WorldWideScience

Sample records for radius cation charge

  1. Antiproton charge radius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crivelli, P.; Cooke, D.; Heiss, M. W.

    2016-09-01

    The upcoming operation of the extra low energy antiprotons ring at CERN, the upgrade of the antiproton decelerator (AD), and the installation in the AD hall of an intense slow positron beam with an expected flux of 1 08 e+ /s will open the possibility for new experiments with antihydrogen (H ¯). Here we propose a scheme to measure the Lamb shift of H ¯. For four months of data taking, we anticipate an uncertainty of 100 ppm. This will provide a test of C P T and the first determination of the antiproton charge radius at the level of 10%.

  2. Ionic charge, radius, and potential control root/soil concentration ratios of fifty cationic elements in the organic horizon of a beech (Fagus sylvatica) forest podzol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Germund

    2004-08-15

    The root/organic soil concentration ratio; R/S) of 50 cationic mineral elements was related to their ionic properties, including ionic radius (r), ionic charge (z), and ionic potential (z/r or z2/r). The materials studied were ectomycorrhizal beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) roots and their almost purely organic soil substrate, the O-horizon (mor; raw humus) of a Podzol in South Sweden, developed in a site which has been untouched by forestry or other mechanical disturbance since at least 50 years and located in an area with no local sources of pollution. Elements determined by ICP-AES were aluminium, barium, calcium, iron, potassium, magnesium, manganese, sodium and strontium. Determined by ICP-MS were silver, beryllium, bismuth, cadmium, cerium, cobalt, chromium, caesium, copper, dysprosium, erbium, europium, gallium, gadolinium, hafnium, mercury, holmium, indium, lanthanum, lithium, lutetium, niobium, neodymium, nickel, lead, praseodymium, rubidium, scandium, samarium, tin, terbium, thorium, titanium, thallium, thulium, uranium, vanadium, yttrium, ytterbium, zinc and zirconium. The R/S ratios were most clearly related to the ionic potential of the cationic elements studied, which accounted for approximately 60% of the variability in R/S among elements. The ionic charge of an element was more important than the ionic radius. Elements with high ionic charge had low R/S ratios and vice versa. No clear differences in R/S between essential and non-essential plant nutrients were observed, especially when ions of similar charge were compared.

  3. Trace Element Partitioning under Crustal and Uppermost Mantle Conditions: The Influences of Ionic Radius, Cation Charge, Pressure, and Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, B. J.; Blundy, J. D.

    2003-12-01

    The controls on partitioning of trace elements between crystals and silicate melts were initially the subject of crystal-chemical, rather than petrogenetic interest. Goldschmidt (1937) systematized his observations of elemental concentrations in minerals as a means of understanding and predicting element behavior during crystallization from liquids or gases. Thus, he proposed his three "rules" of element partitioning, which may be summarized as follows: (i) Any two ions of the same charge and very similar ionic radius have essentially the same crystal-liquid partition coefficient (D=[i]xtl/[i]liq, where [i] refers to the concentration of element i). (ii) If there is a small difference of ionic radius, the smaller ion enters the crystal preferentially, e.g., DMg2+>DFe2+, DK+>DRb+>DCs+. (iii) For ions of similar radius but different charges, the ion with the higher charge enters the crystal preferentially, i.e., DSc3+>DMg2+>DLi+, DCa2+>DNa+, and DBa2+>DK+. These principles were taught to generations of students and, as we will show below, under certain circumstances, retain a degree of validity. They are neither, however, universally correct nor do they have any quantitative applicability. The aim of this chapter is to summarize the ways in which Goldschmidt's work has been amplified through a combination of theory and experimental measurement in order to quantify crystal-liquid partitioning behavior.Since the development of accurate methods of determining element concentration at the ppm level, the trace-element contents of igneous rocks have frequently been used to model their chemical evolution. These studies use estimated crystal-liquid partition coefficients together with solutions for the differential equations describing, e.g., fractional crystallization or fractional melting (Schilling and Winchester, 1967; Gast, 1968; Shaw, 1970) to model evolution of the melt during precipitation or dissolution of the crystalline phases. Generally, because of lack of data

  4. Nuclear charge radius of $^8$He

    CERN Document Server

    Müller, P; Villari, A C C; Alcantara-Nunez, J A; Alves-Conde, R; Bailey, K; Drake, G W F; Dubois, M; Eleon, C; Gaubert, G; Holt, R J; Janssens, R V F; Lecesne, N; Lu, Z -T; O'Connor, T P; Saint-Laurent, M -G; Thomas, J -C; Wang, L -B

    2008-01-01

    The root-mean-square (rms) nuclear charge radius of ^8He, the most neutron-rich of all particle-stable nuclei, has been determined for the first time to be 1.93(3) fm. In addition, the rms charge radius of ^6He was measured to be 2.068(11) fm, in excellent agreement with a previous result. The significant reduction in charge radius from ^6He to ^8He is an indication of the change in the correlations of the excess neutrons and is consistent with the ^8He neutron halo structure. The experiment was based on laser spectroscopy of individual helium atoms cooled and confined in a magneto-optical trap. Charge radii were extracted from the measured isotope shifts with the help of precision atomic theory calculations.

  5. The anti-proton charge radius

    CERN Document Server

    Crivelli, P; Heiss, M W

    2016-01-01

    The upcoming operation of the Extra Low ENergy Antiprotons (ELENA) ring at CERN, the upgrade of the anti-proton decelerator (AD), and the installation in the AD hall of an intense slow positron beam with an expected flux of $10^{8}$ e$^+$/s will open the possibility for new experiments with anti-hydrogen ($\\bar{\\text{H}}$). Here we propose a scheme to measure the Lamb shift of $\\bar{\\text{H}}$. For a month of data taking, we anticipate an uncertainty of 100 ppm. This will provide a test of CPT and the first determination of the anti-proton charge radius at the level of 10%.

  6. Deuteron charge radius from spectroscopy data in atomic deuterium

    CERN Document Server

    Pohl, Randolf; Udem, Thomas; Antognini, Aldo; Beyer, Axel; Fleurbaey, Hélène; Grinin, Alexey; Hänsch, Theodor W; Julien, Lucile; Kottmann, Franz; Krauth, Julian J; Maisenbacher, Lothar; Matveev, Arthur; Biraben, François

    2016-01-01

    We give a pedagogical description of the method to extract the charge radii and Rydberg constant from laser spectroscopy in regular hydrogen (H) and deuterium (D) atoms, that is part of the CODATA least-squares adjustment of the fundamental physical constants. We give a deuteron charge radius from D spectroscopy alone of 2.1415(45) fm. This value is independent of the proton charge radius, and five times more accurate than the value found in the CODATA Adjustment 10.

  7. Experiments towards resolving the proton charge radius puzzle

    CERN Document Server

    Antognini, A; Amaro, F D; Amaro, P; Abdou-Ahmed, M; Biraben, F; Chen, T -L; Covita, D S; Dax, A J; Diepold, M; Fernandes, L M P; Franke, B; Galtier, S; Gouvea, A L; Götzfried, J; Graf, T; Hänsch, T W; Hildebrandt, M; Indelicato, P; Julien, L; Kirch, K; Knecht, A; Kottmann, F; Krauth, J J; Liu, Y -W; Machado, J; Monteiro, C M B; Mulhauser, F; Nez, F; Santos, J P; Santos, J M F dos; Szabo, C I; Taqqu, D; Veloso, J F C A; Voss, A; Weichelt, B; Pohl, R

    2015-01-01

    We review the status of the proton charge radius puzzle. Emphasis is given to the various experiments initiated to resolve the conflict between the muonic hydrogen results and the results from scattering and regular hydrogen spectroscopy.

  8. Experiments towards resolving the proton charge radius puzzle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antognini A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We review the status of the proton charge radius puzzle. Emphasis is given to the various experiments initiated to resolve the conflict between the muonic hydrogen results and the results from scattering and regular hydrogen spectroscopy.

  9. The charge radius and anapole moment of a free fermion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gongora-T, A.; Stuart, R.G. (European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland). Theory Div.)

    1992-07-01

    We derive an expression for the charge radius and anapole moment of a free fermion induced at one loop in the standard Glashow-Salam-Weinberg model of electroweak interactions. The result, despite earlier claims to the contrary, is demonstrably gauge-invariant and observable in principle. (orig.).

  10. Extraction of the proton charge radius from experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Kelkar, N G; Nowakowski, M

    2016-01-01

    Static properties of hadrons such as their radii and other moments of the electric and magnetic distributions can only be extracted using theoretical methods and not directly measured from experiments. As a result, discrepancies between the extracted values from different precision measurements can exist. The proton charge radius, $r_p$, which is either extracted from electron proton elastic scattering data or from hydrogen atom spectroscopy seems to be no exception. The value $r_p = 0.84087(39)$ fm extracted from muonic hydrogen spectroscopy is about 4% smaller than that obtained from electron proton scattering or standard hydrogen spectroscopy. The resolution of this so called proton radius puzzle has been attempted in many different ways over the past six years. The present article reviews these attempts with a focus on the methods of extracting the radius.

  11. Charge Radius Measurement of the Halo Nucleus $^{11}$Li

    CERN Multimedia

    Kluge, H-J; Kuehl, T; Simon, H; Wang, Haiming; Zimmermann, C; Onishi, T; Tanihata, I; Wakasugi, M

    2002-01-01

    %IS385 %title\\\\ \\\\The root-mean-square charge radius of $^{11}$Li will be determined by measuring the isotope shift of a suitable atomic transition in a laser spectroscopic experiment. Comparing the charge radii of the lithium isotopes obtained by this nuclear-model-independent method with the relevant mass radii obtained before will help to answer the question whether the proton distribution in halo nuclei at the neutron drip-line is decoupled to the first order from their neutron distribution. The necessary experimental sensitivity requires the maximum possible rate of $^{11}$Li nuclei in a beam of low emittance which can only be provided by ISOLDE.

  12. Simulation for Proton Charge Radius (PRad) Experiment at Jefferson Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Li; PRad Collaboration Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The ``Proton Charge Radius Puzzle'' refers to 7 σ discrepancy between the proton charge radius extracted from muonic hydrogen Lamb shift measurements and that from the atomic hydrogen Lamb shift and e-p elastic scattering measurements. In order to get a better understanding of this puzzle, the PRad experiment (E12-11-106) was proposed and recently performed with 1.1 and 2.2 GeV unpolarized electron beam in Hall B at Jefferson Lab. The experiment aims to extract the electric form factor and the charge radius of proton by simultaneously measuring the e - p elastic scattering cross section and the Møller cross section at very low Q2(2 × 10-4 10-1(GeV / c) 2) region, with sub-percent precision. A windowless hydrogen gas flow target was used to better control the background. A high-efficiency and high-resolution calorimeter (HyCal) and a pair of Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) chambers were used in the experiment. This talk will focus on comparing the detailed simulation of PRad experiment and its background with preliminary spectra from the data. This work is supported in part by NSF MRI Award PHY-1229153, the U.S. Department of Energy under Contacts No. DE-FG02-07ER41528, Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory, Mississippi State University and PRad collaboration.

  13. Nuclear charge radius measurements of radioactive beryllium isotopes

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    We propose to measure the nuclear charge radii of the beryllium isotopes $^{7,9,10}$Be and the one-neutron halo isotope $^{11}$Be using laser spectroscopy of trapped ions. Ions produced at ISOLDE and ionized with the laser ion source will be cooled and bunched in the radio-frequency buncher of the ISOLTRAP experiment and then transferred into a specially designed Paul trap. Here, they will be cooled to temperatures in the mK range employing sympathetic and direct laser cooling. Precision laser spectroscopy of the isotope shift on the cooled ensemble in combination with accurate atomic structure calculations will provide nuclear charge radii with a precision of better than 3%. This will be the first model-independent determination of a one-neutron halo nuclear charge radius.

  14. Measurement of the $\\Sigma^{-}$ Charge Radius at SELEX

    CERN Document Server

    Eschrich, I

    1998-01-01

    The charge radii of Sigma^- and pi^- have been determined by direct elastic scttering on shell electrons. The measurement was performed in the framework of the SELEX (E781) charm hadroproduction experiment at Fermilab which employs a 600 GeV/c high-intensity Sigma^-/pi^- beam and a 3-stage magnetic spectrometer covering 0.1 <= x_F <= 1.0. Scattering angles and momenta of both hadron and electron were measured with high precision using silicon microstrip detectors, thus allowing for a segmented solid target. Two TRDs provided full particle identification. A preliminary result for the Sigma^- charge radius for a four-momentum transfer squared of 0.03 GeV^2/c^2 <= Q^2 <= 0.16 GeV^2/c^2 will be reported. In a parallel analysis the pi^- charge radius has been determined for 0.03 GeV^2/c^2 <= Q^2 <= 0.2 GeV^2/c^2, and is found to be consistent with previous experiments.

  15. The neutrino charge radius is a physical observable

    CERN Document Server

    Bernabeu, J; Vidal, J

    2004-01-01

    We present a method which allows, at least in principle, the direct extraction of the gauge-invariant and process-independent neutrino charge radius (NCR) from experiments. Under special kinematic conditions, the judicious combination of neutrino and anti-neutrino forward differential cross-sections allows the exclusion of all target-dependent contributions, such as gauge-independent box-graphs, not related to the NCR. We show that the remaining contributions contain universal, renormalization group invariant combinations, such as the electroweak effective charge and the running mixing angle, which must be also separated out. By considering the appropriate number of independent experiments we show that one may systematically eliminate these universal terms, and finally express the NCR entirely in terms of physical cross-sections. Even though the kinematic conditions and the required precision may render the proposed experiments unfeasible, at the conceptual level the analysis presented here allows for the pro...

  16. Measurement of the Σ- Charge Radius in the Selex Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, J.

    2000-01-01

    The charge radius of the Σ- has been determined by direct elastic scattering on shell electrons. The measurement was performed in the framework of the Selex (E781) charm hadroproduction experiment at Fermilab. Selex employs 600 GeV/c high-intensity Σ-/π- and p/π+ beams and a three-stage magnetic spectrometer covering 0.1 <= xF <= 1.0. The scattering angles and momenta of the hadron and the electron were measured with high precision using silicon microstrip detectors. Particle identification was provided by two TRDs. For control of systematic effects the charge radii of the proton and the π- were measured with the same apparatus and are found to be consistent with previous experiments.

  17. Some issues concerning the proton charge radius puzzle

    CERN Document Server

    Walcher, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    An explanation of the difference of the charge radius of the proton as determined from the Lamb shift in electronic hydrogen and from elastic electron scattering off the proton on the one side and the recent high precision determination with muonic hydrogen on the other side is presented. It is shown that the modification of the $2S_{1/2}$ and $2P_{3/2}$ wave functions by the "Uehling potential" yields a correction to the theoretical Lamb shift of $\\delta (\\Delta E_{\\textrm{Lamb}}) = 0.302$ meV which has to be compared to $\\delta (\\Delta E_{\\textrm{Lamb}}) = 0.322(46)$ meV equivalent to the stated radius difference. The explanation is based on the realization that the bound state wave functions modified by the external "Uehling potential" have to be propagated by the vacuum polarization propagator in order to give the correct leading order Lamb shift. It is argued that a conflicting relativistic calculation neglects this propagation aspect. The explanation demonstrates that the Lamb shift is dynamically induc...

  18. Evaluation of the proton charge radius from e-p scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Arrington, John

    2015-01-01

    In light of the proton radius puzzle, the discrepancy between measurements of the proton charge radius from muonic hydrogen and those from electronic hydrogen and electron-proton scattering measurements, we reexamine the charge radius extractions from electron scattering measurements. We provide a recommended value for the proton RMS charge radius, $r_E = 0.879 \\pm 0.011$ fm, based on a global examination of elastic e-p scattering data. The uncertainties include contributions to account for tension between different data sets and inconsistencies between radii using different extraction procedures.

  19. Electrostatic charge confinement using bulky tetraoctylammonium cation and four anions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreeva, Nadezhda A.; Chaban, Vitaly V.

    2016-04-01

    Thanks to large opposite electrostatic charges, cations and anions establish strong ionic bonds. However, applications of ionic systems - electrolytes, gas capture, solubilization, etc. - benefit from weaker non-covalent bonds. The common approaches are addition of cosolvents and delocalization of electron charge density via functionalization of ions. We report fine tuning of closest-approach distances, effective radii, and cation geometry by different anions using the semi-empirical molecular dynamics simulations. We found that long fatty acid chains employed in the tetraalkylammonium cation are largely inefficient and new substituents must be developed. The reported results foster progress of task-specific ionic liquids.

  20. Sharp bounds on the critical stability radius for relativistic charged spheres: I

    CERN Document Server

    Andreasson, Hakan

    2007-01-01

    In a recent paper by Giuliani and Rothman \\cite{GR}, the problem of finding a lower bound on the radius R of a charged sphere with mass M and charge Q is addressed. Such a bound is referred to as the critical stability radius. Equivalently, it can be formulated as the problem of finding an upper bound on M for given radius and charge. This problem has resulted in a number of papers in recent years but neither a transparent nor a general inequality similar to the case without charge, i.e., $M\\leq 4R/9,$ has been found. In this paper we derive the surprisingly transparent inequality \\begin{equation}\

  1. Sharp bounds on the critical stability radius for relativistic charged spheres

    CERN Document Server

    Andreasson, Hakan

    2008-01-01

    In a recent paper by Giuliani and Rothman \\cite{GR}, the problem of finding a lower bound on the radius $R$ of a charged sphere with mass M and charge Qradius. Equivalently, it can be formulated as the problem of finding an upper bound on M for given radius and charge. This problem has resulted in a number of papers in recent years but neither a transparent nor a general inequality similar to the case without charge, i.e., M\\leq 4R/9, has been found. In this paper we derive the surprisingly transparent inequality

  2. Bounds on the tau and muon neutrino vector and axial vector charge radius

    CERN Document Server

    Hirsch, M; Restrepo, D A; Hirsch, Martin; Nardi, Enrico; Restrepo, Diego

    2003-01-01

    A Majorana neutrino is characterized by just one flavor diagonal electromagnetic form factor: the anapole moment, that in the static limit corresponds to the axial vector charge radius . Experimental information on this quantity is scarce, especially in the case of the tau neutrino. We present a comprehensive analysis of the available data on the single photon production process $e^+e^- -> \

  3. Cation charge dependence of the forces driving DNA assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeRouchey, Jason; Parsegian, V Adrian; Rau, Donald C

    2010-10-20

    Understanding the strength and specificity of interactions among biologically important macromolecules that control cellular functions requires quantitative knowledge of intermolecular forces. Controlled DNA condensation and assembly are particularly critical for biology, with separate repulsive and attractive intermolecular forces determining the extent of DNA compaction. How these forces depend on the charge of the condensing ion has not been determined, but such knowledge is fundamental for understanding the basis of DNA-DNA interactions. Here, we measure DNA force-distance curves for a homologous set of arginine peptides. All forces are well fit as the sum of two exponentials with 2.4- and 4.8-Å decay lengths. The shorter-decay-length force is always repulsive, with an amplitude that varies slightly with length or charge. The longer-decay-length force varies strongly with cation charge, changing from repulsion with Arg¹ to attraction with Arg². Force curves for a series of homologous polyamines and the heterogeneous protein protamine are quite similar, demonstrating the universality of these forces for DNA assembly. Repulsive amplitudes of the shorter-decay-length force are species-dependent but nearly independent of charge within each species. A striking observation was that the attractive force amplitudes for all samples collapse to a single curve, varying linearly with the inverse of the cation charge.

  4. Correlating charge radius with quadrupole deformation and $B(E2)$ in atomic nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Bao-Hua; Wang, Hao-Xin

    2016-01-01

    A very good linear correlation is found between the four-point charge radius relation $\\delta R_{2p-2n}(Z,N)$ with that of quadrupole deformation data in even-even nuclei. This results in a further improved charge radius relation that holds in a precision of about 5$\\times 10^{-3}$ fm. Such correlations are also seen in global nuclear models, their precisions, however, are not enough to be consistent with the experimental data. The new relation between charge radii and deformation of even-even nuclei can be generalized to the reduced electric quadrupole transition probability $B(E2)$ between the first $2^+$ state and the $0^+$ ground state, and the mean lifetime $\\tau$ of the first 2$^+$ state.

  5. Self-gravitation of massive charge and the Einstein-Maxwell electron radius

    CERN Document Server

    Dekker, H

    2014-01-01

    The existence of stable, charged elementary 'point particles' still is a basically unsolved puzzle in theoretical physics. E.g., in quantum electrodynamics the infinite self-energy of the Dirac point electron is 'swept under the carpet' by renormalizing its mass. The present work takes a fresh look at the problem by including gravity - without resorting to string theory. Using Einstein's equations for the gravitational fields in a general static isotropic metric with the full energy-momentum tensor (for the charged material mass and the electromagnetic fields) as the source term, an exact solution with a well-defined characteristic radius emerges where mass and charge accumulate: $r_{\\rm c}{=}\\sqrt{r_{\\rm e}r_o/2}$ - with $r_{\\rm e}{=}e^2\\!/4\\pi\\epsilon_omc^2{\\approx}10^{-15}$m being the{~}'classical' electron radius and where $r_o{=}2mG/c^2{\\approx}10^{-57}$m is the Schwarzschild radius belonging to the observable mass $m{\\approx}10^{-30}$kg. The novel 'Einstein-Maxwell' gravitational electron radius can als...

  6. An examination of proton charge radius extractions from e-p scattering data

    CERN Document Server

    Arrington, John

    2015-01-01

    A detailed examination of issues associated with proton radius extractions from elastic electron-proton scattering experiments is presented. Sources of systematic uncertainty and model dependence in the extractions are discussed, with an emphasis on how these may impact the proton charge and magnetic radii. A comparison of recent Mainz data to previous world data is presented, highlighting the difference in treatment of systematic uncertainties as well as tension between different data sets. We find several issues that suggest that larger uncertainties than previously quoted may be appropriate, but do not find any corrections which would resolve the proton radius puzzle.

  7. Measurements of atomic splittings in atomic hydrogen and the proton charge radius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hessels, E. A.

    2016-09-01

    The proton charge radius can be determined from precise measurements of atomic hydrogen spectroscopy. A review of the relevant measurements will be given, including an update on our measurement of the n=2 Lamb shift. The values obtained from hydrogen will be compared to those obtained from muonic hydrogen and from electron-proton elastic scattering measurements. This work is funded by NSERC, CRC and CFI.

  8. Missed radiative corrections in muon g-2 and proton charge radius measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arbuzov Andrej

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available QED radiative corrections to the muon anomalous magnetic moment and elastic electron-proton scattering are discussed. It is shown that a collective effect due to mutual interaction of muons within experimental conditions might provide a contribution to the observed muon magnetic moment. This effect is parameterized by an effective mean shift of muons off their mass shells. Higher order corrections to elastic electronproton at low energies are systematically treated within the leading and next-to-leading logarithmic approximation. The corrections are relevant for the modern experiments on proton form factor and charge radius definition.

  9. Measurement of the {sigma}{sup -} charge radius in the SELEX experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, J

    2000-01-31

    The charge radius of the {sigma}{sup -} has been determined by direct elastic scattering on shell electrons. The measurement was performed in the framework of the SELEX (E781) charm hadroproduction experiment at Fermilab. SELEX employs 600 GeV/c high-intensity {sigma}{sup -}/{pi}{sup -} and p/{pi}{sup +} beams and a three-stage magnetic spectrometer covering 0.1 {<=} x{sub F} {<=} 1.0. The scattering angles and momenta of the hadron and the electron were measured with high precision using silicon microstrip detectors. Particle identification was provided by two TRDs. For control of systematic effects the charge radii of the proton and the {pi}{sup -} were measured with the same apparatus and are found to be consistent with previous experiments.

  10. Measurement of the SIGMA sup - charge radius in the SELEX experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Simón, J

    2000-01-01

    The charge radius of the SIGMA sup - has been determined by direct elastic scattering on shell electrons. The measurement was performed in the framework of the SELEX (E781) charm hadroproduction experiment at Fermilab. SELEX employs 600 GeV/c high-intensity SIGMA sup - /pi sup - and p/pi sup + beams and a three-stage magnetic spectrometer covering 0.1 <= x sub F <= 1.0. The scattering angles and momenta of the hadron and the electron were measured with high precision using silicon microstrip detectors. Particle identification was provided by two TRDs. For control of systematic effects the charge radii of the proton and the pi sup - were measured with the same apparatus and are found to be consistent with previous experiments.

  11. Triton charge radius to next-to-next-to-leading order in pionless effective field theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanasse, Jared

    2017-02-01

    The triton point charge radius is calculated to next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) in pionless effective field theory ( EFT (π / )) , yielding a prediction of 1.14 ±0.19 fm (leading order), 1.59 ±0.08 fm (next-to leading order), and 1.62 ±0.03 fm (NNLO) in agreement with the current experimental extraction of 1.5978 ±0.040 fm [Angeli and Marinova, At. Data Nucl. Data Tables 99, 69 (2013)], 10.1016/j.adt.2011.12.006. The error at NNLO is due to cutoff variation (˜1 % ) within a reasonable range of calculated cutoffs and from a EFT (π / ) error estimate (˜1.5 % ). In addition new techniques are introduced to add perturbative corrections to bound- and scattering state calculations for short-range effective field theories, but with a focus on their use in EFT (π / ) .

  12. Evaluation of the strength of electron-proton scattering data for determining the proton charge radius

    CERN Document Server

    Horbatsch, M

    2015-01-01

    Precisely measured electron-proton elastic scattering cross sections [Phys. Rev. Lett. {\\bf 105}, 242002 (2010)] are reanalyzed to evaluate their strength for determining the rms charge radius ($R_{\\rm E}$) of the proton. More than half of the cross sections at lowest $Q^2$ are fit using two single-parameter form-factor models, with the first based on a dipole parametrization, and the second on a linear fit to a conformal-mapping variable. These low-$Q^2$ fits extrapolate the slope of the form factor to $Q^2$=0 and determine $R_{\\rm E}$ values of approximately 0.84 and 0.89~fm, respectively. Fits spanning all $Q^2$, in which the single constants are replaced with cubic splines at larger $Q^2$, lead to similar results for $R_{\\rm E}$. We conclude that the scattering data is consistent with $R_{\\rm E}$ ranging from at least 0.84 to 0.89~fm, and therefore cannot resolve the discrepancy between determinations of $R_{\\rm E}$ made using muonic and electronic hydrogen-atom spectroscopy.

  13. Charge Shielding of PIP2 by Cations Regulates Enzyme Activity of Phospholipase C.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Bae Seo

    Full Text Available Hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2 of the plasma membrane by phospholipase C (PLC generates two critical second messengers, inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate and diacylglycerol. For the enzymatic reaction, PIP2 binds to positively charged amino acids in the pleckstrin homology domain of PLC. Here we tested the hypothesis that positively charged divalent and multivalent cations accumulate around the negatively charged PIP2, a process called electrostatic charge shielding, and therefore inhibit electrostatic PIP2-PLC interaction. This charge shielding of PIP2 was measured quantitatively with an in vitro enzyme assay using WH-15, a PIP2 analog, and various recombinant PLC proteins (β1, γ1, and δ1. Reduction of PLC activity by divalent cations, polyamines, and neomycin was well described by a theoretical model considering accumulation of cations around PIP2 via their electrostatic interaction and chemical binding. Finally, the charge shielding of PIP2 was also observed in live cells. Perfusion of the cations into cells via patch clamp pipette reduced PIP2 hydrolysis by PLC as triggered by M1 muscarinic receptors with a potency order of Mg2+ < spermine4+ < neomycin6+. Accumulation of divalent cations into cells through divalent-permeable TRPM7 channel had the same effect. Altogether our results suggest that Mg2+ and polyamines modulate the activity of PLCs by controlling the amount of free PIP2 available for the enzymes and that highly charged biomolecules can be inactivated by counterions electrostatically.

  14. Cationic surfactants derived from lysine: effects of their structure and charge type on antimicrobial and hemolytic activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colomer, A; Pinazo, A; Manresa, M A; Vinardell, M P; Mitjans, M; Infante, M R; Pérez, L

    2011-02-24

    Three different sets of cationic surfactants from lysine have been synthesized. The first group consists of three monocatenary surfactants with one lysine as the cationic polar head with one cationic charge. The second consists of three monocatenary surfactants with two amino acids as cationic polar head with two positive charges. Finally, four gemini surfactants were synthesized in which the spacer chain and the number and type of cationic charges have been regulated. The micellization process, antimicrobial activity, and hemolytic activity were evaluated. The critical micelle concentration was dependent only on the hydrophobic character of the molecules. Nevertheless, the antimicrobial and hemolytic activities were related to the structure of the compounds as well as the type of cationic charges. The most active surfactants against the bacteria were those with a cationic charge on the trimethylated amino group, whereas all of these surfactants showed low hemolytic character.

  15. The neutrino charge radius as a probe of physics beyond the standard model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novales-Sanchez, H.; Toscano, J. J. [Facultad de Ciencias Fisico Matematicas, Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Apartado Postal 1152, Puebla, Pue (Mexico); Rosado, A.; Santiago-Olan, V. [Instituto de Fisica, Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla. Apdo. Postal J-48, C.P. 72570 Puebla, Pue (Mexico)

    2013-06-12

    In this paper, we review the search of possible physics effects beyond the standard model on the electromagnetic charge and anapole form factors, f{sub Q}(q{sup 2}) and f{sub A}(q{sup 2}), for a no massive Dirac neutrino, when these quantities are calculated in the frame of an effective electroweak Yang-Mills theory, which induces the most general SU{sub L}(2)-invariant Lorentz tensor structure of nonrenormalizable type for the WW{gamma} vertex. We found that in this frame, besides the standard model contribution, the additional contribution to f{sub Q}(q{sup 2}) and f{sub A}(q{sup 2}) (f{sub Q}{sup O{sub W}}(q{sup 2}) and f{sub A}{sup O{sub W}}(q{sup 2}), respectively) are gauge independent and finite functions of q{sup 2} after adopting a renormalization scheme. These form factors, f{sub Q}{sup O{sub W}}(q{sup 2}) and f{sub A}{sup O{sub W}}(q{sup 2}), get contribution at the one loop level only from the proper neutrino electromagnetic vertex. Besides, the relation f{sub Q}{sup eff}(q{sup 2}) = q{sup 2}f{sub A}{sup eff}(q{sup 2})(f{sub Q}{sup eff}(q{sup 2}) = f{sub Q}{sup SM}(q{sup 2})+f{sub Q}{sup O{sub W}}(q{sup 2}),f{sub A}{sup eff}(q{sup 2}) = f{sub A}{sup SM}(q{sup 2})+f{sub A}{sup O{sub W}}(q{sup 2})) is still fulfilled and hence the relation a{sub v}{sup eff} = {sup eff}/6(a{sub v}{sup eff} = a{sub v}{sup SM}+a{sub v}{sup O{sub W}},{sup eff} = {sup SM}+{sup O{sub W}}) is obtained, just as in the SM. Using the experimental constraint on the anomalous WW{gamma} vertex, a value for the additional contribution to the charge radius of Double-Vertical-Line {sup O{sub W}} Double-Vertical-Line Less-Than-Or-Equivalent-To 10{sup -34} cm{sup 2} is gotten, which is one order of magnitude lower than the SM value.

  16. Bounds on tau neutrino magnetic moment and charge radius from Super-K and SNO observations

    CERN Document Server

    Joshipura, A S; Joshipura, Anjan S.; Mohanty, Subhendra

    2001-01-01

    Neutrinos can scatter electrons in water detectors through their magnetic moments and charge radii in addition to the charged and neutral currents channels. The recent solar neutrino charged current event rates announced by SNO with the earlier solar and atmospheric neutrino observations from Super-Kamiokande allows us to put upper bounds of $\\mu < 10^{-31} cm^2$ on the neutrino charge radii. For the electron and muon neutrinos these bounds are comparable with existing bounds but for tau neutrinos these bounds are three orders of magnitude more stringent than earlier terrestrial bounds. These bounds are independent of any specific model of neutrino oscillations.

  17. Sorption of poly(vinyl alcohol) and its cationic derivative on silica oxide: effect of charge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liesiene, J.; Matulioniene, J.; Aniulyte, J.; Keizer, de A.

    2005-01-01

    Adsorption of poly(vinyl alcohol)-based cationic polyelectrolyte (DEAE-PVA) as well as unmodified poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) onto silica oxide surface was studied by means of reflectometry. The study was focused on the effect of charge of polymer segments on their adsorption on silica oxide. The resu

  18. Sharp bounds on the radius of relativistic charged spheres: Guilfoyle's stars saturate the Buchdahl-Andr\\'easson bound

    CERN Document Server

    Lemos, José P S

    2015-01-01

    Buchdahl, by imposing a few physical assumptions on the matter, i.e., its density is a nonincreasing function of the radius and the fluid is a perfect fluid, and on the configuration, such as the exterior is the Schwarzschild solution, found that the radius $r_0$ to mass $m$ ratio of a star would obey the Buchdahl bound $r_0/m\\geq9/4$. He noted that the bound was saturated by the Schwarzschild interior solution, the solution with $\\rho_{\\rm m}(r)= {\\rm constant}$, where $\\rho_{\\rm m}(r)$ is the energy density of the matter at $r$, when the central central pressure blows to infinity. Generalizations of this bound have been studied. One generalization was given by Andr\\'easson by including electrically charged matter and imposing that $p+2p_T \\leq\\rho_{\\rm m}$, where $p$ is the radial pressure and $p_T$ the tangential pressure. His bound is given by $r_0/m\\geq9/\\left(1+\\sqrt{1+3\\,q^2/r_0^2}\\right)^{2}$, the Buchdahl-Andr\\'easson bound, with $q$ being the star's total electric charge. Following Andr\\'easson's pr...

  19. Increasing the gravimetric energy density of organic based secondary battery cathodes using small radius cations (Li+ and Mg2+).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Burgos, Kenneth; Rodríguez-Calero, Gabriel G; Zhou, Weidong; Burkhardt, Stephen E; Abruña, Héctor D

    2013-10-02

    One of the major challenges in electrochemical energy storage (EES) is increasing the gravimetric capacity and energy density of the cathode material. Here we demonstrate how to increase the gravimetric energy density of electrical energy storage devices based on the use of organic materials through exploitation of the strong ionic coupling between a reduced carbonyl functionality and small cations such as lithium (Li(+)) and magnesium (Mg(2+)). Binding of the cation to the reduced carbonyl results in a positive shift of the formal reduction potential of the carbonyl couple. This has the effect of increasing the cell voltage which, in turn, results in an increase in the energy density. We show how this interaction can be used to dramatically increase, by up to a factor of 2, the energy density for a selected case study using 1,2-di(thiophen-2-yl)ethane-1,2-dione (DTED). We have carried out electrochemical and computational studies in order to understand the thermodynamic (positive shift of 250 mV and 1 V in the formal potential for the first and second reductions, respectively, of the carbonyl groups of DTED) and kinetic effects between small radii cations (Li(+) and Mg(2+)) and the reduced carbonyl functionality of carbonyl-based organic molecules (C-bOMs).

  20. Poly(ethylene glycol)-block-cationic polylactide nanocomplexes of differing charge density for gene delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Kuang; Jones, Charles H; Mistriotis, Panagiotis; Yu, Yun; Ma, Xiaoni; Ravikrishnan, Anitha; Jiang, Ming; Andreadis, Stelios T; Pfeifer, Blaine A; Cheng, Chong

    2013-12-01

    Representing a new type of biodegradable cationic block copolymer, well-defined poly(ethylene glycol)-block-cationic polylactides (PEG-b-CPLAs) with tertiary amine-based cationic groups were synthesized by thiol-ene functionalization of an allyl-functionalized diblock precursor. Subsequently the application of PEG-b-CPLAs as biodegradable vectors for the delivery of plasmid DNAs (pDNAs) was investigated. Via the formation of PEG-b-CPLA:pDNA nanocomplexes by spontaneous electrostatic interaction, pDNAs encoding luciferase or enhanced green fluorescent protein were successfully delivered to four physiologically distinct cell lines (including macrophage, fibroblast, epithelial, and stem cell). Formulated nanocomplexes demonstrated high levels of transfection with low levels of cytotoxicity and hemolysis when compared to a positive control. Biophysical characterization of charge densities of nanocomplexes at various polymer:pDNA weight ratios revealed a positive correlation between surface charge and gene delivery. Nanocomplexes with high surface charge densities were utilized in an in vitro serum gene delivery inhibition assay, and effective gene delivery was observed despite high levels of serum. Overall, these results help to elucidate the influence of charge, size, and PEGylation of nanocomplexes upon the delivery of nucleic acids in physiologically relevant conditions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Removal of Endotoxin from Human Serum Albumin Solutions by Hydrophobic and Cationic Charged Membrane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A novel matrix of macropore cellulose membrane was prepared by chemical graft, and immobilized the cationic charged groups as affinity ligands. The prepared membrane can be used for the removal of endotoxin from human serum albumin (HSA) solutions. With a cartridge of 20 sheets affinity membrane of 47 mm diameter, the endotoxin level in HSA solution can be reduced to 0.027 eu/mL. Recovery of HSA was over 95%.

  2. Porous cationic polymers: the impact of counteranions and charges on CO2 capture and conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyukcakir, Onur; Je, Sang Hyun; Choi, Dong Shin; Talapaneni, Siddulu Naiudu; Seo, Yongbeom; Jung, Yousung; Polychronopoulou, Kyriaki; Coskun, Ali

    2016-01-18

    Porous cationic polymers (PCPs) with surface areas up to 755 m(2) g(-1) bearing positively charged viologen units in their backbones and different counteranions have been prepared. We have demonstrated that by simply varying counteranions both gas sorption and catalytic properties of PCPs can be tuned for metal-free capture and conversion of CO2 into value-added products such as cyclic carbonates with excellent yields.

  3. Three-Body Bound States and The Triton Charge Radius; Perturbative Corrections to Next-to-next-to-leading order in Pionless Effective Field Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Vanasse, Jared

    2015-01-01

    In the three-body system of ${}^3\\mathrm{H}$ we show how perturbative corrections can be added to the leading ordering triton vertex function. Using this new scheme we calculate the triton charge form factor and use it to extract the triton charge radius to next-to-leading-order, yielding a prediction of 1.58~fm. We show that a new counter-term will be needed to predict the triton charge radius at next-to-next-to-leading order.

  4. Laser systems for collinear spectroscopy and the charge radius of {sup 12}Be

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krieger, Andreas

    2012-03-30

    Collinear laser spectroscopy has been used to investigate the nuclear charge radii of shortlived medium- and heavy-Z nuclei for more than three decades. But it became only recently be applicable to low-Z nuclei. This region of the nuclear chart attracts attention because so-called ab-initio nuclear models, based on realistic nucleon-nucleon potentials, can only be applied to the lightest elements due to the rapidly increasing calculational demands with the number of nucleons. Furthermore, strong clusterization of atomic nuclei occurs and the encountered halo nuclei are presently subject of intense research. The isotopic chain of beryllium exhibits the prime example of a one-neutron halo nucleus, {sup 11}Be, and the two- or four-neutron halo nucleus {sup 14}Be. {sup 12}Be is a key isotope between these two exotic nuclei and particularly interesting because the nuclear shell model predicts a shell closure for the magic neutron number N = 8. In the course of this thesis, several frequency-stabilized laser systems for collinear laser spectroscopy have been developed. At TRIGA-SPEC a frequency-doubled diode laser system with a tapered amplifier and a frequency comb-stabilized titanium-sapphire laser with a frequency doubling stage are now available for the spectroscopy of refractory metals above molybdenum. They have already been used for test-experiments and commissioning of the TRIGA-LASER beamline. Furthermore, frequency-quadrupling of the Ti:Sa laser was demonstrated to expand the emitted wavelengths into the 200 nm region. At ISOLDE/CERN a frequency comb-stabilized and an iodine-stabilized dye laser were installed and applied for laser spectroscopy of {sup 9,10,11,12}Be{sup +}. The improved laser system and the development of a delayed photon-ion coincidence detection improved the sensitivity of the beryllium spectroscopy by more than two orders of magnitude and, thus, the previous measurements of {sup 7-11}Be could be extended for the first time to the short

  5. Frequency metrology of helium around 1083 nm and determination of the nuclear charge radius

    CERN Document Server

    Pastor, P Cancio; Giusfredi, G; De Natale, P; Inguscio, M; Yerokhin, V A; Pachucki, K

    2012-01-01

    We measure the absolute frequency of seven out of the nine allowed transitions between the 2^3S and 2^3P hyperfine manifolds in a metastable ^3He beam by using an optical frequency comb synthesizer-assisted spectrometer. The relative uncertainty of our measurements ranges from 1x10^{-11} to 5x10^{-12}, which is, to our knowledge,the most precise result for any optical ^3He transition to date. The resulting 2^3P-2^3S centroid frequency is 276702827203.1 (2.3) kHz. Comparing this value with the known result for the ^4He centroid and performing {\\em ab initio} QED calculations of the ^4He-^3He isotope shift, we extract the difference of the squared nuclear charge radii \\delta r^2 of ^3He and ^4He. Our result for \\delta r^2=1.075 (3) fm^2 disagrees by about 4 sigma with the recent determination [R. van Rooij {\\em et al.}, Science {\\bf 333}, 196 (2011)].

  6. Chitosan based atorvastatin nanocrystals: effect of cationic charge on particle size, formulation stability, and in-vivo efficacy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kurakula, Mallesh; El-Helw, A M; Sobahi, Tariq R; Abdelaal, Magdy Y

    2015-01-01

    .... The influence of cationic charge densities of chitosan (low CS(L), medium CS(M), high CS(H) molecular weights) and Labrasol(®) in solubility enhancement and modifying the release was investigated, using atorvastatin...

  7. Charge Transfer Dissociation (CTD) Mass Spectrometry of Peptide Cations: Study of Charge State Effects and Side-Chain Losses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pengfei; Jackson, Glen P.

    2017-01-01

    1+, 2+, and 3+ precursors of substance P and bradykinin were subjected to helium cation irradiation in a 3D ion trap mass spectrometer. Charge exchange with the helium cations produces a variety of fragment ions, the number and type of which are dependent on the charge state of the precursor ions. For 1+ peptide precursors, fragmentation is generally restricted to C-CO backbone bonds (a and x ions), whereas for 2+ and 3+ peptide precursors, all three backbone bonds (C-CO, C-N, and N-Cα) are cleaved. The type of backbone bond cleavage is indicative of possible dissociation channels involved in CTD process, including high-energy, kinetic-based, and ETD-like pathways. In addition to backbone cleavages, amino acid side-chain cleavages are observed in CTD, which are consistent with other high-energy and radical-mediated techniques. The unique dissociation pattern and supplementary information available from side-chain cleavages make CTD a potentially useful activation method for the structural study of gas-phase biomolecules.

  8. Distinct Fragmentation Pathways of Anticancer Drugs Induced by Charge-Carrying Cations in the Gas Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Areum; Lee, Hong Hee; Heo, Chae Eun; Cho, Yunju; Kim, Sunghwan; Kang, Dukjin; Kim, Hugh I.

    2017-04-01

    With the growth of the pharmaceutical industry, structural elucidation of drugs and derivatives using tandem mass spectrometry (MS2) has become essential for drug development and pharmacokinetics studies because of its high sensitivity and low sample requirement. Thus, research seeking to understand fundamental relationships between fragmentation patterns and precursor ion structures in the gas phase has gained attention. In this study, we investigate the fragmentation of the widely used anticancer drugs, doxorubicin (DOX), vinblastine (VBL), and vinorelbine (VRL), complexed by a singly charged proton or alkali metal ion (Li+, Na+, K+) in the gas phase. The drug-cation complexes exhibit distinct fragmentation patterns in tandem mass spectra as a function of cation size. The trends in fragmentation patterns are explicable in terms of structures derived from ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) and theoretical calculations.

  9. Distinct Fragmentation Pathways of Anticancer Drugs Induced by Charge-Carrying Cations in the Gas Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Areum; Lee, Hong Hee; Heo, Chae Eun; Cho, Yunju; Kim, Sunghwan; Kang, Dukjin; Kim, Hugh I.

    2016-12-01

    With the growth of the pharmaceutical industry, structural elucidation of drugs and derivatives using tandem mass spectrometry (MS2) has become essential for drug development and pharmacokinetics studies because of its high sensitivity and low sample requirement. Thus, research seeking to understand fundamental relationships between fragmentation patterns and precursor ion structures in the gas phase has gained attention. In this study, we investigate the fragmentation of the widely used anticancer drugs, doxorubicin (DOX), vinblastine (VBL), and vinorelbine (VRL), complexed by a singly charged proton or alkali metal ion (Li+, Na+, K+) in the gas phase. The drug-cation complexes exhibit distinct fragmentation patterns in tandem mass spectra as a function of cation size. The trends in fragmentation patterns are explicable in terms of structures derived from ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) and theoretical calculations.

  10. Spectral properties and reactivity of diarylmethanol radical cations in aqueous solution. Evidence for intramolecular charge resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bietti, Massimo; Lanzalunga, Osvaldo

    2002-04-19

    Spectral properties and reactivities of ring-methoxylated diarylmethane and diarylmethanol radical cations, generated in aqueous solution by pulse and gamma-radiolysis and by the one-electron chemical oxidant potassium 12-tungstocobalt(III)ate, have been studied. The radical cations display three bands in the UV, visible, and vis-NIR regions of the spectrum. The vis-NIR band is assigned to an intramolecular charge resonance interaction (CR) between the neutral donor and charged acceptor rings, as indicated by the observation that the relative intensity of the vis-NIR band compared to that of the UV and visible bands does not increase with increasing substrate concentration and that the position and intensity of this band is influenced by the ring-substitution pattern. In acidic solution (pH = 4), monomethoxylated diarylmethanol radical cations 1a.(+ -)1e.(+) decay by C(alpha)-H deprotonation [k = (1.7-1.9) x 10(4)s(-1)] through the intermediacy of a ketyl radical, which is further oxidized in the reaction medium to give the corresponding benzophenones, as evidenced by both time-resolved spectroscopic and product studies. With the dimethoxylated radical cation 2.(+), C(alpha)-H deprotonation is instead significantly slower (k = 6.7 x 10(2)s(-1)). In basic solution, 1a.(+)-1e.(+) undergo (-)OH-induced deprotonation from the alpha-OH group with k(OH.)approximately equal to 1.4 x 10(10)M(-1)s(-1), leading to a ketyl radical anion, which is oxidized in the reaction medium to the corresponding benzophenone.

  11. Ionic charge transport between blockages: Sodium cation conduction in freshly excised bulk brain tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emin, David, E-mail: emin@unm.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Akhtari, Massoud [Semple Institutes for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Ellingson, B. M. [Department of Radiology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Mathern, G. W. [Department of Neurosurgery, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    We analyze the transient-dc and frequency-dependent electrical conductivities between blocking electrodes. We extend this analysis to measurements of ions’ transport in freshly excised bulk samples of human brain tissue whose complex cellular structure produces blockages. The associated ionic charge-carrier density and diffusivity are consistent with local values for sodium cations determined non-invasively in brain tissue by MRI (NMR) and diffusion-MRI (spin-echo NMR). The characteristic separation between blockages, about 450 microns, is very much shorter than that found for sodium-doped gel proxies for brain tissue, >1 cm.

  12. Influence of polymer charge on the shear yield stress of silica aggregated with adsorbed cationic polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ying; Yu, Hai; Wanless, Erica J; Jameson, Graeme J; Franks, George V

    2009-08-15

    Flocs were produced by adding three cationic polymers (10% charge density, 3.0x10(5) g/mol molecular weight; 40% charge density, 1.1x10(5) g/mol molecular weight; and 100% charge density, 1.2x10(5) g/mol molecular weight) to 90 nm diameter silica particles. The shear yield stresses of the consolidated sediment beds from settled and centrifuged flocs were determined via the vane technique. The polymer charge density plays an important role in influencing the shear yield stresses of sediment beds. The shear yield stresses of sediment beds from flocs induced by the 10% charged polymer were observed to increase with an increase in polymer dose, initial solid concentration and background electrolyte concentration at all volume fractions. In comparison, polymer dose has a marginal effect on the shear yield stresses of sediment beds from flocs induced by the 40% and 100% charged polymers. The shear yield stresses of sediments from flocs induced by the 40% charged polymer are independent of salt concentration whereas the addition of salt decreases the shear yield stresses of sediments from flocs induced by the 100% charged polymer. When flocculated at the optimum dose for each polymer (12 mg/g silica for the 10% charged polymer at 0.03 M NaCl, 12 mg/g for 40% and 2 mg/g for 100%), shear yield stress increases as polymer charge increases. The effects observed are related to the flocculation mechanism (bridging, patch attraction or charge neutralisation) and the magnitude of the adhesive force. Comparison of shear and compressive yield stresses show that the network is only slightly weaker in shear than in compression. This is different than many other systems (mainly salt and pH coagulation) which have shear yield stress much less than compressive yield stress. The existing models relating the power law exponent of the volume fraction dependence of the shear yield stress to the network fractal structure are not satisfactory to predict all the experimental behaviour.

  13. Cooperative coupling of the Li cation and groups to amplify the charge transfer between C60 and corannulene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Gang; Xu, Jing; Chen, Zhi-Yuan; Lei, E.; Liu, Xiang-Shuai; Liu, Chun-Guang

    2017-02-01

    In present work, four complexes have been designed to investigate the effect of Li+ cation and substituent on the geometric structures and a series of electronic properties using density functional theory. The calculated results indicate that the charge decomposition (CDA) analysis and extend charge decomposition analysis (ECDA) of four complexes have the same sequence. The average d values defined the distances between C60 and corannulene display the inverse sequence. Consequently, the cooperative coupling of the Li+ cation and appropriate substituent is predicted to be an effective way to enhance the charge transfer between the C60 and corannulene derivatives.

  14. Charge-dependent dissociation of insulin cations via ion/ion electron transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jian; Gunawardena, Harsha P.; Huang, Teng-Yi; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2008-10-01

    The dissociation reactions of various charge states of insulin cations obtained directly from nano-electrospray were investigated as a result of ion/ion electron transfer from azobenzene anions. Data were collected with and without simultaneous ion trap collisional excitation of the first generation charge-reduced product during the ion/ion reaction period. Neither separation of the two constituent chains nor cleavages within the loop defined by the disulfide bridges were observed under normal electron transfer dissociation (ETD) conditions for any of the charge states studied. However, substantial sequence coverage (exocyclic region: 82.6%; entire protein: 38.8%) outside the ring structure was obtained for insulin +6, while only limited coverage (exocyclic: 43.5%; entire protein: 20.4%) was observed for insulin +5 and no dissociation, aside from low abundance side-chain losses, was noted for insulin +4 and +3 in the normal ETD spectra. When the first generation charge-reduced precursor ions were subjected to collisional activation during the ion/ion reaction period, higher sequence coverages were obtained for both insulin +5 (entire protein: 34.7%) and +4 (entire protein: 20.4%) with backbone cleavages occurring within the loop defined by the disulfide bonds. Dissociation of insulin +3 was not significantly improved by the additional activation. Separation of the two constituent chains resulting from cleavages of both of the two disulfide bridges that link the chains was observed for insulin +6, +5, and +4 when the charge-reduced species were activated. The dissociation of disulfide linkages in this study suggests that as the charge state decreases, disulfide bond cleavages dominate over N-C[alpha] bond cleavages in the electron transfer dissociation process.

  15. Cationic Net Charge and Counter Ion Type as Antimicrobial Activity Determinant Factors of Short Lipopeptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greber, Katarzyna E.; Dawgul, Malgorzata; Kamysz, Wojciech; Sawicki, Wieslaw

    2017-01-01

    To get a better insight into the antimicrobial potency of short cationic lipopeptides, 35 new entities were synthesized using solid phase peptide strategy. All newly obtained lipopeptides were designed to be positively charged from +1 to +4. This was achieved by introducing basic amino acid - lysine - into the lipopeptide structure and had a hydrophobic fatty acid chain attached. Lipopeptides were subjected to microbiological tests using reference strains of Gram-negative bacteria: Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus vulgaris, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Gram-positive bacteria: Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Bacillus subtilis, Enterococcus faecalis, and fungi: Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis, Aspergillus brasiliensis. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) and minimal fungicidal concentration (MFC) were established for each strain. The toxicity toward human cells was determined by hemolysis tests via minimum hemolytic concentration (MHC) determination. The effect of the trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) counter ion on the antimicrobial activity of lipopeptides was also examined by its removing and performing the antimicrobial tests using counter ion-free compounds. The study shows that lipopeptides are more potent against Gram-positive than Gram-negative strains. It was revealed that positive charge equals at least +2 is a necessary condition to observe significant antimicrobial activity, but only when it is balanced with a proper length of hydrophobic fatty acid chain. The hemolytic activity of lipopeptides strongly depends on amino acid composition of the hydrophilic portion of the molecule as well as fatty acid chain length. Compounds endowed with a greater positive charge were more toxic to human erythrocytes. This should be considered during new lipopeptide molecules design. Our studies also revealed the TFA counter ion has no significant effect on the antimicrobial behavior of cationic

  16. Chitosan based atorvastatin nanocrystals: effect of cationic charge on particle size, formulation stability, and in-vivo efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurakula M

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mallesh Kurakula,1 AM El-Helw,2 Tariq R Sobahi,1 Magdy Y Abdelaal11Polymer Research Lab, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia; 2Department of Pharmaceutics, Faculty of Pharmacy, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi ArabiaAbstract: Cationic charged chitosan as stabilizer was evaluated in preparation of nanocrystals using probe sonication method. The influence of cationic charge densities of chitosan (low CSL, medium CSM, high CSH molecular weights and Labrasol® in solubility enhancement and modifying the release was investigated, using atorvastatin (ATR as poorly soluble model drug. Compared to CSM and CSH; low cationic charge of CSL acted as both electrostatic and steric stabilizer by significant size reduction to 394 nm with charge of 21.5 meV. Solubility of ATR-CSL increased to 60-fold relative to pure ATR and ATR-L. Nanocrystals were characterized for physiochemical properties. Scanning electron microscopy revealed scaffold-like structures with high surface area. X-ray powder diffractometry and differential scanning calorimetry revealed crystalline to slight amorphous state changes after cationic charge size reduction. Fourier transform-infrared spectra indicated no potent drug-excipient interactions. The enhanced dissolution profile of ATR-CSL indicates that sustained release was achieved compared with ATR-L and Lipitor®. Anti-hyperlipidemic performance was pH dependent where ATR-CSL exhibited 2.5-fold higher efficacy at pH 5 compared to pH 6 and Lipitor®. Stability studies indicated marked changes in size and charge for ATR-L compared to ATR-CSL exemplifying importance of the stabilizer. Therefore, nanocrystals developed with CSL as a stabilizer is a promising choice to enhance dissolution, stability, and in-vivo efficacy of major Biopharmaceutical Classification System II/IV drugs.Keywords: atorvastatin, anti-hyperlipidemia, chitosan, cationic charge, stability, nanocrystals

  17. Charge transfer from 2-aminopurine radical cation and radical anion to nucleobases: A pulse radiolysis study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manoj, P. [School of Chemical Sciences, Mahatma Gandhi University, Kottayam 686 560, Kerala (India); Mohan, H. [Radiation Chemistry and Chemical Dynamics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Mittal, J.P. [Radiation Chemistry and Chemical Dynamics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Manoj, V.M. [School of Chemical Sciences, Mahatma Gandhi University, Kottayam 686 560, Kerala (India); Aravindakumar, C.T. [School of Chemical Sciences, Mahatma Gandhi University, Kottayam 686 560, Kerala (India)], E-mail: CT-Aravindakumar@rocketmail.com

    2007-01-08

    Pulse radiolysis study has been carried out to investigate the properties of the radical cation of 2-aminopurine (2AP) and the probable charge transfer from the radical cation and radical anion of 2AP to natural nucleobases in aqueous medium. The radical cation of 2AP was produced by the reaction of sulfate radical anion (SO{sub 4}{sup dot-}). The time resolved absorption spectra obtained by the reaction of SO{sub 4}{sup dot-} with 2AP at neutral pH have two distinct maxima at 380 and 470nm and is assigned to the formation of a neutral radical of the form 2AP-N{sup 2}(-H){sup dot} (k{sub 2}=4.7x10{sup 9}dm{sup 3}mol{sup -1}s{sup -1} at pH 7). This neutral radical is formed from the deprotonation reaction of a very short-lived radical cation of 2AP. The transient absorption spectra recorded at pH 10.2 have two distinct maxima at 400 and 480nm and is assigned to the formation of a nitrogen centered radical (2AP-N(9){sup dot}). As the hole transport from 2AP to guanine is a highly probable process, the reaction of SO{sub 4}{sup dot-} is carried out in the presence of guanosine, adenosine and inosine. The spectrum obtained in the presence of guanosine was significantly different from that in the absence and it showed prominent absorption maxima at 380 and 470nm, and a weak broad maximum centered around 625nm which match well with the reported spectrum of a neutral guanine radical (G(-H){sup dot}). The electron transfer reaction from the radical anion of 2AP to thymine (T), cytidine (Cyd) and uridine (Urd) was also investigated at neutral pH. Among the three pyrimidines, only the transient spectrum in the presence of T gave a significant difference from the spectral features of the electron adduct of 2AP, which showed a prominent absorption maximum at 340nm and this spectrum is similar to the electron adduct spectrum of T. The preferential reduction of thymine by 2AP{sup dot-} and the oxidation of guanosine by 2AP{sup dot+} clearly follow the oxidation

  18. IR spectroscopy of cationized aliphatic amino acids: Stability of charge-solvated structure increases with metal cation size

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drayss, M. K.; Armentrout, P. B.; Oomens, J.; Schaefer, M.

    2010-01-01

    Gas-phase structures of alkali metal cationized (Li+, Na+,K+, Rb+, and Cs+) proline (Pro) and N-methyl alanine have been investigated using infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy utilizing light generated by a free electron laser and computational modeling. Measured IRMPD spectra

  19. IR spectroscopy of cationized aliphatic amino acids: Stability of charge-solvated structure increases with metal cation size

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drayß, M.K.; Armentrout, P.B.; Oomens, J.; Schäfer, M.

    2010-01-01

    Gas-phase structures of alkali metal cationized (Li+, Na+, K+, Rb+, and Cs+) proline (Pro) and N-methyl alanine have been investigated using infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy utilizing light generated by a free electron laser and computational modeling. Measured IRMPD spectr

  20. Structure and physical properties of ternary organic conductors of TCNQ, iodine, and double-charged unsymmetrical cations: PET and PESe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abashev, G.G. [Perm State Univ. (Russian Federation). Inst. of Natural Sci.; Russkikh, V.S. [Perm State Univ. (Russian Federation). Inst. of Natural Sci.; Koshta, A. [Polska Akademia Nauk, Poznan (Poland). Inst. Fizyki Molekularnej; Lapinski, A. [Polska Akademia Nauk, Poznan (Poland). Inst. Fizyki Molekularnej; Krol, S. [Polska Akademia Nauk, Poznan (Poland). Inst. Fizyki Molekularnej; Pukacki, W. [Polska Akademia Nauk, Poznan (Poland). Inst. Fizyki Molekularnej; Graja, A. [Polska Akademia Nauk, Poznan (Poland). Inst. Fizyki Molekularnej

    1996-01-01

    Ternary organic salts of TCNQ, iodine, and double-charged unsymmetrical cations containing sulfur or selenium are investigated. The crystal structure of the salts is determined; their dc electrical conductivity, ESR, and IR spectral properties are studied. The physical properties of the investigated salts are found as typical for Q-1D organic semiconductors. (orig.)

  1. Fragmentation of Singly, Doubly, and Triply Charged Hydrogen Deficient Peptide Radical Cations in Infrared Multiphoton Dissociation and Electron Induced Dissociation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalli, Anastasia; Hess, Sonja

    2012-02-01

    Gas phase fragmentation of hydrogen deficient peptide radical cations continues to be an active area of research. While collision induced dissociation (CID) of singly charged species is widely examined, dissociation channels of singly and multiply charged radical cations in infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) and electron induced dissociation (EID) have not been, so far, investigated. Here, we report on the gas phase dissociation of singly, doubly and triply charged hydrogen deficient peptide radicals, [M + nH](n+1)+· ( n = 0, 1, 2), in MS3 IRMPD and EID and compare the observed fragmentation pathways to those obtained in MS3 CID. Backbone fragmentation in MS3 IRMPD and EID was highly dependent on the charge state of the radical precursor ions, whereas amino acid side chain cleavages were largely independent of the charge state selected for fragmentation. Cleavages at aromatic amino acids, either through side chain loss or backbone fragmentation, were significantly enhanced over other dissociation channels. For singly charged species, the MS3 IRMPD and EID spectra were mainly governed by radical-driven dissociation. Fragmentation of doubly and triply charged radical cations proceeded through both radical- and charge-driven processes, resulting in the formation of a wide range of backbone product ions including, a-, b-, c-, y-, x-, and z-type. While similarities existed between MS3 CID, IRMPD, and EID of the same species, several backbone product ions and side chain losses were unique for each activation method. Furthermore, dominant dissociation pathways in each spectrum were dependent on ion activation method, amino acid composition, and charge state selected for fragmentation.

  2. THE EFFECT OF CHARGE AND CHEMICAL STRUCTURE OF CATIONIC SURFACTANTS ON LASER TONER AGGLOMERATION UNDER ALKALINE PULPING CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Jiang,

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory-scale agglomeration experiments followed by image analysis were used to evaluate the effectiveness of different cationic surfactants on the 1-octadecanol agglomeration of a negatively charged laser toner. Various types of surfactants with different geometric structures were investigated. It was found that this toner became agglomerated under neutral pulping conditions, but it did not agglomerate under alkaline conditions at all. A small amount of the cationic surfactant compensated for the agglomeration disruption caused by the negative surface charge of the toner and made this toner agglomerate very well. These cationic surfactants consist of a chemical structure of C12 to C18 saturated alkyl hydrophobic chains. The positive charge of these surfactants played the major role in alleviating agglomeration disruption. Additionally, an extra phenol group on these surfactants contributed only minor advantages for toner agglomeration in the presence of 1-octadecanol. The best co-agglomeration performance occurred within a very narrow range of similar total positive charge densities based on the total toner weight. It was also found that this positive charge effect could not be applied to the chemical compounds of high molecular weight polymeric materials.

  3. Hydrogen Bond Acceptors and Additional Cationic Charges in Methylene Blue Derivatives: Photophysics and Antimicrobial Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felgenträger, Ariane; Maisch, Tim; Dobler, Daniel; Späth, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Photodynamic inactivation of bacteria (PIB) by efficient singlet oxygen photosensitizers might be a beneficial alternative to antibiotics in the struggle against multiresistant bacteria. Phenothiazinium dyes belong to the most prominent classes of such sensitizers due to their intense absorption in the red-light region (λ abs, max ca. 600–680 nm, ε > 50000 L mol−1 cm−1), their low toxicity, and their attachment/penetration abilities. Except simple substituents like alkyl or hydroxyalkyl residues, nearly no modifications of the phenothiaziniums have been pursued at the auxochromic sites. By this, the properties of methylene blue derivatives and their fields of application are limited; it remains unclear if their potential antimicrobial efficacy may be enhanced, also to compete with porphyrins. We prepared a set of six mainly novel methylene blue derivatives with the ability of additional hydrogen bonding and/or additional cationic charges to study the substituents' effect on their activity/toxicity profiles and photophysical properties. Direct detection of singlet oxygen was performed at 1270 nm and the singlet oxygen quantum yields were determined. In suspensions with both, Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, some derivatives were highly active upon illumination to inactivate S. aureus and E. coli up to 7 log10 steps (99.99999%) without inherent toxicities in the nonirradiated state. PMID:23509728

  4. Effect of alterations in glomerular charge on deposition of cationic and anionic antibodies to fixed glomerular antigens in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, S; Baker, P; Pritzl, P; Couser, W G

    1985-07-01

    Reduction of the negative charge of the glomerular capillary wall alters its charge- and size-selective properties. To investigate the effect of alteration in glomerular charge properties on antibody localization, we prepared cationic and anionic fractions of antibodies to subepithelial and glomerular basement membrane (GBM) antigens, and compared their deposition in normal rats and rats treated with protamine sulfate or aminonucleoside of puromycin to reduce capillary wall charge. IgG antibodies were eluted from kidneys of rats with active Heymann's nephritis (AICN), passive Heymann's nephritis (PHN), or anti-GBM nephritis (NTN), separated into cationic and anionic fractions, and radiolabeled with iodine 125 or iodine 131. Relative antibody content of each fraction was determined by incubation with an excess of glomerular antigen. Varying amounts of cationic and anionic IgG eluted from kidneys of rats with AICN or PHN were injected into 24 normal or protamine sulfate-treated rats. Glomerular binding of all antibodies was highly correlated with IgG delivery to the kidney. The ratio of cationic to anionic antibody deposited in the glomeruli of normal rats after 4 hours was 1.08 +/- 0.07 for AICN eluate and 0.37 +/- 0.04 for PHN eluate. The ratios were not significantly different in animals pretreated with protamine sulfate (1.15 +/- 0.06 and 0.44 +/- 0.06, respectively; P greater than 0.05). Varying amounts of cationic and anionic IgG eluted from kidneys of rats with NTN were injected into 10 normal rats and four rats treated with aminonucleoside of puromycin. Glomerular binding of antibody was again highly correlated with IgG delivery to the kidney. The ratio of cationic to anionic antibody deposited in the glomeruli of normal rats after 1 hour was 1.03 +/- 0.06, and was not significantly altered in rats treated with aminonucleoside of puromycin (1.05 +/- 0.03, P greater than 0.5). Proteinuria in PHN rats was also unaffected by treatment with protamine sulfate for

  5. Cation-mediated conversion of the state of charge in uranium arene inverted-sandwich complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camp, Clement; Mougel, Victor; Pecaut, Jacques; Mazzanti, Marinella [Laboratoire de Reconnaissance Ionique et Chimie de Coordination, SCIB, UMR-E3 CEA-UJF, INAC, CEA-Grenoble (France); Maron, Laurent [LCPNO, CNRS and INSA, UPS, Universite de Toulouse (France)

    2013-12-16

    Two new arene inverted-sandwich complexes of uranium supported by siloxide ancillary ligands [K{U(OSi(OtBu)_3)_3}{sub 2}(μ-η{sup 6}:η{sup 6}-C{sub 7}H{sub 8})] (3) and [K{sub 2}{U(OSi(OtBu)_3)_3}{sub 2}(μ-η{sup 6}:η{sup 6}-C{sub 7}H{sub 8})] (4) were synthesized by the reduction of the parent arene-bridged complex [{U(OSi(OtBu)_3)_3}{sub 2}(μ-η{sup 6}:η{sup 6}-C{sub 7}H{sub 8})] (2) with stoichiometric amounts of KC{sub 8} yielding a rare family of inverted-sandwich complexes in three states of charge. The structural data and computational studies of the electronic structure are in agreement with the presence of high-valent uranium centers bridged by a reduced tetra-anionic toluene with the best formulation being U{sup V}-(arene{sup 4-})-U{sup V}, KU{sup IV}-(arene{sup 4-})-U{sup V}, and K{sub 2}U{sup IV}-(arene{sup 4-})-U{sup IV} for complexes 2, 3, and 4 respectively. The potassium cations in complexes 3 and 4 are coordinated to the siloxide ligands both in the solid state and in solution. The addition of KOTf (OTf=triflate) to the neutral compound 2 promotes its disproportionation to yield complexes 3 and 4 (depending on the stoichiometry) and the U{sup IV} mononuclear complex [U(OSi(OtBu){sub 3}){sub 3}(OTf)(thf){sub 2}] (5). This unprecedented reactivity demonstrates the key role of potassium for the stability of these complexes. (Copyright copyright 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  6. The K-meson form factor and charge radius: linking low-energy data to future high-energy Jefferson Laboratory results

    CERN Document Server

    Krutov, A F; Troitsky, V E

    2016-01-01

    Starting from a successful model of the $\\pi$-meson electromagnetic form factor, we calculate the similar form factor, f_K(Q^2), of the charged K meson for a wide range of the momentum transfer squared, Q^2. The only remaining free parameter is to be determined from the measurements of the K-meson charge radius, r_K. We fit this single parameter to the published data of the NA-7 experiment which measured f_K(Q^2) at Q^2->0 and determine our preferred range of r_K, which happens to be close to recent lattice results. Still, the accuracy in the determination of r_K is poor. However, future measurements of the K-meson electromagnetic form factor at Q^2<~5.5 GeV^2, scheduled in Jefferson Laboratory for 2017, will test our approach and will reduce the uncertainty in r_K significantly.

  7. Measurements of CP Violation and Neutral Kaon Charge Radius using K(L) → π+π-e+e- Decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golossanov, Alexander [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2005-05-01

    CP violation and K{sup 0} charge radius were measured using KL → π+π-e+e- decays. Specifically, a unique CP-violating decay-plane asymmetry was measured along with the parameters of individual contributions to the decay invariant amplitude: (1) CP-conserving magnetic dipole direct emission form factor, (2) CP-conserving K0 charge radius transition amplitude and (3) an upper limit for the CP-violating electric dipole direct emission amplitude. The measurements were obtained from the data sample accumulated by KTeV experiment at Fermilab. KTeV had two major goals: the measurement of direct CP violation parameter Re(ϵ'/ϵ) and the study of rare kaon decays. The state of the art detector was constructed, commissioned, operated and maintained by an international collaboration of scientists from fourteen institutions. The KL → π+π-e+e-L decays took place in the KTeV fiducial decay region.

  8. High-pressure systematic of NaMe3+Si2O6 pyroxenes: volume compression vs Me3+ cation radius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periotto, Benedetta; Nestola, Fabrizio; Balic-Zunic, Tonci; Pasqual, Daria; Alvaro, Matteo; Ohashi, Haruo

    2010-05-01

    strongly the softest one (as expected for cpx) and a and c axes compressing by similar rates. Using a third-order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state (BM3) to fit the pressure - unit-cell volume data we could refine simultaneously the unit-cell volume V0, the room pressure bulk modulus KT0 and its first pressure derivative K'. Using EoSFIT5.2 software we obtained the following coefficients: V0 = 463.42(3) Å3, KT0 = 109.0(6) GPa, K' = 3.3(2). In order to obtain a reliable comparison among NaMe3+Si2O6 pyroxenes, we have plotted the relative compression V/V0 calculated to 10 GPa versus the cation radius of Me3+ site for NaVSi2O6, NaAlSi2O6, NaCrSi2O6, NaFe3+Si2O6 end-members (all C2/c space group). For the NaTiSi2O6 end-member we have performed such calculation using the published P-V data up to 4.34 GPa as at greater pressures this cpx transforms to a triclinic symmetry and cannot be considered for a comparison. According to this comparison, a perfect linear relation is showed for those cpx having a 3d-transition element at Me3+ site, while those cpx with Al and In at Me3+ site totally lie out of trend. In good agreement with a previous work on CaMe2+Si2O6 C2/c compounds (Me2+ = Mg, Fe, Ni), the results of this work confirm that the empirical KT0 * V0 = constant relationship is followed in C2/c cpx only if the same valence electron character is shared and provide a definitive model for (Ca,Na)(Me2+,Me3+)Si2O6 clinopyroxene compounds.

  9. A simple connection of the (electroweak) anapole moment with the (electroweak) charge radius of a massless left-handed Dirac neutrino

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosado, A. [Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Puebla (Mexico)

    2001-04-01

    Assuming that the neutrino is a massless left-handed Dirac particle, we show that the neutrino anapole moment and the neutrino charge radius satisfy the simple relation a{sub v} =(r{sup 2}{sub v}) /6, in the context of the Standard Model of the electroweak interactions. We also show that the neutrino electroweak anapole moment a{sub v}l{sup E}W and the neutrino electroweak charge radius (r{sup 2}{sub v}){sup E}W, which have been defined through the v{sub l}l' scattering at the one-loop level and are physical quantities, also obey the relation a{sub v}l{sup E}W =(r{sup 2}{sub v}){sup E}W/6. [Spanish] Suponiendo que el neutrino es una particula de Dirac, sin masa y con helicidad izquierda, mostramos que el momento anapolar a{sub v} y el radio de carga (r{sub v}{sup 2}) del neutrino satisfacen la relacion simple a{sub v} =(r{sup 2}{sub v}) /6, en el contexto del Modelo Estandar de las interacciones electrodebiles. Ademas, mostramos que el momento anapolar electrodebil a{sub v}l{sup E}W y el radio de carga electrodebil (r{sup 2}{sub v}){sup E}W del neutrino, los cuales han sido definidos a traves de la dispersion v{sub l}l' a nivel de un lazo y que son cantidades fisicas, tambien obedecen la relacion a{sub v}l{sup E}W =(r{sup 2}{sub v}){sup E}W/6.

  10. Nongeminate Radiative Recombination of Free Charges in Cation-Exchanged PbS Quantum Dot Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, Ashley R.; Beard, Matthew C.; Johnson, Justin C.

    2016-06-01

    Using photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy we explore the radiative recombination pathways in PbS quantum dots (QDs) synthesized by two methods. We compare conventionally synthesized PbS from a PbO precursor to PbS synthesized using cation-exchange from CdS QDs. We show that strongly coupled films of PbS QDs from the cation-exchange luminesce with significant efficiency at room temperature. This is in stark contrast to conventional PbS QDs, which have exceedingly weak room temperature emission. Moreover, the power dependence of the emission is quadratic, indicating bimolecular radiative recombination that is reasonably competitive with trap-assisted recombination, a feature previously unreported in coupled PbS QD films. We interpret these results in terms of a greatly reduced defect concentration for cation-exchanged QDs that mitigates the influence of trap-assisted recombination. Cation-exchanged QDs have recently been employed in highly efficient and air-stable lead chalcogenide QD devices, and the reduced number of trap states inferred here may lead to improved current collection and higher open circuit voltage.

  11. The Proton Radius Puzzle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Downie E. J.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The proton radius puzzle is the difference between the proton radius as measured with electron scattering and in the excitation spectrum of atomic hydrogen, and that measured with muonic hydrogen spectroscopy. Since the inception of the proton radius puzzle in 2010 by the measurement of Pohl et al.[1], many possible resolutions to the puzzle have been postulated, but, to date, none has been generally accepted. New data are therefore necessary to resolve the issue. We briefly review the puzzle, the proposed solutions, and the new electron scattering and spectroscopy experiments planned and underway. We then introduce the MUSE experiment, which seeks to resolve the puzzle by simultaneously measuring elastic electron and muon scattering on the proton, in both charge states, thereby providing new information to the puzzle. MUSE addresses issues of two-photon effects, lepton universality and, possibly, new physics, while providing simultaneous form factor, and therefore radius, measurements with both muons and electrons.

  12. Recharging cationic DNA complexes with highly charged polyanions for in vitro and in vivo gene delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trubetskoy, V S; Wong, S C; Subbotin, V; Budker, V G; Loomis, A; Hagstrom, J E; Wolff, J A

    2003-02-01

    The intravenous delivery of plasmid DNA complexed with either cationic lipids (CL) or polyethyleneimine (PEI) enables high levels of foreign gene expression in lung. However, these cationic DNA complexes cause substantial toxicity. The present study found that the inclusion of polyacrylic acid (pAA) with DNA/polycation and DNA/CL complexes prevented the serum inhibition of the transfection complexes in cultured cells. The mechanism mediating this increase seems to involve both particle size enlargement due to flocculation and electrostatic shielding from opsonizing serum proteins. The use of pAA also increased the levels of lung expression in mice in vivo substantially above the levels achieved with just binary complexes of DNA and linear PEI (lPEI) or CL and reduced their toxicity. Also, the use of a "chaser" injection of pAA 30 min after injection of the ternary DNA/lPEI/pAA complexes further aided this effort to reduce toxicity while not affecting foreign gene expression. By optimizing the amount of pAA, lPEI, and DNA within the ternary complexes and using the "chaser" injection, substantial levels of lung expression were obtained while avoiding adverse effects in lung or liver. These developments will aid the use of cationic DNA complexes in animals and for eventual human gene therapy.

  13. The lightest organic radical cation for charge storage in redox flow batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Jinhua; Pan, Baofei; Duan, Wentao; Wei, Xiaoliang; Assary, Rajeev S.; Su, Liang; Brushett, Fikile; Cheng, Lei; Liao, Chen; Ferrandon, Magali S.; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Zhengcheng; Burrell, Anthony K.; Curtiss, Larry A.; Shkrob, Ilya A.; Moore, Jeffrey S.; Zhang, Lu

    2016-08-25

    Electrochemically reversible fluids of high energy density are promising materials for capturing the electrical energy generated from intermittent sources like solar and wind. To meet this technological challenge there is a need to understand the fundamental limits and interplay of electrochemical potential, stability and solubility in “lean” derivatives of redox-active molecules. Here we describe the process of molecular pruning, illustrated for 2,5-di-tert-butyl-1,4-bis(2-methoxyethoxy)benzene, a molecule known to produce a persistently stable, high-potential radical cation. By systematically shedding molecular fragments considered important for radical cation steric stabilization, we discovered a minimalistic structure that retains long-term stability in its oxidized form. Interestingly, we find the tert-butyl groups are unnecessary; high stability of the radical cation and high solubility are both realized in derivatives having appropriately positioned arene methyl groups. These stability trends are rationalized by mechanistic considerations of the postulated decomposition pathways. We suggest that the molecular pruning approach will uncover lean redox active derivatives for electrochemical energy storage leading to materials with long-term stability and high intrinsic capacity.

  14. Charge state dependent fragmentation of gaseous [alpha]-synuclein cations via ion trap and beam-type collisional activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanthamontri, Chamnongsak; Liu, Jian; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2009-06-01

    Ions derived from nano-electrospray ionization (nano-ESI) of [alpha]-synuclein, a 14.5 kDa, 140 amino acid residue protein that is a major component of the Lewy bodies associated with Parkinson's disease, have been subjected to ion trap and beam-type collisional activation. The former samples products from fragmentation at rates generally lower than 100 s-1 whereas the latter samples products from fragmentation at rates generally greater than 103 s-1. A wide range of protein charge states spanning from as high as [M+17H]17+ to as low as [M+4H]4+ have been formed either directly from nano-ESI or via ion/ion proton transfer reactions involving the initially formed protein cations and have been subjected to both forms of collision-induced dissociation (CID). The extent of sequence information (i.e., number of distinct amide bond cleavages) available from either CID method was found to be highly sensitive to protein precursor ion charge state. Furthermore, the relative contributions of the various competing dissociation channels were also dependent upon precursor ion charge state. The qualitative trends in the changes in extent of amide bond cleavages and identities of bonds cleaved with precursor ion charge state were similar for two forms of CID. However, for every charge state examined, roughly twice the primary sequence information resulted from beam-type CID relative to ion trap CID. For example, evidence for cleavage of 86% of the protein amide bonds was observed for the [M+9H]9+ precursor ion using beam-type CID whereas 41% of the bonds were cleaved for the same precursor ion using ion trap CID. The higher energies required to drive fragmentation reactions at rates necessary to observe products in the beam experiment access more of the structurally informative fragmentation channels, which has important implications for whole protein tandem mass spectrometry.

  15. Energetics and bonding in aluminosilicate rings with alkali metal and alkaline-earth metal charge-compensating cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatti, Carlo; Ottonello, Giulio; Richet, Pascal

    2012-08-23

    The stabilizing effect of alkali and alkaline-earth metal ions on the oxygen donors of four- and six-membered faujausite-like rings has been calculated in terms of Kohn-Sham core-level (O1s) energy shifts with respect to these same complexes without cations. The results confirm and complement earlier investigations by Vayssilov and co-workers where Na(+) and K(+) were the only complexing cations. The oxygen donor centers in six-membered rings are stabilized by -3.6 ± 0.4, -3.9 ± 0.5, -7.3 ± 0.1, and -7.6 ± 0.2 eV by K(+), Na(+), Ca(2+), and Mg(2+) adions, respectively. The energy shifts are even greater for four-membered rings where the stabilization effects attain -3.7 ± 0.1, -4.1 ± 0.1, -8.1 ± 0.1, and -9.0 ± 0.1 eV, respectively. These effects are also observed on the low-lying σ-bonding and antibonding molecular orbitals (MOs) of the oxygen framework, but in a less systematic fashion. Clear relationships with the core-level shifts are found when the effects of alkali metal complexation are evaluated through electron localization/delocalization indices, which are defined in terms of the whole wave function and not just of the individual orbitals. Complexation with cations not only involves a small but significant electron sharing of the cation with the oxygen atoms in the ring but also enhances electron exchange among oxygen atoms while reducing that between the O atoms and the Si or Al atoms bonded to them. Such changes slightly increase from Na to K and from Mg to Ca, whereas they are significantly enhanced for alkaline-earth metals relative to alkali metals. With respect to Al-free complexes, Si/Al substitution and cation charge compensation generally enhance electron delocalization among the O atoms, except between those that are linked through an Al atom, and cause either an increased or a decreased Si-O ionicity (smaller/higher electron exchange) depending on the position of O in the chain relative to the Al atom(s). The generally increased

  16. Charge Control in Two Isostructural Anionic/Cationic Co(II) Coordination Frameworks for Enhanced Acetylene Capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Di-Ming; Tian, Jia-Yue; Liu, Chun-Sen; Chen, Min; Du, Miao

    2016-10-10

    Two isostructural Co(II) -based metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) with the opposite framework charges have been constructed, which can be simply controlled by changing the tetrazolyl or triazolyl terminal in two bifunctional ligands. Notably, the cationic MOF 2 can adsorb much more C2 H2 than the anionic MOF 1 with an increase of 88 % for C2 H2 uptake at 298 K in spite of more active nitrogen sites in 1. Theoretical calculations indicate that both nitrate and triazolyl play vital roles in C2 H2 binding and the C2 H2 adsorption isotherm confirms that the enhanced C2 H2 uptake for 2 (225 and 163 cm(3) g(-1) at 273 and 298 K) is exceptionally high for MOF materials without open metal sites or uncoordinated polar atom groups on the frameworks. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Actinide cation-cation complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoyer, Nancy Jane [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    The +5 oxidation state of U, Np, Pu, and Am is a linear dioxo cation (AnO2+) with a formal charge of +1. These cations form complexes with a variety of other cations, including actinide cations. Other oxidation states of actinides do not form these cation-cation complexes with any cation other than AnO2+; therefore, cation-cation complexes indicate something unique about AnO2+ cations compared to actinide cations in general. The first cation-cation complex, NpO2+•UO22+, was reported by Sullivan, Hindman, and Zielen in 1961. Of the four actinides that form AnO2+ species, the cation-cation complexes of NpO2+ have been studied most extensively while the other actinides have not. The only PuO2+ cation-cation complexes that have been studied are with Fe3+ and Cr3+ and neither one has had its equilibrium constant measured. Actinides have small molar absorptivities and cation-cation complexes have small equilibrium constants; therefore, to overcome these obstacles a sensitive technique is required. Spectroscopic techniques are used most often to study cation-cation complexes. Laser-Induced Photacoustic Spectroscopy equilibrium constants for the complexes NpO2+•UO22+, NpO2+•Th4+, PuO2+•UO22+, and PuO2+•Th4+ at an ionic strength of 6 M using LIPAS are 2.4 ± 0.2, 1.8 ± 0.9, 2.2 ± 1.5, and ~0.8 M-1.

  18. Integrating high electrical conductivity and photocatalytic activity in cotton fabric by cationizing for enriched coating of negatively charged graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahito, Iftikhar Ali; Sun, Kyung Chul; Arbab, Alvira Ayoub; Qadir, Muhammad Bilal; Jeong, Sung Hoon

    2015-10-01

    Electroconductive textiles have attended tremendous focus recently and researchers are making efforts to increase conductivity of e-textiles, in order to increase the use of such flexible and low cost textile materials. In this study, surface conductivity and photo catalytic activity of standard cotton fabric (SCF) was enhanced by modifying its surface charge, from negative to positive, using Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) as a cationic agent, to convert it into cationised cotton fabric (CCF). Then, both types of fabrics were dip coated with a simple dip and dry technique for the adsorption of negatively charged graphene oxide (GO) sheets onto its surface. This resulted in 67.74% higher loading amount of GO on the CCF making self-assembly. Finally, this coating was chemically converted by vapor reduction using hydrazine hydrate to reduced graphene oxide (rGO) for restoration of a high electrical conductivity at the fabric surface. Our results revealed that with such high loading of GO, the surface resistance of CCF was only 40Ω/sq as compared to 510Ω/sq of the SCF and a 66% higher photo catalytic activity was also achieved through cationization for improved GO coating. Graphene coated SCF and CCF were characterized using FE-SEM, FTIR, Raman, UV-vis, WAXD, EDX and XPS spectroscopy to ascertain successful reduction of GO to rGO. The effect of BSA treatment on adsorption of cotton fabric was studied using drop shape analyzer to measure contact angle and for thermal and mechanical resistance, the fabric was tested for TGA and tensile strength, respectively. rGO coated fabric also showed slightly improved thermal stability yet a minor loss of strength was observed. The high flexibility, photocatalytic activity and excellent conductivity of this fabric suggests that it can be used as an electrode material for various applications.

  19. Electrostatic protein immobilization using charged polyacrylamide gels and cationic detergent microfluidic Western blotting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dohyun; Karns, Kelly; Tia, Samuel Q; He, Mei; Herr, Amy E

    2012-03-06

    We report a novel protein immobilization matrix for fully integrated microfluidic Western blotting (WB). The electrostatic immobilization gel (EIG) enables immobilization of all proteins sized using cetyl trimethylammonium bromide polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (CTAB-PAGE), for subsequent electrophoretic probing with detection affinity reagents (e.g., labeled antibodies). The "pan-analyte" capture strategy introduced here uses polyacrylamide gel grafted with concentrated point charges (zwitterionic macromolecules), in contrast to existing microfluidic WB strategies that rely on a sandwich immunoassay format for analyte immobilization and detection. Sandwich approaches limit analyte immobilization to capture of only a priori known targets. A charge interaction mechanism study supports the hypothesis that electrostatic interaction plays a major role in analyte immobilization on the EIG. We note that protein capture efficiency depends on both the concentration of copolymerized charges and ionic strength of the gel buffer. We demonstrate pan-analyte immobilization of sized CTAB-laden model proteins (protein G, ovalbumin, bovine serum albumin, β-galactosidase, lactoferrin) on the EIG with initial capture efficiencies ranging from 21 to 100%. Target proteins fixed on the EIG (protein G, lactoferrin) are detected using antibody probes with signal-to-noise ratios of 34 to 275. The approach advances protein immunoblotting performance through 200× reduction on sample consumption, 12× reduction in assay duration, and automated assay operation, compared to slab-gel WB. Using the microfluidic WB assay, assessment of lactoferrin in human tear fluid is demonstrated with a goal of advancing toward nonbiopsy-based diagnosis of Sjögren's Syndrome, an autoimmune disease.

  20. Charge transfer and mixed-valence behavior in phtalocyanine-dimer cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monari, Antonio; Evangelisti, Stefano; Leininger, Thierry

    2010-09-28

    Phtalocyanine compounds deserved a considerable interest in recent times, particularly because of their possible use in the field of nanoelectronics. In particular, the charge mobility (of both electrons and holes) in phtalocyanine stacked arrangements has been recently extensively investigated. The present work focuses on the study of the hole-transfer mechanism between two phtalocyanine monomers. For an interdisk distance larger than 4.5 bohrs, the eclipsed dimer exhibits a mixed-valence behavior, with a saddle point transition state separating two equivalent minima. This behavior, however, is strongly dependent on the relative angle between the disks. In particular, the mixed-valence character of the compound is strongly enhanced for arrangements that are far from the eclipsed geometry. Moreover, for values of the angle close to π/8 and 3π/8, the ground and excited transition states have exactly the same energy, thus implying the presence of a conical intersection. These results can have deep implication in the charge transfer along phtalocyanine chains.

  1. Interaction of cationic hydrophobic surfactants at negatively charged surfaces investigated by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamee, Cathy E; Butt, Hans-Jürgen; Higashitani, Ko; Vakarelski, Ivan U; Kappl, Michael

    2009-10-06

    Atomic force microscopy was used to study the adsorption of the surfactant octadecyl trimethyl ammonium chloride (C18TAC) at a low concentration (0.03 mM) to negatively charged surfaces in water. Atomic force microscopy tips were functionalized with dimethyloctadecyl(3-tripropyl)ammonium chloride (C18TAC-si) or N-trimethoxysilylpropyl-N,N,N-trimethylammomium chloride (hydrophilpos-si) to facilitate imaging of the adsorbed surfactant without artifacts. Tapping mode images and force measurements revealed C18TAC patches, identified as partial surfactant bilayers or hemimicelles. The forces controlling the adsorption process of the C18TAC to a negatively charged surface were investigated by measuring the forces between a C18TAC-si or a hydrophilpos-si tip and a silica surface in the presence of varying concentrations of either NaCl or NaNO3. Screening of forces with an increasing NaCl concentration was observed for the C18TAC-si and hydrophilpos-si tips, proving an electrostatic contribution. Screening was also observed for the hydrophilpos-si tip in NaNO3, whereas a long-range attraction was observed for the C18TAC-si tip for all NaNO3 concentrations. These results indicate that screening of the forces for the C18TAC-si tip depended on the type and/or size of the anion, possibly due to a different probability of the anions to enter the silane layers. The interaction of C18TAC patches with C18TAC-si tips in the presence of NaCl and the interaction of the patches with hydrophilpos-si tips in either NaCl or NaNO3 were repulsive and independent of the number of force curves measured, indicating a stable, positively charged C18TAC patch. However, the forces measured between the patches and a C18TAC-si tip in NaNO3 depended on the number of force curves measured, indicating a change in patch structure induced by the first interaction.

  2. Novel doubly charged cation based electrolytes for non-aqueous supercapacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaenes, Alar; Kurig, Heisi; Romann, Tavo; Lust, Enn [Institute of Chemistry, University of Tartu, 14a Ravila Street, 50411 Tartu (Estonia)

    2010-04-15

    The electrochemical characteristics for the electrical double layer capacitors based on the titanium carbide derived carbon (CDC-TiC) electrodes in 0.4 M N,N-dimethyl-1,4-diazabicyclo[2,2,2]octanediium tetrafluoroborate (DMDABCO(BF{sub 4}){sub 2}), 0.2 M DMDABCO(BF{sub 4}){sub 2} + 0.2 M triethylmethylammonium tetrafluoroborate (TEMABF{sub 4}), and 0.4 M TEMABF{sub 4} in {gamma}-butyrolactone ({gamma}-BL) have been studied using cyclic voltammetry, constant current charging/discharging and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The ideal electrical double layer capacitor behaviour was observed in a wide region of cell voltages (U {<=} 3.0 V) for the CDC-TiC electrodes in 0.4 M DMDABCO(BF{sub 4}){sub 2} in {gamma}-BL. The geometry of solvation shells around DMDABCO{sup 2+}, TEMA{sup +}, and BF{sub 4}{sup -} have been optimized with molecular dynamics calculations and the coordination numbers equal to 15, 7 or 8, respectively, have been proposed and compared with electrochemical and gas sorption data for CDC-TiC. The gravimetric capacitance (129 F g{sup -1}), high gravimetric energy (40.6 Wh kg{sup -1}) and power (93 kW kg{sup -1}) were established for the CDC-TiC electrodes in 0.4 M DMDABCO(BF{sub 4}){sub 2} {gamma}-BL solution. (author)

  3. 22C charge radius prediction: Addendum and erratum to “Constraints on two-neutron separation energy in the Borromean 22C nucleus” [Phys. Lett. B 697 (1) (2011) 90-93

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, M. T.; Marques de Carvalho, R. S.; Frederico, T.; Tomio, Lauro

    2012-08-01

    Relevant to experimental investigations on the 22C properties, we are correcting numerical results presented in [M.T. Yamashita, R.S. Marques de Carvalho, T. Frederico, L. Tomio, Phys. Lett. B 697 (2011) 90], updating our estimate for the two-neutron separation energy, and adding the charge radius prediction for this halo nucleus with respect to 20C: √{ - } ≳ 0.9 fm.

  4. Ion transport with charge-protected and non-charge-protected cations in alcohol-based electrolytes using the compensated Arrhenius formalism. Part I: ionic conductivity and the static dielectric constant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrowsky, Matt; Fleshman, Allison; Frech, Roger

    2012-05-17

    The temperature dependence of ionic conductivity and the static dielectric constant is examined for 0.30 m TbaTf- or LiTf-1-alcohol solutions. Above ambient temperature, the conductivity increases with temperature to a greater extent in electrolytes whose salt has a charge-protected cation. Below ambient temperature, the dielectric constant changes only slightly with temperature in electrolytes whose salt has a cation that is not charge-protected. The compensated Arrhenius formalism is used to describe the temperature-dependent conductivity in terms of the contributions from both the exponential prefactor σo and Boltzmann factor exp(-Ea/RT). This analysis explains why the conductivity decreases with increasing temperature above 65 °C for the LiTf-dodecanol electrolyte. At higher temperatures, the decrease in the exponential prefactor is greater than the increase in the Boltzmann factor.

  5. The impact of Au doping on the charge carrier dynamics at the interfaces between cationic porphyrin and silver nanoclusters

    KAUST Repository

    Almansaf, Abdulkhaleq A.

    2017-02-04

    We explore the impact of Au doping on the charge transfer dynamics between the positively charged porphyrin (TMPyP) and negatively charged silver nanoclusters (Ag29 NCs). Our transient absorption (TA) spectroscopic results demonstrate that the interfacial charge transfer, the intersystem crossing and the triplet state lifetime of porphyrin can be tuned by the doping of Au atoms in Ag29 NCs. Additionally, we found that the electrostatic interaction between the negative charge of the cluster and the positive charge on the TMPyP is the driving force that brings them close to each other for complex formation and subsequently facilitates the transfer process.

  6. Energy decomposition analysis of cation-π, metal ion-lone pair, hydrogen bonded, charge-assisted hydrogen bonded, and π-π interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Bhaskar; Srivastava, Hemant Kumar; Gayatri, Gaddamanugu; Sastry, Garikapati Narahari

    2015-03-30

    This study probes the nature of noncovalent interactions, such as cation-π, metal ion-lone pair (M-LP), hydrogen bonding (HB), charge-assisted hydrogen bonding (CAHB), and π-π interactions, using energy decomposition schemes-density functional theory (DFT)-symmetry-adapted perturbation theory and reduced variational space. Among cation-π complexes, the polarization and electrostatic components are the major contributors to the interaction energy (IE) for metal ion-π complexes, while for onium ion-π complexes (NH4+, PH4+, OH3+, and SH3+) the dispersion component is prominent. For M-LP complexes, the electrostatic component contributes more to the IE except the dicationic metal ion complexes with H2 S and PH3 where the polarization component dominates. Although electrostatic component dominates for the HB and CAHB complexes, dispersion is predominant in π-π complexes.

  7. The Extent of Disorder among Charge-balancing Cations in Silicate Glasses and Melts: Spectroscopic Analysis and ab initio Molecular Orbital Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S.; Doyle, C. S.; Stebbins, J. F.

    2001-12-01

    Aluminosilicate melts are one of the dominant components in upper mantle and crust. Essential to the thermodynamic and transport properties of these systems is the full understanding on the atomic arrangements and the extent of disorder. Recent quantification of the extent of disorder among 'framework cations' in silicate melts using NMR provided improved prospects on the atomic structure of the glasses and melt and their corresponding properties and allowed the degree of randomness to be evaluated in terms of the degree of Al-avoidance (Q) and degree of phase separations (P) (Lee and Stebbins, J. Phys. Chem. B 104, 4091; Lee and Stebbins, GCA in press). Quantitative estimation of the extent of disorder among 'charge-balancing cations' including Na in aluminosilicate glasses, however, has remained an unsolved problem and these cations have often been assumed to be randomly distributed. Here, we explore the intermediate range order around Na in charge-balanced aluminosilicate glasses using Na-23 NMR and Near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) with full multiple scattering (FMS) simulations combined with ab initio molecular orbital calculations. We also quantify the extent of disorder in charge balancing cations as a function of Na-O bond length (d(Na-O)) distribution with composition and present a structural model favoring ordered Na distributions. Peak position in Na-23 magic angle spinning (MAS) spectra of aluminosilicate glasses with varying R (Si/Al) at 14.1 T varies from -10.28 ppm (R = 0.7) to -19.98 ppm (R = 6). These results suggest that average d(Na-O) increases with increasing R, which is confirmed by Na-23 multiple quantum MAS spectra where the chemical shift moves toward lower frequency with increasing Si and shows the individual Gaussian components of Na-O distributions such as Na-(Al-O-Al), Na-(Si-O-Al) and Na-(Si-O-Si). Calculated d(Na-(Al-O-Al)) of 2.57 Å is shorter than d(Na-(Si-O-Si)) of 2.88 Å. Strong compositional dependence is

  8. Accidental degeneracy in the spiropyran radical cation : charge transfer between two orthogonal rings inducing ultra-efficient reactivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mendive-Tapia, David; Kortekaas, Luuk; Steen, Jorn D.; Perrier, Aurelie; Lasorne, Benjamin; Browne, Wesley R.; Jacquemin, Denis

    2016-01-01

    Photochromism of the spiropyran radical cation to the corresponding merocyanine form is investigated by a combination of electrochemical oxidation, UV/vis absorption spectroscopy, spectroelectrochemistry and first-principles calculations (TD-DFT, CAS-SCF and CAS-PT2). First, we demonstrate that the

  9. Interactions between liposomes and cations in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruso, Juan M; Besada, Lina; Martínez-Landeira, Pablo; Seoane, Laura; Prieto, Gerardo; Sarmiento, Félix

    2003-05-01

    An investigation on the dependence of electrophoretic mobilities of unilamellar vesicles of phosphatidylcholine-cholesterol-phosphatidylinositol (PC-Chol-PI) on the concentration of several cations with variations in the relation charge/radius in the range Na+, K+, Cs+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Ba2+, Al3+, and La3+ has been realized. Plots of zeta potential against ion concentration exhibit a maximum for all the cations under study, the position of the maximum is greatly affected by the charge of the ion. From the feature of these plots two phenomenon were observed: an initial binding of cations into the slipping plane for ion concentration below the maximum and a phenomenon of vesicle association for concentration above the maximum. To confirm these observations measurements on dynamic light scattering were performed to obtain the corresponding size distribution of the liposomes at different ion concentrations. Finally the ability of the Stern isotherm to describe the adsorption of the cations to vesicles was tested by two methods. The two main parameters of the theory: the total number of adsorption sites per unit area, N1, and the equilibrium constant, K; (and consequently the free energy of adsorption, deltaG0ads) were calculated for the different ions, showing good agreement. The equilibrium constants of adsorption have been found to obey a linear relationship with ion radius the slope of which decreases with the ion charge.

  10. Determination of Charge Density of Cationic Starch by Colloidal Titration%胶体滴定法测定阳离子淀粉的电荷密度

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴宗华; 陈少平

    2001-01-01

    A particle charge detector (PCD) was applied to determine the end point of collo idal titration for cationic starch having small charge density.The results showe d that the curve of streaming potential indicated sharply the end point of titrati on for cationic starch.Degree of substitution obtained from colloidal titration was in good agreement with that determined by Kjeldahl method.%应用粒子电荷测定仪(PCD)的流动电位变化判定阳离子淀粉胶体滴定的终点。结果表明流 动电位曲线敏锐地指示了低电荷密度的阳离子淀粉胶体滴定的终点。测得的阳离子淀粉的取 代度与国标凯氏定氮法测得的数值相近,最大偏差为0.003。

  11. Effect of A-site cation size on magnetic and charge-ordering properties of Ln{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}Mn{sub 0.9}Cu{sub 0.1}O{sub 3} (Ln = La, Pr, Nd, or Ho)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadav, Kamlesh [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee 247667 (India); Singh, M.P.; Razavi, F.S. [Department of Physics, Brock University, 500 Glenridge Ave, St Catharines L2S 3A1 (Canada); Varma, G.D., E-mail: gdvarfph@iitr.ernet.in [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee 247667 (India)

    2012-08-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structural, magnetic, and electrical properties of Ln{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}Mn{sub 0.9}Cu{sub 0.1}O{sub 3} (Ln = La, Pr, Nd, or Ho) have been studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The influence of A-site cation radius ( Left-Pointing-Angle-Bracket r{sub A} Right-Pointing-Angle-Bracket ) and the A-site cation size-disorder ({sigma}{sup 2}) on magnetic properties are studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The various interdependent phenomena such as ferromagnetism, phase separation, and charge ordering are investigated. - Abstract: The structural, magnetic, and electrical properties of Ln{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}Mn{sub 0.9}Cu{sub 0.1}O{sub 3} (Ln = La, Pr, Nd, or Ho) perovskite manganites have been investigated to explore the influence of A-site cation radius ( Left-Pointing-Angle-Bracket r{sub A} Right-Pointing-Angle-Bracket ) and the A-site cation size-disorder ({sigma}{sup 2}) on the various interdependent phenomena such as ferromagnetism (FM), phase separation (PS), and charge ordering (CO). The temperature dependence magnetization (M-T) curve of La-based sample shows four distinct points at {approx}269 K, 255 K, 200 K, and 148 K corresponding to strong FM, cluster glass (CG), weak FM, and charged ordered antiferromagnetic (COAFM) transitions, respectively. Our investigation shows that Neel temperatures (T{sub N}) increases, whereas Curie (T{sub C}) and irreversibility temperatures (T{sub irr}) decrease with decreasing Left-Pointing-Angle-Bracket r{sub A} Right-Pointing-Angle-Bracket , i.e., with increasing {sigma}{sup 2}. Furthermore, the value of the magnetization decreases and resistivity increases with decreasing Left-Pointing-Angle-Bracket r{sub A} Right-Pointing-Angle-Bracket . All samples exhibit insulating behavior in the temperature range 77-300 K and above 110 K the electronic conduction mechanism has been described within the framework of the variable range hopping (VRH) model.

  12. Puzzling out the proton radius puzzle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihovilovič Miha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The discrepancy between the proton charge radius extracted from the muonic hydrogen Lamb shift measurement and the best present value obtained from the elastic scattering experiments, remains unexplained and represents a burning problem of today’s nuclear physics: after more than 50 years of research the radius of a basic constituent of matter is still not understood. This paper presents a summary of the best existing proton radius measurements, followed by an overview of the possible explanations for the observed inconsistency between the hydrogen and the muonic-hydrogen data. In the last part the upcoming experiments, dedicated to remeasuring the proton radius, are described.

  13. Puzzling out the proton radius puzzle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihovilovič, M.; Merkel, H.; Weber, A. [Institut für Kernphysik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, Johann-Joachim-Becher-Weg 45, 55128 Mainz (Germany)

    2016-01-22

    The discrepancy between the proton charge radius extracted from the muonic hydrogen Lamb shift measurement and the best present value obtained from the elastic scattering experiments, remains unexplained and represents a burning problem of today’s nuclear physics: after more than 50 years of research the radius of a basic constituent of matter is still not understood. This paper presents a summary of the best existing proton radius measurements, followed by an overview of the possible explanations for the observed inconsistency between the hydrogen and the muonic-hydrogen data. In the last part the upcoming experiments, dedicated to remeasuring the proton radius, are described.

  14. Ion transport with charge-protected and non-charge-protected cations using the compensated Arrhenius formalism. Part 2. Relationship between ionic conductivity and diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrowsky, Matt; Fleshman, Allison; Bopege, Dharshani N; Frech, Roger

    2012-08-09

    Temperature-dependent ionic conductivities and cation/anion self-diffusion coefficients are measured for four electrolyte families: TbaTf-linear primary alcohols, LiTf-linear primary alcohols, TbaTf-n-alkyl acetates, and LiTf-n-alkyl acetates. The Nernst-Einstein equation does not adequately describe the data. Instead, the compensated Arrhenius formalism is applied to both conductivity and diffusion data. General trends based on temperature and alkyl chain length are observed when conductivity is plotted against cation or anion diffusion coefficient, but there is no clear pattern to the data. However, plotting conductivity exponential prefactors against those for diffusion results in four distinct curves, one each for the alcohol and acetate families described above. Furthermore, the TbaTf-alcohol and TbaTf-acetate data are "in line" with each other. The conductivity prefactors for the LiTf-alcohol data are smaller than those for the TbaTf data. The LiTf-acetate data have the lowest conductivity prefactors. This trend in prefactors mirrors the observed trend in degree of ionic association for these electrolytes.

  15. Soft X-ray absorption spectra of aqueous salt solutions with highly charged cations in liquid microjets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, Craig P.; Uejio, Janel S.; Duffin, Andrew M.; Drisdell, Walter S.; Smith, Jared D.; Saykally, Richard J.

    2010-03-11

    X-ray absorption spectra of 1M aqueous solutions of indium (III) chloride, yttrium (III) bromide, lanthanum (III) chloride, tin (IV) chloride and chromium (III) chloride have been measured at the oxygen K-edge. Relatively minor changes are observed in the spectra compared to that of pure water. SnCl{sub 4} and CrCl{sub 3} exhibit a new onset feature which is attributed to formation of hydroxide or other complex molecules in the solution. At higher energy, only relatively minor, but salt-specific changes in the spectra occur. The small magnitude of the observed spectral changes is ascribed to offsetting perturbations by the cations and anions.

  16. Humic acid adsorption onto cationic cellulose nanofibers for bioinspired removal of copper( ii ) and a positively charged dye

    KAUST Repository

    Sehaqui, H.

    2015-01-01

    © The Royal Society of Chemistry. Waste pulp residues are herein exploited for the synthesis of a sorbent for humic acid (HA), which is a major water pollutant. Cellulose pulp was etherified with a quaternary ammonium salt in water thereby introducing positive charges onto the surface of the pulp fibers, and subsequently mechanically disintegrated into high surface area cellulose nanofibers (CNF). CNF with three different charge contents were produced and their adsorption capacity towards HA was investigated with UV-spectrophotometry, quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation, and ζ-potential measurements. Substantial coverage of the CNF surface with HA in a wide pH range led to a reversal of the positive ζ-potentials of CNF suspensions. The HA adsorption capacity and the kinetics of HA uptake were found to be promoted by both acidic pH conditions and the surface charge content of CNF. It is suggested that HA adsorption onto CNF depends on electrostatic interactions between the two components, as well as on the conformation of HA. At pH ∼ 6, up to 310 mg g-1 of HA were adsorbed by the functionalized CNF, a substantially higher capacity than that of previously reported HA sorbents in the literature. It is further shown that CNF-HA complexes could be freeze-dried into "soil-mimicking" porous foams having good capacity to capture Cu(ii) ions and positive dyes from contaminated water. Thus, the most abundant natural polymer, i.e., cellulose could effectively bind the most abundant natural organic matter for environmental remediation purpose.

  17. Phase behavior and molecular thermodynamics of coacervation in oppositely charged polyelectrolyte/surfactant systems: a cationic polymer JR 400 and anionic surfactant SDS mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongcui; Kelkar, Manish S; Wagner, Norman J

    2012-07-17

    Coacervation in mixtures of polyelectrolytes and surfactants with opposite charge is common in nature and is also technologically important to consumer health care products. To understand the complexation behavior of these systems better, we combine multiple experimental techniques to systematically study the polymer/surfactant binding interactions and the phase behavior of anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) surfactant in cationic JR 400 polymer aqueous solutions. The phase-behavior study resolves a discrepancy in the literature by identifying a metastable phase between the differing redissolution phase boundaries reported in the literature for the surfactant-rich regime. Isothermal titration calorimetry analyzed within the framework of the simple Satake-Yang model identifies binding parameters for the surfactant-lean phase, whereas a calculation for polymer-bound micelles coexisting with free micelles is analyzed in the surfactant-rich redissolution regime. This analysis provides a preliminary understanding of the interactions governing the observed phase behavior. The resulting thermodynamic properties, including binding constants and the molar Gibbs free energies, enthalpies, and entropies, identify the relative importance of both hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions and provide a first approximation for the corresponding microstructures in the different phases. Our study also addresses the stability and metastability of oppositely charged polyelectrolytes and surfactant mixtures.

  18. Distal Radius Fracture (Broken Wrist)

    Science.gov (United States)

    .org Distal Radius Fracture (Broken Wrist) Page ( 1 ) The radius is the larger of the two bones of the forearm. The ... the distal end. A fracture of the distal radius occurs when the area of the radius near ...

  19. Internal charge transfer based ratiometric interaction of anionic surfactant with calf thymus DNA bound cationic surfactant: Study I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Abhijit; Chaudhuri, Tandrima; Moulik, Satya Priya; Banerjee, Manas

    2016-01-01

    Cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) binds calf thymus (ct-) DNA like anionic biopolymers electrostatically and established equilibrium both in the ground as well as in excited state in aqueous medium at pH 7. Anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) does not show even hydrophobic interaction with ct-DNA at low concentration. On contrary, SDS can establish well defined equilibrium with DNA bound CTAB in ground state where the same CTAB-DNA isosbestic point reappears. First report of internal charge transfer (ICT) based binding of CTAB with ct-DNA as well as ICT based interaction of anionic SDS with DNA bound CTAB that shows dynamic quenching contribution also. The reappearance of anodic peak and slight increase in cathodic peak current with increasing concentration (at lower range) of anionic SDS, possibly reflect the release of CTAB from DNA bound CTAB by SDS.

  20. Internal charge transfer based ratiometric interaction of anionic surfactant with calf thymus DNA bound cationic surfactant: Study I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Abhijit; Chaudhuri, Tandrima; Moulik, Satya Priya; Banerjee, Manas

    2016-01-01

    Cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) binds calf thymus (ct-) DNA like anionic biopolymers electrostatically and established equilibrium both in the ground as well as in excited state in aqueous medium at pH 7. Anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) does not show even hydrophobic interaction with ct-DNA at low concentration. On contrary, SDS can establish well defined equilibrium with DNA bound CTAB in ground state where the same CTAB-DNA isosbestic point reappears. First report of internal charge transfer (ICT) based binding of CTAB with ct-DNA as well as ICT based interaction of anionic SDS with DNA bound CTAB that shows dynamic quenching contribution also. The reappearance of anodic peak and slight increase in cathodic peak current with increasing concentration (at lower range) of anionic SDS, possibly reflect the release of CTAB from DNA bound CTAB by SDS.

  1. Charge structure and cation distribution on Fe-Ga chalcogenide spinel by neutron diffraction and Moessbauer spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sam Jin; Son, Bae Soon; Shim, In Bo; Kim, Chul Sung [Kookmin University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Kun Pyo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    FeGa{sub x}Cr{sub 2-x}S{sub 4} (x=0.1 and 0.3) have been studied with x-ray, neutron difraction, and Moessbauer spectroscopy. Rietveld refinement of x-ray, neutron diffraction, and Moessbauer spectroscopy lead to the conclusion that the samples are in inverse spinel type, where the majority of Ga ions are present at tetrahedral site (A). The neutron diffractions on FeGa{sub x}Cr{sub 2-x}S{sub 4} (x=0.1) above 10 K show long range interaction behaviors and reveal an antiferromagnetic ordering, with the magnetic moment of Fe{sup 2+}(- 3.45 {mu}{sub B}) aligned antiparallel to Cr{sup 3+} (+2.89 {mu}{sub B}) at 10 K. Fe ions migrate from the tetrahedral (A) site to the octahedral (B) site with increase of Ga substitutions. The electric quadrupole splittings of the A and B sites in Moessbauer spectra give a direct evidence that Ga ion stimulate asymmetric charge distribution of Fe ions in the A site.

  2. Effective Cleaning Radius Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Churnetski, B.V.

    2001-10-15

    This report discusses results of testing done in the Savannah River Laboratory half tank and full tank mockup facilities using kaolin clay slurries and the relationship between cleaning radius and pump and slurry characteristics.

  3. Double-peak elution profile of a monoclonal antibody in cation exchange chromatography is caused by histidine-protonation-based charge variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Haibin; Cao, Mingyan; Newell, Kelcy; Afdahl, Christopher; Wang, Jihong; Wang, William K; Li, Yuling

    2015-12-11

    We have systemically investigated unusual elution behaviors of an IgG4 (mAb A) in cation exchange chromatography (CEX). This mAb A exhibited two elution peaks under certain conditions when being purified by several strong CEX columns. When either of the two peaks was isolated and re-injected on the same column, the similar pattern was observed again during elution. The protein distribution between the two peaks could be altered by NaCl concentration in the feed, or NaCl concentration in wash buffer, or elution pH, suggesting two pH-associated strong-and-weak binding configurations. The protein distributions under different pH values showed good correlation with protonated/un-protonated fractions of a histidine residue. These results suggest that the double-peak elution profile associates with histidine-protonation-based charge variants. By conducting pepsin digestion, amino-acid specific chemical modifications, peptide mapping, and measuring the effects of elution residence time, a histidine in the variable fragment (Fab) was identified to be the root cause. Besides double-peak pattern, mAb A can also exhibit peak-shouldering or single elution peak on different CEX resins, reflecting different resins' resolving capability on protonated/un-protonated forms. This work characterizes a novel cause for unusual elution behaviors in CEX and also provides alternative avenues of purification development for mAbs with similar behaviors.

  4. High Tc superconductors: The scaling of Tc with the number of bound holes associated with charge transfer neutralizing the multivalence cations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vezzoli, G. C.; Chen, M. F.; Craver, F.

    1991-01-01

    It is observed that for the known high-T(sub c) Cu-, Tl-, and Bi-based superconductors, T(sub c) scales consistently with the number of bound holes per unit cell which arise from charge transfer excitations of frequency approximately = 3 x 10(exp 13) that neutralized the multivalence cations into diamagnetic states. The resulting holes are established on the oxygens. Extrapolation of this empirical fit in the up-temperature direction suggests a T(sub c) of about 220-230 K at a value of 25 holes/unit cell (approximately the maximum that can be materials-engineered into a high-T(sub c) K2MnF4 or triple Perovskite structure). In the down-temperature direction, the extrapolation gives a T(sub c) in the vicinity of 235 K for the Y-Ba-Cu-O system as well as the known maximum temperature of 23 K for low-T(sub c) materials shown by Nb3Ge. The approach is also consistent with the experimental findings that only multivalence ions which are diamagnetic in their atomic state (Cu, Tl, Bi, Pb, and Sb) associate with high-T(sub c) compounds.

  5. Spectral radius of graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Stevanovic, Dragan

    2015-01-01

    Spectral Radius of Graphs provides a thorough overview of important results on the spectral radius of adjacency matrix of graphs that have appeared in the literature in the preceding ten years, most of them with proofs, and including some previously unpublished results of the author. The primer begins with a brief classical review, in order to provide the reader with a foundation for the subsequent chapters. Topics covered include spectral decomposition, the Perron-Frobenius theorem, the Rayleigh quotient, the Weyl inequalities, and the Interlacing theorem. From this introduction, the

  6. A unified description of the electrochemical, charge distribution, and spectroscopic properties of the special-pair radical cation in bacterial photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimers, Jeffrey R; Hush, Noel S

    2004-04-01

    We apply our four-state 70-vibration vibronic-coupling model for the properties of the photosynthetic special-pair radical cation to: (1) interpret the observed correlations between the midpoint potential and the distribution of spin density between the two bacteriochlorophylls for 30 mutants of Rhodobacter sphaeroides, (2) interpret the observed average intervalence hole-transfer absorption energies as a function of spin density for six mutants, and (3) simulate the recently obtained intervalence electroabsorption Stark spectrum of the wild-type reaction center. While three new parameters describing the location of the sites of mutation with respect to the special pair are required to describe the midpoint-potential data, a priori predictions are made for the transition energies and the Stark spectrum. In general, excellent predictions are made of the observed quantities, with deviations being typically of the order of twice the experimental uncertainties. A unified description of many chemical and spectroscopic properties of the bacterial reaction center is thus provided. Central to the analysis is the assumption that the perturbations made to the reaction center, either via mutations of protein residues or by application of an external electric field, act only to independently modify the oxidation potentials of the two halves of the special pair and hence the redox asymmetry E0. While this appears to be a good approximation, clear evidence is presented that effects of mutation can be more extensive than what is allowed for. A thorough set of analytical equations describing the observed properties is obtained using the Born-Oppenheimer adiabatic approximation. These equations are generally appropriate for intervalence charge-transfer problems and include, for the first time, full treatment of both symmetric and antisymmetric vibrational motions. The limits of validity of the adiabatic approach to the full nonadiabatic problem are obtained.

  7. Study Application of RADIUS Protocol on Ethernet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Fang; YANG Huan-yu; LI Hong

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents how to apply the RADIUS (Remote Authentication Dial In User Service)protocol ,which is generally applied to dial-up network, to the authentication & charge of Broad Band accessing control system on Ethernet. It is provided that the Broad Band accessing control system included a self-designed communication protocol is used in communicating between an terminal user and Network Access Server .The interface module on the servers side and the Radius system is also given in this article.

  8. Electrospray mass and tandem mass spectrometry of homologous and isomeric singly, doubly, triply and quadruply charged cationic ruthenated meso-(phenyl)m-(meta- and para-pyridyl)n (m + n = 4) macrocyclic porphyrin complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomazela, Daniela M; Gozzo, Fabio C; Mayer, Ildemar; Engelmann, Fábio M; Araki, Koiti; Toma, Henrique E; Eberlin, Marcos N

    2004-10-01

    Ten homologous or isomeric singly, doubly, triply and quadruply charged cationic macrocyclic complexes I-Va, bn+ (n = 1-4) formed by the coordination of [Ru(bipy)2Cl]+ to the pyridyl N-atoms of a series of meso-(phenyl)m-(meta or para-pyridyl)n-porphyrins (m + n = 4) were transferred to the gas phase and structurally characterized by electrospray ionization (ESI) mass (MS) and tandem mass (MS/MS) spectrometry. Previously known to be stable in solution and in the solid state, I-Va, bn+ are found to constitute also a new class of stable, long-lived multiply charged gas-phase ions with spatially separated charge sites. Increasing intramolecular electrostatic repulsion from Ia, b+ to IVa, b3+ facilitates in-source and tandem collision-induced dissociation (CID). However, for the quadruply charged ions Va, b4+, electrostatic repulsion is alleviated mainly by ion pairing with the CF3SO3- counterion forming the salt clusters [Va,b/CF3SO3]3+ and [Va,b/(CF3SO3)2]2+ with reduced charge states. Ion-pairing that yields [IVa,b/CF3SO3]2+ is also observed as a minor ESI process for the triply charged ions IVa, b3+. The gaseous ions I-Va, bn+ (n = 2, 3 or 4) dissociate by sequential 'charge partitioning' with the formation of two cationic fragments by the release of [Ru(bipy)2Cl]+. The meta (a) and para (b) isomers and the positional isomers II2+ and III2+ display nearly identical ESI-MS and ESI-MS/MS spectra. ESI-MS/MS of I-Va, bn+ shows that the Ru-py(P) is, intrinsically, the weakest bond since this bond breaks preferentially upon CID.

  9. Proton radius from electron scattering data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higinbotham, Douglas W. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Kabir, Al Amin; Lin, Vincent; Meekins, David; Norum, Blaine; Sawatzky, Brad

    2016-05-01

    Background: The proton charge radius extracted from recent muonic hydrogen Lamb shift measurements is significantly smaller than that extracted from atomic hydrogen and electron scattering measurements. The discrepancy has become known as the proton radius puzzle. Purpose: In an attempt to understand the discrepancy, we review high-precision electron scattering results from Mainz, Jefferson Lab, Saskatoon, and Stanford. Methods: We make use of stepwise regression techniques using the F test as well as the Akaike information criterion to systematically determine the predictive variables to use for a given set and range of electron scattering data as well as to provide multivariate error estimates. Results: Starting with the precision, low four-momentum transfer (Q2) data from Mainz (1980) and Saskatoon (1974), we find that a stepwise regression of the Maclaurin series using the F test as well as the Akaike information criterion justify using a linear extrapolation which yields a value for the proton radius that is consistent with the result obtained from muonic hydrogen measurements. Applying the same Maclaurin series and statistical criteria to the 2014 Rosenbluth results on GE from Mainz, we again find that the stepwise regression tends to favor a radius consistent with the muonic hydrogen radius but produces results that are extremely sensitive to the range of data included in the fit. Making use of the high-Q2 data on GE to select functions which extrapolate to high Q2, we find that a Padé (N=M=1) statistical model works remarkably well, as does a dipole function with a 0.84 fm radius, GE(Q2)=(1+Q2/0.66GeV2)−2. Conclusions: Rigorous applications of stepwise regression techniques and multivariate error estimates result in the extraction of a proton charge radius that is consistent with the muonic hydrogen result of 0.84 fm; either from linear extrapolation of the extremely-low-Q2 data or by use of the Padé approximant for extrapolation using a larger range of

  10. Turnaround radius in modified gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Faraoni, Valerio

    2015-01-01

    In an accelerating universe in General Relativity there is a maximum radius above which a shell of test particles cannot collapse, but is dispersed by the cosmic expansion. This radius could be used in conjunction with observations of large structures to constrain the equation of state of the universe. We extend the concept of turnaround radius to modified theories of gravity for which the gravitational slip is non-vanishing.

  11. The Proton Radius from Electron Scattering Data

    CERN Document Server

    Higinbotham, Douglas W; Lin, Vincent; Meekins, David; Norum, Blaine; Sawatzky, Brad

    2015-01-01

    In an attempt to understand the discrepancy between the proton radius determined the muonic hydrogen Lamb shift and elastic electron-proton scattering measurements, we carefully review two classic, high precision electron scattering charge form factor, ${G_E}$, results. Upon examination, it was noted that the covariance matrices of common three parameter fits show large parameter correlations. Thus, we reanalyzed the classic data guided by statistical constraints and found low $q^2$, two-parameter fits were actually consistent with muonic hydrogen results. By subsequently including the highest measured values of ${G_E}(q^2)$ in the fits, we found that a dipole function, $G_E(q^2) = ( 1 + q^2/0.66[\\rm{GeV}^2])^{-2}$, with the muonic hydrogen radius, 0.84087(39) fm, not only describes the low $q^2$ electron scattering data, but also describes the highest measured $q^2$ $G_E$ values.

  12. Synthetic cation-selective nanotube: Permeant cations chaperoned by anions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilder, Tamsyn A.; Gordon, Dan; Chung, Shin-Ho

    2011-01-01

    The ability to design ion-selective, synthetic nanotubes which mimic biological ion channels may have significant implications for the future treatment of bacteria, diseases, and as ultrasensitive biosensors. We present the design of a synthetic nanotube made from carbon atoms that selectively allows monovalent cations to move across and rejects all anions. The cation-selective nanotube mimics some of the salient properties of biological ion channels. Before practical nanodevices are successfully fabricated it is vital that proof-of-concept computational studies are performed. With this in mind we use molecular and stochastic dynamics simulations to characterize the dynamics of ion permeation across a single-walled (10, 10), 36 Å long, carbon nanotube terminated with carboxylic acid with an effective radius of 5.08 Å. Although cations encounter a high energy barrier of 7 kT, its height is drastically reduced by a chloride ion in the nanotube. The presence of a chloride ion near the pore entrance thus enables a cation to enter the pore and, once in the pore, it is chaperoned by the resident counterion across the narrow pore. The moment the chaperoned cation transits the pore, the counterion moves back to the entrance to ferry another ion. The synthetic nanotube has a high sodium conductance of 124 pS and shows linear current-voltage and current-concentration profiles. The cation-anion selectivity ratio ranges from 8 to 25, depending on the ionic concentrations in the reservoirs.

  13. The PRad experiment and the proton radius puzzle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gasparian Ashot

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available New results from the recent muonic hydrogen experiments seriously questioned our knowledge of the proton charge radius, rp. The new value, with its unprecedented less than sub-percent precision, is currently up to eight standard deviation smaller than the average value from all previous experiments, triggering the well-known “proton charge radius puzzle” in nuclear and atomic physics. The PRad collaboration is currently preparing a novel, magnetic-spectrometer-free ep scattering experiment in Hall B at JLab for a new independent rp measurement to address this growing “puzzle” in physics.

  14. A comparative study on the effect of Curcumin and Chlorin-p6 on the diffusion of two organic cations across a negatively charged lipid bilayer probed by second harmonic spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, R. K.; Varshney, G. K.; Dube, A.; Gupta, P. K.; Das, K.

    2014-09-01

    The influence of Curcumin and Chlorin-p6 (Cp6) on the real time diffusion kinetics of two organic cations, LDS (LDS-698) and Malachite Green (MG) across a negatively charged phospholipid bilayer is investigated by Second Harmonic (SH) spectroscopy. The diffusion time constant of LDS at neutral pH in liposomes containing either Curcumin or Cp6 is significantly reduced, the effect being more pronounced with Curcumin. At acidic pH, the quantum of reduction in the diffusion time constant of MG by both the drugs was observed to be similar. The relative changes in the average diffusion time constants of the cations with increasing drug concentration at pH 5.0 and 7.4 shows a substantial pH effect for Curcumin induced membrane permeability, while a modest pH effect was observed for Cp6 induced membrane permeability. Based on available evidence this can be attributed to the increased interaction between the drug and the polar head groups of the lipid at pH 7.4 where the drug resides closer to the lipid-water interface.

  15. The effect of cation-πinteractions in electrolyte/organic nanofiltration systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gang Yang; Yu Ma; Weihong Xing

    2016-01-01

    The rejection properties of a nanofiltration organic membrane were investigated using KCl solutions, NaCl solutions, NaCl/benzyl alcohol hybrid solutions and KCl/benzyl alcohol hybrid solutions. The presence of benzyl alcohol (3.7 mol · m−3) caused a decrease in electrolyte rejection within the range of 0 to 6%. The mechanism of the decrease was discussed. The cation–πbond was assumed to form in the hybrid solution and to further induce the partial dehydration of the cation. The steric and charge density inhibition of the salt activity was strength-ened, and the salt rejection was thus decreased. A simulation was performed to evaluate the radius of the cation. © 2015 The Chemical Industry and Engineering Society of China, and Chemical Industry Press. Al rights reserved.

  16. Collapse of charge ordering in Bi0.5Sr0.5MnO3 by cation disorder: a magnetic and structural investigation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S. Savitha Pillai; Rajasekhar Madugundo; Santhosh. P. Nagappan Nair

    2008-01-01

    The structure, transport, and magnetic properties of LaxBi0.5-xSr0.5MnO3 (LBSMO) (x=0.1 and 0.4) were studied through X-ray diffraction, magnetization, and electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements. The structural analysis showed that the LBSMO crystallized in an orthorhombic perovskite structure with Pbnm space group for x=0.1 and Imma space group for x=0.4 and the highly polarizable 6s2 lone pair of Bi3+ was the tuning factor for the structural variations. Magnetic studies revealed that the replacement of Bi ions by La ions resulted in the collapse high temperature charge ordering state of BSMO and it order Ferro Magnetically (FM) with TC around 355 and 330 K for x=0.1 and 0.4, respectively. Both ESR, temperature and field dependant magnetization suggested that there was a coexistence of FM and the paramagnetic phases well below TC and the FM and CO-AFM phases below 250 K of LBSMO.

  17. The Muon Scattering Experiment (MUSE at PSI and the proton radius puzzle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohl Michael

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The unexplained large discrepancy of the proton charge radius measurements with muonic hydrogen Lamb shift and determinations from elastic electron scattering and Lamb shift in regular hydrogen of seven standard deviations is known as the proton radius puzzle. Suggested solutions of the puzzle range from possible errors in the experiments through unexpectedly large hadronic physics effects to new physics beyond the Standard Model. A new approach to verify the radius discrepancy in a systematic manner will be pursued with the Muon Scattering Experiment (MUSE at PSI. The experiment aims to compare elastic cross sections, the proton elastic form factors, and the extracted proton charge radius with scattering of electrons and muons of either charge and under identical conditions. The difference in the observed radius will be probed with a high precision to verify the discrepancy. An overview of the experiment and the current status will be presented.

  18. Silicification and biosilicification Part 5. An investigation of the silica structures formed at weakly acidic pH and neutral pH as facilitated by cationically charged macromolecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patwardhan, Siddharth V.; Clarson, Stephen J

    2003-06-10

    Biosilicification in diatoms has been reported to occur at (or close to) neutral pH and it has been shown that protein molecules can act as catalysts/templates/scaffolds for this elegant materials chemistry. Here we report the formation of silica spheres from an aqueous silica precursor as facilitated by both poly-L-lysine (PLL) and poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) at pH 6.0 and under ambient conditions. It was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) that there were morphological differences in the silica formed at pH 6 when compared to the silica morphologies formed using the same macromolecules at neutral pH. Notably, a bimodal distribution of silica particles was seen for both the PLL and PAH systems at pH 6. These results are compared and contrasted with those previously reported for the pH dependence of silicification and biosilicification and in particular, those obtained for the pH dependence of silica formation in the presence silaffin proteins isolated form the diatom C. fusiformis. The findings for these cationically charged macromolecules suggest that lysine may be an important amino acid in the primary sequence of proteins that catalyze the formation of silica structures in vivo.

  19. Ion mobility studies of carbohydrates as group I adducts: isomer specific collisional cross section dependence on metal ion radius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuting; Dodds, Eric D

    2013-10-15

    Carbohydrates play numerous critical roles in biological systems. Characterization of oligosaccharide structures is essential to a complete understanding of their functions in biological processes; nevertheless, their structural determination remains challenging in part due to isomerism. Ion mobility spectrometry provides the means to resolve gas phase ions on the basis of their shape-to-charge ratios, thus providing significant potential for separation and differentiation of carbohydrate isomers. Here, we report on the determination of collisional cross sections for four groups of isomeric carbohydrates (including five isomeric disaccharides, four isomeric trisaccharides, two isomeric pentasaccharides, and two isomeric hexasaccharides) as their group I metal ion adducts (i.e., [M + Li](+), [M + Na](+), [M + K](+), [M + Rb](+), and [M + Cs](+)). In all, 65 collisional cross sections were measured, the great majority of which have not been previously reported. As anticipated, the collisional cross sections of the carbohydrate metal ion adducts generally increase with increasing metal ion radius; however, the collisional cross sections were found to scale with the group I cation size in isomer specific manners. Such measurements are of substantial analytical value, as they illustrate how the selection of charge carrier influences carbohydrate ion mobility determinations. For example, certain pairs of isomeric carbohydrates assume unique collisional cross sections upon binding one metal ion, but not another. On the whole, these data suggest a role for the charge carrier as a probe of carbohydrate structure and thus have significant implications for the continued development and application of ion mobility spectrometry for the distinction and resolution of isomeric carbohydrates.

  20. Magnetic Radius of the Deuteron

    CERN Document Server

    Afanasiev, A V; Trubnikov, S V; Afanasev, Andrei V; Trubnikov, S V

    1998-01-01

    The root-mean square radius of the deuteron magnetic moment distribution, $ r_{Md}$, is calculated for several realistic models of the $NN$--interaction. For the Paris potential the result is $r_{Md} = 2.312 \\pm 0.010 $ fm. The dependence of $r_{Md} $ on the choice of $NN$ model, relativistic effects and meson exchange currents is investigated. The experimental value of $r_{Md}$ is also considered. The necessity of new precise measurements of the deuteron magnetic form factor at low values of $Q^2$ is stressed.

  1. Table of charged particle energies versus magnetic field strength x orbit radius (B{rho}) for A = 1 to 7 (100< (B{rho}) < 1200 kG.cm); Table des energies des particules chargees en fonction de la rigidite magnetique (B{rho}) pour A = 1 a 7 (100< (B{rho}) < 1200 kG.cm)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bianchi, L. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-07-01

    A table of charged particle energies versus magnetic field strength x orbit radius (B{sub {rho}}) is presented. Particles p, d, t, {sup 3}He{sup ++}, {sup 4}He{sup +}, {sup 4}He{sup ++}, {sup 6}Li{sup +}, {sup 6}Li{sup ++}, {sup 6}Li{sup +++}, {sup 7}Li{sup +}, {sup 7}Li{sup ++}, {sup 7}Li{sup +++}. Values of B{sub {rho}}: 100 to 1200 kG.cm by steps of 0.5 kG.cm. Values of energies are given in keV. (author) [French] Nous presentons une table des energies de protons, deutons, tritons, {sup 3}He{sup ++}, {sup 4}He{sup +}, {sup 4}He{sup ++}, {sup 6}Li{sup +}, {sup 6}Li{sup ++}, {sup 6}Li{sup +++}, {sup 7}Li{sup +}, {sup 7}Li{sup ++}, {sup 7}Li{sup +++} en fonction de leur rigidite magnetique (B{sub {rho}}). Les valeurs de B{sub {rho}} sont comprises entre 100 et 1200 kG.cm par pas de 0.5 kG.cm. Les valeurs des energies sont donnees en keV. (auteur)

  2. Predictions of nuclear charge radii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, M.; Lu, Y.; Zhao, Y. M.; Arima, A.

    2016-12-01

    The nuclear charge radius is a fundamental property of an atomic nucleus. In this article we study the predictive power of empirical relations for experimental nuclear charge radii of neighboring nuclei and predict the unknown charge radii of 1085 nuclei based on the experimental CR2013 database within an uncertainty of 0.03 fm.

  3. The convexity radius of a Riemannian manifold

    OpenAIRE

    Dibble, James

    2014-01-01

    The ratio of convexity radius over injectivity radius may be made arbitrarily small within the class of compact Riemannian manifolds of any fixed dimension at least two. This is proved using Gulliver's method of constructing manifolds with focal points but no conjugate points. The approach is suggested by a characterization of the convexity radius that resembles a classical result of Klingenberg about the injectivity radius.

  4. Absolute Stability Limit for Relativistic Charged Spheres

    CERN Document Server

    Giuliani, Alessandro

    2007-01-01

    We find an exact solution for the stability limit of relativistic charged spheres for the case of constant gravitational mass density and constant charge density. We argue that this provides an absolute stability limit for any relativistic charged sphere in which the gravitational mass density decreases with radius and the charge density increases with radius. We then provide a cruder absolute stability limit that applies to any charged sphere with a spherically symmetric mass and charge distribution. We give numerical results for all cases. In addition, we discuss the example of a neutral sphere surrounded by a thin, charged shell.

  5. Experimental study of finite Larmor radius effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Struve, K.W.

    1980-08-01

    Linear Z-pinches in Ar, Kr, Xe, N/sub 2/, and He are experimentally studied in regimes where strong finite Larmor radius effects could provide a significant stabilizing effect. Scaling arguments show that for deuterium such a pinch has an electron line density of order 2 x 10/sup 15//cm. For higher Z plasmas a higher line density is allowed, the exact value of which depends on the average ion charge. The pinch is formed by puffing gas axially through the cathode towards the anode of an evacuated pinch chamber. When the gas reaches the anode, the pinch bank is fired. The pinch current rises in 2 to 3 ..mu..sec to a maximum of 100 to 200 kA. The pinch bank capacitance is 900 ..mu..F, and the external inductance is 100 nH. Additionally, the bank is fused to increase dI/dt. The primary diagnostics are a framing camera, a spatially resolved Mach-Zehnder interferometer, and X-ray absorption.

  6. Sharp Upper and Lower Bounds for the Laplacian Spectral Radius and the Spectral Radius of Graphs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji-ming Guo

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, sharp upper bounds for the Laplacian spectral radius and the spectral radius of graphs are given, respectively. We show that some known bounds can be obtained from our bounds. For a bipartite graph G, we also present sharp lower bounds for the Laplacian spectral radius and the spectral radius,respectively.

  7. Mirror with thermally controlled radius of curvature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neil, George R.; Shinn, Michelle D.

    2010-06-22

    A radius of curvature controlled mirror for controlling precisely the focal point of a laser beam or other light beam. The radius of curvature controlled mirror provides nearly spherical distortion of the mirror in response to differential expansion between the front and rear surfaces of the mirror. The radius of curvature controlled mirror compensates for changes in other optical components due to heating or other physical changes. The radius of curvature controlled mirror includes an arrangement for adjusting the temperature of the front surface and separately adjusting the temperature of the rear surface to control the radius of curvature. The temperature adjustment arrangements can include cooling channels within the mirror body or convection of a gas upon the surface of the mirror. A control system controls the differential expansion between the front and rear surfaces to achieve the desired radius of curvature.

  8. Divalent cation shrinks DNA but inhibits its compaction with trivalent cation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tongu, Chika; Kenmotsu, Takahiro; Yoshikawa, Yuko; Zinchenko, Anatoly; Chen, Ning; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2016-05-01

    Our observation reveals the effects of divalent and trivalent cations on the higher-order structure of giant DNA (T4 DNA 166 kbp) by fluorescence microscopy. It was found that divalent cations, Mg(2+) and Ca(2+), inhibit DNA compaction induced by a trivalent cation, spermidine (SPD(3+)). On the other hand, in the absence of SPD(3+), divalent cations cause the shrinkage of DNA. As the control experiment, we have confirmed the minimum effect of monovalent cation, Na(+) on the DNA higher-order structure. We interpret the competition between 2+ and 3+ cations in terms of the change in the translational entropy of the counterions. For the compaction with SPD(3+), we consider the increase in translational entropy due to the ion-exchange of the intrinsic monovalent cations condensing on a highly charged polyelectrolyte, double-stranded DNA, by the 3+ cations. In contrast, the presence of 2+ cation decreases the gain of entropy contribution by the ion-exchange between monovalent and 3+ ions.

  9. PREPARATION AND CHARACTERISATION OF HYDROPHOBIC AND CATIONIC MONTMORILLONITE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    W. Liu; Y. Ni; H. Xiao

    2004-01-01

    Hydrophilic and cationic montmorillonite is desirable for pitch control in the pulp and paper industry. In this paper, polyaminoamide - epichlorohydrin (PAE)modified montmorillonite was prepared. The modified montmorillonite was characterized using X-ray diffraction, FTIR and thermal gravimetric analysis. The amount of PAE intercalated and cationic charge densities of the modified montmorillonite were determined. Finally, it was found that both the solution and melt-intercalated samples with different charge densities exhibited strong interactions with dispersed colloidal rosin acid.

  10. Effect of bond length and radius on superconducting transition temperature for FeAs-based superconductors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    By comparing the data of lattice parameters of more than 50 new FeAs-based high temperature superconductors in two syetems, the effect of bondlength on superconducting transition temperature (T C ) was found that, for both FeAs superconductor systems with similar ionic radii of cation A, the bond length L As-A between Arsenic atom and its nearest neighbor cation at the A site is in an inverse proportion to T C , i.e. the larger the bond length L As-A , the lower the T C . In addition, we also found a noticeable effect of ionic radius on T C , in which deviation from the tendency line of bond length vs. T C decreases with the increasing ionic radius. Both bond length-T C and ionic radii-T C relations indicate that the interaction of cation A and As ion have significant effect on superconductivity. The analysis on the electronic structure indicates that there exists the proximity of the secondary-outer p-orbit of the cation A and the 4s orbit of the As ion, both in energy space and in real space. Some high frequency individual vibrating modes would be established through exchange coupling on their inner orbits. It is worth of mention that the superconducting condensation is influenced by the interaction between the cation A and the As atoms.

  11. Synthesis and characterization of a novel water-soluble cationic diblock copolymer with star conformation by ATRP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Shuzhao [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, NB E3B 5A3 (Canada); School of Materials Science and Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Xiao, Miaomiao [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, NB E3B 5A3 (Canada); Zheng, Anna [School of Materials Science and Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Xiao, Huining, E-mail: hxiao@unb.ca [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, NB E3B 5A3 (Canada)

    2014-10-01

    A water-soluble cationic diblock copolymer, CD-PAM-b-PMeDMA, was synthesized through atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) from a β-cyclodextrin (CD) macroinitiator with 10-active sites (10Br-β-CD). In order to reduce the cytotoxicity of the CD-PAM-b-PMeDMA, biocompatible polyacrylamide (PAM) was first introduced onto the surface of β-CD as a scaffold structure by ATRP using the 10Br-β-CD as a macroinitiator. The reaction conditions of AM were explored and optimized. The ATRP of [2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl] trimethyl ammonium chloride (MeDMA) was also performed to synthesize the second cationic block using the resulting CD-PAM as a macroinitiator. The resulting diblock copolymer shows an increased hydrodynamic radius in aqueous solution with a pretty low concentration compared with β-CD. In addition, it appears a near-uniform coniform after being deposited on mica ascribed to the presence of an asymmetric 10-arm structure. - Highlights: • A 10-arm diblock polymer was prepared by ATRP for the potential use as a non-viral gene delivery. • PAM was first synthesized in a controlled manner considering its biocompatibility. • The hydrodynamic radius of the copolymer in aqueous solution increase to 130 nm from 7.5 nm of CD. • The copolymer appears coniform after deposited on mica surface due to the charge attraction.

  12. On the radius constants for classes of analytic functions

    OpenAIRE

    Ali, Rosihan M.; Jain, Naveen; Ravichandran, V.

    2012-01-01

    Radius constants for several classes of analytic functions on the unit disk are obtained. These include the radius of starlikeness of a positive order, radius of parabolic starlikeness, radius of Bernoulli lemniscate starlikeness, and radius of uniform convexity. In the main, the radius constants obtained are sharp. Conjectures on the non-sharp constants are given.

  13. Finite Larmor Radius Effects to Arbitrary Order

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knorr, G.; Hansen, F.R.; Lynov, Jens-Peter

    1988-01-01

    A representation of a finite Larmor radius plasma is proposed, which permits the transition rL → ∞ without becoming mathematically ill-posed. It is being used in a two-dimensional guiding center plasma spectral code and may have useful analytical applications. The ions are represented as guiding...... centers and the Larmor radius is averaged analytically for every Fourier-mode. Finite Larmor radius densities and velocities are thus obtained from guiding center quantities by application of a filter in wave vector space....

  14. Proton Radius, Darwin-Foldy Term and Radiative Corrections

    CERN Document Server

    Jentschura, U D

    2010-01-01

    We discuss the role of the so-called Darwin-Foldy term in the evaluation of the proton and deuteron charge radii from atomic hydrogen spectroscopy and nuclear scattering data. The question of whether this term should be included or excluded from the nuclear radius has been controversially discussed in the literature. We attempt to clarify which literature values correspond to which conventions. A detailed discussion of the conventions appears useful because a recent experiment [R. Pohl et al., Nature vol. 466, p. 213 (2010)] has indicated that there is a discrepancy between the proton charge radii inferred from ordinary ("electronic") atomic hydrogen and muonic hydrogen. We also investigate the role of quantum electrodynamic radiative corrections in the determination of nuclear radii from scattering data, and propose a definition of the nuclear self energy which is compatible with the subtraction of the radiative corrections in scattering experiments.

  15. Is the proton radius puzzle evidence of extra dimensions?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahia, F.; Lemos, A.S. [Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Department of Physics, Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil)

    2016-08-15

    The proton charge radius inferred from muonic hydrogen spectroscopy is not compatible with the previous value given by CODATA-2010, which, on its turn, essentially relies on measurements of the electron-proton interaction. The proton's new size was extracted from the 2S-2P Lamb shift in the muonic hydrogen, which showed an energy excess of 0.3 meV in comparison to the theoretical prediction, evaluated with the CODATA radius. Higher-dimensional gravity is a candidate to explain this discrepancy, since the muon-proton gravitational interaction is stronger than the electron-proton interaction and, in the context of braneworld models, the gravitational potential can be hugely amplified in short distances when compared to the Newtonian potential. Motivated by these ideas, we study a muonic hydrogen confined in a thick brane. We show that the muon-proton gravitational interaction modified by extra dimensions can provide the additional separation of 0.3 meV between the 2S and 2P states. In this scenario, the gravitational energy depends on the higher-dimensional Planck mass and indirectly on the brane thickness. Studying the behavior of the gravitational energy with respect to the brane thickness in a realistic range, we find constraints for the fundamental Planck mass that solve the proton radius puzzle and are consistent with previous experimental bounds. (orig.)

  16. The quantitative relationship between metal radii, cationic radii and electronic configurations of elements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    艾德生; 曾荣树; 叶大年

    1999-01-01

    A close relationship has been found between the metal radii, cationic radii and electronic configurations of elements. A unified formula for calculating metal radii is presented, whose paramatem are only related to the electronic configuration. Meanwhile theoretical relation between cationic radii and electronic configuration can be revealed by combining quantitative analysis with qualitative analysis. The calculated results and the charts of standard deviations are coincident with those given by reference books. Our work indicates that the metal radius and cationic radius of an element reflect in essence the element’s configuration.

  17. Mass-radius relationships in icy satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupo, M. J.; Lewis, J. S.

    1979-01-01

    Using published laboratory data for H2O ice, a modeling technique was developed by which the bulk density, density and temperature profile, rotational moment of inertia, central pressure, and location of the rock-ice interface can all be obtained as a function of the radius, the heliocentric distance, and the silicate composition. Models of the interiors of Callisto, Ganymede, Europa, Rhea, and Titan are given, consistent with present mass and radius data. The radius and mass of spheres of ice under self-gravitation for two different temperature classes are given (103 and 77 deg K). Measurements of mass, radius and I/MR2 by spacecraft can be interpreted by this model to yield substantial information about the internal structure and the ice/rock ratio of the icy satellites of Jupiter and Saturn.

  18. Inside the Bondi radius of M87

    CERN Document Server

    Russell, H R; McNamara, B R; Broderick, A E

    2015-01-01

    Chandra X-ray observations of the nearby brightest cluster galaxy M87 resolve the hot gas structure across the Bondi accretion radius of the central supermassive black hole, a measurement possible in only a handful of systems but complicated by the bright nucleus and jet emission. By stacking only short frame-time observations to limit pileup, and after subtracting the nuclear PSF, we analysed the X-ray gas properties within the Bondi radius at 0.12-0.22 kpc (1.5-2.8 arcsec), depending on the black hole mass. Within 2 kpc radius, we detect two significant temperature components, which are consistent with constant values of 2 keV and 0.9 keV down to 0.15 kpc radius. No evidence was found for the expected temperature increase within ~0.25 kpc due to the influence of the SMBH. Within the Bondi radius, the density profile is consistent with $\\rho\\propto r^{-1}$. The lack of a temperature increase inside the Bondi radius suggests that the hot gas structure is not dictated by the SMBH's potential and, together with...

  19. Solar Radius at Sub-Terahertz Frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, Fabian; Valio, Adriana

    2017-10-01

    The visible surface of the Sun, or photosphere, is defined as the solar radius in the optical spectrum range located at 696,000 km (Cox et al. (Ed. 2015)). However, as the altitude increases, the dominant electromagnetic radiation is emitted at other frequencies. Our aim is to measure the solar radius at frequencies of 212 GHz and 405 GHz through out a solar cycle and, therefore, the altitude where these emissions are generated and that variation along the years. Also we tried to verify the the radius dependence on the solar activity cycle, which can be a good indicator of the changes that occur in the atmosphere structure. For this, we used data obtained by the Submillimetric Solar Telescope (SST) created from daily scans made by SST from 1990 to 2015. From these scans a 2D map of the solar disk was constructed. The solar radius is then determined by adjusting a circumference to the points where the brightness is half of the quiet Sun level, which is set as the most common temperature value in the solar map, i.e., the mode of the temperature distribution. Thus, we determined the solar radius at 212 and 405 GHz and the altitude of the emissions respectively. For 212 GHz, we obtained a radius of 976.5''+/-8'' (707+/-4 Mm), whereas for 405 GHz, we obtained 975.0''+/-8'' (707+/-5 Mm). optical spectrum range

  20. Cationic niosomes an effective gene carrier composed of novel spermine-derivative cationic lipids: effect of central core structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opanasopit, Praneet; Leksantikul, Lalita; Niyomtham, Nattisa; Rojanarata, Theerasak; Ngawhirunpat, Tanasait; Yingyongnarongkul, Boon-Ek

    2017-05-01

    Cationic niosomes formulated from Span 20, cholesterol (Chol) and novel spermine-based cationic lipids of multiple central core structures (di(oxyethyl)amino, di(oxyethyl)amino carboxy, 3-amino-1,2-dioxypropyl and 2-amino-1,3-dioxypropyl) were successfully prepared for improving transfection efficiency in vitro. The niosomes composed of spermine cationic lipid with central core structure of di(oxyethyl)amino revealed the highest gene transfection efficiency. To investigate the factors affecting gene transfection and cell viability including differences in the central core structures of cationic lipids, the composition of vesicles, molar ratio of cationic lipids in formulations and the weight ratio of niosomes to DNA. Cationic niosomes composed of nonionic surfactants (Span20), cholesterol and spermine-based cationic lipids of multiple central core structures were formulated. Gene transfection and cell viability were evaluated on a human cervical carcinoma cell line (HeLa cells) using pDNA encoding green fluorescent protein (pEGFP-C2). The morphology, size and charge were also characterized. High transfection efficiency was obtained from cationic niosomes composed of Span20:Chol:cationic lipid at the molar ratio of 2.5:2.5:0.5 mM. Cationic lipids with di(oxyethyl)amino as a central core structure exhibited highest transfection efficiency. In addition, there was also no serum effect on transfection efficiency. These novel cationic niosomes may constitute a good alternative carrier for gene transfection.

  1. Status of the MUSE Measurement of the Proton Radius at PSI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilman, Ronald; MUSE Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    It is a puzzle that the proton radius appears to be different when measured with muons vs. with electrons. The MUon Scattering Experiment (MUSE) at the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI) πM1 beam line utilizes a mixed e / μ / π beam to measure μ+/- p and e+/- p elastic scattering. The experiment will study the proton electromagnetic form factors at low Q2, in the region most sensitive to the proton radius. The goal is to determine whether the charge radius is indeed the same for muons and electrons, with measurements at the same time in a single experiment. I will describe test measurements done for the MUSE experiment and discuss the status of the project. It is a puzzle that the proton radius appears to be different when measured with muons vs. with electrons. The MUon Scattering Experiment (MUSE) at the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI) πM1 beam line utilizes a mixed e / μ / π beam to measure μ+/- p and e+/- p elastic scattering. The experiment will study the proton electromagnetic form factors at low Q2, in the region most sensitive to the proton radius. The goal is to determine whether the charge radius is indeed the same for muons and electrons, with measurements at the same time in a single experiment. I will describe test measurements done for the MUSE experiment and discuss the status of the project. This work was supported in part by the US National Science Foundation Grant PHY 1306126.

  2. Long-term evolution of broken wakefields in finite radius plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Lotov, Konstantin; Petrenko, Alexey

    2014-01-01

    A novel effect of fast heating and charging a finite-radius plasma is discovered in the context of plasma wakefield acceleration. As the plasma wave breaks, the most of its energy is transferred to plasma electrons which create strong charge-separation electric field and azimuthal magnetic field around the plasma. The slowly varying field structure is preserved for hundreds of wakefield periods and contains (together with hot electrons) up to 80% of the initial wakefield energy.

  3. Cationic dialkylarylphosphates: a new family of bio-inspired cationic lipids for gene delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Corre, Stéphanie S; Belmadi, Nawal; Berchel, Mathieu; Le Gall, Tony; Haelters, Jean-Pierre; Lehn, Pierre; Montier, Tristan; Jaffrès, Paul-Alain

    2015-01-28

    In this work that aims to synthesize and evaluate new cationic lipids as vectors for gene delivery, we report the synthesis of a series of cationic lipids in which a phosphate functional group acts as a linker to assemble on a molecular scale, two lipid chains and one cationic polar head. The mono or dicationic moiety is connected to the phosphate group by an aryl spacer. In this work, two synthesis strategies were evaluated. The first used the Atherton-Todd coupling reaction to introduce a phenolic derivative to dioleylphosphite. The second strategy used a sequential addition of lipid alcohol and a phenolic derivative on POCl3. The two methods are efficient, but the latter allows larger yields. Different polar head groups were introduced, thus producing amphiphilic compounds possessing either one permanent (N-methyl-imidazolium, pyridinium, trimethylammonium) or two permanent cationic charges. All these cationic lipids were formulated as liposomal solutions and characterized (size and zeta potential). They formed stable liposomal solutions both in water (at pH 7.0) and in a weakly acidic medium (at pH 5.5). Finally, this new generation of cationic lipids was used to deliver DNA into various human-derived epithelial cells cultured in vitro. Compared with Lipofectamine used as a reference commercial lipofection reagent, some cationic dialkylarylphosphates were able to demonstrate potent gene transfer abilities, and noteworthily, monocationic derivatives were much more efficient than dicationic analogues.

  4. Measuring Neutron Star Mass and Radius with Three Mass-Radius Relations

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, C M; Kojima, Y; Chang, H K; Xu, R X; Li, X D; Zhang, B; Kiziltan, B

    2006-01-01

    We propose to determine the mass and the radius of a neutron star (NS) using three measurable mass-radius relationships, namely the ``apparent'' radius inferred from neutron star thermal emission, the gravitational redshift inferred from the absorption lines, as well as the averaged stellar mass density inferred from the orbital Keplerian frequency derived from the kilohertz quasi periodic oscillation (kHz QPO) data. We apply the method to constrain the NS mass and the radius of the X-ray sources, 1E 1207.4-5209, Aql X-1 and EXO 0748-676.

  5. Influence of various functional groups on the relative stability of alkylperoxy triplet cations: A theoretical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kenneth J.; Meloni, Giovanni

    2015-07-01

    CBS-QB3 energy calculations show that the formation of a stable triplet cation for alkylperoxy radicals is dependent on factors other than the stability of the daughter cations exclusively. We have found that in cases where the daughter ions are not capable of stabilizing the cation through hyperconjugation, it is possible for the triplet cation to be bound. In many circumstances, CBS-QB3 calculations have found bound triplet cation states with 'negative dissociation energies.' These results are attributed to the effects that electron donating/withdrawing substituents have on the spin and charge densities of the resulting cations.

  6. Asymptotic Normalization Coefficient of 27P→26Si+p and Radius of 27P Halo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Bing; LI Zhi-Hong; LIU Wei-Ping; BAI Xi-Xiang

    2006-01-01

    The asymptotic normalization coefficient of the virtual decay 27P→26Si+p is extracted to be 1840±240 fm-1 from the peripheral 26Mg(d,p)27Mg reaction using charge symmetry of mirror pair,for the first time.It is then used to derive the rms radius of the valence proton in the ground state of 27P.We obtain the rms radius 1/2=4.57±0.36 fm,significantly larger than the matter radius of 27P.The probability of the valence proton outside the matter radius of 27P is found to be 73%.The present work supports the conclusion that the 27P ground state has a proton halo structure.

  7. Induced Charge Capacitive Deionization

    CERN Document Server

    Rubin, S; Biesheuvel, P M; Bercovici, M

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the phenomenon of induced-charge capacitive deionization (ICCDI) that occurs around a porous and conducting particle immersed in an electrolyte, under the action of an external electrostatic field. The external electric field induces an electric dipole in the porous particle, leading to capacitive charging of its volume by both cations and anions at opposite poles. This regime is characterized both by a large RC charging time and a small electrochemical charge relaxation time, which leads to rapid and significant deionization of ionic species from a volume which is on the scale of the particle. We show by theory and experiment that the transient response around a cylindrical particle results in spatially non-uniform charging and non-steady growth of depletion regions which emerge around the particle's poles. Potentially, ICCDI can be useful in applications where fast concentration changes of ionic species are required over large volumes.

  8. A comparative study on the effect of Curcumin and Chlorin-p6 on the transport of the LDS cation across a negatively charged POPG bilayer: Effect of pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varshney, G. K.; Kintali, S. R.; Gupta, P. K.; Das, K.

    2017-02-01

    We report the use of interface selective Second Harmonic generation technique to investigate the transport of the LDS cation across POPG liposomes in the pH range of 4.0 to 8.0 in the presence and absence of two amphiphilic drugs, Curcumin and Chlorin-p6 (Cp6). Our results show that bilayer permeability of liposomes is significantly affected by the presence of the drugs and pH of the medium as evidenced by significant changes in the transport kinetics of the LDS. Studies carried out in the pH range 4.0-8.0 show that while Cp6 significantly enhanced the transport of LDS at pH 4.0, the transport of the cation was seen to increase with increasing pH, with maximum effect at pH 7.4 for Curcumin. The pH dependent bilayer localization of both the drugs was investigated by conducting steady state FRET studies using DPH labeled lipids as donors. The FRET results and the relative population of the various ionic/nonionic species of the drugs at different pH suggest that distance dependent interaction between the various ionic species of the drugs and polar head groups of the lipid is responsible for the observed pH dependence enhancement of the drug induced membrane permeability. Another interesting observation was that the stability of Curcumin in presence of POPG liposomes was observed to degrade significantly near physiological pH (7.4 and 8.0). Although this degradation did not affect the liposome integrity, interestingly this was observed to enhance the transport of the LDS cation across the bilayer. That the degradation products of Curcumin are equally effective as the drug itself in enhancing the membrane permeability lends additional support to the current opinion that the bioactive degradation products of the drug may have a significant contribution to its observed pharmacological effects.

  9. Understanding the proton radius puzzle: Nuclear structure effects in light muonic atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Ji, Chen; Dinur, Nir Nevo; Bacca, Sonia; Barnea, Nir

    2015-01-01

    We present calculations of nuclear structure effects to the Lamb shift in light muonic atoms. We adopt a modern ab-initio approach by combining state-of-the-art nuclear potentials with the hyperspherical harmonics method. Our calculations are instrumental to the determination of nuclear charge radii in the Lamb shift measurements, which will shed light on the proton radius puzzle.

  10. Lipopolysaccharide Neutralization by Cationic-Amphiphilic Polymers through Pseudoaggregate Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppu, Divakara S S M; Haldar, Jayanta

    2016-03-14

    Synthetic polymers incorporating the cationic charge and hydrophobicity to mimic the function of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been developed. These cationic-amphiphilic polymers bind to bacterial membranes that generally contain negatively charged phospholipids and cause membrane disintegration resulting in cell death; however, cationic-amphiphilic antibacterial polymers with endotoxin neutralization properties, to the best of our knowledge, have not been reported. Bacterial endotoxins such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) cause sepsis that is responsible for a great amount of mortality worldwide. These cationic-amphiphilic polymers can also bind to negatively charged and hydrophobic LPS and cause detoxification. Hence, we envisaged that cationic-amphiphilic polymers can have both antibacterial as well as LPS binding properties. Here we report synthetic amphiphilic polymers with both antibacterial as well as endotoxin neutralizing properties. Levels of proinflammatory cytokines in human monocytes caused by LPS stimulation were inhibited by >80% when coincubated with these polymers. These reductions were found to be dependent on concentration and, more importantly, on the side-chain chemical structure due to variations in the hydrophobicity profiles of these polymers. These cationic-amphiphilic polymers bind and cause LPS neutralization and detoxification. Investigations of polymer interaction with LPS using fluorescence spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering (DLS) showed that these polymers bind but neither dissociate nor promote LPS aggregation. We show that polymer binding to LPS leads to sort of a pseudoaggregate formation resulting in LPS neutralization/detoxification. These findings provide an unusual mechanism of LPS neutralization using novel synthetic cationic-amphiphilic polymers.

  11. Critical bubble radius in solvent sublation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The complex compound of dithizone-Co(Ⅱ) was separated and concentrated from the aqueous phase to n-octanol by solvent sublation. From the analysis of the coalescence behavior of bubbles on water-organic interface, the conception of critical bubble radius was proposed, and the value of the critical bubble radius in the water-octanol system was obtained: 1.196 × 10-3 m. The simulation of the mathematical model using CBR and experimental data is completed with perfect results, and the simulation of the mathematical model using CBR is very different with the classic one. The analytical results proved that the critical bubble radius should be adequately considered in mathematical model of solvent sublation.

  12. Relationship Between Thermal Tides and Radius Excess

    CERN Document Server

    Socrates, Aristotle

    2013-01-01

    Close-in extrasolar gas giants -- the hot Jupiters -- display departures in radius above the zero-temperature solution, the radius excess, that are anomalously high. The radius excess of hot Jupiters follows a relatively close relation with thermal tidal tidal torques and holds for ~ 4-5 orders of magnitude in a characteristic thermal tidal power in such a way that is consistent with basic theoretical expectations. The relation suggests that thermal tidal torques determine the global thermodynamic and spin state of the hot Jupiters. On empirical grounds, it is shown that theories of hot Jupiter inflation that invoke a constant fraction of the stellar flux to be deposited at great depth are, essentially, falsified.

  13. A Maximum Radius for Habitable Planets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alibert, Yann

    2015-09-01

    We compute the maximum radius a planet can have in order to fulfill two constraints that are likely necessary conditions for habitability: 1- surface temperature and pressure compatible with the existence of liquid water, and 2- no ice layer at the bottom of a putative global ocean, that would prevent the operation of the geologic carbon cycle to operate. We demonstrate that, above a given radius, these two constraints cannot be met: in the Super-Earth mass range (1-12 Mearth), the overall maximum that a planet can have varies between 1.8 and 2.3 Rearth. This radius is reduced when considering planets with higher Fe/Si ratios, and taking into account irradiation effects on the structure of the gas envelope.

  14. Simultaneous anion and cation mobility in polypyrrole

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skaarup, Steen; Bay, Lasse; Vidanapathirana, K.;

    2003-01-01

    Polypyrrole (PPy) polymer films permanently doped with large, immobile anion dodecyl benzene sulfonate (DBS) have been characterized by cyclic voltammetry in order to clarify the roles of cations and anions in the aqueous electrolyte as mobile ions in the film. Aqueous solutions of 0.05-0.1 M...... alkali metal chlorides as well as BaCl2, NaBr and (CH3CH2CH2)(4)NBr were used to investigate the effects of both the ionic charge, size and shape. In 1: 1 electrolytes using small ions only three peaks are present: a sharp cathodic peak at ca. - 0.6 V vs, SCE representing both the insertion of cations...... complicating reproducibility when employing PPy(DBS) polymers as actuators. When the cation is doubly charged, it enters the film less readily, and anions dominate the mobility. Using a large and bulky cation switches the mechanism to apparently total anion motion. The changes in area of the three peaks...

  15. Management of Malunions of the Distal Radius

    OpenAIRE

    Yaniel Truffin Rodriguez; Osmany Pérez Martínez; Rafael Esmandy Gómez Arregoitía; Indira L. Gómez Gil

    2015-01-01

    Fractures of the distal radius often present with a group of major complications. Of these, malunion is one of the most disabling. Its management through salvage procedures is essential for its correction. The case of a 60-year-old healthy woman of urban origin treated at the Dr. Gustavo Aldereguía Lima University General Hospital in Cienfuegos because of a malunion of the distal end of the left radius as a result of a previous Colles' fracture is presented. The patient complained of severe p...

  16. Contact radius of stamps in reversible adhesion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    A mechanics model is developed for the contact radius of stamps with pyramid tips in transfer printing.This is important to the realization of reversible control of adhesion,which has many important applications,such as climbing robots,medical tapes,and transfer printing of electronics.The contact radius is shown to scale linearly with the work of adhesion between the stamp and the contacting surface,and inversely with the plane-strain modulus of the stamp. It also depends on the cone angle and tip radiu...

  17. BOREL RADIUS AND T-RADIUS OF THE ALGEBROIDAL FUNCTION IN THE UNIT DISC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kong Yinying

    2012-01-01

    Using Ahlfors' theory of covering surface and a type-function,we confirm the existence theorem of a Borel radius and a T-radius for the algebroidal function dealing with multiple values in the unit disc,which briefly extend some results for the algebroidal functions in the complex plane.

  18. Topographic matching of distal radius and proximal fibula articular surface for distal radius osteoarticular reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H; Chen, S; Wang, Z; Guo, Y; Liu, B; Tong, D

    2016-07-01

    During osteoarticular reconstruction of the distal radius with the proximal fibula, congruity between the two articular surfaces is an important factor in determining the quality of the outcome. In this study, a three-dimensional model and a coordinate transformation algorithm were developed on computed tomography scanning. Articular surface matching was performed and parameters for the optimal position were determined quantitatively. The mean radii of best-fit spheres of the articular surfaces of the distal radius and proximal fibula were compared quantitatively. The radial inclination and volar tilt following reconstruction by an ipsilateral fibula graft, rather than the contralateral, best resembles the values of the native distal radius. Additionally, the ipsilateral fibula graft reconstructed a larger proportion of the distal radius articular surface than did the contralateral. The ipsilateral proximal fibula graft provides a better match for the reconstruction of the distal radius articular surface than the contralateral, and the optimal position for graft placement is quantitatively determined.

  19. Mass and Radius of Neutron Stars Constrained by Photospheric Radius Expansion X-ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Kyujin; Kim, Myungkuk; Kim, Young-Min; Lee, Chang-Hwan

    Simultaneous measurement of mass and radius of a neutron star is important because it provides strong constraint on the equation of state for nuclear matter inside a neutron star. Type I X-ray Bursts (XRBs) that have been observed in low-mass X-ray binaries sometimes show photospheric radius expansion (PRE). By combining observed fluxes, X-ray spectra, and distances of PRE XRBs and using a statistical analysis, it is possible to simultaneously constrain the mass and radius of a neutron star. However, the mass and radius of a neutron star estimated in this method depends on the opacity of accreted material. We investigate the effect of the opacity on the mass and radius estimation by taking into account the cases that the hydrogen mass fraction of accreted material has narrowly-distributed values. We present preliminary results that are investigated with three different values of hydrogen mass fraction and compare our results with previous studies.

  20. Cation-cation interaction in neptunyl(V) compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krot, N.N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Physical Chemistry (Russian Federation); Saeki, Masakatsu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-03-01

    The original manuscript was prepared by Professor N.N. Krot of Institute of Physical Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, in 1997. Saeki tried to translate that into Japanese and to add some new data since 1997. The contents include the whole picture of cation-cation interactions mainly in 5-valence neptunium compounds. Firstly, characteristic structures of neptunium are summarized of the cation-cation bonding in compounds. Secondly, it is mentioned how the cation-cation bonding affects physical and chemical properties of the compounds. Then, characterization-methods for the cation-cation bonding in the compounds are discussed. Finally, the cation-cation interactions in compounds of other actinide-ions are shortly reviewed. (author)

  1. Denseness of Numerical Radius Attaining Holomorphic Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee HanJu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the density of numerical radius attaining holomorphic functions on certain Banach spaces using the Lindenstrauss method. In particular, it is shown that if a complex Banach space is locally uniformly convex, then the set of all numerical attaining elements of is dense in .

  2. Denseness of Numerical Radius Attaining Holomorphic Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Ju Lee

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the density of numerical radius attaining holomorphic functions on certain Banach spaces using the Lindenstrauss method. In particular, it is shown that if a complex Banach space X is locally uniformly convex, then the set of all numerical attaining elements of A(BX:X is dense in A(BX:X.

  3. Improved KAM estimates for the Siegel radius

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liverani, C.; Turchetti, G.

    1986-12-01

    For the Siegel center problem the authors explore the possibility of improving the KAM estimates, with a view to possible extensions to Hamiltonian systems. The use of a suitable norm and explicit perturbative computations allow estimates to within a factor 2 of the Siegel radius for the quadratic map.

  4. Mass-radius relationships for exoplanets

    CERN Document Server

    Swift, Damian; Hicks, Damien; Hamel, Sebastien; Caspersen, Kyle; Schwegler, Eric; Collins, Gilbert; Ackland, Graeme

    2010-01-01

    For planets other than Earth, and in particular for exoplanets, interpretation of the composition and structure depends largely on a comparison of the mass and radius with the composition expected given their distance from the parent star. The composition implies a mass-radius relation for different layers within the planet, which is based heavily on equations of state calculated from electronic structure theory and measured experimentally on Earth. We summarize current techniques for predicting and measuring equations of state, and calculate mass-radius relations for key materials for which the equation of state is reasonably well established, and for Fe-rock combinations. The relations are compared with the observed masses and radii of planets and exoplanets, broadly supporting recent inferences about exoplanet structures. CoRoT-7b probably has a rocky mantle over an Fe-based core. The core is likely to be proportionately smaller than the Earth's. GJ 1214b lies between the mass-radius curves for H_2Oand CH_...

  5. Equivalent pore radius and velocity of elastic waves in shale. Skjold Flank-1 Well, Danish North Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mbia, Ernest Ncha; Fabricius, Ida Lykke; Oji, Collins O.

    2013-01-01

    Equivalent pore radius links permeability and porosity of a porous medium. This property can be calculated from specific surface and porosity data measured in the laboratory. We can obtain porosity information from logging data but specific surface information can only be obtained from laboratory...... experiments on cuttings or core samples. In this study we demonstrate that elastic moduli as calculated from bulk density and velocity of elastic waves relate to equivalent pore radius of the studied shale intervals. This relationship establishes the possibility of calculating equivalent pore radius from...... and BET specific surface were obtained from these samples using kaolinite and smectite as reference. The cuttings samples were also characterized with respect to mineralogical composition, content of organic carbon and cation exchange capacity.Equivalent pore radius was calculated from porosity and BET...

  6. Diffusion of Trivalent Cations in MgO at 1 atm and High Temperature (1473-1775 K)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crispin, K. L.; van Orman, J. A.; Li, C.

    2006-12-01

    Trivalent impurities govern cation vacancy concentrations in most minerals, and thus play a central role in solid-state diffusion in the Earth. Periclase is the second most abundant mineral in the lower mantle and is a key to understanding creep and chemical exchange mechanisms. Although periclase is among the simplest of minerals, diffusion of trivalent cations is a complex process. Trivalent cations tend to bind to oppositely charged cation vacancies to form pairs, and in some cases higher-order complexes. Impurity-vacancy pairs are extremely mobile species; the continual presence of a vacancy adjacent to the trivalent impurity allows it to move through the lattice much more rapidly than it would in the absence of binding. We have performed experiments on diffusion of Ga, Sc, Y and Cr in periclase, and developed a theoretical approach to extract the binding energy and impurity-vacancy pair diffusivity from the experimental diffusion profiles. Experiments were performed in an open air vertical tube furnace. Diffusion source material consisted either of a spinel powder (Al) or powder doped with trace (0.5-1.0 mol%) trivalent cations (Ga, Sc, Y, Cr) through a combustion synthesis. This powder was then packed around a pure MgO single-crystal in a platinum capsule and suspended in the furnace. Samples were held at constant temperature, then quenched, mounted in epoxy perpendicular to the diffusion interface, ground to near the center of the crystal, and polished with diamond suspensions. Diffusion profiles were measured using a JEOL 8900 electron microprobe with a focused 50 nA beam and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy. Spots were obtained every 2.5 microns along a track perpendicular to the edge of the crystal. Theoretical diffusion profiles were calculated numerically, and were fit to the experimental profiles through chi- squared minimization. Impurity-vacancy binding energies obtained from the fit are generally in good agreement with theoretical calculations

  7. The influence of large cations on the electrochemical properties of tunnel-structured metal oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yifei; Zhan, Chun; He, Kun; Chen, Hungru; Yao, Wentao; Sharifi-Asl, Soroosh; Song, Boao; Yang, Zhenzhen; Nie, Anmin; Luo, Xiangyi; Wang, Hao; Wood, Stephen M.; Amine, Khalil; Islam, M. Saiful; Lu, Jun; Shahbazian-Yassar, Reza

    2016-11-01

    Metal oxides with a tunnelled structure are attractive as charge storage materials for rechargeable batteries and supercapacitors, since the tunnels enable fast reversible insertion/extraction of charge carriers (for example, lithium ions). Common synthesis methods can introduce large cations such as potassium, barium and ammonium ions into the tunnels, but how these cations affect charge storage performance is not fully understood. Here, we report the role of tunnel cations in governing the electrochemical properties of electrode materials by focusing on potassium ions in α-MnO2. We show that the presence of cations inside 2 × 2 tunnels of manganese dioxide increases the electronic conductivity, and improves lithium ion diffusivity. In addition, transmission electron microscopy analysis indicates that the tunnels remain intact whether cations are present in the tunnels or not. Our systematic study shows that cation addition to α-MnO2 has a strong beneficial effect on the electrochemical performance of this material.

  8. Is the proton radius puzzle an evidence of extra dimensions?

    CERN Document Server

    Dahia, F

    2015-01-01

    The proton charge radius inferred from muonic hydrogen spectroscopy is not compatible with the previous value given by CODATA-2010, which, on its turn, essentially relies on measurements of the electron-proton interaction. The proton's new size was extracted from the 2S-2P Lamb shift in the muonic hydrogen, which showed an energy excess of 0.3 meV in comparison to the theoretical prediction, evaluated with the CODATA radius. Higher-dimensional gravity is a candidate to explain this discrepancy, since the muon-proton gravitational interaction is stronger than the electron-proton interaction and, in the context of braneworld models, the gravitational potential can be hugely amplified in short distances when compared to the Newtonian potential. Motivated by these ideas, we study a muonic hydrogen confined in a thick brane. We show that the muon-proton gravitational interaction modified by extra dimensions can provide the additional separation of 0.3 meV between 2S and 2P states. In this scenario, the gravitation...

  9. Independent adsorption of monovalent cations and cationic polymers at PE/PG lipid membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khomich, Daria A.; Nesterenko, Alexey M.; Kostritskii, Andrei Yu; Kondinskaia, Diana A.; Ermakov, Yuri A.; Gurtovenko, Andrey A.

    2017-01-01

    Synthetic cationic polymers constitute a wide class of polymeric biocides. Commonly their antimicrobial effect is associated to their interaction with bacterial membranes. In the present study we analyze the interaction of various cationic polymers with model bacterial membranes comprised of a mixture of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and phosphatidylglycerol (PG). We describe a polymer-membrane interaction as a process of modification of the surface charge. It is well known that small monovalent inorganic cations (Na+, K+) cannot overcharge the surface of a bilayer containing anionic lipids. In contrast, polycations are able to overcharge anionic membranes and demonstrate a very large input to the electric field distribution at the membrane-water interface. We aimed here to study the electrostatic effects associated with the interaction of polycations of different types with a model lipid membrane whose composition closely resembles that of bacterial membranes (PE:PG = 1:4). Four different cationic polymers (polyvinylamine, polyallylamine, poly-L-lysine and polyethylenimine) were adsorbed at a model PE/PG bilayer in MD simulations. Adsorption of sodium cations was inspected separately for PE/PG bilayers of different composition and cation’s binding parameters were determined. From computational experiments and consequent theoretical analysis we concluded that sodium adsorption at anionic binding sites does not depend on the presence of polycations. Therefore, we hypothesize that antimicrobial activity of the studied cationic polymers should depend on the ionic composition of the medium.

  10. Migration of Cations and Anions in Amorphous Polymer Electrolytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    N.A.Stolwijk; S.H.Obeidi; M.Wiencierz

    2007-01-01

    1 Results Polymer electrolytes are used as ion conductors in batteries and fuel cells.Simple systems consist of a polymer matrix complexing an inorganic salt and are fully amorphous at the temperatures of interest.Both cations and anions are mobile and contribute to charge transport.Most studies on polymer electrolytes use the electrical conductivity to characterize the ion mobility.However,conductivity measurements cannot discriminate between cations and anions.This paper reports some recent results fr...

  11. Interactions between cationic liposomes and drugs or biomolecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANA MARIA CARMONA-RIBEIRO

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available Multiple uses for synthetic cationic liposomes composed of dioctadecyldimethylammonium bromide (DODAB bilayer vesicles are presented. Drugs or biomolecules can be solubilized or incorporated in the cationic bilayers. The cationic liposomes themselves can act as antimicrobial agents causing death of bacteria and fungi at concentrations that barely affect mammalian cells in culture. Silica particles or polystyrene microspheres can be functionalized by coverage with DODAB bilayers or phospholipid monolayers. Negatively charged antigenic proteins can be carried by the cationic liposomes which generate a remarkable immunoadjuvant action. Nucleotides or DNA can be physically adsorbed to the cationic liposomes to be transferred to mammalian cells for gene therapy. An overview of the interactions between DODAB vesicles and some biomolecules or drugs clearly points out their versatility for useful applications in a near future.

  12. Interactions between cationic liposomes and drugs or biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona-Ribeiro, A M

    2000-01-01

    Multiple uses for synthetic cationic liposomes composed of dioctadecyldimethylammonium bromide (DODAB) bilayer vesicles are presented. Drugs or biomolecules can be solubilized or incorporated in the cationic bilayers. The cationic liposomes themselves can act as antimicrobial agents causing death of bacteria and fungi at concentrations that barely affect mammalian cells in culture. Silica particles or polystyrene microspheres can be functionalized by coverage with DODAB bilayers or phospholipid monolayers. Negatively charged antigenic proteins can be carried by the cationic liposomes which generate a remarkable immunoadjuvant action. Nucleotides or DNA can be physically adsorbed to the cationic liposomes to be transferred to mammalian cells for gene therapy. An overview of the interactions between DODAB vesicles and some biomolecules or drugs clearly points out their versatility for useful applications in a near future.

  13. Do Cation-π Interactions Exist in Bacteriorhodopsin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Kun-Sheng; WANG Guang-Yu; HE Jin-An

    2001-01-01

    Metal ions are essential to the structure and physiological functions of bacteriorhodopsin. Experimental evidence suggests the existence of specific cation binding to the negatively charged groups of Asp85 and Asp212 via an electrostatic interaction. However, only using electrostatic force is not enough to explain the role of the metal cations because the carboxylate of Asp85 is well known to be protonated in the M intermediate. Considering the presence of some aromatic amino acid residues in the vicinity of the retinal pocket, the existence of cation-π interactions between the metal cation and aromatic amino acid residues is suggested. Obviously, introduction of this kind of interaction is conducive to understanding the effects of the metal cations and aromatic amino acid residues inside the protein on the structural stability and proton pumping of bacteriorhodopsin.

  14. Prediction of mono-, bi-, and trivalent metal cation relative toxicity to the seaweed Gracilaria domingensis (Gracilariales, Rhodophyta) in synthetic seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Luiz Fernando; Zambotti-Villela, Leonardo; Yokoya, Nair Sumie; Bastos, Erick Leite; Stevani, Cassius Vinicius; Colepicolo, Pio

    2013-11-01

    The present study reports a 48-h aquatic metal-toxicity assay based on daily growth rates of the red seaweed Gracilaria domingensis (Gracilariales, Rhodophyta) in synthetic seawater. The median inhibitory concentration (IC50) for each metal cation was experimentally determined, and the ratios of free ions (aqueous complex) were calculated by software minimization of the total equilibrium activity (MINTEQA2) to determine the free median inhibitory concentration (IC50F). A model for predicting the toxicity of 14 metal cations was developed using the generic function approximation algorithm (GFA) with log IC50F values as the dependent variables and the following properties as independent variables: ionic radius (r), atomic number (AN), electronegativity (Xm ), covalent index (Xm (2) r), first hydrolysis constant (|log KOH |), softness index (σp ), ion charge (Z), ionization potential (ΔIP), electrochemical potential (ΔEo ), atomic number divided by ionization potential (AN/ΔIP), and the cation polarizing power for Z(2) /r and Z/AR. The 3-term independent variables were predicted as the best-fit model (log IC50F: -23.64 + 5.59 Z/AR + 0.99 |log KOH | + 37.05 σp ; adjusted r(2) : 0.88; predicted r(2) : 0.68; Friedman lack-of-fit score: 1.6). This mathematical expression can be used to predict metal-biomolecule interactions, as well as the toxicity of mono-, bi-, and trivalent metal cations, which have not been experimentally tested in seaweed to date. Quantitative ion-character relationships allowed the authors to infer that the mechanism of toxicity might involve an interaction between metals and functional groups of biological species containing sulfur or oxygen.

  15. MASS-RADIUS RELATIONSHIPS FOR EXOPLANETS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swift, D. C.; Eggert, J. H.; Hicks, D. G.; Hamel, S.; Caspersen, K.; Schwegler, E.; Collins, G. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California, CA 94550 (United States); Nettelmann, N. [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Rostock, D-18051 Rostock (Germany); Ackland, G. J. [Centre for Science at Extreme Conditions, School of Physics, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom)

    2012-01-01

    For planets other than Earth, particularly exoplanets, interpretation of the composition and structure depends largely on comparing the mass and radius with the composition expected given their distance from the parent star. The composition implies a mass-radius relation which relies heavily on equations of state calculated from electronic structure theory and measured experimentally on Earth. We lay out a method for deriving and testing equations of state, and deduce mass-radius and mass-pressure relations for key, relevant materials whose equation of state (EOS) is reasonably well established, and for differentiated Fe/rock. We find that variations in the EOS, such as may arise when extrapolating from low-pressure data, can have significant effects on predicted mass-radius relations and on planetary pressure profiles. The relations are compared with the observed masses and radii of planets and exoplanets, broadly supporting recent inferences about exoplanet structures. Kepler-10b is apparently 'Earth-like', likely with a proportionately larger core than Earth's, nominally 2/3 of the mass of the planet. CoRoT-7b is consistent with a rocky mantle over an Fe-based core which is likely to be proportionately smaller than Earth's. GJ 1214b lies between the mass-radius curves for H{sub 2}O and CH{sub 4}, suggesting an 'icy' composition with a relatively large core or a relatively large proportion of H{sub 2}O. CoRoT-2b is less dense than the hydrogen relation, which could be explained by an anomalously high degree of heating or by higher than assumed atmospheric opacity. HAT-P-2b is slightly denser than the mass-radius relation for hydrogen, suggesting the presence of a significant amount of matter of higher atomic number. CoRoT-3b lies close to the hydrogen relation. The pressure at the center of Kepler-10b is 1.5{sup +1.2}{sub -1.0} TPa. The central pressure in CoRoT-7b is probably close to 0.8 TPa, though may be up to 2 TPa. These

  16. On the pi pi continuum in the nucleon form factors and the proton radius puzzle

    CERN Document Server

    Hoferichter, M; de Elvira, J Ruiz; Hammer, H -W; Meißner, U -G

    2016-01-01

    We present an improved determination of the $\\pi\\pi$ continuum contribution to the isovector spectral functions of the nucleon electromagnetic form factors. Our analysis includes the most up-to-date results for the $\\pi\\pi\\to\\bar N N$ partial waves extracted from Roy-Steiner equations, consistent input for the pion vector form factor, and a thorough discussion of isospin-violating effects and uncertainty estimates. As an application, we consider the $\\pi\\pi$ contribution to the isovector electric and magnetic radii by means of sum rules, which, in combination with the accurately known neutron electric radius, are found to slightly prefer a small proton charge radius.

  17. On the ππ continuum in the nucleon form factors and the proton radius puzzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoferichter, M.; Kubis, B.; Ruiz de Elvira, J.; Hammer, H.-W.; Meißner, U.-G.

    2016-11-01

    We present an improved determination of the ππ continuum contribution to the isovector spectral functions of the nucleon electromagnetic form factors. Our analysis includes the most up-to-date results for the ππ→bar{N} N partial waves extracted from Roy-Steiner equations, consistent input for the pion vector form factor, and a thorough discussion of isospin-violating effects and uncertainty estimates. As an application, we consider the ππ contribution to the isovector electric and magnetic radii by means of sum rules, which, in combination with the accurately known neutron electric radius, are found to slightly prefer a small proton charge radius.

  18. Does the cation really matter? The effect of modifying an ionic liquid cation on an SN2 process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Eden E L; Yau, Hon Man; Hawker, Rebecca R; Croft, Anna K; Harper, Jason B

    2013-09-28

    The rate of reaction of a Menschutkin process in a range of ionic liquids with different cations was investigated, with temperature-dependent kinetic data giving access to activation parameters for the process in each solvent. These data, along with molecular dynamics simulations, demonstrate the importance of accessibility of the charged centre on the cation and that the key interactions are of a generalised electrostatic nature.

  19. Three dimensional finite element analysis of anatomic distal radius Nitinol memory connector treating distal radius fracture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏佳灿; 张春才; 禹宝庆; 许硕贵; 王家林; 纪方; 张雪松; 吴建国; 王保华; 薛召军; 丁祖泉

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the memory biomechanical character of anatomic distal radius Nitinol memory connector (DRMC) in treating distal radius fracture. Methods: Establishing three dimensional model and finite element analysis, we calculated the stress in and around the fracture faces when distal radius fracture was fixated with DRMC. Results: Axial holding stress produced by holding part of DRMC on distal radius was 14.66 MPa. The maximum stress of holding part was 40-70 MPa, the minimum stress was 3-7 MPa,and the stress of compression part was 20-40 MPa. Conclusion: The distribution of stress produced by DRMC around the fracture line is reasonable, and axial holding stress can help stabilize fracture during earlier period. The existence of longitudal compression and memory effect can transfer fixated disused section into developed section and enhance fracture healing.

  20. Cost Effective RADIUS Authentication for Wireless Clients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru ENACEANU

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Network administrators need to keep administrative user information for each network device, but network devices usually support only limited functions for user management. WLAN security is a modern problem that needs to be solved and it requires a lot of overhead especially when applied to corporate wireless networks. Administrators can set up a RADIUS server that uses an external database server to handle authentication, authorization, and accounting for network security issues.

  1. Phacoemulsification efficiency with a radiused phaco tip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Isha; Zaugg, Brian; Stagg, Brian C; Barlow, William R; Pettey, Jeff H; Jensen, Jason D; Kirk, Kevin R; Olson, Randall J

    2014-05-01

    To evaluate radiused and nonradiused phacoemulsification tips to determine which tip is more efficient in removal of lens fragments using 3 ultrasound (US) modalities. John A. Moran Eye Center Laboratories, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA. Experimental study. Porcine lens nuclei were formalin-soaked for 2 hours or 3 hours and then divided into 2.0 mm cubes. Thirty-degree, 0.9 mm beveled radiused tips and nonradiused tips were used with torsional, transverse, and micropulsed US modalities. Bent tips were used with torsional and transversal US, and straight tips were used with micropulsed US. Efficiency (time to lens removal) and chatter (number of lens fragment repulsions from the tip) were determined. The mean phacoemulsification efficiency was statistically significantly decreased (increased time for removal) with the radiused tip compared with the nonradiused tip for torsional US only (2-hour soaked lenses: 2.14 seconds ± 1.94 [SD] versus 1.18 ± 0.69 seconds [P tip showed decreased efficiency with torsional US only. No author has a financial or proprietary interest in any material or method mentioned. Copyright © 2014 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. On the radius of habitable planets

    CERN Document Server

    Alibert, Yann

    2013-01-01

    The conditions that a planet must fulfill to be habitable are not precisely known. However, it is comparatively easier to define conditions under which a planet is very likely not habitable. Finding such conditions is important as it can help select, in an ensemble of potentially observable planets, which ones should be observed in greater detail for characterization studies. Assuming, as in the Earth, that the presence of a C-cycle is a necessary condition for long-term habitability, we derive, as a function of the planetary mass, a radius above which a planet is likely not habitable. We compute the maximum radius a planet can have to fulfill two constraints: surface conditions compatible with the existence of liquid water, and no ice layer at the bottom of a putative global ocean. We demonstrate that, above a given radius, these two constraints cannot be met. We compute internal structure models of planets, using a five-layer model (core, inner mantle, outer mantle, ocean, and atmosphere), for different mas...

  3. Role of carboxyl residues and membrane lipids in cation binding to bacteriorhodopsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrabeta-Robinson, E; Semadeni, M; Packer, L

    1989-03-01

    To investigate the site specificity of cation binding to bacteriorhodopsin, carboxyl groups were chemically modified in purple membrane preparations from Halobacterium halobium. Cation binding followed by EPR and visible spectroscopy has led us to the conclusion that two cations bind to the surface regions and that at least one cation binds to carboxyl groups in the protein interior. Conformational freedom is necessary for the cooperative conversion of deionized blue species to cation-reconstituted purple species. Studies of white membranes from the JW-5 strain showed that a higher content of charged lipids results in the binding of approximately 100 more color-regulating cations and in negative cooperativity in the blue-to-purple species conversion. A greater dependence of protein structure on these bound cations suggests a role for cations in the modulation of opsin-lipid interaction.

  4. Commentary on the Radius of the Sun: Optical Illusion or Manifestation of a Real Surface?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In modern solar theory, the photospheric surface merely act s as an optical illusion. Gases cannot support the existence of such a boundary. Conve rsely, the liquid metallic hydrogen model supports the idea that the Sun has a distinct s urface. Observational as- tronomy continues to report increasingly precise measures of solar radius and diameter. Even the smallest temporal variations in these parameters w ould have profound impli- cations relative to modeling the Sun and understanding clim ate fluctuations on Earth. A review of the literature convincingly demonstrates that th e solar body does indeed pos- sess a measurable radius which provides, along with previou s discussions (Robitaille P.M. On the Presence of a Distinct Solar Surface: A Reply to He rv ́e Faye. Progr. Phys. , 2011, v. 3, 75–78., the twenty-first line of evidence that t he Sun is comprised of condensed-matter.

  5. Repulsion between oppositely charged planar macroions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YongSeok Jho

    Full Text Available The repulsive interaction between oppositely charged macroions is investigated using Grand Canonical Monte Carlo simulations of an unrestricted primitive model, including the effect of inhomogeneous surface charge and its density, the depth of surface charge, the cation size, and the dielectric permittivity of solvent and macroions, and their contrast. The origin of the repulsion is a combination of osmotic pressure and ionic screening resulting from excess salt between the macroions. The excess charge over-reduces the electrostatic attraction between macroions and raises the entropic repulsion. The magnitude of the repulsion increases when the dielectric constant of the solvent is lowered (below that of water and/or the surface charge density is increased, in good agreement with experiment. Smaller size of surface charge and the cation, their discreteness and mobility are other factors that enhance the repulsion and charge inversion phenomenons.

  6. Predicting Organic Cation Sorption Coefficients: Accounting for Competition from Sorbed Inorganic Cations Using a Simple Probe Molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolin, William C; Goyetche, Reaha; Carter, Katherine; Medina, John; Vasudevan, Dharni; MacKay, Allison A

    2017-06-06

    With the increasing number of emerging contaminants that are cationic at environmentally relevant pH values, there is a need for robust predictive models of organic cation sorption coefficients (Kd). Current predictive models fail to account for the differences in the identity, abundance, and affinity of surface-associated inorganic exchange ions naturally present at negatively charged receptor sites on environmental solids. To better understand how organic cation sorption is influenced by surface-associated inorganic exchange ions, sorption coefficients of 10 organic cations (including eight pharmaceuticals and two simple probe organic amines) were determined for six homoionic forms of the aluminosilicate mineral, montmorillonite. Organic cation sorption coefficients exhibited consistent trends for all compounds across the various homoionic clays with sorption coefficients (Kd) decreasing as follows: Kd(Na(+)) > Kd(NH4(+)) ≥ Kd(K(+)) > Kd(Ca(2+)) ≥ Kd(Mg(2+)) > Kd(Al(3+)). This trend for competition between organic cations and exchangeable inorganic cations is consistent with the inorganic cation selectivity sequence, determined for exchange between inorganic ions. Such consistent trends in competition between organic and inorganic cations suggested that a simple probe cation, such as phenyltrimethylammonium or benzylamine, could capture soil-to-soil variations in native inorganic cation identity and abundance for the prediction of organic cation sorption to soils and soil minerals. Indeed, sorption of two pharmaceutical compounds to 30 soils was better described by phenyltrimethylammonium sorption than by measures of benzylamine sorption, effective cation exchange capacity alone, or a model from the literature (Droge, S., and Goss, K. Environ. Sci. Technol. 2013, 47, 14224). A hybrid approach integrating structural scaling factors derived from this literature model of organic cation sorption, along with phenyltrimethylammonium Kd values, allowed for

  7. Comparison of Cation Adsorption by Isostructural Rutile and Cassiterite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machesky, Michael L. [Illinois State Water Survey, Champaign, IL; Wesolowski, David J [ORNL; Rosenqvist, Jorgen K [ORNL; Predota, M. [University of South Bohemia, Czech Republic; Vlcek, Lukas [ORNL; Ridley, Moira K [ORNL; Kohli, V [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Zhang, Zhan [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Fenter, Paul [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Cummings, Peter T [ORNL; Lvov, Serguei N. [Pennsylvania State University; Fedkin, Mark V [ORNL; Rodriguez-Santiago, V [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Kubicki, James D. [Pennsylvania State University; Bandura, Andrei V. [St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg, Russia

    2011-01-01

    Macroscopic net proton charging curves for powdered rutile and cassiterite specimens with the (110) Crystal face predominant, as a function of pH in RbCl and NaCl solutions, trace SrCl2 in NaCl, and trace ZnCl2 in NaCl and Na Triflate solutions, are compared to corresponding molecular-level information obtained from static DFT optimizations and classical MD simulations, as well as synchrotron X-ray methods. The similarities and differences in the macroscopic charging behavior of rutile and cassiterite largely reflect the cation binding modes observed at the molecular level. Cation adsorption is primarily inner-sphere on both isostructural (110) surfaces, despite predictions that outer-sphere binding should predominate on low bulk dielectric constant oxides such as cassiterite ( bulk 11). Inner-sphere adsorption is also significant for Rb and Na on neutral surfaces, whereas Cl- binding is predominately outer-sphere. As negative surface charge increases, relatively more Rb , Na , and especially Sr2 are bound in highly desolvated tetradentate fashion on the rutile (110) surface, largely accounting for enhanced negative charge development relative to cassiterite. Charging curves in the presence of Zn2 are very steep but similar for both oxides, reflective of Zn2 hydrolysis (and accompanying proton release) during the adsorption process, and the similar binding modes for ZnOH on both surfaces. These results suggest that differences in cation adsorption between high and low bulk dielectric constant oxides are more subtly related to the relative degree of cation desolvation accompanying inner-sphere binding (i.e., more tetradentate binding on rutile), rather than distinct inner- and outer-sphere adsorption modes. Cation desolvation may be favored at the rutile (110) surface in part because inner-sphere water molecules are bound further from and less tightly than on the cassiterite (110) surface. Hence, their removal upon inner-sphere cation binding is relatively more

  8. Comparison of cation adsorption by isostructural rutile and cassiterite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machesky, Michael; Wesolowski, David; Rosenqvist, Jörgen; Předota, Milan; Vlcek, Lukas; Ridley, Moira; Kohli, Vaibhav; Zhang, Zhan; Fenter, Paul; Cummings, Peter; Lvov, Serguei; Fedkin, Mark; Rodriguez-Santiago, Victor; Kubicki, James; Bandura, Andrei

    2011-04-19

    Macroscopic net proton charging curves for powdered rutile and cassiterite specimens with the (110) crystal face predominant, as a function of pH in RbCl and NaCl solutions, trace SrCl(2) in NaCl, and trace ZnCl(2) in NaCl and Na Triflate solutions, are compared to corresponding molecular-level information obtained from static DFT optimizations and classical MD simulations, as well as synchrotron X-ray methods. The similarities and differences in the macroscopic charging behavior of rutile and cassiterite largely reflect the cation binding modes observed at the molecular level. Cation adsorption is primarily inner-sphere on both isostructural (110) surfaces, despite predictions that outer-sphere binding should predominate on low bulk dielectric constant oxides such as cassiterite (ε(bulk) ≈ 11). Inner-sphere adsorption is also significant for Rb(+) and Na(+) on neutral surfaces, whereas Cl(-) binding is predominately outer-sphere. As negative surface charge increases, relatively more Rb(+), Na(+), and especially Sr(2+) are bound in highly desolvated tetradentate fashion on the rutile (110) surface, largely accounting for enhanced negative charge development relative to cassiterite. Charging curves in the presence of Zn(2+) are very steep but similar for both oxides, reflective of Zn(2+) hydrolysis (and accompanying proton release) during the adsorption process, and the similar binding modes for ZnOH(+) on both surfaces. These results suggest that differences in cation adsorption between high and low bulk dielectric constant oxides are more subtly related to the relative degree of cation desolvation accompanying inner-sphere binding (i.e., more tetradentate binding on rutile), rather than distinct inner- and outer-sphere adsorption modes. Cation desolvation may be favored at the rutile (110) surface in part because inner-sphere water molecules are bound further from and less tightly than on the cassiterite (110) surface. Hence, their removal upon inner

  9. Small-radius jets to all orders

    CERN Document Server

    Cacciari, Matteo; Soyez, Gregory; Salam, Gavin; Dasgupta, Mrinal

    2015-01-01

    With hadron colliders continuing to push the boundaries of precision, it is becoming increas­ ingly important to have a detailed understanding of the subtleties appearing at smaller values of the jet radius R. We present a method to resum all leading logarithmic terms, a'.; Inn R, using a generating functional approach, as was recently discussed in Ref. 1. We study a variety of observables, such as the inclusive jet spectrum and jet vetoes for Higgs physics, and show that small-R effects can be sizeable. Finally, we compare our calculations to existing ALICE data, and show good agreement.

  10. Sorption of the organic cation metoprolol on silica gel from its aqueous solution considering the competition of inorganic cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutzner, Susann; Schaffer, Mario; Börnick, Hilmar; Licha, Tobias; Worch, Eckhard

    2014-05-01

    Systematic batch experiments with the organic monovalent cation metoprolol as sorbate and the synthetic material silica gel as sorbent were conducted with the aim of characterizing the sorption of organic cations onto charged surfaces. Sorption isotherms for metoprolol (>99% protonated in the tested pH of around 6) in competition with mono- and divalent inorganic cations (Na(+), NH4(+), Ca(2+), and Mg(2+)) were determined in order to assess their influence on cation exchange processes and to identify the role of further sorptive interactions. The obtained sorption isotherms could be described well by an exponential function (Freundlich isotherm model) with consistent exponents (about 0.8). In general, a decreasing sorption of metoprolol with increasing concentrations in inorganic cations was observed. Competing ions of the same valence showed similar effects. A significant sorption affinity of metoprolol with ion type dependent Freundlich coefficients KF,0.77 between 234.42 and 426.58 (L/kg)(0.77) could still be observed even at very high concentrations of competing inorganic cations. Additional column experiments confirm this behavior, which suggests the existence of further relevant interactions beside cation exchange. In subsequent batch experiments, the influence of mixtures with more than one competing ion and the effect of a reduced negative surface charge at a pH below the point of zero charge (pHPZC ≈ 2.5) were also investigated. Finally, the study demonstrates that cation exchange is the most relevant but not the sole mechanism for the sorption of metoprolol on silica gel.

  11. Small-angle neutron scattering studies on water soluble complexes of poly(ethylene glycol)-based cationic random copolymer and SDS

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C K Nisha; V Manorama; Souvik Maiti; K N Jayachandran; V K Aswal; P S Goyal

    2004-08-01

    The interaction of cationic random copolymers of methoxy poly(ethylene glycol) monomethacrylate and (3-(methacryloylamino)propyl) trimethylammonium chloride with oppositely charged surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulphate, and the influence of surfactant association on the polymer conformation have been investigated by small-angle neutron scattering. SANS data showed a positive indication of the formation of RCP-SDS complexes. Even though the complete structure of the polyion complexes could not be ascertained, the results obtained give us the information on the local structure in these polymer-surfactant systems. The data were analysed using the log-normal distribution of the polydispersed spherical aggregate model for the local structure in these complexes. For all the systems the median radius and the polydispersity were found to be in the range of 20 ± 2 Å and 0:6 ± 0:05, respectively.

  12. Are classifications of proximal radius fractures reproducible?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    dos Santos João BG

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fractures of the proximal radius need to be classified in an appropriate and reproducible manner. The aim of this study was to assess the reliability of the three most widely used classification systems. Methods Elbow radiographs images of patients with proximal radius fractures were classified according to Mason, Morrey, and Arbeitsgemeinschaft für osteosynthesefragen/Association for the Study of Internal Fixation (AO/ASIF classifications by four observers with different experience with this subject to assess their intra- and inter-observer agreement. Each observer analyzed the images on three different occasions on a computer with numerical sequence randomly altered. Results We found that intra-observer agreement of Mason and Morrey classifications were satisfactory (κ = 0.582 and 0.554, respectively, while the AO/ASIF classification had poor intra-observer agreement (κ = 0.483. Inter-observer agreement was higher in the Mason (κ = 0.429-0.560 and Morrey (κ = 0.319-0.487 classifications than in the AO/ASIF classification (κ = 0.250-0.478, which showed poor reliability. Conclusion Inter- and intra-observer agreement of the Mason and Morey classifications showed overall satisfactory reliability when compared to the AO/ASIF system. The Mason classification is the most reliable system.

  13. Synthesis and characterisation of cationically modified phospholipid polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Andrew L; Berwick, James; Davies, Martyn C; Roberts, Clive J; Wang, Jin-Hai; Small, Sharon; Dunn, Anthony; O'Byrne, Vincent; Redman, Richard P; Jones, Stephen A

    2004-07-01

    Phospholipid-like copolymers based on 2-(methacryloyloxyethyl) phosphorylcholine were synthesised using monomer-starved free radical polymerisation methods and incorporating cationic charge in the form of the choline methacrylate monomer in amounts varying from 0 to 30 wt%, together with a 5 wt% silyl cross-linking agent in order to render them water-insoluble once thermally cured. Characterisation using a variety of techniques including nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, high-pressure liquid chromatography and gel permeation chromatography showed the cationic monomer did not interfere with the polymerisation and that the desired amount of charge had been incorporated. Gravimetric and differential scanning calorimetry methods were used to evaluate the water contents of polymer membranes cured at 70 degrees C, which was seen to increase with increasing cation content, producing materials with water contents ranging from 50% to 98%. Surface plasmon resonance indicated that the coatings swelled rapidly in water, the rate and extent of swelling increasing with increasing cation level. Dynamic contact angle showed that coatings of all the polymers possessed a hydrophobic surface when dry in air, characteristic of the alkyl chains expressed at the surface (>100 degrees advancing angle). Rearrangement of the hydrophilic groups to the surface occurred once wet, to produce highly wettable surfaces with a decrease in advancing angle with increasing cation content. Atomic force microscopy showed all polymer films to be smooth with no features in topographical or phase imaging. Mechanical properties of the dry films were also unaffected by the increase in cation content.

  14. Photochemical generation, isomerization, and oxygenation of stilbene cation radicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, F.D.; Bedell, A.M.; Dykstra, R.E.; Elbert, J.E. (Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (USA)); Gould, I.R.; Farid, S. (Eastman Kodak Co., Rochester, NY (USA))

    1990-10-24

    The cation radicals of cis- and trans-stilbene and several of their ring-substituted derivatives have been generated in solution directly by means of pulsed-laser-induced electron transfer to singlet cyanoanthracenes or indirectly via electron transfer from biphenyl to the singlet cyanoanthracene followed by secondary electron transfer from the stilbenes to the biphenyl cation radical. Transient absorption spectra of the cis- and trans-stilbene cation radicals generated by secondary electron transfer are similar to those previously obtained in 77 K matrices. Quantum yields for radical ion-pair cage escape have been measured for direct electron transfer from the stilbenes to three neutral and one charged singlet acceptor. These values increase as the ion-pair energy increases due to decreased rate constants for radical ion-pair return electron transfer, in accord with the predictions of Marcus theory for highly exergonic electron transfer. Cage-escape efficiencies are larger for trans- vs cis-stilbene cation radicals, possibly due to the greater extent of charge delocalization in the planar trans vs nonpolar cis cation radicals. Cage-escape stilbene cation radicals can initiate a concentration-dependent one way cis- {yields} trans-stilbene isomerization reaction.

  15. Computer simulation of alkali metal cation-montmorillonite hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Fang-Ru Chou [Columbia Univ., Palisades, NY (United States); Skipper, N.T. [Univ. College, London (United Kingdom); Sposito, G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Molecular structure in the interlayers of Li-, Na-, or K-Wyoming montmorillonite with one, two, or three adsorbed water layers was investigated for the first time by concurrent Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, based on the Matsouka-Clementi-Yoshimine, (MCY) model of water-water interactions. Calculated layer spacings, as well as interlayer-species self-diffusion coefficients, were in good agreement with available experimental data. Inner-sphere surface complexes of the cations with tetrahedral charge sites were observed for all hydrates, whereas outer-sphere surface complexes of the cations with octahedral charge sites, found also in the one-layer hydrate, tended to dissociate from the clay mineral basal planes into a diffuse layer in the two- and three-layer hydrates. Differences in the interlayer water structure among the hydrates mainly reflected cation solvation, although some water molecules were entrapped within cavities in the montmorillonite surface. All of the interlayer cation and water species exchanged on the time scale (0.2 ns) of the MD simulations. Comparisons with results obtained using, instead of the MCY model, the TIP4P model for water-water, cation-water, and cation-clay interactions indicated that layer spacings and interlayer species mobilities tend to be under-predicted by the TIP4P model.

  16. Understanding the proton radius puzzle: Nuclear structure effects in light muonic atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present calculations of nuclear structure effects to the Lamb shift in light muonic atoms. We adopt a modern ab-initio approach by combining state-of-the-art nuclear potentials with the hyperspherical harmonics method. Our calculations are instrumental to the determination of nuclear charge radii in the Lamb shift measurements, which will shed light on the proton radius puzzle.

  17. Genetics Home Reference: thrombocytopenia-absent radius syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions TAR syndrome thrombocytopenia-absent radius syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... PDF Open All Close All Description Thrombocytopenia-absent radius (TAR) syndrome is characterized by the absence of ...

  18. Mass-radius relations of white dwarfs at finite temperatures

    OpenAIRE

    Boshkayev, Kuantay; Rueda, Jorge A.; Ruffini, Remo; Zhami, Bakytzhan; Kalymova, Zhanerke; Balgimbekov, Galymdin

    2016-01-01

    We construct mass-radius relations of white dwarfs taking into account the effects of rotation and finite temperatures. We compare and contrast the theoretical mass-radius relations with observational data.

  19. Cationic disorder and Mn{sup 3+}/Mn{sup 4+} charge ordering in the B′ and B″ sites of Ca{sub 3}Mn{sub 2}NbO{sub 9} perovskite: a comparison with Ca{sub 3}Mn{sub 2}WO{sub 9}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    López, C.A., E-mail: calopez@unsl.edu.ar [INTEQUI-Área de Química General e Inorgánica “Dr. G. F. Puelles”, Facultad de Química, Bioquímica y Farmacia, Universidad Nacional de San Luis, Chacabuco y Pedernera, 5700 San Luis (Argentina); Centro Atómico Bariloche, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica and Instituto Balseiro, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, 8400S.C. de Bariloche, Río Negro (Argentina); Saleta, M.E. [Centro Atómico Bariloche, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica and Instituto Balseiro, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, 8400S.C. de Bariloche, Río Negro (Argentina); Pedregosa, J.C. [INTEQUI-Área de Química General e Inorgánica “Dr. G. F. Puelles”, Facultad de Química, Bioquímica y Farmacia, Universidad Nacional de San Luis, Chacabuco y Pedernera, 5700 San Luis (Argentina); Sánchez, R.D. [Centro Atómico Bariloche, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica and Instituto Balseiro, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, 8400S.C. de Bariloche, Río Negro (Argentina); Alonso, J.A. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); and others

    2014-02-15

    We describe the preparation, crystal structure determination, magnetic and transport properties of two novel Mn-containing perovskites, with a different electronic configuration for Mn atoms located in B site. Ca{sub 3}Mn{sup 3+}{sub 2}WO{sub 9} and Ca{sub 3}Mn{sup 3+/4+}{sub 2}NbO{sub 9} were synthesized by standard ceramic procedures; the crystallographic structure was studied from X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) and neutron powder diffraction (NPD). Both phases exhibit a monoclinic symmetry (S.G.: P2{sub 1}/n); Ca{sub 3}Mn{sub 2}WO{sub 9} presents a long-range ordering over the B sites, whereas Ca{sub 3}Mn{sub 2}NbO{sub 9} is strongly disordered. By “in-situ” NPD, the temperature evolution of the structure study presents an interesting evolution in the octahedral size (〈Mn–O〉) for Ca{sub 3}Mn{sub 2}NbO{sub 9}, driven by a charge ordering effect between Mn{sup 3+} and Mn{sup 4+} atoms, related to the anomaly observed in the transport measurements at T≈160 K. Both materials present a magnetic order below T{sub C}=30 K and 40 K for W and Nb materials, respectively. The magneto-transport measurements display non-negligible magnetoresistance properties in the paramagnetic regime. - Graphical abstract: Comparison between the octahedron size and the magnetic behaviour for Ca{sub 3}Mn{sub 2}NbO{sub 9} in the temperature region where the charge and magnetic order occur. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Two novel Mn-containing double perovskites were obtained by solid-state reactions. • Both double perovskites are monoclinic (P2{sub 1}/n) determined by XRPD and NPD. • Ca{sub 3}Mn{sub 2}WO{sub 9} contains Mn{sup 3+} while Ca{sub 3}Mn{sub 2}NbO{sub 9} includes mixed-valence cations Mn{sup 3+}/Mn{sup 4+}. • Ca{sub 3}Mn{sub 2}NbO{sub 9} presents a charge-ordering effect between Mn{sup 3+} and Mn{sup 4+} evidenced by NPD. • The magnetic and transport studies evidenced the charge ordering in Ca{sub 3}Mn{sub 2}NbO{sub 9}.

  20. Spectral Radius of Hamiltonian Planar Graphs and Outerplanar Graphs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周建; 林翠琴; 胡冠章

    2001-01-01

    The spectral radius is an important parameter of a graph related to networks. A method forestimating the spectral radius of each spanning subgraph is used to prove that the spectral radius of aHamiltonian planar graph of order n ≥ 4 is less than or equal toand the spectral radius of theouterplanar graph of order n ≥ 6 is less than or equal to, which are improvements overprevious results. A direction for further study is then suggested.``

  1. 21 CFR 886.1450 - Corneal radius measuring device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Corneal radius measuring device. 886.1450 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1450 Corneal radius measuring device. (a) Identification. A corneal radius measuring device is an AC-powered device intended to...

  2. Ultrasound-Assisted Distal Radius Fracture Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socransky, Steve; Skinner, Andrew; Bromley, Mark; Smith, Andrew; Anawati, Alexandre; Middaugh, Jeff; Ross, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Closed reduction of distal radius fractures (CRDRF) is a commonly performed emergency department (ED) procedure. The use of point-of-care ultrasound (PoCUS) to diagnose fractures and guide reduction has previously been described. The primary objective of this study was to determine if the addition of PoCUS to CRDRF changed the perception of successful initial reduction. This was measured by the rate of further reduction attempts based on PoCUS following the initial clinical determination of achievement of best possible reduction. Methods  We performed a multicenter prospective cohort study, using a convenience sample of adult ED patients presenting with a distal radius fracture to five Canadian EDs. All study physicians underwent standardized PoCUS training for fractures. Standard clinically-guided best possible fracture reduction was initially performed. PoCUS was then used to assess the reduction adequacy. Repeat reduction was performed if deemed indicated. A post-reduction radiograph was then performed. Clinician impression of reduction adequacy was scored on a 5 point Likert scale following the initial clinically-guided reduction and following each PoCUS scan and the post-reduction radiograph. Results  There were 131 patients with 132 distal radius fractures. Twelve cases were excluded prior to analysis. There was no significant difference in the assessment of the initial reduction status by PoCUS as compared to the clinical exam (mean score: 3.8 vs. 3.9; p = 0.370; OR 0.89; 95% CI 0.46 to 1.72; p = 0.87). Significantly fewer cases fell into the uncertain category with PoCUS than with clinical assessment (2 vs 12; p = 0.008). Repeat reduction was performed in 49 patients (41.2%). Repeat reduction led to a significant improvement (p < 0.001) in the PoCUS determined adequacy of reduction (mean score: 4.3 vs 3.1; p < 0.001). In this group, the odds ratio for adequate vs. uncertain or inadequate reduction assessment using PoCUS was 12.5 (95% CI 3

  3. Predictive model of cationic surfactant binding to humic substances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ishiguro, M.; Koopal, L.K.

    2011-01-01

    The humic substances (HS) have a high reactivity with other components in the natural environment. An important factor for the reactivity of HS is their negative charge. Cationic surfactants bind strongly to HS by electrostatic and specific interaction. Therefore, a surfactant binding model is devel

  4. A Cationic Diode Based on Asymmetric Nafion® Film Deposits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    He, Daping; Madrid, Elena; Aaronson, Barak; Fan, Lian; Doughty, James; Mathwig, Klaus; Bond, Alan M; McKeown, Neil B; Marken, Frank

    2017-01-01

    A thin film of Nafion®, of approximately 5 microm thickness, asymmetrically deposited onto a 6 microm thick film of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) fabricated with a 5, 10, 20, or 40 microm microhole, is shown to exhibit prominent ionic diode behaviour involving cation charge carrier ("cationic d

  5. Understanding the mass-radius relation for sub-Neptunes: radius as a proxy for composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, Eric D.; Fortney, Jonathan J. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Transiting planet surveys like Kepler have provided a wealth of information on the distribution of planetary radii, particularly for the new populations of super-Earth- and sub-Neptune-sized planets. In order to aid in the physical interpretation of these radii, we compute model radii for low-mass rocky planets with hydrogen-helium envelopes. We provide model radii for planets 1-20 M {sub ⊕}, with envelope fractions 0.01%-20%, levels of irradiation 0.1-1000 times Earth's, and ages from 100 Myr to 10 Gyr. In addition we provide simple analytic fits that summarize how radius depends on each of these parameters. Most importantly, we show that at fixed H/He envelope fraction, radii show little dependence on mass for planets with more than ∼1% of their mass in their envelope. Consequently, planetary radius is to a first order a proxy for planetary composition, i.e., H/He envelope fraction, for Neptune- and sub-Neptune-sized planets. We recast the observed mass-radius relationship as a mass-composition relationship and discuss it in light of traditional core accretion theory. We discuss the transition from rocky super-Earths to sub-Neptune planets with large volatile envelopes. We suggest ∼1.75 R {sub ⊕} as a physically motivated dividing line between these two populations of planets. Finally, we discuss these results in light of the observed radius occurrence distribution found by Kepler.

  6. Competitive Effects of 2+ and 3+ Cations on DNA Compaction

    CERN Document Server

    Tongu, C; Yoshikawa, Y; Zinchenko, A A; Chen, N; Yoshikawa, K

    2016-01-01

    By using single-DNA observation with fluorescence microscopy, we observed the effects of divalent and trivalent cations on the higher-order structure of giant DNA (T4 DNA with 166 kbp). It was found that divalent cations, such as Mg(2+) and Ca(2+), inhibit DNA compaction induced by a trivalent cation, spermidine (SPD(3+)). On the other hand, in the absence of SPD(3+), divalent cations cause the shrinkage of DNA. These experimental observations are inconsistent with the well-established Debye-Huckel scheme regarding the shielding effect of counter ions, which is given as the additivity of contributions of cations with different valences. We interpreted the competition between 2+ and 3+ cations in terms of the change in the translational entropy of the counter ions before and after the folding transition of DNA. For the compaction with SPD(3+), we considered the increase in translational entropy due to the ion-exchange of the intrinsic monovalent cations condensing on a highly-charged polyelectrolyte, double-st...

  7. Mass-radius relationships of rocky exoplanets

    CERN Document Server

    Sohl, F; Rauer, H

    2012-01-01

    Mass and radius of planets transiting their host stars are provided by radial velocity and photometric observations. Structural models of solid exoplanet interiors are then constructed by using equations of state for the radial density distribution, which are compliant with the thermodynamics of the high-pressure limit. However, to some extent those structural models suffer from inherent degeneracy or non-uniqueness problems owing to a principal lack of knowledge of the internal differentiation state and/or the possible presence of an optically thick atmosphere. We here discuss the role of corresponding measurement errors, which adversely affect determinations of a planet's mean density and bulk chemical composition. Precise measurements of planet radii will become increasingly important as key observational constraints for radial density models of individual solid low-mass exoplanets or super-Earths.

  8. Physeal arrest of the distal radius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abzug, Joshua M; Little, Kevin; Kozin, Scott H

    2014-06-01

    Fractures of the distal radius are among the most common pediatric fractures. Although most of these fractures heal without complication, some result in partial or complete physeal arrest. The risk of physeal arrest can be reduced by avoiding known risk factors during fracture management, including multiple attempts at fracture reduction. Athletes may place substantial compressive and shear forces across the distal radial physes, making them prone to growth arrest. Timely recognition of physeal arrest can allow for more predictable procedures to be performed, such as distal ulnar epiphysiodesis. In cases of partial arrest, physeal bar excision with interposition grafting can be performed. Once ulnar abutment is present, more invasive procedures may be required, including ulnar shortening osteotomy or radial lengthening.

  9. Charge transfer to a semi-esterified bifunctional phenol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brede, O.; Hermann, R.; Orthner, H. [Leipzig Univ. (Germany)

    1996-03-01

    The charge transfer from solvent radical cations of n-butyl chloride and cyclohexane to 2-butyl-6(3`-t-butyl-2`-hydroxy-5`-methylbenzyl)-4-methyl-phenylac rylate (GM) yields in the first step phenoxyl radicals as well as acrylate radical cations of this semi-acrylated bifunctional phenol. Subsequently an intramolecular charge transfer from the acrylate radical cation to the phenol group takes place. Because of the instability of phenol radical cations, under our experimental conditions (nanosecond pulse radiolysis, non-polar solvents, room temperature) phenoxyl radicals are the only observable products of phenol ionization. (author).

  10. Anionic and cationic Hofmeister effects on hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwierz, Nadine; Horinek, Dominik; Netz, Roland R

    2013-02-26

    Using a two-step modeling approach, we address the full spectrum of direct, reversed, and altered ionic sequences as the charge of the ion, the charge of the surface, and the surface polarity are varied. From solvent-explicit molecular dynamics simulations, we extract single-ion surface interaction potentials for halide and alkali ions at hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces. These are used within Poisson-Boltzmann theory to calculate ion density and electrostatic potential distributions at mixed polar/unpolar surfaces for varying surface charge. The resulting interfacial tension increments agree quantitatively with experimental data and capture the Hofmeister series, especially the anomaly of lithium, which is difficult to obtain using continuum theory. Phase diagrams that feature different Hofmeister series as a function of surface charge, salt concentration, and surface polarity are constructed from the long-range force between two surfaces interacting across electrolyte solutions. Large anions such as iodide have a high hydrophobic surface affinity and increase the effective charge magnitude on negatively charged unpolar surfaces. Large cations such as cesium also have a large hydrophobic surface affinity and thereby compensate an external negative charge surface charge most efficiently, which explains the well-known asymmetry between cations and anions. On the hydrophilic surface, the size-dependence of the ion surface affinity is reversed, explaining the Hofmeister series reversal when comparing hydrophobic with hydrophilic surfaces.

  11. Dependence of the atomic energy levels on a superstrong magnetic field with account of a finite nucleus radius and mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godunov, S. I.; Vysotsky, M. I.

    2013-06-01

    The influence of the finiteness of the proton radius and mass on the energies of a hydrogen atom and hydrogenlike ions in a superstrong magnetic field is studied. The finiteness of the nucleus size pushes the ground energy level up leading to a nontrivial dependence of the value of the critical nucleus charge on the external magnetic field.

  12. Antibacterial Activity of Geminized Amphiphilic Cationic Homopolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Shi, Xuefeng; Yu, Danfeng; Zhang, Jian; Yang, Guang; Cui, Yingxian; Sun, Keji; Wang, Jinben; Yan, Haike

    2015-12-22

    The current study is aimed at investigating the effect of cationic charge density and hydrophobicity on the antibacterial and hemolytic activities. Two kinds of cationic surfmers, containing single or double hydrophobic tails (octyl chains or benzyl groups), and the corresponding homopolymers were synthesized. The antimicrobial activity of these candidate antibacterials was studied by microbial growth inhibition assays against Escherichia coli, and hemolysis activity was carried out using human red blood cells. It was interestingly found that the homopolymers were much more effective in antibacterial property than their corresponding monomers. Furthermore, the geminized homopolymers had significantly higher antibacterial activity than that of their counterparts but with single amphiphilic side chains in each repeated unit. Geminized homopolymers, with high positive charge density and moderate hydrophobicity (such as benzyl groups), combine both advantages of efficient antibacterial property and prominently high selectivity. To further explain the antibacterial performance of the novel polymer series, the molecular interaction mechanism is proposed according to experimental data which shows that these specimens are likely to kill microbes by disrupting bacterial membranes, leading them unlikely to induce resistance.

  13. Cationic Antimicrobial Polymers and Their Assemblies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Carmona-Ribeiro

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Cationic compounds are promising candidates for development of antimicrobial agents. Positive charges attached to surfaces, particles, polymers, peptides or bilayers have been used as antimicrobial agents by themselves or in sophisticated formulations. The main positively charged moieties in these natural or synthetic structures are quaternary ammonium groups, resulting in quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs. The advantage of amphiphilic cationic polymers when compared to small amphiphilic molecules is their enhanced microbicidal activity. Besides, many of these polymeric structures also show low toxicity to human cells; a major requirement for biomedical applications. Determination of the specific elements in polymers, which affect their antimicrobial activity, has been previously difficult due to broad molecular weight distributions and random sequences characteristic of radical polymerization. With the advances in polymerization control, selection of well defined polymers and structures are allowing greater insight into their structure-antimicrobial activity relationship. On the other hand, antimicrobial polymers grafted or self-assembled to inert or non inert vehicles can yield hybrid antimicrobial nanostructures or films, which can act as antimicrobials by themselves or deliver bioactive molecules for a variety of applications, such as wound dressing, photodynamic antimicrobial therapy, food packing and preservation and antifouling applications.

  14. On Galaxy Mass-Radius Relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindoni, D.; Secco, L.; Contini, E.; Caimmi, R.

    In the Clausius' virial maximum theory (TCV) [Secco and Bindoni, NewA 14, 567 (2009)] to explain the galaxy Fundamental Plane (FP) a natural explanation follows about the observed relationship between stellar mass and effective radius, M ∗ - r e , for early type galaxies (ETGs). The key of this correlation lies in the deep link which has to exist between cosmology and the existence of the FP. The general strategy consists in using the two-component tensor virial theorem to describe the virial configuration of the baryonic component of mass M B ≃ M ∗ embedded in a dark matter (DM) halo of mass M D at the end of relaxation phase. In a ΛCDM flat cosmology, starting from variance at equivalence epoch, we derive some preliminary theoretical relationships, M ∗ - r e , which are functions of mass ratio m = M D / M B . They appear to be in agreement with the trends extracted from the data of galaxy sample used by [Tortora et al., MNRAS 396, 1132 (2009)].

  15. Fragmentation of a Jet with Small Radius

    CERN Document Server

    Dai, Lin; Leibovich, Adam K

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we consider the fragmentation of a parton into a jet with small jet radius $R$. Perturbatively, logarithms of $R$ can appear, which for narrow jets can lead to large corrections. Using soft-collinear effective theory (SCET), we introduce the jet fragmentation function (JFF), which describes the fragmentation of a parton into a jet. We discuss how these objects are related to the standard jet functions. Calculating the JFF to next-to-leading order, we show that these objects satisfy the standard DGLAP evolution equations, with a natural scale that depends upon $R$. By using standard renormalization group evolution, we can therefore resum logarithms of $R$. We further use SCET to prove a factorization theorem where the JFFs naturally appear, for the fragmentation of a hadron within a jet with small $R$. Finally, we also show how this formalism can be used to resum the ratio of jet radii for a subjet to be emitted from within a fat jet.

  16. Suitability of the methylene blue test for determination of cation exchange capacity of clay minerals related to ammonium acetate method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milošević, Maja; Logar, Mihovil; Dojčinović, Biljana; Erić, Suzana

    2015-04-01

    Cation exchange capacity (CEC) represents one of the most important parameters of clay minerals which reflects their ability to exchange cations with liquid phases in near contact. Measurement of CEC is used for characterizing sample plasticity, adsorbing and swelling properties which later define their usage in industrial purposes. Several methods have been developed over the years for determination of layer charge, charge density, charge distribution, etc. and have been published in numerous papers (Czimerova et al., 2006; Yukselen and Kaya, 2008). The main goal of present study is comparison of suitability of more recent method - methylene blue test in regard to older method - ammonium acetate for determination of CEC. For this study, we selected one montmorillonite clay (Bogovina, Serbia) and two mainly kaolinite clays (Miličinica, Serbia). Chemicals used for CEC determinations were solution of methylene blue (MB)(14*10-6M/ml) and ammonium acetate (AA) solution (1M). The obtained results are showing generally lower values in case of MB method. The main difference is due to molecular aggregation of MB on the clay surface. AA method is highly sensitive to the presence of CaO. Release of Ca ion from the sample into the solution can limit the saturation of exchange sites by the ammonium ion. This is clearly visible in case of montmorillonite clay. Fe2+ and Mg ions are difficult to move by the ammonium ion because of their ion radius, but in case of MB molecule there is no such restriction in removing them from the exchange sites. MB solution, even in a low concentration (2*10-6M/ml), is showing preferable results in moving the ions from their positions which is already visible after adding a small quantity of solution (25cm3). Both MB-titration and MB-spot test yield similar results and are much simpler methods than AA and they also give other information such as specific surface area (external and internal) whereas AA method only provides information about

  17. Regulation of Cation Balance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyert, Martha S.; Philpott, Caroline C.

    2013-01-01

    All living organisms require nutrient minerals for growth and have developed mechanisms to acquire, utilize, and store nutrient minerals effectively. In the aqueous cellular environment, these elements exist as charged ions that, together with protons and hydroxide ions, facilitate biochemical reactions and establish the electrochemical gradients across membranes that drive cellular processes such as transport and ATP synthesis. Metal ions serve as essential enzyme cofactors and perform both structural and signaling roles within cells. However, because these ions can also be toxic, cells have developed sophisticated homeostatic mechanisms to regulate their levels and avoid toxicity. Studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have characterized many of the gene products and processes responsible for acquiring, utilizing, storing, and regulating levels of these ions. Findings in this model organism have often allowed the corresponding machinery in humans to be identified and have provided insights into diseases that result from defects in ion homeostasis. This review summarizes our current understanding of how cation balance is achieved and modulated in baker’s yeast. Control of intracellular pH is discussed, as well as uptake, storage, and efflux mechanisms for the alkali metal cations, Na+ and K+, the divalent cations, Ca2+ and Mg2+, and the trace metal ions, Fe2+, Zn2+, Cu2+, and Mn2+. Signal transduction pathways that are regulated by pH and Ca2+ are reviewed, as well as the mechanisms that allow cells to maintain appropriate intracellular cation concentrations when challenged by extreme conditions, i.e., either limited availability or toxic levels in the environment. PMID:23463800

  18. Cationic PAMAM dendrimers aggressively initiate blood clot formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Clinton F; Campbell, Robert A; Brooks, Amanda E; Assemi, Shoeleh; Tadjiki, Soheyl; Thiagarajan, Giridhar; Mulcock, Cheyanne; Weyrich, Andrew S; Brooks, Benjamin D; Ghandehari, Hamidreza; Grainger, David W

    2012-11-27

    Poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimers are increasingly studied as model nanoparticles for a variety of biomedical applications, notably in systemic administrations. However, with respect to blood-contacting applications, amine-terminated dendrimers have recently been shown to activate platelets and cause a fatal, disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC)-like condition in mice and rats. We here demonstrate that, upon addition to blood, cationic G7 PAMAM dendrimers induce fibrinogen aggregation, which may contribute to the in vivo DIC-like phenomenon. We demonstrate that amine-terminated dendrimers act directly on fibrinogen in a thrombin-independent manner to generate dense, high-molecular-weight fibrinogen aggregates with minimal fibrin fibril formation. In addition, we hypothesize this clot-like behavior is likely mediated by electrostatic interactions between the densely charged cationic dendrimer surface and negatively charged fibrinogen domains. Interestingly, cationic dendrimers also induced aggregation of albumin, suggesting that many negatively charged blood proteins may be affected by cationic dendrimers. To investigate this further, zebrafish embryos were employed to more specifically determine the speed of this phenomenon and the pathway- and dose-dependency of the resulting vascular occlusion phenotype. These novel findings show that G7 PAMAM dendrimers significantly and adversely impact many blood components to produce rapid coagulation and strongly suggest that these effects are independent of classic coagulation mechanisms. These results also strongly suggest the need to fully characterize amine-terminated PAMAM dendrimers in regard to their adverse effects on both coagulation and platelets, which may contribute to blood toxicity.

  19. Scale factor correction for Gaussian beam truncation in second moment beam radius measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, Lucas R.; Dragone, Rocco V.; MacGregor, Andrew D.

    2017-04-01

    Charged-couple devices (CCD) and complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) image sensors, in conjunction with the second moment radius analysis method, are effective tools for determining the radius of a laser beam. However, the second moment method heavily weights sensor noise, which must be dealt with using a thresholding algorithm and a software aperture. While these noise reduction methods lower the random error due to noise, they simultaneously generate systematic error by truncating the Gaussian beam's edges. A scale factor that is invariant to beam ellipticity and corrects for the truncation of the Gaussian beam due to thresholding and the software aperture has been derived. In particular, simulations showed an order of magnitude reduction in measured beam radius error when using the scale factor-irrespective of beam ellipticity-and further testing with real beam data demonstrated that radii corrected by the scale factor are independent of the noise reduction parameters. Thus, through use of the scale factor, the accuracy of beam radius measurements made with a CCD or CMOS sensor and the second moment are significantly improved.

  20. Understanding the ``Proton Radius Puzzle'': Nuclear Polarizability Correction in μD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Oscar J.; Dinur, Nir Nevo; Ji, Chen; Bacca, Sonia; Barnea, Nir

    2016-09-01

    The accuracy of the proton radius was improved ten-fold by new spectroscopic measurements in muonic hydrogen but it differs by 7 σ from hydrogen determinations. This discrepancy, has been coined the ``proton radius puzzle''. The results of new high-precision experiments on muonic deuterium indicate a new deuterium radius puzzle. The accuracy of the nuclear charge radius determination from these measurements is limited by the uncertainty in the nuclear structure effects. We have calculated this correction in Ref. including the first estimate of the nuclear-model dependence. Due to the importance of constraining the uncertainty, we will determine the statistical and systematic uncertainties of the χEFT potentials by determining the co-variance matrices of our predictions. I will also discuss an alternate method that may reduce the theoretical uncertainty. TRIUMF receives federal funding via a contribution agreement with the National Research Council of Canada. This work was supported in parts by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (Grant Number SAPIN-2015-00031).

  1. Quantitative analysis of monoclonal antibodies by cation-exchange chromatofocusing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozhkova, Anna

    2009-08-07

    A robust cation-exchange chromatofocusing method was developed for the routine analysis of a recombinant humanized monoclonal IgG antibody. We compare the chromatofocusing method to the conventional cation-exchange chromatography (CEX) employing a salt gradient and show clear advantages of chromatofocusing over CEX. We demonstrate the suitability of the present chromatofocusing method for its intended purpose by testing the validation characteristics. To our knowledge, this is the first chromatofocusing method developed for the routine analysis of monoclonal antibody charge species.

  2. On the p-norm joint spectral radius

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周佳立

    2003-01-01

    The p-norm joint spectral radius is defined by a bounded collection of square matrices with complex entries and of the same size. In the present paper the author investigates the p-norm joint spectral radius for integers. The method introduced in this paper yields some basic formulas for these spectral radii. The approach used in this paper provides a simple proof of Berger-Wang's relation concerning the ∞-norm joint spectral radius.

  3. On the p-norm joint spectral radius

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周佳立

    2003-01-01

    The p-norm joint spectral radius is defined by a bounded collection of square matrices with complex entries and of the same size. In the present paper the author investigates the p-norm joint spectral radius for integers. The method introduced in this paper yields some basic formulas for these spectral radii. The approach used in this paper provides a simple proof of Berger-Wang' s relation concerning the ∞-norm joint spectral radius.

  4. Switchable Pickering emulsions stabilized by silica nanoparticles hydrophobized in situ with a conventional cationic surfactant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yue; Jiang, Jianzhong; Liu, Kaihong; Cui, Zhenggang; Binks, Bernard P

    2015-03-24

    A stable oil-in-water Pickering emulsion stabilized by negatively charged silica nanoparticles hydrophobized in situ with a trace amount of a conventional cationic surfactant can be rendered unstable on addition of an equimolar amount of an anionic surfactant. The emulsion can be subsequently restabilized by adding a similar trace amount of cationic surfactant along with rehomogenization. This destabilization-stabilization behavior can be cycled many times, demonstrating that the Pickering emulsion is switchable. The trigger is the stronger electrostatic interaction between the oppositely charged ionic surfactants compared with that between the cationic surfactant and the (initially) negatively charged particle surfaces. The cationic surfactant prefers to form ion pairs with the added anionic surfactant and thus desorbs from particle surfaces rendering them surface-inactive. This access to switchable Pickering emulsions is easier than those employing switchable surfactants, polymers, or surface-active particles, avoiding both the complicated synthesis and the stringent switching conditions.

  5. Effects of charge density and hydrophobicity of poly(amido amine)s for non-viral gene delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piest, Martin; Engbersen, Johan F.J.

    2010-01-01

    High cationic charge densities in polymeric vectors result in tight DNA condensation, leading to small highly positively charged polyplexes which show generally high cellular uptake in vitro. However, high cationic charge densities also introduce membrane-disruptive properties to the polymers, there

  6. Atomic radii for atoms with the 6s shell outermost: The effective atomic radius and the van der Waals radius from {sub 55}Cs to {sub 80}Hg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatewaki, Hiroshi, E-mail: htatewak@nsc.nagoya-cu.ac.jp [Graduate School of Natural Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya, Aichi 467-8501 (Japan); Institute of Advanced Studies in Artificial Intelligence, Chukyo University, Toyota, Aichi 470-0393 (Japan); Hatano, Yasuyo [School of Information Science and Technology, Chukyo University, Toyota, Aichi 470-0393 (Japan); Noro, Takeshi [Division of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0810 (Japan); Yamamoto, Shigeyoshi [School of International Liberal Studies, Chukyo University, Nagoya, Aichi 466-8666 (Japan)

    2015-06-15

    We consider, for atoms from {sub 55}Cs to {sub 80}Hg, the effective atomic radius (r{sub ear}), which is defined as the distance from the nucleus at which the magnitude of the electric field is equal to that in He at one half of the equilibrium bond length of He{sub 2}. The values of r{sub ear} are about 50% larger than the mean radius of the outermost occupied orbital of 6s, . The value of r{sub ear} decreases from {sub 55}Cs to {sub 56}Ba and undergoes increases and decreases with rising nuclear charge from {sub 57}La to {sub 70}Y b. In fact r{sub ear} is understood as comprising two interlaced sequences; one consists of {sub 57}La, {sub 58}Ce, and {sub 64}Gd, which have electronic configuration (4f{sup n−1})(5d{sup 1})(6s{sup 2}), and the remaining atoms have configuration (4f{sup n})(6s{sup 2}). The sphere defined by r{sub ear} contains 85%–90% of the 6s electrons. From {sub 71}Lu to {sub 80}Hg the radius r{sub ear} also involves two sequences, corresponding to the two configurations 5d{sup n+1}6s{sup 1} and 5d{sup n}6s{sup 2}. The radius r{sub ear} according to the present methodology is considerably larger than r{sub vdW} obtained by other investigators, some of who have found values of r{sub vdW} close to .

  7. Study on the Radius of an Electrical Spherical Micelle:Functional Theoretical Approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG,Zheng-Wu(王正武); HUANG,Dong-Yang(黄东阳); YI,Xi-Zhang(易希璋); LI,Gan-Zuo(李干佐)

    2004-01-01

    For the purpose of eliminating restriction,the Poisson-Boltzmann(PB)equation,which represents the potential of the electrical double layer of spherical micelles,can be solved analytically only under the lower potential condition,a kind of iterative method in functional analysis theory has been used.The radius of the spherical particle can be obtained from the diagram of the second iterative solution of the potential versus the distance from the center of the particle.The influences of the concentration of the ions,the charge number of ions,the aggregation number of the particle,the dielectric constant of solvent and the temperature of system on the radius also have been studied.

  8. Limits on the effective quark radius from inclusive ep scattering at HERA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Antonelli, S.; Aushev, V.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bloch, I.; Boos, E. G.; Brock, I.; Brook, N. H.; Brugnera, R.; Bruni, A.; Bussey, P. J.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Catterall, C. D.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Corradi, M.; Dementiev, R. K.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dusini, S.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Grzelak, G.; Guzik, M.; Gwenlan, C.; Hain, W.; Hlushchenko, O.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ishitsuka, M.; Januschek, F.; Jomhari, N. Z.; Kadenko, I.; Kananov, S.; Karshon, U.; Kaur, P.; Kisielewska, D.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotański, A.; Kötz, U.; Kovalchuk, N.; Kowalski, H.; Krupa, B.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Limentani, S.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Mastroberardino, A.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Mohammad Nasir, N.; Myronenko, V.; Nagano, K.; Nobe, T.; Nowak, R. J.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Paul, E.; Perlański, W.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polini, A.; Przybycień, M.; Roloff, P.; Ruspa, M.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schneekloth, U.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shevchenko, R.; Shkola, O.; Shyrma, Yu.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Słomiński, W.; Solano, A.; Stanco, L.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stopa, P.; Sukhonos, D.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Tassi, E.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Tymieniecka, T.; Verbytskyi, A.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Wichmann, K.; Wing, M.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Zakharchuk, N.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2016-06-01

    The high-precision HERA data allows searches up to TeV scales for beyond the Standard Model contributions to electron-quark scattering. Combined measurements of the inclusive deep inelastic cross sections in neutral and charged current ep scattering corresponding to a luminosity of around 1 fb-1 have been used in this analysis. A new approach to the beyond the Standard Model analysis of the inclusive ep data is presented; simultaneous fits of parton distribution functions together with contributions of "new physics" processes were performed. Results are presented considering a finite radius of quarks within the quark form-factor model. The resulting 95% C.L. upper limit on the effective quark radius is 0.43 ṡ10-16 cm.

  9. Limits on the effective quark radius from inclusive ep scattering at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramowicz, H. [Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel). School of Physics; Max Planck Institute for Physics, Munich (Germany); Abt, I. [Max Planck Institute for Physics, Munich (Germany); Adamczyk, L. [AGH-Univ. of Science and Technology, Krakow (Poland). Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Sciences; Collaboration: ZEUS Collaboration; and others

    2016-04-15

    The high-precision HERA data allows searches up to TeV scales for Beyond the Standard Model contributions to electron-quark scattering. Combined measurements of the inclusive deep inelastic cross sections in neutral and charged current ep scattering corresponding to a luminosity of around 1 fb{sup -1} have been used in this analysis. A new approach to the beyond the Standard Model analysis of the inclusive ep data is presented; simultaneous fits of parton distribution functions together with contributions of ''new physics'' processes were performed. Results are presented considering a finite radius of quarks within the quark form-factor model. The resulting 95% C.L. upper limit on the effective quark radius is 0.43.10{sup -16} cm.

  10. Limits on the effective quark radius from inclusive $ep$ scattering at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Abramowicz, H; Adamczyk, L; Adamus, M; Antonelli, S; Aushev, V; Behnke, O; Behrens, U; Bertolin, A; Bloch, I; Boos, EG; Brock, I; Brook, NH; Brugnera, R; Bruni, A; Bussey, PJ; Caldwell, A; Capua, M; Catterall, CD; Chwastowski, J; Ciborowski, J; Ciesielski, R; Cooper-Sarkar, AM; Corradi, M; Dementiev, RK; Devenish, RCE; Dusini, S; Foster, B; Gach, G; Gallo, E; Garfagnini, A; Geiser, A; Gizhko, A; Gladilin, LK; Golubkov, Yu A; Grzelak, G; Guzik, M; Hain, W; Hochman, D; Hori, R; Ibrahim, ZA; Iga, Y; Ishitsuka, M; Januschek, F; Jomhari, NZ; Kadenko, I; Kananov, S; Karshon, U; Kaur, P; Kisielewska, D; Klanner, R; Klein, U; Korzhavina, IA; Kotański, A; Kötz, U; Kovalchuk, N; Kowalski, H; Krupa, B; Kuprash, O; Kuze, M; Levchenko, BB; Levy, A; Limentani, S; Lisovyi, M; Lobodzinska, E; Löhr, B; Lohrmann, E; Longhin, A; Lontkovskyi, D; Lukina, OYu; Makarenko, I; Malka, J; Mohamad Idris, F; Mohammad Nasir, N; Myronenko, V; Nagano, K; Nobe, T; Nowak, RJ; Onishchuk, Yu; Paul, E; Perlański, W; Pokrovskiy, NS; Przybycien, M; Roloff, P; Ruspa, M; Saxon, DH; Schioppa, M; Schneekloth, U; Schörner-Sadenius, T; Shcheglova, LM; Shevchenko, R; Shkola, O; Shyrma, Yu; Singh, I; Skillicorn, IO; Słomiński, W; Solano, A; Stanco, L; Stefaniuk, N; Stern, A; Stopa, P; Sztuk-Dambietz, J; Tassi, E; Tokushuku, K; Tomaszewska, J; Tsurugai, T; Turcato, M; Turkot, O; Tymieniecka, T; Verbytskyi, A; Wan Abdullah, WAT; Wichmann, K; Wing, M; Yamada, S; Yamazaki, Y; Zakharchuk, N; Żarnecki, AF; Zawiejski, L; Zenaiev, O; Zhautykov, BO; Zotkin, DS; Bhadra, S; Gwenlan, C; Hlushchenko, O; Polini, A; Mastroberardino, A; Sukhonos, D

    2016-01-01

    The high-precision HERA data allows searches up to TeV scales for Beyond the Standard Model contributions to electron-quark scattering. Combined measurements of the inclusive deep inelastic cross sections in neutral and charged current $ep$ scattering corresponding to a luminosity of around 1 fb$^{-1}$ have been used in this analysis. A new approach to the beyond the Standard Model analysis of the inclusive $ep$ data is presented; simultaneous fits of parton distribution functions together with contributions of "new physics" processes were performed. Results are presented considering a finite radius of quarks within the quark form-factor model. The resulting 95% C.L. upper limit on the effective quark radius is $0.43\\cdot 10^{-16}$ cm.

  11. Variation of diffusivity with the cation radii in molten salts of superionic conductors containing iodine anion: A molecular dynamics study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Srinivasa R Varanasi; S Yashonath

    2012-01-01

    A molecular dynamics study of the dependence of diffusivity of the cation on ionic radii in molten AgI is reported.We have employed modified Parinello-Rahman-Vashistha interionic pair potential proposed by Shimojo and Kobayashi. Our results suggest that the diffusivity of the cation exhibits an increase followed by a decrease as the ionic radius is increased. Several structural and dynamical properties are reported.

  12. A self-consistent value of the electric radius of the proton from the Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Karshenboim, Savely G

    2014-01-01

    Recently a high-precision measurement of the Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen has been performed. An accurate value of the proton charge radius can be extracted from this datum with a high accuracy. To do that a sufficient accuracy should be achieved also on the theoretical side, including an appropriate treatment of higher-order proton-structure effects. Here we consider a higher-order contribution of the finite size of the proton to the Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen. Only model-dependent results for this correction have been known up to date. Meantime, the involved models are not consistent either with the existing experimental data on the electron-proton scattering or with the value for the electric charge radius of the proton extracted from the Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen. We consider the higher-order contribution of the proton finite size in a model-independent way and eventually derive a self-consistent value of the electric radius of the proton. The re-evaluated value of the proton charge radius is foun...

  13. Ultra-small and innocuous cationic starch nanospheres: preparation, characterization and drug delivery study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yinjuan; Liu, Mingzhu; Gao, Chunmei; Yang, Jinlong; Zhang, Xinyu; Zhang, Xinjie; Liu, Zhen

    2013-07-01

    This research demonstrated the preparation of ultra-small cationic starch nanospheres for the first time. Unlike conventional cationic starch, the cationic starch in here could not form gel. The starch nanoparticles were obtained via reverse micro-emulsion method and were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Dynamic light scattering (DLS). The formation mechanism of cationic starch nanospheres was proposed and the effects of preparation conditions on particle size were also investigated. A cationic starch nanosphere with a size of 50 nm can be obtained under the optimal condition. Moreover, the drug release behaviors, cytotoxicity test and degradation analysis were tested and indicated that the particles possess good capacity in delivering the negatively charged molecules, biocompatibility and biodegradability. Thus, the cationic nanoparticles exhibit potential applications in the areas of food and medical sciences. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Dust Charging in Electronegative SiH4 Plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN Ping; WANG Zheng-Xiong; LIU Yue; LIU Jin-Yuan; WANG Xiao-Gang

    2005-01-01

    @@ We theoretically investigate the dust charging in electronegative silane (SiH4) plasmas, taking into account the effects of UV photodetachment. It is found that UV photodetachment could significantly lower the dust negative charge and even makes dust grains be positively charged under some special conditions. In addition, the other parameters, involving the negative ion and dust number densities, electron temperature and dust radius, have great effects upon the dust charging.

  15. Charged-Exciton Complexes in Quantum Dots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Wen-Fang

    2001-01-01

    It is known experimentally that stable charged-exciton complexes can exist in low-dimensional semiconductor nanostructures. Much less is known about the properties of such charged-exciton complexes since three-body problems are very difficult to be solved, even numerically. Here we introduce the correlated hyperspherical harmonics as basis functions to solve the hyperangular equation for negatively and positively charged excitons (trions) in a harmonic quantum dot. By using this method, we have calculated the energy spectra of the low-lying states of a charged exciton as a function of the radius of quantum dot. Based on symmetry analysis, the level crossover as the dot radius increases can be fully explained as the results of symmetry constraint.``

  16. Nanoengineered field induced charge separation membranes manufacture thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Kevin C.; Haslam, Jeffery J.; Bourcier, William L.; Floyd, III, William Clary

    2016-08-02

    A device according to one embodiment includes a porous membrane having a surface charge and pore configuration characterized by a double layer overlap effect being present in pores of the membrane, where the porous membrane includes functional groups that preferentially interact with either cations or anions. A device according to another embodiment includes a porous membrane having a surface charge in pores thereof sufficient to impart anion or cation selectivity in the pores. Additional devices, systems and methods are also presented.

  17. Applying Occam's Razor To The Proton Radius Puzzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higinbotham, Douglas

    2016-09-01

    Over the past five decades, ever more complex mathematical functions have been used to extract the radius of the proton from electron scattering data. For example, in 1963 the proton radius was extracted with linear and quadratic fits of low Q2 data (Lamb shift measurements.

  18. The Origin of the Ionic-Radius Ratio Rules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, William B.

    2010-01-01

    In response to a reader query, this article traces the origins of the ionic-radius ratio rules and their incorrect attribution to Linus Pauling in the chemical literature and to Victor Goldschmidt in the geochemical literature. In actual fact, the ionic-radius ratio rules were first proposed within the context of the coordination chemistry…

  19. Decreasing the spectral radius of a graph by link removals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Mieghem, P.; Stevanović, D.; Kuipers, F.; Li, C.; Van de Bovenkamp, R.; Liu, D.; Wang, H.

    2011-01-01

    The decrease of the spectral radius, an important characterizer of network dynamics, by removing links is investigated. The minimization of the spectral radius by removing m links is shown to be an NP-complete problem, which suggests considering heuristic strategies. Several greedy strategies are co

  20. The minimal spectral radius of graphs with a given diameter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, E.R. van; Kooij, R.E.

    2007-01-01

    The spectral radius of a graph (i.e., the largest eigenvalue of its corresponding adjacency matrix) plays an important role in modeling virus propagation in networks. In fact, the smaller the spectral radius, the larger the robustness of a network against the spread of viruses. Among all connected g

  1. Numerical Radius Inequalities for Finite Sums of Operators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirmostafaee Alireza Kamel

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we obtain some sharp inequalities for numerical radius of finite sums of operators. Moreover, we give some applications of our result in estimation of spectral radius. We also compare our results with some known results.

  2. Distal radius fractures: what determines the outcome after surgery?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teunis, T.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis addresses current issues in the outcome of operatively treated distal radius fractures. The general aim was to determine factors associated with adverse events, loss of motion, functional limitations, and opioid use after surgery. Injury In 3D complete articular distal radius fracture mo

  3. Solubility and transport of cationic and anionic patterned nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jiaye; Guo, Hongxia; Olvera de La Cruz, Monica

    2012-02-01

    Diffusion and transport of nanoparticles (NPs) though nanochannels is important for desalination, drug delivery, and biomedicine. Their surface composition dictate their efficiency separating them by reverse osmosis, delivering into into cells, as well as their toxicity. We analyze bulk diffusion and transport through nanochannels of NPs with different hydrophobic-hydrophilic patterns achieved by coating a fraction of the NP sites with positive or negative charges via explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations. The cationic NPs are more affected by the patterns, less water soluble, and have higher diffusion constants and fluxes than their anionic NPs counterparts. The NP-water interaction dependence on surface pattern and field strength explains these observations. For equivalent patterns, anionic NPs solubilize more than cationic NPs since the Coulomb interaction of free anionic NPs, which are much stronger than hydrophobic NP-water interactions, are about twice that of cationic NPs.

  4. Return Radius and volume of recrystallized material in Ostwald Ripening

    CERN Document Server

    Hausser, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Within the framework of the LSW theory of Ostwald ripening the amount of volume of the second (solid) phase that is newly formed by recrystallization is investigated. It is shown, that in the late stage, the portion of the newly generated volume formed within an interval from time $t_0$ to $t$ is a certain function of $t/t_0$ and an explicit expression of this volume is given. To achieve this, we introduce the notion of the {\\it return radius} $r(t,t_0)$, which is the unique radius of a particle at time $t_0$ such that this particle has -- after growing and shrinking -- the same radius at time $t$. We derive a formula for the return radius which later on is used to obtain the newly formed volume. Moreover, formulas for the growth rate of the return radius and the recrystallized material at time $t_0$ are derived.

  5. Cationic polymers and porous materials

    KAUST Repository

    Han, Yu

    2017-04-27

    According to one or more embodiments, cationic polymers may be produced which include one or more monomers containing cations. Such cationic polymers may be utilized as structure directing agents to form mesoporous zeolites. The mesoporous zeolites may include micropores as well as mesopores, and may have a surface area of greater than 350 m2/g and a pore volume of greater than 0.3 cm3/g. Also described are core/shell zeolites, where at least the shell portion includes a mesoporous zeolite material.

  6. Cationic cellulose nanofibers from waste pulp residues and their nitrate, fluoride, sulphate and phosphate adsorption properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehaqui, Houssine; Mautner, Andreas; Perez de Larraya, Uxua; Pfenninger, Numa; Tingaut, Philippe; Zimmermann, Tanja

    2016-01-01

    Cationic cellulose nanofibers (CNF) having 3 different contents of positively charged quaternary ammonium groups have been prepared from waste pulp residues according to a water-based modification method involving first the etherification of the pulp with glycidyltrimethylammonium chloride followed by mechanical disintegration. The cationic nanofibers obtained were observed by scanning electron microscopy and the extent of the reaction was evaluated by conductometric titration, ζ-potential measurements, and thermogravimetric analyses. The cationic CNF had a maximum cationic charge content of 1.2mmolg(-1) and positive ζ-potential at various pH values. Sorption of negatively charged contaminants (fluoride, nitrate, phosphate and sulphate ions) and their selectivity onto cationic CNF have been evaluated. Maximum sorption of ∼0.6mmolg(-1) of these ions by CNF was achieved and selectivity adsorption studies showed that cationic CNF are more selective toward multivalent ions (PO4(3-) and SO4(2-)) than monovalent ions (F(-) and NO3(-)). In addition, we demonstrated that cationic CNF can be manufactured into permeable membranes capable of dynamic nitrate adsorption by utilizing a simple paper-making process.

  7. Comparison of cation adsorption by isostructural rutile and cassiterite.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machesky, M.; Wesolowski, D.; Rosenqvist, J.; Predota, M.; Vlcek, L.; Ridley, M.; Kohli, V.; Zhang, Z.; Fenter, P.; Cummings, P.; Lvov, S.; Fedkin, M.; Rodriguez-Santiago, V.; Kupicki, J.; Bandura, A. (X-Ray Science Division); (Illinois State Water Survey); (Oak Ridge National Laboratory); (University of South Branisovska); (Texas Tech University); (Vanderbilt University); (The Pennsylvania State University); (St. Petersburg State University)

    2011-01-01

    Macroscopic net proton charging curves for powdered rutile and cassiterite specimens with the (110) crystal face predominant, as a function of pH in RbCl and NaCl solutions, trace SrCl{sub 2} in NaCl, and trace ZnCl{sub 2} in NaCl and Na Triflate solutions, are compared to corresponding molecular-level information obtained from static DFT optimizations and classical MD simulations, as well as synchrotron X-ray methods. The similarities and differences in the macroscopic charging behavior of rutile and cassiterite largely reflect the cation binding modes observed at the molecular level. Cation adsorption is primarily inner-sphere on both isostructural (110) surfaces, despite predictions that outer-sphere binding should predominate on low bulk dielectric constant oxides such as cassiterite ({epsilon}{sub bulk} {approx} 11). Inner-sphere adsorption is also significant for Rb{sup +} and Na{sup +} on neutral surfaces, whereas Cl{sup -} binding is predominately outer-sphere. As negative surface charge increases, relatively more Rb{sup +}, Na{sup +}, and especially Sr{sup 2+} are bound in highly desolvated tetradentate fashion on the rutile (110) surface, largely accounting for enhanced negative charge development relative to cassiterite. Charging curves in the presence of Zn{sup 2+} are very steep but similar for both oxides, reflective of Zn{sup 2+} hydrolysis (and accompanying proton release) during the adsorption process, and the similar binding modes for ZnOH{sup +} on both surfaces. These results suggest that differences in cation adsorption between high and low bulk dielectric constant oxides are more subtly related to the relative degree of cation desolvation accompanying inner-sphere binding (i.e., more tetradentate binding on rutile), rather than distinct inner- and outer-sphere adsorption modes. Cation desolvation may be favored at the rutile (110) surface in part because inner-sphere water molecules are bound further from and less tightly than on the

  8. Reconstruction and Calibration of Small Radius Jets in the ATLAS Experiment for LHC Run 2

    CERN Document Server

    Loch, Peter; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Small radius jets with R = 0.4 are standard tools in ATLAS for physics analysis. They are calibrated using a sequence of Monte Carlo simulation-derived calibrations and corrections followed by in-situ calibrations based on the transverse momentum balance between the probed jets and well-measured reference signals. In this talk the inputs to jet reconstruction in LHC Run 2 comprising calorimeter cell clusters, reconstructed charge particle tracks, and particle flow objects, are discussed together with the jet energy calibration scheme. Selected results from the performance of the procedure and the associated systematic uncertainties are presented.

  9. Proton radius from electron-proton scattering and chiral perturbation theory

    CERN Document Server

    Horbatsch, Marko; Pineda, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    We determine the root-mean-square proton charge radius, $R_{\\rm p}$, from a fit to low-$Q^2$ electron-proton elastic scattering cross section data with the higher moments fixed (within uncertainties) to the values predicted by chiral perturbation theory. We obtain $R_{\\rm p}=0.844(12)$ fm. This number is perfectly consistent with the value obtained from muonic hydrogen analyses and disagrees with the CODATA value (based upon atomic hydrogen spectroscopy and electron-proton scattering determinations) by more than two standard deviations.

  10. Effects of inlet radius and bell mouth radius on flow rate and sound quality of centrifugal blower

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Pham Ngoc; Kim, Jae Won; Byun, S. M. [Sunmoon University, Asan (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, E. Y. [Hanbat National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    The effect of inlet radius and bell mouth radius on flow rate of centrifugal blower were numerically simulated using a commercial CFD program, FLUENT. In this research, a total of eight numerical models were prepared by combining different values of bell mouth radii and inlet radii (the cross section of bell mouth was chosen as a circular arc in this research). The frozen rotor method combined with a realizable k-epsilon turbulence model and non-equilibrium wall function was used to simulate the three-dimensional flow inside the centrifugal blowers. The inlet radius was then revealed to have significant impact on flow rate with the maximum difference between analyzed models was about 4.5% while the bell mouth radius had about 3% impact on flow rate. Parallel experiments were carried out to confirm the results of CFD analysis. The CFD results were thereafter validated owning to the good agreement between CFD results and the parallel experiment results. In addition to performance analysis, noise experiments were carried out to analyze the dependence of sound quality on inlet radius and bell mouth radius with different flow rate. The noise experiment results showed that the loudness and sharpness value of different models were quite similar, which mean the inlet radius and the bell mouth radius didn't have a clear impact on sound quality of centrifugal blower.

  11. Cation exchange interaction between antibiotic ciprofloxacin and montmorillonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Chih-Jen [Department of Earth Sciences, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Department of Geosciences, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Li, Zhaohui, E-mail: li@uwp.edu [Department of Earth Sciences, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Department of Geosciences, University of Wisconsin - Parkside, Kenosha, WI 53144 (United States); Jiang, Wei-Teh, E-mail: atwtj@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Earth Sciences, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Jean, Jiin-Shuh; Liu, Chia-Chuan [Department of Earth Sciences, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China)

    2010-11-15

    Exploring the interactions between antibiotics and soils/minerals is of great importance in resolving their fate, transport, and elimination in the environment due to their frequent detection in wastewater, river water, sewage sludge and soils. This study focused on determining the adsorption properties and mechanisms of interaction between antibiotic ciprofloxacin and montmorillonite (SAz-1), a swelling dioctahedral mineral with Ca{sup 2+} as the main interlayer cation. In acidic and neutral aqueous solutions, a stoichiometric exchange between ciprofloxacin and interlayer cations yielded an adsorption capacity as high as 330 mg/g, corresponding to 1.0 mmol/g. When solution pH was above its pK{sub a2} (8.7), adsorption of ciprofloxacin was greatly reduced due to the net repulsion between the negatively charged clay surfaces and the ciprofloxacin anion. The uptake of ciprofloxacin expanded the basal spacing (d{sub 001}) of montmorillonite from 15.04 to 17.23 A near its adsorption capacity, confirming cation exchange within the interlayers in addition to surface adsorption. Fourier transform infrared results further suggested that the protonated amine group of ciprofloxacin in its cationic form was electrostatically attracted to negatively charged sites of clay surfaces, and that the carboxylic acid group was hydrogen bonded to the basal oxygen atoms of the silicate layers. The results indicate that montmorillonite is an effective sorbent to remove ciprofloxacin from water.

  12. Cation exchange interaction between antibiotic ciprofloxacin and montmorillonite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chih-Jen; Li, Zhaohui; Jiang, Wei-Teh; Jean, Jiin-Shuh; Liu, Chia-Chuan

    2010-11-15

    Exploring the interactions between antibiotics and soils/minerals is of great importance in resolving their fate, transport, and elimination in the environment due to their frequent detection in wastewater, river water, sewage sludge and soils. This study focused on determining the adsorption properties and mechanisms of interaction between antibiotic ciprofloxacin and montmorillonite (SAz-1), a swelling dioctahedral mineral with Ca(2+) as the main interlayer cation. In acidic and neutral aqueous solutions, a stoichiometric exchange between ciprofloxacin and interlayer cations yielded an adsorption capacity as high as 330 mg/g, corresponding to 1.0 mmol/g. When solution pH was above its pK(a2) (8.7), adsorption of ciprofloxacin was greatly reduced due to the net repulsion between the negatively charged clay surfaces and the ciprofloxacin anion. The uptake of ciprofloxacin expanded the basal spacing (d(001)) of montmorillonite from 15.04 to 17.23 A near its adsorption capacity, confirming cation exchange within the interlayers in addition to surface adsorption. Fourier transform infrared results further suggested that the protonated amine group of ciprofloxacin in its cationic form was electrostatically attracted to negatively charged sites of clay surfaces, and that the carboxylic acid group was hydrogen bonded to the basal oxygen atoms of the silicate layers. The results indicate that montmorillonite is an effective sorbent to remove ciprofloxacin from water. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Cationic Nitrogen Doped Helical Nanographenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kun; Feng, Xinliang; Berger, Reinhard; Popov, Alexey A; Weigand, Jan J; Vincon, Ilka; Machata, Peter; Hennersdorf, Felix; Zhou, Youjia; Fu, Yubin

    2017-09-13

    Herein, we report on the synthesis of a series of novel cationic nitrogen doped nanographenes (CNDN) by rhodium catalyzed annulation reactions. This powerful method allows for the synthesis of cationic nanographenes with non-planar, axial chiral geometries. Single-crystal X-ray analysis reveals helical and cove-edged structures. Compared to their all-carbon analogues, the CNDN exhibit energetically lower lying frontier orbitals with a reduced optical energy gap and an electron accepting behavior. All derivatives show quasi reversible reductions in cyclic voltammetry. Depending on the number of nitrogen dopant, in situ spectroelectrochemistry proves the formation of neutral radicals (one nitrogen dopant) or radical cations (two nitrogen dopants) upon reduction. The developed synthetic protocol paves the way for the design and synthesis of expanded nanographenes or even graphene nanoribbons containing cationic nitrogen doping. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Analysis of the radius and diameter protocols in terms of pricing telecommunication services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesna M. Radonjić

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Accounting of telecommunication services is closely related to the functions of authentication and authorization. These functions are usually considered together and implemented within the same server using a common protocol. The most renowned protocols for authentication, authorization and accounting are the RADIUS and Diameter protocols.   AAA functions and related protocols   In this chapter, the accounting management architecture developed by IETF is presented. It includes the interaction between network elements, accounting servers and billing and charging servers. Accounting data can be used for management, planning and charging users as well as other (specific purposes. Authentication is the process of confirming a user's digital identity, usually through some type of identifiers and related data. Authorization determines whether a particular entity is authorized to perform an activity.   Basic Functions of the RADIUS Protocol   The RADIUS architecture is based on a client-server model. It uses UDP on the transport layer. Transactions between the client and the server are authenticated, which is achieved by using a common secret key that is never sent through the network. Given the limited resources available to network devices, RADIUS facilitates and centralizes charging end users, provides some protection against active attacks by unauthorized users and it has great support from different network equipment vendors. Although RADIUS is a widely accepted protocol for the mechanisms of authentication, authorization and accounting, it has certain shortcomings that may be caused by the protocol itself or by its poor implementation.   Architecture and Operation of the Diameter Protocol   Diameter is a scalable protocol designed by the IETF working group in order to eliminate shortcomings and functional limitations of the RADIUS protocol and eventually to replace it in the near future. Most of the basic Diameter mechanisms and its

  15. Electron spectra of radical cations of heteroanalogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrushenko, K.B.; Turchaninov, V.K.; Vokin, A.I.; Ermikov, A.F.; Frolov, Yu.L.

    1985-12-01

    Radical cation spectra of indazole and benzothiophene in the visible region were obtained by laser photolysis during the reaction of photoexcited quinones with these compounds in acetonitrile. The charge transfer bands of the complexes of the test compounds with p-chloranil and 7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane in dioxane were recorded on a Specord M-40. Photoelectron spectra were obtained on a ES-3201 electron spectrometer. The He(I) resonance band (21.21 eV) was used for excitation. Measurements were carried out in the 60-120/sup 0/C range. The energy scale was calibrated form the first ionization potentials of Ar (15.76 eV) and chlorobenzene (9.06 eV). The error in the determination of the ionization potentials for the first four photoelectron bands was 0.05 eV.

  16. THE CHARACTERISTICS OF HIGH MOLECULAR WEIGHT CATIONIC POLYACRYLAMIDE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongjie Zhang; Huiren Hu; Fushan Chen

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, the cationic polyacrylamide (CPAM)with high molecular weight was prepared in aqueous solution through a complex initiator system. The CPAM was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (13C NMR), and the charge density of the CPAM was determined by colloid titration. The results obtained indicated that the copolymerization technology used in the experiment was successful.

  17. Asymmetric cation-binding catalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oliveira, Maria Teresa; Lee, Jiwoong

    2017-01-01

    and KCN, are selectively bound to the catalyst, providing exceptionally high enantioselectivities for kinetic resolutions, elimination reactions (fluoride base), and Strecker synthesis (cyanide nucleophile). Asymmetric cation-binding catalysis was recently expanded to silicon-based reagents, enabling...... solvents, thus increasing their applicability in synthesis. The expansion of this concept to chiral polyethers led to the emergence of asymmetric cation-binding catalysis, where chiral counter anions are generated from metal salts, particularly using BINOL-based polyethers. Alkali metal salts, namely KF...

  18. Thermoconvective vortices in a cylindrical annulus with varying inner radius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castaño, D; Navarro, M C; Herrero, H

    2014-12-01

    This paper shows the influence of the inner radius on the stability and intensity of vertical vortices, qualitatively similar to dust devils and cyclones, generated in a cylindrical annulus non-homogeneously heated from below. Little relation is found between the intensity of the vortex and the magnitude of the inner radius. Strong stable vortices can be found for both small and large values of the inner radius. The Rankine combined vortex structure, that characterizes the tangential velocity in dust devils, is clearly observed when small values of the inner radius and large values of the ratio between the horizontal and vertical temperature differences are considered. A contraction on the radius of maximum azimuthal velocity is observed when the vortex is intensified by thermal mechanisms. This radius becomes then nearly stationary when frictional force balances the radial inflow generated by the pressure drop in the center, despite the vortex keeps intensifying. These results connect with the behavior of the radius of the maximum tangential wind associated with a hurricane.

  19. Role of Reverse Divalent Cation Diffusion in Forward Osmosis Biofouling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Ming; Bar-Zeev, Edo; Hashmi, Sara M; Nghiem, Long D; Elimelech, Menachem

    2015-11-17

    We investigated the role of reverse divalent cation diffusion in forward osmosis (FO) biofouling. FO biofouling by Pseudomonas aeruginosa was simulated using pristine and chlorine-treated thin-film composite polyamide membranes with either MgCl2 or CaCl2 draw solution. We related FO biofouling behavior-water flux decline, biofilm architecture, and biofilm composition-to reverse cation diffusion. Experimental results demonstrated that reverse calcium diffusion led to significantly more severe water flux decline in comparison with reverse magnesium permeation. Unlike magnesium, reverse calcium permeation dramatically altered the biofilm architecture and composition, where extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) formed a thicker, denser, and more stable biofilm. We propose that FO biofouling was enhanced by complexation of calcium ions to bacterial EPS. This hypothesis was confirmed by dynamic and static light scattering measurements using extracted bacterial EPS with the addition of either MgCl2 or CaCl2 solution. We observed a dramatic increase in the hydrodynamic radius of bacterial EPS with the addition of CaCl2, but no change was observed after addition of MgCl2. Static light scattering revealed that the radius of gyration of bacterial EPS with addition of CaCl2 was 20 times larger than that with the addition of MgCl2. These observations were further confirmed by transmission electron microscopy imaging, where bacterial EPS in the presence of calcium ions was globular, while that with magnesium ions was rod-shaped.

  20. High-performance cation-exchange chromatofocusing of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Xuezhen; Frey, Douglas D

    2003-03-28

    Chromatofocusing using high-performance cation-exchange column packings, as opposed to the more commonly used anion-exchange column packings, is investigated with regard to the performance achieved and the range of applications possible. Linear or convex gradients in the range from pH 2.6 to 9 were formed using a variety of commercially available column packings that provide a buffering capacity in different pH ranges, and either polyampholytes or simple mixtures having a small number (three or fewer) of buffering species as the elution buffer. The resolutions achieved using cation-exchange or anion-exchange chromatofocusing were in general comparable, although for certain pairs of proteins better resolution could be achieved using one type of packing as compared to the other, evidently due to the way electrostatic charges are distributed on the protein surface. Several chromatofocusing methods were investigated that take advantage of the acid-base properties of commercially available cation-exchange column packings. These include the use of gradients with a composite shape, the use of very low pH ranges, and the use of elution buffers containing a single buffering species. The advantages of chromatofocusing over ion-exchange chromatography using a salt gradient at constant pH were illustrated by employing the former method and a cation-exchange column packing to separate beta-lactoglobulins A and B, which is a separation reported to be impossible using the latter method and a cation-exchange column packing. Trends in the apparent isoelectric points determined using cation- and anion-exchange chromatofocusing were interpreted using applicable theories. Results of this study indicate that cation-exchange chromatofocusing is a useful technique which is complementary to anion-exchange chromatofocusing and isoelectric focusing for separating proteins at both the analytical and preparative scales.

  1. Anaerobic toxicity of cationic silver nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gitipour, Alireza; Thiel, Stephen W. [Biomedical, Chemical, and Environmental Engineering, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Scheckel, Kirk G. [USEPA, Office of Research and Development, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Tolaymat, Thabet, E-mail: tolaymat.thabet@epa.gov [USEPA, Office of Research and Development, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2016-07-01

    The microbial toxicity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) stabilized with different capping agents was compared to that of Ag{sup +} under anaerobic conditions. Three AgNPs were investigated: (1) negatively charged citrate-coated AgNPs (citrate-AgNPs), (2) minimally charged polyvinylpyrrolidone coated AgNPs (PVP-AgNPs) and (3) positively charged branched polyethyleneimine coated AgNPs (BPEI-AgNPs). The AgNPs investigated in this experiment were similar in size (10–15 nm), spherical in shape, but varied in surface charge which ranged from highly negative to highly positive. While, at AgNPs concentrations lower than 5 mg L{sup −1}, the anaerobic decomposition process was not influenced by the presence of the nanoparticles, there was an observed impact on the diversity of the microbial community. At elevated concentrations (100 mg L{sup −1} as silver), only the cationic BPEI-AgNPs demonstrated toxicity similar in magnitude to that of Ag{sup +}. Both citrate and PVP-AgNPs did not exhibit toxicity at the 100 mg L{sup −1} as measured by biogas evolution. These findings further indicate the varying modes of action for nanoparticle toxicity and represent one of the few studies that evaluate end-of-life management concerns with regards to the increasing use of nanomaterials in our everyday life. These findings also highlight some of the concerns with a one size fits all approach to the evaluation of environmental health and safety concerns associated with the use of nanoparticles. - Highlights: • At concentrations -1 the anaerobic decomposition process was not impacted. • An impact on the microbial community at concentrations -1 were observed. • At high concentrations (100 mg L{sup −1}), the cationic BPEI-AgNPs demonstrated toxicity. • Toxicity was demonstrated without the presence of oxidative dissolution of silver. • A one size fits all approach for the evaluation of NPs may not be accurate.

  2. An Asian perspective on the management of distal radius fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastin, Sandeep J; Chung, Kevin C

    2012-05-01

    There is limited data regarding the epidemiology, pathology, and management of distal radius fractures from centers in Asia. The advanced economies in Asia include Hong Kong, Japan, Korea, Singapore, and Taiwan, whereas the prominent emerging economies are China, India, Malaysia, Philippines, and Thailand. This article examines the available epidemiological data from Asia, compares the management of distal radius fractures in the advanced and emerging Asian economies and how they compare with the current management in the west. It concludes by offering solutions for improving outcomes of distal radius fractures in Asia.

  3. Relationship between elastic moduli and pore radius in clay aggregates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2011-01-01

    Available experimental data on elastic velocities of clay-air mixtures and clay-brine mixtures as a function of porosity are re-interpreted. Pore radius as calculated from porosity and specific surface measured by BET seems to be the factor controlling stiffness of these un-cemented sediments....... For each of the two pore fluids: air or brine smectitic clay and kaolinitic clay seem to have similar power law relationships between a given elastic modulus and pore radius. These results indicate that pore radius and thus permeability of shale in the depth interval of mechanical compaction may...

  4. Fracture of the distal radius: epidemiology and premanagement radiographic characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porrino, Jack A; Maloney, Ezekiel; Scherer, Kurt; Mulcahy, Hyojeong; Ha, Alice S; Allan, Christopher

    2014-09-01

    Fractures of the distal radius are common and frequently encountered by the radiologist. We review the epidemiology, classification, as well as the concept of instability. Salient qualitative and quantitative features of the distal radius fracture identifiable on the routine radiography series are highlighted. We conclude with a synopsis of descriptors that are of greatest utility to the clinician for treatment planning and that should be addressed in the radiology report. A detailed understanding of the intricacies of the distal radius fracture is necessary for the radiologist to provide a clinically relevant description.

  5. Radius of 9C from the Asymptotic Normalization Coefficient

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhi-Hong; GUO Bing; LIU Wei-Ping; BAI Xi-Xiang; LIAN Gang; SU Jun; YAN Sheng-Quan; WANG Bao-Xiang; ZENG Sheng

    2005-01-01

    @@ The asymptotic normalization coefficient (ANC) of9 C = 8 B+p deduced from 8 Li(d, p)9 Li reaction is used to obtainthe root-mean-square (rms) radius of the loosely bound proton in the 9C ground state. We obtain 1/2 = 3.61 fmfor the valence proton, which is significantly larger than the matter radius of 9 C. The probability of the valence proton outside the matter radius of 9 C is greater than 60%. The present work supports the conclusion that 9 Chas a proton halo structure.

  6. Stable charged cosmic strings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigel, H; Quandt, M; Graham, N

    2011-03-11

    We study the quantum stabilization of a cosmic string by a heavy fermion doublet in a reduced version of the standard model. We show that charged strings, obtained by populating fermionic bound state levels, become stable if the electroweak bosons are coupled to a fermion that is less than twice as heavy as the top quark. This result suggests that extraordinarily large fermion masses or unrealistic couplings are not required to bind a cosmic string in the standard model. Numerically we find the most favorable string profile to be a simple trough in the Higgs vacuum expectation value of radius ≈10(-18)  m. The vacuum remains stable in our model, because neutral strings are not energetically favored.

  7. Geneva University - Measurement of the Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen: the proton radius puzzle

    CERN Multimedia

    2010-01-01

    GENEVA UNIVERSITY École de physique Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENEVA 4 Tel: (022) 379 62 73 Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Wednesday 12 May 2010 PARTICLE PHYSICS SEMINAR at 17.00 hrs – Stückelberg Auditorium Measurement of the Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen: the proton radius puzzle Dr Aldo Antogninia , CREMA Collaboration, Max Planck Institute, Germany At the Paul Scherrer Institut, Switzerland, we have measured several 2S-2P transition frequencies in muonic hydrogen (µp) and deuterium (µd) by means of laser spectroscopy. This results in an order of magnitude improvement on the rms charge radius values of the proton and the deuteron. Additionally the Zemach radii and the deuteron polarizability are also inferred. The new proton radius value is deduced with a relative accuracy of 0.1% but strongly disagrees from CODATA. The origin of this discrepancy is not yet known. It may come from theo...

  8. Characterisation of cationic potato starch by asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation. Influence of ionic strength and degree of substitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santacruz, Stalin

    2014-06-15

    The properties of a paper sheet depend on the absorption together with the physico-chemical properties of additives used in the paper processing. The effect of ionic strength and degree of substitution of cationic potato starch on the elution pattern of asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation was analysed. The effect of starch derivatisation, in either dry or wet phase, was also investigated. Average molar mass showed no difference between the starches obtained from the two derivatisation processes. Apparent densities showed that dry cationic starch had higher density than wet cationic starch for a hydrodynamic radius between 50 and 100 nm. Elution times of native and three cationic starches increased when the ionic strength increased from 50 to 100mM. No differences in the molar mass among cationic starches with different degree of substitution suggested no degradation due to a derivatisation process. Large sample loads can be used at 100mM without overloading.

  9. Quantization of charges and fluxes in warped Stenzel geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Hashimoto, Akikazu

    2011-01-01

    We examine the quantization of fluxes for the warped Stiefel cone and Stenzel geometries and their orbifolds, and distinguish the roles of three related notions of charge: Page, Maxwell, and brane. The orbifolds admit discrete torsion, and we describe the associated quantum numbers which are consistent with the geometry in its large radius and small radius limits from both the type IIA and the M-theory perspectives. The discrete torsion, measured by a Page charge, is related to the number of fractional branes. We relate the shifts in the Page charges under large gauge transformations to the Hanany-Witten brane creation effect.

  10. Enthalpy-entropy compensation for n-hexane adsorption on Y zeolite containing transition metal cations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hercigonja R.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the values of entropy changes related to n-hexane adsorption onto cation exchanged Y zeolite were calculated from differential heats. Various transition metal cations (Co2+, Ni2+, Zn2+ and Cd2+ were introduced into the lattice of the parent NaY, and the existence of enthalpy-entropy compensation effect related to n-hexane adsorption, id. est, the linearity of -ΔH vs. -ΔS plots was examined. The compensation effect was confirmed for all investigated zeolites. The compensation effect can be comprehended as governed by ion-induced dipole interaction between highly polarizing cationic centers in zeolite and nonopolar n-hexane molecules. Finally, the compensation effect and so the compensation temperature were found to depend on the type of charge-balancing cation (charge, size and electronic configuration. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 172018

  11. and minimum plastic zone radius (MPZR) for four point bend ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    LEFM) approach. ... where the radius of plastic zone takes either a local or global minimum depending on the ..... facilities provided by the Research Centre, B V B College of Engineering & ... American institute of physics conference proceedings.

  12. Split radius-form blocks for tube benders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, D. R.; Seiple, C. W.

    1970-01-01

    Two-piece, radius-form block permits accurate forming and removing of parts with more than a 180 degree bend. Tube bender can shape flexible metal tubing in applications dealing with plumbing, heating, and pressure transmission lines.

  13. The Potato Radius: a Lower Minimum Size for Dwarf Planets

    CERN Document Server

    Lineweaver, Charles H

    2010-01-01

    Gravitational and electronic forces produce a correlation between the mass and shape of objects in the universe. For example, at an average radius of ~ 200 km - 300 km, the icy moons and rocky asteroids of our Solar System transition from a rounded potato shape to a sphere. We derive this potato-to-sphere transition radius -- or "potato radius" -- from first principles. Using the empirical potato radii of asteroids and icy moons, we derive a constraint on the yield strength of these bodies during their formative years when their shapes were determined. Our proposed ~ 200 km potato radius for icy moons would substantially increase the number of trans-Neptunian objects classified as dwarf planets.

  14. CHARGE syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad Chitra

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract CHARGE syndrome was initially defined as a non-random association of anomalies (Coloboma, Heart defect, Atresia choanae, Retarded growth and development, Genital hypoplasia, Ear anomalies/deafness. In 1998, an expert group defined the major (the classical 4C's: Choanal atresia, Coloboma, Characteristic ears and Cranial nerve anomalies and minor criteria of CHARGE syndrome. Individuals with all four major characteristics or three major and three minor characteristics are highly likely to have CHARGE syndrome. However, there have been individuals genetically identified with CHARGE syndrome without the classical choanal atresia and coloboma. The reported incidence of CHARGE syndrome ranges from 0.1–1.2/10,000 and depends on professional recognition. Coloboma mainly affects the retina. Major and minor congenital heart defects (the commonest cyanotic heart defect is tetralogy of Fallot occur in 75–80% of patients. Choanal atresia may be membranous or bony; bilateral or unilateral. Mental retardation is variable with intelligence quotients (IQ ranging from normal to profound retardation. Under-development of the external genitalia is a common finding in males but it is less apparent in females. Ear abnormalities include a classical finding of unusually shaped ears and hearing loss (conductive and/or nerve deafness that ranges from mild to severe deafness. Multiple cranial nerve dysfunctions are common. A behavioral phenotype for CHARGE syndrome is emerging. Mutations in the CHD7 gene (member of the chromodomain helicase DNA protein family are detected in over 75% of patients with CHARGE syndrome. Children with CHARGE syndrome require intensive medical management as well as numerous surgical interventions. They also need multidisciplinary follow up. Some of the hidden issues of CHARGE syndrome are often forgotten, one being the feeding adaptation of these children, which needs an early aggressive approach from a feeding team. As the child

  15. A Sharp upper bound for the spectral radius of a nonnegative matrix and applications

    OpenAIRE

    You, Lihua; Shu, Yujie; Zhang, Xiao-Dong

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we obtain a sharp upper bound for the spectral radius of a nonnegative matrix. This result is used to present upper bounds for the adjacency spectral radius, the Laplacian spectral radius, the signless Laplacian spectral radius, the distance spectral radius, the distance Laplacian spectral radius, the distance signless Laplacian spectral radius of a graph or a digraph. These results are new or generalize some known results.

  16. Charged Leptons

    CERN Document Server

    Albrecht, J; Babu, K; Bernstein, R H; Blum, T; Brown, D N; Casey, B C K; Cheng, C -h; Cirigliano, V; Cohen, A; Deshpande, A; Dukes, E C; Echenard, B; Gaponenko, A; Glenzinski, D; Gonzalez-Alonso, M; Grancagnolo, F; Grossman, Y; Harnik, R; Hitlin, D G; Kiburg, B; Knoepfe, K; Kumar, K; Lim, G; Lu, Z -T; McKeen, D; Miller, J P; Ramsey-Musolf, M; Ray, R; Roberts, B L; Rominsky, M; Semertzidis, Y; Stoeckinger, D; Talman, R; Van De Water, R; Winter, P

    2013-01-01

    This is the report of the Intensity Frontier Charged Lepton Working Group of the 2013 Community Summer Study "Snowmass on the Mississippi", summarizing the current status and future experimental opportunities in muon and tau lepton studies and their sensitivity to new physics. These include searches for charged lepton flavor violation, measurements of magnetic and electric dipole moments, and precision measurements of the decay spectrum and parity-violating asymmetries.

  17. INTERACTIONS BETWEEN CATIONIC POLYELECTROLYTE AND PULP FINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elina Orblin

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Papermaking pulps are a mixture of fibres, fibre fragments, and small cells (parenchyma or ray cells, usually called pulp fines. The interactions between pulp fines and a cationic copolymer of acrylamide and acryloxyethyltrimethyl ammonium chloride were investigated based on solid-liquid isotherms prepared under different turbulence, and subsequent advanced surface characterization using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS. The surface charge and surface area of pulp fine substrates were measured by methylene blue sorption-XPS analysis and nitrogen adsorption combined with mercury porosimetry, respectively. The driving force behind polyelectrolyte adsorption was the amount of the surface anionic charge, whereas surface area appeared to be of less importance. Based on a comparison of solid-liquid and XPS sorption isotherms, different polyelectrolyte conformations were suggested, depending on the types of fines: A flatter conformation and partial cell-wall penetration of polyelectrolytes on kraft fines from freshly prepared pulp, and a more free conformation with extended loops and tails on lignocellulosic fines from recycled pulp. Additionally, ToF-SIMS imaging proved that recycled pulp fines contained residual de-inking chemicals (primarily palmitic acid salts that possibly hinder the electrostatic interactions with polyelectrolytes.

  18. Cation Defects and Conductivity in Transparent Oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Exarhos, Gregory J.; Windisch, Charles F.; Ferris, Kim F.; Owings, Robert R.

    2007-10-24

    High quality doped zinc oxide and mixed transition metal spinel oxide films have been deposited by means of sputter deposition from metal and metal oxide targets, and by spin casting from aqueous or alcoholic precursor solutions. Deposition conditions and post-deposition processing are found to alter cation oxidation states and their distributions in both oxide materials resulting in marked changes to both optical transmission and electrical response. For ZnO, partial reduction of the neat or doped material by hydrogen treatment of the heated film or by electrochemical processing renders the oxide n-type conducting. Continued reduction was found to diminish conductivity. In contrast, oxidation of the infrared transparent p-type spinel conductors typified by NiCo2O4 was found to increase conductivity. The disparate behavior of these two materials is caused in part by the sign of the charge carrier and by the existence of two different charge transport mechanisms that are identified as free carrier conduction and polaron hopping. While much work has been reported concerning structure/property relationships in the free carrier conducting oxides, there is a significantly smaller body of information on transparent polaron conductors. In this paper, we identify key parameters that promote conductivity in mixed metal spinel oxides and compare their behavior with that of the free carrier TCO’s.

  19. Understanding the salinity effect on cationic polymers in inducing flocculation of the microalga Neochloris oleoabundans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    't Lam, G P; Giraldo, J B; Vermuë, M H; Olivieri, G; Eppink, M H M; Wijffels, R H

    2016-05-10

    A mechanistic study was performed to evaluate the effect of salinity on cationic polymeric flocculants, that are used for the harvesting of microalgae. The polyacrylamide Synthofloc 5080H and the polysaccharide Chitosan were employed for the flocculation of Neochloris oleoabundans. In seawater conditions, a maximum biomass recovery of 66% was obtained with a dosage of 90mg/L Chitosan. This recovery was approximately 25% lower compared to Synthofloc 5080H reaching recoveries greater than 90% with dosages of 30mg/L. Although different recoveries were obtained with both flocculants, the polymers exhibit a similar apparent polymer length, as was evaluated from viscosity measurements. While both flocculants exhibit similar polymer lengths in increasing salinity, the zeta potential differs. This indicates that polymeric charge dominates flocculation. With increased salinity, the effectivity of cationic polymeric flocculants decreases due to a reduction in cationic charge. This mechanism was confirmed through a SEM analysis and additional experiments using flocculants with various charge densities.

  20. Predicting the failure load of the distal radius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Monique E; Webber, Colin E; Bouxsein, Mary L

    2003-06-01

    The distal radius is an important site for the early detection of patients at risk for fracture. Since measuring bone strength in vivo is not possible, we evaluated which bone assessment method of the forearm would best predict failure load of the distal radius and computed a factor of risk for wrist fracture (Phi wrist). Thirty-eight cadaveric forearm specimens were measured by five different techniques to assess bone density, bone mineral content, geometry and trabecular structure at the distal forearm. The bone assessment techniques included dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) of the radius, peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) of the 4% and 20% distal sites of the radius, DXA of the phalanges, digital X-ray radiogrammetry of the forearm (DXR-BMD), and quantitative ultrasound of the radius. The failure load of each excised radius was determined by simulating a fall on an outstretched hand. The pQCT measurements of polar stress-strain index and cortical content explained the greatest portion of variance in failure load (r2=0.82-0.85). Bone mineral content measures were generally better predictors of failure load (r2=0.53-0.85) than the corresponding volumetric or areal bone mineral density values (r2=0.22-0.69) measured by either pQCT or DXA. Multiple regression analysis showed that the addition of a bone geometry measure improved the ability of a bone density measure alone to predict failure load. There was high variability in the ability of different techniques and different variables within a given technique to predict failure load. Estimates of the factor of risk for wrist fracture (Phi wrist) revealed that the women in this study would have been likely to fracture their distal radius upon falling from a standing height (Phi wrist= 1.04), whereas the men would have likely withstood the impact without fracturing their wrist (Phi wrist= 0.79).

  1. Understanding the impact of the central atom on the ionic liquid behavior: Phosphonium vs ammonium cations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, Pedro J.; Ventura, Sónia P. M.; Batista, Marta L. S.; Schröder, Bernd; Coutinho, João A. P., E-mail: jcoutinho@ua.pt [CICECO, Departamento de Química, Universidade de Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Gonçalves, Fernando [Departamento de Biologia e CESAM (Centro de Estudos do Ambiente e do Mar), Universidade de Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Esperança, José [Instituto de Tecnologia Química e Biológica, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2780-901 Oeiras (Portugal); Mutelet, Fabrice [Laboratoire Réactions et Génie des Procédés, CNRS (UPR3349), Nancy-Université, 1 rue Grandville, BP 20451 54001 Nancy (France)

    2014-02-14

    The influence of the cation's central atom in the behavior of pairs of ammonium- and phosphonium-based ionic liquids was investigated through the measurement of densities, viscosities, melting temperatures, activity coefficients at infinite dilution, refractive indices, and toxicity against Vibrio fischeri. All the properties investigated are affected by the cation's central atom nature, with ammonium-based ionic liquids presenting higher densities, viscosities, melting temperatures, and enthalpies. Activity coefficients at infinite dilution show the ammonium-based ionic liquids to present slightly higher infinite dilution activity coefficients for non-polar solvents, becoming slightly lower for polar solvents, suggesting that the ammonium-based ionic liquids present somewhat higher polarities. In good agreement these compounds present lower toxicities than the phosphonium congeners. To explain this behavior quantum chemical gas phase DFT calculations were performed on isolated ion pairs at the BP-TZVP level of theory. Electronic density results were used to derive electrostatic potentials of the identified minimum conformers. Electrostatic potential-derived CHelpG and Natural Population Analysis charges show the P atom of the tetraalkylphosphonium-based ionic liquids cation to be more positively charged than the N atom in the tetraalkylammonium-based analogous IL cation, and a noticeable charge delocalization occurring in the tetraalkylammonium cation, when compared with the respective phosphonium congener. It is argued that this charge delocalization is responsible for the enhanced polarity observed on the ammonium based ionic liquids explaining the changes in the thermophysical properties observed.

  2. Numerical study of superradiant instability for charged stringy black hole-mirror system

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Ran

    2015-01-01

    We numerically study the superradiant instability of charged massless scalar field in the background of charged stringy black hole with mirror-like boundary condition. We compare the numerical result with the previous analytical result and show the dependencies of this instability upon various parameters of black hole charge $Q$, scalar field charge $q$, and mirror radius $r_m$. Especially, we have observed that imaginary part of BQN frequencies grows with the scalar field charge $q$ rapidly.

  3. Numerical study of superradiant instability for charged stringy black hole-mirror system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ran; Zhao, Junkun

    2015-01-01

    We numerically study the superradiant instability of charged massless scalar field in the background of charged stringy black hole with mirror-like boundary condition. We compare the numerical result with the previous analytical result and show the dependencies of this instability upon various values of black hole charge Q, scalar field charge q, and mirror radius rm. Especially, we have observed that imaginary part of BQN frequencies grows with the scalar field charge q rapidly.

  4. Numerical study of superradiant instability for charged stringy black hole–mirror system

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Ran; Zhao, Junkun

    2015-01-01

    We numerically study the superradiant instability of charged massless scalar field in the background of charged stringy black hole with mirror-like boundary condition. We compare the numerical result with the previous analytical result and show the dependencies of this instability upon various values of black hole charge Q , scalar field charge q , and mirror radius rm . Especially, we have observed that imaginary part of BQN frequencies grows with the scalar field charge q rapidly.

  5. Numerical study of superradiant instability for charged stringy black hole–mirror system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We numerically study the superradiant instability of charged massless scalar field in the background of charged stringy black hole with mirror-like boundary condition. We compare the numerical result with the previous analytical result and show the dependencies of this instability upon various values of black hole charge Q, scalar field charge q, and mirror radius rm. Especially, we have observed that imaginary part of BQN frequencies grows with the scalar field charge q rapidly.

  6. Structural Role of Alkali Cations in Calcium Aluminosilicate Glasses as Examined Using Oxygen-17 Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukenaga, Sohei; Kanehashi, Koji; Shibata, Hiroyuki; Saito, Noritaka; Nakashima, Kunihiko

    2016-08-01

    The structural roles of alkali and calcium cations are important for understanding the physical and chemical properties of aluminosilicate melts and glasses. Recently, oxygen-17 nuclear magnetic resonance (17O NMR) studies of calcium-sodium aluminosilicate glasses showed that these structural roles are not randomly given, but rather each cation has its own preferential role. However, the relationship between cation type and role preference in calcium aluminosilicate glass is not completely understood. In the present study, the structural roles of lithium, sodium, and potassium cations in selected calcium aluminosilicate glasses are investigated using 17O solid-state NMR experiments. Data from these experiments clearly show that potassium cations have a notably stronger tendency to act as charge compensators within the network structure, compared to sodium and lithium cations. The result of 17O NMR experiment also showed that sodium and lithium cations in part act as network modifier alongside with calcium cations.

  7. Optimal network modification for spectral radius dependent phase transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Yonatan; Kirsch, Lior; Louzoun, Yoram

    2016-09-01

    The dynamics of contact processes on networks is often determined by the spectral radius of the networks adjacency matrices. A decrease of the spectral radius can prevent the outbreak of an epidemic, or impact the synchronization among systems of coupled oscillators. The spectral radius is thus tightly linked to network dynamics and function. As such, finding the minimal change in network structure necessary to reach the intended spectral radius is important theoretically and practically. Given contemporary big data resources such as large scale communication or social networks, this problem should be solved with a low runtime complexity. We introduce a novel method for the minimal decrease in weights of edges required to reach a given spectral radius. The problem is formulated as a convex optimization problem, where a global optimum is guaranteed. The method can be easily adjusted to an efficient discrete removal of edges. We introduce a variant of the method which finds optimal decrease with a focus on weights of vertices. The proposed algorithm is exceptionally scalable, solving the problem for real networks of tens of millions of edges in a short time.

  8. Accuracy of distal radius positioning using an anatomical plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vroemen, Joy C; Dobbe, Johannes G G; Sierevelt, Inger N; Strackee, Simon D; Streekstra, Geert J

    2013-04-01

    Over the past decade, several anatomical plates have been introduced to improve the result of open reduction and internal fixation of the distal radius. Using 3-dimensional imaging techniques, the authors studied the accuracy and reproducibility of distal radius positioning using anatomical plates.Distal radius fractures and the correction of these fractures were simulated with plastic bone models of radii. The authors simulated a defect by removing an arbitrary wedge shape from the artificial radii. Two surgeons corrected these fractures by placing 2 anatomical plate types according to the plate manufacturers' instructions. The residual positioning errors of the distal segment in relation to the unaffected radii were determined using 3-dimensional imaging and were compared with naturally occurring bilateral radius differences in healthy individuals. In many cases, positioning does not agree with differences based on bilateral asymmetry in healthy patients.This study indicated the accuracy of anatomical plates. Positioning an anatomical plate may lead to considerable residual errors in individual patients. Volar distal radius plate shapes differ among plate manufacturers. Therefore, one plate may perform better than another in an individual.

  9. The radius distribution of planets around cool stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morton, Timothy D. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, 4 Ivy Lane, Peyton Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Swift, Jonathan, E-mail: tdm@astro.princeton.edu [Department of Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, MC 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2014-08-10

    We calculate an empirical, non-parametric estimate of the shape of the period-marginalized radius distribution of planets with periods less than 150 days using the small yet well-characterized sample of cool (T{sub eff} < 4000 K) dwarf stars in the Kepler catalog. In particular, we present and validate a new procedure, based on weighted kernel density estimation, to reconstruct the shape of the planet radius function down to radii smaller than the completeness limit of the survey at the longest periods. Under the assumption that the period distribution of planets does not change dramatically with planet radius, we show that the occurrence of planets around these stars continues to increase to below 1 R{sub ⊕}, and that there is no strong evidence for a turnover in the planet radius function. In fact, we demonstrate using many iterations of simulated data that a spurious turnover may be inferred from data even when the true distribution continues to rise toward smaller radii. Finally, the sharp rise in the radius distribution below ∼3 R{sub ⊕} implies that a large number of planets await discovery around cool dwarfs as the sensitivities of ground-based transit surveys increase.

  10. Evidence for a large radius of the 11Be projectile

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, W. Y.; Choi, K. S.; Cheoun, Myung-Ki; Kim, K. S.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate ratios of the elastic scattering cross section to Rutherford cross section, PE, and angular distributions of breakup cross section by using an optical model which exploits various long-range dynamic polarization potentials as well as short-range nuclear bare potentials for the 11Be projectile. From these simultaneous analyses, we extract a large radius of a halo projectile from the experimental data for PE and the angular distribution of the breakup cross section of the 11Be + 64Zn and 11 + 120Sn systems. It results from the fact that a large radius for the long-range nuclear potential is more reasonable for properly explaining these data simultaneously. The extracted reduced interaction radius turns out to be r0=3.18 ˜3.61 fm for 11Be nucleus, which is larger than the conventional value of r0=1.1 ˜1.5 fm used in the standard radius form R =r0A1 /3 . Furthermore, the larger radius as well as the normalization constant N is shown to be important for understanding Coulomb dipole strength distribution.

  11. Compensation of steric demand by cation-pi interactions, cobaltocenium cations as guests in tetraurea calix[4]arene dimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frish, Limor; Vysotsky, Myroslav O; Böhmer, Volker; Cohen, Yoram

    2003-06-07

    The affinities of ferrocene (2) and the cobaltocenium cation (3+), which have roughly the same size and differ in their charge, towards the inner cavity of the dimeric capsule formed by tetraurea calix[4]arene (1) were studied in C2D4Cl2 solutions. While 3+, which occupies more than 75% of the internal volume of the dimer, is readily encapsulated this is not the case for 2. This is probably due to cation-pi interactions, which operate only between 3+ and the aromatic rings of the calix[4]arene dimer. We found that the affinity of the cobaltocenium cation is higher than that of the tropylium cation (4+) and is only 2-3 times less than that of the tetraethylammoniun cation (5+). From the variable temperature 1H NMR spectra of this capsule, the free energy of activation at 298 K (deltaGdouble dagger(298K)) for the reorientation of the hydrogen bonded belt between the two parts of the dimer could be determined by total line shape analysis for the aromatic protons of the calixarene. The value of 14.3 +/- 0.2 kcal mol(-1) for the dimeric capsules of 3+ PF6- is very similar to the free activation energy found for dimeric capsules of 1 with 4+ PF6- and 5+ PF6- in C2D4Cl2. It becomes significantly lower, if PF6- is replaced by BF4-. We also found that ten times more DMSO is needed to disrupt the capsule 1 x 3+ x 1 than the corresponding 1 x 1 dimer containing benzene as guest. This demonstrates again the importance of the cation-pi interactions for the stability of such hydrogen-bonded dimeric capsules.

  12. Probing optical band gaps at nanoscale from tetrahedral cation vacancy defects and variation of cation ordering in NiCo2O4 epitaxial thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dileep, K.; Loukya, B.; Silwal, P.; Gupta, A.; Datta, R.

    2014-10-01

    High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) is utilized to probe the optical band gaps at the nanoscale in epitaxial NiCo2O4 (NCO) thin films with different structural order (cation/charge). The structure of NCO deviates from the ideal inverse spinel (non-magnetic and insulating) for films grown at higher temperatures (>500 °C) towards a mixed cation structure (magnetic with metallic conductivity) at lower deposition temperatures (<450 °C). This significantly modifies the electronic structure as well as the nature of the band gap of the material. Nanoscale regions with unoccupied tetrahedral A site cations are additionally observed in all the samples and direct measurement from such areas reveals considerably lower band gap values as compared to the ideal inverse spinel and mixed cation configurations. Experimental values of band gaps have been found to be in good agreement with the theoretical mBJLDA exchange potential based calculated band gaps for various cation ordering and consideration of A site cation vacancy defects. The origin of rich variation in cation ordering observed in this system is discussed.

  13. The Compton Radius, the de Broglie Radius, the Planck Constant, and the Bohr Orbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daywitt W. C.

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The Bohr orbits of the hydrogen atom and the Planck constant can be derived classically from the Maxwell equations and the assumption that there is a variation in the electron’s velocity about its average value [1]. The resonant nature of the circulating electron and its induced magnetic and Faraday fields prevents a radiative collapse of the electron into the nuclear proton. The derived Planck constant is h = 2 e 2 = c , where e , , and c are the electronic charge, the fine structure constant, and the speed of light. The fact that the Planck vacuum (PV theory [2] derives the same Planck constant independently of the above implies that the two derivations are related. The following highlights that connection.

  14. The Compton Radius, the de Broglie Radius, the Planck Constant, and the Bohr Orbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daywitt W. C.

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The Bohr orbits of the hydrogen atom and the Planck constant can be derived classically from the Maxwell equations and the assumption that there is a variation in the electron's velocity about its average value. The resonant nature of the circulating electron and its induced magnetic and Faraday fields prevents a radiative collapse of the electron into the nuclear proton. The derived Planck constant is $h=2pi e^2/alpha c$, where $e$, $alpha$, and $c$ are the electronic charge, the fine structure constant, and the speed of light. The fact that the Planck vacuum (PV theory derives the same Planck constant independently of the above implies that the two derivations are related. The following highlights that connection.

  15. Research progress in cation-π interactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG JiaGao; LUO XiaoMin; YAN XiuHua; LI Zhong; TANG Yun; JIANG HuaLiang; ZHU WeiLiang

    2008-01-01

    Cation-π interaction is a potent intermolecular interaction between a cation and an aromatic system, which has been viewed as a new kind of binding force, as being compared with the classical interac-tions (e.g. hydrogen bonding, electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions). Cation-π interactions have been observed in a wide range of biological contexts. In this paper, we present an overview of the typi-cal cation-π interactions in biological systems, the experimental and theoretical investigations on cation-π interactions, as well as the research results on cation-π interactions in our group.

  16. Research progress in cation-π interactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Cation-π interaction is a potent intermolecular interaction between a cation and an aromatic system,which has been viewed as a new kind of binding force,as being compared with the classical interactions(e.g. hydrogen bonding,electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions). Cation-π interactions have been observed in a wide range of biological contexts. In this paper,we present an overview of the typical cation-π interactions in biological systems,the experimental and theoretical investigations on cation-π interactions,as well as the research results on cation-π interactions in our group.

  17. The dependence of the atomic energy levels on a superstrong magnetic field with account of a finite nucleus radius and mass

    CERN Document Server

    Godunov, S I

    2013-01-01

    The influence of the finiteness of the proton radius and mass on the energies of a hydrogen atom and hydrogen-like ions in a superstrong magnetic field is studied. The finiteness of the nucleus size pushes the ground energy level up leading to a nontrivial dependence of the value of critical nucleus charge on the external magnetic field.

  18. Cation ordering and superstructures in natural layered double hydroxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivovichev, Sergey V; Yakovenchuk, Victor N; Zolotarev, Andrey A; Ivanyuk, Gregory N; Pakhomovsky, Yakov A

    2010-01-01

    Layered double hydroxides (LDHs) constitute an important group of materials with many applications ranging from catalysis and absorption to carriers for drug delivery, DNA intercalation and carbon dioxide sequestration. The structures of LDHs are based upon double brucite-like hydroxide layers [M(2+)(n)M(3+)(m)(OH)(2(m+n)](m+), where M(2+) = Mg(2+), Fe(2+), Mn(2+), Zn(2+), etc.; M(3+) = Al(3+), Fe(3+), Cr(3+), Mn(3+), etc. Structural features of LDHs such as cation ordering, charge distribution and polytypism have an immediate influence upon their properties. However, all the structural studies on synthetic LDHs deal with powder samples that prevent elucidation of such fine details of structure architecture as formation of superstructures due to cation ordering. In contrast to synthetic materials, natural LDHs are known to form single crystals accessible to single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis, which provides a unique possibility to investigate 3D cation ordering in LDHs that results in formation of complex superstructures, where 2D cation order is combined with a specific order of layer stacking (polytypism). Therefore LDH minerals provide an indispensable source of structural information for modeling of structures and processes happening in LDHs at the molecular and nanoscale levels.

  19. Antiviral effect of cationic compounds on bacteriophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mai Huong eChatain-Ly

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The antiviral activity of several cationic compounds - cetytrimethylammonium (CTAB, chitosan, nisin and lysozyme - was investigated on the bacteriophage c2 (DNA head and non-contractile tail infecting Lactococcus strains and the bacteriophage MS2 (F-specific RNA infecting E.coli. Firstly, these activities were evaluated in a phosphate buffer pH 7- 10 mM. The CTAB had a virucidal effect on the Lactococcus bacteriophages, but not on the MS2. After 1 min of contact with 0.125 mM CTAB, the c2 population was reduced from 6 log(pfu/mL to 1,5 log(pfu/mL and completely deactivated at 1 mM. On the contrary, chitosan inhibited the MS2 more than it did the bacteriophages c2. No antiviral effect was observed for the nisin or the lysozyme on bacteriophages after 1 min of treatment. A 1 and 2.5 log reduction was respectively observed for nisin and lysozyme when the treatment time increased (5 or 10 min. These results showed that the antiviral effect depended both on the virus and structure of the antimicrobial compounds. The antiviral activity of these compounds was also evaluated in different physico-chemical conditions and in complex matrices. The antiviral activity of CTAB was impaired in acid pH and with an increase of the ionic strength. These results might be explained by the electrostatic interactions between cationic compounds and negatively charged particles such as bacteriophages or other compounds in a matrix. Milk proved to be protective suggesting the components of food could interfere with antimicrobial compounds.

  20. Radius variation of optical fibers with angstrom accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumetsky, M; Dulashko, Y

    2010-12-01

    We have developed a robust method for the unprecedentedly accurate angstrom-scale detection of local variations of the fiber radius based on the idea suggested by Birks et al. [IEEE Photon. Technol. Lett. 12, 182 (2000)]. The method uses an optical microfiber (MF) translated at a small distance along the tested fiber and periodically touching it at measurement points. At these points, the MF transmission spectrum exhibits whispering-gallery-mode (WGM) resonances shifting with the tested fiber radius. A simple and comprehensive optimization scheme, which determines the radius variation without visual recognition of resonances and treats their shifts simultaneously, is developed. The optics of WGM propagation is discussed, and the condition for the validity of the developed method is established.

  1. A Precise Estimate of the Radius of HD 149026b

    CERN Document Server

    Nutzman, Philip; Winn, Joshua N; Knutson, Heather A; Fortney, Jonathan J; Holman, Matthew J; Agol, Eric

    2008-01-01

    We present Spitzer 8 micron transit observations of the extrasolar planet system HD 149026. At this wavelength, transit light curves are weakly affected by stellar limb-darkening, allowing for a simpler and more accurate determination of planetary parameters. We measure a planet-star radius ratio of R_p/R_s = 0.05158 +/- 0.00077, and in combination with ground-based data and independent constraints on the stellar mass and radius, we derive an orbital inclination of i = 85.4 +0.9/-0.8 deg. and a planet radius of 0.755 +/- 0.040 Jupiter radii. These measurements further support models in which the planet is greatly enriched in heavy elements.

  2. Effect of sample radius on stability of electromagnetic levitation melting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马伟增; 郑红星; 季诚昌; 李建国

    2004-01-01

    Based on the power dissipating model of spherical sample in free convection gas medium and the expression of input power, the model of temperature calculation for electromagnetic levitation melting sample was established. Considering the limitation of levitation force and levitation sample temperature,the principle of stability levitation zone computation was determined. A spherical sample (ThDy)Fe2 under the protection of argon gas was examined, and the effect of radius of levitation sample and perturbation on the stable levitation zone was investigated.The results show that longitudinal perturbation and transverse perturbation can shorten the length of stable levitation zone and the range of levitation sample radius. By increasing the sample radius and weakening the perturbation the electromagnetic levitation melting stability of sample can be improved.

  3. Rational functions with maximal radius of absolute monotonicity

    KAUST Repository

    Loczi, Lajos

    2014-05-19

    We study the radius of absolute monotonicity R of rational functions with numerator and denominator of degree s that approximate the exponential function to order p. Such functions arise in the application of implicit s-stage, order p Runge-Kutta methods for initial value problems and the radius of absolute monotonicity governs the numerical preservation of properties like positivity and maximum-norm contractivity. We construct a function with p=2 and R>2s, disproving a conjecture of van de Griend and Kraaijevanger. We determine the maximum attainable radius for functions in several one-parameter families of rational functions. Moreover, we prove earlier conjectured optimal radii in some families with 2 or 3 parameters via uniqueness arguments for systems of polynomial inequalities. Our results also prove the optimality of some strong stability preserving implicit and singly diagonally implicit Runge-Kutta methods. Whereas previous results in this area were primarily numerical, we give all constants as exact algebraic numbers.

  4. Thoughts on the so-called radius-capitellum axis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schild, H.; Mueller, H.A.; Wagner, H.; Baetz, W.

    1982-02-01

    We have studied 438 patients radiologically in order to observe the so-called 'radius-capitellum axis'. In about a quarter of people with normal elbows the axis passes lateral to the middle portion of the capitellum, so that even when there is marked deviation, there is no certainty that the humero-radial joint is abnormal. Deviation of the axis can be caused by changes in the shape of the capitellum or of the radius, or by distension of the capsule of the elbow joint, or by various changes in muscular pull.

  5. Dome-shaped osteotomy for distal radius fracture malunions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunelli, Giorgio A

    2003-06-01

    After having hinted to the various component of the malformity caused by malunions of the distal radius fracture, the various possibilities of correcting this deformity are described. The difficulty to correct all the components of the deformity are considered. Then a Dome-shaped osteotomy of the distal radius is described that allows to correct all the deformities in all the directions as the gliding plane of the osteotomy is spherical. The ulnar plus and the DRUJ alterations are corrected by means of an added Sauvé-Kapandji procedure that guarantees against any painful movement of the DRUJ preserving effective prono-supination.

  6. Cation-Cation Interactions in [(UO2)2(OH)n](4-n) Complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odoh, Samuel O.; Govind, Niranjan; Schreckenbach, Georg; De Jong, Wibe A.

    2013-10-07

    The structures and bonding of gas-phase [(UO2)2(OH)n]4-n (n=2-6) complexes have been studied using density functional theory (DFT), MP2 and CCSD(T) methods with particular emphasis on ground state structures featuring cation-cation interactions (CCIs) between the uranyl groups. An interesting trend is observed in the stabilities of members of this series of complexes. The structures of [(UO2)2(OH)2]2+, [(UO2)2(OH)4] and [(UO2)2(OH)6]2- featuring CCIs are found at higher energies (by 3-20 kcal/mol) in comparison to their conventional μ2-dihydroxo structures. In contrast, the CCI structures of [(UO2)2(OH)3]+ and [(UO2)2(OH)5]- are respectively almost degenerate with and lower in energy than the structures with the μ2-dihydroxo format. The origin of this trend lies in the ‘symmetry’-based need to balance the coordination numbers and effective atomic charges of each uranium center. The calculated IR vibrational frequencies provide signature probes that can be used in differentiating the lowenergy structures and in experimentally confirming the existence of the structures featuring CCIs. Analysis of the bonding in the structures of [(UO2)2(OH)3]+ and [(UO2)2(OH)5]- shows that the CCIs and bridging hydroxo between the dioxo-uranium units are mainly electrostatic in nature.

  7. Cation selectivity by the CorA Mg2+ channel requires a fully hydrated cation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moomaw, Andrea S; Maguire, Michael E

    2010-07-27

    The CorA Mg(2+) channel is the primary uptake system in about half of all bacteria and archaea. However, the basis for its Mg(2+) selectivity is unknown. Previous data suggested that CorA binds a fully hydrated Mg(2+) ion, unlike other ion channels. The crystal structure of Thermotoga maritima CorA shows a homopentamer with two transmembrane segments per monomer connected by a short periplasmic loop. This highly conserved loop, (281)EFMPELKWS(289) in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium CorA, is the only portion of the channel outside of the cell, suggesting a role in cation selectivity. Mutation of charged residues in the loop, E281 and K287, to any of several amino acids had little effect, demonstrating that despite conservation electrostatic interactions with these residues are not essential. While mutation of the universally conserved E285 gave a minimally functional channel, E285A and E285K mutants were the most functional, again indicating that the negative charge at this position is not a determining factor. Several mutations at K287 and W288 behaved anomalously in a transport assay. Analysis indicated that mutation of K287 and W288 disrupts cooperative interactions between distinct Mg(2+) binding sites. Overall, these results are not compatible with electrostatic interaction of the Mg(2+) ion with the periplasmic loop. Instead, the loop appears to form an initial binding site for hydrated Mg(2+), not for the dehydrated cation. The loop residues may function to accelerate dehydration of the before entry of Mg(2+) into the pore of the channel.

  8. Tripodal Receptors for Cation and Anion Sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuswandi, Bambang; Nuriman,; Verboom, Willem; Reinhoudt, David N.

    2006-01-01

    This review discusses different types of artificial tripodal receptors for the selectiverecognition and sensing of cations and anions. Examples on the relationship between structure andselectivity towards cations and anions are described. Furthermore, their applications as potentiometricion sensing

  9. S. Typhimurium strategies to resist killing by cationic antimicrobial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matamouros, Susana; Miller, Samuel I

    2015-11-01

    S. Typhimurium is a broad host range Gram-negative pathogen that must evade killing by host innate immune systems to colonize, replicate, cause disease, and be transmitted to other hosts. A major pathogenic strategy of Salmonellae is entrance, survival, and replication within eukaryotic cell phagocytic vacuoles. These phagocytic vacuoles and gastrointestinal mucosal surfaces contain multiple cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs) which control invading bacteria. S. Typhimurium possesses several key mechanisms to resist killing by CAMPs which involve sensing CAMPs and membrane damage to activate signaling cascades that result in remodeling of the bacterial envelope to reduce its overall negative charge with an increase in hydrophobicity to decrease binding and effectiveness of CAMPs. Moreover Salmonellae have additional mechanisms to resist killing by CAMPs including an outer membrane protease which targets cationic peptides at the surface, and specific efflux pumps which protect the inner membrane from damage. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Bacterial Resistance to Antimicrobial Peptides.

  10. Heavy metal cations permeate the TRPV6 epithelial cation channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, Gergely; Danko, Tamas; Bergeron, Marc J; Balazs, Bernadett; Suzuki, Yoshiro; Zsembery, Akos; Hediger, Matthias A

    2011-01-01

    TRPV6 belongs to the vanilloid family of the transient receptor potential channel (TRP) superfamily. This calcium-selective channel is highly expressed in the duodenum and the placenta, being responsible for calcium absorption in the body and fetus. Previous observations have suggested that TRPV6 is not only permeable to calcium but also to other divalent cations in epithelial tissues. In this study, we tested whether TRPV6 is indeed also permeable to cations such as zinc and cadmium. We found that the basal intracellular calcium concentration was higher in HEK293 cells transfected with hTRPV6 than in non-transfected cells, and that this difference almost disappeared in nominally calcium-free solution. Live cell imaging experiments with Fura-2 and NewPort Green DCF showed that overexpression of human TRPV6 increased the permeability for Ca(2+), Ba(2+), Sr(2+), Mn(2+), Zn(2+), Cd(2+), and interestingly also for La(3+) and Gd(3+). These results were confirmed using the patch clamp technique. (45)Ca uptake experiments showed that cadmium, lanthanum and gadolinium were also highly efficient inhibitors of TRPV6-mediated calcium influx at higher micromolar concentrations. Our results suggest that TRPV6 is not only involved in calcium transport but also in the transport of other divalent cations, including heavy metal ions, which may have toxicological implications.

  11. Social Support Contributes to Outcomes following Distal Radius Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caitlin J. Symonette

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Distal radius fractures are the most common fracture of the upper extremity and cause variable disability. This study examined the role of social support in patient-reported pain and disability at one year following distal radius fracture. Methods. The Medical Outcomes Study Social Support Survey was administered to a prospective cohort of 291 subjects with distal radius fractures at their baseline visit. Pearson correlations and stepwise linear regression models (F-to-remove 0.10 were used to identify whether social support contributes to wrist fracture outcomes. The primary outcome of pain and disability at one year was measured using the Patient Rated Wrist Evaluation. Results. Most injuries were low energy (67.5% and were treated nonoperatively (71.9%. Pearson correlation analysis revealed that higher reported social support correlated with improved Patient Rated Wrist Evaluation scores at 1 year, r(n=181=-0.22, P<0.05. Of the subscales within the Social Support Survey, emotional/informational support explained a significant proportion of the variance in 1-year Patient Rated Wrist Evaluation scores, R2=4.7%, F (1, 181 = 9.98, P<0.05. Conclusion. Lower emotional/informational social support at the time of distal radius fracture contributes a small but significant percentage to patient-reported pain and disability outcomes.

  12. Optimal Taylor-Couette flow: Radius ratio dependence

    CERN Document Server

    Monico, Rodolfo Ostilla; Jannink, Tim J G; van Gils, Dennis P M; Verzicco, Roberto; Grossmann, Siegfried; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef

    2013-01-01

    Taylor-Couette flow with independently rotating inner (i) and outer (o) cylinders is explored numerically and experimentally to determine the effects of the radius ratio {\\eta} on the system response. Numerical simulations reach Reynolds numbers of up to Re_i=9.5 x 10^3 and Re_o=5x10^3, corresponding to Taylor numbers of up to Ta=10^8 for four different radius ratios {\\eta}=r_i/r_o between 0.5 and 0.909. The experiments, performed in the Twente Turbulent Taylor-Couette (T^3C) setup, reach Reynolds numbers of up to Re_i=2x10^6$ and Re_o=1.5x10^6, corresponding to Ta=5x10^{12} for {\\eta}=0.714-0.909. Effective scaling laws for the torque J^{\\omega}(Ta) are found, which for sufficiently large driving Ta are independent of the radius ratio {\\eta}. As previously reported for {\\eta}=0.714, optimum transport at a non-zero Rossby number Ro=r_i|{\\omega}_i-{\\omega}_o|/[2(r_o-r_i){\\omega}_o] is found in both experiments and numerics. Ro_opt is found to depend on the radius ratio and the driving of the system. At a drivi...

  13. Radius ratio effects on natural heat transfer in concentric annulus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alipour, M.; Hosseini, R.; Kolaei, Alireza Rezania

    2013-01-01

    This paper studies natural convection heat transfer in vertical and electrically heated annulus. The metallic cylinders mounted concentrically in a parallel tube. Measurements are carried out for four input electric powers and three radius ratios with an apparatus immersed in stagnant air...

  14. Radius-mass scaling laws for celestial bodies

    OpenAIRE

    Muradian, R.; S. Carneiro; Marques, R.

    1999-01-01

    In this letter we establish a connection between two-exponent radius-mass power laws for cosmic objects and previously proposed two-exponent Regge-like spin-mass relations. A new, simplest method for establishing the coordinates of Chandrasekhar and Eddington points is proposed.

  15. 3D imaging in corrective osteotomy of the distal radius

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vroemen, Joy

    2013-01-01

    The research described in this thesis is on the development, design, implementation and testing of new techniques for corrective osteotomy of the distal radius. The goal of this thesis is threefold. At first, possible pitfalls of conventional corrective osteotomy surgery were determined and quantifi

  16. Surgical versus conservative treatment of distal radius fractures in elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisan, C; Klumpp, R; Nava, V; Riccardi, D; Recalcati, W

    2013-10-01

    The distal radius fractures (DRFs) are the second most common fracture in the elderly population. Despite their frequency, the optimal treatment of these fractures remains controversial. Several dogmatic myths on DRFs management may adversely affect their outcome and despite a strong trend versus surgical options, systematic reviews suggest that conservative treatment remains the safest option for DRFs in most cases.

  17. Human Fertility Increases with the Marital-radius

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Labouriau, Rodrigo; Amorim, António

    2008-01-01

    We report a positive association between marital radius (distance between mates' birthplaces) and fertility detected in a large population. Spurious association due to socioeconomic factors is discarded by a conditional analysis involving income, education, and urbanicity. Strong evidence...... of consanguinity's deleterious effects affecting an entire human population is provided...

  18. Nonlinear buckling analyses of a small-radius carbon nanotube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ning, E-mail: liuxiao@ase.buaa.edu.cn; Li, Min; Jia, Jiao [School of Aeronautic Science and Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100091 (China); Wang, Yong-Gang [Department of Applied Mechanics, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2014-04-21

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) was first discovered by Sumio Iijima. It has aroused extensive attentions of scholars from all over the world. Over the past two decades, we have acquired a lot of methods to synthesize carbon nanotubes and learn their many incredible mechanical properties such as experimental methods, theoretical analyses, and computer simulations. However, the studies of experiments need lots of financial, material, and labor resources. The calculations will become difficult and time-consuming, and the calculations may be even beyond the realm of possibility when the scale of simulations is large, as for computer simulations. Therefore, it is necessary for us to explore a reasonable continuum model, which can be applied into nano-scale. This paper attempts to develop a mathematical model of a small-radius carbon nanotube based on continuum theory. An Isotropic circular cross-section, Timoshenko beam model is used as a simplified mechanical model for the small-radius carbon nanotube. Theoretical part is mainly based on modified couple stress theory to obtain the numerical solutions of buckling deformation. Meanwhile, the buckling behavior of the small radius carbon nanotube is simulated by Molecular Dynamics method. By comparing with the numerical results based on modified couple stress theory, the dependence of the small-radius carbon nanotube mechanical behaviors on its elasticity constants, small-size effect, geometric nonlinearity, and shear effect is further studied, and an estimation of the small-scale parameter of a CNT (5, 5) is obtained.

  19. Individualist-Collectivist Culture and Trust Radius : A Multilevel Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hoorn, André

    2015-01-01

    We apply a multilevel approach to examine empirically the nexus between individualist and collectivist culture on the one hand and people’s radius of trust on the other. People’s trust level (i.e., the intensity with which people trust other people) has been extensively studied. Increasingly, howeve

  20. Injectivity Radius and Cartan Polyhedron for Simply Connected Symmetric Spaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling YANG

    2007-01-01

    The author explores the relationship between the cut locus of. an arbitrary simply connected and compact Riemannian symmetric space and the Cartan polyhedron of corresponding restricted root system, and computes the injectivity radius and diameter for every type of irreducible ones.

  1. On the mass–radius relation of hot stellar systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gieles, M.; BAumgardt, H.; Heggie, D.C.; Lamers, J.T.W.H.

    2010-01-01

    Most globular clusters have half-mass radii of a few pc with no apparent correlation with their masses. This is different from elliptical galaxies, for which the Faber–Jackson relation suggests a strong positive correlation between mass and radius. Objects that are somewhat in between globular clust

  2. Nonlinear buckling analyses of a small-radius carbon nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ning; Wang, Yong-Gang; Li, Min; Jia, Jiao

    2014-04-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) was first discovered by Sumio Iijima. It has aroused extensive attentions of scholars from all over the world. Over the past two decades, we have acquired a lot of methods to synthesize carbon nanotubes and learn their many incredible mechanical properties such as experimental methods, theoretical analyses, and computer simulations. However, the studies of experiments need lots of financial, material, and labor resources. The calculations will become difficult and time-consuming, and the calculations may be even beyond the realm of possibility when the scale of simulations is large, as for computer simulations. Therefore, it is necessary for us to explore a reasonable continuum model, which can be applied into nano-scale. This paper attempts to develop a mathematical model of a small-radius carbon nanotube based on continuum theory. An Isotropic circular cross-section, Timoshenko beam model is used as a simplified mechanical model for the small-radius carbon nanotube. Theoretical part is mainly based on modified couple stress theory to obtain the numerical solutions of buckling deformation. Meanwhile, the buckling behavior of the small radius carbon nanotube is simulated by Molecular Dynamics method. By comparing with the numerical results based on modified couple stress theory, the dependence of the small-radius carbon nanotube mechanical behaviors on its elasticity constants, small-size effect, geometric nonlinearity, and shear effect is further studied, and an estimation of the small-scale parameter of a CNT (5, 5) is obtained.

  3. Synthesis and rheological properties of cation-exchanged Laponite suspensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phuoc, Tran X. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Howard, Bret H. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Chyu, Minking K. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2009-11-01

    In this paper we report our new approach to synthesize cation-exchanged Laponite suspensions. General observations of the prepared samples indicated that an aqueous suspension of 1 wt.% Laponite retained its free flowing liquid phase characteristics even after aging for several weeks. When bivalent cationic metals (Cu, Co, Ni) were ablated into the suspension, the strong charge of the crystal face was reduced and, on standing, the suspension gelled becoming highly viscous. This sol-gel transition was induced by the formation of a space-filled structure due to both van der Waals and electrostatic bonds between the positively charged rims and negatively charged faces. Rheological properties of such prepared suspensions were measured using a Brookfield DV-II Pro Viscometer with a small sample adapter (SSA18/13RPY). The yield strengths of 2.2 N/m2, 3.2 N/m2, and 1.7 N/m2 were measured for Ni-, Co-, and Cumodified Laponite suspensions, respectively. These yield strengths are sufficiently high for suspending weighting materials such as barite which requires the gel strength of about 0.5 N/m2.

  4. Synthesis and rheological properties of cation exchanged Laponite suspensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tran, X P; Howard, B; Chyu, M K

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we report our new approach to synthesize cation-exchanged Laponite suspensions. General observations of the prepared samples indicated that an aqueous suspension of 1 wt% Laponite retained its free flowing liquid phase characteristics even after aging for several weeks. When bivalent cationic metals (Cu, Co, Ni) were ablated into the suspension, the strong charge of the crystal face was reduced and, on standing, the suspension gelled becoming highly viscous. This sol-gel transition was induced by the formation of a space-filled structure due to both van derWaals and electrostatic bonds between the positively charged rims and negatively charged faces. Rheological properties of such prepared suspensions were measured using a Brookfield DV-H Pro Viscometer with a small sample adapter{SSA18/13RPY). The yield strengths of2.2 N/m2, 3.2 N/m2, and 1.7 N/m2 were measured for Ni-, Co-, and Cu-modified Laponite suspensions, respectively. These yield strengths are sufficiently high for suspending weighting materials such as barite which requires the gel strength of about 0.5 N/m2.

  5. USING COLLOIDAL LAYERED DOUBLE HYDROXIDES AS CATIONIC MICROPARTICULATE COMPONENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Songlin Wang; Wenxia Liu

    2004-01-01

    Layered double hydroxides consisting of layers with cationic charges may be potential candidates of cationic microparticles forming synergetic retention effect with anionic polyacrylamide. In this work, the layered double hydroxides with various molar ratios of Mg/Al were synthesized by co-precipitation of magnesium chloride and aluminum chloride and peptized by intense washing with water. The chemical formula, particle size, Zeta potential of the layered double hydroxide were analyzed. It was found that positively charged magnesium aluminum hydroxide with particle diameter in nanoparticle size could be prepared. The Zeta potential and particle size vary with the feed molar ratio of Mg/Al and the peptizing process, respectively. The Zeta potential is also pH dependent. The retention experiments carried out on DDJ show that when used together with anionic polyacrylamide, the positively charged colloidal double hydroxide greatly improves the retention of reed pulps. The chemical formula, particle size and Zeta potential of the colloidal double hydroxide all affect its retention behavior.

  6. Use of statistical modeling to predict the effect of formulation composition on coacervation, silicone deposition, and conditioning sensory performance of cationic cassia polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepilleur, Carole; Mullay, John; Kyer, Carol; McCalister, Pam; Clifford, Ted

    2011-01-01

    Formulation composition has a dramatic influence on coacervate formation in conditioning shampoo. The purpose of this study is to correlate the amount of coacervate formation of novel cationic cassia polymers to the corresponding conditioning profiles on European brown hair using silicone deposition, cationic polymer deposition and sensory evaluation. A design of experiments was conducted by varying the levels of three surfactants (sodium lauryl ether sulfate, sodium lauryl sulfate, and cocamidopropyl betaine) in formulations containing cationic cassia polymers of different cationic charge density (1.7 and 3.0m Eq/g). The results show formulation composition dramatically affects physical properties, coacervation, silicone deposition, cationic polymer deposition and hair sensory attributes. Particularly, three parameters are of importance in determining silicone deposition: polymer charge, surfactant (micelle) charge and total amount of surfactant (micelle aspect ratio). Both sensory panel testing and silicone deposition results can be predicted with a high confidence level using statistical models that incorporate these parameters.

  7. Cationic Redistribution at Epitaxial Interfaces in Superconducting Two-Dimensionally Doped Lanthanum Cuprate Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baiutti, Federico; Gregori, Giuliano; Wang, Yi; Suyolcu, Y Eren; Cristiani, Georg; van Aken, Peter A; Maier, Joachim; Logvenov, Gennady

    2016-10-12

    The exploration of interface effects in complex oxide heterostructures has led to the discovery of novel intriguing phenomena in recent years and has opened the path toward the precise tuning of material properties at the nanoscale. One recent example is space-charge superconductivity. Among the complex range of effects which may arise from phase interaction, a crucial role is played by cationic intermixing, which defines the final chemical composition of the interface. In this work, we performed a systematic study on the local cationic redistribution of two-dimensionally doped lanthanum cuprate films grown by oxide molecular beam epitaxy, in which single LaO layers in the epitaxial crystal structure were substituted by layers of differently sized and charged dopants (Ca, Sr, Ba, and Dy). In such a model system, in which the dopant undergoes an asymmetric redistribution across the interface, the evolution of the cationic concentration profile can be effectively tracked by means of atomically resolved imaging and spectroscopic methods. This allowed for the investigation of the impact of the dopant chemistry (ionic size and charge) and of the growth conditions (temperature) on the final superconducting and structural properties. A qualitative model for interface cationic intermixing, based on thermodynamic considerations, is proposed. This work highlights the key role which cationic redistribution may have in the definition of the final interface properties and represents a further step forward the realization of heterostructures with improved quality.

  8. Like-charge attraction and opposite-charge decomplexation between polymers and DNA molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyukdagli, Sahin

    2017-02-01

    We scrutinize the effect of polyvalent ions on polymer-DNA interactions. We extend a recently developed test-charge theory [S. Buyukdagli et al., Phys. Rev. E 94, 042502 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevE.94.042502] to the case of a stiff polymer interacting with a DNA molecule in an electrolyte mixture. The theory accounts for one-loop level electrostatic correlation effects such as the ionic cloud deformation around the strongly charged DNA molecule as well as image-charge forces induced by the low DNA permittivity. Our model can reproduce and explain various characteristics of the experimental phase diagrams for polymer solutions. First, the addition of polyvalent cations to the electrolyte solution results in the attraction of the negatively charged polymer by the DNA molecule. The glue of the like-charge attraction is the enhanced shielding of the polymer charges by the dense counterion layer at the DNA surface. Second, through the shielding of the DNA-induced electrostatic potential, mono- and polyvalent cations of large concentration both suppress the like-charge attraction. Within the same formalism, we also predict a new opposite-charge repulsion effect between the DNA molecule and a positively charged polymer. In the presence of polyvalent anions such as sulfate or phosphate, their repulsion by the DNA charges leads to the charge screening deficiency of the region around the DNA molecule. This translates into a repulsive force that results in the decomplexation of the polymer from DNA. This opposite-charge repulsion phenomenon can be verified by current experiments and the underlying mechanism can be beneficial to gene therapeutic applications where the control over polymer-DNA interactions is the key factor.

  9. VOL AR PLATING OF DISTAL RADIUS FRACTURE : A RETROSPECTIVE ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Treatment of distal radius has undergone remarkable changes since the time of Abraham colles. Conservative treatment with cast application has given way to operative techniques for better o utcome in high demand young individuals. Volar plating fo r distal end radius fractures is an effective technique which allows early mobilisation with re storation of r adial inclination , radial length , articular congruity and palmar tilt. MATERIALS AND METHODS: T his study was performed in chettinad hospital and research institute between January 2013 and M arch 2014. 24 patients with closed isolated distal end radius fractures treated with open reduction and internal fixation with plates and screws by volar approach were followed up retrospectively for a minimum period of one year . There were 17 men and 7 women. Mean age was 44 years (Range, 22 - 75 years. The fractures were classified based on the AO system. There were 4 A2, 12 B3, 5 C1, 3 C2 fracture types. RESULTS : All the patients were evaluated with standard anteroposterior and lateral radiographs and CT scans in c ase of intraarticular fractures . In all patie nts plating of distal end radius done by volar approach. Patients were followed postoperatively for one y ear radiologically and clinically by modified clinical scoring system by Green and O Brien. Five patients had excellent results, thirteen patients had good results with twenty five percent restriction of wrist function . Five patients had fair results. One patient had postop wound infection which required implant removal and external fixator application . CONCLUSION: With proper patient selection a nd accurate surgical techniques , volar plating continues to be a useful method of treatment for distal end radius fractures with minimal complications and allowing early return of patients to normal activities.

  10. Unstable Distal Radius Fractures Treated by Volar Locking Anatomical Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, Anto; Deniese, Pascal Noel; Babu, Abey Thomas; Rengasamy, Kanagasabai; Najimudeen, Syed

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Fracture of the distal end of radius represents the most common fracture of the upper extremity accounting for 16-20% of all fractures. Plating is now emerging as the gold standard for management of distal radius fractures due to increased rate of complications such as malunion, subluxation/dislocation of distal radio-ulnar joint or late collapse of fracture. Procedures such as closed reduction and cast immobilization, ligamentotaxis with external fixator and percutaneous pin fixation are no longer acceptable. Aim The purpose of the study was to evaluate the functional and radiological outcome of unstable distal radius fractures treated with the volar locking plate. Materials and Methods We reviewed 53 patients from January 2011 to December 2015, treated for unstable distal radius fractures using a volar locking compression plate. Standard radiographic and clinical assessment after 12 months (range 12-16 months) were measured and final functional and radiological outcome were assessed using the Modified Mayo wrist scoring system and Sarmiento’s modification of Lindstorm criteria respectively. Results There were 42 males and 11 females with an average age of 39.12±31.78 years (18-71 years). At the end of 12 months, 36 patients had an excellent radiological outcome and 10 patients had good radiological outcome as per Sarmiento’s modification of Lindstorm criteria. Eleven patients had an excellent functional outcome and 26 patients had a good functional outcome as per modified Mayo wrist scoring system. There was one case of superficial wound infection which subsided with intravenous antibiotics. Conclusion The volar locking plate fixation helps in early mobilization of the wrist, restores anatomy, allows early return to function, prevents secondary loss of reduction and hence is an effective treatment for unstable fractures of the distal radius. PMID:28274009

  11. Precision charging of microparticles in plasma via the Rayleigh instability for evaporating charged liquid droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennet, Euan; Mahony, Charles M. O.; Potts, Hugh E.; Everest, Paul; Rutherford, David; Askari, Sadegh; Kelsey, Colin; Perez-Martin, Fatima; Hamilton, Neil; McDowell, David A.; Mariotti, Davide; Maguire, Paul; Diver, Declan A.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we describe a novel method for delivering a precise, known amount of electric charge to a micron-sized solid target. Aerosolised microparticles passed through a plasma discharge will acquire significant electric charge. The fluid stability under evaporative stress is a key aspect that is core to the research. Initially stable charged aerosols subject to evaporation (i.e. a continually changing radius) may encounter the Rayleigh stability limit. This limit arises from the electrostatic and surface tension forces and determines the maximum charge a stable droplet can retain, as a function of radius. We demonstrate that even if the droplet charge is initially much less than the Rayleigh limit, the stability limit will be encountered as the droplet evaporates. The instability emission mechanism is strongly linked to the final charge deposited on the target, providing a mechanism that can be used to ensure a predictable charge deposit on a known encapsulated microparticle. The authors gratefully acknowledge support from EPSRC via Grant Numbers EP/K006142/1 and EP/K006088/1.

  12. All spherically symmetric charged anisotropic solutions for compact stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurya, S.K. [University of Nizwa, Department of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, College of Arts and Science, Nizwa (Oman); Gupta, Y.K. [Raj Kumar Goel Institute of Technology, Department of Mathematics, Ghaziabad, UP (India); Ray, Saibal [Government College of Engineering and Ceramic Technology, Department of Physics, Kolkata, West Bengal (India)

    2017-06-15

    In the present paper we develop an algorithm for all spherically symmetric anisotropic charged fluid distributions. Considering a new source function ν(r) we find a set of solutions which is physically well behaved and represents compact stellar models. A detailed study specifically shows that the models actually correspond to strange stars in terms of their mass and radius. In this connection we investigate several physical properties like energy conditions, stability, mass-radius ratio, electric charge content, anisotropic nature and surface redshift through graphical plots and mathematical calculations. All the features from these studies are in excellent agreement with the already available evidence in theory as well as observations. (orig.)

  13. Limits on the effective quark radius from inclusive ep scattering & contact interactions at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Zarnecki, Aleksander Filip

    2016-01-01

    The high-precision HERA data allow searches for up to TeV scales "Beyond the Standard Model" contributions to electron-quark scattering. Combined H1 and ZEUS measurements of inclusive deep inelastic cross sections in neutral and charged current ep scattering are considered, corresponding to a luminosity of around 1 fb$^{-1}$. A new approach to the beyond the Standard Model analysis of the inclusive $ep$ data is presented; simultaneous fits of parton distribution functions and contributions of "new physics" processes are performed. Considered are possible deviations from the Standard Model due to a finite radius of quarks, described within the quark form-factor model, and due to new electron-quark interactions in the framework of $eeqq$ contact interactions (CI). The resulting 95% C.L. upper limit on the effective quark radius is $0.43\\cdot 10^{-16}$ cm. The limits on the CI mass scale extend up to 10 TeV depending on the CI scenario.

  14. Modeling the Interaction between Integrin-Binding Peptide (RGD) and Rutile Surface: The Effect of Cation Mediation on Asp Adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Chunya [Harbin Institute of Technology; Skelton, Adam [Vanderbilt University; Chen, Mingjun [Harbin Institute of Technology; Vlcek, Lukas [ORNL; Cummings, Peter T [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    The binding of a negatively charged residue, aspartic acid (Asp) in tripeptide arginine-glycine-aspartic acid, onto a negatively charged hydroxylated rutile (110) surface in aqueous solution, containing divalent (Mg{sup 2+}, Ca{sup 2+}, or Sr{sup 2+}) or monovalent (Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, or Rb{sup +}) cations, was studied by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The results indicate that ionic radii and charges will significantly affect the hydration, adsorption geometry, and distance of cations from the rutile surface, thereby regulating the Asp/rutile binding mode. The adsorption strength of monovalent cations on the rutile surface in the order Na{sup +} > K{sup +} > Rb{sup +} shows a 'reverse' lyotropic trend, while the divalent cations on the same surface exhibit a 'regular' lyotropic behavior with decreasing crystallographic radii (the adsorption strength of divalent cations: Sr{sup 2+} > Ca{sup 2+} > Mg{sup 2+}). The Asp side chain in NaCl, KCl, and RbCl solutions remains stably H-bonded to the surface hydroxyls and the inner-sphere adsorbed compensating monovalent cations act as a bridge between the COO{sup -} group and the rutile, helping to 'trap' the negatively charged Asp side chain on the negatively charged surface. In contrast, the mediating divalent cations actively participate in linking the COO{sup -} group to the rutile surface; thus the Asp side chain can remain stably on the rutile (110) surface, even if it is not involved in any hydrogen bonds with the surface hydroxyls. Inner- and outer-sphere geometries are all possible mediation modes for divalent cations in bridging the peptide to the rutile surface.

  15. Search for contact interactions, large extra dimensions and finite quark radius in ep collisions at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Abramowicz, H; Adamus, M; Adler, V; Aghuzumtsyan, G; Antonioli, P; Antonov, A; Arneodo, M; Bailey, D S; Bamberger, A; Barakbaev, A N; Barbagli, G; Barbi, M; Bari, G; Barreiro, F; Bartsch, D; Basile, M; Behrens, U; Bell, M; Bellagamba, L; Benen, A; Bertolin, A; Bhadra, S; Bloch, I; Bold, T; Boos, E G; Borras, K; Boscherini, D; Brock, I; Brook, N H; Brugnera, R; Brümmer, N; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Bussey, P J; Butterworth, J M; Bylsma, B; Caldwell, A; Capua, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carli, T; Carlin, R; Catterall, C D; Chekanov, S; Chiochia, V; Chwastowski, J; Ciborowski, J; Ciesielski, R; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Cloth, P; Cole, J E; Collins-Tooth, C; Contin, A; Cooper-Sarkar, A M; Coppola, N; Cormack, C; Corradi, M; Corriveau, F; Cottrell, A; D'Agostini, Giulio; Dal Corso, F; Danilov, P; Dannheim, D; De Pasquale, S; Dementiev, R K; Derrick, M; Deshpande, A A; Devenish, R C E; Dhawan, S; Dobur, D; Dolgoshein, B A; Doyle, A T; Drews, G; Durkin, L S; Dusini, S; Eisenberg, Y; Ermolov, P F; Eskreys, Andrzej; Ferrando, J; Ferrero, M I; Figiel, J; Filges, D; Foster, B; Foudas, C; Fourletov, S; Fourletova, J; Fricke, U; Fusayasu, T; Gabareen, A; Galas, A; Gallo, E; Garfagnini, A; Geiser, A; Genta, C; Gialas, I; Giusti, P; Gladilin, L K; Gladkov, D; Glasman, C; Gliga, S; Goers, S; Golubkov, Yu A; Goncalo, R; González, O; Gosau, T; Göttlicher, P; Grabowska-Bold, I; Grijpink, S; Grzelak, G; Gutsche, O; Gwenlan, C; Haas, T; Hain, W; Hall-Wilton, R; Hamatsu, R; Hamilton, J; Hanlon, S; Hart, J C; Hartmann, H; Hartner, G; Heaphy, E A; Heath, G P; Helbich, M; Heusch, C A; Hilger, E; Hillert, S; Hirose, T; Hochman, D; Holm, U; Iacobucci, G; Iga, Y; Inuzuka, M; Irrgang, P; Jakob, P; Jones, T W; Kagawa, S; Kahle, B; Kaji, H; Kananov, S; Karshon, M; Karstens, F; Kataoka, M; Katkov, I I; Kcira, D; Khein, L A; Kim, J Y; Kim, Y K; Kind, O; Kisielewska, D; Kitamura, S; Koffeman, E; Kohno, T; Kooijman, P; Koop, T; Korzhav, I A; Kotanski, A; Kötz, U; Kowal, A M; Kowal, M; Kowalski, H; Kowalski, T; Krakauer, D A; Kramberger, G; Kreisel, A; Krumnack, N; Kuze, M; Kuzmin, V A; Labarga, L; Labes, H; Lainesse, J; Lammers, S; Lee, J H; Lelas, D; Levchenko, B B; Levy, A; Li, L; Lightwood, M S; Lim, H; Lim, I T; Limentani, S; Ling, T Y; Liu, X; Löhr, B; Lohrmann, E; Loizides, J H; Long, K R; Longhin, A; Lukina, O Yu; Luzniak, P; Maddox, E; Magill, S; Mankel, R; Margotti, A; Marini, G; Martin, J F; Mastroberardino, A; Matsuzawa, K; Mattingly, M C K; McCubbin, N A; Mellado, B; Melzer-Pellmann, I A; Menary, S R; Metlica, F; Meyer, U; Miglioranzi, S; Milite, M; Mirea, A; Monaco, V; Montanari, A; Mus, B; Nagano, K; Namsoo, T; Nania, R; Nguyen, C N; Nigro, A; Ning, Y; Notz, D; Nowak, R J; Nuncio-Quiroz, A E; Oh, B Y; Olkiewicz, K; Pac, M Y; Padhi, S; Paganis, S; Palmonari, F; Parenti, A; Park, I H; Patel, S; Paul, E; Pavel, N; Pawlak, J M; Pelfer, P G; Pellegrino, A; Pesci, A; Piotrzkowski, K; Plucinsky, P P; Pokrovskiy, N S; Polini, A; Posocco, M; Proskuryakov, A S; Przybycien, M B; Rautenberg, J; Raval, A; Reeder, D D; Ren, Z; Renner, R; Repond, J; Riveline, U; Robins, S; Rosin, M; Rurua, L; Ruspa, M; Sacchi, R; Salehi, H; Sartorelli, G; Savin, A A; Saxon, D H; Schagen, S; Schioppa, M; Schlenstedt, S; Schleper, P; Schmidke, W B; Schneekloth, U; Sciulli, F; Shcheglova, L M; Skillicorn, I O; Slominski, W; Smith, W H; Soares, M; Solano, A; Son, D; Sosnovtsev, V V; Stairs, D G; Stanco, L; Standage, J; Stifutkin, A; Stonjek, S; Stopa, P; Stösslein, U; Straub, P B; Suchkov, S; Susinno, G; Suszycki, L; Sutton, M R; Sztuk, J; Szuba, D; Szuba, J; Tandler, J; Tapper, A D; Targett-Adams, C; Tassi, E; Tawara, T; Terron, J; Tiecke, H G; Tokushuku, K; Tsurugai, T; Turcato, M; Tymieniecka, T; Ukleja, A; Ukleja, J; Vázquez, M; Velthuis, J J; Vlasov, N N; Voss, K C; Walczak, R; Walsh, R; Wang, M; Weber, A; Whitmore, J J; Wichmann, K; Wichmann, R; Wick, K; Wiggers, L; Wills, H H; Wing, M; Wolf, G; Yamada, S; Yamashita, T; Yamazaki, Y; Yoshida, R; Youngman, C; Zambrana, M; Zawiejski, L; Zeuner, W; Zhautykov, B O; Zichichi, A; Ziegler, A; Zotkin, S A; De Wolf, E

    2004-01-01

    A search for physics beyond the Standard Model has been performed with high-Q^2 neutral current deep inelastic scattering events recorded with the ZEUS detector at HERA. Two data sets, e^+ p \\to e^+ X and e^- p \\to e^- X, with respective integrated luminosities of 112 pb^-1 and 16 pb^-1, were analyzed. The data reach Q^2 values as high as 40000 GeV^2. No significant deviations from Standard Model predictions were observed. Limits were derived on the effective mass scale in eeqq contact interactions, the ratio of leptoquark mass to the Yukawa coupling for heavy leptoquark models and the effective Planck mass scale in models with large extra dimensions. The limit on the quark charge radius, in the classical form factor approximation, is 0.85 10^-16 cm.

  16. Computational and analytical modeling of cationic lipid-DNA complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farago, Oded; Grønbech-Jensen, Niels

    2007-05-01

    We present a theoretical study of the physical properties of cationic lipid-DNA (CL-DNA) complexes--a promising synthetically based nonviral carrier of DNA for gene therapy. The study is based on a coarse-grained molecular model, which is used in Monte Carlo simulations of mesoscopically large systems over timescales long enough to address experimental reality. In the present work, we focus on the statistical-mechanical behavior of lamellar complexes, which in Monte Carlo simulations self-assemble spontaneously from a disordered random initial state. We measure the DNA-interaxial spacing, d(DNA), and the local cationic area charge density, sigma(M), for a wide range of values of the parameter (c) representing the fraction of cationic lipids. For weakly charged complexes (low values of (c)), we find that d(DNA) has a linear dependence on (c)(-1), which is in excellent agreement with x-ray diffraction experimental data. We also observe, in qualitative agreement with previous Poisson-Boltzmann calculations of the system, large fluctuations in the local area charge density with a pronounced minimum of sigma(M) halfway between adjacent DNA molecules. For highly-charged complexes (large (c)), we find moderate charge density fluctuations and observe deviations from linear dependence of d(DNA) on (c)(-1). This last result, together with other findings such as the decrease in the effective stretching modulus of the complex and the increased rate at which pores are formed in the complex membranes, are indicative of the gradual loss of mechanical stability of the complex, which occurs when (c) becomes large. We suggest that this may be the origin of the recently observed enhanced transfection efficiency of lamellar CL-DNA complexes at high charge densities, because the completion of the transfection process requires the disassembly of the complex and the release of the DNA into the cytoplasm. Some of the structural properties of the system are also predicted by a continuum

  17. Atomistic simulations of cation hydration in sodium and calcium montmorillonite nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guomin; Neretnieks, Ivars; Holmboe, Michael

    2017-08-01

    During the last four decades, numerous studies have been directed to the swelling smectite-rich clays in the context of high-level radioactive waste applications and waste-liners for contaminated sites. The swelling properties of clay mineral particles arise due to hydration of the interlayer cations and the diffuse double layers formed near the negatively charged montmorillonite (MMT) surfaces. To accurately study the cation hydration in the interlayer nanopores of MMT, solvent-solute and solvent-clay surface interactions (i.e., the solvation effects and the shape effects) on the atomic level should be taken into account, in contrast to many recent electric double layer based methodologies using continuum models. Therefore, in this research we employed fully atomistic simulations using classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, the software package GROMACS along with the CLAYFF forcefield and the SPC/E water model. We present the ion distributions and the deformation of the hydrated coordination structures, i.e., the hydration shells of Na+ and Ca2+ in the interlayer, respectively, for MMT in the first-layer, the second-layer, the third-layer, the fourth-layer, and the fifth-layer (1W, 2W, 3W, 4W, and 5W) hydrate states. Our MD simulations show that Na+ in Na-MMT nanopores have an affinity to the ditrigonal cavities of the clay layers and form transient inner-sphere complexes at about 3.8 Å from clay midplane at water contents less than the 5W hydration state. However, these phenomena are not observed in Ca-MMT regardless of swelling states. For Na-MMT, each Na+ is coordinated to four water molecules and one oxygen atom of the clay basal-plane in the first hydration shell at the 1W hydration state, and with five to six water molecules in the first hydration shell within a radius of 3.1 Å at all higher water contents. In Ca-MMT, however each Ca2+ is coordinated to approximately seven water molecules in the first hydration shell at the 1W hydration state and

  18. Vibrational studies of benzene, pyridine, pyridine-N-oxide and their cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, M; Srivastava, Mayuri; Yadav, R A

    2013-07-01

    IR and Raman spectra of pyridine and pyridine-N-oxide have been recorded and analyzed. The optimized molecular geometries, APT charges and vibrational characteristics for benzene, pyridine, pyridine-N-oxide and their cations have been computed using DFT method. Due to attachment of O atom at N site or removal of electron all the modes are affected in magnitudes. However, significant changes are noticed in their IR intensities, Raman activities and depolarization ratios of the Raman bands in going from pyridine to its N-oxide or in going from neutrals to their cations. It is interesting to note that in going from benzene to benzene cation charge redistribution takes place to reduce the symmetry from D6h to D2h. The calculated frequencies have been correlated with the experimental frequencies for the pyridine and pyridine-N-oxide molecules.

  19. Charge renormalization of nanoparticles immersed in a molecular electrolyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenas-Gómez, B L; González-Mozuelos, P

    2010-01-07

    The renormalization of the electric charge of nanoparticles (small colloids) at infinite dilution immersed in a supporting electrolyte containing molecular ions is studied here using a simple model. The nanoparticles are represented by charged spheres of finite diameter, the anions are assumed to be pointlike, and the cations are modeled as two identical charged points connected by a rigid rod. The static structure of this model system is determined using the reference interaction site model equations with suitable closure relations and the renormalized charges are analyzed employing the dressed interactions site theory approach. It is found that for a wide range of ionic strengths these renormalized charges are clearly dependent on the length of the cations for nanoparticles with negative bare charge, but this dependence is practically negligible for nanoparticles with positive bare charges. In the limit of zero cation length and small nanoparticle charges the standard Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek model renormalization is recovered. A brief account of the structural and thermodynamic properties of the model molecular electrolyte is also provided.

  20. Variable radius cartography - History and perspectives of a new discipline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalera, Giancarlo

    2014-05-01

    The map that Toscanelli sent to Columbus was an unconscious application of cartography at a smaller radius than the real. The first really conscious attempts to represent the geography of Earth on globes of radius less than the current one occurred after the formulation of the concept of expanding Earth through geological time. The American chemist and geologist Richard Owen (1810-1890) in his book Key to the geology of the globe (1857) described the principles of what he himself called Anatomical Geology, with the Earth growing as a biological organism. The book contained a global paleogeographic map of the Earth that would have had a radius of about 4000 kilometers. In 1928 J.A.H. Kerkhoff (under the pseudonym Aero-dilettant) published a series of paleogeographic globes on which the modern oceans disappeared. With the same artisan methods of transfer continental outlines from a sphere to a smaller one, in 1933 O.C. Hilgenberg represented three different geological epochs, and, later, for the first time mapped paleopoles with their site-pole segments of meridian. Even today the traditional method of Hilgenberg is followed by senior researchers (Klaus Vogel, 2003) and younger geologists (James Maxlow). In England Hugh Owen applied the methods of traditional cartography to the variable radius one. His Atlas of Continental Displacement was in the 70s and 80s, for this discipline, a real milestone. While in the field of constant radius paleogeography the adherents to plate tectonics created many computer codes of automatic mapping (Bullard et al., 1965; Smith & Hallam, 1970; Scotese et al., 1979; and many others), in the variable radius field few tried to reach the same task. In 1972 in United States a first very simple attempt (but was not further developed) came from a private, R.B. Perry, followed by the still not-computerized Atlas of Owen, and both them constituted inspiration for the construction of a FORTRAN variable radius mapping code at INGV, with which it

  1. Exciton Coupling of Phenylalanine Reveals Conformational Changes of Cationic Peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bortolini, Christian; Liu, Lei; Hoffmann, Soren V.

    2017-01-01

    Circular dichroism (CD) is a versatile tool to investigate the secondary structure of proteins. Conventionally, CD signals in the far-UV region are primarily attributed to peptide bond absorption; likewise aromatic residue analysis has typically only focussed on the near-UV absorption characteris...... of overcoming antimicrobial resistance......., we strive towards a quantitative interpretation of CD spectra by detailing the contributions of aromatic chromophores in the far-UV and accurately describing unfolded states of charged amino acid side chains. To this end, we probe conformational changes of cationic peptides, which impact...

  2. Blackbody-induced radiative dissociation of cationic SF 6 clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toker, Jonathan; Rahinov, I.; Schwalm, D.;

    2012-01-01

    The stability of cationic SF5+(SF6)n−1 clusters was investigated by measuring their blackbody-induced radiative dissociation (BIRD) rates. The clusters were produced in a supersonic expansion ion source and stored in an electrostatic ion-beam trap at room temperature, where their abundances...... and lifetimes were measured. Using the “master equation” approach, relative binding energies of an SF6 unit in the clusters could be extracted from the storage-time dependence of the survival probabilities. The results allow for a deeper insight into the effect of a localized charge on the structure...... and stability of SF6-based clusters....

  3. Anion recognition and cation-induced molecular motion in a heteroditopic [2]rotaxane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leontiev, Alexandre V; Jemmett, Charlotte A; Beer, Paul D

    2011-01-17

    A heteroditopic [2]rotaxane consisting of a calix[4]diquinone-isophthalamide macrocycle and 3,5-bis-amide pyridinium axle components with the capability of switching between two positional isomers in response to barium cation recognition is synthesised. The anion binding properties of the rotaxane's interlocked cavity together with Na(+) , K(+) , NH(4) (+) and Ba(2+) cation recognition capabilities are elucidated by (1) H NMR and UV-visible spectroscopic titration experiments. Upon binding of Ba(2+) , molecular displacement of the axle's positively charged pyridinium group from the rotaxane's macrocyclic cavity occurs, whereas the monovalent cations Na(+) , K(+) and NH(4) (+) are bound without causing significant co-conformational change. The barium cation induced shuttling motion can be reversed on addition of tetrabutylammonium sulfate.

  4. Cationic liposomal drug delivery system for specific targeting of human cd14+ monocytes in whole blood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    This invention concerns a liposome comprising lipids and at least one active ingredient, wherein at least one of the lipids is a cationic lipid; said liposome exhibiting a net positive charge at physiological conditions at which said liposome preferentially adheres to monocytes in freshly drawn b......, an infectious disease, an inflammatory disease, an autoimmune disease or allergy....

  5. A Novel Method for the Determination of Membrane Hydration Numbers of Cations in Conducting Polymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jafeen, M.J.M.; Careem, M.A.; Skaarup, Steen

    2012-01-01

    . Simultaneous cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance technique was used to determine the amount of charge inserted and the total mass change during the reduction process in a polypyrrole film. From these values, the number of water molecules accompanying each cation was evaluated...

  6. Intermolecular forces between low generation PAMAM dendrimer condensed DNA helices: role of cation architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Min; Parkin, Sean R; DeRouchey, Jason E

    2014-01-28

    In recent years, dendriplexes, complexes of cationic dendrimers with DNA, have become attractive DNA delivery vehicles due to their well-defined chemistries. To better understand the nature of the forces condensing dendriplexes, we studied low generation poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimer-DNA complexes and compared them to comparably charged linear arginine peptides. Using osmotic stress coupled with X-ray scattering, we have investigated the effect of molecular chain architecture on DNA-DNA intermolecular forces that determine the net attraction and equilibrium interhelical distance within these polycation condensed DNA arrays. In order to compact DNA, linear cations are believed to bind in DNA grooves and to interact with the phosphate backbone of apposing helices. We have previously shown a length dependent attraction resulting in higher packaging densities with increasing charge for linear cations. Hyperbranched polycations, such as polycationic dendrimers, presumably would not be able to bind to DNA and correlate their charges in the same manner as linear cations. We show that attractive and repulsive force amplitudes in PAMAM-DNA assemblies display significantly different trends than comparably charged linear arginines resulting in lower DNA packaging densities with increasing PAMAM generation. The salt and pH dependencies of packaging in PAMAM dendrimer-DNA and linear arginine-DNA complexes were also investigated. Significant differences in the force curve behaviour and salt and pH sensitivities suggest that different binding modes may be present in DNA condensed by dendrimers when compared to linear polycations.

  7. Charge Trapping in Photovoltaically Active Perovskites and Related Halogenoplumbate Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkrob, Ilya A; Marin, Timothy W

    2014-04-01

    Halogenoplumbate perovskites (MeNH3PbX3, where X is I and/or Br) have emerged as promising solar panel materials. Their limiting photovoltaic efficiency depends on charge localization and trapping processes that are presently insufficiently understood. We demonstrate that in halogenoplumbate materials the holes are trapped by organic cations (that deprotonate from their oxidized state) and Pb(2+) cations (as Pb(3+) centers), whereas the electrons are trapped by several Pb(2+) cations, forming diamagnetic lead clusters that also serve as color centers. In some cases, paramagnetic variants of these clusters can be observed. We suggest that charge separation in the halogenoplumbates resembles latent image formation in silver halide photography. Electron and hole trapping by lead clusters in extended dislocations in the bulk may be responsible for accumulation of trapped charge observed in this photovoltaic material.

  8. 21 CFR 886.1430 - Ophthalmic contact lens radius measuring device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ophthalmic contact lens radius measuring device... lens radius measuring device. (a) Identification. An ophthalmic contact lens radius measuring device is an AC-powered device that is a microscope and dial gauge intended to measure the radius of a...

  9. Competition between kaolinite flocculation and stabilization in divalent cation solutions dosed with anionic polyacrylamides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byung Joon; Schlautman, Mark A; Toorman, Erik; Fettweis, Michael

    2012-11-01

    Divalent cations have been reported to develop bridges between anionic polyelectrolytes and negatively-charged colloidal particles, thereby enhancing particle flocculation. However, results from this study of kaolinite suspensions dosed with various anionic polyacrylamides (PAMs) reveal that Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) can lead to colloid stabilization under some conditions. To explain the opposite but coexisting processes of flocculation and stabilization with divalent cations, a conceptual flocculation model with (1) particle-binding divalent cationic bridges between PAM molecules and kaolinite particles and (2) polymer-binding divalent cationic bridges between PAM molecules is proposed. The particle-binding bridges enhanced flocculation and aggregated kaolinite particles in large, easily-settleable flocs whereas the polymer-binding bridges increased steric stabilization by developing polymer layers covering the kaolinite surface. Both the particle-binding and polymer-binding divalent cationic bridges coexist in anionic PAM- and kaolinite-containing suspensions and thus induce the counteracting processes of particle flocculation and stabilization. Therefore, anionic polyelectrolytes in divalent cation-enriched aqueous solutions can sometimes lead to the stabilization of colloidal particles due to the polymer-binding divalent cationic bridges.

  10. Transfer matrices of dipoles with bending radius variation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    With the increasing demand of high brightness in light source, the uniform dipole can not meet the needs of low emittance, and thus the dipole with bending radius variation is introduced in this paper. The transfer matrix of a non-uniform dipole whose bending radius is linearly changed is chosen as an example and a very simple calculation formula of non-uniform dipole transfer matrices is given. The transfer matrices of some common profile non-uniform dipoles are also listed. The comparison of these transfer matrices and the matrices calculated with slices method verifies the numerical accuracy of this formula. This method can make the non-uniform beam dynamic problem simpler, very helpful for emittance research and lattice design with non-uniform dipoles.

  11. Error analysis for a laser differential confocal radius measurement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu; Qiu, Lirong; Zhao, Weiqian; Xiao, Yang; Wang, Zhongyu

    2015-02-10

    In order to further improve the measurement accuracy of the laser differential confocal radius measurement system (DCRMS) developed previously, a DCRMS error compensation model is established for the error sources, including laser source offset, test sphere position adjustment offset, test sphere figure, and motion error, based on analyzing the influences of these errors on the measurement accuracy of radius of curvature. Theoretical analyses and experiments indicate that the expanded uncertainty of the DCRMS is reduced to U=0.13  μm+0.9  ppm·R (k=2) through the error compensation model. The error analysis and compensation model established in this study can provide the theoretical foundation for improving the measurement accuracy of the DCRMS.

  12. Predicting jet radius in electrospinning by superpositioning exponential functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widartiningsih, P. M.; Iskandar, F.; Munir, M. M.; Viridi, S.

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents an analytical study of the correlation between viscosity and fiber diameter in electrospinning. Control over fiber diameter in electrospinning process was important since it will determine the performance of resulting nanofiber. Theoretically, fiber diameter was determined by surface tension, solution concentration, flow rate, and electric current. But experimentally it had been proven that significantly viscosity had an influence to fiber diameter. Jet radius equation in electrospinning process was divided into three areas: near the nozzle, far from the nozzle, and at jet terminal. There was no correlation between these equations. Superposition of exponential series model provides the equations combined into one, thus the entire of working parameters on electrospinning take a contribution to fiber diameter. This method yields the value of solution viscosity has a linear relation to jet radius. However, this method works only for low viscosity.

  13. Network partition via a bound of the spectral radius

    CERN Document Server

    Mondragon, R J

    2015-01-01

    Based on the density of connections between the nodes of high degree, we introduce two bounds of the spectral radius. We use these bounds to split a network into two sets, one of these sets contains the high degree nodes, we refer to this set as the spectral--core. The degree of the nodes of the subnetwork formed by the spectral--core gives an approximation to the top entries of the leading eigenvector of the whole network. We also present some numerical examples showing the dependancy of the spectral--core with the assortativity coefficient, its evaluation in several real networks and how the properties of the spectral--core can be used to reduce the spectral radius.

  14. Core Deuterium Fusion and Radius Inflation in Hot Jupiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaikumar, Prashanth; Rachid Ouyed

    2016-06-01

    Several laboratory-based studies have shown that the Deuterium fusion cross-section is enhanced in a solid deuterated target as compared to a gas target, attributable to enhanced mobility of deuterons in a metal lattice. As an application, we propose that, for core temperatures and compositions characterizing hot Jupiters, screened Deuterium fusion can occur deep in the interior, and show that the amount of radius inflation from this effect can be important if there is sufficient rock-ice in the core. The mechanism of screened Deuterium fusion, operating in the above temperature range, is generally consistent with the trend in radius anomaly with planetary equilibrium temperature. We also explore the trend with planetary mass using a simple analytic model.

  15. External Fixation of Unstable Distal Radius Fracture. A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaniel Truffin Rodríguez

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Unstable fracture of the distal radius is a common injury. If not properly treated, it can cause major disturbance in the radiocarpal joint and impaired hand function. A case of a 42-year-old patient of rural origin without a history of previous conditions treated at the Gustavo Aldereguía Lima Hospital in Cienfuegos is presented. He suffered a fall on the outstretched hand, which led to an unstable fracture of the left distal radius. Emergency surgery consisting of manual fracture reduction under general anesthesia and fixation with RALCA minifixator plus a percutaneously placed Kirschner wire was performed. Since this fracture is often inadequately treated, the presentation of this case can be helpful to many orthopedic surgeons.

  16. Radius fracture from an electrical injury involving an electric guitar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappano, Dante

    2010-03-01

    Electrical injury ranges widely from simple shock and mild burns to more extensive superficial injury, internal injury, and mortality. Bony fracture from electrically-induced tetanic muscle contraction is a rare but recognized injury. We report the case of a 14-year-old boy who suffered a minor burn and radius fracture related to an electrical injury involving his electric guitar. An interesting pattern is emerging from available case reports of similar injuries.

  17. Biomechanical Stability of Four Fixation Constructs for Distal Radius Fractures

    OpenAIRE

    Capo, John T.; Kinchelow, Tosca; Brooks, Kenneth; Tan, Virak; Manigrasso, Michaele; Francisco, Kristin

    2009-01-01

    Implants available for distal radius fracture fixation include dorsal nonlocked plating (DNLP), volar locked plating (VLP), radial–ulnar dual-column locked plating (DCPs), and locked intramedullary fixation (IMN). This study examines the biomechanical properties of these four different fixation constructs. In 28 fresh-frozen radii, a wedge osteotomy was performed, creating an unstable fracture model and the four fixation constructs employed (DNLP, VLP, DCPs, and IMN). Dorsal bending loads wer...

  18. From cation to oxide: hydroxylation and condensation of aqueous complexes; Du cation a l'oxyde: hydroxylation et condensation en solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jolivet, J.P. [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Chimie de la Matiere Condensee, URA CNRS 1466, 75 - Paris (France)

    1997-07-01

    Hydroxylation, condensation and precipitation of metal cations in aqueous solution are briefly reviewed. Hydroxylation of aqueous complexes essentially depends on the format charge (oxidation state), the size and the pH of the medium. It is the step allowing the condensation reaction. Depending on the nature of complexes (aqua-hydroxo, oxo-hydroxo), the. mechanism of condensation is different, olation or ox-olation respectively. The first one leads to poly-cations or hydroxides more or less stable against dehydration. The second one leads to poly-anions or oxides. Oligomeric species (poly-cations, poly-anions) are form from charged monomer complexes while the formation of solid phases requires non-charged precursors. Because of their high lability, charged oligomers are never the precursors of solids phases. The main routes for the formation of solid phases from solution are studied with two important and representative elements, Al and Si. For Al{sup 3+} ions, different methods (base addition in solution, thermo-hydrolysis, hydrothermal synthesis) are discussed in relation to the crystal structure of the solid phase obtained. For silicic species condensing by ox-olation, the role of acid or base catalysis on the morphology of gels is studied. The influence of complexing ligands on the processes and on the characteristics of solids (morphology of particles, basic salts and polymetallic oxides formation) is studied. (author)

  19. Formation scenarios and mass-radius relation for neutron stars

    CERN Document Server

    Zdunik, J L

    2011-01-01

    Neutron star crust, formed via accretion of matter from a companion in a low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB), has an equation of state (EOS) stiffer than that of catalyzed matter. At a given neutron star mass, M, the radius of a star with an accreted crust is therefore larger, by DR(M), than for usually considered star built of catalyzed matter. Using a compressible liquid drop model of nuclei, we calculate, within the one-component plasma approximation, the EOSs corresponding to different nuclear compositions of ashes of X-ray bursts in LMXB. These EOSs are then applied for studying the effect of different formation scenarios on the neutron-star mass-radius relation. Assuming the SLy EOS for neutron star's liquid core, derived by Douchin & Haensel (2001), we find that at M=1.4 M_sun the star with accreted crust has a radius more than 100 m larger that for the crust of catalyzed matter. Using smallness of the crust mass compared to M, we derive a formula that relates DR(M) to the difference in the crust EOS. Thi...

  20. Habitability of Exomoons at the Hill or Tidal Locking Radius

    CERN Document Server

    Hinkel, Natalie R

    2013-01-01

    Moons orbiting extrasolar planets are the next class of object to be observed and characterized for possible habitability. Like the host-planets to their host-star, exomoons have a limiting radius at which they may be gravitationally bound, or the Hill radius. In addition, they also have a distance at which they will become tidally locked and therefore in synchronous rotation with the planet. We have examined the flux phase profile of a simulated, hypothetical moon orbiting at a distant radius around the confirmed exoplanets mu Ara b, HD 28185 b, BD +14 4559 b, and HD 73534 b. The irradiated flux on a moon at it's furthest, stable distance from the planet achieves it's largest flux gradient, which places a limit on the flux ranges expected for subsequent (observed) moons closer in orbit to the planet. We have also analyzed the effect of planetary eccentricity on the flux on the moon, examining planets that traverse the habitable zone either fully or partially during their orbit. Looking solely at the stellar ...

  1. Characterizing SL2S galaxy groups using the Einstein radius

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verdugo, T.; Motta, V.; Foex, G.

    2014-01-01

    Aims. We aim to study the reliability of RA (the distance from the arcs to the center of the lens) as a measure of the Einstein radius in galaxy groups. In addition, we want to analyze the possibility of using RA as a proxy to characterize some properties of galaxy groups, such as luminosity (L......) and richness (N). Methods. We analyzed the Einstein radius, θE, in our sample of Strong Lensing Legacy Survey (SL2S) galaxy groups, and compared it with RA, using three different approaches: 1) the velocity dispersion obtained from weak lensing assuming a singular isothermal sphere profile (θE,I); 2) a strong.......7 ± 0.2)RA, θE,II = (0.4 ± 1.5) + (1.1 ± 0.4)RA, and θE,III = (0.4 ± 1.5) + (0.9 ± 0.3)RA for each method respectively. We found weak evidence of anti-correlation between RA and z, with Log RA = (0.58 ± 0.06) − (0.04 ± 0.1)z, suggesting a possible evolution of the Einstein radius with z, as reported...

  2. The Radius Distribution of Small Planets Around Cool Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Morton, Timothy D

    2013-01-01

    We calculate an empirical, non-parametric estimate of the shape of the radius distribution of small planets with periods less than 90 days using the small yet well-characterized sample of cool T_eff <4000 K dwarf stars in the Kepler catalog. Using a new technique we call a modified kernel density estimator (MKDE) and carefully correcting for incompleteness, we show that planets with radii ~1.25 R_earth are the most common planets around these stars. An apparent overabundance of planets with radii 2-2.5 R_earth may be evidence for a population of planets with H/He atmospheres. Lastly, the sharp rise in the radius distribution from ~4 R_earth to 2 R_earth implies that a large number of planets await discovery around cool dwarfs as the sensitivities of ground-based surveys increase. The radius distribution will continue to be tested with future Kepler results, but the features reported herein are robust features of the current dataset and thus invite theoretical explanation in the context of planetary system ...

  3. Conversion of radius of curvature to power (and vice versa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickenhagen, Sven; Endo, Kazumasa; Fuchs, Ulrike; Youngworth, Richard N.; Kiontke, Sven R.

    2015-09-01

    Manufacturing optical components relies on good measurements and specifications. One of the most precise measurements routinely required is the form accuracy. In practice, form deviation from the ideal surface is effectively low frequency errors, where the form error most often accounts for no more than a few undulations across a surface. These types of errors are measured in a variety of ways including interferometry and tactile methods like profilometry, with the latter often being employed for aspheres and general surface shapes such as freeforms. This paper provides a basis for a correct description of power and radius of curvature tolerances, including best practices and calculating the power value with respect to the radius deviation (and vice versa) of the surface form. A consistent definition of the sagitta is presented, along with different cases in manufacturing that are of interest to fabricators and designers. The results make clear how the definitions and results should be documented, for all measurement setups. Relationships between power and radius of curvature are shown that allow specifying the preferred metric based on final accuracy and measurement method. Results shown include all necessary equations for conversion to give optical designers and manufacturers a consistent and robust basis for decision-making. The paper also gives guidance on preferred methods for different scenarios for surface types, accuracy required, and metrology methods employed.

  4. Methane Planets and their Mass-Radius Relation

    CERN Document Server

    Helled, Ravit; Vos, Eran

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of both the mass and radius of an exoplanet allows us to estimate its mean density, and therefore, its composition. Exoplanets seem to fill a very large parameter space in terms of mass and composition, and unlike the solar-system's planets, exoplanets also have intermediate masses (~5-50 M_Earth) with various densities. In this letter, we investigate the behavior of the Mass-Radius relation for methane (CH_4) planets and show that when methane planets are massive enough (M_planet > ~15 M_Earth) the methane can dissociate and lead to a differentiated planet with a carbon core, a methane envelope, and a hydrogen atmosphere. The contribution of a rocky core to the behavior of CH_4 planet is considered as well. We also develop interior models for several detected intermediate-mass planets that could, in principle, be methane/methane-rich planets. The example of methane planets emphasizes the complexity of the Mass-Radius relation and the challenge in inferring the planetary composition uniquely.

  5. Chiral DNA packaging in DNA-cationic liposome assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuidam, N J; Barenholz, Y; Minsky, A

    1999-09-03

    Recent studies have indicated that the structural features of DNA-lipid assemblies, dictated by the lipid composition and cationic lipid-to-DNA ratio, critically affect the efficiency of these complexes in acting as vehicles for cellular delivery of genetic material. Using circular dichroism we find that upon binding DNA, positively-charged liposomes induce a secondary conformational transition of the DNA molecules from the native B form to the C motif. Liposomes composed of positively-charged and neutral 'helper' lipids, found to be particularly effective as transfecting agents, induce - in addition to secondary conformational changes - DNA condensation into a left-handed cholesteric-like phase. A structural model is presented according to which two distinct, yet inter-related modes of DNA packaging coexist within such assemblies. The results underline the notion that subtle changes in the components of a supramolecular assembly may substantially modulate the interplay of interactions which dictate its structure and functional properties.

  6. The Free Tricoordinated Silyl Cation Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čičak, H.

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available As the importance and abundance of silicon in our environment is large, it has been thought that silicon might take the place of carbon in forming a host of similar compounds and silicon-based life. However, until today there is no experimental evidence for such a hypothesis and carbon is still unique among the elements in the vast number and variety of compounds it can form. Also, the corresponding derivatives of the two elements show considerable differences in their chemical properties.The essential debate concerning organosilicon chemistry relates to the existence of the free planar tricoordinated silyl cations in condensed phase (R3Si+, in analogy to carbocations (R3C+ which have been known and characterized as free species. Although silyl cations are thermodynamically more stable than their carbon analogs, they are very reactive due to their high inherent electrophilicity and the ability of hypervalent coordination. On the other hand, stabilization by inductive and hyperconjugative effects and larger steric effects of carbocations make them less sensitive to solvation or other environmental effects than silyl cations. Hence, observation of free silyl cations in the condensed phase proved extremely difficult and the actual problem is the question of the degree of the (remaining silyl cation character.The first free silyl cation, trimesitylsilyl cation, and in analogy with it tridurylsilyl cation, were synthesized by Lambert et al. Free silyl cations based on analogy to aromatic ions (homocyclopropenylium and tropylium have also been prepared. However, in these silyl cations the cationic character is reduced by internal π -conjugation. Čičak et al. prepared some silyl-cationic intermediates (Me3Si--CH≡CR+in solid state. With the help of quantum-mechanical calculations it was concluded that these adducts have much more silyl cation than carbocation character.

  7. Millimeter Wave Scattering from Neutral and Charged Water Droplets

    CERN Document Server

    Heifetz, Alexander; Liao, Shaolin; Gopalsami, N Sami; Raptis, A C Paul

    2010-01-01

    We investigated 94GHz millimeter wave (MMW) scattering from neutral and charged water mist produced in the laboratory with an ultrasonic atomizer. Diffusion charging of the mist was accomplished with a negative ion generator (NIG). We observed increased forward and backscattering of MMW from charged mist, as compared to MMW scattering from an uncharged mist. In order to interpret the experimental results, we developed a model based on classical electrodynamics theory of scattering from a dielectric sphere with diffusion-deposited mobile surface charge. In this approach, scattering and extinction cross-sections are calculated for a charged Rayleigh particle with effective dielectric constant consisting of the volume dielectric function of the neutral sphere and surface dielectric function due to the oscillation of the surface charge in the presence of applied electric field. For small droplets with (radius smaller than 100nm), this model predicts increased MMW scattering from charged mist, which is qualitative...

  8. Determination of the ReA Electron Beam Ion Trap electron beam radius and current density with an X-ray pinhole camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumann, Thomas M., E-mail: baumannt@nscl.msu.edu; Lapierre, Alain, E-mail: lapierre@nscl.msu.edu; Kittimanapun, Kritsada; Schwarz, Stefan; Leitner, Daniela; Bollen, Georg [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL), Michigan State University (MSU), 640 S. Shaw Lane, East Lansing, Michigan, 48824 (United States)

    2014-07-15

    The Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) of the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University is used as a charge booster and injector for the currently commissioned rare isotope re-accelerator facility ReA. This EBIT charge breeder is equipped with a unique superconducting magnet configuration, a combination of a solenoid and a pair of Helmholtz coils, allowing for a direct observation of the ion cloud while maintaining the advantages of a long ion trapping region. The current density of its electron beam is a key factor for efficient capture and fast charge breeding of continuously injected, short-lived isotope beams. It depends on the radius of the magnetically compressed electron beam. This radius is measured by imaging the highly charged ion cloud trapped within the electron beam with a pinhole camera, which is sensitive to X-rays emitted by the ions with photon energies between 2 keV and 10 keV. The 80%-radius of a cylindrical 800 mA electron beam with an energy of 15 keV is determined to be r{sub 80%}=(212±19)μm in a 4 T magnetic field. From this, a current density of j = (454 ± 83)A/cm{sup 2} is derived. These results are in good agreement with electron beam trajectory simulations performed with TriComp and serve as a test for future electron gun design developments.

  9. Gas-phase energies of actinide oxides -- an assessment of neutral and cationic monoxides and dioxides from thorium to curium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcalo, Joaquim; Gibson, John K.

    2009-08-10

    An assessment of the gas-phase energetics of neutral and singly and doubly charged cationic actinide monoxides and dioxides of thorium, protactinium, uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium, and curium is presented. A consistent set of metal-oxygen bond dissociation enthalpies, ionization energies, and enthalpies of formation, including new or revised values, is proposed, mainly based on recent experimental data and on correlations with the electronic energetics of the atoms or cations and with condensed-phase thermochemistry.

  10. Binding of single stranded nucleic acids to cationic ligand functionalized gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Jessica A; Tucker, Tasha L; Therriault, William; Yingling, Yaroslava G

    2016-11-11

    The interactions of nanoparticles (NPs) with single stranded nucleic acids (NAs) have important implications in gene delivery, and nanotechnological and biomedical applications. Here, the complexation of cationic ligand functionalized gold nanoparticles with single stranded deoxyribose nucleic acid (DNA) and ribonucleic acid (RNA) are examined using all atom molecular dynamics simulations. The results indicated that complexation depends mostly on charge of nanoparticle, and, to lesser extent, sequence and type of nucleic acid. For cationic nanoparticles, electrostatic interactions between charged ligands and the nucleic acid backbone dominate binding regardless of nanoparticle charge. Highly charged nanoparticles bind more tightly and cause compaction of the single-stranded NAs through disruption of intrastrand π-π stacking and hydrogen bonding. However, poly-purine strands (polyA-DNA, polyA-RNA) show less change in structure than poly-pyrimidine strands (polyT-DNA, polyU-RNA). Overall, the results show that control over ssNA structure may be achieved with cationic NPs with a charge of more than 30, but the extent of the structural changes depends on sequence.

  11. PEGylation enhances tumor targeting of plasmid DNA by an artificial cationized protein with repeated RGD sequences, Pronectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinkhani, Hossein; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2004-05-31

    The objective of this study is to investigate feasibility of a non-viral gene carrier with repeated RGD sequences (Pronectin F+) in tumor targeting for gene expression. The Pronectin F+ was cationized by introducing spermine (Sm) to the hydroxyl groups to allow to polyionically complex with plasmid DNA. The cationized Pronectin F+ prepared was additionally modified with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) molecules which have active ester and methoxy groups at the terminal, to form various PEG-introduced cationized Pronectin F+. The cationized Pronectin F+ with or without PEGylation at different extents was mixed with a plasmid DNA of LacZ to form respective cationized Pronectin F+-plasmid DNA complexes. The plasmid DNA was electrophoretically complexed with cationized Pronectin F+ and PEG-introduced cationized Pronectin F+, irrespective of the PEGylation extent, although the higher N/P ratio of complexes was needed for complexation with the latter Pronectin F+. The molecular size and zeta potential measurements revealed that the plasmid DNA was reduced in size to about 250 nm and the charge was changed to be positive by the complexation with cationized Pronectin F+. For the complexation with PEG-introduced cationized Pronectin F+, the charge of complex became neutral being almost 0 mV with the increasing PEGylation extents, while the molecular size was similar to that of cationized Pronectin F+. When cationized Pronectin F+-plasmid DNA complexes with or without PEGylation were intravenously injected to mice carrying a subcutaneous Meth-AR-1 fibrosarcoma mass, the PEG-introduced cationized Pronectin F+-plasmid DNA complex specifically enhanced the level of gene expression in the tumor, to a significantly high extent compared with the cationized Pronectin F+-plasmid DNA complexes and free plasmid DNA. The enhanced level of gene expression depended on the percentage of PEG introduced, the N/P ratio, and the plasmid DNA dose. A fluorescent microscopic study revealed that the

  12. High and rapid alkali cation storage in ultramicroporous carbonaceous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Young Soo; Lee, Seulbee; Kim, Na Rae; Kang, Minjee; Leal, Cecilia; Park, Kyu-Young; Kang, Kisuk; Jin, Hyoung-Joon

    2016-05-01

    To achieve better supercapacitor performance, efforts have focused on increasing the specific surface area of electrode materials to obtain higher energy and power density. The control of pores in these materials is one of the most effective ways to increase the surface area. However, when the size of pores decreases to a sub-nanometer regime, it becomes difficult to apply the conventional parallel-plate capacitor model because the charge separation distance (d-value) of the electrical double layer has a similar length scale. In this study, ultramicroporous carbonaceous materials (UCMs) containing sub-nanometer-scale pores are fabricated using a simple in situ carbonization/activation of cellulose-based compounds containing potassium. The results show that alkali cations act as charge carriers in the ultramicropores (<0.7 nm), and these materials can deliver high capacitances of ∼300 F g-1 at 0.5 A g-1 and 130 F g-1, even at a high current rate of 65 A g-1 in an aqueous medium. In addition, the UCM-based symmetric supercapacitors are stable over 10,000 cycles and have a high energy and power densities of 8.4 Wh kg-1 and 15,000 W kg-1, respectively. This study provides a better understanding of the effects of ultramicropores in alkali cation storage.

  13. Cationic Nanocylinders Promote Angiogenic Activities of Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Bok Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymers have been used extensively taking forms as scaffolds, patterned surface and nanoparticle for regenerative medicine applications. Angiogenesis is an essential process for successful tissue regeneration, and endothelial cell–cell interaction plays a pivotal role in regulating their tight junction formation, a hallmark of angiogenesis. Though continuous progress has been made, strategies to promote angiogenesis still rely on small molecule delivery or nuanced scaffold fabrication. As such, the recent paradigm shift from top-down to bottom-up approaches in tissue engineering necessitates development of polymer-based modular engineering tools to control angiogenesis. Here, we developed cationic nanocylinders (NCs as inducers of cell–cell interaction and investigated their effect on angiogenic activities of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs in vitro. Electrospun poly (l-lactic acid (PLLA fibers were aminolyzed to generate positively charged NCs. The aninolyzation time was changed to produce two different aspect ratios of NCs. When HUVECs were treated with NCs, the electrostatic interaction of cationic NCs with negatively charged plasma membranes promoted migration, permeability and tubulogenesis of HUVECs compared to no treatment. This effect was more profound when the higher aspect ratio NC was used. The results indicate these NCs can be used as a new tool for the bottom-up approach to promote angiogenesis.

  14. CO 2 adsorption in mono-, di- and trivalent cation-exchanged metal-organic frameworks: A molecular simulation study

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Yifei

    2012-02-28

    A molecular simulation study is reported for CO 2 adsorption in rho zeolite-like metal-organic framework (rho-ZMOF) exchanged with a series of cations (Na +, K +, Rb +, Cs +, Mg 2+, Ca 2+, and Al 3+). The isosteric heat and Henry\\'s constant at infinite dilution increase monotonically with increasing charge-to-diameter ratio of cation (Cs + < Rb + < K + < Na + < Ca 2+ < Mg 2+ < Al 3+). At low pressures, cations act as preferential adsorption sites for CO 2 and the capacity follows the charge-to-diameter ratio. However, the free volume of framework becomes predominant with increasing pressure and Mg-rho-ZMOF appears to possess the highest saturation capacity. The equilibrium locations of cations are observed to shift slightly upon CO 2 adsorption. Furthermore, the adsorption selectivity of CO 2/H 2 mixture increases as Cs + < Rb + < K + < Na + < Ca 2+ < Mg 2+ ≈ Al 3+. At ambient conditions, the selectivity is in the range of 800-3000 and significantly higher than in other nanoporous materials. In the presence of 0.1% H 2O, the selectivity decreases drastically because of the competitive adsorption between H 2O and CO 2, and shows a similar value in all of the cation-exchanged rho-ZMOFs. This simulation study provides microscopic insight into the important role of cations in governing gas adsorption and separation, and suggests that the performance of ionic rho-ZMOF can be tailored by cations. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  15. Mass and charge transport in micro and nanofluidic channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Niels Asger; Olesen, Laurits Højgaard; Okkels, Fridolin

    2007-01-01

    and charge transport coefficients that satisfy Onsager relations. In the limit of nonoverlapping Debye layers the transport coefficients are simply expressed in terms of parameters of the electrolyte as well as the hydraulic radiusR ¼ 2A=P with Aand P being the cross-sectional area and perimeter...

  16. Charge segregation in weakly ionized microgels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyatt, John S.; Douglas, Alison M.; Stanley, Chris; Do, Changwoo; Barker, Thomas H.; Fernández-Nieves, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    We investigate microgels synthesized from N -isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) copolymerized with a large mol% of acrylic acid, finding that when the acid groups are partially ionized at high temperatures, competition between ion-induced swelling and hydrophobic deswelling of poly(NIPAM) chains results in microphase separation. In cross-linked microgels, this manifests as a dramatic decrease in the ratio between the radius of gyration and the hydrodynamic radius to ˜0.2 , indicating that almost all the mass of the microgel is concentrated near the particle center. We also observe a concurrent decrease of the polymer network length scale via small-angle neutron scattering, confirming the presence of a dense, deswollen core surrounded by a diffuse, charged periphery. We compare these results to those obtained for a system of charged ultralow-cross-linked microgels; the form factor shows a distinct peak at high q when the temperature exceeds a threshold value. We successfully fit the form factor to theory developed to describe scattering from weakly charged gels in poor solvents, and we tie this behavior to charge segregation in the case of the cross-linked microgels.

  17. Measurement of Capillary Radius and Contact Angle within Porous Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi, Saitej; Dharmarajan, Ramanathan; Moghaddam, Saeed

    2015-12-01

    The pore radius (i.e., capillary radius) and contact angle determine the capillary pressure generated in a porous medium. The most common method to determine these two parameters is through measurement of the capillary pressure generated by a reference liquid (i.e., a liquid with near-zero contact angle) and a test liquid. The rate of rise technique, commonly used to determine the capillary pressure, results in significant uncertainties. In this study, we utilize a recently developed technique for independently measuring the capillary pressure and permeability to determine the equivalent minimum capillary radii and contact angle of water within micropillar wick structures. In this method, the experimentally measured dryout threshold of a wick structure at different wicking lengths is fit to Darcy's law to extract the maximum capillary pressure generated by the test liquid. The equivalent minimum capillary radii of different wick geometries are determined by measuring the maximum capillary pressures generated using n-hexane as the working fluid. It is found that the equivalent minimum capillary radius is dependent on the diameter of pillars and the spacing between pillars. The equivalent capillary radii of micropillar wicks determined using the new method are found to be up to 7 times greater than the current geometry-based first-order estimates. The contact angle subtended by water at the walls of the micropillars is determined by measuring the capillary pressure generated by water within the arrays and the measured capillary radii for the different geometries. This mean contact angle of water is determined to be 54.7°.

  18. Fractal analysis of bone architecture at distal radius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomomitsu, Tatsushi; Mimura, Hiroaki; Murase, Kenya; Sone, Teruki; Fukunaga, Masao

    2005-12-20

    Bone strength depends on bone quality (architecture, turnover, damage accumulation, and mineralization) as well as bone mass. In this study, human bone architecture was analyzed using fractal image analysis, and the clinical relevance of this method was evaluated. The subjects were 12 healthy female controls and 16 female patients suspected of having osteoporosis (age range, 22-70 years; mean age, 49.1 years). High-resolution CT images of the distal radius were acquired and analyzed using a peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) system. On the same day, bone mineral densities of the lumbar spine (L-BMD), proximal femur (F-BMD), and distal radius (R-BMD) were measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). We examined the correlation between the fractal dimension and six bone mass indices. Subjects diagnosed with osteopenia or osteoporosis were divided into two groups (with and without vertebral fracture), and we compared measured values between these two groups. The fractal dimension correlated most closely with L-BMD (r=0.744). The coefficient of correlation between the fractal dimension and L-BMD was very similar to the coefficient of correlation between L-BMD and F-BMD (r=0.783) and the coefficient of correlation between L-BMD and R-BMD (r=0.742). The fractal dimension was the only measured value that differed significantly between both the osteopenic and the osteoporotic subjects with and without vertebral fracture. The present results suggest that the fractal dimension of the distal radius can be reliably used as a bone strength index that reflects bone architecture as well as bone mass.

  19. HABITABILITY OF EXOMOONS AT THE HILL OR TIDAL LOCKING RADIUS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinkel, Natalie R.; Kane, Stephen R., E-mail: natalie.hinkel@gmail.com [NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, Caltech, MS 100-22, 770 South Wilson Avenue, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Moons orbiting extrasolar planets are the next class of object to be observed and characterized for possible habitability. Like the host-planets to their host-star, exomoons have a limiting radius at which they may be gravitationally bound, or the Hill radius. In addition, they also have a distance at which they will become tidally locked and therefore in synchronous rotation with the planet. We have examined the flux phase profile of a simulated, hypothetical moon orbiting at a distant radius around the confirmed exoplanets {mu} Ara b, HD 28185 b, BD +14 4559 b, and HD 73534 b. The irradiated flux on a moon at its furthest, stable distance from the planet achieves its largest flux gradient, which places a limit on the flux ranges expected for subsequent (observed) moons closer in orbit to the planet. We have also analyzed the effect of planetary eccentricity on the flux on the moon, examining planets that traverse the habitable zone either fully or partially during their orbit. Looking solely at the stellar contributions, we find that moons around planets that are totally within the habitable zone experience thermal equilibrium temperatures above the runaway greenhouse limit, requiring a small heat redistribution efficiency. In contrast, exomoons orbiting planets that only spend a fraction of their time within the habitable zone require a heat redistribution efficiency near 100% in order to achieve temperatures suitable for habitability. This means that a planet does not need to spend its entire orbit within the habitable zone in order for the exomoon to be habitable. Because the applied systems comprise giant planets around bright stars, we believe that the transit detection method is most likely to yield an exomoon discovery.

  20. The role of effective charges in the electrophoresis of highly charged colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterji, Apratim; Horbach, Jürgen

    2010-12-15

    We study the variation of electrophoretic mobility μ of highly charged spherical colloidal macroions for varying surface charge density σ on the colloid using computer simulations of the primitive model for charged colloids. Hydrodynamic interactions between ions are incorporated by coupling the primitive model of charged colloids to the lattice Boltzmann model (LB) of the fluid. In the highly charged regime, the mobility μ of the colloid is known to decrease with the increase of bare charge Q of the colloid; the aim of this paper is to investigate the cause of this. We have identified that the two main factors contributing to the decrease of μ are counterion charge condensation on the highly charged colloid and an increase in effective friction of the macroion-counterion complex due to the condensed counterions. Thus the established O'Brien and White theory, which identified the dipolar force originating from distortion of the electric double layer as the cause of decreasing μ, seems to break down for the case of highly charged colloids with σ in the range of 30-400 µC cm (- 2). To arrive at our conclusions, we counted the number of counterions q0 moving along with the spherical macroion. We observe in our simulations that q0 increases with the increase of bare charge Q, such that the effective charge Qeff = Q - q0 remains approximately constant. Interestingly for our nanometer-sized charged colloid, we observe that, if surface charge density σ of the colloid is increased by decreasing the radius RM of the colloid but fixed bare charge Q, the effective charge Q - q0 decreases with the increase of σ. This behavior is qualitatively different when σ is increased by increasing Q keeping RM fixed. Our observations address a controversy about the effective charge of a strongly charged macroion: some studies claim that effective charge is independent of the bare charge (Alexander et al 1984 J. Chem. Phys. 80 5776; Trizac et al 2003 Langmuir 19 4027) whereas

  1. CHARGE Association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semanti Chakraborty

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present here a case of 17-year-old boy from Kolkata presenting with obesity, bilateral gynecomastia, mental retardation, and hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism. The patient weighed 70 kg and was of 153 cm height. Facial asymmetry (unilateral facial palsy, gynecomastia, decreased pubic and axillary hair, small penis, decreased right testicular volume, non-palpable left testis, and right-sided congenital inguinal hernia was present. The patient also had disc coloboma, convergent squint, microcornea, microphthalmia, pseudohypertelorism, low set ears, short neck, and choanalatresia. He had h/o VSD repaired with patch. Laboratory examination revealed haemoglobin 9.9 mg/dl, urea 24 mg/dl, creatinine 0.68 mg/dl. IGF1 77.80 ng/ml (decreased for age, GH <0.05 ng/ml, testosterone 0.25 ng/ml, FSH-0.95 ΅IU/ml, LH 0.60 ΅IU/ml. ACTH, 8:00 A.M cortisol, FT3, FT4, TSH, estradiol, DHEA-S, lipid profile, and LFT was within normal limits. Prolactin was elevated at 38.50 ng/ml. The patient′s karyotype was 46XY. Echocardiography revealed ventricularseptal defect closed with patch, grade 1 aortic regurgitation, and ejection fraction 67%. Ultrasound testis showed small right testis within scrotal sac and undescended left testis within left inguinal canal. CT scan paranasal sinuses revealed choanalatresia and deviation of nasal septum to the right. Sonomammography revealed bilateral proliferation of fibroglandular elements predominantly in subareoalar region of breasts. MRI of brain and pituitary region revealed markedly atrophic pituitary gland parenchyma with preserved infundibulum and hypothalamus and widened suprasellar cistern. The CHARGE association is an increasingly recognized non-random pattern of congenital anomalies comprising of coloboma, heart defect, choanal atresia, retarded growth and development, genital hypoplasia, ear abnormalities, and/or deafness. [1] These anomalies have a higher probability of occurring together. In this report, we have

  2. A generalized spectral radius formula and Olsen's question

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loring, Terry; Shulman, Tatiana

    2012-01-01

    Let A be a C⁎C⁎-algebra and I be a closed ideal in A. For x∈Ax∈A, its image in A/IA/I is denoted by x˙, and its spectral radius is denoted by r(x)r(x). We prove that max{r(x),‖x˙‖}=inf‖(1+i)−1x(1+i)‖ (where the infimum is taken over all i∈Ii∈I such that 1+i1+i is invertible), which generalizes th...

  3. Guidelines for measuring solar radius with Baily beads analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SIGISMONDI Costantino

    2009-01-01

    By inspection of central eclipses videorecords, data of Baily beads timings are retrievable. Knowing the lunar limb profile at the moment of the eclipse we evaluate the excess or defect of solar limb when the Sun is assumed at its standard radius. Two procedures of data analysis are here presented: one based on limb heights and the other on times. While these methods are based upon Occult 4 software, they can be used with other ephemerides and new lunar profiles. The example of 2006 total eclipse data, with its remarkably negative value of ΔR=-0.41"±0.04", is presented.

  4. Guidelines for measuring solar radius with Baily beads analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SIGISMONDI; Costantino

    2009-01-01

    By inspection of central eclipses videorecords, data of Baily beads timings are retrievable. Knowing the lunar limb profile at the moment of the eclipse we evaluate the excess or defect of solar limb when the Sun is assumed at its standard radius. Two procedures of data analysis are here presented: one based on limb heights and the other on times. While these methods are based upon Occult 4 software, they can be used with other ephemerides and new lunar profiles. The example of 2006 total eclipse data, with its remarkably negative value of ΔR= - 0.41"± 0.04", is presented.

  5. Modelling Acoustic Wave Propagation in Axisymmetric Varying-Radius Waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bæk, David; Willatzen, Morten

    2008-01-01

    A computationally fast and accurate model (a set of coupled ordinary differential equations) for fluid sound-wave propagation in infinite axisymmetric waveguides of varying radius is proposed. The model accounts for fluid heat conduction and fluid irrotational viscosity. The model problem is solved...... by expanding solutions in terms of cross-sectional eigenfunctions following Stevenson’s method. A transfer matrix can be easily constructed from simple model responses of a given waveguide and later used in computing the response to any complex wave input. Energy losses due to heat conduction and viscous...

  6. Finite Larmor radius influence on MHD solitary waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Mjølhus

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available MHD solitons are studied in a model where the usual Hall-MHD model is extended to include the finite Larmor radius (FLR corrections to the pressure tensor. The resulting 4-dimensional set of differential equations is treated numerically. In this extended model, the point at infinity can be of several types. Necessary for the existence of localized solutions is that it is either a saddle-saddle, a saddle-center, or, possibly, a focus-focus. In cases of saddle-center, numerical solutions for localized travelling structures have been obtained, and compared with corresponding results from the Hall-MHD model.

  7. Experimental Method for Microbubbles Dynamics Monitoring and Radius Sizing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouan, Damien; Achaoui, Younes; Payan, Cedric; Mensah, Serge

    Rationale and aim: Within the context of divers' decompression illness prevention, ultrasonic detection and sizing of circulating microbubbles in blood is of great interest. In order to be representative of the divers gas tension level (supersaturation) and thus, to optimize decompression stages, the measurements (made in the right ventricle region) should be performed during a short period of time (ventricle filling <20 ms), efficient to detect a broad range of bubbles' radii population (radius from 20 to 200 _m) and harmless (Mechanical Index MI<0.3).

  8. Paediatric post-traumatic cortical defects of the distal radius

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roach, Richard T.; Summers, Bruce N. [Department of Orthopaedics, Princess Royal Hospital, Telford (United Kingdom); Cassar-Pullicino, Victor [Department of Radiology, Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Hospital, Oswestry, Shropshire (United Kingdom)

    2002-05-01

    Paediatric post-traumatic cortical defects, although rare, are predominately seen affecting the distal radius following a greenstick or torus fracture. We review the literature and present a further two cases supported by CT and MRI. Images from an acute greenstick fracture are also presented to help understand the pathogenesis. Defects are typically solitary on plain radiographs and are usually noticed late, proximal to the site of compression. They are non-expansile in an otherwise healthy child. CT and MRI may reveal smaller multiple subperiosteal defects. Typical defects require no further management other than reassurance and advice that they may occasionally cause discomfort but resolve with time. (orig.)

  9. Trajectory Calculator for Finite-Radius Cutter on a Lathe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Strekalov, Dmitry; Yu, Nan

    2009-01-01

    A computer program calculates the two-dimensional trajectory (radial vs. axial position) of a finite-radius-of-curvature cutting tool on a lathe so as to cut a workpiece to a piecewise-continuous, analytically defined surface of revolution. (In the original intended application, the tool is a diamond cutter, and the workpiece is made of a crystalline material and is to be formed into an optical resonator disk.) The program also calculates an optimum cutting speed as F/L, where F is a material-dependent empirical factor and L is the effective instantaneous length of the cutting edge.

  10. Comments on “Reverberation Radius in Real Rooms”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Jafari Shalkouhi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this letter is to comment on the article "Reverberation Radius in Real Rooms" by Mijić and Mašović (2010. Mijić and Mašović measured critical distance and reverberation time in four different size rooms from 125 Hz to 4 kHz octave bands. They proposed a method for measurement of critical distance. This paper confirms that the measurements of critical distance made by Mijić and Mašović were not accurate at some frequencies.

  11. Post-traumatic cystic lesion following fracture of the radius

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papadimitriou, Nikolaos G.; Christophorides, John; Beslikas, Theodoros A.; Papadimitriou, Ageliki G. [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 2. Orthopaedic University Clinic, Thessaloniki (Greece); Doulianaki, Eleni G. [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 1. Pediatric University Clinic, Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2005-07-01

    Post-traumatic cystic lesions are an uncommon complication of fractures in children. They are benign, asymptomatic, non-expansive and tend to resolve spontaneously. Their cause seems to be the invasion of bone-marrow fat by subperiosteal hematoma, which may be visible on radiographs during fracture consolidation of the newly formed subperiosteal bone. The case we present is of cyst formation following a fracture of the distal radius and we evaluate the role of yellow bone marrow in the pathogenesis of the cyst. Its typical features clear differentiation from other lesions, preventing unnecessary and, possibly, invasive examinations. (orig.)

  12. Cation composition effects on oxide conductivity in the Zr_2Y_2O_7-Y_3NbO_7 system

    CERN Document Server

    Marrocchelli, Dario; Norberg, Stefan T; Hull, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Realistic, first-principles-based interatomic potentials have been used in molecular dynamics simulations to study the effect of cation composition on the ionic conductivity in the Zr2Y2O7-Y3NbO7 system and to link the dynamical properties to the degree of lattice disorder. Across the composition range, this system retains a disordered fluorite crystal structure and the vacancy concentration is constant. The observed trends of decreasing conductivity and increasing disorder with increasing Nb5+ content were reproduced in simulations with the cations randomly assigned to positions on the cation sublattice. The trends were traced to the influences of the cation charges and relative sizes and their effect on vacancy ordering by carrying out additional calculations in which, for example, the charges of the cations were equalised. The simulations did not, however, reproduce all the observed properties, particularly for Y3NbO7. Its conductivity was significantly overestimated and prominent diffuse scattering featur...

  13. Modelling of Charged anisotropic compact stars with EOS $\\rho=f(p)$

    CERN Document Server

    Maurya, S K

    2016-01-01

    Charged compact star models have been determined for anisotropic fluid distribution. We have solved the Einstein's- Maxwell field equations to construct the charged compact star models by using radial pressure, metric function $e^{\\lambda}$ and electric charge function. The generic charged anisotropic solution is verified by exploring different physical conditions like, causality condition, mass-radius relation and stability of the solution (via. adiabatic index, TOV equations and Herrera cracking concept). It is observed that the present charged anisotropic compact star is compatible with the star PSR 1937+21. However we also presented the EOS $\\rho=f(p)$ for present charged compact star model.

  14. Afrikaans Syllabification Patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tilla Fick

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to English, automatic hyphenation by computer of Afrikaans words is a problem that still needs to be addressed, since errors are still often encountered in printed text. An initial step in this task is the ability to automatically syllabify words. Since new words are created continuously by joining words, it is necessary to develop an “intelligent” technique for syllabification. As a first phase of the research, we consider only the orthographic information of words, and disregard both syntactic and morphological information. This approach allows us to use machine-learning techniques such as artificial neural networks and decision trees that are known for their pattern recognition abilities. Both these techniques are trained with isolated patterns consisting of input patterns and corresponding outputs (or targets that indicate whether the input pattern should be split at a certain position, or not. In the process of compiling a list of syllabified words from which to generate training data for the  syllabification problem, irregular patterns were identified. The same letter patterns are split differently in different words and complete words that are spelled identically are split differently due to meaning. We also identified irregularities in and between  the different dictionaries that we used. We examined the influence range of letters that are involved in irregularities. For example, for their in agter-ente and vaste-rente we have to consider three letters to the left of r to be certain where the hyphen should be inserted. The influence range of the k in verstek-waarde and kleinste-kwadrate is four to the left and three to the right. In an analysis of letter patterns in Afrikaans words we found that the letter e has the highest frequency overall (16,2% of all letters in the word list. The frequency of words starting with s is the highest, while the frequency of words ending with e is the highest. It is important to

  15. Experiment for a measurement of the charge radius of the proton at the S-DALINAC and investigation of the fine structure of giant resonances in {sup 28}Si, {sup 48}Ca and {sup 166}Er with the help of the wavelet analysis; Experiment zur Messung des Ladungsradius des Protons am S-DALINAC und Untersuchung der Feinstruktur von Riesenresonanzen in {sup 28}Si, {sup 48}Ca und {sup 166}Er mit Hilfe der Waveletanalyse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pysmenetska, Inna

    2009-07-22

    The present thesis consists of two parts. In the first part a novel experimental method for the measurement of the proton root-mean-square radius at the S-DALINAC is presented. A setup based on semiconductor detectors is realized. In contrast to previous experiments it allows a simultaneous measurement of the momentum transfer dependence of the elastic electron scattering cross section. A possible suppression of the significant electron and bremsstrahlung background observed in a test experiment was investigated with the help of different methods, such as {delta}E-E telescopes, the time of flight method with a pulsed beam and pulse shape discrimination. The combination of these methods allows a reduction of the background at all scattering angles, which should allow a successful measurement. The response of the detector system was studied with the help of Monte-Carlo simulations with an emphasis on the dependence of the expected accuracy of different parameters. The second part of this work describes an investigation of the fine structure of giant resonances in {sup 28}Si, {sup 48}Ca and {sup 166}Er with the help of a wavelet analysis. The discrete wavelet transform was used for a background determination in spectra of the iso vector E1 and the M2 giant resonances in {sup 48}Ca. This allows the extraction of 1{sup -} und 2{sup -} level densities in the excitation energy region of the respective resonances with the help of a fluctuation analysis. A fluctuation analysis of the fine structure of the isoscalar E2 resonance in {sup 166}Er allows the extraction of the coherent widths of the 2{sup +} states. In the excitation energy region E{sub x}=10-16 MeV widths between 30 and 80 eV are found. The fine structure of the giant resonances is furthermore specified by characteristic scales. In this thesis scales in {sup 28}Si and {sup 48}Ca are extracted with the help of the above mentioned wavelet transform. In {sup 28}Si the isovector E1 and isoscalar E2 resonances were

  16. Novel cationic SLN containing a synthesized single-tailed lipid as a modifier for gene delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Wangyang; Liu Chunxi; Ye Jiesheng; Zou Weiwei; Zhang Na; Xu Wenfang [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Shandong University, 44 Wenhua Xi Road, Ji' nan (China)], E-mail: zhangnancy9@sdu.edu.cn

    2009-05-27

    Cationic solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) can bind DNA directly via ionic interaction and mediate in vitro gene transfection. However, toxicity is still an obstacle, which is strongly dependent on the cationic lipid used. In the present study, a novel single-tailed cationic lipid, 6-lauroxyhexyl lysinate (LHLN), was synthesized and used as a modifier to prepare stable SLN-DNA complexes by a nanoprecipitation method. The commonly used cationic lipid cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) modified SLN-DNA formulation served as a contrast. These two formulations were characterized and compared in terms of morphology, particle size, surface charge, DNA binding capacity, release profile, cytotoxicity, and transfection efficiency. The LHLN SLN-DNA complexes had a similar spherical morphology, a relatively narrow particle size distribution and a more remarkable DNA loading capability compared to the CTAB ones. Most importantly, LHLN modified SLN had a higher gene transfection efficiency than the naked DNA and CTAB ones, which was approximately equal to that of Lipofectamine-DNA complexes, and a lower cytotoxicity compared with CTAB-SLN and Lipofectamine 2000. Thus, the novel cationic SLN can achieve efficient transfection of plasmid DNA, and to some extent reduce the cytotoxicity, which might overcome some drawbacks of the conventional cationic nanocarriers in vivo and may become a promising non-viral gene therapy vector.

  17. Novel cationic SLN containing a synthesized single-tailed lipid as a modifier for gene delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wangyang; Liu, Chunxi; Ye, Jiesheng; Zou, Weiwei; Zhang, Na; Xu, Wenfang

    2009-05-01

    Cationic solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) can bind DNA directly via ionic interaction and mediate in vitro gene transfection. However, toxicity is still an obstacle, which is strongly dependent on the cationic lipid used. In the present study, a novel single-tailed cationic lipid, 6-lauroxyhexyl lysinate (LHLN), was synthesized and used as a modifier to prepare stable SLN-DNA complexes by a nanoprecipitation method. The commonly used cationic lipid cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) modified SLN-DNA formulation served as a contrast. These two formulations were characterized and compared in terms of morphology, particle size, surface charge, DNA binding capacity, release profile, cytotoxicity, and transfection efficiency. The LHLN SLN-DNA complexes had a similar spherical morphology, a relatively narrow particle size distribution and a more remarkable DNA loading capability compared to the CTAB ones. Most importantly, LHLN modified SLN had a higher gene transfection efficiency than the naked DNA and CTAB ones, which was approximately equal to that of Lipofectamine-DNA complexes, and a lower cytotoxicity compared with CTAB-SLN and Lipofectamine 2000. Thus, the novel cationic SLN can achieve efficient transfection of plasmid DNA, and to some extent reduce the cytotoxicity, which might overcome some drawbacks of the conventional cationic nanocarriers in vivo and may become a promising non-viral gene therapy vector.

  18. Pore with gate: modulating hydrogen storage in metal-organic framework materials via cation exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sihai; Callear, Samantha K; Ramirez-Cuesta, Anibal J; David, William I F; Sun, Junliang; Blake, Alexander J; Champness, Neil R; Schröder, Martin

    2011-01-01

    A range of anionic metal-organic framework (MOF) materials has been prepared by combination of In(III) with tetracarboxylate isophthalate-based ligands. These materials incorporate organic cations, either H2ppz2+ (ppz = piperazine) or Me2NH2+, that are hydrogen bonded to the pore wall. These cations act as a gate controlling entry of N2 and H2 gas into and out of the porous host. Thus, hysteretic adsorption/desorption for N2 and H2 is observed in these systems, reflecting the role of the bulky hydrogen bonded organic cations in controlling the kinetic trapping of substrates. Post-synthetic cation exchange with Li+ leads to removal of the organic cation and the formation of the corresponding Li+ salts. Replacement of the organic cation with smaller Li+ leads to an increase in internal surface area and pore volume of the framework material, and in some cases to an increase in the isosteric heat of adsorption of H2 at zero coverage, as predicted by theoretical modelling. The structures, characterisation and analysis of these charged porous materials as storage portals for H2 are discussed. Inelastic neutron scattering experiments confirm interaction of H2 with the carboxylate groups of the isophthalate ligands bound to In(III) centres.

  19. Molecular modeling of organic corrosion inhibitors: why bare metal cations are not appropriate models of oxidized metal surfaces and solvated metal cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokalj, Anton

    2014-01-01

    The applicability of various models of oxidized metal surfaces - bare metal cations, clusters of various size, and extended (periodic) slabs - that are used in the field of quantum-chemical modeling of corrosion inhibitors is examined and discussed. As representative model systems imidazole inhibitor, MgO surface, and solvated Mg(2+) ion are considered by means of density-functional-theory calculations. Although the results of cluster models are prone to cluster size and shape effects, the clusters of moderate size seem useful at least for qualitative purposes. In contrast, the bare metal cations are useless not only as models of oxidized surfaces but also as models of solvated cations, because they bind molecules several times stronger than the more appropriate models. In particular, bare Mg(2+) binds imidazole by 5.9 eV, while the slab model of MgO(001) by only 0.35 eV. Such binding is even stronger for 3+ cations, e.g., bare Al(3+) binds imidazole by 17.9 eV. The reasons for these fantastically strong binding energies are discussed and it is shown that the strong bonding is predominantly due to electron charge transfer from molecule to metal cation, which stems from differences between molecular and metal ionization potentials.

  20. Two empirical regimes of the planetary mass-radius relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashi, Dolev; Helled, Ravit; Zucker, Shay; Mordasini, Christoph

    2017-08-01

    Today, with the large number of detected exoplanets and improved measurements, we can reach the next step of planetary characterization. Classifying different populations of planets is not only important for our understanding of the demographics of various planetary types in the galaxy, but also for our understanding of planet formation. We explore the nature of two regimes in the planetary mass-radius (M-R) relation. We suggest that the transition between the two regimes of "small" and "large" planets occurs at a mass of 124 ± 7M⊕ and a radius of 12.1 ± 0.5R⊕. Furthermore, the M-R relation is R ∝ M0.55 ± 0.02 and R ∝ M0.01 ± 0.02 for small and large planets, respectively. We suggest that the location of the breakpoint is linked to the onset of electron degeneracy in hydrogen, and therefore to the planetary bulk composition. Specifically, it is the characteristic minimal mass of a planet that consists of mostly hydrogen and helium, and therefore its M-R relation is determined by the equation of state of these materials. We compare the M-R relation from observational data with the relation derived by population synthesis calculations and show that there is a good qualitative agreement between the two samples.

  1. What is the largest Einstein radius in the universe?

    CERN Document Server

    Oguri, Masamune

    2008-01-01

    The Einstein radius plays a central role in lens studies as it characterises the strength of gravitational lensing. The distribution of Einstein radii near the upper cutoff should probe the largest mass concentrations in the universe. Adopting a triaxial halo model, we compute expected distributions of large Einstein radii. To assess the cosmic variance, we generate a number of all-sky Monte-Carlo realisations. We find that the expected largest Einstein radius in the universe is sensitive to the cosmological model: for a source redshift z=1, they are 42^{+9}_{-7}, 35^{+8}_{-6}, and 54^{+12}_{-7} arcseconds, assuming best-fit parameters of the WMAP5, WMAP3 and WMAP1 data, respectively. These values are broadly consistent with current observations given their incompleteness. For the same source redshift, we expect in all-sky 35 (WMAP5), 15 (WMAP3), and 150 (WMAP1) clusters that have Einstein radii larger than 20''. Whilst the values of the largest Einstein radii are almost unaffected by the primordial non-Gauss...

  2. Automated bone age assessment of older children using the radius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Sinchai; Gertych, Arkadiusz; Zhang, Aifeng; Liu, Brent J.; Huang, Han K.

    2008-03-01

    The Digital Hand Atlas in Assessment of Skeletal Development is a large-scale Computer Aided Diagnosis (CAD) project for automating the process of grading Skeletal Development of children from 0-18 years of age. It includes a complete collection of 1,400 normal hand X-rays of children between the ages of 0-18 years of age. Bone Age Assessment is used as an index of skeletal development for detection of growth pathologies that can be related to endocrine, malnutrition and other disease types. Previous work at the Image Processing and Informatics Lab (IPILab) allowed the bone age CAD algorithm to accurately assess bone age of children from 1 to 16 (male) or 14 (female) years of age using the Phalanges as well as the Carpal Bones. At the older ages (16(male) or 14(female) -19 years of age) the Phalanges as well as the Carpal Bones are fully developed and do not provide well-defined features for accurate bone age assessment. Therefore integration of the Radius Bone as a region of interest (ROI) is greatly needed and will significantly improve the ability to accurately assess the bone age of older children. Preliminary studies show that an integrated Bone Age CAD that utilizes the Phalanges, Carpal Bones and Radius forms a robust method for automatic bone age assessment throughout the entire age range (1-19 years of age).

  3. Stellar Initial Mass Function: Trends With Galaxy Mass And Radius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Taniya

    2017-06-01

    There is currently no consensus about the exact shape and, in particular, the universality of the stellar initial mass function (IMF). For massive galaxies, it has been found that near-infrared (NIR) absorption features, which are sensitive to the ratio of dwarf to giant stars, deviate from a Milky Way-like IMF; their modelling seems to require a larger fraction of low mass stars. There are now increasing results looking at whether the IMF varies not only with galaxy mass, but also radially within galaxies. The SDSS-IV/MaNGA integral-field survey will provide spatially resolved spectroscopy for 10,000 galaxies at R 2000 from 360-1000nm. Spectra of early-type galaxies were stacked to achieve high S/N which is particularly important for features in the NIR. Trends with galaxy radius and mass were compared to stellar population models for a range of absorption features in order to separate degeneracies due to changes in stellar population parameters, such as age, metallicity and element abundances, with potential changes in the IMF. Results for 611 galaxies show that we do not require an IMF steeper than Kroupa as a function of galaxy mass or radius based on the NaI index. The Wing-Ford band hints towards a steeper IMF at large radii however we do not have reliable measurements for the most massive galaxies.

  4. Biomechanical stability of four fixation constructs for distal radius fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capo, John T; Kinchelow, Tosca; Brooks, Kenneth; Tan, Virak; Manigrasso, Michaele; Francisco, Kristin

    2009-09-01

    Implants available for distal radius fracture fixation include dorsal nonlocked plating (DNLP), volar locked plating (VLP), radial-ulnar dual-column locked plating (DCPs), and locked intramedullary fixation (IMN). This study examines the biomechanical properties of these four different fixation constructs. In 28 fresh-frozen radii, a wedge osteotomy was performed, creating an unstable fracture model and the four fixation constructs employed (DNLP, VLP, DCPs, and IMN). Dorsal bending loads were applied and bending stiffness, load to yield 5 mm displacement, and ultimate failure were measured. Bending stiffness for VLP (16.7 N/mm) was significantly higher than for DNLP (6.8 N/mm), while IMN (12.6 N/mm) and DCPs (11.8 N/mm) were similar. Ultimate load to failure occurred at 278.2 N for the VLP, 245.7 N for the IMN, and 52.0 N for the DNLP. The VLP was significantly stronger than the DNLP and DCPs, and the IMN and DCPs were stronger than the DNLP. The VLP has higher average bending stiffness, ultimate bending strength, and resistance to 5 mm displacement than the other constructs and significantly higher ultimate bending strength than the DCPs and DNLP. There was no statistically significant difference between the VLP and IMN. VLP and IMN fixation of distal radius fractures can achieve comparable stability.

  5. Maximum wind radius estimated by the 50 kt radius: improvement of storm surge forecasting over the western North Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Hiroshi; Wu, Wenjie

    2016-03-01

    Even though the maximum wind radius (Rmax) is an important parameter in determining the intensity and size of tropical cyclones, it has been overlooked in previous storm surge studies. This study reviews the existing estimation methods for Rmax based on central pressure or maximum wind speed. These over- or underestimate Rmax because of substantial variations in the data, although an average radius can be estimated with moderate accuracy. As an alternative, we propose an Rmax estimation method based on the radius of the 50 kt wind (R50). Data obtained by a meteorological station network in the Japanese archipelago during the passage of strong typhoons, together with the JMA typhoon best track data for 1990-2013, enabled us to derive the following simple equation, Rmax = 0.23 R50. Application to a recent strong typhoon, the 2015 Typhoon Goni, confirms that the equation provides a good estimation of Rmax, particularly when the central pressure became considerably low. Although this new method substantially improves the estimation of Rmax compared to the existing models, estimation errors are unavoidable because of fundamental uncertainties regarding the typhoon's structure or insufficient number of available typhoon data. In fact, a numerical simulation for the 2013 Typhoon Haiyan as well as 2015 Typhoon Goni demonstrates a substantial difference in the storm surge height for different Rmax. Therefore, the variability of Rmax should be taken into account in storm surge simulations (e.g., Rmax = 0.15 R50-0.35 R50), independently of the model used, to minimize the risk of over- or underestimating storm surges. The proposed method is expected to increase the predictability of major storm surges and to contribute to disaster risk management, particularly in the western North Pacific, including countries such as Japan, China, Taiwan, the Philippines, and Vietnam.

  6. Advancements in Anion Exchange Membrane Cations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sturgeon, Matthew R. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Long, Hai [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Park, Andrew M. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Pivovar, Bryan S. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Anion-exchange membrane fuel cells (AME-FCs) are of increasingly popular interest as they enable the use of non-Pt fuel cell catalysts, the primary cost limitation of proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Benzyltrimethyl ammonium (BTMA) is the standard cation that has historically been utilized as the hydroxide conductor in AEMs. Herein we approach AEMs from two directions. First and foremost we study the stability of several different cations in a hydroxide solution at elevated temperatures. We specifically targeted BTMA and methoxy and nitro substituted BTMA. We've also studied the effects of adding an akyl spacer units between the ammonium cation and the phenyl group. In the second approach we use computational studies to predict stable ammonium cations, which are then synthesized and tested for stability. Our unique method to study cation stability in caustic conditions at elevated temperatures utilizes Teflon Parr reactors suitable for use under various temperatures and cation concentrations. NMR analysis was used to determine remaining cation concentrations at specific time points with GCMS analysis verifying product distribution. We then compare the experimental results with calculated modeling stabilities. Our studies show that the electron donating methoxy groups slightly increase stability (compared to that of BTMA), while the electron withdrawing nitro groups greatly decrease stability in base. These results give insight into possible linking strategies to be employed when tethering a BTMA like ammonium cation to a polymeric backbone; thus synthesizing an anion exchange membrane.

  7. The mechanism of kaolin clay flocculation by a cation-independent bioflocculant produced by Chryseobacterium daeguense W6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weijie Liu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, several novel cation-independent bioflocculants have been reported, which can avoid the secondary contamination caused by addition of cations. However, compared with cation-dependent bioflocculants, the flocculating mechanism of cation-independent bioflocculants is largely unknown. In this study, a cation-independent bioflocculant MBF-W6 produced by Chryseobacterium daeguense W6 was used as a model to investigate the flocculating mechanism. The results showed that the major flocculating component of MBF-W6 is a complex of proteins and polysaccharides. The zeta potential results indicated that kaolin clay particles were not precipitated due to charge neutralization and the bridging mediated by cations did not play a major role in the flocculating process. These results are consistent with the fact that MBF-W6 is a cation-independent bioflocculant. Further scanning electron microscopic observation showed that MBF-W6 induced flocs formed tight packed structure, suggesting that the kaolin clay particles maybe directly attached and bridged by bioflocculant MBF-W6. In addition, we also found out that Fe3+ ions inhibit the flocculating activity of MBF-W6 by affecting –COO− and –NH groups. Therefore this study can improve our understanding on flocculating mechanism of cation-independent bioflocculants.

  8. Decondensation behavior of DNA chains induced by multivalent cations at high salt concentrations:Molecular dynamics simulations and experiments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋杨伟; 冉诗勇; 何林李; 王向红; 章林溪

    2015-01-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations and atomic force microscopy (AFM), we study the decondensation process of DNA chains induced by multivalent cations at high salt concentrations in the presence of short cationic chains in solutions. The typical simulation conformations of DNA chains with varying salt concentrations for multivalent cations imply that the concentration of salt cations and the valence of multivalent cations have a strong influence on the process of DNA decondensation. The DNA chains are condensed in the absence of salt or at low salt concentrations, and the compacted conformations of DNA chains become loose when a number of cations and anions are added into the solution. It is explicitly demonstrated that cations can overcompensate the bare charge of the DNA chains and weaken the attraction interactions between the DNA chains and short cationic chains at high salt concentrations. The condensation-decondensation transi-tions of DNA are also experimentally observed in mixing spermidine withλ-phage DNA at different concentrations of NaCl/MgCl2 solutions.

  9. The use of the radius of gyration in a WLC polymer model of cancer cell adhesion to glycosaminoglycans substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peramo, Antonio; Matthews, Garrett

    2009-03-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAG) are a group of polysaccharides involved in several biological functions, including cell adhesion. Most of their biological properties are derived from the interactions of the chains with their environment, hence the interest in developing physical models that could describe their interactions with whole cells. As linear biopolymers with low polydispersity, GAG can be described using polymer models of Gaussian chain distributions, like the WLC (worm-like chain) model. We found that the adhesion of whole cancer cells to glass substrates coated with GAG appear to be dependent on the charge per dimer and degree of sulfation of the GAG chain. We have hypothesized that the adhesion of whole cancer cells to GAG substrates can be described as a function of polysaccharide radius of gyration and used the WLC model describing the global structure of the GAGs to analyze this relationship. We will show that the adhesion of the cancer cells has a linear response with the radius of gyration and is essentially controlled by the charge per dimer. This dominating mechanism is not eliminated when the cells are resuspended in media with heparin. We then propose how these physical properties could be used to predict the preferred molecular structures of compounds for use as anti-metastatic or anti-inflammatory agents.

  10. Cation diffusion in the natural zeolite clinoptilolite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyer, A.; White, K.J. [Science Research Institute, Chemistry Division, Cockcroft Building, University of Salford, Salford (United Kingdom)

    1999-12-14

    The natural zeolite clinoptilolite is mined commercially in many parts of the world. It is a selective exchanger for the ammonium cation and this has prompted its use in waste water treatment, swimming pools and in fish farming. It is also used to scavenge radioisotopes in nuclear waste clean-up. Further potential uses for clinoptilolite are in soil amendment and remediation. The work described herein provides thermodynamic data on cation exchange processes in clinoptilolite involving the NH{sub 4}, Na, K, Ca, and Mg cations. The data includes estimates of interdiffusion coefficients together with free energies, entropies and energies of activation for the cation exchanges studied. Suggestions are made as to the mechanisms of cation-exchanges involved.

  11. Measurement of the Neutron Radius of 208Pb Through Parity Violation in Electron Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saenboonruang, Kiadtisak [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2013-05-01

    In contrast to the nuclear charge densities, which have been accurately measured with electron scattering, the knowledge of neutron densities still lack precision. Previous model-dependent hadron experiments suggest the difference between the neutron radius, Rn, of a heavy nucleus and the proton radius, Rp, to be in the order of several percent. To accurately obtain the difference, Rn-Rp, which is essentially a neutron skin, the Jefferson Lab Lead (208Pb) Radius Experiment (PREX) measured the parity-violating electroweak asymmetry in the elastic scattering of polarized electrons from 208Pb at an energy of 1.06 GeV and a scattering angle of 5° . Since Z0 boson couples mainly to neutrons, this asymmetry provides a clean measurement of Rn with respect to Rp. PREX was conducted at the Jefferson lab experimental Hall A, from March to June 2010. The experiment collected a final data sample of 2x 107 helicity-window quadruplets. The measured parity-violating electroweak asymmetry APV = 0.656 ± 0.060 (stat) ± 0.014 (syst) ppm corresponds to a difference between the radii of the neutron and proton distributions, Rn-Rp = 0.33+0.16-0.18 fm and provides the first electroweak observation of the neutron skin as expected in a heavy, neutron-rich nucleus. The value of the neutron radius of 208Pb has important implications for models of nuclear structure and their application in atomic physics and astrophysics such as atomic parity non-conservation (PNC) and neutron stars.

  12. Solution Versus Gas-Phase Modification of Peptide Cations with NHS-Ester Reagents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentinova, Marija; Barefoot, Nathan Z.; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2012-02-01

    A comparison between solution and gas phase modification of primary amine sites in model peptide cations with N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) ester reagents is presented. In all peptides, the site of modification in solution was directed to the N-terminus by conducting reactions at pH = 5, whereas for the same peptides, a lysine residue was preferentially modified in the gas phase. The difference in pKa values of the N-terminus and ɛ-amino group of the lysine allows for a degree of control over sites of protonation of the peptides in aqueous solution. With removal of the dielectric and multiple charging of the peptide ions in the gas phase, the accommodation of excess charge can affect the preferred sites of reaction. Interaction of the lone pair of the primary nitrogen with a proton reduces its nucleophilicity and, as a result, its reactivity towards NHS-esters. While no evidence for reaction of the N-terminus with sulfo-NHS-acetate was noted in the model peptide cations, a charge inversion experiment using bis[sulfosuccinimidyl] suberate, a cross-linking reagent with two sulfo-NHS-ester functionalities, showed modification of the N-terminus. Hence, an unprotonated N-terminus can serve as a nucleophile to displace NHS, which suggests that its lack of reactivity with the peptide cations is likely due to the participation of the N-terminus in solvating excess charge.

  13. Spontaneous charging and crystallization of water droplets in oil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Graaf, J.; Zwanikken, J.W.; Bier, Markus; Baarsma, Arjen; Oloumi, Yasha; Spelt, Mischa; van Roij, R.H.H.G.

    2008-01-01

    We study the spontaneous charging and the crystallization of spherical micron-sized water-droplets dispersed in oil by numerically solving, within a Poisson-Boltzmann theory in the geometry of a spherical cell, for the density profiles of the cations and anions in the system. We take into account

  14. Workplace Charging. Charging Up University Campuses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giles, Carrie [ICF International, Fairfax, VA (United States); Ryder, Carrie [ICF International, Fairfax, VA (United States); Lommele, Stephen [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-03-01

    This case study features the experiences of university partners in the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Workplace Charging Challenge with the installation and management of plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) charging stations.

  15. On the inner radius of univalency by pre-Schwarzian derivative

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In this paper,the inner radius of univalency of hyperbolic domains by pre-Schwarzian derivative is studied,and some general formulas for the lower bound of the inner radius are established. As their applications,the lower bounds of inner radiuses for angular domains and strongly starlike domains are obtained.

  16. STABILITY RADIUS OF NON-SMOOTH PRITCHARD-SALAMON SYSTEMS AND THE ALGEBRAIC RICCATI EQUATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weisheng JIANG; Falun HUANG; Tingyu ZHU

    2009-01-01

    The authors discuss the stability radius of the non-smooth Pritchard-Salamon systems under structured perturbations. A formula for the stability radius in terms of the norm of a certain input-output operator is obtained. Furthermore, the relationship between stability radius and the solvability of some type of algebraic Riccati equations is given.

  17. On the inner radius of univalency by pre-Schwarzian derivative

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao CHENG; Ji-xiu CHEN

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the inner radius of univalency of hyperbolic domains by pre-Schwarzian derivative is studied, and some general formulas for the lower bound of the inner radius are established.As their applications, the lower bounds of inner radiuses for angular domains and strongly starlike domains are obtained.

  18. Post-traumatic osteonecrosis of the lunate after fracture of the distal radius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Akito; Yajima, Hiroshi; Kisanuki, Osamu

    2014-12-01

    We present a case of post-traumatic osteonecrosis of the lunate after fracture of the distal radius. Post-traumatic osteonecrosis of the carpal lunate after a fracture of the distal radius has, to our knowledge, not been reported previously. We treated the patient with vascularised bone graft from the distal radius, with a satisfactory result.

  19. Variable Charge Soils: Mineralogy and Chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qafoku, Nik; Van Ranst, Eric; Noble, Andrew; Baert, Geert

    2003-11-01

    ferromagnesian-rich parent materials) the surfaces of phyllosilicates are coated to a lesser or greater extent by amorphous or crystalline, oppositely charged nanoparticles of Fe and Al oxides. These coatings exhibit a high reactive surface area and help cementing larger particles with one another. As a result of these electrostatic interactions, stable microaggregates that are difficult to disperse are formed in variable charge soils. Most of highly weathered soils have reached the “advanced stage” of Jackson-Sherman weathering sequence that is characterized by the removal of Na, K, Ca, Mg, and Fe(II), the presence of Fe and Al polymers, and very dilute soil solutions with an ionic strength (IS) of less than 1 mmol L-1. The inter-penetration or overlapping of the diffuse double layers on oppositely charged surfaces may occur in these dilute systems. These diffuse layer interactions may affect the magnitude of the effective charge, i.e., the counter-ion charge (4). In addition, salt adsorption, which is defined as the simultaneous adsorption in equivalent amounts of the cation and anion of an electrolyte with no net release of other ions into the soil solution, appears to be a common phenomenon in these soils. They act as cation- and anion-exchangers and as salt-sorbers. The magnitude of salt adsorption depends strongly on initial IS in the soil solution and the presence in appreciable amounts of oppositely charged surfaces. Among the authors that have made illustrious contributions towards a better understanding of these fascinating soil systems are S. Matson, R.K. Schofield, van Olphen, M.E. Sumner, G.W. Thomas, G.P. Gillman, G. Uehara, B.K.G. Theng, K. Wada, N.J. Barrow, J.W. Bowden, R.J. Hunter and G. Sposito. This entry is mainly based on publications by these authors.

  20. Severely comminuted radius fracture presenting as a signature patterned injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Jain

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dilemma still prevails, regarding the exact management of mangled extremity injuries between limb salvage versus amputation, each having there own set of complications. We here present a case of severely comminuted fractures of radius (bag of bones along with the multiple criss-cross shaped lacerated wounds on the forearm and wrist presenting as a “signature pattern injury” caused by entrapment of the limb in the concrete mixer. MESS score of patient was 8, a score valid for amputation, but contrary, we successfully salvaged the patient's limb with use of radio-carpal distracter. Management of mangled injuries should be individualized, with due consideration to the mechanism and force of injury, associated injuries, and the patient profile.

  1. Severely comminuted radius fracture presenting as a signature patterned injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Saurabh; Rajan, Sunil; Srivastava, Abhishek

    2016-01-01

    Dilemma still prevails, regarding the exact management of mangled extremity injuries between limb salvage versus amputation, each having there own set of complications. We here present a case of severely comminuted fractures of radius (bag of bones) along with the multiple criss-cross shaped lacerated wounds on the forearm and wrist presenting as a "signature pattern injury" caused by entrapment of the limb in the concrete mixer. MESS score of patient was 8, a score valid for amputation, but contrary, we successfully salvaged the patient's limb with use of radio-carpal distracter. Management of mangled injuries should be individualized, with due consideration to the mechanism and force of injury, associated injuries, and the patient profile.

  2. How to extract physics from HBT radius parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Heinz, Ulrich W

    1996-01-01

    I review recent progress in the understanding of the connection between the space-time structure of the particle emitting source and the form of the two-particle correlation function in momentum space. Based on a new scheme for calculating the HBT radius parameters from the emission function, strategies are suggested to separate for rapidly expanding sources the information on the spatial and temporal structure of the source. To this end a new fitting function for the two-particle correlation function is proposed. Its usefulness is demonstrated for a typical expanding model source, and it is shown how the dependence of the resulting fit parameters on the momentum of the particle pair can be used to measure the longitudinal and transverse expansion of the source.

  3. Inductive voltage adder (IVA) for submillimeter radius electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazarakis, M.G.; Poukey, J.W.; Maenchen, J.E. [and others

    1996-12-31

    The authors have already demonstrated the utility of inductive voltage adder accelerators for production of small-size electron beams. In this approach, the inductive voltage adder drives a magnetically immersed foilless diode to produce high-energy (10--20 MeV), high-brightness pencil electron beams. This concept was first demonstrated with the successful experiments which converted the linear induction accelerator RADLAC II into an IVA fitted with a small 1-cm radius cathode magnetically immersed foilless diode (RADLAC II/SMILE). They present here first validations of extending this idea to mm-scale electron beams using the SABRE and HERMES-III inductive voltage adders as test beds. The SABRE experiments are already completed and have produced 30-kA, 9-MeV electron beams with envelope diameter of 1.5-mm FWHM. The HERMES-III experiments are currently underway.

  4. The muonic hydrogen Lamb shift and the proton radius

    CERN Document Server

    Peset, Clara

    2014-01-01

    We obtain a model independent expression for the muonic hydrogen Lamb shift up to $\\mathcal O (m_\\mu \\alpha^6, m_\\mu \\alpha^5 \\frac{m_\\mu^2}{m_\\rho^2})$. The hadronic effects are controlled by the chiral theory, which allows for their model independent determination. We give their complete expression including the pion and Delta particles. Out of this analysis and the experimental measurement of the muonic hydrogen Lamb shift we determine the electromagnetic proton radius: $r_p$=0.8412(15) fm. This number is at 6.8$\\sigma$ variance with respect to the CODATA value. The parametric control of the uncertainties allows us to obtain a model independent determination of the error, which is dominated by hadronic effects.

  5. Constraints on the distribution of supernova remnants with Galactocentric radius

    CERN Document Server

    Green, D A

    2015-01-01

    Supernova remnants (SNRs) in the Galaxy are an important source of energy injection into the interstellar medium, and also of cosmic rays. Currently there are 294 known SNRs in the Galaxy, and their distribution with Galactocentric radius is of interest for various studies. Here I discuss some of the statistics of Galactic SNRs, including the observational selection effects that apply, and difficulties in obtaining distances for individual remnants from the `Sigma-D' relation. Comparison of the observed Galactic longitude distribution of a sample of bright Galactic SNRs -- which are not strongly affected by selection effects -- with those expected from models is used to constrain the Galactic distribution of SNRs. The best-fitting power-law/exponential model is more concentrated towards the Galactic centre than the widely used distribution obtained by Case & Bhattacharya (1998).

  6. Decreasing "circumference" for increasing "radius" in axially symmetric gravitating systems

    CERN Document Server

    Lubo, M

    2001-01-01

    Apart from the flat space with an angular deficit, Einstein general relativity possesses another cylindrically symmetric solution. Because this configuration displays circles whose "circumferences" tend to zero when their "radius" go to infinity, it has not received much attention in the past. We propose a geometric interpretation of this feature and find that it implies field boundary conditions different from the ones found in the literature if one considers a source consisting of the scalar and the vector fields of a U(1) system . To obtain a non increasing energy density the gauge symmetry must be unbroken . For the Higgs potential this is achieved only with a vanishing vacuum expectation value but then the solution has a null scalar field. A non trivial scalar behaviour is exhibited for a potential of sixth order. The trajectories of test particles in this geometry are studied, its causal structure discussed. We find that this bosonic background can support a normalizable fermionic condensate but not suc...

  7. Large-radius bipolaron and the polaron-polaron interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashirina, N I [Institute of Semiconductor Physics, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kiev (Ukraine); Lakhno, Viktor D [Institute of Mathematical Problems of Biology, Russian Academy of Sciences, Pushchino, Moscow region (Russian Federation)

    2010-08-09

    Research on the polaron-polaron interaction and the theory of large-radius bipolarons are reviewed. The difference between the two-center and one-center continuum bipolaron models in isotropic and anisotropic crystals is discussed. It is shown that the inclusion of electron-electron correlations can significantly reduce the bipolaron and D{sup -}-center energies as well as the energies of exchange-bound pairs of shallow hydrogen-like centers. The two-center bipolaron configuration corresponds to a shallow secondary minimum and is unstable. The phonon-mediated exchange interaction between Pekar polarons has an antiferromagnetic nature and exceeds the ferromagnetic interaction due to the Coulomb interaction of electrons localized in polaron potential wells. The possibility that the superfluidity of bipolarons can give rise to high-temperature superconductivity is discussed and problems related to the Wigner crystallization of a polaron gas are examined. (reviews of topical problems)

  8. Sensor Activation and Radius Adaptation (SARA) in Heterogeneous Sensor Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Bartolini, Novella; la Porta, Thomas; Petrioli, Chiara; Silvestri, Simone

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we address the problem of prolonging the lifetime of wireless sensor networks (WSNs) deployed to monitor an area of interest. In this scenario, a helpful approach is to reduce coverage redundancy and therefore the energy expenditure due to coverage. We introduce the first algorithm which reduces coverage redundancy by means of Sensor Activation and sensing Radius Adaptation (SARA)in a general applicative scenario with two classes of devices: sensors that can adapt their sensing range (adjustable sensors) and sensors that cannot (fixed sensors). In particular, SARA activates only a subset of all the available sensors and reduces the sensing range of the adjustable sensors that have been activated. In doing so, SARA also takes possible heterogeneous coverage capabilities of sensors belonging to the same class into account. It specifically addresses device heterogeneity by modeling the coverage problem in the Laguerre geometry through Voronoi-Laguerre diagrams. SARA executes quickly and is guarante...

  9. Massive radius-dependent flow slippage in carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siria, Alessandro; Secchi, Eleonora; Marbach, Sophie; Niguès, Antoine; Stein, Derek; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2016-11-01

    Nanofluidics is the frontier where the continuum picture of fluid mechanics confronts the atomic nature of matter. Recent reports indicate that carbon nanotubes exhibit exceptional water transport properties due to nearly frictionless interfaces and this has stimulated interest in nanotube-based membranes for desalination, nano-filtration, and energy harvesting. However, the fundamental mechanisms of water transport inside nanotubes and at water-carbon interfaces remain controversial, as existing theories fail to provide a satisfying explanation for the limited experimental results. We report a study of water jets emerging from single nanotubes made of carbon and boron-nitride materials. Our experiments reveal extensive and radius-dependent surface slippage in carbon nanotubes (CNT). In stark contrast, boron-nitride nanotubes (BNNT), which are crystallographically similar to CNTs but electronically different, exhibit no slippage. This shows that slippage originates in subtle atomic-scale details of the solid-liquid interface. ERC StG - NanoSOFT.

  10. Heliocentric radius of the cosmic ray modulation boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, B. A.; Van Allen, J. A.

    1986-01-01

    A semiempirical analysis is made of an extensive body of observed cosmic ray intensity data from Pioneers 10 and 11, and related spectral information from other authors, in order to infer the radius R of the modulation region surrounding the sun. During the period 1972-1985, the inferred values of R vary with time systematically and in a manner generally similar to that of sunspot numbers. The range of values of R is from 42 AU at the time of minimum solar activity (circa 1976) to 88 AU about 1.5 yr following the time of maximum solar activity (circa 1980). A specific, testable prediction is that Pioneer 10 will reach the modulation boundary in 1988, and will remain in its vicinity for several years thereafter.

  11. Galaxy Mass, Metallicity, Radius and Star Formation Rates

    CERN Document Server

    Brisbin, Drew

    2011-01-01

    Working with 108,786 Sloan Digital Sky Survey low redshift galaxies, we have examined the relation between galaxy mass, metallicity, radius, and star formation rates. We subdivided the redshift range covered in our sample 0.072.8E10 Msun and exhibit high metallicities at high star formation rates, suggesting that for these galaxies star formation independent of mass infall plays a significant role. A toy model for the physics of infall accounts for the SFR Mi^(3/2) relation and permits us to estimate the mean densities and velocities of clumps of baryonic matter traversing the dark matter halos in which the SDSS galaxies may be embedded. The model also reproduces the gross features of the galaxy main sequence.

  12. Relations between photoionization cross sections and photon radius

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Shan-Liang

    2016-01-01

    The relations between photoionization cross sections and photon radius are obtained on basis of quantum mechanics and the particle-like properties of a photon. The photoionization cross sections of H atom and H-like ions, He atom and He like ions, alkali metal atoms, and Rydberg atoms are calculated using the relations. The calculation results are found to be good agreement with the known experimental data. The results show that the photoionization cross section is always smaller than the cross section of the photon to ionize the atom or ion and can be expressed as the product of the cross section of the photon and the probability that electron meets with the photon. These provide the intuitive understanding for the photoionization phenomena and open a new avenue of research on interaction between a photon and an atom or ion.

  13. Cationic Bolaamphiphiles for Gene Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Amelia Li Min; Lim, Alisa Xue Ling; Zhu, Yiting; Yang, Yi Yan; Khan, Majad

    2014-05-01

    Advances in medical research have shed light on the genetic cause of many human diseases. Gene therapy is a promising approach which can be used to deliver therapeutic genes to treat genetic diseases at its most fundamental level. In general, nonviral vectors are preferred due to reduced risk of immune response, but they are also commonly associated with low transfection efficiency and high cytotoxicity. In contrast to viral vectors, nonviral vectors do not have a natural mechanism to overcome extra- and intracellular barriers when delivering the therapeutic gene into cell. Hence, its design has been increasingly complex to meet challenges faced in targeting of, penetration of and expression in a specific host cell in achieving more satisfactory transfection efficiency. Flexibility in design of the vector is desirable, to enable a careful and controlled manipulation of its properties and functions. This can be met by the use of bolaamphiphile, a special class of lipid. Unlike conventional lipids, bolaamphiphiles can form asymmetric complexes with the therapeutic gene. The advantage of having an asymmetric complex lies in the different purposes served by the interior and exterior of the complex. More effective gene encapsulation within the interior of the complex can be achieved without triggering greater aggregation of serum proteins with the exterior, potentially overcoming one of the great hurdles faced by conventional single-head cationic lipids. In this review, we will look into the physiochemical considerations as well as the biological aspects of a bolaamphiphile-based gene delivery system.

  14. [Manifestation of Dupuytren nodules following fracture of the distal radius].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichelhaus, Alice; Wendt, M; Mielsch, N; Gradl, G; Mittlmeier, T

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the incidence of post-traumatic development of Dupuytren nodules in distal radius fractures treated operatively. In 2 prospective randomised studies for operative treatment of distal radius fractures, the formation of Dupuytren nodules was registered. One of the exclusion criteria was a pre-existing Dupuytren's disease at the date of trauma. In addition to the notification of the development of Dupuytren nodules, signs of a complex regional pain syndrome were registered as well as the wrist function, level of pain and grip strength. The Castaing and the Gartland and Werley scores were assessed. The clinical outcomes of patients with and without Dupuytren nodules were compared. 239 of 275 (87%) of the patients could be examined 1 year after the operation, consisting of 32 men and 207 women with a median age of 64.2 years. The patients with Dupuytren nodules were re-evaluated after 16-60 months (median 41.8) for progression of the disease. 21 patients (8.7%) developed changes of the palmar aponeurosis. In 20 patients nodules were stated, one patient showed a cord at the fourth ray of the injured hand. 19 out of 21 patients were female (90.5%). At re-evaluation after 41.8 months (16-60) progression could not be noted nor could similar changes be seen on the contralateral side. Patients with Dupuytren nodules were not handicapped in their hand function. 3 patients (14.3%) revealed a positive family history for Dupuytren's disease. Abuse of alcohol or diabetes was not present in any of the patients with Dupuytren nodules, 7 (33%) were smokers. The occurrence of Dupyutren nodules can be triggered by a trauma or operation. It may be speculated that these nodules are an entity of their own as no progression of the contracture could be seen during the follow-up period. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. UV-Vis Action Spectroscopy Reveals a Conformational Collapse in Hydrogen-Rich Dinucleotide Cation Radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korn, Joseph A; Urban, Jan; Dang, Andy; Nguyen, Huong T H; Tureček, František

    2017-09-07

    We report the generation of deoxyriboadenosine dinucleotide cation radicals by gas-phase electron transfer to dinucleotide dications and their noncovalent complexes with crown ether ligands. Stable dinucleotide cation radicals of a novel hydrogen-rich type were generated and characterized by tandem mass spectrometry and UV-vis photodissociation (UVPD) action spectroscopy. Electron structure theory analysis indicated that upon electron attachment the dinucleotide dications underwent a conformational collapse followed by intramolecular proton migrations between the nucleobases to give species whose calculated UV-vis absorption spectra matched the UVPD action spectra. Hydrogen-rich cation radicals generated from chimeric riboadenosine 5'-diesters gave UVPD action spectra that pointed to novel zwitterionic structures consisting of aromatic π-electron anion radicals intercalated between stacked positively charged adenine rings. Analogies with DNA ionization are discussed.

  16. Biosorption of silver cations onto Lactococcus lactis and Lactobacillus casei isolated from dairy products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanowski, Maciej; Pomastowski, Paweł; Railean-Plugaru, Viorica; Rafińska, Katarzyna; Ligor, Tomasz; Buszewski, Bogusław

    2017-01-01

    The current work deals with the phenomenon of silver cations uptake by two kinds of bacteria isolated from dairy products. The mechanism of sorption of silver cations by Lactococcus lactis and Lactobacillus casei bacteria was investigated. Inductively coupled plasma–mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was used for determination of silver concentration sorbed by bacteria. Analysis of charge distribution was conducted by diffraction light scattering method. Changes in the ultrastructure of Lactococcus lactis and Lactobacillus casei cells after treatment with silver cations were investigated using transmission electron microscopy observation. Molecular spectroscopy methods, namely Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS) were employed for description of the sorption mechanism. Moreover, an analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) extracted from bacterial cells was performed. PMID:28362838

  17. Effect of primycin on monovalent cation transport of erythrocyte membrane and lipid bilayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaskó, K; Györgyi, S; Horváth, I

    1979-04-01

    The effects of primycin were investigated on the alkali-cation transport of human erythrocytes and on the electric conduction of bimolecular lipid membranes. In the concentration range of 3.10(-6) approximately 10(-5) M primycin increased the permeability of erythrocytes to alkali-cations according to the sequences Cs+ greater than Rb+ approximately K+ greater than Na+, while the conductance of the negatively charged phosphatidylserine bimolecular lipid membrane increased by 2 approximately 3 orders of magnitude. The resistance-lowering effect of primycin strongly depended on the cationic species applied and a selectivity order Na+ greater than K+ greater than Rb+ greater than Cs+ was found. A possible mechanism of the primycin-membrane interaction is suggested on the basis of experimental data.

  18. Driving force for the hydration of the swelling clays: case of montmorillonites saturated with alkaline-earth cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salles, Fabrice; Douillard, Jean-Marc; Bildstein, Olivier; Gaudin, Cedric; Prelot, Benedicte; Zajac, Jerzy; Van Damme, Henri

    2013-04-01

    Important structural modifications occur in swelling clays upon water adsorption. The multi-scale evolution of the swelling clay structure is usually evidenced by various experimental techniques. However, the driving force behind such phenomena is still not thoroughly understood. It appears strongly dependent on the nature of the interlayer cation. In the case of montmorillonites saturated with alkaline cations, it was inferred that the compensating cation or the layer surface could control the hydration process and thus the opening of the interlayer space, depending on the nature of the interlayer cation. In the present study, emphasis is put on the impact of divalent alkaline-earth cations compensating the layer charge in montmorillonites. Since no experimental technique offers the possibility of directly determining the hydration contributions related to interlayer cations and layer surfaces, an approach based on the combination of electrostatic calculations and immersion data is developed here, as already validated in the case of montmorillonites saturated by alkaline cations. This methodology allows to estimate the hydration energy for divalent interlayer cations and therefore to shed a new light on the driving force for hydration process occurring in montmorillonites saturated with alkaline-earth cations. Firstly, the surface energy values obtained from the electrostatic calculations based on the Electronegativity Equalization Method vary from 450 mJ m(-2) for Mg-montmorillonite to 1100 mJ m(-2) for Ba-montmorillonite. Secondly, considering both the hydration energy for cations and layer surfaces, the driving force for the hydration of alkaline-earth saturated montmorillonites can be attributed to the interlayer cation in the case of Mg-, Ca-, Sr-montmorillonites and to the interlayer surface in the case of Ba-montmorillonites. These results explain the differences in behaviour upon water adsorption as a function of the nature of the interlayer cation

  19. Spectroscopy and computational studies on the interaction of octyl, dodecyl, and hexadecyl derivatives of anionic and cationic surfactants with adenosine deaminase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajloo, Davood; Mahmoodabadi, Najmeh; Ghadamgahi, Maryam; Saboury, Ali Akbar

    2016-07-01

    Effects of sodium (octyl, dodecyl, hexadecyl) sulfate and their cationic analogous on the structure of adenosine deaminase (ADA) were investigated by fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopy as well as molecular dynamics simulation and docking calculation. Root-mean-square derivations, radius of gyration, solvent accessible surface area, and radial distribution function were obtained. The results showed that anionic and cationic surfactants reduce protein stability. Cationic surfactants have more effect on the ADA structure in comparison with anionic surfactants. More concentration and longer surfactants are parallel to higher denaturation. Furthermore, aggregation in the presence of anionic surfactants is more than cationic surfactants. Docking data showed that longer surfactants have more interaction energy and smaller ones bound to the active site.

  20. Cation distributions on rapidly solidified cobalt ferrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Guire, Mark R.; Kalonji, Gretchen; O'Handley, Robert C.

    1990-01-01

    The cation distributions in two rapidly solidified cobalt ferrites have been determined using Moessbauer spectroscopy at 4.2 K in an 8-T magnetic field. The samples were obtained by gas atomization of a Co0-Fe2O3-P2O5 melt. The degree of cation disorder in both cases was greater than is obtainable by cooling unmelted cobalt ferrite. The more rapidly cooled sample exhibited a smaller departure from the equilibrium cation distribution than did the more slowly cooled sample. This result is explained on the basis of two competing effects of rapid solidification: high cooling rate of the solid, and large undercooling.

  1. Cation distributions on rapidly solidified cobalt ferrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Guire, Mark R.; Kalonji, Gretchen; O'Handley, Robert C.

    1990-01-01

    The cation distributions in two rapidly solidified cobalt ferrites have been determined using Moessbauer spectroscopy at 4.2 K in an 8-T magnetic field. The samples were obtained by gas atomization of a Co0-Fe2O3-P2O5 melt. The degree of cation disorder in both cases was greater than is obtainable by cooling unmelted cobalt ferrite. The more rapidly cooled sample exhibited a smaller departure from the equilibrium cation distribution than did the more slowly cooled sample. This result is explained on the basis of two competing effects of rapid solidification: high cooling rate of the solid, and large undercooling.

  2. Effective Nanoparticle-based Gene Delivery by a Protease Triggered Charge Switch

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjetting, Torben; Jølck, Rasmus Irming; Andresen, Thomas Lars

    2014-01-01

    investigation in vivo including a PEG layer and a net negative charge that should ensure long-circulating properties before being activated by proteases in diseased tissue. Protease activation leads to detachment of PEG and a charge switching where the LNPs become positive due to the presence of glutamates...... in the cleaved peptide moiety. The cationic lipid DOTAP is used mainly to complex DNA and proton titratable DODAP is used to increase endosomal escape and enhance transfection efficiency. The idea of using a mixture of permanently charged and titratable cationic lipids shielded by a protease sensitive negatively...

  3. Measurement of ulnar variance and radial inclination on X-rays of healed distal radius fractures. With the axis of the distal radius or ulna?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuysbaert, Gilles; Ringburg, Akkie; Petronilia, Steven; Vanden Berghe, Alex; Hollevoet, Nadine

    2015-06-01

    Ulnar variance and radial inclination are radiological parameters frequently used to evaluate displacement of distal radius fractures. In most studies measurements are based on the long central axis of the distal radius, although the axis of the distal ulna can also be used. The purpose of this study was to determine which axis is more reliable. Four observers performed measurements on standard anteroposterior digital wrist X-rays of 20 patients taken 1 and 2 months after sustaining an extra-articular distal radius fracture. Intraobserver reliability was similar with both methods. No difference was found in interobserver reliability between both methods for ulnar variance, but for radial inclination it was better with the axis through the radius. Measurements on two X-rays of the same wrist taken at a different moment were similar with both methods. It can be concluded that the central axis of the distal radius can remain the basis to determine ulnar variance and radial inclination.

  4. Aza-macrocyclic complexes of the Group 1 cations - synthesis, structures and density functional theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyke, John; Levason, William; Light, Mark E; Pugh, David; Reid, Gillian; Bhakhoa, Hanusha; Ramasami, Ponnadurai; Rhyman, Lydia

    2015-08-21

    The Group 1 complexes, [M(Me6[18]aneN6)][BAr(F)] (M = Li-Cs; Me6[18]aneN6 = 1,4,7,10,13,16-hexamethyl-1,4,7,10,13,16-hexaazacyclooctadecane; BAr(F) = tetrakis{3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)-phenyl}borate), are obtained in high yield by reaction of the macrocycle with M[BAr(F)] in anhydrous CH2Cl2 solution, and characterised spectroscopically ((1)H, (13)C{(1)H}, (7)Li, (23)Na, and (133)Cs NMR), by microanalysis and, for M = Li, K, and Rb, by single crystal X-ray analysis. The structures show N6-coordination to the metal ion; the small ionic radius for Li(+) leads to a puckered conformation. In contrast, the K(+) ion fits well into the N6 plane, with the [BAr(F)](-) anions above and below, leading to two K(+) species in the asymmetric unit (a hexagonal planar [K(Me6[18]aneN6)](+) cation and a '[K(Me6[18]aneN6)(κ(1)-BAr(F))2](-) anion', with long axial KF interactions). The Rb(+) ion sits above the N6 plane, with two long axial RbF interactions in one cation and two long, mutually cis RbF interactions in the other. The unusual sandwich cations, [M(Me3tacn)2](+) (M = Na, K; distorted octahedral, N6 donor set) and half-sandwich cations [Li(Me3tacn)(thf)](+) (distorted tetrahedron, N3O donor set), [Li(Me4cyclen)(OH2)](+), and [Na(Me4cyclen)(thf)](+) (both distorted square pyramids with N4O donor sets) were also prepared (Me3tacn = 1,4,7-trimethyl-1,4,7-triazacyclononane, Me4cyclen = 1,4,7,10-tetramethyl-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane). Density functional theory (DFT) calculations, using the BP86 and B3LYP functionals, show that the accessibility of the [M(Me3tacn)2](+) sandwich cations depends strongly on the M(+) ionic radius, such that it is sufficiently large to avoid steric clashing between the Me groups of the two rings, and small enough to avoid very acute N-M-N chelate angles. The calculations also show that coordination to the Group 1 cation involves significant donation of electron density from the p-orbitals on the N atoms of the macrocycle, rather than purely

  5. Stability of gravitating charged-scalar solitons in a cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Ponglertsakul, Supakchai; Dolan, Sam R

    2016-01-01

    We present new regular solutions of Einstein-charged scalar field theory in a cavity. The system is enclosed inside a reflecting mirror-like boundary, on which the scalar field vanishes. The mirror is placed at the zero of the scalar field closest to the origin, and inside this boundary our solutions are regular. We study the stability of these solitons under linear, spherically symmetric perturbations of the metric, scalar and electromagnetic fields. If the radius of the mirror is sufficiently large, we present numerical evidence for the stability of the solitons. For small mirror radius, some of the solitons are unstable. We discuss the physical interpretation of this instability.

  6. Formation and fragmentation of quadruply charged molecular ions by intense femtosecond laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatsuhashi, Tomoyuki; Nakashima, Nobuaki

    2010-07-22

    We investigated the formation and fragmentation of multiply charged molecular ions of several aromatic molecules by intense nonresonant femtosecond laser pulses of 1.4 mum with a 130 fs pulse duration (up to 2 x 10(14) W cm(-2)). Quadruply charged states were produced for 2,3-benzofluorene and triphenylene molecular ion in large abundance, whereas naphthalene and 1,1'-binaphthyl resulted only in up to triply charged molecular ions. The laser wavelength was nonresonant with regard to the electronic transitions of the neutral molecules, and the degree of fragmentation was strongly correlated with the absorption of the singly charged cation radical. Little fragmentation was observed for naphthalene (off-resonant with cation), whereas heavy fragmentation was observed in the case of 1,1'-binaphthyl (resonant with cation). The degree of H(2) (2H) and 2H(2) (4H) elimination from molecular ions increased as the charge states increased in all the molecules examined. A striking difference was found between triply and quadruply charged 2,3-benzofluorene: significant suppression of molecular ions with loss of odd number of hydrogen was observed in the quadruply charged ions. The Coulomb explosion of protons in the quadruply charged state and succeeding fragmentation resulted in the formation of triply charged molecular ions with an odd number of hydrogens. The hydrogen elimination mechanism in the highly charged state is discussed.

  7. Effects of cation size disorder and lattice distortion on metamagnetism in phase-separated manganites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavani, K. R.; Paulose, P. L.

    2005-07-01

    The effects of A-site cation size disorder in ABO 3 type charge-ordered and antiferromagnetic Pr 0.5Ca 0.5MnO 3 system have been studied by substituting La 3+, Sr 2+ or Ba 2+, while keeping the valency of Mn ions and the tolerance factor ( t=0.921) constant in the substituted compounds. We find that the substitutions by these larger cations induce successive sharp step-like metamagnetic transitions at 2.5 K. The critical field for metamagnetism is the lowest for 3% Ba substituted compound, which has the largest A-site cation size disorder and the least distorted MnO 6 octahedra, among the compounds reported here. These cation substitutions give rise to ferromagnetic clusters within antiferromagnetic matrix, indicating phase-separation at low temperatures. The growth of the clusters is found to vary with the substitution amount. The local lattice distortion of MnO 6 octahedra enhances the charge ordering temperature and reduces the magnetization at high fields (>1 T) in these manganites.

  8. Drug carrier systems based on water-soluble cationic beta-cyclodextrin polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianshu; Xiao, Huining; Li, Jiehua; Zhong, YinPing

    2004-07-08

    This study was designed to synthesize, characterize and investigate the drug inclusion property of a series of novel cationic beta-cyclodextrin polymers (CPbetaCDs). Proposed water-soluble polymers were synthesized from beta-cyclodextrin (beta-CD), epichlorohydrin (EP) and choline chloride (CC) through a one-step polymerization procedure by varying molar ratio of EP and CC to beta-CD. Physicochemical properties of the polymers were characterized with colloidal titration, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and aqueous solubility determination. The formation of naproxen/CPbetaCDs inclusion complexes was confirmed by NMR and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). Cationic beta-CD polymers showed better hemolytic activities than parent beta-CD and neutral beta-CD polymer in hemolysis test. The morphological study of erythrocytes revealed a cell membrane invagination induced by the cationic groups. The effects of molecular weight and charge density of the polymers on their inclusion and release performance of naproxen were also investigated through phase-solubility and dissolution studies. It was found that the cationic beta-CD polymers with high molecular weight or low charge density exhibited better drug inclusion and dissolution abilities.

  9. Preparation of Panel and Charged Particles for Electrophoretic Display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyung Suk; Park, Jin Woo; Park, Lee Soon; Lee, Jung Kyung; Han, Yoon Soo; Kwon, Younghwan

    Studies on the formulation of photosensitive paste for transparent soft mold press (TSMP) method have been performed. With the optimum formulation of the photosensitive paste the box-type barrier rib with good flexibility and high solvent resistance was fabricated, suitable for the panel material of the electrophoretic display. Cationically-charged white particles were prepared by using TiO2 nanoparticles, silane coupling agent with amino groups, dispersant and acetic acid. The cationically charged TiO2 particles exhibited 74.09 mV of zeta potential and 3.11 × 10-5 cm2/Vs of mobility. Electrophoretic display fabricated with the charged TiO2 particles exhibited 10 V of low driving voltage and maximum contrast ratio (5.3/1) at 30 V.

  10. On the real performance of cation exchange resins in wastewater treatment under conditions of cation competition: the case of heavy metal pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prelot, Benedicte; Ayed, Imen; Marchandeau, Franck; Zajac, Jerzy

    2014-01-01

    Sorption performance of cation-exchange resins Amberlite® IRN77 and Amberlite™ IRN9652 toward Cs(I) and Sr(II) has been tested in single-component aqueous solutions and simulated waste effluents containing other monovalent (Effluent 1) or divalent (Effluent 2) metal cations, as well as nitrate, borate, or carbonate anions. The individual sorption isotherms of each main component were measured by the solution depletion method. The differential molar enthalpy changes accompanying the ion-exchange between Cs+ or Sr2+ ions and protons at the resin surface from single-component nitrate solutions were measured by isothermal titration calorimetry and they showed a higher specificity of the two resins toward cesium. Compared to the retention limits of both resins under such idealized conditions, an important depression in the maximum adsorption capacity toward each main component was observed in multication systems. The overall effect of ion exchange process appeared to be an unpredictable outcome of the individual sorption capacities of the two resins toward various cations as a function of the cation charge, size, and concentration. The cesium retention capacity of the resins was diminished to about 25% of the "ideal" value in Effluent 1 and 50% in Effluent 2; a further decrease to about 15% was observed upon concomitant strontium addition. The uptake of strontium by the resins was found to be less sensitive to the addition of other metal components: the greatest decrease in the amount adsorbed was 60% of the ideal value in the two effluents for Amberlite® IRN77 and 75% for Amberlite™ IRN9652. It was therefore demonstrated that any performance tests carried out under idealized conditions should be exploited with much caution to predict the real performance of cation exchange resins under conditions of cation competition.

  11. PREAPARATION OF CATIONIC LATEXES OF POLY(STYRENE-CO-BUTYL ACRYLATE) AND THEIR PROPERTIES EVOLUTION IN LATEX DILUTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong Zou; Xiu-fen Li; Xiao-li Zhu; Xiang-zheng Kong

    2012-01-01

    Cationic latexes were prepared through emulsion copolymerization of styrene (St) and butyl acrylate (BA) with a cationic surfactant,cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB).Latex properties,including particle size,size distribution,ζ potential,surface tension and monomer conversion,were determined for latexes prepared with different CTAB amounts.Evolution of these properties during emulsion polymerization was followed in order to understand the mechanism of the particles formation.Results showed that both particle size and ζpotential were function of polymerization time and latex solids.Parallel emulsion polymerizations with cationic,anionic charged initiator and charge-free initiators were also carried out,the latex properties were determined at different polymerization time.All these results were attentively interpreted based on the mechanisms of emulsion polymerization,surfactant adsorption and latex particle stabilization.

  12. Cationic ruthenium alkylidene catalysts bearing phosphine ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Koji; Grubbs, Robert H

    2016-02-28

    The discovery of highly active catalysts and the success of ionic liquid immobilized systems have accelerated attention to a new class of cationic metathesis catalysts. We herein report the facile syntheses of cationic ruthenium catalysts bearing bulky phosphine ligands. Simple ligand exchange using silver(i) salts of non-coordinating or weakly coordinating anions provided either PPh3 or chelating Ph2P(CH2)nPPh2 (n = 2 or 3) ligated cationic catalysts. The structures of these newly reported catalysts feature unique geometries caused by ligation of the bulky phosphine ligands. Their activities and selectivities in standard metathesis reactions were also investigated. These cationic ruthenium alkylidene catalysts reported here showed moderate activity and very similar stereoselectivity when compared to the second generation ruthenium dichloride catalyst in ring-closing metathesis, cross metathesis, and ring-opening metathesis polymerization assays.

  13. Radius of lunar core estimated by GRAIL results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, K.; Yamada, R.; Kikuchi, F.; Iwata, T.; Hanada, H.; Ishihara, Y.; Kamata, S.; Sasaki, S.

    2013-12-01

    Internal structure and composition of the Moon provide important clue and constraints on theories for how the Moon formed and evolved. The Apollo seismic network has contributed to the internal structure modeling. Efforts have been made to detect the lunar core from the noisy Apollo data (e.g., [1], [2]), but there is scant information about the structure below the deepest moonquakes at about 1000 km depth. On the other hand, there have been geodetic studies to infer the deep structure of the Moon. For example, LLR (Lunar Laser Ranging) data analyses detected a displacement of the lunar pole of rotation, indicating that dissipation is acting on the rotation arising from a fluid core [3]. Bayesian inversion using geodetic data (such as mass, moments of inertia, tidal Love numbers k2 and h2, and quality factor Q) also suggests a fluid core and partial melt in the lower mantle region [4]. Recent analyses of GRAIL data have achieved the improved k2 accuracy; JPL solution is 0.02405 × 0.00018 [5], and GSFC solution is 0.02427 × 0.00026 [6]. The two solutions are consistent with each other within their error bounds, and the accuracy of k2 is now about 1 %. Such an accurately-determined Love number will contribute to constrain the structure of the lunar deep interior, such as the radius of the possible liquid core. We used geodetic data of the mass, the mean moment of inertia, the Love numbers h2 and k2 to infer the size of liquid core. It is difficult to tightly constrain the internal structure from the geodetic data only because there are trade-offs among the structures of crust, mantle, and core. In our preliminary analysis we used a 5-layer model and the mantle structure was constrained by VPREMOON [2] with 5 % error for density and 10 % error for shear and bulk moduli being assumed. An inversion using Markov chain Monte Carlo method indicates that the core radius is 480 × 50 km, but the density values were sampled around the assumed lower limit of 3600 kg/m3. When

  14. ABCD-Type Law for Charged-Particle Beam Transport in Paraxial Approximation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈宝信; 孙别和

    2003-01-01

    Based on the similarity between charged-particle beam transversal transport and transmission of ellipse Gaussian light beam in paraxial approximation, it is shown that charged-particle beam transversal transport in real space is governed by the ABCD-type law for a complex curvature radius of the charged-particle beam in which the beam transverse emittance plays the role of wavelength; from this, a novel technique for characterizing charged-particle beam is proposed. Finally, this analogy provides an insight observation that it is hopeful to attain possible coherent charged-particle beam in favourable accelerator environment.

  15. Interpnictogen cations: exploring new vistas in coordination chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Alasdair P M; Gray, Paul A; Burford, Neil

    2014-06-10

    Pnictine derivatives can behave as both 2e(-) donors (Lewis bases) and 2e(-) acceptors (Lewis acids). As prototypical ligands in the coordination chemistry of transition metals, amines and phosphines also form complexes with p-block Lewis acids, including a variety of pnictogen-centered acceptors. The inherent Lewis acidity of pnictogen centers can be enhanced by the introduction of a cationic charge, and this feature has been exploited in recent years in the development of compounds resulting from coordinate Pn-Pn and Pn-Pn' interactions. These compounds offer the unusual opportunity for homoatomic coordinate bonding and the development of complexes that possess a lone pair of electrons at the acceptor center. This Review presents new directions in the systematic extension of coordination chemistry from the transition series into the p-block.

  16. Organic non-aqueous cation-based redox flow batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansen, Andrew N.; Vaughey, John T.; Chen, Zonghai; Zhang, Lu; Brushett, Fikile R.

    2016-03-29

    The present invention provides a non-aqueous redox flow battery comprising a negative electrode immersed in a non-aqueous liquid negative electrolyte, a positive electrode immersed in a non-aqueous liquid positive electrolyte, and a cation-permeable separator (e.g., a porous membrane, film, sheet, or panel) between the negative electrolyte from the positive electrolyte. During charging and discharging, the electrolytes are circulated over their respective electrodes. The electrolytes each comprise an electrolyte salt (e.g., a lithium or sodium salt), a transition-metal free redox reactant, and optionally an electrochemically stable organic solvent. Each redox reactant is selected from an organic compound comprising a conjugated unsaturated moiety, a boron cluster compound, and a combination thereof. The organic redox reactant of the positive electrolyte is selected to have a higher redox potential than the redox reactant of the negative electrolyte.

  17. On the Field of a Spherical Charged Pulsating Distribution of Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stavroulakis N.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In the theory of the gravitational field generated by an isotropic spherical mass, the spheres centered at the origin of $R^3$ are non-Euclidean objects, so that each of them possesses a curvature radius distinct from its Euclidean radius. The classical theory suppresses this distinction and consequently leads to inadmissible errors. Specifically, it leads to the false idea that the field of a pulsating source is static. In a number of our previous publications (see references, we have exposed the inevitable role that the curvature radius plays and demonstrated that the field generated by a pulsating not charged spherical course is dynamical. In the present paper we prove that the curvature radius plays also the main role in the description of the gravitational field generated by a charged pulsating source.

  18. Structural Insights into Mitochondrial Calcium Uniporter Regulation by Divalent Cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Samuel K; Shanmughapriya, Santhanam; Mok, Mac C Y; Dong, Zhiwei; Tomar, Dhanendra; Carvalho, Edmund; Rajan, Sudarsan; Junop, Murray S; Madesh, Muniswamy; Stathopulos, Peter B

    2016-09-22

    Calcium (Ca(2+)) flux into the matrix is tightly controlled by the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter (MCU) due to vital roles in cell death and bioenergetics. However, the precise atomic mechanisms of MCU regulation remain unclear. Here, we solved the crystal structure of the N-terminal matrix domain of human MCU, revealing a β-grasp-like fold with a cluster of negatively charged residues that interacts with divalent cations. Binding of Ca(2+) or Mg(2+) destabilizes and shifts the self-association equilibrium of the domain toward monomer. Mutational disruption of the acidic face weakens oligomerization of the isolated matrix domain and full-length human protein similar to cation binding and markedly decreases MCU activity. Moreover, mitochondrial Mg(2+) loading or blockade of mitochondrial Ca(2+) extrusion suppresses MCU Ca(2+)-uptake rates. Collectively, our data reveal that the β-grasp-like matrix region harbors an MCU-regulating acidic patch that inhibits human MCU activity in response to Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) binding.

  19. Cation locations and dislocations in zeolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Luis James

    The focus of this dissertation is the extra-framework cation sites in a particular structural family of zeolites, chabazite. Cation sites play a particularly important role in the application of these sieves for ion exchange, gas separation, catalysis, and, when the cation is a proton, acid catalysis. Structural characterization is commonly performed through the use of powder diffraction and Rietveld analysis of powder diffraction data. Use of high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance, in the study of the local order of the various constituent nuclei of zeolites, complements well the long-range order information produced by diffraction. Recent developments in solid state NMR techniques allow for increased study of disorder in zeolites particularly when such phenomena test the detection limits of diffraction. These two powerful characterization techniques, powder diffraction and NMR, offer many insights into the complex interaction of cations with the zeolite framework. The acids site locations in SSZ-13, a high silica chabazite, and SAPO-34, a silicoaluminophosphate with the chabazite structure, were determined. The structure of SAPO-34 upon selective hydration was also determined. The insensitivity of X-rays to hydrogen was avoided through deuteration of the acid zeolites and neutron powder diffraction methods. Protons at inequivalent positions were found to have different acid strengths in both SSZ-13 and SAPO-34. Other light elements are incorporated into zeolites in the form of extra-framework cations, among these are lithium, sodium, and calcium. Not amenable by X-ray powder diffraction methods, the positions of such light cations in fully ion-exchanged versions of synthetic chabazite were determined through neutron powder diffraction methods. The study of more complex binary cation systems were conducted. Powder diffraction and solid state NMR methods (MAS, MQMAS) were used to examine cation site preferences and dislocations in these mixed-akali chabazites

  20. Effects of Acetate on Cation Exchange Capacity of a Zn-Containing Montmorillonite : Physicochemical Significance and Metal Uptake

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stathi, P.; Papadas, I. T.; Enotiadis, A.; Gengler, R. Y. N.; Gournis, D.; Rudolf, P.; Deligiannakis, Y.

    2009-01-01

    Fundamental properties such as cation exchange capacity (CEC), permanent charge, pH(PZC), and metal uptake of a Zn-containing montmorillonite are modified, in a predictable manner, by a mild chemical treatment using acetate. Acetate treatment allows a controllable increase of the CEC of montmorillon

  1. Organic Cations Might Not Be Essential to the Remarkable Properties of Band Edge Carriers in Lead Halide Perovskites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Haiming; Trinh, M Tuan; Wang, Jue; Fu, Yongping; Joshi, Prakriti P; Miyata, Kiyoshi; Jin, Song; Zhu, X-Y

    2017-01-01

    A charge carrier in a lead halide perovskite lattice is protected as a large polaron responsible for the remarkable photophysical properties, irrespective of the cation type. All-inorganic-based APbX3 perovskites may mitigate the stability problem for their applications in solar cells and other optoelectronics.

  2. Simultaneous occurrence of three different valence tautomers in meso-vinylruthenium-modified zinc porphyrin radical cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Wuttke, Evelyn; Polit, Walther; Exner, Thomas; Winter, Rainer F

    2013-03-01

    The mixed-valent radical cation of a styrylruthenium-modified meso-tetraarylzinc porphyrin forms a mixture of three different valence tautomers (VTs) in CH2Cl2 or 1,2-C2H4Cl2 solutions. One of these VTs has the charge and spin delocalized over the porphyrin and the styrylruthenium moieties, while the other two display charge and spin localization on just one of the different redox sites. The relative amounts of the three different VTs were determined by EPR and IR spectroscopies at variable temperatures, while delocalization in the ground state was confirmed by DFT calculations.

  3. What Is the Largest Einstein Radius in the Universe?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oguri, Masamune; Blandford, Roger D.

    2008-08-05

    The Einstein radius plays a central role in lens studies as it characterizes the strength of gravitational lensing. In particular, the distribution of Einstein radii near the upper cutoff should probe the probability distribution of the largest mass concentrations in the universe. Adopting a triaxial halo model, we compute expected distributions of large Einstein radii. To assess the cosmic variance, we generate a number of Monte-Carlo realizations of all-sky catalogues of massive clusters. We find that the expected largest Einstein radius in the universe is sensitive to parameters characterizing the cosmological model, especially {sigma}{sub s}: for a source redshift of unity, they are 42{sub -7}{sup +9}, 35{sub -6}{sup +8}, and 54{sub -7}{sup +12} arcseconds (errors denote 1{sigma} cosmic variance), assuming best-fit cosmological parameters of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe five-year (WMAP5), three-year (WMAP3) and one-year (WMAP1) data, respectively. These values are broadly consistent with current observations given their incompleteness. The mass of the largest lens cluster can be as small as {approx} 10{sup 15} M{sub {circle_dot}}. For the same source redshift, we expect in all-sky {approx} 35 (WMAP5), {approx} 15 (WMAP3), and {approx} 150 (WMAP1) clusters that have Einstein radii larger than 2000. For a larger source redshift of 7, the largest Einstein radii grow approximately twice as large. While the values of the largest Einstein radii are almost unaffected by the level of the primordial non-Gaussianity currently of interest, the measurement of the abundance of moderately large lens clusters should probe non-Gaussianity competitively with cosmic microwave background experiments, but only if other cosmological parameters are well-measured. These semi-analytic predictions are based on a rather simple representation of clusters, and hence calibrating them with N-body simulations will help to improve the accuracy. We also find that these &apos

  4. Failure of dual radius hydroxyapatite-coated acetabular cups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zatti Giovanni

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Many kind of hydroxyapatite-coated cups were used, with favorable results in short term studies; it was supposed that its use could improve osteointegration of the cup, enhancing thus stability and survivorship. The purpose of this study is to analyze the long term behavior of the hemispheric HA coated, Dual Radius Osteonics cup and to discuss the way of failure through the exam of the revised components and of both periacetabular and osteolysis tissue. Materials and Methods Between 1994 and 1997, at the Department of Orthopedic Sciences of the Insubria University, using the posterolateral approach, were implanted 276 Dual Radius Osteonics® in 256 patients, with mean age of 63 years. Results At a mean follow-up of 10 years (range 8–12 years, 183 cups in 165 patients, were available for clinical and radiographical evaluation. 22 Cups among the 183 were revised (11%. The cause of revision was aseptic loosening in 17 cases, septic loosening in one case, periprosthetic fracture in another case, osteolysis and polyethylene wear in two cases and, finally, recurrent dislocations in the last one. In the remaining patients, mean HHS increased from a preoperative value of 50,15 to a postoperative value of 92,69. The mean polyethylene wear was 1,25 mm (min. 0,08, max. 3,9 mm, with a mean annual wear of 0,17 mm. The mean acetabular migration on the two axis was 1,6 mm and 1,8 mm. Peri-acetabular osteolysis were recorded in 89% of the implants (163 cases. The cumulative survivorship (revision as endpoint at the time was 88,9%. Conclusion Our study confirms the bad behavior of this type of cup probably related to the design, to the method of HA fixation. The observations carried out on the revised cup confirm these hypotheses but did not clarify if the third body wear could be a further problem. Another interesting aspect is the high incidence of osteolysis, which are often asymptomatic becoming a problem for the surgeon as the

  5. [Py-Desmanet pinning in distal radius fractures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexa, O; Popia, I

    2009-01-01

    Internal fixation by pinning is one of the most used methods of surgical treatment in fractures of the distal extremity of the radius. As in stable fractures a styloid pinning is satisfactory, in unstable fractures however we must resort to different patterns of pin insertion, in order to effectively prevent the secondary displacement of the fractured fragments. The elastic pinning described by Py and Desmanet is one of the possibilities of inserting the pins. The principle of this method is to use the bending-induced tension in the pins to counteract the postero-lateral displacing forces. The authors have treated by this technique five patients with distal radius fractures (3 women and 2 men) about 56 years of average age, all with good-quality bone, all with Colles' fracture pattern (2-4 cm above the radio-carpal articulation, no articular involvement, posterior displacement of the distal fragment). The reduction of the fractures was achieved by closed manipulation and controlled intraoperatively with the C-arm. We preferred to reduce the fractures before inserting the pins, although this is not compulsory, according to the authors of the technique. The approach was minimally-invasive, through two 1-cm long incisions. The pins, previously blunted and curved along the last centimeters, were introduced using a "T"-shaped handle. The potential complications, consisting of injuries of the many elements which cross the region, were avoided by sufficiently long incisions and identification and retraction of these elements (tendons, nervous branches) in order not to penetrate them with the pins. The aftertreatment consisted of immediate mobilization of the wrist in one patient, 21-day splinting in other two and 30-day splinting in the last two, depending on the intraoperative assessment of the stability of the fixation. The pins were removed at 45 days postoperatively in all cases. There were no complications such as loss of reduction or pin migration. In all cases

  6. Failure of dual radius hydroxyapatite-coated acetabular cups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelo, Fabio; Molina, Mauro; Riva, Giacomo; Zatti, Giovanni; Cherubino, Paolo

    2008-08-07

    Many kind of hydroxyapatite-coated cups were used, with favorable results in short term studies; it was supposed that its use could improve osteointegration of the cup, enhancing thus stability and survivorship. The purpose of this study is to analyze the long term behavior of the hemispheric HA coated, Dual Radius Osteonics cup and to discuss the way of failure through the exam of the revised components and of both periacetabular and osteolysis tissue. Between 1994 and 1997, at the Department of Orthopedic Sciences of the Insubria University, using the posterolateral approach, were implanted 276 Dual Radius Osteonics in 256 patients, with mean age of 63 years. At a mean follow-up of 10 years (range 8-12 years), 183 cups in 165 patients, were available for clinical and radiographical evaluation. 22 Cups among the 183 were revised (11%). The cause of revision was aseptic loosening in 17 cases, septic loosening in one case, periprosthetic fracture in another case, osteolysis and polyethylene wear in two cases and, finally, recurrent dislocations in the last one. In the remaining patients, mean HHS increased from a preoperative value of 50.15 to a postoperative value of 92.69. The mean polyethylene wear was 1.25 mm (min. 0.08, max 3.9 mm), with a mean annual wear of 0.17 mm. The mean acetabular migration on the two axis was 1.6 mm and 1.8 mm. Peri-acetabular osteolysis were recorded in 89% of the implants (163 cases). The cumulative survivorship (revision as endpoint) at the time was 88,9%. Our study confirms the bad behavior of this type of cup probably related to the design, to the method of HA fixation. The observations carried out on the revised cup confirm these hypotheses but did not clarify if the third body wear could be a further problem. Another interesting aspect is the high incidence of osteolysis, which are often asymptomatic becoming a problem for the surgeon as the patient refuses the possibility of a revision.

  7. Cationic β-cyclodextrin polymer applied to a dual cyclodextrin polyelectrolyte multilayer system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junthip, Jatupol; Tabary, Nicolas; Leclercq, Laurent; Martel, Bernard

    2015-08-01

    A polyelectrolyte multilayer film (PEM) based on cationic and anionic β-cyclodextrin polyelectrolytes was coated onto a textile substrate for future drug delivery purposes. We firstly synthesized a novel cationic β-cyclodextrin polymer (polyEPG-CD) by crosslinking β-cyclodextrin (βCD) with epichlorohydrin (EP) under basic conditions, in the presence of glycidyltrimetrylammonium chloride (GTMAC) as cationizing group. The influence of preparation conditions has been investigated in order to preferably obtain a water soluble fraction whose charge density and molecular weights were optimal for the layer-by-layer (LbL) deposition process. The different cationic cyclodextrin polymers obtained were characterized by FTIR, NMR, colloidal titration, conductimetry, thermogravimetric analysis and size exclusion chromatography. Besides, the counterpart polyelectrolyte was a β-cyclodextrin polymer crosslinked with citric acid, polyCTR-CD, whose synthesis and characterization have been previously reported. Finally we realized the Layer by Layer (LbL) build-up of the PEM coating onto the textile support, using the dip coating method, by alternatively soaking it in cationic polyEPG-CD and anionic polyCTR-CD solutions. This multilayer self-assembly was monitored by SEM, gravimetry and OWLS in function of both polyelectrolytes concentrations and ratios. Solutions parameters such as pH, ionic strenght were also discussed.

  8. Cationic Liposomes Modified with Polyallylamine as a Gene Carrier: Preparation, Characterization and Transfection Efficiency Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Kazemi Oskuee

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Cationic polymers and cationic liposomes have shown to be effective non-viral gene delivery vectors. In this study, we tried to improve the transfection efficiency by employing the advantages of both. Methods: For this purpose, modified polyallylamines (PAAs were synthesized. These modifications were done through the reaction of PAA (15 KDa with acrylate and 6-bromoalkanoic acid derivatives. Liposomes comprising of these cationic polymers and cationic lipid were prepared and extruded through polycarbonate filters to obtain desired size. Liposome-DNA nanocomplexes were prepared in three carrier to plasmid (C/P ratios. Size, zeta potential and DNA condensation ability of each complex were characterized separately and finally transfection efficiency and cytotoxicity of prepared vectors were evaluated in Neuro2A cell line. Results: The results showed that mean particle size of all these nanocomplexes was lower than 266 nm with surface charge of 22.0 to 33.9 mV. Almost the same condensation pattern was observed in all vectors and complete condensation was occurred at C/P ratio of 1.5. The lipoplexes containing modified PAA 15 kDa with 10% hexyl acrylate showed the highest transfection efficacy and lowest cytotoxicity in C/P ratio of 0.5. Conclusion: In some cases nanocomplexes consisting of cationic liposome and modified PAA showed better transfection activity and lower cytotoxicity compared to PAA.

  9. Zeaxanthin Radical Cation Formation in Minor Light-Harvesting Complexes of Higher Plant Antenna

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avenson, Thomas H.; Ahn, Tae Kyu; Zigmantas, Donatas; Niyogi, Krishna K.; Li, Zhirong; Ballottari, Matteo; Bassi, Roberto; Fleming, Graham R.

    2008-01-31

    Previous work on intact thylakoid membranes showed that transient formation of a zeaxanthin radical cation was correlated with regulation of photosynthetic light-harvesting via energy-dependent quenching. A molecular mechanism for such quenching was proposed to involve charge transfer within a chlorophyll-zeaxanthin heterodimer. Using near infrared (880-1100 nm) transient absorption spectroscopy, we demonstrate that carotenoid (mainly zeaxanthin) radical cation generation occurs solely in isolated minor light-harvesting complexes that bind zeaxanthin, consistent with the engagement of charge transfer quenching therein. We estimated that less than 0.5percent of the isolated minor complexes undergo charge transfer quenching in vitro, whereas the fraction of minor complexes estimated to be engaged in charge transfer quenching in isolated thylakoids was more than 80 times higher. We conclude that minor complexes which bind zeaxanthin are sites of charge transfer quenching in vivo and that they can assume Non-quenching and Quenching conformations, the equilibrium LHC(N)<--> LHC(Q) of which is modulated by the transthylakoid pH gradient, the PsbS protein, and protein-protein interactions.

  10. Cation induced differential effect on structural and functional properties of Mycobacterium tuberculosis α-Isopropylmalate synthase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhakuni Vinod

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background α-isopropylmalate synthase (MtαIPMS, an enzyme that catalyzes the first committed step of the leucine biosynthetic pathway of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a potential drug target for the anti-tuberculosis drugs. Cations induce differential effect of activation and inhibition of MtαIPMS. To date no concrete mechanism for such an opposite effect of similarly charged cations on the functional activity of enzyme has been presented. Results Effect of cations on the structure and function of the MtαIPMS has been studied in detail. The studies for the first time demonstrate that different cations interact specifically at different sites in the enzyme and modulate the enzyme structure differentially. The inhibitors Zn2+ and Cd2+ ions interact directly with the catalytic domain of the enzyme and induce unfolding/denaturation of the domain. The activator K+ also interacts with the catalytic TIM barrel domain however, it does not induce any significant effect on the enzyme structure. Studies with isolated catalytic TIM barrel domain showed that it can carry out the catalytic function on its own but probably requires the non-catalytic C-terminal domain for optimum functioning. An important observation was that divalent cations induce significant interaction between the regulatory and the catalytic domain of MtαIPMS thus inducing structural cooperativity in the enzyme. This divalent cation induced structural cooperativity might result in modulation of activity of the catalytic domain by regulatory domain. Conclusion The studies for the first time demonstrate that different cations bind at different sites in the enzyme leading to their differential effects on the structure and functional activity of the enzyme.

  11. On the Field of a Stationary Charged Spherical Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stavroulakis N.

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The equations of gravitation related to the field of a spherical charged source imply the existence of an interdependence between gravitation and electricity [5]. The present paper deals with the joint action of gravitation and electricity in the case of a stationary charged spherical source. Let m and " be respectively the mass and the charge of the source, and let k be the gravitational constant. Then the equations of gravitation need specific discussion according as j " j m p k (source strongly charged. In any case the curvature radius of the sphere bounding the matter possesses a strictly positive greatest lower hound, so that the source is necessarily an extended object. Pointwise sources do not exist. In particular, charged black holes do not exist.

  12. Cationized Carbohydrate Gas-Phase Fragmentation Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bythell, Benjamin J.; Abutokaikah, Maha T.; Wagoner, Ashley R.; Guan, Shanshan; Rabus, Jordan M.

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the fragmentation chemistry of cationized carbohydrates using a combination of tandem mass spectrometry, regioselective labeling, and computational methods. Our model system is D-lactose. Barriers to the fundamental glyosidic bond cleavage reactions, neutral loss pathways, and structurally informative cross-ring cleavages are investigated. The most energetically favorable conformations of cationized D-lactose were found to be similar. In agreement with the literature, larger group I cations result in structures with increased cation coordination number which require greater collision energy to dissociate. In contrast with earlier proposals, the B n -Y m fragmentation pathways of both protonated and sodium-cationized analytes proceed via protonation of the glycosidic oxygen with concerted glycosidic bond cleavage. Additionally, for the sodiated congeners our calculations support sodiated 1,6-anhydrogalactose B n ion structures, unlike the preceding literature. This affects the subsequent propensity of formation and prediction of B n /Y m branching ratio. The nature of the anomeric center (α/β) affects the relative energies of these processes, but not the overall ranking. Low-energy cross-ring cleavages are observed for the metal-cationized analytes with a retro-aldol mechanism producing the 0,2 A 2 ion from the sodiated forms. Theory and experiment support the importance of consecutive fragmentation processes, particularly for the protonated congeners at higher collision energies.

  13. Cationized Carbohydrate Gas-Phase Fragmentation Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bythell, Benjamin J.; Abutokaikah, Maha T.; Wagoner, Ashley R.; Guan, Shanshan; Rabus, Jordan M.

    2017-04-01

    We investigate the fragmentation chemistry of cationized carbohydrates using a combination of tandem mass spectrometry, regioselective labeling, and computational methods. Our model system is D-lactose. Barriers to the fundamental glyosidic bond cleavage reactions, neutral loss pathways, and structurally informative cross-ring cleavages are investigated. The most energetically favorable conformations of cationized D-lactose were found to be similar. In agreement with the literature, larger group I cations result in structures with increased cation coordination number which require greater collision energy to dissociate. In contrast with earlier proposals, the B n -Y m fragmentation pathways of both protonated and sodium-cationized analytes proceed via protonation of the glycosidic oxygen with concerted glycosidic bond cleavage. Additionally, for the sodiated congeners our calculations support sodiated 1,6-anhydrogalactose B n ion structures, unlike the preceding literature. This affects the subsequent propensity of formation and prediction of B n /Y m branching ratio. The nature of the anomeric center (α/β) affects the relative energies of these processes, but not the overall ranking. Low-energy cross-ring cleavages are observed for the metal-cationized analytes with a retro-aldol mechanism producing the 0,2 A 2 ion from the sodiated forms . Theory and experiment support the importance of consecutive fragmentation processes, particularly for the protonated congeners at higher collision energies.

  14. Non-Surface Activity of Cationic Amphiphilic Diblock Copolymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nayak, Rati Ranjan; Yamada, Tasuku; Matsuoka, Hideki, E-mail: ratiranjan@immt.res.in, E-mail: matsuoka@star.polym.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Polymer Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan)

    2011-09-19

    Cationic amphiphilic diblock copolymers containing quaternized poly (2-vinylpyridine) chain as a hydrophilic segment (PIp-b-PNMe2VP) were synthesized by living anionic polymerization. By IR measurement, we confirmed the quaternization of the polymer (PIp-b-PNMe2VP), and determined the degree of quaternization by conductometric titration. The surface tension experiment showed that the polymers are non-surface active in nature. The foam formation of the polymer solutions was also investigated with or without added salt. Almost no foam formation behavior was observed without added salt, while a little foam was observed in the presence of 1M NaCl. The critical micelle concentration (cmc) of the diblock copolymers with 3 different chain lengths was measured by the static light scattering method. The cmc values obtained in this study were much lower than the values obtained for anionic non-surface active diblock polymers studied previously. The hydrodynamic radii of the polymer micelle increased slightly in the presence of 1 M NaCl. The transmission electron microscopic images revealed spherical micelles in pure water. In the presence of salt, the cmc values increased as was the case for anionic polymers, which is unlike conventional surfactant systems but consistent with non-surface active anionic block copolymers. The microviscosity of the micelle core was evaluated using Coumarin-153 as a fluorescent anisotropy probe using steady-sate fluorescence depolarization. Non-surface activity has been proved to be universal for ionic amphiphilic block copolymers both for anionic and cationic. Hence, the origin of non-surface activity is not the charged state of water surface itself, but should be an image charge repulsion at the air/water interface.

  15. Titration kinetics of Asp-85 in bacteriorhodopsin: exclusion of the retinal pocket as the color-controlling cation binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, X; Bressler, S; Ottolenghi, M; Eliash, T; Friedman, N; Sheves, M

    1997-10-20

    The spectrum (the purple blue transition) and function of the light-driven proton pump bacteriorhodopsin are determined by the state of protonation of the Asp-85 residue located in the vicinity of the retinal chromophore. The titration of Asp-85 is controlled by the binding/unbinding of one or two divalent metal cations (Ca2+ or Mg2+). The location of such metal binding site(s) is approached by studying the kinetics of the cation-induced titration of Asp-85 using metal ions and large molecular cations, such as quaternary ammonium ions, R4N+ (R = Et, Pr, a divalent 'bolaform ion' [Et3N+-(CH2)4-N+Et3] and the 1:3 molecular complex formed between Fe2+ and 1,10-phenanthroline (OP). The basic multi-component kinetic features of the titration, extending from 10(-2) to 10(4) s, are unaffected by the charge and size of the cation. This indicates that cation binding to bR triggers the blue --> purple titration in a fast step, which is not rate-determining. In view of the size of the cations involved, these observations indicate that the cation binding site is in an exposed location on, or close to, the membrane surface. This excludes previous models, which placed the color-controlling Ca2+ ion in the retinal binding pocket.

  16. Enhanced tumor localization and retention of chlorin e6 in cationic nanolipoplexes potentiate the tumor ablation effects of photodynamic therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, Gayong; Lee, Sangbin; Kim, Chan-Wha [School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Bong [Department of Animal Biotechnology, Konkuk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Yu-Kyoung, E-mail: ohyk@snu.ac.kr [College of Pharmacy and Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Seoul National University, 599 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-07

    Here we report the tumor ablation effects of the negatively charged photosensitizer chlorin e6 (Ce6) in nanocomplexes. Ce6 was complexed to cationic 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-ethylphosphocholine-based liposomes, forming cationic nanolipoplexes. The loading efficiency of Ce6 to cationic nanolipoplexes was greater than 90%. The degree of enhancement of cellular uptake of Ce6 by treatment in cationic nanolipoplexes increased with the concentration of Ce6, showing 18.3-fold higher uptake than free Ce6 at 15 {mu}M. Molecular imaging revealed the preferential distribution and retention of Ce6 in SCC7 tumor tissues after intravenous administration of Ce6 in cationic nanolipoplexes. Moreover, localized illumination of mice receiving Ce6 in cationic nanolipoplexes resulted in the formation of thick scabs over tumor regions, and complete ablation of tumors after scab detachment. In contrast, continuous growth of tumors was observed in the group treated with free Ce6. Our results suggest that the cationic nanolipoplexes of Ce6 improve the therapeutic effects of photodynamic cancer therapy as compared to free Ce6.

  17. Battery charging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carollo, J.A.; Kalinsky, W.A.

    1984-02-21

    A battery charger utilizes three basic modes of operation that includes a maintenance mode, a rapid charge mode and time controlled limited charging mode. The device utilizes feedback from the battery being charged of voltage, current and temperature to determine the mode of operation and the time period during which the battery is being charged.

  18. Recombination radius of a Frenkel pair and capture radius of a self-interstitial atom by vacancy clusters in bcc Fe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Kenichi; Stoller, Roger E; Xu, Haixuan

    2015-08-26

    The recombination radius of a Frenkel pair is a fundamental parameter for the object kinetic Monte Carlo (OKMC) and mean field rate theory (RT) methods that are used to investigate irradiation damage accumulation in irradiated materials. The recombination radius in bcc Fe has been studied both experimentally and numerically, however there is no general consensus about its value. The detailed atomistic processes of recombination also remain uncertain. Values from 1.0a0 to 3.3a0 have been employed as a recombination radius in previous studies using OKMC and RT. The recombination process of a Frenkel pair is investigated at the atomic level using the self-evolved atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo (SEAKMC) method in this paper. SEAKMC calculations reveal that a self-interstitial atom recombines with a vacancy in a spontaneous reaction from several nearby sites following characteristic pathways. The recombination radius of a Frenkel pair is estimated to be 2.26a0 by taking the average of the recombination distances from 80 simulation cases. In addition, we apply these procedures to the capture radius of a self-interstitial atom by a vacancy cluster. The capture radius is found to gradually increase with the size of the vacancy cluster. The fitting curve for the capture radius is obtained as a function of the number of vacancies in the cluster.

  19. Lamellar cationic lipid-DNA complexes from lipids with a strong preference for planar geometry: A Minimal Electrostatic Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perico, Angelo; Manning, Gerald S

    2014-11-01

    We formulate and analyze a minimal model, based on condensation theory, of the lamellar cationic lipid (CL)-DNA complex of alternately charged lipid bilayers and DNA monolayers in a salt solution. Each lipid bilayer, composed by a random mixture of cationic and neutral lipids, is assumed to be a rigid uniformly charged plane. Each DNA monolayer, located between two lipid bilayers, is formed by the same number of parallel DNAs with a uniform separation distance. For the electrostatic calculation, the model lipoplex is collapsed to a single plane with charge density equal to the net lipid and DNA charge. The free energy difference between the lamellar lipoplex and a reference state of the same number of free lipid bilayers and free DNAs, is calculated as a function of the fraction of CLs, of the ratio of the number of CL charges to the number of negative charges of the DNA phosphates, and of the total number of planes. At the isoelectric point the free energy difference is minimal. The complex formation, already favoured by the decrease of the electrostatic charging free energy, is driven further by the free energy gain due to the release of counterions from the DNAs and from the lipid bilayers, if strongly charged. This minimal model compares well with experiment for lipids having a strong preference for planar geometry and with major features of more detailed models of the lipoplex.

  20. Possible Solutions to the Radius Anomalies of Transiting Giant Planets

    CERN Document Server

    Burrows, A; Budai, J D; Hubbard, W B

    2006-01-01

    We calculate the theoretical evolution of the radii of all fourteen of the known transiting extrasolar giant planets (EGPs) for a variety of atmospheric metallicities, dense inner core masses, and possible internal power sources. We incorporate the effects of stellar irradiation and customize such effects for each EGP and star. Looking collectively at the family as a whole, we find that there are in fact two radius anomalies to be explained. Not only are the radii of a subset of the known transiting EGPs larger than expected from previous theory, but many of the other objects are smaller than the default theory would allow. We suggest that the larger EGPs can be explained by invoking super-solar metallicity atmospheres and opacities that naturally retain internal heat and straightforwardly comport with the observed correlation between the statistics of EGPs and parent metallicity. This explanation might obviate the necessity for an extra internal power source. We explain the smaller radii by the presence in p...

  1. Placing molecules with Bohr radius resolution using DNA origami

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funke, Jonas J.; Dietz, Hendrik

    2016-01-01

    Molecular self-assembly with nucleic acids can be used to fabricate discrete objects with defined sizes and arbitrary shapes. It relies on building blocks that are commensurate to those of biological macromolecular machines and should therefore be capable of delivering the atomic-scale placement accuracy known today only from natural and designed proteins. However, research in the field has predominantly focused on producing increasingly large and complex, but more coarsely defined, objects and placing them in an orderly manner on solid substrates. So far, few objects afford a design accuracy better than 5 nm, and the subnanometre scale has been reached only within the unit cells of designed DNA crystals. Here, we report a molecular positioning device made from a hinged DNA origami object in which the angle between the two structural units can be controlled with adjuster helices. To test the positioning capabilities of the device, we used photophysical and crosslinking assays that report the coordinate of interest directly with atomic resolution. Using this combination of placement and analysis, we rationally adjusted the average distance between fluorescent molecules and reactive groups from 1.5 to 9 nm in 123 discrete displacement steps. The smallest displacement step possible was 0.04 nm, which is slightly less than the Bohr radius. The fluctuation amplitudes in the distance coordinate were also small (±0.5 nm), and within a factor of two to three of the amplitudes found in protein structures.

  2. Massive radius-dependent flow slippage in carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secchi, Eleonora; Marbach, Sophie; Niguès, Antoine; Stein, Derek; Siria, Alessandro; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2016-09-08

    Measurements and simulations have found that water moves through carbon nanotubes at exceptionally high rates owing to nearly frictionless interfaces. These observations have stimulated interest in nanotube-based membranes for applications including desalination, nano-filtration and energy harvesting, yet the exact mechanisms of water transport inside the nanotubes and at the water-carbon interface continue to be debated because existing theories do not provide a satisfactory explanation for the limited number of experimental results available so far. This lack of experimental results arises because, even though controlled and systematic studies have explored transport through individual nanotubes, none has met the considerable technical challenge of unambiguously measuring the permeability of a single nanotube. Here we show that the pressure-driven flow rate through individual nanotubes can be determined with unprecedented sensitivity and without dyes from the hydrodynamics of water jets as they emerge from single nanotubes into a surrounding fluid. Our measurements reveal unexpectedly large and radius-dependent surface slippage in carbon nanotubes, and no slippage in boron nitride nanotubes that are crystallographically similar to carbon nanotubes, but electronically different. This pronounced contrast between the two systems must originate from subtle differences in the atomic-scale details of their solid-liquid interfaces, illustrating that nanofluidics is the frontier at which the continuum picture of fluid mechanics meets the atomic nature of matter.

  3. Mass-Radius Relation of Strongly Magnetized White Dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, P.; Bhattacharya, D.

    2017-03-01

    We study the strongly magnetized white dwarf configurations in a self-consistent manner as a progenitor of the over-luminous type-Ia supernovae. We compute static equilibria of white dwarf stars containing a strong magnetic field and present the modification of the white dwarf mass-radius relation caused by the magnetic field. From a static equilibrium study, we find that a maximum white dwarf mass of about 1.9 M⊙ may be supported if the interior poloidal field is as strong as approximately 1010 T. On the other hand if the field is purely toroidal the maximum mass can be more than 5 M⊙. All these modifications are mainly from the presence of the Lorenz force. The effects of i) modification of the equation of state due to Landau quantization, ii) electrostatic interaction due to ions, iii) general relativistic calculation on the stellar structure and, iv) field geometry are also considered. These strongly magnetised configurations are sensitive to magnetic instabilities where the perturbations grow at the corresponding Alfven time scales.

  4. Mass-Radius Relation for Rocky Planets based on PREM

    CERN Document Server

    Zeng, Li; Jacobsen, Stein

    2015-01-01

    Several small dense exoplanets are now known, inviting comparisons to Earth and Venus. Such comparisons require translating their masses and sizes to composition models of evolved multi-layer-interior planets. Such theoretical models rely on our understanding of the Earth's interior, as well as independently derived equations of state (EOS), but have so far not involved direct extrapolations from Earth's seismic model -PREM. In order to facilitate more detailed compositional comparisons between small exoplanets and the Earth, we derive here a semi-empirical mass-radius relation for two-layer rocky planets based on PREM: ${\\frac{R}{R_\\oplus}} = (1.07-0.21\\cdot \\text{CMF})\\cdot (\\frac{M}{M_\\oplus})^{1/3.7}$, where CMF stands for Core Mass Fraction. It is applicable to 1$\\sim$8 M$_{\\oplus}$ and CMF of 0.0$\\sim$0.4. Applying this formula to Earth and Venus and several known small exoplanets with radii and masses measured to better than $\\sim$30\\% precision gives a CMF fit of $0.26\\pm0.07$.

  5. Variation of Inner Radius of Dust Torus in NGC4151

    CERN Document Server

    Koshida, Shintaro; Kobayashi, Yukiyasu; Minezaki, Takeo; Sakata, Yu; Sugawara, Shota; Enya, Keigo; Suganuma, Masahiro; Tomita, Hiroyuki; Aoki, Tsutomu; Peterson, Bruce A

    2009-01-01

    The long-term optical and near infrared monitoring observations for a type 1 act ive galactic nucleus NGC 4151 were carried out for six years from 2001 to 2006 b y using the MAGNUM telescope, and delayed response of flux variations in the $K(2.2\\mu m)$ band to those in the $V(0.55\\mu m)$ band was clearly detected. Based on cross correlation analysis, we precisely measured a lag time $\\Delta t$ for eight separate periods, and we found that $\\Delta t$ is not constant changing be tween 30 and 70 days during the monitoring period. Since $\\Delta t$ is the ligh t travel time from the central energy source out to the surrounding dust torus, this is the first convincing evidence that the inner radius of dust torus did ch ange in an individual AGN. In order to relate such a change of $\\Delta t$ with a change of AGN luminosity $L$, we presented a method of taking an average of th e observed $V$-band fluxes that corresponds to the measured value of $\\Delta t$, and we found that the time-changing track of NGC 4151 in the...

  6. Mass-Radius Relation for Rocky Planets Based on PREM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Li; Sasselov, Dimitar D.; Jacobsen, Stein B.

    2016-03-01

    Several small dense exoplanets are now known, inviting comparisons to Earth and Venus. Such comparisons require translating their masses and sizes to composition models of evolved multi-layer interior planets. Such theoretical models rely on our understanding of the Earth’s interior, as well as independently derived equations of state, but so far have not involved direct extrapolations from Earth’s seismic model: the Preliminary Reference Earth Model (PREM). To facilitate more detailed compositional comparisons between small exoplanets and the Earth, we derive here a semi-empirical mass-radius relation for two-layer rocky planets based on PREM, \\frac{R}{{R}\\oplus }=(1.07-0.21\\cdot {CMF})\\cdot {≤ft(\\frac{M}{{M}\\oplus }\\right)}1/3.7, where CMF stands for core mass fraction. It is applicable to 1 ˜ 8 M⊕ and a CMF of 0.0 ˜ 0.4. Applying this formula to Earth and Venus and several known small exoplanets with radii and masses measured to better than ˜30% precision gives a CMF fit of 0.26 ± 0.07.

  7. Massive radius-dependent flow slippage in carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secchi, Eleonora; Marbach, Sophie; Niguès, Antoine; Stein, Derek; Siria, Alessandro; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2016-09-01

    Measurements and simulations have found that water moves through carbon nanotubes at exceptionally high rates owing to nearly frictionless interfaces. These observations have stimulated interest in nanotube-based membranes for applications including desalination, nano-filtration and energy harvesting, yet the exact mechanisms of water transport inside the nanotubes and at the water-carbon interface continue to be debated because existing theories do not provide a satisfactory explanation for the limited number of experimental results available so far. This lack of experimental results arises because, even though controlled and systematic studies have explored transport through individual nanotubes, none has met the considerable technical challenge of unambiguously measuring the permeability of a single nanotube. Here we show that the pressure-driven flow rate through individual nanotubes can be determined with unprecedented sensitivity and without dyes from the hydrodynamics of water jets as they emerge from single nanotubes into a surrounding fluid. Our measurements reveal unexpectedly large and radius-dependent surface slippage in carbon nanotubes, and no slippage in boron nitride nanotubes that are crystallographically similar to carbon nanotubes, but electronically different. This pronounced contrast between the two systems must originate from subtle differences in the atomic-scale details of their solid-liquid interfaces, illustrating that nanofluidics is the frontier at which the continuum picture of fluid mechanics meets the atomic nature of matter.

  8. Mass-radius relation of strongly magnetized white dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, Prasanta; Bhattacharya, Dipankar

    2016-07-01

    We study the strongly magnetized white dwarf configurations in a self-consistent manner as a progenitor of the over-luminous type-Ia supernovae. We compute static equilibria of white dwarf stars containing a strong magnetic field and present the modification of white dwarf mass-radius relation caused by the magnetic field. From a static equilibrium study, we find that a maximum white dwarf mass of about 1.9 M_{⊙} may be supported if the interior poloidal field is as strong as approximately 10^{10} T. On the other hand, if the field is purely toroidal the maximum mass can be more than 5 M_⊙. All these modifications are mainly from the presence of Lorenz force. The effects of i) modification of equation of state due to Landau quantization ii) electrostatic interaction due to ions, ii) general relativistic calculation on the stellar structure and, iii) field geometry are also considered. These strongly magnetised configurations are sensitive to magnetic instabilities where the perturbations grow at the corresponding Alfven time scales.

  9. Photospheric radius expansion in superburst precursors from neutron stars

    CERN Document Server

    Keek, L

    2012-01-01

    Thermonuclear runaway burning of carbon is in rare cases observed from accreting neutron stars as day-long X-ray flares called superbursts. In the few cases where the onset is observed, superbursts exhibit a short precursor burst at the start. In each instance, however, the data was of insufficient quality for spectral analysis of the precursor. Using data from the propane anti-coincidence detector of the PCA instrument on RXTE, we perform the first detailed time resolved spectroscopy of precursors. For a superburst from 4U 1820-30 we demonstrate the presence of photospheric radius expansion. We find the precursor to be 1.4-2 times more energetic than other short bursts from this source, indicating that the burning of accreted helium is insufficient to explain the full precursor. Shock heating would be able to account for the lacking energy. We argue that this precursor is a strong indication that the superburst starts as a detonation, and that a shock induces the precursor. Furthermore, we employ our techniq...

  10. System Estimates Radius of Curvature of a Segmented Mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakoczy, John

    2008-01-01

    A system that estimates the global radius of curvature (GRoC) of a segmented telescope mirror has been developed for use as one of the subsystems of a larger system that exerts precise control over the displacements of the mirror segments. This GRoC-estimating system, when integrated into the overall control system along with a mirror-segment- actuation subsystem and edge sensors (sensors that measure displacements at selected points on the edges of the segments), makes it possible to control the GROC mirror-deformation mode, to which mode contemporary edge sensors are insufficiently sensitive. This system thus makes it possible to control the GRoC of the mirror with sufficient precision to obtain the best possible image quality and/or to impose a required wavefront correction on incoming or outgoing light. In its mathematical aspect, the system utilizes all the information available from the edge-sensor subsystem in a unique manner that yields estimates of all the states of the segmented mirror. The system does this by exploiting a special set of mirror boundary conditions and mirror influence functions in such a way as to sense displacements in degrees of freedom that would otherwise be unobservable by means of an edge-sensor subsystem, all without need to augment the edge-sensor system with additional metrological hardware. Moreover, the accuracy of the estimates increases with the number of mirror segments.

  11. Closing capacity of segmental radius defects in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodde, Esther W H; Spauwen, Paul H M; Mikos, Antonios G; Jansen, John A

    2008-04-01

    In the research of synthetic bone graft substitutes, the relevance for bone regeneration can be confirmed in a critical-sized model. In this study the rabbit radial defect was investigated as an ingenious model of critical size, due to its defect immobilizing intact ulna. In addition, the influence of poly(DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) on bone regeneration was determined. Sixteen, 4-month-old rabbits received bilateral segmental radial defects of 15 or 20 mm. The osteotomy ends were marked with small titanium pins. Half of the group received injected PLGA microparticle/carboxymethylcellulose implants. Implantation time was 12 weeks. Evaluation consisted of radiographs after surgery and sacrifice, microcomputed tomography and histology. The radiographs revealed that the created defects were significantly smaller after sacrifice. Further a number of radii showed fibrocartilaginous interposition. Both findings indicated instability of the created defect. All evaluation techniques revealed that 15 and 20 mm were not of critical size, as most defects were more or less regenerated. PLGA microparticles did not influence bone regeneration significantly. In conclusion, 15- and 20-mm radius defects in 4-month-old rabbits were not a suitable model for bone regeneration as these defects were neither critical size nor stable. PLGA-microparticle degradation did not influence bone regeneration.

  12. Mass-radius relations for helium white dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Civelek, R

    1998-01-01

    In recent years, white dwarf stars are receiving increasing attension. The recent studies on the relation of M-R for the WDs are those of Wood (1990), Vennes et al. (1995) and Althaus and Benvenuto (1997, 1998). Vennes et al. (1995) computed static M-R relation for masses between 0.4 $M_\\odot$ and 0.7 $M_\\odot$ assuming non zero temperature effects. They assumed the luminosity is proportional to the mass which works for cool WDs but their results are in the range of high effective temperatures. As Althaus and Benvenuto (1997) mentioned, luminosity is not proportional to a constant for hot WD interiors because of neutrino emission. The purpose of this study is to present the effect of neutrino emission at finite temperatures. We considered fully degenerate configuration for WDs with pure helium composition to obtain static mass-radius relation for masses greater than 0.4 $M_\\odot$ with luminosity mass ratio due to neutrino energy loss.

  13. Photogrammetric analysis of the articular surface of the distal radius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ege, A; Seker, D Z; Tuncay, I; Duran, Z

    2004-01-01

    Three-dimensional measurements made using photogrammetry have recently gained popularity with the development of real-time detection facilities and up-to-date equipment. The modelling of human bones presents a particular challenge as the measurements required are difficult to obtain, especially from uneven surfaces. In this study, the articular surfaces of 12 radius bones were evaluated using photogrammetry to obtain three-dimensional coordinates of certain points. Morphometric characteristics of the digital topography of the articular surface were analysed using three-dimensional data from more than 200 points for each specimen. The coronal plane curve, from the tip of the styloid process to the centre of the distal radioulnar articular notch, was found to be similar to the fourth degree polynomial function. A mathematical expression representing the sagittal curve passing through scapholunate border could not be found. Close-range photogrammetry is a safe and precise technique that can provide reliable, reproducible and accurate data for evaluating complex morphological surfaces.

  14. Volar morphology of the distal radius in axial planes: a quantitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oura, Keiichiro; Oka, Kunihiro; Kawanishi, Yohei; Sugamoto, Kazuomi; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Murase, Tsuyoshi

    2015-04-01

    To investigate the cause of rupture of the flexor pollicis longus (FPL) after volar plate fixation of distal radius fractures, previous studies have examined the shape of the distal radius in the sagittal plane or in the lateral view. However, there are no reports on the anatomical shape of the volar surface concavity of the distal radius in the axial plane. We hypothesized that this concavity might contribute to the mismatch between the plate and the surface of the radius. To test this hypothesis, we constructed three-dimensional models of the radius and FPL based on computed tomography scans of 70 normal forearms. We analyzed axial cross-sectional views with 2 mm intervals. In all cases, the volar surface of the distal radius was concave in the axial plane. The concavity depth was maximum at 6 mm proximal to the palmar edge of the lunate fossa and progressively decreased toward the proximal radius. FPL was closest to the radius at 2 mm proximal to the palmar edge of the lunate fossa. The volar surface of the distal radius was externally rotated from proximal to distal. These results may help to develop new implants which fit better to the radius and decrease tendon irritation.

  15. A Simple AIMD Approach to Derive Atomic Charges for Condensed Phase Simulation of Ionic Liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y; Maginn, EJ

    2012-08-23

    The atomic charges for two ionic liquids (ILs), 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([BMIM] [PF6]) and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([EMIM][PF6]), were derived from periodic crystal phase calculations with density functional theory (DFT) and plane wave basis sets (denoted as "AIMD-c charge"). For both ILs, the total charge was found to be +/- 0.8 e for the cation and anion, respectively, due to the charge transfer between ions and polarization caused by the environment. These atomic charges were used in a force field developed within the general Amber force field framework. Using this force field, static, dynamic, and thermodynamic properties were computed for the two ILs using molecular dynamics simulation. The results were compared against results obtained using the same Amber force field but four different sets of partial charges, denoted as full charge, scaled charge, AIMD-1 charge, and AIMD-b charge, respectively. The full charge was derived from quantum chemistry calculation of isolated ions in a vacuum and resulted in a total charge of unity on each ion. The scaled charge was obtained by uniformly scaling the full charge by 0.8. AIMD-1 and AIMD-b charges were derived from liquid phase ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. The scaled charges have the same total charge on the ions as the AIMD-c charge but different distributions. It was found that simulation results not only depend on the total charge of each ion, but they are also sensitive to the charge distribution within an ion, especially for dynamic and thermodynamic properties. Overall, for the two ILs under study, the AIMD-c charge was found to predict experimental results better than the other four sets of charges, indicating that fitting charges from crystal phase DFT calculations, instead of extensive sampling of the liquid phase configurations, is a simple and reliable way to derive atomic charges for condensed phase ionic liquid simulations.

  16. Effective dynamics of a classical point charges

    CERN Document Server

    Polonyi, Janos

    2013-01-01

    The effective Lagrangian of a point charge is derived by eliminating the electromagnetic field within the framework of the classical closed time path formalism. The short distance singularity of the electromagnetic field is regulated by an UV cutoff. The Abraham-Lorentz force is recovered and its similarity to anomalies is underlined. The full cutoff-dependent linearized equation of motion is obtained, no runaway trajectories are found but the effective dynamics shows acausality if the cutoff is beyond the classical charge radius. The strength of the radiation reaction force displays a pole in its cutoff-dependence in a manner reminiscent of the Landau-pole of perturbative QED. Similarity between the dynamical breakdown of the time reversal invariance and dynamical symmetry breaking is pointed out.

  17. Thermodynamics and Charging of Interstellar Iron Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensley, Brandon S.; Draine, B. T.

    2017-01-01

    Interstellar iron in the form of metallic iron nanoparticles may constitute a component of the interstellar dust. We compute the stability of iron nanoparticles to sublimation in the interstellar radiation field, finding that iron clusters can persist down to a radius of ≃4.5 Å, and perhaps smaller. We employ laboratory data on small iron clusters to compute the photoelectric yields as a function of grain size and the resulting grain charge distribution in various interstellar environments, finding that iron nanoparticles can acquire negative charges, particularly in regions with high gas temperatures and ionization fractions. If ≳10% of the interstellar iron is in the form of ultrasmall iron clusters, the photoelectric heating rate from dust may be increased by up to tens of percent relative to dust models with only carbonaceous and silicate grains.

  18. Thermodynamics and Charging of Interstellar Iron Nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Hensley, Brandon S

    2016-01-01

    Interstellar iron in the form of metallic iron nanoparticles may constitute a component of the interstellar dust. We compute the stability of iron nanoparticles to sublimation in the interstellar radiation field, finding that iron clusters can persist down to a radius of $\\simeq 4.5\\,$\\AA, and perhaps smaller. We employ laboratory data on small iron clusters to compute the photoelectric yields as a function of grain size and the resulting grain charge distribution in various interstellar environments, finding that iron nanoparticles can acquire negative charges particularly in regions with high gas temperatures and ionization fractions. If $\\gtrsim 10\\%$ of the interstellar iron is in the form of ultrasmall iron clusters, the photoelectric heating rate from dust may be increased by up to tens of percent relative to dust models with only carbonaceous and silicate grains.

  19. Radius model of convex vertical curve of freeway based on attachment coefficient

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Song-ling; PEI Yu-long

    2008-01-01

    A longitudinal slope brake model was established for the radius calculation of vertical curve of free-way through analyzing the dynamics of brake-running of vehicles running on the longitudinal slope road section. To satisfy the requirement of sight distance, a relation model was established for the attachment coefficient and the convex vertical curve radius. Using MATLAB simulation technique, the convex vertical curve radius at different attachment conditions was calculated accurately and a three-dimensional figure was drawn to describe the relation between the adhesive coefficient, the driving velocity and the radius of vertical curve. The correlation between the convex vertical curve radius and the adhesive coefficient was further analyzed and compared with National Technical Standards. The suggested radius of vertical curve was then put forward to provide a theoretical platform for the security design of the convex vertical curve.

  20. Minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis for distal radius fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu-ming Wei

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fractures of distal radius are common injury in all age groups. Cast treatment with or without close reduction is a viable option. However, the results are often unsatisfactory with restricted function. The open reduction and internal fixation often results in extensive soft tissue dissection and associated high rates of infection and delayed/nonunion. The distractor/external fixator have reported good functional and anatomical results but the incidence of pin traction infection nerve injury and cosmedic deformity are high. We introduced a modified operative technique for minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis (MIPO for distal radial fracture and evaluated the functional outcomes and complications. Materials and Methods: 22 distal radial fractures (10 left, 12 right were treated using the MIPO technique and two small incisions with a palmar locking plate from August 2009 to August 2010. The wrist function was assessed according to Dienst wrist rating system, and postoperative complications were recorded. Results: According to Dienst wrist rating system, 13 patients showed excellent results, 6 cases showed good results and 3 patients had moderate results. No patient had poor results. Thus, the excellent and good rate was 86.4%. One patient had anesthesia in the thenar eminence and this symptom disappeared after 3 months. One patient had delayed healing in the proximal wrist crease. Two patients had mild pain on the ulnar side of the wrist and two patients had limited wrist joint function. Conclusion: The MIPO technique by using two small palmar incisions is safe and effective for treatment of distal radial fractures.