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Sample records for raman ftir photoacoustic-ftir

  1. Photoacoustic FTIR spectroscopic study of undisturbed nacre from red abalone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Devendra; Katti, Kalpana; Katti, Dinesh

    2006-07-01

    In this work, photoacoustic Fourier transform infrared (PA-FTIR) spectroscopy has been utilized to study interfacial interactions of undisturbed nacre and nacre powder from red abalone shell. The spectra of both undisturbed nacre and nacre powder showed characteristic bands of aragonite and proteins. Although nacre powder and undisturbed nacre are chemically identical, PA-FTIR spectrum of undisturbed nacre is found to be significantly different from that of nacre powder. A broad and strong band is observed at around 1485 cm -1 in nacre powder. The intensity of this band is notably reduced in undisturbed nacre. This result is explained on the basis of interfacial interactions between aragonite platelets and acidic proteins. It is also observed that band at around 1788 cm -1 originates from three overlapping bands 1797, 1787 and 1778 cm -1. The band at around 1787 cm -1 is assigned to C dbnd O stretching of carboxylate groups of acidic proteins. The other two bands at 1797 and 1778 cm -1, originate from aragonite and have been assigned to combination bands, ν 3 + ν 4a and ν 3 + ν 4b, respectively. For the study of stratification in undisturbed nacre, PA-FTIR spectra have been collected in step scan mode. The variation in spectra with depth can be attributed to changes in conformation of proteins as well as interfacial interactions.

  2. A comparison of transmission, reflection and photoacoustic FTIR techniques in the analysis of recycled and irradiated polyamide-6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evora, Maria C.; Goncalez, Odair L.

    2002-01-01

    A comparative study involving transmission, reflection and photoacoustic FTIR techniques is presented with analysis of polyamide-6. The potential and limitations of these methods are investigated by analyzing structural variations that take place at the surface in the bulk in recycled and irradiated polyamide-6 with a 1.5 MeV electron beam with a 500kGY dose, in the presence of O 2 . FTIR techniques appear to be sensitive in detecting small structural changes that occur in recycled and irradiated polyamide-6. The analysis of samples indicated the formation of OH, HOC=O-, - C=O groups. Also, small structural changes were detected which are characterisitic of NH and CN-C=O groups. Transmission techniques show better the structural changes in the bulk, and microscopy-FTIR appears to be more sensitive in detecting what occurs at the sample surface. (author)

  3. Determination of drug content in semisolid formulations by non-invasive spectroscopic methods: FTIR - ATR, - PAS, - Raman and PDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gotter, B; Hein, J; Neubert, R H H; Faubel, W; Heissler, St

    2010-01-01

    This study elucidates the potential use of photothermal deflection spectroscopy (PDS), FTIR photoacoustic (FTIR-PAS), FT Raman, and FTIR-attenuated total reflection (FTIR-ATR) spectroscopy as analytical tools for investigating the drug content in semisolid formulations. Regarding the analytical parameters, this study demonstrates the photothermal beam deflection to be definitely comparable to well established spectroscopic methods for this purpose. The correlation coefficients range from 0.990 to 0.999. Likewise, repeatability and limit of detection are comparable.

  4. Structure of polypropylene/polyethylene blends assessed by polarised PA-FTIR spectroscopy, polarised FT Raman spectroscopy and confocal Raman microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schmidt, Pavel; Dybal, Jiří; Ščudla, Jaroslav; Raab, Miroslav; Kratochvíl, Jaroslav; Eichhorn, K. J.; López-Quintana, S.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 184, - (2002), s. 107-122 ISSN 1022-1360. [European Symposium on Polymer Spectroscopy /14./. Dresden, 02.09.2001-05.09.2001] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/97/1071; GA ČR GA203/97/0539; GA AV ČR KSK4050111; GA AV ČR IAA4050904 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4050913 Keywords : polypropylene/polyethylene blends * polarized photoacoustic FTIR spectroscopy * confocal Raman microscopy Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 0.758, year: 2002

  5. FT-IR, RAMAN AND DFT STUDIES ON THE VIBRATIONAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Department of Physics, Science Faculty, Anadolu University, Eskişehir, Turkey ... IR spectrum was recorded using Bruker Optics IFS66v/s FTIR spectrometer at a ... spectrum was obtained using a Bruker Senterra Dispersive Raman microscope.

  6. Raman and FTIR spectroscopy of methane in olivine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A.; Oze, C.; Rossman, G. R.; Celestian, A. J.

    2017-12-01

    Olivine has been proposed to be a direct source of methane (CH4) in serpentinization systems and experiments. Here, Raman and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy were used to verify the presence and abundance of CH4 in olivine samples from nine localities, including the San Carlos olivine. Raman analyses did not identify any methane in the olivine samples. As olivine is orthorhombic, three polarized FTIR spectra were obtained for the olivine samples. No methane was detected in any of the olivine samples using FTIR. Overall, olivine investigated in this study does not appear to be a primary source of methane.

  7. Vibrational microspectroscopy of food. Raman vs. FT-IR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Lisbeth Garbrecht; Løkke, Mette Marie; Micklander, Elisabeth

    2003-01-01

    . The high spatial resolution makes it possible to study areas down to approximately 10x10 mum with FT-IR microspectroscopy and approximately 1 x 1 mum with Raman microspectroscopy. This presentation highlights the advantages and disadvantages of the two microspectroscopic techniques when applied...

  8. [Raman, FTIR spectra and normal mode analysis of acetanilide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Hui-Qin; Tao, Ya-Ping; Han, Li-Gang; Han, Yun-Xia; Mo, Yu-Jun

    2012-10-01

    The Raman and FTIR spectra of acetanilide (ACN) were measured experimentally in the regions of 3 500-50 and 3 500-600 cm(-1) respectively. The equilibrium geometry and vibration frequencies of ACN were calculated based on density functional theory (DFT) method (B3LYP/6-311G(d, p)). The results showed that the theoretical calculation of molecular structure parameters are in good agreement with previous report and better than the ones calculated based on 6-31G(d), and the calculated frequencies agree well with the experimental ones. Potential energy distribution of each frequency was worked out by normal mode analysis, and based on this, a detailed and accurate vibration frequency assignment of ACN was obtained.

  9. 3-Iodobenzaldehyde: XRD, FT-IR, Raman and DFT studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Chandraju Sadolalu Chidan; Parlak, Cemal; Tursun, Mahir; Fun, Hoong-Kun; Rhyman, Lydia; Ramasami, Ponnadurai; Alswaidan, Ibrahim A; Keşan, Gürkan; Chandraju, Siddegowda; Quah, Ching Kheng

    2015-06-15

    The structure of 3-iodobenzaldehyde (3IB) was characterized by FT-IR, Raman and single-crystal X-ray diffraction techniques. The conformational isomers, optimized geometric parameters, normal mode frequencies and corresponding vibrational assignments of 3IB were examined using density functional theory (DFT) method, with the Becke-3-Lee-Yang-Parr (B3LYP) functional and the 6-311+G(3df,p) basis set for all atoms except for iodine. The LANL2DZ effective core basis set was used for iodine. Potential energy distribution (PED) analysis of normal modes was performed to identify characteristic frequencies. 3IB crystallizes in monoclinic space group P21/c with the O-trans form. There is a good agreement between the theoretically predicted structural parameters, and vibrational frequencies and those obtained experimentally. In order to understand halogen effect, 3-halogenobenzaldehyde [XC6H4CHO; X=F, Cl and Br] was also studied theoretically. The free energy difference between the isomers is small but the rotational barrier is about 8kcal/mol. An atypical behavior of fluorine affecting conformational preference is observed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Analysis of environmental microplastics by vibrational microspectroscopy: FTIR, Raman or both?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Käppler, Andrea; Fischer, Dieter; Oberbeckmann, Sonja; Schernewski, Gerald; Labrenz, Matthias; Eichhorn, Klaus-Jochen; Voit, Brigitte

    2016-11-01

    The contamination of aquatic ecosystems with microplastics has recently been reported through many studies, and negative impacts on the aquatic biota have been described. For the chemical identification of microplastics, mainly Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy are used. But up to now, a critical comparison and validation of both spectroscopic methods with respect to microplastics analysis is missing. To close this knowledge gap, we investigated environmental samples by both Raman and FTIR spectroscopy. Firstly, particles and fibres >500 μm extracted from beach sediment samples were analysed by Raman and FTIR microspectroscopic single measurements. Our results illustrate that both methods are in principle suitable to identify microplastics from the environment. However, in some cases, especially for coloured particles, a combination of both spectroscopic methods is necessary for a complete and reliable characterisation of the chemical composition. Secondly, a marine sample containing particles microplastics as well as spectra quality, measurement time and handling. We show that FTIR imaging leads to significant underestimation (about 35 %) of microplastics compared to Raman imaging, especially in the size range microplastics fraction into 500-50 μm (rapid and reliable analysis by FTIR imaging) and into 50-1 μm (detailed and more time-consuming analysis by Raman imaging). Graphical Abstract Marine microplastic sample (fraction <400 μm) on a silicon filter (middle) with the corresponding Raman and IR images.

  11. DFT, FT-IR, FT-Raman and vibrational studies of 3-methoxyphenyl boronic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, N. R.; Hiremath, Sudhir M.; Hiremath, C. S.

    2018-05-01

    The aim of this work is to study the possible stable, geometrical molecular structure, experimental and theoretical FT-IR and FT-Raman spectroscopic methods of 3-Methoxyphenyl boronic acid (3MPBA). FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra were recorded in the region of 4000-400 cm-1 and 40000-50 cm-1 respectively. The optimized geometric structure and vibrational wavenumbers of the title compound were searched by B3LYP hybrid density functional theory method with 6-311++G (d, p) basis set. The Selectedexperimentalbandswereassignedandcharacterizedonthebasisofthescaledtheoreticalwavenumbersby their potential energy distribution (PED) of the vibrational modes obtained from VEDA 4 program. Finally, the predicted calculation results were applied to simulated FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of the title compound, which show agreement with the observed spectra. Whereas, it is observed that, the theoretical frequencies are more than the experimental one for O-H stretching vibration modes of the title molecule.

  12. Diamond/carbon nanotube composites: Raman, FTIR and XPS spectroscopic studies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Varga, Marián; Ižák, Tibor; Vretenár, V.; Kozak, Halyna; Holovský, Jakub; Artemenko, Anna; Hulman, M.; Skákalová, V.; Lee, D. S.; Kromka, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 111, Jan (2016), s. 54-61 ISSN 0008-6223 R&D Projects: GA ČR GC15-22102J; GA MŠk(CZ) 7AMB14SK037 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : diamond * carbon nanotubes * spectroscopy * Raman * FTIR * XPS Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials Impact factor: 6.337, year: 2016

  13. An FT-Raman, FT-IR, and Quantum Chemical Investigation of Stanozolol and Oxandrolone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tibebe Lemma

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available We have studied the Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR and the Fourier transform Raman (FT-Raman spectra of stanozolol and oxandrolone, and we have performed quantum chemical calculations based on the density functional theory (DFT with a B3LYP/6-31G (d, p level of theory. The FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra were collected in a solid phase. The consistency between the calculated and experimental FT-IR and FT-Raman data indicates that the B3LYP/6-31G (d, p can generate reliable geometry and related properties of the title compounds. Selected experimental bands were assigned and characterized on the basis of the scaled theoretical wavenumbers by their total energy distribution. The good agreement between the experimental and theoretical spectra allowed positive assignment of the observed vibrational absorption bands. Finally, the calculation results were applied to simulate the Raman and IR spectra of the title compounds, which show agreement with the observed spectra.

  14. Detection of metanil yellow contamination in turmeric using FT-Raman and FT-IR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhakal, Sagar; Chao, Kuanglin; Qin, Jianwei; Kim, Moon; Schmidt, Walter; Chan, Dian

    2016-05-01

    Turmeric is well known for its medicinal value and is often used in Asian cuisine. Economically motivated contamination of turmeric by chemicals such as metanil yellow has been repeatedly reported. Although traditional technologies can detect such contaminants in food, high operational costs and operational complexities have limited their use to the laboratory. This study used Fourier Transform Raman Spectroscopy (FT-Raman) and Fourier Transform - Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) to identify metanil yellow contamination in turmeric powder. Mixtures of metanil yellow in turmeric were prepared at concentrations of 30%, 25%, 20%, 15%, 10%, 5%, 1% and 0.01% (w/w). The FT-Raman and FT-IR spectral signal of pure turmeric powder, pure metanil yellow powder and the 8 sample mixtures were obtained and analyzed independently to identify metanil yellow contamination in turmeric. The results show that FT-Raman spectroscopy and FT-IR spectroscopy can detect metanil yellow mixed with turmeric at concentrations as low as 1% and 5%, respectively, and may be useful for non-destructive detection of adulterated turmeric powder.

  15. FTIR, FT-Raman, FT-NMR and quantum chemical investigations of 3-acetylcoumarin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjunan, V.; Sakiladevi, S.; Marchewka, M. K.; Mohan, S.

    2013-05-01

    3-Acetylcoumarin (3AC) was synthesised by a Knoevenagel reaction. Conformational analysis using the B3LYP method was also carried out to determine the most stable conformation of the compound. FTIR and FT-Raman spectra of 3AC have been recorded in the range 4000-400 and 4000-100 cm-1, respectively. 1H and 13C NMR spectra have also been recorded. The complete vibrational assignment and analysis of the fundamental modes of the compound were carried out using the experimental FTIR and FT-Raman data and quantum mechanical studies. The experimental vibrational frequencies were compared with the wavenumbers obtained theoretically from the DFT-B3LYP/B3PW91 gradient calculations employing the standard 6-31G**, high level 6-311++G** and cc-pVTZ basis sets for optimised geometry of the compound. The frontier molecular orbital energies of the compound are determined by DFT method.

  16. FTIR and Raman spectroscopic studies of selenium nanoparticles synthesised by the bacterium Azospirillum thiophilum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tugarova, Anna V.; Mamchenkova, Polina V.; Dyatlova, Yulia A.; Kamnev, Alexander A.

    2018-03-01

    Vibrational (Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Raman) spectroscopic techniques can provide unique molecular-level information on the structural and compositional characteristics of complicated biological objects. Thus, their applications in microbiology and related fields are steadily increasing. In this communication, biogenic selenium nanoparticles (Se NPs) were obtained via selenite (SeO32-) reduction by the bacterium Azospirillum thiophilum (strain VKM B-2513) for the first time, using an original methodology for obtaining extracellular NPs. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed the Se NPs to have average diameters within 160-250 nm; their zeta potential was measured to be minus 18.5 mV. Transmission FTIR spectra of the Se NPs separated from bacterial cells showed typical proteinacious, polysaccharide and lipid-related bands, in line with TEM data showing a thin layer covering the Se NPs surface. Raman spectra of dried Se NPs layer in the low-frequency region (under 500 cm-1 down to 150 cm-1) showed a single very strong band with a maximum at 250 cm-1 which, in line with its increased width (ca. 30 cm-1 at half intensity), can be attributed to amorphous elementary Se. Thus, a combination of FTIR and Raman spectroscopic approaches is highly informative in non-destructive analysis of structural and compositional properties of biogenic Se NPs.

  17. Analysis of European honeybee (Apis mellifera) wings using ATR-FTIR and Raman spectroscopy: A pilot study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Machovič, Vladimír; Lapčák, L.; Havelcová, Martina; Borecká, Lenka; Novotná, M.; Novotná, M.; Javůrková, I.; Langrová, I.; Hájková, Š.; Brožová, A.; Titěra, D.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 1 (2017), s. 22-29 ISSN 1211-3174 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : honeybee wings * ATR-FTIR * Raman spectroscopy * protein * lipid * chitin Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation OBOR OECD: Analytical chemistry

  18. FTIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gierczak, C.A.; Andino, J.M.; Butler, J.W.; Heiser, G.A.; Jesion, G.; Korniski, T.J.

    1991-01-01

    FTIR spectroscopy has been shown to be a valuable tool in the analysis of complex gas phase mixtures, such as dilute vehicle exhaust. Regulated and non-regulated vehicle emissions have been routinely sampled and analyzed using prototype instrumentation developed in this laboratory, and in several other laboratories over the last decade. More recently, commercial versions of these FTIR analyzers have become available through several manufacturers. This paper reviews the data acquisition and processing techniques utilized by the FTIR analyzer developed in this laboratory. The statistical detection limits for 22 of the components analyzed by the system are presented. In addition, the linearity of the carbon monoxide (CO) analysis is demonstrated over several orders of magnitude. Experiments designed to study the effects of environmental parameters on the accuracy and the sensitivity of the system are also described

  19. Characterization of mannitol in Curvularia protuberata hyphae by FTIR and Raman spectromicroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isenor, Merrill; Kaminskyj, Susan G W; Rodriguez, Russell J; Redman, Regina S; Gough, Kathleen M

    2010-12-01

    FTIR and Raman spectromicroscopy were used to characterize the composition of Curvularia protuberata hyphae, and to compare a strain isolated from plants inhabiting geothermal soils with a non-geothermal isolate. Thermal IR source images of hyphae have been acquired with a 64 × 64 element focal plane array detector; single point IR spectra have been obtained with synchrotron source light. In some C. protuberata hyphae, we have discovered the spectral signature of crystalline mannitol, a fungal polyol with complex protective roles. With FTIR-FPA imaging, we have determined that the protein content in cells remains fairly constant throughout the length of a hypha, whereas the mannitol is found at discrete, irregular locations. This is the first direct observation of mannitol in intact fungal hyphae. Since the concentration of mannitol in cells varies with respect to position and is not present in all hyphae, this discovery may be related to habitat adaptation, fungal structure and growth stages.

  20. FT-IR, FT-Raman spectra and DFT calculations of melaminium perchlorate monohydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanagathara, N.; Marchewka, M. K.; Drozd, M.; Renganathan, N. G.; Gunasekaran, S.; Anbalagan, G.

    2013-08-01

    Melaminium perchlorate monohydrate (MPM), an organic material has been synthesized by slow solvent evaporation method at room temperature. Powder X-ray diffraction analysis confirms that MPM crystal belongs to triclinic system with space group P-1. FTIR and FT Raman spectra are recorded at room temperature. Functional group assignment has been made for the melaminium cations and perchlorate anions. Vibrational spectra have also been discussed on the basis of quantum chemical density functional theory (DFT) calculations using Firefly (PC GAMESS) version 7.1 G. Vibrational frequencies are calculated and scaled values are compared with experimental values. The assignment of the bands has been made on the basis of the calculated PED. The Mulliken charges, HOMO-LUMO orbital energies are analyzed directly from Firefly program log files and graphically illustrated. HOMO-LUMO energy gap and other related molecular properties are also calculated. The theoretically constructed FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of MPM coincide with the experimental one. The chemical structure of the compound has been established by 1H and 13C NMR spectra. No detectable signal was observed during powder test for second harmonic generation.

  1. FT-IR, FT-Raman and UV-visible spectra of potassium 3-furoyltrifluoroborate salt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iramain, Maximiliano A.; Davies, Lilian; Brandán, Silvia Antonia

    2018-04-01

    The potassium 3-furoyltrifluoroborate salt has been experimentally characterized by means of FT-IR, FT-Raman and UV-Visible spectroscopies. Here, the predicted FT-IR, FT-Raman and UV-visible spectra by using theoretical B3LYP/6-31G* and 6-311++G** calculations show very good correlations with the corresponding experimental ones. The solvation energies were predicted by using both levels of calculations. The NBO analyses reveal the high stability of the salt by using the B3LYP/6-31G* level of theory while the AIM studies evidence the ionic characteristics of the salt in both media. The strong blue colour observed on the K atom by using the molecular electrostatic potential mapped suggests that this region act as typical electrophilic site. The gap values have revealed that the salt in gas phase is more reactive than in solution, as was reported in the literature while, the F13⋯H6 interaction together with the Ksbnd O bond observed by the studies of their charges could probably modulate the reactivities of this salt in aqueous solution. The force fields were computed with the SQMFF methodology and the Molvib program to perform the complete vibrational analysis. Then, the 39 vibration normal modes classified as 26 A'+ 13 A″ were completely assigned and their force constants are also reported.

  2. FTIR, FT-Raman, FT-NMR and quantum chemical investigations of 3-acetylcoumarin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjunan, V; Sakiladevi, S; Marchewka, M K; Mohan, S

    2013-05-15

    3-Acetylcoumarin (3AC) was synthesised by a Knoevenagel reaction. Conformational analysis using the B3LYP method was also carried out to determine the most stable conformation of the compound. FTIR and FT-Raman spectra of 3AC have been recorded in the range 4000-400 and 4000-100 cm(-1), respectively. (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra have also been recorded. The complete vibrational assignment and analysis of the fundamental modes of the compound were carried out using the experimental FTIR and FT-Raman data and quantum mechanical studies. The experimental vibrational frequencies were compared with the wavenumbers obtained theoretically from the DFT-B3LYP/B3PW91 gradient calculations employing the standard 6-31G(**), high level 6-311++G(**) and cc-pVTZ basis sets for optimised geometry of the compound. The frontier molecular orbital energies of the compound are determined by DFT method. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparison of FTIR-ATR and Raman spectroscopy in determination of VLDL triglycerides in blood serum with PLS regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleszko, Adam; Hartwich, Jadwiga; Wójtowicz, Anna; Gąsior-Głogowska, Marlena; Huras, Hubert; Komorowska, Małgorzata

    2017-08-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia, related with triglyceride (TG) in plasma above 1.7 mmol/L is one of the cardiovascular risk factors. Very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) are the main TG carriers. Despite being time consuming, demanding well-qualified staff and expensive instrumentation, ultracentrifugation technique still remains the gold standard for the VLDL isolation. Therefore faster and simpler method of VLDL-TG determination is needed. Vibrational spectroscopy, including FT-IR and Raman, is widely used technique in lipid and protein research. The aim of this study was assessment of Raman and FT-IR spectroscopy in determination of VLDL-TG directly in serum with the isolation step omitted. TG concentration in serum and in ultracentrifugated VLDL fractions from 32 patients were measured with reference colorimetric method. FT-IR and Raman spectra of VLDL and serum samples were acquired. Partial least square (PLS) regression was used for calibration and leave-one-out cross validation. Our results confirmed possibility of reagent-free determination of VLDL-TG directly in serum with both Raman and FT-IR spectroscopy. Quantitative VLDL testing by FT-IR and/or Raman spectroscopy applied directly to maternal serum seems to be promising screening test to identify women with increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes and patient friendly method of choice based on ease of performance, accuracy and efficiency.

  4. Synthesis, FTIR, FT-Raman, UV-visible, ab initio and DFT studies on benzohydrazide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjunan, V; Rani, T; Mythili, C V; Mohan, S

    2011-08-01

    A systematic vibrational spectroscopic assignment and analysis of benzohydrazide (BH) has been carried out by using FTIR and FT-Raman spectral data. The vibrational analysis were aided by electronic structure calculations--ab initio (RHF) and hybrid density functional methods (B3LYP and B3PW91) performed with 6-31G(d,p) and 6-311++G(d,p) basis sets. Molecular equilibrium geometries, electronic energies, IR intensities, harmonic vibrational frequencies, depolarization ratios and Raman activities have been computed. Potential energy distribution (PED) and normal mode analysis have also been performed. The assignments proposed based on the experimental IR and Raman spectra have been reviewed and complete assignment of the observed spectra have been proposed. UV-visible spectrum of the compound was also recorded and the electronic properties, such as HOMO and LUMO energies and λ(max) were determined by time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) method. The geometrical, thermodynamical parameters and absorption wavelengths were compared with the experimental data. The interactions of carbonyl and hydrazide groups on the benzene ring skeletal modes were investigated. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Evaluation of Turmeric Powder Adulterated with Metanil Yellow Using FT-Raman and FT-IR Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sagar Dhakal

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Turmeric powder (Curcuma longa L. is valued both for its medicinal properties and for its popular culinary use, such as being a component in curry powder. Due to its high demand in international trade, turmeric powder has been subject to economically driven, hazardous chemical adulteration. This study utilized Fourier Transform-Raman (FT-Raman and Fourier Transform-Infra Red (FT-IR spectroscopy as separate but complementary methods for detecting metanil yellow adulteration of turmeric powder. Sample mixtures of turmeric powder and metanil yellow were prepared at concentrations of 30%, 25%, 20%, 15%, 10%, 5%, 1%, and 0.01% (w/w. FT-Raman and FT-IR spectra were acquired for these mixture samples as well as for pure samples of turmeric powder and metanil yellow. Spectral analysis showed that the FT-IR method in this study could detect the metanil yellow at the 5% concentration, while the FT-Raman method appeared to be more sensitive and could detect the metanil yellow at the 1% concentration. Relationships between metanil yellow spectral peak intensities and metanil yellow concentration were established using representative peaks at FT-Raman 1406 cm−1 and FT-IR 1140 cm−1 with correlation coefficients of 0.93 and 0.95, respectively.

  6. Raman and FTIR spectroscopic studies on two hydroxylated tung oils (HTO) bearing conjugated double bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Yuwei; Ren, Zhiyong; Jiang, Lei; Zhang, Jiaxiang; Wang, Huafen; Zhang, Guobao

    2018-06-01

    Tung oil (TO) was used as a model compound to study two hydroxylated tung oils (HTO), prepared from TO by either aminolysis (HTO-am) or alcoholysis (HTO-al). Main bands in Raman and FTIR spectra were initially assigned based on the detailed analysis of the compound spectra before and after exposure to elevated temperature (200 °C). The effect of heat treatment in air on spectral bands, and especially on the changes associated with double bonds, were then investigated. In the present work, changes in spectral bands due to heat treatment were compared with those revealed in the previous work of others. The results show that the conjugated triene structure of TO has been retained during alcoholysis and aminolysis, to yield the HTOs studied; yet the change of the triene structure caused by heating is different among the three samples; the H-bonding strength between OH and Cdbnd O in HTO-am is higher than that in HTO-al; the changes in HTO vOH and vCdbnd O bands in FTIR caused by the present heat treatment were significant; for TO, there is a big difference between changes in spectra as caused by thermal exposure, compared to those caused by ageing under UV light or exposure to a catalyst. The present work has laid additional groundwork for further study of the reactions of such triply conjugated double bond structures under different ageing conditions.

  7. FT-Raman and FTIR spectra of photoactive aminobenzazole derivatives in the solid state: A combined experimental and theoretical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, Rodrigo Martins [Universidade Federal do Pampa, Campus Bagé, Grupo de Pesquisa em Espectroscopia de Materiais Fotônicos, 96400-970 Bagé, RS (Brazil); Rodembusch, Fabiano Severo [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Grupo de Pesquisa em Fotoquímica Orgânica Aplicada, Av. Bento Gonçalves 9500, CEP 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Habis, Charles [Northern Virginia Community College, Manassas, VA (United States); Moreira, Eduardo Ceretta, E-mail: eduardomoreira@unipampa.edu.br [Universidade Federal do Pampa, Campus Bagé, Grupo de Pesquisa em Espectroscopia de Materiais Fotônicos, 96400-970 Bagé, RS (Brazil)

    2014-12-15

    This study reports the experimental investigation of two photoactive aminobenzazole derivatives in the solid state by FT-Raman and Infrared Spectroscopies (FTIR) and its comparison with theoretical models. The optimized molecular structure, vibrational frequencies, and corresponding vibrational assignments of these compounds have been investigated experimentally and theoretically using Spanish Initiative for Electronic Simulations with Thousands of Atoms (SIESTA) and Gaussian03 Software Package. The FT-Raman and FTIR spectra were acquired with high resolution and emission frequencies identified by simulating the vibrational modes. The most intense peak observed in the FT-Raman spectra is the in-plane deformation vibrational of O–H bond that could be related to the vibrational region responsible for the stabilization of the enol conformer in the ground state which undergoes ESIPT to form a keto tautomer in the excited state. Additionally, the position of the amino group played an important role on the vibrational characteristics of the studied compounds. Also, the simulations proved to be a good approach in undertaking the FTIR and FT-Raman experiments. The use of graphic correlations helps us to determine the method and basis that best fit the experimental results. - Highlights: • Structural and vibrational properties of two aminobenzazoles were reported. • Comparison between experimental techniques and theoretical models. • The position of the amino group played an important role on the vibrational characteristics of the studied compounds.

  8. FT-Raman and FT-IR studies of 1:2.5 piroxicam: β-cyclodextrin inclusion compound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoluzza, A.; Rossi, M.; Taddei, P.; Redenti, E.; Zanol, M.; Ventura, P.

    1999-05-01

    The FT-Raman and FT-IR spectra of amorphous 1:2.5 piroxicam (P): β-cyclodextrin (βCD) inclusion compound (PβCD) are presented and discussed in comparison with the spectra of the three main modifications of piroxicam (α,β and monohydrate). In the 1700-1200 cm -1 FT-Raman spectrum of 1:2.5 PβCD inclusion compound the bands of βCD are weak and covered by those stronger of piroxicam, differently from the FT-IR spectrum where the bands of βCD are stronger, so covering a large part of the spectrum. Typical FT-Raman marker bands are assigned for the characterization of the three modifications of piroxicam. The FT-Raman spectrum of 1:2.5 PβCD inclusion compound predominantly shows the bands at about 1465 and 1400 cm -1 of the monohydrate, indicating that piroxicam assumes the zwitterionic structure stabilized by interaction with βCD via electrostatic and hydrogen bonds. The dipolar character of 1:2.5 PβCD inclusion compound improves the solubility and the dissolution rate of piroxicam and thus its rate of absorption.

  9. The biocompatibility of carbon hydroxyapatite/β-glucan composite for bone tissue engineering studied with Raman and FTIR spectroscopic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sroka-Bartnicka, Anna; Kimber, James A; Borkowski, Leszek; Pawlowska, Marta; Polkowska, Izabela; Kalisz, Grzegorz; Belcarz, Anna; Jozwiak, Krzysztof; Ginalska, Grazyna; Kazarian, Sergei G

    2015-10-01

    The spectroscopic approaches of FTIR imaging and Raman mapping were applied to the characterisation of a new carbon hydroxyapatite/β-glucan composite developed for bone tissue engineering. The composite is an artificial bone material with an apatite-forming ability for the bone repair process. Rabbit bone samples were tested with an implanted bioactive material for a period of several months. Using spectroscopic and chemometric methods, we were able to determine the presence of amides and phosphates and the distribution of lipid-rich domains in the bone tissue, providing an assessment of the composite's bioactivity. Samples were also imaged in transmission using an infrared microscope combined with a focal plane array detector. CaF2 lenses were also used on the infrared microscope to improve spectral quality by reducing scattering artefacts, improving chemometric analysis. The presence of collagen and lipids at the bone/composite interface confirmed biocompatibility and demonstrate the suitability of FTIR microscopic imaging with lenses in studying these samples. It confirmed that the composite is a very good background for collagen growth and increases collagen maturity with the time of the bone growth process. The results indicate the bioactive and biocompatible properties of this composite and demonstrate how Raman and FTIR spectroscopic imaging have been used as an effective tool for tissue characterisation.

  10. Comparative FT-Raman, FT-IR and colour shifts spectroscopic evaluation of gamma irradiated experimental models of oil paintings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manca, M.M.; Virgolici, M.; Cutrubinis, M.; Moise, I.V.; Ponta, C.C.; Negut, C.D.; Stanculescu, I.R.; Bucharest University

    2011-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The present study follows the changes of gamma irradiated historic pigments and experimental models of oil paintings with non-destructive and non-contact spectroscopic analytical techniques which are the only ones accepted by the conservators/restorers community. Molecular structure characterization was performed by FT-IR / Raman spectroscopy using a Bruker Vertex 70 class equipped with two mobile probes: a MIR fibre module for MIR probes (with LN2 cooled detector) and a Raman RAM II module (LN2 Ge detector) with a RAMPROBE fibre. Colour was measured by a portable reflectance spectrophotometer (Miniscan XE Plus, HunterLab) in diffuse/8 deg geometry with a beam diameter of 4 mm and specular component included. Correlations between colour shifts and changes in molecular structure induced by gamma irradiation were further investigated.

  11. Structure-activity relations of 2-(methylthio)benzimidazole by FTIR, FT-Raman, NMR, DFT and conceptual DFT methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjunan, V; Raj, Arushma; Ravindran, P; Mohan, S

    2014-01-24

    The vibrational fundamental modes of 2-(methylthio)benzimidazole (2MTBI) have been analysed by combining FTIR, FT-Raman and quantum chemical calculations. The structural parameters of the compound are determined from the optimised geometry by B3LYP with 6-31G(∗∗), 6-311++G(∗∗) and cc-pVTZ basis sets and giving energies, harmonic vibrational frequencies, depolarisation ratios, IR intensities and Raman activities. (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra have been analysed and (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts are calculated using the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method. The structure-activity relationship of the compound is also investigated by conceptual DFT methods. The chemical reactivity and site selectivity of the molecule has been determined with the help of global and local reactivity descriptors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Energy profile, spectroscopic (FT-IR, FT-Raman and FT-NMR) and DFT studies of 4-bromoisophthalic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjunan, V.; Thirunarayanan, S.; Mohan, S.

    2018-04-01

    The stable conformer of 4-bromoisophthalic acid (BIPA) has been identified by potential energy profile analysis. All the structural parameters of 4-bromoisophthalic acid are determined by B3LYP method with 6-311++G**, 6-31G** and cc-pVTZ basis sets. The fundamental vibrations are analysed with the use of FT-IR (4000-400 cm-1) and FT-Raman (4000-100 cm-1) spectra. The harmonic vibrational frequencies are theoretically calculated and compared with experimental FTIR and FT-Raman frequencies. The 1H and 13C NMR spectra have been analysed and compared with theoretical 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts calculated by gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method. The electronic properties, such as HOMO (highest occupied molecular orbital) and LUMO (lowest unoccupied molecular orbital) energies are determined by B3LYP/cc-pVTZ method. The electron density distribution and site of chemical reactivity of BIPA molecule have been obtained by mapping electron density isosurface with molecular electrostatic potential (MEP). Stability of the molecules arising from hyperconjugative interactions, charge delocalizations have been analysed by using natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. The thermodynamic properties and atomic natural charges of the compound are analysed and the reactive sites of the molecule are identified. The global and local reactivity descriptors are evaluated to analyse the chemical reactivity and site selectivity of molecule through Fukui functions.

  13. Sensing the Structural Differences in Cellulose from Apple and Bacterial Cell Wall Materials by Raman and FT-IR Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymańska-Chargot, Monika; Cybulska, Justyna; Zdunek, Artur

    2011-01-01

    Raman and Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy was used for assessment of structural differences of celluloses of various origins. Investigated celluloses were: bacterial celluloses cultured in presence of pectin and/or xyloglucan, as well as commercial celluloses and cellulose extracted from apple parenchyma. FT-IR spectra were used to estimate of the Iβ content, whereas Raman spectra were used to evaluate the degree of crystallinity of the cellulose. The crystallinity index (XCRAMAN%) varied from −25% for apple cellulose to 53% for microcrystalline commercial cellulose. Considering bacterial cellulose, addition of xyloglucan has an impact on the percentage content of cellulose Iβ. However, addition of only xyloglucan or only pectins to pure bacterial cellulose both resulted in a slight decrease of crystallinity. However, culturing bacterial cellulose in the presence of mixtures of xyloglucan and pectins results in an increase of crystallinity. The results confirmed that the higher degree of crystallinity, the broader the peak around 913 cm−1. Among all bacterial celluloses the bacterial cellulose cultured in presence of xyloglucan and pectin (BCPX) has the most similar structure to those observed in natural primary cell walls. PMID:22163913

  14. Characterisation of 1,3-diammonium propylselenate monohydrate by XRD, FT-IR, FT-Raman, DSC and DFT studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirunarayanan, S.; Arjunan, V.; Marchewka, M. K.; Mohan, S.; Atalay, Yusuf

    2016-03-01

    The crystals of 1,3-diammonium propylselenate monohydrate (DAPS) were prepared and characterised X-ray diffraction (XRD), FT-IR, FT-Raman spectroscopy, and DFT/B3LYP methods. It comprises protonated propyl ammonium moieties (diammonium propyl cations), selenate anions and water molecule which are held together by a number of hydrogen bonds and form infinite chains. The XRD data confirm the transfer of two protons from selenic acid to 1,3-diaminopropane molecule. The DAPS complex is stabilised by the presence of O-H···O and N-H···O hydrogen bonds and the electrostatic interactions as well. The N···O and O···O bond distances are 2.82-2.91 and 2.77 Å, respectively. The FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of 1,3-diammonium propyl selenate monohydrate are recorded and the complete vibrational assignments have been discussed. The geometry is optimised by B3LYP method using 6-311G, 6-311+G and 6-311+G* basis sets and the energy, structural parameters, vibrational frequencies, IR and Raman intensities are determined. Differential scanning colorimetry (DSC) data were also presented to analyse the possibility of the phase transition. Complete natural bonding orbital (NBO) analysis is carried out to analyse the intramolecular electronic interactions and their stabilisation energies. The electrostatic potential of the complex lies in the range +1.902e × 10-2 to -1.902e × 10-2. The limits of total electron density of the complex is +8.43e × 10-2 to -8.43e × 10-2.

  15. FTIR, FT-Raman, FT-NMR, UV-visible and quantum chemical investigations of 2-amino-4-methylbenzothiazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjunan, V; Sakiladevi, S; Rani, T; Mythili, C V; Mohan, S

    2012-03-01

    The FT-IR (4000-400 cm(-1)) and FT-Raman (4000-100 cm(-1)) spectral measurements and complete assignments of the observed spectra of 2-amino-4-methylbenzothiazole (2A4MBT) have been proposed. Ab initio and DFT calculations have been performed and the structural parameters of the compound were determined from the optimised geometry with 6-31G(d,p), 6-311++G(d,p) and cc-pVDZ basis sets and giving energies, harmonic vibrational frequencies, depolarisation ratios, IR intensities and Raman activities. (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra were recorded and (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts of the molecule were calculated using the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method. UV-visible spectrum of the compound was also recorded and the electronic properties, such as HOMO, LUMO and band gap energies were measured by time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) approach. The geometric parameters, energies, harmonic vibrational frequencies, IR intensities, Raman activities chemical shifts and absorption wavelengths were compared with the available experimental data of the molecule. The influences of methyl and amino groups on the skeletal modes and on the proton chemical shifts have been investigated. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Helium ion irradiated polyamidoimide films: a FT-IR and Raman follow-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merhari, L.; Belorgeot, C.; Quintard, P.

    1994-01-01

    The evolution of polyamidoimide (PAI) at a molecular level has been studied by infrared and Raman spectroscopy after several He + ion irradiations. The infrared investigation made it possible to study the appearance of CO 2 and HCN molecules and, for example, to correlate CO 2 with C-O vanishing bands during He + ion irradiation. Preliminary Raman spectroscopy results confirmed a graphite-like structure for strongly irradiated PAI. In situ spectroscopic measurements versus fluence during irradiation with other ions are expected to give further information about the polymer structure evolution. (6 figures, 10 references) (UK)

  17. Atomic force microscope with combined FTIR-Raman spectroscopy having a micro thermal analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Samuel D [Aiken, SC; Fondeur, Fernando F [North Augusta, SC

    2011-10-18

    An atomic force microscope is provided that includes a micro thermal analyzer with a tip. The micro thermal analyzer is configured for obtaining topographical data from a sample. A raman spectrometer is included and is configured for use in obtaining chemical data from the sample.

  18. Structural and vibrational spectral investigations of melaminium maleate monohydrate by FTIR, FT-Raman and quantum chemical calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjunan, V.; Kalaivani, M.; Marchewka, M. K.; Mohan, S.

    2013-04-01

    The structural investigations of the molecular complex of melamine with maleic acid, namely melaminium maleate monohydrate have been carried out by quantum chemical methods in addition to FTIR, FT-Raman and far-infrared spectral studies. The quantum chemical studies were performed with DFT (B3LYP) method using 6-31G**, cc-pVDZ and 6-311++G** basis sets to determine the energy, structural and thermodynamic parameters of melaminium maleate monohydrate. The hydrogen atom from maleic acid was transferred to the melamine molecule giving the singly protonated melaminium cation. The ability of ions to form spontaneous three-dimensional structure through weak Osbnd H⋯O and Nsbnd H⋯O hydrogen bonds shows notable vibrational effects.

  19. FT-IR, FT-Raman, and DFT computational studies of melaminium nitrate molecular-ionic crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanak, Hasan; Marchewka, Mariusz K.

    2013-02-01

    The experimental and theoretical vibrational spectra of melaminium nitrate were studied. The Raman and infrared (FT-IR) spectra of the melaminium nitrate and its deuterated analogue were recorded in the solid phase. Molecular geometry and vibrational frequency values of melaminium nitrate in the electronic ground state were calculated using the density functional method (B3LYP) with the 6-31++G(d,p) basis set. The calculated results show that the optimized geometry can well reproduce the crystal structure, and the theoretical vibrational frequency values show good agreement with experimental values. The NBO analysis reveals that the N-H···O and N-H···N intermolecular interactions significantly influence crystal packing in this molecule.

  20. Structural and vibrational spectral investigations of melaminium maleate monohydrate by FTIR, FT-Raman and quantum chemical calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjunan, V; Kalaivani, M; Marchewka, M K; Mohan, S

    2013-04-15

    The structural investigations of the molecular complex of melamine with maleic acid, namely melaminium maleate monohydrate have been carried out by quantum chemical methods in addition to FTIR, FT-Raman and far-infrared spectral studies. The quantum chemical studies were performed with DFT (B3LYP) method using 6-31G(**), cc-pVDZ and 6-311++G(**) basis sets to determine the energy, structural and thermodynamic parameters of melaminium maleate monohydrate. The hydrogen atom from maleic acid was transferred to the melamine molecule giving the singly protonated melaminium cation. The ability of ions to form spontaneous three-dimensional structure through weak OH···O and NH···O hydrogen bonds shows notable vibrational effects. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Raman and Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) Mineral to Matrix Ratios Correlate with Physical Chemical Properties of Model Compounds and Native Bone Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Erik A; Lloyd, Ashley A; Salazar-Lara, Carolina; Donnelly, Eve

    2017-10-01

    Raman and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic imaging techniques can be used to characterize bone composition. In this study, our objective was to validate the Raman mineral:matrix ratios (ν 1 PO 4 :amide III, ν 1 PO 4 :amide I, ν 1 PO 4 :Proline + hydroxyproline, ν 1 PO 4 :Phenylalanine, ν 1 PO 4 :δ CH 2 peak area ratios) by correlating them to ash fraction and the IR mineral:matrix ratio (ν 3 PO 4 :amide I peak area ratio) in chemical standards and native bone tissue. Chemical standards consisting of varying ratios of synthetic hydroxyapatite (HA) and collagen, as well as bone tissue from humans, sheep, and mice, were characterized with confocal Raman spectroscopy and FT-IR spectroscopy and gravimetric analysis. Raman and IR mineral:matrix ratio values from chemical standards increased reciprocally with ash fraction (Raman ν 1 PO 4 /Amide III: P Raman ν 1 PO 4 /Amide I: P Raman ν 1 PO 4 /Proline + Hydroxyproline: P Raman ν 1 PO 4 /Phenylalanine: P Raman ν 1 PO 4 /δ CH 2 : P Raman and IR mineral:matrix ratio values were strongly correlated ( P Raman mineral:matrix bone composition parameter correlates strongly to ash fraction and to its IR counterpart. Finally, the mineral:matrix ratio values of the native bone tissue are similar to those of both chemical standards and theoretical values, confirming the biological relevance of the chemical standards and the characterization techniques.

  2. Experimental (FT-IR, FT-Raman, 1H, 13C NMR) and theoretical study of alkali metal 2-aminobenzoates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samsonowicz, M.; Świsłocka, R.; Regulska, E.; Lewandowski, W.

    2008-09-01

    The influence of lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium and cesium on the electronic system of the 2-aminobenzoic acid was studied by the methods of molecular spectroscopy. The vibrational (FT-IR, FT-Raman) and NMR ( 1H and 13C) spectra for 2-aminobenzoic acid and its alkali metal salts were recorded. The assignment of vibrational spectra was done on the basis of literature data, theoretical calculations and our previous experience. Characteristic shifts of bands and changes in intensities of bands along the metal series were observed. The changes of chemical shifts of protons ( 1H NMR) and carbons ( 13C NMR) in the series of studied alkali metal 2-aminobenzoates were observed too. Optimized geometrical structures of studied compounds were calculated by B3LYP method using 6-311++G ∗∗ basis set. Geometric aromaticity indices, dipole moments and energies were also calculated. The theoretical wavenumbers and intensities of IR and Raman spectra were obtained. The calculated parameters were compared to experimental characteristic of studied compounds.

  3. FTIR and Raman Characterization of TiO2 Nanoparticles Coated with Polyethylene Glycol as Carrier for 2-Methoxyestradiol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea León

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to prepare a novel targeting drug delivery system for 2-Methoxyestradiol (2ME in order to improve the clinical application of this antitumor drug. It is based in nanoparticles (NPs of titanium dioxide (TiO2 coated with polyethylene glycol (PEG and loaded with 2ME. A complete IR and Raman characterization have been made to confirm the formation of TiO2–PEG–2ME composite. Vibrational modes have been assigned for TiO2, PEG, and 2ME and functionalized TiO2–PEG and TiO2–PEG–2ME. The observed variation in peak position of FTIR and Raman of each for these composites has been elucidated in terms of intermolecular interactions between PEG–2ME and TiO2, obtaining step-by-step the modification processes that were attributed to the conjugation of PEG and 2ME to TiO2 NPs. Modifying TiO2 NPs with PEG loaded with the 2ME drug revealed that the titanium dioxide nanocarrier possesses an effective adsorption capability, and we discuss their potential application as a system of drug delivery.

  4. Bacterial and abiotic decay in waterlogged archaeological Picea abies (L.) Karst studied by confocal Raman imaging and ATR-FTIR spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Nanna Bjerregaard; Gierlinger, Notburga; Thygesen, Lisbeth Garbrecht

    2015-01-01

    Waterlogged archaeological Norway spruce [Picea abies (L.) Karst] poles were studied by means of confocal Raman imaging (CRI) and attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) analysis to determine lignin and polysaccharide composition and distribution in the cell......, and minor oxidation of the lignin polymer compared to recent reference material. This is evidence for abiotic decay in the course of waterlogging....

  5. FTIR and FT-Raman spectra and density functional computations of the vibrational spectra, molecular geometry and atomic charges of the biomolecule: 5-bromouracil

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rastogi, V.K.; Palafox, M. A.; Mittal, L.; Peica, N.; Keifer, W.; Lang, Kamil; Ojha, S.P.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 38, č. 10 (2007), s. 1227-1241 ISSN 0377-0486 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : FTIR and FT-Raman spectra * density functional computations * molecular geometry Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 3.514, year: 2007

  6. The spectroscopic (FT-IR, FT-Raman, dispersive Raman and NMR) study of ethyl-6-chloronicotinate molecule by combined density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabacak, Mehmet; Calisir, Zuhre; Kurt, Mustafa; Kose, Etem; Atac, Ahmet

    2016-01-15

    In this study, ethyl-6-chloronicotinate (E-6-ClN) molecule is recorded in the region 4000-400 cm(-1) and 3500-100 cm(-1) (FT-IR, FT-Raman and dispersive Raman, respectively) in the solid phase. ((1))H and ((13))C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra are recorded in DMSO solution. The structural and spectroscopic data of the molecule are obtained for two possible isomers (S1 and S2) from DFT (B3LYP) with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set calculations. The geometry of the molecule is fully optimized, vibrational spectra are calculated and fundamental vibrations are assigned on the basis of the potential energy distribution (PED) of the vibrational modes. ((1))H and ((13))C NMR chemical shifts are calculated by using the gauge-invariant atomic orbital (GIAO) method. The electronic properties, such as excitation energies, oscillator strengths, wavelengths, HOMO and LUMO energies, are performed by time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT). Total and partial density of state and overlap population density of state diagrams analysis are presented for E-6-ClN molecule. Furthermore, frontier molecular orbitals (FMO), molecular electrostatic potential, and thermodynamic features are performed. In addition to these, reduced density gradient of the molecule is performed and discussed. As a conclusion, the calculated results are compared with the experimental spectra of the title compound. The results of the calculations are applied to simulate the vibrational spectra of the molecule, which show excellent agreement with the observed ones. The theoretical and tentative results will give us a detailed description of the structural and physicochemical properties of the molecule. Natural bond orbital analysis is done to have more information stability of the molecule arising from charge delocalization, and to reveal the information regarding charge transfer within the molecules. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Study regarding magnetospirillum griphyswaldenses bacteria biochemical changes using FTIR and Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihai, C.; Institute of Biology, Bucharest; Mihaela, M.; Ioan, A.; Ovidius University, Constanta

    2011-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Spectroscopy using Fourier transform and Raman spectroscopy can be used to enlighten functional groups that belong to different biomolecules that are specific to cells (proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, nucleic acids), thus obtaining valuable information regarding bacteria's biochemical composition. Since microorganisms react very promptly to the culture medium changes, the apparition of a stress agent produces a modification of the cellular enzymatic print in order to compensate for the effect of those factors, thus the bacteria self adapting to those changes. These methods can be used to highlight the metabolically modifications in cells which respond to stress factors. The biochemical modification are important in bioremediation processes like biosorption of metal contaminated waste water from metallurgical baths or even from irradiator pool, heavy water from nuclear power plant. The main targets are to analyze the biochemical modification appeared in presence or absence of two metals, Fe and Co. The presence of Fe is benefit for bacteria because she can absorb iron and deposit as magnetic inside the cell. The presence of Co determines changes in metabolism with the loss of many polar bindings but the growth was not inhibited even in concentration like 100 mM.

  8. Resonant Raman and FTIR spectra of carbon doped GaN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, S.; Kobayashi, H.; Araki, K.; Suzuki, K.; Sawaki, N.; Yamashita, K.; Honda, Y.; Amano, H.

    2015-03-01

    Intentionally carbon (C) doped (0 0 0 1)GaN was grown using C2H2 on a sapphire substrate by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy. Optical spectra of the heavily doped samples were investigated at room temperature. In Raman spectra excited by the 325 nm line of a He-Cd laser, multiple LO phonon scattering signals up to 7th order were observed, and the A1(LO) phonon energy was determined to be 737.5 cm-1 (91.45 meV). In infrared reflectance spectra, on the other hand, a local vibration mode was found at 777.5 cm-1, which is attributed to a Ga-C bond in the GaN matrix suggesting that the C sits on an N site (CN). In spite of the strong suggestion of CN, the samples did not show p-type conduction. Possible origin of the carrier compensation is discussed in relation to the enhancement of defect related yellow luminescence in the photoluminescence spectra.

  9. FTIR, FT-Raman, UV-Visible spectra and quantum chemical calculations of allantoin molecule and its hydrogen bonded dimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Mohammad Jane; Ahmad, Shabbir

    2015-02-05

    FTIR, FT-Raman and electronic spectra of allantoin molecule are recorded and investigated using DFT and MP2 methods with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The molecular structure, anharmonic vibrational spectra, natural atomic charges, non-linear optical properties, etc. have been computed for the ground state of allantoin. The anharmonic vibrational frequencies are calculated using PT2 algorithm (Barone method) as well as VSCF and CC-VSCF methods. These methods yield results that are in remarkable agreement with the experiment. The coupling strengths between pairs of modes are also calculated using coupling integral based on 2MR-QFF approximation. The simulations on allantoin dimers have been also performed at B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory to investigate the effect of the intermolecular interactions on the molecular structure and vibrational frequencies of the monomer. Vibrational assignments are made with the great accuracy using PED calculations and animated modes. The combination and overtone bands have been also identified in the FTIR spectrum with the help of anharmonic computations. The electronic spectra are simulated in gas and solution at TD-B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory. The important global quantities such as electro-negativity, electronic chemical potential, electrophilicity index, chemical hardness and softness based on HOMO, LUMO energy eigenvalues are also computed. NBO analysis has been performed for monomer and dimers of allantoin at B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. FT-Raman and FT-IR spectroscopy of synthetic Mg/Zn/Al-hydrotalcites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leishman, N.; Kloprogge, J.T.; Fry, R.; Frost, R.L.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Hydrotalcites, also known as layered double hydroxides, are less well known and more diffuse in nature than cationic clays. They can be visualised as positively charged hydroxide layers comparable to brucite in which a part of the Mg 2+ is substituted by a trivalent metal like Al 3+ or Fe 3+ separated by charge compensating mostly hydrated interlayer anions. In synthetic hydrotalcites a broad range of compositions are possible of the type [M 2+ 1-x M 3+ x (OH) 2 ][A n- ] x/n -yH 2 O, where M 2+ and M 3+ are the di- and trivalent cations in the octahedral positions within the hydroxide layers with x between 0.17 and 0.33. A n- is an exchangeable interlayer anion. The hydrotalcites with Mg/Zn/Al atomic ratios of 6/0/2, 4/2/2, 2/4/2 and 0/6/2 were synthesised by the slow simultaneous addition of a mixed aluminum-magnesium-zinc nitrate solution and a NaOH solution under vigorous stirring buffering the pH at ± 10. The products were washed to eliminate excess salt and dried at 60 deg C. The nature of the resulting material was checked by XRD and TEM. Both proved the materials to exist of only crystalline hydrotalcite except for the Zn 6 Al 2 (OH) 16 CO 3 .nH 2 O, which contained some unidentified products. The infrared and Raman spectra of synthetic hydrotalcites with different Mg/Zn ratios reveal complicated spectra. Based on the differences in the spectra between the various hydrotalcites and comparison to the comparable hydroxides and hydroxycarbonates a much more detailed band assignment can be made than has been published before

  11. Evaluation of Salmon Adhesion on PET-Metal Interface by ATR, FT-IR, and Raman Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Zumelzu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The material employed in this study is an ecoefficient, environmentally friendly, chromium (VI-free (noncarcinogenic metal polymer. The originality of the research lies in the study of the effect of new production procedures of salmon on metal packaging with multilayer polyethylene terephthalate (PET polymer coatings. Our hypothesis states that the adhesion of postmortem salmon muscles to the PET polymer coating produces surface and structural changes that affect the functionality and limit the useful life of metal containers, compromising therefore their recycling capacity as ecomaterials. This work is focused on studying the effects of the biochemical changes of postmortem salmon on the PET coating and how muscle degradation favors adhesion to the container. The experimental design considered a series of laboratory tests of containers simulating the conditions of canned salmon, chemical and physical tests of food-contact canning to evaluate the adhesion, and characterization of changes in the multilayer PET polymer by electron microscopy, ATR, FT-IR, and Raman spectroscopy analyses. The analyses determined the effect of heat treatment of containers on the loss of freshness of canned fish and the increased adhesion to the container wall, and the limited capability of the urea treatment to remove salmon muscle from the container for recycling purposes.

  12. Rapid characterisation of Klebsiella oxytoca isolates from contaminated liquid hand soap using mass spectrometry, FTIR and Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieckmann, Ralf; Hammerl, Jens Andre; Hahmann, Hartmut; Wicke, Amal; Kleta, Sylvia; Dabrowski, Piotr Wojciech; Nitsche, Andreas; Stämmler, Maren; Al Dahouk, Sascha; Lasch, Peter

    2016-06-23

    Microbiological monitoring of consumer products and the efficiency of early warning systems and outbreak investigations depend on the rapid identification and strain characterisation of pathogens posing risks to the health and safety of consumers. This study evaluates the potential of three rapid analytical techniques for identification and subtyping of bacterial isolates obtained from a liquid hand soap product, which has been recalled and reported through the EU RAPEX system due to its severe bacterial contamination. Ten isolates recovered from two bottles of the product were identified as Klebsiella oxytoca and subtyped using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI TOF MS), near-infrared Fourier transform (NIR FT) Raman spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Comparison of the classification results obtained by these phenotype-based techniques with outcomes of the DNA-based methods pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis of whole-genome sequencing (WGS) data revealed a high level of concordance. In conclusion, a set of analytical techniques might be useful for rapid, reliable and cost-effective microbial typing to ensure safe consumer products and allow source tracking.

  13. Structural and vibrational spectral investigations of melaminium glutarate monohydrate by FTIR, FT-Raman and DFT methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjunan, V.; Marchewka, M. K.; Raj, Arushma; Yang, Haifeng; Mohan, S.

    2015-01-01

    Melaminium glutarate monohydrate has been synthesised and FTIR and FT-Raman spectral investigations are carried out. The molecular geometry and vibrational frequencies of melaminium glutarate monohydrate in the ground state have been determined by using B3LYP method with 6-31++G**, 6-31++G and cc-pVDZ basis sets. The stability of the system, inter molecular hydrogen bonding and the electron donor-acceptor interactions of the complex have been investigated by using natural bonding orbital analysis. It reveals that the Nsbnd H⋯O and Osbnd H⋯O intermolecular interactions significantly influence crystal packing of this molecular complex. The glutarate anion forms hydrogen bonds to the melaminium cation as the proton donor of the type Nsbnd H⋯O with a distance (N⋯O) = 2.51 Å. It is also linked by other hydrogen bonds to the water molecule of the type Osbnd H⋯O with (O⋯O) = 2.82 Å and to the amino (sbnd NH2) group of melaminium cation of the type Nsbnd H⋯O with (N⋯O) = 2.82 Å as the proton acceptor. The electrostatic potential of the complex is in the range +1.892e × 10-2 to -1.892e × 10-2. The limits of total electron density of the complex is +6.679e × 10-2 to -6.679e × 10-2.

  14. Structural and vibrational spectral investigations of melaminium glutarate monohydrate by FTIR, FT-Raman and DFT methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjunan, V; Marchewka, M K; Raj, Arushma; Yang, Haifeng; Mohan, S

    2015-01-25

    Melaminium glutarate monohydrate has been synthesised and FTIR and FT-Raman spectral investigations are carried out. The molecular geometry and vibrational frequencies of melaminium glutarate monohydrate in the ground state have been determined by using B3LYP method with 6-31++G(**), 6-31++G and cc-pVDZ basis sets. The stability of the system, inter molecular hydrogen bonding and the electron donor-acceptor interactions of the complex have been investigated by using natural bonding orbital analysis. It reveals that the N-H⋯O and O-H⋯O intermolecular interactions significantly influence crystal packing of this molecular complex. The glutarate anion forms hydrogen bonds to the melaminium cation as the proton donor of the type N-H⋯O with a distance (N⋯O)=2.51 Å. It is also linked by other hydrogen bonds to the water molecule of the type O-H⋯O with (O⋯O)=2.82 Å and to the amino (NH2) group of melaminium cation of the type N-H⋯O with (N⋯O)=2.82 Å as the proton acceptor. The electrostatic potential of the complex is in the range +1.892e×10(-2) to -1.892e×10(-2). The limits of total electron density of the complex is +6.679e×10(-2) to -6.679e×10(-2). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of Low Carbohydrate High Protein (LCHP) diet on atherosclerotic plaque phenotype in ApoE/LDLR-/- mice: FT-IR and Raman imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrobel, T P; Marzec, K M; Chlopicki, S; Maślak, E; Jasztal, A; Franczyk-Żarów, M; Czyżyńska-Cichoń, I; Moszkowski, T; Kostogrys, R B; Baranska, M

    2015-09-22

    Low Carbohydrate High Protein (LCHP) diet displays pro-atherogenic effects, however, the exact mechanisms involved are still unclear. Here, with the use of vibrational imaging, such as Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and Raman (RS) spectroscopies, we characterize biochemical content of plaques in Brachiocephalic Arteries (BCA) from ApoE/LDLR(-/-) mice fed LCHP diet as compared to control, recomended by American Institute of Nutrition, AIN diet. FT-IR images were taken from 6-10 sections of BCA from each mice and were complemented with RS measurements with higher spatial resolution of chosen areas of plaque sections. In aortic plaques from LCHP fed ApoE/LDLR(-/-) mice, the content of cholesterol and cholesterol esters was increased, while that of proteins was decreased as evidenced by global FT-IR analysis. High resolution imaging by RS identified necrotic core/foam cells, lipids (including cholesterol crystals), calcium mineralization and fibrous cap. The decreased relative thickness of the outer fibrous cap and the presence of buried caps were prominent features of the plaques in ApoE/LDLR(-/-) mice fed LCHP diet. In conclusion, FT-IR and Raman-based imaging provided a complementary insight into the biochemical composition of the plaque suggesting that LCHP diet increased plaque cholesterol and cholesterol esters contents of atherosclerotic plaque, supporting the cholesterol-driven pathogenesis of LCHP-induced atherogenesis.

  16. A Raman scattering and FT-IR spectroscopic study on the effect of the solar radiation in Antarctica on bovine cornea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Tatsuyuki; Murakami, Naoki; Yoshikiyo, Keisuke; Takahashi, Tetsuya; Yamamoto, Naoyuki

    2010-01-01

    The Raman scattering and FT-IR spectra of the corneas, transported to the Syowa station in Antarctica and exposed to the solar radiation of the mid-summer for four weeks, were studied to reveal that type IV collagen involved in corneas were fragmented. The amide I and III Raman bands were observed at 1660 and 1245 cm -1, respectively, and the amide I and II infrared bands were observed at 1655 and 1545 cm -1, respectively, for original corneas before exposure. The background of Raman signals prominently increased and the ratio of amide II infrared band versus amide I decreased by the solar radiation in Antarctica. The control experiment using an artificial UV lamp was also performed in laboratory. The decline rate of the amide II/amide I was utilized for estimating the degree of fragmentation of collagen, to reveal that the addition of vitamin C suppressed the reaction while the addition of sugars promoted it. The effect of the solar radiation in Antarctica on the corneas was estimated as the same as the artificial UV lamp of four weeks (Raman) or one week (FT-IR) exposure.

  17. Raman and FTIR spectra of CeO{sub 2} and Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} in iron phosphate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, Yuanming, E-mail: laiyuanming@ipm.com.cn [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technologies for Comprehensive Utilization of Platinum Metals, Kunming Institute of Precious Metals, Kunming 650106 (China); State Key Laboratory Cultivation Base for Nonmetal Composite and Functional Materials, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China); Liang, Xiaofeng; Yang, Shiyuan [State Key Laboratory Cultivation Base for Nonmetal Composite and Functional Materials, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China); Liu, Pei; Zeng, Yiming; Hu, Changyi [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technologies for Comprehensive Utilization of Platinum Metals, Kunming Institute of Precious Metals, Kunming 650106 (China)

    2014-12-25

    Highlights: • The structure of the studied samples has been investigated by Raman and FTIR spectroscopy. • The structure for the all samples has similar features. • The structure consists of predominantly Q{sup 1} with a fraction of Q{sup 0} and Q{sup 2} units. • The Ce and Gd enters in the structure of studied glasses as a network modifier. - Abstract: In the present work, multicomponent oxide samples of composition x(CeO{sub 2} + Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3})–(40 − x)Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}–60P{sub 2}O{sub 5} (0 ⩽ x ⩽ 8 mol%) were produced by conventional melting method. The samples were investigated to examine the effect of the CeO{sub 2} and Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} composition on the structure of the iron phosphate glasses system. The X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for the x ⩽ 6 mol% samples show all the samples formed homogeneous glass, but for the x = 8 mol% samples show the presence of randomly distributed crystalline phase embedded in an amorphous matrix. The x(CeO{sub 2} + Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3})–(40 − x)Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}–60P{sub 2}O{sub 5} glass containing 8 mol% CeO{sub 2} and Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} partially crystallized during annealing and Ce/Gd-rich were identified by EDS in the crystalline phase. The structure of the studied samples has been investigated using Raman and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The Raman and FTIR spectra for the samples have analogous spectral features. The Raman and FTIR spectra suggest that the structure is mainly constituted by the pyrophosphate glass based structure, with a part proportion of metaphosphate and orthophosphate structure. Raman and FTIR spectra allowed us to identify the structural units which appear in the structural network of these phosphate glasses and also the network modifier role of cerium and gadolinium ions.

  18. FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV spectra and DFT calculations on monomeric and dimeric structure of 2-amino-5-bromobenzoic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabacak, Mehmet; Cinar, Mehmet

    2012-02-01

    In this work, the molecular conformation, vibrational and electronic transition analysis of 2-amino-5-bromobenzoic acid (2A5BrBA) were presented for the ground state using experimental techniques (FT-IR, FT-Raman and UV) and density functional theory (DFT) employing B3LYP exchange correlation with the 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra were recorded in the regions of 400-4000 cm(-1) and 50-4000 cm(-1), respectively. There are four conformers, C1, C2, C3 and C4 for this molecule. The geometrical parameters, energies and wavenumbers have been obtained for all four conformers. The computational results diagnose the most stable conformer of 2A5BrBA as the C1 form. The complete assignments of fundamental vibrations were performed on the basis of the total energy distribution (TED) of the vibrational modes, calculated with scaled quantum mechanics (SQM) method. Raman activities calculated by DFT method have been converted to the corresponding Raman intensities using Raman scattering theory. The UV spectra of investigated compound were recorded in the region of 200-400 nm for ethanol and water solutions. The electronic properties were evaluated with help of time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) theoretically and results were compared with experimental observations. The thermodynamic properties of the studied compound at different temperatures were calculated, revealing the correlations between standard heat capacity, standard entropy, standard enthalpy changes and temperatures. The observed and the calculated geometric parameters, vibrational wavenumbers and electronic transitions were compared with observed data and found to be in good agreement. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of microwave treatment on structure of binders based on sodium carboxymethyl starch: FT-IR, FT-Raman and XRD investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczmarska, Karolina; Grabowska, Beata; Spychaj, Tadeusz; Zdanowicz, Magdalena; Sitarz, Maciej; Bobrowski, Artur; Cukrowicz, Sylwia

    2018-06-01

    The paper deals with the influence of the microwave treatment on sodium carboxymethyl starch (CMS-Na) applied as a binder for moulding sands. The Fourier transformation infrared spectrometry (FT-IR), Raman spectroscopy (FT-Raman) and XRD analysis data of native potato starch and three different carboxymethyl starches (CMS-Na) with various degree of substitution (DS) before and after exposition to microwave radiation have been compared. FT-IR studies showed that polar groups present in CMS-Na structure take part in the formation of new hydrogen bonds network after water evaporation. However, these changes depend on DS value of the modified starch. The FT-Raman study confirmed that due to the impact on the samples by microwave, the changes of intensity in the characteristic bands associated with the crystalline regions in the sample were noticed. The X-ray diffraction data for microwave treated CMS-Na samples have been compared with the diffractograms of initial materials and analysis of XRD patterns confirmed that microwave-treated samples exhibit completely amorphous structure. Analysis of structural changes allows to state that the binding of sand grains in moulding sand with CMS-Na polymeric binder consists in the formation of hydrogen bonds networks (physical cross-linking).

  20. Effect of microwave treatment on structure of binders based on sodium carboxymethyl starch: FT-IR, FT-Raman and XRD investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczmarska, Karolina; Grabowska, Beata; Spychaj, Tadeusz; Zdanowicz, Magdalena; Sitarz, Maciej; Bobrowski, Artur; Cukrowicz, Sylwia

    2018-06-15

    The paper deals with the influence of the microwave treatment on sodium carboxymethyl starch (CMS-Na) applied as a binder for moulding sands. The Fourier transformation infrared spectrometry (FT-IR), Raman spectroscopy (FT-Raman) and XRD analysis data of native potato starch and three different carboxymethyl starches (CMS-Na) with various degree of substitution (DS) before and after exposition to microwave radiation have been compared. FT-IR studies showed that polar groups present in CMS-Na structure take part in the formation of new hydrogen bonds network after water evaporation. However, these changes depend on DS value of the modified starch. The FT-Raman study confirmed that due to the impact on the samples by microwave, the changes of intensity in the characteristic bands associated with the crystalline regions in the sample were noticed. The X-ray diffraction data for microwave treated CMS-Na samples have been compared with the diffractograms of initial materials and analysis of XRD patterns confirmed that microwave-treated samples exhibit completely amorphous structure. Analysis of structural changes allows to state that the binding of sand grains in moulding sand with CMS-Na polymeric binder consists in the formation of hydrogen bonds networks (physical cross-linking). Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. In Situ Focused Beam Reflectance Measurement (FBRM, Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR-FTIR and Raman Characterization of the Polymorphic Transformation of Carbamazepine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohrab Rohani

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to study the polymorphic transformation of carbamazepine from Form II to Form III in 1-propanol during seeded isothermal batch crystallization. First, the pure Form II and Form III were obtained and characterized. Then their solubilities and metastable zone limits were measured by in-situ attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR spectroscopy and focused beam reflectance measurement (FBRM. A transition temperature at about 34.2 °C was deduced suggesting the enantiotropic nature of this compound over the studied temperature range. To quantify the polymorph ratio during the transformation process, a new in-situ quantitative method was developed to measure the fraction of Form II by Raman spectroscopy. Successful tracking of the nucleation of the stable form and the transformation from Form II to Form III during isothermal crystallization was achieved by Raman spectroscopy and FBRM. The results from these three in-situ techniques, FBRM, FTIR and Raman were consistent with each other. The results showed a strong dependency on the amount of seeds added during isothermal crystallization.

  2. The use of UV, FT-IR and Raman spectra for the identification of the newest penem analogs: solutions based on mathematic procedure and the density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cielecka-Piontek, J; Lewandowska, K; Barszcz, B; Paczkowska, M

    2013-02-15

    The application of ultraviolet, FT-IR and Raman spectra was proposed for identification studies of the newest penem analogs (doripenem, biapenem and faropenem). An identification of the newest penem analogs based on their separation from related substances was achieved after the application of first derivative of direct spectra in ultraviolet which permitted elimination of overlapping effects. A combination of experimental and theoretical studies was performed for analyzing the structure and vibrational spectra (FT-IR and Raman spectra) of doripenem, biapenem and faropenem. The calculations were conducted using the density functional theory with the B3LYP hybrid functional and 6-31G(d,p) basis set. The confirmation of the applicability of the DFT methodology for interpretation of vibrational IR and Raman spectra of the newest penem analogs contributed to determination of changes of vibrations in the area of the most labile bonds. By employing the theoretical approach it was possible to eliminate necessity of using reference standards which - considering the instability of penem analogs - require that correction coefficients are factored in. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy, Ultraviolet Resonance Raman (UVRR) Spectroscopy, and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) for Study of the Kinetics of Formation and Structural Characterization of Tau Fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Gayathri

    2017-01-01

    Kinetic studies of tau fibril formation in vitro most commonly employ spectroscopic probes such as thioflavinT fluorescence and laser light scattering or negative stain transmission electron microscopy. Here, I describe the use of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy (AFM) as complementary probes for studies of tau aggregation. The sensitivity of vibrational spectroscopic techniques (FTIR and UVRR) to secondary structure content allows for measurement of conformational changes that occur when the intrinsically disordered protein tau transforms into cross-β-core containing fibrils. AFM imaging serves as a gentle probe of structures populated over the time course of tau fibrillization. Together, these assays help further elucidate the structural and mechanistic complexity inherent in tau fibril formation.

  4. Primidone--an antiepileptic drug--characterisation by quantum chemical and spectroscopic (FTIR, FT-Raman, 1H, 13C NMR and UV-Visible) investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjunan, V; Santhanam, R; Subramanian, S; Mohan, S

    2013-05-15

    The solid phase FTIR and FT-Raman spectra of primidone were recorded in the regions 4000-400 cm(-1) and 4000-100 cm(-1), respectively. The vibrational spectra were analysed and the observed fundamentals were assigned and analysed. The experimental wavenumbers were compared with the theoretical scaled vibrational wavenumbers determined by DFT methods. The Raman intensities were also determined with B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) method. The total electron density and molecular electrostatic potential surface of the molecule were constructed by using B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) method to display electrostatic potential (electron+nuclei) distribution. The HOMO and LUMO energies were measured. Natural bond orbital analysis of primidone has been performed to indicate the presence of intramolecular charge transfer. The (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra were recorded and the chemical shifts of the molecule were calculated. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. ATR-FTIR and Raman spectroscopic investigation of the electroporation-mediated transdermal delivery of a nanocarrier system containing an antitumour drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balázs, Boglárka; Sipos, Péter; Danciu, Corina; Avram, Stefana; Soica, Codruta; Dehelean, Cristina; Varju, Gábor; Erős, Gábor; Budai-Szűcs, Mária; Berkó, Szilvia; Csányi, Erzsébet

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present work was the optimization of the transdermal delivery of a lyotropic liquid crystal genistein-based formulation (LLC-GEN). LLC was chosen as medium in view of the poor solubility of GEN in water. Membrane diffusion and penetration studies were carried out with a Franz diffusion cell, through a synthetic membrane in vitro, a chick chorioallantoic membrane ex ovo, and ex vivo excised human epidermis. Thereafter, LLC-GEN was combined with electroporation (EP) to enhance the transdermal drug delivery. The synergistic effect of EP was verified by in vivo ATR-FTIR and ex vivo Raman spectroscopy on hairless mouse skin.

  6. Characterization of writing materials of books of great historical-artistic value by FT-IR and micro-raman spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vito Librando

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This work describes the application of Fourier-Transform Infrared and Raman spectroscopic techniques for the characterization of cellulose paper samples and inks used on ancient writing materials. These samples from books of high historical and artistic interest were provided by the Public Library of Syracuse.The ancient paper showed a characteristic pattern of carbonyl groups, whose vibration modes were observed in FTIR spectra. The spectra of ancient paper samples were compared to each other and to modern paper in order to highlight differences in conservation state between new and old papers. The paper aging process is related to the presence of acid substances and oxidative agents that result in cellulose hydrolysis leading to the shortening of its chain along with changes in the amount of the crystalline form. This hydrolysis causes changes in hydrogen bonds and consequently change the CCH, COH, OCH and HCH bending vibrations mode. In this work, the FTIR and Raman spectra of inks used on ancient paper and parchment samples were also discussed.

  7. The characterization of canvas painting by the Serbian artist Milo Milunović using X-ray fluorescence, micro-Raman and FTIR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damjanović, Lj.; Gajić-Kvaščev, M.; Đurđević, J.; Andrić, V.; Marić-Stojanović, M.; Lazić, T.; Nikolić, S.

    2015-01-01

    A canvas painting by Milo Milunović “The Inspiration of the poet” was studied by energy dispersive X-Ray fluorescence (EDXRF), micro-Raman and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy in order to identify materials used by the artist and his painting technique. Study is perfomed combining in situ non-destructive method with the preparation and study of cross-section samples and raw fragments of the samples. Milo Milunović, an eminent painter from Balkan region, made a copy of the Nicolas Poussin's original painting in Louvre in 1926/27. Obtained results revealed following pigments on the investigated canvas painting: vermilion, minium, cobalt blue, ultramarine, lead white, zinc white, cadmium yellow, chrome-based green pigment and several earth pigments – red and yellow ocher, green earth and umber. Ground layer was made of lead white mixed with calcium carbonate. - Highlights: • In situ EDXRF, micro-Raman and FTIR spectroscopy were employed. • Pallete of painting “The Inspiration of the poet” by Milunović has been determined. • Obtained results allowed evaluation of the painter’s technique. • Milo Milunović worked on the clay ground imitating Nicoals Poussin’s technique

  8. Vibrational spectra (FT-IR, FT-Raman), frontier molecular orbital, first hyperpolarizability, NBO analysis and thermodynamics properties of Piroxicam by HF and DFT methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, S.; Gunasekaran, S.; Srinivasan, S.

    2015-03-01

    The solid phase FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of 4-Hydroxy-2-methyl-N-(2-pyridinyl)-2H-1,2-benzothiazine-3-carboxamide-1,1-dioxide (Piroxicam) have been recorded in the region 4000-400 and 4000-100 cm-1 respectively. The molecular geometry, harmonic vibrational frequencies and bonding features of piroxicam in the ground state have been calculated by Hartree-Fock (HF) and density functional theory (DFT) methods using 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The calculated harmonic vibrational frequencies are scaled and they are compared with experimental obtained by FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra. A detailed interpretation of the vibrational spectra of the title compound has been made on the basis of the calculated potential energy distribution (PED). The electronic properties, such as HOMO and LUMO energies, molecular electrostatic potential (MESP) are also performed. The linear polarizability (α) and the first order hyper polarizability (β) values of the title compound have been computed. The molecular stability arising from hyper conjugative interaction, charge delocalization has been analyzed using natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis.

  9. Quantification and Identification of Microplastics in Marine Samples from 5 µm to 5 mm by FTIR and Raman Microspectroscopy and Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, D.

    2016-12-01

    Several million tons of plastic debris enter the oceans every year caused by industry, inappropriate disposal of waste, waste from fishing activities and waste from ships. Macro plastic parts in the ocean are degraded to secondary microplastics (MP), mostly in the range from 1 µm to 5 mm. Primary MP on the other hand, are microbeads in cosmetic products, cleaning agents and industrial incorrect disposed raw materials. The impacts of MP on marine ecosystems can cause many problems for animals, birds and humans, like the absorption of toxic contaminants by MP, the potential association of MP with pathogenic microorganism, the mistake with food and that MP itself can contain toxic additives. We show the first results, achieved with samples collected from different sites in the Baltic Sea and adjacent river systems, gathered from the water surface, from the water column and from sea sediments and beaches to get knowledge of the composition, size and distribution of MP in the oceans. After preparation we get cleaned samples on a silicon filter [1]. On this filter we identify MP by FTIR and Raman microspectroscopy. All particles > 500 µm are separately measured. The particles additionally FTIR and Raman Imaging. These and further topics, like the comparison of different sampling sites will be discussed in the talk. It can be summarized that Raman microspectroscopy is an outstanding method to detect MP in aquatic systems down to 1 µm. Detailed results are described in [1, 2]. [1] Käppler A., Fischer D., Eichhorn K.-J. et. al. Anal. Bioanal. Chem. 2015; 407: 6791 [2] Fischer D., Käppler A., Eichhorn K.-J. American Laboratory 2015; 47: 32

  10. FT-Raman, FT-IR spectra and total energy distribution of 3-pentyl-2,6-diphenylpiperidin-4-one: DFT method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subashchandrabose, S; Saleem, H; Erdogdu, Y; Rajarajan, G; Thanikachalam, V

    2011-11-01

    FT-Raman and FT-IR spectra were recorded for 3-pentyl-2,6-diphenylpiperidin-4-one (PDPO) sample in solid state. The equilibrium geometries, harmonic vibrational frequencies, infrared and the Raman scattering intensities were computed using DFT/6-31G(d,p) level. Results obtained at this level of theory were used for a detailed interpretation of the infrared and Raman spectra, based on the total energy distribution (TED) of the normal modes. Molecular parameters such as bond lengths, bond angles and dihedral angles were calculated and compared with X-ray diffraction data. This comparison was good agreement. The intra-molecular charge transfer was calculated by means of natural bond orbital analysis (NBO). Hyperconjugative interaction energy was more during the π-π* transition. Energy gap of the molecule was found using HOMO and LUMO calculation, hence the less band gap, which seems to be more stable. Atomic charges of the carbon, nitrogen and oxygen were calculated using same level of calculation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Quantum mechanical, spectroscopic studies (FT-IR, FT-Raman, NMR, UV) and normal coordinates analysis on 3-([2-(diaminomethyleneamino) thiazol-4-yl] methylthio)-N'-sulfamoylpropanimidamide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthu, S.; Uma Maheswari, J.; Sundius, Tom

    2013-05-01

    Famotidine (3-([2-(diaminomethyleneamino) thiazol-4-yl] methylthio)-N'-sulfamoylpropanimidamide) is a histamine H2-receptor antagonist that inhibits stomach acid production, and it is commonly used in the treatment of peptic ulcer disease (PUD) and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD/GORD). Quantum chemical calculations of the equilibrium geometry of famotidine in the ground state were carried out using density functional theory (DFT/B3LYP) with the 6-311G(d,p) basis set. In addition, harmonic vibrational frequencies, infrared intensities and Raman activities were calculated at the same level of theory. A detailed interpretation of the infrared and Raman spectrum of the drug is also reported. Theoretical simulations of the FT-IR, and FT-Raman spectra of the title compound have been calculated. Good correlations between the experimental 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts and calculated GIAO shielding tensors were found. The results of the energy and oscillator strength calculations by time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) supplement the experimental findings. Total and partial density of state (TDOS and PDOS) and also overlap population density of state (COOP or OPDOS) diagrams analysis were presented. The dipole moment, linear polarizability and first order hyperpolarizability values were also computed. The linear polarizability and first order hyperpolarizabilities of the studied molecule indicate that the compound is a good candidate for nonlinear optical materials.

  12. Characterization of Meldrum's acid derivative 5-(5-Ethyl-1,3,4-thiadiazol-2-ylamino)methylene-2,2-dimethyl-1,3-dioxane-4,6-dione by Raman and FT-IR spectroscopy and DFT calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Toledo, T. A.; da Silva, L. E.; Teixeira, A. M. R.; Freire, P. T. C.; Pizani, P. S.

    2015-07-01

    In this study, the structural and vibrational properties of Meldrum's acid derivative 5-(5-Ethyl-1,3,4-thiadiazol-2-ylamino)methylene-2,2-dimethyl-1,3-dioxane-4,6-dione, C11H13N3O4S were studied combining experimental techniques such as Raman and FT-IR spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The Raman and FT-IR spectra were recorded at room conditions in the regions from 80 to 3400 cm-1 and 400 to 4000 cm-1, respectively. Vibrational wavenumbers were predicted using DFT calculations with the hybrid functional B3LYP and basis set 6-31G(d,p). A comparison between experimental and theoretical data is provided for the Raman and FT-IR spectra. The descriptions of the normal modes were carried by means of potential energy distribution (PED).

  13. Spectroscopic investigation (FT-IR, FT-Raman), HOMO-LUMO, NBO, and molecular docking analysis of N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea, a potential anticancer agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Priyanka; Islam, S. S.; Ahmad, Hilal; Prabaharan, A.

    2018-02-01

    Nitrosourea plays an important role in the treatment of cancer. N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea, also known as ENU, (chemical formula C3H7N3O2), is a highly potent mutagen. The chemical is an alkylating agent and acts by transferring the ethyl group of ENU to nucleobases (usually thymine) in nucleic acids. The molecular structure of N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea has been elucidated using experimental (FT-IR and FT-Raman) and theoretical (DFT) techniques. APT charges, Mulliken atomic charges, Natural bond orbital, Electrostatic potential, HOMO-LUMO and AIM analysis were performed to identify the reactive sites and charge transfer interactions. Furthermore, to evaluate the anticancer activity of ENU molecular docking studies were carried out against 2JIU protein.

  14. Characterization of a Namban folding screen from the Edo period by X RF, Raman, FTIR and Sem-EDS: Comparison with a screen from the Momoyama period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pessanha, S.; Madeira, T.I.; Manso, M.; Carvalho, M.L.; LeGac, A.; Bardon, T.; Kazarian, S.G.; Silva, R.J.C.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: In 1543 Portuguese sailors arrived in southern Japan and foreign trade flourished there until they were banned and their missionaries expelled, in the early 1600s. The art that Japanese artists created after this contact has its own name: Namban. This work compares two Namban folding screens that depict the same scene, the arrival in a port which may be Nagasaki. One screen is signed by painter Kano Naizen (1570-1616), contemporaneous of this Namban trade, the other screen is attributed to the Edo period (1615-1868) and is what we could consider a second generation screen, a copy of scenes and characters that appear on the first screen but in increased scale and minor detail. The analysis of the screens was performed in situ using portable EDXRF spectrometry. The equipment used in this study consists on an X-ray generator ECLIPSE II from Amptek, with an Ag anode and an Amptek XR-100CR of Si-PIN thermoelectrically cooled detector. Micro-samples were collected and analysed with Raman spectrometry using the Xplora Confocal Raman microscope by Horiba and analyzed with micro-ATR-FTIR spectroscopy and spectroscopic imaging using a Hyperion FTIR microscope with a Ge crystal and combined with a FPA detector. The palette used by both artists seems very similar, opting to gold, malachite, azurite, vermillion, red lead, white oyster shell, and carbon black. Differences were found, namely the resort to mixtures of pigments in the later screen, namely vermillion with red lead in an orange shade of red, and also the mixture of vermillion and carbon black to obtain a brown color. It was also discovered what seems to be the mineral amazonite in the light blue shades of the screen belonging to the Edo Period. (author)

  15. Characterization of a Namban folding screen from the Edo period by X RF, Raman, FTIR and Sem-EDS: Comparison with a screen from the Momoyama period

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pessanha, S.; Madeira, T.I.; Manso, M.; Carvalho, M.L., E-mail: luisa@cii.fc.ul.p [Centro de Fisica Atomica da Universidade de Lisboa, Lisboa (Portugal); LeGac, A. [Departamento Conservacao e Restauro, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Caparica (Portugal); Bardon, T.; Kazarian, S.G. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Imperial College London (United Kingdom); Silva, R.J.C. [CENIMAT/I3N, Departamento de Ciencia dos Materiais, FCT, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Caparica (Portugal)

    2011-07-01

    Full text: In 1543 Portuguese sailors arrived in southern Japan and foreign trade flourished there until they were banned and their missionaries expelled, in the early 1600s. The art that Japanese artists created after this contact has its own name: Namban. This work compares two Namban folding screens that depict the same scene, the arrival in a port which may be Nagasaki. One screen is signed by painter Kano Naizen (1570-1616), contemporaneous of this Namban trade, the other screen is attributed to the Edo period (1615-1868) and is what we could consider a second generation screen, a copy of scenes and characters that appear on the first screen but in increased scale and minor detail. The analysis of the screens was performed in situ using portable EDXRF spectrometry. The equipment used in this study consists on an X-ray generator ECLIPSE II from Amptek, with an Ag anode and an Amptek XR-100CR of Si-PIN thermoelectrically cooled detector. Micro-samples were collected and analysed with Raman spectrometry using the Xplora Confocal Raman microscope by Horiba and analyzed with micro-ATR-FTIR spectroscopy and spectroscopic imaging using a Hyperion FTIR microscope with a Ge crystal and combined with a FPA detector. The palette used by both artists seems very similar, opting to gold, malachite, azurite, vermillion, red lead, white oyster shell, and carbon black. Differences were found, namely the resort to mixtures of pigments in the later screen, namely vermillion with red lead in an orange shade of red, and also the mixture of vermillion and carbon black to obtain a brown color. It was also discovered what seems to be the mineral amazonite in the light blue shades of the screen belonging to the Edo Period. (author)

  16. Evaluation of a setting reaction pathway in the novel composite TiHA-CSD bone cement by FT-Raman and FT-IR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paluszkiewicz, Czesława; Czechowska, Joanna; Ślósarczyk, Anna; Paszkiewicz, Zofia

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine a setting reaction pathway in a novel, surgically handy implant material, based on calcium sulfate hemihydrate (CSH) and titanium doped hydroxyapatite (TiHA). The previous studies confirmed superior biological properties of TiHA in comparison to the undoped hydroxyapatite (HA) what makes it highly attractive for future medical applications. In this study the three types of titanium modified HA powders: untreated, calcined at 800 °C, sintered at 1250 °C and CSH were used to produce bone cements. The Fourier Transform-InfraRed (FT-IR) spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy were applied to evaluate processes taking place during the setting of the studied materials. Our results undoubtedly confirmed that the reaction pathways and the phase compositions differed significantly for set cements and were dependent on the initial heat treatment of TiHA powder. Final materials were multiphase composites consisting of calcium sulfate dihydrate, bassanite, tricalcium phosphate, hydroxyapatite and calcium titanate (perovskite). The FT-IR and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) measurements performed after the incubation of the cement samples in the simulated body fluid (SBF), indicate on high bioactive potential of the obtained bone cements.

  17. FT-Raman, FT-IR and UV-visible spectral investigations and ab initio computations of anti-epileptic drug: Vigabatrin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwin, Bismi; Joe, I. Hubert

    2013-10-01

    Vibrational analysis of anti-epileptic drug vigabatrin, a structural GABA analog was carried out using NIR FT-Raman and FTIR spectroscopic techniques. The equilibrium geometry, various bonding features and harmonic vibrational wavenumbers were studied using density functional theory method. The detailed interpretation of the vibrational spectra has been carried out with the aid of VEDA.4 program. Vibrational spectra, natural bond orbital analysis and optimized molecular structure show clear evidence for the effect of electron charge transfer on the activity of the molecule. Predicted electronic absorption spectrum from TD-DFT calculation has been compared with the UV-vis spectrum. The Mulliken population analysis on atomic charges and the HOMO-LUMO energy were also calculated. Good consistency is found between the calculated results and experimental data for the electronic absorption as well as IR and Raman spectra. The blue-shifting of the Csbnd C stretching wavenumber reveals that the vinyl group is actively involved in the conjugation path. The NBO analysis confirms the occurrence of intramolecular hyperconjugative interactions resulting in ICT causing stabilization of the system.

  18. FT-Raman, FT-IR and UV-visible spectral investigations and ab initio computations of anti-epileptic drug: vigabatrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwin, Bismi; Joe, I Hubert

    2013-10-01

    Vibrational analysis of anti-epileptic drug vigabatrin, a structural GABA analog was carried out using NIR FT-Raman and FTIR spectroscopic techniques. The equilibrium geometry, various bonding features and harmonic vibrational wavenumbers were studied using density functional theory method. The detailed interpretation of the vibrational spectra has been carried out with the aid of VEDA.4 program. Vibrational spectra, natural bond orbital analysis and optimized molecular structure show clear evidence for the effect of electron charge transfer on the activity of the molecule. Predicted electronic absorption spectrum from TD-DFT calculation has been compared with the UV-vis spectrum. The Mulliken population analysis on atomic charges and the HOMO-LUMO energy were also calculated. Good consistency is found between the calculated results and experimental data for the electronic absorption as well as IR and Raman spectra. The blue-shifting of the C-C stretching wavenumber reveals that the vinyl group is actively involved in the conjugation path. The NBO analysis confirms the occurrence of intramolecular hyperconjugative interactions resulting in ICT causing stabilization of the system. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The spectroscopic (FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV and NMR) first order hyperpolarizability and HOMO-LUMO analysis of dansyl chloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabacak, M.; Cinar, M.; Kurt, M.; Poiyamozhi, A.; Sundaraganesan, N.

    2014-01-01

    The solid phase FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of dansyl chloride (DC) have been recorded in the regions 400-4000 and 50-4000 cm-1, respectively. The spectra have been interpreted in terms of fundamentals modes, combination and overtone bands. The structure of the molecule has been optimized and the structural characteristics have been determined by density functional theory (B3LYP) method with 6-311++G(d,p) as basis set. The vibrational frequencies were calculated for most stable conformer and were compared with the experimental frequencies, which yield good agreement between observed and calculated frequencies. The infrared and Raman spectra have also been predicted from the calculated intensities. 1H and 13C NMR spectra were recorded and 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts of the molecule were calculated using the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method. UV-Visible spectrum of the compound was recorded in the region 200-600 nm and the electronic properties HOMO and LUMO energies were measured by time-dependent TD-DFT approach. Nonlinear optical and thermodynamic properties were interpreted. All the calculated results were compared with the available experimental data of the title molecule.

  20. Comprehensive quantum chemical and spectroscopic (FTIR, FT-Raman, 1H, 13C NMR) investigations of O-desmethyltramadol hydrochloride an active metabolite in tramadol - An analgesic drug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjunan, V.; Santhanam, R.; Marchewka, M. K.; Mohan, S.

    2014-03-01

    O-desmethyltramadol is one of the main metabolites of tramadol widely used clinically and has analgesic activity. The FTIR and FT-Raman spectra of O-desmethyl tramadol hydrochloride are recorded in the solid phase in the regions 4000-400 cm-1 and 4000-100 cm-1, respectively. The observed fundamentals are assigned to different normal modes of vibration. Theoretical studies have been performed as its hydrochloride salt. The structure of the compound has been optimised with B3LYP method using 6-31G** and cc-pVDZ basis sets. The optimised bond length and bond angles are correlated with the X-ray data. The experimental wavenumbers were compared with the scaled vibrational frequencies determined by DFT methods. The IR and Raman intensities are determined with B3LYP method using cc-pVDZ and 6-31G(d,p) basic sets. The total electron density and molecular electrostatic potential surfaces of the molecule are constructed by using B3LYP/cc-pVDZ method to display electrostatic potential (electron + nuclei) distribution. The electronic properties HOMO and LUMO energies were measured. Natural bond orbital analysis of O-desmethyltramadol hydrochloride has been performed to indicate the presence of intramolecular charge transfer. The 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts of the molecule have been anlysed.

  1. FT-IR, FT-Raman, NMR studies and ab initio-HF, DFT-B3LYP vibrational analysis of 4-chloro-2-fluoroaniline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arivazhagan, M; Anitha Rexalin, D

    2012-10-01

    The Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and Fourier transform Raman (FT-Raman) spectra of 4-chloro-2-fluoroaniline (CFA) have been recorded and analyzed. The equilibrium geometry, bonding features and harmonic vibrational frequencies have been investigated with the help of ab initio and density functional theory (DFT) methods. The assignments of the vibrational spectra have been carried out with the help of normal coordinate analysis (NCA) following the scaled quantum mechanical force field methodology. The (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts of the molecule are calculated by the Gauge including atomic orbital (GIAO) method. The first order hyperpolarizability (β(0)) of this novel molecular system and related properties (β, α(0) and Δα) of CFA are calculated using B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) and HF/6-311++G(d,p) methods on the finite-field approach. The calculated results also show that the CFA molecule might have microscopic nonlinear optical (NLO) behavior with non-zero values. Stability of the molecule arising from hyper conjugative interactions, charge delocalization has been analyzed using natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. The result confirms the occurrence of intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) within the molecule. The HOMO-LUMO energies UV-vis spectral analysis and MEP are performed by B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) approach. A detailed interpretation of the infrared and Raman spectra of CFA is also reported based on total energy distribution (TED). The difference between the observed and scaled wave number values of the most of the fundamentals is very small. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The joined use of n.i. spectroscopic analyses - FTIR, Raman, visible reflectance spectrometry and EDXRF - to study drawings and illuminated manuscripts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruni, S.; Guglielmi, V.; Caglio, S.; Poldi, G.

    2008-01-01

    Some art objects being small and very precious prevents conservators and conservation scientists from whatever kind of sampling, so that only completely non-invasive (n.i.) studies are permitted. Besides, also moving the object is sometimes forbidden: this happens for jewels as well as for manuscripts, illuminated codices, drawings and paintings. Some important physical n.i. analyses, such as PIXE and PIGE, therefore cannot be used in many cases. With these limitations, only imaging techniques in X, UV, Visible and IR bands, and a few spectroscopic methods that can be carried out with portable instruments can be applied, i.e. molecular spectroscopies like Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), Raman, UV visible and near IR reflectance spectrometry (UV-Vis-NIR RS) and atomic spectroscopy like energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF). The use of only one or two of these techniques is usually far from giving all the information required to achieve a full characterization of materials used by the artist or during restorations, and to understand some conservative problems of the object. On the contrary, a joined use of n.i. analyses can supply a larger set of data, allowing for cross checks. With this aim we show a fully integrated spectroscopic approach to polychrome objects, and, in particular, to drawings and illuminated manuscripts, using portable instruments, specifically μ-FTIR, μ-Raman, Vis-RS and EDXRF, where also the Raman signal does not suffer fluorescence caused by varnish coating and from binder. We propose the joined use of all these four physical analyses to characterize materials - support, pigments, dyes, binders, etc. - on a complex case: a painted and drawn parchment of the late 15th century, or the beginning of the 16th, partly attributed to Andrea Mantegna. The collected spectroscopic data have been compared to proper spectral databases, some of which specifically realized in our laboratories. Also, mixtures of pigments and their stratigraphical

  3. Pressure-induced amorphization and reactivity of solid dimethyl acetylene probed by in situ FTIR and Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Jiwen; Daljeet, Roshan; Kieran, Arielle; Song, Yang

    2018-06-01

    Conjugated polymers are prominent semiconductors that have unique electric conductivity and photoluminescence. Synthesis of conjugated polymers under high pressure is extremely appealing because it does not require a catalyst or solvent used in conventional chemical methods. Transformation of acetylene and many of its derivatives to conjugated polymers using high pressure has been successfully achieved, but not with dimethyl acetylene (DMA). In this work, we present a high-pressure study on solid DMA using a diamond anvil cell up to 24.4 GPa at room temperature characterized by in situ Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy. Our results show that solid DMA exists in a phase II crystal structure and is stable up to 12 GPa. Above this pressure, amorphization was initiated and the process was completed at 24.4 GPa. The expected polymeric transformation was not evident upon compression, but only observed upon decompression from a threshold compression pressure (e.g. 14.4 GPa). In situ florescence measurements suggest excimer formation via crystal defects, which induces the chemical reactions. The vibrational spectral analysis suggests the products contain the amorphous poly(DMA) and possibly additional amorphous hydrogenated carbon material.

  4. FTIR, FT-RAMAN, NMR, spectra, normal co-ordinate analysis, NBO, NLO and DFT calculation of N,N-diethyl-4-methylpiperazine-1-carboxamide molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthu, S; Elamurugu Porchelvi, E

    2013-11-01

    The Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) and FT-Raman of N,N-diethyl-4-methylpiperazine-1-carboxamide (NND4MC) have been recorded and analyzed. The structure of the compound was optimized and the structural characteristics were determined by density functional theory (DFT) using B3LYP method with 6-31G(d,p) and 6-311G(d,p) basis sets. The difference between the observed and scaled wavenumber values of most of the fundamentals is very small. The theoretically predicted FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of the title molecule have been constructed. The detailed interpretation of the vibrational spectra has been carried out with aid of normal coordinate analysis (NCA) following the scaled quantum mechanical force field methodology. Stability of the molecule arising from hyperconjugative interactions and charge delocalization has been analyzed using natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. The results show that electron density (ED) in the σ(*) and π(*) antibonding orbitals and second order delocalization energies (E2) confirm the occurrence of intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) within the molecule. The electronic dipole moment (μD) and the first hyperpolarizability (βtot) values of the investigated molecule were computed using Density Functional Theory (DFT/B3LYP) with 6-31G(d,p) and 6-311G(d,p) basis sets. The calculated results also show that the NND4MC molecule may have microscopy nonlinear optical (NLO) behavior with non zero values. Mulliken atomic charges of NND4MC were calculated. The (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts of the molecule were calculated by the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method and compared with experimental results. The UV-Vis spectrum of the compound was recorded. The theoretical electronic absorption spectra have been calculated by using CIS, TD-DFT methods. A study on the electronic properties, such as HOMO and LUMO energies, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) were also performed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B

  5. Single-particle investigation of summertime and wintertime Antarctic sea spray aerosols using low-Z particle EPMA, Raman microspectrometry, and ATR-FTIR imaging techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Hyo-Jin; Gupta, Dhrubajyoti; Cho, Hye-Rin; Hwang, Hee Jin; Do Hur, Soon; Gim, Yeontae; Ro, Chul-Un

    2016-11-01

    Two aerosol samples collected at King Sejong Korean scientific research station, Antarctica, on 9 December 2011 in the austral summer (sample S1) and 23 July 2012 in the austral winter (sample S2), when the oceanic chlorophyll a levels on the collection days of the samples were quite different, by ˜ 19 times (2.46 vs. 0.13 µg L-1, respectively), were investigated on a single-particle basis using quantitative energy-dispersive electron probe X-ray microanalysis (ED-EPMA), called low-Z particle EPMA, Raman microspectrometry (RMS), and attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) imaging techniques to obtain their characteristics based on the elemental chemical compositions, molecular species, and mixing state. X-ray analysis showed that the supermicron summertime and wintertime Antarctic aerosol samples have different elemental chemical compositions, even though all the individual particles analyzed were sea spray aerosols (SSAs); i.e., the contents of C, O, Ca, S, and Si were more elevated, whereas Cl was more depleted, for sample S1 than for sample S2. Based on qualitative analysis of the chemical species present in individual SSAs by the combined application of RMS and ATR-FTIR imaging, different organic species were observed in samples S1 and S2; i.e., Mg hydrate salts of alanine were predominant in samples S1 and S2, whereas Mg salts of fatty acids internally mixed with Mg hydrate salts of alanine were significant in sample S2. Although CaSO4 was observed significantly in both samples S1 and S2, other inorganic species, such as Na2SO4, NaNO3, Mg(NO3)2, SiO2, and CH3SO3Mg, were observed more significantly in sample S1, suggesting that those compounds may be related to the higher phytoplankton activity in summer.

  6. Spectroscopic [FT-IR and FT-Raman] and molecular modeling (MM) study of benzene sulfonamide molecule using quantum chemical calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinod, K. S.; Periandy, S.; Govindarajan, M.

    2016-07-01

    The spectroscopic and molecular modeling (MM) study includes, FT-IR, FT-Raman and 13C NMR and 1H NMR spectra of the Benzene sulfonamide were recorded for the analysis. The observed experimental and theoretical frequencies (IR and Raman) were assigned according to their distinctive region. The present study of this title molecule have been carried out by hybrid computational calculations of HF and DFT (B3LYP) methods with 6-311+G(d,p) and 6-311++G(d,p) basis sets and the corresponding results are tabulated. The structural modifications of the compound due to the substitutions of NH2 and SO2 were investigated. The minimum energy conformers of the compound were studied using conformational analysis. The alternations of the vibrational pattern of the base structure related to the substitutions were analyzed. The thermodynamic parameters (such as zero-point vibrational energy, thermal energy, specific heat capacity, rotational constants, entropy, and dipole moment) of Benzene sulfonamide have been calculated. The donor acceptor interactions of the compound and the corresponding UV transitions are found out using NBO analysis. The NMR spectra were simulated by using the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method with B3LYP methods and the 6-311++G(d,p) basis set and their spectra were simulated and the chemical shifts related to TMS were compared. A quantum computational study on the electronic and optical properties absorption wavelengths, excitation energy, dipole moment and frontier molecular orbital energies, were performed by HF and DFT methods. The energy gap of the present compound was calculated related to HOMO and LUMO energies which confirm the occurring of charge transformation between the base and ligand group. Besides frontier molecular orbitals (FMO), molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) was performed. The thermodynamic properties (heat capacity, entropy, and enthalpy) of the title compound at different temperatures were calculated in gas phase and

  7. Investigation of the Cross-Section Stratifications of Icons Using Micro-Raman and Micro-Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazidou, Dimitra; Lampakis, Dimitrios; Karapanagiotis, Ioannis; Panayiotou, Costas

    2018-01-01

    The cross-section stratifications of samples, which were removed from six icons, are studied using optical microscopy, micro-Raman spectroscopy, and micro-Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. The icons, dated from the 14th to 19th centuries, are prominent examples of Byzantine painting art and are attributed to different artistic workshops of ​​northern Greece. The following materials are identified in the cross-sections of the icon samples using micro-Raman spectroscopy: anhydrite; calcite; carbon black; chrome yellow; cinnabar; gypsum; lead white; minium; orpiment; Prussian blue; red ochre; yellow ochre; and a paint of organic origin which can be either indigo ( Indigofera tinctoria L. and others) or woad ( Isatis tinctoria L.). The same samples are investigated using micro-FT-IR which leads to the following identifications: calcite; calcium oxalates; chrome yellow; gypsum; kaolinite; lead carboxylates; lead sulfate (or quartz); lead white; oil; protein; Prussian blue; saponified oil; shellac; silica; and tree resin. The study of the cross-sections of the icon samples reveals the combinations of the aforementioned inorganic and organic materials. Although the icons span over a long period of six centuries, the same stratification comprising gypsum ground layer, paint layers prepared by modified "egg tempera" techniques (proteinaceous materials mixed with oil and resins), and varnish layer is revealed in the investigated samples. Moreover, the presence of three layers of varnishes, one at the top and other two as intermediate layers, in the cross-section analysis of a sample from Virgin and Child provide evidence of later interventions.

  8. Experimental (FT-IR, FT-Raman, 1H NMR) and theoretical study of magnesium, calcium, strontium, and barium picolinates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swiderski, G; Kalinowska, M; Wojtulewski, S; Lewandowski, W

    2006-05-01

    The experimental IR, Raman, and 1H NMR spectra of picolinic acid, as well as magnesium, calcium, strontium, and barium picolinates were registered, assigned and studied. Characteristic changes in the spectra of metal picolinates in comparison with the spectrum of ligand were observed, which lead to the conclusion that perturbation of the aromatic system of picolinates increases along with the series Mg-->Ca-->Sr-->Ba. Theoretical structures of beryllium and magnesium picolinates, as well as theoretical IR spectrum of magnesium picolinate were calculated in B3PW91/6-311++G(d, p) level. On the basis of calculated bond lengths in pyridine ring geometric, aromaticity indexes HOMA were calculated. The idea of these indexes is based on the fact that the essential factor in aromatic stabilization is the pi delocalization manifested in: planar geometry, equalization of the bond lengths and angles, and symmetry. The decidedly lower value of HOMA for magnesium picolinate (i.e. 0.545; 0.539) than that for beryllium picolinate (i.e. 0.998; 0.998) indicate higher aromatic properties of Be picolinate than of Mg picolinate. The comparison of theoretical and literature experimental structures of magnesium picolinate was done. The experimental structure contains two water molecules, so the calculations for hydrated magnesium picolinate were carried on, and the influence of coordinated water molecule on the structure of picolinates was discussed. The HOMAs for hydrated experimental and calculated Mg picolinate amount to 0.870; 0.743, and 0.900; 0.890, respectively, whereas for anhydrous structure, it is as described above, i.e. 0.545; 0.539. Thus, the calculations clearly showed that water molecules coordinated to the central atom weakens the effect of metal on the electronic system of ligand.

  9. Curcumin-β-cyclodextrin inclusion complex: stability, solubility, characterisation by FT-IR, FT-Raman, X-ray diffraction and photoacoustic spectroscopy, and food application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangolim, Camila Sampaio; Moriwaki, Cristiane; Nogueira, Ana Claudia; Sato, Francielle; Baesso, Mauro Luciano; Neto, Antônio Medina; Matioli, Graciette

    2014-06-15

    Curcumin was complexed with β-CD using co-precipitation, freeze-drying and solvent evaporation methods. Co-precipitation enabled complex formation, as indicated by the FT-IR and FT-Raman techniques via the shifts in the peaks that were assigned to the aromatic rings of curcumin. In addition, photoacoustic spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction, with the disappearance of the band related to aromatic rings, by Gaussian fitting, and modifications in the spectral lines, respectively, also suggested complex formation. The possible complexation had an efficiency of 74% and increased the solubility of the pure colourant 31-fold. Curcumin-β-CD complex exhibited a sunlight stability 18% higher than the pure colourant. This material was stable to pH variations and storage at -15 and 4°C. With an isothermal heating at 100 and 150°C for 2h, the material exhibited a colour retention of approximately 99%. The application of curcumin-β-CD complex in vanilla ice creams intensified the colour of the products and produced a great sensorial acceptance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Acid-base properties, FT-IR, FT-Raman spectroscopy and computational study of 1-(pyrid-4-yl)piperazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mary, Y Sheena; Panicker, C Yohannan; Varghese, Hema Tresa; Van Alsenoy, Christian; Procházková, Markéta; Sevčík, Richard; Pazdera, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    We report the vibrational spectral analysis was carried out using FT-IR and FT-Raman spectroscopy for 1-(pyrid-4-yl)piperazine (PyPi). Single crystals of PyPi suitable for X-ray structural analysis were obtained. The acid-base properties are also reported. PyPi supported on a weak acid cation-exchanger in the single protonated form and this system can be used efficiently as the solid supported analogue of 4-N,N-dimethyl-aminopyridine. The complete vibrational assignments of wavenumbers were made on the basis of potential energy distribution. The HOMO and LUMO analysis is used to determine the charge transfer within the molecule and with the molecular electrostatic potential map was applied for the reactivity assessment of PyPi molecule toward proton, electrophiles and nucleopholes as well. The stability of the molecule arising from hyper-conjugative interaction and charge delocalization has been analyzed using NBO analysis. The calculated first hyperpolarizability of PyPi is 17.46 times that of urea. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Ab initio and DFT study of hydrogen bond interactions between ascorbic acid and dimethylsulfoxide based on FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niazazari, Naser; Zatikyan, Ashkhen L.; Markarian, Shiraz A.

    2013-06-01

    The hydrogen bonding of 1:1 complexes formed between L-ascorbic acid (LAA) and dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) has been studied by means of ab initio and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Solutions of L-ascorbic acid (AA) in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) have been studied by means of both FT-IR (4000-220 cm-1) and FT-Raman spectroscopy. Ab initio Hartree-Fock (HF) and DFT methods have been used to determine the structure and energies of stable conformers of various types of L-AA/DMSO complexes in gas phase and solution. The basis sets 6-31++G∗∗ and 6-311+G∗ were used to describe the structure, energy, charges and vibrational frequencies of interacting complexes in the gas phase. The optimized geometric parameters and interaction energies for various complexes at different theories have been estimated. Binding energies have been corrected for basis set superposition error (BSSE) and harmonic vibrational frequencies of the structures have been calculated to obtain the stable forms of the complexes. The self-consistent reaction field (SCRF) has been used to calculate the effect of DMSO as the solvent on the geometry, energy and charges of complexes. The solvent effect has been studied using the Onsager models. It is shown that the polarity of the solvent plays an important role on the structures and relative stabilities of different complexes. The results obtained show that there is a satisfactory correlation between experimental and theoretical predictions.

  12. Molecular vibrational investigation [FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV-Visible and NMR] on Bis(thiourea) Nickel chloride using HF and DFT calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, S.; Sundararajan, R. S.; Ramachandraraja, C.; Ramalingam, S.; Durga, R.

    2015-03-01

    In the present research work, the FT-IR, FT-Raman spectra of the Bis(thiourea) Nickel chloride (BTNC) were recorded and analyzed. The observed fundamental frequencies in finger print and functional group regions were assigned according to their uniqueness region. The computational calculations were carried out by HF and DFT (B3LYP and B3PW91) methods with 6-31++G(d,p) and 6-311++G(d,p) basis sets and the corresponding results were tabulated. The present organo-metallic compound was made up of covalent and coordination covalent bonds. The modified vibrational pattern of the complex molecule associated with ligand group was analyzed. Furthermore, the 13C NMR and 1H NMR spectral data were calculated by using the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method with B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) basis set and their spectra were simulated and the chemical shifts linked to TMS were compared. A investigation on the electronic and optical properties; absorption wavelengths, excitation energy, dipole moment and frontier molecular orbital energies were carried out. The kubo gap of the present compound was calculated related to HOMO and LUMO energies which confirm the occurring of charge transformation between the base and ligand. Besides frontier molecular orbitals (FMO), molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) was performed. The NLO properties related to Polarizability and hyperpolarizability based on the finite-field approach were also discussed.

  13. Spectroscopic [FT-IR and FT-Raman] and theoretical [UV-Visible and NMR] analysis on α-Methylstyrene by DFT calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthikeyan, N.; Joseph Prince, J.; Ramalingam, S.; Periandy, S.

    2015-05-01

    In the present research work, the FT-IR, FT-Raman and 13C and 1H NMR spectra of the α-Methylstyrene were recorded. The observed fundamental frequencies in finger print as well as functional group regions were assigned according to their uniqueness region. The Gaussian computational calculations are carried out by HF and DFT (B3LYP and B3PW91) methods with 6-31++G(d,p) and 6-311++G(d,p) basis sets and the corresponding results were tabulated. The impact of the presence of vinyl group in phenyl structure of the compound is investigated. The modified vibrational pattern of the molecule associated vinyl group was analyzed. Moreover, 13C NMR and 1H NMR were calculated by using the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method with B3LYP methods and the 6-311++G(d,p) basis set and their spectra were simulated and the chemical shifts linked to TMS were compared. A study on the electronic and optical properties; absorption wavelengths, excitation energy, dipole moment and frontier molecular orbital energies were carried out. The kubo gap of the present compound was calculated related to HOMO and LUMO energies which confirm the occurring of charge transformation between the base and ligand. Besides frontier molecular orbitals (FMO), molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) was performed. The NLO properties related to Polarizability and hyperpolarizability based on the finite-field approach were also discussed.

  14. Experimental and theoretical studies of (FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV-Visible and DFT) 4-(6-methoxynaphthalen-2-yl) butan-2-one.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindasamy, P; Gunasekaran, S

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the vibrational spectral analysis was carried out by using FT-Raman and FT-IR spectroscopy in the range 4000-50 cm(-1) and 4000-450 cm(-1) respectively for 4-(6-methoxynaphthalen-2-yl) butan-2-one (abbreviated as 4MNBO) molecule. Theoretical calculations were performed by density functional theory (DFT/B3LYP) method using 6-311G(d,p) and 6-311++G(d,p) basis sets. The difference between the observed and calculated wavenumber value of most of the fundamentals were very small. The complete vibrational assignments of wavenumbers were made on the basis of potential energy distribution (PED). The UV-Vis spectrum was recorded in the methanol solution. The energy, wavelength and oscillator's strength were calculated by Time Dependent Density Functional Theory (TD-DFT) and matched to the experimental findings. The intramolecular contacts have been interpreted using natural bond orbital (NBO) and natural localized molecular orbital (NLMO) analysis. Thermodynamic properties of 4MNBO at different temperature have been calculated. The molecular electrostatic potential surface (MESP) and Frontier molecular orbital's (FMO's) analysis were investigated using theoretical calculations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Molecular vibrational investigation [FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV-Visible and NMR] on Bis(thiourea) Nickel chloride using HF and DFT calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, S; Sundararajan, R S; Ramachandraraja, C; Ramalingam, S; Durga, R

    2015-03-05

    In the present research work, the FT-IR, FT-Raman spectra of the Bis(thiourea) Nickel chloride (BTNC) were recorded and analyzed. The observed fundamental frequencies in finger print and functional group regions were assigned according to their uniqueness region. The computational calculations were carried out by HF and DFT (B3LYP and B3PW91) methods with 6-31++G(d,p) and 6-311++G(d,p) basis sets and the corresponding results were tabulated. The present organo-metallic compound was made up of covalent and coordination covalent bonds. The modified vibrational pattern of the complex molecule associated with ligand group was analyzed. Furthermore, the (13)C NMR and (1)H NMR spectral data were calculated by using the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method with B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) basis set and their spectra were simulated and the chemical shifts linked to TMS were compared. A investigation on the electronic and optical properties; absorption wavelengths, excitation energy, dipole moment and frontier molecular orbital energies were carried out. The kubo gap of the present compound was calculated related to HOMO and LUMO energies which confirm the occurring of charge transformation between the base and ligand. Besides frontier molecular orbitals (FMO), molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) was performed. The NLO properties related to Polarizability and hyperpolarizability based on the finite-field approach were also discussed. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Preparation and characterizations of SnO2 nanopowder and spectroscopic (FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV-Visible and NMR) analysis using HF and DFT calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayeshamariam, A; Ramalingam, S; Bououdina, M; Jayachandran, M

    2014-01-24

    In this work, pure and singe phase SnO2 Nano powder is successfully prepared by simple sol-gel combustion route. The photo luminescence and XRD measurements are made and compared the geometrical parameters with calculated values. The FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra are recorded and the fundamental frequencies are assigned. The optimized parameters and the frequencies are calculated using HF and DFT (LSDA, B3LYP and B3PW91) theory in bulk phase of SnO2 and are compared with its Nano phase. The vibrational frequency pattern in nano phase gets realigned and the frequencies are shifted up to higher region of spectra when compared with bulk phase. The NMR and UV-Visible spectra are simulated and analyzed. Transmittance studies showed that the HOMO-LUMO band gap (Kubo gap) is reduced from 3.47 eV to 3.04 eV while it is heated up to 800°C. The Photoluminescence spectra of SnO2 powder showed a peak shift towards lower energy side with the change of Kubo gap from 3.73 eV to 3.229 eV for as-prepared and heated up to 800°C. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Analysis of 19th century ceramic fragments excavated from Pirenópolis (Goiás, Brazil) using FT-IR, Raman, XRF and SEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Renato P.; Coelho, Filipe A.; Felix, Valter S.; Pereira, Marcelo O.; de Souza, Marcos André Torres; Anjos, Marcelino J.

    2018-03-01

    This study used Raman, FT-IR and XRF spectroscopy and SEM to analyze ceramic fragments dating from the 19th century, excavated from an old farm in the municipality of Pirenópolis, Goiás, Brazil. The results show that the samples were produced in an open oven at a firing temperature below 500 °C, using raw materials including kaolinite, hematite, magnetite, quartz, microcline, albite, anhydrite, calcite, illite, orthoclase and MnO2. Although the analyses showed similarities in the manufacturing process and the presence of many minerals was common in all samples, multivariate statistical methods (PCA) allowed a more detailed assessment of similarities and differences in the mineral composition of the samples. The results of the PCA showed that the samples excavated in one of the slave quarters (senzalas) group with those excavated at the farmhouse, where the landowner lived, which indicates a paternalistic attitude towards captives, including the sharing of ceramic materials of everyday use.

  18. Raman, FTIR, thermal and optical properties of TeO2-Nb2O5-B2O3-V2O5 quaternary glass system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swapna

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A series of quaternary glass systems with the composition 79TeO2-(20−xNb2O5-xB2O3-1V2O5 was prepared using the melt quench technique. Such studies as optical absorption, Raman, FTIR spectroscopy, EPR and DSC were carried out on the glass system. The physical properties, such as density (ρ and molar volume (VM, were determined. The Urbach energy (ΔE, optical band gap (Eopt, optical basicity (Λ, refractive index (n and electron polarizability (α of the glasses were determined from optical absorption data. Spin-Hamiltonian parameters of VO2+ ions were calculated from the EPR data. With the gradual substitution of B2O3 at the expense of Nb2O5, the density and optical band gap of the glasses decreased, and the electronic polarizability increased. EPR spectra revealed that VO2+ occupies an octahedral site with tetrahedral compression. Spin-Hamiltonian parameters g|| and g⊥ increased as B2O3 content increased in the glass. The glass transition temperature (Tg also decreased as the B2O3 content in the glass increased.

  19. Kinetics of hydroxyapatite deposition on solid substrates modified by sequential implantation of Ca and P ions - Part I. FTIR and Raman spectroscopy study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecheva, Emilia V.; Pramatarova, Liliana D.; Maitz, Manfred F.; Pham, Mihn T.; Kondyuirin, Alexey V.

    2004-07-01

    In this work, the kinetics of hydroxyapatite (HA) deposition on solid substrates from liquid precursor (simulated body fluid, SBF) is investigated. The surfaces of stainless steel, silicon and silica glass substrates are modified by sequential implantation of Ca and P ions. Three groups of samples of each material: (i) ion-implanted; (ii) ion-implanted and thermally treated at 873 K in air for 60 min; and (iii) untreated are prepared. To investigate the kinetics of the HA deposition, all three groups of samples are introduced at equal conditions into SBF whose supersaturation is maintained during the whole 6-day period of immersion. The layers are analyzed by FTIR and Raman spectroscopy. Both techniques complement each other and show the formation of HA with incorporated CO 32- and HPO 42- groups. Following the kinetics of the deposition process, it is concluded that the speed of deposition is different on the three materials modified by Ca and P implantation and by oxidation, compared to untreated samples but in order to distinguish clearly the effect of the ion implantation and oxidation the very initial moment of nucleation and layer growth should be more carefully investigated.

  20. Quantum computational studies, spectroscopic (FT-IR, FT-Raman and UV-Vis) profiling, natural hybrid orbital and molecular docking analysis on 2,4 Dibromoaniline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Christina Susan; Prasana, Johanan Christian; Muthu, S.; Rizwana B, Fathima; Raja, M.

    2018-05-01

    The research exploration will comprise of investigating the molecular structure, vibrational assignments, bonding and anti-bonding nature, nonlinear optical, electronic and thermodynamic nature of the molecule. The research is conducted at two levels: First level employs the spectroscopic techniques - FT-IR, FT-Raman and UV-Vis characterizing techniques; at second level the data attained experimentally is analyzed through theoretical methods using and Density Function Theories which involves the basic principle of solving the Schrodinger equation for many body systems. A comparison is drawn between the two levels and discussed. The probability of the title molecule being bio-active theoretically proved by the electrophilicity index leads to further property analyzes of the molecule. The target molecule is found to fit well with Centromere associated protein inhibitor using molecular docking techniques. Higher basis set 6-311++G(d,p) is used to attain results more concurrent to the experimental data. The results of the organic amine 2, 4 Dibromoaniline is analyzed and discussed.

  1. Synthesis and characterization of an anticoagulant 4-hydroxy-1-thiocoumarin by FTIR, FT-Raman, NMR, DFT, NBO and HOMO-LUMO analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjunan, V.; Santhanam, R.; Sakiladevi, S.; Marchewka, M. K.; Mohan, S.

    2013-04-01

    Experimental and theoretical investigations on the molecular structural, electronic and the vibrational characteristics of 4-hydroxy-1-thiocoumarin are presented. Conformational analysis was carried out to obtain the more stable configuration of the compound. The vibrational frequencies were obtained by DFT/B3LYP calculations employing 6-311++G(d,p), 6-31G(d,p), cc-pVTZ basic sets and B3PW91 method with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set and are compared with FTIR and FT-Raman spectral data recorded in the region of 4000-400 and 4000-100 cm-1, respectively. The total electron density and molecular electrostatic potential surfaces of the molecule were constructed to display electrostatic potential (electron + nuclei) distribution. The electronic properties HOMO and LUMO energies were measured. 1H and 13C NMR spectra were recorded and 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts of the molecule were calculated by using the Gauge-Independent Atomic Orbital (GIAO) method and analyzed. The picture of localized bonds and lone pairs, stabilization energy of the delocalization of electrons, the charge and hybridisation of the atoms of 4-hydroxy-1-thiocoumarin were clearly explained by NBO analysis.

  2. Exploring the structure-activity relations of N-carbethoxyphthalimide by combining FTIR, FT-Raman and NMR spectroscopy with DFT electronic structure method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjunan, V; Govindaraja, S Thillai; Ravindran, P; Mohan, S

    2014-01-01

    The complete vibrational assignment and analysis of N-carbethoxyphthalimide were carried out using the experimental FTIR and FT-Raman data in the range 4000-450 and 4000-100 cm(-1), respectively along with quantum chemical studies of the compound using DFT-B3LYP gradient calculations employing the 6-31G**, 6-311++G** and cc-pVDZ basis sets. The 1H (400 MHz; CDCl3) and 13C (100 MHz;CDCl3) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra were also recorded. Due to the partial ionic nature of the carbonyl group, the carbon atoms C1 and C3 in NCEP show downfield effect and the corresponding observed chemical shift of both are observed at 163.76 ppm and the carbon atom C16 in the carbethoxy group also give signal in the downfield at 148.45 ppm. The active sites are determined by molecular electrostatic potential. The possible electronic transitions are determined by HOMO and LUMO orbital shapes and their energies. The structure-chemical reactivity relations of the compound were determined through chemical potential, global hardness, global softness, electronegativity, electrophilicity and local reactivity descriptors by conceptual DFT methods. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Single-particle investigation of summertime and wintertime Antarctic sea spray aerosols using low-Z particle EPMA, Raman microspectrometry, and ATR-FTIR imaging techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.-J. Eom

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Two aerosol samples collected at King Sejong Korean scientific research station, Antarctica, on 9 December 2011 in the austral summer (sample S1 and 23 July 2012 in the austral winter (sample S2, when the oceanic chlorophyll a levels on the collection days of the samples were quite different, by  ∼  19 times (2.46 vs. 0.13 µg L−1, respectively, were investigated on a single-particle basis using quantitative energy-dispersive electron probe X-ray microanalysis (ED-EPMA, called low-Z particle EPMA, Raman microspectrometry (RMS, and attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR imaging techniques to obtain their characteristics based on the elemental chemical compositions, molecular species, and mixing state. X-ray analysis showed that the supermicron summertime and wintertime Antarctic aerosol samples have different elemental chemical compositions, even though all the individual particles analyzed were sea spray aerosols (SSAs; i.e., the contents of C, O, Ca, S, and Si were more elevated, whereas Cl was more depleted, for sample S1 than for sample S2. Based on qualitative analysis of the chemical species present in individual SSAs by the combined application of RMS and ATR-FTIR imaging, different organic species were observed in samples S1 and S2; i.e., Mg hydrate salts of alanine were predominant in samples S1 and S2, whereas Mg salts of fatty acids internally mixed with Mg hydrate salts of alanine were significant in sample S2. Although CaSO4 was observed significantly in both samples S1 and S2, other inorganic species, such as Na2SO4, NaNO3, Mg(NO32, SiO2, and CH3SO3Mg, were observed more significantly in sample S1, suggesting that those compounds may be related to the higher phytoplankton activity in summer.

  4. Characterization of prepared In2O3 thin films: The FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV-Visible investigation and optical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panneerdoss, I Joseph; Jeyakumar, S Johnson; Ramalingam, S; Jothibas, M

    2015-08-05

    In this original work, the Indium oxide (In2O3) thin film is deposited cleanly on microscope glass substrate at different temperatures by spray pyrolysis technique. The physical properties of the films are characterized by XRD, SEM, AFM and AFM measurements. The spectroscopic investigation has been carried out on the results of FT-IR, FT-Raman and UV-Visible. XRD analysis exposed that the structural transformation of films from stoichiometric to non-stoichiometric orientation of the plane vice versa and also found that, the film is polycrystalline in nature having cubic crystal structure with a preferred grain orientation along (222) plane. SEM and AFM studies revealed that, the film with 0.1M at 500°C has spherical grains with uniform dimension. The complete vibrational analysis has been carried out and the optimized parameters are calculated using HF and DFT (CAM-B3LYP, B3LYP and B3PW91) methods with 3-21G(d,p) basis set. Furthermore, NMR chemical shifts are calculated by using the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) technique. The molecular electronic properties; absorption wavelengths, excitation energy, dipole moment and frontier molecular orbital energies, molecular electrostatic potential energy (MEP) analysis and Polarizability first order hyperpolarizability calculations are performed by time dependent DFT (TD-DFT) approach. The energy excitation on electronic structure is investigated and the assignment of the absorption bands in the electronic spectra of steady compound is discussed. The calculated HOMO and LUMO energies showed the enhancement of energy gap by the addition of substitutions with the base molecule. The thermodynamic properties (heat capacity, entropy, and enthalpy) at different temperatures are calculated and interpreted in gas phase. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV-visible, and NMR spectroscopy and vibrational properties of the labdane-type diterpene 13-epi-sclareol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chain, Fernando E; Leyton, Patricio; Paipa, Carolina; Fortuna, Mario; Brandán, Silvia A

    2015-03-05

    In this work, FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV-Visible and NMR spectroscopies and density functional theory (DFT) calculations were employed to study the structural and vibrational properties of the labdane-type diterpene 13-epi-sclareol using the hybrid B3LYP method together with the 6-31G(∗) basis set. Three stable structures with minimum energy found on the potential energy curves (PES) were optimized, and the corresponding molecular electrostatic potentials, atomic charges, bond orders, stabilization energies and topological properties were computed at the same approximation level. The complete assignment of the bands observed in the vibrational spectrum of 13-epi-sclareol was performed taking into account the internal symmetry coordinates for the three structures using the scaled quantum mechanical force field (SQMFF) methodology at the same level of theory. In addition, the force constants were calculated and compared with those reported in the literature for similar compounds. The predicted vibrational spectrum and the calculated (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR chemical shifts are in good agreement with the corresponding experimental results. The theoretical UV-Vis spectra for the most stable structure of 13-epi-sclareol demonstrate a better correlation with the corresponding experimental spectrum. The study of the three conformers by means of the theory of atoms in molecules (AIM) revealed different H bond interactions and a strong dependence of the interactions on the distance between the involved atoms. Furthermore, the natural bond orbital (NBO) calculations showed the characteristics of the electronic delocalization for the two six-membered rings with chair conformations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Spectroscopic [FT-IR and FT-Raman] and theoretical [UV-Visible and NMR] analysis on α-Methylstyrene by DFT calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthikeyan, N; Joseph Prince, J; Ramalingam, S; Periandy, S

    2015-05-15

    In the present research work, the FT-IR, FT-Raman and (13)C and (1)H NMR spectra of the α-Methylstyrene were recorded. The observed fundamental frequencies in finger print as well as functional group regions were assigned according to their uniqueness region. The Gaussian computational calculations are carried out by HF and DFT (B3LYP and B3PW91) methods with 6-31++G(d,p) and 6-311++G(d,p) basis sets and the corresponding results were tabulated. The impact of the presence of vinyl group in phenyl structure of the compound is investigated. The modified vibrational pattern of the molecule associated vinyl group was analyzed. Moreover, (13)C NMR and (1)H NMR were calculated by using the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method with B3LYP methods and the 6-311++G(d,p) basis set and their spectra were simulated and the chemical shifts linked to TMS were compared. A study on the electronic and optical properties; absorption wavelengths, excitation energy, dipole moment and frontier molecular orbital energies were carried out. The kubo gap of the present compound was calculated related to HOMO and LUMO energies which confirm the occurring of charge transformation between the base and ligand. Besides frontier molecular orbitals (FMO), molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) was performed. The NLO properties related to Polarizability and hyperpolarizability based on the finite-field approach were also discussed. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Molecular structure, electronic properties, NLO, NBO analysis and spectroscopic characterization of Gabapentin with experimental (FT-IR and FT-Raman) techniques and quantum chemical calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Leena; Karabacak, Mehmet; Narayan, V.; Cinar, Mehmet; Prasad, Onkar

    2013-05-01

    Gabapentin (GP), structurally related to the neurotransmitter GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid), mimics the activity of GABA and is also widely used in neurology for the treatment of peripheral neuropathic pain. It exists in zwitterionic form in solid state. The present communication deals with the quantum chemical calculations of energies, geometrical structure and vibrational wavenumbers of GP using density functional (DFT/B3LYP) method with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. In view of the fact that amino acids exist as zwitterions as well as in the neutral form depending on the environment (solvent, pH, etc.), molecular properties of both the zwitterionic and neutral form of GP have been analyzed. The fundamental vibrational wavenumbers as well as their intensities were calculated and compared with experimental FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra. The fundamental assignments were done on the basis of the total energy distribution (TED) of the vibrational modes, calculated with scaled quantum mechanical (SQM) method. The electric dipole moment, polarizability and the first hyperpolarizability values of the GP have been calculated at the same level of theory and basis set. The nonlinear optical (NLO) behavior of zwitterionic and neutral form has been compared. Stability of the molecule arising from hyper-conjugative interactions and charge delocalization has been analyzed using natural bond orbital analysis. Ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectrum of the title molecule has also been calculated using TD-DFT method. The thermodynamic properties of both the zwitterionic and neutral form of GP at different temperatures have been calculated.

  8. [Raman spectroscopy applied to analytical quality control of injectable drugs: analytical evaluation and comparative economic versus HPLC and UV / visible-FTIR].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourget, P; Amin, A; Vidal, F; Merlette, C; Troude, P; Corriol, O

    2013-09-01

    In France, central IV admixture of chemotherapy (CT) treatments at the hospital is now required by law. We have previously shown that the shaping of Therapeutic Objects (TOs) could profit from an Analytical Quality Assurance (AQA), closely linked to the batch release, for the three key parameters: identity, purity, and initial concentration of the compound of interest. In the course of recent and diversified works, we showed the technical superiority of non-intrusive Raman Spectroscopy (RS) vs. any other analytical option and, especially for both HPLC and vibrational method using a UV/visible-FTIR coupling. An interconnected qualitative and economic assessment strongly helps to enrich these relevant works. The study compares in operational situation, the performance of three analytical methods used for the AQC of TOs. We used: a) a set of evaluation criteria, b) the depreciation tables of the machinery, c) the cost of disposables, d) the weight of equipment and technical installations, e) the basic accounting unit (unit of work) and its composite costs (Euros), which vary according to the technical options, the weight of both human resources and disposables; finally, different combinations are described. So, the unit of work can take 12 different values between 1 and 5.5 Euros, and we provide various recommendations. A qualitative evaluation grid constantly places the SR technology as superior or equal to the 2 other techniques currently available. Our results demonstrated: a) the major interest of the non-intrusive AQC performed by RS, especially when it is not possible to analyze a TO with existing methods e.g. elastomeric portable pumps, and b) the high potential for this technique to be a strong contributor to the security of the medication circuit, and to fight the iatrogenic effects of drugs especially in the hospital. It also contributes to the protection of all actors in healthcare and of their working environment.

  9. Potential energy profile, structural, vibrational and reactivity descriptors of trans-2-methoxycinnamic acid by FTIR, FT-Raman and quantum chemical studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjunan, V.; Anitha, R.; Thenmozhi, S.; Marchewka, M. K.; Mohan, S.

    2016-06-01

    The stable conformers of trans-2-methoxycinnamic acid (trans-2MCA) are determined by potential energy profile analysis. The energies of the s-cis and s-trans conformers of trans-2MCA determined by B3LYP/cc-pVTZ method are -612.9788331 Hartrees and -612.9780953 Hartrees, respectively. The vibrational and electronic investigations of the stable s-cis and s-trans conformers of trans-2-methoxycinnamic acid have been carried out extensively with FTIR and FT-Raman spectral techniques. The s-cis conformer (I) with a (C16-C17-C18-O19) dihedral angle equal to 0° is found to be more favoured relative to the one s-trans (II) with (C16-C17-C18-O19) = 180°, possibly due to delocalization, hydrogen bonding and steric repulsion effects between the methoxy and acrylic acid groups. The DFT studies are performed with B3LYP method by utilizing 6-311++G** and cc-pVTZ basis sets to determine the structure, thermodynamic properties, vibrational characteristics and chemical shifts of the compound. The total dipole moments of the conformers determined by B3LYP/cc-pVTZ method are 3.35 D and 4.87 D for s-cis and s-trans, respectively. It reveals the higher polarity of s-trans conformer of trans-2MCA molecule. The electronic and steric influence of the methoxy group on the skeletal frequencies has been analysed. The energies of the frontier molecular orbitals and the LUMO-HOMO energy gap have been determined. The MEP of s-cis conformer lie in the range +1.374e × 10-2 to -1.374e × 10-2 while for s-trans it is +1.591e × 10-2 to -1.591e × 10-2. The total electron density of s-cis conformer lie in the range +5.273e × 10-2 to -5.273e × 10-2 while for s-trans it is +5.403e × 10-2 to -5.403e × 10-2. The MEP and total electron density shows that the s-cis conformer is less polar, less reactive and more stable than the s-trans conformer. All the reactivity descriptors of the molecule have been discussed. Intramolecular electronic interactions and their stabilisation energies have analysed

  10. FTIR and Raman Study of the LixTiyMn1-yO2 (y = 0, 0.11) Cathodes in Methylpropyl Pyrrolidinium Bis(fluoro-sulfonyl)imide, LiTFSI Electrolyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardwick, L.J.; Lucas, I.T.; Doeff, M.M.; Kostecki, R.; Saint, J.A.

    2009-02-02

    This work demonstrates the protective effect of partial titanium substitution in Li{sub x}Ti{sub 0.11}Mn{sub 0.89}O{sub 2} against surface decomposition in room-temperature ionic liquid (RTILs) cells. Raman microscopy and reflectance Fourier transform IR (FTIR) spectroscopy were used to analyze electrodes recovered from cycled Li/Li{sub x}Ti{sub y}Mn{sub 1-y}O{sub 2} (y=0, 0.11) cells containing the 0.5 mol/kg LiTFSI in P{sub 13}FSI RTIL electrolyte. [TFSI=bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide.] Raman and FTIR spectra of cycled Li{sub x}MnO{sub 2} cathodes showed many distinct bands that can be attributed to both the electrolyte and electrode decomposition products. The thickness of the amorphous porous layer on the Li{sub x}MnO{sub 2} cathode increased during cycling. The surface degradation of Li{sub x}MnO{sub 2} and precipitation of electrolyte decomposition products contributed to the film growth. Improved cycling behavior was observed in cells containing Li{sub x}Ti{sub 0.11}Mn{sub 0.89}O{sub 2}, yet Raman spectroscopy also showed possible surface degradation. The FTIR spectra of cycled Li{sub x}MnO{sub 2} and Li{sub x}Ti{sub 0.11}Mn{sub 0.89}O{sub 2} cathodes displayed bands characteristic for LiSO{sub 3}CF{sub 3} and Li{sub 2}NSO{sub 2}CF{sub 3}, which originate from the reaction of the TFSI anion with traces of water present in the cell.

  11. Spectroscopic (FT-IR, FT-Raman, NMR and UV-Visible) and quantum chemical studies of molecular geometry, Frontier molecular orbital, NLO, NBO and thermodynamic properties of salicylic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, S; Gunasekaran, S; Srinivasan, S

    2014-11-11

    The solid phase FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of 2-hydroxybenzoic acid (salicylic acid) have been recorded in the region 4000-400 and 4000-100 cm(-1) respectively. The optimized molecular geometry and fundamental vibrational frequencies are interpreted with the aid of structure optimizations and normal coordinate force field calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) method and a comparative study between Hartree Fork (HF) method at 6-311++G(d,p) level basis set. The calculated harmonic vibrational frequencies are scaled and they are compared with experimentally obtained FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra. A detailed interpretation of the vibrational spectra of this compound has been made on the basis of the calculated potential energy distribution (PED). The time dependent DFT method is employed to predict its absorption energy and oscillator strength. The linear polarizability (α) and the first order hyper polarizability (β) values of the investigated molecule have been computed. The electronic properties, such as HOMO and LUMO energies, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) are also performed. Stability of the molecule arising from hyper conjugative interaction, charge delocalization has been analyzed using natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Spectroscopic investigations (FT-IR & FT-Raman) and molecular docking analysis of 6-[1-methyl-4-nitro-1H-imidazol-5-yl) sulfonyl]-7H-purine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasath, M.; Govindammal, M.; Sathya, B.

    2017-10-01

    The Azathioprine is used as anticancer agent. Azathioprine is chemically called 6-[1-methyl-4-nitro-1H-imidazol-5-yl) sulfonyl]-7H-purine (6M4N5P). The vibrational analysis of the 6M4N5P compound was carried out by using FT-IR and FT-Raman spectroscopic techniques and compared with aspects. The optimized geometry, frequency and intensity of the vibrational bands of 6M4N5P were obtained from the HF and DFT methods with 6-31G (d,p) basis set. The harmonic vibrational frequencies were calculated and the scaled values have been compared with experimental FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra. The calculated Highest Occupied Molecular Orbital (HOMO) and Lowest Unoccupied Molecular Orbital (LUMO) energies show that charge transfer occur within the molecule. MEP (Molecular Electrostatic Potential) is very useful in the investigation of the charge distributions and molecular structure. The molecule orbital contributions were determined by using the total density of states (TDOS). A molecular docking analysis has been carried out to understand the conformational change and electrostatic properties of 6M4N5P in the active site of Rac1-Receptor.

  13. Thiol-thione tautomeric analysis, spectroscopic (FT-IR, Laser-Raman, NMR and UV-vis) properties and DFT computations of 5-(3-pyridyl)-4H-1,2,4-triazole-3-thiol molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gökce, Halil; Öztürk, Nuri; Ceylan, Ümit; Alpaslan, Yelda Bingöl; Alpaslan, Gökhan

    2016-06-15

    In this study, the 5-(3-pyridyl)-4H-1,2,4-triazole-3-thiol molecule (C7H6N4S) molecule has been characterized by using FT-IR, Laser-Raman, NMR and UV-vis spectroscopies. Quantum chemical calculations have been performed to investigate the molecular structure (thione-thiol tautomerism), vibrational wavenumbers, electronic transition absorption wavelengths in DMSO solvent and vacuum, proton and carbon-13 NMR chemical shifts and HOMOs-LUMOs energies at DFT/B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level for all five tautomers of the title molecule. The obtained results show that the calculated vibrational wavenumbers, NMR chemical shifts and UV-vis wavelengths are in a good agreement with experimental data. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Theoretical (in B3LYP/6-3111++G** level), spectroscopic (FT-IR, FT-Raman) and thermogravimetric studies of gentisic acid and sodium, copper(II) and cadmium(II) gentisates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regulska, E; Kalinowska, M; Wojtulewski, S; Korczak, A; Sienkiewicz-Gromiuk, J; Rzączyńska, Z; Swisłocka, R; Lewandowski, W

    2014-11-11

    The DFT calculations (B3LYP method with 6-311++G(d,p) mixed with LanL2DZ for transition metals basis sets) for different conformers of 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (gentisic acid), sodium 2,5-dihydroxybenzoate (gentisate) and copper(II) and cadmium(II) gentisates were done. The proposed hydrated structures of transition metal complexes were based on the results of experimental findings. The theoretical geometrical parameters and atomic charge distribution were discussed. Moreover Na, Cu(II) and Cd(II) gentisates were synthesized and the composition of obtained compounds was revealed by means of elemental and thermogravimetric analyses. The FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of gentisic acid and gentisates were registered and the effect of metals on the electronic charge distribution of ligand was discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Spectroscopic investigation (FT-IR and FT-Raman), vibrational assignments, HOMO-LUMO analysis and molecular docking study of 1-hydroxy-4,5,8-tris(4-methoxyphenyl) anthraquinone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renjith, R.; Sheena Mary, Y.; Tresa Varghese, Hema; Yohannan Panicker, C.; Thiemann, Thies; Shereef, Anas; Al-Saadi, Abdulaziz A.

    2015-12-01

    FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of 1-hydroxy-4,5,8-tris(4-methoxyphenyl)anthraquinone were recorded and analyzed. The vibrational wavenumbers were computed using DFT quantum chemical calculations. The data obtained from wavenumber calculations were used to assign the vibrational bands obtained experimentally. A detailed molecular picture of the title compound and its interactions were obtained from NBO analysis. From the MEP plot it is clear that the negative electrostatic potential regions are mainly localized over carbonyl group. There is some evidence of a region of negative electrostatic potential due to π-electron density of the benzo groups. Molecular docking study shows that methoxy groups attached to the phenyl rings and hydroxyl group are crucial for binding and the title compound might exhibit inhibitory activity against PI3K and may act as an anti-neoplastic agent.

  16. Spectroscopic (FT-IR, FT-Raman, 1H- and 13C-NMR, Theoretical and Microbiological Study of trans o-Coumaric Acid and Alkali Metal o-Coumarates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Kowczyk-Sadowy

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This work is a continuation of research on a correlation between the molecular structure and electronic charge distribution of phenolic compounds and their biological activity. The influence of lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium and cesium cations on the electronic system of trans o-coumaric (2-hydroxy-cinnamic acid was studied. We investigated the relationship between the molecular structure of the tested compounds and their antimicrobial activity. Complementary molecular spectroscopic techniques such as infrared (FT-IR, Raman (FT-Raman, ultraviolet-visible (UV-VIS and nuclear magnetic resonance (1H- and 13C-NMR were applied. Structures of the molecules were optimized and their structural characteristics were calculated by the density functional theory (DFT using the B3LYP method with 6-311++G** as a basis set. Geometric and magnetic aromaticity indices, atomic charges, dipole moments and energies were also calculated. Theoretical parameters were compared to the experimental characteristics of investigated compounds. Correlations between certain vibrational bands and some metal parameters, such as electronegativity, ionization energy, atomic and ionic radius, were found. The microbial activity of studied compounds was tested against Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Proteus vulgaris and Candida albicans.

  17. Quantum mechanical and spectroscopic (FT-IR, FT-Raman) study, NBO analysis, HOMO-LUMO, first order hyperpolarizability and molecular docking study of methyl[(3R)-3-(2-methylphenoxy)-3-phenylpropyl]amine by density functional method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuruvilla, Tintu K.; Prasana, Johanan Christian; Muthu, S.; George, Jacob; Mathew, Sheril Ann

    2018-01-01

    Quantum chemical techniques such as density functional theory (DFT) have become a powerful tool in the investigation of the molecular structure and vibrational spectrum and are finding increasing use in application related to biological systems. The Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and Fourier transform Raman (FT-Raman) techniques are employed to characterize the title compound. The vibrational frequencies were obtained by DFT/B3LYP calculations with 6-31G(d,p) and 6-311 ++G(d,p) as basis sets. The geometry of the title compound was optimized. The vibrational assignments and the calculation of Potential Energy Distribution (PED) were carried out using the Vibrational Energy Distribution Analysis (VEDA) software. Molecular electrostatic potential was calculated for the title compound to predict the reactive sites for electrophilic and nucleophilic attack. In addition, the first-order hyperpolarizability, HOMO and LUMO energies, Fukui function and NBO were computed. The thermodynamic properties of the title compound were calculated at different temperatures, revealing the correlations between heat capacity (C), entropy (S) and enthalpy changes (H) with temperatures. Molecular docking studies were also conducted as part of this study. The paper further explains the experimental results which are in line with the theoretical calculations and provide optimistic evidence through molecular docking that the title compound can act as a good antidepressant. It also provides sufficient justification for the title compound to be selected as a good candidate for further studies related to NLO properties.

  18. Synthesis, spectroscopic (FT-IR, FT-Raman, NMR, UV-Visible), NLO, NBO, HOMO-LUMO, Fukui function and molecular docking study of (E)-1-(5-bromo-2-hydroxybenzylidene)semicarbazide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, M.; Raj Muhamed, R.; Muthu, S.; Suresh, M.

    2017-08-01

    The title compound, (E)-1-(5-bromo-2-hydroxybenzylidene)semicarbazide (15BHS) was synthesized and characterized by FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV, 1HNMR and 13CNMR spectral analysis. The optimized molecular geometry, the vibrational wavenumbers, the infrared intensities and the Raman scattering activities were calculated by using density functional theory(DFT) B3LYP method with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The detailed interpretation of the vibrational spectra has been carried out by VEDA program. The calculated HOMO and LUMO energies show that charge transfer within the molecule. Stability of the molecule arising from hyperconjugative interactions, charge delocalization have been analyzed using natural bond orbital analysis (NBO). The first order hyperpolarizability, Molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) and Fukui functions were also performed. To study the biological activity of the investigation molecule, molecular docking was done to identify the hydrogen bond lengths and binding energy with different antifungal proteins. The thermodynamic properties (heat capacity, entropy, and enthalpy) of the 15BHS at different temperatures have been calculated.

  19. Comprehensive quantum chemical and spectroscopic (FTIR, FT-Raman, 1H, 13C NMR) investigations of O-desmethyltramadol hydrochloride an active metabolite in tramadol--an analgesic drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjunan, V; Santhanam, R; Marchewka, M K; Mohan, S

    2014-03-25

    O-desmethyltramadol is one of the main metabolites of tramadol widely used clinically and has analgesic activity. The FTIR and FT-Raman spectra of O-desmethyl tramadol hydrochloride are recorded in the solid phase in the regions 4000-400 cm(-1) and 4000-100 cm(-1), respectively. The observed fundamentals are assigned to different normal modes of vibration. Theoretical studies have been performed as its hydrochloride salt. The structure of the compound has been optimised with B3LYP method using 6-31G(**) and cc-pVDZ basis sets. The optimised bond length and bond angles are correlated with the X-ray data. The experimental wavenumbers were compared with the scaled vibrational frequencies determined by DFT methods. The IR and Raman intensities are determined with B3LYP method using cc-pVDZ and 6-31G(d,p) basic sets. The total electron density and molecular electrostatic potential surfaces of the molecule are constructed by using B3LYP/cc-pVDZ method to display electrostatic potential (electron+nuclei) distribution. The electronic properties HOMO and LUMO energies were measured. Natural bond orbital analysis of O-desmethyltramadol hydrochloride has been performed to indicate the presence of intramolecular charge transfer. The (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shifts of the molecule have been anlysed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Comprehensive quantum chemical and spectroscopic (FTIR, FT-Raman, (1)H, (13)C NMR) investigations of (1,2-epoxyethyl)benzene and (1,2-epoxy-2-phenyl)propane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjunan, V; Anitha, R; Devi, L; Mohan, S; Yang, Haifeng

    2015-01-25

    Aromatic epoxides are causative factors for mutagenic and carcinogenic activity of polycyclic arenes. The 1,2- or 2,3-epoxy compounds are widely used to a considerable extent in the textile, plastics, pharmaceutical, cosmetics, detergent and photochemical industries. The FTIR and FT-Raman spectra of (1,2-epoxyethyl)benzene and (1,2-epoxy-2-phenyl)propane are recorded in the regions 4000-400 cm(-1) and 4000-100 cm(-1), respectively. The observed fundamentals are assigned to different normal modes of vibration. The structure of the compound has been optimised with B3LYP method using 6-311++G(**) and cc-pVTZ basis sets. The IR and Raman intensities are determined. The total electron density and molecular electrostatic potential surfaces of the molecule are constructed by using B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) method to display electrostatic potential (electron+nuclei) distribution. The electronic properties HOMO and LUMO energies were measured. Natural bond orbital analysis of the compounds has been performed to indicate the presence of intramolecular charge transfer. The (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shifts of the molecules have been analysed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Quantum mechanical study and spectroscopic (FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV-Visible) study, potential energy surface scan, Fukui function analysis and HOMO-LUMO analysis of 3-tert-butyl-4-methoxyphenol by DFT methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravanan, S; Balachandran, V

    2014-09-15

    This study represents an integral approach towards understanding the electronic and structural aspects of 3-tert-butyl-4-methoxyphenol (TBMP). Fourier-transform Infrared (FT-IR) and Fourier-transform Raman (FT-Raman) spectra of TBMP was recorded in the region 4000-400 cm(-1) and 3500-100 cm(-1), respectively. The molecular structures, vibrational wavenumbers, infrared intensities and Raman activities were calculated using DFT (B3LYP and LSDA) methods using 6-311++G (d,p) basis set. The most stable conformer of TBMP was identified from the computational results. The assignments of vibrational spectra have been carried out with the help of normal co-ordinate analysis (NCA) following the scaled quantum mechanical force field (SQMFF) methodology. The first order hyperpolarizability (β0) and related properties (β, α0 and Δα) of TBMP have been discussed. The stability and charge delocalization of the molecule was studied by Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) analysis. UV-Visible spectrum and effects of solvents have been discussed and the electronic properties such as HOMO and LUMO energies were determined by time-dependent TD-DFT approach with B3LYP/6-311++G (d,p) level of theory. The molecule orbital contributions are studied by density of energy states (DOSs). The reactivity sites are identified by mapping the electron density into electrostatic potential surface (MEP). Mulliken analysis of atomic charges is also calculated. The thermodynamic properties at different temperatures were calculated, revealing the correlations between standard heat capacities, standard entropy and standard enthalpy changes with temperatures. Global hardness, global softness, global electrophilicity and ionization potential of the title compound are determined. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. FT-IR, FT-Raman spectra, density functional computations of the vibrational spectra and molecular conformational analysis of 2,5-di-tert-butyl-hydroquinone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, N.; Sundaraganesan, N.; Dereli, Ö.; Türkkan, E.

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of finding conformer among six different possible conformers of 2,5-di-tert-butyl-hydroquinone (DTBHQ), its equilibrium geometry and harmonic wavenumbers were calculated by the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) method. The infrared and Raman spectra of DTBHQ were recorded in the region 400-4000 cm -1 and 50-3500 cm -1, respectively. In addition, the IR spectra in CCl 4 at various concentrations of DTBHQ are also recorded. The computed vibrational wavenumbers were compared with the IR and Raman experimental data. Computational calculations at B3LYP level with two different basis sets 6-31G(d,p) and 6-311++G(d,p) are also employed in the study of the possible conformer of DTBHQ. The complete assignments were performed on the basis of the potential energy distribution (PED) of the vibrational modes, calculated using VEDA 4 program. The general agreement between the observed and calculated frequencies was established.

  3. DFT-assisted spectroscopic characterization of pyrazosulfuron-ethyl: FT-Raman, FTIR and UV-vis studies of a sulfonyl urea herbicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monicka, J. Clemy; James, C.

    2014-10-01

    Raman and IR spectra of pyrazosulfuron-ethyl have been reported here, and it is shown that the spectra has been fully interpreted in terms of assigning normal modes to the various spectral features by using density functional theory calculations. The Raman bands observed for PY in solid phase are characteristic for the carbonyl group, Csbnd C, Csbnd H and Nsbnd H stretching and deformation vibrations. The dimer structure of PY was optimized, including the Nsbnd H…N and Csbnd H…O intermolecular interactions. Stability of the molecule arising from hyperconjugative interactions leading to its bioactivity and charge delocalization have been analyzed using natural bond orbital analysis. Spectral analysis reveals the substantial effect of non-bonding interaction, conjugation and induction effects in the molecule which in turn influences the bioactivity of the compound. Red shifting of (∼94 cm-1) Nsbnd H stretching band substantiates the presence of strong Nsbnd H…N intramolecular hydrogen bonding in the molecule. The aromatic behavior of pyrimidine and pyrazole ring has been calculated using the HOMA method.

  4. Characterisation of the rare cadmium chromate pigment in a 19th century tube colour by Raman, FTIR, X-ray and EPR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Marie Bitsch; Sørensen, Mikkel Agerbæk; Sanyova, Jana

    2017-01-01

    . However, in one of the tube colours labelled “Jaune de Cadmium Citron” (cadmium lemon yellow) an extremely rare cadmium chromate pigment was found. The pigment was analysed and characterised by Raman microscopy (MRS), scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), attenuated...... chromate, and the resulting yellow crystals proved identical to the pigment found in the tube colour “Jaune de Cadmium Citron”. The structure determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction identified the pigment as 2CdCrO4·KOH·H2O or more accurately as KCd2(CrO4)2(H3O2) illustrating the μ-H3O2– species...

  5. Electronic [UV-Visible] and vibrational [FT-IR, FT-Raman] investigation and NMR-mass spectroscopic analysis of terephthalic acid using quantum Gaussian calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthikeyan, N.; Joseph Prince, J.; Ramalingam, S.; Periandy, S.

    2015-03-01

    In this research work, the vibrational IR, polarization Raman, NMR and mass spectra of terephthalic acid (TA) were recorded. The observed fundamental peaks (IR, Raman) were assigned according to their distinctiveness region. The hybrid computational calculations were carried out for calculating geometrical and vibrational parameters by DFT (B3LYP and B3PW91) methods with 6-31++G(d,p) and 6-311++G(d,p) basis sets and the corresponding results were tabulated. The molecular mass spectral data related to base molecule and substitutional group of the compound was analyzed. The modification of the chemical property by the reaction mechanism of the injection of dicarboxylic group in the base molecule was investigated. The 13C and 1H NMR spectra were simulated by using the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method and the absolute chemical shifts related to TMS were compared with experimental spectra. The study on the electronic and optical properties; absorption wavelengths, excitation energy, dipole moment and frontier molecular orbital energies, were performed by hybrid Gaussian calculation methods. The orbital energies of different levels of HOMO and LUMO were calculated and the molecular orbital lobe overlapping showed the inter charge transformation between the base molecule and ligand group. From the frontier molecular orbitals (FMO), the possibility of electrophilic and nucleophilic hit also analyzed. The NLO activity of the title compound related to Polarizability and hyperpolarizability were also discussed. The present molecule was fragmented with respect to atomic mass and the mass variation depends on the substitutions have also been studied.

  6. Electronic [UV-Visible] and vibrational [FT-IR, FT-Raman] investigation and NMR-mass spectroscopic analysis of terephthalic acid using quantum Gaussian calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthikeyan, N; Prince, J Joseph; Ramalingam, S; Periandy, S

    2015-03-15

    In this research work, the vibrational IR, polarization Raman, NMR and mass spectra of terephthalic acid (TA) were recorded. The observed fundamental peaks (IR, Raman) were assigned according to their distinctiveness region. The hybrid computational calculations were carried out for calculating geometrical and vibrational parameters by DFT (B3LYP and B3PW91) methods with 6-31++G(d,p) and 6-311++G(d,p) basis sets and the corresponding results were tabulated. The molecular mass spectral data related to base molecule and substitutional group of the compound was analyzed. The modification of the chemical property by the reaction mechanism of the injection of dicarboxylic group in the base molecule was investigated. The (13)C and (1)H NMR spectra were simulated by using the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method and the absolute chemical shifts related to TMS were compared with experimental spectra. The study on the electronic and optical properties; absorption wavelengths, excitation energy, dipole moment and frontier molecular orbital energies, were performed by hybrid Gaussian calculation methods. The orbital energies of different levels of HOMO and LUMO were calculated and the molecular orbital lobe overlapping showed the inter charge transformation between the base molecule and ligand group. From the frontier molecular orbitals (FMO), the possibility of electrophilic and nucleophilic hit also analyzed. The NLO activity of the title compound related to Polarizability and hyperpolarizability were also discussed. The present molecule was fragmented with respect to atomic mass and the mass variation depends on the substitutions have also been studied. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Quantum mechanical study of the structure and spectroscopic (FT-IR, FT-Raman, 13C, 1H and UV), first order hyperpolarizabilities, NBO and TD-DFT analysis of the 4-methyl-2-cyanobiphenyl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastian, S; Sundaraganesan, N; Karthikeiyan, B; Srinivasan, V

    2011-02-01

    The Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and FT-Raman of 4-methyl-2-cyanobiphenyl (4M2CBP) have been recorded and analyzed. The equilibrium geometry, bonding features and harmonic vibrational frequencies have been investigated with the help of density functional theory (DFT) method. The assignments of the vibrational spectra have been carried out with the help of normal coordinate analysis (NCA) following the scaled quantum mechanical force field methodology (SQMFF). The 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts of the molecule were calculated by the Gauge including atomic orbital (GIAO) method. The first order hyperpolarizability (β0) of this novel molecular system and related properties (β, α0 and Δα) of 4M2CBP are calculated using HF/6-311G(d,p) method on the finite-field approach. Stability of the molecule arising from hyperconjugative interactions, charge delocalization have been analyzed using natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. The results show that charge in electron density (ED) in the σ* and π* antibonding orbitals and second order delocalization energies (E2) confirms the occurrence of intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) within the molecule. UV-vis spectrum of the compound was recorded and the electronic properties, such as HOMO and LUMO energies, were performed by time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) approach. Finally the calculations results were applied to simulated infrared and Raman spectra of the title compound which show good agreement with observed spectra. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Analysis of the structure and the FT-IR and Raman spectra of 2-(4-nitrophenyl)-4H-3,1-benzoxazin-4-one. Comparisons with the chlorinated and methylated derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, María V.; Rudyk, Roxana A.; Davies, Lilian; Brandán, Silvia Antonia

    2017-07-01

    In this work, the structural, topological and vibrational properties of the monomer and three dimers of the 2-(4-nitrophenyl)-4H-3,1-benzoxazin-4-one (NPB) derivative were studied combining the experimental FTIR and FT-Raman spectra in the solid phase with DFT calculations. Here, Natural Bond Orbital (NBO), Atoms in Molecules (AIM) and HOMO and LUMO calculations were performed by using the hybrid B3LYP/6-31G*and B3LYP/6-311++G** methods in order to compute those properties and to predict their reactivities. The comparisons with the properties reported for the chlorinated (Cl-PB) and methylated (CH3-PB) derivatives at the same levels of theory can be clearly justified by the activating (CH3) and deactivating (NO2 and Cl) characteristics of the different groups linked to oxaxin rings. The NBO and AIM studies evidence the following stability orders: Cl-PB > NO2-PB > CH3-PB in very good concordance with the f(νC23-X26) force constants values. The frontier orbitals analyses reveal that the Cl-PB and NO2-PB derivatives have good stabilities and high chemical hardness while CH3-PB has a higher chemical reactivity. On the other hand, the complete vibrational assignments for monomer and dimers species of NPB were presented. The presence of the IR bands at 1574 and 1037 cm-1 and, of the Raman bands at 1571 and 1038 cm-1 support clearly the presence of the different dimeric species proposed for NPB.

  9. FT-IR and Raman vibrational analysis, B3LYP and M06-2X simulations of 4-bromomethyl-6-tert-butyl-2H-chromen-2-one

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sert, Yusuf; Puttaraju, K. B.; Keskinoğlu, Sema; Shivashankar, K.; Ucun, Fatih

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the experimental and theoretical vibrational frequencies of a newly synthesized bacteriostatic and anti-tumor molecule namely, 4-bromomethyl-6-tert-butyl-2H-chromen-2-one have been investigated. The experimental FT-IR (4000-400 cm-1) and Raman spectra (4000-100 cm-1) of the compound in solid phase have been recorded. The theoretical vibrational frequencies and optimized geometric parameters have been calculated using density functional theory (DFT/B3LYP: Becke, 3-parameter, Lee-Yang-Parr and DFT/M06-2X: highly parametrized, empirical exchange correlation function) with 6-311++G(d, p) basis set by Gaussian 03 software, for the first time. The assignments of the vibrational frequencies have been done by potential energy distribution (PED) analysis using VEDA 4 software. The theoretical optimized geometric parameters and vibrational frequencies have been found to be in good agreement with the corresponding experimental data and results in the literature. In addition, the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) energy, the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) energy and the other related molecular energy values of the compound have been investigated using the same theoretical calculations.

  10. Experimental FT-IR, Laser-Raman and DFT spectroscopic analysis of a potential chemotherapeutic agent 6-(2-methylpropyl)-4-oxo-2-sulfanylidene-1,2,3,4-tetrahydropyrimidine-5-carbonitrile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sert, Yusuf; Al-Turkistani, Abdulghafoor A; Al-Deeb, Omar A; El-Emam, Ali A; Ucun, Fatih; Çırak, Çağrı

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the experimental and theoretical vibrational frequencies of a newly synthesized potential chemotherapeutic agent namely, 6-(2-methylpropyl)-4-oxo-2-sulfanylidene-1,2,3,4-tetrahydropyrimidine-5-carbonitrile have been investigated. The experimental FT-IR (4000-400 cm(-1)) and Laser-Raman spectra (4000-100 cm(-1)) of the molecule in solid phase have been recorded. The theoretical vibrational frequencies and optimized geometric parameters (bond lengths and bond angles) have been calculated by using density functional theory (DFT/B3LYP: Becke, 3-parameter, Lee-Yang-Parr) and M06-2X (the highly parametrized, empirical exchange correlation function) quantum chemical methods with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set by Gaussian 09 W software, for the first time. The assignments of the vibrational frequencies have been done by potential energy distribution (PED) analysis by using VEDA 4 software. The theoretical optimized geometric parameters and vibrational frequencies have been found to be in good agreement with the corresponding experimental data, and with the results in the literature. In addition, the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) energies and the other related molecular energy values have been calculated and depicted. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. (2E)-1-(5-Chlorothiophen-2-yl)-3-{4-[(E)-2-phenylethenyl]phenyl}prop-2-en-1-one: Synthesis, XRD, FT-IR, Raman and DFT studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parlak, Cemal; Ramasami, Ponnadurai; Kumar, Chandraju Sadolalu Chidan; Tursun, Mahir; Quah, Ching Kheng; Rhyman, Lydia; Bilge, Metin; Fun, Hoong-Kun; Chandraju, Siddegowda

    2015-01-01

    A novel (2E)-1-(5-chlorothiophen-2-yl)-3-{4-[(E)-2-phenylethenyl]phenyl}prop-2-en-1-one [C21H15ClOS] compound has been synthesized and its structure has been characterized by FT-IR, Raman and single-crystal X-ray diffraction techniques. The conformational isomers, optimized geometric parameters, normal mode frequencies and corresponding vibrational assignments of the compound have been examined by means of HF, MP2, BP86, BLYP, BMK, B3LYP, B3PW91, B3P86 and M06-2X functionals. Reliable vibrational assignments and molecular orbitals have been investigated by the potential energy distribution and natural bonding orbital analyses, respectively. The compound crystallizes in the triclinic space group P-1 with the cis-trans-trans form. There is a good agreement between the experimentally determined structural parameters and vibrational frequencies of the compound and those predicted theoretically using the density functional theory with the BLYP and BP86 functionals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Vibrational spectroscopy (FT-IR and Laser-Raman) investigation, and computational (M06-2X and B3LYP) analysis on the structure of 4-(3-fluorophenyl)-1-(propan-2-ylidene)-thiosemicarbazone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sert, Yusuf; Miroslaw, Barbara; Çırak, Çağrı; Doğan, Hatice; Szulczyk, Daniel; Struga, Marta

    2014-07-15

    In this study, the experimental and theoretical vibrational spectral analysis of 4-(3-fluorophenyl)-1-(propan-2-ylidene)-thiosemicarbazone have been carried out. The experimental FT-IR (4000-400 cm(-1)) and Laser-Raman spectra (4000-100 cm(-1)) have been recorded for the solid state samples. The theoretical vibrational frequencies and the optimized geometric parameters (bond lengths and angles) have been calculated for gas phase using density functional theory (DFT/B3LYP: Becke, 3-parameter, Lee-Yang-Parr) and M06-2X (the highly parametrized, empirical exchange correlation function) quantum chemical methods with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The diversity in molecular geometry of fluorophenyl substituted thiosemicarbazones has been discussed based on the X-ray crystal structure reports and theoretical calculation results from the literature. The assignments of the vibrational frequencies have been done on the basis of potential energy distribution (PED) analysis by using VEDA4 software. A good correlation was found between the computed and experimental geometric and vibrational data. In addition, the highest occupied (HOMO) and lowest unoccupied (LUMO) molecular orbital energy levels and other related molecular energy values of the compound have been determined using the same level of theoretical calculations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Structural, Spectroscopic (FT-IR, Raman and NMR, Non-linear Optical (NLO, HOMO-LUMO and Theoretical (DFT/CAM-B3LYP Analyses of N-Benzyloxycarbonyloxy-5-Norbornene-2,3-Dicarboximide Molecule

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuri ÖZTÜRK

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The experimental spectroscopic investigation of N-benzyloxycarbonyloxy-5-norbornene-2,3-dicarboximide (C17H15NO5 molecule has been done using 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts, FT-IR and Raman spectroscopies. Conformational forms have been determined depending on orientation of N-benzyloxycarbonyloxy and 5-norbornene-2,3-dicarboximide (NDI groups of the title compound. The structural geometric optimizations, vibrational wavenumbers, NMR chemical shifts (in vacuum and chloroform and HOMO-LUMO analyses for all conformers of the title molecule have been done with DFT/CAM-B3LYP method at the 6-311++G(d,p basis set. Additionally, based on the calculated HOMO and LUMO energy values, some molecular properties such as ionization potential (I, electron affinity (A, electronegativity (χ, chemical hardness (h, chemical softness (z, chemical potential (μ and electrophilicity index (w parameters are determined for all conformers. The non-linear optical (NLO properties have been studied for the title molecule. We can say that the experimental spectral data are in accordance with calculated values.

  14. Synthesis, electronic structure investigation of 3-pentyl-2,6-di(furan-2-yl)piperidin-4-one by FT-IR, FT-Raman and UV-Visible spectral studies and ab initio/DFT calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arockia Doss, M; Savithiri, S; Rajarajan, G; Thanikachalam, V; Anbuselvan, C

    2015-12-05

    FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of 3-pentyl-2,6-di(furan-2-yl) piperidin-4-one (3-PFPO) were recorded in the solid phase. The structural and spectroscopic analyses of 3-PFPO were made by using B3LYP/HF level with 6-311++G(d, p) basis set. The fundamental vibrations are assigned on the basis of the total energy distribution (TED) of the vibrational modes, calculated with scaled quantum mechanics (SQM) method and PQS program. Comparison of the observed fundamental vibrational frequencies of 3-PFPO with calculated results by HF and DFT methods indicates that B3LYP is superior to HF method for molecular vibrational problems. The electronic properties such as excitation energies, oscillator strength, wavelengths and HOMO-LUMO energies were obtained by time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) approach. The polarizability and first order hyperpolarizability of the title molecule were calculated and interpreted. The hyperconjugative interaction energy (E((2))) and electron densities of donor (i) and acceptor (j) bonds were calculated using NBO analysis. In addition, MEP and atomic charges of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and hydrogen were calculated using B3LYP/6-311++G(d, p) level theory. Moreover, thermodynamic properties (heat capacities, entropy and enthalpy) of the title compound at different temperatures were calculated in gas phase. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Spectroscopic studies (FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV-Visible), normal co-ordinate analysis, first-order hyperpolarizability and HOMO, LUMO studies of 3,4-dichlorobenzophenone by using Density Functional Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkata Prasad, K; Samatha, K; Jagadeeswara Rao, D; Santhamma, C; Muthu, S; Mark Heron, B

    2015-01-01

    The vibrational frequencies of 3,4-dichlorobenzophenone (DCLBP) were obtained from the FT-IR and Raman spectral data, and evaluated based on the Density Functional Theory using the standard method B3LYP with 6-311+G(d,p) as the basis set. On the basis of potential energy distribution together with the normal-co-ordinate analysis and following the scaled quantum mechanical force methodology, the assignments for the various frequencies were described. The values of the electric dipole moment (μ) and the first-order hyperpolarizability (β) of the molecule were computed. The UV-absorption spectrum was also recorded to study the electronic transitions. The calculated HOMO and LUMO energies show that charge transfer occurs within the molecule. The NBO analysis, to study the intramolecular hyperconjugative interactions, was carried out. Mulliken's net charges were evaluated. The MEP and thermodynamic properties were also calculated. The electron density-based local reactivity descriptor, such as Fukui functions, was calculated to explain the chemical selectivity or reactivity site in 3,4-dichlorobenzophenone. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Spectroscopic (FT-IR, FT-Raman, and UV-visible) and quantum chemical studies on molecular geometry, Frontier molecular orbitals, NBO, NLO and thermodynamic properties of 1-acetylindole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Vikas K; Al-Abdullah, Ebtehal S; El-Emam, Ali A; Sachan, Alok K; Pathak, Shilendra K; Kumar, Amarendra; Prasad, Onkar; Bishnoi, Abha; Sinha, Leena

    2014-12-10

    Quantum chemical calculations of ground state energy, geometrical structure and vibrational wavenumbers of 1-acetylindole were carried out using density functional (DFT/B3LYP) method with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra were recorded in the condensed state. The fundamental vibrational wavenumbers were calculated and a good correlation between experimental and scaled calculated wavenumbers has been accomplished. Electric dipole moment, polarizability and first static hyperpolarizability values of 1-acetylindole have been calculated at the same level of theory and basis set. The results show that the 1-acetylindole molecule possesses nonlinear optical (NLO) behavior with non-zero values. Stability of the molecule arising from hyper-conjugative interactions and charge delocalization has been analyzed using natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. UV-Visible spectrum of the molecule was recorded in the region 200-500nm and the electronic properties like HOMO and LUMO energies and composition were obtained using TD-DFT method. The calculated energies and oscillator strengths are in good correspondence with the experimental data. The thermodynamic properties of the compound under investigation were calculated at different temperatures. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Synthesis, molecular structure, FT-IR, Raman, XRD and theoretical investigations of (2E)-1-(5-chlorothiophen-2-yl)-3-(naphthalen-2-yl)prop-2-en-1-one.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chidan Kumar, Chandraju Sadolalu; Fun, Hoong Kun; Parlak, Cemal; Rhyman, Lydia; Ramasami, Ponnadurai; Tursun, Mahir; Chandraju, Siddegowda; Quah, Ching Kheng

    2014-11-11

    A novel (2E)-1-(5-chlorothiophen-2-yl)-3-(naphthalen-2-yl)prop-2-en-1-one [C17H11ClOS] compound has been synthesized and its structure has been characterized by FT-IR, Raman and single-crystal X-ray diffraction techniques. The isomers, optimized geometrical parameters, normal mode frequencies and corresponding vibrational assignments of the compound have been examined by means of the density functional theory method, employing, the Becke-3-Lee-Yang-Parr functional and the 6-311+G(3df,p) basis set. Reliable vibrational assignments and molecular orbitals have been investigated by the potential energy distribution and natural bonding orbital analyses, respectively. The compound crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P2₁/c with the unit cell parameters a=5.7827(8)Å, b=14.590(2)Å, c=16.138(2)Å and β=89.987 (°). The CC bond of the central enone group adopts an E configuration. There is a good agreement between the theoretically predicted structural parameters and vibrational frequencies and those obtained experimentally. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of alkali metal ions on the pyrrole and pyridine π-electron systems in pyrrole-2-carboxylate and pyridine-2-carboxylate molecules: FT-IR, FT-Raman, NMR and theoretical studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Świderski, G.; Wojtulewski, S.; Kalinowska, M.; Świsłocka, R.; Lewandowski, W.

    2011-05-01

    The FT-IR, FT-Raman and 1H and 13C NMR spectra of pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid (PCA) and lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium and caesium pyrrole-2-carboxylates were recorded, assigned and compared in the Li → Na → K → Rb → Cs salt series. The effect of alkali metal ions on the electronic system of ligands was discussed. The obtained results were compared with previously reported ones for pyridine-2-carboxylic acid and alkali metal pyridine-2-carboxylates. Calculations for pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid and Li, Na, K pyrrole-2-carboxylates in B3LYP/6-311++G ** level and Møller-Plesset method in MP2/6-311++G ** level were made. Bond lengths, angles and dipole moments as well as aromaticity indices (HOMA, EN, GEO, I 6) for the optimized structures of pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid (PCA) and lithium, sodium, potassium pyrrole-2-carboxylates were also calculated. The degree of perturbation of the aromatic system of ligand under the influence of metals in the Li → Cs series was investigated with the use of statistical methods (linear correlation), calculated aromaticity indices and Mulliken, NBO and ChelpG population analysis method. Additionally, the Bader theory (AIM) was applied to setting the characteristic of the bond critical points what confirmed the influence of alkali metals on the pyrrole ring.

  19. Vibrational investigation on FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra, IR intensity, Raman activity, peak resemblance, ideal estimation, standard deviation of computed frequencies analyses and electronic structure on 3-methyl-1,2-butadiene using HF and DFT (LSDA/B3LYP/B3PW91) calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalingam, S; Jayaprakash, A; Mohan, S; Karabacak, M

    2011-11-01

    FT-IR and FT-Raman (4000-100 cm(-1)) spectral measurements of 3-methyl-1,2-butadiene (3M12B) have been attempted in the present work. Ab-initio HF and DFT (LSDA/B3LYP/B3PW91) calculations have been performed giving energies, optimized structures, harmonic vibrational frequencies, IR intensities and Raman activities. Complete vibrational assignments on the observed spectra are made with vibrational frequencies obtained by HF and DFT (LSDA/B3LYP/B3PW91) at 6-31G(d,p) and 6-311G(d,p) basis sets. The results of the calculations have been used to simulate IR and Raman spectra for the molecule that showed good agreement with the observed spectra. The potential energy distribution (PED) corresponding to each of the observed frequencies are calculated which confirms the reliability and precision of the assignment and analysis of the vibrational fundamentals modes. The oscillation of vibrational frequencies of butadiene due to the couple of methyl group is also discussed. A study on the electronic properties such as HOMO and LUMO energies, were performed by time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) approach. The calculated HOMO and LUMO energies show that charge transfer occurs within the molecule. The thermodynamic properties of the title compound at different temperatures reveal the correlations between standard heat capacities (C) standard entropies (S), and standard enthalpy changes (H). Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The role of zinc deficiency-induced changes in the phospholipid-protein balance of blood serum in animal depression model by Raman, FTIR and UV-vis spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depciuch, J; Sowa-Kućma, M; Nowak, G; Szewczyk, B; Doboszewska, U; Parlinska-Wojtan, M

    2017-05-01

    Depression is a serious mental illness. To study the mechanisms of diseases and search for new, more effective therapies, animal models are used. Unfortunately, none of the available models does reflect all symptoms of depression. Zinc deficiency is proposed as a new animal model of depression. However, it has not been yet validated in a detailed manner. Recently, spectroscopic techniques are increasingly being used both in clinical and preclinical studies. Here we examined the effect of zinc deficiency and amitryptyline treatment on the phospholipid - protein balance in the blood serum of rats using Raman, Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR) and UV-vis technique. Male Sprague Dawley rats were fed with a zinc ample diet (ZnA, 50mg Zn/kg) or a zinc deficient diet (ZnD, 3mg Zn/kg) for 4 weeks. Then amitriptyline administration (AMI, 10mg/kg, i.p.) was started. After injecting the drug for 2-weeks, blood samples were collected and analyzed. It was found that zinc deficiency decreases both the level of phospholipids and proteins and also causes structural changes in their structures. In the ZnD group amitriptyline treatment influenced the protein level and structure. UV-vis spectroscopy combined with the second derivative calculated from the FTIR spectra provided information that the proteins in blood serum of rat fed with a low Zn diet regain their intact structure after amitriptyline medication. Simultaneously, the antidepressant therapy did not have any effect on the level of phospholipids in this group of rats. Additionally, our results show, that amitriptyline administration can change the structure of phospholipids in rats subjected to zinc ample diet. This altered structure of phospholipids was identified as shortening of carbon chains. Our findings indicate that the decreased level of zinc may be the cause of depressive disorders, as it leads to changes in the phospholipid-protein balance necessary for the proper functioning of the body. This study also shows

  1. Experimental spectroscopic (FTIR, FT-Raman, FT-NMR, UV-Visible) and DFT studies of 1-ethyl-1,4-dihydro-7-methyl-4oxo-1,8 napthyridine-3-carboxylic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthu, S; Elamurugu Porchelvi, E

    2013-12-01

    The solid phase FTIR and FT-Raman spectra of 1-ethyl-1,4-dihydro-7-methyl-4oxo-1,8 napthyridine-3-carboxylic acid (EDMONCA) have been recorded in the regions 4000-500 and 4000-400 cm(-1) respectively. The equilibrium geometry, harmonic vibrational frequencies have been investigated by DFT/B3LYP and B3PW91 methods with 6-311G (d,p) basis set. The different between the observed and scaled wave number values of most of the fundamental is very small. The assignments of the vibrational spectra have been carried out with the aid of normal coordinate analysis (NCA) following the scaled quantum mechanical force field methodology (SQMFFM). Stability of the molecule arising from hyper conjugative interactions, charge delocalization has been analyzed using natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. UV-Visible spectrum of the compound was recorded and the electronic properties HOMO and LOMO energies were measured. The electric dipole moment (μD) and first hyperpolarizability (βtot) values of the investigated molecule were computed using ab initio quantum mechanical calculations. The calculated results also show that the EDMONCA molecule may have microscopic nonlinear optics (NLO) behavior with non-zero values. (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra were recorded and (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shift of the molecule were calculated using the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method. Thermal stability of EDMONCA was studied by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Next Fukui function was calculated to explain the chemical selectivity or reactivity site in EDMONCA. Finally molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) and other molecular properties were performed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. FT-IR, FT-Raman spectra and ab initio HF and DFT calculations of 7-chloro-5-(2-chlorophenyl)-3-hydroxy-2,3-dihydro-1H-1,4-benzodiazepin-2-one.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthu, S; Prasath, M; Paulraj, E Isac; Balaji, R Arun

    2014-01-01

    The Fourier Transform infrared and Fourier Transform Raman spectra of 7-chloro-5 (2-chlorophenyl)-3-hydroxy-2,3-dihydro-1H-1,4-benzodiazepin-2-one (7C3D4B) were recorded in the regions 4000-400 and 4000-100 cm(-1), respectively. The appropriate theoretical spectrograms for the IR and Raman spectra of the title molecule were also constructed. The calculated results show that the predicted geometry can well reproduce the structural parameters. Predicted vibrational frequencies have been assigned and compared with experimental IR spectra and they supported each other. Stability of the molecule arising from hyperconjugative interactions, charge delocalization and intramolecular hydrogen bond-like weak interaction has been analyzed using natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis by using B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) method. The results show that electron density (ED) in the σ* and π* antibonding orbitals and second-order delocalization energies E(2) confirm the occurrence of intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) within the molecule. The first order hyperpolarizability (βtotal) of this molecular system and related properties (β, μ, and Δα) are calculated using HF/6-31G(d,p) and B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) methods based on the finite-field approach. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of 5-chlorocytosine: Solid state simulation and tautomerism. Effect of the chlorine substitution in the Watson-Crick base pair 5-chlorodeoxycytidine-deoxyguanosine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcolea Palafox, M.; Rastogi, V. K.; Singh, S. P.

    2018-01-01

    The laser Raman and IR spectra of 5-chlorocytosine have been recorded and accurately assigned in the solid state using Density functional calculations (DFT) together with the linear scaling equation procedure (LSE) and the solid state simulation of the crystal unit cell through a tetramer form. These results remarkably improve those reported previously by other authors. Several new scaling equations were proposed to be used in related molecules. The six main tautomers of the biomolecule 5-chlorocytosine were determined and optimized at the MP2 and CCSD levels, using different basis sets. The relative stabilities were compared with those obtained in cytosine and their 5-halo derivatives. Several relationships between energies, geometric parameters and NBO atomic charges were established. The effect of the chlorine substitution in the fifth position was evaluated through the stability of the Watson-Crick (WC) base pair of 5-chlorodeoxycytidine with deoxyguanosine, and through their vibrational spectra.

  4. Use of FT-IR, FT-Raman and thermal analysis to evaluate the gel formation of curdlan produced by Agrobacterium sp. IFO 13140 and determination of its rheological properties with food applicability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangolim, Camila Sampaio; da Silva, Thamara Thaiane; Fenelon, Vanderson Carvalho; do Nascimento, Adriane; Sato, Francielle; Matioli, Graciette

    2017-10-01

    Curdlan is a linear polysaccharide composed of glucose units joined by β-(1,3) bonds that possesses unique gelation properties. This study aimed to characterize the structure and evaluate the gelling properties of curdlan produced by Agrobacterium sp. IFO 13140 and its gels, as well as apply it in food. FT-Raman analysis highlighted the structural changes that occurred during the formation of gels, with variations related to the hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions, which occur with the formation of the low-set and high-set gels, respectively. Rheological analysis showed that the pre-gelled commercial curdlan and the curdlan produced by Agrobacterium sp. IFO 13140 differed in terms of gelation properties, which depends of the degree of polymerization of the polysaccharide, but when applied to pasta products, both improved the texture parameters. The curdlan gels were found to have great potential as gelling agents to improve texture, water retention capacity and stability of food products. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. FT-IR, FT-Raman, NMR spectra, density functional computations of the vibrational assignments (for monomer and dimer) and molecular geometry of anticancer drug 7-amino-2-methylchromone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariappan, G.; Sundaraganesan, N.

    2014-04-01

    Vibrational assignments for the 7-amino-2-methylchromone (abbreviated as 7A2MC) molecule using a combination of experimental vibrational spectroscopic measurements and ab initio computational methods are reported. The optimized geometry, intermolecular hydrogen bonding, first order hyperpolarizability and harmonic vibrational wavenumbers of 7A2MC have been investigated with the help of B3LYP density functional theory method. The calculated molecular geometry parameters, the theoretically computed vibrational frequencies for monomer and dimer and relative peak intensities were compared with experimental data. DFT calculations using the B3LYP method and 6-31 + G(d,p) basis set were found to yield results that are very comparable to experimental IR and Raman spectra. Detailed vibrational assignments were performed with DFT calculations and the potential energy distribution (PED) obtained from the Vibrational Energy Distribution Analysis (VEDA) program. Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) study revealed the characteristics of the electronic delocalization of the molecular structure. 13C and 1H NMR spectra have been recorded and 13C and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts of the molecule have been calculated using the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method. Furthermore, All the possible calculated values are analyzed using correlation coefficients linear fitting equation and are shown strong correlation with the experimental data.

  6. Vibrational spectroscopic (FT-IR, FT-Raman) and quantum mechanical study of 4-(2-chlorophenyl)-2-ethyl-9-methyl-6H-thieno[3,2-f] [1,2,4]triazolo[4,3-a][1,4] diazepine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuruvilla, Tintu K.; Prasana, Johanan Christian; Muthu, S.; George, Jacob

    2018-04-01

    The spectroscopic properties of 4-(2-chlorophenyl)-2-ethyl-9-methyl-6H-thieno [3,2-f] [1,2,4] triazolo [4,3-a] [1,4] diazepine were investigated in the present study using FT-IR and FT-Raman techniques. The results obtained were compared with quantum mechanical methods, as it serves as an important tool in interpreting and predicting vibrational spectra. The optimized molecular geometry, the vibrational wavenumbers, the infrared intensities and Raman scattering were calculated using density functional theory B3LYP method with 6-311++g (d,p) basis set. All the experimental results were in line with the theoretical data. The molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) and HOMO LUMO energies of the title compound were accounted. The results indicated that the title compound has a lower softness value (0.27) and high electrophilicity index (4.98) hence describing its biological activity. Further, natural bond orbital was also analyzed as part of the work. Fukui functions were calculated in order to explain the chemical selectivity or the reactivity site in 4-(2-chlorophenyl)-2-ethyl-9-methyl-6H-thieno [3,2-f] [1,2,4] triazolo [4,3-a] [1,4] diazepine. The thermodynamic properties of the title compound were closely examined at different temperatures. It revealed the correlations between heat capacity (C), entropy (S) and enthalpy changes (H) with temperatures. The paper further explains that the title compound can act as good antidepressant through molecular docking studies.

  7. Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman spectroscopy has gained increased use and importance in recent years for accurate and precise detection of physical and chemical properties of food materials, due to the greater specificity and sensitivity of Raman techniques over other analytical techniques. This book chapter presents Raman s...

  8. Spectroscopic (FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV, 1H and 13C NMR insights, electronic profiling and DFT computations on ({(E-[3-(1H-imidazol-1-yl-1-phenylpropylidene] amino}oxy(4-nitrophenylmethanone, an imidazole-bearing anti-Candida agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Wahaibi Lamya H.

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The anti-Candida agent, ({(E-[3-(1H-imidazol-1-yl-1-phenylpropylidene]amnio}oxy(4-nitropheny methanone (IPAONM, was subjected to comprehensive spectroscopic (FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV–Vis 1H and 13C NMR characterization as well as Hartree Fock and density functional theory computation studies. The selected optimized geometric bond lengths and bond angles of the IPAONM molecule were compared with the experimental values. The calculated wavenumbers have been scaled and compared with the experimental spectra. Mulliken charges and natural bond orbital analysis of the title molecule were calculated and interpreted. The energy and oscillator strengths of the IPAONM molecule were calculated by time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT. In addition, frontier molecular orbitals and molecular electrostatic potential diagram of the title compound were computed and analyzed. A study on the electronic properties, such as HOMO, HOMO-1, LUMO and LUMO+1 energies was carried out using TD-DFT approach. The 1H and 13C NMR chemical shift values of the title compound were calculated by the gauge independent atomic orbital method and compared with the experimental results.

  9. Raman facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Raman scattering is a powerful light scattering technique used to diagnose the internal structure of molecules and crystals. In a light scattering experiment, light...

  10. Spectroscopic studies (FTIR, FT-Raman and UV-Visible), normal coordinate analysis, NBO analysis, first order hyper polarizability, HOMO and LUMO analysis of (1R)-N-(Prop-2-yn-1-yl)-2,3-dihydro-1H-inden-1-amine molecule by ab initio HF and density functional methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthu, S; Ramachandran, G

    2014-01-01

    The Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and FT-Raman of (1R)-N-(Prop-2-yn-1-yl)-2,3-dihydro-1H-inden-1-amine (1RNPDA) were recorded in the regions 4000-400 cm(-1) and 4000-100 cm(-1) respectively. A complete assignment and analysis of the fundamental vibrational modes of the molecule were carried out. The observed fundamental modes have been compared with the harmonic vibrational frequencies computed using HF method by employing 6-31G(d,p) basis set and DFT(B3LYP) method by employing 6-31G(d,p) basis set. The vibrational studies were interpreted in terms of Potential Energy Distribution (PED). The complete vibrational frequency assignments were made by Normal Co-ordinate Analysis (NCA) following the scaled quantum mechanical force field methodology (SQMFF). The first order hyper polarizability (β0) of this molecular system and related properties (α, μ, and Δα) are calculated using B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) method based on the finite-field approach. The thermodynamic functions of the title compound were also performed at the above methods and basis set. A detailed interpretation of the infrared and Raman spectra of 1RNPDA is reported. The (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts of the molecule were calculated using the GIAO method confirms with the experimental values. Stability of the molecule arising from hyper-conjugative interactions and charge delocalization has been analyzed using Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) analysis. UV-vis spectrum of the compound was recorded and electronic properties such as excitation energies, oscillator strength and wavelength were performed by TD-DFT/B3LYP using 6-31G(d,p) basis set. The HOMO and LUMO energy gap reveals that the energy gap reflects the chemical activity of the molecule. The observed and calculated wave numbers are formed to be in good agreement. The experimental spectra also coincide satisfactorily with those of theoretically constructed spectra. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. CV Raman

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    formatted to take advantage of the changes in publishing methods in the past thirty ..... This work would not have been possible without the support and en- couragement of ..... in which Raman made his decision, have a deeper significance than .... Light in Water and the Colour of the Sea within a month of his return to India ...

  12. Raman Chandrasekar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education. Raman Chandrasekar. Articles written in Resonance – Journal of Science Education. Volume 13 Issue 5 May 2008 pp 430-439 General Article. How Children Learn to Use Language - An Overview of R. Narasimhan's Ideas on Child Language Acquisition.

  13. Determination of iprodione in agrochemicals by infrared and Raman spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armenta, Sergio; Garrigues, Salvador; de la Guardia, Miguel

    2007-04-01

    Two methodologies based on vibrational spectrometry--making use of Fourier transform infrared absorption (FTIR) and Raman spectrometry--were developed for iprodione determination in solid pesticide formulations. The FTIR procedure involved the extraction of iprodione by CHCl(3), and the latter determination involved measuring the peak area between 1450 and 1440 cm(-1), corrected using a horizontal baseline defined at 1481 cm(-1). FT-Raman determination was performed directly on the powdered solid products, using standard chromatography glass vials as sample cells and measuring the Raman intensity between 1003 and 993 cm(-1), with a two-point baseline correction established between 1012 and 981 cm(-1). The sensitivities obtained were 0.319 area values g mg(-1) for FTIR determination and 5.58 area values g g(-1) for FT-Raman. The repeatabilities, taken to be the relative standard deviation of five independent measurements at 1.51 mg g(-1) and 10.98% w/w concentration levels, were equal to 0.16% and 0.9% for FTIR and FT-Raman, respectively, and the limits of detection were 0.3 and 0.2% w/w (higher than those obtained for HPLC, 0.016% w/w). FTIR determination provided a sample frequency of 60 h(-1), higher than those obtained for the Raman and reference chromatography methods (25 and 8.6 h(-1), respectively). On the other hand, the new FT-Raman method eliminates reagent consumption and waste generation, and reduces the need for sample handling and the contact of operator with the pesticide. In spite of their lack of sensitivity, vibrational procedures can therefore provide viable environmentally friendly alternatives to laborious, time- and solvent-consuming reference chromatography methods for quality control in commercially available pesticide formulations.

  14. Biological Applications Of Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Or Bloody FTIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsen, R. J.; Winters, S.; Gendreau, R. M.

    1981-10-01

    An ex vivo FT-IR/ATR experiment for studying blood protein adsorption at the molecular level is described. This experiment involves the use of live dogs pumping the blood through a arterial-veinal shunt to the ATR cell and back into the animal. The results from these live dog experiments are compared to results obtained using donated whole blood. These experiments demonstrate that FT-IR can be used to study aqueous, physiological, flowing solutions in real time with the sensitivity necessary to detect minor changes.

  15. FTIR Emission spectroscopy of surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Woerkom, P. C. M.

    A number of vibrational spectroscopic techniques are available For the study of surfaces, such as ATR, IR reflection-absorption, IR emission, etc. Infrared emission is hardly used, although interesting applications are possible now due to the high sensitivity of Fourier transform IR (FTIR) spectrometers. Two examples, where infrared emission measurements are very fruitful, will be given. One is the investigation of the curing behaviour of organic coatings, the other is the in situ study of heterogeneously catalyzed reactions. Undoubtedly, infrared emission measurements offer a number of specific advantages in some cases. Especially the less critical demands on the sample preparation are important.

  16. FTIR Calibration Methods and Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perron, Gaetan

    Over the past 10 years, several space-borne FTIR missions were launched for atmospheric research, environmental monitoring and meteorology. One can think of the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) launched by the European Space Agency, the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) launched by the Canadian Space Agency, the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) launched by NASA and the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) launched by Eumetsat in Europe. Others are near to be launched, namely the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) from the Integrated Program Of- fice in the United States and the Thermal And Near infrared Sensor for carbon Observation (TANSO) from the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency. Moreover, several missions under definition foresee the use of this technology as sensor, e.g. Meteosat Third Generation (MTG), Eumetsat Polar System (EPS) and the Premier mission, one of the six candidates of the next ESA Earth Explorer Core Mission. In order to produce good quality products, calibration is essential. Calibrated data is the output of three main sub-systems that are tightly coupled: the instrument, the calibration targets and the level 1B processor. Calibration requirements must be carefully defined and propagated to each sub-system. Often, they are carried out by different parties which add to the complexity. Under budget and schedule pressure, some aspects are sometimes neglected and jeopardized final quality. For space-borne FTIR, level 1B outputs are spectra that are radiometrically, spectrally calibrated and geolocated. Radiometric calibration means to assign an intensity value in units to the y-axis. Spectral calibration means to assign to the x-axis the proper frequency value in units. Finally, geolocated means to assign a target position over the earth geoid i.e. longitude, latitude and altitude. This paper will present calibration methods and issues related to space-borne FTIR missions, e.g. two

  17. Introductory Raman spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Ferraro, John R

    2012-01-01

    Praise for Introductory Raman Spectroscopy Highlights basic theory, which is treated in an introductory fashion Presents state-of-the-art instrumentation Discusses new applications of Raman spectroscopy in industry and research.

  18. Raman spectroscopic biochemical mapping of tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Nicholas; Hart Prieto, Maria C.; Kendall, Catherine A.; Shetty, Geeta; Barr, Hugh

    2006-02-01

    Advances in technologies have brought us closer to routine spectroscopic diagnosis of early malignant disease. However, there is still a poor understanding of the carcinogenesis process. For example it is not known whether many cancers follow a logical sequence from dysplasia, to carcinoma in situ, to invasion. Biochemical tissue changes, triggered by genetic mutations, precede morphological and structural changes. These can be probed using Raman or FTIR microspectroscopy and the spectra analysed for biochemical constituents. Local microscopic distribution of various constituents can then be visualised. Raman mapping has been performed on a number of tissues including oesophagus, breast, bladder and prostate. The biochemical constituents have been calculated at each point using basis spectra and least squares analysis. The residual of the least squares fit indicates any unfit spectral components. The biochemical distribution will be compared with the defined histopathological boundaries. The distribution of nucleic acids, glycogen, actin, collagen I, III, IV, lipids and others appear to follow expected patterns.

  19. Confocal Raman Microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Dieing, Thomas; Toporski, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Confocal Raman Microscopy is a relatively new technique that allows chemical imaging without specific sample preparation. By integrating a sensitive Raman spectrometer within a state-of-the-art microscope, Raman microscopy with a spatial resolution down to 200nm laterally and 500nm vertically can be achieved using visible light excitation. Recent developments in detector and computer technology as well as optimized instrument design have reduced integration times of Raman spectra by orders of magnitude, so that complete images consisting of tens of thousands of Raman spectra can be acquired in seconds or minutes rather than hours, which used to be standard just one decade ago. The purpose of this book is to provide the reader a comprehensive overview of the rapidly developing field of Confocal Raman Microscopy and its applications.

  20. Raman spectroscopy of poly (3-hydroxybutyrate) modified with poly (vinyl acetate) by radiation- induced copolymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, Maykel; Galego Fernandez, Norma; Ortiz del Toro, Pedro; Rapado, Manuel; Paredes

    2007-01-01

    Poly (3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) is an important material used in the field of medicine. However in common conditions, PHB has some deficiencies. It is very brittle and slightly hydrophobic polymer. This somewhat limit its applications. Radiation chemistry can be used to improve its chemical properties. In the present study, the substrate, modified by radiation-induced graft copolymerization with vinyl acetate (VAc), was characterized using FTIR and Raman spectroscopy. FTIR spectroscopy did not reveal any significant bands but Raman spectroscopy revealed the formation of a new band that characterize the material

  1. Raman spectroscopy in graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malard, L.M.; Pimenta, M.A.; Dresselhaus, G.; Dresselhaus, M.S.

    2009-01-01

    Recent Raman scattering studies in different types of graphene samples are reviewed here. We first discuss the first-order and the double resonance Raman scattering mechanisms in graphene, which give rise to the most prominent Raman features. The determination of the number of layers in few-layer graphene is discussed, giving special emphasis to the possibility of using Raman spectroscopy to distinguish a monolayer from few-layer graphene stacked in the Bernal (AB) configuration. Different types of graphene samples produced both by exfoliation and using epitaxial methods are described and their Raman spectra are compared with those of 3D crystalline graphite and turbostratic graphite, in which the layers are stacked with rotational disorder. We show that Resonance Raman studies, where the energy of the excitation laser line can be tuned continuously, can be used to probe electrons and phonons near the Dirac point of graphene and, in particular allowing a determination to be made of the tight-binding parameters for bilayer graphene. The special process of electron-phonon interaction that renormalizes the phonon energy giving rise to the Kohn anomaly is discussed, and is illustrated by gated experiments where the position of the Fermi level can be changed experimentally. Finally, we discuss the ability of distinguishing armchair and zig-zag edges by Raman spectroscopy and studies in graphene nanoribbons in which the Raman signal is enhanced due to resonance with singularities in the density of electronic states.

  2. Operando Raman Micro Spectroscopy of Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-16

    the cathode , transitions ion exchange sites from the sulfonic acid to the dissociated sulfonate form. Visualization of density functional theory...catalysts dispersed in an alcoholic dispersion of solubilized ionomer (e.g., Nafion). Teflon dispersion is included in cathode inks to lower the surface...tolerant of condensed water, is complementary to FTIR. Operando Raman spectroscopy of solid oxide fuel cells has been reported.28–30 Although there are

  3. Raman fiber lasers

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book serves as a comprehensive, up-to-date reference about this cutting-edge laser technology and its many new and interesting developments. Various aspects and trends of Raman fiber lasers are described in detail by experts in their fields. Raman fiber lasers have progressed quickly in the past decade, and have emerged as a versatile laser technology for generating high power light sources covering a spectral range from visible to mid-infrared. The technology is already being applied in the fields of telecommunication, astronomy, cold atom physics, laser spectroscopy, environmental sensing, and laser medicine. This book covers various topics relating to Raman fiber laser research, including power scaling, cladding and diode pumping, cascade Raman shifting, single frequency operation and power amplification, mid-infrared laser generation, specialty optical fibers, and random distributed feedback Raman fiber lasers. The book will appeal to scientists, students, and technicians seeking to understand the re...

  4. Infrared and NIR Raman spectroscopy in medical microbiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumann, Dieter

    1998-04-01

    FTIR and FT-NIR Raman spectra of intact microbial cells are highly specific, fingerprint-like signatures which can be used to (i) discriminate between diverse microbial species and strains, (ii) detect in situ intracellular components or structures such as inclusion bodies, storage materials or endospores, (iii) detect and quantify metabolically released CO2 in response to various different substrate, and (iv) characterize growth-dependent phenomena and cell-drug interactions. The characteristic information is extracted from the spectral contours by applying resolution enhancement techniques, difference spectroscopy, and pattern recognition methods such as factor-, cluster-, linear discriminant analysis, and artificial neural networks. Particularly interesting applications arise by means of a light microscope coupled to the spectrometer. FTIR spectra of micro-colonies containing less than 103 cells can be obtained from colony replica by a stamping technique that transfers micro-colonies growing on culture plates to a special IR-sample holder. Using a computer controlled x, y- stage together with mapping and video techniques, the fundamental tasks of microbiological analysis, namely detection, enumeration, and differentiation of micro- organisms can be integrated in one single apparatus. FTIR and NIR-FT-Raman spectroscopy can also be used in tandem to characterize medically important microorganisms. Currently novel methodologies are tested to take advantage of the complementary information of IR and Raman spectra. Representative examples on medically important microorganisms will be given that highlight the new possibilities of vibrational spectroscopies.

  5. Confocal Raman microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Dieing, Thomas; Hollricher, Olaf

    2018-01-01

    This second edition provides a cutting-edge overview of physical, technical and scientific aspects related to the widely used analytical method of confocal Raman microscopy. The book includes expanded background information and adds insights into how confocal Raman microscopy, especially 3D Raman imaging, can be integrated with other methods to produce a variety of correlative microscopy combinations. The benefits are then demonstrated and supported by numerous examples from the fields of materials science, 2D materials, the life sciences, pharmaceutical research and development, as well as the geosciences.

  6. Study of the Pyrrol/Diphenylamine Copolymer by FT-IR spectroscopy and conductivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alberto Perez

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this study was to analyze the physical properties of the copolymer formed by the electrochemical deposition of the polydiphenylamine (PDPA on polypyrrole (Ppy and Ppy on PDPA, in different conditions, through the characterization of the materials formed by the resonant Raman, FT-IR and conductivity techniques. The interactions among the species which are present in the new copolymer structure and the changes in electronic conductivity, were verified. The copolymer was also synthesized electrochemically in the presence of iodide species and the material was characterized by FT-IR spectroscopy and conductivity. The role of the dopant was studied in the process of charge transfer between the copolymer-dopant, acting in the stabilization of the species in the polymer backbone and the increase of the electronic conductivity.

  7. TG-FTIR analysis of biomass pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bassilakis, R.; Carangelo, R.M.; Wojtowicz, M.A. [Advanced Fuel Research Inc., Hartford, CT (United States)

    2001-10-09

    A great need exists for comprehensive biomass-pyrolysis models that could predict yields and evolution patterns of selected volatile products as a function of feedstock characteristics and process conditions. A thermogravimetric analyzer coupled with Fourier transform infrared analysis of evolving products (TG-FTIR) can provide useful input to such models in the form of kinetic information obtained under low heating rate conditions. In this work, robust TG-FTIR quantification routes were developed for infrared analysis of volatile products relevant to biomass pyrolysis. The analysis was applied to wheat straw, three types of tobacco (Burley, Oriental, and Bright) and three biomass model compounds (xylan, chlorogenic acid, and D-glucose). Product yields were compared with literature data, and species potentially quantifiable by FT-IR are reviewed. Product-evolution patterns are reported for all seven biomass samples. 41 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Holographic Raman lidar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, G.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: We have constructed a Raman lidar system that incorporates a holographic optical element. By resolving just 3 nitrogen lines in the Resonance Raman spectroscopy (RRS) spectrum, temperature fits as good as 1% at altitudes of 20km can be made in 30 minutes. Due to the narrowband selectivity of the HOE, the lidar provides measurements over a continuous 24hr period. By adding a 4th channel to capture the Rayleigh backscattered light, temperature profiles can be extended to 80km

  9. Biochemical applications of FT-IR spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pistorius, A.M.A.

    1996-01-01

    This thesis describes the use of (FT-)IR spectroscopy in general biochemical research. In chapter 3, IR spectroscopy is used in the quantitation of residual detergent after reconstitution of an integral membrane protein in a pre-defined lipid matrix. This chapter discusses the choice of the

  10. Quantitative gas analysis with FT-IR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, J.; Larsen, A.

    1995-01-01

    Calibration spectra of CO in the 2.38-5100 ppm concentration range (22 spectra) have been measured with a spectral resolution of 4 cm(-1), in the mid-IR (2186-2001 cm(-1)) region, with a Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) instrument. The multivariate calibration method partial least-squares (PLS1...

  11. Analyzing FTIR spectra using high sensitivity compare function of FTIR software for 2-pack epoxy paints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saaid, Farish Irfal; Chan, Chin Han; Ong, Max Chong Hup; Winie, Tan; Harun, Mohamad Kamal

    2015-08-01

    The existing problem of oil and gas companies faced for on-site jobs of polymeric coatings on steel pipelines is that the quality of polymeric coatings varies from job to job for the same product brand from the same supplier or paint manufacturer. This can be due to the inherent problem of the reformulation of polymeric coatings or in other words adulterated polymeric coatings are supplied, where the quality of the coatings deviates from the submitted specifications for prequalification and tender purpose. Major oil and gas companies in Malaysia are calling for Coating Fingerprinting Certificate for the supply of polymeric coatings from local paint manufactures as quality assurance requirement of the coatings supplied. This will reduce the possibility of failures of the polymeric coatings, which lead to the corrosion of steel pipelines resulting in leakage of crude oil and gas to the environment. In this case, Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) is a simple and reliable tool for coating fingerprinting. In this study, we conclude that, revelation of possible components of the 2-pack epoxy paints by carrying out extensive FTIR libraries search on FTIR spectra seems to be extremely challenging. Estimation of correlation of the sample spectrum to that of the reference spectrum using Compare function from one FTIR manufacturer, even the FTIR spectra are collected by different FTIR spectrometers from different FTIR manufacturers, can be made. The results of the correlation are reproducible.

  12. The Scope Of Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschfeld, T.

    1981-10-01

    Three auarters of a century after its inception, a generation after its advantages were recognized, and a decade after its first commercialization, FT-IR dominates the growth of the IR market, and reigns alone over its high performance end. What lies ahead for FT-IR now? On one hand, the boundary between it and the classical scanning spectrometers is becoming fuzzy, as gratings attempt to use as much of FT-IR's computer technology as they can handle, and smaller FT systems invade the medium cost instrument range. On the other hand, technology advances in IR detectors, non-Fourier interference devices, and the often announced tunable laser are at long last getting set to make serious inroads in the field (although not necessarily in the manner most of us expected). However, the dominance of FT-IR as the leading edge of IR spectroscopy seems assured for a good many years. The evolution of FT-IR will be dominated by demands not yet fully satisfied such as rapid sample turnover, better quantitation, automated interpretation, higher GC-IR sensitivity, improved LC-IR, and, above all else, reliability and ease of use. These developments will be based on multiple small advances in hardware, large advances in the way systems are put together, and the traditional yearly revolutionary advances of the computer industry. The big question in the field will, however, still be whether our ambition and our skill can continue to keep up with the advances of our tools. It will be fun.

  13. Study of melanoma invasion by FTIR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y.; Sulé-Suso, J.; Sockalingum, G. D.

    2008-02-01

    Compared to other forms of skin cancer, a malignant melanoma has a high risk of spreading to other parts of the body. Melanoma invasion is a complex process involving changes in cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interaction and cell-cell interactions. To fully understand the factors which control the invasion process, a human skin model system was reconstructed. HBL (a commercially available cell line) melanoma cells were seeded on a skin model with and without the presence of keratinocytes and/or fibroblasts. After 14 days culture, the skin specimens were fixed, parafin embedded and cut into 7 µm sections. The de-parafinised sections were investigated by synchrotron Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopy to study skin cell invasion behaviour. The advantage of using FTIR is its ability to obtain the fingerprint information of the invading cells in terms of protein secondary structure in comparison to non-invading cells and the concentration of the enzyme (matrix-metalloproteinase) which digests protein matrix, near the invading cells. With aid of the spectral mapping images, it is possible to pinpoint the cells in non-invasion and invasion area and analyse the respective spectra. It has been observed that the protein bands in cells and matrix shifted between non-invasive and invasive cells in the reconstructed skin model. We hypothesise that by careful analysis of the FTIR data and validation by other models, FTIR studies can reveal information on which type of cells and proteins are involved in melanoma invasion. Thus, it is possible to trace the cell invasion path by mapping the spectra along the interface of cell layer and matrix body by FTIR spectroscopy.

  14. Comparison between infrared and Raman spectroscopic analysis of maturing rabbit cortical bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turunen, Mikael J; Saarakkala, Simo; Rieppo, Lassi; Helminen, Heikki J; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Isaksson, Hanna

    2011-06-01

    The molecular composition of the organic and inorganic matrices of bone undergoes alterations during maturation. The aim of this study was to compare Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and near-infrared (NIR) Raman microspectroscopy techniques for characterization of the composition of growing and developing bone from young to skeletally mature rabbits. Moreover, the specificity and differences of the techniques for determining bone composition were clarified. The humeri of female New Zealand White rabbits, with age range from young to skeletally mature animals (four age groups, n = 7 per group), were studied. Spectral peak areas, intensities, and ratios related to organic and inorganic matrices of bone were analyzed and compared between the age groups and between FT-IR and Raman microspectroscopic techniques. Specifically, the degree of mineralization, type-B carbonate substitution, crystallinity of hydroxyapatite (HA), mineral content, and collagen maturity were examined. Significant changes during maturation were observed in various compositional parameters with one or both techniques. Overall, the compositional parameters calculated from the Raman spectra correlated with analogous parameters calculated from the IR spectra. Collagen cross-linking (XLR), as determined through peak fitting and directly from the IR spectra, were highly correlated. The mineral/matrix ratio in the Raman spectra was evaluated with multiple different peaks representing the organic matrix. The results showed high correlation with each other. After comparison with the bone mineral density (BMD) values from micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) imaging measurements and crystal size from XRD measurements, it is suggested that Raman microspectroscopy is more sensitive than FT-IR microspectroscopy for the inorganic matrix of the bone. In the literature, similar spectroscopic parameters obtained with FT-IR and NIR Raman microspectroscopic techniques are often compared. According to the present

  15. Raman spectrum of asphaltene

    KAUST Repository

    Abdallah, Wael A.; Yang, Yang

    2012-01-01

    Asphaltenes extracted from seven different crude oils representing different geological formations from around the globe were analyzed using the Raman spectroscopic technique. Each spectrum is fitted with four main peaks using the Gaussian function. On the basis of D1 and G bands of the Raman spectrum, asphaltene indicated an ordered structure with the presence of boundary defected edges. The average aromatic sheet size of the asphaltene molecules is estimated within the range of 1.52-1.88 nm, which represents approximately seven to eight aromatic fused rings. This estimation is based on the integrated intensity of D1 and G bands, as proposed by Tunistra and Koenig. The results here are in perfect agreement with so many other used techniques and indicate the potential applicability of Raman measurements to determine the average aromatic ring size and its boundary. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  16. Raman spectrum of asphaltene

    KAUST Repository

    Abdallah, Wael A.

    2012-11-05

    Asphaltenes extracted from seven different crude oils representing different geological formations from around the globe were analyzed using the Raman spectroscopic technique. Each spectrum is fitted with four main peaks using the Gaussian function. On the basis of D1 and G bands of the Raman spectrum, asphaltene indicated an ordered structure with the presence of boundary defected edges. The average aromatic sheet size of the asphaltene molecules is estimated within the range of 1.52-1.88 nm, which represents approximately seven to eight aromatic fused rings. This estimation is based on the integrated intensity of D1 and G bands, as proposed by Tunistra and Koenig. The results here are in perfect agreement with so many other used techniques and indicate the potential applicability of Raman measurements to determine the average aromatic ring size and its boundary. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  17. Polyurethane Nanocomposites Containing Reduced Graphene Oxide, FTIR, Raman, and XRD Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Strankowski

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, graphene and other graphene-based materials have become an essential part of composite science and technology. Their unique properties are not only restricted to graphene but also shared with derivative compounds like graphene oxide, reduced graphene oxide, functionalized graphene, and so forth. One of the most structurally important materials, graphene oxide (GO, is prepared by the oxidation of graphite. Though removal of the oxide groups can create vacancies and structural defects, reduced graphene oxide (rGO is used in composites as effective filler similar to GO. Authors developed a new polyurethane nanocomposite using a derivative of grapheme, thermally reduced graphene oxide (rGO, to modify the matrix of polyurethane elastomers, by rGO.

  18. 4-Mercaptophenylboronic acid: conformation, FT-IR, Raman, OH stretching and theoretical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parlak, Cemal; Ramasami, Ponnadurai; Tursun, Mahir; Rhyman, Lydia; Kaya, Mehmet Fatih; Atar, Necip; Alver, Özgür; Şenyel, Mustafa

    2015-06-05

    4-Mercaptophenylboronic acid (4-mpba, C6H7BO2S) was investigated experimentally by vibrational spectroscopy. The molecular structure and spectroscopic parameters were studied by computational methods. The molecular dimer was investigated for intermolecular hydrogen bonding. Potential energy distribution analysis of normal modes was performed to identify characteristic frequencies. The present work provides a simple physical picture of the OH stretch vibrational spectra of 4-mpba and analogues of the compound studied. When the different computational methods are compared, there is a strong evidence of the better performance of the BLYP functional than the popular B3LYP functional to describe hydrogen bonding in the dimer. The findings of this research work should be useful to experimentalists in their quests for functionalised 4-mpba derivatives. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    weak Raman signal, which facilitates identification in chemi- cal and biological systems. Recently, single-molecule Raman scattering has enhanced the detection sensitivity limit of ... was working on the molecular diffraction of light, which ulti-.

  20. Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 15; Issue 2. Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy - Recent Advancement of Raman Spectroscopy. Ujjal Kumar Sur. General Article Volume 15 Issue 2 February 2010 pp 154-164 ...

  1. Probing Pharmaceutical Mixtures during Milling: The Potency of Low-Frequency Raman Spectroscopy in Identifying Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Greg; Römann, Philipp; Poller, Bettina; Löbmann, Korbinian; Grohganz, Holger; Rooney, Jeremy S; Huff, Gregory S; Smith, Geoffrey P S; Rades, Thomas; Gordon, Keith C; Strachan, Clare J; Fraser-Miller, Sara J

    2017-12-04

    This study uses a multimodal analytical approach to evaluate the rates of (co)amorphization of milled drug and excipient and the effectiveness of different analytical methods in detecting these changes. Indomethacin and tryptophan were the model substances, and the analytical methods included low-frequency Raman spectroscopy (785 nm excitation and capable of measuring both low- (10 to 250 cm -1 ) and midfrequency (450 to 1800 cm -1 ) regimes, and a 830 nm system (5 to 250 cm -1 )), conventional (200-3000 cm -1 ) Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD). The kinetics of amorphization were found to be faster for the mixture, and indeed, for indomethacin, only partial amorphization occurred (after 360 min of milling). Each technique was capable of identifying the transformations, but some, such as low-frequency Raman spectroscopy and XRPD, provided less ambiguous signatures than the midvibrational frequency techniques (conventional Raman and FTIR). The low-frequency Raman spectra showed intense phonon mode bands for the crystalline and cocrystalline samples that could be used as a sensitive probe of order. Multivariate analysis has been used to further interpret the spectral changes. Overall, this study demonstrates the potential of low-frequency Raman spectroscopy, which has several practical advantages over XRPD, for probing (dis-)order during pharmaceutical processing, showcasing its potential for future development, and implementation as an in-line process monitoring method.

  2. Development of Raman spectrophotometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, A.I.

    2008-05-01

    In this work, the Raman spectrophotometer HG.2S Jobin Yvon rebuilt and developed, the Raman setup provided as a gift for Neelian University from Amsterdam University. The main parts, which were replaced, include monochromator, an air-cooled photomultiplier tube RCA IP 28, log amplifier, hand scanning lab VIEW card for computer interfacing. The components assembled and the whole device was tested successfully. The developed setup was checked using some standard solutions, which showed perfect consistency with literature in the references and published papers. Solutions included hexane, cyclohexane, carbon tetrachloride, benzene and sodium sulfate.(Author)

  3. Raman spectra of graphene ribbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, R; Furukawa, M; Dresselhaus, G; Dresselhaus, M S

    2010-01-01

    Raman spectra of graphene nanoribbons with zigzag and armchair edges are calculated within non-resonant Raman theory. Depending on the edge structure and polarization direction of the incident and scattered photon beam relative to the edge direction, a symmetry selection rule for the phonon type appears. These Raman selection rules will be useful for the identification of the edge structure of graphene nanoribbons.

  4. Designing of Raman laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zidan, M. D.; Al-Awad, F.; Alsous, M. B.

    2005-01-01

    In this work, we describe the design of the Raman laser pumped by Frequency doubled Nd-YAG laser (λ=532 nm) to generate new laser wavelengths by shifting the frequency of the Nd-YAG laser to Stokes region (λ 1 =683 nm, λ 2 =953.6 nm, λ 3 =1579.5 nm) and Antistokes region (λ ' 1 =435 nm, λ ' 2 =369.9 nm, λ ' 3=319.8 nm). Laser resonator has been designed to increase the laser gain. It consists of two mirrors, the back mirror transmits the pump laser beam (λ=532 nm) through the Raman tube and reflects all other generated Raman laser lines. Four special front mirrors were made to be used for the four laser lines λ 1 =683 nm, λ 2 =953.6 nm and λ ' 1 = 435 nm, λ ' 2 =369.9 nm. The output energy for the lines υ 1 s, υ 2 s, υ 1 as,υ 2 as was measured. The output energy of the Raman laser was characterized for different H 2 pressure inside the tube. (Author)

  5. Confocal Raman microspectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puppels, G.J.

    1991-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a technique that provides detailed structural information about molecules studied. In the field of molecular biophysics it has been extensively used for characterization of nucleic acids and proteins and for investigation of interactions between these molecules. It was felt that this technique would have great potential if it could be applied for in situ study of these molecules and their interactions, at the level of single living cell or a chromosome. To make this possible a highly sensitive confocal Raman microspectrometer (CRM) was developed. The instrument is described in detail in this thesis. It incorporates a number of recent technological developments. First, it employs a liquid nitrogen cooled CCD-camera. This type of detector, first used in astronomy, is the ultimate detector for Raman spectroscopy because it combines high quantum efficiency light detection with photon-noise limited operation. Second, an important factor in obtaining a high signal throughput of the spectrometer was the development of a new type of Raman notch filter. In the third place, the confocal detection principle was applied in the CRM. This limits the effective measuring volume to 3 . (author). 279 refs., 48 figs., 11 tabs

  6. Raman Imaging Techniques and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Raman imaging has long been used to probe the chemical nature of a sample, providing information on molecular orientation, symmetry and structure with sub-micron spatial resolution. Recent technical developments have pushed the limits of micro-Raman microscopy, enabling the acquisition of Raman spectra with unprecedented speed, and opening a pathway to fast chemical imaging for many applications from material science and semiconductors to pharmaceutical drug development and cell biology, and even art and forensic science. The promise of tip-enhanced raman spectroscopy (TERS) and near-field techniques is pushing the envelope even further by breaking the limit of diffraction and enabling nano-Raman microscopy.

  7. Raman spectroscopy an intensity approach

    CERN Document Server

    Guozhen, Wu

    2017-01-01

    This book summarizes the highlights of our work on the bond polarizability approach to the intensity analysis. The topics covered include surface enhanced Raman scattering, Raman excited virtual states and Raman optical activity (ROA). The first chapter briefly introduces the Raman effect in a succinct but clear way. Chapter 2 deals with the normal mode analysis. This is a basic tool for our work. Chapter 3 introduces our proposed algorithm for the Raman intensity analysis. Chapter 4 heavily introduces the physical picture of Raman virtual states. Chapter 5 offers details so that the readers can have a comprehensive idea of Raman virtual states. Chapter 6 demonstrates how this bond polarizability algorithm is extended to ROA intensity analysis. Chapters 7 and 8 offer details on ROA, showing many findings on ROA mechanism that were not known or neglected before. Chapter 9 introduces our proposed classical treatment on ROA which, as combined with the results from the bond polarizability analysis, leads to a com...

  8. Combined use of infrared and Raman spectra in the characterization of orthoclase under various hydrostatic pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rui; Wang, Zhi-Hua; Xu, Qiang; Yu, Na; Cao, Miao-Cong

    2014-02-01

    Colorless and pink orthoclase from Balikun granite body, East Zhunger in Xinjiang, served as the samples for the research on hydrostatic pressure experiment. The in-situ hydrostatic pressure test for orthoclases was conducted at the room temperature and pressures from 100 to 600 MPa using cubic zirconia anvil cell, with quartz as pressure gauge. The water located in the orthoclases for the conditions of different hydrostatic pressures was characterized through the methods of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Raman spectra. The results showed that there was a linear correlation between the shifting of Raman bands and hydrostatic pressure applied to the feldspar. All of vibration peaks of M-O structural groups in orthoclases, the bending vibration peaks of Si(Al(IV))-O-Si bond and tetrahedron groups of [SiO4] in Raman spectra shifted toward the higher frequency regularly, the drift distance is 2, 2.19 and less than 2 cm(-1) respectively. The spectra of FTIR suggested that there was more water in colorless orthoclases than the pink one under certain conditions of hydrostatic pressure. The intensity and integral area centered at 3420 cm(-1) in FTIR spectra increased with the rising of hydrostatic pressure. The integral area for colorless and pink feldspar in FTIR spectra rose from 120, 1383 cm(-1) under normal pressure to 1570, 2001 cm(-1) at 600 MPa respectively. The experimental results might indicate that the water in the earth crust could enter the orthoclases in certain condition of the aqueous confining pressure.

  9. The Use of FTIR and Micro-FTIR Spectroscopy: An Example of Application to Cultural Heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Francesco La Russa

    2009-01-01

    The main components found in the samples of both monuments are: gypsum, calcium oxalate, and organic matter due to probably conservation treatments. In particular, the qualitative distribution maps of degradation products, obtained by means of micro-FTIR operating in ATR mode, revealed that the degradation process is present deep inside the stones also if it is not visible macroscopically. This process represents the main cause of crumbling of the substrate. The results of this research highlight the benefits of the -FTIR analysis providing useful insights on the polishing and consolidation processes of stone materials.

  10. Analysis of human gallstones by FTIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Channa, Naseem A.; Khand, Fateh D.

    2008-01-01

    The present study was aimed at determining the composition of gallstones removed from patients in Southern Sindh, Pakistan. 109 gallstone samples surgically removed from as many patients (98 females and 11 males; age range 20 to 80 years) admitted for treatment in Liaquat University hospital, Jamshsoro during 2000 to 2003, were analyzed for composition by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. 74 (67.9%) of the 109 gallstone samples were found to be pure cholesterol stones, 5 (4.6%) pure calcium carbonate stones, 13 (11.9%) cholesterol + calcium carbonate, 10 (9.2%) cholesterol + bilirubin and 07 (6.4%) calcium bilirubinate stones. In mixed composition gallstones cholesterol was concentrated more at periphery than in the center of stone. Cholesterol either singly (67.9%) or in combination with either calcium carbonate (11.9%) or bilirubin (9.2%) was the most predominant component of gallstones. Analysis of gallstones based on FTIR suggests that cholesterol either singly or in combination with either calcium carbonate or bilirubin is the most predominant component of gallstones from Southern Sindh, Pakistan. (author)

  11. Raman study of ? crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimenta, M. A.; Oliveira, M. A. S.; Bourson, P.; Crettez, J. M.

    1997-09-01

    In this work we present a polarized Raman study of 0953-8984/9/37/020/img7 single crystals for several values of the concentration 0953-8984/9/37/020/img8 made using different scattering geometries. The Raman spectra, composed of broad bands, have been fitted in accordance with a symmetry analysis which allowed us to assign the vibrational modes, and determine their frequencies and damping constants. The results are compatible with an average hexagonal symmetry for the solid solutions with x in the range 0953-8984/9/37/020/img9. In each of the spectra we found two bands at about 590 and 0953-8984/9/37/020/img10, probably associated with the existence of 0953-8984/9/37/020/img11 structures in the solid solutions.

  12. Surface enhanced Raman scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Furtak, Thomas

    1982-01-01

    In the course of the development of surface science, advances have been identified with the introduction of new diagnostic probes for analytical characterization of the adsorbates and microscopic structure of surfaces and interfaces. Among the most recently de­ veloped techniques, and one around which a storm of controversy has developed, is what has now been earmarked as surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). Within this phenomenon, molecules adsorbed onto metal surfaces under certain conditions exhibit an anomalously large interaction cross section for the Raman effect. This makes it possible to observe the detailed vibrational signature of the adsorbate in the ambient phase with an energy resolution much higher than that which is presently available in electron energy loss spectroscopy and when the surface is in contact with a much larger amount of material than that which can be tolerated in infrared absorption experiments. The ability to perform vibrational spectroscopy under these conditions would l...

  13. Raman Plus X: Biomedical Applications of Multimodal Raman Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Nandan K; Dai, Yichuan; Liu, Peng; Hu, Chuanzhen; Tong, Lieshu; Chen, Xiaoya; Smith, Zachary J

    2017-07-07

    Raman spectroscopy is a label-free method of obtaining detailed chemical information about samples. Its compatibility with living tissue makes it an attractive choice for biomedical analysis, yet its translation from a research tool to a clinical tool has been slow, hampered by fundamental Raman scattering issues such as long integration times and limited penetration depth. In this review we detail the how combining Raman spectroscopy with other techniques yields multimodal instruments that can help to surmount the translational barriers faced by Raman alone. We review Raman combined with several optical and non-optical methods, including fluorescence, elastic scattering, OCT, phase imaging, and mass spectrometry. In each section we highlight the power of each combination along with a brief history and presentation of representative results. Finally, we conclude with a perspective detailing both benefits and challenges for multimodal Raman measurements, and give thoughts on future directions in the field.

  14. The Use of FTIR and Micro-FTIR Spectroscopy: An Example of Application to Cultural Heritage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    La Russa, M.F.; Ruffolo, S.A.; Crisci, G.M.; Barone, G.; Mazzoleni, P.; Pezzino, A.

    2011-01-01

    Micro-FTIR and FTIR spectroscopy is useful for the study of degradation forms of cultural heritage. In particular it permits to identify the degradation phases and to establish the structural relationship between them and the substratum. In this paper, we report the results obtained on marble from a Roman sarcophagus, located in the medieval cloister of St. Cosimato Convent (Rome), and on oolitic limestone from the facade of St. Giuseppe Church in Syracuse (Sicily). The main components found in the samples of both monuments are: gypsum, calcium oxalate, and organic matter due to probably conservation treatments. In particular, the qualitative distribution maps of degradation products, obtained by means of micro-FTIR operating in ATR mode, revealed that the degradation process is present deep inside the stones also if it is not visible macroscopically. This process represents the main cause of crumbling of the substrate. The results of this research highlight the benefits of the μ-FTIR analysis providing useful insights on the polishing and consolidation processes of stone materials

  15. Instant detection and identification of concealed explosive-related compounds: Induced Stokes Raman versus infrared.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbasuney, Sherif; El-Sherif, Ashraf F

    2017-01-01

    The instant detection of explosives and explosive-related compounds has become an urgent priority in recent years for homeland security and counter-terrorism applications. Modern techniques should offer enhancement in selectivity, sensitivity, and standoff distances. Miniaturisation, portability, and field-ruggedisation are crucial requirements. This study reports on instant and standoff identification of concealed explosive-related compounds using customized Raman technique. Stokes Raman spectra of common explosive-related compounds were generated and spectrally resolved to create characteristic finger print spectra. The scattered Raman emissions over the band 400:2000cm -1 were compared to infrared absorption using FTIR. It has been demonstrated that the two vibrational spectroscopic techniques were opposite and completing each other. Molecular vibrations with strong absorption in infrared (those involve strong change in dipole moments) induced weak signals in Raman and vice versa. The tailored Raman offered instant detection, high sensitivity, and standoff detection capabilities. Raman demonstrated characteristic fingerprint spectra with stable baseline and sharp intense peaks. Complete correlations of absorption/scattered signals to certain molecular vibrations were conducted to generate an entire spectroscopic profile of explosive-related compounds. This manuscript shades the light on Raman as one of the prevailing technologies for instantaneous detection of explosive-related compounds. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Resonant Impulsive Stimulated Raman Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mokhtari, A; Chesnoy, J

    1988-03-15

    Using a femtosecond dye laser, we observe in real-time vibrational oscillations excited by impulsive stimulated Raman scattering (ISRS) close to an electronic resonance. We perform single-beam Raman excitation and probe the driven coherence by a polarization-sensitive detection. We demonstrate for the first time impulsively Raman-induced dichroism, birefringence as well as frequency and time delay shifts. We analyse the characteristics of resonant ISRS on a vibrational mode of a dye molecule (malachite green) in solution.

  17. Resonant Impulsive Stimulated Raman Scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mokhtari, A.; Chesnoy, J.

    1988-01-01

    Using a femtosecond dye laser, we observe in real-time vibrational oscillations excited by impulsive stimulated Raman scattering (ISRS) close to an electronic resonance. We perform single-beam Raman excitation and probe the driven coherence by a polarization-sensitive detection. We demonstrate for the first time impulsively Raman-induced dichroism, birefringence as well as frequency and time delay shifts. We analyse the characteristics of resonant ISRS on a vibrational mode of a dye molecule (malachite green) in solution

  18. Raman spectroscopic study of ancient South African domestic clay pottery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legodi, M. A.; de Waal, D.

    2007-01-01

    The technique of Raman spectroscopy was used to examine the composition of ancient African domestic clay pottery of South African origin. One sample from each of four archaeological sites including Rooiwal, Lydenburg, Makahane and Graskop was studied. Normal dispersive Raman spectroscopy was found to be the most effective analytical technique in this study. XRF, XRD and FT-IR spectroscopy were used as complementary techniques. All representative samples contained common features, which were characterised by kaolin (Al 2Si 2O 5(OH) 5), illite (KAl 4(Si 7AlO 20)(OH) 4), feldspar (K- and NaAlSi 3O 8), quartz (α-SiO 2), hematite (α-Fe 2O 3), montmorillonite (Mg 3(Si,Al) 4(OH) 2·4.5H 2O[Mg] 0.35), and calcium silicate (CaSiO 3). Gypsum (CaSO 4·2H 2O) and calcium carbonates (most likely calcite, CaCO 3) were detected by Raman spectroscopy in Lydenburg, Makahane and Graskop shards. Amorphous carbon (with accompanying phosphates) was observed in the Raman spectra of Lydenburg, Rooiwal and Makahane shards, while rutile (TiO 2) appeared only in Makahane shard. The Raman spectra of Lydenburg and Rooiwal shards further showed the presence of anhydrite (CaSO 4). The results showed that South African potters used a mixture of clays as raw materials. The firing temperature for most samples did not exceed 800 °C, which suggests the use of open fire. The reddish brown and grayish black colours were likely due to hematite and amorphous carbon, respectively.

  19. Diffusion measurements by Raman spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Susanne Brunsgaard; Shapiro, Alexander; Berg, Rolf W.

    Poster "Diffusion measurements by Raman spectroscopy", See poster at http://www.kemi.dtu.dk/~ajo/rolf/petroday2004.ppt......Poster "Diffusion measurements by Raman spectroscopy", See poster at http://www.kemi.dtu.dk/~ajo/rolf/petroday2004.ppt...

  20. Imaging with extrinsic Raman labels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijtsema, N M; Duindam, J J; Puppels, G J; Otto, C; Greve, J

    1996-01-01

    In two separate examples we demonstrate the use of extrinsic Raman scattering probes for imaging of biological samples. First, the distribution of cholesterol in a rat eye Lens is determined with the use of the Raman scattered light from filipin, a molecule which binds specifically to cholesterol.

  1. Raman scattering tensors of tyrosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuboi, M; Ezaki, Y; Aida, M; Suzuki, M; Yimit, A; Ushizawa, K; Ueda, T

    1998-01-01

    Polarized Raman scattering measurements have been made of a single crystal of L-tyrosine by the use of a Raman microscope with the 488.0-nm exciting beam from an argon ion laser. The L-tyrosine crystal belongs to the space group P2(1)2(1)2(1) (orthorhombic), and Raman scattering intensities corresponding to the aa, bb, cc, ab and ac components of the crystal Raman tensor have been determined for each prominent Raman band. A similar set of measurements has been made of L-tyrosine-d4, in which four hydrogen atoms on the benzene ring are replaced by deuterium atoms. The effects of NH3-->ND3 and OH-->OD on the Raman spectrum have also been examined. In addition, depolarization ratios of some bands of L-tyrosine in aqueous solutions of pH 13 and pH 1 were examined. For comparison with these experimental results, on the other hand, ab initio molecular orbital calculations have been made of the normal modes of vibration and their associated polarizability oscillations of the L-tyrosine molecule. On the basis of these experimental data and by referring to the results of the calculations, discussions have been presented on the Raman tensors associated to some Raman bands, including those at 829 cm-1 (benzene ring breathing), 642 cm-1 (benzene ring deformation), and 432 cm-1 (C alpha-C beta-C gamma bending).

  2. Miniature Raman spectrometer development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonvallet, Joseph; Auz, Bryan; Rodriguez, John; Olmstead, Ty

    2018-02-01

    The development of techniques to rapidly identify samples ranging from, molecule and particle imaging to detection of high explosive materials, has surged in recent years. Due to this growing want, Raman spectroscopy gives a molecular fingerprint, with no sample preparation, and can be done remotely. These systems can be small, compact, lightweight, and with a user interface that allows for easy use and sample identification. Ocean Optics Inc. has developed several systems that would meet all these end user requirements. This talk will describe the development of different Ocean Optics Inc miniature Raman spectrometers. The spectrometer on a phone (SOAP) system was designed using commercial off the shelf (COTS) components, in a rapid product development cycle. The footprint of the system measures 40x40x14 mm (LxWxH) and was coupled directly to the cell phone detector camera optics. However, it gets roughly only 40 cm-1 resolution. The Accuman system is the largest (290x220X100 mm) of the three, but uses our QEPro spectrometer and get 7-11 cm-1 resolution. Finally, the HRS-30 measuring 165x85x40 mm is a combination of the other two systems. This system uses a modified EMBED spectrometer and gets 7-12 cm-1 resolution. Each of these units uses a peak matching algorithm that then correlates the results to the pre-loaded and customizable spectral libraries.

  3. Evaluation of polybutadiene rubbers using FTIR spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, L.N.; Schimidt, F., E-mail: lucas@ifg.edu.br [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia de Goias (IFG), Goiania, GO (Brazil); Antonio, P.L.; Caldas, L.V.E. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Vieira, S.L. [Universidade Federal de Goias (UFG), Goiania, GO (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica

    2017-09-01

    Radiation dosimetry for medical and industrial purposes has increasingly evolved over the last few decades with the introduction of various new detectors. Depending on the properties exhibited for radiation dosimetry, some detectors present their applications in a specific area. From a physics point of view, an ideal dosimeter should be able to measure absorbed dose. In this work, synthetic materials based on polybutadiene rubbers (PBR) were proposed as a new class of radiation detectors. The influence of radiation dose on their properties has been investigated for application in radiation dosimetry. The rubber samples were exposed to absorbed doses from 10 Gy up to 250 Gy, using a {sup 60}Co Gamma Cell-220 system. Their responses were carried out with a Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectrometer to investigate the presence of absorbance peaks. The results suggested the existence of a relationship between the absorbed doses and the absorbance peaks associated with stretching (1300-1200 cm{sup -1}), deformation (1450-1340 cm{sup -1}) and vibration (1500-1400 cm{sup -1}) processes in the material. (author)

  4. Evaluation of polybutadiene rubbers using FTIR spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, L.N.; Schimidt, F.; Antonio, P.L.; Caldas, L.V.E.; Vieira, S.L.

    2017-01-01

    Radiation dosimetry for medical and industrial purposes has increasingly evolved over the last few decades with the introduction of various new detectors. Depending on the properties exhibited for radiation dosimetry, some detectors present their applications in a specific area. From a physics point of view, an ideal dosimeter should be able to measure absorbed dose. In this work, synthetic materials based on polybutadiene rubbers (PBR) were proposed as a new class of radiation detectors. The influence of radiation dose on their properties has been investigated for application in radiation dosimetry. The rubber samples were exposed to absorbed doses from 10 Gy up to 250 Gy, using a "6"0Co Gamma Cell-220 system. Their responses were carried out with a Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectrometer to investigate the presence of absorbance peaks. The results suggested the existence of a relationship between the absorbed doses and the absorbance peaks associated with stretching (1300-1200 cm"-"1), deformation (1450-1340 cm"-"1) and vibration (1500-1400 cm"-"1) processes in the material. (author)

  5. Gas monitoring onboard ISS using FTIR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gisi, Michael; Stettner, Armin; Seurig, Roland; Honne, Atle; Witt, Johannes; Rebeyre, Pierre

    2017-06-01

    In the confined, enclosed environment of a spacecraft, the air quality must be monitored continuously in order to safeguard the crew's health. For this reason, OHB builds the ANITA2 (Analysing Interferometer for Ambient Air) technology demonstrator for trace gas monitoring onboard the International Space Station (ISS). The measurement principle of ANITA2 is based on the Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) technology with dedicated gas analysis software from the Norwegian partner SINTEF. This combination proved to provide high sensitivity, accuracy and precision for parallel measurements of 33 trace gases simultaneously onboard ISS by the precursor instrument ANITA1. The paper gives a technical overview about the opto-mechanical components of ANITA2, such as the interferometer, the reference Laser, the infrared source and the gas cell design and a quick overview about the gas analysis. ANITA2 is very well suited for measuring gas concentrations specifically but not limited to usage onboard spacecraft, as no consumables are required and measurements are performed autonomously. ANITA2 is a programme under the contract of the European Space Agency, and the air quality monitoring system is a stepping stone into the future, as a precursor system for manned exploration missions.

  6. Femtosecond Broadband Stimulated Raman Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Soo-Y; Yoon, Sagwoon; Mathies, Richard A

    2006-01-01

    Femtosecond broadband stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS) is a new technique where a narrow bandwidth picosecond Raman pump pulse and a red-shifted broadband femtosecond Stokes probe pulse (with or without time delay between the pulses) act on a sample to produce a high resolution Raman gain spectrum with high efficiency and speed, free from fluorescence background interference. It can reveal vibrational structural information and dynamics of stationary or transient states. Here, the quantum picture for femtosecond broadband stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS) is used to develop the semiclassical coupled wave theory of the phenomenon and to derive an expression for the measurable Raman gain in FSRS. The semiclassical theory is applied to study the dependence of lineshapes in FSRS on the pump-probe time delay and to deduce vibrational dephasing times in cyclohexane in the ground state

  7. Blood analysis by Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enejder, Annika M K; Koo, Tae-Woong; Oh, Jeankun; Hunter, Martin; Sasic, Slobodan; Feld, Michael S; Horowitz, Gary L

    2002-11-15

    Concentrations of multiple analytes were simultaneously measured in whole blood with clinical accuracy, without sample processing, using near-infrared Raman spectroscopy. Spectra were acquired with an instrument employing nonimaging optics, designed using Monte Carlo simulations of the influence of light-scattering-absorbing blood cells on the excitation and emission of Raman light in turbid medium. Raman spectra were collected from whole blood drawn from 31 individuals. Quantitative predictions of glucose, urea, total protein, albumin, triglycerides, hematocrit, and hemoglobin were made by means of partial least-squares (PLS) analysis with clinically relevant precision (r(2) values >0.93). The similarity of the features of the PLS calibration spectra to those of the respective analyte spectra illustrates that the predictions are based on molecular information carried by the Raman light. This demonstrates the feasibility of using Raman spectroscopy for quantitative measurements of biomolecular contents in highly light-scattering and absorbing media.

  8. [Bone Cell Biology Assessed by Microscopic Approach. Assessment of bone quality using Raman and infrared spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suda, Hiromi Kimura

    2015-10-01

    Bone quality, which was defined as "the sum total of characteristics of the bone that influence the bone's resistance to fracture" at the National Institute of Health (NIH) conference in 2001, contributes to bone strength in combination with bone mass. Bone mass is often measured as bone mineral density (BMD) and, consequently, can be quantified easily. On the other hand, bone quality is composed of several factors such as bone structure, bone matrix, calcification degree, microdamage, and bone turnover, and it is not easy to obtain data for the various factors. Therefore, it is difficult to quantify bone quality. We are eager to develop new measurement methods for bone quality that make it possible to determine several factors associated with bone quality at the same time. Analytic methods based on Raman and FTIR spectroscopy have attracted a good deal of attention as they can provide a good deal of chemical information about hydroxyapatite and collagen, which are the main components of bone. A lot of studies on bone quality using Raman and FTIR imaging have been reported following the development of the two imaging systems. Thus, both Raman and FTIR imaging appear to be promising new bone morphometric techniques.

  9. Ultra-compact MEMS FTIR spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabry, Yasser M.; Hassan, Khaled; Anwar, Momen; Alharon, Mohamed H.; Medhat, Mostafa; Adib, George A.; Dumont, Rich; Saadany, Bassam; Khalil, Diaa

    2017-05-01

    Portable and handheld spectrometers are being developed and commercialized in the late few years leveraging the rapidly-progressing technology and triggering new markets in the field of on-site spectroscopic analysis. Although handheld devices were commercialized for the near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), their size and cost stand as an obstacle against the deployment of the spectrometer as spectral sensing components needed for the smart phone industry and the IoT applications. In this work we report a chip-sized microelectromechanical system (MEMS)-based FTIR spectrometer. The core optical engine of the solution is built using a passive-alignment integration technique for a selfaligned MEMS chip; self-aligned microoptics and a single detector in a tiny package sized about 1 cm3. The MEMS chip is a monolithic, high-throughput scanning Michelson interferometer fabricated using deep reactive ion etching technology of silicon-on-insulator substrate. The micro-optical part is used for conditioning the input/output light to/from the MEMS and for further light direction to the detector. Thanks to the all-reflective design of the conditioning microoptics, the performance is free of chromatic aberration. Complemented by the excellent transmission properties of the silicon in the infrared region, the integrated solution allows very wide spectral range of operation. The reported sensor's spectral resolution is about 33 cm-1 and working in the range of 1270 nm to 2700 nm; upper limited by the extended InGaAs detector. The presented solution provides a low cost, low power, tiny size, wide wavelength range NIR spectral sensor that can be manufactured with extremely high volumes. All these features promise the compatibility of this technology with the forthcoming demand of smart portable and IoT devices.

  10. Scanning angle Raman spectroscopy: Investigation of Raman scatter enhancement techniques for chemical analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Matthew W. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2013-01-01

    This thesis outlines advancements in Raman scatter enhancement techniques by applying evanescent fields, standing-waves (waveguides) and surface enhancements to increase the generated mean square electric field, which is directly related to the intensity of Raman scattering. These techniques are accomplished by employing scanning angle Raman spectroscopy and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy. A 1064 nm multichannel Raman spectrometer is discussed for chemical analysis of lignin. Extending dispersive multichannel Raman spectroscopy to 1064 nm reduces the fluorescence interference that can mask the weaker Raman scattering. Overall, these techniques help address the major obstacles in Raman spectroscopy for chemical analysis, which include the inherently weak Raman cross section and susceptibility to fluorescence interference.

  11. Detection of latent prints by Raman imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Linda Anne [Andersonville, TN; Connatser, Raynella Magdalene [Knoxville, TN; Lewis, Sr., Samuel Arthur

    2011-01-11

    The present invention relates to a method for detecting a print on a surface, the method comprising: (a) contacting the print with a Raman surface-enhancing agent to produce a Raman-enhanced print; and (b) detecting the Raman-enhanced print using a Raman spectroscopic method. The invention is particularly directed to the imaging of latent fingerprints.

  12. Frequency shifts in stimulated Raman scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinth, W.; Kaiser, W.

    1980-01-01

    The nonresonant contributions to the nonlinear susceptibility chisup(()3) produce a frequency chirp during stimulated Raman scattering. In the case of transient stimulated Raman scattering, the spectrum of the generated Stokes pulse is found at higher frequencies than expected from spontaneous Raman data. The frequency difference can be calculated from the theory of stimulated Raman scattering. (orig.)

  13. Raman spectra of lithium compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorelik, V. S.; Bi, Dongxue; Voinov, Y. P.; Vodchits, A. I.; Gorshunov, B. P.; Yurasov, N. I.; Yurasova, I. I.

    2017-11-01

    The paper is devoted to the results of investigating the spontaneous Raman scattering spectra in the lithium compounds crystals in a wide spectral range by the fibre-optic spectroscopy method. We also present the stimulated Raman scattering spectra in the lithium hydroxide and lithium deuteride crystals obtained with the use of powerful laser source. The symmetry properties of the lithium hydroxide, lithium hydroxide monohydrate and lithium deuteride crystals optical modes were analyzed by means of the irreducible representations of the point symmetry groups. We have established the selection rules in the Raman and infrared absorption spectra of LiOH, LiOH·H2O and LiD crystals.

  14. High-sensitivity Raman spectrometer to study pristine and irradiated interstellar ice analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Chris J; Brotton, Stephen J; Jones, Brant M; Misra, Anupam K; Sharma, Shiv K; Kaiser, Ralf I

    2013-06-18

    We discuss the novel design of a sensitive, normal-Raman spectrometer interfaced to an ultra-high vacuum chamber (5 × 10(-11) Torr) utilized to investigate the interaction of ionizing radiation with low temperature ices relevant to the solar system and interstellar medium. The design is based on a pulsed Nd:YAG laser which takes advantage of gating techniques to isolate the scattered Raman signal from the competing fluorescence signal. The setup incorporates innovations to achieve maximum sensitivity without detectable heating of the sample. Thin films of carbon dioxide (CO2) ices of 10 to 396 nm thickness were prepared and characterized using both Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and HeNe interference techniques. The ν+ and ν- Fermi resonance bands of CO2 ices were observed by Raman spectroscopy at 1385 and 1278 cm(-1), respectively, and the band areas showed a linear dependence on ice thickness. Preliminary irradiation experiments are conducted on a 450 nm thick sample of CO2 ice using energetic electrons. Both carbon monoxide (CO) and the infrared inactive molecular oxygen (O2) products are readily detected from their characteristic Raman bands at 2145 and 1545 cm(-1), respectively. Detection limits of 4 ± 3 and 6 ± 4 monolayers of CO and O2 were derived, demonstrating the unique power to detect newly formed molecules in irradiated ices in situ. The setup is universally applicable to the detection of low-abundance species, since no Raman signal enhancement is required, demonstrating Raman spectroscopy as a reliable alternative, or complement, to FT-IR spectroscopy in space science applications.

  15. Rapid habitability assessment of Mars samples by pyrolysis-FTIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Peter R.; Sephton, Mark A.

    2016-02-01

    Pyrolysis Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (pyrolysis FTIR) is a potential sample selection method for Mars Sample Return missions. FTIR spectroscopy can be performed on solid and liquid samples but also on gases following preliminary thermal extraction, pyrolysis or gasification steps. The detection of hydrocarbon and non-hydrocarbon gases can reveal information on sample mineralogy and past habitability of the environment in which the sample was created. The absorption of IR radiation at specific wavenumbers by organic functional groups can indicate the presence and type of any organic matter present. Here we assess the utility of pyrolysis-FTIR to release water, carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide and organic matter from Mars relevant materials to enable a rapid habitability assessment of target rocks for sample return. For our assessment a range of minerals were analyzed by attenuated total reflectance FTIR. Subsequently, the mineral samples were subjected to single step pyrolysis and multi step pyrolysis and the products characterised by gas phase FTIR. Data from both single step and multi step pyrolysis-FTIR provide the ability to identify minerals that reflect habitable environments through their water and carbon dioxide responses. Multi step pyrolysis-FTIR can be used to gain more detailed information on the sources of the liberated water and carbon dioxide owing to the characteristic decomposition temperatures of different mineral phases. Habitation can be suggested when pyrolysis-FTIR indicates the presence of organic matter within the sample. Pyrolysis-FTIR, therefore, represents an effective method to assess whether Mars Sample Return target rocks represent habitable conditions and potential records of habitation and can play an important role in sample triage operations.

  16. Raman spectroscopy of white wines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Coralie; Bruneel, Jean-Luc; Guyon, François; Médina, Bernard; Jourdes, Michael; Teissedre, Pierre-Louis; Guillaume, François

    2015-08-15

    The feasibility of exploiting Raman scattering to analyze white wines has been investigated using 3 different wavelengths of the incoming laser radiation in the near-UV (325 nm), visible (532 nm) and near infrared (785 nm). To help in the interpretation of the Raman spectra, the absorption properties in the UV-visible range of two wine samples as well as their laser induced fluorescence have also been investigated. Thanks to the strong intensity enhancement of the Raman scattered light due to electronic resonance with 325 nm laser excitation, hydroxycinnamic acids may be detected and analyzed selectively. Fructose and glucose may also be easily detected below ca. 1000 cm(-1). This feasibility study demonstrates the potential of the Raman spectroscopic technique for the analysis of white wines. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. All-Fiber Raman Probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunetti, Anna Chiara

    by means of fiber components. Assuming the possibility to use a fiber laser with a fundamental radiation at 1064nm, in-fiber efficient second harmonic generation is achieved by optically poling the core of the waveguide delivering the excitation light to the sample. In this way, Raman spectroscopy...... in the visible range can be performed. The simultaneous delivery of the excitation light and collection of the Raman signal from the sample are achieved by means of a doubleclad fiber, whose core and inner cladding act as \\independent" transmission channels. A double-clad fiber coupler allows for the recovery...... of the collected Raman scattering from the inner-cladding region of the double-clad fiber, thus replacing the bulk dichroic component normally used to demultiplex the pump and Raman signal. A tunable Rayleigh-rejection filter based on a liquid filled-photonic bandgap fiber is also demonstrated in this work...

  18. Triplet State Resonance Raman Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilbrandt, Robert Walter; Jensen, N. H.; Pagsberg, Palle Bjørn

    1978-01-01

    Makes the first report on the resonance Raman spectrum of a molecule in its triplet state generated by pulse radiolysis. A solution of 0.01 mol dm-3 of p-terphenyl in benzene was studied......Makes the first report on the resonance Raman spectrum of a molecule in its triplet state generated by pulse radiolysis. A solution of 0.01 mol dm-3 of p-terphenyl in benzene was studied...

  19. Heating by the Raman instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estabrook, K.G.; Kruer, W.L.

    1980-01-01

    Computer simulations are presented of the reflection and heating due to stimulated Raman backscatter of intense laser light in large regions of underdense plasma. The heated electron distribution is found to be approximately a Maxwellian of temperature (m/sub e//2)v/sub p/ 2 , where v/sub p/ is the phase velocity of the electron plasma wave. A simple model of the reflection is presented. Raman may cause a pre-heat problem with large laser fusion reactor targets

  20. In situ FTIR assessment of desiccation-tolerant tissues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolkers, W.F.; Hoekstra, F.A.

    2003-01-01

    This essay shows how Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopy can be applied to study thermodynamic parameters and conformation of endogenous biomolecules in desiccation-tolerant biological tissues. Desiccation tolerance is the remarkable ability of some organisms to survive complete

  1. A study of Ganoderma lucidum spores by FTIR microspectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Chen, Xianliang; Qi, Zeming; Liu, Xingcun; Li, Weizu; Wang, Shengyi

    2012-06-01

    In order to obtain unique information of Ganoderma lucidum spores, FTIR microspectroscopy was used to study G. lucidum spores from Anhui Province (A), Liaoning Province (B) and Shangdong Province (C) of China. IR micro-spectra were acquired with high-resolution and well-reproducibility. The IR spectra of G. lucidum spores from different areas were similar and mainly made up of the absorption bands of polysaccharide, sterols, proteins, fatty acids, etc. The results of curve fitting indicated the protein secondary structures were dissimilar among the above G. lucidum spores. To identify G. lucidum spores from different areas, the H1078/H1640 value might be a potentially useful factor, furthermore FTIR microspectroscopy could realize this identification efficiently with the help of hierarchical cluster analysis. The result indicates FTIR microspectroscopy is an efficient tool for identification of G. lucidum spores from different areas. The result also suggests FTIR microspectroscopy is a potentially useful tool for the study of TCM.

  2. Characterization of Momordica charantia Ussing FT-IR Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attila Keseru

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, because earlier claim shows that the plant used as stomachic, carminative, tonic, antipyretic, antidiabetic, in rheumatoid arthritis and gout, the present investigation was carried to characterized a principal components of plant using FT-IR technique

  3. Safranin-O dye in the ground state. A study by density functional theory, Raman, SERS and infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lofrumento, C.; Arci, F.; Carlesi, S.; Ricci, M.; Castellucci, E.; Becucci, M.

    2015-02-01

    The analysis of ground state structural and vibrational properties of Safranin-O is presented. The experimental results, obtained by FTIR, Raman and SERS spectroscopy, are discussed in comparison to the results of DFT calculations carried out at the B3LYP/6-311 + G(d,p) level of theory. The calculated spectra reproduce quite satisfactorily the experimental data. The calculated Safranin-O equilibrium structure and the assignment of the vibrational spectra are reported as well. From the changes between Raman and SERS spectra a model is presented for the interaction of Safranin-O with silver nanoparticles.

  4. In Vitro Polarized Resonance Raman Study of N719 and N719-TBP in Dye Sensitized Solar Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassing, Søren; Jernshøj, Kit Drescher; Nguyen, Phuong Tuyet

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: The working efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) depends on the long-term stability of the dye itself and on the microscopic structure of the dye-semiconductor interface. Previous experimental studies of DSCs based on ruthenium dye with bipyridine ligands (N719) adsorbed...... to the TiO2substrate applied FTIR,un-polarized Raman (RS) and un-polarized resonance Raman (RRS) spectroscopy. In the un-polarized RRS studies of N719/TiO2 – DSCs the discussion of the adsorption of N719 was based on the rather weak carbonyl or carboxyl group stretching vibrations and on minor spectral...

  5. Design of an 1800nm Raman amplifier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane, Ask Sebastian; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    We present the experimental results for a Raman amplifier that operates at 1810 nm and is pumped by a Raman fiber laser at 1680 nm. Both the pump laser and the Raman amplifier is polarization maintaining. A challenge when scaling Raman amplifiers to longer wavelengths is the increase...... in transmission loss, but also the reduction in the Raman gain coefficient as the amplifier wavelength is increased. Both polarization components of the Raman gain is characterized, initially for linearly co-polarized signal and pump, subsequently linearly polarized orthogonal signal and pump. The noise...

  6. Raman Optical Activity and Raman Spectra of Amphetamine Species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Rolf W.; Shim, Irene; White, Peter Cyril

    2012-01-01

    Theoretical calculations and preliminary measurements of vibrational Raman optical activity (ROA) spectra of different species of amphetamine (amphetamine and amphetamine-H+) are reported for the first time. The quantum chemical calculations were carried out as hybrid ab initio DFT-molecular orbi......Theoretical calculations and preliminary measurements of vibrational Raman optical activity (ROA) spectra of different species of amphetamine (amphetamine and amphetamine-H+) are reported for the first time. The quantum chemical calculations were carried out as hybrid ab initio DFT...... are employed for identification purposes. The DFT calculations show that the most stable conformations are those allowing for close contact between the aromatic ring and the amine hydrogen atoms. The internal rotational barrier within the same amphetamine enanti- omer has a considerable influence on the Raman...

  7. Raman Spectroscopy for Homeland Security Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory Mogilevsky

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Raman spectroscopy is an analytical technique with vast applications in the homeland security and defense arenas. The Raman effect is defined by the inelastic interaction of the incident laser with the analyte molecule’s vibrational modes, which can be exploited to detect and identify chemicals in various environments and for the detection of hazards in the field, at checkpoints, or in a forensic laboratory with no contact with the substance. A major source of error that overwhelms the Raman signal is fluorescence caused by the background and the sample matrix. Novel methods are being developed to enhance the Raman signal’s sensitivity and to reduce the effects of fluorescence by altering how the hazard material interacts with its environment and the incident laser. Basic Raman techniques applicable to homeland security applications include conventional (off-resonance Raman spectroscopy, surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS, resonance Raman spectroscopy, and spatially or temporally offset Raman spectroscopy (SORS and TORS. Additional emerging Raman techniques, including remote Raman detection, Raman imaging, and Heterodyne imaging, are being developed to further enhance the Raman signal, mitigate fluorescence effects, and monitor hazards at a distance for use in homeland security and defense applications.

  8. Raman chemical imaging technology for food and agricultural applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper presents Raman chemical imaging technology for inspecting food and agricultural products. The paper puts emphasis on introducing and demonstrating Raman imaging techniques for practical uses in food analysis. The main topics include Raman scattering principles, Raman spectroscopy measurem...

  9. Theory of Graphene Raman Scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Eric J; Yang, Yuan; Kocia, Lucas; Chen, Wei; Fang, Shiang; Borunda, Mario; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    2016-02-23

    Raman scattering plays a key role in unraveling the quantum dynamics of graphene, perhaps the most promising material of recent times. It is crucial to correctly interpret the meaning of the spectra. It is therefore very surprising that the widely accepted understanding of Raman scattering, i.e., Kramers-Heisenberg-Dirac theory, has never been applied to graphene. Doing so here, a remarkable mechanism we term"transition sliding" is uncovered, explaining the uncommon brightness of overtones in graphene. Graphene's dispersive and fixed Raman bands, missing bands, defect density and laser frequency dependence of band intensities, widths of overtone bands, Stokes, anti-Stokes anomalies, and other known properties emerge simply and directly.

  10. Raman fiber distributed feedback lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westbrook, Paul S; Abedin, Kazi S; Nicholson, Jeffrey W; Kremp, Tristan; Porque, Jerome

    2011-08-01

    We demonstrate fiber distributed feedback (DFB) lasers using Raman gain in two germanosilicate fibers. Our DFB cavities were 124 mm uniform fiber Bragg gratings with a π phase shift offset from the grating center. Our pump was at 1480 nm and the DFB lasers operated on a single longitudinal mode near 1584 nm. In a commercial Raman gain fiber, the maximum output power, linewidth, and threshold were 150 mW, 7.5 MHz, and 39 W, respectively. In a commercial highly nonlinear fiber, these figures improved to 350 mW, 4 MHz, and 4.3 W, respectively. In both lasers, more than 75% of pump power was transmitted, allowing for the possibility of substantial amplification in subsequent Raman gain fiber. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  11. Higher order mode optical fiber Raman amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rottwitt, Karsten; Friis, Søren Michael Mørk; Usuga Castaneda, Mario A.

    2016-01-01

    We review higher order mode Raman amplifiers and discuss recent theoretical as well as experimental results including system demonstrations.......We review higher order mode Raman amplifiers and discuss recent theoretical as well as experimental results including system demonstrations....

  12. Field Raman spectrograph for environmental analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrabba, M.M.

    1995-01-01

    The use of Raman Spectroscopy in the screening of soils, ground water, and surface waters for pollutants is described. A probe accessory for conducting surface enhanced Raman Spectroscopy is undergoing testing for dilute chlorinated solvents

  13. Raman and Photoluminescence Spectroscopy in Mineral Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehn, J. W.

    2014-06-01

    Raman spectroscopy is particularly useful for rapid identification of minerals and gemstones. Raman spectrometers also allow PL studies for authentication of samples and geological provenance, diamond type screening and detection of HPHT treatments.

  14. Dynamics of long ring Raman fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhanov, Sergey V.; Melnikov, Leonid A.; Mazhirina, Yulia A.

    2016-04-01

    The numerical model for dynamics of long fiber ring Raman laser is proposed. The model is based on the transport equations and Courant-Isaacson-Rees numerical method. Different regimes of a long ring fiber Raman laser are investigated.

  15. Raman Spectroscopy of Microbial Pigments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Howell G. M.; Oren, Aharon

    2014-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a rapid nondestructive technique providing spectroscopic and structural information on both organic and inorganic molecular compounds. Extensive applications for the method in the characterization of pigments have been found. Due to the high sensitivity of Raman spectroscopy for the detection of chlorophylls, carotenoids, scytonemin, and a range of other pigments found in the microbial world, it is an excellent technique to monitor the presence of such pigments, both in pure cultures and in environmental samples. Miniaturized portable handheld instruments are available; these instruments can be used to detect pigments in microbiological samples of different types and origins under field conditions. PMID:24682303

  16. Micro-raman and tip-enhanced raman spectroscopy of carbon allotropes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoffmann, G.G.; With, de G.; Loos, J.

    2008-01-01

    Raman spectroscopic data are obtained on various carbon allotropes like diamond, amorphous carbon, graphite, graphene and single wall carbon nanotubes by micro-Raman spectroscopy, tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy and tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy imaging, and the potentials of these techniques for

  17. Challenges in higher order mode Raman amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rottwitt, Karsten; Nielsen, Kristian; Friis, Søren Michael Mørk

    2015-01-01

    A higher order Raman amplifier model that take random mode coupling into account ispresented. Mode dependent gain and signal power fluctuations at the output of the higher order modeRaman amplifier are discussed......A higher order Raman amplifier model that take random mode coupling into account ispresented. Mode dependent gain and signal power fluctuations at the output of the higher order modeRaman amplifier are discussed...

  18. Mixture analysis with laser raman spctroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, M.S.; Bark, G.M.

    1981-01-01

    Trace amount of methyl orange was determined in colored medium by resonance Raman spectrometry. Without major modification of a commercial laser Raman spectrometer, the resonance Raman active molecule could be determined satisfactorily in 10sup(-5)M range when the background fluorescence was more than 20 times stronger than the signal. Use of fluorescence quenching agent was found helpful to improve the Raman signal. Suggestions for the improvement of analytical method is presented. (Author)

  19. Subfemtosecond pulse generation by cascade-stimulated Raman scattering with modulated Raman excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Kun; Wu Jian; Zeng Heping

    2003-01-01

    Subfemtosecond (sub-fs) pulses can be generated by cascade-stimulated Raman scattering in a Raman medium with modulated Raman excitations, driven by two sufficiently intense laser beams, one of which is amplitude modulated. The nonadiabatic Raman interaction establishes a strong modulated Raman coherence, which supports compression of the generated broadband Raman sidebands to a train of sub-fs pulses regardless of whether the carrier frequencies of the driving lasers are tuned above, below or on two-photon Raman resonance. (letter to the editor)

  20. Raman Microscopy and Microspectroscopy of Biological Materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijtsema, N.M.; Otto, C.; Segers-Nolten, G.M.J.; Greve, J.; Merlin, Jean Claude; Turrell, Sylvia; Huvenne, Jean Pierre

    With a confocal Raman microspectrometer it is possible to collect Raman signal of a volume of only 1 µm3 Therefore, this technique offers the possibility to obtain information about the chemical composition of small cell structures like granules, without destroying the cell [1], This makes Raman

  1. Raman spectra of lignin model compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umesh P. Agarwal; Richard S. Reiner; Ashok K. Pandey; Sally A. Ralph; Kolby C. Hirth; Rajai H. Atalla

    2005-01-01

    To fully exploit the value of Raman spectroscopy for analyzing lignins and lignin containing materials, a detailed understanding of lignins’ Raman spectra needs to be achieved. Although advances made thus far have led to significant growth in application of Raman techniques, further developments are needed to improve upon the existing knowledge. Considering that lignin...

  2. Raman Spectroscopy of Ocular Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermakov, Igor V.; Sharifzadeh, Mohsen; Gellermann, Warner

    The optically transparent nature of the human eye has motivated numerous Raman studies aimed at the non-invasive optical probing of ocular tissue components critical to healthy vision. Investigations include the qualitative and quantitative detection of tissue-specific molecular constituents, compositional changes occurring with development of ocular pathology, and the detection and tracking of ocular drugs and nutritional supplements. Motivated by a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms leading to cataract formation in the aging human lens, a great deal of work has centered on the Raman detection of proteins and water content in the lens. Several protein groups and the hydroxyl response are readily detectable. Changes of protein compositions can be studied in excised noncataractous tissue versus aged tissue preparations as well as in tissue samples with artificially induced cataracts. Most of these studies are carried out in vitro using suitable animal models and conventional Raman techniques. Tissue water content plays an important role in optimum light transmission of the outermost transparent ocular structure, the cornea. Using confocal Raman spectroscopy techniques, it has been possible to non-invasively measure the water to protein ratio as a measure of hydration status and to track drug-induced changes of the hydration levels in the rabbit cornea at various depths. The aqueous humor, normally supplying nutrients to cornea and lens, has an advantageous anterior location for Raman studies. Increasing efforts are pursued to non-invasively detect the presence of glucose and therapeutic concentrations of antibiotic drugs in this medium. In retinal tissue, Raman spectroscopy proves to be an important tool for research into the causes of macular degeneration, the leading cause of irreversible vision disorders and blindness in the elderly. It has been possible to detect the spectral features of advanced glycation and advanced lipooxydation end products in

  3. Inverse Raman effect: applications and detection techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, L.J. Jr.

    1980-08-01

    The processes underlying the inverse Raman effect are qualitatively described by comparing it to the more familiar phenomena of conventional and stimulated Raman scattering. An experession is derived for the inverse Raman absorption coefficient, and its relationship to the stimulated Raman gain is obtained. The power requirements of the two fields are examined qualitatively and quantitatively. The assumption that the inverse Raman absorption coefficient is constant over the interaction length is examined. Advantages of the technique are discussed and a brief survey of reported studies is presented

  4. Inverse Raman effect: applications and detection techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, L.J. Jr.

    1980-08-01

    The processes underlying the inverse Raman effect are qualitatively described by comparing it to the more familiar phenomena of conventional and stimulated Raman scattering. An experession is derived for the inverse Raman absorption coefficient, and its relationship to the stimulated Raman gain is obtained. The power requirements of the two fields are examined qualitatively and quantitatively. The assumption that the inverse Raman absorption coefficient is constant over the interaction length is examined. Advantages of the technique are discussed and a brief survey of reported studies is presented.

  5. Intramolecular hydrogen bonding in N-salicylideneaniline: FT-IR spectrum and quantum chemical calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosavi-Tekyeh, Zainab; Dastani, Najmeh

    2015-12-01

    FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of N-salicylideneaniline (SAn) and its deuterated analogue (D-SAn) are recorded, and the theoretical calculations are performed on their molecular structures and vibrational frequencies. The same calculations are performed for SAn in different solutions using the polarizable conductor continuum model (CPCM) method. Comparisons between the spectra obtained and the corresponding theoretical calculations are used to assign the vibrational frequencies for these compounds. The spectral behavior of SAn upon deuteration is also used to distinguish the positions of OH vibrational frequencies. The hydrogen bond strength of SAn is investigated by applying the atoms-in-molecules (AIM) theory, natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis, and geometry calculations. The harmonic vibrational frequencies of SAn are calculated at B3LYP and X3LYP levels of theory using 6-31G*, 6-311G**, and 6-311++G** basis sets. The AIM results support a medium hydrogen bonding in SAn. The observed νOH/νOD and γOH/γOD for SAn appear at 2940/2122 and 830/589 cm-1, respectively.

  6. Limitations of using Raman microscopy for the analysis of high-content-carbon-filled ethylene propylene diene monomer rubber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghanbari-Siahkali, A.; Almdal, K.; Kingshott, P.

    2003-01-01

    The effects of laser irradiation on changes to the surface chemistry and structure of a commercially available ethylene propylene diene monomer (EPDM) rubber sample after Raman microscopy analysis was investigated. The Raman measurements were carried out with different levels of laser power...... on the sample, ranging from 4.55 mW to 0.09 mW. The surface of the EPDM was analyzed before and after laser exposure using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. The techniques have surface probe depths of approximately less...... than or equal to10 nm and 1 mum, respectively. Both sets of analysis show that ingredients of the blended EPDM rubber "bloom" to the surface as a result of local heating that takes place due to the absorption of laser by carbon black during the Raman analysis. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM...

  7. THE FTIR STUDIES OF PHOTO-OXIDATIVE DEGRADATION OF POLYPROPYLENE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEN Zaiqing; HU Xingzhou; SHEN Deyan

    1988-01-01

    The photo-oxidative degradation process of polypropylene film containing iron ions was investigated via FTIR and absorbance substraction technique. It is shown that the iron ions play an important role in the decomposition of hydroperoxide and the increase of the degradation rate of polypropylene film. Theamorphous region of PP film undergoes degradation prior to the crystalline one.

  8. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy for identification of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was used in this study to identify and determine spectral features of Chlorella vulgaris Beijerinck 1890 and Scenedesmus obliquus (Turpin) Kützing 1833. Two cultures were grown in a chemically-defined media under photoautotrophic culture conditions isolated from eutrophic ...

  9. FTIR Laboratory in Support of the PV Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keyes, B. M.; Gedvilas, L. M.; Bhattacharya, R.; Xu, Y.; Li, X.; Wang, Q.

    2005-01-01

    The Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) Laboratory supports the Solar Energy Technologies Program through the measurement and characterization of solar energy-related materials and devices. The FTIR technique is a fast, accurate, and reliable method for studying molecular structure and composition. This ability to identify atomic species and their bonding environment is a powerful combination that finds use in many research and development efforts. A brief overview of the technical approach used is contained in Section 2 of this report. Because of its versatility and accessibility, the FTIR Laboratory is a valuable contributor to the Solar Energy Technologies Program. The laboratory provides support for, and collaborates with, several in-house programs as well as our industry and university partners. By the end of FY 2004, the FTIR Laboratory performed over 1100 measurements on PV-related materials. These contributions resulted in conference and workshop presentations and several peer-reviewed publications. A brief summary of a few of these efforts is contained in Section 3 of this report

  10. FTIR and Raman spectroscopy of carbon nanoparticles in SiO2, ZnO and NiO matrices

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Katumba, G

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Coatings of carbon nanoparticles dispersed in SiO2, ZnO and NiO matrices on aluminium substrates have been fabricated by a sol–gel technique. Spectrophotometry was used to determine the solar absorptance and the thermal emittance of the composite...

  11. Structural transitions of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride/water mixtures studied by Raman and FTIR spectroscopy and WAXS

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kotov, Nikolay; Šturcová, Adriana; Zhigunov, Alexander; Raus, Vladimír; Dybal, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 4 (2016), s. 1958-1967 ISSN 1528-7483 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/12/0703 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : ionic liquid * phase transition * capillarity Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 4.055, year: 2016

  12. Evaluation of turmeric powder adulterated with metanil yellow using FT-Raman and FT-IR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turmeric powder (Curcuma longa L.) is valued both for its medicinal properties and for its popular culinary use such as being a component in curry powder. Due to its high demand in international trade, turmeric powder has been subject to economically driven, hazardous chemical adulteration. This stu...

  13. Structure and vibrational spectra of melaminium bis(trifluoroacetate) trihydrate: FT-IR, FT-Raman and quantum chemical calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangeetha, V.; Govindarajan, M.; Kanagathara, N.; Marchewka, M. K.; Gunasekaran, S.; Anbalagan, G.

    Melaminium bis(trifluoroacetate) trihydrate (MTFA), an organic material has been synthesized and single crystals of MTFA have been grown by the slow solvent evaporation method at room temperature. X-ray powder diffraction analysis confirms that MTFA crystal belongs to the monoclinic system with space group P2/c. The molecular geometry, vibrational frequencies and intensity of the vibrational bands have been interpreted with the aid of structure optimization based on density functional theory (DFT) B3LYP method with 6-311G(d,p) and 6-311++G(d,p) basis sets. The X-ray diffraction data have been compared with the data of optimized molecular structure. The theoretical results show that the crystal structure can be reproduced by optimized geometry and the vibrational frequencies show good agreement with the experimental values. The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shift of the molecule has been calculated by the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method and compared with experimental results. HOMO-LUMO, and other related molecular and electronic properties are calculated. The Mulliken and NBO charges have also been calculated and interpreted.

  14. ULTRAVIOLET RAMAN SPECTRAL SIGNATURE ACQUISITION: UV RAMAN SPECTRAL FINGERPRINTS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SEDLACEK,III, A.J.FINFROCK,C.

    2002-09-01

    As a member of the science-support part of the ITT-lead LISA development program, BNL is tasked with the acquisition of UV Raman spectral fingerprints and associated scattering cross-sections for those chemicals-of-interest to the program's sponsor. In support of this role, the present report contains the first installment of UV Raman spectral fingerprint data on the initial subset of chemicals. Because of the unique nature associated with the acquisition of spectral fingerprints for use in spectral pattern matching algorithms (i.e., CLS, PLS, ANN) great care has been undertaken to maximize the signal-to-noise and to minimize unnecessary spectral subtractions, in an effort to provide the highest quality spectral fingerprints. This report is divided into 4 sections. The first is an Experimental section that outlines how the Raman spectra are performed. This is then followed by a section on Sample Handling. Following this, the spectral fingerprints are presented in the Results section where the data reduction process is outlined. Finally, a Photographs section is included.

  15. Utilizing Raman Spectroscopy and Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy to investigate healthy and cancerous colon samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barzegar, A.; Rezaei, H.; Malekfar, R.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, spontaneous Raman scattering and surface-enhanced Raman scattering, Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy spectra have been investigated. The samples which were kept in the formalin solution selected from the human's healthy and cancerous colon tissues. The Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy spectra were collected by adding colloidal solution contained silver nanoparticles to the top of the samples. The recorded spectra were compared for the spontaneous Raman spectra of healthy and cancerous colon samples. The spontaneous and surface enhanced Raman scattering data were also collected and compared for both healthy and damaged samples.

  16. Proton transfers in a channelrhodopsin-1 studied by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) difference spectroscopy and site-directed mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogren, John I; Yi, Adrian; Mamaev, Sergey; Li, Hai; Spudich, John L; Rothschild, Kenneth J

    2015-05-15

    Channelrhodopsin-1 from the alga Chlamydomonas augustae (CaChR1) is a low-efficiency light-activated cation channel that exhibits properties useful for optogenetic applications such as a slow light inactivation and a red-shifted visible absorption maximum as compared with the more extensively studied channelrhodopsin-2 from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (CrChR2). Previously, both resonance Raman and low-temperature FTIR difference spectroscopy revealed that unlike CrChR2, CaChR1 under our conditions exhibits an almost pure all-trans retinal composition in the unphotolyzed ground state and undergoes an all-trans to 13-cis isomerization during the primary phototransition typical of other microbial rhodopsins such as bacteriorhodopsin (BR). Here, we apply static and rapid-scan FTIR difference spectroscopy along with site-directed mutagenesis to characterize the proton transfer events occurring upon the formation of the long-lived conducting P2 (380) state of CaChR1. Assignment of carboxylic C=O stretch bands indicates that Asp-299 (homolog to Asp-212 in BR) becomes protonated and Asp-169 (homolog to Asp-85 in BR) undergoes a net change in hydrogen bonding relative to the unphotolyzed ground state of CaChR1. These data along with earlier FTIR measurements on the CaChR1 → P1 transition are consistent with a two-step proton relay mechanism that transfers a proton from Glu-169 to Asp-299 during the primary phototransition and from the Schiff base to Glu-169 during P2 (380) formation. The unusual charge neutrality of both Schiff base counterions in the P2 (380) conducting state suggests that these residues may function as part of a cation selective filter in the open channel state of CaChR1 as well as other low-efficiency ChRs. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Transcutaneous Raman Spectroscopy of Bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Jason R.

    Clinical diagnoses of bone health and fracture risk typically rely upon measurements of bone density or structure, but the strength of a bone is also dependent upon its chemical composition. One technology that has been used extensively in ex vivo, exposed-bone studies to measure the chemical composition of bone is Raman spectroscopy. This spectroscopic technique provides chemical information about a sample by probing its molecular vibrations. In the case of bone tissue, Raman spectra provide chemical information about both the inorganic mineral and organic matrix components, which each contribute to bone strength. To explore the relationship between bone strength and chemical composition, our laboratory has contributed to ex vivo, exposed-bone animal studies of rheumatoid arthritis, glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis, and prolonged lead exposure. All of these studies suggest that Raman-based predictions of biomechanical strength may be more accurate than those produced by the clinically-used parameter of bone mineral density. The utility of Raman spectroscopy in ex vivo, exposed-bone studies has inspired attempts to perform bone spectroscopy transcutaneously. Although the results are promising, further advancements are necessary to make non-invasive, in vivo measurements of bone that are of sufficient quality to generate accurate predictions of fracture risk. In order to separate the signals from bone and soft tissue that contribute to a transcutaneous measurement, we developed an overconstrained extraction algorithm that is based upon fitting with spectral libraries derived from separately-acquired measurements of the underlying tissue components. This approach allows for accurate spectral unmixing despite the fact that similar chemical components (e.g., type I collagen) are present in both soft tissue and bone and was applied to experimental data in order to transcutaneously detect, to our knowledge for the first time, age- and disease-related spectral

  18. Raman spectroscopy peer review report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkelman, W.D.; Eberlein, S.J.

    1994-09-01

    The Hanford Site in eastern Washington includes 177 underground storage tanks (UST), which contain waste materials produced during the production of nuclear fuels. The materials in the tanks must be characterized to support the retrieval, processing, and final disposition of the waste. Characterization is currently performed by removing waste samples for analyses in a hot cell or laboratory. A review of the Hanford Raman Spectroscopy Program was held in Richland on March 23 and 24, 1994. A team of principal investigators and researchers made presentations that covered both technical and programmatic aspects of the Hanford Site Raman work. After these presentations and discussions, the review panel met in a closed session to formalize a list of findings. The reviewers agreed that Raman spectroscopy is an excellent method to attack the tank waste characterization and screening problems that were presented. They agreed that there was a good chance that the method would be successful as presently envisioned. The reviewers provided the following primary recommendations: evaluation a laser with wavelength in the near infrared; provide optical filters at or near the sampling end of the fiber-optic probe; develop and implement a strategy for frequent calibration of the system; do not try to further increase Raman resolution at the expense of wavelength range; clearly identify and differentiate between requirements for providing a short-term operational system and requirements for optimizing a system for long-term field use; and determine the best optical configuration, which may include reduced fiber-optic diameter and/or short focal length and low F-number spectrographs

  19. Raman spectra of SDW superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rout, G.C. [Condensed Matter Physics Group, Department of Physics, Government Science College, Chatrapur, Orissa 761 020 (India)]. E-mail: gcr@iopb.res.in; Bishoyi, K.C. [P.G. Department of Physics, F.M. College (Autonomous), Balasore, Orissa 756 001 (India); Behera, S.N. [Institute of Physics, Bhubaneswar 751 005 (India)

    2005-03-15

    We report the calculation of the phonon response of the coexistent spin density wave (SDW) and superconducting (SC) state and predict the observation of SC gap in the Raman spectra of rare-earth nickel borocarbide superconductors. The SDW state normally does not couple to the lattice and hence, the phonons in the system are not expected to be affected by the SDW state. But there is a possibility of observing SC gap mode in the Raman spectra of a SDW superconductor due to the coupling of the SC gap excitation to the Raman active phonons in the system via the electron-phonon (e-p) interaction. A theoretical model is used for the coexistent phase and electron-phonon interaction. Phonon Green's function is calculated by Zubarev's technique and the phonon self-energy due to e-p interaction which is given by electron density response function in the coexistent state corresponding to the SDW wave vector q = Q is evaluated. The results so obtained exhibit agreement with the experimental observations.

  20. Raman spectra of SDW superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rout, G.C.; Bishoyi, K.C.; Behera, S.N.

    2005-01-01

    We report the calculation of the phonon response of the coexistent spin density wave (SDW) and superconducting (SC) state and predict the observation of SC gap in the Raman spectra of rare-earth nickel borocarbide superconductors. The SDW state normally does not couple to the lattice and hence, the phonons in the system are not expected to be affected by the SDW state. But there is a possibility of observing SC gap mode in the Raman spectra of a SDW superconductor due to the coupling of the SC gap excitation to the Raman active phonons in the system via the electron-phonon (e-p) interaction. A theoretical model is used for the coexistent phase and electron-phonon interaction. Phonon Green's function is calculated by Zubarev's technique and the phonon self-energy due to e-p interaction which is given by electron density response function in the coexistent state corresponding to the SDW wave vector q = Q is evaluated. The results so obtained exhibit agreement with the experimental observations

  1. Raman spectroscopic studies on bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maquelin, Kees; Choo-Smith, Lin-P'ing; Endtz, Hubert P.; Bruining, Hajo A.; Puppels, Gerwin J.

    2000-11-01

    Routine clinical microbiological identification of pathogenic micro-organisms is largely based on nutritional and biochemical tests. Laboratory results can be presented to a clinician after 2 - 3 days for most clinically relevant micro- organisms. Most of this time is required to obtain pure cultures and enough biomass for the tests to be performed. In the case of severely ill patients, this unavoidable time delay associated with such identification procedures can be fatal. A novel identification method based on confocal Raman microspectroscopy will be presented. With this method it is possible to obtain Raman spectra directly from microbial microcolonies on the solid culture medium, which have developed after only 6 hours of culturing for most commonly encountered organisms. Not only does this technique enable rapid (same day) identifications, but also preserves the sample allowing it to be double-checked with traditional tests. This, combined with the speed and minimal sample handling indicate that confocal Raman microspectroscopy has much potential as a powerful new tool in clinical diagnostic microbiology.

  2. FT-IR Microspectroscopy of Rat Ear Cartilage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedicto de Campos Vidal

    Full Text Available Rat ear cartilage was studied using Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR microspectroscopy to expand the current knowledge which has been established for relatively more complex cartilage types. Comparison of the FT-IR spectra of the ear cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM with published data on articular cartilage, collagen II and 4-chondroitin-sulfate standards, as well as of collagen type I-containing dermal collagen bundles (CBs with collagen type II, was performed. Ear cartilage ECM glycosaminoglycans (GAGs were revealed histochemically and as a reduction in ECM FT-IR spectral band heights (1140-820 cm-1 after testicular hyaluronidase digestion. Although ear cartilage is less complex than articular cartilage, it contains ECM components with a macromolecular orientation as revealed using polarization microscopy. Collagen type II and GAGs, which play a structural role in the stereo-arrangement of the ear cartilage, contribute to its FT-IR spectrum. Similar to articular cartilage, ear cartilage showed that proteoglycans add a contribution to the collagen amide I spectral region, a finding that does not recommend this region for collagen type II quantification purposes. In contrast to articular cartilage, the symmetric stretching vibration of -SO3- groups at 1064 cm-1 appeared under-represented in the FT-IR spectral profile of ear cartilage. Because the band corresponding to the asymmetric stretching vibration of -SO3- groups (1236-1225 cm-1 overlapped with that of amide III bands, it is not recommended for evaluation of the -SO3- contribution to the FT-IR spectrum of the ear cartilage ECM. Instead, a peak (or shoulder at 1027-1016 cm-1 could be better considered for this intent. Amide I/amide II ratios as calculated here and data from the literature suggest that protein complexes of the ear cartilage ECM are arranged with a lower helical conformation compared to pure collagen II. The present results could motivate further studies on this tissue

  3. Difference Raman spectroscopy of DNA molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anokhin, Andrey S; Yuzyuk, Yury I; Gorelik, Vladimir S; Dovbeshko, Galina I; Pyatyshev, Alexander Yu

    2015-01-01

    In this paper the micro-Raman spectra of calf DNA for different points of DNA sample have been recorded. The Raman spectra were made with help of difference Raman spectroscopy technique. Raman spectra were recorded with high spatial resolution from different points of the wet and dry samples in different spectral range (100÷4000cm −1 ) using two lasers: argon (514.5 nm) and helium -neon (632.8 nm). The significant differences in the Raman spectra for dry and wet DNA and for different points of DNA molecules were observed. The obtained data on difference Raman scattering spectra of DNA molecules may be used for identification of DNA types and for analysis of genetic information associated with the molecular structure of this molecule

  4. Raman amplification in optical communication systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Rasmus

    2008-01-01

    Fiber Raman amplifiers are investigated with the purpose of identifying new applications and limitations for their use in optical communication systems. Three main topics are investigated, namely: New applications of dispersion compensating Raman amplifiers, the use Raman amplification to increase...... fiberbaserede Raman-forstærkere med henblik på at identificere både deres begrænsninger og nye anvendelsesmuligheder i optiske kommunikationssystemer. En numerisk forstærkermodel er blevet udviklet for bedre at forstå forstærkerens dynamik, dens gain- og støjbegrænsninger. Modellen bruges til at forudsige...... forstærkerens statiske og dynamiske egenskaber, og det eftervises at dens resultater er i god overensstemmelse med eksperimentelle forstærkermålinger. Dispersions-kompenserende fiber er på grund af sin store udbredelse og fiberens høje Raman gain effektivitet et meget velegnet Raman gain-medium. Tre nye...

  5. Raman technique application for rubber blends characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smitthipong, W.

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Raman spectroscopy has been employed in a number of studies to examine the morphological changes in a variety of materials. It is a non-destructive analysis method and an equally useful method for the investigation of material structure. Recently, Raman spectroscopy has been developed to employ as an imaging instrumentation. Sample surface scanning in X- and Y-axis and sample depth (Z-axis can be carried out by modifying the focus of the laser beam from the Raman microscope. Therefore, three-dimensional images can be thus built by using special software. The surface and bulk properties of immiscible rubber blend were investigated by Raman spectroscopy. The results obtained by Raman spectroscopy were in good agreement with those of Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM. The combination of Raman spectrometry and SEM clearly elucidates the identification of phases between the dispersed phase and the matrix (continuous phase of the immiscible rubber blends.

  6. Enhanced Raman scattering in porous silicon grating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiajia; Jia, Zhenhong; Lv, Changwu

    2018-03-19

    The enhancement of Raman signal on monocrystalline silicon gratings with varying groove depths and on porous silicon grating were studied for a highly sensitive surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) response. In the experiment conducted, porous silicon gratings were fabricated. Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) were then deposited on the porous silicon grating to enhance the Raman signal of the detective objects. Results show that the enhancement of Raman signal on silicon grating improved when groove depth increased. The enhanced performance of Raman signal on porous silicon grating was also further improved. The Rhodamine SERS response based on Ag NPs/ porous silicon grating substrates was enhanced relative to the SERS response on Ag NPs/ porous silicon substrates. Ag NPs / porous silicon grating SERS substrate system achieved a highly sensitive SERS response due to the coupling of various Raman enhancement factors.

  7. Synchrotron-based FTIR spectromicroscopy: Cytotoxicity and heating considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holman, Hoi-Ying N.; Martin, Michael C.; McKinney, Wayne R.

    2002-12-13

    Synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared (SR-FTIR) spectromicroscopy is a newly emerging bioanalytical and imaging tool. This unique technique provides mid-infrared (IR) spectra, hence chemical information, with high signal-to-noise at spatial resolutions as fine as 3 to 10 microns. Thus it enables researchers to locate, identify, and track specific chemical events within an individual living mammalian cell. Mid-IR photons are too low in energy (0.05 - 0.5 eV) to either break bonds or to cause ionization. In this review, we show that the synchrotron IR beam has no detectable effects on the short- and long-term viability, reproductive integrity, cell-cycle progression, and mitochondrial metabolism in living human cells, and produces only minimal sample heating (< 0.5 degrees C). These studies have established an important foundation for SR-FTIR spectromicroscopy in biological and biomedical research.

  8. Applications of FT-IR spectrophotometry in cancer diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunaciu, Andrei A; Hoang, Vu Dang; Aboul-Enein, Hassan Y

    2015-01-01

    This review provides a brief background to the application of infrared spectroscopy, including Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy, in biological fluids. It is not meant to be complete or exhaustive but to provide the reader with sufficient background for selected applications in cancer diagnostics. Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) is a fast and nondestructive analytical method. The infrared spectrum of a mixture serves as the basis to quantitate its constituents, and a number of common clinical chemistry tests have proven to be feasible using this approach. This review focuses on biomedical FT-IR applications, published in the period 2009-2013, used for early detection of cancer through qualitative and quantitative analysis.

  9. Effect of jitter on an imaging FTIR spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, C. L., LLNL

    1997-04-01

    Line of sight (LOS) jitter produces temporal modulations of the signals which are detected in the focal plane of a temporally modulated imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer. A theoretical treatment of LOS jitter effects is given, and is compared with the results of measurements with LIFTIRS1 (the Livermore Imaging Fourier Transform InfraRed Spectrometer). The identification, isolation, quantification and removal of jitter artifacts in hyperspectral imaging data by means of principal components analysis is discussed. The theoretical distribution of eigenvalues expected from principal components analysis is used to determine the level of significance of spatially coherent instrumental artifacts in general, including jitter as a representative example. It is concluded that an imaging FTIR spectrometer is much less seriously impacted by a given LOS jitter level than a non imaging FTIR spectrometer.

  10. Synchrotron-based FTIR spectromicroscopy Cytotoxicity and heating considerations

    CERN Document Server

    Holman, H Y N; McKinney, W R

    2002-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared (SR-FTIR) spectromicroscopy is a newly emerging bioanalytical and imaging tool. This unique technique provides mid-infrared (IR) spectra, hence chemical information, with high signal-to-noise at spatial resolutions as fine as 3 to 10 microns. Thus it enables researchers to locate, identify, and track specific chemical events within an individual living mammalian cell. Mid-IR photons are too low in energy (0.05 - 0.5 eV) to either break bonds or to cause ionization. In this review, we show that the synchrotron IR beam has no detectable effects on the short- and long-term viability, reproductive integrity, cell-cycle progression, and mitochondrial metabolism in living human cells, and produces only minimal sample heating (< 0.5 degrees C). These studies have established an important foundation for SR-FTIR spectromicroscopy in biological and biomedical research.

  11. FT-IR spectroscopy of lipoproteins—A comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krilov, Dubravka; Balarin, Maja; Kosović, Marin; Gamulin, Ozren; Brnjas-Kraljević, Jasminka

    2009-08-01

    FT-IR spectra, in the frequency region 4000-600 cm -1, of four major lipoprotein classes: very low density lipoprotein (VLDL), low density lipoprotein (LDL) and two subclasses of high density lipoproteins (HDL 2 and HDL 3) were analyzed to obtain their detailed spectral characterization. Information about the protein domain of particle was obtained from the analysis of amide I band. The procedure of decomposition and curve fitting of this band confirms the data already known about the secondary structure of two different apolipoproteins: apo A-I in HDL 2 and HDL 3 and apo B-100 in LDL and VLDL. For information about the lipid composition and packing of the particular lipoprotein the well expressed lipid bands in the spectra were analyzed. Characterization of spectral details in the FT-IR spectrum of natural lipoprotein is necessary to study the influence of external compounds on its structure.

  12. Raman Spectroscopy with simple optic components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendoza, Mario; Cunya, Eduardo; Olivera, Paula

    2014-01-01

    Raman Spectroscopy is .a high resolution photonics technique that provides chemical and structural information of almost any material, organic or inorganic compound. In this report we describe the implementation of a system based on the principle of Raman scattering, developed to analyze solid samples. The spectrometer integrates an optical bench coupled to an optical fiber and a green laser source of 532 nm. The spectrometer was tested obtaining the Naphthalene and the Yellow 74 Pigment Raman patterns. (authors).

  13. Laser Spark Formamide Decomposition Studied by FT-IR Spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ferus, Martin; Kubelík, Petr; Civiš, Svatopluk

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 115, č. 44 (2011), s. 12132-12141 ISSN 1089-5639 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400400705; GA AV ČR IAAX00100903; GA ČR GAP208/10/2302 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : FT-IR spectroscopy * high-power laser * induced dielectric-breakdown Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.946, year: 2011

  14. Reduction of Raman scattering and fluorescence from anvils in high pressure Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dierker, S. B.; Aronson, M. C.

    2018-05-01

    We describe a new design and use of a high pressure anvil cell that significantly reduces the Raman scattering and fluorescence from the anvils in high pressure Raman scattering experiments. The approach is particularly useful in Raman scattering studies of opaque, weakly scattering samples. The effectiveness of the technique is illustrated with measurements of two-magnon Raman scattering in La2CuO4.

  15. FTIR- Microspectroscopy as diagnostic method for cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitaly Erukhimovitch, Vitaly; Mukmenev, Igor; Huleihel, Mahmoud

    2010-01-01

    In the present study we have compared the spectral behavior of malignant cells with normal un transformed cells using microscopic Fourier-Transform Infrared (FTIR-M) spectroscopy in order to evaluate the potential of this technique for early detection of cancer cells. Cells were transformed by infection with murine sarcoma virus (MuSV) and examined at various times post infection (p. i) by FTIR M. Our results showed significant and consistent differences between the normal cells and malignant cells. A considerable decrease in carbohydrates and phosphates levels was seen in malignant cells compared to the normal cells. In addition, the peak attributed to the PO2- symmetric stretching mode at 1082 cm-1 in normal cells was shifted significantly to 1087 cm-1 in malignant cells. These spectral changes in addition to others were seen already about 24 h p.i., while no morphological changes were observed at this time by optical microscope. These results in addition to further differences in the shapes of various bands may indicate for promising potential of FTIR microscopy technique for detection of malignant cells at early stages of malignant transformation.(Author)

  16. Air Contamination Quantification by FTIR with Gas Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freischlag, Jason

    2017-01-01

    Air quality is of utmost importance in environmental studies and has many industrial applications such as aviators grade breathing oxygen (ABO) for pilots and breathing air for fire fighters. Contamination is a major concern for these industries as identified in MIL-PRF-27210, CGA G-4.3, CGA G-7.1, and NFPA 1989. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) is a powerful tool that when combined with a gas cell has tremendous potential for gas contamination analysis. Current procedures focus mostly on GC-MS for contamination quantification. Introduction of this topic will be done through a comparison of the currently used deterministic methods for gas contamination with those of FTIR gas analysis. Certification of the mentioned standards through the ISOIEC 17065 certifying body A2LA will be addressed followed by an evaluation of quality information such as the determinations of linearity and the limits of detection and quantitation. Major interferences and issues arising from the use of the FTIR for accredited work with ABO and breathing air will be covered.

  17. Characterization and identification of microorganisms by FT-IR microspectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo-Thi, N. A.; Kirschner, C.; Naumann, D.

    2003-12-01

    We report on a novel FT-IR approach for microbial characterization/identification based on a light microscope coupled to an infrared spectrometer which offers the possibility to acquire IR-spectra of microcolonies containing only few hundred cells. Microcolony samples suitable for FT-IR microspectroscopic measurements were obtained by a replica technique with a stamping device that transfers spatially accurate cells of microcolonies growing on solid culture plates to a special, IR-transparent or reflecting stamping plate. High quality spectra could be recorded either by applying the transmission/absorbance or the reflectance/absorbance mode of the infrared microscope. Signal to noise ratios higher than 1000 were obtained for microcolonies as small as 40 μm in diameter. Reproducibility levels were established that allowed species and strain identification. The differentiation and classification capacity of the FT-IR microscopic technique was tested for different selected microorganisms. Cluster and factor analysis methods were used to evaluate the complex spectral data. Excellent discrimination between bacteria and yeasts, and at the same time Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial strains was obtained. Twenty-two selected strains of different species within the genus Staphylococcus were repetitively measured and could be grouped into correct species cluster. Moreover, the results indicated that the method allows also identifications at the subspecies level. Additionally, the new approach allowed spectral mapping analysis of single colonies which provided spatially resolved characterization of growth heterogeneity within complex microbial populations such as colonies.

  18. Application of FTIR spectroscopy to the characterization of archeological wood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traoré, Mohamed; Kaal, Joeri; Martínez Cortizas, Antonio

    2016-01-15

    Two archeological wood samples were studied by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (FTIR-ATR) spectroscopy. They originate from a shipwreck in Ribadeo Bay in the northwest of Spain and from a beam wood of an old nave of the Cathedral of Segovia in the central Spain. Principal component analysis was applied to the transposed data matrix (samples as columns and spectral bands as rows) of 43 recorded spectra (18 in the shipwreck and 25 in the beam wood). The results showed differences between the two samples, with a larger proportion of carbohydrates and smaller proportion of lignin in the beam than in the shipwreck wood. Within the beam wood, lignin content was significantly lower in the recent than the old tree rings (P=0.005). These variations can be attributed to species differences between the two woods (oak and pine respectively), with a mixture of guaiacyl and syringyl in hardwood lignin, whereas softwood lignin consists almost exclusively of guaiacyl moieties. The influence of environmental conditions on the FTIR fingerprint was probably reflected by enhanced oxidation of lignin in aerated conditions (beam wood) and hydrolysis of carbohydrates in submerged-anoxic conditions (shipwreck wood). Molecular characterization by analytical pyrolysis of selected samples from each wood type confirmed the interpretation of the mechanisms behind the variability in wood composition obtained by the FTIR-ATR. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. What Good is Raman Water Vapor Lidar?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitman, David

    2011-01-01

    Raman lidar has been used to quantify water vapor in the atmosphere for various scientific studies including mesoscale meteorology and satellite validation. Now the international networks of NDACC and GRUAN have interest in using Raman water vapor lidar for detecting trends in atmospheric water vapor concentrations. What are the data needs for addressing these very different measurement challenges. We will review briefly the scientific needs for water vapor accuracy for each of these three applications and attempt to translate that into performance specifications for Raman lidar in an effort to address the question in the title of "What good is Raman water vapor Iidar."

  20. Raman Spectroscopy and its Application in Nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Shu-Lin

    2012-01-01

    Raman Spectroscopy and its Application in Nanostructures is an original and timely contribution to a very active area of physics and materials science research. This book presents the theoretical and experimental phenomena of Raman spectroscopy, with specialized discussions on the physical fundamentals, new developments and main features in low-dimensional systems of Raman spectroscopy. In recent years physicists, materials scientists and chemists have devoted increasing attention to low-dimensional systems and as Raman spectroscopy can be used to study and analyse such materials as carbon nan

  1. Raman microspectroscopy, surface-enhanced Raman scattering microspectroscopy, and stable-isotope Raman microspectroscopy for biofilm characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivleva, Natalia P; Kubryk, Patrick; Niessner, Reinhard

    2017-07-01

    Biofilms represent the predominant form of microbial life on our planet. These aggregates of microorganisms, which are embedded in a matrix formed by extracellular polymeric substances, may colonize nearly all interfaces. Detailed knowledge of microorganisms enclosed in biofilms as well as of the chemical composition, structure, and functions of the complex biofilm matrix and their changes at different stages of the biofilm formation and under various physical and chemical conditions is relevant in different fields. Important research topics include the development and improvement of antibiotics and medical devices and the optimization of biocides, antifouling strategies, and biological wastewater treatment. Raman microspectroscopy is a capable and nondestructive tool that can provide detailed two-dimensional and three-dimensional chemical information about biofilm constituents with the spatial resolution of an optical microscope and without interference from water. However, the sensitivity of Raman microspectroscopy is rather limited, which hampers the applicability of Raman microspectroscopy especially at low biomass concentrations. Fortunately, the resonance Raman effect as well as surface-enhanced Raman scattering can help to overcome this drawback. Furthermore, the combination of Raman microspectroscopy with other microscopic techniques, mass spectrometry techniques, or particularly with stable-isotope techniques can provide comprehensive information on monospecies and multispecies biofilms. Here, an overview of different Raman microspectroscopic techniques, including resonance Raman microspectroscopy and surface-enhanced Raman scattering microspectroscopy, for in situ detection, visualization, identification, and chemical characterization of biofilms is given, and the main feasibilities and limitations of these techniques in biofilm research are presented. Future possibilities of and challenges for Raman microspectroscopy alone and in combination with other

  2. Thyroid lesions diagnosis by Fourier transformed infrared absorption spectroscopy (FTIR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albero, Felipe Guimaraes

    2009-01-01

    Thyroid nodules are a common disorder, with 4-7% of incidence in the Brazilian population. Although the fine needle aspiration (FNA) is an accurate method for thyroid tumors diagnosis, the discrimination between benign and malignant neoplasm is currently not possible in some cases with high incidence of false negative diagnosis, leading to a surgical intervention due to the risk of carcinomas. The aim of this study was to verify if the Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) can contribute to the diagnosis of thyroid carcinomas and goiters, using samples of tissue and aspirates. Samples of FNA, homogenates and tissues of thyroid nodules with histopathological diagnosis were obtained and prepared for FTIR spectroscopy analysis. The FNA and homogenates samples were measured by μ-FTIR (between 950 . 1750 cm -1 ), at a nominal resolution of 4 cm -1 and 120 scans). Tissue samples were analyzed directly by ATR-FTIR technique, at a resolution 2 cm -1 , with 60 scans in the same region. All spectra were corrected by the baseline and normalized by amides area (1550-1640 cm -1 ) in order to minimize variations of sample homogeneity. Then, spectra were converted into second derivatives using the Savitzk-Golay algorithm with a 13 points window. The Ward's minimum variance algorithm and Euclidean distances among the points were used for cluster analysis. Some FNA samples showed complex spectral pattern. All samples showed some cell pellets and large amount of hormone, represented by the bands of 1545 and 1655 cm -1 . Bands in 1409, 1412, 1414, 1578 and 1579 cm -1 were also found, indicating possible presence of sugar, DNA, citric acid or metabolic products. In this study, it was obtained an excellent separation between goiter and malign lesion for the samples of tissues, with 100% of specificity in specific cluster and 67% sensibility and 50 of specificity. In homogenate and FNA samples this sensibility and specificity were lower, because among these samples, it were

  3. Raman spectra studies of dipeptides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchard, Simone.

    1977-10-01

    This work deals with the homogenous and heterogeneous dipeptides derived from alanine and glycine, in the solid state or in aqueous solutions, in the zwitterions or chlorhydrates form. The Raman spectra comparative study of these various forms of hydrogenated or deuterated compounds allows to specify some of the attributions which are necessary in the conformational study of the like tripeptides. These compounds contain only one peptidic group; therefore there is no possibility of intramolecular hydrogen bond which caracterise vibrations of non bonded peptidic groups and end groups. Infrared spectra of solid dipeptides will be presented and discussed in the near future [fr

  4. Development of Femtosecond Stimulated Raman Spectroscopy: Stimulated Raman Gain via Elimination of Cross Phase Modulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Seung Min; Lee, Young Jong; Yu, Jong Wan; Kim, Seong Keun

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a new femtosecond probe technique by using stimulated Raman spectroscopy. The cross phase modulation in femtosecond time scale associated with off-resonant interaction was shown to be eliminated by integrating the transient gain/loss signal over the time delay between the Raman pump pulse and the continuum pulse. The stimulated Raman gain of neat cyclohexane was obtained to demonstrate the feasibility of the technique. Spectral and temporal widths of stimulated Raman spectra were controlled by using a narrow band pass filter. Femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy was proposed as a highly useful probe in time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy

  5. Fourier Transform Infrared and Resonance Raman Spectroscopic Studies of Bacteriorhodopsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earnest, Thomas Nixon

    Fourier transform infrared and resonance Raman spectroscopy were used to investigate the structure and function of the light-activated, transmembrane proton pump, bacteriorhodopsin, from the purple membrane of Halobacterium halobium. Bacteriorhodopsin (bR) is a 27,000 dalton integral membrane protein consisting of 248 amino acids with a retinylidene chromophore. Absorption of a photon leads to the translocation of one or two protons from the inside of the cell to the outside. Resonance Raman spectroscopy allows for the study of the configuration of retinal in bR and its photointermediates by the selective enhancement of vibrational modes of the chromophore. This technique was used to determine that the chromophore is attached to lysine-216 in both the bR _{570} and the M _{412} intermediates. In bR with tyrosine-64 selectively nitrated or aminated, the chromophore appears to have the same configuration in that bR _{570} (all- trans) and M _{412} (13- cis) states as it does in unmodified bR. Polarized Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) permits the study of the direction of transition dipole moments arising from molecular vibrations of the protein and the retinal chromophore. The orientation of alpha helical and beta sheet components was determined for bR with the average helical tilt found to lie mostly parallel to the membrane normal. The beta sheet structures also exhibit an IR linear dichroism for the amide I and amide II bands which suggest that the peptide backbone is mostly perpendicular to the membrane plane although it is difficult to determine whether the bands originate from sheet or turn components. The orientation of secondary structure components of the C-1 (residues 72-248) and C-2 (residues 1-71) fragments were also investigated to determine the structure of these putative membrane protein folding intermediates. Polarized, low temperature FTIR -difference spectroscopy was then used to investigate the structure of bR as it undergoes

  6. Infrared and Raman spectroscopy: principles and spectral interpretation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Larkin, Peter

    2011-01-01

    "Infrared and Raman Spectroscopy: Principles and Spectral Interpretation explains the background, core principles and tests the readers understanding of the important techniques of Infrared and Raman Spectroscopy...

  7. Raman and infrared spectroscopy of carbohydrates: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiercigroch, Ewelina; Szafraniec, Ewelina; Czamara, Krzysztof; Pacia, Marta Z.; Majzner, Katarzyna; Kochan, Kamila; Kaczor, Agnieszka; Baranska, Malgorzata; Malek, Kamilla

    2017-10-01

    Carbohydrates are widespread and naturally occurring compounds, and essential constituents for living organisms. They are quite often reported when biological systems are studied and their role is discussed. However surprisingly, up till now there is no database collecting vibrational spectra of carbohydrates and their assignment, as has been done already for other biomolecules. So, this paper serves as a comprehensive review, where for selected 14 carbohydrates in the solid state both FT-Raman and ATR FT-IR spectra were collected and assigned. Carbohydrates can be divided into four chemical groups and in the same way is organized this review. First, the smallest molecules are discussed, i.e. monosaccharides (D-(-)-ribose, 2-deoxy-D-ribose, L-(-)-arabinose, D-(+)-xylose, D-(+)-glucose, D-(+)-galactose and D-(-)-fructose) and disaccharides (D-(+)-sucrose, D-(+)-maltose and D-(+)-lactose), and then more complex ones, i.e. trisaccharides (D-(+)-raffinose) and polysaccharides (amylopectin, amylose, glycogen). Both Raman and IR spectra were collected in the whole spectral range and discussed looking at the specific regions, i.e. region V (3600-3050 cm- 1), IV (3050-2800 cm- 1) and II (1200-800 cm- 1) assigned to the stretching vibrations of the OH, CH/CH2 and C-O/C-C groups, respectively, and region III (1500-1200 cm- 1) and I (800-100 cm- 1) dominated by deformational modes of the CH/CH2 and CCO groups, respectively. In spite of the fact that vibrational spectra of saccharides are significantly less specific than spectra of other biomolecules (e.g. lipids or proteins), marker bands of the studied molecules can be identified and correlated with their structure.

  8. Analysis of ancient pigments by Raman microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuo Jian; Xu Cunyi

    1999-01-01

    Raman microscopy can be applied for the spatial resolution, and non-destructive in situ analysis of inorganic pigments in pottery, manuscripts and paintings. Compared with other techniques, it is the best single technique for this purpose. An overview is presented of the applications of Raman microscopy in the analysis of ancient pigments

  9. RAMAN-SPECTRA OF HUMAN DENTAL CALCULUS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    TSUDA, H; ARENDS, J

    1993-01-01

    Raman spectra of human dental calculus have been observed for the first time by use of micro-Raman spectroscopy. The spectral features of calculus were influenced easily by heating caused by laser irradiation. Therefore, the measurements were carried out at relatively low power (5 mW, 1-mu m spot

  10. Self-pulsation in Raman fiber amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Martin Erland Vestergaard; Ott, Johan Raunkjær; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2009-01-01

    Dynamic behavior caused by Brillouin scattering in Raman fiber amplifiers is studied. Modes of self-pulsation steady state oscillations are found. Their dependence on amplification scheme is demonstrated.......Dynamic behavior caused by Brillouin scattering in Raman fiber amplifiers is studied. Modes of self-pulsation steady state oscillations are found. Their dependence on amplification scheme is demonstrated....

  11. Raman Spectroscopic Studies of Methane Gas Hydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Susanne Brunsgaard; Berg, Rolf W.

    2009-01-01

    A brief review of the Raman spectroscopic studies of methane gas hydrates is given, supported by some new measurements done in our laboratory.......A brief review of the Raman spectroscopic studies of methane gas hydrates is given, supported by some new measurements done in our laboratory....

  12. Characterization of Materials by Raman Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozielski, M.

    2007-03-01

    The paper reports on the use of phonon spectra obtained with the Raman spectroscopy for characterization of different materials. The Raman scattering spectra obtained for zinc selenide crystals, mixed crystals zinc selenide admixtured with magnesium or beryllium, oxide crystals including strontium lanthanum gallate, molecular crystals of triammonium hydrogen diseleniate and a homologous series of polyoxyethylene glycols are analysed.

  13. INFRARED AND RAMAN SPECTROSCOPIC STUDY OF ION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Infrared and Raman spectroscopy techniques have been used to study the ionic interactions of strontium(II) and barium(II) with thiocyanate ion in liquid ammonia. A number of bands were observed in both n (CN) and n (CS) regions of infrared and Raman spectra and these were assigned to 1:1 contact ion pair, ...

  14. Applications of Raman spectroscopy in life science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Airton A.; T. Soto, Cláudio A.; Ali, Syed M.; Neto, Lázaro P. M.; Canevari, Renata A.; Pereira, Liliane; Fávero, Priscila P.

    2015-06-01

    Raman spectroscopy has been applied to the analysis of biological samples for the last 12 years providing detection of changes occurring at the molecular level during the pathological transformation of the tissue. The potential use of this technology in cancer diagnosis has shown encouraging results for the in vivo, real-time and minimally invasive diagnosis. Confocal Raman technics has also been successfully applied in the analysis of skin aging process providing new insights in this field. In this paper it is presented the latest biomedical applications of Raman spectroscopy in our laboratory. It is shown that Raman spectroscopy (RS) has been used for biochemical and molecular characterization of thyroid tissue by micro-Raman spectroscopy and gene expression analysis. This study aimed to improve the discrimination between different thyroid pathologies by Raman analysis. A total of 35 thyroid tissues samples including normal tissue (n=10), goiter (n=10), papillary (n=10) and follicular carcinomas (n=5) were analyzed. The confocal Raman spectroscopy allowed a maximum discrimination of 91.1% between normal and tumor tissues, 84.8% between benign and malignant pathologies and 84.6% among carcinomas analyzed. It will be also report the application of in vivo confocal Raman spectroscopy as an important sensor for detecting advanced glycation products (AGEs) on human skin.

  15. Confocal Raman Microscopy; applications in tissue engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Apeldoorn, Aart A.

    2005-01-01

    This dissertation describes the use of confocal Raman microscopy and spectroscopy in the field of tissue engineering. Moreover, it describes the combination of two already existing technologies, namely scanning electron microscopy and confocal Raman spectroscopy in one apparatus for the enhancement

  16. Raman spectra of human dentin mineral

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsuda, H; Ruben, J; Arends, J

    Human dentin mineral has been investigated by using micro-Raman spectroscopy. Fluorescence and thermal problems were largely avoided by preparing dentin samples by grinding and ultrasonic agitation in acetone. The Raman spectral features were consistent with those of impure hydroxyapatite containing

  17. Development of a Raman spectrometer to study surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biswas, Nandita; Chadha, Ridhima; Kapoor, Sudhir; Sarkar, Sisir K.; Mukherjee, Tulsi

    2011-02-01

    Raman spectroscopy is an important tool, which provides enormous information on the vibrational and structural details of materials. This understanding is not only interesting due to its fundamental importance, but also of considerable importance in optoelectronics and device applications of these materials in nanotechnology. In this report, we begin with a brief introduction on the Raman effect and various Raman scattering techniques, followed by a detailed discussion on the development of an instrument with home-built collection optics attachment. This Raman system consists of a pulsed laser excitation source, a sample compartment, collection optics to collect the scattered light, a notch filter to reject the intense laser light, a monochromator to disperse the scattered light and a detector to detect the Raman signal. After calibrating the Raman spectrometer with standard solvents, we present our results on Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) investigations on three different kinds of chemical systems. (author)

  18. High Fidelity Raman Chemical Imaging of Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobba, Venkata Nagamalli Koteswara Rao

    The development of high fidelity Raman imaging systems is important for a number of application areas including material science, bio-imaging, bioscience and healthcare, pharmaceutical analysis, and semiconductor characterization. The use of Raman imaging as a characterization tool for detecting the amorphous and crystalline regions in the biopolymer poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) is the precis of my thesis. In the first chapter, a brief insight about the basics of Raman spectroscopy, Raman chemical imaging, Raman mapping, and Raman imaging techniques has been provided. The second chapter contains details about the successful development of tailored sample of PLLA. Biodegradable polymers are used in areas of tissue engineering, agriculture, packaging, and in medical field for drug delivery, implant devices, and surgical sutures. Detailed information about the sample preparation and characterization of these cold-drawn PLLA polymer substrates has been provided. Wide-field Raman hyperspectral imaging using an acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) was demonstrated in the early 1990s. The AOTF contributed challenges such as image walk, distortion, and image blur. A wide-field AOTF Raman imaging system has been developed as part of my research and methods to overcome some of the challenges in performing AOTF wide-field Raman imaging are discussed in the third chapter. This imaging system has been used for studying the crystalline and amorphous regions on the cold-drawn sample of PLLA. Of all the different modalities that are available for performing Raman imaging, Raman point-mapping is the most extensively used method. The ease of obtaining the Raman hyperspectral cube dataset with a high spectral and spatial resolution is the main motive of performing this technique. As a part of my research, I have constructed a Raman point-mapping system and used it for obtaining Raman hyperspectral image data of various minerals, pharmaceuticals, and polymers. Chapter four offers

  19. Relaxation oscillations in stimulated Raman scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kachen, G.I.; Lowdermilk, W.H.

    1977-01-01

    Light pulses created by stimulated Raman scattering having been found to exhibit a complex time dependence which resembles relaxation oscillations. A focused laser pulse generated both forward and backward Raman emissions which appeared as a series of pulses with durations much shorter than the incident laser pulse. Time dependence of the Raman emission was observed directly by use of a streak camera. The number of observed pulses increased with the intensity of the incident pulse, while separation of the pulses in time depended on the length of the focal region. Beam focusing was incorporated in the coupled wave equations for stimulated Raman scattering. These rate equations were then solved numerically, and the results are in good qualitative agreement with the experimental observations. The short Raman pulses are created by a process associated with depletion of the incident laser pulse. This process occurs under a broad range of conditions

  20. Raman spectra of filled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bose, S.M.; Behera, S.N.; Sarangi, S.N.; Entel, P.

    2004-01-01

    The Raman spectra of a metallic carbon nanotube filled with atoms or molecules have been investigated theoretically. It is found that there will be a three way splitting of the main Raman lines due to the interaction of the nanotube phonon with the collective excitations (plasmons) of the conduction electrons of the nanotube as well as its coupling with the phonon of the filling material. The positions and relative strengths of these Raman peaks depend on the strength of the electron-phonon interaction, phonon frequency of the filling atom and the strength of interaction of the nanotube phonon and the phonon of the filling atoms. Careful experimental studies of the Raman spectra of filled nanotubes should show these three peaks. It is also shown that in a semiconducting nanotube the Raman line will split into two and should be observed experimentally

  1. Surface enhanced raman spectroscopy on chip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hübner, Jörg; Anhøj, Thomas Aarøe; Zauner, Dan

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we report low resolution surface enhanced Raman spectra (SERS) conducted with a chip based spectrometer. The flat field spectrometer presented here is fabricated in SU-8 on silicon, showing a resolution of around 3 nm and a free spectral range of around 100 nm. The output facet...... is projected onto a CCD element and visualized by a computer. To enhance the otherwise rather weak Raman signal, a nanosurface is prepared and a sample solutions is impregnated on this surface. The surface enhanced Raman signal is picked up using a Raman probe and coupled into the spectrometer via an optical...... fiber. The obtained spectra show that chip based spectrometer together with the SERS active surface can be used as Raman sensor....

  2. Ultrafast surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Emily L; Brandt, Nathaniel C; Cassabaum, Alyssa A; Frontiera, Renee R

    2015-08-07

    Ultrafast surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) with pico- and femtosecond time resolution has the ability to elucidate the mechanisms by which plasmons mediate chemical reactions. Here we review three important technological advances in these new methodologies, and discuss their prospects for applications in areas including plasmon-induced chemistry and sensing at very low limits of detection. Surface enhancement, arising from plasmonic materials, has been successfully incorporated with stimulated Raman techniques such as femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS) and coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS). These techniques are capable of time-resolved measurement on the femtosecond and picosecond time scale and can be used to follow the dynamics of molecules reacting near plasmonic surfaces. We discuss the potential application of ultrafast SERS techniques to probe plasmon-mediated processes, such as H2 dissociation and solar steam production. Additionally, we discuss the possibilities for high sensitivity SERS sensing using these stimulated Raman spectroscopies.

  3. Implementation of Deep Ultraviolet Raman Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Chuan

    of the aromatics, Toluene and Naphthalene, in the gasoline. Chapter 6 shows examples of other applications of DUV Raman spectroscopy, for instance for the illegal red food additive: Sudan I. For this dye Raman spectra - useful to indicate an unwanted presence - could not be obtained with green or blue laser line...... Raman spectrometry was further applied to detect another illegal food additive, Melamine, in milk sample. It was shown that the DUV constitutes a more sensitive measurement method than traditional Raman spectrometry and realizes a direct detection in liquid milk. In another research field regarding...... spectra of the gasoline samples. It is virtually unimportant what the rest of the sample consisted of. The most intense characteristic band is located at 1381 cm-1. The Raman spectra of home-made artificial gasoline mixtures - with gradually increasing Naphthalene contents - can be used to determine...

  4. Raman scattering of Cisplatin near silver nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirsaleh-Kohan, Nasrin; Duplanty, Michael; Torres, Marjorie; Moazzezi, Mojtaba; Rostovtsev, Yuri V.

    2018-03-01

    The Raman scattering of Cisplatin (the first generation of anticancer drugs) has been studied. In the presence of silver nanoparticles, strong modifications of Raman spectra have been observed. The Raman frequencies have been shifted and the line profiles are broadened. We develop a theoretical model to explain the observed features of the Raman scattering. The model takes into account self-consistently the interaction of molecules with surface plasmonic waves excited in the silver nanoparticles, and it provides a qualitative agreement with the observed Raman spectra. We have demonstrated that the using silver nanoparticles can increase sensitivity of the technique, and potentially it has a broader range of applications to both spectroscopy and microscopy.

  5. Pulse compression by Raman induced cavity dumping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Rougemont, F.; Xian, D.K.; Frey, R.; Pradere, F.

    1985-01-01

    High efficiency pulse compression using Raman induced cavity dumping has been studied theoretically and experimentally. Through stimulated Raman scattering the electromagnetic energy at a primary frequency is down-converted and extracted from a storage cavity containing the Raman medium. Energy storage may be achieved either at the laser frequency by using a laser medium inside the storage cavity, or performed at a new frequency obtained through an intracavity nonlinear process. The storage cavity may be dumped passively through stimulated Raman scattering either in an oscillator or in an amplifier. All these cases have been studied by using a ruby laser as the pump source and compressed hydrogen as the Raman scatter. Results differ slightly accordingly to the technique used, but pulse shortenings higher than 10 and quantum efficiencies higher than 80% were obtained. This method could also be used with large power lasers of any wavelength from the ultraviolet to the farinfrared spectral region

  6. Applications of Raman spectroscopy to gemology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bersani, Danilo; Lottici, Pier Paolo

    2010-08-01

    Being nondestructive and requiring short measurement times, a low amount of material, and no sample preparation, Raman spectroscopy is used for routine investigation in the study of gemstone inclusions and treatments and for the characterization of mounted gems. In this work, a review of the use of laboratory Raman and micro-Raman spectrometers and of portable Raman systems in the gemology field is given, focusing on gem identification and on the evaluation of the composition, provenance, and genesis of gems. Many examples are shown of the use of Raman spectroscopy as a tool for the identification of imitations, synthetic gems, and enhancement treatments in natural gemstones. Some recent developments are described, with particular attention being given to the semiprecious stone jade and to two important organic materials used in jewelry, i.e., pearls and corals.

  7. Raman spectroscopy in pharmaceutical product design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paudel, Amrit; Raijada, Dhara; Rantanen, Jukka

    2015-01-01

    Almost 100 years after the discovery of the Raman scattering phenomenon, related analytical techniques have emerged as important tools in biomedical sciences. Raman spectroscopy and microscopy are frontier, non-invasive analytical techniques amenable for diverse biomedical areas, ranging from...... molecular-based drug discovery, design of innovative drug delivery systems and quality control of finished products. This review presents concise accounts of various conventional and emerging Raman instrumentations including associated hyphenated tools of pharmaceutical interest. Moreover, relevant...... application cases of Raman spectroscopy in early and late phase pharmaceutical development, process analysis and micro-structural analysis of drug delivery systems are introduced. Finally, potential areas of future advancement and application of Raman spectroscopic techniques are discussed....

  8. Differentiation of Leishmania species by FT-IR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, Josafá C.; Mittmann, Josane; Ferreira, Isabelle; Ferreira-Strixino, Juliana; Raniero, Leandro

    2015-05-01

    Leishmaniasis is a parasitic infectious disease caused by protozoa that belong to the genus Leishmania. It is transmitted by the bite of an infected female Sand fly. The disease is endemic in 88 countries Desjeux (2001) [1] (16 developed countries and 72 developing countries) on four continents. In Brazil, epidemiological data show the disease is present in all Brazilian regions, with the highest incidences in the North and Northeast. There are several methods used to diagnose leishmaniasis, but these procedures have many limitations, are time consuming, have low sensitivity, and are expensive. In this context, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) analysis has the potential to provide rapid results and may be adapted for a clinical test with high sensitivity and specificity. In this work, FT-IR was used as a tool to investigate the promastigotes of Leishmaniaamazonensis, Leishmaniachagasi, and Leishmaniamajor species. The spectra were analyzed by cluster analysis and deconvolution procedure base on spectra second derivatives. Results: cluster analysis found four specific regions that are able to identify the Leishmania species. The dendrogram representation clearly indicates the heterogeneity among Leishmania species. The band deconvolution done by the curve fitting in these regions quantitatively differentiated the polysaccharides, amide III, phospholipids, proteins, and nucleic acids. L. chagasi and L. major showed a greater biochemistry similarity and have three bands that were not registered in L. amazonensis. The L. amazonensis presented three specific bands that were not recorded in the other two species. It is evident that the FT-IR method is an indispensable tool to discriminate these parasites. The high sensitivity and specificity of this technique opens up the possibilities for further studies about characterization of other microorganisms.

  9. Preliminary Discrimination of Cheese Adulteration by FT-IR Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucian Cuibus

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The present work describes a preliminary study to compare some traditional Romanian cheeses and adulterated cheeses using Attenuated Total Reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR. For PLS model calibration (6 concentration levels and validation (5 concentration levels sets were prepared from commercial Dalia Cheese from different manufacturers by spiking it with palm oil at concentrations ranging 2-50 % and 5-40 %, respectively. Fifteen Dalia Cheese were evaluated as external set. The spectra of each sample, after homogenization, were acquired in triplicate using a FTIR Shimatsu Prestige 21 Spectrophotometer, with a horizontal diamond ATR accessory in the MIR region 4000-600 cm-1. Statistical methods as PLS were applied using MVC1 routines written for Matlab R2010a. As first step the optimal condition for PLS model were obtained using cross-validation on the Calibration set. Spectral region in 3873-652 cm-1, and 3 PLS-factors were stated as the best conditions and showed an R2 value of 0.9338 and a relative error in the calibration of 17.2%. Then validation set was evaluated, obtaining good recovery rates (108% and acceptable dispersion of the data (20%. The curve of actual vs. predicted values shows slope near to 1 and origin close to 0, with an R2 of 0.9695. When the external sample set was evaluated, samples F19, F21, F22 and F24, showed detectable levels of palm fats. The results proved that FTIR-PLS is a reliable non-destructive technique for a rapid quantification the level of adulteration in cheese.  The spectroscopic methods could assist the quality control authority, traders and the producers to discriminate the adulterated cheeses with palm oil.

  10. Optimizing laser crater enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lednev, V N; Sdvizhenskii, P A; Grishin, M Ya; Filichkina, V A; Shchegolikhin, A N; Pershin, S M

    2018-03-20

    Raman signal enhancement by laser crater production was systematically studied for 785 nm continuous wave laser pumping. Laser craters were produced in L-aspartic acid powder by a nanosecond pulsed solid state neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser (532 nm, 8 ns, 1 mJ/pulse), while Raman spectra were then acquired by using a commercial spectrometer with 785 nm laser beam pumping. The Raman signal enhancement effect was studied in terms of the number of ablating pulses used, the lens-to-sample distance, and the crater-center-laser-spot offset. The influence of the experiment parameters on Raman signal enhancement was studied for different powder materials. Maximum Raman signal enhancement reached 11 fold for loose powders but decreased twice for pressed tablets. Raman signal enhancement was demonstrated for several diverse powder materials like gypsum or ammonium nitrate with better results achieved for the samples tending to give narrow and deep craters upon the laser ablation stage. Alternative ways of cavity production (steel needle tapping and hole drilling) were compared with the laser cratering technique in terms of Raman signal enhancement. Drilling was found to give the poorest enhancement of the Raman signal, while both laser ablation and steel needle tapping provided comparable results. Here, we have demonstrated for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, that a Raman signal can be enhanced 10 fold with the aid of simple cavity production by steel needle tapping in rough highly reflective materials. Though laser crater enhancement Raman spectroscopy requires an additional pulsed laser, this technique is more appropriate for automatization compared to the needle tapping approach.

  11. Validation and application of FTIR spectroscopy in raw milk analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kučević Denis S.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate whether FTIR spectroscopy is an accurate and valid technique for the assessment of quality parameters in raw cow's milk: fat, protein, lactose, and total solids. The assessment was based on calibration series and comparison with reference material. Furthermore, it takes into account the results obtained in the inter-laboratory comparisons (proficiency testing. The calibration samples were purchased from the accredited regional reference laboratories. The validation parameters included linearity, accuracy, repeatability, reproducibility, and robustness. The linearity ratio was 0.95%. The biases calculated for the fat, protein, lactose and dry matter were -0.33, 0.31, -0.25, and 0.06 respectively. The F value from the F-test was used to determine the significant differences between two independent sets of the results. The obtained results were as follows: 1.469 for fat, 1.634 for protein, 1.192 for lactose, and 0.528 for dry matter. The intra-laboratory reproducibility calculated as the Horwitz Ratios for all parameters were within the criterion limits (0.5 to 0.8. The data obtained for carry-over were 0.27% for fat, 0.52% for protein, 0.47% for lactose, and 0.47% for dry matter. Based on the obtained results it can be concluded that the FTIR spectroscopy is a reliable instrumental technique for the determination of fat, protein, lactose and total solids in raw cow's milk.

  12. Assessment of nonenzymatic glycation in protein by FTIR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero de Joshi, Virginia; Joshi, Narahari V.; Gil, Herminia; Velasquez, William; Contreras, Silvia; Marquez, Glevis

    1999-04-01

    Detection of nonenzymatic glycated proteins is a very significant feature in diabetes, aging and related diseases, therefore we have carried out an FTIR spectroscopic study for glycated and native proteins such as (gamma) -globulin, human serum albumin. For this purpose, commercially available proteins were glycated by a usual procedure and their FTIR spectra were recorded together with that of the native ones. In order to follow the changes in time, (gamma) -globulin was glycated during 1, 2, 3, 5 and 8 weeks and their spectra were recorded. Direct verification was obtained by examining a model unit where the -NH2 group was attached to glucose. The spectrum shows a strong peak at 3500 cm-1 confirming the observed variation in time dependent spectra. The general features of the spectra are very similar and there was no additional structure or change in the peaks. This is understandable as not all the lysine residues are glycated, only a small fraction. Glucose is attached to the (epsilon) -amino group of lysine to form Amadori products, and therefore, the vibrational modes corresponding to the (epsilon) -NH2 unit of lysine are expected to be altered. This region exactly lies in the Amide I region of protein structure. Careful investigation of this part, indeed, shows a complex structure originated from alternations of -NH2 group. Thus, the present investigation indicates that an optical approach could be a rapid and effective method to identify the nonenzymatic glycation process.

  13. Sem-edx and ftir studies of chlorinated rubber coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bano, H.; Khan, M.I.

    2013-01-01

    Summary: Anticorrosive performance of chlorinated rubber coating has been investigated by visual examination, Scanning electron microscopy (SEM)/Energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. After surface preparation, commercially available coating system based on chlorinated rubber (primer)/chlorinated rubber (topcoat) formulation was applied on mild steel test panels (10cm x 15cm sizes). Prepared coated panels were exposed at marine, industrial and urban test sites located in Karachi, Pakistan according to ISO 8565 norm. Accelerated testing was performed by using a salt spray chamber (ASTM B117 norm). Accelerated weathering methods are the methods in which the factors responsible for the degradation of coatings are artificially intensified in order to achieve the rapid degradation of coatings. Visual examination of blistering and rusting as well as SEM micrographs indicated a more severe degradation of the coating surface characteristics at natural exposure testing sites (particularly at marine test site) than for accelerated (salt spray) testing. EDX determination of the Oxygen/Carbon (O/C) ratios also indicated increased degradation at natural test sites compared to the accelerated (salt spray) testing. Photooxidation of the binder results in the formation of carbonyl compounds as revealed by FTIR spectroscopy which also indicated dehydrochlorination. (author)

  14. High-density polyethylene dosimetry by transvinylene FTIR analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McLaughlin, W.L.; Silverman, J.; Al-Sheikhly, M.

    1999-01-01

    and electrons. The useful dose range of 0.053 cm thick high-density polyethylene film (rho = 0.961 g cm(-3); melt index = 0.8 dg min(-1)), for irradiations by (60)Co gamma radiation and 2.0 and 0.4 MeV electron beams in deaerated atmosphere (Na gas), is about 50-10(3) kGy for FTIR transvinylene......The formation of transvinylene unsaturation, -CH=CH-, due to free-radical or cationic-initiated dehydrogenation by irradiation, is a basic reaction in polyethylene and is useful for dosimetry at high absorbed doses. The radiation-enhanced infrared absorption having a maximum at nu = 965 cm......(-l) (lambda = 10.36 mu m) is stable in air and can be measured by Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectrophotometry. The quantitative analysis is a useful means of product end-point dosimetry for radiation processing with gamma rays and electrons, where polyethylene is a component of the processed product...

  15. The Designing of Magnetic-Driven Micromirror for Portable FTIRs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaoxi Wang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy is a widely used instrument to analyze and test different materials including organic and inorganic. Most of current commercial Fourier transform infrared spectrometers are limited in miniaturization and scanning velocity by their macroscopic components. MEMS FTIR spectroscopy is one of the important applications of translational actuator-driven systems by using MEMS technology. The critical component in MEMS FTIRs is the large displacement translating micromirror and its actuator. The paper presents a large displacement and high-surface quality micromirror. The micromirror consists of a micromagnetic actuator and a micromirror plate. The mirror plate and the actuator are fabricated separately and bonded together afterwards, and its size is 3.6 × 3.6 mm2 high-surface quality square mirror plate and a 1cm2 moving part. The microactuator’s moving part is fabricated using MetalMUMPS, and its fixed part includes a ring permanent magnet and a solenoid to realize a large displacement. The mirror plate is fabricated using polished silicon coated with metal layer with high-surface prototypes that are fabricated and experimentally tested. A maximum stroke of 400 μm has been achieved in pull-in whereas only 140 μm stroke have been measured for a 4 to 5-volt DC-controlled displacement, and the resonance frequency is 10 Hz.

  16. Experimental and theoretical studies on IR, Raman, and UV-Vis spectra of quinoline-7-carboxaldehyde.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumru, M; Küçük, V; Kocademir, M; Alfanda, H M; Altun, A; Sarı, L

    2015-01-05

    Spectroscopic properties of quinoline-7-carboxaldehyde (Q7C) have been studied in detail both experimentally and theoretically. The FT-IR (4000-50 cm(-1)), FT-Raman (4000-50 cm(-1)), dispersive-Raman (3500-50 cm(-1)), and UV-Vis (200-400 nm) spectra of Q7C were recorded at room temperature (25 °C). Geometry parameters, potential energy surface about CCH(O) bond, harmonic vibrational frequencies, IR and Raman intensities, UV-Vis spectrum, and thermodynamic characteristics (at 298.15K) of Q7C were computed at Hartree-Fock (HF) and density functional B3LYP levels employing the 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. Frontier molecular orbitals, molecular electrostatic potential, and Mulliken charge analyses of Q7C have also been performed. Q7C has two stable conformers that are energetically very close to each other with slight preference to the conformer that has oxygen atom of the aldehyde away from the nitrogen atom of the quinoline. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Raman spectroscopy in high temperature chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drake, M.C.; Rosenblatt, G.M.

    1979-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy (largely because of advances in laser and detector technology) is assuming a rapidly expanding role in many areas of research. This paper reviews the contribution of Raman spectroscopy in high temperature chemistry including molecular spectroscopy on static systems and gas diagnostic measurements on reactive systems. An important aspect of high temperature chemistry has been the identification and study of the new, and often unusual, gaseous molecules which form at high temperatures. Particularly important is the investigation of vibrational-rotational energy levels and electronic states which determine thermodynamic properties and describe chemical bonding. Some advantages and disadvantages of high temperature Raman spectrosocpy for molecular studies on static systems are compared: (1) Raman vs infrared; (2) gas-phase vs condensed in matries; and (3) atmospheric pressure Raman vs low pressure techniques, including mass spectroscopy, matrix isolation, and molecular beams. Raman studies on molecular properties of gases, melts, and surfaces are presented with emphasis on work not covered in previous reviews of high temperature and matrix isolation Raman spectroscopy

  18. Raman spectroscopy in high temperature chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drake, M.C.; Rosenblatt, G.M.

    1979-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy (largely because of advances in laser and detector technology) is assuming a rapidly expanding role in many areas of research. This paper reviews the contribution of Raman spectroscopy in high temperature chemistry including molecular spectroscopy on static systems and gas diagnostic measurements on reactive systems. An important aspect of high temperature chemistry has been the identification and study of the new, and often unusual, gaseous molecules which form at high temperatures. Particularly important is the investigation of vibrational-rotational energy levels and electronic states which determine thermodynamic properties and describe chemical bonding. Some advantages and disadvantages of high temperature Raman spectrosocpy for molecular studies on static systems are compared: (1) Raman vs infrared; (2) gas-phase vs condensed in matrices; and (3) atmospheric pressure Raman vs low pressure techniques, including mass spectroscopy, matrix isolation, and molecular beams. Raman studies on molecular properties of gases, melts, and surfaces are presented with emphasis on work not covered in previous reviews of high temperature and matrix isolation Raman spectroscopy

  19. Laser-Raman spectroscopy of living cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, S.J.

    1980-01-01

    Investigations into the laser-Raman shift spectra of bacterial and mammalian cells have revealed that many Raman lines observed at 4-6 K, do not appear in the spectra of cells held at 300 K. At 300 K, Raman activity, at set frequencies, is observed only when the cells are metabolically active; however, the actual live cell spectrum, between 0 and 3400 cm -1 , has been found to alter in a specific way with time as the cells' progress through their life cycles. Lines above 300 cm -1 , from in vivo Raman active states, appear to shift to higher wave numbers whereas those below 300 cm -1 seem to shift to lower ones. The transient nature of many shift lines observed and the intensity of them when present in the spectrum indicates that, in, vivo, a metabolically induced condensation of closely related states occurs at a set time in the life of a living cell. In addition, the calculated ratio between the intensities of Stokes and anti-Stokes lines observed suggests that the metabolically induced 'collective' Raman active states are produced, in vivo, by non thermal means. It appears, therefore, that the energetics of the well established cell 'time clock' may be studied by laser-Raman spectroscopy; moreover, Raman spectroscopy may yield a new type of information regarding the physics of such biological phenomena as nutrition, virus infection and oncogenesis. (orig.)

  20. Environment-dependent conformation investigation of 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (3-AT): Raman Spectroscopy and density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Shuang; Zhao, Yanying; Xue, Jiadan; Zheng, Xuming

    2018-02-01

    In the paper, diverse tautomers of 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (3AT) in solid and polar solvent have been explored by FT-IR, FT-Raman and 488 nm Raman experiments combing with quantum chemical theoretical calculation using PCM solvent model and normal mode analysis. The vibrational spectra prefer the 3-amino-1,2,4-2H-triazole (2H-3AT) dimer in solid, while in a polar solvent 3AT is apt to the 3-amino-1,2,4-2H-triazole (2H-3AT) monomer. The significant wavenumber difference and Raman intensity patterns in solid and different solvents are induced by hydrogen bond perturbation along > NH ⋯ N ≤ hydrogen bonds on five-membered N-heterocyclic ring. The ground state proton transfer reaction mechanism along the five-membered N-heterocyclic ring is supported by intermolecular hydrogen bonding between 3AT and protonic solvent molecules.

  1. Determination of ripeness stages of Mazafati variety of date fruit by Raman spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Khodabakhshian

    2016-04-01

    with a Deuterated Triglycine Sulfate (DTGS detector and a solid substrate beam splitter. The spectra were collected with rapid scan software running under OMNIC (Nicolet, Madion, Wis., U.S.A and a resolution of 4 cm-1 by coadding of 128 scans. FT-Raman has three main advantages over dispersive Raman systems: (1 reducing the laser-induced fluorescence that a number of samples exhibit; (2 easing the operation as with a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectrometer; and (3 showing a high spectral resolution with a good wavelength accuracy (Yang and Ying, 2011. Furthermore, the Raman spectra of pure tannin were measured as a reference spectrum. The original data were used for further analysis only after subtracting dark current spectra. For obtaining dark current spectra, the laser was set to zero. Results and Discussion: Physical properties of date fruits: The results of some physical parameters of the studied date fruit are shown in Table1. The changes in the physical properties were dependent on the internal quality in different ripeness stages. This justification also was revealed for date fruits by Al-Hooti et al. (1995. The obtained relations between ripening stages and internal quality of studied samples are represented in the next part. Raman spectra of tannin: Raman features of the tannin in the wavelength range of 200-2500 cm-1 are shown in Figure 3. As shown in the figure, major Raman features of the tannin were observed in the spectral region of 600-1600 cm-1. Three main Raman peaks were identified in this region. The tannin showed its highest Raman intensity at 1590 cm-1, which was higher than that at 1357 cm-1. The other peak (650 cm-1 showed low intensity. As stated by many researchers (Shahidi and Naczk, 2004; Al-Farsi et al., 2005; Biglari et al., 2008, these bands are assigned to stretching C-C, C=C and C-H bonds which compose the structure of phytochemicals. Beyond 1600 cm-1, no notable Raman scattering signals were observed. Themain Raman features of

  2. Characterization of conducting polyaniline blends by Resonance Raman Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Jose E. Pereira da; Temperini, Marcia L.A.; Torresi, Susana I. Cordoba de

    2005-01-01

    Raman and optical microscopy were used to investigate possible interactions between polyaniline (PANI) and different insulating polymers in conducting blends. Resonance Raman and optical micrographs were used to study the physical interaction in materials. Analysis Raman spectra was done investigating the relative intensity of bands at 574 and 607 cm -1 . A relationship between Raman bands and conductivity was also proposed. (author)

  3. Raman Chair | About IASc | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Raman Chair. The Raman Chair was instituted in 1972 by the Government of India to commemorate the memory of the founder of the Academy, Sir C. V. Raman. Eminent scientists are invited by the Council of the Academy to occupy the Chair, for periods of between six weeks and six months. Raman Professors who have ...

  4. Resonance Raman study of benzyl radical

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langkilde, F.W.; Bajdor, K.; Wilbrandt, R.

    1992-01-01

    Time-resolved resonance Raman spectra are obtained of benzyl radicals created by laser flash photolysis of benzylchloride and diphenylacetone in solution. The spectra are obtained in resonance with the intense 2 2A2-1 B-2(2) transition of benzyl. The strong Raman bands are assigned to totally...... symmetric a1 modes. The remaining observed bands are tentatively assigned to fundamental modes of b1, a2, and b2 symmetry, and to overtones and combinations. The resonance Raman spectra are found to be quite different from previous fluorescence spectra of benzyl, and the origins of these differences...

  5. Detection of laser damage by Raman microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fauchet, P.M.; Campbell, I.H.; Adar, F.

    1988-01-01

    The authors demonstrate that Raman miroscopy is a sensitive and quantitative tool to detect and characterize laser-induced damage in solids. After damage is induced with single or multiple high power laser pulses, a Raman microprobe maps the surface of the sample with one micron spatial resolution. By performing accurate measurements of the Stokes line, the authors have been able to measure stress, strain and crystallinity in various samples which had been exposed to high intensity pulses. These results are compared to those obtained using conventional tools such as Nomarski microscopy. Major advantages of Raman microscopy include sensitivity to subtle structural modifications and the fact that it gives quantitative measurements

  6. Raman band intensities of tellurite glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnichenko, V G; Sokolov, V O; Koltashev, V V; Dianov, E M; Grishin, I A; Churbanov, M F

    2005-05-15

    Raman spectra of TeO2-based glasses doped with WO3, ZnO, GeO2, TiO2, MoO3, and Sb2O3 are measured. The intensity of bands in the Raman spectra of MoO3-TeO2 and MoO3-WO3-TeO2 glasses is shown to be 80-95 times higher than that for silica glass. It is shown that these glasses can be considered as one of the most promising materials for Raman fiber amplifiers.

  7. Raman overtone intensities measured for H2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shelton, D.P.

    1990-01-01

    The Raman spectra of the vibrational fundamental, first overtone and second overtone transitions of the H 2 molecule were recorded using visible and ultraviolet argon--ion laser excitation. The ratios of transition polarizability matrix elements, α 01,21 /α 01,11 and α 01,31 /α 01,11 , were determined from the measured intensities of the Q(1) Raman lines v,J=0,1→v',1 for v'=1,2,3. The experimentally determined value of the Raman first overtone matrix element is in good agreement with the value from the best ab initio calculation

  8. Understanding the distribution of natural wax in starch-wax films using synchrotron-based FTIR (S-FTIR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscat, Delina; Tobin, Mark J; Guo, Qipeng; Adhikari, Benu

    2014-02-15

    High amylose starch-glycerol (HAG) films were produced incorporating beeswax, candelilla wax and carnauba wax in the presence and absence of Tween-80 in order to determine the distribution of wax in the films during the film formation process. The distribution of these waxes within the film was studied using Synchrotron based Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (S-FTIR) which provided 2D mapping along the thickness of the film. The incorporation of 5% and 10% wax in HAG films produced randomly distributed wax or wax-rich domains, respectively, within these films. Consequently, the addition of these waxes to HAG increased the surface roughness and hydrophobicity of these films. The addition of Tween-80 caused variations in wax-rich bands within the films. The HAG+carnauba wax+Tween-80 films exhibited domed wax-rich domains displayed with high integrated CH2 absorption value at the interior of the films, rougher surface and higher contact angle values than the other films. The S-FTIR 2D images indicated that the distribution of wax in starch-wax films correlated with the roughness and hydrophobicity of the starch-wax films. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Mode-dependent dispersion in Raman line shapes: Observation and implications from ultrafast Raman loss spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umapathy, S.; Mallick, B.; Lakshmanna, A.

    2010-01-01

    Ultrafast Raman loss spectroscopy (URLS) enables one to obtain the vibrational structural information of molecular systems including fluorescent materials. URLS, a nonlinear process analog to stimulated Raman gain, involves a narrow bandwidth picosecond Raman pump pulse and a femtosecond broadband white light continuum. Under nonresonant condition, the Raman response appears as a negative (loss) signal, whereas, on resonance with the electronic transition the line shape changes from a negative to a positive through a dispersive form. The intensities observed and thus, the Franck-Condon activity (coordinate dependent), are sensitive to the wavelength of the white light corresponding to a particular Raman frequency with respect to the Raman pump pulse wavelength, i.e., there is a mode-dependent response in URLS.

  10. Emerging technology: applications of Raman spectroscopy for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kast, Rachel E; Tucker, Stephanie C; Killian, Kevin; Trexler, Micaela; Honn, Kenneth V; Auner, Gregory W

    2014-09-01

    There is a need in prostate cancer diagnostics and research for a label-free imaging methodology that is nondestructive, rapid, objective, and uninfluenced by water. Raman spectroscopy provides a molecular signature, which can be scaled from micron-level regions of interest in cells to macroscopic areas of tissue. It can be used for applications ranging from in vivo or in vitro diagnostics to basic science laboratory testing. This work describes the fundamentals of Raman spectroscopy and complementary techniques including surface enhanced Raman scattering, resonance Raman spectroscopy, coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy, confocal Raman spectroscopy, stimulated Raman scattering, and spatially offset Raman spectroscopy. Clinical applications of Raman spectroscopy to prostate cancer will be discussed, including screening, biopsy, margin assessment, and monitoring of treatment efficacy. Laboratory applications including cell identification, culture monitoring, therapeutics development, and live imaging of cellular processes are discussed. Potential future avenues of research are described, with emphasis on multiplexing Raman spectroscopy with other modalities.

  11. Raman Spectroscopy with simple optic components; Espectrometria Raman con componentes opticos simples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendoza, Mario; Cunya, Eduardo; Olivera, Paula [Direccion de Investigacion y Desarrollo, Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear, Lima (Peru)

    2014-07-01

    Raman Spectroscopy is .a high resolution photonics technique that provides chemical and structural information of almost any material, organic or inorganic compound. In this report we describe the implementation of a system based on the principle of Raman scattering, developed to analyze solid samples. The spectrometer integrates an optical bench coupled to an optical fiber and a green laser source of 532 nm. The spectrometer was tested obtaining the Naphthalene and the Yellow 74 Pigment Raman patterns. (authors).

  12. An Empirical Study on Raman Peak Fitting and Its Application to Raman Quantitative Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xueyin; Mayanovic, Robert A

    2017-10-01

    Fitting experimentally measured Raman bands with theoretical model profiles is the basic operation for numerical determination of Raman peak parameters. In order to investigate the effects of peak modeling using various algorithms on peak fitting results, the representative Raman bands of mineral crystals, glass, fluids as well as the emission lines from a fluorescent lamp, some of which were measured under ambient light whereas others under elevated pressure and temperature conditions, were fitted using Gaussian, Lorentzian, Gaussian-Lorentzian, Voigtian, Pearson type IV, and beta profiles. From the fitting results of the Raman bands investigated in this study, the fitted peak position, intensity, area and full width at half-maximum (FWHM) values of the measured Raman bands can vary significantly depending upon which peak profile function is used in the fitting, and the most appropriate fitting profile should be selected depending upon the nature of the Raman bands. Specifically, the symmetric Raman bands of mineral crystals and non-aqueous fluids are best fit using Gaussian-Lorentzian or Voigtian profiles, whereas the asymmetric Raman bands are best fit using Pearson type IV profiles. The asymmetric O-H stretching vibrations of H 2 O and the Raman bands of soda-lime glass are best fit using several Gaussian profiles, whereas the emission lines from a florescent light are best fit using beta profiles. Multiple peaks that are not clearly separated can be fit simultaneously, provided the residuals in the fitting of one peak will not affect the fitting of the remaining peaks to a significant degree. Once the resolution of the Raman spectrometer has been properly accounted for, our findings show that the precision in peak position and intensity can be improved significantly by fitting the measured Raman peaks with appropriate profiles. Nevertheless, significant errors in peak position and intensity were still observed in the results from fitting of weak and wide Raman

  13. Biomedical Applications of Micro-Raman and Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    hydroxyapatite ; 1073cm-1, carbonate from carbonate apatite; 1442cm-1, cholesterol and cholesterol esters. 17 Table 1. Tentative assignment and Raman peak...allowed for the discrete location of atherosclerotic plaques. Raman peaks at 961 and 1073 cm-1 reveal the presence of calcium hydroxyapatite and... hydroxyapatite are located within the vessel wall. Similarly, Fig. 5 maps the Raman intensity of the peak at 1073cm-1, which is indicative of

  14. DFT study of structure, IR and Raman spectra of the fluorescent "Janus" dendron built from cyclotriphosphazene core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furer, V. L.; Vandyukova, I. I.; Vandyukov, A. E.; Fuchs, S.; Majoral, J. P.; Caminade, A. M.; Kovalenko, V. I.

    2011-11-01

    The FTIR and FT-Raman spectra of the zero generation dendron, possessing five fluorescent dansyl terminal groups, cyclotriphosphazene core, and one carbamate function G0v were studied. The structural optimization and normal mode analysis were performed for G0v dendron on the basis of the density functional theory (DFT). The calculated geometrical parameters and harmonic vibrational frequencies are predicted in a good agreement with the experimental data. It was found that dendron molecule G0v has a concave lens structure with slightly non-planar cyclotriphosphazene core. The experimental IR and Raman spectra of G0v dendron were interpreted by means of potential energy distributions. Relying on DFT calculations a complete vibrational assignment is proposed. The frequency of ν(N-H) band in the IR spectrum reveal the presence of H-bonds in the G0v dendron.

  15. Hydrogenated fullerenes in space: FT-IR spectra analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Barbary, A. A.

    2016-01-01

    Fullerenes and hydrogenated fullerenes are found in circumstellar and interstellar environments. But the determination structures for the detected bands in the interstellar and circumstellar space are not completely understood so far. For that purpose, the aim of this article is to provide all possible infrared spectra for C 20 and C 60 fullerenes and their hydrogenated fullerenes. Density Functional theory (DFT) is applied using B3LYP exchange-functional with basis set 6–31G(d, p). The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) is found to be capable of distinguishing between fullerenes, mono hydrogenated fullerenes and fully hydrogenated fullerenes. In addition, deposition of one hydrogen atom outside the fully hydrogenated fullerenes is found to be distinguished by forming H 2 molecule at peak around 4440 cm −1 . However, deposition of one hydrogen atom inside the fully hydrogenated fullerenes cannot be distinguished. The obtained spectral structures are analyzed and are compared with available experimental results.

  16. [Application of FTIR micro-spectroscopy in the tribology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhi-meng

    2002-10-01

    The wave number of characteristic absorption peak nu asC-O-C of the polyester formed on the frictional process were determined by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Micro-spectroscopy, and the wave number displacement of characteristic absorption peak nu asC-O-C was analyzed based on the conversion mass of polyester formed. The internal relations between anti-wear order rule of hydroxyl fatty acids and vibration absorption peak nu asC-O-C of polyester formed by hydroxyl fatty acids was deduced according to these results, and the anti-wear order of hydroxyl fatty acids was reasonably explained, that is 13, 14-di-hydroxydocosanoic acid > 13 (14)-monohydroxydocosanoic acid = 9,10-dihydroxyoctadecanoic acid > 9,10,12-trihydroxyoctadecanoic acid > 9(10)-monohydroxyoctadecanoic acid. A net polyester film is formed by 13, 14-dihydroxydocosanoic acid and a linear polyester film is formed by 9, (10)-monohydroxyoctadecanoic acid and 13(14)-monohydroxydocosanoic acid.

  17. Ftir study of gamma irradiation LDPE film in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moura, Esperidiana A.B.; Silva, Andre L.A.; Gouvea, Paulo H.D.; Silva, Leonardo G. Andrade e; Gouvea, Douglas; Castro, Ricardo H.R.; Wiebeck, Helio; Kawano, Yoshio

    2003-01-01

    The use of the ionizing radiation for application in plastic packaging, to improve some of properties and for radiation sterilization, has been gaining popularity in the packaging industry. As a consequence of the irradiation, plastic packaging materials can undergo some chemical and physical alterations in their basic function, mainly concerning the protection characteristics. Since changes in physical properties of irradiated packaging films reflect radiation-induced chemical changes in molecular structure, in this work, an investigation was performed by Ftir analysis of LDPE film before and after radiation. Film samples were irradiated with doses between 0 Gy and 100 kGy, at room temperature and in the presence of air. The results showed alterations in the molecular structure, according to the absorbed radiation dose. (author)

  18. BET, thermal degradation, and FTIR spectras of triazine polyamine polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Can, Mustafa

    2017-04-01

    Here we show effect of the polyamine polymer chain length to BET isotherms. According to IUPAC classification [1], all three polymers are fitting type 1 physical adsorption isotherm with H3 hysteresis (except for EDA having H2 hysteresis). Moreover, TG and TGA analysis of polymers triazine-ethylenediamine (EDA) and triazine-triethylenetetramine (TETA) are provided. Due to the similarities of the structure, main decomposition temperatures are close to each other (between 593 K and 873 K). In order to understand change of FTIR spectra with adsorption and stripping Au(III), fresh, Au(III) adsorbed and recycled spectras of polymers measured. For further discussions about the effect of chain length to adsorption of Au(III) onto triazine polyamine polymer particles "Au (III) Uptake by Triazine Polyamine Polymers: Mechanism, Kinetic and Equilibrium Studies" Can et al. [2] (article in press).

  19. FTIR Drug-Polymer Interactions Studies of Perindopril Erbumine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modni, A.; Ahmad, S.; Din, I.; Hussain, Z.

    2014-01-01

    The present study was carried out to prepare different combinations of Perindopril Erbumine with different polymers like Hydroxy propyl methyl cellulose, Hydroxy propyl methyl cellulose K4M, Hydroxy propyl methyl cellulose K15M, Xanthan gum and Ethyl cellulose, thereby to determine any possible interactions between Perindopril erbumine and polymers. The analytical technique Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was used to take spectra of individual drug, polymers and combination of drug with polymers. The results were analyzed to find out any interactions of Perindopril erbumine and polymers. From this study it was concluded that there were no any significant changes in characteristic peaks of drug after combinations with polymers which indicated no interaction between Perindopril erbumine and polymers. (author)

  20. Photoacoustic Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy Of Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidrine, D. Warren

    1981-10-01

    After discovering the photoacoustic effect, Alexander Graham Bell predicted its use in spectrometers, and that it would find its greatest utility "in the ultra-red." More than ninety years were required to fulfil his first prediction, and the second is still a prophecy. There is no record whether he ever imagined that an invention being developed that same winter by a young protege of his named Albert Michelson would ever be combined with his photoacoustic effect. A century later, the combination was made by Farrow Burnham, and Eyring, using a visible-range interferometer spectrometer of their own design. Soon afterwards, Rockley and myself, working independently, applied the technique to infrared measurements of solid samples. Photoacoustic cells are now commercially available as FT-IR accessories, and the technique is in use in the field.

  1. Application of microfluidic devices for time resolved FTIR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, C.

    2012-01-01

    Within this thesis, micro fluidic mixers, operated in continuous flow mode, were used for time resolved FTIR studies of chemical reactions in aqueous solution. Any chemical reaction, that can be started upon mixing two reagents, can be examined with this technique. The mixing channel also serves as the observation window for the IR measurements. The actual measurements take place at well defined spots along this channel, corresponding to specific reaction times: moving the measurement spot (100 × 100 μm 2 ) towards the entry yields shorter reaction times, moving it towards the channel's end gives longer reaction times. The temporal resolution of the experiment depends on the flow rate inside the mixing channel and the spacing between subsequent measurement points. Fast flow rates, limited by the back pressure of the mixer leading to leakages, allow time resolutions in the sub-millisecond time range using a standard FTIR microscope, whereas slow flow rates allow the measurement of reaction times up to 1000 ms. Evaluating the mixer using a fast chemical reaction resulted in mixing times of approximately 5 ms and a homogeneous distribution of the liquids across the width of the mixing channel. The mixer was then used for the measurement of the H/D exchange on carbohydrates, the complex formaldehyde sulfite clock reaction, and the folding of the protein ubiquitin from its native to the ''A'' state, induced by mixing it with an acidified methanol solution. For cleaning the mixer a software tool, called ATLAS, was developed in LabVIEW, which was used to automatize the necessary cleaning steps performed by a dedicated flow system. Additionally, the micro mixer technology was combined with the step scan measurement technique using a beam condenser focusing the IR beam of an FTIR spectrometer down to a spot size of 1 mm diameter and through the mixer. The laser light, initiating the chemical reaction inside the mixing channel, was coupled into the focusing unit using a

  2. Study of the deuterated albumin by FT-IR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoenescu, Daniela; Sahini, V.E.

    2000-01-01

    The albumin is a protein from the soluble or corpuscular protein class, which exists in cells, in dissolved state or in form of a hydrated gel. Proteins are essential constituents beside water, inorganic salts, lipids, carbon hydrates, vitamins, enzymes. The albumin is also a protein soluble in water and in diluted electrolyte solutions (acids, bases and salts). The investigation of the vibration isotopic effect has a great importance both for the diatomic molecules and for the polyatomic molecules. This paper is the first from a series of works which are intended to study the physico-chemical properties of the deuterated albumin and of the albumin solutions in heavy water by an isotopic exchange method. To put in evidence H-D exchange, the FT-IR spectroscopy is used when the deuterated albumin has different layer thickness. It is also of interest to elucidate the isotopic exchange between the hydrogen and oxygen atoms in bovine serum albumin macromolecules. (authors)

  3. [FTIR study on the finger nail with carcinoma of nasopharynx].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Qin; Liu, Gang; Liu, Tian-hui

    2004-12-01

    Finger nails from twenty normal people and three with carcinoma of nasopharynx were studied by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) technique. The results showed that there are obvious differences between FTIR spectra of them in spectral parameters such as frequency, intensity and band shape etc. The most striking differences in the spectra were observed in the change of amide II, the disappearance of delta(s) (CH3) peak, and at 874.0 cm(-1) whether appeared an absorption peak. The changes involving the phosphate symmetric stretching nu(s, PO2-) and asynmmetric stretching nu(as, PO2-) modes, the CH3 and CH2 groups stretching (v(s, CH2), nu(as, CH3)) bending (delta (CH3)) modes and the C-O stretching nu (C-O) mode were discussed. In addition, the changes of structure of hydrogen-bonding of nucleic acid and cell proteins and the packing and the conformational structure of the membrane lipids were analysed. The average wave number of band of nu(s) (PO2-) shifted from 1080.0 to 1077.6 cm(-1) and that of nu(as) (PO2-) shifted from 1239.4 to 1238.4 cm(-1), which indicated that the degree of hydrogen-bonding formed by oxygen atom of the phosphodiester groups of nucleic acids was weakened. The average wave number of band of delta (CH2) of membrane lipids shifted from 1453.1 to 1453.7 cm(-1), and its peak intensity was slightly enhanced, which suggested that the conformational structure of the methylene chains of membrane lipids is more disordered than in normal nail.

  4. [FTIR study on the normal and cancerous stomach tissues].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Y; Lin, Y

    2001-06-01

    Tissues of cancerous and corresponding normal stomach were studied by FTIR technique. The results showed that there are obvious differences between FTIR spectra of them in spectral parameters such as frequency, intensity and band shape etc. The changes involving the phosphate symmetric stretching nu s, PO2- and asymmetric stretching nu as, PO2- modes, the CH3 and CH2 groups stretching (nu s, CH2, nu as, CH3) and bending (delta CH2) modes and the C-O stretching nu C-O mode were discussed. In addition, the changes of structure of hydrogen-bonding of nucleic acid and cell proteins and the packing and the conformational structure of the membrance lipids were analysed further. The average wavenumber of band of nu s, PO2- shifted from 1,080.92 cm-1 to 1,085.93 cm-1 and that of nu as, PO2- shifted from 1,239.64 cm-1 to 1,238.73 cm-1 which indicated that the degree of hydrogen-bonding formed by oxygen atom of the phosphodiester groups of nucleic acids was increased. The average wavenumber of band of delta CH2 of membrance lipids shifted from 1,455.23 cm-1 to 1,457.37 cm-1 that suggested that the conformational structure of the methylene chains of membrance lipids is more disordered than in normal tissues. The shift of band of nu C-O of cell proteins from 1,166.08 cm-1 to 1,166.58 cm-1 indicated that the hydrogen-bond of cell proteins become weaker.

  5. Infrared and Raman Vibrational Spectroscopies Reveal the Palette of Frescos Found in the Medieval Monastery of Karaach Teke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zorba, T.; Paraskevopoulos, K.M.; Pavlidou, E.; Andrikopoulos, K.S.; Daniilia, S.; Popkonstantinov, K.; Kostova, R.; Platnyov, V.

    2007-01-01

    Vibrational spectroscopy is applied on samples obtained from the excavation area of the medieval Monastery (10 th century) of Karaach-Teke in Bulgaria. The results of the corresponding study, reveal the type of materials used for the creation of the wall-paintings and give evidence of Byzantine influence, a fact that further supports the well known impact of Byzantium on the technology and thematic-aesthetic features of iconography in Bulgaria during this era. In addition, the complementarity of FTIR and -Raman spectroscopies in the identification of pigments is indicated

  6. Micro-Raman spectroscopy of chromosomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Mul, F.F.M.; van Welle, A.G.M.; Otto, Cornelis; Greve, Jan

    1984-01-01

    Raman spectra of intact chromosomes (Chinese hamster), recorded with a microspectrometer, are reported. The spectra could be assigned to protein and DNA contributions. Protein and DNA conformations and the ratio of base pairs in DNA were determined.

  7. Energy dissipation by a longitudinal Raman process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fano, U.; Inokuti, Mitio

    1994-01-01

    The concept of a longitudinal Raman process is introduced to encompass the indirect transmission of energy from slow electrons to nuclei through the reversible polarization of surrounding electrons. Experimental approaches are sought to assess this process quantitatively

  8. Stimulated Raman scattering: old physics, new applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakovlev, Vladislav V; Petrov, Georgi I; Zhang, Hao F; Noojin, Gary D; Denton, Michael L; Thomas, Robert J; Scully, Marlan O

    2009-10-01

    Stimulated Raman scattering as a promising way of expanding the tunability of ultrafast lasers and as an exciting new biomedical imaging modality capable of selective excitation and chemically-specific diagnostics of molecular species.

  9. Raman assisted lightwave synthesized frequency sweeper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Tegtmeier; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2010-01-01

    We present a Lightwave Synthesized Frequency Sweeper comprising a Raman amplifier for loss compensation. The generated pulse train contains 123 pulses and has a flat signal level as well as a low noise level.......We present a Lightwave Synthesized Frequency Sweeper comprising a Raman amplifier for loss compensation. The generated pulse train contains 123 pulses and has a flat signal level as well as a low noise level....

  10. PM Raman fiber laser at 1679 nm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane, Ask Sebastian; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate a PM Raman fiber laser emitting light at 1679 nm. The laser has an slope efficiency of 67 % and an output power of more than 275mWwith a 27 pm linewidth.......We demonstrate a PM Raman fiber laser emitting light at 1679 nm. The laser has an slope efficiency of 67 % and an output power of more than 275mWwith a 27 pm linewidth....

  11. Citrus fruits freshness assessment using Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekvapil, Fran; Brezestean, Ioana; Barchewitz, Daniel; Glamuzina, Branko; Chiş, Vasile; Cintă Pinzaru, Simona

    2018-03-01

    The freshness of citrus fruits commonly available in the market was non-destructively assessed by Raman spectroscopy. Intact clementine, mandarin and tangerine species were characterised concerning their carotenoids skin Raman signalling in a time course from the moment they were acquired as fresh stock, supplying the market, to the physical degradation, when they were no longer attractive to consumers. The freshness was found to strongly correlate to the peel Raman signal collected from the same area of the intact fruits in a time course of a maximum of 20days. We have shown that the intensity of the carotenoid Raman signal is indeed a good indicator of fruit freshness and introduced a Raman coefficient of freshness (C Fresh ), whose time course is linearly decreasing, with different slope for different citrus groups. Additionally, we demonstrated that the freshness assessment could be achieved using a portable Raman instrument. The results could have a strong impact for consumer satisfaction and the food industry. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. In situ Raman mapping of art objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brondeel, Ph.; Moens, L.; Vandenabeele, P.

    2016-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy has grown to be one of the techniques of interest for the investigation of art objects. The approach has several advantageous properties, and the non-destructive character of the technique allowed it to be used for in situ investigations. However, compared with laboratory approaches, it would be useful to take advantage of the small spectral footprint of the technique, and use Raman spectroscopy to study the spatial distribution of different compounds. In this work, an in situ Raman mapping system is developed to be able to relate chemical information with its spatial distribution. Challenges for the development are discussed, including the need for stable positioning and proper data treatment. To avoid focusing problems, nineteenth century porcelain cards are used to test the system. This work focuses mainly on the post-processing of the large dataset which consists of four steps: (i) importing the data into the software; (ii) visualization of the dataset; (iii) extraction of the variables; and (iv) creation of a Raman image. It is shown that despite the challenging task of the development of the full in situ Raman mapping system, the first steps are very promising. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Raman spectroscopy in art and archaeology’. PMID:27799424

  13. Visualizing cell state transition using Raman spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taro Ichimura

    Full Text Available System level understanding of the cell requires detailed description of the cell state, which is often characterized by the expression levels of proteins. However, understanding the cell state requires comprehensive information of the cell, which is usually obtained from a large number of cells and their disruption. In this study, we used Raman spectroscopy, which can report changes in the cell state without introducing any label, as a non-invasive method with single cell capability. Significant differences in Raman spectra were observed at the levels of both the cytosol and nucleus in different cell-lines from mouse, indicating that Raman spectra reflect differences in the cell state. Difference in cell state was observed before and after the induction of differentiation in neuroblastoma and adipocytes, showing that Raman spectra can detect subtle changes in the cell state. Cell state transitions during embryonic stem cell (ESC differentiation were visualized when Raman spectroscopy was coupled with principal component analysis (PCA, which showed gradual transition in the cell states during differentiation. Detailed analysis showed that the diversity between cells are large in undifferentiated ESC and in mesenchymal stem cells compared with terminally differentiated cells, implying that the cell state in stem cells stochastically fluctuates during the self-renewal process. The present study strongly indicates that Raman spectral morphology, in combination with PCA, can be used to establish cells' fingerprints, which can be useful for distinguishing and identifying different cellular states.

  14. Prospects for in vivo Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanlon, E.B.; Manoharan, R.; Koo, T.-W.; Shafer, K.E.; Motz, J.T.; Fitzmaurice, M.; Kramer, J.R.; Itzkan, I.; Dasari, R.R.; Feld, M.S.

    2000-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a potentially important clinical tool for real-time diagnosis of disease and in situ evaluation of living tissue. The purpose of this article is to review the biological and physical basis of Raman spectroscopy of tissue, to assess the current status of the field and to explore future directions. The principles of Raman spectroscopy and the molecular level information it provides are explained. An overview of the evolution of Raman spectroscopic techniques in biology and medicine, from early investigations using visible laser excitation to present-day technology based on near-infrared laser excitation and charge-coupled device array detection, is presented. State-of-the-art Raman spectrometer systems for research laboratory and clinical settings are described. Modern methods of multivariate spectral analysis for extracting diagnostic, chemical and morphological information are reviewed. Several in-depth applications are presented to illustrate the methods of collecting, processing and analysing data, as well as the range of medical applications under study. Finally, the issues to be addressed in implementing Raman spectroscopy in various clinical applications, as well as some long-term directions for future study, are discussed. (author)

  15. Developing of FTIR- and new probe technique for combustion gas analysis; Utveckling av FTIR- och sondteknik foer gasanalys i foerbraenningsrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, Annika; Andersson, Christer [Vattenfall Utveckling AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Thulin, C [Swedish National Testing and Research Inst., Boraas (Sweden); Karlsson, Maria; Aamand, L E [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden)

    1996-08-01

    The objective of the reported project has been to develop and field test a versatile measurement system for combustion gases based on the FTIR technique. The project has included the following stages: Development of gas sampling methods, Further development of the FTIR technique, Field testing of the measurement system. The development of evaluation routines based on CLS and PLS methods has lead to the conclusion that both methods are well suited for the application in question, which enables an automation of the evaluation procedure. However, the elaboration of versatile and quality controlled methods is time consuming and the application requires a qualified user. With the dilution probe prototype, a satisfactory rejection of particles is achieved at the same time as a good mixing of the dilution gas and the sample gas takes place. Sampling is performed without using a filter at the probe tip. The intended function of the probe requires that most particles can be rejected without giving rise to a too high dilution ratio. This was achieved in the middle and upper part of the CFB boiler. Comparisons of measurement data from field measurements with the developed probe concept and the `conventional` CTH extractive probe show that the results are in good agreement in many cases, but also that interesting discrepancies exist. Sampling artefacts have been noticed for the gases HCN and SO{sub 2}, where HCN and SO{sub 2} are found in higher concentrations when sampling with the dilution probe. Analyzed concentrations of CO and hydrocarbons (methane, ethene and acetylene) are throughout all the measurements lower when the dilution probe is used. 21 refs, 34 figs, 29 tabs

  16. Quantum statistics of stimulated Raman and hyper-Raman scattering by master equation approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, P.S.; Dash, J.

    1991-01-01

    A quantum theoretical density matrix formalism of stimulated Raman and hyper-Raman scattering using master equation approach is presented. The atomic system is described by two energy levels. The effects of upper level population and the cavity loss are incorporated. The photon statistics, coherence characteristics and the building up of the Stokes field are investigated. (author). 8 figs., 5 refs

  17. Characterization of excited electronic states of naphthalene by resonance Raman and hyper-Raman scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonang, C.C.; Cameron, S.M.

    1992-01-01

    The first resonance Raman and hyper-Raman scattering from naphthalene are reported. Fourth harmonic of a mode-locked Nd:YAG laser is used to resonantly excite the 1 B 1u + transition, producing Raman spectra that confirm the dominance of the vibronically active ν 28 (b 3g ) mode and the Franck--Condon active a g modes, ν 5 and ν 3 . A synchronously pumped stilbene dye laser and its second harmonic are employed as the excitation sources for hyper-Raman and Raman scattering from the overlapping 1 B 2 u + and 1 A g - states. The Raman spectra indicate that the equilibrium geometry of naphthalene is distorted primarily along ν 5 , ν 8 , and ν 7 normal coordinates upon excitation to 1 B 2 u + . The hyper-Raman spectrum shows that ν 25 (b 2u ) is the mode principally responsible for vibronic coupling between the 1 A g - and 1 B 2u + states. The results demonstrate the advantageous features of resonance hyper-Raman scattering for the case of overlapping one- and two-photon allowed transitions. Calculations based on simple molecular orbital configurations are shown to qualitatively agree with the experimental results

  18. Application of Raman Microspectroscopic and Raman imaging techniques for cell biological studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Puppels, G.J.; Puppels, G.J.; Bakker schut, T.C.; Bakker Schut, T.C.; Sijtsema, N.M.; Grond, M.; Grond, M.; Maraboeuf, F.; de Grauw, C.J.; de Grauw, C.J.; Figdor, Carl; Greve, Jan

    1995-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is being used to study biological molecules for some three decades now. Thanks to continuing advances in instrumentation more and more applications have become feasible in which molecules are studied in situ, and this has enabled Raman spectroscopy to enter the realms of

  19. Integration of Correlative Raman microscopy in a dual beam FIB-SEM J. of Raman Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmermans, Frank Jan; Liszka, B.; Lenferink, Aufrid T.M.; van Wolferen, Hendricus A.G.M.; Otto, Cornelis

    2016-01-01

    We present an integrated confocal Raman microscope in a focused ion beam scanning electron microscope (FIB SEM). The integrated system enables correlative Raman and electron microscopic analysis combined with focused ion beam sample modification on the same sample location. This provides new

  20. Development and Application of Raman Microspectroscopic and Raman Imaging Techniques for Cell Biological Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PUPPELS, G J; SCHUT, T C B; SIJTSEMA, N M; GROND, M; MARABOEUF, F; DEGRAUW, C G; FIGDOR, C G; GREVE, J

    1995-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is being used to study biological molecules for some three decades now. Thanks to continuing advances in instrumentation more and more applications have become feasible in which molecules are studied in situ, and this has enabled Raman spectroscopy to enter the realms of

  1. Laser Raman Spectroscopy with Different Excitation Sources and Extension to Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Wahadoszamen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A dispersive Raman spectrometer was used with three different excitation sources (Argon-ion, He-Ne, and Diode lasers operating at 514.5 nm, 633 nm, and 782 nm, resp.. The system was employed to a variety of Raman active compounds. Many of the compounds exhibit very strong fluorescence while being excited with a laser emitting at UV-VIS region, hereby imposing severe limitation to the detection efficiency of the particular Raman system. The Raman system with variable excitation laser sources provided us with a desired flexibility toward the suppression of unwanted fluorescence signal. With this Raman system, we could detect and specify the different vibrational modes of various hazardous organic compounds and some typical dyes (both fluorescent and nonfluorescent. We then compared those results with the ones reported in literature and found the deviation within the range of ±2 cm−1, which indicates reasonable accuracy and usability of the Raman system. Then, the surface enhancement technique of Raman spectrum was employed to the present system. To this end, we used chemically prepared colloidal suspension of silver nanoparticles as substrate and Rhodamine 6G as probe. We could observe significant enhancement of Raman signal from Rhodamine 6G using the colloidal solution of silver nanoparticles the average magnitude of which is estimated to be 103.

  2. [Raman spectra of monkey cerebral cortex tissue].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ji-chun; Guo, Jian-yu; Cai, Wei-ying; Wang, Zu-geng; Sun, Zhen-rong

    2010-01-01

    Monkey cerebral cortex, an important part in the brain to control action and thought activities, is mainly composed of grey matter and nerve cell. In the present paper, the in situ Raman spectra of the cerebral cortex of the birth, teenage and aged monkeys were achieved for the first time. The results show that the Raman spectra for the different age monkey cerebral cortex exhibit most obvious changes in the regions of 1000-1400 and 2800-3000 cm(-1). With monkey growing up, the relative intensities of the Raman bands at 1313 and 2885 cm(-1) mainly assigned to CH2 chain vibrational mode of lipid become stronger and stronger whereas the relative intensities of the Raman bands at 1338 and 2932 cm(-1) mainly assigned to CH3 chain vibrational mode of protein become weaker and weaker. In addition, the two new Raman bands at 1296 and 2850 cm(-1) are only observed in the aged monkey cerebral cortex, therefore, the two bands can be considered as a character or "marker" to differentiate the caducity degree with monkey growth In order to further explore the changes, the relative intensity ratios of the Raman band at 1313 cm(-1) to that at 1338 cm(-1) and the Raman band at 2885 cm(-1) to that at 2 932 cm(-1), I1313/I1338 and I2885/I2932, which are the lipid-to-protein ratios, are introduced to denote the degree of the lipid content. The results show that the relative intensity ratios increase significantly with monkey growth, namely, the lipid content in the cerebral cortex increases greatly with monkey growth. So, the authors can deduce that the overmuch lipid is an important cause to induce the caducity. Therefore, the results will be a powerful assistance and valuable parameter to study the order of life growth and diagnose diseases.

  3. Applicability of FTIR-spectroscopy for characterizing waste organic matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smidt, E.

    2001-12-01

    State and development of waste organic matter were characterized by means of FTIR-spectroscopy. Due to the interaction of infrared light with matter energy is absorbed by chemical functional groups. Chemical preparation steps are not necessary and therefore this method offers a more holistic information about the material. The first part of experiments was focussed on spectra of different waste materials representing various stages of decomposition. Due to characteristics in the fingerprint- region the identity of wastes is provable. Heights of significant bands in the spectrum were measured and relative absorbances were calculated. Changes of relative absorbances indicate the development of organic matter during decomposition. Organic matter of waste samples was compared to organic matter originating from natural analogous processes (peat, soil). The second part of experiments concentrated on a composting process for a period of 260 days. Spectral characteristics of the samples were compared to their chemical, physical and biological data. The change of relative absorbances was reflected by conventional parameters. According to the development of the entire sample humic acids underwent a change as well. For practical use the method offers several possibilities: monitoring of a process, comparison of different processes, quality control of products originating from waste materials and the proof of their identity. (author)

  4. Diffuse reflectance FTIR of stains on grit blasted metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, G.L.; Hallman, R.L. Jr.; Cox, R.L. [Oak Ridge Centers for Manufacturing Technologies, TN (United States)

    1997-08-09

    Diffuse reflectance mid-infrared Fourier transform (DRIFT) spectroscopy has been applied to the detection of oil contamination on grit-blasted metals. The object of this application is to detect and discriminate between silicone and hydrocarbon oil contamination at levels approaching 10 mg/m{sup 2}. A portable FTIR spectrometer with dedicated diffuse reflectance optics was developed for this purpose. Using translation devices positioned by instructions from the spectrometer operating system, images of macroscopic substrates were produced with millimeter spatial resolution. The pixels that comprise an image are each a full mid-infrared spectrum with excellent signal-to-noise, each determined as individual files and uniquely saved to disc. Reduced spectra amplitudes, based on peak height, area, or other chemometric techniques, mapped as a function of the spatial coordinates of the pixel are used to display the image. This paper demonstrates the application of the technique to the analysis of stains on grit-blasted metals, including the calibration of the method, the inspection of substrates, and the migration of oil contamination.

  5. Hydration of amino acids: FTIR spectra and molecular dynamics studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panuszko, Aneta; Adamczak, Beata; Czub, Jacek; Gojło, Emilia; Stangret, Janusz

    2015-11-01

    The hydration of selected amino acids, alanine, glycine, proline, valine, isoleucine and phenylalanine, has been studied in aqueous solutions by means of FTIR spectra of HDO isotopically diluted in H2O. The difference spectra procedure and the chemometric method have been applied to remove the contribution of bulk water and thus to separate the spectra of solute-affected HDO. To support interpretation of obtained spectral results, molecular dynamics simulations of amino acids were performed. The structural-energetic characteristic of these solute-affected water molecules shows that, on average, water affected by amino acids forms stronger and shorter H-bonds than those in pure water. Differences in the influence of amino acids on water structure have been noticed. The effect of the hydrophobic side chain of an amino acid on the solvent interactions seems to be enhanced because of the specific cooperative coupling of water strong H-bond chain, connecting the carboxyl and amino groups, with the clathrate-like H-bond network surrounding the hydrocarbon side chain. The parameter derived from the spectral data, which corresponds to the contributions of the population of weak hydrogen bonds of water molecules which have been substituted by the stronger ones in the hydration sphere of amino acids, correlated well with the amino acid hydrophobicity indexes.

  6. Hydrogenated fullerenes in space: FT-IR spectra analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Barbary, A. A. [Physics Department, Faculty of Education, Ain-Shams University, Cairo, Egypt Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Jazan University, Jazan (Saudi Arabia)

    2016-06-10

    Fullerenes and hydrogenated fullerenes are found in circumstellar and interstellar environments. But the determination structures for the detected bands in the interstellar and circumstellar space are not completely understood so far. For that purpose, the aim of this article is to provide all possible infrared spectra for C{sub 20} and C{sub 60} fullerenes and their hydrogenated fullerenes. Density Functional theory (DFT) is applied using B3LYP exchange-functional with basis set 6–31G(d, p). The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) is found to be capable of distinguishing between fullerenes, mono hydrogenated fullerenes and fully hydrogenated fullerenes. In addition, deposition of one hydrogen atom outside the fully hydrogenated fullerenes is found to be distinguished by forming H{sub 2} molecule at peak around 4440 cm{sup −1}. However, deposition of one hydrogen atom inside the fully hydrogenated fullerenes cannot be distinguished. The obtained spectral structures are analyzed and are compared with available experimental results.

  7. Analysis of contaminants on electronic components by reflectance FTIR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffith, G.W.

    1982-09-01

    The analysis of electronic component contaminants by infrared spectroscopy is often a difficult process. Most of the contaminants are very small, which necessitates the use of microsampling techniques. Beam condensers will provide the required sensitivity but most require that the sample be removed from the substrate before analysis. Since it can be difficult and time consuming, it is usually an undesirable approach. Micro ATR work can also be exasperating, due to the difficulty of positioning the sample at the correct place under the ATR plate in order to record a spectrum. This paper describes a modified reflection beam condensor which has been adapted to a Nicolet 7199 FTIR. The sample beam is directed onto the sample surface and reflected from the substrate back to the detector. A micropositioning XYZ stage and a close-focusing telescope are used to position the contaminant directly under the infrared beam. It is possible to analyze contaminants on 1 mm wide leads surrounded by an epoxy matrix using this device. Typical spectra of contaminants found on small circuit boards are included

  8. Impedance Spectroscopy and FTIR Studies of PEG - Based Polymer Electrolytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anji Reddy Polu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ionic conductivity of poly(ethylene glycol (PEG - ammonium chloride (NH4Cl based polymer electrolytes can be enhanced by incorporating ceramic filler TiO2 into PEG-NH4Cl matrix. The electrolyte samples were prepared by solution casting technique. FTIR studies indicates that the complex formation between the polymer, salt and ceramic filler. The ionic conductivity was measured using impedance spectroscopy technique. It was observed that the conductivity of the electrolyte varies with TiO2 concentration and temperature. The highest room temperature conductivity of the electrolyte of 7.72×10−6 S cm-1 was obtained at 15% by weight of TiO2 and that without TiO2 filler was found to be 9.58×10−7 S cm−1. The conductivity has been improved by 8 times when the TiO2 filler was introduced into the PEG–NH4Cl electrolyte system. The conductance spectra shows two distinct regions: a dc plateau and a dispersive region. The temperature dependence of the conductivity of the polymer electrolytes seems to obey the VTF relation. The conductivity values of the polymer electrolytes were reported and the results were discussed. The imaginary part of dielectric constant (εi decreases with increase in frequency in the low frequency region whereas frequency independent behavior is observed in the high frequency region.

  9. Broadband stimulated Raman spectroscopy in the deep ultraviolet region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuramochi, Hikaru; Fujisawa, Tomotsumi; Takeuchi, Satoshi; Tahara, Tahei

    2017-09-01

    We report broadband stimulated Raman measurements in the deep ultraviolet (DUV) region, which enables selective probing of the aromatic amino acid residues inside proteins through the resonance enhancement. We combine the narrowband DUV Raman pump pulse (1000 cm-1) to realize stimulated Raman measurements covering a >1500 cm-1 spectral window. The stimulated Raman measurements for neat solvents, tryptophan, tyrosine, and glucose oxidase are performed using 240- and 290-nm Raman pump, highlighting the high potential of the DUV stimulated Raman probe for femtosecond time-resolved study of proteins.

  10. A quarter century of stimulated Raman scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloembergen, N.

    1987-01-01

    To round out a quarter century of SRS the timing of this writing (1986) requires a look ahead of only one year into the future. The proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Raman Spectroscopy present a picture of current activity. Further progress will be made in time-resolved spectroscopy with subpicosecond resolution, in the study of hyper-Raman and other higher order effects with CARS, in extension of resonant Raman excitation in the UV region of spectrum, and in the development of Raman laser sources. During past few years extensive theoretical investigations have been made for four-wave light mixing in the case of one or more very strong light beams. The perturbation approach for those fields ceases to be valid. If only one light field is strong, the usual approach is to make a transformation to a rotating coordinate system so that the strong Hamiltonian for this light field becomes time-independent. Very recently these techniques have been extended to the case of two or more strong fields. CARS-type experiments with strong beams are likely to receive more attention. Extrapolation of the current activities instills confidence in the vitality of stimulated Raman scattering for the foreseeable future

  11. Optical Sensors based on Raman Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jernshøj, Kit Drescher

    Formålet med denne afhandling er at give en systematisk og uddybende videnskabelig diskussion af molekylær Raman spredning, som kan danne grundlag for udviklingen af molekylespecifikke optiske sensorer til on-site, ikke-destruktiv måling. Afhandlingen falder i tre dele, to teoriafsnit, hvor første...... del omhandler den tilgangelige molekylære information ved overfladeforstærket resonans Raman spredning (SERRS), samt hvordan adgangen til denne information kan optimeres. Anden del omhandler, hvordan det molekylære informationsindhold kan forøges ved at kombinere polariserede Raman og resonans Raman...... målinger på frie molekyler med multivariat analyse. I tredje og sidste del, som er et eksperimentelt afsnit, præsenteres og diskuteres overfladeforstærkede Raman målinger (SERS) på tre udvalgte pesticider. Afhandlingen indledes med en diskussion af teorien bag SERRS med speciel fokus på den molekylære...

  12. Polarization Sensitive Coherent Raman Measurements of DCVJ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Josiah; Cooper, Nathan; Lawhead, Carlos; Shiver, Tegan; Ujj, Laszlo

    2014-03-01

    Coherent Raman spectroscopy which recently developed into coherent Raman microscopy has been used to produce label free imaging of thin layers of material and find the spatial distributions of certain chemicals within samples, e.g. cancer cells.(1) Not all aspects of coherent scattering have been used for imaging. Among those for example are special polarization sensitive measurements. Therefore we have investigated the properties of polarization sensitive CARS spectra of a highly fluorescent molecule, DCVJ.(2) Spectra has been recorded by using parallel polarized and perpendicular polarized excitations. A special polarization arrangement was developed to suppress the non-resonant background scattering from the sample. These results can be used to improve the imaging properties of a coherent Raman microscope in the future. This is the first time coherent Raman polarization sensitive measurements have been used to characterize the vibrational modes of DCVJ. 1: K. I. Gutkowski, et al., ``Fluorescence of dicyanovinyl julolidine in a room temperature ionic liquid '' Chemical Physics Letters 426 (2006) 329 - 333 2: Fouad El-Diasty, ``Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering: Spectroscopy and microscopy'' Vibrational Spectroscopy 55 (2011) 1-37

  13. Dome C ultracarbonaceous Antarctic micrometeorites. Infrared and Raman fingerprints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dartois, E.; Engrand, C.; Duprat, J.; Godard, M.; Charon, E.; Delauche, L.; Sandt, C.; Borondics, F.

    2018-01-01

    Context. UltraCarbonaceous Antarctic MicroMeteorites (UCAMMs) represent a small fraction of interplanetary dust particles reaching the Earth's surface and contain large amounts of an organic component not found elsewhere. They are most probably sampling a contribution from the outer regions of the solar system to the local interplanetary dust particle (IDP) flux. Aims: We characterize UCAMMs composition focusing on the organic matter, and compare the results to the insoluble organic matter (IOM) from primitive meteorites, IDPs, and the Earth. Methods: We acquired synchrotron infrared microspectroscopy (μFTIR) and μRaman spectra of eight UCAMMs from the Concordia/CSNSM collection, as well as N/C atomic ratios determined with an electron microprobe. Results: The spectra are dominated by an organic component with a low aliphatic CH versus aromatic C=C ratio, and a higher nitrogen fraction and lower oxygen fraction compared to carbonaceous chondrites and IDPs. The UCAMMs carbonyl absorption band is in agreement with a ketone or aldehyde functional group. Some of the IR and Raman spectra show a C≡N band corresponding to a nitrile. The absorption band profile from 1400 to 1100 cm-1 is compatible with the presence of C-N bondings in the carbonaceous network, and is spectrally different from that reported in meteorite IOM. We confirm that the silicate-to-carbon content in UCAMMs is well below that reported in IDPs and meteorites. Together with the high nitrogen abundance relative to carbon building the organic matter matrix, the most likely scenario for the formation of UCAMMs occurs via physicochemical mechanisms taking place in a cold nitrogen rich environment, like the surface of icy parent bodies in the outer solar system. The composition of UCAMMs provides an additional hint of the presence of a heliocentric positive gradient in the C/Si and N/C abundance ratios in the solar system protoplanetary disc evolution. Part of the equipment used in this work has been

  14. Ultraviolet Resonant Raman Enhancements in the Detection of Explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Short Jr., Billy Joe [Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA (United States)

    2009-06-01

    Raman-based spectroscopy is potentially militarily useful for standoff detection of high explosives. Normal (non-resonance) and resonance Raman spectroscopies are both light scattering techniques that use a laser to measure the vibrational spectrum of a sample. In resonance Raman, the laser is tuned to match the wavelength of a strong electronic absorbance in the molecule of interest, whereas, in normal Raman the laser is not tuned to any strong electronic absorbance bands. The selection of appropriate excitation wavelengths in resonance Raman can result in a dramatic increase in the Raman scattering efficiency of select band(s) associated with the electronic transition. Other than the excitation wavelength, however, resonance Raman is performed experimentally the same as normal Raman. In these studies, normal and resonance Raman spectral signatures of select solid high explosive (HE) samples and explosive precursors were collected at 785 nm, 244 nm and 229 nm. Solutions of PETN, TNT, and explosive precursors (DNT & PNT) in acetonitrile solvent as an internal Raman standard were quantitatively evaluated using ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) microscopy and normal Raman spectroscopy as a function of power and select excitation wavelengths. Use of an internal standard allowed resonance enhancements to be estimated at 229 nm and 244 nm. Investigations demonstrated that UVRR provided ~2000-fold enhancement at 244 nm and ~800-fold improvement at 229 nm while PETN showed a maximum of ~25-fold at 244 nm and ~190-fold enhancement at 229 nm solely from resonance effects when compared to normal Raman measurements. In addition to the observed resonance enhancements, additional Raman signal enhancements are obtained with ultraviolet excitation (i.e., Raman scattering scales as !4 for measurements based on scattered photons). A model, based partly on the resonance Raman enhancement results for HE solutions, is presented for estimating Raman enhancements for solid HE samples.

  15. A chemometric method for correcting FTIR spectra of biomaterials for interference from water in KBr discs

    Science.gov (United States)

    FTIR analysis of solid biomaterials by the familiar KBr disc technique is very often frustrated by water interference in the important protein (amide I) and carbohydrate (hydroxyl) regions of their spectra. A method was therefore devised that overcomes the difficulty and measures FTIR spectra of so...

  16. FTIR spectra of whey and casein hydrolysates in relation to their functional properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ven, van der C.; Muresan, S.; Gruppen, H.; Bont, D.B.A.; Merck, K.B.; Voragen, A.G.J.

    2002-01-01

    Mid-infrared spectra of whey and casein hydrolysates were recorded using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Multivariate data analysis techniques were used to investigate the capacity of FTIR spectra to classify hydrolysates and to study the ability of the spectra to predict bitterness,

  17. Validation of the CrIS fast physical NH3 retrieval with ground-based FTIR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dammers, E.; Shephard, M.W.; Palm, M.; Cady-Pereira, K.; Capps, S.; Lutsch, E.; Strong, K.; Hannigan, J.W.; Ortega, I.; Toon, G.C.; Stremme, W.; Grutter, M.; Jones, N.; Smale, D.; Siemons, J.; Hrpcek, K.; Tremblay, D.; Schaap, M.; Notholt, J.; Willem Erisman, J.

    2017-01-01

    Presented here is the validation of the CrIS (Cross-track Infrared Sounder) fast physical NH3 retrieval (CFPR) column and profile measurements using ground-based Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) observations. We use the total columns and profiles from seven FTIR sites in the Network for the

  18. Characterization of Kevlar Using Raman Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washer, Glenn; Brooks, Thomas; Saulsberry, Regor

    2007-01-01

    This paper explores the characterization of Kevlar composite materials using Raman spectroscopy. The goal of the research is to develop and understand the Raman spectrum of Kevlar materials to provide a foundation for the development of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) technologies based on the interaction of laser light with the polymer Kevlar. The paper discusses the fundamental aspects of experimental characterization of the spectrum of Kevlar, including the effects of incident wavelength, polarization and laser power. The effects of environmental exposure of Kevlar materials on certain characteristics of its Raman spectrum are explored, as well as the effects of applied stress. This data may provide a foundation for the development of NDE technologies intended to detect the in-situ deterioration of Kevlar materials used for engineering applications that can later be extended to other materials such as carbon fiber composites.

  19. Raman scattering of rare earth hexaborides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogita, Norio; Hasegawa, Takumi; Udagawa, Masayuki; Iga, Fumitoshi; Kunii, Satoru

    2009-01-01

    Raman scattering spectra were measured for the rare-earth hexaborides RB 6 (R = Ce, Gd, or Dy). All Raman-active phonons due to B 6 vibrations were observed in the range 600 - 1400 cm -1 . Anomalous peaks were detected below 200 cm -1 , which correspond to vibrations of rare-earth ion excited by second-order Raman scattering process. The intensity and energy of the rare-earth mode decrease with decreasing temperature. This suggests that the rare-earth ion vibrates in a shallow and anharmonic potential due to the boron cage. Using the reported values of mean square displacement of rare-earth ion, we estimated the anharmonic contribution for the rare-earth vibrations.

  20. Vacuum FTIR study on the hygroscopicity of magnesium acetate aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Na; Cai, Chen; He, Xiang; Pang, Shu-Feng; Zhang, Yun-Hong

    2018-03-01

    Hygroscopicity and volatility of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) are two important properties, which determine the composition, concentration, size, phase state of SOA and thus chemical and optical properties for SOA. In this work, magnesium acetate (Mg(Ac)2) aerosol was used as a simple SOA model in order to reveal relationship between hygroscopicity and volatility. A novel approach was set up based on a combination of a vacuum FTIR spectrometer and a home-made relative humidity (RH) controlling system. The striking advantage of this approach was that the RH and the compositions of aerosols could be obtained from a same IR spectrum, which guaranteed the synchronism between RH and spectral features on a sub-second scale. At the constant RH of 90% and 80% for 3000 s, the water content within Mg(Ac)2 aerosol particles decreased about 19.0% and 9.4% while there were 13.4% and 6.0% of acetate loss. This was attributed to a cooperation between volatile of acetic acid and Mg2 + hydrolysis in Mg(Ac)2 aerosols, which greatly suppressed the hygroscopicity of Mg(Ac)2 aerosols. When the RH changed with pulsed mode between 70% and 90%, hygroscopicity relaxation was observed for Mg(Ac)2 aerosols. Diffuse coefficient of water in the relaxation process was estimated to be 5 × 10- 12 m2·s- 1 for the Mg(Ac)2 aerosols. Combining the IR spectra analysis, the decrease in the diffuse coefficient of water was due to the formation of magnesium hydroxide accompanying acetic acid evaporation in the aerosols.

  1. Water in Tektites and Impact Glasses by FTIR Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beran, Anton; Koeberl, Christian

    1997-03-01

    To improve the scarce data base of water content in tektites and impact glasses, we analyzed 26 tektites from all four strewn fields and 25 impact glass samples for their water content. We used the fourier transformed IR (FTIR) spectrometry method, which permits measurement of areas of about 40 mm in diameter. Our results show that the tektites have water contents ranging from 0.002 to 0.030 wt% (average 0.014+/-0.008 wt%). Ivory Coast tektites have the lowest water abundances (0.002-0.003 wt%), and Muong Nong-type indochinites and some North American tektites having the highest contents (up to about 0.03 wt%). Impact glass samples (from the Zhamanshin, Aouelloul, and Rio Cuarto craters) yielded water contents of 0.008 to 0.13 wt% H2O. Typical impact glasses from the Aouelloul and Zhamanshin craters have low water contents (0.008 to 0.063 wt%). Libyan Desert Glasses and Rio Cuarto glasses have higher water contents (about 0.11 wt%). We also analyzed glasses of unknown origin (e.g., urengoites; glass fragments from Tikal), which showed very low water contents, in agreement with an origin by impact. Our data confirm that all tektites found on land have very low water contents (<0.03 wt% water), while impact glasses have slightly higher water contents. Both glass types are very dry compared to volcanic glasses. This study confirms that the low water contents (<0.05 wt%) of such glasses can be considered good evidence for an origin by impact.

  2. Raman spectroscopy of synthetic and natural iowaite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Ray L; Adebajo, Moses O; Erickson, Kristy L

    2005-02-01

    The chemistry of a magnesium based hydrotalcite known as iowaite Mg6Fe2Cl2(OH)16.4H2O has been studied using Raman spectroscopy. Iowaite has chloride as the counter anion in the interlayer. The formula of synthetic iowaite was found to be Mg5.78Fe2.09(Cl,(CO3)0.5)(OH)16.4H2O. Oxidation of natural iowaite results in the formation of Mg4FeO(Cl,CO3) (OH)8.4H2O. X-ray diffraction (XRD) shows that the iowaite is a layered structure with a d(001) spacing of 8.0 angtsroms. For synthetic iowaite three Raman bands at 1376, 1194 and 1084 cm(-1) are attributed to CO3 stretching vibrations. These bands are not observed for the natural iowaite but are observed when the natural iowaite is exposed to air. The Raman spectrum of natural iowaite shows three bands at 708, 690 and 620 cm(-1) and upon exposure to air, two broad bands are found at 710 and 648 cm(-1). The Raman spectrum of synthetic iowaite has a very broad band at 712 cm(-1). The Raman spectrum of natural iowaite shows an intense band at 527 cm(-1). The air oxidized iowaite shows two bands at 547 and 484 cm(-1) attributed to the (CO3)(2-)nu2 bending mode. Raman spectroscopy has proven most useful for the study of the chemistry of iowaite and chemical changes induced in natural iowaite upon exposure to air.

  3. Compositional characterization of carbon electrode material: A study using simultaneous TG-DTA-FTIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raje, Naina; Aacherekar, Darshana A.; Reddy, A.V.R.

    2009-01-01

    Present work describes the application of thermal methods, especially the evolved gas analysis (EGA) for the compositional characterization of carbon electrode material with respect to its organic, amorphous and graphitic carbon content. Trace levels of organic carbon present in the amorphous carbon samples were determined qualitatively by using FTIR absorption spectroscopy. Amorphous and graphitic carbon content in synthetic mixture samples were determined quantitatively using simultaneous TG-DTA-FTIR measurements. FTIR system was calibrated using the measured absorption signal of the evolved carbon dioxide due to the decomposition of cadmium carbonate. Inter-comparison studies using TG-FTIR measurements show that simultaneous FTIR spectroscopy is an effective complementary quantitative measurement technique for thermogravimetric analysis involving the complex decomposition reaction processes.

  4. Phonon populations by nanosecond-pulsed Raman scattering in Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compaan, A.; Lee, M.C.; Trott, G.J.

    1985-01-01

    Since the first time-resolved Raman studies of phonon populations under pulsed-laser-annealing conditions, a number of cw Raman studies have been performed which provide a much improved basis for interpreting the pulsed Raman data. Here we present new pulsed Raman results and interpret them with reference to temperature-dependent resonance effects, high-carrier-density effects, phonon anharmonicity, and laser-induced strain effects. The pulsed Raman data: Stokes to anti-Stokes ratios, shift and shape of the first-order peak, and second-order spectra: indicate the existence of a phase in which the Raman signal disappears followed by a rapidly cooling solid which begins within 300 K of the 1685 K normal melting temperature of Si. We identify a major difficulty in pulsed Raman studies in Si to be the decrease in Raman intensity at high temperatures

  5. Upgrade of an old Raman Spectrometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Susanne Brunsgaard; Berg, Rolf W.; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2004-01-01

    Improvement of a conventional Jeol Raman spectrometer with a single channel photo multiplier detector is described. New optical components (fibres, mirror, lens and CCD detector) have been chosen to design a high quality and easy-to-use instrument. Tests have shown that with this modified...... spectrometer Raman spectra can be acquired of a quality comparable to the spectra obtained previously, but the time needed to obtain a spectrum is markedly reduced. Selected test spectra and a simple calibration procedure to obtain the wavenumber values from the band CCD pixel position are presented....

  6. Raman spectroscopic study of reaction dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacPhail, R. A.

    1990-12-01

    The Raman spectra of reacting molecules in liquids can yield information about various aspects of the reaction dynamics. The author discusses the analysis of Raman spectra for three prototypical unimolecular reactions, the rotational isomerization of n-butane and 1,2-difluoroethane, and the barrierless exchange of axial and equatorial hydrogens in cyclopentane via pseudorotation. In the first two cases the spectra are sensitive to torsional oscillations of the gauche conformer, and yield estimates of the torsional solvent friction. In the case of cyclopentane, the spectra can be used to discriminate between different stochastic models of the pseudorotation dynamics, and to determine the relevant friction coefficients.

  7. Blood proteins analysis by Raman spectroscopy method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artemyev, D. N.; Bratchenko, I. A.; Khristoforova, Yu. A.; Lykina, A. A.; Myakinin, O. O.; Kuzmina, T. P.; Davydkin, I. L.; Zakharov, V. P.

    2016-04-01

    This work is devoted to study the possibility of plasma proteins (albumin, globulins) concentration measurement using Raman spectroscopy setup. The blood plasma and whole blood were studied in this research. The obtained Raman spectra showed significant variation of intensities of certain spectral bands 940, 1005, 1330, 1450 and 1650 cm-1 for different protein fractions. Partial least squares regression analysis was used for determination of correlation coefficients. We have shown that the proposed method represents the structure and biochemical composition of major blood proteins.

  8. Raman Optical Activity of Biological Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanch, Ewan W.; Barron, Laurence D.

    Now an incisive probe of biomolecular structure, Raman optical activity (ROA) measures a small difference in Raman scattering from chiral molecules in right- and left-circularly polarized light. As ROA spectra measure vibrational optical activity, they contain highly informative band structures sensitive to the secondary and tertiary structures of proteins, nucleic acids, viruses and carbohydrates as well as the absolute configurations of small molecules. In this review we present a survey of recent studies on biomolecular structure and dynamics using ROA and also a discussion of future applications of this powerful new technique in biomedical research.

  9. Raman spectroscopy: a structural probe of glycosaminoglycans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bansil, R.; Stanley, H.E.; Yannas, I.V.

    1978-01-01

    The authors report the first Raman spectroscopic study of the glycosaminoglycans chondroitin 4-sulfate, chondroitin 6-sulfate and hyaluronic acid, both in solution and in the solid state. To aid in spectral identification, infrared spectra were also recorded from films of these samples. Vibrational frequencies for important functional groups like the sulfate groups, glycosidic linkages, C-OH and the N-acetyl group can be identified from the Raman spectra. Certain differences in the spectra of the different glycosaminoglycans can be interpreted in terms of the geometry of the various substituents, while other differences can be related to differences in chemical composition. (Auth.)

  10. Negative refraction using Raman transitions and chirality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikes, D. E.; Yavuz, D. D. [Department of Physics, 1150 University Avenue, University of Wisconsin at Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2011-11-15

    We present a scheme that achieves negative refraction with low absorption in far-off resonant atomic systems. The scheme utilizes Raman resonances and does not require the simultaneous presence of an electric-dipole transition and a magnetic-dipole transition near the same wavelength. We show that two interfering Raman tran-sitions coupled to a magnetic-dipole transition can achieve a negative index of refraction with low absorption through magnetoelectric cross-coupling. We confirm the validity of the analytical results with exact numerical simulations of the density matrix. We also discuss possible experimental implementations of the scheme in rare-earth metal atomic systems.

  11. RAMAN THE MAN, HIS CONTRIBUTION AND HIS MESSAGE

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    GV

    Since research careers did not exist back then, Raman decided to join the .... the sea is blue, Raman was constantly thinking about the quantum aspect ..... Referring to the many papers published by Raman in the Journal of ... After that, the creative period ceases abruptly, though scientific .... science of international quality.

  12. Raman Chair | About IASc | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The Raman Chair was instituted in 1972 by the Government of India to commemorate the memory of the founder of the Academy, Sir C. V. Raman. Eminent scientists are invited by the Council of the Academy to occupy the Chair, for periods of between six weeks and six months. Raman Professors who have occupied the ...

  13. A Raman Study of Titanate Nanotubes | Liu | South African Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of the addition of NaOH or KOH on commercial Degussa Titania P25 was investigated using TEM, Raman and in situ Raman spectroscopy. Treatment of titania with conc. NaOH generated a tubular material corresponding to a sodium titanate. An in situ Raman study on the sodium titanate nanotubes as a function ...

  14. Analyzing the fundamental properties of Raman amplification in optical fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rottwitt, Karsten; Povlsen, Jørn Hedegaard

    2005-01-01

    The Raman response of germanosilicate fibers is presented. This includes not only the material dependence but also the relation between the spatial-mode profile of the light and the Raman response in the time and frequency domain. From the Raman-gain spectrum, information is derived related...

  15. Scaling the Raman gain coefficient: Applications to Germanosilicate fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rottwitt, Karsten; Bromage, J.; Stentz, A.J.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive analysis of the temperature dependence of a Raman amplifier and the scaling of the Raman gain coefficient with wavelength, modal overlap, and material composition. The temperature dependence is derived by applying a quantum theoretical description, whereas...... the scaling of the Raman gain coefficient is derived using a classical electromagnetic model. We also present experimental verification of our theoretical findings....

  16. Nanostructured surface enhanced Raman scattering substrates for explosives detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Michael Stenbaek; Olsen, Jesper Kenneth; Boisen, Anja

    2010-01-01

    Here we present a method for trace detection of explosives in the gas phase using novel surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy substrates. Novel substrates that produce an exceptionally large enhancement of the Raman effect were used to amplify the Raman signal of explosives...

  17. Interpretation of IR and Raman spectra of dopamine neurotransmitter and effect of hydrogen bond in HCl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, T.; Mukherjee, V.

    2018-05-01

    The potential energy scanning with respect to the different dihedral angles were performed to search possible numbers of dopamine (neutral) conformers and further, fifteen conformers of dopamine were identified on the basis of energy minima. Vibrational frequencies were calculated for all the conformers of dopamine. Density functional theory was employed to carry out all the computations. The exchange correlation functional B3LYP and the basis set 6-31++G(d,p) were included in DFT calculation. The FTIR and FT-Raman spectra of dopamine hydrochloride were also recorded in the spectral region 400-4000 cm-1 and 50-4000 cm-1 respectively. The normal coordinate analysis was also performed to scale DFT calculated force constants and to calculate potential energy distributions. The detailed vibrational spectral analysis and the assignments of the bands, done on the best-fit basis comparison of the experimentally obtained and theoretically calculated IR and Raman spectra, match quite well indicating DFT calculations as very accurate source of normal mode assignments. The interaction of the most stable conformer of dopamine with HCl was also studied to know the effect of hydrogen bond on its geometry and dynamics. The stability of the dopamine in isolated and protonated forms arising from hyperconjugative interactions was also analyzed by natural bond orbital analysis.

  18. Observation and simulation of ethane at 23 FTIR sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, W. M. J.; Mahieu, E.; Franco, B.; Pozzer, A.; Taraborrelli, D.; Prignon, M.; Servais, C. P.; De Maziere, M.; Vigouroux, C.; Mengistu Tsidu, G.; Sufa, G.; Mellqvist, J.; Blumenstock, T.; Hase, F.; Schneider, M.; Sussmann, R.; Nagahama, T.; Sudo, K.; Hannigan, J. W.; Ortega, I.; Morino, I.; Nakajima, H.; Smale, D.; Makarova, M.; Poberovsky, A.; Murata, I.; Grutter de la Mora, M.; Guarin, C. A.; Stremme, W.; Té, Y.; Jeseck, P.; Notholt, J.; Palm, M.; Conway, S. A.; Lutsch, E.; Strong, K.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Jones, N. B.; Paton-Walsh, C.; Friedrich, M.; Smeekes, S.

    2017-12-01

    Ethane is the most abundant non-methane hydrocarbon (NMHC) in the Earth atmosphere. Its main sources are of anthropogenic origin, with globally 62% from leakage during production and transport of natural gas, 20% from biofuel combustion and 18% from biomass burning. In the Southern hemisphere, anthropogenic emissions are lower which makes biomass burning emissions a more significant source. The main removal process is oxidation by the hydroxyl radical (OH), leading to a mean atmospheric lifetime of 2 months. Until recently, a prolonged decrease of its abundance has been documented, at rates of -1 to -2.7%/yr, with global emissions dropping from 14 to 11 Tg/yr over 1984-2010 owing to successful measures reducing fugitive emissions from its fossil fuel sources. However, subsequent investigations have reported on an upturn in the ethane trend, characterized by a sharp rise from about 2009 onwards. The ethane increase is attributed to the oil and natural gas production boom in North America, although significant changes in OH could also be at play. In the present contribution, we report the trend of ethane at 23 ground-based Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) sites spanning the 80ºN to 79ºS latitude range. Over 2010-2015, a significant ethane rise of 3-5%/yr is determined for most sites in the Northern Hemisphere, while for the Southern hemisphere the rates of changes are not significant at the 2-sigma uncertainty level . Dedicated model simulations by EMAC (ECHAM5/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry; 1.8×1.8 degrees) implementing various emission scenarios are included in order to support data interpretation. The usual underestimation of the NMHCs emissions in the main inventories is confirmed here for RCP85 (Representative Concentration Pathway Database v8.5). Scaling them by 1.5 is needed to capture the background levels of atmospheric ethane. Moreover, additional and significant emissions ( 7 Tg over 2009-2015) are needed to capture the ethane rise in the Northern

  19. A low-cost Raman spectrometer design used to study Raman ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    The paper discusses the design of a low cost Raman spectrometer. ... system. We observe both the radial-breathing mode (RBM) and the tangential mode ... broadened due to the inherent tube diameter distribution present in the material.

  20. Resonance Raman Optical Activity and Surface Enhanced Resonance Raman Optical Activity analysis of Cytochrome C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, Christian; Abdali, Salim; White, Peter C.

    2007-01-01

    High quality Resonance Raman (RR) and resonance Raman Optical Activity (ROA) spectra of cytochrome c were obtained in order to perform full assignment of spectral features of the resonance ROA spectrum. The resonance ROA spectrum of cytochrome c revealed a distinct spectral signature pattern due...... to resonance enhanced skeletal porphyrin vibrations, more pronounced than any contribution from the protein back-bone. Combining the intrinsic resonance enhancement of cytochrome c with surface plasmon enhancement by colloidal silver particles, the Surface Enhanced Resonance Raman Scattering (SERRS) and Chiral...... Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (ChERS) spectra of the protein were successfully obtained at very low concentration (as low as 1 µM). The assignment of spectral features was based on the information obtained from the RR and resonance ROA spectra. Excellent agreement between RR and SERRS spectra is reported...

  1. Charge Transfer Effect on Raman and Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy of Furfural Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Fu; Shi, Haiyang; Chen, Weigen; Gu, Zhaoliang; Du, Lingling; Wang, Pinyi; Wang, Jianxin; Huang, Yingzhou

    2017-08-02

    The detection of furfural in transformer oil through surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is one of the most promising online monitoring techniques in the process of transformer aging. In this work, the Raman of individual furfural molecules and SERS of furfural-M x (M = Ag, Au, Cu) complexes are investigated through density functional theory (DFT). In the Raman spectrum of individual furfural molecules, the vibration mode of each Raman peak is figured out, and the deviation from experimental data is analyzed by surface charge distribution. In the SERS of furfural-M x complexes, the influence of atom number and species on SERS chemical enhancement factors (EFs) are studied, and are further analyzed by charge transfer effect. Our studies strengthen the understanding of charge transfer effect in the SERS of furfural molecules, which is important in the online monitoring of the transformer aging process through SERS.

  2. NIR–FT Raman, FT–IR and surface-enhanced Raman scattering ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Single crystals of (S)-phenylsuccinic acid (SPSA) were grown by the slow evaporation tech- nique and vibrational ... the shift of Raman frequencies, enhancing or weak- ening of .... Harmonic vibrational wave numbers were cal- culated using ...

  3. Laser pulses for coherent xuv Raman excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenman, Loren; Koch, Christiane P.; Whaley, K. Birgitta

    2015-07-01

    We combine multichannel electronic structure theory with quantum optimal control to derive femtosecond-time-scale Raman pulse sequences that coherently populate a valence excited state. For a neon atom, Raman target populations of up to 13% are obtained. Superpositions of the ground and valence Raman states with a controllable relative phase are found to be reachable with up to 4.5% population and arbitrary phase control facilitated by the pump pulse carrier-envelope phase. Analysis of the optimized pulse structure reveals a sequential mechanism in which the valence excitation is reached via a fast (femtosecond) population transfer through an intermediate resonance state in the continuum rather than avoiding intermediate-state population with simultaneous or counterintuitive (stimulated Raman adiabatic passage) pulse sequences. Our results open a route to coupling valence excitations and core-hole excitations in molecules and aggregates that locally address specific atoms and represent an initial step towards realization of multidimensional spectroscopy in the xuv and x-ray regimes.

  4. Raman imaging using fixed bandpass filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landström, L.; Kullander, F.; Lundén, H.; Wästerby, P.

    2017-05-01

    By using fixed narrow band pass optical filtering and scanning the laser excitation wavelength, hyperspectral Raman imaging could be achieved. Experimental, proof-of-principle results from the Chemical Warfare Agent (CWA) tabun (GA) as well as the common CWA simulant tributyl phosphate (TBP) on different surfaces/substrates are presented and discussed.

  5. Raman spectroscopy of garnet-group minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingsheng, P.; Mao, Ho-kwang; Dien, L.; Chao, E.C.T.

    1994-01-01

    The Raman spectra of the natural end members of the garnet-group minerals, which include pyrope, almandine and spessarite of Fe-Al garnet series and grossularite, andradite and uvarovite of Ca-Fe garnet series, have been studied. Measured Raman spectra of these minerals are reasonably and qualitatively assigned to the internal modes, translational and rotatory modes of SiO4 tetrahedra, as well as the translational motion of bivalent cations in the X site. The stretch and rotatory Alg modes for the Fe-Al garnet series show obvious Raman shifts as compared with those for the Ca-Fe garnet series, owing to the cations residing in the X site connected with SiO4 tetrahedra by sharing the two edges. The Raman shifts of all members within either of the series are attributed mainly to the properties of cations in the X site for the Fe-Al garnet series and in the Y site for the Ca-Fe garnet series. ?? 1994 Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  6. Raman spectroscopic studies of hydrogen clathrate hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strobel, Timothy A; Sloan, E Dendy; Koh, Carolyn A

    2009-01-07

    Raman spectroscopic measurements of simple hydrogen and tetrahydrofuran+hydrogen sII clathrate hydrates have been performed. Both the roton and vibron bands illuminate interesting quantum dynamics of enclathrated H(2) molecules. The complex vibron region of the Raman spectrum has been interpreted by observing the change in population of these bands with temperature, measuring the absolute H(2) content as a function of pressure, and with D(2) isotopic substitution. Quadruple occupancy of the large sII clathrate cavity shows the highest H(2) vibrational frequency, followed by triple and double occupancies. Singly occupied small cavities display the lowest vibrational frequency. The vibrational frequencies of H(2) within all cavity environments are redshifted from the free gas phase value. At 76 K, the progression from ortho- to para-H(2) occurs over a relatively slow time period (days). The rotational degeneracy of H(2) molecules within the clathrate cavities is lifted, observed directly in splitting of the para-H(2) roton band. Raman spectra from H(2) and D(2) hydrates suggest that the occupancy patterns between the two hydrates are analogous, increasing confidence that D(2) is a suitable substitute for H(2). The measurements suggest that Raman is an effective and convenient method to determine the relative occupancy of hydrogen molecules in different clathrate cavities.

  7. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy: nonlocal limitations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toscano, Giuseppe; Raza, Søren; Xiao, Sanshui

    2012-01-01

    for our understanding of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). The intrinsic length scale of the electron gas serves to smear out assumed field singularities, leaving the SERS enhancement factor finite, even for geometries with infinitely sharp features. For silver nanogroove structures, mimicked...

  8. Surface enhanced Raman optical activity (SEROA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdali, Salim; Blanch, E.W.

    2008-01-01

    Raman optical activity (ROA) directly monitors the stereochemistry of chiral molecules and is now an incisive probe of biomolecular structure. ROA spectra contain a wealth of information on tertiary folding, secondary structure and even the orientation of individual residues in proteins and nucleic...

  9. Basic principles of ultrafast Raman loss spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    field tries to drive the electron with its frequency. If the applied field is of the form E = E0eiωt , the driving ..... (CARS),8 coherent Stokes Raman scattering (CSRS), ... gain or loss process in which only two beams are required and it is a self ...

  10. Optimizing laser crater enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lednev, V. N.; Sdvizhenskii, P. A.; Grishin, M. Ya.; Fedorov, A. N.; Khokhlova, O. V.; Oshurko, V. B.; Pershin, S. M.

    2018-05-01

    The laser crater enhanced Raman scattering (LCERS) spectroscopy technique has been systematically studied for chosen sampling strategy and influence of powder material properties on spectra intensity enhancement. The same nanosecond pulsed solid state Nd:YAG laser (532 nm, 10 ns, 0.1-1.5 mJ/pulse) was used for laser crater production and Raman scattering experiments for L-aspartic acid powder. Increased sampling area inside crater cavity is the key factor for Raman signal improvement for the LCERS technique, thus Raman signal enhancement was studied as a function of numerous experimental parameters including lens-to-sample distance, wavelength (532 and 1064 nm) and laser pulse energy utilized for crater production. Combining laser pulses of 1064 and 532 nm wavelengths for crater ablation was shown to be an effective way for additional LCERS signal improvement. Powder material properties (particle size distribution, powder compactness) were demonstrated to affect LCERS measurements with better results achieved for smaller particles and lower compactness.

  11. Application of Raman spectroscopy for cancer diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnakumar, N.

    2011-01-01

    Cancer is the second leading causes of death next to heart diseases, Half of all cancer cases occur in developing countries. The conventional histopathology is usually the most trustable gold standard for pre-cancer and cancer diagnosis. However, the applicability of this method is more or less restricted because of the requirement of removing human tissues and the difficulty of real time diagnosis. Recently, there has been increased interest in 'optical biopsy' system using tissue spectroscopy to establish the pathological changes. Among optical based methods, Raman spectroscopy is a unique vibrational spectroscopic technique capable of probing biomolecular structures and conformation of tissues, and has excelled in the early detection of pre-cancer and cancer in the number of organs with high diagnostic specificity. Raman spectroscopy offers certain distinct advantages over than other optical diagnostic techniques such as high spatial resolution, use of less harmful NIR radiation, less or no sample preparation, no influence of water bands which facilitates in vivo/in situ measurements. This makes Raman spectroscopy also very useful for biomedical applications. Several research groups have demonstrated the efficacy of this technique in biomedical applications. The background and principle of these techniques will be discussed with some examples and discussions on how Raman spectroscopy can act as a promising technique for rapid in vivo diagnosis and detection of various cancers at the molecular level. (author)

  12. Detecting changes during pregnancy with Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargis, Elizabeth; Robertson, Kesha; Al-Hendy, Ayman; Reese, Jeff; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita

    2010-02-01

    Preterm labor is the second leading cause of neonatal mortality and leads to a myriad of complications like delayed development and cerebral palsy. Currently, there is no way to accurately predict preterm labor, making its prevention and treatment virtually impossible. While there are some at-risk patients, over half of all preterm births do not fall into any high-risk category. This study seeks to predict and prevent preterm labor by using Raman spectroscopy to detect changes in the cervix during pregnancy. Since Raman spectroscopy has been used to detect cancers in vivo in organs like the cervix and skin, it follows that spectra will change over the course of pregnancy. Previous studies have shown that fluorescence decreased during pregnancy and increased during post-partum exams to pre-pregnancy levels. We believe significant changes will occur in the Raman spectra obtained during the course of pregnancy. In this study, Raman spectra from the cervix of pregnant mice and women will be acquired. Specific changes that occur due to cervical softening or changes in hormonal levels will be observed to understand the likelihood that a female mouse or a woman will enter labor.

  13. Quantum Zeno effect in Raman scattering

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Thun, K.; Peřina, Jan; Křepelka, Jaromír

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 299, - (2002), s. 19-30 ISSN 0375-9601 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A015 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010921 Keywords : quantum measurement * Raman scattering * Zeno effect Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.483, year: 2002

  14. Electronic resonances in broadband stimulated Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batignani, G.; Pontecorvo, E.; Giovannetti, G.; Ferrante, C.; Fumero, G.; Scopigno, T.

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous Raman spectroscopy is a formidable tool to probe molecular vibrations. Under electronic resonance conditions, the cross section can be selectively enhanced enabling structural sensitivity to specific chromophores and reaction centers. The addition of an ultrashort, broadband femtosecond pulse to the excitation field allows for coherent stimulation of diverse molecular vibrations. Within such a scheme, vibrational spectra are engraved onto a highly directional field, and can be heterodyne detected overwhelming fluorescence and other incoherent signals. At variance with spontaneous resonance Raman, however, interpreting the spectral information is not straightforward, due to the manifold of field interactions concurring to the third order nonlinear response. Taking as an example vibrational spectra of heme proteins excited in the Soret band, we introduce a general approach to extract the stimulated Raman excitation profiles from complex spectral lineshapes. Specifically, by a quantum treatment of the matter through density matrix description of the third order nonlinear polarization, we identify the contributions which generate the Raman bands, by taking into account for the cross section of each process.

  15. Measured stimulated Raman gain in methane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopert, R.B.

    1983-01-01

    This report is about the stimulated Raman effect in methane due to the nu 1 vibration. For various gas pressures between 150 torr and 30 atm, the Raman lineshape function was both experimentally measured and synthesized using a computer model. The stimulated Raman gain was measured by sending a pump laser beam provided by an argon-ion laser and a weak probe beam provided by a tunable dye laser through a cell of methane gas. The stimulated Raman effect caused some of the energy from the pump beam to be transferred to the probe beam. The intensity of the pump beam was low so the gain of the probe beam was on the order of parts per million. A two detector arrangement and a differential amplifier system that had a feedback loop to balance the detectors was constructed to measure the small gains. A detailed description of this detection system that was able to measure gains as small as 0.2 parts per million is provided

  16. Quasiperiodic Raman technique for ultrashort pulse generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yavuz, D.D.; Walker, D.R.; Shverdin, M.Y.; Yin, G.Y.; Harris, S.E.

    2003-01-01

    We report the experimental demonstration of a new Raman technique that produces 200 sidebands, ranging in wavelength from 3 μm to 195 nm. By studying multiphoton ionization of nitric oxide (NO) molecules, we show mutual phase coherence among 15 visible sidebands covering 0.63 octaves of bandwidth

  17. Construction of coherent antistokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zidan, M. D.; Jazmati, A.

    2007-01-01

    Coherent Antistokes Raman Spectroscopy (CARS) has been built. It consists of a Raman cell, which is filled with CO 2 gas at 5 atm pressure and a frequency doubled Nd-YAG laser pumped dye laser. The two beams are focused by means of a bi-convex lens into Raman cell. The Antistokes signals (CARS signals) are generated due to Four-wave mixing process. The antistokes signals were directed to monochrometer entrance slit by prism . The signals are detected by photomultiplier detector which is fixed on the exit slit and connected to data acquisition card located inside the computed case. The dye laser frequency has to be tuned to satisfy the energy difference between the ν 1 beam (Nd- YAG laser beam) and the ν 2 beam (the stokes beam or the dye laser beam) exactly corresponds to a vibrational - rotational Raman resonance (ν 2 - ν 1 = ν M ) in the 12 CO 2 or 13 CO 2 molecule, then the antistokes signals (ν 3 ) will be generated. The spectra of the CARS signals have been recorded to determine the isotope shift of 12 CO 2 , 13 CO 2 , which is 18.3 cm -1 . (author)

  18. Raman spectroscopy of saliva as a perspective method for periodontitis diagnostics Raman spectroscopy of saliva

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonchukov, S.; Sukhinina, A.; Bakhmutov, D.; Minaeva, S.

    2012-01-01

    In view of its potential for biological tissues analyses at a molecular level, Raman spectroscopy in optical range has been the object of biomedical research for the last years. The main aim of this work is the development of Raman spectroscopy for organic content identifying and determination of biomarkers of saliva at a molecular level for periodontitis diagnostics. Four spectral regions were determined: 1155 and 1525 cm-1, 1033 and 1611 cm-1, which can be used as biomarkers of this widespread disease.

  19. Raman spectroscopy for diagnosis of glioblastoma multiforme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clary, Candace Elise

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most common and most fatal malignant brain tumor, is highly infiltrative and incurable. Although improved prognosis has been demonstrated by surgically resecting the bulk tumor, a lack of clear borders at the tumor margins complicates the selection decision during surgery. This dissertation investigates the potential of Raman spectroscopy for distinguishing between normal and malignant brain tissue and sets the groundwork for a surgical diagnostic guide for resection of gross malignant gliomas. These studies revealed that Raman spectroscopy was capable of discriminating between normal scid mouse brain tissue and human xenograft tumors induced in those mice. The spectra of normal and malignant tissue were normalized by dividing by the respective magnitudes of the peaks near 1440 cm -1. Spectral differences include the shape of the broad peaks near 1440 cm-1 and 1660 cm-1 and the relative magnitudes of the peaks at 1264 cm-1, 1287 cm-1, 1297 cm-1, 1556 cm -1, 1586 cm-1, 1614 cm-1, and 1683 cm-1. From these studies emerged questions regarding how to objectively normalize and compare spectra for future automation. Some differences in the Raman spectra were shown to be inherent in the disease states of the cells themselves via differences in the Raman spectra of normal human astrocytes in culture and cultured cells derived from GBM tumors. The spectra of astrocytes and glioma cells were normalized by dividing by the respective magnitudes of the peaks near 1450 cm-1. The differences between the Raman spectra of normal and transformed cells include the ratio of the 1450 cm-1/1650 cm-1 peaks and the relative magnitudes of the peaks at 1181 cm-1, 1191 cm-1, 1225 cm-1, 1263 cm -1, 1300 cm-1, 1336 cm-1, 1477 cm-1, 1494 cm-1, and 1695 cm -1. Previous Raman spectroscopic studies of biological cells have shown that the magnitude of the Raman signal decreases over time, indicating sample damage. Cells exposed to laser excitation at similar power

  20. Graphene Dendrimer-stabilized silver nanoparticles for detection of methimazole using Surface-enhanced Raman scattering with computational assignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Tawfik A.; Al-Shalalfeh, Mutasem M.; Al-Saadi, Abdulaziz A.

    2016-08-01

    Graphene functionalized with polyamidoamine dendrimer, decorated with silver nanoparticles (G-D-Ag), was synthesized and evaluated as a substrate with surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for methimazole (MTZ) detection. Sodium borohydride was used as a reducing agent to cultivate silver nanoparticles on the dendrimer. The obtained G-D-Ag was characterized by using UV-vis spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope (SEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscope (TEM), Fourier-transformed infrared (FT-IR) and Raman spectroscopy. The SEM image indicated the successful formation of the G-D-Ag. The behavior of MTZ on the G-D-Ag as a reliable and robust substrate was investigated by SERS, which indicated mostly a chemical interaction between G-D-Ag and MTZ. The bands of the MTZ normal spectra at 1538, 1463, 1342, 1278, 1156, 1092, 1016, 600, 525 and 410 cm-1 were enhanced due to the SERS effect. Correlations between the logarithmical scale of MTZ concentrations and SERS signal intensities were established, and a low detection limit of 1.43 × 10-12 M was successfully obtained. The density functional theory (DFT) approach was utilized to provide reliable assignment of the key Raman bands.

  1. Optical trapping and Raman spectroscopy of single nanostructures using standing-wave Raman tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mu-ying; He, Lin; Chen, Gui-hua; Yang, Guang; Li, Yong-qing

    2017-08-01

    Optical tweezers integrated with Raman spectroscopy allows analyzing a single trapped micro-particle, but is generally less effective for individual nano-sized objects in the 10-100 nm range. The main challenge is the weak gradient force on nanoparticles that is insufficient to overcome the destabilizing effect of scattering force and Brownian motion. Here, we present standing-wave Raman tweezers for stable trapping and sensitive characterization of single isolated nanostructures with a low laser power by combining a standing-wave optical trap (SWOT) with confocal Raman spectroscopy. This scheme has stronger intensity gradients and balanced scattering forces, and thus is more stable and sensitive in measuring nanoparticles in liquid with 4-8 fold increase in the Raman signals. It can be used to analyze many nanoparticles that cannot be measured with single-beam Raman tweezers, including individual single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT), graphene flakes, biological particles, polystyrene beads (100 nm), SERS-active metal nanoparticles, and high-refractive semiconductor nanoparticles with a low laser power of a few milliwatts. This would enable sorting and characterization of specific SWCNTs and other nanoparticles based on their increased Raman fingerprints.

  2. Raman spectroscopy of triolein under high pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tefelski, D. B.; Jastrzębski, C.; Wierzbicki, M.; Siegoczyński, R. M.; Rostocki, A. J.; Wieja, K.; Kościesza, R.

    2010-03-01

    This article presents results of the high pressure Raman spectroscopy of triolein. Triolein, a triacylglyceride (TAG) of oleic acid, is an unsaturated fat, present in natural oils such as olive oil. As a basic food component and an energy storage molecule, it has considerable importance for food and fuel industries. To generate pressure in the experiment, we used a high-pressure cylindrical chamber with sapphire windows, presented in (R.M. Siegoczyński, R. Kościesza, D.B. Tefelski, and A. Kos, Molecular collapse - modification of the liquid structure induced by pressure in oleic acid, High Press. Res. 29 (2009), pp. 61-66). Pressure up to 750 MPa was applied. A Raman spectrometer in "macro"-configuration was employed. Raman spectroscopy provides information on changes of vibrational modes related to structural changes of triolein under pressure. Interesting changes in the triglyceride C‒H stretching region at 2650-3100 cm-1 were observed under high-pressures. Changes were also observed in the ester carbonyl (C˭ O) stretching region 1700-1780 cm-1 and the C‒C stretching region at 1050-1150 cm-1. The overall luminescence of the sample decreased under pressure, making it possible to set longer spectrum acquisition time and obtain more details of the spectrum. The registered changes suggest that the high-pressure solid phase of triolein is organized as β-polymorphic, as was reported in (C. Akita, T. Kawaguchi, and F. Kaneko, Structural study on polymorphism of cis-unsaturated triacylglycerol: Triolein, J. Phys. Chem. B 110 (2006), pp. 4346-4353; E. Da Silva and D. Rousseau, Molecular order and thermodynamics of the solid-liquid transition in triglycerides via Raman spectroscopy, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 10 (2008), pp. 4606-4613) (with temperature-induced phase transitions). The research has shown that Raman spectroscopy in TAGs under pressure reveals useful information about its structural changes.

  3. Spectroscopy and Raman imaging of inhomogeneous materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maslova, Olga

    2014-01-01

    This thesis is aimed at developing methodologies in Raman spectroscopy and imaging. After reviewing the statistical instruments which allow treating giant amount of data (multivariate analysis and classification), the study is applied to two families of well-known materials which are used as models for testing the limits of the implemented developments. The first family is a series of carbon materials pyrolyzed at various temperatures and exhibiting inhomogeneities at a nm scale which is suitable for Raman-X-ray diffraction combination. Another results concern the polishing effect on carbon structure. Since it is found to induce Raman artifacts leading to the overestimation of the local structural disorder, a method based on the use of the G band width is therefore proposed in order to evaluate the crystallite size in both unpolished and polished nano-graphites. The second class of materials presents inhomogeneities at higher (micrometric) scales by the example of uranium dioxide ceramics. Being well adapted in terms of spatial scale, Raman imaging is thus used for probing their surfaces. Data processing is implemented via an approach combining the multivariate (principal component) analysis and the classical fitting procedure with Lorentzian profiles. The interpretation of results is supported via electron backscattering diffraction (EBSD) analysis which enables us to distinguish the orientation effects of ceramic grains from other underlying contributions. The last ones are mainly localized at the grain boundaries, that is testified by the appearance of a specific Raman mode. Their origin seems to be caused by stoichiometric oxygen variations or impurities, as well as strain inhomogeneities. The perspectives of this work include both the implementation of other mathematical methods and in-depth analysis of UO 2 structure damaged by irradiation (anisotropic effects, role of grain boundaries). (author) [fr

  4. Synchrotron FTIR Imaging For The Identification Of Cell Types Within Human Tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walsh, Michael J.; Pounder, F. Nell; Nasse, Michael J.; Macias, Virgilia; Kajdacsy-Balla, Andre; Hirschmugl, Carol; Bhargava, Rohit

    2010-01-01

    The use of synchrotron Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (S-FTIR) has been shown to be a very promising tool for biomedical research. S-FTIR spectroscopy allows for the fast acquisition of infrared (IR) spectra at a spatial resolution approaching the IR diffraction limit. The development of the Infrared Environmental Imaging (IRENI) beamline at the Synchrotron Radiation Center (SRC) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison has allowed for diffraction limited imaging measurements of cells in human prostate and breast tissues. This has allowed for the identification of cell types within tissues that would otherwise not have been resolvable using conventional FTIR sources.

  5. In-pile Thermal Conductivity Characterization with Time Resolved Raman

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xinwei [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Hurley, David H. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2018-03-19

    The project is designed to achieve three objectives: (1) Develop a novel time resolved Raman technology for direct measurement of fuel and cladding thermal conductivity. (2) Validate and improve the technology development by measuring ceramic materials germane to the nuclear industry. (3) Conduct instrumentation development to integrate optical fiber into our sensing system for eventual in-pile measurement. We have developed three new techniques: time-domain differential Raman (TD-Raman), frequency-resolved Raman (FR-Raman), and energy transport state-resolved Raman (ET-Raman). The TD-Raman varies the laser heating time and does simultaneous Raman thermal probing, the FR-Raman probes the material’s thermal response under periodical laser heating of different frequencies, and the ET-Raman probes the thermal response under steady and pulsed laser heating. The measurement capacity of these techniques have been fully assessed and verified by measuring micro/nanoscale materials. All these techniques do not need the data of laser absorption and absolute material temperature rise, yet still be able to measure the thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity with unprecedented accuracy. It is expected they will have broad applications for in-pile thermal characterization of nuclear materials based on pure optical heating and sensing.

  6. Condensing Raman spectrum for single-cell phenotype analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Shiwei

    2015-12-09

    Background In recent years, high throughput and non-invasive Raman spectrometry technique has matured as an effective approach to identification of individual cells by species, even in complex, mixed populations. Raman profiling is an appealing optical microscopic method to achieve this. To fully utilize Raman proling for single-cell analysis, an extensive understanding of Raman spectra is necessary to answer questions such as which filtering methodologies are effective for pre-processing of Raman spectra, what strains can be distinguished by Raman spectra, and what features serve best as Raman-based biomarkers for single-cells, etc. Results In this work, we have proposed an approach called rDisc to discretize the original Raman spectrum into only a few (usually less than 20) representative peaks (Raman shifts). The approach has advantages in removing noises, and condensing the original spectrum. In particular, effective signal processing procedures were designed to eliminate noise, utilising wavelet transform denoising, baseline correction, and signal normalization. In the discretizing process, representative peaks were selected to signicantly decrease the Raman data size. More importantly, the selected peaks are chosen as suitable to serve as key biological markers to differentiate species and other cellular features. Additionally, the classication performance of discretized spectra was found to be comparable to full spectrum having more than 1000 Raman shifts. Overall, the discretized spectrum needs about 5storage space of a full spectrum and the processing speed is considerably faster. This makes rDisc clearly superior to other methods for single-cell classication.

  7. [Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy analysis of thiabendazole pesticide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lei; Wu, Rui-mei; Liu, Mu-hua; Wang, Xiao-bin; Yan, Lin-yuan

    2015-02-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) technique was used to analyze the Raman peaks of thiabendazole pesticides in the present paper. Surface enhanced substrates of silver nanoparticle were made based on microwave technology. Raman signals of thiabendazole were collected by laser Micro-Raman spectrometer with 514. 5 and 785 nm excitation wavelengths, respectively. The Raman peaks at different excitation wavelengths were analyzed and compared. The Raman peaks 782 and 1 012 at 785 nm excitation wavelength were stronger, which were C--H out-of-plane vibrations. While 1284, 1450 and 1592 cm(-1) at 514.5 nm excitation wavelength were stronger, which were vng and C==N stretching. The study results showed that the intensity of Raman peak and Raman shift at different excitation wavelengths were different And strong Raman signals were observed at 782, 1012, 1284, 1450 and 1592 cm(-1) at 514.5 and 785 nm excitation wavelengths. These characteristic vibrational modes are characteristic Raman peaks of carbendazim pesticide. The results can provide basis for the rapid screening of pesticide residue in agricultural products and food based on Raman spectrum.

  8. Raman Spectra from Pesticides on the Surface of Fruits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, P X; Zhou Xiaofang; Cheng, Andrew Y S; Fang Yan

    2006-01-01

    Raman spectra of several vegetables and fruits were studied by micro-Raman spectrometer (514.5 nm) and Near-infrared Fourier Transform Raman spectrometer (FTRaman). It is shown that at 514.5 nm excitation, most of the spectra are from that of carotene with some very strong fluorescence in some cases. While at 1064 nm wavelength excitation, the spectra from the different samples demonstrate different characteristic Raman spectra without fluorescence. We discuss the spectroscopic difference by the two excitation wavelengths, and the application of Raman spectra for detection of pesticides left on the surface of vegetables and fruits. Raman spectra of fruits and pesticides were successfully recorded, and using the FT-Raman spectra the pesticides left on the surface of the fruits can be detected conveniently

  9. Raman spectroscopy in nanomedicine: current status and future perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, Mark E; Byrne, Hugh J

    2013-08-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a branch of vibration spectroscopy that is capable of probing the chemical composition of materials. Recent advances in Raman microscopy have significantly added to the range of applications, which now extend from medical diagnostics to exploring the interfaces between biological organisms and nanomaterials. In this review, Raman is introduced in a general context, highlighting some of the areas in which the technique has been successful in the past, as well as some of the potential benefits it offers over other analytical modalities. The subset of Raman techniques that specifically probe the nanoscale, namely surface- and tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, will be described and specific applications relevant to nanomedical applications will be reviewed. Progress in the use of traditional label-free Raman for investigation of nanoscale interactions will be described, and recent developments in coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering will be explored, particularly its applications to biomedical and nanomedical fields.

  10. Raman tensor elements of β-Ga2O3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranert, Christian; Sturm, Chris; Schmidt-Grund, Rüdiger; Grundmann, Marius

    2016-11-03

    The Raman spectrum and particularly the Raman scattering intensities of monoclinic β-Ga 2 O 3 are investigated by experiment and theory. The low symmetry of β-Ga 2 O 3 results in a complex dependence of the Raman intensity for the individual phonon modes on the scattering geometry which is additionally affected by birefringence. We measured the Raman spectra in dependence on the polarization direction for backscattering on three crystallographic planes of β-Ga 2 O 3 and modelled these dependencies using a modified Raman tensor formalism which takes birefringence into account. The spectral position of all 15 Raman active phonon modes and the Raman tensor elements of 13 modes were determined and are compared to results from ab-initio calculations.

  11. Coherent Raman scattering: Applications in imaging and sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Meng

    In this thesis, I discuss the theory, implementation and applications of coherent Raman scattering to imaging and sensing. A time domain interferometric method has been developed to collect high resolution shot-noise-limited Raman spectra over the Raman fingerprint regime and completely remove the electronic background signal in coherent Raman scattering. Compared with other existing coherent Raman microscopy methods, this time domain approach is proved to be simpler and more robust in rejecting background signal. We apply this method to image polymers and biological samples and demonstrate that the same setup can be used to collect two photon fluorescence and self phase modulation signals. A signal to noise ratio analysis is performed to show that this time domain method has a comparable signal to noise ratio to spectral domain methods, which we confirm experimentally. The coherent Raman method is also compared with spontaneous Raman scattering. The conditions under which coherent methods provide signal enhancement are discussed and experiments are performed to compare coherent Raman scattering with spontaneous Raman scattering under typical biological imaging conditions. A critical power, above which coherent Raman scattering is more sensitive than spontaneous Raman scattering, is experimentally determined to be ˜1mW in samples of high molecule concentration with a 75MHz laser system. This finding is contrary to claims that coherent methods provide many orders of magnitude enhancement under comparable conditions. In addition to the far field applications, I also discuss the combination of our time domain coherent Raman method with near field enhancement to explore the possibility of sensing and near field imaging. We report the first direct time-resolved coherent Raman measurement performed on a nanostructured substrate for molecule sensing. The preliminary results demonstrate that sub 20 fs pulses can be used to obtain coherent Raman spectra from a small number

  12. Heavy fuel oil pyrolysis and combustion: kinetics and evolved gases investigated by TGA-FTIR

    KAUST Repository

    Abdul Jameel, Abdul Gani; Han, Yunqing; Brignoli, Omar; Telalovic, Selvedin; Elbaz, Ayman M.; Im, Hong G.; Roberts, William L.; Sarathy, Mani

    2017-01-01

    investigated using non-isothermal thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) coupled with a Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer. TG and DTG (differential thermo-gravimetry) were used for the kinetic analysis and to study the mass loss characteristics due

  13. A Synchrotron FTIR Microspectroscopy Investigation of Fungal Hyphae Grown under Optimal and Stressed Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szeghalmi, A.; Kaminskyj, S.; Gough, K.

    2007-01-01

    Synchrotron FTIR can provide high spatial resolution ( o C but have growth defects at 42 o C. We have also investigated Neurospora and Rhizopus cultures grown in media with optimal or elevated pH. Significant differences between the spectra of the three fungi are likely related to differences in composition and structure. In addition, high spatial resolution synchrotron FTIR spectroscopy provides an outstanding method for monitoring subtle subcellular changes that accompany environmental stress

  14. Applications of diamond crystal ATR FTIR spectroscopy to the characterization of ambers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiliano, Michel; Asia, Laurence; Onoratini, Gérard; Mille, Gilbert

    2007-08-01

    Diamond crystal ATR FTIR spectroscopy is a rapid technique with virtually no sample preparation which requires small sample amounts and showed potential in the study of ambers. FTIR spectra of ambers present discriminating patterns and can be used to distinguish amber from immature resins as copal, to determine local or Baltic origin of archaeological ambers and to detect most of the falsifications encountered in the amber commercialisation.

  15. Stimulated Raman backscattering at high laser intensities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skoric, M M [Vinca Inst. of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade (Yugoslavia); Tajima, Toshiki; Sasaki, Akira; Maluckov, A; Jovanovic, M

    1998-03-01

    Signatures of Stimulated Raman backscattering of a short-pulse high-intensity laser interacting with an underdense plasma are discussed. We introduce a nonlinear three-wave interaction model that accounts for laser pump depletion and relativistic detuning. A mechanism is revealed based on a generic route to chaos, that predicts a progressive increase of the backscatter complexity with a growing laser intensity. Importance of kinetic effects is outlined and demonstrated in fluid-hybrid and particle simulations. As an application, we show that spectral anomalies of the backscatter, predicted by the above model, are consistent with recent sub-picosecond, high-intensity laser gas-target measurements at Livermore and elsewhere. Finally, a recently proposed scheme for generation of ultra-short, low-prepulse laser pulses by Raman backscattering in a thin foil target, is shown. (author)

  16. Raman Amplification with a Flying Focus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull, D.; Bucht, S.; Davies, A.; Haberberger, D.; Kessler, T.; Shaw, J. L.; Froula, D. H.

    2018-01-01

    We propose a new laser amplifier scheme utilizing stimulated Raman scattering in plasma in conjunction with a "flying focus"—a chromatic focusing system combined with a chirped pump beam that provides spatiotemporal control over the pump's focal spot. Pump intensity isosurfaces are made to propagate at v =-c so as to be in sync with the injected counterpropagating seed pulse. By setting the pump intensity in the interaction region to be just above the ionization threshold of the background gas, an ionization wave is produced that travels at a fixed distance ahead of the seed. Simulations show that this will make it possible to optimize the plasma temperature and mitigate many of the issues that are known to have impacted previous Raman amplification experiments, in particular, the growth of precursors.

  17. Field Raman spectrograph for environmental analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, J.W. III; Forney, R.W.; Carrabba, M.M.; Rauh, R.D.

    1995-01-01

    The enormous cost for chemical analysis at DOE facilities predicates that cost-saving measures be implemented. Many approaches, ranging from increasing laboratory sample throughput by reducing preparation time to the development of field instrumentation, are being explored to meet this need. Because of the presence of radioactive materials at many DOE sites, there is also a need for methods that are safer for site personnel and analysts. This project entails the development of a compact Raman spectrograph for field screening and monitoring of a wide variety of wastes, pollutants, and corrosion products in storage tanks, soils, and ground and surface waters. Analytical advantages of the Raman technique include its ability to produce a unique, spectral fingerprint for each contaminant and its ability to analyze both solids and liquids directly, without the need for isolation or cleanup

  18. Raman Identification of Polymorphs in Pentacene Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Girlando

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We use Raman spectroscopy to characterize thin films of pentacene grown on Si/SiO x by Supersonic Molecular Beam Deposition (SuMBD. We find that films up to a thickness of about 781 Å (∼ 52 monolayers all belong to the so-called thin-film (TF phase. The appearance with strong intensity of some lattice phonons suggests that the films are characterized by good intra-layer order. A comparison of the Raman spectra in the lattice and CH bending spectral regions of the TF polymorph with the corresponding ones of the high-temperature (HT and low-temperature (LT bulk pentacene polymorphs provides a quick and nondestructive method to identify the different phases.

  19. Frequency-asymmetric gain profile in a seeded Raman amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Repasky, K.S.; Carlsten, J.L.

    1996-01-01

    This paper examines the effect of index guiding on Raman gain. The slowly varying Maxwell wave equation including both the real and imaginary parts of the Raman susceptibility for a seeded Raman amplifier is explored. Using a Gauss-Laguerre mode expansion for the Stokes field, the output Stokes energy is numerically studied as a function of gain and detuning from the Raman resonance. The calculations indicate that the real part of the Raman susceptibility causes the Raman medium to act as a lens when the Stokes seed is detuned from the Raman resonance. This focusing effect leads to higher peak Stokes energy when the Stokes seed is tuned to the blue side of the Raman resonance. Specifically for Raman scattering in H 2 with a pump laser at 532 nm and an input seed near 683 nm, the peak Stokes energy can shift by as much as 300 MHz from the Raman resonance. An experiment which confirms these predictions is also presented. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  20. Monolithic PM Raman fiber laser at 1679 nm for Raman amplification at 1810 nm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane, Ask Sebastian; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) has been subject to much attention within the field of fiber lasers and amplifiers as it provides an extended wavelength coverage in comparison to rare-earth based devices. Motivated by the projected capacity crunch [1], different approaches are being explored...... demonstrate a monolithic RM Raman fiber laser (RFL), which acts as a pump for a Raman amplifier (RA) at 1810 nm. The lasing wavelength of a RFL, thus also for a RA, can in principle be designed arbitrarily within the entire wavelength range from the Erbium band up to the Thulium/Holmium band...... of OFS PM Raman fiber, with an estimated propagation loss of 0.42/0.46/1.3 dB/km at 1564/1679/1810 nm. The Raman gain coefficient was measured to be gR=2.66/2.35 W-1km-1 at 1679/1810 nm. The laser curve of the RFL is depicted in Fig. 1b, with a slope efficiency of 67 %. The high slope efficiency...

  1. Raman Spectra of Nanodiamonds: New Treatment Procedure Directed for Improved Raman Signal Marker Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raoul R. Nigmatullin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Detonation nanodiamonds (NDs have shown to be promising agents in several industries, ranging from electronic to biomedical applications. These NDs are characterized by small particle size ranging from 3 to 6 nm, while having a reactive surface and a stable inert core. Nanodiamonds can exhibit novel intrinsic properties such as fluorescence, high refractive index, and unique Raman signal making them very attractive imaging agents. In this work, we used several nanodiamond preparations for Raman spectroscopic studies. We exposed these nanodiamonds to increasing temperature treatments at constant heating rates (425–575°C aiding graphite release. We wanted to correlate changes in the nanodiamond surface and properties with Raman signal which could be used as a detection marker. These observations would hold potential utility in biomedical imaging applications. First, the procedure of optimal linear smoothing was applied successfully to eliminate the high-frequency fluctuations and to extract the smoothed Raman spectra. After that we applied the secondary Fourier transform as the fitting function based on some significant set of frequencies. The remnant noise was described in terms of the beta-distribution function. We expect this data treatment to provide better results in biomolecule tracking using nanodiamond base Raman labeling.

  2. Combined experimental and theoretical study on the Raman and Raman optical activity signatures of pentamethylundecane diastereoisomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drooghaag, Xavier; Marchand-Brynaert, Jacqueline; Champagne, Benoît; Liégeois, Vincent

    2010-09-16

    The synthesis and the separation of the four stereoisomers of 2,4,6,8,10-pentamethylundecane (PMU) are described together with their characterization by Raman spectroscopy. In parallel, theoretical calculations of the Raman and vibrational Raman optical activity (VROA) spectra are reported and analyzed in relation with the recorded spectra. A very good agreement is found between the experimental and theoretical spectra. The Raman spectra are also shown to be less affected by the change of configuration than the VROA spectra. Nevertheless, by studying the overlap between the theoretical Raman spectra, we show clear relationships between the spectral fingerprints and the structures displaying a mixture of the TGTGTGTG conformation of the (4R,6s,8S)-PMU (isotactic compound) with the TTTTTTTT conformation of the (4R,6r,8S)-PMU (syndiotactic compound). Then, the fingerprints of the VROA spectra of the five conformers of the (4R,8R)-PMU have been related to the fingerprints of the regular (TG)(N) isotactic compound as a function of the torsion angles. Since the (TT)(N) syndiotactic compound has no VROA signatures, the VROA spectroscopy is very sensitive to the helical structures, as demonstrated here.

  3. Raman spectroscopy and oral exfoliative cytology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Aditi; Shah, Nupur; Mahimkar, Manoj; Garud, Mandavi; Pagare, Sandeep; Nair, Sudhir; Krishna, C. Murali

    2014-03-01

    Early detection of oral cancers can substantially improve disease-free survival rates. Ex vivo and in vivo Raman spectroscopic (RS) studies on oral cancer have demonstrated the applicability of RS in identifying not only malignant and premalignant conditions but also cancer-field-effects: the earliest events in oral carcinogenesis. RS has also been explored for cervical exfoliated cells analysis. Exfoliated cells are associated with several advantages like non-invasive sampling, higher patient compliance, transportation and analysis at a central facility: obviating need for on-site instrumentation. Thus, oral exfoliative cytology coupled with RS may serve as a useful adjunct for oral cancer screening. In this study, exfoliated cells from healthy controls with and without tobacco habits, premalignant lesions (leukoplakia and tobacco-pouch-keratosis) and their contralateral mucosa were collected using a Cytobrush. Cells were harvested by vortexing and centrifugation at 6000 rpm. The cellular yield was ascertained using Neubauer's chamber. Cell pellets were placed on a CaF2 window and Raman spectra were acquired using a Raman microprobe (40X objective) coupled HE-785 Raman spectrometer. Approximately 7 spectra were recorded from each pellet, following which pellet was smeared onto a glass slide, fixed in 95% ethanol and subjected to Pap staining for cytological diagnosis (gold standard). Preliminary PC-LDA followed by leave-one-out cross validation indicate delineation of cells from healthy and all pathological conditions. A tendency of classification was also seen between cells from contralateral, healthy tobacco and site of premalignant lesions. These results will be validated by cytological findings, which will serve as the basis for building standard models of each condition.

  4. Enhanced Raman scattering on functionalized graphene substrates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Valeš, Václav; Kovaříček, Petr; Fridrichová, Michaela; Ji, X.; Ling, X.; Kong, J.; Dresselhaus, M. S.; Kalbáč, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 2 (2017), č. článku 025087. ISSN 2053-1583 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-01953S Grant - others:AVČR PPPLZ(CZ) L200401551 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : spectroscopy * molecules * graphene * graphene enhanced Raman scattering * functionalized graphene Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 6.937, year: 2016

  5. Raman characterization of bulk ferromagnetic nanostructured graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardo, Helena; Divine Khan, Ngwashi; Faccio, Ricardo; Araújo-Moreira, F.M.; Fernández-Werner, Luciana

    2012-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy was used to characterize bulk ferromagnetic graphite samples prepared by controlled oxidation of commercial pristine graphite powder. The G:D band intensity ratio, the shape and position of the 2D band and the presence of a band around 2950 cm -1 showed a high degree of disorder in the modified graphite sample, with a significant presence of exposed edges of graphitic planes as well as a high degree of attached hydrogen atoms.

  6. Candida parapsilosis Biofilm Identification by Raman Spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Samek, Ota; Mlynariková, K.; Bernatová, Silvie; Ježek, Jan; Krzyžánek, Vladislav; Šiler, Martin; Zemánek, Pavel; Růžička, F.; Holá, Miroslava; Mahelová, M.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 12 (2014), s. 23924-23935 E-ISSN 1422-0067 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01; GA ČR GAP205/11/1687 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : Raman spectroscopy * Candida parapsilosis * biofilm Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 2.862, year: 2014

  7. Raman Microspectroscopy of the Yeast Vacuoles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bednárová, Lucie; Palacký, J.; Bauerová, Václava; Hrušková-Heidingsfeldová, Olga; Pichová, Iva; Mojzeš, P.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 27, 5-6 (2012), s. 503-507 ISSN 0712-4813 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP208/10/0376; GA ČR GA310/09/1945 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : Raman microspectroscopy * living cell * yeast * vacuole * chemical composition * polyphospate * Candida albicans Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 0.530, year: 2012

  8. Raman Spectroelectrochemical Investigations of Immobilized Redox Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Grochol, Jana

    2007-01-01

    Das Interesse an auf Elektroden immobilisierten Redoxproteinen ist in den letzten Jahren stark gestiegen. Die oberflächenverstärkte Resonanz-Raman- (SERR) Spektroelektrochemie eignet sich hervorragend zum Studium des heterogenen Elektronentransfers, da sie selektiv das Schwingungsspektrum der Redoxzentren der immobilisierten Spezies abfragt. SERR Spektroskopie kombiniert die Vorteile der Oberflächen- und Resonanz-Verstärkung, indem Hämproteine auf rauen Silberelektroden adsorbiert und in der ...

  9. In vivo Raman spectroscopy of cervix cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubina, S.; Sathe, Priyanka; Dora, Tapas Kumar; Chopra, Supriya; Maheshwari, Amita; Krishna, C. Murali

    2014-03-01

    Cervix-cancer is the third most common female cancer worldwide. It is the leading cancer among Indian females with more than million new diagnosed cases and 50% mortality, annually. The high mortality rates can be attributed to late diagnosis. Efficacy of Raman spectroscopy in classification of normal and pathological conditions in cervix cancers on diverse populations has already been demonstrated. Our earlier ex vivo studies have shown the feasibility of classifying normal and cancer cervix tissues as well as responders/non-responders to Concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). The present study was carried out to explore feasibility of in vivo Raman spectroscopic methods in classifying normal and cancerous conditions in Indian population. A total of 182 normal and 132 tumor in vivo Raman spectra, from 63 subjects, were recorded using a fiberoptic probe coupled HE-785 spectrometer, under clinical supervision. Spectra were acquired for 5 s and averaged over 3 times at 80 mW laser power. Spectra of normal conditions suggest strong collagenous features and abundance of non-collagenous proteins and DNA in case of tumors. Preprocessed spectra were subjected to Principal Component-Linear Discrimination Analysis (PCLDA) followed by leave-one-out-cross-validation. Classification efficiency of ~96.7% and 100% for normal and cancerous conditions respectively, were observed. Findings of the study corroborates earlier studies and suggest applicability of Raman spectroscopic methods in combination with appropriate multivariate tool for objective, noninvasive and rapid diagnosis of cervical cancers in Indian population. In view of encouraging results, extensive validation studies will be undertaken to confirm the findings.

  10. Raman exfoliative cytology for oral precancer diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Aditi; Gera, Poonam; Pai, Venkatesh; Dubey, Abhishek; Tyagi, Gunjan; Waghmare, Mandavi; Pagare, Sandeep; Mahimkar, Manoj; Murali Krishna, C.

    2017-11-01

    Oral premalignant lesions (OPLs) such as leukoplakia, erythroplakia, and oral submucous fibrosis, often precede oral cancer. Screening and management of these premalignant conditions can improve prognosis. Raman spectroscopy has previously demonstrated potential in the diagnosis of oral premalignant conditions (in vivo), detected viral infection, and identified cancer in both oral and cervical exfoliated cells (ex vivo). The potential of Raman exfoliative cytology (REC) in identifying premalignant conditions was investigated. Oral exfoliated samples were collected from healthy volunteers (n=20), healthy volunteers with tobacco habits (n=20), and oral premalignant conditions (n=27, OPL) using Cytobrush. Spectra were acquired using Raman microprobe. Spectral acquisition parameters were: λex: 785 nm, laser power: 40 mW, acquisition time: 15 s, and average: 3. Postspectral acquisition, cell pellet was subjected to Pap staining. Multivariate analysis was carried out using principal component analysis and principal component-linear discriminant analysis using both spectra- and patient-wise approaches in three- and two-group models. OPLs could be identified with ˜77% (spectra-wise) and ˜70% (patient-wise) sensitivity in the three-group model while with 86% (spectra-wise) and 83% (patient-wise) in the two-group model. Use of histopathologically confirmed premalignant cases and better sampling devices may help in development of improved standard models and also enhance the sensitivity of the method. Future longitudinal studies can help validate potential of REC in screening and monitoring high-risk populations and prognosis prediction of premalignant lesions.

  11. Raman probe. Innovative technology summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-07-01

    The Raman probe is deployed in high-level waste tanks with the cone penetrometer (CPT). These technologies are engineered and optimized to work together. All of the hardware is radiation hardened, designed for and tested in the high-radiation, highly caustic chemical environment of US Department of Energy's (DOE's) waste storage tanks. When deployed in tanks, the system is useful for rapidly assessing the species and concentrations of organic-bearing tank wastes. The CPT was originally developed for geological and groundwater applications, with sensors that measure physical parameters such as soil moisture, temperature, and pH. When deployed, it is hydraulically forced directly into the ground rather than using boring techniques utilized by rotary drilling systems. There is a separate Innovative Technology Summary Report for the CPT, so this report will focus on the changes made specifically to support the Raman probe. The most significant changes involve adapting the Raman probe for in-tank and subsurface field use and developing meaningful real-time data analysis. Testing of the complete LLNL system was conducted in a hot cell in the 222-S Laboratory at the Hanford site in summer 1997. Both instruments were tested in situ on solvent-contaminated soils (TCE and PCE) at the Savannah River Site in February and June 1998. This report describes the technology, its performance, its uses, cost, regulatory and policy issues, and lessons learned

  12. Raman spectrum of natural and synthetic stishovite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemley, R.J.; Mao, Ho-kwang; Chao, E.C.T.

    1986-01-01

    Raman spectra of natural and synthetic samples of stishovite have been measured with a micro-optical spectrometer system. These spectra have a pattern that is characteristic of rutile-structured oxides. The spectrum of synthetic stishovite is characterized by well-resolved bands at 231, 589, 753, and 967 cm-1, which are assigned as the B1g, Eg, A1g, and B2g fundamentals, respectively, of the first-order Raman spectrum of the ideal, ordered structure. Natural stishovite obtained from Meteor Crater, Arizona has a first-order Raman spectrum that is fully consistent with that of the synthetic material. The observed spectrum of the natural sample, however, is weaker and has bands in addition to those identified as fundamentals in the spectrum of the synthetic material. A broad band at ???475 cm-1 may be indicative of glass or contaminants derived from the extraction procedure. Alternatively, this band may arise from multiphonon scattering that is enhanced by poor crystallinity or structural disorder in the natural shocked sample. ?? 1986 Springer-Verlag.

  13. Microscopic modeling of the Raman diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benisti, D.; Morice, O.; Gremillet, L.; Strozzi, D.

    2010-01-01

    In the typical conditions of density and electronic temperature of the Laser Megajoule (LMJ), a quantitative assessment of the Raman reflectivity requires an accurate calculation of the non-linear movement of each electron submitted to the waves propagating in the plasma. The interaction of a laser beam with a plasma generates an electronic wave shifted in frequency (that can be back-scattered) and an electron plasma wave (OPE). The OPE can give to the electrons a strongly non-linear movement by trapping them in a potential well. This non-linearity of microscopic origin has an impact on the plasma electronic density. We have succeeded in computing this plasma electronic density in a very accurate way by combining the principles of a perturbative approach with those of an adiabatic theory. Results show that the Raman diffusion can grow on temperature and density ranges more important than expected. We have predicted the threshold and the behavior of the Raman diffusion above this threshold as accurately as we had done it with a Vlasov code but by being 10000 times more rapid. (A.C.)

  14. A Raman-Based Portable Fuel Analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farquharson, Stuart

    2010-08-01

    Fuel is the single most import supply during war. Consider that the US Military is employing over 25,000 vehicles in Iraq and Afghanistan. Most fuel is obtained locally, and must be characterized to ensure proper operation of these vehicles. Fuel properties are currently determined using a deployed chemical laboratory. Unfortunately, each sample requires in excess of 6 hours to characterize. To overcome this limitation, we have developed a portable fuel analyzer capable of determine 7 fuel properties that allow determining fuel usage. The analyzer uses Raman spectroscopy to measure the fuel samples without preparation in 2 minutes. The challenge, however, is that as distilled fractions of crude oil, all fuels are composed of hundreds of hydrocarbon components that boil at similar temperatures, and performance properties can not be simply correlated to a single component, and certainly not to specific Raman peaks. To meet this challenge, we measured over 800 diesel and jet fuels from around the world and used chemometrics to correlate the Raman spectra to fuel properties. Critical to the success of this approach is laser excitation at 1064 nm to avoid fluorescence interference (many fuels fluoresce) and a rugged interferometer that provides 0.1 cm-1 wavenumber (x-axis) accuracy to guarantee accurate correlations. Here we describe the portable fuel analyzer, the chemometric models, and the successful determination of these 7 fuel properties for over 100 unknown samples provided by the US Marine Corps, US Navy, and US Army.

  15. Diagnosing breast cancer by using Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haka, Abigail S.; Shafer-Peltier, Karen E.; Fitzmaurice, Maryann; Crowe, Joseph; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Feld, Michael S.

    2005-08-01

    We employ Raman spectroscopy to diagnose benign and malignant lesions in human breast tissue based on chemical composition. In this study, 130 Raman spectra are acquired from ex vivo samples of human breast tissue (normal, fibrocystic change, fibroadenoma, and infiltrating carcinoma) from 58 patients. Data are fit by using a linear combination model in which nine basis spectra represent the morphologic and chemical features of breast tissue. The resulting fit coefficients provide insight into the chemical/morphological makeup of the tissue and are used to develop diagnostic algorithms. The fit coefficients for fat and collagen are the key parameters in the resulting diagnostic algorithm, which classifies samples according to their specific pathological diagnoses, attaining 94% sensitivity and 96% specificity for distinguishing cancerous tissues from normal and benign tissues. The excellent results demonstrate that Raman spectroscopy has the potential to be applied in vivo to accurately classify breast lesions, thereby reducing the number of excisional breast biopsies that are performed. Author contributions: M.F., J.C., R.R.D., and M.S.F. designed research; A.S.H. and K.E.S.-P. performed research; A.S.H. and M.F. analyzed data; and A.S.H. wrote the paper.This paper was submitted directly (Track II) to the PNAS office.Abbreviations: DEH, ductal epithelial hyperplasia; ROC, receiver operating characteristic; N/C, nuclear-to-cytoplasm.

  16. Raman study of opal at high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farfan, G.; Wang, S.; Mao, W. L.

    2011-12-01

    More commonly known for their beauty and lore as gemstones, opals are also intriguing geological materials which may have potential for materials science applications. Opal lacks a definite crystalline structure, and is composed of an amorphous packing of hydrated silica (SiO2) spheroids, which provides us with a unique nano-scaled mineraloid with properties unlike those of other amorphous materials like glass. Opals from different localities were studied at high pressure using a diamond anvil cell to apply pressure and Raman spectroscopy to look at changes in bonding as pressure was increased. We first tested different samples from Virgin Valley, NV, Spencer, ID, Juniper Ridge, OR, and Australia, which contain varying amounts of water at ambient conditions, using Raman spectroscopy to determine if they were opal-CT (semicrystalline cristobalite-trydimite volcanic origin) or opal-A (amorphous sedimentary origin). We then used x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy in a diamond anvil cell to see how their bonding and structure changed under compression and to determine what effect water content had on their high pressure behavior. Comparison of our results on opal to other high pressure studies of amorphous materials like glass has implications from a geological and materials science standpoint.

  17. Field Raman Spectrograph for Environmental Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sylvia, J.M.; Haas, J.W.; Spencer, K.M.; Carrabba, M.M.; Rauh, R.D.; Forney, R.W.; Johnston, T.M.

    1998-01-01

    The widespread contamination found across the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex has received considerable attention from the government and public alike. A massive site characterization and cleanup effort has been underway for several years and is expected to continue for several decades more. The scope of the cleanup effort ranges from soil excavation and treatment to complete dismantling and decontamination of whole buildings. To its credit, DOE has supported research and development of new technologies to speed up and reduce the cost of this effort. One area in particular has been the development of portable instrumentation that can be used to perform analytical measurements in the field. This approach provides timely data to decision makers and eliminates the expense, delays, and uncertainties of sample preservation, transport, storage, and laboratory analysis. In this program, we have developed and demonstrated in the field a transportable, high performance Raman spectrograph that can be used to detect and identify contaminants in a variety of scenarios. With no moving parts, the spectrograph is rugged and can perform many Raman measurements in situ with flexible fiber optic sampling probes. The instrument operates under computer control and a software package has been developed to collect and process spectral data. A collection of Raman spectra for 200 contaminants of DOE importance has been compiled in a searchable format to assist in the identification of unknown contaminants in the field

  18. Raman scattering study of filled skutterudite compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogita, N; Kojima, R; Hasegawa, T; Takasu, Y; Udagawa, M; Kondo, T; Takeda, N; Ikeno, T; Ishikawa, K; Sugawara, H; Kikuchi, D; Sato, H; Sekine, C; Shirotani, I

    2007-01-01

    Raman scattering of skutterudite compounds RT 4 X 12 (R=La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm and Yb, T=Fe, Ru and Os, X=P and Sb) have been measured. All first-order Raman active phonons are observed and are assigned as the pnicogen vibrations. At the low energy region, the second-order phonons, due to the vibration of the rare earth ions with a flat phonon dispersion, are observed in the spectra of RRu 4 P 12 (R=La and Sm) and ROs 4 Sb 12 (R=La, Ce, Pr, Nd, and Sm). The appearance of the second-order phonons in the spectra is caused by an anharmonic vibrations of rare earth ions in large cage space and a large density of state due to the flat phonon dispersion. However, in spite of the similar cage space, the 2nd-order phonons are hardly observed for RFe 4 Sb 12 and RRu 4 Sb 12 . Thus, these results suggest that the dynamics of the rare earth ion is closely related to not only the cage size but also the electronic state due to the transition metals. Raman spectra of PrRu 4 P 12 show the drastic spectral change due to the metal-insulator transition. The phonon spectra and crystal field excitations due to the structural change have been assigned above and below the transition temperature

  19. UTI diagnosis and antibiogram using Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastanos, Evdokia; Kyriakides, Alexandros; Hadjigeorgiou, Katerina; Pitris, Constantinos

    2009-07-01

    Urinary tract infection diagnosis and antibiogram require a 48 hour waiting period using conventional methods. This results in ineffective treatments, increased costs and most importantly in increased resistance to antibiotics. In this work, a novel method for classifying bacteria and determining their sensitivity to an antibiotic using Raman spectroscopy is described. Raman spectra of three species of gram negative Enterobacteria, most commonly responsible for urinary tract infections, were collected. The study included 25 samples each of E.coli, Klebsiella p. and Proteus spp. A novel algorithm based on spectral ratios followed by discriminant analysis resulted in classification with over 94% accuracy. Sensitivity and specificity for the three types of bacteria ranged from 88-100%. For the development of an antibiogram, bacterial samples were treated with the antibiotic ciprofloxacin to which they were all sensitive. Sensitivity to the antibiotic was evident after analysis of the Raman signatures of bacteria treated or not treated with this antibiotic as early as two hours after exposure. This technique can lead to the development of new technology for urinary tract infection diagnosis and antibiogram with same day results, bypassing urine cultures and avoiding all undesirable consequences of current practice.

  20. Simulations and analysis of the Raman scattering and differential Raman scattering/Raman optical activity (ROA) spectra of amino acids, peptides and proteins in aqueous solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jalkanen, Karl J.; Nieminen, R. M.; Bohr, Jakob

    2000-01-01

    The Raman and Raman optical activity (ROA) spectra of amino acids and small peptides in aqueous solution have been simulated by density functional theory and restricted Hartree/Fock methods. The treatment of the aqueous environment in treated in two ways. The water molecules in the first hydratio...

  1. The use of lasers as sources for Raman spectrometry, resonance Raman spectrometry, and light scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capitini, R.; Ceccaldi, M.; Leicknam, J.P.; Plus, R.

    1975-01-01

    The activity of the laboratory is principally centred on the determination of molecular structures and the study of molecular interactions in solution by infrared and Raman spectrometry. With the development of work on relatively large molecules, particularly biological molecules, it became necessary to complete information on the molecular weight and on the intra and intermolecular geometry and interactions of these bodies. In order to obtain these informations Rayleigh scattering and resonance Raman spectrometry were used. The advantages of using vibrational spectrometry, particularly Raman, in conjunction with the diffusion of light for these structural and molecular interaction studies is emphasized. It is shown that these two techniques could not have developed as they have done in the last few years without the use of lasers as light source [fr

  2. Highly sensitive high resolution Raman spectroscopy using resonant ionization methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owyoung, A.; Esherick, P.

    1984-05-01

    In recent years, the introduction of stimulated Raman methods has offered orders of magnitude improvement in spectral resolving power for gas phase Raman studies. Nevertheless, the inherent weakness of the Raman process suggests the need for significantly more sensitive techniques in Raman spectroscopy. In this we describe a new approach to this problem. Our new technique, which we call ionization-detected stimulated Raman spectroscopy (IDSRS), combines high-resolution SRS with highly-sensitive resonant laser ionization to achieve an increase in sensitivity of over three orders of magnitude. The excitation/detection process involves three sequential steps: (1) population of a vibrationally excited state via stimulated Raman pumping; (2) selective ionization of the vibrationally excited molecule with a tunable uv source; and (3) collection of the ionized species at biased electrodes where they are detected as current in an external circuit

  3. Scanning Angle Raman spectroscopy in polymer thin film characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Vy H.T. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2015-12-19

    The focus of this thesis is the application of Raman spectroscopy for the characterization of thin polymer films. Chapter 1 provides background information and motivation, including the fundamentals of Raman spectroscopy for chemical analysis, scanning angle Raman scattering and scanning angle Raman scattering for applications in thin polymer film characterization. Chapter 2 represents a published manuscript that focuses on the application of scanning angle Raman spectroscopy for the analysis of submicron thin films with a description of methodology for measuring the film thickness and location of an interface between two polymer layers. Chapter 3 provides an outlook and future directions for the work outlined in this thesis. Appendix A, contains a published manuscript that outlines the use of Raman spectroscopy to aid in the synthesis of heterogeneous catalytic systems. Appendix B and C contain published manuscripts that set a foundation for the work presented in Chapter 2.

  4. Combined raman spectrometer/laser-induced breakdown spectrometer design concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazalgette Courrèges-Lacoste, Gregory; Ahlers, Berit; Boslooper, Erik; Rull-Perez, Fernando; Maurice, Sylvestre

    2017-11-01

    Amongst the different instruments that have been preselected to be on-board the Pasteur payload on ExoMars is the Raman/ Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) instrument. Raman spectroscopy and LIBS will be integrated into a single instrument sharing many hardware commonalities. An international team under the lead of TNO has been gathered to produce a design concept for a combined Raman Spectrometer/ LIBS Elegant Bread-Board (EBB). The instrument is based on a specifically designed extremely compact spectrometer with high resolution over a large wavelength range, suitable for both Raman spectroscopy and LIBS measurements. Low mass, size and resources are the main drivers of the instrument's design concept. The proposed design concept, realization and testing programme for the combined Raman/ LIBS EBB is presented as well as background information on Raman and LIBS.

  5. UV Resonant Raman Spectrometer with Multi-Line Laser Excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, James L.; Kohel, James M.; Kirby, James P.; Morookian, John Michael; Pelletier, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    A Raman spectrometer employs two or more UV (ultraviolet) laser wavel engths to generate UV resonant Raman (UVRR) spectra in organic sampl es. Resonant Raman scattering results when the laser excitation is n ear an electronic transition of a molecule, and the enhancement of R aman signals can be several orders of magnitude. In addition, the Ra man cross-section is inversely proportional to the fourth power of t he wavelength, so the UV Raman emission is increased by another fact or of 16, or greater, over visible Raman emissions. The Raman-scatter ed light is collected using a high-resolution broadband spectrograph . Further suppression of the Rayleigh-scattered laser light is provi ded by custom UV notch filters.

  6. Sensitivity of Raman spectroscopy to normal patient variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargis, Elizabeth; Byrd, Teresa; Logan, Quinisha; Khabele, Dineo; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita

    2011-11-01

    Many groups have used Raman spectroscopy for diagnosing cervical dysplasia; however, there have been few studies looking at the effect of normal physiological variations on Raman spectra. We assess four patient variables that may affect normal Raman spectra: Race/ethnicity, body mass index (BMI), parity, and socioeconomic status. Raman spectra were acquired from a diverse population of 75 patients undergoing routine screening for cervical dysplasia. Classification of Raman spectra from patients with a normal cervix is performed using sparse multinomial logistic regression (SMLR) to determine if any of these variables has a significant effect. Results suggest that BMI and parity have the greatest impact, whereas race/ethnicity and socioeconomic status have a limited effect. Incorporating BMI and obstetric history into classification algorithms may increase sensitivity and specificity rates of disease classification using Raman spectroscopy. Studies are underway to assess the effect of these variables on disease.

  7. Ultrafast stimulated Raman spectroscopy in the near-infrared region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takaya, Tomohisa

    2016-01-01

    A number of electronic transitions in the near-infrared wavelength region are associated with migration or delocalization of electrons in large molecules or molecular systems. Time-resolved near-infrared Raman spectroscopy will be a powerful tool for investigating the structural dynamic of samples with delocalized electrons. However, the sensitivity of near-infrared spontaneous Raman spectrometers is significantly low due to an extremely small probability of Raman scattering and a low sensitivity of near-infrared detectors. Nonlinear Raman spectroscopy is one of the techniques that can overcome the sensitivity problems and enable us to obtain time-resolved Raman spectra in resonance with near-IR transitions. In this article, the author introduces recent progress of ultrafast time-resolved near-infrared stimulated Raman spectroscopy. Optical setup, spectral and temporal resolution, and applications of the spectrometer are described. (author)

  8. XRD and FTIR crystallinity indices in sound human tooth enamel and synthetic hydroxyapatite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyes-Gasga, José; Martínez-Piñeiro, Esmeralda L.; Rodríguez-Álvarez, Galois; Tiznado-Orozco, Gaby E.; García-García, Ramiro

    2013-01-01

    The crystallinity index (CI) is a measure of the percentage of crystalline material in a given sample and it is also correlated to the degree of order within the crystals. In the literature two ways are reported to measure the CI: X-ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopy. Although the CI determined by these techniques has been adopted in the field of archeology as a structural order measure in the bone with the idea that it can help e.g. in the sequencing of the bones in chronological and/or stratigraphic order, some debate remains about the reliability of the CI values. To investigate similarities and differences between the two techniques, the CI of sound human tooth enamel and synthetic hydroxyapatite (HAP) was measured in this work by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), at room temperature and after heat treatment. Although the (CI) XRD index is related to the crystal structure of the samples and the (CI) FTIR index is related to the vibration modes of the molecular bonds, both indices showed similar qualitative behavior for heat-treated samples. At room temperature, the (CI) XRD value indicated that enamel is more crystalline than synthetic HAP, while (CI) FTIR indicated the opposite. Scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) images were also used to corroborate the measured CI values. - Highlights: • XRD and FTIR crystallinity indices for tooth enamel and synthetic HAP were obtained. • SEM and TEM images were more correlated with (CI) XRD than with (CI) FTIR . • Regardless of the temperature, (CI) XRD and (CI) FTIR showed similar behavior. • XRD and FTIR crystallinity indices resulted in a fast and qualitative measurement

  9. XRD and FTIR crystallinity indices in sound human tooth enamel and synthetic hydroxyapatite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes-Gasga, José, E-mail: jreyes@fisica.unam.mx [Instituto de Física, UNAM, Circuito de la Investigación Científica s/n., Cd. Universitaria, Coyoacán 04510, México, D.F. (Mexico); Martínez-Piñeiro, Esmeralda L., E-mail: esmemapi@gmail.com [Instituto de Física, UNAM, Circuito de la Investigación Científica s/n., Cd. Universitaria, Coyoacán 04510, México, D.F. (Mexico); Rodríguez-Álvarez, Galois, E-mail: galoisborre@yahoo.com [Instituto de Física, UNAM, Circuito de la Investigación Científica s/n., Cd. Universitaria, Coyoacán 04510, México, D.F. (Mexico); Tiznado-Orozco, Gaby E., E-mail: gab0409@yahoo.com.mx [Unidad Académica de Odontología, Universidad Autónoma de Nayarit, Edificio E7, Ciudad de la Cultura “Amado Nervo”, C.P. 63190 Tepic, Nayarit (Mexico); García-García, Ramiro, E-mail: ramiro@fisica.unam.mx [Instituto de Física, UNAM, Circuito de la Investigación Científica s/n., Cd. Universitaria, Coyoacán 04510, México, D.F. (Mexico); and others

    2013-12-01

    The crystallinity index (CI) is a measure of the percentage of crystalline material in a given sample and it is also correlated to the degree of order within the crystals. In the literature two ways are reported to measure the CI: X-ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopy. Although the CI determined by these techniques has been adopted in the field of archeology as a structural order measure in the bone with the idea that it can help e.g. in the sequencing of the bones in chronological and/or stratigraphic order, some debate remains about the reliability of the CI values. To investigate similarities and differences between the two techniques, the CI of sound human tooth enamel and synthetic hydroxyapatite (HAP) was measured in this work by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), at room temperature and after heat treatment. Although the (CI){sub XRD} index is related to the crystal structure of the samples and the (CI){sub FTIR} index is related to the vibration modes of the molecular bonds, both indices showed similar qualitative behavior for heat-treated samples. At room temperature, the (CI){sub XRD} value indicated that enamel is more crystalline than synthetic HAP, while (CI){sub FTIR} indicated the opposite. Scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) images were also used to corroborate the measured CI values. - Highlights: • XRD and FTIR crystallinity indices for tooth enamel and synthetic HAP were obtained. • SEM and TEM images were more correlated with (CI){sub XRD} than with (CI){sub FTIR}. • Regardless of the temperature, (CI){sub XRD} and (CI){sub FTIR} showed similar behavior. • XRD and FTIR crystallinity indices resulted in a fast and qualitative measurement.

  10. Raman spectra of ordinary and deuterated liquid ammonias; Spectres Raman des ammoniacs ordinaire et deuteries liquides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ceccaldi, M; Leicknam, J P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, 91 - Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires, direction des materiaux et des combustibles nucleaires, departement de physico-chimie, service des isotopes stables, service de spectrometrie de masse

    1968-12-01

    The three deuterated ammonia molecules, as well as ordinary ammonia, have been examined in the liquid state by Raman spectroscopy using a high-pressure cell described elsewhere. This work thus completes the infrared spectrometry studies. We have examined the NH and ND valency absorption regions. The polarization measurements and isotope effect considerations make it possible to confirm most of the attributions recently proposed for interpreting the infrared spectra of the four isotopic molecules: the apparent disagreement between the NH{sub 3} and ND{sub 3} spectra obtained in this region by infrared and Raman spectroscopy is discussed: by the first technique the number of bands in the spectra corresponds well to the theoretically expected number, and the relative intensities conform more or less to expectations; the Raman spectra however have a strong supplementary band in the same region, produced by a Fermi resonance; it is possible to explain, from theoretical considerations, why this resonance appears so easily in the Raman spectrum, whereas it is detected in the infrared only by a very detailed analysis of the effects of solvents on the ammonia. (authors) [French] Les trois ammoniacs deuteries, ainsi que l'ammoniac ordinaire, sont examines a l'etat liquide par spectrometrie Raman, a l'aide d'une cuve haute pression decrite par ailleurs. Ce travail complete donc les etudes effectuees par spectrometrie infra-rouge. Nous avons examine les regions d'absorption de valence NH et ND. Les mesures de polarisation et des considerations sur les effets isotopiques permettent de confirmer la plupart des attributions proposees recemment pour interpreter les spectres infra-rouges des quatre molecules isotopiques: on discute egalement l'apparent desaccord entre les spectres de NH{sub 3} et de ND{sub 3} obtenus dans cette region par infra-rouge et Raman: par la premiere technique le nombre de bandes relevees sur les spectres correspond bien au nombre theoriquement attendu et

  11. Characterization of pigment/binder - systems in arts via FTIR and UV/Vis/NIR - spectroscopy with special consideration of nondestructive methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vetter, W.A.

    2014-01-01

    The main focus of this doctoral thesis is on the non-destructive analysis of art objects by using compound specific reflection-UV/Vis/NIR and reflection-FTIR spectroscopy. Based on commercially available instruments, measuring systems have been designed and built to meet the specific requirements of material analysis in the field of art. These systems have been utilized to analyse different types of art objects (watercolour paintings, easel paintings, contemporary graphic art objects) in order to identify the materials used by the artists. Furthermore, two new procedures are presented which allow to build up adequate reference databases from only minimal sample amounts of original watercolour materials of the 19th century. This is a crucial point as both methods require references for the identification of the materials. The results obtained demonstrate that UV/Vis/NIR and FTIR spectroscopy in reflection mode enable the non-destructive identification of a variety of both, organic and inorganic materials, particularly in combination with element specific XRF (X-ray fluorescence analysis) and thus are valuable tools for the analysis of cultural heritage objects. Furthermore, the results have shown that a comparison of the complementary methods strongly facilitated the evaluation of spectra obtained by the particular analytical techniques and hence reliable results could be obtained in many cases. As expected, several frequently used pigments e.g. carbon based blacks, earth pigments and lake pigments could not be identified unambiguously due to methodical limitations. Therefore, the use of additional complementary methods such as Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) would be highly desirable. Except a few examples, the characteristics of the radiation used for the investigations did not allow to draw conclusions about the distribution of materials in multilayer structures. For this reason, it still remains necessary to analyse cross-sections of samples for a

  12. Rationale for single molecule detection by means of Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaponenko, S.V.; Guzatov, D.V.

    2009-01-01

    A consistent quantum electrodynamical description is proposed of Raman scattering of light by a molecule in a medium with a modified photon density of states. Enhanced local density of states near a metal nanobody is shown to increase a scattering rate by several orders of magnitude, thus providing a rationale for experimental detection of single molecules by means of Raman spectroscopy. For an ellipsoidal particle 10 14 -fold enhancement of the Raman scattering cross-section is obtained. (authors)

  13. Preventing Raman Lasing in High-Q WGM Resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Matsko, Andrey; Strekalov, Dmitry; Maleki, Lute

    2007-01-01

    A generic design has been conceived to suppress the Raman effect in whispering- gallery-mode (WGM) optical resonators that have high values of the resonance quality factor (Q). Although it is possible to exploit the Raman effect (even striving to maximize the Raman gain to obtain Raman lasing), the present innovation is intended to satisfy a need that arises in applications in which the Raman effect inhibits the realization of the full potential of WGM resonators as frequency-selection components. Heretofore, in such applications, it has been necessary to operate high-Q WGM resonators at unattractively low power levels to prevent Raman lasing. (The Raman-lasing thresholds of WGM optical resonators are very low and are approximately proportional to Q(sup -2)). Heretofore, two ways of preventing Raman lasting at high power levels have been known, but both entail significant disadvantages: A resonator can be designed so that the optical field is spread over a relatively large mode volume to bring the power density below the threshold. For any given combination of Q and power level, there is certain mode volume wherein Raman lasing does not start. Unfortunately, a resonator that has a large mode volume also has a high spectral density, which is undesirable in a typical photonic application. A resonator can be cooled to the temperature of liquid helium, where the Raman spectrum is narrower and, therefore, the Raman gain is lower. However, liquid-helium cooling is inconvenient. The present design overcomes these disadvantages, making it possible to operate a low-spectral-density (even a single-mode) WGM resonator at a relatively high power level at room temperature, without risk of Raman lasing.

  14. Investigations of a Dual Seeded 1178 nm Raman Laser System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-14

    was obtained by Raman amplification of a distributed feedback diode laser in a variably strained polarization- maintaining fiber with a record-high...Calia, D.B., “50W CW visible laser source at 589 nm obtained via frequency doubling of three coherently combined narrow-band Raman fiber amplifiers...AFRL-RD-PS- TP-2016-0009 AFRL-RD-PS- TP-2016-0009 INVESTIGATIONS OF A DUAL SEEDED 1178 NM RAMAN LASER SYSTEM Leanne Henry, et al. 14 January

  15. Raman Spectrometer for the Characterization of Advanced Materials and Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-18

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: The grant focused on the purchase of a Renishaw InVia Raman microscope to support and enhance the research in...laser. The system includes an accessory for polarization (for 785 nm) and an optical cable that allows external Raman measurements. The manufacturer...UU 18-04-2016 1-Feb-2015 31-Jan-2016 Final Report: Raman Spectrometer for the Characterization of Advanced Materials and Nanomaterials The views

  16. Raman scattering in condensed media placed in photon traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncharov, A. P.; Gorelik, V. S.; Krawtsow, A. V.

    2007-11-01

    A new type of resonator cells (photon traps) has been worked out, which ensures the Raman opalescence regime (i.e., the conditions under which the relative Raman scattering intensity at the outlet of the cells increases significantly as compared to the exciting line intensity. The Raman scattering spectra of a number of organic and inorganic compounds placed in photon traps are studied under pulse-periodic excitation by a copper-vapor laser.

  17. Comparison of Raman, NIR, and ATR FTIR spectroscopy as analytical tools for in-line monitoring of CO2 concentration in an amine gas treating process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kachko, A.; Ham, L.V. van der; Bardow, A.; Vlugt, T.J.H.; Goetheer, E.L.V.

    2016-01-01

    Chemical absorption of CO2 using aqueous amine-based solvents is one of the common approaches to control acidic gases emissions to the atmosphere. Improvement in the efficiency of industrial processes requires precise monitoring tools that fit with the specific application. Process monitoring using

  18. DFT, FT-IR, FT-Raman and NMR studies of 4-(substituted phenylazo)-3,5-diacetamido-1H-pyrazoles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kınalı, Selin; Demirci, Serkan; Çalışır, Zühre; Kurt, Mustafa; Ataç, Ahmet

    2011-05-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the structural and vibrational spectra of some novel azo dyes. 2-(Substituted phenylazo)malononitriles were synthesized by the coupling reaction of the diazonium salts, which were prepared with the use of various aniline derivatives with malononitrile, and then 4-(substituted phenylazo)-3,5-diamino-1H-pyrazole azo dyes were obtained via the ring closure of the azo compounds with hydrazine monohydrate. The experimental and theoretical vibrational spectra of azo dyes were studied. The structural and spectroscopic analysis of the molecules were carried out by using Becke's three-parameters hybrid functional (B3LYP) and density functional harmonic calculations. The 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts of the azo dye molecules were calculated using the gauge-invariant-atomic orbital (GIAO) method. The calculated vibrational wavenumbers and chemical shifts were compared with the experimental data of the molecules.

  19. Role of water in structural changes of poly(AVGVP) and poly(GVGVP) studied by FTIR and Raman spectroscopy and ab initio calculations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schmidt, Pavel; Dybal, Jiří; Rodriguez-Cabello, J. C.; Reboto, V.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 2 (2005), s. 697-706 ISSN 1525-7797 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/00/1320; GA AV ČR IAA4050208 Grant - others:Junta de Castilla y León(ES) VA002/02; Junta de Castilla y León(ES) VA020/03 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : poly(pentapeptides] * structural changes * water Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 3.618, year: 2005

  20. Nucleobases and C2 and C4 Imidazolium Acetate Interactions: FTIR-ATR, Raman and NMR Spectra and ab Initio Calculations Insights

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Araújo, J. M. M.; Ferreira, Rui; Veiga, H.I.M.

    applications can be designed. The tunable nature of the solubility of various compounds, including molecules of pharmaceutical and biological interest, in RTILs makes extraction them attractive for many separation and purification processes [1;2]. Exploring new applications requires fundamental understanding...... nucleobases is perceived. The results obtained for the three ILs families outlined, Imidazolium-, Phosphonium- and Ammonium-based ILs, show that the ILs containing a carbonyl group in the anion present higher dissolution capabilities. This is due to the establishment of hydrogen bonds between uracil and IL...

  1. Chemical analysis of acoustically levitated drops by Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuckermann, Rudolf; Puskar, Ljiljana; Zavabeti, Mahta; Sekine, Ryo; McNaughton, Don

    2009-07-01

    An experimental apparatus combining Raman spectroscopy with acoustic levitation, Raman acoustic levitation spectroscopy (RALS), is investigated in the field of physical and chemical analytics. Whereas acoustic levitation enables the contactless handling of microsized samples, Raman spectroscopy offers the advantage of a noninvasive method without complex sample preparation. After carrying out some systematic tests to probe the sensitivity of the technique to drop size, shape, and position, RALS has been successfully applied in monitoring sample dilution and preconcentration, evaporation, crystallization, an acid-base reaction, and analytes in a surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy colloidal suspension.

  2. Raman scattering in the atmospheres of the major planets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cochran, W.D.; Trafton, L.M.

    1978-01-01

    A method is developed for calculating the rate at which photons are Raman scattered as a function of frequency and depth in an inhomogeneous anisotropically scattering atmosphere. This method is used to determine the effects of Raman scattering by H 2 in the atmospheres of the major planets. Raman scattering causes an insufficient decrease in the blue and ultraviolet to explain the albedos of all of the planets; an additional source of extinction is necessary in this spectral region. Approximately 0.5-2.0% of the blue continuum photons have undergone Raman scattering in the shallow atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn, while in the deep atmospheres of Uranus and Neptune Raman scattering accounts for abount 10-15% of the blue continuum intensity. The filling in of the cores of solar lines and the production of Raman-shifted ghosts of the Fraunhofer spectrum will be detectable effects in all of the major planets. Raman scattering has a significant influence on the formation and profiles of the strong red and near-infrared CH 4 bands on Uranus and Neptune. The residual intensity in the cores of these bands may be fully explained as a result of Raman scattering by H 2 . This scattering of photons into the cores of saturated absorption bands will cause an underestimate of the abundance of the absorber unless the effects of Raman scattering by H 2 in an inhomogeneous atmosphere are properly included in the analysis

  3. All passive architecture for high efficiency cascaded Raman conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaswamy, V.; Arun, S.; Chayran, G.; Supradeepa, V. R.

    2018-02-01

    Cascaded Raman fiber lasers have offered a convenient method to obtain scalable, high-power sources at various wavelength regions inaccessible with rare-earth doped fiber lasers. A limitation previously was the reduced efficiency of these lasers. Recently, new architectures have been proposed to enhance efficiency, but this came at the cost of enhanced complexity, requiring an additional low-power, cascaded Raman laser. In this work, we overcome this with a new, all-passive architecture for high-efficiency cascaded Raman conversion. We demonstrate our architecture with a fifth-order cascaded Raman converter from 1117nm to 1480nm with output power of ~64W and efficiency of 60%.

  4. Electron enhanced Raman scattering and its applications in solution chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yui, Hiroharu

    2007-01-01

    The present review describes a new enhancement technique for Raman scattering in aqueous solutions. Raman scattering spectroscopy has an inherent ability to distinguish between molecules with great similarity and provides useful information on local physical and chemical environments at their functional groups' level. Since the Raman scattering signals from water molecules are quite weak, Raman spectroscopy has great advantage for detection or discrimination of a trace amount of analytes in aqueous environments. However, Raman scattering cross-sections are inherently small and it generally requires high power excitation and long acquisition times to obtain high-quality Raman spectra. These conditions create disadvantages for the analyses for living cells and real-time monitoring for environmental analyses. Here, I describe a new Raman enhancement technique, namely electron enhanced Raman scattering (EERS)', where artificially generated electrons additionally affect the polarizability of target molecular systems and enhance their inherent Raman cross-section. Principles of the EERS and its applications to aqueous solution are presented. (author)

  5. DEB-silicone rubber hydrogen absorbing Raman detection technology research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Suolong; Zhong Jingrong; Wang Huang; Yang Kaixu; Xiao Jiqun; Liu Jiaxi; Liao Junsheng

    2012-01-01

    The DEB-Pd/C hydrogen getter powder and DEB-Pd/C-silicone rubber getter film were prepared and used for hydrogen detection in close systems by laser Raman method. The DEB alkanes Raman peak intensity changes with the getter time were monitored by Raman spectrometer. As a result, silicone rubber has good compatibility with DEB getter, slow access to hydrogen and good flexible. The alkanes peak intensity-getter time followed a exponential rule. DEB getter films are suitable for Raman on-line monitor of cumulative hydrogen of a closed system at long time. (authors)

  6. Raman spectroscopic characterization of multiwall carbon nanotubes and of composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Bokobza

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work Raman spectroscopy was used for extensive characterization of multiwall carbon nanotube (MWNTs and of MWCNTs/rubber composites. We have measured the Raman spectra of bundled and dispersed multiwall carbon nanotubes. All the Raman bands of the carbon nanotubes are seen to shift to higher wavenumbers upon debundling on account of less intertube interactions. Effects of laser irradiation were also investigated. Strong effects are observed by changing the wavelength of the laser excitation. On the other hand, at a given excitation wavelength, changes on the Raman bands are observed by changing the laser power density due to sample heating during the measurement procedure.

  7. Infrared and Raman spectroscopy: principles and spectral interpretation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Larkin, Peter

    2011-01-01

    .... The book reviews basic principles, instrumentation, sampling methods, quantitative analysis, origin of group frequencies and qualitative interpretation using generalized Infrared (IR) and Raman spectra...

  8. Evaluation of Shifted Excitation Raman Difference Spectroscopy and Comparison to Computational Background Correction Methods Applied to Biochemical Raman Spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordero, Eliana; Korinth, Florian; Stiebing, Clara; Krafft, Christoph; Schie, Iwan W; Popp, Jürgen

    2017-07-27

    Raman spectroscopy provides label-free biochemical information from tissue samples without complicated sample preparation. The clinical capability of Raman spectroscopy has been demonstrated in a wide range of in vitro and in vivo applications. However, a challenge for in vivo applications is the simultaneous excitation of auto-fluorescence in the majority of tissues of interest, such as liver, bladder, brain, and others. Raman bands are then superimposed on a fluorescence background, which can be several orders of magnitude larger than the Raman signal. To eliminate the disturbing fluorescence background, several approaches are available. Among instrumentational methods shifted excitation Raman difference spectroscopy (SERDS) has been widely applied and studied. Similarly, computational techniques, for instance extended multiplicative scatter correction (EMSC), have also been employed to remove undesired background contributions. Here, we present a theoretical and experimental evaluation and comparison of fluorescence background removal approaches for Raman spectra based on SERDS and EMSC.

  9. Source Determination of Red Gel Pen Inks using Raman Spectroscopy and Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy combined with Pearson's Product Moment Correlation Coefficients and Principal Component Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamad Asri, Muhammad Naeim; Mat Desa, Wan Nur Syuhaila; Ismail, Dzulkiflee

    2018-01-01

    The potential combination of two nondestructive techniques, that is, Raman spectroscopy (RS) and attenuated total reflectance-fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy with Pearson's product moment correlation (PPMC) coefficient (r) and principal component analysis (PCA) to determine the actual source of red gel pen ink used to write a simulated threatening note, was examined. Eighteen (18) red gel pens purchased from Japan and Malaysia from November to December 2014 where one of the pens was used to write a simulated threatening note were analyzed using RS and ATR-FTIR spectroscopy, respectively. The spectra of all the red gel pen inks including the ink deposited on the simulated threatening note gathered from the RS and ATR-FTIR analyses were subjected to PPMC coefficient (r) calculation and principal component analysis (PCA). The coefficients r = 0.9985 and r = 0.9912 for pairwise combination of RS and ATR-FTIR spectra respectively and similarities in terms of PC1 and PC2 scores of one of the inks to the ink deposited on the simulated threatening note substantiated the feasibility of combining RS and ATR-FTIR spectroscopy with PPMC coefficient (r) and PCA for successful source determination of red gel pen inks. The development of pigment spectral library had allowed the ink deposited on the threatening note to be identified as XSL Poppy Red (CI Pigment Red 112). © 2017 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  10. Application of Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy in determination of microalgal compositions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Yingying; Yao, Changhong; Xue, Song; Yang, Haibo

    2014-01-01

    Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) was applied in algal strain screening and monitoring cell composition dynamics in a marine microalga Isochrysis zhangjiangensis during algal cultivation. The content of lipid, carbohydrate and protein of samples determined by traditional methods had validated the accuracy of FT-IR method. For algal screening, the band absorption ratios of lipid/amide I and carbo/amide I from FT-IR measurements allowed for the selection of Isochrysis sp. and Tetraselmis subcordiformis as the most potential lipid and carbohydrate producers, respectively. The cell composition dynamics of I. zhangjiangensis measured by FT-IR revealed the diversion of carbon allocation from protein to carbohydrate and neutral lipid when nitrogen-replete cells were subjected to nitrogen limitation. The carbo/amide I band absorption ratio had also been demonstrated to depict physiological status under nutrient stress in T. subcordiformis. FT-IR serves as a tool for the simultaneous measurement of lipid, carbohydrate, and protein content in cell. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Ground-based FTIR retrievals of SF6 on Reunion Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Minqiang; Langerock, Bavo; Vigouroux, Corinne; Wang, Pucai; Hermans, Christian; Stiller, Gabriele; Walker, Kaley A.; Dutton, Geoff; Mahieu, Emmanuel; De Mazière, Martine

    2018-02-01

    SF6 total columns were successfully retrieved from FTIR (Fourier transform infrared) measurements (Saint Denis and Maïdo) on Reunion Island (21° S, 55° E) between 2004 and 2016 using the SFIT4 algorithm: the retrieval strategy and the error budget were presented. The FTIR SF6 retrieval has independent information in only one individual layer, covering the whole of the troposphere and the lower stratosphere. The trend in SF6 was analysed based on the FTIR-retrieved dry-air column-averaged mole fractions (XSF6) on Reunion Island, the in situ measurements at America Samoa (SMO) and the collocated satellite measurements (Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding, MIPAS, and Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier Transform Spectrometer, ACE-FTS) in the southern tropics. The SF6 annual growth rate from FTIR retrievals is 0.265 ± 0.013 pptv year-1 for 2004-2016, which is slightly weaker than that from the SMO in situ measurements (0.285 ± 0.002 pptv year-1) for the same time period. The SF6 trend in the troposphere from MIPAS and ACE-FTS observations is also close to the ones from the FTIR retrievals and the SMO in situ measurements.

  12. Ground-based FTIR retrievals of SF6 on Reunion Island

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Zhou

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available SF6 total columns were successfully retrieved from FTIR (Fourier transform infrared measurements (Saint Denis and Maïdo on Reunion Island (21° S, 55° E between 2004 and 2016 using the SFIT4 algorithm: the retrieval strategy and the error budget were presented. The FTIR SF6 retrieval has independent information in only one individual layer, covering the whole of the troposphere and the lower stratosphere. The trend in SF6 was analysed based on the FTIR-retrieved dry-air column-averaged mole fractions (XSF6 on Reunion Island, the in situ measurements at America Samoa (SMO and the collocated satellite measurements (Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding, MIPAS, and Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier Transform Spectrometer, ACE-FTS in the southern tropics. The SF6 annual growth rate from FTIR retrievals is 0.265 ± 0.013 pptv year−1 for 2004–2016, which is slightly weaker than that from the SMO in situ measurements (0.285 ± 0.002 pptv year−1 for the same time period. The SF6 trend in the troposphere from MIPAS and ACE-FTS observations is also close to the ones from the FTIR retrievals and the SMO in situ measurements.

  13. Methodological effects in Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy: Implications for structural analyses of biomacromolecular samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamnev, Alexander A.; Tugarova, Anna V.; Dyatlova, Yulia A.; Tarantilis, Petros A.; Grigoryeva, Olga P.; Fainleib, Alexander M.; De Luca, Stefania

    2018-03-01

    A set of experimental data obtained by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy (involving the use of samples ground and pressed with KBr, i.e. in a polar halide matrix) and by matrix-free transmission FTIR or diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform (DRIFT) spectroscopic methodologies (involving measurements of thin films or pure powdered samples, respectively) were compared for several different biomacromolecular substances. The samples under study included poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) isolated from cell biomass of the rhizobacterium Azospirillum brasilense; dry PHB-containing A. brasilense biomass; pectin (natural carboxylated heteropolysaccharide of plant origin; obtained from apple peel) as well as its chemically modified derivatives obtained by partial esterification of its galacturonide-chain hydroxyl moieties with palmitic, oleic and linoleic acids. Significant shifts of some FTIR vibrational bands related to polar functional groups of all the biomacromolecules under study, induced by the halide matrix used for preparing the samples for spectroscopic measurements, were shown and discussed. A polar halide matrix used for preparing samples for FTIR measurements was shown to be likely to affect band positions not only per se, by affecting band energies or via ion exchange (e.g., with carboxylate moieties), but also by inducing crystallisation of metastable amorphous biopolymers (e.g., PHB of microbial origin). The results obtained have important implications for correct structural analyses of polar, H-bonded and/or amphiphilic biomacromolecular systems using different methodologies of FTIR spectroscopy.

  14. FTIR analysis of flue gases - combined in-situ and dry extractive gas sampling; Kombination av in-situ och kallextraktiv roekgasmaetning med FTIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Christer; Soederbom, J [Vattenfall Utveckling AB, Aelvkarleby (Sweden)

    1996-10-01

    Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR) spectroscopy is a promising and versatile technique for gas analysis which lately has moved from the laboratory to industrial applications such as emission monitoring of combustion plants. This has been made possible by recent developments of spectrometers and software. The single most important advantage of the FTIR is its capability to simultaneously analyse virtually all gas species of interest in flue gas applications. The project has studied the feasibility of using the technique as a multi-component emission monitoring system. A specific aim was to evaluate different implementations of the technique to flue gas analysis: in-situ, hot/dry and cold extraction or combinations of these. The goal was to demonstrate a system in which gas components that normally require hot extraction (NH{sub 3}, HCl, H{sub 2}O) could instead be measured in-situ. In this way potential sampling artefacts e.g. for ammonia monitoring, can be avoided. The remaining gas components are measured using cold extraction and thereby minimizing interference from water. The latter advantage can be crucial for the accuracy of e.g. NO{sub x} measurements. Prior to the project start in-situ monitoring using FTIR was, a to a large extent, an untried method. The fact that broad band IR radiation can not be guided through optical fibres, presented a major technical obstacle. An `in-situ probe` was developed to serve the purpose. The probe is equipped with a gold plated mirror at the end and is mounted on the support structure of the FTIR-spectrometer. The arrangement proved to be a robust solution without being unnecessary complex or cumbersome to use. 10 refs, 45 figs, 10 tabs

  15. Role of Raman spectroscopy and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy in colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Cerys A; Lewis, Paul D; Dunstan, Peter R; Harris, Dean A

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the fourth most common cancer in the United Kingdom and is the second largest cause of cancer related death in the United Kingdom after lung cancer. Currently in the United Kingdom there is not a diagnostic test that has sufficient differentiation between patients with cancer and those without cancer so the current referral system relies on symptomatic presentation in a primary care setting. Raman spectroscopy and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) are forms of vibrational spectroscopy that offer a non-destructive method to gain molecular information about biological samples. The techniques offer a wide range of applications from in vivo or in vitro diagnostics using endoscopic probes, to the use of micro-spectrometers for analysis of biofluids. The techniques have the potential to detect molecular changes prior to any morphological changes occurring in the tissue and therefore could offer many possibilities to aid the detection of CRC. The purpose of this review is to look at the current state of diagnostic technology in the United Kingdom. The development of Raman spectroscopy and SERS in clinical applications relation for CRC will then be discussed. Finally, future areas of research of Raman/SERS as a clinical tool for the diagnosis of CRC are also discussed. PMID:27190582

  16. Doping of C-70 fullerene peapods with lithium vapor: Raman spectroscopic and Raman spectroelectrochemical studies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kalbáč, Martin; Valeš, Václav; Kavan, Ladislav; Dunsch, L.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 48 (2014), 485706 ISSN 0957-4484 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP204/10/1677 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : fullerene peapods * Raman spectroelectrochemistry * Li doping Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.821, year: 2014

  17. Raman Spectroscopy and in Situ Raman Spectroelectrochemistry of Isotopically Engineered Graphene Systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frank, Otakar; Dresselhaus, M. S.; Kalbáč, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 1 (2015), s. 111-118 ISSN 0001-4842 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH13022; GA MŠk LL1301 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : Raman spectroscopy * spectroelectrochemistry * graphene Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 22.003, year: 2015

  18. Time-resolved FTIR [Fourier transform infrared] emission studies of laser photofragmentation and chain reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leone, S.R.

    1990-01-01

    Recent progress is described resulting from the past three years of DOE support for studies of combustion-related photofragmentation dynamics, energy transfer, and reaction processes using a time-resolved Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) emission technique. The FTIR is coupled to a high repetition rate excimer laser which produces radicals by photolysis to obtain novel, high resolution measurements on vibrational and rotational state dynamics. The results are important for the study of numerous radical species relevant to combustion processes. The method has been applied to the detailed study of photofragmentation dynamics in systems such as acetylene, which produces C 2 H; chlorofluoroethylene to study the HF product channel; vinyl chloride and dichloroethylene, which produce HCl; acetone, which produces CO and CH 3 ; and ammonia, which produces NH 2 . In addition, we have recently demonstrated use of the FTIR technique for preliminary studies of energy transfer events under near single collision conditions, radical-radical reactions, and laser-initiated chain reaction processes

  19. Direct detection of saponins in crude extracts of soapnuts by FTIR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almutairi, Meshari Saad; Ali, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Direct detection of saponins in soapnuts (Sapindus mukorossi) using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy is investigated in this project. Potassium bromide powder was mixed with extracted powder of soapnuts and compressed to a thin pellet for examination process. The outcome of the FTIR spectra of saponin demonstrated characteristic triterpenoid saponin absorptions of OH, C = O, C-H, and C = C, while the glycoside linkages to the sapogenins were indicated by the absorptions of C-O. The significance of this study is that saponin absorption peaks are directly detectable in crude aqueous and 95% ethanol extracts of soapnuts powder using FTIR spectroscopy, thereby eliminating the need of further expensive and exhaustive purification steps. The extracts of soapnuts were screened for saponins along with controls by phytochemical tests, and advanced spectroscopic techniques such as ultra fast liquid chromatography and ultra performance liquid chromatography quadrupole-time of flight-mass spectrometry were also implemented to validate the saponins.

  20. Off-line real-time FTIR analysis of a process step in imipenem production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boaz, Jhansi R.; Thomas, Scott M.; Meyerhoffer, Steven M.; Staskiewicz, Steven J.; Lynch, Joseph E.; Egan, Richard S.; Ellison, Dean K.

    1992-08-01

    We have developed an FT-IR method, using a Spectra-Tech Monit-IR 400 systems, to monitor off-line the completion of a reaction in real-time. The reaction is moisture-sensitive and analysis by more conventional methods (normal-phase HPLC) is difficult to reproduce. The FT-IR method is based on the shift of a diazo band when a conjugated beta-diketone is transformed into a silyl enol ether during the reaction. The reaction mixture is examined directly by IR and does not require sample workup. Data acquisition time is less than one minute. The method has been validated for specificity, precision and accuracy. The results obtained by the FT-IR method for known mixtures and in-process samples compare favorably with those from a normal-phase HPLC method.