcellular localization analysis of all Era-like GTPases in Arabidopsis revealed that all 30 eubacteria-related GTPases are localized to chloroplasts and/or mitochondria, whereas archaea-related DRG and NOG1 are localized to the cytoplasm and nucleus, respectively, suggesting that chloroplast- and mitochondrion-localized GTPases are derived from the ancestral cyanobacterium and α-proteobacterium, respectively, through endosymbiotic gene transfer (EGT). However, phylogenetic analyses revealed that plant organelle GTPase evolution is rather complex. Among the eubacterium-related GTPases, only four localized to chloroplasts (including one dual targeting GTPase) and two localized to mitochondria were derived from cyanobacteria and α-proteobacteria, respectively. Three other chloroplast-targeted GTPases were related to α-proteobacterial proteins, rather than to cyanobacterial GTPases. Furthermore, we found that four other GTPases showed neither cyanobacterial nor α-proteobacterial affiliation. Instead, these GTPases were closely related to clades from other eubacteria, such as Bacteroides (Era1, EngB-1, and EngB-2) and green non-sulfur bacteria (HflX). This study thus provides novel evidence that LGT significantly contributed to the evolution of organelle-targeted Era-like GTPases in plants.

  4. Small GTPase Rab40c associates with lipid droplets and modulates the biogenesis of lipid droplets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran Tan

    Full Text Available The subcellular location and cell biological function of small GTPase Rab40c in mammalian cells have not been investigated in detail. In this study, we demonstrated that the exogenously expressed GFP-Rab40c associates with lipid droplets marked by neutral lipid specific dye Oil red or Nile red, but not with the Golgi or endosomal markers. Further examination demonstrated that Rab40c is also associated with ERGIC-53 containing structures, especially under the serum starvation condition. Rab40c is increasingly recruited to the surface of lipid droplets during lipid droplets formation and maturation in HepG2 cells. Rab40c knockdown moderately decreases the size of lipid droplets, suggesting that Rab40c is involved in the biogenesis of lipid droplets. Stimulation for adipocyte differentiation increases the expression of Rab40c in 3T3-L1 cells. Rab40c interacts with TIP47, and is appositionally associated with TIP47-labeled lipid droplets. In addition, over-expression of Rab40c causes the clustering of lipid droplets independent of its GTPase activity, but completely dependent of the intact SOCS box domain of Rab40c. In addition, Rab40c displayed self-interaction as well as interaction with TIP47 and the SOCS box is essential for its ability to induce clustering of lipid droplets. Our results suggest that Rab40c is a novel Rab protein associated with lipid droplets, and is likely involved in modulating the biogenesis of lipid droplets.

  5. Timing it right: precise ON/OFF switches for Rho1 and Cdc42 GTPases in cytokinesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, Mohan K; Tao, Evelyn Yaqiong

    2013-07-22

    In many eukaryotes, cytokinesis requires an actomyosin contractile ring that is crucial for cell constriction and new membrane organization. Two studies in this issue (Onishi et al. 2013. J. Cell Biol. http://dx.doi.org.10.1083/jcb.201302001 and Atkins et al. 2013. J. Cell Biol. http://dx.doi.org.10.1083/jcb.201301090) establish that precise activation and/or inactivation of Rho1 and Cdc42 GTPases is important for the correct order and successful completion of events downstream of actomyosin ring constriction in budding yeast.

  6. Role of Arf GTPases in fungal morphogenesis and virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labbaoui, Hayet; Bogliolo, Stéphanie; Ghugtyal, Vikram; Solis, Norma V; Filler, Scott G; Arkowitz, Robert A; Bassilana, Martine

    2017-02-01

    Virulence of the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans depends on the switch from budding to filamentous growth, which requires sustained membrane traffic and polarized growth. In many organisms, small GTPases of the Arf (ADP-ribosylation factor) family regulate membrane/protein trafficking, yet little is known about their role in fungal filamentous growth. To investigate these GTPases in C. albicans, we generated loss of function mutants in all 3 Arf proteins, Arf1-Arf3, and 2 Arf-like proteins, Arl1 and Arl3. Our results indicate that of these proteins, Arf2 is required for viability and sensitivity to antifungal drugs. Repressible ARF2 expression results in defects in filamentous growth, cell wall integrity and virulence, likely due to alteration of the Golgi. Arl1 is also required for invasive filamentous growth and, although arl1/arl1 cells can initiate hyphal growth, hyphae are substantially shorter than that of the wild-type, due to the inability of this mutant to maintain hyphal growth at a single site. We show that this defect does not result from an alteration of phospholipid distribution and is unlikely to result from the sole Golgin Imh1 mislocalization, as Imh1 is not required for invasive filamentous growth. Rather, our results suggest that the arl1/arl1 hyphal growth defect results from increased secretion in this mutant. Strikingly, the arl1/arl1 mutant is drastically reduced in virulence during oropharyngeal candidiasis. Together, our results highlight the importance of Arl1 and Arf2 as key regulators of hyphal growth and virulence in C. albicans and identify a unique function of Arl1 in secretion.

  7. Role of Arf GTPases in fungal morphogenesis and virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayet Labbaoui

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Virulence of the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans depends on the switch from budding to filamentous growth, which requires sustained membrane traffic and polarized growth. In many organisms, small GTPases of the Arf (ADP-ribosylation factor family regulate membrane/protein trafficking, yet little is known about their role in fungal filamentous growth. To investigate these GTPases in C. albicans, we generated loss of function mutants in all 3 Arf proteins, Arf1-Arf3, and 2 Arf-like proteins, Arl1 and Arl3. Our results indicate that of these proteins, Arf2 is required for viability and sensitivity to antifungal drugs. Repressible ARF2 expression results in defects in filamentous growth, cell wall integrity and virulence, likely due to alteration of the Golgi. Arl1 is also required for invasive filamentous growth and, although arl1/arl1 cells can initiate hyphal growth, hyphae are substantially shorter than that of the wild-type, due to the inability of this mutant to maintain hyphal growth at a single site. We show that this defect does not result from an alteration of phospholipid distribution and is unlikely to result from the sole Golgin Imh1 mislocalization, as Imh1 is not required for invasive filamentous growth. Rather, our results suggest that the arl1/arl1 hyphal growth defect results from increased secretion in this mutant. Strikingly, the arl1/arl1 mutant is drastically reduced in virulence during oropharyngeal candidiasis. Together, our results highlight the importance of Arl1 and Arf2 as key regulators of hyphal growth and virulence in C. albicans and identify a unique function of Arl1 in secretion.

  8. Yersinia outer protein YopE affects the actin cytoskeleton in Dictyostelium discoideum through targeting of multiple Rho family GTPases

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Vlahou, Georgia

    2009-07-14

    Abstract Background All human pathogenic Yersinia species share a virulence-associated type III secretion system that translocates Yersinia effector proteins into host cells to counteract infection-induced signaling responses and prevent phagocytosis. Dictyostelium discoideum has been recently used to study the effects of bacterial virulence factors produced by internalized pathogens. In this study we explored the potential of Dictyostelium as model organism for analyzing the effects of ectopically expressed Yersinia outer proteins (Yops). Results The Yersinia pseudotuberculosis virulence factors YopE, YopH, YopM and YopJ were expressed de novo within Dictyostelium and their effects on growth in axenic medium and on bacterial lawns were analyzed. No severe effect was observed for YopH, YopJ and YopM, but expression of YopE, which is a GTPase activating protein for Rho GTPases, was found to be highly detrimental. GFP-tagged YopE expressing cells had less conspicuous cortical actin accumulation and decreased amounts of F-actin. The actin polymerization response upon cAMP stimulation was impaired, although chemotaxis was unaffected. YopE also caused reduced uptake of yeast particles. These alterations are probably due to impaired Rac1 activation. We also found that YopE predominantly associates with intracellular membranes including the Golgi apparatus and inhibits the function of moderately overexpressed RacH. Conclusion The phenotype elicited by YopE in Dictyostelium can be explained, at least in part, by inactivation of one or more Rho family GTPases. It further demonstrates that the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum can be used as an efficient and easy-to-handle model organism in order to analyze the function of a translocated GAP protein of a human pathogen.

  9. General and Specific Contributions of RAN to Reading and Arithmetic Fluency in First Graders: A Longitudinal Latent Variable Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Hornung

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, we opted for a longitudinal design and examined rapid automatized naming (RAN performance from two perspectives. In a first step, we examined the structure of RAN performance from a general cognitive perspective. We investigated whether rapid naming measures (e.g., digit RAN and color RAN reflect a mainly domain-general factor or domain-specific factors. In a second step, we examined how the best fitting RAN model was related to reading and arithmetic outcomes, assessed several months later. Finally in a third step we took a clinical perspective and investigated specific contributions of RAN measures to reading and arithmetic outcomes. While RAN has emerged as a promising predictor of reading, the relationship between RAN and arithmetic has been less examined in the past. Hundred and twenty-two first graders completed seven RAN tasks, each comprising visually familiar stimuli such as digits, vowels, consonants, dice, finger-numeral configurations, objects, and colors. Four months later the same children completed a range of reading and arithmetic tasks. From a general descriptive perspective, structural equation modeling supports a one-dimensional RAN factor in 6- to -7-year-old children. However, from a clinical perspective, our findings emphasize the specific contributions of RANs. Interestingly, alphanumeric RANs (i.e., vowel RAN were most promising when predicting reading skills and number-specific RANs (i.e., finger-numeral configuration RAN were most promising when predicting arithmetic fluency. The implications for clinical and educational practices will be discussed.

  10. Effect of Engine Installation on Jet Noise using a Hybrid LES/RANS Approach Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Installation effects arising from propulsion airframe interaction are known to produce substantial variations in the in-situ jet noise. A hybrid LES/RANS...

  11. Mesh Generation and Adaption for High Reynolds Number RANS Computations Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal offers to provide NASA with an automatic mesh generator for the simulation of aerodynamic flows using Reynolds-Averages Navier-Stokes (RANS) models....

  12. Simvastatin enhances aquaporin-2 surface expression and urinary concentration in vasopressin-deficient Brattleboro rats through modulation of Rho GTPase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Zhang, Yan; Bouley, Richard; Chen, Ying; Matsuzaki, Toshiyuki; Nunes, Paula; Hasler, Udo; Brown, Dennis

    2011-01-01

    Statins are 3-hydroxyl-3-methyglutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitors that are commonly used to inhibit cholesterol biosynthesis. Emerging data have suggested that they also have “pleotropic effects,” including modulating actin cytoskeleton reorganization. Here, we report an effect of simvastatin on the trafficking of aquaporin-2 (AQP2). Specifically, simvastatin induced the membrane accumulation of AQP2 in cell cultures and kidneys in situ. The effect of simvastatin was independent of protein kinase A activation and phosphorylation at AQP2-Ser256, a critical event involved in vasopressin (VP)-regulated AQP2 trafficking. Further investigation showed that simvastatin inhibited endocytosis in parallel with downregulation of RhoA activity. Overexpression of active RhoA attenuated simvastatin's effect, suggesting the involvement of this small GTPase in simvastatin-mediated AQP2 trafficking. Finally, the effect of simvastatin on urinary concentration was investigated in VP-deficient Brattleboro rats. Simvastatin acutely (3–6 h) increased urinary concentration and decreased urine output in these animals. In summary, simvastatin regulates AQP2 trafficking in vitro and urinary concentration in vivo via events involving downregulation of Rho GTPase activity and inhibition of endocytosis. Our study provides an alternative mechanism to regulate AQP2 trafficking, bypassing the VP-vasopressin receptor signaling pathway. PMID:21511701

  13. A dynamic hybrid RANS/LES modeling methodology for turbulent/transitional flow field prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Mohammad Faridul

    A dynamic hybrid Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS)-Large Eddy Simulation (LES) modeling framework has been investigated and further developed to improve the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) prediction of turbulent flow features along with laminar-to-turbulent transitional phenomena. In recent years, the use of hybrid RANS/LES (HRL) models has become more common in CFD simulations, since HRL models offer more accuracy than RANS in regions of flow separation at a reduced cost relative to LES in attached boundary layers. The first part of this research includes evaluation and validation of a dynamic HRL (DHRL) model that aims to address issues regarding the RANS-to-LES zonal transition and explicit grid dependence, both of which are inherent to most current HRL models. Simulations of two test cases---flow over a backward facing step and flow over a wing with leading-edge ice accretion---were performed to assess the potential of the DHRL model for predicting turbulent features involved in mainly unsteady separated flow. The DHRL simulation results are compared with experimental data, along with the computational results for other HRL and RANS models. In summary, these comparisons demonstrate that the DHRL framework does address many of the weaknesses inherent in most current HRL models. Although HRL models are widely used in turbulent flow simulations, they have limitations for transitional flow predictions. Most HRL models include a fully turbulent RANS component for attached boundary layer regions. The small number of HRL models that do include transition-sensitive RANS models have issues related to the RANS model itself and to the zonal transition between RANS and LES. In order to address those issues, a new transition-sensitive HRL modeling methodology has been developed that includes the DHRL methodology and a physics-based transition-sensitive RANS model. The feasibility of the transition-sensitive dynamic HRL (TDHRL) model has been investigated by

  14. Aurora A phosphorylates MCAK to control ran-dependent spindle bipolarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Ems-McClung, Stephanie C; Walczak, Claire E

    2008-07-01

    During mitosis, mitotic centromere-associated kinesin (MCAK) localizes to chromatin/kinetochores, a cytoplasmic pool, and spindle poles. Its localization and activity in the chromatin region are regulated by Aurora B kinase; however, how the cytoplasmic- and pole-localized MCAK are regulated is currently not clear. In this study, we used Xenopus egg extracts to form spindles in the absence of chromatin and centrosomes and found that MCAK localization and activity are tightly regulated by Aurora A. This regulation is important to focus microtubules at aster centers and to facilitate the transition from asters to bipolar spindles. In particular, we found that MCAK colocalized with NuMA and XMAP215 at the center of Ran asters where its activity is regulated by Aurora A-dependent phosphorylation of S196, which contributes to proper pole focusing. In addition, we found that MCAK localization at spindle poles was regulated through another Aurora A phosphorylation site (S719), which positively enhances bipolar spindle formation. This is the first study that clearly defines a role for MCAK at the spindle poles as well as identifies another key Aurora A substrate that contributes to spindle bipolarity.

  15. Spontaneous cell polarization: Feedback control of Cdc42 GTPase breaks cellular symmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Sophie G

    2015-11-01

    Spontaneous polarization without spatial cues, or symmetry breaking, is a fundamental problem of spatial organization in biological systems. This question has been extensively studied using yeast models, which revealed the central role of the small GTPase switch Cdc42. Active Cdc42-GTP forms a coherent patch at the cell cortex, thought to result from amplification of a small initial stochastic inhomogeneity through positive feedback mechanisms, which induces cell polarization. Here, I review and discuss the mechanisms of Cdc42 activity self-amplification and dynamic turnover. A robust Cdc42 patch is formed through the combined effects of Cdc42 activity promoting its own activation and active Cdc42-GTP displaying reduced membrane detachment and lateral diffusion compared to inactive Cdc42-GDP. I argue the role of the actin cytoskeleton in symmetry breaking is not primarily to transport Cdc42 to the active site. Finally, negative feedback and competition mechanisms serve to control the number of polarization sites. © 2015 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Tuning a RANS k-e model for jet-in-crossflow simulations.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefantzi, Sophia; Ray, Jaideep; Arunajatesan, Srinivasan; DeChant, Lawrence Justin

    2013-09-01

    We develop a novel calibration approach to address the problem of predictive ke RANS simulations of jet-incrossflow. Our approach is based on the hypothesis that predictive ke parameters can be obtained by estimating them from a strongly vortical flow, specifically, flow over a square cylinder. In this study, we estimate three ke parameters, C%CE%BC, Ce2 and Ce1 by fitting 2D RANS simulations to experimental data. We use polynomial surrogates of 2D RANS for this purpose. We conduct an ensemble of 2D RANS runs using samples of (C%CE%BC;Ce2;Ce1) and regress Reynolds stresses to the samples using a simple polynomial. We then use this surrogate of the 2D RANS model to infer a joint distribution for the ke parameters by solving a Bayesian inverse problem, conditioned on the experimental data. The calibrated (C%CE%BC;Ce2;Ce1) distribution is used to seed an ensemble of 3D jet-in-crossflow simulations. We compare the ensemble's predictions of the flowfield, at two planes, to PIV measurements and estimate the predictive skill of the calibrated 3D RANS model. We also compare it against 3D RANS predictions using the nominal (uncalibrated) values of (C%CE%BC;Ce2;Ce1), and find that calibration delivers a significant improvement to the predictive skill of the 3D RANS model. We repeat the calibration using surrogate models based on kriging and find that the calibration, based on these more accurate models, is not much better that those obtained with simple polynomial surrogates. We discuss the reasons for this rather surprising outcome.

  17. An Enhanced OFDM Resource Allocation Algorithm in C-RAN Based 5G Public Safety Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Feng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Public Safety Network (PSN is the network for critical communication when disaster occurs. As a key technology in 5G, Cloud-Radio Access Network (C-RAN can play an important role in PSN instead of LTE-based RAN. This paper firstly introduces C-RAN based PSN architecture and models the OFDM resource allocation problem in C-RAN based PSN as an integer quadratic programming, which allows the trade-off between expected bitrates and allocating fairness of PSN Service User (PSU. However, C-RAN based PSN needs to improve the efficiency of allocating algorithm because of a mass of PSU-RRH associations when disaster occurs. To deal with it, the resources allocating problem with integer variables is relaxed into one with continuous variables in the first step and an algorithm based on Generalized Bender’s Decomposition (GBD is proposed to solve it. Then we use Feasible Pump (FP method to get a feasible integer solution on the original OFDM resources allocation problem. The final experiments show the total throughput achieved by C-RAN based PSN is at most higher by 19.17% than the LTE-based one. And the average computational time of the proposed GBD and FP algorithm is at most lower than Barrier by 51.5% and GBD with no relaxation by 30.1%, respectively.

  18. Involvement of rho-gtpases in fibroblast adhesion and fibronectine fibrillogenesis under stretch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guignandon, A.; Lambert, C.; Rattner, A.; Servotte, S.; Lapiere, C.; Nusgens, B.; Vico, L.

    The Rho family small GTPases play a crucial role in mediating cellular adaptation to mechanical stimulation (MS), and possibly to microgravity (μg), through effects on the cytoskeleton and cell adhesion which is, in turn, mainly regulated by fibronectin fibrillogenesis (FnF). It remains unclear how mechanical stimulation is transduced to the Rho signaling pathways and how it impacts on fibronectin (fbn) fibrillogenesis (FnF). μg (2 days, mission STS-095) led to de-adhesion of fibroblasts and modification of the underlying extracellular matrix. To determine whether GTPases modulated FnF, we generated stable cell lines expressing high level of activated RhoA and Rac1 (QL) as compared to wild type (WI26-WT). After MS application [8% deformation, 1Hz, 15 min., 3 times/day for 1-2 days], we quantified focal adhesion (vinculin, paxillin, FAKY397), f-actin stress fibers (Sf) and FnF with home-developed softwares. We reported that after MS, Sf are more rapidly (30min) formed under the nucleus in Wi26-WT (+100%) and Rac1 (+200%) than in RhoA (+20%). Vinculin & paxillin were only restricted to the cell edge in static conditions and homogeneously distributed after MS in WT and Rac1. The relative area of contacts (vinculin & paxillin) was more dramatically enhanced by MS in Rac1 (+80%) than in WT (+40%) and RhoA (+25%) indicating that new focal contacts are formed under MS and supported the presence of Sf. MS Activation of FAK (FAKY397) was clear in WT and Rac1 and reduced in RhoA. FnF was restricted to cell-cell contacts zone without any change in the relative area of fbn after a 2-days MS. However we found more numerous spots of fbn at the cell center in Rac1 as compared with RhoA & WT suggesting that these fibrillar contacts will grow upon maturation and modulate FnF. The results indicate that MS induces formation of Sf and focal adhesions and enhances FF. RhoA has been shown to induce the formation of Sf and focal adhesions, and Rac1 activation decreases Rho activity in

  19. Immobilized metal affinity cryogel-based high-throughput platform for screening bioprocess and chromatographic parameters of His6-GTPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Joyita; Kumar, Ashok

    2017-04-01

    Among various tools of product monitoring, chromatography is of vital importance as it also extends to the purification of product. Immobilized metal affinity cryogel (Cu(II)-iminodiacetic acid- and Ni(II)-nitrilotriacetic acid-polyacrylamide) minicolumns (diameter 8 mm, height 4 mm, void volume 250 μl) were inserted in open-ended 96-well plate and different chromatographic parameters and bioprocess conditions were analysed. The platform was first validated with lysozyme. Optimum binding of lysozyme (∼90%) was achieved when 50 μg of protein in 20 mM Tris, pH 8.0 was applied to the minicolumns with maximum recovery (∼90%) upon elution with 300 mM imidazole. Thereafter, the platform was screened for chromatographic conditions of His6-GTPase. Since cryogels have large pore size, they can easily process non-clarified samples containing debris and particulate matters. The bound enzymes on the gel retain its activity and therefore can be assayed on-column by adding substrate and then displacing the product. Highest binding of His6-GTPase was achieved when 50 μl of non-clarified cell lysate was applied to the cryogel and subsequently washed with 50 mM Tris, 150 mM NaCl, 5 mM MgCl2, 10 mM imidazole, pH 8.0 with dynamic and static binding capacities of ∼1.5 and 3 activity units. Maximum recovery was obtained upon elution with 300 mM imidazole with a purification fold of ∼10; the purity was also analysed by SDS-PAGE. The platform showed reproducible results which were validated by Bland-Altman plot. The minicolumn was also scaled up for chromatographic capture and recovery of His6-GTPase. The bioprocess conditions were monitored which displayed that optimum production of His6-GTPase was attained by induction with 200 μM isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactoside at 25 °C for 12 h. It was concluded that immobilized metal affinity cryogel-based platform can be successfully used as a high-throughput platform for screening of bioprocess and chromatographic

  20. Interaction of Cupidin/Homer2 with two actin cytoskeletal regulators, Cdc42 small GTPase and Drebrin, in dendritic spines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mori Nozomu

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Homer is a postsynaptic scaffold protein that links various synaptic signaling proteins, including the type I metabotropic glutamate receptor subunits 1α and 5, the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor, Shank and Cdc42 small GTPase. Overexpression of Homer induces changes in dendritic spine morphology in cultured hippocampal neurons. However, the molecular basis underpinning Homer-mediated spine morphogenesis remains unclear. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the structural and functional properties of the interaction between Cupidin/Homer2 and two actin-cytoskeletal regulators, Cdc42 small GTPase and Drebrin. Results Cupidin/Homer2 interacted with activated Cdc42 small GTPase via the Cdc42-binding domain that resides around amino acid residues 191–283, within the C-terminal coiled-coil domain. We generated a Cupidin deletion mutant lacking amino acids 191–230 (CPDΔ191–230, which showed decrease Cdc42-binding ability but maintained self-multimerization ability. Cupidin suppressed Cdc42-induced filopodia-like protrusion formation in HeLa cells, whereas CPDΔ191–230 failed to do so. In cultured hippocampal neurons, Cupidin was targeted to dendritic spines, whereas CPDΔ191–230 was distributed in dendritic shafts as well as spines. Overexpression of CPDΔ191–230 decreased the number of synapses and reduced the amplitudes of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents in hippocampal neurons. Cupidin interacted with a dendritic spine F-actin-binding protein, Drebrin, which possesses two Homer ligand motifs, via the N-terminal EVH-1 domain. CPDΔ191–230 overexpression decreased Drebrin clustering in the dendritic spines of hippocampal neurons. Conclusion These results indicate that Cupidin/Homer2 interacts with the dendritic spine actin regulators Cdc42 and Drebrin via its C-terminal and N-terminal domains, respectively, and that it may be involved in spine morphology and synaptic properties.

  1. The two TRAPP complexes of metazoans have distinct roles and act on different Rab GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, Falko; Galindo, Antonio; Muschalik, Nadine; Munro, Sean

    2017-12-22

    Originally identified in yeast, transport protein particle (TRAPP) complexes are Rab GTPase exchange factors that share a core set of subunits. TRAPPs were initially found to act on Ypt1, the yeast orthologue of Rab1, but recent studies have found that yeast TRAPPII can also activate the Rab11 orthologues Ypt31/32. Mammals have two TRAPP complexes, but their role is less clear, and they contain subunits that are not found in the yeast complexes but are essential for cell growth. To investigate TRAPP function in metazoans, we show that Drosophila melanogaster have two TRAPP complexes similar to those in mammals and that both activate Rab1, whereas one, TRAPPII, also activates Rab11. TRAPPII is not essential but becomes so in the absence of the gene parcas that encodes the Drosophila orthologue of the SH3BP5 family of Rab11 guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). Thus, in metazoans, Rab1 activation requires TRAPP subunits not found in yeast, and Rab11 activation is shared by TRAPPII and an unrelated GEF that is metazoan specific. © 2018 MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology.

  2. [Study of the mechanism of Ras-dva small GTPase intracellular localization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tereshina, M B; Belousov, V V; Zaraĭskiĭ, A G

    2007-01-01

    An analysis of amino acid sequences of small GTPases of the Ras-dva family allowed us to determine the C-terminal prenylation motif, which could be responsible for the membrane localization of these proteins. We demonstrated using in vivo EGFP tracing that the Ras-dva small GTPases from Xenopus laevis embryo cells and NIH-3T3 fibroblasts are localized on both plasma membranes and endomembranes (the endoplasmic reticulum, the Golgi apparatus, and vesicles). At the same time, the replacement of the Cys residue, the SH group of which must be theoretically farnesylated, in the C-terminal prenylation motif of the Ras-dva small GTPase by the Ser residue prevented the membrane localization of the protein. These results indicate that the C-terminal prenylation site is critical for the membrane localization of small Ras-dva GTPases.

  3. Role of Rab family GTPases and their effectors in melanosomal logistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohbayashi, Norihiko; Fukuda, Mitsunori

    2012-04-01

    Rab GTPases constitute a family of small GTPases that regulate a variety of membrane trafficking events in all eukaryotic cells by recruiting their specific effector molecules. Recent accumulating evidence indicates that members of the mammalian Rab small GTPase family are involved in certain physiological and pathological processes. In particular, functional impairments of specific Rab proteins, e.g. Rab38 and Rab27A, their regulators or their effectors cause pigmentation disorders in humans and coat colour variations in mice because such impairments cause defects in melanosomal logistics, i.e. defects in melanosome biogenesis and transport. Genetic and biochemical analyses of the gene products responsible for mammalian pigmentation disorders in the past decade have revealed that Rab-mediated endosomal transport systems and melanosome transport systems play crucial roles in the efficient darkening of mammalian hair and skin. In this article, we review current knowledge regarding melanosomal logistics, with particular focus on the roles of Rab small GTPases and their effectors.

  4. Nitric oxide enhances keratinocyte cell migration by regulating Rho GTPase via cGMP-PKG signalling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rixing Zhan

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO has been shown to improve wound healing, but the mechanism underlying this function is not well defined. Here, we explored the effect of NO on the migration of a human keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT and its possible mechanism.The effects of NO on HaCaT cells in the presence of different concentrations of the NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP were evaluated in a cell migration assay. Subsequently, the cytoskeleton reorganization of cultured HaCaT cells stained with rhodamine-phalloidin was observed with a confocal laser scanning microscope. The mRNA expression and active proteins of CDC42, Rac1 and RhoA in the cultured cells were determined via RT-PCR and pull-down assays, respectively. Furthermore, the roles of various inhibitors or agonists specific to cGMP, PKG and CDC42, Rac1, RhoA in the effects of NO on HaCaT cell migration, F-actin stress fibre formation, and Rho GTPase expression were observed.It was also found HaCaT cell migration was increased by SNP in a dose-dependent manner, and the other two NO donors either spermine NONOate or SNAP had almost the same effects on HaCat cell migrations. The formation of F-actin stress fibres in SNP-treated HaCaT cells was increased. The mRNA expression and the active proteins of CDC42, Rac1 and RhoA were found to be upregulated after SNP treatment. Similar effects were observed after the cells were treated with a cGMP or PKG agonist. Additionally, the SNP-mediated upregulation of the mRNA expression and the active proteins of CDC42, Rac1 and RhoA were inhibited by the addition of an inhibitor of cGMP or PKG. Moreover, the SNP-mediated promoting effects of migration and cytoskeleton reorganization were inhibited by treatment with inhibitors of cGMP, PKG, CDC42, Rac1 and RhoA respectively.Our data indicated that the stimulatory effects of NO on cell migration of HaCaT cells are mediated by the cGMP signalling pathway via the upregulation of Rho-GTPase expression, which might promote

  5. Are small GTPases signal hubs in sugar-mediated induction of fructan biosynthesis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tita Ritsema

    Full Text Available External sugar initiates biosynthesis of the reserve carbohydrate fructan, but the molecular processes mediating this response remain obscure. Previously it was shown that a phosphatase and a general kinase inhibitor hamper fructan accumulation. We use various phosphorylation inhibitors both in barley and in Arabidopsis and show that the expression of fructan biosynthetic genes is dependent on PP2A and different kinases such as Tyr-kinases and PI3-kinases. To further characterize the phosphorylation events involved, comprehensive analysis of kinase activities in the cell was performed using a PepChip, an array of >1000 kinase consensus substrate peptide substrates spotted on a chip. Comparison of kinase activities in sugar-stimulated and mock(sorbitol-treated Arabidopsis demonstrates the altered phosphorylation of many consensus substrates and documents the differences in plant kinase activity upon sucrose feeding. The different phosphorylation profiles obtained are consistent with sugar-mediated alterations in Tyr phosphorylation, cell cycling, and phosphoinositide signaling, and indicate cytoskeletal rearrangements. The results lead us to infer a central role for small GTPases in sugar signaling.

  6. Rho GTPases: Novel Players in the Regulation of the DNA Damage Response?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhard Fritz

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1 belongs to the family of Ras-homologous small GTPases. It is well characterized as a membrane-bound signal transducing molecule that is involved in the regulation of cell motility and adhesion as well as cell cycle progression, mitosis, cell death and gene expression. Rac1 also adjusts cellular responses to genotoxic stress by regulating the activity of stress kinases, including c-Jun-N-terminal kinase/stress-activated protein kinase (JNK/SAPK and p38 kinases as well as related transcription factors. Apart from being found on the inner side of the outer cell membrane and in the cytosol, Rac1 has also been detected inside the nucleus. Different lines of evidence indicate that genotoxin-induced DNA damage is able to activate nuclear Rac1. The exact mechanisms involved and the biological consequences, however, are unclear. The data available so far indicate that Rac1 might integrate DNA damage independent and DNA damage dependent cellular stress responses following genotoxin treatment, thereby coordinating mechanisms of the DNA damage response (DDR that are related to DNA repair, survival and cell death.

  7. The pseudo GTPase CENP-M drives human kinetochore assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basilico, Federica; Maffini, Stefano; Weir, John R; Prumbaum, Daniel; Rojas, Ana M; Zimniak, Tomasz; De Antoni, Anna; Jeganathan, Sadasivam; Voss, Beate; van Gerwen, Suzan; Krenn, Veronica; Massimiliano, Lucia; Valencia, Alfonso; Vetter, Ingrid R; Herzog, Franz; Raunser, Stefan; Pasqualato, Sebastiano; Musacchio, Andrea

    2014-07-08

    Kinetochores, multi-subunit complexes that assemble at the interface with centromeres, bind spindle microtubules to ensure faithful delivery of chromosomes during cell division. The configuration and function of the kinetochore-centromere interface is poorly understood. We report that a protein at this interface, CENP-M, is structurally and evolutionarily related to small GTPases but is incapable of GTP-binding and conformational switching. We show that CENP-M is crucially required for the assembly and stability of a tetramer also comprising CENP-I, CENP-H, and CENP-K, the HIKM complex, which we extensively characterize through a combination of structural, biochemical, and cell biological approaches. A point mutant affecting the CENP-M/CENP-I interaction hampers kinetochore assembly and chromosome alignment and prevents kinetochore recruitment of the CENP-T/W complex, questioning a role of CENP-T/W as founder of an independent axis of kinetochore assembly. Our studies identify a single pathway having CENP-C as founder, and CENP-H/I/K/M and CENP-T/W as CENP-C-dependent followers.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02978.001. Copyright © 2014, Basilico et al.

  8. Vesicular Trafficking Defects, Developmental Abnormalities, and Alterations in the Cellular Death Process Occur in Cell Lines that Over-Express Dictyostelium GTPase, Rab2, and Rab2 Mutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Maringer

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Small molecular weight GTPase Rab2 has been shown to be a resident of pre-Golgi intermediates and required for protein transport from the ER to the Golgi complex, however, the function of Rab2 in Dictyostelium has yet to be fully characterized. Using cell lines that over-express DdRab2, as well as cell lines over-expressing constitutively active (CA, and dominant negative (DN forms of the GTPase, we report a functional role in vesicular transport specifically phagocytosis, and endocytosis. Furthermore, Rab2 like other GTPases cycles between an active GTP-bound and an inactive GDP-bound state. We found that this GTP/GDP cycle for DdRab2 is crucial for normal Dictyostelium development and cell–cell adhesion. Similar to Rab5 and Rab7 in C. elegans, we found that DdRab2 plays a role in programmed cell death, possibly in the phagocytic removal of apoptotic corpses.

  9. Quantifying Model Form Uncertainty in RANS Simulation of Wing-Body Junction Flow

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Jin-Long; Xiao, Heng

    2016-01-01

    Wing-body junction flows occur when a boundary layer encounters an airfoil mounted on the surface. The corner flow near the trailing edge is challenging for the linear eddy viscosity Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) models, due to the interaction of two perpendicular boundary layers which leads to highly anisotropic Reynolds stress at the near wall region. Recently, Xiao et al. proposed a physics-informed Bayesian framework to quantify and reduce the model-form uncertainties in RANS simulations by utilizing sparse observation data. In this work, we extend this framework to incorporate the use of wall function in RANS simulations, and apply the extended framework to the RANS simulation of wing-body junction flow. Standard RANS simulations are performed on a 3:2 elliptic nose and NACA0020 tail cylinder joined at their maximum thickness location. Current results show that both the posterior mean velocity and the Reynolds stress anisotropy show better agreement with the experimental data at the corner regio...

  10. Rapid automatized naming (RAN) in children with ADHD: An ex-Gaussian analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Matthew; Jacobson, Lisa A; Hague, Cole; Bellows, Alison; Denckla, Martha B; Mahone, E Mark

    2017-07-01

    Children with ADHD demonstrate increased frequent "lapses" in performance on tasks in which the stimulus presentation rate is externally controlled, leading to increased variability in response times. It is less clear whether these lapses are also evident during performance on self-paced tasks, e.g., rapid automatized naming (RAN), or whether RAN inter-item pause time variability uniquely predicts reading performance. A total of 80 children aged 9 to 14 years-45 children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and 35 typically developing (TD) children-completed RAN and reading fluency measures. RAN responses were digitally recorded for analyses. Inter-stimulus pause time distributions (excluding between-row pauses) were analyzed using traditional (mean, standard deviation [SD], coefficient of variation [CV]) and ex-Gaussian (mu, sigma, tau) methods. Children with ADHD were found to be significantly slower than TD children (p reading fluency. RAN response time distributions were also significantly more variable (SD, tau) in children with ADHD. Hierarchical regression revealed that the exponential component (tau) of the letter-naming response time distribution uniquely predicted reading fluency in children with ADHD (p reading, ADHD symptom severity and age. The findings suggest that children with ADHD (without word-level reading difficulties) manifest slowed performance on tasks of reading fluency; however, this "slowing" may be due in part to lapses from ongoing performance that can be assessed directly using ex-Gaussian methods that capture excessively long response times.

  11. Physcomitrella patens: a model to investigate the role of RAC/ROP GTPase signalling in tip growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eklund, D Magnus; Svensson, Emma M; Kost, Benedikt

    2010-04-01

    Polarized cell expansion plays an important role in plant morphogenesis. Tip growth is a dramatic form of this process, which is widely used as a model to study its regulation by RAC/ROP GTPase signalling. During the dominant haploid phase of its life cycle, the moss Physcomitrella patens contains different types of cells that expand by tip growth. Physcomitrella is a highly attractive experimental system because its genome has been sequenced, and transgene integration by homologous recombination occurs in this plant at frequencies allowing effective gene targeting. Furthermore, together with the vascular spikemoss Selaginella moellendorffii, whose genome has also been sequenced, the non-vascular moss Physcomitrella provides an evolutionary link between green algae and angiosperms. BLAST searches established that the Physcomitrella and Selaginella genomes encode not only putative RAC/ROP GTPases, but also homologues of all known regulators of polarized RAC/ROP signalling, as well as of key effectors acting in signalling cascades downstream of RAC/ROP activity. Nucleotide sequence relationships within seven different families of Physcomitrella, Selaginella, Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco) genes with distinct functions in RAC/ROP signalling were characterized based on extensive maximum likelihood and Neighbor-Joining analyses. The results of these analyses are interpreted in the light of current knowledge concerning expression patterns and molecular functions of RAC/ROP signalling proteins in angiosperms. A key aim of this study is to facilitate the use of Physcomitrella as a model to investigate the molecular control of tip growth in plants.

  12. Metformin, Independent of AMPK, Inhibits mTORC1 In a Rag GTPase-Dependent Manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalender, Adem; Selvaraj, Anand; Kim, So Young; Gulati, Pawan; lé, Sophie Br; Viollet, Benoit; Kemp, Bruce; Bardeesy, Nabeel; Dennis, Patrick; Schlager, John J.; Marette, André; Kozma, Sara C.; Thomas, George

    2010-01-01

    Dysfunctional mTORC1 signaling is associated with a number of human pathologies owing to its central role in controlling cell growth, proliferation, and metabolism. Regulation of mTORC1 is achieved by the integration of multiple inputs, including those of mitogens, nutrients, and energy. It is thought that agents that increase the cellular AMP/ATP ratio, such as the anti-diabetic biguanides metformin and phenformin, inhibit mTORC1 through AMPK activation of TSC1/2-dependent or -independent mechanisms. Unexpectedly, we found that biguanides inhibit mTORC1 signaling, not only in the absence of TSC1/2, but also in the absence of AMPK. Consistent with these observations, in two distinct pre-clinical models of cancer and diabetes, metformin acts to suppress mTORC1 signaling in an AMPK-independent manner. We found that the ability of biguanides to inhibit mTORC1 activation and signaling is, instead, dependent on the Rag GTPases. PMID:20444419

  13. Identification of potential small molecule binding pockets on Rho family GTPases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Manuel Ortiz-Sanchez

    Full Text Available Rho GTPases are conformational switches that control a wide variety of signaling pathways critical for eukaryotic cell development and proliferation. They represent attractive targets for drug design as their aberrant function and deregulated activity is associated with many human diseases including cancer. Extensive high-resolution structures (>100 and recent mutagenesis studies have laid the foundation for the design of new structure-based chemotherapeutic strategies. Although the inhibition of Rho signaling with drug-like compounds is an active area of current research, very little attention has been devoted to directly inhibiting Rho by targeting potential allosteric non-nucleotide binding sites. By avoiding the nucleotide binding site, compounds may minimize the potential for undesirable off-target interactions with other ubiquitous GTP and ATP binding proteins. Here we describe the application of molecular dynamics simulations, principal component analysis, sequence conservation analysis, and ensemble small-molecule fragment mapping to provide an extensive mapping of potential small-molecule binding pockets on Rho family members. Characterized sites include novel pockets in the vicinity of the conformationaly responsive switch regions as well as distal sites that appear to be related to the conformations of the nucleotide binding region. Furthermore the use of accelerated molecular dynamics simulation, an advanced sampling method that extends the accessible time-scale of conventional simulations, is found to enhance the characterization of novel binding sites when conformational changes are important for the protein mechanism.

  14. Does ability to establish sound-symbol pairings mediate the RAN reading relationship?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Mads; Juul, Holger; Elbro, Carsten

    for animals in a paired associate learning task. These animals were then used in a rapid naming task. Results Preliminary results show that reading correlated with the amount of training required for learning the animal names (r=-.19, p=.06). RAN speed with the same animals did not correlate with reading......Performance on tests to rapidly name letters and digits has been shown to correlate with reading. One possible reason is that these tests probe the ability to learn and automatise symbol-sound associations. However, most studies have not controlled for the amount of experience with the RAN......-items, so it is unclear whether it is the experience or the ability to take advantage of the experience that is responsible for the correlation between RAN and reading. Paired associate learning tasks have been shown to differentiate dyslexics from controls, and to correlate with reading in unselected...

  15. Development of a Hybrid RANS/LES Method for Compressible Mixing Layer Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiadis, Nicholas J.; Alexander, J. Iwan D.; Reshotko, Eli

    2001-01-01

    A hybrid method has been developed for simulations of compressible turbulent mixing layers. Such mixing layers dominate the flows in exhaust systems of modem day aircraft and also those of hypersonic vehicles currently under development. The hybrid method uses a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) procedure to calculate wall bounded regions entering a mixing section, and a Large Eddy Simulation (LES) procedure to calculate the mixing dominated regions. A numerical technique was developed to enable the use of the hybrid RANS/LES method on stretched, non-Cartesian grids. The hybrid RANS/LES method is applied to a benchmark compressible mixing layer experiment. Preliminary two-dimensional calculations are used to investigate the effects of axial grid density and boundary conditions. Actual LES calculations, performed in three spatial directions, indicated an initial vortex shedding followed by rapid transition to turbulence, which is in agreement with experimental observations.

  16. Ras-dva, a member of novel family of small GTPases, is required for the anterior ectoderm patterning in the Xenopus laevis embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tereshina, Maria B; Zaraisky, Andrey G; Novoselov, Vladimir V

    2006-02-01

    Ras-like small GTPases are involved in the regulation of many processes essential for the specification of the vertebrate body plan. Recently, we identified the gene of novel small GTPase Ras-dva, which is specifically expressed at the anterior margin of the neural plate of the Xenopus laevis embryo. Now, we demonstrate that Ras-dva and its homologs in other species constitute a novel protein family, distinct from the previously known families of small GTPases. We show that the expression of Ras-dva begins during gastrulation throughout the anterior ectoderm and is activated by the homeodomain transcription factor Otx2; however, later on, Ras-dva expression is inhibited in the anterior neural plate by another homeodomain factor Xanf1. Downregulation of Ras-dva functioning by the dominant-negative mutant or by the antisense morpholino oligonucleotides results in severe malformations of the forebrain and derivatives of the cranial placodes. Importantly, although the observed abnormalities can be rescued by co-injection of the Ras-dva mRNA, they cannot be rescued by the mRNA of the closest Ras-dva homolog from another family of small GTPases, Ras. This fact indicates functional specificity of the Ras-dva signaling pathway. At the molecular level, downregulation of Ras-dva inhibits the expression of several regulators of the anterior neural plate and folds patterning, such as Otx2, BF-1 (also known as Foxg1), Xag2, Pax6, Slug and Sox9, and interferes with FGF8 signaling within the anterior ectoderm. By contrast, expression of the epidermal regulator BMP4 and its target genes, Vent1, Vent2b and Msx1, is upregulated. Together, the data obtained indicate that Ras-dva is an essential component of the signaling network that patterns the early anterior neural plate and the adjacent ectoderm in the Xenopus laevis embryos.

  17. Crystal Structure Analysis of Wild Type and Fast Hydrolyzing Mutant of EhRabX3, a Tandem Ras Superfamily GTPase from Entamoeba histolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Vijay Kumar; Chandra, Mintu; Saito-Nakano, Yumiko; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi; Datta, Sunando

    2016-01-16

    The enteric protozoan parasite, Entamoeba histolytica, is the causative agent of amoebic dysentery, liver abscess and colitis in human. Vesicular trafficking plays a key role in the survival and virulence of the protozoan and is regulated by various Rab GTPases. EhRabX3 is a catalytically inefficient amoebic Rab protein, which is unique among the eukaryotic Ras superfamily by virtue of its tandem domain organization. Here, we report the crystal structures of GDP-bound fast hydrolyzing mutant (V71A/K73Q) and GTP-bound wild type EhRabX3 at 3.1 and 2.8Å resolutions, respectively. Though both G-domains possess "phosphate binding loop containing nucleoside triphosphate hydrolases fold", only the N-terminal domain binds to guanine nucleotide. The relative orientation of the N-terminal domain and C-terminal domain is stabilized by numerous inter-domain interactions. Compared to other Ras superfamily members, both the GTPase domains displayed large deviation in switch II perhaps due to non-conservative substitutions in this region. As a result, entire switch II is restructured and moved away from the nucleotide binding pocket, providing a rationale for the diminished GTPase activity of EhRabX3. The N-terminal GTPase domain possesses unusually large number of cysteine residues. X-ray crystal structure of the fast hydrolyzing mutant of EhRabX3 revealed that C39 and C163 formed an intra-molecular disulfide bond. Subsequent mutational and biochemical studies suggest that C39 and C163 are critical for maintaining the structural integrity and function of EhRabX3. Structure-guided functional investigation of cysteine mutants could provide the physiological implications of the disulfide bond and could allow us to design potential inhibitors for the better treatment of intestinal amebiasis. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Model-Invariant Hybrid LES-RANS Computation of Separated Flow Past Periodic Hills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    The requirement that physical quantities not vary with a hybrid LESRANS model's blending parameter imposes conditions on the computation that lead to better results across LES-RANS transitions. This promises to allow placement of those transitions so that LES is performed only where required by the physics, improving computational efficiency. The approach is applied to separated flow past periodic hills, where good predictions of separation-bubble size are seen due to the gradual, controlled, LES-RANS transition and the resulting enhanced near-wall eddy viscosity.

  19. The small GTPase RhoB regulates TNFα signaling in endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Kroon

    Full Text Available The inflammatory response of endothelial cells triggered by cytokines such as TNFα and IL1β plays a pivotal role in innate immunity. Upon pro-inflammatory cytokine stimulation, endothelial cells produce chemokines and cytokines that attract and activate leukocytes, and express high levels of leukocyte adhesion molecules. This process is mediated by intracellular signaling cascades triggered by activation of e.g. the TNFα receptor (TNFR that lead to the activation of the NFκB transcription factor and of MAP kinases, which in turn activate inflammatory gene transcription. We found that the small GTPase RhoB was strongly and rapidly upregulated in primary human endothelial cells by TNFα, IL1β and LPS. We subsequently investigated the role of RhoB in the regulation of TNFR signaling in endothelial cells by silencing RhoB expression with siRNA. We provide evidence that the TNFα-induced activation of p38 MAP kinase is strongly dependent on RhoB, but not on RhoA, while JNK activation is regulated by both RhoB and RhoA. Consistent with the important role of p38 MAP kinase in inflammation, we demonstrate that loss of RhoB impairs TNFα-induced ICAM-1 expression and reduces cell production of IL6 and IL8. In addition, we show that RhoB silencing alters the intracellular traffic of TNFα after endocytosis. Since RhoB is a known regulator of the intracellular traffic of membrane receptors, our data suggest that RhoB controls TNFα signaling through the regulation of the TNFR traffic.

  20. ROP GTPase-mediated auxin signaling regulates pavement cell interdigitation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Deshu; Ren, Huibo; Fu, Ying

    2015-01-01

    In multicellular plant organs, cell shape formation depends on molecular switches to transduce developmental or environmental signals and to coordinate cell-to-cell communication. Plants have a specific subfamily of the Rho GTPase family, usually called Rho of Plants (ROP), which serve as a critical signal transducer involved in many cellular processes. In the last decade, important advances in the ROP-mediated regulation of plant cell morphogenesis have been made by using Arabidopsis thaliana leaf and cotyledon pavement cells. Especially, the auxin-ROP signaling networks have been demonstrated to control interdigitated growth of pavement cells to form jigsaw-puzzle shapes. Here, we review findings related to the discovery of this novel auxin-signaling mechanism at the cell surface. This signaling pathway is to a large extent independent of the well-known Transport Inhibitor Response (TIR)-Auxin Signaling F-Box (AFB) pathway, and instead requires Auxin Binding Protein 1 (ABP1) interaction with the plasma membrane-localized, transmembrane kinase (TMK) receptor-like kinase to regulate ROP proteins. Once activated, ROP influences cytoskeletal organization and inhibits endocytosis of the auxin transporter PIN1. The present review focuses on ROP signaling and its self-organizing feature allowing ROP proteins to serve as a bustling signal decoder and integrator for plant cell morphogenesis. © 2014 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  1. A Conserved Role for Atlastin GTPases in Regulating Lipid Droplet Size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin W. Klemm

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Lipid droplets (LDs are the major fat storage organelles in eukaryotic cells, but how their size is regulated is unknown. Using genetic screens in C. elegans for LD morphology defects in intestinal cells, we found that mutations in atlastin, a GTPase required for homotypic fusion of endoplasmic reticulum (ER membranes, cause not only ER morphology defects, but also a reduction in LD size. Similar results were obtained after depletion of atlastin or expression of a dominant-negative mutant, whereas overexpression of atlastin had the opposite effect. Atlastin depletion in Drosophila fat bodies also reduced LD size and decreased triglycerides in whole animals, sensitizing them to starvation. In mammalian cells, co-overexpression of atlastin-1 and REEP1, a paralog of the ER tubule-shaping protein DP1/REEP5, generates large LDs. The effect of atlastin-1 on LD size correlates with its activity to promote membrane fusion in vitro. Our results indicate that atlastin-mediated fusion of ER membranes is important for LD size regulation.

  2. Molecular imaging analysis of Rab GTPases in the regulation of phagocytosis and macropinocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egami, Youhei

    2016-01-01

    Phagocytosis and macropinocytosis, actin-dependent endocytic pathways that mediate the uptake of particles and fluid, respectively, are fundamental routes that enable cells to sample their environment, eliminate pathogens and endogenous cell debris, and contribute to immunoprotection and the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. These processes require a well-organized network of actin cytoskeletal remodeling and membrane transport, which are spatiotemporally regulated by small GTPases. The Rab family of small GTPases, which functions as molecular switches, plays central roles in intracellular membrane trafficking. Although multiple Rab proteins are localized to phagosomes and regulate phagosome maturation, the precise role of each Rab family member in Fcγ receptor (FcγR)-mediated phagocytosis is not fully characterized. Recently, we revealed that Rab35 and Rab20 are important regulators of phagosome formation and maturation, respectively. This review summarizes the functional implication of these Rab GTPases during FcγR-mediated phagocytosis in macrophages. Currently, compared with our knowledge of the regulatory mechanisms of receptor-mediated endocytosis including phagocytosis, the molecular components and signaling cascades of macropinocytosis remain poorly elucidated. Our time-lapse imaging showed that several Rab GTPases are sequentially recruited to the membrane of macropinosomes. Based on our observations, these findings regarding the spatiotemporal localization of Rab GTPases during macropinocytosis are introduced.

  3. Regulation of ER-Golgi Transport Dynamics by GTPases in Budding Yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuyuki Suda

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A large number of proteins are synthesized de novo in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. They are transported through the Golgi apparatus and then delivered to their proper destinations. The ER and the Golgi play a central role in protein processing and sorting and show dynamic features in their forms. Ras super family small GTPases mediate the protein transport through and between these organelles. The ER-localized GTPase, Sar1, facilitates the formation of COPII transport carriers at the ER exit sites (ERES on the ER for the transport of cargo proteins from the ER to the Golgi. The Golgi-localized GTPase, Arf1, controls intra-Golgi, and Golgi-to-ER transport of cargo proteins by the formation of COPI carriers. Rab GTPases localized at the Golgi, which are responsible for fusion of membranes, are thought to establish the identities of compartments. Recent evidence suggests that these small GTPases regulate not only discrete sites for generation/fusion of transport carriers, but also membrane dynamics of the organelles where they locate to ensure the integrity of transport. Here we summarize the current understandings about the membrane traffic between these organelles and highlight the cutting-edge advances from super-resolution live imaging of budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  4. Human Lsg1 defines a family of essential GTPases that correlates with the evolution of compartmentalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scheffzek Klaus

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Compartmentalization is a key feature of eukaryotic cells, but its evolution remains poorly understood. GTPases are the oldest enzymes that use nucleotides as substrates and they participate in a wide range of cellular processes. Therefore, they are ideal tools for comparative genomic studies aimed at understanding how aspects of biological complexity such as cellular compartmentalization evolved. Results We describe the identification and characterization of a unique family of circularly permuted GTPases represented by the human orthologue of yeast Lsg1p. We placed the members of this family in the phylogenetic context of the YlqF Related GTPase (YRG family, which are present in Eukarya, Bacteria and Archea and include the stem cell regulator Nucleostemin. To extend the computational analysis, we showed that hLsg1 is an essential GTPase predominantly located in the endoplasmic reticulum and, in some cells, in Cajal bodies in the nucleus. Comparison of localization and siRNA datasets suggests that all members of the family are essential GTPases that have increased in number as the compartmentalization of the eukaryotic cell and the ribosome biogenesis pathway have evolved. Conclusion We propose a scenario, consistent with our data, for the evolution of this family: cytoplasmic components were first acquired, followed by nuclear components, and finally the mitochondrial and chloroplast elements were derived from different bacterial species, in parallel with the formation of the nucleolus and the specialization of nuclear components.

  5. FtsZDr, a tubulin homologue in radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans is characterized as a GTPase exhibiting polymerization/depolymerization dynamics in vitro and FtsZ ring formation in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, Kruti Mehta; Tewari, Raghvendra; Misra, Hari Sharan

    2014-05-01

    The GTPase-dependent polymerization/depolymerization dynamics of FtsZ regulate bacterial cell division in vivo. Deinococcus radiodurans is better known for its extraordinary radioresistance and therefore, the characterization of FtsZ of this bacterium (FtsZDr) would be required to understand the mechanisms underlying regulation of cell division in response to DNA damage. Recombinant FtsZDr bound to GTP and showed GTPase activity. It produced bundles of protofilaments in the presence of either GTP or Mg2+ ions. But the formation of the higher size ordered structures required both GTP and Mg2+ in vitro. It showed polymerization/depolymerization dynamics as a function of GTP and Mg2+. Interestingly, ATP interacted with FtsZDr and stimulated its GTPase activity by ∼2-fold possibly by increasing both substrate affinity and rate of reaction. FtsZDr-GFP expressing in D. radiodurans produced typical Z ring perpendicular to the plane of first cell division. These results suggested that FtsZDr is a GTPase in vitro and produces typical Z ring at the mid cell position in D. radiodurans. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Modelling of sand transport under wave-generated sheet flows with a RANS diffusion model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hassan, Wael; Ribberink, Jan S.

    2010-01-01

    A 1DV-RANS diffusion model is used to study sand transport processes in oscillatory flat-bed/sheet flow conditions. The central aim is the verification of the model with laboratory data and to identify processes controlling the magnitude and direction (‘onshore’/‘offshore’) of the net time-averaged

  7. Computing the flow past Vortex Generators : Comparison between RANS Simulations and Experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manolesos, M.; Sorensen, NN; Troldborg, N.; Florentie, L.; Papadakis, G; Voutsinas, S.

    2016-01-01

    The flow around a wind turbine airfoil equipped with Vortex Generators (VGs) is examined. Predictions from three different Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) solvers with two different turbulence models and two different VG modelling approaches are compared between them and with experimental

  8. Computing the flow past Vortex Generators: Comparison between RANS Simulations and Experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manolesos, M.; Sørensen, Niels N.; Troldborg, Niels

    2016-01-01

    The flow around a wind turbine airfoil equipped with Vortex Generators (VGs) is examined. Predictions from three different Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) solvers with two different turbulence models and two different VG modelling approaches are compared between them and with experimental ...

  9. Inadequacy representation of flamelet-based RANS model for turbulent non-premixed flame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myoungkyu; Oliver, Todd; Moser, Robert

    2017-11-01

    Stochastic representations for model inadequacy in RANS-based models of non-premixed jet flames are developed and explored. Flamelet-based RANS models are attractive for engineering applications relative to higher-fidelity methods because of their low computational costs. However, the various assumptions inherent in such models introduce errors that can significantly affect the accuracy of computed quantities of interest. In this work, we develop an approach to represent the model inadequacy of the flamelet-based RANS model. In particular, we pose a physics-based, stochastic PDE for the triple correlation of the mixture fraction. This additional uncertain state variable is then used to construct perturbations of the PDF for the instantaneous mixture fraction, which is used to obtain an uncertain perturbation of the flame temperature. A hydrogen-air non-premixed jet flame is used to demonstrate the representation of the inadequacy of the flamelet-based RANS model. This work was supported by DARPA-EQUiPS(Enabling Quantification of Uncertainty in Physical Systems) program.

  10. Optimal Assignment of Cells in C-RAN Deployments with Multiple BBU Pools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Henrik; Checko, Aleksandra; Al-obaidi, Rami

    2015-01-01

    recommend to divide the area into multiple BBU Pools. In this paper we show how to optimally assign cells to different BBU Pools in such a scenario. By using Integer Linear Programming (ILP) method we derive engineering guidelines for minimizing the CAPital EXpenditure (CAPEX) of C-RAN deployment....

  11. Western Culture in Japanese Film: Kurosawa's "Throne of Blood" and "Ran."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Peter E.

    Akira Kurosawa, the most popular Asian film maker with audiences in the United States, has found in William Shakespeare's plays themes and plots that resonate within Japanese culture. While the translations of "Macbeth" into "Throne of Blood" and "King Lear" into "Ran" are quite direct and literal with only…

  12. Analysis of vegetation effect on waves using a vertical 2-D RANS model

    Science.gov (United States)

    A vertical two-dimensional (2-D) model has been applied in the simulation of wave propagation through vegetated water bodies. The model is based on an existing model SOLA-VOF which solves the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations with the finite difference method on a staggered rectangula...

  13. Optimizing Cloud-RAN Deployments in Real-life Scenarios Using Microwave Radio

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-obaidi, Rami; Checko, Aleksandra; Holm, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    derive engineering guidelines for minimizing the CAPital EXpenditure (CAPEX) of C-RAN deployment. We show for which population density and span of BBU Pool coverage usage of Microwave Radio (MWR) links is viable. For larger scale deployment we recommend to divide the area into multiple BBU Pools....

  14. Ardo Ran Varres elustab härra Tartüffi / Tiit Tuumalu

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tuumalu, Tiit, 1971-

    2005-01-01

    2.-9. septembrini Pärnus, Haapsalus, Tallinnas, Viljandis ja Tartus toimuvast tummfilmi ühe olulisema lavastaja F. W. Murnau "Tartüff" filmikontserdist "Tartüff live", esitaja Varrese ansambel ARV Ensemble. Ardo Ran Varrese töödest

  15. Analysis of Binding Site Hot Spots on the Surface of Ras GTPase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buhrman, Greg; O; #8242; Connor, Casey; Zerbe, Brandon; Kearney, Bradley M.; Napoleon, Raeanne; Kovrigina, Elizaveta A.; Vajda, Sandor; Kozakov, Dima; Kovrigin, Evgenii L.; Mattos, Carla (NCSU); (MCW); (BU)

    2012-09-17

    We have recently discovered an allosteric switch in Ras, bringing an additional level of complexity to this GTPase whose mutants are involved in nearly 30% of cancers. Upon activation of the allosteric switch, there is a shift in helix 3/loop 7 associated with a disorder to order transition in the active site. Here, we use a combination of multiple solvent crystal structures and computational solvent mapping (FTMap) to determine binding site hot spots in the 'off' and 'on' allosteric states of the GTP-bound form of H-Ras. Thirteen sites are revealed, expanding possible target sites for ligand binding well beyond the active site. Comparison of FTMaps for the H and K isoforms reveals essentially identical hot spots. Furthermore, using NMR measurements of spin relaxation, we determined that K-Ras exhibits global conformational dynamics very similar to those we previously reported for H-Ras. We thus hypothesize that the global conformational rearrangement serves as a mechanism for allosteric coupling between the effector interface and remote hot spots in all Ras isoforms. At least with respect to the binding sites involving the G domain, H-Ras is an excellent model for K-Ras and probably N-Ras as well. Ras has so far been elusive as a target for drug design. The present work identifies various unexplored hot spots throughout the entire surface of Ras, extending the focus from the disordered active site to well-ordered locations that should be easier to target.

  16. Targeting Ras signaling in AML: RALB is a small GTPase with big potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomeroy, Emily J; Eckfeldt, Craig E

    2017-07-06

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a devastating malignancy for which novel treatment approaches are desperately needed. Ras signaling is an attractive therapeutic target for AML because a large proportion of AMLs have mutations in NRAS, KRAS, or genes that activate Ras signaling, and key Ras effectors are activated in virtually all AML patient samples. This has inspired efforts to develop Ras-targeted treatment strategies for AML. Due to the inherent difficulty and disappointing efficacy of targeting Ras proteins directly, many have focused on inhibiting Ras effector pathways. Inhibiting the major oncogenic Ras effectors, the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and/or phosphatidylinositiol-3-kinase (PI3K) pathways, has generally demonstrated modest efficacy for AML. While this may be in part related to functional redundancy between these pathways, it is now clear that other Ras effectors have key oncogenic roles. Specifically, the Ras-like (Ral) GTPases have emerged as critical mediators of Ras-driven transformation and AML cell survival. Our group recently uncovered a critical role for RALB signaling in leukemic cell survival and a potential mediator of relapse following Ras-targeted therapy in AML. Furthermore, we found that RALB signaling is hyperactivated in AML patient samples, and inhibiting RALB has potent anti-leukemic activity in preclinical AML models. While key questions remain regarding the importance of RALB signaling across the genetically diverse spectrum of AML, the specific mechanism(s) that promotes leukemic cell survival downstream of RALB, and how to pharmacologically target RALB signaling effectively - RALB has emerged as a critical Ras effector and potential therapeutic target for AML.

  17. Mutational analyses of Dictyostelium IQGAP-related protein GApa: possible interaction with small GTPases in cytokinesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, M; Adachi, H; Sutoh, K

    2001-08-01

    GAPA is an IQGAP-related protein and is involved in Dictyostelium cytokinesis. Since mammalian IQ-GAPs are effectors for Rac/Cdc42, GAPA is also predicted to bind to small GTPases, which are to be identified. In this study, mutant GAPAs were examined for functions in cytokinesis by genetic complementation of gapA- cells. Positively charged side chains of Arg442 and Lys474 of GAPA, predicted to be present on the surface of interaction with small GTPases, were found to be essential, suggesting an interaction between GAPA and putative small GTPase in cytokinesis. Also, results from truncated GAPAs indicated that almost the entire region of GAPA homologous to IQGAP is required for cytokinesis in Dictyostelium.

  18. The small GTPase Cdc42 modulates the number of exocytosis-competent dense-core vesicles in PC12 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Mai [Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Kitaguchi, Tetsuya [Cell Signaling Group, Waseda Bioscience Research Institute in Singapore (WABOIS), Waseda University, 11 Biopolis Way, 05-01/02 Helios, Singapore 138667 (Singapore); Numano, Rika [The Electronics-Inspired Interdisciplinary Research Institute (EIIRIS), Toyohashi University of Technology, 1-1 Hibarigaoka, Tennpaku-cho, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan); Ikematsu, Kazuya [Forensic Pathology and Science, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan); Kakeyama, Masaki [Laboratory of Environmental Health Sciences, Center for Disease Biology and Integrative Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Murata, Masayuki; Sato, Ken [Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Tsuboi, Takashi, E-mail: takatsuboi@bio.c.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan)

    2012-04-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Regulation of exocytosis by Rho GTPase Cdc42. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cdc42 increases the number of fusion events from newly recruited vesicles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cdc42 increases the number of exocytosis-competent dense-core vesicles. -- Abstract: Although the small GTPase Rho family Cdc42 has been shown to facilitate exocytosis through increasing the amount of hormones released, the precise mechanisms regulating the quantity of hormones released on exocytosis are not well understood. Here we show by live cell imaging analysis under TIRF microscope and immunocytochemical analysis under confocal microscope that Cdc42 modulated the number of fusion events and the number of dense-core vesicles produced in the cells. Overexpression of a wild-type or constitutively-active form of Cdc42 strongly facilitated high-KCl-induced exocytosis from the newly recruited plasma membrane vesicles in PC12 cells. By contrast, a dominant-negative form of Cdc42 inhibited exocytosis from both the newly recruited and previously docked plasma membrane vesicles. The number of intracellular dense-core vesicles was increased by the overexpression of both a wild-type and constitutively-active form of Cdc42. Consistently, activation of Cdc42 by overexpression of Tuba, a Golgi-associated guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Cdc42 increased the number of intracellular dense-core vesicles, whereas inhibition of Cdc42 by overexpression of the Cdc42/Rac interactive binding domain of neuronal Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein decreased the number of them. These findings suggest that Cdc42 facilitates exocytosis by modulating both the number of exocytosis-competent dense-core vesicles and the production of dense-core vesicles in PC12 cells.

  19. ran Bonde - landsköpman och bondeseglare på 1500-talet / Bengt Eriksson

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Eriksson, Bengt

    2012-01-01

    Üle Soome lahe kaubandusest 16. sajandil. Helsingi kihelkonnas tegutsenud kaupmehest Göran Bondest, kes käis aastas 5-6 korda kaubareisil Tallinnas. Tihedamad suhted sidusid Göran Bondet Tallinna kaupmehe Hemlich Fickega. "Läänemere valitsejast" Sören Norrbyst. Helsingi rajamisest Gustav I Vasa poolt vastukaaluks Tallinnale

  20. Rac1 and Cdc42 GTPases regulate shear stress-driven β-catenin signaling in osteoblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, Qiaoqiao; Cho, Eunhye [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Yokota, Hiroki [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Na, Sungsoo, E-mail: sungna@iupui.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States)

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: •Shear stress increased TCF/LEF activity and stimulated β-catenin nuclear localization. •Rac1, Cdc42, and RhoA displayed distinct dynamic activity patterns under flow. •Rac1 and Cdc42, but not RhoA, regulate shear stress-driven TCF/LEF activation. •Cytoskeleton did not significantly affect shear stress-induced TCF/LEF activation. -- Abstract: Beta-catenin-dependent TCF/LEF (T-cell factor/lymphocyte enhancing factor) is known to be mechanosensitive and an important regulator for promoting bone formation. However, the functional connection between TCF/LEF activity and Rho family GTPases is not well understood in osteoblasts. Herein we investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying oscillatory shear stress-induced TCF/LEF activity in MC3T3-E1 osteoblast cells using live cell imaging. We employed fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based and green fluorescent protein (GFP)-based biosensors, which allowed us to monitor signal transduction in living cells in real time. Oscillatory (1 Hz) shear stress (10 dynes/cm{sup 2}) increased TCF/LEF activity and stimulated translocation of β-catenin to the nucleus with the distinct activity patterns of Rac1 and Cdc42. The shear stress-induced TCF/LEF activity was blocked by the inhibition of Rac1 and Cdc42 with their dominant negative mutants or selective drugs, but not by a dominant negative mutant of RhoA. In contrast, constitutively active Rac1 and Cdc42 mutants caused a significant enhancement of TCF/LEF activity. Moreover, activation of Rac1 and Cdc42 increased the basal level of TCF/LEF activity, while their inhibition decreased the basal level. Interestingly, disruption of cytoskeletal structures or inhibition of myosin activity did not significantly affect shear stress-induced TCF/LEF activity. Although Rac1 is reported to be involved in β-catenin in cancer cells, the involvement of Cdc42 in β-catenin signaling in osteoblasts has not been identified. Our findings in this study demonstrate

  1. Transcriptional regulation of the small GTPase RhoB gene by TGF{beta}-induced signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilaki, Eleftheria; Papadimitriou, Elsa; Tajadura, Virginia; Ridley, Anne J; Stournaras, Christos; Kardassis, Dimitris

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the mechanism of transcriptional induction of the small GTPase RhoB gene by the transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta) signaling pathway and the role of this regulation in TGFbeta-induced cell migration. To achieve our goals, we utilized a combination of siRNA-mediated gene silencing, adenovirus-mediated gene transfer receptor and MAPK inhibition, transactivation assays, and DNA-protein interaction assays in human HaCaT keratinocytes. We found that the RhoB gene is a direct transcriptional target of TGFbeta. We show that TGFbeta activates an early MEK/ERK pathway and that this activation is required for the recruitment of Smad3 to a novel, nonclassical, Smad binding element in the proximal RhoB promoter, in a p53-dependent manner. This element is overlapping with a CCAAT box that constitutively binds nuclear factor Y. Mutagenesis of this site abolished the Smad-mediated transactivation of the RhoB promoter. Finally, silencing of RhoB gene expression via siRNA or utilization of a dominant negative form of RhoB significantly inhibited TGFbeta-induced migration of HaCaT keratinocytes and DU145 prostate cancer cells. Our findings establish RhoB as a direct transcriptional target of TGFbeta in human keratinocytes and identify an important role of RhoB in TGFbeta-induced cell migration.-Vasilaki, E., Papadimitriou, E., Tajadura, V., Ridley, A. J., Stournaras, C., Kardassis, D. Transcriptional regulation of the small GTPase RhoB gene by TGFbeta-induced signaling pathways.

  2. Mutations in the Rho1 small GTPase disrupt morphogenesis and segmentation during early Drosophila development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magie, C R; Meyer, M R; Gorsuch, M S; Parkhurst, S M

    1999-12-01

    Rho GTPases play an important role in diverse biological processes such as actin cytoskeleton organization, gene transcription, cell cycle progression and adhesion. They are required during early Drosophila development for proper execution of morphogenetic movements of individual cells and groups of cells important for the formation of the embryonic body plan. We isolated loss-of-function mutations in the Drosophila Rho1 (Rho1) gene during a genetic screen for maternal-effect mutations, allowing us to investigate the specific roles Rho1 plays in the context of the developing organism. Here we report that Rho1 is required for many early events: loss of Rho1 function results in both maternal and embryonic phenotypes. Embryos homozygous for the Rho1 mutation exhibit a characteristic zygotic phenotype, which includes severe defects in head involution and imperfect dorsal closure. Two phenotypes are associated with reduction of maternal Rho1 activity: the actin cytoskeleton is disrupted in egg chambers, especially in the ring canals and embryos display patterning defects as a result of improper maintenance of segmentation gene expression. Despite showing imperfect dorsal closure, Rho1 does not activate downstream genes or interact genetically with members of the JNK signaling pathway, used by its relatives dRac and dCdc42 for proper dorsal closure. Consistent with its roles in regulating actin cytoskeletal organization, we find that Rho1 interacts genetically and physically with the Drosophila formin homologue, cappuccino. We also show that Rho1 interacts both genetically and physically with concertina, a G(alpha) protein involved in cell shape changes during gastrulation.

  3. Characterization and functional analysis of the calmodulin-binding domain of Rac1 GTPase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Xu

    Full Text Available Rac1, a member of the Rho family of small GTPases, has been shown to promote formation of lamellipodia at the leading edge of motile cells and affect cell migration. We previously demonstrated that calmodulin can bind to a region in the C-terminal of Rac1 and that this interaction is important in the activation of platelet Rac1. Now, we have analyzed amino acid residue(s in the Rac1-calmodulin binding domain that are essential for the interaction and assessed their functional contribution in Rac1 activation. The results demonstrated that region 151-164 in Rac1 is essential for calmodulin binding. Within the 151-164 region, positively-charged amino acids K153 and R163 were mutated to alanine to study impact on calmodulin binding. Mutant form of Rac1 (K153A demonstrated significantly reduced binding to calmodulin while the double mutant K153A/R163A demonstrated complete lack of binding to calmodulin. Thrombin or EGF resulted in activation of Rac1 in CHRF-288-11 or HeLa cells respectively and W7 inhibited this activation. Immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated that higher amount of CaM was associated with Rac1 during EGF dependent activation. In cells expressing mutant forms of Rac1 (K153A or K153A/R163A, activation induced by EGF was significantly decreased in comparison to wild type or the R163A forms of Rac1. The lack of Rac1 activation in mutant forms was not due to an inability of GDP-GTP exchange or a change in subcelllular distribution. Moreover, Rac1 activation was decreased in cells where endogenous level of calmodulin was reduced using shRNA knockdown and increased in cells where calmodulin was overexpressed. Docking analysis and modeling demonstrated that K153 in Rac1 interacts with Q41 in calmodulin. These results suggest an important role for calmodulin in the activation of Rac1 and thus, in cytoskeleton reorganization and cell migration.

  4. Signal transduction by Ras-like GTPases: a potential target for anticancer drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spaargaren, M.; Bischoff, J. R.; McCormick, F.

    1995-01-01

    Members of the ras family of GTPases are involved in a wide variety of cellular processes including cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and transformation. The ras oncogene is one of the most frequently mutated genes in human cancer. In addition, other oncogene and tumor suppressor gene

  5. Decoding Mammalian Ribosome-mRNA States by Translational GTPase Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Sichen; Murray, Jason; Brown, Alan; Taunton, Jack; Ramakrishnan, V; Hegde, Ramanujan S

    2016-11-17

    In eukaryotes, accurate protein synthesis relies on a family of translational GTPases that pair with specific decoding factors to decipher the mRNA code on ribosomes. We present structures of the mammalian ribosome engaged with decoding factor⋅GTPase complexes representing intermediates of translation elongation (aminoacyl-tRNA⋅eEF1A), termination (eRF1⋅eRF3), and ribosome rescue (Pelota⋅Hbs1l). Comparative analyses reveal that each decoding factor exploits the plasticity of the ribosomal decoding center to differentially remodel ribosomal proteins and rRNA. This leads to varying degrees of large-scale ribosome movements and implies distinct mechanisms for communicating information from the decoding center to each GTPase. Additional structural snapshots of the translation termination pathway reveal the conformational changes that choreograph the accommodation of decoding factors into the peptidyl transferase center. Our results provide a structural framework for how different states of the mammalian ribosome are selectively recognized by the appropriate decoding factor⋅GTPase complex to ensure translational fidelity. Copyright © 2016 MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Neuronal Rho GTPase Rac1 elimination confers neuroprotection in a mouse model of permanent ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karabiyik, Cansu; Fernandes, Rui; Figueiredo, Francisco Rosário

    2018-01-01

    The Rho GTPase Rac1 is a multifunctional protein involved in distinct pathways ranging from development to pathology. The aim of the present study was to unravel the contribution of neuronal Rac1 in regulating the response to brain injury induced by permanent focal cerebral ischemia (pMCAO). Our ...

  7. Rab GTPase prenylation hierarchy and its potential role in choroideremia disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Köhnke

    Full Text Available Protein prenylation is a widespread post-translational modification in eukaryotes that plays a crucial role in membrane targeting and signal transduction. RabGTPases is the largest group of post-translationally C-terminally geranylgeranylated. All Rabs are processed by Rab geranylgeranyl-transferase and Rab escort protein (REP. Human genetic defects resulting in the loss one of two REP isoforms REP-1, lead to underprenylation of RabGTPases that manifests in retinal degradation and blindness known as choroideremia. In this study we used a combination of microinjections and chemo-enzymatic tagging to establish whether Rab GTPases are prenylated and delivered to their target cellular membranes with the same rate. We demonstrate that although all tested Rab GTPases display the same rate of membrane delivery, the extent of Rab prenylation in 5 hour time window vary by more than an order of magnitude. We found that Rab27a, Rab27b, Rab38 and Rab42 display the slowest prenylation in vivo and in the cell. Our work points to possible contribution of Rab38 to the emergence of choroideremia in addition to Rab27a and Rab27b.

  8. The HOPS/class C Vps complex tethers membranes by binding to one Rab GTPase in each apposed membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Ruoya; Stroupe, Christopher

    2015-07-15

    Many Rab GTPase effectors are membrane-tethering factors, that is, they physically link two apposed membranes before intracellular membrane fusion. In this study, we investigate the distinct binding factors needed on apposed membranes for Rab effector-dependent tethering. We show that the homotypic fusion and protein-sorting/class C vacuole protein-sorting (HOPS/class C Vps) complex can tether low-curvature membranes, that is, liposomes with a diameter of ∼100 nm, only when the yeast vacuolar Rab GTPase Ypt7p is present in both tethered membranes. When HOPS is phosphorylated by the vacuolar casein kinase I, Yck3p, tethering only takes place when GTP-bound Ypt7p is present in both tethered membranes. When HOPS is not phosphorylated, however, its tethering activity shows little specificity for the nucleotide-binding state of Ypt7p. These results suggest a model for HOPS-mediated tethering in which HOPS tethers membranes by binding to Ypt7p in each of the two tethered membranes. Moreover, because vacuole-associated HOPS is presumably phosphorylated by Yck3p, our results suggest that nucleotide exchange of Ypt7p on multivesicular bodies (MVBs)/late endosomes must take place before HOPS can mediate tethering at vacuoles. © 2015 Ho and Stroupe. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  9. Palmitoylation of the immunity related GTPase, Irgm1: impact on membrane localization and ability to promote mitochondrial fission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanley C Henry

    Full Text Available The Immunity-Related GTPases (IRG are a family of large GTPases that mediate innate immune responses. Irgm1 is particularly critical for immunity to bacteria and protozoa, and for inflammatory homeostasis in the intestine. Although precise functions for Irgm1 have not been identified, prior studies have suggested roles in autophagy/mitophagy, phagosome remodeling, cell motility, and regulating the activity of other IRG proteins. These functions ostensibly hinge on the ability of Irgm1 to localize to intracellular membranes, such as those of the Golgi apparatus and mitochondria. Previously, it has been shown that an amphipathic helix, the αK helix, in the C-terminal portion of the protein partially mediates membrane binding. However, in absence of αK, there is still substantial binding of Irgm1 to cellular membranes, suggesting the presence of other membrane binding motifs. In the current work, an additional membrane localization motif was found in the form of palmitoylation at a cluster of cysteines near the αK. An Irgm1 mutant possessing alanine to cysteine substitutions at these amino acids demonstrated little residual palmitoylation, yet it displayed only a small decrease in localization to the Golgi and mitochondria. In contrast, a mutant containing the palmitoylation mutations in combination with mutations disrupting the amphipathic character of the αK displayed a complete loss of apparent localization to the Golgi and mitochondria, as well as an overall loss of association with cellular membranes in general. Additionally, Irgm1 was found to promote mitochondrial fission, and this function was undermined in Irgm1 mutants lacking the palmitoylation domain, and to a greater extent in those lacking the αK, or the αK and palmitoylation domains combined. Our data suggest that palmitoylation together with the αK helix firmly anchor Irgm1 in the Golgi and mitochondria, thus facilitating function of the protein.

  10. Sevoflurane Inhalation Accelerates the Long-Term Memory Consolidation via Small GTPase Overexpression in the Hippocampus of Mice in Adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Emi; Kinoshita, Hiroyuki; Feng, Guo-Gang; Hayashi, Hisaki; Satomoto, Maiko; Sato, Motohiko; Fujiwara, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Sevoflurane exposure impairs the long-term memory in neonates. Whether the exposure to animals in adolescence affects the memory, however, has been unclear. A small hydrolase enzyme of guanosine triphosphate (GTPase) rac1 plays a role in the F-actin dynamics related to the synaptic plasticity, as well as superoxide production via reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase activation. The current study was designed to examine whether sevoflurane exposure to mice in early adolescence modifies the long-term learning ability concomitantly with the changes in F-actin constitution as well as superoxide production in the hippocampus according to the levels of rac1 protein expression. Four-week-old mice were subjected to the evaluation of long-term learning ability for three days. On day one, each mouse was allowed to enter a dark chamber for five min to acclimatization. On day two, the procedure was repeated with the addition of an electric shock as soon as a mouse entered the dark chamber. All mice subsequently inhaled 2 L/min air with (Sevoflurane group) and without (Control group) 2.5% sevoflurane for three hours. On day three, each mouse was placed on the platform and retention time, which is the latency to enter the dark chamber, was examined. The brain removed after the behavior test, was used for analyses of immunofluorescence, Western immunoblotting and intracellular levels of superoxide. Sevoflurane exposure significantly prolonged retention time, indicating the enhanced long-term memory. Sevoflurane inhalation augmented F-actin constitution coexisting with the rac1 protein overexpression in the hippocampus whereas it did not alter the levels of superoxide. Sevoflurane exposure to 4-week-old mice accelerates the long-term memory concomitantly with the enhanced F-actin constitution coexisting with the small GTPase rac1 overexpression in the hippocampus. These results suggest that sevoflurane inhalation may amplify long-term memory

  11. Evaluating C-RAN Fronthaul Functional Splits in Terms of Network Level Energy and Cost Savings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Checko, Aleksandra; Popovska Avramova, Andrijana; Berger, Michael Stübert

    2016-01-01

    split in the baseband processing chain has been proposed to overcome these challenges. This paper evaluates, by mathematical and simulation methods, different splits with respect to network level energy and cost efficiency having in the mind the expected quality of service.The proposed mathematical......The placement of the complete baseband processing in a centralized pool results in high data rate requirement and inflexibility of the fronthaul network, which challenges the energy and cost effectiveness of the cloud radio access network (C-RAN). Recently, redesign of the C-RAN through functional...... model quantifies the multiplexing gains and the trade-offs between centralization and decentralization concerning the cost of the pool, fronthaul network capacity and resource utilization. The event-based simulation captures the influence of the traffic load dynamics and traffic type variation...

  12. Assessment of 3D-RANS models for the simulation of topographically forced shallow flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safarzadeh Akbar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work the performance of Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS simulations to predict the flow structure developed by the presence of a sidewall obstacle in a uniform open-channel shallow flow is discussed. The tested geometry was selected due to its important role in several fluvial applications, such as the control of riverbank erosion and the creation of improved ecological conditions in river restoration applications. The results are compared against experimental laboratory velocity fields obtained after Large Scale Particle Image Velocimetry (LSPIV measurements. It is shown that the length of reattachment of the separated shear layer generated by the obstacle is well predicted by a Reynolds Stress Model, while classical two-equation models show important limitations. All the performed RANS simulations are unable to properly predict the formation of a secondary gyre region, which develops immediately downstream the obstacle.

  13. Enhancing LTE with Cloud-RAN and Load-Controlled Parasitic Antenna Arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Artuso, Matteo; Boviz, Dora; Checko, Aleksandra

    2016-01-01

    implementations of C-RANs tackle fundamental technical and economic challenges. In this article, we present an end-to-end solution for practically implementable C-RANs by providing innovative solutions to key issues such as the design of cost-effective hardware and power-effective signals for RRHs, efficient...... design and distribution of data and control traffic for coordinated communications, and conception of a flexible and elastic architecture supporting dynamic allocation of both the densely distributed RRHs and the centralized processing resources in the cloud to create virtual base stations. More...... specifically, we propose a novel antenna array architecture called load-controlled parasitic antenna array (LCPAA) where multiple antennas are fed by a single RF chain. Energy- and spectral-efficient modulation as well as signaling schemes that are easy to implement are also provided. Additionally, the design...

  14. On the use of (U)RANS and LES approaches for turbulent incompressible single phase flows in nuclear engineering applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benhamadouche, Sofiane, E-mail: sofiane.benhamadouche@edf.fr

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • The paper deals with the use of (U)RANS and LES in nuclear engineering applications. • It gives some ideas and guidelines to run high quality computations. • Some perspectives are drawn concerning the development of (U)RANS and LES approaches in the future. - Abstract: The present paper gives some ideas and guidelines in order to run high quality (U)RANS or LES computations. The paper starts with (U)RANS approaches, advocating the use of Reynolds Stress Models for complex flows and recommending further work on modeling of turbulent heat fluxes, which remains today too basic in industry. The superiority of wall-resolved models vs. wall-modeled in RANS is recalled and the use of adaptive wall treatment is suggested. The concept of Unsteady RANS is finally questioned. Then, important issues around LES are raised. The mesh refinement criteria are recalled for wall-resolved LES and the use of wall models addressed. The production of DNS and wall-resolved LES calculations for flow understanding and RANS validation is encouraged.

  15. Computing the flow past Vortex Generators: Comparison between RANS Simulations and Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manolesos, M.; Sørensen, N. N.; Troldborg, N.; Florentie, L.; Papadakis, G.; Voutsinas, S.

    2016-09-01

    The flow around a wind turbine airfoil equipped with Vortex Generators (VGs) is examined. Predictions from three different Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) solvers with two different turbulence models and two different VG modelling approaches are compared between them and with experimental data. The best results are obtained with the more expensive fully resolved VG approach. The cost efficient BAY model can also provide acceptable results, if grid related numerical diffusion is minimized and only force coefficient polars are considered.

  16. A comparison between Smoothed-Particle Hydrodynamics and RANS Volume of Fluid method in modelling slamming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Sasson

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The oil and gas industry requires complex subsea infrastructure in order to develop offshore oil and gas fields. Upon installation, these components may encounter high slamming loads, stemming from impact with the water surface. This paper utilises two different numerical methods, the mesh-free Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH approach and Reynolds Averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS Volume of Fluid (VOF method to quantify these loads on a free-falling object. The investigation is also interested in conducting a parameter study and determining the effect of varying simulation parameters on the prediction of slamming event kinematics and forces. The surface impact of a freefalling wedge was introduced as a case study and has been simulated using SPH and RANS, with the results being compared to an experimental investigation. It was found from the SPH simulations that particle resolution and the size of the SPH particle kernel are very important, whilst the diffusion term does not play an important role. The latter is due to the very transient nature of slamming events, which do not allow sufficient time for diffusion in the fluid domain. For the RANS simulations, motion of the wedge was achieved using the overset grid technique, whereby varying the discretising time step was found to have a pronounced impact on the accuracy of the captured slamming event. Through analysing the numerical data, one can observe that the RANS results correlate slightly better with the experimental data as opposed to that obtained from the SPH modelling. However, considering the robustness and quick set up of the SPH simulations, both of these two numerical approaches are considered to be promising tools for modelling more complicated slamming problems, including those potentially involving more intricate structures.

  17. Propeller Analysis Using RANS/BEM Coupling Accounting for Blade Blockage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-04

    2000 and 2010 Gothenburg and 2005 Tokyo workshops on numerical ship hydrodynamics (Larrson et al., 2002, Larsson et al. 2013, Hino 2005). The KCS is...Workshop on Numerical Ship Hydrodynamics, Chalmers University of Technology. Larsson , L., Stern, F. and Visonneau, M. (eds.), (2013). Numerical ...B2Y 3Z7 ABSTRACT A popular method for analyzing a propeller operating behind a ship is to couple a Reynolds-averaged Navier- Stokes (RANS) solution

  18. RANS/CAA based Prediction of Jet Mixing Noise in Cruise Flight

    OpenAIRE

    Appel, Christina; Rossignol, Karl-Stéphane; Klabes, Alexander; Neifeld, Andrej; Herr, Michaela; Ewert, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Besides turbulent boundary layer induced excitation noise, jet noise is the second most important aeroacoustic source for aircraft cabin noise. A goal within the DLR project ECCO (Enhanced Cabin Comfort Computations) was to improve current cabin noise pre- diction approaches. Within the framework of the project ECCO RANS (Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes) and CAA (Computational Aero Acoustics) computations for jet noise at cruise conditions have been carried out. Especially at h...

  19. How prenylation and S-acylation regulate subcellular targeting and function of ROP GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorek, Nadav; Henis, Yoav I; Yalovsky, Shaul

    2011-07-01

    Rho of Plants (ROP) small G proteins function at discrete domains of the plasma and possibly endo membranes. ROPs are synthesized as soluble proteins and their attachment to membranes and partitioning in membrane microdomains are facilitated by the posttranslational lipid modifications prenylation and/or S-acylation. Based on their amino acid sequences, ROPs can be classified into two major subgroups: type-I ROPs terminate with a canonical CaaX box motif and are prenylated primarily by geranylgeranyltransferase-I (GGT-I) and to a lesser extent by farnesyltransferase (FT). Type-II ROPs terminate with a plant specific GC-CG box domain and are attached to the plasma membrane by stable S-acylation. In addition, type-I and possibly also type-II ROPs undergo activation dependent transient S-acylation in the G-domain and consequent partitioning into lipid rafts. Surprisingly, although geranylgeranylation is required for the membrane attachment of type-I ROPs and the γ subunits of heterotrimeric G proteins, Arabidopsis mutants lacking GGT-I function have a mild phenotype compared to wild type plants. The mild phenotype of the ggt-I mutants suggested that farnesylation by FT may compensate for the loss of GGT-I function and that possibly the prenylated type-I and S-acylated type-II ROPS have some overlapping functions. In a paper recently published in Plant Physiology we examined the role of the prenyl group type in type-I ROP function and membrane interaction dynamics and the functional redundancy between type-I and type-II ROPs. This study complements a second paper in which we examined the role of G-domain transient S-acylation in the membrane interaction dynamics and signaling by type-I ROPs. Together these two studies provide a framework for realizing the role of prenylation and S-acylation in subcellular targeting, membrane interaction dynamics and signaling by ROP GTPases.

  20. The Monomeric GTPase Rab35 Regulates Phagocytic Cup Formation and Phagosomal Maturation in Entamoeba histolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Kuldeep; Datta, Sunando

    2017-03-24

    One of the hallmarks of amoebic colitis is the detection of Entamoeba histolytica (Eh) trophozoites with ingested erythrocytes. Therefore, erythrophagocytosis is traditionally considered as one of the most important criteria to identify the pathogenic behavior of the amoebic trophozoites. Phagocytosis is an essential process for the proliferation and virulence of this parasite. Phagocytic cargo, upon internalization, follows a defined trafficking route to amoebic lysosomal degradation machinery. Here, we demonstrated the role of EhRab35 in the early and late phases of erythrophagocytosis by the amoeba. EhRab35 showed large vacuolar as well as punctate vesicular localization. The spatiotemporal dynamics of vacuolar EhRab35 and its exchange with soluble cytosolic pool were monitored by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments. Using extensive microscopy and biochemical methods, we demonstrated that upon incubation with RBCs EhRab35 is recruited to the site of phagocytic cups as well as to the nascent phagosomes that harbor Gal/GalNAc lectin and actin. Overexpression of a dominant negative mutant of EhRab35 reduced phagocytic cup formation and thereby reduced RBC internalization, suggesting a potential role of the Rab GTPase in the cup formation. Furthermore, we also performed a phagosomal maturation assay and observed that the activated form of EhRab35 significantly increased the rate of RBC degradation. Interestingly, this mutant also significantly enhanced the number of acidic compartments in the trophozoites. Taken together, our results suggest that EhRab35 is involved in the initial stage of phagocytosis as well as in the phagolysosomal biogenesis in E. histolytica and thus contributes to the pathogenicity of the parasite. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Expression of Rho GTPases family in melanoma cells and its influence on cytoskeleton and migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Si-Jian; Zhang, Wei; Ni, Na-Na; Wu, Qiong; Wang, Xiao-Po; Lin, You-Kun; Sun, Jian-Fang

    2017-05-02

    Rho GTPases family members influenced the filopodia, lamellipodia, stress fiber and adhesion plaque of melanoma cells through regulating cytoskeleton recombination. The role of Rho GTPases family in the migration and invasion of melanoma and its molecular mechanism were explored. The morphological difference between three types of melanoma cells (M14, A375 and MV3) and human melanocyte (MC) was observed by the Hoffman microscope. Cells were stained by phalloidin labeled by rhodamine. The differences between 4 types of cells in filopodia, lamellipodia, stress fiber and adhesion plaque (microfilament is the main constituent) were observed under the super-high resolution microscope. The migration ability of 4 types of cells was detected by Transwell migration assay. QPCR was used to detect the mRNA transcription level of Rho GTPases family. WB was adopted to detect the expression of RhoD and DIAPH2 proteins. There were significant differences in filopodia, lamellipodia, stress fiber and adhesion plaque between MC and 3 types of melanoma cells (M14, A375 and MV3). MC did not have stress fiber or adhesion plaque, while M14, A375 and MV3 had stress fiber and adhesion plaque. All 4 types of cells had thin and short filopodia. MV3 had fewer but thicker stress fibers than the latter two. Transwell migration test indicated the followings: M14 and A375 had a similar high migration rate; the migration rate of MV3 was slightly low; MC did not have the ability of transmembrane migration. QPCR results of Rho GTPases family in 4 types of cells showed the change corresponding to immunofluorescence. WB results showed that RhoD was barely expressed in M14, A375 or MV3. DIAPH2, the downstream effector molecule of RhoD, had the corresponding change. Rho GTPases influences the migration and invasion of melanoma cells through regulating filopodia, lamellipodia, stress fiber and adhesion plaque (microfilament is the main constituent).

  2. Legume small GTPases and their role in the establishment of symbiotic associations with Rhizobium spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuksel, Bayram; Memon, Abdul R

    2009-04-01

    Small GTP-binding genes act as molecular switches regulating myriad of cellular processes including vesicle-mediated intracellular trafficking, signal transduction, cytoskeletal reorganization and cell division in plants and animals. Even though these genes are well conserved both functionally and sequentially across whole Eukaryotae, occasional lineage-specific diversification in some plant species in terms of both functional and expressional characteristics have been reported. Hence, comparative phyletic and correlative functional analyses of legume small GTPases homologs with the genes from other Metazoa and Embryophyta species would be very beneficial for gleaning out the small GTPases that could have specialized in legume-specific processes; e.g., nodulation. The completion of genome sequences of two model legumes, Medicago truncatula and Lotus japonicus will significantly improve our knowledge about mechanism of biological processes taking place in legume-rhizobia symbiotic associations. Besides, the need for molecular switches coordinating busy cargo-trafficking between symbiosis partners would suggest a possible subfunctionalization of small GTPases in Fabaceae for these functions. Therefore, more detailed investigation into the functional characteristics of legume small GTPases would be helpful for the illumination of the events initialized with the perception of bacteria by host, followed by the formation of infection thread and the engulfment of rhizobial bacteria, and end with the senescence of nitrogen-fixing organelles, nodules. In summary, a more thorough functional and evolutionary characterization of small GTPases across the main lineages of Embryophyta is significant for better comprehension of evolutionary history of Plantae, that is because, these genes are associated with multitude of vital biological processes including organogenesis.

  3. Application of Les, Pans and Rans to a Case of Intake Channel Steady Flow Test Bench

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vítek Oldřich

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with evaluation of intake channel flow properties (discharge coefficient, tumble and swirl ratio using both 3-D CFD simulation and measurement. Sensitivity of different calculation parameters was tested. The most important ones are mesh parameters and applied turbulence models (considered models: LES, PANS and RANS. Concerning the mesh, the critical parameter is a mesh configuration near a wall - a thickness of mesh boundary layer and an amount of these layers have significant impact on mass flow rate while tumble/swirl ratio is unaffected by that. Based on that, these mesh parameters can be considered as tuning constants for fine-tuning the CFD model. Regarding the mesh cell size, 2 different values were tested (0.6 and 0.3 mm. It was found out that neither mesh is fine enough to perform proper LES. Hence, PANS performance is close to RANS. Concerning the turbulence models, PANS seems to be the best one as it combines advantages of both LES and RANS. Generally speaking, mass flow rate prediction is relatively good while swirl/tumble one is more problematic as only qualitative agreement can be achieved.

  4. Accurate load prediction by BEM with airfoil data from 3D RANS simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Marc S.; Nitzsche, Jens; Hennings, Holger

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, two methods for the extraction of airfoil coefficients from 3D CFD simulations of a wind turbine rotor are investigated, and these coefficients are used to improve the load prediction of a BEM code. The coefficients are extracted from a number of steady RANS simulations, using either averaging of velocities in annular sections, or an inverse BEM approach for determination of the induction factors in the rotor plane. It is shown that these 3D rotor polars are able to capture the rotational augmentation at the inner part of the blade as well as the load reduction by 3D effects close to the blade tip. They are used as input to a simple BEM code and the results of this BEM with 3D rotor polars are compared to the predictions of BEM with 2D airfoil coefficients plus common empirical corrections for stall delay and tip loss. While BEM with 2D airfoil coefficients produces a very different radial distribution of loads than the RANS simulation, the BEM with 3D rotor polars manages to reproduce the loads from RANS very accurately for a variety of load cases, as long as the blade pitch angle is not too different from the cases from which the polars were extracted.

  5. Data-free and data-driven spectral perturbations for RANS UQ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edeling, Wouter; Mishra, Aashwin; Iaccarino, Gianluca

    2017-11-01

    Despite recent developments in high-fidelity turbulent flow simulations, RANS modeling is still vastly used by industry, due to its inherent low cost. Since accuracy is a concern in RANS modeling, model-form UQ is an essential tool for assessing the impacts of this uncertainty on quantities of interest. Applying the spectral decomposition to the modeled Reynolds-Stress Tensor (RST) allows for the introduction of decoupled perturbations into the baseline intensity (kinetic energy), shape (eigenvalues), and orientation (eigenvectors). This constitutes a natural methodology to evaluate the model form uncertainty associated to different aspects of RST modeling. In a predictive setting, one frequently encounters an absence of any relevant reference data. To make data-free predictions with quantified uncertainty we employ physical bounds to a-priori define maximum spectral perturbations. When propagated, these perturbations yield intervals of engineering utility. High-fidelity data opens up the possibility of inferring a distribution of uncertainty, by means of various data-driven machine-learning techniques. We will demonstrate our framework on a number of flow problems where RANS models are prone to failure. This research was partially supported by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency under the Enabling Quantification of Uncertainty in Physical Systems (EQUiPS) project (technical monitor: Dr Fariba Fahroo), and the DOE PSAAP-II program.

  6. Nuclear size is sensitive to NTF2 protein levels in a manner dependent on Ran binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuković, Lidija D.; Jevtić, Predrag; Zhang, Zhaojie; Stohr, Bradley A.; Levy, Daniel L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Altered nuclear size is associated with many cancers, and determining whether cancer-associated changes in nuclear size contribute to carcinogenesis necessitates an understanding of mechanisms of nuclear size regulation. Although nuclear import rates generally positively correlate with nuclear size, NTF2 levels negatively affect nuclear size, despite the role of NTF2 (also known as NUTF2) in nuclear recycling of the import factor Ran. We show that binding of Ran to NTF2 is required for NTF2 to inhibit nuclear expansion and import of large cargo molecules in Xenopus laevis egg and embryo extracts, consistent with our observation that NTF2 reduces the diameter of the nuclear pore complex (NPC) in a Ran-binding-dependent manner. Furthermore, we demonstrate that ectopic NTF2 expression in Xenopus embryos and mammalian tissue culture cells alters nuclear size. Finally, we show that increases in nuclear size during melanoma progression correlate with reduced NTF2 expression, and increasing NTF2 levels in melanoma cells is sufficient to reduce nuclear size. These results show a conserved capacity for NTF2 to impact on nuclear size, and we propose that NTF2 might be a new cancer biomarker. PMID:26823604

  7. Unsteady Three-Dimensional Simulation of a Shear Coaxial GO2/GH2 Rocket Injector with RANS and Hybrid-RAN-LES/DES Using Flamelet Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westra, Doug G.; West, Jeffrey S.; Richardson, Brian R.

    2015-01-01

    Historically, the analysis and design of liquid rocket engines (LREs) has relied on full-scale testing and one-dimensional empirical tools. The testing is extremely expensive and the one-dimensional tools are not designed to capture the highly complex, and multi-dimensional features that are inherent to LREs. Recent advances in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tools have made it possible to predict liquid rocket engine performance, stability, to assess the effect of complex flow features, and to evaluate injector-driven thermal environments, to mitigate the cost of testing. Extensive efforts to verify and validate these CFD tools have been conducted, to provide confidence for using them during the design cycle. Previous validation efforts have documented comparisons of predicted heat flux thermal environments with test data for a single element gaseous oxygen (GO2) and gaseous hydrogen (GH2) injector. The most notable validation effort was a comprehensive validation effort conducted by Tucker et al. [1], in which a number of different groups modeled a GO2/GH2 single element configuration by Pal et al [2]. The tools used for this validation comparison employed a range of algorithms, from both steady and unsteady Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (U/RANS) calculations, large-eddy simulations (LES), detached eddy simulations (DES), and various combinations. A more recent effort by Thakur et al. [3] focused on using a state-of-the-art CFD simulation tool, Loci/STREAM, on a two-dimensional grid. Loci/STREAM was chosen because it has a unique, very efficient flamelet parameterization of combustion reactions that are too computationally expensive to simulate with conventional finite-rate chemistry calculations. The current effort focuses on further advancement of validation efforts, again using the Loci/STREAM tool with the flamelet parameterization, but this time with a three-dimensional grid. Comparisons to the Pal et al. heat flux data will be made for both RANS and

  8. The Tip of the Four N-Terminal α-Helices of Clostridium sordellii Lethal Toxin Contains the Interaction Site with Membrane Phosphatidylserine Facilitating Small GTPases Glucosylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Varela Chavez

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium sordellii lethal toxin (TcsL is a powerful virulence factor responsible for severe toxic shock in man and animals. TcsL belongs to the large clostridial glucosylating toxin (LCGT family which inactivates small GTPases by glucosylation with uridine-diphosphate (UDP-glucose as a cofactor. Notably, TcsL modifies Rac and Ras GTPases, leading to drastic alteration of the actin cytoskeleton and cell viability. TcsL enters cells via receptor-mediated endocytosis and delivers the N-terminal glucosylating domain (TcsL-cat into the cytosol. TcsL-cat was found to preferentially bind to phosphatidylserine (PS-containing membranes and to increase the glucosylation of Rac anchored to the lipid membrane. We have previously reported that the N-terminal four helical bundle structure (1–93 domain recognizes a broad range of lipids, but that TcsL-cat specifically binds to PS and phosphatidic acid. Here, we show using mutagenesis that the PS binding site is localized on the tip of the four-helix bundle which is rich in positively-charged amino acids. Residues Y14, V15, F17, and R18 on loop 1, between helices 1 and 2, in coordination with R68 from loop 3, between helices 3 and 4, form a pocket which accommodates L-serine. The functional PS-binding site is required for TcsL-cat binding to the plasma membrane and subsequent cytotoxicity. TcsL-cat binding to PS facilitates a high enzymatic activity towards membrane-anchored Ras by about three orders of magnitude as compared to Ras in solution. The PS-binding site is conserved in LCGTs, which likely retain a common mechanism of binding to the membrane for their full activity towards membrane-bound GTPases.

  9. Gain-of-Function Mutations of ARHGAP31, a Cdc42/Rac1 GTPase Regulator, Cause Syndromic Cutis Aplasia and Limb Anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southgate, Laura; Machado, Rajiv D.; Snape, Katie M.; Primeau, Martin; Dafou, Dimitra; Ruddy, Deborah M.; Branney, Peter A.; Fisher, Malcolm; Lee, Grace J.; Simpson, Michael A.; He, Yi; Bradshaw, Teisha Y.; Blaumeiser, Bettina; Winship, William S.; Reardon, Willie; Maher, Eamonn R.; FitzPatrick, David R.; Wuyts, Wim; Zenker, Martin; Lamarche-Vane, Nathalie; Trembath, Richard C.

    2011-01-01

    Regulation of cell proliferation and motility is essential for normal development. The Rho family of GTPases plays a critical role in the control of cell polarity and migration by effecting the cytoskeleton, membrane trafficking, and cell adhesion. We investigated a recognized developmental disorder, Adams-Oliver syndrome (AOS), characterized by the combination of aplasia cutis congenita (ACC) and terminal transverse limb defects (TTLD). Through a genome-wide linkage analysis, we detected a locus for autosomal-dominant ACC-TTLD on 3q generating a maximum LOD score of 4.93 at marker rs1464311. Candidate-gene- and exome-based sequencing led to the identification of independent premature truncating mutations in the terminal exon of the Rho GTPase-activating protein 31 gene, ARHGAP31, which encodes a Cdc42/Rac1 regulatory protein. Mutant transcripts are stable and increase ARHGAP31 activity in vitro through a gain-of-function mechanism. Constitutively active ARHGAP31 mutations result in a loss of available active Cdc42 and consequently disrupt actin cytoskeletal structures. Arhgap31 expression in the mouse is substantially restricted to the terminal limb buds and craniofacial processes during early development; these locations closely mirror the sites of impaired organogenesis that characterize this syndrome. These data identify the requirement for regulated Cdc42 and/or Rac1 signaling processes during early human development. PMID:21565291

  10. Vitreous-induced cytoskeletal rearrangements via the Rac1 GTPase-dependent signaling pathway in human retinal pigment epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Xionggao [State Key Ophthalmic Laboratory, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Department of Ophthalmology, Hainan Medical College, Haikou (China); Wei, Yantao; Ma, Haizhi [State Key Ophthalmic Laboratory, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Zhang, Shaochong, E-mail: zhshaochong@163.com [State Key Ophthalmic Laboratory, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China)

    2012-03-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Vitreous induces morphological changes and cytoskeletal rearrangements in RPE cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rac1 is activated in vitreous-transformed RPE cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rac inhibition prevents morphological changes in vitreous-transformed RPE cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rac inhibition suppresses cytoskeletal rearrangements in vitreous-transformed RPE cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The vitreous-induced effects are mediated by a Rac1 GTPase/LIMK1/cofilin pathway. -- Abstract: Proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) is mainly caused by retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell migration, invasion, proliferation and transformation into fibroblast-like cells that produce the extracellular matrix (ECM). The vitreous humor is known to play an important role in PVR. An epithelial-to-mesenchymal transdifferentiation (EMT) of human RPE cells induced by 25% vitreous treatment has been linked to stimulation of the mesenchymal phenotype, migration and invasion. Here, we characterized the effects of the vitreous on the cell morphology and cytoskeleton in human RPE cells. The signaling pathway that mediates these effects was investigated. Serum-starved RPE cells were incubated with 25% vitreous, and the morphological changes were examined by phase-contrast microscopy. Filamentous actin (F-actin) was examined by immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. Protein phosphorylation of AKT, ERK1/2, Smad2/3, LIM kinase (LIMK) 1 and cofilin was analyzed by Western blot analysis. Vitreous treatment induced cytoskeletal rearrangements, activated Rac1 and enhanced the phosphorylation of AKT, ERK1/2 and Smad2/3. When the cells were treated with a Rac activation-specific inhibitor, the cytoskeletal rearrangements were prevented, and the phosphorylation of Smad2/3 was blocked. Vitreous treatment also enhanced the phosphorylation of LIMK1 and cofilin and the Rac inhibitor blocked this effect. We propose that vitreous

  11. Ivan Rančić: A forgotten painter of flowers and landscapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marković Kamenko M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ivan Rančić was born in the Kraljevo village, in eastern Serbia to a family of farmers on 19th, February, 1906. Very little data about him has been preserved, therefore, this paper is an attempt to make a reconstruction of his life and work. He attended primary school in his birth place, lower secondary school he finished in Knjazevac and Military Academy in Belgrade. After completing the National Academy in 1934, he was sent to Zagreb where he got his first post. He lived there with his wife and his son until the capitulation of the country in 1941. A few months after the collapse of the country, he was arrested and sent to Ljubljana and three months later to a concentration camp in Austria. He spent about fifteen months in that camp in during which time he intensively studied painting. He fled from the camp to Switzerland and stayed there until his death in 1987. According to some letters he sent to his wife in Nis, some of his paintings he created during his time in the camp, ne took to Switzerland where he eventually sold them. He did the toughest jobs there in order to survive and painted extensively. After World War II he graduated from the School of Fine Arts in Lausanne. Later on he had two exhibitions at the New Gallery of Modern Art. Ivan Rančić came a long way from an unknown beginner to a respected prominent artist. He left behind about 350 works, many of which he sold during his life, mainly landscapes and still life in oil, watercolor and pastel. He was neither concerned about styles and trends nor did he believe in the old and the new. If he came to a certain specific manner of painting, it is because at one point it was imposed on him as the only proper way of expression. The analysis of Rančić's paintings leads to the conclusion that his creation had gone through four phases. The first one (started in the concentration camp in Austria during which he painted still lifes without full sketches, previous studies, and the use

  12. Rho GTPase function in flies: insights from a developmental and organismal perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johndrow, James E; Magie, Craig R; Parkhurst, Susan M

    2004-12-01

    Morphogenesis is a key event in the development of a multicellular organism and is reliant on coordinated transcriptional and signal transduction events. To establish the segmented body plan that underlies much of metazoan development, individual cells and groups of cells must respond to exogenous signals with complex movements and shape changes. One class of proteins that plays a pivotal role in the interpretation of extracellular cues into cellular behavior is the Rho family of small GTPases. These molecular switches are essential components of a growing number of signaling pathways, many of which regulate actin cytoskeletal remodeling. Much of our understanding of Rho biology has come from work done in cell culture. More recently, the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has emerged as an excellent genetic system for the study of these proteins in a developmental and organismal context. Studies in flies have greatly enhanced our understanding of pathways involving Rho GTPases and their roles in development.

  13. Function of small GTPase Rho3 in regulating growth, conidiation and virulence of Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Bang; Li, Boqiang; Qin, Guozheng; Tian, Shiping

    2015-02-01

    Small GTPases of the Rho family play an important role in regulating biological processes in fungi. In this study, we mainly investigated the biological functions of Rho3 in Botrytis cinerea, and found that deletion of the rho3 from B. cinerea significantly suppressed vegetative growth and conidiation, reduced appressorium formation and decreased virulence. Microscopy analysis revealed that the distance between septa was increased in the Δrho3 mutant. In addition, mitochondria were suggested to be the main sources of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in B. cinerea based on dual staining with 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate and MitoTracker orange. The Δrho3 mutant showed less accumulation of ROS in the hyphae tips compared to the WT strain of B. cinerea. These results provide the novel evidence to ascertain the function of small GTPase Rho3 in regulating growth, conidiation and virulence of B. cinerea. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Disruption of Toxoplasma gondii Parasitophorous Vacuoles by the Mouse p47-Resistance GTPases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available The p47 GTPases are essential for interferon-gamma-induced cell-autonomous immunity against the protozoan parasite, Toxoplasma gondii, in mice, but the mechanism of resistance is poorly understood. We show that the p47 GTPases, including IIGP1, accumulate at vacuoles containing T. gondii. The accumulation is GTP-dependent and requires live parasites. Vacuolar IIGP1 accumulations undergo a maturation-like process accompanied by vesiculation of the parasitophorous vacuole membrane. This culminates in disruption of the parasitophorous vacuole and finally of the parasite itself. Over-expression of IIGP1 leads to accelerated vacuolar disruption whereas a dominant negative form of IIGP1 interferes with interferon-gamma-mediated killing of intracellular parasites. Targeted deletion of the IIGP1 gene results in partial loss of the IFN-gamma-mediated T. gondii growth restriction in mouse astrocytes.

  15. ARF1 and SAR1 GTPases in Endomembrane Trafficking in Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birsen Cevher-Keskin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Small GTPases largely control membrane traffic, which is essential for the survival of all eukaryotes. Among the small GTP-binding proteins, ARF1 (ADP-ribosylation factor 1 and SAR1 (Secretion-Associated RAS super family 1 are commonly conserved among all eukaryotes with respect to both their functional and sequential characteristics. The ARF1 and SAR1 GTP-binding proteins are involved in the formation and budding of vesicles throughout plant endomembrane systems. ARF1 has been shown to play a critical role in COPI (Coat Protein Complex I-mediated retrograde trafficking in eukaryotic systems, whereas SAR1 GTPases are involved in intracellular COPII-mediated protein trafficking from the ER to the Golgi apparatus. This review offers a summary of vesicular trafficking with an emphasis on the ARF1 and SAR1 expression patterns at early growth stages and in the de-etiolation process.

  16. İRAN VE REJİM İSTİKRARI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özgür ÜŞENMEZ

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available ÖZ: Bu çalışma, İran rejiminin son yıllarda Orta Doğu'yu sarsan isyanlar ve istikrarsızlıklara-Batı'daki beklentilerin aksine- geçmişten, özellikle 1979'daki devrimden miras kalan sosyal yapı ve politikaların etkisiyle direnebildiğini iddia ediyor. Tunus ve Mısır'daki halk isyanları, temel aktör olan alt sınıflar ve onların neo-liberal ekonomik politikalara muhalefetiyle yayılırken, İran’da devrim sonrası gelişen sosyal devlet mekanizması hala halk ile rejimin tamamen birbirine yabancılaşmasını önlemekte. Ancak son yıllarda ortaya çıkan yeni gerilimler ve İran'ın uyguladığı ekonomi politikaları rejimin krizini derinleştirebilir. Bu nedenledir ki Orta Doğu'yu ve özelde İran'ı anlamak için hegemonik blokların tarihsel değişimini inceleyen ucu açık bir analiz elzemdir. ABSTRACT: This article argues that contrary to the expectations of the Western World, Iranian regime successfully resisted the revolutionary tides of the Arab Spring. Most important determinant of this process for Iran was the legacy of the 1979 revolution and it's associated structures that relatively protects the most vulnerable parts of the population against the wide spread neo-liberal economic policies in the Middle East. So with that feature Iran differs from the Tunisian and the Egyptian examples. In order to understand these features further this essay adapts a historical analysis of changes in hegemonic blocs in Iran since 1979.

  17. OTN Transport of Baseband Radio Serial Protocols in C-RAN Architecture for Mobile Network Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Checko, Aleksandra; Kardaras, Georgios; Lanzani, Christian Fabio Alessandro

    This white paper presents a proof of concept implementation of digital baseband radio data transport over Optical Transport Network (OTN) compliant to 3GPP Long Term Evolution – Advanced (LTE-A) standard enabling Cloud Radio Access Network (C-RAN) architecture. The transport between the baseband...... module and a remote radio module is compliant to Common Public Radio Interface (CPRI) and to the OBSAI reference point 3 - 01 (RP3-01) interface protocols, respectively. The purpose is to demonstrate that data integrity and clocking performance at the radio node still meets the strict standard...

  18. Investigation on hydrodynamic performance of a marine propeller in oblique flow by RANS computations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianxi Yao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a numerical study on investigating on hydrodynamic characteristics of a marine propeller in oblique flow. The study is achieved by RANS simulations on an open source platform - OpenFOAM. A sliding grid approach is applied to compute the rotating motion of the propeller. Total force and moment acting on blades, as well as average force distributions in one revolution on propeller disk, are obtained for 70 cases of com- binations of advance ratios and oblique angles. The computed results are compared with available experimental data and discussed.

  19. Hybrid RANS/LES method for wind flow over complex terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bechmann, Andreas; Sørensen, Niels N.

    2010-01-01

    ), and this layer acts as wall model for the outer flow handled by LES. The well-known high Reynolds number two-equation k - turbulence model is used in the RANS layer and the model automatically switches to a two-equation k - subgrid scale stress model in the LES region. The approach can be used for flow over...... the turbulent kinetic energy, whereas the new method captures the high turbulence levels well but underestimates the mean velocity. The presented results are for a relative mild configuration of complex terrain, but the proposed method can also be used for highly complex terrain where the benefits of the new...

  20. Statistical Multiplexing of Computations in C-RAN with Tradeoffs in Latency and Energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalør, Anders Ellersgaard; Agurto Agurto, Mauricio Ignacio; Pratas, Nuno

    2017-01-01

    In the Cloud Radio Access Network (C-RAN) architecture, the baseband signals from multiple remote radio heads are processed in a centralized baseband unit (BBU) pool. This architecture allows network operators to adapt the BBU’s computational resources to the aggregate access load experienced...... frame duration, then this may result in additional access latency and limit the energy savings. In this paper we investigate the tradeoff by considering two extreme time-scales for the resource multiplexing: (i) long-term, where the computational resources are adapted over periods much larger than...

  1. Synchronization challenges in packet-based Cloud-RAN fronthaul for mobile networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Checko, Aleksandra; Juul, Anders Christian; Christiansen, Henrik Lehrmann

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we look at reusing existing packet-based network (e.g. Ethernet) to possibly decrease deployment costs of fronthaul Cloud Radio Access Network (C-RAN) network and cost of Baseband Unit (BBU) resources. The challenge of this solution is that it requires mobile traffic (until now...... transmitted over synchronous protocols) to traverse the asynchronous Ethernet without losing synchronization. We analyze synchronization requirements of mobile networks and present an overview of solutions that fulfill them in traditional mobile networks. Then we elaborate on challenges that packet...... bridge the gap between Ethernet and mobile network domains creating a comprehensive architectural analysis....

  2. The Rho-GTPase cdc42 regulates neural progenitor fate at the apical surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cappello, Silvia; Attardo, Alessio; Wu, Xunwei

    2006-01-01

    the fundamental difference between these progenitors. Here we show that the conditional deletion of the small Rho-GTPase cdc42 at different stages of neurogenesis in mouse telencephalon results in an immediate increase in basal mitoses. Whereas cdc42-deficient progenitors have normal cell cycle length...... progenitors. Thus, cdc42 has a crucial role at the apical pole of progenitors, thereby regulating the position of mitoses and cell fate....

  3. Critical Contribution of RAL GTPases to Growth and Survival of Breast Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-04-01

    genotypes (20 animals for each group) with a needle coated with a mixture of Gram-negative bacteria (Erwinia carotovora carotovora) and fungi ( Candida ... albicans ). Ten hours later, total RNA was extracted and evaluated by quantitative real-time RT-PCR for Drosomycin (Drs) and ribosomal protein 49 (rp49) gene...RalGTPases: corrupting the exocyst in cancer cells. Trends Cell Biol. 15, 327–332.Cantor, S.B., Urano, T., and Feig, L.A. (1995). Identification and char

  4. The GTPase Rab37 Participates in the Control of Insulin Exocytosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanda Ljubicic

    Full Text Available Rab37 belongs to a subclass of Rab GTPases regulating exocytosis, including also Rab3a and Rab27a. Proteomic studies indicate that Rab37 is associated with insulin-containing large dense core granules of pancreatic β-cells. In agreement with these observations, we detected Rab37 in extracts of β-cell lines and human pancreatic islets and confirmed by confocal microscopy the localization of the GTPase on insulin-containing secretory granules. We found that, as is the case for Rab3a and Rab27a, reduction of Rab37 levels by RNA interference leads to impairment in glucose-induced insulin secretion and to a decrease in the number of granules in close apposition to the plasma membrane. Pull-down experiments revealed that, despite similar functional effects, Rab37 does not interact with known Rab3a or Rab27a effectors and is likely to operate through a different mechanism. Exposure of insulin-secreting cells to proinflammatory cytokines, fatty acids or oxidized low-density lipoproteins, mimicking physiopathological conditions that favor the development of diabetes, resulted in a decrease in Rab37 expression. Our data identify Rab37 as an additional component of the machinery governing exocytosis of β-cells and suggest that impaired expression of this GTPase may contribute to defective insulin release in pre-diabetic and diabetic conditions.

  5. Comparisons of LES and RANS Computations with PIV Experiments on a Cylindrical Cavity Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Tao Su

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A comparison study on the numerical computations by large eddy simulation (LES and Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS methods with experiment on a cylindrical cavity flow was conducted in this paper. Numerical simulations and particle image velocimetry (PIV measurement were performed for two Reynolds numbers of the flow at a constant aspect ratio of H/R = 2.4 (R is the radius of the cylindrical cavity, and H is liquid level. The three components of velocity were extracted from 100 sequential PIV measured velocity frames with averaging, in order to illustrate the axial jet flow evolution and circulation distribution in the radial direction. The results show that LES can reproduce well the fine structure inside the swirling motions in both the meridional and the horizontal planes, as well as the distributions of velocity components and the circulation, in good agreement with experimental results, while the RANS method only provided a rough trend of inside vortex structure. Based on the analysis of velocity profiles at various locations, it indicates that LES is more suitable for predicting the complex flow characteristics inside complicated three-dimensional geometries.

  6. Validation of Heat Transfer and Film Cooling Capabilities of the 3-D RANS Code TURBO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyam, Vikram; Ameri, Ali; Chen, Jen-Ping

    2010-01-01

    The capabilities of the 3-D unsteady RANS code TURBO have been extended to include heat transfer and film cooling applications. The results of simulations performed with the modified code are compared to experiment and to theory, where applicable. Wilcox s k-turbulence model has been implemented to close the RANS equations. Two simulations are conducted: (1) flow over a flat plate and (2) flow over an adiabatic flat plate cooled by one hole inclined at 35 to the free stream. For (1) agreement with theory is found to be excellent for heat transfer, represented by local Nusselt number, and quite good for momentum, as represented by the local skin friction coefficient. This report compares the local skin friction coefficients and Nusselt numbers on a flat plate obtained using Wilcox's k-model with the theory of Blasius. The study looks at laminar and turbulent flows over an adiabatic flat plate and over an isothermal flat plate for two different wall temperatures. It is shown that TURBO is able to accurately predict heat transfer on a flat plate. For (2) TURBO shows good qualitative agreement with film cooling experiments performed on a flat plate with one cooling hole. Quantitatively, film effectiveness is under predicted downstream of the hole.

  7. Development of a Hybrid RANS/LES Method for Turbulent Mixing Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiadis, Nicholas J.; Alexander, J. Iwan D.; Reshotko, Eli

    2001-01-01

    Significant research has been underway for several years in NASA Glenn Research Center's nozzle branch to develop advanced computational methods for simulating turbulent flows in exhaust nozzles. The primary efforts of this research have concentrated on improving our ability to calculate the turbulent mixing layers that dominate flows both in the exhaust systems of modern-day aircraft and in those of hypersonic vehicles under development. As part of these efforts, a hybrid numerical method was recently developed to simulate such turbulent mixing layers. The method developed here is intended for configurations in which a dominant structural feature provides an unsteady mechanism to drive the turbulent development in the mixing layer. Interest in Large Eddy Simulation (LES) methods have increased in recent years, but applying an LES method to calculate the wide range of turbulent scales from small eddies in the wall-bounded regions to large eddies in the mixing region is not yet possible with current computers. As a result, the hybrid method developed here uses a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) procedure to calculate wall-bounded regions entering a mixing section and uses a LES procedure to calculate the mixing-dominated regions. A numerical technique was developed to enable the use of the hybrid RANS-LES method on stretched, non-Cartesian grids. With this technique, closure for the RANS equations is obtained by using the Cebeci-Smith algebraic turbulence model in conjunction with the wall-function approach of Ota and Goldberg. The LES equations are closed using the Smagorinsky subgrid scale model. Although the function of the Cebeci-Smith model to replace all of the turbulent stresses is quite different from that of the Smagorinsky subgrid model, which only replaces the small subgrid turbulent stresses, both are eddy viscosity models and both are derived at least in part from mixing-length theory. The similar formulation of these two models enables the RANS

  8. Enrichment of Phosphatidylethanolamine in Viral Replication Compartments via Co-opting the Endosomal Rab5 Small GTPase by a Positive-Strand RNA Virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Xu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Positive-strand RNA viruses build extensive membranous replication compartments to support replication and protect the virus from antiviral responses by the host. These viruses require host factors and various lipids to form viral replication complexes (VRCs. The VRCs built by Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV are enriched with phosphatidylethanolamine (PE through a previously unknown pathway. To unravel the mechanism of PE enrichment within the TBSV replication compartment, in this paper, the authors demonstrate that TBSV co-opts the guanosine triphosphate (GTP-bound active form of the endosomal Rab5 small GTPase via direct interaction with the viral replication protein. Deletion of Rab5 orthologs in a yeast model host or expression of dominant negative mutants of plant Rab5 greatly decreases TBSV replication and prevents the redistribution of PE to the sites of viral replication. We also show that enrichment of PE in the viral replication compartment is assisted by actin filaments. Interestingly, the closely related Carnation Italian ringspot virus, which replicates on the boundary membrane of mitochondria, uses a similar strategy to the peroxisomal TBSV to hijack the Rab5-positive endosomes into the viral replication compartments. Altogether, usurping the GTP-Rab5-positive endosomes allows TBSV to build a PE-enriched viral replication compartment, which is needed to support peak-level replication. Thus, the Rab family of small GTPases includes critical host factors assisting VRC assembly and genesis of the viral replication compartment.

  9. An in vitro study on the involvement of LINGO-1 and Rho GTPases in Nogo-A regulated differentiation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiang-Hui; Jin, Wei-Lin; Ju, Gong

    2007-10-01

    Nogo-A has been considered as one of the most important myelin-associated axonal regeneration inhibitors in the central nervous system. Recent studies have demonstrated various additional physiological roles of Nogo family members. To understand the possible effect of Nogo-A on the differentiation of oligodendrocytes, antibodies against distinct extracellular domains of Nogo-A were applied in cell cultures. Oligodendrocyte precursor cells from P2 rat cortex were grown in the presence of monoclonal antibody against the N-terminal inhibitory domain of Nogo-A or the C-terminal 66 amino acid loop of Nogo-A for 3 days, and the antibody treatment resulted in stunted process extension and inhibited differentiation of oligodendrocytes. Concomitant with morphology changes, Rho GTPases activity was greatly increased upon the antibody treatment and the expression level of LINGO-1, which was recently shown to be a negative regulator for the oligodendrocyte maturation, was upregulated in the process of antibody treatment. These results indicate that endogenous Nogo-A expressed in oligodendrocyte may act though Rho GTPase and LINGO-1 to influence the morphological differentiation of oligodendrocytes and will help us to understand the physiology role of Nogo-A in oligodendrocyte biology.

  10. Ras-like small GTPases in platelet biology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruyn, K.M.T. (Kimball Marinus Theodor) de

    2002-01-01

    In a human body, the behaviour of each cell is controlled by signals like hormones or growth factors. A cell receives such messages by means of specific receptors. These transmit the messages to other proteins in the cell and so on. Such cascades control for example the pattern of active genes or

  11. Structurally Distinct Bacterial TBC-like GAPs Link Arf GTPase to Rab1 Inactivation to Counteract Host Defenses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Na; Zhu, Yongqun; Lu, Qiuhe; Hu, Liyan; Zheng, Yuqing; Shao, Feng (NIBS-China); (Zhejiang)

    2012-10-10

    Rab GTPases are frequent targets of vacuole-living bacterial pathogens for appropriate trafficking of the vacuole. Here we discover that bacterial effectors including VirA from nonvacuole Shigella flexneri and EspG from extracellular Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) harbor TBC-like dual-finger motifs and exhibits potent RabGAP activities. Specific inactivation of Rab1 by VirA/EspG disrupts ER-to-Golgi trafficking. S. flexneri intracellular persistence requires VirA TBC-like GAP activity that mediates bacterial escape from autophagy-mediated host defense. Rab1 inactivation by EspG severely blocks host secretory pathway, resulting in inhibited interleukin-8 secretion from infected cells. Crystal structures of VirA/EspG-Rab1-GDP-aluminum fluoride complexes highlight TBC-like catalytic role for the arginine and glutamine finger residues and reveal a 3D architecture distinct from that of the TBC domain. Structure of Arf6-EspG-Rab1 ternary complex illustrates a pathogenic signaling complex that rewires host Arf signaling to Rab1 inactivation. Structural distinctions of VirA/EspG further predict a possible extensive presence of TBC-like RabGAP effectors in counteracting various host defenses.

  12. ROP GTPase Signaling in The Hormonal Regulation of Plant Growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Zhenbiao

    2013-05-24

    I secured funding from the DOE to investigate the effect of auxin signaling on ROP9. This was based on our preliminary data showing that ROP9 is activated by auxin. However, we were unable to show that rop9 knockout mutants have altered sensitivity to auxin. Instead, we found that auxin activates both ROP2 and ROP6, and relevant mutants exhibit reduced sensitivity to auxin. Therefore we used the fund to strengthen our research on ROP2 and ROP6. My laboratory made major advancements in the recent years in the understanding of the effect of auxin signaling on ROP2 and ROP6. This is clearly exemplified by the numerous publications acknowledging fund DE-FG0204ER15555 as the source of funding.

  13. A stable chemical SUMO1-Ubc9 conjugate specifically binds as a thioester mimic to the RanBP2-E3 ligase complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Stefanie; Ritterhoff, Tobias; Melchior, Frauke; Mootz, Henning D

    2015-05-26

    Ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like (Ubl) modifiers such as SUMO are conjugated to substrate proteins by E1, E2, and E3 enzymes. In the presence of an E3 ligase, the E2∼Ubl thioester intermediate becomes highly activated and is prone to chemical decomposition, thus making biochemical and structural studies difficult. Here we explored a stable chemical conjugate of the E2 enzyme from the SUMO pathway, Ubc9, with its modifier SUMO1 as a structural analogue of the Ubc9∼SUMO1 thioester intermediate, by introducing a triazole linkage by biorthogonal click chemistry. The chemical conjugate proved stable against proteolytic cleavage, in contrast to a Ubc9-SUMO1 isopeptide analogue obtained by auto-SUMOylation. Triazole-linked Ubc9-SUMO1 bound specifically to the preassembled E3 ligase complex RanBP2/RanGAP1*SUMO1/Ubc9, thus suggesting that it is a suitable thioester mimic. We anticipate interesting prospects for its use as a research tool to study protein complexes involving E2 and E3 enzymes. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Ectopic expression of the striatal-enriched GTPase Rhes elicits cerebellar degeneration and an ataxia phenotype in Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swarnkar, Supriya; Chen, Youjun; Pryor, William M; Shahani, Neelam; Page, Damon T; Subramaniam, Srinivasa

    2015-10-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is caused by an expansion of glutamine repeats in the huntingtin protein (mHtt) that invokes early and prominent damage of the striatum, a region that controls motor behaviors. Despite its ubiquitous expression, why certain brain regions, such as the cerebellum, are relatively spared from neuronal loss by mHtt remains unclear. Previously, we implicated the striatal-enriched GTPase, Rhes (Ras homolog enriched in the striatum), which binds and SUMOylates mHtt and increases its solubility and cellular cytotoxicity, as the cause for striatal toxicity in HD. Here, we report that Rhes deletion in HD mice (N171-82Q), which express the N-terminal fragment of human Htt with 82 glutamines (Rhes(-/-)/N171-82Q), display markedly reduced HD-related behavioral deficits, and absence of lateral ventricle dilatation (secondary to striatal atrophy), compared to control HD mice (N171-82Q). To further validate the role of GTPase Rhes in HD, we tested whether ectopic Rhes expression would elicit a pathology in a brain region normally less affected in HD. Remarkably, ectopic expression of Rhes in the cerebellum of N171-82Q mice, during the asymptomatic period led to an exacerbation of motor deficits, including loss of balance and motor incoordination with ataxia-like features, not apparent in control-injected N171-82Q mice or Rhes injected wild-type mice. Pathological and biochemical analysis of Rhes-injected N171-82Q mice revealed a cerebellar lesion with marked loss of Purkinje neuron layer parvalbumin-immunoreactivity, induction of caspase 3 activation, and enhanced soluble forms of mHtt. Similarly reintroducing Rhes into the striatum of Rhes deleted Rhes(-/-)Hdh(150Q/150Q) knock-in mice, elicited a progressive HD-associated rotarod deficit. Overall, these studies establish that Rhes plays a pivotal role in vivo for the selective toxicity of mHtt in HD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Physics-Informed Machine Learning for Predictive Turbulence Modeling: Using Data to Improve RANS Modeled Reynolds Stresses

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Jian-Xun; Xiao, Heng

    2016-01-01

    Turbulence modeling is a critical component in numerical simulations of industrial flows based on Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations. However, after decades of efforts in the turbulence modeling community, universally applicable RANS models with predictive capabilities are still lacking. Recently, data-driven methods have been proposed as a promising alternative to the traditional approaches of turbulence model development. In this work we propose a data-driven, physics-informed machine learning approach for predicting discrepancies in RANS modeled Reynolds stresses. The discrepancies are formulated as functions of the mean flow features. By using a modern machine learning technique based on random forests, the discrepancy functions are first trained with benchmark flow data and then used to predict Reynolds stresses discrepancies in new flows. The method is used to predict the Reynolds stresses in the flow over periodic hills by using two training flow scenarios of increasing difficulties: (1) ...

  16. Rinfoform Usage As Update Request Media Articles In iRAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Untung Rahardja

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Ease of access to information made public should continue to improve his knowledge of information technology. As one of the Universities in the field of computers, Perguruan Tinggi Raharja has a lot of innovation to create pembelajalan unconventional media. For that create an information media that serve as a center of tutorial every innovation in Perguruan Tinggi Raharja. iRAN (iLeraning Prog Ask And News. In the implementation one that is still seen as less is a service request in Iran. Utilization of Cloud Computing RinfoApps as media RinfoForms one of them is deemed to cover deficiencies that affect the improvements in the services provided.This research was conducted using the method of data collection, including the method of observation, and literature study method. RinfoForm expected utilization associated with Cluod Computin can give effect to the service request is in Iran.

  17. RANS-based simulation of wave-induced sheet-flow transport of graded sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calistan, Ugur; Fuhrman, David R.

    2017-01-01

    A one-dimensional vertical (1DV) turbulence-closure flow model, coupled with sediment transport capabilities,is extended to incorporate graded sediment mixtures. The hydrodynamic model solves the horizontalcomponent of the incompressible Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS) equations coupled...... for each grain fraction, includingeffects associated with increased exposure of larger particles within a mixture. The suspended sedimenttransport model also makes use of modified reference concentration approach, wherein reference concentrationscomputed individually for each fraction are translated...... to a common level, conveniently enabling use of asingle computational grid for the simulation of suspended sediments. Parametric study shows that these twoeffects combine to help alleviate an otherwise systematic tendency towards over- (under-) predicted transportrates for fine (coarse) sand fractions...

  18. Rans-Based Numerical Simulation of Wave-Induced Sheet-Flow Transport of Graded Sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuhrman, David R.; Caliskan, Ugur

    An existing one-dimensional vertical (1DV) turbulence-closure flow model, coupled with sediment transport capabilities, is extended to incorporate graded sediment mixtures. The hydrodynamic model solves the horizontal component of the incompressible Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS) equations...... coupled with k–ω turbulence closure. In addition to standard bed and suspended load descriptions, the sediment transport model incorporates so-called high-concentration effects (turbulence damping and hindered settling velocities). The sediment transport model treats the bed and suspended load...... individually for each grain fraction within a mixture, and includes effects associated with increased exposure of larger particles within a mixture. The model also makes use of a modified reference concentration approach, with reference concentrations computed individually for each fraction...

  19. RANS-based simulation of turbulent wave boundary layer and sheet-flow sediment transport processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuhrman, David R.; Schløer, Signe; Sterner, Johanna

    2013-01-01

    A numerical model coupling the horizontal component of the incompressible Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS) equationswith two-equation k−ω turbulence closure is presented and used to simulate a variety of turbulent wave boundary layer processes. The hydrodynamic model is additionally coupled...... of a number of local factors important within cross-shore wave boundary layer and sediment transport dynamics. The hydrodynamic model is validated for both hydraulically smooth and rough conditions, based on wave friction factor diagrams and boundary layer streaming profiles, with the results in excellent...... agreement with experimental and/or previous numerical work. The sediment transport model is likewise validated against oscillatory tunnel experiments involving both velocity-skewed and acceleration-skewed flows, as well as against measurements beneath real progressive waves.Model capabilities are exploited...

  20. Investigation on the wake evolution of contra-rotating propeller using RANS computation and SPIV measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang-Jun Paik

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The wake characteristics of Contra-Rotating Propeller (CRP were investigated using numerical simulation and flow measurement. The numerical simulation was carried out with a commercial CFD code based on a Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS equations solver, and the flow measurement was performed with Stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry (SPIV system. The simulation results were validated through the comparison with the experiment results measured around the leading edge of rudder to investigate the effect of propeller operation under the conditions without propeller, with forward propeller alone, and with both forward and aft propellers. The evolution of CRP wake was analyzed through velocity and vorticity contours on three transverse planes and one longitudinal plane based on CFD results. The trajectories of propeller tip vortex core in the cases with and without aft propeller were also compared, and larger wake contraction with CRP was confirmed.

  1. RANS simulation of cavitation and hull pressure fluctuation for marine propeller operating behind-hull condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang-Jun Paik

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Simulations of cavitation flow and hull pressure fluctuation for a marine propeller operating behind a hull using the unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equations (RANS are presented. A full hull body submerged under the free surface is modeled in the computational domain to simulate directly the wake field of the ship at the propeller plane. Simulations are performed in design and ballast draught conditions to study the effect of cavitation number. And two propellers with slightly different geometry are simulated to validate the detectability of the numerical simulation. All simulations are performed using a commercial CFD software FLUENT. Cavitation patterns of the simulations show good agreement with the experimental results carried out in Samsung CAvitation Tunnel (SCAT. The simulation results for the hull pressure fluctuation induced by a propeller are also compared with the experimental results showing good agreement in the tendency and amplitude, especially, for the first blade frequency.

  2. A RANS modelling approach for predicting powering performance of ships in waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn Windén

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a modelling technique for simulating self-propelled ships in waves is presented. The flow is modelled using a RANS solver coupled with an actuator disk model for the propeller. The motion of the ship is taken into consideration in the definition of the actuator disk region as well as the advance ratio of the propeller. The RPM of the propeller is controlled using a PID-controller with constraints added on the maximum permissible RPM increase rate. Results are presented for a freely surging model in regular waves with different constraints put on the PID-controller. The described method shows promising results and allows for the studying of several factors relating to self-propulsion. However, more validation data is needed to judge the accuracy of the model.

  3. Optimizing small cell deployment by the use of C-RANs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Checko, Aleksandra; Holm, Henrik Laumand; Christiansen, Henrik Lehrmann

    2014-01-01

    conditions. Furthermore, based on theoretical calculations and Network simulations we present considerations on deployment scenarios to optimize green field deployments in terms of Total Cost of Ownership (TCO). This involves optimizing the mix of cells with different traffic profiles and the BBU Pool......A Cloud Radio Access Network (C-RAN) is a novel mobile network architecture that has the potential to support extremely dense mobile network deployments enhancing the network capacity while offering cost savings on baseband resources. In this work we analyze cell traffic profiles and evaluate...... the conditions that impact the statistical multiplexing gain in the Baseband Unit (BBU) Pool. We conclude on the set of parameters that maximize the statistical multiplexing gain, leading to the highest potential cost savings. We then propose a packet based architecture that can adapt to changing traffic...

  4. Galaxy evolution. Isolated compact elliptical galaxies: stellar systems that ran away.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilingarian, Igor; Zolotukhin, Ivan

    2015-04-24

    Compact elliptical galaxies form a rare class of stellar system (~30 presently known) characterized by high stellar densities and small sizes and often harboring metal-rich stars. They were thought to form through tidal stripping of massive progenitors, until two isolated objects were discovered where massive galaxies performing the stripping could not be identified. By mining astronomical survey data, we have now found 195 compact elliptical galaxies in all types of environment. They all share similar dynamical and stellar population properties. Dynamical analysis for nonisolated galaxies demonstrates the feasibility of their ejection from host clusters and groups by three-body encounters, which is in agreement with numerical simulations. Hence, isolated compact elliptical and isolated quiescent dwarf galaxies are tidally stripped systems that ran away from their hosts. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  5. Flow field analysis of a pentagonal-shaped bridge deck by unsteady RANS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Naimul Haque

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Long-span cable-stayed bridges are susceptible to dynamic wind effects due to their inherent flexibility. The fluid flow around the bridge deck should be well understood for the efficient design of an aerodynamically stable long-span bridge system. In this work, the aerodynamic features of a pentagonal-shaped bridge deck are explored numerically. The analytical results are compared with past experimental work to assess the capability of two-dimensional unsteady RANS simulation for predicting the aerodynamic features of this type of deck. The influence of the bottom plate slope on aerodynamic response and flow features was investigated. By varying the Reynolds number (2 × 104 to 20 × 104 the aerodynamic behavior at high wind speeds is clarified.

  6. A RANS/DES Numerical Procedure for Axisymmetric Flows with and without Strong Rotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Andrew Jacob [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    A RANS/DES numerical procedure with an extended Lax-Wendroff control-volume scheme and turbulence model is described for the accurate simulation of internal/external axisymmetric flow with and without strong rotation. This new procedure is an extension, from Cartesian to cylindrical coordinates, of (1) a second order accurate multi-grid, control-volume integration scheme, and (2) a k-ω turbulence model. This paper outlines both the axisymmetric corrections to the mentioned numerical schemes and the developments of techniques pertaining to numerical dissipation, multi-block connectivity, parallelization, etc. Furthermore, analytical and experimental case studies are presented to demonstrate accuracy and computational efficiency. Notes are also made toward numerical stability of highly rotational flows.

  7. A Synthesis of Hybrid RANS/LES CFD Results for F-16XL Aircraft Aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luckring, James M.; Park, Michael A.; Hitzel, Stephan M.; Jirasek, Adam; Lofthouse, Andrew J.; Morton, Scott A.; McDaniel, David R.; Rizzi, Arthur M.

    2015-01-01

    A synthesis is presented of recent numerical predictions for the F-16XL aircraft flow fields and aerodynamics. The computational results were all performed with hybrid RANS/LES formulations, with an emphasis on unsteady flows and subsequent aerodynamics, and results from five computational methods are included. The work was focused on one particular low-speed, high angle-of-attack flight test condition, and comparisons against flight-test data are included. This work represents the third coordinated effort using the F-16XL aircraft, and a unique flight-test data set, to advance our knowledge of slender airframe aerodynamics as well as our capability for predicting these aerodynamics with advanced CFD formulations. The prior efforts were identified as Cranked Arrow Wing Aerodynamics Project International, with the acronyms CAWAPI and CAWAPI-2. All information in this paper is in the public domain.

  8. C9orf72’s interaction with Rab GTPases - modulation of membrane traffic and autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bor Luen Tang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Hexanucleotide repeat expansion in an intron of Chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9orf72 is the most common genetic cause of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS and Frontotemporal Dementia (FTD. While functional haploinsufficiency of C9orf72 resulting from the mutation may play a role in ALS/FTD, the actual cellular role of the protein has been unclear. Recent findings have now shown that C9orf72 physically and functionally interacts with multiple members of the Rab small GTPases family, consequently exerting important influences on cellular membrane traffic and the process of autophagy. Loss of C9orf72 impairs endocytosis in neuronal cell lines, and attenuated autophagosome formation. Interestingly, C9orf72 could influence autophagy both as part of a Guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF complex, or as a Rab effector that facilitates transport of the Unc-51-like Autophagy Activating Kinase 1 (Ulk1 autophagy initiation complex. The cellular function of C9orf72 is discussed in the light of these recent findings

  9. An Elmo-Dock complex locally controls Rho GTPases and actin remodeling during cadherin-mediated adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toret, Christopher P; Collins, Caitlin; Nelson, W James

    2014-12-08

    Cell-cell contact formation is a dynamic process requiring the coordination of cadherin-based cell-cell adhesion and integrin-based cell migration. A genome-wide RNA interference screen for proteins required specifically for cadherin-dependent cell-cell adhesion identified an Elmo-Dock complex. This was unexpected as Elmo-Dock complexes act downstream of integrin signaling as Rac guanine-nucleotide exchange factors. In this paper, we show that Elmo2 recruits Dock1 to initial cell-cell contacts in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. At cell-cell contacts, both Elmo2 and Dock1 are essential for the rapid recruitment and spreading of E-cadherin, actin reorganization, localized Rac and Rho GTPase activities, and the development of strong cell-cell adhesion. Upon completion of cell-cell adhesion, Elmo2 and Dock1 no longer localize to cell-cell contacts and are not required subsequently for the maintenance of cell-cell adhesion. These studies show that Elmo-Dock complexes are involved in both integrin- and cadherin-based adhesions, which may help to coordinate the transition of cells from migration to strong cell-cell adhesion. © 2014 Toret et al.

  10. Performance evaluation of RANS-based turbulence models in simulating a honeycomb heat sink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subasi, Abdussamet; Ozsipahi, Mustafa; Sahin, Bayram; Gunes, Hasan

    2017-07-01

    As well-known, there is not a universal turbulence model that can be used to model all engineering problems. There are specific applications for each turbulence model that make it appropriate to use, and it is vital to select an appropriate model and wall function combination that matches the physics of the problem considered. Therefore, in this study, performance of six well-known Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes ( RANS) based turbulence models which are the Standard k {{-}} ɛ, the Renormalized Group k- ɛ, the Realizable k- ɛ, the Reynolds Stress Model, the k- ω and the Shear Stress Transport k- ω and accompanying wall functions which are the standard, the non-equilibrium and the enhanced are evaluated via 3D simulation of a honeycomb heat sink. The CutCell method is used to generate grid for the part including heat sink called test section while a hexahedral mesh is employed to discretize to inlet and outlet sections. A grid convergence study is conducted for verification process while experimental data and well-known correlations are used to validate the numerical results. Prediction of pressure drop along the test section, mean base plate temperature of the heat sink and temperature at the test section outlet are regarded as a measure of the performance of employed models and wall functions. The results indicate that selection of turbulence models and wall functions has a great influence on the results and, therefore, need to be selected carefully. Hydraulic and thermal characteristics of the honeycomb heat sink can be determined in a reasonable accuracy using RANS- based turbulence models provided that a suitable turbulence model and wall function combination is selected.

  11. RANS based CFD methodology for a real scale 217-pin wire-wrapped fuel assembly of KAERI PGSFR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Jae-Ho, E-mail: jhjeong@kaeri.re.kr [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 989-111 Daedeok-daero, Yuseoung-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Song, Min-Seop [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, 559 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kwi-Lim [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 989-111 Daedeok-daero, Yuseoung-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • This paper presents a suitable way for a practical RANS based CFD methodology which is applicable to real scale 217-pin wire-wrapped fuel assembly of KAERI PGSFR. • A key point of differentiation of the RANS based CFD methodology in this study is adapting an innovative grid generation method using a fortran based in-house code with a GGI function in a general-purpose commercial CFD code, CFX. • The RANS based CFD methodology is implemented with high resolution scheme and SST turbulence model in the 7-pin 37-pin, and 127-pin wire-wrapped fuel assembly of PNC and JNC. Furthermore, the RANS based CFD methodology can be successfully extended to the real scale 217-pin wire-wrapped fuel bundles of KAERI PGSFR. • Three-dimensional thermal-hydraulic characteristics have been also investigated briefly. - Abstract: This paper presents a suitable way for a practical RANS (Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes simulation) based CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) methodology which is applicable to real scale 217-pin wire-wrapped fuel assembly of KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute) PGSFR (Prototype Gen-IV Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor). The main purpose of the current study is to support license issue for the KAERI PGSFR core safety and to elucidate thermal-hydraulic characteristics in a 217-pin wire-wrapped fuel assembly of KAERI PGSFR. A key point of differentiation of the RANS based CFD methodology in this study is adapting an innovative grid generation method using a fortran based in-house code with a GGI (General Grid Interface) function in a general-purpose commercial CFD code, CFX. The innovative grid generation method with GGI function can achieve to simulate a real wire shape with minimizing cell skewness. The RANS based CFD methodology is implemented with high resolution scheme in convection term and SST (Shear Stress Transport) turbulence model in the 7-pin 37-pin, and 127-pin wire-wrapped fuel assembly of PNC (Power reactor and Nuclear fuel

  12. Regulation of Liver Metabolism by the Endosomal GTPase Rab5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Zeigerer

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The liver maintains glucose and lipid homeostasis by adapting its metabolic activity to the energy needs of the organism. Communication between hepatocytes and extracellular environment via endocytosis is key to such homeostasis. Here, we addressed the question of whether endosomes are required for gluconeogenic gene expression. We took advantage of the loss of endosomes in the mouse liver upon Rab5 silencing. Strikingly, we found hepatomegaly and severe metabolic defects such as hypoglycemia, hypercholesterolemia, hyperlipidemia, and glycogen accumulation that phenocopied those found in von Gierke’s disease, a glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase deficiency. G6Pase deficiency alone can account for the reduction in hepatic glucose output and glycogen accumulation as determined by mathematical modeling. Interestingly, we uncovered functional alterations in the transcription factors, which regulate G6Pase expression. Our data highlight a requirement of Rab5 and the endosomal system for the regulation of gluconeogenic gene expression that has important implications for metabolic diseases.

  13. Mechanism and rate constants of the Cdc42 GTPase binding with intrinsically disordered effectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Xiaodong; Zhou, Huan-Xiang

    2016-05-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are often involved in signaling and regulatory functions, through binding to cellular targets. Many IDPs undergo disorder-to-order transitions upon binding. Both the binding mechanisms and the magnitudes of the binding rate constants can have functional importance. Previously we have found that the coupled binding and folding of any IDP generally follows a sequential mechanism that we term dock-and-coalesce, whereby one segment of the IDP first docks to its subsite on the target surface and the remaining segments subsequently coalesce around their respective subsites. Here we applied our TransComp method within the framework of the dock-and-coalesce mechanism to dissect the binding kinetics of two Rho-family GTPases, Cdc42 and TC10, with two intrinsically disordered effectors, WASP and Pak1. TransComp calculations identified the basic regions preceding the GTPase binding domains (GBDs) of the effectors as the docking segment. For Cdc42 binding with both WASP and Pak1, the calculated docking rate constants are close to the observed overall binding rate constants, suggesting that basic-region docking is the rate-limiting step and subsequent conformational coalescence of the GBDs on the Cdc42 surface is fast. The possibility that conformational coalescence of the WASP GBD on the TC10 surface is slow warrants further experimental investigation. The account for the differences in binding rate constants among the three GTPase-effector systems and mutational effects therein yields deep physical and mechanistic insight into the binding processes. Our approach may guide the selection of mutations that lead to redesigned binding pathways. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Generalized myoclonic epilepsy with photosensitivity in juvenile dogs caused by a defective DIRAS family GTPase 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wielaender, Franziska; Sarviaho, Riika; James, Fiona; Hytönen, Marjo K; Cortez, Miguel A; Kluger, Gerhard; Koskinen, Lotta L E; Arumilli, Meharji; Kornberg, Marion; Bathen-Noethen, Andrea; Tipold, Andrea; Rentmeister, Kai; Bhatti, Sofie F M; Hülsmeyer, Velia; Boettcher, Irene C; Tästensen, Carina; Flegel, Thomas; Dietschi, Elisabeth; Leeb, Tosso; Matiasek, Kaspar; Fischer, Andrea; Lohi, Hannes

    2017-03-07

    The clinical and electroencephalographic features of a canine generalized myoclonic epilepsy with photosensitivity and onset in young Rhodesian Ridgeback dogs (6 wk to 18 mo) are described. A fully penetrant recessive 4-bp deletion was identified in the DIRAS family GTPase 1 (DIRAS1) gene with an altered expression pattern of DIRAS1 protein in the affected brain. This neuronal DIRAS1 gene with a proposed role in cholinergic transmission provides not only a candidate for human myoclonic epilepsy but also insights into the disease etiology, while establishing a spontaneous model for future intervention studies and functional characterization.

  15. Human Mammary Epithelial Cell Transformation by Rho GTPase Through a Novel Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    had observed increased expression of ELF3 in RhoA-immortalized hMECs (Zhao et al., Cancer Res 2009), we performed expression analysis of ELF3 in a...87: 635-44. 18. Burbelo P, Wellstein A, Pestell RG. Altered Rho GTPase signaling pathways in breast cancer cells. Breast Cancer Res Treat 2004; 84...supernatants containing 4 Ag/mL polybrene. Stable cell lines were established by selection in G418 (100 Ag/mL). Western blot analysis and antibodies. Cell

  16. Generalized myoclonic epilepsy with photosensitivity in juvenile dogs caused by a defective DIRAS family GTPase 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wielaender, Franziska; Sarviaho, Riika; James, Fiona; Hytönen, Marjo K.; Cortez, Miguel A.; Kluger, Gerhard; Koskinen, Lotta L. E.; Arumilli, Meharji; Kornberg, Marion; Bathen-Noethen, Andrea; Tipold, Andrea; Rentmeister, Kai; Bhatti, Sofie F. M.; Hülsmeyer, Velia; Boettcher, Irene C.; Tästensen, Carina; Flegel, Thomas; Leeb, Tosso; Matiasek, Kaspar; Fischer, Andrea; Lohi, Hannes

    2017-01-01

    The clinical and electroencephalographic features of a canine generalized myoclonic epilepsy with photosensitivity and onset in young Rhodesian Ridgeback dogs (6 wk to 18 mo) are described. A fully penetrant recessive 4-bp deletion was identified in the DIRAS family GTPase 1 (DIRAS1) gene with an altered expression pattern of DIRAS1 protein in the affected brain. This neuronal DIRAS1 gene with a proposed role in cholinergic transmission provides not only a candidate for human myoclonic epilepsy but also insights into the disease etiology, while establishing a spontaneous model for future intervention studies and functional characterization. PMID:28223533

  17. ARF1 and SAR1 GTPases in Endomembrane Trafficking in Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Birsen Cevher-Keskin

    2013-01-01

    Small GTPases largely control membrane traffic, which is essential for the survival of all eukaryotes. Among the small GTP-binding proteins, ARF1 (ADP-ribosylation factor 1) and SAR1 (Secretion-Associated RAS super family 1) are commonly conserved among all eukaryotes with respect to both their functional and sequential characteristics. The ARF1 and SAR1 GTP-binding proteins are involved in the formation and budding of vesicles throughout plant endomembrane systems. ARF1 has been shown to pla...

  18. Identification of Neutrophil Exocytosis Inhibitors (Nexinhibs), Small Molecule Inhibitors of Neutrophil Exocytosis and Inflammation: DRUGGABILITY OF THE SMALL GTPase Rab27a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jennifer L; Ramadass, Mahalakshmi; He, Jing; Brown, Steven J; Zhang, Jinzhong; Abgaryan, Lusine; Biris, Nikolaos; Gavathiotis, Evripidis; Rosen, Hugh; Catz, Sergio D

    2016-12-09

    Neutrophils constitute the first line of cellular defense in response to bacterial and fungal infections and rely on granular proteins to kill microorganisms, but uncontrolled secretion of neutrophil cargos is injurious to the host and should be closely regulated. Thus, increased plasma levels of neutrophil secretory proteins, including myeloperoxidase and elastase, are associated with tissue damage and are hallmarks of systemic inflammation. Here, we describe a novel high-throughput screening approach to identify small molecule inhibitors of the interaction between the small GTPase Rab27a and its effector JFC1, two central regulators of neutrophil exocytosis. Using this assay, we have identified small molecule inhibitors of Rab27a-JFC1 binding that were also active in cell-based neutrophil-specific exocytosis assays, demonstrating the druggability of Rab GTPases and their effectors. These compounds, named Nexinhibs (neutrophil exocytosis inhibitors), inhibit exocytosis of azurophilic granules in human neutrophils without affecting other important innate immune responses, including phagocytosis and neutrophil extracellular trap production. Furthermore, the compounds are reversible and potent inhibitors of the extracellular production of superoxide anion by preventing the up-regulation of the granule membrane-associated subunit of the NADPH oxidase at the plasma membrane. Nexinhibs also inhibit the up-regulation of activation signature molecules, including the adhesion molecules CD11b and CD66b. Importantly, by using a mouse model of endotoxin-induced systemic inflammation, we show that these inhibitors have significant activity in vivo manifested by decreased plasma levels of neutrophil secretory proteins and significantly decreased tissue infiltration by inflammatory neutrophils. Altogether, our data present the first neutrophil exocytosis-specific inhibitor with in vivo anti-inflammatory activity, supporting its potential use as an inhibitor of systemic

  19. RANS / LES coupling applied to high Reynolds number turbulent flows of the nuclear industry; Application du couplage RANS / LES aux ecoulements turbulents a haut nombre de Reynolds de l'industrie nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benarafa, Y

    2005-12-15

    The main issue to perform a computational study of high Reynolds numbered turbulent flows consists on predicting their unsteadiness without implying a tremendous computational cost. First, the main drawbacks of large-eddy simulation with standard wall model on a coarse mesh for a plane channel flow are highlighted. To correct these drawbacks two coupling RANS/LES methods have been proposed. The first one relies on a sophisticated wall model (TBLE) which consists on solving Thin Boundary Layer Equations with a RANS type turbulent closure in the near wall region. The second one consists on a RANS/LES methods have been proposed. The second one consists on a RANS/LES coupling method using a forcing term approach. These various approaches have been implemented in the TRIO-U code developed at CEA (French Atomic Center) at Grenoble, France. The studied flow configurations are the fully developed plane channel flow and a flow around a surface-mounted cubical obstacle. Both approaches provide encouraging results and allow a surface-mounted cubical obstacle. Both approaches provide encouraging results and allow unsteady simulations for a low computational cost. (author)

  20. Neutron Crystal Structure of RAS GTPase Puts in Question the Protonation State of the GTP γ-Phosphate*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knihtila, Ryan; Holzapfel, Genevieve; Weiss, Kevin; Meilleur, Flora; Mattos, Carla

    2015-01-01

    RAS GTPase is a prototype for nucleotide-binding proteins that function by cycling between GTP and GDP, with hydrogen atoms playing an important role in the GTP hydrolysis mechanism. It is one of the most well studied proteins in the superfamily of small GTPases, which has representatives in a wide range of cellular functions. These proteins share a GTP-binding pocket with highly conserved motifs that promote hydrolysis to GDP. The neutron crystal structure of RAS presented here strongly supports a protonated γ-phosphate at physiological pH. This counters the notion that the phosphate groups of GTP are fully deprotonated at the start of the hydrolysis reaction, which has colored the interpretation of experimental and computational data in studies of the hydrolysis mechanism. The neutron crystal structure presented here puts in question our understanding of the pre-catalytic state associated with the hydrolysis reaction central to the function of RAS and other GTPases. PMID:26515069

  1. 78 FR 34084 - Freeport-McMoRan Energy LLC; Application for Long-Term Authorization To Export Liquefied Natural...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-06

    ... Freeport-McMoRan Energy LLC; Application for Long-Term Authorization To Export Liquefied Natural Gas... natural gas (non-FTA countries) with which trade is not prohibited by U.S. law or policy. FME requests... Natural Gas Act (NGA), 15 U.S.C. 717b(c).\\3\\ In the current Application, FME requests both FTA and non...

  2. A comparison of RANS computations and wind tunnel tests for RMS pressures on a high-rise building model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalkman, I.M.; Bronkhorst, A.J.; Bentum, C.A. van; Franke, J.

    2012-01-01

    Five root-mean-square (RMS) pressure models are used in combination with different turbulence models to determine whether it is possible to obtain a conservative estimate of RMS pressures on a high-rise building model from a RANS calculation. When a precursor domain is used for the generation of

  3. HIV Integration Targeting: A Pathway Involving Transportin-3 and the Nuclear Pore Protein RanBP2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huegel, Alyssa; Roth, Shoshannah L.; Schaller, Torsten; James, Leo C.; Towers, Greg J.; Young, John A. T.; Chanda, Sumit K.; König, Renate; Malani, Nirav; Berry, Charles C.; Bushman, Frederic D.

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide siRNA screens have identified host cell factors important for efficient HIV infection, among which are nuclear pore proteins such as RanBP2/Nup358 and the karyopherin Transportin-3/TNPO3. Analysis of the roles of these proteins in the HIV replication cycle suggested that correct trafficking through the pore may facilitate the subsequent integration step. Here we present data for coupling between these steps by demonstrating that depletion of Transportin-3 or RanBP2 altered the terminal step in early HIV replication, the selection of chromosomal sites for integration. We found that depletion of Transportin-3 and RanBP2 altered integration targeting for HIV. These knockdowns reduced HIV integration frequency in gene-dense regions and near gene-associated features, a pattern that differed from that reported for depletion of the HIV integrase binding cofactor Psip1/Ledgf/p75. MLV integration was not affected by the Transportin-3 knockdown. Using siRNA knockdowns and integration targeting analysis, we also implicated several additional nuclear proteins in proper target site selection. To map viral determinants of integration targeting, we analyzed a chimeric HIV derivative containing MLV gag, and found that the gag replacement phenocopied the Transportin-3 and RanBP2 knockdowns. Thus, our data support a model in which Gag-dependent engagement of the proper transport and nuclear pore machinery mediate trafficking of HIV complexes to sites of integration. PMID:21423673

  4. HIV integration targeting: a pathway involving Transportin-3 and the nuclear pore protein RanBP2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen E Ocwieja

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide siRNA screens have identified host cell factors important for efficient HIV infection, among which are nuclear pore proteins such as RanBP2/Nup358 and the karyopherin Transportin-3/TNPO3. Analysis of the roles of these proteins in the HIV replication cycle suggested that correct trafficking through the pore may facilitate the subsequent integration step. Here we present data for coupling between these steps by demonstrating that depletion of Transportin-3 or RanBP2 altered the terminal step in early HIV replication, the selection of chromosomal sites for integration. We found that depletion of Transportin-3 and RanBP2 altered integration targeting for HIV. These knockdowns reduced HIV integration frequency in gene-dense regions and near gene-associated features, a pattern that differed from that reported for depletion of the HIV integrase binding cofactor Psip1/Ledgf/p75. MLV integration was not affected by the Transportin-3 knockdown. Using siRNA knockdowns and integration targeting analysis, we also implicated several additional nuclear proteins in proper target site selection. To map viral determinants of integration targeting, we analyzed a chimeric HIV derivative containing MLV gag, and found that the gag replacement phenocopied the Transportin-3 and RanBP2 knockdowns. Thus, our data support a model in which Gag-dependent engagement of the proper transport and nuclear pore machinery mediate trafficking of HIV complexes to sites of integration.

  5. RANS-VOF modeling of hydrodynamics and sand transport under full-scale non-breaking and breaking waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandez Mora, Maria de Los Angeles; Ribberink, Jan S.; van der Zanden, Joep; van der Werf, Jebbe J.; Jacobsen, N.G.; Lynett, P.; Lynett, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    A 2D RANS-VOF model is used to simulate the flow and sand transport for two different full-scale laboratory experiments: i) non-breaking waves over a horizontal sand bed (Schretlen et al., 2011) and ii) plunging breaking waves over a barred mobile bed profile (Van der Zanden et al., 2016). For the

  6. Identification and function of 11 Rab GTPases in giant freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ying; Ren, Qian

    2015-03-01

    Rab GTPases, members of the Ras-like GTPase superfamily, are central elements in endocytic membrane trafficking. However, little is known of the Rab genes in the giant freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii. In this study, 11 Rab genes were identified from M. rosenbergii. All MrRabs have a RAB domain. Phylogenetic analysis showed that these 11 MrRabs were divided into different groups. The MrRab genes were ubiquitously expressed in heart, hemocytes, hepatopancreas, gills, stomach, and intestines. Real-time polymerase chain reaction revealed that the MrRab genes were significantly upregulated by white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) in the prawns, indicating that MrRabs might play an important role in innate immune response against WSSV. Moreover, after challenge with Vibrio parahaemolyticus, the expression levels of all MrRabs in the hepatopancreas were also upregulated, which might indicated the involvement of MrRabs in prawns antibacterial immunity. In all, these preliminary results showed that MrRabs were involved in innate immunity of M. rosenbergii. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Regulation of phagocytosis against bacterium by Rab GTPase in shrimp Marsupenaeus japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Rongrong; Wu, Wenlin; Xu, Jianyang; Zhang, Xiaobo

    2008-09-01

    Rab GTPases, members of the Ras superfamily, play important roles in phagosome formation and maturation. However, the involvement of Rab protein in phagocytosis against invading pathogens in crustacean remains unknown. In the present study, the RNAi and mRNA overexpression assays were conducted to elucidate the function of shrimp Rab gene (designated as PjRab) in hemocytic phagocytosis against bacterium. The results indicated that the phagocytic percentage and phagocytic index using FITC-labeled Vibrio parahemolyticus were significantly decreased when the PjRab gene was silenced by sequence-specific siRNA, suggesting that the PjRab protein was essential in hemocytic phagocytosis. On the other hand, the overexpression of PjRab gene leaded to the increase of phagocytic percentage and phagocytic index. The findings indicated that the PjRab protein was involved in the regulation of hemocytic phagocytosis of shrimp. Our report on the regulation of phagocytosis by Rab GTPase would contribute a better clue to realize the still poorly understood molecular events involved in shrimp as well as crustacean immune response.

  8. Analysis of the interactions between Rab GTPases and class V myosins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Andrew J; Miserey-Lenkei, Stéphanie; Goud, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Myosins are actin-based motor proteins that are involved in a wide variety of cellular processes such as membrane transport, muscle contraction, and cell division. Humans have over 40 myosins that can be placed into 18 classes, the malfunctioning of a number of which can lead to disease. There are three members of the human class V myosin family, myosins Va, Vb, and Vc. People lacking functional myosin Va suffer from a rare autosomal recessive disease called Griscelli's Syndrome type I (GS1) that is characterized by severe neurological defects and partial albinism. Mutations in the myosin Vb gene lead to an epithelial disorder called microvillus inclusion disease (MVID) that is often fatal in infants. The class V myosins have been implicated in the transport of diverse cargoes such as melanosomes in pigment cells, synaptic vesicles in neurons, RNA transcripts in a variety of cell types, and organelles such as the endoplasmic reticulum. The Rab GTPases play a critical role in recruiting class V myosins to their cargo. We recently published a study in which we used the yeast two-hybrid system to systematically test myosin Va for its ability to interact with each member of the human Rab GTPase family. We present here a detailed description of this yeast two-hybrid "living chip" assay. Furthermore, we present a protocol for validating positive interactions obtained from this screen by coimmunoprecipitation.

  9. Effects of Rho1, a small GTPase on the production of recombinant glycoproteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Sha; Zhang, Ge-Yuan; Zhang, Huijie; Kitajima, Toshihiko; Nakanishi, Hideki; Gao, Xiao-Dong

    2016-10-21

    To humanize yeast N-glycosylation pathways, genes involved in yeast specific hyper-mannosylation must be disrupted followed by the introduction of genes catalyzing the synthesis, transport, and addition of human sugars. However, deletion of these genes, for instance, OCH1, which initiates hyper-mannosylation, could cause severe defects in cell growth, morphogenesis and response to environmental challenges. In this study, overexpression of RHO1, which encodes the Rho1p small GTPase, is confirmed to partially recover the growth defect of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Δalg3Δoch1 double mutant strain. In addition, transmission electron micrographs indicated that the cell wall structure of RHO1-expressed cells have an enhanced glucan layer and also a recovered mannoprotein layer, revealing the effect of Rho1p GTPase on cell wall biosynthesis. Similar complementation phenotypes have been confirmed by overexpression of the gene that encodes Fks2 protein, a catalytic subunit of a 1,3-β-glucan synthase. Besides the recovery of cell wall structure, the RHO1-overexpressed Δalg3Δoch1 strain also showed improved abilities in temperature tolerance, osmotic potential and drug sensitivity, which were not observed in the Δalg3Δoch1-FKS2 cells. Moreover, RHO1 overexpression could also increase N-glycan site occupancy and the amount of secreted glycoproteins. Overexpression of RHO1 in 'humanized' glycoprotein producing yeasts could significantly facilitate its future industrial applications for the production of therapeutic glycoproteins.

  10. Repeat Associated Non-AUG Translation (RAN Translation Dependent on Sequence Downstream of the ATXN2 CAG Repeat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel R Scoles

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2 is a progressive autosomal dominant disorder caused by the expansion of a CAG tract in the ATXN2 gene. The SCA2 disease phenotype is characterized by cerebellar atrophy, gait ataxia, and slow saccades. ATXN2 mutation causes gains of toxic and normal functions of the ATXN2 gene product, ataxin-2, and abnormally slow Purkinje cell firing frequency. Previously we investigated features of ATXN2 controlling expression and noted expression differences for ATXN2 constructs with varying CAG lengths, suggestive of repeat associated non-AUG translation (RAN translation. To determine whether RAN translation occurs for ATXN2 we assembled various ATXN2 constructs with ATXN2 tagged by luciferase, HA or FLAG tags, driven by the CMV promoter or the ATXN2 promoter. Luciferase expression from ATXN2-luciferase constructs lacking the ATXN2 start codon was weak vs AUG translation, regardless of promoter type, and did not increase with longer CAG repeat lengths. RAN translation was detected on western blots by the anti-polyglutamine antibody 1C2 for constructs driven by the CMV promoter but not the ATXN2 promoter, and was weaker than AUG translation. Strong RAN translation was also observed when driving the ATXN2 sequence with the CMV promoter with ATXN2 sequence downstream of the CAG repeat truncated to 18 bp in the polyglutamine frame but not in the polyserine or polyalanine frames. Our data demonstrate that ATXN2 RAN translation is weak compared to AUG translation and is dependent on ATXN2 sequences flanking the CAG repeat.

  11. Doxycycline reduces the migration of tuberous sclerosis complex-2 null cells - effects on RhoA-GTPase and focal adhesion kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Ho Yin; Oliver, Brian Gregory George; Burgess, Janette Kay; Krymskaya, Vera P; Black, Judith Lee; Moir, Lyn M

    2015-11-01

    Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is associated with dysfunction of the tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) leading to enhanced cell proliferation and migration. This study aims to examine whether doxycycline, a tetracycline antibiotic, can inhibit the enhanced migration of TSC2-deficient cells, identify signalling pathways through which doxycycline works and to assess the effectiveness of combining doxycycline with rapamycin (mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 inhibitor) in controlling cell migration, proliferation and wound closure. TSC2-positive and TSC2-negative mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF), 323-TSC2-positive and 323-TSC2-null MEF and Eker rat uterine leiomyoma (ELT3) cells were treated with doxycycline or rapamycin alone, or in combination. Migration, wound closure and proliferation were assessed using a transwell migration assay, time-lapse microscopy and manual cell counts respectively. RhoA-GTPase activity, phosphorylation of p70S6 kinase (p70S6K) and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in TSC2-negative MEF treated with doxycycline were examined using ELISA and immunoblotting techniques. The enhanced migration of TSC2-null cells was reduced by doxycycline at concentrations as low as 20 pM, while the rate of wound closure was reduced at 2-59 μM. Doxycycline decreased RhoA-GTPase activity and phosphorylation of FAK in these cells but had no effect on the phosphorylation of p70S6K, ERK1/2 or AKT. Combining doxycycline with rapamycin significantly reduced the rate of wound closure at lower concentrations than achieved with either drug alone. This study shows that doxycycline inhibits TSC2-null cell migration. Thus doxycycline has potential as an anti-migratory agent in the treatment of diseases with TSC2 dysfunction. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  12. Suppressed invasive and migratory behaviors of SW1353 chondrosarcoma cells through the regulation of Src, Rac1 GTPase, and MMP13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenxiao; Wan, Qiaoqiao; Na, Sungsoo; Yokota, Hiroki; Yan, Jing-Long; Hamamura, Kazunori

    2015-12-01

    Chondrosarcoma is the second frequent type of primary bone cancer. In response to stress to the endoplasmic reticulum, activation of eIF2α-mediated signaling is reported to induce apoptosis. However, its effects on invasive and migratory behaviors of chondrosarcoma have not been understood. Focusing on potential roles of Src kinase, Rac1 GTPase, and MMP13, we investigated eIF2α-driven regulation of SW1353 chondrosarcoma cells. In particular, we employed two chemical agents (salubrinal, Sal; and guanabenz, Gu) that elevate the level of eIF2α phosphorylation. The result revealed that both Sal and Gu reduced invasion and motility of SW1353 chondrosarcoma cells in a dose dependent manner. Live imaging using a fluorescent resonance energy transfer (FRET) technique showed that Sal and Gu downregulated activities of Src kinase as well as Rac1 GTPase in an eIF2α dependent manner. RNA interference experiments supported an eIF2α-mediated regulatory network in the inhibitory role of Sal and Gu. Partial silencing of MMP13 also suppressed malignant phenotypes of SW1353 chondrosarcoma cells. However, MMP13 was not regulated via eIF2α since administration of Sal but not Gu reduced expression of MMP13. In summary, we demonstrate that eIF2α dependent and independent pathways regulate invasion and motility of SW1353 chondrosarcoma cells, and inactivation of Src, Rac1, and MMP13 by Sal could provide a potential adjuvant therapy for combating metastatic chondrosarcoma cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. RANS Modeling of Stably Stratified Turbulent Boundary Layer Flows in OpenFOAM®

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Jordan M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantifying mixing processes relating to the transport of heat, momentum, and scalar quantities of stably stratified turbulent geophysical flows remains a substantial task. In a stably stratified flow, such as the stable atmospheric boundary layer (SABL, buoyancy forces have a significant impact on the flow characteristics. This study investigates constant and stability-dependent turbulent Prandtl number (Prt formulations linking the turbulent viscosity (νt and diffusivity (κt for modeling applications of boundary layer flows. Numerical simulations of plane Couette flow and pressure-driven channel flow are performed using the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS framework with the standard k-ε turbulence model. Results are compared with DNS data to evaluate model efficacy for predicting mean velocity and density fields. In channel flow simulations, a Prandtl number formulation for wall-bounded flows is introduced to alleviate overmixing of the mean density field. This research reveals that appropriate specification of Prt can improve predictions of stably stratified turbulent boundary layer flows.

  14. Validation of the simpleFoam (RANS solver for the atmospheric boundary layer in complex terrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peralta C.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We validate the simpleFoam (RANS solver in OpenFOAM (version 2.1.1 for simulating neutral atmospheric boundary layer flows in complex terrain. Initial and boundary conditions are given using Richards and Hoxey proposal [1]. In order to obtain stable simulation of the ABL, modified wall functions are used to set the near-wall boundary conditions, following Blocken et al remedial measures [2]. A structured grid is generated with the new library terrainBlockMesher [3,4], based on OpenFOAM's blockMesh native mesher. The new tool is capable of adding orographic features and the forest canopy. Additionally, the mesh can be refined in regions with complex orography. We study both the classical benchmark case of Askervein hill [5] and the more recent Bolund island data set [6]. Our purpose is two-folded: to validate the performance of OpenFOAM steady state solvers, and the suitability of the new meshing tool to generate high quality structured meshes, which will be used in the future for performing more computationally intensive LES simulations in complex terrain.

  15. A Game-Theoretical Approach for Spectrum Efficiency Improvement in Cloud-RAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuofu Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As tremendous mobile devices access to the Internet in the future, the cells which can provide high data rate and more capacity are expected to be deployed. Specifically, in the next generation of mobile communication 5G, cloud computing is supposed to be applied to radio access network. In cloud radio access network (Cloud-RAN, the traditional base station is divided into two parts, that is, remote radio heads (RRHs and base band units (BBUs. RRHs are geographically distributed and densely deployed, so as to achieve high data rate and low latency. However, the ultradense deployment inevitably deteriorates spectrum efficiency due to the severer intercell interference among RRHs. In this paper, the downlink spectrum efficiency can be improved through the cooperative transmission based on forming the coalitions of RRHs. We formulate the problem as a coalition formation game in partition form. In the process of coalition formation, each RRH can join or leave one coalition to maximize its own individual utility while taking into account the coalition utility at the same time. Moreover, the convergence and stability of the resulting coalition structure are studied. The numeric simulation result demonstrates that the proposed approach based on coalition formation game is superior to the noncooperative method in terms of the aggregate coalition utility.

  16. RANS SIMULATION OF HYDROFOIL EFFECTS ON HYDRODYNAMIC COEFFICIENTS OF A PLANING CATAMARAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Najafi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Determination of high-speed crafts’ hydrodynamic coefficients will help to analyze the dynamics of these kinds of vessels and the factors affecting their dynamic stabilities. Also, it can be useful and effective in controlling the vessel instabilities. The main purpose of this study is to determine the coefficients of longitudinal motions of a planing catamaran with and without a hydrofoil using RANS method to evaluate the foil effects on them. Determination of hydrodynamic coefficients by experimental approach is costly, and requires meticulous laboratory equipment; therefore, utilizing numerical methods and developing a virtual laboratory seems highly efficient. In the present study, the numerical results for hydrodynamic coefficients of a high-speed craft are verified against Troesch’s (1992 experimental results. In the following, after determination of hydrodynamic coefficients of a planing catamaran with and without foil, the foil effects on its hydrodynamic coefficients are evaluated. The results indicate that most of the coefficients are frequency independent especially at high frequencies.

  17. Simulating wind and marine hydrokinetic turbines with actuator lines in RANS and LES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachant, Peter; Wosnik, Martin

    2015-11-01

    As wind and marine hydrokinetic (MHK) turbine designs mature, focus is shifting towards improving turbine array layouts for maximizing overall power output, i.e., minimizing wake interference for axial-flow or horizontal-axis turbines, or taking advantage of constructive wake interaction for cross-flow or vertical-axis turbines. Towards this goal, an actuator line model (ALM) was developed to provide a computationally feasible method for simulating full turbine arrays inside Navier-Stokes models. The ALM predicts turbine loading with the blade element method combined with sub-models for dynamic stall and flow curvature. The open-source software is written as an extension library for the OpenFOAM CFD package, which allows the ALM body force to be applied to their standard RANS and LES solvers. Turbine forcing is also applied to volume of fluid (VOF) models, e.g., for predicting free surface effects on submerged MHK devices. An additional sub-model is considered for injecting turbulence model scalar quantities based on actuator line element loading. Results are presented for the simulation of performance and wake dynamics of axial- and cross-flow turbines and compared with moderate Reynolds number experiments and body-fitted mesh, blade-resolving CFD. Work supported by NSF-CBET grant 1150797.

  18. Simulation of an Isolated Tiltrotor in Hover with an Unstructured Overset-Grid RANS Solver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Biedron, Robert T.

    2009-01-01

    An unstructured overset-grid Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) solver, FUN3D, is used to simulate an isolated tiltrotor in hover. An overview of the computational method is presented as well as the details of the overset-grid systems. Steady-state computations within a noninertial reference frame define the performance trends of the rotor across a range of the experimental collective settings. Results are presented to show the effects of off-body grid refinement and blade grid refinement. The computed performance and blade loading trends show good agreement with experimental results and previously published structured overset-grid computations. Off-body flow features indicate a significant improvement in the resolution of the first perpendicular blade vortex interaction with background grid refinement across the collective range. Considering experimental data uncertainty and effects of transition, the prediction of figure of merit on the baseline and refined grid is reasonable at the higher collective range- within 3 percent of the measured values. At the lower collective settings, the computed figure of merit is approximately 6 percent lower than the experimental data. A comparison of steady and unsteady results show that with temporal refinement, the dynamic results closely match the steady-state noninertial results which gives confidence in the accuracy of the dynamic overset-grid approach.

  19. cpRAS: a novel circularly permuted RAS-like GTPase domain with a highly scattered phylogenetic distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novotny Marian

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A recent systematic survey suggested that the YRG (or YawG/YlqF family with the G4-G5-G1-G2-G3 order of the conserved GTPase motifs represents the only possible circularly permuted variation of the canonical GTPase structure. Here we show that a different circularly permuted GTPase domain actually does exist, conforming to the pattern G3-G4-G5-G1-G2. The domain, dubbed cpRAS, is a variant of RAS family GTPases and occurs in two types of larger proteins, either inserted into a region homologous to a bacterial group of proteins classified as COG2373 and potentially related to the alpha-2-macroglobulin family (so far a single protein in Dictyostelium or in combination with a von Willebrand factor type A (VWA domain. For the latter protein type, which was found in a few metazoans and several distantly related protists, existence in the common ancestor of opisthokonts, Amoebozoa and excavates followed by at least eight independent losses may be inferred. Our findings thus bring further evidence for the importance of parallel reduction of ancestral complexity in the eukaryotic evolution. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Lakshminarayan Iyer and Fyodor Kondrashov. For the full reviews, please go to the Reviewers' comments section.

  20. Small GTPase CDC-42 promotes apoptotic cell corpse clearance in response to PAT-2 and CED-1 in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neukomm, L J; Zeng, S; Frei, A P; Huegli, P A; Hengartner, M O

    2014-06-01

    The rapid clearance of dying cells is important for the well-being of multicellular organisms. In C. elegans, cell corpse removal is mainly mediated by three parallel engulfment signaling cascades. These pathways include two small GTPases, MIG-2/RhoG and CED-10/Rac1. Here we present the identification and characterization of CDC-42 as a third GTPase involved in the regulation of cell corpse clearance. Genetic analyses performed by both loss of cdc-42 function and cdc-42 overexpression place cdc-42 in parallel to the ced-2/5/12 signaling module, in parallel to or upstream of the ced-10 module, and downstream of the ced-1/6/7 module. CDC-42 accumulates in engulfing cells at membranes surrounding apoptotic corpses. The formation of such halos depends on the integrins PAT-2/PAT-3, UNC-112 and the GEF protein UIG-1, but not on the canonical ced-1/6/7 or ced-2/5/12 signaling modules. Together, our results suggest that the small GTPase CDC-42 regulates apoptotic cell engulfment possibly upstream of the canonical Rac GTPase CED-10, by polarizing the engulfing cell toward the apoptotic corpse in response to integrin signaling and ced-1/6/7 signaling in C. elegans.

  1. Homozygous mutation in Atlastin GTPase 1 causes recessive hereditary spastic paraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willkomm, Lena; Heredia, Raul; Hoffmann, Katrin; Wang, Haicui; Voit, Thomas; Hoffman, Eric P; Cirak, Sebahattin

    2016-06-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is an extremely heterogeneous disease caused by mutations of numerous genes leading to lower limb spasticity (pure forms) that can be accompanied by neurological symptoms (complex forms). Despite recent advances, many causal mutations in patients remain unknown. We identified a consanguineous family with the early-onset HSP. Whole-exome sequencing revealed homozygosity for a novel Atlastin GTPase 1 gene stop mutation in three affected siblings. Heterozygous parents and siblings were unaffected. This was unexpected as mutations in the Atlastin 1 gene are known to cause autosomal dominant HSP. But our study showed that Atlastin 1 mutations may cause autosomal recessively inherited paraplegia with an underlying loss-of-function mechanism. Hence, patients with recessive forms of HSP should also be tested for the Atlastin 1 gene.

  2. Control of Homeostasis and Dendritic Cell Survival by the GTPase RhoA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Shuai; Dislich, Bastian; Brakebusch, Cord H

    2015-01-01

    Tissues accommodate defined numbers of dendritic cells (DCs) in highly specific niches where different intrinsic and environmental stimuli control DC life span and numbers. DC homeostasis in tissues is important, because experimental changes in DC numbers influence immunity and tolerance toward...... various immune catastrophes and inflammation. However, the precise molecular mechanisms regulating DC life span and homeostasis are unclear. We report that the GTPase RhoA controls homeostatic proliferation, cytokinesis, survival, and turnover of cDCs. Deletion of RhoA strongly decreased the numbers of CD...... findings identify RhoA as a central regulator of DC homeostasis, and its deletion decreases DC numbers below critical thresholds for immune protection and homeostasis, causing aberrant compensatory DC proliferation....

  3. Structural and functional insights into the mode of action of a universally conserved Obg GTPase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boya Feng

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Obg proteins are a family of P-loop GTPases, conserved from bacteria to human. The Obg protein in Escherichia coli (ObgE has been implicated in many diverse cellular functions, with proposed molecular roles in two global processes, ribosome assembly and stringent response. Here, using pre-steady state fast kinetics we demonstrate that ObgE is an anti-association factor, which prevents ribosomal subunit association and downstream steps in translation by binding to the 50S subunit. ObgE is a ribosome dependent GTPase; however, upon binding to guanosine tetraphosphate (ppGpp, the global regulator of stringent response, ObgE exhibits an enhanced interaction with the 50S subunit, resulting in increased equilibrium dissociation of the 70S ribosome into subunits. Furthermore, our cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM structure of the 50S·ObgE·GMPPNP complex indicates that the evolutionarily conserved N-terminal domain (NTD of ObgE is a tRNA structural mimic, with specific interactions with peptidyl-transferase center, displaying a marked resemblance to Class I release factors. These structural data might define ObgE as a specialized translation factor related to stress responses, and provide a framework towards future elucidation of functional interplay between ObgE and ribosome-associated (pppGpp regulators. Together with published data, our results suggest that ObgE might act as a checkpoint in final stages of the 50S subunit assembly under normal growth conditions. And more importantly, ObgE, as a (pppGpp effector, might also have a regulatory role in the production of the 50S subunit and its participation in translation under certain stressed conditions. Thus, our findings might have uncovered an under-recognized mechanism of translation control by environmental cues.

  4. Evolution of the Rho family of ras-like GTPases in eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boureux, Anthony; Vignal, Emmanuel; Faure, Sandrine; Fort, Philippe

    2007-01-01

    GTPases of the Rho family are molecular switches that play important roles in converting and amplifying external signals into cellular effects. Originally demonstrated to control the dynamics of the F-actin cytoskeleton, Rho GTPases have been implicated in many basic cellular processes that influence cell proliferation, differentiation, motility, adhesion, survival, or secretion. To elucidate the evolutionary history of the Rho family, we have analyzed over 20 species covering major eukaryotic clades from unicellular organisms to mammals, including platypus and opossum, and have reconstructed the ontogeny and the chronology of emergence of the different subfamilies. Our data establish that the 20 mammalian Rho members are structured into 8 subfamilies, among which Rac is the founder of the whole family. Rho, Cdc42, RhoUV, and RhoBTB subfamilies appeared before Coelomates and RhoJQ, Cdc42 isoforms, RhoDF, and Rnd emerged in chordates. In vertebrates, gene duplications and retrotranspositions increased the size of each chordate Rho subfamily, whereas RhoH, the last subfamily, arose probably by horizontal gene transfer. Rac1b, a Rac1 isoform generated by alternative splicing, emerged in amniotes, and RhoD, only in therians. Analysis of Rho mRNA expression patterns in mouse tissues shows that recent subfamilies have tissue-specific and low-level expression that supports their implication only in narrow time windows or in differentiated metabolic functions. These findings give a comprehensive view of the evolutionary canvas of the Rho family and provide guides for future structure and evolution studies of other components of Rho signaling pathways, in particular regulators of the RhoGEF family.

  5. Antisense expression of an Arabidopsis ran binding protein renders transgenic roots hypersensitive to auxin and alters auxin-induced root growth and development by arresting mitotic progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S. H.; Arnold, D.; Lloyd, A.; Roux, S. J.

    2001-01-01

    We cloned a cDNA encoding an Arabidopsis Ran binding protein, AtRanBP1c, and generated transgenic Arabidopsis expressing the antisense strand of the AtRanBP1c gene to understand the in vivo functions of the Ran/RanBP signal pathway. The transgenic plants showed enhanced primary root growth but suppressed growth of lateral roots. Auxin significantly increased lateral root initiation and inhibited primary root growth in the transformants at 10 pM, several orders of magnitude lower than required to induce these responses in wild-type roots. This induction was followed by a blockage of mitosis in both newly emerged lateral roots and in the primary root, ultimately resulting in the selective death of cells in the tips of both lateral and primary roots. Given the established role of Ran binding proteins in the transport of proteins into the nucleus, these findings are consistent with a model in which AtRanBP1c plays a key role in the nuclear delivery of proteins that suppress auxin action and that regulate mitotic progress in root tips.

  6. A Priori Analysis of a Compressible Flamelet Model using RANS Data for a Dual-Mode Scramjet Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinlan, Jesse R.; Drozda, Tomasz G.; McDaniel, James C.; Lacaze, Guilhem; Oefelein, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    In an effort to make large eddy simulation of hydrocarbon-fueled scramjet combustors more computationally accessible using realistic chemical reaction mechanisms, a compressible flamelet/progress variable (FPV) model was proposed that extends current FPV model formulations to high-speed, compressible flows. Development of this model relied on observations garnered from an a priori analysis of the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) data obtained for the Hypersonic International Flight Research and Experimentation (HI-FiRE) dual-mode scramjet combustor. The RANS data were obtained using a reduced chemical mechanism for the combustion of a JP-7 surrogate and were validated using avail- able experimental data. These RANS data were then post-processed to obtain, in an a priori fashion, the scalar fields corresponding to an FPV-based modeling approach. In the current work, in addition to the proposed compressible flamelet model, a standard incompressible FPV model was also considered. Several candidate progress variables were investigated for their ability to recover static temperature and major and minor product species. The effects of pressure and temperature on the tabulated progress variable source term were characterized, and model coupling terms embedded in the Reynolds- averaged Navier-Stokes equations were studied. Finally, results for the novel compressible flamelet/progress variable model were presented to demonstrate the improvement attained by modeling the effects of pressure and flamelet boundary conditions on the combustion.

  7. Critical role of RanBP2-mediated SUMOylation of Small Heterodimer Partner in maintaining bile acid homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Hyun; Kwon, Sanghoon; Byun, Sangwon; Xiao, Zhen; Park, Sean; Wu, Shwu-Yuan; Chiang, Cheng-Ming; Kemper, Byron; Kemper, Jongsook Kim

    2016-01-01

    Bile acids (BAs) are recently recognized signalling molecules that profoundly affect metabolism. Because of detergent-like toxicity, BA levels must be tightly regulated. An orphan nuclear receptor, Small Heterodimer Partner (SHP), plays a key role in this regulation, but how SHP senses the BA signal for feedback transcriptional responses is not clearly understood. We show an unexpected function of a nucleoporin, RanBP2, in maintaining BA homoeostasis through SUMOylation of SHP. Upon BA signalling, RanBP2 co-localizes with SHP at the nuclear envelope region and mediates SUMO2 modification at K68, which facilitates nuclear transport of SHP and its interaction with repressive histone modifiers to inhibit BA synthetic genes. Mice expressing a SUMO-defective K68R SHP mutant have increased liver BA levels, and upon BA- or drug-induced biliary insults, these mice exhibit exacerbated cholestatic pathologies. These results demonstrate a function of RanBP2-mediated SUMOylation of SHP in maintaining BA homoeostasis and protecting from the BA hepatotoxicity. PMID:27412403

  8. Metformin impairs Rho GTPase signaling to induce apoptosis in neuroblastoma cells and inhibits growth of tumors in the xenograft mouse model of neuroblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ambrish; Al-Sammarraie, Nadia; DiPette, Donald J.; Singh, Ugra S.

    2014-01-01

    Metformin has been shown to inhibit tumor growth in xenograft rodent models of adult cancers, and various human clinical trials are in progress. However, the precise molecular mechanisms of metformin action are largely unknown. In the present study we examined the anti-tumor activity of metformin against neuroblastoma, and determined the underlying signaling mechanisms. Using human neuroblastoma xenograft mice, we demonstrated that oral administration of metformin (100 and 250 mg/kg body weight) significantly inhibited the growth of tumors. The interference of metformin in spheroid formation further confirmed the anti-tumor activity of metformin. In tumors, the activation of Rac1 (GTP-Rac1) and Cdc42 (GTP-Cdc42) was increased while RhoA activation (GTP-RhoA) was decreased by metformin. It also induced phosphorylation of JNK and inhibited the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 without affecting p38 MAP Kinase. Infection of cells by adenoviruses expressing dominant negative Rac1 (Rac1-N17), Cdc42 (Cdc42-N17) or constitutively active RhoA (RhoA-V14), or incubation of cells with pharmacological inhibitors of Rac1 (NSC23766) or Cdc42 (ML141) significantly protected neuroblastoma cells from metformin-induced apoptosis. Additionally, inhibition of JNK activity along with Rac1 or Cdc42 attenuated cytotoxic effects of metformin. These studies demonstrated that metformin impairs Rho GTPases signaling to induce apoptosis via JNK pathway. PMID:25365944

  9. The Mitochondrial GTPase Gem1 Contributes to the Cell Wall Stress Response and Invasive Growth of Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Koch

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The interactions of mitochondria with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER are crucial for maintaining proper mitochondrial morphology, function and dynamics. This enables cells to utilize their mitochondria optimally for energy production and anabolism, and it further provides for metabolic control over developmental decisions. In fungi, a key mechanism by which ER and mitochondria interact is via a membrane tether, the protein complex ERMES (ER-Mitochondria Encounter Structure. In the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the mitochondrial GTPase Gem1 interacts with ERMES, and it has been proposed to regulate its activity. Here we report on the first characterization of Gem1 in a human fungal pathogen. We show that in Candida albicans Gem1 has a dominant role in ensuring proper mitochondrial morphology, and our data is consistent with Gem1 working with ERMES in this role. Mitochondrial respiration and steady state cellular phospholipid homeostasis are not impacted by inactivation of GEM1 in C. albicans. There are two major virulence-related consequences of disrupting mitochondrial morphology by GEM1 inactivation: C. albicans becomes hypersusceptible to cell wall stress, and is unable to grow invasively. In the gem1Δ/Δ mutant, it is specifically the invasive capacity of hyphae that is compromised, not the ability to transition from yeast to hyphal morphology, and this phenotype is shared with ERMES mutants. As a consequence of the hyphal invasion defect, the gem1Δ/Δ mutant is drastically hypovirulent in the worm infection model. Activation of the mitogen activated protein (MAP kinase Cek1 is reduced in the gem1Δ/Δ mutant, and this function could explain both the susceptibility to cell wall stress and lack of invasive growth. This result establishes a new, respiration-independent mechanism of mitochondrial control over stress signaling and hyphal functions in C. albicans. We propose that ER-mitochondria interactions and the ER

  10. RanBP9 overexpression down-regulates phospho-cofilin, causes early synaptic deficits and impaired learning, and accelerates accumulation of amyloid plaques in the mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palavicini, Juan Pablo; Wang, Hongjie; Minond, Dmitriy; Bianchi, Elisabetta; Xu, Shaohua; Lakshmana, Madepalli K

    2014-01-01

    Loss of synaptic proteins and functional synapses in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) as well as transgenic mouse models expressing amyloid-β protein precursor is now well established. However, the earliest age at which such loss of synapses occurs, and whether known markers of AD progression accelerate functional deficits is completely unknown. We previously showed that RanBP9 overexpression leads to enhanced amyloid plaque burden in a mouse model of AD. In this study, we found significant reductions in the levels of synaptophysin and spinophilin, compared with wild-type controls, in both the cortex and the hippocampus of 5- and 6-month old but not 3- or 4-month old APΔE9/RanBP9 triple transgenic mice, and not in APΔE9 double transgenic mice, nor in RanBP9 single transgenic mice. Interestingly, amyloid plaque burden was also increased in the APΔE9/RanBP9 mice at 5-6 months. Consistent with these results, we found significant deficits in learning and memory in the APΔE9/RanBP9 mice at 5 and 6 month. These data suggest that increased amyloid plaques and accelerated learning and memory deficits and loss of synaptic proteins induced by RanBP9 are correlated. Most importantly, APΔE9/RanBP9 mice also showed significantly reduced levels of the phosphorylated form of cofilin in the hippocampus. Taken together these data suggest that RanBP9 overexpression down-regulates cofilin, causes early synaptic deficits and impaired learning, and accelerates accumulation of amyloid plaques in the mouse brain.

  11. Mammalian knock out cells reveal prominent roles for atlastin GTPases in ER network morphology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Guohua; Zhu, Peng-Peng; Renvoisé, Benoît; Maldonado-Báez, Lymarie; Park, Seong Hee; Blackstone, Craig, E-mail: blackstc@ninds.nih.gov

    2016-11-15

    Atlastins are large, membrane-bound GTPases that participate in the fusion of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) tubules to generate the polygonal ER network in eukaryotes. They also regulate lipid droplet size and inhibit bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling, though mechanisms remain unclear. Humans have three atlastins (ATL1, ATL2, and ATL3), and ATL1 and ATL3 are mutated in autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia and hereditary sensory neuropathies. Cellular investigations of atlastin orthologs in most yeast, plants, flies and worms are facilitated by the presence of a single or predominant isoform, but loss-of-function studies in mammalian cells are complicated by multiple, broadly-expressed paralogs. We have generated mouse NIH-3T3 cells lacking all three mammalian atlastins (Atl1/2/3) using CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene knockout (KO). ER morphology is markedly disrupted in these triple KO cells, with prominent impairment in formation of three-way ER tubule junctions. This phenotype can be rescued by expression of distant orthologs from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Sey1p) and Arabidopsis (ROOT HAIR DEFECTIVE3) as well as any one of the three human atlastins. Minimal, if any, changes are observed in the morphology of mitochondria and the Golgi apparatus. Alterations in BMP signaling and increased sensitivity to ER stress are also noted, though effects appear more modest. Finally, atlastins appear required for the proper differentiation of NIH-3T3 cells into an adipocyte-like phenotype. These findings have important implications for the pathogenesis of hereditary spastic paraplegias and sensory neuropathies associated with atlastin mutations. - Highlights: • NIH-3T3 cells lacking all three atlastin paralogs were generated using CRISPR/Cas9. • Cells lacking all atlastin GTPases exhibit far fewer 3-way ER tubule junctions. • ER morphology defects in atlastin knockout cells are rescued by distant plant and yeast orthologs. • Atlastin knock out cells also

  12. EFL GTPase in cryptomonads and the distribution of EFL and EF-1alpha in chromalveolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gile, Gillian H; Patron, Nicola J; Keeling, Patrick J

    2006-10-01

    EFL (EF-like protein) is a member of the GTPase superfamily that includes several translation factors. Because it has only been found in a few eukaryotic lineages and its presence correlates with the absence of the related core translation factor EF-1alpha, its distribution is hypothesized to be the result of lateral gene transfer and replacement of EF-1alpha. In one supergroup of eukaryotes, the chromalveolates, two major lineages were found to contain EFL (dinoflagellates and haptophytes), while the others encode EF-1alpha (apicomplexans, ciliates, heterokonts and cryptomonads). For each of these groups, this distribution was deduced from whole genome sequence or expressed sequence tag (EST) data from several species, with the exception of cryptomonads from which only a single EF-1alpha PCR product from one species was known. By sequencing ESTs from two cryptomonads, Guillardia theta and Rhodomonas salina, and searching for all GTPase translation factors, we revealed that EFL is present in both species, but, contrary to expectations, we found EF-1alpha in neither. On balance, we suggest the previously reported EF-1alpha from Rhodomonas salina is likely an artefact of contamination. We also identified EFL in EST data from two members of the dinoflagellate lineage, Karlodinium micrum and Oxyrrhis marina, and from an ongoing genomic sequence project from a third, Perkinsus marinus. Karlodinium micrum is a symbiotic pairing of two lineages that would have both had EFL (a dinoflagellate and a haptophyte), but only the dinoflagellate gene remains. Oxyrrhis marina and Perkinsus marinus are early diverging sister-groups to dinoflagellates, and together show that EFL originated early in this lineage. Phylogenetic analysis confirmed that these genes are all EFL homologues, and showed that cryptomonad genes are not detectably related to EFL from other chromalveolates, which collectively form several distinct groups. The known distribution of EFL now includes a third group

  13. Rab35 GTPase Triggers Switch-like Recruitment of the Lowe Syndrome Lipid Phosphatase OCRL on Newborn Endosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauvin, Clothilde; Rosendale, Morgane; Gupta-Rossi, Neetu; Rocancourt, Murielle; Larraufie, Pierre; Salomon, Rémi; Perrais, David; Echard, Arnaud

    2016-01-11

    Phosphoinositide (PtdIns) homeostasis requires a tight spatial and temporal regulation during the endocytic process [1]. Indeed, PtdIns(4,5)P2 plays a crucial role in endocytosis by controlling clathrin-coated pit formation, whereas its conversion into PtdIns4P right after scission of clathrin-coated vesicles (CCVs) is essential for successful uncoating and cargo sorting [1-6]. In non-neuronal cells, endosomal PtdIns(4,5)P2 hydrolysis critically relies on the lipid phosphatase OCRL [7-9], the inactivation of which causes the Oculo-Cerebro-Renal syndrome of Lowe [10, 11]. To understand the coupling between PtdIns(4,5)P2 hydrolysis and endosome formation, a key issue is thus to unravel the mechanism by which OCRL is recruited on CCVs precisely after their scission from the plasma membrane. Here we found that the Rab35 GTPase, which plays a fundamental but poorly understood role in endosomal trafficking after cargo internalization [12-21], directly recruits the OCRL phosphatase immediately after scission of the CCVs. Consistent with Rab35 and OCRL acting together, depletion of either Rab35 or OCRL leads to retention of internalized receptors such as the endogenous cation-independent mannose-6-phosphate receptor (CI-MPR) in peripheral clathrin-positive endosomes that display abnormal association with PtdIns(4,5)P2- and actin-binding proteins. Remarkably, Rab35 loading on CCVs rapidly follows the recruitment of the AP2-binding Rab35 GEF/activator DENND1A (connecdenn 1) and the disappearance of the Rab35 GAP/inhibitor EPI64B. We propose that the precise spatial and temporal activation of Rab35 acts as a major switch for OCRL recruitment on newborn endosomes, post-scission PtdIns(4,5)P2 hydrolysis, and subsequent endosomal trafficking. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Targeting GTPases in Parkinson’s disease: comparison to the historic path of kinase drug discovery and perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Lin; Sklar, Larry A.

    2014-01-01

    Neurological diseases have placed heavy social and financial burdens on modern society. As the life expectancy of humans is extended, neurological diseases, such as Parkinson’s disease, have become increasingly common among senior populations. Although the enigmas of Parkinson’s diseases await resolution, more vivid pictures on the cause, progression, and control of the illness are emerging after years of research. On the molecular level, GTPases are implicated in the etiology of Parkinson’s ...

  15. GTPases RhoA and Rac1 are important for amelogenin and DSPP expression during differentiation of ameloblasts and odontoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biz, Michelle Tillmann; Marques, Mara Rúbia; Crema, Virgínia Oliveira; Moriscot, Anselmo Sigari; dos Santos, Marinilce Fagundes

    2010-06-01

    Morphogenesis and cytodifferentiation are distinct processes in tooth development. Cell proliferation predominates in morphogenesis; differentiation involves changes in form and gene expression. The cytoskeleton is essential for both processes, being regulated by Rho GTPases. The aim of this study was to verify the expression, distribution, and role of Rho GTPases in ameloblasts and odontoblasts during tooth development in correlation with actin and tubulin arrangements and amelogenin and dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) expression. RhoA, Rac1, and Cdc42 were strongly expressed during morphogenesis; during cytodifferentiation, RhoA was present in ameloblasts and odontoblasts, Rac1 and its effector Pak3 were observed in ameloblasts; and Cdc42 was present in all cells of the tooth germ and mesenchyme. The expression of RhoA mRNA and its effectors RockI and RockII, Rac1 and Pak3, as analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction, increased after ameloblast and odontoblast differentiation, according to the mRNA expression of amelogenin and DSPP. The inhibition of all Rho GTPases by Clostridium difficile toxin A completely abolished amelogenin and DSPP expression in tooth germs cultured in anterior eye chamber, whereas the specific inhibition of the Rocks showed only a partial effect. Thus, both GTPases are important during tooth morphogenesis. During cytodifferentiation, Rho proteins are essential for the complete differentiation of ameloblasts and odontoblasts by regulating the expression of amelogenin and DSPP. RhoA and its effector RockI contribute to this role. A specific function for Rac1 in ameloblasts remains to be elucidated; its punctate distribution indicates its possible role in exocytosis/endocytosis.

  16. Sar1-GTPase-dependent ER exit of KATP channels revealed by a mutation causing congenital hyperinsulinism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taneja, Tarvinder K; Mankouri, Jamel; Karnik, Rucha

    2009-01-01

    caused by one such mutation in Kir6.2, E282K. The study led to the discovery that Kir6.2 contains a di-acidic ER exit signal, (280)DLE(282), which promotes concentration of the channel into COPII-enriched ER exit sites prior to ER export via a process that requires Sar1-GTPase. The E282K mutation...

  17. Volvo ja Ikea endine tegevjuht Göran Carstedt : Tänapäevane (personali)juhtimine peab sisaldama eeskätt looduslähedast mõtteviisi / Göran Carstedt ; interv. Tiina Saar

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Carstedt, Göran

    2008-01-01

    Juhtimiskonsultant ning Organisatsioonilise Õppimise Ühingu eestvedaja ja arendaja Göran Carsedt vastab küsimustele, mis puudutavad ettevõtte tegevust personali tööle pühendumise parendamiseks, ettevõtte jätkusuutlikku juhtimist ja tootlikkust, majanduslanguse mõju ettevõtete personalipoliitikale, talendijuhtimist, väikeste ettevõttete ellujäämist majanduslanguse ajal, IKEA kui hea tööandja mainet ning jätkusuutlikku personaliarendajat. Lisa: Jätkusuutlik juhtimine Rootsi moodi

  18. Comparison of RANS and IDDES solutions for turbulent flow and heat transfer past a backward-facing step

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, E. M.; Smirnovsky, A. A.; Schur, N. A.; Zaitsev, D. K.; Smirnov, P. E.

    2017-10-01

    Numerical simulations were carried out under conditions of the benchmark-quality experiments of Vogel&Eaton (1985), where nominally 2D fluid dynamics and heat transfer past a backward-facing step in a channel with expansion ratio of 1.25 was investigated at the Reynolds number of 28,000 (based on the step height and the upstream centreline velocity). Comparative computations were performed using an in-house finite-volume code SINF/Flag-S and the ANSYS Fluent, running the codes with same grids. Two approaches were used for turbulence modelling. First, the Menter SST turbulence model was used to perform refined 2D and 3D RANS steady-state computations. The 3D analysis was undertaken to evaluate influence of boundary layers developing on the sidewalls of the experimental channel. The data obtained has resulted in the conclusion that the side wall effects disturbing spanwise uniformity of wall friction and heated wall temperature in the test configuration were of the same order or less than the skin friction coefficient and the Stanton number measurement errors. Then, 3D time-dependent computations were carried out using the vortex-resolving IDDES method being a hybridization of RANS and LES. The IDDES results obtained with the two codes are in a satisfactory agreement, especially for the finer grid of 17.3 million cells. Comparing with the experimental data, the IDDES approach produces the best agreement for the wall friction, whereas the RANS solutions show superiority in predictions of the local Stanton number distribution.

  19. Inhibition of the small GTPase Cdc42 in regulation of epileptic-seizure in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y; Liu, J; Luan, G; Wang, X

    2015-03-19

    Altered expression of neuronal cytoskeletal proteins are known to play an important role in hyper-excitability of neurons in patients and animal models of epilepsy. Our previous work showed that cell division cycle 42 GTP-binding protein (Cdc42), a small GTPase of the Rho-subfamily, is significantly increased in the brain tissue of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and in the brain tissues of the epileptic model of rats. However, whether inhibition of Cdc42 can modify epileptic seizures has not been investigated. In this study, using a pilocarpine-induced epileptic model, we found that pretreatment with ML141, a specific inhibitor of Cdc42, reduces seizure severity. Whole-cell patch-clamp recording on CA1 pyramidal neurons in hippocampal slices from pilocarpine-induced epileptic model demonstrated that ML141 significantly inhibits the frequency of action potentials (APs), increases the amplitude and frequency of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs), and increases the amplitude of evoked inhibitory postsynaptic currents (eIPSCs). However, ML141 did not have an impact on the miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs). Our results are the first to indicate that Cdc42 plays an important role in the onset and progression of epileptic-seizures by regulating synaptic inhibition. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Dynamic localization of rop GTPases to the tonoplast during vacuole development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Y; Seals, D F; Randall, S K; Yang, Z

    2001-01-01

    Vacuoles are essential pleomorphic organelles that undergo dynamic changes during cell growth and differentiation in plants. How developmental signals are linked to vacuole biogenesis and development is poorly understood. In this report, we show that a Rop GTPase is localized to developing vacuoles in pea (Pisum sativum cv Extra Early Alaska). Rop belongs to the RHO family of Ras-related small GTP-binding proteins that are key molecular switches in a wide variety of eukaryotic signal transduction pathways. Using indirect immunofluorescence and an anti-Rop antibody, we showed that Rop proteins accumulate to high levels in rapidly growing tapetal cells of pea anthers. In these cells, Rop is localized to an endomembrane system that exists as dynamic pleomorphic networks: a perinuclear fine network decorated with punctate dots, a network composed of small spheres and tubules, and interconnected chambers. Colocalization with a tonoplast annexin VCaB42 shows that these dynamic networks represent the tonoplast. Our results suggest that the dynamic Rop-containing tonoplast networks represent a unique stage of vacuole development. The specific localization of Rop to developing vacuoles supports a role for Rop in signal transduction that mediates vacuole development in plants.

  1. NMR derived model of GTPase effector domain (GED self association: relevance to dynamin assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swagata Chakraborty

    Full Text Available Self-association of dynamin to form spiral structures around lipidic vesicles during endocytosis is largely mediated by its 'coiled coil' GTPase Effector Domain (GED, which, in vitro, self-associates into huge helical assemblies. Residue-level structural characterizations of these assemblies and understanding the process of association have remained a challenge. It is also impossible to get folded monomers in the solution phase. In this context, we have developed here a strategy to probe the self-association of GED by first dissociating the assembly using Dimethyl Sulfoxide (DMSO and then systematically monitoring the refolding into helix and concomitant re-association using NMR spectroscopy, as DMSO concentration is progressively reduced. The short segment, Arg109 - Met116, acts as the nucleation site for helix formation and self-association. Hydrophobic and complementary charge interactions on the surfaces drive self-association, as the helices elongate in both the directions resulting in an antiparallel stack. A small N-terminal segment remains floppy in the assembly. Following these and other published results on inter-domain interactions, we have proposed a plausible mode of dynamin self assembly.

  2. Maize ROP2 GTPase provides a competitive advantage to the male gametophyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, K M; Vejlupkova, Z; Meeley, R B; Fowler, J E

    2003-12-01

    Rop GTPases have been implicated in the regulation of plant signal transduction and cell morphogenesis. To explore ROP2 function in maize, we isolated five Mutator transposon insertions (rop2::Mu alleles). Transmission frequency through the male gametophyte, but not the female, was lower than expected in three of the rop2::Mu mutants. These three alleles formed an allelic series on the basis of the relative transmission rate of each when crossed as trans-heterozygotes. A dramatic reduction in the level of ROP2-mRNA in pollen was associated with the three alleles causing a transmission defect, whereas a rop2::Mu allele that did not result in a defect had wild-type transcript levels, thus confirming that mutation of rop2 causes the mutant phenotype. These data strongly support a role for rop2 in male gametophyte function, perhaps surprisingly, given the expression in pollen of the nearly identical duplicate gene rop9. However, the transmission defect was apparent only when a rop2::Mu heterozygote was used as the pollen donor or when a mixture of wild-type and homozygous mutant pollen was used. Thus, mutant pollen is at a competitive disadvantage compared to wild-type pollen, although mutant pollen grains lacked an obvious cellular defect. Our data demonstrate the importance in vivo of a specific Rop, rop2, in the male gametophyte.

  3. New splicing variants of mitochondrial Rho GTPase-1 (Miro1) transport peroxisomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumoto, Kanji; Ono, Tatsuaki; Toyama, Ryusuke; Shimomura, Ayako; Nagata, Aiko; Fujiki, Yukio

    2017-12-08

    Microtubule-dependent long-distance movement of peroxisomes occurs in mammalian cells. However, its molecular mechanisms remain undefined. In this study, we identified three distinct splicing variants of human mitochondrial Rho GTPase-1 (Miro1), each containing amino acid sequence insertions 1 (named Miro1-var2), 2 (Miro1-var3), and both 1 and 2 (Miro1-var4), respectively, at upstream of the transmembrane domain. Miro1-var4 and Miro1-var2 are localized to peroxisomes in a manner dependent on the insertion 1 that is recognized by the cytosolic receptor Pex19p. Exogenous expression of Miro1-var4 induces accumulation of peroxisomes at the cell periphery and augments long-range movement of peroxisomes along microtubules. Depletion of all Miro1 variants by knocking down MIRO1 suppresses the long-distance movement of peroxisomes. Such abrogated movement is restored by reexpression of peroxisomal Miro1 variants. Collectively, our findings identify for the first time peroxisome-localized Miro1 variants as adapter proteins that link peroxisomes to the microtubule-dependent transport complexes including TRAK2 in the intracellular translocation of peroxisomes in mammalian cells. © 2018 Okumoto et al.

  4. Surface Mechanical and Rheological Behaviors of Biocompatible Poly((D,L-lactic acid-ran-glycolic acid)-block-ethylene glycol) (PLGA-PEG) and Poly((D,L-lactic acid-ran-glycolic acid-ran-ε-caprolactone)-block-ethylene glycol) (PLGACL-PEG) Block Copolymers at the Air-Water Interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun Chang; Lee, Hoyoung; Khetan, Jawahar; Won, You-Yeon [Purdue

    2016-02-01

    Air–water interfacial monolayers of poly((d,l-lactic acid-ran-glycolic acid)-block-ethylene glycol) (PLGA–PEG) exhibit an exponential increase in surface pressure under high monolayer compression. In order to understand the molecular origin of this behavior, a combined experimental and theoretical investigation (including surface pressure–area isotherm, X-ray reflectivity (XR) and interfacial rheological measurements, and a self-consistent field (SCF) theoretical analysis) was performed on air–water monolayers formed by a PLGA–PEG diblock copolymer and also by a nonglassy analogue of this diblock copolymer, poly((d,l-lactic acid-ran-glycolic acid-ran-caprolactone)-block-ethylene glycol) (PLGACL–PEG). The combined results of this study show that the two mechanisms, i.e., the glass transition of the collapsed PLGA film and the lateral repulsion of the PEG brush chains that occur simultaneously under lateral compression of the monolayer, are both responsible for the observed PLGA–PEG isotherm behavior. Upon cessation of compression, the high surface pressure of the PLGA–PEG monolayer typically relaxes over time with a stretched exponential decay, suggesting that in this diblock copolymer situation, the hydrophobic domain formed by the PLGA blocks undergoes glass transition in the high lateral compression state, analogously to the PLGA homopolymer monolayer. In the high PEG grafting density regime, the contribution of the PEG brush chains to the high monolayer surface pressure is significantly lower than what is predicted by the SCF model because of the many-body attraction among PEG segments (referred to in the literature as the “n-cluster” effects). The end-grafted PEG chains were found to be protein resistant even under the influence of the “n-cluster” effects.

  5. Surface Mechanical and Rheological Behaviors of Biocompatible Poly((D,L-lactic acid-ran-glycolic acid)-block-ethylene glycol) (PLGA-PEG) and Poly((D,L-lactic acid-ran-glycolic acid-ran-ε-caprolactone)-block-ethylene glycol) (PLGACL-PEG) Block Copolymers at the Air-Water Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Chang; Lee, Hoyoung; Khetan, Jawahar; Won, You-Yeon

    2015-12-29

    Air-water interfacial monolayers of poly((D,L-lactic acid-ran-glycolic acid)-block-ethylene glycol) (PLGA-PEG) exhibit an exponential increase in surface pressure under high monolayer compression. In order to understand the molecular origin of this behavior, a combined experimental and theoretical investigation (including surface pressure-area isotherm, X-ray reflectivity (XR) and interfacial rheological measurements, and a self-consistent field (SCF) theoretical analysis) was performed on air-water monolayers formed by a PLGA-PEG diblock copolymer and also by a nonglassy analogue of this diblock copolymer, poly((D,L-lactic acid-ran-glycolic acid-ran-caprolactone)-block-ethylene glycol) (PLGACL-PEG). The combined results of this study show that the two mechanisms, i.e., the glass transition of the collapsed PLGA film and the lateral repulsion of the PEG brush chains that occur simultaneously under lateral compression of the monolayer, are both responsible for the observed PLGA-PEG isotherm behavior. Upon cessation of compression, the high surface pressure of the PLGA-PEG monolayer typically relaxes over time with a stretched exponential decay, suggesting that in this diblock copolymer situation, the hydrophobic domain formed by the PLGA blocks undergoes glass transition in the high lateral compression state, analogously to the PLGA homopolymer monolayer. In the high PEG grafting density regime, the contribution of the PEG brush chains to the high monolayer surface pressure is significantly lower than what is predicted by the SCF model because of the many-body attraction among PEG segments (referred to in the literature as the "n-cluster" effects). The end-grafted PEG chains were found to be protein resistant even under the influence of the "n-cluster" effects.

  6. The Rho-GTPase effector ROCK regulates meiotic maturation of the bovine oocyte via myosin light chain phosphorylation and cofilin phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, So-Rim; Xu, Yong-Nan; Jo, Yu-Jin; Namgoong, Suk; Kim, Nam-Hyung

    2015-11-01

    Oocyte meiosis involves a unique asymmetric division involving spindle movement from the central cytoplasm to the cortex, followed by polar body extrusion. ROCK is a Rho-GTPase effector involved in various cellular functions in somatic cells as well as oocyte meiosis. ROCK was previously shown to promote actin organization by phosphorylating several downstream targets, including LIM domain kinase (LIMK), phosphorylated cofilin (p-cofilin), and myosin light chain (MLC). In this study, we investigated the roles of ROCK and MLC during bovine oocyte meiosis. We found that ROCK was localized around the nucleus at the oocyte's germinal-vesicle (GV) stage, but spreads to the rest of the cytoplasm in later developmental stages. On the other hand, phosphorylated MLC (p-MLC) localized at the cortex, and its abundance decreased by the metaphase-II stage. Disrupting ROCK activity, via RNAi or the chemical inhibitor Y-27632, blocked both cell cycle progression and polar body extrusion. ROCK inhibition also resulted in decreased cortical actin, p-cofilin, and p-MLC levels. Similar to the phenotype associated with inhibition of ROCK activity, inhibition of MLC kinase by the chemical inhibitor ML-7 caused defects in polar body extrusion. Collectively, our results suggest that the ROCK/MLC/actomyosin as well as ROCK/LIMK/cofilin pathways regulate meiotic spindle migration and cytokinesis during bovine oocyte maturation. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Exploiting Statistical Methodologies and Controlled Vocabularies for Prioritized Functional Analysis of Genomic Experiments: the StRAnGER Web Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatziioannou, Aristotelis A; Moulos, Panagiotis

    2011-01-01

    StRAnGER is a web application for the automated statistical analysis of annotated gene profiling experiments, exploiting controlled biological vocabularies, like the Gene Ontology or the KEGG pathways terms. Starting from annotated lists of differentially expressed genes and gene enrichment scores, regarding the terms of each vocabulary, StRAnGER repartitions and reorders the initial distribution of terms to define a new distribution of elements. Each element pools terms holding the same enrichment score. The new distribution thus derived, is reordered in a decreasing order to the right, according to the observation score of the elements, while elements with the same score, are sorted again in a decreasing order of their enrichment scores. By applying bootstrapping techniques, a corrected measure of the statistical significance of these elements is derived, which enables the selection of terms mapped to these elements, unambiguously associated with respective significant gene sets. The selected terms are immunized against the bias infiltrating statistical enrichment analyses, producing technically very high statistical scores, due to the finite nature of the data population. Besides their high statistical score, another selection criterion for the terms is the number of their members, something that incurs a biological prioritization in line with a Systems Biology context. The output derived, represents a detailed ranked list of significant terms, which constitute a starting point for further functional analysis.

  8. Exploiting statistical methodologies and controlled vocabularies for prioritized functional analysis of genomic experiments: The StRAnGER web application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aristotle A Chatziioannou

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available StRAnGER is a web application for the automated statistical analysis of annotated gene profiling experiments, exploiting controlled biological vocabularies, like the Gene Ontology or the KEGG pathways terms. Starting from annotated lists of differentially expressed genes and gene enrichment scores, regarding the terms of each vocabulary, StRAnGER repartitions and reorders the initial distribution of terms to define a new distribution of elements. Each element pools terms holding the same enrichment score. The new distribution thus derived, is reordered in a decreasing order to the right, according to the observation score of the elements, while elements with the same score, are sorted again in a decreasing order of their enrichment scores. By applying bootstrapping techniques, a corrected measure of the statistical significance of these elements is derived, which enables the selection of terms mapped to these elements, unambiguously associated with respective significant gene sets. The selected terms are immunized against the bias infiltrating statistical enrichment analyses, producing technically very high statistical scores, due to the finite nature of the data population. Besides their high statistical score, another selection criterion for the terms is the number of their members, something that incurs a biological prioritization in line with a Systems Biology context. The output derived, represents a detailed ranked list of significant terms, which constitute a starting point for further functional analysis.

  9. c9RAN translation: a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendron, Tania F; Cosio, Danielle M; Petrucelli, Leonard

    2013-09-01

    A hexanucleotide (GGGGCC) repeat expansion within a non-coding region of the C9ORF72 gene is the most common mutation associated with both frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Elucidating how these expanded repeats (GGGGCCexp) cause 'c9FTD/ALS' has since become an important goal of the FTD/ALS field. GGGGCCexp transcripts aggregate into discrete nuclear structures, termed RNA foci. This phenomenon, observed in various repeat expansion disorders, is associated with RNA-binding protein sequestration. Of note, recent findings show that GGGGCCexp transcripts also succumb to an alternative fate: repeat-associated non-ATG translation (RAN translation). This unconventional mode of translation, which occurs in the absence of an initiating codon, results in the production of polyGA, polyGP and polyGR peptides. Antibodies generated against these peptides detect high molecular weight, insoluble material in brain homogenates, as well as neuronal inclusions throughout the central nervous system of c9FTD/ALS cases. Given that both foci formation and RAN translation in c9FTD/ALS require the synthesis of GGGGCCexp RNA, therapeutic strategies that target these transcripts and result in their neutralization or degradation could effectively block these two potential pathogenic mechanisms and provide a much needed treatment for c9FTD/ALS.

  10. A Response Regulator Interfaces between the Frz Chemosensory System and the MglA/MglB GTPase/GAP Module to Regulate Polarity in Myxococcus xanthus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keilberg, Daniela; Wuichet, Kristin; Drescher, Florian; Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte

    2012-01-01

    How cells establish and dynamically change polarity are general questions in cell biology. Cells of the rod-shaped bacterium Myxococcus xanthus move on surfaces with defined leading and lagging cell poles. Occasionally, cells undergo reversals, which correspond to an inversion of the leading-lagging pole polarity axis. Reversals are induced by the Frz chemosensory system and depend on relocalization of motility proteins between the poles. The Ras-like GTPase MglA localizes to and defines the leading cell pole in the GTP-bound form. MglB, the cognate MglA GTPase activating protein, localizes to and defines the lagging pole. During reversals, MglA-GTP and MglB switch poles and, therefore, dynamically localized motility proteins switch poles. We identified the RomR response regulator, which localizes in a bipolar asymmetric pattern with a large cluster at the lagging pole, as important for motility and reversals. We show that RomR interacts directly with MglA and MglB in vitro. Furthermore, RomR, MglA, and MglB affect the localization of each other in all pair-wise directions, suggesting that RomR stimulates motility by promoting correct localization of MglA and MglB in MglA/RomR and MglB/RomR complexes at opposite poles. Moreover, localization analyses suggest that the two RomR complexes mutually exclude each other from their respective poles. We further show that RomR interfaces with FrzZ, the output response regulator of the Frz chemosensory system, to regulate reversals. Thus, RomR serves at the functional interface to connect a classic bacterial signalling module (Frz) to a classic eukaryotic polarity module (MglA/MglB). This modular design is paralleled by the phylogenetic distribution of the proteins, suggesting an evolutionary scheme in which RomR was incorporated into the MglA/MglB module to regulate cell polarity followed by the addition of the Frz system to dynamically regulate cell polarity. PMID:23028358

  11. A response regulator interfaces between the Frz chemosensory system and the MglA/MglB GTPase/GAP module to regulate polarity in Myxococcus xanthus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Keilberg

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available How cells establish and dynamically change polarity are general questions in cell biology. Cells of the rod-shaped bacterium Myxococcus xanthus move on surfaces with defined leading and lagging cell poles. Occasionally, cells undergo reversals, which correspond to an inversion of the leading-lagging pole polarity axis. Reversals are induced by the Frz chemosensory system and depend on relocalization of motility proteins between the poles. The Ras-like GTPase MglA localizes to and defines the leading cell pole in the GTP-bound form. MglB, the cognate MglA GTPase activating protein, localizes to and defines the lagging pole. During reversals, MglA-GTP and MglB switch poles and, therefore, dynamically localized motility proteins switch poles. We identified the RomR response regulator, which localizes in a bipolar asymmetric pattern with a large cluster at the lagging pole, as important for motility and reversals. We show that RomR interacts directly with MglA and MglB in vitro. Furthermore, RomR, MglA, and MglB affect the localization of each other in all pair-wise directions, suggesting that RomR stimulates motility by promoting correct localization of MglA and MglB in MglA/RomR and MglB/RomR complexes at opposite poles. Moreover, localization analyses suggest that the two RomR complexes mutually exclude each other from their respective poles. We further show that RomR interfaces with FrzZ, the output response regulator of the Frz chemosensory system, to regulate reversals. Thus, RomR serves at the functional interface to connect a classic bacterial signalling module (Frz to a classic eukaryotic polarity module (MglA/MglB. This modular design is paralleled by the phylogenetic distribution of the proteins, suggesting an evolutionary scheme in which RomR was incorporated into the MglA/MglB module to regulate cell polarity followed by the addition of the Frz system to dynamically regulate cell polarity.

  12. A response regulator interfaces between the Frz chemosensory system and the MglA/MglB GTPase/GAP module to regulate polarity in Myxococcus xanthus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keilberg, Daniela; Wuichet, Kristin; Drescher, Florian; Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte

    2012-09-01

    How cells establish and dynamically change polarity are general questions in cell biology. Cells of the rod-shaped bacterium Myxococcus xanthus move on surfaces with defined leading and lagging cell poles. Occasionally, cells undergo reversals, which correspond to an inversion of the leading-lagging pole polarity axis. Reversals are induced by the Frz chemosensory system and depend on relocalization of motility proteins between the poles. The Ras-like GTPase MglA localizes to and defines the leading cell pole in the GTP-bound form. MglB, the cognate MglA GTPase activating protein, localizes to and defines the lagging pole. During reversals, MglA-GTP and MglB switch poles and, therefore, dynamically localized motility proteins switch poles. We identified the RomR response regulator, which localizes in a bipolar asymmetric pattern with a large cluster at the lagging pole, as important for motility and reversals. We show that RomR interacts directly with MglA and MglB in vitro. Furthermore, RomR, MglA, and MglB affect the localization of each other in all pair-wise directions, suggesting that RomR stimulates motility by promoting correct localization of MglA and MglB in MglA/RomR and MglB/RomR complexes at opposite poles. Moreover, localization analyses suggest that the two RomR complexes mutually exclude each other from their respective poles. We further show that RomR interfaces with FrzZ, the output response regulator of the Frz chemosensory system, to regulate reversals. Thus, RomR serves at the functional interface to connect a classic bacterial signalling module (Frz) to a classic eukaryotic polarity module (MglA/MglB). This modular design is paralleled by the phylogenetic distribution of the proteins, suggesting an evolutionary scheme in which RomR was incorporated into the MglA/MglB module to regulate cell polarity followed by the addition of the Frz system to dynamically regulate cell polarity.

  13. Whole-Organism Developmental Expression Profiling Identifies RAB-28 as a Novel Ciliary GTPase Associated with the BBSome and Intraflagellar Transport.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor L Jensen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Primary cilia are specialised sensory and developmental signalling devices extending from the surface of most eukaryotic cells. Defects in these organelles cause inherited human disorders (ciliopathies such as retinitis pigmentosa and Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS, frequently affecting many physiological and developmental processes across multiple organs. Cilium formation, maintenance and function depend on intracellular transport systems such as intraflagellar transport (IFT, which is driven by kinesin-2 and IFT-dynein motors and regulated by the Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS cargo-adaptor protein complex, or BBSome. To identify new cilium-associated genes, we employed the nematode C. elegans, where ciliogenesis occurs within a short timespan during late embryogenesis when most sensory neurons differentiate. Using whole-organism RNA-Seq libraries, we discovered a signature expression profile highly enriched for transcripts of known ciliary proteins, including FAM-161 (FAM161A orthologue, CCDC-104 (CCDC104, and RPI-1 (RP1/RP1L1, which we confirm are cilium-localised in worms. From a list of 185 candidate ciliary genes, we uncover orthologues of human MAP9, YAP, CCDC149, and RAB28 as conserved cilium-associated components. Further analyses of C. elegans RAB-28, recently associated with autosomal-recessive cone-rod dystrophy, reveal that this small GTPase is exclusively expressed in ciliated neurons where it dynamically associates with IFT trains. Whereas inactive GDP-bound RAB-28 displays no IFT movement and diffuse localisation, GTP-bound (activated RAB-28 concentrates at the periciliary membrane in a BBSome-dependent manner and undergoes bidirectional IFT. Functional analyses reveal that whilst cilium structure, sensory function and IFT are seemingly normal in a rab-28 null allele, overexpression of predicted GDP or GTP locked variants of RAB-28 perturbs cilium and sensory pore morphogenesis and function. Collectively, our findings present a new

  14. Nanomechanics of human adipose-derived stem cells: small GTPases impact chondrogenic differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungmann, Pia M; Mehlhorn, Alexander T; Schmal, Hagen; Schillers, Hermann; Oberleithner, Hans; Südkamp, Norbert P

    2012-05-01

    Human adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) show gene expression of chondrogenic markers after three-dimensional cultivation. However, hypertrophy and osteogenic transdifferentiation are still limiting clinical applications. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of small GTPases (Rac1 and RhoA) on transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1-mediated chondrogenic differentiation of ASCs and compare it with BMP-2-induced hypertrophy, by assessing effects on intracellular and extracellular matrix. In a novel experimental approach we characterized differentiation of living stem cells by single-cell elasticity measurements using atomic force microscopy. Results were matched with single-cell size measurements (diameter and volume) and quantitative real time-polymerase chain reaction for osteogenic and hypertrophic (alkaline phosphatase [ALP], collagen type X) as well as chondrogenic (collagen type II) gene expression. Intracellular F-actin expression was visualized by phalloidin staining of alginate-embedded ASCs. Statistical analysis was performed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and two-sided t-test. Nontreated two-dimensional cultured ASCs (2D ASC) showed a significantly lower deformability than chondrocytes (Young's modulus: 294.4 vs. 225.1 Pa; ANOVA: p<0.001). Standard chondrogenic stimulation decreased stem cell elasticity to chondrocyte values (221.7 Pa). All other chondrogenic differentiated ASCs presented intermediate elasticity (BMP-2 stimulation: 269.1 Pa; Rac1 inhibition: 279.8 Pa; RhoA inhibtition: 257.8 Pa; p<0.05 compared to 2D ASC). F-actin fluorescence was visually decreased in Rac1-inhibited cells and increased in BMP-2-stimulated cells. Cell volume of 2D ASCs (6382.3 fL; p<0.001) was significantly higher than in all stimulated samples (BMP-2: 3076.7 fL; RhoA inhibition: 3126.0 fL). Volume of stem cells after standard chondrogenic stimulation (2590.0 fL) was not significantly different from chondrocyte volume (2244.9 fL). Rac1-Inhibitor reduced

  15. Identification and Characterization of a Chloroplast-Targeted Obg GTPase in Dendrobium officinale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ji; Deng, Feng; Deng, Mengsheng; Han, Jincheng; Chen, Jianbin; Wang, Li; Yan, Shen; Tong, Kai; Liu, Fan; Tian, Mengliang

    2016-12-01

    Bacterial homologous chloroplast-targeted Obg GTPases (ObgCs) belong to the plant-typical Obg group, which is involved in diverse physiological processes during chloroplast development. However, the evolutionarily conserved function of ObgC in plants remains elusive and requires further investigation. In this study, we identified DoObgC from an epiphytic plant Dendrobium officinale and demonstrated the characteristics of DoObgC. Sequence analysis indicated that DoObgC is highly conserved with other plant ObgCs, which contain the chloroplast transit peptide (cTP), Obg fold, G domain, and OCT regions. The C terminus of DoObgC lacking the chloroplast-targeting cTP region, DoObgCΔ1-160, showed strong similarity to ObgE and other bacterial Obgs. Overexpression of DoObgCΔ1-160 in Escherichia coli caused slow cell growth and an increased number of elongated cells. This phenotype was consistent with the phenotype of cells overexpressing ObgE. Furthermore, the expression of recombinant DoObgCΔ1-160 enhanced the cell persistence of E. coli to streptomycin. Results of transient expression assays revealed that DoObgC was localized to chloroplasts. Moreover, we demonstrated that DoObgC could rescue the embryotic lethal phenotype of the Arabidopsis obgc-t mutant, suggesting that DoObgC is a functional homolog to Arabidopsis AtObgC in D. officinale. Gene expression profiles showed that DoObgC was expressed in leaf-specific and light-dependent patterns and that DoObgC responded to wounding treatments. Our previous and present studies reveal that ObgC has an evolutionarily conserved role in ribosome biogenesis to adapt chloroplast development to the environment.

  16. Functional Characterization of Monomeric GTPase Rab1 in the Secretory Pathway of Leishmania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahl, Surbhi; Parashar, Smriti; Malhotra, Himanshu; Raje, Manoj; Mukhopadhyay, Amitabha

    2015-12-11

    Leishmania secretes a large number of its effectors to the extracellular milieu. However, regulation of the secretory pathway in Leishmania is not well characterized. Here, we report the cloning, expression, and characterization of the Rab1 homologue from Leishmania. We have found that LdRab1 localizes in Golgi in Leishmania. To understand the role of LdRab1 in the secretory pathway of Leishmania, we have generated transgenic parasites overexpressing GFP-LdRab1:WT, GFP-LdRab1:Q67L (a GTPase-deficient dominant positive mutant of Rab1), and GFP-LdRab1:S22N (a GDP-locked dominant negative mutant of Rab1). Surprisingly, our results have shown that overexpression of GFP-LdRab1:Q67L or GFP-LdRab1:S22N does not disrupt the trafficking and localization of hemoglobin receptor in Leishmania. To determine whether the Rab1-dependent secretory pathway is conserved in parasites, we have analyzed the role of LdRab1 in the secretion of secretory acid phosphatase and Ldgp63 in Leishmania. Our results have shown that overexpression of GFP-LdRab1:Q67L or GFP-LdRab1:S22N significantly inhibits the secretion of secretory acid phosphatase by Leishmania. We have also found that overexpression of GFP-LdRab1:Q67L or GFP-LdRab1:S22N retains RFP-Ldgp63 in Golgi and blocks the secretion of Ldgp63, whereas the trafficking of RFP-Ldgp63 in GFP-LdRab1:WT-expressing cells is unaltered in comparison with control cells. Taken together, our results have shown that the Rab1-regulated secretory pathway is well conserved, and hemoglobin receptor trafficking follows an Rab1-independent secretory pathway in Leishmania. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Functional Characterization of Monomeric GTPase Rab1 in the Secretory Pathway of Leishmania*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahl, Surbhi; Parashar, Smriti; Malhotra, Himanshu; Raje, Manoj; Mukhopadhyay, Amitabha

    2015-01-01

    Leishmania secretes a large number of its effectors to the extracellular milieu. However, regulation of the secretory pathway in Leishmania is not well characterized. Here, we report the cloning, expression, and characterization of the Rab1 homologue from Leishmania. We have found that LdRab1 localizes in Golgi in Leishmania. To understand the role of LdRab1 in the secretory pathway of Leishmania, we have generated transgenic parasites overexpressing GFP-LdRab1:WT, GFP-LdRab1:Q67L (a GTPase-deficient dominant positive mutant of Rab1), and GFP-LdRab1:S22N (a GDP-locked dominant negative mutant of Rab1). Surprisingly, our results have shown that overexpression of GFP-LdRab1:Q67L or GFP-LdRab1:S22N does not disrupt the trafficking and localization of hemoglobin receptor in Leishmania. To determine whether the Rab1-dependent secretory pathway is conserved in parasites, we have analyzed the role of LdRab1 in the secretion of secretory acid phosphatase and Ldgp63 in Leishmania. Our results have shown that overexpression of GFP-LdRab1:Q67L or GFP-LdRab1:S22N significantly inhibits the secretion of secretory acid phosphatase by Leishmania. We have also found that overexpression of GFP-LdRab1:Q67L or GFP-LdRab1:S22N retains RFP-Ldgp63 in Golgi and blocks the secretion of Ldgp63, whereas the trafficking of RFP-Ldgp63 in GFP-LdRab1:WT-expressing cells is unaltered in comparison with control cells. Taken together, our results have shown that the Rab1-regulated secretory pathway is well conserved, and hemoglobin receptor trafficking follows an Rab1-independent secretory pathway in Leishmania. PMID:26499792

  18. Rho GTPase protein Cdc42 is critical for postnatal cartilage development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagahama, Ryo [Department of Biochemistry, School of Dentistry, Showa University, Tokyo (Japan); Department of Orthodontics, School of Dentistry, Showa University, Tokyo (Japan); Yamada, Atsushi, E-mail: yamadaa@dent.showa-u.ac.jp [Department of Biochemistry, School of Dentistry, Showa University, Tokyo (Japan); Tanaka, Junichi [Department of Oral Diagnostic Sciences, School of Dentistry, Showa University, Tokyo (Japan); Aizawa, Ryo [Department of Periodontology, School of Dentistry, Showa University, Tokyo (Japan); Suzuki, Dai [Department of Biochemistry, School of Dentistry, Showa University, Tokyo (Japan); Kassai, Hidetoshi [Laboratory of Animal Resources, Center for Disease Biology and Integrative Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Yamamoto, Matsuo [Department of Periodontology, School of Dentistry, Showa University, Tokyo (Japan); Mishima, Kenji [Department of Oral Diagnostic Sciences, School of Dentistry, Showa University, Tokyo (Japan); Aiba, Atsu [Laboratory of Animal Resources, Center for Disease Biology and Integrative Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Maki, Koutaro [Department of Orthodontics, School of Dentistry, Showa University, Tokyo (Japan); Kamijo, Ryutaro [Department of Biochemistry, School of Dentistry, Showa University, Tokyo (Japan)

    2016-02-19

    Cdc42, a small Rho GTPase family member, has been shown to regulate multiple cellular functions in vitro, including actin cytoskeletal reorganization, cell migration, proliferation, and gene expression. However, its tissue-specific roles in vivo remain largely unknown, especially in postnatal cartilage development, as cartilage-specific Cdc42 inactivated mice die within a few days after birth. In this study, we investigated the physiological functions of Cdc42 during cartilage development after birth using tamoxifen-induced cartilage-specific inactivated Cdc42 conditional knockout (Cdc42 {sup fl/fl}; Col2-CreERT) mice, which were generated by crossing Cdc42 flox mice (Cdc42 {sup fl/fl}) with tamoxifen-induced type II collagen (Col2) Cre transgenic mice using a Cre/loxP system. The gross morphology of the Cdc42 cKO mice was shorter limbs and body, as well as reduced body weight as compared with the controls. In addition, severe defects were found in growth plate chondrocytes of the long bones, characterized by a shorter proliferating zone (PZ), wider hypertrophic zone (HZ), and loss of columnar organization of proliferating chondrocytes, resulting in delayed endochondral bone formation associated with abnormal bone growth. Our findings demonstrate the importance of Cdc42 for cartilage development during both embryonic and postnatal stages. - Highlights: • Tamoxifen-induced cartilage specific inactivated Cdc42 mutant mice were generated. • Cdc42 mutant mice were shorter limbs and body. • Severe defects were found in growth plate chondrocytes.

  19. Synapse Formation in Monosynaptic Sensory–Motor Connections Is Regulated by Presynaptic Rho GTPase Cdc42

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Fumiyasu; Ladle, David R.; Leslie, Jennifer R.; Duan, Xin; Rizvi, Tilat A.; Ciraolo, Georgianne M.; Zheng, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Spinal reflex circuit development requires the precise regulation of axon trajectories, synaptic specificity, and synapse formation. Of these three crucial steps, the molecular mechanisms underlying synapse formation between group Ia proprioceptive sensory neurons and motor neurons is the least understood. Here, we show that the Rho GTPase Cdc42 controls synapse formation in monosynaptic sensory–motor connections in presynaptic, but not postsynaptic, neurons. In mice lacking Cdc42 in presynaptic sensory neurons, proprioceptive sensory axons appropriately reach the ventral spinal cord, but significantly fewer synapses are formed with motor neurons compared with wild-type mice. Concordantly, electrophysiological analyses show diminished EPSP amplitudes in monosynaptic sensory–motor circuits in these mutants. Temporally targeted deletion of Cdc42 in sensory neurons after sensory–motor circuit establishment reveals that Cdc42 does not affect synaptic transmission. Furthermore, addition of the synaptic organizers, neuroligins, induces presynaptic differentiation of wild-type, but not Cdc42-deficient, proprioceptive sensory neurons in vitro. Together, our findings demonstrate that Cdc42 in presynaptic neurons is required for synapse formation in monosynaptic sensory–motor circuits. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Group Ia proprioceptive sensory neurons form direct synapses with motor neurons, but the molecular mechanisms underlying synapse formation in these monosynaptic sensory–motor connections are unknown. We show that deleting Cdc42 in sensory neurons does not affect proprioceptive sensory axon targeting because axons reach the ventral spinal cord appropriately, but these neurons form significantly fewer presynaptic terminals on motor neurons. Electrophysiological analysis further shows that EPSPs are decreased in these mice. Finally, we demonstrate that Cdc42 is involved in neuroligin-dependent presynaptic differentiation of proprioceptive sensory neurons in vitro

  20. Mammalian knock out cells reveal prominent roles for atlastin GTPases in ER network morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Guohua; Zhu, Peng-Peng; Renvoisé, Benoît; Maldonado-Báez, Lymarie; Park, Seong Hee; Blackstone, Craig

    2016-11-15

    Atlastins are large, membrane-bound GTPases that participate in the fusion of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) tubules to generate the polygonal ER network in eukaryotes. They also regulate lipid droplet size and inhibit bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling, though mechanisms remain unclear. Humans have three atlastins (ATL1, ATL2, and ATL3), and ATL1 and ATL3 are mutated in autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia and hereditary sensory neuropathies. Cellular investigations of atlastin orthologs in most yeast, plants, flies and worms are facilitated by the presence of a single or predominant isoform, but loss-of-function studies in mammalian cells are complicated by multiple, broadly-expressed paralogs. We have generated mouse NIH-3T3 cells lacking all three mammalian atlastins (Atl1/2/3) using CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene knockout (KO). ER morphology is markedly disrupted in these triple KO cells, with prominent impairment in formation of three-way ER tubule junctions. This phenotype can be rescued by expression of distant orthologs from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Sey1p) and Arabidopsis (ROOT HAIR DEFECTIVE3) as well as any one of the three human atlastins. Minimal, if any, changes are observed in the morphology of mitochondria and the Golgi apparatus. Alterations in BMP signaling and increased sensitivity to ER stress are also noted, though effects appear more modest. Finally, atlastins appear required for the proper differentiation of NIH-3T3 cells into an adipocyte-like phenotype. These findings have important implications for the pathogenesis of hereditary spastic paraplegias and sensory neuropathies associated with atlastin mutations. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. RANS simulations of wind turbine wakes: optimal tuning of turbulence closure and aerodynamic loads from LiDAR and SCADA data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letizia, Stefano; Puccioni, Matteo; Zhan, Lu; Viola, Francesco; Camarri, Simone; Iungo, Giacomo Valerio

    2017-11-01

    Numerical simulations of wakes produced by utility-scale wind turbines still present challenges related to the variability of the atmospheric conditions and, in the most of the cases, the lack of information about the geometry and aerodynamic performance of the wind turbine blades. In order to overcome the mentioned difficulties, we propose a RANS solver for which turbine aerodynamic forcing and turbulence closure are calibrated through LiDAR and SCADA data acquired for an onshore wind farm. The wind farm under examination is located in North Texas over a relatively flat terrain. The experimental data are leveraged to maximize accuracy of the RANS predictions in terms of wake velocity field and power capture for different atmospheric stability conditions and settings of the wind turbines. The optimization of the RANS parameters is performed through an adjoint-RANS formulation and a gradient-based procedure. The optimally-tuned aerodynamic forcing and turbulence closure are then analyzed in order to investigate effects of the atmospheric stability on the evolution of wind turbine wakes and power performance. The proposed RANS solver has low computational costs comparable to those of wake engineering models, which make it a compelling tool for wind farm control and optimization. Acknowledgments: NSF I/UCRC WindSTAR IIP 1362033 and TACC.

  2. New component of the vacuolar class C-Vps complex couples nucleotide exchange on the Ypt7 GTPase to SNARE-dependent docking and fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurmser, A E; Sato, T K; Emr, S D

    2000-10-30

    The class C subset of vacuolar protein sorting (Vps) proteins (Vps11, Vps18, Vps16 and Vps33) assembles into a vacuole/prevacuole-associated complex. Here we demonstrate that the class C-Vps complex contains two additional proteins, Vps39 and Vps41. The COOH-terminal 148 amino acids of Vps39 direct its association with the class C-Vps complex by binding to Vps11. A previous study has shown that a large protein complex containing Vps39 and Vps41 functions as a downstream effector of the active, GTP-bound form of Ypt7, a rab GTPase required for the fusion of vesicular intermediates with the vacuole (Price, A., D. Seals, W. Wickner, and C. Ungermann. 2000. J. Cell Biol. 148:1231-1238). Here we present data that indicate that this complex also functions to stimulate nucleotide exchange on Ypt7. We show that Vps39 directly binds the GDP-bound and nucleotide-free forms of Ypt7 and that purified Vps39 stimulates nucleotide exchange on Ypt7. We propose that the class C-Vps complex both promotes Vps39-dependent nucleotide exchange on Ypt7 and, based on the work of Price et al., acts as a Ypt7 effector that tethers transport vesicles to the vacuole. Thus, the class C-Vps complex directs multiple reactions during the docking and fusion of vesicles with the vacuole, each of which contributes to the overall specificity and efficiency of this transport process.

  3. A Conserved GEF for Rho-Family GTPases Acts in an EGF Signaling Pathway to Promote Sleep-like Quiescence in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Amanda L; Laboy, Jocelyn T; Huang, Huiyan; Hart, Anne C; Norman, Kenneth R

    2016-03-01

    Sleep is evolutionarily conserved and required for organism homeostasis and survival. Despite this importance, the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying sleep are not well understood. Caenorhabditis elegans exhibits sleep-like behavioral quiescence and thus provides a valuable, simple model system for the study of cellular and molecular regulators of this process. In C. elegans, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling is required in the neurosecretory neuron ALA to promote sleep-like behavioral quiescence after cellular stress. We describe a novel role for VAV-1, a conserved guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) for Rho-family GTPases, in regulation of sleep-like behavioral quiescence. VAV-1, in a GEF-dependent manner, acts in ALA to suppress locomotion and feeding during sleep-like behavioral quiescence in response to cellular stress. Additionally, VAV-1 activity is required for EGF-induced sleep-like quiescence and normal levels of EGFR and secretory dense core vesicles in ALA. Importantly, the role of VAV-1 in promoting cellular stress-induced behavioral quiescence is vital for organism health because VAV-1 is required for normal survival after cellular stress. Copyright © 2016 by the Genetics Society of America.

  4. Ral GTPase interacts with the N-terminal in addition to the C-terminal region of PLC-delta1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grujic, Ognjen; Bhullar, Rajinder P

    2009-06-12

    Previously, we have shown that RalA, a calmodulin (CaM)-binding protein, binds to the C2 region in the C-terminal of PLC-delta1, and increases its enzymatic activity. Since PLC-delta1 contains a CaM-like region in its N-terminus, we have investigated if RalA can also bind to the N-terminus of PLC-delta1. Therefore, we created a GST-PLC-delta1 construct consisting of the first 294 amino acids of PLC-delta1 (GST-PLC-delta1(1-294)). In vitro binding experiments confirmed that PLC-delta1(1-294) was capable of binding directly to RalA. W-7 coupled to polyacrylamide beads bound pure PLC-delta1, demonstrating that PLC-delta1 contains a CaM-like region. Competition assays with W-7, peptides representing RalA and the newly identified RalB CaM-binding regions, or the IQ peptide from PLC-delta1 were able to inhibit RalA binding to PLC-delta1(1-294). This study demonstrates that there are two binding sites for RalA in PLC-delta1 and provides further insight into the role of Ral GTPase in the regulation of PLC-delta1 function.

  5. Multiple factors confer specific Cdc42 and Rac protein activation by dedicator of cytokinesis (DOCK) nucleotide exchange factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Kiran; Yang, Jing; Zhang, Ziguo; Barford, David

    2011-07-15

    DOCK (dedicator of cytokinesis) guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) activate the Rho-family GTPases Rac and Cdc42 to control cell migration, morphogenesis, and phagocytosis. The DOCK A and B subfamilies activate Rac, whereas the DOCK D subfamily activates Cdc42. Nucleotide exchange is catalyzed by a conserved DHR2 domain (DOCK(DHR2)). Although the molecular basis for DOCK(DHR2)-mediated GTPase activation has been elucidated through structures of a DOCK9(DHR2)-Cdc42 complex, the factors determining recognition of specific GTPases are unknown. To understand the molecular basis for DOCK-GTPase specificity, we have determined the crystal structure of DOCK2(DHR2) in complex with Rac1. DOCK2(DHR2) and DOCK9(DHR2) exhibit similar tertiary structures and homodimer interfaces and share a conserved GTPase-activating mechanism. Multiple structural differences between DOCK2(DHR2) and DOCK9(DHR2) account for their selectivity toward Rac1 and Cdc42. Key determinants of selectivity of Cdc42 and Rac for their cognate DOCK(DHR2) are a Phe or Trp residue within β3 (residue 56) and the ability of DOCK proteins to exploit differences in the GEF-induced conformational changes of switch 1 dependent on a divergent residue at position 27. DOCK proteins, therefore, differ from DH-PH GEFs that select their cognate GTPases through recognition of structural differences within the β2/β3 strands.

  6. A Mobility Management Using Follow-Me Cloud-Cloudlet in Fog-Computing-Based RANs for Smart Cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuh-Shyan; Tsai, Yi-Ting

    2018-02-06

    Mobility management for supporting the location tracking and location-based service (LBS) is an important issue of smart city by providing the means for the smooth transportation of people and goods. The mobility is useful to contribute the innovation in both public and private transportation infrastructures for smart cities. With the assistance of edge/fog computing, this paper presents a fully new mobility management using the proposed follow-me cloud-cloudlet (FMCL) approach in fog-computing-based radio access networks (Fog-RANs) for smart cities. The proposed follow-me cloud-cloudlet approach is an integration strategy of follow-me cloud (FMC) and follow-me edge (FME) (or called cloudlet). A user equipment (UE) receives the data, transmitted from original cloud, into the original edge cloud before the handover operation. After the handover operation, an UE searches for a new cloud, called as a migrated cloud, and a new edge cloud, called as a migrated edge cloud near to UE, where the remaining data is migrated from the original cloud to the migrated cloud and all the remaining data are received in the new edge cloud. Existing FMC results do not have the property of the VM migration between cloudlets for the purpose of reducing the transmission latency, and existing FME results do not keep the property of the service migration between data centers for reducing the transmission latency. Our proposed FMCL approach can simultaneously keep the VM migration between cloudlets and service migration between data centers to significantly reduce the transmission latency. The new proposed mobility management using FMCL approach aims to reduce the total transmission time if some data packets are pre-scheduled and pre-stored into the cache of cloudlet if UE is switching from the previous Fog-RAN to the serving Fog-RAN. To illustrate the performance achievement, the mathematical analysis and simulation results are examined in terms of the total transmission time, the

  7. A Mobility Management Using Follow-Me Cloud-Cloudlet in Fog-Computing-Based RANs for Smart Cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuh-Shyan Chen

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Mobility management for supporting the location tracking and location-based service (LBS is an important issue of smart city by providing the means for the smooth transportation of people and goods. The mobility is useful to contribute the innovation in both public and private transportation infrastructures for smart cities. With the assistance of edge/fog computing, this paper presents a fully new mobility management using the proposed follow-me cloud-cloudlet (FMCL approach in fog-computing-based radio access networks (Fog-RANs for smart cities. The proposed follow-me cloud-cloudlet approach is an integration strategy of follow-me cloud (FMC and follow-me edge (FME (or called cloudlet. A user equipment (UE receives the data, transmitted from original cloud, into the original edge cloud before the handover operation. After the handover operation, an UE searches for a new cloud, called as a migrated cloud, and a new edge cloud, called as a migrated edge cloud near to UE, where the remaining data is migrated from the original cloud to the migrated cloud and all the remaining data are received in the new edge cloud. Existing FMC results do not have the property of the VM migration between cloudlets for the purpose of reducing the transmission latency, and existing FME results do not keep the property of the service migration between data centers for reducing the transmission latency. Our proposed FMCL approach can simultaneously keep the VM migration between cloudlets and service migration between data centers to significantly reduce the transmission latency. The new proposed mobility management using FMCL approach aims to reduce the total transmission time if some data packets are pre-scheduled and pre-stored into the cache of cloudlet if UE is switching from the previous Fog-RAN to the serving Fog-RAN. To illustrate the performance achievement, the mathematical analysis and simulation results are examined in terms of the total transmission time

  8. Interferon-γ restricts Toxoplasma gondii development in murine skeletal muscle cells via nitric oxide production and immunity-related GTPases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna C Takács

    Full Text Available The apicomplexan parasite Toxoplasma gondii is regularly transmitted to humans via the ingestion of contaminated meat products from chronically infected livestock. This route of transmission requires intracellular development and long-term survival of the parasite within muscle tissue. In this study, we determined the cell-autonomous immunity of mature primary embryonic or C2C12 skeletal muscle cells (SkMCs to infection with T. gondii. Non-activated SkMCs and control fibroblasts sustained parasite replication; however, interferon (IFN-γ significantly inhibited parasite growth in SkMCs but not in fibroblasts. Intracellular parasite replication was diminished by IFN-γ whereas host cell invasion was not affected. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF did not further increase the IFN-γ-triggered host defense of SkMCs against Toxoplasma. Remarkably, IFN-γ alone or in combination with TNF decreased the high level of T. gondii bradyzoite formation being observed in non-activated SkMCs. Stimulation of SkMCs with IFN-γ strongly triggered expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS transcripts, and induced significantly higher levels of nitric oxide (NO in SkMCs than in fibroblasts. Consequently, pharmacological inhibition of iNOS partially abrogated the IFN-γ-induced toxoplasmacidal activity of SkMCs. In addition, SkMCs strongly up-regulated immunity-regulated GTPases (IRGs following stimulation with IFN-γ. IRGs accumulated on Toxoplasma-containing vacuoles in SkMCs in a parasite strain-dependent manner. Subsequent vacuole disruption and signs of degenerating parasites were regularly recognized in IFN-γ-treated SkMCs infected with type II parasites. Together, murine SkMCs exert potent toxoplasmacidal activity after stimulation with IFN-γ and have to be considered active participants in the local immune response against Toxoplasma in skeletal muscle.

  9. In vivo FRET imaging revealed a regulatory role of RanGTP in kinetochore-microtubule attachments via Aurora B kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoke-Peng Lee

    Full Text Available Under the fluctuating circumstances provided by the innate dynamics of microtubules and opposing tensions resulted from microtubule-associated motors, it is vital to ensure stable kinetochore-microtubule attachments for accurate segregation. However, a comprehensive understanding of how this regulation is mechanistically achieved remains elusive. Using our newly designed live cell FRET time-lapse imaging, we found that post-metaphase RanGTP is crucial in the maintenance of stable kinetochore-microtubule attachments by regulating Aurora B kinase via the NES-bearing Mst1. More importantly, our study demonstrates that by ensuring stable alignment of metaphase chromosomes prior to segregation, RanGTP is indispensible in governing the genomic integrity and the fidelity of cell cycle progression. Our findings suggest an additional role of RanGTP beyond its known function in mitotic spindle assembly during the prometaphase-metaphase transition.

  10. The Rho GTPase Effector ROCK Regulates Cyclin A, Cyclin D1, and p27Kip1 Levels by Distinct Mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Croft, Daniel R.; Olson, Michael F.

    2006-01-01

    The members of the Rho GTPase family are well known for their regulation of actin cytoskeletal structures. In addition, they influence progression through the cell cycle. The RhoA and RhoC proteins regulate numerous effector proteins, with a central and vital signaling role mediated by the ROCK I and ROCK II serine/threonine kinases. The requirement for ROCK function in the proliferation of numerous cell types has been revealed by studies utilizing ROCK-selective inhibitors such as Y-27632. H...

  11. Stage-specific functions of the small Rho GTPases Cdc42 and Rac1 for adult hippocampal neurogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vadodaria, Krishna C; Brakebusch, Cord; Suter, Ueli

    2013-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying the generation, maturation, and integration of new granule cells generated throughout life in the mammalian hippocampus remain poorly understood. Small Rho GTPases, such as Cdc42 and Rac1, have been implicated previously in neural stem/progenitor cell (NSPC......) proliferation and neuronal maturation during embryonic development. Here we used conditional genetic deletion and virus-based loss-of-function approaches to identify temporally distinct functions for Cdc42 and Rac1 in adult hippocampal neurogenesis. We found that Cdc42 is involved in mouse NSPC proliferation...... Cdc42 and Rac1 in the course of adult hippocampal neurogenesis....

  12. Steady RANS methodology for calculating pressure drop in an in-line molten salt compact crossflow heat exchanger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carasik, Lane B.; Shaver, Dillon R.; Hassan, Yassin A.; Haefner, Jonah B.

    2017-11-01

    The development of molten salt cooled reactors (MSR) and fluoride-salt cooled high temperature reactors (FHR) requires the use of advanced design tools for the primary heat exchanger design. Due to geometric and flow characteristics, compact (pitch to diameter ratios equal to or less than 1.25) heat exchangers with a crossflow flow arrangement can become desirable for these reactors. Unfortunately, the available experimental data is limited for compact tube bundles or banks in crossflow. Computational Fluid Dynamics can be used to alleviate the lack of experimental data in these tube banks. Previous computational efforts have been primarily focused on large S/D ratios (larger than 1.4) using unsteady Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes and Large Eddy Simulation frameworks. These approaches are useful, but have large computational requirements that make comprehensive design studies impractical. A CFD study was conducted with steady RANS in an effort to provide a starting point for future design work. The study was performed for an in-line tube bank geometry with FLiBe (LiF-BeF2), a frequently selected molten salt, as the working fluid. Based on the estimated pressure drops, the pressure and velocity distributions in the domain, an appropriate meshing strategy was determined and presented. Periodic boundaries in the spanwise direction transverse flow were determined to be an appropriate boundary condition for reduced computational domains. The domain size was investigated and a minimum of 2-flow channels for a domain is recommended to ensure the behavior is accounted for. Lastly, the standard low Re κ-ε (Lien) turbulence model was determined to be the most appropriate for steady RANS of this case at the time of writing.

  13. Aurora A Phosphorylates MCAK to Control Ran-dependent Spindle Bipolarity

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Xin; Ems-McClung, Stephanie C.; Walczak, Claire E.

    2008-01-01

    During mitosis, mitotic centromere-associated kinesin (MCAK) localizes to chromatin/kinetochores, a cytoplasmic pool, and spindle poles. Its localization and activity in the chromatin region are regulated by Aurora B kinase; however, how the cytoplasmic- and pole-localized MCAK are regulated is currently not clear. In this study, we used Xenopus egg extracts to form spindles in the absence of chromatin and centrosomes and found that MCAK localization and activity are tightly regulated by Auro...

  14. The Small GTPase Rac1 Contributes to Extinction of Aversive Memories of Drug Withdrawal by Facilitating GABAAReceptor Endocytosis in the vmPFC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weisheng; Ju, Yun-Yue; Zhou, Qi-Xin; Tang, Jian-Xin; Li, Meng; Zhang, Lei; Kang, Shuo; Chen, Zhong-Guo; Wang, Yu-Jun; Ji, Hui; Ding, Yu-Qiang; Xu, Lin; Liu, Jing-Gen

    2017-07-26

    Extinction of aversive memories has been a major concern in neuropsychiatric disorders, such as anxiety disorders and drug addiction. However, the mechanisms underlying extinction of aversive memories are not fully understood. Here, we report that extinction of conditioned place aversion (CPA) to naloxone-precipitated opiate withdrawal in male rats activates Rho GTPase Rac1 in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) in a BDNF-dependent manner, which determines GABA A receptor (GABA A R) endocytosis via triggering synaptic translocation of activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein (Arc) through facilitating actin polymerization. Active Rac1 is essential and sufficient for GABA A R endocytosis and CPA extinction. Knockdown of Rac1 expression within the vmPFC of rats using Rac1-shRNA suppressed GABA A R endocytosis and CPA extinction, whereas expression of a constitutively active form of Rac1 accelerated GABA A R endocytosis and CPA extinction. The crucial role of GABA A R endocytosis in the LTP induction and CPA extinction is evinced by the findings that blockade of GABA A R endocytosis by a dynamin function-blocking peptide (Myr-P4) abolishes LTP induction and CPA extinction. Thus, the present study provides first evidence that Rac1-dependent GABA A R endocytosis plays a crucial role in extinction of aversive memories and reveals the sequence of molecular events that contribute to learning experience modulation of synaptic GABA A R endocytosis. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT This study reveals that Rac1-dependent GABA A R endocytosis plays a crucial role in extinction of aversive memories associated with drug withdrawal and identifies Arc as a downstream effector of Rac1 regulations of synaptic plasticity as well as learning and memory, thereby suggesting therapeutic targets to promote extinction of the unwanted memories. Copyright © 2017 the authors 0270-6474/17/377096-15$15.00/0.

  15. Book Review: A History of the Czechoslovak Ocean Shipping Company, 1948–1989: How a Small, Landlocked Country Ran Maritime Business During the Cold War

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taudal Poulsen, René

    2016-01-01

    Review of: Lenka Krátká: A History of the Czechoslovak Ocean Shipping Company, 1948–1989: How a Small, Landlocked Country Ran Maritime Business During the Cold War. Stuttgart: Ibidem Verlag, 2015. x + 271 pp., tables, notes, bibliography. ISBN: 978-3-8382-0666-0, £23.90 (pbk).......Review of: Lenka Krátká: A History of the Czechoslovak Ocean Shipping Company, 1948–1989: How a Small, Landlocked Country Ran Maritime Business During the Cold War. Stuttgart: Ibidem Verlag, 2015. x + 271 pp., tables, notes, bibliography. ISBN: 978-3-8382-0666-0, £23.90 (pbk)....

  16. Exocyst subunits Exo70 and Exo84 cooperate with small GTPases to regulate behavior and endocytic trafficking in C. elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaming Jiu

    Full Text Available The exocyst complex is required for cell polarity regulation and the targeting and tethering of transport vesicles to the plasma membrane. The complex is structurally well conserved, however, the functions of individual subunits and their regulation is poorly understood. Here we characterize the mutant phenotypes for the exocyst complex genes exoc-7 (exo70 and exoc-8 (exo84 in Caenorhabditis elegans. The mutants display pleiotropic behavior defects that resemble those observed in cilia mutants (slow growth, uncoordinated movement, defects in chemo-, mechano- and thermosensation. However, no obvious morphological defects in cilia were observed. A targeted RNAi screen for small GTPases identified eleven genes with enhanced phenotypes when combined with exoc-7, exoc-8 single and exoc-7;exoc-8 double mutants. The screen verified previously identified functional links between the exocyst complex and small GTPases and, in addition, identified several novel potential regulators of exocyst function. The exoc-8 and exoc-7;exoc-8 mutations caused a significant size increase in the rab-10 RNAi-induced endocytic vacuoles in the intestinal epithelial cells. In addition, exoc-8 and exoc-7;exoc-8 mutations resulted in up-regulation of RAB-10 expression and affected the accumulation of endocytic marker proteins in these cells in response to rab-10 RNAi. The findings identify novel, potential regulators for exocyst function and show that exoc-7 and exoc-8 are functionally linked to rab-10 in endosomal trafficking in intestinal epithelial cells in C. elegans.

  17. Rab GTPases and the Autophagy Pathway: Bacterial Targets for a Suitable Biogenesis and Trafficking of Their Own Vacuoles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Milagros López de Armentia

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is an intracellular process that comprises degradation of damaged organelles, protein aggregates and intracellular pathogens, having an important role in controlling the fate of invading microorganisms. Intracellular pathogens are internalized by professional and non-professional phagocytes, localizing in compartments called phagosomes. To degrade the internalized microorganism, the microbial phagosome matures by fusion events with early and late endosomal compartments and lysosomes, a process that is regulated by Rab GTPases. Interestingly, in order to survive and replicate in the phagosome, some pathogens employ different strategies to manipulate vesicular traffic, inhibiting phagolysosomal biogenesis (e.g., Staphylococcus aureus and Mycobacterium tuberculosis or surviving in acidic compartments and forming replicative vacuoles (e.g., Coxiella burnetti and Legionella pneumophila. The bacteria described in this review often use secretion systems to control the host’s response and thus disseminate. To date, eight types of secretion systems (Type I to Type VIII are known. Some of these systems are used by bacteria to translocate pathogenic proteins into the host cell and regulate replicative vacuole formation, apoptosis, cytokine responses, and autophagy. Herein, we have focused on how bacteria manipulate small Rab GTPases to control many of these processes. The growing knowledge in this field may facilitate the development of new treatments or contribute to the prevention of these types of bacterial infections.

  18. Maternal smoke exposure decreases mesenchymal proliferation and modulates Rho-GTPase-dependent actin cytoskeletal signaling in fetal lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unachukwu, Uchenna; Trischler, Jordis; Goldklang, Monica; Xiao, Rui; D'Armiento, Jeanine

    2017-06-01

    The present study tested the hypothesis that maternal smoke exposure results in fetal lung growth retardation due to dysregulation in various signaling pathways, including the Wnt (wingless-related integration site)/β-catenin pathway. Pregnant female C57BL/6J mice were exposed to cigarette smoke (100-150 mg/m3) or room air, and offspring were humanely killed on 12.5, 14.5, 16.5, and 18.5 d post coitum (dpc). We assessed lung stereology with Cavalieri estimation; apoptosis with proliferating cell nuclear antigen, TUNEL, and caspase assays; and gene expression with quantitative PCR (qPCR) and RNA sequencing on lung epithelium and mesenchyme retrieved by laser capture microdissection. Results demonstrated a significant decrease in body weight and lung volume of smoke-exposed embryos. At 16.5 dpc, the reduction in lung volume was due to loss of lung mesenchymal tissue correlating with a decrease in cell proliferation (n = 10; air: 61.65% vs. smoke: 44.21%, P smoke-induced up-regulation of Rho-GTPase-dependent actin cytoskeletal signaling that can lead to loss of tissue integrity.-Unachukwu, U., Trischler, J., Goldklang, M., Xiao, R., D'Armiento, J. Maternal smoke exposure decreases mesenchymal proliferation and modulates Rho-GTPase-dependent actin cytoskeletal signaling in fetal lungs. © FASEB.

  19. Coordinated regulation by two VPS9 domain-containing guanine nucleotide exchange factors in small GTPase Rab5 signaling pathways in fission yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukamoto, Yuta [Department of Biology, Graduate School of Science, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Kagiwada, Satoshi [Department of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, Nara Women' s University, Kitauoyanishi-machi, Nara 630-8506 (Japan); Shimazu, Sayuri [Center for Supports to Research and Education Activities, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Takegawa, Kaoru [Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Graduate School of Bioresource and Bioenvironmental Sciences, Kyushu University, 6-10-1 Hakozaki, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan); Noguchi, Tetsuko [Department of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, Nara Women' s University, Kitauoyanishi-machi, Nara 630-8506 (Japan); Miyamoto, Masaaki, E-mail: miya@kobe-u.ac.jp [Department of Biology, Graduate School of Science, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Center for Supports to Research and Education Activities, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan)

    2015-03-20

    The small GTPase Rab5 is reported to regulate various cellular functions, such as vesicular transport and endocytosis. VPS9 domain-containing proteins are thought to activate Rab5(s) by their guanine-nucleotide exchange activities. Numerous VPS9 proteins have been identified and are structurally conserved from yeast to mammalian cells. However, the functional relationships among VPS9 proteins in cells remain unclear. Only one Rab5 and two VPS9 proteins were identified in the Schizosaccharomyces pombe genome. Here, we examined the cellular function of two VPS9 proteins and the relationship between these proteins in cellular functions. Vps901-GFP and Vps902-GFP exhibited dotted signals in vegetative and differentiated cells. vps901 deletion mutant (Δvps901) cells exhibited a phenotype deficient in the mating process and responses to high concentrations of ions, such as calcium and metals, and Δvps901Δvps902 double mutant cells exhibited round cell shapes similar to ypt5-909 (Rab5 mutant allele) cells. Deletion of both vps901 and vps902 genes completely abolished the mating process and responses to various stresses. A lack of vacuole formation and aberrant inner cell membrane structures were also observed in Δvps901Δvps902 cells by electron microscopy. These data strongly suggest that Vps901 and Vps902 are cooperatively involved in the regulation of cellular functions, such as cell morphology, sexual development, response to ion stresses, and vacuole formation, via Rab5 signaling pathways in fission yeast cells. - Highlights: • Roles of Rab5 activator VPS9 proteins in cellular functions. • Cooperation between VPS9 proteins in Rab5 signaling pathway. • Roles of each VPS9 protein in Rab5 signaling pathway are discussed.

  20. Gene : CBRC-PVAM-01-1461 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PVAM-01-1461 Novel UN A Orphan receptors RBGP1_PONAB 0.0 86% ref|NP_001125691.1| RAB GTPase activa...ting protein 1 [Pongo abelii] sp|Q5RAN1|RBGP1_PONAB RecName: Full=Rab GTPase-activating ...protein 1; AltName: Full=Rab6 GTPase-activating protein GAPCenA; AltName: Full=GAP and centrosome-associated... protein emb|CAH91179.1| hypothetical protein [Pongo abelii] 0.0 86% MLDSEGSSPFTPVA...SLLHYPLPVGEALTCQVFGFVVSVLKSVSMTSLACISIDRYIAITKPLTYNTLVTPWRLRLCIFLIWLYSTLVFLPSFLHWGKPGYHGDVFQCNRVA

  1. Structural Determinants of Clostridium difficile Toxin A Glucosyltransferase Activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pruitt, Rory N.; Chumbler, Nicole M.; Rutherford, Stacey A.; Farrow, Melissa A.; Friedman, David B.; Spiller, Ben; Lacy, D. Borden (Vanderbilt)

    2012-03-28

    The principle virulence factors in Clostridium difficile pathogenesis are TcdA and TcdB, homologous glucosyltransferases capable of inactivating small GTPases within the host cell. We present crystal structures of the TcdA glucosyltransferase domain in the presence and absence of the co-substrate UDP-glucose. Although the enzymatic core is similar to that of TcdB, the proposed GTPase-binding surface differs significantly. We show that TcdA is comparable with TcdB in its modification of Rho family substrates and that, unlike TcdB, TcdA is also capable of modifying Rap family GTPases both in vitro and in cells. The glucosyltransferase activities of both toxins are reduced in the context of the holotoxin but can be restored with autoproteolytic activation and glucosyltransferase domain release. These studies highlight the importance of cellular activation in determining the array of substrates available to the toxins once delivered into the cell.

  2. RanBP9 overexpression accelerates loss of pre and postsynaptic proteins in the APΔE9 transgenic mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongjie; Wang, Ruizhi; Xu, Shaohua; Lakshmana, Madepalli K

    2014-01-01

    There is now compelling evidence that the neurodegenerative process in Alzheimer's disease (AD) begins in synapses. Loss of synaptic proteins and functional synapses in the amyloid precursor protein (APP) transgenic mouse models of AD is well established. However, what is the earliest age at which such loss of synapses occurs, and whether known markers of AD progression accelerate functional deficits is completely unknown. We previously showed that RanBP9 overexpression leads to robustly increased amyloid β peptide (Aβ) generation leading to enhanced amyloid plaque burden in a mouse model of AD. In this study we compared synaptic protein levels among four genotypes of mice, i.e., RanBP9 single transgenic (Ran), APΔE9 double transgenic (Dbl), APΔE9/RanBP9 triple transgenic (Tpl) and wild-type (WT) controls. We found significant reductions in the levels of synaptic proteins in both cortex and hippocampus of 5- and 6-months-old but not 3- or 4-months-old mice. Specifically, at 5-months of age, rab3A was reduced in the triple transgenic mice only in the cortex by 25% (pproteins in the mouse brain.

  3. Study of laminar separation bubble on low Reynolds number operating airfoils: RANS modelling by means of an high-accuracy solver and experimental verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crivellini, A.; D'Alessandro, V.; Di Benedetto, D.; Montelpare, S.; Ricci, R.

    2014-04-01

    This work is devoted to the Computational Fluid-Dynamics (CFD) simulation of laminar separation bubble (LSB) on low Reynolds number operating airfoils. This phenomenon is of large interest in several fields, such as wind energy, and it is characterised by slow recirculating flow at an almost constant pressure. Presently Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) methods, due to their limited computational requests, are the more efficient and feasible CFD simulation tool for complex engineering applications involving LSBs. However adopting RANS methods for LSB prediction is very challenging since widely used models assume a fully turbulent regime. For this reason several transitional models for RANS equations based on further Partial Differential Equations (PDE) have been recently introduced in literature. Nevertheless in some cases they show questionable results. In this work RANS equations and the standard Spalart-Allmaras (SA) turbulence model are used to deal with LSB problems obtaining promising results. This innovative result is related to: (i) a particular behaviour of the SA equation; (ii) a particular implementation of SA equation; (iii) the use of a high-order discontinuous Galerkin (DG) solver. The effectiveness of the proposed approach is tested on different airfoils at several angles of attack and Reynolds numbers. Numerical results were verified with both experimental measurements performed at the open circuit subsonic wind tunnel of Università Politecnica delle Marche (UNIVPM) and literature data.

  4. Ozsvath, Zsuzsanna: "When the Danube Ran Red"; Mandel, Eva Marika: "Le Livre de Mana"; Roth, Marika: "All the Pretty Shoes; A Memoir of Survival and the Feminine Spirit".

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evi Blaikie

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ozsvath, Zsuzsanna. When the Danube Ran Red. Syracuse University Press, 2010,171 pp., Illus.Mandel, Eva Marika. Le Livre de Mana. Paris, Glyphe 2009, 231 pp., Illus.Roth, Marika. All the Pretty Shoes; A Memoir of Survival and the Feminine SpiritWyatt McKenzy 2010, 254 pp., Illus.Reviewed by Evi Blaikie, Freelance Writer.

  5. A lentiviral sponge for miR-101 regulates RanBP9 expression and amyloid precursor protein metabolism in hippocampal neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian eBarbato

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegeneration associated with amyloid β (Aβ peptide accumulation, synaptic loss, and memory impairment are pathophysiological features of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Numerous microRNAs regulate amyloid precursor protein (APP expression and metabolism. We previously reported that miR-101 is a negative regulator of APP expression in cultured hippocampal neurons. In this study, a search for predicted APP metabolism-associated miR-101 targets led to the identification of a conserved miR-101 binding site within the 3’ untranslated region (UTR of the mRNA encoding Ran-binding protein 9 (RanBP9. RanBP9 increases APP processing by β-amyloid converting enzyme 1 (BACE1, secretion of soluble APPβ (sAPPβ, and generation of Aβ. MiR-101 significantly reduced reporter gene expression when co-transfected with a RanBP9 3'-UTR reporter construct, while site-directed mutagenesis of the predicted miR-101 target site eliminated the reporter response. To investigate the effect of stable inhibition of miR-101 both in vitro and in vivo, a microRNA sponge was developed to bind miR-101 and derepress its targets. Four tandem bulged miR-101 responsive elements (REs, located downstream of the enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP open reading frame and driven by the synapsin promoter, were placed in a lentiviral vector to create the pLSyn-miR-101 sponge. Delivery of the sponge to primary hippocampal neurons significantly increased both APP and RanBP9 expression, as well as sAPPβ levels in the conditioned medium. Importantly, silencing of endogenous RanBP9 reduced sAPPβ levels in miR-101 sponge-containing hippocampal cultures, indicating that miR-101 inhibition may increase amyloidogenic processing of APP by RanBP9. Lastly, the impact of miR-101 on its targets was demonstrated in vivo by intrahippocampal injection of the pLSyn-miR-101 sponge into C57BL6 mice. This study thus provides the basis for studying the consequences of long-term miR-101 inhibition on

  6. Comprehensive Approaches to Multiphase Flows in Geophysics - Application to nonisothermal, nonhomogenous, unsteady, large-scale, turbulent dusty clouds I. Hydrodynamic and Thermodynamic RANS and LES Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Dartevelle

    2005-09-05

    The objective of this manuscript is to fully derive a geophysical multiphase model able to ''accommodate'' different multiphase turbulence approaches; viz., the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS), the Large Eddy Simulation (LES), or hybrid RANSLES. This manuscript is the first part of a larger geophysical multiphase project--lead by LANL--that aims to develop comprehensive modeling tools for large-scale, atmospheric, transient-buoyancy dusty jets and plume (e.g., plinian clouds, nuclear ''mushrooms'', ''supercell'' forest fire plumes) and for boundary-dominated geophysical multiphase gravity currents (e.g., dusty surges, diluted pyroclastic flows, dusty gravity currents in street canyons). LES is a partially deterministic approach constructed on either a spatial- or a temporal-separation between the large and small scales of the flow, whereas RANS is an entirely probabilistic approach constructed on a statistical separation between an ensemble-averaged mean and higher-order statistical moments (the so-called ''fluctuating parts''). Within this specific multiphase context, both turbulence approaches are built up upon the same phasic binary-valued ''function of presence''. This function of presence formally describes the occurrence--or not--of any phase at a given position and time and, therefore, allows to derive the same basic multiphase Navier-Stokes model for either the RANS or the LES frameworks. The only differences between these turbulence frameworks are the closures for the various ''turbulence'' terms involving the unknown variables from the fluctuating (RANS) or from the subgrid (LES) parts. Even though the hydrodynamic and thermodynamic models for RANS and LES have the same set of Partial Differential Equations, the physical interpretations of these PDEs cannot be the same, i.e., RANS models an averaged field, while LES simulates a

  7. Investigation of Synthetic Jets Efficiency to Control Cavity Flotation with Subsonic External Flow by High-Resolution RANS / ILES Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Lyubimov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cavities often found in airplanes: a niche for the landing gear, various weapons, etc. Reducing fluctuations of pressure and temperature in the cavity is a relevant practical problem. The article presents simulation results of external subsonic flow around the cavity (M = 0.85, T = 300K. . Calculations were performed using the high-resolution RANS/ILES (Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes - RANS, Implicit Large Eddy Simulation - ILES method. To control flow the authors propose to use synthetic jets. Synthetic jets are produced by periodic ejection and suction of fluid from a slot induced by the movement of a diaphragm (generator of synthetic jets inside a cavity. They are compact and efficient and do not require a special working body and the ways for its supply. Instead of calculating the flow in the synthetic jet generator was used the modified boundary condition on the wall where the output slots was positioned. Under consideration there were two variants of slots for synthetic jets output: in front of the cavity and inside the cavity on the front wall. The frequency and amplitude values of the synthetic jet specified a mode of each jet. For a jet inside the cavity two modes have been reviewed, namely: 100 Hz and 50m/s, 200Hz and 50m/s. For jet in front of the cavity three modes have been reviewed, specifically: 20Hz and 20m/s, 100Hz and 50m/s, 200Hz and 50m/s. Analysis of calculation results showed that for all modes under examination, the synthetic jets reduced fluctuation of static pressure and temperature on the bottom and back walls of the cavity. The mode with parameters 200Hz, 50 m/s and synthetic jet located in front of the cavity was the most efficient. Furthermore, we compared the results of calculations for two-and three-dimensional cavities, which have the same length and depth. Research has shown that the simplified quasi-two-dimensional calculations cannot be used to evaluate the pressure and temperature fluctuations. This is due to

  8. Repeated BCG treatment of mouse bladder selectively stimulates small GTPases and HLA antigens and inhibits single-spanning uroplakins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Donnell Michael A

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite being a mainstay for treating superficial bladder carcinoma and a promising agent for interstitial cystitis, the precise mechanism of Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG remains poorly understood. It is particularly unclear whether BCG is capable of altering gene expression beyond its well-recognized pro-inflammatory effects and how this relates to its therapeutic efficacy. The objective of this study was to determine differentially expressed genes in the mouse bladder following repeated intravesical BCG therapy. Methods Mice were transurethrally instilled with BCG or pyrogen-free on days 1, 7, 14, and 21. Seven days after the last instillation, urothelia along with the submucosa was removed and amplified ds-DNA was prepared from control- and BCG-treated bladder mucosa and used to generate suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH. Plasmids from control- and BCG-specific differentially expressed clones and confirmed by Virtual Northern were then purified and the inserts were sequenced and annotated. Finally, chromatin immune precipitation combined with real-time polymerase chain reaction assay (ChIP/Q-PCR was used to validate SSH-selected transcripts. Results Repeated intravesical BCG treatment induced an up regulation of genes associated with antigen presentation (B2M, HLA-A, HLA-DQA1, HLA-DQB2, HLA-E, HLA-G, IGHG, and IGH and representatives of two IFNγ-induced small GTPase families: the GBPs (GBP1, GBP2, and GBP5 and the p47GTPases (IIGTP1, IIGTP2, and TGTP. Genes expressed in saline-treated bladders but down-regulated by BCG included: the single-spanning uroplakins (UPK3a and UPK2, SPRR2G, GSTM5, and RSP 19. Conclusion Here we introduced a hypothesis-generator approach to determine key genes involved in the urothelium/sumbmucosa responses to BCG therapy. Urinary bladder responds to repeated BCG treatment by up-regulating not only antigen presentation-related genes, but also GBP and p47 small GTPases, both potentially

  9. Site-directed mutagenesis of Arg58 and Asp86 of elongation factor Tu from Escherichia coli: effects on the GTPase reaction and aminoacyl-tRNA binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Charlotte Rohde; Clark, Brian F. C.

    1996-01-01

    Elongation factor Tu from Escherichia coli was mutated separately at positions Asp86 and Arg58, in order to shed light both on the GTPase mechanism of elongation factor Tu and on the binding of aminoacyl-tRNA. In addition, the binding of guanine nucleotides was investigated by determination of th...

  10. A Cognitive Metaphorical Analysis of Selected Verses in the Glorius Qu’ran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Abdel Tawwab Sharaf Eldin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Metaphor has been generally contemplated and broke down inside the schema of verbal and written discourse, scholarly works and artistic studies. It has been identified with metaphorical language and has been viewed as quite recently a sort of aesthetic frivolity (Murray & Moon, 2006. In addition, conventional instructing of metaphors presents language as an abnormal or different method for using it (Goatly, 1997. Likewise, as Goatly has put it, scholars have needed figures of speech strictly limited to writing, talk and craftsmanship. Moreover, metaphor is viewed as something that fits in with abstract structures which is more concerned with novel or intriguing uses of words. Lakoff & Johnson (1980 presented an alternate idea and perspective of metaphor which is known as reasonable metaphorical dissection. The theory underlying this new approach is that the reasonable metaphors enter our understanding of our general surroundings and they shape our demeanor. Appropriately, as pointed out by Lakoff & Johnson (1980, metaphor is available in ordinary discourse, in every language, and is to a certain degree, has gotten to be culturally specific. Besides both contend that metaphors affect our way of viewing the meanings and are discovered widely in a significant number of our languages, contemplations and activities.

  11. The social licence for research: why care.data ran into trouble.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Pam; Laurie, Graeme T; Dixon-Woods, Mary

    2015-05-01

    In this article we draw on the concept of a social licence to explain public concern at the introduction of care.data, a recent English initiative designed to extract data from primary care medical records for commissioning and other purposes, including research. The concept of a social licence describes how the expectations of society regarding some activities may go beyond compliance with the requirements of formal regulation; those who do not fulfil the conditions for the social licence (even if formally compliant) may experience ongoing challenge and contestation. Previous work suggests that people's cooperation with specific research studies depends on their perceptions that their participation is voluntary and is governed by values of reciprocity, non-exploitation and service of the public good. When these conditions are not seen to obtain, threats to the social licence for research may emerge. We propose that care.data failed to adequately secure a social licence because of: (i) defects in the warrants of trust provided for care.data, (ii) the implied rupture in the traditional role, expectations and duties of general practitioners, and (iii) uncertainty about the status of care.data as a public good. The concept of a social licence may be useful in explaining the specifics of care.data, and also in reinforcing the more general lesson for policy-makers that legal authority does not necessarily command social legitimacy. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  12. The communities of harvestmen (Opilionida of floodplain forest in the Ranšpurk National Nature Reserve and their fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hana Šejnohová

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available During the years 1993–2001 the monitoring of the soil surface fauna was carried out in a floodplain fo- rest in the Ranšpurk National Nature Reserve (south Moravia. The harvestmen assemblages fluctuation is described in detail in this paper. The method of pitfall traps was used. A total of 3174 individuals of seven harvestmen species were collected. The species composition was very similar to other research results from the southern Moravian floodplain forest. Only the dominance values differ from the values in the other localities. All of the registered species prefer moisture and shadow places. The highest abundance was observed in Astrobunus laevipes (Canestrini, 1872, Nemastoma lugubre (Müller, 1776, Oligolophus tridens (C. L. Koch, 1936 and Rilaena triangularis (Herbst, 1799. The dynamics of harvestmen occurrence during the year had a different development than in other groups of invertebrates. Harvestmen mostly occurred in pitfall traps in autumn and winter months. The highest abundance of harvestmen in traps was observed in December and January. In July 1997, disastrous flood affected all groups of invertebrates. The flood had a minimal impact on the abundance of harvestmen in pitfall traps.

  13. Proactive monitoring of an onshore wind farm through lidar measurements, SCADA data and a data-driven RANS solver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iungo, Giacomo Valerio; Camarri, Simone; Ciri, Umberto; El-Asha, Said; Leonardi, Stefano; Rotea, Mario A.; Santhanagopalan, Vignesh; Viola, Francesco; Zhan, Lu

    2016-11-01

    Site conditions, such as topography and local climate, as well as wind farm layout strongly affect performance of a wind power plant. Therefore, predictions of wake interactions and their effects on power production still remain a great challenge in wind energy. For this study, an onshore wind turbine array was monitored through lidar measurements, SCADA and met-tower data. Power losses due to wake interactions were estimated to be approximately 4% and 2% of the total power production under stable and convective conditions, respectively. This dataset was then leveraged for the calibration of a data driven RANS (DDRANS) solver, which is a compelling tool for prediction of wind turbine wakes and power production. DDRANS is characterized by a computational cost as low as that for engineering wake models, and adequate accuracy achieved through data-driven tuning of the turbulence closure model. DDRANS is based on a parabolic formulation, axisymmetry and boundary layer approximations, which allow achieving low computational costs. The turbulence closure model consists in a mixing length model, which is optimally calibrated with the experimental dataset. Assessment of DDRANS is then performed through lidar and SCADA data for different atmospheric conditions. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under the I/UCRC WindSTAR, NSF Award IIP 1362033.

  14. Ras GTPase-like protein MglA, a controller of bacterial social-motility in Myxobacteria, has evolved to control bacterial predation by Bdellovibrio.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S Milner

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus invade Gram-negative bacteria in a predatory process requiring Type IV pili (T4P at a single invasive pole, and also glide on surfaces to locate prey. Ras-like G-protein MglA, working with MglB and RomR in the deltaproteobacterium Myxococcus xanthus, regulates adventurous gliding and T4P-mediated social motility at both M. xanthus cell poles. Our bioinformatic analyses suggested that the GTPase activating protein (GAP-encoding gene mglB was lost in Bdellovibrio, but critical residues for MglA(Bd GTP-binding are conserved. Deletion of mglA(Bd abolished prey-invasion, but not gliding, and reduced T4P formation. MglA(Bd interacted with a previously uncharacterised tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR domain protein Bd2492, which we show localises at the single invasive pole and is required for predation. Bd2492 and RomR also interacted with cyclic-di-GMP-binding receptor CdgA, required for rapid prey-invasion. Bd2492, RomR(Bd and CdgA localize to the invasive pole and may facilitate MglA-docking. Bd2492 was encoded from an operon encoding a TamAB-like secretion system. The TamA protein and RomR were found, by gene deletion tests, to be essential for viability in both predatory and non-predatory modes. Control proteins, which regulate bipolar T4P-mediated social motility in swarming groups of deltaproteobacteria, have adapted in evolution to regulate the anti-social process of unipolar prey-invasion in the "lone-hunter" Bdellovibrio. Thus GTP-binding proteins and cyclic-di-GMP inputs combine at a regulatory hub, turning on prey-invasion and allowing invasion and killing of bacterial pathogens and consequent predatory growth of Bdellovibrio.

  15. RAR1 and HSP90 Form a Complex with Rac/Rop GTPase and Function in Innate-Immune Responses in Rice[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thao, Nguyen Phuong; Chen, Letian; Nakashima, Ayako; Hara, Shin-ichiro; Umemura, Kenji; Takahashi, Akira; Shirasu, Ken; Kawasaki, Tsutomu; Shimamoto, Ko

    2007-01-01

    A rice (Oryza sativa) Rac/Rop GTPase, Os Rac1, is involved in innate immunity, but its molecular function is largely unknown. RAR1 (for required for Mla12 resistance) and HSP90 (a heat shock protein 90 kD) are important components of R gene–mediated disease resistance, and their function is conserved in several plant species. HSP90 has also recently been shown to be important in mammalian innate immunity. However, their functions at the molecular level are not well understood. In this study, we examined the functional relationships between Os Rac1, RAR1, and HSP90. Os RAR1-RNA interference (RNAi) rice plants had impaired basal resistance to a compatible race of the blast fungus Magnaporthe grisea and the virulent bacterial blight pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae. Constitutively active Os Rac1 complemented the loss of resistance, suggesting that Os Rac1 and RAR1 are functionally linked. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments with rice cell culture extracts indicate that Rac1 forms a complex with RAR1, HSP90, and HSP70 in vivo. Studies with Os RAR1-RNAi and treatment with geldanamycin, an HSP90-specific inhibitor, showed that RAR1 and HSP90 are essential for the Rac1-mediated enhancement of pathogen-associated molecular pattern–triggered immune responses in rice cell cultures. Furthermore, the function of HSP90, but not RAR1, may be essential for their association with the Rac1 complex. Os Rac1 also regulates RAR1 expression at both the mRNA and protein levels. Together, our results indicate that Rac1, RAR1, HSP90, and HSP70 form one or more protein complexes in rice cells and suggest that these proteins play important roles in innate immunity in rice. PMID:18156216

  16. RAR1 and HSP90 form a complex with Rac/Rop GTPase and function in innate-immune responses in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thao, Nguyen Phuong; Chen, Letian; Nakashima, Ayako; Hara, Shin-ichiro; Umemura, Kenji; Takahashi, Akira; Shirasu, Ken; Kawasaki, Tsutomu; Shimamoto, Ko

    2007-12-01

    A rice (Oryza sativa) Rac/Rop GTPase, Os Rac1, is involved in innate immunity, but its molecular function is largely unknown. RAR1 (for required for Mla12 resistance) and HSP90 (a heat shock protein 90 kD) are important components of R gene-mediated disease resistance, and their function is conserved in several plant species. HSP90 has also recently been shown to be important in mammalian innate immunity. However, their functions at the molecular level are not well understood. In this study, we examined the functional relationships between Os Rac1, RAR1, and HSP90. Os RAR1-RNA interference (RNAi) rice plants had impaired basal resistance to a compatible race of the blast fungus Magnaporthe grisea and the virulent bacterial blight pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae. Constitutively active Os Rac1 complemented the loss of resistance, suggesting that Os Rac1 and RAR1 are functionally linked. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments with rice cell culture extracts indicate that Rac1 forms a complex with RAR1, HSP90, and HSP70 in vivo. Studies with Os RAR1-RNAi and treatment with geldanamycin, an HSP90-specific inhibitor, showed that RAR1 and HSP90 are essential for the Rac1-mediated enhancement of pathogen-associated molecular pattern-triggered immune responses in rice cell cultures. Furthermore, the function of HSP90, but not RAR1, may be essential for their association with the Rac1 complex. Os Rac1 also regulates RAR1 expression at both the mRNA and protein levels. Together, our results indicate that Rac1, RAR1, HSP90, and HSP70 form one or more protein complexes in rice cells and suggest that these proteins play important roles in innate immunity in rice.

  17. Nitric oxide causes macrophage migration via the HIF-1-stimulated small GTPases Cdc42 and Rac1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jie; Dehne, Nathalie; Brüne, Bernhard

    2009-09-15

    Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) is a key regulator of tumor development. Recently, the tumor microenvironment, with the presence of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), has gained considerable interest. The mechanisms of macrophage/TAM migration as well as the role of HIF-1 in macrophages for tumor progression are still under debate. We present evidence that under normoxic conditions, nitric oxide (NO) promotes macrophage migration. The response was impaired in macrophages from leukocyte conditional HIF-1 alpha(-/-) mice. NO production and cell migration in response to cytokines were attenuated in macrophages from iNOS(-/-) mice, suggesting that iNOS-derived NO transmits cytokine signaling toward cell migration. We further identified the small GTPases Cdc42 and Rac1 as effectors of the NO-HIF axis to drive macrophage migration by modulating the actin cytoskeleton. Our observations strengthen the role of HIF-1 in macrophages as a target of NO in facilitating functional responses such as migration.

  18. Human Rab small GTPase- and class V myosin-mediated membrane tethering in a chemically defined reconstitution system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoshita, Motoki; Mima, Joji

    2017-11-10

    Membrane tethering is a fundamental process essential for the compartmental specificity of intracellular membrane trafficking in eukaryotic cells. Rab-family small GTPases and specific sets of Rab-interacting effector proteins, including coiled-coil tethering proteins and multisubunit tethering complexes, are reported to be responsible for membrane tethering. However, whether and how these key components directly and specifically tether subcellular membranes remains enigmatic. Using chemically defined proteoliposomal systems reconstituted with purified human Rab proteins and synthetic liposomal membranes to study the molecular basis of membrane tethering, we established here that Rab-family GTPases have a highly conserved function to directly mediate membrane tethering, even in the absence of any types of Rab effectors such as the so-called tethering proteins. Moreover, we demonstrate that membrane tethering mediated by endosomal Rab11a is drastically and selectively stimulated by its cognate Rab effectors, class V myosins (Myo5A and Myo5B), in a GTP-dependent manner. Of note, Myo5A and Myo5B exclusively recognized and cooperated with the membrane-anchored form of their cognate Rab11a to support membrane tethering mediated by trans-Rab assemblies on opposing membranes. Our findings support the novel concept that Rab-family proteins provide a bona fide membrane tether to physically and specifically link two distinct lipid bilayers of subcellular membranes. They further indicate that Rab-interacting effector proteins, including class V myosins, can regulate these Rab-mediated membrane-tethering reactions. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. The dock-and-coalesce mechanism for the association of a WASP disordered region with the Cdc42 GTPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Li; Matthews, Megan; Pang, Xiaodong; Zhou, Huan-Xiang

    2017-10-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) play key roles in signaling and regulation. Many IDPs undergo folding upon binding to their targets. We have proposed that coupled folding and binding of IDPs generally follow a dock-and-coalesce mechanism, whereby a segment of the IDP, through diffusion, docks to its cognate subsite and, subsequently, the remaining segments coalesce around their subsites. Here, by a combination of experiment and computation, we determined the precise form of dock-and-coalesce operating in the association between the intrinsically disordered GTPase-binding domain (GBD) of the Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome protein and the Cdc42 GTPase. The association rate constants (ka ) were measured by stopped-flow fluorescence under various solvent conditions. ka reached 10(7) m(-1) ·s(-1) at physiological ionic strength and had a strong salt dependence, suggesting that an electrostatically enhanced, diffusion-controlled docking step may be rate limiting. Our computation, based on the transient-complex theory, identified the N-terminal basic region of the GBD as the docking segment. However, several other changes in solvent conditions provided strong evidence that the coalescing step also contributed to determining the magnitude of ka . Addition of glucose and trifluoroethanol and an increase in temperature all produced experimental ka values much higher than expected from the effects on the docking rate alone. Conversely, addition of urea led to ka values much lower than expected if only the docking rate was affected. These results all pointed to ka being approximately two-thirds of the docking rate constant under physiological solvent conditions. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  20. Origin of the nucleus and Ran-dependent transport to safeguard ribosome biogenesis in a chimeric cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jékely Gáspár

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The origin of the nucleus is a central problem about the origin of eukaryotes. The common ancestry of nuclear pore complexes (NPC and vesicle coating complexes indicates that the nucleus evolved via the modification of a pre-existing endomembrane system. Such an autogenous scenario is cell biologically feasible, but it is not clear what were the selective or neutral mechanisms that had led to the origin of the nuclear compartment. Results A key selective force during the autogenous origin of the nucleus could have been the need to segregate ribosome factories from the cytoplasm where ribosomal proteins (RPs of the protomitochondrium were synthesized. After its uptake by an anuclear cell the protomitochondrium transferred several of its RP genes to the host genome. Alphaproteobacterial RPs and archaebacterial-type host ribosomes were consequently synthesized in the same cytoplasm. This could have led to the formation of chimeric ribosomes. I propose that the nucleus evolved when the host cell compartmentalised its ribosome factories and the tightly linked genome to reduce ribosome chimerism. This was achieved in successive stages by first evolving karyopherin and RanGTP dependent chaperoning of RPs, followed by the evolution of a membrane network to serve as a diffusion barrier, and finally a hydrogel sieve to ensure selective permeability at nuclear pores. Computer simulations show that a gradual segregation of cytoplasm and nucleoplasm via these steps can progressively reduce ribosome chimerism. Conclusion Ribosome chimerism can provide a direct link between the selective forces for and the mechanisms of evolving nuclear transport and compartmentalisation. The detailed molecular scenario presented here provides a solution to the gradual evolution of nuclear compartmentalization from an anuclear stage. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Eugene V Koonin, Martijn Huynen, Anthony M. Poole and Patrick Forterre.

  1. Proactive monitoring of a wind turbine array with lidar measurements, SCADA data and a data-driven RANS solver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iungo, G.; Said, E. A.; Santhanagopalan, V.; Zhan, L.

    2016-12-01

    Power production of a wind farm and durability of wind turbines are strongly dependent on non-linear wake interactions occurring within a turbine array. Wake dynamics are highly affected by the specific site conditions, such as topography and local atmospheric conditions. Furthermore, contingencies through the life of a wind farm, such as turbine ageing and off-design operations, make prediction of wake interactions and power performance a great challenge in wind energy. In this work, operations of an onshore wind turbine array were monitored through lidar measurements, SCADA and met-tower data. The atmospheric wind field investing the wind farm was estimated by using synergistically the available data through five different methods, which are characterized by different confidence levels. By combining SCADA data and the lidar measurements, it was possible to estimate power losses connected with wake interactions. For this specific array, power losses were estimated to be 4% and 2% of the total power production for stable and convective atmospheric regimes, respectively. The entire dataset was then leveraged for the calibration of a data-driven RANS (DDRANS) solver for prediction of wind turbine wakes and power production. The DDRANS is based on a parabolic formulation of the Navier-Stokes equations with axisymmetry and boundary layer approximations, which allow achieving very low computational costs. Accuracy in prediction of wind turbine wakes and power production is achieved through an optimal tuning of the turbulence closure model. The latter is based on a mixing length model, which was developed based on previous wind turbine wake studies carried out through large eddy simulations and wind tunnel experiments. Several operative conditions of the wind farm under examination were reproduced through DDRANS for different stability regimes, wind directions and wind velocity. The results show that DDRANS is capable of achieving a good level of accuracy in prediction

  2. Analysis of multiuser mixed RF/FSO relay networks for performance improvements in Cloud Computing-Based Radio Access Networks (CC-RANs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimi, Isiaka A.; Monteiro, Paulo P.; Teixeira, António L.

    2017-11-01

    The key paths toward the fifth generation (5G) network requirements are towards centralized processing and small-cell densification systems that are implemented on the cloud computing-based radio access networks (CC-RANs). The increasing recognitions of the CC-RANs can be attributed to their valuable features regarding system performance optimization and cost-effectiveness. Nevertheless, realization of the stringent requirements of the fronthaul that connects the network elements is highly demanding. In this paper, considering the small-cell network architectures, we present multiuser mixed radio-frequency/free-space optical (RF/FSO) relay networks as feasible technologies for the alleviation of the stringent requirements in the CC-RANs. In this study, we use the end-to-end (e2e) outage probability, average symbol error probability (ASEP), and ergodic channel capacity as the performance metrics in our analysis. Simulation results show the suitability of deployment of mixed RF/FSO schemes in the real-life scenarios.

  3. Numerical investigation of the vortex-induced vibration of an elastically mounted circular cylinder at high Reynolds number (Re = 104 and low mass ratio using the RANS code.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niaz Bahadur Khan

    Full Text Available This study numerically investigates the vortex-induced vibration (VIV of an elastically mounted rigid cylinder by using Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS equations with computational fluid dynamic (CFD tools. CFD analysis is performed for a fixed-cylinder case with Reynolds number (Re = 104 and for a cylinder that is free to oscillate in the transverse direction and possesses a low mass-damping ratio and Re = 104. Previously, similar studies have been performed with 3-dimensional and comparatively expensive turbulent models. In the current study, the capability and accuracy of the RANS model are validated, and the results of this model are compared with those of detached eddy simulation, direct numerical simulation, and large eddy simulation models. All three response branches and the maximum amplitude are well captured. The 2-dimensional case with the RANS shear-stress transport k-w model, which involves minimal computational cost, is reliable and appropriate for analyzing the characteristics of VIV.

  4. The small GTPase Rab5 homologue Ypt5 regulates cell morphology, sexual development, ion-stress response and vacuolar formation in fission yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukamoto, Yuta; Katayama, Chisako [Graduate School of Science, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Shinohara, Miki; Shinohara, Akira [Institute for Protein Research, Osaka University, 3-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Maekawa, Shohei [Graduate School of Science, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Miyamoto, Masaaki, E-mail: miya@kobe-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Center for Supports to Research and Education Activities, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan)

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •Multiple functions of Rab5 GTPase in fission yeast were found. •Roles of Rab5 in fission yeast were discussed. •Relation between Rab5 and actin cytoskeleton were discussed. -- Abstract: Inner-membrane transport is critical to cell function. Rab family GTPases play an important role in vesicle transport. In mammalian cells, Rab5 is reported to be involved in the regulation of endosome formation, phagocytosis and chromosome alignment. Here, we examined the role of the fission yeast Rab5 homologue Ypt5 using a point mutant allele. Mutant cells displayed abnormal cell morphology, mating, sporulation, endocytosis, vacuole fusion and responses to ion stress. Our data strongly suggest that fission yeast Rab5 is involved in the regulation of various types of cellular functions.

  5. AKT activation drives the nuclear localization of CSE1L and a pro-oncogenic transcriptional activation in ovarian cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenzato, Annalisa; Biolatti, Marta [Department of Oncology, University of Torino School of Medicine, Torino (Italy); Institute for Cancer Research at Candiolo, Candiolo, Torino (Italy); Delogu, Giuseppe [Department of Biomedical Sciences-Histology, University of Sassari, Sassari (Italy); Capobianco, Giampiero [Department of Surgical, Microsurgical and Medical Sciences, University of Sassari, Sassari (Italy); Farace, Cristiano [Department of Biomedical Sciences-Histology, University of Sassari, Sassari (Italy); Dessole, Salvatore; Cossu, Antonio; Tanda, Francesco [Department of Surgical, Microsurgical and Medical Sciences, University of Sassari, Sassari (Italy); Madeddu, Roberto [Department of Biomedical Sciences-Histology, University of Sassari, Sassari (Italy); National Institute of Biostructures and Biosystems, Rome (Italy); Olivero, Martina [Department of Oncology, University of Torino School of Medicine, Torino (Italy); Institute for Cancer Research at Candiolo, Candiolo, Torino (Italy); Di Renzo, Maria Flavia, E-mail: mariaflavia.direnzo@unito.it [Department of Oncology, University of Torino School of Medicine, Torino (Italy); Institute for Cancer Research at Candiolo, Candiolo, Torino (Italy)

    2013-10-15

    The human homolog of the yeast cse1 gene (CSE1L) is over-expressed in ovarian cancer. CSE1L forms complex with Ran and importin-α and has roles in nucleocytoplasmic traffic and gene expression. CSE1L accumulated in the nucleus of ovarian cancer cell lines, while it was localized also in the cytoplasm of other cancer cell lines. Nuclear localization depended on AKT, which was constitutively active in ovarian cancer cells, as the CSE1L protein translocated to the cytoplasm when AKT was inactivated. Moreover, the expression of a constitutively active AKT forced the translocation of CSE1L from the cytoplasm to the nucleus in other cancer cells. Nuclear accrual of CSE1L was associated to the nuclear accumulation of the phosphorylated Ran Binding protein 3 (RanBP3), which depended on AKT as well. Also in samples of human ovarian cancer, AKT activation was associated to nuclear accumulation of CSE1L and phosphorylation of RanBP3. Expression profiling of ovarian cancer cells after CSE1L silencing showed that CSE1L was required for the expression of genes promoting invasion and metastasis. In agreement, CSE1L silencing impaired motility and invasiveness of ovarian cancer cells. Altogether these data show that in ovarian cancer cells activated AKT by affecting RanBP3 phosphorylation determines the nuclear accumulation of CSE1L and likely the nuclear concentration of transcription factors conveying pro-oncogenic signals. - highlights: • CSE1L is a key player in nucleocytoplasmic traffic by forming complex with Ran. • AKT phosphorylates RanBP3 that regulates the nucleocytoplasmic gradient of Ran. • The activated oncogenic AKT drives the nuclear accumulation of CSE1L. • CSE1L in the nucleus up-regulates genes conveying pro-oncogenic signals. • CSE1L might contribute to tumor progression driven by the activated oncogenic AKT.

  6. The Small GTPase MoSec4 Is Involved in Vegetative Development and Pathogenicity by Regulating the Extracellular Protein Secretion in Magnaporthe oryzae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huakun Zheng

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The Rab GTPase proteins play important roles in the membrane trafficking, and consequently protein secretion and development of eukaryotic organisms. However, little is known about the function of Rab GTPases in Magnaporthe oryzae. To further explore the function of Rab GTPases, we deleted the ortholog of the yeast Sec4p protein in M. oryzae, namely MoSEC4. The Mosec4 mutant is defective in polarized growth and conidiation, and it displays decreased appressorium turgor pressure and attenuated pathogenicity. Notably, the biotrophic invasive hyphae produced in rice cells are more bulbous and compressed in the Mosec4 mutant. Further studies showed that deletion of the MoSEC4 gene resulted in decreased secretion of extracellular enzymes and mislocalization of the cytoplasmic effector PWL2-mCherry-NLS. In accordance with its role in secretion, the GFP-MoSec4 fusion protein mainly accumulates at tips of growing vegetative hyphae. Our results suggest that the MoSec4 protein plays important roles in the secretion of extracellular proteins and consequently hyphal development and pathogenicity in the rice blast fungus.

  7. Suppression of dynamin GTPase decreases α-synuclein uptake by neuronal and oligodendroglial cells: a potent therapeutic target for synucleinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konno Masatoshi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The intracellular deposition of misfolded proteins is a common neuropathological hallmark of most neurodegenerative disorders. Increasing evidence suggests that these pathogenic proteins may spread to neighboring cells and induce the propagation of neurodegeneration. Results In this study, we have demonstrated that α-synuclein (αSYN, a major constituent of intracellular inclusions in synucleinopathies, was taken up by neuronal and oligodendroglial cells in both a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Once incorporated, the extracellular αSYN was immediately assembled into high-molecular-weight oligomers and subsequently formed cytoplasmic inclusion bodies. Furthermore, αSYN uptake by neurons and cells of the oligodendroglial lineage was markedly decreased by the genetic suppression and pharmacological inhibition of the dynamin GTPases, suggesting the involvement of the endocytic pathway in this process. Conclusions Our findings shed light on the mode of αSYN uptake by neuronal and oligodendroglial cells and identify therapeutic strategies aimed at reducing the propagation of protein misfolding.

  8. Bisphenol A binds to Ras proteins and competes with guanine nucleotide exchange: implications for GTPase-selective antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöpel, Miriam; Jockers, Katharina F G; Düppe, Peter M; Autzen, Jasmin; Potheraveedu, Veena N; Ince, Semra; Yip, King Tuo; Heumann, Rolf; Herrmann, Christian; Scherkenbeck, Jürgen; Stoll, Raphael

    2013-12-12

    We show for the first time that bisphenol A (10) has the capacity to interact directly with K-Ras and that Rheb weakly binds to bisphenol A (10) and 4,4'-biphenol derivatives. We have characterized these interactions at atomic resolution suggesting that these compounds sterically interfere with the Sos-mediated nucleotide exchange in H- and K-Ras. We show that 4,4'-biphenol (5) selectively inhibits Rheb signaling and induces cell death suggesting that this compound might be a novel candidate for treatment of tuberous sclerosis-mediated tumor growth. Our results propose a new mode of action for bisphenol A (10) that advocates a reduced exposure to this compound in our environment. Our data may lay the foundation for the future design of GTPase-selective antagonists with higher affinity to benefit of the treatment of cancer because K-Ras inhibition is regarded to be a promising strategy with a potential therapeutic window for targeting Sos in Ras-driven tumors.

  9. Downregulation of cGMP phosphodiesterase induced by expression of GTPase-deficient cone transducin in mouse rod photoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raport, C J; Lem, J; Makino, C; Chen, C K; Fitch, C L; Hobson, A; Baylor, D; Simon, M I; Hurley, J B

    1994-06-01

    Photoexcitation of vertebrate retinal rod photoreceptors stimulates GTP binding to the transducin alpha subunit. Like other GTP-binding proteins, transducin restores itself to an inactive form by hydrolyzing its bound GTP. The role of GTP hydrolysis in phototransduction was investigated. A mutant form of cone transducin alpha deficient in its ability to hydrolyze bound GTP was expressed in mouse rod photoreceptors. Expression of the mutant cone transducin alpha at levels threefold to sixfold higher than endogenous rod transducin alpha led to a specific depletion of the transducin target, cGMP phosphodiesterase, and a decrease in the cGMP level. Suction electrode recordings revealed abnormally prolonged flash responses, decreased maximal response amplitudes, and a shift in the stimulus-response relation to higher flash strengths. Rods expressing high levels of GTPase-deficient cone transduction alpha have reduced levels of phosphodiesterase catalytic subunits and cGMP. These changes are associated with prolonged flash responses, reduced dark current, and decreased sensitivity to light.

  10. Commensal microbiota-induced microRNA modulates intestinal epithelial permeability through the small GTPase ARF4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, Kazuaki; Sugi, Yutaka; Narabayashi, Hikari; Kobayakawa, Tetsuro; Nakanishi, Yusuke; Tsuda, Masato; Hosono, Akira; Kaminogawa, Shuichi; Hanazawa, Shigemasa; Takahashi, Kyoko

    2017-09-15

    The intestinal tract contains many commensal bacteria that modulate various physiological host functions. Dysbiosis of commensal bacteria triggers dysfunction of the intestinal epithelial barrier, leading to the induction or aggravation of intestinal inflammation. To elucidate whether microRNA plays a role in commensal microbiome-dependent intestinal epithelial barrier regulation, we compared transcripts in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) from conventional and germ-free mice and found that commensal bacteria induced the expression of miR-21-5p in IECs. miR-21-5p increased intestinal epithelial permeability and up-regulated ADP ribosylation factor 4 (ARF4), a small GTPase, in the IEC line Caco-2. We also found that ARF4 expression was up-regulated upon suppression of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) and programmed cell death 4 (PDCD4), which are known miR-21-5p targets, by RNAi. Furthermore, ARF4 expression in epithelial cells of the large intestine was higher in conventional mice than in germ-free mice. ARF4 suppression in the IEC line increased the expression of tight junction proteins and decreased intestinal epithelial permeability. These results indicate that commensal microbiome-dependent miR-21-5p expression in IECs regulates intestinal epithelial permeability via ARF4, which may therefore represent a target for preventing or managing dysfunction of the intestinal epithelial barrier. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Cooperative assembly of proteins in the ribosomal GTPase centre demonstrated by their interactions with mutant 23S rRNAs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosendahl, G; Douthwaite, S

    1995-01-01

    -1102) and within a hairpin loop (1068-1072), where the protein probably makes nucleotide contacts. Some of these mutations also interfere with binding of the r-protein complex L10.(L12)4 to an adjacent site on the rRNA. When added together to rRNA, proteins L10.(L12)4 and L11 bind cooperatively to overcome......The ribosomal protein L11 binds to the region of 23S rRNA associated with the GTPase-dependent steps of protein synthesis. Nucleotides 1054-1107 within this region of the Escherichia coli 23S rRNA gene were mutagenized with bisulphite. Twenty point mutations (G-->A and C-->T transitions......) and numerous multiple mutations were generated. Expression of mutant 23S rRNAs in vivo shows that all the mutations detectably alter the phenotype, with effects ranging from a slight growth rate reduction to lack of viability. Temperature sensitivity is conferred by 1071G-->A and 1092C-->U substitutions...

  12. Endoplasmic reticulum-resident Rab8A GTPase is involved in phagocytosis in the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanadate, Yuki; Saito-Nakano, Yumiko; Nakada-Tsukui, Kumiko; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi

    2016-10-01

    Phagocytosis is indispensable for the pathogenesis of the intestinal protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica. Here, we showed that in E. histolytica Rab8A, which is generally involved in trafficking from the trans-Golgi network to the plasma membrane in other organisms but was previously identified in phagosomes of the amoeba in the proteomic analysis, primarily resides in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and participates in phagocytosis. We demonstrated that down-regulation of EhRab8A by small antisense RNA-mediated transcriptional gene silencing remarkably reduced adherence and phagocytosis of erythrocytes, bacteria and carboxylated latex beads. Surface biotinylation followed by SDS-PAGE analysis revealed that the surface expression of several proteins presumably involved in target recognition was reduced in the EhRab8A gene-silenced strain. Further, overexpression of wild-type EhRab8A augmented phagocytosis, whereas expression of the dominant-negative form of EhRab8A resulted in reduced phagocytosis. These results indicated that EhRab8A regulates transport of surface receptor(s) for the prey from the ER to the plasma membrane. To our knowledge, this is the first report that the ER-resident Rab GTPase is involved in phagocytosis through the regulation of trafficking of a surface receptor, supporting a premise of direct involvement of the ER in phagocytosis. © 2016 The Authors Cellular Microbiology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Endoplasmic reticulum‐resident Rab8A GTPase is involved in phagocytosis in the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanadate, Yuki; Saito‐Nakano, Yumiko; Nakada‐Tsukui, Kumiko

    2016-01-01

    Summary Phagocytosis is indispensable for the pathogenesis of the intestinal protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica. Here, we showed that in E. histolytica Rab8A, which is generally involved in trafficking from the trans‐Golgi network to the plasma membrane in other organisms but was previously identified in phagosomes of the amoeba in the proteomic analysis, primarily resides in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and participates in phagocytosis. We demonstrated that down‐regulation of EhRab8A by small antisense RNA‐mediated transcriptional gene silencing remarkably reduced adherence and phagocytosis of erythrocytes, bacteria and carboxylated latex beads. Surface biotinylation followed by SDS‐PAGE analysis revealed that the surface expression of several proteins presumably involved in target recognition was reduced in the EhRab8A gene‐silenced strain. Further, overexpression of wild‐type EhRab8A augmented phagocytosis, whereas expression of the dominant‐negative form of EhRab8A resulted in reduced phagocytosis. These results indicated that EhRab8A regulates transport of surface receptor(s) for the prey from the ER to the plasma membrane. To our knowledge, this is the first report that the ER‐resident Rab GTPase is involved in phagocytosis through the regulation of trafficking of a surface receptor, supporting a premise of direct involvement of the ER in phagocytosis. PMID:26807810

  14. Sec71 functions as a GEF for the small GTPase Arf1 to govern dendrite pruning ofDrosophilasensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Zhang, Heng; Shi, Meng; Liou, Yih-Cherng; Lu, Lei; Yu, Fengwei

    2017-05-15

    Pruning, whereby neurons eliminate their excess neurites, is central for the maturation of the nervous system. In Drosophila , sensory neurons, ddaCs, selectively prune their larval dendrites without affecting their axons during metamorphosis. However, it is unknown whether the secretory pathway plays a role in dendrite pruning. Here, we show that the small GTPase Arf1, an important regulator of the secretory pathway, is specifically required for dendrite pruning of ddaC/D/E sensory neurons but dispensable for apoptosis of ddaF neurons. Analyses of the GTP- and GDP-locked forms of Arf1 indicate that the cycling of Arf1 between GDP-bound and GTP-bound forms is essential for dendrite pruning. We further identified Sec71 as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Arf1 that preferentially interacts with its GDP-bound form. Like Arf1, Sec71 is also important for dendrite pruning, but not for apoptosis, of sensory neurons. Arf1 and Sec71 are interdependent for their localizations on Golgi. Finally, we show that the Sec71/Arf1-mediated trafficking process is a prerequisite for Rab5-dependent endocytosis to facilitate endocytosis and degradation of the cell-adhesion molecule Neuroglian (Nrg). © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  15. The atypical Rho GTPase RhoD is a regulator of actin cytoskeleton dynamics and directed cell migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blom, Magdalena; Reis, Katarina [Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institutet, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden); Heldin, Johan [Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala SE-751 22 Uppsala (Sweden); Kreuger, Johan [Department of Medical Cell Biology, Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala University, SE-751 23 Uppsala (Sweden); Aspenström, Pontus, E-mail: pontus.aspenstrom@ki.se [Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institutet, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2017-03-15

    RhoD belongs to the Rho GTPases, a protein family responsible for the regulation and organization of the actin cytoskeleton, and, consequently, many cellular processes like cell migration, cell division and vesicle trafficking. Here, we demonstrate that the actin cytoskeleton is dynamically regulated by increased or decreased protein levels of RhoD. Ectopic expression of RhoD has previously been shown to give an intertwined weave of actin filaments. We show that this RhoD-dependent effect is detected in several cell types and results in a less dynamic actin filament system. In contrast, RhoD depletion leads to increased actin filament-containing structures, such as cortical actin, stress fibers and edge ruffles. Moreover, vital cellular functions such as cell migration and proliferation are defective when RhoD is silenced. Taken together, we present data suggesting that RhoD is an important component in the control of actin dynamics and directed cell migration. - Highlights: • Increased RhoD expression leads to loss of actin structures, e.g. stress fibers and gives rise to decreased actin dynamics. • RhoD knockdown induces various actin-containing structures such as edge ruffles, stress fibers and cortical actin, in a cell-type specific manner. • RhoD induces specific actin rearrangements depending on its subcellular localization. • RhoD knockdown has effects on cellular processes, such as directed cell migration and proliferation.

  16. Genetic analysis of Chinese families reveals a novel truncation allele of the retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Hu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To make comprehensive molecular diagnosis for retinitis pigmentosa (RP patients in a consanguineous Han Chinese family using next generation sequencing based Capture-NGS screen technology. METHODS: A five-generation Han Chinese family diagnosed as non-syndromic X-linked recessive RP (XLRP was recruited, including four affected males, four obligate female carriers and eleven unaffected family members. Capture-NGS was performed using a custom designed capture panel covers 163 known retinal disease genes including 47 RP genes, followed by the validation of detected mutation using Sanger sequencing in all recruited family members. RESULTS: Capture-NGS in one affected 47-year-old male reveals a novel mutation, c.2417_2418insG:p.E806fs, in exon ORF15 of RP GTPase regulator (RPGR gene results in a frameshift change that results in a premature stop codon and a truncated protein product. The mutation was further validated in three of four affected males and two of four female carriers but not in the other unaffected family members. CONCLUSION: We have identified a novel mutation, c.2417_2418insG:p.E806fs, in a Han Chinese family with XLRP. Our findings expand the mutation spectrum of RPGR and the phenotypic spectrum of XLRP in Han Chinese families, and confirms Capture-NGS could be an effective and economic approach for the comprehensive molecular diagnosis of RP.

  17. An isoform of Arabidopsis myosin XI interacts with small GTPases in its C-terminal tail region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Kohsuke; Igarashi, Hisako; Mano, Shoji; Takenaka, Chikako; Shiina, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Masatoshi; Demura, Taku; Nishimura, Mikio; Shimmen, Teruo; Yokota, Etsuo

    2008-01-01

    Myosin XI, a class of myosins expressed in plants is believed to be responsible for cytoplasmic streaming and the translocation of organelles and vesicles. To gain further insight into the translocation of organelles and vesicles by myosin XI, an isoform of Arabidopsis myosin XI, MYA2, was chosen and its role in peroxisome targeting was examined. Using the yeast two-hybrid screening method, two small GTPases, AtRabD1 and AtRabC2a, were identified as factors that interact with the C-terminal tail region of MYA2. Both recombinant AtRabs tagged with His bound to the recombinant C-terminal tail region of MYA2 tagged with GST in a GTP-dependent manner. Furthermore, AtRabC2a was localized on peroxisomes, when its CFP-tagged form was expressed transiently in protoplasts prepared from Arabidopsis leaf tissue. It is suggested that MYA2 targets the peroxisome through an interaction with AtRabC2a. PMID:18703495

  18. The interaction of RNA helicase DDX3 with HIV-1 Rev-CRM1-RanGTP complex during the HIV replication cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahboobi, Seyed Hanif; Javanpour, Alex A; Mofrad, Mohammad R K

    2015-01-01

    Molecular traffic between the nucleus and the cytoplasm is regulated by the nuclear pore complex (NPC), which acts as a highly selective channel perforating the nuclear envelope in eukaryotic cells. The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) exploits the nucleocytoplasmic pathway to export its RNA transcripts across the NPC to the cytoplasm. Despite extensive study on the HIV life cycle and the many drugs developed to target this cycle, no current drugs have been successful in targeting the critical process of viral nuclear export, even though HIV's reliance on a single host protein, CRM1, to export its unspliced and partially spliced RNA transcripts makes it a tempting target. Due to recent findings implicating a DEAD-box helicase, DDX3, in HIV replication and a member of the export complex, it has become an appealing target for anti-HIV drug inhibition. In the present research, we have applied a hybrid computational protocol to analyze protein-protein interactions in the HIV mRNA export cycle. This method is based on molecular docking followed by molecular dynamics simulation and accompanied by approximate free energy calculation (MM/GBSA), computational alanine scanning, clustering, and evolutionary analysis. We highlight here some of the most likely binding modes and interfacial residues between DDX3 and CRM1 both in the absence and presence of RanGTP. This work shows that although DDX3 can bind to free CRM1, addition of RanGTP leads to more concentrated distribution of binding modes and stronger binding between CRM1 and RanGTP.

  19. Prediction of dosage-based parameters from the puff dispersion of airborne materials in urban environments using the CFD-RANS methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efthimiou, G. C.; Andronopoulos, S.; Bartzis, J. G.

    2018-02-01

    One of the key issues of recent research on the dispersion inside complex urban environments is the ability to predict dosage-based parameters from the puff release of an airborne material from a point source in the atmospheric boundary layer inside the built-up area. The present work addresses the question of whether the computational fluid dynamics (CFD)-Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) methodology can be used to predict ensemble-average dosage-based parameters that are related with the puff dispersion. RANS simulations with the ADREA-HF code were, therefore, performed, where a single puff was released in each case. The present method is validated against the data sets from two wind-tunnel experiments. In each experiment, more than 200 puffs were released from which ensemble-averaged dosage-based parameters were calculated and compared to the model's predictions. The performance of the model was evaluated using scatter plots and three validation metrics: fractional bias, normalized mean square error, and factor of two. The model presented a better performance for the temporal parameters (i.e., ensemble-average times of puff arrival, peak, leaving, duration, ascent, and descent) than for the ensemble-average dosage and peak concentration. The majority of the obtained values of validation metrics were inside established acceptance limits. Based on the obtained model performance indices, the CFD-RANS methodology as implemented in the code ADREA-HF is able to predict the ensemble-average temporal quantities related to transient emissions of airborne material in urban areas within the range of the model performance acceptance criteria established in the literature. The CFD-RANS methodology as implemented in the code ADREA-HF is also able to predict the ensemble-average dosage, but the dosage results should be treated with some caution; as in one case, the observed ensemble-average dosage was under-estimated slightly more than the acceptance criteria. Ensemble

  20. Prediction of dosage-based parameters from the puff dispersion of airborne materials in urban environments using the CFD-RANS methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efthimiou, G. C.; Andronopoulos, S.; Bartzis, J. G.

    2017-02-01

    One of the key issues of recent research on the dispersion inside complex urban environments is the ability to predict dosage-based parameters from the puff release of an airborne material from a point source in the atmospheric boundary layer inside the built-up area. The present work addresses the question of whether the computational fluid dynamics (CFD)-Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) methodology can be used to predict ensemble-average dosage-based parameters that are related with the puff dispersion. RANS simulations with the ADREA-HF code were, therefore, performed, where a single puff was released in each case. The present method is validated against the data sets from two wind-tunnel experiments. In each experiment, more than 200 puffs were released from which ensemble-averaged dosage-based parameters were calculated and compared to the model's predictions. The performance of the model was evaluated using scatter plots and three validation metrics: fractional bias, normalized mean square error, and factor of two. The model presented a better performance for the temporal parameters (i.e., ensemble-average times of puff arrival, peak, leaving, duration, ascent, and descent) than for the ensemble-average dosage and peak concentration. The majority of the obtained values of validation metrics were inside established acceptance limits. Based on the obtained model performance indices, the CFD-RANS methodology as implemented in the code ADREA-HF is able to predict the ensemble-average temporal quantities related to transient emissions of airborne material in urban areas within the range of the model performance acceptance criteria established in the literature. The CFD-RANS methodology as implemented in the code ADREA-HF is also able to predict the ensemble-average dosage, but the dosage results should be treated with some caution; as in one case, the observed ensemble-average dosage was under-estimated slightly more than the acceptance criteria. Ensemble

  1. Inhibition of Rac GTPases in the Therapy of Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    information The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report are those of the author(s) and should not be construed as an official...Franitza, S., Grabovsky, V., Slav, M. M., Nagler, A., Lider , O., Alon, R., Zipori, D., and Lapidot, T. (2000). The chemokine SDF-1 activates the integrins...3296. Peled, A., Petit, I., Kollet, O.,Magid,M., Ponomaryov, T., Byk, T., Nagler, A., Ben-Hur, H., Many, A., Shultz, L., Lider , O., Alon, R., et al

  2. Molecular characterization and expression analysis of the small GTPase ROP members expressed in laticifers of the rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yunxia; Huang, Yacheng; Fang, Yongjun; Qi, Jiyan; Tang, Chaorong

    2014-01-01

    ROP (Rho of plants) proteins are plant-specific Rho-type small GTPases which play important roles in cellular processes and stress responses. This study explores the characteristics and possible functions of ROPs that are expressed primarily in laticifers of the rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis). The work serves as a preliminary step to determining their involvement in latex flow and regeneration, laticifers formation and tapping panel dryness (TPD, a physiological disorder in rubber trees that result in the stoppage of latex flow). In this connection, we (i) identified five HbROPs (HbROP1-HbROP5) by searching latex transcripts database and the genome databases, (ii) characterized molecular and phylogenic aspects of the HbROPs and examined the cis-regulatory elements in their promoter regions; (iii) analyzed by Real-time Quantitative PCR (QPCR) the tissue specificity of the HbROPs and their expression patterns in response to tapping, bark wounding and growth regulator treatments. All five HbROP genes were strongly expressed in the latex, with HbROP1, 3, 4 and 5 showing the highest expression among the six Hevea tissues examined, viz. latex, bud, mature leaf, bark, male flower and seed. When tapping was initiated on previously untapped trees, HbROP3 transcription was substantially down-regulated whereas HbROP5 expression was markedly up-regulated. Transcripts of HbROP3 rose gradually with the development of TPD. Except for the cytokinin 6-benzyl aminopurine that induced a rise in HbROP5 transcripts by more than 2-fold, the other growth regulators tested had little effect on HbROPs expression. The roles of HbROPs in rubber tree are discussed in relation to the diverse functions of ROP homologs reported in other plant species. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Ras-like family small GTPases genes in Nilaparvata lugens: Identification, phylogenetic analysis, gene expression and function in nymphal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weixia; Li, Kailong; Wan, Pinjun; Lai, Fengxiang; Fu, Qiang; Zhu, Tingheng

    2017-01-01

    Twenty-nine cDNAs encoding Ras-like family small GTPases (RSGs) were cloned and sequenced from Nilaparvata lugens. Twenty-eight proteins are described here: 3 from Rho, 2 from Ras, 9 from Arf and 14 from Rabs. These RSGs from N.lugens have five conserved G-loop motifs and displayed a higher degree of sequence conservation with orthologues from insects. RT-qPCR analysis revealed NlRSGs expressed at all life stages and the highest expression was observed in hemolymph, gut or wing for most of NlRSGs. RNAi demonstrated that eighteen NlRSGs play a crucial role in nymphal development. Nymphs with silenced NlRSGs failed to molt, eclosion or development arrest. The qRT-PCR analysis verified the correlation between mortality and the down-regulation of the target genes. The expression level of nuclear receptors, Kr-h1, Hr3, FTZ-F1 and E93 involved in 20E and JH signal pathway was impacted in nymphs with silenced twelve NlRSGs individually. The expression of two halloween genes, Cyp314a1 and Cyp315a1 involved in ecdysone synthesis, decreased in nymphs with silenced NlSar1 or NlArf1. Cyp307a1 increased in nymphs with silenced NlArf6. In N.lugens with silenced NlSRβ, NlSar1 and NlRab2 at 9th day individually, 0.0% eclosion rate and almost 100.0% mortality was demonstrated. Further analysis showed NlSRβ could be served as a candidate target for dsRNA-based pesticides for N.lugens control.

  4. mTOR direct interactions with Rheb-GTPase and raptor: sub-cellular localization using fluorescence lifetime imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadav Rahul B

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR signalling pathway has a key role in cellular regulation and several diseases. While it is thought that Rheb GTPase regulates mTOR, acting immediately upstream, while raptor is immediately downstream of mTOR, direct interactions have yet to be verified in living cells, furthermore the localisation of Rheb has been reported to have only a cytoplasmic cellular localization. Results In this study a cytoplasmic as well as a significant sub-cellular nuclear mTOR localization was shown , utilizing green and red fluorescent protein (GFP and DsRed fusion and highly sensitive single photon counting fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM of live cells. The interaction of the mTORC1 components Rheb, mTOR and raptor, tagged with EGFP/DsRed was determined using fluorescence energy transfer-FLIM. The excited-state lifetime of EGFP-mTOR of ~2400 ps was reduced by energy transfer to ~2200 ps in the cytoplasm and to 2000 ps in the nucleus when co-expressed with DsRed-Rheb, similar results being obtained for co-expressed EGFP-mTOR and DsRed-raptor. The localization and distribution of mTOR was modified by amino acid withdrawal and re-addition but not by rapamycin. Conclusions The results illustrate the power of GFP-technology combined with FRET-FLIM imaging in the study of the interaction of signalling components in living cells, here providing evidence for a direct physical interaction between mTOR and Rheb and between mTOR and raptor in living cells for the first time.

  5. Palmitoylation of the ciliary GTPase ARL13b is necessary for its stability and its role in cilia formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Kasturi; Jerman, Stephanie; Jozsef, Levente; McNamara, Thomas; Onyekaba, Ginikanwa; Sun, Zhaoxia; Marin, Ethan P

    2017-10-27

    Primary cilia are hairlike extensions of the plasma membrane of most mammalian cells that serve specialized signaling functions. To traffic properly to cilia, multiple cilia proteins rely on palmitoylation, the post-translational attachment of a saturated 16-carbon lipid. However, details regarding the mechanism of how palmitoylation affects cilia protein localization and function are unknown. Herein, we investigated the protein ADP-ribosylation factor-like GTPase 13b (ARL13b) as a model palmitoylated ciliary protein. Using biochemical, cellular, and in vivo studies, we found that ARL13b palmitoylation occurs in vivo in mouse kidneys and that it is required for trafficking to and function within cilia. Myristoylation, a 14-carbon lipid, is shown to largely substitute for palmitoylation with regard to cilia localization of ARL13b, but not with regard to its function within cilia. The functional importance of palmitoylation results in part from a dramatic increase in ARL13b stability, which is not observed with myristoylation. Additional results show that blockade of depalmitoylation slows the degradation of ARL13b that occurs during cilia resorption, raising the possibility that the sensitivity of ARL13b stability to palmitoylation may be exploited by the cell to accelerate degradation of ARL13b by depalmitoylating it. Together, the results show that palmitoylation plays a unique and critical role in controlling the localization, stability, abundance, and thus function of ARL13b. Pharmacological manipulation of protein palmitoylation may be a strategy to alter cilia function. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. Klebsiella pneumoniae Translocates across the Intestinal Epithelium via Rho GTPase- and Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase/Akt-Dependent Cell Invasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chun-Ru; Pan, Yi-Jiun; Liu, Ju-Yun; Chen, Chun-Tang; Lin, Tzu-Lung

    2014-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is an important pathogen that causes hospital-acquired septicemia and is associated with the recent emergence of community-acquired pyogenic liver abscess (PLA). Clinical typing suggests that K. pneumoniae infections originate from the gastrointestinal reservoir. However, the underlying mechanism remains unknown. Here, we have sought to determine how K. pneumoniae penetrates the intestinal barrier. We identified that bacteremia and PLA clinical isolates adhered to and invaded intestinal epithelial cells. Internalization of K. pneumoniae in three different human colonic cell lines was visualized by confocal microscopy and three-dimensional (3D) imaging. Using a Transwell system, we demonstrated that these K. pneumoniae isolates translocated across a polarized Caco-2 monolayer. No disruptions of transepithelial electrical resistance and altered distribution of tight junction protein ZO-1 or occludin were observed. Therefore, K. pneumoniae appeared to penetrate the intestinal epithelium via a transcellular pathway. Using specific inhibitors, we characterized the host signaling pathways involved. Inhibition by cytochalasin D and nocodazole suggested that actin and microtubule cytoskeleton were both important for K. pneumoniae invasion. A Rho inhibitor, ML141, LY294002, and an Akt1/2 inhibitor diminished K. pneumoniae invasion in a dose-dependent manner, indicating that Rho family GTPases and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling were required. By a mouse model of gastrointestinal colonization, in vivo invasion of K. pneumoniae into colonic epithelial cells was demonstrated. Our results present evidence to describe a possible mechanism of gastrointestinal translocation for K. pneumoniae. Cell invasion by manipulating host machinery provides a pathway for gut-colonized K. pneumoniae cells to penetrate the intestinal barrier and access extraintestinal locations to cause disease. PMID:25452552

  7. Responses of three very large inducible GTPases to bacterial and white spot syndrome virus challenges in the giant fresh water prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ying; Jin, Min; Yin, Shaowu; Ding, Zhengfeng; Wang, Wen; Ren, Qian

    2016-04-01

    Interferons (IFNs) are cytokines secreted by cells in response to invasion by pathogens, such as viruses, bacteria, parasites, or tumor cells. Very large inducible GTPases (VLIG) are the latest IFN-inducible GTPase family to be discovered and are the largest known GTPases of any species. However, VLIG proteins from invertebrates have yet to be characterized. In this study, three forms of VLIGs designated as MrVLIG1, MrVLIG2, and MrVLIG3 were cloned from the giant fresh water prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii. MrVLIG1 has a 5445 bp open reading frame (ORF) encoding an 1814-amino acid protein. The complete nucleotide sequence of MrVLIG2 cDNA is 7055 bp long consisting of a 5757 bp ORF encoding a protein with 1918 amino acids. The full length of the MrVLIG3 gene consists of 5511 bp with a 3909 bp ORF encoding a peptide with 1302 amino acids. BLASTP and phylogenetic tree analyses showed that the three MrVLIGs are clustered into one subgroup and, together with other vertebrate VLIGs, into a branch. Tissue distribution analysis indicated that the mRNAs of the three MrVLIGs were widely expressed in almost all detected tissues, including the hemocytes, heart, hepatopancreas, gills, stomach, and intestine, with the highest expression in the hepatopancreas. They were also detected in the intestine but with relatively low expression levels. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR analysis showed that the mRNA transcripts of the MrVLIGs in the hepatopancreas were significantly expressed at various time points after infection with Vibrio parahaemolyticus and white spot syndrome virus. In summary, the three isoforms of VLIG genes participate in the innate immune response of the shrimps to bacterial and viral infections. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Rho GTPases and regulation of cell migration and polarization in human corneal epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aihua Hou

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Epithelial cell migration is required for regeneration of tissues and can be defective in a number of ocular surface diseases. This study aimed to determine the expression pattern of Rho family small G-proteins in human corneal epithelial cells to test their requirement in directional cell migration. METHODS: Rho family small G-protein expression was assessed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Dominant-inhibitory constructs encoding Rho proteins or Rho protein targeting small interfering RNA were transfected into human corneal epithelial large T antigen cells, and wound closure rate were evaluated by scratch wounding assay, and a complementary non-traumatic cell migration assay. Immunofluorescence staining was performed to study cell polarization and to assess Cdc42 downstream effector. RESULTS: Cdc42, Chp, Rac1, RhoA, TC10 and TCL were expressed in human corneal epithelial cells. Among them, Cdc42 and TCL were found to significantly affect cell migration in monolayer scratch assays. These results were confirmed through the use of validated siRNAs directed to Cdc42 and TCL. Scramble siRNA transfected cells had high percentage of polarized cells than Cdc42 or TCL siRNA transfected cells at the wound edge. We showed that the Cdc42-specific effector p21-activated kinase 4 localized predominantly to cell-cell junctions in cell monolayers, but failed to translocate to the leading edge in Cdc42 siRNA transfected cells after monolayer wounding. CONCLUSION: Rho proteins expressed in cultured human corneal epithelial cells, and Cdc42, TCL facilitate two-dimensional cell migration in-vitro. Although silencing of Cdc42 and TCL did not noticeably affect the appearance of cell adhesions at the leading edge, the slower migration of these cells indicates both GTP-binding proteins play important roles in promoting cell movement of human corneal epithelial cells.

  9. Serine34 phosphorylation of RHO guanine dissociation inhibitor (RHOGDI{alpha}) links signaling from conventional protein kinase C to RHO GTPase in cell adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dovas, Athanassios; Choi, Youngsil; Yoneda, Atsuko

    2010-01-01

    Protein kinase Calpha (PKCalpha) is an essential serine/threonine kinase regulating many signaling networks. At cell adhesion sites, PKCalpha can impact the actin cytoskeleton through its influence on RhoGTPases but the intermediate steps are not well known. One important regulator of Rho....... Phosphospecific antibodies reveal endogenous phosphorylation in several cell types that is sensitive to adhesion events triggered, for example, by hepatocyte growth factor. Phosphorylation is also sensitive to PKC inhibition. Together with FRET microscopy sensing GTP-RhoA levels, the data reveal a common pathway...... in cell adhesion linking two essential mediators, PKCalpha and RhoA....

  10. The guanine exchange factor Gartenzwerg and the small GTPase Arl1 function in the same pathway with Arfaptin during synapse growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leo Chang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The generation of neuronal morphology requires transport vesicles originating from the Golgi apparatus (GA to deliver specialized components to the axon and dendrites. Drosophila Arfaptin is a membrane-binding protein localized to the GA that is required for the growth of the presynaptic nerve terminal. Here we provide biochemical, cellular and genetic evidence that the small GTPase Arl1 and the guanine-nucleotide exchange factor (GEF Gartenzwerg are required for Arfaptin function at the Golgi during synapse growth. Our data define a new signaling pathway composed of Arfaptin, Arl1, and Garz, required for the generation of normal synapse morphology.