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Sample records for radon flux studies

  1. Detailed analysis of radon flux studies at Australian uranium projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mudd, Gavin M.

    2005-01-01

    The release of radon gas and radon progeny from uranium projects is a major issue during operation as well as for the design of rehabilitation works. In Australia, there have been a number of premining radon flux studies as part of the environmental investigation and potential development of recent uranium projects. There is also an increasing amount of operational data on radon fluxes and loads from various aspects of projects, such as tailings, waste rock and mills. Thus there exists much useful measured data which can be used to assess the design radon flux and load targets for rehabilitation. The main projects for which radon data exists includes Ranger, Olympic Dam, Beverley, Honeymoon, Jabiluka, Yeelirrie, Lake Way, Koongarra, Moline, Coronation Hill, Rockhole, Nabarlek, Rum Jungle, Port Pirie and Ben Lomond. To date, much of this data has not been systematically evaluated. The need to compile and assess this data is twofold. Firstly, to assess the loads released from uranium production as an input into life-cycle analyses of the nuclear fuel cycle, such as those undertaken by UNSCEAR and industry groups. Secondly, there is a need to set suitable design standards for radon flux for the rehabilitation of former and current uranium projects. This paper will present such a detailed compilation of radon fluxes and loads which can then be used as the basis for both life-cycle analyses as well as setting appropriate site-specific rehabilitation criteria for radon. The implications for former and current projects is then discussed as well as future data needs. Ultimately, there is a critical need for thorough baseline surveys prior to mining to ensure accurate assessments of changes to radon fluxes and loads. The data and analysis presented is considered applicable to all uranium projects in Australia, as well as being a useful model for considering such issues internationally

  2. Radon flux measurement methodologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielson, K.K.; Rogers, V.C.

    1984-01-01

    Five methods for measuring radon fluxes are evaluated: the accumulator can, a small charcoal sampler, a large-area charcoal sampler, the ''Big Louie'' charcoal sampler, and the charcoal tent sampler. An experimental comparison of the five flux measurement techniques was also conducted. Excellent agreement was obtained between the measured radon fluxes and fluxes predicted from radium and emanation measurements

  3. Predicting radon flux from uranium mill tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman, H.D.; Hartley, J.N.

    1983-11-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), under contract to the US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP) office, is developing technology for the design of radon barriers for uranium mill tailings piles. To properly design a radon cover for a particular tailings pile, the radon flux emanating from the bare tailings must be known. The tailings characteristics required to calculate the radon flux include radium-226 content, emanating power, bulk density, and radon diffusivity. This paper presents theoretical and practical aspects of estimating the radon flux from an uranium tailings pile. Results of field measurements to verify the calculation methodology are also discussed. 24 references, 4 figures, 4 tables

  4. Radon flux maps for the Netherlands and Europe using terrestrial gamma radiation derived from soil radionuclides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manohar, S. N.; Meijer, H. A. J.; Herber, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    Naturally occurring radioactive noble gas, radon (222Rn) is a valuable tracer to study atmospheric processes and to validate global chemical transport models. However, the use of radon as a proxy in atmospheric and climate research is limited by the uncertainties in the magnitude and distribution of the radon flux density over the Earth's surface. Terrestrial gamma radiation is a useful proxy for generating radon flux maps. A previously reported radon flux map of Europe used terrestrial gamma radiation extracted from automated radiation monitoring networks. This approach failed to account for the influence of local artificial radiation sources around the detector, leading to under/over estimation of the reported radon flux values at different locations. We present an alternative approach based on soil radionuclides which enables us to generate accurate radon flux maps with good confidence. Firstly, we present a detailed comparison between the terrestrial gamma radiation obtained from the National Radiation Monitoring network of the Netherlands and the terrestrial gamma radiation calculated from soil radionuclides. Extending further, we generated radon flux maps of the Netherlands and Europe using our proposed approach. The modelled flux values for the Netherlands agree reasonably well with the two observed direct radon flux measurements (within 2σ level). On the European scale, we find that the observed radon flux values are higher than our modelled values and we introduce a correction factor to account for this difference. Our approach discussed in this paper enables us to develop reliable and accurate radon flux maps in countries with little or no information on radon flux values.

  5. Research on radon flux reduction from uranium mill tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Overmyer, R.F.; Thamer, B.J.; Nielson, K.K.; Rogers, V.C.

    1980-01-01

    Radon flux reduction from tailings may be accomplished by the use of an impermeable cover to contain the radon until it decays (half life is 2.8 days). The use of a thick, relatively impermeable cover can attenuate radon flux because a large fraction of the radon would decay before it diffuses through the cover into the atmosphere. This method of reducing radon flux may require soil cover thicknesses on the order of 10 feet. In some locations, obtaining 10 feet of soil to cover 200 acres of tailings may be difficult or may lead to other significant environmental impacts. The Department of Energy is sponsoring research to identify alternatives to thick soil covers for reducing radon flux from uranium tailings to meet the forthcoming standards. The two most effective and practical materials tested thus far are Calcilox and asphalt emulsion. Currently, asphalt emulsions are being tested at the Grand Junction tailings pile in Grand Junction, Colorado, by Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Other asphalt formulations, such as foamed asphalt that requires less water than asphalt emulsions, may be practical and will be tested this year. Some sulfur-based materials and sulfur-extended asphalt also appear promising and will be tested for effectiveness in reducing radon flux. It is also important to investigate methods of applying various stabilizers to inactive tailings piles in various physical conditions of moisture content, and physical stability. Finally, since the EPA standards for remedial action at tailings piles are stated in terms of radon flux, it is important that radon flux measurements be standardized so that reliable flux measurements can be obtained and directly compared among various laboratories

  6. Improved radon-flux-measurement system for uranium-tailings pile measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman, H.D.

    1981-10-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is developing cover technology for uranium mill tailings that will inhibit the diffusion of radon to the atmosphere. As part of this cover program, an improved radon flux measurement system has been developed. The radon measurement system is a recirculating, pressure-balanced, flow-through system that uses activated carbon at ambient temperatures to collect the radon. With the system, an area of 0.93 m 2 is sampled for periods ranging from 1 to 12 h. The activated carbon is removed from the radon trap and the collected radon is determined by counting the 214 Bi daughter product. Development of the system included studies to determine the efficiency of activated carbon, relative calibration measurements and field measurements made during 1980 at the inactive tailings pile in Grand Junction, Colorado. Results of these studies are presented

  7. Variation of radon flux along active fault zones in association with earthquake occurrence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papastefanou, C.

    2010-01-01

    Radon flux measurements were carried out at three radon stations along an active fault zone in the Langadas basin, Northern Greece by various techniques for earthquake prediction studies. Specially made devices with alpha track-etch detectors (ATDs) were installed by using LR-115, type II, non-strippable cellulose nitrate films (integrating method of measurements). Continuous monitoring of radon gas exhaling from the ground was also performed by using silicon diode detectors, Barasol and Clipperton type, in association with various probes and sensors including simultaneously registration of the meteorological parameters, such as precipitation height (rainfall events), temperature and barometric pressure. The obtained radon data were studied in parallel with the data of seismic events, such as the magnitude, M L of earthquakes, the epicentral distance, the hypocentral distance and the energy released during the earthquake event occurred at the fault zone during the period of measurements to find out any association between the rad on flux and the meteorological and seismological parameters. Seismic events with magnitude M L ≥ 4.0 appeared to be preceded by large precursory signals produced a well-defined 'anomaly' (peak) of radon flux prior to the event. In the results, the radon peaks in the obtained spectra appeared to be sharp and narrow. The rise time of a radon peak, that is the time period from the onset of a radon peak until the time of radon flux maximum is about a week, while the after time, that is the time interval between the time of radon flux maximum and the time of a seismic event ranges from about 3 weeks or more.

  8. Persistence of radon-222 flux during monsoon at a geothermal zone in Nepal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girault, Frederic; Koirala, Bharat Prasad; Perrier, Frederic; Richon, Patrick; Rajaure, Sudhir

    2009-01-01

    The Syabru-Bensi hydrothermal zone, Langtang region (Nepal), is characterized by high radon-222 and CO 2 discharge. Seasonal variations of gas fluxes were studied on a reference transect in a newly discovered gas discharge zone. Radon-222 and CO 2 fluxes were measured with the accumulation chamber technique, coupled with the scintillation flask method for radon. In the reference transect, fluxes reach exceptional mean values, as high as 8700 ± 1500 g m -2 d -1 for CO 2 and 3400 ± 100 x 10 -3 Bq m -2 s -1 for radon. Gases fluxes were measured in September 2007 during the monsoon and during the dry winter season, in December 2007 to January 2008 and in December 2008 to January 2009. Contrary to expectations, radon and its carrier gas fluxes were similar during both seasons. The integrated flux along this transect was approximately the same for radon, with a small increase of 11 ± 4% during the wet season, whereas it was reduced by 38 ± 5% during the monsoon for CO 2 . In order to account for the persistence of the high gas emissions during monsoon, watering experiments have been performed at selected radon measurement points. After watering, radon flux decreased within 5 min by a factor of 2-7 depending on the point. Subsequently, it returned to its original value, firstly, by an initial partial recovery within 3-4 h, followed by a slow relaxation, lasting around 10 h and possibly superimposed by diurnal variations. Monsoon, in this part of the Himalayas, proceeds generally by brutal rainfall events separated by two- or three-day lapses. Thus, the recovery ability shown in the watering experiments accounts for the observed long-term persistence of gas discharge. This persistence is an important asset for long-term monitoring, for example to study possible temporal variations associated with stress accumulation and release.

  9. Inter-comparison of different direct and indirect methods to determine radon flux from soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossi, C.; Vargas, A.; Camacho, A.; Lopez-Coto, I.; Bolivar, J.P.; Xia Yu; Conen, F.

    2011-01-01

    The physical and chemical characteristics of radon gas make it a good tracer for use in the application of atmospheric transport models. For this purpose the radon source needs to be known on a global scale and this is difficult to achieve by only direct experimental methods. However, indirect methods can provide radon flux maps on larger scales, but their reliability has to be carefully checked. It is the aim of this work to compare radon flux values obtained by direct and indirect methods in a measurement campaign performed in the summer of 2008. Different systems to directly measure radon flux from the soil surface and to measure the related parameters terrestrial γ dose and 226 Ra activity in soil, for indirect estimation of radon flux, were tested. Four eastern Spanish sites with different geological and soil characteristics were selected: Teruel, Los Pedrones, Quintanar de la Orden and Madrid. The study shows the usefulness of both direct and indirect methods for obtaining radon flux data. Direct radon flux measurements by continuous and integrated monitors showed a coefficient of variation between 10% and 23%. At the same time, indirect methods based on correlations between 222 Rn and terrestrial γ dose rate, or 226 Ra activity in soil, provided results similar to the direct measurements, when these proxies were directly measured at the site. Larger discrepancies were found when proxy values were extracted from existing data bases. The participating members involved in the campaign study were the Institute of Energy Technology (INTE) of the Technical University of Catalonia (UPC), Huelva University (UHU), and Basel University (BASEL).

  10. Calculating flux to predict future cave radon concentrations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rowberry, Matthew David; Martí, Xavier; Frontera, C.; Van De Wiel, M.J.; Briestenský, Miloš

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 157, JUN (2016), 16-26 ISSN 0265-931X R&D Projects: GA MŠk LM2010008 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 ; RVO:68378271 Keywords : cave radon concentration * cave radon flux * cave ventilation * radioactive decay * fault slip * numerical modelling Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure; BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders (FZU-D) Impact factor: 2.310, year: 2016

  11. A modeling study of the effect of depth of burial of depleted uranium and thorium on radon gas flux at a dry desert alluvial soil radioactive waste management site (RWMS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindstrom, F.T.; Cawlfield, D.E.; Emer, D.F.; Shott, G.J.

    1993-08-01

    An integral part of designing low-level waste (LLW) disposal pits and their associated closure covers in very dry desert alluvium is the use of a radon gas transport and fate model. Radon-222 has the potential to be a real heath hazard. The production of radon-222 results from the radioactive decay (a particle emission) of radium-226 in the uranium-235 and 238 Bateman chains. It is also produced in the thorium-230 series. Both long lived radionuclides have been proposed for disposal in the shallow land burial pits in Area 5 RWMS compound of Nevada Test Site (NTS). The constructed physics based model includes diffusion and barometric pressure-induced advection of an M-chain of radionuclides. The usual Bateman decay mechanics are included for each radionuclide. Both linear reversible and linear irreversible first order sorption kinetics are assumed for each radionuclide. This report presents the details of using the noble gas transport model, CASCADR9, in an engineering design study mode. Given data on the low-level waste stream, which constitutes the ultimate source of radon-222 in the RWMS, CASCADR9 is used to generate the surface flux (pCi/cm 2 -sec) of radon-222 under the realistic atmospheric and alluvial soil conditions found in the RWMS at Area 5, of the NTS. Specifically, this study examines the surface flux of radon-222 as a function of the depth of burial below the land surface

  12. Indoor radon epidemiological study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunz, E; Tomasek, L; Mueller, T [National Radiation Protection Institute, Prague (Czech Republic); Placek, V [Inst. for Expertises and Emergencies, Pribram-Kamenna (Czech Republic); Matzner, J; Heribanova, A [State Office for Nuclear Safety, Prague (Czech Republic)

    1996-12-31

    The study is a long-term prospective cohort study of lung cancer and possibility other causes of death. The study population includes inhabitants of the area, who had resided there for at three years and at least one of these between 1.1.1960 and 21.12.1989. A total of 11865 inhabitants satisfied these criteria. The cumulative exposure of each respondent is being assessed on the basis of measurements in dwellings, time spent there and estimation of previous exposure levels by a model accounting for constructional changes in buildings. One year lasting measurements of radon daughter products by integral dosimeters (Kodak film LR 115) were performed in practically all dwellings of the specified area. Radon measurements in houses in term of equilibrium concentration are compared with the results of a pilot study in Petrovice in 1990-91 which gave the stimulus for the epidemiological study. The distribution of death causes and ratio of observed (O) to expected (E) cases among collected death cases in the cohort, generally, somewhat lower ratios than one reflect the non-industrial character of the region, with the exception of lung cancer in man. The differences in the O/E ratios for lung cancer among the separate communities indicate that even in the situation of generally lower mortality, the dependence of lung cancer mortality on radon.

  13. EPA's radon study results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowd, R.M.

    1988-01-01

    Last winter, in cooperation with agencies in 10 states and two metropolitan area counties, EPA measured the indoor air radon concentrations of 14,000 houses, some chosen statistically at random and some by request of the homeowner. Passive measurement methodologies were used, such as exposing a charcoal canister to the air for a few days and allowing the air to migrate in to the charcoal naturally. To reduce dilution of radon by the outside air, the protocol required that the house be shut up; therefore, the study was conducted during winter. The measuring device was placed in the lowest livable area (usually the basement) of each house to maximize potential concentration. It should be noted that these procedures are generally considered to be screening tests because they result in a worst-case measurement rather than a best value. The results of these findings are presented

  14. Study of the radon released from open drill holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacer, J.C.

    1981-06-01

    The radon emanating from three open drill holes was measured at a site of known uranium mineralization in the Red Desert of south central Wyoming. The radon flux from the soil and drill holes was measured by the accumulator method with activated charcoal cartridges. The surface soil was found to release radon at an average rate of 0.41 atoms/cm 2 /sec; the radon emanating from the holes was more variable than that from the soil. The three holes studied released an average of 47 atoms/cm 2 /sec of radon. This average is equivalent to the radon released to the atmosphere by 14.5 ft 2 of soil. The data indicate that the radon emanated from an open drill hole is not as significant as other possible activities at a drill site (i.e. digging a trench or drilling a hole) or from household activities involving the usage of water

  15. Radon studies in Indian dwellings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, A.J.

    2000-01-01

    The indoor radon ( 222 Rn) concentration has been measured by Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors (SSNTDs) in large number of Indian dwellings. Radon concentrations were measured in different parts of the country. In the first study, radon concentrations were measured in 143 dwellings of Udaipur, Bikaner and Banswara towns of Rajasthan province. The distributions of the time-averaged indoor radon concentration in these three towns of the Rajasthan fit an approximately log normal distribution. The geometric mean (GM) values of radon concentrations in these three places were found to be 74 Bq m -3 , 46 Bq m -3 and 66 Bq m -3 with a geometric standard deviation (GSD) of 2.2, 2.2 and 2.5 respectively. In another study, radon concentrations were measured in about 150 dwellings of hilly regions of the country. The measurements were carried out in Kohima (Nagaland), Baijnath and Palampur (Himachal Pradesh). The distribution of radon concentration in Kohima dwellings was found to be approximately log normal, however, the radon distribution in Baijnath and Palampur dwellings seems to be bimodal. The GM values of the radon concentrations for 65 dwellings in Kohima and 43 dwellings in Baijnath and Palampur were 88 Bq m -3 and 134 Bq m -3 with GSD of 1.7 and 2.5 respectively. The results are discussed in detail. (author)

  16. Study of underground radon transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csige, I.; Hakl, J.; Lenart, L.

    1990-01-01

    The soil gas radon content measurements with solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs) are widely used in geoscience, for instance in uranium exploration and earthquake prediction. In these applications the radon frequently is used as a natural tracer of underground fluid transport processes. Obviously, to get the soil radon measuring method more and more effective the study of these transport processes in deeper part of the Earth is fundamental. The Track Detector Group in the Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences in Debrecen has been performing environmental radon activity concentration measurements since 1977 with alpha sensitive SSNTDs. These types of measurements were initiated and widely used by the late head of the group Dr. G. Somogyi, who devoted his life to better understanding of the nature. The measurements in caves, springs and drilled wells proved to be effective to study these underground radon transport processes. We are glad to present some results of our investigations. 7 refs, 7 figs

  17. Modeling radon flux from the earth's surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schery, S.D.; Wasiolek, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    We report development of a 222 Rn flux density model and its use to estimate the 222 Rn flux density over the earth's land surface. The resulting maps are generated on a grid spacing of 1 0 x 1 0 using as input global data for soil radium, soil moisture, and surface temperature. While only a first approximation, the maps suggest a significant regional variation (a factor of three is not uncommon) and a significant seasonal variation (a factor of two is not uncommon) in 222 Rn flux density over the earth's surface. The estimated average global flux density from ice-free land is 34 ± 9 mBq m -2 s -1 . (author)

  18. Measurement of radon flux and tailings parameters for quantifying the source term due to radon exhalation from U tailings pile at Jaduguda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahoo, B.K.; Mayya, Y.S.; Sapra, B.K.; Gaware, J.J.; Khuswaha, H.S.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: The exposures from radon ( 222 Rn) and its decay products have been received considerable attention in the world community because of their adverse health effect. There are various natural and man-made sources of radon present in our environment. Among the man-made sources, the U tailings (waste product from U mining and milling facility) may be considered an important one because it contains significant amount of 226 Ra activity after the U extraction from the ore bodies. These tailings (slurry form) are being impounded into a repository site nearby the facility called 'Tailings Pile' (TP). Significant amount of radon emission takes place from this area by the process of emanation and exhalation. Hence, a study was taken up to quantify the source term arising due to radon emission from uranium tailings pile at Jaduguda in Jharkhand state. In-situ experiments were conducted at 40 locations of the uranium tailings pile in three seasons namely summer, rainy and winter to measure the radon fluxes. The measurements were carried out by deploying a cylindrical chamber, attached to a continuous radon monitor, on the surface of the tailings pile. The dimension of the chamber was selected by using a recently developed two dimensional theory of soil chamber, so that radon concentration growth will be in exponential fashion and the data generated within 2-3 hours of deployment period will be sufficient for accurately deriving the actual radon flux. After the data collection, the fluxes were derived by fitting an exponential growth function to the plot of radon concentration with time. The fluxes were also predicted by diffusion theory using the measured tailings parameters such as 226 Ra content, radon emanation factor, porosity, temperature and moisture. An excellent matching between the predicted and measured fluxes was observed. The validity of diffusion theory in the matrix of U tailings pile provides an alternate method for back-calculating the tailings

  19. Radon in soils: intercomparative studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segovia, N.; Galle, C.; Seidel, J.-L.; Monnin, M.

    1988-01-01

    Two kinds of experiments were designed to evaluate some of the variations that can be expected from radon in soil concentrations as monitored by closely spaced solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs). Measurements were performed by the Insituto Nacional de Investigations Nucleares in Mexico and the Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire in France. The first experimental design consisted of a series of 15 day exposures of twenty monitoring devices placed inside a single bore hole. Fluctuations obtained in the radon levels at the twenty closely spaced monitoring sites ranged from 9% to 33%. The second experiment was performed with 4 pairs of radon monitoring devices located at 4 different sites at the summit of the Nevado de Toluca volcano. Results show that the SSNTD technique is well suited for radon measurements intended for geophysical studies. (author)

  20. Radon in soils: intercomparative studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segovia, N.; Galle, C. (Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Mexico City (Mexico)); Seidel, J.-L.; Monnin, M. (Clermont-Ferrand-2 Univ., 63 - Aubiere (France). Lab. de Physique Corpusculaire)

    1988-01-01

    Two kinds of experiments were designed to evaluate some of the variations that can be expected from radon in soil concentrations as monitored by closely spaced solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs). Measurements were performed by the Insituto Nacional de Investigations Nucleares in Mexico and the Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire in France. The first experimental design consisted of a series of 15 day exposures of twenty monitoring devices placed inside a single bore hole. Fluctuations obtained in the radon levels at the twenty closely spaced monitoring sites ranged from 9% to 33%. The second experiment was performed with 4 pairs of radon monitoring devices located at 4 different sites at the summit of the Nevado de Toluca volcano. Results show that the SSNTD technique is well suited for radon measurements intended for geophysical studies. (author).

  1. Measuring radon flux across active faults: Relevance of excavating and possibility of satellite discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richon, Patrick, E-mail: patrick.richon@cea.f [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris, Equipe Geologie des Systemes Volcaniques, 4 place Jussieu, UMR-7154 CNRS, F-75005 Paris (France); Klinger, Yann; Tapponnier, Paul [Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris, Equipe de Seismotectonique, 4 place Jussieu, UMR-7154 CNRS, F-75005 Paris (France); Li Chenxia [Institute of Geology, Chinese Earthquake Administration, P.O. Box 9803, 100029 Beijing (China); Van Der Woerd, Jerome [Institut de Physique du Globe de Strasbourg, CNRS, UMR-7516, INSU, Universite Louis Pasteur, Strasbourg I, 5 Rue Rene Descartes, F-67084 Strasbourg Cedex (France); Perrier, Frederic [Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris, Equipe de Geomagnetisme, 4 place Jussieu, UMR-7154 CNRS et Universite Paris 7 Denis-Diderot, F-75005 Paris (France)

    2010-02-15

    Searching for gas exhalation around major tectonic contacts raises important methodological issues such as the role of the superficial soil and the possible long distance transport. These effects have been studied on the Xidatan segment of the Kunlun Fault, Qinghai Province, China, using measurement of the radon-222 and carbon dioxide exhalation flux. A significant radon flux, reaching up to 538 +- 33 mBq m{sup -2} s{sup -1} was observed in a 2-3 m deep trench excavated across the fault. On the soil surface, the radon flux varied from 7 to 38 mBq m{sup -2} s{sup -1}, including on the fault trace, with an average value of 14.1 +- 1.0 mBq m{sup -2} s{sup -1}, similar to the world average. The carbon dioxide flux on the soil surface, with an average value of 12.9 +- 3.3 g m{sup -2} day{sup -1}, also remained similar to regular background values. It showed no systematic spatial variation up to a distance of 1 km from the fault, and no clear enhancement in the trench. However, a high carbon dioxide flux of 421 +- 130 g m{sup -2} day{sup -1} was observed near subvertical fractured phyllite outcrops on a hill located about 3 km north of the fault, at the boundary of the large-scale pull-apart basin associated with the fault. This high carbon dioxide flux was associated with a high radon flux of 607 +- 35 mBq m{sup -2} s{sup -1}. These preliminary results indicate that, at the fault trace, it can be important to measure gas flux at the bottom of a trench to remove superficial soil layers. In addition, gas discharges need to be investigated also at some distance from the main fault, in zones where morphotectonics features support associated secondary fractures.

  2. Detecting buried radium contamination using soil-gas and surface-flux radon meaurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karp, K.E.

    1988-06-01

    The Technical Measurements Center (TMC) has investigated the effectiveness of using radon soil-gas under surface-flux measurments to locate radium contamination that is buried sufficiently deep to be undetectable by surface gamma methods. At the first test site studied, an indication of a buried source was revealed by mapping anomalous surface-flux and soil-gas concentrations in the near surface overburden. The mapped radon anomalies were found to correspond in rough outline to the shape of the areal extent of the deposit as determined by borehole gamma-ray logs. The 5.9pCi/g radium deposit, buried 2 feet below the surface, went undetected by conventional surface gamma measurements. Similar results were obtained at the second test site where radon and conventional surface gamma measurements were taken in an area having radium concentrations ranging from 13.3 to 341.0 pCi/g at a depth of 4 feet below the surface. The radon methods were found to have a detection limit for buried radium lower than that of the surface gamma methods, as evidenced by the discovery of the 13.3 pCi/g deposit which went undetected by the surface gamma methods. 15 refs., 33 figs., 8 tabs

  3. Radon flux from rehabilitated and unrehabilitated uranium mill tailings deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonter, M.; Akber, R.; Holdsworth, S.

    2002-01-01

    board the data in the SENES report, UNSCEAR 2000 has reduced its estimated radon release rate from abandoned but stabilized tails from 3 Bq/m 2 .s to 1 Bq/m 2 .s. The initial impetus for the present paper was a request to review the SENES Report. In the process of this review it became obvious that there was only patchy data in the published literature which reported actual measurements of radon release, or radon flux, either from rehabilitated or from unrehabilitated tailings deposits. There certainly appeared in our initial literature reviews to be no attempted compilation of real world data aimed at providing 'global' or 'overview' figures. This would appear to be a major information gap, which the present paper seeks to address. This paper will briefly review the SENES Report, so as to provide a more detailed background to the discussion of radon as a global consequence of uranium mining, and will then go on to provide the results of our literature searches and interpretation. The present authors have found that the amount of data available in the literature regarding radon release from rehabilitated and from unrehabilitated tailings deposits was not large, and it was hard to find. This document presents the results of our literature searches, as described above, an attempt at an overall review, and our interpretations of the general findings of these literature searches. We wish to acknowledge useful feedback from S Frost, of CAMECO. Copyright (2002) Australasian Radiation Protection Society Inc

  4. Direct measurement of present-day tectonic movement and associated radon flux in Postojna Cave, Slovenia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šebela, S.; Vaupotič, J.; Košťák, Blahoslav; Stemberk, Josef

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 72, č. 1 (2010), s. 21-34 ISSN 1090-6924 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/09/2024; GA MŠk MEB091005 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519 Keywords : fault displacements * radon flux * Postojna Cave Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 0.842, year: 2010 www.caves.org/pub/journal/Journal_of_Cave_and_Karst_Studies_volume_72.htm

  5. Monitoring the radon flux from gold-mine dumps by gamma-ray mapping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindsay, R; de Meijer, RJ; Maleka, PP; Newman, RT; Motlhabane, TGK; de Villiers, D

    The exhalation of radon from the large mine dumps at the gold mines in South Africa is a potential health hazard. Determination of radon fluxes from these dumpsites is problematic due to the scatter in the data in time and place and the cost involved in getting a representative sample. gamma-ray

  6. Czech studies of lung cancer and radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomasek, L.

    2002-01-01

    According to the International Agency for Research on Cancer, there is a significant evidence to classify radon as a carcinogen. Using extrapolations from occupational studies, it can be shown that for some countries environmental exposure to radon is the second most important cause of lung cancer in the general population after cigarette smoking. Czech studies among uranium miners, established in 1970 by Josef Sevc, and in the general population aim to contribute to knowledge on the risk from radon, particularly by evaluating temporal factors and interaction of radon exposure and smoking

  7. Low-Cost Radon Reduction Pilot Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, William B. [Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofit, Champaign, IL (United States); Francisco, Paul W. [Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofit, Champaign, IL (United States); Merrin, Zachary [Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofit, Champaign, IL (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the research was to conduct a primary scoping study on the impact of air sealing between the foundation and the living space on radon transport reduction across the foundation-living space floor assembly. Fifteen homes in the Champaign, Illinois area participated in the study. These homes were instrumented for hourly continuous radon measurements and simultaneous temperature and humidity the foundation was improved. However, this improved isolation did not lead to significant reductions in radon concentration in the living space. Other factors such as outdoor temperature were shown to have an impact on radon concentration.

  8. Radon

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... radon-resistant features. These features include gravel and plastic sheeting below the foundation, along with proper sealing ... lower the radon level. Detailed information about radon reduction in your home or building can be found ...

  9. Effects of radon in indoor air studied

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auvinen, A.

    1994-01-01

    Radon is an odorless, tasteless and colourless radioactive noble gas that enters indoor air from the ground. Radon causes lung cancer. A committee set up to evaluate the health risks of chemical substances has been drafting a report on radon, which will compile the major research findings on the lung cancer risk posed by radon. Animal tests have shown that even small doses of radon can cause lung cancer. Smokers seem to contract radon-induced lung cancer more readily than non-smokers. Because research findings have been conflicting, however, it is not known exactly how high the risk of lung cancer caused by indoor radon exposure really is. Several major research projects are under way to obtain increasingly accurate risk assessments. An on-going European joint project brings together several studies - some already finished, some still being worked on. In this way it will be possible to get more accurate risk assessments than from individual studies. In order to prevent lung cancer, it is important to continue the work of determining and reducing radon connects and to combat smoking. (orig.)

  10. The radon concentration profile and the flux from a pilot-scale layered tailings pile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zettwoog, P.; Fourcade, N.; Campbell, F.E.; Caplan, H.

    1982-01-01

    A pilot tailings model was constructed to demonstrate the feasibility of the sub-aerial technique of tailing deposition for the proposed uranium mine and mill at Key Lake, Saskatchewan. A series of radon measurements were made on the model and results obtained for the radon concentration profile in the tailings, and for the flux from the surface. The results were compared with the model calculations of Zettwoog. (U.K.)

  11. Comparative study of radon in Sudan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gharbi, Shaza Ismail Mohammed

    2014-07-01

    This study was conducted primarily to contribute radon data for radon map in Sudan and identify regions with elevated radon levels and improve data collection and analysis for the future radon levels evaluation. This study partially covered three states of Sudan ( Red Sea - Khartoum - South Khordofan). Previous work done has been considered in this study which focused and investigated the levels of radon concentration in ( indoor radon gas and water) by using gamma spectrometry equipped with ( HPGe detector) or (Na1 (T1) detector). The results obtained are within the acceptable levels and dose not poses any risk from radiation protection point of view. Red Sea state ( port-sudan): (124.39±6.21) Bq/m 3 . Khartoum state ( Suba): (151.52) Bq/m 3 . (Omdurman): ( 127±23) Bq/m 3 . Radon in water: (59) Bq/L. South Kordofan State: (102.8) Bq/m 3 . In water (Kadugli): (3 1 39)) Bq/L.(Author)

  12. A study of radon 222 transfer indoors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maximilien, R.; Robe, M.C.; Archimbaud, M.

    1985-01-01

    Indoor exposure can vary considerably depending upon the natural environment (geology, climate), man-made arrangements (building materials, insulation and ventilation systems...) or way of living. In order to specify the sources and assess their respective contribution in a given dwelling, a good knowledge of radon transfer and dispersion processes is required as well as a heavy experimental device (continuous radon and ventilation monitoring...). The study must be limited to some cases selected by a systematic measurement program either because they are representative of dwelling conditions, or preferably on account of their high radon level, the origin of which will be investigated. As a consequence, countermeasures can be developed. A pilot study has been carried out on radon transport in two houses of the Rhone river valley. The two houses -selected among 131 other ones for their high radon levels- are built with the same architectural approach and located very close to each other, yet the factors accounting for domestic exposure are quite different. Indoor parameters are at the origin of various radon concentrations in the case of low natural ventilation; conversely, outdoor parameters only seem to act in the case of high ventilation. For a larger part, however, radon seems to emanate from under the foundations of both houses [fr

  13. Determination of radon flux rates in a uranium mine (Cluff Lake, Saskatchewan)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-12-01

    The Atomic Energy Control Board contracted SENES Consultants Limited to design and implement a field program at Amok Limited's Cluff Lake uranium mine, with the overall objective of obtaining reliable radon flux data applicable for use in the VENTRAD computer model. The VENTRAD model was developed to model underground mine ventilation systems. To avoid the uncertainties inherent in localized flux measurements made on small surfaces, radon flux measurements were determined through measurement of incremental changes in the concentration of radon between the incoming and outgoing air in selected areas of the underground workings. The locations were selected throughout the mine in both ore and sterile rock. Average radon flux rates measured during three field campaigns were as follows: sterile rock decline 4 pCi/m 2 .second; sterile rock mainway 25 pCi/m 2 .second; worked-out stope 100 pCi/m 2 .second; active work stope 240 pCi/m 2 .second; and work face 14,000 pCi/m 2 .second. Data collected during the three field programs were used to validate the VENTRAD computer model. The results of the validation exercise suggest close agreement between predicted and measured air flow rates and radon concentrations were overestimated for areas immediately impacted by auxiliary ventilation fans and ore transfer mill holes which connect the ore extraction and haulage levels of the mine

  14. Radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This leaflet in the At-a-Glance Series, describes what radon is, where it is found, why it presents a risk to health, the official advice, and the remedies that are available to reduce radon levels. (author)

  15. Radon measurement studies in Kazakhstan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevost'yanov, V.N.

    2003-01-01

    Today, one has to admit that despite the important role and certain achievements in providing the radiation control in Kazakhstan, radon measurements still present some problems related to clear definition of physical quantities applied, correct use of methods, and application of adequate measuring devices to meet requirements of regulatory documents currently in effect, such as NRB-99. The paper provides some data on radon measurements, describes the problem status in Kazakhstan and proposes ways to solve it. (author)

  16. A Radon Micro Study of Salthill, Galway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyle-Tobin Ann

    2006-01-01

    This project presents a study of radon gas, when it enters from the ground into the built environment. In order to further inform the present body of knowledge on this potentially dangerous gas, a radon micro study is carried out in the area of Salthill, Galway. A total of 51 households are measured for radon. The results indicate a high variation in the levels recorded, with over a third of the houses measuring above the national safe standard of 200 becquerels per cubic meter, with a small percentage of houses exhibiting very high levels. The results are spatially analysed against the local geology, as radon is a by-product of the breakdown of uranium in rocks. Householders' knowledge and awareness of radon is explored to inform the reasons why more people are not testing their homes for radon, and not installing remedial measures when high levels are detected. The findings indicate significant gaps in householders' knowledge of radon. A certain complacency is noted, which may indicate that people still do not recognise a need to know about this invisible threat. As ways to encourage further testing and remediation levels are equally explored, the government is viewed to play a central role in these processes through partial state funding. Further evidence supports continued and more effective and widespread advertising of radon issues, through all types of media, with emphasis at local level. Incidents of lung cancer and lung disease of long term residents are recorded in an attempt to find out if there is a correlation between them. The results indicate no correlation; however, not all households could participate in this part of the survey as it was limited to long-term residents only

  17. Radon flux maps for the Netherlands and Europe using terrestrial gamma radiation derived from soil radionuclides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manohar, S.N.; Meijer, H.A.J.; Herber, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Naturally occurring radioactive noble gas, radon (Rn-222) is a valuable tracer to study atmospheric processes and to validate global chemical transport models. However, the use of radon as a proxy in atmospheric and climate research is limited by the uncertainties in the magnitude and distribution

  18. Radon studies in selected workplaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randle, M.W.

    2000-01-01

    Radon progeny levels were measured in coal mines, a hard rock mine and two underground hydro power stations, to indicate if there is a health problem associated with exposure to radon and radon progeny in these workplaces. The average alpha concentrations ranged from 37 to 276 Bq m -3 , with the highest levels being found in a mine with no ventillation that was being decommissioned. Average dosages were calculated to be 0.1 - 0.7 mSv y -1 . Radon progeny levels in coal mines measured in the return air circuit are indicative of levels to which a worker at the face would be exposed. They were well below international guidelines for intervention in New Zealand mines, as were the slightly higher levels in two underground hydro power stations. These results confirm that radon levels in New Zealand are low. Even in the extreme situation represented by the Sullivan mine with no ventillation the levels do not warrant concern. 11 refs., 2 tabs

  19. Radon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weigel, F [Muenchen Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Anorganische Chemie

    1978-09-01

    The noble gas radon, formerly called emanation, was discovered a few years after radium. /sup 222/Rn, the longest-lived isotope, has a half-life of 3,82 days. This half life is so short that the experimental techniques available at present (1978) are not sufficient for a characterization of defined radon compounds, even though there are definite indications for the existence of such compounds, and one may expect such radon compounds to be even more stable than the numerous known xenon compounds. - The radon isotopes /sup 219/Rn (Actinon), /sup 220/Rn (Thoron), and /sup 222/Rn (Radon) occur in nature despite their rather short half-lives, because they are continously generated from their mothers /sup 223/Ra, /sup 224/Ra, and /sup 226/Ra, which are in secular equilibrium with long-lived isotopes /sup 235/U, /sup 238/U, and /sup 232/Th, and are in turn continously formed from these long-lived isotopes. Since the radon isotopes are gases, they enter the atmosphere and are carried for long distances with air currents. - Because radon is so short-lived, its practical applications are rather limited. For medical applications, small sealed glass tubes filled with radon are used as radiation sources after the radon has decayed, because the whole series of Po-, Bi-, and Pb-isotopes of the radium decay chain are formed, whose penetrating radiation is useful for therapy. When solids are spiked with Ra isotopes, radon is evolved at a constant rate. On heating such solids, phase transitions show up by sudden increased radon evolution (Hahn's emanation method). - On the basis of nuclear theoretical calculations, there is hardly a chance for the discovery of a long-lived radon species. Therefore, major progress in radon chemistry is hardly to be expected in the near future.

  20. A study of radon indoor concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pena, P.; Ruiz, W.; Segovia, N.; Ponciano, G.

    2000-01-01

    It was realized a study of radon concentration in houses of Mexico City and in a laboratory of the Nuclear Centre of Salazar, State of Mexico. The radon determination in air was realized with solid nuclear track detectors and with Honeywell and Alpha guard automatic equipment. The results show that the majority of houses have values under 148 Bq/m 3 obtaining some housings with upper values located in the Lomas zone. A study in smokers houses and another of controls showed very similar distributions. It was studied the day time fluctuations finding that radon increases considerably during the dawn. Some upper values obtained in a laboratory of the Nuclear Centre were remedied with ventilation. (Author)

  1. A study of radon variation in dwelling during 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaikh, A.N.; Ramachandran, T.V.; Muraleedharan, T.S.; Subbaramu, M.C.

    1989-01-01

    Natural radioactivity due to radon and its progeny levels indoors contributes significantly to the total radiation to man. The main source of radon and its progeny in a dwelling is the emanation of radon gas from soil. The temperature and ventilation vary in a dwelling during the year. These parameters influence the indoor radon levels. The seasonal variation of radon was studied in a dwelling as well as in the outside air. The filter paper method and alpha counting, and the solid state track detector technique and track counting were used to study the radon levels. The geometric mean of radon daughters concentrations were 0.5 mWL and 0.8 mWL measured by filter-paper method and SSNTD method respectively. The geometric mean of radon concentrations were 6.2 Bqm -3 and 10.0 Bqm -3 by filter-paper method and SSNTD method respectively. (author). 3 figs., 3 tabs., 13 refs

  2. Radon anomalies prior to earthquakes (1). Review of previous studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Tokonami, Shinji; Yasuoka, Yumi; Shinogi, Masaki; Nagahama, Hiroyuki; Omori, Yasutaka; Kawada, Yusuke

    2008-01-01

    The relationship between radon anomalies and earthquakes has been studied for more than 30 years. However, most of the studies dealt with radon in soil gas or in groundwater. Before the 1995 Hyogoken-Nanbu earthquake, an anomalous increase of atmospheric radon was observed at Kobe Pharmaceutical University. The increase was well fitted with a mathematical model related to earthquake fault dynamics. This paper reports the significance of this observation, reviewing previous studies on radon anomaly before earthquakes. Groundwater/soil radon measurements for earthquake prediction began in 1970's in Japan as well as foreign countries. One of the most famous studies in Japan is groundwater radon anomaly before the 1978 Izu-Oshima-kinkai earthquake. We have recognized the significance of radon in earthquake prediction research, but recently its limitation was also pointed out. Some researchers are looking for a better indicator for precursors; simultaneous measurements of radon and other gases are new trials in recent studies. Contrary to soil/groundwater radon, we have not paid much attention to atmospheric radon before earthquakes. However, it might be possible to detect precursors in atmospheric radon before a large earthquake. In the next issues, we will discuss the details of the anomalous atmospheric radon data observed before the Hyogoken-Nanbu earthquake. (author)

  3. Study of radon transport through concrete modified with silica fume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chauhan, R.P.; Kumar, Amit

    2013-01-01

    The concentration of radon in soil usually varies between a few kBq/m 3 and tens or hundreds of kBq/m 3 depending upon the geographical region. This causes the transport of radon from the soil to indoor environments by diffusion and advection through the pore space of concrete. To reduce indoor radon levels, the use of concrete with low porosity and a low radon diffusion coefficient is recommended. A method of reducing the radon diffusion coefficient through concrete and hence the indoor radon concentration by using silica fume to replace an optimum level of cement was studied. The diffusion coefficient of the concrete was reduced from (1.63 ± 0.3) × 10 −7 to (0.65 ± 0.01) × 10 −8 m 2 /s using 30% substitution of cement with silica fume. The compressive strength of the concrete increased as the silica-fume content increased, while radon exhalation rate and porosity of the concrete decreased. This study suggests a cost-effective method of reducing indoor radon levels. -- Highlights: • Radon diffusion study through silica fume modified concrete was carried out. • Radon diffusion coefficient of concrete decreased with increase of silica fume contents. • Compressive strength increased with increase of silica fume. • Radon exhalation rates and porosity of samples decreased with addition of silica fume. • Radon diffusion coefficient decreased to 2.6% by 30% silica fume substitution

  4. Low-cost Radon Reduction Pilot Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, William B. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Francisco, Paul W. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Merrin, Zachary [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Building America research team Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofits conducted a primary scoping study on the impact of air sealing between the foundation and the living space on radon transport reduction across the foundation and living space floor assembly. Fifteen homes in the Champaign, Illinois, area participated in the study. These homes were instrumented for hourly continuous radon measurements and simultaneous temperature and humidity measurements. Blower door and zone pressure diagnostics were conducted at each house. The treatments consisted of using air-sealing foams at the underside of the floor that separated the living space from the foundation and providing duct sealing on the ductwork that is situated in the foundation area. The hypothesis was that air sealing the floor system that separated the foundation from the living space should better isolate the living space from the foundation; this isolation should lead to less radon entering the living space from the foundation. If the hypothesis had been proven, retrofit energy-efficiency programs may have chosen to adopt these isolation methods for enhanced radon protection to the living space.

  5. Fluxes and exchange rates of radon and oxygen across an air-sea interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duenas, C.; Fernandez, M.C.; La Torre, M. de

    1986-01-01

    The flux of 222 Rn and O 2 from shallow water off the Bay of Malaga has been measured. The mean value of flux of 222 Rn is evaluated to be 74 atoms/m 2 · s. The Bay is a weak source of oxygen to the atmosphere, where the net production of oxygen is found to be 1.82 mol/m 2 · y. Moreover, the gas exchange rates of 222 Rn and O 2 across the air-sea interface has been determined by the radon method. The gas exchange rates and the wind speed have been estimated. (author)

  6. Radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmen, R.W.

    1987-01-01

    The discovery that radon enters into residential and commercial structures and produces adverse health consequences to occupants thereof has raised issues for the real estate profession in connection with transactions involving affected structures. The legal responsibilities of real estate professionals in relation to such structures have not yet been clearly defined. Moreover, consistent and reliable testing methods and results, clear identification of circumstances where testing is necessary, and consensus as to health risks suggested by various radon levels have yet to be achieved. When these legal and technical questions are clarified, real estate buyer and sellers as well as agents and brokers will be greatly benefited

  7. Study of different factors which can explain the radon exhalation potential of soils; Recherche de differents parametres caracterisant le potentiel d`exhalation en radon des sols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demongeot, St

    1997-10-27

    Radon is a natural radioactive gas belonging to the Uranium-238 chain, which is present in the earth crust and produced by the disintegration of radium-226. It is considered as the major source of radiological exposure of man to natural radiation because it can accumulate in indoor atmosphere. So, this health risk must be take into account.The aim of this study is to find some tools in order to identify high radon level area. The first part of this study has consisted in measurement of radon emission from different not sufficient for the estimation of the radon exhalation potential in a given area. In the second part of this work, we have studied the variations of in situ radon concentration as a function of different geological and pedologic parameters of the site. With the results obtained, we have determined the data which have to be considered, and the methodology to be applied for the determination of the radon exhalation of a given area. Furthermore, by the mean of numerical simulations (TRACH Model), it was possible to know the scale of radon flux variation in a given point versus the hydric state of the ground and thus the permeability: these parameters are not easy to measure because of their variabilities with time. The methodology ESPERAS (EStimation du Potential d`Exhalation en Radon des Sols) developed during this work was applied first, at a local scale and then to greater area. The values estimated by this way are in a good agreement with the results of measurements. So, we can determine the areas which are affected by high radon levels. (author)

  8. A process-based {sup 222}radon flux map for Europe and its comparison to long-term observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karstens, U. [Max-Planck-Instistut fuer Biogeochemie, Jena (Germany); Schwingshackl, C.; Schmithuesen, D.; Levin, I. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Umweltphysik

    2015-07-01

    Detailed {sup 222}radon ({sup 222}Rn) flux maps are an essential pre-requisite for the use of radon in atmospheric transport studies. Here we present a high-resolution {sup 222}Rn flux map for Europe, based on a parameterization of {sup 222}Rn production and transport in the soil. The {sup 222}Rn exhalation rate is parameterized based on soil properties, uranium content, and modelled soil moisture from two different land-surface reanalysis data sets. Spatial variations in exhalation rates are primarily determined by the uranium content of the soil, but also influenced by soil texture and local water-table depth. Temporal variations are related to soil moisture variations as the molecular diffusion in the unsaturated soil zone depends on available air-filled pore space. The implemented diffusion parameterization was tested against campaign-based {sup 222}Rn soil profile measurements. Monthly {sup 222}Rn exhalation rates from European soils were calculated with a nominal spatial resolution of 0.083 x 0.083 and compared to long-term direct measurements of {sup 222}Rn exhalation rates in different areas of Europe. The two realizations of the {sup 222}Rn flux map, based on the different soil moisture data sets, both realistically reproduce the observed seasonality in the fluxes but yield considerable differences for absolute flux values. The mean {sup 222}Rn flux from soils in Europe is estimated to be 10 mBq m{sup -2} s{sup -1} (ERA-Interim/Land soil moisture) or 15 mBq m{sup -2} s{sup -1} (GLDAS (Global Land Data Assimilation System) Noah soil moisture) for the period 2006-2010. The corresponding seasonal variations with low fluxes in winter and high fluxes in summer range in the two realizations from ca. 7 to ca. 14 mBq m{sup -2} s{sup -1} and from ca. 11 to ca. 20 mBq m{sup -2} s{sup -1}, respectively. These systematic differences highlight the importance of realistic soil moisture data for a reliable estimation of {sup 222}Rn exhalation rates. Comparison with

  9. A process-based 222radon flux map for Europe and its comparison to long-term observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karstens, U.; Schwingshackl, C.; Schmithüsen, D.; Levin, I.

    2015-11-01

    Detailed 222radon (222Rn) flux maps are an essential pre-requisite for the use of radon in atmospheric transport studies. Here we present a high-resolution 222Rn flux map for Europe, based on a parameterization of 222Rn production and transport in the soil. The 222Rn exhalation rate is parameterized based on soil properties, uranium content, and modelled soil moisture from two different land-surface reanalysis data sets. Spatial variations in exhalation rates are primarily determined by the uranium content of the soil, but also influenced by soil texture and local water-table depth. Temporal variations are related to soil moisture variations as the molecular diffusion in the unsaturated soil zone depends on available air-filled pore space. The implemented diffusion parameterization was tested against campaign-based 222Rn soil profile measurements. Monthly 222Rn exhalation rates from European soils were calculated with a nominal spatial resolution of 0.083° × 0.083° and compared to long-term direct measurements of 222Rn exhalation rates in different areas of Europe. The two realizations of the 222Rn flux map, based on the different soil moisture data sets, both realistically reproduce the observed seasonality in the fluxes but yield considerable differences for absolute flux values. The mean 222Rn flux from soils in Europe is estimated to be 10 mBq m-2 s-1 (ERA-Interim/Land soil moisture) or 15 mBq m-2 s-1 (GLDAS (Global Land Data Assimilation System) Noah soil moisture) for the period 2006-2010. The corresponding seasonal variations with low fluxes in winter and high fluxes in summer range in the two realizations from ca. 7 to ca. 14 mBq m-2 s-1 and from ca. 11 to ca. 20 mBq m-2 s-1, respectively. These systematic differences highlight the importance of realistic soil moisture data for a reliable estimation of 222Rn exhalation rates. Comparison with observations suggests that the flux estimates based on the GLDAS Noah soil moisture model on average better

  10. A process-based 222radon flux map for Europe and its comparison to long-term observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karstens, U.; Schwingshackl, C.; Schmithuesen, D.; Levin, I.

    2015-01-01

    Detailed 222 radon ( 222 Rn) flux maps are an essential pre-requisite for the use of radon in atmospheric transport studies. Here we present a high-resolution 222 Rn flux map for Europe, based on a parameterization of 222 Rn production and transport in the soil. The 222 Rn exhalation rate is parameterized based on soil properties, uranium content, and modelled soil moisture from two different land-surface reanalysis data sets. Spatial variations in exhalation rates are primarily determined by the uranium content of the soil, but also influenced by soil texture and local water-table depth. Temporal variations are related to soil moisture variations as the molecular diffusion in the unsaturated soil zone depends on available air-filled pore space. The implemented diffusion parameterization was tested against campaign-based 222 Rn soil profile measurements. Monthly 222 Rn exhalation rates from European soils were calculated with a nominal spatial resolution of 0.083 x 0.083 and compared to long-term direct measurements of 222 Rn exhalation rates in different areas of Europe. The two realizations of the 222 Rn flux map, based on the different soil moisture data sets, both realistically reproduce the observed seasonality in the fluxes but yield considerable differences for absolute flux values. The mean 222 Rn flux from soils in Europe is estimated to be 10 mBq m -2 s -1 (ERA-Interim/Land soil moisture) or 15 mBq m -2 s -1 (GLDAS (Global Land Data Assimilation System) Noah soil moisture) for the period 2006-2010. The corresponding seasonal variations with low fluxes in winter and high fluxes in summer range in the two realizations from ca. 7 to ca. 14 mBq m -2 s -1 and from ca. 11 to ca. 20 mBq m -2 s -1 , respectively. These systematic differences highlight the importance of realistic soil moisture data for a reliable estimation of 222 Rn exhalation rates. Comparison with observations suggests that the flux estimates based on the GLDAS Noah soil moisture model on

  11. Study of different factors which can explain the radon exhalation potential of soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demongeot, St.

    1997-01-01

    Radon is a natural radioactive gas belonging to the Uranium-238 chain, which is present in the earth crust and produced by the disintegration of radium-226. It is considered as the major source of radiological exposure of man to natural radiation because it can accumulate in indoor atmosphere. So, this health risk must be take into account.The aim of this study is to find some tools in order to identify high radon level area. The first part of this study has consisted in measurement of radon emission from different not sufficient for the estimation of the radon exhalation potential in a given area. In the second part of this work, we have studied the variations of in situ radon concentration as a function of different geological and pedologic parameters of the site. With the results obtained, we have determined the data which have to be considered, and the methodology to be applied for the determination of the radon exhalation of a given area. Furthermore, by the mean of numerical simulations (TRACH Model), it was possible to know the scale of radon flux variation in a given point versus the hydric state of the ground and thus the permeability: these parameters are not easy to measure because of their variabilities with time. The methodology ESPERAS (EStimation du Potential d'Exhalation en Radon des Sols) developed during this work was applied first, at a local scale and then to greater area. The values estimated by this way are in a good agreement with the results of measurements. So, we can determine the areas which are affected by high radon levels. (author)

  12. Sediment-water chemical exchange in the coastal zone traced by in situ radon-222 flux measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martens, C.S.; Kipphut, G.W.; Klump, J.V.

    1980-01-01

    In situ radon-222 flux experiments conducted in benthic chambers in Cape Lookout Bight, a small marine basin on the North Carolina coast, reveal that enhanced chemical transport across the sediment-water interface during summer months is caused by abiogenic bubble tube structures. Transport rates for dissolved radon, methane, and ammonium more than three times greater than those predicted on the basis of molecular diffusion occur when open tubes are maintained by semidiurnal low-tide bubbling

  13. Comparative study on radon effects and thermal effects on humans in radon hot spring therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaoka, K.; Mitsunobu, F.; Hanamoto, K.; Tanizaki, Y.; Sugita, K.; Kohima, S.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: The radon therapy is used radon ( 222 Rn) gas, which mainly emits alpha-rays, and induces a small amount of active oxygen in the body. Because most of the diseases to which the radon therapy as well as the thermal therapy is applied are related to activated oxygen, in this study the effects of the radioactivity of radon and thermal effects were compared under the room or the hot spring condition with the similar chemical component, using as the parameters which are closely involved in the clinical for radon therapy. In the results, the radon and thermal therapy enhanced the antioxidation function, such as the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase, which inhibit lipid peroxidation and total cholesterol produce in the body. Moreover the therapy enhanced concanavalin A (ConA)-induced mitogen response, and increased the level of CD4, which is the marker of helper T cell, and decreased the level of CD8, which is the common marker of killer T cell and supresser T cell, in the white cell differentiation antigen (CD4/CD8) assay. Furthermore, the therapy increased the levels of alpha atrial natriuretic polypeptide (alpha ANP), beta endorphin, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), insulin and glucose-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PDH), and decreased the vasopression level. The results were on the whole larger in the radon group than in the thermal group. The findings suggest that the radon therapy more contributes to the prevention of life style-related diseases related to peroxidation reactions and immune depression than thermal therapy. Moreover these indicate what may be a part of the mechanism for the alleviation of hypertension, osteoarthritis (pain) and diabetes mellitus brought about more radon therapy than thermal therapy

  14. Experimental study of radon and thoron diffusion through barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durcik, M; Havlik, F [Inst. of Preventive and Clinical Medicine, 83301 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    1996-12-31

    The measurement results of diffusion parameters for radon (radon-222) and thoron (radon-220) through barriers, experimental equipment and theoretical background of diffusion are presented in this paper. The diffusion barriers are used for measuring radon and thoron by passive detectors in order to test the reduction techniques in houses. Six samples (filter paper, rubber, polyethylene, glass laminate, polypropylene) were studied for radon diffusion. The thickness barriers were from 0.012 mm to 2 mm, the diffusion area was 16 cm{sup 2} and the volume V{sub 2} was 30 dm{sup 3}. The diffusion constants D were obtained using given expressions and the data from measurements. The procedures used in experiments are useful for study of diffusion ability of radon and thoron in barriers and determination diffusion parameters from short term measurements. (J.K.). 2 figs., 1 tab., 3 refs.

  15. Experimental study of radon and thoron diffusion through barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durcik, M.; Havlik, F.

    1995-01-01

    The measurement results of diffusion parameters for radon (radon-222) and thoron (radon-220) through barriers, experimental equipment and theoretical background of diffusion are presented in this paper. The diffusion barriers are used for measuring radon and thoron by passive detectors in order to test the reduction techniques in houses. Six samples (filter paper, rubber, polyethylene, glass laminate, polypropylene) were studied for radon diffusion. The thickness barriers were from 0.012 mm to 2 mm, the diffusion area was 16 cm 2 and the volume V 2 was 30 dm 3 . The diffusion constants D were obtained using given expressions and the data from measurements. The procedures used in experiments are useful for study of diffusion ability of radon and thoron in barriers and determination diffusion parameters from short term measurements. (J.K.). 2 figs., 1 tab., 3 refs

  16. Occupational exposure to radon in Australian Tourist Caves an Australian-wide study of radon levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solomon, S B; Langroo, R; Peggie, J R [Australian Radiation Laboratory. Yallambie, VIC (Australia); Lyons, R G [University of Auckland, Auckland, (New Zealand). Department of Physics; James, J M [University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia). Department of Chemisty

    1996-02-01

    The study described in this report sets out to determine which Australian show caves have long- term radon levels in excess of the proposed action level of 1000 Bq m{sup -3}. The collaborative study between the Australian Radiation Laboratory (ARL), the University of Sydney and the University of Auckland, was carried out with the support of a Research Grant from Worksafe Australia. The aims of this study were to measure radon levels for each season over a period of one year, at representative sites in all developed show caves around Australia, to determine yearly average radon levels for each cave tour, based on these site measurements, to estimate the radiation doses to the tour guides employed in these caves, and to identify caves with radon concentrations in excess of the action level. (authors) 7 refs., 10 tabs., 2 figs.

  17. Occupational exposure to radon in Australian Tourist Caves an Australian-wide study of radon levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomon, S.B.; Langroo, R.; Peggie, J.R.; Lyons, R.G.; James, J.M.

    1996-02-01

    The study described in this report sets out to determine which Australian show caves have long- term radon levels in excess of the proposed action level of 1000 Bq m -3 . The collaborative study between the Australian Radiation Laboratory (ARL), the University of Sydney and the University of Auckland, was carried out with the support of a Research Grant from Worksafe Australia. The aims of this study were to measure radon levels for each season over a period of one year, at representative sites in all developed show caves around Australia, to determine yearly average radon levels for each cave tour, based on these site measurements, to estimate the radiation doses to the tour guides employed in these caves, and to identify caves with radon concentrations in excess of the action level. (authors)

  18. A study on the risk from indoor radon 220 and radon 222 exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rannou, A.

    1986-12-01

    The hazards from radon (radon 220 and 222) in dwelling atmospheres have been studied. In the first part devoted to the present state of the problem, an analysis is made of the formation mechanisms and the evolution of radon and its daughters indoors. The main physical and dosimetric quantities required for the risk evaluation are defined. The theoretical and experimental analysis of the methods of measurements of radon and its daughters used in the measurement campaign are considered in the second part. The progress and the result of the national survey are developed in the third part. The effects of several factors on indoor levels are discussed. The conclusions of a particular study in the Finistere ''department'' are presented. The data collected make it possible to assess the mean exposure of man to natural radiation [fr

  19. Estimating the amount and distribution of radon flux density from the soil surface in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuo Weihai; Guo Qiuju; Chen Bo; Cheng Guan

    2008-01-01

    Based on an idealized model, both the annual and the seasonal radon ( 222 Rn) flux densities from the soil surface at 1099 sites in China were estimated by linking a database of soil 226 Ra content and a global ecosystems database. Digital maps of the 222 Rn flux density in China were constructed in a spatial resolution of 25 km x 25 km by interpolation among the estimated data. An area-weighted annual average 222 Rn flux density from the soil surface across China was estimated to be 29.7 ± 9.4 mBq m -2 s -1 . Both regional and seasonal variations in the 222 Rn flux densities are significant in China. Annual average flux densities in the southeastern and northwestern China are generally higher than those in other regions of China, because of high soil 226 Ra content in the southeastern area and high soil aridity in the northwestern one. The seasonal average flux density is generally higher in summer/spring than winter, since relatively higher soil temperature and lower soil water saturation in summer/spring than other seasons are common in China

  20. Study on radon geological potential of Beijing city

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Qingcheng; Wu Xinmin; Liu Yujuan; Yang Yaxin; Zhang Ye

    2009-01-01

    According to elemental geochemistry in Beijing, the uranium content in the area was measured, and distribution of radon concentration was predicted. Based on the uranium-radium equilibrium coefficient, porosity and diffusion coefficient, which were either measured or calculated, the radon geological potential of Beijing city was studied using γ-ray spectroscopy or mass spectroscopy and certain models were used to calculate the relation between radon geological potential and lithology and geological structure. The results showed that radon geological potential of Beijing city could be divided into four zones, tend of every zone coincides with the main structure, and the potential values nearly relate with geological factors. (authors)

  1. Study of the effects of radon in three biological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavera, L.; Balcazar, M.; Lopez, A.; Brena, M.; Rosa, M.E. De la; Villalobos P, R.

    2002-01-01

    The radon and its decay products are responsible of the 3/4 parts of the exposure of the persons to the environmental radiation. The discovery at the end of XIX Century of the illnesses, mainly of cancer, which appeared in the presence of radon, lead to an accelerated growing of the radon studies: monitoring, dosimetry, effects on the persons, etc. Several epidemiological studies of radon in miners and population in general have been realized; advancing in the knowledge about the concentration-lung cancer risk relationship, but with discrepancies in the results depending on the concentration levels. Therefor, studies which consuming time, efforts and money go on doing. The research of the radon effects in biological systems different to human, allows to realize studies in less time, in controlled conditions and generally at lower cost, generating information about the alpha radiation effects in the cellular field. Therefor it was decided to study the response of three biological systems exposed to radon: an unicellular bacteria Escherichia Coli which was exposed directly to alpha particles from an electrodeposited source for determining the sensitivity limit of the chose technique. A plant, Tradescantia, for studying the cytogenetic effect of the system exposed to controlled concentrations of radon. An insect, Drosophila Melanogaster, for studying the genetic effects and the accumulated effects in several generations exposed to radon. In this work the experimental settlements are presented for the expositions of the systems and the biological results commenting the importance of these. (Author)

  2. Study of the factors affecting radon diffusion through building materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chauhan, R.P.

    2011-01-01

    Radon appears mainly by diffusion processes from the point of origin following - decay of 226 Ra in underground soil and building materials used, in the construction of floors, walls, and ceilings. The diffusion of radon in dwellings is a process determined by the radon concentration gradient across the building material structure and can be a significant contributor to indoor radon inflow. Radon can originate from the deeply buried deposit beneath homes and can migrate to the surface of earth. Radon diffusion and transport through different media is a complex process and is affected by several factors. It is well known that for building construction materials the porosity, permeability and the diffusion coefficient are the parameters, which can quantify the materials capability to hinder the flow of radon soil gas. An increase in porosity will provide more air space within the material for radon to travel, thus reducing its resistance to radon transport. The permeability of material describes its ability to act as a barrier to gas movement when a pressure gradient exists across it and is closely related to the porosity of material. The radon diffusion coefficient of a material quantifies the ability of radon gas to move through it when a concentration gradient is the driving force. This parameter depends upon the porosity and permeability of the medium. As diffusion process is the major contributor to indoor levels, therefore, the factors affecting the diffusion process need to be kept in consideration. Keeping this in mind the experimental arrangements have been made for control study of radon diffusion through some building materials to observe the effects of different factors viz.; compaction, grain size, temperature, humidity and the mixing of these materials etc. For the present study alpha sensitive LR-115 type II solid-state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs) have been used for the recording of alpha tracks caused by radon gas after its diffusion through the

  3. Study on radon concentrations in Antarctica's instrumentation and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, H.E. da.

    1990-04-01

    Continuos measurements of the natural radioactive gas sup(222)Rn are made at the Brazilian Antarctic station Comandante Ferraz (62 sup(0)S, 58 sup(0)W) to study the continental influence of air masses over the Antarctic peninsula. The technique employed in the measurements is base on the process of electrostatic collection of the ionized Polonium isotopes (the Radon decay products). The efficiency of collection is of the order of 50% to 57% for an applied electric potential of 17 kV. The collection chamber has a hemispheric shape in order to optimize the collection yield. The observed radioactivity at the Ferraz station for the period March to November 1986 and 1987 exhibited different behaviors. The year 1986 showed an average radioactivity of (2.6 ± 1.8) x 10 sup(-2) Bq.m sup(-3), while in 1987 a 50% decrease in the concentration was observed with a value of (1.44 ± 0.8) x 10 sup(-2) Bq.m sup(-3). Associated variations of wind velocity and continental aerosol loads were also observed. Periodicities in the radon time series displayed more intense peaks at 25 to 30 day periods. No seasonal trend was observed. Transient increases of radon correlated with short deicing periods. The average flux of Rn were calculated from a sampling network consisting of 20 points spread over the exposed regoliths and outcrops of the King George island, with values of 250 atoms m sup(-2) s sup(-1) for the sup(220)Rn and 7500 atoms m sup(-2) s sup(-1) for the sup(222)Rn isotope. (author)

  4. Radon diffusion studies in air, gravel, sand, soil and water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, B.; Singh, S.; Virk, H.S.

    1993-01-01

    Radon isotopes are practically inert and have properties of gases under conditions of geological interest. During their brief lives their atoms are capable of moving from sites of their generation. Radon diffusion studies were carried out in air, gravel, sand, soil and water using silicon diffused junction electronic detector, Alphameter-400. Diffusion constant and diffusion length is calculated for all these materials. (author)

  5. Comparative study of radon exposure in Canadian homes and uranium mines - a discussion on the importance of national radon program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Jing

    2017-01-01

    The history of lung cancer in uranium miners is well known for over hundreds of years when the disease was referred to as 'miner's disease' or 'mountain sickness'. Radon levels in uranium mines have decreased significantly over the past 30 years as a result of effective radiation protection measures at workplaces. For the most recent 10-year period, the average radon concentrations to underground and surface workers in Canadian uranium mines were 111 and 11 Bq m -3 , respectively. Based on the recent radon survey carried out in roughly 14 000 homes in 121 health regions across Canada and the more recent radon and thoron survey in 33 Canadian cities and 4000 homes, the average radon concentration in Canadian homes is 77 Bq m -3 . This study demonstrates that, nowadays, workers are exposed to radon in underground mines at a comparable radon level to what Canadians are exposed to at home. Since exposure to indoor radon is the main source of natural radiation exposure to the population, it is important for the National Radon Program to further increase radon awareness, and to encourage more Canadians to take appropriate actions to reduce radon exposure. (authors)

  6. Study and treatment of situations implying radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robe, M.Ch.

    2005-01-01

    The radon is a radioactive gas with a natural origin. It comes from a disintegration of uranium and radium present in the soils. It comes from granitic and volcanic subsoils. The radon can accumulate in buildings. It is the principal source of natural exposure and the second one after medical exposures. It is the only one source of radiations on which man is susceptible to act. Ventilation and airtightness are solutions to reduce radon concentration. (N.C.)

  7. The use of track registration detectors to reconstruct contemporary and historical airborne radon ( sup 2 sup 2 sup 2 Rn) and radon progeny concentrations for a radon-lung cancer epidemiologic study

    CERN Document Server

    Steck, D J

    1999-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies that investigate the relationship between radon and lung cancer require accurate estimates for the long-term average concentrations of radon progeny in dwellings. Year-to-year and home-to-home variations of radon in domestic environments pose serious difficulties for reconstructing an individual's long-term radon-related exposure. The use of contemporary radon gas concentrations as a surrogate for radon-related dose introduces additional uncertainty in dose assessment. Studies of glass exposed in radon chambers and in a home show that radon progeny deposited on, and implanted in, glass hold promise for reconstructing past radon concentrations in a variety of atmospheres. We developed an inexpensive track registration detector for the Iowa Radon Lung Cancer Study (IRLCS) that simultaneously measures contemporary airborne radon concentrations, surface deposited alpha activity density, and implanted sup 2 sup 1 sup 0 Po activity density. The implanted activity is used to reconstruct the cum...

  8. Study on the influence factors about the soil radon measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Zixiang; Liu Yanbin; Jia Yuxin; Mai Weiji; Liu Xiaolian; Yang Yuhua

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To explore relevant factors about the soil radon measurement and provide gist of formulating correct measure method by studying the way of the soil radon measurement. Methods: Deflation-ionization room standard is adopted. Results: The concentration of soil radon becomes higher with the sample's volume added, it also augmented with the measure depth increased in certain degree; The concentration of soil radon changes little when sample's depth is above 60 cm; The time of deflation has no obvious influence on the concentration of soil radon, but microwave show serious effect on it; The results will be lowered when the desiccant is humidified, raining has the same affection on it; Plant has some impact on it. Conclusion: The measured results will be affected by microwave, oscillate and plant. Sample's volume and depth, soil's humidity can influence it too. The result's veracity can be guaranteed by choosing appropriate sample and measure condition. (authors)

  9. Analysis of soil radon data in earthquake precursory studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hari Prasad Jaishi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Soil radon data were recorded at two selected sites along Mat fault in Mizoram (India, which lies in the highest seismic zone in India. The study was carried out during July 2011 to May 2013 using LR-115 Type II films. Precursory changes in radon concentration were observed prior to some earthquakes that occurred around the measuring sites. Positive correlation was found between the measured radon data and the seismic activity in the region. Statistical analysis of the radon data together with the meteorological parameters was done using Multiple Regression Method. Results obtained show that the method employed was useful for removing the effect of meteorological parameters and to identify radon maxima possibly caused by seismic activity.

  10. A study of radon indoor concentration; Un estudio de concentracion de radon intramuros

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pena, P.; Ruiz, W.; Segovia, N.; Ponciano, G. [ININ, Gerencia de Ciencias Ambientales, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    It was realized a study of radon concentration in houses of Mexico City and in a laboratory of the Nuclear Centre of Salazar, State of Mexico. The radon determination in air was realized with solid nuclear track detectors and with Honeywell and Alpha guard automatic equipment. The results show that the majority of houses have values under 148 Bq/m{sup 3} obtaining some housings with upper values located in the Lomas zone. A study in smokers houses and another of controls showed very similar distributions. It was studied the day time fluctuations finding that radon increases considerably during the dawn. Some upper values obtained in a laboratory of the Nuclear Centre were remedied with ventilation. (Author)

  11. Influence of moisture content on radon diffusion in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, M.; Ramola, R.C.; Singh, S.; Virk, H.S.

    1990-01-01

    Radon diffusion from soil has been studied as a function of the moisture content of the soil. A few simple experiments showed that up to a certain moisture content the radon diffusion increased with increasing moisture. A sharp rise in radon concentration occurred as the moisture was increased from the completely dry state to 13% water by weight. The radon flux was measured for columns of dry, moist and water saturated soil. The highest flux came from the column filled with moist soil. Water saturated soil gave the lowest flux because of the much lower diffusion coefficient of radon through water. (author)

  12. A reconnaissance study of radon concentrations in Hamadan city, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. K. Gillmore

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results of a reconnaissance study that used CR-39 alpha track-etch detectors to measure radon concentrations in dwellings in Hamadan, western Iran, significantly, built on permeable alluvial fan deposits. The indoor radon levels recorded varied from 4 (i.e. below the lower limit of detection for the method to 364 Bq/m3 with a mean value of 108 Bq/m3 which is 2.5 times the average global population-weighted indoor radon concentration – these data augment the very few published studies on indoor radon levels in Iran. The maximum radon concentration in Hamadan occurs during the winter period (January to March with lower concentrations during the autumn. The effective dose equivalent to the population in Hamadan is estimated from this study to be in the region of 2.7 mSv/y, which is above the guidelines for dose to a member of the public of 1 mSv/y suggested by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP in 1993. This study supports other work in a number of countries that indicates such permeable "surficial" deposits as being of intermediate to high radon potential. In western Iran, the presence of hammered clay floors, the widespread presence of excavated qanats, the textural properties of surficial deposits and human behaviour intended to cope with winds are likely to be important factors influencing radon concentrations in older buildings.

  13. Experimental and theoretical study of radon levels in a house

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ameon, R.; Dupuis, M.; Marie, L.; Diez, O.; LionS, J.; Tymen, G.

    2006-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Radon being a radioactive gas of natural origin is omnipresent everywhere at the surface of earth. It is created by the radium decay issued from the uranium contained in the earth crust and more specifically in granitic and volcanic subsoils. Because of the dilution due to air masses, its concentration in open air is low. On the other hand, radon may accumulate in the confined atmosphere of buildings and achieve high concentration levels. Across France, it has been estimated that 300 000 individual dwellings present concentration higher than the French reference level of 400 Bq.m -3 and that 60 000 other ones would exhibit concentration above 1 000 Bq.m -3 , the French warning threshold. Indoor radon concentration may vary significantly for various reasons, including design of buildings, radium content and texture of the soil in contact with the building's slab and walls, the under pressure value between the inside and outside and the fresh air supply rate. These considerations have led the I.R.S.N. to develop a code called R.A.D.O.N. 2 for conducting simple and methodical studies of indoor radon concentrations, to take into account the above-mentioned factors. But, the achievement of an effective diagnosis and risk management -aiding tool requires to first check its validity on the phenomenological model at the origin of the code. A 3-year experimental follow-up was, thus, conducted within an unoccupied house built on an uranium-bearing geological formation. After characterization of the subsoil, the instrumentation was implemented on site to continuously monitor the following parameters: - the radon source term in the building (exhalation rate of 222 Rn at the ground/building interface and at soil surface, radon concentration at the soil and in outdoor air), - the radon penetration by advection (differential pressure in the house basement), - the driving mechanisms for natural ventilation in the house (weather conditions, indoor

  14. Experimental and theoretical study of radon levels in a house

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ameon, R.; Dupuis, M.; Marie, L.; Diez, O.; LionS, J. [Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety, Fontenay-aux-roses (France); Tymen, G. [LARAAH, Universite de Bretagne Occidentale, Brest (France)

    2006-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Radon being a radioactive gas of natural origin is omnipresent everywhere at the surface of earth. It is created by the radium decay issued from the uranium contained in the earth crust and more specifically in granitic and volcanic subsoils. Because of the dilution due to air masses, its concentration in open air is low. On the other hand, radon may accumulate in the confined atmosphere of buildings and achieve high concentration levels. Across France, it has been estimated that 300 000 individual dwellings present concentration higher than the French reference level of 400 Bq.m{sup -3} and that 60 000 other ones would exhibit concentration above 1 000 Bq.m{sup -3}, the French warning threshold. Indoor radon concentration may vary significantly for various reasons, including design of buildings, radium content and texture of the soil in contact with the building's slab and walls, the under pressure value between the inside and outside and the fresh air supply rate. These considerations have led the I.R.S.N. to develop a code called R.A.D.O.N. 2 for conducting simple and methodical studies of indoor radon concentrations, to take into account the above-mentioned factors. But, the achievement of an effective diagnosis and risk management -aiding tool requires to first check its validity on the phenomenological model at the origin of the code. A 3-year experimental follow-up was, thus, conducted within an unoccupied house built on an uranium-bearing geological formation. After characterization of the subsoil, the instrumentation was implemented on site to continuously monitor the following parameters: - the radon source term in the building (exhalation rate of {sup 222}Rn at the ground/building interface and at soil surface, radon concentration at the soil and in outdoor air), - the radon penetration by advection (differential pressure in the house basement), - the driving mechanisms for natural ventilation in the house (weather

  15. Review of high-sensitivity Radon studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojcik, M.; Zuzel, G.; Simgen, H.

    2017-10-01

    A challenge in many present cutting-edge particle physics experiments is the stringent requirements in terms of radioactive background. In peculiar, the prevention of Radon, a radioactive noble gas, which occurs from ambient air and it is also released by emanation from the omnipresent progenitor Radium. In this paper we review various high-sensitivity Radon detection techniques and approaches, applied in the experiments looking for rare nuclear processes happening at low energies. They allow to identify, quantitatively measure and finally suppress the numerous sources of Radon in the detectors’ components and plants.

  16. A reconnaissance study of radon concentrations in Hamadan city, Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Gillmore, G.; Jabarivasal, N.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents results of a reconnaissance study that used CR-39 alpha track-etch detectors to measure radon concentrations in dwellings in Hamadan, western Iran, significantly, built on permeable alluvial fan deposits. The indoor radon levels recorded varied from 4 (i.e. below the lower limit of detection for the method) to 364 Bq/m3 with a mean value of 108 Bq/m3 which is 2.5 times the average global population-weighted indoor radon concent...

  17. Occupational studies of radon daughters and lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hornung, R.W.; Ballew, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    The relationship between exposure to radon daughters and lung cancer mortality has been established. The purpose of this paper is to review some of the major studies of the health effects due to exposure to the decay products of radon gas and to discuss their potential implications with regard to risk associated with indoor radon. There has been much recent interest in the health hazards associated with radon largely motivated by the discovery of high levels of this radioactive gas in the Reading Prong (a geological area in Pennsylvania and New Jersey) and subsequently throughout the United States. Although at least three studies in the U.S. have been initiated to better estimate the lung cancer risks from low level indoor radon exposure, the results will not be known for several years. Consequently, present knowledge concerning such risks is almost entirely derived from studies of underground exposure to miners. Those studies effectively exclude women and children; therefore, assumptions must be made with regard to risk to a large segment of the population. Before discussing current health studies of radon daughter exposure, some background information is presented

  18. Radon and lung cancer: an epidemiological study in Norway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stranden, E.; Strand, T.; Magnus, K.; James, A.C.; Green, B.M.R.

    1988-01-01

    The objectives and strategy of an epidemiological study on the effects of exposure to radon in Norwegian dwellings is presented. The study is a cooperation between the National Institute of Radiation Hygiene and the Norwegian Cancer Registry in Norway and the National Radiological Protection Board of the United Kingdom, with funding by the Norwegian Cancer Society. Measurements of radon are being made in 10,000 dwellings representing all Norwegian municipalities. The potential for detecting an effect of radon exposure by such a study in Norway is unique because: (1) Radon concentrations are high and there are large regional variations. (2) Data from the Norwegian Cancer Registry is of high quality: all cancers have been subject to compulsory reporting since 1955. These data can be broken down according to municipality, sex and age. (3) In 1964/1965 a large scale survey of smoking habits was carried out in Norway. These data can also be broken down according to municipality, sex and age, and by types of smoking and smoking rate. It is intended to examine the correlation between lung cancer incidence and geographical variation in radon levels after making allowance for smoking habits. Radon measurements were started in early 1987 and the results of the study are expected to be published in 1989. (author)

  19. Study of the effects of radon in three biological systems; Estudio de los efectos del radon en tres sistemas biologicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavera, L. [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Av. Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas No. 152, Edif. 23, Col. San Mateo Atepehuacan, 07730 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Balcazar, M.; Lopez, A.; Brena, M. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Rosa, M.E. De la [Facultad de Quimica, UNAM, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Villalobos P, R. [Centro de Estudios de la Atmosfera, UNAM, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2002-07-01

    The radon and its decay products are responsible of the 3/4 parts of the exposure of the persons to the environmental radiation. The discovery at the end of XIX Century of the illnesses, mainly of cancer, which appeared in the presence of radon, lead to an accelerated growing of the radon studies: monitoring, dosimetry, effects on the persons, etc. Several epidemiological studies of radon in miners and population in general have been realized; advancing in the knowledge about the concentration-lung cancer risk relationship, but with discrepancies in the results depending on the concentration levels. Therefor, studies which consuming time, efforts and money go on doing. The research of the radon effects in biological systems different to human, allows to realize studies in less time, in controlled conditions and generally at lower cost, generating information about the alpha radiation effects in the cellular field. Therefor it was decided to study the response of three biological systems exposed to radon: an unicellular bacteria Escherichia Coli which was exposed directly to alpha particles from an electrodeposited source for determining the sensitivity limit of the chose technique. A plant, Tradescantia, for studying the cytogenetic effect of the system exposed to controlled concentrations of radon. An insect, Drosophila Melanogaster, for studying the genetic effects and the accumulated effects in several generations exposed to radon. In this work the experimental settlements are presented for the expositions of the systems and the biological results commenting the importance of these. (Author)

  20. Transport studies of radon in limestone underlying houses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gammage, R.B.; Dudney, C.S.; Wilson, D.L.; Saultz, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    In hilly limestone terrains of the southern Appalachians, subterranean networks of solution cavities and fissures present circulatory systems facilitating convective and advective transport of radon-bearing gas. Evidence suggests that the primary driving forces for transport are aerostatic pressure differentials created by the difference between the underground and the outside air temperatures. Examples are presented of houses experiencing elevated indoor radon levels as a consequence of communicating with such subsurface transportation systems. The location of a house near the upper or lower end of a subterranean-circulatory system seems to produce amplification of indoor radon levels in winter or summer, respectively. The transport mechanism for radon-bearing air in karst and its impact on indoor radon need better understanding, both in regard to evaluating the geographical prevalence of the phenomenon and the induced spatial and temporal effects that are possible. This paper reports field studies made at houses in karst regions at Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and Huntsville, Alabama. A primary radon-transport mechanism is advocated of ascending or descending subsurface columns of air whose flows are largely driven by aerostatic pressure gradients created by the inground-outdoor air temperature differentials. 5 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  1. Investigations of radon and radon daughters in surficial aquifers of florida

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-05-01

    The principal purpose of the investigation was to test the hypothesis that radon soil flux, considered the principal source of indoor radon contamination, has an underlying relationship to the radon content of associated shallow groundwaters. The working hypothesis was that radon build-up in both soil and shallow groundwater is basically a consequence of the same factor, radon emanation from soil grains and the solid surfaces of the aquifers. Groundwater may be advantageous as an indicator of radon potential. Another object of the project was to investigate temporal and spatial trends of radon daughter products in shallow aquifers. After analyzing all of the radon soil, flux, and groundwater measurements made over the two-year study period, it is clear that while there is no direct relationship between either radon soil concentration or flux and groundwater radon. Measurements in wells where polonium is present at very high concentrations have shown that 210Po is largely unsupported by its radioactive predecessor, and that polonium is considerably more variable, in both space and time than other parameters measured in the same wells, including radon

  2. Pilot study of the application of Tellus airborne radiometric and soil geochemical data for radon mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appleton, J.D. [British Geological Survey, Kingsley Dunham Centre, Keyworth, Nottingham NG12 5GG (United Kingdom)], E-mail: jda@bgs.ac.uk; Miles, J.C.H.; Green, B.M.R. [Health Protection Agency (HPA) - Radiation Protection Division, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0RQ (United Kingdom); Larmour, R. [Environment and Heritage Service, Department of the Environment, Belfast BT7 2JA (United Kingdom)

    2008-10-15

    The scope for using Tellus Project airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and soil geochemical data to predict the probability of houses in Northern Ireland having high indoor radon concentrations is evaluated, in a pilot study in the southeast of the province, by comparing these data statistically with in-house radon measurements. There is generally good agreement between radon maps modelled from the airborne radiometric and soil geochemical data using multivariate linear regression analysis and conventional radon maps which depend solely on geological and indoor radon data. The radon maps based on the Tellus Project data identify some additional areas where the radon risk appears to be relatively high compared with the conventional radon maps. One of the ways of validating radon maps modelled on the Tellus Project data will be to carry out additional indoor measurements in these areas.

  3. Earthquake forecasting studies using radon time series data in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walia, Vivek; Kumar, Arvind; Fu, Ching-Chou; Lin, Shih-Jung; Chou, Kuang-Wu; Wen, Kuo-Liang; Chen, Cheng-Hong

    2017-04-01

    For few decades, growing number of studies have shown usefulness of data in the field of seismogeochemistry interpreted as geochemical precursory signals for impending earthquakes and radon is idendified to be as one of the most reliable geochemical precursor. Radon is recognized as short-term precursor and is being monitored in many countries. This study is aimed at developing an effective earthquake forecasting system by inspecting long term radon time series data. The data is obtained from a network of radon monitoring stations eastblished along different faults of Taiwan. The continuous time series radon data for earthquake studies have been recorded and some significant variations associated with strong earthquakes have been observed. The data is also examined to evaluate earthquake precursory signals against environmental factors. An automated real-time database operating system has been developed recently to improve the data processing for earthquake precursory studies. In addition, the study is aimed at the appraisal and filtrations of these environmental parameters, in order to create a real-time database that helps our earthquake precursory study. In recent years, automatic operating real-time database has been developed using R, an open source programming language, to carry out statistical computation on the data. To integrate our data with our working procedure, we use the popular and famous open source web application solution, AMP (Apache, MySQL, and PHP), creating a website that could effectively show and help us manage the real-time database.

  4. Radon in drinking water in Co. Wicklow. A pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, T.P.; Sequeira, S.; McKittrick, L.; Colgan, P.A.

    2003-02-01

    Attention has been focused on the issue of radon in drinking water by a European Commission recommendation proposing that surveys should be undertaken in Member States to determine the scale and nature of exposures caused by radon in domestic drinking water supplies. The Commission recommends 1000 Bq/l as the radon activity concentration in private drinking water supplies above which remedial action to reduce the concentration should be taken. The logic behind the proposed action level is that it would broadly correspond to the risk posed to an individual from exposure to radon in the home at the current Reference Level of 200 Bq/m3 in air. A pilot study to assess the distribution and concentrations of radon in private ground water supplies was recently completed in Co. Wicklow. County Wicklow was selected for the study primarily on the basis that the underlying geology is predominantly granite with elevated uranium content. Furthermore, there is an estimated 1200 to 5000 private ground water supplies in use in the county and high radon activity concentrations in air in a significant number of dwellings have previously been predicted. As part of the pilot study, a number of scientific issues were addressed in order to underpin the results obtained and these are also discussed in the report. Radon activity concentrations were measured in the private ground water supplies of 166 houses in Co. Wicklow. In all cases the ground water was the principal source of drinking water for the house occupants. Four supplies had activity concentrations in excess of the Recommended EC action level of 1000 Bq/l, fifteen had activity concentrations between 500 and 1000 Bq/l, 51 were between 100 and 500 Bq/l and 96 had activity concentrations below 100 Bq/l. The doses estimated for the ingestion of radon bearing water vary significantly with the quantity of drinking water consumed and the degree to which the water has been processed prior to consumption. However dose estimates based

  5. Radon in drinking water in Co. Wicklow. A pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, T.P.; Sequeira, S.; McKittrick, L.; Colgan, P.A.

    2003-01-01

    Attention has been focused on the issue of radon in drinking water by a European Commission recommendation proposing that surveys should be undertaken in Member States to determine the scale and nature of exposures caused by radon in domestic drinking water supplies. The Commission recommends 1000 Bq/l as the radon activity concentration in private drinking water supplies above which remedial action to reduce the concentration should be taken. The logic behind the proposed action level is that it would broadly correspond to the risk posed to an individual from exposure to radon in the home at the current Reference Level of 200 Bq/m 3 in air. A pilot study to assess the distribution and concentrations of radon in private ground water supplies was recently completed in Co. Wicklow. County Wicklow was selected for the study primarily on the basis that the underlying geology is predominantly granite with elevated uranium content. Furthermore, there is an estimated 1200 to 5000 private ground water supplies in use in the county and high radon activity concentrations in air in a significant number of dwellings have previously been predicted. As part of the pilot study, a number of scientific issues were addressed in order to underpin the results obtained and these are also discussed in the report. Radon activity concentrations were measured in the private ground water supplies of 166 houses in Co. Wicklow. In all cases the ground water was the principal source of drinking water for the house occupants. Four supplies had activity concentrations in excess of the Recommended EC action level of 1000 Bq/l, fifteen had activity concentrations between 500 and 1000 Bq/l, 51 were between 100 and 500 Bq/l and 96 had activity concentrations below 100 Bq/l. The doses estimated for the ingestion of radon bearing water varies significantly with the quantity of drinking water consumed and the degree to which the water has been processed prior to consumption. However dose estimates

  6. Radon exhalation study in cements and other building materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, J.; Sharma, N.

    2012-01-01

    Radon is a radioactive inert gas, which is produced during the decay of radium, an element present in the naturally occurring uranium series. In the recent past, environmental scientists all over the world have been expressing great concern about the radiation hazard from radon and its short lived daughter products inside buildings. The radon concentration inside a building depends upon the radon exhalation from the building materials used for the construction and the soil underneath the building. In the present investigations, a comparative study for radon exhalation rate has been carried out in some Indian and Pakistani cements and other building materials being used locally such as sand, soil, bricks, marbles, CaCO 3 , POPs by using Track Etch Technique. The Pakistani cement with the trade name 'Elephant' shows the minimum mass exhalation rate while the Indian 'Birla White' cement has shown the maximum. Among the other building materials studied, CaCO 3 has shown the minimum, while local soil the maximum mass exhalation rate. Out of the fired clay bricks, roof tiles, floor tiles and different marbles, floor tiles have the minimum areal exhalation rate while roof tiles the maximum. (author)

  7. A study of indoor radon levels and radon effective dose in dwellings of some cities of Gezira State in Sudan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elzain Abd-Elmoniem Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to natural sources of radiation, especially 222Rn and its short-lived daughter products has become an important issue throughout the world because sustained exposure of humans to indoor radon may cause lung cancer. The indoor radon concentration level and radon effective dose rate were carried out in the dwellings of Medani, El Hosh, Elmanagil, Haj Abd Allah, and Wad Almahi cities, Gezira State - Central Sudan, in 393 measurements, using passive integrated solid-state nuclear track devices containing allyl diglycol carbonate plastic detectors. The radon concentration in the corresponding dwellings was found to vary from (57 ± 8 Bq/m3 in Medani to 41 ± 9 Bq/m3 in Wad Almahi, with an average of 49 ± 10 Bq/m3. Assuming an indoor occupancy factor of 0.8 and 0.4 for the equilibrium factor of radon indoors, we found that the annual effective dose rate from 222Rn in the studied dwellings ranges from 1.05 to 1.43 mSv per year and the relative lung cancer risk for radon exposure was 1.044%. In this research, we also correlated the relationship of radon concentration and building age. From our study, it is clear that the annual effective dose rate is larger than the “normal” background level as quoted by UNSCEAR, lower than the recommended action level of ICRP, and less than the maximum permissible dose defined by the International Atomic Energy Agency.

  8. Experimental animal studies of radon and cigarette smoke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cross, F.T.; Dagle, G.E.; Gies, R.A.; Smith, L.G.; Buschbom, R.L.

    1992-01-01

    Cigarette-smoking is a dominant cause of lung cancer and confounds risk assessment of exposure to radon decay products. Evidence in humans on the interaction between cigarette-smoking and exposure to radon decay products, although limited, indicates a possible synergy. Experimental animal data, in addition to showing synergy, also show a decrease or no change in risk with added cigarette-smoke exposures. This article reviews previous animal data developed at Compagnie Generale des Matieres Nucleaires and Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) on mixed exposures to radon and cigarette smoke, and highlights new initiation-promotion-initiation (IPI) studies at PNL that were designed within the framework of a two-mutation carcinogenesis model. Also presented are the PNL exposure system, experimental protocols, dosimetry, and biological data observed to date in IPI animals

  9. Studies on deposition of radon daughters on glass surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loerinc, M.; Feher, I.; Palfalvi, J.

    1998-01-01

    In a certain village in Northern Hungary, in some houses the radon concentration was found to be in the order of kBq.m -3 . In an attempt to decide whether an earthquake or the near-by mining activity is to blame, past radon concentration was studied making use of radon daughters embedded in the surface layer of glass sheets. In the investigation several conclusions were reached: drastic changes in Rn concentration could be excluded, ie., the high Rn concentration existed over the last 50 years; the continuing deposition of dirt on the glass surface and the occasional cleaning had no significant effect; the effect of corrosion processes at the glass surface should be further investigated. (A.K.)

  10. Review of epidemiological studies on hazards of radon daughters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, D.K.; Stewart, C.G.; Johnson, J.R.

    1981-01-01

    A review, with nearly 100 references, of the biological effects of radon and radon daughters is presented. Calculations of the relative dose from daughter products, as well as of the variation in dose with such things as unattached fraction, particle size, age and breathing rate are discussed. Estimates of annual risk of lung cancer in miners after inhalation of thoron daughters are given, and compared with hazards of employment in various US industries. The implications of these epidemiological studies for future regulations are discussed

  11. A detailed study of inexpensive radon control techniques in New York state houses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitschke, I.A.; Wadach, J.B.; Clarke, W.A.; Traynor, G.W.; Adams, G.P.; Rizzuto, J.E.

    1984-01-01

    As part of a comprehensive indoor air quality and infiltration field study, radon concentrations were measured in 60 houses in upstate New York using passive integrating monitors. Indoor air radon concentrations ranged from 0.2 pCi/l to 50 pCi/l. Four houses with the highest radon levels were then extensively monitored using real-time continuous instruments for the measurement of radon, radon daughters, respirable particles, infiltration, inside-outside pressure difference, and weather parameters. Several inexpensive radon mitigation techniques were tested in these four houses. Their effectiveness ranged widely. Techniques identified as effective were permanently installed in 14 houses having indoor air radon concentration above 2 pCi/l. Finally, the long-term effectiveness of the installed control techniques is being tested using passive integrating radon monitors. (Author)

  12. Multidimensional simulation of radon diffusion through earthen covers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, D.W.; Gee, G.W.

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to document applications of the RADMD model used at PNL to perform analyses of radon diffusion through uranium mill tailings cover systems. The accuracy of the numerical formulation of the RADMD model was demonstrated through a comparison with a two-dimensional analytic solution to the radon diffusion equation. Excellent agreement was obtained between two-dimensional radon concentration profiles predicted by RADMD and those obtained with the analytic solution. A simulation was made of radon diffusion into a test canister using the two dimensional capabilities of RADMD. The radon flux profile was computed and illustrates the effects of the canister on the surface radon flux. The influence of the canister on the radon flux was shown to be significant under certain circumstances. Defects in earthen cover systems were evaluated using the three dimensional capabilities of RADMD. The results support the expectation that defective covers can increase the surface flux from a covered talings pile. Compared to a cover with no defects, radon flux could be elevated by as much as a factor of three when 20% of the radon control layer area contained pockets of reduced moisture. The effects of temporal and spatial variations in moisture content have been modeled by coupling RADMD with a variable saturated flow model. Two dimensional simulations were made of the time dependence of radon flux from a tailings site before and after cover placement. The results demonstrated the expected flux reduction produced by a thick earthen cover. Time dependence of the radon flux after cover placement was attributed to slight changes in moisture content of the cover material with time. The particular cover studied had a compacted clay layer that effectively attenuated the radon

  13. Radon diffusion coefficients for soils. Previous studies and their application to uranium-bearing wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Tomozo; Gunji, Yasuyoshi; Iida, Takao

    2008-01-01

    Radon diffusion in soils has been studied over the years by many researchers. The application of such studies to the evaluation of radiation exposure caused by radon from uranium-bearing wastes disposed in a shallow land site is very important. The present paper surveyed closely relevant studies and elucidated the inherent nature of radon diffusion in terms of the definition of radon diffusion coefficients. Then, basic features of measurement methods for determining radon diffusion coefficients in soils were explained. Furthermore, theoretical aspects of radon diffusion in soils were discussed in terms of microscopic radon diffusion in soils and large-scale radon diffusion through cover soil defects for uranium mill tailings. Finally, in order to apply the radon diffusion studies to uranium-bearing waste disposal in shallow land sites, new challenges were presented: elucidation of radon diffusion in uranium-bearing wastes and cover-soil cracks, and demonstration of the validity of applying only radon diffusion in the evaluation of radiation exposure caused by radon, which would come through Japanese cover soils for uranium-bearing waste disposal. (author)

  14. Modelling and experimental study of the behavior of radon and radon decay products in an enclosure. Application to houses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gouronnec, A.M.

    1995-01-01

    Since the eighties, more and more studies were performed about radon and its decay products in houses with one of the aim being the estimation of the dose received by their inhabitants. Then, the principal objective of this work is to describe the behaviour of radon and its decay products within a dwelling. In the first part to the report, a few definitions are given and data from literature give an idea of indoor radon and radon decay products activities and/or size distribution. Aspects of dosimetry are presented too. In the second part of the work, a mathematical model, called 'PRADDO' of Physic of Radon and radon Decay products in Domestic environment is developed on the basis of the classical model written by Jacobi in 1972. On the one hand, it has to predict radon decay products activities in systems consisting in one or more enclosure(s), from radon activity and from ambient aerosol concentration and size distribution. On the other hand, one part of the model is assigned to study the influence of the entry model parameters variation on the calculated quantities. Then, in the third part of the work, two experimental studies are realised in order to compare measurements to modelization. The first experimentation is a laboratory work, made on the test bench ICARE from IPSN, and the second one consists in describing the basement of an occupied house from Brittany. In the two cases, the comparison between experiments and modelling shows a good agreement if particles are present in the air, but any conclusion is made when is no aerosol in the enclosure. (author). 158 refs., 81 figs., 42 tabs

  15. Realization of a simulator for radon-222 underground migration studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tidjani, A.; Seidel, J.L.; Monnin, M.; Isabelle, D.B.

    1987-01-01

    To study under controlled conditions the underground movements of radon gas a simulator has been built. It was designed in order to vary independently the different geophysical parameters such as pressure, temperature, humidity, type of soil and its granulometry, etc.. The first tests, described in this paper, have demonstrated the usefullness of such a simulator. (orig.)

  16. Studies of Radon and Radon Progeny in Air Conditioned Rooms in Hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marley, F.; Denman, A.R.; Phillips, P.S.

    1998-01-01

    A series of continuous real-time radon and radon progeny measurements together with passive etched track detector measurements were performed in hospital premises during 1996. In one small room, detailed measurements over several weeks showed that both the radon concentration and the Equilibrium Factor depended on the intermittent operation of a filtered positive pressure displacement air-conditioning system, which was designed to conform to operating theatre standards. The average radon level measured while the air-conditioning was off was almost four times higher than that recorded whilst it was on. The progeny level was over five times higher than that whilst it was on. Thus, the Equilibrium Factor (F), was significantly lower when the air-conditioning was on. Measurements in similar rooms in two hospitals, confirmed that the reduction in radon level was a general finding. Thus staff working in such environments receive significantly lower radiation dose from radon than staff working in nearby normally ventilated rooms. (author)

  17. Studies on spatial distribution of indoor radon concentration at Mysore city, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pruthvi Rani, K.S.; Chandrashekara, M.S.; Paramesh, L.

    2016-01-01

    Radon is a radioactive inert gas, with a half life of 3.82 days. Radium present in soil rocks and building material are the sources of atmospheric radon. Radon and its short-lived decay products ( 218 Po, 214 Pb, 214 Bi, and 214 Po) can be deposited in the lung tissues and give rise to higher radiation doses. Radon is now recognized as the second most important cause of lung cancer after smoking in the general population. In the present investigation a systematic study of the distribution of radon concentration has been carried out in a small room at different co-ordinates and time scales

  18. A study of radon levels in NHS premises in affected areas around the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denman, A.R.; Lewis, G.T.R.; Brennen, S.E.

    2002-01-01

    Radon gas contributes a significant fraction of the natural background radiation dose, and in some areas raised levels are found in buildings, both homes and the workplace. Different UK Action Levels apply to homes and the workplace, because of the diurnal variation of radon. This study reviews the results for a number of hospitals throughout England and Wales, and suggests that the likelihood of finding raised radon levels is similar in the workplace and homes in the same area. Radon measurements and consequent remediation of any raised levels are appropriate in all workplaces in radon Affected Areas with over 5% of houses above the UK domestic Action Level of 200 Bq m -3

  19. Human Lung Cancer Risks from Radon – Part III - Evidence of Influence of Combined Bystander and Adaptive Response Effects on Radon Case-Control Studies - A Microdose Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Bobby E.; Thompson, Richard E.; Beecher, Georgia C.

    2012-01-01

    Since the publication of the BEIR VI (1999) report on health risks from radon, a significant amount of new data has been published showing various mechanisms that may affect the ultimate assessment of radon as a carcinogen, in particular the potentially deleterious Bystander Effect (BE) and the potentially beneficial Adaptive Response radio-protection (AR). The case-control radon lung cancer risk data of the pooled 13 European countries radon study (Darby et al 2005, 2006) and the 8 North American pooled study (Krewski et al 2005, 2006) have been evaluated. The large variation in the odds ratios of lung cancer from radon risk is reconciled, based on the large variation in geological and ecological conditions and variation in the degree of adaptive response radio-protection against the bystander effect induced lung damage. The analysis clearly shows Bystander Effect radon lung cancer induction and Adaptive Response reduction in lung cancer in some geographical regions. It is estimated that for radon levels up to about 400 Bq m−3 there is about a 30% probability that no human lung cancer risk from radon will be experienced and a 20% probability that the risk is below the zero-radon, endogenic spontaneous or perhaps even genetically inheritable lung cancer risk rate. The BEIR VI (1999) and EPA (2003) estimates of human lung cancer deaths from radon are most likely significantly excessive. The assumption of linearity of risk, by the Linear No-Threshold Model, with increasing radon exposure is invalid. PMID:22942874

  20. Study of the calibration of the medical physics department - radon dosimeter in a radon facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikololpoulos, D.; Louizi, A.; Papadimitriou, D.; Proukakis, C.

    1997-01-01

    Several techniques have been developed to measure radon indoors.The use of a Solid State Nuclear Track Detector closed in a cup, has turned out to be the most appropriate for long term measurements. The Medical Physics Department of the Athens University is carrying out radon measurements in dwellings, apartments, outdoor air and mines since 1996. For this purpose a simple device, the so called Medical Physics Department radon dosimeter, has been constructed, which measures the radon concentration averaged over a long period of time. In the present paper the calibration technique introduced and the results of the calibration of the Medical Physics Department. (authors)

  1. Studies of radon mitigation in well water by aeration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mafra, Karina Cristina; Paschuk, Sergei A.; Denyak, Valeriy; Reque, Marilson; Correa, Janine Nicolosi; Barbosa, Laercio

    2011-01-01

    The 222 Rn concentration in natural water in different countries usually is about few Bq/L and is the subject of the National legislation as well as International norms and recommendations. The United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) established a limit of 11.1 Bq/L for the radon level in drinking water and this limit is considered as guideline in Canada and many countries of the European Union. This work presents the results of study of radon ( 222 Rn) concentration reduction in well water using the aeration process developed at the Laboratory of Applied Nuclear Physics of the Federal University of Technology (UTFPR). The water samples were collected from a well at Pinheirinho region of Curitiba in 2011. Experimental setup was based on the Radon Monitor (AlphaGUARD). The 222 Rn concentration was analyzed using the software DataEXPERT by Genitron Instruments, taking into account the volume of water sample, its temperature, atmospheric pressure and the total volume of the air in the vessels. Initial concentration of radon in water samples was 28,67 Bq/L which is bigger than maximum concentration recommended by USEPA. The mitigation was performed by means of diffusion aeration of water samples of 15L during the time interval of 24 hours following a period of 4 days. The efficiency of aeration mitigation was controlled by comparing the activity of radon in aerated water with reference water samples that were not aerated. Obtained results show very satisfactory decrease of 222 Rn activity in water samples even after few hours of intense aeration. (author)

  2. Natural radon as a limnological tracer for the study of vertical and horizontal eddy diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imboden, D.M.

    1979-01-01

    Radon-222 (half-life 3.8 d) has been used successfully as a geochemical tracer for vertical near bottom mixing in the ocean. The parent nuclide radium-226 (half-life 1600 a) occurs in far greater quantities in sediments than in the water column, thus providing a boundary source for emanation of radon. Vertical mixing in lakes may be of central importance for the evolution of chemical and biological processes. Most lakes pass through a stagnation period during which the euphotic zone continuously loses nutrients by sedimentation of plankton through the thermocline. The return flux of nutrients from the sediments through the hypolimnion and thermocline to the euphotic layer can only be understood and quantified if vertical mixing processes are known. The traditional means by which vertical eddy diffusion is calculated is the temperature method. However, temperature changes near the bottom of deep lakes are often too small to be measured. Among various (natural or man-made) geochemical tracers radon-222 seems to be especially suitable for the study of vertical mixing since its 'memory' of about one week very often allows measured activities to be interpreted in terms of a relatively simple steady-state model

  3. Estimating SGD flux in the Pingtung Plain coastal area by using Radon and Radium isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li Chang, Yao; Chieh Su, Chih

    2015-04-01

    In the past two decades, submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) has been recognized as an important pathway to transport material into coastal area. Our study area is located at Pingtung Plain which is the second largest plain in Taiwan with three major rivers, including Gaoping, Donggang and Linbian Rivers, flow through the plain. The Gaoping River, which has the largest drainage area, flows throughout the central part of the plain. The Pingtung Plain composed by four aquifers in different depths (0, 50, 100, and 200 m) and each layer extends to coastal area. Groundwater is an important water resource for local agriculture and aquaculture. However, the long-term over-pumping induced subsidence problem makes salinization at some coastal area. Some previous studies pointed out the SGD accounts for 80% or more of the mass of freshwater in Fangshan coast, depends on salinity and stable isotopes research. In this study, the radioactive tracers, Radon (222Rn, T1/2=3.8 d) and short-lived Ra isotopes (223Ra, T1/2=11.4 d & 224Ra, T1/2=3.6 d) are used in tracing SGD off the Pingtung Plain. During 2013 to 2014, the terrestrial water samples were collected from Gaoping, Donggang, Linbian Rivers and springs in different seasons. We also conducted two coastal waters cruises by using R/V Ocean Researcher 3 (OR3-1768 and 1799 cruises in May and September 2014). Continuous 222Rn was measured by RAD7 equipped with RAD-AQUA system and large volume (20 L) seawater samples were collected by CTD/Rosette water sampler with Niskin sterile bottles. Water samples were flow through Mn-fiber (flow rate < 1 LPM) to concentrate the Ra isotopes, and counted via RaDeCC system. In spatial variation, our result shows the excess 224Ra in the downstream of Gaoping River (2.39 dpm 100L-1) is higher than upstream (1.09 dpm 100L-1). It indicates the groundwater input may play an important role at the downstream of Gaoping River. For temporal variation, excess 224Ra in the Gaoping River are higher in wet

  4. Design issues in studies of radon and lung cancer: Implications of the joint effect of smoking and radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upfal, M.; Divine, G.; Siemiatycki, J.

    1995-01-01

    Many case-control studies have been undertaken to assess whether and to what extent residential radon exposure is a risk factor for lung cancer. Nearly all these studies have been conducted in populations including smokers and nonsmokers. In this paper, we show that, depending on the nature of the joint effect of radon and tobacco on lung cancer risk, it may be very difficult to detect a main effect due to radon in mixed smoking and nonsmoking populations. If the joint effect is closer to additive than multiplicative, the most cost-effective way to achieve adequate statistical power may be to conduct a study among never-smokers. Because the underlying joint effect is unknown, and because many studies have been carried out among mixed smoker and nonsmoker populations, it would be desirable to conduct some studies with adequate power among never-smokers only. 30 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  5. Relationship between indoor radon and lung cancer: a study of feasibility of an epidemiological study. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, S.; Neuberg, D.; DuMouchel, W.; Kleitman, D.; Chernoff, H.

    1981-01-01

    This report describes a study to assess the feasibility of an epidemiologic investigation of the relationship between residential radon exposure and lung cancer. Field measurements of residential radon levels in the State of Maine are described. Using these radon measurements and BEIR, 1980 risk assessments, it is estimated that at most 10% of lung cancers in Maine can be considered attributable to residential radon exposure. Calculations are made of sample sizes necessary for a case-control study of radon and lung cancer, for several levels of radon and smoking health effects. The effects of misclassification of exposure variables on the probability of detecting a radon health effect are discussed. A comparison is made of three different mathematical models which could be used for sample size estimation. Dollar cost estimates are given for conducting an epidemiologic case-control study of the relationship between residential radon exposure and lung cancer.

  6. Relationship between indoor radon and lung cancer: a study of feasibility of an epidemiological study. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmussen, S.; Neuberg, D.; DuMouchel, W.; Kleitman, D.; Chernoff, H.

    1981-01-01

    This report describes a study to assess the feasibility of an epidemiologic investigation of the relationship between residential radon exposure and lung cancer. Field measurements of residential radon levels in the State of Maine are described. Using these radon measurements and BEIR, 1980 risk assessments, it is estimated that at most 10% of lung cancers in Maine can be considered attributable to residential radon exposure. Calculations are made of sample sizes necessary for a case-control study of radon and lung cancer, for several levels of radon and smoking health effects. The effects of misclassification of exposure variables on the probability of detecting a radon health effect are discussed. A comparison is made of three different mathematical models which could be used for sample size estimation. Dollar cost estimates are given for conducting an epidemiologic case-control study of the relationship between residential radon exposure and lung cancer

  7. ERRICCA radon model intercomparison exercise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, C.E.; Albarracin, D.; Csige, I.; Graaf, E.R. van der; Jiranek, M.; Rehs, B.; Svoboda, Z.; Toro, L.

    1999-04-01

    Numerical models based on finite-difference or finite-element methods are used by various research groups in studies of radon-222 transport through soil and building materials. Applications range from design of radon remediation systems to more fundamental studies of radon transport. To ascertain that results obtained with these models are of good quality, it is necessary that such models are tested. This document reports on a benchmark test organized by the EU project ERRICCA: European Research into Radon in Construction Concerted Action. The test comprises the following cases: 1) Steady-state diffusive radon profiles in dry and wet soils, 2) steady-state entry of soil gas and radon into a house, 3) time-dependent radon exhalation from a building-material sample. These cases cover features such as: soil heterogeneity, anisotropy, 3D-effects, time dependency, combined advective and diffusive transport of radon, flux calculations, and partitioning of radon between air and water in soil pores. Seven groups participated in the intercomparison. All groups submitted results without knowing the results of others. For these results, relatively large group-to-group discrepancies were observed. Because of this, all groups scrutinized their computations (once more) and engaged in follow-up discussions with others. During this debugging process, problems were indeed identified (and eliminated). The accordingly revised results were in better agreement than those reported initially. Some discrepancies, however, still remain. All in all, it seems that the exercise has served its purpose and stimulated improvements relating to the quality of numerical modelling of radon transport. To maintain a high quality of modelling, it is recommended that additional exercises are carried out. (au)

  8. Study of probes for geophysical process analysis. Radon-emanometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tidjani, A.

    1984-09-01

    This study concerns mainly the measurement of radon-222 concentration in the ground, as an indicator of underground gas displacements. With nuclear track solid state detectors (SSNTD), it has been shown that the use of a radon source, buried at 180 cm depth, provides an increase of sensitivity. In order to automatize the in-field measurements, electronic detectors (scintillators, semi-conductors) have been developed. These detectors have been used for preliminary studies in the field for further applications to the prevision of earthquakes and volcanic eruption, and on a simulation set-up to analyse the possible influence of atmospheric parameters (pressure, temperature, ...) on underground gas displacement. Some tests have been done on the use of SSNTD for tracer analysis [fr

  9. Indoor radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-12-01

    The radon, a natural radioactive gas, is present almost everywhere on the earth's surface. It can be accumulated at high concentration in confined spaces (buildings, mines, etc). In the last decades many studies conducted in several countries showed that inhaling important amounts of radon rises the risk of lung cancer. Although, the radon is a naturally appearing radioactive source, it may be the subject of a human 'enhancement' of concentration. The increasing radon concentration in professional housing constitutes an example of enhanced natural radioactivity which can induce health risks on workers and public. Besides, the radon is present in the dwelling houses (the domestic radon). On 13 May 1996, the European Union Council issued the new EURATOM Instruction that establishes the basic standards of health protection of population and workers against the ionizing radiation hazards (Instruction 96/29/EURATOM, JOCE L-159 of 29 June 1996). This instruction does not apply to domestic radon but it is taken into consideration by another EURATOM document: the recommendation of the Commission 90/143/EURATOM of 21 February 1990 (JOCE L-80 of 27 March 1990). The present paper aims at establishing in accordance to European Union provisions the guidelines for radon risk management in working places, as well as in dwelling houses, where the implied risk is taken into account. This document does not deal with cases of high radon concentration on sites where fabrication, handling or storage of radium sources take place. These situations must be treated by special studies

  10. Mechanisms of radon injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cross, F.T.

    1988-01-01

    In this new project, they conduct molecular, cellular and whole-animal research relevant to understanding the inhalation toxicology of radon and radon-daughter exposures. The work specifically addresses the exposure-rate effect in radon-daughter carcinogenesis; the induction-promotion relationships associated with exposure to radon and cigarette-smoke mixtures; the role of oncogenes in radon-induced cancers; the effects of radon on DNA as well as on DNA repair processes; and the involvement of growth factors and their receptors in radon-induced carcinogenesis. Preliminary experiments showed that oncogenes are activated in radon-induced lung tumors. They have therefore begun further exposures pertinent to the oncogene and growth-factor studies. An in vitro radon cellular-exposure system was designed, and cell exposures were initiated. Initiation-promotion-initiation studies with radon and cigarette-smoke mixtures have also begun; and they are compiling a radon health-effects bibliography

  11. Study of radon 222 permeation through plastic membranes. Application to a measurement method of radon in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labed, V.; Rannou, A.; Robe, M.C.

    1990-01-01

    Gaseous permeation is a complex phenomenon of gas transfer through some polymers. Original in respect of conventional studies where permeation occurs between two gaseous phases, the present study concerns radon 222 transfer between water and air through a membrane. Polypropylene membranes are tested with an experimental device following time evolution of the phenomenon by measurement of volume activity in water and in air. An application of this study to a method for determination of radon concentration in water by measurement of concentration in air is discussed [fr

  12. Radon and radon progeny in 70 houses in the Tennessee Valley area: study design and measurement methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudney, C.S.; Hawthorne, A.R.; Monar, K.P.; Quillen, J.L.; Clark, C. Jr.; Doane, R.W.; Wallace, R.G.; Reed, R.P.

    1986-01-01

    Levels of radon and its short-lived airborne progeny are being measured in a year-long study of 70 houses in four states in the Tennessee Valley. Various methods were used to solicit volunteers with differing degrees of success. Criteria for selection of houses in the study included presence of a lower level with cement floor and one or more block walls in contact with the soil, absence of obvious indications of technologically enhanced sources of radium, and proximity to one of four cities, (Knoxville, Chattanooga, Birmingham, or Florence). By design, most houses in the study are in the same neighborhood as at least one other house in the study. Houses range in age from newly constructed to about 40 years old. Most of the houses have more than 2000 square feet of finished floor space. The lower level encompasses a garage in most cases. More complete information pertaining to house characteristics will be gathered in the course of the study. Measurements are being made to obtain information on both location- and season-dependent variation of radon and radon progeny. Simultaneous measurements are made quarterly on both upper and lower levels of each house. Grab samples of air are collected and analyzed for radon using a modified Lucas cell technique. Short-term (10-minute) samples of airborne particulate material are collected and analyzed for radon progeny. One-week integrated measurements of working levels are made once each quarter using modified thermoluminescent dosimeters. Both three- and twelve-month integrated measurements of radon using track-etch monitors are being made. 19 references, 1 figures

  13. Study of radon emanation from uranium mill tailings. Relations between radon emanating power and physicochemical properties of the material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellegrini, D.

    1999-01-01

    The uranium extraction from ores leads to large amounts of mill tailings still containing radionuclides, such as thorium-230 and radium-226, which generate radon-222. Without protective action, radon exposition may be high enough to cause concern for health of populations living in the vicinity of an uranium mill tailings disposal. This exposition pathway has therefore to be taken into account in the radiological impact studies. The emanating power, i.e. the part of radon atoms which escape from the solid particles, is directly involved in the radon source term evaluation. It may be determined for a given material by laboratory measurements. Emanating powers from 0.08 to 0.33 have been obtained for mill tailings from Jouac (Limousin, France), at various moisture contents. In order to reduce the relations of dependence between some of the emanation parameters, more simple phases, kaolinite and polymeric resins, have been studied. Those experiments have led us to the selection of the mechanisms and the parameters to consider for the development of an emanation modelling. The whole of the results obtained point out the radon sorption, in various proportions depending on the materials. The moisture content influence on the emanation from materials containing fine particles have been confirmed: the emanation increases with this parameter until a continuous water film surrounding the particles have been formed, and then become constant. This 'water effect' occurs in a moisture content range, which depends on the material porosity. Elsewhere, the presence of amorphous phases may led to a high radon emanation. (author)

  14. Radon as a natural geochemical tracer for study of groundwater discharge into lakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, Axel

    2008-01-01

    In the presented work the suitability of the naturally occurring radioactive noble gas isotope radon-222 for qualitative and quantitative description of groundwater discharge into lakes was studied. Basis of these investigations was the development of two innovative techniques for the on-site determination of radon in water. In the ex-situ radon measurement procedure, water from the source concerned is taken up in an exchange cell used for this purpose. Inside this cell, the radon dissolved in water is transferred via diffusion into a closed counter-flow of air and subsequently detected by a radon-in-air monitor. Where the in-situ radon determination is concerned, a module composed of a semipermeable membrane is introduced into a water column. Subsequently, the radon dissolved in the water body diffuses through the membrane into the corresponding air flow, by means of which it is transferred into a radon-in-air monitor and is detected. Combination of the developed mobile radon extraction techniques with a suitable and portable radon monitor allow the detection of radon-222 with sufficient accuracy (smaller 20 %) in groundwater as well as in surface waters, i.e., within a broad range of concentrations. Radon-222 was subsequently used to characterize groundwater discharge into a meromictic and a dimictic lake, i.e. two types of lake basically distinct from each other with respect to their water circulation properties were investigated. The use of the noble gas isotope radon-222 as a geochemical tracer makes the application of on-site detection techniques possible and that this in turn permits a rapid, reliable, and cost-effective assessment of groundwater discharge rates into lake water bodies

  15. Radon as a natural geochemical tracer for study of groundwater discharge into lakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Axel

    2008-06-27

    In the presented work the suitability of the naturally occurring radioactive noble gas isotope radon-222 for qualitative and quantitative description of groundwater discharge into lakes was studied. Basis of these investigations was the development of two innovative techniques for the on-site determination of radon in water. In the ex-situ radon measurement procedure, water from the source concerned is taken up in an exchange cell used for this purpose. Inside this cell, the radon dissolved in water is transferred via diffusion into a closed counter-flow of air and subsequently detected by a radon-in-air monitor. Where the in-situ radon determination is concerned, a module composed of a semipermeable membrane is introduced into a water column. Subsequently, the radon dissolved in the water body diffuses through the membrane into the corresponding air flow, by means of which it is transferred into a radon-in-air monitor and is detected. Combination of the developed mobile radon extraction techniques with a suitable and portable radon monitor allow the detection of radon-222 with sufficient accuracy (smaller 20 %) in groundwater as well as in surface waters, i.e., within a broad range of concentrations. Radon-222 was subsequently used to characterize groundwater discharge into a meromictic and a dimictic lake, i.e. two types of lake basically distinct from each other with respect to their water circulation properties were investigated. The use of the noble gas isotope radon-222 as a geochemical tracer makes the application of on-site detection techniques possible and that this in turn permits a rapid, reliable, and cost-effective assessment of groundwater discharge rates into lake water bodies.

  16. The radon anomaly of Porcheresse (Ardennes, Belgium). A case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charlet, J.M.; Zhu, H.C.; Poffijn, A.

    1999-01-01

    From a very high radon concentration in a dwelling of the village of Porcheresse (Belgium), the paper discusses on of the significance of the numerous radon indoor anomalies detected in the Southern part of Belgium

  17. A study of Radon-Concentration Distribution in Buildings in Gyeong-ju

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, C. H.; Jang, S. Y.; Jung, O. J.; Moon, J. H. [Dongguk University, Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    Radon({sup 222}Rn) gas is the natural radiation generated by radioactive decay of uranium({sup 238}U) nuclide. The radon which exists in ground flows into the inside by the atmospheric temperature, the differential-pressure or a gap of building underground and a ejection by a drywall with a phosphoric In Korea, Korean Institute of Nuclear Safety had been studied about the inside-radon radioactivity investigation over the nation. In the area around the nuclear power plant, it is possible to exist both of a radioactivity nuclide and a natural. Therefore it is necessary to investigate the radon radioactivity in surrounding area of nuclear power plants. In this study, it is purpose to develop the method of establishing the on-line monitoring system to minimize the radiological effect due to radon gas, based on the real state of radon exposure in Gyeong-ju surrounding Nuclear Power Plant

  18. Theoretical and experimental study of radon measurement with designing and calibration domestic canister with active charcoal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urosevic, V.; Nikezic, D.; Zekic, R.

    2005-01-01

    Radon concentration in air may change significantly large variation due to atmospheric variation. Measurement with active charcoal can be inaccurate because the variation in radon concentration. We made model to simulate radon measurements with active charcoal in order to optimize and improve integration characteristic. A numerical method and computer code based on the method of finite elements is developed for the case of variable radon concentration in air. This program simulates radon adsorption by the activated charcoal bed, enabling determination of sensitivity. The dependence of sensitivity on different parameters, such as temperature, thickness of the charcoal, etc. was studied using this program. Using results of theoretical investigation we designed and calibrated our canister with active charcoal for radon measurements. (author)

  19. Study on radon and thoron levels in different types of granitic work industries around Tumkur city

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagabhushan, S.R.; Ningappa, C.; Srilatha; Shekar, Usha; Sannappa, J.

    2011-01-01

    Radon is a naturally occurring radioactive noble gas generated by the decay of uranium and thorium bearing minerals in rocks, soils and building materials. Radon and decay products are the major contributors to human exposure from natural radiation sources. Epidemiological evidence indicates that indoor radon and thoron were responsible for a substantial number of lung cancer in publics. UNSCEAR reported recently indicates that there is a remarkable coherence between the risk estimates developed from epidemiological studies from miners and residential case-control radon studies. Hence to select the study area for the estimation of dose due to radon and thoron to the publics and workers, concentration of radon, thoron and their progeny were measured by using SSNTD. Since, activity concentration in granite more, higher concentrations of radon and thoron have been observed in the dwellings near to granite industry and lesser concentration of radon and thoron have been observed in the dwellings near brick industries of Tumkur city. From the study, the concentration of radon and thoron varied from 31 to 70.4 Bq.m 3 and 11.6 to 46.3 Bq.m 3 , respectively. Corresponding progeny level varied from 0.11 to 2.5 mWL and 1.1 to 3.4 mWL, respectively. (author)

  20. A charcoal canister survey of radon emanation at the rehabilitated uranium mine site at Nabarlek

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storm, J.R.; Patterson, J.R.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes a recent survey of radon emanation measurements from the rehabilitated Nabarlek mine site. It was mined out in 1979, decommissioned in 1995 and provided a good test bed for assessment of rehabilitation in terms of radon flux attenuation. Measurements have been made with charcoal canisters. Studies to measure the radon-220 flux by observing Tl-208 progeny of thoron the effectiveness of trial covers and meteorological considerations will be reported

  1. A charcoal canister survey of radon emanation at the rehabilitated uranium mine site at Nabarlek

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Storm, J R; Patterson, J R [University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA (Australia). Department of Physics and Mathematical Physics

    1999-07-01

    This paper describes a recent survey of radon emanation measurements from the rehabilitated Nabarlek mine site. It was mined out in 1979, decommissioned in 1995 and provided a good test bed for assessment of rehabilitation in terms of radon flux attenuation. Measurements have been made with charcoal canisters. Studies to measure the radon-220 flux by observing Tl-208 progeny of thoron the effectiveness of trial covers and meteorological considerations will be reported.

  2. A combined analysis of North American case-control studies of residential radon and lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krewski, Daniel; Lubin, Jay H; Zielinski, Jan M; Alavanja, Michael; Catalan, Vanessa S; Field, R William; Klotz, Judith B; Létourneau, Ernest G; Lynch, Charles F; Lyon, Joseph L; Sandler, Dale P; Schoenberg, Janet B; Steck, Daniel J; Stolwijk, Jan A; Weinberg, Clarice; Wilcox, Homer B

    2006-04-01

    Cohort studies have consistently shown underground miners exposed to high levels of radon to be at excess risk of lung cancer, and extrapolations based on those results indicate that residential radon may be responsible for nearly 10-15% of all lung cancer deaths per year in the United States. However, case-control studies of residential radon and lung cancer have provided ambiguous evidence of radon lung cancer risks. Regardless, alpha-particle emissions from the short-lived radioactive radon decay products can damage cellular DNA. The possibility that a demonstrated lung carcinogen may be present in large numbers of homes raises a serious public health concern. Thus, a systematic analysis of pooled data from all North American residential radon studies was undertaken to provide a more direct characterization of the public health risk posed by prolonged radon exposure. To evaluate the risk associated with prolonged residential radon exposure, a combined analysis of the primary data from seven large scale case-control studies of residential radon and lung cancer risk was conducted. The combined data set included a total of 4081 cases and 5281 controls, representing the largest aggregation of data on residential radon and lung cancer conducted to date. Residential radon concentrations were determined primarily by a-track detectors placed in the living areas of homes of the study subjects in order to obtain an integrated 1-yr average radon concentration in indoor air. Conditional likelihood regression was used to estimate the excess risk of lung cancer due to residential radon exposure, with adjustment for attained age, sex, study, smoking factors, residential mobility, and completeness of radon measurements. Although the main analyses were based on the combined data set as a whole, we also considered subsets of the data considered to have more accurate radon dosimetry. This included a subset of the data involving 3662 cases and 4966 controls with a-track radon

  3. Study of radon emanation variations in Morocco soil, correlations with seismic activities and atmospheric parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boukhal, H.; Cherkaoui, T.E.; Lferde, M.

    1994-01-01

    In order to verify the possibility of radon signal use in earthquake prediction, a study of radon emanation variation in soil was undertaken. Regular measurements have been carried out in five cities of Morocco ( Rabat, Tetouan, Ifrane, Khouribga, Berchid). The measuring method is based on the solid state nuclear track detectors technique. The good correlation between the different seismic activities and the variations of radon emanation rate in the five stations, have shown the interest of radon use in the earthquake prediction. 1 tab., 2 figs., 2 refs. (author)

  4. A 2-year study of seasonal indoor radon variations in northern Virginia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mose, D.G.; Mushrush, G.W.; Chrosniak, C.E.

    1991-01-01

    The concentrations of indoor radon in the basements of homes located in northern Virginia average about 1.4 times the first-floor radon concentrations. Basement indoor radon concentrations exhibit seasonal variations that can be related to home use patterns of the occupants. Little indoor radon difference was seen between homes that have concrete block basement walls and poured concrete basement walls, but homes that use oil or gas furnaces for heating have ∼ 25% lower indoor radon than homes that use electrical heating systems. Particular geological units seem to be associated with elevated indoor radon concentrations, and several units are associated with indoor radon concentrations that exceed 4 pCi/l (the U.S. Environmental Agency action level) at some time in more than 40% of the homes. Comparative studies between indoor radon and total gamma aeroradioactivity show that aeroradioactivity can be accurately used to estimate community radon hazards. When combined with information about the home heating system, geology and aeroradioactivity can be used to identify problem homes

  5. Mass spectrometric studies of the cluster formation of radon progeny

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong, S.L.

    1993-01-01

    A new experimental system is developed to study the cluster formation of radon progeny with neutral molecules in the environment, which includes a modified mass spectrometer and a surface barrier detector. With the system, the cluster research is carried out at molecular level at which the mass of individual cluster formed is measured. A theory is also proposed to treat the cluster formation as a discrete process based on the ion-dipole and dipole-dipole interactions. Comparison between the theory and experiment is given. (author). 16 refs., 6 figs

  6. Mass spectrometric studies of the cluster formation of radon progeny

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, S L [Toronto Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry

    1994-12-31

    A new experimental system is developed to study the cluster formation of radon progeny with neutral molecules in the environment, which includes a modified mass spectrometer and a surface barrier detector. With the system, the cluster research is carried out at molecular level at which the mass of individual cluster formed is measured. A theory is also proposed to treat the cluster formation as a discrete process based on the ion-dipole and dipole-dipole interactions. Comparison between the theory and experiment is given. (author). 16 refs., 6 figs.

  7. A study of some factors which are related to indoor radon concentrations in Greece

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louizi, A.; Nikolopoulos, D.; Lobotesi, E.; Mavroudaki, E.; Koukouliou, V.K.; Chanioti, M.; Papadimitriou, D.; Yiakoumakis, M.; Proukakis, C.

    1997-01-01

    The Medical Physics Department of the University of Athens is conducting radon-222 measurements in Greek dwellings. It is well known that the concentration of radon gas indoors, are related to various factors. A study of these factors has started and first results are reported. (authors)

  8. Planning meeting combined analysis, North America residential radon studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    This report describes the Third International Department of Energy/ Commission of European Communities Workshop on Residential Radon Epidemiology held in February 1995 in Baltimore, MD. This culminates a major effort begun 1988, co-sponsored by the DOE and the CEC Radiation Protection Programme to identify and bring together all those scientists worldwide performing epidemiological case control studies of residential radon and lung cancer. Two prior meetings were held in 1989 and 1991. The goal of this effort is to work with the investigators and to pool these studies to increase their limited statistical power and to maximize any information that could be gained from them. That goal has now been met. At this Workshop the task moved from planning and agreement to implementation, as many of the studies were finally being completed and published. This report provides a summary of the Workshop as well as that of the first implementation workgroup meeting hosted by Health Canada. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  9. Overview of current radon and radon daughter research at LBL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    This report provides a brief summary of radon and radon daughter research at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The radon and radon daughter research program has two broad goals: (1) the study of sources of radon and its subsequent transport into houses, and (2) research on the behavior of radon daughters in indoor environments. Additional research effort is directed to several auxiliary areas, including development of instrumentation and monitoring techniques, studies of indoor air movement, and measurement and control of indoor particulate concentrations

  10. Robustness study in SSNTD method validation: indoor radon quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, D.C.S.; Silva, N.C.; Bonifácio, R.L.

    2017-01-01

    Quality control practices are indispensable to organizations aiming to reach analytical excellence. Method validation is an essential component to quality systems in laboratories, serving as a powerful tool for standardization and reliability of outcomes. This paper presents a study of robustness conducted over a SSNTD technique validation process, with the goal of developing indoor radon measurements at the highest level of quality. This quality parameter indicates how well a technique is able to provide reliable results in face of unexpected variations along the measurement. In this robustness study, based on the Youden method, 7 analytical conditions pertaining to different phases of the SSNTD technique (with focus on detector etching) were selected. Based on the ideal values for each condition as reference, extreme levels regarded as high and low were prescribed to each condition. A partial factorial design of 8 unique etching procedures was defined, where each presented their own set of high and low condition values. The Youden test provided 8 indoor radon concentration results, which allowed percentage estimations that indicate the potential influence of each analytical condition on the SSNTD technique. As expected, detector etching factors such as etching solution concentration, temperature and immersion time were identified as the most critical parameters to the technique. Detector etching is a critical step in the SSNTD method – one that must be carefully designed during validation and meticulously controlled throughout the entire process. (author)

  11. Robustness study in SSNTD method validation: indoor radon quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias, D.C.S.; Silva, N.C.; Bonifácio, R.L., E-mail: danilacdias@gmail.com [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (LAPOC/CNEN), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil). Laboratorio de Pocos de Caldas

    2017-07-01

    Quality control practices are indispensable to organizations aiming to reach analytical excellence. Method validation is an essential component to quality systems in laboratories, serving as a powerful tool for standardization and reliability of outcomes. This paper presents a study of robustness conducted over a SSNTD technique validation process, with the goal of developing indoor radon measurements at the highest level of quality. This quality parameter indicates how well a technique is able to provide reliable results in face of unexpected variations along the measurement. In this robustness study, based on the Youden method, 7 analytical conditions pertaining to different phases of the SSNTD technique (with focus on detector etching) were selected. Based on the ideal values for each condition as reference, extreme levels regarded as high and low were prescribed to each condition. A partial factorial design of 8 unique etching procedures was defined, where each presented their own set of high and low condition values. The Youden test provided 8 indoor radon concentration results, which allowed percentage estimations that indicate the potential influence of each analytical condition on the SSNTD technique. As expected, detector etching factors such as etching solution concentration, temperature and immersion time were identified as the most critical parameters to the technique. Detector etching is a critical step in the SSNTD method – one that must be carefully designed during validation and meticulously controlled throughout the entire process. (author)

  12. Study of a Greek area with enhanced indoor radon concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louizi, A.; Nikolopoulos, D.; Koukouliou, V.; Kehagia, K.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper the focus is on Arnea Chalkidikis, an area in Greece with granitic geological background and indications of possible elevated radon concentration indoors. Data are reported of indoor radon measurements with etched track detectors and those used for dosimetric estimations. Moreover, data are reported on soil gas and soil radon concentrations in Arnea, as well as radon and uranium concentrations in water samples. From the measured radon concentrations in water samples the contribution to the overall dose has been calculated. For a period of 1 month, indoor radon and progeny activity has also been monitored in the dwelling that has the maximum indoor radon concentration in Greece. This dwelling is in Arnea and the dose delivered to the inhabitants has been calculated. Mean annual effective dose due to indoor radon was 4.5 mSv and about 11% of this was due to the use of water. Mean soil gas concentration and soil radon concentration were (90 ± 30) kBq m -3 (P -3 (P -1 (P<0.05). (author)

  13. Study of radon dispersion in typical dwelling using CFD modeling combined with passive-active measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabi, R.; Oufni, L.

    2017-10-01

    Inhalation of radon (222Rn) and its decay products are a major source of natural radiation exposure. It is known from recent surveys in many countries that radon and its progeny contribute significantly to total inhalation dose and it is fairly established that radon when inhaled in large quantity causes lung disorder. Indoor air conditions and ventilation systems strongly influence the indoor radon concentration. This study focuses on investigating both numerically and experimentally the influence of environmental conditions on the indoor radon concentration and spatial distribution. The numerical results showed that ventilation rate, temperature and humidity have significant impacts on both radon content and distribution. The variations of radon concentration with the ventilation, temperature and relative humidity are discussed. The measurement results show the diurnal variations of the indoor radon concentration are found to exhibit a positive correlation with relative humidity and negatively correlate with the air temperature. The analytic solution is used to validate the numeric results. The comparison amongst analytical, numerical and measurement results shows close agreement.

  14. Comparative study of short- and long-term indoor radon measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Jarallah, M.I. [Department of Physics, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)], E-mail: mibrahim@kfupm.edu.sa; Fazal-ur-Rehman,; Abdalla, Khalid [Department of Physics, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)

    2008-08-15

    Short-term indoor radon measurements are used widely. Therefore, it is interesting to find out a correlation between these measurements and long-term measurements which reflect a better average radon concentration of individual measurement. To find the correlation between the two measurements of indoor radon concentrations at low radon levels, a study was carried out at 34 locations of King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals (KFUPM), Dhahran, Saudi Arabia using active and passive methods. In the short-term active method, a radon gas analyzer (AlphaGUARD) was used for a duration of 24 h in each measurement. In the long-term passive method, CR-39 based radon dosimeters were utilized for a period of 6 months, from January 2006 to June 2006. The short-term active measurements showed that the average, minimum and maximum radon concentrations were 19, 8 and 58Bqm{sup -3}, respectively, with a standard deviation of 8.6Bqm{sup -3}. The long-term passive measurements showed that the average, minimum and maximum radon concentrations were 25, 10 and 67Bqm{sup -3}, respectively, with a standard deviation of 12Bqm{sup -3}. The two measurements showed a poor correlation (R{sup 2}=0.38). The long-term measurements showed on the average higher concentrations by a factor of 1.3.

  15. Study of Behavior and detection of radon in environmental samples by scintillation method. Application for radium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ZAFIMANJATO, J.L.R.

    2007-01-01

    Radon is considered as the major source of radiological exposure of natural radiations to the population. On an international scale, it represents about the half of exposures of natural radiation sources (UNSCEAR, 1993) Radon gets into human body with inhaled air and sometimes with drinking water. Then, the objective of this work is to know the radon concentrations in water and in indoor atmosphere, and the risk in order to set up a method of monitoring and to identify high radon level areas. A specific method of detection using liquid scintillation with special emphasis on α/β discrimination, the use of solvent extractive and enrichment of radionuclides have been developed for the determination of both 222 Rn and 226 Ra in water. The method is simple, rapid and sensitive. In a pilot project for a monitoring of drinking water in Madagascar, it was shown that the proposed method was suitable for a large scale monitoring and routine analysis. Considerable concentrations of radon were found in water and air samples from Vinaninkarena. Radon concentrations obtained by in situ and in laboratory measurements have been compared to the results of an international intercomparison campaigns organised by the German Society for Liquid Scintillation Spectrometry in 2011. A theoretical study of the behavior of radon is porous material containing radium is detailed in order to describe its exhalation phenomena. An assessment model of the dose due to ingestion and liberation of radon from water is presented and compared with other models especially to the Crawford Brown's model. [fr

  16. Study on radon and thoron progeny levels in Gudalore in South India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selvasekarapandian, S.; Sivakumar, R.; Mugunthamanikandan, N.; Meenakshisundaram, V.; Santhanam, R.

    2000-01-01

    One of the important route of radiation exposure to man is through inhalation of air containing radioisotopes. A major contribution to inhalation dose comes from radon, thoron and its progenies. The indoor radon and thoron progeny levels are determined by two count method. In this method the radon and thoron progenies are collected on a glass fiber filter paper using volume air sampler (Staplex) and counted for alpha activity in ZnS (Ag) alpha counting system. It is observed that thoron working level is higher than the radon working level in all houses except few houses with stone walls and mosaic floor. Behavior of indoor radon and thoron working levels for different seasons at different houses are determined and discussed in detail. Radon and thoron working levels are measured high in winter, autumn, and low in summer and rainy seasons. Among all seasons highest value is measured in winter and low in summer and rainy seasons. Radon progeny working level varies from 1.659 to 6.675 mWL, whereas thoron progeny working level varies from 1.670 to 12.671 mWL. The geometric mean values of radon and thoron progeny concentration in the present study are 2.836 and 4.133 mWL. The high thoron progeny level observed in this is attributed to the high thorium content observed in soils of this area. (author)

  17. Application of studies of miners to radon problem in homes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radford, E.P.; Clair Renard, K.G.S.

    1984-01-01

    The lung cancer risk from exposure in homes to short-lived daughters of radon-222 can be estimated from results for underground miners, if differences in epidemiologic and exposure variables between mining populations and the general public can be assessed. Our study of Swedish iron miners exposed at low dose rates and with long follow-up time has enabled us to determine smoking-specific risk coefficients, and to rule out other factors in the mine atmosphere as contributing to lung cancer risk. Miners differ from the population at large in the following characteristics: sex, age at exposure, dose rate, dust conditions in mines and homes, smoking, volume breathed per unit time and proportion of the year exposed. The last two factors affect the conversion of air concentrations to cumulative yearly doses, and from present evidence dose rate, sex and age should not alter risk factors to a great extent. For persons aged 60 about 30% of lung cancers in non-smokers may be attributed to radon daughters, and about 6% in smokers. The percentage may be higher at older ages if the relative risk is found to be constant at these ages. (Author)

  18. Uranium City radiation reduction program: further studies on remedial measures and radon infiltration routes for houses with block walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leung, M.K.

    1980-01-01

    This report describes the results of tests of partial sealing of concrete block walls to prevent radon infiltration into houses in Uranium City, and gives the results of studies of radon migration through concrete block walls. Results of some laboratory tests on the effectiveness of concrete blocks as a radon barrier are included

  19. Contribution to the study of radon risk assessment - Use of Solid State Nuclear Tracks Detectors (SSNTD) for the measurement of radon in buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RALAIARISOA, H.L

    2004-01-01

    222 Rn is a natural radioactive gas, originating from the decay of 226 Ra. Both of these radionuclides are elements of 238 U series. Uranium is naturally present in the rocks and soils, therefore radon is always present too because it is a soil gas. Radon takes the most important part in man exposure to natural sources of ionizing radiations. Moreover, it causes lung cancer. It can accumulate in confined environments such as buildings, so that its inhalation is a potential risk for human health. Thus radon measurement is necessary for radiation protection. Integrated measurement using Solid State Nuclear Tracks Detector (SSNTD) is a very common method for radon measurement in buildings because of the low cost of the detectors and their easy application. The measurement technics are based on the interaction of alpha particles emitted by radon with a polymer. Alpha particles produce in the polymer latent tracks, which need chemical revelation to be observable with optical microscopy. The number of revealed tracks is proportionnal to the average volumic activity of 222 Rn corresponding to the time exposure of the detectors.The aim of this thesis work is the continuation of previous study on the preliminary investigations of radon levels in the city of Antananarivo, and to extend this study in Antsirabe, which has been shown as a region of interest. The levels of radon measured in buildings in Antananarivo and Antsirabe are typical values of indoor radon concentration. The average values of concentrations are inferior to 60 Bq.m - 3. The health risk is negligible but not nul. A typical protocol of radon level measurement in Malagasy buildings is suggested to allow the implementation of a risk management policy related to radon within the Malagasy context. [fr

  20. A study of the physico-chemical characteristics of a solid radon 222 source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chuiton, G.

    1990-01-01

    A solid radon 222 source is described; it is made of a manganese oxide impregnated acrylic felt disc on which radium 226 is fixed. The disc is incorporated into a scanning device allowing the passage through the felt of a radon 222 free gas (air or nitrogen) previously led to a relative humidity of air near to saturation. At the device outlet, a stable activity of radon 222 is obtained. The preparation, characteristics and radiochemical stability conditions of the 226 radium source are presented. Following a description of the scanning device, the radon 222 emanation coefficient is studied as a function of the relative humidity of air. The reliability of the device is assessed by an uncertainty calculation for the utilisation conditions recommended. Finally, an approach to the physico-chemical processes governing radon 222 emanation rate in the device is set forth [fr

  1. Microclimatic effects on outdoor radon and its progeny in a long-term study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuetz, M.; Keller, G.; Kappel, R.J.A.

    1994-01-01

    The dose due to the long term radon exposure is estimated from the radon concentration and from an equilibrium factor that in the literature is reported with a wide uncertainty. Therefore the radon equilibrium factor outdoors and its dependence on climatic effects should be investigated in a long-term study. Both the outdoor concentrations of radon and of its progeny near Ellweiler/Hunsrueck were measured continuously during 12 months and the resulting equilibrium factors were determined. Simultaneously to the every 2 hour's radon data many meterological parameters as temperature and relative to humidity of the air, barometric pressure and duration and amount of rainfall were recorded. At a height of 6 meters above ground and in 10 minute intervals the local wind direction and velocity were registered. By that a set of more than 3000 single measurements of the equilibrium factor and of the corresponding weather conditions was collected

  2. Studies on the migration rule and mechanism of radon and its daughters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Wenyi; Fang Fang; Zhou Rongsheng; Ma Yingjie; Qiu Yuande; Hou Xinsheng; Wu Yunping; Zu Xiulan; Wang Xiaoqin

    2000-01-01

    By using very precise, highly sensitive, static accumulated, easily repeated CD-1 α-cup, the migration rule and mechanism of radon and its daughters was studied. Significant results were obtained: (1) Under laboratory conditions, the vertical component of migration of radon and its daughters was much greater than the horizontal component, the former was over 90% and the latter was less than 10%. (2) Despite the very big specific gravity of radon and its daughters, the descending component of migration was less than 45%, while the ascending component was more than 45%. (3) After α-particles (emitted from radon and its daughters) being slowed down. 4 He combined with the radon and its daughters to form clusters. When the density of the cluster was less than that of the air, the self-ascending would occur

  3. Czech miner studies of lung cancer risk from radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomasek, L.

    2002-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence of lung cancer risk from radon is based mainly on studies of miners. Two such studies among Czech uranium miners were established in 1970 and 1980. A subcohort of 5002 miners and a nested-in case-control study contribute to a joint European project. In this paper, the subcohort of miners with 495 lung cancers is described. The excess relative risk depends linearly on cumulative exposure incurred more than 5 years before. The relative effect from exposures in the distant past decreases by 62% per decade. Simultaneously, the excess relative risk is lower by 43% per decade in dependence on age at exposure. The effect of smoking, partly analysed in the study, suggests a twofold elevation in the relative risk coefficient among non-smokers, but this difference is not significant. (author)

  4. Environmental radon studies using solid state nuclear track detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Surinder; Sharma, Dinesh Kumar; Kumar, Ajay

    2004-01-01

    The results of radon activity recorded in 70 dwellings of Nurpur area, Kangra district, Himachal Pradesh, India are reported. LR-115 Type 2 films in the bare mode were exposed for four seasons of three months each covering a period of one year for the measurement of indoor radon levels. The calibration constant of 0.020 tracks cm -2 d -1 per Bq m -3 has been used to express radon activity in Bq m -3 . The annual average indoor radon concentrations in 17 different villages of the area are found to vary from 168±46 to 429±71 Bq m -3 . Most of the indoor radon values lie in the range of action levels (200-600 Bq m -3 ) recommended by International Commission on Radiological Protection

  5. Radon study in underground buildings in Chongqing, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Wen; Jiang Rende; Liu Yigang

    1993-01-01

    Radon concentration measurements using a scintillation detector were conducted in 51 large underground buildings, which have been used as hotels, entertainment halls, restaurants, shops and factories, etc, in Chongqing, China. The results showed that the radon concentrations in these underground buildings ranged from 3.2 to 616.2 Bqm -3 . The arithmetic mean was 57.6 Bqm -3 , which was about 4 times as much as the mean radon concentration in ground buildings in Chongqing. The underground buildings with the highest radon concentrations were correlated with the high content of radium-226 in building materials, mechanical ventilation through interior circulatory ducts, underground depth of the building, and particularly, fissures in the walls. Measures of radon mitigation in underground buildings were recommended. (orig.). (3 refs., 5 tabs.)

  6. A naturally ventilated accumulator for integrating measurements of radon flux from soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuo Weihai; Furukawa, Masahide; Tokonami, Shinji

    2007-01-01

    For long-term and large-scale measurements of the averaged 222 Rn fluxes from soils in the general environmental conditions, a simple measuring method was developed. 222 Rn exhaling from soils is accumulated by a naturally ventilated accumulator (NVA) and its concentration is measured with passive 222 Rn monitors set inside the NVA. The ventilation rate of the NVA is about 0.26 h -1 and it is hardly affected by the changes of meteorological conditions during field measurements. The air and soil conditions inside and outside of the NVA are nearly the same throughout the measurements. It indicates that the natural conditions of soils will not be significantly disturbed by the NVA. Field measurements confirmed that soil 222 Rn fluxes measured by the new method were in general agreement with the results measured by another commonly used method and theoretical estimations. As no electric power is needed as well as the operation and maintenance are easy, the low-cost system offers a promise as an improved technique for long-term measurements of soil 222 Rn fluxes in the general environmental conditions. (author)

  7. Groundwater fluxes into a submerged sinkhole area, Central Italy, using radon and water chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuccimei, P. [Dipartimento di Scienze Geologiche, Universita ' Roma Tre' , Largo San Leonardo Murialdo 1, 00146 Rome (Italy)]. E-mail: tuccimei@uniroma3.it; Salvati, R. [Dipartimento di Scienze Geologiche, Universita ' Roma Tre' , Largo San Leonardo Murialdo 1, 00146 Rome (Italy); Capelli, G. [Dipartimento di Scienze Geologiche, Universita ' Roma Tre' , Largo San Leonardo Murialdo 1, 00146 Rome (Italy); Delitala, M.C. [Dipartimento di Scienze Geologiche, Universita ' Roma Tre' , Largo San Leonardo Murialdo 1, 00146 Rome (Italy); Primavera, P. [Dipartimento di Scienze Geologiche, Universita ' Roma Tre' , Largo San Leonardo Murialdo 1, 00146 Rome (Italy)

    2005-10-15

    The groundwater contribution into Green Lake and Black Lake (Vescovo Lakes Group), two cover collapse sinkholes in Pontina Plain (Central Italy), was estimated using water chemistry and a {sup 222}Rn budget. These data can constrain the interactions between sinkholes and deep seated fluid circulation, with a special focus on the possibility of the bedrock karst aquifer feeding the lake. The Rn budget accounted for all quantifiable surface and subsurface input and output fluxes including the flux across the sediment-water interface. The total value of groundwater discharge into Green Lake and Black Lake ({approx}540 {+-} 160 L s{sup -1}) obtained from the Rn budget is lower than, but comparable with historical data on the springs group discharge estimated in the same period of the year (800 {+-} 90 L s{sup -1}). Besides being an indirect test for the reliability of the Rn-budget 'tool', it confirms that both Green and Black Lake are effectively springs and not simply 'water filled' sinkholes. New data on the water chemistry and the groundwater fluxes into the sinkhole area of Vescovo Lakes allows the assessment of the mechanism responsible for sinkhole formation in Pontina Plain and suggests the necessity of monitoring the changes of physical and chemical parameters of groundwater below the plain in order to mitigate the associated risk.

  8. Groundwater fluxes into a submerged sinkhole area, Central Italy, using radon and water chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuccimei, P.; Salvati, R.; Capelli, G.; Delitala, M.C.; Primavera, P.

    2005-01-01

    The groundwater contribution into Green Lake and Black Lake (Vescovo Lakes Group), two cover collapse sinkholes in Pontina Plain (Central Italy), was estimated using water chemistry and a 222 Rn budget. These data can constrain the interactions between sinkholes and deep seated fluid circulation, with a special focus on the possibility of the bedrock karst aquifer feeding the lake. The Rn budget accounted for all quantifiable surface and subsurface input and output fluxes including the flux across the sediment-water interface. The total value of groundwater discharge into Green Lake and Black Lake (∼540 ± 160 L s -1 ) obtained from the Rn budget is lower than, but comparable with historical data on the springs group discharge estimated in the same period of the year (800 ± 90 L s -1 ). Besides being an indirect test for the reliability of the Rn-budget 'tool', it confirms that both Green and Black Lake are effectively springs and not simply 'water filled' sinkholes. New data on the water chemistry and the groundwater fluxes into the sinkhole area of Vescovo Lakes allows the assessment of the mechanism responsible for sinkhole formation in Pontina Plain and suggests the necessity of monitoring the changes of physical and chemical parameters of groundwater below the plain in order to mitigate the associated risk

  9. Study of the subterranean estuary of Venice lagoon using radium and radon isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gattacceca, J.

    2009-02-01

    This study focuses on hydrological processes in the southern part of Venice lagoon (Italy), and more specifically on the interactions between surface waters and groundwater of superficial coastal aquifers. These aquifers present a hydraulic head and a ground level below sea level. Major elements and stable isotopes were used to characterize mixing processes into the superficial aquifer. Our results, in agreement with hydrodynamic modelling, evidenced the restriction of saline intrusion to a narrow coastal fringe (≤ 1 km). Submarine groundwater discharge fluxes into the lagoon were quantified using radium and radon natural isotopes. Their activities in the lagoon are in excess compared to the sea. Our results and preliminary modelling work evidence that the system requires an input from groundwater enriched in these isotopes to explain measured activities. A mass balance at steady state is used to quantify the flux. Results vary between 8.1*10 5 and 1.5*10 7 m 3 .d -1 . This flux is mainly due to recirculation of lagoon water into the sediments, and is 2 to 10 times higher than surface runoff, and may have significant environmental consequences by releasing contaminants. (author)

  10. Case-control study of radon and lung cancer in New Jersey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilcox, H. B.; Al-Zoughool, M.; Garner, M. J.; Jiang, H.; Klotz, J. B.; Krewski, D.; Nicholson, W. J.; Schoenberg, J. B.; Villeneuve, P. J.; Zielinski, J. M.

    2008-01-01

    Radon is known to cause lung cancer in humans; however, there remain uncertainties about the effects associated with residential exposures. This case-control study of residential radon and lung cancer was conducted in five counties in New Jersey and involved 561 cases and 740 controls. A yearlong α-track detector measurement of radon was completed for ∼93% of all residences lived in at the time of interview (a total of 2063). While the odds ratios (ORs) for whole data were suggestive of an increased risk for exposures >75 Bq m -3 , these associations were not statistically significant. The adjusted excess OR (EOR) per 100 Bq m -3 was -0.13 (95% CI: -0.30 to 0.44) for males, 0.29 (95% CI: -0.12 to 1.70) for females and 0.05 (95% CI: -0.14 to 0.56) for all subjects combined. An analysis of radon effects by histological type of lung cancer showed that the OR was strongest for small/oat cell carcinomas in both males and females. There was no statistical heterogeneity of radon effects by demographic factors (age at disease occurrence, education level and type of respondent). Analysis by categories of smoking status, frequency or duration did not modify the risk estimates of radon on lung cancer. The findings of this study are consistent with an earlier population-based study of radon and lung cancer among New Jersey women, and with the North American pooling of case control radon seven studies, including the previous New Jersey study. Several uncertainties regarding radon measurements and assumptions of exposure history may have resulted in underestimation of a true exposure-response relationship. (authors)

  11. Outlines of a study of some indicators of exposure of underground workers to radon in Slovakia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beno, M; Nikodemova, D; Vladar, M; Fueloep, M; Vicanova, M [Inst. of Preventive and Clinical Medicine, Bratislava (Slovakia)

    1996-12-31

    In this paper some indicators of exposure of underground workers to radon in Slovakia which will be used for determination of miners radiation burden and for the radon dose estimate was explained. The projected study has a dose-effect scaffold and its projected goals are on the side of dose assessment: 1) to determine the professional exposure of underground workers to radon by personal dosimetry and to establish a database of integrated personal doses for future epidemiological studies; 2) to introduce the method of counting the radionuclide {sup 210}Pb in the bones and skulls of underground workers. On the side of effect assessment the goals are: 1) to find out if a dependence of the number of chromosomal aberrations (CA) and micronuclei in the lymphocytes from radon dose exists. The measurements of radon in mines, preferentially those by personal dosimeters as well as an existing database of radon concentration measurements in dwellings and caves will serve for the radon dose estimate; 2) to compare the DNA-repair rate in the lymphocytes of people professionally exposed to radon in Slovak caves with the same rate as assessed in unexposed people; 3) to find out the proportional role of confounding factors such as smoking, alcohol abuse, exposure to dust etc., which might influence upon the interpretation of the dose from radon to health response relationship; 4) to establish a central database of lung cancer cases in professionally exposed underground workers for future epidemiological studies. The direct method will rely upon determination of miners radiation burden based on the {sup 210}Pb activity deposited in skeleton. The experimental design to assess the effects will have three main methodological parts: 1) determination of the count of chromosomal aberrations and micronuclei using classical methods; 2) determination of the chromosomal changes using the fluorescent in situ hybridization method; 3) determination of the DNA-repair rate. (J.K.) 8 refs.

  12. Earthquake precursory studies in Kangra valley of North West Himalayas, India, with special emphasis on radon emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Arvind; Singh, Surinder; Mahajan, Sandeep; Bajwa, Bikramjit Singh; Kalia, Rajeev; Dhar, Sunil

    2009-01-01

    The continuous soil gas radon monitoring is carried out at Palampur and the daily monitoring of radon concentration in water is carried out at Dharamshala region of Kangra valley of North West Himalayas, India, a seismic zone V, to study the correlation of radon anomalies in relation to seismic activities. In this study, radon monitoring in soil was carried out by using barasol probe manufactured by Algade France, whereas the radon content in water was recorded using RAD 7 radon monitoring system of Durridge Company USA. The effect of meteorological parameters viz. temperature, pressure, wind velocity, rainfall, and humidity on radon emission has been studied. The seasonal average value and standard deviation of radon in soil and water is calculated to find the radon anomaly to minimize the effect of meteorological parameters on radon emission. The radon anomalies observed in the region have been correlated with the seismic events of M≥2 reported by Wadia Institute of Himalayas Geology Dehradoon and Indian Meteorological Department, New Delhi in NW Himalayas within 250 km distance from the monitoring stations.

  13. RADON MITIGATION IN SCHOOLS: CASE STUDIES OF RADON MITIGATION SYSTEMS INSTALLED BY EPA IN FOUR MARYLAND SCHOOLS ARE PRESENTED

    Science.gov (United States)

    The first part of this two-part paper discusses radon entry into schools, radon mitigation approaches for schools, and school characteristics (e.g., heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning -- HVAC-- system design and operation) that influence radon entry and mitigation system ...

  14. Study of radon diffusion from RHA-modified ordinary Portland cement using SSNTD technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narula, A.K.; Goyal, S.K.; Chauhan, R.P.; Chakarvarti, S.K.

    2013-01-01

    The diffusion coefficient of radon is a very important factor in estimating the rate of indoor radon inflow. The aim of this work is to develop and assess the potential of radon resistant construction materials in residential buildings. Of late, rice husk ash (RHA) has been used as a component in cement. The X-ray diffraction of RHA indicates that the RHA contains mainly amorphous materials while the X-ray fluorescence analysis shows that the major percentage of it is composed of silica. The amorphous silica present in the RHA is responsible for the pozzolonic activity of the ash. The results of the present study indicate that the RHA when mixed with cement initially reduces radon diffusion coefficient, followed by enhancement when the percentage of RHA is increased above 30% by weight. - Highlights: ► Radon diffusion coefficient has been measured in Portland cement with different percentage of rice husk ash (RHA). ► The mixing of RHA to cement changes the radon diffusion coefficient. ► The mixture of cement and RHA can be used to make building materials more resistant to radon entry through diffusion

  15. A study on surveillance of environmental factors affecting the variation of indoor radon concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Shin Ae; Kim, Ok Ja; Lee, Mi Kyeong; Cho, Eun Ok; Choi, Yun Sun; Choi, Jin Kyeong; Park, Seon Hye; Han, Hyeon Sun [Hankook Research, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-03-15

    Before the main survey, a preliminary survey was carried out to decide the most suitable type of a radon detector the most appropriate places to install such a radon detector. To this end, three types of detectors were set up in 108 locations, approximately 3% of 3,000 to measure the radon levels, and 102 detectors(94%) were collected. As a result of the preliminary survey, Radtrack was chosen as a radon detector for the main survey, and bedrooms on the first floor of houses and the first floor of public buildings were decided to be the places for the first installment of detectors. It is most desirable to survey the radon concentrations in all houses nationwide. Considering the survey period and budgets, however, 3,000 spots were targeted for the main survey at the recommendation of the Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety in charge of this study. As it is important to maintain the same panels for a year to measure the radon concentrations at 3,000 locations, a total of 3,237 panels, 10% more than the target sample number, were surveyed considering the possible loss of panels during the survey period. The first radon detector was installed in each of 3,237 spots in December 1999, and collected three months later in March 2000, followed by the installment of the second detector.

  16. Is environmental radon gas associated with the incidence of neurodegenerative conditions? A retrospective study of multiple sclerosis in radon affected areas in England and Wales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groves-Kirkby, Christopher J.; Denman, Antony R.; Campbell, Jackie; Crockett, Robin G.M.; Phillips, Paul S.; Rogers, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    To test whether an association exists between radon gas concentration in the home and increased multiple sclerosis (MS) incidence, a retrospective study was undertaken of MS incidence in known areas of raised domestic radon concentration in England and Wales, using The Health Improvement Network (THIN) clinical research database. The study population comprised 20,140,498 person-years of clinical monitoring (males: 10,056,628: 49.93%; females: 10,083,870: 50.07%), representing a mean annual population of 2.5 million individuals. To allow for the possible latency of MS initiation following exposure, data extraction was limited to patients with at least five years registration history with the same GP practice before first diagnosis. Patient records were allocated to one of nine radon concentration bands depending on the average radon level in their postcode sector. MS incidence was analysed by searching for patients with first MS diagnosis over the eight calendar years 2005–2012 inclusive. 1512 new MS cases were diagnosed, 1070 females, 442 males, equivalent to raw incidence rates of 7.51, 10.61 and 4.40 per 10 5 person-years respectively, comparable to previously reported results. Of these new cases, 115 could be allocated to one of the radon bands representing high radon areas. Standardising to the UK 2010 population, excess relative risk (ERR) figures for MS were calculated for each radon band. Linear regression of ERR against mean band radon concentration shows a positive gradient of 0.22 per 100 Bq·m −3 (R 2  = 0.25, p = 0.0961) when forced through the origin to represent a linear-no-threshold response. The null hypothesis falls inside the 95% confidence interval for the linear fit and therefore this fit is not statistically significant. We conclude that, despite THIN sampling around 5% of the population, insufficient data was available to confirm or refute the hypothesised association between MS incidence and radon concentration. - Highlights:

  17. Models for retrospective quantification of indoor radon exposure in case-control studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerken, M.; Kreienbrock, L.; Wellmann, J.; Kreuzer, M.; Wichmann, H.E.

    2000-01-01

    In epidemiologic studies on lung cancer risk due to indoor radon the quantification of individual radon exposure over a long time period is one of the main issues. Therefore, radon measurements in one or more dwellings, which in total have been inhabited by the participants for a sufficient time-period, are necessary as well as consideration of changes of building characteristics and ventilation habits, which influence radon concentration. Given data on 1-y alpha-track measurements and personal information from 6,000 participants of case-control studies in West and East Germany, and improved method is developed to assess individual radon exposure histories. Times spent in different rooms of the dwelling, which are known from a personal questionnaire, are taken into account. The time spent outside the house varies substantially among the participants. Therefore, assuming a substantially lower radon exposure outside the dwelling, the residence time constitutes an important aspect of total radon exposure. By means of an analysis of variance, important determinants of indoor radon are identified, namely constant conditions such as type of house, type of construction, year of construction, floor and type of basement, and changeable conditions such as heating system, window insulation, and airing habits. A correction of measurements in former dwellings by factors derived from the analysis is applied if current living conditions differ from those of the participants at the time when they were living in the particular dwellings. In rare cases the adjustment for changes leads to a correction of the measurements with a factor of about 1.4, but a reduction of 5% on average only. Exposure assessment can be improved by considering time at home and changes of building and ventilation conditions that affect radon concentration. The major concern that changes in ventilation habits and building conditions lead to substantial errors in exposure assessment cannot be confirmed in the

  18. A study on the environmental behavior of global air pollutants based on the continuous measurements of atmospheric radon concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iida, Takao; Yamazawa, Hiromi

    2003-01-01

    Radon is a useful natural radioactive tracer of air transportation of atmospheric pollution, since radon is a noble gas and chemically inert. The atmospheric radon concentration is usually measured by a high-sensitivity electrostatic collection method or a two-filter method. The variations of radon concentrations observed over a solitary island and in the upper atmosphere are suitable for comparing with those of air pollutants. Some numerical simulation models were used to study the radon global transport in the atmosphere. In East Asia, atmospheric radon and air pollutants are transported with the air stream from the continent of China to the Northwestern Pacific Ocean. It is necessary to clarify the transport mechanism from both radon observations at various locations and numerical simulation. (author)

  19. Public perceptions of radon risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mainous, A.G. III; Hagen, M.D.

    1993-01-01

    Since 1984, a significant amount of media attention has focused on health threats from radon gas exposure. Using a probability telephone survey of adults (n = 685), we studied public perceptions of risk from radon exposure versus other environmental health risks. The results indicated that 92% of those individuals who had heard of radon believe radon to be a health risk, although only 4% believe they are currently exposed to high levels of radon gas. Perception of risk from radon was positively related to other perceptions of environmental risks. Younger and less educated individuals were more likely to perceive radon as a health risk. Women were three-and-one-half times as likely as men to perceive risk from radon. However, there was no significant relationship between perceived risk from radon and cigarette smoking. Media attention has apparently led to public awareness of radon hazards, but further attention is needed to improve smokers' awareness of their special risks from radon

  20. Studying the possibility of recharging E-Perm for radon measurement in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shweikani, R.; Bardan, R.

    2011-03-01

    In this work recharging electret detectors and studying their responding for radioactive gases (radon gas) was studied and the results were compared with solid state nuclear detectors (CR-39). After several experiments we found that using a metal nozzle which is connected to a high voltage supply (poling method) was useful to polarize the electret material and get a stable electrostatic charge. The stability of electret was studied after each experiment ,the results showed that the best charging parameters were: (7 mm as a nozzle height.- 15 sec as a charging time.- 5 kV as a charging voltage). Depending on the charging and stability studying results the electrets were calibrated in radon calibration cell and the calibration factors were defined The charged electrets were examined to measure radon concentration in the open environmental and were compared with CR-39 detectors; the charged electrets appeared a liner response for radon gas as CR-39 detectors.(author)

  1. Radon diffusion studies in some building materials using solid state nuclear track detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, S; Singh, B; Singh, J

    1999-01-01

    LR-115 plastic track detector has been used to study radon diffusion through some building materials, viz. cement, soil, marble chips, sand and lime as well as air. Diffusion constant and diffusion length is calculated for all these materials.

  2. Geochemical studies of potential source minerals of radon: case studies in Hungary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajnai, G.; Nagy-Balogh, J.; Gal-Solymos, K.; Konc, Z.; Breitner, D.; Barabas, A.; Szabo, C. [Eotvos Univ., Lithosphere Fluid Research Lab, Dept. of Petrology and Geochemistry, Budapest (Hungary); Barabas, A. [Eotvos Univ., Dept. of Geophysics, Budapest (Hungary)

    2006-07-01

    In Hungary, during the past decade five distinct regions have been chosen to find possible explanations of the uncommonly high radon background radiation values. The main aim of the research is to study U- and Th-bearing minerals in petrographic and geochemical characters. Besides the microscopic techniques, whole rock and in situ geochemical analytical methods were applied to determine the bulk U and Th content of the studied geological samples. We assume that some of the radon measured is related to the U and Th contents of the samples. (authors)

  3. A study of radon 222 permeation through plastic membranes. Application to a method of radon measurement in water and saturated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labed, V.

    1991-04-01

    In order to improve the BARASOL R device and to use it in water-saturated soils and in pressure constraint conditions, we have studied radon 222 permeation through plastic membranes. While the permeation process usually takes place between two media being in the same state, most often gaseous, the present study describes the transfer of radon 222 from the water to the air via a membrane. Polypropylene membranes have been tested with an experimental set-up by monitoring the evolution of radon concentrations in water and in air. The permeation coefficient and the activation energy were calculated in various conditions. With a second experimental set-up, we have tested the polyethylene membrane which has been adapted on the BARASOL. In these conditions, we have shown that it is possible to measure radon in water at concentrations around 10 3 Bq.m -3 [fr

  4. A study of radon activity inside some houses in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Islam, G.S.; Islam, M.A.; Farid, S.M.; Rahman, A.

    1988-01-01

    The solid state nuclear track detector CR-39 has been used for long term measurements of the radon-222 emanation from building materials and the resultant activity inside houses in Bangladesh. Particular attention is paid to a special type of house with thick walls made entirely of mud. The radon-exhalation rate of the walls of these mud-built houses is found to be consistently higher than that of brick-built houses. (author)

  5. Studies on indoor radon concentrations in Karimanagar district of Telangana State, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivas Reddy, G.; Vinay Kumar Reddy, K.; Sreenivasa Reddy, B.; Ch Gopal Reddy, P.; Yadagiri Reddy, P.; Rama Reddy, K.

    2015-01-01

    Karimnagar district of Telangana state in India falls geologically under the Karimnagar Granulite Terrain (KGT) and, is well known for several types of granites. Studies revealed that the radiation levels are elevated with these granitic rocks. The indoor radon concentrations are estimated in about 80 dwellings, selected randomly in Karimnagar district, using LR-115 Type-II Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors based Twin Chamber Cup dosimeters for a period of one year on quarterly basis. The dose rates due to the radon concentrations are calculated. The seasonal variations of the indoor radon concentrations have been studied. Further, the dependency of indoor radon concentrations on different types of dwellings is also discussed in the present paper. (author)

  6. The ORNL Indoor Air Quality Study: Re-cap, Context, and Assessment on Radon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonn, Bruce Edward [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Rose, Erin M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ternes, Mark P. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-10-01

    As part of the retrospective evaluation of the U.S. Department of Energy s low-income Weatherization Assistance Program that was led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), an assessment of the impacts of weatherization on indoor air quality (IAQ) was conducted. This assessment included nearly 500 treatment and control homes across the country. Homes were monitored for carbon monoxide, radon, formaldehyde, temperature and humidity pre- and post-weatherization. This report focuses on the topic of radon and addresses issues not thoroughly discussed in the original IAQ report. The size, scope and rigor of the radon component of the IAQ study are compared to previous studies that assessed the impacts of weatherization on indoor radon levels. It is found that the ORNL study is by far the most extensive study conducted to date, though the ORNL results are consistent with the findings of the other studies. However, the study does have limitations related to its reliance on short-term measurements of radon and inability to attribute changes in radon levels in homes post-weatherization to specific weatherization measures individually or in combination.

  7. Modelling and experimental study of the behavior of radon and radon decay products in an enclosure. Application to houses; Modelisation et etude experimentale du comportement du radon et de ses descendants dans une enceinte confinee. Application a une habitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gouronnec, A M

    1995-02-03

    Since the eighties, more and more studies were performed about radon and its decay products in houses with one of the aim being the estimation of the dose received by their inhabitants. Then, the principal objective of this work is to describe the behaviour of radon and its decay products within a dwelling. In the first part to the report, a few definitions are given and data from literature give an idea of indoor radon and radon decay products activities and/or size distribution. Aspects of dosimetry are presented too. In the second part of the work, a mathematical model, called `PRADDO` of Physic of Radon and radon Decay products in Domestic environment is developed on the basis of the classical model written by Jacobi in 1972. On the one hand, it has to predict radon decay products activities in systems consisting in one or more enclosure(s), from radon activity and from ambient aerosol concentration and size distribution. On the other hand, one part of the model is assigned to study the influence of the entry model parameters variation on the calculated quantities. Then, in the third part of the work, two experimental studies are realised in order to compare measurements to modelization. The first experimentation is a laboratory work, made on the test bench ICARE from IPSN, and the second one consists in describing the basement of an occupied house from Brittany. In the two cases, the comparison between experiments and modelling shows a good agreement if particles are present in the air, but any conclusion is made when is no aerosol in the enclosure. (author). 158 refs., 81 figs., 42 tabs.

  8. Indoor radon and risk of lung cancer: an epidemiological study in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruosteenoja, E.

    1991-03-01

    The main aim of the present study was to establish whether high radon concentrations in dwellings in Finland had increased the risk of lung cancer. Previous studies had shown an association between the α-active radon daughters and elevated lung cancer risk among miners. Convincing evidence of the risk among the general population exposed to radon indoors was, however, lacking. A descriptive analysis was first conducted in an area in southern Finland with high indoor radon exposure. In 18 rural municipalities this analysis yielded no significant correlation between the average radon exposure and incidence of male lung cancer. A case-control study within a cohort of the same rural population was then designed. The data included 238 male cases of lung cancer diagnosed in 1980-85 and 434 controls (390 smokers and 44 nonsmokers) from the male population. Radon exposure was measured, when possible, in all the dwellings occupied by a case or control in 1950-1975. Measurements were available for the total 25-year period, or for a proportion of it, for 164 cases and 334 controls; for the rest only estimates were available. In spite of the fact that the controls were mainly selected among smokers, the amount smoked still appeared to be the most important lung cancer risk factor in the data, the risk increasing linearly with the quantity of cigarettes smoked in a lifetime. The risk of lung cancer was not associated with the radon exposure level when the whole data were studied. In heavy smokers, however, a positive though not significant, effect on the risk from radon exposure was found. In the range of uncertainty the findings do not conflict with most of those observed among miners or the general population so far. (orig.)

  9. A comparison study between radon concentration in schools and other workplaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clouvas, A.; Xanthos, S.

    2012-01-01

    The Nuclear Technology Laboratory of the Aristotle Univ. of Thessaloniki has since 1999 an open research project of indoor radon measurements in Greek workplaces. Since now 1380 measurements in 690 workplaces have been performed. Most (75 %) of the workplaces were offices in schools. The remaining 25 % were offices, mainly in public buildings. In the present study, a possible correlation between radon concentration in schools and other workplaces is investigated and discussed. (authors)

  10. Radon in the workplace: Implications of studies of post-remediation monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denman, A. R.; Parkinson, S.; Johnstone, M.; Crockett, R. G. M.; Phillips, P. S.

    2004-01-01

    Radon gas has been shown to cause an increased incidence of lung cancer. In affected areas, levels in the overground workplace can be sufficiently high to be a health risk and remediation is required. In the UK, the workplace Action Level is 400 Bq m -3 . The variation of radon levels in the workplace was studied both before and after remediation. In most rooms, remediation resulted in a greater reduction at night than during the working day. The dose reduction, and therefore the health benefit, to workers is less than that predicted by the drop in radon averaged over 24 h. In order to obtain a health benefit to 75% of workers in our series, the 24 h average radon level in each room must be reduced to -3 . It is recommended that UK Regulatory Agencies adopt a post-remediation workplace Action Level of 225 Bq m -3 . (authors)

  11. Study on absolute humidity influence of NRL-1 measuring apparatus for radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shan Jian; Xiao Detao; Zhao Guizhi; Zhou Qingzhi; Liu Yan; Qiu Shoukang; Meng Yecheng; Xiong Xinming; Liu Xiaosong; Ma Wenrong

    2014-01-01

    The absolute humidity and temperature's effects on the NRL-1 measuring apparatus for radon were studied in this paper. By controlling the radon activity concentration of the radon laboratory in University of South China and improving the temperature and humidity adjust strategy, different correction factor values under different absolute humidities were obtained. Moreover, a correction curve between 1.90 and 14.91 g/m"3 was also attained. The results show that in the case of absolute humidity, when it is less than 2.4 g/m"3, collection efficiency of the NRL-1 measuring apparatus for radon tends to be constant, and the correction factor of the absolute humidity closes to 1. However, the correction factor increases nonlinearly along with the absolute humidity. (authors)

  12. Study of radon progeny distribution and radiation dose rate in the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujinami, Naoto

    2009-01-01

    The absorbed dose rate in air of airborne gamma-ray and the concentration of radon progeny in surface air have been observed continuously in Maizuru, Japan. When data observed on fine days were plotted, with dose rate as ordinate and contraction as abscissa, these points traced with a lapse of time illustrated an anticlockwise looping for each day. This result suggests that the variation of absorbed dose rate lags behind that of concentration of radon progeny; this is due to the delay time incurred as the concentration level gradually varies from ground surface to upper air. Radon progeny concentrations in precipitation and in surface air have been observed there in order to study the relationship between the two concentrations and the influence of precipitation patterns on the concentration in precipitation. Results obtained from analysis of the observed data suggest that radon progeny in precipitation originate mainly from scavenging within the cloud (rainout) and not from that below the cloud (washout). (author)

  13. Study on radon concentration monitoring using activated charcoal canisters in high humidity environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yuexing; Wang Haijun; Yang Yifang; Qin Sichang; Wang Zhentao; Zhang Zhenjiang

    2009-01-01

    The effects of humidity on the sensitivity using activated charcoal canisters for measuring radon concentrations in high humidity environments were studied. Every canister filled with 80 g of activated charcoal, and they were exposed to 48 h or 72 h in the relative humidity of 68%, 80%, 88% and 96% (28 degree C), respectively. The amount of radon absorbed in the canisters was determined by counting the gamma rays from 214 Pb and 214 Bi (radon progeny). The results showed that counts decreased with the increase of relative humidity. There was a negative linear relationship between count and humidity. In the relative humidity range of 68%-96%, the sensitivity of radon absorption decreased about 2.4% for every 1% (degree)rise in humidity. The results also showed that the exposure time of the activated charcoal canisters should be less than 3 days. (authors)

  14. Intercomparison of passive radon-detectors under field conditions in epidemiological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreienbrock, L; Poffijn, A; Tirmarche, M; Feider, M; Kies, A; Darby, S C

    1999-05-01

    The Ardennes and Eifel region is a geologically distinct area covering parts of Germany, Belgium, France, and Luxembourg where enhanced concentrations of radon occur in some houses and other buildings. An international case-control study is being conducted to examine the role of radon in the etiology of lung cancer in this area. The radon detectors used are issued by different laboratories involving a variety of detector types and processes. A series of intercomparisons in houses was therefore conducted under similar conditions of exposure in the field. In most situations the different detectors gave similar results. Nevertheless, in some situations open and closed detectors yielded different results. Therefore, estimates of radon exposure have to be adjusted if results are to be pooled.

  15. Potential study of bed filtration characteristics in impressed boreholes by radon tracer technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litvinov, A.A.; Pinkenzon, D.B.; Makarov, M.S.; Vinarskij, M.S.

    1977-01-01

    Potential study of bed filtration characteristics in impressed boreholes by radon tracer method is shown. Effects recorded by radon tracer result from gamma radiation of short-living radon decay daughter products. During filtration of tracer through punched holes, cement stone, and rocks the products are deposited and cause a local effect for 2-3 hours. There is a shortage of short-living products in filtrated radon liquid and for some time (which is necessary for production of notable quantity of new decay products) it is practically not a gamma emitter. It is shown that the feature of effect formation governs the technique for well logging as well as interpretation of the results obtained

  16. Comparative study of different types of granular activated carbon in removing medium level radon from water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alabdula'aly, A.I.; Maghrawy, H.B.

    2011-01-01

    Granular activated carbon (GAC) has proven its effectiveness in removing radon from water supplies. Laboratory and pilot plant studies were carried out using three different types of activated carbons (F-300, F-400, and HD-4000) to remove radon from water supply. From the experimental kinetic study, the data indicated that at least 6 h are needed to attain equilibrium between radon activity adsorbed onto carbon and its concentration in the aqueous phase. Also, it showed that HD-4000 has higher capacity for removing radon than the other two investigated carbons F-300 and F-400. The adsorption isotherms were satisfactorily explained by Freundlich equation. In the pilot plant study, the performance of the three activated carbons in removing radon at medium concentration (∼111 Bq dm -3 ) was evaluated over 60 days of continuous water flow. Four empty-bed contact times (EBCTs) corresponding to four bed depths were continuously monitored and the corresponding steady state adsorption-decay constant values were calculated and the efficiency of each carbon was used to provide a facet for comparison. The γ-radiation exposure rate distribution throughout each GAC bed was measured and compared. This study, despite paucity of literature in this field, is useful for designing a GAC adsorption system for the removal of medium level radon concentration from water supplies. (author)

  17. Studies on radon concentration in underground water samples in and around Kabini river basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yashaswini, T.; Ningappa, C.; Niranjan, R.S.; Sannappa, J.

    2017-01-01

    Radon is a radioactive inert gas, a decay product of radium, causes environmental health problems like lung cancer. Radium present in the earth crest continuously releases radon into underground water. From the point view of health, the study of radon concentration level in underground water base line data is important. In the present study, radon concentration in underground water have been measured in 40 underground water samples collected in and around Kabini River of Karnataka State by using Emanometry technique. The radon concentration in the study area varies from 21.2 to 168.2Bq.l -1 with a geometrical mean value of 73.3 Bq.l -1 . The physicochemical parameters of water such as chloride, Fluoride, nitrite, sulphate, TDS are measured in the same samples in order to know about the impact of these parameters on radon concentration and their health risks to the general public. The experimental techniques and results obtained are discussed in the presentation. (author)

  18. Study of temporal variation of radon concentrations in public drinking water supplies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    York, E.L.

    1995-01-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has proposed a Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for radon-222 in public drinking water supplies of 300 pCi/L. Proposed monitoring requirements include collecting quarterly grab samples for the first year, then annual samples for the remainder of the compliance cycle provided first year quarterly samples average below the MCL. The focus of this research was to study the temporal variation of groundwater radon concentrations to investigate how reliably one can predict an annual average radon concentration based on the results of grab samples. Using a open-quotes slow-flowclose quotes collection method and liquid scintillation analysis, biweekly water samples were taken from ten public water supply wells in North Carolina (6 month - 11 month sampling periods). Based on study results, temporal variations exist in groundwater radon concentrations. Statistical analysis performed on the data indicates that grab samples taken from each of the ten wells during the study period would exhibit groundwater radon concentrations within 30% of their average radon concentration

  19. Experimental study of the combined effects of inhalation of radon daughter products and tobacco smoke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chameaud, J.; Perraud, R.; Chretien, J.; Masse, R.; Lafuma, J.

    1979-01-01

    For 10 years, over 500 lung cancers have been induced in rats by inhalations of radon daughter products at various concentrations and cumulated doses. Considering several points and the dose-effect relationship especially, such cancers can be compared with human cancers. This type of experiments, fully mastered, has made it possible to undertake under good conditions the study of the co-carcinogenic effect of various inhaled pollutants such as tobacco smoke. In a first experiment, 100 rats were exposed to a 4000WLM cumulated dose of radon daughter products, knowing that this level induces some 30% of lung cancers. 50 animals were then administered tobacco smoke by inhalation in a fume box during 5 months (350 h.) In the group inhaling radon only, 17 cancers appeared; in the radon -tobacco group 32 cancers bigger and more invasive were observed. Under the same conditions, tobacco smoke was inhaled by rats previously exposed to lower doses of radon daughter products (2 groups of 30 rats, 500 and 100 WLM respectively). Again, the number of cancers observed was higher that the number of cancers expected if the rats had inhaled radon only. This co-carcinogenic and potentiating action of tobacco was clearly demonstrated. Further experiments are considered in order to determine the processes involved

  20. A comparative study of indoor radon concentrations between dwellings and schools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapdan, E.; Altinsoy, N.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the relationship of radon concentrations between dwellings and the schools located in the same regions and to obtain related indoor average radon concentration dwelling–school correction factor for similar locations. The research has been carried out by determining indoor radon concentrations at schools and dwellings located at the same districts in the selected two separate research fields called The Former Adapazari region and The New Adapazari region in the city of Adapazari using a total of 81 Cr-39 passive radon detectors for 75 days. The average radon concentrations have been determined for the dwellings and the schools in 15 districts of the Former Adapazari region as 59.9 Bq m −3 and 57.1 Bq m −3 , respectively. The results in 4 districts of the New Adapazari region were 63.5 Bq m −3 for the dwellings and 61.0 Bq m −3 for the schools. Moreover, the annual effective doses were calculated as 1.33 mSv/y and 1.41 mSv/y for the dwellings of Former Adapazari and New Adapazari, respectively. It was seen that the doses received in the dwellings are about four times the doses received in the schools. The indoor radon concentration dwelling–school correction factor was found to be 1.04±0.01 for the research area.

  1. A Laboratory for studying radon mitigation methods in high-rise office buildings in Hong Kong

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leung, J.K.C.; Hung, L.C.; Tso, M.Y.W.

    1996-01-01

    A territory-wide survey of indoor radon level in 1993 showed that 17% of offices Hong Kong have radon concentrations above 200 Bq m -3 compared with 4% for dwellings. Consequently, the Radioisotope Unit Radon Analysis Laboratory (RURAL) is being built for studying radon mitigation methods applicable to high-rise office buildings. The laboratory consists of three rooms; the main exposure room is built of concrete and is surrounded by the buffer room; and all controls and operations are done inside the control room. The exposure room can, with the aid of the buffer room, simulate any environmental conditions that can be faced by a real building. The pressure, temperature and humidity can be adjusted to any meteorological conditions that can be found in Hong Kong. Pressure differential and temperature differential can be adjusted to simulate the arrival of fronts, troughs or typhoons. Aerosol concentration and distribution inside the exposure room are controllable as well as the ventilation conditions. Various mitigation methods will be tested under different conditions. Passive methods include application of radon barriers to building structures and active methods include the use of air cleaners; techniques to increase radon daughters plateout or reduce their attachment to aerosols; and various modifications to the ventilation systems. Mitigation techniques involving modifications to the building strictures and building services will also be developed with the help of the RURAL. (author)

  2. Experimental study of ion-induced nucleation by radon decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, F.; Hopke, P.K.

    1993-01-01

    In the environment, the presence of ions from natural radioactivity may increase the rate of new particle formation through ion-induced nucleation. A thermal diffusion cloud chamber (TDCC) has been built to experimentally study ion-induced nucleation where the ions are produced by gaseous radioactive sources. The critical supersaturation values and nucleation rates for methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol, and 1-butanol vapors on ions produced within the volume of the chamber by alpha decay of 222 Rn have been measured quantitatively at various radioactivity concentrations and supersaturations. The presence of ion tracks and the effect of an external electric field were also investigated. The alpha tracks and ion-induced nucleation formed by 222 Rn decay become visible at the critical supersaturation that is below the value needed for homogeneous nucleation. At this supersaturation, the nucleation rates increase substantially with increasing 222 Rn at low activity concentrations, but attain limiting values at higher concentrations. The experimental results indicate that the ionization by radon decay will promote ion-cluster formation and lower the free energy barriers. The formation of visible droplets is strongly dependent on the supersaturation. This study also confirms that the external electric field has a significant effect on the observed rates of nucleation

  3. Comparative study of radon concentration in selected modern and traditional building at Kenyatta University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chege, W.M.; Rathore, I.V.S.; Chhabra, S.C.; Mustapha, A.O.

    2010-01-01

    Radon is leading source of radiation exposure to the public and increases risk of cancer (UNSCEAR, 2000). There is general lack of data on indoor radon in Kenya especially on building design-traditional versus modern. In rural Kenya traditional mud huts coexist with modern stone building. Indoor radon found to vary widely in Kenya: Mustapha et al (2002): 5-1200 Bqm3, Maina et al (2004): 5-704 Bqm3. None of previous works indicates radon variation with building design. The aim of the current study is to compare radon concentrations in coexisting stone buildings and mud huts. Such data would be useful in formulation of policies regarding housing, as part of radon data base in Kenya Experimental Techniques Characteristic of selected buildings: Traditional Huts: Single roomed, Wall made of wood and plastered using mud, bare floor and no ceiling, grass-thatched or mud plastered, doors and windows remained open during the sampling period. Modern Buildings: (Classes used to represent modern building). Those made of natural stone, wooden floor, ceiling, doors and windows remained shut during the sampling period. Measurement of Radon Concentration Radon sampling was done using Charcoal canisters (EPA type). They were activated, and then exposed simultaneously at sampling sites for 48 hours. Analysis and data acquisition was done using NaI(Tl) gamma-ray spectrometer. Radon concentration was calculated based on gamma rays emitted by 214Pb (295 and 352 keV) and 214Bi (609 keV). 13 Results and Discussion Radon levels were higher in classrooms and significantly high in huts. Mean (Bqm-3 ) Minimum (Bqm-3 ) Maximum (Bqm-3 ). Traditional huts had 170.3 15.6 30.2 315.4 while modern buildings had 193 ±19.3 115.76 257.2. There were higher levels in classroom despite lower levels of 226Ra (50.18 Bqkg-1) in natural stone. Possible source of high concentrations: - radon seeping in through floor boards building up over time as building more closed up - Radon concentration was more varied

  4. Radon-prone areas in the Lombard plain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sesana, Lucia; Polla, Giancarla; Facchini, Ugo; De Capitani, Luisa

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports the results of indoor radon measurements carried out in the Lombard plain. The aim of this study, which is based on the geological context, was to identify radon high-risk areas. The underlying geology has been established by means of the available stratigraphies giving a schematic representation of the sites in which either occurrence of gravel or silt and clay predominate with depths ranging from 0 to 50 m. Radon measurements were performed in a sample of 411 one-family houses in seven villages located in the southern area of Bergamo and Brescia. The findings indicate that when the substrate is dominated by clay, radon concentration for dwellings on the ground floor are low, whereas a strong predominance of underlying gravel mixed up in sand gives in winter months high radon flux from underground

  5. Radon-prone areas in the Lombard plain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sesana, Lucia [Istituto di Fisica Generale Applicata, Universita degli Studi di Milano, Via G. Celoria, 16 - 20133 Milan (Italy)]. E-mail: lucia.sesana@unimi.it; Polla, Giancarla [Istituto di Fisica Generale Applicata, Universita degli Studi di Milano, Via G. Celoria, 16 - 20133 Milan (Italy); Facchini, Ugo [Istituto di Fisica Generale Applicata, Universita degli Studi di Milano, Via G. Celoria, 16 - 20133 Milan (Italy); De Capitani, Luisa [Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, Universita degli Studi di Milano, Via Botticelli, 23 - 20133 Milan (Italy)

    2005-07-01

    This paper reports the results of indoor radon measurements carried out in the Lombard plain. The aim of this study, which is based on the geological context, was to identify radon high-risk areas. The underlying geology has been established by means of the available stratigraphies giving a schematic representation of the sites in which either occurrence of gravel or silt and clay predominate with depths ranging from 0 to 50 m. Radon measurements were performed in a sample of 411 one-family houses in seven villages located in the southern area of Bergamo and Brescia. The findings indicate that when the substrate is dominated by clay, radon concentration for dwellings on the ground floor are low, whereas a strong predominance of underlying gravel mixed up in sand gives in winter months high radon flux from underground.

  6. A calibration facility for radon fluxmeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xianjie; Qiu Shoukang; Zhou Jianliang; Liu Chunkui; Pan Jialin; Yang Mingli

    1998-01-01

    Calibration facilities for radon fluxmeter with three kinds of different emanation medium have been developed. The stability of radon flux is 5%, 9% (RSD) respectively. The uniformity of radon flux is 4.5%, 8.5% (RSD) respectively. These specifications fulfill the calibration requirement for radon fluxmeter. The determination of radon flux of facility takes full account of eliminating the main error source-attenuation effect (including leakage and back diffusion etc.): not only prevent attenuation and make a relevant correction. Therefore the accuracy of determination is assured. The calibration, intercomparison of radon flux meter and the quantitatively evaluation on the measurement method of radon flux are made to be possible by the successful establishment of this facility. (author)

  7. A study of indoor radon in greenhouses in Mexico City, Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillermo Espinosa; Allan Chavarria; Jose-Ignacio Golzarri

    2013-01-01

    Enclosed spaces in contact with soil, the main source of radon, like greenhouses have potentially high radon ( 222 Rn) concentrations. Greenhouses are frequented by visitors and also are workplaces. The study of radon concentrations in greenhouses is, thus, a relevant concern for public health and environmental radiation authorities. For this study, the radon concentrations in 12 greenhouses in different locations within Mexico City were measured using nuclear track methodology. The detectors used for the study consisted of the well-known closed-end cup device, with CR-39 Lantrack R as detector material. The measurements were carried out over a period of one year, divided into four three-month sub-periods. The lowest and highest annual mean radon concentrations found in individual greenhouses were 17.0 and 45.1 Bq/m 3 , respectively. The annual mean averaged over all 12 greenhouses was 27.3 Bq/m 3 . No significant seasonal variation was observed. Using the highest annual mean radon concentration found in an individual greenhouse, and an equilibrium factor of 0.4, the effective dose from 222 Rn and its progenies was calculated to be 339.9 nSv/h. This corresponds to an annual dose rate of 679.8 μSv/y (0.057 WLM/y) for a worker spending 4 h a day, 5 days a week, 50 weeks a year, inside the greenhouse. For a visitor spending 12 h a year inside the greenhouse the annual dose is 2.469 μSv/y. The study of indoor radon concentrations in closed buildings such as greenhouses, which are both workplaces and open to visitors, is an important public health consideration. (author)

  8. Scope of radon monitoring for earthquake-studies in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virk, H.S.

    1994-01-01

    In India, there is scope for investigating and exploiting radon as a precursor for earthquakes and for exploration of hydrocarbon deposits. This report mainly deals with the investigations carried out in Kangra and Chamba valleys of Himachal Pradesh under Himalayan Seismicity Project of Department of Science and Technology, Govt. of India. 20 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  9. Radon-222 Study in Ceramics and Indoor Air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moussa, N.L.A.A.

    2011-01-01

    A total 50 samples of 13 different ceramic tiles companies collected from the Egyptian market for the measurements of radon exhalation rate. Three homes include twenty rooms were selected. The period of the survey was in range 2-3 months for homes for each season while it was about 15 days for ceramic tiles. The radon exhalation rate of ceramic tiles (clay and glaze) and indoor radon activity concentration were measured by alpha tracks technique. The average radon exhalation rate in three homes was observed to be in the range 2.2-5.2 mBq.m -2 .h -1 . The average of Ra-226 activity for all ceramic tiles either the floor or wall tile is in the range 16-64 Bq.kg -1 . The porosity of ceramic tiles is found in the range 0.19-0.29. The effective dose in all rooms is found in the range 0.9- 1.3 mSv.y -1 .

  10. Radon removal equipment based on aeration: A literature study of tests performed in Sweden between 1981 and 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mjoenes, L.

    2000-02-01

    In Sweden some principles to reduce the radon concentration in drinking water were tested in the beginning of the 1980s. Spray aeration under atmospheric pressure, diffused bubble aeration, aeration in the pressure tank and different combinations of these principles were studied. Aeration in the drill hole and adsorption on granulated activated char-coal were also tested. The best results, about 70 % reduction, were obtained with aeration in the pressure tank with a spray system combined with diffused air bubbling. The Oerebro project in the beginning of the 1990s included on site testing of five different aeration solutions: Aeration in the drill hole, aeration in the storage tank, ejector aeration, shallow tray aeration and packed column aeration. The radon removal efficiency varied between 20 % and 99 %. In 1994 a study intended to test the radon removal capacity of different water treatment equipment was performed. Six units of radon separators were included but most of the tested equipment was installed for other water treatment purposes. The performed measurements showed that the only types of equipment that reduce the radon concentration efficiently are radon separators and reverse osmosis filters. The radon removal capacity of the radon separators varied between 23 % and 97 %. In 1996 the nine most common radon separators on the Swedish market were tested. The results showed that the tested radon removal equipment worked well, although the technical quality and chosen technical solutions were not always the best. The radon removal capacity of the units participating in this test was in most cases between 96 and 99 %. In some cases the capacity exceeded 99 %. In order to reach this radon removal capacity the water must be recirculated in a storage tank under atmospheric pressure

  11. Radon removal equipment based on aeration: A literature study of tests performed in Sweden between 1981 and 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mjoenes, L

    2000-02-01

    In Sweden some principles to reduce the radon concentration in drinking water were tested in the beginning of the 1980s. Spray aeration under atmospheric pressure, diffused bubble aeration, aeration in the pressure tank and different combinations of these principles were studied. Aeration in the drill hole and adsorption on granulated activated char-coal were also tested. The best results, about 70 % reduction, were obtained with aeration in the pressure tank with a spray system combined with diffused air bubbling. The Oerebro project in the beginning of the 1990s included on site testing of five different aeration solutions: Aeration in the drill hole, aeration in the storage tank, ejector aeration, shallow tray aeration and packed column aeration. The radon removal efficiency varied between 20 % and 99 %. In 1994 a study intended to test the radon removal capacity of different water treatment equipment was performed. Six units of radon separators were included but most of the tested equipment was installed for other water treatment purposes. The performed measurements showed that the only types of equipment that reduce the radon concentration efficiently are radon separators and reverse osmosis filters. The radon removal capacity of the radon separators varied between 23 % and 97 %. In 1996 the nine most common radon separators on the Swedish market were tested. The results showed that the tested radon removal equipment worked well, although the technical quality and chosen technical solutions were not always the best. The radon removal capacity of the units participating in this test was in most cases between 96 and 99 %. In some cases the capacity exceeded 99 %. In order to reach this radon removal capacity the water must be recirculated in a storage tank under atmospheric pressure.

  12. Study and development of microporous organic compounds for radon adsorption and his application in particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noel, Raymond

    2015-01-01

    The neutrino is one of the twelve elementary particles from the standard model. It is characterize by a neutral electrical charge and an extremely low mass. Many experiments have been set up in order to study the properties of neutrino. Despite scientific breakthrough, the nature of this particle is still unknown up to now. The NEMO collaboration is studying the neutrinoless double beta decay, a very rare radioactive process, to find out the nature of neutrino and to know if the neutrino is equivalent to the antineutrino. Today, the NEMO collaboration is building a new detector called SuperNEMO. The gas inside the detector need to have a concentration in radon below 100 μBq/m"3, to minimize the radioactive background. The purification of this gas is achieved from the adsorption of radon by microporous material. In this work, we have developed in CPPM a bench test to measure the radon adsorption by various materials, in order to propose an adsorption model, and to reach the purity condition needed for SuperNEMO. Along with the study on adsorbents available and to better understand the radon adsorption, we synthesized and studied at CINaM star-shape poly-aromatic hydrocarbons and branched or dendritic aromatic polymers, incorporating sulfur, to adsorb radon [fr

  13. A study of the influence of a gravel subslab layer on radon entry rate using two basement structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, A.L.; Sextro, R.G.; Fisk, W.J.; Garbesi, K.; Wooley, J.; Wollenberg, H.A.

    1993-01-01

    In buildings with elevated radon concentrations, the dominant transport mechanism of radon is advective flow of soil gas into the building substructure. However, the building-soil system is often complex, making detailed studies of the radon source term difficult. In order to examine radon entry into buildings, the authors have constructed two room-size, precisely-fabricated basement structures at a site with relatively homogeneous, moderately permeable soil. The basements are identical except that one lies directly on native soil whereas the other lies on a high permeability aggregate layer. The soil pressure field and radon entry rate have been measured for different basement pressures and environmental conditions. The subslab gravel layer greatly enhances the advective entry of radon into the structure; when the structures are depressurized, the radon entry rate into the structure with the subslab gravel layer is more than a factor of 3 times the radon entry rate into the other structure for the same depressurization. The gravel subslab layer also spreads the pressure field around the structure, extending the field of influence of the structure and the region from which it draws radon

  14. A study of indoor radon, thoron and their exhalation rates in the environment of Fazilka district, Punjab, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narang, Saurabh; Kumar, Deepak; Sharma, Dinesh Kumar; Kumar, Ajay

    2018-02-01

    Over the last few decades, the study of radioactive radon gas has gained huge momentum due to its possible role in health related hazards. In the present work, pin-hole twin chamber single entrance dosimeters have been used for track measurements of radon and thoron. The annual average radon concentration varies from 50.3 to 204 Bq/m3 at all locations. Almost all the values are below the safe range provided by ICRP. Radon concentration is found to be higher in winter as compared to other seasons. Variation of radon with quality of dwellings is also discussed. The values of annual effective dose due to radon and thoron are also well within the range provided by ICRP and WHO. Radon and thoron exhalation rates are measured using SMART RnDuo monitor. The radon mass exhalation rates ranged from 11 to 71 mBq/kg/h while the thoron surface values ranged from 36 to 2048 Bq/m2/h. All the values are on the lower side. A weak correlation is found between radon and thoron concentrations and their exhalation rates. When compared with the values of other parts of northern India, the values of present investigation are on higher side.

  15. A study of the influence of a gravel subslab layer on radon entry rate using two basement structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, A.L.; Sextro, R.G.; Fisk, W.J.; Garbesi, K.; Wooley, J.; Wollenberg, H.A.

    1993-01-01

    In buildings with elevated radon concentrations, the dominant transport mechanism of radon is advective flow of soil gas into the building substructure. However, the building-soil system is often complex, making detailed studies of the radon source term difficult. In order-to examine radon entry into buildings, we have constructed two room-size, precisely-fabricated basement structures at a site with relatively homogeneous, moderately permeable soil. The basements are identical except that one lies directly on native soil whereas the other lies on a high permeability aggregate layer. The soil pressure field and radon entry rate have been measured for different basement pressures and environmental conditions. The subslab gravel layer greatly enhances the advective entry of radon into the structure; when the structures are depressurized, the radon entry rate into the structure with the subslab gravel layer is more than a factor of 3 times the radon entry rate into the other structure for the same depressurization. The gravel subslab layer also spreads the pressure field around the structure, extending the field of influence of the structure and the region from which it draws radon. (orig.). (7 refs., 3 figs.)

  16. Concentration variation of radon in the room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komaruzaman Mohd Noor; Haziman Hassan; Rosli Mahat; Yusof Md Amin

    1995-01-01

    The study was carried out to determine the variation of radon concentration in the room. Radon detector used was solid nuclear tracks detector (SSNTD) LR-115. From this result, suitable points to make radon measurement was determined

  17. Indoor Radon Concentration Related to Different Radon Areas and Indoor Radon Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhásová Šenitková, Ingrid; Šál, Jiří

    2017-12-01

    Indoor radon has been observed in the buildings at areas with different radon risk potential. Preventive measures are based on control of main potential radon sources (soil gas, building material and supplied water) to avoid building of new houses above recommended indoor radon level 200 Bq/m3. Radon risk (index) estimation of individual building site bedrock in case of new house siting and building protection according technical building code are obligatory. Remedial actions in buildings built at high radon risk areas were carried out principally by unforced ventilation and anti-radon insulation. Significant differences were found in the level of radon concentration between rooms where radon reduction techniques were designed and those where it was not designed. The mathematical model based on radon exhalation from soil has been developed to describe the physical processes determining indoor radon concentration. The model is focused on combined radon diffusion through the slab and advection through the gap from sub-slab soil. In this model, radon emanated from building materials is considered not having a significant contribution to indoor radon concentration. Dimensional analysis and Gauss-Newton nonlinear least squares parametric regression were used to simplify the problem, identify essential input variables and find parameter values. The presented verification case study is introduced for real buildings with respect to various underground construction types. Presented paper gives picture of possible mathematical approach to indoor radon concentration prediction.

  18. Experimental and Monte Carlo simulation studies of open cylindrical radon monitoring device using CR-39 detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rehman, Fazal-ur- E-mail: fazalr@kfupm.edu.sa; Jamil, K.; Zakaullah, M.; Abu-Jarad, F.; Mujahid, S.A

    2003-07-01

    There are several methods of measuring radon concentrations but nuclear track detector cylindrical dosimeters are widely employed. In this investigation, the consequence of effective volumes of the dosimeters on the registration of alpha tracks in a CR-39 detector was studied. In a series of experiments an optimum radius for a CR-39-based open cylindrical radon dosimeter was found to be about 3 cm. Monte Carlo simulation techniques hav been employed to verify the experimental results. In this context, a computer code Monte Carlo simulation dosimetry (MOCSID) was developed. Monte Carlo simulation experiments gave the optimum radius of the dosimeters as 3.0 cm. The experimental results are in good agreement with those obtained by Monte Carlo design calculations. In addition to this, plate-out effects of radon progeny were also studied. It was observed that the contribution of radon progeny ({sup 218}Po and {sup 214}Po) plated-out on the wall of the dosimeters increases with an increase of dosimeter radii and then decrease to 0 at a radius of about 3 cm if a point detector has been installed at the center of the dosimeter base. In the code MOCSID different types of random number generators were employed. The results of this research are very useful for designing an optimum size of radon dosimeters.

  19. Experimental and Monte Carlo simulation studies of open cylindrical radon monitoring device using CR-39 detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehman, Fazal-ur-; Jamil, K.; Zakaullah, M.; Abu-Jarad, F.; Mujahid, S.A.

    2003-01-01

    There are several methods of measuring radon concentrations but nuclear track detector cylindrical dosimeters are widely employed. In this investigation, the consequence of effective volumes of the dosimeters on the registration of alpha tracks in a CR-39 detector was studied. In a series of experiments an optimum radius for a CR-39-based open cylindrical radon dosimeter was found to be about 3 cm. Monte Carlo simulation techniques hav been employed to verify the experimental results. In this context, a computer code Monte Carlo simulation dosimetry (MOCSID) was developed. Monte Carlo simulation experiments gave the optimum radius of the dosimeters as 3.0 cm. The experimental results are in good agreement with those obtained by Monte Carlo design calculations. In addition to this, plate-out effects of radon progeny were also studied. It was observed that the contribution of radon progeny ( 218 Po and 214 Po) plated-out on the wall of the dosimeters increases with an increase of dosimeter radii and then decrease to 0 at a radius of about 3 cm if a point detector has been installed at the center of the dosimeter base. In the code MOCSID different types of random number generators were employed. The results of this research are very useful for designing an optimum size of radon dosimeters

  20. Residential radon exposure and lung cancer risk in Misasa, Japan. A case-control study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobue, Tomotaka; Lee, Valerie S.; Ye, Weimin; Tanooka, Hiroshi; Mifune, Masaaki; Suyama, Akihiko; Koga, Taeko; Morishima, Hiroshige; Kondo, Sohei

    2000-01-01

    In order to investigate an association between residential radon exposure and risk of lung cancer, a case-control study was conducted in Misasa Town, Tottori Prefecture, Japan. The case series consisted of 28 people who had died of lung cancer in the years 1976-96 and 36 controls chosen randomly from the residents in 1976, matched by sex and year of birth. Individual residential radon concentrations were measured for 1 year with alpha track detectors. The average radon concentration was 46 Bq/m 3 for cases and 51 Bq/m 3 for controls. Compared to the level of 24 or less Bq/m 3 , the adjusted odds ratios of lung cancer associated with radon levels of 25-49, 50-99 and 100 or more Bq/m 3 , were 1.13 (95% confidence interval; 0.29-4.40), 1.23 (0.16-9.39) and 0.25 (0.03-2.33), respectively. None of the estimates showed statistical significance, due to small sample size. When the subjects were limited to only include residents of more than 30 years, the estimates did not change substantially. This study did not find that the risk pattern of lung cancer, possibly associated with residential radon exposure, in Misasa Town differed from patterns observed in other countries. (author)

  1. Environmental radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majumdar, S.K.; Schmalz, R.F.; Miller, E.W.

    1990-01-01

    This book covers many aspects of environmental radon, including: historical perspectives; occurrence and properties; detection, measurement, and mitigation, radon and health; and political, economic, and legislative impacts

  2. Study on indoor radon exposure and its effect on human health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Xinwei

    2005-01-01

    Radon and its daughters relate to people health. Radon widely exists in the nature. The paper discusses the source, exposure and activity level of indoor radon, systematically analyzes the hazards and dose-response of residential radon exposure, and at last indicates the concrete method of controlling residential radon concentration. By interdicting radon pollution source and ventilation might effectively reduce indoor radon concentration and improve environmental air quality. (authors)

  3. A model to predict radon exhalation from walls to indoor air based on the exhalation from building material samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahoo, B.K.; Sapra, B.K.; Gaware, J.J.; Kanse, S.D.; Mayya, Y.S.

    2011-01-01

    In recognition of the fact that building materials are an important source of indoor radon, second only to soil, surface radon exhalation fluxes have been extensively measured from the samples of these materials. Based on this flux data, several researchers have attempted to predict the inhalation dose attributable to radon emitted from walls and ceilings made up of these materials. However, an important aspect not considered in this methodology is the enhancement of the radon flux from the wall or the ceiling constructed using the same building material. This enhancement occurs mainly because of the change in the radon diffusion process from the former to the latter configuration. To predict the true radon flux from the wall based on the flux data of building material samples, we now propose a semi-empirical model involving radon diffusion length and the physical dimensions of the samples as well as wall thickness as other input parameters. This model has been established by statistically fitting the ratio of the solution to radon diffusion equations for the cases of three-dimensional cuboidal shaped building materials (such as brick, concrete block) and one dimensional wall system to a simple mathematical function. The model predictions have been validated against the measurements made at a new construction site. This model provides an alternative tool (substitute to conventional 1-D model) to estimate radon flux from a wall without relying on 226 Ra content, radon emanation factor and bulk density of the samples. Moreover, it may be very useful in the context of developing building codes for radon regulation in new buildings. - Research highlights: → A model is proposed to predict radon flux from wall using flux of building material. → It is established based on the diffusion mechanism in building material and wall. → Study showed a large difference in radon flux from building material and wall. → Model has been validated against the measurements made at

  4. Study of the atmospheric chemistry of radon progeny in laboratory and real indoor atmospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopke, P.K.

    1992-07-01

    This report covers the second year of the 28 month grant current grant to Clarkson University to study the chemical and physical behavior of the polonium 218 atom immediately following its formation by the alpha decay of radon. Because small changes in size for activity result in large changes in the delivered dose per unit exposure, this behavior must be understood if the exposure to radon progeny and it dose to the cells in the respiratory tract are to be fully assessed. Two areas of radon progeny behavior are being pursued; laboratory studies under controlled conditions to better understand the fundamental physical and chemical process that affect the progeny's atmospheric behavior and studies in actual indoor environments to develop a better assessment of the exposure of the occupants of that space to the size and concentration of the indoor radioactive aerosol. This report describes the progress toward achieving these objectives.

  5. A study on the indoor radon concentrations in hospitals in the Shillong region, Meghalaya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Yubaraj; Maibam, Deveshwori; Saxena, Atul; Ram, Priya P.; Walia, Devesh

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we report our findings on radon survey in indoor environment which consists of around 105 rooms in 8 major hospitals in Shillong region and also present experimental estimates on the associated annual effective doses and life-time fatality risks. The survey has been undertaken using LR-115 Type 2 detectors. Radon activity concentration values were found to range from 65.66 Bq.m -3 to 783.77 Bq.m -3 with an arithmetic mean value of 260.4±138.3 Bq.m -3 and a geometric mean value of 228.4±1.67 Bq.m -3 . Distribution analysis of the radon activity concentration measured at the hospital rooms has been carried out. Of the total rooms surveyed, 60% have radon concentration more than the ICRP prescribed lower limit of 200 Bq.m -3 and about 4% of the rooms higher than the upper limit of 600 Bq.m -3 . Floor-wise study has been done and a decrease in radon concentration with increase in floor-number has been observed. (author)

  6. A compact multiparameter acquisition system for radon concentration studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugliese; Baiano; Boiano; D'Onofrio; Roca; Sabbarese; Vollaro

    2000-07-01

    A compact device suitable to acquire and display, at the same time, radon concentrations in a given atmosphere, and the environmental parameters characterising the atmosphere, is presented and described. It consists of two main blocks: (i) a detection section including a set of sensors for measuring pressure, humidity and temperature, and a set of silicon surface barrier detectors mounted in electrostatic cells collecting the ionised radon daughters; (ii) a single NIM module featuring an eight channel 12 bit ADC and the linear electronics to shape the signals from the silicon detectors. The system is controlled by a computer via a RS232 port. The software, implemented in Visual Basic, allows to display the energy distribution of the pulses coming from the alpha detectors and to initialise and control all phases of the acquisition. The results of preliminary tests show the high reliability of the system.

  7. A compact multiparameter acquisition system for radon concentration studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pugliese, M.; Baiano, G.; Boiano, A.; D'Onofrio, A.; Roca, V.; Sabbarese, C.; Vollaro, P.

    2000-01-01

    A compact device suitable to acquire and display, at the same time, radon concentrations in a given atmosphere, and the environmental parameters characterising the atmosphere, is presented and described. It consists of two main blocks: (i) a detection section including a set of sensors for measuring pressure, humidity and temperature, and a set of silicon surface barrier detectors mounted in electrostatic cells collecting the ionised radon daughters; (ii) a single NIM module featuring an eight channel 12 bit ADC and the linear electronics to shape the signals from the silicon detectors. The system is controlled by a computer via a RS232 port. The software, implemented in Visual Basic, allows to display the energy distribution of the pulses coming from the alpha detectors and to initialise and control all phases of the acquisition. The results of preliminary tests show the high reliability of the system

  8. A study of radon-222 concentrations in North Carolina groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, J.P.

    1992-01-01

    The groundwater of 400 North Carolina homes was sampled to ascertain the distribution and extent of 222 Rn in North Carolina groundwater. Arithmetic mean (AM) and geometric mean (GM) concentrations of 1,816 pCi L -1 and 656 pCi L -1 were found for the state. These results indicate that two-thirds of 114 degree C. homes served by groundwater exceed the EPA proposed 300 pCi L -1 maximum contaminant level (MCL). Only 2% of NC homes exceeded 10,000 pCi L-1. The Eastern region had the lowest radon concentrations by far, with a GM of 2-)0 pCi L -1 . The Central region and Western region had GM's of 794 pCi L -1 and 1,032 pCi L -1 respectively. The groundwater data approached a log normal distribution. No consistent trends were noted in the relationship between indoor radon concentrations and groundwater radon concentrations. A correlation coefficient of 0.00921 revealed a very weak linear relationship

  9. The significance of radon in radioactive pollution of environment. Pt. 2. Radon effect on living organism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kossakowski, S.; Dziura, A.; Kossakowski, A.

    1998-01-01

    Authors review the history of radon monitoring. Epidemiological studies of lung cancer and its correlation to radon concentration in mines and buildings are described. The influence of radon on animals living in the buildings built from waste materials is described. Authors review plans concerning creation of radon monitoring system in Poland. The necessity of monitoring influence of radon on animals is described

  10. [Experimental study on the influence of natural and artificial ventilation on indoor radon concentration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remetti, R; Gigante, G E

    2010-01-01

    The study presents the results of a campaign of measurements on the daily radon concentration using a Genitron Alpha Guard spectrometer. All the measurements have been intended to highlight the radon concentration variability during the 24 hours of the day and trying to find correlations with other ambient parameters such as temperature and pressure or local conditions such as the presence or not of a forced ventilation system. The main part of the measurements have been carried in the area of the Nuclear Measurement Laboratory of the Department of Basic and Applied Sciences for Engineering of "Sapienza" University of Rome. Results show a rapid rise of radon concentration in the night, when the artificial ventilation system was off and with door and windows closed. In the morning, after the opening of door and windows, the concentration falls down abruptly. With artificial ventilation system in function concentration never reaches significant values.

  11. Effect of local geology on indoor radon levels: a case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawthorne, A.R.; Gammage, R.B.; Dudney, C.S.

    1984-01-01

    This paper presents the results of radon monitoring in 40 East Tennessee homes that were a component of a larger study to evaluate indoor air quality. Measurements were conducted during two 3-month time periods with passive integrating track etch monitors in each of the forty homes. In a subset of homes, measurements were also conducted with a real-time monitor that provided readings on an hourly basis. The results of the monitoring indicate that about 30% of the homes had radon levels greater that 4 pCi/L in the living space. Homes with elevated radon levels were associated with local variations in geology; most of the homes having higher levels were located on the porous dolomite ridge partially surrounding Oad Ridge, Tennessee. (Author)

  12. Radon concentration studies in houses on the territory of the former German Democratic Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehmann, R.

    1993-01-01

    In cooperation with the Federal Institute of Water, Soil and Air Hygiene, studies have been made since March 1990 in mining centers in the South of the former GDR territory on radon concentration in as many differently used houses as possible, predominantly in dwelling houses, but also in plant buildings, schools, kindergartens, recreation homes, etc. Under this program, measurements were performed until October 1990 in the cities of Schneeberg, Johanngeorgenstadt and Ronneburg and in the municipality of Schlema. The results obtained from this radon screening covering almost the whole affected area, qualitatively correspond to those obtained from small random samples taken under a regional measuring program performed in the respective muncipalities. A summary presentation is given of the range of radon concentration in houses to be expected in East Germany, relating it to geologically different areas in accordance with the present state of knowledge. (orig./DG) [de

  13. A Monte Carlo study of radon detection in cylindrical diffusion chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rickards, Jorge, E-mail: rickards@fisica.unam.m [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito de la Investigacion Cientifica, Ciudad Universitaria, Delegacion Coyoacan, 04520 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Golzarri, Jose-Ignacio, E-mail: golzarri@fisica.unam.m [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito de la Investigacion Cientifica, Ciudad Universitaria, Delegacion Coyoacan, 04520 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Espinosa, Guillermo, E-mail: espinosa@fisica.unam.m [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito de la Investigacion Cientifica, Ciudad Universitaria, Delegacion Coyoacan, 04520 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2010-05-15

    The functioning of radon diffusion chambers was studied using the Monte Carlo code RAMMX developed here. The alpha particles from radon are assumed randomly produced in the volume of the cylinder, and those from the progeny are assumed to originate randomly at the cylindrical surface. The energy spectrum, the distribution of incident angles, and the distribution of path lengths of the alpha particles on the detector were obtained. These quantities vary depending on input parameters such as initial alpha particle energy, radius and depth of the diffusion chamber, detector size and atmospheric pressure. The calculated energy spectrum for both {sup 222}Rn and {sup 220}Rn was compared with experiment, permitting the identification of each peak and its origin, and a better understanding of radon monitoring. Three aspects not considered in previous calculations are progeny alphas coming from surfaces of the monitor, taking into account the atmospheric pressure, and including the isotope {sup 220}Rn.

  14. Swiss radon programme 'RAPROS'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeller, W.

    1992-03-01

    The results of the five-year radon research program RAPROS presented in this report, allow for scientifically valid statements on the origin of elevated levels of indoor radon in Switzerland. These results form a basis for recommendations and for actions to be taken. Indoor radon concentrations have been measured in more than 4000 living-rooms and 2000 basements; a sampling density of about 0.2% of the Swiss housing stock. According to these measurements radon leads to an estimated average annual effective dose of 2 milli-Sievert, although in some regions the annual dose may be much higher. Extrapolation of the existing data shows that in about 10'000 Swiss houses radon may exceed 1000 Bq/m 3 . For these houses remedial actions are recommended. There seems to be no radon problem in the large cities in the Swiss Plateau. High indoor radon concentrations in Switzerland are due to the soil beneath the buildings. Data from the study indicated that the most important soil characteristic influencing indoor radon concentrations was its gas permeability. Because natural ventilation in a heated house creates a slight underpressure in the lower levels with respect to surrounding soils, radon is driven from the soil into the building. Weatherization of the houses to reduce energy consumption had in most cases no effect on the indoor radon concentrations. Radon from tap water or from building materials does not contribute significantly to indoor radon levels in Switzerland. The high levels in the Jura Mountains are thought to be associated with karstic limestone bedrock. Several houses within Switzerland have now been modified to reduce radon levels. The most successful mitigation technique combined forced-air ventilation with tightening of the basement to decrease or prevent air infiltration from the soil. (author) figs., tabs., refs

  15. Radon 10 x 10 project: Implantation of geographic information systems in studies of radon in homes and geology catalans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amado Sanjuan, J. L.; Bach Plaza, J.; Baixeras divar, C.; Font Guiteras, L. L.; Moreno Balta, V.

    2013-01-01

    This methodology provides a useful tool to establish relationships between different data in order to identify areas in which to assess the radiological risk that represents radon in the Catalan population and gagging. (Author)

  16. Epidemiological study on the cancer mortality in an area with elevated radon daughter exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohl-Rueling, J.

    1983-07-01

    In many countries water containing considerable amounts of Radon-222 is used in so-called ''Radon Spas'' for therapeutical purposes. In the Austrian radon spas Badgastein and Bad Hofgastein many detailed studies of the environmental natural radioactivity have been carried out for about 20 years. The accumulated annual doses to the basal cells of the segmental and subsegmental bronchiols (receiving the highest dose at inhalation of radon and daughters, and target for lung cancer) were calculated for several population groups in this area. The researcher calculated the exposure to radon and daughter accumulated over a lifetime for each single person who lived in Badgastein for at least 10 years and died between 1947 and 1980. The lifetime bronchial doses of 1366 residents who died between 1947 and 1980 from several causes of death were calculated. Altogether 56 lung cancer cases occurred. From that the annual lung cancer incidence rate for Badgastein (30 and 108 per 10 5 living people of all ages and for persons over 40 years respectively) is not statistically different from the mean observed lung cancer cases in the whole Federal Province of Salzburg (32 and 98 respectively). A case-control study has also been carried out to compare the mean annual lifetime exposure of lung cancer deaths with those of other. It can be seen that for the higher exposed population groups and even more so for the miners, the persons who died of lung cancer received a higher dose than those who died of other cancer and other causes. Therefore radon daughter inhalation may be responsible for lung cancer induction even in a non-mining environment

  17. Study of the behavior of automatic track detectors for radon determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno C, A.

    1997-01-01

    Both the alpha decay and the alpha and beta emitting radon daughters, may affect the living cells. In this thesis, experiments have been performed to study the response of environmental radon using different alpha particle detectors. A study was performed both in the laboratory and in the field of two kinds of detectors: a) Passive solid state nuclear track detectors, LR 115 type II, capable to integrate the alpha particles in a given period of time and, b) an automatic active detector, Clipperton, that continuously accumulate the alpha counting from radon decay. LR-115 track detectors were exposed in the laboratory to alpha particles from a radioactive source and a controlled radon atmosphere. The detectors were also exposed to electrons from an electron accelerator. The number of alpha tracks in the detectors were evaluated with two kinds of spark counters. The response of the track detectors as a function of the number of alpha tracks showed a reproducibility of 92%, and the effect of electron doses showed that the bulk etching velocity varied as a function of the electron dose. Additionally some changes were introduced in an SSNTD exchanger, exposed to the radon chamber in order to reduce the background in the non exposed positions. A conversion factor of 0.016 tracks/cm 2 . 10h per Bq/m 3 was obtained. The response of the two spark counters was similar. Field soil radon determinations were performed with track detectors during 11 months and with the active detector during 5 months with exposures each month and each hour respectively. When calculated for the same time periods exposure the response of both systems was similar. However differences were quite striking in the patterns of short and long term exposure periods since short term fluctuations are explicitly shown with the active detector while integrated within the passive one. (Author)

  18. In-vivo measurements of Pb-210 to determine cumulative exposure to radon daughters: A pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurer, G.R.; Cohen, N.; Stark, A.; Ju, C.

    1991-05-01

    The objective of this study is to demonstrate the feasibility of estimating cumulative exposure of individuals to low concentrations of radon by measuring the amount of Pb-A-10 in their skeletons. This report presents progress to date establishing the validity of an vivo technique to measure skeletal burdens of Pb-210, accumulated from exposure to radon and radon progeny. With the skeletal content of Pb--210 and a model for Pb metabolism, cumulative exposure to radon and its short-lived daughters (radon/daughters) may be calculated for use in deriving a dose-response relationship between lung cancer and exposure to radon/daughters. Data are presented for 29 subjects exposed to ''above-average'' radon concentrations in their homes, showing the correlation between measured Pb--210 burdens, and measured pCi/l and WLM exposure estimates. Their results are compared to measurements of a population of 24 subject's presumed exposed to average concentrations. Measurements of a Pennsylvania family exposed for a year in a home with an extremely high radon content are also presented. Update of results of an ongoing study of the biological half-time of Pb--210 in man involving measurements, of a retired radiation worker with a 40 year old skeletal burden of Pb-210

  19. Factors influencing radon attenuation by tailing covers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silker, W.B.; Rogers, V.C.

    1981-07-01

    The US NRC, in its Generic Environmental Impact Statement on uranium milling has specified that the radon flux escaping a uranium mill tailings pile will be reduced to pCi/m 2 s by application of covering layers of soils and clays. These covers present a radon diffusion barrier, which sufficiently increases the time required for radon passage from the tailings to the atmosphere to allow for decay of 222 Rn within the cover. The depth of cover necessary to reduce the escaping radon flux to the prescribed level is to be determined by calculation, and requires precise knowledge of the radon diffusion coefficient in the covering media. A Radon Attenuation Test Facility was developed to determine rates of radon diffusion through candidate cover materials. This paper describes this facility and its application for determining the influence of physical properties of the soil column on the radon diffusion coefficient

  20. Radon analyser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The process claimed includes the steps of transferring radon gas produced by a sample to a charcoal trap, cooled to a temperature whereby the radon is absorbed by the charcoal, heating the charcoal trap to a sufficient temperature to release the radon, and transferring the radon to a counting device where the gas particles are counted

  1. Integrated source-risk model for radon: A definition study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laheij, G.M.H.; Aldenkamp, F.J.; Stoop, P.

    1993-10-01

    The purpose of a source-risk model is to support policy making on radon mitigation by comparing effects of various policy options and to enable optimization of counter measures applied to different parts of the source-risk chain. There are several advantages developing and using a source-risk model: risk calculations are standardized; the effects of measures applied to different parts of the source-risk chain can be better compared because interactions are included; and sensitivity analyses can be used to determine the most important parameters within the total source-risk chain. After an inventory of processes and sources to be included in the source-risk chain, the models presently available in the Netherlands are investigated. The models were screened for completeness, validation and operational status. The investigation made clear that, by choosing for each part of the source-risk chain the most convenient model, a source-risk chain model for radon may be realized. However, the calculation of dose out of the radon concentrations and the status of the validation of most models should be improved. Calculations with the proposed source-risk model will give estimations with a large uncertainty at the moment. For further development of the source-risk model an interaction between the source-risk model and experimental research is recommended. Organisational forms of the source-risk model are discussed. A source-risk model in which only simple models are included is also recommended. The other models are operated and administrated by the model owners. The model owners execute their models for a combination of input parameters. The output of the models is stored in a database which will be used for calculations with the source-risk model. 5 figs., 15 tabs., 7 appendices, 14 refs

  2. Residential radon and lung cancer: a cohort study in Galicia, Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Barbosa-Lorenzo

    Full Text Available Case-control studies show an association between residential radon and lung cancer. The aim of this paper is to investigate this association through a cohort study. We designed an ambispective cohort study using the Galician radon map, Spain, with controls drawn from a previous case-control study. Subjects were recruited between 2002 and 2009. The data were cross-checked to ascertain lung cancer incidence and then analysed using a Cox regression model. A total of 2,127 subjects participated; 24 lung cancer cases were identified; 76.6% of subjects were drawn from the radon map. The adjusted hazard ratio was 1.2 (95%CI: 0.5-2.8 for the category of subjects exposed to 50Bq/m3 or more. This risk rose when subjects from the case-control study were analyzed separately. In conclusion, we did not observe any statistically significant association between residential radon exposure and lung cancer; however, it appears that with a sample of greater median age (such as participants from the case-control study, the risk of lung cancer would have been higher.

  3. Prospect of radon as a tracer in studying of landslide forecast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Huifeng; Ding Dexin

    2004-01-01

    Radon, as a chemical element of radioactivity, is widely used in the fields of earth-quake monitoring, prospecting mine and exploring resource. This paper discussed the theory of radon's separating out from the soil and the theory and means of surveying radon. It also relates the radon anomaly in the measuring process of soil radon, caused by the interferring of the environmental factors in measurement results. It further clarifies the wilde application of radon as a tracer in landslide forecast. (authors)

  4. Radon and radon progeny in 70 houses in the Tennessee Valley area: study design and measurement methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudney, C.S.; Hawthorne, A.R.; Monar, K.P.; Quillen, J.L.; Clark, C. Jr.; Doane, R.W.; Wallace, R.G.; Reed, R.P.

    1986-01-01

    Levels of radon and its short-lived airborne progeny are being measured in a year-long study of 70 houses in four states in the Tennessee Valley. Various methods were used to solicit volunteers with differing degrees of success. Criteria for selection of houses in the study included presence of a lower level with cement floor and one or more block walls in contact with the soil, absence of obvious indications of technologically enhanced sources of radium, and proximity to one of four cities (Knoxville, Chattanooga, Birmingham, or Florence). By design, most houses in the study are in the same neighborhood as at least one other house in the study. Houses range in age from newly constructed to about 40 years old. Most of the houses have more than 2000 square feet of finished floor space. The lower level encompasses a garage in most cases. More complete information pertaining to house characteristics will be gathered in the course of the study. 19 refs., 1 fig

  5. Study on radon concentration in nursery school in the mining region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skowronek, J.; Wysocka, M.; Mielnikow, A.

    1999-01-01

    Study on children exposure from natural radon background has been performed on the example of nursery schools being localized in Piekary Slaskie in the coal mining region of Silesia. Indoor air contamination has been measured as well as soil air and air outside the houses. In none of examined places the exposure do not exceeded the IAEA acceptable level

  6. Radon and radioactivity at a town overlying Uranium ores in northern Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourtidis, K; Georgoulias, A K; Vlahopoulou, M; Tsirliganis, N; Kastelis, N; Ouzounis, K; Kazakis, N

    2015-12-01

    Extensive measurements of (222)Rn in the town of Xanthi in N Greece show that the part of the town overlying granite deposits and the outcrop of a uranium ore has exceptionally high indoor radon levels, with monthly means up to 1500 Bq m(-3). A large number of houses (40%) in this part of the town exhibit radon levels above 200 Bq m(-3) while 11% of the houses had radon levels above 400 Bq m(-3). Substantial interannual variability as well as the highest in Europe winter/summer ratios (up to 12) were observed in this part of the town, which consist of traditional stone masonry buildings of the late 19th-early 20th century. Measurements of (238)U and (232)Th content of building materials from these houses as well as radionuclide measurements in different floors show that the high levels of indoor radon measured in these buildings are not due to high radon emanation rates from the building materials themselves but rather due to high radon flux from the soil because of the underlying geology, high radon penetration rates into the buildings from underground due to the lack of solid concrete foundations in these buildings, or a combination thereof. From the meteorological variables studied, highest correlation with indoor (222)Rn was found with temperature (r(2) = 0.65). An indoor radon prognostic regression model using temperature, pressure and precipitation as input was developed, that reproduced indoor radon with r(2) = 0.69. Hence, meteorology is the main driving factor of indoor radon, with temperature being the most important determinant. Preliminary flux measurements indicate that the soil-atmosphere (222)Rn flux should be in the range 150-250 Bq m(-2) h(-1), which is in the upper 10% of flux values for Europe. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Residential radon exposure and risk of incident hematologic malignancies in the Cancer Prevention Study-II Nutrition Cohort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teras, Lauren R., E-mail: lauren.teras@cancer.org [Epidemiology Research Program, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA (United States); Diver, W. Ryan [Epidemiology Research Program, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA (United States); Turner, Michelle C. [Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL), Barcelona (Spain); Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF), Barcelona (Spain); CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Madrid (Spain); McLaughlin Centre for Population Health Risk Assessment, University of Ottawa, Ottawa (Canada); Krewski, Daniel [McLaughlin Centre for Population Health Risk Assessment, University of Ottawa, Ottawa (Canada); School of Epidemiology, Public Health and Disease Prevention, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Sahar, Liora [Statistics and Evaluation Center, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA (United States); Ward, Elizabeth [Intramural Research, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA (United States); Gapstur, Susan M. [Epidemiology Research Program, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Dosimetric models show that radon, an established cause of lung cancer, delivers a non-negligible dose of alpha radiation to the bone marrow, as well as to lymphocytes in the tracheobronchial epithelium, and therefore could be related to risk of hematologic cancers. Studies of radon and hematologic cancer risk, however, have produced inconsistent results. To date there is no published prospective, population-based study of residential radon exposure and hematologic malignancy incidence. We used data from the American Cancer Society Cancer Prevention Study-II Nutrition Cohort established in 1992, to examine the association between county-level residential radon exposure and risk of hematologic cancer. The analytic cohort included 140,652 participants (66,572 men, 74,080 women) among which 3019 incident hematologic cancer cases (1711 men, 1308 women) were identified during 19 years of follow-up. Cox proportional hazard regression was used to calculate multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for radon exposure and hematologic cancer risk. Women living in counties with the highest mean radon concentrations (>148 Bq/m{sup 3}) had a statistically significant higher risk of hematologic cancer compared to those living in counties with the lowest (<74 Bq/m{sup 3}) radon levels (HR=1.63, 95% CI:1.23–2.18), and there was evidence of a dose-response relationship (HR{sub continuous}=1.38, 95% CI:1.15–1.65 per 100 Bq/m{sup 3}; p-trend=0.001). There was no association between county-level radon and hematologic cancer risk among men. The findings of this large, prospective study suggest residential radon may be a risk factor for lymphoid malignancies among women. Further study is needed to confirm these findings. - Highlights: • This is the first prospective, general population study of residential radon and risk of hematologic cancer. • Findings from this study suggest that residential radon exposure may be a risk factor

  8. Residential radon exposure and risk of incident hematologic malignancies in the Cancer Prevention Study-II Nutrition Cohort

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teras, Lauren R.; Diver, W. Ryan; Turner, Michelle C.; Krewski, Daniel; Sahar, Liora; Ward, Elizabeth; Gapstur, Susan M.

    2016-01-01

    Dosimetric models show that radon, an established cause of lung cancer, delivers a non-negligible dose of alpha radiation to the bone marrow, as well as to lymphocytes in the tracheobronchial epithelium, and therefore could be related to risk of hematologic cancers. Studies of radon and hematologic cancer risk, however, have produced inconsistent results. To date there is no published prospective, population-based study of residential radon exposure and hematologic malignancy incidence. We used data from the American Cancer Society Cancer Prevention Study-II Nutrition Cohort established in 1992, to examine the association between county-level residential radon exposure and risk of hematologic cancer. The analytic cohort included 140,652 participants (66,572 men, 74,080 women) among which 3019 incident hematologic cancer cases (1711 men, 1308 women) were identified during 19 years of follow-up. Cox proportional hazard regression was used to calculate multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for radon exposure and hematologic cancer risk. Women living in counties with the highest mean radon concentrations (>148 Bq/m 3 ) had a statistically significant higher risk of hematologic cancer compared to those living in counties with the lowest (<74 Bq/m 3 ) radon levels (HR=1.63, 95% CI:1.23–2.18), and there was evidence of a dose-response relationship (HR continuous =1.38, 95% CI:1.15–1.65 per 100 Bq/m 3 ; p-trend=0.001). There was no association between county-level radon and hematologic cancer risk among men. The findings of this large, prospective study suggest residential radon may be a risk factor for lymphoid malignancies among women. Further study is needed to confirm these findings. - Highlights: • This is the first prospective, general population study of residential radon and risk of hematologic cancer. • Findings from this study suggest that residential radon exposure may be a risk factor for lymphoid

  9. Radon in Antarctica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilic, R.; Rusov, V.D.; Pavlovych, V.N.; Vaschenko, V.M.; Hanzic, L.; Bondarchuk, Y.A.

    2005-01-01

    The paper reviews results of radon measurements obtained in Antarctic research stations in the last 40 years by both active and passive radon monitors. A brief description of the radon laboratory set-up in the Ukrainian Academician Vernadsky station on the Antarctic Peninsula (W 64 o 16 ' , S 65 o 15 ' ), where radon is measured by two types of etched track Rn dosimeter and 4 types of continuous radon monitoring devices is presented. Some selected results of research work are described related to: (i) analysis of radon storms, defined as an abrupt increase of 222 Rn during the occurrence of a cyclone, and its applicability for the study of the transport of air masses of continental origin to Antarctica; (ii) a study of the correlation of changes of radon concentration and geomagnetic field induced by tectonic activity and its application to predicting tectonomagnetic anomalies, and (iii) verification of a newly developed theoretical model based on noise analysis of the measured radon signal for earthquake prediction. Suggestions for future utilization of radon for basic research in Antarctica (and not only in Antarctica) conclude the contribution. conclude the contribution

  10. Radon Measurements in Vojvodina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bikit, I.; Bikit, K.; Forkapic, S.; Mrda, D.; Nikolov, J.; Todorovic, N.; Veskovic, M.

    2013-01-01

    Recent analyses of epidemiological studies of lung cancer risk from residential exposures demonstrate a statistically significant increase per unit of exposure below average annual concentrations of about 200 Bq/m 3 . Indoor radon measurements performed in Novi Sad in about 400 houses and flats are presented and discussed in this paper. By measuring gamma-activity of radon daughters, radon activity concentration was determined to be 50 Bq/m 3 . In Vojvodina region indoor radon levels were measured by alpha track detectors CR-39 on about 3000 locations during the winter seasons in the period of three years (2003-2005). The main aim of the present study was to explore the critical group of population for radon exposure and to estimate maximal annual doses. Existing radon maps which identify regions with elevated radon levels will improve data collection and analysis for the future radon campaigns. Collaboration on the JRC program of European indoor radon map and implementation of grid system are also discussed.(author)

  11. Small area mapping of domestic radon, smoking prevalence and lung cancer incidence – A case study in Northamptonshire, UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denman, Antony R.; Rogers, Stephen; Ali, Akeem; Sinclair, John; Phillips, Paul S.; Crockett, Robin G.M.; Groves-Kirkby, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Smoking and radon both cause lung cancer, and together the risk is significantly higher. UK public health campaigns continue to reduce smoking prevalence, and other initiatives identify houses with raised radon (radon-222) levels and encourage remedial action. Smoking prevalence and radon levels in the UK have been mapped at Primary Care Trust level. This paper extends that work, using a commercial socio-demographic database to estimate smoking prevalence at the postcode sector level, and to predict the population characteristics at postcode sector level for 87 postcode sectors in Northamptonshire. Likely smoking prevalence in each postcode sector is then modelled from estimates of the smoking prevalence in the different socio-economic groups used by the database. Mapping estimated smoking prevalence, radon potential and average lung cancer incidence for each postcode sector suggested that there was little correlation between smoking prevalence and radon levels, as radon potential was generally lower in urban areas in Northamptonshire, where the estimates of smoking prevalence were highest. However, the analysis demonstrated some sectors where both radon potential and smoking prevalence were moderately raised. This study showed the potential of this methodology to map estimated smoking prevalence and radon levels to inform locally targeted public health campaigns to reduce lung cancer incidence. - Highlights: • We use a commercial socio-demographic database to estimate smoking prevalence in small areas in Northamptonshire, UK. • We map the estimated smoking prevalence and average domestic radon levels in these small areas. • We estimate annual average lung cancer incidence in these small areas. • The methodology is useful to evaluate and plan localised public health campaigns to reduce lung cancer incidence.

  12. Study on calculation models and distribution rules of the radon concentration and its progenies concentration in blind roadway with forced-exhaust ventilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Yongjun; Wang Liheng; Zhou Xinghuo; Li Xiangyang; Zhong Yongming; Wang Shuyun; Ding Dexin

    2014-01-01

    The forced-exhaust ventilation is an important way to control the concentration of radon and its progenies in long-distance blind driving roadway. It is of great significance for guiding the design of ventilation and radiation protection to study distribution characteristics of the concentration of radon and its progenies in the wind of roadway adopting the forced-exhaust ventilation. Therefore, according to the decay relationship of radon and its progenies, a simplified mathematical calculation model was built, which relates to the radon activity concentration and the potential alpha concentration of radon progenies. The paper also analyzed the sources of radon and its progenies in the limited space of the blind roadway. Then, based on the turbulence mass transfer theory of ventilation air flow, the paper established mathematical calculation models of distribution characteristics of the radon activity concentration and the potential alpha concentration of radon progenies in blind roadway with forced-exhaust ventilation, respectively. Finally, the paper applied the calculation models to a special blind roadway, and discussed the influence of the ventilation air inflow and the radon exhalation rate of rock wall on the distribution of radon concentration and the potential alpha concentration of radon progenies in the roadway. Meanwhile, some protective measurements were put forward to reduce the radiation dose of worker caused by radon and its progenies in the blind roadway. (authors)

  13. Study of radon-222 emanation from sedimentary phosphates and corresponding phosphogypsum. Temperature effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boujrhal, F.M.

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the effect of temperature on radon emanation from the phosphates of various regions of Morocco, from corresponding phosphogypsum and from teeth fossilized of Youssoufia phosphate. The interpretation of obtained results was carried out by the physicochemical studies with various approaches; the X-ray diffraction analysis, the measurement of the specific surface area and porousness, the determination of the oxygen content by activation analysis with 14 MeV neutron. The thermal treatment between 100 and 900 degrees C conducted to the following points: - An increase of the radon degassing rate, which is first slow when the temperature increase from 20 to 600 degrees C, then becomes brutal beyond this temperature. We attributed this variation to the training effect ( transport effect ) of radon by the others gas susceptible to be released with thermal effect, particularly the CO sub 2. - The reduction of the radon emanation power versus temperature. We could demonstrate a linear correlation between the power emanation and the specific surface area. 122 refs., 102 figs., 20 tabs. (Author)

  14. Radon in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Search Radon Contact Us Share Radon in Schools Related Information Managing Radon in Schools Radon Measurement ... Radon Could Be a Serious Threat to Your School Chances are you've already heard of radon - ...

  15. Study of lung cancer and residential radon in the Czech Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomasek, L.; Mueller, T.; Kunz, E.; Heribanova, A.; Matzner, J.; Placek, V.; Burian, I.; Holecek, J.

    2001-01-01

    The lung cancer mortality study was designed as a follow-up study of the population (N = 12,004) in a radon-prone area in the Czech Republic, covering the 1960-1999 period. Information on the vital status and causes of death was mostly obtained from local authorities and extracted from the national population registry. Exposure estimates were based on one-year measurements of radon progeny in the majority of houses within the study area (74 %). Exposures outside the area (16%) were based on radon mapping of the Czech Republic. The mean concentration, 509 Bq/m 3 , is five-fold higher than the country-wide average. By 1999, a total of 210 lung cancers had been observed, which is somewhat more than the nationally expected value (O/E = 1.10), as compared to the generally low numbers regarding cancer types other than lung cancer (O/E = 0.81). The excess relative risk for the standard radon concentration (100 Bq/m 3 ) was 0.087 (90 % CI: 0.017-0.208), which is consistent with the risk coefficients derived from other indoor studies. The increased lung cancer incidence was found to depend linearly on exposure in terms of the mean radon concentration during the past 5-34 years. The estimate was not affected appreciably by adjustment to smoking; although the risk coefficient was higher for non-smokers than for smokers (0.130 vs 0.069), the difference was not statistically significant

  16. Study of the atmospheric chemistry of radon progeny in laboratory and real indoor atmospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopke, P.K.

    1992-07-01

    This report describes studies on the chemical and physical behavior of the [sup 218]Po atom immediately following its formation by the alpha decay of radon. Because small changes in size for activity in the sub-10 nm size range result in large changes in the delivered dose per unit exposure, this behavior must be understood if the exposure to radon progeny and its dose to the cells in the respiratory tract are to be fully assessed. The specific tasks of the controlled laboratory studies are to determine the formation rates of [center dot]OH radicals formed by the radiolysis of air following radon decay, to examine the formation of particles by the radiolytic oxidation of substances like SO[sub 2] ethylene, and H[sub 2]S to lower vapor pressure compounds and determine the role of gas phase additives such as H[sub 2]O and NH[sub 3] in determining the particle size, to measure the rate of ion-induced nucleation using a thermal diffusion cloud chamber, and to measure the neutralization rate of [sup 218]Po[sub x][sup +] in O[sub 2] at low radon concentrations. Tasks of the exposure studies in occupied indoor spaces are to initiate measurements of the activity size distributions in actual homes with occupants present so that the variability of the indoor activity size distributions can be assessed with respect to indoor aerosol sources and general lifestyle variations of the occupants, to initiate a prospective study of the utility of measurement of deposited [sup 210]Pb embedded in glass surfaces as a measure of the long-term, integrated exposure of the population to radon, and to develop the methodology to determine the hygroscopicity of the indoor aerosol so that the changes in deposition efficiency of the radioactive indoor aerosol with hygroscopic growth in the respiratory tract can be assessed.

  17. Does balneotherapy with low radon concentration in water influence the endocrine system? A controlled non-randomized pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Katalin; Berhés, István; Kovács, Tibor; Kávási, Norbert; Somlai, János; Bender, Tamás

    2009-08-01

    Radon bath is a well-established modality of balneotherapy for the management of degenerative musculoskeletal disorders. The present study was conducted to ascertain whether baths of relatively low (80 Bq/l) radon concentration have any influence on the functioning of the endocrine system. In the study, a non-randomized pilot study, 27 patients with degenerative musculoskeletal disorders received 30-min radon baths (of 31-32 degrees C temperature and 80 Bq/l average radon concentration) daily, for 15 days. Twenty-five patients with matching pathologies were subjected to balneotherapy according to the same protocol, using thermal water with negligible radon content (6 Bq/l). Serum thyroid stimulating hormone, prolactin, cortisol, adrenocorticotropic hormone, and dehydroepiandrosterone levels were measured before and after a balneotherapy course of 15 sessions. Comparison of the accumulated data using the Wilcoxon test did not reveal any significant difference between pre- and post-treatment values or between the two patient groups. It is noted that while the beneficial effects of balneotherapy with radon-containing water on degenerative disorders is widely known, only few data have been published in the literature on its effect on endocrine functions. The present study failed to demonstrate any substantial effect of thermal water with relatively low radon content on the functioning of the endocrine system.

  18. Comparative survey of outdoor, residential and workplace radon concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barros, Nirmalla; Field, R. William; Field, Dan W.; Steck, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated radon concentrations in above-ground (i.e. first floor) workplace in Missouri and compared them with above-ground radon concentrations in nearby homes and outdoor locations. This study also examined the potential utility of using home and outdoor radon concentrations to predict the radon concentration at a nearby workplace (e.g. county agencies and schools). Even though workplace radon concentrations were not statistically different from home radon concentrations, the radon concentration at a particular home, or outdoor location, was a poor predictor of the radon concentration at a nearby workplace. Overall, 9.6 and 9.9 % of homes and workplace, respectively, exhibited radon concentrations of ≥148 Bq m -3 . Because of the percentage of workplace with elevated radon concentrations, the results suggest that additional surveys of workplace radon concentrations are needed, especially in areas of high radon potential, to assess the contribution of workplace radon exposure to an individual's overall radon exposure. (authors)

  19. Controlled study of the evolution of radon and its decay products in radioactive mine environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calizaya A, F.

    1985-01-01

    This thesis discusses three aspects related to radon emissions and control of radon decay products in mine environments: (1) measurement of the effects of environmental parameters on radiation levels, (2) analysis of the data using ordinary linear regression and transfer function models and (3) prediction of the concentration of radioactive contaminants in the mine air. In-mine and laboratory experiments were conducted to develop the research data. In mine tests were conducted in a bulkhead isolated mine drift containing low grade uranium ore at the Colorado School of Mines, Experimental Mine with the US Bureau of Mines - Spokane Research Center (USBM, SRC) micro-computer based radiation monitoring system. Parameters such as amount of ore, amount of condensation nuclei in the mine air, temperature, air velocity, and barometric pressure were studied. The laboratory tests were conducted in an air-tight radon chamber equipped with a container of the radioactive material, various monitors, and the USBM, SRC Data Acquisition System. The effect of parameters such as ore grade, particle size, rock moisture, air temperature and relative humidity on radon concentrations were measured in the laboratory. Radiation levels, together with parameters affecting these levels, were measured over a period of one year (June 1984-July 1985) both in the laboratory model and in the field

  20. Experimental study of the combined effect of cigarette smoke and an active burden of radon-222

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chameaud, J.; Perraud, R.; Chretien, J.; Masse, R.; Lafuma, J.

    1978-01-01

    Previous studies on the carcinogenic effect of radon-222 derivatives have yielded accurate relationships, for each radon dose, between the dose value and the frequencies and latency times of lung cancers. In the present work, one hundred rats were subjected, over one-and-a-half months, to a total dose of 3600 WLM, chosen because it corresponds to a 30% occurrence of cancers. Fifty of these animals then inhaled cigarette smoke during 50 ten-minute sessions per week. The total time for these inhalations was 350 hours spread over about six months. In the 'radon' group (50 rats), 17 animals were found to have lung cancer. In the 'radon + tobacco' group (50 rats), 32 cancers were observed; moreover, the tumours in this group were much more extensive, multifocal and invasive. Animals subjected to cigarette smoke alone have never shown lung cancer. The effect of tobacco as a co-factor in carcinogenesis has thus been varified experimentally, although inhaled cigarette smoke alone is not carcinogenic in rats. (author)

  1. Study on radon concentration in groundwater of Sira and Tiptur taluk of Tumkur district, Karnataka, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M B Karthik Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A study on radon concentration in groundwater samples collected from different villages of Sira and Tiptur taluk of Tumkur district has been conducted using emanometry method, and the effective dose to the public was estimated. The geometric mean of the activity concentration of dissolved radon was found to be 39.13 ± 1.99 and 3.78 ± 0.05 Bq/L for Sira and Tiptur taluk, respectively. The total annual effective dose for adult, children, and infants was also estimated and was found to be 0.20, 0.18, and 0.31 mSv/year, respectively, in Sira taluk and 0.019, 0.017, and 0.029 mSv/year in Tiptur taluk, respectively. Water samples were also analyzed for the physicochemical parameters to assess the quality of drinking water and also to understand the influence of these parameters on dissolved radon concentration. Poor correlation was observed between dissolved radon concentration and pH in both taluks.

  2. Studies on possibility for alleviation of lifestyle diseases by low-dose irradiation or radon inhalation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kataoka, T.; Sakoda, A.; Yoshimoto, M.; Nakagawa, S.; Toyota, T.; Nishiyama, Y.; Yamato, K.; Ishimori, Y.; Kawabe, A.; Hanamoto, K.; Taguchi, T.; Yamaoka, K.

    2011-01-01

    Our previous studies showed the possibility that activation of the anti-oxidative function alleviates various oxidative damages, which are related to lifestyle diseases. Results showed that, low-dose X-ray irradiation activated superoxide dismutase and inhibits oedema following ischaemia-reperfusion. To alleviate ischaemia-reperfusion injury with transplantation, the changes of the anti-oxidative function in liver graft using low-dose X-ray irradiation immediately after exenteration were examined. Results showed that liver grafts activate the anti-oxidative function as a result of irradiation. In addition, radon inhalation enhances the anti-oxidative function in some organs, and alleviates alcohol-induced oxidative damage of mouse liver. Moreover, in order to determine the most effective condition of radon inhalation, mice inhaled radon before or after carbon tetrachloride (CCl 4 ) administration. Results showed that radon inhalation alleviates CCl 4 -induced hepatopathy, especially prior inhalation. It is highly possible that adequate activation of anti-oxidative functions induced by low-dose irradiation can contribute to preventing or reducing oxidative damages, which are related to lifestyle diseases. (authors)

  3. EML indoor radon workshop, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, A.C.; Lowder, W.; Fisenne, I.; Knutson, E.O.; Hinchliffe, L.

    1983-07-01

    A workshop on indoor radon, held at the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) on November 30 and December 1, 1982, covered recent developments in radon daughter research and development. Thirty papers were presented dealing with standardization and quality assurance measurement methods, surveys, measurements strategy, physical mechanisms of radon and radon daughter transport and development of guidance standards for indoor exposures. The workshop concluded with a planning session that identified the following needs: (1) national and international intercomparisons of techniques for measuring radon and radon daughter concentrations, working level and radon exhalation flux density; (2) development and refinement of practical measurement techniques for thoron and its daughter products; (3) quantitative definition of the sources of indoor radon and the mechanisms of transport into structures; (4) better knowledge of the physical properties of radon daughters; (5) more complete and accurate data on the population exposure to radon, which can only be met by broadly based surveys; and (6) more international cooperation and information exchange among countries with major research programs

  4. Radon 10 x 10 project: Implantation of geographic information systems in studies of radon in homes and geology catalans; Proyecto radon 10x10: aplicacion de los sistemas de informacion geografica en estudios de radon y geologia en viviendas catalanas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amado Sanjuan, J. L.; Bach Plaza, J.; Baixeras divar, C.; Font Guiteras, L. L.; Moreno Balta, V.

    2013-07-01

    This methodology provides a useful tool to establish relationships between different data in order to identify areas in which to assess the radiological risk that represents radon in the Catalan population and gagging. (Author)

  5. Study of the behaviour of radon in soil and the interpretation of radon anomalies in the exploration for uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatnagar, A.S.

    1975-04-01

    The report presents detailed tables of data on radon distribution patterns to enable an interpretation of the anomalies to be carried out in the process of exploration for uranium. The distribution of radon in soils fits into a lognormal pattern. In places where uranium mineralization exists, the distribution pattern is a two lognormal one. This method can be used to classify areas and delineate them according to the distribution pattern found over them. The field work was carried out in the Delhi area, in Turumdih and in Udaisagar

  6. Radon exhalation study from cement, cement slabs and concrete slabs with variation in fly ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Nisha; Singh, Jaspal

    2012-01-01

    Fly ash is a waste product from coal-fired power plants. Fly ash has become a subject of world-wide interest in recent years because of its diverse uses, e.g. in the manufacture of concrete for building purposes, for the filling of underground cavities, or as a component of building material. The fly ash may contain enhanced levels of the natural radionuclides in the uranium and thorium series and by using the fly ash in building materials, the radiation levels in houses may thus be technologically enhanced. Because of its relatively high radionuclide contents (including 226 Ra), fly ash may, however, present a potential hazard to the population through its radon emanation, which would be highly undesirable. Since fly ash is frequently used as a building material, the idea of the experiment was to mix fly ash in different proportions in the cement in the powder form, cemented slabs and concrete slabs to study the combined behaviors. Alpha sensitive LR-115 type II plastic track detector, commonly known as Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors (SSNTDs), were used to measure the radon concentration. The alpha particles emitted from the radon causes the radiation damaged tracks. The chemical etching in NaOH at 60°C for about 90 minutes was done to reveal these latent tracks, which were then scanned and counted by an optical microscope of suitable magnification. By calculating the track density of registered tracks, the radon concentrations were determined. In case of cement in the powder form and in cemented slab, starting from the pure cement, fly ash was added up to 70% by weight. In this case the radon exhalation rate has increased by addition of fly ash in the cement and in case of concrete slabs by the addition of fly ash in the cement the radon exhalation increases up to 60% and then decreases. Therefore, on the basis of our investigations we concluded that in general radon exhalation rate increases with the addition of fly ash. (author)

  7. Studying radon exhalation rates variability from phosphogypsum piles in the SW of Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    López-Coto, I., E-mail: israel.lopez@dfa.uhu.es [Dpto. Física Aplicada, Facultad CC. Experimentales, University of Huelva, Campus de El Carmen s/n, 21007 Huelva (Spain); Mas, J.L. [Dpto. Física Aplicada I. Escuela Politécnica Superior, University of Sevilla, C/Virgen de Africa 7, 41012 Sevilla (Spain); Vargas, A. [Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Instituto de Técnicas Energéticas, Campus Sud Edificio ETSEIB, Planta 0, Pabellón C, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Bolívar, J.P. [Dpto. Física Aplicada, Facultad CC. Experimentales, University of Huelva, Campus de El Carmen s/n, 21007 Huelva (Spain)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • Variability of radon exhalation rates from PG piles has been studied using numerical simulation supported by experimental data. • Most relevant parameters controlling the exhalation rate are radon potential and moisture saturation. • Piling up the waste increasing the height instead of the surface allows the reduction of the exhalation rate. • A proposed cover here is expected to allow exhalation rates reductions up to 95%. - Abstract: Nearly 1.0 × 10{sup 8} tonnes of phosphogypsum were accumulated during last 50 years on a 1200 ha disposal site near Huelva town (SW of Spain). Previous measurements of exhalation rates offered very variable values, in such a way that a worst case scenario could not be established. Here, new experimental data coupled to numerical simulations show that increasing the moisture contents or the temperature reduces the exhalation rate whilst increasing the radon potential or porosity has the contrary effect. Once the relative effects are compared, it can be drawn that the most relevant parameters controlling the exhalation rate are radon potential (product of emanation factor by {sup 226}Ra concentration) and moisture saturation of PG. From wastes management point of view, it can be concluded that piling up the waste increasing the height instead of the surface allows the reduction of the exhalation rate. Furthermore, a proposed cover here is expected to allow exhalation rates reductions up to 95%. We established that the worst case scenario corresponds to a situation of extremely dry winter. Under these conditions, the radon exhalation rate (0.508 Bq m{sup −2} s{sup −1}) would be below though close to the upper limit established by U.S.E.P.A. for inactive phopsphogypsum piles (0.722 Bq m{sup −2} s{sup −1})

  8. A retrospective study of radon daughter concentrations in the workplace in the fluorspar mines of St. Lawrence, Newfoundland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corkhill, D.A.; Dory, A.B.

    1984-07-01

    Fluorspar mining began in St. Lawrence, Newfoundland in the early thirties. In the early years the existing economic and social conditions resulted in poor health and safety practices in the mines. A high incidence of many types of pulmonary diseases, including lung cancer, among the miners was investigated by the Department of National Health and Welfare, and by 1960 radiation in the mines was recognized as the major cause. The original epidemiological study used radon daughter exposure estimates determined from a limited number of radon daughter measurements in one of the mines. Insufficient experience existed at that time to allow a proper technical assessment of the mines and to modify the estimated radon daughter concentrations accordingly. A review of the environmental conditions in the early years of mining and a revision of the estimates of radon daughter concentrations in those mines is presented. Environmental working conditions were determined based on a review of maps, inspectors' reports, Commission hearings, recollections of former workers and of the authors. Comparison to the conditions in the mines in later years, when radiation samples were taken more frequently allowed estimations of the probable radon daughter concentrations that would have existed in the mines earlier. Ranges of estimated average concentrations were made by mines for each year and wherever possible for broad types of job classes. Rather than attempting to propose single numbers for radon daughter concentrations, which in turn might have implied an accuracy that did not exist, ranges of average radon daughter concentrations were estimated

  9. A study on the radon concentrations in water in Jeddah (Saudi Arabia) and the associated health effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tayyeb, Z.A.; Kinsara, A.R.; Farid, S.M.

    1998-01-01

    Several studies have shown that water-borne 222 Rn contributes to indoor air concentrations. A passive radon measurement method was employed to determine radon activity concentrations in the water of Jeddah city (Saudi Arabia). Tap water, flushing water and drinking water, including natural mineral water, artificial mineral water and distilled water, have been investigated for their radon concentrations. It is observed that the radon concentration in natural mineral water samples is the highest and that in flush water, it is the lowest. From these measurements, the corresponding annual effective dose for the stomach and the lung are determined. It is found that the annual effective dose resulting from direct consumption of water is far greater than that due to inhalation of radon emanated from tap water and flushing water. Moreover, it is also seen that the annual effective dose resulting from inhalation of radon emanated from tap water and flushing water is negligible compared to the total annual effective dose for indoor radon in Jeddah. (author)

  10. Radon in soil gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rector, H.E.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a technology review conducted to identify and organize the range of options for measuring radon in soil gas as a means to evaluate radon exposure potential in buildings. The main focus of the review includes identifying the following: Measurement of objectives - the specific parameter(s) that each technology is designed to measure( e.g., soil gas concentration, flux density, etc.); Equipment needs -commercial availability of systems and/or components, specifications for fabricated components; Procedural information - documented elements of field and laboratory methodology and quality assurance; Underlying assumptions - conceptual and mathematical models utilized to convert analytical outcomes to estimators of radon. Basic technologies and field data were examined from a generic perspective (e.g., the common denominators of passive detectors, hollow sampling probes, flux monitors)( as well as specific configurations developed by individual investigators (e.g., sample volume, depth) to develop the basis for separating analytical uncertainties form sampling uncertainties

  11. The effect and the amendment of thermoregulation to the stability of radon concentration in radon chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xiongjie; Wang Renbo; Qu Jinhui; Tang Bin; Zhu Zhifu; Man Zaigang

    2010-01-01

    When the temperature in the airtight radon chamber was adjusted, it would induce the frequent changes of the air pressure in chamber, then the radon concentration in the radon chamber would continuously reduce, which could seriously destroy the stability of the radon concentration in radon chamber. In this paper, on the study of the effect reasons to the stability of radon concentration in airtight radon chamber due to the thermoregulation, a new amendment scheme was put forward, and the solutions of the relevant parameters were discussed. The amendment scheme had been successfully applied to HD-6 radon chamber, and achieved good results. (authors)

  12. Paloma-radon: Atmospheric radon-222 as a geochemical probe for water in the Martian subsoil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabroux, J.-C.; Michielsen, N.; Voisin, V.; Ferry, C.; Richon, P.; Pineau, J.-F.; Le Roulley, J.-C.; Chassefière, E.

    2003-04-01

    Radon exhalation from a porous soil is known to depend strongly on the soil moisture content: a minute amount of water, or water ice, in the pore space increases dramatically the possibility for radon to migrate far from its parent mineral. We propose to take advantage of this characteristic by using atmospheric radon-222 as a geochemical probe for water in the Martian soil, at least one order of magnitude deeper than the current Mars Odyssey neutron data. Strong thermal inversions during the Martian night will accumulate radon in the lowest atmospheric boundary layer, up to measurable levels despite the comparatively high environmental (cosmic and solar) background radiation and the assumed low uranium content of the upper crust of the planet. Preliminary studies and development of an instrument for the measurement of the Martian atmospheric alpha radioactivity is part of the CNES-supported PALOMA experiment. Two test benches have been implemented, one of them allowing differential measurements of the diffusion of radon in the Martian soil simulant NASA JSC Mars-1, under relevant temperatures and pressures. The other, a 1 m^3 radon-dedicated test bench, aims to characterize the instrument that will measure radon in the Mars environment (7 mb CO_2). Tests on several nuclear radiation detectors show that semiconductor alpha-particle detectors (PIPS) are the best option (already on board the Mars Pathfinder Rover and other platforms). In addition, the detection volume is left open in order to capitalize upon the long (ca. 4 m) alpha track at this low pressure. A stationary diffusion model was developed in order to assess the radon flux at the Mars soil surface. Diffusion of gas in Martian soil is governed by Knudsen diffusion. The radon Knudsen diffusion coefficient was estimated, depending on the soil moisture and relevant structural properties, leading to a radon diffusion length of the order of 20 m. The landed platform PALOMA-Radon instrument will consist of a

  13. Paloma-radon: atmospheric radon 222 as a geochemical probe for water in the martian subsoil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabroux, J.Ch.; Michielsen, N.; Voisin, V.

    2003-01-01

    Radon exhalation from a porous soil is known to depend strongly on the soil moisture content: a minute amount of water, or water ice, in the pore space increases dramatically the possibility for radon to migrate far from its parent mineral. We propose to take advantage of this characteristic by using atmospheric radon 222 as a geochemical probe for water in the Martian soil, at least one order of magnitude deeper than the current Mars Odyssey neutron data. Strong thermal inversions during the Martian night will accumulate radon in the lowest atmospheric boundary layer, up to measurable levels despite the comparatively high environmental (cosmic and solar) background radiation and the assumed low uranium content of the upper crust of the planet. Preliminary studies and development of an instrument for the measurement of the Martian atmospheric alpha radioactivity is part of the CNES supported PALOMA experiment. Two test benches have been implemented, one of them allowing differential measurements of the diffusion of radon in the Martian soil simulant NASA JSC Mars-1, under relevant temperatures and pressures. The other, a 1 m3 radon-dedicated test bench, aims to characterize the instrument that will measure radon in the Mars environment (7 mb CO 2 ). Tests on several nuclear radiation detectors show that semiconductor alpha-particle detectors (PIPS) are the best option. In addition, the detection volume is left open in order to capitalize upon the long (ca. 4 m) alpha track at this low pressure. A stationary diffusion model was developed in order to assess the radon flux at the Mars soil surface. Diffusion of gas in Martian soil is governed by Knudsen diffusion. The radon Knudsen diffusion coefficient was estimated, depending on the soil moisture and relevant structural properties, leading to a radon diffusion length of the order of 20 m. The landed platform PALOMA-Radon instrument will consist of a set of alpha detectors connected to an electronic spectrometer, a

  14. Paloma-radon: atmospheric radon 222 as a geochemical probe for water in the martian subsoil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabroux, J.Ch.; Michielsen, N.; Voisin, V

    2003-07-01

    Radon exhalation from a porous soil is known to depend strongly on the soil moisture content: a minute amount of water, or water ice, in the pore space increases dramatically the possibility for radon to migrate far from its parent mineral. We propose to take advantage of this characteristic by using atmospheric radon 222 as a geochemical probe for water in the Martian soil, at least one order of magnitude deeper than the current Mars Odyssey neutron data. Strong thermal inversions during the Martian night will accumulate radon in the lowest atmospheric boundary layer, up to measurable levels despite the comparatively high environmental (cosmic and solar) background radiation and the assumed low uranium content of the upper crust of the planet. Preliminary studies and development of an instrument for the measurement of the Martian atmospheric alpha radioactivity is part of the CNES supported PALOMA experiment. Two test benches have been implemented, one of them allowing differential measurements of the diffusion of radon in the Martian soil simulant NASA JSC Mars-1, under relevant temperatures and pressures. The other, a 1 m3 radon-dedicated test bench, aims to characterize the instrument that will measure radon in the Mars environment (7 mb CO{sub 2}). Tests on several nuclear radiation detectors show that semiconductor alpha-particle detectors (PIPS) are the best option. In addition, the detection volume is left open in order to capitalize upon the long (ca. 4 m) alpha track at this low pressure. A stationary diffusion model was developed in order to assess the radon flux at the Mars soil surface. Diffusion of gas in Martian soil is governed by Knudsen diffusion. The radon Knudsen diffusion coefficient was estimated, depending on the soil moisture and relevant structural properties, leading to a radon diffusion length of the order of 20 m. The landed platform PALOMA-Radon instrument will consist of a set of alpha detectors connected to an electronic spectrometer

  15. Health effects of water-borne radon: review of a proposed study. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The Science Advisory Board's Radiation Advisory Committee was requested to review the scientific merit of a proposal to conduct an epidemiological study of radon in indoor air. The Board accepted the request and formed a Radioepidemiology Subcommittee which responded to two overriding scientific issues: Can further epidemiological study contribute to an understanding of the risks of lung cancer associated with household exposures. The Subcommittee concludes that scientific uncertainties in current epidemiological studies (chiefly studies of uranium miners) could be further reduced through direct investigations of the domestic population. Is the proposed study under review by the Office of Research and Development, entitled Health Effects of Waterborne Radon, appropriately designed to address the risk. For reasons cited in the attached report, the Subcommittee concludes that it is not appropriately designed

  16. Laboratory studies on the removal of radon-born lead from KamLAND's organic liquid scintillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefer, G.; Grant, C.; Piepke, A.; Ebihara, T.; Ikeda, H.; Kishimoto, Y.; Kibe, Y.; Koseki, Y.; Ogawa, M.; Shirai, J.; Takeuchi, S.; Mauger, C.; Zhang, C.; Schweitzer, G.; Berger, B. E.; Dazeley, S.; Decowski, M. P.; Detwiler, J. A.; Djurcic, Z.; Dwyer, D. A.; Efremenko, Y.; Enomoto, S.; Freedman, S. J.; Fujikawa, B. K.; Furuno, K.; Gando, A.; Gando, Y.; Gratta, G.; Hatakeyama, S.; Heeger, K. M.; Hsu, L.; Ichimura, K.; Inoue, K.; Iwamoto, T.; Kamyshkov, Y.; Karwowski, H. J.; Koga, M.; Kozlov, A.; Lane, C. E.; Learned, J. G.; Maricic, J.; Markoff, D. M.; Matsuno, S.; McKee, D.; McKeown, R. D.; Miletic, T.; Mitsui, T.; Motoki, M.; Nakajima, Kyo; Nakajima, Kyohei; Nakamura, K.; O`Donnell, T.; Ogawa, H.; Piquemal, F.; Ricol, J.-S.; Shimizu, I.; Suekane, F.; Suzuki, A.; Svoboda, R.; Tajima, O.; Takemoto, Y.; Tamae, K.; Tolich, K.; Tornow, W.; Watanabe, Hideki; Watanabe, Hiroko; Winslow, L. A.; Yoshida, S.

    2015-01-01

    The removal of radioactivity from liquid scintillator has been studied in preparation of a low background phase of KamLAND. This paper describes the methods and techniques developed to measure and efficiently extract radon decay products from liquid scintillator. We report the radio-isotope reduction factors obtained when applying various extraction methods. During this study, distillation was identified as the most efficient method for removing radon-born lead from liquid scintillator.

  17. Laboratory studies on the removal of radon-born lead from KamLAND's organic liquid scintillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keefer, G., E-mail: gregkeefer@llnl.gov [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Grant, C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Piepke, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8583 (Japan); Ebihara, T.; Ikeda, H. [Research Center for Neutrino Science, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Kishimoto, Y. [Research Center for Neutrino Science, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8583 (Japan); Kibe, Y.; Koseki, Y.; Ogawa, M.; Shirai, J.; Takeuchi, S. [Research Center for Neutrino Science, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Mauger, C.; Zhang, C. [W.K. Kellogg Radiation Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Schweitzer, G. [Department of Chemistry, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Berger, B.E. [Department of Physics, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523 (United States); Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8583 (Japan); Dazeley, S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Decowski, M.P. [Physics Department, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8583 (Japan); Detwiler, J.A. [Physics Department, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Djurcic, Z. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); and others

    2015-01-01

    The removal of radioactivity from liquid scintillator has been studied in preparation of a low background phase of KamLAND. This paper describes the methods and techniques developed to measure and efficiently extract radon decay products from liquid scintillator. We report the radio-isotope reduction factors obtained when applying various extraction methods. During this study, distillation was identified as the most efficient method for removing radon-born lead from liquid scintillator.

  18. Residential radon exposure, diet and lung cancer: a case-control study in a Mediterranean region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochicchio, Francesco; Forastiere, Francesco; Farchi, Sara; Quarto, Maria; Axelson, Olav

    2005-05-10

    We performed a case-control study in Lazio, a region in central Italy characterized by high levels of indoor radon, Mediterranean climate and diet. Cases (384) and controls (404) aged 35-90 years were recruited in the hospital. Detailed information regarding smoking, diet and other risk factors were collected by direct interview. Residential history during the 30-year period ending 5 years before enrollment was ascertained. In each dwelling, radon detectors were placed in both the main bedroom and the living room for 2 consecutive 6-month periods. We computed odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for time-weighted radon concentrations using both categorical and continuous unconditional logistic regression analysis and adjusting for smoking, diet and other variables. Radon measurements were available from 89% and 91% of the time period for cases and controls, respectively. The adjusted ORs were 1.30 (1.03-1.64), 1.48 (1.08-2.02), 1.49 (0.82-2.71) and 2.89 (0.45-18.6) for 50-99, 100-199, 200-399 and 400+ Bq/m(3), respectively, compared with 0-49 Bq/m(3) (OR = 1; 0.56-1.79). The excess odds ratio (EOR) per 100 Bq/m(3) was 0.14 (-0.11, 0.46) for all subjects, 0.24 (-0.09, 0.70) for subjects with complete radon measurements and 0.30 (-0.08, 0.82) for subjects who had lived in 1 or 2 dwellings. There was a tendency of higher risk estimates among subjects with low-medium consumption of dietary antioxidants (EOR = 0.32; -0.19, 1.16) and for adenocarcinoma, small cell and epidermoid cancers. This study indicates an association, although generally not statistically significant, between residential radon and lung cancer with both categorical and continuous analyses. Subjects with presumably lower uncertainty in the exposure assessment showed a higher risk. Dietary antioxidants may act as an effect modifier.

  19. A retrospective mortality study of workers exposed to radon in a Brazilian coal mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veiga, Lene Holanda Sadler

    2004-08-01

    High levels of radon concentration were found in the underground workplace of an underground coal mine in Parana state, which has been in activity since 1942. Many of these workers were exposed for a long period of time to a work atmosphere with high radon, and radon decay products concentration. Taking this into account, it was decided to carry on a historical cohort, study with the workers' of this mining universe (underground and surface) in. order to evaluate the possible health effects related to this exposure, by means of a retrospective study of mortality. Through multiple strategies, it was possible to trace the vital status of 90% of the cohort. The causes of the deaths were identified by active search, of Death Declarations in the Health Office of Parana state and also in and other states. The success rate of cause of death identification was 100%. The final, cohort included 1946 underground workers and 910 surface workers. Standard mortality ratio (SMR) analysis showed lower mortality from all causes for both underground (SMR-88, 95%CI=78-98) and surface workers (SMR=96, 95%CI=81- 113). A highly significant SMR was observed for pneumonia cause of death among surface ((SMR=284, 95%CI=118-684) and underground miners (SMR-254, 95%CI=140-459), while a highly significant lung cancer mortality risk was observed only for underground miners (SMR=177, 95%CI=105-299) with a significant trend in relation to years of underground work (duration of exposure). Taking into account that mortality from smoking-related cancers other than lung cancer is not elevated in underground workers and diesel equipment were not used at this mine, the results suggest that the exposure to radon daughters may have been responsible for the lung cancer excess among underground workers. This work consists of the first historical Brazilian cohort involving miners exposed to radon and one of the few historical cohorts built in Brazil. It should be considered the fact that many workers of

  20. Long-term temporal variability of the radon-222 exhalation flux from a landform covered by low uranium grade waste rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bollhöfer, Andreas; Doering, Che

    2016-01-01

    Radon-222 exhalation flux densities from two different substrates of several metres thickness, waste rock and waste rock mixed with approximately 30% lateritic material, were measured over a period of five years in the wet-dry tropics of Northern Australia. Fourteen measurement campaigns using activated charcoal canisters (n > 1000) covered both dry and wet seasons and showed differences in seasonal and long term trends of the "2"2"2Rn exhalation flux densities normalised to the "2"2"6Ra activity concentrations of the substrate. Dry season "2"2"2Rn exhalation was generally higher for the mixed substrate, due to the larger fraction of fines. Seasonality established within the first year of landform construction on the mixed substrate, due to the higher water holding capacity of the lateritic material. In contrast, waste rock only shows no seasonality until years four and five after construction, when average normalised dry season "2"2"2Rn exhalation flux densities from waste rock increase to values (0.47 ± 0.06 mBq m"−"2 s"−"1 per Bq kg"−"1) similar to the mixed substrate (0.64 ± 0.08 mBq m"−"2 s"−"1 per Bq kg"−"1), likely due to an increase in fines from rapid weathering of the schistose waste rock. Volumetric water content has been used to parametrize relative "2"2"2Rn exhalation and we determined that wet season "2"2"2Rn exhalation is about 40% of the dry season exhalation. - Highlights: • We determined "2"2"2Rn exhalation flux densities normalised to "2"2"6Ra activity concentrations (R_E_-_R) for two substrates. • R_E_-_R was lower for waste rock only compared to waste rock blended with 30% fine grained lateritic material. • Seasonality in waste rock "2"2"2Rn exhalation flux densities established 4 years after construction. • Wet season R_E_-_R was about 40% of the dry season R_E_-_R.

  1. Risks from radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doll, Richard

    1992-01-01

    The best estimate of risk to which everyone is exposed from natural radon in buildings is now obtained by extrapolation from observations on men exposed to radon in mines. The relationship between dose and effect derived by the US National Research Council implies that about 6% of the current life-time risk of developing the disease in the UK is attributable to radon, but for residents of some houses it will be much greater. This estimate is dependent on many assumptions, some of which are certainly wrong, and reliable estimates can be obtained only by direct observations on people living in different houses. It is possible that radon may also cause some risk of other cancers, notably leukaemia, but such risks, if real, are certainly small. Studies in progress should provide reliable estimates of all radon induced risks within a few years. (author)

  2. Radon in Syrian houses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Othman, I.; Hushari, M.; Raja, G.; Alsawaf, A.

    1996-01-01

    A nationwide investigation of radon levels in Syrian houses was carried out during the period 1991-1993. Passive radon diffusion dosemeters using polycarbonate detectors were distributed in houses all over Syria. Detectors were subjected to electrochemical etching to reveal latent tracks of alpha particles. The mean radon concentration in Syrian houses was found to be 45 Bq m -3 with some values several times higher. This investigation indicated that there were a few houses in Syria that require remedial action. Most houses that have high levels of radon were found in the southern area, especially in the Damascus governorate. The study also indicated that radon concentrations were higher in old houses built from mud with no tiling. (author)

  3. Chemical properties of radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stein, L.

    1986-01-01

    Radon is frequently regarded as a totally inert element. It is, however, a ''metalloid'' - an element which lies on the diagonal of the Periodic Table between the true metals and nonmetals and which exhibits some of the characteristics of both. It reacts with fluorine, halogen fluorides, dioxygenyl salts, fluoro-nitrogen salts, and halogen fluoride-metal fluoride complexes to form ionic compounds. Several of the solid reagents can be used to collect radon from air but must be protected from moisture, since they hydrolyze readily. Recently, solutions of nonvolatile, cationic radon have been produced in nonaqueous solvents. Ion-exchange studies have shown that the radon can be quantitatively collected on columns packed with either Nafion resins or complex salts. In its ionic state, radon is able to displace H + , Na + , K + , Cs + , Ca 2+ , and Ba 2+ ions from a number of solid materials. 27 refs., 6 figs

  4. Standardization of radon measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matuszek, J.M.; Hutchinson, J.A.; Lance, B.H.; Virgil, M.G.; Mahoney, R.J.

    1988-01-01

    Radon escaping from soil into homes appears to present the single greatest source of radiation exposure that most people will ever face. Measurement protocols for the relatively inert gas inextricably link the method of collection with the counting of the specimen. The most commonly used methods depend on the measurement of dislocation sites on plastic α-track detectors or on the adsorption of radon onto activated charcoal for subsequent counting of the γ-rays produced by decay of the radon progeny. The uncertainties inherent to the radon-measurement methods used commercially in the United States are far greater than those for measurements of other environmental radionuclides. The results of this preliminary study raise doubts as to whether existing proficiency-testing programs can provide assurance that radon-measurement methods are representative of actual conditions in any dwelling. 17 refs., 1 figs., 4 tabs

  5. Radon therapy; Radon in der Therapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spruck, Kaija [Technische Hochschule Mittelhessen, Giessen (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizinische Physik und Strahlenschutz

    2017-04-01

    Radon therapies are used since more than 100 years in human medicine. Today this method is controversially discussed due to the possible increase of ionizing radiation induced tumor risk. Although the exact mode of biological radiation effect on the cell level is still not known new studies show the efficiency of the radon therapy without side effect for instance for rheumatic/inflammatory or respiratory disorders.

  6. Radon surveys and their implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miles, J.C.H.; Cliff, K.D.; Dixon, D.W.; Green, B.M.R.; Strong, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    In the UK, as in other countries, radon daughter inhalation is the most significant cause of human exposure to ionising radiation either at home or at work whether one considers the mean or the maximum dose. Substantial studies of radon are under way in the UK, and the importance of radon is recognised in several spheres. NRPB investigations of the radon levels in buildings and mines are reported, the distributions of doses presented and risk factors calculated. The bases of radon limitation for workers and members of the public are given and the means of compliance discussed. (author)

  7. Health effects of radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Easterly, C.

    1994-01-01

    Exposure of people to radon has taken on increased interest during the last decade because of the understanding that buildings can serve to trap radon and its daughters, and thereby build up undesirable concentrations of these radioactive elements. Numerous studies of underground miners (often uranium miners) have shown an increased risk of lung cancer in comparison with nonexposed populations. Laboratory animals exposed to radon daughters also develop lung cancer. The abundant epidemiological and experimental data have established the carcinogenicity of radon progeny. Those observations are of considerable importance, because uranium, from which radon and its progeny arise, is ubiquitous in the earth's crust, including coal mines. Risk estimates of the health effects of long-term exposures at relatively low levels require continued development, especially to address the potential health effects of radon and radon daughters in homes and occupational settings where the exposure levels are less than levels in underground uranium and other metal mines that have been the subject of epidemiological studies. Two approaches can be used to characterize the lung-cancer risks associated with radon-daughter exposure: mathematical representations of the respiratory tract that model radiation doses to target cells and epidemiological investigation of exposed populations, mainly underground uranium miners. The mathematically-based dosimetric approach provides an estimate of lung cancer risk related to radon-daughter exposure based specifically on modeling of the dose to target cells. The various dosimetric models all require assumptions, some of which are not subject to direct verification, as to breathing rates; the deposition of radon daughters in the respiratory tract; and the type, nature, and location of the target cells for cancer induction. The most recent large committee effort drawn together to evaluate this issue was sponsored by the National Research Council

  8. Measurements of indoor radon and radon progeny in Mexico City

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Y.S.; Rodriguez, G.P.

    1996-01-01

    Indoor radon has been a public concern associated with increased lung cancer risks. Radon decay products interact with indoor aerosols to form progeny with different size distributions, which may influence the lung dosimetry when the progeny are inhaled. Air pollution in Mexico City is a serious problems with high particulate concentrations, but there are few reports of indoor radon measurement. The purposes of this study were to measure the aerosol concentration, radon concentration, and radon activity size distribution in the living area of three houses in Mexico City. The radon concentration was monitored by a RGM-3 radon gas monitor (Eberline, Inc., Santa Fe, NM). A graded diffusion battery was used to determine the progeny concentration and activity size distribution. The concentration and size distribution of the indoor aerosols were monitored by a quartz, crystal microbalance cascade impactor. Our measurements showed high concentrations of indoor aerosols (20-180 gg m -3 ). However, the radon concentrations-were low ( -1 ), but showed a clear diurnal pattern with peak concentrations from 2-10 AM. The activity size distributions of radon progeny were trimodal, with peaks of 0.6 nm, 4-5 nm, and 100 rim. Most activities were associated with large particle sizes. Our results indicated that indoor radon concentration was not high, due in part to a relatively high air exchange with outdoor air. The high aerosol concentration may also play an important part in the activity size distribution of radon progeny

  9. Radon in homes and risk of lung cancer: 13 collaborative analyses of individual data from European case-control studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darby, S.; Hill, D.; Doll, R.; Auvinen, A.; Barros Dios, J.M.; Ruano Ravina, A.; Baysson, H.; Tirmarche, M.; Bochicchio, F.; Deo, H.; Falk, R.; Forastiere, F.; Hakama, M.; Heid, I.; Schaffrath Rosario, A.; Wichmann, H.E.; Kreienbrock, L.; Kreuzer, M.; Lagarde, F.; Pershagen, G.; Makelainen, I.; Ruosteenoja, E.; Muirhead, C.; Oberaigner, W.; TomaBek, L.; Whitley, E.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To determine the risk of lung cancer associated with exposure at home to the radioactive disintegration products of naturally occurring radon gas. Design: Collaborative analysis of individual data from 13 case-control studies of residential radon and lung cancer. Setting: Nine European countries. Subjects: 7148 cases of lung cancer and 14 208 controls. Main outcome measures: Relative risks of lung cancer and radon gas concentrations in homes inhabited during the previous 5-34 years measured in becquerels (radon disintegrations per second) per cubic metre (Bq/m3) of household air. Results: The mean measured radon concentration in homes of people in the control group was 97 Bq/m3, with 11% measuring > 200 and 4% measuring > 400 Bq/m3. For cases of lung cancer the mean concentration was 104 Bq/m3. The risk of lung cancer increased by 8.4% (95% confidence interval 3.0% to 15.8%) per 100 Bq/m3 increase in measured radon (P=0.0007). This corresponds to an increase of 16% (5% to 31%) per 100 Bq/m3 increase in usual radon- that is, after correction for the dilution caused by random uncertainties in measuring radon concentrations. The dose-response relation seemed to be linear with no threshold and remained significant (P = 0.04) in analyses limited to individuals from homes with measured radon < 200 Bq/m3. The proportionate excess risk did not differ significantly with study, age, sex, or smoking. In the absence of other causes of death, the absolute risks of lung cancer by age 75 years at usual radon concentrations of 0, 100, and 400 Bq/m3 would be about 0.4%, 0.5%, and 0.7%, respectively, for lifelong non-smokers, and about 25 times greater (10%, 12%, and 16%) for cigarette smokers. Conclusions: Collectively, though not separately, these studies show appreciable hazards from residential radon, particularly for smokers and recent ex-smokers, and indicate that it is responsible for about 2% of all deaths from cancer in Europe. (author)

  10. Effects of various tailings covers on radon gas emanation from pyritic uranium tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dave, N.K.; Lim, T.P.

    1987-01-01

    Radon emanation studies were carried out at an inactive pyritic uranium tailings site in Elliot Lake, Ontario, Canada, to evaluate the effects of various existing dry and wet covers on radon flux rates. Measurements were taken using activated charcoal cartridges for various surface covers consisting of bare, vegetated, acidophilic moss with high degree of water saturation, compacted crushed rock and gravel, and winter snow. The results showed that at a given site, there was no significant difference in radon emanation rates between various tailings covers and bare tailings. In particular, no increase In radon emanation rates from vegetated areas compared to bare tailings was observed. Radon emanation rates varied spatially depending on tailings grain size, porosity, moisture content and on pressure and water table variations. The emanation rates were higher for tailings with low water contents compared to those for wet and moss covered tailings

  11. Study on seasonal variation of indoor radon, thoron and their progeny levels in Hassan District of Karnataka, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasa, E.; Rangswamy, D.R.; Sannappa, J.

    2015-01-01

    Radon, thoron and their progeny concentrations have been measured in different types of buildings at different locations for different seasons in Hassan city using time-integrated passive radon dosimeters containing LR-115 Type II solid state nuclear track detector exposed for four seasons of 3 months each covering a period of one year from October 2012 to September 2013. The radon and thoron activity concentration in summer season in the corresponding dwellings has been found to vary from 7.4 to 45.7 Bq m -3 and 5.4 to 34.9 Bqm -3 with a median of 23.59±11 Bqm -3 and 1447±8 Bq -3 respectively. The radon progeny concentrations varies from 0.4 to 4.1 mWL with an average value of 1.83±1 mWL, while thoron progeny concentrations vary from 0.3 to 3.2 mWL with an average value of 1.12±0.7 mWL respectively. The annual effective dose received due to radon, thoron and its progeny by the inhabitants in the dwellings under study has also been calculated which is found to vary from 0.320±0.4 to 1.860 ±1.1 mSv y -1 with an average value of 0.9576 ± 0.8 mSv y -1 . In general, the level of radon-thoron was observed highest in winter and lowest in summer. A detail analysis of radon and thoron distribution in different houses with seasonal variation is presented in this paper. From this study it is observed that, bathrooms and kitchens have significantly higher radon concentrations as compared to other rooms in the dwellings. (author)

  12. Effect of local geology on indoor radon levels: a case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawthorne, A.R.; Gammage, R.B.; Dudney, C.S.

    1984-01-01

    This paper presents the results of radon monitoring in 40 East Tennessee homes that were a component of a larger study to evaluate indoor air quality. Measurements were conducted during two 3-month time periods with passive integrating track etch monitors in each of the forty homes. In a subset of homes, measurements were also conducted with a real-time monitor that provided readings on an hourly basis. The results of the monitoring indicate that about 30% of the homes had radon levels were associated with local variations in geology; most of the homes having higher levels were located on the porous dolomite ridge partially surrounding Oak Ridge, Tennessee. 7 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

  13. Effect of local geology on indoor radon levels: a case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawthorne, A.R.; Gammage, R.B.; Dudney, C.S.

    1984-01-01

    This paper presents the results of radon monitoring in 40 East Tennessee homes that were a component of a larger study to evaluate indoor air quality. Measurements were conducted during two 3-month time periods with passive integrating track etch monitors in each of the forty homes. In a subset of homes, measurements were also conducted with a real-time monitor that provided readings on an hourly basis. The results of the monitoring indicate that about 30% of the homes had radon levels were associated with local variations in geology; most of the homes having higher levels were located on the porous dolomite ridge partially surrounding Oak Ridge, Tennessee. 7 references, 3 figures, 2 tables

  14. Animal study on biological responses by radon inhalation making use of waste rock which contains feeble activity of uranium (Joint research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishimori, Yuu; Sakoda, Akihiro; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Mitsunobu, Fumihiro; Yamaoka, Kiyonori; Kataoka, Takahiro; Yamato, Keiko; Nishiyama, Yuichi

    2013-06-01

    Okayama University and the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) have carried out the collaborative study of physiological effects of inhaled radon for the low-dose range. Main assignments were as follows. Based on the clinical knowledge, Misasa Medical Center (Okayama University Hospital) clarified the issues that should be addressed. Graduate School of Health Sciences (Okayama University) supervised the research and studied the biological responses. The JAEA made the development and control of a facility for radon inhalation experiments and the investigation of biokinetics and absorbed doses of radon. From 2007 to 2011, the following results were obtained. (1) Literature on effects of radon for the low-dose range was surveyed to determine the present tasks. (2) The first Japanese large-scale facility was developed for radon inhalation experiments with small animals. (3) Relationships between radon concentration and inhalation time were widely examined to understand the change in antioxidative functions due to radon, which are the most basic parameters. (4) Inhibitory effects of radon on oxidative damages were observed using model mice with reactive oxygen- or free radical-related diseases like alcohol-induced oxidative damages and type I diabetes. (5) In order to discuss biological responses quantitatively following radon inhalation, the biokinetics of inhaled radon was examined and the model for calculation of absorbed doses for organs and tissues was obtained. (author)

  15. Studies on radon concentration at the work places of Mysuru, Bengaluru, Tumkuru and Kolar Districts of Karnataka State, South India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ningappa, C.; Reddy, K. Umesha; Rangaswamy, D.R.; Sannappa, J.

    2015-01-01

    Radon is a radioactive noble gas and is the decay product of naturally occurring uranium. It decays into radioactive metal ions polonium-218 and polonium-214 by alpha radiation, which are harmful to the human health. The concentrations of radon and its progeny inside a given working place depends on activity of radium both in the soil surrounding the workplace and in the building materials, atmospheric conditions, design of the workplace, porosity of the surrounding soil, building layout, and the ventilation habits of the inhabitants of the building. The estimation of dose due to radon and its progeny to the general public and workers at work places are very important. Thus, concentration of radon and its progeny and dose due to radon and its progeny to the public and workers were measured at sixty workplaces of Mysuru, Bengaluru, Tumkur and Kolar districts based on geology and willingness of the workplace owner using twin cup dosimeter based on Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors (SSNTDs) and results are discussed in the present study. The values measured indoor radon in the area of study ranged from a 11.6 to 284.8 Bq.m -3 . (author)

  16. Radon Research Program, FY 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-03-01

    The scientific information being sought in this program encompasses research designed to determine radon availability and transport outdoors, modeling transport into and within buildings, physics and chemistry of radon and radon progeny, dose response relationships, lung cancer risk, and mechanisms of radon carcinogenesis. The main goal of the DOE/OHER Radon Research Program is to develop information to reduce these uncertainties and thereby provide an improved health risk estimate of exposure to radon and its progeny as well as to provide information useful in radon control strategies. Results generated under the Program were highlighted in a National Research Council report on radon dosimetry. The study concluded that the risk of radon exposure is 30% less in homes than in mines. This program summary of book describes the OHER FY-1991 Radon Research Program. It is the fifth in an annual series of program books designed to provide scientific and research information to the public and to other government agencies on the DOE Radon Research Program

  17. Using the thermal diffusion cloud chamber to study the ion-induced nucleation by radon decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Yefei.

    1991-01-01

    Thermal diffusion cloud chamber is steady-state device and has been extensively used for nucleation research. In order to study the ion-induced nucleation by radon decay, a new chamber was designed with improved both upper and bottom plates, the system of circulating fluid, the gasketting, the temperature measurement and the insulation. An alternative method of using oxygen as carrier gas was examined. Therefore, the heavy carrier gas including nitrogen, oxygen, neon, argon and air can be used to study radon radiolysis-induced nucleation for the water or organic compounds in the TDCC. The effects of the pressure and temperature ranges on the density, supersaturation, temperature and partial pressure profile for the water-oxygen-helium in the TDCC have been examined. Based on the classical theory, the rate profile of ion-induced nucleation by radon decays was calculated and compared with the homogeneous nucleation. From measured indoor concentrations of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC), thermodynamic theory models were used to assess the possibility that these compounds will form ultrafine particles in indoor air by ion-induced nucleation. The energy, number of molecules and equilibrium radius of clusters have been calculated based on Such and Thomson theories. These two sets of values have been compared. Ion cluster radii corresponding to 1--3 VOC molecules are in range of 3--5 x 10 -8 cm. 43 refs., 18 figs., 5 tabs

  18. The measurement of activity-weighted size distributions of radon progeny: methods and laboratory intercomparison studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopke, P.K.; Strydom, R.; Ramamurthi, M.; Knutson, E.O.; Tu, K.W.; Scofield, P.; Holub, R.F.; Cheng, Y.S.; Su, Y.F.; Winklmayr, W.

    1992-01-01

    Over the past 5 y, there have been significant improvements in measurement of activity-weighted size distributions of airborne radon decay products. The modification of screen diffusion batteries to incorporate multiple screens of differing mesh number, called graded screen arrays, have permitted improved size resolution below 10 nm such that the size distributions can now be determined down to molecular sized activities (0.5 nm). In order to ascertain the utility and reliability of such systems, several intercomparison tests have been performed in a 2.4 m3 radon chamber in which particles of varying size have been produced by introducing SO2 and H2O along with the radon to the chamber. In April 1988, intercomparison studies were performed between direct measurements of the activity-weighted size distributions as measured by graded screen arrays and an indirect measurement of the distribution obtained by measuring the number size distribution with a differential mobility analyzer and multiplying by the theoretical attachment rate. Good agreement was obtained in these measurements. A second set of intercomparison studies among a number of groups with graded screen array systems was made in April 1989 with the objective of resolving spectral structure below 10 nm. Again, generally good agreement among the various groups was obtained although some differences were noted. It is thus concluded that such systems can be constructed and can be useful in making routine measurements of activity-weighted size distributions with reasonable confidence in the results obtained

  19. Comparative study on the inhibitory effects of antioxidant vitamins and radon on carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kataoka, Takahiro; Nishiyama, Yuichi; Yamato, Keiko; Teraoka, Junichi; Morii, Yuji; Taguchi, Takehito; Yamaoka, Kiyonori; Sakoda, Akihiro; Ishimori, Yuu

    2012-01-01

    We have previously reported that radon inhalation activates anti-oxidative functions and inhibits carbon tetrachloride (CCl 4 )-induced hepatopathy. It has also been reported that antioxidant vitamins can inhibit CCl 4 -induced hepatopathy. In the current study, we examined the comparative efficacy of treatment with radon, ascorbic acid and α-tocopherol on CCl 4 -induced hepatopathy. Mice were subjected to intraperitoneal injection of CCl 4 after inhaling approximately 1000 or 2000 Bq/m 3 radon for 24 h, or immediately after intraperitoneal injection of ascorbic acid (100, 300, or 500 mg/kg bodyweight) or α-tocopherol (100, 300, or 500 mg/kg bodyweight). We estimated the inhibitory effects on CCl 4 -induced hepatopathy based on hepatic function-associated parameters, oxidative damage-associated parameters and histological changes. The results revealed that the therapeutic effects of radon inhalation were almost equivalent to treatment with ascorbic acid at a dose of 500 mg/kg or α-tocopherol at a dose of 300 mg/kg. The activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase in the liver were significantly higher in mice exposed to radon than in mice treated with CCl 4 alone. These findings suggest that radon inhalation has an anti-oxidative effect against CCl 4 -induced hepatopathy similar to the anti-oxidative effects of ascorbic acid or α-tocopherol due to the induction of anti-oxidative functions. (author)

  20. Radon and thoron levels, their spatial and seasonal variations in adobe dwellings - a case study at the great Hungarian plain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, Zsuzsanna; Jordan, Gyozo; Szabó, Csaba; Horváth, Ákos; Holm, Óskar; Kocsy, Gábor; Csige, István; Szabó, Péter; Homoki, Zsolt

    2014-06-01

    Radon and thoron isotopes are responsible for approximately half of the average annual effective dose to humans. Although the half-life of thoron is short, it can potentially enter indoor air from adobe walls. Adobe was a traditional construction material in the Great Hungarian Plain. Its major raw materials are the alluvial sediments of the area. Here, seasonal radon and thoron activity concentrations were measured in 53 adobe dwellings in 7 settlements by pairs of etched track detectors. The results show that the annual average radon and thoron activity concentrations are elevated in these dwellings and that the proportions with values higher than 300 Bq m(-3) are 14-17 and 29-32% for radon and thoron, respectively. The calculated radon inhalation dose is significantly higher than the world average value, exceeding 10 mSv y(-1) in 7% of the dwellings of this study. Thoron also can be a significant contributor to the inhalation dose with about 30% in the total inhalation dose. The changes of weather conditions seem to be more relevant in the variation of measurement results than the differences in the local sedimentary geology. Still, the highest values were detected on clay. Through the year, radon follows the average temperature changes and is affected by the ventilation, whereas thoron rather seems to follow the amount of precipitation.

  1. Preliminary Study for 3D Radon Distribution Modelling in the Room

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, ChoongWie; Kim, HeeReyoung [UNIST, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Radon exists in the form of noble gas, which comes from decay of {sup 238}U, becoming stable {sup 206}Pb going through 4 alpha and 4 beta decays. If this process occurred in human body after inhalation, lung could be damaged by interaction with these radiations causing lung cancer. Most radon in indoor air comes from soil (85 - 97%) through crack of the wall but it also came from wall (2 - 5%) itself in home. Due to its hazardous and unpredictable characteristic, radon became one of the concerning nuclides in indoor air. Hence, the number of survey and research about radon has been increased. Although accurate radon measurement is important to evaluate health risk, it is hard to actually achieve because radon is affected by many conditions, where its concentration can vary easily. Moreover, radon concentration can vary according to the height because of density of radon in the spatial aspect. 3D distribution modelling in the room of radon with aerodynamic features and sources variations was carried out to find average and maximum radon concentration. 3D radon distribution in the room would be find through this computational analysis and it is thought to be possible to correct measured radon concentration with spatial variation to fit the height of nose where inhalation occur. The methodological concept for 3D modelling was set up to solve transport equation for radon behavior by using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software such as FLUENT.

  2. Radon and Lung Cancer Case-Control Study in Middle Ural

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirdin, I.A.; Lezhnin, V.L.; Yarmoshenko, I.V.; Ekidin, A.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The pilot phase of radon and lung cancer case-control study has been performed in Karpinsk and Pervouralsk towns of Middle Ural region of Russia. The case group consists of 341 persons with lung cancer and living in that towns at least five previous years. The lung cancer diagnoses were carefully verified by instrumental techniques and 70% of its were morphologically validated. The persons for the control group (448) were chosen from the population living in that towns at least five years taking into account the age and sex. The special epidemiological questionnaire was developed which includes the items by the groups of factors as follow: clinical data, social factors, chronic lung diseases, life habit, tobacco smoking, alcohol drinking, diet preference etc. The epidemiological questionnaires were fulfilled for each member of case and control groups. Radon gas concentration and thoron equilibrium equivalent concentration measurements had been performed using nuclear track detectors and grab sampling accordingly in the dwellings of case and control groups members. By preliminary estimation the odds ratios are 1, 0.91, 1.2, 1.1 in the ranges of radon and thoron equilibrium equivalent concentration 0-6, 3-13, 13-36 and 36-370 Bq/m 3 respectively. The deeper and more rigorous analysis as well as different independent approaches will be discussed in the paper.(author)

  3. Design, characterization and use of replicate human upper airways for radon dosimetry studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swift, D.L.; Cheng, Y.S.; Su, Y.F.; Yeh, H.C.

    1992-01-01

    The size distribution of inhaled radon progeny aerosols is a significant factor in dosimetry. The role of the airways above the trachea is an important determinant of the respiratory distribution of both attached and unattached progeny aerosols. In order to provide information on the effect of particle size and breathing conditions on the overall and local deposition, we have developed a method to produce a replicate airway model from an in vivo magnetic resonance imaging coronal scan. The model consists of a sandwich of methacrylate elements, each element having the thickness of the scan interval. The transition between successive scan outlines traced on the front and back surfaces of each element is handsculpted in the plastic. The hollow model of the nasal passages thus produced has been characterized both morphologically and fluid-mechanically and has a flow resistance typical of a normal adult. The model has several distinct advantages for studies of radon progeny aerosol deposition. After exposure to a radioaerosol (or to an aerosol of an otherwise measurable substance) the individual elements can be separated to determine local deposition. The dimensions of specific upper-airway regions can be changed by replacing a small number of elements. The model has been incorporated in an exposure system for determining overall nandregional deposition of aerosols whose median diameter is approximately 1.7 nm. Measurements at several flow rates are presented to demonstrate use of the model in radon dosimetry. The model should also be useful for determining the airway deposition of other environmental aerosols

  4. Indoor radon and radon daughters survey at Campinas-Brazil using CR-39: First results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guedes, S.; Hadler, J.C.N.; Iunes, P.J.; Navia, L.M.S.; Neman, R.S.; Paulo, S.R.; Rodrigues, V.C.; Souza, W.F.; Tello, C.A.S.; Zuniga, A.

    1999-01-01

    The first results of a radon and radon daughters (RD) survey performed at Campinas-SP, Brazil, are presented. We employed a technique that, potentially, makes possible to measure the radon and RD activity in the air and to separate from this result the activity of radon, alone. In this preliminary paper only the former activity is studied

  5. Indoor radon and radon daughters survey at Campinas-Brazil using CR-39: First results

    CERN Document Server

    Guedes, S; Iunes, P J; Navia, L M S; Neman, R S; Paulo, S R; Rodrigues, V C; Souza, W F; Tello, C A S; Zúñiga, A G

    1999-01-01

    The first results of a radon and radon daughters (RD) survey performed at Campinas-SP, Brazil, are presented. We employed a technique that, potentially, makes possible to measure the radon and RD activity in the air and to separate from this result the activity of radon, alone. In this preliminary paper only the former activity is studied.

  6. The radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This booklet is intended to answer briefly the most important questions about the nature and sources of radon, its pathways from environment to organism, as well as the ways to minimize its concentration in the habitat's atmosphere. The radon is a naturally appearing radioactive gas, produced through the decay of uranium and radium present in the terrestrial crust. It can be found everywhere on the planet's surface and it is emitted particularly from the granite and volcanic underground rocks as well as from certain construction materials. It is one of the agents producing pulmonary cancer, although not so dangerous as the tobacco is. The following items are elaborated in this booklet: - the place of radon in the average exposure to ionizing radiations of the French population; - the risk; - the radon in the environment (the meteorological conditions, the nature of the rocks); - radon in dwellings (radon measurements in the French dwellings, the entrance pathways of radon, the dependence of radon concentration on the profession and way of life of the inhabitants); - radon measurements; - how to reduce the radon concentration in dwellings

  7. Radon in public buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, H.; Flesch, K.; Hermann, E.; Loebner, W.; Leissring, B.

    2009-01-01

    From the Free State of Saxony, a study was commissioned to survey how reliable measurements to characterize the radon situation in public buildings at a reasonable financial and human effort can be carried out to reduce radiation exposure in public buildings. The study approach was for 6 objects. To characterize the radon situation the time evolution measurement of radon concentrations of more than 1 to 2 weeks turned out to be sufficient. A novel data analysis enables the identification of a ''typical daily alteration of the radon concentration'' depending on the ventilation conditions and the daily use of the offices or class rooms. The identification of typical diurnal radon variations for the working time and weekends or holidays is of fundamental importance for assessing the exposure situation in public buildings. It was shown that the radon concentration during working time are in general much lower than in the times when the buildings (offices) are unused. It turned out that the long-term radon measurements with nuclear track detectors within distinct time regimes (day / night, working hours / leisure time) by utilizing switch modules are very efficient to estimate the actual exposure. (orig.)

  8. A new method for studying the transport of radon and thoron in various building materials using CR-39 and LR-115 solid state nuclear track detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misdaq, M.A.; Ktata, A.; Bakhchi, A.

    2000-01-01

    Radon ( 222 Rn) and thoron ( 220 Rn) α-activities per unit volume were measured inside and outside different building materials by using two types of solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTD) (CR-39 and LR-115 type II). In addition, the radon and thoron emanation coefficients of the studied materials were evaluated. Based on these data, the transport of radon and thoron across parallelepipedic blocks of the building materials could be investigated and radon and thoron global α-activities per unit volume outside different building material blocks were determined. Moreover, the diffusion length and the effective diffusion coefficient of radon in the building materials were evaluated and the total alpha activity due to radon in the atmospheres of different rooms consisting of different building materials was studied

  9. Radon thematic days - Conference proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-03-01

    This document brings together the available presentations given at the Radon thematic days organized by the French society of radiation protection (SFRP). Twenty five presentations (slides) are compiled in the document and deal with: 1 - General introduction about radon (Sebastien Baechler, IRA); 2 - Survey of epidemiological studies (Dominique Laurier, IRSN); 3 - Dosimetric model (Eric Blanchardon, Estelle Davesne, IRSN); 4 - Radon issue in Franche-Comte: measurement of the domestic exposure and evaluation of the associated health impact (Francois Clinard, InVS); 5 - WHO's (World Health Organization) viewpoint in limiting radon exposure in homes (Ferid Shannoun, OMS); 6 - Radon measurement techniques (Roselyne Ameon, IRSN); 7 - Quality of radon measurements (Francois Bochud, IRA); 8 - International recommendations (Jean-Francois Lecomte, IRSN); 9 - Radon management strategy in Switzerland - 1994-2014 (Christophe Murith, OFSP); 10 - 2011-2015 action plan for radon risk management (Jean-Luc Godet, Eric Dechaux, ASN); 11 - Radon at work place in Switzerland (Lisa Pedrazzi, SUVA); 12 - Strategies of radiation protection optimization in radon exposure situations (Cynthia Reaud, CEPN); 13 - Mapping of the radon potential of geologic formations in France (Geraldine Ielsch, IRSN); 14 - Radon database in Switzerland (Martha Gruson, OFSP); 15 - Radon 222 in taps water (Jeanne Loyen, IRSN); 16 - Buildings protection methods (Bernard Collignan, CSTB, Roselyne Ameon, IRSN); 17 - Preventive and sanitation measures in Switzerland (Claudio Valsangiacomo, SUPSI); 18 - Training and support approach for building specialists (Joelle Goyette-Pernot, Fribourg engineers and architects' school); 19 - Status of radon bulk activity measurements performed between 2005-2010 in public areas (Cyril Pineau, ASN); 20 - Neuchatel Canton experiments (Didier Racine, SENE); 21 - Montbeliard region experience in the radon risk management (Isabelle Netillard, Pays de Montbeliard Agglomeration); 22

  10. Contribution of radon and radon daughters to respiratory cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harley, N.; Samet, J.M.; Cross, F.T.; Hess, T.; Muller, J.; Thomas, D.

    1986-01-01

    This article reviews studies on the contribution of radon and radon daughters to respiratory cancer and proposes recommendations for further research, particularly a national radon survey. The steady-state outdoor radon concentration averages 200 pCi/m3, and indoor levels are about 4 times higher. The primary source of radon in homes is the underlying soil; entry depends on multiple variables and reduced ventilation for energy conservation increases indoor radon levels. Occupational exposures are expressed in units of radon daughter potential energy concentration or working level (WL). Cumulative exposure is the product of the working level and the time exposed. The unit for cumulative exposure is the working level month (WLM). The occupational standard for radon exposure is 4 WLM/year, and 2 WLM/year has been suggested as a guideline for remedial action in homes. Epidemiologic studies show that miners with cumulative radon daughter exposures somewhat below 100 WLM have excess lung cancer mortality. Some 3% to 8% of miners studied have developed lung cancer attributable to radon daughters. All of the underground mining studies show an increased risk of lung cancer with radon daughter exposure. All cell types of lung cancer increased with radon exposure. If radon and smoking act in a multiplicative manner, then the risk for smokers could be 10 times that for nonsmokers. The potential risk of lung cancer appears to be between 1 and 2 per 10,000/WLM, which yields a significant number of lung cancers as some 220 million persons in the United States are exposed on average to 10 to 20 WLM/lifetime

  11. Radon monitoring technique with electret collecting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Zhiheng; Zuo Fuqi; Xiao Detao; Zhao Xkiuliang

    1991-12-01

    The integrating radon monitoring technique with electret collecting is a method which collects the 218 Po + positive ions by electrostatic field produced by electret. It has greatly improved the sensitivity of radon measurement. The response factor of this method reaches to 4.7 cm -2 Bq -1 m 3 h -1 , 1000 times larger than that of common passive sampling method. The monitoring device and its principle are introduced. The measuring results of radon concentration and radon flux rate and quality assurance system by using this method in the Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant, Human Environmental Monitoring Central Station and some uranium mines are also presented. The analytical results show that the radon concentration in the Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant is affected by wind direction. When wind directs toward sea, the radon concentration is high. If the wind is to the contrary, it is low. The radon concentration ratio of both is about 2

  12. Case-control study on radon exposure and lung cancer in an Italian region. Preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bochicchio, F; Nuccetelli, C.; Forastiere, F.; Mallone, S.; Sera, F.

    2000-01-01

    The present estimates of the lung cancer risk for the general population due to radon exposure in dwellings are generally obtained by extrapolating the risk estimates derived from epidemiologic studies on miner cohorts. However, due to uncertainties related to this extrapolation, numerous case-control studies in Europe and North America were planned to estimate directly the risk in dwellings. Most of these studies are still underway and, thanks to their similar design and compatible protocols, it will be possible to perform a pooled analysis in order to improve statistical power. One of these projects is being conducted in the Lazio region of Italy, which is one of the Italian regions with the highest levels of radon indoors. A total of 408 cases and 424 controls older than 34 years, who lived for 25 years or longer in the Lazio Region, were recruited in a hospital of Rome. Detailed information regarding smoking, and occupational exposure of the subjects were collected by interviews in hospital. Residential histories (periods and addresses) during the 35 years preceding the enrolment were ascertained for all study members from the local Register and from a short questionnaire to the subjects or to the next-of-kin, resulting in 2068 dwellings to be monitored within the Lazio region. The distribution of the number of dwellings among cases and controls was the following: 25.7% of the cases and 27.3% of the controls had lived all the preceding 35 years in a single dwelling, whereas only a minority (7.9%) changed five addresses or more. The mean number of dwellings was very similar among cases (2.47) and controls (2.50). In each dwelling, radon dosemeters were placed in both the main bedroom and living room for two consecutive six-month periods. In the second six-month period, two thermoluminescent dosemeters were also collocated in each monitored room to measure gamma radiation emitted by the building materials, in order to evaluate more comprehensively the exposure of

  13. Study of the effects of atmospheric parameters on ground radon concentration by track technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tidjani, Adams

    1988-01-01

    Radon emanation was continuously monitored for 24 months, accompanied by measurements of atmospheric parameters. Integrated measurments of radon concentrations have been performed with LR-115 cellulose nitrate track detectors. The monitoring was conducted at 16 sites distributed around the Dakar University area. Observed changes in radon concentration are interpreted as being caused by changes in meteorological conditions and ocean tides. (author)

  14. The radon 222 transport in soils. The case of the storage of residues coming from uranium ores processing; La migration du radon 222 dans un sol. Application aux stockages de residus issus du traitement des minerais d'uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferry, C

    2000-07-01

    Uranium Mill Tailings (UMT) contain comparatively large quantities of radium-226. This radionuclide yields, by radioactive decay, the radioactive gas radon-222. Tailing piles are routinely covered to reduce the radon release-rate into the atmosphere. In order to assess the long term environmental impact of a UMT repository, mechanisms governing radon exhalation at the soil surface must be deciphered and understood. A model of radon transport in the unsaturated zone is developed for this purpose: water- and air-flow in the porous material are determined, as well as radon transport by diffusion in the pore space and advection by the gas phase. The radon transport model in the unsaturated zone - TRACI (which stands, in French, for Radon Transport within the Unsaturated Layer) - calculates moisture contents in the soil, Darcy's velocities of the liquid and gas phases, radon concentrations in the gas phase and radon flux at the soil surface. TRACI's results are compared with observations carried out on a UMT and a cover layer. Input parameters are derived from the textural analysis of the material under study, whereas upper boundary conditions are given by meteorological data. If we consider measurement errors and uncertainties on the porous medium characterisation, model's results are generally in good agreement with observations, at least on the long run. Moreover, data analysis shows hat transient phenomena are understood as well, in most situations. (author)

  15. Lung Cancer Risk from Occupational and Environmental Radon and Role of Smoking in Two Czech Nested Case-Control Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladislav Tomasek

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to evaluate the risk of lung cancer from combined exposure to radon and smoking. Methodologically, it is based on case-control studies nested within two Czech cohort studies of nearly 11,000 miners followed-up for mortality in 1952–2010 and nearly 12,000 inhabitants exposed to high levels of radon in homes, with mortality follow-up in 1960–2010. In addition to recorded radon exposure, these studies use information on smoking collected from the subjects or their relatives. A total of 1,029 and 370 cases with smoking information have been observed in the occupational and environmental (residential studies, respectively. Three or four control subjects have been individually matched to cases according to sex, year of birth, and age. The combined effect from radon and smoking is analyzed in terms of geometric mixture models of which the additive and multiplicative models are special cases. The resulting models are relatively close to the additive interaction (mixing parameter 0.2 and 0.3 in the occupational and residential studies, respectively. The impact of the resulting model in the residential radon study is illustrated by estimates of lifetime risk in hypothetical populations of smokers and non-smokers. In comparison to the multiplicative risk model, the lifetime risk from the best geometric mixture model is considerably higher, particularly in the non-smoking population.

  16. Animal study on biological responses by radon inhalation making use of waste rock which contains feeble activity of uranium (2) (Joint research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishimori, Yuu; Sakoda, Akihiro; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Mitsunobu, Fumihiro; Yamaoka, Kiyonori; Kataoka, Takahiro; Etani, Reo

    2016-03-01

    Okayama University and the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) have carried out the collaborative study of physiological effects of inhaled radon for the low-dose range. Main assignments were as follows. Based on the clinical knowledge, Misasa Medical Center (Okayama University Hospital) clarified the issues that should be addressed. Graduate School of Health Sciences (Okayama University) supervised the research and studied the biological responses. The JAEA made the development and control of a facility for radon inhalation experiments and the investigation of biokinetics and exposure doses of radon. From 2009 to 2013, the following results were obtained. (1) Literature on drinking effects of radon hot spring water was surveyed to determine the present tasks. (2) Under the present experimental conditions, drinking of hot spring water into which radon was intentionally introduced using the equipment in the facility did not have significant effects on mice. (3) Inhibitory effects of antioxidant pre-supplements (Vitamins C and E) and radon pre-inhalation on hepatic or renal oxidative damage were examined to make the comparison. (4) In order to discuss biological responses quantitatively following radon inhalation, the biokinetics of inhaled radon were studied. (5) Some exposure routes due to inhalation of radon or its progeny were modeled to calculate organ doses in mice. (author)

  17. Study on the measurement method of diffusion coefficient for radon in the soil. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iida, Takao

    2000-03-01

    To investigate radon behavior in the soil at Ningyo Pass, the radon concentrations in the soil and the radon exhalation rate from soil surface were measured by four continuous soil radon monitoring systems, soil gas sampling method, and accumulation method. The radon concentrations in the soil measured with continuous soil radon monitoring systems varied form 5000 Bq·m -3 to 15000 Bq·m -3 at 10 cm to 40 cm depth. On the other hand, the radon concentrations measured by soil gas sampling method was 15000 Bq·m -3 at 15 cm depth. The accumulation method gives the vales of 0. 36∼0.68 Bq·m -2 ·s -1 for radon exhalation rate from soil surface. To simulate the radon transport in soil, the following parameters of the soil are important: radon diffusion coefficients, dry density, wet density, soil particle density, true density, water content and radium concentration. The measured radon diffusion coefficients in the soil were (1.61±0.09)x10 -6 m 2 s -1 , (8.68±0.23)x10 -7 m 2 s -1 ∼ (1.53±0.12)x10 -6 m 2 s -1 and (2.99±0.32)x10 -6 m 2 s -1 ∼ (4.39±0.43)x10 -6 m 2 s -1 for sandy soils of the campus of Nagoya University, Tsuruga peninsula, and Ningyo Pass, respectively. By using these parameters, the radon transport phenomena in the soil of two layers were calculated by analytical and numerical methods. The radon profile calculated by numerical method agrees fairly well with measured values. By covering of 2 m soil, the radon exhalation rate decreases to 1/4 by analytical method, and 3/5 by numerical method. The covering of normal soil is not so effective for reducing the radon exhalation rate. (author)

  18. The radon influence of SAGE results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavrin, V.N.; Gorbachev, V.V.; Mirmov, I.N.

    2002-01-01

    The method for evaluating systematic errors, connected with radon, is described in the experiment on determining the SAGE solar neutrino flux. The systematic error by the measured neutrino capture rate in the gallium 75 SNU target does not exceed 0.3 SNU. The obtained value (0.3 SNU) is the upper limit of the radon systematic error. Its low value means, that radon does not contribute significantly to the SAGE result [ru

  19. The Assessment of the Integrated Antioxidant System of the Body in the Course of Radon Therapy: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jadwiga Kuciel-Lewandowska

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The sources of Reactive Oxidative Species (ROS in the organism are the respiratory processes occurring in cells catalyzed by different enzymes. Operation of ROS is balanced by antioxidants, the compounds; although present in low concentrations, they significantly inhibit the degree of oxidation of particular molecules. The Aim of the Study. The aim of this study was to assess the changes in the integrated antioxidant system under the influence of radon therapy in osteoarthritis patients. Material and Methods. Observation included 35 patients suffering from degenerative joints and disc disease (mean age 56.5 years undergoing radon water therapy and control group that consisted of 15 osteoarthritis patients (mean age 54.2 without contact with radon water. Before therapy and after 18 days of treatment, serum total antioxidant status (TAS was assessed with the use of standard colorimetric assay. Results. In the study group, we observed trends to increase TAS concentration, whereas, in the control group, TAS concentration was decreasing. Conclusions. (1 Radon waters treatment influenced the level of TAS of osteoarthritis patients treated with the radon water. (2 The change in TAS concentrations in the study group may be the result of low doses of ionizing radiation, but further studies on larger patient’s groups are demanded. This study is registered with number NCT03274128.

  20. Study on singular radon releases from mining residues and the impact on the outdoor radon concentration; Untersuchungen zu singulaeren Radonfreisetzungen aus bergbaulichen Hinterlassenschaften und ihre Auswirkungen auf die Radonkonzentration im Freien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kahnt, Rene; Martin, Mirko; Pinka, Jana

    2012-03-15

    The G.E.O.S. mbH was assigned by the Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz to perform time resolved measurements of the radon release and time and spatial resolved studies on the atmospheric dispersion dependent on the topographic and meteorological conditions in the area of Haiden. The report includes data on the radon release from mining residues at the site Johanngeorgenstadt and measurements in other areas.

  1. Study of properties of active charcoal used for measuring of low radon activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muellerova, M.; Holy, K.

    2011-01-01

    We used the German charcoal Silicarbon for adsorption of radon from the air. From the column with activated carbon arranged in a row, we obtain cut-off dependence of radon on activated carbon at various temperatures, cooling and also at different speeds, drawing radon air through activated charcoal. From information we have chosen the most appropriate combination of temperature and cooling flow in order to maximize capture efficiency of radon in the first column of active charcoal. To change active carbon and optimization of operation allows us to measure the radon exhalation rate from various materials up to the level of 3·10 -9 Bq/s. (authors)

  2. Radon risk communication research: Practical lessons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, A.; Johnson, F.R.

    1990-01-01

    Those responsible for state and local radon programs often express frustration about the small share of homes that have been tested for radon, and the small share of those with high readings that have been mitigated. There are now a number of completed studies that have examined how well alternative ways of communicating about radon risk have accomplished the goals of motivating appropriate testing and mitigation. This paper summarizes the research results that are most crucial for planning and implementing effective radon risk communication programs. We identify six reasons why people do not respond to radon as a serious threat and provide some remedies suggested by radon studies

  3. The Montana Radon Study: Social Marketing via Digital Signage Technology for Reaching Families in the Waiting Room

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. I tested a social marketing intervention delivered in health department waiting rooms via digital signage technology for increasing radon program participation among priority groups. Methods. I conducted a tri-county, community-based study over a 3-year period (2010–2013) in a high-radon state by using a quasi-experimental design. We collected survey data for eligible participants at the time of radon test kit purchase. Results. Radon program participation increased at the intervention site (t38 = 3.74; P = .001; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 4.8, 16.0) with an increase in renters (χ21,228 = 4.3; P = .039), Special Supplementary Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children families (χ21,166 = 3.13; P = .077) and first-time testers (χ21,228 = 10.93; P = .001). Approximately one third (30.3%; n = 30) attributed participation in the radon program to viewing the intervention message. The intervention crossover was also successful with increased monthly kit sales (t37 = 2.69; P = .01; 95% CI = 1.20, 8.47) and increased households participating (t23 = 4.76; P marketing message was an effective population-based intervention for increasing radon program participation. The results prompted policy changes for Montana radon programming and adoption of digital signage technology by 2 health departments. PMID:25121816

  4. A study of radon levels in the soil of Nasir's College of Agriculture - Yemen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, Taher M.; Ahmed, Hayel A.; Zumalian, Abubaker A.

    2000-01-01

    The radon diffusion in the atmosphere and dwelling interior comes from one source, it is the soil. Emitting alpha particles, radon daughters may be deposited in to the lungs and cause health hazards, so for this reason, estimation of radon levels in soil and dwelling were done in may countries. in the present work, we have used the passive dosimeters (SSNTD s ) containing (Cr-39) detectors. The dosimeters were distributed at the surface of the ground, in the soil horizontally (at depth 50 cm) and in soil with depth. The overall mean for radon levels in soil horizontally was (1.28 ± 0.05) KBq/m 3 and the mean radon concentration at the surface of the ground was (0.42 ± 0.03) KBq/m 3 . It is found that radon concentration increases as the depth increases up to (90 cm) depth after that radon levels decrease as the depth increases. (author)

  5. A feasibility study of geogenic indoor radon mapping from airborne radiometric survey in northern Thailand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wattananikorn, K. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand)], E-mail: kittic@science.cmu.ac.th; Emharuthai, S. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Wanaphongse, P. [Office of Atoms for Peace, Bangkok (Thailand)

    2008-01-15

    Experiments were carried out in seven test sites on three Quaternary alluvial and terrace deposit basins of northern Thailand, to test the possibility of using airborne equivalent uranium to predict geogenic indoor radon values of the region. The methodology was based on the correlation among soil gas permeability, soil radon concentration and indoor radon, as well as a relationship between soil radon and airborne uranium values. The methodology established works rather well when tested in areas of known indoor radon. Based on the predicted values that were obtained from this method, indoor radon in most areas of alluvial and terrace deposit basins of northern Thailand is less than 44Bq/m{sup 3}. There is no area in these basins where predicted indoor radon exceeds 74Bq/m{sup 3}.

  6. Radon exposure and lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Planinic, J.; Vukovic, B.; Faj, Z.; Radolic, V.; Suveljak, B.

    2003-01-01

    Although studies of radon exposure have established that Rn decay products are a cause of lung cancer among miners, the lung cancer risk to the general population from indoor radon remains unclear and controversial. Our epidemiological investigation of indoor radon influence on lung cancer incidence was carried out for 201 patients from the Osijek town. Ecological method was applied by using the town map with square fields of 1 km 2 and the town was divided into 24 fields. Multiple regression study for the lung cancer rate on field, average indoor radon exposure and smoking showed a positive linear double regression for the mentioned variables. Case-control study showed that patients, diseased of lung cancer, dwelt in homes with significantly higher radon concentrations, by comparison to the average indoor radon level of control sample. (author)

  7. Radon, smoking and human papilloma virus as risk factors for lung cancer in an environmental epidemiological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. P. Malinovsky

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study: to analyze the risk of lung cancer caused by exposure to indoor radon using an environmental study, taking into account recent data on the possible effect of Human Papillomavirus, based on lung cancer mortality and radon exposure in the Russian regions.Materials and methods: in the analysis, linear dependencies of lung cancer against influencing factors were used. The average radon concentration for the regions of Russia was earlier reconstructed on the basis of the annual reports of the form 4-DOZ. Information on morbidity and mortality from malignant neoplasms in Russia was obtained from annual reports issued by the Р. Hertsen Moscow Oncology Research Institute. As a surrogate of the level of infection with Human Papillomavirus, the incidence of cervix cancer was used. The smoking prevalence was estimated applying data on the incidence of tongue cancer.Results: taking into account smoking and infection with Human Papillomavirus, it is possible to obtain estimates of lung cancer excess relative risk when induced by radon in dwellings consistent with the results of case-control studies.Conclusion: the analysis of regionally aggregated data on deaths from lung cancer in Russia, the average level of indoor radon concentrations and significant risk factors for lung cancer confirms the linear threshold-free concept of radiation-induced carcinogenesis.

  8. Ventilation influence upon indoor air radon level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Deyuan

    1995-01-01

    Levels of indoor radon in air are studied by a continuous electrostatic radon monitor under normal living conditions to evaluate the influence of air conditioned ventilation on indoor air radon level. Results show that the indoor air radon concentrations are not much more than those without household conditioner living condition, although using household conditioner requires a sealed room which should lead to a higher radon level. Turning on air conditioner helps lower indoor radon level. Therefore, the total indoor air Rn levels are normal > ventilation > exhaust or in-draft > exhaust plus in-draft

  9. A cost-effectiveness analysis of radon protection methods in domestic properties: a comparative case study in Brixworth, Northamptonshire, UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coskeran, Thomas; Denman, Antony; Phillips, Paul; Tornberg, Roger

    2006-01-01

    Building regulations in the UK have since 1992 required that radon-proof membranes be installed in new domestic properties to protect residents against the adverse effects of radon. This study compares the cost-effectiveness of the current regulatory regime with an alternative that would entail new properties being tested for radon after construction, and being remediated if necessary. The alternative regime is found to be more cost-effective for a sample of properties in Brixworth, Northamptonshire, UK. For this regime, the central estimate of cost per quality-adjusted life-year gained, the measure of cost-effectiveness used, is Pounds 2869 compared to Pounds 6182 for installing membranes, results suggesting a case for re-examining the current regulations on radon protection in new properties. Pilot studies will, however, be needed to consider how different means of protecting residents of new properties against radon might operate in practice and to provide improved evidence on their relative cost-effectiveness

  10. Study of the contribution of the radon in the measurement with an automatic gamma probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caveda Ramos, C.A.; Dominguez Levy, O.; Alonso Abad, D.; Montalvan Estrada, A.; Fabelo Bonet, O.

    2008-01-01

    In this work, study about the influence of the radon in the daily measurements of the dose rate absorbed in air due to the environmental gamma radiation is achieved. This magnitude is measured each ten minutes for the Gamma Tracer probe, which is located in the western station of the National Network of Environmental Radiological Surveillance of the Republic of Cuba, this station belongs to the Center of Protection and Hygiene of the Radiations (CPHR). For achieving such study approximately 157 680 measurements of the gamma dose rate corresponding the period 2004-2006 were analyzed. The gamma probe used has two independent counter channels which are both complemented with a Geiger-Muller detector; also it can only detect gamma radiation and perform measurements of the gamma dose rate between 8.7 n Gy/h and 8.7 mGy/h. This probe is located at the height of 3.5 m and is exposed to the sun rays directly. For improving the interpretation of the data, the average of all the values of gamma dose rate was calculated, for each hour of the 365 days of the year. The values were also monthly averaged out. The data were processed by employing the software Gamma Red which was improved by adding some options. A comparison between the results obtained and the annual radon variation internationally published was made. With the present study, it was proved that the main contribution to the daily measurements of the dose rate absorbed in the air due to environmental gamma radiation, on stable weather conditions, is associated with the radon daughters which emit gamma radiation. (author)

  11. Some comments on the feasibility of an epidemiological study on incidence of lung cancer due to exposure to radon daughters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elsasser, U.

    1988-01-01

    For two different designs of a study - cohort and case control study - estimates of required sample size have been made on the basis of lung cancer risk assessment data for exposure to radon and radon daughters. The estimates have shown that a cohort study is not feasible for reasons of unjustifiably high requirements. A case control study, however, may contribute to clarifying the lung cancer risk, especially if the basic overall entity is limited to the population group of over 50 years of age. (orig.) [de

  12. Determination of detection efficiency for radon and radon daughters with CR 39 track detector - a Monte Carlo study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikezic, D.

    1994-01-01

    The detection effciency, ρ, (or a calibration coefficient k) for radon measurements with a solid state nuclear track detector CR 39 was determined by many authors. There is a considerable discrepancy among reported values for ρ. This situation was a challenge to develop a software program to calculation ρ. This software is based on Bethe-Bloch's expression for the stopping power for heavy charged particles in a medium, as wll as on the Monte Carlo Method. Track parameters were calculated by using an iterative procedure as given in G. Somogyi et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. 109 (1973) 211. Results for an open detector and for the detector in a diffusion chamber were presented in this article. (orig.)

  13. Scopingsreport Radon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blaauboer RO; Vaas LH; Hesse JM; Slooff W

    1989-01-01

    Dit scopingsrapport vormt een onderdeel van de voorbereiding tot het opstellen van het basisdocument radon. Het doel van dit rapport is het algemene kennisniveau van de deelnemers aan de scopingsbijeenkomst aangaande radon op eenzelfde peil te brengen en discussie- en beslispunten inzake de

  14. The Montana Radon Study: social marketing via digital signage technology for reaching families in the waiting room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Laura S

    2015-04-01

    I tested a social marketing intervention delivered in health department waiting rooms via digital signage technology for increasing radon program participation among priority groups. I conducted a tri-county, community-based study over a 3-year period (2010-2013) in a high-radon state by using a quasi-experimental design. We collected survey data for eligible participants at the time of radon test kit purchase. Radon program participation increased at the intervention site (t38 = 3.74; P = .001; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 4.8, 16.0) with an increase in renters (χ(2)1,228 = 4.3; P = .039), Special Supplementary Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children families (χ(2)1,166 = 3.13; P = .077) and first-time testers (χ(2)1,228 = 10.93; P = .001). Approximately one third (30.3%; n = 30) attributed participation in the radon program to viewing the intervention message. The intervention crossover was also successful with increased monthly kit sales (t37 = 2.69; P = .01; 95% CI = 1.20, 8.47) and increased households participating (t23 = 4.76; P signage technology by 2 health departments.

  15. A study of environmental radon levels in rammed earth dwellings in the south west of Western Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walsh, M.; Jennings, P.

    2002-01-01

    Indoor radon and thoron progeny Equilibrium Equivalent Concentrations (EEC) were measured with a portable 'Radon Sniffer' in 10 rammed earth dwellings and 10 conventional dwellings in Margaret River in the South West of Western Australia. Natural background gamma radiation was also measured within the dwellings. The results of this study show that the mean indoor radon progeny concentrations in rammed earth and non-rammed earth dwellings was 24 Bq m -3 EEC and 9.3 Bq m -3 EEC respectively. The mean indoor thoron progeny concentrations in rammed earth and non-rammed earth dwellings was 3.9 Bq m -3 EEC and 0.8 Bq m -3 EEC respectively. The ranges of combined indoor radon and thoron progeny concentrations in rammed earth and non-rammed earth dwellings were between 2.1 and 76 Bq m -3 EEC and 2.0 and 27 Bq m -3 EEC respectively. The mean annual effective radiation dose equivalents from combined indoor radon and thoron progeny concentrations EEC using UNSCEAR's (1982) conversion factors in rammed earth and non-rammed earth dwellings were 4.1 mSv y -1 and 2.2 mSv y -1 respectively. Copyright (2002) Australasian Radiation Protection Society Inc

  16. Project Radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekholm, S.

    1988-01-01

    The project started in March 1987. The objective is to perform radon monitoring in 2000 dwellings occupied by people employed by State Power Board and to continue to contribute to the development of radon filters. The project participates in developing methods for radon measurement and decontamination and in adapting the methods to large scale application. About 400 so called radon trace measurements (coarse measurement) and about 10 action measurements (decontamination measurement) have been made so far. Experience shows that methods are fully applicable and that the decontamination measures recommended give perfectly satisfactory results. It is also established that most of the houses with high radon levels have poor ventilation Many of them suffer from moisture and mould problems. The work planned for 1988 and 1989 will in addition to measurements be directed towards improvement of the measuring methods. An activity catalogue will be prepared in cooperation with ventilation enterprises. (O.S.)

  17. Technique and equipment for measuring volume activity of radon in the air of radon laboratories and clinics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorob'ev, I.B.; Krivokhatskij, A.S.; Nekrasov, E.V.; Nikolaev, V.A.; Potapov, V.G.; Terent'ev, M.V.

    1990-01-01

    Usability of a new equipment-technique combination for measuring radon activity in the air of radon laboratories and balneological clinics is studied. The complex includes nitrate-cellulose detector, radon chamber, Aist, Istra type spark counters and technique of spark counting. The method sensitivity is 50 Bqxm 3 , the error is 30%. Usability and advisability of track method in radon laboratories and balneological clinics for simultaneous measurement in several points of integral volumetric radon activities are confirmred. The method permits to carry out rapid and accurate bulk investigations. The results of determining mean volumetric radon activity in the air in different points of radon laboratory and radon clinics are presented

  18. Radon balneotherapy and physical activity for osteoporosis prevention: a randomized, placebo-controlled intervention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winklmayr, Martina; Kluge, Christian; Winklmayr, Wolfgang; Küchenhoff, Helmut; Steiner, Martina; Ritter, Markus; Hartl, Arnulf

    2015-03-01

    Low-dose radon hyperthermia balneo treatment (LDRnHBT) is applied as a traditional measure in the non-pharmacological treatment of rheumatic diseases in Europe. During the last decades, the main approach of LDRnHBT was focused on the treatment of musculoskeletal disorders, but scientific evidence for the biological background of LDRnHBT is weak. Recently, evidence emerged that LDRnHBT influences bone metabolism. We investigated, whether combined LDRnHBT and exercise treatment has an impact on bone metabolism and quality of life in a study population in an age group at risk for developing osteoporosis. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial comprised guided hiking tours and hyperthermia treatment in either radon thermal water (LDRnHBT) or radon-free thermal water (PlaceboHBT). Markers of bone metabolism, quality of life and somatic complaints were evaluated. Statistics was performed by linear regression and a linear mixed model analysis. Significant changes over time were observed for most analytes investigated as well as an improvement in self-assessed health in both groups. No significant impact from the LDRnHBT could be observed. After 6 months, the LDRnHBT group showed a slightly stronger reduction of the osteoclast stimulating protein receptor activator of nuclear kB-ligand compared to the PlaceboHBT group, indicating a possible trend. A combined hyperthermia balneo and exercise treatment has significant immediate and long-term effects on regulators of bone metabolism as well as somatic complaints. LDRnHBT and placeboHBT yielded statistically equal outcomes.

  19. Study of epidemiological risk of lung cancer in Mexico due indoor radon exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ángeles, A.; Espinosa, G.

    2014-07-01

    In this work the lifetime relative risks (LRR) of lung cancer due to exposure to indoor 222Rn on the Mexican population is calculated. Cigarette smoking is the number one risk factor for lung cancer (LC), because that, to calculate the number of cases of LC due to exposure to 222Rn is necessary considers the number of cases of LC for smoking cigarette. The lung cancer mortality rates published by the "Secretaría de Salud" (SSA), the mexican population data published by the "Consejo Nacional de Población" (CONAPO), smoking data in the mexican population, published by the "Comisión Nacional Contra las Adicciones" (CONADIC), the "Organización Panamericana de la Salud" (OPS) and indoor 222Rn concentrations in Mexico published in several recent studies are used. To calculate the lifetime relative risks (LRR) for different segments of the Mexican population, firstly the Excess Relative Risk (ERR) is calculated using the method developed by the BEIR VI committee and subsequently modified by the USEPA and published in the report "EPA Assessment of Risks from Radon in Homes". The excess relative risks were then used to calculate the corresponding lifetime relative risks, again using the method developed by the BEIR VI committee. The lifetime relative risks for Mexican male and female eversmokers and Mexican male and female never-smokers were calculated for radon concentrations spanning the range found in recent studies of indoor radon concentrations in Mexico. The lifetime relative risks of lung cancer induced by lifetime exposure to the mexican average indoor radon concentration were estimated to be 1.44 and 1.40 for never-smokers mexican females and males respectively, and 1.19 and 1.17 for ever-smokers Mexican females and males respectively. The Mexican population LRR values obtained in relation to the USA and Canada LRR published values in ever-smokers for both gender are similar with differences less than 4%, in case of never-smokers in relation with Canada

  20. Seasonal and Lunar Month Periods Observed in Natural Neutron Flux at High Altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenkin, Yuri; Alekseenko, Victor; Cai, Zeyu; Cao, Zhen; Cattaneo, Claudio; Cui, Shuwang; Giroletti, Elio; Gromushkin, Dmitry; Guo, Cong; Guo, Xuewen; He, Huihai; Liu, Ye; Ma, Xinhua; Shchegolev, Oleg; Vallania, Piero; Vigorito, Carlo; Zhao, Jing

    2017-07-01

    Air radon concentration measurement is useful for research on geophysical effects, but it is strongly sensitive to site geology and many geophysical and microclimatic processes such as wind, ventilation, air humidity and so on inducing very big fluctuations on the concentration of radon in air. On the contrary, monitoring the radon concentration in soil by measuring the thermal neutron flux reduces environmental effects. In this paper, we report some experimental results on the natural thermal neutron flux as well as on the concentration of air radon and its variations at 4300 m asl. These results were obtained with unshielded thermal neutron scintillation detectors (en-detectors) and radon monitors located inside the ARGO-YBJ experimental hall. The correlation of these variations with the lunar month and 1-year period is undoubtedly confirmed. A method for earthquake prediction provided by a global net of en-detectors is currently under study.

  1. Open charcoal chamber method for mass measurements of radon exhalation rate from soil surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsapalov, Andrey; Kovler, Konstantin; Miklyaev, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Radon exhalation rate from the soil surface can serve as an important criterion in the evaluation of radon hazard of the land. Recently published international standard ISO 11665-7 (2012) is based on the accumulation of radon gas in a closed container. At the same time since 1998 in Russia, as a part of engineering and environmental studies for the construction, radon flux measurements are made using an open charcoal chamber for a sampling duration of 3–5 h. This method has a well-defined metrological justification and was tested in both favorable and unfavorable conditions. The article describes the characteristics of the method, as well as the means of sampling and measurement of the activity of radon absorbed. The results of the metrological study suggest that regardless of the sampling conditions (weather, the mechanism and rate of radon transport in the soil, soil properties and conditions), uncertainty of method does not exceed 20%, while the combined standard uncertainty of radon exhalation rate measured from the soil surface does not exceed 30%. The results of the daily measurements of radon exhalation rate from the soil surface at the experimental site during one year are reported. - Highlights: • Radon exhalation rate from the soil surface area of 32 cm"2 can be measured at level of 10 mBq/(m"2s) at the uncertainty ≤30%. • The method has a metrological justification. • No need to consider climate conditions, soil properties and conditions, mechanism and rate of radon transport in the soil.

  2. Measurement and Simulation of Radon Transport in East Asia and Their Implication on Source Distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirao, S.; Yamazawa, H.; Moriizumi, J.; Iida, T.

    2012-01-01

    Outlines of the continuous monitoring of atmospheric radon concentration at several locations in East Asia, the development and validation of a long-range atmospheric transport model, and a trial of estimating and reducing uncertainty in radon exhalation flux density maps were presented. Atmospheric radon concentration data observed at a small solitary island in the Pacific Ocean were successfully used to improve the vertical diffusion scheme in the model although the uncertainty in the radon flux density data was the limitation. It was also pointed out that a kind of source-receptor analysis using the radon concentration observed at these islands would reduce uncertainty in the radon flux density maps. (author)

  3. Initial study on the quantitative determination of radon in varied construction dwllings in the province of Pichincha, Ecuador

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayala, Maria; Penaherrera, Patricio; Munoz, Victor

    1993-01-01

    This research involves data from dwellings built up with different types of raw materials found spread in the province of Pichincha - Ecuador. The SSNTD method using a cellulose nitrate sensible film LR-115 was used for the research. The incidence of temperature, altitude, ventilation on the concentration gas radon-222 were also subject of a qualitative study. Eventually, the results show that the adobe dwellings and/or poorly ventilated dwellings prodece maximum concentration of radon-222 than first or second floor, meaning that, the gas is also coming up from the ground. In any case the level of radon-222 concentration is less than the acceptet limit, 200 Bq/m 3, by UNCEAR. Only places, such as Mindo and Calderon, surpass the limit

  4. Potential for bias in epidemiologic studies that rely on glass-based retrospective assessment of radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinberg, C.R.

    1995-01-01

    Retrospective assessment of exposure to radon remains the greatest challenge in epidemiologic efforts to assess lung cancer risk associated with residential exposure. An innovative technique based on measurement of α-emitting, long-lived daughters embedded by recoil into household glass may one day provide improved radon dosimetry. Particulate air pollution is known, however, to retard the plate-out of radon daughters. This would be expected to result in a differential effect on dosimetry, where the calibration curve relating the actual historical radon exposure to the remaining α-activity in the glass would be different in historically smoky and nonsmoky environments. The resulting open-quotes measurement confoundingclose quotes can distort inferences about the effect of radon and can also produce spurious evidence for synergism between radon exposure and cigarette smoking. 18 refs., 4 figs

  5. Is radon 222 an appropriate tracer for the study of seismic precursors?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richon, P.; Heritier, T.; Sebe, O.; Maffat, I.; Holtzappfel, T.; Le Hesran, E.; Geber, O.; Ulziibat, M.; Demberel, S.; Oyun-Erdene, M.; Bilguun, M.

    2015-01-01

    Radon 222 is a natural radionuclide that can be measured in air, water, and soil in very, very small quantities. Experiments performed in laboratories have shown that a local strain on a rock has an impact on the mobility of the radon gas and as local strains increase with the approach of an earthquake, it is considered that radon abnormal measurements may help predicting earthquakes. The first stage to extrapolate laboratory results to large-scale application is to master the metrology of the radon gas. A campaign of measurements achieved in Mongolia on the Emeelt site has allowed an optimization of radon metrology and of the positioning of the probes. Preliminary results have shown that abnormal values of radon concentrations that are not correlated with local meteorology, appear a few days before local seismic activity resumes

  6. Basic study on positive effects of radon inhalation on pet's health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kataoka, Takahiro; Sakoda, Akihiro; Kawabe, Atsushi; Hanamoto, Katsumi; Yamaoka, Kiyonori; Tokunaga, Rikizo

    2012-01-01

    Radon inhalation using our radon exposure device activated anti-oxidative function in some organs of mouse. To assess the possibility of its application to veterinary care, healthy dogs and cats with chronic renal failure were inhaled radon at a concentration of 5500 Bq/m 3 for 30 minutes every 2 days for 30 days. In result, radon inhalation within a relatively long time period significantly decreased the triglyceride level of dogs. On the other hand, some cats increased the volume of drinking water by radon inhalation and the creatinine level in blood of these cats was decreased to normal level. These findings suggest that radon inhalation may have curative properties against chronic renal failure. (author)

  7. Radon concentration in a house of Calvados

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leleyter, L.; Riffault, B.; Mazenc, B.

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies indicate a link between the risk of lung cancer and residential radon exposure. However, in France, awareness of this problem was made relatively late. Accordingly this study examines the radon concentration in a private home in Calvados (Normandy region). Findings show that the presence of a fireplace in a house can accelerate radon convective transfer, and that simple adjustments to interior and exterior accommodation can significantly reduce radon concentrations in the home. (authors)

  8. Analysis of infiltration through a clay radon barrier at an UMTRA disposal cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    An infiltration study was initiated in January 1988 to assess the percent saturation in, and infiltration through, clay radon barriers of typical Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project disposal cells. Predicting infiltration through the radon barrier is necessary to evaluate whether the disposal cell will comply with the proposed US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) groundwater protection standards (40 CFR 192). The groundwater standards require demonstrating that tailings seepage will not cause background concentrations or maximum concentration limits (MCLs) to be exceeded at the downgradient edge of the disposal facility (the point of compliance, or POC). This demonstration generally consists of incorporating the predicted seepage flux and the concentration of the specific hazardous constituents into a contaminant transport model, and predicting the resultant concentrations at the POC. The infiltration study consisted of a field investigation to evaluate moisture conditions in the radon barrier of the completed Shiprock, New Mexico, UMTRA Project disposal cell and previously completed UMTRA Project disposal cells at Clive, Utah, and Burrell, Pennsylvania. Coring was conducted to measure percent saturation profiles in the radon barriers at these disposal cells. In addition, a detailed investigation of the Shiprock radon barrier was conducted to establish the effects of meteorological stresses on moisture conditions in the filter layer and radon barrier. The Shiprock infiltration study was also intended to characterize hydraulic gradients and operational unsaturated hydraulic conductivities in the radon barrier

  9. Risk assessment of radon gas concentration for some selected offices of KNUST campus, Kumasi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bediako, Yaw Addo

    2013-11-01

    Radon (Rn-222) has been identified as an factor that could result in a health hazard by studies all around the world. The health risks can be minimised by preventing measures where radon is highly concentrated as in some mines or homes or offices. A study in the buildup concentration of the inert gas, will give us a better understanding of its possible pathways through soil into the air surrounding and offices where radon releases can become hazardous. Measuring the radon concentrations on campus, can help to deduce the radon flux to identify the problem areas for rehabilitation. An active method incorporating Trace level radon gas detection and continious monitoring method was used in this study to determine the radon concentration of the selected offices. Concentrations ranging from 0.010 to 0.498 pCi/I were detected, with the head of optometry and Visual Science recording the highest concentration of 0.498 pCi/I, while the head of Agricultural Engineering Department office with the least concentration of 0.010 pCi/I. Although these concentrations are generally low as compared with the EPA guidelines of an action level of 4 pCi/I, but no amount of radiation is said to be safe. (au)

  10. A hypothetical high level of radon output before a major geophysical event: a theoretical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monnin, M.; Seidel, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    Variation of radon concentration may play the role of a precursor for seisms and volcanic eruptions. This variation depends on the motion of interstitial gases. A numerical model is presented. It describes the steady states of the radon concentration and mainly the transient states between two different steady states. For an up-flow of gases, it predicts the formation of an intense emission of radon over a short period of time, called a 'kludon' [fr

  11. Indoor and underground radon activity in the northern part of Bangladesh: a preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haque, A.K.F.; Islam, G.S.; Islam, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    CR-39 solid state nuclear track detectors were used to determine the indoor and underground radon activity at three locations in the northern part of Bangladesh. The indoor radon activity at Naogaon was found to be higher than that at Rajshahi and Ruppur. Radon concentration in the mud-built houses at Naogaon was estimated to be ∼ 500 Bq m -3 (14pCi 1 -1 ) which is more than three times the recommended limit. The underground radon emanation at Naogaon was found to be one order of magnitude higher than that at the other two places. (author)

  12. Study on radon and thoron levels in different types of granitic work industries around Tumkur city

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagabhushan, S.R.; Ujjinappa; Srilatha; Sannappa, J.

    2013-01-01

    Radon, Thoron and its progeny monitoring has become a global phenomenon due to its health hazards on human being. The concentration of radon, thoron and their progeny levels have been measured in different types of Granite and brick work industries around Tumkur city by using LR-115 type II Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors (SSNTDs) have been used for the measurement of these gases. The higher concentration of radon, thoron and their progeny were observed in the dwellings near brick industries compared to Granite cutting and polishing industries. The inhalation dose due to Radon, Thoron and their progeny to the workers and public living near these industries have been estimated. (author)

  13. Flux

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Ib

    . FLUX betegner en flyden eller strømmen, dvs. dynamik. Forstår man livet som proces og udvikling i stedet for som ting og mekanik, får man et andet billede af det gode liv end det, som den velkendte vestlige mekanicisme lægger op til. Dynamisk forstået indebærer det gode liv den bedst mulige...... kanalisering af den flux eller energi, der strømmer igennem os og giver sig til kende i vore daglige aktiviteter. Skal vores tanker, handlinger, arbejde, samvær og politiske liv organiseres efter stramme og faste regelsæt, uden slinger i valsen? Eller skal de tværtimod forløbe ganske uhindret af regler og bånd...

  14. Radon problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, B.L.

    1985-01-01

    This chapter examines the health hazards resulting from the release of naturally occurring radioactive gas derived from the decay of uranium. It is estimated that random inhalation is now causing about 10,000 fatal lung cancers per year in the US. Radon is constantly being generated in rocks and soils (in which uranium is naturally present) and in materials produced from them (e.g., brick, stone, cement, plaster). It is emphasized that radon levels in buildings are typically 5 times higher than outdoors because radon diffusing up from the ground below or out of bricks, stone, cement, or plaster is trapped inside for a relatively long time

  15. A comparative study of indoor radon levels and inhalation dose in some areas of Punjab and Haryana, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajwa, B.S.; Singh, Harmanjit; Singh, Joga; Singh, Surinder

    2009-01-01

    Indoor radon concentrations have been measured for two consecutive half-year periods in a wide range of dwellings of some regions of Punjab and Haryana states. The objective was to find correlation between the variations of indoor radon levels with the sub-soil, local geology, type of building materials, etc. of the two regions. So keeping this in view the indoor radon measurements have been carried out in the dwellings of different villages around the Tusham ring complex, Bhiwani District, Haryana, known to be composed of acidic volcanics and the associated granites along with some villages of Amritsar District, Punjab. The indoor radon concentration in the dwellings around Tusham (Haryana) have been found to be varying from 120.5±95 to 915.2±233 Bq m -3 , whereas it ranges from 60.0±37 to 235.6±96 Bq m -3 for the dwellings of Punjab. The 222 Rn concentration observed at most of locations particularly around Tusham ring complex region is higher than that of all the villages studied in Punjab region. Local geology including embedded granitic rocks, sub-soil, etc. as well as building materials having higher radioactive content are the major contributors for the higher indoor radon levels observed in the dwelling around Tusham, where few dwellings have higher radon concentrations than the ICRP, 1993 recommendations. The annual effective dose equivalent has also been estimated for each location of the both regions, which has been found to be varying from 1.0 to 17.2 mSv/y. (author)

  16. Cost and effectiveness of radon barrier systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, E.G.; Freeman, H.D.; Hartley, J.N.; Gee, G.W.

    1982-12-01

    Earthen, asphalt, and multilayer radon barrier systems can all provide reduction in the amount of radon gas released from uranium mill tailings. Pacific Northwest Laboratory field tested all three types of covers at Grand Junction, Colorado during the summer of 1981. All nine individual radon barrier systems tested currently meet the EPA standard for radon flux of 20 pCi m - 2 s - 1 . The cost of the asphalt and 3m earthen covers were about the same at the field test. Multilayer covers were significantly more costly. Cost estimates for three high priority western sites indicate 3m of earthen cover is the least costly radon barrier when earthen material is available at or near the disposal site. If earthen material must be imported more than 8 to 10 km asphalt and possibly multilayer radon barriers can be cost effective

  17. Measurement and comparison of indoor radon levels in new and old buildings in the city of Muzaffarabad (Azad Kashmir), Pakistan. A pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafique, Muhammad; Jabeen, Shahida; Bukhari, Shujaht; Rahman, Saeed ur; Shahzad, Muhammad Ikram; Matiullah; Rahman, Said; Nasir, Tabassum

    2009-01-01

    Indoor radon concentrations have been measured in a limited number of dwellings in the state capital of Azad Jammu and Kashimir, Muzaffarabad city after the devastating earthquake of 2005. Radon detectors (CN-85 based box-type) were placed in the drawing rooms, bedrooms and kitchens of 35 houses, selected on the basis of their location and design as well as willingness and cooperation of householders from mid May to mid July 2007. The average radon concentrations were found to vary from 24 to 518 Bq m -3 , 41 to 380 Bq m -3 and 32 to 467 Bq m -3 in the bedrooms, drawing rooms and kitchens, respectively. The weighted average radon concentration in older houses was found to vary from 51 to 334 Bq m -3 and for newly constructed houses a considerable decrease in measured values (ranging from 14 to 102 Bq m -3 ) have been found. As Pakistan does not currently have a national reference (or action level) for radon in homes, therefore the present data has been compared with the data reported for other countries. Some of the houses studied were found to have higher radon concentrations. These higher values of indoor radon levels may be due to the poor ventilation and influence of the earthquake in creating new fissures and therefore new pathways for radon to enter into the buildings. (author)

  18. Measurement and comparison of indoor radon levels in new and old buildings in the city of Muzaffarabad (Azad Kashmir), Pakistan. A pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafique, Muhammad; Jabeen, Shahida; Bukhari, Shujaht [Dept. of Physics, Univ. of Azad Jammu and Kashmir Muzaffarabad, Azad Kashmir (Pakistan); Rahman, Saeed ur [Dept. of Physics, COMSATS Inst. of Information Technology, Islamabad (Pakistan); Shahzad, Muhammad Ikram; Matiullah, [Physics Division, PINSTECH, Islamabad (Pakistan); Rahman, Said [SPAS Division, SPARCENT, SUPARCO HQs, Karachi (Pakistan); Nasir, Tabassum [Dept. of Physics, Gomal Univ., Dera Ismail Khan (Pakistan)

    2009-11-15

    Indoor radon concentrations have been measured in a limited number of dwellings in the state capital of Azad Jammu and Kashimir, Muzaffarabad city after the devastating earthquake of 2005. Radon detectors (CN-85 based box-type) were placed in the drawing rooms, bedrooms and kitchens of 35 houses, selected on the basis of their location and design as well as willingness and cooperation of householders from mid May to mid July 2007. The average radon concentrations were found to vary from 24 to 518 Bq m{sup -3}, 41 to 380 Bq m{sup -3} and 32 to 467 Bq m{sup -3} in the bedrooms, drawing rooms and kitchens, respectively. The weighted average radon concentration in older houses was found to vary from 51 to 334 Bq m{sup -3} and for newly constructed houses a considerable decrease in measured values (ranging from 14 to 102 Bq m{sup -3}) have been found. As Pakistan does not currently have a national reference (or action level) for radon in homes, therefore the present data has been compared with the data reported for other countries. Some of the houses studied were found to have higher radon concentrations. These higher values of indoor radon levels may be due to the poor ventilation and influence of the earthquake in creating new fissures and therefore new pathways for radon to enter into the buildings. (author)

  19. Radon and risk of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rootwelt, K.

    1988-01-01

    The article reviews present knowledge on the possible detriment to health of radon in homes. It is concluded that inducement of lung cancer has neither been proved nor disproved. Large-scale epidemiological studies are in progress. Until the results of these studies have been reported, frightening anti-radon propaganda should be discouraged

  20. Results of the first 5 years of a study on year-to-year variations of radon concentration in Italian dwellings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bochicchio, F.; Ampollini, M.; Antignani, S.; Bruni, B.; Quarto, M.; Venoso, G.

    2009-01-01

    Radon concentration in air is subject to significant variations at different time scales, owing to several factors. In general, the shorter the time period considered, the larger the variations in radon concentration, e.g., day-to-day variations are usually higher than month-to-month variations. An average over 12 consecutive months is generally considered the best estimate of the long-term average radon concentration. Due to practical reasons, however, very few data are available on year-to-year variations. Year-to-year variations can have quite a relevant impact on radon policies and on the assessment of health risks from exposures to radon. Therefore, a project was started in 1996 aimed to evaluate year-to-year variations in a sample of dwellings. Systematic radon measurements have been made with LR 115 based radon detectors (closed type) in the living room and one bedroom of a sample of dwellings in Rome (Italy). The analysis of the results of the first five consecutive years of measurements, regarding the 76 dwellings included in the final analysis, showed relatively low year-to-year variations, with a median coefficient of variation of 14% (range 3%-42%), smaller than that observed in studies from other European countries. Therefore, in the analyzed sample, 12-month measurements can be considered a good estimate of the average radon concentration, at least within a 5-year period. This is quite important for radon regulations and policies, e.g. annual measurements could be recommended and repetition of radon measurements could not be necessary within periods of 5 years. Moreover, the impact of the observed year-to-year variations on the lung cancer risk estimated in the Italian epidemiological study is expected to be not high, if variations on periods up to about 30 years can be assumed similar to those observed in this study.

  1. Reduction of radon concentration in a basement workplace: study of the problem and characterization of the main parameters affecting the radon concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiaberto, E.M.; Magnoni, M.; Righino, F.; Costa Laia, R.

    2002-01-01

    In this work is described the method used for the mitigation of high radon concentrations found in a basement workplace, the ARPA laboratory used for the metrology of EMF. In this lab was in fact measured a radon concentration up to 1900 Bq/m 3 , a value largely exceeding the Italian limit for workplaces (500 Bq/m 3 ). The basement workplace affected by radon is a room of around 500 m 3 with no windows and only one door, during work usually close, and therefore with a very low ventilation rate. In this workplace, usually two persons spent about 6 hour per day. Therefore their exposure to the radon and its decay products can attain a considerable value. For this people, accordingly to the accepted dosimetric models, an effective dose of several mSv per year could be estimated (ICRP Publication n. 65, 1993). It is thus important to reduce the radon concentration to acceptable levels, i.e. at least lower than 500 Bq/m 3 . This paper deals not only with the simple method used for the remedial action, but also to the investigation of the relevant parameters affecting the radon concentration. In particular, the monitoring of the radon concentration before and after the remedial action, allowed the calculation of the radon entry rates (Bq/s) and the ventilation rates (s-1) in the different experimental condition

  2. Radon reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, M.A.

    1990-01-01

    During a radon gas screening program, elevated levels of radon gas were detected in homes on Mackinac Island, Mich. Six homes on foundations with crawl spaces were selected for a research project aimed at reducing radon gas concentrations, which ranged from 12.9 to 82.3 pCi/l. Using isolation and ventilation techniques, and variations thereof, radon concentrations were reduced to less than 1 pCi/l. This paper reports that these reductions were achieved using 3.5 mil cross laminated or 10 mil high density polyethylene plastic as a barrier without sealing to the foundation or support piers, solid and/or perforated plastic pipe and mechanical fans. Wind turbines were found to be ineffective at reducing concentrations to acceptable levels. Homeowners themselves installed all materials

  3. Geographical associations between radon and cancer: is domestic radon level a marker of socioeconomic status?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolff, S.P.; Stern, G.

    1991-01-01

    Previous studies showing a geographical association between radon and various cancers, particularly the leukaemias and lymphomas, appear to be confounded by the role of radon levels as a surrogate for socioeconomic status. Higher socioeconomic status (at least at the UK county level) is correlated with higher levels of domestic radon. Controlling for the relationship between socioeconomic status and radon removes the correlation between radon exposure and lymphoproliferative disease. Reported associations between radon and lymphoproliferative disease (and possibly other cancers) may be secondary to socioeconomic variables. (author)

  4. Radon transport modelling: User's guide to RnMod3d

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Claus Erik

    2000-01-01

    RnMod3d is a numerical computer model of soil-gas and radon transport in porous media. It can be used, for example, to study radon entry from soil into houses in response to indoor-outdoor pressure differences or changes in atmospheric pressure. It canalso be used for flux calculations of radon...... decay, diffusion and advection of radon can be solved. Moisture is included in the model, and partitioning ofradon between air, water and soil grains (adsorption) is taken into account. Most parameters can change in time and space, and transport parameters (diffusivity and permeability) may...... be anisotropic. This guide includes benchmark tests based on simpleproblems with known solutions. RnMod3d has also been part of an international model intercomparison exercise based on more complicated problems without known solutions. All tests show that RnMod3d gives results of good quality....

  5. Effects of periodic atmospheric pressure variation on radon entry into buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Y. W.; Narasimhan, T. N.

    1992-06-01

    Using a mathematical model, we have investigated the temporal variations of radon entry into a house basement in the presence of time-dependent periodic variations of barometric pressure as well as a persistent small steady depressurization within the basement. The tool for our investigation is an integral finite difference numerical code which can solve for both diffusive and advective flux of radon in the soil gas which is treated as a slightly compressible fluid. Two different boundary conditions at the house basement are considered: (1) a dirt floor basement so that diffusion is equally or more important than advective transport, and (2) an "impermeable" cement basement except for a 1-cm-wide crack near the perimeter of the basement floor; in which case, advective transport of radon flux dominates. Two frequencies of barometric pressure fluctuation with representative values of amplitudes, based on a Fourier decomposition of barometric pressure data, were chosen in this study: one with a short period of 0.5 hour with pressure amplitude of 50 Pa, the other a diurnal variation with a period of 24 hours with the typical pressure amplitude of 250 Pa. For a homogeneous soil medium with soil permeability to air between 10-13 and 10-10 m2, we predict that the barometric fluctuations increase the radon entry into the basement by up to 120% of the steady radon inflow into the basement owing to a steady depressurization of 5 Pa. If soil permeability heterogeneity is present, such as the presence of a thin layer of higher permeability aggregate immediately below the basement floor, radon flux due to atmospheric pumping is further increased. Effects of pressure pumping on radon entry are also compared to diffusion-only transport when the steady depressurization is absent. It is found that contribution to radon entry is significant for the basement crack configuration. In particular, for pressure pumping at 0.5-hour period and for a homogeneous medium of permeability of 10

  6. Radon/helium studies for earthquake prediction N-W Himalaya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virk, H.S.

    1999-01-01

    The paper presents the preliminary data of radon monitoring stated in the Himalayan orogenic belt. Radon anomalies are correlated with microseismic activity in the N-W Himalaya. The He/Rn ratio will be used as a predictive tool for earthquakes

  7. Indoor radon level measurements in Iran using AEOI passive dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohrabi, M.; Solaymanian, A.R.

    1988-01-01

    A passive radon diffusion dosimeter was developed at the RPD of AEOI for nationwide indoor radon level measurements. Several parameters of the dosimeter were studied. Radon levels were determined in about 250 houses in Ramsar (a high natural radiation area), Tehran, Babolsar and Gonabad. In this paper, the results of some dosimeter parameters as well as radon levels in indoor air are reported

  8. Radon and aerosol release from open-pit uranium mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, V.W.; Nielson, K.K.; Mauch, M.L.

    1982-08-01

    The quantity of 222 Rn (hereafter called radon) released per unit of uranium produced from open pit mining has been determined. A secondary objective was to determine the nature and quantity of airborne particles resulting from mine operations. To accomplish these objectives, a comprehensive study of the release rates of radon and aerosol material to the atmosphere was made over a one-year period from April 1979 to May 1980 at the Morton Ranch Mine which was operated by United Nuclear Corporation (UNC) in partnership with Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). The mine is now operated for TVA by Silver King Mines. Morton Ranch Mine was one of five open pit uranium mines studied in central Wyoming. Corroborative measurements were made of radon flux and 226 Ra (hereafter called radium) concentrations of various surfaces at three of the other mines in October 1980 and again at these three mines plus a fourth in April of 1981. Three of these mines are located in the Powder River Basin, about 80 kilometers east by northeast of Casper. One is located in the Shirley Basin, about 60 km south of Casper, and the remaining one is located in the Gas Hills, approximately 100 km west of Casper. The one-year intensive study included simultaneous measurement of several parameters: continuous measurement of atmospheric radon concentration near the ground at three locations, monthly 24-hour radon flux measurements from various surfaces, radium analyses of soil samples collected under each of the flux monitoring devices, monthly integrations of aerosols on dichotomous aerosol samplers, analysis of aerosol samplers for total dust loading, aerosol elemental and radiochemical composition, aerosol elemental composition by particle size, wind speed, wind direction, temperature, barometric pressure, and rainfall

  9. Radon measurements at IC-09 well of Chingshui geothermal field (Taiwan): A case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Y.; Kuo, T.; Fan, K.; Liang, H.; Tsai, C.; Chiang, C.; Su, C.

    2011-01-01

    Radon concentration was monitored during the flow tests of well IC-09 at the Chingshui geothermal field. The radon concentration was found to increase from 54 ± 29 to 983 ± 65 Bq/m 3 as a step function of production time, or cumulative production. The observed radon behavior can be explained by a radial composite model with the carbonate scales deposited in the skin zone near the well. The radius of skin zone near well IC-09 can be estimated with radon data at about 20 m using a plug flow model. Monitoring natural radon during the well flow tests is a helpful tracer to diagnose the formation damage near the well.

  10. Certain problems about radon. Pt.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Huishan

    2005-01-01

    Discussion has been made on certain pointed out problems which presently influence the work and development of radon survey, and certain specific problems have been put forward which should be paid much attention and taken measures. Among the problems, some come from cognition, i.e. two kinds of balance and examination about radon, chief culprit of radon's daughter, multiply control and migration, the significance of radon in the water and soil, important standards for designing and evaluating the sites of construction projects, thoughts on the mechanism of the harm of radon and its daughters, diseases causing of both high and low radon, difficulty of emanation of indoor radon, normal low radon from natural marble; and others must be resolved specifically, i.e. establishment of national radon standards as quickly as possible, improvement of on-the-spot examination technique, national-wide radon survey with multiple disciplines and technology, the research on the mechanism of radon's harm and the establishment national radon study center. (authors)

  11. Experience gained with a case control study of risk factors in bronchial carcinoma - would the approach be suitable for assessment of the radon problem?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wichmann, H.E.

    1988-01-01

    In the USA and in Sweden, case control studies are being done for investigating the incidence of lung cancer and a possible association with indoor exposure to radon daughters. In the F.R.G., methods and results of a case control study of other risk factors in bronchial carcinoma are available, and the question currently discussed is whether the data obtained by this study, together with additional measurements, could be used to assess the radon problem, or whether an individual radon study should be done, and what its requirements would be. (orig.) [de

  12. Studies on radon exhalation rate from building materials of Mysuru district, Karnataka

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandini, M.; Lavanya, B.S.K.; Chandrashekara, M.S.; Pruthvi Rani, K.S.

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, mass exhalation rate of 222 Rn from soil and building materials was studied using scintillation based Smart Radon Monitor (SRM) and also using Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors (SSNTD) employing Can Technique, following standard procedure. Mass exhalation rate of 222 Rn from various building material samples such as brick, sand, cement, concrete and from different types of flooring materials was determined. The results obtained from these methods were compared and analysed. The samples of construction materials were collected from various locations of Mysuru city. The city has an area of about 128 sq km with population of about 1 million. Mining industries of magnetite, dunite and lime stone are located around Mysuru city. In addition to this, quarrying and crushing of granite stones for building activities also exist nearby

  13. Study of the atmospheric chemistry of radon progeny in laboratory and real indoor atmospheres. Final project report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopke, P.K.

    1996-09-01

    This report completes Clarkson University's study of the chemical and physical behavior of the 218 Po atom immediately following its formation by the alpha decay of radon. Because small changes in size for activity in the sub-10 nm size range result in large changes in the delivered dose per unit exposure, this behavior must be understood if the exposure to radon progeny and it dose to the cells in the respiratory tract are to be fully assessed. In order to pursue this general goal, two areas of radon progeny behavior are being pursued; laboratory studies under controlled conditions to better understand the fundamental physical and chemical processes that affect the progeny's atmospheric behavior and studies in actual indoor environments to develop a better assessment of the exposure of the occupants of that space to the size and concentration of the indoor radioactive aerosol. Thus, two sets of specific goals have been established for this project. The specific tasks of the controlled laboratory studies are (1) Determine the formation rates of circ OH radicals formed by the radiolysis of air following radon decay; (2) Examine the formation of particles by the radiolytic oxidation of substances like SO 2 , ethylene, and H 2 S to lower vapor pressure compounds and determine the role of gas phase additives such as H 2 O and NH 3 in determining the particle size; (3) Measure the rate of ion-induced nucleation using a thermal diffusion cloud chamber, and (4) Measure the neutralization rate of 218 PoO x + in O 2 at low radon concentrations

  14. Radon measurements in indoor workplaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokonami, S.; Matsumoto, M.; Furukawa, M.; Fujimoto, K.; Fujitaka, K.; Pan, J.; Kurosawa, R.

    1996-01-01

    Radon measurements in several office buildings located in Tokyo were carried out with two types of device to study the time-dependent radon concentration in indoor workplaces. Both types of device use the electrostatic field for the collection of 218 Po onto the electrode of the detector. One provides an average radon concentration throughout the day. The other, in which a weekly timer is installed in the circuit of the electrode of the device, provides an average radon concentration during working hours (9:00-17:00, Monday-Friday). Although radon concentrations in Japanese dwellings have been found to be generally low, relatively high concentrations were observed in the office buildings. No consistent seasonal variation was recognised in this study. Little difference of average radon concentrations between working hours and the whole day was found throughout the year in two offices. On the other hand, a significant difference was observed in other offices. The operation of an air conditioner might change the radon concentration during working hours. From the results of radon measurements the average effective dose in the workplace was estimated to be 0.23 mSv for 2000 working hours in a year. (Author)

  15. CONTRIBUTION OF RADON FLOWS AND RADON SOURCES TO THE RADON CONCENTRATION IN A DWELLING

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEMEIJER, RJ; STOOP, P; PUT, LW

    1992-01-01

    In this paper a model is presented for analysis of the radon concentrations in a compartment in terms of contributions from transport by flows of air between compartments and from radon sources in the compartment. Measurements were made to study the effect of increased natural ventilation of the

  16. Experimental study on the aging process of the LR 115 cellulose nitrate radon detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siems, M.; Freyer, K.; Treutler, H.-C.; Joensson, G.; Enge, W.

    2001-01-01

    An experimental determination of the aging process of cellulose nitrate detector material was based on the examination of special properties of the LR 115 solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs) of various ages up to 18 years. The examined relevant parameters are the bulk etching rate v b and the track etching rate v t . These parameters are responsible for the appearance, the size and the registration efficiency of tracks of α-particles from radon gas in the detector. To find a correlation between these material parameters and the detector sensitivity an experimental calibration of indoor room and outdoor soil detector devices based on LR 115 took place at the Umweltforschungszentrum Leipzig-Halle (Germany). To avoid routine calibration work in external radon exposure facilities a correction of the age dependent calibration factors with the material parameters measured in one's own laboratory was targeted. In this study a general age dependence, however, was not found. The following statements for practical applications can be made. (i) the bulk etching rate v b for detectors of the same batch has a depth dependence and this dependence is constant over 2 years (LR 115 September 1994). (ii) detectors of different batches older than 5 years and stored at room temperature show an odd v b behaviour when v b is used for describing track shapes. (iii) the calibration factor of detectors of different batches that were stored at about +4 deg. C is constant over 5 years (LR 115 September 1994 and February 1999, Table 2). The conclusion is that LR 115 detectors not older than 5 years and stored in a refrigerator at about +4 deg. C should be preferred for radon measurements. Furthermore these detectors should be recalibrated every year and the microscope work of this calibrations should be performed by the same person who performs the measurements. In addition, a phenomenon related to fundamental track formation mechanisms was found, that the time straggling of the

  17. Report of the special committee for the study of physiological effects of radon in human

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This report outlines the activities of the committee for the study of physiological effects of radon in human based on the presentation in the meetings by the members in the period, 1996-1998. The methods to estimate the exposed dose of radon (Rn) have been considerably improved now. But it is necessary to consider living conditions such as housing conditions, respiratory ratio as well as physical measurements such as Rn concentration, its balance factor, the ratio of non-absorbed component, for accurate evaluation of the physiological effects of Rn. This committee was established aiming to investigate the physiological effects of Rn in human bodies and solve the problems in this area. In a period from 1996 to 1998, meeting was held nine times by the committee. The respective main themes were as follows: the purpose of this committee and the plans of activities in future for the first meeting, indoor Rn level and balance factor for the second, outdoor Rn level and aerosol of its daughter nuclides for the third, respiratory air movement model for the 4th, Rn inhalation, epidemiological study of Rn for the 5th, epidemiological study of Rn for the 6th, problems in Rn level survey for the 7th, behaviors of Rn and its daughter nuclides in occupational environment for 9th, and variance in dose calibration factor and biological effects of α-ray for 10th. At present, dose evaluation and risk evaluation for Rn exposure include considerable uncertainty. Accurate dose evaluation for Rn is necessary to determine the limitation dose for human bodies to repress the physiological effects. (M.N.)

  18. Radon concentration and working level in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stiver, J.H.; Tung, Chao-Hsiung.

    1995-01-01

    Radon-222 ( 222 Rn) and 222 Rn progeny WL monitoring in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) was initiated to support regulatory compliance. Measurements were taken over two periods, in Test Alcove No. 1 of the ESF, about 60 m from the tunnel entrance. For both periods, 222 Rn concentration was less than 10% of the Derived Air Concentration (DAC) set forth in DOE Order 5480.11. Thus, these assessments were sufficient to demonstrate regulatory compliance. Based on these findings, quarterly 222 Rn and 222 Rn progeny monitoring was initiated. Two systems each were employed for 222 Rn and 222 Rn progeny measurement. No significant differences were observed between the respective systems. An interesting finding was that at the time the measurements were taken, barometric pressure appeared to be the predominant factor controlling 222 Rn concentration in the ESF. This was true even during periods of ventilation shutdown

  19. STUDY OF RADIATION EXPOSURE DUE TO RADON, THORON AND THEIR PROGENY IN THE INDOOR ENVIRONMENT OF RAJPUR REGION OF UTTARAKHAND HIMALAYA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandari, Tushar; Aswal, Sunita; Prasad, Mukesh; Pant, Preeti; Bourai, A A; Ramola, R C

    2016-10-01

    In the present study, the measurements of indoor radon, thoron and their progeny concentrations have been carried out in the Rajpur region of Uttarakhand, Himalaya, India by using LR-115 solid-state nuclear track detector-based time-integrated techniques. The gas concentrations have been measured by single-entry pin-hole dosemeter technique, while for the progeny concentrations, deposition-based Direct Thoron and Radon Progeny Sensor technique has been used. The radiation doses due to the inhalation of radon, thoron and progeny have also been determined by using obtained concentrations of radon, thoron and their progeny in the study area. The average radon concentration varies from 75 to 123 Bq m -3 with an overall average of 89 Bq m -3 The average thoron concentration varies from 29 to 55 Bq m -3 with an overall average of 38 Bq m -3 The total annual effective dose received due to radon, thoron and their progeny varies from 2.4 to 4.1 mSv y -1 with an average of 2.9 mSv y -1 While the average equilibrium factor for radon and its progeny was found to be 0.39, for thoron and its progeny, it was 0.06. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Studying the Variation of Radon Level in Some Houses in Alexandria City, Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd El-Zaher, M.; Fahmi, N.M.

    2009-01-01

    Inhalation of indoor radon has been recognized as one of the health hazards. In the present work a set of indoor radon measurements was carried out, in different Egyptian houses in Alexandria city, built of the same type of building materials, using time-integrated passive radon dosimeters containing LR-115 Type II solid state nuclear track detector. Measurements were carried out from October 2007 to June 2008. The results show that, the radon concentrations and the annual effective dose in these houses varied from (38.62 to 120.39) Bq m-3 and (0.96 to 3.06) mSv y-1 respectively. The mean values of radon concentrations in living rooms, bedrooms, bathrooms, and kitchens were: (50.93±7.14), (63.75±7.63), (105.3± 14.67) and (82.38±8.35) Bq m -3 respectively. Also the mean values of annual effective dose were (1.26±0.17), (1.58±0.185), (2.63±0.36) and (2.0± 0.20) mSv y -1 , respectively. This data shows that, bathrooms and kitchens have significantly higher radon concentrations and annual radon dose

  1. Environmental and indoor study of Radon concentration in San Joaquin area, Queretaro, Mexico, first results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinojo Alonso, N.A.; Kotsarenko, A.; Yutsis, V.; Hernandez Silva, G.; Perego, P.; Fazio, M.; Grimalsky, V.; Koshevaya, S.; Foglia, F.; Cortes Silva, A.; García Martínez, R.; Martínez Reyes, J.; Norini, G.; Groppelli, G.

    2013-01-01

    A highly contaminated zone with a maximum over 57,000 Bq/m 3 was discovered in a populated community “Agua de Venados” during the 2009–2011 soil Radon survey in San Joaquin, Queretaro State, Mexico. The indoor Radon monitoring accomplished in 2 different époques in a nearby 4 dwellings has shown an increased Radon hazard in 1 of the 4 buildings (about 300 Bq/m 3 ) during a rainy season and highly elevated indoor Radon levels (over 400 Bq/m 3 ) already in 3 buildings during a dry season. The averaged diurnal indoor Radon variations are in a correlation with the atmospheric pressure and the air humidity and are independent on the air temperature. The maximum indoor Radon hazard for dwellings is estimated for the morning interval 5–10 a.m. - Highlights: ► Emanative zone of 57,000 Bq/m 3 was found in area “Agua de Venados”. ► Indoor Radon level in a nearby dwellings elevates during a dry season. ► Maximum risk for residents was estimated during the daily interval 5–10 a.m

  2. Relation between residential radon concentrations and housing characteristics. The Cracow study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jedrychowski, W.; Flak, E.; Wesolowski, J.; Liu Kaishen

    1995-01-01

    The survey on indoor radon exposure was undertaken to explain whether the excess in lung cancer deaths in the Cracow city center may be attributed to this particular exposure. A total of 310 detectors was placed in households randomly chosen from three homogeneous strata of residential buildings. The first stratum included houses in the old city center constructed predominantly from stone bricks. The second stratum covered the city area with big apartment condominiums built from concrete blocks. The third stratum consisted of single family houses located in a suburban area. From each of these residency strata a random sample of an equal number of households was chosen, and the radon detectors were placed in households located at various levels of the buildings. The three-month radon sampling data were used to determine the distribution of various levels of radon in the households. In the measurement of radon exposure, Landauer α-track samplers were used. The data collected show that the type of building was the best single predictor of indoor radon concentrations. Other variables found to be associated significantly with indoor concentrations were the household level in the building and the house age. In general, residences with concrete slabs and dwellings with rarely-opened windows were found to have slightly higher radon concentrations. (author) 2 tabs., 15 refs

  3. A numerical study on the performance evaluation of ventilation systems for indoor radon reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ji Eun; Park, Hoon Chae; Choi, Hang Seok; Cho, Seung Yeon; Jeong, Tae Young; Roh, Sung Cheoul [Yonsei University, Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    Numerical simulations were conducted using computational fluid dynamics to evaluate the effect of ventilation conditions on radon ({sup 222}Rn) reduction performance in a residential building. The results indicate that at the same ventilation rate, a mechanical ventilation system is more effective in reducing indoor radon than a natural ventilation system. For the same ventilation type, the indoor radon concentration decreases as the ventilation rate increases. When the air change per hour (ACH) was 1, the indoor radon concentration was maintained at less than 100 Bq/m{sup 3}. However, when the ACH was lowered to 0.01, the average indoor radon concentration in several rooms exceeded 148 Bq/ m{sup 3}. The angle of the inflow air was found to affect the indoor air stream and consequently the distribution of the radon concentration. Even when the ACH was 1, the radon concentrations of some areas were higher than 100 Bq/m{sup 3} for inflow air angles of 5 .deg. and 175 .deg.

  4. Radon levels in Oslo schools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birovlev, A.

    2004-01-01

    Radon measurements using passive CR-39 detectors have been conducted in all schools in Oslo municipality during winter 2003/2004. Results are presented and discussed in the light of qualitative and quantitative factors, some of which are specific for schools as workplaces. Analysis is conducted with respect to factors relating to building construction type, ventilation principle, age of building, building size etc. The influence of ventilation type on radon levels is studied, and problems of investigations based purely on conventional passive radon detectors are noted. Over-estimation of radon concentration by passive detectors and day-night variations of indoor radon levels in buildings with mechanical ventilation systems are discussed. Several guiding principles for planning similar investigations based on above discussions are outlined. (author)

  5. Ion climate and radon concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busbarna, L.

    1981-01-01

    Characteristic values of radon concentration in natural ion climate and in open air were compared and the effect of artificially produced negative ion excess on the radon concentration of air was studied. The results show that the radon concentration measurable at the rise of negative ion excess is smaller than that in the case of natural equilibrium. This effect can be utilized lowering the background of the scintillation chambers, thus increasing their sensitivity. The negative ions of the artificial ion climate lower radon concentration in closed space. The question arises whether only the ion climate is responsible for the effects on the organism and on the nervous system or the radon concentration of the air also contributes to them. (author)

  6. Radon - To mobilise civil society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    As radon is one of the two main sources of exposure of population to ionizing radiations in France, is notably said to be responsible of 1.000 to 3.000 deaths for lung cancer per year, and could be at the origin of other cancers like child leukaemia, this set of articles evokes the different factors which promote radon transfer from soils to buildings, studies performed to better identify geological sources of radon, actions implemented to assess radon presence in dwellings (distribution of 'radon kits' in Brittany), the performance of radiological expertise by the IRSN on the request of public authorities, the project of dwelling inventory and population information. A second article reports examples of intervention by the IRSN to inform local authorities, inhabitants, academics, public utilities, building professions, and even children. Technical solutions adopted in the United Kingdom are briefly evoked

  7. Radon and its importance for animal hygiene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janowski, T.M.; Tombarkiewicz, B.

    1995-01-01

    Reconnaissance studies on radon concentration were carried out for various species of animal in animal housing in the Cracow region. It was found that the level of radon inside the livestock houses depended on the type of housing and animal species. In a cow shed the concentration of radon was higher by 25% than in the atmosphere, whereas in a piggery the radon level exceeded twice that in the ambient air. However, in a poultry house the radon concentration was over 20% lower then outside. (author). 9 refs

  8. Measurements of radon concentrations in dwelling houses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birkholz, W.; Klink, T.

    1993-01-01

    Radon and its daughter products gain in importance in health protection and radiation safety. Especially in the southern region of Saxony radon concentrations in dwellings may be high by former silver and uranium mines. We found radon contents of about 20.000 Bq/m 3 in dwellings. To redevelop such houses it is necessary to know intrude path of radon. In present work we studied different measuring systems, active and passive detectors, short and long term integrating devices. By means of investigation of radon sources several redeveloping methods are rates as well from radiological as from civil engineering point of view. (author)

  9. Application of nuclear track detectors for radon related measurments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abu-Jarad, F.A.

    1988-01-01

    The application of nuclear track detectors for radon related measurements is discussed. The ''Can Technique'', used for measuring radon emanation from building materials, walls and soil; the ''Working Level Monitor'', used for measuring short period working levels of radon daughters in houses; and ''Passive Radon Dosimeters'', used to measure radon levels in houses for long term (few months) periods are described. Application of nuclear track detectors for measuring the radon daughters plate-out on the surface of mixing fan blades and walls are discussed. The uranium content of some wall papers was found to be 6 ppm. The variation of radon progeny concentration in the same room was measured and supported by another study through Gas Chromatograph measurements. The independence of radon concentration on room level in high-rise buildings was established. The effect of sub-floor radon emanation on radon concentration in houses is dependent on whether there is sub-floor ventilation or not. (author)

  10. Impact of structural parameters on the radon exhalation of building materials: Preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roelofs, L.M.M.

    1993-01-01

    Samples of mortar and sand-lime pieces with different percentages of fly ash are hardened at different relative humidities. The porosity distribution, the moisture and the radon exhalation of these samples are determined. Based on the data of the above-mentioned analyses, the thickness of the adsorbed water layer in the water-filled pores is estimated. The correlation between the structural parameters and the radon exhalation is investigated. If the radon exhalation process can be modelled, the radiation risk of applying fly ash in building materials can be controlled or reduced. The results do not yet show a clear indication. The applied methods have to be considered in more detail

  11. A study of diurnal variations of radon and thoron concentrations in different indoor environmental conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pant, Preeti; Prasad, Mukesh; Ramola, R.C.

    2015-01-01

    The measurements for diurnal variations in radon ( 222 Rn) and thoron ( 220 Rn) concentrations were performed in the different indoor conditions of Tehri Garhwal, Uttarakhand, India by using AlphaGUARD, Portable Radon Monitor and RAD7. While selecting the dwellings, the ventilation conditions, building materials, life style of the inhabitants and their exposure time indoors were also considered. The behavior of indoor radon and thoron concentrations was observed for different type of dwellings with different environmental conditions. The measurement techniques, results obtained and comparison of the results are discussed in details. (author)

  12. Preliminary study of the contamination by Radon Gas in dwelling enclosures in Costa Rica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loria, L.G.; Jimenez, R.; Gallardo, M.C.

    1993-01-01

    The use of Solid State Nuclear Track detectors (SSNTD), LR-115 type II-Quick, is one of the convenient technique to assess the average radiation levels of alpha activities in the environment. This technique has been used to assess the Radon concentration in some areas of San Jose, Costa Rica. Exposed SSNTD films are chemically etched in an alkaline solution and the density of alpha tracks are given as concentration (pCi/L) of Radon. The only known health effect associated with exposure to elevated levels of Radon is an increased risk of developing lung cancer. (authors). 10 refs, 4 figs, 3 tabs

  13. Radon measurements in Greece

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgiou, E.; Ntalles, K.; Molfetas, M.; Athanassiadis, A.; Proukakis, C.

    1988-01-01

    Studies of radon concentration in greek spas, in a cave, in constituents of the greek cement, in building materials in Greece and in greek mines have been published. Some preliminary studies of radon concentration in greek dwellings have been published. In order to get an idea of the problem in Greece we decided to carry out a national survey. Two different sites were selected: Athens, where domicile about 40% of the greek population and Domatia, a small village in northern Greece 600Km from Athens, located in an area known to have soil with increased uranium concentrations

  14. Radon exhalation of cementitious materials made with coal fly ash: Part 1 - scientific background and testing of the cement and fly ash emanation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovler, K.; Perevalov, A.; Steiner, V.; Metzger, L.A.

    2005-01-01

    Increased interest in measuring radionuclides and radon concentrations in fly ash, cement and other components of building products is due to the concern of health hazards of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM). The current work focuses on studying the influence of fly ash (FA) on radon-exhalation rate (radon flux) from cementitious materials. The tests were carried out on cement paste specimens with different FA contents. The first part of the paper presents the scientific background and describes the experiments, which we designed for testing the radon emanation of the raw materials used in the preparation of the cement-FA pastes. It is found that despite the higher 226 Ra content in FA (more than 3 times, compared with Portland cement) the radon emanation is significantly lower in FA (7.65% for cement vs. 0.52% only for FA)

  15. Evaluation of the performance characteristics of radon and radon-daughter concentration measurement devices under controlled environmental conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearson, M.D.

    1989-04-01

    The Technical Measurements Center (TMC) conducted a study to expose 10 radon and 7 radon-daughter concentration measurement devices in the DOE/GJPO Radon/Radon-Daughter Environmental Chamber for a series of 24 controlled-environment tests. The tests evaluated the devices' response to temperature, relative humidity, dew point, condensation-nuclei concentration, radon-daughter/radon equilibrium ratio, and non-uniform radon and radon-daughter concentration. Devices were evaluated for linear response as a function of concentration. In addition to response to environmental parameters, the evaluation included determining the utility of the devices in providing reasonable assurance of compliance with the radon and radon-daughter concentration standards for DOE remedial action programs. This reasonable assurance criterion is based on a coefficient of variation of 25 percent for devices deployed for year-long measurements and a coefficient of variation of 18 percent for devices deployed for intermittent sampling. 39 refs., 65 figs., 33 tabs

  16. Alpha scintillation radon counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucas, H.F. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Radon counting chambers which utilize the alpha-scintillation properties of silver activated zinc sulfide are simple to construct, have a high efficiency, and, with proper design, may be relatively insensitive to variations in the pressure or purity of the counter filling. Chambers which were constructed from glass, metal, or plastic in a wide variety of shapes and sizes were evaluated for the accuracy and the precision of the radon counting. The principles affecting the alpha-scintillation radon counting chamber design and an analytic system suitable for a large scale study of the 222 Rn and 226 Ra content of either air or other environmental samples are described. Particular note is taken of those factors which affect the accuracy and the precision of the method for monitoring radioactivity around uranium mines

  17. Radon: an environmental pollutant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, W.A.

    1979-01-01

    Radiological concerns with the disposal and use of mining and milling residues have heightened to the point that federal agencies are asking or being asked to formulate new regulactions for controlling radon daughters from a variety of sources - radioactivity previously considered to be part of our natural environment. Based on information derived from epidemiologic studies of underground miners, particularly uranium miners, the health impact on the general public is being projected. Depending on the assumptions made, these projections vary widely. Because of these variations in health risks, decisions on control measures have even wider implications on economic and social considerations. Thus the question: is radon an environmental pollutant. While not fully answering the question, recognizing the uncertainties in assessing and controlling radon daughters can put the question in better perspective

  18. Remedial measures in Swedish and Norwegian houses - application of radon and radon decay product measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Just, G.; Philipsborn, H. von; Matolin, M.; Molzahn, D.

    1998-01-01

    Houses and apartments in Sweden and Norway with excessive indoor radon concentrations were studied in detail with a variety of methods, standard and novel ones recently developed. For suitable remediation it is necessary to distinguish soil radon and exhalation from blue (porous) concrete. Our CARBOTEST-S is a simple, sensitive, in-situ method to quantify radon exhalation from existing walls, as well as radon permeability of different protective foils and final quality control of foils applied to existing walls. (orig.) [de

  19. Scopingreport radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaauboer, R.O.; Vaas, L.H.; Hesse, J.M.; Slooff, W.

    1989-09-01

    This report contains general information on radon concerning the existing standards, sources and emissions, the exposure levels and effect levels. lt serves as a basis for the discussion during the exploratory melting to be held in November/December 1989, aimed at determining the contents of the Integrated Criteria Document Radon. Attention is focussd on Rn-222 (radon) and Rn-220 (thoron), presently of public interest because of radon gas pollution in private homes. In the Netherlands air quality standards nor product standards for the exhalation rate of building materials have been recommended. The major source of radon in the Netherlands is the soil gas (> 97%), minor sources are phosphate residues and building materials (> 2% in total). Hence, the major concern is the transfer through the inhalation of air, the lung being the most critical organ at risk to develop cancer. Compared to risks for humans, the risks of radon and its daughters for aquatic and terrestric organisms, as well as for agricultural crops and livestock, are assumed to be limited. In the Netherlands the average dose for man due to radon and thoron progeny is appr. 1.2 mSv per year, the estimated dose range being 0.1-3.5 mSv per year. This dose contributes for about 50% to rhe total exposure due to all sources of ionizing radiation. Of this dose respectively 80% is caused by radon and about 90% is received indoor. The estimated dose for the general population corresponds to a risk for inducing fatal cancers of about 15 x 10-6 per year, ranging from 1.2 x 10-6 to 44 x 10-6 which exceeds the risk limit of 1 x 10-6 per year -as defined in the standardization policy in the Netherlands for a single source of ionizing radiation-with a factor 15 (1- 44). Reduction of exposure is only possible in the indoor environment. Several techniques have been described to reduce the indoor dose, resulting from exhalation of the soil and building materials. )aut- hor). 37 refs.; 3 figs.; 8 tabs

  20. Combined effect of radon exposure and smoking on lung cancer risk - result of a case-control study among Czech miners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomasek, Ladislav

    2010-01-01

    Because of the predominant role of cigarette smoking as a cause of lung cancer, an understanding of the joint effect of smoking and radon exposure is needed for the assessment of the risk from radon. The aim of the present work is to verify differences in smoking specific risk coefficients observed earlier (BEIR VI). The present study includes two cohorts of uranium miners in west and central Bohemia and one cohort of burnt clay miners exposed to radon. In the nested study, for each case of lung cancer (observed in 1954-2007) with smoking data up to three controls were selected from all cohort members matched by year of birth, age, and the cohort. Data on smoking in the study were collected from subjects in person, from medical records, and from relatives. The statistical assessment of the study was based on conditional logistic regression with linear dependence of estimated relative risk on radon exposure

  1. Radium on soil mineral surfaces: Its mobility under environmental conditions and its role in radon emanation. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turekian, K.K.

    1997-01-01

    The ultimate source of 222 Rn to the atmosphere is, of course, 226 Ra. Tracking the mobility of radium therefore is part of the story of radon flux assessment. The study of radium mobility and radon flux measurements has involved virtually all the reservoirs at the Earth's surface. These include soils, groundwaters, coastal waters and the atmosphere. The attempt to understand the mobility of radium involved the study of almost all the radium isotopes ( 226 Ra, 228 Ra, 224 Ra) and the parent and daughters of these isotopes

  2. Radon assay for SNO+

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rumleskie, Janet [Laurentian University, Greater Sudbury, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-12-31

    The SNO+ experiment will study neutrinos while located 6,800 feet below the surface of the earth at SNOLAB. Though shielded from surface backgrounds, emanation of radon radioisotopes from the surrounding rock leads to back-grounds. The characteristic decay of radon and its daughters allows for an alpha detection technique to count the amount of Rn-222 atoms collected. Traps can collect Rn-222 from various positions and materials, including an assay skid that will collect Rn-222 from the organic liquid scintillator used to detect interactions within SNO+.

  3. Characterizing the source of radon indoors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nero, A.V.; Nazaroff, W.W.

    1983-09-01

    Average indoor radon concentrations range over more than two orders of magnitude, largely because of variability in the rate at which radon enters from building materials, soil, and water supplies. Determining the indoor source magnitude requires knowledge of the generation of radon in source materials, its movement within materials by diffusion and convection, and the means of its entry into buildings. This paper reviews the state of understanding of indoor radon sources and transport. Our understanding of generation rates in and movement through building materials is relatively complete and indicates that, except for materials with unusually high radionuclide contents, these sources can account for observed indoor radon concentrations only at the low end of the range observed. Our understanding of how radon enters buildings from surrounding soil is poorer, however recent experimental and theoretical studies suggest that soil may be the predominant source in many cases where the indoor radon concentration is high. 73 references, 3 figures, 1 table

  4. Interaction of radon progeny with atmospheric aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morawska, Lidia

    1994-01-01

    The radiological health hazard due to the airborne radon progeny depends on three factors (i) radon concentration in the air, (ii) radon progeny concentration, and (iii) active particle size distribution. Conclusions as to the health hazard cannot be drawn without full understanding of the interaction mechanisms between radon progeny and atmospheric aerosols. The aim of this work was to study the interaction mechanisms between radon progeny, natural environmental aerosols and environmental tobacco smoke (ETS). The experiments were performed under controlled laboratory conditions of radon concentration (1.85 and 3.70 Bq m -3 ), relative humidity (35, 50, 75 and 95%) and ETS generation. The size distribution of radioactivity carrying aerosols was measured using a wire screen diffusion battery system and size distribution of all airborne aerosols using a differential mobility particle sizer. The paper presents and discusses the results of activity size distribution and radon progeny concentration measurements for different environmental conditions. 7 refs., 2 tabs

  5. Radon in public buildings; Radon in oeffentlichen Gebaeuden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, H.; Flesch, K. [IAF - Radiooekologie GmbH, Dresden (Germany); Hermann, E. [B.P.S. Engineering GmbH, Zwickau (Germany); Loebner, W. [Wismut GmbH, Chemnitz (Germany); Leissring, B. [Bergtechnisches Ingenieurbuero GEOPRAX, Chemnitz (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    From the Free State of Saxony, a study was commissioned to survey how reliable measurements to characterize the radon situation in public buildings at a reasonable financial and human effort can be carried out to reduce radiation exposure in public buildings. The study approach was for 6 objects. To characterize the radon situation the time evolution measurement of radon concentrations of more than 1 to 2 weeks turned out to be sufficient. A novel data analysis enables the identification of a ''typical daily alteration of the radon concentration'' depending on the ventilation conditions and the daily use of the offices or class rooms. The identification of typical diurnal radon variations for the working time and weekends or holidays is of fundamental importance for assessing the exposure situation in public buildings. It was shown that the radon concentration during working time are in general much lower than in the times when the buildings (offices) are unused. It turned out that the long-term radon measurements with nuclear track detectors within distinct time regimes (day / night, working hours / leisure time) by utilizing switch modules are very efficient to estimate the actual exposure. (orig.)

  6. Contribution of waterborne radon to home air quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deb, A.K.

    1994-01-01

    Radon-222 is a member of the uranium decay chain and is formed from the decay of radium-226. Radon and its decay products emit alpha particles during the decay process. If radon is inhaled, alpha particles emitted from inhaled radon and its daughters increase the risk of lung cancer. Radon is soluble in water; thus when radon comes in contact with groundwater it dissolves. The radon concentration in groundwater may range from 100 pCi/L to 1,000,000 pCi/L. When water with a high radon level is used in the home, radon is released from the water to the air and thus can increase indoor air radon concentration. Considering the estimated health risk from radon in public water supply systems, EPA has proposed a maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 300 pCi/L for radon in public drinking water supplies. To address the health risks of radon in water and the proposed regulations, the American Water Works Association Research Foundation (AWWARF) initiated a study to determine the contribution of waterborne radon to radon levels in indoor household air

  7. Experimental study of the atmospheric neutrino flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirata, K.S.; Kajita, T.; Koshiba, M.

    1988-01-01

    We have observed 277 fully contained events in the KAMIOKANDE detector. The number of electron-like single prong events is in good agreement with the predictions of a Monte Carlo calculation based on atmospheric neutrino interactions in the detector. On the other hand, the number of muon-like single prong events is 59 ± 7 %(statistical error) of the predicted number of the Monte Carlo calculation. We are unable to explain the data as the result of systematic detector effects or uncertainties in the atmospheric neutrino fluxes. (author)

  8. Managing Radon in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA recommends testing all schools for radon. As part of an effective IAQ management program, schools can take simple steps to test for radon and reduce risks to occupants if high radon levels are found.

  9. Measurement of exhalation rate of radon and radon concentration in air using open vial method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horiuchi, Kimiko; Ishii, Tadashi.

    1991-01-01

    It was recognized that more than half of total exposure dose on human subject is caused by radon and its decay products which originate from naturally occurring radioactive substances (1988 UNSCEAR). Since then the exhalation of radon from the ground surface has received increasing attention. The authors have developed a new method for the determination of radon in natural water using toluene extraction of radon and applying a liquid scintillation counter of an integral counting technique which is able to get the absolute counting of radon. During these studies, the authors found out that when a counting vial containing of Liquid scintillator (LS)-toluene solution, without a lid, is exposed to the atmosphere for a while, dissolution of radon clearly occurs due to high solubility of radon into toluene layer. To extend this finding for the determination of radon in the atmosphere, the authors devised a new method to actively collect the atmosphere containing radon in a glass bottle by discharging a definite amount of water in it, which is named as open-vial dynamic method. The radon concentration can be easily calculated after the necessary corrections such as the partition coefficient and others. Applying proposed method to measure the radon exhalation rate from the ground surface and radon concentration in air of the dwelling environment, radioactive mineral spring zone and various geological formation such as granitic or sedimentary rocks. (author)

  10. Meta-analysis of thirty-two case-control and two ecological radon studies of lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrzynski, Ludwik; Fornalski, Krzysztof W; Reszczynska, Joanna

    2018-03-01

    A re-analysis has been carried out of thirty-two case-control and two ecological studies concerning the influence of radon, a radioactive gas, on the risk of lung cancer. Three mathematically simplest dose-response relationships (models) were tested: constant (zero health effect), linear, and parabolic (linear-quadratic). Health effect end-points reported in the analysed studies are odds ratios or relative risk ratios, related either to morbidity or mortality. In our preliminary analysis, we show that the results of dose-response fitting are qualitatively (within uncertainties, given as error bars) the same, whichever of these health effect end-points are applied. Therefore, we deemed it reasonable to aggregate all response data into the so-called Relative Health Factor and jointly analysed such mixed data, to obtain better statistical power. In the second part of our analysis, robust Bayesian and classical methods of analysis were applied to this combined dataset. In this part of our analysis, we selected different subranges of radon concentrations. In view of substantial differences between the methodology used by the authors of case-control and ecological studies, the mathematical relationships (models) were applied mainly to the thirty-two case-control studies. The degree to which the two ecological studies, analysed separately, affect the overall results when combined with the thirty-two case-control studies, has also been evaluated. In all, as a result of our meta-analysis of the combined cohort, we conclude that the analysed data concerning radon concentrations below ~1000 Bq/m3 (~20 mSv/year of effective dose to the whole body) do not support the thesis that radon may be a cause of any statistically significant increase in lung cancer incidence.

  11. Uranium mill tailings and radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanchey, L.A.

    1981-01-01

    The major health hazard from uranium mill tailings is presumed to be respiratory cancer resulting from the inhalation of radon daughter products. A review of studies on inhalation of radon and its daughters indicates that the hazard from the tailings is extremely small. If the assumptions used in the studies are correct, one or two people per year in the US may develop cancer as a result of radon exhaled from all the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program sites. The remedial action should reduce the hazard from the tailings by a factor of about 100

  12. Uranium mill tailings and radon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanchey, L A

    1981-04-01

    The major health hazard from uranium mill tailings is presumed to be respiratory cancer resulting from the inhalation of radon daughter products. A review of studies on inhalation of radon and its daughters indicates that the hazard from the tailings is extremely small. If the assumptions used in the studies are correct, one or two people per year in the United States may develop cancer as a result of radon exhaled from all the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action program sites. The remedial action should reduce the hazard from the tailings by a factor of about 100.

  13. Uranium mill tailings and radon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanchey, L A

    1981-01-01

    The major health hazard from uranium mill tailings is presumed to be respiratory cancer resulting from the inhalation of radon daughter products. A review of studies on inhalation of radon and its daughters indicates that the hazard from the tailings is extremely small. If the assumptions used in the studies are correct, one or two people per year in the US may develop cancer as a result of radon exhaled from all the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program sites. The remedial action should reduce the hazard from the tailings by a factor of about 100.

  14. The use of radon as an earthquake precursor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramola, R.C.; Singh, M.; Sandhu, A.S.; Singh, S.; Virk, H.S.

    1990-01-01

    Radon monitoring for earthquake prediction is part of an integral approach since the discovery of coherent and time anomalous radon concentrations prior to, during and after the 1966 Tashkent earthquake. In this paper some studies of groundwater and soil gas radon content in relation to earthquake activities are reviewed. Laboratory experiments and the development of groundwater and soil gas radon monitoring systems are described. In addition, radon monitoring studies conducted at the Guru Nanak Dev University Campus since 1986 are presented in detail. During these studies some anomalous changes in radon concentration were recorded before earthquakes occurred in the region. The anomalous radon increases are independent of meteorological conditions and appear to be caused by strain changes, which precede the earthquake. Anomalous changes in radon concentration before an earthquake suggest that radon monitoring can serve as an additional technique in the earthquake prediction programme in India. (author)

  15. A study of the dilution potential of the planetary boundary layer over India and adjoining oceans using radon measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rangarajan, C; Eapen, C.D.

    1990-01-01

    A comparison is made of the dilution potential of the Planetary Boundary Layer (PBI) at surface and high altitude locations in India and over the oceans of the Arabian Sea, Bay of Bengal region, using radon as a tracer. The significant difference in the diffusive properties of the PBL at these locations and their variations through the seasons are discussed and the use of these studies for plant siting pointed out. (author)

  16. Cases study of lung cancer deaths and analysis of radon levels in house-room of Mexicali, B. C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez B, G.; Reyna C, M. A.

    2009-10-01

    The lung cancer is a case of health of more importance as much in women as in men, with more frequency that the cancer of mamma, colon and prostate on the whole. A factor that influences in the cancer generation originating serious complications it is the exposition to radioactive substances in closed places, as house-room. In the investigation study, levels of radon concentration were measured in interiors of Mexicali homes, to study the relationship that this gas could have with the death cases by lung cancer into population. The gas radon is radioactive and it adheres easily to particles that remain suspended in air; when inhaling them small explosions take place inside the alveoli, changing the DNA of cells and lung cancer is generated. The meteorological, geographical and urban characteristics of Mexicali, favor conditions so that certain areas of the city present high indexes of suspended particles in atmosphere. One sample of gas radon inside 100 house-rooms, the analysis was made by paved and not paved colonies and for sex, to establish if the death cases by lung cancer had relationship with the genus and/or with some of two groups of colonies. The study found that the major number of deaths it was presented in colonies in which lacked the paving service and always happened with more frequency in women; and that in homes of having died by lung cancer the radon concentrations were more high that the homes where there was not death cases, with significant differences that go from 9.2% to 70%. This investigation project is presented as a cases study in the Mexicali City. (Author)

  17. Radon transport modelling: User's guide to RnMod3d

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, C.E.

    2000-08-01

    RnMod3d is a numerical computer model of soil-gas and radon transport in porous media. It can be used, for example, to study radon entry from soil into houses in response to indoor-outdoor pressure differences or changes in atmospheric pressure. It can also be used for flux calculations of radon from the soil surface or to model radon exhalation from building materials such as concrete. The finite-volume model is a technical research tool, and it cannot be used meaningfully without good understanding of the involved physical equations. Some understanding of numerical mathematics and the programming language Pascal is also required. Originally, the code was developed for internal use at Risoe only. With this guide, however, it should be possible for others to use the model. Three-dimensional steady-state or transient problems with Darcy flow of soil gas and combined generation, radioactive decay, diffusion and advection of radon can be solved. Moisture is included in the model, and partitioning of radon between air, water and soil grains (adsorption) is taken into account. Most parameters can change in time and space, and transport parameters (diffusivity and permeability) may be anisotropic. This guide includes benchmark tests based on simple problems with known solutions. RnMod3d has also been part of an international model intercomparison exercise based on more complicated problems without known solutions. All tests show that RnMod3d gives results of good quality. (au)

  18. Radon transport modelling: User's guide to RnMod3d

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, C.E

    2000-08-01

    RnMod3d is a numerical computer model of soil-gas and radon transport in porous media. It can be used, for example, to study radon entry from soil into houses in response to indoor-outdoor pressure differences or changes in atmospheric pressure. It can also be used for flux calculations of radon from the soil surface or to model radon exhalation from building materials such as concrete. The finite-volume model is a technical research tool, and it cannot be used meaningfully without good understanding of the involved physical equations. Some understanding of numerical mathematics and the programming language Pascal is also required. Originally, the code was developed for internal use at Risoe only. With this guide, however, it should be possible for others to use the model. Three-dimensional steady-state or transient problems with Darcy flow of soil gas and combined generation, radioactive decay, diffusion and advection of radon can be solved. Moisture is included in the model, and partitioning of radon between air, water and soil grains (adsorption) is taken into account. Most parameters can change in time and space, and transport parameters (diffusivity and permeability) may be anisotropic. This guide includes benchmark tests based on simple problems with known solutions. RnMod3d has also been part of an international model intercomparison exercise based on more complicated problems without known solutions. All tests show that RnMod3d gives results of good quality. (au)

  19. Time Series Analysis of Soil Radon Data Using Multiple Linear Regression and Artificial Neural Network in Seismic Precursory Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, S.; Jaishi, H. P.; Tiwari, R. P.; Tiwari, R. C.

    2017-07-01

    This paper reports the analysis of soil radon data recorded in the seismic zone-V, located in the northeastern part of India (latitude 23.73N, longitude 92.73E). Continuous measurements of soil-gas emission along Chite fault in Mizoram (India) were carried out with the replacement of solid-state nuclear track detectors at weekly interval. The present study was done for the period from March 2013 to May 2015 using LR-115 Type II detectors, manufactured by Kodak Pathe, France. In order to reduce the influence of meteorological parameters, statistical analysis tools such as multiple linear regression and artificial neural network have been used. Decrease in radon concentration was recorded prior to some earthquakes that occurred during the observation period. Some false anomalies were also recorded which may be attributed to the ongoing crustal deformation which was not major enough to produce an earthquake.

  20. Radon exhalation of cementitious materials made with coal fly ash: Part 2 - testing hardened cement-fly ash pastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovler, K.; Perevalov, A.; Levit, A.; Steiner, V.; Metzger, L.A.

    2005-01-01

    Increased interest in measuring radionuclides and radon concentrations in fly ash (FA), cement and other components of building products is due to the concern about health hazards of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM). The paper focuses on studying the influence of FA on radon exhalation rate (radon flux) from cementitious materials. In the previous part of the paper the state of the art was presented, and the experiments for testing raw materials, Portland cement and coal fly ash, were described. Since the cement and FA have the most critical role in the radon release process relative to other concrete constituents (sand and gravel), and their contribution is dominant in the overall radium content of concrete, tests were carried out on cement paste specimens with different FA contents, 0-60% by weight of the binder (cement+FA). It is found that the dosage of FA in cement paste has a limited influence on radon exhalation rate, if the hardened material is relatively dense. The radon flux of cement-FA pastes is lower than that of pure cement paste: it is about ∼3 mBq m -2 s -1 for cement-FA pastes with FA content as high as 960 kg m -3

  1. Radon risk in the house

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bressa, G.

    2001-01-01

    Radon was discovered in 1900, but its potential dangerousness for man was fully understood only in 1950. Being a radioactive natural gas - and therefore particularly dangerous - radon results from the long decay chain of radionuclides, such as thorium and radium. Some igneous rocks (granite, tufa and lava) as well as coal are considered to be the main sources of this radionuclide. A number of epidemiologic studies have shown the carcinogenicity of this element, particularly among miners and workers subjected to high level exposure in confined spaces such as basements, garages, cellars, etc. There are, however, some techniques to remove radon in order to reduce exposure to minimum values [it

  2. Study and development of an airborne instrument for collecting aerosols and for measuring radon 222 by its active deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filippi, Dominique

    2000-01-01

    The study and development of an airborne instrument designed to collect aerosols and measure radon 222 is detailed in this thesis. Having discussed the context of radon and introduced the methods of the measurement of radon 222 by its natural active deposition, the measurement of aerosols with the Sextant Avionique/LSCE dynamic iso-kinetic probe is quantified. These estimations of the efficiency of the probe were obtained during iso-axial simulations of the flow around the probe at different sub-sonic speeds, then by the calculation of trajectories of particles at the entrance to the probe for several debit coefficients. The effect of the attack angle is discussed along with the iso-kinetic criteria of pressure necessary for the functioning of this probe. To conclude this theoretical study, the author has estimated the deposits during aerosol transport in pipes. The instrument once constructed, (dubbed A VIRAD), is then itself presented, along with the technological aspects adopted for its use. The instrument was validated during an experimental aerial study STAAARTE 99. The measures obtained during these flights are presented in the conclusions. (author) [fr

  3. Short- versus long-term radon detectors: a comparative study in Galicia, NW Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruano-Ravina, A.; Castro-Bernardez, M.; Sande-Meijide, M.; Vargas, A.; Barros-Dios, J.M.

    2008-01-01

    As reported in previous studies, Galicia (NW Spain) is an area of high radon concentrations. This study was sought to analyze the correlation between short-term (activated carbon) and long-term (alpha particle track) detectors in this geographic area, and ascertain whether there were differences in their readings that might be influenced by other variables. A comparison study, as part of a case-control study was designed in which two detectors, one of each type, were placed in the selected homes. A total of 391 homes yielded readings with both detectors. The results indicated that there was a relatively good correlation between both types of monitors (correlation coefficient 0.608; p < 0.001). The highest correlations between both detectors were observed for unventilated homes, coastal sites, and the oldest buildings. Short-term and long-term detectors do not show a similar performance in all settings or situations. It is advisable to use long-term detectors whenever possible

  4. Short- versus long-term radon detectors: a comparative study in Galicia, NW Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruano-Ravina, A. [Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, School of Medicine, University of Santiago de Compostela, C/San Francisco s/n, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Galician Agency for Health Technology Assessment, Galician Health Service, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); CIBER de Epidemiologia y Salud Publica, CIBERESP (Spain)], E-mail: mralbert@usc.es; Castro-Bernardez, M. [Epidemiology Department, Directorate-General for Public Health, Galician Regional Authority (Spain); Sande-Meijide, M. [Preventive Medicine Unit, Ourense Hospital Complex, Galician Health Service (Spain); Vargas, A. [Energy Techniques Institute, Polytechnic University of Catalonia, Barcelona (Spain); Barros-Dios, J.M. [Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, School of Medicine, University of Santiago de Compostela, C/San Francisco s/n, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); CIBER de Epidemiologia y Salud Publica, CIBERESP (Spain); Preventive Medicine Unit, Santiago de Compostela University Hospital, Galician Health Service (Spain)

    2008-07-15

    As reported in previous studies, Galicia (NW Spain) is an area of high radon concentrations. This study was sought to analyze the correlation between short-term (activated carbon) and long-term (alpha particle track) detectors in this geographic area, and ascertain whether there were differences in their readings that might be influenced by other variables. A comparison study, as part of a case-control study was designed in which two detectors, one of each type, were placed in the selected homes. A total of 391 homes yielded readings with both detectors. The results indicated that there was a relatively good correlation between both types of monitors (correlation coefficient 0.608; p < 0.001). The highest correlations between both detectors were observed for unventilated homes, coastal sites, and the oldest buildings. Short-term and long-term detectors do not show a similar performance in all settings or situations. It is advisable to use long-term detectors whenever possible.

  5. Studies on 222Rn concentration in ground water using smart radon monitor and assessment of the radiation dose to the population of Mysuru city

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandrashekara, M.S.; Pruthvi Rani, K.S.

    2017-01-01

    Radioactive elements originate from the earth's crust and make their way into air, water, food and eventually in to the living system. Even though 75% of the Earth's surface is covered by water, only about 0.3 % of the total water on the Earth is available for public use. The ground water contains trace amounts of radioactive elements and these radionuclides contribute significant amount of dose to living beings, through intake of water into the human body. Radon dissolved in water is released into air when it is used for cooking, drinking, bathing and washing purposes. Exposure of population to higher concentrations of radon and its progeny for a long time causes occurrence of lung cancer and pathological effects like respiratory functional changes. Radon is a main source of ionizing radiation of natural origin and the studies on radon concentrations in drinking water are of importance. A systematic study of 226 Ra and 222 Rn concentration in the drinking water samples was carried out in Mysuru city. The concentration of 226 Ra and 222 Rn was estimated in water samples using emanometry method employing scintillation cells and alpha counting system. The 222 Rn concentration in water was also measured using a Smart Radon Monitor (SRM) for comparison of the results. SRM is a technologically advanced real time, portable, radon monitor developed at BARC, Mumbai

  6. A new methodology for cost-effectiveness studies of domestic radon remediation programmes: Quality-adjusted life-years gained within Primary Care Trusts in Central England

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coskeran, Thomas; Denman, Antony; Phillips, Paul; Gillmore, Gavin; Tornberg, Roger

    2006-01-01

    Radon is a naturally occurring radioactive gas, high levels of which are associated with geological formations such as those found in Northamptonshire and North Oxfordshire in the UK. The UK's National Radiological Protection Board have designated both districts as radon Affected Areas. Radiation levels due to radon, therefore, exceed 200 Bq m -3 , the UK's domestic Action Level, in over one percent of domestic properties. Because of radon's radioactivity, exposure to the gas can potentially cause lung cancer, and has been linked to some 2000 deaths a year in the UK. Consequently, when radiation levels exceed the Action Level, remediation against radon's effects is recommended to householders. This study examines the cost-effectiveness of remediation measures in Northamptonshire and North Oxfordshire by estimating cost per quality-adjusted life-year gained in four Primary Care Trusts, organisations that play a key public health policy role in the UK's National Health Service. The study is the first to apply this approach to estimating the cost-effectiveness of radon remediation programmes. Central estimates of cost per quality-adjusted life-year in the four Primary Care Trusts range from Pounds 6143 to Pounds 10 323. These values, when assessed against generally accepted criteria, suggest the remediation programmes in the trusts were cost-effective. Policy suggestions based on the estimates, and designed to improve cost-effectiveness further, are proposed for the four Primary Care Trusts and the UK's National Health Service

  7. Construction materials and Radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paschuk, Sergei A.; Correa, Janine Nicolosi; Loriane, Fior; Schelin, Hugo R.; Pottker, Fabiana; Paula Melo, Vicente de

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Current studies have been performed with the aim to find the correlation of radon concentration in the air and used construction materials. At the first stage of the measurements different samples of materials used in civil construction were studied as a source of radon in the air and at the second step it was studied the radon infiltration insulation using different samples of finishing materials. For 222 Rn concentration measurements related to different construction materials as well as for the studies of radon emanation and its reduction, the sealed cell chambers, of approximately 60 x 60cm 2 , have been built using the ceramic and concrete blocks. This construction has been performed within protected and isolated laboratory environment to maintain the air humidity and temperature stable. These long term measurements have been performed using polycarbonate alpha track passive detectors. The exposure time was set about 15 days considering previous calibration performed at the Institute of Radiation Protection and Dosimetry (IRD/CNEN), where the efficiency of 70% was obtained for the density of alpha particle tracks about 13.8 cm -2 per exposure day and per kBq/m 3 of radon activity concentration. The chemical development of alpha tracks has been achieved by electrochemical etching. The track identification and counting have been done using a code based on the MATLAB Image Processing Toolbox. The cell chambers have been built following four principle steps: 1) Assembling the walls using the blocks and mortar; 2) Plaster installation; 3) Wall surface finishing using the lime; 4) Wall surface insulation by paint. Making the comparison between three layers installed at the masonry walls from concrete and ceramic blocks, it could be concluded that only wall painting with acrylic varnish attended the expectation and reduced the radon emanation flow by the factor of 2.5 approximately. Studied construction materials have been submitted the instant

  8. Experimental study of gene expression in lung and bronchus of radon-exposed mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Zhiying; Tian Mei; Liu Jianxiang; Ruan Jianlei; Piao Chunnan; Su Xu

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To construct and identify differentially expressed cDNA library in lung and bronchus of mice exposed to radon. Methods: 2 week old, weighing (18-22)g, male BALB/c mice were placed in a SR-NIM02 radon chamber. One group of mice was exposed to radon, which was equivalent to the accumulative dose of 30 WLM. The control group was about 0.02 WLM. To construct a subtracted cDNA library enriched with differentially expressed genes, the Super SMART technique and the suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) were performed. The obtained forward and reverse cDNA fragments were directly inserted into pGEM-T-easy vector and transformed into E. coli DH5α. The inserts in plasmid were amplified by nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and some of which were sequenced. In the end these sequences were BLASTed with GeneBank. Results: 146 of 460 clones obtained randomly were positive clones contained (1000-1500)bp inserted cDNA fragments. The forward and reverse subtracted cDNA library in lung and bronchus of mice exposed to radon was constructed, and 48 up-regulation and 61 down-regulation cDNA sequences selected were homologous with GeneBank in different extent. Conclusions: The subtracted cDNA library in lung and bronchus of mice exposed to radon is successfully constructed, and genes that differentially expressed are identified. Some genes might have relation with the immunity, cell cycle and apoptosis. (authors)

  9. Ozone and radon at Cape Grim: A study of their interdependence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahorowski, W.; Galbally, I.E.; Meyer, C.P.

    1996-01-01

    A discussion of the ozone and radon variations at Cape Grim, Tasmania, and their interdependence is presented. The use of radon concentration as a criterion for baseline conditions ( - 3) results in a baseline data set that has a smaller range of concentrations within each month than that obtained using wind speed and direction as baseline criteria. The passage of cold fronts at Cape Grim is associated with a change in air flow from the continent to the Southern Ocean. Comparison of radon, wind direction and ozone during these events indicates that continental air continues arriving at Cape Grim for several hours after passage of the front and the establishment of the air flow from the baseline sector. This confirms that use of the speed and direction is not necessarily a good method of defining baseline conditions for ozone. When air comes to Cape Grim form over the Tasmanian land surface during those times of the year when (due to solar radiation and temperature) the probability of ozone production is low, the ozone and radon concentrations observed are negatively correlated. A simple model of ozone destruction at the Earth's surface and radon emission from the surface quantitatively describes these observations. (author). 1 tab., 5 figs., 6 refs

  10. Study on the influence of CR-39 detector size on radon progeny detection in indoor environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, L. A.; Hadler, J. C.; Lixandrão F, A. L.; Guedes, S.; Takizawa, R. H. [Instituto de Física Gleb Wataghin, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, UNICAMP, 13083-970 Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2014-11-11

    It is well known that radon daughters up to {sup 214}Po are the real contaminants to be considered in case of indoor radon contamination. Assemblies consisting of 6 circular bare sheets of CR-39, a nuclear track detector, with radius varying from 0.15 to 1.2 cm were exposed far from any material surface for periods of approximately 6 months in 13 different indoor rooms (7 workplaces and 6 dwellings), where ventilation was moderate or poor. It was observed that track density was as greater as smaller was the detector radius. Track density data were fitted using an equation deduced based on the assumption that the behavior of radon and its progeny in the air was described by Fick's Law, i.e., when the main mechanism of transport of radon progeny in the air is diffusion. As many people spend great part of their time in closed or poorly ventilated environments, the confirmation they present equilibrium between radon and its progeny is an interesting start for dosimetric calculations concerning this contamination.

  11. Instrumentation for a radon research house

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazaroff, W.W.; Revzan, K.L.; Robb, A.W.

    1981-07-01

    A highly automated monitoring and control system for studying radon and radon-daughter behavior in residences has been designed and built. The system has been installed in a research house, a test space contained in a two-story wood-framed building, which allows us to conduct controlled studies of (1) pollutant transport within and between rooms, (2) the dynamics of radon daughter behavior, and (3) techniques for controlling radon and radon daughters. The system's instrumentation is capable of measuring air-exchange rate, four-point radon concentration, individual radon daughter concentrations, indoor temerature and humidity, and outdoor weather parameters (temperature, humidity, modules, wind speed, and wind direction). It is also equipped with modules that control the injection of radon and tracer gas into the test space, the operation of the forced-air furnace, the mechanical ventilation system, and the mixing fans located in each room. A microcomputer controls the experiments and records the data on magnetic tape and on a printing terminal. The data on tape is transferred to a larger computer system for reduction and analysis. In this paper we describe the essential design and function of the instrumentation system, as a whole, singling out those components that measure ventilation rate, radon concentration, and radon daughter concentrations

  12. Radon and hydrotherapy: application to French spas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ameon, R.

    2004-01-01

    Owing to the use of thermal water for treatments, the dissolved radon ends up, through degassing, in the atmosphere of the various spa premises. According to the type of treatments, the radon activity concentration in the air is very variable; it depends on two factors, the supply of thermal water, and therefore of radon, and the ventilation of the various premises. In unfavourable, even non-existent, ventilation conditions, it is not uncommon to measure radon concentration reaching several thousands of becquerels per air cubic meter. These high values of radon activity concentration, with or without its short-lived daughters, may lead to a staff exposure of approximately ten or several tens of mSv per year. A French spa was subject to a radon 'expertise' during which the radon source terms, 'ground in contact with the buildings' and 'thermal water' were characterized. The radon mapping in the internal atmosphere of the various spa premises and the workstations' analysis resulted in an assessment of the exposure due to radon inhalation. This study showed that on workstations, notably linked to hydrotherapy, the staff exposure to radon is in the same range as the dose assessments from foreign studies. The implementation of an appropriate ventilation of the treatment rooms and a better management of the thermal water in the spa resulted in a significant reduction of staff exposure

  13. A performance evaluation study of three types of alpha-track detector radon monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeager, W.M.; Lucas, R.M.; Daum, K.A.; Sensintaffar, E.; Poppell, S.; Feldt, L.; Clarkin, M.

    1991-01-01

    Three models of alpha-track detector (ATD) Rn monitors were exposed in Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Rn chambers to obtain estimates of precision and bias for the National Residential Radon Survey (NRRS). Exposures in this study ranged from 37 to 740 Bq y m-3 (1 to 20 pCi y L-1), plus blanks. These exposures correspond to the range expected in most U.S. residences. All detectors were purchased through a Rn mitigation firm to assure that the vendors did not give special attention to the ATDs used in this study. Ten ATDs of each model were studied at 12 exposures. The mean and standard deviation of the reported values for each model were calculated and compared with the continuously monitored chamber concentrations to determine the bias and precision at each exposure. Results of this analysis were discussed with the vendors, who took corrective actions. Changes in track counting procedures and calibrations improved detector performance. Readings of one detector were adjusted based on a regression of the monitored values on the reported values

  14. Study of radon emanation from uranium mill tailings. Relations between radon emanating power and physicochemical properties of the material; Etude de l'emanation du radon a partir de residus de traitement de minerais d'uranium. Mise en evidence de relations entre le facteur d'emanation et les caracteristiques du materiau

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pellegrini, D

    1999-07-01

    The uranium extraction from ores leads to large amounts of mill tailings still containing radionuclides, such as thorium-230 and radium-226, which generate radon-222. Without protective action, radon exposition may be high enough to cause concern for health of populations living in the vicinity of an uranium mill tailings disposal. This exposition pathway has therefore to be taken into account in the radiological impact studies. The emanating power, i.e. the part of radon atoms which escape from the solid particles, is directly involved in the radon source term evaluation. It may be determined for a given material by laboratory measurements. Emanating powers from 0.08 to 0.33 have been obtained for mill tailings from Jouac (Limousin, France), at various moisture contents. In order to reduce the relations of dependence between some of the emanation parameters, more simple phases, kaolinite and polymeric resins, have been studied. Those experiments have led us to the selection of the mechanisms and the parameters to consider for the development of an emanation modelling. The whole of the results obtained point out the radon sorption, in various proportions depending on the materials. The moisture content influence on the emanation from materials containing fine particles have been confirmed: the emanation increases with this parameter until a continuous water film surrounding the particles have been formed, and then become constant. This 'water effect' occurs in a moisture content range, which depends on the material porosity. Elsewhere, the presence of amorphous phases may led to a high radon emanation. (author)

  15. Effect of fresh air ventilation on indoor radon concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Hao; Wu Jianhua; Fu Shi

    2012-01-01

    The radon concentration of laboratory for radon simulation (LRS) was measured by the RAD7 radon monitor, and the effect of the different fresh air ventilations on indoor radon concentration was studied and analyzed. The indoor radon concentration of LRS can be accumulated up to 2000 Bq/m 3 and the average radon exhalation rate of the LRS is 14.5 Bq · m -2 . h -1 . Furthermore, when the fresh air enters into the LRS continuously, the indoor radon concentration decreases exponentially with the increase of time. The equilibrium radon concentration and equilibrium time of LRS decrease exponentially with the increase of the rate of fresh air ventilation. In addition, the indoor radon concentration increases by accumulation with the decrease of the rate of fresh air ventilation. (authors)

  16. Experience from using plastic film in radon measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joensson, G.

    1999-01-01

    Plastic film is a useful detector of radon gas. The method of detection of the gas is used for several decades to measure radon concentrations both indoors and in soil. Experiences from radon measurements in Sweden indoors, in soil and in water using the plastic film Kodak LR 115-II are discussed in this report. Some examples are given from various projects. One example is taken from a large scale mapping of indoor radon levels in houses, where the building material is the main source of radon. In another example the measurements from a large scale soil radon mapping are discussed. The use of the plastic film for measurements of radon levels in water is also discussed. All the investigations are made in order to give the authorities concerned information of the radon situation and to study the connection between high indoor radon levels and various types of cancers

  17. Indoor radon measurements and radon prognosis for the province of Kymi, southeastern Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pennanen, M.; Maekelaeinen, I.; Voutilainen, A.

    1996-12-01

    The purpose of the regional radon prognosis is to classify areas with different levels of radon risk. The radon prognosis gives the percentages of future homes expected to have indoor radon concentrations exceeding the levels of 200 and 400 Bq/m 3 . It is assumed that no protection against the entry of radon is used in construction. In this study about 5900 indoor radon measurements made in single family houses, semi-detached houses and row houses were used. Data on the location, geology and construction of buildings were determined from maps and questionnaires. An empirical statistical model, the adjusted indoor radon measurements and geological data were used to assess the radon risk from soil and bedrock in different areas. The building sites of the province of Kymi were divided into thirteen sub-areas. The radon prognosis are calculated for the most radon-prone foundation types including 1) houses with a slab-on-grade and 2) houses with a basement or hillside houses with open stairwells between basement and first floor. The radon levels are generally greater in the western part of the area. The radon risk is highest in gravel-dominated esker areas in southwestern, western (in Pyhtaa, Kotka, Anjalankoski, litti, Valkeala) and central (Taipalsaari) parts of the area. The radon risk is also high in some bedrock and till areas, also in southwestern and western parts of the area. In these areas the level of 200 Bq/m 3 will be exceeded in 80 % of new houses. About half of the future houses in these areas will have indoor radon concentrations exceeding 400 Bq/m 3 . The radon risk is lowest in the eastern part of the province of Kymi in every soil type. In this area the level of 200 Bq/m 3 will be exceeded in 30 % of new houses. Below 10 % will exceed 400 Bq/m 3 . (orig.) (14 refs.)

  18. Study of variations of radon emanations from soil in Morocco using solid state nuclear track detectors. Correlations with atmospheric parameters and seismic activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boukhal, H.

    1993-01-01

    This study investigates the quantity variations of radon emanating from soil in accordance with time. It aims to verify the possibility of the radon sign use in earthquake prediction. Regular measures of radon concentration in soil have been carried out over the two years 1991 and 1992 in five towns of Morocco: Rabat, Tetouan, Ifrane and Khouribga, and in geophysic observatory of Ibn Rochd (Berchid region). The measuring method is based on the solid state nuclear track detectors technique. The obtained results have shown an influence of the atmospheric effects on the radon emanation. The experiment proved that, on one hand, the variations of the aforesaid influence are correlated to variations of the pluviometry and the atmospheric temperature and, on the other hand, there is no notable effect of atmospheric pressure or atmospheric humidity. The good correlations between the different seismic activities and the variations of radon emanation rate in the five measurement stations, have shown the interest of radon use in the earthquake prediction field. 81 refs., 100 figs., 17 tabs.(F. M.)

  19. Study of radon concentration and toxic elements in drinking and irrigated water and its implications in Sungai Petani, Kedah, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisar Ahmad

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The radon activity concentration and toxic elements have been assessed in drinking and irrigated water samples collected from different locations of Sungai Petani, Kedah, Malaysia. The water samples were collected from wells, streams and taps. A calibrated alpha spectrometer RAD-7 (Model 2890 and Atomic Absorption Spectrometers (Perkin–Elmer, Model AAnalyst 200, Shimadzu, Model AA-700 were used to estimate radon activity concentration and toxic elements, respectively. Maximum average value of radon concentration among the various types of water sources was found 14.7 ± 1.44 Bq/l in well water used for drinking and irrigation and minimum was found 5.37 ± 0.58 Bq/l in tap water used for drinking. Contribution of radon in drinking water to indoor air and age dependent associated annual effective doses were calculated from the measured radon concentration and were found less than lower limit of recommended action level. The activity concentrations of Ni > Pb > Cd > As > Cr were found higher for streams water as compared to wells and tap water. Values of radon concentration in well water were found higher than EPA recommended level and lower than WHO action level while the annual effective doses and level of toxic elements in water reported in this study were found lower than recommended level.

  20. Probing the application of Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy for assessment of deposited flux of Radon and Thoron progeny in high exposure conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, R., E-mail: rosaline@barc.gov.in; Sapra, B.K.; Rout, R.P.; Prajith, R.

    2016-12-01

    Direct measurement of Radon and Thoron progeny in the atmosphere and occupational environments such as Uranium mines, Uranium and Thorium handling facilities has gained importance because of its radiological significance in inhalation dose assessment. In this regard, Radon and Thoron Progeny sensors (DTPS and DRPS) are the only passive solid state nuclear track detector (SSNTD, LR115) based devices which are being extensively used for time integrated direct progeny measurements. An essential component of the analysis is the chemical etching of the detectors, followed by spark counting of tracks and then estimation of the inhalation dose using appropriate calibration factors. Alternatively, the tracks may be counted using image analysis techniques. However, under high exposure conditions, both these methods have inherent limitations and errors arising due to increased frequency of tracks. In the present work, we probe the use of Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR) spectroscopy to analyse the deposited fluence of the progeny particulates based on change in transmittance of the nitric group vibrational bands of the LR115. A linear relationship between the transmittance and the deposited fluence was observed, which can be used to estimate the deposited fluence rate and the inhalation dose. This alternative method of analysis will provide a faster and non-destructive technique for inhalation dose assessment, specially for routine large scale measurements. - Highlights: • An alternative method of inhalation dose assessment. • Linearity between the transmittance of nitric goup bands and the deposited fluence. • Faster and non-destructive technique for high exposure scenarios.

  1. Using radon-222 for tracing groundwater discharge into an open-pit lignite mining lake--a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Axel; Schubert, Michael

    2007-12-01

    Groundwater discharge into an open pit lignite mining lake was investigated using radon-222 as a naturally occurring environmental tracer. The chosen study site was a meromictic lake, i.e., a water body that is divided horizontally into two separate layers--the upper mixolimnion (with seasonal mixing) and the lower monimolimnion (without seasonal mixing). For the estimation of groundwater discharge rates into the lake, a simple box model including all radon sinks and sources related to each layer was applied. Two field investigations were performed. During the October campaign, the total groundwater discharge into the lake was found to be 18.9 and 0.7 m(3) d(-1) for the mixolimnion and monimolimnion, respectively. During the December campaign, the groundwater discharge into the mixolimnion was 15.0 m(3) d(-1), whereas no discharge at all was observed into the monimolimnion. Based on the given water volumes, the residence time of lake water was 5.3 years for the monimolimnion and varies between 0.9 and 1.1 years for the mixolimnion. The investigation confirmed radon to be a useful environmental tracer for groundwater and surface water interactions in meromictic lake environments.

  2. BGS Radon Protective Measures GIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appleton, D.; Adlam, K.

    2000-01-01

    The British Geological Survey Radon Protective Measures Geographical Information System is described. The following issues are highlighted: Identification of development sites where radon protection is required in new dwellings; Mapping radon potential on the basis of house radon and geology; Radon Protective Measures GIS; Radon site reports; and Follow-up radon protective measures sire reports

  3. Measurements of indoor radon concentration in Libyan cities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elarabiy, S. F.; Khalifa, M.; Misrati, N.; Chahboune, N.; Ahmed, M.

    2012-12-01

    Studies confirm that the risk of exposure to indor radon is attributable to lung cancer worldwide. The relationship between radon exposure and cancer is a linear one which necessitates for need for measurements of indoor radon concentration. This paper presents the results of measurements of indoor radon in several libya cities using CR-39 plastic. The results showed that the average radon concentration in the cities of Tripoli, Al-harcha and Alrajaban were 48.8 Bg/m 3 , 51.4 Bg/m 3 and 55.5 Bg/m 3 respectively. The average indoor radon concentration in Libya is low comparing with other studies. (Author)

  4. Study of radon, thoron and toxic elements in some textile dyes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abel-Ghany, H.A.

    2013-01-01

    Elemental analysis of textile dyes may provide valuable information concerning the content and concentrations of element, especially the toxic ones. Such information monitors the safety of handling and using these dyes in textile industry. In addition to the safety of wearing of clothes stained with these dyes. In the present work, the specific activity of both radon and thoron were measured in nine textile dyes by using alpha emitters registration which are emitted from radon and thoron gases in CR-39 nuclear track detectors. Unexpectedly, the results obtained reports a high concentration of both radon and thoron gases in some samples (samples D5 and D9). Also the concentration of toxic elements (Cu, Pb, Zn, Mn, Cd and Cr) in textile dyes were determined by flame and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. (author)

  5. Uranium, radium and radon exhalation study in some soil samples using track etch technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harmanjit, Singh; Joga, Singh; Surinder, Singh; Bajwa, B.S.

    2006-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Uranium, radium concentration and radon exhalation rates have been determined in the soil samples collected from some areas of Punjab using the L.R.-115 nuclear track detectors. Radium concentration in these samples has been found to be varying from 0.80 to 5.34 Bq Kg-1. The radon exhalation rate in these samples has been found to be varying from 0.99 to 6.60 mBq Kg -1 h -1 (32.82 to 218.49 mBqm -2 h -1 ). A good correlation has been observed between radon exhalation rate and radium concentration observed in the soil samples. The uranium concentration in all these samples is being carried out and the other correlations will also be established. (authors)

  6. Radon concentration in drinking water and water for living use and their study status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan Chenglong

    2005-01-01

    Low quality water is the chief reason for resulting in decrease of human group's physique, and in early appearance of nutrition and supersession diseases. The assimilation of radon released from water by human body may cause radioactive impact to those organs such as stomach and lungs. The monitoring determination for chemical quality of drinking water in developed countries comprises as many as 350 items, and the maximum contamination level of international standards is adopted for checking the radon concentration in drinking water, However, at present, only 35 items of the chemical quality of drinking water are determined in China. The monitoring determination of radon concentration in running water of cities, in distillation water, mineral water, pure water, deep well water in country side, as well as natural surface water is of great market potential in the future. (authors)

  7. A study of reducing radon level by ventilation in underground space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xiaoyan; Wang Yan; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing; Zheng Baoshan; Wang Xue

    2005-01-01

    Using Model 1027 continuous radon monitor, a test of reducing radon level by ventilation in underground space was done. Four different types of ventilation, i.e. by air pump (P), by air intake blower (B), by air pump and air intake blower simultaneously (PBS), and by air pump and air intake blower in turn (PBT), were examined. The authors found that efficiency of PBS is the highest among these ventilation type. Having ventilated the underground space with PBS for 1, 2 or 3 hours in three different days, and having observed the radon concentration change in the following 24 hours, the authors can conclude that it is safe for people to stay there during the eight working hours if the underground space is ventilated for 2 hours everyday in the morning. (authors)

  8. Statistical uncertainty analysis of radon transport in nonisothermal, unsaturated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holford, D.J.; Owczarski, P.C.; Gee, G.W.; Freeman, H.D.

    1990-10-01

    To accurately predict radon fluxes soils to the atmosphere, we must know more than the radium content of the soil. Radon flux from soil is affected not only by soil properties, but also by meteorological factors such as air pressure and temperature changes at the soil surface, as well as the infiltration of rainwater. Natural variations in meteorological factors and soil properties contribute to uncertainty in subsurface model predictions of radon flux, which, when coupled with a building transport model, will also add uncertainty to predictions of radon concentrations in homes. A statistical uncertainty analysis using our Rn3D finite-element numerical model was conducted to assess the relative importance of these meteorological factors and the soil properties affecting radon transport. 10 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs

  9. Residential radon survey in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arvela, H.; Maekelaeinen, I.; Castren, O.

    1993-02-01

    The study measured the indoor radon concentration in the dwellings of 3074 persons, selected randomly from the central population register of Finland. Alpha track detectors and two consecutive half year measuring periods were used. The national mean of indoor radon concentration for persons living in low-rise residential buildings as well as blocks of flats was 145 and 82 Bq/m 3 , respectively. The mean for the total population was 123 Bq/m 3 . Based on the decision of the Ministry of Social Affairs and Health in 1992, the indoor radon concentration should not exceed 400 Bq/m 3 in already existing houses, the target for new construction being less than 200 Bq/m 3 . According to the study, the percentage of the Finnish population living in houses with an indoor radon concentration exceeding 200, 400 and 800 Bq/m 3 was 12.3 %, 3.6 % and 1.0 %

  10. Radon studies for extending Los Azufres geothermal energy field in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavera, L.; Balcazar, M.; Camacho, M.E.; Chavez, A.; Perez, H.; Gomez, J.

    1999-01-01

    Los Azufres is a 98 MW producing geothermal energy field situated in the Mexican volcanic belt at the west part of the country. Recently, hydrothermal activity and geochemical analysis of geothermal fluids from the north part of the geothermal field gave indications of a possible geothermal-production area, similar to the already producing field. In order to investigate the activity of geological structures, which are considered the means of geothermal fluids transporters, radon mapping was carried out using sets of 240 LR-115 detectors in the area of interest. Radon values higher than 10 kBq m -3 were considered anomalous and indicative of geothermal anomalies

  11. Radon remediation of dwellings with suspended timber floors -case studies from the Building Research Establishment (UK)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welsh, P.; Stephen, R.

    1994-01-01

    Dwellings with suspended floors and high radon levels are proving difficult to remediate. This paper reports on the experience of the Building Research Establishment in dealing with such dwellings. Brief details of the remediation of 14 houses are given, and comparisons are made between the effectiveness of the different techniques adopted. Natural ventilation, mechanical supply ventilation and mechanical extract ventilation are three techniques that have been used successfully as radon remedial measures. Preliminary results suggest that supply ventilation is more effective than extract ventilation. (author)

  12. Radon studies for extending Los Azufres geothermal energy field in Mexico

    CERN Document Server

    Tavera, L; Camacho, M E; Chavez, A; Pérez, H; Gómez, J

    1999-01-01

    Los Azufres is a 98 MW producing geothermal energy field situated in the Mexican volcanic belt at the west part of the country. Recently, hydrothermal activity and geochemical analysis of geothermal fluids from the north part of the geothermal field gave indications of a possible geothermal-production area, similar to the already producing field. In order to investigate the activity of geological structures, which are considered the means of geothermal fluids transporters, radon mapping was carried out using sets of 240 LR-115 detectors in the area of interest. Radon values higher than 10 kBq m sup - sup 3 were considered anomalous and indicative of geothermal anomalies.

  13. A direct evidence for high carbon dioxide and radon-222 discharge in Central Nepal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrier, F.; Byrdina, S.; Richon, P.; Bollinger, L.; Bureau, S.; Richon, P.; France-Lanord, Ch.; Rajaure, S.; Koirala, Bharat Prasad; Shrestha, Prithvi Lal; Gautam, Umesh Prasad; Tiwari, Dilli Ram; Sapkota, Soma Nath; Revil, A.; Revil, A.; Contraires, S.

    2009-01-01

    Gas discharges have been identified at the Syabru-Bensi hot springs, located at the front of the High Himalaya in Central Nepal, in the Main Central Thrust zone. The hot spring waters are characterized by a temperature reaching 61 C, high salinity, high alkalinity and δ 13 C varying from +0. 7 parts per thousand to +4. 8 parts per thousand. The gas is mainly dry carbon dioxide, with a δ 13 C of -0. 8 parts per thousand. The diffuse carbon dioxide flux, mapped by the accumulation chamber method, reached a value of 19000 g m -2 day -1 , which is comparable with values measured on active volcanoes. Similar values have been observed over a two-year time interval and the integral around the main gas discharge amounts to 0. 25 ± 0. 07 mol s -1 , or 350 ± 100 ton a -1 . The mean radon-222 concentration in spring water did not exceed 2. 5 Bq L -1 , exponentially decreasing with water temperature. In contrast, in gas bubbles collected in the water or in the dry gas discharges, the radon concentration varied from 16 000 to 41000 Bq m -3 . In the soil, radon concentration varied from 25000 to more than 50000 Bq m -3 . Radon flux, measured at more than fifty points, reached extreme values, larger than 2 Bq m -2 s -1 , correlated to the larger values of the carbon dioxide flux. Our direct observation confirms previous studies which indicated large degassing in the Himalaya. The proposed understanding is that carbon dioxide is released at mid-crustal depth by metamorphic reactions within the Indian basement, transported along pre-existing faults by meteoric hot water circulation, and degassed before reaching surface. This work, first, confirms that further studies should be undertaken to better constrain the carbon budget of the Himalaya, and, more generally, the contribution of mountain building to the global carbon balance. Furthermore, the evidenced gas discharges provide a unique natural laboratory for methodological studies, and appear particularly important to study as

  14. Radon in balneology - measurement of radon retention by patients and radiation protection for personell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Just, G.; Falkenbach, A.; Grunewald, W.A.; Philipsborn, H. von

    2001-01-01

    In radon balneology patients are exposed to radon either from water or air through the skin or through inhalation. Drinking radon water was not included in the study. Previously, the radon transfer has been determined for an estimate of the medically active amount of radon retained in the patient. A simpler approach of measuring radon in expiration under and after exposure has now been standardised and applied to probands under different conditions of exposure. In addition, radon decay products were measured in sweat, saliva and in the skin. Experimental parameters were evaluated for a comparison of different concentrations observed under different conditions. Results are likely to improve both therapy for patients and radiation protection for members of the personnel. (orig.) [de

  15. Radon in Norwegian dwellings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strand, T.; Green, B.M.R; Lomas, P.R.; Mangnus, K.; Stranden, E.

    1991-01-01

    Measurements of radon in indoor air have been made in a total of about 7500 randomly selected dwellings in Norway from all parts of the country. The number of selected dwellings in each municipality is about proportional to its population, except for the two largest municipalities, Oslo and Bergen, where somewhat smaller samples were taken due to the higher population density. The measurements were performed by nuclear track detectors from the National Radiological Protection Boards in United Kingdom, and the integration time for the measurements was 6 months. The detectors were spread evenly over all seasons of the year to eliminate influence from seasonal variation in the radon level. One single measurement was performed in each dwelling: in the main bedroom. The results shows that the distribution of radon concentrations in Norwegian bedrooms is log-normal. The aritmetic mean of the measurements, including all categories of dwellings, is calculated to be 51 Bq/m 3 and the corresponding geometric mean to be 26 Bq/m 3 . In a large proportion of single-family houses the living room and the kitchen are located on the ground floor while the bedrooms are located one floor higher. The results of the study shows that the radon level is somewhat higher at the ground floor than on the first floor, and higher in the basement than on the first floor. Taking this into account, and assuming that measurements in bedrooms on the first floor is a representative average for living room and kitchen, the average radon concentration for Norwegian dwellings is estimated to be between 55-65 Bq/m 3 . In this estimate, possible influences of the fact that the winters 87/88 and 88/89 were much warmer than normal and may therefor have lowered the results, has been taken into account. 15 refs., 9 figs., 15 tabs

  16. Significance of independent radon entry rate and air exchange rate assessment for the purpose of radon mitigation effectiveness proper evaluation: case studies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Froňka, A.; Jílek, K.; Moučka, L.; Brabec, Marek

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 145, 2-3 (2011), s. 133-137 ISSN 0144-8420 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : indoor radon * kalman filter * state-space modeling Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research Impact factor: 0.822, year: 2011

  17. Radon reduction in crawl-space houses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osborne, M.C.; Moore, D.G.; Southerlan, R.E.; Brennan, T.; Pyle, B.E.

    1989-01-01

    This paper gives results of an EPA study of radon-mitigation alternatives for crawl space houses in several houses in Nashville, TN. Application of one of these alternative mitigation options, suction under a polyethylene membrane, has been successful in significantly reducing radon levels in both the crawl space and the house. The large radon concentrations measured under unvented plastic ground covers and the moisture barriers found in many crawl spaces can act as radon-rich reservoirs capable of contaminating a crawl space and house during periods of depressurization. With the exhaust components of the mitigation system in place, radon levels below the plastic decreased by more than 95% under both passive and active suction conditions. Based on the study, the design of a cost-effective subplastic suction passive radon mitigation system for crawl spaces seems promising

  18. Radon adsorption on present activated charcoals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazankin, Yu.N.; Trofimov, A.M.; Mikhajlova, L.K.

    1978-01-01

    Radon adsorption from helium and air has been studied on modern activated carbons of SKT-1, SKT-2a, SKT-3, SKT-2b, SKT-6, PAU-1 within the temperature range from 100 to 80 deg. It has been shown that PAU-1 carbon has the highest activity with respect to radon in the temperature range studied. With decreasing temperature the adsorption coefficients increase sharply. It has been found that for the case of radon adsorption from helium the logarythm of the Henry coefficient linearly depends on the inverse value of absolute temperature. Adsorption of radon from air is inhibited and the above-cited relationship is deviated from linear. The results of calculating differential heats of radon and air adsorption as well as coefficients of radon and air separation on carbons are presented

  19. Radon risk in the house; Il rischio radon nelle abitazioni

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bressa, G. [Padua Univ., Padua (Italy). Dipt. di Farmacologia e Anestesiologia, Lab. di Tossicologia

    2001-04-01

    Radon was discovered in 1900, but its potential dangerousness for man was fully understood only in 1950. Being a radioactive natural gas - and therefore particularly dangerous - radon results from the long decay chain of radionuclides, such as thorium and radium. Some igneous rocks (granite, tufa and lava) as well as coal are considered to be the main sources of this radionuclide. A number of epidemiologic studies have shown the carcinogenicity of this element, particularly among miners and workers subjected to high level exposure in confined spaces such as basements, garages, cellars, etc. There are, however, some techniques to remove radon in order to reduce exposure to minimum values. [Italian] Il radon fu scoperto nel 1900, ma solo nel 1950 si comprese la sua potenziale pericolosita' per l'uomo. Il radon e' particolarmente pericoloso essendo un gas naturale radioattivo. Esso proviene dalla lunga catena di decadimento di radionuclidi come il torio e di radio. Sorgenti di tale radionuclide sono da considerarsi principalmente alcune rocce ignee (graniti, tufi e lave) e il carbone. Diversi studi epidemiologici hanno evidenziato la cancerogenicita' di tale elemento, specie tra i minatori e soggetti esposti ad alti livelli in ambienti confinati quali scantinati, garage sotterranei, ecc.. Esistono comunque tecniche di intervento per la rimozione del gas radon in modo tale da ridurre l'esposizione a valori minimi.

  20. Communicating the risk from radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, A.; McClelland, G.H.; Schulze, W.D.; Doyle, J.K.

    1991-01-01

    A prominent television station developed a special series of newscasts and public service announcements about radon. This was combined with their advertising of the availability of reduced-price radon test kits in a local supermarket chain. The large number of test kits sold was a success from a marketing perspective, but not from a public health perspective - especially because of the very small share of high readings that were mitigated. In contrast, a study of housing sales showed a much higher testing rate and corresponding mitigation when risk communication accompanied the housing transaction, rather than being directed toward the general public. This paper examined the relative effectiveness of these alternative approaches to radon risk communication, emphasizing the implications for developing and implementing radon programs

  1. Lung cancer risk, exposure to radon and tobacco consumption in a nested case-control study of French uranium miners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leuraud, K.; Billon, S.; Bergot, D.; Tirmarche, M.; Laurier, D.; Caer, S.; Quesne, B.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: A nested case-control study was conducted among the French uranium miners cohort in order to assess the effect of protract ed radon exposure on lung cancer risk taking into account tobacco consumption. Material and methods: One hundred uranium miners employed by the French company CEA-COGEMA and who died of a lung cancer between 1980 and 1994 were identified as cases among the cohort. For each case, five controls were randomly matched on birth period and attained age at the time of death of the corresponding case. Cumulated radon exposure during employment was reconstructed for each of these 100 cases and 500 controls. Smoking habits were retrospectively determined from three complementary sources: 1) medical files, 2) forms filled in by occupational physicians and 3) questionnaires applied in face-to-face interviews, phone calls or mailings. Analysis was performed by conditional logistic regression using a linear excess relative risk (ERR) model. A multiplicative model was fitted to assess the joint effect of radon exposure and smoking on lung cancer risk. Results: Smoking status was established for 62 cases and 320 controls and two categories ('ever smokers' vs. 'never smokers') were defined. Ninety percent of the cases and 73% of the controls were classified as 'ever smokers'. Mean five-year lagged cumulated radon exposures were 82.0 and 47.6 working level months (WLM) for the cases and the controls, respectively. The excess relative risk per WLM (ERR/WLM) was 1.1% with a 95%-confidence interval (CI) of 0.2-2.0%. When adjusting for smoking, radon exposure effect was little modified (ERR/WLM = 0.8%, 95% -CI = 0.1- 2.8%). The effect of smoking on lung cancer risk was comparable to results reported in previous miners cohorts (OR = 3.04, 95% -CI = 1.20-7.70). Discussion: A consequent effort was carried out to collect smoking status from three sources for the miners included in this nested case-control study. This analysis shows that, when adjusting on

  2. Radon and health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chobanova, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Radon is radioactive noble gas that can be found in soil, water, outdoor and indoor air. Since environmental radon on average accounts for about half of all human exposure to radiation from natural sources, increasing attention has been paid to exposure to radon and its associated health risks. Many countries have introduced regulations to protect their population from radon in dwellings and workplaces. In this article are discussed main characteristics of radon, including sources of exposure, variation in radon exposure, how managing risks from radon exposure, how to measure the concentration of radon. There are results of measurements conducted under the 'National radon programme' in Bulgaria also. Key words: radon, sources of exposure, risk, cancer, measure to decrease the concentration [bg

  3. Radon as a geophysical tracer on Mars: study of its transport, first evidence and development of an instrument for its measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meslin, Pierre-Yves

    2008-01-01

    Radon-222, an inert and radioactive gas stemming from the uranium decay series, and its progeny are often used as tracers to study transfers in soils and in the atmosphere. They have also been studied on the surface of the Moon in connection with lunar outgassing. On Mars, where radon has never been studied nor measured so far, we show that their measurement could provide new insight and constraints on the chemical nature of the hydrogen measured in the Martian soil, in surface-atmosphere exchange processes, in atmospheric transport and, finally, in the dust cycle. Our approach is based on a coupled soil-atmosphere transport model implemented into the Global Circulation Model LMDZ. It includes the source term, the diffusion and adsorption of radon within the soil, and its atmospheric transport. The model input parameters are derived either experimentally (emanation factor and adsorption coefficient extrapolated to low temperatures) or by realistic models of porous media (diffusion coefficient at low pressure and as a function of the water saturation level). The model yields predictive maps of the radon exhalation rate as well as 3D fields of concentration in the soil and atmosphere, which will allow direct comparison with bismuth-214 measurements made by the GRS onboard the Mars Odyssey orbiter. We present preliminary results on this subject. An analysis of alpha spectra acquired by the APXS of the rover Opportunity is also presented, which shows evidence of a polonium-210 deposit on atmospheric dust, providing the first indirect proof of the presence of radon in the Martian atmosphere. We propose a simplified dust cycle model that enables us to infer an estimate of the global average radon exhalation rate on Mars. Lastly, we simulate the performance of an alpha spectrometer aimed at measuring radon and its progeny on the surface of the planet. (author)

  4. Reasons for increasing radon concentrations in radon remediated houses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clavensjoe, B.

    1997-01-01

    The study comprises 31 single-dwelling houses where remedial actions were carried out in the 1980s. In all of them the radon concentrations have increased more than 30% according to recent control measurements. Radon sources are building material as well as the soil. The remedial actions dealt with ventilation systems, leakage through the basement floor, air cushions, sub-slab suction or radon wells according to the original problems. Causes for the increase varied: In many houses with soil radon problems, the installation of a normal mechanical ventilation system is not a good remedial action. In some houses on a ground with high permeability and high radon content in the soil air, the radon concentration may increase by the lowering of the indoor air pressure. In other houses the increase was a measurement effect, where sites/rooms were confused. Living related causes were identified in a number of cases, where fan speeds were reduced for energy conservation/noise reduction purposes or different use of windows airing had occurred. Extension of the dwelling space without changing the ventilation system caused the increase in one house. 23 refs

  5. Radon epidemiology: A guide to the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marks, S.

    1988-12-01

    This document was written as a comprehensive overview of the voluminous literature on both uranium miner and residential radon epidemiology studies. This document provides the reader with a fairly complete list of radon epidemiology publications and key features of each, so that readers may further pursue only those publications of interest in the vast body of radon literature. A companion document, exploring all on-going residential radon epidemiology studies will be published by the Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER), the Department of Energy (DOE) in the spring of 1989

  6. A study of radon emanation from waste rock at Northern Territory uranium mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, G.C.; Gan, T.H.; Elliott, G.

    1983-01-01

    Field measurements were made of radon emanation rates from waste rock sources at Ranger, Nabarlek and Rum Jungle, three Northern Territory uranium mine sites. The preliminary mean emanation rate was approximately 50 Bq m - 2 s - 2 per percent ore grade

  7. Exposure to underground radon in and around Kolkata Municipal Corporation area. An exhaustive study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Argha Deb; Mahasin Gazi; Arindam Naskar; Chiranjib Barman

    2017-01-01

    Air radon survey was carried out at different underground locations at Kolkata using radon monitor. Average radon concentration for basements was found to be 22.70 ± 1.12 Bq/m"3 with maximum 59.00 ± 7.18 Bq/m"3 and minimum 8.50 ± 3.14 Bq/m"3. Average level for sub-ways was 23.05 ± 2.59 Bq/m"3 fluctuating between maximum 39.00 ± 1.24 Bq/m"3 and minimum 13.50 ± 1.78 Bq/m"3. In comparison, open air background at basement entrance was 19.44 ± 1.06 Bq/m"3 and subway entrance was 18.58 ± 1.14 Bq/m"3. Annual effective dose was calculated to assess probable health risk. Radon concentration level and annual effective dose were found well below safe levels recommended by International Agencies WHO and UNSCEAR. (author)

  8. Correlation between indoor radon and soil gas availability: Results of field studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kothari, B.K.; Kunz, C.; Lilley, W.

    1990-01-01

    To correlate indoor radon concentrations with soil gas, the authors have carried out a field survey of surficial material in selected regions of New York State. The survey consisted of measurements of gamma radiation, Ra-226, Rn-222 and the permeability for gas flow in surficial material. Based on the data, three areas with a potential for above average indoor radon concentrations have been identified: (1) a black shale region in Onondaga County; (2) a granitic region in Orange County; and (3) a black shale region in Erie County. For an area with potential for below-average indoor radon concentrations, sandy deposits on Long Island with an average concentration of 0.7 pCi Ra-226/g and 160 pCi Rn-222/L at 2-feet depth, have been selected. Fifteen homes from each of these four areas are under test for indoor radon. Measurements of air infiltration rates and soil gas availability parameters are planned for all 60 homes

  9. Domestic Radon Exposure and Risk of Childhood Cancer: A Prospective Census-Based Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hauri, D.; Spycher, B.; Huss, A.; Zimmermann, F.; Grotzer, M.; von der Weid, N.; Weber, D.; Spoerri, A.; Kuehni, C.E.; Röösli, M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: In contrast with established evidence linking high doses of ionizing radiation with childhood cancer, research on low-dose ionizing radiation and childhood cancer has produced inconsistent results.Objective: We investigated the association between domestic radon exposure and childhood

  10. Study of radon exhalation and emanation rates from fly ash samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raj Kumari; Jain, Ravinder; Kant, Krishan; Gupta, Nitin; Garg, Maneesha; Yadav, Mani Kant

    2013-01-01

    Fly ash, a by-product of burnt coal is technologically important material being used for manufacturing of bricks, sheets, cement, land filling etc. The increased interest in measuring radon exhalation and emanation rates in fly ash samples is due to its health hazards and environmental pollution and the same have been measured to assess the radiological impact of radon emanated from fly ash disposal sites. Samples of fly ash from different thermal power stations in northern India and National Council for Cement and Building Materials (NCB) were collected and analysed for the measurements. For the measurement, alpha sensitive LR-115 type II plastic track detectors were used. Gamma spectrometry and can technique was used for the measurements. The experimental data show that fly ash samples emanate radon in significant amount and this consequently, may result in increased radon levels in dwellings built by using fly ash bricks and excessive radiation exposure to workers residing in the surroundings of fly ash dumping sites. (author)

  11. CASE STUDIES OF RADON REDUCTION RESEARCH IN MARYLAND, NEW JERSEY, AND VIRGINIA SCHOOLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives results of radon mitigation research conducted in 1991 and 1992 in school buildings in Maryland, New Jersey, and Virginia. One school in each state was selected. In two schools, the objective was to evaluate the potential for modifying the school ventilation sy...

  12. The study of thoron and radon progeny concentrations in dwellings in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Q.; Shimo, M.; Ikebe, Y.

    1992-01-01

    Ths paper aims to make a comparison of different concentrations of thoron ( 220 Rn) progeny and radon ( 222 Rn) progeny in different kinds of dwellings. The potential alpha energy concentrations and the effective dose equivalent caused by thoron and radon progeny, respectively, have also been estimated. The measurements were carried out in 23 dwellings. The results indicate that thoron progeny concentrations indoors might be strongly affected by the type of building material used. Traditional Japanese buildings made with mud may have high thoron progeny concentrations of about 3.52 Bq.m -3 and a concentration ratio of thoron progeny to radon progeny of about 0.5, whereas in concrete dwellings thoron progeny concentrations are about 0.72 Bq.m -3 and the concentration ratio of thoron progeny to radon progeny is about 0.1. The annual effective dose equivalent of thoron progeny is 1.23 mSv in mud dwellings and 0.25 mSv in concrete dwellings. (author)

  13. Methodology developed to make the Quebec indoor radon potential map

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drolet, Jean-Philippe, E-mail: jean-philippe.drolet@ete.inrs.ca [Institut national de la recherche scientifique, Eau Terre Environnement Research Centre (ETE-INRS), 490 de la Couronne, G1K 9A9 Quebec (Canada); Martel, Richard [Institut national de la recherche scientifique, Eau Terre Environnement Research Centre (ETE-INRS), 490 de la Couronne, G1K 9A9 Quebec (Canada); Poulin, Patrick [Institut national de santé publique du Québec (INSPQ), 945 avenue Wolfe, G1V 5B3 Quebec (Canada); Dessau, Jean-Claude [Agence de la santé et des services sociaux des Laurentides, 1000 rue Labelle, J7Z 5 N6 Saint-Jérome (Canada)

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents a relevant approach to predict the indoor radon potential based on the combination of the radiogeochemical data and the indoor radon measurements in the Quebec province territory (Canada). The Quebec ministry of health asked for such a map to identify the radon-prone areas to manage the risk for the population related to indoor radon exposure. Three radiogeochemical criteria including (1) equivalent uranium (eU) concentration from airborne surface gamma-ray surveys, (2) uranium concentration measurements in sediments, (3) bedrock and surficial geology were combined with 3082 basement radon concentration measurements to identify the radon-prone areas. It was shown that it is possible to determine thresholds for the three criteria that implied statistically significant different levels of radon potential using Kruskal–Wallis one way analyses of variance by ranks. The three discretized radiogeochemical datasets were combined into a total predicted radon potential that sampled 98% of the studied area. The combination process was also based on Kruskal–Wallis one way ANOVA. Four statistically significant different predicted radon potential levels were created: low, medium, high and very high. Respectively 10 and 13% of the dwellings exceed the Canadian radon guideline of 200 Bq/m{sup 3} in low and medium predicted radon potentials. These proportions rise up to 22 and 45% respectively for high and very high predicted radon potentials. This predictive map of indoor radon potential based on the radiogeochemical data was validated using a map of confirmed radon exposure in homes based on the basement radon measurements. It was shown that the map of predicted radon potential based on the radiogeochemical data was reliable to identify radon-prone areas even in zones where no indoor radon measurement exists. - Highlights: • 5 radiogeochemical datasets were used to map the geogenic indoor radon potential. • An indoor radon potential was determined for

  14. Methodology developed to make the Quebec indoor radon potential map

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drolet, Jean-Philippe; Martel, Richard; Poulin, Patrick; Dessau, Jean-Claude

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a relevant approach to predict the indoor radon potential based on the combination of the radiogeochemical data and the indoor radon measurements in the Quebec province territory (Canada). The Quebec ministry of health asked for such a map to identify the radon-prone areas to manage the risk for the population related to indoor radon exposure. Three radiogeochemical criteria including (1) equivalent uranium (eU) concentration from airborne surface gamma-ray surveys, (2) uranium concentration measurements in sediments, (3) bedrock and surficial geology were combined with 3082 basement radon concentration measurements to identify the radon-prone areas. It was shown that it is possible to determine thresholds for the three criteria that implied statistically significant different levels of radon potential using Kruskal–Wallis one way analyses of variance by ranks. The three discretized radiogeochemical datasets were combined into a total predicted radon potential that sampled 98% of the studied area. The combination process was also based on Kruskal–Wallis one way ANOVA. Four statistically significant different predicted radon potential levels were created: low, medium, high and very high. Respectively 10 and 13% of the dwellings exceed the Canadian radon guideline of 200 Bq/m 3 in low and medium predicted radon potentials. These proportions rise up to 22 and 45% respectively for high and very high predicted radon potentials. This predictive map of indoor radon potential based on the radiogeochemical data was validated using a map of confirmed radon exposure in homes based on the basement radon measurements. It was shown that the map of predicted radon potential based on the radiogeochemical data was reliable to identify radon-prone areas even in zones where no indoor radon measurement exists. - Highlights: • 5 radiogeochemical datasets were used to map the geogenic indoor radon potential. • An indoor radon potential was determined for each

  15. Radon: a problem of terminology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellegrini, D.; Demongeot, S.

    1995-01-01

    Here are detailed the difficulties to speak about the same thing if we don't use the same language. The example is the radon and what we want to tell about it; it is necessary to explain what words we are using and what mean we want to give them. Then, emanation and exhalation are given with their definitions. Also the terms as factor, flux and rate are redefined. It is a way to make scientific population sensitive to terminology

  16. Study of heat flux deposition in the Tore Supra Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpentier, S.

    2009-02-01

    Accurate measurements of heat loads on internal tokamak components is essential for protection of the device during steady state operation. The optimisation of experimental scenarios also requires an in depth understanding of the physical mechanisms governing the heat flux deposition on the walls. The objective of this study is a detailed characterisation of the heat flux to plasma facing components (PFC) of the Tore Supra tokamak. The power deposited onto Tore Supra PFCs is calculated using an inverse method, which is applied to both the temperature maps measured by infrared thermography and to the enthalpy signals from calorimetry. The derived experimental heat flux maps calculated on the toroidal pumped limiter (TPL) are then compared with theoretical heat flux density distributions from a standard SOL-model. They are two experimental observations that are not consistent with the model: significant heat flux outside the theoretical wetted area, and heat load peaking close to the tangency point between the TPL and the last closed field surface (LCFS). An experimental analysis for several discharges with variable security factors q is made. In the area consistent with the theoretical predictions, this parametric study shows a clear dependence between the heat flux length λ q (estimated in the SOL (scrape-off layer) from the IR measurements) and the magnetic configuration. We observe that the spreading of heat fluxes on the component is compensated by a reduction of the power decay length λ q in the SOL when q decreases. On the other hand, in the area where the derived experimental heat loads are not consistent with the theoretical predictions, we observe that the spreading of heat fluxes outside the theoretical boundary increases when q decreases, and is thus not counterbalanced. (author)

  17. Radon Survey in Hospitals in Slovenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaupotic, J.

    2003-01-01

    In Slovenia, several radon studies at workplaces have been carried out in last years, supported by the Ministry of Education, Science and Sport, and the Ministry of Health. After radon surveys in kindergartens, schools and homes, within which about 2600 buildings were checked for radon and which provided the level of radon problem in the country, next investigations were focused on the workplaces with potentially higher radon risk. Hence, in the Postojna Cave permanent radon monitoring was introduced in 1995 and comprehensive radon studies were performed: in 5 bigger spas during 1996-1998, in major waterworks and wine cellars in 2001, and in major Slovene hospitals in 2002. This paper reports the results of radon study in 26 major Slovene hospitals, comprising radon concentrations in 201 rooms and dose estimates for 1025 persons working in these rooms. Radon survey in 201 rooms of 26 major hospitals in Slovenia revealed only 7 rooms in which monthly average radon concentration in the indoor air exceeded 400 Bqm -3 . Generally, concentrations in basement were on average for about 30% higher than in ground floor, although exceptionally high values have also been found in the ground floor. For 966 persons (94.2%) of the total of 1025 persons working in the rooms surveyed, the annual effective dose, estimated according to the Basic Safety Standards was below 1 mSv, while for 59 it exceeded 1 mSv. In 7 rooms with more than 400 Bqm -3 in which 16 persons receive between 2.1 and 7.3 mSv per year radon monitoring is continued. (author)

  18. Radon as a groundwater tracer in Forsmark and Laxemar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grolander, Sara

    2009-10-01

    Radon concentrations were measured in different water types in Forsmark and Laxemar during the site investigation and within this study. From these measurements it can be concluded that large differences between surface water, near surface groundwater and deep groundwater can be found in both Laxemar and Forsmark. The differences in radon concentrations between different water types are used in this study to detect interactions between surface water, near surface water and deep groundwater. From the radon measurements it can also be concluded that radon concentration in deep groundwater varies largely with depth. These variations with depth are probably caused by groundwater flow in conductive fracture zones in the bedrock. The focus of this study has been the radon concentration of near surface groundwater and the interaction between near surface groundwater and deep groundwater. Radon measurements have been done using the RAD-7 radon detector within this study. It could be concluded that RAD-7 is a good technique for radon measurements and also easy to use in field. The radon concentrations measured in near surface groundwater in Laxemar within this study were low and homogenous. The variation in radon concentration has been analyses and compared to other parameters. Since the hypothesis of this study has been that there are differences in radon concentrations between recharging and discharging groundwater, the most important parameter to consider is the recharge/discharge field classification of the wells. No correlation between the recharge/discharge classifications of wells and the radon concentrations were found. The lack of correlation between groundwater flow patterns and radon concentration means that it is not possible to detect flow patterns in near surface groundwater using radon as a tracer in the Laxemar area. The lack of correlation can be caused by the fact that there are just a few wells located in areas classified as recharge area. It can also be

  19. Radon dynamics in underwater thermal radon therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lettner, H.; Hofmann, W.; Winkler, R.; Rolle, R.; Foisner, W.

    1998-01-01

    At a facility for underwater thermal radon therapy in Bad Hofgastein, experiments were carried out with the aim of establishing radon in the air exhaled by the treated patients and of radon decay products on the skin of the patients. The time course of radon concentration in the exhaled air shows a maximum a few minutes after entering the bath, then the Rn concentration remains constant over the remaining time spent in the bath. Taking into account several simplifying assumptions, the average dose to the epidermis from radon daughters is about 50 μGy. (A.K.)

  20. Radon and its hazards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Guilan

    2002-01-01

    The author describes basic physical and chemical properties of radon and the emanation, introduces methods of radon measurement, expounds the hazards of non-mine radon accumulation to the health of human being and the protection, as well as the history how the human being recognizes the hazards of radon through the specific data and examples, and finally proposes protecting measures to avoid the hazards of radon to the health of human being, and to do ecologic evaluation of environments

  1. Behaviors of radon in indoor environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mochizuki, Sadamu; Shimo, Michikuni.

    1987-01-01

    The source of radon ( 222 Rn) in the atmosphere is radioactive nuclide, uranium ( 238 U), which exists fairly common throughout the earth's crust. Radium ( 226 Ra) descended from uranium produce radon ( 222 Rn) of noble gas by decay. After formation in the ground, radon diffuses into the atmosphere. Without exception radon decay products are heavy metals which soon become attached to natural aerosols. Therefore, radon and its daughters (decay products) appear also in indoor environment, and generally, their concentration levels become higher than that of outdoor air due to build-up effects in the closed indoor environments. With the progress of the study on the influence of radon and its daughers on human health, it has become clear that they act effectively as an exciting cause of lung cancer. So, the study on the risk evaluation of them in room air has become to be very important. Concequently, the behaviors of radon and its daughters in indoor environment, first of all, should be studied in detail for the accurate estimation of the risk caused by them. In this special edition, fundamental characteristics of radon and its daughters, some measuring methods, theoretical considerations and some observational evidences obtained from various circumstances of indoor environment are described inorder to grasp and understand the behaviors of radon and its daughters in the indoor environment. (author)

  2. Establishment of a radon test chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Chingjiang; Liu Chichang; Lin Yuming

    1993-01-01

    A walk-in type radon test chamber of 23 m 3 has been built for testing and calibration of radon measurement instruments. The environmental conditions of the test chamber can be varied within a wide range of values. The design objectives specification, monitoring instruments and testing results of this chamber are discussed. This test chamber is available for domestic radon researchers and its accuracy can be traced to the international standard. A routine intercomparison study will be held annually by using this chamber. Other tests like radon progeny and thoron standard may also be performed in this chamber. (1 fig.)

  3. Study of radon exhalation from phosphogypsum plates and blocks from different origins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Lucas Jose Pereira da

    2011-01-01

    Phosphogypsum is a waste of the fertilizer industry that concentrates radionuclides. In this work, the 222 Rn exhalation rate from phosphogypsum plates and blocks from different origins used at dwellings construction was studied. The 222 Rn exhalation rate was determined through the accumulation chamber technique with solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTD). The effective dose for an individual living in a residence built with phosphogypsum based materials was evaluated. It also was calculated the 222 Rn exhalation rate through the UNSCEAR model, from the 226 Ra concentration in the materials, in order to compare the experimental results. It was evaluated the contribution of building component (paint) to the reduction of 222 Rn exhalation rate. The plates and blocks were manufactured with phosphogypsum from Bunge Fertilizantes, Ultrafertil and Fosfertil. Blocks manufactured with ordinary gypsum was also evaluated. The average results obtained were 0.19 ± 0.06 Bq m-2 h-1, 1.3 ± 0.3 Bq m -2 h -1 and 0.41 ± 0.07 Bq m -2 h -1 for plates manufactured with phosphogypsum from Bunge Fertilizer, Ultrafertil and Fosfertil, respectively. For the phosphogypsum blocks the values were 0.11 ± 0.01 Bq m -2 h-1, 1.2 ± 0.6 Bq m -2 h -1 , 0.47 ± 0.15 Bq m -2 h -1 , for Bunge, Ultrafertil and Fosfertil. The blocks manufactured with ordinary gypsum presented average value of 0.18 ± 0.08 Bq m -2 h'- 1 . All phosphogypsum plates and blocks evaluated in this study presented effective dose for radon inhalation lower than the recommended value of 1mSv y -1 , the annual effective dose limit for public exposure by International Commission on Radiological Protection. (author)

  4. Radon in the Environment: Friend or Foe?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussein, A.S.

    2009-01-01

    Radon 222 is a naturally occurring radioactive gas that is part of the Uranium decay series. Its Presence in the environment is associated mainly with trace amounts of uranium and its immediate parent, radium 226 , in rocks, soil and groundwater. About one-half of the effective doses from natural sources is estimated to be delivered by inhalation of the short lived radon progeny. Owing to this fact, radon is the most popular subject of studies on environmental radioactivity. The presence of high level of radon in indoor environment constitutes a major health hazard for man. The radon progeny is well established as causative agents of lung cancer and other types of caners. Radon unique properties as a naturally radioactive gas have led to its use as a geophysical tracer for locating buried faults and geological structures, in exploring for uranium, and for predicting earthquakes. Radon has been used as a tracer in the study of atmospheric transport process. There have been several other applications of radon in meteorology, water research and medicine. This paper summarizes the health effects and the potential benefits of radon and its progeny.

  5. Flux pinning and flux flow studies in superconductors using flux flow noise techniques. Progress report, April 1, 1976--December 17, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joiner, W.C.H.

    1976-12-01

    Measurements of flux flow noise power spectra have been combined with critical current measurements and measurements of current-voltage characteristics to study flux flow and local pinning interactions effective during flux flow. A model of flux flow noise generation in the presence of local pinning interactions is developed and applied to situations where pinning is dominated by: (1) grain boundaries, (2) normal metal precipitates in a superconducting matrix, (3) gross deformation producing a critical current peak effect, and (4) surface grooves imposed on a sample surface. In the case of pinning caused by normal metal precipitates in a superconducting matrix, unusual training and hysterisis effects are observed in the flux flow characteristics. The greater sensitivity of noise spectra, as compared with bulk critical current measurements, in obtaining a detailed picture of flux flow is emphasized

  6. Indoor air radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cothern, C.R.

    1990-01-01

    This review concerns primarily the health effects that result from indoor air exposure to radon gas and its progeny. Radon enters homes mainly from the soil through cracks in the foundation and other holes to the geologic deposits beneath these structures. Once inside the home the gas decays (half-life 3.8 d) and the ionized atoms adsorb to dust particles and are inhaled. These particles lodge in the lung and can cause lung cancer. The introduction to this review gives some background properties of radon and its progeny that are important to understanding this public health problem as well as a discussion of the units used to describe its concentrations. The data describing the health effects of inhaled radon and its progeny come both from epidemiological and animal studies. The estimates of risk from these two data bases are consistent within a factor of two. The epidemiological studies are primarily for hard rock miners, although some data exist for environmental exposures. The most complete studies are those of the US, Canadian, and Czechoslovakian uranium miners. Although all studies have some deficiencies, those of major importance include uranium miners in Saskatchewan, Canada, Swedish iron miners, and Newfoundland fluorspar miners. These six studies provide varying degrees of detail in the form of dose-response curves. Other epidemiological studies that do not provide quantitative dose-response information, but are useful in describing the health effects, include coal, iron ore and tin miners in the UK, iron ore miners in the Grangesburg and Kiruna, Sweden, metal miners in the US, Navajo uranium miners in the US, Norwegian niobian and magnitite miners, South African gold and uranium miners, French uranium miners, zinc-lead miners in Sweden and a variety of small studies of environmental exposure. An analysis of the epidemiological studies reveals a variety of interpretation problem areas.172 references

  7. Concentration en radon dans une maison du Calvados

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leleyter, Lydia; Riffault, Benoit; Mazenc, Bernard

    2010-03-01

    Recent studies indicate a link between the risk of lung cancer and residential radon exposure. However, in France, awareness of this problem was made relatively late. Accordingly this study examines the radon concentration in a private home in Calvados. Findings show that the presence of a fireplace in a house can accelerate radon convective transfer, and that simple adjustments to interior and exterior accommodation can significantly reduce radon concentrations in the home.

  8. Radon programme: presence and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulka, J.

    2009-01-01

    In this presentation an overview of radon programme experiences is presented. The paper summarises national radon policy, national programmes, legislation, the role of preventive measures and interventions with respect to existing and future exposure and knowledge of radon risk, problems of remediation strategies, practical protection in dwellings, radon measurements strategies, progress in radon measurement of an individual house (radon diagnosis), radon mapping process and sense of delineation of radon prone areas, natural radioactivity of building materials and radioactivity in public water and their role in the radon programme, public awareness on radon issue and publicity campaign. Some research activities are proposed aiming at effective solutions of radon issues in future

  9. Radon and risk of death from cancer and cardiovascular diseases in the German uranium miners cohort study. Follow-up 1946-2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreuzer, Michaela; Grosche, B.; Schnelzer, M.; Tschense, A.; Dufey, F.; Walsh, L.

    2010-01-01

    Data from the German uranium miners cohort study were analyzed to investigate the radon-related risk of mortality from cancer and cardiovascular diseases. The Wismut cohort includes 58,987 men who were employed for at least 6 months from 1946 to 1989 at the former Wismut uranium mining company in Eastern Germany. By the end of 2003, a total of 3,016 lung cancer deaths, 3,355 deaths from extrapulmonary cancers, 5,141 deaths from heart diseases and 1,742 deaths from cerebrovascular diseases were observed. Although a number of studies have already been published on various endpoints in the Wismut cohort, the aim of the present analyses is to provide a direct comparison of the magnitude of radon-related risk for different cancer sites and cardiovascular diseases using the same data set, the same follow-up period and the same statistical methods. A specific focus on a group of cancers of the extrathoracic airways is also made here, due to the assumed high organ doses from absorbed radon progeny. Internal Poisson regression was used to estimate the excess relative risk (ERR) per unit of cumulative exposure to radon in working level months (WLM) and its 95% confidence limits (CI). There was a statistically significant increase in the risk of lung cancer with increasing radon exposure (ERR/WLM = 0.19%; 95% CI: 0.17%; 0.22%). A smaller, but also statistically significant excess was found for cancers of the extrathoracic airways and trachea (ERR/WLM = 0.062%; 95% CI: 0.002%; 0.121%). Most of the remaining nonrespiratory cancer sites showed a positive relationship with increasing radon exposure, which, however, did not reach statistical significance. No increase in risk was noted for coronary heart diseases (ERR/WLM = 0.0003%) and cerebrovascular diseases (ERR/WLM = 0.001%). The present data provide clear evidence of an increased radon-related risk of death from lung cancer, some evidence for an increased radon-related risk of death from cancers of the extrathoracic airways

  10. Radon and risk of death from cancer and cardiovascular diseases in the German uranium miners cohort study: follow-up 1946-2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreuzer, Michaela; Grosche, B; Schnelzer, M; Tschense, A; Dufey, F; Walsh, L

    2010-05-01

    Data from the German uranium miners cohort study were analyzed to investigate the radon-related risk of mortality from cancer and cardiovascular diseases. The Wismut cohort includes 58,987 men who were employed for at least 6 months from 1946 to 1989 at the former Wismut uranium mining company in Eastern Germany. By the end of 2003, a total of 3,016 lung cancer deaths, 3,355 deaths from extrapulmonary cancers, 5,141 deaths from heart diseases and 1,742 deaths from cerebrovascular diseases were observed. Although a number of studies have already been published on various endpoints in the Wismut cohort, the aim of the present analyses is to provide a direct comparison of the magnitude of radon-related risk for different cancer sites and cardiovascular diseases using the same data set, the same follow-up period and the same statistical methods. A specific focus on a group of cancers of the extrathoracic airways is also made here, due to the assumed high organ doses from absorbed radon progeny. Internal Poisson regression was used to estimate the excess relative risk (ERR) per unit of cumulative exposure to radon in working level months (WLM) and its 95% confidence limits (CI). There was a statistically significant increase in the risk of lung cancer with increasing radon exposure (ERR/WLM = 0.19%; 95% CI: 0.17%; 0.22%). A smaller, but also statistically significant excess was found for cancers of the extrathoracic airways and trachea (ERR/WLM = 0.062%; 95% CI: 0.002%; 0.121%). Most of the remaining nonrespiratory cancer sites showed a positive relationship with increasing radon exposure, which, however, did not reach statistical significance. No increase in risk was noted for coronary heart diseases (ERR/WLM = 0.0003%) and cerebrovascular diseases (ERR/WLM = 0.001%). The present data provide clear evidence of an increased radon-related risk of death from lung cancer, some evidence for an increased radon-related risk of death from cancers of the extrathoracic airways

  11. Determination of equilibrium factor between radon and its progeny using surface barrier detector for various shapes of passive radon dosimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamil, K. [PINSTECH, Islamabad (Pakistan). Environ. Radiat. Group; Fazal-ur-Rehman [PINSTECH, Islamabad (Pakistan). Environ. Radiat. Group; Ali, S. [PINSTECH, Islamabad (Pakistan). Environ. Radiat. Group; Khan, H.A. [PINSTECH, Islamabad (Pakistan). Environ. Radiat. Group

    1997-03-21

    In the field of radon dosimetry, it is customary to measure radon ({sup 222}Rn) concentration while potential health hazard is due to the radon short-lived progeny. When radon is in secular equilibrium, the measured activity of radon equals the activity of radon`s progeny. However, in practical cases an inequilibrium between radon and its progeny exists which is measured in terms of the equilibrium factor. To determine the equilibrium factor between radon and its progeny in a closed environment various shapes of passive dosimeters based upon solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs) are employed. In order to observe the dependence of equilibrium factor upon shapes or effective volumes, experiments have been performed replacing the SSNTDs with a surface barrier detector in Karlsruhe diffusion chamber, pen-type and box-type dosimeters. Using the collected alpha spectra, the equilibrium factor has been determined for a radon-air mixture in a custom designed radon chamber simulating a closed environment of a room. The results show that the radon equilibrium factor is about 0.20 for different shapes of dosimeters studied in this research. It is concluded that the determination of equilibrium factor between radon and its progeny does not depend upon effective volume or shape of the passive dosimeters using alpha spectroscopic data acquired by surface barrier detector. (orig.).

  12. A personal radon dosemeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberstedt, S.; Vanmarcke, H.

    1994-03-01

    In the last decade the radon issue has become one of the major problems of radiation protection. Animal studies as well as epidemiological studies showed an increased lung cancer risk. A new personal radon-dosemeter on the basis of a CR-39 (poly-allyl diglycol carbonate) track-etch detector has been developed. The read-out of the detectors is based on the image- processing technique. The actual efficiency of the new dosemeter, obtained with a semi-automatic personal-computer based image-analysis system, is 1.43 +/- 0.15 tracks/cm 2 /(kBq/m 3 h), which is about three times that of the widely used Karlsruhe-type detector based on polycarbonate detectors

  13. Radon legislation and national guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aakerblom, G

    1999-07-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and The Council of the European Union have recommended the Member States to take action against radon in homes and at workplaces. Within the EU project European Research into Radon in Construction Concerted Action, ERRICCA, the Topic Group on Legal and Building Code Impact was designated to study the current radon legislation and give advice regarding future enactment of laws and recommendations. On behalf of the Group, a questionnaire on radon legislation was sent out to nearly all European states and a selection of non-European states. Questions were asked regarding reference levels for dwellings, workplaces and drinking water, and about regulations or recommendations for building materials and city planning. All 15 EU Member States, 17 non-EU European countries and 10 non-European countries responded to the questionnaire. Their answers are considered current as of the end of 1998. Most European States and many non-European countries have recommended reference levels for dwellings and workplaces, and some have guidelines for measures against radon incorporated in their building codes and guidelines for construction techniques. However, only a few countries have enforced reference levels or regulations for planning and construction. The reference levels for indoor radon concentration in existing and new dwellings or workplaces are within the range 150-1000 Bq/m{sup 3}. Sweden is the only country (Out of 15 EU member states) which has enforced limits for existing dwellings. Sweden and the UK have both enforced levels for new dwellings. 7 non-European countries (Out of 17 responding countries) have enforced levels for existing dwellings and 9 have them for new dwellings. At the end of 1998, only Finland, Sweden, the Czech Republic, Romania, Russia and the Slovak Republic had limits for radon in water, although 8 countries were planning to introduce such limits. The present limits are within the range for

  14. Radon legislation and national guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aakerblom, G.

    1999-07-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and The Council of the European Union have recommended the Member States to take action against radon in homes and at workplaces. Within the EU project European Research into Radon in Construction Concerted Action, ERRICCA, the Topic Group on Legal and Building Code Impact was designated to study the current radon legislation and give advice regarding future enactment of laws and recommendations. On behalf of the Group, a questionnaire on radon legislation was sent out to nearly all European states and a selection of non-European states. Questions were asked regarding reference levels for dwellings, workplaces and drinking water, and about regulations or recommendations for building materials and city planning. All 15 EU Member States, 17 non-EU European countries and 10 non-European countries responded to the questionnaire. Their answers are considered current as of the end of 1998. Most European States and many non-European countries have recommended reference levels for dwellings and workplaces, and some have guidelines for measures against radon incorporated in their building codes and guidelines for construction techniques. However, only a few countries have enforced reference levels or regulations for planning and construction. The reference levels for indoor radon concentration in existing and new dwellings or workplaces are within the range 150-1000 Bq/m 3 . Sweden is the only country (Out of 15 EU member states) which has enforced limits for existing dwellings. Sweden and the UK have both enforced levels for new dwellings. 7 non-European countries (Out of 17 responding countries) have enforced levels for existing dwellings and 9 have them for new dwellings. At the end of 1998, only Finland, Sweden, the Czech Republic, Romania, Russia and the Slovak Republic had limits for radon in water, although 8 countries were planning to introduce such limits. The present limits are within the range for 50

  15. Study of the atmospheric chemistry of radon progeny in laboratory and real indoor atmospheres. Progress report, July 1, 1991--June 30, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopke, P.K.

    1992-07-01

    This report covers the second year of the 28 month grant current grant to Clarkson University to study the chemical and physical behavior of the polonium 218 atom immediately following its formation by the alpha decay of radon. Because small changes in size for activity result in large changes in the delivered dose per unit exposure, this behavior must be understood if the exposure to radon progeny and it dose to the cells in the respiratory tract are to be fully assessed. Two areas of radon progeny behavior are being pursued; laboratory studies under controlled conditions to better understand the fundamental physical and chemical process that affect the progeny`s atmospheric behavior and studies in actual indoor environments to develop a better assessment of the exposure of the occupants of that space to the size and concentration of the indoor radioactive aerosol. This report describes the progress toward achieving these objectives.

  16. Radon Exhalation from some Finishing Materials Frequently used in Syria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shweikani, R.; Raja, G.

    2011-01-01

    Building materials are one of the main radon sources in dwellings. Therefore, the determination of radon exhalation from these materials will help in prediction the existence of dwelling with potential radon risk. Ceramic tiles and marble samples were collected from Syrian local market. The correlation between radon exhalation from these materials and radium-226 content was studied. Results showed that there is no clear relation between radium content and radon exhalation rate, and the exhalation of radon did not exceed the permissible limits of American Environment Protection Agency (EPA). In addition, the additional annual dose from radon and gamma of the natural radioactivity in ceramic and marble when used as finishing materials in houses was also estimated and found to be not exceeding 20 μSv and 35 μSv from radon and gamma respectively. (author)

  17. Radon exhalation from some Finishing Materials frequently used in Syria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shweikani, R.; Raja, G.

    2009-02-01

    Building materials are one of the main radon sources in dwellings. Therefore, the determination of radon exhalation from these materials will help in prediction the existence of dwelling with potential radon risk. Ceramic tiles and marble samples were collected from Syrian local market. The correlation between radon exhalation from these materials and radium-226 content were studied. Results showed that there is no clear relation between radium content and radon exhalation rate, and the exhalation of radon did not exceed the permissible limits of American Environment Protection Agency (EPA). In addition, the additional annual dose from radon and gamma of the natural radioactivity in ceramic and marble when used as finishing materials in houses were also estimated and found to be not exceeding 20 μSv and μ35 Sv from radon and gamma respectively. (author)

  18. Study on coal char ignition by radiant heat flux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korotkikh, A. G.; Slyusarskiy, K. V.

    2017-11-01

    The study on coal char ignition by CO2-continuous laser was carried out. The coal char samples of T-grade bituminous coal and 2B-grade lignite were studied via CO2-laser ignition setup. Ignition delay times were determined at ambient condition in heat flux density range 90-200 W/cm2. The average ignition delay time value for lignite samples were 2 times lower while this difference is larger in high heat flux region and lower in low heat flux region. The kinetic constants for overall oxidation reaction were determined using analytic solution of simplified one-dimensional heat transfer equation with radiant heat transfer boundary condition. The activation energy for lignite char was found to be less than it is for bituminous coal char by approximately 20 %.

  19. Study on the radon content of the surface and groundwaters in southern part of Calcutta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallik, S B; Datta, J; Ghosh, S [Jadavpur Univ., Calcutta (India). Dept. of Geological Sciences

    1979-07-01

    The radon level of the surface and groundwaters has been determined in the southern part of Calcutta in 1976. The experimental setup is made highly sensitive so as to monitor the activity upto the range of 10sup(-17) curies per litre. The mean activities in this area are 0.569, 0.404, 0.458 and 0.988 pico-curies respectively for the samples from the surface, 30.5 m., 152.5 m and 244 m. depth. The chlorides and the total dissolved substances in the samples vary with the depth as the radon content does. The activity of the samples from the Bengal Lamp area, which is just below the permissible limit, gives out a sharp peak above the mean value. It is considered that this is arising out of some external contamination and is likely to be derived from some radioactive wastes from the nearby laboratories.

  20. A study of radon concentration in kindergartens in the Upper Silesia, Poland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozlowska, B.; Kordiak, M.; Wysocka, M.

    2004-01-01

    Based on the average results of the long term measurement, the effective dose per year which children in kindergartens may absorb was calculated to lie between 0.08 mSv and 1.4 mSv. In a few buildings in Katowice where the plastic detectors were exposed for a year, i.e. much longer than in other cities, the estimated effective doses are much lower than in the buildings where the exposure lasted two months in spring. It was assumed that children stay in the kindergartens 10 hours per day, which may be overestimation of the average time. Analysis of the data shows that Upper Silesia can be a region of potential radon risk because of its specific geological structure and intensive coal mining. It should be noted that high radon levels are not due to enhanced natural radioactivity of coal or the neighboring rocks. (P.A.)

  1. Measurement of radon in Spanish houses: characterization of its sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The determination of radon concentrations in-house are analyzed by different universities. The programs of Cantabria, Valencia, Barcelona and La Laguna Universities are presented. These programs study the environmental impact of radon in Barcelona and Madrid and characterize the radon sources

  2. Energy flux simulation in heterogeneous cropland - a two year study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Christian; Thieme, Christoph; Biernath, Christian; Heinlein, Florian; Priesack, Eckart

    2016-04-01

    Recent studies show that uncertainties in regional and global climate and weather simulations are partly due to inadequate descriptions of the energy flux exchanges between the land surface and the atmosphere [Stainforth et al. 2005]. One major shortcoming is the limitation of the grid-cell resolution, which is recommended to be about at least 3x3 km² in most models due to limitations in the model physics. To represent each individual grid cell most models select one dominant soil type and one dominant land use type. This resolution, however, is often too coarse in regions where the spatial heterogeneity of soil and land use types are high, e.g. in Central Europe. The relevance of vegetation (e.g. crops), ground cover, and soil properties to the moisture and energy exchanges between the land surface and the atmosphere is well known [McPherson 2007], but the impact of vegetation growth dynamics on energy fluxes is only partly understood [Gayler et al. 2014]. An elegant method to avoid the shortcoming of grid cell resolution is the so called mosaic approach. This approach is part of the recently developed ecosystem model framework Expert-N [Biernath et al. 2013] . The aim of this study was to analyze the impact of the characteristics of five managed field plots, planted with winter wheat, potato and maize on the near surface soil moistures and on the near surface energy flux exchanges of the soil-plant-atmosphere interface. The simulated energy fluxes were compared with eddy flux tower measurements between the respective fields at the research farm Scheyern, North-West of Munich, Germany. To perform these simulations, we coupled the ecosystem model Expert-N to an analytical footprint model [Mauder & Foken 2011] . The coupled model system has the ability to calculate the mixing ratio of the surface energy fluxes at a given point within one grid cell (in this case at the flux tower between the two fields). The approach accounts for the temporarily and spatially

  3. Study on radon and thoron levels in different types of dwellings of Lambapur area of Nalgonda District, A.P., India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinay Kumar Reddy, K.; Gopal Reddy, Ch.; Yadagiri Reddy, P.; Rama Reddy, K.

    2006-01-01

    An attempt has been made to study the indoor radon and thoron concentration levels in different types of dwellings of Lambapur and Peddagattu proposed uranium mining areas. The dwellings with mud floors recorded a relatively higher concentrations compared to those with other type of floors. Similar studies have also been made with different types of walls. In this case, dwellings having brick walls with mud plastering showed relatively higher levels of radon and thoron concentrations. The average concentration levels of radon and thoron in this area is found to be 88.8 ± 66.7 Bq.m -3 and 118.3 ± 96.4 Bq.m -3 . (author)

  4. Radon reduction in waterworks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raff, O.; Haberer, K.; Wilken, R.D.; Funk, H.; Stueber, J.; Wanitschek, J.; Akkermann-Kubillus, A.; Stauder, S.

    2000-01-01

    The removal of radon from water using water aeration is one of the most effective methods for reducing radon in waterworks. Therefore, this report describes investigations on packed tower columns and shallow aeration devices and a method for mathematical modelling of gas exchange processes for dimensioning packed tower columns for radon removal. Moreover, possibilities for removing radon using active carbon filtration under waterworks typical conditions and for reducing indoor radon levels in waterworks are discussed. Finally, conclusions on the necessity of radon removal in German waterworks are drawn. (orig.) [de

  5. A further study of the (CR-LR) difference technique for retrospective radon exposure assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikezic, D.; Yip, C.W.Y.; Leung, S.Y.Y.; Leung, J.K.C.; Yu, K.N.

    2006-01-01

    The (CR-LR) difference technique, based on the CR-39 and LR 115 detectors, for the determination of implanted 210 Po in glass after deposition of short-lived radon progeny, was analyzed in details in this paper. The sensitivities of both detectors were calculated using the Monte Carlo method with V functions particularly derived in our previous works for the detectors used in the present experiments. The dependency of the sensitivity ratio on the removed layer of both detectors was determined and verified experimentally. The simulated sensitivity ratios correlate well with the experimental ones. A major finding of the present work is that the sensitivity ratio between the CR-39 and LR 115 detectors depends only weakly on the ratio between the 238 U and 232 Th concentrations in the glass samples. This is crucial for the application of the (CR-LR) difference technique for retrospective radon exposure assessments, since measurements of the 238 U and 232 Th concentrations in the relatively small real-life glass samples will make the retrospective radon exposure assessments impractical

  6. Radon in Estonian dwellings - Results from a National Radon Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pahapill, Lia; Rulkov, Anne; Rajamaee, Raivo [Estonian Radiation Protection Centre (Kiirguskeskus), Tallinn (Spain); Aakerblom, Gustav [Swedish Radiation Protection Authority, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2003-10-01

    A countrywide survey of radon concentrations in Estonian dwellings was carried out during the period 1998-2001. The survey formed a part of the cooperation program on radiation protection between the Estonian Radiation Protection (Kiirguskeskus) Centre and the Swedish Radiation Protection Authority (SSI). The survey included measurements in a number of dwellings representative for Estonia in detached houses and multifamily buildings (only dwellings on the bottom floor were included in the survey). Altogether, radon concentrations were measured in 515 dwellings, a number large enough to be statistically significant. All measurements were made with alphatrack film detectors of the same type that SSI uses in Sweden. The measurements were made during a 2-3 month period during the winter half-year. Two detectors were used in each dwelling. In Estonia there are 0.17 million dwellings in detached houses and 0.45 million in multi apartment buildings. Of the 1.26 million inhabitants in Estonia. 0.36 million live in detached houses and 0.90 million in multi apartment buildings. Most of the latter were built during the Soviet occupation. Of the dwellings in multifamily buildings 30 % are assumed to be situated on the first floor. The mean radon concentration in dwellings in detached hoses, according to the survey results, is 103 Bq/m{sup 3}, in dwellings on the bottom floor in multi apartment buildings it is 78 Bq/m{sup 3}. In 1% of the dwellings the radon concentration exceeded 400 Bq/m{sup 3}. The highest radon concentration found in the study was 1040 Bq/m{sup 3}. Based on the assumption that the average radon concentration in the dwellings in multi-apartment buildings that are not situated on the bottom floor is 30 Bq/m{sup 3}, and that these dwellings constitute 70% of all dwellings in multi apartment buildings, the mean radon concentration in dwellings in multi apartment buildings is calculated to be 44 Bq/m{sup 3}. The mean value for all Estonia dwellings is calculated

  7. Radon in Estonian dwellings - Results from a National Radon Survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pahapill, Lia; Rulkov, Anne; Rajamaee, Raivo; Aakerblom, Gustav

    2003-10-01

    A countrywide survey of radon concentrations in Estonian dwellings was carried out during the period 1998-2001. The survey formed a part of the cooperation program on radiation protection between the Estonian Radiation Protection (Kiirguskeskus) Centre and the Swedish Radiation Protection Authority (SSI). The survey included measurements in a number of dwellings representative for Estonia in detached houses and multifamily buildings (only dwellings on the bottom floor were included in the survey). Altogether, radon concentrations were measured in 515 dwellings, a number large enough to be statistically significant. All measurements were made with alphatrack film detectors of the same type that SSI uses in Sweden. The measurements were made during a 2-3 month period during the winter half-year. Two detectors were used in each dwelling. In Estonia there are 0.17 million dwellings in detached houses and 0.45 million in multi apartment buildings. Of the 1.26 million inhabitants in Estonia. 0.36 million live in detached houses and 0.90 million in multi apartment buildings. Most of the latter were built during the Soviet occupation. Of the dwellings in multifamily buildings 30 % are assumed to be situated on the first floor. The mean radon concentration in dwellings in detached hoses, according to the survey results, is 103 Bq/m 3 , in dwellings on the bottom floor in multi apartment buildings it is 78 Bq/m 3 . In 1% of the dwellings the radon concentration exceeded 400 Bq/m 3 . The highest radon concentration found in the study was 1040 Bq/m 3 . Based on the assumption that the average radon concentration in the dwellings in multi-apartment buildings that are not situated on the bottom floor is 30 Bq/m 3 , and that these dwellings constitute 70% of all dwellings in multi apartment buildings, the mean radon concentration in dwellings in multi apartment buildings is calculated to be 44 Bq/m 3 . The mean value for all Estonia dwellings is calculated to be 60 Bq/m 3 . Using

  8. Determination of photon detector coefficient in neutron flux study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jedol Dayou; Azali Muhammad; Abd Aziz Mohamed; Abdul Razak Daud; Elias Saniman

    1995-01-01

    The efficiency of photon detector which is normally used in neutron flux measurement has been studied. The data obtain have been plotted using mathematical models in the form of reciprocal, exponential and semilog equation and subsequently efficiency coefficient of the detector has been determined. Beside that, energy quadratic equation model has also been used. It has been found that equation model selection is very important in the detector efficiency coefficient determination. In the case of energy quadratic equation, it has been found that the selection of energy set influenced the result. It can be concluded that energy quadratic equation is the best model in the neutron flux determination

  9. Radon in homes of the Portland, Oregon Area: Radon data from local radon testing companies collected by CRM (Continuous Radon Measurement) machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, H.; Lindsey, K.; Linde, T.; Burns, S. F.

    2013-12-01

    Students from the Department of Geology at Portland State University paired up with the Oregon Health Authority to better understand radon gas values in homes of the Portland metropolitan area. This study focuses on radon values collected by continuous radon measurement (CRM) machines, taken by local radon testing companies. The local companies participating in this study include Alpha Environmental Services, Inc., Cascade Radon, Environmental Works, The House Detectives, LLC, and Soil Solutions Environmental Services, Inc. In total, 2491 radon readings spanning across 77 zip codes were collected from local companies in the Portland metropolitan area. The maximum value, average value, percentage of homes greater than 4 pCi/L and total rank sum was calculated and used to determine the overall radon potential for each zip code (Burns et al., 1998). A list and four maps were produced showing the results from each category. Out of the total records, 24 zip codes resulted in high radon potential and the average reading for the entire Portland Metropolitan area was 3.7 pCi/L. High potential zip codes are thought to be a result of sand and gravel (Missoula Flood deposits) and faults present in the subsurface. The CRM data was compared with both long-term and short-term data provided by the Oregon Health Authority to validate radon potentials in each zip code. If a home is located in a zip code with high or moderate radon potential across two types of data sets, it is recommended that those homes be tested for radon gas.

  10. Study of the combined effects of smoking and inhalation of uranium ore dust, radon daughters and diesel oil exhaust fumes in hamsters and dogs. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cross, F.T.; Palmer, R.F.; Filipy, R.E.; Busch, R.H.; Stuart, B.O.

    1978-09-01

    Exposure to particulates from uranium ore dust and diesel exhaust soot provoked inflammatory and proliferative responses in lungs. Also exposure to radon and radon daughters yielded increased occurrences of bronchiolar epithelial hyperplasia and metaplastic changes of alveolar epithelium. The data suggest that this cellular change is also a precursor of premalignant change in hamsters. The authors suggest an animal model other than the hamster based on two observations: (1) the Syrian golden hamster has been shown to be highly refractory to carcinoma induction; and (2) that when exposed to realistic levels of agents in life-span exposure regimens, the hamster does not develop lesions. Dog studies with cigarette smoke exposure showed mitigating effects on radon daughter induced respiratory tract cancer. Two reasons are suggested although no empirical evidence was gathered. A strict comparison of human and animal exposures and interpolative models are not possible at this time. (PCS)</