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Sample records for ramp rate effects

  1. On the Effect of Ramp Rate in Damage Accumulation of the CPV Die-Attach: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosco, N. S.; Silverman, T. J.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2012-06-01

    It is commonly understood that thermal cycling at high temperature ramp rates may activate unrepresentative failure mechanisms. Increasing the temperature ramp rate of thermal cycling, however, could dramatically reduce the test time required to achieve an equivalent amount of thermal fatigue damage, thereby reducing overall test time. Therefore, the effect of temperature ramp rate on physical damage in the CPV die-attach is investigated. Finite Element Model (FEM) simulations of thermal fatigue and thermal cycling experiments are made to determine if the amount of damage calculated results in a corresponding amount of physical damage measured to the die-attach for a variety of fast temperature ramp rates. Preliminary experimental results are in good agreement with simulations and reinforce the potential of increasing temperature ramp rates. Characterization of the microstructure and resulting fatigue crack in the die-attach suggest a similar failure mechanism across all ramp rates tested.

  2. A Cost-Effective Power Ramp-Rate Control Strategy for Single-Phase Two-Stage Grid-Connected Photovoltaic Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sangwongwanich, Ariya; Yang, Yongheng; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2016-01-01

    In the case of a wide-scale adoption of grid-connected Photovoltaic (PV) systems, more fluctuated power will be injected into the grid due to the intermittency of solar PV energy. A sudden change in the PV power can potentially induce grid voltage fluctuations, and thus challenge the stability...... of the grid. Hence, this sudden active power change resulting in a large power ramp-rate should be avoided in practice. In fact, some grid regulations also released strict rules on active power ramp-rates for PV systems. This paper proposes a cost-effective control strategy to limit the power ramp......-rate for two-stage grid-connected PV systems. The main concept of the proposed scheme is to modify the maximum power point tracking algorithm in such a way to regulate the PV power at the left side of the maximum power point curve. As a consequence, the power ramp-rate can be controlled according to the set...

  3. The effects of RAMPs upon cell signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Routledge, Sarah J; Ladds, Graham; Poyner, David R

    2017-07-05

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) play a vital role in signal transduction. It is now clear that numerous other molecules within the cell and at the cell surface interact with GPCRs to modulate their signalling properties. Receptor activity modifying proteins (RAMPs) are a group of single transmembrane domain proteins which have been predominantly demonstrated to interact with Family B GPCRs, but interactions with Family A and C receptors have recently begun to emerge. These interactions can influence cell surface expression, ligand binding preferences and G protein-coupling, thus modulating GPCR signal transduction. There is still a great deal of research to be conducted into the effects of RAMPs on GPCR signalling; their effects upon Family B GPCRs are still not fully documented, in addition to their potential interactions with Family A and C GPCRs. New interactions could have a significant impact on the development of therapeutics. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Mathematical formulation to predict the harmonics of the superconducting Large Hadron Collider magnets: III. Precycle ramp rate effects and magnet characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Sammut

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The Large Hadron Collider (LHC at CERN is equipped with a feed-forward control system known as the field description for the LHC (FiDeL which is designed to predict the magnetic field and its multipoles, hence reducing the burden on beam based feedback. FiDeL consists of a physical and empirical parametric field model based on magnetic measurements at warm and in cryogenic conditions. It is particularly critical during beam injection when the field decays and at the beginning of acceleration when the field snaps back. It is known that the decay amplitude is largely affected by the powering history of the magnet, particularly by the precycle flattop current and duration and the preinjection preparation duration. Recently, we have collected data that quantify the dependence of the decay amplitude on the precycle ramp rate. This paper presents the results of the measurements performed to investigate this effect, and the method included in FiDeL to model the precycle dependence. With this complete picture of dynamic changes, we finally discuss the effect on the data taken at nominally constant field, along the magnet loadline. We show that a correction for dynamic changes is required for adequate magnet characterization.

  5. Mathematical formulation to predict the harmonics of the superconducting Large Hadron Collider magnets; 3, Precycle ramp rate effects and magnet characterization

    CERN Document Server

    Sammut, Nicholas; Deferne, Guy; Venturini Delsolaro, Walter

    2009-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN is equipped with a feed-forward control system known as the field description for the LHC (FiDeL) which is designed to predict the magnetic field and its multipoles, hence reducing the burden on beam based feedback. FiDeL consists of a physical and empirical parametric field model based on magnetic measurements at warm and in cryogenic conditions. It is particularly critical during beam injection when the field decays and at the beginning of acceleration when the field snaps back. It is known that the decay amplitude is largely affected by the powering history of the magnet, particularly by the precycle flattop current and duration and the preinjection preparation duration. Recently, we have collected data that quantify the dependence of the decay amplitude on the precycle ramp rate. This paper presents the results of the measurements performed to investigate this effect, and the method included in FiDeL to model the precycle dependence. With this complete picture of dy...

  6. Ramp rate induced quenches in the one-metre dipole model magnets for the CERN LHC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verweij, A.P.; Verweij, A.P.; ten Kate, Herman H.J.; Leroy, D.; Oberli, L.; Siemko, A.

    1995-01-01

    During the investigation of 1 m model dipoles for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) a considerable number of quenches are performed at high ramp rate. In this paper the results are presented of these quenches which are made both at 1.7-2.1 K and at 4.3 K for ramp rates varying between 10 As/sup -1/

  7. Effectiveness of a multidisciplinary risk assessment and management programme-diabetes mellitus (RAMP-DM) on patient-reported outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Eric Yuk Fai; Fung, Colman Siu Cheung; Wong, Carlos King Ho; Choi, Edmond Pui Hang; Jiao, Fang Fang; Chan, Anca Ka Chun; Chan, Karina Hiu Yen; Lam, Cindy Lo Kuen

    2017-02-01

    Little is known about how the patient-reported outcomes is influenced by multidisciplinary-risk-assessment-and-management-programme for patients with diabetes mellitus (RAMP-DM). This paper aims to evaluate the effectiveness of RAMP-DM on patient-reported outcomes. This was a prospective longitudinal study on 1039 diabetes mellitus patients (714/325 RAMP-DM/non-RAMP-DM) managed in primary care setting. 536 and 402 RAMP-DM participants, and 237 and 187 non-RAMP-DM participants were followed up at 12 and 24 months with completed survey, respectively. Patient-reported outcomes included health-related quality of life, change in global health condition and patient enablement measured by Short Form-12 Health Survey version-2 (SF-12v2), Global Rating Scale, Patient Enablement Instrument respectively. The effects of RAMP-DM on patient-reported outcomes were evaluated by mixed effect models. Subgroup analysis was performed by stratifying haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) (optimal HbA1c DM with suboptimal HbA1c was associated with greater improvement in SF-12v2 physical component summary score at 12-month (coefficient:3.80; P-value DM participants. However, there was no significant difference in patient-reported outcomes between RAMP-DM and non-RAMP-DM participants with optimal HbA1c. Participation in RAMP-DM is effective in improving physical component of HRQOL, Global Rating Scale and patient enablement among diabetes mellitus patients with suboptimal HbA1c, but not in those with optimal HbA1c. Patients with sub-optimal diabetes mellitus control should be the priority target population for RAMP-DM. This observational study design may have potential bias in the characteristics between groups, and randomized clinical trial is needed to confirm the results.

  8. Effect of ramp-cavity on hydrogen fueled scramjet combustor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.V.S. Moorthy

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Sustained combustion and optimization of combustor are the two challenges being faced by combustion scientists working in the area of supersonic combustion. Thorough mixing, lower stagnation pressure losses, positive thrust and sustained combustion are the key issues in the field of supersonic combustion. Special fluid mechanism is required to achieve good mixing. To induce such mechanisms in supersonic inflows, the fuel injectors should be critically shaped incurring less flow losses. Present investigations are focused on the effect of fuel injection scheme on a model scramjet combustor performance. Ramps at supersonic flow generate axial vortices that help in macro-mixing of fuel with air. Interaction of shocks generated by ramps with the fuel stream generates boro-clinic torque at the air & liquid fuel interface, enhancing micro-mixing. Recirculation zones present in cavities increase the residence time of the combustible mixture. Making use of the advantageous features of both, a ramp-cavity combustor is designed. The combustor has two sections. First, constant height section consists of a backward facing step followed by ramps and cavities on both the top and bottom walls. The ramps are located alternately on top and bottom walls. The complete combustor width is utilized for the cavities. The second section of the combustor is diverging area section. This is provided to avoid thermal choking. In the present work gaseous hydrogen is considered as fuel. This study was mainly focused on the mixing characteristics of four different fuel injection locations. It was found that injecting fuel upstream of the ramp was beneficial from fuel spread point of view.

  9. Assessing the effectiveness of ramp-up during sonar operations using exposure models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benda-Beckmann, A.M. von; Wensveen, P.J.; Kvadsheim, P.H.; Lam, F.P.A.; Miller, P.J.O.; Tyack, P.L.; Ainslie, M.A.

    2016-01-01

    Ramp-up procedures are used to mitigate the impact of sound on marine mammals. Sound exposure models combined with observations of marine mammals responding to sound can be used to assess the effectiveness of ramp-up procedures. We found that ramp-up procedures before full-level sonar operations can

  10. Heart Rate Variability as a Measure of Airport Ramp-Traffic Controllers Workload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Miwa; Dulchinos, Victoria Lee

    2016-01-01

    Heart Rate Variability (HRV) has been reported to reflect the person's cognitive and emotional stress levels, and may offer an objective measure of human-operator's workload levels, which are recorded continuously and unobtrusively to the task performance. The present paper compares the HRV data collected during a human-in-the-loop simulation of airport ramp-traffic control operations with the controller participants' own verbal self-reporting ratings of their workload.

  11. Effects of On- and Off-Ramps in Cellular Automata Models for Traffic Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diedrich, G.; Santen, L.; Schadschneider, A.; Zittartz, J.

    We present results on the modeling of on- and off-ramps in cellular automata for traffic flow, especially the Nagel-Schreckenberg model. We study two different types of on-ramps that cause qualitatively the same effects. In a certain density regime ρlowjammed states exist. This phase separation is the reason for the plateau formation and implies a behavior analogous to that of stationary defects. This analogy allows to perform very fast simulations of complex traffic networks with a large number of on- and off-ramps because one can parametrise on-ramps in an exceedingly easy way.

  12. Assessing the effectiveness of ramp-up during sonar operations using exposure models – a killer whale case study. (abstract)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benda-Beckmann, A.M. von; Wensveen, P.J.; Kvadsheim, P.H.; Lam, F.P.A.; Miller, P.J.O.; Tyack, P.L.; Ainslie, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Ramp-up (or soft-start) procedures are commonly used to mitigate the impact of sound on marine mammals. Although this procedure is often adopted as a common-sense approach, studies that quantify the effectiveness of ramp-up are currently lacking. The effectiveness of ramp-up is investigated by

  13. The Effects of Using a Ramp and Elevator to Load and Unload Trailers on the Behavior and Physiology of Piglets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John McGlone

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Transport is an inevitable process in the modern U.S. swine industry. The loading process is a novel and potentially stressful experience. This study uses behavior, heart rate and leukocyte counts to compare stress one hour before, during and after loading via ramp or elevator. Piglets were held in a home pen (control (CON, walked up and down an aisle (handled (HAN, or walked to a truck and loaded via elevator (ELE or ramp (RAM. Sitting, feeding and blood parameters did not show a significant treatment by time effect (p > 0.05. Standing behavior did not differ between CON and HAN piglets nor between RAM and ELE piglets (p > 0.05; however, CON and HAN piglets stood more than RAM and ELE piglets during treatment (p < 0.05. After treatment, drinking behavior was increased in RAM piglets (p < 0.05. The heart rate of ELE piglets decreased 6.3% after treatment; whereas the heart rate of RAM piglets remained elevated 2.4% (p < 0.05. In terms of heart rate, loading by elevator appears to be less stressful than loading by ramp.

  14. Energy Storage Requirements for PV Power Ramp Rate Control in Northern Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julius Schnabel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Photovoltaic (PV generators suffer from fluctuating output power due to the highly fluctuating primary energy source. With significant PV penetration, these fluctuations can lead to power system instability and power quality problems. The use of energy storage systems as fluctuation compensators has been proposed as means to mitigate these problems. In this paper, the behavior of PV power fluctuations in Northern European climatic conditions and requirements for sizing the energy storage systems to compensate them have been investigated and compared to similar studies done in Southern European climate. These investigations have been performed through simulations that utilize measurements from the Tampere University of Technology solar PV power station research plant in Finland. An enhanced energy storage charging control strategy has been developed and tested. Energy storage capacity, power, and cycling requirements have been derived for different PV generator sizes and power ramp rate requirements. The developed control strategy leads to lesser performance requirements for the energy storage systems compared to the methods presented earlier. Further, some differences on the operation of PV generators in Northern and Southern European climates have been detected.

  15. Fuel-disruption experiments under high-ramp-rate heating conditions. [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, S.A.; Worledge, D.H.; Cano, G.L.; Mast, P.K.; Briscoe, F.

    1983-10-01

    This topical report presents the preliminary results and analysis of the High Ramp Rate fuel-disruption experiment series. These experiments were performed in the Annular Core Research Reactor at Sandia National Laboratories to investigate the timing and mode of fuel disruption during the prompt-burst phase of a loss-of-flow accident. High-speed cinematography was used to observe the timing and mode of the fuel disruption in a stack of five fuel pellets. Of the four experiments discussed, one used fresh mixed-oxide fuel, and three used irradiated mixed-oxide fuel. Analysis of the experiments indicates that in all cases, the observed disruption occurred well before fuel-vapor pressure was high enough to cause the disruption. The disruption appeared as a rapid spray-like expansion and occurred near the onset of fuel melting in the irradiated-fuel experiments and near the time of complete fuel melting in the fresh-fuel experiment. This early occurrence of fuel disruption is significant because it can potentially lower the work-energy release resulting from a prompt-burst disassembly accident.

  16. The effects of ramp gait exercise with PNF on stroke patients’ dynamic balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Kyo Chul; Kim, Hyeon Ae

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effects of ramp gait training using lower extremity patterns of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) on chronic stroke patients’ dynamic balance ability. [Subjects and Methods] In total, 30 stroke patients participated in this study, and they were assigned randomly and equally to an experimental group and a control group. The experimental group received exercise treatment for 30 min and ramp gait training with PNF for 30 min. The control group received exercise treatment for 30 min and ground gait training for 30 min. The interventions were conducted in 30 min sessions, three times per week for four week. The subjects were assessed with the Berg balance scale test, timed up and go test, and functional reach test before and after the experiment and the results were compared. [Results] After the intervention, the BBS and FRT values had significantly increased and the TUG value had significantly decreased in the experimental group; however, the BBS, FRT, and TUG values showed no significant differences in the control group. In addition, differences between the two groups before the intervention and after the intervention were not significant. [Conclusion] In conclusion, ramp gait training with PNF improved stroke patients’ dynamic balance ability, and a good outcome of ramp gait training with PNF is also expected for other neurological system disease patients. PMID:26180312

  17. The effects of ramp gait exercise with PNF on stroke patients' dynamic balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Kyo Chul; Kim, Hyeon Ae

    2015-06-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effects of ramp gait training using lower extremity patterns of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) on chronic stroke patients' dynamic balance ability. [Subjects and Methods] In total, 30 stroke patients participated in this study, and they were assigned randomly and equally to an experimental group and a control group. The experimental group received exercise treatment for 30 min and ramp gait training with PNF for 30 min. The control group received exercise treatment for 30 min and ground gait training for 30 min. The interventions were conducted in 30 min sessions, three times per week for four week. The subjects were assessed with the Berg balance scale test, timed up and go test, and functional reach test before and after the experiment and the results were compared. [Results] After the intervention, the BBS and FRT values had significantly increased and the TUG value had significantly decreased in the experimental group; however, the BBS, FRT, and TUG values showed no significant differences in the control group. In addition, differences between the two groups before the intervention and after the intervention were not significant. [Conclusion] In conclusion, ramp gait training with PNF improved stroke patients' dynamic balance ability, and a good outcome of ramp gait training with PNF is also expected for other neurological system disease patients.

  18. Laser-Driven Ramp Compression to Investigate and Model Dynamic Response of Iron at High Strain Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nourou Amadou

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Efficient laser shock processing of materials requires a good characterization of their dynamic response to pulsed compression, and predictive numerical models to simulate the thermomechanical processes governing this response. Due to the extremely high strain rates involved, the kinetics of these processes should be accounted for. In this paper, we present an experimental investigation of the dynamic behavior of iron under laser driven ramp loading, then we compare the results to the predictions of a constitutive model including viscoplasticity and a thermodynamically consistent description of the bcc to hcp phase transformation expected near 13 GPa. Both processes are shown to affect wave propagation and pressure decay, and the influence of the kinetics of the phase transformation on the velocity records is discussed in details.

  19. Ramped-amplitude NOVEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Can, T. V.; Weber, R. T.; Walish, J. J.; Swager, T. M.; Griffin, R. G.

    2017-04-01

    We present a pulsed dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) study using a ramped-amplitude nuclear orientation via electron spin locking (RA-NOVEL) sequence that utilizes a fast arbitrary waveform generator (AWG) to modulate the microwave pulses together with samples doped with narrow-line radicals such as 1,3-bisdiphenylene-2-phenylallyl (BDPA), sulfonated-BDPA (SA-BDPA), and trityl-OX063. Similar to ramped-amplitude cross polarization in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance, RA-NOVEL improves the DNP efficiency by a factor of up to 1.6 compared to constant-amplitude NOVEL (CA-NOVEL) but requires a longer mixing time. For example, at τmix = 8 μs, the DNP efficiency reaches a plateau at a ramp amplitude of ˜20 MHz for both SA-BDPA and trityl-OX063, regardless of the ramp profile (linear vs. tangent). At shorter mixing times (τmix = 0.8 μs), we found that the tangent ramp is superior to its linear counterpart and in both cases there exists an optimum ramp size and therefore ramp rate. Our results suggest that RA-NOVEL should be used instead of CA-NOVEL as long as the electronic spin lattice relaxation T1e is sufficiently long and/or the duty cycle of the microwave amplifier is not exceeded. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example of a time domain DNP experiment that utilizes modulated microwave pulses. Our results also suggest that a precise modulation of the microwave pulses can play an important role in optimizing the efficiency of pulsed DNP experiments and an AWG is an elegant instrumental solution for this purpose.

  20. Effect of a transverse plasma jet on a shock wave induced by a ramp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyu WANG

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available We conducted experiments in a wind tunnel with Mach number 2 to explore the evolution of a transverse plasma jet and its modification effect on a shock wave induced by a ramp with an angle of 24°. The transverse plasma jet was created by arc discharge in a small cylindrical cavity with a 2 mm diameter orifice. Three group tests with different actuator arrangements in the spanwise or streamwise direction upstream from the ramp were respectively studied to compare their disturbances to the shock wave. As shown by a time-resolved schlieren system, an unsteady motion of the shock wave by actuation was found: the shock wave was significantly modified by the plasma jet with an upstream motion and a reduced angle. Compared to spanwise actuation, a more intensive impact was obtained with two or three streamwise actuators working together. From shock wave structures, the control effect of the plasma jet on the shock motion based on a thermal effect, a potential cause of shock modification, was discussed. Furthermore, we performed a numerical simulation by using the Improved Delayed Detached Eddy Simulation (IDDES method to simulate the evolution of the transverse plasma jet plume produced by two streamwise actuators. The results show that flow structures are similar to those identified in schlieren images. Two streamwise vortices were recognized, which indicates that the higher jet plume is the result of the overlap of two streamwise jets. Keywords: Flow control, Improved delayed detached eddy simulation (IDDES method, Plasma synthetic jet, Shock wave/boundary layer interaction, Time resolved schlieren system

  1. Flow control of an oblique shock wave reflection with micro-ramp vortex generators : Effects of location and size

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giepman, R.H.M.; Schrijer, F.F.J.; Van Oudheusden, B.W.

    2013-01-01

    The effects of micro-ramp height and location on a shock induced separation bubble were quantified using planar particle image velocimetry measurements. Conditional averaging was used to show that the amount of separation is related to the momentum flux in the near-wall region (< 0.5?) of the

  2. An optimal EOQ inventory model for non-instantaneous deteriorating items with ramp type demand rate, time dependent holding cost and shortages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangarajan, K.; Karthikeyan, K.

    2017-11-01

    An economic order quantity inventory model for non-instantaneous deteriorating items has been developed with ramp type demand rate, time dependent deterioration rate and time dependent holding cost. Shortages in inventory are allowed in this model, which is partially backlogged. The main objective of this model is to develop an optimal replenishment policy that minimizes the total average inventory cost. Numerical examples are used to illustrate the developed model.

  3. Increasing flux rate to shorten leaching period and ramp-up production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngantung, Billy; Agustin, Riska; Ravi'i

    2017-01-01

    J Resources Bolaang Mongondow (JBRM) has operated a dynamic heap leach in its Bakan Gold Mine since late 2013. After successfully surpassing its name plate capacity of 2.6 MT/annum in 2014, the clayey and transition ore become the next operational challenge. The presence of transition and clayey ore requires longer leaching period, hence reducing the leach pad capacity which then caused reduced production. Maintaining or even increasing production with such longer leaching ore types can be done by expanding the leach pad area which means an additional capital investment, and/or shortening the leaching cycle which compromise a portion of gold extraction. JBRM has been successfully increasing the leach pad production from 2.6 MT/annum to 3.8 MT/annum, whilst improving the gold extraction from around 70% to around 80%. This was achieved by managing the operation of the leach pad which is shortening the leach cycle by identifying and combining the optimal flux rate application versus the tonne processed in each cell, at no capital investment for expanding the cell capacity.

  4. Penerapan Batas Ramp-Rate dengan Menggunakan Kombinasi Metode FDP (Forward Dynamic Programming dan QP (Quadratic Programming Pada Unit Commitment-Economic Dispatch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riza Fahmi Andriyanto

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Kebutuhan akan energi listrik terus menigkat seiring dengan perkembangan teknologi. meningkatnya beban listrik ini harus diimbangi dengan penambahan daya yang dibangkitkan. Hal ini sangat berpengaruh pada penjadwalan unit pembangkit yang harus ditentukan dengan baik agar didapatkan pembangkitan yang optimal. Pada Tugas Akhir ini mengambil topik mengenai unit commitment dan economic dispatch dengan mempertimbangkan nilai dari batasan generator (ramp-rate. Metode yang digunakan adalah complete enumeration dengan forward dynamic programming pada unit commitment dan quadratic programming pada economic dispatch. Metode - metode tersebut diterapkan dalam pemrograman matlab sehingga dapat dijadikan suatu program perhitungan unit commitment dan economic dispatch dengan mempertimbangkan nilai batasan ramp-rate. Dengan metode tersebut, diharapkan permasalahan penjadwalan unit pembangkit dapat terselesaikan dengan baik dan optimal sehingga memperoleh total biaya pembangkitan yang ekonomis.

  5. LHC main dipoles proposed baseline current ramping

    OpenAIRE

    Bottura, L; Burla, P; Wolf, R

    1998-01-01

    Several studies performed from 1994 to 1996 including some in the framework of the Dynamic Effects Working Group, have shown that the magnitude of the magnetic field imperfections generated in the LHC main dipoles depends partly on the shape of the magnetic field ramp. A current ramp optimisation has been carried out with several combinations of mathematical functions. The result of this study is t he proposed baseline current ramp. The graphic representation of this ramp is included in this ...

  6. Effects of wall shear stress on unsteady MHD conjugate flow in a porous medium with ramped wall temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Arshad; Khan, Ilyas; Ali, Farhad; Ulhaq, Sami; Shafie, Sharidan

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of an arbitrary wall shear stress on unsteady magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow of a Newtonian fluid with conjugate effects of heat and mass transfer. The fluid is considered in a porous medium over a vertical plate with ramped temperature. The influence of thermal radiation in the energy equations is also considered. The coupled partial differential equations governing the flow are solved by using the Laplace transform technique. Exact solutions for velocity and temperature in case of both ramped and constant wall temperature as well as for concentration are obtained. It is found that velocity solutions are more general and can produce a huge number of exact solutions correlative to various fluid motions. Graphical results are provided for various embedded flow parameters and discussed in details.

  7. Effect of Ramping Requirement and Price Cap on Energy Price in a System with High Wind Penetration

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Sebastián; Smeers, Yves; Aguado, José de

    2015-01-01

    The European power market is currently retiring or mothballing large capacities of conventional plants, and at the same time incorporating a significant amount of non-dispatchable renewable generation, in particular wind. We analyse the mothballing process (and the resulting system) and study how they are affected by a price cap implemented in the energy only market, and by a possible implementation of ramping products in the system. Sebastian Martin, Yves Smeers, and Jose Aguado. Effect o...

  8. A study of inflation effects on an EOQ model for Weibull deteriorating/ameliorating items with ramp type of demand and shortages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valliathal M.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the effects of inflation and time discounting on an inventory model with general ramp type demand rate, time dependent (Weibull deterioration rate and partial backlogging of unsatisfied demand. The model is studied under the replenishment policy, starting with shortages under two different types of backlogging rates, and their comparative study is also provided. We then use the computer software, MATLto find the optimal replenishment policies. Duration of positive inventory level is taken as the decision variable to minimize the total cost of the proposed system. Numerical examples are then taken to illustrate the solution procedure. Finally, sensitivity of the optimal solution to changes of the values of different system parameters is also studied.

  9. Unleashing the Charges: An Improved Reduction of Key Exoplanet Datasets and a Tool for Ramp Effect Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yifan

    2017-08-01

    Among HST's most lasting and iconic results are WFC3/IR observations of transiting exoplanets that provided exciting insights into atmospheres of planets ranging from super-earths to hot-Jupiters. However, all time-resolved WFC3/IR observations suffer from an often-limiting detector systematic: the ramp effect. Current efforts are forced to discard orbits most affected and to apply an empirical procedure to minimize the amplitude. We developed and demonstrated a powerful new, solid state physics-motivated detector model that accurately corrects for the ramp effect and reaches essentially photon-noise limited performance for even the most affected orbits. We propose here to apply our RECTE ramp charge trap correction to key archival datasets for which significant improvements are expected. We will also use these datasets to further test and document the RECTE correction on data acquired in different observing modes and to seek further improvements in RECTE's detector parameters. We will document and release RECTE, along with a data reduction cookbook, to the community. We also expect important improvements in the science results from the four key HST datasets.Our charge trap correction will help increasing HST's efficiency for infrared transit spectroscopy by about 20-25% (no more need to discard first orbits), saving dozens of orbits in the future, and will also improve the reliability and reproducibility of infrared time-domain observations. Our work is especially important for the most challenging transit and phase curve observations and will likely provide an example for an approach that can be utilized for JWST instruments with architectures similar to WFC3.

  10. Analysis of the Effects of a Flexible Ramping Ancillary Service Product on Power System Operations: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krad, Ibrahim; Ibanez, Eduardo; Ela, Erik

    2015-10-19

    The recent increased interest in utilizing variable generation (VG) resources such as wind and solar in power systems has motivated investigations into new operating procedures. Although these resources provide desirable value to a system (e.g., no fuel costs or emissions), interconnecting them provides unique challenges. Their variable, non-controllable nature in particular requires significant attention, because it directly results in increased power system variability and uncertainty. One way to handle this is via new operating reserve schemes. Operating reserves provide upward and downward generation and ramping capacity to counteract uncertainty and variability prior to their realization. For instance, uncertainty and variability in real-time dispatch can be accounted for in the hour-ahead unit commitment. New operating reserve methodologies that specifically account for the increased variability and uncertainty caused by VG are currently being investigated and developed by academia and industry. This paper examines one method inspired by the new operating reserve product being proposed by the California Independent System Operator. The method is based on examining the potential ramping requirements at any given time and enforcing those requirements via a reserve demand curve in the market-clearing optimization as an additional ancillary service product.

  11. Loading and Unloading Weaned Pigs: Effects of Bedding Types, Ramp Angle, and Bedding Moisture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arlene Garcia

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of non-slip surfaces during loading and unloading of weaned pigs plays an important role in animal welfare and economics of the pork industry. Currently, the guidelines available only suggest the use of ramps below 20° to load and unload pigs. Three ramp angles (0°, 10° or 20°, five bedding materials (nothing, sand, feed, wood shavings or wheat straw hay, two moistures (dry or wet bedding; >50% moisture over two seasons (>23.9 °C summer, <23.9 °C winter were assessed for slips/falls/vocalizations (n = 6,000 pig observations. “Score” was calculated by the sum of slips, falls, and vocalizations. With the exception of using feed as a bedding, all beddings provided some protection against elevated slips, falls, and vocalizations (P < 0.01. Providing bedding reduced (P < 0.05 scores regardless of whether the bedding was dry or wet. Scores increased as the slope increased (P < 0.01. Provision of bedding, other than feed, at slopes greater than zero, decreased slips, falls and vocalizations. The total time it took to load and unload pigs was

  12. Ramp Metering Status in California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongren Wang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to provide an update of the major improvement in terms of ramp metering design and operations in California. These updates include ramp metering policies, ramp metering development plans, ramp metering design manual, and ramp metering and system management initiatives.

  13. Numerical study of friction-induced instability and acoustic radiation - Effect of ramp loading on the squeal propensity for a simplified brake model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soobbarayen, K.; Sinou, J.-J.; Besset, S.

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents a numerical study of the influence of loading conditions on the vibrational and acoustic responses of a disc brake system subjected to squeal. A simplified model composed of a circular disc and a pad is proposed. Nonlinear effects of contact and friction over the frictional interface are modelled with a cubic law and a classical Coulomb's law with a constant friction coefficient. The stability analysis of this system shows the presence of two instabilities with one and two unstable modes that lead to friction-induced nonlinear vibrations and squeal noise. Nonlinear time analysis by temporal integration is conducted for two cases of loadings and initial conditions: a static load near the associated sliding equilibrium and a slow and a fast ramp loading. The analysis of the time responses shows that a sufficiently fast ramp loading can destabilize a stable configuration and generate nonlinear vibrations. Moreover, the fast ramp loading applied for the two unstable cases generates higher amplitudes of velocity than for the static load cases. The frequency analysis shows that the fast ramp loading generates a more complex spectrum than for the static load with the appearance of new resonance peaks. The acoustic responses for these cases are estimated by applying the multi-frequency acoustic calculation method based on the Fourier series decomposition of the velocity and the Boundary Element Method. Squeal noise emissions for the fast ramp loading present lower or higher levels than for the static load due to the different amplitudes of velocities. Moreover, the directivity is more complex for the fast ramp loading due to the appearance of new harmonic components in the velocity spectrum. Finally, the sound pressure convergence study shows that only the first harmonic components are sufficient to well describe the acoustic response.

  14. MEASURING CHROMATICITY ALONG THE RAMP USING THE PLL TUNE METER IN RHIC.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TEPIKIAN,S.; AHRENS,L.; CAMERON,P.; SCHULTHEISS,C.

    2002-06-02

    Beam stability up the ramp requires the appropriate sign and magnitude of the chromaticity. We developed a way to measure the chromaticity using the PLL (Phase Locked Loop) tune-meter. Since, the accuracy of the PLL tune-meter with properly adjusted loop gain is better than {approx} 0.0001 in tune units, the radial loop needs only be changed by a small amount of 0.2mm at a 1Hz rate. Thus, we can achieve fast chromaticity measurements in 1 sec. Except during the very beginning of the ramp where there are snapback effects and the gamma changes very rapidly, we can have good chromaticcity measurements along the ramp. This leads to the possibility of correcting the chromaticity during the ramp using a feedback system.

  15. Effect of the magnetic field orientation on the modulation period of the critical current of ramp-type Josephson junctions

    OpenAIRE

    Heinsohn, J.-K.; Dittmann, R.; Niemeyer, J.; Rodriguez Contreras, J.; Goldobin, E.; Klushin, A. M.; Siegel, M.; Hagedorn, D.; Pöpel, R.; Dolata, R.; Buchholz, F. -I.

    2001-01-01

    We have investigated the dependence of the critical current I-C on the value and orientation of an externally applied magnetic field H for interface-engineered YBa2Cu3O7-x ramp-type Josephson junctions. The results are compared with measurements of Nb ramp-type junctions with a PdAu interlayer. The I-C versus H dependences are similar to Fraunhofer patterns and their modulation period changes several orders of magnitude with the orientation of the magnetic field. For both junction types, the ...

  16. Meniscal Ramp Lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahla, Jorge; Dean, Chase S.; Moatshe, Gilbert; Mitchell, Justin J.; Cram, Tyler R.; Yacuzzi, Carlos; LaPrade, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Meniscal ramp lesions are more frequently associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries than previously recognized. Some authors suggest that this entity results from disruption of the meniscotibial ligaments of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus, whereas others support the idea that it is created by a tear of the peripheral attachment of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans have been reported to have a low sensitivity, and consequently, ramp lesions often go undiagnosed. Therefore, to rule out a ramp lesion, an arthroscopic evaluation with probing of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus should be performed. Several treatment options have been reported, including nonsurgical management, inside-out meniscal repair, or all-inside meniscal repair. In cases of isolated ramp lesions, a standard meniscal repair rehabilitation protocol should be followed. However, when a concomitant ACL reconstruction (ACLR) is performed, the rehabilitation should follow the designated ACLR postoperative protocol. The purpose of this article was to review the current literature regarding meniscal ramp lesions and summarize the pertinent anatomy, biomechanics, diagnostic strategies, recommended treatment options, and postoperative protocol. PMID:27504467

  17. Long-term effects of the multidisciplinary risk assessment and management program for patients with diabetes mellitus (RAMP-DM): a population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Fangfang; Fung, Colman Siu Cheung; Wan, Yuk Fai; McGhee, Sarah Morag; Wong, Carlos King Ho; Dai, Daisy; Kwok, Ruby; Lam, Cindy Lo Kuen

    2015-08-14

    Studies on the long-term effectiveness of multidisciplinary risk-stratification based management in Chinese population were rare. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of a multidisciplinary risk assessment and management program for patients with diabetes mellitus (RAMP-DM) in reducing the risks of cardiovascular complications and all-cause mortality. A prospective cohort study was conducted in 18,188 propensity score matched RAMP-DM participants and subjects with diabetes under usual primary care (9,094 subjects in each group). The study endpoints were the first occurrence of coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke, heart failure (HF), total cardiovascular disease (CVD) and all-cause mortality. We constructed multivariable Cox proportional hazard regressions to estimate the association between the RAMP-DM intervention and the first occurrence of study endpoints. The median follow-up period was 36 months. Three hundred and ninety-nine CVD events occurred in the RAMP-DM group, as compared with 608 in the control group [adjusted hazard ratio, 0.629; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.554-0.715; P DM group was less than half that of control group (202 vs 552, adjusted hazard ratio, 0.363; 95% CI, 0.308-0.428; P DM group for CHD, stroke, and HF were 0.570 (95% CI, 0.470-0.691; P DM intervention was associated with lower incidences of individual and total cardiovascular complications, as well as all-cause mortality over 3 years follow-up. The encouraging results provided evidence to support that the structured risk-stratification management leading by a multidisciplinary clinical team was an effective approach to reduce future cardiovascular complications in people with diabetes. NCT02034695, http://www.ClinicalTrials.gov.

  18. Flow characteristics in the helicoidal-ramp dropshaft for middle head; Churakusa rasen annairoshiki rakusako no ryudo tokusei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawasaki, S.; Mori, Y.; Yoshimoto, T.; Nakanishi, T. [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-11-01

    Some types of dropshafts had been developed and applied to sewerage equipment to transport much water to a low position smoothly. The helicoidal-ramp dropshaft for high head shows a better performance than the other types. For application to middle head, the flow characteristics have been investigated by the model test. The results show that the helical pitch influences the water level in the dropshaft and open ratio of the outlet orifice remarkably influences the transported air rate. Comparison between the flow with or without the helical ramp shows that the helical ramp is effective to decrease transported air and pressure fluctuation at the bottom of dropshaft. (author)

  19. Cellular automata model simulating traffic car accidents in the on-ramp system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echab, H.; Lakouari, N.; Ez-Zahraouy, H.; Benyoussef, A.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, using Nagel-Schreckenberg model we study the on-ramp system under the expanded open boundary condition. The phase diagram of the two-lane on-ramp system is computed. It is found that the expanded left boundary insertion strategy enhances the flow in the on-ramp lane. Furthermore, we have studied the probability of the occurrence of car accidents. We distinguish two types of car accidents: the accident at the on-ramp site (Prc) and the rear-end accident in the main road (Pac). It is shown that car accidents at the on-ramp site are more likely to occur when traffic is free on road A. However, the rear-end accidents begin to occur above a critical injecting rate αc1. The influence of the on-ramp length (LB) and position (xC0) on the car accidents probabilities is studied. We found that large LB or xC0 causes an important decrease of the probability Prc. However, only large xC0 provokes an increase of the probability Pac. The effect of the stochastic randomization is also computed.

  20. Investigation of strut-ramp injector in a Scramjet combustor: Effect of strut geometry, fuel and jet diameter on mixing characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soni, Rahul Kumar; De, Ashoke De [Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur (India)

    2017-03-15

    The strut-based injector has been found to be one of the most promising injector designs for a supersonic combustor, offering enhanced mixing of fuel and air. The mixing and flow field characteristics of the straight (SS) and Tapered strut (TS), with fixed ramp angle and height at free stream Mach number 2 in conjunction with fuel injection at Mach 2.3 have been investigated numerically and reported. In the present investigation, hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and ethylene (C{sub 2}H{sub 4}) are injected in oncoming supersonic flow from the back of the strut, where jet to free stream momentum ratio is maintained at 0.79 and 0.69 for H2 and C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, respectively. The predicted wall static pressure and species mole fractions at various downstream locations are compared with the experimental data for TS case with 0.6 mm jet diameter and found to be in good agreement. Further, the effect of jet diameter and strut geometry on the near field mixing in strut ramp configuration is discussed for both the fuels. The numerical results are assessed based on various parameters for the performance evaluation of different strut ramp configurations. The SS configuration for both the injectant has been found to be an optimum candidate; also it is observed that for higher jet diameter larger combustor length is required to achieve satisfactory near field mixing.

  1. The effect of continuous natural roughness onhydraulic jump characteristics on the stone ramps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. F. Maghrebi

    2017-01-01

    the flume. Water contraction usually occurs after the sluice gate is avoided by a steel plate welded on the sluice gate. So, the initial depth equals the gate opening. According to the experimental procedure, after placing theuniform roughness heights on channel bed, the pump runs and water flows slowly into the flume. Then, discharge increases to reach the desired value and the sluice gate opening is set up to have the hydraulic jump formed at a distance of ahead of the gate. These circumstances maintain enough for data recording. The parameter of gravel particles considered as the most sensible characteristic. The subcritical depth y2 was measured from the profile survey, where the water surface began to be essentially level. Results and discussions: In the smooth and rough beds experiments show that variation in initial depth does not have any effect on decreasing the conjugate depths ratio. The conjugate depths ratio decreases as the roughness increases. The difference between conjugate depths ratio of rough beds with middle diameter 3.5mm (B and 11mm (C appears when the Froude number exceeds 7.5 and for Froude numbers greater than 10, a significant drop can be observed in the conjugate depths ratio diagrams from rough bed B to C. The horizontal distance between the beginning and end point of a hydraulic jump is considered as the length of the hydraulic jump. Dimensionless length of the hydraulic jump is presented as which is usually considered as a function of . For Froude number greater than 10, the dimensionless length of the hydraulic jump is nearly constant. Then, the ratio of for Froude numbers greater than 10 seems to be independent of supercritical Froude number and is just a function of roughness. In all experiments the length of the hydraulic jump decreases compared with the smooth bed under conditions that bed roughness is not subjected to water jet. Conclusions: Experiments demonstrated that in the rough bed by increasing roughness, the conjugated

  2. Ramps and hybrid effects on keel bone and foot pad disorders in modified aviaries for laying hens

    OpenAIRE

    Heerkens, J.L.T.; Delezie, E.; Ampe, B.; Rodenburg, T.B.; Tuyttens, F.A.M.

    2016-01-01

    Non-cage systems provide laying hens with considerable space allowance, perches and access to litter, thereby offering opportunities for natural species-specific behaviors. Conversely, these typical characteristics of non-cage systems also increase the risk of keel bone and foot pad disorders. The aim of this study was twofold: 1) to investigate if providing ramps between perches (housing factor) reduces keel bone and foot pad disorders and 2) to test for genetic predisposition by comparing 2...

  3. RAMP 2005 technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-04-26

    This technical report provided details of all monitoring activities conducted by the Regional Aquatics Monitoring Program (RAMP), which was initiated in 1997 to examine the impacts of oil sands mining development on aquatic systems in the region. RAMP's objective is to integrate aquatic monitoring activities in order to identify long-term trends and regional issues related to the environment in the Regional Municipality of Wood Buffalo. In 2005, RAMP focused on key components of boreal aquatic ecosystems. This report provided full outlines of all climate and hydrology monitoring activities; water and sedimentation analyses; and studies of benthic communities in rivers, lakes, and deltas. Sets of measurements endpoints were used to represent the health and integrity of valued environmental resources. Satellite imager was used to estimate activities related to oil sands developments. The report was divided into subsections which related monitoring activities for various rivers and tributaries in the region. Small and negligible calculated changes were observed in hydrologic conditions in the Athabasca River mainstem. No discernible changes in water and sediment quality were observed that could positively be ascribed to oil sands developments in the region. Very little evidence suggested that fish populations had changed as a result of increased activities in the region. The influence of oil sands development activities on the aquatic resources of the Athabasca River mainstem were minor and mostly undetectable. The results of fish tissue studies from the lower Athabasca River showed that concentrations of mercury in fish tissues occurred at levels that posed a high risk to subsistence fishers. A higher number of metal concentrations in some lakes in the region was attributed to natural causes. The results of a sentinel species monitoring program conducted at the Ells River watershed were also included. Recommendations for further refining RAMP programs were also

  4. Meniscal Ramp Lesions

    OpenAIRE

    Chahla, Jorge; Dean, Chase S.; Moatshe, Gilbert; Mitchell, Justin J.; Cram, Tyler R.; Yacuzzi, Carlos; LAPRADE, ROBERT F.

    2016-01-01

    Meniscal ramp lesions are more frequently associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries than previously recognized. Some authors suggest that this entity results from disruption of the meniscotibial ligaments of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus, whereas others support the idea that it is created by a tear of the peripheral attachment of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans have been reported to have a low sensitivity, and conse...

  5. Effectiveness of the multidisciplinary Risk Assessment and Management Program for Patients with Diabetes Mellitus (RAMP-DM) for diabetic microvascular complications: A population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, F; Fung, C S C; Wan, Y F; McGhee, S M; Wong, C K H; Dai, D; Kwok, R; Lam, C L K

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of the multidisciplinary Risk Assessment and Management Program for Patients with Diabetes Mellitus (RAMP-DM) in reducing the risks of microvascular complications. This prospective cohort study was conducted with 29,670 propensity-score-matched RAMP-DM participants and diabetes patients under the usual primary care (14,835 in each group). Study endpoints were the first occurrence of any diabetic microvascular complications, non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy/preproliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR/prePDR), sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy (STDR) or blindness, nephropathy, end-stage renal disease (ESRD), neuropathy and lower-limb ulcers or amputation. Log-rank tests and multivariable Cox proportional-hazards regressions were employed to estimate between-group differences in incidences of study endpoints. After a median follow-up of 36 months with>41,000 person-years in each group, RAMP-DM participants had a lower incidence of microvascular complications (760 vs 935; adjusted hazard ratio [HR]: 0.73; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.66-0.81; PDM vs control group for ESRD, STDR or blindness, and lower-limb ulcers or amputation were 0.40 (95% CI: 0.24-0.69; PDM intervention was associated with lower incidences of all microvascular complications except neuropathy over a 3-year follow-up. These encouraging results constitute evidence that structured risk assessment and risk-stratified management provided by a multidisciplinary team is effective for reducing microvascular complications in diabetes patients. NCT02034695, www.ClinicalTrials.gov. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. The effect of different acid-treatments on the age spectrum of organic matter in sediments determined by Ramped PyrOx/accelerator mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNichol, A. P.; Bao, R.

    2016-02-01

    Studies of the radiocarbon and stable carbon isotopes of organic matter (OM) in sediments have become common and are an effective way to understand the fate of sedimentary OM burial in the aquatic environment. In practice, obtaining the radiocarbon and stable carbon isotopic composition in sediments requires first removing inorganic carbon by acid treatment. Two common treatments are acid rinsing and fumigation. The radiocarbon ages and stable carbon isotopic values obtained using the different acid-treatments can differ significantly, but the details of the change of organic components have received much less attention. A new approach was recently developed for radiocarbon dating of carbonate -poor and/or rich sediments using a so-called ramped pyrolysis/oxidation ("Ramped PyrOx") method in combination with accelerator mass spectrometry. Radiocarbon and stable carbon isotopic analysis of the CO2 that evolves under a linear temperature program allows separation of OC components in sediments based on their thermochemical stability (Rosenheim et al., 2008). In this preliminary study, we explore the utility of the Ramped PyrOx method for determining the effect of different acid-treatments on radiocarbon ages and carbon isotopic compositions of OM in sediments. The observations indicate that the HCl rinsing method alters OM more than fumigation in lower carbonate samples while the opposite occurs in the high carbonate samples. This result has implications for studies of the transfer of carbon from the terrestrial to the marine environment because these are samples that contain low amounts of carbonate material. Recommendations for the most appropriate way to treat these samples will be made. The loss of organic matter during the HCl rinsing in the marine carbonate poor sediments could be one of the reasons that radiocarbon ages in the labile thermal fractions were older than that processed by fumigation, whereas younger in the resistant thermal fractions. The distinct

  7. Power Ramp Limitation capabilities of Large PV Power Plants with Active Power Reserves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogdan, Craciun; Kerekes, Tamas; Sera, Dezso

    2017-01-01

    Power Ramp Limitation (PRL) is likely to become a requirement for large scale photovoltaic power plants (LPVPPs) in order to allow the increase of PV penetration levels. Especially in islands with reduced inertia capability, this problem is more stringent: high power ramp can be caused by either...... fast irradiance changes or other participant generators for example wind power, or loads. In order to compensate for the power mismatch, LPVPPs must use Active Power Reserve (APR), by either curtailment or auxiliary storage. The paper proposes a PRL control structure for dynamic APR sizing...... and deployment. The selected test case is the power system of Puerto Rico (PREPA), modeled using the modified IEEE 12 bus benchmark system, with different levels of PV penetration. It is shown that LPVPP with PRL can effectively reduce the ramping rate of the participating generators. Considering that the large...

  8. Chemical reaction and radiation effects on the transient MHD free convection flow of dissipative fluid past an infinite vertical porous plate with ramped wall temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. RAJESH

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A finite-difference analysis is performed to study the effects of thermal radiation and chemical reaction on the transient MHD free convection and mass transform flow of a dissipative fluid past an infinite vertical porous plate subject to ramped wall temperature. The fluid considered here is a gray, absorbing/ /emitting radiation but a non-scattering medium. The dimensionless governing equations are unsteady, coupled and non-linear partial differential equations. An analytical method fails to give a solution. Hence an implicit finite difference scheme of Crank-Nicolson method is employed. The effect of the magnetic parameter (M, chemical reaction parameter (K, radiation parameter (F, buoyancy ratio parameter (N, Schmidt number (Sc on the velocity field and skin friction for both air (Pr = 0.71 and water (Pr = 7 in the presence of both aiding (N>0 and opposing (N<0 flows are extensively discussed with the help of graphs.

  9. Effect of geometry on the downstream flow topology of a micro ramp in a supersonic turbulent boundary layer : An experimental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tambe, S.S.; Schrijer, F.F.J.; van Oudheusden, B.W.

    2017-01-01

    The physical relation between the geometry and the flow topology of the wake of a micro ramp is investigated by means of a parametric study. Various micro ramp geometries are placed in a supersonic turbulent boundary layer at a free-stream Mach number of 2. The flow field is measured with schlieren

  10. Ramp management and control handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    This handbook provides guidance and recommended practices on managing and controlling traffic on ramps with freeway facilities. The use or application of the guidance and recommendations provided will in time serve to enhance the use and effectivenes...

  11. A microfluidic separation platform using an array of slanted ramps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risbud, Sumedh; Bernate, Jorge; Drazer, German

    2013-03-01

    The separation of the different components of a sample is a crucial step in many micro- and nano-fluidic applications, including the detection of infections, the capture of circulating tumor cells, the isolation of proteins, RNA and DNA, to mention but a few. Vector chromatography, in which different species migrate in different directions in a planar microfluidic device thus achieving spatial as well as temporal resolution, offers the promise of high selectivity along with high throughput. In this work, we present a microfluidic vector chromatography platform consisting of slanted ramps in a microfluidic channel for the separation of suspended particles. We construct these ramps using inclined UV lithography, such that the inclined portion of the ramps is upstream. We show that particles of different size displace laterally to a different extent when driven by a flow field over a slanted ramp. The flow close to the ramp reorients along the ramp, causing the size-dependent deflection of the particles. The cumulative effect of an array of these ramps would cause particles of different size to migrate in different directions, thus allowing their passive and continuous separation.

  12. Effects of the Multidisciplinary Risk Assessment and Management Program for Patients with Diabetes Mellitus (RAMP-DM) on biomedical outcomes, observed cardiovascular events and cardiovascular risks in primary care: a longitudinal comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Fang Fang; Fung, Colman Siu Cheung; Wong, Carlos King Ho; Wan, Yuk Fai; Dai, Daisy; Kwok, Ruby; Lam, Cindy Lo Kuen

    2014-08-21

    To assess whether the Multidisciplinary Risk Assessment and Management Program for Patients with Diabetes Mellitus (RAMP-DM) led to improvements in biomedical outcomes, observed cardiovascular events and predicted cardiovascular risks after 12-month intervention in the primary care setting. A random sample of 1,248 people with diabetes enrolled to RAMP-DM for at least 12 months was selected and 1,248 people with diabetes under the usual primary care were matched by age, sex, and HbA1c level at baseline as the usual care group. Biomedical and cardiovascular outcomes were measured at baseline and at 12-month after the enrollment. Difference-in-differences approach was employed to measure the effect of RAMP-DM on the changes in biomedical outcomes, proportion of subjects reaching treatment targets, observed and predicted cardiovascular risks. Compared to the usual care group, RAMP-DM group had lower cardiovascular events incidence (1.21% vs 2.89%, P = 0.003), and net decrease in HbA1c (-0.20%, P risks (total CVD risk, -2.06%, P risk, -1.43%, P risk, -0.71%, P risks. The RAMP-DM resulted in greater improvements in HbA1c and reduction in observed and predicted cardiovascular risks at 12 months follow-up, which indicated a risk-stratification multidisciplinary intervention was an effective strategy for managing Chinese people with diabetes in the primary care setting. ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT02034695.

  13. Sound exposure changes European seabass behaviour in a large outdoor floating pen: Effects of temporal structure and a ramp-up procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neo, Y Y; Hubert, J; Bolle, L; Winter, H V; Ten Cate, C; Slabbekoorn, H

    2016-07-01

    Underwater sound from human activities may affect fish behaviour negatively and threaten the stability of fish stocks. However, some fundamental understanding is still lacking for adequate impact assessments and potential mitigation strategies. For example, little is known about the potential contribution of the temporal features of sound, the efficacy of ramp-up procedures, and the generalisability of results from indoor studies to the outdoors. Using a semi-natural set-up, we exposed European seabass in an outdoor pen to four treatments: 1) continuous sound, 2) intermittent sound with a regular repetition interval, 3) irregular repetition intervals and 4) a regular repetition interval with amplitude 'ramp-up'. Upon sound exposure, the fish increased swimming speed and depth, and swam away from the sound source. The behavioural readouts were generally consistent with earlier indoor experiments, but the changes and recovery were more variable and were not significantly influenced by sound intermittency and interval regularity. In addition, the 'ramp-up' procedure elicited immediate diving response, similar to the onset of treatment without a 'ramp-up', but the fish did not swim away from the sound source as expected. Our findings suggest that while sound impact studies outdoors increase ecological and behavioural validity, the inherently higher variability also reduces resolution that may be counteracted by increasing sample size or looking into different individual coping styles. Our results also question the efficacy of 'ramp-up' in deterring marine animals, which warrants more investigation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. An EOQ model with time dependent Weibull deterioration and ramp type demand ,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaitanya Kumar Tripathy

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an order level inventory system with time dependent Weibull deterioration and ramp type demand rate where production and demand are time dependent. The proposed model of this paper considers economic order quantity under two different cases. The implementation of the proposed model is illustrated using some numerical examples. Sensitivity analysis is performed to show the effect of changes in the parameters on the optimum solution.

  15. Effects of Ramped Wall Temperature on Unsteady Two-Dimensional Flow Past a Vertical Plate with Thermal Radiation and Chemical Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Rajesh

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of free convection with thermal radiation of a viscous incompressible unsteady flow past a vertical plate with ramped wall temperature and mass diffusion is presented here, taking into account the homogeneous chemical reaction of first order. The fluid is gray, absorbing-emitting but non-scattering medium and the Rosseland approximation is used to describe the radiative flux in the energy equation. The dimensionless governing equations are solved using an implicit finite-difference method of the Crank-Nicolson type, which is stable and convergent. The velocity profiles are compared with the available theoretical solution and are found to be in good agreement. Numerical results for the velocity, the temperature, the concentration, the local and average skin friction, the Nusselt number and Sherwood number are shown graphically. This work has wide application in chemical and power engineering and also in the study of vertical air flow into the atmosphere. The present results can be applied to an important class of flows in which the driving force for the flow is provided by combination of the thermal and chemical species diffusion effects.

  16. Quantification of tsunami-induced flows on a Mediterranean carbonate ramp reveals catastrophic evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slootman, A.; Cartigny, M.J.B.; Moscariello, A.; Chiaradia, M.; de Boer, P.L.

    2016-01-01

    Cool-water carbonates are the dominant limestones in the Mediterranean Basin since the Early Pliocene. Their deposition typically resulted in ramp morphologies due to high rates of resedimentation. Several such fossil carbonate ramps are characterised by a bimodal facies stacking pattern, where

  17. Interactions between rates of temperature change and acclimation affect latitudinal patterns of warming tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Jessica L; Chown, Steven L; Janion-Scheepers, Charlene; Clusella-Trullas, Susana

    2016-01-01

    Critical thermal limits form an increasing component of the estimation of impacts of global change on ectotherms. Whether any consistent patterns exist in the interactive effects of rates of temperature change (or experimental ramping rates) and acclimation on critical thermal limits and warming tolerance (one way of assessing sensitivity to climate change) is, however, far from clear. Here, we examine the interacting effects of ramping rate and acclimation on the critical thermal maxima (CTmax) and minima (CTmin) and warming tolerance of six species of springtails from sub-tropical, temperate and polar regions. We also provide microhabitat temperatures from 26 sites spanning 5 years in order to benchmark environmentally relevant rates of temperature change. Ramping rate has larger effects than acclimation on CTmax, but the converse is true for CTmin. Responses to rate and acclimation effects are more consistent among species for CTmax than for CTmin. In the latter case, interactions among ramping rate and acclimation are typical of polar species, less marked for temperate ones, and reduced in species from the sub-tropics. Ramping rate and acclimation have substantial effects on estimates of warming tolerance, with the former being more marked. At the fastest ramping rates (>1.0°C/min), tropical species have estimated warming tolerances similar to their temperate counterparts, whereas at slow ramping rates (warming tolerance is much reduced in tropical species. Rates of temperate change in microhabitats relevant to the springtails are typically warming tolerance approach.

  18. Does Stepwise Voltage Ramping Protect the Kidney from Injury During Extracorporeal Shockwave Lithotripsy? Results of a Prospective Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skuginna, Veronika; Nguyen, Daniel P; Seiler, Roland; Kiss, Bernhard; Thalmann, George N; Roth, Beat

    2016-02-01

    Renal damage is more frequent with new-generation lithotripters. However, animal studies suggest that voltage ramping minimizes the risk of complications following extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (SWL). In the clinical setting, the optimal voltage strategy remains unclear. To evaluate whether stepwise voltage ramping can protect the kidney from damage during SWL. A total of 418 patients with solitary or multiple unilateral kidney stones were randomized to receive SWL using a Modulith SLX-F2 lithotripter with either stepwise voltage ramping (n=213) or a fixed maximal voltage (n=205). SWL. The primary outcome was sonographic evidence of renal hematomas. Secondary outcomes included levels of urinary markers of renal damage, stone disintegration, stone-free rate, and rates of secondary interventions within 3 mo of SWL. Descriptive statistics were used to compare clinical outcomes between the two groups. A logistic regression model was generated to assess predictors of hematomas. Significantly fewer hematomas occurred in the ramping group(12/213, 5.6%) than in the fixed group (27/205, 13%; p=0.008). There was some evidence that the fixed group had higher urinary β2-microglobulin levels after SWL compared to the ramping group (p=0.06). Urinary microalbumin levels, stone disintegration, stone-free rate, and rates of secondary interventions did not significantly differ between the groups. The logistic regression model showed a significantly higher risk of renal hematomas in older patients (odds ratio [OR] 1.03, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.00-1.05; p=0.04). Stepwise voltage ramping was associated with a lower risk of hematomas (OR 0.39, 95% CI 0.19-0.80; p=0.01). The study was limited by the use of ultrasound to detect hematomas. In this prospective randomized study, stepwise voltage ramping during SWL was associated with a lower risk of renal damage compared to a fixed maximal voltage without compromising treatment effectiveness. Lithotripsy is a noninvasive

  19. Ramp-incremented and RPE-clamped test protocols elicit similar VO2max values in trained cyclists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, Allison M; Midgley, Adrian W; Zavorsky, Gerald S; Hillman, Angela R

    2014-08-01

    The present study compared the efficacy of ramp incremented and ratings of perceived exertion (RPE)-clamped test protocols for eliciting maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max). Sixteen trained cyclists (age 34 ± 7 years) performed a ramp-incremented protocol and an RPE-clamped protocol 1 week apart in a randomized, counterbalanced order. The RPE-clamped protocol consisted of five, 2-min stages where subjects self-selected work rate and pedal cadence to maintain the prescribed RPE. After completing both test protocols subjects were asked which they preferred. The mean ± SD test time of 568 ± 72 s in the ramp protocol was not significantly different to the 600 ± 0 s in the RPE-clamped protocol (mean difference = 32 s; p = 0.09), or was the VO2max of 3.86 ± 0.73 L min(-1) in the ramp protocol significantly different to the 3.87 ± 0.72 L min(-1) in the RPE-clamped protocol (mean difference = 0.002 L min(-1); p = 0.97). Furthermore, no significant differences were observed for peak power output (p = 0.21), maximal minute ventilation (p = 0.97), maximal respiratory exchange ratio (p = 0.09), maximal heart rate (p = 0.51), and post-test blood lactate concentration (p = 0.58). The VO2max attained in the preferred protocol was significantly higher than the non-preferred protocol (mean difference = 0.14 L min(-1); p = 0.03). The RPE-clamped test protocol was as effective as the ramp-incremented protocol for eliciting VO2max and could be considered as a valid alternative protocol, particularly where a fixed test duration is desirable.

  20. Modelling ramp-up curves to reflect learning: improving capacity planning in secondary pharmaceutical production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Klaus Reinholdt Nyhuus; Grunow, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The experience gained during production ramp-up leads to an increase of the effective production capacity over time. However, full utilisation of production capacity is not always possible during ramp-up. In such cases, the experience gained and hence the available effective capacity...... production. Due to its regulatory framework, this industry cannot fully exploit available capacities during ramp-up. We develop a capacity planning model for a new pharmaceutical drug, which determines the number and location of new production lines and the build-up of inventory such that product...... availability at market launch is ensured. Our MILP model is applied to a real industry case study using three empirically observed ramp-up curves to demonstrate its value as decision support tool. We demonstrate the superiority of our volume-dependent method over the traditional time-dependent ramp...

  1. Reinforcement Learning for Ramp Control: An Analysis of Learning Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Lu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Reinforcement Learning (RL has been proposed to deal with ramp control problems under dynamic traffic conditions; however, there is a lack of sufficient research on the behaviour and impacts of different learning parameters. This paper describes a ramp control agent based on the RL mechanism and thoroughly analyzed the influence of three learning parameters; namely, learning rate, discount rate and action selection parameter on the algorithm performance. Two indices for the learning speed and convergence stability were used to measure the algorithm performance, based on which a series of simulation-based experiments were designed and conducted by using a macroscopic traffic flow model. Simulation results showed that, compared with the discount rate, the learning rate and action selection parameter made more remarkable impacts on the algorithm performance. Based on the analysis, some suggestionsabout how to select suitable parameter values that can achieve a superior performance were provided.

  2. Radar echo processing with partitioned de-ramp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubbert, Dale F.; Tise, Bertice L.

    2013-03-19

    The spurious-free dynamic range of a wideband radar system is increased by apportioning de-ramp processing across analog and digital processing domains. A chirp rate offset is applied between the received waveform and the reference waveform that is used for downconversion to the intermediate frequency (IF) range. The chirp rate offset results in a residual chirp in the IF signal prior to digitization. After digitization, the residual IF chirp is removed with digital signal processing.

  3. Potential Field Cellular Automata Model for Pedestrian Evacuation in a Domain with a Ramp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Xia Jian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a potential field cellular automata model with a pushing force field to simulate the pedestrian evacuation in a domain with a ramp. We construct a cost potential depending on the ramp angle and introduce a function to evaluate the pushing force, which is related to the cost and the desired direction of pedestrian. With increase of crowd density, there is no empty space for pedestrian moving forward; pedestrian will purposefully push another pedestrian on her or his desired location to arrive the destination quickly. We analyse the relationship between the slope of ramp and the pushing force and investigate the changing of injured situations with the changing of the slope of ramp. When the number of pedestrians and the ramp angle arrive at certain critical points, the Domino effect will be simulated by this proposed model.

  4. Striatal dopamine ramping may indicate flexible reinforcement learning with forgetting in the cortico-basal ganglia circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Kenji; Kato, Ayaka

    2014-01-01

    It has been suggested that the midbrain dopamine (DA) neurons, receiving inputs from the cortico-basal ganglia (CBG) circuits and the brainstem, compute reward prediction error (RPE), the difference between reward obtained or expected to be obtained and reward that had been expected to be obtained. These reward expectations are suggested to be stored in the CBG synapses and updated according to RPE through synaptic plasticity, which is induced by released DA. These together constitute the “DA=RPE” hypothesis, which describes the mutual interaction between DA and the CBG circuits and serves as the primary working hypothesis in studying reward learning and value-based decision-making. However, recent work has revealed a new type of DA signal that appears not to represent RPE. Specifically, it has been found in a reward-associated maze task that striatal DA concentration primarily shows a gradual increase toward the goal. We explored whether such ramping DA could be explained by extending the “DA=RPE” hypothesis by taking into account biological properties of the CBG circuits. In particular, we examined effects of possible time-dependent decay of DA-dependent plastic changes of synaptic strengths by incorporating decay of learned values into the RPE-based reinforcement learning model and simulating reward learning tasks. We then found that incorporation of such a decay dramatically changes the model's behavior, causing gradual ramping of RPE. Moreover, we further incorporated magnitude-dependence of the rate of decay, which could potentially be in accord with some past observations, and found that near-sigmoidal ramping of RPE, resembling the observed DA ramping, could then occur. Given that synaptic decay can be useful for flexibly reversing and updating the learned reward associations, especially in case the baseline DA is low and encoding of negative RPE by DA is limited, the observed DA ramping would be indicative of the operation of such flexible reward

  5. Study on traffic characteristics for a typical expressway on-ramp bottleneck considering various merging behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jie; Li, Zhipeng; Sun, Jian

    2015-12-01

    Recurring bottlenecks at freeway/expressway are considered as the main cause of traffic congestion in urban traffic system while on-ramp bottlenecks are the most significant sites that may result in congestion. In this paper, the traffic bottleneck characteristics for a simple and typical expressway on-ramp are investigated by the means of simulation modeling under the open boundary condition. In simulations, the running behaviors of each vehicle are described by a car-following model with a calibrated optimal velocity function, and lane changing actions at the merging section are modeled by a novel set of rules. We numerically derive the traffic volume of on-ramp bottleneck under different upstream arrival rates of mainline and ramp flows. It is found that the vehicles from the ramp strongly affect the pass of mainline vehicles and the merging ratio changes with the increasing of ramp vehicle, when the arrival rate of mainline flow is greater than a critical value. In addition, we clarify the dependence of the merging ratio of on-ramp bottleneck on the probability of lane changing and the length of the merging section, and some corresponding intelligent control strategies are proposed in actual traffic application.

  6. The effect of temperature fluctuations of reaction rate constants in turbulent reacting flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinitz, W.; Antaki, P. J.; Kassar, G. M.

    1981-01-01

    Current models of turbulent reacting flows frequently use Arrhenius reaction rate constants obtained from static or laminar flow theory and/or experiments, or from best fits of static, laminar, and turbulent data. By treating the reaction rate constant as a continuous random variable which is temperature-dependent, the present study assesses the effect of turbulent temperature fluctuations on the reaction rate constant. This model requires that a probability density function (PDF) describing the nature of the fluctuations be specified. Three PDFs are examined: the clipped Gaussian, the beta PDF, and the ramp model. All the models indicate that the reaction rate constant is greater in a turbulent flow field than in an equivalent laminar flow. In addition, an amplification ratio, which is the ratio of the turbulent rate constant to the laminar rate constant, is defined and its behavior as a function of the mean temperature fluctuations is described

  7. Theory of Feshbach molecule formation in a dilute gas during a magnetic field ramp

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, J. E.; Nygaard, Nicolai; Clark, C. W.

    2006-01-01

    Starting with coupled atom-molecule Boltzmann equations, we develop a simplified model to understand molecule formation observed in recent experiments. Our theory predicts several key features: (1) the effective adiabatic rate constant is proportional to density; (2) in an adiabatic ramp......, the dependence of molecular fraction on magnetic field resembles an error function whose width and centroid are related to the temperature; (3) the molecular production efficiency is a universal function of the initial phase space density, the specific form of which we derive for a classical gas. Our predictions...

  8. Extracting Strength from Ramp-Release Experiments on Z

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Justin

    2013-06-01

    Releasing from a compressed state has long been recognized as a sensitive measure of a material's constitutive response. The initial elastic unloading provides insights which can be related to changes in shear stress or, in the context of classic plasticity, to the material's yield surface. Ramp compression and subsequent release experiments on Sandia's Z machine typically consist of a driving aluminum electrode pushing a sample material which is backed by a window. A particle velocity measurement of the sample/window interface provides a ramp-release profile. Under most circumstances, however, the impedance mismatch at this interface results in the measurement of a highly perturbed velocity, particularly at the late times of interest. Wave attenuation, the finite pressure range over which the material elastically unloads, and rate effects additionally complicate the interpretation of the experiment. In an effort to accurately analyze experiments of this type, each of these complications is addressed. The wave interactions are accounted for through the so-called transfer function methodology and involves a coupling of the experimental measurements with numerical simulations. Simulated window velocity measurements are combined with the corresponding in situ simulations to define a mapping describing the wave interactions due to the presence of the window. Applying this mapping to the experimentally measured velocity results in an in situ sample response which may then be used in a classic Lagrangian analysis from which the strength can be extracted via the self-consistent method. Corrections for attenuation, pressure averaging, and limitations of the analysis due to rate-effects are verified through the use of synthetic data. To date, results on the strength of aluminum to 1.2 MBar, beryllium to 1 MBar, and tantalum to over 2 MBar have been obtained through this methodology and will be presented. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by

  9. Arthroscopic prevalence of ramp lesion in 868 patients with anterior cruciate ligament injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Feng, Hua; Zhang, Hui; Hong, Lei; Wang, Xue Song; Zhang, Jin

    2011-04-01

    A special type of repairable meniscal lesion involving the peripheral attachment of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus is commonly associated with anterior cruciate ligament deficiency and is termed a "ramp lesion." However, there are no previously published articles reporting the epidemiologic characteristics of ramp lesions. The ramp lesion is a special type of medial meniscal tear with high prevalence associated with anterior cruciate ligament rupture; the prevalence increases with time from anterior cruciate ligament injury. Age and gender are risk factors affecting the prevalence of the ramp lesion. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. From April 2002 to October 2007, 868 consecutive knees were diagnosed as having an anterior cruciate ligament injury and received arthroscopic surgery for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. All the patients had verified tears of the ramp area under arthroscopy. The prevalence of the ramp lesion was evaluated retrospectively. Then, all cases were divided into different groups depending on the time interval from anterior cruciate ligament injury to anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction and other relevant risk factors such as age and gender. The effects of age, gender, and time from injury on the prevalence of ramp lesions were analyzed. Among 868 knees that underwent surgery for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, 144 knees were diagnosed as having a ramp lesion. The mean age was 24.7 years; there were 113 male and 31 female patients. The mean time from injury to anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction was 27.2 months. The prevalence of ramp lesions was 16.6%, which was analyzed as a logarithmic correlation with time from injury. Patients younger than 30 years of age and male patients had a significantly higher prevalence of ramp lesions. The ramp lesion is a common meniscal injury that can occur at the time of anterior cruciate ligament rupture or as a result of knee laxity associated with

  10. Lean Application to Manufacturing Ramp-Up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Irene; Rymaszewska, Anna

    2016-01-01

    This article provides a theoretical overview of the concepts of lean and manufacturing ramp-up in an attempt to conceptualize the strategic areas in which lean philosophy and principles can be applied for continuous improvements. The application of lean principles during the final stage of a new...... product development process, that is, the ramp-up process, is a critical, early enabler of lean manufacturing. The manufacturing strategy literature conceptualizes a state of “leanness in operations,” which can consolidate both the concepts of lean and manufacturing ramp-up, providing a dual perspective....... Abstracting from the extant literature, the authors considered the competitiveness of manufacturing companies from two principal perspectives: the leanness of the ramp-up process and the new-value creation of quality managers. While much of the literature fails to acknowledge that the roots of lean actually...

  11. Deficiency of RAMP1 attenuates antigen-induced airway hyperresponsiveness in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manyu Li

    Full Text Available Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease affecting the lung, characterized by breathing difficulty during an attack following exposure to an environmental trigger. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP is a neuropeptide that may have a pathological role in asthma. The CGRP receptor is comprised of two components, which include the G-protein coupled receptor, calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR, and receptor activity-modifying protein 1 (RAMP1. RAMPs, including RAMP1, mediate ligand specificity in addition to aiding in the localization of receptors to the cell surface. Since there has been some controversy regarding the effect of CGRP on asthma, we sought to determine the effect of CGRP signaling ablation in an animal model of asthma. Using gene-targeting techniques, we generated mice deficient for RAMP1 by excising exon 3. After determining that these mice are viable and overtly normal, we sensitized the animals to ovalbumin prior to assessing airway resistance and inflammation after methacholine challenge. We found that mice lacking RAMP1 had reduced airway resistance and inflammation compared to wildtype animals. Additionally, we found that a 50% reduction of CLR, the G-protein receptor component of the CGRP receptor, also ameliorated airway resistance and inflammation in this model of allergic asthma. Interestingly, the loss of CLR from the smooth muscle cells did not alter the airway resistance, indicating that CGRP does not act directly on the smooth muscle cells to drive airway hyperresponsiveness. Together, these data indicate that signaling through RAMP1 and CLR plays a role in mediating asthma pathology. Since RAMP1 and CLR interact to form a receptor for CGRP, our data indicate that aberrant CGRP signaling, perhaps on lung endothelial and inflammatory cells, contributes to asthma pathophysiology. Finally, since RAMP-receptor interfaces are pharmacologically tractable, it may be possible to develop compounds targeting the RAMP1/CLR

  12. Wind-Friendly Flexible Ramping Product Design in Multi-Timescale Power System Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Mingjian; Zhang, Jie; Wu, Hongyu; Hodge, Bri-Mathias

    2017-07-01

    With increasing wind power penetration in the electricity grid, system operators are recognizing the need for additional flexibility, and some are implementing new ramping products as a type of ancillary service. However, wind is generally thought of as causing the need for ramping services, not as being a potential source for the service. In this paper, a multi-timescale unit commitment and economic dispatch model is developed to consider the wind power ramping product (WPRP). An optimized swinging door algorithm with dynamic programming is applied to identify and forecast wind power ramps (WPRs). Designed as positive characteristics of WPRs, the WPRP is then integrated into the multi-timescale dispatch model that considers new objective functions, ramping capacity limits, active power limits, and flexible ramping requirements. Numerical simulations on the modified IEEE 118-bus system show the potential effectiveness of WPRP in increasing the economic efficiency of power system operations with high levels of wind power penetration. It is found that WPRP not only reduces the production cost by using less ramping reserves scheduled by conventional generators, but also possibly enhances the reliability of power system operations. Moreover, wind power forecasts play an important role in providing high-quality WPRP service.

  13. Thermal shock resistance behavior of a functionally graded ceramic: Effects of finite cooling rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhihe Jin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a semi-analytical model to explore the effects of cooling rate on the thermal shock resistance behavior of a functionally graded ceramic (FGC plate with a periodic array of edge cracks. The FGC is assumed to be a thermally heterogeneous material with constant elastic modulus and Poisson's ratio. The cooling rate applied at the FGC surface is modeled using a linear ramp function. An integral equation method and a closed form asymptotic temperature solution are employed to compute the thermal stress intensity factor (TSIF. The thermal shock residual strength and critical thermal shock of the FGC plate are obtained using the SIF criterion. Thermal shock simulations for an Al2O3/Si3N4 FGC indicate that a finite cooling rate leads to a significantly higher critical thermal shock than that under the sudden cooling condition. The residual strength, however, is relatively insensitive to the cooling rate.

  14. Implications of sea-level rise in a modern carbonate ramp setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokier, Stephen W.; Court, Wesley M.; Onuma, Takumi; Paul, Andreas

    2018-03-01

    This study addresses a gap in our understanding of the effects of sea-level rise on the sedimentary systems and morphological development of recent and ancient carbonate ramp settings. Many ancient carbonate sequences are interpreted as having been deposited in carbonate ramp settings. These settings are poorly-represented in the Recent. The study documents the present-day transgressive flooding of the Abu Dhabi coastline at the southern shoreline of the Arabian/Persian Gulf, a carbonate ramp depositional system that is widely employed as a Recent analogue for numerous ancient carbonate systems. Fourteen years of field-based observations are integrated with historical and recent high-resolution satellite imagery in order to document and assess the onset of flooding. Predicted rates of transgression (i.e. landward movement of the shoreline) of 2.5 m yr- 1 (± 0.2 m yr- 1) based on global sea-level rise alone were far exceeded by the flooding rate calculated from the back-stepping of coastal features (10-29 m yr- 1). This discrepancy results from the dynamic nature of the flooding with increased water depth exposing the coastline to increased erosion and, thereby, enhancing back-stepping. A non-accretionary transgressive shoreline trajectory results from relatively rapid sea-level rise coupled with a low-angle ramp geometry and a paucity of sediments. The flooding is represented by the landward migration of facies belts, a range of erosive features and the onset of bioturbation. Employing Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (Church et al., 2013) predictions for 21st century sea-level rise, and allowing for the post-flooding lag time that is typical for the start-up of carbonate factories, it is calculated that the coastline will continue to retrograde for the foreseeable future. Total passive flooding (without considering feedback in the modification of the shoreline) by the year 2100 is calculated to likely be between 340 and 571 m with a flooding rate of 3

  15. Fast-ramp rapid vertical processor for 300-mm Si wafer processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Cole; Laser, Allan; Herring, Robert; Pandey, Pradeep

    1998-09-01

    Fast-ramp vertical furnace technology has been established on the 200-nm wafer platform providing higher capacity production, decreased cycle time and lower thermal budgets. Fast-ramp furnaces are capable of instantaneous temperature ramp rates up to 100 degrees C/min. This fast-ramp technology is now applied to 300-nm wafer processing on the SVG/Thermco Rapid Vertical Processor Vertical Furnace. 300- mm fast-ramp capability using the latest in real-time adaptive model based temperature control technology, Clairvoyant Control, is reported. Atmospheric Thermal Oxidation, LPCVD Nitride and Polysilicon Deposition, and LPCVD TEOS-based SiO2 Deposition results are discussed. 300- mm wafer Radial Delta Temperature dependence on temperature ramp rate, wafer pitch, and wafer support fixtures are discussed. Wafer throughput is calculated and reported. The Clairvoyant Control methodology of combining thermal, direct and virtually-sensed parameters to produce real-tim e estimation of wafer temperatures, thermal trajectory optimization, and feedback to minimize variations in film thickness and electrical properties is presented.

  16. LHC Report: intensity ramp-up – familiar demons

    CERN Multimedia

    Mike Lamont for the LHC team

    2015-01-01

    The first 2015 scrubbing run ended on Friday, 3 July and successfully delivered a well-scrubbed machine ready for operation with a 50 ns beam. This opened the way for the first phase of the so-called beam intensity ramp-up. The last couple of weeks have seen the number of bunches increase from 3 to 476 per beam via periods of 50, 144 and 300 bunches per beam.   The graph plots the rate of LHC beam dumps due to single-event effects (SEE) versus beam luminosity. It is an indication of the importance of tackling this issue.   To verify the full and proper functioning of all systems, operators need at least 3 fills and 20 hours of stable beams without significant problems. After 20 hours, an extensive checklist is signed off by the system experts before the next step up in the number of bunches. The systems involved include magnet protection, radio-frequency, beam instrumentation, collimation, operations, feedback, beam dump and injection. Increasing the total beam intensity poses a numb...

  17. A Novel Parameter for Ramp Metering and Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Jia, Yuanhua; Zhang, Yong; Chen, Feng; Ao, Guchang

    Real and scientific traffic flow parameter are the basis to make efficient traffic control strategy and establish control function and this will leads to an appropriate and impartial reflection to efficiency and equity of control property. Intelligent control is a new development where the control problem is to find the combination of control measures that result in the best road performance and control effectiveness. The problems of intelligent metering evaluation for local ramp are considered. In this paper, a novel ramp queuing parameter-the reduplicated waiting time was posed using the queuing theory. With in-situ traffic flow data, comparison between the novel and previous parameters are made to clarify the advantages of the novel parameter.

  18. Micro-Ramps for Hypersonic Flow Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Kontis

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Shock/boundary layer interaction (SBLI is an undesirable phenomenon, occurring in high-speed propulsion systems. The conventional method to manipulate and control SBLI is using a bleed system that involves the removal of a certain amount of mass of the inlet flow to control boundary layer separation. However, the system requires a larger nacelle to compensate the mass loss, larger nacelles contribute to additional weight and drag and reduce the overall performance. This study investigates a novel type of flow control device called micro-ramps, a part of the micro vortex generators (VGs family that intends to replace the bleed technique. Micro-ramps produce pairs of counter-rotating streamwise vortices, which help to suppress SBLI and reduce the chances of flow separation. Experiments were done at Mach 5 with two micro-ramp models of different sizes. Schlieren photography, surface flow visualization and infrared thermography were used in this investigation. The results revealed the detailed flow characteristics of the micro-ramp, such as the primary and secondary vortices. This helps us to understand the overall flow physics of micro-ramps in hypersonic flow and their application for SBLI control.

  19. A Collaborative Strategy for a Three Echelon Supply Chain with Ramp Type Demand, Deterioration and Inflation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayan Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A supply chain system has been investigated in which a single manufacturer procures raw materials from a single supplier, processes them to produce finished products, and then delivers the products to a single retailer. The customer's demand rate is assumed to be time-sensitive in nature (ramp type that allows two-phase variation in the demand and production rate. Our adoption of ramp type demand reflects a real market demand for a newly launched product. Shortages are allowed with partial backlogging of demand (only for the retailer, i.e. the rest represent lost sales. The effects of inflation of the cost parameters and deterioration are also considered separately. We show that the total cost function is convex. Using this convexity, a simple algorithm is presented to determine the optimal order quantity and optimal cycle time for the total cost function. The results are discussed with numerical examples and particular cases of the model discussed briefly. A sensitivity analysis of the optimal solution with respect to the parameters of the system is carried out. (original abstract

  20. Fast Ramping Superconducting Magnet Design Issues for Future Injector Upgrades at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Kirby, G A; Bottura, L; Auchmann, B; Catalan-Lasheras, N

    2008-01-01

    An upgrade of the LHC injection chain, and especially the sequence of PS and SPS, up to an extraction energy of 1 TeV, is one of the steps considered to improve the performance of the whole accelerator complex. The magnets for this upgrade require central magnetic field from 2 T (for a PS upgrade) to 4.5 T (for an SPS upgrade), for which superconducting magnets are a candidate. Due to the fast field sweep rate of the magnets (from about 1.5 T/s to 2.5 T/s), internal heating from eddy and persistent current effects (AC loss) must be minimized. In this paper we discuss a rationale for the design and optimization of fast ramped superconducting accelerator magnets, specifically aimed at the LHC injectors. We introduce a design parameter, the product of bore field and field ramp-rate, providing a measure of the magnet performance, and we apply it to choose the design range for a technology demonstration magnet. We finally discuss the dependence of key design parameters on the bore field and the bore diameter...

  1. Accelerating Science Driven System Design With RAMP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wawrzynek, John [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Researchers from UC Berkeley, in collaboration with the Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, are engaged in developing an Infrastructure for Synthesis with Integrated Simulation (ISIS). The ISIS Project was a cooperative effort for “application-driven hardware design” that engages application scientists in the early parts of the hardware design process for future generation supercomputing systems. This project served to foster development of computing systems that are better tuned to the application requirements of demanding scientific applications and result in more cost-effective and efficient HPC system designs. In order to overcome long conventional design-cycle times, we leveraged reconfigurable devices to aid in the design of high-efficiency systems, including conventional multi- and many-core systems. The resulting system emulation/prototyping environment, in conjunction with the appropriate intermediate abstractions, provided both a convenient user programming experience and retained flexibility, and thus efficiency, of a reconfigurable platform. We initially targeted the Berkeley RAMP system (Research Accelerator for Multiple Processors) as that hardware emulation environment to facilitate and ultimately accelerate the iterative process of science-driven system design. Our goal was to develop and demonstrate a design methodology for domain-optimized computer system architectures. The tangible outcome is a methodology and tools for rapid prototyping and design-space exploration, leading to highly optimized and efficient HPC systems.

  2. Coordinated Ramp Metering and Intersection Signal Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongyan Su

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The operations of freeway ramp metering and urban traffic network signal control are independent in most areas. Such situation may cause some conflict between traffic streams of the two subsystems, or, at least, their dynamic interactions have not been taken into account from an overall system viewpoint. Traffic performance can be improved if the controls of these two subnetworks are integrated. This paper proposes a novel signal control strategy for the feeding intersection and a coordination strategy for integrating it with the corresponding freeway onramp metering. UP ALINEA with queue-overwrite is used for the ramp metering. A signal optimization, which takes into account the available ramp space and traffic demand, is developed for intersection signal control. A calibrated micro-simulation is used to compare the proposed control/coordination strategies and current control plans in the field. Simulation result shows that, even though the overall system performance only gets a marginal improvement, intersection delay reduces significantly.

  3. Effects of Liraglutide on Heart Rate and Heart Rate Variability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumarathurai, Preman; Anholm, Christian; Larsen, Bjørn Strøier

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Reduced heart rate variability (HRV) and increased heart rate (HR) have been associated with cardiovascular mortality. Glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonists (GLP-1 RAs) increase HR, and studies have suggested that they may reduce HRV. We examined the effect of the GLP-1 RA...

  4. Effect of kinetic parameters on simultaneous ramp reactivity insertion plus beam tube flooding accident in a typical low enriched U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-Al fuel-based material testing reactor-type research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasir, Rubina; Mirza, Nasir M. [Dept. of, Physics, Air University, Islamabad (Pakistan); Mirza, Sikander M. [Dept. of, Physics and Applied Mathematics, Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Post Office Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2017-06-15

    This work looks at the effect of changes in kinetic parameters on simultaneous reactivity insertions and beam tube flooding in a typical material testing reactor-type research reactor with low enriched high density (U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-Al) fuel. Using a modified PARET code, various ramp reactivity insertions (from $0.1/0.5 s to $1.3/0.5 s) plus beam tube flooding ($0.5/0.25 s) accidents under uncontrolled conditions were analyzed to find their effects on peak power, net reactivity, and temperature. Then, the effects of changes in kinetic parameters including the Doppler coefficient, prompt neutron lifetime, and delayed neutron fractions on simultaneous reactivity insertion and beam tube flooding accidents were analyzed. Results show that the power peak values are significantly sensitive to the Doppler coefficient of the system in coupled accidents. The material testing reactor-type system under such a coupled accident is not very sensitive to changes in the prompt neutron life time; the core under such a coupled transient is not very sensitive to changes in the effective delayed neutron fraction.

  5. Entry ramps in the Nagel-Schreckenberg model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Morten Monrad; Ruhoff, Peder Thusgaard

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes a way of including entry ramps in the Nagel-Schreckenberg traffic model. The idea is to place what are called shadow cars on a highway next to cars on entry ramps, which enables the drivers to take ramp cars into account. The model is shown to capture important real...

  6. Spectral properties of electromyographic and mechanomyographic signals during isometric ramp and step contractions in biceps brachii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Liping; Wakeling, James M; Green, Adam; Lambrecht, Kirstin; Ferguson-Pell, Martin

    2011-02-01

    The purposes of this study were: (1) to apply wavelet and principal component analysis to quantify the spectral properties of the surface EMG and MMG signals from biceps brachii during isometric ramp and step muscle contractions when the motor units are recruited in an orderly manner, and (2) to compare the recruitment patterns of motor unit during isometric ramp and step muscle contractions. Twenty healthy participants (age = 34 ± 10.7 years) performed step and ramped isometric contractions. Surface EMG and MMG were recorded from biceps brachii. The EMGs and MMGs were decomposed into their intensities in time-frequency space using a wavelet technique. The EMG and MMG spectra were then compared using principal component analysis (PCA) and ANCOVA. Wavelet combined PCA offers a quantitative measure of the contribution of high and low frequency content within the EMG and MMG. The ANCOVA indicated that there was no significant difference in EMG total intensity, EMG(MPF), first and second principal component loading scores (PCI and PCII) between ramp and step contractions, whereas the MMG(MPF) and MMG PCI loading scores were significantly higher during ramp contractions than during step contractions. These findings suggested that EMG and MMG may offer complimentary information regarding the interactions between motor unit recruitment and firing rate that control muscle force production. In addition, our results support the hypothesis that different motor unit recruitment strategy was used by the muscle when contracting under different conditions. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Off ramp : a secondary school TDM program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haq, F. [Better Environmentally Sound Transportation (BEST), Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2002-07-01

    The cities of Vancouver and Victoria in British Columbia have implemented a high school vehicle trip reduction program entitled Off-Ramp. The program, created by BEST, is about youth empowerment to help youths lead their peers to walk, cycle, skateboard, in-line skate, or carpool to school for a sustainable environment. Students raise awareness through media and drama to counter pop images of driving as being cool. Sponsorship is very important to the success of the program.

  8. A survey on wind power ramp forecasting.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, C.; Gama, J.; Matias, L.; Botterud, A.; Wang, J. (Decision and Information Sciences); (INESC Porto)

    2011-02-23

    The increasing use of wind power as a source of electricity poses new challenges with regard to both power production and load balance in the electricity grid. This new source of energy is volatile and highly variable. The only way to integrate such power into the grid is to develop reliable and accurate wind power forecasting systems. Electricity generated from wind power can be highly variable at several different timescales: sub-hourly, hourly, daily, and seasonally. Wind energy, like other electricity sources, must be scheduled. Although wind power forecasting methods are used, the ability to predict wind plant output remains relatively low for short-term operation. Because instantaneous electrical generation and consumption must remain in balance to maintain grid stability, wind power's variability can present substantial challenges when large amounts of wind power are incorporated into a grid system. A critical issue is ramp events, which are sudden and large changes (increases or decreases) in wind power. This report presents an overview of current ramp definitions and state-of-the-art approaches in ramp event forecasting.

  9. Plasma-Assisted Control of Mach-2 Flowfield over Ramp Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Yasumasa; Leonov, Sergey B.; Houpt, Alec; Hedlund, Brock E.; Elliott, Skye

    2017-10-01

    This study examined the effect of Reynolds number on plasma-assisted flow control ahead of a compression ramp geometry in Mach-2 supersonic flow. The experiments were conducted in the supersonic wind tunnel SBR-50 at the University of Notre Dame. Stagnation temperature and pressure were varied as T0=294-500K and P0=1-3bar to attain Reynolds number ranging from 3.4×105-2.2×106. Ramp pressure measurements, schlieren visualization, and high-speed camera imaging were used for the evaluation of plasma-assisted flow control effects. A linear dependency was found between the ramp pressure change per averaged plasma power and Reynolds number.

  10. Solar Power Ramp Events Detection Using an Optimized Swinging Door Algorithm: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Mingjian; Zhang, Jie; Florita, Anthony; Hodge, Bri-Mathias; Ke, Deping; Sun, Yuanzhang

    2015-08-07

    Solar power ramp events (SPREs) are those that significantly influence the integration of solar power on non-clear days and threaten the reliable and economic operation of power systems. Accurately extracting solar power ramps becomes more important with increasing levels of solar power penetrations in power systems. In this paper, we develop an optimized swinging door algorithm (OpSDA) to detection. First, the swinging door algorithm (SDA) is utilized to segregate measured solar power generation into consecutive segments in a piecewise linear fashion. Then we use a dynamic programming approach to combine adjacent segments into significant ramps when the decision thresholds are met. In addition, the expected SPREs occurring in clear-sky solar power conditions are removed. Measured solar power data from Tucson Electric Power is used to assess the performance of the proposed methodology. OpSDA is compared to two other ramp detection methods: the SDA and the L1-Ramp Detect with Sliding Window (L1-SW) method. The statistical results show the validity and effectiveness of the proposed method. OpSDA can significantly improve the performance of the SDA, and it can perform as well as or better than L1-SW with substantially less computation time.

  11. [A prospective randomized control trial of arthroscopic surgery for stable ramp lesion of the medial meniscus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X; Feng, H; Hong, L; Zhang, H

    2017-03-01

    Objective: To evaluate the necessity of arthroscopic suture repair for the stable ramp lesion. Methods: From August 2008 to April 2012, 91 patients of consecutive cases were diagnosed as anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury associated with stable ramp lesion in Department of Sports Medicine Service of Beijing Jishuitan Hospital. All of the diagnosis was confirmed during arthroscopic surgeries. The patients were randomized into suture repair group and control group. The ACL was reconstructed using auto grafts of hamstring. MRI was used for evaluation of the healing of the ramp lesion during the follow-up period. The stability of the knee joint was evaluated using KT-1000 device. The clinical functional outcomes were analyzed with Lysholm and International Knee Documentation Committee(IKDC) score. t test and χ(2) test were used to analyze the data, respectively. Results: There were 73 patients (80%) were available for final follow-up. The follow-up period was 24 to 72 months (mean (38.9±16.1) months). The suture repair group included 40 patients, while the control group included 33 patients. There were no statistically difference in age(t=0.458, P>0.05), gender(χ(2)=0.222, P>0.05), time interval from injury(t=0.643, P>0.05) and associated injuries(χ(2)=0.658, P>0.05). At the final follow-up, the healing rate of ramp lesion in suture repair group was 97.5% (95% of complete healed, 2.5% of partial healed, and 2.5% of non-healed), in control group the healing rate was 93.9% (87.8% of complete healed, 6.1% of partial healed, and 6.1% of non healed), there were no significant differences between the two groups (χ(2)=0.446, P>0.05). There was no statistically significant difference of postoperative knee stability (t=-0.510, P>0.05). The healing status of ramp area from MRI evaluation had statistically significant correlation with the ACL stability (χ(2)=11.919, P0.05; t=0.032, P>0.05). Conclusions: Stable ramp lesion could be well healed after arthroscopic

  12. Transport physics of ASDEX Upgrade current ramps: experiment and theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fable, E; Angioni, C; Fietz, S; Hobirk, J; Pereverzev, G, E-mail: emiliano.fable@ipp.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2010-11-01

    Interpretative analysis of experimental data from the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak current ramps-up and ramps-down is carried out to shed light on the properties of confinement and transport in these particular phases of the plasma discharge. It is found that the two ramps are similar in parameters evolution, but are not symmetric with respect to the current level, for several reasons that will be elucidated. Theory-based energy transport modeling allows to understand the underlying transport processes at play, although there are limitations in describing the edge part of the plasma at very low currents, in particular during ramp-up. Possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed. Finally, the relevant turbulence (linear) regime is identified simultaneously with calculations of quasi-linear particle transport, showing that a broad range of modes, from Trapped Electron Modes (TEM) to Ion Temperature Gradient (ITG) modes, is explored during both the ramp-up and ramp-down.

  13. Iterative ramp sharpening for structure signature-preserving simplification of images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grazzini, Jacopo A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Soille, Pierre [EC-JRC

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present a simple and heuristic ramp sharpening algorithm that achieves local contrast enhancement of vector-valued images. The proposed algorithm performs a local comparison of intensity values as well as gradient strength and directional information derived from the gradient structure tensor so that the sharpening is applied only for pixels found on the ramps around true edges. This way, the contrast between objects and regions separated by a ramp is enhanced correspondingly, avoiding ringing artefacts. It is found that applying this technique in an iterative manner on blurred imagery produces sharpening preserving both structure and signature of the image. The final approach reaches a good compromise between complexity and effectiveness for image simplification, enhancing in an efficient manner the image details and maintaining the overall image appearance.

  14. Determining the Flexible Ramping Capacity of Electric Vehicles to Enhance Locational Flexibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dam Kim

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A high penetration level of renewable energy in a power system increases variability and uncertainty, which can lead to ramping capability shortage. This makes the stable operation of a power system difficult. However, appropriate management of electric vehicles (EVs can overcome such difficulties. In this study, EVs were applied as a flexible ramping product (FRP, and a method was developed to increase the system ramping capability. When increasing the FRP to the amount required for the system, the effect on transmission lines cannot be neglected. Thus, the required FRP considering transmission constraints is calculated separately for each zone to secure deliverability. To make adjustment possible, the zonal available capacity is calculated by considering the probabilities of the location and the plugged and charged states of EVs. The applicability of EVs as an FRP resource is examined, and the results showed that they can be used at a more significant level considering the transmission constraints.

  15. Flying Off a Frictionless Curved Ramp

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Conservation of mechanical energy. Resumen Una ecuación general se deriva para un punto a lo largo de una trayectoria curvada descendente, de una partícula...objeto empieza desde el reposo hasta un punto en que la pendiente de la curva es cero. La velocidad de lanzamiento y el ángulo se calculan para los...gravitational field having magnitude g . The particle loses contact with the track when it has speed 0 and when the slope of the ramp makes angle 0

  16. LHC Report: Intensity ramp-up

    CERN Multimedia

    Mike Lamont for the LHC Team

    2012-01-01

    The first stable beams at 4 TeV were declared on Thursday, 5 April with 3 bunches per beam. This marked the start of the intensity ramp-up, which aims to get back up to 1380 bunches per beam as quickly as is safely possible.   The next couple of days saw fills with 47, 84 and 264 bunches per beam and on Sunday, 8 April the move was made to 624 bunches. With the squeeze to 60 cm in place, 624 bunches with reasonably high bunch intensities of around 1.3 to 1.4 x1011 protons per bunch have already yielded respectable peak luminosities of up to 2.5 x1033 cm-2s-1. Following a lot of hard work during the Christmas technical stop, machine availability is very good at the moment. The ramp-up in the number of bunches is accompanied by a series of checks aimed to make sure the machine protection systems and operational procedures are in a good enough shape to safely deal with the beam intensity. 624 bunches at 4 TeV already represents an energy over 50 MJ and serious damage potential. The next few days sh...

  17. Comparison of four different categories of prosthetic feet during ramp ambulation in unilateral transtibial amputees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Vibhor; Gailey, Robert S; Gaunaurd, Ignacio A; O'Toole, Christopher; Finnieston, Adam; Tolchin, Ronald

    2015-10-01

    Comparative effectiveness of prosthetic feet during ramp ambulation in unilateral transtibial amputees, who function at different Medicare Functional Classification Levels, has not been published. To determine differences in symmetry in external work between four categories of prosthetic feet in K-Level-2 and K-Level-3 unilateral transtibial amputees during ramp ascent and descent. Randomized repeated-measures trial. Ten subjects completed six testing sessions during which symmetry in external work was calculated using F-scan in-sole sensors. Between testing sessions 1 and 2, subjects received standardized functional prosthetic training. In Sessions 3-6, subjects tested four feet--solid ankle cushion heel, stationary attachment flexible endoskeleton, Talux (categories K1, K2, and K3, respectively), and Proprio-Foot (microprocessor ankle)--using a study socket and had a 10- to 14-day accommodation period with each foot. During ramp descent, K-Level-2 subjects demonstrated higher symmetry in external work values with Talux and Proprio-Foot compared to the solid ankle cushion heel foot. K-Level-3 subjects also had higher symmetry in external work values with the Talux foot than the solid ankle cushion heel foot. Ramp ascent symmetry in external work values were not significantly different between feet. Prosthetic foot category appears to influence symmetry in external work more during decline walking than incline walking. K-Level-2 unilateral transtibial amputees achieve greater symmetry from K3 dynamic response prosthetic feet with J-shaped ankle and microprocessor ankles while descending ramps. The findings suggest that K-Level-2 unilateral transtibial amputees benefit from K3 dynamic response prosthetic feet with J-shaped ankle. These results support the prescription of K3 feet for K-Level-2 amputees who frequently negotiate ramps. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics 2014.

  18. The healthy immigrant effect and mortality rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Edward

    2011-12-01

    According to the 2006 Census, almost the Canadian population were foreign-born, a percentage that is projected to reach at least 25% by 2031. Studies based on age-standardized mortality rates (ASMR) have found a healthy immigrant effect, with lower overall rates among immigrants. A duration effect has also been observed-immigrants' mortality advantage lessened as their time in Canada increased. ASMRs based on the 1991 to 2001 census mortality follow-up study indicate a healthy immigrant effect and a duration effect at the national level for all-cause mortality for both sexes. However, at the national level, the mortality rate among women from the United States and from Sub-Saharan Africa was similar to that of Canadian-born women. For the three largest Census Metropolitan Areas (Toronto, Montreal and Vancouver), a healthy immigrant effect was not observed among women or among most men from the United States or Sub-Saharan Africa.

  19. Tissue response of selective retina therapy by means of a feedback-controlled energy ramping mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Young-Gun; Seifert, Eric; Roh, Young J; Theisen-Kunde, Dirk; Kang, Seungbum; Brinkmann, Ralf

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the safety and selectivity of the retinal pigment epithelium lesions by using automatic energy ramping and dosimetry technique for selective retina therapy and to investigate the healing response. Ten eyes of Chinchilla Bastard rabbits were treated with an automatic dosage controlled selective retina therapy laser (frequency doubled Q-switched Nd:YLF, wavelength: 527 nm, pulse duration: 1.7 μs, repetition rate: 100 Hz, pulse energy: linear increasing from pulse to pulse up to shut down - maximal 110 μJ, max. number of pulses in a burst: 30, retinal spot diameter: 133 μm). After treatment, fundus photography, optical coherence tomography and fluorescein angiography were performed at three time points from 1 h to 3 weeks. Histological analysis was performed. A total of 381 selective retina therapy laser spots were tested (range 13-104 μJ).Typical fundus photographs obtained at 1 h after irradiation showed that 379 out of 381 lesions produced by selective retina therapy were not visible ophthalmoscopically and the lesions could be detected by angiography only. Optical coherence tomography images revealed that the structure of photoreceptors was preserved, but a disrupted retinal pigment epithelium layer was observed as was expected. By 3 weeks, histology showed selective retinal pigment epithelium damage without any effect on the inner retina and focal proliferation of the retinal pigment epithelium layer. Automatically controlled selective retina therapy is a significant improvement in this innovative treatment. It could be demonstrated that the non-contact, reflectometric technique with a controlled pulse energy ramp is safe and selective. © 2014 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

  20. Analysis of the potential of building ramps in hydrotechnical structures as a means of facilitating fish migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Tymiński

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Measures aimed at preserving “ecological corridors” in rivers are a difficult and complex issue that requires specialized knowledge from many science disciplines. Fishways are one of the most important solutions that ensure the ecological continuity of rivers for fish, particularly due to their near-natural design. A characteristic feature of their construction is the use of natural building materials (stones, tree stumps, gravel, and vegetation in such a way that their appearance resembles asmall watercourse. The design of hydraulic fishways is based only on the criterion of maximum speed (vmax and the parameter of unitary energy of water E; it does not provide complete information about these devices’ efficiency. In order to produce optimal flow conditions for ichthyofauna in the fishway, there is a need for research into the spatial distribution of the hydraulic parameters, such as disorders of the flow velocity field or distributions of turbulence (Tu. The aim and scope of this work was to examine the potential of building fish ramps as a means of creating a watercourse through hydrotechnical structures, in order to facilitate fish migration. For this purpose, research was conducted on a physical model in the water laboratory of Prof. Julian Wołoszyn at the Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences. A physical model of a fish ramp was built. Depths and flow speeds at the established water flow rate were measured. Depths of water in the fishway were evaluated in strategic places for fish – i.e. at the entrance and exit of the fishway and between cylindric stones (flow obstacles on the ramp. The speed was measured at mesh nodes which are spaced at intervals of 15 cm along the length of the riverbed and of 10 cm across the cross section. Maps of the spatial distribution of the flow velocity were drafted based on the results obtained, from which maximum and minimum speeds, stream/current distribution and a rest zone for

  1. A new proposal to guide velocity and inclination in the ramp protocol for the treadmill ergometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva Odwaldo Barbosa e

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To suggest criteria to guide protocol prescription in ramp treadmill testing, according to sex and age, based on velocity, inclination, and max VO2 reached by the population studied. METHODS: Prospective study describing heart rate (HR, time, velocity, inclination, and VO2 estimated at maximum effort of 1840 individuals from 4 to 79 years old, who performed a treadmill test (TT according to the ramp protocol. A paired Student t test was used to assess the difference between predicted and reached max VO2, calculated according to the formulas of the "American College of Sports Medicine". RESULTS: Submaximal HR was surpassed in 90.1% of the examinations, with a mean time of 10.0±2.0 minute. Initial and peak inclination velocity of the exercise and max VO2 were inversely proportional to age and were greater in male patients. Predicted Max VO2 was significantly lower than that reached in all patients, except for female children and adolescents (age < 20 years old. CONCLUSION: Use of velocity, inclination, and maximum VO2 actually reached, as a criterion in prescribing the ramp protocol may help in the performance of exercise in treadmill testing. The ramp protocol was well accepted in all age groups and sexes with exercise time within the programmed 8 to 12 minutes.

  2. Gyrokinetic Analysis of the Current Ramp Phase of an ITER-like DIII-D Discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravenec, B.; Holland, C.; McKee, G. R.; Candy, J.; Görler, T.

    2016-10-01

    Being able to predict transport, especially electron, during the current ramp-up phase of a discharge is of great interest, especially for ITER. Here we present results, both linear and nonlinear, from the gyrokinetic codes GYRO, CGYRO, GS2, and GENE (a benchmarking effort) for a DIII-D discharge run with the ITER shape and normalized current, field and ramp rate. Preliminary results at the mid-radius (r / a = 0.6) and at the end of the current ramp from GENE are insignificant fluxes while CGYRO predicts only a finite electron energy flux. However, this flux is from fluctuations at the highest poloidal wave numbers of the simulations, implying that valid simulations may need to resolve the electron scales. These results plus linear analysis and nonlinear simulations at other times during the ramp and at other locations in the plasma will be presented. Supported by the US DOE under DE-FG02-08ER54978, DE-FG02-07ER54917, DE-FG02-89ER53296, DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  3. Real effective exchange rate misalignment in Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Nwachukwu, Ngozi E.; Adebayo, Racheal O.; Shettima, Abdullahi M.; Anigwe, John O.; Udechukwu-Peterclaver, Chidinma T.

    2016-01-01

    The study analyzed the relationship between relevant macroeconomic variables and the real effective exchange rate (REER) in Nigeria based on the Behavioural Equilibrium Exchange Rate (BEER) approach. An Autoregressive Distributed Lag (ARDL) model was estimated to obtain the equilibrium REER while the resultant levels of misalignment were computed for the period 1990 - 2014. Model results indicated that terms of trade and degree of trade openness are significant determinants of the REER, imply...

  4. Safety and operational performance evaluation of four types of exit ramps on Florida's freeways (final report).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    This project mainly focuses on exit ramp performance analysis of safety and operations. In addition, issues of advance guide sign for exit ramp are also mentioned. : Safety analysis evaluates safety performances of different exit ramps used in Florid...

  5. Nanosizing of drugs: Effect on dissolution rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dizaj, S. Maleki; Vazifehasl, Zh.; Salatin, S.; Adibkia, Kh.; Javadzadeh, Y.

    2015-01-01

    The solubility, bioavailability and dissolution rate of drugs are important parameters for achieving in vivo efficiency. The bioavailability of orally administered drugs depends on their ability to be absorbed via gastrointestinal tract. For drugs belonging to Class II of pharmaceutical classification, the absorption process is limited by drug dissolution rate in gastrointestinal media. Therefore, enhancement of the dissolution rate of these drugs will present improved bioavailability. So far several techniques such as physical and chemical modifications, changing in crystal habits, solid dispersion, complexation, solubilization and liquisolid method have been used to enhance the dissolution rate of poorly water soluble drugs. It seems that improvement of the solubility properties ofpoorly water soluble drugscan translate to an increase in their bioavailability. Nowadays nanotechnology offers various approaches in the area of dissolution enhancement of low aqueous soluble drugs. Nanosizing of drugs in the form of nanoparticles, nanocrystals or nanosuspensions not requiring expensive facilities and equipment or complicated processes may be applied as simple methods to increase the dissolution rate of poorly water soluble drugs. In this article, we attempted to review the effects of nanosizing on improving the dissolution rate of poorly aqueous soluble drugs. According to the reviewed literature, by reduction of drug particle size into nanometer size the total effective surface area is increased and thereby dissolution rate would be enhanced. Additionally, reduction of particle size leads to reduction of the diffusion layer thickness surrounding the drug particles resulting in the increment of the concentration gradient. Each of these process leads to improved bioavailability. PMID:26487886

  6. Effects Of Frame Rates In Video Displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, Gary V.; Wagner, Charles A.

    1991-01-01

    Report describes experiment on subjective effects of rates at which display on cathode-ray tube in flight simulator updated and refreshed. Conducted to learn more about jumping, blurring, flickering, and multiple lines that observer perceives when line moves at high speed across screen of a calligraphic CRT.

  7. Optimization design of energy deposition on single expansion ramp nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Shengjun; Yan, Chao; Wang, Xiaoyong; Qin, Yupei; Ye, Zhifei

    2017-11-01

    Optimization design has been widely used in the aerodynamic design process of scramjets. The single expansion ramp nozzle is an important component for scramjets to produces most of thrust force. A new concept of increasing the aerodynamics of the scramjet nozzle with energy deposition is presented. The essence of the method is to create a heated region in the inner flow field of the scramjet nozzle. In the current study, the two-dimensional coupled implicit compressible Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes and Menter's shear stress transport turbulence model have been applied to numerically simulate the flow fields of the single expansion ramp nozzle with and without energy deposition. The numerical results show that the proposal of energy deposition can be an effective method to increase force characteristics of the scramjet nozzle, the thrust coefficient CT increase by 6.94% and lift coefficient CN decrease by 26.89%. Further, the non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm coupled with the Radial Basis Function neural network surrogate model has been employed to determine optimum location and density of the energy deposition. The thrust coefficient CT and lift coefficient CN are selected as objective functions, and the sampling points are obtained numerically by using a Latin hypercube design method. The optimized thrust coefficient CT further increase by 1.94%, meanwhile, the optimized lift coefficient CN further decrease by 15.02% respectively. At the same time, the optimized performances are in good and reasonable agreement with the numerical predictions. The findings suggest that scramjet nozzle design and performance can benefit from the application of energy deposition.

  8. Effect of massing on larval growth rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Aidan P; Wallman, James F

    2014-08-01

    Estimation of minimum postmortem interval commonly relies on predicting the age of blowfly larvae based on their size and an estimate of the temperatures to which they have been exposed throughout their development. The majority of larval growth rate data have been developed using small larval masses in order to avoid excess heat generation. The current study collected growth rate data for larvae at different mass volumes, and assessed the temperature production of these masses, for two forensically important blow fly species, Chrysomya rufifacies and Calliphora vicina. The growth rate of larvae in a small mass, exposed to the higher temperatures equivalent to those experienced by large masses, was also assessed to determine if observed differences were due to the known temperature effects of maggot masses. The results showed that temperature production increased with increasing mass volume, with temperature increases of 11 °C observed in the large Ch. rufifacies masses and increases of 5 °C in the large C. vicina masses. Similarly, the growth rate of the larvae was affected by mass size. The larvae from small masses grown at the higher temperatures experienced by large masses displayed an initial delay in growth, but then grew at a similar rate to those larvae at a constant 23 °C. Since these larvae from masses of equivalent sizes displayed similar patterns of growth rate, despite differing temperatures, and these growth rates differed from larger masses exposed to the same temperatures, it can be concluded that larval growth rate within a mass may be affected by additional factors other than temperature. Overall, this study highlights the importance of understanding the role of massing in larval development and provides initial developmental data for mass sizes of two forensically important blowfly species commonly encountered in Australian forensic casework. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. MRI can accurately detect meniscal ramp lesions of the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arner, Justin W; Herbst, Elmar; Burnham, Jeremy M; Soni, Ashish; Naendrup, Jan-Hendrik; Popchak, Adam; Fu, Freddie H; Musahl, Volker

    2017-12-01

    Posterior horn meniscal tears are commonly found in conjunction with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. Some believe tears in the posterior meniscocapsular zone, coined ramp lesions, are important to knee stability. The purpose of this study was to determine whether pre-operative MRI evaluation was able to accurately and reproducibly identify ramp lesions. Three blinded reviewers assessed MRIs twice for the presence of ramp lesions in patients undergoing ACL reconstruction. Sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value, and positive predictive value for MRI were calculated based on arthroscopic diagnosis of a ramp lesion. Intra-class correlation coefficient was calculated to assess intra- and interobserver reliability of the MRI assessment between the three examiners. Significance was set at p ramp lesions, while the other 77 had other meniscal pathology. Sensitivity of detecting a ramp lesion on MRI ranged from 53.9 to 84.6%, while specificity was 92.3-98.7%. Negative predictive value was 91.1-97.4%, while positive predictive value was 50.0-90.0%. Inter-rater reliability between three reviewers was moderate at 0.56. The observers had excellent intra-rater reliability ranging from 0.75 to 0.81. This study demonstrates high sensitivity and excellent specificity in detecting meniscal ramp lesions on MRI. Ramp lesions are likely more common and may have greater clinical implications than previously appreciated; the outcomes of untreated lesions must be investigated. Pre-operative identification of ramp lesions may aid clinicians in surgical planning and patient education to improve outcomes by addressing pathology which may have otherwise been missed. III.

  10. Strain rate effects in stress corrosion cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parkins, R.N. (Newcastle upon Tyne Univ. (UK). Dept. of Metallurgy and Engineering Materials)

    1990-03-01

    Slow strain rate testing (SSRT) was initially developed as a rapid, ad hoc laboratory method for assessing the propensity for metals an environments to promote stress corrosion cracking. It is now clear, however, that there are good theoretical reasons why strain rate, as opposed to stress per se, will often be the controlling parameter in determining whether or not cracks are nucleated and, if so, are propagated. The synergistic effects of the time dependence of corrosion-related reactions and microplastic strain provide the basis for mechanistic understanding of stress corrosion cracking in high-pressure pipelines and other structures. However, while this may be readily comprehended in the context of laboratory slow strain tests, its extension to service situations may be less apparent. Laboratory work involving realistic stressing conditions, including low-frequency cyclic loading, shows that strain or creep rates give good correlation with thresholds for cracking and with crack growth kinetics.

  11. Speaking rate effects on locus equation slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Jeff; Weismer, Gary

    2013-01-01

    A locus equation describes a 1st order regression fit to a scatter of vowel steady-state frequency values predicting vowel onset frequency values. Locus equation coefficients are often interpreted as indices of coarticulation. Speaking rate variations with a constant consonant–vowel form are thought to induce changes in the degree of coarticulation. In the current work, the hypothesis that locus slope is a transparent index of coarticulation is examined through the analysis of acoustic samples of large-scale, nearly continuous variations in speaking rate. Following the methodological conventions for locus equation derivation, data pooled across ten vowels yield locus equation slopes that are mostly consistent with the hypothesis that locus equations vary systematically with coarticulation. Comparable analyses between different four-vowel pools reveal variations in the locus slope range and changes in locus slope sensitivity to rate change. Analyses across rate but within vowels are substantially less consistent with the locus hypothesis. Taken together, these findings suggest that the practice of vowel pooling exerts a non-negligible influence on locus outcomes. Results are discussed within the context of articulatory accounts of locus equations and the effects of speaking rate change. PMID:24535890

  12. Strain rate effects for spallation of concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Häussler-Combe Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Appropriate triaxial constitutive laws are the key for a realistic simulation of high speed dynamics of concrete. The strain rate effect is still an open issue within this context. In particular the question whether it is a material property – which can be covered by rate dependent stress strain relations – or mainly an effect of inertia is still under discussion. Experimental and theoretical investigations of spallation of concrete specimen in a Hopkinson Bar setup may bring some evidence into this question. For this purpose the paper describes the VERD model, a newly developed constitutive law for concrete based on a damage approach with included strain rate effects [1]. In contrast to other approaches the dynamic strength increase is not directly coupled to strain rate values but related to physical mechanisms like the retarded movement of water in capillary systems and delayed microcracking. The constitutive law is fully triaxial and implemented into explicit finite element codes for the investigation of a wide range of concrete structures exposed to impact and explosions. The current setup models spallation experiments with concrete specimen [2]. The results of such experiments are mainly related to the dynamic tensile strength and the crack energy of concrete which may be derived from, e.g., the velocity of spalled concrete fragments. The experimental results are compared to the VERD model and two further constitutive laws implemented in LS-Dyna. The results indicate that both viscosity and retarded damage are required for a realistic description of the material behaviour of concrete exposed to high strain effects [3].

  13. LHC Report: Ramp-up complete

    CERN Multimedia

    Mike Lamont for the LHC Team

    2012-01-01

    The intensity ramp-up outlined in the last Bulletin continued more or less as planned, with some steady running with 1092 bunches followed by the final step-up to 1380 – the maximum number of bunches for the year.   Monday, 16 April was spent performing luminosity calibration. Under carefully controlled conditions and a special beam configuration, the experiments' luminosity measurements were calibrated against a measurement of the accelerator’s absolute luminosity obtained with Van der Meer scans. These scans give the beam sizes at the interaction point which, together with an accurate measurement of the beam and bunch currents (and other more subtle considerations), allow a precise measurement of the absolute luminosity. With the Van der Meer scans out of the way, the final step-up in the number of bunches to 1380 was made. This has resulted in an average peak luminosity of around 5.6x1033 cm-2s-1 in the general-purpose detectors (ATLAS and CMS have yet to publish th...

  14. The ability of laying pullets to negotiate two ramp designs as measured by bird preference and behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersson, Isabelle C; Weeks, Claire A; Norman, Kate I; Nicol, Christine J

    2017-01-01

    Laying hens are often kept in barn or free-range systems where they must negotiate level changes in the house to access resources. However, collisions and resultant keel fractures are commonplace. Producers sometimes add ramps to make raised areas more accessible but designs vary and very little research has investigated bird preference or behaviour when using different ramp designs, or the effect of ramp design on falls and collisions. Two ramp designs were studied in an experimental setting-a ramp made of plastic poultry slats (grid ramp, GR) and a ramp made of wooden rungs (ladder ramp, LR). Sixty-four young female hens were trained to move to a food reward and this was used to test their behavioural responses when first negotiating the two different ramps during individual tests. Both upward and downward transitions were studied. Ramp preference was also tested using a room that replicated a commercial single-tier system with both types of ramp available. Birds were placed in this room in groups of 16 for three days and their use of the ramps studied. A greater percentage of birds successfully completed (reached the reward bowl) on the GR than the LR during both upward (58% vs 37%) and downward (83% vs 73%) transitions, and a smaller percentage of birds made zero attempts to use the GR than the LR (upwards: 13% vs 56%, downwards: 8% vs 26%). When making a downward transition, more hesitation behaviours were seen (head orientations, stepping on the spot, moving away) for the LR. However, more head orientations were seen for the GR during the upward transition. Birds were more likely to abort attempts (an attempt began when a bird placed both feet on the ramp) to move up the GR than the LR. Birds took longer to negotiate the LR than the GR in both directions, and more pauses were seen during a successful upward transition on the LR. Birds were more likely to move down the GR by walking/running whereas birds tended to jump over the entire LR. More collisions with

  15. The ability of laying pullets to negotiate two ramp designs as measured by bird preference and behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle C. Pettersson

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Laying hens are often kept in barn or free-range systems where they must negotiate level changes in the house to access resources. However, collisions and resultant keel fractures are commonplace. Producers sometimes add ramps to make raised areas more accessible but designs vary and very little research has investigated bird preference or behaviour when using different ramp designs, or the effect of ramp design on falls and collisions. Methods Two ramp designs were studied in an experimental setting—a ramp made of plastic poultry slats (grid ramp, GR and a ramp made of wooden rungs (ladder ramp, LR. Sixty-four young female hens were trained to move to a food reward and this was used to test their behavioural responses when first negotiating the two different ramps during individual tests. Both upward and downward transitions were studied. Ramp preference was also tested using a room that replicated a commercial single-tier system with both types of ramp available. Birds were placed in this room in groups of 16 for three days and their use of the ramps studied. Results A greater percentage of birds successfully completed (reached the reward bowl on the GR than the LR during both upward (58% vs 37% and downward (83% vs 73% transitions, and a smaller percentage of birds made zero attempts to use the GR than the LR (upwards: 13% vs 56%, downwards: 8% vs 26%. When making a downward transition, more hesitation behaviours were seen (head orientations, stepping on the spot, moving away for the LR. However, more head orientations were seen for the GR during the upward transition. Birds were more likely to abort attempts (an attempt began when a bird placed both feet on the ramp to move up the GR than the LR. Birds took longer to negotiate the LR than the GR in both directions, and more pauses were seen during a successful upward transition on the LR. Birds were more likely to move down the GR by walking/running whereas birds tended to jump

  16. The plastic response of Tantalum in Quasi-Isentropic Compression Ramp and Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Alexander; Brown, Justin; Lim, Hojun; Lane, J. Matthew D.

    2017-06-01

    The mechanical response of various forms of tantalum under extreme pressures and strain rates is studied using dynamic quasi-isentropic compression loading conditions in atomistic simulations. Ramp compression in bcc metals under these conditions tend to show a significant strengthening effect with increasing pressure; however, due to limitations of experimental methods in such regimes, the underlying physics for this phenomenon is not well understood. Molecular dynamics simulations provide important information about the plasticity mechanisms and can be used to investigate this strengthening. MD simulations are performed on nanocrystalline Ta and single crystal defective Ta with dislocations and point defects to uncover how the material responds and the underlying plasticity mechanisms. The different systems of solid Ta are seen to plastically deform through different mechanisms. Fundamental understanding of tantalum plasticity in these high pressure and strain rate regimes is needed to model and fully understand experimental results. Sandia National Labs is a multi program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corp., a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corp., for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  17. Novel Surveillance Technologies for Airport Ramp Area Operations Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of the current research is to develop the concept, algorithms and software necessary for enabling a novel surveillance system for airports ramp areas....

  18. Inside-Out Repair of Meniscal Ramp Lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePhillipo, Nicholas N; Cinque, Mark E; Kennedy, Nicholas I; Chahla, Jorge; Geeslin, Andrew G; Moatshe, Gilbert; Engebretsen, Lars; LaPrade, Robert F

    2017-08-01

    Meniscal ramp lesions have been reported to be present in 9% to 17% of patients undergoing anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Detection at the time of arthroscopy can be accomplished based upon clinical suspicion and careful evaluation without the use of an accessory posteromedial portal. Options for surgical treatment include arthroscopic repair using an all-inside or inside-out technique. The purpose of this Technical Note is to detail our arthroscopic inside-out repair technique for meniscal ramp lesions.

  19. Study on Trailing Edge Ramp of Supercritical Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-30

    7 th Asia-Pacific International Symposium on Aerospace Technology, 25 – 27 November 2015, Cairns Study on Trailing Edge Ramp of Supercritical...separation bubble near the trailing edge. However, the present CFD result shows that it seems a pressure ramp without separation gains better...11372160). 2 Corresponding author. E-mail: chenhaixin@tsinghua.edu.cn 7 th Asia-Pacific International Symposium on Aerospace Technology, 25 – 27

  20. PDR with a foot-mounted IMU and ramp detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Antonio R; Seco, Fernando; Zampella, Francisco; Prieto, José C; Guevara, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    The localization of persons in indoor environments is nowadays an open problem. There are partial solutions based on the deployment of a network of sensors (Local Positioning Systems or LPS). Other solutions only require the installation of an inertial sensor on the person's body (Pedestrian Dead-Reckoning or PDR). PDR solutions integrate the signals coming from an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU), which usually contains 3 accelerometers and 3 gyroscopes. The main problem of PDR is the accumulation of positioning errors due to the drift caused by the noise in the sensors. This paper presents a PDR solution that incorporates a drift correction method based on detecting the access ramps usually found in buildings. The ramp correction method is implemented over a PDR framework that uses an Inertial Navigation algorithm (INS) and an IMU attached to the person's foot. Unlike other approaches that use external sensors to correct the drift error, we only use one IMU on the foot. To detect a ramp, the slope of the terrain on which the user is walking, and the change in height sensed when moving forward, are estimated from the IMU. After detection, the ramp is checked for association with one of the existing in a database. For each associated ramp, a position correction is fed into the Kalman Filter in order to refine the INS-PDR solution. Drift-free localization is achieved with positioning errors below 2 meters for 1,000-meter-long routes in a building with a few ramps.

  1. The Tool Life of Ball Nose end Mill Depending on the Different Types of Ramping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vopát Tomáš

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the cutting tool wear measurement process and tool life of ball nose end mill depending on upward ramping and downward ramping. The aim was to determine and compare the wear (tool life of ball nose end mill for different types of copy milling operations, as well as to specify particular steps of the measurement process. In addition, we examined and observed cutter contact areas of ball nose end mill with machined material. For tool life test, DMG DMU 85 monoBLOCK 5-axis CNC milling machine was used. In the experiment, cutting speed, feed rate, axial depth of cut and radial depth of cut were not changed. The cutting tool wear was measured on Zoller Genius 3s universal measuring machine. The results show different tool life of ball nose end mills depending on the copy milling strategy.

  2. The Tool Life of Ball Nose end Mill Depending on the Different Types of Ramping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vopát, Tomáš; Peterka, Jozef; Kováč, Martin

    2014-12-01

    The article deals with the cutting tool wear measurement process and tool life of ball nose end mill depending on upward ramping and downward ramping. The aim was to determine and compare the wear (tool life) of ball nose end mill for different types of copy milling operations, as well as to specify particular steps of the measurement process. In addition, we examined and observed cutter contact areas of ball nose end mill with machined material. For tool life test, DMG DMU 85 monoBLOCK 5-axis CNC milling machine was used. In the experiment, cutting speed, feed rate, axial depth of cut and radial depth of cut were not changed. The cutting tool wear was measured on Zoller Genius 3s universal measuring machine. The results show different tool life of ball nose end mills depending on the copy milling strategy.

  3. Interconnections between equilibrium topology and dynamical quantum phase transitions in a linearly ramped Haldane model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Utso; Dutta, Amit

    2017-05-01

    We study the behavior of Fisher zeros (FZs) and dynamical quantum phase transitions (DQPTs) for a linearly ramped Haldane model occurring in the subsequent temporal evolution of the same, and we probe the intimate connection with the equilibrium topology of the model. Here, we investigate the temporal evolution of the final state of the Haldane Hamiltonian (evolving with the time-independent final Hamiltonian) reached following a linear ramping of the staggered (Semenoff) mass term from an initial to a final value, first selecting a specific protocol, so chosen that the system is ramped from one nontopological phase to the other through a topological phase. We establish the existence of three possible behaviors of areas of FZs corresponding to a given sector: (i) no-DQPT, (ii) one-DQPT (intermediate), and (iii) two-DQPTs (reentrant), depending on the inverse quenching rate τ . Our study also reveals that the appearance of the areas of FZs is an artefact of the nonzero (quasi-momentum-dependent) Haldane mass (MH), whose absence leads to an emergent one-dimensional behavior indicated by the shrinking of the area's FZs to lines and the nonanalyticity in the dynamical "free energy" itself. Moreover, the characteristic rates of crossover between the three behaviors of FZs are determined by the time-reversal-invariant quasimomentum points of the Brillouin zone where MH vanishes. Thus, we observe that through the presence or absence of MH, there exists an intimate relation to the topological properties of the equilibrium model even when the ramp drives the system far away from equilibrium.

  4. Vibration Analysis of the Space Shuttle External Tank Cable Tray Flight Data With and Without PAL Ramp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Bruce E.; Panda, Jayanta; Sutliff, Daniel L.

    2008-01-01

    External Tank Cable Tray vibration data for three successive Space Shuttle flights were analyzed to assess response to buffet and the effect of removal of the Protuberance Air Loads (PAL) ramp. Waveform integration, spectral analysis, cross-correlation analysis and wavelet analysis were employed to estimate vibration modes and temporal development of vibration motion from a sparse array of accelerometers and an on-board system that acquired 16 channels of data for approximately the first 2 min of each flight. The flight data indicated that PAL ramp removal had minimal effect on the fluctuating loads on the cable tray. The measured vibration frequencies and modes agreed well with predicted structural response.

  5. 1D and 3D analyses of the Zy2 SCIP BWR ramp tests with the fuel codes METEOR and ALCYONE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sercombe, J.; Agard, M.; Stuzik, C.; Michel, B.; Thouvenin, G.; Poussard, C.; Kallstrom, K. R. [CEA, Saint-Paul-lez Durance (France)

    2008-10-15

    In this paper, three power ramp tests performed on high burn-up Recrystallized Zircaloy2 - UO{sub 2} BWR fuel rods (56 to 63 MWd/kgU) within the SCIP project have been simulated with METEOR and ALCYONE 3D. Two of the ramp tests are of staircase type up to Linear Heat Rates of 420 and 520 W/cm and with long holding periods. Failure of the 420 W/cm fuel rod was observed after 40 minutes. The third ramp test consists in a more standard ramp test with a constant power rate of 80 W/cm/min till 410 W/cm and a short holding time. The tests were first simulated with the METEOR 1D fuel rod code leading accurate results in terms of profilometry and fission gas releases. The behaviour of a fuel pellet fragment and of the cladding piece on top of it was then investigated with ALCYONE 3D. The size and the main characteristics of the ridges after base irradiation and power ramp testing were recovered. Finally, the failure criteria validated for PWR conditions and fuel rods with low to medium burn ups were used to analyze the failure probability of the KKL rodlets during ramp testing.

  6. Off-ramps and on-ramps: keeping talented women on the road to success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewlett, Sylvia Ann; Luce, Carolyn Buck

    2005-03-01

    Most professional women step off the career fast track at some point. With children to raise, elderly parents to care for, and other pulls on their time, these women are confronted with one off-ramp after another. When they feel pushed at the same time by long hours and unsatisfying work, the decision to leave becomes even easier. But woe to the woman who intends for that exit to be temporary. The on-ramps for professional women to get back on track are few and far between, the authors confirm. Their new survey research reveals for the first time the extent of the problem--what percentage of highly qualified women leave work and for how long, what obstacles they face coming back, and what price they pay for their time-outs. And what are the implications for corporate America? One thing at least seems clear: As market and economic factors align in ways guaranteed to make talent constraints and skill shortages huge issues again, employers must learn to reverse this brain drain. Like it or not, large numbers of highly qualified, committed women need to take time out of the workplace. The trick is to help them maintain connections that will allow them to reenter the workforce without being marginalized for the rest of their lives. Strategies for building such connections include creating reduced-hour jobs, providing flexibility in the workday and in the arc of a career, removing the stigma of taking time off, refusing to burn bridges, offering outlets for altruism, and nurturing women's ambition.

  7. Meniscal Ramp Lesions: Anatomy, Incidence, Diagnosis, and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahla, Jorge; Dean, Chase S; Moatshe, Gilbert; Mitchell, Justin J; Cram, Tyler R; Yacuzzi, Carlos; LaPrade, Robert F

    2016-07-01

    Meniscal ramp lesions are more frequently associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries than previously recognized. Some authors suggest that this entity results from disruption of the meniscotibial ligaments of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus, whereas others support the idea that it is created by a tear of the peripheral attachment of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans have been reported to have a low sensitivity, and consequently, ramp lesions often go undiagnosed. Therefore, to rule out a ramp lesion, an arthroscopic evaluation with probing of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus should be performed. Several treatment options have been reported, including nonsurgical management, inside-out meniscal repair, or all-inside meniscal repair. In cases of isolated ramp lesions, a standard meniscal repair rehabilitation protocol should be followed. However, when a concomitant ACL reconstruction (ACLR) is performed, the rehabilitation should follow the designated ACLR postoperative protocol. The purpose of this article was to review the current literature regarding meniscal ramp lesions and summarize the pertinent anatomy, biomechanics, diagnostic strategies, recommended treatment options, and postoperative protocol.

  8. Unified Geostatistical Modeling for Data Fusion and Spatial Heteroskedasticity with R Package ramps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian J. Smith

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available This article illustrates usage of the ramps R package, which implements the reparameterized and marginalized posterior sampling (RAMPS algorithm for complex Bayesian geostatistical models. The RAMPS methodology allows joint modeling of areal and point-source data arising from the same underlying spatial process. A reparametrization of variance parameters facilitates slice sampling based on simplexes, which can be useful in general when multiple variances are present. Prediction at arbitrary points can be made, which is critical in applications where maps are needed. Our implementation takes advantage of sparse matrix operations in the Matrix package and can provide substantial savings in computing time for large datasets. A user-friendly interface, similar to the nlme mixed effects models package, enables users to analyze datasets with little programming effort. Support is provided for numerous spatial and spatiotemporal correlation structures, user-defined correlation structures, and non-spatial random effects. The package features are illustrated via a synthetic dataset of spatially correlated observation distributed across the state of Iowa, USA.

  9. Resident-Assisted Montessori Programming (RAMP): training persons with dementia to serve as group activity leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Cameron J; Skrajner, Michael J

    2004-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of an activity implemented by means of Resident-Assisted Montessori Programming (RAMP). Four persons with early-stage dementia were trained to serve as leaders for a small-group activity played by nine persons with more advanced dementia. Assessments of leaders' ability to learn the procedures of leading a group, as well as their satisfaction with this role, were taken, as were measures of players' engagement and affect during standard activities programming and RAMP activities. Leaders demonstrated the potential to fill the role of group activity leader effectively, and they expressed a high level of satisfaction with this role. Players' levels of positive engagement and pleasure during the RAMP activity were higher than during standard group activities. This study suggests that to the extent that procedural learning is available to persons with early-stage dementia, especially when they are assisted with external cueing, these individuals can successfully fill the role of volunteers when working with persons with more advanced dementia. This can provide a meaningful social role for leaders and increase access to high quality activities programming for large numbers of persons with dementia. Copyright 2004 The Gerontological Society of America

  10. Ramping turn-to-turn loss and magnetization loss of a No-Insulation (RE)Ba2Cu3Ox high temperature superconductor pancake coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.; Song, H.; Yuan, W.; Jin, Z.; Hong, Z.

    2017-03-01

    This paper is to study ramping turn-to-turn loss and magnetization loss of a no-insulation (NI) high temperature superconductor (HTS) pancake coil wound with (RE)Ba2Cu3Ox (REBCO) conductors. For insulated (INS) HTS coils, a magnetization loss occurs on superconducting layers during a ramping operation. For the NI HTS coil, additional loss is generated by the "bypassing" current on the turn-to-turn metallic contacts, which is called "turn-to-turn loss" in this study. Therefore, the NI coil's ramping loss is much different from that of the INS coil, but few studies have been reported on this aspect. To analyze the ramping losses of NI coils, a numerical method is developed by coupling an equivalent circuit network model and a H-formulation finite element method model. The former model is to calculate NI coil's current distribution and turn-to-turn loss, and the latter model is to calculate the magnetization loss. A test NI pancake coil is wound with REBCO tapes and the reliability of this model is validated by experiments. Then the characteristics of the NI coil's ramping losses are studied using this coupling model. Results show that the turn-to-turn loss is much higher than the magnetization loss. The NI coil's total ramping loss is much higher than that of its insulated counterpart, which has to be considered carefully in the design and operation of NI applications. This paper also discusses the possibility to reduce NI coil's ramping loss by decreasing the ramping rate of power supply or increasing the coil's turn-to-turn resistivity.

  11. ARQ-Aided Downlink Time Switched Transmit Diversity with Power Ramping in the WCDMA LCR-TDD System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Seung-Hoon; Jeon, Cha-Eul; Ma, Ri-A.

    This paper investigates the performance of ARQ-aided downlink Time Switched Transmit Diversity (TSTD) in the WCDMA Low Chip Rate (LCR)-Time Division Duplex (TDD) system, when antenna switching and power ramping are applied. With the help of the ARQ signal, where the receiver sends the acknowledgement (ACK or NACK) to the transmitter, the proposed TSTD scheme switches the transmit antenna and ramps up the transmission power for the retransmitted data, when the transmitter receives a NACK signal. Simulation results demonstrate, that when the mobile speed is 3km/h and a frame error rate (FER) is set to 1%, the antenna switching scheme yields 2dB to 3dB performance gain in terms of average Eb/N0, and the power ramping gives 0.7dB to 1.6dB gain, compared with the conventional ARQ-aided TSTD. In addition, 6% of throughput gain is shown by amalgamating the antennas switching as well as the power ramping, when the average Eb/N0 is equal to 0dB.

  12. Improving Wind-Ramp Forecasts in the Stable Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn, David E.; Takle, Eugene S.; Gallus, William A.

    2017-06-01

    The viability of wind-energy generation is dependent on highly accurate numerical wind forecasts, which are impeded by inaccuracies in model representation of boundary-layer processes. This study revisits the basic theory of the Mellor, Yamada, Nakanishi, and Niino (MYNN) planetary boundary-layer parametrization scheme, focusing on the onset of wind-ramp events related to nocturnal low-level jets. Modifications to the MYNN scheme include: (1) calculation of new closure parameters that determine the relative effects of turbulent energy production, dissipation, and redistribution; (2) enhanced mixing in the stable boundary layer when the mean wind speed exceeds a specified threshold; (3) explicit accounting of turbulent potential energy in the energy budget. A mesoscale model is used to generate short-term (24 h) wind forecasts for a set of 15 cases from both the U.S.A. and Germany. Results show that the new set of closure parameters provides a marked forecast improvement only when used in conjunction with the new mixing length formulation and only for cases that are originally under- or over-forecast (10 of the 15 cases). For these cases, the mean absolute error (MAE) of wind forecasts at turbine-hub height is reduced on average by 17%. A reduction in MAE values on average by 26% is realized for these same cases when accounting for the turbulent potential energy together with the new mixing length. This last method results in an average reduction by at least 13% in MAE values across all 15 cases.

  13. Evaluation of the quality of care of a multi-disciplinary Risk Factor Assessment and Management Programme for Hypertension (RAMP-HT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Esther Yee Tak; Wan, Eric Yuk Fai; Chan, Karina Hiu Yen; Wong, Carlos King Ho; Kwok, Ruby Lai Ping; Fong, Daniel Yee Tak; Lam, Cindy Lo Kuen

    2015-06-19

    There is some evidence to support a risk-stratified, multi-disciplinary approach to manage patients with hypertension in primary care. The aim of this study is to evaluate the quality of care (QOC) of a multi-disciplinary Risk Assessment and Management Programme for Hypertension (RAMP-HT) for hypertensive patients in busy government-funded primary care clinics in Hong Kong. The objectives are to develop an evidence-based, structured and comprehensive evaluation framework on quality of care, to enhance the QOC of the RAMP-HT through an audit spiral of two evaluation cycles and to determine the effectiveness of the programme in reducing cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. A longitudinal study is conducted using the Action Learning and Audit Spiral methodologies to measure whether pre-set target standards of care intended by the RAMP-HT are achieved. A structured evaluation framework on the quality of structure, process and outcomes of care has been developed based on the programme objectives and literature review in collaboration with the programme workgroup and health service providers. Each participating clinic is invited to complete a structure of care evaluation questionnaire in each evaluation cycle. The data of all patients who have enrolled into the RAMP-HT in the pre-defined evaluation periods are used for the evaluation of the process and outcomes of care in each evaluation cycle. For evaluation of the effectiveness of RAMP-HT, the primary outcomes including blood pressure (both systolic and diastolic), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and estimated 10-year CVD risk of RAMP-HT participants are compared to those of hypertensive patients in usual care without RAMP-HT. The QOC and effectiveness of the RAMP-HT in improving clinical and patient-reported outcomes for patients with hypertension in normal primary care will be determined. Possible areas for quality enhancement and standards of good practice will be established to inform service planning and policy

  14. Shock formation and the ideal shape of ramp compression waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swift, D C; Kraus, R G; Loomis, E; Hicks, D G; McNaney, J M; Johnson, R P

    2008-05-29

    We derive expressions for shock formation based on the local curvature of the flow characteristics during dynamic compression. Given a specific ramp adiabat, calculated for instance from the equation of state for a substance, the ideal nonlinear shape for an applied ramp loading history can be determined. We discuss the region affected by lateral release, which can be presented in compact form for the ideal loading history. Example calculations are given for representative metals and plastic ablators. Continuum dynamics (hydrocode) simulations were in good agreement with the algebraic forms. Example applications are presented for several classes of laser-loading experiment, identifying conditions where shocks are desired but not formed, and where long duration ramps are desired.

  15. PDR with a Foot-Mounted IMU and Ramp Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Guevara

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The localization of persons in indoor environments is nowadays an open problem. There are partial solutions based on the deployment of a network of sensors (Local Positioning Systems or LPS. Other solutions only require the installation of an inertial sensor on the person’s body (Pedestrian Dead-Reckoning or PDR. PDR solutions integrate the signals coming from an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU, which usually contains 3 accelerometers and 3 gyroscopes. The main problem of PDR is the accumulation of positioning errors due to the drift caused by the noise in the sensors. This paper presents a PDR solution that incorporates a drift correction method based on detecting the access ramps usually found in buildings. The ramp correction method is implemented over a PDR framework that uses an Inertial Navigation algorithm (INS and an IMU attached to the person’s foot. Unlike other approaches that use external sensors to correct the drift error, we only use one IMU on the foot. To detect a ramp, the slope of the terrain on which the user is walking, and the change in height sensed when moving forward, are estimated from the IMU. After detection, the ramp is checked for association with one of the existing in a database. For each associated ramp, a position correction is fed into the Kalman Filter in order to refine the INS-PDR solution. Drift-free localization is achieved with positioning errors below 2 meters for 1,000-meter-long routes in a building with a few ramps.

  16. Age-related decreases in motor unit discharge rate and force control during isometric plantar flexion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallio, J; Søgaard, Karen; Avela, J

    2012-01-01

    Aging is related to multiple changes in muscle physiology and function. Previous findings concerning the effects of aging on motor unit discharge rate (DR) and fluctuations in DR and force are somewhat contradictory. Eight YOUNG and nine OLD physically active males performed isometric ramp (RECR)...

  17. No Fatigue Effect on Blink Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, W.; Zangemeister, W.; Stark, L.

    1984-01-01

    Blink rate is reported to vary dependent upon ongoing task performance, perceptual, attentional and cognitive factors, and fatigue. Five levels of task difficulty were operationally defined and task performance as lines read aloud per minute were measured. A single noninvasive infrared TV eyetracker was modified to measure blinking and an on-line computer program identified and counted blinks while the subject performed the tasks. Blink rate decreased by 50% when either task performance increased (fast reading) or visual difficulty increased (blurred text); blink rate increased greatly during rest breaks. There was no change in blink rate during one hour experiments even though subjects complained of severe fatigue.

  18. Optimisation of the Current Ramp for the LHC

    OpenAIRE

    Burla, P; King, Q; Pett, John G

    1999-01-01

    The field quality of the main magnets in the LHC will be, in part, dependent upon the shape of the magnetic field as a function of time. A theoretical optimisation of this function has been carried-out with the aim of minimising the dynamic errors [3]. This work resulted in the definition of a current ramp function composed of mathematically defined, smoothly joining segments. A prototype digital controller based on a DSP has been developed and built [4]. In this equipment the current ramp is...

  19. Analysis of failed ramps during the RHIC FY09 run

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minty, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.

    2014-08-15

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is a versatile accelerator that supports operation with polarized protons of up to 250 GeV and ions with up to 100 GeV/nucleon. During any running period, various operating scenarios with different particle species, beam energies or accelerator optics are commissioned. In this report the beam commissioning periods for establishing full energy beams (ramp development periods) from the FY09 run are summarized and, for the purpose of motivating further developments, we analyze the reasons for all failed ramps.

  20. Never the twain shall meet? : Simulating sales & operations planning ramp-up dynamics in IT-enabled service supply chains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akkermans, Henk; Voss, C.; van Oers, Roeland; Zhu, Quan

    2016-01-01

    In IT-enabled service supply chains offering services through a mix of manual and automated activities, volume ramp-ups are notoriously difficult. Especially difficult is the attempt to effectively balance the inherently conflicting objectives of the functions Sales, who want to increase output as

  1. Effects of release rates on the range of attraction of carbon dioxide to some southwestern Ontario mosquito species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIver, S B; McElligott, P E

    1989-03-01

    The effects of release rates of 0, 250, 500, 1,000 and 4,000 ml/min on the range of attraction of carbon dioxide to some southwestern Ontario mosquito species was determined using ramp traps placed at 3, 7, 11, 15 and 19 m from a central pressurized cylinder. For female Aedes vexans, spring Aedes spp. and Anopheles walkeri, an increase in the release rate of CO2 from 1,000 to 4,000 ml/min resulted in extension of the range of attractiveness from between 3-7 m to between 7-11 m; rates of 500 and 250 ml/min did result in an increase in number of mosquitoes in the traps. Correspondingly, significantly more mosquitoes were caught in the traps at 3 m when the rate was increased to 1,000 ml/min from 500 ml/min. For Ae. vexans, 4,000 ml/min of CO2 attracted more mosquitoes to the 7 m traps than 1,000 ml/min. In this work carbon dioxide did not result in an increase in the number of Culiseta inornata, Cs. morsitans and Culex restuans and Cx. pipiens in the traps.

  2. Brazilian exchange rate complexity: Financial crisis effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piqueira, José Roberto C.; Mortoza, Letícia Pelluci D.

    2012-04-01

    With the financial market globalization, foreign investments became vital for the economies, mainly in emerging countries. In the last decades, Brazilian exchange rates appeared as a good indicator to measure either investors' confidence or risk aversion. Here, some events of global or national financial crisis are analyzed, trying to understand how they influenced the "dollar-real" rate evolution. The theoretical tool to be used is the López-Mancini-Calbet (LMC) complexity measure that, applied to real exchange rate data, has shown good fitness between critical events and measured patterns.

  3. Lightning on Jupiter - Rate, energetics, and effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, J. S.

    1980-01-01

    Voyager data on the optical and radio-frequency detection of lightning discharges in the atmosphere of Jupiter suggest a stroke rate significantly lower than on the earth. The efficiency of conversion of atmospheric convective energy flux into lightning is almost certainly less than on the earth, probably near 10 to the -7th rather than the terrestrial value of 10 to the -4th. At this level the rate of production of complex organic molecules by lightning and by thunder shock waves is negligible compared to the rates of known photochemical processes for forming colored inorganic solids.

  4. Effect of Air Injection on Nucleation Rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Capellades Mendez, Gerard; Kiil, Søren; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    2017-01-01

    From disruption of the supersaturated solution to improved mass transfer in the crystallizing suspension, the introduction of a moving gas phase in a crystallizer could lead to improved rates of nucleation and crystal growth. In this work, saturated air has been injected to batch crystallizers...... of the distributions were studied independently, allowing the simultaneous determination of the mean induction time and a certain detection delay related to the rate of crystal growth after formation of the first nucleus. When saturated air was injected in aqueous glycine solutions, the average detection delay...... of this technique for reduction in nucleation induction time and improved mass deposition rates in crystallization operations....

  5. Summary The effect of pregnancy on the heart rate, respiratory rate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Summary. The effect of pregnancy on the heart rate, respiratory rate,. QRS axis and QRS complex duration of the ECG was investigated in 41 pregnant compared to 39 non pregnant age and height matched Nigerian subjects. Results obtained show that pregnancy had no significant effect (p>0.05) on heart rate, respiratory ...

  6. SR-71 - Taxi on Ramp with Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    This photo shows a head-on shot of NASA's SR-71A aircraft taxiing on the ramp at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, heat waves from its engines blurring the hangars in the background. Two SR-71 aircraft have been used by NASA as testbeds for high-speed and high-altitude aeronautical research. The aircraft, an SR-71A and an SR-71B pilot trainer aircraft, have been based here at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. They were transferred to NASA after the U.S. Air Force program was cancelled. As research platforms, the aircraft can cruise at Mach 3 for more than one hour. For thermal experiments, this can produce heat soak temperatures of over 600 degrees Fahrenheit (F). This operating environment makes these aircraft excellent platforms to carry out research and experiments in a variety of areas -- aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, thermal protection materials, high-speed and high-temperature instrumentation, atmospheric studies, and sonic boom characterization. The SR-71 was used in a program to study ways of reducing sonic booms or over pressures that are heard on the ground, much like sharp thunderclaps, when an aircraft exceeds the speed of sound. Data from this Sonic Boom Mitigation Study could eventually lead to aircraft designs that would reduce the 'peak' overpressures of sonic booms and minimize the startling affect they produce on the ground. One of the first major experiments to be flown in the NASA SR-71 program was a laser air data collection system. It used laser light instead of air pressure to produce airspeed and attitude reference data, such as angle of attack and sideslip, which are normally obtained with small tubes and vanes extending into the airstream. One of Dryden's SR-71s was used for the Linear Aerospike Rocket Engine, or LASRE Experiment. Another earlier project consisted of a series of flights using the SR-71 as a science camera platform for NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena

  7. Inter-Organisational Coordination in Ramp-Up Execution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Irene; Karlsson, Christer

    the degree of fragmentation in the process planning and execution. Resource dependence theory (RDT) is used as central explanatory framework for inter-organisational interdependencies formation throughout the planning and execution of the ramp-up activities and milestones. This study aims at exploring inter...

  8. Enhanced transparency ramp-type Josephson contacts through interlayer deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smilde, H.J.H.; Hilgenkamp, Johannes W.M.; Rijnders, Augustinus J.H.M.; Rogalla, Horst; Blank, David H.A.

    2002-01-01

    A thin interlayer is incorporated in ramp-type Josephson junctions to obtain an increased transparency. The interlayer restores the surface damaged by ion milling and has the advantage of an all in situ barrier deposition between two superconductors, leading to clean and well-defined interfaces. The

  9. 9 CFR 313.1 - Livestock pens, driveways and ramps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... protruding objects which may, in the opinion of the inspector, cause injury or pain to the animals. Loose... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Livestock pens, driveways and ramps. 313.1 Section 313.1 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF...

  10. LHCD during current ramp experiments on Alcator C-Mod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, G. M.; Poli, F.; Chilenski, M. A.; Hughes, J. W.; Mumgaard, R. T.; Scott, S. D.; Shiraiwa, S.; Wukitch, S. J.

    2017-10-01

    The lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) system on Alcator C-Mod is capable of sustaining fully non-inductive discharges for multiple current relaxation times (τcr ˜ 200 ms) at line averaged densities in the range of 5x1019 m-3. Some of these non-inductive discharges develop unstable MHD modes that can greatly reduce current drive performance, particularly in discharges with plasma current of 0.5 MA or less [1,2]. Avoiding these unstable MHD modes motivated an experiment to test if the stable current profile shape of a higher current non-inductive discharge could be achieved in a lower current discharge. Starting from a discharge at 0.8 MA, the plasma current was ramped down to 0.5 MA over 200 ms. The surface voltage of the plasma swings negative during the ramp, with the loop voltage reversal impacting the edge fast electron measurements immediately. Little change can be seen during the Ip ramp in the core fast electron measurements, indicating that the loop voltage reversal does not penetrate fully to the magnetic axis on the timescale of the current ramp. The resulting discharge did not exhibit deleterious MHD instabilities, however the existence of this one discharge does not necessarily represent a robust solution to the problem.

  11. Magnesium-diboride ramp-type Josephson junctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mijatovic, D.; Brinkman, Alexander; Oomen, I.; Rijnders, Augustinus J.H.M.; Hilgenkamp, Johannes W.M.; Rogalla, Horst; Blank, David H.A.

    2002-01-01

    Josephson junctions have been realized in which two superconducting magnesium-diboride (MgB2) layers are separated by a thin MgO barrier layer, using the ramp-type configuration. Their current–voltage characteristics follow the behavior described by the resistively shunted junction model, with an

  12. LHCD during current ramp experiments on Alcator C-Mod

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wallace G.M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The lower hybrid current drive (LHCD system on Alcator C-Mod is capable of sustaining fully non-inductive discharges for multiple current relaxation times (τcr ∼ 200 ms at line averaged densities in the range of 5x1019 m-3. Some of these non-inductive discharges develop unstable MHD modes that can greatly reduce current drive performance, particularly in discharges with plasma current of 0.5 MA or less [1,2]. Avoiding these unstable MHD modes motivated an experiment to test if the stable current profile shape of a higher current non-inductive discharge could be achieved in a lower current discharge. Starting from a discharge at 0.8 MA, the plasma current was ramped down to 0.5 MA over 200 ms. The surface voltage of the plasma swings negative during the ramp, with the loop voltage reversal impacting the edge fast electron measurements immediately. Little change can be seen during the Ip ramp in the core fast electron measurements, indicating that the loop voltage reversal does not penetrate fully to the magnetic axis on the timescale of the current ramp. The resulting discharge did not exhibit deleterious MHD instabilities, however the existence of this one discharge does not necessarily represent a robust solution to the problem.

  13. Heart rate and respiratory rate influence on heart rate variability repeatability: effects of the correction for the prevailing heart rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub Sławomir Gąsior

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Since heart rate variability (HRV is associated with average heart rate (HR and respiratory rate (RespRate, alterations in these parameters may impose changes in HRV. Hence the repeatability of HRV measurements may be affected by differences in HR and RespRate. The study aimed to evaluate HRV repeatability and its association with changes in HR and RespRate.Methods: Forty healthy volunteers underwent two ECG examinations seven days apart. Standard HRV indices were calculated from 5-min ECG recordings. The ECG-derived respiration signal was estimated to assess RespRate. To investigate HR impact on HRV, HRV parameters were corrected for prevailing HR. Results: Differences in HRV parameters between the measurements were associated with the changes in HR and RespRate. However, in multiple regression analysis only HR alteration proved to be independent determinant of the HRV differences – every change in HR by 1 bpm changed HRV values by 16.5% on average. After overall removal of HR impact on HRV, coefficients of variation of the HRV parameters significantly dropped on average by 26.8% (p < 0.001, i.e. by the same extent HRV reproducibility improved. Additionally, the HRV correction for HR decreased association between RespRate and HRV. Conclusions: In stable conditions, HR but not RespRate is the most powerful factor determining HRV reproducibility and even a minimal change of HR may considerably alter HRV. However, the removal of HR impact may significantly improve HRV repeatability. The association between HRV and RespRate seems to be, at least in part, HR dependent.

  14. Predictive Control of Wind Turbine for Load Reduction during Ramping Events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Weipeng; Li, Changgang; Liu, Yutian

    2017-01-01

    on the Blade Element Momentum (BEM) theory. The generator speed and pitch angle are simultaneously regulated to realize the control objectives. A two-stage optimization is designed in order to reduce the computational complexity. The objectives of the first stage are minimizing the ramping rate and maximizing...... the power generation. A trade-off is made between the two contradictory objectives by setting weight coefficients. The second stage reduces the WT load and meanwhile guarantees the power reference from the first stage is tracked. Feedback is designed based on neural network prediction to compensate...

  15. Hartmann-Hahn 2D-map to optimize the RAMP-CPMAS NMR experiment for pharmaceutical materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Kazuko; Martineau, Charlotte; Fink, Gerhard; Steuernagel, Stefan; Taulelle, Francis

    2012-02-01

    Cross polarization-magic angle spinning (CPMAS) is the most used experiment for solid-state NMR measurements in the pharmaceutical industry, with the well-known variant RAMP-CPMAS its dominant implementation. The experimental work presented in this contribution focuses on the entangled effects of the main parameters of such an experiment. The shape of the RAMP-CP pulse has been considered as well as the contact time duration, and a particular attention also has been devoted to the radio-frequency (RF) field inhomogeneity. (13)C CPMAS NMR spectra have been recorded with a systematic variation of (13)C and (1)H constant radiofrequency field pair values and represented as a Hartmann-Hahn matching two-dimensional map. Such a map yields a rational overview of the intricate optimal conditions necessary to achieve an efficient CP magnetization transfer. The map also highlights the effects of sweeping the RF by the RAMP-CP pulse on the number of Hartmann-Hahn matches crossed and how RF field inhomogeneity helps in increasing the CP efficiency by using a larger fraction of the sample. In the light of the results, strategies for optimal RAMP-CPMAS measurements are suggested, which lead to a much higher efficiency than constant amplitude CP experiment. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. The Effects of Gun Ownership Rates and Gun Control Laws on Suicide Rates

    OpenAIRE

    Mark Gius

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to determine the effects of gun control laws and gun ownership rates on state-level suicide rates. Using the most recent data on suicide rates, gun control measures, and gun ownership rates, the results of the present study suggest that states that require handgun permits have lower gun-related suicide rates, and states that have higher gun ownership rates have higher gun-related suicide rates. Regarding non-gun suicides, results suggest that stricter gun c...

  17. Effect of seeding rate on organic production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Increased demand for organic rice (Oryza sativa L.) has incentivized producer conversion from conventional to organically-managed rice production in the U.S. Little is known on the impacts of seeding rate on organic rice production. A completely randomized factorial design with four replications was...

  18. 30 CFR 57.9303 - Construction of ramps and dumping facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Construction of ramps and dumping facilities... MINES Loading, Hauling, and Dumping Safety Devices, Provisions, and Procedures for Roadways, Railroads, and Loading and Dumping Sites § 57.9303 Construction of ramps and dumping facilities. Ramps and...

  19. 30 CFR 56.9303 - Construction of ramps and dumping facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Construction of ramps and dumping facilities... Loading, Hauling, and Dumping Safety Devices, Provisions, and Procedures for Roadways, Railroads, and Loading and Dumping Sites § 56.9303 Construction of ramps and dumping facilities. Ramps and dumping...

  20. Break up of bound-N-spatial-soliton in a ramp waveguide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suryanto, A.; van Groesen, Embrecht W.C.

    2002-01-01

    We present an analytical and numerical investigation of the propagation of spatial solitons in a nonlinear waveguide with ramp linear refractive index profile (ramp waveguide). For the propagation of a single soliton beam in a ramp waveguide, the particle theory shows that the soliton beam follows a

  1. 40 CFR 86.1362-2007 - Steady-state testing with a ramped-modal cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Exhaust Test Procedures § 86.1362-2007 Steady-state testing with a ramped-modal cycle. This section... testing the engine on a dynamometer with the following ramped-modal duty cycle to determine whether it... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Steady-state testing with a ramped...

  2. 40 CFR 86.1362-2010 - Steady-state testing with a ramped-modal cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Exhaust Test Procedures § 86.1362-2010 Steady-state testing with a ramped-modal cycle. This section... testing the engine on a dynamometer with the following ramped-modal duty cycle to determine whether it...-modal test with a warmed-up engine. If the ramped-modal test follows directly after testing over the...

  3. Ramping Performance Analysis of the Kahuku Wind-Energy Battery Storage System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gevorgian, V. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Corbus, D. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2013-11-01

    High penetrations of wind power on the electrical grid can introduce technical challenges caused by resource variability. Such variability can have undesirable effects on the frequency, voltage, and transient stability of the grid. Energy storage devices can be an effective tool in reducing variability impacts on the power grid in the form of power smoothing and ramp control. Integrating anenergy storage system with a wind power plant can help smooth the variable power produced from wind. This paper explores the fast-response, megawatt-scale, wind-energy battery storage systems that were recently deployed throughout the Hawaiian islands to support wind and solar projects.

  4. Nonmarital Fertility and the Effects of Divorce Rates on Youth Suicide Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messner, Steven F.; Bjarnason, Thoroddur; Raffalovich, Lawrence E.; Robinson, Bryan K.

    2006-01-01

    Using pooled, time-series data for a sample of 15 developed nations, we assess the effect of divorce rates on gender-specific suicide rates for youths aged 15-19 with models of relative cohort size, lagged nonmarital fertility, and an interaction term for divorce rates and nonmarital fertility. The results reveal that, for young men, relative…

  5. Pure rate effect on compressive strength of concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Lee Sangho; Kim Kyoung-Min; Cho Jae-Yoel

    2017-01-01

    Dynamic Increase Factor (DIF) has been used to consider the compressive strength enhancement of concrete at the high and intermediate strain rates. However, DIF formulae suggested until now include the inertia effects as well as the rate effect because the DIF formulae has been assumed as a function of only the strain rate and the inertia effects cannot be avoided in tests at the high and intermediate strain rate region. Therefore, applying the DIF to design or analysis of social infrastructu...

  6. Effects of temperature on chirp rates of tree crickets (Orthoptera ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1991-10-02

    Oct 2, 1991 ... Surprisingly little is known about the effects of temperature on rates within poikilothenn nervous systems (Walker. 1975). Since poikilothenn metabolic rates generally increase with temperature, pulse rates and chirp rates of the calling songs of crickets generally increase with temperature. Since songs that ...

  7. Antidepressant Prescription and Suicide Rates: Effect of Age and Gender

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalmar, Sandor; Szanto, Katalin; Rihmer, Zoltan; Mazumdar, Sati; Harrison, Katrin; Mann, J. John

    2008-01-01

    To determine whether the effect of antidepressant exposure on suicide rate is modified by age and gender in Hungary, annual antidepressant prescription rates and suicide rates of about 10 million inhabitants between 1999-2005 were analyzed by age and gender groups. The suicide rate was inversely related to the increased use of antidepressants in…

  8. Cardiac-Activity Measures for Assessing Airport Ramp-Tower Controller's Workload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Miwa; Dulchinos, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    Heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV) potentially offer objective, continuous, and non-intrusive measures of human-operators mental workload. Such measurement capability is attractive for workload assessment in complex laboratory simulations or safety-critical field testing. The present study compares mean HR and HRV data with self-reported subjective workload ratings collected during a high-fidelity human-in-the-loop simulation of airport ramp traffic control operations, which involve complex cognitive and coordination tasks. Mean HR was found to be weakly sensitive to the workload ratings, while HRV was not sensitive or even contradictory to the assumptions. Until more knowledge on stress response mechanisms of the autonomic nervous system is obtained, it is recommended that these cardiac-activity measures be used with other workload assessment tools, such as subjective measures.

  9. Cumulative Interarrival Time Distributions of Freeway Entrance Ramp Traffic for Traffic Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdinç Öner

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Cumulative interarrival time (IAT distributions for signalized and non-signalized freeway entrance ramps were developed to be used in digital computer traffic simulation models. The data from four different non-signalized entrance ramps (three ramps with a single lane, one ramp with two lanes and two different signalized entrance ramps (both with a single lane were used for developing the cumulative IAT distributions. The cumulative IAT distributions for the signalized and non-signalized entrance ramps were compared with each other and with the cumulative IAT distributions of the lanes for freeways. The comparative results showed that the cumulative IAT distributions for non-signalized entrance ramps are very close to the leftmost lane of a 3-lane freeway where the maximum absolute difference between the cumulative IAT distribution of the leftmost lane of a 3-lane freeway and the entrance ramps cumulative IAT distribution was 3%. The cumulative IAT distribution for the signalized entrance ramps was found to be different from the non-signalized entrance ramp cumulative IAT distribution. The approximated cumulative IAT distributions for signalized and non-signalized entrance ramp traffic for any hourly traffic volume from a few vehicles/hour up to 2,500 vehicles/hour can be obtained at http://www.ohio.edu/orite/research/uitds.cfm.

  10. Ramp-Reversal Memory and Phase-Boundary Scarring in Transition Metal Oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardi, Naor; Anouchi, Elihu; Yamin, Tony; Middey, Srimanta; Kareev, Michael; Chakhalian, Jak; Dubi, Yonatan; Sharoni, Amos

    2017-06-01

    Transition metal oxides are complex electronic systems that exhibit a multitude of collective phenomena. Two archetypal examples are VO2 and NdNiO3 , which undergo a metal-insulator phase transition (MIT), the origin of which is still under debate. Here this study reports the discovery of a memory effect in both systems, manifested through an increase of resistance at a specific temperature, which is set by reversing the temperature ramp from heating to cooling during the MIT. The characteristics of this ramp-reversal memory effect do not coincide with any previously reported history or memory effects in manganites, electron-glass or magnetic systems. From a broad range of experimental features, supported by theoretical modelling, it is found that the main ingredients for the effect to arise are the spatial phase separation of metallic and insulating regions during the MIT and the coupling of lattice strain to the local transition temperature of the phase transition. We conclude that the emergent memory effect originates from phase boundaries at the reversal temperature leaving "scars" in the underlying lattice structure, giving rise to a local increase in the transition temperature. The universality and robustness of the effect shed new light on the MIT in complex oxides. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Gas turbine power plant with supersonic shock compression ramps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawlor, Shawn P [Bellevue, WA; Novaresi, Mark A [San Diego, CA; Cornelius, Charles C [Kirkland, WA

    2008-10-14

    A gas turbine engine. The engine is based on the use of a gas turbine driven rotor having a compression ramp traveling at a local supersonic inlet velocity (based on the combination of inlet gas velocity and tangential speed of the ramp) which compresses inlet gas against a stationary sidewall. The supersonic compressor efficiently achieves high compression ratios while utilizing a compact, stabilized gasdynamic flow path. Operated at supersonic speeds, the inlet stabilizes an oblique/normal shock system in the gasdynamic flow path formed between the rim of the rotor, the strakes, and a stationary external housing. Part load efficiency is enhanced by use of a lean pre-mix system, a pre-swirl compressor, and a bypass stream to bleed a portion of the gas after passing through the pre-swirl compressor to the combustion gas outlet. Use of a stationary low NOx combustor provides excellent emissions results.

  12. Prosthodontic management of mandibular deviation using palatal ramp appliance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prince Kumar

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Segmental resection of the mandible generally results in deviation of the mandible to the defective side. This loss of continuity of the mandible destroys the balance of the lower face and leads to decreased mandibular function by deviation of the residual segment toward the surgical site. Prosthetic methods advocated to reduce or eliminate mandibular deviation include intermaxillary fixation, removable mandibular guide flange, palatal ramp, implant-supported prosthesis and palatal guidance restorations which may be useful in reducing mandibular deviation and improving masticatory performance and efficiency. These methods and restorations would be combined with a well organized mandibular exercise regimen. This clinical report describes the rehabilitation following segmental mandibulectomy using palatal ramp prosthesis.

  13. Meniscal ramp lesions : anatomy, incidence, diagnosis, and treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Chahla, Jorge; Dean, Chase S.; Moatshe, Gilbert; Mitchell, Justin J.; Cram, Tyler R.; Yacuzzi, Carlos; LaPrade, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    © 2016 The Author(s). This is an Open Access article. Meniscal ramp lesions are more frequently associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries than previously recognized. Some authors suggest that this entity results from disruption of the meniscotibial ligaments of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus, whereas others support the idea that it is created by a tear of the peripheral attachment of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus. Magnetic resonance imaging (...

  14. Variable Length Inflatable Ramp Launch and Recovery System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-22

    the air beams. [0015] To deploy a tow body into the liquid medium, a positioning cart transitions from the ABDF to the aft end of the deployed and...100 into a liquid medium, the positioning cart 24 transitions from the ABDF 18 to the aft end of the variable length inflatable ramp launch and...this manner maintain their shapes when inflated. [0050] For enhanced damage tolerance and puncture resistance; the skins of the drop stitch and

  15. Meniscal ramp lesions : anatomy, incidence, diagnosis, and treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Chahla, Jorge; Dean, Chase S.; Moatshe, Gilbert; Mitchell, Justin J.; Cram, Tyler R.; Yacuzzi, Carlos; LAPRADE, ROBERT F.

    2016-01-01

    Meniscal ramp lesions are more frequently associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries than previously recognized. Some authors suggest that this entity results from disruption of the meniscotibial ligaments of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus, whereas others support the idea that it is created by a tear of the peripheral attachment of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans have been reported to have a low sensitivity, ...

  16. Validation of transport models in ASDEX Upgrade current ramps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fietz, Sina; Hobirk, Joerg; Fable, Emiliano; Fischer, Rainer; Fuchs, Christoph; Pereverzev, Grigori; Ryter, Francois [Max Planck Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Garching (Germany); Collaboration: the ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2011-07-01

    In order to prepare adequate ramp up and down scenarios for ITER, understanding the physics of transport during the current ramps is essential. The aim of the work was to assess the capability of several transport models to reproduce the experimental data during the current ramps. For this purpose, the calculated temperature profiles from different transport models, i.e. Coppi-Tang, Neo-Alcator, Bohm-Gyrobohm, critical gradient model and H98/2 scaling-based are compared to experimental temperature profiles under different conditions. The strong variation of the experimental electron temperature profiles are partly reproduced by the models. The importance of central and edge radiation will be emphasized, as well as the main transport properties of the models, especially in the case of strong local electron heating (ECRH). To investigate the control capabilities of a Tokamak, particularly with regard to ITER, the impact on global plasma parameters like the internal inductance and the stored energy is also investigated.

  17. Ramp and periodic dynamics across non-Ising critical points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Roopayan; Sen, Arnab; Sengupta, K.

    2018-01-01

    We study ramp and periodic dynamics of ultracold bosons in an one-dimensional (1D) optical lattice which supports quantum critical points separating a uniform and a Z3 or Z4 symmetry broken density-wave ground state. Our protocol involves both linear and periodic drives which takes the system from the uniform state to the quantum critical point (for linear drive protocol) or to the ordered state and back (for periodic drive protocols) via controlled variation of a parameter of the system Hamiltonian. We provide exact numerical computation, for finite-size boson chains with L ≤24 using exact diagonalization (ED), of the excitation density D , the wave function overlap F , and the excess energy Q at the end of the drive protocol. For the linear ramp protocol, we identify the range of ramp speeds for which D and Q show Kibble-Zurek scaling. We find, based on numerical analysis with L ≤24 , that such scaling is consistent with that expected from critical exponents of the q -state Potts universality class with q =3 ,4 . For the periodic protocol, we show that the model displays near-perfect dynamical freezing at specific frequencies; at these frequencies D ,Q →0 and |F |→1 . We provide a semi-analytic explanation of such freezing behavior and relate this phenomenon to a many-body version of Stuckelberg interference. We suggest experiments which can test our theory.

  18. Radiance Measurement on Shock-Ramp Loaded Tin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Jeffrey; Akin, Minta; Asimow, Paul; Holmes, Neil

    2017-06-01

    An accurate material temperature is not only an essential component of an equation of state, but also a good measure of a phase transition, its kinetics, and associated thermal transport properties. In a series of experiments, we measured particle velocity and thermal emission at the tin-LiF interfaces on shock and ramp loading experiments. Using a graded density impactor, we drive the tin sample through melting with the initial shock and then further ramp-compress it back into the solid phase. Various configurations of experimental set-up were used to simultaneously measure particle velocity and thermal emission from which we deduce pressure, density, sound velocity and temperature. A gray body radiation is assumed in these calculations. We present here more recent results and updated analysis of shock-and-ramp-loaded tin experiments. The measured particle velocity shows a traditional signature for phase transition, while thermal radiance exhibits a change consistent with the heat of solidification. We will discuss here the mechanical and thermal aspects of this phase transition, its kinetics, and thermal transport issues in this experiment. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  19. Review of Wind Energy Forecasting Methods for Modeling Ramping Events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wharton, S; Lundquist, J K; Marjanovic, N; Williams, J L; Rhodes, M; Chow, T K; Maxwell, R

    2011-03-28

    Tall onshore wind turbines, with hub heights between 80 m and 100 m, can extract large amounts of energy from the atmosphere since they generally encounter higher wind speeds, but they face challenges given the complexity of boundary layer flows. This complexity of the lowest layers of the atmosphere, where wind turbines reside, has made conventional modeling efforts less than ideal. To meet the nation's goal of increasing wind power into the U.S. electrical grid, the accuracy of wind power forecasts must be improved. In this report, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, in collaboration with the University of Colorado at Boulder, University of California at Berkeley, and Colorado School of Mines, evaluates innovative approaches to forecasting sudden changes in wind speed or 'ramping events' at an onshore, multimegawatt wind farm. The forecast simulations are compared to observations of wind speed and direction from tall meteorological towers and a remote-sensing Sound Detection and Ranging (SODAR) instrument. Ramping events, i.e., sudden increases or decreases in wind speed and hence, power generated by a turbine, are especially problematic for wind farm operators. Sudden changes in wind speed or direction can lead to large power generation differences across a wind farm and are very difficult to predict with current forecasting tools. Here, we quantify the ability of three models, mesoscale WRF, WRF-LES, and PF.WRF, which vary in sophistication and required user expertise, to predict three ramping events at a North American wind farm.

  20. Direct numerical simulation of supersonic turbulent boundary layer subjected to a curved compression ramp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Fulin; Li, Xinliang; Duan, Yanhui; Yu, Changping

    2017-12-01

    Numerical investigations on a supersonic turbulent boundary layer over a longitudinal curved compression ramp are conducted using direct numerical simulation for a free stream Mach number M∞ = 2.9 and Reynolds number Reθ = 2300. The total turning angle is 24°, and the concave curvature radius is 15 times the thickness of the incoming turbulent boundary layer. Under the selected conditions, the shock foot is transferred to a fan of the compression wave because of the weaker adverse pressure gradient. The time-averaged flow-field in the curved ramp is statistically attached where the instantaneous flow-field is close to the intermittent transitory detachment state. Studies on coherent vortex structures have shown that large-scale vortex packets are enhanced significantly when the concave curvature is aligned in the spanwise direction. Consistent with findings of previous experiments, the effect of the concave curvature on the logarithmic region of the mean velocity profiles is found to be small. The intensity of the turbulent fluctuations is amplified across the curved ramp. Based on the analysis of the Reynolds stress anisotropy tensor, the evolutions of the turbulence state in the inner and outer layers of the boundary layer are considerably different. The curvature effect on the transport mechanism of the turbulent kinetic energy is studied using the balance analysis of the contributing terms in the transport equation. Furthermore, the Görtler instability in the curved ramp is quantitatively analyzed using a stability criterion. The instantaneous streamwise vorticity confirms the existence of the Görtler-like structures. These structures are characterized by an unsteady motion. In addition, the dynamic mode decomposition analysis of the instantaneous flow field at the spanwise/wall-normal plane reveals that four dynamical relevant modes with performance loss of 16% provide an optimal low-order representation of the essential characteristics of the numerical

  1. Annual Percentage Rate and Annual Effective Rate: Resolving Confusion in Intermediate Accounting Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicknair, David; Wright, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Evidence of confusion in intermediate accounting textbooks regarding the annual percentage rate (APR) and annual effective rate (AER) is presented. The APR and AER are briefly discussed in the context of a note payable and correct formulas for computing each is provided. Representative examples of the types of confusion that we found is presented…

  2. Effects of social stress on heart rate and heart rate variability in growing pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, IC; Sgoifo, A; Lambooij, E; Korte, SM; Blokhuis, HJ; Koolhaas, JM

    The effects of social stress on heart rate, heart rate variability and the occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias were studied in 12 growing pigs. Social stress was induced during a good competition test with a pen mate, and subsequently during a resident-intruder test with an unacquainted pig in which

  3. Effects of social stress on heart rate and heart rate variability in growing pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, de I.C.; Sgoifo, A.; Lambooij, E.; Korte, S.M.; Blokhuis, H.J.; Koolhaas, J.M.

    2000-01-01

    The effects of social stress on heart rate, heart rate variability and the occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias were studied in 12 growing pigs. Social stress was induced during a good competition test with a pen mate, and subsequently during a resident-intruder test with an unacquainted pig in which

  4. Corticomuscular coherence variation throughout the gait cycle during overground walking and ramp ascent: A preliminary investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winslow, Anna T; Brantley, Justin; Zhu, Fangshi; Contreras Vidal, Jose L; Huang, He

    2016-08-01

    Recent designs of neural-machine interfaces (NMIs) incorporating electroencephalography (EEG) or electromyography (EMG) have been used in lower limb assistive devices. While the results of previous studies have shown promise, a NMI which takes advantage of early movement-related EEG activity preceding movement onset, as well as the improved signal-to-noise ratio of EMG, could prove to be more accurate and responsive than current NMI designs based solely on EEG or EMG. Previous studies have demonstrated that the activity of the sensorimotor cortex is coupled to the firing rate of motor units in lower limb muscles during voluntary contraction. However, the exploration of corticomuscular coherence during locomotive tasks has been limited. In this study, coupling between the motor cortex and right tibialis anterior muscle activity was preliminarily investigated during self-paced over-ground walking and ramp ascent. EEG at the motor cortex and surface EMG from the tibialis anterior were collected from one able-bodied subject. Coherence between the two signals was computed and studied across gait cycles. The EEG activity led the EMG activity in the low gamma band in swing phase of level ground walking and in stance phase of ramp ascent. These results may inform the future design of EEG-EMG multimodal NMIs for lower limb devices that assist locomotion of people with physical disabilities.

  5. Effective VAT Rates on Selected Sectors in Tanzania: An Input ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study estimates, by the use of an Input-Output approach, the extent of variation in the effective VAT burden falling on different sub-sectors of the Tanzanian economy. Since optimal taxation theory implies the superiority of rate differentiation over rate uniformity it is important to establish empirically the extent of effective ...

  6. The development of a student rating of teaching effectiveness ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The use of student ratings of teaching effectiveness has become the most widely used, and often the only, source of information to assess and improve teaching effectiveness. Important prerequisites for questionnaires for student ratings should, therefore, be reliability and validity. The research reported in this article presents ...

  7. Relativistic self-focusing of intense laser beam in thermal collisionless quantum plasma with ramped density profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Zare

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Propagation of a Gaussian x-ray laser beam has been analyzed in collisionless thermal quantum plasma with considering a ramped density profile. In this density profile due to the increase in the plasma density, an earlier and stronger self-focusing effect is noticed where the beam width oscillates with higher frequency and less amplitude. Moreover, the effect of the density profile slope and the initial plasma density on the laser propagation has been studied. It is found that, by increasing the initial density and the ramp slope, the laser beam focuses faster with less oscillation amplitude, smaller laser spot size and more oscillations. Furthermore, a comparison is made among the laser self-focusing in thermal quantum plasma, cold quantum plasma and classical plasma. It is realized that the laser self-focusing in the quantum plasma becomes stronger in comparison with the classical regime.

  8. Vitreous flow rates through dual pneumatic cutters: effects of duty cycle and cut rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abulon, Dina Joy K

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to investigate effects of instrument settings on porcine vitreous flow rates through dual pneumatic high-speed vitrectomy probes. The CONSTELLATION(®) Vision System was tested with 250, 450, and 650 mmHg of vacuum using six ULTRAVIT(®) vitrectomy probes of each diameter (25+(®), 25, 23, and 20 gauge) operated from 500 cuts per minute (cpm) up to 5,000 cpm. Duty cycle modes tested included biased open, 50/50, and biased closed. Flow rates were calculated by assessing the change in weight of porcine eyes during vitreous aspiration. Volumetric flow rate was measured with a computer-connected electronic scale. At lower cut rates, the biased open mode produced higher flow than did the 50/50 mode, which produced higher flow than did the biased closed mode. In the biased closed and 50/50 modes, vitreous flow rates tended to increase with increasing cut rate. Vitreous flow rates in the biased open duty cycle mode remained relatively constant across cut rates. Vitreous flow rates through dual pneumatic vitrectomy probes could be manipulated by changing the duty cycle modes on the vitrectomy system. Differences in duty cycle behavior suggest that high-speed cut rates of 5,000 cpm may optimize vitreous aspiration.

  9. Vitreous flow rates through dual pneumatic cutters: effects of duty cycle and cut rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abulon DJK

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Dina Joy K Abulon Medical Affairs, Alcon Research, Ltd, Lake Forest, CA, USA Purpose: We aimed to investigate effects of instrument settings on porcine vitreous flow rates through dual pneumatic high-speed vitrectomy probes. Methods: The CONSTELLATION® Vision System was tested with 250, 450, and 650 mmHg of vacuum using six ULTRAVIT® vitrectomy probes of each diameter (25+®, 25, 23, and 20 gauge operated from 500 cuts per minute (cpm up to 5,000 cpm. Duty cycle modes tested included biased open, 50/50, and biased closed. Flow rates were calculated by assessing the change in weight of porcine eyes during vitreous aspiration. Volumetric flow rate was measured with a computer-connected electronic scale. Results: At lower cut rates, the biased open mode produced higher flow than did the 50/50 mode, which produced higher flow than did the biased closed mode. In the biased closed and 50/50 modes, vitreous flow rates tended to increase with increasing cut rate. Vitreous flow rates in the biased open duty cycle mode remained relatively constant across cut rates. Conclusion: Vitreous flow rates through dual pneumatic vitrectomy probes could be manipulated by changing the duty cycle modes on the vitrectomy system. Differences in duty cycle behavior suggest that high-speed cut rates of 5,000 cpm may optimize vitreous aspiration. Keywords: enhanced 25-gauge vitrectomy, 25-gauge vitrectomy, 20-gauge vitrectomy, 23-gauge vitrectomy, aspiration, Constellation Vision System

  10. The Influence of Frontal and Lateral Ramps in Fold Thrust Belts on Structural Architecture and Erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, D. M.; McQuarrie, N.

    2016-12-01

    In fold thrust belts, horizontal and vertical motions (or flow) define the path that a particular rock or mineral takes to the surface of the Earth, which is dictated by the location of frontal and lateral ramps. Horizontal flow occurs between ramp locations while the vertical component of motion (or flow) dominates when rocks are traveling over the ramps. Frontal ramps are common features near the front (foreland) of a fold thrust belt. Foreland frontal ramps are the easiest to obtain data for, and from these data predict ramp geometry, because they are shallow and the ramp geometry is commonly expressed as changes in the dip of strata in the mapped geology. Less constrainable are the frontal ramps at depth in the hinterland of a fold thrust belt. However, these deep frontal ramps control the architecture of a fold thrust belt, influence the mapped surface geology, control active uplift and thus, are locations of focused erosion. We show kinematic models from Nepal that illustrate how the architecture (geometry of structures, dips of strata) changes in the fold thrust belt when the location of a frontal ramp is moved and how both thermochronologic data and accurate mapping limit the possibilities for the location of these hinterland frontal ramps. Lateral ramps at depth provide limits on the width of horizontal flow paths and encourage vertical flow paths that have orientations strongly oblique to the strike of the orogen. A challenge in fold thrust belts is to determine the most logical location for lateral ramps. We use examples from Nepal that highlight characteristics that can be used to define the location of lateral ramps. Both lateral and frontal ramps produce significant structural elevation and changes in topographic elevation and thus, are locations of focused erosion through time. Additionally, because material is moving both laterally and vertically in a brittle fold thrust belt, frontal and lateral ramps can control the origin of earthquakes as well

  11. Assessment of peak oxygen uptake during handcycling: Test-retest reliability and comparison of a ramp-incremented and perceptually-regulated exercise test.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J Hutchinson

    Full Text Available To examine the reliability of a perceptually-regulated maximal exercise test (PRETmax to measure peak oxygen uptake ([Formula: see text] during handcycle exercise and to compare peak responses to those derived from a ramp-incremented protocol (RAMP.Twenty recreationally active individuals (14 male, 6 female completed four trials across a 2-week period, using a randomised, counterbalanced design. Participants completed two RAMP protocols (20 W·min-1 in week 1, followed by two PRETmax in week 2, or vice versa. The PRETmax comprised five, 2-min stages clamped at Ratings of Perceived Exertion (RPE 11, 13, 15, 17 and 20. Participants changed power output (PO as often as required to maintain target RPE. Gas exchange variables (oxygen uptake, carbon dioxide production, minute ventilation, heart rate (HR and PO were collected throughout. Differentiated RPE were collected at the end of each stage throughout trials.For relative [Formula: see text], coefficient of variation (CV was equal to 4.1% and 4.8%, with ICC(3,1 of 0.92 and 0.85 for repeated measures from PRETmax and RAMP, respectively. Measurement error was 0.15 L·min-1 and 2.11 ml·kg-1·min-1 in PRETmax and 0.16 L·min-1 and 2.29 ml·kg-1·min-1 during RAMP for determining absolute and relative [Formula: see text], respectively. The difference in [Formula: see text] between PRETmax and RAMP was tending towards statistical significance (26.2 ± 5.1 versus 24.3 ± 4.0 ml·kg-1·min-1, P = 0.055. The 95% LoA were -1.9 ± 4.1 (-9.9 to 6.2 ml·kg-1·min-1.The PRETmax can be used as a reliable test to measure [Formula: see text] during handcycle exercise in recreationally active participants. Whilst PRETmax tended towards significantly greater [Formula: see text] values than RAMP, the difference is smaller than measurement error of determining [Formula: see text] from PRETmax and RAMP.

  12. Assessment of peak oxygen uptake during handcycling: Test-retest reliability and comparison of a ramp-incremented and perceptually-regulated exercise test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Michael J; Paulson, Thomas A W; Eston, Roger; Goosey-Tolfrey, Victoria L

    2017-01-01

    To examine the reliability of a perceptually-regulated maximal exercise test (PRETmax) to measure peak oxygen uptake ([Formula: see text]) during handcycle exercise and to compare peak responses to those derived from a ramp-incremented protocol (RAMP). Twenty recreationally active individuals (14 male, 6 female) completed four trials across a 2-week period, using a randomised, counterbalanced design. Participants completed two RAMP protocols (20 W·min-1) in week 1, followed by two PRETmax in week 2, or vice versa. The PRETmax comprised five, 2-min stages clamped at Ratings of Perceived Exertion (RPE) 11, 13, 15, 17 and 20. Participants changed power output (PO) as often as required to maintain target RPE. Gas exchange variables (oxygen uptake, carbon dioxide production, minute ventilation), heart rate (HR) and PO were collected throughout. Differentiated RPE were collected at the end of each stage throughout trials. For relative [Formula: see text], coefficient of variation (CV) was equal to 4.1% and 4.8%, with ICC(3,1) of 0.92 and 0.85 for repeated measures from PRETmax and RAMP, respectively. Measurement error was 0.15 L·min-1 and 2.11 ml·kg-1·min-1 in PRETmax and 0.16 L·min-1 and 2.29 ml·kg-1·min-1 during RAMP for determining absolute and relative [Formula: see text], respectively. The difference in [Formula: see text] between PRETmax and RAMP was tending towards statistical significance (26.2 ± 5.1 versus 24.3 ± 4.0 ml·kg-1·min-1, P = 0.055). The 95% LoA were -1.9 ± 4.1 (-9.9 to 6.2) ml·kg-1·min-1. The PRETmax can be used as a reliable test to measure [Formula: see text] during handcycle exercise in recreationally active participants. Whilst PRETmax tended towards significantly greater [Formula: see text] values than RAMP, the difference is smaller than measurement error of determining [Formula: see text] from PRETmax and RAMP.

  13. Strong self-focusing of a cosh-Gaussian laser beam in collisionless magneto-plasma under plasma density ramp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nanda, Vikas; Kant, Niti, E-mail: nitikant@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Lovely Professional University, G. T. Road, Phagwara, Punjab 144411 (India)

    2014-07-15

    The effect of plasma density ramp on self-focusing of cosh-Gaussian laser beam considering ponderomotive nonlinearity is analyzed using WKB and paraxial approximation. It is noticed that cosh-Gaussian laser beam focused earlier than Gaussian beam. The focusing and de-focusing nature of the cosh-Gaussian laser beam with decentered parameter, intensity parameter, magnetic field, and relative density parameter has been studied and strong self-focusing is reported. It is investigated that decentered parameter “b” plays a significant role for the self-focusing of the laser beam as for b=2.12, strong self-focusing is seen. Further, it is observed that extraordinary mode is more prominent toward self-focusing rather than ordinary mode of propagation. For b=2.12, with the increase in the value of magnetic field self-focusing effect, in case of extraordinary mode, becomes very strong under plasma density ramp. Present study may be very useful in the applications like the generation of inertial fusion energy driven by lasers, laser driven accelerators, and x-ray lasers. Moreover, plasma density ramp plays a vital role to enhance the self-focusing effect.

  14. PV Ramping in a Distributed Generation Environment: A Study Using Solar Measurements; Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sengupta, M.; Keller, J.

    2012-06-01

    Variability in Photovoltaic (PV) generation resulting from variability in the solar radiation over the PV arrays is a topic of continuing concern for those involved with integrating renewables onto existing electrical grids. The island of Lanai, Hawaii is an extreme example of the challenges that integrators will face due to the fact that it is a small standalone grid. One way to study this problem is to take high-resolution solar measurements in multiple locations and model simultaneous PV production for various sizes at those locations. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) collected high-resolution solar data at four locations on the island where proposed PV plants will be deployed in the near future. This data set provides unique insight into how the solar radiation may vary between points that are proximal in distance, but diverse in weather, due to the formation of orographic clouds in the center of the island. Using information about each proposed PV plant size, power output was created at high resolution. The team analyzed this output to understand power production ramps at individual locations and the effects of aggregating the production from all four locations. Hawaii is a unique environment, with extremely variable events occurring on a daily basis. This study provided an excellent opportunity for understanding potential worst-case scenarios for PV ramping. This paper provides an introduction to the datasets that NREL collected over a year and a comprehensive analysis of PV variability in a distributed generation scenario.

  15. Unsteady MHD free convection flow of rotating Jeffrey fluid embedded in a porous medium with ramped wall temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zin, N. A. Mohd; Khan, I.; Shafie, S.

    2017-09-01

    The effect of radiative heat transfer on unsteady magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) free convection flow of rotating Jeffrey fluid past an infinite vertical plate saturated in a porous medium with ramped wall temperature is investigated. The incompressible fluid is taken electrically conducting under influence of transverse magnetic field which perpendicular to the flow. An appropriate dimensionless variables are employed to the governing equations and solved analytically by Laplace transform technique. The results of several controlling parameters for both ramped wall temperature and an isothermal plate are presented graphically with comprehensive discussions. It has been observed that, an increase in rotation parameter, reduced the primary velocity, but an opposite behaviour is noticed for the secondary velocity. Moreover, large values of Hartmann number tends to retard the fluid flow due to the Lorentz force.

  16. Can You Have Your Vigorous Exercise and Enjoy It Too? Ramping Intensity Down Increases Postexercise, Remembered, and Forecasted Pleasure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenko, Zachary; Ekkekakis, Panteleimon; Ariely, Dan

    2016-04-01

    There is a paucity of methods for improving the affective experience of exercise. We tested a novel method based on discoveries about the relation between exercise intensity and pleasure, and lessons from behavioral economics. We examined the effect of reversing the slope of pleasure during exercise from negative to positive on pleasure and enjoyment, remembered pleasure, and forecasted pleasure. Forty-six adults were randomly assigned to a 15-min bout of recumbent cycling of either increasing intensity (0-120% of watts corresponding to the ventilatory threshold) or decreasing intensity (120-0%). Ramping intensity down, thereby eliciting a positive slope of pleasure during exercise, improved postexercise pleasure and enjoyment, remembered pleasure, and forecasted pleasure. The slope of pleasure accounted for 35-46% of the variance in remembered and forecasted pleasure from 15 min to 7 days postexercise. Ramping intensity down makes it possible to combine exposure to vigorous and moderate intensities with a pleasant affective experience.

  17. A Data-Driven Control Design Approach for Freeway Traffic Ramp Metering with Virtual Reference Feedback Tuning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shangtai Jin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available ALINEA is a simple, efficient, and easily implemented ramp metering strategy. Virtual reference feedback tuning (VRFT is most suitable for many practical systems since it is a “one-shot” data-driven control design methodology. This paper presents an application of VRFT to a ramp metering problem of freeway traffic system. When there is not enough prior knowledge of the controlled system to select a proper parameter of ALINEA, the VRFT approach is used to optimize the ALINEA's parameter by only using a batch of input and output data collected from the freeway traffic system. The extensive simulations are built on both the macroscopic MATLAB platform and the microscopic PARAMICS platform to show the effectiveness and applicability of the proposed data-driven controller tuning approach.

  18. Ramp compression of a metallic liner driven by a shaped 5 MA current on the SPHINX machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Almeida, T.; Lassalle, F.; Morell, A.; Grunenwald, J.; Zucchini, F.; Loyen, A.; Maysonnave, T.; Chuvatin, A.

    2014-05-01

    SPHINX is a 6MA, 1-us Linear Transformer Driver operated by the CEA Gramat (France) and primarily used for imploding Z-pinch loads for radiation effects studies. A method for performing magnetic ramp compression experiments was developed using a compact Dynamic Load Current Multiplier inserted between the convolute and the load, to shape the initial current pulse. We present the overall experimental configuration chosen for these experiments and initial results obtained over a set of experiments on an aluminum cylindrical liner. Current profiles measured at various critical locations across the system, are in good agreement with simulated current profiles. The liner inner free surface velocity measurements agree with the hydrocode results obtained using the measured load current as the input. The potential of the technique in terms of applications and achievable ramp pressure levels lies in the prospects for improving the DLCM efficiency.

  19. Distribution of CGRP and its receptor components CLR and RAMP1 in the rat retina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blixt, Frank W; Radziwon-Balicka, Aneta; Edvinsson, Lars

    2017-01-01

    (RAMP1). While there is a growing recognition that CGRP plays a key role in migraine, the function of CGRP in the retina has not been fully established. This study aims to investigate the distribution of CGRP and its two receptor components in the rat retina, visually by immunohistochemistry...... and quantitatively using flow cytometry. CGRP immunoreactivity was found in the Müller cells while CLR/RAMP1 was located in the nerve fiber layer. Furthermore, since almost all RAMP1 immunoreactive cells co-express CLR, we propose that RAMP1 expression in the retina reflects functional CGRP receptors....

  20. Strain Rate Effects in CFRP Used For Blast Mitigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah. L. Orton

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is to gain a better understanding of strain rate effects in carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP laminates exposed to blast loading. The use of CFRP offers an attractive option for mitigating structures exposed to blasts. However, the effect of high strain rates in CFRP composites commonly used in the civil industry is unknown. This research conducted tensile tests of 21 CFRP coupons using a hydraulically powered dynamic loader. The strain rates ranged from 0.0015 s−1 to 7.86 s−1 and are representative of strain rates that CFRP may see in a blast when used to strengthen reinforced concrete structures. The results of the testing showed no increase in the tensile strength or stiffness of the CFRP at the higher strain rates. In addition, the results showed significant scatter in the tensile strengths possibly due to the rate of loading or manufacture of the coupon.

  1. Effect of eating rate on binge size in Bulimia Nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissileff, Harry R; Zimmerli, Ellen J; Torres, Migdalia I; Devlin, Michael J; Walsh, B Timothy

    2008-01-01

    Effect of eating rate on binge size in bulimia nervosa. Bulimia Nervosa (BN) is an eating disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of binge eating. During binge eating episodes, patients often describe the rapid consumption of food, and laboratory studies have shown that during binges patients with BN eat faster than normal controls (NC), but the hypothesis that a rapid rate of eating contributes to the excessive intake of binge meals has not yet been experimentally tested. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of eating rate on binge size in BN, in order to determine whether binge size is mediated, in part, by rate of eating. Thirteen BN and 14 NC subjects were asked to binge eat a yogurt shake that was served at a fast rate (140g/min) on one occasion and at a slow rate (70g/min) on another. NC subjects consumed 169 g more when eating at the fast rate than when eating at the slow rate. In contrast, consumption rates failed to influence binge size in patients with BN (fast: 1205 g; slow: 1195 g). Consequently, there was a significant group by rate interaction. As expected, patients with BN consumed more overall than NC subjects (1200 g vs. 740 g). When instructed to binge in the eating laboratory, patients with BN ate equally large amounts of food at a slow rate as at a fast rate. NC subjects ate less at a slow rate. These findings indicate that in a structured laboratory meal paradigm binge size is not affected by rate of eating. PMID:17996257

  2. of Effects Phosphate Haplustult Duration of Contact and . Rates lof ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An incubation pot experiment was conducted at the Sokoine University of Agriculture, Morogoro,. Tanzania to study the effects of times of contact and rates of Minjingu phosphate rock (MPR) applied to a. Kanhaplic Haplustult on the release of P from the MPR. The soil was mixed with MPR at rat'es equivalent to 0.0, 25.0, ...

  3. Effect of cooling rate on crystallization in an aluminophosphosilicate melt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, S. J.; Zhang, Yanfei; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2011-01-01

    The effect of cooling rate on spontaneous crystallization behavior of an alumino-phospho-silicate melt is studied by means of differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and viscometry. The cooling rates of 160, 2100 and 12000 K/s are attained by subjecting...

  4. Personality Characteristics of Counselors Rated as Effective or Ineffective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggins, J. D.; Weslander, D. L.

    1979-01-01

    Vocational Preference Inventory (VPI) was used to discriminate counselors rated as highly effective, as average, or as ineffective. Results indicated significant correlations between tested personality characteristics and rated job performances. Employment level, sex, age, certification, and degree status were of no significance in predicting…

  5. Evaluating Gender Bias in Ratings of University Instructors' Teaching Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Suzanne; Rush, Leslie; Shaw, Dale

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the gender bias in student ratings of effective teaching. Students in five colleges were invited to rate instructors on three factors: interpersonal characteristics, pedagogical characteristics, and course content characteristics. We analyzed group differences based on student gender, instructor gender, and…

  6. Effects of Variety and Fungicidal Rate on Cercospora Leaf Spots ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RRB and ICGV-86024) and four levels of fungicidal rate (0, 1, 2 and 4 kghaˉı of fungicide mancozeb) replicated three times. Disease ... Keywords: Groundnut; Cercospora leaf spots; Variety; Fungicidal rate; Yield. INTRODUCTION. In Nigeria leaf spot and ..... Rayar. A. J. (1984). Effect of organic manure on soil properties.

  7. The Effectiveness of Media Ratings in Five Empirical Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gosselt, Jordi Franciscus

    2014-01-01

    To protect children and adolescents against and inform parents about harmful media content, media ratings show whether a media product's content is harmful for minors below a given age. In this research project, we performed a series of studies into the effectiveness of media ratings in the

  8. Effect of high heating rate on thermal decomposition behaviour of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    but rely on the concentration of hydrogen. The model ... first-order rate law. Lehmhus and Rausch (2004) have annealed TiH2 pow- der in air and argon. In argon, the powder does not develop a surface layer and as a result, a small amount of hydro- gen is lost ... rate effect on the thermal decomposition behaviour of TiH2.

  9. Effect of weed management methods and nitrogen fertilizer rates on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Inefficient weed management practices and the use of inappropriate nitrogen fertilizer rates are the major causes of low yield of wheat in Ethiopia. Therefore, field experiments were conducted at Bobicho and Faate in southern Ethiopia to determine the effect of weed management practices and N fertilizer rates on grain yield ...

  10. Effects of Malaria on Blood Pressure, Heart Rate, Electrocardiogram ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of malaria on blood pressure, heart rate, electrocardiogram and the cardiovascular responses to postural change were studied in malaria patients. Blood pressure was measured by the sphygmomanometric-auscultatory method. Standard ECG machine was used to record the electrocardiogram. Heart rate was ...

  11. Integrated effect of seeding rate, herbicide dosage and application ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Integrated effect of seeding rate, herbicide dosage and application timing on durum wheat ( Triticum turgidum l. var durum) yield, yield components and wild oat (avena fatua l.) control in south eastern Ethiopia.

  12. Tailored ramp wave generation in gas gun experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cotton Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gas guns are traditionally used as platforms to introduce a planar shock wave to a material using plate impact methods, generating states on the Hugoniot. The ability to deliver a ramp wave to a target during a gas gun experiment enables access to different regions of the equation-of-state surface, making it a valuable technique for characterising material behaviour. Previous techniques have relied on the use of multi-material impactors to generate a density gradient, which can be complex to manufacture. In this paper we describe the use of an additively manufactured steel component consisting of an array of tapered spikes which can deliver a ramp wave over ∼ 2 μs. The ability to tailor the input wave by varying the component design is discussed, an approach which makes use of the design freedom offered by additive manufacturing techniques to rapidly iterate the spike profile. Results from gas gun experiments are presented to evaluate the technique, and compared with 3D hydrodynamic simulations.

  13. Effectiveness of respiratory rates in determining clinical deterioration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølgaard, Rikke Rishøj; Larsen, Palle; Håkonsen, Sasa Jul

    2016-01-01

    Review question/objective: The objective of this systematic review is to identify, appraise and synthesize the best available evidence on the effectiveness of manually measuring respiratory rates for 60 s or less in detecting clinical deterioration of inpatients. More specifically, the review...... question is: Is measurement of respiratory rates for 60 s more effective in detecting clinical deterioration than a shorter duration of measurement?...

  14. Effects of Vibration and G-Loading on Heart Rate, Breathing Rate, and Response Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godinez, Angelica; Ayzenberg, Ruthie; Liston, Dorian B.; Stone, Leland S.

    2013-01-01

    Aerospace and applied environments commonly expose pilots and astronauts to G-loading and vibration, alone and in combination, with well-known sensorimotor (Cohen, 1970) and performance consequences (Adelstein et al., 2008). Physiological variables such as heart rate (HR) and breathing rate (BR) have been shown to increase with G-loading (Yajima et al., 1994) and vibration (e.g. Guignard, 1965, 1985) alone. To examine the effects of G-loading and vibration, alone and in combination, we measured heart rate and breathing rate under aerospace-relevant conditions (G-loads of 1 Gx and 3.8 Gx; vibration of 0.5 gx at 8, 12, and 16 Hz).

  15. Effect of team training on improving MRI study completion rates and no-show rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norbash, Alexander; Yucel, Kent; Yuh, William; Doros, Gheorghe; Ajam, Amna; Lang, Elvira; Pauker, Stephen; Mayr, Nina

    2016-10-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a high-cost imaging modality, and an optimized encounter ideally provides high-quality care, patient satisfaction, and capacity utilization. Our purpose was to assess the effectiveness of team training and its impact on patient show-up and completion rates for their MRI examinations. A total of 97,712 patient visits from three tertiary academic medical centers over 1-year intervals were evaluated, totaling 49,733 visits at baseline and 47,979 after training. Each center's MRI team received team training skill training including advanced communication and team training techniques training. This training included onsite instruction including case simulation with scenarios requiring appropriate behavioral and communicative interventions. Orientation and training also utilized customized online tools and proctoring. The study completion rate and patient show-up rate during consecutive year-long intervals before and after team training were compared to assess its effectiveness. Two-sided chi-square tests for proportions using were applied at a 0.05 significance level. Despite differing no-show rates (5-22.2%) and study incompletion rates (0.7-3.7%) at the three academic centers, the combined patients' data showed significant (P < 0.0001) improvement in the patients' no-show rates (combined decreases from 11.2% to 8.7%) and incompletion rates (combined decreases from 2.3% to 1.4%). Our preliminary results suggest training of the imaging team can improve the no-show and incompletion rates of the MRI service, positively affecting throughput and utilization. Team training can be readily implemented and may help address the needs of the current cost-conscious and consumer-sensitive healthcare environment. J. MAGN. RESON. IMAGING 2016;44:1040-1047. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  16. Tolerance to the rate-increasing and not rate-decreasing effects of pregnanolone in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppolito, Amy K; Gerak, Lisa R

    2010-12-01

    Chronic treatment with benzodiazepines, which positively modulate γ-aminobutyric acidA (GABAA) receptors, can lead to the development of tolerance. Similar effects might also occur during chronic treatment with positive modulators acting at other sites on GABAA receptors (e.g. neuroactive steroids). In this study, tolerance and cross tolerance were examined in seven rats treated daily with the neuroactive steroid pregnanolone (25.6 mg/kg/day) and responding under a fixed ratio 10 schedule of food presentation. Dose-effect curves were determined for positive GABAA modulators (pregnanolone, flunitrazepam, midazolam, and pentobarbital), and other drugs (ketamine and morphine) before, during, and after chronic treatment. Initially, daily pregnanolone administration increased responding; although tolerance developed to the rate-increasing effects after 14 weeks, tolerance did not develop to the rate-decreasing effects. The potencies of pregnanolone, midazolam, and morphine to decrease responding did not change during treatment, whereas flunitrazepam was more potent and pentobarbital and ketamine were less potent during treatment as compared to before treatment. Pregnanolone and midazolam were more potent after treatment than before treatment. The development of tolerance to the rate-increasing effects of pregnanolone indicates that neuroadaptations occur during chronic treatment; the fact that tolerance develops to only some effects suggests that the behavioral consequences of these neuroadaptations are limited.

  17. Response of humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) to ramp-up of a small experimental air gun array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlop, Rebecca A; Noad, Michael J; McCauley, Robert D; Kniest, Eric; Slade, Robert; Paton, David; Cato, Douglas H

    2016-02-15

    'Ramp-up', or 'soft start', is a mitigation measure used in seismic surveys and involves increasing the radiated sound level over 20-40 min. This study compared the behavioural response in migrating humpback whales to the first stages of ramp-up with the response to a 'constant' source, 'controls' (in which the array was towed but not operated) with groups in the absence of the source vessel used as the 'baseline'. Although the behavioural response, in most groups, resulted in an increase in distance from the source (potential avoidance), there was no evidence that either 'ramp-up' or the constant source at a higher level was superior for triggering whales to move away from the source vessel. 'Control' groups also responded suggesting the presence of the source vessel had some effect. However, the majority of groups appeared to avoid the source vessel at distances greater than the radius of most mitigation zones. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. High Voltage Ramp Generator for Electro-Optically Tunable Filter for the MSE-CIF Diagnostics on NSTX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ying; Levinton, Fred

    2004-11-01

    The motional Stark effect (MSE) diagnostic is routinely used to determine the q-profile in large fusion devices. To apply the MSE diagnostic to experiments with low magnetic fields such as NSTX (<1 T), a tunable birefringent Lyot filter is used with high throughput and high resolution which allows for a good signal-to-noise ratio. The birefringent filter is made from lithium-niobate crystals, which are coated with a layer of indium tin-oxide (ITO). The ITO layer is a transparent conductive coating. By applying an electric field across the crystal the index of refraction is varied. This allows tunability of the filter. Putting multiple crystals together and tuning them individually it is possible to pass certain wavelengths of light and reject others. A high voltage ramp generator circuit is under development to ramp a 5 kV signal using a simple design involving MOSFET ladders. The goal is to design the circuit so that it can ramp ±5000 volts at a frequency of around 1 kHz. This would allow the filter to sweep over a range of ˜ 1nm.

  19. Repair of Meniscal Ramp Lesions Through a Posteromedial Portal During Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: Outcome Study With a Minimum 2-Year Follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaunat, Mathieu; Jan, Nicolas; Fayard, Jean Marie; Kajetanek, Charles; Murphy, Colin G; Pupim, Barbara; Gardon, Roland; Sonnery-Cottet, Bertrand

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate the results of arthroscopic all-inside suture repair of medial meniscal ramp lesions through a posteromedial portal during anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. All patients who underwent a suture of the posterior segment of the medial meniscus using a suture hook device through a posteromedial portal during ACL reconstruction with minimum 2 year-follow-up were included in the study. Repair was performed for longitudinal tears within the rim of less than 3 mm (capsulomeniscal junction or red-red zone) or 3 to 5 mm (red-white zone) of an unstable torn meniscus. Patients were assessed pre- and postoperatively with IKDC score and Tegner activity scale. Instrumented knee testing was performed with the Rolimeter arthrometer. Complications including reoperation for failed meniscal repair were also recorded. One hundred thirty-two patients met the inclusion criteria. The mean follow-up time was 27 months (range, 24 to 29 months). The average subjective IKDC rose from 63.8 ± 13.5 (range, 27 to 92) preoperatively to 85.7 ± 12 (range, 43 to 100) at last follow-up (P tears were related to a newly formed tear located anterior to the initial tear. Our results show that arthroscopic meniscal repair of ramp lesions during ACL reconstruction through a posteromedial portal provided a high rate of meniscus healing at the level of the tear and appeared to be safe and effective in this group of patients. Level IV, therapeutic study, case series (no control group). Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Pure rate effect on compressive strength of concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Sangho

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic Increase Factor (DIF has been used to consider the compressive strength enhancement of concrete at the high and intermediate strain rates. However, DIF formulae suggested until now include the inertia effects as well as the rate effect because the DIF formulae has been assumed as a function of only the strain rate and the inertia effects cannot be avoided in tests at the high and intermediate strain rate region. Therefore, applying the DIF to design or analysis of social infrastructures may be dangerous because the resistance by the inertia effects are considered repetitively. In this study, an apparent DIF formula, which includes the inertia effects, was proposed by introducing terms related with the strain acceleration, which represent the axial and radial inertia effects. Then, a nonlinear regression analysis was conducted to determine the coefficients in the apparent DIF formula with results of Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB tests for concrete. Finally, the DIF formula excluding the axial and radial inertia effects was proposed for compressive strength of concrete at the high and intermediate strain rates.

  1. Sound and vibration : effects on infants' heart rate and heart rate variability during neonatal transport

    OpenAIRE

    Karlsson, Björn-Markus; Lindkvist, Marie; Lindkvist, Markus; Karlsson, Marcus; Lundström, Ronnie; Håkansson, Stellan; Wiklund, Urban; van den Berg, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To measure the effect of sound and whole-body vibration on infants' heart rate and heart rate variability during ground and air ambulance transport. Methods: Sixteen infants were transported by air ambulance with ground ambulance transport to and from the airports. Whole-body vibration and sound levels were recorded and heart parameters were obtained by ECG signal. Results: Sound and whole-body vibration levels exceeded the recommended limits. Mean whole-body vibration and sound levels w...

  2. Effects of storage conditions on transpiration rate of pomegranate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the effects of temperature (5, 10, 15 and 22 °C) and relative humidity (RH) (76%, 86% and 96%) on the transpiration rate (TR) of pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) cv. Bhagwa fruit fractions, namely arils and aril-sac. Both temperature and RH had significant effects on the TR of fruit fractions. The TR ...

  3. Virtual stop line strategy to reduce fuel consumption of vehicles at ramp meters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woldeab, Z.; Vreeswijk, J.; Bie, J.

    2013-01-01

    Ramp meters successfully decrease congestion but leave a burden on the traffic situation at on-ramps. Chaotic queuing leads to many stop-and-go movements and causes inefficiency where fuel consumption is concerned. As part of the eCoMove project, complementary strategies are being designed and

  4. Numerical Analysis of Inlet Gas-Mixture Flow Rate Effects on Carbon Nanotube Growth Rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Zahed

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The growth rate and uniformity of Carbon Nano Tubes (CNTs based on Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD technique is investigated by using a numerical model. In this reactor, inlet gas mixture, including xylene as carbon source and mixture of argon and hydrogen as  carrier gas enters into a horizontal CVD reactor at atmospheric pressure. Based on the gas phase and surface reactions, released carbon atoms are grown as CNTs on the iron catalysts at the reactor hot walls. The effect of inlet gas-mixture flow rate, on CNTs growth rate and its uniformity is discussed. In addition the velocity and temperature profile and also species concentrations throughout the reactor are presented.

  5. INTEREST RATES AND CURRENCIES EFFECTS ON ISLAMIC AND CONVENTIONAL BONDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghazali Syamni

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Bond markets have not been well developed in emerging countries. Realizing its important role, especially after the 1997 crises and the islamic economics development, emerging countries have started to develop such markets. This research examines the effect of interest rates and currencies on Islamic and conventional bonds in Bursa Malaysia. The analysis on Islamic bonds shows that interest rates and currencies do not influence Islamic bonds, which supports the prohibition of interest in Islam. The analysis on conventional bonds finds evidence that both interest rates and currencies affect conventional bond. It also finds evidence of a negative association between interest rates and a conventional bond. Keywords: Interest rate, currency, conventional bond, Islamic bond JEL classification numbers: G11, G12, G15

  6. Faster ramp of LHC for use as an FCC High Energy hadron Booster

    CERN Document Server

    Milanese, A; Solfaroli Camillocci, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    This note examines the feasibility of ramping the LHC magnets faster than the present operation, in view of a reuse of LHC as a High Energy hadron Booster. Such a synchrotron would inject 3.3 TeV beams into a larger Future Circular Collider. The main constraints are examined. The conclusion is that the ramp up could be shortened by a factor of 4, with the main dipoles ramping up at 50 A/s instead of 10 A/s and a modified formulation of the ramp function. On the hardware side this would require a voltage upgrade of the dipole power converters and a possible further splitting of the dipole circuits in halves. To make similar gains for the ramp down time, modifications to some of the one-quadrant power converters, would also be needed, including the main quadrupoles.

  7. Effects of coating rate on morphology of copper surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Motamen, S.; M. Vahabi; Jafari, G. R.

    2013-01-01

    We have used standard fractal analysis and Markov approach to obtain further insights on roughness and multifractality of different surfaces. The effect of coating rates on generating topographic rough surfaces in copper thin films with same thickness has been studied using atomic force microscopy technique (AFM). Our results show that by increasing the coating rates, correlation length (grain sizes) and Markov length are decreased and roughness exponent is decreased and our surfaces become m...

  8. Digitized reality: Effects of high frame rate on visual perception

    OpenAIRE

    Loertscher, Miriam Laura; Iseli, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The digital revolution changed film production and its aesthetics in many ways. Although motion is a defining feature of moving images, it is also one of their most problematic aspects because of blurred images or other signal processing artifacts. An artistic research project was conducted to test the effects of high frame rates (HFR) on visual perception. Typical camera movements were recorded in different frame rates (24 / 48 / 96 fps) to generate test sequences for a cinema experiment. 69...

  9. Effectiveness of taxicab security equipment in reducing driver homicide rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menéndez, Cammie K C; Amandus, Harlan E; Damadi, Parisa; Wu, Nan; Konda, Srinivas; Hendricks, Scott A

    2013-07-01

    Taxicab drivers historically have had one of the highest work-related homicide rates of any occupation. In 2010 the taxicab driver homicide rate was 7.4 per 100,000 drivers, compared to the overall rate of 0.37 per 100,000 workers. Evaluate the effectiveness of taxicab security cameras and partitions on citywide taxicab driver homicide rates. Taxicab driver homicide rates were compared in 26 major cities in the U.S. licensing taxicabs with security cameras (n=8); bullet-resistant partitions (n=7); and cities where taxicabs were not equipped with either security cameras or partitions (n=11). News clippings of taxicab driver homicides and the number of licensed taxicabs by city were used to construct taxicab driver homicide rates spanning 15 years (1996-2010). Generalized estimating equations were constructed to model the Poisson-distributed homicide rates on city-specific safety equipment installation status, controlling for city homicide rate and the concurrent decline of homicide rates over time. Data were analyzed in 2012. Cities with cameras experienced a threefold reduction in taxicab driver homicides compared with control cities (RR=0.27; 95% CI=0.12, 0.61; p=0.002). There was no difference in homicide rates for cities with partitions compared with control cities (RR=1.15; 95% CI=0.80, 1.64; p=0.575). Municipal ordinances and company policies mandating security cameras appear to be highly effective in reducing taxicab driver deaths due to workplace violence. Published by Elsevier Inc. on behalf of American Journal of Preventive Medicine

  10. Theory of Crowding Effects on Bimolecular Reaction Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezhkovskii, Alexander M; Szabo, Attila

    2016-07-07

    An analytical expression for the rate constant of a diffusion-influenced bimolecular reaction in a crowded environment is derived in the framework of a microscopic model that accounts for: (1) the slowdown of diffusion due to crowding and the dependence of the diffusivity on the distance between the reactants, (2) a crowding-induced attractive short-range potential of mean force, and (3) nonspecific reversible binding to the crowders. This expression spans the range from reaction to diffusion control. Crowding can increase the reaction-controlled rate by inducing an effective attraction between reactants but decrease the diffusion-controlled rate by reducing their relative diffusivity.

  11. [Ramp lesions : Tips and tricks in diagnostics and therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seil, R; Hoffmann, A; Scheffler, S; Theisen, D; Mouton, C; Pape, D

    2017-10-01

    There is an increasing biomechanical and anatomical understanding of the different types of meniscal lesions. Lesions of the posterior part of the medial meniscus in the meniscosynovial area have recently received increased attention. They generally occur in association with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries. They are often missed ("hidden lesions") due to the fact that they cannot be seen by routine anterior arthroscopic inspection. Furthermore, meniscosynovial lesions play a role in anteroposterior knee laxity and, as such, they may be a cause of failure of ACL reconstruction or of postoperative persistent laxity. Little information is available regarding their cause with respect to injury mechanism, natural history, biomechanical implications, healing potential and treatment options. This article presents an overview of the currently available knowledge of these ramp lesions, their possible pathomechanism, classification, biomechanical relevance as well as repair techniques.

  12. Student rating as an effective tool for teacher evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, Muhammad Nadeem

    2013-01-01

    To determine the effectiveness of students' rating as a teacher evaluation tool. Concurrent mixed method. King Edward Medical University, Lahore, from January to June 2010. Anonymous 5-point Likert scale survey questionnaire was conducted involving a single class consisting of 310 students and 12 students were selected for structured interview based on non-probability purposive sampling. Informed consent was procured. They were required to rate 6 teachers and were supposed to discuss teachers' performance in detail. Quantitative data collected through survey was analyzed using SPSS 15 and qualitative data was analyzed with the help of content analysis by identifying themes and patterns from thick descriptions. This student feedback would show the effectiveness in terms of its feasibility and as an indicator of teaching attributes. Descriptive statistics of quantitative data obtained from survey was used to calculate mean and standard deviation for all teachers' individually. This showed the average direction of the student ratings. Percentages of the responses calculated of teacher A were 85.96%, teacher B 65.53, teacher C 65.20%, teacher D 69.62%, teacher E 65.32% and teacher F 64.24% in terms of overall effectiveness of their teaching. Structured interviews generated qualitative data which validated the students' views about strengths and weaknesses of teachers, and helped to determine the effectiveness of their rating and feedback. This simple rating system clearly showed its importance and hence can be used in institutions as a regular evaluating method of teaching faculty.

  13. Experimental Study of Boundary Layer Flow Control Using an Array of Ramp-Shaped Vortex Generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirt, Stefanie M.; Zaman, Khairul B.M.Q.; Bencic, Tomothy J.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to obtain a database on the flowfield past an array of vortex generators (VGs) in a turbulent boundary layer. All testing was carried out in a low speed wind tunnel with a flow velocity of 29 ft/sec, giving a Reynolds number of 17,500 based on the width of the VG. The flowfield generated by an array of five ramp-shaped vortex generators was examined with hot wire anemometry and smoke flow visualization. The magnitude and extent of the velocity increase near the wall, the penetration of the velocity deficit into the core flow, and the peak streamwise vorticity are examined. Influence of various parameters on the effectiveness of the array is considered on the basis of the ability to pull high momentum fluid into the near wall region.

  14. Effects of ambient conditions on multi-capillary ventilation rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Qing

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As a major physical parameter for the tobacco industry, the ventilation rate of cigarette should be measured reliably. Theoretical and numerical investigation on ef-fects of ambient conditions (e. g., cumulative flux of ozone and additional pressure drop on the ventilation rate was carried out. It was found that the standards exhibited a non-linear airflow component, which explains why additional pressure drop has an effect on the calibrated value, and had low sensitivity to cumulative flux of ozone.

  15. Standardized Testing Practices: Effect on Graduation and NCLEX® Pass Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randolph, Pamela K

    The use standardized testing in pre-licensure nursing programs has been accompanied by conflicting reports of effective practices. The purpose of this project was to describe standardized testing practices in one states' nursing programs and discover if the use of a cut score or oversight of remediation had any effect on (a) first time NCLEX® pass rates, (b) on-time graduation (OTG) or (c) the combination of (a) and (b). Administrators of 38 nursing programs in one Southwest state were sent surveys; surveys were returned by 34 programs (89%). Survey responses were compared to each program's NCLEX pass rate and on-time graduation rate; t-tests were conducted for significant differences associated with a required minimum score (cut score) and oversight of remediation. There were no significant differences in NCLEX pass or on-time graduation rates related to establishment of a cut score. There was a significant difference when the NCLEX pass rate and on-time graduation rate were combined (Outcome Index "OI") with significantly higher program outcomes (P=.02.) for programs without cut-scores. There were no differences associated with faculty oversight of remediation. The results of this study do not support establishment of a cut-score when implementing a standardized testing. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Slow speech rate effects on stuttering preschoolers with disordered phonology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaSalle, Lisa R

    2015-05-01

    To study the effects of clinicians' slow rate on the speech of children who stutter with and without a concomitant phonological disorder, an A-B-A-B single case design was used with six clinician-child dyads, where B = Clinician's slow speech rate model. Two boys and one girl, aged 49-54 months, stuttering with disordered phonology (S + DP), were compared to three boys aged 42-50 months, stuttering with normal phonology (S + NP). Articulation rates were measured in phones per second (pps) in clinician-child adjacent utterance pairs. The S + NP dyads showed improved fluency in the B condition through a larger effect size, higher mean baseline stutter reductions and lower percentages of non-overlapping data than did the S + DP dyads. The S + DP girl showed relatively improved fluency in the B condition. S + DP children showed no articulation rate alignment (Range: 16% decrease to a 1.2% increase), whereas S + NP children averaged a 20% pps rate reduction (Range: 19.6-25.4% decrease), aligning with their clinicians who averaged a 38% pps rate reduction from baseline. The S + DP group spoke significantly (z = -4.63; p boys with time since onset of about 2 years.

  17. Primacy/Recency Effects in Student Ratings of Instruction: A Reinterpretation of Gain-Loss Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leventhal, Les; And Others

    1983-01-01

    This article describes how the effects of initial and final lecture quality on end-of-course student ratings can be predicted from seemingly unrelated gain-loss theory. The effects were investigated, along with the effect on ratings of student belief that the instructor will use midterm rating feedback to improve teaching. (Author)

  18. Effective reaction rates for diffusion-limited reaction cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nałęcz-Jawecki, Paweł; Szymańska, Paulina; Kochańczyk, Marek; Miękisz, Jacek; Lipniacki, Tomasz

    2015-12-07

    Biological signals in cells are transmitted with the use of reaction cycles, such as the phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle, in which substrate is modified by antagonistic enzymes. An appreciable share of such reactions takes place in crowded environments of two-dimensional structures, such as plasma membrane or intracellular membranes, and is expected to be diffusion-controlled. In this work, starting from the microscopic bimolecular reaction rate constants and using estimates of the mean first-passage time for an enzyme-substrate encounter, we derive diffusion-dependent effective macroscopic reaction rate coefficients (EMRRC) for a generic reaction cycle. Each EMRRC was found to be half of the harmonic average of the microscopic rate constant (phosphorylation c or dephosphorylation d), and the effective (crowding-dependent) motility divided by a slowly decreasing logarithmic function of the sum of the enzyme concentrations. This implies that when c and d differ, the two EMRRCs scale differently with the motility, rendering the steady-state fraction of phosphorylated substrate molecules diffusion-dependent. Analytical predictions are verified using kinetic Monte Carlo simulations on the two-dimensional triangular lattice at the single-molecule resolution. It is demonstrated that the proposed formulas estimate the steady-state concentrations and effective reaction rates for different sets of microscopic reaction rates and concentrations of reactants, including a non-trivial example where with increasing diffusivity the fraction of phosphorylated substrate molecules changes from 10% to 90%.

  19. Effect of upward seepage on bedload transport rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-xie Liu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an investigation of injection effects on the bedload transport rate. According to dimensional analysis, two dimensionless groups, an Einstein's parameter group and a modified densimetric Froude number group, were chosen to examine how injection affects the bedload transport rate. Experimental studies were conducted in an open-channel flume with an upward seepage zone. The sediment particles used for the test were 0.9 mm in diameter. The experimental results show that an increase in the injection velocity causes a reduction in the shear velocity excess, which is defined as the difference between the shear and critical shear velocities, leading to a reduction in the bedload transport rate. The equation for predicting the bedload transport rate in the presence of upward seepage was derived empirically. The proposed prediction method is suitable for engineering practice, since it only requires the undisturbed flow condition, properties of sediment particles, and the injection velocity.

  20. Effect of oxygen treatment on heart rate after abdominal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg-Adamsen, S; Lie, C; Bernhard, A

    1999-01-01

    . METHODS: The authors studied the effect of oxygen therapy on arterial oxygen saturation and heart rate in 100 consecutive unselected patients randomly and double blindly allocated to receive air or oxygen therapy between the first and fourth day after major abdominal surgery. RESULTS: The median arterial...... supplementation were found between patients with or without an epidural catheter or between the postoperative day studied. CONCLUSION: Postoperative oxygen therapy increased arterial oxygen saturation and decreased heart rate after uncomplicated abdominal surgery in a consecutive unselected group of patients who......BACKGROUND: Cardiac complications are common during the postoperative period and may be associated with hypoxemia and tachycardia. Preliminary studies in high-risk patients after operation have shown a possible beneficial effect of oxygen therapy on arterial oxygen saturation and heart rate...

  1. Thermal /Soret/ diffusion effects on interfacial mass transport rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, D. E.

    1980-01-01

    It is shown that thermal (Soret) diffusion significantly alters convective mass transport rates and important transition temperatures in highly nonisothermal flow systems involving the transport of 'heavy' species (vapors or particles). Introduction of the Soret transport term is shown to result in mass transfer effects similar to those of 'suction' and a homogeneous chemical 'sink'. It is pointed out that this analogy provides a simple method of correlating and predicting thermal diffusion effects in the abovementioned systems.

  2. Force sensor in simulated skin and neural model mimic tactile SAI afferent spiking response to ramp and hold stimuli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Elmer K

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The next generation of prosthetic limbs will restore sensory feedback to the nervous system by mimicking how skin mechanoreceptors, innervated by afferents, produce trains of action potentials in response to compressive stimuli. Prior work has addressed building sensors within skin substitutes for robotics, modeling skin mechanics and neural dynamics of mechanotransduction, and predicting response timing of action potentials for vibration. The effort here is unique because it accounts for skin elasticity by measuring force within simulated skin, utilizes few free model parameters for parsimony, and separates parameter fitting and model validation. Additionally, the ramp-and-hold, sustained stimuli used in this work capture the essential features of the everyday task of contacting and holding an object. Methods This systems integration effort computationally replicates the neural firing behavior for a slowly adapting type I (SAI afferent in its temporally varying response to both intensity and rate of indentation force by combining a physical force sensor, housed in a skin-like substrate, with a mathematical model of neuronal spiking, the leaky integrate-and-fire. Comparison experiments were then conducted using ramp-and-hold stimuli on both the spiking-sensor model and mouse SAI afferents. The model parameters were iteratively fit against recorded SAI interspike intervals (ISI before validating the model to assess its performance. Results Model-predicted spike firing compares favorably with that observed for single SAI afferents. As indentation magnitude increases (1.2, 1.3, to 1.4 mm, mean ISI decreases from 98.81 ± 24.73, 54.52 ± 6.94, to 41.11 ± 6.11 ms. Moreover, as rate of ramp-up increases, ISI during ramp-up decreases from 21.85 ± 5.33, 19.98 ± 3.10, to 15.42 ± 2.41 ms. Considering first spikes, the predicted latencies exhibited a decreasing trend as stimulus rate increased, as is

  3. Effect of xylazine and ketamine on blood pressure, heart rate and respiratory rate in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, T D; Colby, E D

    1980-06-01

    New Zealand white and New Zeland white-Dutch Belted cross rabbits of both sexes were anesthetized using xylazine and ketamine alone and in combination while blood pressure, heart and respiratory rates were monitored. Blood pressure effects were measured from the aortic arch by a cannula implant through the left carotid artery. Ketamine-xylazine in combination at 35 and 5 mg/kg body weight, respectively, produced 45-60 minutes of surgical plane anesthesia. Anesthesia was induced in approximately 10 minutes. The average initial blood pressure drop was complete in 10 minutes and was 30%. Heart and respiratory rates dropped 19% and 77%, respectively, in the same time span. An additional blood pressure drop of 6-7% occurred as consciousness was regained. Blood pressure recovery was nearly complete (normal) about 6 hours following injection of the drug combination.

  4. Effect of cooling rate on the microstructure and mechanical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... attributed to the presence of manganese. In addition, variation in cooling rate led to increase in strength but severely affected percentage elongation albeit in an acceptable limit of 6%. This effect is discussed in the light of degree of banding of strips and microstructural constituents generated during heat treatment of steel ...

  5. Nitrogen rate and plant population effects on yield and yield ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This research was carried out to determine the effect of plant population and nitrogen rates on yield and yield components in soybean under Bursa, Mustafakemalpaa ecological conditions. Trials were conducted during 2000 and 2001 at the experimental fields of the Mustafakemalpaa Vocational High School, University of ...

  6. Short communication Effective population size and inbreeding rate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    201010100

    2013-05-30

    May 30, 2013 ... Effective population size and inbreeding rate of indigenous Nguni cattle under ... Abstract. Nineteen rural Nguni cattle enterprises managed at communal and small-scale level were used in a study to ..... mothering ability, and tick and disease resistance (Muchenje et al., 2008; Marufu et al., 2009). Though ...

  7. The effect of wind on burning rate of wood cribs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sara McAllister; Mark Finney

    2016-01-01

    Wood cribs are often used as ignition sources for room fire tests. A wood crib may also apply to studies of burning rate in wildland fires, because wildland fuel beds are porous and three dimensional. A unique aspect of wildland fires is the ubiquitous presence of wind. However, very little is known about what effect the increased ventilation has on the...

  8. Nitrogen rate and plant population effects on yield and yield ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-12-17

    Dec 17, 2008 ... This research was carried out to determine the effect of plant population and nitrogen rates on yield and yield components in soybean under Bursa, Mustafakemalpaşa ecological conditions. Trials were conducted during 2000 and 2001 at the experimental fields of the Mustafakemalpaşa Vocational High.

  9. The effect of exchange rate devaluation on selected agricultural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This work examined and evaluated in comparative terms, the effect of exchange rate devaluation on selected agricultural export commodities as well as on the total agricultural export commodities in the Pre-SAP (1972-1985) and the SAP era (1986-2010) in Nigeria. Based on the data collected from Central Bank of Nigeria ...

  10. Effects of Prestorage Leukoreduction on the Rate of Febrile ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the recipient's cytoxic antibodies and human leukocyte. Effects of Prestorage Leukoreduction on the Rate of Febrile Nonhemolytic Transfusion Reactions to. Red Blood Cells in a Tertiary Care Hospital. Rajesh K, Harsh S, Amarjit K. Department of Immunohaematology and Blood Transfusion, Dayanand Medical College and ...

  11. Effects of fertilizer rates and cutting frequency on the marketable ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Field plot studies were conducted on the effects of fertilizer rates and frequencies of cut on fluted pumpkin (Telfairia occidentatis) growth and yield parameters. Treatments comprised four levels of commercial N20P10K10 and four cutting intervals. These were laid out in a randomized complete block design with three ...

  12. The effect of exercise and lifestyle interventions on heart rate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of exercise and lifestyle interventions on heart rate variability in students at risk of cardiovascular disease –A pilot study. ... African Journal for Physical Activity and Health Sciences ... Cardiovascular disease is a major public health concern and it can be modified by diet, exercise and health awareness. However ...

  13. Illinois Ratings of Teacher Effectiveness Manual. Grades 9-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, B. Everard

    The Illinois Ratings of Teacher Effectiveness (IRTE) is an instrument for recording senior high school student perceptions of teacher performance in ten trait areas: teacher appearance, ability to explain, friendliness, grading fairness, discipline, outside classroom assignments, enjoyment of teaching, voice, mannerisms, and command of subject…

  14. Effective dose rate coefficients for exposure to contaminated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veinot, K.G. [Easterly Scientific, Knoxville, TN (United States); Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Eckerman, K.F.; Easterly, C.E. [Easterly Scientific, Knoxville, TN (United States); Bellamy, M.B.; Hiller, M.M.; Dewji, S.A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Center for Radiation Protection Knowledge, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hertel, N.E. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Center for Radiation Protection Knowledge, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Manger, R. [University of California San Diego, Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2017-08-15

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Center for Radiation Protection Knowledge has undertaken calculations related to various environmental exposure scenarios. A previous paper reported the results for submersion in radioactive air and immersion in water using age-specific mathematical phantoms. This paper presents age-specific effective dose rate coefficients derived using stylized mathematical phantoms for exposure to contaminated soils. Dose rate coefficients for photon, electron, and positrons of discrete energies were calculated and folded with emissions of 1252 radionuclides addressed in ICRP Publication 107 to determine equivalent and effective dose rate coefficients. The MCNP6 radiation transport code was used for organ dose rate calculations for photons and the contribution of electrons to skin dose rate was derived using point-kernels. Bremsstrahlung and annihilation photons of positron emission were evaluated as discrete photons. The coefficients calculated in this work compare favorably to those reported in the US Federal Guidance Report 12 as well as by other authors who employed voxel phantoms for similar exposure scenarios. (orig.)

  15. Effect of Cold Water Immersion on Metabolic Rate in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Austin Greenwood

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cold water immersion is a widely used form of cryotherapy in the active population despite the limited knowledge on its physiological effects. From an injury standpoint, reducing metabolic rate is advantageous to prevent secondary injury. In contrast, increased metabolism can be beneficial in ridding the body of unwanted metabolites. This study looked to determine the effect of cold water immersion on metabolic rate.  Understanding this phenomenon will help determine appropriate clinical applications of cold water immersion and lead to a better understanding of cryotherapy in general. This study looked to determine the effect of cryotherapy in the form of waist deep cold water immersion at 9° C on metabolic rate. Methods: 10 participants from a university student population volunteered and completed a 15-minute treatment of waist deep cold water (9° C immersion. Metabolic rate measurements were taken using a Jaeger Oxycon Mobile Unit for 5 minutes prior to treatment, 15 minutes of treatment, and 5 minutes post treatment for a total of 25 minutes. Statistical analysis was completed using a one way repeated measures ANOVA test to compare treatment intervals to baseline intervals. Results: Cold water immersion resulted in elevated metabolic rates for 8 of 10 participants during the first 5 minutes of treatment and for 6 of 10 in the 5 minute post treatment (p < 0.05. A second statistical analysis excluding the first 30 second data point in the 5-10 and 20-25 minute treatments was used to account for movement in and out of the whirlpool. The second analysis showed the same results as the first with the exception of one participant who no longer displayed a statistically significant change in the 20-25 minute interval. Conclusion: These results indicate that cold water immersion should not be used as a measure of reducing secondary injury because of its potential to increase metabolic rate, but instead may have potential benefits in

  16. RAMP1 suppresses mucosal injury from dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashima-Takeda, Noriko; Ito, Yoshiya; Nishizawa, Nobuyuki; Kawashima, Rei; Tanaka, Kiyoshi; Tsujikawa, Kazutake; Watanabe, Masahiko; Majima, Masataka

    2017-04-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is thought to be involved in the modulation of intestinal motility. CGRP receptor is composed of receptor activity-modifying protein (RAMP) 1 combined with calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CRLR) for CGRP. The study investigated the role of CGRP in mice with experimentally induced colitis. The study used dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) to induce colitis in mice. The study compared the severity of colitis in wild-type (WT) mice, mice treated with a CGRP receptor antagonist (CGRP8-37 ), and RAMP1 knockout (-/- ) mice. Pathological changes in the mucosa were assessed, and inflammatory cells and cytokine levels were measured. The severity of inflammation in DSS-induced colitis increased markedly in CGRP8-37 -treated mice and RAMP1-/- mice compared with WT mice. RAMP1-/- mice showed more severe damage compared with CGRP8-37 -treated mice. The number of periodic acid-Schiff-positive cells decreased in CGRP8-37 -treated mice compared with WT mice and was even further decreased in RAMP1-/- mice. RAMP1 was expressed by macrophages, mast cells, and T-cells. RAMP1-/- mice exhibited excessive accumulation of macrophages and mast cells into the colonic tissue with increased levels of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β as compared with WT mice. Infiltration of T-cells into the colonic mucosa, which was associated with the expression of T helper (Th) cytokines including Th1 (interferon gamma) and Th17 (IL-17), was augmented in RAMP1-/- mice. The findings of this study suggest that RAMP1 exerted mucosal protection in DSS-induced colitis via attenuation of recruitment of inflammatory cells and of pro-inflammatory cytokines. © 2016 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  17. Applied Distributed Model Predictive Control for Energy Efficient Buildings and Ramp Metering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler, Sarah Muraoka

    Industrial large-scale control problems present an interesting algorithmic design challenge. A number of controllers must cooperate in real-time on a network of embedded hardware with limited computing power in order to maximize system efficiency while respecting constraints and despite communication delays. Model predictive control (MPC) can automatically synthesize a centralized controller which optimizes an objective function subject to a system model, constraints, and predictions of disturbance. Unfortunately, the computations required by model predictive controllers for large-scale systems often limit its industrial implementation only to medium-scale slow processes. Distributed model predictive control (DMPC) enters the picture as a way to decentralize a large-scale model predictive control problem. The main idea of DMPC is to split the computations required by the MPC problem amongst distributed processors that can compute in parallel and communicate iteratively to find a solution. Some popularly proposed solutions are distributed optimization algorithms such as dual decomposition and the alternating direction method of multipliers (ADMM). However, these algorithms ignore two practical challenges: substantial communication delays present in control systems and also problem non-convexity. This thesis presents two novel and practically effective DMPC algorithms. The first DMPC algorithm is based on a primal-dual active-set method which achieves fast convergence, making it suitable for large-scale control applications which have a large communication delay across its communication network. In particular, this algorithm is suited for MPC problems with a quadratic cost, linear dynamics, forecasted demand, and box constraints. We measure the performance of this algorithm and show that it significantly outperforms both dual decomposition and ADMM in the presence of communication delay. The second DMPC algorithm is based on an inexact interior point method which is

  18. A 4 MA, 500 ns pulsed power generator CQ-4 for characterization of material behaviors under ramp wave loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guiji; Luo, Binqiang; Zhang, Xuping; Zhao, Jianheng; Sun, Chengwei; Tan, Fuli; Chong, Tao; Mo, Jianjun; Wu, Gang; Tao, Yanhui

    2013-01-01

    A pulsed power generator CQ-4 was developed to characterize dynamic behaviors of materials under ramp wave loading, and to launch high velocity flyer plates for shock compression and hypervelocity impact experiments of materials and structures at Institute of Fluid Physics, China Academy of Engineering Physics. CQ-4 is composed of twenty capacitor and primary discharge switch modules with total capacitance of 32 μF and rated charging voltage of 100 kV, and the storage energy is transmitted by two top and bottom parallel aluminum plates insulated by twelve layers of polyester film with total thickness of 1.2 mm. Between capacitor bank and chamber, there are 72 peaking capacitors with total capacitance of 7.2 μF and rated voltage of 120 kV in parallel, which are connected with the capacitor bank in parallel. Before the load, there is a group of seven secondary self-breaking down switches connected with the total circuit in series. The peaking capacitors and secondary switches are used to shape the discharging current waveforms. For short-circuit, the peak current of discharging can be up to 3 ~ 4 MA and rise time varies from 470 ns to 600 ns when the charging voltages of the generator are from 75 kV to 85 kV. With CQ-4 generator, some quasi-isentropic compression experiments under ramp wave loadings are done to demonstrate the ability of CQ-4 generator. And some experiments of launching high velocity flyer plates are also done on CQ-4. The experimental results show that ramp wave loading pressure of several tens of GPa on copper and aluminum samples can be realized and the velocity of aluminum flyer plate with size of 10 mm × 6 mm × 0.35 mm can be accelerated to about 11 km/s and the velocity of aluminum flyer plate with size of 10 mm × 6 mm × 0.6 mm can be up to about 9 km/s, which show that CQ-4 is a good and versatile tool to realize ramp wave loading and shock compression for shock physics.

  19. Non-Cooperative Regulation Coordination Based on Game Theory for Wind Farm Clusters during Ramping Events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qi, Yongzhi; Liu, Yutian; Wu, Qiuwei

    2017-01-01

    With increasing penetration of wind power in power systems, it is important to track scheduled wind power output as much as possible during ramping events to ensure security of the system. In this paper, a non‐cooperative coordination strategy based on the game theory is proposed for the regulation...... of wind farm clusters (WFCs) in order to track scheduled wind power of the WFC during ramping events. In the proposed strategy, a non‐cooperative game is formulated and wind farms compete to provide regulation to the WFC during ramping events. A regulation revenue function is proposed to evaluate...

  20. Emittance Growth due to Crab Cavity Ramping for LHC Beam-1 Lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Morita, A

    2008-01-01

    In LHC upgrade scenarios using global crab crossing, it is desired to turn on the crab cavity only at top energy. Turning on the crab cavity could increase the emittance of the stored beam, since the transverse kick of the crab cavity excites betatron oscillations. For a sufficiently slow ramping speed of the crab cavity voltage, however, the changes in z-dependent closed orbit are sufficiently adiabatic that the emittance growth becomes negligible. In order to determine the safe ramping speed of the LHC crab-cavity voltage, the dependence of the emittance growth on the ramping speed is estimated via a 6D particle-tracking simulation.

  1. Dental service rates: age, period, and cohort effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, D S; Ryan, P; Spencer, A J; Szuster, F S

    2000-06-01

    Variation in dental service provision over time has been related to changes in factors such as oral health and demographics. Dentist factors such as age and cohort effects are also potential sources of influence. The aim of the study was to examine the operation of age, period, and cohort factors on variation in service rates. data were collected by a mailed survey of a random sample of 10% of male and 40% of female dentists from each state/territory of Australia in 1983-84, 1988-89. and 1993-94 with response rates of 73, 75 and 74% respectively. Data on main areas of service were obtained from a log of service items provided on a typical day. Poisson regressions of rates for the 10 main areas of service over time showed increased rates over the study period for diagnostic, preventive, endodontic, crown and bridge, general/miscellaneous and orthodontic services, and decreased rates of prosthodontic services. Goodness-of-fit tests indicated that models for periodontal and endodontic services had a good fit. However, only endodontic services were readily interpretable in terms of descriptive trends. While the age-period-cohort model was preferred, age-period and age-cohort models were also examined because of problems of identification with age-period-cohort models. Endodontic rates were higher among younger dentist birth cohorts, and increased over the 10-year study period for most cohorts of dentists. If these effects for dentist cohorts were extrapolated over the next 10-year interval, the distribution of services would alter, with endodontic services emerging as a dominant area behind restorative, diagnostic, and preventive services.

  2. Continuous monitoring of electromyography (EMG), mechanomyography (MMG), sonomyography (SMG) and torque output during ramp and step isometric contractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jing-Yi; Zheng, Yong-Ping; Xie, Hong-Bo; Chen, Xin

    2010-11-01

    In this study we simultaneously collected ultrasound images, EMG, MMG from the rectus femoris (RF) muscle and torque signal from the leg extensor muscle group of nine male subjects (mean±SD, age=30.7±.4.9 years; body weight=67.0±8.4kg; height=170.4±6.9cm) during step, ramp increasing, and decreasing at three different rates (50%, 25% and 17% MVC/s). The muscle architectural parameters extracted from ultrasound imaging, which reflect muscle contractions, were defined as sonomyography (SMG) in this study. The cross-sectional area (CSA) and aspect ratio between muscle width and thickness (width/thickness) were extracted from ultrasound images. The results showed that the CSA of RF muscles decreased by 7.25±4.07% when muscle torque output changed from 0% to 90% MVC, and the aspect ratio decreased by 41.66±7.96%. The muscle contraction level and SMG data were strongly correlated (R(2)=0.961, P=0.003, for CSA and R(2)=0.999, PEMG RMS in ramp increasing was 8.25±4.00% higher than step (P=0.002). The normalized MMG RMS of step contraction was significantly lower than ramp increasing and decreasing, with averaged differences of 12.22±3.37% (P=0.001) and 12.06±3.37% (P=0.001), respectively. The results of this study demonstrated that the CSA and aspect ratio, i.e., SMG signals, can provide useful information about muscle contractions. They may therefore complement EMG and MMG for studying muscle activation strategies under different conditions. Crown Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Solvent Polarity Effect on Nonradiative Decay Rate of Thioflavin T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stsiapura, Vitali I; Kurhuzenkau, Siarhei A; Kuzmitsky, Valery A; Bouganov, Oleg V; Tikhomirov, Sergey A

    2016-07-21

    It has been established earlier that fluorescence quantum yield of thioflavin T (ThT)-a probe widely used for amyloid fibrils detection-is viscosity-dependent, and photophysical properties of ThT can be well-described by the fluorescent molecular rotor model, which associates twisted internal charge transfer (TICT) reaction with the main nonradiative decay process in the excited state of the dye. Solutions of ThT in a range of polar solvents were studied using steady-state fluorescence and sub-picosecond transient absorption spectroscopy methods, and we showed that solvent effect on nonradiative transition rate knr cannot be reduced to the dependence on viscosity only and that ∼3 times change of knr can be observed for ThT in aprotic solvents and water, which correlates with solvent polarity. Different behavior was observed in alcohol solutions, particularly in longer n-alcohols, where TICT rate was mainly determined by rotational diffusion of ThT fragments. Quantum-chemical calculations of S0 → S1 transition energy were performed to get insight of polar solvent contribution to the excited-state energy stabilization. Effect of polar solvent on electronic energy levels of ThT was simulated by applying homogeneous electric field according to the Onsager cavity model. Static solvent effect on the excited-state potential energy surface, where charge transfer reaction takes place, was not essential to account for experimentally observed TICT rate differences in water and aprotic solvents. From the other side, nonradiative decay rate of ThT in water, ethylene glycol, and aprotic solvents was found to follow dynamics of polar solvation knr ∼ τS(-1), which can explain dependence of the TICT rate on both polarity and viscosity of the solvents.

  4. Comparison of pitch rate history effects on dynamic stall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekhara, M. S.; Carr, Lawrence W.; Ahmed, S.

    1992-01-01

    Dynamic stall of an airfoil is a classic case of forced unsteady separated flow. Flow separation is brought about by large incidences introduced by the large amplitude unsteady pitching motion of an airfoil. One of the parameters that affects the dynamic stall process is the history of the unsteady motion. In addition, the problem is complicated by the effects of compressibility that rapidly appear over the airfoil even at low Mach numbers at moderately high angles of attack. Consequently, it is of interest to know the effects of pitch rate history on the dynamic stall process. This abstract compares the results of a flow visualization study of the problem with two different pitch rate histories, namely, oscillating airfoil motion and a linear change in the angle of attack due to a transient pitching motion.

  5. The effect of seeding with bacteria on biogas production rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dangoggo, S.M. [Usmanu Danfodiyo University, Sokoto (Nigeria). Dept. of Chemistry; Aliyu, M.; Atiku, A.T. [Usmanu Danfodiyo University, Sokoto (Nigeria). Energy Research Centre

    1996-09-01

    Biogas as a clean and cheap fuel is studied with the aim of determining the effect of seeding with bacteria on its production rate using four different substrates. The seeding with four different digesters was carried out with 5g of digested cowdung sludge obtained from a working digester. Results indicate that of all the substrates used for the studies, ipomea asarifobia produced the highest amount of biogas over a period of 40 days. (Author)

  6. Estimating Effective Subsidy Rates of Student Aid Programs

    OpenAIRE

    Stacey H. CHEN

    2008-01-01

    Every year millions of high school students and their parents in the US are asked to fill out complicated financial aid application forms. However, few studies have estimated the responsiveness of government financial aid schemes to changes in financial needs of the students. This paper identifies the effective subsidy rate (ESR) of student aid, as defined by the coefficient of financial needs in the regression of financial aid. The ESR measures the proportion of subsidy of student aid under ...

  7. Effects of Surfactants on the Rate of Chemical Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Samiey

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Surfactants are self-assembled compounds that depend on their structure and electric charge can interact as monomer or micelle with other compounds (substrates. These interactions which may catalyze or inhibit the reaction rates are studied with pseudophase, cooperativity, and stoichiometric (classical models. In this review, we discuss applying these models to study surfactant-substrate interactions and their effects on Diels-Alder, redox, photochemical, decomposition, enzymatic, isomerization, ligand exchange, radical, and nucleophilic reactions.

  8. Bayesian model calibration of ramp compression experiments on Z

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Justin; Hund, Lauren

    2017-06-01

    Bayesian model calibration (BMC) is a statistical framework to estimate inputs for a computational model in the presence of multiple uncertainties, making it well suited to dynamic experiments which must be coupled with numerical simulations to interpret the results. Often, dynamic experiments are diagnosed using velocimetry and this output can be modeled using a hydrocode. Several calibration issues unique to this type of scenario including the functional nature of the output, uncertainty of nuisance parameters within the simulation, and model discrepancy identifiability are addressed, and a novel BMC process is proposed. As a proof of concept, we examine experiments conducted on Sandia National Laboratories' Z-machine which ramp compressed tantalum to peak stresses of 250 GPa. The proposed BMC framework is used to calibrate the cold curve of Ta (with uncertainty), and we conclude that the procedure results in simple, fast, and valid inferences. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-mission laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  9. Muscle synergy analysis in transtibial amputee during ramp ascending activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehryar, P; Shourijeh, M S; Maqbool, H F; Torabi, M; Dehghani-Sanij, A A

    2016-08-01

    In developed countries, the highest number of amputees are elderly with transtibial amputation. Walking on inclined surfaces is difficult for amputees due to loss of muscle volume and strength thereby transtibial amputees (TA) rely on the intact limb to maintain stability. The aim of this study was to use the concatenated non-negative matrix factorization (CNMF) technique to calculate muscle synergy components and compare the difference in muscle synergies and their associated activation profiles in the healthy and amputee groups during ramp ascending (RA) activity. Healthy subjects' dominant leg and amputee's intact leg (IL) were considered for recording surface electromyography (sEMG). The muscle synergies comparison showed a reasonable correlation between the healthy and amputee groups. This suggests the central nervous system (CNS) activates the same group of muscles synergistically. However, the activation coefficient profile (C) results indicated statistically significant difference (p amputee groups. The difference exhibited in activation profiles of amputee's IL could be due to the instability of the prosthetic leg during the GC which resulted in alteration of the IL muscles activations. This information will be useful in rehabilitation and in the future development of prosthetic devices by using the IL muscles information to control the prostheses.

  10. SOUTH RAMP 3.01.X AREA GROUND SUPPORT ANALYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Bonabian

    1999-07-12

    The purpose of this analysis is to evaluate the stability and determine ground support requirements for the 3.01.X areas in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) South Ramp. The 3.01.X area refers to the ESF tunnel portions that were constructed under Section 3.01.X of the ESF General Construction Specification (Reference 8.4). Four 3.01.X areas in the ESF Main Loop are covered in this analysis that extend from Station 60+15.28 to 60+49.22, 62+04.82 to 62+32.77, 75+21.02 to 75+28.38, and 76+63.08 to 77+41.23. The scope of the analysis is (1) to document the as-built configuration including existing voids and installed ground support, (2) to evaluate the existing ground conditions, (3) to determine applicable design loads, (4) to evaluate the stability and determine a ground support system, and (5) to analyze the recommended system.

  11. Effective dynamics along given reaction coordinates, and reaction rate theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Hartmann, Carsten; Schütte, Christof

    2016-12-22

    In molecular dynamics and related fields one considers dynamical descriptions of complex systems in full (atomic) detail. In order to reduce the overwhelming complexity of realistic systems (high dimension, large timescale spread, limited computational resources) the projection of the full dynamics onto some reaction coordinates is examined in order to extract statistical information like free energies or reaction rates. In this context, the effective dynamics that is induced by the full dynamics on the reaction coordinate space has attracted considerable attention in the literature. In this article, we contribute to this discussion: we first show that if we start with an ergodic diffusion process whose invariant measure is unique then these properties are inherited by the effective dynamics. Then, we give equations for the effective dynamics, discuss whether the dominant timescales and reaction rates inferred from the effective dynamics are accurate approximations of such quantities for the full dynamics, and compare our findings to results from approaches like Mori-Zwanzig, averaging, or homogenization. Finally, by discussing the algorithmic realization of the effective dynamics, we demonstrate that recent algorithmic techniques like the "equation-free" approach and the "heterogeneous multiscale method" can be seen as special cases of our approach.

  12. Towards reducing traffic congestion using cooperative adaptive cruise control on a freeway with a ramp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georges Arnaout

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In this paper, the impact of Cooperative Adaptive Cruise Control (CACC systems on traffic performance is examined using microscopic agent-based simulation. Using a developed traffic simulation model of a freeway with an on-ramp - created to induce perturbations and to trigger stop-and-go traffic, the CACC system’s effect on the traffic performance is studied. The previously proposed traffic simulation model is extended and validated. By embedding CACC vehicles in different penetration levels, the results show significance and indicate the potential of CACC systems to improve traffic characteristics and therefore can be used to reduce traffic congestion. The study shows that the impact of CACC is positive but is highly dependent on the CACC market penetration. The flow rate of the traffic using CACC is proportional to the market penetration rate of CACC equipped vehicles and the density of the traffic.Design/methodology/approach: This paper uses microscopic simulation experiments followed by a quantitative statistical analysis. Simulation enables researchers manipulating the system variables to straightforwardly predict the outcome on the overall system, giving researchers the unique opportunity to interfere and make improvements to performance. Thus with simulation, changes to variables that might require excessive time, or be unfeasible to carry on real systems, are often completed within seconds.Findings: The findings of this paper are summarized as follow:•\tProvide and validate a platform (agent-based microscopic traffic simulator in which any CACC algorithm (current or future may be evaluated.•\tProvide detailed analysis associated with implementation of CACC vehicles on freeways.•\tInvestigate whether embedding CACC vehicles on freeways has a significant positive impact or not.Research limitations/implications: The main limitation of this research is that it has been conducted solely in a computer laboratory. Laboratory

  13. Comparison of TID Effects in Space-Like Variable Dose Rates and Constant Dose Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Richard D.; McClure, Steven S.; Rax, Bernard G.; Evans, Robin W.; Jun, Insoo

    2008-01-01

    The degradation of the LM193 dual voltage comparator has been studied at different TID dose rate profiles, including several different constant dose rates and a variable dose rate that simulates the behavior of a solar flare. A comparison of results following constant dose rate vs. variable dose rates is made to explore how well the constant dose rates used for typical part testing predict the performance during a simulated space-like mission. Testing at a constant dose rate equal to the lowest dose rate seen during the simulated flare provides an extremely conservative estimate of the overall amount of degradation. A constant dose rate equal to the average dose rate is also more conservative than the variable rate. It appears that, for this part, weighting the dose rates by the amount of total dose received at each rate (rather than the amount of time at each dose rate) results in an average rate that produces an amount of degradation that is a reasonable approximation to that received by the variable rate.

  14. Optimizing density down-ramp injection for beam-driven plasma wakefield accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez de la Ossa, A.; Hu, Z.; Streeter, M. J. V.; Mehrling, T. J.; Kononenko, O.; Sheeran, B.; Osterhoff, J.

    2017-09-01

    Density down-ramp (DDR) injection is a promising concept in beam-driven plasma wakefield accelerators for the generation of high-quality witness beams. We review and complement the theoretical principles of the method and employ particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations in order to determine constrains on the geometry of the density ramp and the current of the drive beam, regarding the applicability of DDR injection. Furthermore, PIC simulations are utilized to find optimized conditions for the production of high-quality beams. We find and explain the intriguing result that the injection of an increased charge by means of a steepened ramp favors the generation of beams with lower emittance. Exploiting this fact enables the production of beams with high charge (˜140 pC ), low normalized emittance (˜200 nm ) and low uncorrelated energy spread (0.3%) in sufficiently steep ramps even for drive beams with moderate peak current (˜2.5 kA ).

  15. First beam test of a combined ramp and squeeze at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Wenninger, Jorg; Coello De Portugal - Martinez Vazquez, Jaime Maria; Gorzawski, Arkadiusz; Redaelli, Stefano; Schaumann, Michaela; Solfaroli Camillocci, Matteo; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2015-01-01

    With increasing maturity of LHC operation it is possible to envisage more complex beam manipulations. At the same time operational efficiency receives increasing attention. So far ramping the beams to their target energy and squeezing the beams to smaller or higher beta are decoupled at the LHC. (De-)squeezing is always performed at the target energy, currently 6.5 TeV. Studies to combine the ramp and squeeze processes have been made for the LHC since 2011, but so far no experimental test with beam had ever performed. This note describes the first machine experiment with beam aiming at validating the combination of ramp and squeeze, the so-called combined ramp and squeeze (CRS).

  16. Spatial scales of the magnetic ramp at the Venusian bow shock

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    A. P. Dimmock; S. N. Walker; T. L. Zhang; S. A. Pope

    2011-01-01

    .... The study encompasses around 60 crossings of the Venusian bow shock from 2006 to 2009. The statistical relationship between the shock ramp spatial scales, overshoot and upstream shock parameters are investigated...

  17. Optimized Swinging Door Algorithm for Wind Power Ramp Event Detection: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Mingjian; Zhang, Jie; Florita, Anthony R.; Hodge, Bri-Mathias; Ke, Deping; Sun, Yuanzhang

    2015-08-06

    Significant wind power ramp events (WPREs) are those that influence the integration of wind power, and they are a concern to the continued reliable operation of the power grid. As wind power penetration has increased in recent years, so has the importance of wind power ramps. In this paper, an optimized swinging door algorithm (SDA) is developed to improve ramp detection performance. Wind power time series data are segmented by the original SDA, and then all significant ramps are detected and merged through a dynamic programming algorithm. An application of the optimized SDA is provided to ascertain the optimal parameter of the original SDA. Measured wind power data from the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) are used to evaluate the proposed optimized SDA.

  18. Turbulence Models: Data from Other Experiments: Round Synthetic Jets for Separation Control on 2-D Ramp

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Exp: Round Synthetic Jets for Separation Control on 2-D Ramp This web page provides data from experiments that may be useful for the validation of turbulence models....

  19. Gain-Loss versus Reinforcement-Affect Ordering of Student Rating of Teaching: Effect of Rating Instructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turcotte, Shelly J. C.; Leventhal, Les

    1984-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of student rating instructions on primacy and recency effects when rank ordering four lecture quality sequences. Effects were measured on final instructor ratings, liking for the instructor, student affect, and student self-esteem. (Author/BS)

  20. Closed-form solution of the Ogden-Hill's compressible hyperelastic model for ramp loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezvai, Szabolcs; Kossa, Attila

    2017-05-01

    This article deals with the visco-hyperelastic modelling approach for compressible polymer foam materials. Polymer foams can exhibit large elastic strains and displacements in case of volumetric compression. In addition, they often show significant rate-dependent properties. This material behaviour can be accurately modelled using the visco-hyperelastic approach, in which the large strain viscoelastic description is combined with the rate-independent hyperelastic material model. In case of polymer foams, the most widely used compressible hyperelastic material model, the so-called Ogden-Hill's model, was applied, which is implemented in the commercial finite element (FE) software Abaqus. The visco-hyperelastic model is defined in hereditary integral form, therefore, obtaining a closed-form solution for the stress is not a trivial task. However, the parameter-fitting procedure could be much faster and accurate if closed-form solution exists. In this contribution, exact stress solutions are derived in case of uniaxial, biaxial and volumetric compression loading cases using ramp-loading history. The analytical stress solutions are compared with the stress results in Abaqus using FE analysis. In order to highlight the benefits of the analytical closed-form solution during the parameter-fitting process experimental work has been carried out on a particular open-cell memory foam material. The results of the material identification process shows significant accuracy improvement in the fitting procedure by applying the derived analytical solutions compared to the so-called separated approach applied in the engineering practice.

  1. Effects of age on speech and voice quality ratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goy, Huiwen; Kathleen Pichora-Fuller, M; van Lieshout, Pascal

    2016-04-01

    The quality of communication may be affected by listeners' perception of talkers' characteristics. This study examined if there were effects of talker and listener age on the perception of speech and voice qualities. Younger and older listeners judged younger and older talkers' gender and age, then rated speech samples on pleasantness, naturalness, clarity, ease of understanding, loudness, and the talker's suitability to be an audiobook reader. For the same talkers, listeners also rated voice samples on pleasantness, roughness, and power. Younger and older talkers were perceived to be similar on most qualities except age. Younger and older listeners rated talkers similarly, except that younger listeners perceived younger voices to be more pleasant and less rough than older voices. For vowel samples, younger listeners were more accurate than older listeners at age estimation, while older listeners were more accurate than younger listeners at gender identification, suggesting that younger and older listeners differ in their evaluation of specific talker characteristics. Thus, the perception of quality was generally more affected by the age of the listener than the age of the talker, and age-related differences between listeners depended on whether voice or speech samples were used and the rating being made.

  2. Physiological effects of major genes affecting ovulation rate in sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McNatty Kenneth P

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Genetic mutations with major effects on ovulation rate in sheep were recently identified in two genes of the transforming growth factor (TGFβ superfamily and a TGFβ receptor, namely bone morphogenetic protein 15 (BMP15, otherwise known as the growth differentiation factor 9b (GDF9b, GDF9 and activin-like kinase 6 (ALK6 otherwise known as the BMP receptor type IB (BMPRIB. Animals homozygous for the BMP15 or GDF9 mutations are anovulatory whereas animals heterozygous for BMP15 or GDF9 or heterozygous or homozygous for ALK6 have higher than normal ovulation rates. Immunisation of ewes against BMP15 or GDF9 shows that both are essential for normal follicular development and control of ovulation rate. Common features of fertile animals with the BMP15, ALK6 (and possibly GDF9 mutations are changes in oocyte development during early preantral follicular growth, earlier maturation of granulosa cells and ovulation of mature follicles at smaller diameters. In summary, these findings have led to a new paradigm in reproductive biology, namely that the oocyte plays a key role in regulating the ovulation rate.

  3. Classification and Surgical Repair of Ramp Lesions of the Medial Meniscus

    OpenAIRE

    Thaunat, Mathieu; Fayard, Jean Marie; Guimaraes, Tales M.; Jan, Nicolas; Murphy, Colin G.; Sonnery-Cottet, Bertrand

    2016-01-01

    Ramp lesions of the medial meniscus are commonly associated with anterior cruciate ligament ruptures and consist of longitudinal peripheral tears of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus. Given the frequency of partial-thickness tears, they can be difficult to diagnose arthroscopically from the anterior compartment. We describe a classification of the different types of ramp lesions depending on both tear pattern (partial- or full-thickness tear) and associated meniscotibial ligament disr...

  4. 29 CFR 1918.25 - Bridge plates and ramps (See also § 1918.86).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bridge plates and ramps (See also § 1918.86). 1918.25... Means of Access § 1918.25 Bridge plates and ramps (See also § 1918.86). (a) Bridge and car plates (dockboards). Bridge and car plates used afloat shall be well maintained and shall: (1) Be strong enough to...

  5. A practical approach to assess leg muscle oxygenation during ramp-incremental cycle ergometry in heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.C. Barroco

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure is characterized by the inability of the cardiovascular system to maintain oxygen (O2 delivery (i.e., muscle blood flow in non-hypoxemic patients to meet O2 demands. The resulting increase in fractional O2 extraction can be non-invasively tracked by deoxygenated hemoglobin concentration (deoxi-Hb as measured by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS. We aimed to establish a simplified approach to extract deoxi-Hb-based indices of impaired muscle O2 delivery during rapidly-incrementing exercise in heart failure. We continuously probed the right vastus lateralis muscle with continuous-wave NIRS during a ramp-incremental cardiopulmonary exercise test in 10 patients (left ventricular ejection fraction <35% and 10 age-matched healthy males. Deoxi-Hb is reported as % of total response (onset to peak exercise in relation to work rate. Patients showed lower maximum exercise capacity and O2 uptake-work rate than controls (P<0.05. The deoxi-Hb response profile as a function of work rate was S-shaped in all subjects, i.e., it presented three distinct phases. Increased muscle deoxygenation in patients compared to controls was demonstrated by: i a steeper mid-exercise deoxi-Hb-work rate slope (2.2±1.3 vs 1.0±0.3% peak/W, respectively; P<0.05, and ii late-exercise increase in deoxi-Hb, which contrasted with stable or decreasing deoxi-Hb in all controls. Steeper deoxi-Hb-work rate slope was associated with lower peak work rate in patients (r=–0.73; P=0.01. This simplified approach to deoxi-Hb interpretation might prove useful in clinical settings to quantify impairments in O2 delivery by NIRS during ramp-incremental exercise in individual heart failure patients.

  6. A practical approach to assess leg muscle oxygenation during ramp-incremental cycle ergometry in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barroco, A C; Sperandio, P A; Reis, M; Almeida, D R; Neder, J A

    2017-10-02

    Heart failure is characterized by the inability of the cardiovascular system to maintain oxygen (O2) delivery (i.e., muscle blood flow in non-hypoxemic patients) to meet O2 demands. The resulting increase in fractional O2 extraction can be non-invasively tracked by deoxygenated hemoglobin concentration (deoxi-Hb) as measured by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). We aimed to establish a simplified approach to extract deoxi-Hb-based indices of impaired muscle O2 delivery during rapidly-incrementing exercise in heart failure. We continuously probed the right vastus lateralis muscle with continuous-wave NIRS during a ramp-incremental cardiopulmonary exercise test in 10 patients (left ventricular ejection fraction <35%) and 10 age-matched healthy males. Deoxi-Hb is reported as % of total response (onset to peak exercise) in relation to work rate. Patients showed lower maximum exercise capacity and O2 uptake-work rate than controls (P<0.05). The deoxi-Hb response profile as a function of work rate was S-shaped in all subjects, i.e., it presented three distinct phases. Increased muscle deoxygenation in patients compared to controls was demonstrated by: i) a steeper mid-exercise deoxi-Hb-work rate slope (2.2±1.3 vs 1.0±0.3% peak/W, respectively; P<0.05), and ii) late-exercise increase in deoxi-Hb, which contrasted with stable or decreasing deoxi-Hb in all controls. Steeper deoxi-Hb-work rate slope was associated with lower peak work rate in patients (r=-0.73; P=0.01). This simplified approach to deoxi-Hb interpretation might prove useful in clinical settings to quantify impairments in O2 delivery by NIRS during ramp-incremental exercise in individual heart failure patients.

  7. Evolution of plasma wakes in density up- and down-ramps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C. J.; Joshi, C.; Xu, X. L.; Mori, W. B.; Li, F.; Wan, Y.; Hua, J. F.; Pai, C. H.; Wang, J.; Lu, W.

    2018-02-01

    The time evolution of plasma wakes in density up- and down-ramps is examined through theory and particle-in-cell simulations. Motivated by observation of the reversal of a linear plasma wake in a plasma density upramp in a recent experiment (Zhang et al 2017 Phys. Rev. Lett. 119 064801) we have examined the behaviour of wakes in plasma ramps that always accompany any plasma source used for plasma-based acceleration. In the up-ramp case it is found that, after the passage of the drive pulse, the wavnumber/wavelength of the wake starts to decrease/increase with time until it eventually tends to zero/infinity, then the wake reverses its propagation direction and the wavenunber/wavelength of the wake begins to increase/shrink. The evolutions of the wavenumber and the phase velocity of the wake as functions of time are shown to be significantly different in the up-ramp and the down-ramp cases. In the latter case the wavenumber of the wake at a particular position in the ramp increases until the wake is eventually damped. It is also shown that the waveform of the wake at a particular time after being excited can be precisely controlled by tuning the initial plasma density profile, which may enable a new type of plasma-based ultrafast optics.

  8. Report on the access to the deposition areas of the repository. Shaft or Ramp?; Utredning roerande tilltraedesvaegar till djupfoervarets deponeringsomraaden. Schakt eller ramp?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baeckblom, Goeran [Conrox (Sweden); Christiansson, Rolf; Hedin, Allan; Norman, Fredrik [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden); Lagerstedt, Leif [SwedPower AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2003-05-01

    During year 2002, SKB launched the site-specific engineering of the repository at the Oskarshamn and Oesthammar candidate sites. A part of the ongoing engineering work is to evaluate and possibly select type of access from surface to the underground deposition areas located at a depth of some 400 to 700 metres below the surface. The project objectives are to provide a basis for comparison and to compare generic options for access routes to the underground deposition areas, to formulate preliminary Design Justification Statements for the continued site-specific engineering of access routes to the underground repository and also to describe and exemplify methodology for optimisation of the repository engineering. In consideration of the requirements of SKB, several alternative access options are explored. The main alternatives are a ramp with one or two operational areas at the surface, a ramp with parallel excavation of a blind shaft and an alternative with shafts only. A suite of objective functions were employed in the evaluation of the main alternatives relating to long-term safety, occupational safety during construction and operation, environmental impact, sustainability of natural resources, total cost, schedules, flexibility and project risks. All alternatives studied are feasible and safe, but the alternative with a spiral ramp and a blind shaft is deemed to be the most favourable option. The alternative has the highest flexibility without any tangible disadvantages related neither to long-term safety, environmental impact nor to schedules. It is an advantage that ramp traffic is drastically reduced as rock and backfilling material is transported by the skip rather than by vehicles in the ramp, thereby reducing risks of accidents and fires in the ramp. The concurrent ramp and shaft excavation also shorten the construction period with 18 months for the underground excavations. The discounted total cost is however 100 million Swedish Kronor higher for this

  9. Clinical study on the arthroscopic refreshing treatment of anterior cruciate ligament injury combined with stable medial meniscus ramp injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, J; Guan, K; Wang, J Z

    2017-06-01

    This study sought to investigate the clinical efficacy of arthroscopic refreshing treatment of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury combined with stable medial meniscus ramp injury. Sixty-eight patients treated between January 2010 and January 2014 were included, and their clinical data were retrospectively analyzed. All patients, after being treated using ACL reconstruction, were divided into 2 groups according to meniscus injury treatment method. The observation group (31 cases) was treated by arthroscopic refreshing, which removed the tissue on both sides of the tear edge using a cutting knife, while the control group (37 cases) was treated using Fast-fix sutures. All patients were followed up for at least 24 months. Surgical duration, postoperative function recovery time, and hospital stay for patients in the observation group were significantly shorter than for those of the control group (P⟨0.05). Both groups showed significant post-operative improvement for Lysholm scores, IKDC scores, and average knee range of motion at 12 and 24 months post-operation (P⟨0.05), but no significant differences between groups were observed (P⟩0.05). Regarding the difference in movement range between the healthy and injured sides, both groups showed significant decrease post-operation (P⟨0.05). Ultimately, there was no significant difference in the recovery of ramp damage and objective symptoms between the two groups (P⟩0.05). Arthroscopic refreshing treatment of patients with anterior cruciate ligament injury combined with stable ramp lesion can achieve similar clinical curative effects as the Fast-fix suture, thereby providing a simple alternative for patient treatment worth popularizing.

  10. Effects of Functional Analysis Information on Ratings of Intervention Effectiveness and Acceptability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigle, Karen L.; Scotti, Joseph R.

    2000-01-01

    A study analyzed ratings of 55 teachers for the effectiveness and acceptability of a range of interventions and evaluated the impact on those ratings of providing functional information about the problem behavior. Teachers differentially rated brief interruption and differential reinforcement according to the functional information provided in the…

  11. The effect of heart rate on the heart rate variability response to autonomic interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billman, George E

    2013-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV), the beat-to-beat variation in either heart rate (HR) or heart period (R-R interval), has become a popular clinical and investigational tool to quantify cardiac autonomic regulation. However, it is not widely appreciated that, due to the inverse curvilinear relationship between HR and R-R interval, HR per se can profoundly influence HRV. It is, therefore, critical to correct HRV for the prevailing HR particularly, as HR changes in response to autonomic neural activation or inhibition. The present study evaluated the effects of HR on the HRV response to autonomic interventions that either increased (submaximal exercise, n = 25 or baroreceptor reflex activation, n = 20) or reduced (pharmacological blockade: β-adrenergic receptor, muscarinic receptor antagonists alone and in combination, n = 25, or bilateral cervical vagotomy, n = 9) autonomic neural activity in a canine model. Both total (RR interval standard deviation, RRSD) and the high frequency (HF) variability (HF, 0.24-1.04 Hz) were determined before and in response to an autonomic intervention. All interventions that reduced or abolished cardiac parasympathetic regulation provoked large reductions in HRV even after HR correction [division by mean RRsec or (mean RRsec)(2) for RRSD and HF, respectively] while interventions that reduced HR yielded mixed results. β-adrenergic receptor blockade reduced HRV (RRSD but not HF) while both RRSD and HF increased in response to increases in arterial blood (baroreceptor reflex activation) even after HR correction. These data suggest that the physiological basis for HRV is revealed after correction for prevailing HR and, further, that cardiac parasympathetic activity is responsible for a major portion of the HRV in the dog.

  12. The Effect of Heart Rate on the Heart Rate Variability Response to Autonomic Interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George E Billman

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Heart rate variability (HRV, the beat-to-beat variation in either heart rate (HR or heart period (R-R interval, has become a popular clinical and investigational tool to quantify cardiac autonomic regulation. However, it is not widely appreciated that, due to the inverse curvilinear relationship between HR and R-R interval, HR per se can profoundly influence HRV. It is, therefore, critical to correct HRV for the prevailing HR particularly, as HR changes in response to autonomic neural activation or inhibition. The present study evaluated the effects of HR on the HRV response to autonomic interventions that either increased (submaximal exercise, n = 25 or baroreceptor reflex activation, n = 20 or reduced (pharmacological blockade: β-adrenergic receptor, muscarinic receptor antagonists alone and in combination, n = 25, or bilateral cervical vagotomy, n = 9 autonomic neural activity in a canine model. Both total (RR interval standard deviation, RRSD and the high frequency variability (HF, 0.2 to 1.04 Hz were determined before and in response to an autonomic intervention. All interventions that reduced or abolished cardiac parasympathetic regulation provoked large reductions in HRV even after HR correction [division by mean RRsec or (mean RRsec2 for RRSD and HF, respectively] while interventions that reduced HR yielded mixed results. β-adrenergic receptor blockade reduced HRV (RRSD but not HF while both RRSD and HF increased in response to increases in arterial blood (baroreceptor reflex activation even after HR correction. These data suggest that the physiological basis for HRV is revealed after correction for prevailing HR and, further, that cardiac parasympathetic activity is responsible for a major portion of the HRV in the dog.

  13. Rating Effects on Social News Posts and Comments

    OpenAIRE

    Glenski, Maria; Weninger, Tim

    2016-01-01

    At a time when information seekers first turn to digital sources for news and opinion, it is critical that we understand the role that social media plays in human behavior. This is especially true when information consumers also act as information producers and editors through their online activity. In order to better understand the effects that editorial ratings have on online human behavior, we report the results of a two large-scale in-vivo experiments in social media. We find that small, ...

  14. Metal-silicon reaction rates - The effects of capping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weizer, Victor G.; Fatemi, Navid S.

    1989-01-01

    Evidence is presented showing that the presence of the commonly used anti-reflection coating material Ta2O5 on the free surface of contact metallization can either suppress or enhance, depending on the system, the interaction that takes place at elevated temperatures between the metallization and the underlying Si. The cap layer is shown to suppress both the generation and annihilation of vacancies at the free surface of the metal which are necessary to support metal-Si interactons. Evidence is also presented indicating that the mechanical condition of the free metal surface has a significant effect on the metal-silicon reaction rate.

  15. Industry-specific Real Effective Exchange Rates in Asia

    OpenAIRE

    SATO Kiyotaka; SHIMIZU Junko; Nagendra SHRESTHA; Shajuan ZHANG

    2015-01-01

    This study constructs a monthly series of industry-specific real effective exchange rates (I-REERs) based on the producer price indices of nine Asian economies from 2001 to 2014. To check the usefulness of the I-REERs as a measurement of international price competitiveness, we calculated the aggregated I-REER (Avg-I-REER) and compared it with the REER published by the Bank for International Settlements (BIS-REER). We found that in some Asian economies, the Avg-I-REER exhibited different movem...

  16. The Effect of Divorce Laws on Divorce Rates in Europe

    OpenAIRE

    González, L.; Viitanen, T.K.

    2006-01-01

    This paper analyzes a panel of 18 European countries spanning from 1950 to 2003 to examine the extent to which the legal reforms leading to "easier divorce" that took place during the second half of the 20th century have contributed to the increase in divorce rates across Europe. We use a quasi-experimental set-up and exploit the different timing of the reforms in divorce laws across countries. We account for unobserved country-specific factors by introducing country fixed effects, and we inc...

  17. Effect of Lubricant Contaminants on Wear Rates of Lubricated Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-11-13

    34 Radiotracers Reveal Engine Wear During Detergent Oil Filtration Study," SAE Trans., Vol. 68, 1960, pp. 288-297. 45. Weber, K. H., "Hydrodynamic Theory of...Paper No. 71-Vibr.-96. 49. Naval Air Engineering Center/SKF Industries , " Oil Analysis Project," A/T A3400000/051B/5F53537401, 21 November 1974. 50...study on the effect of particulate contamination upon the wear rates of oil -vetted components normally used in lubrication systems. The components

  18. Effect of fetal gender on induction of labor failure rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashwal, Eran; Hadar, Eran; Chen, Rony; Aviram, Amir; Hiersch, Liran; Gabbay-Benziv, Rinat

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate gender effect on induction of labor (IoL) failure rates stratified by indication to delivery. Retrospective cohort analysis of singleton pregnancies 34-42 weeks undergoing cervical ripening using controlled-release PGE2 vaginal insert. IoL Indications were divided into: (1) maternal; (2) hypertensive disorders; (3) premature rupture of membrane or (4) fetal (growth abnormalities, oligohydramnios, postdate, etc,). IoL failure was defined as: (1) Bishop-score ≤7 after 24 hours of PGE2; (2) cesarean delivery due to failed induction; (3) fetal distress followed by PGE2 removal and emergent cesarean. IoL failure rates were stratified by neonatal gender and indication to induction. Logistic regression analysis was utilized to control outcomes to potential confounders. Overall, 1062 pregnancies were included - 521 (49%) had male fetuses. IoL indications did not differ by gender. IoL failure rate was 20.1% (213/1062) - 76% for unfavorable Bishop-score after PGE2 removal; 5.2% for failed induction and 18.8% for fetal-distress while on PGE2. Overall, 14.3% delivered by cesarean section. There were no differences in IoL failure as a group or by indications to induction stratified by fetal gender (21.7% vs. 18.5%, male vs. females, p induction.

  19. Loading rate effect on mechanical properties of cervical spine ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trajkovski, Ana; Omerovic, Senad; Krasna, Simon; Prebil, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical properties of cervical spine ligaments are of great importance for an accurate finite element model when analyzing the injury mechanism. However, there is still little experimental data in literature regarding fresh human cervical spine ligaments under physiological conditions. The focus of the present study is placed on three cervical spine ligaments that stabilize the spine and protect the spinal cord: the anterior longitudinal ligament, the posterior longitudinal ligament and the ligamentum flavum. The ligaments were tested within 24-48 hours after death, under two different loading rates. An increase trend in failure load, failure stress, stiffness and modulus was observed, but proved not to be significant for all ligament types. The loading rate had the highest impact on failure forces for all three ligaments (a 39.1% average increase was found). The observed increase trend, compared to the existing increase trends reported in literature, indicates the importance of carefully applying the existing experimental data, especially when creating scaling factors. A better understanding of the loading rate effect on ligaments properties would enable better case-specific human modelling.

  20. [Music and heart rate variability. Study of the effect of music on heart rate variability in healthy adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escher, J; Evéquoz, D

    1999-05-20

    The effect of trophotropic (relaxing) music on heart rate and heart rate variability has been investigated in 23 healthy young individuals by means of 24-hour Holter-ECG. Relaxing music (Bach, Vivaldi, Mozart) resulted in significant reduction of heart rate and also significant reduction of heart rate variability. The significance of these results for the use of music in coronary heart disease is discussed.

  1. Effects of Cysteamine on Sheep Embryo Cleavage Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinem Ö. ENGİNLER

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress during in vitro culture leads to defects in development of gametes and embryos. Several antioxidants such as cysteamine, L-ascorbic acid, beta mercaptoethanol, cysteine, glutathione, proteins, vitamins have been used to supplement culture media to counter the oxidative stress. This study was conducted to detect the effect of adding cysteamine to the maturation medium to subsequent cleavage rates of sheep embryos. Totally 604 ovaries were obtained by ten replica and 2060 oocytes were collected. The cumulus oocyte complexes were recovered by the slicing method. A total of 1818 selected oocytes were divided into two groups and used for maturation (88.25%. The first group was created as supplemented with cysteamine (Group A and second group (Group B, control without cysteamine in TCM-199. The two groups were incubated for 24 h at 38.8 °C in an atmosphere of 5% CO2 in humidified air for in vitro maturation (IVM. After IVM, oocytes were fertilized with 50 x 107 / mL fresh ram semen in BSOF medium for 18 h. After fertilization, maturation groups were divided into two subgroups with different culture media: Group AI-SOF (Synthetic Oviduct Fluid medium, Group AII-CR1aa (Charles Rosencrans medium, Group BI-SOF and Group BII-CR1aa were achieved. Cleavage rates were evaluated at day 2. post insemination. The rates of cleavage were detected as 59.54% (184/309, 55.44% (173/312, 65.34% (215/329, 59.34% (200/337 respectively, with showing no statistically significant difference between the groups at the level of P>0.05. In conclusion, supplementing cysteamine to maturation media in TCM-199 did not affect the cleavage rates of sheep embryos in SOF and CR1aa culture media.

  2. Effects of maternal breathing rate, psychiatric status, and cortisol on fetal heart rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monk, Catherine; Fifer, William P; Myers, Michael M; Bagiella, Emilia; Duong, Jimmy K; Chen, Ivy S; Leotti, Lauren; Altincatal, Arman

    2011-04-01

    Women's experiences during pregnancy are predictive of variation in neurobehavioral profiles in their children. Few studies have assessed these relationships during the prenatal period. In 113 women in the 36(th) -38(th) gestational week (mean age 26.3 ± 5.4 years), electrocardiogram, blood pressure, respiration, salivary cortisol, and fetal heart rate (HR) were measured during baseline, a psychological challenge (Stroop color-word matching task), and a standardized paced breathing protocol. Subjects underwent the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV prior to testing and were grouped as: depressed, co-morbid for depression and anxiety, anxiety disorder only, and control. There was a significant main effect of maternal diagnostic group on fetal HR only during the Stroop task: fetuses of women in the co-morbid group had a greater HR increase compared to controls (p breathing (p < .0001), and there was no significant difference by maternal diagnosis. For both tasks, changes in fetal HR were independent of women's concurrent cardiorespiratory activity. Finally, although cortisol was higher in the co-morbid group (p < .05), across all participants, there was a trend for maternal baseline cortisol to be positively associated with average fetal HR (p = .06). These findings indicate that variation in fetal HR reactivity-an index of emerging regulatory capacities-is likely influenced by multiple acute and chronic factors associated with women's psychobiology. Copyright © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Effect of the loading rate on fibre reinforced concrete beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhász, K. P.; Schaul, P.; Nagy, L.

    2017-09-01

    Fibre reinforced concrete has become a widely used material since the end of the 20th century. The uniformly distributed steel or macro synthetic fibres in the concrete structures can give the concrete a residual flexural strength after the first cracks. The different behaviour of materials subjected to different loading rates is a well-known phenomenon, both with steel, synthetic and concrete materials. Standards usually present a recommendation for the loading speed in for different tests. Concrete elements show higher performance due to the high speed of loading or impact loads, their fracture energy and therefore their overall capacity appears greater than the specimens loaded at standard speeds. Fibre reinforced concrete structures are widely used in tramlines and railways, where the speed of the loading is high and therefore of impact by nature. It is important to know what the effect of this high speed loading is for fibre reinforced concrete structures: do these structures have additional capacity, or has the designer overestimated their performance? This article will present an investigation into the effect of the loading rate on case of using fibres with different materials in concrete beams.

  4. Determinants of Effective Tax Rate of Companies in Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Freitas Sant’Ana

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to identify the determining factors of the effective tax rate (ETR of companies of Latin America in the period 2009 to 2013. Descriptive study was conduct through documentary research, with a quantitative approach of the data. The sample was made up of 500 companies, being 45 of Argentina, 171 of Brazil, 108 of Chile, 38 of Colombia, and Mexico's 71 67 of Peru. Whose data were collected in the database of Thompson Reuters ® and analyzed by means of panel data regression through the software STATA ®, having as dependent variable the Effective tax rate (ETR and independent variables size (TAM capital intensity (INTCAP, the intensity of inventory (INTINV, leverage (ALAV and profitability on assets (ROA. The results show that the size of companies positively influence presents significant about the ETR of Colombian companies. Capital intensity (INTCAP and the intensity of inventory (INTINV were not meaningful to determine the influence of the ETR in the countries analyzed. The leverage of the Argentine companies reveals a positive influence on the ETR, while for the Colombian companies this influence was significant not significant and negatively to the other countries. Profitability resulted in a negative influence to the Mexican and Peruvian companies, and not significant for the other countries to determine the influence on ETR. Denotes that there are differences regarding the determinants of tax burden in Latin American countries, which encourages further studies

  5. Nonlinear dynamical effects on reaction rates in thermally fluctuating environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Shinnosuke; Komatsuzaki, Tamiki

    2010-07-21

    A framework to calculate the rate constants of condensed phase chemical reactions of manybody systems is presented without relying on the concept of transition state. The theory is based on a framework we developed recently adopting a multidimensional underdamped Langevin equation in the region of a rank-one saddle. The theory provides a reaction coordinate expressed as an analytical nonlinear functional of the position coordinates and velocities of the system (solute), the friction constants, and the random force of the environment (solvent). Up to moderately high temperature, the sign of the reaction coordinate can determine the final destination of the reaction in a thermally fluctuating media, irrespective of what values the other (nonreactive) coordinates may take. In this paper, it is shown that the reaction probability is analytically derived as the probability of the reaction coordinate being positive, and that the integration with the Boltzmann distribution of the initial conditions leads to the exact reaction rate constant when the local equilibrium holds and the quantum effect is negligible. Because of analytical nature of the theory taking into account all nonlinear effects and their combination with fluctuation and dissipation, the theory naturally provides us with the firm mathematical foundation of the origin of the reactivity of the reaction in a fluctuating media.

  6. Seeding rate effects in oat-berseem clover intercrops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, Shirley M.; King, Jane R.; O' Donovan, John T.; Izaurralde, R Cesar C.

    2003-10-01

    The sustainability of cereal cropping systems may be improved by the addition of legumes. The effects of seeding rate were studied for intercrops of berseem clover (Trifolium alexandrinum L.) and oats (Avena sativa L.). Bigbee berseem clover, an annual forage legume, was intercropped with oats on a Black Chernozemic soil at Edmonton, Alberta, in 1996 and 1997. Berseem dry matter (DM) yields were greatly reduced by increasing oat plant density. There was a linear decline in berseem DM with increasing oat DM or oat tiller density. The relationship between oat plant density and berseem DM was nonlinear and varied between years and harvests. Berseem yield reductions varied from 44 to 82% with target densities of 100 oat plants m-2. Effects of berseem seeding rate (BSR) on oats varied between years. Increasing BSR from 6 to 24 kg ha-1 decreased oat tillering, oat DM and oat plant DM by 22-51, 0-57 and 8-51%, respectively, and increased oat tiller DM by 0-18%, with oats at 10 to 20 plants m 2. Differences between years were likely due to environmental factors and relative emergence times. After a silage-stage harvest, oat regrowth was negligible but berseem regrowth averaged 3.1 Mg ha-1 DM.

  7. Turbulence evolution and transport behavior during current ramp-up in ITER-like plasmas on DIII-D

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, G. R.; Austin, M.; Boedo, J.; Bravenec, R.; Holland, C.; Jackson, G.; Luce, T. C.; Rhodes, T. L.; Rudakov, D.; Wang, G.; Yan, Z.; Zeng, L.; Zhao, Y.

    2017-08-01

    Low-wavenumber density fluctuations exhibit unique characteristics during the current ramp-up phase of ITER-like discharges that can partially explain the challenges of correctly modeling transport behavior and predicting global plasma parameters during this period. A strong interaction takes place between the evolving transport, safety factor (q) and kinetic profiles as well as the appearance and evolution of low-order rational surfaces. Density fluctuations from 0.75  modelling and the higher electron temperature found previously over the outer half radius. Comparison of turbulence properties with time-varying linear growth rates with GYRO and GENE demonstrate qualitative consistency with measured fluctuation levels, but calculations don’t exhibit reduced growth rates near low-order rational surfaces, which is inconsistent with experimental observations. This indicates a mechanism that can contribute to reconciling observed turbulence behavior with transport models, allowing for the development of more accurate predictive tools.

  8. Measurement of corner separation zone response on a compression ramp to plasma actuation within the hypersonic boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedlund, Brock E.; Houpt, Alec W.; Gordeyev, Stanislav V.; Leonov, Sergey B.

    2017-10-01

    This study was performed to characterize the dominant frequencies present in the boundary layer uptsream of and in the corner separation zone of a compression surface in Mach 4.5 flow and to determine a control effect of transient plasma actuation on the boundary layer. Schlieren imaging was used to distinguish the corner separation zone for 20°, 25°, and 30° compression ramps mounted on flat plates. Spectra of the natural disturbances present in the boundary layer and separation zone were gathered using a high-speed Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor and surface mounted PCBTM pressure sensors while varying flow parameters by adjusting total pressure, temperature, and ramp angle. Shallow cavity discharge plasma actuators were used as a high-frequency localized thermal forcing mechanism of the boundary layer. The plasma effect was negligible for forcing frequencies (50 kHz) below the natural dominant frequency (~55-80 kHz). High frequency perturbations that can promote the transition to turbulence were amplified when the plasma forcing frequency (100 kHz) was higher than the natural dominant frequency (~55-80 kHz). This technique can potentially be used for active control of hypersonic boundary layer transition and the supersonic flow structure on the compression surface.

  9. Heating and cooling rates and their effects upon heart rate in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... rates increase with increasing body temperature, and for all body temperatures heart rates were greater during heating than during cooling. This suggests that the cardiovascular system plays a role in the heat exchange of the tortoises, but further study is required to completely understand the thermoregulatory process.

  10. The Effects of a Normal Rate versus a Slow Intervalled Rate of Oral Nutrient Intake and Intravenous Low Rate Macronutrient Application on Psychophysical Function - Two Pilot Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denzer-Lippmann, Melanie Y; Bachlechner, Stephan; Wielopolski, Jan; Fischer, Marie; Buettner, Andrea; Doerfler, Arndt; Schöfl, Christof; Münch, Gerald; Kornhuber, Johannes; Thürauf, Norbert

    2017-01-01

    Stomach distension and energy per time are factors influencing satiety. Moreover, different rates of nutrient intake induce different stomach distension. The goal of our studies was to elucidate the influence of different oral rates of nutrient intake (normal rate versus slow intervalled rate; study I) and intravenous low rate macronutrient application (protein, carbohydrate, fat) or placebo (study II) on psychophysical function. The pilot studies investigated the effects of 1) study I: a mixed nutrient solution (1/3 protein, 1/3 fat, 1/3 carbohydrates) 2) study II: intravenous macronutrient infusions (protein, carbohydrate, fat) or placebo on psychophysical function (mood, hunger, food craving, alertness, smell intensity ratings and hedonic ratings) in human subjects. In study I 10 male subjects (age range: 21-30 years) completed the study protocol participating in both test conditions and in study II 20 male subjects (age range: 19-41 years) completed the study protocol participating in all test conditions. Additionally, metabolic function was analyzed and cognitive and olfactory tests were conducted twice starting 100 min before the beginning of the intervention and 240 min after. Psychophysical (mood, hunger, fat-, protein-, carbohydrate-, sweets- and vegetable-craving), alertness and metabolic function tests were performed seven times on each examination day. Greater effects on hunger and food cravings were observed for normal rate of intake compared to slow intervalled rate of intake and intravenous low rate macronutrient application. Our findings potentially confirm that volume of the food ingested and a higher rate of energy per time contribute to satiety during normal rate of food intake, while slow intervalled rate of food intake and intravenous low rate macronutrient application showed no effects on satiation. Our results motivate the view that a certain amount of volume of the food ingested and a certain energy per time ratio are necessary to reduce

  11. The Effects of a Normal Rate versus a Slow Intervalled Rate of Oral Nutrient Intake and Intravenous Low Rate Macronutrient Application on Psychophysical Function – Two Pilot Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Y. Denzer-Lippmann

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Stomach distension and energy per time are factors influencing satiety. Moreover, different rates of nutrient intake induce different stomach distension. The goal of our studies was to elucidate the influence of different oral rates of nutrient intake (normal rate versus slow intervalled rate; study I and intravenous low rate macronutrient application (protein, carbohydrate, fat or placebo (study II on psychophysical function. The pilot studies investigated the effects of 1 study I: a mixed nutrient solution (1/3 protein, 1/3 fat, 1/3 carbohydrates 2 study II: intravenous macronutrient infusions (protein, carbohydrate, fat or placebo on psychophysical function (mood, hunger, food craving, alertness, smell intensity ratings and hedonic ratings in human subjects. In study I 10 male subjects (age range: 21–30 years completed the study protocol participating in both test conditions and in study II 20 male subjects (age range: 19–41 years completed the study protocol participating in all test conditions. Additionally, metabolic function was analyzed and cognitive and olfactory tests were conducted twice starting 100 min before the beginning of the intervention and 240 min after. Psychophysical (mood, hunger, fat-, protein-, carbohydrate-, sweets- and vegetable-craving, alertness and metabolic function tests were performed seven times on each examination day. Greater effects on hunger and food cravings were observed for normal rate of intake compared to slow intervalled rate of intake and intravenous low rate macronutrient application. Our findings potentially confirm that volume of the food ingested and a higher rate of energy per time contribute to satiety during normal rate of food intake, while slow intervalled rate of food intake and intravenous low rate macronutrient application showed no effects on satiation. Our results motivate the view that a certain amount of volume of the food ingested and a certain energy per time ratio are necessary

  12. Heart rate effects of intraosseous injections using slow and fast rates of anesthetic solution deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susi, Louis; Reader, Al; Nusstein, John; Beck, Mike; Weaver, Joel; Drum, Melissa

    2008-01-01

    The authors, using a crossover design, randomly administered, in a single-blind manner, 3 primary intraosseous injections to 61 subjects using: the Wand local anesthetic system at a deposition rate of 45 seconds (fast injection); the Wand local anesthetic system at a deposition rate of 4 minutes and 45 seconds (slow injection); a conventional syringe injection at a deposition rate of 4 minutes and 45 seconds (slow injection), in 3 separate appointments spaced at least 3 weeks apart. A pulse oximeter measured heart rate (pulse). The results demonstrated the mean maximum heart rate was statistically higher with the fast intraosseous injection (average 21 to 28 beats/min increase) than either of the 2 slow intraosseous injections (average 10 to 12 beats/min increase). There was no statistically significant difference between the 2 slow injections. We concluded that an intraosseous injection of 1.4 mL of 2% lidocaine with 1 : 100,000 epinephrine with the Wand at a 45-second rate of anesthetic deposition resulted in a significantly higher heart rate when compared with a 4-minute and 45-second anesthetic solution deposition using either the Wand or traditional syringe.

  13. The Effect of Growth Rate on Interface Morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, R.; Somboonsuk, K.

    1984-01-01

    Since significantly different solidification structures of a given alloy can be obtained by varying experimental growth rates, it is desirable to understand the basic factors which control the formation and stability of these microstructures when conditions are altered. Directional solidification experiments are described and the results obtained in metallic and transparent organic systems are presented. Emphasis is on the characteristics of dendritic structures obtained under different solidification conditions. Specifically, the effect of the growth rate on the primary dendritic spacing, the secondary dendrite spacing, and the dendrite tip radius is discussed. It is shown that significant changes in the primary spacing are observed when a dendrite to cellular transition takes place at lower velocities. It is found that the primary cellular spacing is much smaller than the primary dendrite spacing so that a maximum in the primary spacing occurs as a function of velocity at the dendrite-cellular transition. A theoretical model is also described which quantitatively explains various microstructural features of dendritic and cellular structures.

  14. Effect of increased vacuum and aspiration rates on phacoemulsification efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Isha; Cahoon, Judd M; Gardiner, Gareth; Garff, Kevin; Henriksen, Bradley S; Pettey, Jeff H; Barlow, William R; Olson, Randall J

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate the effect of vacuum and aspiration rates on phacoemulsification efficiency. John A. Moran Eye Center Laboratories, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA. Experimental study. Formalin-soaked porcine lenses were divided into 2.0 mm cubes, and 0.9 mm 30-degree beveled 20-degree bent tips were used with micropulse ultrasound (US) (6 milliseconds on and 6 milliseconds off) and a peristaltic flow system. Vacuum levels were tested at 200, 300, 400, and 500 mm Hg, and aspiration rates were tested at 20, 35, and 50 mL/min. Efficiency (time to lens removal) and chatter (number of lens fragment repulsions from the tip) were determined. Increasing vacuum increased efficiency only when going from 200 mm Hg to higher vacuum levels. Increasing aspiration increased efficiency at all points measured (25 mL/min versus 35 mL/min, P vacuum was increased from 200 mm Hg to 300 mm Hg and up. Chatter decreased with increasing flow. Vacuum improved efficiency only up to 300 mm Hg and was more dependent on increasing flow. Similarly, chatter correlated with 200 mm Hg vacuum only and was more correlated with flow. Limitations of this study include use of only 1 US power modulation and hard nuclear material. No author has a financial or proprietary interest in any material or method mentioned. Copyright © 2015 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The Effects of Air Pollution on Ischemic Stroke Admission Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimohammadi, Hossein; Fakhri, Sara; Derakhshanfar, Hojjat; Hosseini-Zijoud, Seyed-Mostafa; Safari, Saeed

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to determine the relationship between the level of air pollutants and the rate of ischemic stroke (IS) admissions to hospitals. In this retrospective cross-sectional study, stroke admissions (January-March 2012 and 2013) to an emergency department and air pollution and meteorological data were gathered. The relationship between air pollutant levels and hospital admission rates were evaluated using the generalize additive model. In all 379 patients with IS were referred to the hospital (52.5% male; mean age 68.2±13.3 years). Both transient (p<0.001) and long-term (p<0.001) rises in CO level increases the risk of IS. Increased weekly (p<0.001) and monthly (p<0.001) average O3 levels amplifies this risk, while a transient increase in NO2 (p<0.001) and SO2 (p<0.001) levels has the same effect. Long-term changes in PM10 (p<0.001) and PM2.5 (p<0.001) also increase the risk of IS. The findings showed that the level of air pollutants directly correlates with the number of stroke admissions to the emergency department. PMID:26866000

  16. Effect of hyperventilation on rate corrected QT interval of children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannivelu, Arivalagan; Kudumula, Vikram; Bhole, Vinay

    2013-02-01

    Hyperventilation is known to cause ST segment changes and QT variability in adults, but this has not been systematically studied in children. To investigate the effect of hyperventilation on rate corrected QT interval (QTc) in children. 25 children (male=10) with a median age of 14 (range 8.3-17.6) years were asked to hyperventilate for 1 min before exercise testing using the modified Bruce protocol. Mean QTc at rest, after hyperventilation, at peak exercise and at 1 min of recovery was 425(±31), 460(±30), 446(±38) and 420(±32) ms, respectively. Mean increase (95% CI) in QTc after hyperventilation was 35(19 to 51) ms (phyperventilation (mean QT 352(±41) vs 357(±44) ms). In six children, there were abnormalities in T wave morphology following hyperventilation. The QTc increment following hyperventilation was more pronounced in children with resting QTc hyperventilation was seen in children with both low and intermediate probability of long QT syndrome (LQTS). Peak exercise and early recovery did not cause a statistically significant change in QTc in either of these groups. Hyperventilation produces repolarisation abnormalities, including prolongation of QTc and T wave abnormalities in children with low probability of LQTS. The likely mechanism is delayed adaptation of QT interval with increased heart rate. Thus, a hyperventilation episode can be misdiagnosed as LQTS, especially in an emergency department.

  17. PIK-20 and LRV Vehicles Parked on Ramp

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    This photo shows NASA's PIK-20 motor-glider sailplane on the ramp at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Next to the PIK-20 is the Low Reynolds Number Vehicle (LRV) remotely-piloted research vehicle. The PIK-20E was a sailplane flown at NASA's Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (now Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California) beginning in 1981. The vehicle, bearing NASA tail number 803, was used as a research vehicle on projects calling for high lift-over-drag and low-speed performance. Later NASA used the PIK-20E to study the flow of fluids over the aircraft's surface at various speeds and angles of attack as part of a study of airflow efficiency over lifting surfaces. The single-seat aircraft was used to begin developing procedures for collecting sailplane glide performance data in a program carried out by Ames-Dryden. It was also used to study high-lift aerodynamics and laminar flow on high-lift airfoils. Built by Eiri-Avion in Finland, the PIK-20E is a sailplane with a two-cylinder 43-horsepower, retractable engine. It is made of carbon fiber with sandwich construction. In this unique configuration, it takes off and climbs to altitude on its own. After reaching the desired altitude, the engine is shut down and folded back into the fuselage and the aircraft is then operated as a conventional sailplane. Construction of the PIK-20E series was rather unusual. The factory used high-temperature epoxies cured in an autoclave, making the structure resistant to deformation with age. Unlike today's normal practice of laying glass over gelcoat in a mold, the PIK-20E was built without gelcoat. The finish is the result of smooth glass lay-up, a small amount of filler, and an acrylic enamel paint. The sailplane was 21.4 feet long and had a wingspan of 49.2 feet. It featured a wooden, fixed-pitch propeller, a roomy cockpit, wingtip wheels, and a steerable tailwheel.

  18. Effect of atrioventricular conduction on heart rate variability

    KAUST Repository

    Ahmad, Talha Jamal

    2011-08-01

    This paper discusses the effect of atrioventricular conduction time (AVCT) on the short-term Heart Rate Variability (HRV) by computing HRV parameters using intervals between the onsets of successive P waves (PP time series) for three groups: normal, arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death (SCD) patients. A very precise wavelet transform based ECG delineator was developed to detect PP, PR and RR time series. Mean PR variation in arrhythmia and SCD group was found to be significantly high as compared to the normal group. It was observed that when PR variations in arrhythmia and SCD cases crossed a certain threshold, RR variability no longer provided a very accurate estimate of HRV. In such cases, PP variability was able to provide a better assessment of HRV. © 2011 IEEE.

  19. The effects of vacuum polarization on thermonuclear reaction rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Robert J.

    1990-01-01

    Added to the pure Coulomb potential, the contribution from vacuum polarization increases the barrier, reducing the wave function (u) for reacting nuclei within the range of nuclear forces. The cross section and reaction rate are then reduced accordingly by a factor proportional to u squared. The effect is treated by evaluating the vacuum polarization potential as a small correction to the Coulomb term, then computing u in a WKB formulation. The calculation is done analytically employing the small r power-series expansion for the Uehling potential to express the final result in terms of convenient parameters. At a temperature of 1.4 x 10 to the 7th K the (negative) correction is 1.3 percent for the fundamental fusion process p + p yields d + e(+) + nu.

  20. Incidence and Detection of Meniscal Ramp Lesions on Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Patients With Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePhillipo, Nicholas N; Cinque, Mark E; Chahla, Jorge; Geeslin, Andrew G; Engebretsen, Lars; LaPrade, Robert F

    2017-08-01

    Meniscal ramp lesions have been reported to be present in 9% to 17% of patients undergoing anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Detection at the time of arthroscopy can be accomplished based on clinical suspicion and careful evaluation. Preoperative assessment via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been reported to have a low sensitivity in identifying meniscal ramp lesions. To investigate the incidence of meniscal ramp lesions in patients with ACL tears and the sensitivity of preoperative MRI for the detection of ramp lesions. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. All patients who underwent ACL reconstruction by a single surgeon between 2010 and 2016 were included in this study, and patients with medial meniscal ramp lesions found at the time of arthroscopy were identified. The sensitivity of MRI compared with the gold standard of arthroscopic evaluation was determined by review of the preoperative MRI musculoskeletal radiologist report, mimicking the clinical scenario. The incidence was calculated based on arthroscopic findings, and the potential secondary signs of meniscal ramp tears were evaluated on MRI. In a consecutive series of 301 ACL reconstructions, 50 patients (33 male, 17 female) with a mean age of 29.6 years (range, 14-61 years) were diagnosed with a medial meniscal ramp lesion at arthroscopic evaluation (16.6% incidence). The sensitivity of MRI for ramp lesions was 48% based on the preoperative MRI report. A secondary finding of a posteromedial tibial bone bruise was identified on preoperative MRI in 36 of the 50 patients with ramp lesions in a retrospective MRI review by 2 orthopaedic surgeons. Medial meniscal ramp lesions were present in approximately 17% of 301 patients undergoing ACL reconstruction, and less than one-half were diagnosed on the preoperative MRI. A posteromedial tibial bone bruise was found to be a secondary sign of a ramp lesion in 72% of patients. Increased awareness of this potentially combined injury pattern is

  1. Performance Analysis of a Peak-Current Mode Control with Compensation Ramp for a Boost-Flyback Power Converter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan-Guillermo Muñoz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available High voltage gain power converters are very important in photovoltaic applications mainly due to the low output voltage of photovoltaic arrays. This kind of power converters includes three or more semiconductor devices and four or more energy storage elements, making the dynamical analysis of the controlled system more difficult. In this paper, the boost-flyback power converter is controlled by peak-current mode with compensation ramp. The closed-loop analysis is performed to guarantee operation conditions such that a period-1 orbit is attained. The converter is considered as a piecewise linear system, and the closed-loop stability is determined by using the monodromy matrix, obtained by the composition of the saltation matrixes with the solutions of the dynamical equations in the linear intervals. The largest eigenvalue of the monodromy matrix gives the stability of the period-1 orbit, and a deep analysis using bifurcation diagrams let us reach a conclusion about the loss of the stability, which is experimentally verified. To avoid overcompensation effects, the minimum value required by the compensation ramp is obtained, and the minimum and maximum values of the load resistance are found too. The system has a good transient response under disturbances in the load and in the input voltage.

  2. FUEL PERFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM Power-Ramp Testing and Postirradiation Examination of PCI- Resistant LWR Fuel Rod Designs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barner, J. O.; Guenther, R. J.

    1982-09-01

    This report describes the power-ramp testing results from 10 fuel rods irradiated in the Halden Boiling Water Reactor (HBWR), Halden, Norway. Tne work is part of the Fuel Performance Improvement Program (FPIP), which is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DUE) and is conducted through the joint efforts of Consumers Power Company, Exxon Nuclear Company, lnc., and Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The objective of the FPlP is to identify and demonstrate fuel concepts with improved pellet-cladding interaction (PCl) behavior that will be capable of extended burnup. The postirradiation examination results obtained from one nonramped rod are also presented. The power-ramping behavior of three basic fuel rod types--rods with annular-pellet fuel, sphere-pac fuel, and dished-pellet (reference) fuel--are compared in terms of mechanisms known to promote PCl failures. The effects of graphite coating on the inside cladding surface and helium pressurization in rods witn annular fuel are also evaluated .

  3. Effects of Meditation Practice on Spontaneous Eye Blink Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruis, Ayla; Slagter, Heleen A.; Bachhuber, David R.W.; Davidson, Richard J.; Lutz, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    A rapidly growing body of research suggests that meditation can change brain and cognitive functioning. Yet little is known about the neurochemical mechanisms underlying meditation-related changes in cognition. Here we investigated the effects of meditation on spontaneous Eye Blink Rates (sEBR), a non-invasive peripheral correlate of striatal dopamine activity. Previous studies have shown a relationship between sEBR and cognitive functions such as mind-wandering, cognitive flexibility, and attention–functions that are also affected by meditation. We therefore expected that long-term meditation practice would alter eye-blink activity. To test this, we recorded baseline sEBR and Inter Eye-Blink Intervals (IEBI) in long-term meditators (LTM) and meditation naive participants (MNP). We found that LTM not only blinked less frequently, but also showed a different eye-blink pattern than MNP. This pattern had good to high degree of consistency over three time points. Moreover, we examined the effects of an 8 week-course of Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) on sEBR and IEBI, compared to an active control group and a waitlist-control group. No effect of short-term meditation practice was found. Finally, we investigated whether different types of meditation differentially alter eye blink activity by measuring sEBR and IEBI after a full day of two kinds of meditation practices in the LTM. No effect of meditation type was found. Taken together, these findings may suggest either that individual difference in dopaminergic neurotransmission is a self-selection factor for meditation practice, or that long-term, but not short-term meditation practice induces stable changes in baseline striatal dopaminergic functioning. PMID:26871460

  4. The effect of different exercise protocols and regression-based algorithms on the assessment of the anaerobic threshold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuniga, Jorge M; Housh, Terry J; Camic, Clayton L; Bergstrom, Haley C; Schmidt, Richard J; Johnson, Glen O

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of ramp and step incremental cycle ergometer tests on the assessment of the anaerobic threshold (AT) using 3 different computerized regression-based algorithms. Thirteen healthy adults (mean age and body mass [SD] = 23.4 [3.3] years and body mass = 71.7 [11.1] kg) visited the laboratory on separate occasions. Two-way repeated measures analyses of variance with appropriate follow-up procedures were used to analyze the data. The step protocol resulted in greater mean values across algorithms than the ramp protocol for the V[Combining Dot Above]O2 (step = 1.7 [0.6] L·min and ramp = 1.5 [0.4] L·min) and heart rate (HR) (step = 133 [21] b·min and ramp = 124 [15] b·min) at the AT. There were no significant mean differences, however, in power outputs at the AT between the step (115.2 [44.3] W) and the ramp (112.2 [31.2] W) protocols. Furthermore, there were no significant mean differences for V[Combining Dot Above]O2, HR, or power output across protocols among the 3 computerized regression-based algorithms used to estimate the AT. The current findings suggested that the protocol selection, but not the regression-based algorithms can affect the assessment of the V[Combining Dot Above]O2 and HR at the AT.

  5. Upper flow-regime structures in a Pleistocene carbonate ramp (Favignana, Italy): diagnostic criteria and implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slootman, Arnoud; Cartigny, Matthieu; de Boer, Poppe; Moscariello, Andrea

    2017-04-01

    This work presents key diagnostic criteria for the recognition of upper flow-regime sedimentary structures in clastic cool-water carbonate accumulations, illustrated by the excellent exposures of the Pleistocene carbonate ramp succession of Favignana Island (Italy). Cool-water carbonate sedimentation has dominated Mediterranean shelves since the Early Pliocene. Of the various types of marine limestones, cool-water carbonates behave most similar to siliciclastics. They typically develop ramp morphologies with skeletal sand and gravel, consisting of the remains of heterozoan organisms. Resedimentation of this loose carbonate debris during high-energy events such as storms and, more rarely, tsunamis is the norm. Off-ramp supercritical sediment density flows are important contributors to basinward sediment transport as evidenced by the prevalence of backset-stratification bounded by composite erosion surfaces, locally defining spoon-shaped scours-fills, in beds exceeding several metres in thickness. Sedimentary structures created by upper flow-regime bedforms like antidunes, chute-and-pools and cyclic steps as seen on Favignana Island, which form in association with in-phase waves and hydraulic jumps, are not commonly mentioned in carbonate ramp depositional models. For each of the bedforms we present diagnostic criteria to explain otherwise enigmatic sedimentary structures. Thick beds deposited by supercritical sediment density flows have major implications for the distribution of porosity and permeability in carbonate sandstone bodies, especially where they host hydrocarbon and/or water accumulations. The correct identification of upper flow-regime sedimentary structures in carbonate ramp accumulations is therefore important.

  6. Ramp-preserving denoising for conductivity image reconstruction in magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang-Ock; Jeon, Kiwan; Ahn, Seonmin; Kim, Hyung Joong; Woo, Eung Je

    2011-07-01

    In magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography, among several conductivity image reconstruction algorithms, the harmonic B(z) algorithm has been successfully applied to B(z) data from phantoms and animals. The algorithm is, however, sensitive to measurement noise in B(z) data. Especially, in in vivo animal and human experiments where injection current amplitudes are limited within a few milliampere at most, measured B(z) data tend to have a low SNR. In addition, magnetic resonance (MR) signal void in outer layers of bones and gas-filled organs, for example, produces salt-pepper noise in the MR phase and, consequently, B(z) images. The B(z) images typically present areas of sloped transitions, which can be assimilated to ramps. Conductivity contrasts change ramp slopes in B(z) images and it is critical to preserve positions of those ramps to correctly recover edges in conductivity images. In this paper, we propose a ramp-preserving denoising method utilizing a structure tensor. Using an eigenvalue analysis, we identified local regions of salt-pepper noise. Outside the identified local regions, we applied an anisotropic smoothing to reduce noise while preserving their ramp structures. Inside the local regions of salt-pepper noise, we used an isotropic smoothing. After validating the proposed denoising method through numerical simulations, we applied it to in vivo animal imaging experiments. Both numerical simulation and experimental results show significant improvements in the quality of reconstructed conductivity images. © 2011 IEEE

  7. Capacity Estimation for On-Ramp Merging Section of Urban Expressway Based on Time Headway Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing-jian Xue

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a model for estimating capacity of on-ramp merging section of urban expressway based on dynamics and gap acceptance theory, considering lane-changing processes and time headway loss. Survey data were collected from on-ramp merging sections of shanghai urban expressway system and showed that capacity drop of on-ramp merging section is caused by drivers’ lane-changing which may lead to unsteady speed of vehicles and so prolonged time headway compared to the minimum time headway corresponding to the maximum capacity. Three parameters (optimal time headway, time headway loss, and interference quantity of lane-changing are given and a methodology by accumulating time headway loss due to lane-changing is developed to estimate the capacity drop. Results’ comparisons between real data and microsimulation of on-ramp merging sections and sensitivity analysis show that the proposed model can produce reliable and accurate results. This study also reveals that ramp flow and the difference between the optimal speed and the lane-changing speed of fleet have a great impact on capacity drop. This study is beneficial to evaluate congestion levels, to understand complex traffic phenomena, and so to find efficient solutions.

  8. TID Effects in Space-like Variable Dose Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Richard D.

    2008-01-01

    The degradation of the LM193 dual voltage comparator has been studied with different types of TID dose rates. These include several different constant dose rates and a variable dose rate that simulates the behavior of a solar flare. The varying dose rate of a solar flare is the type of real total dose exposure that a space mission might see in lunar or Martian orbit. A comparison of these types of dose rates is made to explore how well the constant dose rates used for typical part testing predicts the performance during a simulated space-like mission.

  9. Strain Rate Effect on Tensile Behavior for a High Specific Strength Steel: From Quasi-Static to Intermediate Strain Rates

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Wang; Yan Ma; Muxin Yang; Ping Jiang; Fuping Yuan; Xiaolei Wu

    2017-01-01

    The strain rate effect on the tensile behaviors of a high specific strength steel (HSSS) with dual-phase microstructure has been investigated. The yield strength, the ultimate strength and the tensile toughness were all observed to increase with increasing strain rates at the range of 0.0006 to 56/s, rendering this HSSS as an excellent candidate for an energy absorber in the automobile industry, since vehicle crushing often happens at intermediate strain rates. Back stress hardening has been ...

  10. Effective Tax Rates in Macroeconomics: Cross-Country Estimates of Tax Rates on Factor Incomes and Consumption

    OpenAIRE

    Enrique G. Mendoza; Assaf Razin; Linda L. Tesar

    1994-01-01

    This paper proposes a method for computing tax rates using national accounts and revenue statistics. Using this method we construct time-series of tax rates for large industrial countries. The method identifies the revenue raised by different taxes at the general government level and defines aggregate measures of the corresponding tax bases. This method yields estimates of effective tax rates on factor incomes and consumption consistent with the tax distortions faced by a representative agent...

  11. 12 CFR 617.7125 - How should a qualified lender determine the effective interest rate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... effective interest rate? 617.7125 Section 617.7125 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM BORROWER RIGHTS Disclosure of Effective Interest Rates § 617.7125 How should a qualified lender determine the effective interest rate? (a) A qualified lender must calculate the effective interest rate on...

  12. The effect of ether anesthesia on fin-clipping rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eschmeyer, Paul H.

    1953-01-01

    As part of an experimental program to learn the effects of stocking lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) in Lake Superior, 141, 392 fingerlings were marked at the Charlevoix (Michigan) Station of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in October 1952. The adipose fin was removed from all fish, the right pelvic from the remainder. A random sample of 2, 417 of the fish showed an average total length of 4.0 inches (range, 2.7 to 5.4). The mean weight of all fish marked was slightly less than one-third ounce (49 fish per pound). The local women, none of whom had previous experience in the work, were employed to mark the fish. Bone-cutting forceps were used for excision of the fins, and each worker wore a bobbinet glove to facilitate handling of the fish. On alternate days the fish were anesthetized with ether before marking, to determine the effect of its use on the fin-clipping rate.

  13. Dutch courage? Effects of acute alcohol consumption on self-ratings and observer ratings of foreign language skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renner, Fritz; Kersbergen, Inge; Field, Matt; Werthmann, Jessica

    2018-01-01

    A popular belief is that alcohol improves the ability to speak in a foreign language. The effect of acute alcohol consumption on perceived foreign language performance and actual foreign language performance in foreign language learners has not been investigated. The aim of the current study was to test the effects of acute alcohol consumption on self-rated and observer-rated verbal foreign language performance in participants who have recently learned this language. Fifty native German speakers who had recently learned Dutch were randomized to receive either a low dose of alcohol or a control beverage that contained no alcohol. Following the experimental manipulation, participants took part in a standardized discussion in Dutch with a blinded experimenter. The discussion was audio-recorded and foreign language skills were subsequently rated by two native Dutch speakers who were blind to the experimental condition (observer-rating). Participants also rated their own individual Dutch language skills during the discussion (self-rating). Participants who consumed alcohol had significantly better observer-ratings for their Dutch language, specifically better pronunciation, compared with those who did not consume alcohol. However, alcohol had no effect on self-ratings of Dutch language skills. Acute alcohol consumption may have beneficial effects on the pronunciation of a foreign language in people who have recently learned that language.

  14. Boundary Layer Flow Control by an Array of Ramp-Shaped Vortex Generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, K. B. M. Q.; Hirt, S. M.; Bencic, T. J.

    2012-01-01

    Flow field survey results for the effect of ramp-shaped vortex generators (VG) on a turbulent boundary layer are presented. The experiments are carried out in a low-speed wind tunnel and the data are acquired primarily by hot-wire anemometry. Distributions of mean velocity and turbulent stresses as well as streamwise vorticity, on cross-sectional planes at various downstream locations, are obtained. These detailed flow field properties, including the boundary layer characteristics, are documented with the primary objective of aiding possible computational investigations. The results show that VG orientation with apex upstream, that produces a downwash directly behind it, yields a stronger pair of streamwise vortices. This is in contrast to the case with apex downstream that produces a pair of vortices of opposite sense. Thus, an array of VG s with the former orientation, usually considered for film-cooling application, may also be superior for mixing enhancement and boundary layer separation control. The data files can be found on a supplemental CD.

  15. Biomechanics of the ski cross start indoors on a customised training ramp and outdoors on snow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedergaard, Niels Jensby; Heinen, Frederik; Sloth, Simon; Holmberg, Hans-Christer; Kersting, Uwe Gustav

    2015-09-01

    An effective start enhances an athlete's chances of success in ski cross competitions. Accordingly, this study was designed to investigate the biomechanics of start techniques used by elite athletes and assess the influence of different start environments. Seven elite ski cross athletes performed starts indoors on a custom-built ramp; six of these also performed starts on an outdoor slope. Horizontal and vertical forces were measured by force transducers located in the handles of the start gate and a 12-camera motion capture system allowed monitoring of the sagittal knee, hip, shoulder, and elbow kinematics. The starting movement involved Pre, Pull, and Push phases. Significant differences between body sides were observed for peak vertical and resultant forces, resultant impulse, and peak angular velocity of the shoulder joint. Significantly lower peak vertical forces (44 N), higher resultant impulse (0.114 Ns/kg), and knee joint range of motion (12°) were observed indoors. Although movement in the ski cross start is generally symmetrical, asymmetric patterns of force were observed among the athletes. Two different movement strategies, i.e. pronounced hip extension or more accentuated elbow flexion, were utilised in the Pull phase. The patterns of force and movement during the indoor and outdoor starts were similar.

  16. The effect of war on marriage, divorce and birth rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, D

    1993-01-01

    The impact of war on marriage, divorce, and birth rates in the United States from 1933 to 1986 is explored. The author concludes that "the involvement of the nation in military activities was accompanied by a decrease in marriage and birth rates but not by any change in divorce rates. Mobilization of the armed forces and demobilization had no discernible impact on divorce, marriage or birth rates."

  17. Effectiveness of quality control methods for glomerular filtration rate calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMeekin, Helena; Wickham, Fred; Barnfield, Mark; Burniston, Maria

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we aimed to identify the types of errors encountered in glomerular filtration rate (GFR) measurement and test the effectiveness of all published quality control (QC) methods for detection of clinically significant errors. A total of 412 GFR tests were carried out on adults and children. The three-point slope-intercept glomerular filtration rate (SI-GFR) was compared with the nine-point 'area under curve' calculation as a gold standard to determine the error in SI-GFR. The Durbin-Watson test was used to characterize the nature of the errors. The sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value (PPV) of QC methods for detecting clinically significant errors were calculated and receiver operating characteristic curves were constructed. The QC methods were also applied to a dataset of 100 four-point GFR tests from different institutions. Model failure is the dominant cause of clinically significant error in this dataset, with individual point measurement errors only giving rise to clinically significant errors in a small number of cases. No QC test had an acceptable combination of sensitivity, PPV and specificity. The correlation coefficient QC test had the largest area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (0.73). No other QC test had an area greater than 0.57. All the QC methods have poor sensitivity and PPV for detecting clinically significant errors and so cannot be relied on to ensure a robust measurement of GFR, underlining the need for careful working practices and a thorough system of measurement checks. We found no evidence for the value of multiple sampling with respect to QC; until such evidence is published, their clinical utility is unproven.

  18. The Effect of Minimum Wage Rates on High School Completion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, John Robert; Hamrock, Caitlin

    2010-01-01

    Does increasing the minimum wage reduce the high school completion rate? Previous research has suffered from (1. narrow time horizons, (2. potentially inadequate measures of states' high school completion rates, and (3. potentially inadequate measures of minimum wage rates. Overcoming each of these limitations, we analyze the impact of changes in…

  19. effect of ambient temperature on farrowing rate in pigs

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    tion, but invariably result in early embryo death. Lllberg. & Burfening(1967) reported that ewes subjected to high air temperature at about the time of mating will have a reduced reproducrive rate because of an increased embryonic death rate. Salisbury & Flerchinger .... of oestrus and accepting the boar. The farrowing rate.

  20. Effects Of Real Exchange Rate Uncertainty On Private Investment In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results of the study indicated that real exchange rate uncertainty is a significant determinant of private investment and that real exchange rate uncertainty has a negative impact on private investment in Ghana. The policy implication of the findings is that government should pursue sound exchange rate policies that ...

  1. Effects of coffee management on deforestation rates and forest integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hylander, Kristoffer; Nemomissa, Sileshi; Delrue, Josefien; Enkosa, Woldeyohannes

    2013-10-01

    Knowledge about how forest margins are utilized can be crucial for a general understanding of changes in forest cover, forest structure, and biodiversity across landscapes. We studied forest-agriculture transitions in southwestern Ethiopia and hypothesized that the presence of coffee (Coffea arabica)decreases deforestation rates because of coffee's importance to local economies and its widespread occurrence in forests and forest margins. Using satellite images and elevation data, we compared changes in forest cover over 37 years (1973-2010) across elevations in 2 forest-agriculture mosaic landscapes (1100 km(2) around Bonga and 3000 km(2) in Goma-Gera). In the field in the Bonga area, we determined coffee cover and forest structure in 40 forest margins that differed in time since deforestation. Both the absolute and relative deforestation rates were lower at coffee-growing elevations compared with at higher elevations (-10/20% vs. -40/50% comparing relative rates at 1800 m asl and 2300-2500 m asl, respectively). Within the coffee-growing elevation, the proportion of sites with high coffee cover (>20%) was significantly higher in stable margins (42% of sites that had been in the same location for the entire period) than in recently changed margins (0% of sites where expansion of annual crops had changed the margin). Disturbance level and forest structure did not differ between sites with 30% or 3% coffee. However, a growing body of literature on gradients of coffee management in Ethiopia reports coffee's negative effects on abundances of forest-specialist species. Even if the presence of coffee slows down the conversion of forest to annual-crop agriculture, there is a risk that an intensification of coffee management will still threaten forest biodiversity, including the genetic diversity of wild coffee. Conservation policy for Ethiopian forests thus needs to develop strategies that acknowledge that forests without coffee production may have higher deforestation

  2. Sequential Effects in Essay Ratings: Evidence of Assimilation Effects Using Cross-Classified Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Haiyan; Andersson, Björn; Guo, Boliang; Xin, Tao

    2017-01-01

    Writing assessments are an indispensable part of most language competency tests. In our research, we used cross-classified models to study rater effects in the real essay rating process of a large-scale, high-stakes educational examination administered in China in 2011. Generally, four cross-classified models are suggested for investigation of rater effects: (1) the existence of sequential effects, (2) the direction of the sequential effects, and (3) differences in raters by their individual characteristics. We applied these models to the data to account for possible cluster effects caused by the application of multiple rating strategies. The results of our research showed that raters demonstrated sequential effects during the rating process. In contrast to many other studies on rater effects, our study found that raters exhibited assimilation effects. The more experienced, lenient, and qualified raters were less susceptible to assimilation effects. In addition, our research demonstrated the feasibility and appropriateness of using cross-classified models in assessing rater effects for such data structures. This paper also discusses the implications for educators and practitioners who are interested in reducing sequential effects in the rating process, and suggests directions for future research.

  3. Sequential Effects in Essay Ratings: Evidence of Assimilation Effects Using Cross-Classified Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyan Zhao

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Writing assessments are an indispensable part of most language competency tests. In our research, we used cross-classified models to study rater effects in the real essay rating process of a large-scale, high-stakes educational examination administered in China in 2011. Generally, four cross-classified models are suggested for investigation of rater effects: (1 the existence of sequential effects, (2 the direction of the sequential effects, and (3 differences in raters by their individual characteristics. We applied these models to the data to account for possible cluster effects caused by the application of multiple rating strategies. The results of our research showed that raters demonstrated sequential effects during the rating process. In contrast to many other studies on rater effects, our study found that raters exhibited assimilation effects. The more experienced, lenient, and qualified raters were less susceptible to assimilation effects. In addition, our research demonstrated the feasibility and appropriateness of using cross-classified models in assessing rater effects for such data structures. This paper also discusses the implications for educators and practitioners who are interested in reducing sequential effects in the rating process, and suggests directions for future research.

  4. Evidence for a crustal ramp below the northernmost part of the Bhutan Himalayas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Roux-Mallouf, Romain; Godard, Vincent; Cattin, Rodolphe; Ferry, Matthieu; Gyeltshen, Jampel; Ritz, Jean-François; Drukpa, Dowchu; Guillou, Valéry; Aster Team

    2015-04-01

    The Main Himalayan Thust (MHT) marks the ca. 2500-km-long boundary between the India and Eurasia plates and accommodates most of the collision that produced the Himalayan Arc. It is the source of great historical and modern earthquakes that have been documented all along the front, except for Bhutan where data is scarce. A key parameter to better understand how tectonic loading accumulates and what magnitudes may be expected in the future is the geometry of the MHT at depth. Although 2D seismic images are now available for the western part of the range, lateral variations in geometry remain poorly constrained for the Bhutanese Himalayas. Here, using new and existing 10Be cosmonuclide exposure ages, tectonic geodesy and uplifted Holocene river terraces we assess both denudation rates and present-day kinematics of the MHT in western Bhutan. Our new dataset includes 32 catchment-averaged denudation rates ranging from 0.025 to 2.1 mm/yr. Their spatial pattern exhibits a strong northward denudation increase starting ca. 110 km north of the MFT. We interpret this major change as a mid-crustal flat-ramp transition in the MHT geometry. Compared to previous images showing in central Nepal and Sikkim a location of 80-100 km north of the MFT for this transition, we propose a longer extent of ca. 130 km for the horizontal décollement. This finding suggests a significant variation in the geometry of the MHT takes place over a very short distance (Bhutan.

  5. Utility of a Non-Exercise VO2max Prediction Model for Designing Ramp Test Protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, F A; Midgley, A; Montenegro, R; Vasconcellos, F; Farinatti, P

    2015-10-01

    This study investigated the validity of determining the final work rates of cycling and walking ramp-incremented maximal cardiopulmonary exercise tests (CPETs) using a non-exercise model to predict maximal oxygen uptake VO2max and the American College of Sports Medicine ACSM's metabolic equations. The validity of using this methodology to elicit the recommended test duration of between 8 and 12 min was then evaluated. First, 83 subjects visited the laboratory once to perform a cycling (n=49) or walking (n=34) CPET to investigate the validity of the methodology. Second, 25 subjects (cycling group: n=13; walking group: n=12) performed a CPET on 2 separate days to test the reliability of CPET outcomes. Observed VO2max was 1.0 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1) lower than predicted in the cycling CPET (P=0.001) and 1.4 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1) lower in the walking CPET (P=0.001). Only one of the 133 conducted CPETs was outside the test duration range of 8-12 min. Test-retest reliability was high for all CPET outcomes, with intraclass correlation coefficients of 0.90 to 0.99. In conclusion, the non-exercise model is a valid and reliable method for establishing the final work rate of cycling and walking CPETs for eliciting test durations of between 8 and 12 min. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Effect of growth rate and body mass on resting metabolic rate in galliform chicks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dietz, MW; Drent, RH

    1997-01-01

    In this study, we asked whether within-species variation in chick resting metabolic rate was related to variation in growth and whether this relationship changed during development in three galliform species (turkey, Meleagris gallopavo, guinea fowl, Numida meleagris, and Japanese quail, Coturnix

  7. Tune and Chromaticity Control During Snapback and Ramp in 2015 LHC Operation

    CERN Document Server

    Schaumann, Michaela; Lamont, Mike; Solfaroli Camillocci, Matteo; Todesco, Ezio; Wenninger, Jorg

    2016-01-01

    Because of current redistribution on the superconducting cables, the harmonic components of the magnetic fields of the superconducting magnets in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) show decay during the low field injection plateau. This results in tune and chromaticity variations for the beams. In the first few seconds of the ramp the original hysteresis state of the magnetic field is restored - the field snaps back. These fast dynamic field changes lead to strong tune and chromaticity excursions that, if not properly controlled, induce beam losses and potentially trigger a beam dump. A feed-forward system applies predicted corrections during the injection plateau and to the first part of the ramp to avoid violent changes of beam conditions. This paper discusses the snapback of tune and chromaticity as observed in 2015, as well as the control of beam parameters during the ramp. It also evaluates the quality of the applied feed-forward corrections and their reproducibility.

  8. Improving Wind Ramp Forecasts by the HRRR System via Statistical Postprocessing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worsnop, Rochelle; Scheuerer, Michael; Hamill, Thomas M.

    2017-04-01

    Wind power forecasting is gaining enormous international significance as more and more countries and regions enact policies to increase the use of renewable energy. Wind ramps pose a particular challenge in decision-making processes in the wind energy industry since a sudden decrease or increase in wind energy production must be balanced by conventional power generators and could be costly for wind farm operators. In this study, we assess the performance of the High-Resolution Rapid Refresh (HRRR) numerical weather prediction model in predicting wind ramps with up to 12 hours of lead time at two wind tower locations in the United States. Novel statistical postprocessing methodology is used to generate scenarios of short-term wind power production; this probabilistic enhancement of the deterministic HRRR forecasts significantly improves the skill in predicting wind ramp events, and could be implemented by wind farm operators to support decision-making.

  9. Annealing to optimize the primary drying rate, reduce freezing-induced drying rate heterogeneity, and determine T(g)' in pharmaceutical lyophilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Searles, J A; Carpenter, J F; Randolph, T W

    2001-07-01

    In a companion paper we show that the freezing of samples in vials by shelf-ramp freezing results in significant primary drying rate heterogeneity because of a dependence of the ice crystal size on the nucleation temperature during freezing.1 The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that post-freezing annealing, in which the product is held at a predetermined temperature for a specified duration, can reduce freezing-induced heterogeneity in sublimation rates. In addition, we test the impact of annealing on primary drying rates. Finally, we use the kinetics of relaxations during annealing to provide a simple measurement of T(g)', the glass transition temperature of the maximally freeze-concentrated amorphous phase, under conditions and time scales most appropriate for industrial lyophilization cycles. Aqueous solutions of hydroxyethyl starch (HES), sucrose, and HES:sucrose were either frozen by placement on a shelf while the temperature was reduced ("shelf-ramp frozen") or by immersion into liquid nitrogen. Samples were then annealed for various durations over a range of temperatures and partially lyophilized to determine the primary drying rate. The morphology of fully dried liquid nitrogen-frozen samples was examined using scanning electron microscopy. Annealing reduced primary drying rate heterogeneity for shelf-ramp frozen samples, and resulted in up to 3.5-fold increases in the primary drying rate. These effects were due to increased ice crystal sizes, simplified amorphous structures, and larger and more numerous holes on the cake surface of annealed samples. Annealed HES samples dissolved slightly faster than their unannealed counterparts. Annealing below T(g)' did not result in increased drying rates. We present a simple new annealing-lyophilization method of T(g)' determination that exploits this phenomenon. It can be carried out with a balance and a freeze-dryer, and has the additional advantage that a large number of candidate formulations can

  10. Dryden B-52 Launch Aircraft on Dryden Ramp

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    NASA's venerable B-52 mothership sits on the ramp in front of the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Over the course of more than 40 years, the B-52 launched numerous experimental aircraft, ranging from the X-15 to the X-38, and was also used as a flying testbed for a variety of other research projects. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket

  11. Validation of a Ramp Running Protocol for Determination of the True VO2max in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayachi, Mohamed; Niel, Romain; Momken, Iman; Billat, Véronique L; Mille-Hamard, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    In the field of comparative physiology, it remains to be established whether the concept of VO2max is valid in the mouse and, if so, how this value can be accurately determined. In humans, VO2max is generally considered to correspond to the plateau observed when VO2 no longer rises with an increase in workload. In contrast, the concept of VO2peak tends to be used in murine studies. The objectives of the present study were to determine whether (i) a continuous ramp protocol yielded a higher VO2peak than a stepwise, incremental protocol, and (ii) the VO2peak measured in the ramp protocol corresponded to VO2max. The three protocols (based on intensity-controlled treadmill running until exhaustion with eight female FVB/N mice) were performed in random order: (a) an incremental protocol that begins at 10 m.min(-1) speed and increases by 3 m.min(-1) every 3 min. (b) a ramp protocol with slow acceleration (3 m.min(-2)), and (c) a ramp protocol with fast acceleration (12 m.min(-2)). Each protocol was performed with two slopes (0 and 25°). Hence, each mouse performed six exercise tests. We found that the value of VO2peak was protocol-dependent (p protocol. In the latter, the presence of a VO2max plateau was associated with the fulfillment of two secondary criteria (a blood lactate concentration >8 mmol.l(-1) and a respiratory exchange ratio >1). The total duration of the 3 m.min(-2) 0° ramp protocol was shorter than that of the incremental protocol. Taken as a whole, our results suggest that VO2max in the mouse is best determined by applying a ramp exercise protocol with slow acceleration and no treadmill slope.

  12. Exploring the Effects of Stellar Multiplicity on Exoplanet Occurrence Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barclay, Thomas; Shabram, Megan

    2017-06-01

    Determining the frequency of habitable worlds is a key goal of the Kepler mission. During Kepler's four year investigation it detected thousands of transiting exoplanets with sizes varying from smaller than Mercury to larger than Jupiter. Finding planets was just the first step to determining frequency, and for the past few years the mission team has been modeling the reliability and completeness of the Kepler planet sample. One effect that has not typically been built into occurrence rate statistics is that of stellar multiplicity. If a planet orbits the primary star in a binary or triple star system then the transit depth will be somewhat diluted resulting in a modest underestimation in the planet size. However, if a detected planet orbits a fainter star then the error in measured planet radius can be very significant. We have taken a hypothetical star and planet population and passed that through a Kepler detection model. From this we have derived completeness corrections for a realistic case of a Universe with binary stars and compared that with a model Universe where all stars are single. We report on the impact that binaries have on exoplanet population statistics.

  13. Effects of Transient Perturbations in Physical Erosion Rates on Modeled Chemical Erosion Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrier, K.; West, N.

    2016-12-01

    Chemical erosion of regolith plays a central role in feedbacks between the topographic evolution of hillslopes, the supply of nutrients to soils and streams, and the global carbon cycle. Theory and experiments suggest one of the strongest controls on chemical erosion rates (W) should be physical erosion rates (E), which affects W by removing weathered material from the regolith and modulating rates of fresh mineral supply to the regolith. Measured relationships between W and E vary substantially around the globe, with some sites exhibiting positive relationships between W and E, some exhibiting negative relationships, and others exhibiting no significant trend. Here we use a numerical model for mineralogy in a 1-D regolith column to show that a similarly wide variety of W-E relationships can be generated by transient perturbations in E. The variety of modeled relationships between W and E during transients ultimately results from the lag in modeled changes in W behind imposed changes in E. We show that this lag time increases linearly with a characteristic regolith production time and decreases with a characteristic mineral dissolution time. As a consequence of the lag, a hysteresis develops in plots of W versus E during transients in E, which results in a positive relationship between W and E over some periods of time, a flat relationship at other times, and a negative relationship at other times. This suggests that a variety of relationships between W and E can be generated by a single perturbation in E, even in the absence of changes in other factors that may affect W, such as climate, biota, or lithology. To the extent that this reflects the behavior of chemical erosion rates in nature, these results may aid interpretation of measurements of W and E based on regolith geochemistry or fluxes of fluvial sediment and solutes.

  14. Classification and Surgical Repair of Ramp Lesions of the Medial Meniscus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaunat, Mathieu; Fayard, Jean Marie; Guimaraes, Tales M; Jan, Nicolas; Murphy, Colin G; Sonnery-Cottet, Bertrand

    2016-08-01

    Ramp lesions of the medial meniscus are commonly associated with anterior cruciate ligament ruptures and consist of longitudinal peripheral tears of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus. Given the frequency of partial-thickness tears, they can be difficult to diagnose arthroscopically from the anterior compartment. We describe a classification of the different types of ramp lesions depending on both tear pattern (partial- or full-thickness tear) and associated meniscotibial ligament disruption. An original technique of arthroscopic suture placement through a single posteromedial portal with a 25° curved suture hook device is described.

  15. The determination of shock ramp width using the noncoplanar magnetic field component

    OpenAIRE

    Newbury, J. A.; Russell, C. T.; Gedalin, M.

    1997-01-01

    We determine a simple expression for the ramp width of a collisionless fast shock, based upon the relationship between the noncoplanar and main magnetic field components. By comparing this predicted width with that measured during an observation of a shock, the shock velocity can be determined from a single spacecraft. For a range of low-Mach, low-beta bow shock observations made by the ISEE-1 and -2 spacecraft, ramp widths determined from two-spacecraft comparison and from this noncoplanar c...

  16. Impacts of ramping inflexibility of conventional generators on strategic operation of energy storage facilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nasrolahpour, Ehsan; Kazempour, Jalal; Zareipour, Hamidreza

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes an approach to assist a pricemaker merchant energy storage facility in making its optimal operation decisions. The facility operates in a pool-based electricity market, where the ramping capability of other resources is limited. Also, wind power resources exist in the system....... The merchant facility seeks to maximize its profit through strategic inter-temporal arbitrage decisions, when taking advantage of those ramp limitations. The market operator, on the other hand, aims at maximizing the social welfare under wind power generation uncertainty. Thus, a stochastic bi...

  17. Simulation of profile evolution from ramp-up to ramp-down and optimization of tokamak plasma termination with the RAPTOR code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teplukhina, A. A.; Sauter, O.; Felici, F.; Merle, A.; Kim, D.; the TCV Team; the ASDEX Upgrade Team; the EUROfusion MST1 Team

    2017-12-01

    The present work demonstrates the capabilities of the transport code RAPTOR as a fast and reliable simulator of plasma profiles for the entire plasma discharge, i.e. from ramp-up to ramp-down. This code focuses, at this stage, on the simulation of electron temperature and poloidal flux profiles using prescribed equilibrium and some kinetic profiles. In this work we extend the RAPTOR transport model to include a time-varying plasma equilibrium geometry and verify the changes via comparison with ATSRA code simulations. In addition a new ad hoc transport model based on constant gradients and suitable for simulations of L–H and H–L mode transitions has been incorporated into the RAPTOR code and validated with rapid simulations of the time evolution of the safety factor and the electron temperature over the entire AUG and TCV discharges. An optimization procedure for the plasma termination phase has also been developed during this work. We define the goal of the optimization as ramping down the plasma current as fast as possible while avoiding any disruptions caused by reaching physical or technical limits. Our numerical study of this problem shows that a fast decrease of plasma elongation during current ramp-down can help in reducing plasma internal inductance. An early transition from H- to L-mode allows us to reduce the drop in poloidal beta, which is also important for plasma MHD stability and control. This work shows how these complex nonlinear interactions can be optimized automatically using relevant cost functions and constraints. Preliminary experimental results for TCV are demonstrated.

  18. Variations in the effect of incarceration on community gonorrhea rates

    OpenAIRE

    Porter, Kimberly A.; Thomas, James C.; Emch, Michael E

    2009-01-01

    High community incarceration rates have been shown to be associated with high rates of HIV and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). Proposed mechanisms underlying this association include transmission by recently released inmates and community disruption through a skewed sex ratio or changes in sexual networks resulting from the absence of individuals removed by incarceration. To continue exploring the relationship between incarceration and STDs, we studied the 2006 rates of gonorrhea at the...

  19. NCAA Academic Non-Qualifiers: Factors Effecting Graduation Rates

    OpenAIRE

    Chadron Hazelbaker

    2015-01-01

    This study examined NCAA Division I men’s basketball initial academic non-qualifiers, their low graduation rate, and variables that increase these rates. While graduation rates and overall academic success of Division I student-athletes has, in fact, improved over the past 25 years (National Collegiate Athletic Association, 2009e), there is still much room for growth. Academic support systems as well as a coaching staff’s perceived communicated importance of academics appears to play a role i...

  20. Effect of different rates and methods of benomyl and mancozeb ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Field assessment of different rates and methods of three fungicide applications on delay in senescence (DS) and grain yield of cowpea during the early and late cropping season of 1999 respectively was conducted. The benomyl treatment applied via the combination of seed and foliar methods at the highest rate of 0.75 + ...

  1. effect of ambient temperature on farrowing rate in pigs

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    tion, but invariably result in early embryo death. Lllberg. & Burfening(1967) reported that ewes subjected to high air temperature at about the time of mating will have a reduced reproducrive rate because of an increased embryonic death rate. Salisbury & Flerchinger (1961) reported early foetal mortailty in cattle inseminated.

  2. Effect of nitrogen application, seeding rate and defoliation height on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The interaction between Trifolium vesiculosum cv Amclo and Lolium multiflorum cv Midmar was measured in a field trial, in terms of dry matter production, crude protein content and crude protein production. The treatments included in the field trials were five different seeding rates of the grass component, four rates of ...

  3. The appearance of erythrocyte membrane elevations Effects of cooling rates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goekoop, J.G.; Spies, F.; Wisse, D.M.; Vries, E. de; Verkleij, A.J.; Kempen, G.M.J. van

    Low cooling rates during the freezing procedure of normal human blood reveals red cell membrane elevations in freeze-etch electron microscopy. When high cooling rate is applied, these morphological changes are present, if the blood samples are quenched from 5 °C. The number of elevations is

  4. Effects of interest and exchange rate policies on Brazilian exports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Maria Sonaglio

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In heterodox literature, the industrial sector is considered strategic for economic development. Consequently, reducing the contribution of this sector in the production of the country before it has reached the stage of economic maturity, affects the productive dynamics and slow technical progress. The appreciation of the real exchange rate is seen as one of the factors responsible for the reduction of the external competitiveness of Brazilian manufactures, and this exchange rate valuation may be occurring due to the differences between domestic and international interest rates. Given this context, the aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of changes in the monetary and exchange rate policy and in the composition of the total exports on the performance of the Brazilian economy using a structuralist model. The results reinforce the importance of the manufacturing sector to economic growth, especially in a competitive exchange rate environment.

  5. The Effects of Credibility on Interest Rates in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kadir DOĞAN

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Credibility is crucial for managing inflation expectations in countries adopting inflation targeting. This study focuses on measurement of credibility and its relation with the interest rates. It aims to determine which measures of credibility best predict the variations of interest rates by using monthly data from Turkey in 2004−2012 period which adopted infla#on targe#ng in 2002. Nine credibility indices are considered in the analysis. We find empirical evidence supporting the claim that higher credibility will lead to lower variations in interest rates of both monetary policy and the market. We also demonstrated that CICK (proposed by Cecchetti and Krause, 2002 is the best credibility index in explaining the variations in both monetary policy interest rate and market interest rate.

  6. Effect of hyperglycemia on mortality rates in critically ill children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seongkuk Kim

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : To verify the effect of hyperglycemia on mortality rates in critically ill children and to identify the blood glucose level that influences prognosis. Methods : From July 2006 to June 2008, a total of 206 patients who were admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU at Asan Medical Center and who survived for more than 7 days were retrospectively reviewed. We analyzed the maximum glucose value within 7 days in PICU, PRISM-III score and SOFA score within 24 hours, and mortality. We did not perform an adjustment analysis of drugs affecting glucose level. Results : The maximum glucose level within 7 days in PICU was higher in the nonsurvival group than in the survival group. Using 4 cutoff values (125, 150, 175, and 200 mg/dL, the mortality of patients with hyperglycemia was found to be 13.0 %, 14.4%, 19.8%, and 21.1%, respectively, and the cutoff values of 175 and 200 mg/dL revealed significant differences in mortalities between the hyperglycemic and normoglycemic groups. The PRISM-III score was not significantly different between the hyperglycemic and normoglycemic groups under a glucose cutoff value of 175 mg/dL, but the SOFA score was higher in the hyperglycemic group. Under a glucose cutoff value of 200 mg/dL, the PRISM-III score was higher in the hyperglycemic group, and the SOFA score did not differ between the 2 groups. Conclusion : Hyperglycemia with a maximal glucose value ?#241;75 mg/dL during the first 7 days after PICU admission was associated with increased mortality in critically ill children.

  7. Effects of caffeine on session ratings of perceived exertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killen, L G; Green, J M; O'Neal, E K; McIntosh, J R; Hornsby, J; Coates, T E

    2013-03-01

    This study examined effects of caffeine on session ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) following 30 min constant-load cycling. Individuals (n = 15) of varying aerobic fitness completed a [Formula: see text] max trial and two 30 min cycling bouts (double-blind, counterbalanced) following ingestion of 6 mL/kg of caffeine or matched placebo. RPE overall, legs and breathing were estimated every 5 min and session RPE was estimated 30 min post-exercise using the OMNI pictorial scale. Session RPE for caffeine and placebo trails were compared using paired t test. Between-trial comparisons of HR, RPE overall, RPE legs and RPE breathing were analyzed using an independent 2 (trial) × 6 (time point) repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) for each dependent variable. Caffeine resulted in a significantly lower session RPE (p < 0.05) for caffeine (6.1 ± 2.2) versus placebo (6.8 ± 2.1). Acute perceptual responses were significantly lower for caffeine for RPE overall (15, 20, 25, and 30 min), RPE breathing (15, 20, 25, and 30 min) and RPE legs (20 and 30 min). Survey responses post-exercise revealed greater feelings of nervousness, tremors, restlessness and stomach distress following caffeine versus placebo. Blunted acute RPE and survey responses suggest participants responded to caffeine ingestion. Caffeine decreased acute RPE during exercise which could partially account for lower session RPE responses. However, decreased session RPE could also reveal a latent analgesic affect of caffeine extending into recovery. Extending the understanding of session RPE could benefit coaches in avoiding overtraining when adjusting training programs.

  8. The effect of midwifery care on rates of cesarean delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawton, Beverley A; Koch, Abby; Stanley, James; Geller, Stacie E

    2013-12-01

    To examine whether changing to a midwifery-led maternity service model was associated with a lower national rate of cesarean delivery. We analyzed trends in the rate of cesarean delivery per 1000 live births between 1996 and 2010 in New Zealand. Estimates of relative increases in rate were calculated via Poisson regression for several maternal age groups over the study period. Rates of cesarean delivery increased over the study period, from 156.9 per 1000 live births in 1996 to 235 per 1000 in 2010: a crude increase of 49.8%. Increasing trends were apparent in each age group, with the largest increases occurring before 2003 and relatively stable rates in the subsequent period. The smoothed estimate showed that the increase in cesarean rate across all age groups was 43.7% (95% confidence interval, 41.6-45.8) over the 15-year period. A national midwifery-led care model was not associated with a decreased rate of cesarean delivery but, instead, with an increase similar to that in other high-resource countries. This indicates that other factors may account for the increase. Further research is needed to examine maternity outcomes associated with different models of maternity care. © 2013.

  9. The role of pre-existing thrust ramps on the evolution of a differently oriented thrust systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonini, Lorenzo; Pini, Gian Andrea; Ponton, Maurizio; Del Ben, Anna

    2017-04-01

    In the accretionary wedges, as well as in fold-and-thrust belts, shortening is mostly accommodated by fault-related folding. This kind of structures are sensitive both to internal factors such as the mechanical characteristics of the rocks involved in contractional processes, and to external ones such as erosion or syn-kinematics sedimentation. Notwithstanding such diversity, the resulting geometries are commonly composed by faults with flat and ramp trajectory and their related folds. The above mentioned factors may directly affect both the geometry and the kinematics of a fault-related folding, for instance, the location, the number, and the frictional properties of weak horizons lead the location and the extent of the flat portion of the thrust systems. The mechanical properties of the rocks involved in the contractional phase impacts on the location and geometry of the thrust ramp. Thus, the stratigraphic and tectonic architecture of an area is central to predict or study the evolution of a contractional system. Among different factors, we select to test the role of pre-existing thrust ramp on the subsequent evolution on differently oriented thrust ramp. As a method we use analogue modeling and as an analogue material we use wet clay (kaolin). We reproduce different setups varying the initial orientation of the pre-existing thrust ramp with respect to the new ramp that we force to nucleate in the same region of the experiment box. The tested angles vary from 0°, i.e. the two ramps are parallel, to 90°, i.e. the two ramps are perpendicular. Our results show that the angle between the two systems directly impact on the degree of development of new ramps. When the angle between new and pre-existing thrust ramps is low, e.g. <30°, the reactivation of the pre-existing ramp prevail on the development of a new ramp. Conversely, high angles promote the development of new thrust ramps optimally oriented with respect to the imposed stress field. Our results are

  10. Perseus B Parked on Ramp - View from Above

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    A long, slender wing and a pusher propeller at the rear characterize the Perseus B remotely piloted aircraft, seen here on the ramp of NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center in September 1999. Perseus B is a remotely piloted aircraft developed as a design-performance testbed under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. Perseus is one of several flight vehicles involved in the ERAST project. A piston engine, propeller-powered aircraft, Perseus was designed and built by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation, Manassas, Virginia. The objectives of Perseus B's ERAST flight tests have been to reach and maintain horizontal flight above altitudes of 60,000 feet and demonstrate the capability to fly missions lasting from 8 to 24 hours, depending on payload and altitude requirements. The Perseus B aircraft established an unofficial altitude record for a single-engine, propeller-driven, remotely piloted aircraft on June 27, 1998. It reached an altitude of 60,280 feet. In 1999, several modifications were made to the Perseus aircraft including engine, avionics, and flight-control-system improvements. These improvements were evaluated in a series of operational readiness and test missions at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Perseus is a high-wing monoplane with a conventional tail design. Its narrow, straight, high-aspect-ratio wing is mounted atop the fuselage. The aircraft is pusher-designed with the propeller mounted in the rear. This design allows for interchangeable scientific-instrument payloads to be placed in the forward fuselage. The design also allows for unobstructed airflow to the sensors and other devices mounted in the payload compartment. The Perseus B that underwent test and development in 1999 was the third generation of the Perseus design, which began with the Perseus Proof-Of-Concept aircraft. Perseus was initially developed as part of NASA's Small High-Altitude Science Aircraft (SHASA) program, which

  11. EFFECT OF COOLING RATES ON THE MICROSTRUCTURE AND ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    B eutectic prepared under various cooling rates had been investigated using differential thermal analysis (DTA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It was observed that for ...

  12. The effect of real exchange rate on unemployment

    OpenAIRE

    Zahra Bakhshi; Mehrzad Ebrahimi

    2016-01-01

    Unemployment is one of the problems that global economics, especially the economy of developing countries such as Iran is faced with. Therefore, there have been many studies to investigate the variables which affect unemployment in macroeconomics. Considering exchange rate volatility in recent years which have affected most of major variables of economy in Iran, this study tried to investigate the relationship between exchange rate and unemployment in Iran using the annual data of 30 years (f...

  13. The Effect of Syllable Repetition Rate on Vocal Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topbas, Oya; Orlikoff, Robert F.; St. Louis, Kenneth O.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined whether mean vocal fundamental frequency ("F"[subscript 0]) or speech sound pressure level (SPL) varies with changes in syllable repetition rate. Twenty-four young adults (12 M and 12 F) repeated the syllables/p[inverted v]/,/p[inverted v]t[schwa]/, and/p[inverted v]t[schwa]k[schwa]/at a modeled "slow" rate of approximately one…

  14. The Effects of Trade Openness on Malaysian Exchange Rate

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Chin; Law, Chee-Hong

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the impact of trade openness on Malaysian exchange rate. The findings show that most of the variables are statistically significant and carried the expected signs. As predicted by the theory, the rise of the income level and stock market index in Malaysia will lead to the appreciation of domestic currency. On the other hand, the increase in trade openness and interest rate can lead to depreciation of Malaysian Ringgit. In addition, the results suggested that a rise in ...

  15. The effect of net foreign assets on saving rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben David Nissim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Observing empirical data we find that many countries try to delay the decision of increasing saving rate in order to avoid a decrease of the living standards. However the delay leads a deterioration of countries financial stability. We present a simple theoretical model that connects between countries' saving rate and their net foreign assets. Using cross section data set of 135 countries in 2010 we estimated the econometric relation between saving rate in 2010 as dependent variable and two explanatory variables: the current account in 2010 and the aggregated current account during 1980-2010. Our findings show that industrial countries in a bad financial state tend to decrease their saving rate as external debt is larger causing to deterioration in external debt while countries with good financial state tend to increase their saving rate and the tendency increase as financial state becomes better. Only in countries with a very large external debt saving rate tends to grow. The results point that gross foreign debt will keep increasing and will worsen world financial state causing increased risk of getting into a world crisis.

  16. Ascending-ramp biphasic waveform has a lower defibrillation threshold and releases less troponin I than a truncated exponential biphasic waveform

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Huang, Jian; Walcott, Gregory P; Ruse, Richard B; Bohanan, Scott J; Killingsworth, Cheryl R; Ideker, Raymond E

    2012-01-01

    .... Defibrillation thresholds were determined for 11 waveforms-3 ascending-ramp waveforms, 3 descending-ramp waveforms, 3 rectilinear first-phase biphasic waveforms, a Gurvich waveform, and a truncated...

  17. Optimizing density down-ramp injection for beam-driven plasma wakefield accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Martinez de la Ossa

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Density down-ramp (DDR injection is a promising concept in beam-driven plasma wakefield accelerators for the generation of high-quality witness beams. We review and complement the theoretical principles of the method and employ particle-in-cell (PIC simulations in order to determine constrains on the geometry of the density ramp and the current of the drive beam, regarding the applicability of DDR injection. Furthermore, PIC simulations are utilized to find optimized conditions for the production of high-quality beams. We find and explain the intriguing result that the injection of an increased charge by means of a steepened ramp favors the generation of beams with lower emittance. Exploiting this fact enables the production of beams with high charge (∼140  pC, low normalized emittance (∼200  nm and low uncorrelated energy spread (0.3% in sufficiently steep ramps even for drive beams with moderate peak current (∼2.5  kA.

  18. Power-Capacity and Ramp-Capability Reserves for Wind Integration in Power-Based UC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morales Espana, G.; Baldick, Ross; García-González, Javier; Ramos, Andres

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a power-based network-constrained unit commitment (UC) model as an alternative to the traditional deterministic UCs to deal with wind generation uncertainty. The formulation draws a clear distinction between power-capacity and ramp-capability reserves to deal with wind production

  19. Probabilistic Wind Power Ramp Forecasting Based on a Scenario Generation Method: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Qin [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Florita, Anthony R [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Krishnan, Venkat K [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Hodge, Brian S [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Cui, Mingjian [Univ. of Texas-Dallas, Richardson, TX (United States); Feng, Cong [Univ. of Texas-Dallas, Richardson, TX (United States); Wang, Zhenke [Univ. of Texas-Dallas, Richardson, TX (United States); Zhang, Jie [Univ. of Texas-Dallas, Richardson, TX (United States)

    2017-08-31

    Wind power ramps (WPRs) are particularly important in the management and dispatch of wind power, and they are currently drawing the attention of balancing authorities. With the aim to reduce the impact of WPRs for power system operations, this paper develops a probabilistic ramp forecasting method based on a large number of simulated scenarios. An ensemble machine learning technique is first adopted to forecast the basic wind power forecasting scenario and calculate the historical forecasting errors. A continuous Gaussian mixture model (GMM) is used to fit the probability distribution function (PDF) of forecasting errors. The cumulative distribution function (CDF) is analytically deduced. The inverse transform method based on Monte Carlo sampling and the CDF is used to generate a massive number of forecasting error scenarios. An optimized swinging door algorithm is adopted to extract all the WPRs from the complete set of wind power forecasting scenarios. The probabilistic forecasting results of ramp duration and start time are generated based on all scenarios. Numerical simulations on publicly available wind power data show that within a predefined tolerance level, the developed probabilistic wind power ramp forecasting method is able to predict WPRs with a high level of sharpness and accuracy.

  20. Key Performance Indicators for the Impact of Cognitive Assembly Planning on Ramp-Up Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Buescher

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Within the ramp-up phase of highly automated assembly systems, the planning effort forms a large part of production costs. Due to shortening product lifecycles, changing customer demands, and therefore an increasing number of ramp-up processes, these costs even rise. So assembly systems should reduce these efforts and simultaneously be flexible for quick adaption to changes in products and their variants. A cognitive interaction system in the field of assembly planning systems is developed within the Cluster of Excellence “Integrative production technology for high-wage countries” at RWTH Aachen University which integrates several cognitive capabilities according to human cognition. This approach combines the advantages of automation with the flexibility of humans. In this paper the main principles of the system's core component—the cognitive control unit—are presented to underline its advantages with respect to traditional assembly systems. Based on this, the actual innovation of this paper is the development of key performance indicators. These refer to the ramp-up process as a main objective of such a system is to minimize the planning effort during ramp-up. The KPIs are also designed to show the impact on the main idea of the Cluster of Excellence in resolving the so-called Polylemma of Production.

  1. A RAMP marker linked to the tobacco black shank resistant gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bulk segregant analysis (BSA) and randomly amplified microsatellite polymorphism (RAMP) were employed to analyze F2 individuals of the Yunyan 317×Hubei 517 to screen and characterize molecular markers linked to black shank resistant gene. A total of 800 arbitrary decamer oligonucleotide primerpairs were used for ...

  2. Recruitment maneuver: RAMP versus CPAP pressure profile in a model of acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, D R; Contador, R S; Baez-Garcia, C S N; Xisto, D G; Cagido, V R; Martini, S V; Morales, M M; Rocco, P R M; Faffe, D S; Zin, W A

    2009-10-31

    We examined whether recruitment maneuvers (RMs) with gradual increase in airway pressure (RAMP) provide better outcome than continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in paraquat-induced acute lung injury (ALI). Wistar rats received saline intraperitoneally (0.5 mL, CTRL) or paraquat (15 mg/kg, ALI). Twenty-four hours later lung mechanics [static elastance, viscoelastic component of elastance, resistive, viscoelastic and total pressures] were determined before and after recruitment with 40cmH2O CPAP for 40s or 40-s-long slow increase in pressure up to 40cmH2O (RAMP) followed by 0 or 5 cmH2O PEEP. Fractional area of alveolar collapse and PCIII mRNA were determined. All mechanical parameters and the fraction area of alveolar collapse were higher in ALI compared to CTRL. Only RAMP-PEEP maneuver significantly improved lung mechanics and decreased PCIII mRNA expression (53%) compared with ALI, while both RMs followed by PEEP decreased alveolar collapse. In conclusion, in the present experimental ALI model, RAMP followed by 5cm H2O PEEP yields a better outcome.

  3. Y-Ba-Cu-O/Au/Nb ramp-type Josephson junctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smilde, H.J.H.; Hilgenkamp, Johannes W.M.; Gerritsma, G.J.; Blank, David H.A.; Rogalla, Horst

    2001-01-01

    Ramp-type junctions connecting the d-wave superconductor YBazCu307.s and the s-wave superconductor niobium are fabricated using a thin gold layer as a chemical barrier. High critical current densities exceeding 5 kA/cm2 are obtained. The normal state resistivity (R,& values of the junctions are of

  4. Modeling ramp compression experiments using large-scale molecular dynamics simulation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattsson, Thomas Kjell Rene; Desjarlais, Michael Paul; Grest, Gary Stephen; Templeton, Jeremy Alan; Thompson, Aidan Patrick; Jones, Reese E.; Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Baskes, Michael I. (University of California, San Diego); Winey, J. Michael (Washington State University); Gupta, Yogendra Mohan (Washington State University); Lane, J. Matthew D.; Ditmire, Todd (University of Texas at Austin); Quevedo, Hernan J. (University of Texas at Austin)

    2011-10-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation (MD) is an invaluable tool for studying problems sensitive to atomscale physics such as structural transitions, discontinuous interfaces, non-equilibrium dynamics, and elastic-plastic deformation. In order to apply this method to modeling of ramp-compression experiments, several challenges must be overcome: accuracy of interatomic potentials, length- and time-scales, and extraction of continuum quantities. We have completed a 3 year LDRD project with the goal of developing molecular dynamics simulation capabilities for modeling the response of materials to ramp compression. The techniques we have developed fall in to three categories (i) molecular dynamics methods (ii) interatomic potentials (iii) calculation of continuum variables. Highlights include the development of an accurate interatomic potential describing shock-melting of Beryllium, a scaling technique for modeling slow ramp compression experiments using fast ramp MD simulations, and a technique for extracting plastic strain from MD simulations. All of these methods have been implemented in Sandia's LAMMPS MD code, ensuring their widespread availability to dynamic materials research at Sandia and elsewhere.

  5. Phase-ramp reduction in interseismic interferograms from pixel-offsets

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Teng

    2014-05-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) is increasingly used to measure interseismic deformation. Inaccurate satellite-orbit information, expressed as phase ramps across interseismic interferograms, is believed to be one of the main sources of error in such measurements. However, many interferograms exhibit higher phase gradients than expected from the reported orbital accuracy, suggesting that there are other error sources. Here, we show that interferogram phase ramps are in part caused by uncorrected satellite timing-parameter errors. We propose a two-step approach to reduce the phase ramps using pixel-offsets estimated between SAR amplitude images. The first step involves using a digital elevation model (DEM) to estimate absolute timing-parameter errors for the reference image of the SAR dataset and the second step updates the timing parameters of the master image for each interferogram. We demonstrate a clear ramp reduction on interseismic interferograms covering the North Anatolian Fault in eastern Turkey. The resulting interferograms show clear signs of interseismic deformation even before stacking. © 2014 IEEE.

  6. The steep ramp test in healthy children and adolescents: reliability and validity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongers, B.C.; Vries, S.I. de; Helders, P.J.M.; Takken, T.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study aimed to examine the reliability and validity of the steep ramp test (SRT), a feasible, maximal exercise test on a cycle ergometer that does not require the use of respiratory gas analysis, in healthy children and adolescents.METHODS: Seventy-five children were randomly divided

  7. Dynamic Turbulence Evolution during current ramp in ITER-like plasmas on DIII-D

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, G. R.; Yan, Z.; Holland, C.; Bravenec, R.; Luce, T.

    2016-10-01

    Low-wavenumber density fluctuations exhibit rapidly changing characteristics during the current ramp-up of ITER-like discharges that reflect a complex interaction between electron transport, safety factor (q), and ne and Te profiles. These measurements and analysis may help explain discrepancies between transport models and measurements during ramp-up. Measurements of the 2D fluctuation properties are obtained across the outer half-radius with Beam Emission Spectroscopy. Density fluctuations at rho=0.55 exhibit fluctuations that decrease in amplitude with time. Transient windows of suppressed fluctuations are observed during ramp-up, which correspond to low-order-rational q-surfaces that are associated with localized improved transport. At rho=0.82, a large amplitude burst of low-frequency turbulence occurs early in the current ramp. The amplitude profile of low-k fluctuations exhibits a strong reduction in turbulence with reduced q95; thermal energy confinement likewise increases with decreasing q95. Supported by US Department of Energy under DE-FG02-08ER54999.

  8. Combined Ramp and Squeeze to 6.5 TeV in the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Solfaroli Camillocci, Matteo; Tomás, Rogelio; Wenninger, Jorg

    2016-01-01

    The cycle of the LHC is composed of an energy ramp followed by a betatron squeeze, needed to reduce the beta- star value in the interaction points. Since Run 1, studies have been carried out to investigate the feasibility of combining the two operations, thus considerably reducing the duration of the operational cycle. In Run 2, the LHC is operating at the energy of 6.5 TeV that requires a much longer cycle than that of Run 1. Therefore, the performance gains from a Combined Ramp and Squeeze (CRS) is more interesting. Merging the energy ramp and the betatron squeeze could result in a gain of several minutes for each LHC cycle. With increasing maturity of LHC operation, it is now possible to envisage more complex beam manipulations; this paper describes the first machine experiment with beam, aiming at validating the combination of ramp and squeeze, which was performed in 2015, during a machine development phase. The operation experience with the LHC run at 2.51 TeV, when CRS down to 4 meters was deployed and ...

  9. A Possible Alternative Exercise Test for Youths with Cystic Fibrosis : The Steep Ramp Test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongers, Bart C.; Werkman, Maarten S.; Arets, H. G. M.; Takken, Tim; Hulzebos, H. J.

    Purpose: The steep ramp test (SRT) can be used to provide an indication of exercise capacity when gas exchange measurements are not possible. This study evaluated the clinical usefulness of the SRT in adolescents with cystic fibrosis (CF) and compared the physiological responses of the SRT with the

  10. The adverse effect of real effective exchange rate change on trade balance in European transition countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selena Begović

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Most European transition countries have fixed or highly managed flexible exchange rate regimes. This exchange rate rigidity is sometimes argued to worsen the trade balance by keeping the currency overvalued. However, there is no unambiguous evidence that currency depreciation/devaluation positively affects trade balance and leads towards the adjustment, even in the short-run. Therefore, we examine the effect of real effective exchange rate (hereafter REER on trade balance in European transition economies over the period 2000-2015. By using fixed effect model for static and generalised method of moments for dynamic estimation, we find that there is an adverse effect of the REER on trade balance in European transition countries over the period 2000-2015. Namely, depreciation of REER deteriorates trade balance in European transition countries, which could be explained by high import dependence and low export capacity. This implies that policymakers in European transition countries should not use exchange rate policy to improve trade balance. This is important in the light of their accession towards European economic and monetary integration, implying that these countries should focus more on using fiscal, rather than monetary (and exchange rate, policy to adjust trade balance, which is one of the required real convergence towards the EU standards.

  11. The moderating effect of stimulus attractiveness on the effect of alcohol consumption on attractiveness ratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiong; Wang, Xiaoyu; Yang, Dong; Chen, Youguo

    2014-01-01

    To explore the enhancing effect of alcohol consumption on attractiveness ratings, in that few studies on the Beer Goggles effect control the stimuli attractiveness level and researchers have seldom considered extending the effect to stimuli other than faces. Male and female participants (n = 103) were randomly assigned to alcohol consumption or placebo groups. Both groups were asked to assess the attractiveness of two types of pictures (faces and landscapes) with three levels of attractiveness for each stimulus category (high, moderate and low). We found significant interactions between beverage type and attractiveness level. Attractiveness ratings for moderate- and low-attractiveness faces were significantly higher in the alcohol compared with placebo condition, while there was no significant difference for high-attractiveness stimuli between these two conditions. As for landscapes, only low-attractiveness stimuli were rated significantly higher in the alcohol condition. Whether or not alcohol consumption leads to an increase in attractiveness ratings depends on the initial attractiveness of the stimulus materials. Alcohol consumption tends to affect ratings for stimuli with relatively low attractiveness. Furthermore, this effect is not limited to faces; it extends to other types of stimuli like landscapes. © The Author 2014. Medical Council on Alcohol and Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  12. The physical phenomena associated with stator winding insulation condition as detected by the ramped direct high-voltage method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rux, Lorelynn Mary

    Deregulation of the electric utility industry has increased the need to monitor the state of powerplant equipment, such as critical generators and motors, to improve availability and reduce life cycle costs via condition-based maintenance. To achieve these goals, nondestructive condition assessment and diagnostic tests are necessary to evaluate the quality and condition of a machine's stator winding insulation system. Periodic tests are generally conducted to monitor insulation aging, diagnose problems, or provide some assurance that the winding has a minimum level of electrical strength. The basic principles of insulation testing are presented herein, and the physical mechanisms that affect the current versus voltage response are described. A stator winding insulation model was developed based on this theoretical foundation for use in understanding and analyzing the macroscopic behavior of complex insulation phenomena. A comprehensive, controlled laboratory experiment was conducted on a set of stator coils that were deliberately manufactured with and without insulation defects. Specific defects were chosen to represent the types of insulation problems typically encountered during manufacture or as a result of in-service aging, and included lack of resin cure, loosely-applied insulating tapes, internal conductive contamination, reduced density of the groundwall insulation, and thermal cycling damage. Results are presented from a series of electrical tests conducted on the coil specimens to compare the effectiveness of various test methods in detecting the different insulation problems. The tests included insulation resistance, polarization index, ramped direct voltage, dissipation factor, dielectric spectroscopy, partial discharge, and recovery voltage measurements. Dielectric principles and testing experience obtained during this investigation were applied to a collection of test results obtained by the author from in-service machines during the past ten years

  13. The measured effect of delay in completing operative performance ratings on clarity and detail of ratings assigned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Reed G; Chen, Xiaodong Phoenix; Sanfey, Hilary; Markwell, Stephen J; Mellinger, John D; Dunnington, Gary L

    2014-01-01

    Operative performance ratings (OPRs) need adequate clarity and detail to support self-directed learning and valid progress decisions. This study was designed to determine (1) the elapsed time between observing operative performances and completing performance ratings under field conditions and (2) the effect of increased elapsed time on rating clarity and detail. Overall, 895 OPRs by 19 faculty members for 37 general surgery residents were the focus of this study. The elapsed time between observing the performance and completing the evaluation was recorded. No-delay comparison data included 45 additional ratings of 8 performances collected under controlled conditions immediately following the performance by 17 surgeons whose sole responsibility was to observe and rate the performances. Item-to-item OPR variation and the presence and nature of comments were indicators of evaluation clarity, detail, and quality. Elapsed time between observing and evaluating performances under field conditions were as follows: 1 day or less, 116 performances (13%); 2 to 3 days, 178 performances (20%); 4 to 14 days, 377 performances (42%); and more than 14 days, 224 performances (25%). Overall, 87% of performances rated more than 14 days after observation had no item-to-item ratings variation compared with 62% rated with a delay of 4 to 14 days, 41% rated with a delay of 2 to 3 days, 42% rated within 1 day, and 2% rated immediately. In addition, 70% of ratings completed more than 14 days after observation had no written comments, compared with 49% for those completed with a delay of 4 to 14 days, 45% for those completed in 2 to 3 days, and 46% for those completed within 1 day. Moreover, 47% of comments submitted after more than 14 days were exclusively global comments (less instructionally useful) compared with 7% for those completed with a delay of 4 to 14 days and 5% for those completed in 1 to 3 days. The elapsed time between observation and rating of operative performances should

  14. Loading rate effect on the fracture behaviour of highstrength concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Del Viso J.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This research deals with the sensitivity of eight types of performancedesigned high-strength concrete to the loading rate. Variations in the composition of the concrete produce the desired performance, for instance having null shrinkage or being able to be pumped at elevated heights without segregation, but they also produce variations in the fracture properties that are reported in this paper. We performed tests at five loading rates spanning six orders of magnitude in the displacement rate, from 1.74 × 10-5 mm/s to 17.4 mm/s. Load-displacement curves show that their peak is higher as the displacement rate increases, whereas the corresponding displacement is almost constant. Fracture energy also increases, but only for loading rates higher than 0.01 mm/s. We use a formula based on a cohesive law with a viscous term to study the results. The correlation of the formula to the experimental results is good and it allows us to obtain the theoretical value for the fracture energy under strictly static conditions. In addition, both the fracture energy and the characteristic length of the concretes used in the study diminish as the compressive strength of their aggregates increases.

  15. Mixed Linear/Square-Root Encoded Single Slope Ramp Provides a Fast, Low Noise Analog to Digital Converter with Very High Linearity for Focal Plane Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrigley, Christopher James (Inventor); Hancock, Bruce R. (Inventor); Newton, Kenneth W. (Inventor); Cunningham, Thomas J. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An analog-to-digital converter (ADC) converts pixel voltages from a CMOS image into a digital output. A voltage ramp generator generates a voltage ramp that has a linear first portion and a non-linear second portion. A digital output generator generates a digital output based on the voltage ramp, the pixel voltages, and comparator output from an array of comparators that compare the voltage ramp to the pixel voltages. A return lookup table linearizes the digital output values.

  16. Effect of Smoking on Blood Pressure and Resting Heart Rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linneberg, Allan; Jacobsen, Rikke K; Skaaby, Tea

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: -Smoking is an important cardiovascular disease risk factor, but the mechanisms linking smoking to blood pressure are poorly understood. METHODS AND RESULTS: -Data on 141,317 participants (62,666 never, 40,669 former, 37,982 current smokers) from 23 population-based studies were...... included in observational and Mendelian randomisation (MR) meta-analyses of the associations of smoking status and smoking heaviness with systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP, DBP), hypertension, and resting heart rate. For the MR analyses, a genetic variant rs16969968/rs1051730 was used as a proxy...... association of smoking heaviness with higher level of resting heart rate, but not with blood pressure. These findings suggest that part of the cardiovascular risk of smoking may operate through increasing resting heart rate....

  17. Effect of water activity on rates of serpentinization of olivine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamadrid, Hector M.; Rimstidt, J. Donald; Schwarzenbach, Esther M.; Klein, Frieder; Ulrich, Sarah; Dolocan, Andrei; Bodnar, Robert J.

    2017-07-01

    The hydrothermal alteration of mantle rocks (referred to as serpentinization) occurs in submarine environments extending from mid-ocean ridges to subduction zones. Serpentinization affects the physical and chemical properties of oceanic lithosphere, represents one of the major mechanisms driving mass exchange between the mantle and the Earth's surface, and is central to current origin of life hypotheses as well as the search for microbial life on the icy moons of Jupiter and Saturn. In spite of increasing interest in the serpentinization process by researchers in diverse fields, the rates of serpentinization and the controlling factors are poorly understood. Here we use a novel in situ experimental method involving olivine micro-reactors and show that the rate of serpentinization is strongly controlled by the salinity (water activity) of the reacting fluid and demonstrate that the rate of serpentinization of olivine slows down as salinity increases and H2O activity decreases.

  18. Effect of Hydrodynamic Interactions on Reaction Rates in Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppenheimer, Naomi; Stone, Howard A

    2017-07-25

    The Brownian motion of two particles in three dimensions serves as a model for predicting the diffusion-limited reaction rate, as first discussed by von Smoluchowski. Deutch and Felderhof extended the calculation to account for hydrodynamic interactions between the particles and the target, which results in a reduction of the rate coefficient by about half. Many chemical reactions take place in quasi-two-dimensional systems, such as on the membrane or surface of a cell. We perform a Smoluchowski-like calculation in a quasi-two-dimensional geometry, i.e., a membrane surrounded by fluid, and account for hydrodynamic interactions between the particles. We show that rate coefficients are reduced relative to the case of no interactions. The reduction is more pronounced than the three-dimensional case due to the long-range nature of two-dimensional flows. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of aerobic exercise training on heart rate variability during wakefulness and sleep and cardiorespiratory responses of young and middle-aged healthy men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Catai

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effects of aerobic physical training (APT on heart rate variability (HRV and cardiorespiratory responses at peak condition and ventilatory anaerobic threshold. Ten young (Y: median = 21 years and seven middle-aged (MA = 53 years healthy sedentary men were studied. Dynamic exercise tests were performed on a cycloergometer using a continuous ramp protocol (12 to 20 W/min until exhaustion. A dynamic 24-h electrocardiogram was analyzed by time (TD (standard deviation of mean R-R intervals and frequency domain (FD methods. The power spectral components were expressed as absolute (a and normalized units (nu at low (LF and high (HF frequencies and as the LF/HF ratio. Control (C condition: HRV in TD (Y: 108, MA: 96 ms; P<0.05 and FD - LFa, HFa - was significantly higher in young (1030; 2589 ms²/Hz than in middle-aged men (357; 342 ms²/Hz only during sleep (P<0.05; post-training effects: resting bradycardia (P<0.05 in the awake condition in both groups; VO2 increased for both groups at anaerobic threshold (P<0.05, and at peak condition only in young men; HRV in TD and FD (a and nu was not significantly changed by training in either groups. The vagal predominance during sleep is reduced with aging. The resting bradycardia induced by short-term APT in both age groups suggests that this adaptation is much more related to intrinsic alterations in sinus node than in efferent vagal-sympathetic modulation. Furthermore, the greater alterations in VO2 than in HRV may be related to short-term APT.

  20. Roles of CLR/RAMP receptor signaling in reproduction and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chia Lin; Hsu, Sheau Yu Teddy

    2013-08-01

    Adrenomedullin (ADM), calcitonin gene-related peptides (α- and β-CGRPs), and intermedin/adrenomedullin 2 (IMD/ADM2) are major regulators of vascular tone and cardiovascular development in vertebrates. Recent research into their functions in reproduction has illuminated the role of these peptides and their cognate receptors (calcitonin receptor-like receptor/receptor activity-modifying protein (CLR/RAMP) receptors) in fetal-maternal blood circulation, fetoplacental development, female gamete development, and gamete movement in the oviduct. Although ADM family peptides function in a temporally and spatially specific manner in various reproductive processes, they appear to act via a similar set of second messengers, including nitric oxide, cyclic GMP, cyclic AMP, and calcium-activated potassium channels in different tissues. These discoveries supported the view that CLR/RAMP receptors were recruited to perform a variety of newly evolved reproductive functions during the evolution of internal reproduction in mammals. These advances also provided insight into how CLR/RAMP receptor signaling pathways coordinate with other physiological adaptions to accommodate the extra metabolic needs during pregnancy, and captured some important details as to how fetal-maternal vascular communications are generated in the first place. Furthermore, these findings have revealed novel, promising opportunities for the prevention and treatment of aberrant pregnancies such as pregnancy-induced hypertension, preeclampsia, and tubal ectopic pregnancy. However, significant efforts are still needed to clarify the relationships between certain components of the CLR/RAMP signaling pathway and aberrant pregnancies before CLR/RAMP receptors can become targets for clinical management. With this understanding, this review summarizes recent progresses with particular focus on clinical implications.

  1. Strain Rate Effect on Tensile Behavior for a High Specific Strength Steel: From Quasi-Static to Intermediate Strain Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The strain rate effect on the tensile behaviors of a high specific strength steel (HSSS with dual-phase microstructure has been investigated. The yield strength, the ultimate strength and the tensile toughness were all observed to increase with increasing strain rates at the range of 0.0006 to 56/s, rendering this HSSS as an excellent candidate for an energy absorber in the automobile industry, since vehicle crushing often happens at intermediate strain rates. Back stress hardening has been found to play an important role for this HSSS due to load transfer and strain partitioning between two phases, and a higher strain rate could cause even higher strain partitioning in the softer austenite grains, delaying the deformation instability. Deformation twins are observed in the austenite grains at all strain rates to facilitate the uniform tensile deformation. The B2 phase (FeAl intermetallic compound is less deformable at higher strain rates, resulting in easier brittle fracture in B2 particles, smaller dimple size and a higher density of phase interfaces in final fracture surfaces. Thus, more energy need be consumed during the final fracture for the experiments conducted at higher strain rates, resulting in better tensile toughness.

  2. Estimating the effects of Exchange and Interest Rates on Stock ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The interest rate also showed a negative relationship but insignificant at the chosen 5% level of significance. This study recommended that policy makers should put in place measures that will ensure a stable macroeconomic environment since an unstable macroeconomic environment can deter investors and make them ...

  3. Seismicity and sedimentation rate effects on submarine slope stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten Brink, U. S.; Andrews, B. D.; Miller, N. C.

    2016-12-01

    Large submarine mass-transport scars are commonly observed on continental margins, but are noticeably less abundant on margins that experience frequent earthquakes than on those that seldom experience them. This is a surprising observation, given that horizontal acceleration from earthquakes and associated strength loss from cyclic loading and liquefaction are commonly thought to provide the primary triggers for inducing failures and subsequent mass movements. Mapping submarine failure scars in ten margins worldwide, we find decreasing scar abundance with both increasing frequency of earthquakes and decreasing sedimentation rate. The decrease in scar abundance is interpreted to represent increasing slope stability. The increase in stability is non linear (power law with btectonic activity (salt diapirs, seamount subduction, etc.) leads to relatively rapid oversteepening of the slope, implying that the morphology of most margins is in fact, stable over many earthquake cycles. Note that the above correlation averages scar area and sedimentation rate over entire margin areas. Variations in sedimentation rate with time, such as over glacial-interglacial cycles, and intra-margin variations in seismic attenuation, sedimentation rate, composition, and pore pressure, have likely affected the abundance of slope failures in time and space.

  4. Effective Rating Scale Development for Speaking Tests: Performance Decision Trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulcher, Glenn; Davidson, Fred; Kemp, Jenny

    2011-01-01

    Rating scale design and development for testing speaking is generally conducted using one of two approaches: the measurement-driven approach or the performance data-driven approach. The measurement-driven approach prioritizes the ordering of descriptors onto a single scale. Meaning is derived from the scaling methodology and the agreement of…

  5. Effect of Feed Cycling on Specific Growth Rate, Condition Factor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Devika

    rate and condition factor when transferred to re- feeding after 21 days of starvation and this response was same at different acclimation temperatures at 4,. 20, and 27 0C (Van Dijk et al., 2005). Wu et al. (2003) found that three spined sticklebacks,. Gasterosteus aculcatus showed sufficient growth compensation to recover ...

  6. Unemployment Benefit Exhaustion: Incentive Effects on Job-Finding Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filges, Trine; Geerdsen, Lars Pico; Knudsen, Anne-Sofie Due; Jørgensen, Anne-Marie Klint

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This systematic review studied the impact of exhaustion of unemployment benefits on the exit rate out of unemployment and into employment prior to benefit exhaustion or shortly thereafter. Method: We followed Campbell Collaboration guidelines to prepare this review, and ultimately located 12 studies for final analysis and interpretation.…

  7. Effects of Standard Extremity on Mixed Standard Scale Performance Ratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-03-01

    standard rating scale: An) evaluation. Organizational B~ehavior and Human Performance, 1977, 18, 19-35. Thorndike , R. M. Correliationalprocedures for...Department of Psychiatry and Chapel Hill, NC 27514 " B(-havioral Science * Baltimore, MD 21205 [r. Edward E, Lawlr Un v’rsity of Southern Californi

  8. Panel design effects on response rates and response quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Seger; Ph.H.B.F. Franses (Philip Hans)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractTo understand changes in individuals' opinions and attitudes it would be best to collect data through panels. Such panels, however, often cause irritation among respondents, resulting in low response rates and low response quality. We address whether this problem can be alleviated by

  9. Heart Rate Variability: Effect of Exercise Intensity on Postexercise Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, David V. B.; Munson, Steven C.; Maldonado-Martin, Sara; De Ste Croix, Mark B. A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the influence of two exercise intensities (moderate and severe) on heart rate variability (HRV) response in 16 runners 1 hr prior to (-1 hr) and at +1 hr, +24 hr, +48 hr, and +72 hr following each exercise session. Time domain indexes and a high frequency component showed a significant decrease…

  10. The Effect of Screening Factors and Thermonuclear Reaction Rates ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In understanding the nucleosynthesis of the elements in stars, one of the most important quantities is the reaction rate and it must be evaluated in terms of the stellar temperature , and its determination involves the knowledge of the excitation function () of the specific nuclear reaction leading to the final nucleus. In this ...

  11. The Effect of Dialect on Rating of Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, Brandon K.; Franklin, Godfrey; Hixon, Mamie

    2009-01-01

    To validate the "power of language" theory, the authors set out to ascertain whether there is any relationship between dialect (language) and intelligence rating. This study suggests that language is a barometer by which people measure one's intelligence and education. The study further suggests that nonstandard English may influence the…

  12. 40 CFR 1039.505 - How do I test engines using steady-state duty cycles, including ramped-modal testing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...-state duty cycles, including ramped-modal testing? 1039.505 Section 1039.505 Protection of Environment... duty cycles, including ramped-modal testing? This section describes how to test engines under steady...-mode or ramped-modal cycles, as follows: (1) For discrete-mode testing, sample emissions separately for...

  13. Effect of selection for relative growth rate and bodyweight of mice on rate, composition and efficiency of growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, H.

    1974-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of selection for parameters of a growth curve, four selection lines and a control line were started from one base population. In the selection lines is selected for a large and a small relative growth rate between 21 and 29 days (RGH and RGL) and for a large and

  14. Adaptive Multi-rate Compression Effects on Vowel Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eIreland

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Signal processing on digitally sampled vowel sounds for the detection of pathological voices has been firmly established. This work examines compression artefacts on vowel speech samples that have been compressed using the adaptive multi-rate codec at various bit-rates. Whereas previous work has used the sensitivity of machine learning algorithm to test for accuracy, this work examines the changes in the extracted speech features themselves and thus report new findings on the usefulness of a particular feature. We believe this work will have potential impact for future research on remote monitoring as the identification and exclusion of a ill-defined speech feature that has been hitherto used, will ultimately increase the robustness of the system.

  15. Rowing Crew Coordination Dynamics at Increasing Stroke Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuijpers, Laura S; Zaal, Frank T J M; de Poel, Harjo J

    2015-01-01

    In rowing, perfect synchronisation is important for optimal performance of a crew. Remarkably, a recent study on ergometers demonstrated that antiphase crew coordination might be mechanically more efficient by reducing the power lost to within-cycle velocity fluctuations of the boat. However, coupled oscillator dynamics predict the stability of the coordination to decrease with increasing stroke rate, which in case of antiphase may eventually yield breakdowns to in-phase. Therefore, this study examined the effects of increasing stroke rate on in- and antiphase crew coordination in rowing dyads. Eleven experienced dyads rowed on two mechanically coupled ergometers on slides, which allowed the ergometer system to move back and forth as one 'boat'. The dyads performed a ramp trial in both in- and antiphase pattern, in which stroke rates gradually increased from 30 strokes per minute (spm) to as fast as possible in steps of 2 spm. Kinematics of rowers, handles and ergometers were captured. Two dyads showed a breakdown of antiphase into in-phase coordination at the first stroke rate of the ramp trial. The other nine dyads reached between 34-42 spm in antiphase but achieved higher rates in in-phase. As expected, the coordinative accuracy in antiphase was worse than in in-phase crew coordination, while, somewhat surprisingly, the coordinative variability did not differ between the patterns. Whereas crew coordination did not substantially deteriorate with increasing stroke rate, stroke rate did affect the velocity fluctuations of the ergometers: fluctuations were clearly larger in the in-phase pattern than in the antiphase pattern, and this difference significantly increased with stroke rate. Together, these results suggest that although antiphase rowing is less stable (i.e., less resistant to perturbation), potential on-water benefits of antiphase over in-phase rowing may actually increase with stroke rate.

  16. 4. Is an Operation Scenario for CS-Less Current Ramp-Up to Steady-State Burning Feasible? : 4.1 Is "Current Ramp-Up without a Center Solenoid" Possible?

    OpenAIRE

    前川, 孝; 永田, 正義; 御手洗, 修; 小野, 靖; 高瀬, 雄一

    2004-01-01

    The present status of experimental and theoretical efforts and future prospects on current start-up and ramp-up methods for ST reactors to reach fusion burning without a center solenoid are discussed. First, we need to form an initial magnetic surface and next to ramp-up the plasma current to a sufficient level for energetic neutral beam injection (NBI). The second heating and current drive by NBI with the ramp-up of the external vertical field may bring the plasma to fusion ignition. The fir...

  17. Control of the neutronic and thermohydraulic conditions of power ramps in an irradiation loop for PWR fuel rod; Controle des conditions neutroniques et thermohydrauliques des rampes de puissance dans une boucle d`irradiation de combustibles de reacteur a eau pressurisee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moulin, D.J.F.

    1993-09-10

    In order to study the power transients effects on PWR fuel rod clad, ramp tests in a pressurized water loop, are carried out at OSIRIS reactor. The present thesis deals with the on-line control of the device, during power ramp and conditioning irradiation. Based on a convolution-type resolution of the kinetics equations, a dynamic compensation of the Silver self-powered neutron detector was developed. With this method, the uncertainty of the ramp end-point is lower than 1%, thus it is very suited for monitoring both transient, as well as steady state conditions. Furthermore, a thermohydraulic model of the irradiation device is described: heat transfer equations, including gamma heating in materials, are solved to obtain temperatures and thermal fluxes of steady states. Results from the model and temperature measurements of the coolant are used together for fuel power determination, in real time. The clad external temperature profile is also calculated and displayed, to improve the irradiation monitoring. (author), 51 refs., 12 annexes, 66 figs.

  18. Effects of visual feedback on manipulation performance and patient ratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triano, John J; Scaringe, John; Bougie, Jacqueline; Rogers, Carolyn

    2006-06-01

    This study examined the explicit targeted outcome (a criterion standard) and visual feedback on the immediate change in and the short-term retention of performance by novice operators for a high-velocity, low-amplitude procedure under realistic conditions. This study used a single-blind randomized experimental design. Forty healthy male (n = 26) and female (n = 14) chiropractic student volunteers with no formal training in spinal manipulative therapy participated. Biomechanical parameters of an L4 mammillary push spinal manipulation procedure performed by novice operators were quantified. Participants were randomly assigned to 2 groups and paired. One group received visual feedback from load-time histories of their performance compared with a criterion standard before a repeat performance. Participants then performed a 10-minute distractive exercise consisting of National Board of Chiropractic Examiners review questions. The second group received no feedback. An independent rating of performance was conducted for each participant by his/her partner. Results were analyzed separately for biomechanical parameters for partner ratings using the Student t test with levels of significance (P visual feedback was associated with change in the biomechanical performance of group 2, a minimum of 14% and a maximum of 32%. Statistical analysis rating of the performance favored the feedback group on 4 of the parameters (fast, P < .0008; force, P < .0056; precision, P < .0034; and composite, P < .0016). Quantitative feedback, based on a tangible conceptualization of the target performance, resulted in immediate and significant improvement in all measured parameters. Newly developed skills were retained at least over short intervals even after distractive tasks. Learning what to do with feedback on one's own performance may be more important than the classic teaching of how to do it.

  19. Effect of gas flow rate on titanium sponge reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiliang; Feng, Gaoping; Wang, Mingdong; Hong, Yanji

    2017-08-01

    This paper expounds the important application of titanium sponge adsorption in inert gas purification, the reaction mechanism of titanium with nitrogen and oxygen was introduced. Explored the relationship between the absorption capacity of sponge titanium on the active gas in air samples and the gas flow rate. The model of sponge titanium for flowing air absorption was established by data analysis. The designed experiment verified the relationship between the titanium processing capacity and the gas collecting device. Finally, the influence of the mass of the sponge titanium on the degassing capacity was studied through experiments.

  20. Effect of a chemical manufacturing plant on community cancer rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Churches Tim

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We conducted a retrospective study to determine if potential past exposure to dioxin had resulted in increased incidence of cancer in people living near a former manufacturing plant in New South Wales, Australia. During operation, from 1928 to 1970, by-products of the manufacturing process, including dioxin and other chemical waste, were dumped into wetlands and mangroves, discharged into a nearby bay and used to reclaim land along the foreshore, leaving a legacy of significant dioxin contamination. Methods We selected 20 Census Collector Districts within 1.5 kilometres of the former manufacturing plant as the study area. We obtained data on all cases of cancer and deaths from cancer in New South Wales from 1972 to 2001. We also compared rates for some cancer types that have been associated with dioxin exposure. Based on a person's residential address at time of cancer diagnosis, or at time of death due to cancer, various geo-coding software and processes were used to determine which collector district the case or death should be attributed to. Age and sex specific population data were used to calculate standardised incidence ratios and standardised mortality ratios, to compare the study area to two comparison areas, using indirect standardisation. Results During the 30-year study period 1,106 cases of cancer and 524 deaths due to cancer were identified in the study area. This corresponds to an age-sex standardised rate of 3.2 cases per 1,000 person-years exposed and 1.6 deaths per 1,000 person-years exposed. The study area had a lower rate of cancer and deaths from cancer than the comparison areas. The case incidence and mortality due to lung and bronchus carcinomas and haematopoietic cancers did not differ significantly from the comparison areas for the study period. There was no obvious geographical trend in ratios when comparing individual collector districts to New South Wales according to distance from the potential

  1. The Effects of Slow Frame Rates on Human Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-01

    and virtual reality ( VR ). Those who have been exposed to these systems are more familiar with the different viewing and psychomotor effects that can...effects of low FR as well as lag in a target acquisition in VR display. Reaction time reductions were the most dramatic until 5 Hz but stabilized at...associated visual lag may cause cue conflict (i.e., discrepancy between visual and vestibular systems), which has been shown to induce cyber

  2. The Effect of Domestic and Economic Stress on Suicide Rates in Canada and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leenaars, Antoon A.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Analyzed rates of birth, divorce, marriage, and unemployment in Canada and United States in comparison to rates of suicide from 1950 to 1985. Found no association between marriage and suicide in Canada, in U.S. marriage had protective effect. Divorce rates were associated positively and birth rates associated negatively with suicide in both…

  3. Control of low-speed turbulent separated flow over a backward-facing ramp. Ph.D. Thesis - Old Dominion Univ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, John C.

    1992-01-01

    The relative performance and flow phenomena associated with several devices for controlling turbulent separated flow were investigated at low speeds. Relative performance of the devices was examined for flow over a curved, backward-facing ramp in a wind tunnel, and the flow phenomena were examined in a water tunnel using dye-flow visualization. Surface static pressure measurements and oil-flow visualization results from the wind tunnel tests indicated that transverse grooves, longitudinal grooves, submerged vortex generators, vortex generator jets (VGJ's), Viets' fluidic flappers, elongated arches at positive angle of attack, and large-eddy breakup devices (LEBU's) at positive angle of attack placed near the baseline separation location reduce flow separation and increase pressure recovery. Spanwise cylinders reduce flow separation but decrease pressure recovery downstream. Riblets, passive porous surfaces, swept grooves, Helmholtz resonators, and arches and LEBU's with angle of attack less than or = 0 degrees had no significant effect in reducing the extent of the separation region. Wall-cooling computations indicated that separation delay on a partially-cooled ramp is nearly the same as on a fully-cooled ramp, while minimizing the frictional drag increase associated with the wall cooling process. Dry-flow visualization tests in the water tunnel indicated that wishbone vortex generators in the forward orientation shed horseshoe vortices; wishbone vortex generators oriented in the reverse direction and doublet vortex generators shed streamwise counterrotating vortices; a spanewise cylinder located near the wall and LEBU's at angle of attack = -10 degrees produced eddies or transverse vortices which rotated with the same sign as the mean vorticity in a turbulent boundary layer; and the most effective VGJ's produced streamwise co-rotating vortices. Comparative wind-tunnel test results indicated that transferring momentum from the outer region of a turbulent boundary

  4. Effect of Various Sugary Beverages on Salivary pH, Flow Rate, and Oral Clearance Rate amongst Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rinki Hans

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Diet is a major aetiological factor for dental caries and enamel erosion. This study was undertaken with the aim of assessing the effect of selected locally available beverages on salivary pH, flow rate, and oral clearance rate amongst adults. Materials and Method. This clinical trial comprised 120 subjects. Test beverages undertaken were pepsi, fruit drink, coffee, and sweetened milk. Statistical analysis was carried out using SPSS version 17. Descriptive statistics, one-way ANOVA, and post hoc Tukey’s test were applied in the statistical tests. Results. It was found that salivary pH decreased for all the beverages immediately after consumption and the salivary flow rate increased after their consumption. The oral clearance rate of sweetened milk was found to be the least at 6.5 minutes and that of pepsi was found to be 13 minutes. However, the oral clearance rates of fruit drink and coffee were found to be equal at 15 minutes. Conclusion. Although it was found out that liquids cleared rapidly from the oral cavity, they had a significant cariogenic and erosive potential. Hence, it is always advised to minimise the consumption of beverages, especially amongst children and young adults to maintain a good oral health.

  5. Effects of Interval Training Programme on Resting Heart Rate in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DATONYE ALASIA

    Enugu, Nigeria, Department of Physiotherapy, University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Ituku-Ozalla, Enugu, Nigeria ... Results: Findings of the study revealed significant effect of exercise training program on HR. Also, changes in VO max negatively. 2 correlated with changes in HR (r= -.503) at ... cardiovascular parameters.

  6. The effect of temperature on the rate of development and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    factors influencing the ··natural rhythm" of cercaria1 emergence before any study of long term temperature effects was undertaken. Such basic information should reveal the factors under- lying the marked diurnal periodicity of cercariae reported by Rowan (1958) from Puerto. Rico and noted locally in the field during rodent ...

  7. The Effect of Police Response Time on Crime Clearance Rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blanes i Vidal, Jordi; Kirchmaier, Tom

    2017-01-01

    Police agencies devote vast resources to minimising the time that it takes them to attend the scene of a crime. Despite this, the long-standing consensus is that police response time has no meaningful effect on the likelihood of catching offenders. We revisit this question using a uniquely rich...

  8. Confidentiality and Professional Affiliation Effects on Subject Ratings of Interviewers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, David W.; And Others

    The purpose of this research was to study the effects of different statements regarding confidentiality (absolute; limited; nondirective) on subject impressions of interviewers. In addition, the professional affiliation of the interviewer was manipulated (psychologist, minister/pastoral counselor, social worker) to assess potential influence of…

  9. Inclusion rate and physiological effects of prolonged feeding of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of incluusion of cocoa bean cake (CBC) on productive performance and physiological response of Isa Brown pullets to prolonged feeding of CBC were investigated. Dietary Inclusions or CBC (0, 50, 100 and 200g/ kg-1 diet) were monitored in typical poultry diets from day old to 51 weeks of age. Sexual maturity ...

  10. Effects of Interval Training Programme on Resting Heart Rate in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: It was concluded that moderate intensity interval training programs is effective in the non-pharmacological adjunct management of hypertension and may prevent cardiovascular event through the down regulation of HR in hypertension. Keywords: Hypertension; Interval exercise; cardiovascular risk factor; Heart ...

  11. Effects of chlormequat chloride and different rates of prohexadione ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-11-28

    Nov 28, 2011 ... avocado (Mandemaker et al., 2005) and also reducing effect on shoot length for apple (Ratiba and Blanco,. 2004) and pear (Smit et al., 2005), and on height for cucumber (Ergun et al., 2007), cabbage (Hamano et al.,. 2002), okra (Ilias et al., 2007), petunia and impatients. (Ilias and Rajapakse, 2005).

  12. Effect of different Rates of Wood Ash on Exchangeable Aluminum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Response of soybean grown on acidic soil to wood ash applied at 0, 2, 4, 6, and 8 t ha-1 was studied in two field experiments in 2003 and 2004 at Umudike in the rainforest zone of Southeast Nigeria. Treatments were fitted in a randomized complete block design (RCBD) replicated three times. Effect of treatments on some ...

  13. Effects of Interval Training Programme on Resting Heart Rate in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DATONYE ALASIA

    Student's t and Pearson correlation tests were used in data analysis. Results: Findings of the study revealed significant effect of exercise training program on HR ... presentwith a series of functional and anatomic deficits, such as increasedvascular resistance, vessel rarefaction, increased heart energy expenditure, increased.

  14. Professor Age Affects Student Ratings: Halo Effect for Younger Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Janie H.; Beyer, Denise; Monteiro, Heather

    2014-01-01

    Student evaluations of teaching provide valued information about teaching effectiveness, and studies support the reliability and validity of such measures. However, research also illustrates potential moderation of student perceptions based on teacher gender, attractiveness, and even age, although the latter receives little research attention. In…

  15. Effects of Dietary Nucleotides on Growth Rate and Disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of dietary nucleotides on growth and disease resistance of crustaceans were evaluated using axenic Artemia culture tests. Higher Artemia growth in xenic culture (15.6 ± 2.9 mm) than in axenic culture (9.2 ± 1.9 mm) reaffirmed the need to eliminate microbial populations known to influence growth and disease ...

  16. Sample pre-heating in magnetic ramp compression experiments on the GEPI high pulsed power driver

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Almeida, Thierry; Chanal, Pierre-Yves; Zinszner, Jean-Luc; Daulhac, Gaetan

    2017-10-01

    GEPI is a 3 MA, 500 ns, high pulsed power driver operated by the CEA and mainly used for dynamically compressing materials in a quasi-isentropic regime at stress levels up to 100 GPa. Usually, materials are loaded starting from ambient temperature conditions, thus, following a single thermodynamic path near an isentrope. Dynamically loading samples from non-ambient initial conditions, either in pressure or temperature, can significantly improve our ability to obtain direct measurements over specific thermodynamic paths of interest. For instance, ramp-compressing multiphase metallic materials from various initial temperatures can help constrain their Equation of State. We have recently equipped the GEPI facility with a preheating device capable of pre-heating metallic samples up to 1100 K prior to their loading. We present results from preliminary experiments on copper and iron ramp compressed starting from temperatures ranging from 300 K to 900 K.

  17. Investigation of ramped voltage stress to screen defective magnetic tunnel junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Chulmin; Sukegawa, Hiroaki; Mitani, Seiji; Song, Yunheub

    2018-01-01

    A ramped voltage stress (RVS) method to screen defective magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) is investigated in order to improve screen accuracy and shorten test time. Approximately 1500 MTJs with 1.25 nm thick tunnel barriers were fabricated for this evaluation, and normal MTJs show a 189% tunnel magnetoresistance ratio, a 365 Ω μm2 resistance-area product, and a 1.8 V breakdown voltage, which is enough for applying reliable screen tests. We successfully classified MTJs as normal MTJs having good characteristics or defective MTJs having insufficient endurance and showing resistance degradation after only short-term cycling. Using the RVS screen test with low ramp speed, it is demonstrated that remarkable screening performance and little dependence on temperature are obtained for short test time.

  18. Effect of speech rate variation on acoustic phone stability in Afrikaans speech recognition

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Badenhorst, JAC

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The authors analyse the effect of speech rate variation on Afrikaans phone stability from an acoustic perspective. Specifically they introduce two techniques for the acoustic analysis of speech rate variation, apply these techniques to an Afrikaans...

  19. Effect of temperature oscillation on chemical reaction rates in the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberstein, I. J.

    1974-01-01

    The effect of temperature fluctuations on atmospheric ozone chemistry is examined by considering the Chapman photochemical theory of ozone transport to calculate globally averaged ozone production rates from mean reaction rates, activation energies, and recombination processes.

  20. The Effects of Smoking Ban Regulations on Individual Smoking Rates

    OpenAIRE

    Roger Wilkins; David Black; Hielke Buddelmeyer

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the dynamics of smoking behaviour in Australia and investigates what impact smoking ban regulations have, if any, on individual smoking patterns. Such legislation receives a lot of press attention when announced and introduced, but its effect on individuals’ smoking behaviour has received little research attention. The main argument used to motivate the introduction of tougher smoking bans is reducing exposure of non-smokers to second hand smoke. From a public policy pers...

  1. Dips, ramps, and rolls- Evidence for paleotopographic and syn-depositional fault control on the Western Kentucky No. 4 coal bed, tradewater formation (Bolsovian) Illinois Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greb, S.F.; Eble, C.F.; Williams, D.A.; Nelson, W.J.

    2001-01-01

    The Western Kentucky No. 4 coal is a high-volatile B to high-volatile C bituminous coal that has been heavily mined along the southern margin of the Western Kentucky Coal Field. The seam has a reputation for rolling floor elevation. Elongate trends of floor depressions are referred to as "dips" and "rolls" by miners. Some are relatively narrow and straight to slightly curvilinear in plan view, with generally symmetric to slightly asymmetric cross-sections. Others are broader and asymmetric in section, with sharp dips on one limb and gradual, ramp-like dips on the other. Some limbs change laterally from gradual dip, to sharp dip, to offset of the coal. Lateral changes in the rate of floor elevation dip are often associated with changes in coal thickness, and in underground mines, changes in floor elevation are sometimes associated with roof falls and haulage problems. In order to test if coal thickness changes within floor depressions were associated with changes in palynology, petrography and coal quality, the coal was sampled at a surface mine across a broad. ramp-like depression that showed down-dip coal thickening. Increment samples of coal from a thick (150 cm), down-ramp and thinner (127 cm), up-ramp position at one surface mine correlate well between sample sites (a distance of 60 m) except for a single increment. The anomalous increment (31 cm) in the lower-middle part of the thick coal bed contained 20% more Lycospora orbicula spores. The rolling floor elevations noted in the study mines are inferred to have been formed as a result of pre-peat paleotopographic depressions, syn-depositional faulting, fault-controlled pre-peat paleotopography, and from compaction beneath post-depositional channels and slumps. Although the association of thick coal with linear trends and inferred faults has been used in other basins to infer syn-depositional faulting, changes in palynology within increment samples of the seam along a structural ramp in this study provide

  2. Validity of thermal ramping assays used to assess thermal tolerance in arthropods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Overgaard

    Full Text Available Proper assessment of environmental resistance of animals is critical for the ability of researchers to understand how variation in environmental conditions influence population and species abundance. This is also the case for studies of upper thermal limits in insects, where researchers studying animals under laboratory conditions must select appropriate methodology on which conclusions can be drawn. Ideally these methods should precisely estimate the trait of interest and also be biological meaningful. In an attempt to develop such tests it has been proposed that thermal ramping assays are useful assays for small insects because they incorporate an ecologically relevant gradual temperature change. However, recent model-based papers have suggested that estimates of thermal resistance may be strongly confounded by simultaneous starvation and dehydration stress. In the present study we empirically test these model predictions using two sets of independent experiments. We clearly demonstrate that results from ramping assays of small insects (Drosophila melanogaster are not compromised by starvation- or dehydration-stress. Firstly we show that the mild disturbance of water and energy balance of D. melanogaster experienced during the ramping tests does not confound heat tolerance estimates. Secondly we show that flies pre-exposed to starvation and dehydration have "normal" heat tolerance and that resistance to heat stress is independent of the energetic and water status of the flies. On the basis of our results we discuss the assumptions used in recent model papers and present arguments as to why the ramping assay is both a valid and ecologically relevant way to measure thermal resistance in insects.

  3. Combined energy ramp and beta star squeeze at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Ryckx, Nick; Redaelli, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    In 2011, the LHC has exceeded expectations by producing a massive amount of data for the experiments. The turnaround time being a bottleneck in terms of operational efficiency, its duration has to be minimized. This is done by combining two already optimized steps, the energy ramp and the betatron squeeze. The aim of this feasibility study will be to generate a set of power converter settings combining both steps and validate them using dry-runs and beam tests.

  4. Risk-limiting Economic Dispatch for Electricity Markets with Flexible Ramping Products

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Chenye; Hug, Gabriela; Kar, Soummya

    2014-01-01

    The expected increase in the penetration of renewables in the approaching decade urges the electricity market to introduce new products - in particular, flexible ramping products - to accommodate the renewables' variability and intermittency. CAISO and MISO are leading the design of the new products. However, it is not clear how such products may affect the electricity market. In this paper, we are specifically interested in assessing how the new products distort the optimal energy dispatch b...

  5. Validity of thermal ramping assays used to assess thermal tolerance in arthropods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overgaard, Johannes; Kristensen, Torsten Nygaard; Sørensen, Jesper Givskov

    2012-01-01

    Proper assessment of environmental resistance of animals is critical for the ability of researchers to understand how variation in environmental conditions influence population and species abundance. This is also the case for studies of upper thermal limits in insects, where researchers studying animals under laboratory conditions must select appropriate methodology on which conclusions can be drawn. Ideally these methods should precisely estimate the trait of interest and also be biological meaningful. In an attempt to develop such tests it has been proposed that thermal ramping assays are useful assays for small insects because they incorporate an ecologically relevant gradual temperature change. However, recent model-based papers have suggested that estimates of thermal resistance may be strongly confounded by simultaneous starvation and dehydration stress. In the present study we empirically test these model predictions using two sets of independent experiments. We clearly demonstrate that results from ramping assays of small insects (Drosophila melanogaster) are not compromised by starvation- or dehydration-stress. Firstly we show that the mild disturbance of water and energy balance of D. melanogaster experienced during the ramping tests does not confound heat tolerance estimates. Secondly we show that flies pre-exposed to starvation and dehydration have "normal" heat tolerance and that resistance to heat stress is independent of the energetic and water status of the flies. On the basis of our results we discuss the assumptions used in recent model papers and present arguments as to why the ramping assay is both a valid and ecologically relevant way to measure thermal resistance in insects.

  6. Latest Permian to Middle Triassic redox condition variations in ramp settings, South China: Pyrite framboid evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Y. Huang; Chen, Z-Q; Wignall, PB; Zhao, L.

    2017-01-01

    A detailed, 10 m.y. redox history of Changhsingian to Anisian (latest Permian to Middle Triassic) oceans in ramp settings is reconstructed based on framboidal pyrite analysis from South China. The result shows that the well-established phenomenon of intense ocean euxinia-anoxia is faithfully recorded in pyrite framboid data. Three major euxinia-anoxia episodes, namely, the end-Changhsingian to end-Smithian, middle to late Spathian, and early to middle Anisian, have been recognized from the ra...

  7. 3D thermo-chemical–mechanical simulation of power ramps with ALCYONE fuel code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baurens, B., E-mail: bertrand.baurens@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DEC/SESC, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Sercombe, J., E-mail: jerome.sercombe@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DEC/SESC, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Riglet-Martial, C.; Desgranges, L. [CEA, DEN, DEC/SESC, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Trotignon, L. [CEA, DEN, DTN/STRI, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Maugis, P. [IM2NP, Aix-Marseille University, UMR CNRS 7334, 13397 Marseille (France)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • This paper presents a 3D thermo-chemical–mechanical modeling of nuclear fuel during power ramps. • It describes the chemical behavior of fission products and their release during a power ramp. • Comparison with experimental data show good agreement for iodine, cesium and tellurium. • These calculations provide an iodine source term for Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) of the cladding. • An I-SCC criterion is obtained from the 3D temporal evolution of stresses and of iodine release. - Abstract: This paper presents the coupling of the fuel performance code ALCYONE with the thermochemical code ANGE and its application to Iodine-Stress Corrosion Cracking (I-SCC). The coupling is illustrated by a 3D simulation of a power ramp. The release of chemically active gases (CsI{sub (g)}, Te{sub x(1ramp are successfully compared to Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) measurements. Based on the 3D simulation, the definition of a stress corrosion initiation criterion is discussed. The combination of the hoop stress and of the quantity of reactive iodine (I{sub (g)}, I{sub 2(g)} and TeI{sub 2(g)} only) released by the pellet is used to show that the necessary conditions for Pellet Cladding Interaction-Stress Corrosion Cracking (PCI-SCC) initiation, based on out-of-pile I-SCC laboratory tests criteria, are met during the simulated power transient.

  8. Modeling effectiveness of gradual increases in source level to mitigate effects of sonar on marine mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Benda-Beckmann, Alexander M; Wensveen, Paul J; Kvadsheim, Petter H; Lam, Frans-Peter A; Miller, Patrick J O; Tyack, Peter L; Ainslie, Michael A

    2014-02-01

    Ramp-up or soft-start procedures (i.e., gradual increase in the source level) are used to mitigate the effect of sonar sound on marine mammals, although no one to date has tested whether ramp-up procedures are effective at reducing the effect of sound on marine mammals. We investigated the effectiveness of ramp-up procedures in reducing the area within which changes in hearing thresholds can occur. We modeled the level of sound killer whales (Orcinus orca) were exposed to from a generic sonar operation preceded by different ramp-up schemes. In our model, ramp-up procedures reduced the risk of killer whales receiving sounds of sufficient intensity to affect their hearing. The effectiveness of the ramp-up procedure depended strongly on the assumed response threshold and differed with ramp-up duration, although extending the duration of the ramp up beyond 5 min did not add much to its predicted mitigating effect. The main factors that limited effectiveness of ramp up in a typical antisubmarine warfare scenario were high source level, rapid moving sonar source, and long silences between consecutive sonar transmissions. Our exposure modeling approach can be used to evaluate and optimize mitigation procedures. © 2013 Society for Conservation Biology.

  9. The effects of smoking ban regulations on individual smoking rates

    OpenAIRE

    Buddelmeyer, Hielke; Wilkins, Roger

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the dynamics of smoking behaviour in Australia and investigates what role smoking ban regulation has, if any, on individual level smoking patterns. The main argument to motivate the introduction of tougher smoking bans is the effect of second hand smoke on non-smokers. From a public policy perspective it is important to know if these policies also affect if a person smokes, or if they only influence when and where people smoke. We use data that tracks individual smoking b...

  10. On rate-dependent dissipation effects in electro-elasticity

    CERN Document Server

    Saxena, Prashant; Steinmann, Paul

    2015-01-01

    This paper deals with the mathematical modelling of large strain electro-viscoelastic deformations in electro-active polymers. Energy dissipation is assumed to occur due to mechanical viscoelasticity of the polymer as well as due to time-dependent effective polarisation of the material. Additive decomposition of the electric field $\\mathbb{E} = \\mathbb{E}_e + \\mathbb{E}_v$ and multiplicative decomposition of the deformation gradient $\\mathbf{F} = \\mathbf{F}_e \\mathbf{F}_v$ are proposed to model the internal dissipation mechanisms. The theory is illustrated with some numerical examples in the end.

  11. Fully non-inductive second harmonic electron cyclotron plasma ramp-up in the QUEST spherical tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idei, H.; Kariya, T.; Imai, T.; Mishra, K.; Onchi, T.; Watanabe, O.; Zushi, H.; Hanada, K.; Qian, J.; Ejiri, A.; Alam, M. M.; Nakamura, K.; Fujisawa, A.; Nagashima, Y.; Hasegawa, M.; Matsuoka, K.; Fukuyama, A.; Kubo, S.; Shimozuma, T.; Yoshikawa, M.; Sakamoto, M.; Kawasaki, S.; Nakashima, H.; Higashijima, A.; Ide, S.; Maekawa, T.; Takase, Y.; Toi, K.

    2017-12-01

    Fully non-inductive second (2nd) harmonic electron cyclotron (EC) plasma current ramp-up was demonstrated with a newlly developed 28 GHz system in the QUEST spherical tokamak. A high plasma current of 54 kA was non-inductively ramped up and sustained stably for 0.9 s with a 270 kW 28 GHz wave. A higher plasma current of 66 kA was also non-inductively achieved with a slow ramp-up of the vertical field. We have achieved a significantly higher plasma current than those achieved previously with the 2nd harmonic EC waves. This fully non-inductive 2nd harmonic EC plasma ramp-up method might be useful for future burning plasma devices and fusion reactors, in particular for operations at half magnetic field with the same EC heating equipment.

  12. Human subjects’ perception of indoor environment and their office work performance during exposures to moderate operative temperature ramps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolarik, Jakub; Toftum, Jørn; Olesen, Bjarne W.

    2008-01-01

    sensation was also included. Subjects filled out questionnaires regarding perception of the environment and intensity of SBS symptoms. Subjects performed simulated office tasks (addition, text typing, proof reading, comprehension and reasoning). Results showed that all tested ramps were recognized...

  13. What Do Kinematic Models Imply About the Constitutive Properties of Rocks Deformed in Flat-Ramp-Flat Folds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, L.; Nevitt, J. M.; Seixas, G.; Hilley, G. E.

    2017-10-01

    Kinematic theories of flat-ramp-flat folds relate fault angles to stratal dips in a way that allows prediction of structural geometries in areas of economic or scientific interest. However, these geometric descriptions imply constitutive properties of rocks that might be discordant with field and laboratory measurements. In this study, we compare deformation resulting from kinematic and mechanical models of flat-ramp-flat folds with identical geometries to determine the conditions over which kinematic models may be reasonably applied to folded rocks. Results show that most mechanical models do not conform to the geometries predicted by the kinematic models, and only low basal friction (μ ≤ 0.1) and shallow ramps (ramp angle ≤10°) produce geometries consistent with kinematic predictions. This implies that the kinematic models might be appropriate for a narrow set of geometric and basal fault friction parameters.

  14. An EOQ inventory model for items with ramp type demand, three-parameter Weibull distribution deterioration and starting with shortage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jain Sanjay

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this present paper an inventory model is developed with ramp type demand, starting with shortage and three - parameter Weibull distribution deterioration. A brief analysis of the cost involved is carried out by an example.

  15. Dorsal stream involvement in recognition of objects with transient onset but not with ramped onset

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lourenco Tomas

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the ventral visual stream is understood to be responsible for object recognition, it has been proposed that the dorsal stream may contribute to object recognition by rapidly activating parietal attention mechanisms, prior to ventral stream object processing. Methods To investigate the relative contribution of the dorsal visual stream to object recognition a group of tertiary students were divided into good and poor motion coherence groups and assessed on tasks classically assumed to rely on ventral stream processing. Participants were required to identify simple line drawings in two tasks, one where objects were presented abruptly for 50 ms followed by a white-noise mask, the other where contrast was linearly ramped on and off over 325 ms and replaced with a mask. Results Although both groups only differed in motion coherence performance (a dorsal stream measure, the good motion coherence group showed superior contrast sensitivity for object recognition on the abrupt, but not the ramped presentation tasks. Conclusions We propose that abrupt presentation of objects activated attention mechanisms fed by the dorsal stream, whereas the ramped presentation had reduced transience and thus did not activate dorsal attention mechanisms as well. The results suggest that rapid dorsal stream activation may be required to assist with ventral stream object processing.

  16. Cyclostratigraphy and chemostratigraphy of a bioclastic storm-dominated carbonate ramp (late Pliensbachian, Iberian Basin)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Val, Jorge; Bádenas, Beatriz; Aurell, Marcos; Rosales, Idoia

    2017-06-01

    Deposition of regressive successions and coeval positive trend in the oxygen stable isotope record in relatively deep marine successions of the upper Pliensbachian of western European basins have been related to a cooling interlude within the warm greenhouse conditions of the Pliensbachian. Sedimentological, cyclostratigraphic and chemostratigraphic analyses carried out in two upper Pliensbachian successions exposed in the Iberian Chain (Obón and San Pedro localities, Spain) allowed the characterization of the imprint of this cooling interlude on the relatively shallow areas of the Iberian carbonate ramp. The upper Pliensbachian succession is characterized by skeletal limestones and encompasses proximal mid-ramp to proximal outer-ramp facies, in which resedimentation and reworking by storm-induced flows controlled the accumulation of bioclastic debris. Two orders of high-frequency, metre-scale sequences have been identified: bundles of beds, and deepening-shallowing sets of bundles. According to the age calibration (previous biostratigraphic data and new strontium isotopes data) and correlation with nearby sections, these sequences are suggested as formed in tune with the short-term and long-term eccentricity Milankovitch cycles. The isotopic data from brachiopod shells and belemnite rostra indicate progressively increasing δ18O and slightly decreasing δ13C trends for the uppermost Pliensbachian Spinatum Zone, reflecting the influence of cooling conditions. However, facies analysis reflects that the expected coeval long-term regression was interrupted by a tectonically driven transgressive event in the uppermost part of the Spinatum Zone.

  17. Capabilities of TRANSURANUS code in simulating power ramp tests from the IFPE database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozzia, D., E-mail: daviderozzia@libero.i [Gruppo di Ricerca Nucleare San Piero a Grado, DIMNP, Universita di Pisa (UNIPI) via Diotisalvi 2, 56100 Pisa (Italy); Adorni, M.; Del Nevo, A.; D' Auria, F. [Gruppo di Ricerca Nucleare San Piero a Grado, DIMNP, Universita di Pisa (UNIPI) via Diotisalvi 2, 56100 Pisa (Italy)

    2011-04-15

    Investigations of fuel behavior are carried out in close connection with experimental research, operation feedback and computational analyses. OECD NEA sets up the 'International Fuel Performance Experiments (IFPE) database', a public domain database on nuclear fuel performance experiments with the purpose of model development and code validation. The objective of the activity (performed in the framework of the IAEA CRP FUMEX-III project) is to investigate the pellet-clad interaction mechanism and the capability of TRANSURANUS code in simulating the phenomena, processes occurring in the fuel rod during the power ramps, with focus on the parameters influencing the cladding failures. The experimental database adopted is the Studsvik PWR Super-Ramp subprogram, part of the IFPE database, which consists of 28 pressurized water reactor fuel rods power ramped at burnup from 28 to 45 MWd/kgU. Relevant results by TRANSURANUS are presented in connection with the experimental evidences. Focus is given on the PCI/SCC failure, demonstrating that the failure threshold, available in TRANSURANUS, results conservative both in case of KWU and W rods.

  18. Wind-Ramp-Forecast Sensitivity to Closure Parameters in a Boundary-Layer Parametrization Scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn, David E.; Takle, Eugene S.; Gallus, William A.

    2017-09-01

    Wind ramps are relatively large changes in wind speed over a period of a few hours and present a challenge for electric utilities to balance power generation and load. Failures of boundary-layer parametrization schemes to represent physical processes limit the ability of numerical models to forecast wind ramps, especially in a stable boundary layer. Herein, the eight "closure parameters" of a widely used boundary-layer parameterization scheme are subject to sensitivity tests for a set of wind-ramp cases. A marked sensitivity of forecast wind speed to closure-parameter values is observed primarily for three parameters that influence in the closure equations the depth of turbulent mixing, dissipation, and the transfer of kinetic energy from the mean to the turbulent flow. Reducing the value of these parameters independently by 25% or by 50% reduces the overall average in forecast wind-speed errors by at least 24% for the first two parameters and increases average forecast error by at least 63% for the third parameter. Doubling any of these three parameters increases average forecast error by at least 67%. Such forecast sensitivity to closure parameter values provides motivation to explore alternative values in the context of a stable boundary layer.

  19. Effects of corporate social responsibility and governance on its credit ratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-young; Kim, JeongYeon

    2014-01-01

    This study reviews the impact of corporate social responsibility (CSR) and corporate governance on its credit rating. The result of regression analysis to credit ratings with relevant primary independent variables shows that both factors have significant effects on it. As we have predicted, the signs of both regression coefficients have a positive sign (+) proving that corporates with excellent CSR and governance index (CGI) scores have higher credit ratings and vice versa. The results show nonfinancial information also may have effects on corporate credit rating. The investment on personal data protection could be an example of CSR/CGI activities which have positive effects on corporate credit ratings.

  20. Influence of heart rate in nonlinear HRV indices as a sampling rate effect evaluated on supine and standing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Bolea

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to characterize and attenuate the influence of mean heart rate (HR on nonlinear heart rate variability (HRV indices (correlation dimension, sample and approximate entropy as a consequence of being the HR the intrinsic sampling rate of HRV signal. This influence can notably alter nonlinear HRV indices and lead to biased information regarding autonomic nervous system (ANS modulation.First, a simulation study was carried out to characterize the dependence of nonlinear HRV indices on HR assuming similar ANS modulation. Second, two HR-correction approaches were proposed: one based on regression formulas and another one based on interpolating RR time series. Finally, standard and HR-corrected HRV indices were studied in a body position change database.The simulation study showed the HR-dependence of non-linear indices as a sampling rate effect, as well as the ability of the proposed HR-corrections to attenuate mean HR influence. Analysis in a body position changes database shows that correlation dimension was reduced around 21% in median values in standing with respect to supine position (p < 0.05, concomitant with a 28% increase in mean HR (p < 0.05. After HR-correction, correlation dimension decreased around 18% in standing with respect to supine position, being the decrease still significant. Sample and approximate entropy showed similar trends.HR-corrected nonlinear HRV indices could represent an improvement in their applicability as markers of ANS modulation when mean HR changes.

  1. A review of dose rate dependent effects of total ionizing dose /TID/ irradiations. [on semiconductor devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, D. K.

    1980-01-01

    The basic effects of ionizing radiation are summarized. The problem of the existence of a true dose rate effect is examined. Consideration is given to the nature of long term annealing, which is sometimes manifested as an 'apparent' dose rate effect. Both analytical and experimental work is considered and the results are related to practical testing requirements.

  2. Heritability of cardiac vagal control in 24-h heart rate variability recordings: influence of ceiling effects at low heart rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neijts, Melanie; Van Lien, Rene; Kupper, Nina; Boomsma, Dorret; Willemsen, Gonneke; de Geus, Eco J C

    2014-10-01

    This study estimated the heritability of 24-h heart rate variability (HRV) measures, while considering ceiling effects on HRV at low heart rates during the night. HRV was indexed by the standard deviation of all valid interbeat intervals (SDNN), the root mean square of differences between valid, successive interbeat intervals (RMSSD), and peak-valley respiratory sinus arrhythmia (pvRSA). Sleep and waking levels of cardiac vagal control were assessed in 1,003 twins and 285 of their non-twin siblings. Comparable heritability estimates were found for SDNN (46%-53%), RMSSD (49%-54%), and pvRSA (48%-57%) during the day and night. A nighttime ceiling effect was revealed in 10.7% of participants by a quadratic relationship between mean pvRSA and the interbeat interval. Excluding these participants did not change the heritability estimates. The genetic factors influencing ambulatory pvRSA, RMSSD, and SDNN largely overlap. These results suggest that gene-finding studies may pool the different cardiac vagal indices and that exclusion of participants with low heart rates is not required. Copyright © 2014 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  3. A tunable electron beam source using trapping of electrons in a density down-ramp in laser wakefield acceleration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekerfelt, Henrik; Hansson, Martin; Gallardo González, Isabel; Davoine, Xavier; Lundh, Olle

    2017-09-25

    One challenge in the development of laser wakefield accelerators is to demonstrate sufficient control and reproducibility of the parameters of the generated bunches of accelerated electrons. Here we report on a numerical study, where we demonstrate that trapping using density down-ramps allows for tuning of several electron bunch parameters by varying the properties of the density down-ramp. We show that the electron bunch length is determined by the difference in density before and after the ramp. Furthermore, the transverse emittance of the bunch is controlled by the steepness of the ramp. Finally, the amount of trapped charge depends both on the density difference and on the steepness of the ramp. We emphasize that both parameters of the density ramp are feasible to vary experimentally. We therefore conclude that this tunable electron accelerator makes it suitable for a wide range of applications, from those requiring short pulse length and low emittance, such as the free-electron lasers, to those requiring high-charge, large-emittance bunches to maximize betatron X-ray generation.

  4. Analysis of real-time crash risk for expressway ramps using traffic, geometric, trip generation, and socio-demographic predictors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ling; Abdel-Aty, Mohamed; Lee, Jaeyoung; Shi, Qi

    2017-07-07

    There have been numerous studies on real-time crash prediction seeking to link real-time crash likelihood with traffic and environmental predictors. Nevertheless, none has explored the impact of socio-demographic and trip generation parameters on real-time crash risk. This study analyzed the real-time crash risk for expressway ramps using traffic, geometric, socio-demographic, and trip generation predictors. Two Bayesian logistic regression models were utilized to identify crash precursors and their impact on ramp crash risk. Meanwhile, four Support Vector Machines (SVM) were applied to predict crash occurrence. Bayesian logistic regression models and SVMs commonly showed that the models with the socio-demographic and trip generation variables outperform their counterparts without those parameters. It indicates that the socio-demographic and trip generation parameters have significant impact on the real-time crash risk. The Bayesian logistic regression model results showed that the logarithm of vehicle count, speed, and percentage of home-based-work production had positive impact on crash risk. Meanwhile, off-ramps or non-diamond-ramps experienced higher crash potential than on-ramps or diamond-ramps, respectively. Though the SVMs provided good model performance, the SVM model with all variables (i.e., all traffic, geometric, socio-demographic, and trip generation variables) had an overfitting problem. Therefore, it is recommended to build SVM models based on significant variables identified by other models, such as logistic regression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Dose-rate effects for apoptosis and micronucleus formation in gamma-irradiated human lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boreham, D.R.; Dolling, J.-A.; Maves, S.R. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Siwarungsun, N. [Chulalongkorn Univ., Bangkok (Thailand); Mitchel, R.E.J. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2000-07-01

    We have compared dose-rate effects for {gamma}-radiation-induced apoptosis and micronucleus formation in human lymphocytes. Long-term assessment of individual radiation-induced apoptosis showed little intraindividual variation but significant interindividual variation. The effectiveness of radiation exposure to cause apoptosis or micronucleus formation was reduced by low-dose-rate exposures, but the reduction was apparent at different dose rates for these two end points. Micronucleus formation showed a dose-rate effect when the dose rate was lowered to 0.29 cGy/min, but there was no accompanying cell cycle delay. A further increase in the dose-rate effect was seen at 0.15 cGy/min, but was now accompanied by cell cycle delay. There was no dose-rate effect for the induction of apoptosis until the dose rate was reduced to 0.15 cGy/min, indicating that the mechanisms or signals for processing radiation-induced lesions for these two end points must be different at least in part. There appear to be two mechanisms that contribute to the dose-rate effect for micronucleus formation. One of these does not affect binucleate cell frequency and occurs at dose rates higher than that required to produce a dose-rate effect for apoptosis, and one affects binucleate cell frequency, induced only at the very low dose rate which coincidentally produces a dose-rate effect for apoptosis. Since the dose rate at which cells showed reduced apoptosis as well as a further reduction in micronucleus formation was very low, we conclude that the processing of the radiation-induced lesions that induce apoptosis, and some micronuclei, is very slow in quiescent and PHA-stimulated lymphocytes, respectively. (author)

  6. [Age, period and birth-cohort effects on marriage rates in Japanese women between 1985 and 2005, and comparison of trends of effects between marriage and birth rates].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Hiroyuki; Odagiri, Youichi; Ohtake, Kazuo; Kobayashi, Jun

    2008-07-01

    An age-period-cohort (APC) analysis was performed to provide information about age-, period-, and cohort-specific effects on marriage trends in Japanese women. In addition, the relationships of the trends of age-, period-, and cohort-specific effects between marriage and birth were analyzed. We obtained data regarding marriages of Japanese women aged between 19 and 38 years for the period of 1985 to 2005 from the National Vital Statistics. Population data used were for an estimated population, obtained from the Population Estimates Annual Reports. Standard cohort tables comprising marriage and population data were analyzed using a Bayesian APC model to identify age-, period-, and cohort-specific effects on marriage rate trends. Previously obtained data for a similar APC-analysis of birth trends were used to compare the trends in the effects of age, period, and cohort on marriage and birth patterns. For this purpose, the estimated values for each effect were normalized. With regard to the marriage trends in Japanese women, the effect of age was the greatest, peaking at the age of 25 years. The period effect increased after 1997; however, its effect was relatively limited as compared to the other effects. The cohort effect, which was greater than the period effect and less than the age effect, on marriage trends showed a decreasing slope for birth cohorts born after 1966 and subsequent increase after 1982. Comparison of age, period and cohort effects between the trends in marriage and birth rates showed that the age effect distinctly peaked at 25 and 28 years for marriage and births, respectively. The period effect on marriage and birth showed a decreasing trend until 1991 and subsequent increased in 1992 and 1997 for births and marriage, respectively. With regard to the cohort effect on birth rates, a decreasing trend was observed for the birth cohorts after 1961, with increase after 1977. However, with regard to the cohort effect on marriage rates, the decreasing

  7. Systematic data mining using a pattern database to accelerate yield ramp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teoh, Edward; Dai, Vito; Capodieci, Luigi; Lai, Ya-Chieh; Gennari, Frank

    2014-03-01

    Pattern-based approaches to physical verification, such as DRC Plus, which use a library of patterns to identify problematic 2D configurations, have been proven to be effective in capturing the concept of manufacturability where traditional DRC fails. As the industry moves to advanced technology nodes, the manufacturing process window tightens and the number of patterns continues to rapidly increase. This increase in patterns brings about challenges in identifying, organizing, and carrying forward the learning of each pattern from test chip designs to first product and then to multiple product variants. This learning includes results from printability simulation, defect scans and physical failure analysis, which are important for accelerating yield ramp. Using pattern classification technology and a relational database, GLOBALFOUNDRIES has constructed a pattern database (PDB) of more than one million potential yield detractor patterns. In PDB, 2D geometries are clustered based on similarity criteria, such as radius and edge tolerance. Each cluster is assigned a representative pattern and a unique identifier (ID). This ID is then used as a persistent reference for linking together information such as the failure mechanism of the patterns, the process condition where the pattern is likely to fail and the number of occurrences of the pattern in a design. Patterns and their associated information are used to populate DRC Plus pattern matching libraries for design-for-manufacturing (DFM) insertion into the design flow for auto-fixing and physical verification. Patterns are used in a production-ready yield learning methodology to identify and score critical hotspot patterns. Patterns are also used to select sites for process monitoring in the fab. In this paper, we describe the design of PDB, the methodology for identifying and analyzing patterns across multiple design and technology cycles, and the use of PDB to accelerate manufacturing process learning. One such

  8. Effects of Personalization and Invitation Email Length on Web-Based Survey Response Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trespalacios, Jesús H.; Perkins, Ross A.

    2016-01-01

    Individual strategies to increase response rate and survey completion have been extensively researched. Recently, efforts have been made to investigate a combination of interventions to yield better response rates for web-based surveys. This study examined the effects of four different survey invitation conditions on response rate. From a large…

  9. An Econometric Analysis of the Effect of Exchange Rate Volatility on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Exchange rate policy plays an important role in national economic development and management. Thus, the debate on exchange rate management has preoccupied economists and public sector managers for a very long time. The objective of this paper is to examine the effect of exchange rate volatility on tradable goods ...

  10. The Effect of Monetary Policy on Exchange Rates : How to Solve the Puzzles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kumah, F.Y.

    1996-01-01

    Recent empirical research on the effects of monetary policy shocks on exchange rate fluctuations have encountered the exchange rate puzzle and th e forward discount bias puzzle.The exchange rate puzzle is the tendency of the domestic currency (of non-US G-7 countries) to depreciate against the US

  11. 78 FR 6140 - Discount Rates for Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Federal Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-29

    ... BUDGET Discount Rates for Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Federal Programs AGENCY: Office of Management... and Budget revised Circular A-94 in 1992. The revised Circular specified certain discount rates to be... States Government were changed. These discount rates are found in Appendix C of the revised Circular. The...

  12. 77 FR 1743 - Discount Rates for Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Federal Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-11

    ... BUDGET Discount Rates for Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Federal Programs AGENCY: Office of Management... and Budget revised Circular A-94 in 1992. The revised Circular specified certain discount rates to be... States Government were changed. These discount rates are found in Appendix C of the revised Circular. The...

  13. 76 FR 7881 - Discount Rates for Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Federal Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-11

    ... BUDGET Discount Rates for Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Federal Programs AGENCY: Office of Management... and Budget revised Circular A-94 in 1992. The revised Circular specified certain discount rates to be... States Government were changed. These discount rates are found in Appendix C of the revised Circular. The...

  14. Effects of shifts in the rate of repetitive stimulation on sustained attention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krulewitz, J. E.; Warm, J. S.; Wohl, T. H.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of shifts in the rate of presentation of repetitive neutral events (background event rate) were studied in a visual vigilance task. Four groups of subjects experienced either a high (21 events/min) or a low (6 events/min) event rate for 20 min and then experienced either the same or the alternate event rate for an additional 40 min. The temporal occurrence of critical target signals was identical for all groups, irrespective of event rate. The density of critical signals was 12 signals/20 min. By the end of the session, shifts in event rate were associated with changes in performance which resembled contrast effects found in other experimental situations in which shift paradigms were used. Relative to constant event rate control conditions, a shift from a low to a high event rate depressed the probability of signal detections, while a shift in the opposite direction enhanced the probability of signal detections.

  15. Microsecond ramp compression of a metallic liner driven by a 5 MA current on the SPHINX machine using a dynamic load current multiplier pulse shaping

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Almeida, T.; Lassalle, F.; Morell, A.; Grunenwald, J.; Zucchini, F.; Loyen, A.; Maysonnave, T.; Chuvatin, A. S.

    2013-09-01

    SPHINX is a 6 MA, 1-μs Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) operated by the CEA Gramat (France) and primarily used for imploding Z-pinch loads for radiation effects studies. Among the options that are currently being evaluated to improve the generator performances are an upgrade to a 20 MA, 1-μs LTD machine and various power amplification schemes, including a compact Dynamic Load Current Multiplier (DLCM). A method for performing magnetic ramp compression experiments, without modifying the generator operation scheme, was developed using the DLCM to shape the initial current pulse in order to obtain the desired load current profile. In this paper, we discuss the overall configuration that was selected for these experiments, including the choice of a coaxial cylindrical geometry for the load and its return current electrode. We present both 3-D Magneto-hydrodynamic and 1D Lagrangian hydrodynamic simulations which helped guide the design of the experimental configuration. Initial results obtained over a set of experiments on an aluminium cylindrical liner, ramp-compressed to a peak pressure of 23 GPa, are presented and analyzed. Details of the electrical and laser Doppler interferometer setups used to monitor and diagnose the ramp compression experiments are provided. In particular, the configuration used to field both homodyne and heterodyne velocimetry diagnostics in the reduced access available within the liner's interior is described. Current profiles measured at various critical locations across the system, particularly the load current, enabled a comprehensive tracking of the current circulation and demonstrate adequate pulse shaping by the DLCM. The liner inner free surface velocity measurements obtained from the heterodyne velocimeter agree with the hydrocode results obtained using the measured load current as the input. An extensive hydrodynamic analysis is carried out to examine information such as pressure and particle velocity history profiles or magnetic

  16. Microsecond ramp compression of a metallic liner driven by a 5 MA current on the SPHINX machine using a dynamic load current multiplier pulse shaping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Almeida, T.; Lassalle, F.; Morell, A.; Grunenwald, J.; Zucchini, F.; Loyen, A. [CEA, DAM, GRAMAT, F-46500 Gramat (France); Maysonnave, T. [International Technologies for High Pulsed Power, F-46500 Thégra (France); Chuvatin, A. S. [Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas, Ecole Polytechnique, F-91128 Palaiseau (France)

    2013-09-15

    SPHINX is a 6 MA, 1-μs Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) operated by the CEA Gramat (France) and primarily used for imploding Z-pinch loads for radiation effects studies. Among the options that are currently being evaluated to improve the generator performances are an upgrade to a 20 MA, 1-μs LTD machine and various power amplification schemes, including a compact Dynamic Load Current Multiplier (DLCM). A method for performing magnetic ramp compression experiments, without modifying the generator operation scheme, was developed using the DLCM to shape the initial current pulse in order to obtain the desired load current profile. In this paper, we discuss the overall configuration that was selected for these experiments, including the choice of a coaxial cylindrical geometry for the load and its return current electrode. We present both 3-D Magneto-hydrodynamic and 1D Lagrangian hydrodynamic simulations which helped guide the design of the experimental configuration. Initial results obtained over a set of experiments on an aluminium cylindrical liner, ramp-compressed to a peak pressure of 23 GPa, are presented and analyzed. Details of the electrical and laser Doppler interferometer setups used to monitor and diagnose the ramp compression experiments are provided. In particular, the configuration used to field both homodyne and heterodyne velocimetry diagnostics in the reduced access available within the liner's interior is described. Current profiles measured at various critical locations across the system, particularly the load current, enabled a comprehensive tracking of the current circulation and demonstrate adequate pulse shaping by the DLCM. The liner inner free surface velocity measurements obtained from the heterodyne velocimeter agree with the hydrocode results obtained using the measured load current as the input. An extensive hydrodynamic analysis is carried out to examine information such as pressure and particle velocity history profiles or

  17. Effects of Monetary Shocks on Exchange Rate: Empirical Evidence from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Chandan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the effect of monetary policy shocks on exchange rate in a Multiple Indicator Approach (MIA framework. This study has employed a monetary policy index of key monetary policy instruments in India (Bank rate, Cash Reserve Ratio, Repo and Reverse Repo rates. The study finds the empirical evidence for puzzling behavior of price level and exchange rate. Both price and exchange rate increase initially in response to a contractionary policy shock. Policy shocks affect output, inflation and exchange rate to an appreciable extent over a forecasting horizon of one year.

  18. Using Ramped Pyrolysis - Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry to Evaluate Petroleum Hydrocarbons Following the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, M.; Rosenheim, B. E.; Bacosa, H. P.; Liu, J.; Liu, Z.

    2016-02-01

    In summer of 2010, the Deepwater Horizon oil spill polluted hundreds of miles of coastline along the Gulf of Mexico. A combination of human-mediated and natural weathering processes then altered the chemical composition (i.e. toxicity) of this spilled crude oil over time and space. One of the most important, yet challenging, aspects of oil spill science is to quantify these chemical changes in natural environments. In this study, we develop ramped pyrolysis - gas chromatography - mass spectrometry (Py-GC-MS) to address this challenge. In this technique, 0.1mg of freeze-dried sample is pyrolyzed over a gradual temperature ramp (50-650°C). The eluded gas is cold-trapped over different thermal ranges (a.k.a. thermal slicing) and each range is individually analyzed via GC-MS, yielding quantifiable, compound-specific results. Py-GC-MS with thermal slicing has never been used for petroleum hydrocarbon analysis, but it has many advantages - it uses minimal sample, is time efficient and does not require sample preparation (minimizing compound loss and increasing the analytical window). During development of this method, we analyzed oiled sediments and tar collected on Grand Isle, Louisiana from 2010-2012. We quantified n-alkane (C10-C38), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and hopane content and confirmed these results with traditional solvent extraction, silica gel fractionation and mass spectrometry. Overall, we found rapid depletion of n-alkanes and PAHs (>90% depletion) in all samples within one year of Deepwater Horizon. After this, n-alkanes were almost 100% depleted by 2012, while PAH degradation continued to a maximum total degradation of 99% and 98% in sediment and tar, respectively. This not only describes the fate of petroleum compounds in salt marshes and beach deposits over time, but also complements previous radiocarbon studies of the same samples showing different rates of degradation in different micro-environments. In addition, the results presented

  19. EFFECT OF SOIL WATER POTENTIAL ON TRANSPIRATION RATE IN CUCUMBER PLANTS

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Tosio; Eguchi, Hiromi; Kuroda, Masaharu; Tanaka, Akira; Koutaki, Masahiro; Ng, Ah Lek; Matsui, Tsuyoshi

    1985-01-01

    In an attempt to examine the effect of soil water potential (pF) on transpiration rate, leaf temperature of cucumber plants was measured under various conditions of soil water potential, and transpiration rate was calculated from heat balance of the leaf. Transpiration rate decreased with reduction in soil water potential; transpiration rate dropped at soil water potentials lower than pF 3.0. This fact suggests that the reduction in soil water potential restricts water uptake in roots and cau...

  20. Hydrogeology of the unsaturated zone, North Ramp area of the Exploratory Studies Facility, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseau, Joseph P.; Kwicklis, Edward M.; Gillies, Daniel C.; Rousseau, Joseph P.; Kwicklis, Edward M.; Gillies, Daniel C.

    1999-01-01

    -14, CHn pore water, and saturated-zone water at boreholes NRG-7 a and SD-9. The absolute chloride concentration of the perched water, however, is much lower than the chloride concentration of pore water from either the PTn or the TSw. The chemical and isotopic compositions of perched water indicate that this water was derived primarily from fracture flow, with little or no contribution from water in the matrix of the overlying rock. Carbon-14 ages of perched water range from 3,000 to 7,000 years. Strontium-87 isotope ratios indicate dissolution of surficial pedogenic calcite and calcite fracture fillings, which supports a fracture-flow origin for perched water. Moreover, carbon-13 and deuterium isotope values indicate rapid infiltration into fractures with little or no prior evaporation. Evidence for deep fracture flow into the Calico Hills Formation at UZ-14 is indicated by carbon-14 values that are from 65 and 95 percent modem carbon, equivalent to apparent ages of about 3,500 to 500 years. Some of these ages are younger than age estimates for perched water in the overlying Topopah Spring Tuff and are much younger than any that could be derived from a matrix-flow model. Evidence is lacking for extensive lateral flow within the PTn or for interception and diversion of this flow downward along structural pathways (faults), two key features of the original conceptual model for unsaturated flow at Yucca Mountain. Where data are available to infer lateral flow in the PTn, it is not certain that fracture flow could not have produced the same results. Pneumatic data, derived primarily from analysis of the interference effects from excavation of the North Ramp tunnel, indicate that faults within the Topopah Spring Tuff are open over substantial distances and are very permeable. Tunnel-boring-induced pneumatic disturbances have been propagated along these faults over distances that exceed 500 meters. These disturbances also have been detected in the pneumatic

  1. The effects of physical and geochemical heterogeneities on hydro-geochemical transport and effective reaction rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atchley, Adam L.; Navarre-Sitchler, Alexis K.; Maxwell, Reed M.

    2014-09-01

    The role of coupled physical and geochemical heterogeneities in hydro-geochemical transport is investigated by simulating three-dimensional transport in a heterogeneous system with kinetic mineral reactions. Ensembles of 100 physically heterogeneous realizations were simulated for three geochemical conditions: 1) spatially homogeneous reactive mineral surface area, 2) reactive surface area positively correlated to hydraulic heterogeneity, and 3) reactive surface area negatively correlated to hydraulic heterogeneity. Groundwater chemistry and the corresponding effective reaction rates were calculated at three transverse planes to quantify differences in plume evolution due to heterogeneity in mineral reaction rates and solute residence time (τ). The model is based on a hypothetical CO2 intrusion into groundwater from a carbon capture utilization and storage (CCUS) operation where CO2 dissolution and formation of carbonic acid created geochemical dis-equilibrium between fluids and the mineral galena that resulted in increased aqueous lead (Pb2 +) concentrations. Calcite dissolution buffered the pH change and created conditions of galena oversaturation, which then reduced lead concentrations along the flow path. Near the leak kinetic geochemical reactions control the release of solutes into the fluid, but further along the flow path mineral solubility controls solute concentrations. Simulation results demonstrate the impact of heterogeneous distribution of geochemical reactive surface area in coordination with physical heterogeneity on the effective reaction rate (Krxn,eff) and Pb2 + concentrations within the plume. Dissimilarities between ensemble Pb2 + concentration and Krxn,eff are attributed to how geochemical heterogeneity affects the time (τeq) and therefore advection distance (Leq) required for the system to re-establish geochemical equilibrium. Only after geochemical equilibrium is re-established, Krxn,eff and Pb2 + concentrations are the same for all three

  2. The effects of physical and geochemical heterogeneities on hydro-geochemical transport and effective reaction rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atchley, Adam L; Navarre-Sitchler, Alexis K; Maxwell, Reed M

    2014-09-01

    The role of coupled physical and geochemical heterogeneities in hydro-geochemical transport is investigated by simulating three-dimensional transport in a heterogeneous system with kinetic mineral reactions. Ensembles of 100 physically heterogeneous realizations were simulated for three geochemical conditions: 1) spatially homogeneous reactive mineral surface area, 2) reactive surface area positively correlated to hydraulic heterogeneity, and 3) reactive surface area negatively correlated to hydraulic heterogeneity. Groundwater chemistry and the corresponding effective reaction rates were calculated at three transverse planes to quantify differences in plume evolution due to heterogeneity in mineral reaction rates and solute residence time (τ). The model is based on a hypothetical CO2 intrusion into groundwater from a carbon capture utilization and storage (CCUS) operation where CO2 dissolution and formation of carbonic acid created geochemical dis-equilibrium between fluids and the mineral galena that resulted in increased aqueous lead (Pb(2+)) concentrations. Calcite dissolution buffered the pH change and created conditions of galena oversaturation, which then reduced lead concentrations along the flow path. Near the leak kinetic geochemical reactions control the release of solutes into the fluid, but further along the flow path mineral solubility controls solute concentrations. Simulation results demonstrate the impact of heterogeneous distribution of geochemical reactive surface area in coordination with physical heterogeneity on the effective reaction rate (Krxn,eff) and Pb(2+) concentrations within the plume. Dissimilarities between ensemble Pb(2+) concentration and Krxn,eff are attributed to how geochemical heterogeneity affects the time (τeq) and therefore advection distance (Leq) required for the system to re-establish geochemical equilibrium. Only after geochemical equilibrium is re-established, Krxn,eff and Pb(2+) concentrations are the same for all

  3. Behavioral momentum theory fails to account for the effects of reinforcement rate on resurgence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Andrew R; Shahan, Timothy A

    2016-05-01

    The behavioral-momentum model of resurgence predicts reinforcer rates within a resurgence preparation should have three effects on target behavior. First, higher reinforcer rates in baseline (Phase 1) produce more persistent target behavior during extinction plus alternative reinforcement. Second, higher rate alternative reinforcement during Phase 2 generates greater disruption of target responding during extinction. Finally, higher rates of either reinforcement source should produce greater responding when alternative reinforcement is suspended in Phase 3. Recent empirical reports have produced mixed results in terms of these predictions. Thus, the present experiment further examined reinforcer-rate effects on persistence and resurgence. Rats pressed target levers for high-rate or low-rate variable-interval food during Phase 1. In Phase 2, target-lever pressing was extinguished, an alternative nose-poke became available, and nose-poking produced either high-rate variable-interval, low-rate variable-interval, or no (an extinction control) alternative reinforcement. Alternative reinforcement was suspended in Phase 3. For groups that received no alternative reinforcement, target-lever pressing was less persistent following high-rate than low-rate Phase-1 reinforcement. Target behavior was more persistent with low-rate alternative reinforcement than with high-rate alternative reinforcement or extinction alone. Finally, no differences in Phase-3 responding were observed for groups that received either high-rate or low-rate alternative reinforcement, and resurgence occurred only following high-rate alternative reinforcement. These findings are inconsistent with the momentum-based model of resurgence. We conclude this model mischaracterizes the effects of reinforcer rates on persistence and resurgence of operant behavior. © 2016 Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior.

  4. DAST Mated to B-52 on Ramp - Close-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    ensures freedom from flutter-an uncontrolled, divergent oscillation of the structure, driven by aerodynamic forces and resulting in structural failure. The program used refined theoretical tools to predict at what speed flutter would occur. It then designed a high-response control system to counteract the motion and permit a much lighter wing structure. The wing had, in effect, 'electronic stiffness.' Flight research with this concept was extremely hazardous because an error in either the flutter prediction or control system implementation would result in wing structural failure and the loss of the vehicle. Because of this, flight demonstration of a sub-scale vehicle made sense from the standpoint of both safety and cost. The program anticipated structural failure during the course of the flight research. The Firebee II was a supersonic drone selected as the DAST testbed because its wing could be easily replaced, it used only tail-mounted control surfaces, and it was available as surplus from the U. S. Air Force. It was capable of 5-g turns (that is, turns producing acceleration equal to 5 times that of gravity). Langley outfitted a drone with an aeroelastic, supercritical research wing suitable for a Mach 0.98 cruise transport with a predicted flutter speed of Mach 0.95 at an altitude of 25,000 feet. Dryden and Langley, in conjunction with Boeing, designed and fabricated a digital flutter suppression system (FSS). Dryden developed an RPRV (remotely piloted research vehicle) flight control system; integrated the wing, FSS, and vehicle systems; and conducted the flight program. In addition to a digital flight control system and aeroelastic wings, each DAST drone had research equipment mounted in its nose and a mid-air retrieval system in its tail. The drones were originally launched from the NASA B-52 bomber and later from a DC-130. The DAST vehicle's flight was monitored from the sky by an F-104 chase plane. When the DAST's mission ended, it deployed a parachute and then

  5. Modeling Effectiveness of Gradual Increases in Source Level to Mitigate Effects of Sonar on Marine Mammals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benda-Beckmann, A.M. von; Wensveen, P.J.; Kvadsheim, P.H.; Lam, F.P.A.; Miller, P.J.O.; Tyack, P.L.; Ainslie, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Ramp-up or soft-start procedures (i.e., gradual increase in the source level) are used to mitigate the effect of sonar sound on marine mammals, although no one to date has tested whether ramp-up procedures are effective at reducing the effect of sound on marine mammals. We investigated the

  6. The Effect of Valsartan on Heart Rate Variability and Heart Rate Recovery in Patients with Mild to Moderate Mitral Stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Metin Esen

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Atrial fibrillation (AF is known to be one of the most important complications of mitral stenosis (MS. It has been reported that autonomic nervous system (ANS had an effect on AF development, heart rate variability (HRV and heart rate recovery (HRR were under the control of ANS, and their disorders were present in MS. We studied the effect of Valsartan on HRV and HRT, and thus its effect on ANS. Methods: Eleven patients (39±8 years, 10 females with mild to moderate MS were included in the study. Sixteen volunteers (38±8 years, 14 females matched for age and sex were selected for control group. All subjects underwent transthoracic echocardiography (TTE, symptom-limited treadmill test and 24 hour Holter monitorization.The patients were administered 160 mg of Valsartan daily for 14 weeks. TTE, treadmill test and Holter monitorization were repeated at the end of treatment period. In Holter monitorization, the time and frequency domain analysis of HRV and in exercise test, HRR at first and third minutes (HRR1 and HRR3 were examined. Results: Before Valsartan treatment, no significant difference was found in HRR and HRV parameters between the two groups. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and also HRR1values were significantly decreased after treatment of Valsartan (117±6 vs. 107±4 mmHg p<0.002, 76±6 vs. 69±9 mmHg p<0.044, 44±14 vs. 33±12 p< 0.014, respectively, while the exercise time was significantly increased (786±114 vs. 846±95 sn p< 0.044. In Holter analysis neither time nor frequency domain of HRV parameters showed a meaningful change. Conclusion: In moderate MS, treatment with Valsartan improved the effort capacity, while autonomic function parameters have been defined on the base of HRV and HRR were not significantly different.

  7. Trunk muscle activity during wheelchair ramp ascent and the influence of a geared wheel on the demands of postural control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howarth, Samuel J; Polgar, Jan M; Dickerson, Clark R; Callaghan, Jack P

    2010-03-01

    To quantify levels of torso muscular demand during wheelchair ramp ascent and the ability of a geared wheel to influence trunk muscle activity. Repeated-measures design. Each participant completed manual wheelchair ramp ascents for each combination of 4 ramp grades (1:12, 1:10, 1:8, and 1:6) and 3 wheel conditions (in gear, out of gear, and a standard spoked wheel) in a block randomized order by wheel condition. Biomechanics laboratory. Healthy novice wheelchair users (N=13; 6 men) from a university student population. Not applicable. Peak electromyographic activity, expressed as a percentage of maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) of the abdominals, latissimus dorsi, and erector spinae during ramp ascent. Temporal location of peak electromyographic activity (EMG) within a propulsive cycle and integrated electromyographic activity for a single propulsive cycle. Abdominal peak activity increased 13.9% MVIC while peak posterior trunk muscle activity increased 4.9% MVIC between the shallowest and steepest ramp grades (Pwheel prevented increased peak activity of the rectus abdominis and external oblique (P>.05). Only peak electromyographic timing of the erector spinae was influenced during the push phase by increasing ramp slope. Increased trunk muscular demand as a result of increasing ramp slope is required to enhance stiffness of the spinal column and provide a stable base during manual propulsion. Manual wheelchair users with compromised activity capacity, compromised abdominal muscle strength, or both, may be able to navigate more difficult terrains while using a geared wheelchair wheel because of reduced demands from the abdominal musculature in the geared wheel condition. Copyright 2010 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Factors controlling the sedimentary evolution of the Kimmeridgian ramp in the north Iberian Basin (NE Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bádenas, B.

    1994-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to summarize the present knowledge reached by the authors on the carbonate ramp which developed in the iberian basin during Kimmeridgian times. Our results were obtained from a combined field analysis and computer modelling carried out in the north Iberian Chain (NE Spain. Extensive field analysis in the Ricia area (Zaragoza, NE Spain, resulted in a detailed mapping of the transition from inner to outerramp facies on this carbonate rampo Three facies belts may be distinguished in this rampo The outer ramp facies consists of marls and mudstones rhythmic facies. The inner ramp facies, located aboye fair-weather wave base, are dominated by coral patch reef growing. The middle ramp facies are represented by marls and micrites bearing skeletal and oolitic tempestite levels which sharply grade into high-amplitude o'olitic sandwave. Factors such as resedimentation by storms, carbonate production and relative variation of sea level acting in the Kimmeridgian ramp are also quantiphied and discussed. Most of the mud accumulated in outer-ramp areas was produced in the coral «carbonate factory» located in inner areas. Off-shore resedimentation by storm was the main agent of basinward transport of this mudo The deduced accommodation curve consists of three elements: a linear rise which satisfactorily matches the normal subsidence figures observed in intracratonic basins; a third-order cycle, that may have a regional cause and higher order cycles in the Milanckovich band, that may be eustatic in origin.La sedimentación en la cuenca ibérica septentrional durante el Kimmeridgiense tuvo lugar en una extensa rampa carbonatada de bajo ángulo. Las facies de rampa externa, acumuladas por debajo del nivel de base del oleaje debido a tormentas (i.e., C. 50 to 80 m de profundidad, están formadas por una ritmita de margas y calizas (i.e., Fm Loriguilla. Las facies de rampa interna, localizadas por encima del nivel de base del oleaje de

  9. The influence of loading rates on hardening effects in elasto/viscoplastic strain-hardening materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Angelis, Fabio; Cancellara, Donato; Grassia, Luigi; D'Amore, Alberto

    2018-01-01

    In this paper the influence of increasing loading rates on hardening effects is analyzed for rate-dependent elastoplastic materials. The effects of different loading rates on hardening rules are discussed with regard to the constitutive behavior of strain-hardening materials in elasto/viscoplasticity. A suitable procedure for the numerical simulation of rate-sensitive material behavior is illustrated. A comparative analysis is presented on constitutive relations in strain-hardening plasticity without rate effects and with rate effects in order to show the different role played by hardening rules in the rate-sensitivity analysis of elasto/viscoplastic strain-hardening materials. By reporting suitable numerical simulations for the adopted constitutive relations it is shown that when the rate of application of the loading is increased the influence of hardening has a different effect in the mechanical behavior of structures. Computational results and applications are finally illustrated in order to show numerically the different role played by hardening on the plastic strains when the loading rates are incremented for elasto/viscoplastic strain-hardening materials and structures.

  10. Effect of algal recycling rate on the performance of Pediastrum boryanum dominated wastewater treatment high rate algal pond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J B K; Craggs, R J

    2014-01-01

    Recycling a portion of gravity harvested algae promoted the dominance of a rapidly settling colonial alga, Pediastrum boryanum (P. boryanum) and improved both biomass productivity and settleability in High Rate Algal Pond (HRAP) treating domestic wastewater. The effect of algal recycling rate on HRAP performance was investigated using 12 replicate mesocosms (18 L) that were operated semi-continuously under ambient conditions. Three experiments were conducted during different seasons with each experiment lasting up to 36 days. Recycling 10%, 25%, and 50% of the 'mass' of daily algal production all increased total biomass concentration in the mesocosms. However, recycling >10% reduced the organic content (volatile suspended solids (VSS)) of the mesocosm biomass from 83% to 68% and did not further increase biomass productivity (based on VSS). This indicates that if a HRAP is operated with a low algal concentration and does not utilise all the available sunlight, algal recycling increases the algal concentration up to an optimum level, resulting in higher algal biomass productivity. Recycling 10% of the daily algal production not only increased biomass productivity by ∼40%, but increased biomass settleability by ∼25%, which was probably a consequence of the ∼30% increase in P. boryanum dominance in the mesocosms compared with controls without recycling.

  11. Broadband suppression of phase-noise with cascaded phase-locked-loops for the generation of frequency ramps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Musch

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The generation of analogue frequency ramps with non-fractional phase-locked-loops (PLL is a cost effective way of linearising varactor controlled oscillators (VCO. In case that the VCO shows a high phase-noise level, a single non-fractional PLL is not able to suppress the phase-noise of the VCO sufficiently. The reason for this is the limited loopbandwidth of the PLL. In the field of precise measurements a high phase-noise level is mostly not tolerable. Examples of VCO-types with an extremely high phase noise level are integrated millimetre wave oscillators based on GaAs-HEMT technology. Both, a low quality factor of the resonator and a high flicker-noise corner frequency of the transistors are the main reason for the poor phase-noise behaviour. On the other hand this oscillator type allows a cost effective implementation of a millimetre-wave VCO. Therefore, a cascaded two-loop structure is presented that is able to linearise a VCO and additionally to reduce its phase-noise significantly.

  12. Human coding synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms at ramp regions of mRNA translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Quan; Qu, Hui-Qi

    2013-01-01

    According to the ramp model of mRNA translation, the first 50 codons favor rare codons and have slower speed of translation. This study aims to detect translational selection on coding synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (sSNP) to support the ramp theory. We investigated fourfold degenerate site (FFDS) sSNPs with A ↔ G or C ↔ T substitutions in human genome for distribution bias of synonymous codons (SC), grouped by CpG or non-CpG sites. Distribution bias of sSNPs between the 3(rd) ~50(th) codons and the 51(st) ~ remainder codons at non-CpG sites were observed. In the 3(rd) ~50(th) codons, G → A sSNPs at non-CpG sites are favored than A → G sSNPs [P = 2.89 × 10(-3)], and C → T at non-CpG sites are favored than T → C sSNPs [P = 8.50 × 10(-3)]. The favored direction of SC usage change is from more frequent SCs to less frequent SCs. The distribution bias is more obvious in synonymous substitutions CG(G → A), AC(C → T), and CT(C → T). The distribution bias of sSNPs in human genome, i.e. frequent SCs to less frequent SCs is favored in the 3(rd) ~50(th) codons, indicates translational selection on sSNPs in the ramp regions of mRNA templates.

  13. Effect of mean velocity shear on the dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizawa, Akira; Liou, Meng-Sing

    1992-01-01

    The dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy in incompressible turbulence is investigated using a two-scale DIA. The dissipation rate is shown to consist of two parts; one corresponds to the dissipation rate used in the current turbulence models of eddy-viscosity type, and another comes from the viscous effect that is closely connected with mean velocity shear. This result can elucidate the physical meaning of the dissipation rate used in the current turbulence models and explain part of the discrepancy in the near-wall dissipation rates between the current turbulence models and direct numerical simulation of the Navier-Stokes equation.

  14. Early diagenesis driven by widespread meteoric infiltration of a Central European carbonate ramp: A reinterpretation of the Upper Muschelkalk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Arthur; Diamond, Larryn W.

    2017-12-01

    Meteoric diagenesis of carbonate ramps is often difficult to interpret and can commonly be confused with other coinciding diagenetic processes. The Middle Triassic Upper Muschelkalk of Switzerland provides an insightful case in which the effects of several overprinting diagenetic environments, including matrix dolomitization, can be clearly unravelled. Previous studies suggested that diagenesis took place in connate marine waters, with later meteoric waters being invoked to explain recrystallization of dolomite. In this study, diagenetic analyses (C-O stable isotope ratios, thin-section point counting, cathodoluminescence and UV-fluorescence microscopy) of calcitic bioclastic samples have revealed that early diagenesis (pre-stylolitization) and the accompanying porosity evolution did not occur exclusively in the presence of marine fluids. Five sequential stages of diagenesis have been identified: marine, shallow burial, mixing-zone, meteoric and dolomitization. Marine diagenesis induced precipitation of bladed and inclusion-rich syntaxial cements that fluoresce strongly under UV-light. Both cements account for a mean 7.5 vol% reduction in the porosity of bioclastic beds. Shallow burial diagenesis likely induced mouldic porosity and associated fluorescent dog-tooth cementation. Based on light oxygen isotope and elevated strontium isotope ratios, matrix aragonite-calcite neomorphism is interpreted to have occurred in a mixture of marine and meteoric fluids. The combination of shallow burial and mixing-zone processes reduced porosity on average by 4.8 vol%. Evidence for subsequent meteoric diagenesis is found in abundant dog-tooth and blocky calcite cements that have mean δ18OVPDB of - 9.36‰ and no signs of recrystallization. These meteoric cements reduced porosity by a further 13.4 vol%. Percolation of meteoric water through the ramp was driven by hydraulic gradients on an adjacent basement high, which was exposed by a cycle of early Ladinian regressions

  15. Effects of subchronic exposures to concentrated ambient particles (CAPs) in mice. III. Acute and chronic effects of CAPs on heart rate, heart-rate fluctuation, and body temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jing-Shiang; Nadziejko, Christine; Chen, Lung Chi

    2005-04-01

    Normal mice (C57) and mice prone to develop atherosclerosis (ApoE-/-) were implanted with electrocardiograph (EKG), core body temperature, and motion transmitters were exposed daily for 6 h to Tuxedo, NY, concentrated ambient particles (CAPs) for 5 day/wk during the spring and summer of 2003. The series of 5-min EKG monitoring and body-temperature measurements were obtained for each animal in the CAPs and filtered air sham exposure groups. Our hypothesis was that chronic exposure could cause cumulative health effects. We used our recently developed nonparametric method to estimate the daily time periods that mean heart rates (HR), body temperature, and physical activity differed significantly between the CAPs and sham exposed group. CAPs exposure most affected heart rate between 1:30 a.m. and 4:30 a.m. With the response variables being the average heart rate, body temperature, and physical activity, we adopted a two-stage modeling approach to obtain the estimates of chronic and acute effects on the changes of these three response variables. In the first stage, a time-varying model estimated daily crude effects. In the second stage, the true means of the estimated crude effects were modeled with a polynominal function of time for chronic effects, a linear term of daily CAPs exposure concentrations for acute effects, and a random component for unknown noise. A Bayesian framework combined these two stages. There were significant decreasing patterns of HR, body temperature, and physical activity for the ApoE-/- mice over the 5 mo of CAPs exposure, with smaller and nonsignificant changes for the C57 mice. The chronic effect changes of the three response variables for ApoE-/- mice were maximal in the last few weeks. There was also a significant relationship between CAPs exposure concentration and short-term changes of heart rate in ApoE-/- mice during exposure. Response variables were also defined for examining fluctuations of 5-min heart rates within long (i.e., 3-6 h

  16. Application of Magnetic Markers for Precise Measurement of Magnetic Fields in Ramped Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Benedikt, Michael; Lindroos, M

    1999-01-01

    For precise measurements of the magnetic field in ramped machines, different magnetic markers are in use. The best known are peaking strips, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) probes and Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) probes. Their operational principles and limitations are explained and some examples of recent and new applications are given. A fuller theoretical description is given of the lesser-known Ferrimagnetic Resonance (FMR) probe and its practical application. The essential purpose of these magnetic markers is the in situ calibration of either on-line magnetic field measurements (e.g. via a magnetic pick-up coil) or field predictions (e.g. using a magnet model).

  17. Power ramp limitation and frequency support in large scale PVPPs without storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Craciun, Bogdan-Ionut; Spataru, Sergiu; Kerekes, Tamas

    2013-01-01

    ramps inducing short-term voltage and frequency instabilities into the power system. System operators in countries with increased PV penetration started to become more and more conservative regarding their operation creating strict Grid Codes (GCs). As a proven fact European Network of Transmission......Photovoltaic (PV) power generation started to become a mature technology and large scale PV Power Plants (PVPPs) operating in Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT) are not a solution anymore. During changes in the meteorological conditions, PVPPs output is directly influenced creating high power...

  18. Maxillary palatal ramp prosthesis: A prosthodontic solution to manage mandibular deviation following surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sampa Ray (Bhattacharya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mandibular resection following surgical treatment for neoplastic lesions of the oral cavity leads to numerous complications including altered mandibular movements, disfigurement, difficult in swallowing, impaired speech and articulation, and deviation of the mandible towards the resected site. Various prosthetic methods are employed to reduce or minimize mandibular deviation and improve and restore the lost functions and esthetic, like maxillomandibular fixation, implant supported prosthesis, removable mandibular guide flange prosthesis, and palatal based guidance restoration. This clinical report describes the rehabilitation of a patient following segmental mandibulectomy using palatal ramp prosthesis.

  19. Measuring modulated luminescence using non-modulated stimulation: Ramping the sample period

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poolton, N.R.J.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Andersen, C.E.

    2003-01-01

    Conventional methods of recording linearly modulated (LM) optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) require control over either the exciting light intensity, or the ability to pulse the source. For many light sources (e.g. constant-power CW lasers, arc lamps and synchrotrons) this can be problematic....... Directly analogous results to LM-OSL can, however, be achieved with non-modulated excitation sources, by ramping the sample period (RSP) of luminescence detection. RSP-OSL has the distinct advantage over LM-OSL in that, since the excitation remains at full power, data accumulation times (that can...

  20. Smoke control and extraction design of overlength car ramp%超长汽车坡道防排烟设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汤晓峰; 李磊

    2015-01-01

    以某长度为228.4 m 的汽车坡道为例,分析了超长汽车坡道排烟设计的难点。采用 FDS 软件进行了 CFD 模拟,验算了具体的排烟效果,分析比较了横向排烟与纵向排烟各工况烟气蔓延与能见度分布,找出了一个高效、安全、可靠的防排烟解决措施。%Taking a length of 228.4 meter car ramp as an example,analyses the difficulties of the smoke control and extraction design for the overlength car ramp.Carries out the CFD simulation by using FDS software,and checks the concrete smoke extraction effect.Compares and analyses the smoke spread and visibility distribution under different conditions of vertical and horizontal smoke extraction,and finds out an efficient,safe and reliable smoke control and extraction solution.