WorldWideScience

Sample records for radiowave propagation measurements

  1. Satellite-to-ground radiowave propagation

    CERN Document Server

    Allnutt, JE

    2011-01-01

    This book is a follow up to the award winning first edition and is written as a comprehensive guide for those who need to obtain a working knowledge of radiowave propagation on satellite-to-ground links at frequencies above 1 GHz, and as a reference book for experts in the field.

  2. Tropospheric radiowave propagation beyond the horizon

    CERN Document Server

    Du Castel, François

    1966-01-01

    Tropospheric Radiowave Propagation Beyond the Horizon deals with developments concerning the tropospheric propagation of ultra-short radio waves beyond the horizon, with emphasis on the relationship between the theoretical and the experimental. Topics covered include the general conditions of propagation in the troposphere; general characteristics of propagation beyond the horizon; and attenuation in propagation. This volume is comprised of six chapters and begins with a brief historical look at the various stages that have brought the technique of transhorizon links to its state of developmen

  3. Tropospheric VHF radiowave propagation measurements in a tropical location in Nigeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aboaba, O.A.

    2006-04-01

    A major task for the radiocommunication engineer in designing a communication system is to be able to predict the behaviour of the radio signal from the point of transmission to the receiving point. Usually, the radiocommunication engineer would have available propagation data that will enable him to demonstrate that the radiocommunications system will meet both the performance and the availability objectives. The data obtained from a 10-month period of terrestrial over-the-horizon propagation measurements, carried out in southwestern part of Nigeria, have been statistically analyzed in this study. The findings from the analysis show that the measured values of field strength were significantly high during the dry months of November to March, the night time and early morning hours while lower values were obtained during the wet months of April to October. In particular, it is observed that the dry month of March recorded the highest median value of field strength while the wet month of July recorded the lowest. These high values of field strength observed during the dry months are attributed to anomalous propagation effects such as extreme super-refractivity and ducting which are often prevalent in the West African tropical sub-region. (author)

  4. Radio-wave propagation for space communications systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ippolito, L. J.

    1981-01-01

    The most recent information on the effects of Earth's atmosphere on space communications systems is reviewed. The design and reliable operation of satellite systems that provide the many applications in space which rely on the transmission of radio waves for communications and scientific purposes are dependent on the propagation characteristics of the transmission path. The presence of atmospheric gases, clouds, fog, precipitation, and turbulence causes uncontrolled variations in the signal characteristics. These variations can result in a reduction of the quality and reliability of the transmitted information. Models and other techniques are used in the prediction of atmospheric effects as influenced by frequency, geography, elevation angle, and type of transmission. Recent data on performance characteristics obtained from direct measurements on satellite links operating to above 30 GHz have been reviewed. Particular emphasis has been placed on the effects of precipitation on the Earth/space path, including rain attenuation, and ice particle depolarization. Other factors are sky noise, antenna gain degradation, scintillations, and bandwidth coherence. Each of the various propagation factors has an effect on design criteria for communications systems. These criteria include link reliability, power margins, noise contribution, modulation and polarization factors, channel cross talk, error rate, and bandwidth limitations.

  5. Radio-Wave Propagation in Salt Domes: Implications for a UHE Cosmic Neutrino Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badescu, Alina-Mihaela; Saftoiu, Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    Salt deposits can be used as a natural dielectric medium for a UHE cosmic neutrino radio detector. Such a detector relies on the capability of reconstructing the initial characteristics of the cosmic neutrino from the measured radio electrical field produced at neutrino’s interaction in salt by the subsequent particle shower. A rigorous characterization of the propagation medium becomes compulsory. It is shown here that the amplitude of the electric field vector is attenuated by almost 90% after 100 m of propagation in a typical salt rock volume. The heterogeneities in salt also determine the minimal uncertainty (estimated at 19%) and the resolution of the detector

  6. Reliable intraocular pressure measurement using automated radio-wave telemetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschalis, Eleftherios I; Cade, Fabiano; Melki, Samir; Pasquale, Louis R; Dohlman, Claes H; Ciolino, Joseph B

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To present an autonomous intraocular pressure (IOP) measurement technique using a wireless implantable transducer (WIT) and a motion sensor. Methods The WIT optical aid was implanted within the ciliary sulcus of a normotensive rabbit eye after extracapsular clear lens extraction. An autonomous wireless data system (AWDS) comprising of a WIT and an external antenna aided by a motion sensor provided continuous IOP readings. The sensitivity of the technique was determined by the ability to detect IOP changes resulting from the administration of latanoprost 0.005% or dorzolamide 2%, while the reliability was determined by the agreement between baseline and vehicle (saline) IOP. Results On average, 12 diurnal and 205 nocturnal IOP measurements were performed with latanoprost, and 26 diurnal and 205 nocturnal measurements with dorzolamide. No difference was found between mean baseline IOP (13.08±2.2 mmHg) and mean vehicle IOP (13.27±2.1 mmHg) (P=0.45), suggesting good measurement reliability. Both antiglaucoma medications caused significant IOP reduction compared to baseline; latanoprost reduced mean IOP by 10% (1.3±3.54 mmHg; P<0.001), and dorzolamide by 5% (0.62±2.22 mmHg; P<0.001). Use of latanoprost resulted in an overall twofold higher IOP reduction compared to dorzolamide (P<0.001). Repeatability was ±1.8 mmHg, assessed by the variability of consecutive IOP measurements performed in a short period of time (≤1 minute), during which the IOP is not expected to change. Conclusion IOP measurements in conscious rabbits obtained without the need for human interactions using the AWDS are feasible and provide reproducible results. PMID:24531415

  7. Reliable intraocular pressure measurement using automated radio-wave telemetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschalis, Eleftherios I; Cade, Fabiano; Melki, Samir; Pasquale, Louis R; Dohlman, Claes H; Ciolino, Joseph B

    2014-01-01

    To present an autonomous intraocular pressure (IOP) measurement technique using a wireless implantable transducer (WIT) and a motion sensor. The WIT optical aid was implanted within the ciliary sulcus of a normotensive rabbit eye after extracapsular clear lens extraction. An autonomous wireless data system (AWDS) comprising of a WIT and an external antenna aided by a motion sensor provided continuous IOP readings. The sensitivity of the technique was determined by the ability to detect IOP changes resulting from the administration of latanoprost 0.005% or dorzolamide 2%, while the reliability was determined by the agreement between baseline and vehicle (saline) IOP. On average, 12 diurnal and 205 nocturnal IOP measurements were performed with latanoprost, and 26 diurnal and 205 nocturnal measurements with dorzolamide. No difference was found between mean baseline IOP (13.08±2.2 mmHg) and mean vehicle IOP (13.27±2.1 mmHg) (P=0.45), suggesting good measurement reliability. Both antiglaucoma medications caused significant IOP reduction compared to baseline; latanoprost reduced mean IOP by 10% (1.3±3.54 mmHg; P<0.001), and dorzolamide by 5% (0.62±2.22 mmHg; P<0.001). Use of latanoprost resulted in an overall twofold higher IOP reduction compared to dorzolamide (P<0.001). Repeatability was ±1.8 mmHg, assessed by the variability of consecutive IOP measurements performed in a short period of time (≤1 minute), during which the IOP is not expected to change. IOP measurements in conscious rabbits obtained without the need for human interactions using the AWDS are feasible and provide reproducible results.

  8. Reliable intraocular pressure measurement using automated radio-wave telemetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paschalis EI

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Eleftherios I Paschalis,* Fabiano Cade,* Samir Melki, Louis R Pasquale, Claes H Dohlman, Joseph B CiolinoMassachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA*These authors contributed equally to this workPurpose: To present an autonomous intraocular pressure (IOP measurement technique using a wireless implantable transducer (WIT and a motion sensor.Methods: The WIT optical aid was implanted within the ciliary sulcus of a normotensive rabbit eye after extracapsular clear lens extraction. An autonomous wireless data system (AWDS comprising of a WIT and an external antenna aided by a motion sensor provided continuous IOP readings. The sensitivity of the technique was determined by the ability to detect IOP changes resulting from the administration of latanoprost 0.005% or dorzolamide 2%, while the reliability was determined by the agreement between baseline and vehicle (saline IOP.Results: On average, 12 diurnal and 205 nocturnal IOP measurements were performed with latanoprost, and 26 diurnal and 205 nocturnal measurements with dorzolamide. No difference was found between mean baseline IOP (13.08±2.2 mmHg and mean vehicle IOP (13.27±2.1 mmHg (P=0.45, suggesting good measurement reliability. Both antiglaucoma medications caused significant IOP reduction compared to baseline; latanoprost reduced mean IOP by 10% (1.3±3.54 mmHg; P<0.001, and dorzolamide by 5% (0.62±2.22 mmHg; P<0.001. Use of latanoprost resulted in an overall twofold higher IOP reduction compared to dorzolamide (P<0.001. Repeatability was ±1.8 mmHg, assessed by the variability of consecutive IOP measurements performed in a short period of time (≤1 minute, during which the IOP is not expected to change.Conclusion: IOP measurements in conscious rabbits obtained without the need for human interactions using the AWDS are feasible and provide reproducible results.Keywords: IOP, pressure transducer, wireless, MEMS, implant, intraocular

  9. Propagation-invariant waves in acoustic, optical, and radio-wave fields

    OpenAIRE

    Salo, Janne

    2003-01-01

    The physical phenomena considered in this thesis are associated with electromagnetic and acoustic waves that propagate in free space or in homogeneous media without diffraction. The concept of rotationally periodic wave propagation is introduced in the first journal article included in the thesis and it is subsequently used to analyse waves that avoid diffractive deterioration by repeatedly returning to their initial shape, possibly rotated around the optical axis. Such waves constitute an es...

  10. Simple Radiowave-Based Method For Measuring Peripheral Blood Flow Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva-Buisson, Yvette J.

    2014-01-01

    Project objective is to design small radio frequency based flow probes for the measurement of blood flow velocity in peripheral arteries such as the femoral artery and middle cerebral artery. The result will be the technological capability to measure peripheral blood flow rates and flow changes during various environmental stressors such as microgravity without contact to the individual being monitored. This technology may also lead to an easier method of detecting venous gas emboli during extravehicular activities.

  11. Propagation of dynamic measurement uncertainty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hessling, J P

    2011-01-01

    The time-dependent measurement uncertainty has been evaluated in a number of recent publications, starting from a known uncertain dynamic model. This could be defined as the 'downward' propagation of uncertainty from the model to the targeted measurement. The propagation of uncertainty 'upward' from the calibration experiment to a dynamic model traditionally belongs to system identification. The use of different representations (time, frequency, etc) is ubiquitous in dynamic measurement analyses. An expression of uncertainty in dynamic measurements is formulated for the first time in this paper independent of representation, joining upward as well as downward propagation. For applications in metrology, the high quality of the characterization may be prohibitive for any reasonably large and robust model to pass the whiteness test. This test is therefore relaxed by not directly requiring small systematic model errors in comparison to the randomness of the characterization. Instead, the systematic error of the dynamic model is propagated to the uncertainty of the measurand, analogously but differently to how stochastic contributions are propagated. The pass criterion of the model is thereby transferred from the identification to acceptance of the total accumulated uncertainty of the measurand. This increases the relevance of the test of the model as it relates to its final use rather than the quality of the calibration. The propagation of uncertainty hence includes the propagation of systematic model errors. For illustration, the 'upward' propagation of uncertainty is applied to determine if an appliance box is damaged in an earthquake experiment. In this case, relaxation of the whiteness test was required to reach a conclusive result

  12. Transhorizon Radiowave Propagation due to Evaporation Dueting

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    from the meteorological perspective, evaporation ducts have far reaching implications on radio communications ... Background Theory ... It is in this context that the tropo- .... eters that are representative of the ongoing physical processes at.

  13. ACTS Propagation Measurements in Maryland and Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissanayake, Asoka; Lin, Kuan-Ting

    1996-01-01

    Rapid growth in new satellite services incorporating very small aperture terminals (VSAT) and ultra small aperture terminals (USAT) is expected in the coming years. Small size terminals allow for widespread use of satellite services in small business and domestic applications. Due to congestion of lower frequency bands such as C and Ku, most of these services will use Ka-band (2/20 GHz) frequencies. Propagation impairments produced by the troposphere is a limiting factor for the effective use of the 20/30 GHz band and the use of smaller Earth terminals makes it difficult to provide sufficient link margins for propagation related outages. In this context, reliable prediction of propagation impairments for low margin systems becomes important. Due to the complexity of propagation phenomena propagation modeling is mainly attempted on an empirical basis. As such, the availability of reliable measured data that extend to probability levels well in excess of the traditional limit of 1 percent is of great importance in the development, validation, and refinement of propagation models. The beacon payload on the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) together with the propagation measurement terminals developed under the NASA ACTS propagation program provide an excellent opportunity to collect such data on a long-term basis. This paper presents the results of ACTS propagation measurements conducted in the Washington, DC metropolitan area by COMSAT Laboratories.

  14. Radio propagation measurement and channel modelling

    CERN Document Server

    Salous, Sana

    2013-01-01

    While there are numerous books describing modern wireless communication systems that contain overviews of radio propagation and radio channel modelling, there are none that contain detailed information on the design, implementation and calibration of radio channel measurement equipment, the planning of experiments and the in depth analysis of measured data. The book would begin with an explanation of the fundamentals of radio wave propagation and progress through a series of topics, including the measurement of radio channel characteristics, radio channel sounders, measurement strategies

  15. Wave processes. Auroral kilometer radiowave radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safargaleev, V.V.

    1993-01-01

    Characteristics of auroral kilometer radiowave radiation (AKRR) are discussed. AKRR is produced at altitudes 1.5-3 R e (R e is the Earth radius) in the auroral cavity. Electrons at energy 1-15 keV are always observed in AKRR production regions

  16. Measuring propagation speed of Coulomb fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sangro, R. de; Finocchiaro, G.; Patteri, P.; Piccolo, M.; Pizzella, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Frascati (Italy)

    2015-03-01

    The problem of gravity propagation has been subject of discussion for quite a long time: Newton, Laplace and, in relatively more modern times, Eddington pointed out that, if gravity propagated with finite velocity, planet motion around the sun would become unstable due to a torque originating from time lag of the gravitational interactions. Such an odd behavior can be found also in electromagnetism, when one computes the propagation of the electric fields generated by a set of uniformly moving charges. As a matter of fact the Lienard-Weichert retarded potential leads to the same formula as the one obtained assuming that the electric field propagate with infinite velocity. The Feynman explanation for this apparent paradox was based on the fact that uniform motions last indefinitely. To verify such an explanation, we performed an experiment to measure the time/space evolution of the electric field generated by an uniformly moving electron beam. The results we obtain, on a finite lifetime kinematical state, are compatible with an electric field rigidly carried by the beam itself. (orig.)

  17. Exposure to radiowaves in physiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gobbato, F.; Valentinuzzi, C.

    1988-01-01

    An assessment of the electromagnetic fields emitted from short and ultra short wave diathermy sources was made to evaluate the hazards to the operator and patient. In ultra short wave diathermy the power density depends on the direction of the emission and decreases with the square of the distance from the source. Regression functions between power density and distance were calculated and analysed statistically. It is possible to calculate a simple algorithm in short wave diathermy, so the field must be mapped from direct measurements. Operator safety is easy to achieve by following simple procedures. Particular caution must be used to protect the patient from exposure of critical biological organs

  18. A Review of Some Features of Radiowave Absorption | Iheonu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . The analysis deals with absorption of radiowaves through the ionosphere using the absorption method – A3 (CW Field Strength) adopting data from the Swiss PTT MNIFTZ 4.1 computer predictions for shortwave transmission. The study gives ...

  19. Modeling of Radiowave Propagation in a Forested Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    and downlink communication from an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) to troops located within forest. Lastly, there is deployment of vehicular ...band (30 to 300 MHz) where the wavelength is relatively long (1.0 m to 10.0 m). With the congestion of spectrum usage in the VHF band and the

  20. Simulation of Radiowave Propagation in a Dense Urban Environment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chung, Chris V

    2007-01-01

    .... A second issue is base station antenna coverage. The antenna gain, half power beamwidth (HPBW), location, and pointing angle should be chosen to give the maximum coverage over a specified sector...

  1. Observation of total electron content and irregularities in electron density using GHz band radiowaves emitted from satellite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Tadahiko; Fujita, Masaharu; Awaka, Jun.

    1978-01-01

    The experiments to investigate the influence of troposphere on millimeter and sub-millimeter wave propagation were carried out, using the engineering test satellite -- 2 (ETS-2) which became the Japanese first stationary satellite and carries the transmitter emitting beacon waves of 1.7, 11.5 and 34.5 GHz coherent each other. By these experiments, it was found that the waves of 1.7 and 11.5 GHz were affected by the ionosphere. The measurement of total electron content using GHz band waves was the first trial in the world, and is capable of grasping its change with higher accuracy than conventional methods. Scintillation of 1.7 GHz is mainly the phenomenon during night, and it was revealed that it has a peak at 22.30 local time and occurred through the radiowave scattering owing to the irregularities of the ionosphere. It is also suggested that some plasma instability is generated in the place where electron density gradient in the ionosphere is large, and the irregularities of fine scale are produced, assuming from GHz band scintillations at the time of magnetic storm. The relations among wave number spectrum, scintillation frequency spectrum and S4 index (statistical quantity to give estimate for scintillation amplitude) can be derived by the weak scattering theory (Simple scattering theory). As seen above, the diagnosis of plasma disturbances in the ionosphere is feasible by the simultaneous observations of total electron content and scintillation. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  2. Association of radiowave absorption with E(sporadic)-activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganguly, S.

    1975-01-01

    Noontime radiowave absorption data for frequencies which are reflected below the height of sporadic-E layers show a strong positive correlation with the sporadic-E layer activity. The possibilities of atmospheric waves affecting both the sporadic-E activity as well as mesospheric ionization are suggested to explain this association

  3. Measurement of sound propagation in glass wool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarnow, Viggo

    1995-01-01

    A new acoustic method for directly measuring the flow resistance, and the compressibility of fibrous materials such as glass wool, is given. Measured results for monochromatic sound in glass wool are presented and compared with theoretically calculated results. The agreement between experimental...

  4. Spherical Horn Array for Wideband Propagation Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franek, Ondrej; Pedersen, Gert Frølund

    2011-01-01

    properties and coupling between the elements are investigated via measurements and numerical simulations. Radiation patterns and sum beams of the array on selected frequencies throughout the band are also presented. Based on the obtained results it is concluded that the array is a good candidate...

  5. Measurements of anisotropic sound propagation in glass wool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarnow, Viggo

    2000-01-01

    to the glass wool sheets was 75 dB/m, and for propagation parallel with the sheets 57 dB/m. For mass density 30 kg/m3, the corresponding numbers were 140 and 100 dB/m. The measured values were compared with calculated ones taking into account the movements of the fiber skeleton. The calculations need...

  6. Nonlinear propagation in ultrasonic fields: measurements, modelling and harmonic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey, V F

    2000-03-01

    In high amplitude ultrasonic fields, such as those used in medical ultrasound, nonlinear propagation can result in waveform distortion and the generation of harmonics of the initial frequency. In the nearfield of a transducer this process is complicated by diffraction effects associated with the source. The results of a programme to study the nonlinear propagation in the fields of circular, focused and rectangular transducers are described, and comparisons made with numerical predictions obtained using a finite difference solution to the Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetsov (or KZK) equation. These results are extended to consider nonlinear propagation in tissue-like media and the implications for ultrasonic measurements and ultrasonic heating are discussed. The narrower beamwidths and reduced side-lobe levels of the harmonic beams are illustrated and the use of harmonics to form diagnostic images with improved resolution is described.

  7. Measurements on wave propagation characteristics of spiraling electron beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, A.; Getty, W. D.

    1976-01-01

    Dispersion characteristics of cyclotron-harmonic waves propagating on a neutralized spiraling electron beam immersed in a uniform axial magnetic field are studied experimentally. The experimental setup consisted of a vacuum system, an electron-gun corkscrew assembly which produces a 110-eV beam with the desired delta-function velocity distribution, a measurement region where a microwave signal is injected onto the beam to measure wavelengths, and a velocity analyzer for measuring the axial electron velocity. Results of wavelength measurements made at beam currents of 0.15, 1.0, and 2.0 mA are compared with calculated values, and undesirable effects produced by increasing the beam current are discussed. It is concluded that a suitable electron beam for studies of cyclotron-harmonic waves can be generated by the corkscrew device.

  8. Constraints on dike propagation from continuous GPS measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segall, P.; Cervelli, Peter; Owen, S.; Lisowski, M.; Miklius, Asta

    2001-01-01

    The January 1997 East Rift Zone eruption on Kilauea volcano, Hawaii, occurred within a network of continuous Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers. The GPS measurements reveal the temporal history of deformation during dike intrusion, beginning ??? 8 hours prior to the onset of the eruption. The dike volume as a function of time, estimated from the GPS data using elastic Green's functions for a homogeneous half-space, shows that only two thirds of the final dike volume accumulated prior to the eruption and the rate of volume change decreased with time. These observations are inconsistent with simple models of dike propagation, which predict accelerating dike volume up to the time of the eruption and little or no change thereafter. Deflationary tilt changes at Kilauea summit mirror the inferred dike volume history, suggesting that the rate of dike propagation is limited by flow of magma into the dike. A simple, lumped parameter model of a coupled dike magma chamber system shows that the tendency for a dike to end in an eruption (rather than intrusion) is favored by high initial dike pressures, compressional stress states, large, compressible magma reservoirs, and highly conductive conduits linking the dike and source reservoirs. Comparison of model predictions to the observed dike volume history, the ratio of erupted to intruded magma, and the deflationary history of the summit magma chamber suggest that most of the magma supplied to the growing dike came from sources near to the eruption through highly conductive conduits. Interpretation is complicated by the presence of multiple source reservoirs, magma vesiculation and cooling, as well as spatial variations in dike-normal stress. Reinflation of the summit magma chamber following the eruption was measured by GPS and accompanied a rise in the level of the Pu'u O'o lava lake. For a spheroidal chamber these data imply a summit magma chamber volume of ??? 20 km3, consistent with recent estimates from seismic

  9. Determination of particle size distributions from acoustic wave propagation measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spelt, P.D.; Norato, M.A.; Sangani, A.S.; Tavlarides, L.L.

    1999-01-01

    The wave equations for the interior and exterior of the particles are ensemble averaged and combined with an analysis by Allegra and Hawley [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 51, 1545 (1972)] for the interaction of a single particle with the incident wave to determine the phase speed and attenuation of sound waves propagating through dilute slurries. The theory is shown to compare very well with the measured attenuation. The inverse problem, i.e., the problem of determining the particle size distribution given the attenuation as a function of frequency, is examined using regularization techniques that have been successful for bubbly liquids. It is shown that, unlike the bubbly liquids, the success of solving the inverse problem is limited since it depends strongly on the nature of particles and the frequency range used in inverse calculations. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  10. Human tissue optical properties measurements and light propagation modelling

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dam, JS

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Biomedical Optics is the study of the optical properties of living biological material, especially its scattering and absorption characteristics, and their significance to light propagation within the material. Determination of tissue optical...

  11. Instrumentation Suite for Acoustic Propagation Measurements in Complex Shallow Water Environments

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Obtain at-sea measurements to test theoretical and modeling predictions of acoustic propagation in dynamic, inhomogeneous, and nonisotropic shallow water...

  12. Propagation Engineering in Wireless Communications

    CERN Document Server

    Ghasemi, Abdollah; Ghasemi, Farshid

    2012-01-01

    Wireless communications has seen explosive growth in recent decades, in a realm that is both broad and rapidly expanding to include satellite services, navigational aids, remote sensing, telemetering, audio and video broadcasting, high-speed data communications, mobile radio systems and much more. Propagation Engineering in Wireless Communications deals with the basic principles of radiowaves propagation for frequency bands used in radio-communications, offering descriptions of new achievements and newly developed propagation models. The book bridges the gap between theoretical calculations and approaches, and applied procedures needed for advanced radio links design. The primary objective of this two-volume set is to demonstrate the fundamentals, and to introduce propagation phenomena and mechanisms that engineers are likely to encounter in the design and evaluation of radio links of a given type and operating frequency. Volume one covers basic principles, along with tropospheric and ionospheric propagation,...

  13. Generation of a auroral kilometer radiowaves at a maser cyclotron resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlasov, V.G.

    1991-01-01

    A linear mechanism of auroral kilometer radiowave (AKR) generation at a maser cyclotron resonance (MCR) in non-homogeneous non-monodimensional plasma is developed. Model distribution functions introduced for longitudinal and transverse electron beasms allow one to obtain x- and o-mode increments in the form of elementary functions. The key concept of work consists in MCR time, taking account of the complex of all processes leading to wave outlet from the MCR. It is shown that MCR time can be sufficient for AKR generation only in certain region of auroral plasma. For x-mode these are such plasma sections where the longitudinal geomagnetic field gradient is compensated by plasma density gradient. O-mode is generated only in those local regions where the plasma density longitudinal gradient is very low. The theoretical minimal width of AKR spectrum line obtained coincides with the minimal measured line width equal to 5Hz. A conclusion is made that the discrete AKR spectrum appears to be the reflection of the auroral plasma inhomogeneous structure

  14. Comparison of UHF measurements with the propagation model of Recommendation ITU-R P.1546

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witvliet, B.A.; Wijninga, P.W.; van Maanen, E.; Smith, B.

    2010-01-01

    This report describes a radio propagation measurement campaign that has been performed along paths between the Netherlands and the United Kingdom. The campaign focused on UHF propagation on mixed land/sea paths. Special attention was given to calibration accuracy and validation of the measurement

  15. Quantifying Electromagnetic Wave Propagation Environment Using Measurements From A Small Buoy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVE PROPAGATION ENVIRONMENT USING MEASUREMENTS FROM A SMALL BUOY by Andrew E. Sweeney June 2017 Thesis Advisor: Qing Wang...TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE QUANTIFYING ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVE PROPAGATION ENVIRONMENT USING MEASUREMENTS FROM A...the Coupled Air Sea Processes and Electromagnetic (EM) ducting Research (CASPER), to understand air-sea interaction processes and their representation

  16. RF propagation measurement and model validation during RF/IR synergy trial vampira

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heemskerk, H.J.M.

    2005-01-01

    The member nations of AC/323 SET-RTG056/RTG32 on Integration of Radar and Infrared for Ship Self Defence have performed the Validation Measurements for Propagation in the Infrared and Radar (VAMPIRA). The objective was to get insight into the radar and infrared synergy concentrated on propagation in

  17. Relation between Statistics of Radiowave Reception at South Pole Station and Auroral Oval Characteristics: Data and Monte Carlo Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labelle, J.; Noonan, K.

    2006-12-01

    Despite their remote location, radio receivers at South Pole Station regularly detect AM broadcast band signals propagating from transmitters thousands of kilometers away. Statistical analysis of received radiowave power at South Pole during 2004 and 2005, integrated over the frequency range of AM broadcast stations, reveals a distinctive time-of-day (UT) dependence: a broad maximum in received power centered at 1500 UT corresponds to magnetic daytime; signal levels are lower during magnetic nighttime except for a calculated based on two contributions: daytime D-region absorption and auroral absorption. The latter varies with day of year and magnetic local time in a complex fashion due to the asymmetric shape and varying size of the auroral oval and the offset of South Pole from the geomagnetic pole. The Monte Carlo simulations confirm that the enhanced absorption of AM broadcast signals during magnetic nighttime results from auroral absorption. Furthermore, the simulations predict that a weak (<0.5 dB) peak near magnetic midnight, similar to that observed in the data, arises from including in the statistical data base intervals when the auroral oval is contracted. These results suggest that ground based radio observations at a sufficiently remote high-latitude site such as South Pole may effectively monitor auroral oval characteristics on a statistical basis at least.

  18. Propagation engineering in radio links design

    CERN Document Server

    Ghasemi, Abdollah; Ghasemi, Farshid

    2013-01-01

    Propagation Engineering in Radio Link Design covers the basic principles of radiowaves propagation in a practical manner.  This fundamental understanding enables the readers to design radio links efficiently. This book elaborates on new achievements as well as recently developed propagation models.  This is in addition to a comprehensive overview of fundamentals of propagation in various scenarios. It examines theoretical calculations, approaches and applied procedures needed for radio links design. The authors study and analysis of the main propagation phenomena and its mechanisms based on the recommendations of International Telecommunications Union, (ITU). The book has been organized in 9 chapters and examines the role of antennas and passive reflectors in radio services, propagation mechanisms related to radar, satellite, short distance, broadcasting and trans-horizon radio links, with two chapters devoted to radio noise and main  parameters of radio link design. The book presents some 278 illustration...

  19. Navigation Signal Disturbances by Multipath Propagation - Scaled Measurements with a Universal Channel Sounder Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geise, Robert; Neubauer, Bjoern; Zimmer, Georg

    2015-11-01

    The performance of navigation systems is always reduced by unwanted multipath propagation. This is especially of practical importance for airborne navigation systems like the instrument landing system (ILS) or the VHF omni directional radio range (VOR). Nevertheless, the quantitative analysis of corresponding, potentially harmful multipath propagation disturbances is very difficult due to the large parameter space. Experimentally difficulties arise due to very expensive, real scale measurement campaigns and numerical simulation techniques still have shortcomings which are briefly discussed. In this contribution a new universal approach is introduced on how to measure very flexibly multipath propagation effects for arbitrary navigation systems using a channel sounder architecture in a scaled measurement environment. Two relevant scenarios of multipath propagation and the impact on navigation signals are presented. The first describes disturbances of the ILS due to large taxiing aircraft. The other example shows the influence of rotating wind turbines on the VOR.

  20. Propagation of SLF/ELF electromagnetic waves

    CERN Document Server

    Pan, Weiyan

    2014-01-01

    This book deals with the SLF/ELF wave propagation, an important branch of electromagnetic theory. The SLF/ELF wave propagation theory is well applied in earthquake electromagnetic radiation, submarine communication, thunderstorm detection, and geophysical prospecting and diagnostics. The propagation of SLF/ELF electromagnetic waves is introduced in various media like the earth-ionospheric waveguide, ionospheric plasma, sea water, earth, and the boundary between two different media or the stratified media. Applications in the earthquake electromagnetic radiation and the submarine communications are also addressed. This book is intended for scientists and engineers in the fields of radio propagation and EM theory and applications. Prof. Pan is a professor at China Research Institute of Radiowave Propagation in Qingdao (China). Dr. Li is a professor at Zhejiang University in Hangzhou (China).

  1. Manipulations of Wavefront Propagation: Useful Methods and Applications for Interferometric Measurements and Scanning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avi Karsenty

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Phase measurements obtained by high-coherence interferometry are restricted by the 2π ambiguity, to height differences smaller than λ/2. A further restriction in most interferometric systems is for focusing the system on the measured object. We present two methods that overcome these restrictions. In the first method, different segments of a measured wavefront are digitally propagated and focused locally after measurement. The divergent distances, by which the diverse segments of the wavefront are propagated in order to achieve a focused image, provide enough information so as to resolve the 2π ambiguity. The second method employs an interferogram obtained by a spectrum constituting a small number of wavelengths. The magnitude of the interferogram’s modulations is utilized to resolve the 2π ambiguity. Such methods of wavefront propagation enable several applications such as focusing and resolving the 2π ambiguity, as described in the article.

  2. Simulation error propagation for a dynamic rod worth measurement technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kastanya, D.F.; Turinsky, P.J.

    1996-01-01

    KRSKO nuclear station, subsequently adapted by Westinghouse, introduced the dynamic rod worth measurement (DRWM) technique for measuring pressurized water reactor rod worths. This technique has the potential for reduced test time and primary loop waste water versus alternatives. The measurement is performed starting from a slightly supercritical state with all rods out (ARO), driving a bank in at the maximum stepping rate, and recording the ex-core detectors responses and bank position as a function of time. The static bank worth is obtained by (1) using the ex-core detectors' responses to obtain the core average flux (2) using the core average flux in the inverse point-kinetics equations to obtain the dynamic bank worth (3) converting the dynamic bank worth to the static bank worth. In this data interpretation process, various calculated quantities obtained from a core simulator are utilized. This paper presents an analysis of the sensitivity to the impact of core simulator errors on the deduced static bank worth

  3. Optical propagation analysis in photobioreactor measurements on cyanobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanjul-Vélez, F.; Arce-Diego, J. L.

    2017-12-01

    Biotechnology applications are nowadays increasing in many areas, from agriculture to biochemistry, or even biomedicine. Knowledge on biological processes is becoming essential in order to be able to adequately estimate and control the production of these elements. Cyanobacteria present the capability of producing oxygen and biomass, from CO2 and light irradiation. Therefore, they could be fundamental for human subsistence in adverse environments, as basic needs of breathing and food would be guaranteed. Cyanobacteria cultivation, as other microorganisms, is carried out in photo-bioreactors. The adequate design of photobioreactors greatly influences elements production throughput. This design includes optical illumination and optical measurement of cyanobacteria growth. In this work an analysis of optical measurement of cyanobacteria growth in a photobioreactor is made. As cyanobacteria are inhomogeneous elements, the influence of light scattering is significant. Several types of cyanobacteria are considered, as long as several spatial profiles and irradiances of the incident light. Depending on cyanobacteria optical properties, optical distribution of transmitted light can be estimated. These results allow an appropriate consideration, in the optical design, of the relationship between detected light and cyanobacteria growth. As a consequence, the most adequate conditions of elements production from cyanobacteria could be estimated.

  4. Propagation of nuclear data uncertainties for fusion power measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sjöstrand Henrik

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Neutron measurements using neutron activation systems are an essential part of the diagnostic system at large fusion machines such as JET and ITER. Nuclear data is used to infer the neutron yield. Consequently, high-quality nuclear data is essential for the proper determination of the neutron yield and fusion power. However, uncertainties due to nuclear data are not fully taken into account in uncertainty analysis for neutron yield calibrations using activation foils. This paper investigates the neutron yield uncertainty due to nuclear data using the so-called Total Monte Carlo Method. The work is performed using a detailed MCNP model of the JET fusion machine; the uncertainties due to the cross-sections and angular distributions in JET structural materials, as well as the activation cross-sections in the activation foils, are analysed. It is found that a significant contribution to the neutron yield uncertainty can come from uncertainties in the nuclear data.

  5. Propagation of Radiosonde Pressure Sensor Errors to Ozonesonde Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauffer, R. M.; Morris, G.A.; Thompson, A. M.; Joseph, E.; Coetzee, G. J. R.; Nalli, N. R.

    2014-01-01

    Several previous studies highlight pressure (or equivalently, pressure altitude) discrepancies between the radiosonde pressure sensor and that derived from a GPS flown with the radiosonde. The offsets vary during the ascent both in absolute and percent pressure differences. To investigate this problem further, a total of 731 radiosonde-ozonesonde launches from the Southern Hemisphere subtropics to Northern mid-latitudes are considered, with launches between 2005 - 2013 from both longer-term and campaign-based intensive stations. Five series of radiosondes from two manufacturers (International Met Systems: iMet, iMet-P, iMet-S, and Vaisala: RS80-15N and RS92-SGP) are analyzed to determine the magnitude of the pressure offset. Additionally, electrochemical concentration cell (ECC) ozonesondes from three manufacturers (Science Pump Corporation; SPC and ENSCI-Droplet Measurement Technologies; DMT) are analyzed to quantify the effects these offsets have on the calculation of ECC ozone (O3) mixing ratio profiles (O3MR) from the ozonesonde-measured partial pressure. Approximately half of all offsets are 0.6 hPa in the free troposphere, with nearly a third 1.0 hPa at 26 km, where the 1.0 hPa error represents 5 persent of the total atmospheric pressure. Pressure offsets have negligible effects on O3MR below 20 km (96 percent of launches lie within 5 percent O3MR error at 20 km). Ozone mixing ratio errors above 10 hPa (30 km), can approach greater than 10 percent ( 25 percent of launches that reach 30 km exceed this threshold). These errors cause disagreement between the integrated ozonesonde-only column O3 from the GPS and radiosonde pressure profile by an average of +6.5 DU. Comparisons of total column O3 between the GPS and radiosonde pressure profiles yield average differences of +1.1 DU when the O3 is integrated to burst with addition of the McPeters and Labow (2012) above-burst O3 column climatology. Total column differences are reduced to an average of -0.5 DU when

  6. Laser Beam Propagation Through Inhomogeneous Media with Shock-Like Profiles: Modeling and Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamovsky, Grigory; Ida, Nathan

    1997-01-01

    Wave propagation in inhomogeneous media has been studied for such diverse applications as propagation of radiowaves in atmosphere, light propagation through thin films and in inhomogeneous waveguides, flow visualization, and others. In recent years an increased interest has been developed in wave propagation through shocks in supersonic flows. Results of experiments conducted in the past few years has shown such interesting phenomena as a laser beam splitting and spreading. The paper describes a model constructed to propagate a laser beam through shock-like inhomogeneous media. Numerical techniques are presented to compute the beam through such media. The results of computation are presented, discussed, and compared with experimental data.

  7. A Tissue Propagation Model for Validating Close-Proximity Biomedical Radiometer Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonds, Q.; Herzig, P.; Weller, T.

    2016-01-01

    The propagation of thermally-generated electromagnetic emissions through stratified human tissue is studied herein using a non-coherent mathematical model. The model is developed to complement subsurface body temperature measurements performed using a close proximity microwave radiometer. The model takes into account losses and reflections as thermal emissions propagate through the body, before being emitted at the skin surface. The derivation is presented in four stages and applied to the human core phantom, a physical representation of a stomach volume of skin, muscle, and blood-fatty tissue. A drop in core body temperature is simulated via the human core phantom and the response of the propagation model is correlated to the radiometric measurement. The results are comparable, with differences on the order of 1.5 - 3%. Hence the plausibility of core body temperature extraction via close proximity radiometry is demonstrated, given that the electromagnetic characteristics of the stratified tissue layers are known.

  8. Review of intense-ion-beam propagation with a view toward measuring ion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, M.

    1982-01-01

    The subject of this review is intense ion beam propagation and the possibilities of measuring time dependent ion energy in the beam. Propagation effects discussed include charge separation, charge and current autoneutralization, electron thermalization and current neutralization decay. The interaction of a plasma beam with material obstacles, like collimators, and with transverse magnetic fields is also described. Depending on beam energy, density and pulse length, these interactions can include material ablation with plasmadynamic flow and undeflected propagation across transverse magnetic fields by a polarization drift. On the basis of this review I conclude that three diagnostics: a single floating potential probe, net current probes (Faraday cups) and a Rutherford scattering spectrometer appear capable of giving prompt, time dependent ion energy measurements

  9. Acoustic signal propagation and measurement in natural stream channels for application to surrogate bed load measurements: Halfmoon Creek, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monitoring sediment-generated noise using submerged hydrophones is a surrogate method for measuring bed load transport in streams with the potential for improving estimates of bed load transport through widespread, inexpensive monitoring. Understanding acoustic signal propagation in natural stream e...

  10. Measuring propagation delay over a coded serial communication channel using FPGAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansweijer, P.P.M.; Peek, H.Z.

    2011-01-01

    Measurement and control applications are increasingly using distributed system technologies. In such applications, which may be spread over large distances, it is often necessary to synchronize system timing and know with great precision the time offsets between parts of the system. Measuring the propagation delay over a coded serial communication channel using serializer/deserializer (SerDes) functionality in FPGAs is described. The propagation delay between transmitter and receiver is measured with a resolution of a single unit interval (i.e. a serial link running at 3.125 Gbps provides a 320 ps resolution). The technique has been demonstrated to work over 100 km fibre to verify the feasibility for application in the future KM3NeT telescope.

  11. Wideband propagation measurements at 30.3 GHz through a pecan orchard in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papazian, Peter B.; Jones, David L.; Espeland, Richard H.

    1992-09-01

    Wideband propagation measurements were made in a pecan orchard in Texas during April and August of 1990 to examine the propagation characteristics of millimeter-wave signals through vegetation. Measurements were made on tree obstructed paths with and without leaves. The study presents narrowband attenuation data at 9.6 and 28.8 GHz as well as wideband impulse response measurements at 30.3 GHz. The wideband probe (Violette et al., 1983), provides amplitude and delay of reflected and scattered signals and bit-error rate. This is accomplished using a 500 MBit/sec pseudo-random code to BPSK modulate a 28.8 GHz carrier. The channel impulse response is then extracted by cross correlating the received pseudo-random sequence with a locally generated replica.

  12. RASS sound speed profile (SSP) measurements for use in outdoor sound propagation models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, S G [Physics Department, University of Auckland (New Zealand); Huenerbein, S v; Waddington, D [Research Institute for the Built and Human Environment, University of Salford (United Kingdom)], E-mail: s.vonhunerbein@salford.ac.uk

    2008-05-01

    The performance of outdoor sound propagation models depends to a great extent on meteorological input parameters. In an effort to improve speed and accuracy, model output synthetic sound speed profiles (SSP) are commonly used depending on meteorological classification schemes. In order to use SSP measured by RASS in outdoor sound propagation models, the complex profiles need to be simplified. In this paper we extend an investigation on the spatial and temporal characteristics of the meteorological data set required to yield adequate comparisons between models and field measurements, so that the models can be fairly judged. Vertical SSP from RASS, SODAR wind profiles as well as mast wind and temperature data from a flat terrain site and measured over a period of several months are used to evaluate applicability of the logarithmic approximation for a stability classification scheme proposed by the HARMONOISE working group.

  13. RASS sound speed profile (SSP) measurements for use in outdoor sound propagation models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, S G; Huenerbein, S v; Waddington, D

    2008-01-01

    The performance of outdoor sound propagation models depends to a great extent on meteorological input parameters. In an effort to improve speed and accuracy, model output synthetic sound speed profiles (SSP) are commonly used depending on meteorological classification schemes. In order to use SSP measured by RASS in outdoor sound propagation models, the complex profiles need to be simplified. In this paper we extend an investigation on the spatial and temporal characteristics of the meteorological data set required to yield adequate comparisons between models and field measurements, so that the models can be fairly judged. Vertical SSP from RASS, SODAR wind profiles as well as mast wind and temperature data from a flat terrain site and measured over a period of several months are used to evaluate applicability of the logarithmic approximation for a stability classification scheme proposed by the HARMONOISE working group

  14. Auroral lights created by high-power radiowaves in the ionospheric E region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kagan, L M

    2008-01-01

    Artificial auroral lights are optical emissions induced by high-power radiowaves in a manner similar to the creation of natural auroral lights due to precipitation of superthermal electrons. Here the Earth's atmosphere itself plays the role of a plasma laboratory. A high-power radio-transmitter creates superthermal electrons in situ due to radiowave interactions with the ionospheric plasma. Low-altitude (85-125 km) artificial aurora is a relatively rare phenomenon observed for the first time about 10 years ago. Analysis of available observations shows that its intensity and structure, as well as the very possibility of its generation at these altitudes, depend largely on the presence and features of so-called sporadic ionization, best known for its effect on navigation and communication. Thus, all other parameters unchanged, a 20 times increase in the height-extent of sporadic ionization clouds could under certain circumstances result in a 27-fold increase in the intensity of the low-altitude artificial aurora. Understanding the morphology and typical features of sporadic ionization clouds for a given location would allow proper planning of experimental campaigns and noticeably extend our knowledge of the atmosphere and its use for human needs. Equally important is that low-altitude artificial auroras give information about the horizontal structure and dynamics of E-region sporadic ionization, the airglow-source region, the energy of superthermal electrons and perhaps the local atmospheric temperature and water vapor content at 80-90 km

  15. User's guide for ALEX: uncertainty propagation from raw data to final results for ORELA transmission measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, N.M.

    1984-02-01

    This report describes a computer code (ALEX) developed to assist in AnaLysis of EXperimental data at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA). Reduction of data from raw numbers (counts per channel) to physically meaningful quantities (such as cross sections) is in itself a complicated procedure; propagation of experimental uncertainties through that reduction procedure has in the past been viewed as even more difficult - if not impossible. The purpose of the code ALEX is to correctly propagate all experimental uncertainties through the entire reduction procedure, yielding the complete covariance matrix for the reduced data, while requiring little additional input from the eperimentalist beyond that which is required for the data reduction itself. This report describes ALEX in detail, with special attention given to the case of transmission measurements (the code itself is applicable, with few changes, to any type of data). Application to the natural iron measurements of D.C. Larson et al. is described in some detail

  16. Fungicidal Effects of Plasma and Radio-Wave Pre-treatments on Seeds of Grain Crops and Legumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filatova, Irina; Azharonok, Viktor; Shik, Alexander; Antoniuk, Alexandra; Terletskaya, Natalia

    An influence of RF plasma and RF electromagnetic field pre-treatments on level of fungal infection of some important agricultural plants has been studied. It is shown that pre-sowing plasma and radio-wave seeds treatments contribute to their germination enhancement and plant productivity improvement owing to stimulative and fungicidal effect of plasma and RF electromagnetic field irradiation.

  17. A method to measure the diffusion coefficient by neutron wave propagation for limited samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woznicka, U.

    1986-03-01

    A study has been made of the use of the neutron wave and pulse propagation method for measurement of thermal neutron diffusion parameters. Earlier works an homogenous and heterogeneous media are reviewed. A new method is sketched for the determination of the diffusion coefficient for samples of limited size. The principle is to place a relatively thin slab of the material between two blocks of a medium with known properties. The advantages and disadvantages of the method are discussed. (author)

  18. Propagation of Measurement-While-Drilling Mud Pulse during High Temperature Deep Well Drilling Operations

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Hongtao; Meng, Yingfeng; Li, Gao; Wei, Na; Liu, Jiajie; Ma, Xiao; Duan, Mubai; Gu, Siman; Zhu, Kuanliang; Xu, Xiaofeng

    2013-01-01

    Signal attenuates while Measurement-While-Drilling (MWD) mud pulse is transmited in drill string during high temperature deep well drilling. In this work, an analytical model for the propagation of mud pulse was presented. The model consists of continuity, momentum, and state equations with analytical solutions based on the linear perturbation analysis. The model can predict the wave speed and attenuation coefficient of mud pulse. The calculated results were compared with the experimental dat...

  19. Measurement of RF propagation around corners in underground mines and tunnels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacksha, R; Zhou, C

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports measurement results for radio frequency (RF) propagation around 90° corners in tunnels and underground mines, for vertically, horizontally and longitudinally polarized signals. Measurements of signal power attenuation from a main entry into a crosscut were performed at four frequencies - 455, 915, 2450 and 5800 MHz - that are common to underground radio communication systems. From the measurement data, signal power loss was determined as a function of signal coupling from the main entry into the crosscut. The resultant power loss data show there are many factors that contribute to power attenuation from a main entry into a crosscut, including frequency, antenna polarization and cross-sectional entry dimensions.

  20. Measurements of UWB Pulse Propagation Along a Wind Turbine Blade at 1 to 20 GHz

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hejselbæk, Johannes; Syrytsin, Igor A.; Eggers, Patrick Claus F.

    2018-01-01

    This paper describes propagation measurements of an Ultra Wide Band (UWB) pulse along a full-scale wind turbine blade. The aim is to use the UWB channel characteristics to determine the deflection of the wind turbine blade under different wind loads. The frequency response is measured from 1 to 20...... the reflection originates a ray-tracing study incorporating a model of the curvature of the blade have been conducted. This showed the area causing the reflections depended highly on the placement of the antenna on the wind turbine blade....

  1. Polarisation and propagation of Lion Roars in the dusk side Magnetosheath

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Maksimovic, M.; Harvey, C. C.; Santolík, Ondřej; Lacombe, C.; De Conchy, Y.; Hubert, D.; Pantellini, F.; Cornilleau-Werhlin, N.; Dandouras, I.; Lucek, E. A.; Balogh, A.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 19, - (2001), s. 1429-1438 ISSN 0992-7689 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/01/1064; GA MŠk ME 467 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3042911 Keywords : Magnetospheric physics (magnetosheath * plasma waves and instabilities) * Radio science (radiowave propagation) Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.199, year: 2001

  2. Indoor Propagation Measurement for WLAN Systems Operating in 2.45 GHz ISM Band

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Pechac

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available For a planning of indoor Wireless LAN systems working in the ISMband, the signal propagation prediction is needed. In this article, themeasurement campaign based on two types of measurements at 2.45 GHz isintroduced. The first type of the measurement was a classicalnarrowband signal level measurement within indoor scenario withoutpresence of people. The aim of this measurement was to find empiricalparameters for COST231 Multi-Wall and One-Slope models. In order tostatistically describe the time varying nature of the received envelopeof the signal, at WLAN 2.45 GHz band, the second part of measurementcampaign was accomplished. In this case, the signal level was measuredusing commercial WLAN PCMCIA cards in two notebooks. Probabilitydensity functions and corresponding cumulative distribution functionswere set and discussed based on the specific locations and orientationof one of the notebooks. Results from both measurement campaigns werecompared and conclusions are drawn for the needs of practical planningof indoor WLAN systems coverage.

  3. Uncertainty propagation for the coulometric measurement of the plutonium concentration in MOX-PU4.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2017-11-07

    This GUM WorkbenchTM propagation of uncertainty is for the coulometric measurement of the plutonium concentration in a Pu standard material (C126) supplied as individual aliquots that were prepared by mass. The C126 solution had been prepared and as aliquoted as standard material. Samples are aliquoted into glass vials and heated to dryness for distribution as dried nitrate. The individual plutonium aliquots were not separated chemically or otherwise purified prior to measurement by coulometry in the F/H Laboratory. Hydrogen peroxide was used for valence adjustment. The Pu assay measurement results were corrected for the interference from trace iron in the solution measured for assay. Aliquot mass measurements were corrected for air buoyancy. The relative atomic mass (atomic weight) of the plutonium from X126 certoficate was used. The isotopic composition was determined by thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) for comparison but not used in calculations.

  4. Measurements of delayed hydride cracking propagation rate in the radial direction of Zircaloy-2 cladding tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubo, T., E-mail: kubo@nfd.co.jp [Nippon Nuclear Fuel Development Co., Ltd., 2163 Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Kobayashi, Y. [M.O.X. Co., Ltd., 1828-520 Hirasu-cho, Mito, Ibaraki 311-0853 (Japan); Uchikoshi, H. [Nippon Nuclear Fuel Development Co., Ltd., 2163 Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan)

    2012-08-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The delayed hydride cracking (DHC) velocity of Zircaloy-2 was measured. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The velocity followed the Arrhenius law up to 270 Degree-Sign C. Activation energy was 49 kJ/mol. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The threshold stress intensity factor for the DHC was from 4 to 6 MPa m{sup 1/2}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An increase in material strength accelerated the DHC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Precipitation and fracture of hydrides at a crack tip is responsible for the DHC. - Abstract: Delayed hydride cracking (DHC) tests of Zircaloy-2 cladding tubes were performed in the chamber of a scanning electron microscope (SEM) to directly observe the crack propagation and measure the crack velocity in the radial direction of the tubes. Pre-cracks were produced at the outer surfaces of the tubes. Hydrogen contents of the tubes were from 90 ppm to 130 ppm and test temperatures were from 225 Degree-Sign C to 300 Degree-Sign C. The crack velocity followed the Arrhenius law at temperatures lower than about 270 Degree-Sign C with apparent activation energy of about 49 kJ/mol. The upper temperature limit for DHC, above which DHC did not occur, was about 280 Degree-Sign C. The threshold stress intensity factor for the initiation of the crack propagation, K{sub IH}, was from about 4 MPa m{sup 1/2} to 6 MPa m{sup 1/2}, almost independent of temperature. An increase in 0.2% offset yield stress of the material accelerated the crack velocity and slightly decreased K{sub IH}. Detailed observations of crack tip movement showed that cracks propagated in an intermittent fashion and the propagation gradually approached the steady state as the crack depth increased. The SEM observations also showed that hydrides were formed at a crack tip and a number of micro-cracks were found in the hydrides. It was presumed from these observations that the repetition of precipitation and fracture of hydrides at the crack tip would be

  5. On ionospheric investigations by coherent radiowaves emitted from artificial Earth satellites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al'fert, Ja. L.

    1976-01-01

    Results of radio-investigations of the ionosphere with the help of coherent radiowaves emitted by beacons placed on artificial Earth satellites are given. The data discussed cover the period from 1958, after the launch of Sputniks 1 and 3, until the last years, when the geostationary satellites ATS were launched. It is shown that up to the present justice has not been done in these experiments to investigations of the local properties of the near Earth plasma. This is a great deficiency in this field of investigation. Data are given which illustrate results of investigations of local ionospheric characteristics. Such data may help to solve some problems in the present stage of the near Earth plasma study. A new possibility of radio-investigation of the near Earth plasma with the help of a chain of satellites connected together is pointed out. (Auth.)

  6. Propagation based phase retrieval of simulated intensity measurements using artificial neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Z. D. C.

    2018-04-01

    Determining the phase of a wave from intensity measurements has many applications in fields such as electron microscopy, visible light optics, and medical imaging. Propagation based phase retrieval, where the phase is obtained from defocused images, has shown significant promise. There are, however, limitations in the accuracy of the retrieved phase arising from such methods. Sources of error include shot noise, image misalignment, and diffraction artifacts. We explore the use of artificial neural networks (ANNs) to improve the accuracy of propagation based phase retrieval algorithms applied to simulated intensity measurements. We employ a phase retrieval algorithm based on the transport-of-intensity equation to obtain the phase from simulated micrographs of procedurally generated specimens. We then train an ANN with pairs of retrieved and exact phases, and use the trained ANN to process a test set of retrieved phase maps. The total error in the phase is significantly reduced using this method. We also discuss a variety of potential extensions to this work.

  7. Plasma density measurements from the GEOS-1 relaxation sounder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Etcheto, J.; Bloch, J.J.

    1978-01-01

    The relaxation sounder uses the characteristics of the propagation of radiowaves to sound the plasma surrounding the spacecraft. It determines, in particular, the plasma frequency, which gives the electron density. Measurements over the whole dayside of the magnetosphere, from the evening to the night sectors, are now available. The behaviour of the plasma resonance depends on local time, the nighttime echoes being generally weaker. Density measurements thus obtained are shown and discussed in the context of what is presently known about the plasma distribution in the magnetosphere. In particular, the density around apogee is studied as a function of magnetic activity. On the dayside, it appears to vary between a few and a few tens of electrons per cubic centimeter. The evolution of the density profile for several consecutive days is studied and interpreted tracing back the drift of the particles. (Auth.)

  8. An experiment to measure the one-way velocity of propagation of electromagnetic radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolen, P.; Torr, D. G.

    1982-01-01

    An experiment involving commercially available instrumentation to measure the velocity of the earth with respect to absolute space is described. The experiment involves the measurement of the one-way propagation velocity of electromagnetic radiation down a high-quality coaxial cable. It is demonstrated that the experiment is both physically meaningful and exceedingly simple in concept and in implementation. It is shown that with currently available commercial equipment one might expect to detect a threshold value for the component of velocity of the earth's motion with respect to absolute space in the equatorial plane of approximately 10 km/s, which greatly exceeds the velocity resolution required to detect the motion of the solar system with respect to the center of the galaxy.

  9. Experimental measurements of lower-hybrid wave propagation in the Versator II tokamak using microwave scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohatgi, R.; Chen, K.; Bekefi, G.; Bonoli, P.; Luckhardt, S.C.; Mayberry, M.; Porkolab, M.; Villasenor, J.

    1991-01-01

    A series of 139 GHz microwave scattering experiments has been performed on the Versator II tokamak (B. Richards, Ph.D. thesis, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1981) to study the propagation of externally launched 0.8 GHz lower-hybrid waves. During lower-hybrid current drive, the launched waves are found to follow a highly directional resonance cone in the outer portion of the plasma. Wave power is also detected near the center of the plasma, and evidence of wave absorption is seen. Scattering of lower-hybrid waves in k space by density fluctuations appears to be a weak effect, although measurable frequency broadening by density fluctuations is found, Δω/ω=3x10 -4 . In the detectable range (2.5 parallel parallel spectra inferred from the scattering measurements are quite similar above and below the current drive density limit. Numerical modeling of these experiments using ray tracing is also presented

  10. Synchronization of streak and framing camera measurements of an intense relativistic electron beam propagating through gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weidman, D.J.; Murphy, D.P.; Myers, M.C.; Meger, R.A.

    1994-01-01

    The expansion of the radius of a 5 MeV, 20 kA, 40 ns electron beam from SuperIBEX during propagation through gas is being measured. The beam is generated, conditions, equilibrated, and then passed through a thin foil that produces Cherenkov light, which is recorded by a streak camera. At a second location, the beam hits another Cherenkov emitter, which is viewed by a framing camera. Measurements at these two locations can provide a time-resolved measure of the beam expansion. The two measurements, however, must be synchronized with each other, because the beam radius is not constant throughout the pulse due to variations in beam current and energy. To correlate the timing of the two diagnostics, several shots have been taken with both diagnostics viewing Cherenkov light from the same foil. Experimental measurements of the Cherenkov light from one foil viewed by both diagnostics will be presented to demonstrate the feasibility of correlating the diagnostics with each other. Streak camera data showing the optical fiducial, as well as the final correlation of the two diagnostics, will also be presented. Preliminary beam radius measurements from Cherenkov light measured at two locations will be shown

  11. Propagation of measurement accuracy to biomass soft-sensor estimation and control quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinwandter, Valentin; Zahel, Thomas; Sagmeister, Patrick; Herwig, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    In biopharmaceutical process development and manufacturing, the online measurement of biomass and derived specific turnover rates is a central task to physiologically monitor and control the process. However, hard-type sensors such as dielectric spectroscopy, broth fluorescence, or permittivity measurement harbor various disadvantages. Therefore, soft-sensors, which use measurements of the off-gas stream and substrate feed to reconcile turnover rates and provide an online estimate of the biomass formation, are smart alternatives. For the reconciliation procedure, mass and energy balances are used together with accuracy estimations of measured conversion rates, which were so far arbitrarily chosen and static over the entire process. In this contribution, we present a novel strategy within the soft-sensor framework (named adaptive soft-sensor) to propagate uncertainties from measurements to conversion rates and demonstrate the benefits: For industrially relevant conditions, hereby the error of the resulting estimated biomass formation rate and specific substrate consumption rate could be decreased by 43 and 64 %, respectively, compared to traditional soft-sensor approaches. Moreover, we present a generic workflow to determine the required raw signal accuracy to obtain predefined accuracies of soft-sensor estimations. Thereby, appropriate measurement devices and maintenance intervals can be selected. Furthermore, using this workflow, we demonstrate that the estimation accuracy of the soft-sensor can be additionally and substantially increased.

  12. MEASURING THE PERFORMANCE OF SIMILARITY PROPAGATION IN AN SEMANTIC SEARCH ENGINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Jayanthi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In the current scenario, web page result personalization is playing a vital role. Nearly 80 % of the users expect the best results in the first page itself without having any persistence to browse longer in URL mode. This research work focuses on two main themes: Semantic web search through online and Domain based search through offline. The first part is to find an effective method which allows grouping similar results together using BookShelf Data Structure and organizing the various clusters. The second one is focused on the academic domain based search through offline. This paper focuses on finding documents which are similar and how Vector space can be used to solve it. So more weightage is given for the principles and working methodology of similarity propagation. Cosine similarity measure is used for finding the relevancy among the documents.

  13. Direct measurements of the velocity and thickness of ''explosively'' propagating buried molten layers in amorphous silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowndes, D.H.; Jellison, G.E. Jr.; Pennycook, S.J.; Withrow, S.P.; Mashburn, D.N.

    1986-01-01

    Simultaneous infrared (1152 nm) and visible (633 nm) reflectivity measurements with nanosecond resolution were used to study the initial formation and subsequent motion of pulsed KrF laser-induced ''explosively'' propagating buried molten layers in ion implantation-amorphized silicon. The buried layer velocity decreases with depth below the surface, but increases with KrF laser energy density; a maximum velocity of about 14 m/s was observed, implying an undercooling-velocity relationship of approx. 14 K/(m/s). Z-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy was used to form a direct chemical image of implanted Cu ions transported by the buried layer and showed that the final buried layer thickness was <15 nm

  14. Part two: Error propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picard, R.R.

    1989-01-01

    Topics covered in this chapter include a discussion of exact results as related to nuclear materials management and accounting in nuclear facilities; propagation of error for a single measured value; propagation of error for several measured values; error propagation for materials balances; and an application of error propagation to an example of uranium hexafluoride conversion process

  15. Propagation Measurements and Comparison with EM Techniques for In-Cabin Wireless Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nektarios Moraitis

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results of a narrowband measurement campaign conducted inside a Boeing 737–400 aircraft, the objective being the development of a propagation prediction model which can be used in the deployment of in-cabin wireless networks. The measurements were conducted at three different frequency bands: 1.8, 2.1, and 2.45 GHz, representative of several wireless services. Both a simple, empirical, inverse distance power law and a deterministic, site-specific model were investigated. Parameters for the empirical model were extracted from the measurements at different locations inside the cabin: aisle and seats. Additionally, a statistical characterization of the multipath scenario created by the transmitted signal and the various cabin elements is presented. The deterministic model, based on Physical Optics (PO techniques, provides a reasonable match with the empirical results. Finally, measurements and modeling results are provided for the penetration loss into the cabin (or out of the cabin, representative of interference scenarios.

  16. In-situ Measurements of the Direction of Propagation of Pump Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, H. G.; Bernhardt, P. A.; Leyser, T.; Siefring, C. L.

    2017-12-01

    In the course of an experiment to modify the ionosphere, the direction of pump wave propagation is affected by density gradients in the horizontal and vertical directions, fundamentally affecting wave-energy transport. Horizontal gradients on various scales may await a modification attempt as a preexisting state of the ionosphere and/or be changed by the deposition of heater radio-frequency energy. In the results from the Radio Receiver Instrument (RRI) in the enhanced Polar Outflow Probe (e-POP), we have recorded on the order of 100 flights over ionospheric heaters revealing a variety of processes that high-frequency pump waves experience in the ionosphere. E-POP flies on the Canadian satellite CASSIOPE in an elliptic (320 x 1400 km), highly-inclined (81°) orbit. High frequency measurements have been/are being made near SPEAR, HAARP, Sura, EISCAT Heating and Arecibo. Electromagnetic waves from ground-based heaters are detected by the two, orthogonal, 6-m dipoles on the RRI. The high input impedance of the RRI means that the dipoles act as voltage probes, from which the electric field of incoming waves can be simply computed. When combined with cold-magnetoplasma electric-field theory, the relationship of voltages on the two orthogonal dipoles is used to deduce the direction of arrival of an incoming wave in three dimensions. We illustrate the technique by its application to analysis of signals from different transmitters. These results show a variety of pump-wave propagation directions, indicating the complexity of density structure within which modification might take place. Such complexity illustrates the importance of three-dimensional models of density in the vicinity of modification.

  17. Ionospheric propagation effects on spectral widths measured by SuperDARN HF radars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Vallières

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available SuperDARN HF radars provide a global survey of the large-scale convection transversely to the Earth's magnetic field in the high-latitude ionosphere. In addition to the mean plasma velocity, this network also provides measurements of spectral widths which are related to the level of turbulence of the sounded plasma. There is an increasing interest in using spectral widths in geophysical studies, since they are used to monitor the footprints of several magnetospheric regions. In the present paper, we show the effect of radio wave propagation through a typical turbulent ionosphere on spectral widths measured by SuperDARN radars. This effect has already been evidenced experimentally in a previous paper. Here, we model the effects of meso-scale structures on a radar wave front and study their impact on a typical measurement. Numerical simulations reproduce the effect evidenced experimentally and show the role of meso-scale structures (1-10km in the systematic bias that affects spectral width values. As in experimental data, this effect is shown to be increasing with decreasing radar frequency.

  18. Ionospheric propagation effects on spectral widths measured by SuperDARN HF radars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Vallières

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available SuperDARN HF radars provide a global survey of the large-scale convection transversely to the Earth's magnetic field in the high-latitude ionosphere. In addition to the mean plasma velocity, this network also provides measurements of spectral widths which are related to the level of turbulence of the sounded plasma. There is an increasing interest in using spectral widths in geophysical studies, since they are used to monitor the footprints of several magnetospheric regions. In the present paper, we show the effect of radio wave propagation through a typical turbulent ionosphere on spectral widths measured by SuperDARN radars. This effect has already been evidenced experimentally in a previous paper. Here, we model the effects of meso-scale structures on a radar wave front and study their impact on a typical measurement. Numerical simulations reproduce the effect evidenced experimentally and show the role of meso-scale structures (1-10km in the systematic bias that affects spectral width values. As in experimental data, this effect is shown to be increasing with decreasing radar frequency.

  19. Guided wave propagation as a measure of axial loads in rails

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Loveday, PW

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Guided wave propagation has been proposed as a means to monitor the axial loads in continuously welded railway rails although no practical system has been developed. In this paper, the influence of axial load on the guided wave propagation...

  20. Radio-Wave Tomography of Inhomogeneities in Biological Media with Multi-Frequency Sounding in the Range 2-8 GHZ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shipilov Sergey

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a method for detecting and mapping inhomogeneities in biological tissues using the radio-wave tomosynthesis method is presented. The proposed method of radio-wave tomosynthesis allows us to calculate the three-dimensional distribution of the permittivity of the space under study and, thereby, to detect tissue inhomogeneities and to determine their location and size. Due to their harmlessness for humans, these methods are suitable for dynamic observation of changes in the size of formation, in contrast to x-ray methods, for which regular doses of ionizing radiation are contraindicated. Therefore, the development of non-invasive methods for the search for inhomogeneities in biological media based on radio-wave sounding, which makes it possible to identify pathological formations, is now very relevant.

  1. Measurement and Analysis of Multiple Output Transient Propagation in BJT Analog Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Nicolas J.-H.; Khachatrian, A.; Warner, J. H.; Buchner, S. P.; McMorrow, D.; Clymer, D. A.

    2016-08-01

    The propagation of Analog Single Event Transients (ASETs) to multiple outputs of Bipolar Junction Transistor (BJTs) Integrated Circuits (ICs) is reported for the first time. The results demonstrate that ASETs can appear at several outputs of a BJT amplifier or comparator as a result of a single ion or single laser pulse strike at a single physical location on the chip of a large-scale integrated BJT analog circuit. This is independent of interconnect cross-talk or charge-sharing effects. Laser experiments, together with SPICE simulations and analysis of the ASET's propagation in the s-domain are used to explain how multiple-output transients (MOTs) are generated and propagate in the device. This study demonstrates that both the charge collection associated with an ASET and the ASET's shape, commonly used to characterize the propagation of SETs in devices and systems, are unable to explain quantitatively how MOTs propagate through an integrated analog circuit. The analysis methodology adopted here involves combining the Fourier transform of the propagating signal and the current-source transfer function in the s-domain. This approach reveals the mechanisms involved in the transient signal propagation from its point of generation to one or more outputs without the signal following a continuous interconnect path.

  2. Mechanical Property Measurements and Fracture Propagation Analysis of Longmaxi Shale by Micro-CT Uniaxial Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minyue Zhou

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical properties and fracture propagation of Longmaxi shale loading under uniaxial compression were measured using eight cylindrical shale specimens (4 mm in diameter and 8 mm in height, with the bedding plane oriented at 0° and 90° to the axial loading direction, respectively, by micro computed tomography (micro-CT. Based on the reconstructed three-dimensional (3-D CT images of cracks, different stages of the crack growth process in the 0° and 90° orientation specimen were revealed. The initial crack generally occurred at relatively smaller loading force in the 0° bedding direction specimen, mainly in the form of tensile splitting along weak bedding planes. Shear sliding fractures were dominant in the specimens oriented at 90°, with a small number of parallel cracks occurring on the bedding plane. The average thickness and volume of cracks in the 90° specimen is higher than those for the specimen oriented at 0°. The geometrical characterization of fractures segmented from CT scan binary images shows that a specific surface area correlates with tortuosity at the different load stages of each specimen. The 3-D box-counting dimension (BCD calculations can accurately reflect crack evolution law in the shale. The results indicate that the cracks have a more complex pattern and rough surface at an orientation of 90°, due to crossed secondary cracks and shear failure.

  3. Propagation of Measurement-While-Drilling Mud Pulse during High Temperature Deep Well Drilling Operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongtao Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Signal attenuates while Measurement-While-Drilling (MWD mud pulse is transmited in drill string during high temperature deep well drilling. In this work, an analytical model for the propagation of mud pulse was presented. The model consists of continuity, momentum, and state equations with analytical solutions based on the linear perturbation analysis. The model can predict the wave speed and attenuation coefficient of mud pulse. The calculated results were compared with the experimental data showing a good agreement. Effects of the angular frequency, static velocity, mud viscosity, and mud density behavior on speed and attenuation coefficients were included in this paper. Simulated results indicate that the effects of angular frequency, static velocity, and mud viscosity are important, and lower frequency, viscosity, and static velocity benefit the transmission of mud pulse. Influenced by density behavior, the speed and attenuation coefficients in drill string are seen to have different values with respect to well depth. For different circulation times, the profiles of speed and attenuation coefficients behave distinctly different especially in lower section. In general, the effects of variables above on speed are seen to be small in comparison.

  4. Evaluation of Concurrent Thermal IR Atmospheric Propagation and Aerosol Particle Size Distribution Measurements at Gotland, Sweden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlson, R.; Tong, R.; Leeuw, G. de

    1998-01-01

    Paper presented at the RTO SET Symposium on E-O Propagation, Signature and System Performance Under Adverse Meteorological Conditions Considering Out-of-Area Operations, held at the Italian Air Force Academy, Naples, Italy, 16-19 March 1998.......Paper presented at the RTO SET Symposium on E-O Propagation, Signature and System Performance Under Adverse Meteorological Conditions Considering Out-of-Area Operations, held at the Italian Air Force Academy, Naples, Italy, 16-19 March 1998....

  5. Measurements of the propagation speed of 511 KeV {gamma}-rays in air and other material media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavalcante, Jose T.P.D.; Silva, Paulo R.J.; Saitovitch, Henrique [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mails: thadeu@cbpf.br; prjs@cbpf.br; henrique@cbpf.br

    2007-07-01

    The propagation speeds of the 511 KeV {gamma}-rays were measured in several material media, based in a fast-slow coincidence method. The time-resolution of the instrumental system used to perform the experiments allows to get reliable results in covered distances of {approx} 40 cm. (author)

  6. IGA/SCC propagation rate measurements on alloy 600 steam generator tubing using a side stream model boiler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takamatsu, H.; Matsueda, K.; Matsunaga, T.; Kitera, T.; Arioka, K.; Tsuruta, T.; Okamoto, S.

    1993-01-01

    IGA/SCC crack propagation rate measurements using various types of IGA/SCC predefected ALloy 600 tubing were tested in model boilers, a side stream model boiler at Ohi Unit 1 and similar model boilers in the laboratory. Types of IGA/SCC predefects introduced from the outside of the tubing were as follows. (1) Actual IGA/SCC predefect introduced by high temperature caustic environments; (2) Longitudinal predefect by electrodischarge machining (EDM) method, and then crack tip fatigue was introduced to serve as the marker on the fractured surface (EDM slit + fatigue). IGA/SCC crack propagation rate was measured after the destructive examination by Cr concentration profile on fracture surface for (1), and observation of intergranular fractured surface propagated from the marked fatigue was employed for (2) and (3) after the model boiler tests. As for the water chemistry conditions, mainly AVT (high N 2 H 4 ) + boric acid (5-10ppm as B in SGs) treatment for both model boilers, and some of the tests for the model boiler in the laboratory employed AVT (high N 2 H 4 ) without boric acid. The results of IGA/SCC crack propagation rate measurements were compared with each other, and the three methods employed showed a good coincidence with the rate of ca. 1 x 10 -5 mm/Hr for AVT (high N 2 H 4 ) + boric acid treatment condition, in the case that crack tip boron intensity (B/O value by IMMA analysis) of more than 1 was observed

  7. Study on the effect of beam propagation through atmospheric turbulence on standoff nanosecond laser induced breakdown spectroscopy measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laserna, J J; Reyes, R Fernández; González, R; Tobaria, L; Lucena, P

    2009-06-08

    We report on an experimental study of the effect of atmospheric turbulence on laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) measurements. The characteristics of the atmosphere dictate specific performance constraints to this technology. Unlike classical laboratory LIBS systems where the distance to the sample is well known and characterized, LIBS systems working at several tens of meters to the target have specific atmospheric propagation conditions that cause the quality of the LIBS signals to be affected to a significant extent. Using a new LIBS based sensor system fitted with a nanosecond laser emitting at 1064 nm, propagation effects at distances of up to 120 m were investigated. The effects observed include wander and scintillation in the outgoing laser beam and in the return atomic emission signal. Plasmas were formed on aluminium targets. Average signal levels and signal fluctuations are measured so the effect of atmospheric turbulence on LIBS measurements is quantified.

  8. Traffic Accident Propagation Properties and Control Measures for Urban Links Based on Cellular Automata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian-sheng Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid development of urban transport and the sharp increase in vehicle population, traffic accidents form one of the most important causes of urban traffic congestion other than the imbalance between traffic supply and demand. Traffic congestion causes severe problems, such as environment contamination and energy dissipation. Therefore, it would be useful to analyze the congestion propagation characteristics after traffic accidents. Numerical analysis and computer simulation were two of the typical methods used at present to study the traffic congestion propagation properties. The latter was more widespread as it is more consistent with the actual traffic flow and more visual than the former. In this paper, an improved cellular automata (CA model was presented to analyze traffic congestion propagation properties and to evaluate control strategies. In order to apply them to urban traffic flow simulation, the CA models have been improved and expanded on. Computer simulations were built for congestion not only extending to the upstream intersection, but also the upstream intersection and the entire road network, respectively. Congestion propagation characteristics after road traffic accidents were obtained, and controls of different severities and durations were analyzed. The results provide the theoretical foundation and practical means for the control of congestion.

  9. Measurements and predictions of hooded crow (Corvus corone cornix) call propagation over open field habitats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kenneth Kragh; Larsen, Ole Næsbye; Attenborough, Keith

    2008-01-01

    In a study of hooded crow communication over open fields an excellent correspondence is found between the attenuation spectra predicted by a "turbulence-modified ground effect plus atmospheric absorption" model, and crow call attenuation data. Sound propagation predictions and background noise...

  10. Propagation of Nuclear Data Uncertainties in Integral Measurements by Monte-Carlo Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noguere, G.; Bernard, D.; De Saint-Jean, C. [CEA Cadarache, 13 - Saint Paul lez Durance (France)

    2006-07-01

    Full text of the publication follows: The generation of Multi-group cross sections together with relevant uncertainties is fundamental to assess the quality of integral data. The key information that are needed to propagate the microscopic experimental uncertainties to macroscopic reactor calculations are (1) the experimental covariance matrices, (2) the correlations between the parameters of the model and (3) the covariance matrices for the multi-group cross sections. The propagation of microscopic errors by Monte-Carlo technique was applied to determine the accuracy of the integral trends provided by the OSMOSE experiment carried out in the MINERVE reactor of the CEA Cadarache. The technique consists in coupling resonance shape analysis and deterministic codes. The integral trend and its accuracy obtained on the {sup 237}Np(n,{gamma}) reaction will be presented. (author)

  11. Uncertainty propagation for the coulometric measurement of the plutonium concentration in CRM126 solution provided by JAEA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales-Arteaga, Maria [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-11-07

    This GUM WorkbenchTM propagation of uncertainty is for the coulometric measurement of the plutonium concentration in a Pu standard material (C126) supplied as individual aliquots that were prepared by mass. The C126 solution had been prepared and as aliquoted as standard material. Samples are aliquoted into glass vials and heated to dryness for distribution as dried nitrate. The individual plutonium aliquots were not separated chemically or otherwise purified prior to measurement by coulometry in the F/H Laboratory. Hydrogen peroxide was used for valence adjustment.

  12. A propagation tool to connect remote-sensing observations with in-situ measurements of heliospheric structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouillard, A. P.; Lavraud, B.; Génot, V.; Bouchemit, M.; Dufourg, N.; Plotnikov, I.; Pinto, R. F.; Sanchez-Diaz, E.; Lavarra, M.; Penou, M.; Jacquey, C.; André, N.; Caussarieu, S.; Toniutti, J.-P.; Popescu, D.; Buchlin, E.; Caminade, S.; Alingery, P.; Davies, J. A.; Odstrcil, D.; Mays, L.

    2017-11-01

    The remoteness of the Sun and the harsh conditions prevailing in the solar corona have so far limited the observational data used in the study of solar physics to remote-sensing observations taken either from the ground or from space. In contrast, the 'solar wind laboratory' is directly measured in situ by a fleet of spacecraft measuring the properties of the plasma and magnetic fields at specific points in space. Since 2007, the solar-terrestrial relations observatory (STEREO) has been providing images of the solar wind that flows between the solar corona and spacecraft making in-situ measurements. This has allowed scientists to directly connect processes imaged near the Sun with the subsequent effects measured in the solar wind. This new capability prompted the development of a series of tools and techniques to track heliospheric structures through space. This article presents one of these tools, a web-based interface called the 'Propagation Tool' that offers an integrated research environment to study the evolution of coronal and solar wind structures, such as Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs), Corotating Interaction Regions (CIRs) and Solar Energetic Particles (SEPs). These structures can be propagated from the Sun outwards to or alternatively inwards from planets and spacecraft situated in the inner and outer heliosphere. In this paper, we present the global architecture of the tool, discuss some of the assumptions made to simulate the evolution of the structures and show how the tool connects to different databases.

  13. Simulation and analysis of TE wave propagation for measurement of electron cloud densities in particle accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonnad, Kiran G., E-mail: kgs52@cornell.edu [CLASSE, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States); Hammond, Kenneth C. [Department of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA (United States); Schwartz, Robert M. [CLASSE, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States); Veitzer, Seth A. [Tech-X Corporation, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2014-08-01

    The use of transverse electric (TE) waves has proved to be a powerful, noninvasive method for estimating the densities of electron clouds formed in particle accelerators. Results from the plasma simulation program VSim have served as a useful guide for experimental studies related to this method, which have been performed at various accelerator facilities. This paper provides results of the simulation and modeling work done in conjunction with experimental efforts carried out at the Cornell electron storage ring “Test Accelerator” (CESRTA). This paper begins with a discussion of the phase shift induced by electron clouds in the transmission of RF waves, followed by the effect of reflections along the beam pipe, simulation of the resonant standing wave frequency shifts and finally the effects of external magnetic fields, namely dipoles and wigglers. A derivation of the dispersion relationship of wave propagation for arbitrary geometries in field free regions with a cold, uniform cloud density is also provided.

  14. Hartmann-Shack wave front measurements for real time determination of laser beam propagation parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, B.; Luebbecke, M.; Mann, K.

    2006-01-01

    The suitability of the Hartmann-Shack technique for the determination of the propagation parameters of a laser beam is faced against the well known caustic approach according to the ISO 11146 standard. A He-Ne laser (543 nm) was chosen as test beam, both in its fundamental mode as well as after intentional distortion, introducing a moderate amount of spherical aberration. Results are given for the most important beam parameters M 2 , divergence, and beam widths, indicating an agreement of better than 10% and for adapted beam diameter <5%. Furthermore, the theoretical background, pros and cons, as well as some features of the software implementation for the Hartmann-Shack sensor are briefly reviewed

  15. How to measure propagation velocity in cardiac tissue: a simulation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre C. Linnenbank

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available To estimate conduction velocities from activation times in myocardial tissue, the average vector method computes all the local activation directions and velocities from local activation times and estimates the fastest and slowest propagation speed from these local values. The single vector method uses areas of apparent uniform elliptical spread of activation and chooses a single vector for the estimated longitudinal velocity and one for the transversal. A simulation study was performed to estimate the influence of grid size, anisotropy, and vector angle bin size. The results indicate that the average vector method can best be used if the grid- or bin-size is large, although systematic errors occur. The single vector method performs better, but requires human intervention for the definition of fiber direction. The average vector method can be automated.

  16. Propagation Measurements for Device-to-Device Communication in Forest Terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hejselbæk, Johannes; Nielsen, Jesper Ødum; Drewes, Christian

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we present a measurement campaign conducted in forest terrain with focus on path-loss. The aim of the measurement campaign is to study the coverage in a Device-to-Device (D2D) communication scenario. The measurement campaign was conducted in the LTE band 8 at 917.5 MHz...... with measurement ranges extending to more than 2.5 km. The measurements have been conducted using a purpose-developed measurement system with a dynamic range of 180 dB. The measurements showed that a D2D system with transmit and receive antenna at heights of 1.5 m could achieve a range of approximately 2 km using...

  17. Fabrication and Characterization of Targets for Shock Propagation and Radiation Burnthrough Measurements on Be-0.9 AT. % Cu Alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nobile, A.; Dropinski, S.C.; Edwards, J.M.; Rivera, G.; Margevicius, R.W.; Sebring, R.J.; Olson, R. E.; Tanner, D.L.

    2004-01-01

    Beryllium-copper alloy (Be0.9%Cu) ICF capsules are being developed for the pursuit of thermonuclear ignition at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Success of this capsule material requires that its shock propagation and radiation burnthrough characteristics be accurately understood. To this end, experiments are being conducted to measure the shock propagation and radiation burnthrough properties of Be0.9%Cu alloy. These experiments involve measurements on small Be0.9%Cu wedge, step and flat samples. Samples are mounted on 1.6-mm-diameter x 1.2-mm-length hohlraums that are illuminated by the OMEGA laser at the University of Rochester. X-rays produced by the hohlraum drive the sample. A streaked optical pyrometer detects breakout of the shock produced by the X-ray pulse. In this paper we describe synthesis of the alloy material, fabrication and characterization of samples, and assembly of the targets. Samples were produced from Be0.9%Cu alloy that was synthesized by hot isostatic pressing of Be powder and copper flake. Samples were 850 μm diameter disks with varying thickness in the case of wedge and step samples, and uniform thickness in the case of flat samples. Sample thickness varied in the range 10-90 μm. Samples were prepared by precision lathe machining and electric discharge machining. The samples were characterized by a Veeco white light interferometer and an optical thickness measurement device that simultaneously measured the upper and lower surface contours of samples using two confocal laser probes. Several campaigns with these samples have been conducted over the past two years

  18. Counter-Propagating Optical Trapping System for Size and Refractive Index Measurement of Microparticles

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Flynn, Richard A; Shao, Bing; Chachisvilis, Mirianas; Ozkan, Mihrimah; Esener, Sadik C

    2005-01-01

    .... Different from the current best technique for microparticles refractive index measurement, refractometry, a bulk technique requiring changing the fluid composition of the sample, our optical trap...

  19. L-Band Radiometers Measuring Salinity From Space: Atmospheric Propagation Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Niels; Hofman-Bang, Dorthe

    2005-01-01

    Microwave radiometers can measure sea surface salinity from space using L-band frequencies around 1.4 GHz. However, requirements to the accuracy of the measurements, in order to be satisfactory for the user, are so stringent that the influence of the intervening atmosphere cannot be neglected...

  20. A study on the propagation of measurement uncertainties into the result on a turbine performance test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Soo Yong; Park, Chan Woo

    2004-01-01

    Uncertainties generated from the individual measured variables have an influence on the uncertainty of the experimental result through a data reduction equation. In this study, a performance test of a single stage axial type turbine is conducted, and total-to-total efficiencies are measured at the various off-design points in the low pressure and cold state. Based on an experimental apparatus, a data reduction equation for turbine efficiency is formulated and six measured variables are selected. Codes are written to calculate the efficiency, the uncertainty of the efficiency, and the sensitivity of the efficiency uncertainty by each of the measured quantities. The influence of each measured variable on the experimental result is figured out. Results show that the largest Uncertainty Magnification Factor (UMF) value is obtained by the inlet total pressure among the six measured variables, and its value is always greater than one. The UMF values of the inlet total temperature, the torque, and the RPM are always one. The Uncertainty Percentage Contribution (UPC) of the RPM shows the lowest influence on the uncertainty of the turbine efficiency, but the UPC of the torque has the largest influence to the result among the measured variables. These results are applied to find the correct direction for meeting an uncertainty requirement of the experimental result in the planning or development phase of experiment, and also to offer ideas for preparing a measurement system in the planning phase

  1. Counter-Propagating Optical Trapping System for Size and Refractive Index Measurement of Microparticles

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Flynn, Richard A; Shao, Bing; Chachisvilis, Mirianas; Ozkan, Mihrimah; Esener, Sadik C

    2005-01-01

    We propose and demonstrate a novel approach to measure the size and refractive index of microparticles based on two beam optical trapping, where forward scattered light is detected to give information about the particle...

  2. Polarization, propagation, and deposition measurements during ECCD experiments on the DIII-D tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petty, C.C.; Luce, T.C.; Lin-Liu, Y.R.; Lohr, J.; Prater, R.; Austin, M.E.

    1999-03-01

    The power deposition profiles for different poloidal and toroidal launch angles have been determined by modulating the ECH power and measuring the electron temperature response. The peak of the measured power density follows the poloidal steering of the ECH launcher, and perpendicular launch gives a narrower deposition profile than does oblique (current drive) launch. The difference in wave refraction between X-mode and O-mode allows positive identification of an unwanted O-mode component of the launched beam

  3. Propagation of void fraction uncertainty measures in the RETRAN-3D simulation of the Peach Bottom turbine trip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinai, Paolo; Macian-Juan, Rafael; Chawla, Rakesh

    2011-01-01

    The paper describes the propagation of void fraction uncertainty, as quantified by employing a novel methodology developed at Paul Scherrer Institut, in the RETRAN-3D simulation of the Peach Bottom turbine trip test. Since the transient considered is characterized by a strong coupling between thermal-hydraulics and neutronics, the accuracy in the void fraction model has a very important influence on the prediction of the power history and, in particular, of the maximum power reached. It has been shown that the objective measures used for the void fraction uncertainty, based on the direct comparison between experimental and predicted values extracted from a database of appropriate separate-effect tests, provides power uncertainty bands that are narrower and more realistic than those based, for example, on expert opinion. The applicability of such an approach to best estimate, nuclear power plant transient analysis has thus been demonstrated.

  4. Development of a simulation program to study error propagation in the reprocessing input accountancy measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanfilippo, L.

    1987-01-01

    A physical model and a computer program have been developed to simulate all the measurement operations involved with the Isotopic Dilution Analysis technique currently applied in the Volume - Concentration method for the Reprocessing Input Accountancy, together with their errors or uncertainties. The simulator is apt to easily solve a number of problems related to the measurement sctivities of the plant operator and the inspector. The program, written in Fortran 77, is based on a particular Montecarlo technique named ''Random Sampling''; a full description of the code is reported

  5. Proceedings of the Twenty-First NASA Propagation Experiments Meeting (NAPEX XXI) and the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Propagation Studies Miniworkshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golshan, Nasser (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    The NASA Propagation Experimenters (NAPEX) meeting is convened each year to discuss studies supported by the NASA Propagation Program. Representatives from the satellite communications industry, academia and government who have an interest in space-ground radio wave propagation are invited to NAPEX meetings for discussions and exchange of information. The reports delivered at this meeting by program managers and investigators present recent activities and future plans. This forum provides an opportunity for peer discussion of work in progress, timely dissemination of propagation results, and close interaction with the satellite communications industry. NAPEX XXI took place in El Segundo, California on June 11-12, 1997 and consisted of three sessions. Session 1, entitled "ACTS Propagation Study Results & Outcome " covered the results of 20 station-years of Ka-band radio-wave propagation experiments. Session 11, 'Ka-band Propagation Studies and Models,' provided the latest developments in modeling, and analysis of experimental results about radio wave propagation phenomena for design of Ka-band satellite communications systems. Session 111, 'Propagation Research Topics,' covered a diverse range of propagation topics of interest to the space community, including overviews of handbooks and databases on radio wave propagation. The ACTS Propagation Studies miniworkshop was held on June 13, 1997 and consisted of a technical session in the morning and a plenary session in the afternoon. The morning session covered updates on the status of the ACTS Project & Propagation Program, engineering support for ACTS Propagation Terminals, and the Data Center. The plenary session made specific recommendations for the future direction of the program.

  6. A database of fragmentation cross section measurements applicable to cosmic ray propagation calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, H.J.; Engelage, J.; Jones, F.C.

    1989-08-01

    A database of single particle inclusive fragment production cross section measurements has been established and is accessible over common computer networks. These measurements have been obtained from both published literature and direct communication with experimenters and include cross sections for nuclear beams on H, He, and heavier targets, and for H and He beams on nuclear targets, for energies >30 MeV/nucleon. These cross sections are directly applicable to calculations involving cosmic ray nuclear interactions with matter. The data base includes projectile, target, and fragment specifications, beam energy, cross section with uncertainty, literature reference, and comment code. It is continuously updated to assure accuracy and completeness. Also available are widely used semi-empirical formulations for calculating production cross sections and excitation functions. In this paper we discuss the database in detail and describe how it can be accessed. We compare the measurements with semi-empirical calculations and point out areas where improved calculations and further cross section measurements are required. 5 refs., 2 figs

  7. Modeling and measuring sound propagation of hooded crow calls in open field habitats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kenneth Kragh; Larsen, Ole Næsbye; Attenborough, Keith

    representative of crow territorial communication and taking into account ground effect and air turbulence, we predict an optimal transmission frequency range between 0,5-1.6 kHz. In a natural open field crow habitat we measure, with sender and receiver heights of 2.8 m and transmission distances up to 320 m...

  8. Evaluation of Specialized Photoacoustic Absorption Chambers for Near-Millimeter Wave (NMMW) Propagation Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-08-01

    traveling a distance of only 8 inches. 3B. L. Bean and S. Perkowitz, 1976, "Far Infrared Transmission Measurements with an Optical Pumped FIR Laser," Appl ...32 ......... I k.4 102. D’Arcy, Edward M., "Accuracy Validation of the Modified Nike Hercules Radar," ASL-TP-J031, May 1979. 103. Rodriguez, Ruben

  9. Magneto-transport measurements of domain wall propagation in individual multi segmented cylindrical nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Mohammed, Hanan; Vidal, Enrique Vilanova; Ivanov, Yurii P.; Kosel, Jü rgen

    2016-01-01

    Magnetotransport measurements were performed on multisegmented Co/Ni nanowires fabricated by template-assisted electrodeposition. Individual nanowires were isolated and electrodes patterned to study their magnetization reversal process. The magnetoresistance reversal curve of the multisegmented nanowire exhibits a step in the switching field. Micromagnetic simulations of the magnetization reversal process are in agreement with the experimental findings and attribute the step at the switching field to the pinning of a domain wall at the interface of the Co/Ni nanowire.

  10. Magneto-transport measurements of domain wall propagation in individual multi segmented cylindrical nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Mohammed, Hanan

    2016-03-01

    Magnetotransport measurements were performed on multisegmented Co/Ni nanowires fabricated by template-assisted electrodeposition. Individual nanowires were isolated and electrodes patterned to study their magnetization reversal process. The magnetoresistance reversal curve of the multisegmented nanowire exhibits a step in the switching field. Micromagnetic simulations of the magnetization reversal process are in agreement with the experimental findings and attribute the step at the switching field to the pinning of a domain wall at the interface of the Co/Ni nanowire.

  11. Measurement of Spatial Coherence of Light Propagating in a Turbulent Atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Barcik

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A lot of issues have to be taken into account when designing a reliable free space optical communication link. Among these are e.g.,beam wander, fluctuation of optical intensity and loss of spatial coherence that are caused by atmospheric turbulence. This paper presents experimental measurements of spatial coherence of a laser beam. The experimental setup is based on Young's double pinhole experiment. Fringe patterns under atmospheric turbulence for four different pinhole separations are presented. From these fringe patterns, visibility is determined and the coherence radius is estimated.

  12. Propagation-of-uncertainty from contact angle and streaming potential measurements to XDLVO model assessments of membrane-colloid interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthu, Satish; Childress, Amy; Brant, Jonathan

    2014-08-15

    Membrane fouling assessed from a fundamental standpoint within the context of the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) model. The DLVO model requires that the properties of the membrane and foulant(s) be quantified. Membrane surface charge (zeta potential) and free energy values are characterized using streaming potential and contact angle measurements, respectively. Comparing theoretical assessments for membrane-colloid interactions between research groups requires that the variability of the measured inputs be established. The impact that such variability in input values on the outcome from interfacial models must be quantified to determine an acceptable variance in inputs. An interlaboratory study was conducted to quantify the variability in streaming potential and contact angle measurements when using standard protocols. The propagation of uncertainty from these errors was evaluated in terms of their impact on the quantitative and qualitative conclusions on extended DLVO (XDLVO) calculated interaction terms. The error introduced into XDLVO calculated values was of the same magnitude as the calculated free energy values at contact and at any given separation distance. For two independent laboratories to draw similar quantitative conclusions regarding membrane-foulant interfacial interactions the standard error in contact angle values must be⩽2.5°, while that for the zeta potential values must be⩽7 mV. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A Network-Based Impact Measure for Propagated Losses in a Supply Chain Network Consisting of Resilient Components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus Felix Bayta Valenzuela

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The topology of a supply chain network affects the impacts of disruptions in it. We formulate a network-based measure of the impact of a disruption loss in a supply chain propagating downstream from an originating node. The measure takes into account the loss profile of the originating node, the structure of the supply network, and the resilience of the network components. We obtain an analytical expression for the impact measure under a beta-distributed initial loss (generalizable to any continuous distribution supported on the interval 0,1, under a breakthrough scenario (in which a fraction of the initial production loss reaches a focal company downstream as opposed to containment upstream or at the originating point. Furthermore, we obtain a closed-form solution for a supply chain network with a k-ary tree topology; a numerical study is performed for a scale-free network and a random network. Our proposed approach enables the evaluation of potential losses for a focal company considering its supply chain network structure, which may help the company to plan or redesign a robust and resilient network in response to different types of disruptions.

  14. Assessment of the Dominant Path Model and Field Measurements for NLOS DTV Signal Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adonias, Geoflly L.; Carvalho, Joabson N.

    2018-03-01

    In Brazil, one of the most important telecommunications systems is broadcast television. Such relevance demands an extensive analysis to be performed chasing technical excellence in order to offer a better digital transmission to the user. Therefore, it is mandatory to evaluate the quality and strength of the Digital TV signal, through studies of coverage predictions models, allowing stations to be projected in a way that their respective signals are harmoniously distributed. The purpose of this study is to appraise measurements of digital television signal obtained in the field and to compare them with numerical results from the simulation of the Dominant Path Model. The outcomes indicate possible blocking zones and a low accumulated probability index above the reception threshold, as well as characterise the gain level of the receiving antenna, which would prevent signal blocking.

  15. Laboratory measurements of shock propagation through spherical cavities in an optically accessible polymer.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chojnicki, Kirsten; Cooper, Marcia A.; Guo, Shuyue

    2017-11-01

    Pore-scale aperture effects on flow in pore networks was studied in the laboratory to provide a parameterization for use in transport models. Four cases were considered: regular and irregular pillar/pore alignment with and without an aperture. The velocity field of each case was measured and simulated, providing quantitatively comparable results. Two aperture effect parameterizations were considered: permeability and transmission. Permeability values varied by an order of magnitude between the cases with and without apertures. However, transmission did not correlate with permeability. Despite having much greater permeability the regular aperture case permitted less transmission than the regular case. Moreover, both irregular cases had greater transmission than the regular cases, a difference not supported by the permeabilities. Overall, these findings suggest that pore-scale aperture effects on flow though a pore-network may not be adequately captured by properties such as permeability for applications that are interested in determining particle transport volume and timing.

  16. MANGO PROPAGATION

    OpenAIRE

    ALBERTO CARLOS DE QUEIROZ PINTO; VICTOR GALÁN SAÚCO; SISIR KUMAR MITRA; FRANCISCO RICARDO FERREIRA

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT This Chapter has the objectives to search, through the review of the available literature, important informations on the evolution of mango propagation regarding theoretical and practical aspects from cellular base of sexual propagation, nursery structures and organizations, substrate compositions and uses, importance of rootstock and scion selections, also it will be described the preparation and transport of the grafts (stem and bud) as well as the main asexual propagation methods...

  17. Case Studies on MHD Wave Propagation by the Exos-D Electric Field Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong-Seon Hwang

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available Magnetohydrodynamic wave phenomena have been investigated in the deep plasmasphere by the electric field measurements in the EXOS-D(Akebono satellite. EXOS-D has highly eccentric orbits(the perigee: 274km, the apogee: 10,500km, which allows relatively long observational time interval near the apogee region compared to othe satellites which pass by the same region with less eccentric orbits. Case studies are peformed on one month data of October in 1989 where the apogee is located near the equator and the magnetic local time is about 9:00-12:00 a.m. in the dayside plasmasphere. The observational region ranges from L=2 to L=3 and the magnetic latitude is restricted to less than 30 degress. The power spectrum is examined for each 128 point series of 8-sec averaged data through a FFT, which covers f=0-62.3 mHz frequency bands. The results are well consistent with field line resonances(FLRs and cavity modes in the plasmasphere.

  18. IGSCC crack propagation rate measurement in BWR environments. Executive summary of a Round Robin study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andresen, Peter L.

    1998-01-01

    Five of the world's best laboratories at performing stress corrosion crack growth studies - ABB Atom AB, AEA Technology, GE Corporate Research and Development Center, Studsvik Material AB, and VTT Manufacturing Technology, were selected to participate in a round robin to evaluate the quality and reproducibility of testing conditions and resulting stress corrosion crack growth rates in sensitized type 304 stainless steel in 288 deg C water. Heat treated, machined and fatigue pre-cracked specimens were provided to all laboratories, and detailed test procedures prescribed the use of active loading, reversed dc potential drop crack monitoring, a common reference electrode supplied to all laboratories by GE CRD (to be used along side each laboratory's own reference electrode), and highly specified water chemistry conditions. The ability of each laboratory to achieve optimal testing conditions varied, although all laboratories achieved an impressive standard of testing control. The most significant laboratory-to-laboratory differences were associated with their ability to achieve high purity autoclave outlet water, reproduce accurate measurements of corrosion potential on the test specimen, and provide high resolution crack following using a reversed dc potential drop. However, the most notable outcome of the program is the consistent observation by all laboratories that initiating and sustaining stress corrosion crack growth at constant load in sensitized type 304 stainless steel is difficult, despite the use of a moderately high stress intensity, and high dissolved oxygen and corrosion potential conditions. Concerns for specimen machining and pre-cracking were identified, although these factors were not the sole cause of difficulty in initiating and sustaining stress corrosion cracking. It was shown that many phases of specimen preparation and testing can have a large influence on the measured SCC response. Even under the best test conditions it is critical to ensure

  19. IGSCC crack propagation rate measurement in BWR environments. Executive summary of a Round Robin study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andresen, Peter L. [GE Corporate Research and Development, Schenectady, NY (United States)

    1998-12-31

    Five of the world`s best laboratories at performing stress corrosion crack growth studies - ABB Atom AB, AEA Technology, GE Corporate Research and Development Center, Studsvik Material AB, and VTT Manufacturing Technology, were selected to participate in a round robin to evaluate the quality and reproducibility of testing conditions and resulting stress corrosion crack growth rates in sensitized type 304 stainless steel in 288 deg C water. Heat treated, machined and fatigue pre-cracked specimens were provided to all laboratories, and detailed test procedures prescribed the use of active loading, reversed dc potential drop crack monitoring, a common reference electrode supplied to all laboratories by GE CRD (to be used along side each laboratory`s own reference electrode), and highly specified water chemistry conditions. The ability of each laboratory to achieve optimal testing conditions varied, although all laboratories achieved an impressive standard of testing control. The most significant laboratory-to-laboratory differences were associated with their ability to achieve high purity autoclave outlet water, reproduce accurate measurements of corrosion potential on the test specimen, and provide high resolution crack following using a reversed dc potential drop. However, the most notable outcome of the program is the consistent observation by all laboratories that initiating and sustaining stress corrosion crack growth at constant load in sensitized type 304 stainless steel is difficult, despite the use of a moderately high stress intensity, and high dissolved oxygen and corrosion potential conditions. Concerns for specimen machining and pre-cracking were identified, although these factors were not the sole cause of difficulty in initiating and sustaining stress corrosion cracking. It was shown that many phases of specimen preparation and testing can have a large influence on the measured SCC response. Even under the best test conditions it is critical to ensure

  20. Measurement and accompanying numerical simulation of fast crack propagation in modified DCB specimens made of Araldit B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoeckl, H.

    1991-06-01

    Numerical simulations of fracture-mechanical experiments with the aim of determining the stress intensity factor and its relation to the fracture velocity from the measured data of the crack length are problematic with the conventional DCB specimen loaded through wedge and bolt namely because of the not clearly definable limiting conditions. Experiments were therefore carried out with modified DCB specimens made of ARALDIT B, with the loading wedge pressed directly into the crack mouth. In the case of suitable specimen dimensions, K I already in the initial phase of crack propagation before arrival of the first reflected waves covers a great part of the relevant range. Numerical simulations agree well with the shadow-optical measurements in this phase. A specimen variant with T-shaped extension at the counterbearing is suitable especially for crack arrest investigations, since high fracture velocities and brief crack jump lengths can be combined in tests with this specimen. The constant member in the series development of the stress distribution at the crack tip according to Williams determines the directional stability of the crack. The theories established by Cotterell, Schindler, Streit and Finnie are discussed by means of the kinking cracks observed during some experiments. (orig.) [de

  1. Effect of the Ionosphere on Radiowave Systems (Based on Ionospheric Effects Symposium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-04-30

    expressed as + 2 K(i) 7 e V 3 where the + and - signs correspond to the polarization of the ordinary (0) and extra -ordinary (X) mode, and we is Zhe plasma...and 0 represent the extra - ordinary and ordinary modes of propagation. k 20 - "t t I t ? .& I % • I " r"V0N,/, I V, / ’ :• O •’ •~~ .. . 4’~"r’t...Luhmann, W.A. Kolasinski, and J.B. Blake, J. Ceophys. Res., 83, 5573, 1978. Renda , G. and J. Lowrence, JPL SP43-21, 91, 0975. Rugge, H.R., D.L

  2. Fabrication of 4-cylinder transparent engine and measurement of the flame propagation behavior with high speed camera at idle condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, S.H. [Yonsei University Graduate School, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chun, K.M. [Yonse University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-04-01

    A transparent engine for visualization study is made using a production 4 cylinder engine. Flame propagation results from individual combustion cycles with high-speed cinematography are presented and discussed for idle condition. The flame propagation image and the in-cylinder pressure were obtained simultaneously, and the image processing software which can calculate the flame area and the flame center was developed. The flame propagation behavior of each cycle shows high cyclic variations, and there are linear correlation between flame area and the in-cylinder pressure. (author). 4 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Propagation Measurement on Earth-Sky Signal Effects for High Speed Train Satellite Channel in Tropical Region at Ku-Band

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulmajeed H. J. Al-Jumaily

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in satellite communication technologies in the tropical regions have led to significant increase in the demand for services and applications that require high channel quality for mobile satellite terminals. Determination and quantification of these requirements are important to optimize service quality, particularly in the Malaysian region. Moreover, the tests on current satellite propagation models were carried out at temperate regions whose environmental characteristics are much different from those in Malaysia. This difference renders these propagation models inapplicable and irrelevant to tropical regions in general. This paper presents the link characteristics observations and performance analysis with propagation measurements done in tropical region to provide an accurate database regarding rain and power arches supply (PAs attenuations in the tropics for mobile scenarios. Hence, an extension for improving the performance assessment and analysis of satellite/transmission has been achieved. The Malaysia propagation measurement for mobile scenario (Malaysia-PMMS enables first-hand coarse estimation and attenuation analysis, because the attenuation resulting from rain and PAs becomes easily amenable for measurement. Parallel to that, the measured attenuation has been compared with that of the simulated output at noise floor level. The underlying analytical tool is validated by measurements specific at tropical region, for dynamic model of mobile satellite links operating at higher than 10 GHz.

  4. Measuring Temperature-Dependent Propagating Disturbances in Coronal Fan Loops Using Multiple SDO-AIA Channels and Surfing Transform Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uritskiy, Vadim M.; Davila, Joseph M.; Viall, Nicholeen M.; Ofman, Leon

    2013-01-01

    A set of co-aligned high resolution images from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) is used to investigate propagating disturbances (PDs) in warm fan loops at the periphery of a non-flaring active region NOAA AR 11082. To measure PD speeds at multiple coronal temperatures, a new data analysis methodology is proposed enabling quantitative description of sub visual coronal motions with low signal-to-noise ratios of the order of 0.1. The technique operates with a set of one-dimensional surfing signals extracted from position-timeplots of several AIA channels through a modified version of Radon transform. The signals are used to evaluate a two-dimensional power spectral density distribution in the frequency - velocity space which exhibits a resonance in the presence of quasi-periodic PDs. By applying this analysis to the same fan loop structures observed in several AIA channels, we found that the traveling velocity of PDs increases with the temperature of the coronal plasma following the square root dependence predicted for the slow mode magneto-acoustic wave which seems to be the dominating wave mode in the studied loop structures. This result extends recent observations by Kiddie et al. (2012) to a more general class of fan loop systems not associated with sunspots and demonstrating consistent slow mode activity in up to four AIA channels.

  5. Measure the Propagation of a Halo CME and Its Driven Shock with the Observations from a Single Perspective at Earth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Lei; Feng, Li; Liu, Siming [Key Laboratory of Dark Matter and Space Astronomy, Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 210008 Nanjing (China); Inhester, Bernd [Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 3, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany); Zhao, Xinhua, E-mail: lfeng@pmo.ac.cn, E-mail: inhester@mps.mpg.de [State Key Laboratory of Space Weather, National Space Science Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2017-02-01

    We present a detailed study of an Earth-directed coronal mass ejection (full-halo CME) event that happened on 2011 February 15, making use of white-light observations by three coronagraphs and radio observations by Wind /WAVES. We applied three different methods to reconstruct the propagation direction and traveling distance of the CME and its driven shock. We measured the kinematics of the CME leading edge from white-light images observed by Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory ( STEREO ) A and B , tracked the CME-driven shock using the frequency drift observed by Wind /WAVES together with an interplanetary density model, and obtained the equivalent scattering centers of the CME by the polarization ratio (PR) method. For the first time, we applied the PR method to different features distinguished from LASCO/C2 polarimetric observations and calculated their projections onto white-light images observed by STEREO-A and STEREO-B . By combining the graduated cylindrical shell (GCS) forward modeling with the PR method, we proposed a new GCS-PR method to derive 3D parameters of a CME observed from a single perspective at Earth. Comparisons between different methods show a good degree of consistence in the derived 3D results.

  6. Measurement and Analysis of Normal Zone Propagation in a ReBCO Coated Conductor at Temperatures Below 50K

    CERN Document Server

    van Nugteren, J; Wessel, S; Krooshoop, E; Nijhuis, A; ten Kate, H

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of the quasi-adiabatic normal zone propagation velocity and quench energies of a Superpower SCS4050 copper stabilised ReBCO superconducting tape are presented over a temperature range of 23 − 47 K; in parallel applied magnetic fields of 6, 10 and 14 T; and over a current range from 50% to 100% of Ic. The data are compared to results of analytic predictions and to one-dimensional numerical simulations. The availability of long lengths of ReBCO coated conductor makes the material interesting for many HTS applications operating well below the boiling point of liquid nitrogen, such as magnets and motors. One of the main issues in the design of such devices is quench detection and protection. At higher temperatures, the quench velocities in these materials are known to be about two orders of magnitude lower compared to low temperature superconductors, resulting in significantly smaller normal zones and the risk of higher peak temperatures. To investigate whether the same also holds for lower tempera...

  7. Propagation measurements and multipath channel modelling for line-of-sight links at 19.5 GHz

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Naicker, K

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The research aims to characterise the performance of the link by evaluating the effects of multipath propagation under various meteorological conditions. A LOS link was established between the Howard College and Westville campuses of UKZN and passes...

  8. Measurement and Analysis of Normal Zone Propagation in a ReBCO Coated at Temperatures Below 50 K (Proc. 25th ICEC & ICMC2014 conference)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Nugteren, J.; Dhalle, Marc M.J.; Wessel, Wilhelm A.J.; Krooshoop, Hendrikus J.G.; Nijhuis, Arend; ten Kate, Herman H.J.

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of the quasi-adiabatic normal zone propagation velocity and quench energies of a Superpower SCS4050 copper stabilised ReBCO superconducting tape are presented over a temperature range of 23 − 47 K; in parallel applied magnetic fields of 6, 10 and 14 T; and over a current range from 50%

  9. MANGO PROPAGATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALBERTO CARLOS DE QUEIROZ PINTO

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This Chapter has the objectives to search, through the review of the available literature, important informations on the evolution of mango propagation regarding theoretical and practical aspects from cellular base of sexual propagation, nursery structures and organizations, substrate compositions and uses, importance of rootstock and scion selections, also it will be described the preparation and transport of the grafts (stem and bud as well as the main asexual propagation methods their uses and practices. Finally, pattern and quality of graft mangos and their commercialization aspects will be discussed in this Chapter.

  10. Non-destructive root oxygen use measurement III : cucumber propagation in rockwool in a climate chamber, July-August 2001

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gérard, S.; Blok, C.

    2001-01-01

    Cucumbers were propagated in rockwool cubes in a climate cell for four weeks. The complete root system of each cucumber was enclosed in an airtight box. Each box was connected to an air bag, which acted as an air reservoir. A peristaltic pump ensured air circulation in the system. The goal of this

  11. Proceedings of Symposium on Climatic Parameters in Radiowave Propagation Prediction, Climpara 94 Held in Moscow, Russia on 13 May - 3 June 1994

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    data acquisition systems and run radio, but due to the short wave length the synchronously. light is more sensible to scattering by small Lidar...the raingauge records from the stations Jaen, in the central part of Andalusia, and Badajoz located in this region (Valladolid, Zamora, and Ciudad Real...EN 20-20.0.72H -- CIUDAD REAL Ix ( > to.I to- t-’l PERCENTAGE OF TIME ()PERCENTAGE OF ’TIME() Figure 9. Relative errors for Western Andalusia Figure 10

  12. A different interpretation of ''Measuring propagation speed of Coulomb fields'' by R. de Sangro, G. Finocchiaro, P. Patteri, M. Piccolo, G. Pizzella

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shabad, Anatoly [P.N. Lebedev Physics Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Tomsk State University, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2016-09-15

    We claim that the anti-relativistic statement in de Sangro et al. (Eur Phys J C 75:137, 2015) that the Coulomb field of a moving charge propagates rigidly with it, cannot as a matter of fact be inferred from the measurements reported in that reference. Registered is not the passing of the Coulomb disk, but the acceleration-dependent part of the Lienard-Wiechert field. (orig.)

  13. Radio-wave detection of ultra-high-energy neutrinos and cosmic rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huege, Tim; Besson, Dave

    2017-12-01

    Radio waves, perhaps because our terrestrial atmosphere and the cosmos beyond are uniquely transparent to them, or perhaps because they are macroscopic, so the basic instruments of detection (antennas) are easily constructible, arguably occupy a privileged position within the electromagnetic spectrum, and, correspondingly, receive disproportionate attention experimentally. Detection of radio-frequency radiation, at macroscopic wavelengths, has blossomed within the last decade as a competitive method for the measurement of cosmic particles, particularly charged cosmic rays and neutrinos. Cosmic-ray detection via radio emission from extensive air showers has been demonstrated to be a reliable technique that has reached a reconstruction quality of the cosmic-ray parameters competitive with more traditional approaches. Radio detection of neutrinos in dense media seems to be the most promising technique to achieve the gigantic detection volumes required to measure neutrinos at energies beyond the PeV-scale flux established by IceCube. In this article, we review radio detection both of cosmic rays in the atmosphere, as well as neutrinos in dense media.

  14. Energy and carbon balances in cheatgrass, an essay in autecology. [Shortwave radiation, radiowave radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinds, W.T.

    1975-01-01

    An experiment to determine the fates of energy and carbon in cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum L.) was carried out on steep (40/sup 0/) north- and south-facing slopes on a small earth mound, using many small lysimeters to emulate swards of cheatgrass. Meteorological conditions and energy fluxes that were measured included air and soil temperatures, relative humidity, wind speed, incoming shortwave radiation, net all-wave radiation, heat flux to the soil, and evaporation and transpiration separately. The fate of photosynthetically fixed carbon during spring growth was determined by analysis of the plant tissues into mineral nutrients, crude protein, crude fat, crude fiber, and nitrogen-free extract (NFE) for roots, shoots, and seeds separately. (auth)

  15. TH-C-17A-11: Hyperthermia-Driven Immunotherapy Using Non-Invasive Radiowaves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serda, R; Savage, D; Corr, S; Curley, S [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The sad truth is that cancer is blamed for the death of nearly one in four people in the US. Immunotherapy offers hope for stimulating cancer immunity leading to targeted killing of cancer cells and a preventative measure for cancer recurrence. Unfortunately, the clinical efficacy of immunotherapy has not yet been established, however novel approaches are being developed, including combining immunotherapy with traditional chemotherapy, radiotherapy or thermal therapy. Therapeutics such as radiofrequency (RF) ablation and select chemotherapeutics induce mild anticancer immune responses. This project seeks to enhance the immune responses stimulated by these agents by co-delivery of nanoparticle-based chemotherapeutics and immune modulators in the presence of RF induced hyperthermia. Methods: A 4T1 mouse model of breast cancer is used to test the ability of RF waves to enhance accumulation of nanoparticles in tumor tissue by increasing blood flow and extravation of nanoparticles from hyperpermeable vessels. Images of particle and cell trafficking in the tumor are captured using an integrated RF and confocal imaging system, and tumor growth is monitored by tumor bioluminescence and caliper measurements. Results: Here we demonstrate enhanced intratumoral blood flow induced by non-invasive RF waves and an increase in nanoparticle accumulation in the tumor. IL-12 is shown to have powerful anti-tumor effects leading to tumor regression and the release of Th1-biased cytokines. Doxorubicin nanoparticles combined with adjuvant nanoparticles exhibited superior antitumor effects to single agent therapy. Conclusion: RF therapy combined with nanotherapeutics is a promising approach to enhance the delivery of therapeutics to the tumor and to stimulate a tumor microenvironment that supports the development of cancer-specific immune responses. This research was supported by the National Institute of Health grant numbers U54 CA143837 and U54 CA151668, and the Kanzius

  16. TH-C-17A-11: Hyperthermia-Driven Immunotherapy Using Non-Invasive Radiowaves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serda, R; Savage, D; Corr, S; Curley, S

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The sad truth is that cancer is blamed for the death of nearly one in four people in the US. Immunotherapy offers hope for stimulating cancer immunity leading to targeted killing of cancer cells and a preventative measure for cancer recurrence. Unfortunately, the clinical efficacy of immunotherapy has not yet been established, however novel approaches are being developed, including combining immunotherapy with traditional chemotherapy, radiotherapy or thermal therapy. Therapeutics such as radiofrequency (RF) ablation and select chemotherapeutics induce mild anticancer immune responses. This project seeks to enhance the immune responses stimulated by these agents by co-delivery of nanoparticle-based chemotherapeutics and immune modulators in the presence of RF induced hyperthermia. Methods: A 4T1 mouse model of breast cancer is used to test the ability of RF waves to enhance accumulation of nanoparticles in tumor tissue by increasing blood flow and extravation of nanoparticles from hyperpermeable vessels. Images of particle and cell trafficking in the tumor are captured using an integrated RF and confocal imaging system, and tumor growth is monitored by tumor bioluminescence and caliper measurements. Results: Here we demonstrate enhanced intratumoral blood flow induced by non-invasive RF waves and an increase in nanoparticle accumulation in the tumor. IL-12 is shown to have powerful anti-tumor effects leading to tumor regression and the release of Th1-biased cytokines. Doxorubicin nanoparticles combined with adjuvant nanoparticles exhibited superior antitumor effects to single agent therapy. Conclusion: RF therapy combined with nanotherapeutics is a promising approach to enhance the delivery of therapeutics to the tumor and to stimulate a tumor microenvironment that supports the development of cancer-specific immune responses. This research was supported by the National Institute of Health grant numbers U54 CA143837 and U54 CA151668, and the Kanzius

  17. Method of measurement of near tip field of fast propagating cracks by means of interferometry; Hikari kansho ni yoru kosoku shinten kiretsu sentanbu no oryokuba keisokuho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, s.; Miyazaki, F. [Toyohashi University of Technology, Aichi (Japan); Nakane, K. [Nitto Denko Corp., Osaka (Japan)

    1994-12-15

    The measurement by an interference method at the tip of fast propagating cracks was investigated. To clarify the direction-dependent problem of dynamic cracks in a higher-order term, a high-precision stress field must be measured in every direction. In this method, the propagated interference fringes near the crack tip are shot at a speed of some hundreds of m/sec, and the coefficient of dynamic stress extension is obtained from the expression given when the number of fringes (`m`) in the interferences fringes is differentiated partially. The information below was obtained. The stress field in every direction can be analyzed by the interference method. However, the interference fringes in an area of absolute {theta} < 120{degree} are radially spread from the crack tip, so the precision of the interference fringes in the {gamma} direction deteriorates. In this area, the above partial differential is higher in precision when {alpha}m/{alpha}{theta} is used instead of {alpha}m/{alpha}{gamma}. The stress extension coefficient obtained by a caustic method can be verified if a stress field of {theta} = {plus_minus}72{degree} is analyzed by the interference method. By shooting in this optical system, the COD measurement, the K-value measurement of caustic light, and the stress field measurement by an interference method can be done simultaneously. 17 refs., 11 figs.

  18. Design of a Combined Beacon Receiver and Digital Radiometer for 40 GHz Propagation Measurements at the Madrid Deep Space Communications Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemba, Michael; Nessel, James; Morabito, David

    2017-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) have jointly developed an atmospheric propagation terminal to measure and characterize propagation phenomena at 40 GHz at the Madrid Deep Space Communications Complex (MDSCC) in Robledo de Chavela, Spain. The hybrid Q-band system utilizes a novel design which combines a 40 GHz beacon receiver and digital radiometer into the same RF front-end and observes the 39.402 GHz beacon of the European Space Agencys Alphasat Aldo Paraboni TDP5 experiment. Atmospheric measurements include gaseous absorption, rain fade, and scintillation. The radiometric measurement is calibrated by means of an included noise diode as well as tipping calibration. The goals of these measurements are to assist MDSCC mission operations as the facility increasingly supports Ka-band missions, as well as to contribute to the development and improvement of International Telecommunications Union (ITU) models for prediction of communications systems performance within the Q-band through the Aldo Paraboni Experiment. Herein, we provide an overview of the system design, characterization, and plan of operations which commenced at the MDSCC beginning in March 2017.

  19. UWB Propagation through Walls

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schejbal, V.; Bezoušek, P.; Čermák, D.; NĚMEC, Z.; Fišer, Ondřej; Hájek, M.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 1 (2006), s. 17-24 ISSN 1210-2512 R&D Projects: GA MPO(CZ) FT-TA2/030 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : Ultra wide band * UWB antennas * UWB propagation * multipath effects Subject RIV: JB - Sensors, Measurment, Regulation

  20. Beam propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermansson, B.R.

    1989-01-01

    The main part of this thesis consists of 15 published papers, in which the numerical Beam Propagating Method (BPM) is investigated, verified and used in a number of applications. In the introduction a derivation of the nonlinear Schroedinger equation is presented to connect the beginning of the soliton papers with Maxwell's equations including a nonlinear polarization. This thesis focuses on the wide use of the BPM for numerical simulations of propagating light and particle beams through different types of structures such as waveguides, fibers, tapers, Y-junctions, laser arrays and crystalline solids. We verify the BPM in the above listed problems against other numerical methods for example the Finite-element Method, perturbation methods and Runge-Kutta integration. Further, the BPM is shown to be a simple and effective way to numerically set up the Green's function in matrix form for periodic structures. The Green's function matrix can then be diagonalized with matrix methods yielding the eigensolutions of the structure. The BPM inherent transverse periodicity can be untied, if desired, by for example including an absorptive refractive index at the computational window edges. The interaction of two first-order soliton pulses is strongly dependent on the phase relationship between the individual solitons. When optical phase shift keying is used in coherent one-carrier wavelength communication, the fiber attenuation will suppress or delay the nonlinear instability. (orig.)

  1. Features of the non-collinear one-phonon anomalous light scattering controlled by elastic waves with elevated linear losses: potentials for multi-frequency parallel spectrum analysis of radio-wave signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shcherbakov, Alexandre S; Arellanes, Adan Omar

    2017-12-01

    During subsequent development of the recently proposed multi-frequency parallel spectrometer for precise spectrum analysis of wideband radio-wave signals, we study potentials of new acousto-optical cells exploiting selected crystalline materials at the limits of their capabilities. Characterizing these wide-aperture cells is non-trivial due to new features inherent in the chosen regime of an advanced non-collinear one-phonon anomalous light scattering by elastic waves with significantly elevated acoustic losses. These features can be observed simpler in uniaxial, tetragonal, and trigonal crystals possessing linear acoustic attenuation. We demonstrate that formerly studied additional degree of freedom, revealed initially for multi-phonon regimes of acousto-optical interaction, can be identified within the one-phonon geometry as well and exploited for designing new cells. We clarify the role of varying the central acoustic frequency and acoustic attenuation using the identified degree of freedom. Therewith, we are strongly restricted by a linear regime of acousto-optical interaction to avoid the origin of multi-phonon processes within carrying out a multi-frequency parallel spectrum analysis of radio-wave signals. Proof-of-principle experiments confirm the developed approaches and illustrate their applicability to innovative technique for an advanced spectrum analysis of wideband radio-wave signals with the improved resolution in an extended frequency range.

  2. Pulse wave propagation in a model human arterial network: Assessment of 1-D visco-elastic simulations against in vitro measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alastruey, Jordi; Khir, Ashraf W; Matthys, Koen S; Segers, Patrick; Sherwin, Spencer J; Verdonck, Pascal R; Parker, Kim H; Peiró, Joaquim

    2011-08-11

    The accuracy of the nonlinear one-dimensional (1-D) equations of pressure and flow wave propagation in Voigt-type visco-elastic arteries was tested against measurements in a well-defined experimental 1:1 replica of the 37 largest conduit arteries in the human systemic circulation. The parameters required by the numerical algorithm were directly measured in the in vitro setup and no data fitting was involved. The inclusion of wall visco-elasticity in the numerical model reduced the underdamped high-frequency oscillations obtained using a purely elastic tube law, especially in peripheral vessels, which was previously reported in this paper [Matthys et al., 2007. Pulse wave propagation in a model human arterial network: Assessment of 1-D numerical simulations against in vitro measurements. J. Biomech. 40, 3476-3486]. In comparison to the purely elastic model, visco-elasticity significantly reduced the average relative root-mean-square errors between numerical and experimental waveforms over the 70 locations measured in the in vitro model: from 3.0% to 2.5% (p<0.012) for pressure and from 15.7% to 10.8% (p<0.002) for the flow rate. In the frequency domain, average relative errors between numerical and experimental amplitudes from the 5th to the 20th harmonic decreased from 0.7% to 0.5% (p<0.107) for pressure and from 7.0% to 3.3% (p<10(-6)) for the flow rate. These results provide additional support for the use of 1-D reduced modelling to accurately simulate clinically relevant problems at a reasonable computational cost. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Remote Monitoring of the Heart Condition of Athletes by Measuring the Cardiac Action Potential Propagation Time Using a Wireless Sensor Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amang Sudarsono

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Highly performing athletes are susceptible to cardiac damage of several kinds which may be irreversible. The monitoring of heart rate and ECG waveforms from such subjects by wireless sensor networks has been reported in health and sports care documents. However, a more decisive parameter for instant to instant changes would be the time of Cardiac Action Potential Propagation. This time, which can be between 15-20 ms would shoot suddenly in acute stress in highly performing athletes for short durations. Repeated incidents of such rising values will tend to cause irreversible damage to the heart. We developed the technique of measuring this time and reporting it through a wireless sensor network to monitoring station.

  4. Polarization measurements through space-to-ground atmospheric propagation paths by using a highly polarized laser source in space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoshima, Morio; Takenaka, Hideki; Shoji, Yozo; Takayama, Yoshihisa; Koyama, Yoshisada; Kunimori, Hiroo

    2009-12-07

    The polarization characteristics of an artificial laser source in space were measured through space-to-ground atmospheric transmission paths. An existing Japanese laser communication satellite and optical ground station were used to measure Stokes parameters and the degree of polarization of the laser beam transmitted from the satellite. As a result, the polarization was preserved within an rms error of 1.6 degrees, and the degree of polarization was 99.4+/-4.4% through the space-to-ground atmosphere. These results contribute to the link estimation for quantum key distribution via space and provide the potential for enhancements in quantum cryptography worldwide in the future.

  5. A novel contra propagating ultrasonic flowmeter using glad buffer rods for high temperature measurement. Application to the oil and gas industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franca, Demartonne R. [Brasilia Univ., DF (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Eletrica; Cheng-Kuei Jen; Yuu Ono [National Research Council (NRC), Quebec (Canada). Industrial Materials Institute

    2005-07-01

    Ultrasonic techniques are attractive for process monitoring and control because they are non-intrusive, robust and inexpensive. Two common concerns limiting the high temperature performance of conventional ultrasonic systems for flow measurement are related to transducers and couplants. A suitable approach to overcoming this drawback is to insert a thermal isolating buffer rod with good ultrasonic performance (e.g., high signal-to-noise ratio). This requirement is important because, a priori, the noises generated in the buffer rod may bury the desired signals, so that no meaningful information is extracted. Besides protecting the ultrasonic transducers from overheating in applications such as high temperature flow measurements, buffer rods are also a solution for the couplant between the probe and tested sample, since their probing end can be directly wetted by fluids. Here, we propose clad buffer rods driven by shear transducers as the main building block of contra propagating ultrasonic flowmeters for high temperature application. It is demonstrated that the superior signal-to-noise ratio exhibit by clad buffer rods compared to the reported non-clad counterparts improve precision in transit-time measurement, leading to more accurate flow speed determination. In addition, it is shown that clad buffer rods generate specific ultrasonic signals for temperature calibration of flowmeters, allowing temperature variation while still measuring accurately the flow speed. These results are of interest for the oil and gas industries. (author)

  6. Study of gravity waves propagation in the thermosphere of Mars based on MAVEN/NGIMS density measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vals, M.

    2017-09-01

    We use MAVEN/NGIMS CO2 density measurements to analyse gravity waves in the thermosphere of Mars. In particular the seasonal/latitudinal variability of their amplitude is studied and interpreted. Key background parameters controlling the activity of gravity waves are analysed with the help of the Mars Climate Database (MCD). Gravity waves activity presents a good anti-correlation to the temperature variability retrieved from the MCD. An analysis at pressure levels is ongoing.

  7. Detection of Diffusion Heterogeneity in Single Particle Tracking Trajectories Using a Hidden Markov Model with Measurement Noise Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slator, Paddy J.; Cairo, Christopher W.; Burroughs, Nigel J.

    2015-01-01

    We develop a Bayesian analysis framework to detect heterogeneity in the diffusive behaviour of single particle trajectories on cells, implementing model selection to classify trajectories as either consistent with Brownian motion or with a two-state (diffusion coefficient) switching model. The incorporation of localisation accuracy is essential, as otherwise false detection of switching within a trajectory was observed and diffusion coefficient estimates were inflated. Since our analysis is on a single trajectory basis, we are able to examine heterogeneity between trajectories in a quantitative manner. Applying our method to the lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) receptor tagged with latex beads (4 s trajectories at 1000 frames s−1), both intra- and inter-trajectory heterogeneity were detected; 12–26% of trajectories display clear switching between diffusive states dependent on condition, whilst the inter-trajectory variability is highly structured with the diffusion coefficients being related by D 1 = 0.68D 0 − 1.5 × 104 nm2 s−1, suggestive that on these time scales we are detecting switching due to a single process. Further, the inter-trajectory variability of the diffusion coefficient estimates (1.6 × 102 − 2.6 × 105 nm2 s−1) is very much larger than the measurement uncertainty within trajectories, suggesting that LFA-1 aggregation and cytoskeletal interactions are significantly affecting mobility, whilst the timescales of these processes are distinctly different giving rise to inter- and intra-trajectory variability. There is also an ‘immobile’ state (defined as D models within membranes incorporating aggregation, binding to the cytoskeleton, or traversing membrane microdomains. PMID:26473352

  8. Residual stress measurement of large scaled welded pipe using neutron diffraction method. Effect of SCC crack propagation and repair weld on residual stress distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Hiroshi; Katsuyama, Jinya; Tobita, Tohru; Morii, Yukio

    2011-01-01

    The RESA-1 neutron engineering diffractometer in the JRR-3 (Japan Research Reactor No.3) at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency, which is used for stress measurements, was upgraded to realize residual stress measurements of large scaled mechanical components. A series of residual stress measurements was made to obtain through-thickness residual stress distributions in a Type 304 stainless steel butt-welded pipe of 500A-sch.80 using the upgraded RESA-1 diffractometer. We evaluated effects of crack propagation such as stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and a part-circumference repair weld on the residual stress distributions induced by girth welding. Measured residual stress distributions near original girth weld revealed good agreement with typical results shown in some previous works using finite element method, deep hole drilling as well as neutron diffraction. After introducing a mock crack with 10 mm depth in the heat affected zone on the inside wall of the pipe by electro discharge machining, the axial residual stresses were found to be released in the part of the mock crack. However, changes in the through-wall bending stress component and the self-equilibrated stress component were negligible and hence the axial residual stress distribution in the ligament was remained in the original residual stresses near girth weld without the mock crack. Furthermore, changes in hoop and radial residual stress were also small. The residual stress distributions after a part repair welding on the outer circumference of the girth weld were significantly different from residual stress distributions near the original girth weld. The through-thickness average axial residual stress was increased due to increase of the tensile membrane stress and mitigation of the bending stress after repair welding. Throughout above studies, we evidenced that the neutron diffraction technique is useful and powerful tool for measuring residual stress distributions in large as well as thick mechanical

  9. Soil pH Errors Propagation from Measurements to Spatial Predictions - Cost Benefit Analysis and Risk Assessment Implications for Practitioners and Modelers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, P. R.; Libohova, Z.; Seybold, C. A.; Wills, S. A.; Peaslee, S.; Beaudette, D.; Lindbo, D. L.

    2017-12-01

    The measurement errors and spatial prediction uncertainties of soil properties in the modeling community are usually assessed against measured values when available. However, of equal importance is the assessment of errors and uncertainty impacts on cost benefit analysis and risk assessments. Soil pH was selected as one of the most commonly measured soil properties used for liming recommendations. The objective of this study was to assess the error size from different sources and their implications with respect to management decisions. Error sources include measurement methods, laboratory sources, pedotransfer functions, database transections, spatial aggregations, etc. Several databases of measured and predicted soil pH were used for this study including the United States National Cooperative Soil Survey Characterization Database (NCSS-SCDB), the US Soil Survey Geographic (SSURGO) Database. The distribution of errors among different sources from measurement methods to spatial aggregation showed a wide range of values. The greatest RMSE of 0.79 pH units was from spatial aggregation (SSURGO vs Kriging), while the measurement methods had the lowest RMSE of 0.06 pH units. Assuming the order of data acquisition based on the transaction distance i.e. from measurement method to spatial aggregation the RMSE increased from 0.06 to 0.8 pH units suggesting an "error propagation". This has major implications for practitioners and modeling community. Most soil liming rate recommendations are based on 0.1 pH unit increments, while the desired soil pH level increments are based on 0.4 to 0.5 pH units. Thus, even when the measured and desired target soil pH are the same most guidelines recommend 1 ton ha-1 lime, which translates in 111 ha-1 that the farmer has to factor in the cost-benefit analysis. However, this analysis need to be based on uncertainty predictions (0.5-1.0 pH units) rather than measurement errors (0.1 pH units) which would translate in 555-1,111 investment that

  10. Measurement and correlation study of silymarin solubility in supercritical carbon dioxide with and without a cosolvent using semi-empirical models and back-propagation artificial neural networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Yang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The solubility data of compounds in supercritical fluids and the correlation between the experimental solubility data and predicted solubility data are crucial to the development of supercritical technologies. In the present work, the solubility data of silymarin (SM in both pure supercritical carbon dioxide (SCCO2 and SCCO2 with added cosolvent was measured at temperatures ranging from 308 to 338 K and pressures from 8 to 22 MPa. The experimental data were fit with three semi-empirical density-based models (Chrastil, Bartle and Mendez-Santiago and Teja models and a back-propagation artificial neural networks (BPANN model. Interaction parameters for the models were obtained and the percentage of average absolute relative deviation (AARD% in each calculation was determined. The correlation results were in good agreement with the experimental data. A comparison among the four models revealed that the experimental solubility data were more fit with the BPANN model with AARDs ranging from 1.14% to 2.15% for silymarin in pure SCCO2 and with added cosolvent. The results provide fundamental data for designing the extraction of SM or the preparation of its particle using SCCO2 techniques.

  11. Group symmetries and information propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draayer, J.P.

    1980-01-01

    Spectroscopy concerns itself with the ways in which the Hamiltonian and other interesting operators defined in few-particle spaces are determined or determine properties of many-particle systems. But the action of the central limit theorem (CLT) filters the transmission of information between source and observed so whether propagating forward from a few-particle defining space, as is usual in theoretical studies, or projecting backward to it from measured things, each is only sensitive to averaged properties of the other. Our concern is with the propagation of spectroscopic information in the presence of good symmetries when filtering action of the CLT is effective. Specifically, we propose to address the question, What propagates and how. We begin with some examples, using both scalar and isospin geometries to illustrate simple propagation. Examples of matrix propagation are studied; contact with standard tensor algebra is established and an algorithm put forward for the expansion of any operator in terms of another set, complete or not; shell-model results for 20 Ne using a realistic interaction and two trace-equivalent forms are presented; and some further challenges are mentioned

  12. PH in Rockwool Propagation Blocks: a Method to Measure the pH Buffer Capacity of Rockwool and Other Mineral Wool Media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blok, C.; Kaarsemaker, R.C.

    2013-01-01

    Within the framework of the international KIWA quality label for rooting media representatives of plant propagators and the rockwool industry agreed to develop a method to characterize the influence of the rooting medium materials on the pH in cultivation. A method for the characterization of

  13. Statistical Analysis of Instantaneous Frequency Scaling Factor as Derived From Optical Disdrometer Measurements At KQ Bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemba, Michael; Nessel, James; Houts, Jacquelynne; Luini, Lorenzo; Riva, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    The rain rate data and statistics of a location are often used in conjunction with models to predict rain attenuation. However, the true attenuation is a function not only of rain rate, but also of the drop size distribution (DSD). Generally, models utilize an average drop size distribution (Laws and Parsons or Marshall and Palmer. However, individual rain events may deviate from these models significantly if their DSD is not well approximated by the average. Therefore, characterizing the relationship between the DSD and attenuation is valuable in improving modeled predictions of rain attenuation statistics. The DSD may also be used to derive the instantaneous frequency scaling factor and thus validate frequency scaling models. Since June of 2014, NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) and the Politecnico di Milano (POLIMI) have jointly conducted a propagation study in Milan, Italy utilizing the 20 and 40 GHz beacon signals of the Alphasat TDP#5 Aldo Paraboni payload. The Ka- and Q-band beacon receivers provide a direct measurement of the signal attenuation while concurrent weather instrumentation provides measurements of the atmospheric conditions at the receiver. Among these instruments is a Thies Clima Laser Precipitation Monitor (optical disdrometer) which yields droplet size distributions (DSD); this DSD information can be used to derive a scaling factor that scales the measured 20 GHz data to expected 40 GHz attenuation. Given the capability to both predict and directly observe 40 GHz attenuation, this site is uniquely situated to assess and characterize such predictions. Previous work using this data has examined the relationship between the measured drop-size distribution and the measured attenuation of the link]. The focus of this paper now turns to a deeper analysis of the scaling factor, including the prediction error as a function of attenuation level, correlation between the scaling factor and the rain rate, and the temporal variability of the drop size

  14. Transferability of decompression wave speed measured by a small-diameter shock tube to full size pipelines and implications for determining required fracture propagation resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botros, K.K.; Geerligs, J.; Rothwell, Brian; Carlson, Lorne; Fletcher, Leigh; Venton, Philip

    2010-01-01

    The control of propagating ductile (or tearing) fracture is a fundamental requirement in the fracture control design of pipelines. The Battelle two-curve method developed in the early 1970s still forms the basis of the analytical framework used throughout the industry. GASDECOM is typically used for calculating decompression speed, and idealizes the decompression process as isentropic and one-dimensional, taking no account of frictional effects. While this approximation appears not to have been a major issue for large-diameter pipes and for moderate pressures (up to 12 MPa), there have been several recent full-scale burst tests at higher pressures and smaller diameters for which the measured decompression velocity has deviated progressively from the predicted values, in general towards lower velocities. The present research was focused on determining whether pipe diameter was a major factor that could limit the applicability of frictionless models such as GASDECOM. Since potential diameter effects are primarily related to wall friction, which in turn is related to the ratio of surface roughness-to-diameter, an experimental approach was developed based on keeping the diameter constant, at a sufficiently small value to allow for an economical experimental arrangement, and varying the internal roughness. A series of tests covering a range of nominal initial pressures from 10 to 21 MPa, and involving a very lean gas and three progressively richer compositions, were conducted using two specialized high-pressure shock tubes (42 m long, I.D. = 38.1 mm). The first is honed to an extremely smooth surface finish, in order to minimize frictional effects and better simulate the behaviour of larger-diameter pipelines, while the second has a higher internal surface roughness. The results show that decompression wave speeds in the rough tube are consistently slower than those in the smooth tube under the same conditions of mixture composition and initial pressure and temperature

  15. Investigation of sporadic solar radiowave radiation and Earth ionosphere parameters on the ''Interkosmos-Kopernik 500'' satellite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aksenov, V.I.; Artem'eva, u.M.; Komrakov, G.P.; Skrebkova, L.A.

    1982-01-01

    Results of investigations into inhomogeneities of electron concentration obtained in 1973 by means of '' the Interkosmos-Kopernik-500'' satellite are presented. A high-frequency impedance probe installed at the satellite (3.1 and 15 MHz working frequencies) provided measurement of the electron concentration in ionosphere in the ranges from 10 3 to 1.8x10 6 cm -3 and of its inhomogeneities of sizes from 0.5 to 100 km having relative fluctuations ΔN/N >= 3x10 -4 . Probability P of appearance of the electron concentration inhomogeneities with relative fluctuations √ (ΔN/N) 2 >= 0.2% at altitudes of 200-1500 km changes within the limits from 2 to 60-70% for middle and equatorial latitudes. The highest probability of the inhomogeneity appearance in the summer hemisphere (northern hemispere) is observed above the maximum of F 2 stratum. Values P at 400-1500 km altitudes at night-time increase from equatorial latitudes to middle ones. At Ksub(p) 2 at altitudes H > 400 km in the northern (summer) hemisphere are mainly lower than in the southern (winter). During the periods of increased geomagnetic activity (Ksub(p) > 3) the probabilities of the inhomogeneity appearance for the latitudes (middle and equatorial) under investigation change insignificantly as a whole. Power character of the inhomogeneous structures spectra at the altitudes of the F region and partially outer ionosphere at middle, low and equatorial latitudes of the northern and southern hemispheres is their common characteristic feature

  16. Propagation Environment Assessment Using UAV Electromagnetic Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-01

    losses can be taken into account when calculating propagation losses. To correlate the data correctly, the measured received signal power must be...DISTRIBUTION CODE 13. ABSTRACT (maximum 200 words) In this thesis, we attempt to build a picture of local propagation conditions by measuring ...operators to choose the optimal settings for the maximum detection range of their radar and radio systems. We also investigate the measurement system

  17. Modelling the gluon propagator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leinweber, D.B.; Parrinello, C.; Skullerud, J.I.; Williams, A.G

    1999-03-01

    Scaling of the Landau gauge gluon propagator calculated at {beta} = 6.0 and at {beta} = 6.2 is demonstrated. A variety of functional forms for the gluon propagator calculated on a large (32{sup 3} x 64) lattice at {beta} = 6.0 are investigated.

  18. Sound propagation in cities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salomons, E.; Polinder, H.; Lohman, W.; Zhou, H.; Borst, H.

    2009-01-01

    A new engineering model for sound propagation in cities is presented. The model is based on numerical and experimental studies of sound propagation between street canyons. Multiple reflections in the source canyon and the receiver canyon are taken into account in an efficient way, while weak

  19. Proceedings of the Twentieth NASA Propagation Experimenters Meeting (NAPEX XX) and the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Propagation Studies Miniworkshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golshan, Nassar (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    The NASA Propagation Experimenters (NAPEX) Meeting and associated Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Propagation Studies Miniworkshop convene yearly to discuss studies supported by the NASA Propagation Program. Representatives from the satellite communications (satcom)industry, academia, and government with an interest in space-ground radio wave propagation have peer discussion of work in progress, disseminate propagation results, and interact with the satcom industry. NAPEX XX, in Fairbanks, Alaska, June 4-5, 1996, had three sessions: (1) "ACTS Propagation Study: Background, Objectives, and Outcomes," covered results from thirteen station-years of Ka-band experiments; (2) "Propagation Studies for Mobile and Personal Satellite Applications," provided the latest developments in measurement, modeling, and dissemination of propagation phenomena of interest to the mobile, personal, and aeronautical satcom industry; and (3)"Propagation Research Topics," covered a range of topics including space/ground optical propagation experiments, propagation databases, the NASA Propagation Web Site, and revision plans for the NASA propagation effects handbooks. The ACTS Miniworkshop, June 6, 1996, covered ACTS status, engineering support for ACTS propagation terminals, and the ACTS Propagation Data Center. A plenary session made specific recommendations for the future direction of the program.

  20. Wireless power transfer via radiowaves

    CERN Document Server

    Shinohara , Naoki

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in Wireless Power Transmission (WPT) technologies have enabled various engineering applications with potential product implementation. WPT can be utilized to charge batteries in various pieces of equipment without the need for a wired connection. Energy can be harvested from ambient RF and microwave radiation and 1 million kW microwaves can be transmitted from space to the ground.This book covers all the theory and technologies of WPT, such as microwave generators with semi-conductors and microwave tubes, antennas, phased arrays, beam efficiency, and rectifiers (rectenna). The

  1. Constraining variable density of ice shelves using wide-angle radar measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drews, Reinhard; Brown, Joel; Matsuoka, Kenichi; Witrant, Emmanuel; Philippe, Morgane; Hubbard, Bryn; Pattyn, Frank

    2016-04-01

    The thickness of ice shelves, a basic parameter for mass balance estimates, is typically inferred using hydrostatic equilibrium, for which knowledge of the depth-averaged density is essential. The densification from snow to ice depends on a number of local factors (e.g., temperature and surface mass balance) causing spatial and temporal variations in density-depth profiles. However, direct measurements of firn density are sparse, requiring substantial logistical effort. Here, we infer density from radio-wave propagation speed using ground-based wide-angle radar data sets (10 MHz) collected at five sites on Roi Baudouin Ice Shelf (RBIS), Dronning Maud Land, Antarctica. We reconstruct depth to internal reflectors, local ice thickness, and firn-air content using a novel algorithm that includes traveltime inversion and ray tracing with a prescribed shape of the depth-density relationship. For the particular case of an ice-shelf channel, where ice thickness and surface slope change substantially over a few kilometers, the radar data suggest that firn inside the channel is about 5 % denser than outside the channel. Although this density difference is at the detection limit of the radar, it is consistent with a similar density anomaly reconstructed from optical televiewing, which reveals that the firn inside the channel is 4.7 % denser than that outside the channel. Hydrostatic ice thickness calculations used for determining basal melt rates should account for the denser firn in ice-shelf channels. The radar method presented here is robust and can easily be adapted to different radar frequencies and data-acquisition geometries.

  2. The Global Survey Method Applied to Ground-level Cosmic Ray Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belov, A.; Eroshenko, E.; Yanke, V.; Oleneva, V.; Abunin, A.; Abunina, M.; Papaioannou, A.; Mavromichalaki, H.

    2018-04-01

    The global survey method (GSM) technique unites simultaneous ground-level observations of cosmic rays in different locations and allows us to obtain the main characteristics of cosmic-ray variations outside of the atmosphere and magnetosphere of Earth. This technique has been developed and applied in numerous studies over many years by the Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radiowave Propagation (IZMIRAN). We here describe the IZMIRAN version of the GSM in detail. With this technique, the hourly data of the world-wide neutron-monitor network from July 1957 until December 2016 were processed, and further processing is enabled upon the receipt of new data. The result is a database of homogeneous and continuous hourly characteristics of the density variations (an isotropic part of the intensity) and the 3D vector of the cosmic-ray anisotropy. It includes all of the effects that could be identified in galactic cosmic-ray variations that were caused by large-scale disturbances of the interplanetary medium in more than 50 years. These results in turn became the basis for a database on Forbush effects and interplanetary disturbances. This database allows correlating various space-environment parameters (the characteristics of the Sun, the solar wind, et cetera) with cosmic-ray parameters and studying their interrelations. We also present features of the coupling coefficients for different neutron monitors that enable us to make a connection from ground-level measurements to primary cosmic-ray variations outside the atmosphere and the magnetosphere. We discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the current version of the GSM as well as further possible developments and improvements. The method developed allows us to minimize the problems of the neutron-monitor network, which are typical for experimental physics, and to considerably enhance its advantages.

  3. Propagation considerations in land mobile satellite transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, W. J.; Smith, E. K.

    1985-01-01

    It appears likely that the Land Mobile Satellite Services (LMSS) will be authorized by the FCC for operation in the 800 to 900 MHz (UHF) and possibly near 1500 MHz (L-band). Propagation problems are clearly an important factor in the effectiveness of this service, but useful measurements are few, and produced contradictory interpretations. A first order overview of existing measurements is presented with particular attention to the first two NASA balloon to mobile vehicle propagation experiments. Some physical insight into the interpretation of propagation effects in LMSS transmissions is provided.

  4. Reconstructing the Surface Permittivity Distribution from Data Measured by the CONSERT Instrument aboard Rosetta: Method and Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plettemeier, D.; Statz, C.; Hegler, S.; Herique, A.; Kofman, W. W.

    2014-12-01

    One of the main scientific objectives of the Comet Nucleus Sounding Experiment by Radiowave Transmission (CONSERT) aboard Rosetta is to perform a dielectric characterization of comet 67P/Chuyurmov-Gerasimenko's nucleus by means of a bi-static sounding between the lander Philae launched onto the comet's surface and the orbiter Rosetta. For the sounding, the lander part of CONSERT will receive and process the radio signal emitted by the orbiter part of the instrument and transmit a signal to the orbiter to be received by CONSERT. CONSERT will also be operated as bi-static RADAR during the descent of the lander Philae onto the comet's surface. From data measured during the descent, we aim at reconstructing a surface permittivity map of the comet at the landing site and along the path below the descent trajectory. This surface permittivity map will give information on the bulk material right below and around the landing site and the surface roughness in areas covered by the instrument along the descent. The proposed method to estimate the surface permittivity distribution is based on a least-squares based inversion approach in frequency domain. The direct problem of simulating the wave-propagation between lander and orbiter at line-of-sight and the signal reflected on the comet's surface is modelled using a dielectric physical optics approximation. Restrictions on the measurement positions by the descent orbitography and limitations on the instrument dynamic range will be dealt with by application of a regularization technique where the surface permittivity distribution and the gradient with regard to the permittivity is projected in a domain defined by a viable model of the spatial material and roughness distribution. The least-squares optimization step of the reconstruction is performed in such domain on a reduced set of parameters yielding stable results. The viability of the proposed method is demonstrated by reconstruction results based on simulated data.

  5. Radio Propagation in Open-pit Mines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Portela Lopes de Almeida, Erika; Caldwell, George; Rodriguez Larrad, Ignacio

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we present the results of an extensive measurement campaign performed at two large iron ore mining centers in Brazil at the 2.6 GHz band. Although several studies focusing on radio propagation in underground mines have been published, measurement data and careful analyses for open......-pit mines are still scarce. Our results aim at filling this gap in the literature. The research is motivated by the ongoing mine automation initiatives, where connectivity becomes critical. This paper presents the first set of results comprising measurements under a gamut of propagation conditions. A second...... paper detailing sub-GHz propagation is also in preparation. The results indicate that conventional wisdom is wrong, in other words, radio-frequency (RF) propagation in surface mines can be far more elaborate than plain free-space line-of-sight conditions. Additionally, the old mining adage “no two mines...

  6. Database for propagation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantak, Anil V.

    1991-07-01

    A propagation researcher or a systems engineer who intends to use the results of a propagation experiment is generally faced with various database tasks such as the selection of the computer software, the hardware, and the writing of the programs to pass the data through the models of interest. This task is repeated every time a new experiment is conducted or the same experiment is carried out at a different location generating different data. Thus the users of this data have to spend a considerable portion of their time learning how to implement the computer hardware and the software towards the desired end. This situation may be facilitated considerably if an easily accessible propagation database is created that has all the accepted (standardized) propagation phenomena models approved by the propagation research community. Also, the handling of data will become easier for the user. Such a database construction can only stimulate the growth of the propagation research it if is available to all the researchers, so that the results of the experiment conducted by one researcher can be examined independently by another, without different hardware and software being used. The database may be made flexible so that the researchers need not be confined only to the contents of the database. Another way in which the database may help the researchers is by the fact that they will not have to document the software and hardware tools used in their research since the propagation research community will know the database already. The following sections show a possible database construction, as well as properties of the database for the propagation research.

  7. Acoustic energy propagation around railways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cizkova, Petra

    2017-09-01

    The article deals with the issues of acoustic energy propagation around railways. The research subject was noise emission spreading into the surroundings during the passage of trains over a directly travelled steel bridge construction. Noise emissions were measured using direct measurements in the field. The measurements were performed in two measurement profiles. The noise exposures A LAE measured near the steel bridge construction were compared against the noise exposures A LAE captured on an open track. From the difference of these data, the noise level of the steel bridge structure was determined. Part of the research was to evaluate the effect of the reconstruction of the railway track superstructure on the acoustic situation in the given section of the railway track. The article describes the methodology of measurements, including the processing and evaluation of measured data. The article points out the noise levels of the steel bridge construction and assesses changes in the acoustic situation after the reconstruction.

  8. Gum-compliant uncertainty propagations for Pu and U concentration measurements using the 1st-prototype XOS/LANL hiRX instrument; an SRNL H-Canyon Test Bed performance evaluation project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holland, Michael K. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); O' Rourke, Patrick E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-05-04

    An SRNL H-Canyon Test Bed performance evaluation project was completed jointly by SRNL and LANL on a prototype monochromatic energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence instrument, the hiRX. A series of uncertainty propagations were generated based upon plutonium and uranium measurements performed using the alpha-prototype hiRX instrument. Data reduction and uncertainty modeling provided in this report were performed by the SRNL authors. Observations and lessons learned from this evaluation were also used to predict the expected uncertainties that should be achievable at multiple plutonium and uranium concentration levels provided instrument hardware and software upgrades being recommended by LANL and SRNL are performed.

  9. A solid state lightning propagation speed sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mach, Douglas M.; Rust, W. David

    1989-01-01

    A device to measure the propagation speeds of cloud-to-ground lightning has been developed. The lightning propagation speed (LPS) device consists of eight solid state silicon photodetectors mounted behind precision horizontal slits in the focal plane of a 50-mm lens on a 35-mm camera. Although the LPS device produces results similar to those obtained from a streaking camera, the LPS device has the advantages of smaller size, lower cost, mobile use, and easier data collection and analysis. The maximum accuracy for the LPS is 0.2 microsec, compared with about 0.8 microsecs for the streaking camera. It is found that the return stroke propagation speed for triggered lightning is different than that for natural lightning if measurements are taken over channel segments less than 500 m. It is suggested that there are no significant differences between the propagation speeds of positive and negative flashes. Also, differences between natural and triggered dart leaders are discussed.

  10. Fast imaging of streamer propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veldhuizen, E.M. van; Baede, A.H.F.M.; Hayashi, D.; Rutgers, W.R.

    2001-01-01

    Recently measurement methods are becoming available to study the corona discharge in more detail. One of the most promising methods is laser-induced fluorescence to determine radical density. Recent improvements in CCD cameras makes it now possible to improve measurements of the discharge structure to a resolution of 1 ns in time and 10 μm in space. This paper shows the first results of the spontaneous emission of a point-to-plane corona discharge in air using such a camera. It clearly indicates that the 2-D approach for streamer propagation under these conditions is insufficient

  11. Fast imaging of streamer propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veldhuizen, E.M. van; Baede, A.H.F.M.; Hayashi, D.; Rutgers, W.R. [Eindhoven Univ. of Technology (Netherlands). Dept. of Applied Physics

    2001-07-01

    Recently measurement methods are becoming available to study the corona discharge in more detail. One of the most promising methods is laser-induced fluorescence to determine radical density. Recent improvements in CCD cameras makes it now possible to improve measurements of the discharge structure to a resolution of 1 ns in time and 10 {mu}m in space. This paper shows the first results of the spontaneous emission of a point-to-plane corona discharge in air using such a camera. It clearly indicates that the 2-D approach for streamer propagation under these conditions is insufficient.

  12. Propagation of waves

    CERN Document Server

    David, P

    2013-01-01

    Propagation of Waves focuses on the wave propagation around the earth, which is influenced by its curvature, surface irregularities, and by passage through atmospheric layers that may be refracting, absorbing, or ionized. This book begins by outlining the behavior of waves in the various media and at their interfaces, which simplifies the basic phenomena, such as absorption, refraction, reflection, and interference. Applications to the case of the terrestrial sphere are also discussed as a natural generalization. Following the deliberation on the diffraction of the "ground? wave around the ear

  13. Simplified propagation of standard uncertainties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shull, A.H.

    1997-01-01

    An essential part of any measurement control program is adequate knowledge of the uncertainties of the measurement system standards. Only with an estimate of the standards'' uncertainties can one determine if the standard is adequate for its intended use or can one calculate the total uncertainty of the measurement process. Purchased standards usually have estimates of uncertainty on their certificates. However, when standards are prepared and characterized by a laboratory, variance propagation is required to estimate the uncertainty of the standard. Traditional variance propagation typically involves tedious use of partial derivatives, unfriendly software and the availability of statistical expertise. As a result, the uncertainty of prepared standards is often not determined or determined incorrectly. For situations meeting stated assumptions, easier shortcut methods of estimation are now available which eliminate the need for partial derivatives and require only a spreadsheet or calculator. A system of simplifying the calculations by dividing into subgroups of absolute and relative uncertainties is utilized. These methods also incorporate the International Standards Organization (ISO) concepts for combining systematic and random uncertainties as published in their Guide to the Expression of Measurement Uncertainty. Details of the simplified methods and examples of their use are included in the paper

  14. Universal self-similarity of propagating populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliazar, Iddo; Klafter, Joseph

    2010-07-01

    This paper explores the universal self-similarity of propagating populations. The following general propagation model is considered: particles are randomly emitted from the origin of a d-dimensional Euclidean space and propagate randomly and independently of each other in space; all particles share a statistically common--yet arbitrary--motion pattern; each particle has its own random propagation parameters--emission epoch, motion frequency, and motion amplitude. The universally self-similar statistics of the particles' displacements and first passage times (FPTs) are analyzed: statistics which are invariant with respect to the details of the displacement and FPT measurements and with respect to the particles' underlying motion pattern. Analysis concludes that the universally self-similar statistics are governed by Poisson processes with power-law intensities and by the Fréchet and Weibull extreme-value laws.

  15. Universal self-similarity of propagating populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliazar, Iddo; Klafter, Joseph

    2010-07-01

    This paper explores the universal self-similarity of propagating populations. The following general propagation model is considered: particles are randomly emitted from the origin of a d -dimensional Euclidean space and propagate randomly and independently of each other in space; all particles share a statistically common—yet arbitrary—motion pattern; each particle has its own random propagation parameters—emission epoch, motion frequency, and motion amplitude. The universally self-similar statistics of the particles’ displacements and first passage times (FPTs) are analyzed: statistics which are invariant with respect to the details of the displacement and FPT measurements and with respect to the particles’ underlying motion pattern. Analysis concludes that the universally self-similar statistics are governed by Poisson processes with power-law intensities and by the Fréchet and Weibull extreme-value laws.

  16. Heat and density pulse propagation in ASDEX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giannone, L.; Riedl, K.; Stroth, U.; Eberhagen, A.; Gruber, O.; Mertens, V.

    1990-01-01

    Experimental measurements of the electron thermal conductivity, derived from the radial propagation of the heat pulse generated by a sawtooth crash, have consistently yielded larger values than those obtained by power balance. It has been proposed that this discrepancy could be the result of the coupling of density and temperature perturbations. Numerical modelling of heat and density pulse propagation on ASDEX has been used to address this question. In addition, measurements at various electron densities and in hydrogen and deuterium were undertaken, with the aim of providing a broad base of experimental measurements for testing the various transport models proposed. (author) 9 refs., 1 fig

  17. Heat and density pulse propagation in ASDEX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giannone, L.; Riedel, K.; Stroth, U.; Eberhagen, A.; Gruber, O.; Mertens, V.

    1990-01-01

    Experimental measurements of the electron thermal conductivity, derived from the radial propagation of the heat pulse generated by a sawtooth crash, have consistently yielded larger values than those obtained by power balance. It has been proposed that this discrepancy could be the result of the coupling of density and temperature perturbations. Numerical modelling of heat and density pulse propagation on ASDEX has been used to address this question. In addition, measurements at various electron densities and in hydrogen and deuterium were undertaken, with the aim of providing a broad base of experimental measurements for testing the various transport models proposed. (orig.)

  18. Multispecimen fatigue crack propagation testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ermi, A.M.; Bauer, R.E.; Chin, B.A.; Straalsund, J.L.

    1981-01-01

    Chains of miniature center-cracked-tension specimens were tested on a conventional testing machine and on a prototypic in-reactor fatigue machine as part of the fusion reactor materials alloy development program. Annealed and 20 percent cold-worked 316 stainless steel specimens were cycled under various conditions of temperature, frequency, stress ratio and chain length. Crack growth rates determined from multispecimen visual measurements and from an electrical potential technique were consistent with those obtained by conventional test methods. Results demonstrate that multispecimen chain testing is a valid method of obtaining fatigue crack propagation information for alloy development. 8 refs

  19. Radio Propagation into Modern Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodriguez Larrad, Ignacio; Nguyen, Huan Cong; Jørgensen, Niels T.K.

    2014-01-01

    Energy-efficient buildings are gaining momentum in order to comply with the new energy regulations. Especially in northern cold countries, thick reinforced walls and energy-efficient windows composed of several layers of glass plus metal coating are becoming the de facto elements in modern building...... constructions. These materials are used in favor of achieving a proper level of thermal isolation, but it has been noticed that they can impact heavily on radio signal propagation. This paper presents a measurement-based analysis of the outdoor-to-indoor attenuation experienced in several modern constructions...

  20. Modification Propagation in Complex Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouronte, Mary Luz; Vargas, María Luisa; Moyano, Luis Gregorio; Algarra, Francisco Javier García; Del Pozo, Luis Salvador

    To keep up with rapidly changing conditions, business systems and their associated networks are growing increasingly intricate as never before. By doing this, network management and operation costs not only rise, but are difficult even to measure. This fact must be regarded as a major constraint to system optimization initiatives, as well as a setback to derived economic benefits. In this work we introduce a simple model in order to estimate the relative cost associated to modification propagation in complex architectures. Our model can be used to anticipate costs caused by network evolution, as well as for planning and evaluating future architecture development while providing benefit optimization.

  1. Propagation environments [Chapter 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglass F. Jacobs; Thomas D. Landis; Tara Luna

    2009-01-01

    An understanding of all factors influencing plant growth in a nursery environment is needed for the successful growth and production of high-quality container plants. Propagation structures modify the atmospheric conditions of temperature, light, and relative humidity. Native plant nurseries are different from typical horticultural nurseries because plants must be...

  2. Uncertainty Propagation in OMFIT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sterling; Meneghini, Orso; Sung, Choongki

    2017-10-01

    A rigorous comparison of power balance fluxes and turbulent model fluxes requires the propagation of uncertainties in the kinetic profiles and their derivatives. Making extensive use of the python uncertainties package, the OMFIT framework has been used to propagate covariant uncertainties to provide an uncertainty in the power balance calculation from the ONETWO code, as well as through the turbulent fluxes calculated by the TGLF code. The covariant uncertainties arise from fitting 1D (constant on flux surface) density and temperature profiles and associated random errors with parameterized functions such as a modified tanh. The power balance and model fluxes can then be compared with quantification of the uncertainties. No effort is made at propagating systematic errors. A case study will be shown for the effects of resonant magnetic perturbations on the kinetic profiles and fluxes at the top of the pedestal. A separate attempt at modeling the random errors with Monte Carlo sampling will be compared to the method of propagating the fitting function parameter covariant uncertainties. Work supported by US DOE under DE-FC02-04ER54698, DE-FG2-95ER-54309, DE-SC 0012656.

  3. The Weinberg propagators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dvoeglazov, V.V.

    1997-01-01

    An analog of the j = 1/2 Feynman-Dyson propagator is presented in the framework of the j = 1 Weinberg's theory. The basis for this construction is the concept of the Weinberg field as a system of four field functions differing by parity and by dual transformations. (orig.)

  4. Tropical Cyclone Propagation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gray, William

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses the question of tropical cyclone propagation or why the average tropical cyclone moves 1-2 m/s faster and usually 10-20 deg to the left of its surrounding (or 5-7 deg radius) deep layer (850-300 mb) steering current...

  5. Measurements of ultrasonic waves by means of laser Doppler velocimeter and an experimental study of elastic wave propagation in inhomogeneous media; Laser doppler sokudokei ni yoru choonpa keisoku to ganseki wo mochiita fukinshitsu baishitsu no hado denpa model jikken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishizawa, O; Sato, T [Geological Survey of Japan, Tsukuba (Japan); Lei, X [Dia Consultants Company, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-05-01

    In the study of seismic wave propagation, a model experimenting technique has been developed using a laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) as the sensor. This technique, not dependent on conventional piezoelectric devices, only irradiates the specimen with laser to measure the velocity amplitude on the target surface, eliminating the need for close contact between the specimen and sensor. In the experiment, elastic penetration waves with their noise levels approximately 0.05mm/s were observed upon application of vibration of 10{sup 6}-10{sup 5}Hz. The specimen was stainless steel or rock, and waveforms caught by the LDV and piezoelectric device were compared. As the result, it was found that the LDV is a powerful tool for effectively explaining elastic wave propagation in inhomogeneous media. The piezoelectric device fails to reproduce accurately the waves to follow the initial one while the LDV detect the velocity amplitude on the specimen surface in a wide frequency range encouraging the discussion over the quantification of observed waveforms. 10 refs., 7 figs.

  6. The quark propagator in a covariant gauge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnet, F.D.R.; Leinweber, D.B.; Williams, A.G.; Zanotti, J.M.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: The quark propagator is one of the fundamental building blocks of QCD. Results strongly depend on the ansatz for the propagator. Direct simulations of QCD on a space time lattice can provide guidance and constraints on the analytic structure of the quark propagator. On the lattice the infrared and asymptotic behaviour of the quark propagator is of particular interest since it is a reflection of the accuracy of the discretised quark action. In the deep infrared region, artefacts associated with the finite size of the lattice spacing become small. This is the most interesting region as nonperturbative physics lies here. However, the ultraviolet behaviour at large momentum of the propagator will in general strongly deviate from the correct continuum behaviour. This behaviour will be action dependent. Some interesting progress has been made in improving the ultraviolet behaviour of the propagator. A method, recently developed and referred to as tree-level correction, consists of using the knowledge of the tree-level behaviour to eliminate the obvious lattice artefacts. Tree-level correction represents a crucial step in extracting meaningful results for the mass function and the renormalisation function outside of the deep infrared region. The mass function is particularly interesting as it provides insights into the constituent quark mass as a measure of the nonperturbative physics. In this poster I will present results from the analytic structure of the propagator in recent lattice studies for a variety of fermion actions in lattice QCD. I will also present the new ratio method used to tree-level correct these quark propagators

  7. Evaluating lysimeter drainage against soil deep percolation modeled with profile soil moisture, field tracer propagation, and lab measured soil hydraulic properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vasquez, Vicente; Thomsen, Anton Gårde; Iversen, Bo Vangsø

    them have been reported. To compare among methods, one year of four large-scale lysimeters drainage (D) was evaluated against modeled soil deep percolation using either profile soil moisture, bromide breakthrough curves from suction cups, or measured soil hydraulic properties in the laboratory....... Measured volumetric soil water content (q) was 3-4% higher inside lysimeters than in the field probably due to a zero tension lower boundary condition inside lysimeters. D from soil hydraulic properties measured in the laboratory resulted in a 15% higher evapotranspiration and 12% lower drainage...... predictions than the model calibrated with field measured q. Bromide (Br) breakthrough curves indicated high variability between lysimeters and field suction cups with mean Br velocities at first arrival time of 110 and 33 mm/d, respectively. D was 520 mm/yr with lysimeters, 613 mm/yr with the calibrated...

  8. Sound Propagation An impedance Based Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Yang-Hann

    2010-01-01

    In Sound Propagation: An Impedance Based Approach , Professor Yang-Hann Kim introduces acoustics and sound fields by using the concept of impedance. Kim starts with vibrations and waves, demonstrating how vibration can be envisaged as a kind of wave, mathematically and physically. One-dimensional waves are used to convey the fundamental concepts. Readers can then understand wave propagation in terms of characteristic and driving point impedance. The essential measures for acoustic waves, such as dB scale, octave scale, acoustic pressure, energy, and intensity, are explained. These measures are

  9. Propagator of stochastic electrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavalleri, G.

    1981-01-01

    The ''elementary propagator'' for the position of a free charged particle subject to the zero-point electromagnetic field with Lorentz-invariant spectral density proportionalω 3 is obtained. The nonstationary process for the position is solved by the stationary process for the acceleration. The dispersion of the position elementary propagator is compared with that of quantum electrodynamics. Finally, the evolution of the probability density is obtained starting from an initial distribution confined in a small volume and with a Gaussian distribution in the velocities. The resulting probability density for the position turns out to be equal, to within radiative corrections, to psipsi* where psi is the Kennard wave packet. If the radiative corrections are retained, the present result is new since the corresponding expression in quantum electrodynamics has not yet been found. Besides preceding quantum electrodynamics for this problem, no renormalization is required in stochastic electrodynamics

  10. Preventing Unofficial Information Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Zhengyi; Ouyang, Yi; Xu, Yurong; Ford, James; Makedon, Fillia

    Digital copies are susceptible to theft and vulnerable to leakage, copying, or manipulation. When someone (or some group), who has stolen, leaked, copied, or manipulated digital documents propagates the documents over the Internet and/or distributes those through physical distribution channels many challenges arise which document holders must overcome in order to mitigate the impact to their privacy or business. This paper focuses on the propagation problem of digital credentials, which may contain sensitive information about a credential holder. Existing work such as access control policies and the Platform for Privacy Preferences (P3P) assumes that qualified or certified credential viewers are honest and reliable. The proposed approach in this paper uses short-lived credentials based on reverse forward secure signatures to remove this assumption and mitigate the damage caused by a dishonest or honest but compromised viewer.

  11. NLO error propagation exercise: statistical results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pack, D.J.; Downing, D.J.

    1985-09-01

    Error propagation is the extrapolation and cumulation of uncertainty (variance) above total amounts of special nuclear material, for example, uranium or 235 U, that are present in a defined location at a given time. The uncertainty results from the inevitable inexactness of individual measurements of weight, uranium concentration, 235 U enrichment, etc. The extrapolated and cumulated uncertainty leads directly to quantified limits of error on inventory differences (LEIDs) for such material. The NLO error propagation exercise was planned as a field demonstration of the utilization of statistical error propagation methodology at the Feed Materials Production Center in Fernald, Ohio from April 1 to July 1, 1983 in a single material balance area formed specially for the exercise. Major elements of the error propagation methodology were: variance approximation by Taylor Series expansion; variance cumulation by uncorrelated primary error sources as suggested by Jaech; random effects ANOVA model estimation of variance effects (systematic error); provision for inclusion of process variance in addition to measurement variance; and exclusion of static material. The methodology was applied to material balance area transactions from the indicated time period through a FORTRAN computer code developed specifically for this purpose on the NLO HP-3000 computer. This paper contains a complete description of the error propagation methodology and a full summary of the numerical results of applying the methodlogy in the field demonstration. The error propagation LEIDs did encompass the actual uranium and 235 U inventory differences. Further, one can see that error propagation actually provides guidance for reducing inventory differences and LEIDs in future time periods

  12. A note on ''Measuring propagation speed of Coulomb fields'' by R. de Sangro, G. Finocchiaro, P. Patteri, M. Piccolo, G. Pizzella

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gitman, D.M. [P.N. Lebedev Physics Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Tomsk State University, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Universidade de Sao Paulo, Instituto de Fisica, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Shabad, A.E. [P.N. Lebedev Physics Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Tomsk State University, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Shishmarev, A.A. [Tomsk State University, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Universidade de Sao Paulo, Instituto de Fisica, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2016-05-15

    In connection with the discussion and the measurements fulfilled in Ref. (Eur Phys J C 75:137, 2015), the full identity is demonstrated between the Feynman formula for the field of a moving charge and the Lienard-Wiechert potentials. (orig.)

  13. A propagation-measurement-based evaluation of channel characteristics and models pertinent to the expansion of mobile radio systems to frequencies beyond 2 GHz

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bultitude, R.J.C.; Schenk, T.C.W.; Op de Kamp, N.A.A.; Adnani, N.

    2007-01-01

    64This paper concerns the measurement-based comparison of urban microcellular mobile radio channel characteristics at 1.9 GHz and a higher frequency, i.e., 5.8 GHz, where future wireless systems could operate. Characteristics that are reported include transmission loss, root-mean-square delay

  14. Uncertainty propagation using the Monte Carlo method in the measurement of airborne particle size distribution with a scanning mobility particle sizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coquelin, L.; Le Brusquet, L.; Fischer, N.; Gensdarmes, F.; Motzkus, C.; Mace, T.; Fleury, G.

    2018-05-01

    A scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) is a high resolution nanoparticle sizing system that is widely used as the standard method to measure airborne particle size distributions (PSD) in the size range 1 nm–1 μm. This paper addresses the problem to assess the uncertainty associated with PSD when a differential mobility analyzer (DMA) operates under scanning mode. The sources of uncertainty are described and then modeled either through experiments or knowledge extracted from the literature. Special care is brought to model the physics and to account for competing theories. Indeed, it appears that the modeling errors resulting from approximations of the physics can largely affect the final estimate of this indirect measurement, especially for quantities that are not measured during day-to-day experiments. The Monte Carlo method is used to compute the uncertainty associated with PSD. The method is tested against real data sets that are monosize polystyrene latex spheres (PSL) with nominal diameters of 100 nm, 200 nm and 450 nm. The median diameters and associated standard uncertainty of the aerosol particles are estimated as 101.22 nm  ±  0.18 nm, 204.39 nm  ±  1.71 nm and 443.87 nm  ±  1.52 nm with the new approach. Other statistical parameters, such as the mean diameter, the mode and the geometric mean and associated standard uncertainty, are also computed. These results are then compared with the results obtained by SMPS embedded software.

  15. Wave propagation in elastic solids

    CERN Document Server

    Achenbach, Jan

    1984-01-01

    The propagation of mechanical disturbances in solids is of interest in many branches of the physical scienses and engineering. This book aims to present an account of the theory of wave propagation in elastic solids. The material is arranged to present an exposition of the basic concepts of mechanical wave propagation within a one-dimensional setting and a discussion of formal aspects of elastodynamic theory in three dimensions, followed by chapters expounding on typical wave propagation phenomena, such as radiation, reflection, refraction, propagation in waveguides, and diffraction. The treat

  16. Thermografic measurement of crack initiation and propagation at thin sheet joints; Rissentstehung thermometrisch ermitteln. Zerstoerungsfreie Bestimmung der Rissinitiierung in mechanisch gefuegten und widerstandpunktgeschweissten Verbindungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bathke, W.; Stahlfeld, G. [Bundesanstalt fuer Materialforschung und -pruefung (BAM), Berlin (Germany). Fachgruppe V.5 - Sicherheit in der Fuegetechnik

    2000-07-01

    This contribution demonstrates how a thermometric procedure might be applied to determine crack initiation during fatigue testing of joints at steel sheets. The procedure is based on the measurement of the temperature increase which is produced by the heat at the respective joint caused by deformation energy. Such investigations are aimed at detection of crack initiation before it becomes visible at the specimen surface. Thermografic measurements at different mechanical joints and resistance welded spots are compared and various applications are suggested. (orig.) [German] In diesem Beitrag wird gezeigt, wie sich ein thermometrisches Verfahren einsetzen laesst, um die Rissentstehung waehrend der Dauerschwingpruefung von Stahlblechen zu erfassen. Vergleichend werden Messungen an Proben, die durch Stanznieten, Clinchen und Widerstandspunktschweissen gefuegt wurden, gegenuebergestellt. Hierzu wird die am Fuegepunkt waehrend der Pruefung in Waerme umgewandelte Formaenderungsenergie kontinuierlich in Form der Temperaturerhoehung gemessen. Ziel dieser Untersuchungen ist es, solche Temperaturerhoehungen zur Erkennung der Rissentstehung zu verwenden, bevor der Riss die Blechoberflaeche erreicht hat und visuell erkennbar wird. Zudem werden verschiedene Anwendungsmoeglichkeiten vorgeschlagen. (orig.)

  17. Indoor Corridor Wideband Radio Propagation Measurements and Channel Models for 5G Millimeter Wave Wireless Communications at 19 GHz, 28 GHz, and 38 GHz Bands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed M. Al-samman

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents millimeter wave (mmWave measurements in an indoor environment. The high demands for the future applications in the 5G system require more capacity. In the microwave band below 6 GHz, most of the available bands are occupied; hence, the microwave band above 6 GHz and mmWave band can be used for the 5G system to cover the bandwidth required for all 5G applications. In this paper, the propagation characteristics at three different bands above 6 GHz (19, 28, and 38 GHz are investigated in an indoor corridor environment for line of sight (LOS and non-LOS (NLOS scenarios. Five different path loss models are studied for this environment, namely, close-in (CI free space path loss, floating-intercept (FI, frequency attenuation (FA path loss, alpha-beta-gamma (ABG, and close-in free space reference distance with frequency weighting (CIF models. Important statistical properties, such as power delay profile (PDP, root mean square (RMS delay spread, and azimuth angle spread, are obtained and compared for different bands. The results for the path loss model found that the path loss exponent (PLE and line slope values for all models are less than the free space path loss exponent of 2. The RMS delay spread for all bands is low for the LOS scenario, and only the directed path is contributed in some spatial locations. For the NLOS scenario, the angle of arrival (AOA is extensively investigated, and the results indicated that the channel propagation for 5G using high directional antenna should be used in the beamforming technique to receive the signal and collect all multipath components from different angles in a particular mobile location.

  18. Temporal scaling in information propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Junming; Li, Chao; Wang, Wen-Qiang; Shen, Hua-Wei; Li, Guojie; Cheng, Xue-Qi

    2014-06-01

    For the study of information propagation, one fundamental problem is uncovering universal laws governing the dynamics of information propagation. This problem, from the microscopic perspective, is formulated as estimating the propagation probability that a piece of information propagates from one individual to another. Such a propagation probability generally depends on two major classes of factors: the intrinsic attractiveness of information and the interactions between individuals. Despite the fact that the temporal effect of attractiveness is widely studied, temporal laws underlying individual interactions remain unclear, causing inaccurate prediction of information propagation on evolving social networks. In this report, we empirically study the dynamics of information propagation, using the dataset from a population-scale social media website. We discover a temporal scaling in information propagation: the probability a message propagates between two individuals decays with the length of time latency since their latest interaction, obeying a power-law rule. Leveraging the scaling law, we further propose a temporal model to estimate future propagation probabilities between individuals, reducing the error rate of information propagation prediction from 6.7% to 2.6% and improving viral marketing with 9.7% incremental customers.

  19. Optimization of directional elastic energy propagation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Erik; Chang, Hannah R.; Ruzzene, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to demonstrate how topology optimization can be used to design a periodically perforated plate, in order to obtain a tailored anisotropic group velocity profile. The main method is demonstrated on both low and high frequency bending wave propagation in an aluminum plate......, but is general in the sense that it could be used to design periodic structures with frequency dependent group velocity profiles for any kind of elastic wave propagation. With the proposed method the resulting design is manufacturable. Measurements on an optimized design compare excellently with the numerical...

  20. Thermal propagation and stability in superconducting films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, K.E.; Kampwirth, R.T.; Zasadzinski, J.F.; Ducharme, S.P.

    1983-01-01

    Thermal propagation and stable hot spots (normal domains) are studied in various high Tsub(c) superconducting films (Nb 3 Sn, Nb, NbN and Nb 3 Ge). A new energy balance is shown to give reasonable quantitative agreement of the dependence of the propagation velocity on the length of short normal domains. The steady state (zero velocity) measurements indicate the existence of two distinct situations for films on high thermal conductivity (sapphire) substrates. For low power per unit area the film and substrate have the same temperature, and the thermal properties of the substrate dominate. However, for higher power densities in short hot spots, the coupling is relatively weak and the thermal properties of the film alone are important. Here a connection is made between the critical current stability of superconducting films and a critical hot spot size for thermal propagation. As a result efficient heat removal is shown to dominate the stabilisation of superconducting films. The strong and weak coupling situations also lead to modifications of the models for propagation velocities on sapphire substrates. Self-healing of hot spots and other phenomena in superconducting film are explained. The potential use of the thermal propagation model in applications of superconductors, especially switches is discussed. (author)

  1. Research on Trust Propagation Models in Reputation Management Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiyuan Su

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Feedback based reputation systems continue to gain popularity in eCommerce and social media systems today and reputation management in large social networks needs to manage cold start and sparseness in terms of feedback. Trust propagation has been widely recognized as an effective mechanism to handle these problems. In this paper we study the characterization of trust propagation models in the context of attack resilience. We characterize trust propagation models along three dimensions: (i uniform propagation and conditional propagation, (ii jump strategies for breaking unwanted cliques, and (iii decay factors for differentiating recent trust history from remote past history. We formally and experimentally show that feedback similarity is a critical measure for countering colluding attacks in reputation systems. Without feedback similarity guided control, trust propagations are vulnerable to different types of colluding attacks.

  2. Propagation Characteristics of International Space Station Wireless Local Area Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sham, Catherine C.; Hwn, Shian U.; Loh, Yin-Chung

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the application of the Uniform Geometrical Theory of Diffraction (UTD) for Space Station Wireless Local Area Networks (WLANs) indoor propagation characteristics analysis. The verification results indicate good correlation between UTD computed and measured signal strength. It is observed that the propagation characteristics are quite different in the Space Station modules as compared with those in the typical indoor WLANs environment, such as an office building. The existing indoor propagation models are not readily applicable to the Space Station module environment. The Space Station modules can be regarded as oversized imperfect waveguides. Two distinct propagation regions separated by a breakpoint exist. The propagation exhibits the guided wave characteristics. The propagation loss in the Space Station, thus, is much smaller than that in the typical office building. The path loss model developed in this paper is applicable for Space Station WLAN RF coverage and link performance analysis.

  3. Bolt beam propagation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokair, I. R.

    BOLT (Beam on Laser Technology) is a rocket experiment to demonstrate electron beam propagation on a laser ionized plasma channel across the geomagnetic field in the ion focused regime (IFR). The beam parameters for BOLT are: beam current I(sub b) = 100 Amps, beam energy of 1--1.5 MeV (gamma =3-4), and a Gaussian beam and channel of radii r(sub b) = r(sub c) = 1.5 cm. The N+1 ionization scheme is used to ionize atomic oxygen in the upper atmosphere. This scheme utilizes 130 nm light plus three IR lasers to excite and then ionize atomic oxygen. The limiting factor for the channel strength is the energy of the 130 nm laser, which is assumed to be 1.6 mJ for BOLT. At a fixed laser energy and altitude (fixing the density of atomic oxygen), the range can be varied by adjusting the laser tuning, resulting in a neutralization fraction axial profile of the form: f(z) = f(sub 0) e(exp minus z)/R, where R is the range. In this paper we consider the propagation of the BOLT beam and calculate the range of the electron beam taking into account the fact that the erosion rates (magnetic and inductive) vary with beam length as the beam and channel dynamically respond to sausage and hose instabilities.

  4. Amplitude and Phase Characteristics of Signals at the Output of Spatially Separated Antennas for Paths with Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anikin, A. S.

    2018-06-01

    Conditional statistical characteristics of the phase difference are considered depending on the ratio of instantaneous output signal amplitudes of spatially separated weakly directional antennas for the normal field model for paths with radio-wave scattering. The dependences obtained are related to the physical processes on the radio-wave propagation path. The normal model parameters are established at which the statistical characteristics of the phase difference depend on the ratio of the instantaneous amplitudes and hence can be used to measure the phase difference. Using Shannon's formula, the amount of information on the phase difference of signals contained in the ratio of their amplitudes is calculated depending on the parameters of the normal field model. Approaches are suggested to reduce the shift of phase difference measured for paths with radio-wave scattering. A comparison with results of computer simulation by the Monte Carlo method is performed.

  5. Submillimeter wave propagation in tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, C.H.; Hutchinson, D.P.; Staats, P.A.; Vander Sluis, K.L.; Mansfield, D.K.; Park, H.; Johnson, L.C.

    1985-01-01

    The propagation of submillimeter-waves (smm) in tokamak plasmas has been investigated both theoretically and experimentally to ensure successful measurements of electron density and plasma current distributions in tokamak devices. Theoretical analyses have been carried out to study the polarization of the smm waves in TFTR and ISX-B tokamaks. A multichord smm wave interferometer/polarimeter system has been employed to simultaneously measure the line electron density and poloidal field-induced Faraday rotation in the ISX-B tokamak. The experimental study on TFTR is under way. Computer codes have been developed and have been used to study the wave propagation and to reconstruct the distributions of plasma current and density from the measured data. The results are compared with other measurements

  6. Submillimeter wave propagation in tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, C.H.; Hutchinson, D.P.; Staats, P.A.; Vander Sluis, K.L.; Mansfield, D.K.; Park, H.; Johnson, L.C.

    1986-01-01

    Propagation of submillimeter waves (smm) in tokamak plasma was investigated both theoretically and experimentally to ensure successful measurements of electron density and plasma current distributions in tokamak devices. Theoretical analyses were carried out to study the polarization of the smm waves in TFTR and ISX-B tokamaks. A multichord smm wave interferometer/polarimeter system was employed to simultaneously measure the line electron density and poloidal field-induced Faraday rotation in the ISX-B tokamak. The experimental study on TFTR is under way. Computer codes were developed and have been used to study the wave propagation and to reconstruct the distributions of plasma current and density from the measured data. The results are compared with other measurements. 5 references, 2 figures

  7. Propagators and path integrals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holten, J.W. van

    1995-08-22

    Path-integral expressions for one-particle propagators in scalar and fermionic field theories are derived, for arbitrary mass. This establishes a direct connection between field theory and specific classical point-particle models. The role of world-line reparametrization invariance of the classical action and the implementation of the corresponding BRST-symmetry in the quantum theory are discussed. The presence of classical world-line supersymmetry is shown to lead to an unwanted doubling of states for massive spin-1/2 particles. The origin of this phenomenon is traced to a `hidden` topological fermionic excitation. A different formulation of the pseudo-classical mechanics using a bosonic representation of {gamma}{sub 5} is shown to remove these extra states at the expense of losing manifest supersymmetry. (orig.).

  8. Curvilinear crack layer propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudnovsky, Alexander; Chaoui, Kamel; Moet, Abdelsamie

    1987-01-01

    An account is given of an experiment designed to allow observation of the effect of damage orientation on the direction of crack growth in the case of crack layer propagation, using polystyrene as the model material. The direction of crack advance under a given loading condition is noted to be determined by a competition between the tendency of the crack to maintain its current direction and the tendency to follow the orientation of the crazes at its tip. The orientation of the crazes is, on the other hand, determined by the stress field due to the interaction of the crack, the crazes, and the hole. The changes in craze rotation relative to the crack define the active zone rotation.

  9. Atomistics of crack propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sieradzki, K.; Dienes, G.J.; Paskin, A.; Massoumzadeh, B.

    1988-01-01

    The molecular dynamic technique is used to investigate static and dynamic aspects of crack extension. The material chosen for this study was the 2D triangular solid with atoms interacting via the Johnson potential. The 2D Johnson solid was chosen for this study since a sharp crack in this material remains stable against dislocation emission up to the critical Griffith load. This behavior allows for a meaningful comparison between the simulation results and continuum energy theorems for crack extension by appropriately defining an effective modulus which accounts for sample size effects and the non-linear elastic behavior of the Johnson solid. Simulation results are presented for the stress fields of moving cracks and these dynamic results are discussed in terms of the dynamic crack propagation theories, of Mott, Eshelby, and Freund

  10. Broadband unidirectional ultrasound propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Dipen N.; Pantea, Cristian

    2017-12-12

    A passive, linear arrangement of a sonic crystal-based apparatus and method including a 1D sonic crystal, a nonlinear medium, and an acoustic low-pass filter, for permitting unidirectional broadband ultrasound propagation as a collimated beam for underwater, air or other fluid communication, are described. The signal to be transmitted is first used to modulate a high-frequency ultrasonic carrier wave which is directed into the sonic crystal side of the apparatus. The apparatus processes the modulated signal, whereby the original low-frequency signal exits the apparatus as a collimated beam on the side of the apparatus opposite the sonic crystal. The sonic crystal provides a bandpass acoustic filter through which the modulated high-frequency ultrasonic signal passes, and the nonlinear medium demodulates the modulated signal and recovers the low-frequency sound beam. The low-pass filter removes remaining high-frequency components, and contributes to the unidirectional property of the apparatus.

  11. Propagation into an unstable state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dee, G.

    1985-01-01

    We describe propagating front solutions of the equations of motion of pattern-forming systems. We make a number of conjectures concerning the properties of such fronts in connection with pattern selection in these systems. We describe a calculation which can be used to calculate the velocity and state selected by certain types of propagating fronts. We investigate the propagating front solutions of the amplitude equation which provides a valid dynamical description of many pattern-forming systems near onset

  12. Propagation of ionization waves during ignition of fluorescent lamps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langer, R; Tidecks, R; Horn, S; Garner, R; Hilscher, A

    2008-01-01

    The propagation of the first ionization wave in a compact fluorescent lamp (T4 tube with standard electrodes) during ignition was investigated for various initial dc-voltages (both polarities measured against ground) and gas compositions (with and without mercury). In addition the effect of the presence of a fluorescent powder coating was studied. The propagation velocity of the initial wave was measured by an assembly of photomultipliers installed along the tube, which detected the light emitted by the wave head. The propagation was found to be faster for positive than for negative polarity. This effect is explained involving processes in the electrode region as well as in the wave head. Waves propagate faster in the presence of a fluorescent powder coating than without it and gases of lighter mass show a faster propagation than gases with higher mass

  13. Aspects of HF radio propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephane Saillant

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available

    radio systems. From the point of view Working Group 2 of the COST 296 Action, interest lies with effects associated

    with propagation via the ionosphere of signals within the HF band. Several aspects are covered in this paper:

    a The directions of arrival and times of flight of signals received over a path oriented along the trough have

    been examined and several types of propagation effects identified. Of particular note, combining the HF observations

    with satellite measurements has identified the presence of irregularities within the floor of the trough that

    result in propagation displaced from the great circle direction. An understanding of the propagation effects that

    result in deviations of the signal path from the great circle direction are of particular relevance to the operation

    of HF radiolocation systems.

    b Inclusion of the results from the above mentioned measurements into a propagation model of the northerly

    ionosphere (i.e. those regions of the ionosphere located poleward of, and including, the mid-latitude trough

    and the use of this model to predict the coverage expected from transmitters where the signals impinge on the

    northerly ionosphere

  14. Propagating annular modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheshadri, A.; Plumb, R. A.

    2017-12-01

    The leading "annular mode", defined as the dominant EOF of surface pressure or of zonal mean zonal wind variability, appears as a dipolar structure straddling the mean midlatitude jet and thus seems to describe north-south wobbling of the jet latitude. However, extratropical zonal wind anomalies frequently tend to migrate poleward. This behavior can be described by the first two EOFs, the first (AM1) being the dipolar structure, and the second (AM2) having a tripolar structure centered on the mean jet. Taken in isolation, AM1 thus describes a north-south wobbling of the jet position, while AM2 describes a strengthening and narrowing of the jet. However, despite the fact that they are spatially orthogonal, and their corresponding time series temporally orthogonal, AM1 and AM2 are not independent, but show significant lag-correlations which reveal the propagation. The EOFs are not modes of the underlying dynamical system governing the zonal flow evolution. The true modes can be estimated using principal oscillation pattern (POP) analysis. In the troposphere, the leading POPs manifest themselves as a pair of complex conjugate structures with conjugate eigenvalues thus, in reality, constituting a single, complex, mode that describes propagating anomalies. Even though the principal components associated with the two leading EOFs decay at different rates, each decays faster than the true mode. These facts have implications for eddy feedback and the susceptibility of the mode to external perturbations. If one interprets the annular modes as the modes of the system, then simple theory predicts that the response to steady forcing will usually be dominated by AM1 (with the longest time scale). However, such arguments should really be applied to the true modes. Experiments with a simplified GCM show that climate response to perturbations do not necessarily have AM1 structures. Implications of these results for stratosphere-troposphere interactions are explored. The POP

  15. Propagation of Ion Acoustic Perturbations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pécseli, Hans

    1975-01-01

    Equations describing the propagation of ion acoustic perturbations are considered, using the assumption that the electrons are Boltzman distributed and isothermal at all times. Quasi-neutrality is also considered.......Equations describing the propagation of ion acoustic perturbations are considered, using the assumption that the electrons are Boltzman distributed and isothermal at all times. Quasi-neutrality is also considered....

  16. Transionospheric propagation predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klobucher, J. A.; Basu, S.; Basu, S.; Bernhardt, P. A.; Davies, K.; Donatelli, D. E.; Fremouw, E. J.; Goodman, J. M.; Hartmann, G. K.; Leitinger, R.

    1979-01-01

    The current status and future prospects of the capability to make transionospheric propagation predictions are addressed, highlighting the effects of the ionized media, which dominate for frequencies below 1 to 3 GHz, depending upon the state of the ionosphere and the elevation angle through the Earth-space path. The primary concerns are the predictions of time delay of signal modulation (group path delay) and of radio wave scintillation. Progress in these areas is strongly tied to knowledge of variable structures in the ionosphere ranging from the large scale (thousands of kilometers in horizontal extent) to the fine scale (kilometer size). Ionospheric variability and the relative importance of various mechanisms responsible for the time histories observed in total electron content (TEC), proportional to signal group delay, and in irregularity formation are discussed in terms of capability to make both short and long term predictions. The data base upon which predictions are made is examined for its adequacy, and the prospects for prediction improvements by more theoretical studies as well as by increasing the available statistical data base are examined.

  17. Dressing the nucleon propagator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fishman, S.; Gersten, A.

    1976-01-01

    The nucleon propagator in the ''nested bubbles'' approximation is analyzed. The approximation is built from the minimal set of diagrams which is needed to maintain the unitarity condition under two-pion production threshold in the two-nucleon Bethe--Salpeter equation. Recursive formulas for subsets of ''nested bubbles'' diagrams calculated in the framework of the pseudoscalar interaction are obtained by the use of dispersion relations. We prove that the sum of all the ''nested bubbles'' diverges. Moreover, the successive iterations are plagued with ghost poles. We prove that the first approximation--which is the so-called chain approximation--has ghost poles for any nonvanishing coupling constant. In an earlier paper we have shown that ghost poles lead to ghost cuts. These cuts are present in the ''nested bubbles.'' Ghost elimination procedures are discussed. Modifications of the ''nested bubbles'' approximation are introduced in order to obtain convergence and in order to eliminate the ghost poles and ghost cuts. In a similar way as in the Lee model, cutoff functions are introduced in order to eliminate the ghost poles. The necessary and sufficient conditions for the absence of ghost poles are formulated and analyzed. The spectral functions of the modified ''nested bubbles'' are analyzed and computed. Finally, we present a theorem, similar in its form to Levinson's theorem in scattering theory, which enables one to compute in a simple way the number of ghost poles

  18. Collective effects in shock propagation through a clumpy medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norman, M.L.; Dickel, J.R.; Livio, M.; Chu, Y.H.

    1988-01-01

    A numerical simulation of shock propagation in a clumpy medium with a weak magnetic field is presented which illustrates a number of dynamical processes of potential importance for explaining spectral line width and radio polarization measurements in supernova remnants

  19. Propagation of steel corrosion in concrete: Experimental and numerical investigations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michel, Alexander; Otieno, M.; Stang, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    This paper focuses on experimental and numerical investigations of the propagation phase of reinforcement corrosion to determine anodic and cathodic Tafel constants and exchange current densities, from corrosion current density and corrosion potential measurements. The experimental program includ...

  20. Propagation of Porro "petal" beams through a turbulent atmosphere

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Burger, L

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available . Construct a series of pseudo–random phase screens from the basis. 3. Implement optical wavefront changes from the pseudo–random phase screens. 4. Propagate the resulting beam to the far field and measure …. Page 11 Phase screen construction 20 40 60 80... constant h is height asl k is the wave number Atmospheric propagation Kolmogorov Turbulence Model Page 10 Atmospheric propagation How to measure turbulence 1. Decompose the turbulence model into a series of orthogonal functions (basis set). 2...

  1. Dike Propagation Near Drifts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this Analysis and Model Report (AMR) supporting the Site Recommendation/License Application (SR/LA) for the Yucca Mountain Project is the development of elementary analyses of the interactions of a hypothetical dike with a repository drift (i.e., tunnel) and with the drift contents at the potential Yucca Mountain repository. This effort is intended to support the analysis of disruptive events for Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA). This AMR supports the Process Model Report (PMR) on disruptive events (CRWMS M and O 2000a). This purpose is documented in the development plan (DP) ''Coordinate Modeling of Dike Propagation Near Drifts Consequences for TSPA-SR/LA'' (CRWMS M and O 2000b). Evaluation of that Development Plan and the work to be conducted to prepare Interim Change Notice (ICN) 1 of this report, which now includes the design option of ''Open'' drifts, indicated that no revision to that DP was needed. These analyses are intended to provide reasonable bounds for a number of expected effects: (1) Temperature changes to the waste package from exposure to magma; (2) The gas flow available to degrade waste containers during the intrusion; (3) Movement of the waste package as it is displaced by the gas, pyroclasts and magma from the intruding dike (the number of packages damaged); (4) Movement of the backfill (Backfill is treated here as a design option); (5) The nature of the mechanics of the dike/drift interaction. These analyses serve two objectives: to provide preliminary analyses needed to support evaluation of the consequences of an intrusive event and to provide a basis for addressing some of the concerns of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) expressed in the Igneous Activity Issue Resolution Status Report

  2. Laser beam propagation generation and propagation of customized light

    CERN Document Server

    Forbes, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    ""The text is easy to read and is accompanied by beautiful illustrations. It is an excellent book for anyone working in laser beam propagation and an asset for any library.""-Optics & Photonics News, July 2014

  3. Lamb wave propagation in monocrystalline silicon wafers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromme, Paul; Pizzolato, Marco; Robyr, Jean-Luc; Masserey, Bernard

    2018-01-01

    Monocrystalline silicon wafers are widely used in the photovoltaic industry for solar panels with high conversion efficiency. Guided ultrasonic waves offer the potential to efficiently detect micro-cracks in the thin wafers. Previous studies of ultrasonic wave propagation in silicon focused on effects of material anisotropy on bulk ultrasonic waves, but the dependence of the wave propagation characteristics on the material anisotropy is not well understood for Lamb waves. The phase slowness and beam skewing of the two fundamental Lamb wave modes A 0 and S 0 were investigated. Experimental measurements using contact wedge transducer excitation and laser measurement were conducted. Good agreement was found between the theoretically calculated angular dependency of the phase slowness and measurements for different propagation directions relative to the crystal orientation. Significant wave skew and beam widening was observed experimentally due to the anisotropy, especially for the S 0 mode. Explicit finite element simulations were conducted to visualize and quantify the guided wave beam skew. Good agreement was found for the A 0 mode, but a systematic discrepancy was observed for the S 0 mode. These effects need to be considered for the non-destructive testing of wafers using guided waves.

  4. Current understanding of SEP acceleration and propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klecker, B

    2013-01-01

    The solar energetic particle (SEP) populations of electrons and ions are highly variable in space and time, in intensity, energy, and composition. Over the last ∼20 years advanced instrumentation onboard many spacecraft (e.g. ACE, Coronas, GOES, Hinode, RHESSI, SAMPEX, SDO, SOHO, STEREO, TRACE, Ulysses, Yokoh, to name a few) extended our ability to explore the characteristics of solar energetic particles by in-situ measurements in interplanetary space and by observing their source characteristics near the Sun by remote-sensing observation of electromagnetic emission over a wide frequency range. These measurements provide crucial information for understanding the sources of the particle populations and the acceleration and propagation processes involved. We are now able to measure intensity-time profiles and anisotropies, energy spectra, elemental and isotopic abundances, and the ionic charge of particles over an extended energy range of 0.01 to several 100 MeV/nuc and for a large dynamic range of particle intensities. Furthermore, multi-spacecraft in-situ observations at different solar longitudes and latitudes provide new insight into the acceleration and propagation processes of SEPs near the Sun and in interplanetary space. In this paper we present an overview of SEP observations, their implications for SEP acceleration and propagation processes, and discuss open questions.

  5. Propagation speed of gamma radiation in brass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavalcante, Jose T.P.D.; Silva, Paulo R.J.; Saitovich, Henrique

    2009-01-01

    The propagation speed (PS) of visible light -represented by a short frequency range in the large frame of electromagnetic radiations (ER) frequencies- in air was measured during the last century, using a great deal of different methods, with high precision results being achieved. Presently, a well accepted value, with very small uncertainty, is c= 299,792.458 Km/s) (c reporting to the Latin word celeritas: 'speed swiftness'). When propagating in denser material media (MM), such value is always lower when compared to the air value, with the propagating MM density playing an important role. Until present, such studies focusing propagation speeds, refractive indexes, dispersions were specially related to visible light, or to ER in wavelengths ranges dose to it, and with a transparent MM. A first incursion in this subject dealing with γ-rays was performed using an electronic coincidence counting system, when the value of it's PS was measured in air, C γ(air) 298,300.15 Km/s; a method that went on with later electronic improvements. always in air. To perform such measurements the availability of a γ-radiation source in which two γ-rays are emitted simultaneously in opposite directions -as already used as well as applied in the present case- turns out to be essential to the feasibility of the experiment, as far as no reflection techniques could be used. Such a suitable source was the positron emitter 22 Na placed in a thin wall metal container in which the positrons are stopped and annihilated when reacting with the medium electrons, in such way originating -as it is very well established from momentum/energy conservation laws - two gamma-rays, energy 511 KeV each, both emitted simultaneously in opposite directions. In all the previous experiments were used photomultiplier detectors coupled to NaI(Tl) crystal scintillators, which have a good energy resolution but a deficient time resolution for such purposes. Presently, as an innovative improvement, were used BaF 2

  6. Optical propagation in linear media atmospheric gases and particles, solid-state components, and water

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, Michael E

    2006-01-01

    PART I: Background Theory and Measurement. 1. Optical Electromagnetics I. 2. Optical Electromagnetics II. 3. Spectroscopy of Matter. 4. Electrodynamics I: Macroscopic Interaction of Light and Matter. 5. Electrodynamics II: Microscopic Interaction of Light and Matter. 6. Experimental Techniques. PART II: Practical Models for Various Media. 7. Optical Propagation in Gases and the Atmosphere of the Earth. 8. Optical Propagation in Solids. 9. Optical Propagation in Liquids. 10. Particle Absorption and Scatter. 11. Propagation Background and Noise

  7. Methodologies of Uncertainty Propagation Calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chojnacki, Eric

    2002-01-01

    After recalling the theoretical principle and the practical difficulties of the methodologies of uncertainty propagation calculation, the author discussed how to propagate input uncertainties. He said there were two kinds of input uncertainty: - variability: uncertainty due to heterogeneity, - lack of knowledge: uncertainty due to ignorance. It was therefore necessary to use two different propagation methods. He demonstrated this in a simple example which he generalised, treating the variability uncertainty by the probability theory and the lack of knowledge uncertainty by the fuzzy theory. He cautioned, however, against the systematic use of probability theory which may lead to unjustifiable and illegitimate precise answers. Mr Chojnacki's conclusions were that the importance of distinguishing variability and lack of knowledge increased as the problem was getting more and more complex in terms of number of parameters or time steps, and that it was necessary to develop uncertainty propagation methodologies combining probability theory and fuzzy theory

  8. Propagation engineering in wireless communications

    CERN Document Server

    Ghasemi, Abdollah; Ghasemi, Farshid

    2016-01-01

    This book covers the basic principles for understanding radio wave propagation for common frequency bands used in radio-communications. This includes achievements and developments in propagation models for wireless communication. This book is intended to bridge the gap between the theoretical calculations and approaches to the applied procedures needed for radio links design in a proper manner. The authors emphasize propagation engineering by giving fundamental information and explain the use of basic principles together with technical achievements. This new edition includes additional information on radio wave propagation in guided media and technical issues for fiber optics cable networks with several examples and problems. This book also includes a solution manual - with 90 solved examples distributed throughout the chapters - and 158 problems including practical values and assumptions.

  9. Wave propagation in electromagnetic media

    CERN Document Server

    Davis, Julian L

    1990-01-01

    This is the second work of a set of two volumes on the phenomena of wave propagation in nonreacting and reacting media. The first, entitled Wave Propagation in Solids and Fluids (published by Springer-Verlag in 1988), deals with wave phenomena in nonreacting media (solids and fluids). This book is concerned with wave propagation in reacting media-specifically, in electro­ magnetic materials. Since these volumes were designed to be relatively self­ contained, we have taken the liberty of adapting some of the pertinent material, especially in the theory of hyperbolic partial differential equations (concerned with electromagnetic wave propagation), variational methods, and Hamilton-Jacobi theory, to the phenomena of electromagnetic waves. The purpose of this volume is similar to that of the first, except that here we are dealing with electromagnetic waves. We attempt to present a clear and systematic account of the mathematical methods of wave phenomena in electromagnetic materials that will be readily accessi...

  10. Massive propagators in instanton fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, L.S.; Lee, C.

    1978-01-01

    Green's functions for massive spinor and vector particles propagating in a self-dual but otherwise arbitrary non-Abelian gauge field are shown to be completely determined by the corresponding Green's functions of massive scalar particles

  11. Semiclassical propagation of Wigner functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittrich, T; Gómez, E A; Pachón, L A

    2010-06-07

    We present a comprehensive study of semiclassical phase-space propagation in the Wigner representation, emphasizing numerical applications, in particular as an initial-value representation. Two semiclassical approximation schemes are discussed. The propagator of the Wigner function based on van Vleck's approximation replaces the Liouville propagator by a quantum spot with an oscillatory pattern reflecting the interference between pairs of classical trajectories. Employing phase-space path integration instead, caustics in the quantum spot are resolved in terms of Airy functions. We apply both to two benchmark models of nonlinear molecular potentials, the Morse oscillator and the quartic double well, to test them in standard tasks such as computing autocorrelation functions and propagating coherent states. The performance of semiclassical Wigner propagation is very good even in the presence of marked quantum effects, e.g., in coherent tunneling and in propagating Schrodinger cat states, and of classical chaos in four-dimensional phase space. We suggest options for an effective numerical implementation of our method and for integrating it in Monte-Carlo-Metropolis algorithms suitable for high-dimensional systems.

  12. Study of phonon propagation in water using picosecond ultrasonics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, F; Atay, T; Dang, C H; Grimsley, T J; Che, S; Ma, J; Zhang, Q; Nurmikko, A V; Maris, H J

    2007-01-01

    The propagation of ultra-short sound pulses in water is studied by using the picosecond ultrasonic technique. A sound pulse is generated when light is absorbed in a metal transducer film deposited onto a substrate. The sound propagates across a thin layer of water and is then reflected back to the surface at which it was generated. The efficiency of optoacoustic detection of the reflected sound is enhanced through the use of a resonant optical cavity. We show that the variation of the shape of the returning sound pulse with propagation distance agrees with that calculated by using the attenuation of sound in water that has been measured at lower frequencies

  13. Characteristic of laser diode beam propagation through a collimating lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qiang; Han, Yiping; Cui, Zhiwei

    2010-01-20

    A mathematical model of a laser diode beam propagating through a collimating lens is presented. Wave propagation beyond the paraxial approximation is studied. The phase delay of the laser diode wave in passing through the lens is analyzed in detail. The propagation optical field after the lens is obtained from the diffraction integral by the stationary phase method. The model is employed to predict the light intensity at various beam cross sections, and the computed intensity distributions are in a good agreement with the corresponding measurements.

  14. Factors Enabling Information Propagation in a Social Network Site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnani, Matteo; Montesi, Danilo; Rossi, Luca

    2013-01-01

    A relevant feature of Social Network Sites is their ability to propagate units of information and create large distributed conversations. This phenomenon is particularly relevant because of the speed of information propagation, which is known to be much faster than within traditional media......, and because of the very large amount of people that can potentially be exposed to information items. While many general formal models of network propagation have been developed in different research fields, in this chapter we present the result of an empirical study on a Large Social Database (LSD) aimed...... at measuring specific socio-technical factors enabling information spreading in Social Network Sites....

  15. Sound propagation in elongated superfluid fermionic clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capuzzi, P.; Vignolo, P.; Federici, F.; Tosi, M. P.

    2006-01-01

    We use hydrodynamic equations to study sound propagation in a superfluid Fermi gas at zero temperature inside a strongly elongated cigar-shaped trap, with main attention to the transition from the BCS to the unitary regime. First, we treat the role of the radial density profile in the limit of a cylindrical geometry and then evaluate numerically the effect of the axial confinement in a configuration in which a hole is present in the gas density at the center of the trap. We find that in a strongly elongated trap the speed of sound in both the BCS and the unitary regime differs by a factor √(3/5) from that in a homogeneous three-dimensional superfluid. The predictions of the theory could be tested by measurements of sound-wave propagation in a setup such as that exploited by Andrews et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 553 (1997)] for an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate

  16. Harmonic surface wave propagation in plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shivarova, A.; Stoychev, T.

    1980-01-01

    Second order harmonic surface waves generated by one fundamental high-frequency surface wave are investigated experimentally in gas discharge plasma. Two types of harmonic waves of equal frequency, associated with the linear dispersion relation and the synchronism conditions relatively propagate. The experimental conditions and the different space damping rates of the waves ensure the existence of different spatial regions (consecutively arranged along the plasma column) of a dominant propagation of each one of these two waves. Experimental data are obtained both for the wavenumbers and the space damping rates by relatively precise methods for wave investigations such as the methods of time-space diagrams and of phase shift measurements. The results are explained by the theoretical model for nonlinear mixing of dispersive waves. (author)

  17. Propagation of avalanches in Mn12-acetate: magnetic deflagration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yoko; Sarachik, M P; Chudnovsky, E M; McHugh, S; Gonzalez-Rubio, R; Avraham, Nurit; Myasoedov, Y; Zeldov, E; Shtrikman, H; Chakov, N E; Christou, G

    2005-09-30

    Local time-resolved measurements of fast reversal of the magnetization of single crystals of Mn12-acetate indicate that the magnetization avalanche spreads as a narrow interface that propagates through the crystal at a constant velocity that is roughly 2 orders of magnitude smaller than the speed of sound. We argue that this phenomenon is closely analogous to the propagation of a flame front (deflagration) through a flammable chemical substance.

  18. Propagation and Signal Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Finn B.

    The use of sound in the sea is ubiquitous: Apart from the military aspect of trying to detect an adversary’s mines and submarines, ship-mounted sonars measure water depth, ship speed, and the presence of fish shoals. Side-scan systems are used for mapping the bottom topography, sub-bottom profilers for getting information about the deeper layering, and other sonar systems for locating pipelines and cables on the seafloor. Sound is also used for navigating submerged vehicles, for underwater communications and for tracking marine mammals. Finally, in the realm of ‘acoustical oceanography’ and ‘ocean acoustic tomography,’ sound is used for measuring physical parameters of the ocean environment and for monitoring oceanic processes [1-6].

  19. 24 GHz cmWave Radio Propagation Through Vegetation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodriguez, Ignacio; Abreu, Renato Barbosa; Portela Lopes de Almeida, Erika

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a measurement-based analysis of cm-wave radio propagation through vegetation at 24 GHz. A set of dedicated directional measurements were performed with horn antennas located close to street level inside a densely-vegetated area illuminated from above. The full azimuth was exam......This paper presents a measurement-based analysis of cm-wave radio propagation through vegetation at 24 GHz. A set of dedicated directional measurements were performed with horn antennas located close to street level inside a densely-vegetated area illuminated from above. The full azimuth...

  20. Energy model for rumor propagation on social networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Shuo; Zhuang, Fuzhen; He, Qing; Shi, Zhongzhi; Ao, Xiang

    2014-01-01

    With the development of social networks, the impact of rumor propagation on human lives is more and more significant. Due to the change of propagation mode, traditional rumor propagation models designed for word-of-mouth process may not be suitable for describing the rumor spreading on social networks. To overcome this shortcoming, we carefully analyze the mechanisms of rumor propagation and the topological properties of large-scale social networks, then propose a novel model based on the physical theory. In this model, heat energy calculation formula and Metropolis rule are introduced to formalize this problem and the amount of heat energy is used to measure a rumor’s impact on a network. Finally, we conduct track experiments to show the evolution of rumor propagation, make comparison experiments to contrast the proposed model with the traditional models, and perform simulation experiments to study the dynamics of rumor spreading. The experiments show that (1) the rumor propagation simulated by our model goes through three stages: rapid growth, fluctuant persistence and slow decline; (2) individuals could spread a rumor repeatedly, which leads to the rumor’s resurgence; (3) rumor propagation is greatly influenced by a rumor’s attraction, the initial rumormonger and the sending probability.

  1. Network-based analysis of software change propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rongcun; Huang, Rubing; Qu, Binbin

    2014-01-01

    The object-oriented software systems frequently evolve to meet new change requirements. Understanding the characteristics of changes aids testers and system designers to improve the quality of softwares. Identifying important modules becomes a key issue in the process of evolution. In this context, a novel network-based approach is proposed to comprehensively investigate change distributions and the correlation between centrality measures and the scope of change propagation. First, software dependency networks are constructed at class level. And then, the number of times of cochanges among classes is minded from software repositories. According to the dependency relationships and the number of times of cochanges among classes, the scope of change propagation is calculated. Using Spearman rank correlation analyzes the correlation between centrality measures and the scope of change propagation. Three case studies on java open source software projects Findbugs, Hibernate, and Spring are conducted to research the characteristics of change propagation. Experimental results show that (i) change distribution is very uneven; (ii) PageRank, Degree, and CIRank are significantly correlated to the scope of change propagation. Particularly, CIRank shows higher correlation coefficient, which suggests it can be a more useful indicator for measuring the scope of change propagation of classes in object-oriented software system.

  2. Wave Propagation in Jointed Geologic Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antoun, T

    2009-12-17

    Predictive modeling capabilities for wave propagation in a jointed geologic media remain a modern day scientific frontier. In part this is due to a lack of comprehensive understanding of the complex physical processes associated with the transient response of geologic material, and in part it is due to numerical challenges that prohibit accurate representation of the heterogeneities that influence the material response. Constitutive models whose properties are determined from laboratory experiments on intact samples have been shown to over-predict the free field environment in large scale field experiments. Current methodologies for deriving in situ properties from laboratory measured properties are based on empirical equations derived for static geomechanical applications involving loads of lower intensity and much longer durations than those encountered in applications of interest involving wave propagation. These methodologies are not validated for dynamic applications, and they do not account for anisotropic behavior stemming from direcitonal effects associated with the orientation of joint sets in realistic geologies. Recent advances in modeling capabilities coupled with modern high performance computing platforms enable physics-based simulations of jointed geologic media with unprecedented details, offering a prospect for significant advances in the state of the art. This report provides a brief overview of these modern computational approaches, discusses their advantages and limitations, and attempts to formulate an integrated framework leading to the development of predictive modeling capabilities for wave propagation in jointed and fractured geologic materials.

  3. Crack propagation on spherical pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebey, J.; Roche, R.

    1975-01-01

    The risk presented by a crack on a pressure vessel built with a ductile steel cannot be well evaluated by simple application of the rules of Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics, which only apply to brittle materials. Tests were carried out on spherical vessels of three different scales built with the same steel. Cracks of different length were machined through the vessel wall. From the results obtained, crack initiation stress (beginning of stable propagation) and instable propagation stress may be plotted against the lengths of these cracks. For small and medium size, subject to ductile fracture, the resulting curves are identical, and may be used for ductile fracture prediction. Brittle rupture was observed on larger vessels and crack propagation occurred at lower stress level. Preceedings curves are not usable for fracture analysis. Ultimate pressure can be computed with a good accuracy by using equivalent energy toughness, Ksub(1cd), characteristic of the metal plates. Satisfactory measurements have been obtained on thin samples. The risks of brittle fracture may then judged by comparing Ksub(1cd) with the calculated K 1 value, in which corrections for vessel shape are taken into account. It is thus possible to establish the bursting pressure of cracked spherical vessels, with the help of two rules, one for brittle fracture, the other for ductile instability. A practical method is proposed on the basis of the work reported here

  4. Signal propagation along the axon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rama, Sylvain; Zbili, Mickaël; Debanne, Dominique

    2018-03-08

    Axons link distant brain regions and are usually considered as simple transmission cables in which reliable propagation occurs once an action potential has been generated. Safe propagation of action potentials relies on specific ion channel expression at strategic points of the axon such as nodes of Ranvier or axonal branch points. However, while action potentials are generally considered as the quantum of neuronal information, their signaling is not entirely digital. In fact, both their shape and their conduction speed have been shown to be modulated by activity, leading to regulations of synaptic latency and synaptic strength. We report here newly identified mechanisms of (1) safe spike propagation along the axon, (2) compartmentalization of action potential shape in the axon, (3) analog modulation of spike-evoked synaptic transmission and (4) alteration in conduction time after persistent regulation of axon morphology in central neurons. We discuss the contribution of these regulations in information processing. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Wave equations for pulse propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shore, B.W.

    1987-01-01

    Theoretical discussions of the propagation of pulses of laser radiation through atomic or molecular vapor rely on a number of traditional approximations for idealizing the radiation and the molecules, and for quantifying their mutual interaction by various equations of propagation (for the radiation) and excitation (for the molecules). In treating short-pulse phenomena it is essential to consider coherent excitation phenomena of the sort that is manifest in Rabi oscillations of atomic or molecular populations. Such processes are not adequately treated by rate equations for excitation nor by rate equations for radiation. As part of a more comprehensive treatment of the coupled equations that describe propagation of short pulses, this memo presents background discussion of the equations that describe the field. This memo discusses the origin, in Maxwell's equations, of the wave equation used in the description of pulse propagation. It notes the separation into lamellar and solenoidal (or longitudinal and transverse) and positive and negative frequency parts. It mentions the possibility of separating the polarization field into linear and nonlinear parts, in order to define a susceptibility or index of refraction and, from these, a phase and group velocity. The memo discusses various ways of characterizing the polarization characteristics of plane waves, that is, of parameterizing a transverse unit vector, such as the Jones vector, the Stokes vector, and the Poincare sphere. It discusses the connection between macroscopically defined quantities, such as the intensity or, more generally, the Stokes parameters, and microscopic field amplitudes. The material presented here is a portion of a more extensive treatment of propagation to be presented separately. The equations presented here have been described in various books and articles. They are collected here as a summary and review of theory needed when treating pulse propagation

  6. Wave propagation in electromagnetic media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, J.L.

    1990-01-01

    This book is concerned with wave propagation in reacting media, specifically in electromagnetic materials. An account is presented of the mathematical methods of wave phenomena in electromagnetic materials. The author presents the theory of time-varying electromagnetic fields, which involves a discussion of Faraday's laws, Maxwell's equations and their application to electromagnetic wave propagation under a variety of conditions. The author gives a discussion of magnetohydrodynamics and plasma physics. Chapters are included on quantum mechanics and the theory of relativity. The mathematical foundation of electromagnetic waves vis a vis partial differential equations is discussed

  7. Vegetative propagation of Bambusa vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Malfitano Braga

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Bamboo is an important source of raw material of multiple uses. The development of simple techniques for its propagation is a practical way to enable its implementation in ownership of low technology. The present work had the objective of evaluating artisanal propagation methods for Bambusa vulgaris. Two types of propagules were tested, with buds budded or not, and three relative positions to the removal of vegetative material on the culm. The best propagule was with only one node, extracted from the lower thirds of the stem, presenting 72% of rooting. This result demonstrates its potential for seedling production of this species under low tech.

  8. Nonequilibrium theory of flame propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merzhanov, A.G.

    1995-01-01

    The nonequilibrium theory of flame propagation is considered as applied to the following three processes of wave propagation: the combustion waves of the second kind, the combustion waves with broad reaction zones, and the combustion waves with chemical stages. Kinetic and combustion wave parameters are presented for different in composition mixtures of boron and transition metals, such as Zr, Hf, Ti, Nb, Ta, Mo, as well as for the Ta-N, Zr-C-H, Nb-B-O systems to illustrate specific features of the above-mentioned processes [ru

  9. Hydrodynamic model of hydrogen-flame propagation in reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baer, M.R.; Ratzel, A.C.

    1982-01-01

    A hydrodynamic model for hydrogen flame propagation in reactor geometries is presented. This model is consistent with the theory of slow combustion in which the gasdynamic field equations are treated in the limit of small Mach numbers. To the lowest order, pressure is spatially uniform. The flame is treated as a density and entropy discontinuity which propagates at prescribed burning velocities, corresponding to laminar or turbulent flames. Radiation cooling of the burned combustion gases and possible preheating of the unburned gases during propagation of the flame is included using a molecular gas-band thermal radiation model. Application of this model has been developed for 1-D variable area flame propagation. Multidimensional effects induced by hydrodynamics and buoyancy are introduced as a correction to the burn velocity (which reflects a modification of planar flame surface to a distorted surface) using experimentally measured pressure-rise time data for hydrogen/air deflagrations in cylindrical vessels

  10. Wave propagation downstream of a high power helicon in a dipolelike magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prager, James; Winglee, Robert; Roberson, B. Race; Ziemba, Timothy

    2010-01-01

    The wave propagating downstream of a high power helicon source in a diverging magnetic field was investigated experimentally. The magnetic field of the wave has been measured both axially and radially. The three-dimensional structure of the propagating wave is observed and its wavelength and phase velocity are determined. The measurements are compared to predictions from helicon theory and that of a freely propagating whistler wave. The implications of this work on the helicon as a thruster are also discussed.

  11. Investigations on the propagation of free surface boiling in a vertical superheated liquid column

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, P.K.; Bhat, G.S.; Arakeri, V.H.

    1987-04-01

    Some experimental studies on boiling propagation in a suddenly depressurized superheated vertical liquid column are reported. The propagation velocity of this phase change has been measured using an optical method. This velocity is strongly dependent on liquid superheat, liquid purity and test section size. The measured velocities of less than 5 m s/sup -1/ are significantly lower than the sonic velocity. Present observations suggest that the dominant mechanism for boiling propagation is convection.

  12. Investigations on the propagation of free surface boiling in a vertical superheated liquid column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, P.K.; Bhat, G.S.; Arakeri, V.H.

    1987-01-01

    Some experimental studies on boiling propagation in a suddenly depressurized superheated vertical liquid column are reported. The propagation velocity of this phase change has been measured using an optical method. This velocity is strongly dependent on liquid superheat, liquid purity and test section size. The measured velocities of less than 5 m s -1 are significantly lower than the sonic velocity. Present observations suggest that the dominant mechanism for boiling propagation is convection. (author)

  13. Acoustic propagation mode in a cylindrical plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, Yoshio; Idehara, Toshitaka; Inada, Hideyo

    1975-01-01

    The sound velocity in a cylindrical plasma produced by a high frequency discharge is measured by an interferometer system. The result shows that the acoustic wave guide effect does exist in a neutral gas and in a plasma. It is found that the wave propagates in the mode m=2 in a rigid boundary above the cut-off frequency fsub(c) and in the mode m=0 below fsub(c). Because the mode m=0 is identical to a plane wave, the sound velocity in free space can be evaluated exactly. In the mode m=2, the sound velocity approaches the free space value, when the frequency increases sufficiently. (auth.)

  14. Earth-Space Propagation Data Bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ernest K.

    1996-01-01

    This paper, designed for the newcomer rather than the expert, will take a rather broad view of what is meant by 'propagation data bases' in that it will take the term to mean both the actual measurements and models of Earth-space paths. The text will largely be drawn from International Radio Consultative Committee (CCIR) reports, now annexed to the Recommendations of the International Telecommunications Union-R Study Group 3, plus some experience with a course taught at the University of Colorado.

  15. Light Propagation Through Transition Metal Dichalcogenides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Christopher; Paul, Jagannath; Zhang, Haoxiang; Stier, Andreas; Karaiskaj, Denis

    C.E.STEVENS,J.PAUL,H.ZHANG, Dept. of Physics, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33620, USA. A.V.STIER, National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545, D. KARAISKAJ, Dept. of Physics, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33620, USA. - Using broadband light, the propagation of light through MoSe2 and WSe2 was investigated. Measuring the optical density for samples with different number of layers, we found that these values differ from what the Beer-Lambert Law predicts. The results were also modeled theoretically according to an effective two-band model. Funded by The Department of Energy.

  16. Physics of Earthquake Rupture Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shiqing; Fukuyama, Eiichi; Sagy, Amir; Doan, Mai-Linh

    2018-05-01

    A comprehensive understanding of earthquake rupture propagation requires the study of not only the sudden release of elastic strain energy during co-seismic slip, but also of other processes that operate at a variety of spatiotemporal scales. For example, the accumulation of the elastic strain energy usually takes decades to hundreds of years, and rupture propagation and termination modify the bulk properties of the surrounding medium that can influence the behavior of future earthquakes. To share recent findings in the multiscale investigation of earthquake rupture propagation, we held a session entitled "Physics of Earthquake Rupture Propagation" during the 2016 American Geophysical Union (AGU) Fall Meeting in San Francisco. The session included 46 poster and 32 oral presentations, reporting observations of natural earthquakes, numerical and experimental simulations of earthquake ruptures, and studies of earthquake fault friction. These presentations and discussions during and after the session suggested a need to document more formally the research findings, particularly new observations and views different from conventional ones, complexities in fault zone properties and loading conditions, the diversity of fault slip modes and their interactions, the evaluation of observational and model uncertainties, and comparison between empirical and physics-based models. Therefore, we organize this Special Issue (SI) of Tectonophysics under the same title as our AGU session, hoping to inspire future investigations. Eighteen articles (marked with "this issue") are included in this SI and grouped into the following six categories.

  17. Invisibility cloaking without superluminal propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perczel, Janos; Leonhardt, Ulf [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Tyc, Tomas, E-mail: jp394@st-andrews.ac.uk, E-mail: tomtyc@physics.muni.cz, E-mail: ulf@st-andrews.ac.uk [Faculty of Science, Kotlarska 2 and Faculty of Informatics, Botanicka 68a, Masaryk University, 61137 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2011-08-15

    Conventional cloaking based on Euclidean transformation optics requires that the speed of light should tend to infinity on the inner surface of the cloak. Non-Euclidean cloaking still needs media with superluminal propagation. Here we show by giving an example that this is no longer necessary.

  18. Propagating Class and Method Combination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernst, Erik

    1999-01-01

    number of implicit combinations. For example, it is possible to specify separate aspects of a family of classes, and then combine several aspects into a full-fledged class family. The combination expressions would explicitly combine whole-family aspects, and by propagation implicitly combine the aspects...

  19. DNA motif elucidation using belief propagation

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Ka-Chun; Chan, Tak-Ming; Peng, Chengbin; Li, Yue; Zhang, Zhaolei

    2013-01-01

    Protein-binding microarray (PBM) is a high-throughout platform that can measure the DNA-binding preference of a protein in a comprehensive and unbiased manner. A typical PBM experiment can measure binding signal intensities of a protein to all the possible DNA k-mers (k = 8 ?10); such comprehensive binding affinity data usually need to be reduced and represented as motif models before they can be further analyzed and applied. Since proteins can often bind to DNA in multiple modes, one of the major challenges is to decompose the comprehensive affinity data into multimodal motif representations. Here, we describe a new algorithm that uses Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) and can derive precise and multimodal motifs using belief propagations. We describe an HMM-based approach using belief propagations (kmerHMM), which accepts and preprocesses PBM probe raw data into median-binding intensities of individual k-mers. The k-mers are ranked and aligned for training an HMM as the underlying motif representation. Multiple motifs are then extracted from the HMM using belief propagations. Comparisons of kmerHMM with other leading methods on several data sets demonstrated its effectiveness and uniqueness. Especially, it achieved the best performance on more than half of the data sets. In addition, the multiple binding modes derived by kmerHMM are biologically meaningful and will be useful in interpreting other genome-wide data such as those generated from ChIP-seq. The executables and source codes are available at the authors' websites: e.g. http://www.cs.toronto.edu/?wkc/kmerHMM. 2013 The Author(s).

  20. DNA motif elucidation using belief propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Ka-Chun; Chan, Tak-Ming; Peng, Chengbin; Li, Yue; Zhang, Zhaolei

    2013-09-01

    Protein-binding microarray (PBM) is a high-throughout platform that can measure the DNA-binding preference of a protein in a comprehensive and unbiased manner. A typical PBM experiment can measure binding signal intensities of a protein to all the possible DNA k-mers (k=8∼10); such comprehensive binding affinity data usually need to be reduced and represented as motif models before they can be further analyzed and applied. Since proteins can often bind to DNA in multiple modes, one of the major challenges is to decompose the comprehensive affinity data into multimodal motif representations. Here, we describe a new algorithm that uses Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) and can derive precise and multimodal motifs using belief propagations. We describe an HMM-based approach using belief propagations (kmerHMM), which accepts and preprocesses PBM probe raw data into median-binding intensities of individual k-mers. The k-mers are ranked and aligned for training an HMM as the underlying motif representation. Multiple motifs are then extracted from the HMM using belief propagations. Comparisons of kmerHMM with other leading methods on several data sets demonstrated its effectiveness and uniqueness. Especially, it achieved the best performance on more than half of the data sets. In addition, the multiple binding modes derived by kmerHMM are biologically meaningful and will be useful in interpreting other genome-wide data such as those generated from ChIP-seq. The executables and source codes are available at the authors' websites: e.g. http://www.cs.toronto.edu/∼wkc/kmerHMM.

  1. DNA motif elucidation using belief propagation

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Ka-Chun

    2013-06-29

    Protein-binding microarray (PBM) is a high-throughout platform that can measure the DNA-binding preference of a protein in a comprehensive and unbiased manner. A typical PBM experiment can measure binding signal intensities of a protein to all the possible DNA k-mers (k = 8 ?10); such comprehensive binding affinity data usually need to be reduced and represented as motif models before they can be further analyzed and applied. Since proteins can often bind to DNA in multiple modes, one of the major challenges is to decompose the comprehensive affinity data into multimodal motif representations. Here, we describe a new algorithm that uses Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) and can derive precise and multimodal motifs using belief propagations. We describe an HMM-based approach using belief propagations (kmerHMM), which accepts and preprocesses PBM probe raw data into median-binding intensities of individual k-mers. The k-mers are ranked and aligned for training an HMM as the underlying motif representation. Multiple motifs are then extracted from the HMM using belief propagations. Comparisons of kmerHMM with other leading methods on several data sets demonstrated its effectiveness and uniqueness. Especially, it achieved the best performance on more than half of the data sets. In addition, the multiple binding modes derived by kmerHMM are biologically meaningful and will be useful in interpreting other genome-wide data such as those generated from ChIP-seq. The executables and source codes are available at the authors\\' websites: e.g. http://www.cs.toronto.edu/?wkc/kmerHMM. 2013 The Author(s).

  2. Radio Wave Propagation Scene Partitioning for High-Speed Rails

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Ai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Radio wave propagation scene partitioning is necessary for wireless channel modeling. As far as we know, there are no standards of scene partitioning for high-speed rail (HSR scenarios, and therefore we propose the radio wave propagation scene partitioning scheme for HSR scenarios in this paper. Based on our measurements along the Wuhan-Guangzhou HSR, Zhengzhou-Xian passenger-dedicated line, Shijiazhuang-Taiyuan passenger-dedicated line, and Beijing-Tianjin intercity line in China, whose operation speeds are above 300 km/h, and based on the investigations on Beijing South Railway Station, Zhengzhou Railway Station, Wuhan Railway Station, Changsha Railway Station, Xian North Railway Station, Shijiazhuang North Railway Station, Taiyuan Railway Station, and Tianjin Railway Station, we obtain an overview of HSR propagation channels and record many valuable measurement data for HSR scenarios. On the basis of these measurements and investigations, we partitioned the HSR scene into twelve scenarios. Further work on theoretical analysis based on radio wave propagation mechanisms, such as reflection and diffraction, may lead us to develop the standard of radio wave propagation scene partitioning for HSR. Our work can also be used as a basis for the wireless channel modeling and the selection of some key techniques for HSR systems.

  3. Optimizing online social networks for information propagation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duan-Bing Chen

    Full Text Available Online users nowadays are facing serious information overload problem. In recent years, recommender systems have been widely studied to help people find relevant information. Adaptive social recommendation is one of these systems in which the connections in the online social networks are optimized for the information propagation so that users can receive interesting news or stories from their leaders. Validation of such adaptive social recommendation methods in the literature assumes uniform distribution of users' activity frequency. In this paper, our empirical analysis shows that the distribution of online users' activity is actually heterogenous. Accordingly, we propose a more realistic multi-agent model in which users' activity frequency are drawn from a power-law distribution. We find that previous social recommendation methods lead to serious delay of information propagation since many users are connected to inactive leaders. To solve this problem, we design a new similarity measure which takes into account users' activity frequencies. With this similarity measure, the average delay is significantly shortened and the recommendation accuracy is largely improved.

  4. Optimizing online social networks for information propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Duan-Bing; Wang, Guan-Nan; Zeng, An; Fu, Yan; Zhang, Yi-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Online users nowadays are facing serious information overload problem. In recent years, recommender systems have been widely studied to help people find relevant information. Adaptive social recommendation is one of these systems in which the connections in the online social networks are optimized for the information propagation so that users can receive interesting news or stories from their leaders. Validation of such adaptive social recommendation methods in the literature assumes uniform distribution of users' activity frequency. In this paper, our empirical analysis shows that the distribution of online users' activity is actually heterogenous. Accordingly, we propose a more realistic multi-agent model in which users' activity frequency are drawn from a power-law distribution. We find that previous social recommendation methods lead to serious delay of information propagation since many users are connected to inactive leaders. To solve this problem, we design a new similarity measure which takes into account users' activity frequencies. With this similarity measure, the average delay is significantly shortened and the recommendation accuracy is largely improved.

  5. EPIC: an Error Propagation/Inquiry Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, A.L.

    1985-01-01

    The use of a computer program EPIC (Error Propagation/Inquiry Code) will be discussed. EPIC calculates the variance of a materials balance closed about a materials balance area (MBA) in a processing plant operated under steady-state conditions. It was designed for use in evaluating the significance of inventory differences in the Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear plants. EPIC rapidly estimates the variance of a materials balance using average plant operating data. The intent is to learn as much as possible about problem areas in a process with simple straightforward calculations assuming a process is running in a steady-state mode. EPIC is designed to be used by plant personnel or others with little computer background. However, the user should be knowledgeable about measurement errors in the system being evaluated and have a limited knowledge of how error terms are combined in error propagation analyses. EPIC contains six variance equations; the appropriate equation is used to calculate the variance at each measurement point. After all of these variances are calculated, the total variance for the MBA is calculated using a simple algebraic sum of variances. The EPIC code runs on any computer that accepts a standard form of the BASIC language. 2 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs

  6. The propagator of stochastic electrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalleri, G.

    1981-01-01

    The "elementary propagator" for the position of a free charged particle subject to the zero-point electromagnetic field with Lorentz-invariant spectral density ~ω3 is obtained. The nonstationary process for the position is solved by the stationary process for the acceleration. The dispersion of the position elementary propagator is compared with that of quantum electrodynamics. Finally, the evolution of the probability density is obtained starting from an initial distribution confined in a small volume and with a Gaussian distribution in the velocities. The resulting probability density for the position turns out to be equal, to within radiative corrections, to ψψ* where ψ is the Kennard wave packet. If the radiative corrections are retained, the present result is new since the corresponding expression in quantum electrodynamics has not yet been found. Besides preceding quantum electrodynamics for this problem, no renormalization is required in stochastic electrodynamics.

  7. Interprocedural Analysis with Lazy Propagation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Simon Holm; Møller, Anders; Thiemann, Peter

    2010-01-01

    We propose lazy propagation as a technique for flow- and context-sensitive interprocedural analysis of programs with objects and first-class functions where transfer functions may not be distributive. The technique is described formally as a systematic modification of a variant of the monotone fr...... framework and its theoretical properties are shown. It is implemented in a type analysis tool for JavaScript where it results in a significant improvement in performance....

  8. Crack propagation in dynamic thermoelasticity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bui, H.D.

    1980-01-01

    We study the singular thermoelastic fields near the crack tip, in the linear strain assumption. The equations are coupled and non linear. The asymptotic expansions of the displacement and the temperature are given for the first and the second order. It is shown that the temperature is singular when the crack propagates. However, this field does not change the dominant singularity of the mechanical field which is the same as that obtained in the theory of isothermal elasticity [fr

  9. Information Propagation on Permissionless Blockchains

    OpenAIRE

    Ersoy, Oguzhan; Ren, Zhijie; Erkin, Zekeriya; Lagendijk, Reginald L.

    2017-01-01

    Blockchain technology, as a decentralized and non-hierarchical platform, has the potential to replace centralized systems. Yet, there are several challenges inherent in the blockchain structure. One of the deficiencies of the existing blockchains is a convenient information propagation technique enhancing incentive-compatibility and bandwidth efficiency. The transition from a centralized system into distributed one brings along game theoretical concerns. Especially for the permissionless bloc...

  10. Quantum noise and superluminal propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segev, Bilha; Milonni, Peter W.; Babb, James F.; Chiao, Raymond Y.

    2000-01-01

    Causal ''superluminal'' effects have recently been observed and discussed in various contexts. The question arises whether such effects could be observed with extremely weak pulses, and what would prevent the observation of an ''optical tachyon.'' Aharonov, Reznik, and Stern (ARS) [Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 2190 (1998)] have argued that quantum noise will preclude the observation of a superluminal group velocity when the pulse consists of one or a few photons. In this paper we reconsider this question both in a general framework and in the specific example, suggested by Chiao, Kozhekin, and Kurizki (CKK) [Phys. Rev. 77, 1254 (1996)], of off-resonant, short-pulse propagation in an optical amplifier. We derive in the case of the amplifier a signal-to-noise ratio that is consistent with the general ARS conclusions when we impose their criteria for distinguishing between superluminal propagation and propagation at the speed c. However, results consistent with the semiclassical arguments of CKK are obtained if weaker criteria are imposed, in which case the signal can exceed the noise without being ''exponentially large.'' We show that the quantum fluctuations of the field considered by ARS are closely related to superfluorescence noise. More generally, we consider the implications of unitarity for superluminal propagation and quantum noise and study, in addition to the complete and truncated wave packets considered by ARS, the residual wave packet formed by their difference. This leads to the conclusion that the noise is mostly luminal and delayed with respect to the superluminal signal. In the limit of a very weak incident signal pulse, the superluminal signal will be dominated by the noise part, and the signal-to-noise ratio will therefore be very small. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  11. Propagation functions in pseudoparticle fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, L.S.; Carlitz, R.D.; Creamer, D.B.; Lee, C.

    1978-01-01

    The Green's functions for massless spinor and vector particles propagating in a self-dual but otherwise arbitrary non-Abelian gauge field are shown to be completely determined by the corrresponding Green's functions of scalar particles. Simple, explicit algebraic expressions are constructed for the scalar Green's functions of isospin-1/2 and isospin-1 particles in the self-dual field of a configuration of n pseudoparticles described by 5n arbitrary parameters

  12. Propagation calculation for reactor cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Yanhua [School of Power and Energy Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong Univ., Shanghai (China); Moriyama, K.; Maruyama, Y.; Nakamura, H.; Hashimoto, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2000-11-01

    The propagation of steam explosion for real reactor geometry and conditions are investigated by using the computer code JASMINE-pro. The ex-vessel steam explosion is considered, which is described as follow: during the accident of reactor core meltdown, the molten core melts a hole at the bottom of reactor vessel and causes the higher temperature core fuel being leaked into the water pool below reactor vessel. During the melt-water mixing interaction process, the high temperature melt evaporates the cool water at an extreme high rate and might induce a steam explosion. A steam explosion could experience first the premixing phase and then the propagation explosion phase. For a propagation calculation, we should know the information about the initial fragmentation time, the total melt mass, premixing region size, initial void fraction and distribution of the melt volume fraction, and so on. All the initial conditions used in this calculation are based on analyses from some simple assumptions and the observation from the experiments. The results show that the most important parameter for the initial condition of this phase is the total mass and its initial distribution. This gives the requirement for a premixing calculation. On the other hand, for higher melt volume fraction case, the fragmentation is strong so that the local pressure can exceed over the EOS maximum pressure of the code, which lead to the incorrect calculation or divergence of the calculation. (Suetake, M.)

  13. Propagating separable equalities in an MDD store

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hadzic, Tarik; Hooker, John N.; Tiedemann, Peter

    2008-01-01

    We present a propagator that achieves MDD consistency for a separable equality over an MDD (multivalued decision diagram) store in pseudo-polynomial time. We integrate the propagator into a constraint solver based on an MDD store introduced in [1]. Our experiments show that the new propagator pro...... provides substantial computational advantage over propagation of two inequality constraints, and that the advantage increases when the maximum width of the MDD store increases....

  14. PIV tracer behavior on propagating shock fronts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glazyrin, Fyodor N; Mursenkova, Irina V; Znamenskaya, Irina A

    2016-01-01

    The present work was aimed at the quantitative particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurement of a velocity field near the front of a propagating shock wave and the study of the dynamics of liquid tracers crossing the shock front. For this goal, a shock tube with a rectangular cross-section (48  ×  24 mm) was used. The flat shock wave with Mach numbers M  =  1.4–2.0 propagating inside the tube channel was studied as well as an expanding shock wave propagating outside the channel with M  =  1.2–1.8 at its main axis. The PIV imaging of the shock fronts was carried out with an aerosol of dioctyl sebacate (DEHS) as tracer particles. The pressures of the gas in front of the shock waves studied ranged from 0.013 Mpa to 0.1 MPa in the series of experiments. The processed PIV data, compared to the 1D normal shock theory, yielded consistent values of wake velocity immediately behind the plain shock wave. Special attention was paid to the blurring of the velocity jump on the shock front due to the inertial particle lag and peculiarities of the PIV technique. A numerical algorithm was developed for analysis and correction of the PIV data on the shock fronts, based on equations of particle-flow interaction. By application of this algorithm, the effective particle diameter of the DEHS aerosol tracers was estimated as 1.03  ±  0.12 μm. A number of different formulations for particle drag were tested with this algorithm, with varying success. The results show consistency with previously reported experimental data obtained for cases of stationary shock waves. (paper)

  15. Ultrasonic propagation velocity in magnetic and magnetorheological fluids due to an external magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bramantya, M A; Sawada, T; Motozawa, M

    2010-01-01

    Ultrasonic propagation velocity in a magnetic fluid (MF) and magnetorheological fluid (MRF) changes with the application of an external magnetic field. The formation of clustering structures inside the MF and MRF clearly has an influence on the ultrasonic propagation velocity. Therefore, we propose a qualitative analysis of these structures by measuring properties of ultrasonic propagation. Since MF and MRF are opaque, non-contact inspection using the ultrasonic technique can be very useful for analyzing the inner structures of MF and MRF. In this study, we measured ultrasonic propagation velocity in a hydrocarbon-based MF and MRF precisely. Based on these results, the clustering structures of these fluids are analyzed experimentally in terms of elapsed time dependence and the effect of external magnetic field strength. The results reveal hysteresis and anisotropy in the ultrasonic propagation velocity. We also discuss differences of ultrasonic propagation velocity between MF and MRF.

  16. Wave propagation simulation of radio occultations based on ECMWF refractivity profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Benzon, Hans-Henrik; Høeg, Per

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a complete radio occultation simulation environment, including realistic refractivity profiles, wave propagation modeling, instrument modeling, and bending angle retrieval. The wave propagator is used to simulate radio occultation measurements. The radio waves are propagated...... of radio occultations. The output from the wave propagator simulator is used as input to a Full Spectrum Inversion retrieval module which calculates geophysical parameters. These parameters can be compared to the ECMWF atmospheric profiles. The comparison can be used to reveal system errors and get...... a better understanding of the physics. The wave propagation simulations will in this paper also be compared to real measurements. These radio occultations have been exposed to the same atmospheric conditions as the radio occultations simulated by the wave propagator. This comparison reveals that precise...

  17. Fast Heat Pulse Propagation by Turbulence Spreading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naulin, Volker; Juul Rasmussen, Jens; Mantica, Paola

    2009-01-01

    The propagation of a cold pulse initiated by edge cooling in JET is compared to propagation of the heat wave originating from a modulation of the heating source roughly at mid radius. It is found that the propagation of the cold pulse is by far faster than what could be predicted on the basis of ...

  18. Yield and fruit quality of peach scion by using rootstocks propagated by air layering and seed

    OpenAIRE

    Picolotto,Luciano; Fachinello,José Carlos; Bianchi,Valmor João; Manica-Berto,Roberta; Pasa,Mateus da Silveira; Schmitz,Juliano Dutra

    2010-01-01

    In rootstock propagation, several methods can be used; however few practices are adopted due to the lack of information about the behavior of stionic combinations at field. The work aimed to compare the propagation method by air layering with the traditional propagation system by seeds using the scion peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch] cultivar Granada. The following variables were measured: yield, fruit weight and size, skin color, flesh firmness, total soluble solids content (TSS) and titat...

  19. Uncertainty Propagation in Monte Carlo Depletion Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shim, Hyung Jin; Kim, Yeong-il; Park, Ho Jin; Joo, Han Gyu; Kim, Chang Hyo

    2008-01-01

    A new formulation aimed at quantifying uncertainties of Monte Carlo (MC) tallies such as k eff and the microscopic reaction rates of nuclides and nuclide number densities in MC depletion analysis and examining their propagation behaviour as a function of depletion time step (DTS) is presented. It is shown that the variance of a given MC tally used as a measure of its uncertainty in this formulation arises from four sources; the statistical uncertainty of the MC tally, uncertainties of microscopic cross sections and nuclide number densities, and the cross correlations between them and the contribution of the latter three sources can be determined by computing the correlation coefficients between the uncertain variables. It is also shown that the variance of any given nuclide number density at the end of each DTS stems from uncertainties of the nuclide number densities (NND) and microscopic reaction rates (MRR) of nuclides at the beginning of each DTS and they are determined by computing correlation coefficients between these two uncertain variables. To test the viability of the formulation, we conducted MC depletion analysis for two sample depletion problems involving a simplified 7x7 fuel assembly (FA) and a 17x17 PWR FA, determined number densities of uranium and plutonium isotopes and their variances as well as k ∞ and its variance as a function of DTS, and demonstrated the applicability of the new formulation for uncertainty propagation analysis that need be followed in MC depletion computations. (authors)

  20. Simulation of ultrasound propagation in bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Jonathan J.; Luo, Gangming; Siffert, Robert S.

    2004-10-01

    Ultrasound has been proposed as a means to noninvasively assess bone and, particularly, bone strength and fracture risk, as for example in osteoporosis. Because strength is a function of both mineral density and architecture, ultrasound has the potential to provide more accurate measurement of bone integrity than, for example, with x-ray absorptiometric methods. Although some of this potential has already been realized-a number of clinical devices are presently available-there is still much that is unknown regarding the interaction of ultrasound with bone. Because of the inherent complexity of the propagation medium, few analytic solutions exist with practical application. For this reason, ultrasound simulation techniques have been developed and applied to a number of different problems of interest in ultrasonic bone assessment. Both 2D and 3D simulation results will be presented, including the effects of architecture and density on the received waveform, propagation effects of both cortical and trabecular bone, and the relative contributions of scattering and absorption to attenuation in trabecular bone. The results of these simulation studies should lead to improved understanding and ultimately to more effective clinical devices for ultrasound bone assessment. [This work was supported by The Carroll and Milton Petrie Foundation and by SBIR Grant No. 1R43RR16750 from the National Center for Research Resources of the NIH.

  1. Calculating Quench Propagation with ANSYS(regsign)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caspi, S.; Chiesa, L.; Ferracin, P.; Gourlay, S.A.; Hafalia, R.; Hinkins, R.; Lietzke, A.F.; Prestemon, S.

    2002-01-01

    A commercial Finite-Element-Analysis program, ANSYS(reg s ign), is widely used in structural and thermal analysis. With the program's ability to include non-linear material properties and import complex CAD files, one can generate coil geometries and simulate quench propagation in superconducting magnets. A 'proof-of-principle' finite element model was developed assuming a resistivity that increases linearly from zero to its normal value at a temperature consistent with the assumed B magnetic field. More sophisticated models could easily include finer-grained coil, cable, structural, and circuit details. A quench is provoked by raising the temperature of an arbitrary superconducting element above its T c . The time response to this perturbation is calculated using small time-steps to allow convergence between steps. Snapshots of the temperature and voltage distributions allow examination of longitudinal and turn-to-turn quench propagation, quench-front annihilation, and cryo-stability. Modeling details are discussed, and a computed voltage history was compared with measurements from a recent magnet test.

  2. Semiclassical propagator of the Wigner function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittrich, Thomas; Viviescas, Carlos; Sandoval, Luis

    2006-02-24

    Propagation of the Wigner function is studied on two levels of semiclassical propagation: one based on the Van Vleck propagator, the other on phase-space path integration. Leading quantum corrections to the classical Liouville propagator take the form of a time-dependent quantum spot. Its oscillatory structure depends on whether the underlying classical flow is elliptic or hyperbolic. It can be interpreted as the result of interference of a pair of classical trajectories, indicating how quantum coherences are to be propagated semiclassically in phase space. The phase-space path-integral approach allows for a finer resolution of the quantum spot in terms of Airy functions.

  3. The propagator of quantum gravity in minisuperspace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louko, J.

    1985-04-01

    We study the quantum gravitational propagation amplitude between two spacelike three-surfaces in minisuperspaces where the supermomentum constraints are identically satisfied. We derive a well-defined path integral formula for the propagator and show that the propagator is an inverse of the canonical Hamiltonian operator. In an exactly solvable deSitter minisuperspace model the propagator is found to obey semi-classically correct boundary conditions. We discuss the implications for the full theory and suggest an approach to unravelling the physical meaning of the propagator. (orig.)

  4. Light propagation in linear optical media

    CERN Document Server

    Gillen, Glen D; Guha, Shekhar

    2013-01-01

    Light Propagation in Linear Optical Media describes light propagation in linear media by expanding on diffraction theories beyond what is available in classic optics books. In one volume, this book combines the treatment of light propagation through various media, interfaces, and apertures using scalar and vector diffraction theories. After covering the fundamentals of light and physical optics, the authors discuss light traveling within an anisotropic crystal and present mathematical models for light propagation across planar boundaries between different media. They describe the propagation o

  5. Radio wave propagation and parabolic equation modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Apaydin, Gokhan

    2018-01-01

    A thorough understanding of electromagnetic wave propagation is fundamental to the development of sophisticated communication and detection technologies. The powerful numerical methods described in this book represent a major step forward in our ability to accurately model electromagnetic wave propagation in order to establish and maintain reliable communication links, to detect targets in radar systems, and to maintain robust mobile phone and broadcasting networks. The first new book on guided wave propagation modeling and simulation to appear in nearly two decades, Radio Wave Propagation and Parabolic Equation Modeling addresses the fundamentals of electromagnetic wave propagation generally, with a specific focus on radio wave propagation through various media. The authors explore an array of new applications, and detail various v rtual electromagnetic tools for solving several frequent electromagnetic propagation problems. All of the methods described are presented within the context of real-world scenari...

  6. Propagation phenomena in real world networks

    CERN Document Server

    Fay, Damien; Gabryś, Bogdan

    2015-01-01

    Propagation, which looks at spreading in complex networks, can be seen from many viewpoints; it is undesirable, or desirable, controllable, the mechanisms generating that propagation can be the topic of interest, but in the end all depends on the setting. This book covers leading research on a wide spectrum of propagation phenomenon and the techniques currently used in its modelling, prediction, analysis and control. Fourteen papers range over topics including epidemic models, models for trust inference, coverage strategies for networks, vehicle flow propagation, bio-inspired routing algorithms, P2P botnet attacks and defences, fault propagation in gene-cellular networks, malware propagation for mobile networks, information propagation in crisis situations, financial contagion in interbank networks, and finally how to maximize the spread of influence in social networks. The compendium will be of interest to researchers, those working in social networking, communications and finance and is aimed at providin...

  7. Wave Propagation in Bimodular Geomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, Maria; Pasternak, Elena; Dyskin, Arcady; Pelinovsky, Efim

    2016-04-01

    Observations and laboratory experiments show that fragmented or layered geomaterials have the mechanical response dependent on the sign of the load. The most adequate model accounting for this effect is the theory of bimodular (bilinear) elasticity - a hyperelastic model with different elastic moduli for tension and compression. For most of geo- and structural materials (cohesionless soils, rocks, concrete, etc.) the difference between elastic moduli is such that their modulus in compression is considerably higher than that in tension. This feature has a profound effect on oscillations [1]; however, its effect on wave propagation has not been comprehensively investigated. It is believed that incorporation of bilinear elastic constitutive equations within theory of wave dynamics will bring a deeper insight to the study of mechanical behaviour of many geomaterials. The aim of this paper is to construct a mathematical model and develop analytical methods and numerical algorithms for analysing wave propagation in bimodular materials. Geophysical and exploration applications and applications in structural engineering are envisaged. The FEM modelling of wave propagation in a 1D semi-infinite bimodular material has been performed with the use of Marlow potential [2]. In the case of the initial load expressed by a harmonic pulse loading strong dependence on the pulse sign is observed: when tension is applied before compression, the phenomenon of disappearance of negative (compressive) strains takes place. References 1. Dyskin, A., Pasternak, E., & Pelinovsky, E. (2012). Periodic motions and resonances of impact oscillators. Journal of Sound and Vibration, 331(12), 2856-2873. 2. Marlow, R. S. (2008). A Second-Invariant Extension of the Marlow Model: Representing Tension and Compression Data Exactly. In ABAQUS Users' Conference.

  8. Propagation and dispersion of shock waves in magnetoelastic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crum, R. S.; Domann, J. P.; Carman, G. P.; Gupta, V.

    2017-12-01

    Previous studies examining the response of magnetoelastic materials to shock waves have predominantly focused on applications involving pulsed power generation, with limited attention given to the actual wave propagation characteristics. This study provides detailed magnetic and mechanical measurements of magnetoelastic shock wave propagation and dispersion. Laser generated rarefacted shock waves exceeding 3 GPa with rise times of 10 ns were introduced to samples of the magnetoelastic material Galfenol. The resulting mechanical measurements reveal the evolution of the shock into a compressive acoustic front with lateral release waves. Importantly, the wave continues to disperse even after it has decayed into an acoustic wave, due in large part to magnetoelastic coupling. The magnetic data reveal predominantly shear wave mediated magnetoelastic coupling, and were also used to noninvasively measure the wave speed. The external magnetic field controlled a 30% increase in wave propagation speed, attributed to a 70% increase in average stiffness. Finally, magnetic signals propagating along the sample over 20× faster than the mechanical wave were measured, indicating these materials can act as passive antennas that transmit information in response to mechanical stimuli.

  9. Model experiments related to outdoor propagation over an earth berm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Karsten Bo

    1994-01-01

    A series of scale model experiments related to outdoor propagation over an earth berm is described. The measurements are performed with a triggered spark source. The results are compared with data from an existing calculation model based upon uniform diffraction theory. Comparisons are made...

  10. Energy harvesting from radio frequency propagation using piezoelectric cantilevers

    KAUST Repository

    Al Ahmad, Mahmoud

    2012-02-01

    This work reports an induced strain in a piezoelectric cantilever due to radio frequency signal propagation. The piezoelectric actuator is coupled to radio frequency (RF) line through a gap of 0.25 mm. When a voltage signal of 10 Vpp propagates in the line it sets an alternating current in the actuator electrodes. This flowing current drives the piezoelectric cantilever to mechanical movement, especially when the frequency of the RF signal matches the mechanical resonant frequency of the cantilever. Output voltage signals versus frequency for both mechanical vibrational and RF signal excitations have been measured using different loads.© 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Experimental study on propagation properties of large size TEM antennas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Guowei; Wang Haiyang; Chen Weiqing; Wang Wei; Zhu Xiangqin; Xie Linshen

    2014-01-01

    The propagation properties of large size TEM antennas were studied by experiment. The size of the TEM antennas is 60 m × 20 m × 10 m and the character Impedance is 120 Ω. A kind of dielectric foil switch is designed compactly with TEM antennas which can generate double exponential waveform with altitude of 10 kV and rise time of l.2 ns. The radiated field distribution was measured. The relationship between rise time/altitude and distance were provided, and the propagation properties of large size TEM antennas were summarized. (authors)

  12. Correlations decrease with propagation of spiking activity in the mouse barrel cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gayathri Nattar Ranganathan

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Propagation of suprathreshold spiking activity through neuronal populations is important for the function of the central nervous system. Neural correlations have an impact on cortical function particularly on the signaling of information and propagation of spiking activity. Therefore we measured the change in correlations as suprathreshold spiking activity propagated between recurrent neuronal networks of the mammalian cerebral cortex. Using optical methods we recorded spiking activity from large samples of neurons from two neural populations simultaneously. The results indicate that correlations decreased as spiking activity propagated from layer 4 to layer 2/3 in the rodent barrel cortex.

  13. Results of neutron propagation in steel sodium mixtures with various source spectra on Harmonie and Tapiro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calamand, D.; Desprets, A.; Rancurel, H.

    1977-01-01

    The first results of a joint CEA/CNEN neutron propagation program conducted on the source reactors HARMONIE and TAPIRO are presented. In both cases, a buffer zone representative of the blanket of a commercial fast power reactor is interposed between the source reactor and the medium in which neutron propagation is measured. This buffer zone provides a realistic source spectrum to be propagated. Experimental results are compared to older results obtained without the buffer zone. The effect of the source spectrum on neutron propagation is discussed, as well as the coherence of the results obtained with the two installations

  14. Fast fracture: an adiabatic restriction on thermally activated crack propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, S.J.

    1978-01-01

    Slow, isothermal, crack propagation is widely suspected to be rate controlled by thermally activated plastic deformation in the crack tip region. Adiabatic conditions are generally established in the fracture modified material at the tip of a crack during fast fracture. The temperature of this material is not the temperature of the specimen and is generally not measured during fast fracture. Thus, a complete thermodynamic description of adiabatic crack propagation data can not be made. When the slow, isothermal, crack propagation mechanisms are assumed to be operative during adiabatic crack propagation then certain predictions can be made. For example: the changes in the driving force due to temperature and rate are always in the opposite sense; there is no minimum in the driving force versus crack velocity without a change in mechanism; the temperature rise in the crack tip fracture modified material is determined mainly by the activation enthalpy for crack propagation; the interpretation of fast fracture structural steel data from simple plastic models is suspect since these materials have dissimilar isothermal temperature dependencies.

  15. Supersonic Heat Wave Propagation in Laser-Produced Underdense Plasma for Efficient X-Ray Generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, M.; Nishimura, H.; Fujioka, S.; Nagai, K.; Iwamae, A.; Ohnishi, N.; Fournier, K.B.; Girard, F.; Primout, M.; Villette, B.; Tobin, M.; Mima, K.

    2008-01-01

    We have observed supersonic heat wave propagation in a low-density aerogel target (ρ ∼ 3.2 mg/cc) irradiated at the intensity of 4 x 10 14 W/cm 2 . The heat wave propagation was measured with a time-resolved x-ray imaging diagnostics, and the results were compared with simulations made with the two-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamic code, RAICHO. Propagation velocity of the ionization front gradually decreased as the wave propagates into the target. The reason of decrease is due to increase of laser absorption region as the front propagates and interplay of hydrodynamic motion and reflection of laser propagation. These features are well reported with the simulation

  16. Temperature dependency of external stress corrosion crack propagation of 304 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashibara, Hitoshi; Mizutani, Yoshihiro; Mayuzumi, Masami; Tani, Jun-ichi

    2010-01-01

    Temperature dependency of external stress corrosion cracking (ESCC) of 304 stainless steel was examined with CT specimens. Maximum ESCC propagation rates appeared in the early phase of ESCC propagation. ESCC propagation rates generally became smaller as testing time advance. Temperature dependency of maximum ESCC propagation rate was analyzed with Arrhenius plot, and apparent activation energy was similar to that of SCC in chloride solutions. Temperature dependency of macroscopic ESCC incubation time was different from that of ESCC propagation rate. Anodic current density of 304 stainless steel was also examined by anodic polarization measurement. Temperature dependency of critical current density of active state in artificial sea water solution of pH=1.3 was similar to that of ESCC propagation rate. (author)

  17. Correction of edge-flame propagation speed in a counterflow, annular slot burner

    KAUST Repository

    Tran, Vu Manh

    2015-10-22

    To characterize the propagation modes of flames, flame propagation speed must be accurately calculated. The impact of propagating edge-flames on the flow fields of unburned gases is limited experimentally. Thus, few studies have evaluated true propagation speeds by subtracting the flow velocities of unburned gases from flame displacement speeds. Here, we present a counterflow, annular slot burner that provides an ideal one-dimensional strain rate and lengthwise zero flow velocity that allowed us to study the fundamental behaviors of edge-flames. In addition, our burner has easy optical access for detailed laser diagnostics. Flame displacement speeds were measured using a high-speed camera and related flow fields of unburned gases were visualized by particle image velocimetry. These techniques allowed us to identify significant modifications to the flow fields of unburned gases caused by thermal expansion of the propagating edges, which enabled us to calculate true flame propagation speeds that took into account the flow velocities of unburned gases.

  18. Genetic conservation and paddlefish propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloss, Brian L.; Klumb, Robert A.; Heist, Edward J.

    2009-01-01

    The conservation of genetic diversity of our natural resources is overwhelmingly one of the central foci of 21st century management practices. Three recommendations related to the conservation of paddlefish Polyodon spathula genetic diversity are to (1) identify genetic diversity at both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA loci using a suggested list of 20 sampling locations, (2) use genetic diversity estimates to develop genetic management units, and (3) identify broodstock sources to minimize effects of supplemental stocking on the genetic integrity of native paddlefish populations. We review previous genetic work on paddlefish and described key principles and concepts associated with maintaining genetic diversity within and among paddlefish populations and also present a genetic case study of current paddlefish propagation at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Gavins Point National Fish Hatchery. This study confirmed that three potential sources of broodfish were genetically indistinguishable at the loci examined, allowing the management agencies cooperating on this program flexibility in sampling gametes. This study also showed significant bias in the hatchery occurred in terms of male reproductive contribution, which resulted in a shift in the genetic diversity of progeny compared to the broodfish. This shift was shown to result from differential male contributions, partially attributed to the mode of egg fertilization. Genetic insights enable implementation of a paddlefish propagation program within an adaptive management strategy that conserves inherent genetic diversity while achieving demographic goals.

  19. Quantum propagation across cosmological singularities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gielen, Steffen; Turok, Neil

    2017-05-01

    The initial singularity is the most troubling feature of the standard cosmology, which quantum effects are hoped to resolve. In this paper, we study quantum cosmology with conformal (Weyl) invariant matter. We show that it is natural to extend the scale factor to negative values, allowing a large, collapsing universe to evolve across a quantum "bounce" into an expanding universe like ours. We compute the Feynman propagator for Friedmann-Robertson-Walker backgrounds exactly, identifying curious pathologies in the case of curved (open or closed) universes. We then include anisotropies, fixing the operator ordering of the quantum Hamiltonian by imposing covariance under field redefinitions and again finding exact solutions. We show how complex classical solutions allow one to circumvent the singularity while maintaining the validity of the semiclassical approximation. The simplest isotropic universes sit on a critical boundary, beyond which there is qualitatively different behavior, with potential for instability. Additional scalars improve the theory's stability. Finally, we study the semiclassical propagation of inhomogeneous perturbations about the flat, isotropic case, at linear and nonlinear order, showing that, at least at this level, there is no particle production across the bounce. These results form the basis for a promising new approach to quantum cosmology and the resolution of the big bang singularity.

  20. Uncertainty propagation in nuclear forensics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pommé, S.; Jerome, S.M.; Venchiarutti, C.

    2014-01-01

    Uncertainty propagation formulae are presented for age dating in support of nuclear forensics. The age of radioactive material in this context refers to the time elapsed since a particular radionuclide was chemically separated from its decay product(s). The decay of the parent radionuclide and ingrowth of the daughter nuclide are governed by statistical decay laws. Mathematical equations allow calculation of the age of specific nuclear material through the atom ratio between parent and daughter nuclides, or through the activity ratio provided that the daughter nuclide is also unstable. The derivation of the uncertainty formulae of the age may present some difficulty to the user community and so the exact solutions, some approximations, a graphical representation and their interpretation are presented in this work. Typical nuclides of interest are actinides in the context of non-proliferation commitments. The uncertainty analysis is applied to a set of important parent–daughter pairs and the need for more precise half-life data is examined. - Highlights: • Uncertainty propagation formulae for age dating with nuclear chronometers. • Applied to parent–daughter pairs used in nuclear forensics. • Investigated need for better half-life data

  1. Expectation propagation for continuous time stochastic processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cseke, Botond; Schnoerr, David; Sanguinetti, Guido; Opper, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    We consider the inverse problem of reconstructing the posterior measure over the trajectories of a diffusion process from discrete time observations and continuous time constraints. We cast the problem in a Bayesian framework and derive approximations to the posterior distributions of single time marginals using variational approximate inference, giving rise to an expectation propagation type algorithm. For non-linear diffusion processes, this is achieved by leveraging moment closure approximations. We then show how the approximation can be extended to a wide class of discrete-state Markov jump processes by making use of the chemical Langevin equation. Our empirical results show that the proposed method is computationally efficient and provides good approximations for these classes of inverse problems. (paper)

  2. Propagation and diffraction of optical vortices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, Pascal; Skelton, Susan E.; Leburn, Christopher G.; Streuber, Casey T.; Wright, Ewan M.; Dholakia, Kishan

    2008-01-01

    We explore the propagation and diffraction of optical vortices (Laguerre-Gaussian beams) of varying azimuthal index past a circular obstacle and Young's double slits. When the beam and obstacle centers are aligned the famous spot of Arago, which arises for zero azimuthal index, is replaced for non-zero azimuthal indices by a dark spot of Arago, a simple consequence of the conserved phase singularity at the beam center. We explore how for larger azimuthal indices, as the beam and obstacle centers are progressively misaligned, the central dark spot breaks up into several dark spots of Arago. Using Young's double slits we can easily measure the azimuthal index of the vortex beam, even for polychromatic vortices generated by broadband supercontinuum radiation

  3. Turbulent Premixed Flame Propagation in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, S.; Disseau, M.; Chakravarthy, V. K.; Jagoda, J.

    1997-01-01

    A facility in which turbulent Couette flow could be generated in a microgravity environment was designed and built. To fit into the NASA Lewis drop tower the device had to be very compact. This means that edge effects and flow re-circulation were expected to affect the flow. The flow was thoroughly investigated using LDV and was found to be largely two dimensional away from the edges with constant turbulence intensities in the core. Slight flow asymmetries are introduced by the non symmetric re-circulation of the fluid outside the test region. Belt flutter problems were remedied by adding a pair of guide plates to the belt. In general, the flow field was found to be quite similar to previously investigated Couette flows. However, turbulence levels and associated shear stresses were higher. This is probably due to the confined re-circulation zone reintroducing turbulence into the test section. An estimate of the length scales in the flow showed that the measurements were able to resolve nearly all the length scales of interest. Using a new LES method for subgrid combustion it has been demonstrated that the new procedure is computational feasible even on workstation type environment. It is found that this model is capable of capturing the propagation of the premixed names by resolving the flame in the LES grid within 2-3 grid points. In contrast, conventional LES results in numerical smearing of the flame and completely inaccurate estimate of the turbulent propagation speed. Preliminary study suggests that there is observable effect of buoyancy in the 1g environment suggesting the need for microgravity experiments of the upcoming experimental combustion studies. With the cold flow properties characterized, an identical hot flow facility is under construction. It is assumed that the turbulence properties ahead of the flame in this new device will closely match the results obtained here. This is required since the hot facility will not enable LDV measurements. The

  4. Search for fourth sound propagation in supersolid 4He

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Y.; Kojima, H.; Lin, X.

    2008-01-01

    A systematic study is carried out to search for fourth sound propagation solid 4 He samples below 500 mK down to 40 mK between 25 and 56 bar using the techniques of heat pulse generator and titanium superconducting transition edge bolometer. If solid 4 He is endowed with superfluidity below 200 mK, as indicated by recent torsional oscillator experiments, theories predict fourth sound propagation in such a supersolid state. If found, fourth sound would provide convincing evidence for superfluidity and a new tool for studying the new phase. The search for a fourth sound-like mode is based on the response of the bolometers to heat pulses traveling through cylindrical samples of solids grown with different crystal qualities. Bolometers with increasing sensitivity are constructed. The heater generator amplitude is reduced to the sensitivity limit to search for any critical velocity effects. The fourth sound velocity is expected to vary as ∞ √ Ρ s /ρ. Searches for a signature in the bolometer response with such a characteristic temperature dependence are made. The measured response signal has not so far revealed any signature of a new propagating mode within a temperature excursion of 5 μK from the background signal shape. Possible reasons for this negative result are discussed. Prior to the fourth sound search, the temperature dependence of heat pulse propagation was studied as it transformed from 'second sound' in the normal solid 4 He to transverse ballistic phonon propagation. Our work extends the studies of [V. Narayanamurti and R. C. Dynes, Phys. Rev. B 12, 1731 (1975)] to higher pressures and to lower temperatures. The measured transverse ballistic phonon propagation velocity is found to remain constant (within the 0.3% scatter of the data) below 100 mK at all pressures and reveals no indication of an onset of supersolidity. The overall dynamic thermal response of solid to heat input is found to depend strongly on the sample preparation procedure

  5. Studies of nonlinear femtosecond pulse propagation in bulk materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Hilary Kaye

    2000-10-01

    Femtosecond pulse lasers are finding widespread application in a variety of fields including medical research, optical switching and communications, plasma formation, high harmonic generation, and wavepacket formation and control. As the number of applications for femtosecond pulses increases, so does the need to fully understand the linear and nonlinear processes involved in propagating these pulses through materials under various conditions. Recent advances in pulse measurement techniques, such as frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG), allow measurement of the full electric field of the pulse and have made detailed investigations of short- pulse propagation effects feasible. In this thesis, I present detailed experimental studies of my work involving nonlinear propagation of femtosecond pulses in bulk media. Studies of plane-wave propagation in fused silica extend the SHG form of FROG from a simple pulse diagnostic to a useful method of interrogating the nonlinear response of a material. Studies of nonlinear propagation are also performed in a regime where temporal pulse splitting occurs. Experimental results are compared with a three- dimensional nonlinear Schrödinger equation. This comparison fuels the development of a more complete model for pulse splitting. Experiments are also performed at peak input powers above those at which pulse splitting is observed. At these higher intensities, a broadband continuum is generated. This work presents a detailed study of continuum behavior and power loss as well as the first near-field spatial- spectral measurements of the generated continuum light. Nonlinear plane-wave propagation of short pulses in liquids is also investigated, and a non-instantaneous nonlinearity with a surprisingly short response time of 10 fs is observed in methanol. Experiments in water confirm that this effect in methanol is indeed real. Possible explanations for the observed effect are discussed and several are experimentally rejected. This

  6. An Empirical Study of Propagation Models for Wireless Communications in Open-pit Mines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Portela Lopes de Almeida, Erika; Caldwell, George; Rodriguez Larrad, Ignacio

    2018-01-01

    —In this paper, we investigate the suitability of the propagation models ITU-R 526, Okumura Hata, COST Hata models and Standard Propagation Model (SPM) to predict the path loss in open-pit mines. The models are evaluated by comparing the predicted data with measurements obtained in two operational...

  7. Propagation losses in photonic crystal waveguides: Effects of band tail absorption and waveguide dispersion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rigal, F.; Joanesarson, Kristoffer Bitsch; Lyasota, A.

    2017-01-01

    Propagation losses in GaAs-based photonic crystal (PhC) waveguides are evaluated near the semiconductor band-edge by measuring the finesse of corresponding Ln cavities. This approach yields simultaneously the propagation losses and the mode reflectivity at the terminations of the cavities. We dem...

  8. Seismic wave propagation in granular media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tancredi, Gonzalo; López, Francisco; Gallot, Thomas; Ginares, Alejandro; Ortega, Henry; Sanchís, Johnny; Agriela, Adrián; Weatherley, Dion

    2016-10-01

    Asteroids and small bodies of the Solar System are thought to be agglomerates of irregular boulders, therefore cataloged as granular media. It is a consensus that many asteroids might be considered as rubble or gravel piles.Impacts on their surface could produce seismic waves which propagate in the interior of these bodies, thus causing modifications in the internal distribution of rocks and ejections of particles and dust, resulting in a cometary-type comma.We present experimental and numerical results on the study of propagation of impact-induced seismic waves in granular media, with special focus on behavior changes by increasing compression.For the experiment, we use an acrylic box filled with granular materials such as sand, gravel and glass spheres. Pressure inside the box is controlled by a movable side wall and measured with sensors. Impacts are created on the upper face of the box through a hole, ranging from free-falling spheres to gunshots. We put high-speed cameras outside the box to record the impact as well as piezoelectic sensors and accelerometers placed at several depths in the granular material to detect the seismic wave.Numerical simulations are performed with ESyS-Particle, a software that implements the Discrete Element Method. The experimental setting is reproduced in the numerical simulations using both individual spherical particles and agglomerates of spherical particles shaped as irregular boulders, according to rock models obtained with a 3D scanner. The numerical experiments also reproduces the force loading on one of the wall to vary the pressure inside the box.We are interested in the velocity, attenuation and energy transmission of the waves. These quantities are measured in the experiments and in the simulations. We study the dependance of these three parameters with characteristics like: impact speed, properties of the target material and the pressure in the media.These results are relevant to understand the outcomes of impacts in

  9. Pulse Propagation on close conductors

    CERN Document Server

    Dieckmann, A

    2001-01-01

    The propagation and reflection of arbitrarily shaped pulses on non-dispersive parallel conductors of finite length with user defined cross section is simulated employing the discretized telegraph equation. The geometry of the system of conductors and the presence of dielectric material determine the capacities and inductances that enter the calculation. The values of these parameters are found using an iterative Laplace equation solving procedure and confirmed for certain calculable geometries including the line charge inside a box. The evolving pulses and the resulting crosstalk can be plotted at any instant and - in the Mathematica notebook version of this report - be looked at in an animation. As an example a differential pair of microstrips as used in the ATLAS vertex detector is analysed.

  10. IBEX - annular beam propagation experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazarakis, M.G.; Miller, R.B.; Shope, S.L.; Poukey, J.W.; Ramirez, J.J.; Ekdahl, C.A.; Adler, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    IBEX is a 4-MV, 100-kA, 20-ns cylindrical isolated Blumlein accelerator. In the experiments reported here, the accelerator is fitted with a specially designed foilless diode which is completely immersed in a uniform magnetic field. Several diode geometries have been studied as a function of magnetic field strength. The beam propagates a distance of 50 cm (approx. 10 cyclotron wavelengths) in vacuum before either striking a beam stop or being extracted through a thin foil. The extracted beam was successfully transported 60 cm downstream into a drift pipe filled either with 80 or 640 torr air. The main objectives of this experiment were to establish the proper parameters for the most quiescent 4 MV, 20 to 40 kA annular beam, and to compare the results with available theory and numerical code simulations

  11. Front propagation in flipping processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antal, T; Ben-Avraham, D; Ben-Naim, E; Krapivsky, P L

    2008-01-01

    We study a directed flipping process that underlies the performance of the random edge simplex algorithm. In this stochastic process, which takes place on a one-dimensional lattice whose sites may be either occupied or vacant, occupied sites become vacant at a constant rate and simultaneously cause all sites to the right to change their state. This random process exhibits rich phenomenology. First, there is a front, defined by the position of the leftmost occupied site, that propagates at a nontrivial velocity. Second, the front involves a depletion zone with an excess of vacant sites. The total excess Δ k increases logarithmically, Δ k ≅ ln k, with the distance k from the front. Third, the front exhibits ageing-young fronts are vigorous but old fronts are sluggish. We investigate these phenomena using a quasi-static approximation, direct solutions of small systems and numerical simulations

  12. Nonlinear operators and their propagators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, C.

    1997-01-01

    Mathematical physicists are familiar with a large set of tools designed for dealing with linear operators, which are so common in both the classical and quantum theories; but many of those tools are useless with nonlinear equations of motion. In this work a general algebra and calculus is developed for working with nonlinear operators: The basic new tool being the open-quotes slash product,close quotes defined by A(1+εB) =A+εA/B+O(ε 2 ). For a generic time development equation, the propagator is constructed and then there follows the formal version of time dependent perturbation theory, in remarkable similarity to the linear situation. A nonperturbative approximation scheme capable of producing high accuracy computations, previously developed for linear operators, is shown to be applicable as well in the nonlinear domain. A number of auxiliary mathematical properties and examples are given. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  13. Rapid Vegetative Propagation Method for Carob

    OpenAIRE

    Hamide GUBBUK; Esma GUNES; Tomas AYALA-SILVA; Sezai ERCISLI

    2011-01-01

    Most of fruit species are propagated by vegetative methods such as budding, grafting, cutting, suckering, layering etc. to avoid heterozygocity. Carob trees (Ceratonia siliqua L.) are of highly economical value and are among the most difficult to propagate fruit species. In the study, air-layering propagation method was investigated first time to compare wild and cultivated (�Sisam�) carob types. In the experiment, one year old carob limbs were air-layered on coco peat medium by wrapping with...

  14. Laser-induced shockwave propagation from ablation in a cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Xianzhong; Mao Xianglei; Mao, Samuel S.; Wen, S.-B.; Greif, Ralph; Russo, Richard E.

    2006-01-01

    The propagation of laser-induced shockwaves from ablation inside of cavities was determined from time-resolved shadowgraph images. The temperature and electron number density of the laser-induced plasma was determined from spectroscopic measurements. These properties were compared to those for laser ablation on the flat surface under the same energy and background gas condition. A theoretical model was proposed to determine the amount of energy and vaporized mass stored in the vapor plume based on these measurements

  15. Simulation of HPIB propagation in biased charge collector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Hongyu; Qiu Aici

    2004-01-01

    A 2.5D PIC simulation using KARAT code for inner charge propagation within biased charge collector for measuring HPIB is presented. The simulation results indicate that the charges were neutralized but the current non-neutralized in the biased charge collector. The influence of ions collected vs biased voltage of the collector was also simulated. -800 V biased voltage can meet the measurement of 500 keV HPIB, and this is consistent with the experimental results

  16. Neural network construction via back-propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burwick, T.T.

    1994-06-01

    A method is presented that combines back-propagation with multi-layer neural network construction. Back-propagation is used not only to adjust the weights but also the signal functions. Going from one network to an equivalent one that has additional linear units, the non-linearity of these units and thus their effective presence is then introduced via back-propagation (weight-splitting). The back-propagated error causes the network to include new units in order to minimize the error function. We also show how this formalism allows to escape local minima

  17. Terrestrial propagation of long electromagnetic waves

    CERN Document Server

    Galejs, Janis; Fock, V A

    2013-01-01

    Terrestrial Propagation of Long Electromagnetic Waves deals with the propagation of long electromagnetic waves confined principally to the shell between the earth and the ionosphere, known as the terrestrial waveguide. The discussion is limited to steady-state solutions in a waveguide that is uniform in the direction of propagation. Wave propagation is characterized almost exclusively by mode theory. The mathematics are developed only for sources at the ground surface or within the waveguide, including artificial sources as well as lightning discharges. This volume is comprised of nine chapte

  18. Fatigue crack propagation behavior under creep conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohji, Kiyotsugu; Kubo, Shiro

    1991-01-01

    The crack propagation behavior of the SUS 304 stainless steel under creep-fatigue conditions was reviewed. Cracks propagated either in purely time-dependent mode or in purely cycle-dependent mode, depending on loading conditions. The time-dependent crack propagation rate was correlated with modified J-integral J * and the cycle-dependent crack propagation rate was correlated with J-integral range ΔJ f . Threshold was observed in the cycle-dependent crack propagation, and below this threshold the time-dependent crack propagation appeared. The crack propagation rates were uniquely characterized by taking the effective values of J * and ΔJ f , when crack closure was observed. Change in crack propagation mode occurred reversibly and was predicted by the competitive damage model. The threshold disappeared and the cycle-dependent crack propagation continued in a subthreshold region under variable amplitude conditions, where the threshold was interposed between the maximum and minimum ΔJ f . (orig.)

  19. Radio Wave Propagation Handbook for Communication on and Around Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Christian; Golshan, Nasser; Kliore, Arvydas

    2002-01-01

    This handbook examines the effects of the Martian environment on radio wave propagation on Mars and in the space near the planet. The environmental effects include these from the Martian atmosphere, ionosphere, global dust storms, aerosols, clouds, and geomorphologic features. Relevant Martian environmental parameters were extracted from the measurements of Mars missions during the past 30 years, especially from Mars Pathfinder and Mars Global Surveyor. The results derived from measurements and analyses have been reviewed through an extensive literature search. The updated parameters have been theoretically analyzed to study their effects on radio propagation. This handbook also provides basic information about the entire telecommunications environment on and around Mars for propagation researchers, system engineers, and link analysts. Based on these original analyses, some important recommendations have been made, including the use of the Martian ionosphere as a reflector for Mars global or trans-horizon communication between future Martian colonies, reducing dust storm scattering effects, etc. These results have extended our wave propagation knowledge to a planet other than Earth; and the tables, models, and graphics included in this handbook will benefit telecommunication system engineers and scientific researchers.

  20. High frequency guided wave propagation in monocrystalline silicon wafers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzolato, Marco; Masserey, Bernard; Robyr, Jean-Luc; Fromme, Paul

    2017-04-01

    Monocrystalline silicon wafers are widely used in the photovoltaic industry for solar panels with high conversion efficiency. The cutting process can introduce micro-cracks in the thin wafers and lead to varying thickness. High frequency guided ultrasonic waves are considered for the structural monitoring of the wafers. The anisotropy of the monocrystalline silicon leads to variations of the wave characteristics, depending on the propagation direction relative to the crystal orientation. Full three-dimensional Finite Element simulations of the guided wave propagation were conducted to visualize and quantify these effects for a line source. The phase velocity (slowness) and skew angle of the two fundamental Lamb wave modes (first anti-symmetric mode A0 and first symmetric mode S0) for varying propagation directions relative to the crystal orientation were measured experimentally. Selective mode excitation was achieved using a contact piezoelectric transducer with a custom-made wedge and holder to achieve a controlled contact pressure. The out-of-plane component of the guided wave propagation was measured using a noncontact laser interferometer. Good agreement was found with the simulation results and theoretical predictions based on nominal material properties of the silicon wafer.

  1. Theoretical and Experimental Study on Vibration Propagation in PMMA Components in Ultrasonic Bonding Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yibo Sun

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasonic bonding has an increasing application in the micro assembly of polymeric micro-electro mechanical systems (MEMS with high requirements for fusion precision. In the ultrasonic bonding process, the propagation of ultrasonic vibration in polymer components is related to the interfacial fusion, which can be used as a monitoring parameter to control ultrasonic energy. To study the vibration propagation in viscoelastic polymer components, finite element analysis on the bonding of poly methyl methacrylate (PMMA micro connector to substrate for microfluidic system is carried out. Curves of propagated vibration amplitude corresponding to interfacial temperatures are obtained. The ultrasonic vibration propagated in PMMA components are measured through experiments. The theoretical and experimental results are contrasted to analyze the change mechanism of vibration propagation related to temperature. Based on the ultrasonic bonding process controlled by the feedback of vibration propagation, interfacial fusions at different vibration propagation states are obtained through experiments. Interfacial fusion behavior is contrasted to the propagated vibration amplitude in theoretical and experimental studies. The relation between vibration propagation and fusion degree is established with the proper parameter range for the obtained high quality bonding.

  2. Role of Compressibility on Tsunami Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdolali, Ali; Kirby, James T.

    2017-12-01

    In the present paper, we aim to reduce the discrepancies between tsunami arrival times evaluated from tsunami models and real measurements considering the role of ocean compressibility. We perform qualitative studies to reveal the phase speed reduction rate via a modified version of the Mild Slope Equation for Weakly Compressible fluid (MSEWC) proposed by Sammarco et al. (2013). The model is validated against a 3-D computational model. Physical properties of surface gravity waves are studied and compared with those for waves evaluated from an incompressible flow solver over realistic geometry for 2011 Tohoku-oki event, revealing reduction in phase speed.Plain Language SummarySubmarine earthquakes and submarine mass failures (SMFs), can generate long gravitational waves (or tsunamis) that propagate at the free surface. Tsunami waves can travel long distances and are known for their dramatic effects on coastal areas. Nowadays, numerical models are used to reconstruct the tsunamigenic events for many scientific and socioeconomic aspects i.e. Tsunami Early Warning Systems, inundation mapping, risk and hazard analysis, etc. A number of typically neglected parameters in these models cause discrepancies between model outputs and observations. Most of the tsunami models predict tsunami arrival times at distant stations slightly early in comparison to observations. In this study, we show how ocean compressibility would affect the tsunami wave propagation speed. In this framework, an efficient two-dimensional model equation for the weakly compressible ocean has been developed, validated and tested for simplified and real cases against three dimensional and incompressible solvers. Taking the effect of compressibility, the phase speed of surface gravity waves is reduced compared to that of an incompressible fluid. Then, we used the model for the case of devastating Tohoku-Oki 2011 tsunami event, improving the model accuracy. This study sheds light for future model development

  3. Slow light and pulse propagation in semiconductor waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Per Lunnemann

    This thesis concerns the propagation of optical pulses in semiconductor waveguide structures with particular focus on methods for achieving slow light or signal delays. Experimental pulse propagation measurements of pulses with a duration of 180 fs, transmitted through quantum well based waveguide...... structures, are presented. Simultaneous measurements of the pulse transmission and delay are measured as a function of input pulse energy for various applied electrical potentials. Electrically controlled pulse delay and advancement are demonstrated and compared with a theoretical model. The limits...... of the model as well as the underlying physical mechanisms are analysed and discussed. A method to achieve slow light by electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in an inhomogeneously broadened quantum dot medium is proposed. The basic principles of EIT are assessed and the main dissimilarities between...

  4. Numerical Algorithms for Precise and Efficient Orbit Propagation and Positioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Ben K.

    orbit propagation, yielding savings in computation time and memory. Orbit propagation and position transformation simulations are analyzed to generate a complete set of recommendations for performing the ITRS/GCRS transformation for a wide range of needs, encompassing real-time on-board satellite operations and precise post-processing applications. In addition, a complete derivation of the ITRS/GCRS frame transformation time-derivative is detailed for use in velocity transformations between the GCRS and ITRS and is applied to orbit propagation in the rotating ITRS. EOP interpolation methods and ocean tide corrections are shown to impact the ITRS/GCRS transformation accuracy at the level of 5 cm and 20 cm on the surface of the Earth and at the Global Positioning System (GPS) altitude, respectively. The precession-nutation and EOP simplifications yield maximum propagation errors of approximately 2 cm and 1 m after 15 minutes and 6 hours in low-Earth orbit (LEO), respectively, while reducing computation time and memory usage. Finally, for orbit propagation in the ITRS, a simplified scheme is demonstrated that yields propagation errors under 5 cm after 15 minutes in LEO. This approach is beneficial for orbit determination based on GPS measurements. We conclude with a summary of recommendations on EOP usage and bias-precession-nutation implementations for achieving a wide range of transformation and propagation accuracies at several altitudes. This comprehensive set of recommendations allows satellite operators, astrodynamicists, and scientists to make informed decisions when choosing the best implementation for their application, balancing accuracy and computational complexity.

  5. Measurement of the energy spectrum with proportional counters with spherical cathodes between 20 keV and 2.5 MeV with the propagation of 14 MeV neutrons in liquid nitrogen and liquid air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider-Kuehnle, P.

    1974-01-01

    This work deals with the measurement of the energy spectrum of a 14 MeV neutron source in liquid nitrogen and liquid air in the energy region of 20 keV to 2.5 MeV as a function of the distance from the source. The measured results together with those of a scintispectrometer which measures the energies between 2.5 MeV and 14 MeV, are to serve as experimentally-supported input data for shielding calculations and are to enable the checking of transport theoretical calculations. (orig./LH) [de

  6. Content Propagation in Online Social Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blenn, N.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis presents methods and techniques to analyze content propagation within online social networks (OSNs) using a graph theoretical approach. Important factors and different techniques to analyze and describe content propagation, starting from the smallest entity in a network, representing a

  7. Topology optimization of wave-propagation problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard; Sigmund, Ole

    2006-01-01

    Topology optimization is demonstrated as a useful tool for systematic design of wave-propagation problems. We illustrate the applicability of the method for optical, acoustic and elastic devices and structures.......Topology optimization is demonstrated as a useful tool for systematic design of wave-propagation problems. We illustrate the applicability of the method for optical, acoustic and elastic devices and structures....

  8. Propagation of microwaves in pulsar magnetospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodo, G; Ferrari, A [Turin Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Fisica Generale; Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Turin (Italy). Lab. di Cosmo-Geofisica); Massaglia, S [Turin Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Fisica Generale; Cambridge Univ. (UK). Inst. of Astronomy)

    1981-12-01

    We discuss the dispersion relation of linearly-polarized waves, propagating along a strong background magnetic field embedded in an electron-positron plasma. The results are then applied to the study of the propagation conditions of coherent curvature radio radiation inside neutron stars magnetospheres, as produced by electric discharges following current pulsar models.

  9. Wave propagation in thermoelastic saturated porous medium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the existence and propagation of four waves in the medium. Three of the waves are ... predicted infinite speed for propagation of ther- mal signals. Lord and ..... saturated reservoir rock (North-sea Sandstone) is chosen for the numerical model ...

  10. In vitro propagation of Irvingia gabonensis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGO

    2007-04-16

    Apr 16, 2007 ... Full-grown plantlets were obtained and work is in progress on mass propagation. ... subsequent mass propagation to produce seedlings for farmers, and to improve food security and ... Shooting and rooting were observed, and full grown plantlets were obtained. ¼ MS +0.2 mg KIN. +0.1 mg NAA. Rooting ...

  11. Uncertainty Propagation in an Ecosystem Nutrient Budget.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New aspects and advancements in classical uncertainty propagation methods were used to develop a nutrient budget with associated error for a northern Gulf of Mexico coastal embayment. Uncertainty was calculated for budget terms by propagating the standard error and degrees of fr...

  12. Canada Basin Acoustic Propagation Experiment (CANAPE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    acoustic communications, acoustic navigation, or acoustic remote sensing of the ocean interior . RELATED PROJECTS The 2015 CANAPE pilot study was a...1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Canada Basin Acoustic Propagation Experiment (CANAPE...ocean structure. Changes in sea ice and the water column affect both acoustic propagation and ambient noise. This implies that what was learned

  13. Propagation testing multi-cell batteries.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orendorff, Christopher J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lamb, Joshua [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Steele, Leigh Anna Marie [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Spangler, Scott Wilmer [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Propagation of single point or single cell failures in multi-cell batteries is a significant concern as batteries increase in scale for a variety of civilian and military applications. This report describes the procedure for testing failure propagation along with some representative test results to highlight the potential outcomes for different battery types and designs.

  14. Diagnostics for the ATA beam propagation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fessenden, T.J.; Atchison, W.L.; Barletta, W.A.

    1981-11-01

    This report contains a discussion of the diagnostics required for the beam propagation experiment to be done with the ATA accelerator. Included are a list of the diagnostics needed; a description of the ATA experimental environment; the status of beam diagnostics available at Livermore including recent developments, and a prioritized list of accelerator and propagation diagnostics under consideration or in various stages of development

  15. Unirradiated cladding rip-propagation tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, W.L.; Hunter, C.W.

    1981-04-01

    The size of cladding rips which develop when a fuel pin fails can affect the subassembly cooling and determine how rapidly fuel escapes from the pin. The object of the Cladding Rip Propagation Test (CRPT) was to quantify the failure development of cladding so that a more realistic fuel pin failure modeling may be performed. The test results for unirradiated 20% CS 316 stainless steel cladding show significantly different rip propagation behavior at different temperatures. At room temperature, the rip growth is stable as the rip extension increases monotonically with the applied deformation. At 500 0 C, the rip propagation becomes unstable after a short period of stable rip propagation. The rapid propagation rate is approximately 200 m/s, and the critical rip length is 9 mm. At test temperatures above 850 0 C, the cladding exhibits very high failure resistances, and failure occurs by multiple cracking at high cladding deformation. 13 figures

  16. In vitro propagation of jojoba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llorente, Berta E; Apóstolo, Nancy M

    2013-01-01

    Jojoba (Simmondsia chinensis (Link) Schn.) is a nontraditional crop in arid and semi-arid areas. Vegetative propagation can be achieved by layering, grafting, or rooting semi-hardwood cuttings, but the highest number of possible propagules is limited by the size of the plants and time of the year. Micropropagation is highly recommended strategy for obtaining jojoba elite clones. For culture initiation, single-node explants are cultivated on Murashige and Skoog medium (MS) supplemented with Gamborg's vitamins (B5), 11.1 μM BA (N(6)-benzyl-adenine), 0.5 μM IBA (indole-3-butyric acid), and 1.4 μM GA(3) (gibberellic acid). Internodal and apical cuttings proliferate on MS medium containing B5 vitamins and 4.4 μM BA. Rooting is achieved on MS medium (half strength mineral salt) amended with B5 vitamins and 14.7 μM IBA during 7 days and transferred to develop in auxin-free rooting medium. Plantlets are acclimatized using a graduated humidity regime on soil: peat: perlite (5:1:1) substrate. This micropagation protocol produces large numbers of uniform plants from selected genotypes of jojoba.

  17. Propagation of Axially Symmetric Detonation Waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Druce, R L; Roeske, F; Souers, P C; Tarver, C M; Chow, C T S; Lee, R S; McGuire, E M; Overturf, G E; Vitello, P A

    2002-06-26

    We have studied the non-ideal propagation of detonation waves in LX-10 and in the insensitive explosive TATB. Explosively-driven, 5.8-mm-diameter, 0.125-mm-thick aluminum flyer plates were used to initiate 38-mm-diameter, hemispherical samples of LX-10 pressed to a density of 1.86 g/cm{sup 3} and of TATB at a density of 1.80 g/cm{sup 3}. The TATB powder was a grade called ultrafine (UFTATB), having an arithmetic mean particle diameter of about 8-10 {micro}m and a specific surface area of about 4.5 m{sup 2}/g. Using PMMA as a transducer, output pressure was measured at 5 discrete points on the booster using a Fabry-Perot velocimeter. Breakout time was measured on a line across the booster with a streak camera. Each of the experimental geometries was calculated using the Ignition and Growth Reactive Flow Model, the JWL++ Model and the Programmed Burn Model. Boosters at both ambient and cold (-20 C and -54 C) temperatures have been experimentally and computationally studied. A comparison of experimental and modeling results is presented.

  18. Acoustic Environment of Haro Strait: Preliminary Propagation Modeling and Data Analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jones, Christopher D; Wolfson, Michael A

    2006-01-01

    Field measurements and acoustic propagation modeling for the frequency range 1 10 kHz are combined to analyze the acoustic environment of Haro Strait of Puget Sound, home to the southern resident killer whales...

  19. Effect of antibiotics on Agave fourcroydes Lem in vitro propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enildo Abreu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available High microbial contamination on henequen (Agave fourcroydes Lem in vitro propagation reduces its efficiency. This work aimed to determine the effect of the use of antibiotics in the control of bacterial contaminants of this culture. Bacterial contaminants were identified and their susceptibility to different antibiotics it were determined. The two best-acting antibiotics were added to the propagation medium and the number of explants contaminated with bacteria and necrotics was quantified. The antibiotic and concentration that did not cause phytotoxicity to the explants and where the lowest percentage of contamination was obtained it was used to continue the propagation of the plants. These were transferred to the acclimatization stage and at 30 days of culture the number of live plants and the number of roots per plant were quantified. In addition, the length of the roots (cm was measured and the leaf area was calculated. Micrococcus spp., Pseudomonas spp., Agrobacterium spp., Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus licheniformis were found. The antibiotics tested inhibited the in vitro growth of the isolated contaminants and the best results were obtained with Ticar and Cefotaxime. Added to the plant propagation medium, Ticar was phytotoxic over 50 mg l-1 and cefotaxime could be used at 100 mg l-1 without causing damage to the explants. The results showed that the plants that came from the culture medium with cefotaxime 100 mg l-1 showed a significant increase of the variables evaluated in the acclimatization stage.   Key words: betalactamic, henequen, micropropagation

  20. Spatial-temporal modeling of malware propagation in networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zesheng; Ji, Chuanyi

    2005-09-01

    Network security is an important task of network management. One threat to network security is malware (malicious software) propagation. One type of malware is called topological scanning that spreads based on topology information. The focus of this work is on modeling the spread of topological malwares, which is important for understanding their potential damages, and for developing countermeasures to protect the network infrastructure. Our model is motivated by probabilistic graphs, which have been widely investigated in machine learning. We first use a graphical representation to abstract the propagation of malwares that employ different scanning methods. We then use a spatial-temporal random process to describe the statistical dependence of malware propagation in arbitrary topologies. As the spatial dependence is particularly difficult to characterize, the problem becomes how to use simple (i.e., biased) models to approximate the spatially dependent process. In particular, we propose the independent model and the Markov model as simple approximations. We conduct both theoretical analysis and extensive simulations on large networks using both real measurements and synthesized topologies to test the performance of the proposed models. Our results show that the independent model can capture temporal dependence and detailed topology information and, thus, outperforms the previous models, whereas the Markov model incorporates a certain spatial dependence and, thus, achieves a greater accuracy in characterizing both transient and equilibrium behaviors of malware propagation.

  1. Effect of copper on crack propagation in beryllium single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldinger, F.; Wilhelm, M.

    The effect of copper additives on the fracture energy and the development of cracks parallel to the basal plane was studied in zone-refined single crystalline beryllium. At 77 0 K the cleavage planes are very smooth, so the crack propagation energy, which is independent of copper content (less than 2 at. percent Cu) in the range of measurement accuracy, is only a little higher than the surface energy of the basal plane. At room temperature, due to intense plastic processes taking place in front of the crack tip, the fracture energy is an order of magnitude higher than at low temperatures. The effect of copper on the plastic processes can be divided into two regions. In region I (less than 1.2 at. percent Cu), in which the crack propagation energy increases sharply with increasing copper content, crack propagation is controlled by prism slips. The decrease in crack propagation energy in region II (greater than 1.2 at. percent Cu) can be attributed to a reduction of beryllium twinning energy with increasing copper content. (auth)

  2. Supersonic propagation of ionization waves in an underdense, laser-produced plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constantin, C.; Back, C.A.; Fournier, K.B.; Gregori, G.; Landen, O.L.; Glenzer, S.H.; Dewald, E.L.; Miller, M.C.

    2005-01-01

    A laser-driven supersonic ionization wave propagating through a millimeter-scale plasma of subcritical density up to 2-3 keV electron temperatures was observed. Propagation velocities initially ten times the sound speed were measured by means of time-resolved x-ray imaging diagnostics. The measured ionization wave trajectory is modeled analytically and by a two-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamics code. The comparison to the modeling suggests that nonlocal heat transport effects may contribute to the attenuation of the heat-wave propagation

  3. Measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boumans, M.; Durlauf, S.N.; Blume, L.E.

    2008-01-01

    Measurement theory takes measurement as the assignment of numbers to properties of an empirical system so that a homomorphism between the system and a numerical system is established. To avoid operationalism, two approaches can be distinguished. In the axiomatic approach it is asserted that if the

  4. Optical Propagation Modeling for the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, W H; Auerbach, J M; Henesian, M A; Jancaitis, K S; Manes, K R; Mehta, N C; Orth, C D; Sacks, R A; Shaw, M J; Widmayer, C C

    2004-01-12

    Optical propagation modeling of the National Ignition Facility has been utilized extensively from conceptual design several years ago through to early operations today. In practice we routinely (for every shot) model beam propagation starting from the waveform generator through to the target. This includes the regenerative amplifier, the 4-pass rod amplifier, and the large slab amplifiers. Such models have been improved over time to include details such as distances between components, gain profiles in the laser slabs and rods, transient optical distortions due to the flashlamp heating of laser slabs, measured transmitted and reflected wavefronts for all large optics, the adaptive optic feedback loop, and the frequency converter. These calculations allow nearfield and farfield predictions in good agreement with measurements.

  5. Propagation channel characterization, parameter estimation, and modeling for wireless communications

    CERN Document Server

    Yin, Xuefeng

    2016-01-01

    Thoroughly covering channel characteristics and parameters, this book provides the knowledge needed to design various wireless systems, such as cellular communication systems, RFID and ad hoc wireless communication systems. It gives a detailed introduction to aspects of channels before presenting the novel estimation and modelling techniques which can be used to achieve accurate models. To systematically guide readers through the topic, the book is organised in three distinct parts. The first part covers the fundamentals of the characterization of propagation channels, including the conventional single-input single-output (SISO) propagation channel characterization as well as its extension to multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) cases. Part two focuses on channel measurements and channel data post-processing. Wideband channel measurements are introduced, including the equipment, technology and advantages and disadvantages of different data acquisition schemes. The channel parameter estimation methods are ...

  6. Alfven wave propagation in a partially ionized plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watts, Christopher; Hanna, Jeremy

    2004-01-01

    Results from a laboratory study of the dispersion relation of Alfven waves propagating through a partially ionized plasma are presented. The plasma is generated using a helicon source, creating a high density, current-free discharge, where the source can be adjusted to one of several modes with varying neutral fraction. Depending on the neutral fraction, the measured dispersion curve of shear Alfven waves can change significantly. Measurement results are compared with theoretical predictions of the effect of neutral particles on Alfven wave propagation. In fitting the theory, the neutral fraction is independently estimated using two simple particle transport models, one collisionless, the other collisional. The two models predict comparable neutral fractions, and agree well with the neutral fraction required for the Alfven dispersion theory

  7. Quench propagation and training in simulated superconducting magnet windings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sampson, W.B.; Garber, M.; Ghosh, A.

    1981-01-01

    Training behavior similar to that which occurs in full scale superconducting accelerator magnets has been observed in small test windings. The test coils are formed from approximately 20 meters of conductor wound non-inductively, in Bifilar fashion. The resulting racetrack shaped coil is molded at elevated temperature to simulate the construction techniques used for the ISABELLE dipoles. The quench current of such windings has been measured as a function of applied field and the effect of parameters such as mechanical loading and porosity have been investigated. The velocity of propagation of the normal front has been measured both along and transverse to the direction of current flow for several test windings. The minimum energy required to produce a self propagating normal zone has also been determined in an attempt to quantify the relative stability of the coils

  8. Observation of drift wave propagation as a source of tokamak edge turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Guiding; Liu Wandong; Yu Changxuan

    1998-01-01

    Core and edge turbulences were measured by Langmuir probe arrays in the KT-5C tokamak plasma. The radial wavenumber spectra show a quasimode like structure which results in a net radial outward propagation of the turbulent fluctuations. The measured fluctuation levels and wave action fluxes are in good agreement with model predictions by Mattor et al., suggesting that drift wave propagation could be a source of edge turbulence

  9. The propagation of Escherichia Coli and of conservative tracers. A comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, I.; Seiler, K.P.

    1982-01-01

    The propagation of Escherichia Coli (ATCC 11229, Gelsenkirchen) is compared with that of conservative tracers in groundwater. The experiments were performed with injection quantities of 10 7 , 10 8 , 10 10 and 10 11 of Escherichia Coli. Both, bacteria and conservative tracers pass their maximum at the same instant in the observation gauges. With injection quantities of more than 10 8 , the propagation of the Escherichia Coli sets in at the same time as it begins with the dyes. When the quantities range below 10 8 , the propagation begins after that of conservative tracers, because Coli bacteria were measured with a lower degree of detecting sensitivity than the tracers. With Coli injection quantities ranging above 10 10 , an increased filtering of these bacteria can be observed. Coli bacteria propagate more laterally than conservative tracers, however it could not be proved that this lateral propagation depends on the bacteria concentration. (orig.) [de

  10. PROPAGATION OF NEW BLACKBERRY CULTIVARS FOR PRODUCING CERTIFIED PROPAGATION MATERIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Isac

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was to study the behaviour of two new Romanian thorn blackberry cultivars DAR 24 and DAR 8 in process of micropropagation, compared with Darrow cultivar usually commercially micropropagated in our laboratory. Due to several drawbacks of the conventional propagation of Rubus, the efficiency of micropropagation was tested in order to obtain high quality planting material and to introduce rapidly these new cultivars in a certification program. Thorn blackberry cultivars DAR 8 and DAR 24 with resistance to winter colds was successfully micropropagated. Blackberry plants were found without virus infection after biological and ELISA tests. Axillary buds from the branches in full growth were used as the initial explants. After four weeks of growth, aseptic cultures was established on MS basal mineral salts, LS vitamins with 0.3 mg/l BAP, 0.1mg/l GA3 and 0.001mg/l NAA. The rate of successfully established cultures was on average 65.11%. Good proliferation of the regenerated shoots was obtained on the same medium composition used for initiation phase, whereas medium MS with mineral salts reduced to ½ and LS vitamins with 0.1 mg/l IBA and 0.1 mg/l GA3 was used in the rooting phase. Dar 24 and Dar 8 cultivars responded by good rates of micropropagation on medium culture B as compared to control Darrow cultivar, even if the obtained shoots length was lower than on medium A. The statistical analysis reveled that the highest MR (20.66 plantlets/explant was obtained for Dar 24. In this case the length of shoots was 1.92 cm. The highest rooting percentages (over 85% were obtained with shoots multiplied on medium B. High quality of rooted plants induced a high percentage of acclimatization of cultivar Dar 8, 86.36% under mist system in green house whereas the percentage of acclimatization of cultivar Dar 24 was lower, 51.85%.

  11. The accuracy of dynamic attitude propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvie, E.; Chu, D.; Woodard, M.

    1990-01-01

    Propagating attitude by integrating Euler's equation for rigid body motion has long been suggested for the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS) but until now has not been implemented. Because of limited Sun visibility, propagation is necessary for yaw determination. With the deterioration of the gyros, dynamic propagation has become more attractive. Angular rates are derived from integrating Euler's equation with a stepsize of 1 second, using torques computed from telemetered control system data. The environmental torque model was quite basic. It included gravity gradient and unshadowed aerodynamic torques. Knowledge of control torques is critical to the accuracy of dynamic modeling. Due to their coarseness and sparsity, control actuator telemetry were smoothed before integration. The dynamic model was incorporated into existing ERBS attitude determination software. Modeled rates were then used for attitude propagation in the standard ERBS fine-attitude algorithm. In spite of the simplicity of the approach, the dynamically propagated attitude matched the attitude propagated with good gyros well for roll and yaw but diverged up to 3 degrees for pitch because of the very low resolution in pitch momentum wheel telemetry. When control anomalies significantly perturb the nominal attitude, the effect of telemetry granularity is reduced and the dynamically propagated attitudes are accurate on all three axes.

  12. Failure propagation tests and analysis at PNC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, H.; Miyake, O.; Daigo, Y.; Sato, M.

    1984-01-01

    Failure propagation tests have been conducted using the Large Leak Sodium Water Reaction Test Rig (SWAT-1) and the Steam Generator Safety Test Facility (SWAT-3) at PNC in order to establish the safety design of the LMFBR prototype Monju steam generators. Test objectives are to provide data for selecting a design basis leak (DBL), data on the time history of failure propagations, data on the mechanism of the failures, and data on re-use of tubes in the steam generators that have suffered leaks. Eighteen fundamental tests have been performed in an intermediate leak region using the SWAT-1 test rig, and ten failure propagation tests have been conducted in the region from a small leak to a large leak using the SWAT-3 test facility. From the test results it was concluded that a dominant mechanism was tube wastage, and it took more than one minute until each failure propagation occurred. Also, the total leak rate in full sequence simulation tests including a water dump was far less than that of one double-ended-guillotine (DEG) failure. Using such experimental data, a computer code, LEAP (Leak Enlargement and Propagation), has been developed for the purpose of estimating the possible maximum leak rate due to failure propagation. This paper describes the results of the failure propagation tests and the model structure and validation studies of the LEAP code. (author)

  13. Estimating propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenyuan; Huizinga, John S.

    2010-03-16

    Techniques are described for estimating the propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor. In particular, techniques which measure and exploit a proper segment of phase frequency response of the surface acoustic wave sensor are described for use as a basis of bacterial detection by the sensor. As described, use of velocity estimation based on a proper segment of phase frequency response has advantages over conventional techniques that use phase shift as the basis for detection.

  14. Network propagation in the cytoscape cyberinfrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlin, Daniel E; Demchak, Barry; Pratt, Dexter; Sage, Eric; Ideker, Trey

    2017-10-01

    Network propagation is an important and widely used algorithm in systems biology, with applications in protein function prediction, disease gene prioritization, and patient stratification. However, up to this point it has required significant expertise to run. Here we extend the popular network analysis program Cytoscape to perform network propagation as an integrated function. Such integration greatly increases the access to network propagation by putting it in the hands of biologists and linking it to the many other types of network analysis and visualization available through Cytoscape. We demonstrate the power and utility of the algorithm by identifying mutations conferring resistance to Vemurafenib.

  15. Pole solutions for flame front propagation

    CERN Document Server

    Kupervasser, Oleg

    2015-01-01

    This book deals with solving mathematically the unsteady flame propagation equations. New original mathematical methods for solving complex non-linear equations and investigating their properties are presented. Pole solutions for flame front propagation are developed. Premixed flames and filtration combustion have remarkable properties: the complex nonlinear integro-differential equations for these problems have exact analytical solutions described by the motion of poles in a complex plane. Instead of complex equations, a finite set of ordinary differential equations is applied. These solutions help to investigate analytically and numerically properties of the flame front propagation equations.

  16. Inward propagating chemical waves in Taylor vortices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Barnaby W; Novak, Jan; Wilson, Mark C T; Britton, Melanie M; Taylor, Annette F

    2010-04-01

    Advection-reaction-diffusion (ARD) waves in the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction in steady Taylor-Couette vortices have been visualized using magnetic-resonance imaging and simulated using an adapted Oregonator model. We show how propagating wave behavior depends on the ratio of advective, chemical and diffusive time scales. In simulations, inward propagating spiral flamelets are observed at high Damköhler number (Da). At low Da, the reaction distributes itself over several vortices and then propagates inwards as contracting ring pulses--also observed experimentally.

  17. Crack Propagation by Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Carlos H. Ricardo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Crack propagation simulation began with the development of the finite element method; the analyses were conducted to obtain a basic understanding of the crack growth. Today structural and materials engineers develop structures and materials properties using this technique. The aim of this paper is to verify the effect of different crack propagation rates in determination of crack opening and closing stress of an ASTM specimen under a standard suspension spectrum loading from FDandE SAE Keyhole Specimen Test Load Histories by finite element analysis. To understand the crack propagation processes under variable amplitude loading, retardation effects are observed

  18. Network propagation in the cytoscape cyberinfrastructure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel E Carlin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Network propagation is an important and widely used algorithm in systems biology, with applications in protein function prediction, disease gene prioritization, and patient stratification. However, up to this point it has required significant expertise to run. Here we extend the popular network analysis program Cytoscape to perform network propagation as an integrated function. Such integration greatly increases the access to network propagation by putting it in the hands of biologists and linking it to the many other types of network analysis and visualization available through Cytoscape. We demonstrate the power and utility of the algorithm by identifying mutations conferring resistance to Vemurafenib.

  19. The acceleration and propagation of solar energetic particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalla, Silvia

    2004-01-01

    During flares and coronal mass ejections at the Sun, ions and electrons can be accelerated to high energies. They can escape from the solar corona into interplanetary space, and be detected by instruments on board spacecraft. This paper will review measurements of these solar energetic particles (SEPs) and models of their acceleration and propagation.It is generally agreed that SEP flux enhancements fall into two distinct classes: the so-called impulsive events, thought to originate in solar flares, and gradual events, thought to be the result of acceleration at the shock driven through the corona and interplanetary space by coronal mass ejections. A fundamental assumption of this model for SEPs is that particles' guiding centers propagate essentially parallel to the interplanetary magnetic field lines, and cross-field particle diffusion is negligible.The recent passage of the Ulysses spacecraft over the solar poles provided the first ever measurements of SEPs out of the ecliptic plane. Analysis of these data has revealed several fundamental differences with respect to the near-ecliptic measurements, such as large delays in particle arrival and in fluxes reaching their peak value. It will be shown that the current model of SEP acceleration and propagation does not account for the Ulysses results, which would more easily be explained by efficient cross-field diffusion of energetic particles

  20. Tracing light propagation to the intrinsic accuracy of spacetime geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crosta, Mariateresa

    2011-01-01

    Advancement in astronomical observations requires codification of light propagation and of the processes of its physical measurement at a high level of accuracy. This could unveil a new window of several subtle relativistic effects suffered by light while propagating. Indeed, light modeling and its subsequent detection should be conceived in a fully relativistic context, in order to interpret the outcome of the observing process in accordance with the geometrical environment affecting light propagation itself and the precepts of measurement. This paper deals with the complexity of such a topic by showing how the geometrical framework of RAMOD, a relativistic model initially developed for astrometric observations in the visible, constitutes an appropriate environment for back-tracing photons. Through gauging the energy content of a given gravitationally bound system, the geometrical aspects that match the required accuracy of present and future observational capabilities are evidenced. Then, by comparing different formulations of the null geodesic, their domain of validity within the given geometrical scheme is refined. Finally, by proving its ability in retrieving recent literature cases, RAMOD is promoted as a measurement-based general relativistic method for any present and future advancement in the light-tracing problem. (paper)

  1. Soot Formation in Freely-Propagating Laminar Premixed Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, K.-C.; Hassan, M. I.; Faeth, G. M.

    1997-01-01

    Soot formation within hydrocarbon-fueled flames is an important unresolved problem of combustion science. Thus, the present study is considering soot formation in freely-propagating laminar premixed flames, exploiting the microgravity environment to simplify measurements at the high-pressure conditions of interest for many practical applications. The findings of the investigation are relevant to reducing emissions of soot and continuum radiation from combustion processes, to improving terrestrial and spacecraft fire safety, and to developing methods of computational combustion, among others. Laminar premixed flames are attractive for studying soot formation because they are simple one-dimensional flows that are computationally tractable for detailed numerical simulations. Nevertheless, studying soot-containing burner-stabilized laminar premixed flames is problematical: spatial resolution and residence times are limited at the pressures of interest for practical applications, flame structure is sensitive to minor burner construction details so that experimental reproducibility is not very good, consistent burner behavior over the lengthy test programs needed to measure soot formation properties is hard to achieve, and burners have poor durability. Fortunately, many of these problems are mitigated for soot-containing, freely-propagating laminar premixed flames. The present investigation seeks to extend work in this laboratory for various soot processes in flames by observing soot formation in freely-propagating laminar premixed flames. Measurements are being made at both Normal Gravity (NG) and MicroGravity (MG), using a short-drop free-fall facility to provide MG conditions.

  2. Biomass plug development and propagation in porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, T L; Fogler, H S

    2001-02-05

    Exopolymer-producing bacteria can be used to modify soil profiles for enhanced oil recovery or bioremediation. Understanding the mechanisms associated with biomass plug development and propagation is needed for successful application of this technology. These mechanisms were determined from packed-bed and micromodel experiments that simulate plugging in porous media. Leuconostoc mesenteroides was used, because production of dextran, a water-insoluble exopolymer, can be controlled by using different carbon sources. As dextran was produced, the pressure drop across the porous media increased and began to oscillate. Three pressure phases were identified under exopolymer-producing conditions: the exopolymer-induction phase, the plugging phase, and the plug-propagation phase. The exopolymer-induction phase extended from the time that exopolymer-producing conditions were induced until there was a measurable increase in pressure drop across the porous media. The plugging phase extended from the first increase in pressure drop until a maximum pressure drop was reached. Changes in pressure drop in these two phases were directly related to biomass distribution. Specifically, flow channels within the porous media filled with biomass creating a plugged region where convective flow occurred only in water channels within the biofilm. These water channels were more restrictive to flow causing the pressure drop to increase. At a maximum pressure drop across the porous media, the biomass yielded much like a Bingham plastic, and a flow channel was formed. This behavior marked the onset of the plug-propagation phase which was characterized by sequential development and breakthrough of biomass plugs. This development and breakthrough propagated the biomass plug in the direction of nutrient flow. The dominant mechanism associated with all three phases of plugging in porous media was exopolymer production; yield stress is an additional mechanism in the plug-propagation phase. Copyright

  3. Interpretation of heat and density pulse propagation in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sips, A.C.C.; Costley, A.E.; O'Rourke, J.O.

    1991-01-01

    This paper addresses two key issues in current research on sawtooth induced heat and density pulse measurements in Tokamaks and their interpretation. First, heat and density pulses in JET and TXT show different qualitative behaviour implying substantially different transport coefficients. Second, a new description of the heat pulse has been used to describe measurements cannot be simulated with the widely used diffusive model. In this paper, we show that consistency between all these measurements can be obtained assuming a diffusive propagation for the heat and density pulses and using linearised coupled transport equations. (author) 6 refs., 5 figs

  4. ON SUN-TO-EARTH PROPAGATION OF CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Ying D.; Luhmann, Janet G.; Möstl, Christian; Bale, Stuart D.; Lin, Robert P.; Lugaz, Noé; Davies, Jackie A.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate how coronal mass ejections (CMEs) propagate through, and interact with, the inner heliosphere between the Sun and Earth, a key question in CME research and space weather forecasting. CME Sun-to-Earth kinematics are constrained by combining wide-angle heliospheric imaging observations, interplanetary radio type II bursts, and in situ measurements from multiple vantage points. We select three events for this study, the 2012 January 19, 23, and March 7 CMEs. Different from previous event studies, this work attempts to create a general picture for CME Sun-to-Earth propagation and compare different techniques for determining CME interplanetary kinematics. Key results are obtained concerning CME Sun-to-Earth propagation: (1) the Sun-to-Earth propagation of fast CMEs can be approximately formulated into three phases: an impulsive acceleration, then a rapid deceleration, and finally a nearly constant speed propagation (or gradual deceleration); (2) the CMEs studied here are still accelerating even after the flare maximum, so energy must be continuously fed into the CME even after the time of the maximum heating and radiation has elapsed in the corona; (3) the rapid deceleration, presumably due to interactions with the ambient medium, mainly occurs over a relatively short timescale following the acceleration phase; and (4) CME-CME interactions seem a common phenomenon close to solar maximum. Our comparison between different techniques (and data sets) has important implications for CME observations and their interpretations: (1) for the current cases, triangulation assuming a compact CME geometry is more reliable than triangulation assuming a spherical front attached to the Sun for distances below 50-70 solar radii from the Sun, but beyond about 100 solar radii we would trust the latter more; (2) a proper treatment of CME geometry must be performed in determining CME Sun-to-Earth kinematics, especially when the CME propagation direction is far away from the

  5. Time-dependent wave front propagation simulation of a hard x-ray split-and-delay unit: Towards a measurement of the temporal coherence properties of x-ray free electron lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Roling

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available For the European x-ray free electron laser (XFEL a split-and-delay unit based on geometrical wavefront beam splitting and multilayer mirrors is built which covers the range of photon energies from 5 keV up to 20 keV. Maximum delays between Δτ=±2.5  ps at hν=20  keV and up to Δτ=±23  ps at hν=5  keV will be possible. Time-dependent wave-optics simulations have been performed by means of Synchrotron Radiation Workshop software for XFEL pulses at hν=5  keV. The XFEL radiation was simulated using results of time-dependent simulations applying the self-amplified spontaneous emission code FAST. Main features of the optical layout, including diffraction on the beam splitter edge and optics imperfections measured with a nanometer optic component measuring machine slope measuring profiler, were taken into account. The impact of these effects on the characterization of the temporal properties of XFEL pulses is analyzed. An approach based on fast Fourier transformation allows for the evaluation of the temporal coherence despite large wavefront distortions caused by the optics imperfections. In this way, the fringes resulting from time-dependent two-beam interference can be filtered and evaluated yielding a coherence time of τ_{c}=0.187  fs (HWHM for real, nonperfect mirrors, while for ideal mirrors a coherence time of τ_{c}=0.191  fs (HWHM is expected.

  6. Wave propagation of spectral energy content in a granular chain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shrivastava, Rohit Kumar; Luding, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    A mechanical wave is propagation of vibration with transfer of energy and momentum. Understanding the spectral energy characteristics of a propagating wave through disordered granular media can assist in understanding the overall properties of wave propagation through inhomogeneous materials like

  7. The propagation of sound in tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kai Ming; Iu, King Kwong

    2002-11-01

    The sound propagation in tunnels is addressed theoretically and experimentally. In many previous studies, the image source method is frequently used. However, these early theoretical models are somewhat inadequate because the effect of multiple reflections in long enclosures is often modeled by the incoherent summation of contributions from all image sources. Ignoring the phase effect, these numerical models are unlikely to be satisfactory for predicting the intricate interference patterns due to contributions from each image source. In the present paper, the interference effect is incorporated by summing the contributions from the image sources coherently. To develop a simple numerical model, tunnels are represented by long rectangular enclosures with either geometrically reflecting or impedance boundaries. Scale model experiments are conducted for the validation of the numerical model. In some of the scale model experiments, the enclosure walls are lined with a carpet for simulating the impedance boundary condition. Large-scale outdoor measurements have also been conducted in two tunnels designed originally for road traffic use. It has been shown that the proposed numerical model agrees reasonably well with experimental data. [Work supported by the Research Grants Council, The Industry Department, NAP Acoustics (Far East) Ltd., and The Hong Kong Polytechnic University.

  8. Particle propagation and acceleration in the heliosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valdes-Galicia, J.F.; Quenby, J.J.; Mousas, X.

    1988-01-01

    A realistic model of interplanetary magnetic field perturbations has been constructed based on data taken on board spacecraft. The model has been used to study numerically pitch angle scattering suffered by energetic particles (1-100 MeV) as they propagate in the Heliosphere. These numerical experiments allow the determination of the pitch angle diffusion coefficient Dμ and the associated mean free path λ. Dμ is found to be always smaller than implied by quasi linear theory, leading to radial mean free paths (λ r ≅ 0.015 AU) that are at least 3 times larger. Inclusion of solar wind velocity measurements in the model producing V x B random electric fields permits the study of stochastic acceleration caused by these fields. Initial results show that these processes might be able to overcome the effects of adiabatic cooling caused by the expansion of the solar wind and thus be of some influence in cosmic ray acceleration when extrapolated to other astrophysical environments

  9. Some properties of light propagation in relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazanski, Stanislaw L.

    1998-01-01

    An outline of a formalism is proposed that describes relativistic effects associated with the propagation of light rays which after being initially split start to reconverge and intersect each other again. Beside a general geometric description that uses the approach of geometric optics, it has been shown how to compute both the difference of the proper times of arrivals of the two light beams to a measuring apparatus, as well as the frequency shifts of each of the beams taken separately. The formalism used here is applicable to both the special and the general theory of relativity, and it can be used equally well either when the light split is produced by a man-made optical device or when it is caused by the gravity field itself. The geometric description used in the formalism is independent of the physical origin of the frequency shift; of whether it is a Doppler, gravitational or cosmological frequency shift effect. Two simple examples of the application of the formalism have been worked out, which illustrate its results for families of inertial and noninertial observers respectively. Furthermore, a short description of a continuous version of the formalism has been presented in the last section of the article

  10. Evaluation of electrical propagation delay with cardiomyocytes by photosensitization reaction in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, Marika; Ogawa, Emiyu; Arai, Tsunenori

    2017-02-01

    In order to study cardiomyocyte electrical conduction damage by a photosensitization reaction (PR) mostly comes from outside of the cells in a few minutes after the PR, we studied propagation delay of contact action potential with cardiomyocyte by the PR. To determine appropriate PR condition for tachyarrhythmia ablation, a precise electrophysiological experiment in vitro has been preferable. We measured the contact action potential using a microelectrode array system of which information may be correct than conventional Ca2+ measurement. We investigated the propagation delays of an evoked potential to evaluate the electrical conduction damage by the PR. Rat cardiomyocytes were cultivated for 5-7 days on a dish with which 64 electrodes were patterned, in an incubator controlled to 37°C, 5% CO2. The following conditions were used for the PR: 40 μg/ml talapordfin sodium and 290 mW/cm2, 40-78 J/cm2 for an irradiation. A 2D map was obtained to visualize the propagation delays of the evoked potential. The propagation speed, which was calculated based on the measured propagation delays, was decreased by about 30-50% on average of all electrodes after the PR. Therefore, we think 2D propagation delays measurement of the evoked potential with contact action potential measuring system might be available to evaluate the acute electrical conduction damage of cardiomyocyte by the PR.

  11. Coupled seismic and electromagnetic wave propagation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schakel, M.D.

    2011-01-01

    Coupled seismic and electromagnetic wave propagation is studied theoretically and experimentally. This coupling arises because of the electrochemical double layer, which exists along the solid-grain/fluid-electrolyte boundaries of porous media. Within the double layer, charge is redistributed,

  12. Propagating semantic information in biochemical network models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schulz Marvin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To enable automatic searches, alignments, and model combination, the elements of systems biology models need to be compared and matched across models. Elements can be identified by machine-readable biological annotations, but assigning such annotations and matching non-annotated elements is tedious work and calls for automation. Results A new method called "semantic propagation" allows the comparison of model elements based not only on their own annotations, but also on annotations of surrounding elements in the network. One may either propagate feature vectors, describing the annotations of individual elements, or quantitative similarities between elements from different models. Based on semantic propagation, we align partially annotated models and find annotations for non-annotated model elements. Conclusions Semantic propagation and model alignment are included in the open-source library semanticSBML, available on sourceforge. Online services for model alignment and for annotation prediction can be used at http://www.semanticsbml.org.

  13. In vitro propagation of Paphiopedilum orchids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Songjun; Huang, Weichang; Wu, Kunlin; Zhang, Jianxia; da Silva, Jaime A Teixeira; Duan, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Paphiopedilum is one of the most popular and rare orchid genera. Members of the genus are sold and exhibited as pot plants and cut flowers. Wild populations of Paphiopedilum are under the threat of extinction due to over-collection and loss of suitable habitats. A reduction in their commercial value through large-scale propagation in vitro is an option to reduce pressure from illegal collection, to attempt to meet commercial needs and to re-establish threatened species back into the wild. Although they are commercially propagated via asymbiotic seed germination, Paphiopedilum are considered to be difficult to propagate in vitro, especially by plant regeneration from tissue culture. This review aims to cover the most important aspects and to provide an up-to-date research progress on in vitro propagation of Paphiopedilum and to emphasize the importance of further improving tissue culture protocols for ex vitro-derived explants.

  14. Constrained bidirectional propagation and stroke segmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, S; Gillespie, W; Suen, C Y

    1983-03-01

    A new method for decomposing a complex figure into its constituent strokes is described. This method, based on constrained bidirectional propagation, is suitable for parallel processing. Examples of its application to the segmentation of Chinese characters are presented. 9 references.

  15. The ghost propagator in Coulomb gauge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, P.; Reinhardt, H.

    2011-01-01

    We present results for a numerical study of the ghost propagator in Coulomb gauge whereby lattice results for the spatial gluon propagator are used as input to solving the ghost Dyson-Schwinger equation. We show that in order to solve completely, the ghost equation must be supplemented by a boundary condition (the value of the inverse ghost propagator dressing function at zero momentum) which determines if the solution is critical (zero value for the boundary condition) or subcritical (finite value). The various solutions exhibit a characteristic behavior where all curves follow the same (critical) solution when going from high to low momenta until 'forced' to freeze out in the infrared to the value of the boundary condition. The boundary condition can be interpreted in terms of the Gribov gauge-fixing ambiguity; we also demonstrate that this is not connected to the renormalization. Further, the connection to the temporal gluon propagator and the infrared slavery picture of confinement is discussed.

  16. Propagation of synchrotron radiation through nanocapillary structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjeoumikhov, A.; Bjeoumikhova, S.; Riesemeier, H.; Radtke, M.; Wedell, R.

    2007-01-01

    The propagation of synchrotron radiation through nanocapillary structures with channel sizes of 200 nm and periods in the micrometer size has been studied experimentally. It was shown that the propagation through individual capillary channels has a mode formation character. Furthermore it was shown that during the propagation through capillary channels the coherence of synchrotron radiation is partially conserved. Interference of beams propagating through different capillary channels is observed which leads to a periodically modulated distribution of the radiation intensity in a plane far from the exit of the structure. These investigations are of high relevance for the understanding of X-ray transmission through nanocapillaries and the appearance of wave properties at this size scale

  17. SDEM modelling of fault-propagation folding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, O.R.; Egholm, D.L.; Poulsen, Jane Bang

    2009-01-01

    and variations in Mohr-Coulomb parameters including internal friction. Using SDEM modelling, we have mapped the propagation of the tip-line of the fault, as well as the evolution of the fold geometry across sedimentary layers of contrasting rheological parameters, as a function of the increased offset......Understanding the dynamics and kinematics of fault-propagation-folding is important for evaluating the associated hydrocarbon play, for accomplishing reliable section balancing (structural reconstruction), and for assessing seismic hazards. Accordingly, the deformation style of fault-propagation...... a precise indication of when faults develop and hence also the sequential evolution of secondary faults. Here we focus on the generation of a fault -propagated fold with a reverse sense of motion at the master fault, and varying only the dip of the master fault and the mechanical behaviour of the deformed...

  18. ADVANCES IN THE PROPAGATION OF RAMBUTAN TREE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RENATA APARECIDA DE ANDRADE

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The reality of Brazilian fruit farming is demonstrating increasing demand for sustainable information about native and exotic fruit, which can diversify and elevate the efficiency of fruit exploitation. Research on propagation of fruits tree is very important so that it can provide a protocol for suitable multiplication of this fruitful. Due to the great genetic diversity of rambutan plants, it is recommended the use of vegetative propagated plants. This research aimed to evaluate the propagation of rambutan by cuttings, layering and grafting, as well as seed germination and viability without storage. The results of this research indicate that this species can be successfully propagated by layering, grafting and seeds. We also observed that the germination percentage of seeds kept inside the fruits for six days were not influenced by the different substrates used in this experiment.

  19. Reversed phase propagation for hyperbolic surface waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Repän, Taavi; Novitsky, Andrey; Willatzen, Morten

    2018-01-01

    Magnetic properties can be used to control phase propagation in hyperbolic metamaterials. However, in the visible spectrum magnetic properties are difficult to obtain. We discuss hyperbolic surface waves allowing for a similar control over phase, achieved without magnetic properties....

  20. ADVANCES IN PEACH, NECTARINE AND PLUM PROPAGATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NEWTON ALEX MAYER

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Nursery trees of stone fruits (Prunus spp. are traditionally produced by union of two distinct genotypes - the rootstock and the scion - which, by grafting, form a composite plant that will be maintained throughout of all plant life. In Brazil, the rootstocks are predominantly seed propagated and therefore usually results in heterogeneous trees for vigor and edaphic adaptation. However, with advances in rootstock breeding programs that released cultivars and certification in several countries (notably in Europe, the system will come gradually evolving for vegetative propagation (cuttings and tissue culture and use of seeds of selected rootstocks with specific characteristics and potted nursery trees production. For scion cultivar propagation, the budding system (with its many variations has predominantly been adopted in major producing countries. This review had as objective to comment main propagation methods adopted for rootstocks and scion in peach, nectarine and plum, and recent technical progress obtained as well as the needs of improvement for nursery tree production.

  1. On the Coulomb gauge quark propagator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kloker, M.; Alkofer, R.; Krassnigg, A.; Krenn, R.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: A solution of the quark Dyson-Schwinger equation including transverse gluons is presented. The corresponding retardation effects in the quark propagator are discussed. Especially, their effects on confinement properties and dynamical mass generation are described. (author)

  2. Front Propagation in Stochastic Neural Fields

    KAUST Repository

    Bressloff, Paul C.; Webber, Matthew A.

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the effects of extrinsic multiplicative noise on front propagation in a scalar neural field with excitatory connections. Using a separation of time scales, we represent the fluctuating front in terms of a diffusive-like displacement

  3. Spark channel propagation in a microbubble liquid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panov, V. A.; Vasilyak, L. M., E-mail: vasilyak@ihed.ras.ru; Vetchinin, S. P.; Pecherkin, V. Ya.; Son, E. E. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute for High Temperatures (Russian Federation)

    2016-11-15

    Experimental study on the development of the spark channel from the anode needle under pulsed electrical breakdown of isopropyl alcohol solution in water with air microbubbles has been performed. The presence of the microbubbles increases the velocity of the spark channel propagation and increases the current in the discharge gap circuit. The observed rate of spark channel propagation in microbubble liquid ranges from 4 to 12 m/s, indicating the thermal mechanism of the spark channel development in a microbubble liquid.

  4. The gluon propagator in momentum space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, C. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States). Dept. of Physics; Parrinello, C. [New York Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Physics]|[Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Soni, A. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1992-12-31

    We consider quenched QCD on a 16{sup 3}{times}40 lattice at {beta}=6.0. We give preliminary numerical results for the lattice gluon propagator evaluated both in coordinate and momentum space. Our findings are compared with earlier results in the literature at zero momentum. In addition, by considering nonzero momenta we attempt to extract the form of the propagator and compare it to continuum predictions formulated by Gribov and others.

  5. The gluon propagator in momentum space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, C. (Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States). Dept. of Physics); Parrinello, C. (New York Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Physics Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Soni, A. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States))

    1992-01-01

    We consider quenched QCD on a 16[sup 3][times]40 lattice at [beta]=6.0. We give preliminary numerical results for the lattice gluon propagator evaluated both in coordinate and momentum space. Our findings are compared with earlier results in the literature at zero momentum. In addition, by considering nonzero momenta we attempt to extract the form of the propagator and compare it to continuum predictions formulated by Gribov and others.

  6. The gluon propagator in momentum space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, C. (Dept. of Physics, Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States)); Parrinello, C. (Physics Dept., New York Univ., NY (United States) Physics Dept., Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Soni, A. (Physics Dept., Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States))

    1993-03-01

    We consider quenched QCD on a 16[sup 3] x 40 lattice at [beta] = 6.0. We give preliminary numerical results for the lattice gluon propagator evaluated both in coordinate and momentum space. Our findings are compared with earlier results in the literature at zero momentum. In addition, by considering nonzero momenta we attempt to extract the form of the propagator and compare it to continuum predictions formulated by Gribov and others. (orig.)

  7. The structure of the gluon propagator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leinweber, D.B.; Parrinello, C.; Skullerud, J.I.; Williams, A.G

    1999-03-01

    The gluon propagator has been calculated for quenched QCD in the Landau gauge at {beta} = 6.0 for volumes 16{sup 3} x 48 and 32{sup 3} x 64, and at {beta} 6.2 for volume 24{sup 3} x 48. The large volume and different lattice spacings allow us to identify and minimise finite volume and finite lattice spacing artefacts. We also study the tensor structure of the gluon propagator, confirming that it obeys the lattice Landau gauge condition.

  8. Propagation of sound waves in ducts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Finn

    2000-01-01

    Plane wave propagation in ducts with rigid walls, radiation from ducts, classical four-pole theory for composite duct systems, and three-dimentional waves in wave guides of various cross-sectional shape are described.......Plane wave propagation in ducts with rigid walls, radiation from ducts, classical four-pole theory for composite duct systems, and three-dimentional waves in wave guides of various cross-sectional shape are described....

  9. Equivalence of Equilibrium Propagation and Recurrent Backpropagation

    OpenAIRE

    Scellier, Benjamin; Bengio, Yoshua

    2017-01-01

    Recurrent Backpropagation and Equilibrium Propagation are algorithms for fixed point recurrent neural networks which differ in their second phase. In the first phase, both algorithms converge to a fixed point which corresponds to the configuration where the prediction is made. In the second phase, Recurrent Backpropagation computes error derivatives whereas Equilibrium Propagation relaxes to another nearby fixed point. In this work we establish a close connection between these two algorithms....

  10. Molecular dynamics simulation of propagating cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, M.

    1982-01-01

    Steady state crack propagation is investigated numerically using a model consisting of 236 free atoms in two (010) planes of bcc alpha iron. The continuum region is modeled using the finite element method with 175 nodes and 288 elements. The model shows clear (010) plane fracture to the edge of the discrete region at moderate loads. Analysis of the results obtained indicates that models of this type can provide realistic simulation of steady state crack propagation.

  11. The gluon propagator in momentum space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, C.; Soni, A.

    1992-01-01

    We consider quenched QCD on a 16 3 x40 lattice at β=6.0. We give preliminary numerical results for the lattice gluon propagator evaluated both in coordinate and momentum space. Our findings are compared with earlier results in the literature at zero momentum. In addition, by considering nonzero momenta we attempt to extract the form of the propagator and compare it to continuum predictions formulated by Gribov and others

  12. Lamb wave propagation in monocrystalline silicon wafers

    OpenAIRE

    Fromme, P.; Pizzolato, M.; Robyr, J-L; Masserey, B.

    2018-01-01

    Monocrystalline silicon wafers are widely used in the photovoltaic industry for solar panels with high conversion efficiency. Guided ultrasonic waves offer the potential to efficiently detect micro-cracks in the thin wafers. Previous studies of ultrasonic wave propagation in silicon focused on effects of material anisotropy on bulk ultrasonic waves, but the dependence of the wave propagation characteristics on the material anisotropy is not well understood for Lamb waves. The phase slowness a...

  13. Crack Propagation by Finite Element Method

    OpenAIRE

    H. Ricardo, Luiz Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Crack propagation simulation began with the development of the finite element method; the analyses were conducted to obtain a basic understanding of the crack growth. Today structural and materials engineers develop structures and materials properties using this technique. The aim of this paper is to verify the effect of different crack propagation rates in determination of crack opening and closing stress of an ASTM specimen under a standard suspension spectrum loading from FD&E SAE Keyh...

  14. Radial propagation of turbulence in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garbet, X.; Laurent, L.; Samain, A.

    1993-12-01

    It is shown in this paper that a turbulence propagation can be due to toroidal or non linear mode coupling. An analytical analysis indicates that the toroidal coupling acts through a convection while the non linear effects induce a diffusion. Numerical simulations suggest that the toroidal propagation is usually the fastest process, except perhaps in some highly turbulent regimes. The consequence is the possibility of non local effects on the fluctuation level and the associated transport. (authors). 7 figs., 19 refs

  15. Measurement of resonance parameters of cross-sections affecting fast-neutron propagation in various media; Mesure des parametres de resonance de sections efficaces lies a la propagation des neutrons dans differents milieux; Izmerenie parametrov rezonansnoj struktury sechenij, vliyayushchikh na rasprostranenie bystrykh nejtronov v sredakh; Medicion de los parametros de resonancia de las secciones eficaces que afectan a la propagacion de los neutrones rapidos en distintos medios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolaev, M N; Filippov, V V; Bondarenko, I I [Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (Russian Federation)

    1962-03-15

    In compiling a system of multi-group constants for fast- and intermediate-reactor calculations, it is frequently necessary to account for the self-shielding effect associated with the resonance structure of the cross-sections. The energy region in which the resonance structure has a considerable influence on neutron propagation in the material extends up to several decades of kilo-electron- volts for heavy nuclei and to several mega-electron-volts for intermediate nuclei. To compute resonance effects in calculating group parameters, it is essential to know not only the average interaction cross-sections between neutrons and materials, but also values such as (1/{Sigma}{sub t}), (1/{Sigma}{sub t}{sup 2}), etc. - the brackets signify averaging over the energy group. Present information about resonance parameters for fast neutrons is not sufficient to calculate these values with the necessary precision. In this connection it is interesting to take direct measurements of the values (1/{Sigma}{sub t}), (1/{Sigma}{sub t}{sup 2}) and other analogous characteristics. The paper describes the results obtained from measurements of a number of parameters such as ({Sigma}{sub t}), ({Sigma}{sub t}{sup 2}), (1/{Sigma}{sub t}), (1/{Sigma}{sub t}{sup 2}), (1/{Sigma}{sub t}{sup 3}), etc. which characterize the cross-section structure of a number of intermediate nuclei within the range from 300 keV to 3 MeV. These values were arrived at by an analysis of transmission curves obtained by good geometry for transmissions up to {approx}10{sup -2}. The data show that resonance effects exercise a strong influence on the diffusion characteristics of the material. (author) [French] Lorsqu'on etablit un systeme de constantes multi-groupes pour les calculs de reacteurs a neutrons rapides et intermediaires, il est souvent necessaire de tenir compte de l'effet d'auto-protectio n lie a la structure de resonance des sections efficaces. Le domaine d'energie dans lequel la structure de resonance a

  16. Nonlinear radial propagation of drift wave turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prakash, M.

    1985-01-01

    We study the linear and the nonlinear radial propagation of drift wave energy in an inhomogeneous plasma. The drift mode excited in such a plasma is dispersive in nature. The drift wave energy spreads out symmetrically along the direction of inhomogeneity with a finite group velocity. To study the effect of the nonlinear coupling on the propagation of energy in a collision free plasma, we solve the Hasegawa-Mima equation as a mixed initial boundary-value problem. The solutions of the linearized equation are used to check the reliability of our numerical calculations. Additional checks are also performed on the invariants of the system. Our results reveal that a pulse gets distorted as it propagates through the medium. The peak of the pulse propagates with a finite velocity that depends on the amplitude of the initial pulse. The polarity of propagation depends on the initial parameters of the pulse. We have also studied drift wave propagation in a resistive plasma. The Hasegawa-Wakatani equations are used to investigate this problem

  17. Soluble Aβ aggregates can inhibit prion propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarell, Claire J; Quarterman, Emma; Yip, Daniel C-M; Terry, Cassandra; Nicoll, Andrew J; Wadsworth, Jonathan D F; Farrow, Mark A; Walsh, Dominic M; Collinge, John

    2017-11-01

    Mammalian prions cause lethal neurodegenerative diseases such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) and consist of multi-chain assemblies of misfolded cellular prion protein (PrP C ). Ligands that bind to PrP C can inhibit prion propagation and neurotoxicity. Extensive prior work established that certain soluble assemblies of the Alzheimer's disease (AD)-associated amyloid β-protein (Aβ) can tightly bind to PrP C , and that this interaction may be relevant to their toxicity in AD. Here, we investigated whether such soluble Aβ assemblies might, conversely, have an inhibitory effect on prion propagation. Using cellular models of prion infection and propagation and distinct Aβ preparations, we found that the form of Aβ assemblies which most avidly bound to PrP in vitro also inhibited prion infection and propagation. By contrast, forms of Aβ which exhibit little or no binding to PrP were unable to attenuate prion propagation. These data suggest that soluble aggregates of Aβ can compete with prions for binding to PrP C and emphasize the bidirectional nature of the interplay between Aβ and PrP C in Alzheimer's and prion diseases. Such inhibitory effects of Aβ on prion propagation may contribute to the apparent fall-off in the incidence of sporadic CJD at advanced age where cerebral Aβ deposition is common. © 2017 The Authors.

  18. Statistical estimation of ultrasonic propagation path parameters for aberration correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waag, Robert C; Astheimer, Jeffrey P

    2005-05-01

    Parameters in a linear filter model for ultrasonic propagation are found using statistical estimation. The model uses an inhomogeneous-medium Green's function that is decomposed into a homogeneous-transmission term and a path-dependent aberration term. Power and cross-power spectra of random-medium scattering are estimated over the frequency band of the transmit-receive system by using closely situated scattering volumes. The frequency-domain magnitude of the aberration is obtained from a normalization of the power spectrum. The corresponding phase is reconstructed from cross-power spectra of subaperture signals at adjacent receive positions by a recursion. The subapertures constrain the receive sensitivity pattern to eliminate measurement system phase contributions. The recursion uses a Laplacian-based algorithm to obtain phase from phase differences. Pulse-echo waveforms were acquired from a point reflector and a tissue-like scattering phantom through a tissue-mimicking aberration path from neighboring volumes having essentially the same aberration path. Propagation path aberration parameters calculated from the measurements of random scattering through the aberration phantom agree with corresponding parameters calculated for the same aberrator and array position by using echoes from the point reflector. The results indicate the approach describes, in addition to time shifts, waveform amplitude and shape changes produced by propagation through distributed aberration under realistic conditions.

  19. Carry-chain propagation delay impacts on resolution of FPGA-based TDC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Lei; Yang Junfeng; Song Kezhu

    2014-01-01

    The architecture of carry chains in Field-Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) is introduced in this paper. The propagation delay time of the rising and falling edges in the carry chains are calculated according to the architecture and they are predicted not equal in most cases. Tests show that the measuring results of the propagation delay time in EP3C120F484C8N series FPGA of Altera are in line with the inference. The difference of propagation delay time results in different accuracies of Time-to-Digital Converter (TDC). This phenomenon shall be considered in the design of TDC implemented in FPGA. It can ensure better accuracy. (authors)

  20. Partial coherence and imperfect optics at a synchrotron radiation source modeled by wavefront propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laundy, David; Alcock, Simon G.; Alianelli, Lucia; Sutter, John P.; Sawhney, Kawal J. S.; Chubar, Oleg

    2014-09-01

    A full wave propagation of X-rays from source to sample at a storage ring beamline requires simulation of the electron beam source and optical elements in the beamline. The finite emittance source causes the appearance of partial coherence in the wave field. Consequently, the wavefront cannot be treated exactly with fully coherent wave propagation or fully incoherent ray tracing. We have used the wavefront code Synchrotron Radiation Workshop (SRW) to perform partially coherent wavefront propagation using a parallel computing cluster at the Diamond Light Source. Measured mirror profiles have been used to correct the wavefront for surface errors.

  1. Propagation of optical pulses in a resonantly absorbing medium: Observation of negative velocity in Rb vapor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, H.; Hayami, K.; Furue, S.; Nakayama, K.; Niwa, H.; Kohmoto, T.; Kunitomo, M.; Fukuda, Y.

    2003-01-01

    Propagation of optical pulses in a resonantly absorbing medium is studied. Propagation time of nanosecond pulses was measured for the Rb D 1 transition. At the center of two absorption lines, delay of the pulse peak which is about ten times as large as the pulse width was observed, where zero delay is defined for the propagation with the light velocity in vacuum. On the other hand, at the peak of an absorption line, negative delay was observed for large absorption, where the advance time is as large as 25% of the pulse width. Simulation including the effect of absorption and phase shift reproduced well the experimental results

  2. Interplay between collective pinning and artificial defects on domain wall propagation in Co/Pt multilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez-Rodriguez, G; Hierro-Rodriguez, A; Perez-Junquera, A; Montenegro, N; Alameda, J M; Velez, M; Menendez, J L; Ravelosona, D

    2010-01-01

    The interplay between collective pinning on intrinsic structural defects and artificial pinning at a patterned hole is studied in magnetic multilayers with perpendicular anisotropy. The pinning strength of a patterned hole is measured through its efficiency to stop domain wall (DW) propagation into a consecutive unpatterned nanowire section (using antisymmetric magnetoresistance to detect the direction of DW propagation) whereas collective pinning is characterized by the field dependence of DW velocity. Close to room temperature, collective pinning becomes weaker than artificial pinning so that pinning at the hole compensates nucleation-pad geometry, blocking DW propagation across the nanowire.

  3. Spacecraft determination of energetic particle propagation parameters: the 1 January 1978 solar event

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kecskemety, K.; Gombosi, T.I.; Somogyi, A.J.

    1981-01-01

    Intensity-time profiles in similar energy intervals measured by the longitudinally separated HELIOS 1/2 and PROGNOZ 6 spacecrafts are used to study coronal injection and interplanetary propagation. The scattering mean free path for the interplanetary propagation turns out to be essentially the same for the three locations. If the coronal propagation is described by a Reid-Axford type diffusion model, the diffusion coefficient is approximately constant below 200 MV (about 0.1 AU), while above this rigidity is exhibits a power law increase

  4. Assessing performance of flaw characterization methods through uncertainty propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miorelli, R.; Le Bourdais, F.; Artusi, X.

    2018-04-01

    In this work, we assess the inversion performance in terms of crack characterization and localization based on synthetic signals associated to ultrasonic and eddy current physics. More precisely, two different standard iterative inversion algorithms are used to minimize the discrepancy between measurements (i.e., the tested data) and simulations. Furthermore, in order to speed up the computational time and get rid of the computational burden often associated to iterative inversion algorithms, we replace the standard forward solver by a suitable metamodel fit on a database built offline. In a second step, we assess the inversion performance by adding uncertainties on a subset of the database parameters and then, through the metamodel, we propagate these uncertainties within the inversion procedure. The fast propagation of uncertainties enables efficiently evaluating the impact due to the lack of knowledge on some parameters employed to describe the inspection scenarios, which is a situation commonly encountered in the industrial NDE context.

  5. Propagation of inertial-gravity waves on an island shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondur, V. G.; Sabinin, K. D.; Grebenyuk, Yu. V.

    2015-09-01

    The propagation of inertial-gravity waves (IGV) at the boundary of the Pacific shelf near the island of Oahu (Hawaii), whose generation was studied in the first part of this work [1], is analyzed. It is shown that a significant role there is played by the plane oblique waves; whose characteristics were identified by the method of estimating 3D wave parameters for the cases when the measurements are available only for two verticals. It is established that along with the descending propagation of energy that is typical of IGVs, wave packets ascend from the bottom to the upper layers, which is caused by the emission of waves from intense jets of discharged waters flowing out of a diffusor located at the bottom.

  6. Light propagation through black-hole lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bentivegna, Eloisa [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università degli Studi di Catania, Via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Korzyński, Mikołaj [Center for Theoretical Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Hinder, Ian; Gerlicher, Daniel, E-mail: eloisa.bentivegna@unict.it, E-mail: korzynski@cft.edu.pl, E-mail: ian.hinder@aei.mpg.de, E-mail: daniel.gerlicher@tum.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Gravitationsphysik, Albert-Einstein-Institut, Am Mühlenberg 1, D-14476 Golm (Germany)

    2017-03-01

    The apparent properties of distant objects encode information about the way the light they emit propagates to an observer, and therefore about the curvature of the underlying spacetime. Measuring the relationship between the redshift z and the luminosity distance D {sub L} of a standard candle, for example, yields information on the Universe's matter content. In practice, however, in order to decode this information the observer needs to make an assumption about the functional form of the D {sub L}( z ) relation; in other words, a cosmological model needs to be assumed. In this work, we use numerical-relativity simulations, equipped with a new ray-tracing module, to numerically obtain this relation for a few black-hole-lattice cosmologies and compare it to the well-known Friedmann-Lema(ȋtre-Robertson-Walker case, as well as to other relevant cosmologies and to the Empty-Beam Approximation. We find that the latter provides the best estimate of the luminosity distance and formulate a simple argument to account for this agreement. We also find that a Friedmann-Lema(ȋtre-Robertson-Walker model can reproduce this observable exactly, as long as a time-dependent cosmological constant is included in the fit. Finally, the dependence of these results on the lattice mass-to-spacing ratio μ is discussed: we discover that, unlike the expansion rate, the D {sub L}( z ) relation in a black-hole lattice does not tend to that measured in the corresponding continuum spacetime as 0μ → .

  7. Measuring $\

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, Jessica Sarah [Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2011-01-01

    The MINOS Experiment consists of two steel-scintillator calorimeters, sampling the long baseline NuMI muon neutrino beam. It was designed to make a precise measurement of the ‘atmospheric’ neutrino mixing parameters, Δm2 atm. and sin2 (2 atm.). The Near Detector measures the initial spectrum of the neutrino beam 1km from the production target, and the Far Detector, at a distance of 735 km, measures the impact of oscillations in the neutrino energy spectrum. Work performed to validate the quality of the data collected by the Near Detector is presented as part of this thesis. This thesis primarily details the results of a vμ disappearance analysis, and presents a new sophisticated fitting software framework, which employs a maximum likelihood method to extract the best fit oscillation parameters. The software is entirely decoupled from the extrapolation procedure between the detectors, and is capable of fitting multiple event samples (defined by the selections applied) in parallel, and any combination of energy dependent and independent sources of systematic error. Two techniques to improve the sensitivity of the oscillation measurement were also developed. The inclusion of information on the energy resolution of the neutrino events results in a significant improvement in the allowed region for the oscillation parameters. The degree to which sin2 (2θ )= 1.0 could be disfavoured with the exposure of the current dataset if the true mixing angle was non-maximal, was also investigated, with an improved neutrino energy reconstruction for very low energy events. The best fit oscillation parameters, obtained by the fitting software and incorporating resolution information were: | Δm2| = 2.32+0.12 -0.08×10-3 eV2 and sin2 (2θ ) > 0.90(90% C.L.). The analysis provides the current world best measurement of the atmospheric neutrino mass

  8. Quantum spacetime operationally based on propagators for extended test particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prugovecki, E.

    1981-01-01

    By taking into account the quantum aspects intrinsic to any operational definition of spatio-temporal relationships, a stochastic concept of spacetime emerges. In relation to its classical counterpart is realized as a stochastic mean around which quantum fluctuations become negligible only in the limit of macroscopic spacetime intervals. The test-particle propagators used in the proposed quantum concept of spacetime are derived by solving in a consistent manner the localizability problem for relativistic particles. This is achieved in the framework of the stochastic phase space formulation of quantum mechanics, which in the nonrelativistic context is shown to result from systems of imprimitivity related to phase space conserved probability currents derivable from bona fide convariant probability densities in stochastic phase spaces of one particle systems, which can be interpreted as due to measurements performed with extended rather than pointlike test particles. The associated particle propagators can be therefore consistently related to coordinate probability densities measurable by the exchange of photons in between test particles from a chosen standard. Quantum spacetime is defined as the family of propagators corresponding to all conceivable coherent flows of test particles. This family of free-fall propagators has to satisfy certain self-consistency conditions as well as consistent laws of motion which inplicitly determine the stochastic geometro-dynamics of quantum space-time. Field theory on quantum spacetime retains many of the formal features of conventional quantum field theory. On a fundamental epistemological level stochastic geometries emerge as essential prerequisites in the construction of spacetime models that would be operationally based and yet consistent with the relativity principle as well as with the uncertinty principle

  9. Observations of apparent superslow wave propagation in solar prominences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raes, J. O.; Van Doorsselaere, T.; Baes, M.; Wright, A. N.

    2017-06-01

    Context. Phase mixing of standing continuum Alfvén waves and/or continuum slow waves in atmospheric magnetic structures such as coronal arcades can create the apparent effect of a wave propagating across the magnetic field. Aims: We observe a prominence with SDO/AIA on 2015 March 15 and find the presence of oscillatory motion. We aim to demonstrate that interpreting this motion as a magneto hydrodynamic (MHD) wave is faulty. We also connect the decrease of the apparent velocity over time with the phase mixing process, which depends on the curvature of the magnetic field lines. Methods: By measuring the displacement of the prominence at different heights to calculate the apparent velocity, we show that the propagation slows down over time, in accordance with the theoretical work of Kaneko et al. We also show that this propagation speed drops below what is to be expected for even slow MHD waves for those circumstances. We use a modified Kippenhahn-Schlüter prominence model to calculate the curvature of the magnetic field and fit our observations accordingly. Results: Measuring three of the apparent waves, we get apparent velocities of 14, 8, and 4 km s-1. Fitting a simple model for the magnetic field configuration, we obtain that the filament is located 103 Mm below the magnetic centre. We also obtain that the scale of the magnetic field strength in the vertical direction plays no role in the concept of apparent superslow waves and that the moment of excitation of the waves happened roughly one oscillation period before the end of the eruption that excited the oscillation. Conclusions: Some of the observed phase velocities are lower than expected for slow modes for the circumstances, showing that they rather fit with the concept of apparent superslow propagation. A fit with our magnetic field model allows for inferring the magnetic geometry of the prominence. The movie attached to Fig. 1 is available at http://www.aanda.org

  10. Dynamic propagation and cleavage crack arrest in bainitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajjaj, M.

    2006-06-01

    In complement of the studies of harmfulness of defects, generally realized in term of initiation, the concept of crack arrest could be used as complementary analyses to the studies of safety. The stop occurs when the stress intensity factor becomes lower than crack arrest toughness (KIa) calculated in elasto-statics (KI ≤ KIa). The aim of this thesis is to understand and predict the stop of a crack propagating at high speed in a 18MND5 steel used in the pressure water reactor (PWR). The test chosen to study crack arrest is the disc thermal shock test. The observations under the scanning electron microscope of the fracture surface showed that the crack arrest always occurs in cleavage mode and that the critical microstructural entity with respect to the propagation and crack arrest corresponds to at least the size of the prior austenitic grain. The numerical analyses in elasto-statics confirm the conservatism of the codified curve of the RCC-M with respect to the values of KIa. The dynamic numerical analyses show that the deceleration of the crack measured at the end of the propagation is related to the global dynamic of the structure (vibrations). The transferability to components of crack arrest toughness obtained from tests analysed in static is thus not assured. The disc thermal shock tests were also modelled by considering a criterion of propagation and arrest of the type 'RKR' characterized by a critical stress sc which depends on the temperature. The results obtained account well for the crack jump measured in experiments as well as the shape of the crack arrest front. (author)

  11. Photon and energy propagation in Cd Se quantum dot systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, Guilherme A.; Santos, Erasto J.; Monte, Adamo F.G.

    2011-01-01

    Full text. Photon propagation is a crucial process in a wide type of optical materials being responsible for the dynamics and excitation spreading. The addition of Cd Se quantum dots (QDs) into a polystyrene (PS) matrix introduces new properties in the polymeric matrix making this new system a good candidate for improvement in light- emitting devices. A confocal microscope was adapted to scan the spatial distribution of emitted luminescence from the sample surface. Energy transfer processes could be associated with the photon propagation provided by the measured luminescence spatial distribution. We proposed that this energy propagation is caused by the photons capture and emission between the dots and besides other mechanics such as electronic transfer, hopping and resonance. This dynamic process can be understood by the spatial migration of excited states. These facts demonstrate the great importance of the energy transfer, absorption and capture processes in a QD system for the improvement of optical electronic devices. It has been found that re-absorption by ground and excited states plays an important role for the energy propagation. The investigation have been done for a wide range of inter-dot distance in such a way that we could observe how the energy transfer behaves according to this distance. We observed that the photon migration length (PML) increases by increasing the QD concentration and reaches the highest value for a given QD concentration, i.e., for a specific inter-dot distance. However, above this concentration the PML starts to decrease. This behavior indicates that the inter-dots distance is crucial in order to get the highest energy flux inside the sample. Thus, by measuring the PML and its wavelength dependence it is possible to understand the whole dynamics in the QD/PS system. All the processes verified so far give us the possibility to classify the QD/PS system as a good candidate to be employed in an optical QD-based device

  12. Propagation engineering; Proceedings of the Meeting, Orlando, FL, Mar. 28-30, 1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopeika, Norman S.; Miller, Walter B.

    The present conference on atmospheric propagation discusses the effect of the turbulence inner scale on atmospheric scintillation, experimental verification of the K-distribution family for scattering, the impact of atmospheric turbulence on FLIR target recognition, a phase-detection algorithm, refractive index structure parameter measurement by incoherent aperture scintillation techniques, an optical scintillometer/Doppler radar instrument for profiling turbulence, and the effects of ionospheric propagation disturbances on space-based SAR. Also discussed are phase structure function measurements with multiple apertures, fluctuations in MMW signals due to clear-air turbulence, multiwavelength transmittance through falling snow, the modeling of aerosols in the marine mixed layer, a unified low stratus cloud-subcloud microphysics model, alexandrite laser-propagation experiments, and vaporization and recondensation in propagation and imaging of laser beams.

  13. A problem-based approach to elastic wave propagation: the role of constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazio, Claudio; Guastella, Ivan; Tarantino, Giovanni

    2009-01-01

    A problem-based approach to the teaching of mechanical wave propagation, focused on observation and measurement of wave properties in solids and on modelling of these properties, is presented. In particular, some experimental results, originally aimed at measuring the propagation speed of sound waves in metallic rods, are used in order to deepen the role of constraints in mechanical wave propagation. Interpretative models of the results obtained in the laboratory are built and implemented by using a well-known simulation environment. The simulation results are, then, compared with experimental data. The approach has been developed and experimented in the context of a workshop on mechanical wave propagation of the two-year Graduate Program for Physics Teacher Education at University of Palermo.

  14. Propagation error simulations concerning the CLIC active prealignment

    CERN Document Server

    Touzé, T; Missiaen, D

    2009-01-01

    The CLIC1 components will have to be prealigned within a thirty times more demanding tolerance than the existing CERNmachines. It is a technical challenge and a key issue for the CLIC feasibility. Simulations have been undertaken concerning the propagation error due to the measurement uncertainties of the prealignment systems. The uncertainties of measurement, taken as hypothesis for the simulations, are based on the data obtained on several dedicated facilities. This paper introduces the simulations and the latest results obtained, as well as the facilities.

  15. Ultrashort pulse-propagation effects in a semiconductor optical amplifier: Microscopic theory and experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hughes, S.; Borri, P.; Knorr, A.

    2001-01-01

    We present microscopic modeling and experimental measurements of femtosecond-pulse interactions in a semiconductor optical amplifier. Two novel nonlinear propagation effects are demonstrated: pulse breakup in the gain regime and pulse compression in the transparency regime. These propagation phen...... phenomena highlight the microscopic origin and important role of adiabatic following in semiconductor optical amplifiers. Fundamental light-matter interactions are discussed in detail and possible applications are highlighted....

  16. Experimental Investigation of Some Effects of Multipath Propagation on a Line-of-Sight Path at 14 GHz

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stephansen, E.; Mogensen, G.

    1979-01-01

    A microwave line-of-sight propagation experiment is carried out in Denmark at frequencies around 14 GHz. Results from long term measurements of multipath propagation are presented. The multipath fade durations are shown to be log-normally distributed. The level dependence of the probability of fa...

  17. Markov transitions and the propagation of chaos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gottlieb, A.

    1998-01-01

    The propagation of chaos is a central concept of kinetic theory that serves to relate the equations of Boltzmann and Vlasov to the dynamics of many-particle systems. Propagation of chaos means that molecular chaos, i.e., the stochastic independence of two random particles in a many-particle system, persists in time, as the number of particles tends to infinity. We establish a necessary and sufficient condition for a family of general n-particle Markov processes to propagate chaos. This condition is expressed in terms of the Markov transition functions associated to the n-particle processes, and it amounts to saying that chaos of random initial states propagates if it propagates for pure initial states. Our proof of this result relies on the weak convergence approach to the study of chaos due to Sztitman and Tanaka. We assume that the space in which the particles live is homomorphic to a complete and separable metric space so that we may invoke Prohorov's theorem in our proof. We also show that, if the particles can be in only finitely many states, then molecular chaos implies that the specific entropies in the n-particle distributions converge to the entropy of the limiting single-particle distribution

  18. Quantum dynamics via a time propagator in Wigner's phase space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønager, Michael; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    1995-01-01

    We derive an expression for a short-time phase space propagator. We use it in a new propagation scheme and demonstrate that it works for a Morse potential. The propagation scheme is used to propagate classical distributions which do not obey the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. It is shown that ...... as a part of the sampling function. ©1995 American Institute of Physics....

  19. Results of the NLO error-propagation exercise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gessiness, B.; Lower, C.W.; Porter, G.K.

    1984-01-01

    The successful conclusion of the Error Propagation Exercise, started 2 years ago at NLO, Inc.'s Feed Materials Production Center, Fernald, Ohio, was reached when a statistically based LEID was determined in a controlled balance area, processing low enriched uranium materials. The three-month test demonstrated that it is possible even in a high-throughput bulk processing facility to collect and process all data necessary for computation of a rigorously determined LEID without interference with production and without significant cost increases. The exercise further demonstrated that much of the data necessary are already collected for other routine uses (e.g., production control, measurement quality control, etc.) so that only a modest increase in data collection is necessary. The automated data collection system developed showed that the additional data can be collected quickly, accurately, and relatively cheaply using readily-available commercial hardware. The benefits of error propagation in terms of increased confidence in nuclear materials safeguards are clear; plans have been developed to extend error propagation to all the enriched uranium processing areas of the Feed Materials Production Center. 6 references, 3 figures

  20. The results of the NLO error propagation exercise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gessiness, B.; Lower, C.W.; Porter, G.K.

    1984-01-01

    The successful conclusion of the Error Propagation Exercise, started 2 years ago at NLO, Inc.'s Feed Materials Production Center, Fernald, Ohio, was reached when a statistically based LEID was determined in a controlled balance area, processing low enriched uranium materials. The three-month test demonstrated that it is possible even in a high-throughput bulk processing facility to collect and process all data necessary for computation of a rigorously determined LEID without interference with production and without significant cost increases. The exercise further demonstrated that much of the data necessary are already collected for other routine uses (e.g., production control, measurement quality control, etc.) so that only a modest increase in data collection is necessary. The automated data collection system developed showed that the additional data can be collected quickly, accurately, and relatively cheaply using readily-available commercial hardware. The benefits of error propagation in terms of increased confidence in nuclear materials safeguards are clear; plans have been developed to extend error propagation to all the enriched uranium processing areas of the Feed Materials Production Center

  1. Experimental studies on the plasma bullet propagation and its inhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karakas, Erdinc; Laroussi, Mounir

    2010-01-01

    Plasma bullets generated by atmospheric pressure low temperature plasma jets have recently been an active research topic due to their unique properties and their enhanced plasma chemistry. In this paper, experimental insights into the plasma bullet lifetime and its velocity are reported. Data obtained from intensified charge-coupled device camera and time-resolved optical emission spectroscopy (OES) elucidated the existence of a weakly ionized channel between the plasma bullet and its source (such as the plasma pencil). Factors responsible for the inhibition of the propagation of the bullet, such as low helium mole fraction, the magnitude of the applied voltage, and the secondary discharge ignition time, are also revealed. A new technique is discussed to accurately measure the plasma bullet velocity, using time-resolved OES. This new technique shows that during its lifetime the plasma bullet goes through launching, propagation, and ending phases. In addition, it is noted that the plasma bullet exhibits an unstable behavior at the early beginning and late ending of the propagation.

  2. Shock wave propagation in neutral and ionized gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podder, N. K.; Wilson IV, R. B.; Bletzinger, P.

    2008-01-01

    Preliminary measurements on a recently built shock tube are presented. Planar shock waves are excited by the spark discharge of a capacitor, and launched into the neutral argon or nitrogen gas as well as its ionized glow discharge in the pressure region 1-17 Torr. For the shock wave propagation in the neutral argon at fixed capacitor charging voltage, the shock wave velocity is found to increase nonlinearly at the lower pressures, reach a maximum at an intermediate pressure, and then decrease almost linearly at the higher pressures, whereas the shock wave strength continues to increase at a nonlinear rate over the entire range of pressure. However, at fixed gas pressure the shock wave velocity increases almost monotonically as the capacitor charging voltage is increased. For the shock wave propagation in the ionized argon glow, the shock wave is found to be most influenced by the glow discharge plasma current. As the plasma current is increased, both the shock wave propagation velocity and the dispersion width are observed to increase nonlinearly

  3. Measurements of transient electromagnetic propagation through concrete and sand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aurand, J.F.

    1996-09-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). If a beam-chopping system could be developed for the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility low-energy beam line, there would be potential to operate the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) at much higher power and duty factor and enable such operation with a radio-frequency quadrapole (RFQ) injector. This would greatly extend the capability of the facility. To accommodate LANSCE operation in the new configuration, a chopped beam must be created in the low-energy transport line before the RFQ. Chopping in this region has never been demonstrated and constitutes the major uncertainty of the proposal and determines the critical path for project completion. This study produces a better understanding of the physics involved in chopping an H-beam in a dilute plasma background, and in transporting a chopped H-beam through a neutralized or partially neutralized plasma channel, as well as an estimate for the optimum neutralization strategy for the beam chopping and transport between the ion source and the RFQ.

  4. Blackmail propagation on small-world networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Zhi-Gang; Jian-Ping Sang; Zou, Xian-Wu; Tan, Zhi-Jie; Jin, Zhun-Zhi

    2005-06-01

    The dynamics of the blackmail propagation model based on small-world networks is investigated. It is found that for a given transmitting probability λ the dynamical behavior of blackmail propagation transits from linear growth type to logistical growth one with the network randomness p increases. The transition takes place at the critical network randomness pc=1/N, where N is the total number of nodes in the network. For a given network randomness p the dynamical behavior of blackmail propagation transits from exponential decrease type to logistical growth one with the transmitting probability λ increases. The transition occurs at the critical transmitting probability λc=1/, where is the average number of the nearest neighbors. The present work will be useful for understanding computer virus epidemics and other spreading phenomena on communication and social networks.

  5. Adaptive numerical modeling of dynamic crack propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adouani, H.; Tie, B.; Berdin, C.; Aubry, D.

    2006-01-01

    We propose an adaptive numerical strategy that aims at developing reliable and efficient numerical tools to model dynamic crack propagation and crack arrest. We use the cohesive zone theory as behavior of interface-type elements to model crack. Since the crack path is generally unknown beforehand, adaptive meshing is proposed to model the dynamic crack propagation. The dynamic study requires the development of specific solvers for time integration. As both geometry and finite element mesh of the studied structure evolve in time during transient analysis, the stability behavior of dynamic solver becomes a major concern. For this purpose, we use the space-time discontinuous Galerkin finite element method, well-known to provide a natural framework to manage meshes that evolve in time. As an important result, we prove that the space-time discontinuous Galerkin solver is unconditionally stable, when the dynamic crack propagation is modeled by the cohesive zone theory, which is highly non-linear. (authors)

  6. Semiclassical propagation: Hilbert space vs. Wigner representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottwald, Fabian; Ivanov, Sergei D.

    2018-03-01

    A unified viewpoint on the van Vleck and Herman-Kluk propagators in Hilbert space and their recently developed counterparts in Wigner representation is presented. Based on this viewpoint, the Wigner Herman-Kluk propagator is conceptually the most general one. Nonetheless, the respective semiclassical expressions for expectation values in terms of the density matrix and the Wigner function are mathematically proven here to coincide. The only remaining difference is a mere technical flexibility of the Wigner version in choosing the Gaussians' width for the underlying coherent states beyond minimal uncertainty. This flexibility is investigated numerically on prototypical potentials and it turns out to provide neither qualitative nor quantitative improvements. Given the aforementioned generality, utilizing the Wigner representation for semiclassical propagation thus leads to the same performance as employing the respective most-developed (Hilbert-space) methods for the density matrix.

  7. Error propagation analysis for a sensor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeater, M.L.; Hockenbury, R.W.; Hawkins, J.; Wilkinson, J.

    1976-01-01

    As part of a program to develop reliability methods for operational use with reactor sensors and protective systems, error propagation analyses are being made for each model. An example is a sensor system computer simulation model, in which the sensor system signature is convoluted with a reactor signature to show the effect of each in revealing or obscuring information contained in the other. The error propagation analysis models the system and signature uncertainties and sensitivities, whereas the simulation models the signatures and by extensive repetitions reveals the effect of errors in various reactor input or sensor response data. In the approach for the example presented, the errors accumulated by the signature (set of ''noise'' frequencies) are successively calculated as it is propagated stepwise through a system comprised of sensor and signal processing components. Additional modeling steps include a Fourier transform calculation to produce the usual power spectral density representation of the product signature, and some form of pattern recognition algorithm

  8. Heat pulse propagation studies in TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fredrickson, E.D.; Callen, J.D.; Colchin, R.J.; Efthimion, P.C.; Hill, K.W.; Izzo, R.; Mikkelsen, D.R.; Monticello, D.A.; McGuire, K.; Bell, J.D.

    1986-02-01

    The time scales for sawtooth repetition and heat pulse propagation are much longer (10's of msec) in the large tokamak TFTR than in previous, smaller tokamaks. This extended time scale coupled with more detailed diagnostics has led us to revisit the analysis of the heat pulse propagation as a method to determine the electron heat diffusivity, chi/sub e/, in the plasma. A combination of analytic and computer solutions of the electron heat diffusion equation are used to clarify previous work and develop new methods for determining chi/sub e/. Direct comparison of the predicted heat pulses with soft x-ray and ECE data indicates that the space-time evolution is diffusive. However, the chi/sub e/ determined from heat pulse propagation usually exceeds that determined from background plasma power balance considerations by a factor ranging from 2 to 10. Some hypotheses for resolving this discrepancy are discussed. 11 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Large scale propagation intermittency in the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrabi, Ali

    2000-11-01

    Long-term (several minutes to hours) amplitude variations observed in outdoor sound propagation experiments at Disneyland, California, in February 1998 are explained in terms of a time varying index of refraction. The experimentally propagated acoustic signals were received and recorded at several locations ranging from 300 meters to 2,800 meters. Meteorological data was taken as a function of altitude simultaneously with the received signal levels. There were many barriers along the path of acoustic propagation that affected the received signal levels, especially at short ranges. In a downward refraction situation, there could be a random change of amplitude in the predicted signals. A computer model based on the Fast Field Program (FFP) was used to compute the signal loss at the different receiving locations and to verify that the variations in the received signal levels can be predicted numerically. The calculations agree with experimental data with the same trend variations in average amplitude.

  10. Propagating Characteristics of Pulsed Laser in Rain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Guo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To understand the performance of laser ranging system under the rain weather condition, we need to know the propagating characteristics of laser pulse in rain. In this paper, the absorption and attenuation coefficients were calculated based on the scattering theories in discrete stochastic media, and the propagating characteristics of laser pulse in rain were simulated and analyzed using Monte-Carlo method. Some simulation results were verified by experiments, and the simulation results are well matched with the experimental data, with the maximal deviation not less than 7.5%. The results indicated that the propagating laser beam would be attenuated and distorted due to the scattering and absorption of raindrops, and the energy attenuation and pulse shape distortion strongly depended on the laser pulse widths.

  11. Heat pulse propagation studies in TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fredrickson, E.D.; Callen, J.D.; Colchin, R.J.

    1986-02-01

    The time scales for sawtooth repetition and heat pulse propagation are much longer (10's of msec) in the large tokamak TFTR than in previous, smaller tokamaks. This extended time scale coupled with more detailed diagnostics has led us to revisit the analysis of the heat pulse propagation as a method to determine the electron heat diffusivity, chi/sub e/, in the plasma. A combination of analytic and computer solutions of the electron heat diffusion equation are used to clarify previous work and develop new methods for determining chi/sub e/. Direct comparison of the predicted heat pulses with soft x-ray and ECE data indicates that the space-time evolution is diffusive. However, the chi/sub e/ determined from heat pulse propagation usually exceeds that determined from background plasma power balance considerations by a factor ranging from 2 to 10. Some hypotheses for resolving this discrepancy are discussed. 11 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab

  12. Propagation Velocity of Solid Earth Tides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, S.

    2017-12-01

    One of the significant considerations in most of the geodetic investigations is to take into account the outcome of Solid Earth tides on the location and its consequent impact on the time series of coordinates. In this research work, the propagation velocity resulting from the Solid Earth tides between the Indian stations is computed. Mean daily coordinates for the stations have been computed by applying static precise point positioning technique for a day. The computed coordinates are used as an input for computing the tidal displacements at the stations by Gravity method along three directions at 1-minute interval for 24 hours. Further the baseline distances are computed between four Indian stations. Computation of the propagation velocity for Solid Earth tides can be done by the virtue of study of the concurrent effect of it in-between the stations of identified baseline distance along with the time consumed by the tides for reaching from one station to another. The propagation velocity helps in distinguishing the impact at any station if the consequence at a known station for a specific time-period is known. Thus, with the knowledge of propagation velocity, the spatial and temporal effects of solid earth tides can be estimated with respect to a known station. As theoretically explained, the tides generated are due to the position of celestial bodies rotating about Earth. So the need of study is to observe the correlation of propagation velocity with the rotation speed of the Earth. The propagation velocity of Solid Earth tides comes out to be in the range of 440-470 m/s. This velocity comes out to be in a good agreement with the Earth's rotation speed.

  13. A formalism for cosmic ray propagation studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golden, R.L.; Badhwar, G.D.; Stephens, S.A.

    1975-01-01

    The continuity equation for cosmic ray propagation is used to derive a set of linear equations interrelating the fluxes of multiply charged nuclei as observed at any particular part of the galaxy. The derivation leads to model indepent definitions for cosmic ray storage time, mean density of target nuclei and effective mass traversed. The set of equations form a common framework for comparisons of theories and observations. As an illustration, it is shown that there exists a large class of propagation models which give the same result as the exponential path length model. (orig./BJ) [de

  14. Underwater Sound Propagation from Marine Pile Driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyff, James A

    2016-01-01

    Pile driving occurs in a variety of nearshore environments that typically have very shallow-water depths. The propagation of pile-driving sound in water is complex, where sound is directly radiated from the pile as well as through the ground substrate. Piles driven in the ground near water bodies can produce considerable underwater sound energy. This paper presents examples of sound propagation through shallow-water environments. Some of these examples illustrate the substantial variation in sound amplitude over time that can be critical to understand when computing an acoustic-based safety zone for aquatic species.

  15. Enhancement of in vitro Guayule propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dastoor, M. N.; Schubert, W. W.; Petersen, G. R. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A method for stimulating in vitro propagation of Guayule from a nutrient medium containing Guayule tissue by adding a substituted trialkyl amine bioinducing agent to the nutrient medium is described. Selective or differentiated propagation of shoots or callus is obtained by varying the amounts of substituted trialky amine present in the nutrient medium. The luxuriant growth provided may be processed for its poly isoprene content or may be transferred to a rooting medium for production of whole plants as identical clones of the original tissue. The method also provides for the production of large numbers of Guayule plants having identical desirable properties such as high polyisoprene levels.

  16. Wave propagation and scattering in random media

    CERN Document Server

    Ishimaru, Akira

    1978-01-01

    Wave Propagation and Scattering in Random Media, Volume 2, presents the fundamental formulations of wave propagation and scattering in random media in a unified and systematic manner. The topics covered in this book may be grouped into three categories: waves in random scatterers, waves in random continua, and rough surface scattering. Random scatterers are random distributions of many particles. Examples are rain, fog, smog, hail, ocean particles, red blood cells, polymers, and other particles in a state of Brownian motion. Random continua are the media whose characteristics vary randomly an

  17. Photon Propagation through Linearly Active Dimers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Delfino Huerta Morales

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We provide an analytic propagator for non-Hermitian dimers showing linear gain or losses in the quantum regime. In particular, we focus on experimentally feasible realizations of the PT -symmetric dimer and provide their mean photon number and second order two-point correlation. We study the propagation of vacuum, single photon spatially-separable, and two-photon spatially-entangled states. We show that each configuration produces a particular signature that might signal their possible uses as photon switches, semi-classical intensity-tunable sources, or spatially entangled sources to mention a few possible applications.

  18. Surface acoustic wave propagation in graphene film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roshchupkin, Dmitry; Plotitcyna, Olga; Matveev, Viktor; Kononenko, Oleg; Emelin, Evgenii; Irzhak, Dmitry; Ortega, Luc; Zizak, Ivo; Erko, Alexei; Tynyshtykbayev, Kurbangali; Insepov, Zinetula

    2015-01-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) propagation in a graphene film on the surface of piezoelectric crystals was studied at the BESSY II synchrotron radiation source. Talbot effect enabled the visualization of the SAW propagation on the crystal surface with the graphene film in a real time mode, and high-resolution x-ray diffraction permitted the determination of the SAW amplitude in the graphene/piezoelectric crystal system. The influence of the SAW on the electrical properties of the graphene film was examined. It was shown that the changing of the SAW amplitude enables controlling the magnitude and direction of current in graphene film on the surface of piezoelectric crystals

  19. Propagation of ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanev, Todor [Bartol Research Institute and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States)], E-mail: stanev@bartol.udel.edu

    2009-06-15

    We briefly describe the energy loss processes of ultrahigh-energy protons, heavier nuclei and {gamma}-rays in interactions with the universal photon fields of the Universe. We then discuss the modification of the accelerated cosmic-ray energy spectrum in propagation by the energy loss processes and the charged cosmic-ray scattering in the extragalactic magnetic fields. The energy lost by the ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays goes into {gamma}-rays and neutrinos that carry additional information about the sources of highest energy particles. The new experimental results of the HiRes and the Auger collaborations are discussed in view of the predictions from propagation calculations.

  20. Light propagation and interaction observed with electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Word, Robert C.; Fitzgerald, J.P.S.; Könenkamp, R., E-mail: rkoe@pdx.edu

    2016-01-15

    We discuss possibilities for a microscopic optical characterization of thin films and surfaces based on photoemission electron microscopy. We show that propagating light with wavelengths across the visible range can readily be visualized, and linear and non-linear materials properties can be evaluated non-invasively with nanometer spatial resolution. While femtosecond temporal resolution can be achieved in pump-probe-type experiments, the interferometric approach presented here has typical image frame times of ~200 fs. - Highlights: • Non-linear photoemission electron micrographs are analyzed. • Optical properties of transparent and metallic thin films are determined. • Light propagation, surface plasmon resonances and energy transfer are discussed.

  1. Information and influence propagation in social networks

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Wei; Lakshmanan, Laks V S

    2013-01-01

    Research on social networks has exploded over the last decade. To a large extent, this has been fueled by the spectacular growth of social media and online social networking sites, which continue growing at a very fast pace, as well as by the increasing availability of very large social network datasets for purposes of research. A rich body of this research has been devoted to the analysis of the propagation of information, influence, innovations, infections, practices and customs through networks. Can we build models to explain the way these propagations occur? How can we validate our models

  2. Ultrasonic wave propagation in powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Lashi, R. S.; Povey, M. J. W.; Watson, N. J.

    2018-05-01

    Powder clumps (cakes) has a significant effect on the flowability and stability of powders. Powder caking is mainly caused by moisture migration due to wetting and environmental (temperature and humidity) changes. The process of moisture migration caking involves creating liquid bridges between the particles during condensation which subsequently harden to form solid bridges. Therefore, an effective and reliable technique is required to quantitatively and non-invasively monitor caking kinetics and effective stiffness. This paper describes two ultrasonic instruments (ultrasonic velocity pulse and airborne ultrasound systems) that have been used to monitor the caking phenomenon. Also, it discusses the relationship between the ultrasonic velocity and attenuation measurements and tracking caking kinetics and the effective stiffness of powders.

  3. Studies of nonlinear ultrasound propagation: safety considerations in the use of ultrasound for medical diagnosis - nonlinear propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egerton, B.; Barnett, S.; Vella, G.

    1994-01-01

    Diagnostic ultrasound is an established imaging modality without any documented harmful effects. New developments such as pulsed Doppler and intracavity investigations may result in increases in ultrasound exposures which could cause harm. Thermal mechanisms and cavitation may become relevant sources of bioeffects. The preliminary study described here investigates the distribution and amplitude of harmonics generated through nonlinear propagation of ultrasound in water. Knowledge of harmonic attenuation will help predict sites of enhanced heating and enable accurate modelling of clinical situations. This presentation is concerned with thermal safety guidelines, their relationship to a typical ultrasound beam profile for a single, medium focussed, transducer operating in water and possible sites of enhanced heating due to nonlinear propagation effects. Measurements were made of the amplitudes of the harmonics generated by the nonlinear propagation of ultrasound in water. The amplitudes of the harmonics were detected up to frequencies of 35 MHz and displayed using Fast Fourier Transform facilities within the oscilloscope. The nonlinearity parameter of the ultrasonic waveforms has been identified as an important factor in thermal effects of ultrasound interactions. The appearance of nonlinear distortion is shown to be dependant on the peak compressional pressure and distance from the ultrasound source. 20 refs., 2 figs

  4. Demonstration of slow light propagation in an optical fiber under dual pump light with co-propagation and counter-propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Wei; Liu, Jianjun; Wang, Yuda; Yang, Yujing; Gao, Yuan; Lv, Pin; Jiang, Qiuli

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, a general theory of coherent population oscillation effect in an Er3+ -doped fiber under the dual-frequency pumping laser with counter-propagation and co-propagation at room temperature is presented. Using the numerical simulation, in case of dual frequency light waves (1480 nm and 980 nm) with co-propagation and counter-propagation, we analyze the effect of the pump optical power ratio (M) on the group speed of light. The group velocity of light can be varied with the change of M. We research the time delay and fractional delay in an Er3+-doped fiber under the dual-frequency pumping laser with counter-propagation and co-propagation. Compared to the methods of the single pumping, the larger time delay can be got by using the technique of dual-frequency laser pumped fiber with co-propagation and counter-propagation.

  5. NDE errors and their propagation in sizing and growth estimates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horn, D.; Obrutsky, L.; Lakhan, R.

    2009-01-01

    The accuracy attributed to eddy current flaw sizing determines the amount of conservativism required in setting tube-plugging limits. Several sources of error contribute to the uncertainty of the measurements, and the way in which these errors propagate and interact affects the overall accuracy of the flaw size and flaw growth estimates. An example of this calculation is the determination of an upper limit on flaw growth over one operating period, based on the difference between two measurements. Signal-to-signal comparison involves a variety of human, instrumental, and environmental error sources; of these, some propagate additively and some multiplicatively. In a difference calculation, specific errors in the first measurement may be correlated with the corresponding errors in the second; others may be independent. Each of the error sources needs to be identified and quantified individually, as does its distribution in the field data. A mathematical framework for the propagation of the errors can then be used to assess the sensitivity of the overall uncertainty to each individual error component. This paper quantifies error sources affecting eddy current sizing estimates and presents analytical expressions developed for their effect on depth estimates. A simple case study is used to model the analysis process. For each error source, the distribution of the field data was assessed and propagated through the analytical expressions. While the sizing error obtained was consistent with earlier estimates and with deviations from ultrasonic depth measurements, the error on growth was calculated as significantly smaller than that obtained assuming uncorrelated errors. An interesting result of the sensitivity analysis in the present case study is the quantification of the error reduction available from post-measurement compensation of magnetite effects. With the absolute and difference error equations, variance-covariance matrices, and partial derivatives developed in

  6. Lightning-based propagation of convective rain fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Dietrich

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a new multi-sensor approach for continuously monitoring convective rain cells. It exploits lightning data from surface networks to propagate rain fields estimated from multi-frequency brightness temperature measurements taken by the AMSU/MHS microwave radiometers onboard NOAA/EUMETSAT low Earth orbiting operational satellites. Specifically, the method allows inferring the development (movement, morphology and intensity of convective rain cells from the spatial and temporal distribution of lightning strokes following any observation by a satellite-borne microwave radiometer. Obviously, this is particularly attractive for real-time operational purposes, due to the sporadic nature of the low Earth orbiting satellite measurements and the continuous availability of ground-based lightning measurements – as is the case in most of the Mediterranean region. A preliminary assessment of the lightning-based rainfall propagation algorithm has been successfully made by using two pairs of consecutive AMSU observations, in conjunction with lightning measurements from the ZEUS network, for two convective events. Specifically, we show that the evolving rain fields, which are estimated by applying the algorithm to the satellite-based rainfall estimates for the first AMSU overpass, show an overall agreement with the satellite-based rainfall estimates for the second AMSU overpass.

  7. Performance of a TV white space database with different terrain resolutions and propagation models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Fanan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive Radio has now become a realistic option for the solution of the spectrum scarcity problem in wireless communication. TV channels (the primary user can be protected from secondary-user interference by accurate prediction of TV White Spaces (TVWS by using appropriate propagation modelling. In this paper we address two related aspects of channel occupancy prediction for cognitive radio. Firstly we investigate the best combination of empirical propagation model and spatial resolution of terrain data for predicting TVWS by examining the performance of three propagation models (Extended-Hata, Davidson-Hata and Egli in the TV band 470 to 790 MHz along with terrain data resolutions of 1000, 100 and 30 m, when compared with a comprehensive set of propagation measurements taken in randomly-selected locations around Hull, UK. Secondly we describe how such models can be integrated into a database-driven tool for cognitive radio channel selection within the TVWS environment.

  8. Microwave propagation and remote sensing atmospheric influences with models and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Karmakar, Pranab Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Because prevailing atmospheric/troposcopic conditions greatly influence radio wave propagation above 10 GHz, the unguided propagation of microwaves in the neutral atmosphere can directly impact many vital applications in science and engineering. These include transmission of intelligence, and radar and radiometric applications used to probe the atmosphere, among others. Where most books address either one or the other, Microwave Propagation and Remote Sensing: Atmospheric Influences with Models and Applications melds coverage of these two subjects to help readers develop solutions to the problems they present. This reference offers a brief, elementary account of microwave propagation through the atmosphere and discusses radiometric applications in the microwave band used to characterize and model atmospheric constituents, which is also known as remote sensing. Summarizing the latest research results in the field, as well as radiometric models and measurement methods, this book covers topics including: Free sp...

  9. Sentiment Propagation in Social Networks: A Case Study in LiveJournal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafarani, Reza; Cole, William D.; Liu, Huan

    Social networking websites have facilitated a new style of communication through blogs, instant messaging, and various other techniques. Through collaboration, millions of users participate in millions of discussions every day. However, it is still difficult to determine the extent to which such discussions affect the emotions of the participants. We surmise that emotionally-oriented discussions may affect a given user's general emotional bent and be reflected in other discussions he or she may initiate or participate in. It is in this way that emotion (or sentiment) may propagate through a network. In this paper, we analyze sentiment propagation in social networks, review the importance and challenges of such a study, and provide methodologies for measuring this kind of propagation. A case study has been conducted on a large dataset gathered from the LiveJournal social network. Experimental results are promising in revealing some aspects of the sentiment propagation taking place in social networks.

  10. Continuous monitoring of back-wall stress corrosion cracking propagation by means of potential drop techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Yasumoto; Atsumi, Takeo; Shoji, Tetsuo

    2006-01-01

    In order to investigate the applicability of the potential drop techniques to the continuous monitoring of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) propagation, SCC tests were performed in a sodium thiosulfate solution at room temperature using plate specimens with weldments. The SCC propagation was monitored using the techniques of direct current potential drop (DCPD), alternating current potential drop (ACPD) and modified induced current potential drop (MICPD) on the reverse side that on which the SCC existed and effectiveness of each technique for the continuous monitoring from the reverse side of SCC was compared from the viewpoints of sensitivity to the crack propagation and measurement stability. The MICPD and DCPD techniques permit continuous monitoring of the back-wall SCC propagation, which initiates from a fatigue pre-crack at a depth of about 4 mm, from which it propagates through more than 80% of the specimen thickness. The MICPD technique can decrease the effect of the current flowing in the direction of the crack length by focusing the induced current into the local area of measurement using induction coils, so that the sensitivity of the continuous monitoring of the back wall SCC propagation is higher than that of the DCPD and ACPD techniques. (author)

  11. Underwater Sound Propagation Modeling Methods for Predicting Marine Animal Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, Craig A; McCammon, Diana F; Taillefer, Martin L

    2016-01-01

    The offshore exploration and production (E&P) industry requires comprehensive and accurate ocean acoustic models for determining the exposure of marine life to the high levels of sound used in seismic surveys and other E&P activities. This paper reviews the types of acoustic models most useful for predicting the propagation of undersea noise sources and describes current exposure models. The severe problems caused by model sensitivity to the uncertainty in the environment are highlighted to support the conclusion that it is vital that risk assessments include transmission loss estimates with statistical measures of confidence.

  12. Ultrasound propagation in dense aerogels filled with liquid 4He

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, K; Ohmori, K; Abe, S; Kanamori, K; Nakanishi, K

    2012-01-01

    Longitudinal ultrasound propagation was studied in dense aerogels filled with liquid 4 He. Sound velocity and attenuation were measured at the frequency of 6 MHz in both normal and superfluid phases. Pressure dependence of velocity and attenuation were also studied. Studied aerogels had porosities about 85%. They had two different types of structure, tangled strand structure and aggregated particles structure. The pore size distributions were narrow. Reduction of superfluid transition temperature mainly depended on not porosity but mean pore size. The structure of gel played an important role in sound velocity and attenuation.

  13. On Polarization and Frequency Dependence of Diffuse Indoor Propagation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jesper Ødum; Andersen, Jørgen Bach; Pedersen, Gert Frølund

    2011-01-01

    The room electromagnetics (RE) theory describes the radio propagation in a single room assuming diffuse scat- tering. A main characteristic is the exponential power-delay profile (PDP) decaying with the so-called reverberation time (RT) parameter, depending only on the wall area, the volume...... of the room and an absorption coefficient. The PDP is independent on the location in the room, except for the arrival time. Based on measurements in a room with a spherical array of 16 dual- polarized wideband horn antennas, the current work studies how the RE parameters depend on the receiver (Rx) antenna...

  14. IMPROVING PROPAGATION SUCCESS OF D. MELANOXYLON ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mgina

    ABSTRACT. Dalbergia melanoxylon is a plant with valuable wood in the world and therefore is over harvested for timber while its regeneration is very low. The propagation efforts by techniques such as tissue culture or mycorrhiza have not been investigated which instigated conduction of this study. Soil and cuttings were ...

  15. Observing mode propagation inside a laser cavity

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Naidoo, Darryl

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available components, to study the forward and backward propagating waves everywhere inside a laser cavity. We verify the previous theoretical-only prediction that the two fields may differ substantially in their amplitude profile, even for stable resonator systems, a...

  16. Interstellar propagation of low energy cosmic rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cesarsky, C.J.

    1975-01-01

    Wave particles interactions prevent low energy cosmic rays from propagating at velocities much faster than the Alfven velocity, reducing their range by a factor of order 50. Therefore, supernovae remnants cannot fill the neutral portions of the interstellar medium with 2 MeV cosmic rays [fr

  17. Wave propagation in non-linear media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broer, L.J.F.

    1965-01-01

    The problem of the propagation of electromagnetic waves through solids is essentially one of interaction between light quanta and matter. The most fundamental and general treatment of this subject is therefore undoubtedly based on the quantummechanical theory of this interaction. Nevertheless, a

  18. Prestress mediates force propagation into the nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Shaohua; Chen Jianxin; Butler, James P.; Wang Ning

    2005-01-01

    Several reports show that the nucleus is 10 times stiffer than the cytoplasm. Hence, it is not clear if intra-nuclear structures can be directly deformed by a load of physiologic magnitudes. If a physiologic load could not directly deform intra-nuclear structures, then signaling inside the nucleus would occur only via the mechanisms of diffusion or translocation. Using a synchronous detection approach, we quantified displacements of nucleolar structures in cultured airway smooth muscle cells in response to a localized physiologic load (∼0.4 μm surface deformation) via integrin receptors. The nucleolus exhibited significant displacements. Nucleolar structures also exhibited significant deformation, with the dominant strain being the bulk strain. Increasing the pre-existing tensile stress (prestress) in the cytoskeleton significantly increased the stress propagation efficiency to the nucleolus (defined as nucleolus displacement per surface deformation) whereas decreasing the prestress significantly lowered the stress propagation efficiency to the nucleolus. Abolishing the stress fibers/actin bundles by plating the cells on poly-L-lysine-coated dishes dramatically inhibited stress propagation to the nucleolus. These results demonstrate that the prestress in the cytoskeleton is crucial in mediating stress propagation to the nucleolus, with implications for direct mechanical regulation of nuclear activities and functions

  19. Wave propagation retrieval method for chiral metamaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andryieuski, Andrei; Malureanu, Radu; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present the wave propagation method for the retrieving of effective properties of media with circularly polarized eigenwaves, in particularly for chiral metamaterials. The method is applied for thick slabs and provides bulk effective parameters. Its strong sides are the absence...

  20. Nonlinear propagation in fusion laser systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bliss, E.S.; Glass, A.J.; Glaze, J.A.

    1977-11-01

    This report was assembled to provide a brief review of the historical development of the study of self-focusing and nonlinear light propagation and its impact on the design of large, Nd-glass lasers for fusion research. No claim to completeness is made, but we feel that the enclosed summary does not miss many of the major developments in the field

  1. A new exact quantum mechanical propagator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegel, F.W.; van Andel, P.W.

    1987-01-01

    The authors derive a closed-form expression for the time-dependent propagator for a quantum mechanical particle which is subject to an external force which is the sum of (i) a reflecting half-plane barrier with a straight edge, and (ii) a harmonic force pointing towards a point of the edge. This new

  2. Generation and propagation of synchro - Cherenkov radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heintzmann, H.; Novello, M.; Schruefer, E.

    1981-01-01

    Particles moving along the magnetic field lines emit under favorable conditions Cherenkov radiation in a cold, rarefied plasma. A peculiar phenomenon occurs for curved magnetic fields: in for example a toroidal magnetic field the radiation spirals inward and approaches a resonance. Both the generation and the study of the propagation of these Cherenkov modes appear to be within reach of present technology. (Author) [pt

  3. Variation principle for nonlinear wave propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, T.; Lee, Y.C.; Nishikawa, Kyoji; Hojo, H.; Yoshida, Y.

    1976-01-01

    Variation principle is derived which determines stationary nonlinear propagation of electrostatic waves in the self-consistent density profile. Example is given for lower-hybrid waves and the relation to the variation principle for the Lagrangian density of electromagnetic fluids is discussed

  4. An Immunization Strategy Based on Propagation Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yixin Zhu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available With the ubiquity of smart phones, wearable equipment, and wireless sensors, the topologies of networks composed by them change along with time. The immunization strategies in which network immune nodes are chosen by analyzing the static aggregation network topologies have been challenged. The studies about interaction propagations between two pathogens show that the interaction can change propagation threshold and the final epidemic size of each other, which provides a new thinking of immunization method. The eradication or inhibition of the virus can be achieved through the spread of its opposite party. Here, we put forward an immunization strategy whose implementation does not depend on the analysis of network topology. The immunization agents are randomly placed on a few of individuals of network and spread out from these individuals on network in a propagation method. The immunization agents prevent virus infecting their habitat nodes with certain immune success rate. The analysis and simulation of evolution equation of the model show that immune propagation has a significant impact on the spread threshold and steady-state density of virus on a finite size of BA networks. Simulations on some real-world networks also suggest that the immunization strategy is feasible and effective.

  5. Slow light pulse propagation in dispersive media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Torben Roland; Mørk, Jesper; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    2009-01-01

    broadening or break-up of the pulse may be observed. The transition from linear to nonlinear pulse propagation is quantified in terms of the spectral width of the pulse. To cite this article: T.R. Nielsen et al., C. R. Physique 10 (2009). (C) 2009 Academie des sciences. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All...... rights reserved....

  6. Propagation by Cuttings, Layering and Division

    OpenAIRE

    Relf, Diane; Ball, Elizabeth Carter

    2009-01-01

    The major methods of asexual propagation are cuttings, layering, division, and budding/grafting. Cuttings involve rooting a severed piece of the parent plant; layering involves rooting a part of the parent and then severing it; and budding and grafting are joining two plant parts from different varieties.

  7. Wave propagation in complex structures with LEGO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lancellotti, V.; Hon, de B.P.; Tijhuis, A.G.

    2012-01-01

    We present the extension of the linear embedding via Green's operators (LEGO) scheme to problems that involve elementary sources localized inside complex structures made of different dielectric media with inclusions. We show how this new feature allows solving problems of wave propagation within,

  8. Propagation of coherent light pulses with PHASE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrdt, J.; Flechsig, U.; Grizzoli, W.; Siewert, F.

    2014-09-01

    The current status of the software package PHASE for the propagation of coherent light pulses along a synchrotron radiation beamline is presented. PHASE is based on an asymptotic expansion of the Fresnel-Kirchhoff integral (stationary phase approximation) which is usually truncated at the 2nd order. The limits of this approximation as well as possible extensions to higher orders are discussed. The accuracy is benchmarked against a direct integration of the Fresnel-Kirchhoff integral. Long range slope errors of optical elements can be included by means of 8th order polynomials in the optical element coordinates w and l. Only recently, a method for the description of short range slope errors has been implemented. The accuracy of this method is evaluated and examples for realistic slope errors are given. PHASE can be run either from a built-in graphical user interface or from any script language. The latter method provides substantial flexibility. Optical elements including apertures can be combined. Complete wave packages can be propagated, as well. Fourier propagators are included in the package, thus, the user may choose between a variety of propagators. Several means to speed up the computation time were tested - among them are the parallelization in a multi core environment and the parallelization on a cluster.

  9. Vertical laser beam propagation through the troposphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minott, P. O.; Bufton, J. L.; Schaefer, W. H.; Grolemund, D. A.

    1974-01-01

    The characteristics of the earth's atmosphere and its effects upon laser beams was investigated in a series of balloon borne, optical propagation experiments. These experiments were designed to simulate the space to ground laser link. An experiment to determine the amplitude fluctuation, commonly called scintillation, caused by the atmosphere was described.

  10. Strategies for Seed Propagation of Native Forbs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susan E. Meyer

    2006-01-01

    Native forbs are an increasingly important component of container production for many public and private nurseries. Propagators are often called upon to grow species with unknown requirements. A systematic approach is required to obtain plants from seeds of these species, beginning with determining what is a propagule and evaluating seed quality. Next, seed dormancy...

  11. Accelerating Generalized Polygon Beams and Their Propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yun-Tian; Zhang Zhi-Gang; Cheng Teng; Zhang Qing-Chuan; Wu Xiao-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Accelerating beams with intensity cusps and exotic topological properties are drawing increasing attention as they have extensive uses in many intriguing fields. We investigate the structural features of accelerating polygon beams, show their generalized mathematical form theoretically, and discuss the even-numbered polygon beams. Furthermore, we also carry out the experiment and observe the intensity evolution during their propagation

  12. Electromagnetic Wave Propagation in Random Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pécseli, Hans

    1984-01-01

    The propagation of a narrow frequency band beam of electromagnetic waves in a medium with randomly varying index of refraction is considered. A novel formulation of the governing equation is proposed. An equation for the average Green function (or transition probability) can then be derived...

  13. On propagation of radiation in crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buzek, V.; Grigorijev, V.I.

    1984-11-01

    The description of the propagation of the photons in the crystal is given in the framework of a quantum field-theoretical model that can be solved exactly. Besides this, the quantum version of the Ewald-Oseen extinction theorem is proved. (author)

  14. Modeling of ultrasound propagation through contrast agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grootens, J.J.F.A.H.; Mischi, M.; Böhmer, M.; Korsten, H.; Aarts, R.M.; Vander Sloten, Jos; Verdonck, Pascal; Nyssen, Marc

    2008-01-01

    In the past years many advances have been made in the detection of ultrasound contrast agents (UCA) by exploiting their nonlinear behavior. However, little attention has been paid to the nonlinear distortion of ultrasound (US) waves propagating through contrast media. The aim of this study is to

  15. Simulation of action potential propagation in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhov, Vladimir; Nerush, Vladimir; Orlova, Lyubov; Vodeneev, Vladimir

    2011-12-21

    Action potential is considered to be one of the primary responses of a plant to action of various environmental factors. Understanding plant action potential propagation mechanisms requires experimental investigation and simulation; however, a detailed mathematical model of plant electrical signal transmission is absent. Here, the mathematical model of action potential propagation in plants has been worked out. The model is a two-dimensional system of excitable cells; each of them is electrically coupled with four neighboring ones. Ion diffusion between excitable cell apoplast areas is also taken into account. The action potential generation in a single cell has been described on the basis of our previous model. The model simulates active and passive signal transmission well enough. It has been used to analyze theoretically the influence of cell to cell electrical conductivity and H(+)-ATPase activity on the signal transmission in plants. An increase in cell to cell electrical conductivity has been shown to stimulate an increase in the length constant, the action potential propagation velocity and the temperature threshold, while the membrane potential threshold being weakly changed. The growth of H(+)-ATPase activity has been found to induce the increase of temperature and membrane potential thresholds and the reduction of the length constant and the action potential propagation velocity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. NASA Lunar Base Wireless System Propagation Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwu, Shian U.; Upanavage, Matthew; Sham, Catherine C.

    2007-01-01

    There have been many radio wave propagation studies using both experimental and theoretical techniques over the recent years. However, most of studies have been in support of commercial cellular phone wireless applications. The signal frequencies are mostly at the commercial cellular and Personal Communications Service bands. The antenna configurations are mostly one on a high tower and one near the ground to simulate communications between a cellular base station and a mobile unit. There are great interests in wireless communication and sensor systems for NASA lunar missions because of the emerging importance of establishing permanent lunar human exploration bases. Because of the specific lunar terrain geometries and RF frequencies of interest to the NASA missions, much of the published literature for the commercial cellular and PCS bands of 900 and 1800 MHz may not be directly applicable to the lunar base wireless system and environment. There are various communication and sensor configurations required to support all elements of a lunar base. For example, the communications between astronauts, between astronauts and the lunar vehicles, between lunar vehicles and satellites on the lunar orbits. There are also various wireless sensor systems among scientific, experimental sensors and data collection ground stations. This presentation illustrates the propagation analysis of the lunar wireless communication and sensor systems taking into account the three dimensional terrain multipath effects. It is observed that the propagation characteristics are significantly affected by the presence of the lunar terrain. The obtained results indicate the lunar surface material, terrain geometry and antenna location are the important factors affecting the propagation characteristics of the lunar wireless systems. The path loss can be much more severe than the free space propagation and is greatly affected by the antenna height, surface material and operating frequency. The

  17. Orbit Propagation and Determination of Low Earth Orbit Satellites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho-Nien Shou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper represents orbit propagation and determination of low Earth orbit (LEO satellites. Satellite global positioning system (GPS configured receiver provides position and velocity measures by navigating filter to get the coordinates of the orbit propagation (OP. The main contradictions in real-time orbit which is determined by the problem are orbit positioning accuracy and the amount of calculating two indicators. This paper is dedicated to solving the problem of tradeoffs. To plan to use a nonlinear filtering method for immediate orbit tasks requires more precise satellite orbit state parameters in a short time. Although the traditional extended Kalman filter (EKF method is widely used, its linear approximation of the drawbacks in dealing with nonlinear problems was especially evident, without compromising Kalman filter (unscented Kalman Filter, UKF. As a new nonlinear estimation method, it is measured at the estimated measurements on more and more applications. This paper will be the first study on UKF microsatellites in LEO orbit in real time, trying to explore the real-time precision orbit determination techniques. Through the preliminary simulation results, they show that, based on orbit mission requirements and conditions using UKF, they can satisfy the positioning accuracy and compute two indicators.

  18. Analysis and Comparison of 24 GHz cmWave Radio Propagation in Urban and Suburban Scenarios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodriguez, Ignacio; Portela Lopes de Almeida, Erika; Abreu, Renato

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a measurement-based comparison of cm-wave propagation in urban and suburban scenarios at 24 GHz with transmitter antennas located above rooftop level. Different sets of directional measurements, exploring the full azimuth and the range from -30 to +30 degrees in elevation, were...

  19. Quantifying wave propagation over a corrugated metal using 5 dBi antennas

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Nkosi, MC

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available corrugated metal of a shipping container and also in a free space. The free space measurement is used as a reference point to study the influence of the metal on the wave propagation. The transmission coefficient measured over the shipping container...

  20. Numerical simulation of stress wave propagation from underground nuclear explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherry, J T; Petersen, F L [Lawrence Radiation Laboratory, University of California, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1970-05-01

    This paper presents a numerical model of stress wave propagation (SOC) which uses material properties data from a preshot testing program to predict the stress-induced effects on the rock mass involved in a Plowshare application. SOC calculates stress and particle velocity history, cavity radius, extent of brittle failure, and the rock's efficiency for transmitting stress. The calculations are based on an equation of state for the rock, which is developed from preshot field and laboratory measurements of the rock properties. The field measurements, made by hole logging, determine in situ values of the rock's density, water content, and propagation velocity for elastic waves. These logs also are useful in judging the layering of the rock and in choosing which core samples to test in the laboratory. The laboratory analysis of rock cores includes determination of hydrostatic compressibility to 40 kb, triaxial strength data, tensile strength, Hugoniot elastic limit, and, for the rock near the point of detonation, high-pressure Hugoniot data. Equation-of-state data are presented for rock from three sites subjected to high explosive or underground nuclear shots, including the Hardhat and Gasbuggy sites. SOC calculations of the effects of these two shots on the surrounding rock are compared with the observed effects. In both cases SOC predicts the size of the cavity quite closely. Results of the Gasbuggy calculations indicate that useful predictions of cavity size and chimney height can be made when an adequate preshot testing program is run to determine the rock's equation of state. Seismic coupling is very sensitive to the low-pressure part of the equation of state, and its successful prediction depends on agreement between the logging data and the static compressibility data. In general, it appears that enough progress has been made in calculating stress wave propagation to begin looking at derived numbers, such as number of cracks per zone, for some insight into the

  1. Numerical simulation of stress wave propagation from underground nuclear explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherry, J.T.; Petersen, F.L.

    1970-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical model of stress wave propagation (SOC) which uses material properties data from a preshot testing program to predict the stress-induced effects on the rock mass involved in a Plowshare application. SOC calculates stress and particle velocity history, cavity radius, extent of brittle failure, and the rock's efficiency for transmitting stress. The calculations are based on an equation of state for the rock, which is developed from preshot field and laboratory measurements of the rock properties. The field measurements, made by hole logging, determine in situ values of the rock's density, water content, and propagation velocity for elastic waves. These logs also are useful in judging the layering of the rock and in choosing which core samples to test in the laboratory. The laboratory analysis of rock cores includes determination of hydrostatic compressibility to 40 kb, triaxial strength data, tensile strength, Hugoniot elastic limit, and, for the rock near the point of detonation, high-pressure Hugoniot data. Equation-of-state data are presented for rock from three sites subjected to high explosive or underground nuclear shots, including the Hardhat and Gasbuggy sites. SOC calculations of the effects of these two shots on the surrounding rock are compared with the observed effects. In both cases SOC predicts the size of the cavity quite closely. Results of the Gasbuggy calculations indicate that useful predictions of cavity size and chimney height can be made when an adequate preshot testing program is run to determine the rock's equation of state. Seismic coupling is very sensitive to the low-pressure part of the equation of state, and its successful prediction depends on agreement between the logging data and the static compressibility data. In general, it appears that enough progress has been made in calculating stress wave propagation to begin looking at derived numbers, such as number of cracks per zone, for some insight into the

  2. Charge Generation and Propagation in Igneous Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, Friedemann

    2002-01-01

    Various electrical phenomena have been reported prior to or concurrent with earthquakes such as resistivity changes, ground potentials, electromagnetic (EM), and luminous signals. Doubts have been raised as to whether some of these phenomena are real and indeed precursory. One of the reasons for uncertainty is that, despite decades of intense work, there is still no physically coherent model. Using low- to medium-velocity impacts to measure electrical signals with microsecond time resolution, it has now been observed that when dry gabbro and diorite cores are impacted at relatively low velocities, approximately 100 m/s, highly mobile charge carriers are generated in a small volume near the impact point. They spread through the rocks, causing electric potentials exceeding +400 mV, EM, and light emission. As the charge cloud spreads, the rock becomes momentarily conductive. When a dry granite block is impacted at higher velocity, approximately 1.5 km/s, the propagation of the P and S waves is registered through the transient piezoelectric response of quartz. After the sound waves have passed, the surface of the granite block becomes positively charged, suggesting the same charge carriers as observed during the low-velocity impact experiments, expanding from within the bulk. During the next 2-3 ms the surface potential oscillates, indicating pulses of electrons injected from ground and contact electrodes. The observations are consistent with positive holes, e.g., defect electrons in the O(2-) sublattice, traveling via the O 2p-dominated valence band of the silicate minerals. Before activation, the positive holes lay dormant in the form of electrically inactive positive hole pairs (PHP), chemically equivalent to peroxy links, O3X/OO\\XO3, with X=Si(4+), Al(3+), etc. PHPs are introduced into the minerals by way of hydroxyl,O3X-OH, which all nominally anhydrous minerals incorporate when crystallizing in H2O-laden environments. The fact that positive holes can be

  3. Action potential propagation: ion current or intramembrane electric field?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martí, Albert; Pérez, Juan J; Madrenas, Jordi

    2018-01-01

    The established action potential propagation mechanisms do not satisfactorily explain propagation on myelinated axons given the current knowledge of biological channels and membranes. The flow across ion channels presents two possible effects: the electric potential variations across the lipid bilayers (action potential) and the propagation of an electric field through the membrane inner part. The proposed mechanism is based on intra-membrane electric field propagation, this propagation can explain the action potential saltatory propagation and its constant delay independent of distance between Ranvier nodes in myelinated axons.

  4. Radial response of a 2-MHz MWD propagation resistivity sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnett, W.C.; Meyer, W.H.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that electromagnetic propagation resistivity sensors have become common in MWD logging applications. These tools are unique among resistivity sensors in that the depth of investigation of the phase shift and attenuation resistivity measurements varies dramatically with the formation resistivity, measuring deeper into the formation in higher resistivity environments. The fact that the depth of investigation can vary be more than a factor of two across a normal range of formation resistivities requires the log analyst to have an understanding of this phenomenon when performing both qualitative and quantitative interpretations of these logs. Other measurement characteristics such as regions of negative or sharply-rising radial response can produce log responses which may seem peculiar when compared to traditional induction logs or laterlogs

  5. Data for spatial characterization of AC signal propagation over primary neuron dendrites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hojeong Kim

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Action potentials generated near the soma propagate not only into the axonal nerve connecting to the adjacent neurons but also into the dendrites interacting with a diversity of synaptic inputs as well as voltage gated ion channels. Measuring voltage attenuation factors between the soma and all single points of the dendrites in the anatomically reconstructed primary neurons with the same cable properties, we report the signal propagation data showing how the alternating current (AC signal such as action potentials back-propagates over the dendrites among different types of primary neurons. Fitting equations and their parameter values for the data are also presented to quantitatively capture the spatial profile of AC signal propagation from the soma to the dendrites in primary neurons. Our data is supplemental to our original study for the dependency of dendritic signal propagation and excitability, and their relationship on the cell type-specific structure in primary neurons (DOI: 10.1016/j.neulet.2015.10.017 [1]. Keywords: Primary neurons, Dendritic signal processing, AC signal propagation, Voltage attenuation analysis

  6. Electron thermal conductivity from heat wave propagation in Wendelstein 7-AS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giannone, L.; Erckmann, V; Gasparino, U; Hartfuss, H J; Kuehner, G; Maassberg, H; Stroth, U; Tutter, M [Association Euratom-Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); W7-AS Team; ECRH Group IPF Stuttgart; Gyrotron Group KFK Karlsruhe

    1992-11-01

    Heat wave propagation experiments have been carried out on the Wendelstein 7-AS stellarator. The deposition of electron cyclotron resonance heating power is highly localized in the plasma centre, so that power modulation produces heat waves which propagate away from the deposition volume. Radiometry of the electron cyclotron emission is used to measure the generated temperature perturbation. The propagation time delay of the temperature perturbation as a function of distance to the power deposition region is used to determine the electron thermal conductivity [chi][sub e]. This value is then compared with the value determined by global power balance. In contrast to sawtooth propagation experiments in tokamaks, it is found that the value of [chi][sub e] from heat wave propagation is comparable to that calculated by power balance. In addition, inward propagating waves were produced by choosing a power deposition region away from the plasma centre. Experiments were carried out at 70 GHz in the ordinary mode and at 140 GHz in the extraordinary mode. Variations of the modulation power amplitude have demonstrated that the inferred value of [chi][sub e] is independent of the amplitude of the induced temperature perturbations. (author). 29 refs, 11 figs, 5 tabs.

  7. Modelling of fatigue crack propagation assisted by gaseous hydrogen in metallic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriconi, C.

    2012-01-01

    Experimental studies in a hydrogenous environment indicate that hydrogen created by surface reactions, then drained into the plastic zone, leads to a modification of deformation and damage mechanisms at the fatigue crack tip in metals, resulting in a significant decrease of crack propagation resistance. This study aims at building a model of these complex phenomena in the framework of damage mechanics, and to confront it with the results of fatigue crack propagation tests in high pressure hydrogen on a 15-5PH martensitic stainless steel. To do so, a cohesive zone model was implemented in the finite element code ABAQUS. A specific traction-separation law was developed, which is suitable for cyclic loadings, and whose parameters depend on local hydrogen concentration. Furthermore, hydrogen diffusion in the bulk material takes into account the influence of hydrostatic stress and trapping. The mechanical behaviour of the bulk material is elastic-plastic. It is shown that the model can qualitatively predict crack propagation in hydrogen under monotonous loadings; then, the model with the developed traction-separation law is tested under fatigue loading. In particular, the simulated crack propagation curves without hydrogen are compared to the experimental crack propagation curves for the 15-5PH steel in air. Finally, simulated fatigue crack propagation rates in hydrogen are compared to experimental measurements. The model's ability to assess the respective contributions of the different damage mechanisms (HELP, HEDE) in the degradation of the crack resistance of the 15-5PH steel is discussed. (author)

  8. Efficient Geometric Sound Propagation Using Visibility Culling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandak, Anish

    2011-07-01

    Simulating propagation of sound can improve the sense of realism in interactive applications such as video games and can lead to better designs in engineering applications such as architectural acoustics. In this thesis, we present geometric sound propagation techniques which are faster than prior methods and map well to upcoming parallel multi-core CPUs. We model specular reflections by using the image-source method and model finite-edge diffraction by using the well-known Biot-Tolstoy-Medwin (BTM) model. We accelerate the computation of specular reflections by applying novel visibility algorithms, FastV and AD-Frustum, which compute visibility from a point. We accelerate finite-edge diffraction modeling by applying a novel visibility algorithm which computes visibility from a region. Our visibility algorithms are based on frustum tracing and exploit recent advances in fast ray-hierarchy intersections, data-parallel computations, and scalable, multi-core algorithms. The AD-Frustum algorithm adapts its computation to the scene complexity and allows small errors in computing specular reflection paths for higher computational efficiency. FastV and our visibility algorithm from a region are general, object-space, conservative visibility algorithms that together significantly reduce the number of image sources compared to other techniques while preserving the same accuracy. Our geometric propagation algorithms are an order of magnitude faster than prior approaches for modeling specular reflections and two to ten times faster for modeling finite-edge diffraction. Our algorithms are interactive, scale almost linearly on multi-core CPUs, and can handle large, complex, and dynamic scenes. We also compare the accuracy of our sound propagation algorithms with other methods. Once sound propagation is performed, it is desirable to listen to the propagated sound in interactive and engineering applications. We can generate smooth, artifact-free output audio signals by applying

  9. Very high-current propagation in the ion-focused to collision-dominated regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanford, T.W.L.; Welch, D.R.; Mock, R.C.

    1994-01-01

    Measurements and analysis show that the 13 TW, Hermes-III [J. J. Ramirez et al., Digest of Technical Papers, 6th IEEE Pulsed Power Conference (Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers, New York, 1987), p. 294], pulsed, electron beam has two windows of stable transport in long drift cells filled with N 2 gas terminated by a bremsstrahlung producing target: a low-pressure window (between ∼1 and ∼100 mTorr) that is dominated by propagation in the semicollisionless ion-focused regime (IFR), and a high-pressure window (between ∼1 and ∼100 Torr) that is dominated by propagation in the resistive collisional regime. In the transition region between the two windows, beam plasma--electron instabilities significantly disrupt propagation. Propagation in both regimes (the IFR at early time and the collisional at later time) is observed from ∼5 to ∼100 mTorr, which produces two distinct bremsstrahlung pulses from the single injected beam pulse. As the pressure increases, two-stream instabilities terminate IFR propagation and the associated bremsstrahlung pulse earlier and earlier in time. Above 5 mTorr, the instability is sufficiently quenched by gas collisions that propagation in the collisional regime back in the beam body occurs, leading to a second propagation and associated bremsstrahlung pulse. Above 200 mTorr, the gas breaks down too rapidly for a significant IFR pulse to form, and for higher pressures only a single pulse in the collisional regime is propagated. Reasonable stability in the collisional regime is not achieved until pressures exceed 1 Torr

  10. reduced-to-sea-level value of microwave radio refractivity over three

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NJPAP

    communication applications that employ tropospheric radiowave propagation. ..... atmosphere, that is, lifting of the boundary layer with significant amount of water vapour .... Theoretical and Applied Climatology, pp 127 –. 135. [7] Adediji A. T. ...

  11. An analytical approach for the Propagation Saw Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, Lorenzo; Fischer, Jan-Thomas; Gaume, Johan

    2016-04-01

    mechanical point of view, a broad phenomenology of the main failure types of the PST is outlined. Then, the Euler-Bernoulli beam theory is applied to the test setup, allowing an easy description of the snowpack stress state in the quasi-static regime. We assume an elastic-perfectly brittle model as constitutive law for the snow slab. Besides, considering the weak layer as a rigid bed of crystals with an a priori inclination, a local instability problem is formulated in order to take into account the combined effect of compressive and shear loading. As a result, the onset of slab and weak layer fracture is described in terms of cut length, slab dimensions and the main mechanical parameters. A condition on the possible propagation of the crack is proposed as well. References [1] C. Sigrist and J. Schweizer, "Critical energy release rates of weak snowpack layers determined in field experiments", Geophysical Research Letters, Volume 34, L03502, 2007. [2] D. Gauthier and B. Jamieson, "Evaluation of a prototype field test for fracture and failure propagation propensity in weak snowpack layers". Cold Regions Science and Technology, Volume 51, Issue 2, Pages 87-97, 2008. [3] R. Simenhois and K.W. Birkeland. "The extended column test: Test effectiveness, spatial variability, and comparison with the propagation saw test." Cold Regions Science and Technology, Volume 59, Issue 23, Pages 210-216, 2009. [4] J. Heierli, P. Gumbsch, M. Zaiser, "Anticrack Nucleation as Triggering Mecchanism for Snow Slab Avalanches", Science, Volume 321, Pages 240-243, 2008. [5] A. van Herwijnen, J. Schweizer, J. Heierli, "Measurement of the deformation field associated with fracture propagation in weak snowpack layers", Journal of Geophysical Research, Volume 115, F03042, 2010. [6] K. W. Birkeland, A. van Herwijnen, E. Knoff, M. Staples, E. Bair, R. Simenhois, "The role of slabs and weak layers in fracture arrest", Proceedings of the International Snow Science Workshop, Banff, 2014. [7] J. Schweizer, B

  12. Faithful conversion of propagating quantum information to mechanical motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, A. P.; Mayer, K. H.; Teufel, J. D.; Burkhart, L. D.; Pfaff, W.; Reagor, M.; Sletten, L.; Ma, X.; Schoelkopf, R. J.; Knill, E.; Lehnert, K. W.

    2017-12-01

    The motion of micrometre-sized mechanical resonators can now be controlled and measured at the fundamental limits imposed by quantum mechanics. These resonators have been prepared in their motional ground state or in squeezed states, measured with quantum-limited precision, and even entangled with microwave fields. Such advances make it possible to process quantum information using the motion of a macroscopic object. In particular, recent experiments have combined mechanical resonators with superconducting quantum circuits to frequency-convert, store and amplify propagating microwave fields. But these systems have not been used to manipulate states that encode quantum bits (qubits), which are required for quantum communication and modular quantum computation. Here we demonstrate the conversion of propagating qubits encoded as superpositions of zero and one photons to the motion of a micromechanical resonator with a fidelity in excess of the classical bound. This ability is necessary for mechanical resonators to convert quantum information between the microwave and optical domains or to act as storage elements in a modular quantum information processor. Additionally, these results are an important step towards testing speculative notions that quantum theory may not be valid for sufficiently massive systems.

  13. Influence of stress relieve heat treatment on fatigue crack propagation in structural steel resistant to atmospheric corrosion welded joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Geraldo de Paula; Villela, Jefferson Jose; Rabello, Emerson Giovani [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)]. E-mails: gpm@cdtn.br; jjv@cdtn.br; egr@cdtn.br; Cimini Junior, Carlos Alberto[Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica]. E-mail: cimini@demet.ufmg.br; Godefroid, Leonardo Barbosa [Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto (UFOP), MG (Brazil). Dept. de Metalurgia]. E-mails: leonardo@demet.em.ufop.br

    2007-07-01

    In this work, the influence of stress relieve heat treatment (SRHT) on the fatigue crack propagation in USI-SAC 50 structural welded joints at the heat affected zone (HAZ) region was studied. Hardness measurements before and after the SRHT were made and crack propagation tests in specimens as welded (AW) and in specimens that were submitted to SRHT, which were accomplished. A reduction in hardness at the regions of HAZ and melted zone (MZ) after the SRHT were observed. It were also verified that the crack propagation rates (da/dN) versus DK on the specimens AW presented regions of retardation on the crack propagation rate, and in the specimens that were submitted to SRHT the crack propagation rate were homogeneous. (author)

  14. Radiation efficiency during slow crack propagation: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jestin, Camille; Lengliné, Olivier; Schmittbuhl, Jean

    2017-04-01

    Creeping faults are known to host a significant aseismic deformation. However, the observations of micro-earthquake activity related to creeping faults (e.g. San Andreas Faults, North Anatolian Fault) suggest the presence of strong lateral variabilities of the energy partitioning between radiated and fracture energies. The seismic over aseismic slip ratio is rather difficult to image over time and at depth because of observational limitations (spatial resolution, sufficiently broad band instruments, etc.). In this study, we aim to capture in great details the energy partitioning during the slow propagation of mode I fracture along a heterogeneous interface, where the toughness is strongly varying in space.We lead experiments at laboratory scale on a rock analog model (PMMA) enabling a precise monitoring of fracture pinning and depinning on local asperities in the brittle-creep regime. Indeed, optical imaging through the transparent material allows the high resolution description of the fracture front position and velocity during its propagation. At the same time, acoustic emissions are also measured by accelerometers positioned around the rupture. Combining acoustic records, measurements of the crack front position and the loading curve, we compute the total radiated energy and the fracture energy. We deduce from them the radiation efficiency, ηR, characterizing the proportion of the available energy that is radiated in form of seismic wave. We show an increase of ηR with the crack rupture speed computed for each of our experiments in the sub-critical crack propagation domain. Our experimental estimates of ηR are larger than the theoretical model proposed by Freund, stating that the radiation efficiency of crack propagation in homogeneous media is proportional to the crack velocity. Our results are demonstrated to be in agreement with existing studies which showed that the distribution of crack front velocity in a heterogeneous medium can be well described by a

  15. International Conference on Dynamic Crack Propagation

    CERN Document Server

    1973-01-01

    The planning meeting for a conference on Dynamic Crack Propagation was held at M.LT. in February 1971 and attended by research workers from several industrial, governmental and academic organizations. It was felt that a more specialized meeting would provide a better opportunity for both U.S. and foreign researchers to exchange their ideas and views on dynamic fracture, a subject which is seldom emphasized in national or international fracture conferences. Dynamic crack propagation has been a concern to specialists in many fields: continuum mechanics, metallurgy, geology, polymer chemistry, orthopedics, applied mathematics, as well as structural design and testing. It impinges on a wide variety of problems such as rock breaking and earthquakes, pressure vessels and line pipes, comminution and the per­ formance of armament and ordnance, etc. Advances have been numerous, covering theories and experiments from both the microscopic and macro­ scopic points of view. Hence, the need for comparing the theoretical ...

  16. Cavitation propagation in water under tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noblin, Xavier; Yip Cheung Sang, Yann; Pellegrin, Mathieu; Materials and Complex Fluids Team

    2012-11-01

    Cavitation appears when pressure decreases below vapor pressure, generating vapor bubbles. It can be obtain in dynamical ways (acoustic, hydraulic) but also in quasi-static conditions. This later case is often observed in nature, in trees, or during the ejection of ferns spores. We study the cavitation bubbles nucleation dynamics and its propagation in a confined microfabricated media. This later is an ordered array of microcavities made in hydrogel filled with water. When the system is put into dry air, it dehydrates, water leaves the cavities and tension (negative pressure) builds in the cavities. This can be sustained up to a critical pressure (of order -20 MPa), then cavitation bubbles appear. We follow the dynamics using ultra high speed imaging. Events with several bubbles cavitating in a few microseconds could be observed along neighboring cells, showing a propagation phenomenon that we discuss. ANR CAVISOFT 2010-JCJC-0407 01.

  17. Radial propagation of microturbulence in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garbet, X.; Laurent, L.; Roubin, J.P.; Samain, A.

    1992-01-01

    Energy confinement time in tokamaks exhibits a clear dependence on global plasma parameters. This is not the case for transport coefficients; their dependence on local plasma parameters cannot be precisely established. The aim of the present paper is to give a possible explanation of this behaviour; turbulence propagates radially because of departure from cylindrical geometry. This implies that the turbulence level at a given point and hence transport coefficients are not only functions of local plasma parameters. A quantitative estimate of the propagation velocity is derived from a Lagrangian formalism. Two cases are considered: the effect of toroidicity and the effect of non linear mode-mode coupling. The consequences of this model are discussed. This process does not depend on the type of instability. For the sake of simplicity only electrostatic perturbations are considered

  18. Isobar propagation in nuclei and collective effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moniz, E.J.; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge

    1979-01-01

    Pion-nucleus and photonuclear reactions at intermediate energy provide a means for studying the dynamics of Δ propagation in the nuclear medium. Our discussion will be limited to (π,π), (γ,π) and (γ,γ) reactions leaving the nucleus in the ground state. Following a comment on the collectivity of the Δ-hole doorway states, a brief summary of what we have learned about Δ-nucleus dynamics from such reactions will be given. Emphasis will be placed on the connection of different aspects of the dynamics to specific inclusive reactions. Finally, the importance of multistep reaction mechanisms and of the interplay between Δ propagation and nuclear degrees of freedom will be discussed. (KBE) 891 KBE/KBE 892 ARA

  19. Belief Propagation Algorithm for Portfolio Optimization Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinzato, Takashi; Yasuda, Muneki

    2015-01-01

    The typical behavior of optimal solutions to portfolio optimization problems with absolute deviation and expected shortfall models using replica analysis was pioneeringly estimated by S. Ciliberti et al. [Eur. Phys. B. 57, 175 (2007)]; however, they have not yet developed an approximate derivation method for finding the optimal portfolio with respect to a given return set. In this study, an approximation algorithm based on belief propagation for the portfolio optimization problem is presented using the Bethe free energy formalism, and the consistency of the numerical experimental results of the proposed algorithm with those of replica analysis is confirmed. Furthermore, the conjecture of H. Konno and H. Yamazaki, that the optimal solutions with the absolute deviation model and with the mean-variance model have the same typical behavior, is verified using replica analysis and the belief propagation algorithm.

  20. Alternative model of thrust-fault propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenstadt, Gloria; de Paor, Declan G.

    1987-07-01

    A widely accepted explanation for the geometry of thrust faults is that initial failures occur on deeply buried planes of weak rock and that thrust faults propagate toward the surface along a staircase trajectory. We propose an alternative model that applies Gretener's beam-failure mechanism to a multilayered sequence. Invoking compatibility conditions, which demand that a thrust propagate both upsection and downsection, we suggest that ramps form first, at shallow levels, and are subsequently connected by flat faults. This hypothesis also explains the formation of many minor structures associated with thrusts, such as backthrusts, wedge structures, pop-ups, and duplexes, and provides a unified conceptual framework in which to evaluate field observations.