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Sample records for radiotherapy target delineation

  1. Value of 18F-FDG PET-CT in nasopharyngeal carcinoma target delineation and radiotherapy boost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Ying; Feng Yanlin

    2011-01-01

    18 F-FDG PET-CT has widely used in nasopharyngeal carcinoma diagnosis and staging in recent years, it's effecten target volume delineation has received great attention. The article lays stress on the clinical research progress of 18 F-FDG PET-CT in the radiotherapy of nasopharyngeal carcinoma improve the accuracy of target delineation, reduce the difference of target delineation, guide the dose painting and boost. (authors)

  2. MRI target delineation may reduce long-term toxicity after prostate radiotherapy.

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    Sander, Lotte; Langkilde, Niels Christian; Holmberg, Mats; Carl, Jesper

    2014-06-01

    Aiming for minimal toxicity after radical prostate cancer (PC) radiotherapy (RT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) target delineation could be a possible benefit knowing that clinical target volumes (CTV) are up to 30% smaller, when CTV delineation on MRI is compared to standard computed tomography (CT). This study compares long-term toxicity using CT or MRI delineation before PC RT. Urinary and rectal toxicity assessments 36 months after image-guided RT (78 Gy) using CTC-AE scores in two groups of PC patients. Peak symptom score values were registered. One group of patients (n=72) had standard CT target delineation and gold markers as fiducials. Another group of patients (n=73) had MRI target delineation and a nickel-titanium stent as fiducial. At 36 months no difference in overall survival (92% in both groups, p=0.29) or in PSA-relapse free survival was found between the groups (MRI=89% and CT=94%, p=0.67). A significantly smaller CTV was found in the MRI group (p=0.02). Urinary retention and frequency were significantly reduced in the MRI group (p=0.03 in the matter of both). The overall urinary and rectal toxicity did not differ between the two groups. MRI delineation leads to a significantly reduced CTV. Significantly lower urinary frequency and urinary retention toxicity scores were observed following MRI delineation. The study did not find significant differences in overall urinary or rectal toxicity between the two groups. PSA-relapse survival did not differ between the two groups at 36 months.

  3. Clinical target volume delineation including elective nodal irradiation in preoperative and definitive radiotherapy of pancreatic cancer

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    Caravatta Luciana

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Radiotherapy (RT is widely used in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. Currently, recommendation has been given for the delineation of the clinical target volume (CTV in adjuvant RT. Based on recently reviewed pathologic data, the aim of this study is to propose criteria for the CTV definition and delineation including elective nodal irradiation (ENI in the preoperative and definitive treatment of pancreatic cancer. Methods The anatomical structures of interest, as well as the abdominal vasculature were identified on intravenous contrast-enhanced CT scans of two different patients with pancreatic cancer of the head and the body. To delineate the lymph node area, a margin of 10 mm was added to the arteries. Results We proposed a set of guidelines for elective treatment of high-risk nodal areas and CTV delineation. Reference CT images were provided. Conclusions The proposed guidelines could be used for preoperative or definitive RT for carcinoma of the head and body of the pancreas. Further clinical investigations are needed to validate the defined CTVs.

  4. A multimodality segmentation framework for automatic target delineation in head and neck radiotherapy

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    Yang, Jinzhong; Aristophanous, Michalis, E-mail: MAristophanous@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Beadle, Beth M.; Garden, Adam S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Schwartz, David L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Purpose: To develop an automatic segmentation algorithm integrating imaging information from computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to delineate target volume in head and neck cancer radiotherapy. Methods: Eleven patients with unresectable disease at the tonsil or base of tongue who underwent MRI, CT, and PET/CT within two months before the start of radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy were recruited for the study. For each patient, PET/CT and T1-weighted contrast MRI scans were first registered to the planning CT using deformable and rigid registration, respectively, to resample the PET and magnetic resonance (MR) images to the planning CT space. A binary mask was manually defined to identify the tumor area. The resampled PET and MR images, the planning CT image, and the binary mask were fed into the automatic segmentation algorithm for target delineation. The algorithm was based on a multichannel Gaussian mixture model and solved using an expectation–maximization algorithm with Markov random fields. To evaluate the algorithm, we compared the multichannel autosegmentation with an autosegmentation method using only PET images. The physician-defined gross tumor volume (GTV) was used as the “ground truth” for quantitative evaluation. Results: The median multichannel segmented GTV of the primary tumor was 15.7 cm{sup 3} (range, 6.6–44.3 cm{sup 3}), while the PET segmented GTV was 10.2 cm{sup 3} (range, 2.8–45.1 cm{sup 3}). The median physician-defined GTV was 22.1 cm{sup 3} (range, 4.2–38.4 cm{sup 3}). The median difference between the multichannel segmented and physician-defined GTVs was −10.7%, not showing a statistically significant difference (p-value = 0.43). However, the median difference between the PET segmented and physician-defined GTVs was −19.2%, showing a statistically significant difference (p-value =0.0037). The median Dice similarity coefficient between the multichannel segmented

  5. A multimodality segmentation framework for automatic target delineation in head and neck radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jinzhong; Beadle, Beth M; Garden, Adam S; Schwartz, David L; Aristophanous, Michalis

    2015-09-01

    To develop an automatic segmentation algorithm integrating imaging information from computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to delineate target volume in head and neck cancer radiotherapy. Eleven patients with unresectable disease at the tonsil or base of tongue who underwent MRI, CT, and PET/CT within two months before the start of radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy were recruited for the study. For each patient, PET/CT and T1-weighted contrast MRI scans were first registered to the planning CT using deformable and rigid registration, respectively, to resample the PET and magnetic resonance (MR) images to the planning CT space. A binary mask was manually defined to identify the tumor area. The resampled PET and MR images, the planning CT image, and the binary mask were fed into the automatic segmentation algorithm for target delineation. The algorithm was based on a multichannel Gaussian mixture model and solved using an expectation-maximization algorithm with Markov random fields. To evaluate the algorithm, we compared the multichannel autosegmentation with an autosegmentation method using only PET images. The physician-defined gross tumor volume (GTV) was used as the "ground truth" for quantitative evaluation. The median multichannel segmented GTV of the primary tumor was 15.7 cm(3) (range, 6.6-44.3 cm(3)), while the PET segmented GTV was 10.2 cm(3) (range, 2.8-45.1 cm(3)). The median physician-defined GTV was 22.1 cm(3) (range, 4.2-38.4 cm(3)). The median difference between the multichannel segmented and physician-defined GTVs was -10.7%, not showing a statistically significant difference (p-value = 0.43). However, the median difference between the PET segmented and physician-defined GTVs was -19.2%, showing a statistically significant difference (p-value =0.0037). The median Dice similarity coefficient between the multichannel segmented and physician-defined GTVs was 0.75 (range, 0.55-0.84), and the

  6. A multimodality segmentation framework for automatic target delineation in head and neck radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jinzhong; Aristophanous, Michalis; Beadle, Beth M.; Garden, Adam S.; Schwartz, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To develop an automatic segmentation algorithm integrating imaging information from computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to delineate target volume in head and neck cancer radiotherapy. Methods: Eleven patients with unresectable disease at the tonsil or base of tongue who underwent MRI, CT, and PET/CT within two months before the start of radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy were recruited for the study. For each patient, PET/CT and T1-weighted contrast MRI scans were first registered to the planning CT using deformable and rigid registration, respectively, to resample the PET and magnetic resonance (MR) images to the planning CT space. A binary mask was manually defined to identify the tumor area. The resampled PET and MR images, the planning CT image, and the binary mask were fed into the automatic segmentation algorithm for target delineation. The algorithm was based on a multichannel Gaussian mixture model and solved using an expectation–maximization algorithm with Markov random fields. To evaluate the algorithm, we compared the multichannel autosegmentation with an autosegmentation method using only PET images. The physician-defined gross tumor volume (GTV) was used as the “ground truth” for quantitative evaluation. Results: The median multichannel segmented GTV of the primary tumor was 15.7 cm"3 (range, 6.6–44.3 cm"3), while the PET segmented GTV was 10.2 cm"3 (range, 2.8–45.1 cm"3). The median physician-defined GTV was 22.1 cm"3 (range, 4.2–38.4 cm"3). The median difference between the multichannel segmented and physician-defined GTVs was −10.7%, not showing a statistically significant difference (p-value = 0.43). However, the median difference between the PET segmented and physician-defined GTVs was −19.2%, showing a statistically significant difference (p-value =0.0037). The median Dice similarity coefficient between the multichannel segmented and physician-defined GTVs was

  7. A tri-modality image fusion method for target delineation of brain tumors in radiotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Guo

    Full Text Available To develop a tri-modality image fusion method for better target delineation in image-guided radiotherapy for patients with brain tumors.A new method of tri-modality image fusion was developed, which can fuse and display all image sets in one panel and one operation. And a feasibility study in gross tumor volume (GTV delineation using data from three patients with brain tumors was conducted, which included images of simulation CT, MRI, and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET examinations before radiotherapy. Tri-modality image fusion was implemented after image registrations of CT+PET and CT+MRI, and the transparency weight of each modality could be adjusted and set by users. Three radiation oncologists delineated GTVs for all patients using dual-modality (MRI/CT and tri-modality (MRI/CT/PET image fusion respectively. Inter-observer variation was assessed by the coefficient of variation (COV, the average distance between surface and centroid (ADSC, and the local standard deviation (SDlocal. Analysis of COV was also performed to evaluate intra-observer volume variation.The inter-observer variation analysis showed that, the mean COV was 0.14(± 0.09 and 0.07(± 0.01 for dual-modality and tri-modality respectively; the standard deviation of ADSC was significantly reduced (p<0.05 with tri-modality; SDlocal averaged over median GTV surface was reduced in patient 2 (from 0.57 cm to 0.39 cm and patient 3 (from 0.42 cm to 0.36 cm with the new method. The intra-observer volume variation was also significantly reduced (p = 0.00 with the tri-modality method as compared with using the dual-modality method.With the new tri-modality image fusion method smaller inter- and intra-observer variation in GTV definition for the brain tumors can be achieved, which improves the consistency and accuracy for target delineation in individualized radiotherapy.

  8. Evaluation of Peritumoral Edema in the Delineation of Radiotherapy Clinical Target Volumes for Glioblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Eric L.; Akyurek, Serap; Avalos, Tedde C; Rebueno, Neal C; Spicer, Chris C; Garcia, John C; Famiglietti, Robin; Allen, Pamela K.; Chao, K.S. Clifford; Mahajan, Anita; Woo, Shiao Y.; Maor, Moshe H.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the spatial relationship between peritumoral edema and recurrence pattern in patients with glioblastoma (GBM). Methods and Materials: Forty-eight primary GBM patients received three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy that did not intentionally include peritumoral edema within the clinical target volume between July 2000 and June 2001. All 48 patients have subsequently recurred, and their original treatment planning parameters were used for this study. New theoretical radiation treatment plans were created for the same 48 patients, based on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) target delineation guidelines that specify inclusion of peritumoral edema. Target volume and recurrent tumor coverage, as well as percent volume of normal brain irradiated, were assessed for both methods of target delineation using dose-volume histograms. Results: A comparison between the location of recurrent tumor and peritumoral edema volumes from all 48 cases failed to show correlation by linear regression modeling (r 2 0.0007; p = 0.3). For patients with edema >75 cm 3 , the percent volume of brain irradiated to 46 Gy was significantly greater in treatment plans that intentionally included peritumoral edema compared with those that did not (38% vs. 31%; p = 0.003). The pattern of failure was identical between the two sets of plans (40 central, 3 in-field, 3 marginal, and 2 distant recurrence). Conclusion: Clinical target volume delineation based on a 2-cm margin rather than on peritumoral edema did not seem to alter the central pattern of failure for patients with GBM. For patients with peritumoral edema >75 cm 3 , using a constant 2-cm margin resulted in a smaller median percent volume of brain being irradiated to 30 Gy, 46 Gy, and 50 Gy compared with corresponding theoretical RTOG plans that deliberately included peritumoral edema

  9. Accuracy verification of PET-CT image fusion and its utilization in target delineation of radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xuetao; Yu Jinming; Yang Guoren; Gong Heyi

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Evaluate the accuracy of co-registration of PET and CT (PET-CT) images on line with phantom, and utilize it on patients to provide clinical evidence for target delineation in radiotherapy. Methods: A phantom with markers and different volume cylinders was infused with various concentrations of 18 FDG, and scanned at 4 mm by PET and CT respectively. After having been transmitted into GE eNTEGRA and treatment planning system (TPS) workstations, the images were fused and reconstructed. The distance between the markers and the errors were monitored in PET and CT images respectively. The volume of cylinder in PET and CT images were measured and compared by certain pixel value proportion deduction method. The same procedure was performed on the pulmonary tumor image in ten patients. Results: eNTEGRA and TPS workstations had a good length linearity, but the fusion error of the latter was markedly greater than the former. Tumors in different volume filled by varying concentrations of 18 FDG required different pixel deduction proportion. The cylinder volume of PET and CT images were almost the same, so were the images of pulmonary tumor of ten patients. Conclusions: The accuracy of image co-registration of PET-CT on line may fulfill the clinical demand. Pixel value proportion deduction method can be used for target delineation on PET image. (authors)

  10. Clinical target volume delineation in glioblastomas: pre-operative versus post-operative/pre-radiotherapy MRI

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    Farace, P; Giri, M G; Meliadò, G; Amelio, D; Widesott, L; Ricciardi, G K; Dall'Oglio, S; Rizzotti, A; Sbarbati, A; Beltramello, A; Maluta, S; Amichetti, M

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Delineation of clinical target volume (CTV) is still controversial in glioblastomas. In order to assess the differences in volume and shape of the radiotherapy target, the use of pre-operative vs post-operative/pre-radiotherapy T1 and T2 weighted MRI was compared. Methods 4 CTVs were delineated in 24 patients pre-operatively and post-operatively using T1 contrast-enhanced (T1PRECTV and T1POSTCTV) and T2 weighted images (T2PRECTV and T2POSTCTV). Pre-operative MRI examinations were performed the day before surgery, whereas post-operative examinations were acquired 1 month after surgery and before chemoradiation. A concordance index (CI) was defined as the ratio between the overlapping and composite volumes. Results The volumes of T1PRECTV and T1POSTCTV were not statistically different (248 ± 88 vs 254 ± 101), although volume differences >100 cm3 were observed in 6 out of 24 patients. A marked increase due to tumour progression was shown in three patients. Three patients showed a decrease because of a reduced mass effect. A significant reduction occurred between pre-operative and post-operative T2 volumes (139 ± 68 vs 78 ± 59). Lack of concordance was observed between T1PRECTV and T1POSTCTV (CI = 0.67 ± 0.09), T2PRECTV and T2POSTCTV (CI = 0.39 ± 0.20) and comparing the portion of the T1PRECTV and T1POSTCTV not covered by that defined on T2PRECTV images (CI = 0.45 ± 0.16 and 0.44 ± 0.17, respectively). Conclusion Using T2 MRI, huge variations can be observed in peritumoural oedema, which are probably due to steroid treatment. Using T1 MRI, brain shifts after surgery and possible progressive enhancing lesions produce substantial differences in CTVs. Our data support the use of post-operative/pre-radiotherapy T1 weighted MRI for planning purposes. PMID:21045069

  11. Target volume delineation variation in radiotherapy for early stage rectal cancer in the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nijkamp, Jasper; Haas-Kock, Danielle F.M. de; Beukema, Jannet C.; Neelis, Karen J.; Woutersen, Dankert; Ceha, Heleen; Rozema, Tom; Slot, Annerie; Vos-Westerman, Hanneke; Intven, Martijn; Spruit, Patty H.; Linden, Yvette van der; Geijsen, Debby; Verschueren, Karijn; Herk, Marcel B. van; Marijnen, Corrie A.M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to measure and improve the quality of target volume delineation by means of national consensus on target volume definition in early-stage rectal cancer. Methods and materials: The CTV’s for eight patients were delineated by 11 radiation oncologists in 10 institutes according to local guidelines (phase 1). After observer variation analysis a workshop was organized to establish delineation guidelines and a digital atlas, with which the same observers re-delineated the dataset (phase 2). Variation in volume, most caudal and cranial slice and local surface distance variation were analyzed. Results: The average delineated CTV volume decreased from 620 to 460 cc (p < 0.001) in phase 2. Variation in the caudal CTV border was reduced significantly from 1.8 to 1.2 cm SD (p = 0.01), while it remained 0.7 cm SD for the cranial border. The local surface distance variation (cm SD) reduced from 1.02 to 0.74 for anterior, 0.63 to 0.54 for lateral, 0.33 to 0.25 for posterior and 1.22 to 0.46 for the sphincter region, respectively. Conclusions: The large variation in target volume delineation could significantly be reduced by use of consensus guidelines and a digital delineation atlas. Despite the significant reduction there is still a need for further improvement.

  12. Radiotherapy planning for glioblastoma based on a tumor growth model: improving target volume delineation

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    Unkelbach, Jan; Menze, Bjoern H.; Konukoglu, Ender; Dittmann, Florian; Le, Matthieu; Ayache, Nicholas; Shih, Helen A.

    2014-02-01

    Glioblastoma differ from many other tumors in the sense that they grow infiltratively into the brain tissue instead of forming a solid tumor mass with a defined boundary. Only the part of the tumor with high tumor cell density can be localized through imaging directly. In contrast, brain tissue infiltrated by tumor cells at low density appears normal on current imaging modalities. In current clinical practice, a uniform margin, typically two centimeters, is applied to account for microscopic spread of disease that is not directly assessable through imaging. The current treatment planning procedure can potentially be improved by accounting for the anisotropy of tumor growth, which arises from different factors: anatomical barriers such as the falx cerebri represent boundaries for migrating tumor cells. In addition, tumor cells primarily spread in white matter and infiltrate gray matter at lower rate. We investigate the use of a phenomenological tumor growth model for treatment planning. The model is based on the Fisher-Kolmogorov equation, which formalizes these growth characteristics and estimates the spatial distribution of tumor cells in normal appearing regions of the brain. The target volume for radiotherapy planning can be defined as an isoline of the simulated tumor cell density. This paper analyzes the model with respect to implications for target volume definition and identifies its most critical components. A retrospective study involving ten glioblastoma patients treated at our institution has been performed. To illustrate the main findings of the study, a detailed case study is presented for a glioblastoma located close to the falx. In this situation, the falx represents a boundary for migrating tumor cells, whereas the corpus callosum provides a route for the tumor to spread to the contralateral hemisphere. We further discuss the sensitivity of the model with respect to the input parameters. Correct segmentation of the brain appears to be the most

  13. Radiotherapy planning for glioblastoma based on a tumor growth model: improving target volume delineation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unkelbach, Jan; Dittmann, Florian; Le, Matthieu; Shih, Helen A; Menze, Bjoern H; Ayache, Nicholas; Konukoglu, Ender

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma differ from many other tumors in the sense that they grow infiltratively into the brain tissue instead of forming a solid tumor mass with a defined boundary. Only the part of the tumor with high tumor cell density can be localized through imaging directly. In contrast, brain tissue infiltrated by tumor cells at low density appears normal on current imaging modalities. In current clinical practice, a uniform margin, typically two centimeters, is applied to account for microscopic spread of disease that is not directly assessable through imaging. The current treatment planning procedure can potentially be improved by accounting for the anisotropy of tumor growth, which arises from different factors: anatomical barriers such as the falx cerebri represent boundaries for migrating tumor cells. In addition, tumor cells primarily spread in white matter and infiltrate gray matter at lower rate. We investigate the use of a phenomenological tumor growth model for treatment planning. The model is based on the Fisher–Kolmogorov equation, which formalizes these growth characteristics and estimates the spatial distribution of tumor cells in normal appearing regions of the brain. The target volume for radiotherapy planning can be defined as an isoline of the simulated tumor cell density. This paper analyzes the model with respect to implications for target volume definition and identifies its most critical components. A retrospective study involving ten glioblastoma patients treated at our institution has been performed. To illustrate the main findings of the study, a detailed case study is presented for a glioblastoma located close to the falx. In this situation, the falx represents a boundary for migrating tumor cells, whereas the corpus callosum provides a route for the tumor to spread to the contralateral hemisphere. We further discuss the sensitivity of the model with respect to the input parameters. Correct segmentation of the brain appears to be the most

  14. The study of target delineation and target movement of whole breast assisted by active breathing control in intensity modulated radiotherapy after breast conservative surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jianbing; Yu Jinming; Ma Zhifang; Lu Jie; Sun Tao; Guo Shoufang; Wang Jingguo

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To explore the influence of different delineators and different delineating time on target determination of the whole breast and to explore intrafraction and interfraction target displacements of the breast on moderate deep inspiration breathing hold (mDIBH) assisted by active breathing control (ABC) alter breast conservative surgery. Methods: Twenty patients received primary CT-simulation assisted by ABC to get five sets of CT image on the three breathing condition which included one set from free breath (FB), two sets from mDIBH and two sets from deep expiration breathing control (DEBH). After radiotherapy with ten to fifteen fractions, the repeat CT-simulation was carried out to get the same five sets of CT image as the primary CT- simulation. The whole breast target were delineated at different time by the same delineator and delineated respectively by five delineators on the first set of CT images got with mDIBH from the primary CT-simulation, and to compare the influence of delineator and delineating time on the whole breast target. The total silver clips in the cavity were marked respectively on the two sets of CT images got with mDIBH from the primary CT-simulation, and to compare the intrafraction displacement of geometric body structured by the total of silver clips. The two ribs near the isocentric plane of the breast target were delineated respectively on two sets of the mDIBH CT image from the primary CT-simulation and on one set of the mDIBH CT image from the repeat CT-simulation, and comparing the movement of the point of interest (POI) of the ribs delineated to get the value of intrafraction and interfraction thoracic expansion. Results: There was not statistically significant between the four volumes of whole breast targets delineated by the same delineator at different time, but with statistics significant between the volumes of whole breast target delineated by the different delineators ( F=19.681, P=0.000). There was not statistically

  15. FDG-PET/CT Imaging for Staging and Target Volume Delineation in Preoperative Conformal Radiotherapy of Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bassi, Maria Chiara; Turri, Lucia; Sacchetti, Gianmauro; Loi, Gianfranco; Cannillo, Barbara; La Mattina, Pierdaniele; Brambilla, Marco; Inglese, Eugenio; Krengli, Marco

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the potential impact of using 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) on staging and target volume delineation for patients affected by rectal cancer and candidates for preoperative conformal radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Twenty-five patients diagnosed with rectal cancer T3-4 N0-1 M0-1 and candidates for preoperative radiotherapy underwent PET/CT simulation after injection of 5.18 MBq/kg of FDG. Clinical stage was reassessed on the basis of FDG-PET/CT findings. The gross tumor volume (GTV) and the clinical target volume (CTV) were delineated first on CT and then on PET/CT images. The PET/CT-GTV and PET/CT-CTV were analyzed and compared with CT-GTV and CT-CTV, respectively. Results: In 4 of 25 cases (24%), PET/CT affected tumor staging or the treatment purpose. In 3 of 25 cases (12%) staged N0 M0, PET/CT showed FDG uptake in regional lymph nodes and in a case also in the liver. In a patient with a single liver metastasis PET/CT detected multiple lesions, changing the treatment intent from curative to palliative. The PET/CT-GTV and PET/CT-CTV were significantly greater than the CT-GTV (p = 0.00013) and CT-CTV (p = 0.00002), respectively. The mean difference between PET/CT-GTV and CT-GTV was 25.4% and between PET/CT-CTV and CT-CTV was 4.1%. Conclusions: Imaging with PET/CT for preoperative radiotherapy of rectal cancer may lead to a change in staging and target volume delineation. Stage variation was observed in 12% of cases and a change of treatment intent in 4%. The GTV and CTV changed significantly, with a mean increase in size of 25% and 4%, respectively

  16. Postoperative radiotherapy for glioma: improved delineation of the clinical target volume using the geodesic distance calculation.

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    DanFang Yan

    Full Text Available OBJECTS: To introduce a new method for generating the clinical target volume (CTV from gross tumor volume (GTV using the geodesic distance calculation for glioma. METHODS: One glioblastoma patient was enrolled. The GTV and natural barriers were contoured on each slice of the computer tomography (CT simulation images. Then, a graphic processing unit based on a parallel Euclidean distance transform was used to generate the CTV considering natural barriers. Three-dimensional (3D visualization technique was applied to show the delineation results. Speed of operation and precision were compared between this new delineation method and the traditional method. RESULTS: In considering spatial barriers, the shortest distance from the point sheltered from these barriers equals the sum of the distance along the shortest path between the two points; this consists of several segments and evades the spatial barriers, rather than being the direct Euclidean distance between two points. The CTV was generated irregularly rather than as a spherical shape. The time required to generate the CTV was greatly reduced. Moreover, this new method improved inter- and intra-observer variability in defining the CTV. CONCLUSIONS: Compared with the traditional CTV delineation, this new method using geodesic distance calculation not only greatly shortens the time to modify the CTV, but also has better reproducibility.

  17. Gold markers for tumor localization and target volume delineation in radiotherapy for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorwerk, Hilke; Christiansen, Hans; Hess, Clemens Friedrich; Hermann, Robert Michael; Liersch, Thorsten; Ghadimi, Michael; Rothe, Hilka

    2009-01-01

    In locally advanced rectal cancer, neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy is indicated. To improve target volume definition for radiotherapy planning, the potential of implanted gold markers in the tumor region was evaluated. In nine consecutive patients, two to three gold markers were implanted in the tumor region during rigid rectoscopy. Computed tomography scans were performed during treatment planning. All electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) recorded during treatment series were analyzed. All patients underwent complete tumor resection with meticulous histopathologic examination. The gold markers could easily be implanted into the mesorectal tissue at the caudal tumor border without any complications. They were helpful in identifying the inferior border of the planning target volume in order to spare normal tissue (in particular anal structures). No significant shift of the markers was found during the course of therapy. Marker matching of the EPIDs did not improve patient positioning in comparison to bone structure matching. The former position of at least one marker could be identified in all patients during histopathologic examination. The use of gold marker enables a more precise definition of the target volume for radiotherapy in patients with rectal cancer. This could eventually allow a better protection of anal structures of patients with a tumor localization = 5 cm cranial of the anal sphincter. The implantation of the gold markers improved communication between the surgeon, the radiooncologist and the pathologist resulting in intensified exchange of relevant informations. (orig.)

  18. The functional imaging in target volume delineation of radiotherapy planning for gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Jingxiong; Wu Hua

    2007-01-01

    Radiotherapy is one of important treatments for glioma. Functional imaging, such as PET, SPECT and MRI, may provide more valuable information not only in display of the evasion extent of glioma but also in demonstration of some biological characteristics of the tumor, such as perfusion, metabolism, hypoxia or proliferation. Thus it may play a role in making an individualized and more exact radiotherapy planning. (authors)

  19. Target volume delineation for head and neck cancer intensity-modulated radiotherapy; Delineation des volumes cibles des cancers des voies aerodigestives superieures en radiotherapie conformationnelle avec modulation d'intensite

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    Lapeyre, M.; Toledano, I.; Bourry, N. [Departement de radiotherapie, centre Jean-Perrin, 58, rue Montalembert, BP 5026, 63011 Clermont-Ferrand cedex 1 (France); Bailly, C. [Unite de radiodiagnostic, centre Jean-Perrin, 58, rue Montalembert, BP 5026, 63011 Clermont-Ferrand cedex 1 (France); Cachin, F. [Unite de medecine nucleaire, centre Jean-Perrin, 58, rue Montalembert, BP 5026, 63011 Clermont-Ferrand cedex 1 (France)

    2011-10-15

    This article describes the determination and the delineation of the target volumes for head-and-neck cancers treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). The delineation of the clinical target volumes (CTV) on the computerized tomography scanner (CT scan) requires a rigorous methodology due to the complexity of head-and-neck anatomy. The clinical examination with a sketch of pretreatment tumour extension, the surgical and pathological reports and the adequate images (CT scan, magnetic resonance imaging and fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography) are necessary for the delineation. The target volumes depend on the overall strategy: sequential IMRT or simultaneous integrated boost-IMRT (SIB-IMRT). The concept of selectivity of the potential subclinical disease near the primary tumor and the selection of neck nodal targets are described according to the recommendations and the literature. The planing target volume (PTV), mainly reflecting setup errors (random and systematic), results from a uniform 4-5 mm expansion around the CTV. We propose the successive delineation of: (1) the gross volume tumour (GTV); (2) the 'high risk' CTV1 around the GTV or including the postoperative tumour bed in case of positive margins or nodal extra-capsular spread (65-70 Gy in 30-35 fractions); (3) the CTV2 'intermediate risk' around the CTV1 for SIB-IMRT (59-63 Gy in 30-35 fractions); (4) the 'low-risk' CTV3 (54-56 Gy in 30-35 fractions); (5) the PTVs. (authors)

  20. 11C-CHO PET in optimization of target volume delineation and treatment regimens in postoperative radiotherapy for brain gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Fangming; Nie Qing; Wang Ruimin; Chang, Susan M.; Zhao Wenrui; Zhu Qi; Liang Yingkui; Yang Ping; Zhang Jun; Jia Haiwei; Fang Henghu

    2012-01-01

    Objective: We explored the clinical values of 11 C-choline ( 11 C-CHO) PET in optimization of target volume delineation and treatment regimens in postoperative radiotherapy for brain gliomas. Methods: Sixteen patients with the pathological confirmation of the diagnosis of gliomas prior to receiving radiotherapy (postoperative) were included, and on whom both MRI and CHO PET scans were performed at the same position for comparison of residual tumors with the two techniques. 11 C-CHO was used as the tracer in the PET scan. A plain T1-weighted, T2-weighted and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted imaging scans were performed in the MRI scan sequence. The gliomas' residual tumor volume was defined as the area with CHO-PET high-affinity uptake and metabolism (V CHO ) and one with MRI T1-weighted imaging high signal intensity (V Gd ), and was determined by a group of experienced professionals and clinicians. Results: (1) In CHO-PET images, the tumor target volume, i.e., the highly metabolic area with a high concentration of isotopes (SUV 1.016–4.21) and the corresponding contralateral normal brain tissues (SUV0.1–0.62), was well contrasted, and the boundary between lesions and surrounding normal brain tissues was better defined compared with MRI and 18 F-FDG PET images. (2) For patients with brain gliomas of WHO Grade II, the SUV was 1.016–2.5; for those with WHO Grades III and IV, SUVs were >26–4.2. (3) Both CHO PET and MRI were positive for 10 patients and negative for 2 patients. The residual tumor consistency between these two studies was 75%. Four of the 10 CHO-PET-positive patients were negative on MRI scans. The maximum distance between V Gd and V CHO margins was 1.8 cm. (4) The gross tumor volumes (GTVs) and the ensuing treatment regimens were changed for 31.3% (5/16) of patients based on the CHO-PET high-affinity uptake and metabolism, in which the change rate was 80% (4/5), 14.3 % (1/7) and 0% (0/4) for patients with WHO Grade II III, and IV gliomas

  1. FDG-PET/CT imaging for staging and target volume delineation in conformal radiotherapy of anal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krengli, Marco; Inglese, Eugenio; Milia, Maria E; Turri, Lucia; Mones, Eleonora; Bassi, Maria C; Cannillo, Barbara; Deantonio, Letizia; Sacchetti, Gianmauro; Brambilla, Marco

    2010-01-01

    FDG-PET/CT imaging has an emerging role in staging and treatment planning of various tumor locations and a number of literature studies show that also the carcinoma of the anal canal may benefit from this diagnostic approach. We analyzed the potential impact of FDG-PET/CT in stage definition and target volume delineation of patients affected by carcinoma of the anal canal and candidates for curative radiotherapy. Twenty seven patients with biopsy proven anal carcinoma were enrolled. Pathology was squamous cell carcinoma in 20 cases, cloacogenic carcinoma in 3, adenocarcinoma in 2, and basal cell carcinoma in 2. Simulation was performed by PET/CT imaging with patient in treatment position. Gross Tumor Volume (GTV) and Clinical Target Volume (CTV) were drawn on CT and on PET/CT fused images. PET-GTV and PET-CTV were respectively compared to CT-GTV and CT-CTV by Wilcoxon rank test for paired data. PET/CT fused images led to change the stage in 5/27 cases (18.5%): 3 cases from N0 to N2 and 2 from M0 to M1 leading to change the treatment intent from curative to palliative in a case. Based on PET/CT imaging, GTV and CTV contours changed in 15/27 (55.6%) and in 10/27 cases (37.0%) respectively. PET-GTV and PET-CTV resulted significantly smaller than CT-GTV (p = 1.2 × 10 -4 ) and CT-CTV (p = 2.9 × 10 -4 ). PET/CT-GTV and PET/CT-CTV, that were used for clinical purposes, were significantly greater than CT-GTV (p = 6 × 10 -5 ) and CT-CTV (p = 6 × 10 -5 ). FDG-PET/CT has a potential relevant impact in staging and target volume delineation of the carcinoma of the anal canal. Clinical stage variation occurred in 18.5% of cases with change of treatment intent in 3.7%. The GTV and the CTV changed in shape and in size based on PET/CT imaging

  2. Cancer-associated stroma affects FDG uptake in experimental carcinomas. Implications for FDG-PET delineation of radiotherapy target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farace, Paolo; Merigo, Flavia; Galie, Mirco; Sbarbati, Andrea; Marzola, Pasquina [University of Verona, Department of Morphological-Biomedical Sciences, Section of Anatomy and Histology, Verona (Italy); D' Ambrosio, Daniela; Nanni, Cristina; Spinelli, Antonello; Fanti, Stefano [Policlinico ' S. Orsola-Malpighi' , Department of Nuclear Medicine, Bologna (Italy); Degrassi, Anna [Nerviano Medical Sciences, Milan (Italy); Rubello, Domenico [' S. Maria della Misericordia' Hospital, PET Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rovigo (Italy)

    2009-04-15

    To analyse the influence of cancer-associated stroma on FDG-uptake in two carcinoma models characterized by different stromal degrees. Eight nude mice were subcutaneously injected with DU-145 prostate cancer cells or BXPC-3 pancreatic cancer cells, and underwent FDG-PET imaging about 2 weeks after implantation. After the mice were killed, histology, and CD31 and GLUT1 immunohistochemistry were performed. To further evaluate the highly stromalized carcinoma using perfusion-sensitive imaging, four BXPC-3 tumours underwent two successive albumin-binding (MS-325) MRI scans during tumour growth. FDG uptake was significantly higher in the DU-145 than in the BXPC-3 tumours, which were hardly distinguishable from adjacent normal tissue. In the BXPC-3 tumours, histology confirmed the widespread presence of aberrant infiltrated stroma, embedded with numerous vessels marked by CD31. In both tumour types, the stromal matrix was negative for GLUT1. In DU-145 tumour cells, GLUT1 immunostaining was greater than in BXPC-3 tumour cells, but not homogeneously, since it was less evident in the tumour cells which were nearer to vessels and stroma. Finally, MS-325 MRI always clearly showed areas of enhancement in the BXPC-3 tumours. Cancer-associated stroma has been reported to be capable of aerobic metabolism with low glucose consumption. Furthermore, it has been proposed that regions with high vascular perfusion exhibit a significantly lower FDG uptake, suggesting some vascular/metabolic reciprocity. Since our results are consistent with these recent findings, they signal a risk of tumour volume underestimation in radiotherapy if FDG uptake alone is used for target delineation of carcinomas, which suggests that additional evaluation should be performed using vasculature/perfusion-sensitive imaging. (orig.)

  3. Cancer-associated stroma affects FDG uptake in experimental carcinomas. Implications for FDG-PET delineation of radiotherapy target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farace, Paolo; D'Ambrosio, Daniela; Merigo, Flavia; Galiè, Mirco; Nanni, Cristina; Spinelli, Antonello; Fanti, Stefano; Degrassi, Anna; Sbarbati, Andrea; Rubello, Domenico; Marzola, Pasquina

    2009-04-01

    To analyse the influence of cancer-associated stroma on FDG-uptake in two carcinoma models characterized by different stromal degrees. Eight nude mice were subcutaneously injected with DU-145 prostate cancer cells or BXPC-3 pancreatic cancer cells, and underwent FDG-PET imaging about 2 weeks after implantation. After the mice were killed, histology, and CD31 and GLUT1 immunohistochemistry were performed. To further evaluate the highly stromalized carcinoma using perfusion-sensitive imaging, four BXPC-3 tumours underwent two successive albumin-binding (MS-325) MRI scans during tumour growth. FDG uptake was significantly higher in the DU-145 than in the BXPC-3 tumours, which were hardly distinguishable from adjacent normal tissue. In the BXPC-3 tumours, histology confirmed the widespread presence of aberrant infiltrated stroma, embedded with numerous vessels marked by CD31. In both tumour types, the stromal matrix was negative for GLUT1. In DU-145 tumour cells, GLUT1 immunostaining was greater than in BXPC-3 tumour cells, but not homogeneously, since it was less evident in the tumour cells which were nearer to vessels and stroma. Finally, MS-325 MRI always clearly showed areas of enhancement in the BXPC-3 tumours. Cancer-associated stroma has been reported to be capable of aerobic metabolism with low glucose consumption. Furthermore, it has been proposed that regions with high vascular perfusion exhibit a significantly lower FDG uptake, suggesting some vascular/metabolic reciprocity. Since our results are consistent with these recent findings, they signal a risk of tumour volume underestimation in radiotherapy if FDG uptake alone is used for target delineation of carcinomas, which suggests that additional evaluation should be performed using vasculature/perfusion-sensitive imaging.

  4. Cancer-associated stroma affects FDG uptake in experimental carcinomas. Implications for FDG-PET delineation of radiotherapy target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farace, Paolo; Merigo, Flavia; Galie, Mirco; Sbarbati, Andrea; Marzola, Pasquina; D'Ambrosio, Daniela; Nanni, Cristina; Spinelli, Antonello; Fanti, Stefano; Degrassi, Anna; Rubello, Domenico

    2009-01-01

    To analyse the influence of cancer-associated stroma on FDG-uptake in two carcinoma models characterized by different stromal degrees. Eight nude mice were subcutaneously injected with DU-145 prostate cancer cells or BXPC-3 pancreatic cancer cells, and underwent FDG-PET imaging about 2 weeks after implantation. After the mice were killed, histology, and CD31 and GLUT1 immunohistochemistry were performed. To further evaluate the highly stromalized carcinoma using perfusion-sensitive imaging, four BXPC-3 tumours underwent two successive albumin-binding (MS-325) MRI scans during tumour growth. FDG uptake was significantly higher in the DU-145 than in the BXPC-3 tumours, which were hardly distinguishable from adjacent normal tissue. In the BXPC-3 tumours, histology confirmed the widespread presence of aberrant infiltrated stroma, embedded with numerous vessels marked by CD31. In both tumour types, the stromal matrix was negative for GLUT1. In DU-145 tumour cells, GLUT1 immunostaining was greater than in BXPC-3 tumour cells, but not homogeneously, since it was less evident in the tumour cells which were nearer to vessels and stroma. Finally, MS-325 MRI always clearly showed areas of enhancement in the BXPC-3 tumours. Cancer-associated stroma has been reported to be capable of aerobic metabolism with low glucose consumption. Furthermore, it has been proposed that regions with high vascular perfusion exhibit a significantly lower FDG uptake, suggesting some vascular/metabolic reciprocity. Since our results are consistent with these recent findings, they signal a risk of tumour volume underestimation in radiotherapy if FDG uptake alone is used for target delineation of carcinomas, which suggests that additional evaluation should be performed using vasculature/perfusion-sensitive imaging. (orig.)

  5. Superior target delineation for stereotactic body radiotherapy of bone metastases from renal cell carcinoma on MRI compared to CT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, Fieke M.; Van Der Velden, Joanne M.; Gerlich, Anne S.; Kotte, Alexis N.T.J.; Eppinga, Wietse S.C.; Kasperts, Nicolien; Verlaan, Jorrit J.; Pameijer, Frank A.; Kerkmeijer, Linda G.W.

    2017-01-01

    Background: In metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) there has been a treatment shift towards targeted therapy, which has resulted in improved overall survival. Therefore, there is a need for better local control of the tumor and its metastases. Image-guided stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in

  6. 11C-methionine PET improves the target volume delineation of meningiomas treated with stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosu, Anca-Ligia; Weber, Wolfgang A.; Astner, Sabrina T.; Adam, Markus; Krause, Bernd J.; Schwaiger, Markus; Molls, Michael; Nieder, Carsten

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of 11 C-methionine positron emission tomography (MET-PET) in target volume delineation for meningiomas and to determine the interobserver variability. Methods and Materials: Two independent observers performed treatment planning in 10 patients according to a prospective written protocol. In the first step, they used coregistered computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In the second step, MET-PET was added to CT/MRI (image fusion based on mutual information). Results: The correlation between gross tumor volume (GTVs) delineated by the two observers based on CT/MRI was r = 0.855 (Spearman's correlation coefficient, p = 0.002) and r = 0.988 (p = 0.000) when MET-PET/CT/MRI were used. The number of patients with agreement in more then 80% of the outlined volume increased with the availability of MET-PET from 1 in 10 to 5 in 10. The median volume of intersection between the regions delineated by two observers increased significantly from 69% (from the composite volume) to 79%, by the addition of MET-PET (p = 0.005). The information of MET-PET was useful to delineate GTV in the area of cavernous sinus, orbit, and base of the skull. Conclusions: The hypothesis-generating findings of potential normal tissue sparing and reduced interobserver variability provide arguments for invasive studies of the correlation between MET-PET images and histologic tumor extension and for prospective trials of target volume delineation with CT/MRI/MET-PET image fusion

  7. The potential advantages of (18)FDG PET/CT-based target volume delineation in radiotherapy planning of head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moule, Russell N; Kayani, Irfan; Moinuddin, Syed A; Meer, Khalda; Lemon, Catherine; Goodchild, Kathleen; Saunders, Michele I

    2010-11-01

    This study investigated two fixed threshold methods to delineate the target volume using (18)FDG PET/CT before and during a course of radical radiotherapy in locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Patients were enrolled into the study between March 2006 and May 2008. (18)FDG PET/CT scans were carried out 72h prior to the start of radiotherapy and then at 10, 44 and 66Gy. Functional volumes were delineated according to the SUV Cut Off (SUVCO) (2.5, 3.0, 3.5, and 4.0bwg/ml) and percentage of the SUVmax (30%, 35%, 40%, 45%, and 50%) thresholds. The background (18)FDG uptake and the SUVmax within the volumes were also assessed. Primary and lymph node volumes for the eight patients significantly reduced with each increase in the delineation threshold (for example 2.5-3.0bwg/ml SUVCO) compared to the baseline threshold at each imaging point. There was a significant reduction in the volume (p⩽0.0001-0.01) after 36Gy compared to the 0Gy by the SUVCO method. There was a negative correlation between the SUVmax within the primary and lymph node volumes and delivered radiation dose (p⩽0.0001-0.011) but no difference in the SUV within the background reference region. The volumes delineated by the PTSUVmax method increased with the increase in the delivered radiation dose after 36Gy because the SUVmax within the region of interest used to define the edge of the volume was equal or less than the background (18)FDG uptake and the software was unable to effectively differentiate between tumour and background uptake. The changes in the target volumes delineated by the SUVCO method were less susceptible to background (18)FDG uptake compared to those delineated by the PTSUVmax and may be more helpful in radiotherapy planning. The best method and threshold have still to be determined within institutions, both nationally and internationally. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Consensus Guidelines for Delineation of Clinical Target Volume for Intensity-Modulated Pelvic Radiotherapy for the Definitive Treatment of Cervix Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Karen; Small, William; Portelance, Lorraine; Creutzberg, Carien; Juergenliemk-Schulz, Ina M.; Mundt, Arno; Mell, Loren K.; Mayr, Nina; Viswanathan, Akila; Jhingran, Anuja; Erickson, Beth; De Los Santos, Jennifer; Gaffney, David; Yashar, Catheryn; Beriwal, Sushil; Wolfson, Aaron

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Accurate target definition is vitally important for definitive treatment of cervix cancer with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), yet a definition of clinical target volume (CTV) remains variable within the literature. The aim of this study was to develop a consensus CTV definition in preparation for a Phase 2 clinical trial being planned by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group. Methods and Materials: A guidelines consensus working group meeting was convened in June 2008 for the purposes of developing target definition guidelines for IMRT for the intact cervix. A draft document of recommendations for CTV definition was created and used to aid in contouring a clinical case. The clinical case was then analyzed for consistency and clarity of target delineation using an expectation maximization algorithm for simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE), with kappa statistics as a measure of agreement between participants. Results: Nineteen experts in gynecological radiation oncology generated contours on axial magnetic resonance images of the pelvis. Substantial STAPLE agreement sensitivity and specificity values were seen for gross tumor volume (GTV) delineation (0.84 and 0.96, respectively) with a kappa statistic of 0.68 (p < 0.0001). Agreement for delineation of cervix, uterus, vagina, and parametria was moderate. Conclusions: This report provides guidelines for CTV definition in the definitive cervix cancer setting for the purposes of IMRT, building on previously published guidelines for IMRT in the postoperative setting.

  9. Multimodality imaging with CT, MR and FDG-PET for radiotherapy target volume delineation in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bird, David; Scarsbrook, Andrew F.; Sykes, Jonathan; Ramasamy, Satiavani; Subesinghe, Manil; Carey, Brendan; Wilson, Daniel J.; Roberts, Neil; McDermott, Gary; Karakaya, Ebru; Bayman, Evrim; Sen, Mehmet; Speight, Richard; Prestwich, Robin J.D.

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to quantify the variation in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma gross tumour volume (GTV) delineation between CT, MR and FDG PET-CT imaging. A prospective, single centre, pilot study was undertaken where 11 patients with locally advanced oropharyngeal cancers (2 tonsil, 9 base of tongue primaries) underwent pre-treatment, contrast enhanced, FDG PET-CT and MR imaging, all performed in a radiotherapy treatment mask. CT, MR and CT-MR GTVs were contoured by 5 clinicians (2 radiologists and 3 radiation oncologists). A semi-automated segmentation algorithm was used to contour PET GTVs. Volume and positional analyses were undertaken, accounting for inter-observer variation, using linear mixed effects models and contour comparison metrics respectively. Significant differences in mean GTV volume were found between CT (11.9 cm 3 ) and CT-MR (14.1 cm 3 ), p < 0.006, CT-MR and PET (9.5 cm 3 ), p < 0.0009, and MR (12.7 cm 3 ) and PET, p < 0.016. Substantial differences in GTV position were found between all modalities with the exception of CT-MR and MR GTVs. A mean of 64 %, 74 % and 77 % of the PET GTVs were included within the CT, MR and CT-MR GTVs respectively. A mean of 57 % of the MR GTVs were included within the CT GTV; conversely a mean of 63 % of the CT GTVs were included within the MR GTV. CT inter-observer variability was found to be significantly higher in terms of position and/or volume than both MR and CT-MR (p < 0.05). Significant differences in GTV volume were found between GTV volumes delineated by radiologists (9.7 cm 3 ) and oncologists (14.6 cm 3 ) for all modalities (p = 0.001). The use of different imaging modalities produced significantly different GTVs, with no single imaging technique encompassing all potential GTV regions. The use of MR reduced inter-observer variability. These data suggest delineation based on multimodality imaging has the potential to improve accuracy of GTV definition. ISRCTN Registry: ISRCTN34165059. Registered 2

  10. TU-A-12A-06: Intra-Observer Variability in Delineation of Target Volumes in Breast Radiotherapy and Its Effect On Accuracy of Deformation Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juneja, P; Harris, E [The Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom); Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom); Bonora, M [University of Milan, Milan (Italy); Evans, P [University of Surrey, Guildford (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: In breast radiotherapy, the target volume may change during treatment and need adaptation of the treatment plan. This is possible for both tumour bed (TB) and whole breast (WB) target volumes. Delineation of the target (to detect changes) is also subject to uncertainty due to intra- and inter-observer variability. This work measured the uncertainty, due to intraobserver variability, in the quantification of tissue deformation. Methods: Datasets consisting of paired prone and supine CT scans of three patients were used. Significant deformation in target volumes is expected between prone and supine patient positions. The selected cases had 1) no seroma, 2) some seroma, and 3) large seroma. The TB and WB were outlined on each dataset three times by one clinician. Delineation variability was defined as the standard deviations of the distances between observer outlines. For each target volume and each case, tissue deformation between prone and supine delineations was quantified using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and the average surface distance (ASD). The uncertainty in the tissue deformation (due to delineation variability) was quantified by measuring the ranges of DSC and ASD using all combinations of pairs of outlines (9 pairs). Results: For the TB, the range of delineation variability was 0.44-1.16 mm. The deformation, DSC and ASD, (and uncertainty in measurement) of the TB between prone and supine position of the cases were: 1) 0.21 (0.17-0.28) and 12.4 mm (11.8-13 mm); 2) 0.54 (0.51-0.57) and 3.3 mm (3.1-3.5 mm); 3) 0.62 (0.61-0.64) and 4.9 mm (4.6-5.2 mm). WB deformation measurements were subject to less uncertainty due to delineation variability than TB deformation measurements. Conclusion: For the first time, the uncertainty, due to observer variability, in the measurement of the deformation of breast target volumes was investigated. Deformations in these ranges would be difficult to detect. This work was supported in part by Cancer Research

  11. Pattern of relapse in surgical treated patients with thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and its possible impact on target delineation for postoperative radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Wenjie; Xin Peiling

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To provide a reference for determination of the postoperative radiotherapy target volume for thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Background data: The irradiation target volume is important for effective postoperative treatment of thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Methods: One hundred forty patients with recurrent or metastatic thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma who had been treated with radical surgery but not with postoperative radiotherapy were enrolled in this study. The information of locoregional recurrence and distant metastasis for these patients was analyzed. Results: The median time to progression in the 140 patients with recurrence or metastasis was 18.3 months (range 15.4-21.1 months). Anastomotic recurrence accounted for 13.6% of treatment failures. The supraclavicular and station 1-5 and 7 lymph nodes had high metastasis rates for esophageal squamous cell carcinomas in all locations. The order from highest to lowest metastasis rate for the station 3 and 4 lymph nodes was middle, upper and lower thoracic esophageal regions and the order for upper abdominal lymph nodes was lower, middle, and upper thoracic esophageal regions. Locoregional recurrence was the most common type of recurrence. Conclusions: For upper and middle thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinomas, the anastomosis, supraclavicular, and station 1-5 and 7 lymph nodes should be delineated as the postoperative prophylactic irradiation target volume with upper abdominal lymph nodes excluded; for lower thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinomas, anastomosis, supraclavicular, station 1-5 and 7 lymph nodes and upper abdominal lymph nodes should be delineated as the postoperative prophylactic irradiation target volume.

  12. Defining the target volume for post-operative radiotherapy after D2 dissection in gastric cancer by CT-based vessel-guided delineation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Hong In; Chang, Jee Suk; Lim, Joon Seok; Noh, Sung Hoon; Hyung, Woo Jin; An, Ji Yeong; Lee, Yong Chan; Rha, Sun Young; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Koom, Woong Sub

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the recurrent nodal gross tumor volume (rnGTV) based on CT-guided vascular structure to refine the clinical target volume (CTV) delineation in postoperative radiotherapy for advanced gastric cancer following radical gastrectomy with D2 dissection. Materials and methods: We retrospectively reviewed follow-up images from 91 patients with their first regional recurrence after D2 dissection in stage III gastric cancer with N3 disease. We defined rnGTV as recurrent nodes shown in follow-up CT images, in which one diagnostic radiologist with specialty of gastrointestinal tract investigated. We drew rnGTVs at the equivalent location based on the same vessels of reference comparing CT images to recurrence CT images. Results: We propose vessel-based locations of rnGTVs on CT images with axial and coronal views. We show different patterns of regional recurrence according to the location of primary gastric cancer using CT and digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) images. Frequently recurred sites, overlapped by more than five rnGTVs, are depicted in a DRR image. Conclusions: This study suggests vessel-based delineations of rnGTVs on CT images depending on nodal recurrence sites from follow-up images after D2 lymphadenectomy. Our results could help reduce the inter-observer variation of CTV delineation after D2 dissection in gastric cancer

  13. Feasibility of CBCT-based target and normal structure delineation in prostate cancer radiotherapy: Multi-observer and image multi-modality study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luetgendorf-Caucig, Carola; Fotina, Irina; Stock, Markus; Poetter, Richard; Goldner, Gregor; Georg, Dietmar

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose: In-room cone-beam CT (CBCT) imaging and adaptive treatment strategies are promising methods to decrease target volumes and to spare organs at risk. The aim of this work was to analyze the inter-observer contouring uncertainties of target volumes and organs at risks (oars) in localized prostate cancer radiotherapy using CBCT images. Furthermore, CBCT contouring was benchmarked against other image modalities (CT, MR) and the influence of subjective image quality perception on inter-observer variability was assessed. Methods and materials: Eight prostate cancer patients were selected. Seven radiation oncologists contoured target volumes and oars on CT, MRI and CBCT. Volumes, coefficient of variation (COV), conformity index (cigen), and coordinates of center-of-mass (COM) were calculated for each patient and image modality. Reliability analysis was performed for the support of the reported findings. Subjective perception of image quality was assessed via a ten-scored visual analog scale (VAS). Results: The median volume for prostate was larger on CT compared to MRI and CBCT images. The inter-observer variation for prostate was larger on CBCT (CIgen = 0.57 ± 0.09, 0.61 reliability) compared to CT (CIgen = 0.72 ± 0.07, 0.83 reliability) and MRI (CIgen = 0.66 ± 0.12, 0.87 reliability). On all image modalities values of the intra-observer reliability coefficient (0.97 for CT, 0.99 for MR and 0.94 for CBCT) indicated high reproducibility of results. For all patients the root mean square (RMS) of the inter-observer standard deviation (σ) of the COM was largest on CBCT with σ(x) = 0.4 mm, σ(y) = 1.1 mm, and σ(z) = 1.7 mm. The concordance in delineating OARs was much stronger than for target volumes, with average CIgen > 0.70 for rectum and CIgen > 0.80 for bladder. Positive correlations between CIgen and VAS score of the image quality were observed for the prostate, seminal vesicles and rectum. Conclusions: Inter-observer variability for target

  14. Postoperative Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the External Auditory Canal and Middle Ear: Treatment Outcomes, Marginal Misses, and Perspective on Target Delineation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Wan-Yu [Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Oncology, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Kuo, Sung-Hsin [Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Oncology, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, Yu-Hsuan; Lu, Szu-Huai; Tsai, Chiao-Ling [Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Oncology, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chia-Hsien Cheng, Jason [Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Oncology, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Oncology, National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hong, Ruey-Long [Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Oncology, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, Ya-Fang [Department of Medical Imaging, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Chuan-Jen; Lin, Kai-Nan; Ko, Jenq-Yuh; Lou, Pei-Jen; Wang, Cheng-Ping [Department of Otolaryngology, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chong, Fok-Ching [Graduate Institute of Electrical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Wang, Chun-Wei, E-mail: cwwang@ntuh.gov.tw [Graduate Institute of Electrical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To report outcomes of the rare disease of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the external auditory canal (EAC) and middle ear treated with surgery and postoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Failure patterns related to spatial dose distribution were also analyzed to provide insight into target delineation. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was conducted of the records of 11 consecutive patients with SCC of the EAC and middle ear who were treated with curative surgery and postoperative IMRT at one institution between January 2007 and February 2010. The prescribed IMRT dose was 60 to 66 Gy at 2 Gy per fraction. Three patients also received concurrent cisplatin-based chemotherapy, and 1 patient received concurrent oral tegafur/uracil. The median follow-up time was 19 months (range, 6-33 months). Results: Four patients had locoregional recurrence, yielding an estimated 2-year locoregional control rate of 70.7%. Among them, 1 patient had persistent disease after treatment, and 3 had marginal recurrence. Distant metastasis occurred in 1 patient after extensive locoregional recurrence, yielding an estimated 2-year distant control rate of 85.7%. The estimated 2-year overall survival was 67.5%. The three cases of marginal recurrence were near the preauricular space and glenoid fossa of the temporomandibular joint, adjacent to the apex of the ear canal and glenoid fossa of the temporomandibular joint, and in the postauricular subcutaneous area and ipsilateral parotid nodes, respectively. Conclusions: Marginal misses should be recognized to improve target delineation. When treating SCC of the EAC and middle ear, care should be taken to cover the glenoid fossa of the temporomandibular joint and periauricular soft tissue. Elective ipsilateral parotid irradiation should be considered. The treatment planning procedure should also be refined to balance subcutaneous soft-tissue dosimetry and toxicity.

  15. Postoperative Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the External Auditory Canal and Middle Ear: Treatment Outcomes, Marginal Misses, and Perspective on Target Delineation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Wan-Yu; Kuo, Sung-Hsin; Chen, Yu-Hsuan; Lu, Szu-Huai; Tsai, Chiao-Ling; Chia-Hsien Cheng, Jason; Hong, Ruey-Long; Chen, Ya-Fang; Hsu, Chuan-Jen; Lin, Kai-Nan; Ko, Jenq-Yuh; Lou, Pei-Jen; Wang, Cheng-Ping; Chong, Fok-Ching; Wang, Chun-Wei

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To report outcomes of the rare disease of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the external auditory canal (EAC) and middle ear treated with surgery and postoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Failure patterns related to spatial dose distribution were also analyzed to provide insight into target delineation. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was conducted of the records of 11 consecutive patients with SCC of the EAC and middle ear who were treated with curative surgery and postoperative IMRT at one institution between January 2007 and February 2010. The prescribed IMRT dose was 60 to 66 Gy at 2 Gy per fraction. Three patients also received concurrent cisplatin-based chemotherapy, and 1 patient received concurrent oral tegafur/uracil. The median follow-up time was 19 months (range, 6–33 months). Results: Four patients had locoregional recurrence, yielding an estimated 2-year locoregional control rate of 70.7%. Among them, 1 patient had persistent disease after treatment, and 3 had marginal recurrence. Distant metastasis occurred in 1 patient after extensive locoregional recurrence, yielding an estimated 2-year distant control rate of 85.7%. The estimated 2-year overall survival was 67.5%. The three cases of marginal recurrence were near the preauricular space and glenoid fossa of the temporomandibular joint, adjacent to the apex of the ear canal and glenoid fossa of the temporomandibular joint, and in the postauricular subcutaneous area and ipsilateral parotid nodes, respectively. Conclusions: Marginal misses should be recognized to improve target delineation. When treating SCC of the EAC and middle ear, care should be taken to cover the glenoid fossa of the temporomandibular joint and periauricular soft tissue. Elective ipsilateral parotid irradiation should be considered. The treatment planning procedure should also be refined to balance subcutaneous soft-tissue dosimetry and toxicity.

  16. Toward Semi-automated Assessment of Target Volume Delineation in Radiotherapy Trials: The SCOPE 1 Pretrial Test Case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gwynne, Sarah, E-mail: Sarah.Gwynne2@wales.nhs.uk [Department of Clinical Oncology, Velindre Cancer Centre, Cardiff, Wales (United Kingdom); Spezi, Emiliano; Wills, Lucy [Department of Medical Physics, Velindre Cancer Centre, Cardiff, Wales (United Kingdom); Nixon, Lisette; Hurt, Chris [Wales Cancer Trials Unit, School of Medicine, Cardiff University, Cardiff, Wales (United Kingdom); Joseph, George [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Velindre Cancer Centre, Cardiff, Wales (United Kingdom); Evans, Mererid [Department of Clinical Oncology, Velindre Cancer Centre, Cardiff, Wales (United Kingdom); Griffiths, Gareth [Wales Cancer Trials Unit, School of Medicine, Cardiff University, Cardiff, Wales (United Kingdom); Crosby, Tom [Department of Clinical Oncology, Velindre Cancer Centre, Cardiff, Wales (United Kingdom); Staffurth, John [Division of Cancer, School of Medicine, Cardiff University, Cardiff, Wales (United Kingdom)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate different conformity indices (CIs) for use in the analysis of outlining consistency within the pretrial quality assurance (Radiotherapy Trials Quality Assurance [RTTQA]) program of a multicenter chemoradiation trial of esophageal cancer and to make recommendations for their use in future trials. Methods and Materials: The National Cancer Research Institute SCOPE 1 trial is an ongoing Cancer Research UK-funded phase II/III randomized controlled trial of chemoradiation with capecitabine and cisplatin with or without cetuximab for esophageal cancer. The pretrial RTTQA program included a detailed radiotherapy protocol, an educational package, and a single mid-esophageal tumor test case that were sent to each investigator to outline. Investigator gross tumor volumes (GTVs) were received from 50 investigators in 34 UK centers, and CERR (Computational Environment for Radiotherapy Research) was used to perform an assessment of each investigator GTV against a predefined gold-standard GTV using different CIs. A new metric, the local conformity index (l-CI), that can localize areas of maximal discordance was developed. Results: The median Jaccard conformity index (JCI) was 0.69 (interquartile range, 0.62-0.70), with 14 of 50 investigators (28%) achieving a JCI of 0.7 or greater. The median geographical miss index was 0.09 (interquartile range, 0.06-0.16), and the mean discordance index was 0.27 (95% confidence interval, 0.25-0.30). The l-CI was highest in the middle section of the volume, where the tumor was bulky and more easily definable, and identified 4 slices where fewer than 20% of investigators achieved an l-CI of 0.7 or greater. Conclusions: The available CIs analyze different aspects of a gold standard-observer variation, with JCI being the most useful as a single metric. Additional information is provided by the l-CI and can focus the efforts of the RTTQA team in these areas, possibly leading to semi-automated outlining assessment.

  17. Toward Semi-automated Assessment of Target Volume Delineation in Radiotherapy Trials: The SCOPE 1 Pretrial Test Case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gwynne, Sarah; Spezi, Emiliano; Wills, Lucy; Nixon, Lisette; Hurt, Chris; Joseph, George; Evans, Mererid; Griffiths, Gareth; Crosby, Tom; Staffurth, John

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate different conformity indices (CIs) for use in the analysis of outlining consistency within the pretrial quality assurance (Radiotherapy Trials Quality Assurance [RTTQA]) program of a multicenter chemoradiation trial of esophageal cancer and to make recommendations for their use in future trials. Methods and Materials: The National Cancer Research Institute SCOPE 1 trial is an ongoing Cancer Research UK-funded phase II/III randomized controlled trial of chemoradiation with capecitabine and cisplatin with or without cetuximab for esophageal cancer. The pretrial RTTQA program included a detailed radiotherapy protocol, an educational package, and a single mid-esophageal tumor test case that were sent to each investigator to outline. Investigator gross tumor volumes (GTVs) were received from 50 investigators in 34 UK centers, and CERR (Computational Environment for Radiotherapy Research) was used to perform an assessment of each investigator GTV against a predefined gold-standard GTV using different CIs. A new metric, the local conformity index (l-CI), that can localize areas of maximal discordance was developed. Results: The median Jaccard conformity index (JCI) was 0.69 (interquartile range, 0.62-0.70), with 14 of 50 investigators (28%) achieving a JCI of 0.7 or greater. The median geographical miss index was 0.09 (interquartile range, 0.06-0.16), and the mean discordance index was 0.27 (95% confidence interval, 0.25-0.30). The l-CI was highest in the middle section of the volume, where the tumor was bulky and more easily definable, and identified 4 slices where fewer than 20% of investigators achieved an l-CI of 0.7 or greater. Conclusions: The available CIs analyze different aspects of a gold standard–observer variation, with JCI being the most useful as a single metric. Additional information is provided by the l-CI and can focus the efforts of the RTTQA team in these areas, possibly leading to semi-automated outlining assessment.

  18. SU-E-J-76: Incorporation of Ultrasound Elastography in Target Volume Delineation for Partial Breast Radiotherapy Planning: A Comparative Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juneja, P; Harris, E; Bamber, J [The Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom); Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: There is substantial observer variability in the delineation of target volumes for post-surgical partial breast radiotherapy because the tumour bed has poor x-ray contrast. This variability may result in substantial variations in planned dose distribution. Ultrasound elastography (USE) has an ability to detect mechanical discontinuities and therefore, the potential to image the scar and distortion in breast tissue architecture. The goal of this study was to compare USE techniques: strain elastography (SE), shear wave elastography (SWE) and acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging using phantoms that simulate features of the tumour bed, for the purpose of incorporating USE in breast radiotherapy planning. Methods: Three gelatine-based phantoms (10% w/v) containing: a stiff inclusion (gelatine 16% w/v) with adhered boundaries, a stiff inclusion (gelatine 16% w/v) with mobile boundaries and fluid cavity inclusion (to mimic seroma), were constructed and used to investigate the USE techniques. The accuracy of the elastography techniques was quantified by comparing the imaged inclusion with the modelled ground-truth using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). For two regions of interest (ROI), the DSC measures their spatial overlap. Ground-truth ROIs were modelled using geometrical measurements from B-mode images. Results: The phantoms simulating stiff scar tissue with adhered and mobile boundaries and seroma were successfully developed and imaged using SE and SWE. The edges of the stiff inclusions were more clearly visible in SE than in SWE. Subsequently, for all these phantoms the measured DSCs were found to be higher for SE (DSCs: 0.91–0.97) than SWE (DSCs: 0.68–0.79) with an average relative difference of 23%. In the case of seroma phantom, DSC values for SE and SWE were similar. Conclusion: This study presents a first attempt to identify the most suitable elastography technique for use in breast radiotherapy planning. Further analysis will

  19. SU-E-J-76: Incorporation of Ultrasound Elastography in Target Volume Delineation for Partial Breast Radiotherapy Planning: A Comparative Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juneja, P; Harris, E; Bamber, J

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: There is substantial observer variability in the delineation of target volumes for post-surgical partial breast radiotherapy because the tumour bed has poor x-ray contrast. This variability may result in substantial variations in planned dose distribution. Ultrasound elastography (USE) has an ability to detect mechanical discontinuities and therefore, the potential to image the scar and distortion in breast tissue architecture. The goal of this study was to compare USE techniques: strain elastography (SE), shear wave elastography (SWE) and acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging using phantoms that simulate features of the tumour bed, for the purpose of incorporating USE in breast radiotherapy planning. Methods: Three gelatine-based phantoms (10% w/v) containing: a stiff inclusion (gelatine 16% w/v) with adhered boundaries, a stiff inclusion (gelatine 16% w/v) with mobile boundaries and fluid cavity inclusion (to mimic seroma), were constructed and used to investigate the USE techniques. The accuracy of the elastography techniques was quantified by comparing the imaged inclusion with the modelled ground-truth using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). For two regions of interest (ROI), the DSC measures their spatial overlap. Ground-truth ROIs were modelled using geometrical measurements from B-mode images. Results: The phantoms simulating stiff scar tissue with adhered and mobile boundaries and seroma were successfully developed and imaged using SE and SWE. The edges of the stiff inclusions were more clearly visible in SE than in SWE. Subsequently, for all these phantoms the measured DSCs were found to be higher for SE (DSCs: 0.91–0.97) than SWE (DSCs: 0.68–0.79) with an average relative difference of 23%. In the case of seroma phantom, DSC values for SE and SWE were similar. Conclusion: This study presents a first attempt to identify the most suitable elastography technique for use in breast radiotherapy planning. Further analysis will

  20. Consequences of additional use of PET information for target volume delineation and radiotherapy dose distribution for esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muijs, Christina T.; Schreurs, Liesbeth M.; Busz, Dianne M.; Beukema, Jannet C.; Borden, Arnout J. van der; Pruim, Jan; Van der Jagt, Eric J.; Plukker, John Th.; Langendijk, Johannes A.

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: To determine the consequences of target volume (TV) modifications, based on the additional use of PET information, on radiation planning, assuming PET/CT-imaging represents the true extent of the tumour. Materials and methods: For 21 patients with esophageal cancer, two separate TV's were retrospectively defined based on CT (CT-TV) and co-registered PET/CT images (PET/CT-TV). Two 3D-CRT plans (prescribed dose 50.4 Gy) were constructed to cover the corresponding TV's. Subsequently, these plans were compared for target coverage, normal tissue dose-volume histograms and the corresponding normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) values. Results: The addition of PET led to the modification of CT-TV with at least 10% in 12 of 21 patients (57%) (reduction in 9, enlargement in 3). PET/CT-TV was inadequately covered by the CT-based treatment plan in 8 patients (36%). Treatment plan modifications resulted in significant changes (p < 0.05) in dose distributions to heart and lungs. Corresponding changes in NTCP values ranged from -3% to +2% for radiation pneumonitis and from -0.2% to +1.2% for cardiac mortality. Conclusions: This study demonstrated that TV's based on CT might exclude PET-avid disease. Consequences are under dosing and thereby possibly ineffective treatment. Moreover, the addition of PET in radiation planning might result in clinical important changes in NTCP.

  1. Interobserver variability in target volume delineation of hepatocellular carcinoma : An analysis of the working group "Stereotactic Radiotherapy" of the German Society for Radiation Oncology (DEGRO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gkika, E; Tanadini-Lang, S; Kirste, S; Holzner, P A; Neeff, H P; Rischke, H C; Reese, T; Lohaus, F; Duma, M N; Dieckmann, K; Semrau, R; Stockinger, M; Imhoff, D; Kremers, N; Häfner, M F; Andratschke, N; Nestle, U; Grosu, A L; Guckenberger, M; Brunner, T B

    2017-10-01

    Definition of gross tumor volume (GTV) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) requires dedicated imaging in multiple contrast medium phases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the interobserver agreement (IOA) in gross tumor delineation of HCC in a multicenter panel. The analysis was performed within the "Stereotactic Radiotherapy" working group of the German Society for Radiation Oncology (DEGRO). The GTVs of three anonymized HCC cases were delineated by 16 physicians from nine centers using multiphasic CT scans. In the first case the tumor was well defined. The second patient had multifocal HCC (one conglomerate and one peripheral tumor) and was previously treated with transarterial chemoembolization (TACE). The peripheral lesion was adjacent to the previous TACE site. The last patient had an extensive HCC with a portal vein thrombosis (PVT) and an inhomogeneous liver parenchyma due to cirrhosis. The IOA was evaluated according to Landis and Koch. The IOA for the first case was excellent (kappa: 0.85); for the second case moderate (kappa: 0.48) for the peripheral tumor and substantial (kappa: 0.73) for the conglomerate. In the case of the peripheral tumor the inconsistency is most likely explained by the necrotic tumor cavity after TACE caudal to the viable tumor. In the last case the IOA was fair, with a kappa of 0.34, with significant heterogeneity concerning the borders of the tumor and the PVT. The IOA was very good among the cases were the tumor was well defined. In complex cases, where the tumor did not show the typical characteristics, or in cases with Lipiodol (Guerbet, Paris, France) deposits, IOA agreement was compromised.

  2. Interobserver delineation variation in lung tumour stereotacticbody radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, G. F.; Nygaard, D. E.; Hollensen, Christian

    2012-01-01

    the interobserver delineation variation for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of peripheral lung tumours using a cross-sectional study design. Methods 22 consecutive patients with 26 tumours were included. Positron emission tomography/CT scans were acquired for planning of SBRT. Three oncologists and three......-sectional analysis of delineation variation for peripheral lung tumours referred for SBRT, establishing the evidence that interobserver variation is very small for these tumours....

  3. Metal artefact reduction for accurate tumour delineation in radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kovacs, David Gergely; Rechner, Laura A.; Appelt, Ane L.

    2018-01-01

    Background and purpose: Two techniques for metal artefact reduction for computed tomography were studied in order to identify their impact on tumour delineation in radiotherapy. Materials and methods: Using specially designed phantoms containing metal implants (dental, spine and hip) as well...... delineation significantly (pmetal implant....... as patient images, we investigated the impact of two methods for metal artefact reduction on (A) the size and severity of metal artefacts and the accuracy of Hounsfield Unit (HU) representation, (B) the visual impact of metal artefacts on image quality and (C) delineation accuracy. A metal artefact reduction...

  4. Selection and delineation of lymph node target volumes in head and neck conformal radiotherapy. proposal for standardizing terminology and procedure based on the surgical experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregoire, V.; Coche, E.; Cosnard, G.; Hamoir, M.; Reychler, H.

    2000-01-01

    The increasing use of 3D treatment planning in head and neck radiation oncology has created an urgent need for new guidelines for the selection and the delineation of the neck node areas to be included in the clinical target volume. Surgical literature has provided us with valuable information on the extent of pathological nodal involvement in the neck as a function of the primary tumor site. In addition, few clinical series have also reported information on radiological nodal involvement in those areas not commonly included in radical neck dissection. Taking all these data together, guidelines for the selection of the node levels to be irradiated for the major head and neck sites could be proposed. To fill the missing link between these Guidelines and the 3D treatment planning, recommendations for the delineation of these node levels (levels I-VI and retropharyngeal) on CT (or MRI) slices have been proposed using the guidelines outlined by the Committee for Head and Neck Surgery and Oncology of the American Academy for Otolarynology-Head and Neck Surgery. These guidelines were adapted to take into account specific radiological landmarks more easily identified on CT or MRI slices than in the operating field. (author)

  5. Quantitative assessment of inter-observer variability in target volume delineation on stereotactic radiotherapy treatment for pituitary adenoma and meningioma near optic tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Hideya; Ogita, Mikio; Yamashita, Koichi; Kotsuma, Tadayuki; Shiomi, Hiroya; Tsubokura, Takuji; Kodani, Naohiro; Nishimura, Takuya; Aibe, Norihiro; Udono, Hiroki; Nishikata, Manabu; Baba, Yoshimi

    2011-01-01

    To assess inter-observer variability in delineating target volume and organs at risk in benign tumor adjacent to optic tract as a quality assurance exercise. We quantitatively analyzed 21 plans made by 11 clinicians in seven CyberKnife centers. The clinicians were provided with a raw data set (pituitary adenoma and meningioma) including clinical information, and were asked to delineate the lesions and create a treatment plan. Their contouring and plans (10 adenoma and 11 meningioma plans), were then compared. In addition, we estimated the influence of differences in contouring by superimposing the respective contours onto a default plan. The median planning target volume (PTV) and the ratio of the largest to the smallest contoured volume were 9.22 cm 3 (range, 7.17 - 14.3 cm 3 ) and 1.99 for pituitary adenoma, and 6.86 cm 3 (range 6.05 - 14.6 cm 3 ) and 2.41 for meningioma. PTV volume was 10.1 ± 1.74 cm 3 for group 1 with a margin of 1 -2 mm around the CTV (n = 3) and 9.28 ± 1.8 cm 3 (p = 0.51) for group 2 with no margin (n = 7) in pituitary adenoma. In meningioma, group 1 showed larger PTV volume (10.1 ± 3.26 cm 3 ) than group 2 (6.91 ± 0.7 cm 3 , p = 0.03). All submitted plan keep the irradiated dose to optic tract within the range of 50 Gy (equivalent total doses in 2 Gy fractionation). However, contours superimposed onto the dose distribution of the default plan indicated that an excessive dose 23.64 Gy (up to 268% of the default plan) in pituitary adenoma and 24.84 Gy (131% of the default plan) in meningioma to the optic nerve in the contours from different contouring. Quality assurance revealed inter-observer variability in contour delineation and their influences on planning for pituitary adenoma and meningioma near optic tract

  6. 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography-Based Radiotherapy Target Volume Definition in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Delineation by Radiation Oncologists vs. Joint Outlining With a PET Radiologist?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanna, Gerard G.; Carson, Kathryn J.; Lynch, Tom; McAleese, Jonathan; Cosgrove, Vivian P.; Eakin, Ruth L.; Stewart, David P.; Zatari, Ashraf; O'Sullivan, Joe M.; Hounsell, Alan R.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: 18 F-Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) has benefits in target volume (TV) definition in radiotherapy treatment planning (RTP) for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC); however, an optimal protocol for TV delineation has not been determined. We investigate volumetric and positional variation in gross tumor volume (GTV) delineation using a planning PET/CT among three radiation oncologists and a PET radiologist. Methods and Materials: RTP PET/CT scans were performed on 28 NSCLC patients (Stage IA-IIIB) of which 14 patients received prior induction chemotherapy. Three radiation oncologists and one PET radiologist working with a fourth radiation oncologist independently delineated the GTV on CT alone (GTV CT ) and on fused PET/CT images (GTV PETCT ). The mean percentage volume change (PVC) between GTV CT and GTV PETCT for the radiation oncologists and the PVC between GTV CT and GTV PETCT for the PET radiologist were compared using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Concordance index (CI) was used to assess both positional and volume change between GTV CT and GTV PETCT in a single measurement. Results: For all patients, a significant difference in PVC from GTV CT to GTV PETCT exists between the radiation oncologist (median, 5.9%), and the PET radiologist (median, -0.4%, p = 0.001). However, no significant difference in median concordance index (comparing GTV CT and GTV FUSED for individual cases) was observed (PET radiologist = 0.73; radiation oncologists = 0.66; p = 0.088). Conclusions: Percentage volume changes from GTV CT to GTV PETCT were lower for the PET radiologist than for the radiation oncologists, suggesting a lower impact of PET/CT in TV delineation for the PET radiologist than for the oncologists. Guidelines are needed to standardize the use of PET/CT for TV delineation in RTP.

  7. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography-based radiotherapy target volume definition in non-small-cell lung cancer: delineation by radiation oncologists vs. joint outlining with a PET radiologist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Gerard G; Carson, Kathryn J; Lynch, Tom; McAleese, Jonathan; Cosgrove, Vivian P; Eakin, Ruth L; Stewart, David P; Zatari, Ashraf; O'Sullivan, Joe M; Hounsell, Alan R

    2010-11-15

    (18)F-Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) has benefits in target volume (TV) definition in radiotherapy treatment planning (RTP) for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC); however, an optimal protocol for TV delineation has not been determined. We investigate volumetric and positional variation in gross tumor volume (GTV) delineation using a planning PET/CT among three radiation oncologists and a PET radiologist. RTP PET/CT scans were performed on 28 NSCLC patients (Stage IA-IIIB) of which 14 patients received prior induction chemotherapy. Three radiation oncologists and one PET radiologist working with a fourth radiation oncologist independently delineated the GTV on CT alone (GTV(CT)) and on fused PET/CT images (GTV(PETCT)). The mean percentage volume change (PVC) between GTV(CT) and GTV(PETCT) for the radiation oncologists and the PVC between GTV(CT) and GTV(PETCT) for the PET radiologist were compared using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Concordance index (CI) was used to assess both positional and volume change between GTV(CT) and GTV(PETCT) in a single measurement. For all patients, a significant difference in PVC from GTV(CT) to GTV(PETCT) exists between the radiation oncologist (median, 5.9%), and the PET radiologist (median, -0.4%, p = 0.001). However, no significant difference in median concordance index (comparing GTV(CT) and GTV(FUSED) for individual cases) was observed (PET radiologist = 0.73; radiation oncologists = 0.66; p = 0.088). Percentage volume changes from GTV(CT) to GTV(PETCT) were lower for the PET radiologist than for the radiation oncologists, suggesting a lower impact of PET/CT in TV delineation for the PET radiologist than for the oncologists. Guidelines are needed to standardize the use of PET/CT for TV delineation in RTP. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Reduction of dose delivered to the rectum and bulb of the penis using MRI delineation for radiotherapy of the prostate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenbakkers, Roel J. H. M.; Deurloo, Kirsten E. I.; Nowak, Peter J. C. M.; Lebesque, Joos V.; van Herk, Marcel; Rasch, Coen R. N.

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE: The prostate volume delineated on MRI is smaller than on CT. The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of MRI- vs. CT-based prostate delineation using multiple observers on the dose to the target and organs at risk during external beam radiotherapy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: CT

  9. Tumor delineation: The weakest link in the search for accuracy in radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Njeh C

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiotherapy is one of the most effective modalities for the treatment of cancer. However, there is a high degree of uncertainty associated with the target volume of most cancer sites. The sources of these uncertainties include, but are not limited to, the motion of the target, patient setup errors, patient movements, and the delineation of the target volume. Recently, many imaging techniques have been introduced to track the motion of tumors. The treatment delivery using these techniques is collectively called image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT. Ultimately, IGRT is only as good as the accuracy with which the target is known. There are reports of interobserver variability in tumor delineation across anatomical sites, but the widest ranges of variations have been reported for the delineation of head and neck tumors as well as esophageal and lung carcinomas. Significant interobserver variability in target delineation can be attributed to many factors including the impact of imaging and the influence of the observer (specialty, training, and personal bias. The visibility of the target can be greatly improved with the use of multimodality imaging by co-registration of CT with a second modality such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and/or positron emission tomography. Also, continuous education, training, and cross-collaboration of the radiation oncologist with other specialties can reduce the degree of variability in tumor delineation.

  10. Development of targeted radiotherapy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferro, Guillermina; Villarreal, Jose E.; Garcia, Laura; Tendilla, Jose I.; Paredes, Lydia; Murphy, Consuelo A.; Pedraza, Martha

    2001-01-01

    Conventional or external beam radiotherapy, has been a viable alternative for cancer treatment. Although this technique is effective, its use is limited if the patient has multiple malignant lesions (metastases). An alternative approach is based on the design of radiopharmaceuticals that, to be administered in the patient, are directed specifically toward the target cell producing a selective radiation delivery. This treatment is known as targeted radiotherapy. We have summarized and discussed some results related to our investigations on the development of targeted radiotherapy systems, including aspects of internal dosimetry

  11. Targeted intraoperative radiotherapy in oncology

    CERN Document Server

    Keshtgar, Mohammed; Wenz, Frederik

    2014-01-01

    Targeted intraoperative radiotherapy is a major advance in the management of cancer patients. With an emphasis on practical aspects, this book offers an ideal introduction to this innovative  technology for clinicians.

  12. Optimising delineation accuracy of tumours in PET for radiotherapy planning using blind deconvolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guvenis, A.; Koc, A.

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging has been proven to be useful in radiotherapy planning for the determination of the metabolically active regions of tumours. Delineation of tumours, however, is a difficult task in part due to high noise levels and the partial volume effects originating mainly from the low camera resolution. The goal of this work is to study the effect of blind deconvolution on tumour volume estimation accuracy for different computer-aided contouring methods. The blind deconvolution estimates the point spread function (PSF) of the imaging system in an iterative manner in a way that the likelihood of the given image being the convolution output is maximised. In this way, the PSF of the imaging system does not need to be known. Data were obtained from a NEMA NU-2 IQ-based phantom with a GE DSTE-16 PET/CT scanner. The artificial tumour diameters were 13, 17, 22, 28 and 37 mm with a target/background ratio of 4:1. The tumours were delineated before and after blind deconvolution. Student's two-tailed paired t-test showed a significant decrease in volume estimation error ( p < 0.001) when blind deconvolution was used in conjunction with computer-aided delineation methods. A manual delineation confirmation demonstrated an improvement from 26 to 16 % for the artificial tumour of size 37 mm while an improvement from 57 to 15 % was noted for the small tumour of 13 mm. Therefore, it can be concluded that blind deconvolution of reconstructed PET images may be used to increase tumour delineation accuracy. (authors)

  13. Interobserver Delineation variation using CT versus combined CT + MRI in intensity- modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villeirs, G.M.; Verstraete, K.L.; Vaerenbergh, K. van; Vakaet, L.; Bral, S.; Claus, F.; Neve, W.J. de; Meerleer, G.O. de

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: to quantify interobserver variation of prostate and seminal vesicle delineations using CT only versus CT + MRI in consensus reading with a radiologist. Material and methods: the prostate and seminal vesicles of 13 patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostatic adenocarcinoma were retrospectively delineated by three radiation oncologists on CT only and on CT + MRI in consensus reading with a radiologist. The volumes and margin positions were calculated and intermodality and interobserver variations were assessed for the clinical target volume (CTV), seminal vesicles, prostate and three prostatic subdivisions (apical, middle and basal third). Results: using CT + MRI as compared to CT alone, the mean CTV, prostate and seminal vesicle volumes significantly decreased by 6.54%, 5.21% and 10.47%, respectively. More importantly, their standard deviations significantly decreased by 63.06%, 62.65% and 44.83%, respectively. The highest level of variation was found at the prostatic apex, followed by the prostatic base and seminal vesicles. Conclusion: addition of MRI to CT in consensus reading with a radiologist results in a moderate decrease of the CTV, but an important decrease of the interobserver delineation variation, especially at the prostatic apex. (orig.)

  14. Tumor and target delineation: current research and future challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Austin-Seymour, Mary; Chen, George T.Y.; Rosenman, Julian; Michalski, Jeff; Lindsley, Karen; Goitein, Michael

    1995-01-01

    In the past decade, significant progress has been made in the imaging of tumors, three dimensional (3D) treatment planning, and radiation treatment delivery. At this time one of the greatest challenges for conformal radiation therapy is the accurate delineation of tumor and target volumes. The physician encounters many uncertainties in the process of defining both tumor and target. The sources of these uncertainties are discussed, as well as the issues requiring study to reduce these uncertainties

  15. Interobserver variability in target volume delineation of hepatocellular carcinoma. An analysis of the working group ''Stereotactic Radiotherapy'' of the German Society for Radiation Oncology (DEGRO)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gkika, E.; Kirste, S. [Medical Center - University of Freiburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany); Tanadini-Lang, S.; Andratschke, N.; Guckenberger, M. [University Hospital Zuerich, Department of Radiation Oncology, Zurich (Switzerland); Holzner, P.A.; Neeff, H.P. [Medical Center - University of Freiburg, Department of Visceral Surgery, Freiburg (Germany); Rischke, H.C. [Medical Center - University of Freiburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany); Medical Center - University of Freiburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Freiburg (Germany); Reese, T. [University Hospital Halle-Wittenberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Halle-Wittenberg (Germany); Lohaus, F. [Technische Universitaet Dresden, Department of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Technische Universitaet Dresden, OncoRay - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden (Germany); National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT), Dresden (Germany); German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Dresden (Germany); Duma, M.N. [Helmholtz Zentrum Munich, Institute of Innovative Radiotherapy, Department of Radiation Sciences, Munich (Germany); TU Munich, Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Dieckmann, K. [Medical University Vienna, Department of Radiation Oncology, General Hospital Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Semrau, R. [University Hospital of Cologne, Department of Radiation Oncology, Cologne (Germany); Stockinger, M. [University Hospital Mainz, Department of Radiation Oncology, Mainz (Germany); Imhoff, D. [University Hospital Frankfurt, Department of Radiation Oncology, Frankfurt (Germany); Saphir Radiosurgery Center, Frankfurt (Germany); Kremers, N. [Medical Center - University of Freiburg, Department of Radiology, Freiburg (Germany); Haefner, M.F. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Nestle, U.; Grosu, A.L.; Brunner, T.B. [Medical Center - University of Freiburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany); University of Freiburg, Faculty of Medicine, Freiburg (Germany); German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Freiburg (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany)

    2017-10-15

    Definition of gross tumor volume (GTV) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) requires dedicated imaging in multiple contrast medium phases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the interobserver agreement (IOA) in gross tumor delineation of HCC in a multicenter panel. The analysis was performed within the ''Stereotactic Radiotherapy'' working group of the German Society for Radiation Oncology (DEGRO). The GTVs of three anonymized HCC cases were delineated by 16 physicians from nine centers using multiphasic CT scans. In the first case the tumor was well defined. The second patient had multifocal HCC (one conglomerate and one peripheral tumor) and was previously treated with transarterial chemoembolization (TACE). The peripheral lesion was adjacent to the previous TACE site. The last patient had an extensive HCC with a portal vein thrombosis (PVT) and an inhomogeneous liver parenchyma due to cirrhosis. The IOA was evaluated according to Landis and Koch. The IOA for the first case was excellent (kappa: 0.85); for the second case moderate (kappa: 0.48) for the peripheral tumor and substantial (kappa: 0.73) for the conglomerate. In the case of the peripheral tumor the inconsistency is most likely explained by the necrotic tumor cavity after TACE caudal to the viable tumor. In the last case the IOA was fair, with a kappa of 0.34, with significant heterogeneity concerning the borders of the tumor and the PVT. The IOA was very good among the cases were the tumor was well defined. In complex cases, where the tumor did not show the typical characteristics, or in cases with Lipiodol (Guerbet, Paris, France) deposits, IOA agreement was compromised. (orig.) [German] Die Definition des makroskopischen Tumorvolumens (GTV) bei hepatozellulaeren Karzinomen (HCC) erfordert eine dezidierte Bildgebung in mehreren Kontrastmittelphasen. Ziel dieser Studie war es, die Interobservervariabilitaet (IOA) bei der Konturierung von HCC-Laesionen durch ein multizentrisches

  16. A local contrast based approach to threshold segmentation for PET target volume delineation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drever, Laura; Robinson, Don M.; McEwan, Alexander; Roa, Wilson

    2006-01-01

    Current radiation therapy techniques, such as intensity modulated radiation therapy and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy rely on the precise delivery of high doses of radiation to well-defined volumes. CT, the imaging modality that is most commonly used to determine treatment volumes cannot, however, easily distinguish between cancerous and normal tissue. The ability of positron emission tomography (PET) to more readily differentiate between malignant and healthy tissues has generated great interest in using PET images to delineate target volumes for radiation treatment planning. At present the accurate geometric delineation of tumor volumes is a subject open to considerable interpretation. The possibility of using a local contrast based approach to threshold segmentation to accurately delineate PET target cross sections is investigated using well-defined cylindrical and spherical volumes. Contrast levels which yield correct volumetric quantification are found to be a function of the activity concentration ratio between target and background, target size, and slice location. Possibilities for clinical implementation are explored along with the limits posed by this form of segmentation

  17. Targeting IAP proteins in combination with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fulda, Simone

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of radiotherapy critically depends on the activation of intrinsic cell death programs in cancer cells. This implies that evasion of cell death, a hallmark of human cancers, can contribute to radioresistance. Therefore, novel strategies to reactivate cell death programs in cancer cells are required in order to overcome resistance to radiotherapy. Since Inhibitor of Apoptosis (IAP) proteins are expressed at high levels in multiple cancers and block cell death induction at a central point, therapeutic targeting of IAP proteins represents a promising approach to potentiate the efficacy of radiotherapy. The current review discusses the concept of targeting IAP proteins in combination with radiotherapy

  18. Comparative evaluation of 11C-MET PET-CT and MRI for GTV delineation in precision radiotherapy for gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Ru; Qian Liting; Wang Shicun; Liu Wei; Luo Wenguang; Zhang Hongbo; Li Guanghu; Hu Zhigang; Liu Lei

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the difference between MRI and 11 C-MET PET-CT for gross tumor volume (GTV) delineation in the precision radiotherapy for gliomas. Methods: Six patients with a pathologically confirmed diagnosis of gliomas were selected for target delineation. Five physicians in our department were called to delineate the GTV based on the preoperative MRI and 11 C-MET PET-CT images of these patients. The GTVs based on the two methods were compared. Results: There was no significant difference between the GTVs based on MRI and 11 C-MET PET-CT (P=0.917), and their coefficients of variation were also similar (P=0.600). The coincidences of GTVs were different among the patients, with a maximum value of 73.0% and a minimum value of 51.8%. GTV showed no significant difference when defined by different physicians on MRI and PET-CT (P=0.709); the biggest difference was 27.66 cm 3 on PET-CT and 40.37 cm 3 on MRI. Conclusions: The boundaries of gliomas defined on MRI and PET-CT are different. The GTVs delineated by different physicians on MRI and PET-CT are similar, and the biggest difference on PET-CT is smaller than that on MRI, which suggests that 11 C-MET PET-CT is a more direct way for displaying GTV. (authors)

  19. Inter-observer variation in delineation of the heart and left anterior descending coronary artery in radiotherapy for breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laugaard Lorenzen, Ebbe; Taylor, C. W.; Maraldo, M.

    2013-01-01

    receiving left breast radiotherapy. The delineations were carried out twice, first without guidelines and then with a set of common guidelines. RESULTS: For the heart, most spatial variation in delineation was near the base of the heart whereas for the LADCA most variation was in its length at the apex...

  20. Target delineation in radiosurgery for cerebral arteriovenous malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, W.Y.; Nordell, B.; Karlsson, B.; Soederman, M.; Lindqvist, M.; Ericson, K.; Franck, A.; Lax, I.; Lindquist, C.

    1993-01-01

    A study of 6 selected arteriovenous malformation (AVM) patients was performed to investigate the feasibility of delineating an AVM on MR images and to compare the AVM volume outlined on different images. Conventional stereotaxic angiograms, stereotaxic MR images and MR angiograms using several different pulse sequences were obtained prior to radiosurgery. Treatment plans were made from the conventional stereotaxic angiograms. These plans were then transferred to a separate dose planning computer which displayed the MR images with the superimposed isodose lines. The radiated volumes of AVM and brain tissue were measured from these MR images. Last, an assessment was made of the radiation volume needed for an appropriate treatment of the AVM if the treatment plan was made from the MR images rather than from the conventional stereotaxic angiogram. It was possible to delineate medium and large size AVM nidi on stereotaxic MR images based on an integration of information obtained from various pulse sequences. The estimated volumes of the AVM nidi were found to be larger on the conventional stereotaxic angiograms than on the stereotaxic MR images. Consequently, a dose plan based on a conventional stereotaxic angiogram would result in a higher integral dose to the brain with the same target dose. By using reliable MR information it is expected that the volume of brain exposed to radiation could be decreased and the adverse effects of stereotactic radiosurgery for AVM thereby minimized. (orig.)

  1. Automated delineation of brain structures in patients undergoing radiotherapy for primary brain tumors: From atlas to dose–volume histograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conson, Manuel; Cella, Laura; Pacelli, Roberto; Comerci, Marco; Liuzzi, Raffaele; Salvatore, Marco; Quarantelli, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To implement and evaluate a magnetic resonance imaging atlas-based automated segmentation (MRI-ABAS) procedure for cortical and sub-cortical grey matter areas definition, suitable for dose-distribution analyses in brain tumor patients undergoing radiotherapy (RT). Patients and methods: 3T-MRI scans performed before RT in ten brain tumor patients were used. The MRI-ABAS procedure consists of grey matter classification and atlas-based regions of interest definition. The Simultaneous Truth and Performance Level Estimation (STAPLE) algorithm was applied to structures manually delineated by four experts to generate the standard reference. Performance was assessed comparing multiple geometrical metrics (including Dice Similarity Coefficient – DSC). Dosimetric parameters from dose–volume-histograms were also generated and compared. Results: Compared with manual delineation, MRI-ABAS showed excellent reproducibility [median DSC ABAS = 1 (95% CI, 0.97–1.0) vs. DSC MANUAL = 0.90 (0.73–0.98)], acceptable accuracy [DSC ABAS = 0.81 (0.68–0.94) vs. DSC MANUAL = 0.90 (0.76–0.98)], and an overall 90% reduction in delineation time. Dosimetric parameters obtained using MRI-ABAS were comparable with those obtained by manual contouring. Conclusions: The speed, reproducibility, and robustness of the process make MRI-ABAS a valuable tool for investigating radiation dose–volume effects in non-target brain structures providing additional standardized data without additional time-consuming procedures

  2. Target volume delineation in external beam partial breast irradiation: Less inter-observer variation with preoperative- compared to postoperative delineation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leij, Femke van der; Elkhuizen, Paula H.M.; Janssen, Tomas M.; Poortmans, Philip; Sangen, Maurice van der; Scholten, Astrid N.; Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine van; Boersma, Liesbeth J.

    2014-01-01

    The challenge of adequate target volume definition in external beam partial breast irradiation (PBI) could be overcome with preoperative irradiation, due to less inter-observer variation. We compared the target volume delineation for external beam PBI on preoperative versus postoperative CT scans of twenty-four breast cancer patients

  3. Target volume delineation in external beam partial breast irradiation: less inter-observer variation with preoperative- compared to postoperative delineation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leij, F. van der; Elkhuizen, P.H.M.; Janssen, T.M.; Poortmans, P.M.P.; Sangen, M. van der; Scholten, A.N.; Vliet-Vroegindeweij, C. van; Boersma, L.J.

    2014-01-01

    The challenge of adequate target volume definition in external beam partial breast irradiation (PBI) could be overcome with preoperative irradiation, due to less inter-observer variation. We compared the target volume delineation for external beam PBI on preoperative versus postoperative CT scans of

  4. Guidelines for target volume definition in post-operative radiotherapy for prostate cancer, on behalf of the EORTC Radiation Oncology Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poortmans, Philip; Bossi, Alberto; Vandeputte, Katia; Bosset, Mathieu; Miralbell, Raymond; Maingon, Philippe; Boehmer, Dirk; Budiharto, Tom; Symon, Zvi; Bergh, Alfons C.M. van den; Scrase, Christopher; Poppel, Hendrik van; Bolla, Michel

    2007-01-01

    The appropriate application of 3-D conformal radiotherapy, intensity modulated radiotherapy or image guided radiotherapy for patients undergoing post-operative radiotherapy for prostate cancer requires a standardisation of the target volume definition and delineation as well as standardisation of the clinical quality assurance procedures. Recommendations for this are presented on behalf of the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Radiation Oncology Group and in addition to the already published guidelines for radiotherapy as the primary treatment

  5. Automatic Delineation of On-Line Head-And-Neck Computed Tomography Images: Toward On-Line Adaptive Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Tiezhi; Chi Yuwei; Meldolesi, Elisa; Yan Di

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and validate a fully automatic region-of-interest (ROI) delineation method for on-line adaptive radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: On-line adaptive radiotherapy requires a robust and automatic image segmentation method to delineate ROIs in on-line volumetric images. We have implemented an atlas-based image segmentation method to automatically delineate ROIs of head-and-neck helical computed tomography images. A total of 32 daily computed tomography images from 7 head-and-neck patients were delineated using this automatic image segmentation method. Manually drawn contours on the daily images were used as references in the evaluation of automatically delineated ROIs. Two methods were used in quantitative validation: (1) the dice similarity coefficient index, which indicates the overlapping ratio between the manually and automatically delineated ROIs; and (2) the distance transformation, which yields the distances between the manually and automatically delineated ROI surfaces. Results: Automatic segmentation showed agreement with manual contouring. For most ROIs, the dice similarity coefficient indexes were approximately 0.8. Similarly, the distance transformation evaluation results showed that the distances between the manually and automatically delineated ROI surfaces were mostly within 3 mm. The distances between two surfaces had a mean of 1 mm and standard deviation of <2 mm in most ROIs. Conclusion: With atlas-based image segmentation, it is feasible to automatically delineate ROIs on the head-and-neck helical computed tomography images in on-line adaptive treatments

  6. Development of a Software for Quantitative Evaluation Radiotherapy Target and Organ-at-Risk Segmentation Comparison

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree; Awan, Musaddiq; Bedrick, Steven; Rasch, Coen R. N.; Rosenthal, David I.; Fuller, Clifton D.

    2014-01-01

    Modern radiotherapy requires accurate region of interest (ROI) inputs for plan optimization and delivery. Target delineation, however, remains operator-dependent and potentially serves as a major source of treatment delivery error. In order to optimize this critical, yet observer-driven process, a

  7. Postoperative radiation in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and target volume delineation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Y

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Yingming Zhu,* Minghuan Li,* Li Kong, Jinming Yu Department of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Esophageal cancer is the sixth leading cause of cancer death worldwide, and patients who are treated with surgery alone, without neoadjuvant therapies, experience frequent relapses. Whether postoperative therapies could reduce the recurrence or improve overall survival is still controversial for these patients. The purpose of our review is to figure out the value of postoperative adjuvant therapy and address the disputes about target volume delineation according to published data. Based on the evidence of increased morbidity and disadvantages on patient survival caused by postoperative chemotherapy or radiotherapy (RT alone provided by studies in the early 1990s, the use of postoperative adjuvant therapies in cases of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma has diminished substantially and has been replaced gradually by neoadjuvant chemoradiation. With advances in surgery and RT, accumulating evidence has recently rekindled interest in the delivery of postoperative RT or chemoradiotherapy in patients with stage T3/T4 or N1 (lymph node positive carcinomas after radical surgery. However, due to complications with the standard radiation field, a nonconforming modified field has been adopted in most studies. Therefore, we analyze different field applications and provide suggestions on the optimization of the radiation field based on the major sites of relapse and the surgical non-clearance area. For upper and middle thoracic esophageal carcinomas, the bilateral supraclavicular and superior mediastinal areas remain common sites of recurrence and should be encompassed within the clinical target volume. In contrast, a consensus has yet to be reached regarding lower thoracic esophageal carcinomas; the

  8. Interobserver delineation uncertainty in involved-node radiation therapy (INRT) for early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma: on behalf of the Radiotherapy Committee of the EORTC lymphoma group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aznar, Marianne C.; Girinsky, Theodore; Berthelsen, Anne Kiil

    2017-01-01

    deviations between the surfaces of the observer and consensus contour (Hausdorff distance). 3D-conformal (3D-CRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans were calculated for each contour in order to investigate the impact of interobserver variability on each treatment modality. Similar target...... of the systematic error associated with delineation uncertainty, ranged from 1.9 to 3.8 mm (median: 3.2 mm). Variations in mean dose resulting from different observer contours were small and were not higher in IMRT plans than in 3D-CRT plans. CONCLUSIONS: We observed considerable differences in target volume...

  9. Tumour bed delineation for partial breast/breast boost radiotherapy: What is the optimal number of implanted markers?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirby, Anna NM.; Jena, Rajesh; Harris, Emma J.; Evans, Phil M.; Crowley, Clare; Gregory, Deborah L.; Coles, Charlotte E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: International consensus has not been reached regarding the optimal number of implanted tumour bed (TB) markers for partial breast/breast boost radiotherapy target volume delineation. Four common methods are: insertion of 6 clips (4 radial, 1 deep and 1 superficial), 5 clips (4 radial and 1 deep), 1 clip at the chest wall, and no clips. We compared TB volumes delineated using 6, 5, 1 and 0 clips in women who have undergone wide-local excision (WLE) of breast cancer (BC) with full-thickness closure of the excision cavity, in order to determine the additional margin required for breast boost or partial breast irradiation (PBI) when fewer than 6 clips are used. Methods: Ten patients with invasive ductal BC who had undergone WLE followed by implantation of six fiducial markers (titanium clips) each underwent CT imaging for radiotherapy planning purposes. Retrospective processing of the DICOM image datasets was performed to remove markers and associated imaging artefacts, using an in-house software algorithm. Four observers outlined TB volumes on four different datasets for each case: (1) all markers present (CT 6M ); (2) the superficial marker removed (CT 5M ); (3) all but the chest wall marker removed (CT CW ); (4) all markers removed (CT 0M ). For each observer, the additional margin required around each of TB 0M , TB CW , and TB 5M in order to encompass TB 6M was calculated. The conformity level index (CLI) and differences in centre-of-mass (COM) between observers were quantified for CT 0M , CT CW , CT 5M , CT 6M . Results: The overall median additional margins required to encompass TB 6M were 8 mm (range 0–28 mm) for TB 0M , 5 mm (range 1–13 mm) for TB CW , and 2 mm (range 0–7 mm) for TB 5M . CLI were higher for TB volumes delineated using CT 6M (0.31) CT 5M (0.32) than for CT CW (0.19) and CT 0M (0.15). Conclusions: In women who have undergone WLE of breast cancer with full-thickness closure of the excision cavity and who are proceeding to PBI or

  10. Variability in target delineation of cervical carcinoma: A Korean radiation oncology group study (KROG 15-06)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Ji Hyeon; Cho, Byung Chul; Jeong, Chi Young; Park, Won; Kim, Hak Jae; Yoon, Won Sup; Yoon, Mee Sun; Kim, Ji-Yoon; Choi, Jin Hwa; Choi, Youngmin; Kim, Joo-Young

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To determine inter-observer variability in target volume definition of cervical cancer in radical and adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) settings. Methods Eight physicians contoured CTVs of 2 patients underwent definitive and postoperative RT. Each volume was analyzed using the individual/median volume ratio and generalized conformity index (CIgen). And center of mass (COM) of each contour was calculated. Expert agreement was quantified using an expectation maximization algorithm for Simultaneous Truth and Performance Level Estimation (STAPLE). Results For definitive RT, the individual/median volume ratio ranged from 0.51 to 1.41, and CIgen was 0.531. Mean 3-dimensional distances of average to each COM were 7.8 mm. For postoperative RT setting, corresponding values were 0.65–1.38, 0.563, and 5.3 mm. Kappa value of expert agreement was 0.65 and 0.67, respectively. STAPLE estimates of the sensitivity, specificity, and kappa measures of inter-physician agreement were 0.73, 0.98, and 0.65 for the definitive and 0.75, 0.98, and 0.67 for the adjuvant radiotherapy setting. The largest difference was observed in the superior-inferior direction, particularly in the upper vagina and the common iliac area. Conclusion As there was still some variability in target delineation, more detailed guidelines for target volume delineation and continuing education would help to reduce this uncertainty. PMID:28301492

  11. Recommendations for the delineation of organs at risk in ENT radiotherapy; Recommandations de delineation des organes a risque en radiotherapie ORL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, D.; Halimi, P.; Berges, O.; Deberne, M.; Botti, M.; Giraud, P. [Hopital europeen Georges-Pompidou, Paris (France); Servagi-Vernat, S. [CHUjean-Minjoz, Besancon (France)

    2011-10-15

    Based on a literature survey, the authors propose recommendations for the delineation of the pharyngeal constrictor muscles, inner ear, larynx, buccal cavity, and temporomandibular joint. These recommendations of delineation of organs at risk are related to the functional anatomy of the considered structures, and correspond to volumes used in published surveys on dose-volume toxicity. They are simple and reproducible. Short communication

  12. MR vs CT imaging: low rectal cancer tumour delineation for three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Neill, B D P

    2009-06-01

    Modern three-dimentional radiotherapy is based upon CT. For rectal cancer, this relies upon target definition on CT, which is not the optimal imaging modality. The major limitation of CT is its low inherent contrast resolution. Targets defined by MRI could facilitate smaller, more accurate, tumour volumes than CT. Our study reviewed imaging and planning data for 10 patients with locally advanced low rectal cancer (defined as < 6 cm from the anal verge on digital examination). Tumour volume and location were compared for sagittal pre-treatment MRI and planning CT. CT consistently overestimated all tumour radiological parameters. Estimates of tumour volume, tumour length and height of proximal tumour from the anal verge were larger on planning CT than on MRI (p < 0.05). Tumour volumes defined on MRI are smaller, shorter and more distal from the anal sphincter than CT-based volumes. For radiotherapy planning, this may result in smaller treatment volumes, which could lead to a reduction in dose to organs at risk and facilitate dose escalation.

  13. Risk-adapted targeted intraoperative radiotherapy versus whole-breast radiotherapy for breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaidya, Jayant S; Wenz, Frederik; Bulsara, Max

    2014-01-01

    The TARGIT-A trial compared risk-adapted radiotherapy using single-dose targeted intraoperative radiotherapy (TARGIT) versus fractionated external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for breast cancer. We report 5-year results for local recurrence and the first analysis of overall survival....

  14. Clipping of tumour resection margins allows accurate target volume delineation in head and neck cancer adjuvant radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bittermann, Gido; Wiedenmann, Nicole; Bunea, Andrei; Schwarz, Steffen J.; Grosu, Anca-L.; Schmelzeisen, Rainer; Metzger, Marc C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Accurate tumour bed localisation is a key requirement for adjuvant radiotherapy. A new procedure is described for head and neck cancer treatment that improves tumour bed localisation using titanium clips. Materials and methods: Following complete local excision of the primary tumour, the tumour bed was marked with titanium clips. Preoperative gross target volume (GTV) and postoperative tumour bed were examined and the distances between the centres of gravity were evaluated. Results: 49 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity were prospectively enrolled in this study. All patients underwent tumour resection, neck lymph node dissection and defect reconstruction in one stage. During surgery, 7–49 clips were placed in the resection cavity. Surgical clip insertion was successful in 88% (n = 43). Clip identification and tumour bed delineation was successful in all 43 patients. The overall distance between the centres of gravity of the preoperative tumour extension to the tumour bed was 0.9 cm. A significant relationship between the preoperative tumour extension and the postoperative tumour bed volume could be demonstrated. Conclusion: We demonstrate a precise delineation of the former tumour cavity. Improvements in tumour bed delineation allow an increase of accuracy for adjuvant treatment

  15. Interobserver delineation uncertainty in involved-node radiation therapy (INRT) for early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma: on behalf of the Radiotherapy Committee of the EORTC lymphoma group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aznar, Marianne C; Girinsky, Theodore; Berthelsen, Anne Kiil; Aleman, Berthe; Beijert, Max; Hutchings, Martin; Lievens, Yolande; Meijnders, Paul; Meidahl Petersen, Peter; Schut, Deborah; Maraldo, Maja V; van der Maazen, Richard; Specht, Lena

    2017-04-01

    In early-stage classical Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) the target volume nowadays consists of the volume of the originally involved nodes. Delineation of this volume on a post-chemotherapy CT-scan is challenging. We report on the interobserver variability in target volume definition and its impact on resulting treatment plans. Two representative cases were selected (1: male, stage IB, localization: left axilla; 2: female, stage IIB, localizations: mediastinum and bilateral neck). Eight experienced observers individually defined the clinical target volume (CTV) using involved-node radiotherapy (INRT) as defined by the EORTC-GELA guidelines for the H10 trial. A consensus contour was generated and the standard deviation computed. We investigated the overlap between observer and consensus contour [Sørensen-Dice coefficient (DSC)] and the magnitude of gross deviations between the surfaces of the observer and consensus contour (Hausdorff distance). 3D-conformal (3D-CRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans were calculated for each contour in order to investigate the impact of interobserver variability on each treatment modality. Similar target coverage was enforced for all plans. The median CTV was 120 cm 3 (IQR: 95-173 cm 3 ) for Case 1, and 255 cm 3 (IQR: 183-293 cm 3 ) for Case 2. DSC values were generally high (>0.7), and Hausdorff distances were about 30 mm. The SDs between all observer contours, providing an estimate of the systematic error associated with delineation uncertainty, ranged from 1.9 to 3.8 mm (median: 3.2 mm). Variations in mean dose resulting from different observer contours were small and were not higher in IMRT plans than in 3D-CRT plans. We observed considerable differences in target volume delineation, but the systematic delineation uncertainty of around 3 mm is comparable to that reported in other tumour sites. This report is a first step towards calculating an evidence-based planning target volume margin for INRT in HL.

  16. Semi-automatic delineation using weighted CT-MRI registered images for radiotherapy of nasopharyngeal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitton, I. [European Georges Pompidou Hospital, Department of Radiology, 20 rue Leblanc, 75015, Paris (France); Cornelissen, S. A. P. [Image Sciences Institute, UMC, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 85500, 3508 GA Utrecht (Netherlands); Duppen, J. C.; Rasch, C. R. N.; Herk, M. van [The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Radiotherapy, Plesmanlaan 121, 1066 CX Amsterdam (Netherlands); Steenbakkers, R. J. H. M. [University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Hanzeplein 1, 9713 GZ Groningen (Netherlands); Peeters, S. T. H. [UZ Gasthuisberg, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven, Belgique (Belgium); Hoebers, F. J. P. [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO clinic), GROW School for Oncology and Development Biology Maastricht, 6229 ET Maastricht (Netherlands); Kaanders, J. H. A. M. [UMC St-Radboud, Department of Radiotherapy, Geert Grooteplein 32, 6525 GA Nijmegen (Netherlands); Nowak, P. J. C. M. [ERASMUS University Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology,Groene Hilledijk 301, 3075 EA Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2011-08-15

    Purpose: To develop a delineation tool that refines physician-drawn contours of the gross tumor volume (GTV) in nasopharynx cancer, using combined pixel value information from x-ray computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) during delineation. Methods: Operator-guided delineation assisted by a so-called ''snake'' algorithm was applied on weighted CT-MRI registered images. The physician delineates a rough tumor contour that is continuously adjusted by the snake algorithm using the underlying image characteristics. The algorithm was evaluated on five nasopharyngeal cancer patients. Different linear weightings CT and MRI were tested as input for the snake algorithm and compared according to contrast and tumor to noise ratio (TNR). The semi-automatic delineation was compared with manual contouring by seven experienced radiation oncologists. Results: A good compromise for TNR and contrast was obtained by weighing CT twice as strong as MRI. The new algorithm did not notably reduce interobserver variability, it did however, reduce the average delineation time by 6 min per case. Conclusions: The authors developed a user-driven tool for delineation and correction based a snake algorithm and registered weighted CT image and MRI. The algorithm adds morphological information from CT during the delineation on MRI and accelerates the delineation task.

  17. Impact of the accuracy of automatic tumour functional volume delineation on radiotherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Maitre, Amandine; Hatt, Mathieu; Pradier, Olivier; Cheze-le Rest, Catherine; Visvikis, Dimitris

    2012-01-01

    Over the past few years several automatic and semi-automatic PET segmentation methods for target volume definition in radiotherapy have been proposed. The objective of this study is to compare different methods in terms of dosimetry. For such a comparison, a gold standard is needed. For this purpose, realistic GATE-simulated PET images were used. Three lung cases and three H and N cases were designed with various shapes, contrasts and heterogeneities. Four different segmentation approaches were compared: fixed and adaptive thresholds, a fuzzy C-mean and the fuzzy locally adaptive Bayesian method. For each of these target volumes, an IMRT treatment plan was defined. The different algorithms and resulting plans were compared in terms of segmentation errors and ground-truth volume coverage using different metrics (V 95 , D 95 , homogeneity index and conformity index). The major differences between the threshold-based methods and automatic methods occurred in the most heterogeneous cases. Within the two groups, the major differences occurred for low contrast cases. For homogeneous cases, equivalent ground-truth volume coverage was observed for all methods but for more heterogeneous cases, significantly lower coverage was observed for threshold-based methods. Our study demonstrates that significant dosimetry errors can be avoided by using more advanced image-segmentation methods. (paper)

  18. Recommendations for the delineation of organs at risk in ENT radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, D.; Halimi, P.; Berges, O.; Deberne, M.; Botti, M.; Giraud, P.; Servagi-Vernat, S.

    2011-01-01

    Based on a literature survey, the authors propose recommendations for the delineation of the pharyngeal constrictor muscles, inner ear, larynx, buccal cavity, and temporomandibular joint. These recommendations of delineation of organs at risk are related to the functional anatomy of the considered structures, and correspond to volumes used in published surveys on dose-volume toxicity. They are simple and reproducible. Short communication

  19. ESTRO consensus guideline on target volume delineation for elective radiation therapy of early stage breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Offersen, Birgitte V.; Boersma, Liesbeth J.; Kirkove, Carine; Hol, Sandra; Aznar, Marianne C.; Biete Sola, Albert; Kirova, Youlia M.; Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Remouchamps, Vincent; Verhoeven, Karolien; Weltens, Caroline; Arenas, Meritxell; Gabrys, Dorota; Kopek, Neil; Krause, Mechthild; Lundstedt, Dan; Marinko, Tanja

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose: Delineation of clinical target volumes (CTVs) is a weak link in radiation therapy (RT), and large inter-observer variation is seen in breast cancer patients. Several guidelines have been proposed, but most result in larger CTVs than based on conventional simulator-based RT. The aim was to develop a delineation guideline obtained by consensus between a broad European group of radiation oncologists. Material and methods: During ESTRO teaching courses on breast cancer, teachers sought consensus on delineation of CTV through dialogue based on cases. One teacher delineated CTV on CT scans of 2 patients, followed by discussion and adaptation of the delineation. The consensus established between teachers was sent to other teams working in the same field, both locally and on a national level, for their input. This was followed by developing a broad consensus based on discussions. Results: Borders of the CTV encompassing a 5 mm margin around the large veins, running through the regional lymph node levels were agreed, and for the breast/thoracic wall other vessels were pointed out to guide delineation, with comments on margins for patients with advanced breast cancer. Conclusion: The ESTRO consensus on CTV for elective RT of breast cancer, endorsed by a broad base of the radiation oncology community, is presented to improve consistency

  20. A general methodology for three-dimensional analysis of variation in target volume delineation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Remeijer, P.; Rasch, C.; Lebesque, J. V.; van Herk, M.

    1999-01-01

    A generic method for three-dimensional (3-D) evaluation of target volume delineation in multiple imaging modalities is presented. The evaluation includes geometrical and statistical methods to estimate observer differences and variability in defining the Gross Tumor Volume (GTV) in relation to the

  1. Intravesical markers for delineation of target volume during external focal irradiation of bladder carcinomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hulshof, Maarten C.C.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Amsterdam (Netherlands)]. E-mail: m.c.hulshof@amc.uva.nl; Andel, George van [Department of Urology, Onze Lieve Vrouwe Gasthuis, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bel, Arjen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Gangel, Pieter [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kamer, Jeroen B. van de [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2007-07-15

    A clip forceps was developed which can insert markers at the border of a bladder tumour through a rigid cystoscope. This technique proved to be simple and safe and is of help for delineation of the target volume during CT simulation for focal boost irradiation of bladder cancer.

  2. Intravesical markers for delineation of target volume during external focal irradiation of bladder carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulshof, Maarten C.C.M.; Andel, George van; Bel, Arjen; Gangel, Pieter; Kamer, Jeroen B. van de

    2007-01-01

    A clip forceps was developed which can insert markers at the border of a bladder tumour through a rigid cystoscope. This technique proved to be simple and safe and is of help for delineation of the target volume during CT simulation for focal boost irradiation of bladder cancer

  3. Intravesical markers for delineation of target volume during external focal irradiation of bladder carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulshof, Maarten C C M; van Andel, George; Bel, Arjen; Gangel, Pieter; van de Kamer, Jeroen B

    2007-07-01

    A clip forceps was developed which can insert markers at the border of a bladder tumour through a rigid cystoscope. This technique proved to be simple and safe and is of help for delineation of the target volume during CT simulation for focal boost irradiation of bladder cancer.

  4. The impact of positron emission tomography on primary tumour delineation and dosimetric outcome in intensity modulated radiotherapy of early T-stage nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Vincent W. C.; Leung, Wan-shun; Wong, Kwun-lam; Chan, Ying-kit; Law, Wing-lam; Leung, Wing-kwan; Yu, Yat-long

    2016-01-01

    In intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), accurate delineation of the gross tumour volume (GTV) is important. Image registration of CT and MRI has been routinely used in treatment planning. With recent development of positron emission tomography (PET), the aims of this study were to evaluate the impact of PET on GTV delineation and dosimetric outcome in IMRT of early stage NPC patients. Twenty NPC patients with T1 or T2 disease treated by IMRT were recruited. For each patient, 2 sets of NP GTVs were delineated separately, in which one set was performed using CT and MRI registration only (GTV CM ), while the other set was carried out using PET, CT and MRI information (GTV CMP ). A 9-field IMRT plan was computed based on the target volumes generated from CT and MRI (PTV CM ). To assess the geometric difference between the GTV CM and GTV CMP , GTV volumes and DICE similarity coefficient (DSC), which measured the geometrical similarity between the two GTVs, were recorded. To evaluate the dosimetric impact, the D max , D min , D mean and D 95 of PTVs were obtained from their dose volume histograms generated by the treatment planning system. The overall mean volume of GTV CMP was greater than GTV CM by 4.4 %, in which GTV CMP was slightly greater in the T1 group but lower in the T2 group. The mean DSC of the whole group was 0.79 ± 0.05. Similar mean DSC values were also obtained from the T1 and T2 groups separately. The dosimetric parameters of PTV CM fulfilled the planning requirements. When applying this plan to the PTV CMP , the average D min (56.9 Gy) and D 95 (68.6 Gy) of PTV CMP failed to meet the dose requirements and demonstrated significant differences from the PTV CM (p = 0.001 and 0.016 respectively), whereas the doses to GTV CMP did not show significant difference with the GTV CM . In IMRT of early stage NPC, PET was an important imaging modality in radiotherapy planning so as to avoid underdosing the PTV, although its

  5. The impact of positron emission tomography on primary tumour delineation and dosimetric outcome in intensity modulated radiotherapy of early T-stage nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Vincent W C; Leung, Wan-Shun; Wong, Kwun-Lam; Chan, Ying-Kit; Law, Wing-Lam; Leung, Wing-Kwan; Yu, Yat-Long

    2016-08-24

    In intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), accurate delineation of the gross tumour volume (GTV) is important. Image registration of CT and MRI has been routinely used in treatment planning. With recent development of positron emission tomography (PET), the aims of this study were to evaluate the impact of PET on GTV delineation and dosimetric outcome in IMRT of early stage NPC patients. Twenty NPC patients with T1 or T2 disease treated by IMRT were recruited. For each patient, 2 sets of NP GTVs were delineated separately, in which one set was performed using CT and MRI registration only (GTVCM), while the other set was carried out using PET, CT and MRI information (GTVCMP). A 9-field IMRT plan was computed based on the target volumes generated from CT and MRI (PTVCM). To assess the geometric difference between the GTVCM and GTVCMP, GTV volumes and DICE similarity coefficient (DSC), which measured the geometrical similarity between the two GTVs, were recorded. To evaluate the dosimetric impact, the Dmax, Dmin, Dmean and D95 of PTVs were obtained from their dose volume histograms generated by the treatment planning system. The overall mean volume of GTVCMP was greater than GTVCM by 4.4 %, in which GTVCMP was slightly greater in the T1 group but lower in the T2 group. The mean DSC of the whole group was 0.79 ± 0.05. Similar mean DSC values were also obtained from the T1 and T2 groups separately. The dosimetric parameters of PTVCM fulfilled the planning requirements. When applying this plan to the PTVCMP, the average Dmin (56.9 Gy) and D95 (68.6 Gy) of PTVCMP failed to meet the dose requirements and demonstrated significant differences from the PTVCM (p = 0.001 and 0.016 respectively), whereas the doses to GTVCMP did not show significant difference with the GTVCM. In IMRT of early stage NPC, PET was an important imaging modality in radiotherapy planning so as to avoid underdosing the PTV, although its effect on GTV

  6. A novel method for delineation of oral mucosa for radiotherapy dose–response studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dean, Jamie A.; Welsh, Liam C.; Gulliford, Sarah L.; Harrington, Kevin J.; Nutting, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    There is currently no standard method for delineating the oral mucosa and most attempts are oversimplified. A new method to obtain anatomically accurate contours of the oral mucosa surfaces was developed and applied to 11 patients. This is expected to represent an opportunity for improved toxicity modelling of oral mucositis

  7. Inter-observer delineation uncertainty in radiotherapy of peripheral lung tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Gitte Fredberg; Nygaard, Ditte Eklund; Roed, Anders Peter

    was included in the study. In our clinical protocol the contrast enhanced PET/CT scan is primarily analysed by a specialist in nuclear medicine and a radiologists together. The PET positive volume is delineated by the specialist in nuclear medicine and only the CT scan and this contour is imported to Eclipse...

  8. Interobserver variability of clinical target volume delineation in supra-diaphragmatic Hodgkin's disease. A multi-institutional experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genovesi, Domenico; Cefaro, Giampiero Ausili; Vinciguerra, Annamaria

    2011-01-01

    To determine interobserver variability in clinical target volume (CTV) of supra-diaphragmatic Hodgkin's lymphoma. At the 2008 AIRO (Italian Society of Radiation Oncology) Meeting, the Radiation Oncology Department of Chieti proposed a multi-institutional contouring dummy-run of two cases of early stage supra-diaphragmatic Hodgkin's lymphoma after chemotherapy. Clinical history, diagnostics, and planning CT imaging were available on Chieti's radiotherapy website (www.radioterapia.unich.it). Participating centers were requested to delineate the CTV and submit it to the coordinating center. To quantify interobserver variability of CTV delineations, the total volume, craniocaudal, laterolateral, and anteroposterior diameters were calculated. A total of 18 institutions for case A and 15 institutions for case B submitted the targets. Case A presented significant variability in total volume (range: 74.1-1,157.1 cc), craniocaudal (range: 6.5-22.5 cm; median: 16.25 cm), anteroposterior (range: 5.04-14.82 cm; median: 10.28 cm), and laterolateral diameters (range: 8.23-22.88 cm; median: 15.5 cm). Mean CTV was 464.8 cc (standard deviation: 280.5 cc). Case B presented significant variability in total volume (range: 341.8-1,662 cc), cranio-caudal (range: 8.0-28.5 cm; median: 23 cm), anteroposterior (range: 7.9-1.8 cm; median: 11.1 cm), and laterolateral diameters (range: 12.9-24.0 cm; median: 18.8 cm). Mean CTV was 926.0 cc (standard deviation: 445.7 cc). This significant variability confirms the need to apply specific guidelines to improve contouring uniformity in Hodgkin's lymphoma. (orig.)

  9. Interactive contour delineation of organs at risk in radiotherapy: Clinical evaluation on NSCLC patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolz, J; Kirişli, H A; Fechter, T; Karnitzki, S; Oehlke, O; Nestle, U; Vermandel, M; Massoptier, L

    2016-05-01

    Accurate delineation of organs at risk (OARs) on computed tomography (CT) image is required for radiation treatment planning (RTP). Manual delineation of OARs being time consuming and prone to high interobserver variability, many (semi-) automatic methods have been proposed. However, most of them are specific to a particular OAR. Here, an interactive computer-assisted system able to segment various OARs required for thoracic radiation therapy is introduced. Segmentation information (foreground and background seeds) is interactively added by the user in any of the three main orthogonal views of the CT volume and is subsequently propagated within the whole volume. The proposed method is based on the combination of watershed transformation and graph-cuts algorithm, which is used as a powerful optimization technique to minimize the energy function. The OARs considered for thoracic radiation therapy are the lungs, spinal cord, trachea, proximal bronchus tree, heart, and esophagus. The method was evaluated on multivendor CT datasets of 30 patients. Two radiation oncologists participated in the study and manual delineations from the original RTP were used as ground truth for evaluation. Delineation of the OARs obtained with the minimally interactive approach was approved to be usable for RTP in nearly 90% of the cases, excluding the esophagus, which segmentation was mostly rejected, thus leading to a gain of time ranging from 50% to 80% in RTP. Considering exclusively accepted cases, overall OARs, a Dice similarity coefficient higher than 0.7 and a Hausdorff distance below 10 mm with respect to the ground truth were achieved. In addition, the interobserver analysis did not highlight any statistically significant difference, at the exception of the segmentation of the heart, in terms of Hausdorff distance and volume difference. An interactive, accurate, fast, and easy-to-use computer-assisted system able to segment various OARs required for thoracic radiation therapy has

  10. Radiotherapy volume delineation using 18F-FDG-PET/CT modifies gross node volume in patients with oesophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Jimenez, E; Mateos, P; Aymar, N; Roncero, R; Ortiz, I; Gimenez, M; Pardo, J; Salinas, J; Sabater, S

    2018-05-02

    Evidence supporting the use of 18F-FDG-PET/CT in the segmentation process of oesophageal cancer for radiotherapy planning is limited. Our aim was to compare the volumes and tumour lengths defined by fused PET/CT vs. CT simulation. Twenty-nine patients were analyzed. All patients underwent a single PET/CT simulation scan. Two separate GTVs were defined: one based on CT data alone and another based on fused PET/CT data. Volume sizes for both data sets were compared and the spatial overlap was assessed by the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). The gross tumour volume (GTVtumour) and maximum tumour diameter were greater by PET/CT, and length of primary tumour was greater by CT, but differences were not statistically significant. However, the gross node volume (GTVnode) was significantly greater by PET/CT. The DSC analysis showed excellent agreement for GTVtumour, 0.72, but was very low for GTVnode, 0.25. Our study shows that the volume definition by PET/CT and CT data differs. CT simulation, without taking into account PET/CT information, might leave cancer-involved nodes out of the radiotherapy-delineated volumes.

  11. Interactive contour delineation of organs at risk in radiotherapy: Clinical evaluation on NSCLC patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolz, J.; Kirişli, H. A.; Massoptier, L.; Fechter, T.; Karnitzki, S.; Oehlke, O.; Nestle, U.; Vermandel, M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Accurate delineation of organs at risk (OARs) on computed tomography (CT) image is required for radiation treatment planning (RTP). Manual delineation of OARs being time consuming and prone to high interobserver variability, many (semi-) automatic methods have been proposed. However, most of them are specific to a particular OAR. Here, an interactive computer-assisted system able to segment various OARs required for thoracic radiation therapy is introduced. Methods: Segmentation information (foreground and background seeds) is interactively added by the user in any of the three main orthogonal views of the CT volume and is subsequently propagated within the whole volume. The proposed method is based on the combination of watershed transformation and graph-cuts algorithm, which is used as a powerful optimization technique to minimize the energy function. The OARs considered for thoracic radiation therapy are the lungs, spinal cord, trachea, proximal bronchus tree, heart, and esophagus. The method was evaluated on multivendor CT datasets of 30 patients. Two radiation oncologists participated in the study and manual delineations from the original RTP were used as ground truth for evaluation. Results: Delineation of the OARs obtained with the minimally interactive approach was approved to be usable for RTP in nearly 90% of the cases, excluding the esophagus, which segmentation was mostly rejected, thus leading to a gain of time ranging from 50% to 80% in RTP. Considering exclusively accepted cases, overall OARs, a Dice similarity coefficient higher than 0.7 and a Hausdorff distance below 10 mm with respect to the ground truth were achieved. In addition, the interobserver analysis did not highlight any statistically significant difference, at the exception of the segmentation of the heart, in terms of Hausdorff distance and volume difference. Conclusions: An interactive, accurate, fast, and easy-to-use computer-assisted system able to segment various OARs

  12. Interactive contour delineation of organs at risk in radiotherapy: Clinical evaluation on NSCLC patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolz, J., E-mail: jose.dolz.upv@gmail.com [AQUILAB, Loos-les-Lille 59120, France and University Lille, Inserm, CHU Lille, U1189–ONCO-THAI–Image Assisted Laser Therapy for Oncology, Lille F-59000 (France); Kirişli, H. A.; Massoptier, L. [AQUILAB, Loos-les-Lille 59120 (France); Fechter, T.; Karnitzki, S.; Oehlke, O.; Nestle, U. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center, Freiburg 79106 (Germany); Vermandel, M. [Inserm Onco Thai U1189, Université Lille 2, CHRU Lille, Lille 59037 (France)

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: Accurate delineation of organs at risk (OARs) on computed tomography (CT) image is required for radiation treatment planning (RTP). Manual delineation of OARs being time consuming and prone to high interobserver variability, many (semi-) automatic methods have been proposed. However, most of them are specific to a particular OAR. Here, an interactive computer-assisted system able to segment various OARs required for thoracic radiation therapy is introduced. Methods: Segmentation information (foreground and background seeds) is interactively added by the user in any of the three main orthogonal views of the CT volume and is subsequently propagated within the whole volume. The proposed method is based on the combination of watershed transformation and graph-cuts algorithm, which is used as a powerful optimization technique to minimize the energy function. The OARs considered for thoracic radiation therapy are the lungs, spinal cord, trachea, proximal bronchus tree, heart, and esophagus. The method was evaluated on multivendor CT datasets of 30 patients. Two radiation oncologists participated in the study and manual delineations from the original RTP were used as ground truth for evaluation. Results: Delineation of the OARs obtained with the minimally interactive approach was approved to be usable for RTP in nearly 90% of the cases, excluding the esophagus, which segmentation was mostly rejected, thus leading to a gain of time ranging from 50% to 80% in RTP. Considering exclusively accepted cases, overall OARs, a Dice similarity coefficient higher than 0.7 and a Hausdorff distance below 10 mm with respect to the ground truth were achieved. In addition, the interobserver analysis did not highlight any statistically significant difference, at the exception of the segmentation of the heart, in terms of Hausdorff distance and volume difference. Conclusions: An interactive, accurate, fast, and easy-to-use computer-assisted system able to segment various OARs

  13. Molecular targeting of gene therapy and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weichselbaum, R.R.; Kufe, D.W.; Advani, S.J.; Roizman, B.

    2001-01-01

    The full promise of gene therapy has been limited by the lack of specificity of vectors for tumor tissue as well as the lack of antitumor efficacy of transgenes encoded by gene delivery systems. In this paper we review our studies investigating two modifications of gene therapy combined with radiotherapy. The first investigations described include studies of radiation inducible gene therapy. In this paradigm, radio-inducible DNA sequences from the CarG elements of the Egr-1 promoter are cloned upstream of a cDNA encoding TNFa. The therapeutic gene (TNFa) is induced by radiation within the tumor microenvironment. In the second paradigm, genetically engineered herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) is induced by ionizing radiation to proliferate within the tumor volume. These modifications of radiotherapy and gene therapy may enhance the efficacy of both treatments

  14. Prospective randomized double-blind pilot study of site-specific consensus atlas implementation for rectal cancer target volume delineation in the cooperative group setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Clifton D.; Nijkamp, Jasper; Duppen, Joop; Rasch, Coen R.N.; Thomas, Charles R.; Wang, Samuel J.; Okunieff, Paul; Jones, William E.; Baseman, Daniel; Patel, Shilpen; Demandante, Carlo G. N.; Harris, Anna M.; Smith, Benjamin D.; Katz, Alan W.; McGann, Camille; Harper, Jennifer L.; Chang, Daniel T.; Smalley, Stephen; Marshall, David T.; Goodman, Karyn A.; Papanikolaou, Niko; Kachnic, Lisa A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Variation in target volume delineation represents a significant hurdle in clinical trials involving conformal radiotherapy. We sought to determine the impact of a consensus guideline-based visual atlas on contouring of target volumes. Methods A representative case and target volume delineation instructions derived from a proposed rectal cancer clinical trial involving conformal radiotherapy were contoured (Scan1) by 14 physician observers and a reference expert. Gross tumor volume (GTV), and 2 clinical target volumes (CTVA, comprising internal iliac, pre-sacral, and peri-rectal nodes, and CTVB, external iliac nodes) were contoured. Observers were randomly assigned to receipt (Group_A) /non-receipt (Group_B) of a consensus guideline and atlas for anorectal cancers, then instructed to re-contour the same case/images (Scan2). Observer variation was analyzed volumetrically using conformation number (CN, where CN=1 equals a total agreement). Results In 14 evaluable contour sets (1 expert, 7 Group_A, 6 Group_B), there was greater agreement for GTV (mean CN 0.75) than CTVs (mean CN 0.46–0.65). Atlas exposure for Group_A led to a significant increased inter-observer agreement for CTVA (mean initial CN 0.68, post-atlas 0.76; p=0.03), as well as increased agreement with the expert reference (initial mean CN 0.58, 0.69 post-atlas; p=0.02). For GTV and CTVB, neither inter-observer nor expert agreement was altered after atlas exposure. Conclusion Consensus guideline atlas implementation resulted in a detectable difference in inter-observer agreement and greater approximation of expert volumes for CTVA, but not GTV or CTVB, in the specified case. Visual atlas inclusion should be considered as a feature in future clinical trials incorporating conformal radiotherapy. PMID:20400244

  15. Extension of Local Disease in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Detected by Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Improvement of Clinical Target Volume Delineation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Shaobo; Sun Ying; Liu Lizhi; Chen Yong; Chen Lei; Mao Yanping; Tang Linglong; Tian Li; Lin Aihua; Liu Mengzhong; Li Li; Ma Jun

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To define by MRI the local extension patterns in patients presenting with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) and to improve clinical target volume delineation. Methods and Materials: Consecutive patients (N = 943) with newly diagnosed and untreated NPC were included in this study. All patients underwent MRI of the nasopharynx and neck, which was reviewed by two radiologists. Results: According to the incidence rates of tumor invasion, the anatomic sites surrounding the nasopharynx were initially classified into three risk grades: high risk (≥ 35%), medium risk (≥ 5-35%), and low risk (< 5%). Incidence rates of tumor invasion into anatomic sites at medium risk were increased, reaching 55.2%, when adjacent high-risk anatomic sites were involved. However, the rates were substantially lower, mostly < 10%, when adjacent high-risk sites were not involved. The incidence rates of concurrent tumor invasion into bilateral sites were < 10%, except in the case of prevertebral muscle involvement (13.1%). Among the 178 incidences of cavernous sinus invasion, there were often two or more simultaneous infiltration routes (60.6%); when only one route was involved, the foramen ovale was the most common (26.4%). Conclusions: In patients presenting with NPC, local disease spreads stepwise from proximal sites to more distal sites. Tumors extend quickly through privileged pathways such as neural foramina. The anatomic sites surrounding the nasopharynx are at low risk of concurrent bilateral tumor invasion. Selective radiotherapy of the local disease in NPC may be feasible.

  16. Target coverage in image-guided stereotactic body radiotherapy of liver tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunderink, Wouter; Méndez Romero, Alejandra; Vásquez Osorio, Eliana M; de Boer, Hans C J; Brandwijk, René P; Levendag, Peter C; Heijmen, Ben J M

    2007-05-01

    To determine the effect of image-guided procedures (with computed tomography [CT] and electronic portal images before each treatment fraction) on target coverage in stereotactic body radiotherapy for liver patients using a stereotactic body frame (SBF) and abdominal compression. CT guidance was used to correct for day-to-day variations in the tumor's mean position in the SBF. By retrospectively evaluating 57 treatment sessions, tumor coverage, as obtained with the clinically applied CT-guided protocol, was compared with that of alternative procedures. The internal target volume-plus (ITV(+)) was introduced to explicitly include uncertainties in tumor delineations resulting from CT-imaging artifacts caused by residual respiratory motion. Tumor coverage was defined as the volume overlap of the ITV(+), derived from a tumor delineated in a treatment CT scan, and the planning target volume. Patient stability in the SBF, after acquisition of the treatment CT scan, was evaluated by measuring the displacement of the bony anatomy in the electronic portal images relative to CT. Application of our clinical protocol (with setup corrections following from manual measurements of the distances between the contours of the planning target volume and the daily clinical target volume in three orthogonal planes, multiple two-dimensional) increased the frequency of nearly full (> or = 99%) ITV(+) coverage to 77% compared with 63% without setup correction. An automated three-dimensional method further improved the frequency to 96%. Patient displacements in the SBF were generally small (design, patient stability in the SBF should be verified with portal imaging.

  17. Dentalmaps: Automatic Dental Delineation for Radiotherapy Planning in Head-and-Neck Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thariat, Juliette; Ramus, Liliane; Maingon, Philippe; Odin, Guillaume; Gregoire, Vincent; Darcourt, Vincent; Guevara, Nicolas; Orlanducci, Marie-Helene; Marcie, Serge; Poissonnet, Gilles; Marcy, Pierre-Yves

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To propose an automatic atlas-based segmentation framework of the dental structures, called Dentalmaps, and to assess its accuracy and relevance to guide dental care in the context of intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A multi-atlas–based segmentation, less sensitive to artifacts than previously published head-and-neck segmentation methods, was used. The manual segmentations of a 21-patient database were first deformed onto the query using nonlinear registrations with the training images and then fused to estimate the consensus segmentation of the query. Results: The framework was evaluated with a leave-one-out protocol. The maximum doses estimated using manual contours were considered as ground truth and compared with the maximum doses estimated using automatic contours. The dose estimation error was within 2-Gy accuracy in 75% of cases (with a median of 0.9 Gy), whereas it was within 2-Gy accuracy in 30% of cases only with the visual estimation method without any contour, which is the routine practice procedure. Conclusions: Dose estimates using this framework were more accurate than visual estimates without dental contour. Dentalmaps represents a useful documentation and communication tool between radiation oncologists and dentists in routine practice. Prospective multicenter assessment is underway on patients extrinsic to the database.

  18. Observer variation in target volume delineation of lung cancer related to radiation oncologist-computer interaction: A 'Big Brother' evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steenbakkers, Roel J.H.M.; Duppen, Joop C.; Fitton, Isabelle; Deurloo, Kirsten E.I.; Zijp, Lambert; Uitterhoeve, Apollonia L.J.; Rodrigus, Patrick T.R.; Kramer, Gijsbert W.P.; Bussink, Johan; Jaeger, Katrien De; Belderbos, Jose S.A.; Hart, Augustinus A.M.; Nowak, Peter J.C.M.; Herk, Marcel van; Rasch, Coen R.N.

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: To evaluate the process of target volume delineation in lung cancer for optimization of imaging, delineation protocol and delineation software. Patients and methods: Eleven radiation oncologists (observers) from five different institutions delineated the Gross Tumor Volume (GTV) including positive lymph nodes of 22 lung cancer patients (stages I-IIIB) on CT only. All radiation oncologist-computer interactions were recorded with a tool called 'Big Brother'. For each radiation oncologist and patient the following issues were analyzed: delineation time, number of delineated points and corrections, zoom levels, level and window (L/W) settings, CT slice changes, use of side windows (coronal and sagittal) and software button use. Results: The mean delineation time per GTV was 16 min (SD 10 min). The mean delineation time for lymph node positive patients was on average 3 min larger (P=0.02) than for lymph node negative patients. Many corrections (55%) were due to L/W change (e.g. delineating in mediastinum L/W and then correcting in lung L/W). For the lymph node region, a relatively large number of corrections was found (3.7 corr/cm 2 ), indicating that it was difficult to delineate lymph nodes. For the tumor-atelectasis region, a relative small number of corrections was found (1.0 corr/cm 2 ), indicating that including or excluding atelectasis into the GTV was a clinical decision. Inappropriate use of L/W settings was frequently found (e.g. 46% of all delineated points in the tumor-lung region were delineated in mediastinum L/W settings). Despite a large observer variation in cranial and caudal direction of 0.72 cm (1 SD), the coronal and sagittal side windows were not used in 45 and 60% of the cases, respectively. For the more difficult cases, observer variation was smaller when the coronal and sagittal side windows were used. Conclusions: With the 'Big Brother' tool a method was developed to trace the delineation process. The differences between

  19. Preclinical evaluation of molecular-targeted anticancer agents for radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, Mechthild; Zips, Daniel; Thames, Howard D.; Kummermehr, Johann; Baumann, Michael

    2006-01-01

    The combination of molecular-targeted agents with irradiation is a highly promising avenue for cancer research and patient care. Molecular-targeted agents are in themselves not curative in solid tumours, whereas radiotherapy is highly efficient in eradicating tumour stem cells. Recurrences after high-dose radiotherapy are caused by only one or few surviving tumour stem cells. Thus, even if a novel agent has the potential to kill only few tumour stem cells, or if it interferes in mechanisms of radioresistance of tumours, combination with radiotherapy may lead to an important improvement in local tumour control and survival. To evaluate the effects of novel agents combined with radiotherapy, it is therefore necessary to use experimental endpoints which reflect the killing of tumour stem cells, in particular tumour control assays. Such endpoints often do not correlate with volume-based parameters of tumour response such as tumour regression and growth delay. This calls for radiotherapy specific research strategies in the preclinical testing of novel anti-cancer drugs, which in many aspects are different from research approaches for medical oncology

  20. Impact of FDG-PET/CT on Radiotherapy Volume Delineation in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer and Correlation of Imaging Stage With Pathologic Findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faria, Sergio L.; Menard, Sonia; Devic, Slobodan; Sirois, Christian; Souhami, Luis; Lisbona, Robert; Freeman, Carolyn R.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET)/computed tomography (CT) is more accurate than CT in determining the extent of non-small-cell lung cancer. We performed a study to evaluate the impact of FDG-PET/CT on the radiotherapy volume delineation compared with CT without using any mathematical algorithm and to correlate the findings with the pathologic examination findings. Methods and Materials: A total of 32 patients with proven non-small-cell lung cancer, pathologic specimens from the mediastinum and lung primary, and pretreatment chest CT and FDG-PET/CT scans were studied. For each patient, two data sets of theoretical gross tumor volumes were contoured. One set was determined using the chest CT only, and the second, done separately, was based on the co-registered FDG-PET/CT data. The disease stage of each patient was determined using the TNM staging system for three data sets: the CT scan only, FDG-PET/CT scan, and pathologic findings. Results: Pathologic examination altered the CT-determined stage in 22 (69%) of 32 patients and the PET-determined stage in 16 (50%) of 32 patients. The most significant alterations were related to the N stage. PET altered the TNM stage in 15 (44%) of 32 patients compared with CT alone, but only 7 of these 15 alterations were confirmed by the pathologic findings. With respect to contouring the tumor volume for radiotherapy, PET altered the contour in 18 (56%) of 32 cases compared with CT alone. Conclusion: The contour of the tumor volume of non-small-cell lung cancer patients with co-registered FDG-PET/CT resulted in >50% alterations compared with CT targeting, findings similar to those of other publications. However, the significance of this change is unknown. Furthermore, pathologic examination showed that PET is not always accurate and histologic examination should be obtained to confirm the findings of PET whenever possible

  1. Impact of FDG-PET on lung cancer delineation for radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morarji, Kavita; Fowler, Allan; Vinod, Shalini K.; Shon, Ivan Ho; Laurence, Jerome M.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the impact of fused diagnostic F-18 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) and planning FDG-PET/CT scans on voluming of lung cancer for radiotherapy. Five radiation oncologists (ROs), five radiation oncology trainees and a radiologist contoured five cases of non-small cell lung cancer. The CT alone, the diagnostic FDG-PET/CT and planning FDG-PET/CT each registered to the CT, were used to contour three volumes. The concordance index (CI) was used to compare each volume with a reference RO. Although there was considerable inter-observer variability in CT contouring, there was no significant difference between mean volumes of the gross tumour volume for the RO and radiation oncology trainees using any technique. There was no increase in CI with the addition of PET/CT, either diagnostic or planning, for the RO. However, the volumes of the radiation oncology trainees showed a significant increase in CI from 65.8% with CT alone to 68.0% and 72.3% with diagnostic PET/CT and planning PET/CT, respectively (P = 0.028). Mean variation at the tumour/mediastinum interface was significantly reduced with addition of registered PET/CT. The concordance of RO with the reference RO did not significantly increase with use of integrated FDG PET/CT images. However, the contouring of radiation oncology trainees' became more concordant with the reference.

  2. A multi-institution evaluation of deformable image registration algorithms for automatic organ delineation in adaptive head and neck radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardcastle, Nicholas; Kumar, Prashant; Oechsner, Markus; Richter, Anne; Song, Shiyu; Myers, Michael; Polat, Bülent; Bzdusek, Karl; Tomé, Wolfgang A; Cannon, Donald M; Brouwer, Charlotte L; Wittendorp, Paul WH; Dogan, Nesrin; Guckenberger, Matthias; Allaire, Stéphane; Mallya, Yogish

    2012-01-01

    Adaptive Radiotherapy aims to identify anatomical deviations during a radiotherapy course and modify the treatment plan to maintain treatment objectives. This requires regions of interest (ROIs) to be defined using the most recent imaging data. This study investigates the clinical utility of using deformable image registration (DIR) to automatically propagate ROIs. Target (GTV) and organ-at-risk (OAR) ROIs were non-rigidly propagated from a planning CT scan to a per-treatment CT scan for 22 patients. Propagated ROIs were quantitatively compared with expert physician-drawn ROIs on the per-treatment scan using Dice scores and mean slicewise Hausdorff distances, and center of mass distances for GTVs. The propagated ROIs were qualitatively examined by experts and scored based on their clinical utility. Good agreement between the DIR-propagated ROIs and expert-drawn ROIs was observed based on the metrics used. 94% of all ROIs generated using DIR were scored as being clinically useful, requiring minimal or no edits. However, 27% (12/44) of the GTVs required major edits. DIR was successfully used on 22 patients to propagate target and OAR structures for ART with good anatomical agreement for OARs. It is recommended that propagated target structures be thoroughly reviewed by the treating physician

  3. Predicted allowable doses to normal organs for biologically targeted radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Donoghue, J.A.; Wheldon, T.E.; Western Regional Hospital Board, Glasgow

    1988-01-01

    The authors have used Dale's extension to the ''linear quadratic'' (LQ) model (Dale, 1985) to evaluate ''equivalent doses'' in cases involving exponentially decaying dose rates. This analysis indicates that the dose-rate effect will be a significant determinant of allowable doses to organs such as liver, kidney and lung. These organ tolerance doses constitute independent constraints on the therapeutic intensity of biologically targeted radiotherapy in exactly the same way as for conventional external beam radiotherapy. In the context of marrow rescue they will in all likelihood constitute the dose-limiting side-effects and thus be especially important. (author)

  4. Use of Maximum Intensity Projections (MIPs) for target outlining in 4DCT radiotherapy planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muirhead, Rebecca; McNee, Stuart G; Featherstone, Carrie; Moore, Karen; Muscat, Sarah

    2008-12-01

    Four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) is currently being introduced to radiotherapy centers worldwide, for use in radical radiotherapy planning for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A significant drawback is the time required to delineate 10 individual CT scans for each patient. Every department will hence ask the question if the single Maximum Intensity Projection (MIP) scan can be used as an alternative. Although the problems regarding the use of the MIP in node-positive disease have been discussed in the literature, a comprehensive study assessing its use has not been published. We compared an internal target volume (ITV) created using the MIP to an ITV created from the composite volume of 10 clinical target volumes (CTVs) delineated on the 10 phases of the 4DCT. 4DCT data was collected from 14 patients with NSCLC. In each patient, the ITV was delineated on the MIP image (ITV_MIP) and a composite ITV created from the 10 CTVs delineated on each of the 10 scans in the dataset. The structures were compared by assessment of volumes of overlap and exclusion. There was a median of 19.0% (range, 5.5-35.4%) of the volume of ITV_10phase not enclosed by the ITV_MIP, demonstrating that the use of the MIP could result in under-treatment of disease. In contrast only a very small amount of the ITV_MIP was not enclosed by the ITV_10phase (median of 2.3%, range, 0.4-9.8%), indicating the ITV_10phase covers almost all of the tumor tissue as identified by MIP. Although there were only two Stage I patients, both demonstrated very similar ITV_10phase and ITV_MIP volumes. These findings suggest that Stage I NSCLC tumors could be outlined on the MIP alone. In Stage II and III tumors the ITV_10phase would be more reliable. To prevent under-treatment of disease, the MIP image can only be used for delineation in Stage I tumors.

  5. Definition and delineation of the clinical target volume for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roels, Sarah; Duthoy, Wim; Haustermans, Karin; Penninckx, Freddy; Vandecaveye, Vincent; Boterberg, Tom; Neve, Wilfried de

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Optimization of radiation techniques to maximize local tumor control and to minimize small bowel toxicity in locally advanced rectal cancer requires proper definition and delineation guidelines for the clinical target volume (CTV). The purpose of this investigation was to analyze reported data on the predominant locations and frequency of local recurrences and lymph node involvement in rectal cancer, to propose a definition of the CTV for rectal cancer and guidelines for its delineation. Methods and Materials: Seven reports were analyzed to assess the incidence and predominant location of local recurrences in rectal cancer. The distribution of lymphatic spread was analyzed in another 10 reports to record the relative frequency and location of metastatic lymph nodes in rectal cancer, according to the stage and level of the primary tumor. Results: The mesorectal, posterior, and inferior pelvic subsites are most at risk for local recurrences, whereas lymphatic tumor spread occurs mainly in three directions: upward into the inferior mesenteric nodes; lateral into the internal iliac lymph nodes; and, in a few cases, downward into the external iliac and inguinal lymph nodes. The risk for recurrence or lymph node involvement is related to the stage and the level of the primary lesion. Conclusion: Based on a review of articles reporting on the incidence and predominant location of local recurrences and the distribution of lymphatic spread in rectal cancer, we defined guidelines for CTV delineation including the pelvic subsites and lymph node groups at risk for microscopic involvement. We propose to include the primary tumor, the mesorectal subsite, and the posterior pelvic subsite in the CTV in all patients. Moreover, the lateral lymph nodes are at high risk for microscopic involvement and should also be added in the CTV

  6. Prospective Randomized Double-Blind Pilot Study of Site-Specific Consensus Atlas Implementation for Rectal Cancer Target Volume Delineation in the Cooperative Group Setting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuller, Clifton D.; Nijkamp, Jasper; Duppen, Joop C.; Rasch, Coen R.N.; Thomas, Charles R.; Wang, Samuel J.; Okunieff, Paul; Jones, William E.; Baseman, Daniel; Patel, Shilpen; Demandante, Carlo G.N.; Harris, Anna M.; Smith, Benjamin D.; Katz, Alan W.; McGann, Camille

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Variations in target volume delineation represent a significant hurdle in clinical trials involving conformal radiotherapy. We sought to determine the effect of a consensus guideline-based visual atlas on contouring the target volumes. Methods and Materials: A representative case was contoured (Scan 1) by 14 physician observers and a reference expert with and without target volume delineation instructions derived from a proposed rectal cancer clinical trial involving conformal radiotherapy. The gross tumor volume (GTV), and two clinical target volumes (CTVA, including the internal iliac, presacral, and perirectal nodes, and CTVB, which included the external iliac nodes) were contoured. The observers were randomly assigned to receipt (Group A) or nonreceipt (Group B) of a consensus guideline and atlas for anorectal cancers and then instructed to recontour the same case/images (Scan 2). Observer variation was analyzed volumetrically using the conformation number (CN, where CN = 1 equals total agreement). Results: Of 14 evaluable contour sets (1 expert and 7 Group A and 6 Group B observers), greater agreement was found for the GTV (mean CN, 0.75) than for the CTVs (mean CN, 0.46-0.65). Atlas exposure for Group A led to significantly increased interobserver agreement for CTVA (mean initial CN, 0.68, after atlas use, 0.76; p = .03) and increased agreement with the expert reference (initial mean CN, 0.58; after atlas use, 0.69; p = .02). For the GTV and CTVB, neither the interobserver nor the expert agreement was altered after atlas exposure. Conclusion: Consensus guideline atlas implementation resulted in a detectable difference in interobserver agreement and a greater approximation of expert volumes for the CTVA but not for the GTV or CTVB in the specified case. Visual atlas inclusion should be considered as a feature in future clinical trials incorporating conformal RT.

  7. Improving superficial target delineation in radiation therapy with endoscopic tracking and registration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weersink, R. A.; Qiu, J.; Hope, A. J.; Daly, M. J.; Cho, B. C. J.; DaCosta, R. S.; Sharpe, M. B.; Breen, S. L.; Chan, H.; Jaffray, D. A. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada) and Ontario Cancer Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9, Canada and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada) and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9, Canada and Ontario Cancer Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada) and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada) and Ontario Cancer Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada)

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: Target delineation within volumetric imaging is a critical step in the planning process of intensity modulated radiation therapy. In endoluminal cancers, endoscopy often reveals superficial areas of visible disease beyond what is seen on volumetric imaging. Quantitatively relating these findings to the volumetric imaging is prone to human error during the recall and contouring of the target. We have developed a method to improve target delineation in the radiation therapy planning process by quantitatively registering endoscopic findings contours traced on endoscopic images to volumetric imaging. Methods: Using electromagnetic sensors embedded in an endoscope, 2D endoscopic images were registered to computed tomography (CT) volumetric images by tracking the position and orientation of the endoscope relative to a CT image set. Regions-of-interest (ROI) in the 2D endoscopic view were delineated. A mesh created within the boundary of the ROI was projected onto the 3D image data, registering the ROI with the volumetric image. This 3D ROI was exported to clinical radiation treatment planning software. The precision and accuracy of the procedure was tested on two solid phantoms with superficial markings visible on both endoscopy and CT images. The first phantom was T-shaped tube with X-marks etched on the interior. The second phantom was an anatomically correct skull phantom with a phantom superficial lesion placed on the pharyngeal surface. Markings were contoured on the endoscope images and compared with contours delineated in the treatment planning system based on the CT images. Clinical feasibility was tested on three patients with early stage glottic cancer. Image-based rendering using manually identified landmarks was used to improve the registration. Results: Using the T-shaped phantom with X-markings, the 2D to 3D registration accuracy was 1.5-3.5 mm, depending on the endoscope position relative to the markings. Intraobserver standard variation was 0

  8. Determination and delineation of nodal target volumes for head-and-neck cancer based on patterns of failure in patients receiving definitive and postoperative IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, K.S. Clifford; Wippold, Franz J.; Ozyigit, Gokhan; Tran, Binh N.; Dempsey, James F.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: We present the guidelines for target volume determination and delineation of head-and-neck lymph nodes based on the analysis of the patterns of nodal failure in patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Data pertaining to the natural course of nodal metastasis for each head-and-neck cancer subsite were reviewed. A system was established to provide guidance for nodal target volume determination and delineation. Following these guidelines, 126 patients (52 definitive, 74 postoperative) were treated between February 1997 and December 2000 with IMRT for head-and-neck cancer. The median follow-up was 26 months (range 12-55), and the patterns of nodal failure were analyzed. Results: These guidelines define the nodal target volume based on the location of the primary tumor and the probability of microscopic metastasis to the ipsilateral and contralateral (Level I-V) nodal regions. Following these guidelines, persistent or recurrent nodal disease was found in 6 (12%) of 52 patients receiving definitive IMRT, and 7 (9%) of 74 patients receiving postoperative IMRT had failure in the nodal region. Conclusion: On the basis of our clinical experience in implementing inverse-planning IMRT for head-and-neck cancer, we present guidelines using a simplified, but clinically relevant, method for nodal target volume determination and delineation. The intention was to provide a foundation that enables different institutions to exchange clinical experiences in head-and-neck IMRT. These guidelines will be subject to future refinement when the clinical experience in head-and-neck IMRT advances

  9. Target volume delineation and treatment planning for particle therapy a practical guide

    CERN Document Server

    Leeman, Jonathan E; Cahlon, Oren; Sine, Kevin; Jiang, Guoliang; Lu, Jiade J; Both, Stefan

    2018-01-01

    This handbook is designed to enable radiation oncologists to treat patients appropriately and confidently by means of particle therapy. The orientation and purpose are entirely practical, in that the focus is on the physics essentials of delivery and treatment planning , illustration of the clinical target volume (CTV) and associated treatment planning for each major malignancy when using particle therapy, proton therapy in particular. Disease-specific chapters provide guidelines and concise knowledge on CTV selection and delineation and identify aspects that require the exercise of caution during treatment planning. The treatment planning techniques unique to proton therapy for each disease site are clearly described, covering beam orientation, matching/patching field techniques, robustness planning, robustness plan evaluation, etc. The published data on the use of particle therapy for a given disease site are also concisely reported. In addition to fully meeting the needs of radiation oncologists, this "kn...

  10. Retroperitoneal Sarcoma Target Volume and Organ at Risk Contour Delineation Agreement Among NRG Sarcoma Radiation Oncologists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldini, Elizabeth H., E-mail: ebaldini@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Abrams, Ross A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Bosch, Walter [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Roberge, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Haas, Rick L.M. [Department of Radiotherapy, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Catton, Charles N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Indelicato, Daniel J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida Medical Center, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Olsen, Jeffrey R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Deville, Curtiland [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Chen, Yen-Lin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Finkelstein, Steven E. [Translational Research Consortium, 21st Century Oncology, Scottsdale, Arizona (United States); DeLaney, Thomas F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Wang, Dian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the variability in target volume and organ at risk (OAR) contour delineation for retroperitoneal sarcoma (RPS) among 12 sarcoma radiation oncologists. Methods and Materials: Radiation planning computed tomography (CT) scans for 2 cases of RPS were distributed among 12 sarcoma radiation oncologists with instructions for contouring gross tumor volume (GTV), clinical target volume (CTV), high-risk CTV (HR CTV: area judged to be at high risk of resulting in positive margins after resection), and OARs: bowel bag, small bowel, colon, stomach, and duodenum. Analysis of contour agreement was performed using the simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE) algorithm and kappa statistics. Results: Ten radiation oncologists contoured both RPS cases, 1 contoured only RPS1, and 1 contoured only RPS2 such that each case was contoured by 11 radiation oncologists. The first case (RPS 1) was a patient with a de-differentiated (DD) liposarcoma (LPS) with a predominant well-differentiated (WD) component, and the second case (RPS 2) was a patient with DD LPS made up almost entirely of a DD component. Contouring agreement for GTV and CTV contours was high. However, the agreement for HR CTVs was only moderate. For OARs, agreement for stomach, bowel bag, small bowel, and colon was high, but agreement for duodenum (distorted by tumor in one of these cases) was fair to moderate. Conclusions: For preoperative treatment of RPS, sarcoma radiation oncologists contoured GTV, CTV, and most OARs with a high level of agreement. HR CTV contours were more variable. Further clarification of this volume with the help of sarcoma surgical oncologists is necessary to reach consensus. More attention to delineation of the duodenum is also needed.

  11. Role of choline PET/CT in guiding target volume delineation for irradiation of prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarzenboeck, S.M.; Kurth, J. [University Medical Centre Rostock, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rostock (Germany); Gocke, C.; Kuhnt, T.; Hildebrandt, G. [University Medical Centre Rostock, Department of Radiotherapy, Rostock (Germany); Krause, B.J. [University Medical Centre Rostock, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rostock (Germany); Universitaet Rostock, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Universitaetsmedizin Rostock, Rostock (Germany)

    2013-07-15

    Choline PET/CT has shown limitations for the detection of primary prostate cancer and nodal metastatic disease, mainly due to limited sensitivity and specificity. Conversely in the restaging of prostate cancer recurrence, choline PET/CT is a promising imaging modality for the detection of local regional and nodal recurrence with an impact on therapy management. This review highlights current literature on choline PET/CT for radiation treatment planning in primary and recurrent prostate cancer. Due to limited sensitivity and specificity in differentiating between benign and malignant prostatic tissues in primary prostate cancer, there is little enthusiasm for target volume delineation based on choline PET/CT. Irradiation planning for the treatment of single lymph node metastases on the basis of choline PET/CT is controversial due to its limited lesion-based sensitivity in primary nodal staging. In high-risk prostate cancer, choline PET/CT might diagnose lymph node metastases, which potentially can be included in the conventional irradiation field. Prior to radiation treatment of recurrent prostate cancer, choline PET/CT may prove useful for patient stratification by excluding distant disease which would require systemic therapy. In patients with local recurrence, choline PET/CT can be used to delineate local sites of recurrence within the prostatic resection bed allowing a boost to PET-positive sites. In patients with lymph node metastases outside the prostatic fossa and regional metastatic lymph nodes, choline PET/CT might influence radiation treatment planning by enabling extension of the target volume to lymphatic drainage sites with or without a boost to PET-positive lymph nodes. Further clinical randomized trials are required to assess treatment outcomes following choline-based biological radiation treatment planning in comparison with conventional radiation treatment planning. (orig.)

  12. Retroperitoneal Sarcoma Target Volume and Organ at Risk Contour Delineation Agreement Among NRG Sarcoma Radiation Oncologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldini, Elizabeth H.; Abrams, Ross A.; Bosch, Walter; Roberge, David; Haas, Rick L.M.; Catton, Charles N.; Indelicato, Daniel J.; Olsen, Jeffrey R.; Deville, Curtiland; Chen, Yen-Lin; Finkelstein, Steven E.; DeLaney, Thomas F.; Wang, Dian

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the variability in target volume and organ at risk (OAR) contour delineation for retroperitoneal sarcoma (RPS) among 12 sarcoma radiation oncologists. Methods and Materials: Radiation planning computed tomography (CT) scans for 2 cases of RPS were distributed among 12 sarcoma radiation oncologists with instructions for contouring gross tumor volume (GTV), clinical target volume (CTV), high-risk CTV (HR CTV: area judged to be at high risk of resulting in positive margins after resection), and OARs: bowel bag, small bowel, colon, stomach, and duodenum. Analysis of contour agreement was performed using the simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE) algorithm and kappa statistics. Results: Ten radiation oncologists contoured both RPS cases, 1 contoured only RPS1, and 1 contoured only RPS2 such that each case was contoured by 11 radiation oncologists. The first case (RPS 1) was a patient with a de-differentiated (DD) liposarcoma (LPS) with a predominant well-differentiated (WD) component, and the second case (RPS 2) was a patient with DD LPS made up almost entirely of a DD component. Contouring agreement for GTV and CTV contours was high. However, the agreement for HR CTVs was only moderate. For OARs, agreement for stomach, bowel bag, small bowel, and colon was high, but agreement for duodenum (distorted by tumor in one of these cases) was fair to moderate. Conclusions: For preoperative treatment of RPS, sarcoma radiation oncologists contoured GTV, CTV, and most OARs with a high level of agreement. HR CTV contours were more variable. Further clarification of this volume with the help of sarcoma surgical oncologists is necessary to reach consensus. More attention to delineation of the duodenum is also needed

  13. Daily targeting of intrahepatic tumors for radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balter, James M.; Brock, Kristy K.; Litzenberg, Dale W.; McShan, Daniel L.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Haken, Randall Ten; McGinn, Cornelius J.; Lam, Kwok L.; Dawson, Laura A.

    2002-01-01

    Introduction: A system has been developed for daily targeting of intrahepatic tumors using a combination of ventilatory immobilization, in-room diagnostic imaging, and on-line setup adjustment. By reducing geometric position uncertainty, as well as organ movement, this system permits reduction of margins and thus potentially higher treatment doses. This paper reports our initial experience treating 8 patients with focal liver tumors using this system. Methods and Materials: The system includes diagnostic X-ray tubes mounted on the wall and ceiling of a treatment room, an active matrix flat panel imager, in-room control for image acquisition and setup adjustment, and a ventilatory immobilization system via active breathing control (ABC). Eight patients participated in the study, two using an early prototype ABC unit, and the remaining six with a commercial ABC system and improved setup measurement tools. Treatment margins were reduced, and dose consequently increased because of increased confidence in target position under this protocol. After daily setup via skin marks, orthogonal radiographs were acquired at suspended ventilation. The images were aligned to the CT model using the diaphragm for inferior-superior (IS) alignment, and the skeleton for left-right (LR) and anterior-posterior (AP) alignment. Adjustments were made for positioning errors greater than a threshold (3 or 5 mm). After treatment, retrospective analysis determined the final setup accuracy, as well as the error in initial setup measurement performed before setup adjustment. Results: Two hundred sixty-two treatment fractions were delivered on eight patients, with 171 treatments requiring repositioning. Typical treatment times were 25-30 min. Patients were able to tolerate ABC throughout the course of treatment. Breath holds up to 35 s long were used for treatment. The use of on-line imaging and setup adjustment reduced setup errors (σ) from 4.0 mm (LR), 6.7 mm (IS), and 3.8 mm (AP) to 2.1 mm (LR

  14. Non-Targeted effects of ionising radiation and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sjostedt, Svetlana; Bezak, Eva

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Modern radiobiology is undergoing rapid change due to new discoveries contradicting the target concept which is currently used to predict dose-response relationships. Thus relatively recently discovered radiation induced bystander effects (RlBEs), that include additional death, mutation and radio-adaptation in non-irradiated cells, change our understanding of the target concept and broadens its boundaries. This can be significant from a radioprotection point of view and also has the potential to reassess radiation damage models currently used in radiotherapy. This article reviews briefly the general concepts of RlBEs such as the proposed underlying mechanisms of signal induction and propagation, experimental approaches and biological end points used to investigate these phenomena. It also summ rises several mathematical models currently proposed in an attempt to quantify RlBE. The main emphasis of this al1icle is to review and highlight the potential impact of the bystander phenomena in radiotherapy.

  15. Phantom study on three-dimensional target volume delineation by PET/CT-based auto-contouring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Tiejiao; Sakaguchi, Yuichi; Mitsumoto, Katsuhiko; Mitsumoto, Tatsuya; Sasaki, Masayuki; Tachiya, Yosuke; Ohya, Nobuyoshi

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine an appropriate threshold value for delineation of the target volume in positron emission tomography (PET)/CT and to investigate whether we could delineate a target volume by phantom studies. A phantom consisted of six spheres (φ10-37 mm) filled with 18 F solution. Data acquisition was performed PET/CT in non-motion and motion status with high 18 F solution and in non-motion status with low 18 F solution. In non-motion phantom experiments, we determined two types of threshold value, an absolute SUV (T SUV ) and a percentage of the maximum SUV (T % ). Delineation using threshold values was applied for all spheres and for selected large spheres (a diameter of 22 mm or larger). In motion phantom experiments, data acquisition was performed in a static mode (sPET) and a gated mode (gPET). CT scanning was performed with helical CT (HCT) and 4-dimentional CT (4DCT). The appropriate threshold values were aT % =27% and aT SUV =2.4 for all spheres, and sT % =30% and sT SUV =4.3 for selected spheres. For all spheres in sPET/HCT in motion, the delineated volumes were 84%-129% by the aT % and 34%-127% by the aT SUV . In gPET/4DCT in motion, the delineated volumes were 94-103% by the aT % and 51-131% by the aT SUV . For low radioactivity spheres, the delineated volumes were all underestimated. A threshold value of T % =27% was proposed for auto-contouring of lung tumors. Our results also suggested that the respiratory gated data acquisition should be performed in both PET and CT for target volume delineation. (author)

  16. Targeted radiotherapy: state of the art and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuillez, J.P.

    2006-01-01

    Internal targeted radiotherapy (previously called metabolic radiotherapy) consists in an in situ irradiation of small tumour lesions all through the body by mean of a radiolabeled agent. It is a more and more emerging technique of cancer treatment, as clearly demonstrated by theoretical and experimental considerations, but also impressive clinical results. Published results allowed the marketing authorization of several specialities at time. Main clinical results, i.e. these obtained with radiolabel antibodies, somatostatin analogs and bone seeking agents, already are very convincing. However, we must wonder if such conclusive results would remain anecdotal in the treatment of cancer, or take a larger and larger place. Recently published results and works in progress clearly show that there are a lot of possibilities which could be explored and many ways of improvement. These possibilities are related to the mechanisms of action, a better understanding of the relationship between injected activity and efficiency through dedicated dosimetry, new radiopharmaceuticals, new targets and a better definition of indications. The review of these different ways leads to an optimistic view of the future for internal radiotherapy, providing it will be thought through a pluri-disciplinary approach. (author)

  17. Target Coverage in Image-Guided Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy of Liver Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wunderink, Wouter; Romero, Alejandra Mendez; Osorio, Eliana M. Vasquez; Boer, Hans C.J. de; Brandwijk, Rene P.; Levendag, Peter C.; Heijmen, Ben

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the effect of image-guided procedures (with computed tomography [CT] and electronic portal images before each treatment fraction) on target coverage in stereotactic body radiotherapy for liver patients using a stereotactic body frame (SBF) and abdominal compression. CT guidance was used to correct for day-to-day variations in the tumor's mean position in the SBF. Methods and Materials: By retrospectively evaluating 57 treatment sessions, tumor coverage, as obtained with the clinically applied CT-guided protocol, was compared with that of alternative procedures. The internal target volume-plus (ITV + ) was introduced to explicitly include uncertainties in tumor delineations resulting from CT-imaging artifacts caused by residual respiratory motion. Tumor coverage was defined as the volume overlap of the ITV + , derived from a tumor delineated in a treatment CT scan, and the planning target volume. Patient stability in the SBF, after acquisition of the treatment CT scan, was evaluated by measuring the displacement of the bony anatomy in the electronic portal images relative to CT. Results: Application of our clinical protocol (with setup corrections following from manual measurements of the distances between the contours of the planning target volume and the daily clinical target volume in three orthogonal planes, multiple two-dimensional) increased the frequency of nearly full (≥99%) ITV + coverage to 77% compared with 63% without setup correction. An automated three-dimensional method further improved the frequency to 96%. Patient displacements in the SBF were generally small (≤2 mm, 1 standard deviation), but large craniocaudal displacements (maximal 7.2 mm) were occasionally observed. Conclusion: Daily, CT-assisted patient setup may substantially improve tumor coverage, especially with the automated three-dimensional procedure. In the present treatment design, patient stability in the SBF should be verified with portal imaging

  18. Interobserver delineation uncertainty in involved-node radiation therapy (INRT) for early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma: on behalf of the Radiotherapy Committee of the EORTC lymphoma group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aznar, M.C.; Girinsky, T.; Berthelsen, A.K.; Aleman, B.; Beijert, M.; Hutchings, M.; Lievens, Y.; Meijnders, P.; Petersen, P.M.; Schut, D.; Maraldo, M.V.; Maazen, R.W. van der; Specht, L.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: In early-stage classical Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) the target volume nowadays consists of the volume of the originally involved nodes. Delineation of this volume on a post-chemotherapy CT-scan is challenging. We report on the interobserver variability in target volume definition

  19. Interobserver delineation uncertainty in involved-node radiation therapy (INRT) for early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma : On behalf of the Radiotherapy Committee of the EORTC lymphoma group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aznar, Marianne C.; Girinsky, Theodore; Berthelsen, Anne Kiil; Aleman, Berthe M.; Beijert, Max; Hutchings, Martin; Lievens, Yolande; Meijnders, Paul; Petersen, Peter Meidahl; Schut, Deborah; Maraldo, Maja V.; van der Maazen, Richard W.; Specht, Lena

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose: In early-stage classical Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) the target volume nowadays consists of the volume of the originally involved nodes. Delineation of this volume on a post-chemotherapy CT-scan is challenging. We report on the interobserver variability in target volume definition

  20. Rectal cancer: The radiation basis of radiotherapy, target volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosset, J.F.; Servagi-Vernat, S.; Crehange, G.; Azria, D.; Gerard, J.P.; Hennequin, C.

    2011-01-01

    Since the implementation of preoperative chemo-radiotherapy and meso-rectal excision, the 5-year rates of locoregional failures in T3-T4 N0-N1M0 rectal cancer fell from 25-30% thirty years ago to 5-8% nowadays. A critical analysis of the locoregional failures sites and mechanisms, as well as the identification of nodal extension, helps the radiation oncologist to optimize the radiotherapy target definition. The upper limit of the clinical target volume is usually set at the top of the third sacral vertebra. The lateral pelvic nodes should be included when the tumor is located in the distal part of the rectum. The anal sphincter and the levator muscles should be spared when a conservative surgery is planned. In case of abdomino-perineal excision, the ischio-rectal fossa and the sphincters should be included in the clinical target volume. A confrontation with radiologist and surgeon is mandatory to improve the definition of the target volumes to be treated. (authors)

  1. Immunohistochemical evaluation of molecular radiotherapy target expression in neuroblastoma tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gains, Jennifer E.; Gaze, Mark N. [University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Oncology, London (United Kingdom); Sebire, Neil J. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Pathology, London (United Kingdom); Moroz, Veronica; Wheatley, Keith [University of Birmingham, Cancer Research UK Clinical Trials Unit, Birmingham (United Kingdom)

    2018-03-15

    Neuroblastoma may be treated with molecular radiotherapy, {sup 131}I meta-Iodobenzylguanidine and {sup 177}Lu Lutetium DOTATATE, directed at distinct molecular targets: Noradrenaline Transporter Molecule (NAT) and Somatostatin Receptor (SSTR2), respectively. This study used immunohistochemistry to evaluate target expression in archival neuroblastoma tissue, to determine whether it might facilitate clinical use of molecular radiotherapy. Tissue bank samples of formalin fixed paraffin embedded neuroblastoma tissue from patients for whom clinical outcome data were available were sectioned and stained with haematoxylin and eosin, and monoclonal antibodies directed against NAT and SSTR2. Sections were examined blinded to clinical information and scored for the percentage and intensity of tumour cells stained. These data were analysed in conjunction with clinical data. Tissue from 75 patients was examined. Target expression scores varied widely between patients: NAT median 45%, inter-quartile range 25% - 65%; and SSTR2 median 55%, interquartile range 30% - 80%; and in some cases heterogeneity of expression between different parts of a tumour was observed. A weak positive correlation was observed between the expression scores of the different targets: correlation coefficient = 0.23, p = 0.05. MYCN amplified tumours had lower SSTR2 scores: mean difference 23% confidence interval 8% - 39%, p < 0.01. Survival did not differ by scores. As expression of both targets is variable and heterogeneous, imaging assessment of both may yield more clinical information than either alone. The clinical value of immunohistochemical assessment of target expression requires prospective evaluation. Variable target expression within a patient may contribute to treatment failure. (orig.)

  2. Delineation of Internal Mammary Nodal Target Volumes in Breast Cancer Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jethwa, Krishan R.; Kahila, Mohamed M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Hunt, Katie N. [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Brown, Lindsay C.; Corbin, Kimberly S.; Park, Sean S.; Yan, Elizabeth S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Boughey, Judy C. [Department of Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Mutter, Robert W., E-mail: mutter.robert@mayo.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States)

    2017-03-15

    Purpose: The optimal clinical target volume for internal mammary (IM) node irradiation is uncertain in an era of increasingly conformal volume-based treatment planning for breast cancer. We mapped the location of gross internal mammary lymph node (IMN) metastases to identify areas at highest risk of harboring occult disease. Methods and Materials: Patients with axial imaging of IMN disease were identified from a breast cancer registry. The IMN location was transferred onto the corresponding anatomic position on representative axial computed tomography images of a patient in the treatment position and compared with consensus group guidelines of IMN target delineation. Results: The IMN location in 67 patients with 130 IMN metastases was mapped. The location was in the first 3 intercostal spaces in 102 of 130 nodal metastases (78%), whereas 18 of 130 IMNs (14%) were located caudal to the third intercostal space and 10 of 130 IMNs (8%) were located cranial to the first intercostal space. Of the 102 nodal metastases within the first 3 intercostal spaces, 54 (53%) were located within the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group consensus volume. Relative to the IM vessels, 19 nodal metastases (19%) were located medially with a mean distance of 2.2 mm (SD, 2.9 mm) whereas 29 (28%) were located laterally with a mean distance of 3.6 mm (SD, 2.5 mm). Ninety percent of lymph nodes within the first 3 intercostal spaces would have been encompassed within a 4-mm medial and lateral expansion on the IM vessels. Conclusions: In women with indications for elective IMN irradiation, a 4-mm medial and lateral expansion on the IM vessels may be appropriate. In women with known IMN involvement, cranial extension to the confluence of the IM vein with the brachiocephalic vein with or without caudal extension to the fourth or fifth interspace may be considered provided that normal tissue constraints are met.

  3. Automatic definition of targeted biological volumes for the radiotherapy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatt, M.; Visvikis, D.; Cheze-Le-Rest, C.; Pradier, O.

    2009-01-01

    The proposed method: Fuzzy locally adaptive Bayesian (F.L.A.B.) showed its reliability and its precision on very complete collection of realistic simulated and real data. Its use in the context of radiotherapy allows to consider easily the studies implementation and scenari of dose painting or dose escalation, including in complex cases of heterogenous fixations. It is conceivable to apply F.L.A.B. on PET images with F.M.I.S.O. ( 18 F fluoro misonidazole) or F.L.T. (fluoro-L-thymidine) to complete the definition of the biological target volume. (N.C.)

  4. SU-C-BRA-05: Delineating High-Dose Clinical Target Volumes for Head and Neck Tumors Using Machine Learning Algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardenas, C [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, TX (United States); Wong, A [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); School of Medicine, The University of Texas Health Sciences Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX (United States); Mohamed, A; Fuller, C [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Yang, J; Court, L; Aristophanous, M [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Rao, A [Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop and test population-based machine learning algorithms for delineating high-dose clinical target volumes (CTVs) in H&N tumors. Automating and standardizing the contouring of CTVs can reduce both physician contouring time and inter-physician variability, which is one of the largest sources of uncertainty in H&N radiotherapy. Methods: Twenty-five node-negative patients treated with definitive radiotherapy were selected (6 right base of tongue, 11 left and 9 right tonsil). All patients had GTV and CTVs manually contoured by an experienced radiation oncologist prior to treatment. This contouring process, which is driven by anatomical, pathological, and patient specific information, typically results in non-uniform margin expansions about the GTV. Therefore, we tested two methods to delineate high-dose CTV given a manually-contoured GTV: (1) regression-support vector machines(SVM) and (2) classification-SVM. These models were trained and tested on each patient group using leave-one-out cross-validation. The volume difference(VD) and Dice similarity coefficient(DSC) between the manual and auto-contoured CTV were calculated to evaluate the results. Distances from GTV-to-CTV were computed about each patient’s GTV and these distances, in addition to distances from GTV to surrounding anatomy in the expansion direction, were utilized in the regression-SVM method. The classification-SVM method used categorical voxel-information (GTV, selected anatomical structures, else) from a 3×3×3cm3 ROI centered about the voxel to classify voxels as CTV. Results: Volumes for the auto-contoured CTVs ranged from 17.1 to 149.1cc and 17.4 to 151.9cc; the average(range) VD between manual and auto-contoured CTV were 0.93 (0.48–1.59) and 1.16(0.48–1.97); while average(range) DSC values were 0.75(0.59–0.88) and 0.74(0.59–0.81) for the regression-SVM and classification-SVM methods, respectively. Conclusion: We developed two novel machine learning methods to delineate

  5. SU-C-BRA-05: Delineating High-Dose Clinical Target Volumes for Head and Neck Tumors Using Machine Learning Algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardenas, C; Wong, A; Mohamed, A; Fuller, C; Yang, J; Court, L; Aristophanous, M; Rao, A

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and test population-based machine learning algorithms for delineating high-dose clinical target volumes (CTVs) in H&N tumors. Automating and standardizing the contouring of CTVs can reduce both physician contouring time and inter-physician variability, which is one of the largest sources of uncertainty in H&N radiotherapy. Methods: Twenty-five node-negative patients treated with definitive radiotherapy were selected (6 right base of tongue, 11 left and 9 right tonsil). All patients had GTV and CTVs manually contoured by an experienced radiation oncologist prior to treatment. This contouring process, which is driven by anatomical, pathological, and patient specific information, typically results in non-uniform margin expansions about the GTV. Therefore, we tested two methods to delineate high-dose CTV given a manually-contoured GTV: (1) regression-support vector machines(SVM) and (2) classification-SVM. These models were trained and tested on each patient group using leave-one-out cross-validation. The volume difference(VD) and Dice similarity coefficient(DSC) between the manual and auto-contoured CTV were calculated to evaluate the results. Distances from GTV-to-CTV were computed about each patient’s GTV and these distances, in addition to distances from GTV to surrounding anatomy in the expansion direction, were utilized in the regression-SVM method. The classification-SVM method used categorical voxel-information (GTV, selected anatomical structures, else) from a 3×3×3cm3 ROI centered about the voxel to classify voxels as CTV. Results: Volumes for the auto-contoured CTVs ranged from 17.1 to 149.1cc and 17.4 to 151.9cc; the average(range) VD between manual and auto-contoured CTV were 0.93 (0.48–1.59) and 1.16(0.48–1.97); while average(range) DSC values were 0.75(0.59–0.88) and 0.74(0.59–0.81) for the regression-SVM and classification-SVM methods, respectively. Conclusion: We developed two novel machine learning methods to delineate

  6. The value of magnetic resonance imaging in target volume delineation of base of tongue tumours - A study using flexible surface coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Merina [Department of Radiotherapy, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Schmidt, Maria [Cancer Research UK Clinical Magnetic Resonance Group, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Surrey (United Kingdom); Sohaib, Aslam [Department of Radiology, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Kong, Christine; Burke, Kevin [Department of Radiotherapy, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Richardson, Cheryl; Usher, Marianne [Cancer Research UK Clinical Magnetic Resonance Group, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Surrey (United Kingdom); Brennan, Sinead [Department of Radiotherapy, St. James' s Hospital, Dublin (Ireland); Riddell, Angela [Department of Radiology, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Davies, Mark; Newbold, Kate [Department of Radiotherapy, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Harrington, Kevin J; Nutting, Christopher M [Department of Radiotherapy, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom)

    2010-02-15

    Introduction: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides superior diagnostic accuracy over computed tomography (CT) in oropharyngeal tumours. Precise delineation of the gross tumour volume (GTV) is mandatory in radiotherapy planning when a GTV boost is required. CT volume definition in this regard is poor. We studied the feasibility of using flexible surface (flex-L) coils to obtain MR images for MR-CT fusion to assess the benefit of MRI over CT alone in planning base of tongue tumours. Methods: Eight patients underwent CT and MRI radiotherapy planning scans with an immobilisation device. Distortion-corrected T1-weighted post-contrast MR scans were fused to contrast-enhanced planning CT scans. GTV, clinical target and planning target volumes (CTV, PTV) and organs at risk (OAR) were delineated on CT, then on MRI with blinding to the CT images. The volumetric and spatial differences between MRI and CT volumes for GTV, CTV, PTV and OAR were compared. MR image distortions due to field inhomogeneity and non-linear gradients were corrected and the need for such correction was evaluated. Results: The mean primary GTV was larger on MRI (22.2 vs. 9.5 cm{sup 3}, p = 0.05) than CT. The mean primary and nodal GTV (i.e. BOT and macroscopic nodes) was significantly larger on MRI (27.2 vs. 14.4 cm{sup 3}, p = 0.05). The volume overlap index (VOI) between MRI and CT for the primary was 0.34 suggesting that MRI depicts parts of the primary tumour not detected by CT. There was no significant difference in volume delineation between MR and CT for CTV, PTV, nodal CTV and nodal PTV. MRI volumes for brainstem and spinal cord were significantly smaller due to improved organ definition (p = 0.002). Susceptibility and gradient-related distortions were not found to be clinically significant. Conclusion: MRI improves the definition of tongue base tumours and neurological structures. The use of MRI is recommended for GTV dose-escalation techniques to provide precise depiction of GTV and

  7. The value of magnetic resonance imaging in target volume delineation of base of tongue tumours - A study using flexible surface coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Merina; Schmidt, Maria; Sohaib, Aslam; Kong, Christine; Burke, Kevin; Richardson, Cheryl; Usher, Marianne; Brennan, Sinead; Riddell, Angela; Davies, Mark; Newbold, Kate; Harrington, Kevin J.; Nutting, Christopher M.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides superior diagnostic accuracy over computed tomography (CT) in oropharyngeal tumours. Precise delineation of the gross tumour volume (GTV) is mandatory in radiotherapy planning when a GTV boost is required. CT volume definition in this regard is poor. We studied the feasibility of using flexible surface (flex-L) coils to obtain MR images for MR-CT fusion to assess the benefit of MRI over CT alone in planning base of tongue tumours. Methods: Eight patients underwent CT and MRI radiotherapy planning scans with an immobilisation device. Distortion-corrected T1-weighted post-contrast MR scans were fused to contrast-enhanced planning CT scans. GTV, clinical target and planning target volumes (CTV, PTV) and organs at risk (OAR) were delineated on CT, then on MRI with blinding to the CT images. The volumetric and spatial differences between MRI and CT volumes for GTV, CTV, PTV and OAR were compared. MR image distortions due to field inhomogeneity and non-linear gradients were corrected and the need for such correction was evaluated. Results: The mean primary GTV was larger on MRI (22.2 vs. 9.5 cm 3 , p = 0.05) than CT. The mean primary and nodal GTV (i.e. BOT and macroscopic nodes) was significantly larger on MRI (27.2 vs. 14.4 cm 3 , p = 0.05). The volume overlap index (VOI) between MRI and CT for the primary was 0.34 suggesting that MRI depicts parts of the primary tumour not detected by CT. There was no significant difference in volume delineation between MR and CT for CTV, PTV, nodal CTV and nodal PTV. MRI volumes for brainstem and spinal cord were significantly smaller due to improved organ definition (p = 0.002). Susceptibility and gradient-related distortions were not found to be clinically significant. Conclusion: MRI improves the definition of tongue base tumours and neurological structures. The use of MRI is recommended for GTV dose-escalation techniques to provide precise depiction of GTV and improved

  8. Target volume delineation and field setup. A practical guide for conformal and intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Nancy Y. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States). Radiation Oncology; Lu, Jiade J. (eds.) [National Univ. Health System, Singapore (Singapore). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; National Univ. of Singapore (Singapore). Dept. of Medicine

    2013-03-01

    Practical handbook on selection and delineation of tumor volumes and fields for conformal radiation therapy, including IMRT. Helpful format facilitating use on a step-by-step basis in daily practice. Designed to ensure accurate coverage of commonly encountered tumors along their routes of spread. This handbook is designed to enable radiation oncologists to appropriately and confidently delineate tumor volumes/fields for conformal radiation therapy, including intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), in patients with commonly encountered cancers. The orientation of this handbook is entirely practical, in that the focus is on the illustration of clinical target volume (CTV) delineation for each major malignancy. Each chapter provides guidelines and concise knowledge on CTV selection for a particular disease, explains how the anatomy of lymphatic drainage shapes the selection of the target volume, and presents detailed illustrations of volumes, slice by slice, on planning CT images. While the emphasis is on target volume delineation for three-dimensional conformal therapy and IMRT, information is also provided on conventional radiation therapy field setup and planning for certain malignancies for which IMRT is not currently suitable.

  9. Head-and-Neck Target Delineation Among Radiation Oncology Residents After a Teaching Intervention: A Prospective, Blinded Pilot Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bekelman, Justin E.; Wolden, Suzanne; Lee, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: We conducted this study to determine the feasibility of incorporating a teaching intervention on target delineation into the educational curriculum of a radiation oncology residency program and to assess the short-term effects on resident skills. Methods and Materials: The study schema consisted of a baseline evaluation, the teaching intervention, and a follow-up evaluation. At the baseline evaluation, the participants contoured three clinical tumor volumes (CTVs) (70 Gy, 59.4 Gy, and 54 Gy) on six contrast-enhanced axial computed tomography images of a de-identified patient with Stage T2N2bM0 squamous cell carcinoma of the right base of the tongue. The participants attended a series of head-and-neck oncology and anatomy seminars. The teaching intervention consisted of a didactic lecture and an interactive hands-on practical session designed to improve the knowledge and skills for target delineation in the head and neck. At the follow-up evaluation, the residents again contoured the CTVs. Results: Of the 14 eligible residents, 11 (79%) actually participated in the study. For all participants, but especially for those who had not had previous experience with head-and-neck target delineation, the teaching intervention was associated with improvement in the delineation of the node-negative neck (CTV 54 Gy contour). Regardless of clinical experience, participants had difficulty determining what should be included in the CTV 59.4 Gy contour to ensure adequate coverage of potential microscopic disease. Conclusion: Incorporating a teaching intervention into the education curriculum of a radiation oncology residency program is feasible and was associated with short-term improvements in target delineation skills. Subsequent interventions will require content refinement, additional validation, longer term follow-up, and multi-institutional collaboration

  10. A treatment planning comparison of four target volume contouring guidelines for locally advanced pancreatic cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fokas, Emmanouil; Eccles, Cynthia; Patel, Neel; Chu, Kwun-Ye; Warren, Samantha; McKenna, W. Gillies; Brunner, Thomas B.

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: Contouring of target volumes varies significantly in radiotherapy of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). There is a lack of consensus as to whether elective lymph nodes (eLN’s) should be included or not in the planning target volume (PTV). In the present study we analyzed the dosimetric coverage of the eLN’s and organs at risk (OAR) by comparing four different contouring guidelines. Methods and materials: PTVs were delineated with (Oxford and RTOG guidelines) or without (Michigan and SCALOP guidelines) including the eLNs in eleven patients with PDAC. eLNs included the peripancreatic, paraaortic, paracaval, celiac trunk, superior mesenteric and portal vein clinical target volumes (CTVs). A 3D-CRT plan (50.40 Gy in 28 fractions) was performed to analyze and compare the dosimetric coverage of all eLNs and OAR between the 4 contouring guidelines. Results: The size of Oxford and RTOG PTVs was comparable and significantly larger than the SCALOP and Michigan PTVs. Interestingly the eLNs received a significant amount of incidental dose irradiation by PTV-based plans that only aimed to treat the tumor without the eLNs. The dosimetric coverage of eLN presented a large variability according to the respective contouring methods. The difference in the size of the 4 PTVs was reflected to the dose distribution at the OAR. Conclusions: Our study provides important information regarding the impact of different contouring guidelines on the dose distribution to the eLNs and the OAR in patients with locally advanced PDAC treated with radiotherapy

  11. Quantitative assessment of inter-clinician variability of target volume delineation for medulloblastoma: quality assurance for the SIOP PNET 4 trial protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coles, Charlotte E.; Hoole, Andrew C.F.; Harden, Susan V; Burnet, Neil G.; Twyman, Nicola; Taylor, Roger E.; Kortmann, Rolf D.; Williams, Michael V.

    2003-01-01

    Background and purpose: To assess inter-clinician variability amongst specialist paediatric radiation oncologists in delineating clinical target volumes for treating medulloblastoma as a quality assurance exercise prior to the introduction of the SIOP PNET 4 trial protocol of conformal radiotherapy to the posterior fossa and tumour bed. Patients and methods: Participants from 17 UK centres attended an educational meeting and then completed a clinical planning exercise to outline: (1) the whole posterior fossa and (2) the tumour bed. Quantitative analysis of the volumes, lengths, spatial positioning and axial planes for each individual was carried out and variation between individuals analysed. Results: Outlining of the posterior fossa was reasonably consistent, although most variation was seen in defining the superior border of the tentorium. A major difference was the decision whether or not to include the post-surgical meningocoele in the clinical target volume (CTV). The CTV for the tumour bed was under treated by all participants due to lack of inclusion of pre-operative tumour extent. Conclusions: This exercise demonstrated several ambiguities in the draft protocol and highlighted particular areas of inter-clinician variation. Consequently the protocol was revised and improved to take account of these findings. We recommend that planning exercises, in conjunction with education and training, should be implemented before the start of any new radiotherapy trial. In the future, the use of image transfer will allow prospective peer review of target volumes before treatment commences. These measures are essential to ensure that alterations in clinical practice are achieved in a uniform way

  12. Variability of Target and Normal Structure Delineation Using Multimodality Imaging for Radiation Therapy of Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalah, Entesar; Moraru, Ion [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Paulson, Eric [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Department of Radiology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Erickson, Beth [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Li, X. Allen, E-mail: ali@mcw.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: To explore the potential of multimodality imaging (dynamic contrast–enhanced magnetic resonance imaging [DCE-MRI], apparent diffusion-coefficient diffusion-weighted imaging [ADC-DWI], fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography [FDG-PET], and computed tomography) to define the gross tumor volume (GTV) and organs at risk in radiation therapy planning for pancreatic cancer. Delineated volumetric changes of DCE-MRI, ADC-DWI, and FDG-PET were assessed in comparison with the finding on 3-dimensional/4-dimensional CT with and without intravenous contrast, and with pathology specimens for resectable and borderline resectable cases of pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: We studied a total of 19 representative patients, whose DCE-MRI, ADC-DWI, and FDG-PET data were reviewed. Gross tumor volume and tumor burden/active region inside pancreatic head/neck or body were delineated on MRI (denoted GTV{sub DCE}, and GTV{sub ADC}), a standardized uptake value (SUV) of 2.5, 40%SUVmax, and 50%SUVmax on FDG-PET (GTV2.5, GTV{sub 40%}, and GTV{sub 50%}). Volumes of the pancreas, duodenum, stomach, liver, and kidneys were contoured according to CT (V{sub CT}), T1-weighted MRI (V{sub T1}), and T2-weighted MRI (V{sub T2}) for 7 patients. Results: Significant statistical differences were found between the GTVs from DCE-MRI, ADC-DW, and FDG-PET, with a mean and range of 4.73 (1.00-9.79), 14.52 (3.21-25.49), 22.04 (1.00-45.69), 19.10 (4.84-45.59), and 9.80 (0.32-35.21) cm{sup 3} for GTV{sub DCE}, GTV{sub ADC}, GTV2.5, GTV{sub 40%}, and GTV{sub 50%}, respectively. The mean difference and range in the measurements of maximum dimension of tumor on DCE-MRI, ADC-DW, SUV2.5, 40%SUVmax, and 50%SUVmax compared with pathologic specimens were −0.84 (−2.24 to 0.9), 0.41 (−0.15 to 2.3), 0.58 (−1.41 to 3.69), 0.66 (−0.67 to 1.32), and 0.15 (−1.53 to 2.38) cm, respectively. The T1- and T2-based volumes for pancreas, duodenum, stomach, and liver were generally smaller

  13. Variability of Target and Normal Structure Delineation Using Multimodality Imaging for Radiation Therapy of Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalah, Entesar; Moraru, Ion; Paulson, Eric; Erickson, Beth; Li, X. Allen

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To explore the potential of multimodality imaging (dynamic contrast–enhanced magnetic resonance imaging [DCE-MRI], apparent diffusion-coefficient diffusion-weighted imaging [ADC-DWI], fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography [FDG-PET], and computed tomography) to define the gross tumor volume (GTV) and organs at risk in radiation therapy planning for pancreatic cancer. Delineated volumetric changes of DCE-MRI, ADC-DWI, and FDG-PET were assessed in comparison with the finding on 3-dimensional/4-dimensional CT with and without intravenous contrast, and with pathology specimens for resectable and borderline resectable cases of pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: We studied a total of 19 representative patients, whose DCE-MRI, ADC-DWI, and FDG-PET data were reviewed. Gross tumor volume and tumor burden/active region inside pancreatic head/neck or body were delineated on MRI (denoted GTV DCE , and GTV ADC ), a standardized uptake value (SUV) of 2.5, 40%SUVmax, and 50%SUVmax on FDG-PET (GTV2.5, GTV 40% , and GTV 50% ). Volumes of the pancreas, duodenum, stomach, liver, and kidneys were contoured according to CT (V CT ), T1-weighted MRI (V T1 ), and T2-weighted MRI (V T2 ) for 7 patients. Results: Significant statistical differences were found between the GTVs from DCE-MRI, ADC-DW, and FDG-PET, with a mean and range of 4.73 (1.00-9.79), 14.52 (3.21-25.49), 22.04 (1.00-45.69), 19.10 (4.84-45.59), and 9.80 (0.32-35.21) cm 3 for GTV DCE , GTV ADC , GTV2.5, GTV 40% , and GTV 50% , respectively. The mean difference and range in the measurements of maximum dimension of tumor on DCE-MRI, ADC-DW, SUV2.5, 40%SUVmax, and 50%SUVmax compared with pathologic specimens were −0.84 (−2.24 to 0.9), 0.41 (−0.15 to 2.3), 0.58 (−1.41 to 3.69), 0.66 (−0.67 to 1.32), and 0.15 (−1.53 to 2.38) cm, respectively. The T1- and T2-based volumes for pancreas, duodenum, stomach, and liver were generally smaller compared with those from CT, except for the kidneys

  14. Geometrical Comparison Measures for Tumor Delineation, what do they mean for the Actual Dosis Plan?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hollensen, Christian; Persson, G.; Højgaard, L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Gross tumour volume (GTV) delineation is central for radiotherapy planning. It provides the basis of the clinical target volume and finally the planning target volume (PTV) which is used for dose optimization. GTV delineations are prone to intermethod and inter......observer variation. In clinical studies this variation is commonly represented by geometrical volume comparison measures (GVCMs) as volume assessment, centre of mass and overlap. The correlation between these measures and the radiotherapy plan are however unclear. The aim of the present study is to investigate...... the correlation between GVCMs and the radiotherapy plans of patients with peripheral lung tumours. Materials and Methods: Peripheral lung tumours of 10 patients referred for stereotactic body radiotherapy in 2008 were delineated by 3 radiologists and 3 oncologists. From these GTV delineations 6 different...

  15. Radiotherapy volume delineation using dynamic [18F]-FDG PET/CT imaging in patients with oropharyngeal cancer: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvoniemi, Antti; Din, Mueez U; Suilamo, Sami; Shepherd, Tony; Minn, Heikki

    2016-11-01

    Delineation of gross tumour volume in 3D is a critical step in the radiotherapy (RT) treatment planning for oropharyngeal cancer (OPC). Static [ 18 F]-FDG PET/CT imaging has been suggested as a method to improve the reproducibility of tumour delineation, but it suffers from low specificity. We undertook this pilot study in which dynamic features in time-activity curves (TACs) of [ 18 F]-FDG PET/CT images were applied to help the discrimination of tumour from inflammation and adjacent normal tissue. Five patients with OPC underwent dynamic [ 18 F]-FDG PET/CT imaging in treatment position. Voxel-by-voxel analysis was performed to evaluate seven dynamic features developed with the knowledge of differences in glucose metabolism in different tissue types and visual inspection of TACs. The Gaussian mixture model and K-means algorithms were used to evaluate the performance of the dynamic features in discriminating tumour voxels compared to the performance of standardized uptake values obtained from static imaging. Some dynamic features showed a trend towards discrimination of different metabolic areas but lack of consistency means that clinical application is not recommended based on these results alone. Impact of inflammatory tissue remains a problem for volume delineation in RT of OPC, but a simple dynamic imaging protocol proved practicable and enabled simple data analysis techniques that show promise for complementing the information in static uptake values.

  16. Probe into rational target volume of nasopharyngeal carcinoma having been treated with conventional radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Yingjie; Zhao Chong; Lu Lixia; Wu Shaoxiong; Cui Nianji; Chen Fujin

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the local control rate and the dosimetric patterns of local recurrence in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients having been treated with standardized conventional radiotherapy and to evaluate the delineation of rational target volume. Methods: From Jan. 2000 to Dec. 2000, 476 patients with untreated NPC were treated by standardized conventional radiotherapy alone at the Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center. The radiation ports were designed on a X-ray simulator. The nasopharyngeal lesion demonstrated by CT scan and the subclinical spread regions adjacent to the nasopharynx were defined as the target volume. Kaplan- Meier method was used to calculate the cumulative local recurrence rate. For patients with local recurrence, the primary and recurrent local tumor volumes(V nx , V recur ) were delineated with three-dimensional treatment planning system(3DTPS), and the dataset of radiation ports and delivered prescription dose to the 3DTPS were transferred according to the first treatment. The dose of radiation received by V recur was calculated and analyzed with dose- volume histogram(DVH). Local recurrence was classified as: 1. 'in-port' with 95% or more of the recurrence volume ( recur V 95 ) was within the 95% isodose; 2. 'marginal' with 20% to 95% of recur V 95 within the 95% isodose; 3. o utside w ith only less than 20% of recur V 95 within the 95% isodose curve. Results: With the median follow- up of 42.5 months (range 8-54 months), 52 patients developed local recurrence. The 1-, 2-, 3 and 4-year cumulative local failure rate was 0.6%, 3.9%, 8.7% and 11.5%, respectively. Among the 42 local recurrent patients who could be analyzed by 3DTPS, 52% were in-port, 40% were marginal and 7% were outside. For most of the marginal recurrence and all the outside recurrence patients, the main reason of recurrence were related to the unreasonable design of the radiation port and inaccuracy in the interpretation image findings. Conclusions: The outcome of

  17. Internal high linear energy transfer (LET) targeted radiotherapy for cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, Barry J

    2006-01-01

    High linear energy transfer (LET) radiation for internal targeted therapy has been a long time coming on to the medical therapy scene. While fundamental principles were established many decades ago, the clinical implementation has been slow. Localized neutron capture therapy, and more recently systemic targeted alpha therapy, are at the clinical trial stage. What are the attributes of these therapies that have led a band of scientists and clinicians to dedicate so much of their careers? High LET means high energy density, causing double strand breaks in DNA, and short-range radiation, sparing adjacent normal tissues. This targeted approach complements conventional radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Such therapies fail on several fronts. Foremost is the complete lack of progress for the control of primary GBM, the holy grail for cancer therapies. Next is the inability to regress metastatic cancer on a systemic basis. This has been the task of chemotherapy, but palliation is the major application. Finally, there is the inability to inhibit the development of lethal metastatic cancer after successful treatment of the primary cancer. This review charts, from an Australian perspective, the developing role of local and systemic high LET, internal radiation therapy. (review)

  18. Radiotherapy in combination with vascular-targeted therapies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciric, Eva; Sersa, Gregor

    2010-01-01

    Given the critical role of tumor vasculature in tumor development, considerable efforts have been spent on developing therapeutic strategies targeting the tumor vascular network. A variety of agents have been developed, with two general approaches being pursued. Antiangiogenic agents (AAs) aim to interfere with the process of angiogenesis, preventing new tumor blood vessel formation. Vascular-disrupting agents (VDAs) target existing tumor vessels causing tumor ischemia and necrosis. Despite their great therapeutic potential, it has become clear that their greatest clinical utility may lie in combination with conventional anticancer therapies. Radiotherapy is a widely used treatment modality for cancer with its distinct therapeutic challenges. Thus, combining the two approaches seems reasonable. Strong biological rationale exist for combining vascular-targeted therapies with radiation. AAs and VDAs were shown to alter the tumor microenvironment in such a way as to enhance responses to radiation. The results of preclinical and early clinical studies have confirmed the therapeutic potential of this new treatment strategy in the clinical setting. However, concerns about increased normal tissue toxicity, have been raised

  19. Influence of experience and qualification on PET-based target volume delineation. When there is no expert - ask your colleague

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doll, C.; Grosu, A.L.; Nestle, U.; Duncker-Rohr, V.; Ruecker, G.; Mix, M.; MacManus, M.; Ruysscher, D. de; Vogel, W.; Eriksen, J.G.; Oyen, W.; Weber, W.

    2014-01-01

    The integration of positron emission tomography (PET) information for target volume delineation in radiation treatment planning is routine in many centers. In contrast to automatic contouring, research on visual-manual delineation is scarce. The present study investigates the dependency of manual delineation on experience and qualification. A total of 44 international interdisciplinary observers each defined a [ 18 F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET based gross tumor volume (GTV) using the same PET/CT scan from a patient with lung cancer. The observers were ''experts'' (E; n = 3), ''experienced interdisciplinary pairs'' (EP; 9 teams of radiation oncologist (RO) + nuclear medicine physician (NP)), ''single field specialists'' (SFS; n = 13), and ''students'' (S; n = 10). Five automatic delineation methods (AM) were also included. Volume sizes and concordance indices within the groups (pCI) and relative to the experts (eCI) were calculated. E (pCI = 0.67) and EP (pCI = 0.53) showed a significantly higher agreement within the groups as compared to SFS (pCI = 0.43, p = 0.03, and p = 0.006). In relation to the experts, EP (eCI = 0.55) showed better concordance compared to SFS (eCI = 0.49) or S (eCI = 0.47). The intermethod variability of the AM (pCI = 0.44) was similar to that of SFS and S, showing poorer agreement with the experts (eCI = 0.35). The results suggest that interdisciplinary cooperation could be beneficial for consistent contouring. Joint delineation by a radiation oncologist and a nuclear medicine physician showed remarkable agreement and better concordance with the experts compared to other specialists. The relevant intermethod variability of the automatic algorithms underlines the need for further standardization and optimization in this field. (orig.) [de

  20. Target Volume Delineation in Oropharyngeal Cancer: Impact of PET, MRI, and Physical Examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiagarajan, Anuradha; Caria, Nicola; Schöder, Heiko; Iyer, N. Gopalakrishna; Wolden, Suzanne; Wong, Richard J.; Sherman, Eric; Fury, Matthew G.; Lee, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Sole utilization of computed tomography (CT) scans in gross tumor volume (GTV) delineation for head-and-neck cancers is subject to inaccuracies. This study aims to evaluate contributions of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), and physical examination (PE) to GTV delineation in oropharyngeal cancer (OPC). Methods: Forty-one patients with OPC were studied. All underwent contrast-enhanced CT simulation scans (CECTs) that were registered with pretreatment PETs and MRIs. For each patient, three sets of primary and nodal GTV were contoured. First, reference GTVs (GTVref) were contoured by the treating radiation oncologist (RO) using CT, MRI, PET, and PE findings. Additional GTVs were created using fused CT/PET scans (GTVctpet) and CT/MRI scans (GTVctmr) by two other ROs blinded to GTVref. To compare GTVs, concordance indices (CI) were calculated by dividing the respective overlap volumes by overall volumes. To evaluate the contribution of PE, composite GTVs derived from CT, MRI, and PET (GTVctpetmr) were compared with GTVref. Results: For primary tumors, GTVref was significantly larger than GTVctpet and GTVctmr (p 0.75), indicating that although the modalities were complementary, the added benefit was small in the context of CECTs. In addition, PE did not aid greatly in nodal GTV delineation. Conclusion: PET and MRI are complementary and combined use is ideal. However, the low CI (ctpetmr vs. ref) particularly for primary tumors underscores the limitations of defining GTVs using imaging alone. PE is invaluable and must be incorporated.

  1. [Radiotherapy of oropharynx carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servagi Vernat, S; Tochet, F; Vieillevigne, L; Pointreau, Y; Maingon, P; Giraud, P

    2016-09-01

    Indication, doses, technique of radiotherapy and concomitant chemotherapy for oropharynx carcinoma are presented. The recommendations for delineation of the target volumes and organs at risk are detailed. Copyright © 2016 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Combining Targeted Agents With Modern Radiotherapy in Soft Tissue Sarcomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Philip; Houghton, Peter; Kirsch, David G.; Finkelstein, Steven E.; Monjazeb, Arta M.; Xu-Welliver, Meng; Dicker, Adam P.; Ahmed, Mansoor; Vikram, Bhadrasain; Teicher, Beverly A.; Coleman, C. Norman; Machtay, Mitchell; Curran, Walter J.

    2014-01-01

    Improved understanding of soft-tissue sarcoma (STS) biology has led to better distinction and subtyping of these diseases with the hope of exploiting the molecular characteristics of each subtype to develop appropriately targeted treatment regimens. In the care of patients with extremity STS, adjunctive radiation therapy (RT) is used to facilitate limb and function, preserving surgeries while maintaining five-year local control above 85%. In contrast, for STS originating from nonextremity anatomical sites, the rate of local recurrence is much higher (five-year local control is approximately 50%) and a major cause of death and morbidity in these patients. Incorporating novel technological advancements to administer accurate RT in combination with novel radiosensitizing agents could potentially improve local control and overall survival. RT efficacy in STS can be increased by modulating biological pathways such as angiogenesis, cell cycle regulation, cell survival signaling, and cancer-host immune interactions. Previous experiences, advancements, ongoing research, and current clinical trials combining RT with agents modulating one or more of the above pathways are reviewed. The standard clinical management of patients with STS with pretreatment biopsy, neoadjuvant treatment, and primary surgery provides an opportune disease model for interrogating translational hypotheses. The purpose of this review is to outline a strategic vision for clinical translation of preclinical findings and to identify appropriate targeted agents to combine with radiotherapy in the treatment of STS from different sites and/or different histology subtypes. PMID:25326640

  3. A clip-based protocol for breast boost radiotherapy provides clear target visualisation and demonstrates significant volume reduction over time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Lorraine [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Cox, Jennifer [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Morgia, Marita [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Atyeo, John [Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Lamoury, Gillian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia)

    2015-09-15

    The clinical target volume (CTV) for early stage breast cancer is difficult to clearly identify on planning computed tomography (CT) scans. Surgical clips inserted around the tumour bed should help to identify the CTV, particularly if the seroma has been reabsorbed, and enable tracking of CTV changes over time. A surgical clip-based CTV delineation protocol was introduced. CTV visibility and its post-operative shrinkage pattern were assessed. The subjects were 27 early stage breast cancer patients receiving post-operative radiotherapy alone and 15 receiving post-operative chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy. The radiotherapy alone (RT/alone) group received a CT scan at median 25 days post-operatively (CT1rt) and another at 40 Gy, median 68 days (CT2rt). The chemotherapy/RT group (chemo/RT) received a CT scan at median 18 days post-operatively (CT1ch), a planning CT scan at median 126 days (CT2ch), and another at 40 Gy (CT3ch). There was no significant difference (P = 0.08) between the initial mean CTV for each cohort. The RT/alone cohort showed significant CTV volume reduction of 38.4% (P = 0.01) at 40 Gy. The Chemo/RT cohort had significantly reduced volumes between CT1ch: median 54 cm{sup 3} (4–118) and CT2ch: median 16 cm{sup 3}, (2–99), (P = 0.01), but no significant volume reduction thereafter. Surgical clips enable localisation of the post-surgical seroma for radiotherapy targeting. Most seroma shrinkage occurs early, enabling CT treatment planning to take place at 7 weeks, which is within the 9 weeks recommended to limit disease recurrence.

  4. A clip-based protocol for breast boost radiotherapy provides clear target visualisation and demonstrates significant volume reduction over time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, Lorraine; Cox, Jennifer; Morgia, Marita; Atyeo, John; Lamoury, Gillian

    2015-01-01

    The clinical target volume (CTV) for early stage breast cancer is difficult to clearly identify on planning computed tomography (CT) scans. Surgical clips inserted around the tumour bed should help to identify the CTV, particularly if the seroma has been reabsorbed, and enable tracking of CTV changes over time. A surgical clip-based CTV delineation protocol was introduced. CTV visibility and its post-operative shrinkage pattern were assessed. The subjects were 27 early stage breast cancer patients receiving post-operative radiotherapy alone and 15 receiving post-operative chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy. The radiotherapy alone (RT/alone) group received a CT scan at median 25 days post-operatively (CT1rt) and another at 40 Gy, median 68 days (CT2rt). The chemotherapy/RT group (chemo/RT) received a CT scan at median 18 days post-operatively (CT1ch), a planning CT scan at median 126 days (CT2ch), and another at 40 Gy (CT3ch). There was no significant difference (P = 0.08) between the initial mean CTV for each cohort. The RT/alone cohort showed significant CTV volume reduction of 38.4% (P = 0.01) at 40 Gy. The Chemo/RT cohort had significantly reduced volumes between CT1ch: median 54 cm 3 (4–118) and CT2ch: median 16 cm 3 , (2–99), (P = 0.01), but no significant volume reduction thereafter. Surgical clips enable localisation of the post-surgical seroma for radiotherapy targeting. Most seroma shrinkage occurs early, enabling CT treatment planning to take place at 7 weeks, which is within the 9 weeks recommended to limit disease recurrence

  5. Evaluation of atlas based auto-segmentation for head and neck target volume delineation in adaptive/replan IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Speight, R; Lindsay, R; Harding, R; Sykes, J; Karakaya, E; Prestwich, R; Sen, M

    2014-01-01

    IMRT for head and neck patients requires clinicians to delineate clinical target volumes (CTV) on a planning-CT (>2hrs/patient). When patients require a replan-CT, CTVs must be re-delineated. This work assesses the performance of atlas-based autosegmentation (ABAS), which uses deformable image registration between planning and replan-CTs to auto-segment CTVs on the replan-CT, based on the planning contours. Fifteen patients with planning-CT and replan-CTs were selected. One clinician delineated CTVs on the planning-CTs and up to three clinicians delineated CTVs on the replan-CTs. Replan-CT volumes were auto-segmented using ABAS using the manual CTVs from the planning-CT as an atlas. ABAS CTVs were edited manually to make them clinically acceptable. Clinicians were timed to estimate savings using ABAS. CTVs were compared using dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and mean distance to agreement (MDA). Mean inter-observer variability (DSC>0.79 and MDA<2.1mm) was found to be greater than intra-observer variability (DSC>0.91 and MDA<1.5mm). Comparing ABAS to manual CTVs gave DSC=0.86 and MDA=2.07mm. Once edited, ABAS volumes agreed more closely with the manual CTVs (DSC=0.87 and MDA=1.87mm). The mean clinician time required to produce CTVs reduced from 169min to 57min when using ABAS. ABAS segments volumes with accuracy close to inter-observer variability however the volumes require some editing before clinical use. Using ABAS reduces contouring time by a factor of three.

  6. Defining a radiotherapy target with positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, Quinten C.; Grills, Inga S.; Kestin, Larry L.; Wong, Ching-Yee O.; Wong, John W.; Martinez, Alvaro A.; Yan Di

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) imaging is now considered the most accurate clinical staging study for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and is also important in the staging of multiple other malignancies. Gross tumor volume (GTV) definition for radiotherapy, however, is typically based entirely on computed tomographic data. We performed a series of phantom studies to determine an accurate and uniformly applicable method for defining a GTV with FDG-PET. Methods and materials: A model-based method was tested by a phantom study to determine a threshold, or unique cutoff of standardized uptake value based on body weight (standardized uptake value [SUV]) for FDG-PET based GTV definition. The degree to which mean target SUV, background FDG concentration, and target volume influenced that GTV definition were evaluated. A phantom was constructed consisting of a 9.0-L cylindrical tank. Glass spheres with volumes ranging from 12.2 to 291.0 cc were suspended within the tank, with a minimum separation of 4 cm between the edges of the spheres. The sphere volumes were selected based on the range of NSCLC patient tumor volumes seen in our clinic. The tank and spheres were filled with a variety of known concentrations of FDG in several experiments and then scanned using a General Electric Advance PET scanner. In the initial experiment, six spheres with identical volumes were filled with varying concentrations of FDG (mean SUV 1.85 ∼ 9.68) and suspended within a background bath of FDG at a similar concentration to that used in clinical practice (0.144 μCi/mL). The second experiment was identical to the first, but was performed at 0.144 and 0.036 μCi/mL background concentrations to determine the effect of background FDG concentration on sphere definition. In the third experiment, six spheres with volumes of 12.2 to 291.0 cc were filled with equal concentrations of FDG and suspended in a standard background FDG concentration of 0.144

  7. Biological modelling of fuzzy target volumes in 3D radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levegruen, S.; Kampen, M. van; Waschek, T.; Engenhart, R.; Schlegel, W.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The outcome of each radiotherapy depends critically on the optimal choice of the target volume. The goal of the radiotherapist is to include all tumor spread at the same time as saving as much healthy tissue as possible. Even when the information of all imaging modalities is combined, the diagnostic techniques are not sensitive and specific enough to visualize all microscopic tumor cell spread. Due to this lack of information there is room for different interpretations concerning the extend of the target volume, leading to a fuzzy target volume. The aim of this work is to develop a model to score different target volume boundaries within the region of diagnostic uncertainty in terms of tumor control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP). Materials and Methods: In order to assess the region of diagnostic uncertainty, the radiotherapist defines interactively a minimal planning target volume that absolutely must be irradiated according to the diagnostic information available and a maximal planning target volume outside which no tumor cell spread is expected. For the NTCP calculation we use the Lyman 4 parameter model to estimate the response of an organ at risk to a uniform partial volume irradiation. The TCP calculation is based on the Poisson model of cell killing. The TCP estimation depends not only on volume, dose, clonogenic cell density and the α parameter of the linear quadratic model but also on the probability to find clonogenic cells in the considered volume. Inside the minimal PTV this probability is 1, outside the maximal PTV it is 0. Therefore all voxels inside the minimal PTV are assigned the value of 1 with respect to the target volume, all voxels outside the maximal PTV the value of 0. For voxels in the region of uncertainty in between, a 3D linear interpolation is performed. Here we assume the probability to follow the interpolated values. Starting with the minimal PTV, the expected gain in TCP and

  8. Delineating organs at risk in radiation therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Ausili Cèfaro, Giampiero; Perez, Carlos A

    2014-01-01

    This book offers an invaluable guide to the delineation of organs at risk of toxicity in patients undergoing radiotherapy. It details the radiological anatomy of organs at risk as seen on typical radiotherapy planning CT scans.

  9. A teaching intervention in a contouring dummy run improved target volume delineation in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. Reducing the interobserver variability in multicentre clinical studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schimek-Jasch, Tanja; Prokic, Vesna; Doll, Christian; Grosu, Anca-Ligia; Nestle, Ursula; Troost, Esther G.C.; Ruecker, Gerta; Avlar, Melanie; Duncker-Rohr, Viola; Mix, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Interobserver variability in the definition of target volumes (TVs) is a well-known confounding factor in (multicentre) clinical studies employing radiotherapy. Therefore, detailed contouring guidelines are provided in the prospective randomised multicentre PET-Plan (NCT00697333) clinical trial protocol. This trial compares strictly FDG-PET-based TV delineation with conventional TV delineation in patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Despite detailed contouring guidelines, their interpretation by different radiation oncologists can vary considerably, leading to undesirable discrepancies in TV delineation. Considering this, as part of the PET-Plan study quality assurance (QA), a contouring dummy run (DR) consisting of two phases was performed to analyse the interobserver variability before and after teaching. In the first phase of the DR (DR1), radiation oncologists from 14 study centres were asked to delineate TVs as defined by the study protocol (gross TV, GTV; and two clinical TVs, CTV-A and CTV-B) in a test patient. A teaching session was held at a study group meeting, including a discussion of the results focussing on discordances in comparison to the per-protocol solution. Subsequently, the second phase of the DR (DR2) was performed in order to evaluate the impact of teaching. Teaching after DR1 resulted in a reduction of absolute TVs in DR2, as well as in better concordance of TVs. The Overall Kappa(κ) indices increased from 0.63 to 0.71 (GTV), 0.60 to 0.65 (CTV-A) and from 0.59 to 0.63 (CTV-B), demonstrating improvements in overall interobserver agreement. Contouring DRs and study group meetings as part of QA in multicentre clinical trials help to identify misinterpretations of per-protocol TV delineation. Teaching the correct interpretation of protocol contouring guidelines leads to a reduction in interobserver variability and to more consistent contouring, which should consequently improve the validity of the overall study

  10. A teaching intervention in a contouring dummy run improved target volume delineation in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer: Reducing the interobserver variability in multicentre clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimek-Jasch, Tanja; Troost, Esther G C; Rücker, Gerta; Prokic, Vesna; Avlar, Melanie; Duncker-Rohr, Viola; Mix, Michael; Doll, Christian; Grosu, Anca-Ligia; Nestle, Ursula

    2015-06-01

    Interobserver variability in the definition of target volumes (TVs) is a well-known confounding factor in (multicentre) clinical studies employing radiotherapy. Therefore, detailed contouring guidelines are provided in the prospective randomised multicentre PET-Plan (NCT00697333) clinical trial protocol. This trial compares strictly FDG-PET-based TV delineation with conventional TV delineation in patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Despite detailed contouring guidelines, their interpretation by different radiation oncologists can vary considerably, leading to undesirable discrepancies in TV delineation. Considering this, as part of the PET-Plan study quality assurance (QA), a contouring dummy run (DR) consisting of two phases was performed to analyse the interobserver variability before and after teaching. In the first phase of the DR (DR1), radiation oncologists from 14 study centres were asked to delineate TVs as defined by the study protocol (gross TV, GTV; and two clinical TVs, CTV-A and CTV-B) in a test patient. A teaching session was held at a study group meeting, including a discussion of the results focussing on discordances in comparison to the per-protocol solution. Subsequently, the second phase of the DR (DR2) was performed in order to evaluate the impact of teaching. Teaching after DR1 resulted in a reduction of absolute TVs in DR2, as well as in better concordance of TVs. The Overall Kappa(κ) indices increased from 0.63 to 0.71 (GTV), 0.60 to 0.65 (CTV-A) and from 0.59 to 0.63 (CTV-B), demonstrating improvements in overall interobserver agreement. Contouring DRs and study group meetings as part of QA in multicentre clinical trials help to identify misinterpretations of per-protocol TV delineation. Teaching the correct interpretation of protocol contouring guidelines leads to a reduction in interobserver variability and to more consistent contouring, which should consequently improve the validity of the overall study

  11. An Improved Algorithm to Delineate Urban Targets with Model-Based Decomposition of PolSAR Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dingfeng Duan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In model-based decomposition algorithms using polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (PolSAR data, urban targets are typically identified based on the existence of strong double-bounced scattering. However, urban targets with large azimuth orientation angles (AOAs produce strong volumetric scattering that appears similar to scattering characteristics from tree canopies. Due to scattering ambiguity, urban targets can be classified into the vegetation category if the same classification scheme of the model-based PolSAR decomposition algorithms is followed. To resolve the ambiguity and to reduce the misclassification eventually, we introduced a correlation coefficient that characterized scattering mechanisms of urban targets with variable AOAs. Then, an existing volumetric scattering model was modified, and a PolSAR decomposition algorithm developed. The validity and effectiveness of the algorithm were examined using four PolSAR datasets. The algorithm was valid and effective to delineate urban targets with a wide range of AOAs, and applicable to a broad range of ground targets from urban areas, and from upland and flooded forest stands.

  12. Histopathological correlation of 11C-choline PET scans for target volume definition in radical prostate radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Joe H.; Joon, Daryl Lim; Lee, Sze Ting; Gong, Sylvia J.; Scott, Andrew M.; Davis, Ian D.; Clouston, David; Bolton, Damien; Hamilton, Christopher S.; Khoo, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of 11 C-choline PET scans in defining dominant intraprostatic lesions (DILs) for radiotherapy target volume definition. Material and methods: Eight men with prostate cancer who had 11 C-choline PET scans prior to radical prostatectomy were studied. Several methods were used to contour the DIL on the PET scans: visual, PET Edge, Region Grow, absolute standardised uptake value (SUV) thresholds and percentage of maximum SUV thresholds. Prostatectomy specimens were sliced in the transverse plane and DILs were delineated on these by a pathologist. These were then compared with the PET scans. The accuracy of correlation was assessed by the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and the Youden index. Results: The contouring method resulting in both the highest DSC and the highest Youden index was 60% of the maximum SUV (SUV 60% ), with values of 0.64 and 0.51, respectively. However SUV 60% was not statistically significantly better than all of the other methods by either measure. Conclusions: Although not statistically significant, SUV 60% resulted in the best correlation between 11 C-choline PET and pathology amongst all the methods studied. The degree of correlation shown here is consistent with previous studies that have justified using imaging for DIL radiotherapy target volume definition.

  13. SU-E-J-34: Clinical Evaluation of Targeting Accuracy and Tractogrphy Delineation of Radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juh, R; Suh, T; Kim, Y; Han, J; Kim, C; Oh, C; Kim, D [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Focal radiosurgery is a common treatment modality for trigeminal neuralgia (TN), a neuropathic facial pain condition. Assessment of treatment effectiveness is primarily clinical, given the paucity of investigational tools to assess trigeminal nerve changes. The efficiency of radiosurgery is related to its highly precise targeting. We assessed clinically the targeting accuracy of radiosurgery with Gamma knife. We hypothesized that trigeminal tractography provides more information than 2D-MR imaging, allowing detection of unique, focal changes in the target area after radiosurgery. Methods: Sixteen TN patients (2 females, 4 male, average age 65.3 years) treated with Gamma Knife radiosurgery, 40 Gy/50% isodose line underwent 1.5Tesla MR trigeminal nerve . Target accuracy was assessed from deviation of the coordinates of the target compared with the center of enhancement on post MRI. Radiation dose delivered at the borders of contrast enhancement was evaluated Results: The median deviation of the coordinates between the intended target and the center of contrast enhancement was within 1mm. The radiation doses fitting within the borders of the contrast enhancement the target ranged from 37.5 to 40 Gy. Trigeminal tractography accurately detected the radiosurgical target. Radiosurgery resulted in 47% drop in FA values at the target with no significant change in FA outside the target, suggesting that radiosurgery primarily affects myelin. Tractography was more sensitive, since FA changes were detected regardless of trigeminal nerve enhancement Conclusion: The median deviation found in clinical assessment of gamma knife treatment for TN Is low and compatible with its high rate of efficiency. DTI parameters accurately detect the effects of focal radiosurgery on the trigeminal nerve, serving as an in vivo imaging tool to study TN. This study is a proof of principle for further assessment of DTI parameters to understand the pathophysiology of TN and treatment effects.

  14. A consensus-based guideline defining clinical target volume for primary disease in external beam radiotherapy for intact uterine cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toita, Takafumi; Ohno, Tatsuya; Kaneyasu, Yuko

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a consensus-based guideline to define clinical target volume for primary disease (clinical target volume primary) in external beam radiotherapy for intact uterine cervical cancer. The working subgroup of the Japan Clinical Oncology Group (JCOG) Radiation Therapy Study Group began developing a guideline for primary clinical target volume in November 2009. The group consisted of 10 radiation oncologists and 2 gynecologic oncologists. The process started with comparing the contouring on computed tomographic images of actual cervical cancer cases among the members. This was followed by a comprehensive literature review that included primary research articles and textbooks as well as information on surgical procedures. Extensive discussion occurred in face-to-face meetings (three occasions) and frequent e-mail communications until a consensus was reached. The working subgroup reached a consensus on the definition for the clinical target volume primary. The clinical target volume primary consists of the gross tumor volume, uterine cervix, uterine corpus, parametrium, vagina and ovaries. Definitions for these component structures were determined. Anatomical boundaries in all directions were defined for the parametrium. Examples delineating these boundaries were prepared for the posterior border of the parametrium for various clinical situations (id est (i.e.) central tumor bulk, degree of parametrial involvement). A consensus-based guideline defining the clinical target volume primary was developed for external beam radiotherapy for intact uterine cervical cancer. This guideline will serve as a template for radiotherapy protocols in future clinical trials. It may also be used in actual clinical practice in the setting of highly precise external beam radiotherapy, including intensity-modulated radiotherapy. (author)

  15. Comparison of T2 and FLAIR imaging for target delineation in high grade gliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miller Robert W

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background FLAIR and T2 weighted MRIs are used based on institutional preference to delineate high grade gliomas and surrounding edema for radiation treatment planning. Although these sequences have inherent physical differences there is limited data on the clinical and dosimetric impact of using either or both sequences. Methods 40 patients with high grade gliomas consecutively treated between 2002 and 2008 of which 32 had pretreatment MRIs with T1, T2 and FLAIR available for review were selected for this study. These MRIs were fused with the treatment planning CT. Normal structures, clinical tumor volume (CTV and planning tumor volume (PTV were then defined on the T2 and FLAIR sequences. A Venn diagram analysis was performed for each pair of tumor volumes as well as a fractional component analysis to assess the contribution of each sequence to the union volume. For each patient the tumor volumes were compared in terms of total volume in cubic centimeters as well as anatomic location using a discordance index. The overlap of the tumor volumes with critical structures was calculated as a measure of predicted toxicity. For patients with MRI documented failures, the tumor volumes obtained using the different sequences were compared with the recurrent gross tumor volume (rGTV. Results The FLAIR CTVs and PTVs were significantly larger than the T2 CTVs and PTVs (p Conclusions Although both T2 and FLAIR MRI sequences are used to define high grade glial neoplasm and surrounding edema, our results show that the volumes generated using these techniques are different and not interchangeable. These differences have bearing on the use of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT and highly conformal treatment as well as on future clinical trials where the bias of using one technique over the other may influence the study outcome.

  16. Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prosnitz, L.R.; Kapp, D.S.; Weissberg, J.B.

    1983-01-01

    This review highlights developments over the past decade in radiotherapy and attempts to summarize the state of the art in the management of the major diseases in which radiotherapy has a meaningful role. The equipment, radiobiology of radiotherapy and carcinoma of the lung, breast and intestines are highlighted

  17. Recurrence pattern of squamous cell carcinoma in the midthoracic esophagus: implications for the clinical target volume design of postoperative radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang X

    2016-10-01

    stations 2, 4, 5, and 7 LNs should be delineated as clinical target volume of postoperative prophylactic irradiation, and upper abdominal LNs should be excluded. While for midthoracic ESCC with three or more positive nodes, upper abdominal LNs should also be included. The length of tumor and histological differentiation should be considered comprehensively to design the clinical target volume for radiotherapy. Keywords: esophagus cancer, radiotherapy, recurrence and metastasis, clinical target volume

  18. Delineating neurotrophin-3 dependent signaling pathways underlying sympathetic axon growth along intermediate targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeler, Austin B; Suo, Dong; Park, Juyeon; Deppmann, Christopher D

    2017-07-01

    Postganglionic sympathetic neurons detect vascular derived neurotrophin 3 (NT3) via the axonally expressed receptor tyrosine kinase, TrkA, to promote chemo-attraction along intermediate targets. Once axons arrive to their final target, a structurally related neurotrophic factor, nerve growth factor (NGF), also acts through TrkA to promote final target innervation. Does TrkA signal differently at these different locales? We previously found that Coronin-1 is upregulated in sympathetic neurons upon exposure to NGF, thereby endowing the NGF-TrkA complex with new signaling capabilities (i.e. calcium signaling), which dampens axon growth and branching. Based on the notion that axons do not express functional levels of Coronin-1 prior to final target innervation, we developed an in vitro model for axon growth and branching along intermediate targets using Coro1a -/- neurons grown in NT3. We found that, similar to NGF-TrkA, NT3-TrkA is capable of inducing MAPK and PI3K in the presence or absence of Coronin-1. However, unlike NGF, NT3 does not induce calcium release from intracellular stores. Using a combination of pharmacology, knockout neurons and in vitro functional assays, we suggest that the NT3-TrkA complex uses Ras/MAPK and/or PI3K-AKT signaling to induce axon growth and inhibit axon branching along intermediate targets. However, in the presence of Coronin-1, these signaling pathways lose their ability to impact NT3 dependent axon growth or branching. This is consistent with a role for Coronin-1 as a molecular switch for axon behavior and suggests that Coronin-1 suppresses NT3 dependent axon behavior. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Triphasic contrast enhanced CT simulation with bolus tracking for pancreas SBRT target delineation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfrey, Devon J; Patel, Bhavik N; Adamson, Justus D; Subashi, Ergys; Salama, Joseph K; Palta, Manisha

    Bolus-tracked multiphasic contrast computed tomography (CT) is often used in diagnostic radiology to enhance the visibility of pancreas tumors, but is uncommon in radiation therapy pancreas CT simulation, and its impact on gross tumor volume (GTV) delineation is unknown. This study evaluates the lesion conspicuity and consistency of pancreas stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) GTVs contoured in the different contrast phases of triphasic CT simulation scans. Triphasic, bolus-tracked planning CT simulation scans of 10 consecutive pancreas SBRT patients were acquired, yielding images of the pancreas during the late arterial (LA), portal venous (PV), and either the early arterial or delayed phase. GTVs were contoured on each phase by a gastrointestinal-specialized radiation oncologist and reviewed by a fellowship-trained abdominal radiologist who specializes in pancreatic imaging. The volumes of the registered GTVs, their overlap ratio, and the 3-dimensional margin expansions necessary for each GTV to fully encompass GTVs from the other phases were calculated. The contrast difference between tumor and normal pancreas was measured, and 2 radiation oncologists rank-ordered the phases according to their value for the lesion-contouring task. Tumor-to-pancreas enhancement was on average much larger for the LA and PV than the delayed phase or early arterial phases; the LA and PV phases were also consistently preferred by the radiation oncologists. Enhancement differences among the phases resulted in highly variable GTV volumes with no observed trends. Overlap ratios ranged from 18% to 75% across all 3 phases, improving to 43% to 91% when considering only the preferred LA and PV phases. GTV expansions necessary to encompass all GTVs ranged from 0.3 to 1.8 cm for all 3 phases, improving slightly to 0.1 to 1.4 cm when considering just the LA and PV phases. For pancreas SBRT, we recommend combining the GTVs from a multiphasic CT simulation with bolus-tracking, including

  20. Conventional 3D staging PET/CT in CT simulation for lung cancer: impact of rigid and deformable target volume alignments for radiotherapy treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, G G; Van Sörnsen De Koste, J R; Carson, K J; O'Sullivan, J M; Hounsell, A R; Senan, S

    2011-10-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET)/CT scans can improve target definition in radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). As staging PET/CT scans are increasingly available, we evaluated different methods for co-registration of staging PET/CT data to radiotherapy simulation (RTP) scans. 10 patients underwent staging PET/CT followed by RTP PET/CT. On both scans, gross tumour volumes (GTVs) were delineated using CT (GTV(CT)) and PET display settings. Four PET-based contours (manual delineation, two threshold methods and a source-to-background ratio method) were delineated. The CT component of the staging scan was co-registered using both rigid and deformable techniques to the CT component of RTP PET/CT. Subsequently rigid registration and deformation warps were used to transfer PET and CT contours from the staging scan to the RTP scan. Dice's similarity coefficient (DSC) was used to assess the registration accuracy of staging-based GTVs following both registration methods with the GTVs delineated on the RTP PET/CT scan. When the GTV(CT) delineated on the staging scan after both rigid registration and deformation was compared with the GTV(CT)on the RTP scan, a significant improvement in overlap (registration) using deformation was observed (mean DSC 0.66 for rigid registration and 0.82 for deformable registration, p = 0.008). A similar comparison for PET contours revealed no significant improvement in overlap with the use of deformable registration. No consistent improvements in similarity measures were observed when deformable registration was used for transferring PET-based contours from a staging PET/CT. This suggests that currently the use of rigid registration remains the most appropriate method for RTP in NSCLC.

  1. Comparison of T2 and FLAIR imaging for target delineation in high grade gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stall, Bronwyn; Zach, Leor; Ning, Holly; Ondos, John; Arora, Barbara; Shankavaram, Uma; Miller, Robert W; Citrin, Deborah; Camphausen, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    FLAIR and T2 weighted MRIs are used based on institutional preference to delineate high grade gliomas and surrounding edema for radiation treatment planning. Although these sequences have inherent physical differences there is limited data on the clinical and dosimetric impact of using either or both sequences. 40 patients with high grade gliomas consecutively treated between 2002 and 2008 of which 32 had pretreatment MRIs with T1, T2 and FLAIR available for review were selected for this study. These MRIs were fused with the treatment planning CT. Normal structures, clinical tumor volume (CTV) and planning tumor volume (PTV) were then defined on the T2 and FLAIR sequences. A Venn diagram analysis was performed for each pair of tumor volumes as well as a fractional component analysis to assess the contribution of each sequence to the union volume. For each patient the tumor volumes were compared in terms of total volume in cubic centimeters as well as anatomic location using a discordance index. The overlap of the tumor volumes with critical structures was calculated as a measure of predicted toxicity. For patients with MRI documented failures, the tumor volumes obtained using the different sequences were compared with the recurrent gross tumor volume (rGTV). The FLAIR CTVs and PTVs were significantly larger than the T2 CTVs and PTVs (p < 0.0001 and p = 0.0001 respectively). Based on the discordance index, the abnormality identified using the different sequences also differed in location. Fractional component analysis showed that the intersection of the tumor volumes as defined on both T2 and FLAIR defined the majority of the union volume contributing 63.6% to the CTV union and 82.1% to the PTV union. T2 alone uniquely identified 12.9% and 5.2% of the CTV and PTV unions respectively while FLAIR alone uniquely identified 25.7% and 12% of the CTV and PTV unions respectively. There was no difference in predicted toxicity to normal structures using T2 or FLAIR. At the

  2. Planning target volumes for radiotherapy: how much margin is needed?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antolak, John A.; Rosen, Isaac I.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: The radiotherapy planning target volume (PTV) encloses the clinical target volume (CTV) with anisotropic margins to account for possible uncertainties in beam alignment, patient positioning, organ motion, and organ deformation. Ideally, the CTV-PTV margin should be determined solely by the magnitudes of the uncertainties involved. In practice, the clinician usually also considers doses to abutting healthy tissues when deciding on the size of the CTV-PTV margin. This study calculates the ideal size of the CTV-PTV margin when only physical position uncertainties are considered. Methods and Materials: The position of the CTV for any treatment is assumed to be described by independent Gaussian distributions in each of the three Cartesian directions. Three strategies for choosing a CTV-PTV margin are analyzed. The CTV-PTV margin can be based on: 1. the probability that the CTV is completely enclosed by the PTV; 2. the probability that the projection of the CTV in the beam's eye view (BEV) is completely enclosed by the projection of the PTV in the BEV; and 3. the probability that a point on the edge of the CTV is within the PTV. Cumulative probability distributions are derived for each of the above strategies. Results: Expansion of the CTV by 1 standard deviation (SD) in each direction results in the CTV being entirely enclosed within the PTV 24% of the time; the BEV projection of the CTV is enclosed within the BEV projection of the PTV 39% of the time; and a point on the edge of the CTV is within the PTV 84% of the time. To have the CTV enclosed entirely within the PTV 95% of the time requires a margin of 2.8 SD. For the BEV projection of the CTV to be within the BEV projection of the PTV 95% of the time requires a margin of 2.45 SD. To have any point on the surface of the CTV be within the PTV 95% of the time requires a margin of 1.65 SD. Conclusion: In the first two strategies for selecting a margin, the probability of finding the CTV within the PTV is

  3. SU-F-I-51: CT/MR Image Deformation: The Clinical Assessment QA in Target Delineation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, C; Chen, Y [Monmouth Medical Center, Long Branch, NJ (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To study the deformation effects in CT/MR image registration of head and neck (HN) cancers. We present a clinical indication in guiding and simplifying registration procedures of this process while CT images possessed artifacts. Methods: CT/MR image fusion provides better soft tissue contrast in intracranial GTV definition with artifacts. However, whether the fusion process should include the deformation process is questionable and not recommended. We performed CT/MR image registration of a HN patient with tonsil GTV and nodes delineation on Varian Velocity™ system. Both rigid transformation and deformable registration of the same CT/MR imaging data were processed separately. Physician’s selection of target delineation was implemented to identify the variations. Transformation matrix was shown with visual identification, as well as the deformation QA numbers and figures were assessed. Results: The deformable CT/MR images were traced with the calculated matrix, both translation and rotational parameters were summarized. In deformable quality QA, the calculated Jacobian matrix was analyzed, which the min/mean/max of 0.73/0/99/1.37, respectively. Jacobian matrix of right neck node was 0.84/1.13/1.41, which present dis-similarity of the nodal area. If Jacobian = 1, the deformation is at the optimum situation. In this case, the deformation results have shown better target delineation for CT/MR deformation than rigid transformation. Though the root-mean-square vector difference is 1.48 mm, with similar rotational components, the cord and vertebrae position were aligned much better in the deformable MR images than the rigid transformation. Conclusion: CT/MR with/without image deformation presents similar image registration matrix; there were significant differentiate the anatomical structures in the region of interest by deformable process. Though vendor suggested only rigid transformation between CT/MR assuming the geometry remain similar, our findings

  4. Target volume definition for {sup 18}F-FDG PET-positive lymph nodes in radiotherapy of patients with non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nestle, Ursula; Schaefer-Schuler, Andrea; Hellwig, Dirk; Kirsch, Carl-Martin [Saarland University Medical Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Kremp, Stephanie; Ruebe, Christian [Saarland University Medical Centre, Department of Radio-oncology, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Groeschel, Andreas [Saarland University Medical Centre, Department of Pneumology, Homburg/Saar (Germany)

    2007-04-15

    FDG PET is increasingly used in radiotherapy planning. Recently, we demonstrated substantial differences in target volumes when applying different methods of FDG-based contouring in primary lung tumours (Nestle et al., J Nucl Med 2005;46:1342-8). This paper focusses on FDG-positive mediastinal lymph nodes (LN{sub PET}). In our institution, 51 NSCLC patients who were candidates for radiotherapy prospectively underwent staging FDG PET followed by a thoracic PET scan in the treatment position and a planning CT. Eleven of them had 32 distinguishable non-confluent mediastinal or hilar nodal FDG accumulations (LN{sub PET}). For these, sets of gross tumour volumes (GTVs) were generated at both acquisition times by four different PET-based contouring methods (visual: GTV{sub vis}; 40% SUV{sub max}: GTV{sub 40}; SUV=2.5: GTV{sub 2.5}; target/background (T/B) algorithm: GTV{sub bg}). All differences concerning GTV sizes were within the range of the resolution of the PET system. The detectability and technical delineability of the GTVs were significantly better in the late scans (e.g. p = 0.02 for diagnostic application of SUV{sub max} = 2.5; p = 0.0001 for technical delineability by GTV{sub 2.5}; p = 0.003 by GTV{sub 40}), favouring the GTV{sub bg} method owing to satisfactory overall applicability and independence of GTVs from acquisition time. Compared with CT, the majority of PET-based GTVs were larger, probably owing to resolution effects, with a possible influence of lesion movements. For nodal GTVs, different methods of contouring did not lead to clinically relevant differences in volumes. However, there were significant differences in technical delineability, especially after early acquisition. Overall, our data favour a late acquisition of FDG PET scans for radiotherapy planning, and the use of a T/B algorithm for GTV contouring. (orig.)

  5. A meta-analysis of lymph node metastasis rate for patients with thoracic oesophageal cancer and its implication in delineation of clinical target volume for radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, X; Zhang, J; Li, B; Wang, Z; Huang, W; Zhou, T; Wei, Y; Li, H

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to pool the lymph node metastasis rate (LNMR) in patients with thoracic oesophageal cancer (TOC) and to determine which node level should be included when undergoing radiation therapy. Methods Qualified studies were identified on Medline, Embase, CBM and the Cochrane Library through to the end of April 2011. Pooled estimates of LNMR were obtained through a random-effect model. Possible effect modifiers which might lead to the statistical heterogeneity were identified through meta-regression, and further subgroup analyses of factors influencing LNMR were performed. Results 45 observational studies with a total of 18 415 patients were included in the meta-analysis. The pooled estimates of LNMR in upper, middle and lower TOC were 30.7%, 16.8% and 11.0% cervical, 42.0%, 21.1% and 10.5% upper mediastinal, 12.9%, 28.1% and 19.6% middle mediastinal, 2.6%, 7.8% and 23.0% lower mediastinal, and 9%, 21.4% and 39.9% abdominal, respectively. Lymph node metastasis most frequently happened to paratracheal, paraoesophageal, perigastric 106recR and station 7. The most obvious difference (≥15%) of LNMR between two-field and three-field lymphatic dissection occurred in cervical, paratracheal, 106recR and 108. Conclusions Through the meta-analysis, more useful information was obtained about clinical target volume (CTV) delineation of TOC patients treated with radiotherapy. However, our study is predominantly a description of squamous carcinoma and the results may not be valid for adenocarcinoma. PMID:22700258

  6. Integrating respiratory-gated PET-based target volume delineation in liver SBRT planning, a pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riou, Olivier; Thariat, Juliette; Serrano, Benjamin; Azria, David; Paulmier, Benoit; Villeneuve, Remy; Fenoglietto, Pascal; Artenie, Antonella; Ortholan, Cécile; Faraggi, Marc

    2014-01-01

    To assess the feasibility and benefit of integrating four-dimensional (4D) Positron Emission Tomography (PET) – computed tomography (CT) for liver stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) planning. 8 patients with 14 metastases were accrued in the study. They all underwent a non-gated PET and a 4D PET centered on the liver. The same CT scan was used for attenuation correction, registration, and considered the planning CT for SBRT planning. Six PET phases were reconstructed for each 4D PET. By applying an individualized threshold to the 4D PET, a Biological Internal Target Volume (BITV) was generated for each lesion. A gated Planning Target Volume (PTVg) was created by adding 3 mm to account for set-up margins. This volume was compared to a manual Planning Target Volume (PTV) delineated with the help of a semi-automatic Biological Target Volume (BTV) obtained from the non-gated exam. A 5 mm radial and a 10 mm craniocaudal margins were applied to account for tumor motion and set-up margins to create the PTV. One undiagnosed liver metastasis was discovered thanks to the 4D PET. The semi-automatic BTV were significantly smaller than the BITV (p = 0.0031). However, after applying adapted margins, 4D PET allowed a statistically significant decrease in the PTVg as compared to the PTV (p = 0.0052). In comparison to non-gated PET, 4D PET may better define the respiratory movements of liver targets and improve SBRT planning for liver metastases. Furthermore, non respiratory-gated PET exams can both misdiagnose liver metastases and underestimate the real internal target volumes

  7. Influence of experience and qualification on PET-based target volume delineation. When there is no expert - ask your colleague

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doll, C.; Grosu, A.L.; Nestle, U. [University Medical Center Freiburg, Radiation Oncology Department, Freiburg/Breisgau (Germany); Duncker-Rohr, V. [University Medical Center Freiburg, Radiation Oncology Department, Freiburg/Breisgau (Germany); Ortenau Clinical Center Offenburg, Radiation Oncology Department, Offenburg (Germany); Ruecker, G. [University of Freiburg, Institute of Medical Biometry und Medical Informatics, Freiburg (Germany); Mix, M. [University Medical Center Freiburg, Nuclear Medicine Department, Freiburg (Germany); MacManus, M. [University of Melbourne, The Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, Melbourne (Australia); Ruysscher, D. de [University Hospital Leuven/KU Leuven, Department of Radiation Oncology, Leuven (Belgium); Vogel, W. [Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Eriksen, J.G. [Odense University Hospital, Department of Oncology, Odense (Denmark); Oyen, W. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Weber, W. [University Medical Center Freiburg, Nuclear Medicine Department, Freiburg (Germany); Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology/Molecular Imaging and Therapy Service, New York (United States)

    2014-06-15

    The integration of positron emission tomography (PET) information for target volume delineation in radiation treatment planning is routine in many centers. In contrast to automatic contouring, research on visual-manual delineation is scarce. The present study investigates the dependency of manual delineation on experience and qualification. A total of 44 international interdisciplinary observers each defined a [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET based gross tumor volume (GTV) using the same PET/CT scan from a patient with lung cancer. The observers were ''experts'' (E; n = 3), ''experienced interdisciplinary pairs'' (EP; 9 teams of radiation oncologist (RO) + nuclear medicine physician (NP)), ''single field specialists'' (SFS; n = 13), and ''students'' (S; n = 10). Five automatic delineation methods (AM) were also included. Volume sizes and concordance indices within the groups (pCI) and relative to the experts (eCI) were calculated. E (pCI = 0.67) and EP (pCI = 0.53) showed a significantly higher agreement within the groups as compared to SFS (pCI = 0.43, p = 0.03, and p = 0.006). In relation to the experts, EP (eCI = 0.55) showed better concordance compared to SFS (eCI = 0.49) or S (eCI = 0.47). The intermethod variability of the AM (pCI = 0.44) was similar to that of SFS and S, showing poorer agreement with the experts (eCI = 0.35). The results suggest that interdisciplinary cooperation could be beneficial for consistent contouring. Joint delineation by a radiation oncologist and a nuclear medicine physician showed remarkable agreement and better concordance with the experts compared to other specialists. The relevant intermethod variability of the automatic algorithms underlines the need for further standardization and optimization in this field. (orig.) [German] Die Daten aus der Positronenemissionstomographie (PET) werden in vielen Kliniken routinemaessig zur

  8. Pacemaker and radiotherapy in breast cancer: is targeted intraoperative radiotherapy the answer in this setting?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keshtgar, Mohammed RS; Eaton, David J; Reynolds, Claire; Pigott, Katharine; Davidson, Tim; Gauter-Fleckenstein, Benjamin; Wenz, Frederik

    2012-01-01

    We present the case of an 83 year old woman with a cardiac pacemaker located close in distance to a subsequently diagnosed invasive ductal carcinoma of the left breast. Short range intraoperative radiotherapy was given following wide local excision and sentinel node biopsy. The challenges of using ionising radiation with pacemakers is also discussed

  9. Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rema Jyothirmayi

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Conservative treatment in the form of limited surgery and post-operative radiotherapy is controversial in hand and foot sarcomas, both due to poor radiation tolerance of the palm and sole, and due to technical difficulties in achieving adequate margins.This paper describes the local control and survival of 41 patients with soft tissue sarcoma of the hand or foot treated with conservative surgery and radiotherapy. The acute and late toxicity of megavoltage radiotherapy to the hand and foot are described. The technical issues and details of treatment delivery are discussed. The factors influencing local control after radiotherapy are analysed.

  10. Comparison of Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Computed Tomography for Breast Target Volume Delineation in Prone and Supine Positions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pogson, Elise M. [Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, Faculty of Engineering and Information Sciences, University of Wollongong, Wollongong (Australia); Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres, Liverpool (Australia); Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, Liverpool (Australia); Delaney, Geoff P. [Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres, Liverpool (Australia); Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, Liverpool (Australia); South Western Sydney Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Sydney (Australia); School of Medicine, University of Western Sydney, Sydney (Australia); Ahern, Verity [Crown Princess Mary Cancer Care Centre, Westmead Hospital, Westmead (Australia); Boxer, Miriam M. [Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres, Liverpool (Australia); South Western Sydney Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Sydney (Australia); Chan, Christine [Department of Radiology, Liverpool Hospital, Liverpool (Australia); David, Steven [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); Dimigen, Marion [Department of Radiology, Liverpool Hospital, Liverpool (Australia); Harvey, Jennifer A. [School of Medicine, University of Queensland, Herston (Australia); Princess Alexandra Hospital, Woolloongabba (Australia); Koh, Eng-Siew [Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres, Liverpool (Australia); Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, Liverpool (Australia); South Western Sydney Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Sydney (Australia); Lim, Karen [Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres, Liverpool (Australia); South Western Sydney Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Sydney (Australia); Papadatos, George [Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres, Liverpool (Australia); and others

    2016-11-15

    Purpose: To determine whether T2-weighted MRI improves seroma cavity (SC) and whole breast (WB) interobserver conformity for radiation therapy purposes, compared with the gold standard of CT, both in the prone and supine positions. Methods and Materials: Eleven observers (2 radiologists and 9 radiation oncologists) delineated SC and WB clinical target volumes (CTVs) on T2-weighted MRI and CT supine and prone scans (4 scans per patient) for 33 patient datasets. Individual observer's volumes were compared using the Dice similarity coefficient, volume overlap index, center of mass shift, and Hausdorff distances. An average cavity visualization score was also determined. Results: Imaging modality did not affect interobserver variation for WB CTVs. Prone WB CTVs were larger in volume and more conformal than supine CTVs (on both MRI and CT). Seroma cavity volumes were larger on CT than on MRI. Seroma cavity volumes proved to be comparable in interobserver conformity in both modalities (volume overlap index of 0.57 (95% Confidence Interval (CI) 0.54-0.60) for CT supine and 0.52 (95% CI 0.48-0.56) for MRI supine, 0.56 (95% CI 0.53-0.59) for CT prone and 0.55 (95% CI 0.51-0.59) for MRI prone); however, after registering modalities together the intermodality variation (Dice similarity coefficient of 0.41 (95% CI 0.36-0.46) for supine and 0.38 (0.34-0.42) for prone) was larger than the interobserver variability for SC, despite the location typically remaining constant. Conclusions: Magnetic resonance imaging interobserver variation was comparable to CT for the WB CTV and SC delineation, in both prone and supine positions. Although the cavity visualization score and interobserver concordance was not significantly higher for MRI than for CT, the SCs were smaller on MRI, potentially owing to clearer SC definition, especially on T2-weighted MR images.

  11. Validation of a 4D-PET Maximum Intensity Projection for Delineation of an Internal Target Volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callahan, Jason, E-mail: jason.callahan@petermac.org [Centre for Molecular Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Kron, Tomas [Department of Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Schneider-Kolsky, Michal [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiation Science, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria (Australia); Dunn, Leon [Department of Applied Physics, RMIT University, Melbourne (Australia); Thompson, Mick [Centre for Molecular Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Siva, Shankar [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Aarons, Yolanda [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Binns, David [Centre for Molecular Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Hicks, Rodney J. [Centre for Molecular Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia)

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: The delineation of internal target volumes (ITVs) in radiation therapy of lung tumors is currently performed by use of either free-breathing (FB) {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography-computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) or 4-dimensional (4D)-CT maximum intensity projection (MIP). In this report we validate the use of 4D-PET-MIP for the delineation of target volumes in both a phantom and in patients. Methods and Materials: A phantom with 3 hollow spheres was prepared surrounded by air then water. The spheres and water background were filled with a mixture of {sup 18}F and radiographic contrast medium. A 4D-PET/CT scan was performed of the phantom while moving in 4 different breathing patterns using a programmable motion device. Nine patients with an FDG-avid lung tumor who underwent FB and 4D-PET/CT and >5 mm of tumor motion were included for analysis. The 3 spheres and patient lesions were contoured by 2 contouring methods (40% of maximum and PET edge) on the FB-PET, FB-CT, 4D-PET, 4D-PET-MIP, and 4D-CT-MIP. The concordance between the different contoured volumes was calculated using a Dice coefficient (DC). The difference in lung tumor volumes between FB-PET and 4D-PET volumes was also measured. Results: The average DC in the phantom using 40% and PET edge, respectively, was lowest for FB-PET/CT (DCAir = 0.72/0.67, DCBackground 0.63/0.62) and highest for 4D-PET/CT-MIP (DCAir = 0.84/0.83, DCBackground = 0.78/0.73). The average DC in the 9 patients using 40% and PET edge, respectively, was also lowest for FB-PET/CT (DC = 0.45/0.44) and highest for 4D-PET/CT-MIP (DC = 0.72/0.73). In the 9 lesions, the target volumes of the FB-PET using 40% and PET edge, respectively, were on average 40% and 45% smaller than the 4D-PET-MIP. Conclusion: A 4D-PET-MIP produces volumes with the highest concordance with 4D-CT-MIP across multiple breathing patterns and lesion sizes in both a phantom and among patients. Freebreathing PET/CT consistently

  12. Validation of a 4D-PET Maximum Intensity Projection for Delineation of an Internal Target Volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callahan, Jason; Kron, Tomas; Schneider-Kolsky, Michal; Dunn, Leon; Thompson, Mick; Siva, Shankar; Aarons, Yolanda; Binns, David; Hicks, Rodney J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The delineation of internal target volumes (ITVs) in radiation therapy of lung tumors is currently performed by use of either free-breathing (FB) 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography-computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) or 4-dimensional (4D)-CT maximum intensity projection (MIP). In this report we validate the use of 4D-PET-MIP for the delineation of target volumes in both a phantom and in patients. Methods and Materials: A phantom with 3 hollow spheres was prepared surrounded by air then water. The spheres and water background were filled with a mixture of 18 F and radiographic contrast medium. A 4D-PET/CT scan was performed of the phantom while moving in 4 different breathing patterns using a programmable motion device. Nine patients with an FDG-avid lung tumor who underwent FB and 4D-PET/CT and >5 mm of tumor motion were included for analysis. The 3 spheres and patient lesions were contoured by 2 contouring methods (40% of maximum and PET edge) on the FB-PET, FB-CT, 4D-PET, 4D-PET-MIP, and 4D-CT-MIP. The concordance between the different contoured volumes was calculated using a Dice coefficient (DC). The difference in lung tumor volumes between FB-PET and 4D-PET volumes was also measured. Results: The average DC in the phantom using 40% and PET edge, respectively, was lowest for FB-PET/CT (DCAir = 0.72/0.67, DCBackground 0.63/0.62) and highest for 4D-PET/CT-MIP (DCAir = 0.84/0.83, DCBackground = 0.78/0.73). The average DC in the 9 patients using 40% and PET edge, respectively, was also lowest for FB-PET/CT (DC = 0.45/0.44) and highest for 4D-PET/CT-MIP (DC = 0.72/0.73). In the 9 lesions, the target volumes of the FB-PET using 40% and PET edge, respectively, were on average 40% and 45% smaller than the 4D-PET-MIP. Conclusion: A 4D-PET-MIP produces volumes with the highest concordance with 4D-CT-MIP across multiple breathing patterns and lesion sizes in both a phantom and among patients. Freebreathing PET/CT consistently underestimates ITV

  13. An evaluation on the impact of national cancer wait targets on a (UK) radiotherapy department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, Neill

    2012-01-01

    The radiotherapy department in this evaluation has been working towards full compliance with national cancer wait targets (CWT) since their implementation. 31 and 62 day targets set a maximum time frame for cancer patients to commence treatment. This evaluation explored the impact of these targets on staff and patients within the radiotherapy department and their overall impact on the radiotherapy service. Methods: This evaluation followed a mixed method approach of sequential triangulation. Qualitative data collection and analysis dominate findings but existing quantitative data, available within the department, was used to support the overall findings. Staff and patient interviews were used to establish attitudes to and experiences of the CWT initiative in relation to radiotherapy treatment. Quantitative data was taken from the local Cancer Centre CWT database that tracks patients referred for radiotherapy. Findings and Conclusion: Qualitative data analysis identified four main themes: pressure, appropriateness of target lengths, quality of treatment provided and efficiency of working practices within the department. Responses within these themes were both positive and negative with patients mainly the former and staff the latter. Quantitative evaluation found an increased monitoring and management burden from the CWT initiative, primarily for administrative, clerical and managerial staff. The main impact of the CWT initiative was an increase in pressure on staff due to reduced time to prepare and deliver treatment. Patients felt the initiative had not impacted negatively on their care and experienced a reduction in anxiety due to a reduction in waiting time.

  14. Clinical variability of target volume description and treatment plans in conformal radiotherapy in muscle invasive bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logue, John P; Sharrock, Carole L; Cowan, Richard A.; Read, Graham; Marrs, Julie; Mott, David

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The delineation of tumor and the production of a treatment plan to encompass this is the prime step in radiotherapy planning. Conformal radiotherapy is developing rapidly and although plentiful research has addressed the implementation of the radiotherapy prescription, scant attention has been made to the fundamental step of production, by the clinician, of an appropriate target volume. As part of an ongoing randomized trial of conformal radiotherapy, in bladder cancer, we have therefore assessed the interphysician variability of radiologists and radiation oncologists (RO) in assessing Gross Tumor Volume(GTV) (ICRU 50) and the adherence of the radiation oncologists to the study protocol of producing a Planning Target Volume (PTV). Materials and Methods: Four patients with T3 carcinoma of bladder who had been entered into the trial were identified. The clinical details, MR scans and CT scans were made available. Eight RO and 3 dedicated diagnostic oncology radiologists were invited to directly outline the GTV onto CT images on a planning computer consul. The RO in addition created a PTV following the trial protocol of 15mm margin around the GTV. Three RO sub-specialized in Urological radiotherapy; all RO had completed training. Volumes were produced, for each clinician, and comparison of these volumes and their isocenters were analyzed. In addition the margins allowed were measured and compared. Results: There was a maximum variation ratio (largest to smallest volume outlined) of the GTV in the four cases of 1.74 among radiologists and 3.74 among oncologists. There was a significant difference (p=0.01) in mean GTV between RO and the radiologists. The mean GTV of the RO exceeded the radiologists by a factor of 1.29 with a mean difference of 13.4 cm 3 The between observer variance within speciality comprised only 9.9% of the total variance in the data having accounted for case and observers speciality. The variation ratio in PTV among oncologists

  15. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET in definition of target volumes and radiotherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiao Wenli; Zhao Jinhua

    2007-01-01

    PET is a functional imaging modality, which can give some biological information of tumor. PET is more and more important in the definition of target volumes and radiotherapy treatment planning. Depending on its sensitivity and specificity, 18 F-fluorideoxyglucose 18 F-FDG PET has been shown to influence the selection of target volumes and radiotherapy treatment planning for non-small cell lung cancers, for head and neck squamous cell carcinomas or for esophageal tumors. On the other hand, for tumors such as rectal carcinomas, convincing data on the value of 18 F-FDG PET for target volume selection are still lacking. However, the application of 18 F-FDG PET in many aspects of radiotherapy is still controversy. Further researches in its clinical application are still needed to investigate whether 18 F-FDG PET for treatment planning should be routine because of the lack of prospective studies. (authors)

  16. Hypoxia-targeted suicidal gene therapy system enhances antitumor effects of radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Junye; Guo Yao; Guo Guozhen

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effects of hypoxia-targeted suicidal gene therapy system combined with radiotherapy on pancreatic cancer. Methods: The recombinant adenovirus Ad-5HRE/hCMVmp-BCD was constructed by DNA recombinant technique. Western blot was used to detect hypoxia-induced expression of bacterial cytosine deaminase (BCD). Cell growth inhibition assay was used to determine the sensitivity of human pancreatic cancer cells MIA-PACA2 to 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC). Tumor xenograft growth delay assays was used to evaluate the effects of Ad-5HRE/hCMVmp-BCD/5-FC combined with radiotherapy on pancreatic cancer. Results: Western blot analysis demonstrated that hypoxia-induced BCD protein expression was achieved in MIA-PACA2 cells infected with Ad-5HRE/hCMVmp-BCD. With hypoxia treatment, the sensitivity of MIA-PACA2 cells infected with Ad-5HRE/hCMVmp-BCD to 5-FC significantly increased. Administration of either Ad-5HRE/hCMVmp-BCD/5-FC or radiotherapy could inhibit the growth of MIA-PACA2 xenografts in nude mice. Moreover, combination of Ad-5HRE/hCMVmp-BCD/5-FC could significantly enhance suppressing effects of radiotherapy on MIA-PACA2 xenografts. Conclusion: Hypoxia-targeted suicidal gene therapy system Ad-5HRE/hCMVmp-BCD/5-FC could enhance antitumor effects of radiotherapy on pancreatic cancer and can be used as a powerful adjunct to conventional radiotherapy. (authors)

  17. Suggestion for the prostatic fossa clinical target volume in adjuvant or salvage radiotherapy after a radical prostatectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jun Su; Park, Won; Pyo, Hong Ryull; Park, Byung Kwan; Park, Sung Yoon; Choi, Han Yong; Lee, Hyun Moo; Jeon, Seong Soo; Seo, Seong Il; Jeong, Byong Chang; Jeon, Hwang Gyun

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: To assess the location of recurrent tumors and suggest the optimal target volume in adjuvant or salvage radiotherapy (RT) after a radical prostatectomy (RP). Material and methods: From January 2000 to December 2012, 113 patients had been diagnosed with suspected recurrent prostate cancer by MRI scan and received salvage RT in the Samsung Medical Center. This study assessed the location of the suspected tumor recurrences and used the inferior border of the pubic symphysis as a point of reference. Results: There were 118 suspect tumor recurrences. The most common site of recurrence was the anastomotic site (78.8%), followed by the bladder neck (15.3%) and retrovesical area (5.9%). In the cranial direction, 106 (87.3%) lesions were located within 30 mm of the reference point. In the caudal direction, 12 lesions (10.2%) were located below the reference point. In the transverse plane, 112 lesions (94.9%) were located within 10 mm of the midline. Conclusions: A MRI scan acquired before salvage RT is useful for the localization of recurrent tumors and the delineation of the target volume. We suggest the optimal target volume in adjuvant or salvage RT after RP, which includes 97% of suspected tumor recurrences

  18. Rectal cancer: The radiation basis of radiotherapy, target volume; Cancers du rectum: volumes cible de la radiotherapie, bases rationnelles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosset, J.F.; Servagi-Vernat, S. [Service oncologie-radiotherapie, CHU Jean-Minjoz, 3, boulevard Fleming, 25030 Besancon (France); Crehange, G. [Service oncologie-radiotherapie, centre Georges-Francois-Leclerc, 1, rue du Pr-Marion, 21079 Dijon cedex (France); Azria, D. [Service oncologie-radiotherapie, centre Val-d' Aurelle, rue Croix-Verte, 34298 Montpellier cedex 5 (France); Gerard, J.P. [Service oncologie-radiotherapie, centre Antoine-Lacassagne, 33, avenue Valombrose, 06189 Nice (France); Hennequin, C. [Service oncologie-radiotherapie, hopital Saint-Louis, 1, avenue Claude-Vellefaux, 75475 Paris (France)

    2011-10-15

    Since the implementation of preoperative chemo-radiotherapy and meso-rectal excision, the 5-year rates of locoregional failures in T3-T4 N0-N1M0 rectal cancer fell from 25-30% thirty years ago to 5-8% nowadays. A critical analysis of the locoregional failures sites and mechanisms, as well as the identification of nodal extension, helps the radiation oncologist to optimize the radiotherapy target definition. The upper limit of the clinical target volume is usually set at the top of the third sacral vertebra. The lateral pelvic nodes should be included when the tumor is located in the distal part of the rectum. The anal sphincter and the levator muscles should be spared when a conservative surgery is planned. In case of abdomino-perineal excision, the ischio-rectal fossa and the sphincters should be included in the clinical target volume. A confrontation with radiologist and surgeon is mandatory to improve the definition of the target volumes to be treated. (authors)

  19. A comparison between radiation therapists and medical specialists in the use of kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography scans for potential lung cancer radiotherapy target verification and adaptation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watt, Sandie Carolyn, E-mail: sandie.watt@sswahs.gov.au [Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres, NSW (Australia); University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, Liverpool, NSW (Australia); Vinod, Shalini K. [Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres, NSW (Australia); Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, Liverpool, NSW (Australia); South Western Sydney Clinical School, The University of New South Wales, Liverpool, NSW (Australia); Department of Radiation Oncology, Prince of Wales Hospital, NSW (Australia); Dimigen, Marion [Department of Radiology, Liverpool Hospital, NSW (Australia); Department of Radiation Oncology, Prince of Wales Hospital, NSW (Australia); Descallar, Joseph [Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, Liverpool, NSW (Australia); South Western Sydney Clinical School, The University of New South Wales, Liverpool, NSW (Australia); Zogovic, Branimere [Department of Radiation Oncology, Prince of Wales Hospital, NSW (Australia); Atyeo, John [University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Wallis, Sian [University of Western Sydney, NSW (Australia); Holloway, Lois C. [Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres, NSW (Australia); University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Institute of Medical Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW, Australia. (Australia); Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, Liverpool, NSW (Australia)

    2016-04-01

    Target volume matching using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is the preferred treatment verification method for lung cancer in many centers. However, radiation therapists (RTs) are trained in bony matching and not soft tissue matching. The purpose of this study was to determine whether RTs were equivalent to radiation oncologists (ROs) and radiologists (RDs) in alignment of the treatment CBCT with the gross tumor volume (GTV) defined at planning and in delineating the GTV on the treatment CBCT, as may be necessary for adaptive radiotherapy. In this study, 10 RTs, 1 RO, and 1 RD performed a manual tumor alignment and correction of the planning GTV to a treatment CBCT to generate an isocenter correction distance for 15 patient data sets. Participants also contoured the GTV on the same data sets. The isocenter correction distance and the contoured GTVs from the RTs were compared with the RD and RO. The mean difference in isocenter correction distances was 0.40 cm between the RO and RD, 0.51 cm between the RTs, and RO and 0.42 cm between the RTs and RD. The 95% CIs were smaller than the equivalence limit of 0.5 cm, indicating that the RTs were equivalent to the RO and RD. For GTV delineation comparisons, the RTs were not found to be equivalent to the RD or RO. The alignment of the planning defined GTV and treatment CBCT using soft tissue matching by the RTs has been shown to be equivalent to those by the RO and RD. However, tumor delineation by the RTs on the treatment CBCT was not equivalent to that of the RO and RD. Thus, it may be appropriate for RTs to undertake soft tissue alignment based on CBCT; however, further investigation may be necessary before RTs undertake delineation for adaptive radiotherapy purposes.

  20. A comparison between radiation therapists and medical specialists in the use of kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography scans for potential lung cancer radiotherapy target verification and adaptation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watt, Sandie Carolyn; Vinod, Shalini K.; Dimigen, Marion; Descallar, Joseph; Zogovic, Branimere; Atyeo, John; Wallis, Sian; Holloway, Lois C.

    2016-01-01

    Target volume matching using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is the preferred treatment verification method for lung cancer in many centers. However, radiation therapists (RTs) are trained in bony matching and not soft tissue matching. The purpose of this study was to determine whether RTs were equivalent to radiation oncologists (ROs) and radiologists (RDs) in alignment of the treatment CBCT with the gross tumor volume (GTV) defined at planning and in delineating the GTV on the treatment CBCT, as may be necessary for adaptive radiotherapy. In this study, 10 RTs, 1 RO, and 1 RD performed a manual tumor alignment and correction of the planning GTV to a treatment CBCT to generate an isocenter correction distance for 15 patient data sets. Participants also contoured the GTV on the same data sets. The isocenter correction distance and the contoured GTVs from the RTs were compared with the RD and RO. The mean difference in isocenter correction distances was 0.40 cm between the RO and RD, 0.51 cm between the RTs, and RO and 0.42 cm between the RTs and RD. The 95% CIs were smaller than the equivalence limit of 0.5 cm, indicating that the RTs were equivalent to the RO and RD. For GTV delineation comparisons, the RTs were not found to be equivalent to the RD or RO. The alignment of the planning defined GTV and treatment CBCT using soft tissue matching by the RTs has been shown to be equivalent to those by the RO and RD. However, tumor delineation by the RTs on the treatment CBCT was not equivalent to that of the RO and RD. Thus, it may be appropriate for RTs to undertake soft tissue alignment based on CBCT; however, further investigation may be necessary before RTs undertake delineation for adaptive radiotherapy purposes.

  1. Target volume determination in radiotherapy for non-small-cell lung cancer-facts and questions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kepka, L.; Bujko, K.

    2003-01-01

    Although the precise target volume definition in conformal radiotherapy is required by ICRU Report 50 and 62, this task in radiotherapy for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is often controversial and strict accordance with ICRU requirements is hard to achieve. The Gross Tumour Volume (GTV) definition depends mainly on the imaging method used. We discuss the use of new imaging modalities, like PET, in GTV definition. The Clinical Target Volume (CTV) definition remains a separate, and still unresolved problem, especially in the part concerning the Elective Nodal Irradiation (ENI). Nowadays, there is no unified attitude among radiation oncologists regarding the necessity and extent of ENI. The common use of combined treatment modalities and the tendency to dose escalation, both increasing the potential toxicity, result in the more frequent use of involved-fields techniques. Problems relating to margins during Planning Target Volume (PTV) of lung cancer irradiation are also discussed. Another issue is the Interclinician variability in target volumes definition, especially when there is data indicating that the GTV, as defined by 3 D-treatment planning in NSCLC radiotherapy, may be highly prognostic for survival. We postulate that special attention should be paid to detailed precision of target volume determination in departmental and trial protocols. Careful analysis of patterns of failures from ongoing protocols will enable us to formulate the guidelines for target volume definition in radiotherapy for lung cancer. (author)

  2. Characterization of Target Volume Changes During Breast Radiotherapy Using Implanted Fiducial Markers and Portal Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, Emma J.; Donovan, Ellen M.; Yarnold, John R.; Coles, Charlotte E.; Evans, Philip M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine target volume changes by using volume and shape analysis for patients receiving radiotherapy after breast conservation surgery and to compare different methods of automatically identifying changes in target volume, position, size, and shape during radiotherapy for use in adaptive radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Eleven patients undergoing whole breast radiotherapy had fiducial markers sutured into the excision cavity at the time of surgery. Patients underwent imaging using computed tomography (for planning and at the end of treatment) and during treatment by using portal imaging. A marker volume (MV) was defined by using the measured marker positions. Changes in both individual marker positions and MVs were identified manually and using six automated similarity indices. Comparison of the two types of analysis (manual and automated) was undertaken to establish whether similarity indices can be used to automatically detect changes in target volumes. Results: Manual analysis showed that 3 patients had significant MV reduction. This analysis also showed significant changes between planning computed tomography and the start of treatment for 9 patients, including single and multiple marker movement, deformation (shape change), and rotation. Four of the six similarity indices were shown to be sensitive to the observed changes. Conclusions: Significant changes in size, shape, and position occur to the fiducial marker-defined volume. Four similarity indices can be used to identify these changes, and a protocol for their use in adaptive radiotherapy is suggested

  3. Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zedgenidze, G.A.; Kulikov, V.A.; Mardynskij, Yu.S.

    1984-01-01

    The technique for roentgenotopometric and medicamentous preparation of patients for radiotherapy has been reported in detail. The features of planning and performing of remote, intracavitary and combined therapy in urinary bladder cancer are considered. The more effective methods of radiotherapy have been proposed taking into account own experience as well as literature data. The comparative evaluation of treatment results and prognosis are given. Radiation pathomorphism of tumors and tissues of urinary bladder is considered in detail. The problems of diagnosis, prophylaxis and treatment of complications following radiodiagnosis and radiotherapy in patients with urinary bladder cancer are illustrated widely

  4. A dimensionless dynamic contrast enhanced MRI parameter for intra-prostatic tumour target volume delineation: initial comparison with histology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrinivich, W. Thomas; Gibson, Eli; Gaed, Mena; Gomez, Jose A.; Moussa, Madeleine; McKenzie, Charles A.; Bauman, Glenn S.; Ward, Aaron D.; Fenster, Aaron; Wong, Eugene

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: T2 weighted and diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) show promise in isolating prostate tumours. Dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE)-MRI has also been employed as a component in multi-parametric tumour detection schemes. Model-based parameters such as Ktrans are conventionally used to characterize DCE images and require arterial contrast agent (CR) concentration. A robust parameter map that does not depend on arterial input may be more useful for target volume delineation. We present a dimensionless parameter (Wio) that characterizes CR wash-in and washout rates without requiring arterial CR concentration. Wio is compared to Ktrans in terms of ability to discriminate cancer in the prostate, as demonstrated via comparison with histology. Methods: Three subjects underwent DCE-MRI using gadolinium contrast and 7 s imaging temporal resolution. A pathologist identified cancer on whole-mount histology specimens, and slides were deformably registered to MR images. The ability of Wio maps to discriminate cancer was determined through receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis. Results: There is a trend that Wio shows greater area under the ROC curve (AUC) than Ktrans with median AUC values of 0.74 and 0.69 respectively, but the difference was not statistically significant based on a Wilcoxon signed-rank test (p = 0.13). Conclusions: Preliminary results indicate that Wio shows potential as a tool for Ktrans QA, showing similar ability to discriminate cancer in the prostate as Ktrans without requiring arterial CR concentration.

  5. Reduce in Variation and Improve Efficiency of Target Volume Delineation by a Computer-Assisted System Using a Deformable Image Registration Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, K.S. Clifford; Bhide, Shreerang FRCR; Chen, Hansen; Asper, Joshua PAC; Bush, Steven; Franklin, Gregg; Kavadi, Vivek; Liengswangwong, Vichaivood; Gordon, William; Raben, Adam; Strasser, Jon; Koprowski, Christopher; Frank, Steven; Chronowski, Gregory; Ahamad, Anesa; Malyapa, Robert; Zhang Lifei; Dong Lei

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether a computer-assisted target volume delineation (CAT) system using a deformable image registration approach can reduce the variation of target delineation among physicians with different head and neck (HN) IMRT experiences and reduce the time spent on the contouring process. Materials and Methods: We developed a deformable image registration method for mapping contours from a template case to a patient case with a similar tumor manifestation but different body configuration. Eight radiation oncologists with varying levels of clinical experience in HN IMRT performed target delineation on two HN cases, one with base-of-tongue (BOT) cancer and another with nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC), by first contouring from scratch and then by modifying the contours deformed by the CAT system. The gross target volumes were provided. Regions of interest for comparison included the clinical target volumes (CTVs) and normal organs. The volumetric and geometric variation of these regions of interest and the time spent on contouring were analyzed. Results: We found that the variation in delineating CTVs from scratch among the physicians was significant, and that using the CAT system reduced volumetric variation and improved geometric consistency in both BOT and NPC cases. The average timesaving when using the CAT system was 26% to 29% for more experienced physicians and 38% to 47% for the less experienced ones. Conclusions: A computer-assisted target volume delineation approach, using a deformable image-registration method with template contours, was able to reduce the variation among physicians with different experiences in HN IMRT while saving contouring time

  6. SU-E-J-136: Multimodality-Image-Based Target Delineation for Dose Painting of Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalah, E; Paulson, E; Erickson, B; Li, X [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Dose escalated RT may provide improved disease local-control for selected unresectable pancreatic cancer. Accurate delineation of the gross tumor volume (GTV) inside pancreatic head or body would allow safe dose escalation considering the tolerances of adjacent organs at risk (OAR). Here we explore the potential of multi-modality imaging (DCE-MRI, ADC-MRI, and FDG-PET) to define the GTV for dose painting of pancreatic cancer. Volumetric variations of DCE-MRI, ADC-MRI and FDG-PET defined GTVs were assessed in comparison to the findings on CT, and to pathology specimens for resectable and borderline reseactable cases of pancreatic cancer. Methods: A total of 19 representative patients with DCE-MRI, ADC-MRI and FDG-PET data were analyzed. Of these, 8 patients had pathological specimens. GTV, inside pancreatic head/neck, or body, were delineated on MRI (denoted GTVDCE, and GTVADC), on FDG-PET using SUV of 2.5, 40% SUVmax, and 50% SUVmax (denoted GTV2.5, GTV40%, and GTV50%). A Kruskal-Wallis test was used to determine whether significant differences existed between GTV volumes. Results: Significant statistical differences were found between the GTVs defined by DCE-MRI, ADC-MRI, and FDG-PET, with a mean and range of 4.73 (1.00–9.79), 14.52 (3.21–25.49), 22.04 (1.00–45.69), 19.10 (4.84–45.59), and 9.80 (0.32–35.21) cm3 (p<0.0001) for GTVDCE, GTVADC, GTV2.5, GTV40%, and GTV50%, respectively. The mean difference and range in the measurements of maximum dimension of GTVs based on DCE-MRI, ADC-MRI, SUV2.5, 40% SUVmax, and 50% SUVmax compared with pathologic specimens were −0.84 (−2.24 to 0.9), 0.41 (−0.15 to 2.3), 0.58 (−1.41 to 3.69), 0.66 (−0.67 to 1.32), and 0.15 (−1.53 to 2.38) cm, respectively. Conclusion: Differences exists between DCE, ADC, and PET defined target volumes for RT of pancreatic cancer. Further studies combined with pathological specimens are required to identify the optimal imaging modality and/or acquisition method to

  7. Difference in target definition using three different methods to include respiratory motion in radiotherapy of lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloth Møller, Ditte; Knap, Marianne Marquard; Nyeng, Tine Bisballe; Khalil, Azza Ahmed; Holt, Marianne Ingerslev; Kandi, Maria; Hoffmann, Lone

    2017-11-01

    Minimizing the planning target volume (PTV) while ensuring sufficient target coverage during the entire respiratory cycle is essential for free-breathing radiotherapy of lung cancer. Different methods are used to incorporate the respiratory motion into the PTV. Fifteen patients were analyzed. Respiration can be included in the target delineation process creating a respiratory GTV, denoted iGTV. Alternatively, the respiratory amplitude (A) can be measured based on the 4D-CT and A can be incorporated in the margin expansion. The GTV expanded by A yielded GTV + resp, which was compared to iGTV in terms of overlap. Three methods for PTV generation were compared. PTV del (delineated iGTV expanded to CTV plus PTV margin), PTV σ (GTV expanded to CTV and A was included as a random uncertainty in the CTV to PTV margin) and PTV ∑ (GTV expanded to CTV, succeeded by CTV linear expansion by A to CTV + resp, which was finally expanded to PTV ∑ ). Deformation of tumor and lymph nodes during respiration resulted in volume changes between the respiratory phases. The overlap between iGTV and GTV + resp showed that on average 7% of iGTV was outside the GTV + resp implying that GTV + resp did not capture the tumor during the full deformable respiration cycle. A comparison of the PTV volumes showed that PTV σ was smallest and PTV Σ largest for all patients. PTV σ was in mean 14% (31 cm 3 ) smaller than PTV del , while PTV del was 7% (20 cm 3 ) smaller than PTV Σ . PTV σ yields the smallest volumes but does not ensure coverage of tumor during the full respiratory motion due to tumor deformation. Incorporating the respiratory motion in the delineation (PTV del ) takes into account the entire respiratory cycle including deformation, but at the cost, however, of larger treatment volumes. PTV Σ should not be used, since it incorporates the disadvantages of both PTV del and PTV σ .

  8. Change of tumor target volume during waiting time for intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Bo; Yi Junlin; Gao Li; Xu Guozhen; Huang Xiaodong; Zhang Zhong; Luo Jingwei; Li Suyan

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To determine the influence of change in tumor target volume of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) while waiting for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods: From March 2005 to December 2005, 31 patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma received IMRT as the initial treatment at the Cancer Hospital of Chinese Academic of Medical Sciences. The original simulation CT scan was acquired before IMRT planning. A second CT scan was acquired before the start of radiotherapy. Wait- ing time was defined as the duration between CT simulation and start of radiotherapy. CT-CT fusion was used to minimize the error of delineation between the first tumor target volume (GTV) and the second tumor target volume (sGTV). Tumor target volume was calculated by treatment planning system. T test was carried out to analyse the difference between GTV and sGTV. Pearson correlation and multivariate linear regression was used to analyse the influence factor of the change betweent GTV and sGTV. Results: Median waiting time was 18 days (range, 9-27 days). There were significant differences between GTV and sGTV of both primary tumor (P=0.009) and metastatic lymphoma (P=0.005 ). Both Pearson correlation and multivariate linear regression showed that the change of primary tumor target volume had significant correlation with the first tumor target volume but had no significant correlation with the waiting time, sex, age, T stage and N stage (1992 Chinese Fuzhou Staging Classification). Conclusions: Within the range of the waiting time ob- served in our study, large volume primary tumor would have had a significant increase in volume, but whether the therapeutic effect would be influenced or not would need to be proved by study of large number of cases. Patients with large volume tumor should be considered to reduce the influence of waiting time by enlarging gross target volume and clinical targe volume and by neoadjuveant chemotherapy. For avoiding the unnecessary high-dose to normal

  9. Delineation of the primary tumour Clinical Target Volumes (CTV-P) in laryngeal, hypopharyngeal, oropharyngeal and oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma: AIRO, CACA, DAHANCA, EORTC, GEORCC, GORTEC, HKNPCSG, HNCIG, IAG-KHT, LPRHHT, NCIC CTG, NCRI, NRG Oncology, PHNS, SBRT, SOMERA, SRO, SSHNO, TROG

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grégoire, Vincent; Evans, Mererid; Le, Quynh-Thu

    2018-01-01

    PURPOSE: Few studies have reported large inter-observer variations in target volume selection and delineation in patients treated with radiotherapy for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Consensus guidelines have been published for the neck nodes (see Grégoire et al., 2003, 2014...... anatomy. METHOD: For each anatomic location within the larynx, hypopharynx, oropharynx and oral cavity, and for each T-stage, the DAHANCA proposal has been comprehensively reviewed and edited to include anatomic knowledge into the geometric Clinical Target Volume (CTV) delineation concept. A first...... treatment variations from clinicians to clinicians, facilitate the conduct of multi-institutional clinical trials, and contribute to improved care of patients with head and neck carcinoma....

  10. Target volume definition with 18F-FDG PET-CT in radiotherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carson, K. J.; Hanna, G. G.; Hounsell, A. R.

    2011-01-01

    There is considerable interest in using 18F -Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) images for radiotherapy treatment planning (RTF) purposes, and in particular for defining target volumes. This is a rapidly evolving subject and this review describes the background to this application of PET imaging and discusses the issues involved. (authors)

  11. Planning magnetic resonance imaging for prostate cancer intensity-modulated radiation therapy: Impact on target volumes, radiotherapy dose and androgen deprivation administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsley, Patrick J; Aherne, Noel J; Edwards, Grace V; Benjamin, Linus C; Wilcox, Shea W; McLachlan, Craig S; Assareh, Hassan; Welshman, Richard; McKay, Michael J; Shakespeare, Thomas P

    2015-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans are increasingly utilized for radiotherapy planning to contour the primary tumors of patients undergoing intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). These scans may also demonstrate cancer extent and may affect the treatment plan. We assessed the impact of planning MRI detection of extracapsular extension, seminal vesicle invasion, or adjacent organ invasion on the staging, target volume delineation, doses, and hormonal therapy of patients with prostate cancer undergoing IMRT. The records of 509 consecutive patients with planning MRI scans being treated with IMRT for prostate cancer between January 2010 and July 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. Tumor staging and treatment plans before and after MRI were compared. Of the 509 patients, 103 (20%) were upstaged and 44 (9%) were migrated to a higher risk category as a result of findings at MRI. In 94 of 509 patients (18%), the MRI findings altered management. Ninety-four of 509 patients (18%) had a change to their clinical target volume (CTV) or treatment technique, and in 41 of 509 patients (8%) the duration of hormone therapy was changed because of MRI findings. The use of radiotherapy planning MRI altered CTV design, dose and/or duration of androgen deprivation in 18% of patients in this large, single institution series of men planned for dose-escalated prostate IMRT. This has substantial implications for radiotherapy target volumes and doses, as well as duration of androgen deprivation. Further research is required to investigate whether newer MRI techniques can simultaneously fulfill staging and radiotherapy contouring roles. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  12. Target migration from re-inflation of adjacent atelectasis during lung stereotactic body radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Bijing; Verma, Vivek; Zheng, Dandan; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Bennion, Nathan R; Bhirud, Abhijeet R; Poole, Maria A; Zhen, Weining

    2017-06-10

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is a widely accepted option for the treatment of medically inoperable early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Herein, we highlight the importance of interfraction image guidance during SBRT. We describe a case of early-stage NSCLC associated with segmental atelectasis that translocated 15 mm anteroinferiorly due to re-expansion of the adjacent segmental atelectasis following the first fraction. The case exemplifies the importance of cross-sectional image-guided radiotherapy that shows the intended target, as opposed to aligning based on rigid anatomy alone, especially in cases associated with potentially "volatile" anatomic areas.

  13. 4D imaging for target definition in stereotactic radiotherapy for lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slotman, Ben J; Lagerwaard, Frank J; Senan, Suresh

    2006-01-01

    Stereotactic radiotherapy of Stage I lung tumors has been reported to result in high local control rates that are far superior to those obtained with conventional radiotherapy techniques, and which approach those achieved with primary surgery. Breathing-induced motion of tumor and target tissues is an important issue in this technique and careful attention should be paid to the contouring and the generation of individualized margins. We describe our experience with the use of 4DCT scanning for this group of patients, the use of post-processing tools and the potential benefits of respiratory gating.

  14. Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wannenmacher, M.; Debus, J.; Wenz, F.

    2006-01-01

    The book is focussed on the actual knowledge on the clinical radiotherapy and radio-oncology. Besides fundamental and general contributions specific organ systems are treated in detail. The book contains the following contributions: Basic principles, radiobiological fundamentals, physical background, radiation pathology, basics and technique of brachytherapy, methodology and technique of the stereotactic radiosurgery, whole-body irradiation, operative radiotherapy, hadron therapy, hpyerthermia, combined radio-chemo-therapy, biometric clinical studies, intensity modulated radiotherapy, side effects, oncological diagnostics; central nervous system and sense organs, head-neck carcinomas, breast cancer, thorax organs, esophagus carcinoma, stomach carcinoma, pancreas carcinoma, heptabiliary cancer and liver metastases, rectal carcinomas, kidney and urinary tract, prostate carcinoma, testicular carcinoma, female pelvis, lymphatic system carcinomas, soft tissue carcinoma, skin cancer, bone metastases, pediatric tumors, nonmalignant diseases, emergency in radio-oncology, supporting therapy, palliative therapy

  15. Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Sonja; Debus, Jürgen; Neuhof, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    Solitary plasmocytoma occurring in bone (solitary plasmocytoma of the bone, SBP) or in soft tissue (extramedullary plasmocytoma, EP) can be treated effectively and with little toxicity by local radiotherapy. Ten-year local control rates of up to 90% can be achieved. Patients with multiple myeloma often suffer from symptoms such as pain or neurological impairments that are amenable to palliative radiotherapy. In a palliative setting, short treatment schedules and lower radiation doses are used to reduce toxicity and duration of hospitalization. In future, low-dose total body irradiation (TBI) may play a role in a potentially curative regimen with nonmyeloablative conditioning followed by allogenic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation.

  16. Target volume definition for external beam partial breast radiotherapy: Clinical, pathological and technical studies informing current approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirby, Anna M.; Coles, Charlotte E.; Yarnold, John R.

    2010-01-01

    Partial breast irradiation (PBI) is currently under investigation in several phase III trials and, following a recent consensus statement, its use off-study may increase despite ongoing uncertainty regarding optimal target volume definition. We review the clinical, pathological and technical evidence for target volume definition in external beam partial breast irradiation (EB-PBI). The optimal method of tumour bed (TB) delineation requires X-ray CT imaging of implanted excision cavity wall markers. The definition of clinical target volume (CTV) as TB plus concentric 15 mm margins is based on the anatomical distribution of multifocal and multicentric disease around the primary tumour in mastectomy specimens, and the clinical locations of local tumour relapse (LR) after breast conservation surgery. If the majority of LR originate from foci of residual invasive and/or intraduct disease in the vicinity of the TB after complete microscopic resection, CTV margin logically takes account of the position of primary tumour within the surgical resection specimen. The uncertain significance of independent primary tumours as sources of preventable LR, and of wound healing responses in stimulating LR, increases the difficulties in defining optimal CTV. These uncertainties may resolve after long-term follow-up of current PBI trials. By contrast, a commonly used 10 mm clinical to planning target volume (PTV) margin has a stronger evidence base, although departmental set-up errors need to be confirmed locally. A CTV-PTV margin >10 mm may be required in women with larger breasts and/or large seromas, whilst the role of image-guided radiotherapy with or without TB markers in reducing CTV-PTV margins needs to be explored.

  17. Radio-anatomy Atlas for delineation SIRIADE web site: features and 1 year results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denisa, F.; Pointreau, Y.

    2010-01-01

    3-D conformal radiotherapy is based on accurate target volumes delineation. Radio-anatomy knowledge's are useful but sometimes difficult to obtain. Moreover, the sources of recommendations for volume definition are disparate. We thus developed a free radio-anatomy web site dedicated to volumes delineation for radiation-oncologists (www.siriade.org). This web site is a search engine allowing to access to delineation characteristics of main tumours illustrated with clinical cases. It does not aim to provide guidelines. Its main purpose is to provide an iconographic training support with frequent up-datings. We present the features of this web site and one year connexion statistics. (authors)

  18. Clinical target volume for rectal cancer. Preoperative radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorchel, F.; Bossel, J.F.; Baron, M.H.; Goubard, O.; Bartholomot, B.; Mantion, G.; Pelissier, E.P.; Maingon, P.

    2001-01-01

    The total meso-rectal excision allows the marked increase of the local control rate in rectal cancer. Therefore, the meso-rectal space is the usual field for the spread of rectal cancer cells. It could therefore be considered as the clinical target volume in the preoperative plan by the radiation oncologist. We propose to identify the mesorectum on anatomical structures of a treatment-position CT scan. (authors)

  19. Integration of multidisciplinary technologies for real time target visualization and verification for radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wen-Chung; Chen, Chin-Sheng; Tai, Hung-Chi; Liu, Chia-Yuan; Chen, Yu-Jen

    2014-01-01

    The current practice of radiotherapy examines target coverage solely from digitally reconstructed beam's eye view (BEV) in a way that is indirectly accessible and that is not in real time. We aimed to visualize treatment targets in real time from each BEV. The image data of phantom or patients from ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT) scans were captured to perform image registration. We integrated US, CT, US/CT image registration, robotic manipulation of US, a radiation treatment planning system, and a linear accelerator to constitute an innovative target visualization system. The performance of this algorithm segmented the target organ in CT images, transformed and reconstructed US images to match each orientation, and generated image registration in real time mode with acceptable accuracy. This image transformation allowed physicians to visualize the CT image-reconstructed target via a US probe outside the BEV that was non-coplanar to the beam's plane. It allowed the physicians to remotely control the US probe that was equipped on a robotic arm to dynamically trace and real time monitor the coverage of the target within the BEV during a simulated beam-on situation. This target visualization system may provide a direct remotely accessible and real time way to visualize, verify, and ensure tumor targeting during radiotherapy.

  20. Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pistenma, D.A.

    1980-01-01

    The need for radiotherapy research is exemplified by the 100,000 cancer patients who will fail treatment locally and/or regionally annually for the next several years but who would benefit from better local treatment modalities. Theoretically, all of the areas of investigation discussed in this projection paper have the potential to significantly improve local-regional treatment of cancer by radiotherapy alone or in combination with other modalities. In many of the areas of investigation discussed in this paper encouraging results have been obtained in cellular and animal tumor studies and in limited studies in humans as well. In the not too distant future the number of patients who would benefit from better local control may increase by tens of thousands if developments in chemotherapy and/or immunotherapy provide a means to eradicate disseminated microscopic foci of cancer. Thus the efforts to improve local-regional control take on even greater significance

  1. Anti-vascular internal high LET targeted radiotherapy for cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, Barry J.

    2006-01-01

    Targeted alpha therapy (TAT) is an emerging therapeutic modality, thought to be best suited to cancers such as leukaemia and cancer micrometastases, but not solid tumours. However, several subjects in our phase 1 clinical trial of systemic TAT for melanoma experienced marked regression of subcutaneous and internal tumours. The MCSP receptor is expressed on both tumour capillary pericytes and melanoma cells, and is targeted by the 9.2.27 monoclonal antibody. When this is labelled with the alpha-emitting radioisotope Bi-213, the resulting alpha-immunoconjugate can extravasate through capillary fenestrations and selectively kill these cells, as well as the contiguous endothelial cells in the capillaries, causing capillary closure and subsequent tumour regression. These results suggest that tumours can be regressed by a process called tumour anti-vascular alpha therapy (TAVAT). By analogy, tumour regression in boron neutron capture therapy could be achieved by similar means, where in the alpha and Li-7 ions emitted by boron-10 neutron capture events in cancer cells contiguous to the endothelial cells could shut down tumour capillaries by a process of tumour anti-vascular neutron capture therapy (TAVNCT). (author)

  2. Long-Term Results of Targeted Intraoperative Radiotherapy (Targit) Boost During Breast-Conserving Surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaidya, Jayant S., E-mail: jayant.vaidya@ucl.ac.uk [Research Department of Surgery, Division of Surgery and Interventional Science, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Baum, Michael [Research Department of Surgery, Division of Surgery and Interventional Science, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Tobias, Jeffrey S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University College London Hospitals, London (United Kingdom); Wenz, Frederik [Radiation Oncology and Gynaecology, University Medical Centre of Mannheim (Germany); Massarut, Samuele [Surgery and Radiation Oncology, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico (CRO), Aviano (Italy); Keshtgar, Mohammed [Research Department of Surgery, Division of Surgery and Interventional Science, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Hilaris, Basil [Radiation Oncology, Our Lady of Mercy, New York Medical College, New York (United States); Saunders, Christobel [Institute of Health and Rehabilitation Research, University of Notre Dame, Fremantle, Western Australia (Australia); Williams, Norman R.; Brew-Graves, Chris [Research Department of Surgery, Division of Surgery and Interventional Science, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Corica, Tammy [Institute of Health and Rehabilitation Research, University of Notre Dame, Fremantle, Western Australia (Australia); Roncadin, Mario [Surgery and Radiation Oncology, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico (CRO), Aviano (Italy); Kraus-Tiefenbacher, Uta; Suetterlin, Marc [Radiation Oncology and Gynaecology, University Medical Centre of Mannheim (Germany); Bulsara, Max [Institute of Health and Rehabilitation Research, University of Notre Dame, Fremantle, Western Australia (Australia); Joseph, David [Radiation Oncology, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital and School of Surgery, University of Western Australia, Perth (Australia)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: We have previously shown that delivering targeted radiotherapy to the tumour bed intraoperatively is feasible and desirable. In this study, we report on the feasibility, safety, and long-term efficacy of TARGeted Intraoperative radioTherapy (Targit), using the Intrabeam system. Methods and Materials: A total of 300 cancers in 299 unselected patients underwent breast-conserving surgery and Targit as a boost to the tumor bed. After lumpectomy, a single dose of 20 Gy was delivered intraoperatively. Postoperative external beam whole-breast radiotherapy excluded the usual boost. We also performed a novel individualized case control (ICC) analysis that computed the expected recurrences for the cohort by estimating the risk of recurrence for each patient using their characteristics and follow-up period. Results: The treatment was well tolerated. The median follow up was 60.5 months (range, 10-122 months). Eight patients have had ipsilateral recurrence: 5-year Kaplan Meier estimate for ipsilateral recurrence is 1.73% (SE 0.77), which compares well with that seen in the boosted patients in the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer study (4.3%) and the UK STAndardisation of breast RadioTherapy study (2.8%). In a novel ICC analysis of 242 of the patients, we estimated that there should be 11.4 recurrences; in this group, only 6 recurrences were observed. Conclusions: Lumpectomy and Targit boost combined with external beam radiotherapy results in a low local recurrence rate in a standard risk patient population. Accurate localization and the immediacy of the treatment that has a favorable effect on tumour microenvironment may contribute to this effect. These long-term data establish the long-term safety and efficacy of the Targit technique and generate the hypothesis that Targit boost might be superior to an external beam boost in its efficacy and justifies a randomized trial.

  3. Impact of 4D-(18)FDG-PET/CT imaging on target volume delineation in SBRT patients with central versus peripheral lung tumors. Multi-reader comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirindel, Alin; Adebahr, Sonja; Schuster, Daniel; Schimek-Jasch, Tanja; Schanne, Daniel H; Nemer, Ursula; Mix, Michael; Meyer, Philipp; Grosu, Anca-Ligia; Brunner, Thomas; Nestle, Ursula

    2015-06-01

    Evaluation of the effect of co-registered 4D-(18)FDG-PET/CT for SBRT target delineation in patients with central versus peripheral lung tumors. Analysis of internal target volume (ITV) delineation of central and peripheral lung lesions in 21 SBRT-patients. Manual delineation was performed by 4 observers in 2 contouring phases: on respiratory gated 4DCT with diagnostic 3DPET available aside (CT-ITV) and on co-registered 4DPET/CT (PET/CT-ITV). Comparative analysis of volumes and inter-reader agreement. 11 cases of peripheral and 10 central lesions were evaluated. In peripheral lesions, average CT-ITV was 6.2 cm(3) and PET/CT-ITV 8.6 cm(3), resembling a mean change in hypothetical radius of 2 mm. For both CT-ITVs and PET/CT-ITVs inter reader agreement was good and unchanged (0.733 and 0.716; p=0.58). All PET/CT-ITVs stayed within the PTVs derived from CT-ITVs. In central lesions, average CT-ITVs were 42.1 cm(3), PET/CT-ITVs 44.2 cm(3), without significant overall volume changes. Inter-reader agreement improved significantly (0.665 and 0.750; p1 ml in average for all observers. The addition of co-registered 4DPET data to 4DCT based target volume delineation for SBRT of centrally located lung tumors increases the inter-observer agreement and may help to avoid geographic misses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Targeting Rad50 sensitizes human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells to radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Lihong; Huang, Jiancong; Wang, Kai; Li, Jingjia; Yan, Ruicheng; Zhu, Ling; Ye, Jin; Wu, Xifu; Zhuang, Shimin; Li, Daqing; Zhang, Gehua

    2016-01-01

    The Mre11-Rad50-Nbs1 (MRN) complex is well known for its crucial role in initiating DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) repair pathways to resistant irradiation (IR) injury and thus facilitating radioresistance which severely reduces radiocurability of nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC). Targeting native cellular MRN function would sensitize NPC cells to IR. A recombinant adenovirus containing a mutant Rad50 gene (Ad-RAD50) expressing Rad50 zinc hook domain but lacking the ATPase domain and the Mre11 interaction domain was constructed to disrupt native cellular MRN functions. The effects of Ad-RAD50 on the MRN functions were assessed in NPC cells lines using western blot, co-immunoprecipitation and confocal microscopy analyses. The increased radiosensitivity of transient Ad-RAD50 to IR was examined in NPC cells, including MTT assay, colony formation. The molecular mechanisms of radiosensitization were confirmed by neutral comet assay and western bolts. Nude mice subcutaneous injection, tumor growth curve and TUNEL assay were used to evaluate tumor regression and apoptosis in vivo. Rad50 is remarkably upregulated in NPC cells after IR, implying the critical role of Rad50 in MRN functions. The transient expression of this mutant Rad50 decreased the levels of native cellular Rad50, Mre11 and Nbs1, weakened the interactions among these proteins, abrogated the G2/M arrest induced by DSBs and reduced the DNA repair ability in NPC cells. A combination of IR and mutant RAD50 therapy produced significant tumor cytotoxicity in vitro, with a corresponding increase in DNA damage, prevented proliferation and cell viability. Furthermore, Ad-RAD50 sensitized NPC cells to IR by causing dramatic tumor regression and inducing apoptosis in vivo. Our findings define a novel therapeutic approach to NPC radiosensitization via targeted native cellular Rad50 disruption. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-016-2190-8) contains supplementary material, which is available to

  5. Nonrandom Intrafraction Target Motions and General Strategy for Correction of Spine Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Lijun; Sahgal, Arjun; Hossain, Sabbir; Chuang, Cynthia; Descovich, Martina; Huang, Kim; Gottschalk, Alex; Larson, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To characterize nonrandom intrafraction target motions for spine stereotactic body radiotherapy and to develop a method of correction via image guidance. The dependence of target motions, as well as the effectiveness of the correction strategy for lesions of different locations within the spine, was analyzed. Methods and Materials: Intrafraction target motions for 64 targets in 64 patients treated with a total of 233 fractions were analyzed. Based on the target location, the cases were divided into three groups, i.e., cervical (n = 20 patients), thoracic (n = 20 patients), or lumbar-sacrum (n = 24 patients) lesions. For each case, time-lag autocorrelation analysis was performed for each degree of freedom of motion that included both translations (x, y, and z shifts) and rotations (roll, yaw, and pitch). A general correction strategy based on periodic interventions was derived to determine the time interval required between two adjacent interventions, to overcome the patient-specific target motions. Results: Nonrandom target motions were detected for 100% of cases regardless of target locations. Cervical spine targets were found to possess the highest incidence of nonrandom target motion compared with thoracic and lumbar-sacral lesions (p < 0.001). The average time needed to maintain the target motion to within 1 mm of translation or 1 deg. of rotational deviation was 5.5 min, 5.9 min, and 7.1 min for cervical, thoracic, and lumbar-sacrum locations, respectively (at 95% confidence level). Conclusions: A high incidence of nonrandom intrafraction target motions was found for spine stereotactic body radiotherapy treatments. Periodic interventions at approximately every 5 minutes or less were needed to overcome such motions.

  6. Intraoperative Boost Radiotherapy during Targeted Oncoplastic Breast Surgery: Overview and Single Center Experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfram Malter

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast-conserving surgery followed by whole-breast irradiation is the standard local therapy for early breast cancer. The international discussion of reduced importance of wider tumor-free resection margins than “tumor not touching ink” leads to the development of five principles in targeted oncoplastic breast surgery. IORT improves local recurrence risk and diminishes toxicity since there is less irradiation of healthy tissue. Intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT can be delivered in two settings: an IORT boost followed by a conventional regimen of external beam radiotherapy or a single IORT dose. The data from TARGIT-A and ELIOT reinforce the conviction that intraoperative radiotherapy during breast-conserving surgery is a reliable alternative to conventional postoperative fractionated irradiation, but only in a carefully selected population at low risk of local recurrence. We describe our experiences with IORT boost (50 kV energy X-rays; 20 Gy in combination with targeted oncoplastic breast surgery in a routine clinical setting. Our experiences demonstrate the applicability and reliability of combining IORT boost with targeted oncoplastic breast surgery in breast-conserving therapy of early breast cancer.

  7. Targeted intraoperative radiotherapy (TARGIT) yields very low recurrence rates when given as a boost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaidya, Jayant S.; Baum, Michael; Tobias, Jeffrey S.; Massarut, Samuele; Wenz, Frederik; Murphy, Olive; Hilaris, Basil; Houghton, Joan B.Sc.; Saunders, Christobel; Corica, Tammy; Roncadin, Mario; Kraus-Tiefenbacher, Uta; Melchaert, Frank; Keshtgar, Mohammed; Sainsbury, Richard; Douek, Michael; Harrison, Elly; Thompson, Alastair; Joseph, David

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Patients undergoing breast-conserving surgery were offered boost radiotherapy with targeted intraoperative radiotherapy (TARGIT) using the Intrabeam system to test the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of the new approach. Methods and Materials: We treated 302 cancers in 301 unselected patients. This was not a low-risk group. One-third of patients (98/301) were younger than 51 years of age. More than half of the tumors (172, 57%) were between 1 cm and 2 cm, and one-fifth (62, 21%) were >2 cm; 29% (86) had a Grade 3 tumor and, in 29% (87), axillary lymph nodes contained metastasis. After primary surgery, 20 Gy was delivered intraoperatively to the surface of the tumor bed, followed by external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT), but excluding the usual boost. Results: The treatment was well tolerated. The follow-up ranged from 3 to 80 months (164 and 90 patients completed 2 and 3 years follow-up, respectively). Four patients (1.3%) had local recurrence. The Kaplan-Meier estimate of local recurrence is 2.6% (SE = 1.7) at 5 years. This compares favorably with the 4.3% recurrence rate in boosted patients from the EORTC boost study, in which only 8.1% patients were node-positive, as opposed to 29% in our series. Conclusion: Targeted intraoperative radiotherapy combined with EBRT results in a low local recurrence rate. This could be attributed to both accurate targeting and timeliness of the treatment. These data support the need for a randomized trial to test whether the TARGIT boost is superior to conventional external boost, especially in high-risk women

  8. Efficient approach for determining four-dimensional computed tomography-based internal target volume in stereotactic radiotherapy of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeo, Seung Gu; Kim, Eun Seog

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate efficient approaches for determining internal target volume (ITV) from four-dimensional computed tomography (4D CT) images used in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). 4D CT images were analyzed for 15 patients who received SBRT for stage I NSCLC. Three different ITVs were determined as follows: combining clinical target volume (CTV) from all 10 respiratory phases (ITV 10Phases ); combining CTV from four respiratory phases, including two extreme phases (0% and 50%) plus two intermediate phases (20% and 70%) (ITV 4Phases ); and combining CTV from two extreme phases (ITV 2Phases ). The matching index (MI) of ITV 4Phases and ITV 2Phases was defined as the ratio of ITV 4Phases and ITV 2Phases , respectively, to the ITV 10Phases . The tumor motion index (TMI) was defined as the ratio of ITV 10Phases to CTV mean , which was the mean of 10 CTVs delineated on 10 respiratory phases. The ITVs were significantly different in the order of ITV 10Phases , ITV 4Phases , and ITV 2Phases (all p 4Phases was significantly higher than that of ITV 2Phases (p 4Phases was inversely related to TMI (r = -0.569, p = 0.034). In a subgroup with low TMI (n = 7), ITV 4Phases was not statistically different from ITV 10Phases (p = 0.192) and its MI was significantly higher than that of ITV 2Phases (p = 0.016). The ITV 4Phases may be an efficient approach alternative to optimal ITV 10Phases in SBRT for early-stage NSCLC with less tumor motion.

  9. A contrast-oriented algorithm for FDG-PET-based delineation of tumour volumes for the radiotherapy of lung cancer: derivation from phantom measurements and validation in patient data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, Andrea; Hellwig, Dirk; Kirsch, Carl-Martin; Nestle, Ursula [Saarland University Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Homburg (Germany); Kremp, Stephanie; Ruebe, Christian [Saarland University Medical Center, Department of Radiotherapy, Homburg (Germany)

    2008-11-15

    An easily applicable algorithm for the FDG-PET-based delineation of tumour volumes for the radiotherapy of lung cancer was developed by phantom measurements and validated in patient data. PET scans were performed (ECAT-ART tomograph) on two cylindrical phantoms (phan1, phan2) containing glass spheres of different volumes (7.4-258 ml) which were filled with identical FDG concentrations. Gradually increasing the activity of the fillable background, signal-to-background ratios from 33:1 to 2.5:1 were realised. The mean standardised uptake value (SUV) of the region-of-interest (ROI) surrounded by a 70% isocontour (mSUV{sub 70}) was used to represent the FDG accumulation of each sphere (or tumour). Image contrast was defined as: C=(mSUV{sub 70}-BG)/BG wehre BG is the mean background - SUV. For the spheres of phan1, the threshold SUVs (TS) best matching the known sphere volumes were determined. A regression function representing the relationship between TS/(mSUV{sub 70}-BG) and C was calculated and used for delineation of the spheres in phan2 and the gross tumour volumes (GTVs) of eight primary lung tumours. These GTVs were compared to those defined using CT. The relationship between TS/(mSUV{sub 70}-BG) and C is best described by an inverse regression function which can be converted to the linear relationship TS=a x mSUV{sub 70}+b x BG. Using this algorithm, the volumes delineated in phan2 differed by only -0.4 to +0.7 mm in radius from the true ones, whilst the PET-GTVs differed by only -0.7 to +1.2 mm compared with the values determined by CT. By the contrast-oriented algorithm presented in this study, a PET-based delineation of GTVs for primary tumours of lung cancer patients is feasible. (orig.)

  10. Integration of multidisciplinary technologies for real time target visualization and verification for radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang WC

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Wen-Chung Chang,1,* Chin-Sheng Chen,2,* Hung-Chi Tai,3 Chia-Yuan Liu,4,5 Yu-Jen Chen3 1Department of Electrical Engineering, National Taipei University of Technology, Taipei, Taiwan; 2Graduate Institute of Automation Technology, National Taipei University of Technology, Taipei, Taiwan; 3Department of Radiation Oncology, Mackay Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; 4Department of Internal Medicine, Mackay Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; 5Department of Medicine, Mackay Medical College, New Taipei City, Taiwan  *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: The current practice of radiotherapy examines target coverage solely from digitally reconstructed beam's eye view (BEV in a way that is indirectly accessible and that is not in real time. We aimed to visualize treatment targets in real time from each BEV. The image data of phantom or patients from ultrasound (US and computed tomography (CT scans were captured to perform image registration. We integrated US, CT, US/CT image registration, robotic manipulation of US, a radiation treatment planning system, and a linear accelerator to constitute an innovative target visualization system. The performance of this algorithm segmented the target organ in CT images, transformed and reconstructed US images to match each orientation, and generated image registration in real time mode with acceptable accuracy. This image transformation allowed physicians to visualize the CT image-reconstructed target via a US probe outside the BEV that was non-coplanar to the beam's plane. It allowed the physicians to remotely control the US probe that was equipped on a robotic arm to dynamically trace and real time monitor the coverage of the target within the BEV during a simulated beam-on situation. This target visualization system may provide a direct remotely accessible and real time way to visualize, verify, and ensure tumor targeting during radiotherapy. Keywords: ultrasound, computerized tomography

  11. Variation in radiotherapy target volume definition, dose to organs at risk and clinical target volumes using anatomic (computed tomography) versus combined anatomic and molecular imaging (positron emission tomography/computed tomography): intensity-modulated radiotherapy delivered using a tomotherapy Hi Art machine: final results of the VortigERN study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, S; Frew, J; Mott, J; McCallum, H; Stevenson, P; Maxwell, R; Wilsdon, J; Kelly, C G

    2012-12-01

    Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT) is the current standard for delineating tumours of the head and neck for radiotherapy. Although metabolic imaging with positron emission tomography (PET) has been used in recent years, the studies were non-confirmatory in establishing its routine role in radiotherapy planning in the modern era. This study explored the difference in gross tumour volume and clinical target volume definitions for the primary and nodal volumes when FDG PET/CT was used as compared with CECT in oropharyngeal cancer cases. Twenty patients with oropharyngeal cancers had a PET/CT scan in the treatment position after consent. Target volumes were defined on CECT scans by a consultant clinical oncologist who was blind to the PET scans. After obtaining inputs from a radiologist, another set of target volumes were outlined on the PET/CT data set. The gross and clinical target volumes as defined on the two data sets were then analysed. The hypothesis of more accurate target delineation, preventing geographical miss and comparative overlap volumes between CECT and PET/CT, was explored. The study also analysed the volumes of intersection and analysed whether there was any TNM stage migration when PET/CT was used as compared with CECT for planning. In 17 of 20 patients, the TNM stage was not altered when adding FDG PET information to CT. PET information prevented geographical miss in two patients and identified distant metastases in one case. PET/CT gross tumour volumes were smaller than CECT volumes (mean ± standard deviation: 25.16 cm(3) ± 35.8 versus 36.56 cm(3) ± 44.14; P standard deviation: CECT versus PET/CT 32.48 cm(3) ± 36.63 versus 32.21 cm(3) ± 37.09; P > 0.86) were not statistically different. Similarity and discordance coefficients were calculated and are reported. PET/CT as compared with CECT could provide more clinically relevant information and prevent geographical miss when used for radiotherapy planning for advanced oropharyngeal

  12. A teaching intervention in a contouring dummy run improved target volume delineation in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. Reducing the interobserver variability in multicentre clinical studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schimek-Jasch, Tanja; Prokic, Vesna; Doll, Christian; Grosu, Anca-Ligia; Nestle, Ursula [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Freiburg (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Consortium (DKTK) partner site: Freiburg, Heidelberg (Germany); Troost, Esther G.C. [Maastricht University Medical Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Ruecker, Gerta [University Medical Center Freiburg, Institute for Medical Biometry and Statistics, Centre for Medical Biometry and Medical Informatics, Freiburg (Germany); Avlar, Melanie [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Duncker-Rohr, Viola [Ortenau-Klinikum Offenburg-Gengenbach, Department of Radiation Oncology, Gengenbach (Germany); Mix, Michael [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Freiburg (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Consortium (DKTK) partner site: Freiburg, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2015-02-10

    Interobserver variability in the definition of target volumes (TVs) is a well-known confounding factor in (multicentre) clinical studies employing radiotherapy. Therefore, detailed contouring guidelines are provided in the prospective randomised multicentre PET-Plan (NCT00697333) clinical trial protocol. This trial compares strictly FDG-PET-based TV delineation with conventional TV delineation in patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Despite detailed contouring guidelines, their interpretation by different radiation oncologists can vary considerably, leading to undesirable discrepancies in TV delineation. Considering this, as part of the PET-Plan study quality assurance (QA), a contouring dummy run (DR) consisting of two phases was performed to analyse the interobserver variability before and after teaching. In the first phase of the DR (DR1), radiation oncologists from 14 study centres were asked to delineate TVs as defined by the study protocol (gross TV, GTV; and two clinical TVs, CTV-A and CTV-B) in a test patient. A teaching session was held at a study group meeting, including a discussion of the results focussing on discordances in comparison to the per-protocol solution. Subsequently, the second phase of the DR (DR2) was performed in order to evaluate the impact of teaching. Teaching after DR1 resulted in a reduction of absolute TVs in DR2, as well as in better concordance of TVs. The Overall Kappa(κ) indices increased from 0.63 to 0.71 (GTV), 0.60 to 0.65 (CTV-A) and from 0.59 to 0.63 (CTV-B), demonstrating improvements in overall interobserver agreement. Contouring DRs and study group meetings as part of QA in multicentre clinical trials help to identify misinterpretations of per-protocol TV delineation. Teaching the correct interpretation of protocol contouring guidelines leads to a reduction in interobserver variability and to more consistent contouring, which should consequently improve the validity of the overall study

  13. Impact of target reproducibility on tumor dose in stereotactic radiotherapy of targets in the lung and liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wulf, Joern; Haedinger, Ulrich; Oppitz, Ulrich; Thiele, Wibke; Flentje, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Background and purpose: Previous analyses of target reproducibility in extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy have revealed standard security margins for planning target volume (PTV) definition of 5 mm in axial and 5-10 mm in longitudinal direction. In this study the reproducibility of the clinical target volume (CTV) of lung and liver tumors within the PTV over the complete course of hypofractionated treatment is evaluated. The impact of target mobility on dose to the CTV is assessed by dose-volume histograms (DVH). Materials and methods: Twenty-two pulmonary and 21 hepatic targets were treated with three stereotactic fractions of 10 Gy to the PTV-enclosing 100%-isodose with normalization to 150% at the isocenter. A conformal dose distribution was related to the PTV, which was defined by margins of 5-10 mm added to the CTV. Prior to each fraction a computed tomography (CT)-simulation over the complete target volume was performed resulting in a total of 60 CT-simulations for lung and 58 CT-simulations for hepatic targets. The CTV from each CT-simulation was segmented and matched with the CT-study used for treatment planning. A DVH of the simulated CTV was calculated for each fraction. The target coverage (TC) of dose to the simulated CTV was defined as the proportion of the CTV receiving at least the reference dose (100%). Results: A decrease of TC to 3 . Conclusions: Target reproducibility was precise within the reference isodose in 91% of lung and 81% of liver tumors with a TC of the complete CTV ≥95% at each fraction of treatment. Pulmonary targets with increased breathing mobility and liver tumors >100 cm 3 are at risk for target deviation exceeding the standard security margins for PTV-definition at least for one fraction and require individual evaluation of sufficient margins

  14. Impact of target reproducibility on tumor dose in stereotactic radiotherapy of targets in the lung and liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulf, Jörn; Hädinger, Ulrich; Oppitz, Ulrich; Thiele, Wibke; Flentje, Michael

    2003-02-01

    Previous analyses of target reproducibility in extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy have revealed standard security margins for planning target volume (PTV) definition of 5mm in axial and 5-10mm in longitudinal direction. In this study the reproducibility of the clinical target volume (CTV) of lung and liver tumors within the PTV over the complete course of hypofractionated treatment is evaluated. The impact of target mobility on dose to the CTV is assessed by dose-volume histograms (DVH). Twenty-two pulmonary and 21 hepatic targets were treated with three stereotactic fractions of 10 Gy to the PTV-enclosing 100%-isodose with normalization to 150% at the isocenter. A conformal dose distribution was related to the PTV, which was defined by margins of 5-10mm added to the CTV. Prior to each fraction a computed tomography (CT)-simulation over the complete target volume was performed resulting in a total of 60 CT-simulations for lung and 58 CT-simulations for hepatic targets. The CTV from each CT-simulation was segmented and matched with the CT-study used for treatment planning. A DVH of the simulated CTV was calculated for each fraction. The target coverage (TC) of dose to the simulated CTV was defined as the proportion of the CTV receiving at least the reference dose (100%). A decrease of TC to or=95% at each fraction of treatment. Pulmonary targets with increased breathing mobility and liver tumors >100 cm(3) are at risk for target deviation exceeding the standard security margins for PTV-definition at least for one fraction and require individual evaluation of sufficient margins.

  15. Strategies for systemic radiotherapy of micrometastases using antibody-targeted 131I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheldon, T E; O'Donoghue, J A; Hilditch, T E; Barrett, A

    1988-02-01

    A simple analysis is developed to evaluate the likely effectiveness of treatment of micrometastases by antibody-targeted 131I. Account is taken of the low levels of tumour uptake of antibody-conjugated 131I presently achievable and of the "energy wastage" in targeting microscopic tumours with a radionuclide whose disintegration energy is widely dissipated. The analysis shows that only modest doses can be delivered to micrometastases when total body dose is restricted to levels which allow recovery of bone marrow. Much higher doses could be delivered to micrometastases when bone marrow rescue is used. A rationale is presented for targeted systemic radiotherapy used in combination with external beam total body irradiation (TBI) and bone marrow rescue. This has some practical advantages. The effect of the targeted component is to impose a biological non-uniformity on the total body dose distribution with regions of high tumour cell density receiving higher doses. Where targeting results in high doses to particular normal organs (e.g. liver, kidney) the total dose to these organs could be kept within tolerable limits by appropriate shielding of the external beam radiation component of the treatment. Greater levels of tumour cell kill should be achievable by the combination regime without any increase in normal tissue damage over that inflicted by conventional TBI. The predicted superiority of the combination regime is especially marked for tumours just below the threshold for detectability (e.g. approximately 1 mm-1 cm diameter). This approach has the advantage that targeted radiotherapy provides only a proportion of the total body dose, most of which is given by a familiar technique. The proportion of dose given by the targeted component could be increased as experience is gained. The predicted superiority of the combination strategy should be experimentally testable using laboratory animals. Clinical applications should be cautiously approached, with due regard to

  16. Long-term follow-up after modern radical prostate cancer radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sander, Lotte

    that clinical target volumes are up to 30% smaller on MRI delineation compared to computer tomography delineation. The overall aim of the thesis was to explore the use of MRI target planning and a Nicle-Titanium prostate stent as fiducial marker for both MR-CT co-registration and image guided radiotherapy....... radiotherapy is a well established treatment modality for prostate cancer. Accuracy and precision are key words with regard to optimal survival and minimal toxicity in modern radiotherapy and are fundamentals in modern radiotherapy. Modern imaging has improved the ability to define radiotherapy target volumes......A significant increase in the prostate cancer incidence has made prostate cancer a major health problem in recent years. Because of the often but unfortunately not always indolent nature of the disease, over-diagnosis and over-treatment are relevant clinical and ethic dilemmas. External beam...

  17. The distribution of alternative agents for targeted radiotherapy within human neuroblastoma spheroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mairs, R.J.; Gaze, M.N.; Murray, T.; Reid, R.; McSharry, C.; Babich, J.W.

    1991-01-01

    This study aims to select the radiopharmaceutical vehicle for targeted radiotherapy of neuroblastoma which is most likely to penetrate readily the centre of micrometastases in vivo. The human neuroblastoma cell line NB1-G, grown as multicellular spheroids provided an in vitro model for micrometastases. The radiopharmaceuticals studied were the catecholamine analogue metaiodobenzyl guanidine (mIBG), a specific neuroectodermal monoclonal antibody (UJ13A) and β nerve growth factor (βNGF). Following incubation of each drug with neuroblastoma spheroids, autoradiographs of frozen sections were prepared to demonstrate their relative distributions. mIBG and βNGF were found to penetrate the centre of spheroids readily although the concentration of mIBG greatly exceeded that of βNGF. In contrast, UJ13A was only bound peripherally. We conclude that mIBG is the best available vehicle for targeted radiotherapy of neuroblastoma cells with active uptake mechanisms for catecholimines. It is suggested that radionuclides with a shorter range of emissions than 131 I may be conjugated to benzyl guanidine to constitute more effective targeting agents with potentially less toxicity to adjacent normal tissues. (author)

  18. Radio-anatomy Atlas for delineation SIRIADE web site: features and 1 year results; Site de radio-anatomie et d'aide a la delineation (SIRIADE): presentation et bilan a un an

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denisa, F. [Centre Jean-Bernard, Clinique Victor-Hugo, 72 - Le Mans (France); Pointreau, Y. [Clinique d' oncologie radiotherapie, Centre Henry-S.-Kaplan, CHU Bretonneau, 37 - Tours (France)

    2010-07-01

    3-D conformal radiotherapy is based on accurate target volumes delineation. Radio-anatomy knowledge's are useful but sometimes difficult to obtain. Moreover, the sources of recommendations for volume definition are disparate. We thus developed a free radio-anatomy web site dedicated to volumes delineation for radiation-oncologists (www.siriade.org). This web site is a search engine allowing to access to delineation characteristics of main tumours illustrated with clinical cases. It does not aim to provide guidelines. Its main purpose is to provide an iconographic training support with frequent up-datings. We present the features of this web site and one year connexion statistics. (authors)

  19. Computerised tomography in radiotherapy planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badcock, P.C.

    1983-01-01

    This study evaluates the effectiveness of computed tomography as an adjunct to radiotherapy planning. Until recently, acquisition of accurate data concerning tumour anatomy lagged behind other developments in radiotherapy. With the advent of computer-tomography (CT), these data can be displayed and transmitted to a treatment planning computer. It is concluded that the greatest inaccuracies in the radiation treatment of patients are to be found in both the inadequate delineation of the target volume within the patient and changes in body outline relative to the target volume over the length of the irradiated volume. The technique was useful in various subgroups (pelvic, intra-thoracic and chest-wall tumours) and for those patients being treated palliatively. With an estimated improvement in cure rate of 4.5% and cost-effective factors of between 3.3 and 5, CT-assisted radiotherapy planning appears to be a worthwhile procedure. (orig.)

  20. Converting from CT- to MRI-only-based target definition in radiotherapy of localized prostate cancer: A comparison between two modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seppälä, Tiina; Visapää, Harri; Collan, Juhani; Kapanen, Mika; Beule, Annette; Kouri, Mauri; Tenhunen, Mikko; Saarilahti, Kauko

    2015-11-01

    To investigate the conversion of prostate cancer radiotherapy (RT) target definition from CT-based planning into an MRI-only-based planning procedure. Using the CT- and MRI-only-based RT planning protocols, 30 prostate cancer patients were imaged in the RT fixation position. Two physicians delineated the prostate in both CT and T2-weighted MRI images. The CT and MRI images were coregistered based on gold seeds and anatomic borders of the prostate. The uncertainty of the coregistration, as well as differences in target volumes and uncertainty of contour delineation were investigated. Conversion of margins and dose constraints from CT- to MRI-only-based treatment planning was assessed. On average, the uncertainty of image coregistration was 0.4 ± 0.5 mm (one standard deviation, SD), 0.9 ± 0.8 mm and 0.9 ± 0.9 mm in the lateral, anterior-posterior and base-apex direction, respectively. The average ratio of the prostate volume between CT and MRI was 1.20 ± 0.15 (one SD). Compared to the CT-based contours, the MRI-based contours were on average 2-7 mm smaller in the apex, 0-1 mm smaller in the rectal direction and 1-4 mm smaller elsewhere. When converting from a CT-based planning procedure to an MRI-based one, the overall planning target volumes (PTV) are prominently reduced only in the apex. The prostate margins and dose constraints can be retained by this conversion.

  1. Hypoxia targeted bifunctional suicide gene expression enhances radiotherapy in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Xiaorong; Xing, Ligang; Deng, Xuelong; Hsiao, Hung Tsung; Manami, Akiko; Koutcher, Jason A.; Clifton Ling, C.; Li, Gloria C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether hypoxia targeted bifunctional suicide gene expression-cytosine deaminase (CD) and uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (UPRT) with 5-FC treatments can enhance radiotherapy. Materials and methods: Stable transfectants of R3327-AT cells were established which express a triple-fusion-gene: CD, UPRT and monomoric DsRed (mDsRed) controlled by a hypoxia inducible promoter. Hypoxia-induced expression/function of CDUPRTmDsRed was verified by western blot, flow cytometry, fluorescent microscopy, and cytotoxicity assay of 5-FU and 5-FC. Tumor-bearing mice were treated with 5-FC and local radiation. Tumor volume was monitored and compared with those treated with 5-FC or radiation alone. In addition, the CDUPRTmDsRed distribution in hypoxic regions of tumor sections was visualized with fluorescent microscopy. Results: Hypoxic induction of CDUPRTmDsRed protein correlated with increased sensitivity to 5-FC and 5-FU. Significant radiosensitization effects were detected after 5-FC treatments under hypoxic conditions. In the tumor xenografts, the distribution of CDUPRTmDsRed expression visualized with fluorescence microscopy was co-localized with the hypoxia marker pimonidazole positive staining cells. Furthermore, administration of 5-FC to mice in combination with local irradiation resulted in significant tumor regression, as in comparison with 5-FC or radiation treatments alone. Conclusions: Our data suggest that the hypoxia-inducible CDUPRT/5-FC gene therapy strategy has the ability to specifically target hypoxic cancer cells and significantly improve the tumor control in combination with radiotherapy.

  2. Aptamer-based radiopharmaceuticals for diagnostic imaging and targeted radiotherapy of epithelial tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Missailidis, Sotiris; Perkins, Alan; Santos-Filho, Sebastiao David; Fonseca, Adenilson de Souza da; Bernardo-Filho, Mario

    2008-01-01

    In the continuous search for earlier diagnosis and improved therapeutic modalities against cancer, based on our constantly increasing knowledge of cancer biology, aptamers hold the promise to expand on current antibody success, but overcoming some of the problems faced with antibodies as therapeutic or delivery agents in cancer. However, as the first aptamer reached the market as an inhibitor against angiogenesis for the treatment of macular degeneration, aptamers have found only limited applications or interest in oncology, and even less as radiopharmaceuticals for diagnostic imaging and targeted radiotherapy of tumours. Yet, the chemistry for the labelling of aptamers and the options to alter their pharmacokinetic properties, to make them suitable for use as radiopharmaceuticals is now available and recent advances in their development can demonstrate that these molecules would make them ideal delivery vehicles for the development of targeted radiopharmaceuticals that could deliver their radiation load with accuracy to the tumour site, offering improved therapeutic properties and reduced side effects. (author)

  3. Aptamer-based radiopharmaceuticals for diagnostic imaging and targeted radiotherapy of epithelial tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Missailidis, Sotiris [The Open University, Milton Keynes (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemistry and Analytical Sciences]. E-mail: s.missailidis@open.ac.uk; Perkins, Alan [University of Nottingham (United Kingdom). Dept. of Medical Physics; Santos-Filho, Sebastiao David; Fonseca, Adenilson de Souza da; Bernardo-Filho, Mario [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes. Dept. de Biofisica e Biometria

    2008-12-15

    In the continuous search for earlier diagnosis and improved therapeutic modalities against cancer, based on our constantly increasing knowledge of cancer biology, aptamers hold the promise to expand on current antibody success, but overcoming some of the problems faced with antibodies as therapeutic or delivery agents in cancer. However, as the first aptamer reached the market as an inhibitor against angiogenesis for the treatment of macular degeneration, aptamers have found only limited applications or interest in oncology, and even less as radiopharmaceuticals for diagnostic imaging and targeted radiotherapy of tumours. Yet, the chemistry for the labelling of aptamers and the options to alter their pharmacokinetic properties, to make them suitable for use as radiopharmaceuticals is now available and recent advances in their development can demonstrate that these molecules would make them ideal delivery vehicles for the development of targeted radiopharmaceuticals that could deliver their radiation load with accuracy to the tumour site, offering improved therapeutic properties and reduced side effects. (author)

  4. Molecular Differentiation of Risk for Disease Progression: Delineating Stage-Specific Therapeutic Targets for Disease Management in Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Worsham, Maria J; Raju, Usha; Chase, Gary; Lu, Mei

    2004-01-01

    .... The aim of this research is to 1a: identify an informative set of specific genetic alterations that underlie the pathogenesis of disease progression to serve as targets for management of disease at the earliest stages and 1b...

  5. Molecular Differentiation of Risk for Disease Progression: Delineating Stage-Specific Therapeutic Targets for Disease Management in Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Worsham, Maria J; Raju, Usha; Lu, Mei

    2006-01-01

    .... The aim of this research is to 1a: identify an informative set of specific genetic alterations that underlie the pathogenesis of disease progression to serve as targets for management of disease at the earliest stages and 1b...

  6. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Craniospinal Irradiation: Target Volume Considerations, Dose Constraints, and Competing Risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, William; Filion, Edith; Roberge, David; Freeman, Carolyn R.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To report the results of an analysis of dose received to tissues and organs outside the target volume, in the setting of spinal axis irradiation for the treatment of medulloblastoma, using three treatment techniques. Methods and Materials: Treatment plans (total dose, 23.4 Gy) for a standard two-dimensional (2D) technique, a three-dimensional (3D) technique using a 3D imaging-based target volume, and an intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) technique, were compared for 3 patients in terms of dose-volume statistics for target coverage, as well as organ at risk (OAR) and overall tissue sparing. Results: Planning target volume coverage and dose homogeneity was superior for the IMRT plans for V 95% (IMRT, 100%; 3D, 96%; 2D, 98%) and V 107% (IMRT, 3%; 3D, 38%; 2D, 37%). In terms of OAR sparing, the IMRT plan was better for all organs and whole-body contour when comparing V 10Gy , V 15Gy , and V 20Gy . The 3D plan was superior for V 5Gy and below. For the heart and liver in particular, the IMRT plans provided considerable sparing in terms of V 10Gy and above. In terms of the integral dose, the IMRT plans were superior for liver (IMRT, 21.9 J; 3D, 28.6 J; 2D, 38.6 J) and heart (IMRT, 9 J; 3D, 14.1J; 2D, 19.4 J), the 3D plan for the body contour (IMRT, 349 J; 3D, 337 J; 2D, 555 J). Conclusions: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy is a valid treatment option for spinal axis irradiation. We have shown that IMRT results in sparing of organs at risk without a significant increase in integral dose

  7. 3D Groundwater flow model at the Upper Rhine Graben scale to delineate preferential target areas for geothermal projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armandine Les Landes, Antoine; Guillon, Théophile; Peter-Borie, Mariane; Rachez, Xavier

    2017-04-01

    Any deep unconventional geothermal project remains risky because of the uncertainty regarding the presence of the geothermal resource at depth and the drilling costs increasing accordingly. That's why this resource must be located as precisely as possible to increase the chances of successful projects and their economic viability. To minimize the risk, as much information as possible should be gathered prior to any drilling. Usually, the position of the exploration wells of geothermal energy systems is chosen based on structural geology observations, geophysics measurements and geochemical analyses. Confronting these observations to results from additional disciplines should bring more objectivity in locating the region to explore and where to implant the geothermal system. The Upper Rhine Graben (URG) is a tectonically active rift system that corresponds to one branch of the European Cenozoic Rift System where the basin hosts a significant potential for geothermal energy. The large fault network inherited from a complex tectonic history and settled under the sedimentary deposits hosts fluid circulation patterns. Geothermal anomalies are strongly influenced by fluid circulations within permeable structures such as fault zones. In order to better predict the location of the geothermal resource, it is necessary to understand how it is influenced by heat transport mechanisms such as groundwater flow. The understanding of fluid circulation in hot fractured media at large scale can help in the identification of preferential zones at a finer scale where additional exploration can be carried out. Numerical simulations is a useful tool to deal with the issue of fluid circulations through large fault networks that enable the uplift of deep and hot fluids. Therefore, we build a numerical model to study groundwater flow at the URG scale (150 x 130km), which aims to delineate preferential zones. The numerical model is based on a hybrid method using a Discrete Fracture Network

  8. Systematic evaluation of MRI findings in different stages of treatment of cervical cancer: Potential of MRI on delineation of target, pathoanatomic structures, and organs at risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimopoulos, Johannes; Schard, Gerdi; Berger, Daniel; Lang, Stefan; Goldner, Gregor; Helbich, Thomas; Poetter, Richard

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To compare magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings at different stages of cervix cancer treatment and to define the potential of MRI to delineate the gross tumor volume (GTV), clinical target volume (CTV), pathoanatomic structures, and organs at risk (OAR) in brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Forty-nine patients underwent MRI at diagnosis and at brachytherapy. The ability to discriminate anatomic structures on MRI was assessed (quality factor: 0 = inability to discriminate; 1 = fair discrimination; 2 = good discrimination; 3 = excellent discrimination). The overall ability to visualize (percentage of patients with quality factors greater than 0) and the overall discrimination quality score (mean quality factors of all patients) were estimated for the applicator, GTV at diagnosis (GTV D ), GTV at brachytherapy (GTV BT )/'gray zones,' cervix rim/uterine corpus, OAR, vaginal wall, and parametria. Results: The overall ability to visualize the applicator on MRI at brachytherapy was 100%; for the GTV BT /'gray zones,' cervix rim/uterine corpus, OAR, and vaginal wall, visualization was 98% (overall discrimination quality factors: 1.2, 2.9, 2.1, 1.9, 1.7, and 2.6). Three of 4 borders of parametrial space were defined in more than 98% (discrimination quality factors: 2.9, 2.1, and 1.2). Conclusion: Magnetic resonance imaging provides appropriate information for definition of the applicator, GTV, CTV, pathoanatomic structures, and OAR that enables precise delineation for cervix cancer brachytherapy

  9. The target volume concept at the recording of external beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quast, U.; Glaeser, L.

    1981-01-01

    With the aim of complete, exact and reproducible manual recording and documentation of external beam radiotherapy a concept is proposed providing treatment planning and recording related to space and time for target volumes of different order corresponding to Ist, IInd or IIIrd part of treatment course, regarding all dose limiting organs at risk. The record consists of the dosage plan for medical treatment planning, the treatment plan for physical dose distribution planning and the treatment record of absorbed doses delivered as well as a checklist for patient and machine set-up, and labels for intended actions during treatment development. A clear arrangement of the record form in logical order was found, demanding exact specification of target(s) and beam(s) and their relation in space and time; asking for verbal and graphical description of target volumes, organs at risk, patient positioning, beam portals and dose reference points in terms of patients' anatomy; emphasizing the most important medical data by marked areas and leaving enough empty space for additional data, remarks or comments. During several years of clinical use these record forms proved to be suitable for all cases of external beam therapy, for complex situations of target volumes and treatment-scheduling, for all treatment techniques and radiation qualities and for all ways of physical treatment planning. They can be extended to automatic treatment verification, monitoring and recording as well as to the application of in-vivo-measurements of absorbed doses. (orig.) [de

  10. Combined-modality treatment of solid tumors using radiotherapy and molecular targeted agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Brigette B Y; Bristow, Robert G; Kim, John; Siu, Lillian L

    2003-07-15

    Molecular targeted agents have been combined with radiotherapy (RT) in recent clinical trials in an effort to optimize the therapeutic index of RT. The appeal of this strategy lies in their potential target specificity and clinically acceptable toxicity. This article integrates the salient, published research findings into the underlying molecular mechanisms, preclinical efficacy, and clinical applicability of combining RT with molecular targeted agents. These agents include inhibitors of intracellular signal transduction molecules, modulators of apoptosis, inhibitors of cell cycle checkpoints control, antiangiogenic agents, and cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibitors. Molecular targeted agents can have direct effects on the cytoprotective and cytotoxic pathways implicated in the cellular response to ionizing radiation (IR). These pathways involve cellular proliferation, DNA repair, cell cycle progression, nuclear transcription, tumor angiogenesis, and prostanoid-associated inflammation. These pathways can also converge to alter RT-induced apoptosis, terminal growth arrest, and reproductive cell death. Pharmacologic modulation of these pathways may potentially enhance tumor response to RT though inhibition of tumor repopulation, improvement of tumor oxygenation, redistribution during the cell cycle, and alteration of intrinsic tumor radiosensitivity. Combining RT and molecular targeted agents is a rational approach in the treatment of solid tumors. Translation of this approach from promising preclinical data to clinical trials is actively underway.

  11. Poster - 36: Effect of Planning Target Volume Coverage on the Dose Delivered in Lung Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dekker, Chris; Wierzbicki, Marcin [McMaster University, Juravinski Cancer Centre (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: In lung radiotherapy, breathing motion may be encompassed by contouring the internal target volume (ITV). Remaining uncertainties are included in a geometrical expansion to the planning target volume (PTV). In IMRT, the treatment is then optimized until a desired PTV fraction is covered by the appropriate dose. The resulting beams often carry high fluence in the PTV margin to overcome low lung density and to generate steep dose gradients. During treatment, the high density tumour can enter the PTV margin, potentially increasing target dose. Thus, planning lung IMRT with a reduced PTV dose may still achieve the desired ITV dose during treatment. Methods: A retrospective analysis was carried out with 25 IMRT plans prescribed to 63 Gy in 30 fractions. The plans were re-normalized to cover various fractions of the PTV by different isodose lines. For each case, the isocentre was moved using 125 shifts derived from all 3D combinations of 0 mm, (PTV margin - 1 mm), and PTV margin. After each shift, the dose was recomputed to approximate the delivered dose. Results and Conclusion: Our plans typically cover 95% of the PTV by 95% of the dose. Reducing the PTV covered to 94% did not significantly reduce the delivered ITV doses for (PTV margin - 1 mm) shifts. Target doses were reduced significantly for all other shifts and planning goals studied. Thus, a reduced planning goal will likely deliver the desired target dose as long as the ITV rarely enters the last mm of the PTV margin.

  12. Targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor in radiotherapy: radiobiological mechanisms, preclinical and clinical results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumann, Michael; Krause, Mechthild

    2004-01-01

    Background and purpose: Inhibition of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a fastly developing field in preclinical and clinical cancer research. This review presents the current status of knowledge and discusses radiobiological mechanisms which may underly the efficacy of EGFR inhibitors combined with irradiation. Materials and methods: Preclinical and clinical results on combined targeting of the EGFR and irradiation from the literature and from this laboratory are reviewed. Focus is given to the radiobiological rationale of this approach and to endpoints of experimental radiotherapy. Results: Overexpression of the EGFR is associated with decreased local tumour control after radiotherapy, especially when the overall treatment time is long. Inhibition of the EGFR either alone or in combination with irradiation decreases the growth rate of tumours expressing this receptor. Preclinical data provide proof-of-principle that local tumour control may be improved by combining irradiation with C225 mAb. In a randomised phase III clinical trial, simultaneous irradiation and treatment with the EGFR antibody Cetuximab (Erbitux[reg]; C225) in head and neck cancer patients resulted in significantly improved locoregional tumour control and survival compared to curative irradiation alone. Acute skin reactions increased in the experimental arm. The underlying mechanisms of enhanced radiation effects of combined EGFR inhibition with irradiation and of the partly conflicting results in different studies are poorly understood. There is increasing evidence, that important intertumoral heterogeneity in the response to EGFR inhibition alone and combined with irradiation exists, which appears to be at least partly dependent on specific mutations of the receptor as well as of molecules that are involved in the intracellular signal transduction pathway. Conclusions and outlook: Further investigations at all levels of the translational research chain exploring the mechanisms of

  13. Advances in Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gregoire, Vincent; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Nuyts, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Over the last few decades, significant improvements have been made in the radiotherapy (RT) treatment of head and neck malignancies. The progressive introduction of intensity-modulated RT and the use of multimodality imaging for target volume and organs at risk delineation, together with the use of

  14. Targeted radiotherapy with 177 Lu-DOTA-TATE in athymic mice with induced pancreatic malignant tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, M. A de; Pedraza L, M.; Rodriguez C, J.; Ferro F, G.; Murphy S, E.

    2006-01-01

    Malignant pancreas tumours induced in athymic mice are a good model for targeted radiotherapy. The objective of this research was to estimate pancreatic tumour absorbed radiation doses and to evaluate 177 Lu-DOTA-TATE as a therapeutic radiopharmaceutical that could be used in humans. AR42J murine pancreas cancer cells, which over-express somatostatin receptors, were injected in athymic mice and 20 days later the mean tumour size was 3.08 square cm (n=3). A mean of 86.3 MBq 177 Lu-DOTA-TATE, was injected in a tail vein and 19 days after therapy the size of the tumours was 0.81 square cm. There was a partial relapse and after 16 days, when sacrificed, the mean tumour size was 8.28 cubic cm. An epithelial and sarcoma mixed tumour in the kidney of one treated mouse was found. The tumour of the control mouse was 8.61 cubic cm when sacrificed 14 days after tumour induction. Radiotherapy estimates to the tumours was 35.9-39.7 Gy and the tumours might have been completely reduced with a second therapy dose. These preliminary studies justify further therapeutic and dosimetry estimations to ensure that Lu- 177 -DOTA-TATE will act as expected in man, considering kidney radiation. (Author)

  15. True Local Recurrence Rate in the Conserved Breast After Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Targeted Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whipp, Elisabeth; Beresford, Mark; Sawyer, Elinor; Halliwell, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Better accuracy of local radiotherapy may substantially improve local control and thus long-term breast cancer survival. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has high resolution and sensitivity in breast tissue and may depict the tumor bed more accurately than conventional planning techniques. A postoperative complex (POCx) comprises all visible changes thought to be related to surgery within the breast and acts as a surrogate for the tumor bed. This study reports on local recurrence rates after MRI-assisted radiotherapy planning to ensure adequate coverage of the POCx. Methods and Materials: Simple opposed tangential fields were defined by surface anatomy in the conventional manner in 221 consecutive patients. After MRI, fields were modified by a single radiation oncologist to ensure encompassment of the POCx with a 10-mm margin. Genetic analysis was performed on all local relapses (LRs) to distinguish true recurrences (TRs) from new primaries (NPs). Results: This was a high risk cohort at 5 years: only 9.5% were classified as low risk (St Gallen): 43.4% were Grade 3 and 19.9% had surgical margins <1 mm; 62.4% of patients received boosts. Adjustments of standard field margins were required in 69%. After a median follow-up of 5 years, there were 3 LRs (1.3%) as the site of first relapse in 221 patients, comprising two TRs (0.9%) and one NP (0.4%). Conclusions: Accurate targeting of the true tumor bed is critical. MRI may better define the tumor bed.

  16. Telemedicine in radiotherapy treatment planning: requirements and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, D.R.; Bruland, O.S.; Davis, B.J.

    2000-01-01

    Telemedicine facilitates decentralized radiotherapy services by allowing remote treatment planning and quality assurance of treatment delivery. A prerequisite is digital storage of relevant data and an efficient and reliable telecommunication system between satellite units and the main radiotherapy clinic. The requirements of a telemedicine system in radiotherapy is influenced by the level of support needed. In this paper we differentiate between three categories of telemedicine support in radiotherapy. Level 1 features video conferencing and display of radiotherapy images and dose plans. Level 2 involves replication of selected data from the radiotherapy database - facilitating remote treatment planning and evaluation. Level 3 includes real-time, remote operations, e.g. target volume delineation and treatment planning performed by the team at the satellite unit under supervision and guidance from more experienced colleagues at the main clinic. (author)

  17. Rule of lymph node metastasis and proper target of postoperative radiotherapy for thoracic esophageal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Zefen; Zhou Zongmei; Lv Jima; Liang Jun; Ou Guangfei; Jin Jing; Song Yongwen; Zhang Shiping; Yin Weibo

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the rule of lymph node metastasis in thoracic esophageal carcinoma, and to study the proper radiation target. Methods: From September 1986 to December 1997,549 patients with esophageal carcinoma who had undergone radical resection were divided into surgery alone group (S,275 patients) or surgery plus radiotherapy group(S + R,274 patients). Radiotherapy was begun 3 to 4 weeks after operation. The radiation target included both supra-clavicular areas and the entire mediastinum. The total dose was 50 Gy in 25 fractions over 5 weeks for the supra-clavicular areas and 60 Gy in 30 fractions over 6 weeks for the entire mediastinum. Results: The 5-year overall survival of patients with lymph node metastasis in one anatomic site and two anatomic sites was 31.5% and 13.9% (P=0.013), respectively. For patients with > 2 positive nodes metastasis receiving surgery alone, the corresponding 5-year survival was 24.8% and 4.9% (P=0.046), respectively. The median number of dissected lymph nodes of the upper-, middle-and lower-segment esophageal carcinoma was 13, 17 and 20, respectively. The rate of metastatic lymph node in the para-esophagus region was the highest(61.5%-64.9%), which was not different among the different primary sites (P=0.922). The anastomotic stoma recurrence rate of the upper-segment esophageal carcinoma was higher than that of the middle- or lower-segment carcinomas (16.7%, 3.1%, and 7.7%, χ 2 =9.02,P<0.05). Conclusions: For the thoracic esophageal carcinoma, the number of anatomic sites of lymph node metastasis is an important factor affecting the survival. The lower rate of lymph node metastasis of the upper segment esophageal carcinoma may be corrected with the less lymph node dissected. The rate of lymph node metastasis in para-esophageal region is not related with the lesion segment. The anastomotic stoma is an important radiotherapy target for upper segment esophageal carcinoma. (authors)

  18. Interobserver variations of target volume delineation and its impact on irradiated volume in accelerated partial breast irradiation with intraoperative interstitial breast implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritu Raj Upreti

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To investigate the interobserver variations in delineation of lumpectomy cavity (LC and clinical target volume (CTV, and its impact on irradiated volume in accelerated partial breast irradiation using intraoperative multicatheter brachytherapy. Material and methods : Delineation of LC and CTV was done by five radiation oncologists on planning computed tomography (CT scans of 20 patients with intraoperative interstitial breast implant. Cavity visualization index (CVI, four-point index ranging from (0 = poor to (3 = excellent was created and assigned by observers for each patient. In total, 200 contours for all observers and 100 treatment plans were evaluated. Spatial concordance (conformity index, CI common , and CIgen, average shift in the center of mass (COM, and ratio of maximum and minimum volumes (V max /V min of LC and CTV were quantified among all observers and statistically analyzed. Variation in active dwell positions (0.5 cm step for each catheter, total reference air kerma (TRAK, volume enclosed by prescription isodose (V100% among observers and its spatial concordance were analyzed. Results : The mean ± SD CI common of LC and CTV was 0.54 ± 0.09, and 0.58 ± 0.08, respectively. Conformity index tends to increase, shift in COM and V max /V min decrease significantly (p < 0.05, as CVI increased. Out of total 309 catheters, 29.8% catheters had no change, 29.8% and 17.5% catheters had variations of 1 and 2 dwell positions (0.5 cm and 1 cm, respectively. 9.3% catheters shown variations ≥ 10 dwell positions (5 cm. The mean ± SD CI common of V100% was 0.75 ± 0.11. The mean observed V max /V min of prescription isodose and TRAK was 1.18 (range, 1.03 to 1.56 and 1.11 (range, 1.03 to 1.35, respectively. Conclusions : Interobserver variability in delineation of target volume was found to be significantly related to CVI. Smaller variability was observed with excellent visualization of LC. Interobserver variations showed dosimetric

  19. Multi-isocenter stereotactic radiotherapy: implications for target dose distributions of systematic and random localization errors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebert, M.A.; Zavgorodni, S.F.; Kendrick, L.A.; Weston, S.; Harper, C.S.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: This investigation examined the effect of alignment and localization errors on dose distributions in stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) with arced circular fields. In particular, it was desired to determine the effect of systematic and random localization errors on multi-isocenter treatments. Methods and Materials: A research version of the FastPlan system from Surgical Navigation Technologies was used to generate a series of SRT plans of varying complexity. These plans were used to examine the influence of random setup errors by recalculating dose distributions with successive setup errors convolved into the off-axis ratio data tables used in the dose calculation. The influence of systematic errors was investigated by displacing isocenters from their planned positions. Results: For single-isocenter plans, it is found that the influences of setup error are strongly dependent on the size of the target volume, with minimum doses decreasing most significantly with increasing random and systematic alignment error. For multi-isocenter plans, similar variations in target dose are encountered, with this result benefiting from the conventional method of prescribing to a lower isodose value for multi-isocenter treatments relative to single-isocenter treatments. Conclusions: It is recommended that the systematic errors associated with target localization in SRT be tracked via a thorough quality assurance program, and that random setup errors be minimized by use of a sufficiently robust relocation system. These errors should also be accounted for by incorporating corrections into the treatment planning algorithm or, alternatively, by inclusion of sufficient margins in target definition

  20. Labelling techniques of biomolecules for targeted radiotherapy final report of a co-ordinated research project 1998-2002

    CERN Document Server

    International Atomic Energ Agency. Vienna

    2003-01-01

    Malignant tumour disease accounts for approximately one third of deaths worldwide. Gastrointestinal adenocarcinomas, prostate and breast cancers are among the most frequently appearing tumours. Radiotherapy is an essential mode of treatment of all cancer patients either alone or in conjunction with other modalities like surgery and chemotherapy. In most cases radiotherapy is given using external radiation sources. It is also possible to administer radiotherapy by specifically localizing radioisotopes emitting particulate radiation in the tumour tissue. This targeted therapy has proved to have several advantages over external beam therapy, notably the possibility of selectively delivering higher radiation doses to the targeted tumour cells and treating multiple metastases. Procedures for therapy of thyroid carcinoma and hyper-thyroidism using radioiodine (131I) introduced about five decades ago, have stood the test of time and are still widely used the world over. In addition to the therapeutic nuclides of the...

  1. Gene network inference and biochemical assessment delineates GPCR pathways and CREB targets in small intestinal neuroendocrine neoplasia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignat Drozdov

    Full Text Available Small intestinal (SI neuroendocrine tumors (NET are increasing in incidence, however little is known about their biology. High throughput techniques such as inference of gene regulatory networks from microarray experiments can objectively define signaling machinery in this disease. Genome-wide co-expression analysis was used to infer gene relevance network in SI-NETs. The network was confirmed to be non-random, scale-free, and highly modular. Functional analysis of gene co-expression modules revealed processes including 'Nervous system development', 'Immune response', and 'Cell-cycle'. Importantly, gene network topology and differential expression analysis identified over-expression of the GPCR signaling regulators, the cAMP synthetase, ADCY2, and the protein kinase A, PRKAR1A. Seven CREB response element (CRE transcripts associated with proliferation and secretion: BEX1, BICD1, CHGB, CPE, GABRB3, SCG2 and SCG3 as well as ADCY2 and PRKAR1A were measured in an independent SI dataset (n = 10 NETs; n = 8 normal preparations. All were up-regulated (p<0.035 with the exception of SCG3 which was not differently expressed. Forskolin (a direct cAMP activator, 10(-5 M significantly stimulated transcription of pCREB and 3/7 CREB targets, isoproterenol (a selective ß-adrenergic receptor agonist and cAMP activator, 10(-5 M stimulated pCREB and 4/7 targets while BIM-53061 (a dopamine D(2 and Serotonin [5-HT(2] receptor agonist, 10(-6 M stimulated 100% of targets as well as pCREB; CRE transcription correlated with the levels of cAMP accumulation and PKA activity; BIM-53061 stimulated the highest levels of cAMP and PKA (2.8-fold and 2.5-fold vs. 1.8-2-fold for isoproterenol and forskolin. Gene network inference and graph topology analysis in SI NETs suggests that SI NETs express neural GPCRs that activate different CRE targets associated with proliferation and secretion. In vitro studies, in a model NET cell system, confirmed that transcriptional

  2. 135La as an auger-electron emitter for targeted internal radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fonslet, Jesper; Lee, Boon Quan; Tran, Thuy A.

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: 135La has favorable nuclear and chemical properties for Auger-based targeted internal radiotherapy. Here we present detailed investigations of the production, emissions, imaging characteristics, and dosimetry related to 135La therapy. Methods and Results: 135La was produced by 16.5 Me....... The generated Auger spectrum was used to recalculate cellular S-factors. Conclusion: 135La was produced with high specific activity, reactivity, radionuclidic purity, and yield. The emission spectrum and the dosimetry are favorable for internal radionuclide therapy. ....... recovered > 98 % of the 135La with an effective molar activity of 70 ±20 GBq/µmol. To better assess cellular and organ dosimetry of this nuclide, we have recalculated the X-ray and Auger emission spectra using a Monte Carlo model accounting for effects of multiple vacancies during the Auger cascade...

  3. Guidelines for primary radiotherapy of patients with prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehmer, Dirk; Maingon, Philippe; Poortmans, Philip; Baron, Marie-Helene; Miralbell, Raymond; Remouchamps, Vincent; Scrase, Christopher; Bossi, Alberto; Bolla, Michel

    2006-01-01

    Background and purposes: The appropriate application of 3-D conformal radiotherapy, intensity modulated radiotherapy or image guided radiotherapy for patients undergoing radiotherapy for prostate cancer requires a standardisation of target delineation as well as clinical quality assurance procedures. Patients and methods: Pathological and imaging studies provide valuable information on tumour extension. In addition, clinical investigations on patient positioning and immobilisation as well as treatment verification data offer an abundance of information. Results: Target volume definitions for different risk groups of prostate cancer patients based on pathological and imaging studies are provided. Available imaging modalities, patient positioning and treatment preparation studies as well as verification procedures are collected from literature studies. These studies are summarised and recommendations are given where appropriate. Conclusions: On behalf of the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Radiation Oncology Group this article presents a common set of recommendations for external beam radiotherapy of patients with prostate cancer

  4. Can FDG-PET assist in radiotherapy target volume definition of metastatic lymph nodes in head-and-neck cancer?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schinagl, D.A.X.; Hoffmann, A.L.; Vogel, W.V.; Dalen, J.A. van; Verstappen, S.M.M.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Kaanders, J.H.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The role of FDG-PET in radiotherapy target volume definition of the neck was evaluated by comparing eight methods of FDG-PET segmentation to the current CT-based practice of lymph node assessment in head-and-neck cancer patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Seventy-eight

  5. Biological evaluation and molecular docking of Rhein as a multi-targeted radiotherapy sensitization agent of nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Zhengying; Tian, Wei; Li, Jing; Wang, Chunmiao; Pan, Zhiyu; Li, Danrong; Hou, Huaxin

    2017-11-01

    Radiation resistance of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is a joint effect caused by complex molecular mechanisms. The development of multi-target radiotherapy sensitization agents offered a promising method for the treatment of NPC. In this work, the probability of Rhein to be a multi-target radiotherapy sensitization agent was explored through computer aid virtual screening by inverse docking study. In order to validate the accuracy of the computational results, radiotherapy sensitization of Rhein to NPC cells and its effects on the expression of target proteins were evaluated separately by CCK8 assay and Western blotting analysis. Our result demonstrated that Rhein possessed strong binding affinity with RAC1 and HSP90. No cytotoxic concentration of Rhein had radiosensitization effect on nasopharyngeal carcinoma CNE1 cells. After treatment with Rhein and 2Gy radiation, the expression of RAC1 upregulated and the expression of HSP90 down-regulated in cells. Based on the above data, Rhein is likely to become an attractive lead compound for the future design of multi-target radiotherapy sensitization agents.

  6. A strategy to objectively evaluate the necessity of correcting detected target deviations in image guided radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yue, Ning J.; Kim, Sung; Jabbour, Salma; Narra, Venkat; Haffty, Bruce G.

    2007-01-01

    Image guided radiotherapy technologies are being increasingly utilized in the treatment of various cancers. These technologies have enhanced the ability to detect temporal and spatial deviations of the target volume relative to planned radiation beams. Correcting these detected deviations may, in principle, improve the accuracy of dose delivery to the target. However, in many situations, a clinical decision has to be made as to whether it is necessary to correct some of the deviations since the relevant dosimetric impact may or may not be significant, and the corresponding corrective action may be either impractical or time consuming. Ideally this decision should be based on objective and reproducible criteria rather than subjective judgment. In this study, a strategy is proposed for the objective evaluation of the necessity of deviation correction during the treatment verification process. At the treatment stage, without any alteration from the planned beams, the treatment beams should provide the desired dose coverage to the geometric volume identical to the planning target volume (PTV). Given this fact, the planned dose distribution and PTV geometry were used to compute the dose coverage and PTV enclosure of the clinical target volume (CTV) that was detected from imaging during the treatment setup verification. The spatial differences between the detected CTV and the planning CTV are essentially the target deviations. The extent of the PTV enclosure of the detected CTV as well as its dose coverage were used as criteria to evaluate the necessity of correcting any of the target deviations. This strategy, in principle, should be applicable to any type of target deviations, including both target deformable and positional changes and should be independent of how the deviations are detected. The proposed strategy was used on two clinical prostate cancer cases. In both cases, gold markers were implanted inside the prostate for the purpose of treatment setup

  7. Locoregional control after intensity-modulated radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma with an anatomy-based target definition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawashima, Mitsuhiko; Ariji, Takaki; Kameoka, Satoru

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate locoregional control after intensity-modulated radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal cancer using a target definition along with anatomical boundaries. Forty patients with biopsy-proven squamous cell or non-keratinizing carcinoma of the nasopharynx who underwent intensity-modulated radiotherapy between April 2006 and November 2009 were reviewed. There were 10 females and 30 males with a median age of 48 years (range, 17-74 years). More than half of the patients had T3/4 (n=21) and/or N2/3 (n=24) disease. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy was administered as 70 Gy/33 fractions with or without concomitant chemotherapy. The clinical target volume was contoured along with muscular fascia or periosteum, and the prescribed radiotherapy dose was determined for each anatomical compartment and lymph node level in the head and neck. One local recurrence was observed at Meckel's cave on the periphery of the high-risk clinical target volume receiving a total dose of <63 Gy. Otherwise, six locoregional failures were observed within irradiated volume receiving 70 Gy. Local and nodal control rates at 3 years were 91 and 89%, respectively. Adverse events were acceptable, and 25 (81%) of 31 patients who were alive without recurrence at 2 years had xerostomia of ≤ Grade 1. The overall survival rate at 3 years was 87%. Target definition along with anatomically defined boundaries was feasible without compromise of the therapeutic ratio. It is worth testing this method further to minimize the unnecessary irradiated volume and to standardize the target definition in intensity-modulated radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal cancer. (author)

  8. Transverse tomography and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leer, J.W.H.

    1982-01-01

    This study was intended to delineate the indications for radiotherapy treatment-planning with the help of computerized axial tomography (C.T.) and transverse analog tomography (T.A.T.). Radiotherapy localisation procedures with the conventional method (simulator), with the CT-scanner and with the transverse analog tomograph (T.A.T., Simtomix, Oldelft) were compared. As criterium for evaluation differences in reconstruction drawing based on these methods were used. A certain method was judged ''superior'' to another if the delineation of the target volume was more accurate, if a better impression was gained of the site of (for irradiation) organs at risk, or if the localisation could only be performed with that method. The selected group of patients consisted of 120 patients for whom a reconstruction drawing in the transverse plane was made according to the treatment philosophy. In this group CT-assisted localisation was judged on 68 occasions superior to the conventional method. In a number of cases it was found that a ''standard'' change in a standard target volume, on the base of augmented anatomical knowledge, made the conventional method sufficient. The use of CT-scanner for treatment planning was estimated. For ca. 270/1000 new patients a CT-scan is helpful (diagnostic scan), for 140 of them the scan is necessary (planning scan). The quality of the anatomical information obtained with the T.A.T. does not yet fall within acceptable limits, but progress has been made. (Auth.)

  9. PET CT Thresholds for Radiotherapy Target Definition in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: How Close are we to the Pathologic Findings?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Kailiang; Ung, Yee C.; Hornby, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Optimal target delineation threshold values for positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) radiotherapy planning is controversial. In this present study, different PET CT threshold values were used for target delineation and then compared pathologically. Methods and Materials: A total of 31 non-small-cell lung cancer patients underwent PET CT before surgery. The maximal diameter (MD) of the pathologic primary tumor was obtained. The CT-based gross tumor volumes (GTV CT ) were delineated for CT window-level thresholds at 1,600 and -300 Hounsfield units (HU) (GTV CT1 ); 1,600 and -400 (GTV CT2 ); 1,600 and -450 HU (GTV CT3 ); 1,600 and -600 HU (GTV CT4 ); 1,200 and -700 HU (GTV CT5 ); 900 and -450 HU (GTV CT6 ); and 700 and -450 HU (GTV CT7 ). The PET-based GTVs (GTV PET ) were autocontoured at 20% (GTV 20 ), 30% (GTV 30 ), 40% (GTV 40 ), 45% (GTV 45 ), 50% (GTV 50 ), and 55% (GTV 55 ) of the maximal intensity level. The MD of each image-based GTV in three-dimensional orientation was determined. The MD of the GTV PET and GTV CT were compared with the pathologically determined MD. Results: The median MD of the GTV CT changed from 2.89 (GTV CT2 ) to 4.46 (GTV CT7 ) as the CT thresholds were varied. The correlation coefficient of the GTV CT compared with the pathologically determined MD ranged from 0.76 to 0.87. The correlation coefficient of the GTV CT1 was the best (r = 0.87). The median MD of GTV PET changed from 5.72cm to 2.67cm as the PET thresholds increased. The correlation coefficient of the GTV PET compared with the pathologic finding ranged from 0.51 to 0.77. The correlation coefficient of GTV 50 was the best (r = 0.77). Conclusion: Compared with the MD of GTV PET , the MD of GTV CT had better correlation with the pathologic MD. The GTV CT1 and GTV 50 had the best correlation with the pathologic results.

  10. Targeted Intraoperative Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer in Patients in Whom External Beam Radiation Is Not Possible

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keshtgar, Mohammed R.S.; Vaidya, Jayant S.; Tobias, Jeffrey S.; Wenz, Frederik; Joseph, David; Stacey, Chris; Metaxas, Marinos G.; Keller, Anke; Corica, Tammy; Williams, Norman R.; Baum, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: External beam radiation therapy (EBRT) following wide local excision of the primary tumor is the standard treatment in early breast cancer. In some circumstances this procedure is not possible or is contraindicated or difficult. The purpose of this study was to determine the safety and efficacy of targeted intraoperative radiotherapy (TARGIT) when EBRT is not feasible. Methods and Materials: We report our experience with TARGIT in three centers (Australia, Germany, and the United Kingdom) between 1999 and 2008. Patients at these centers received a single radiation dose of 20 Gy to the breast tissue in contact with the applicator (or 6 Gy at 1-cm distance), as they could not be given EBRT and were keen to avoid mastectomy. Results: Eighty patients were treated with TARGIT. Reasons for using TARGIT were 21 patients had previously received EBRT, and 31 patients had clinical reasons such as systemic lupus erythematosus, motor neuron disease, Parkinson's disease, ankylosing spondylitis, morbid obesity, and cardiovascular or severe respiratory disease. Three of these patients received percutaneous radiotherapy without surgery; 28 patients were included for compelling personal reasons, usually on compassionate grounds. After a median follow-up of 38 months, only two local recurrences were observed, an annual local recurrence rate of 0.75% (95% confidence interval, 0.09%-2.70%). Conclusions: While we await the results of the randomized trial (over 2,000 patients have already been recruited), TARGIT is an acceptable option but only in highly selected cases that cannot be recruited in the trial and in whom EBRT is not feasible/possible.

  11. Radiotherapy for Brain Metastases From Renal Cell Carcinoma in the Targeted Therapy Era: The University of Rochester Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, James E; Youn, Paul; Peterson, Carl R; Usuki, Kenneth Y; Walter, Kevin A; Okunieff, Paul; Milano, Michael T

    2017-10-01

    Radiotherapy remains the standard approach for brain metastases from renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Kinase inhibitors (KI) have become standard of care for metastatic RCC. They also increase the radiosensitivity of various tumor types in preclinical models. Data are lacking regarding the effect of KIs among RCC patients undergoing radiotherapy for brain metastases. We report our experience of radiotherapy for brain metastatic RCC in the era of targeted therapy and analyzed effects of concurrent KI therapy. We retrospectively analyzed 25 consecutive patients who received radiotherapy for brain metastases from RCC with whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT), stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), or both. Kaplan-Meier rates of overall survival (OS) and brain progression-free survival (BPFS) were calculated and univariate analyses performed. Lower diagnosis-specific graded prognostic assessment (DS-GPA) score and multiple intracranial metastases were associated with decreased OS and BPFS on univariate analysis; DS-GPA is also a prognostic factor on multivariate analysis. There was no significant difference in OS or BPFS for SRS compared with WBRT or WBRT and SRS combined. The concurrent use of KI was not associated with any change in OS or BPFS. This hypothesis-generating analysis suggests among patients with brain metastatic RCC treated with the most current therapies, those selected to undergo SRS did not experience significantly different survival or control outcomes than those selected to undergo WBRT. From our experience to date, limited in patient numbers, there seems to be neither harm nor benefit in using concurrent KI therapy during radiotherapy. Given that most patients progress systemically, we would recommend considering KI use during brain radiotherapy in these patients.

  12. Target position uncertainty during visually guided deep-inspiration breath-hold radiotherapy in locally advanced lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rydhog, Jonas Scherman; de Blanck, Steen Riisgaard; Josipovic, Mirjana

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to estimate the uncertainty in voluntary deep-inspiration breath hold (DISH) radiotherapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients.Methods: Perpendicular fluoroscopic movies were acquired in free breathing (FB) and DIBH during a course...... of visually guided DIBH radiotherapy of nine patients with NSCLC. Patients had liquid markers injected in mediastinal lymph nodes and primary tumours. Excursion, systematic- and random errors, and inter-breath-hold position uncertainty were investigated using an image based tracking algorithm.Results: A mean...... small in visually guided breath-hold radiotherapy of NSCLC. Target motion could be substantially reduced, but not eliminated, using visually guided DIBH. (C) 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  13. Internal dosimetry through GATE simulations of preclinical radiotherapy using a melanin-targeting ligand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrot, Y; Donnarieix, D; Maigne, L; Degoul, F; Auzeloux, P; Bonnet, M; Cachin, F; Chezal, J M; Labarre, P; Moins, N; Papon, J; Rbah-Vidal, L; Vidal, A; Miot-Noirault, E

    2014-01-01

    The GATE Monte Carlo simulation platform based on the Geant4 toolkit is under constant improvement for dosimetric calculations. In this study, we explore its use for the dosimetry of the preclinical targeted radiotherapy of melanoma using a new specific melanin-targeting radiotracer labeled with iodine 131. Calculated absorbed fractions and S values for spheres and murine models (digital and CT-scan-based mouse phantoms) are compared between GATE and EGSnrc Monte Carlo codes considering monoenergetic electrons and the detailed energy spectrum of iodine 131. The behavior of Geant4 standard and low energy models is also tested. Following the different authors’ guidelines concerning the parameterization of electron physics models, this study demonstrates an agreement of 1.2% and 1.5% with EGSnrc, respectively, for the calculation of S values for small spheres and mouse phantoms. S values calculated with GATE are then used to compute the dose distribution in organs of interest using the activity distribution in mouse phantoms. This study gives the dosimetric data required for the translation of the new treatment to the clinic. (paper)

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Based Target Volume Delineation in Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning for Brain Tumors Using Localized Region-Based Active Contour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aslian, Hossein [Department of Medical Radiation, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sadeghi, Mahdi [Agricultural, Medical and Industrial Research School, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahdavi, Seied Rabie [Department of Medical Physics, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Babapour Mofrad, Farshid [Department of Medical Radiation, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Astarakee, Mahdi, E-mail: M-Astarakee@Engineer.com [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khaledi, Navid [Department of Medical Radiation, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fadavi, Pedram [Department of Radiation Oncology, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical application of a robust semiautomatic image segmentation method to determine the brain target volumes in radiation therapy treatment planning. Methods and Materials: A local robust region-based algorithm was used on MRI brain images to study the clinical target volume (CTV) of several patients. First, 3 oncologists delineated CTVs of 10 patients manually, and the process time for each patient was calculated. The averages of the oncologists’ contours were evaluated and considered as reference contours. Then, to determine the CTV through the semiautomatic method, a fourth oncologist who was blind to all manual contours selected 4-8 points around the edema and defined the initial contour. The time to obtain the final contour was calculated again for each patient. Manual and semiautomatic segmentation were compared using 3 different metric criteria: Dice coefficient, Hausdorff distance, and mean absolute distance. A comparison also was performed between volumes obtained from semiautomatic and manual methods. Results: Manual delineation processing time of tumors for each patient was dependent on its size and complexity and had a mean (±SD) of 12.33 ± 2.47 minutes, whereas it was 3.254 ± 1.7507 minutes for the semiautomatic method. Means of Dice coefficient, Hausdorff distance, and mean absolute distance between manual contours were 0.84 ± 0.02, 2.05 ± 0.66 cm, and 0.78 ± 0.15 cm, and they were 0.82 ± 0.03, 1.91 ± 0.65 cm, and 0.7 ± 0.22 cm between manual and semiautomatic contours, respectively. Moreover, the mean volume ratio (=semiautomatic/manual) calculated for all samples was 0.87. Conclusions: Given the deformability of this method, the results showed reasonable accuracy and similarity to the results of manual contouring by the oncologists. This study shows that the localized region-based algorithms can have great ability in determining the CTV and can be appropriate alternatives for manual approaches in brain cancer.

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Based Target Volume Delineation in Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning for Brain Tumors Using Localized Region-Based Active Contour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslian, Hossein; Sadeghi, Mahdi; Mahdavi, Seied Rabie; Babapour Mofrad, Farshid; Astarakee, Mahdi; Khaledi, Navid; Fadavi, Pedram

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical application of a robust semiautomatic image segmentation method to determine the brain target volumes in radiation therapy treatment planning. Methods and Materials: A local robust region-based algorithm was used on MRI brain images to study the clinical target volume (CTV) of several patients. First, 3 oncologists delineated CTVs of 10 patients manually, and the process time for each patient was calculated. The averages of the oncologists’ contours were evaluated and considered as reference contours. Then, to determine the CTV through the semiautomatic method, a fourth oncologist who was blind to all manual contours selected 4-8 points around the edema and defined the initial contour. The time to obtain the final contour was calculated again for each patient. Manual and semiautomatic segmentation were compared using 3 different metric criteria: Dice coefficient, Hausdorff distance, and mean absolute distance. A comparison also was performed between volumes obtained from semiautomatic and manual methods. Results: Manual delineation processing time of tumors for each patient was dependent on its size and complexity and had a mean (±SD) of 12.33 ± 2.47 minutes, whereas it was 3.254 ± 1.7507 minutes for the semiautomatic method. Means of Dice coefficient, Hausdorff distance, and mean absolute distance between manual contours were 0.84 ± 0.02, 2.05 ± 0.66 cm, and 0.78 ± 0.15 cm, and they were 0.82 ± 0.03, 1.91 ± 0.65 cm, and 0.7 ± 0.22 cm between manual and semiautomatic contours, respectively. Moreover, the mean volume ratio (=semiautomatic/manual) calculated for all samples was 0.87. Conclusions: Given the deformability of this method, the results showed reasonable accuracy and similarity to the results of manual contouring by the oncologists. This study shows that the localized region-based algorithms can have great ability in determining the CTV and can be appropriate alternatives for manual approaches in brain cancer

  16. Delineation of the primary tumour Clinical Target Volumes (CTV-P) in laryngeal, hypopharyngeal, oropharyngeal and oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma: AIRO, CACA, DAHANCA, EORTC, GEORCC, GORTEC, HKNPCSG, HNCIG, IAG-KHT, LPRHHT, NCIC CTG, NCRI, NRG Oncology, PHNS, SBRT, SOMERA, SRO, SSHNO, TROG consensus guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grégoire, Vincent; Evans, Mererid; Le, Quynh-Thu; Bourhis, Jean; Budach, Volker; Chen, Amy; Eisbruch, Abraham; Feng, Mei; Giralt, Jordi; Gupta, Tejpal; Hamoir, Marc; Helito, Juliana K; Hu, Chaosu; Hunter, Keith; Johansen, Jorgen; Kaanders, Johannes; Laskar, Sarbani Ghosh; Lee, Anne; Maingon, Philippe; Mäkitie, Antti; Micciche', Francesco; Nicolai, Piero; O'Sullivan, Brian; Poitevin, Adela; Porceddu, Sandro; Składowski, Krzysztof; Tribius, Silke; Waldron, John; Wee, Joseph; Yao, Min; Yom, Sue S; Zimmermann, Frank; Grau, Cai

    2018-01-01

    Few studies have reported large inter-observer variations in target volume selection and delineation in patients treated with radiotherapy for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Consensus guidelines have been published for the neck nodes (see Grégoire et al., 2003, 2014), but such recommendations are lacking for primary tumour delineation. For the latter, two main schools of thoughts are prevailing, one based on geometric expansion of the Gross Tumour Volume (GTV) as promoted by DAHANCA, and the other one based on anatomical expansion of the GTV using compartmentalization of head and neck anatomy. For each anatomic location within the larynx, hypopharynx, oropharynx and oral cavity, and for each T-stage, the DAHANCA proposal has been comprehensively reviewed and edited to include anatomic knowledge into the geometric Clinical Target Volume (CTV) delineation concept. A first proposal was put forward by the leading authors of this publication (VG and CG) and discussed with opinion leaders in head and neck radiation oncology from Europe, Asia, Australia/New Zealand, North America and South America to reach a worldwide consensus. This consensus proposes two CTVs for the primary tumour, the so called CTV-P1 and CVT-P2, corresponding to a high and lower tumour burden, and which should be associated with a high and a lower dose prescription, respectively. Implementation of these guidelines in the daily practice of radiation oncology should contribute to reduce treatment variations from clinicians to clinicians, facilitate the conduct of multi-institutional clinical trials, and contribute to improved care of patients with head and neck carcinoma. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Automatic definition of targeted biological volumes for the radiotherapy applications; Definition automatique des volumes biologiques cibles pour les applications de radiotherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatt, M.; Visvikis, D. [LaTIM, U650 Inserm, 29 - Brest (France); Cheze-Le-Rest, C. [Service de medecine nucleaire, 29 - Brest (France); Pradier, O. [Service de radiotherapie, 29 - Brest (France)

    2009-10-15

    The proposed method: Fuzzy locally adaptive Bayesian (F.L.A.B.) showed its reliability and its precision on very complete collection of realistic simulated and real data. Its use in the context of radiotherapy allows to consider easily the studies implementation and scenari of dose painting or dose escalation, including in complex cases of heterogenous fixations. It is conceivable to apply F.L.A.B. on PET images with F.M.I.S.O. ({sup 18}F fluoro misonidazole) or F.L.T. (fluoro-L-thymidine) to complete the definition of the biological target volume. (N.C.)

  18. Targeted intraoperative radiotherapy tumour bed boost during breast-conserving surgery after neoadjuvant chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolberg, Hans-Christian; Akpolat-Basci, Leyla; Stephanou, Miltiades [Marienhospital Bottrop gGmbH, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Bottrop (Germany); Loevey, Gyoergy [BORAD, Bottrop (Germany); Fasching, Peter A. [University of Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Untch, Michael [Helios Klinikum Berlin-Buch, Berlin (Germany); Liedtke, Cornelia [University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein/Campus Luebeck, Luebeck (Germany); Bulsara, Max [University of Notre Dame, Fremantle (Australia); University College, London (United Kingdom); Vaidya, Jayant S. [University College, London (United Kingdom)

    2017-01-15

    The use of targeted intraoperative radiotherapy (TARGIT-IORT) as a tumour bed boost during breast-conserving surgery (BCS) for breast cancer has been reported since 1998. We present its use in patients undergoing breast conservation following neoadjuvant therapy (NACT). In this retrospective study involving 116 patients after NACT we compared outcomes of 61 patients who received a tumour bed boost with IORT during lumpectomy versus 55 patients treated in the previous 13 months with external (EBRT) boost. All patients received whole breast radiotherapy. Local recurrence-free survival (LRFS), disease-free survival (DFS), distant disease-free survival (DDFS), breast cancer mortality (BCM), non-breast cancer mortality (NBCM) and overall mortality (OS) were compared. Median follow up was 49 months. The differences in LRFS, DFS and BCM were not statistically significant. The 5-year Kaplan-Meier estimate of OS was significantly better by 15% with IORT: IORT 2 events (96.7%, 95%CI 87.5-99.2), EBRT 9 events (81.7%, 95%CI 67.6-90.1), hazard ratio (HR) 0.19 (0.04-0.87), log rank p = 0.016, mainly due to a reduction of 10.1% in NBCM: IORT 100%, EBRT 89.9% (77.3-95.7), HR (not calculable), log rank p = 0.015. The DDFS was as follows: IORT 3 events (95.1%, 85.5-98.4), EBRT 12 events (69.0%, 49.1-82.4), HR 0.23 (0.06-0.80), log rank p = 0.012. IORT during lumpectomy after neoadjuvant chemotherapy as a tumour bed boost appears to give results that are not worse than external beam radiotherapy boost. These data give further support to the inclusion of such patients in the TARGIT-B (boost) randomised trial that is testing whether IORT boost is superior to EBRT boost. (orig.) [German] Die intraoperative Radiotherapie (TARGIT-IORT) als vorgezogener Boost im Rahmen der brusterhaltenden Therapie (BET) ist seit 1998 Gegenstand der wissenschaftlichen Diskussion. Wir praesentieren Daten zum Einsatz der IORT bei der BET nach neoadjuvanter Therapie (NACT). In diese retrospektive Analyse

  19. Clinicopathologic Analysis of Microscopic Extension in Lung Adenocarcinoma: Defining Clinical Target Volume for Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grills, Inga S.; Fitch, Dwight L.; Goldstein, Neal S.; Yan Di; Chmielewski, Gary W.; Welsh, Robert J.; Kestin, Larry L.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the gross tumor volume (GTV) to clinical target volume margin for non-small-cell lung cancer treatment planning. Methods: A total of 35 patients with Stage T1N0 adenocarcinoma underwent wedge resection plus immediate lobectomy. The gross tumor size and microscopic extension distance beyond the gross tumor were measured. The nuclear grade and percentage of bronchoalveolar features were analyzed for association with microscopic extension. The gross tumor dimensions were measured on a computed tomography (CT) scan (lung and mediastinal windows) and compared with the pathologic dimensions. The potential coverage of microscopic extension for two different lung stereotactic radiotherapy regimens was evaluated. Results: The mean microscopic extension distance beyond the gross tumor was 7.2 mm and varied according to grade (10.1, 7.0, and 3.5 mm for Grade 1 to 3, respectively, p < 0.01). The 90th percentile for microscopic extension was 12.0 mm (13.0, 9.7, and 4.4 mm for Grade 1 to 3, respectively). The CT lung windows correlated better with the pathologic size than did the mediastinal windows (gross pathologic size overestimated by a mean of 5.8 mm; composite size [gross plus microscopic extension] underestimated by a mean of 1.2 mm). For a GTV contoured on the CT lung windows, the margin required to cover microscopic extension for 90% of the cases would be 9 mm (9, 7, and 4 mm for Grade 1 to 3, respectively). The potential microscopic extension dosimetric coverage (55 Gy) varied substantially between the stereotactic radiotherapy schedules. Conclusion: For lung adenocarcinomas, the GTV should be contoured using CT lung windows. Although a GTV based on the CT lung windows would underestimate the gross tumor size plus microscopic extension by only 1.2 mm for the average case, the clinical target volume expansion required to cover the microscopic extension in 90% of cases could be as large as 9 mm, although considerably smaller for high-grade tumors

  20. Aspen Delineation - Aspen Delineation Project [ds362

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — The database represents delineations of aspen stands, where aspen assessment data was gathered. Aspen assessment information corresponding to this polygon layer can...

  1. Persistent pain after targeted intraoperative radiotherapy (TARGIT) or external breast radiotherapy for breast cancer: A randomized trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kenneth Geving; Gärtner, Rune; Kroman, Niels

    2012-01-01

    for participation, and a total of 244 patients were included and received a detailed questionnaire. The response rate was 98%, leaving 238 patients for the final analysis. Pain prevalence were 33.9% in the EBRT group and 24.6% in the IORT group (p = 0.11). Treatment with IORT may not alter the risk of PPBCT.......Persistent pain after breast cancer treatment (PPBCT) affects between 25 and 60% of patients depending on surgical and adjuvant treatment. External breast radiotherapy (EBRT) has been shown to be a riskfactor for PPBCT, raising the question whether intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT), with its...... smaller radiation field may reduce the development of PPBCT. Using data from the TARGIT-A trial, the aim of this study was to compare these two treatments with regard to development of PPBCT. A total of 281 patients enrolled in the TARGIT-A trial from the Copenhagen University Hospitals was screened...

  2. Deep Learning Algorithm for Auto-Delineation of High-Risk Oropharyngeal Clinical Target Volumes With Built-In Dice Similarity Coefficient Parameter Optimization Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardenas, Carlos E; McCarroll, Rachel E; Court, Laurence E; Elgohari, Baher A; Elhalawani, Hesham; Fuller, Clifton D; Kamal, Mona J; Meheissen, Mohamed A M; Mohamed, Abdallah S R; Rao, Arvind; Williams, Bowman; Wong, Andrew; Yang, Jinzhong; Aristophanous, Michalis

    2018-06-01

    Automating and standardizing the contouring of clinical target volumes (CTVs) can reduce interphysician variability, which is one of the largest sources of uncertainty in head and neck radiation therapy. In addition to using uniform margin expansions to auto-delineate high-risk CTVs, very little work has been performed to provide patient- and disease-specific high-risk CTVs. The aim of the present study was to develop a deep neural network for the auto-delineation of high-risk CTVs. Fifty-two oropharyngeal cancer patients were selected for the present study. All patients were treated at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center from January 2006 to August 2010 and had previously contoured gross tumor volumes and CTVs. We developed a deep learning algorithm using deep auto-encoders to identify physician contouring patterns at our institution. These models use distance map information from surrounding anatomic structures and the gross tumor volume as input parameters and conduct voxel-based classification to identify voxels that are part of the high-risk CTV. In addition, we developed a novel probability threshold selection function, based on the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC), to improve the generalization of the predicted volumes. The DSC-based function is implemented during an inner cross-validation loop, and probability thresholds are selected a priori during model parameter optimization. We performed a volumetric comparison between the predicted and manually contoured volumes to assess our model. The predicted volumes had a median DSC value of 0.81 (range 0.62-0.90), median mean surface distance of 2.8 mm (range 1.6-5.5), and median 95th Hausdorff distance of 7.5 mm (range 4.7-17.9) when comparing our predicted high-risk CTVs with the physician manual contours. These predicted high-risk CTVs provided close agreement to the ground-truth compared with current interobserver variability. The predicted contours could be implemented clinically, with only

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging and conformal radiotherapy: Characterization of MRI alone simulation for conformal radiotherapy. Development and evaluation of an automatic volumes of interest segmentation tool for prostate cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasquier, David

    2006-01-01

    Radiotherapy is a curative treatment of malignant tumours. Radiotherapy techniques considerably evolved last years with the increasing integration of medical images in conformal radiotherapy. This technique makes it possible to elaborate a complex ballistics conforming to target volume and sparing healthy tissues. The examination currently used to delineate volumes of interest is Computed Tomography (CT), on account of its geometrical precision and the information that it provides on electronic densities needed to dose calculation. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) ensures a more precise delineation of target volumes in many locations, such as pelvis and brain. For pelvic tumours, the use of MRI needs image registration, which complicates treatment planning and poses the problem of the lack of in vivo standard method of validation. The obstacles in the use of MRI alone in treatment planning were evaluated. Neither geometrical distortion linked with the system and the patient nor the lack of information on electronic densities represent stumbling obstacles. Distortion remained low even in edge of large field of view on modern machines. The assignment of electronic densities to bone structures and soft tissues in MR images permitted to obtain equivalent dosimetry to that carried out on the original CT, with a good reproducibility and homogeneous distribution within target volume. The assignment of electronic densities could not be carried out using 20 MV photons and suitable ballistics. The development of Image Guided Radiotherapy could facilitate the use of MRI alone in treatment planning. Target volumes and organ at risk delineation is a time consuming task in radiotherapy planning. We took part in the development and evaluated a method of automatic and semi automatic delineation of volumes of interest from MRI images for prostate cancer radiotherapy. For prostate and organ at risk automatic delineation an organ model-based method and a seeded region growing method

  4. Assessment of various strategies for 18F-FET PET-guided delineation of target volumes in high-grade glioma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vees, Hansjörg; Senthamizhchelvan, Srinivasan; Miralbell, Raymond; Weber, Damien C; Ratib, Osman; Zaidi, Habib

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of the study is to assess the contribution of (18)F-fluoro-ethyl-tyrosine ((18)F-FET) positron emission tomography (PET) in the delineation of gross tumor volume (GTV) in patients with high-grade gliomas compared with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) alone. The study population consisted of 18 patients with high-grade gliomas. Seven image segmentation techniques were used to delineate (18)F-FET PET GTVs, and the results were compared to the manual MRI-derived GTV (GTV(MRI)). PET image segmentation techniques included manual delineation of contours (GTV(man)), a 2.5 standardized uptake value (SUV) cutoff (GTV(2.5)), a fixed threshold of 40% and 50% of the maximum signal intensity (GTV(40%) and GTV(50%)), signal-to-background ratio (SBR)-based adaptive thresholding (GTV(SBR)), gradient find (GTV(GF)), and region growing (GTV(RG)). Overlap analysis was also conducted to assess geographic mismatch between the GTVs delineated using the different techniques. Contours defined using GTV(2.5) failed to provide successful delineation technically in three patients (18% of cases) as SUV(max) segmentation algorithm is crucial, since it impacts both the volume and shape of the resulting GTV. The 2.5 SUV isocontour and GF segmentation techniques performed poorly and should not be used for GTV delineation. With adequate setting, the SBR-based PET technique may add considerably to conventional MRI-guided GTV delineation.

  5. Targeted radiotherapy with 177 Lu-DOTA-TATE in athymic mice with induced pancreatic malignant tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez C, J.; Murphy, C.A. de; Pedraza L, M.; Ferro F, G.; Murphy S, E.

    2006-01-01

    Malignant pancreas tumours induced in athymic mice are a good model for peptide receptor targeted radiotherapy. The objective of this research was to estimate pancreatic tumour absorbed radiation doses after administration of 177 Lu-DOTA-TATE in mice as a therapeutic radiopharmaceutical that could be used in humans. AR42J murine pancreas cancer cells expressing somatostatin receptors, were implanted in athymic mice (n=18) to obtain the 177 Lu-DOTA-TATE biokinetics and dosimetry. To estimate its therapeutic efficacy 87 MBq were injected in a tail vein of 3 mice and 19 days p.i. there were a partial relapse. There was an epithelial and sarcoma mixed tumour in the kidneys of mouse III. The absorbed dose to tumour, kidney and pancreas was 50.5 ± 7.2 Gy, 17.5 ± 2.5 Gy and 12.6 ± 2.3 Gy respectively. These studies justify further therapeutic and dosimetry estimations to ensure that 177 Lu-DOTA-TATE will act as expected in man considering its kidney radiotoxicity. (Author)

  6. 135La as an Auger-electron emitter for targeted internal radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonslet, J.; Lee, B. Q.; Tran, T. A.; Siragusa, M.; Jensen, M.; Kibédi, T.; E Stuchbery, A.; Severin, G. W.

    2018-01-01

    135La has favorable nuclear and chemical properties for Auger-based targeted internal radiotherapy. Here we present detailed investigations of the production, emissions, and dosimetry related to 135La therapy. 135La was produced by 16.5 MeV proton irradiation of metallic natBa on a medical cyclotron, and was isolated and purified by trap-and-release on weak cation-exchange resin. The average production rate was 407  ±  19 MBq µA-1 (saturation activity), and the radionuclidic purity was 98% at 20 h post irradiation. Chemical separation recovered  >  98 % of the 135La with an effective molar activity of 70  ±  20 GBq µmol-1. To better assess cellular and organ dosimetry of this nuclide, we have calculated the x-ray and Auger emission spectra using a Monte Carlo model accounting for effects of multiple vacancies during the Auger cascade. The generated Auger spectrum was used to calculate cellular S-factors. 135La was produced with high specific activity, reactivity, radionuclidic purity, and yield. The emission spectrum and the dosimetry are favorable for internal radionuclide therapy.

  7. Targeted radiotherapy of osteosarcoma using 153Sm-EDTMP. A new promising approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruland, Oe.S.; Skretting, A.; Solheim, Oe.P.; Aas, M.

    1996-01-01

    We report a case where targeted radionuclide therapy using 153 Sm-EDTMP gave substantial palliative effect. A 35-year-old male with a primary osteosarcoma located in the first lumbar vertebra relapsed with progressive back pain after conventional treatment modalities had failed. He became bedridden, and developed paraparesis and impaired bladder function. On a diagnostic bone-scan intense radioactivity was localized in the tumor. He therefore was given 153 Sm-EDTMP treatment twice, 8 weeks apart, 35 and 32 MBq/kg body weight respectively. After a few days the pain was significantly relieved and by the second radionuclide treatment the pareses subsided. For six months he was able to be up and about without any neurological signs or detectable metastases. Eventually, however, he experienced increasing local pain, developed paraparesis, was re-operated but died 4 months later. The dramatic transient improvement observed in this case warrants further exploration using 153 Sm-EDTMP as a boost technique, supplementary to conventiontal external radiotherapy. (orig.)

  8. Targeted radiotherapy of osteosarcoma using {sup 153}Sm-EDTMP. A new promising approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruland, Oe.S. [Dept. of Medical Oncology and Radiotherapy, Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Skretting, A. [Dept. of Medical Physics and Technology, Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Solheim, Oe.P. [Dept. of Medical Oncology and Radiotherapy, Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Aas, M. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo (Norway)

    1996-10-01

    We report a case where targeted radionuclide therapy using {sup 153}Sm-EDTMP gave substantial palliative effect. A 35-year-old male with a primary osteosarcoma located in the first lumbar vertebra relapsed with progressive back pain after conventional treatment modalities had failed. He became bedridden, and developed paraparesis and impaired bladder function. On a diagnostic bone-scan intense radioactivity was localized in the tumor. He therefore was given {sup 153}Sm-EDTMP treatment twice, 8 weeks apart, 35 and 32 MBq/kg body weight respectively. After a few days the pain was significantly relieved and by the second radionuclide treatment the pareses subsided. For six months he was able to be up and about without any neurological signs or detectable metastases. Eventually, however, he experienced increasing local pain, developed paraparesis, was re-operated but died 4 months later. The dramatic transient improvement observed in this case warrants further exploration using {sup 153}Sm-EDTMP as a boost technique, supplementary to conventiontal external radiotherapy. (orig.).

  9. Preliminary estimation of minimum target dose in intracavitary radiotherapy for cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohara, Kiyoshi; Oishi-Tanaka, Yumiko; Sugahara, Shinji; Itai, Yuji [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Clinical Medicine

    2001-08-01

    In intracavitary radiotherapy (ICRT) for cervical cancer, minimum target dose (D{sub min}) will pertain to local disease control more directly than will reference point A dose (D{sub A}). However, ICRT has been performed traditionally without specifying D{sub min} since the target volume was not identified. We have estimated D{sub min} retrospectively by identifying tumors using magnetic resonance (MR) images. Pre- and posttreatment MR images of 31 patients treated with high-dose-rate ICRT were used. ICRT was performed once weekly at 6.0 Gy D{sub A}, and involved 2-5 insertions for each patient, 119 insertions in total. D{sub min} was calculated arbitrarily simply at the point A level using the tumor width (W{sub A}) to compare with D{sub A}. W{sub A} at each insertion was estimated by regression analysis with pre- and posttreatment W{sub A}. D{sub min} for each insertion varied from 3.0 to 46.0 Gy, a 16-fold difference. The ratio of total D{sub min} to total D{sub A} for each patient varied from 0.5 to 6.5. Intrapatient D{sub min} difference between the initial insertion and final insertion varied from 1.1 to 3.4. Preliminary estimation revealed that D{sub min} varies widely under generic dose prescription. Thorough D{sub min} specification will be realized when ICRT-applicator insertion is performed under MR imaging. (author)

  10. The Role of Seminal Vesicle Motion in Target Margin Assessment for Online Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Jian; Wu Qiuwen; Yan Di

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: For patients with intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancer, the seminal vesicles (SVs) are included in the clinical target volume (CTV). The purposes of this study are to investigate interfraction motion characteristics of the SVs and determine proper margins for online computed tomography image guidance. Methods and Materials: Twenty-four patients, each with 16 daily helical computed tomography scans, were included in this study. A binary image mask was used for image registration to determine daily organ motion. Two online image-guided radiotherapy strategies (prostate only and prostate + SVs) were simulated in a hypofractionated scheme. Three margin designs were studied for both three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). In prostate-only guidance, Margin A was uniformly applied to the whole CTV, and Margin B was applied to the SVs with a fixed 3-mm prostate margin. In prostate plus SV guidance, Margin C was uniformly applied to the CTV. The minimum margins were sought to satisfy the criterion that minimum cumulative CTV dose be more than those of the planning target volume in the plan for greater than 95% of patients. Results: The prostate and SVs move significantly more in the anterior-posterior and superior-inferior than right-left directions. The anterior-posterior motion of the prostate and SVs correlated (R 2 = 0.7). The SVs move significantly more than the prostate. The minimum margins found were 2.5 mm for three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and 4.5, 4.5, and 3.0 mm for Margins A, B, and C for IMRT, respectively. Margins for IMRT were larger, but the irradiated volume and doses to critical structures were smaller. Minimum margins of 4.5 mm to the SVs and 3 mm to the prostate are recommended for IMRT with prostate-only guidance. Conclusions: The SVs move independently from the prostate gland, and additional margins are necessary for image-guided radiotherapy

  11. Sphere of equivalence--a novel target volume concept for intraoperative radiotherapy using low-energy X rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herskind, Carsten; Griebel, Jürgen; Kraus-Tiefenbacher, Uta; Wenz, Frederik

    2008-12-01

    Accelerated partial breast radiotherapy with low-energy photons from a miniature X-ray machine is undergoing a randomized clinical trial (Targeted Intra-operative Radiation Therapy [TARGIT]) in a selected subgroup of patients treated with breast-conserving surgery. The steep radial dose gradient implies reduced tumor cell control with increasing depth in the tumor bed. The purpose was to compare the expected risk of local recurrence in this nonuniform radiation field with that after conventional external beam radiotherapy. The relative biologic effectiveness of low-energy photons was modeled using the linear-quadratic formalism including repair of sublethal lesions during protracted irradiation. Doses of 50-kV X-rays (Intrabeam) were converted to equivalent fractionated doses, EQD2, as function of depth in the tumor bed. The probability of local control was estimated using a logistic dose-response relationship fitted to clinical data from fractionated radiotherapy. The model calculations show that, for a cohort of patients, the increase in local control in the high-dose region near the applicator partly compensates the reduction of local control at greater distances. Thus a "sphere of equivalence" exists within which the risk of recurrence is equal to that after external fractionated radiotherapy. The spatial distribution of recurrences inside this sphere will be different from that after conventional radiotherapy. A novel target volume concept is presented here. The incidence of recurrences arising in the tumor bed around the excised tumor will test the validity of this concept and the efficacy of the treatment. Recurrences elsewhere will have implications for the rationale of TARGIT.

  12. Benchmarking of Monte Carlo simulation of bremsstrahlung from thick targets at radiotherapy energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faddegon, Bruce A.; Asai, Makoto; Perl, Joseph; Ross, Carl; Sempau, Josep; Tinslay, Jane; Salvat, Francesc

    2008-01-01

    Several Monte Carlo systems were benchmarked against published measurements of bremsstrahlung yield from thick targets for 10-30 MV beams. The quantity measured was photon fluence at 1 m per unit energy per incident electron (spectra), and total photon fluence, integrated over energy, per incident electron (photon yield). Results were reported at 10-30 MV on the beam axis for Al and Pb targets and at 15 MV at angles out to 90 degree sign for Be, Al, and Pb targets. Beam energy was revised with improved accuracy of 0.5% using an improved energy calibration of the accelerator. Recently released versions of the Monte Carlo systems EGSNRC, GEANT4, and PENELOPE were benchmarked against the published measurements using the revised beam energies. Monte Carlo simulation was capable of calculation of photon yield in the experimental geometry to 5% out to 30 degree sign , 10% at wider angles, and photon spectra to 10% at intermediate photon energies, 15% at lower energies. Accuracy of measured photon yield from 0 to 30 degree sign was 5%, 1 s.d., increasing to 7% for the larger angles. EGSNRC and PENELOPE results were within 2 s.d. of the measured photon yield at all beam energies and angles, GEANT4 within 3 s.d. Photon yield at nonzero angles for angles covering conventional field sizes used in radiotherapy (out to 10 degree sign ), measured with an accuracy of 3%, was calculated within 1 s.d. of measurement for EGSNRC, 2 s.d. for PENELOPE and GEANT4. Calculated spectra closely matched measurement at photon energies over 5 MeV. Photon spectra near 5 MeV were underestimated by as much as 10% by all three codes. The photon spectra below 2-3 MeV for the Be and Al targets and small angles were overestimated by up to 15% when using EGSNRC and PENELOPE, 20% with GEANT4. EGSNRC results with the NIST option for the bremsstrahlung cross section were preferred over the alternative cross section available in EGSNRC and over EGS4. GEANT4 results calculated with the ''low energy

  13. Method comparison of ultrasound and kilovoltage x-ray fiducial marker imaging for prostate radiotherapy targeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuller, Clifton David; Jr, Charles R Thomas; Schwartz, Scott; Golden, Nanalei; Ting, Joe; Wong, Adrian; Erdogmus, Deniz; Scarbrough, Todd J

    2006-01-01

    Several measurement techniques have been developed to address the capability for target volume reduction via target localization in image-guided radiotherapy; among these have been ultrasound (US) and fiducial marker (FM) software-assisted localization. In order to assess interchangeability between methods, US and FM localization were compared using established techniques for determination of agreement between measurement methods when a 'gold-standard' comparator does not exist, after performing both techniques daily on a sequential series of patients. At least 3 days prior to CT simulation, four gold seeds were placed within the prostate. FM software-assisted localization utilized the ExacTrac X-Ray 6D (BrainLab AG, Germany) kVp x-ray image acquisition system to determine prostate position; US prostate targeting was performed on each patient using the SonArray (Varian, Palo Alto, CA). Patients were aligned daily using laser alignment of skin marks. Directional shifts were then calculated by each respective system in the X, Y and Z dimensions before each daily treatment fraction, previous to any treatment or couch adjustment, as well as a composite vector of displacement. Directional shift agreement in each axis was compared using Altman-Bland limits of agreement, Lin's concordance coefficient with Partik's grading schema, and Deming orthogonal bias-weighted correlation methodology. 1019 software-assisted shifts were suggested by US and FM in 39 patients. The 95% limits of agreement in X, Y and Z axes were ±9.4 mm, ±11.3 mm and ±13.4, respectively. Three-dimensionally, measurements agreed within 13.4 mm in 95% of all paired measures. In all axes, concordance was graded as 'poor' or 'unacceptable'. Deming regression detected proportional bias in both directional axes and three-dimensional vectors. Our data suggest substantial differences between US and FM image-guided measures and subsequent suggested directional shifts. Analysis reveals that the vast majority of

  14. Benchmarking of Monte Carlo simulation of bremsstrahlung from thick targets at radiotherapy energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faddegon, Bruce A.; Asai, Makoto; Perl, Joseph; Ross, Carl; Sempau, Josep; Tinslay, Jane; Salvat, Francesc [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94143 (United States); Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); National Research Council Canada, Institute for National Measurement Standards, 1200 Montreal Road, Building M-36, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada); Institut de Tecniques Energetiques, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya and Centro de Investigacion Biomedica en Red en Bioingenieria, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN), Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Facultat de Fisica (ECM), Universitat de Barcelona, Societat Catalana de Fisica (IEC), Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2008-10-15

    Several Monte Carlo systems were benchmarked against published measurements of bremsstrahlung yield from thick targets for 10-30 MV beams. The quantity measured was photon fluence at 1 m per unit energy per incident electron (spectra), and total photon fluence, integrated over energy, per incident electron (photon yield). Results were reported at 10-30 MV on the beam axis for Al and Pb targets and at 15 MV at angles out to 90 degree sign for Be, Al, and Pb targets. Beam energy was revised with improved accuracy of 0.5% using an improved energy calibration of the accelerator. Recently released versions of the Monte Carlo systems EGSNRC, GEANT4, and PENELOPE were benchmarked against the published measurements using the revised beam energies. Monte Carlo simulation was capable of calculation of photon yield in the experimental geometry to 5% out to 30 degree sign , 10% at wider angles, and photon spectra to 10% at intermediate photon energies, 15% at lower energies. Accuracy of measured photon yield from 0 to 30 degree sign was 5%, 1 s.d., increasing to 7% for the larger angles. EGSNRC and PENELOPE results were within 2 s.d. of the measured photon yield at all beam energies and angles, GEANT4 within 3 s.d. Photon yield at nonzero angles for angles covering conventional field sizes used in radiotherapy (out to 10 degree sign ), measured with an accuracy of 3%, was calculated within 1 s.d. of measurement for EGSNRC, 2 s.d. for PENELOPE and GEANT4. Calculated spectra closely matched measurement at photon energies over 5 MeV. Photon spectra near 5 MeV were underestimated by as much as 10% by all three codes. The photon spectra below 2-3 MeV for the Be and Al targets and small angles were overestimated by up to 15% when using EGSNRC and PENELOPE, 20% with GEANT4. EGSNRC results with the NIST option for the bremsstrahlung cross section were preferred over the alternative cross section available in EGSNRC and over EGS4. GEANT4 results calculated with the &apos

  15. Emergence and present status of Lu-177 in targeted radiotherapy. The Indian scenario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banerjee, S.; Das, T.; Chakraborty, S.; Venkatesh, M. [Bhabha Atomic Reseach Centre, Trombay, Mumbai (India). Radiopharmaceuticals Div.

    2012-07-01

    . In the present article, our research efforts toward standardization of production methodology of {sup 177}Lu in high specific activity and its utilization in the development of agents for targeted radiotherapy are being reported. (orig.)

  16. Optimization of radiotherapy to target volumes with concave outlines: target-dose homogenization and selective sparing of critical structures by constrained matrix inversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colle, C; Van den Berge, D; De Wagter, C; Fortan, L; Van Duyse, B; De Neve, W

    1995-12-01

    The design of 3D-conformal dose distributions for targets with concave outlines is a technical challenge in conformal radiotherapy. For these targets, it is impossible to find beam incidences for which the target volume can be isolated from the tissues at risk. Commonly occurring examples are most thyroid cancers and the targets located at the lower neck and upper mediastinal levels related to some head and neck. A solution to this problem was developed, using beam intensity modulation executed with a multileaf collimator by applying a static beam-segmentation technique. The method includes the definition of beam incidences and beam segments of specific shape as well as the calculation of segment weights. Tests on Sherouse`s GRATISTM planning system allowed to escalate the dose to these targets to 65-70 Gy without exceeding spinal cord tolerance. Further optimization by constrained matrix inversion was investigated to explore the possibility of further dose escalation.

  17. 18F-fluorocholine PET-guided target volume delineation techniques for partial prostate re-irradiation in local recurrent prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Hui; Vees, Hansjoerg; Miralbell, Raymond; Wissmeyer, Michael; Steiner, Charles; Ratib, Osman; Senthamizhchelvan, Srinivasan; Zaidi, Habib

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: We evaluate the contribution of 18 F-choline PET/CT in the delineation of gross tumour volume (GTV) in local recurrent prostate cancer after initial irradiation using various PET image segmentation techniques. Materials and methods: Seventeen patients with local-only recurrent prostate cancer (median = 5.7 years) after initial irradiation were included in the study. Rebiopsies were performed in 10 patients that confirmed the local recurrence. Following injection of 300 MBq of 18 F-fluorocholine, dynamic PET frames (3 min each) were reconstructed from the list-mode acquisition. Five PET image segmentation techniques were used to delineate the 18 F-choline-based GTVs. These included manual delineation of contours (GTV man ) by two teams consisting of a radiation oncologist and a nuclear medicine physician each, a fixed threshold of 40% and 50% of the maximum signal intensity (GTV 40% and GTV 50% ), signal-to-background ratio-based adaptive thresholding (GTV SBR ), and a region growing (GTV RG ) algorithm. Geographic mismatches between the GTVs were also assessed using overlap analysis. Results: Inter-observer variability for manual delineation of GTVs was high but not statistically significant (p = 0.459). In addition, the volumes and shapes of GTVs delineated using semi-automated techniques were significantly higher than those of GTVs defined manually. Conclusions: Semi-automated segmentation techniques for 18 F-choline PET-guided GTV delineation resulted in substantially higher GTVs compared to manual delineation and might replace the latter for determination of recurrent prostate cancer for partial prostate re-irradiation. The selection of the most appropriate segmentation algorithm still needs to be determined.

  18. 18F-fluorocholine PET-guided target volume delineation techniques for partial prostate re-irradiation in local recurrent prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Vees, Hansjörg; Miralbell, Raymond; Wissmeyer, Michael; Steiner, Charles; Ratib, Osman; Senthamizhchelvan, Srinivasan; Zaidi, Habib

    2009-11-01

    We evaluate the contribution of (18)F-choline PET/CT in the delineation of gross tumour volume (GTV) in local recurrent prostate cancer after initial irradiation using various PET image segmentation techniques. Seventeen patients with local-only recurrent prostate cancer (median=5.7 years) after initial irradiation were included in the study. Rebiopsies were performed in 10 patients that confirmed the local recurrence. Following injection of 300 MBq of (18)F-fluorocholine, dynamic PET frames (3 min each) were reconstructed from the list-mode acquisition. Five PET image segmentation techniques were used to delineate the (18)F-choline-based GTVs. These included manual delineation of contours (GTV(man)) by two teams consisting of a radiation oncologist and a nuclear medicine physician each, a fixed threshold of 40% and 50% of the maximum signal intensity (GTV(40%) and GTV(50%)), signal-to-background ratio-based adaptive thresholding (GTV(SBR)), and a region growing (GTV(RG)) algorithm. Geographic mismatches between the GTVs were also assessed using overlap analysis. Inter-observer variability for manual delineation of GTVs was high but not statistically significant (p=0.459). In addition, the volumes and shapes of GTVs delineated using semi-automated techniques were significantly higher than those of GTVs defined manually. Semi-automated segmentation techniques for (18)F-choline PET-guided GTV delineation resulted in substantially higher GTVs compared to manual delineation and might replace the latter for determination of recurrent prostate cancer for partial prostate re-irradiation. The selection of the most appropriate segmentation algorithm still needs to be determined.

  19. Assessment of various strategies for 18F-FET PET-guided delineation of target volumes in high-grade glioma patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vees, Hansjoerg; Senthamizhchelvan, Srinivasan; Ratib, Osman; Miralbell, Raymond; Weber, Damien C.; Zaidi, Habib

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to assess the contribution of 18 F-fluoro-ethyl-tyrosine ( 18 F-FET) positron emission tomography (PET) in the delineation of gross tumor volume (GTV) in patients with high-grade gliomas compared with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) alone. The study population consisted of 18 patients with high-grade gliomas. Seven image segmentation techniques were used to delineate 18 F-FET PET GTVs, and the results were compared to the manual MRI-derived GTV (GTV MRI ). PET image segmentation techniques included manual delineation of contours (GTV man ), a 2.5 standardized uptake value (SUV) cutoff (GTV 2.5 ), a fixed threshold of 40% and 50% of the maximum signal intensity (GTV 40% and GTV 50% ), signal-to-background ratio (SBR)-based adaptive thresholding (GTV SBR ), gradient find (GTV GF ), and region growing (GTV RG ). Overlap analysis was also conducted to assess geographic mismatch between the GTVs delineated using the different techniques. Contours defined using GTV 2.5 failed to provide successful delineation technically in three patients (18% of cases) as SUV max MRI (67% of cases). Yet, PET detected frequently tumors that are not visible on MRI and added substantially tumor extension outside the GTV MRI in six patients (33% of cases). The selection of the most appropriate 18 F-FET PET-based segmentation algorithm is crucial, since it impacts both the volume and shape of the resulting GTV. The 2.5 SUV isocontour and GF segmentation techniques performed poorly and should not be used for GTV delineation. With adequate setting, the SBR-based PET technique may add considerably to conventional MRI-guided GTV delineation. (orig.)

  20. A strategy to correct for intrafraction target translation in conformal prostate radiotherapy: Simulation results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keall, P. J.; Lauve, A. D.; Hagan, M. P.; Siebers, J. V.

    2007-01-01

    A strategy is proposed in which intrafraction internal target translation is corrected for by repositioning the multileaf collimator position aperture to conform to the new target pose in the beam projection, and the beam monitor units are adjusted to account for the change in the geometric relationship between the target and the beam. The purpose of this study was to investigate the dosimetric stability of the prostate and critical structures in the presence of internal target translation using the dynamic compensation strategy. Twenty-five previously treated prostate cancer patients were replanned using a four-field conformal technique to deliver 72 Gy to 95% of the planning target volume (PTV). Internal translation was introduced by displacing the prostate PTV (no rotation or deformation was considered). Thirty-six randomly selected isotropic displacements of magnitude 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 cm were sampled for each patient, for a total of 3600 errors. Due to their anatomic relation to the prostate, the rectum and bladder contours were also moved with the same magnitude and direction as the prostate. The dynamic compensation strategy was used to correct each of these errors by conforming the beam apertures to the new target pose and adjusting the monitor units using inverse-square and off-axis factor corrections. The dynamic compensation strategy plans were then compared to the original treatment plans via dose-volume histogram (DVH) analysis. Changes of more than 5% of the prescription dose (3.6 Gy) were deemed clinically significant. Compared to the original treatment plans, the dynamic compensation strategy produced small discrepancies in isodose distributions and DVH analyses for all structures considered apart from the femoral heads. These differences increased with the magnitude of the internal motion. Coverage of the PTV was excellent: D 5 , D 95 , and D mean were not increased or decreased by more than 5% of the prescription dose for any of the 3600

  1. Multivariate analysis for the estimation of target localization errors in fiducial marker-based radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takamiya, Masanori [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501, Japan and Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-applied Therapy, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Nakamura, Mitsuhiro, E-mail: m-nkmr@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Akimoto, Mami; Ueki, Nami; Yamada, Masahiro; Matsuo, Yukinori; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-applied Therapy, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Tanabe, Hiroaki [Division of Radiation Oncology, Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation, Kobe 650-0047 (Japan); Kokubo, Masaki [Division of Radiation Oncology, Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation, Kobe 650-0047, Japan and Department of Radiation Oncology, Kobe City Medical Center General Hospital, Kobe 650-0047 (Japan); Itoh, Akio [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)

    2016-04-15

    Purpose: To assess the target localization error (TLE) in terms of the distance between the target and the localization point estimated from the surrogates (|TMD|), the average of respiratory motion for the surrogates and the target (|aRM|), and the number of fiducial markers used for estimating the target (n). Methods: This study enrolled 17 lung cancer patients who subsequently underwent four fractions of real-time tumor tracking irradiation. Four or five fiducial markers were implanted around the lung tumor. The three-dimensional (3D) distance between the tumor and markers was at maximum 58.7 mm. One of the markers was used as the target (P{sub t}), and those markers with a 3D |TMD{sub n}| ≤ 58.7 mm at end-exhalation were then selected. The estimated target position (P{sub e}) was calculated from a localization point consisting of one to three markers except P{sub t}. Respiratory motion for P{sub t} and P{sub e} was defined as the root mean square of each displacement, and |aRM| was calculated from the mean value. TLE was defined as the root mean square of each difference between P{sub t} and P{sub e} during the monitoring of each fraction. These procedures were performed repeatedly using the remaining markers. To provide the best guidance on the answer with n and |TMD|, fiducial markers with a 3D |aRM ≥ 10 mm were selected. Finally, a total of 205, 282, and 76 TLEs that fulfilled the 3D |TMD| and 3D |aRM| criteria were obtained for n = 1, 2, and 3, respectively. Multiple regression analysis (MRA) was used to evaluate TLE as a function of |TMD| and |aRM| in each n. Results: |TMD| for n = 1 was larger than that for n = 3. Moreover, |aRM| was almost constant for all n, indicating a similar scale for the marker’s motion near the lung tumor. MRA showed that |aRM| in the left–right direction was the major cause of TLE; however, the contribution made little difference to the 3D TLE because of the small amount of motion in the left–right direction. The TLE

  2. Stereotactic intracranial radiotherapy: Dose prescription

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlienger, M.; Lartigau, E.; Nataf, F.; Mornex, F.; Latorzeff, I.; Lisbona, A.; Mahe, M.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this article was the study of the successive steps permitting the prescription of dose in stereotactic intracranial radiotherapy, which includes radiosurgery and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy. The successive steps studied are: the choice of stereotactic intracranial radiotherapy among the therapeutic options, based on curative or palliative treatment intent, then the selection of lesions according to size/volume, pathological type and their number permitting the choice between radiosurgery or fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy, which have the same methodological basis. Clinical experience has determined the level of dose to treat the lesions and limit the irradiation of healthy adjacent tissues and organs at risk structures. The last step is the optimization of the different parameters to obtain a safe compromise between the lesion dose and healthy adjacent structures. Study of dose-volume histograms, coverage indices and 3D imaging permit the optimization of irradiation. For lesions close to or included in a critical area, the prescribed dose is planned using the inverse planing method. Implementation of the successively described steps is mandatory to insure the prescription of an optimized dose. The whole procedure is based on the delineation of the lesion and adjacent healthy tissues. There are sometimes difficulties to assess the delineation and the volume of the target, however improvement of local control rates and reduction of secondary effects are the proof that the totality of the successive procedures are progressively improved. In practice, stereotactic intracranial radiotherapy is a continually improved treatment method, which constantly benefits from improvements in the choice of indications, imaging, techniques of irradiation, planing/optimization methodology and irradiation technique and from data collected from prolonged follow-up. (authors)

  3. A comparison of perfusion computed tomography and contrast enhanced computed tomography on radiation target volume delineation using rabbit VX2 brain tumor model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Changjin; Luo Yunxiu; Yu Jinming; Lu Haibo; Li Chao; Zhang Dekang; Huang Jianming; Wang Jie; Lang Jinyi

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To compare the accuracy of blood volume perfusion imaging (perfusion CT)with contrast enhanced 64-slice spiral computed tomography (CECT) in the evaluation of gross tumor volume (GTV) and clinical target volume (CTV) using rabbits with VX2 brain tumor. Methods: Perfusion CT and CECT were performed in 20 rabbits with VX2 brain tumor. The GTV and CTV calculated with the maximal and minimal diameter of each tumor in the blood volume (BV) maps and CECT were measured and compared to those in pathological specimens. Results: The mean value of the maximal and minimal diameter of GTV was (8.19 ± 2.29) mm and (4.83 ± 1.31) mm in pathological specimens, (11.98 ±3.29) mm and (7.03±1.82) mm in BV maps, while (6.36±3.85) mm and (3.17±1.93) mm in CECT images, which were significantly different (pathological specimen vs. BV map, t = 7.17, P =0.000;pathological specimen vs. CECT, t = 8.37, P = 0.000, respectively). The mean value of the maximal and minimal diameter of CTV in pathologic specimens was (12.87 ± 3.74) mm and (7.71 ± 2.15) mm, which was significantly different from that of GTV and CTV in CECT (t = - 3. 18, P = 0. 005 and t = - 4.24, P =0.000; t= -11.59,P=0.000 and t= -9.39, P=0.000), while similar with that of GTV in BV maps (t = - 1.95,P = 0. 067; t = - 2. 06, P = 0. 054). For CECT, the margin from GTV to CTV was 81.83% ±40.33% for the maximal diameter and 276.73% ± 131.46% for the minimal. While for BV maps, the margin was 7.93% ± 17. 84% and 12.52% ± 27. 83%, which was significant different from that for CECT images (t=7.36, P=0. 000 and t= -8.78, P=0.000). Conclusions: Compared with CECT, the BV map from 64-slice spiral CT perfusion imaging might have higher accuracy in target volume delineation for brain tumor. (authors)

  4. Comparison and Consensus Guidelines for Delineation of Clinical Target Volume for CT- and MR-Based Brachytherapy in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viswanathan, Akila N.; Erickson, Beth; Gaffney, David K.; Beriwal, Sushil; Bhatia, Sudershan K.; Lee Burnett, Omer; D'Souza, David P.; Patil, Nikhilesh; Haddock, Michael G.; Jhingran, Anuja; Jones, Ellen L.; Kunos, Charles A.; Lee, Larissa J.; Lin, Lilie L.; Mayr, Nina A.; Petersen, Ivy; Petric, Primoz; Portelance, Lorraine; Small, William; Strauss, Jonathan B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To create and compare consensus clinical target volume (CTV) contours for computed tomography (CT) and 3-Tesla (3-T) magnetic resonance (MR) image-based cervical-cancer brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Twenty-three experts in gynecologic radiation oncology contoured the same 3 cervical cancer brachytherapy cases: 1 stage IIB near-complete response (CR) case with a tandem and ovoid, 1 stage IIB partial response (PR) case with tandem and ovoid with needles, and 1 stage IB2 CR case with a tandem and ring applicator. The CT contours were completed before the MRI contours. These were analyzed for consistency and clarity of target delineation using an expectation maximization algorithm for simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE), with κ statistics as a measure of agreement between participants. The conformity index was calculated for each of the 6 data sets. Dice coefficients were generated to compare the CT and MR contours of the same case. Results: For all 3 cases, the mean tumor volume was smaller on MR than on CT (P<.001). The κ and conformity index estimates were slightly higher for CT, indicating a higher level of agreement on CT. The Dice coefficients were 89% for the stage IB2 case with a CR, 74% for the stage IIB case with a PR, and 57% for the stage IIB case with a CR. Conclusion: In a comparison of MR-contoured with CT-contoured CTV volumes, the higher level of agreement on CT may be due to the more distinct contrast medium visible on the images at the time of brachytherapy. MR at the time of brachytherapy may be of greatest benefit in patients with large tumors with parametrial extension that have a partial or complete response to external beam. On the basis of these results, a 95% consensus volume was generated for CT and for MR. Online contouring atlases are available for instruction at (http://www.nrgoncology.org/Resources/ContouringAtlases/GYNCervicalBrachytherapy.aspx)

  5. Comparison and Consensus Guidelines for Delineation of Clinical Target Volume for CT- and MR-Based Brachytherapy in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viswanathan, Akila N., E-mail: aviswanathan@lroc.harvard.edu [Brigham and Women' s Hospital/Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Erickson, Beth [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Gaffney, David K. [University of Utah Huntsman Cancer Hospital, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Beriwal, Sushil [University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Bhatia, Sudershan K. [University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Lee Burnett, Omer [University of Alabama, Birmingham, Alabama (United States); D' Souza, David P.; Patil, Nikhilesh [London Health Sciences Centre and Western University, London, Ontario (Canada); Haddock, Michael G. [Mayo Medical Center, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Jhingran, Anuja [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Jones, Ellen L. [University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Kunos, Charles A. [Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Lee, Larissa J. [Brigham and Women' s Hospital/Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Lin, Lilie L. [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Mayr, Nina A. [University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (United States); Petersen, Ivy [Mayo Medical Center, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Petric, Primoz [Division of Radiotherapy, Institute of Oncology Ljubljana, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Department of Radiation Oncology, National Center for Cancer Care and Research, Doha (Qatar); Portelance, Lorraine [University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Small, William [Loyola University Strich School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Strauss, Jonathan B. [The Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois (United States); and others

    2014-10-01

    Objective: To create and compare consensus clinical target volume (CTV) contours for computed tomography (CT) and 3-Tesla (3-T) magnetic resonance (MR) image-based cervical-cancer brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Twenty-three experts in gynecologic radiation oncology contoured the same 3 cervical cancer brachytherapy cases: 1 stage IIB near-complete response (CR) case with a tandem and ovoid, 1 stage IIB partial response (PR) case with tandem and ovoid with needles, and 1 stage IB2 CR case with a tandem and ring applicator. The CT contours were completed before the MRI contours. These were analyzed for consistency and clarity of target delineation using an expectation maximization algorithm for simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE), with κ statistics as a measure of agreement between participants. The conformity index was calculated for each of the 6 data sets. Dice coefficients were generated to compare the CT and MR contours of the same case. Results: For all 3 cases, the mean tumor volume was smaller on MR than on CT (P<.001). The κ and conformity index estimates were slightly higher for CT, indicating a higher level of agreement on CT. The Dice coefficients were 89% for the stage IB2 case with a CR, 74% for the stage IIB case with a PR, and 57% for the stage IIB case with a CR. Conclusion: In a comparison of MR-contoured with CT-contoured CTV volumes, the higher level of agreement on CT may be due to the more distinct contrast medium visible on the images at the time of brachytherapy. MR at the time of brachytherapy may be of greatest benefit in patients with large tumors with parametrial extension that have a partial or complete response to external beam. On the basis of these results, a 95% consensus volume was generated for CT and for MR. Online contouring atlases are available for instruction at (http://www.nrgoncology.org/Resources/ContouringAtlases/GYNCervicalBrachytherapy.aspx)

  6. Comparative evaluation of 11C-MET PET-CT and MRI for GTV delineation in precision radiotherapy for gliomas%基于11C-MET PET-CT与MRI对脑胶质瘤精确放疗GTV勾画的比较研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王如; 钱立庭; 汪世存; 刘伟; 罗文广; 张洪波; 李广虎; 胡智刚; 刘磊

    2014-01-01

    目的 探讨11C-MET PET-CT和MRI图像对脑胶质瘤GTV确定的差异.方法 选取6例经病理证实为胶质瘤患者的术前MRI及11C-MET PET-CT图像,分别由我科5位医师在两种图像资料上勾画GTV,比较两者差异.结果 在MRI11C-MET PET-CT上勾画的GTV体积相似(P=0.917),GTV变异系数也相似(P =0.600).勾画的GTV重合度最大为73.0%、最小为51.8%.方差分析显示不同勾画者之间在两种图像资料上勾画的GTV相似(P =0.709),但PET-CT组GTV最大差值为27.66 cm3,而MRI组的为40.37 cm3.结论 MRI与PET-CT显示的肿瘤边界存在差异,不同勾画者勾画的GTV相似,PET-CT组的GTV最大差值较MRI组的小,11C-MET PET-CT显示GTV较为直观.%Objective To evaluate the difference between MRI and 11C-MET PET-CT for gross tumor volume (GTV) delineation in the precision radiotherapy for gliomas.Methods Six patients with a pathologically confirmed diagnosis of gliomas were selected for target delineation.Five physicians in our department were called to delineate the GTV based on the preoperative MRI and 11C-MET PET-CT images of these patients.The GTVs based on the two methods were compared.Results There was no significant difference between the GTVs based on MRI and 11C-MET PET-CT (P =0.917),and their coefficients of variation were also similar (P =0.600).The coincidences of GTVs were different among the patients,with a maximum value of 73.0% and a minimum value of 51.8%.GTV showed no significant difference when defined by different physicians on MRI and PET-CT (P =0.709) ; the biggest difference was 27.66 cm3 on PET-CT and 40.37 cm3 on MRI.Conclusions The boundaries of gliomas defined on MRI and PET-CT are different.The GTVs delineated by different physicians on MRI and PET-CT are similar,and the biggest difference on PET-CT is smaller than that on MRI,which suggests that 11C-MET PET-CT is a more direct way for displaying GTV.

  7. Postoperative Radiotherapy in Prostate Cancer: The Case of the Missing Target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croke, Jennifer; Malone, Shawn; Roustan Delatour, Nicolas; Belanger, Eric; Avruch, Leonard; Morash, Christopher; Kayser, Cathleen; Underhill, Kathryn; Spaans, Johanna

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Postoperative radiotherapy (XRT) increases survival in high-risk prostate cancer patients. Approximately 50% of patients on long-term follow-up relapse despite adjuvant XRT and the predominant site of failure remains local. Four consensus guidelines define postoperative clinical target volume (CTV) in prostate cancer. We explore the possibility that inadequate CTV coverage is an important cause of local failure. This study evaluates the utility of preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in defining prostate bed CTV. Methods and Materials: Twenty prostate cancer patients treated with postoperative XRT who also had preoperative staging MRI were included. The four guidelines were applied and the CTVs were expanded to create planning target volumes (PTVs). Preoperative MRIs were fused with postoperative planning CT scans. MRI-based prostate and gross visible tumors were contoured. Three-dimensional (3D) conformal four- and six-field XRT plans were developed and dose–volume histograms analyzed. Subtraction analysis was conducted to assess the adequacy of prostate/gross tumor coverage. Results: Gross tumor was visible in 18 cases. In all 20 cases, the consensus CTVs did not fully cover the MRI-defined prostate. On average, 35% of the prostate volume and 32% of the gross tumor volume were missed using six-field 3D treatment plans. The entire MRI-defined gross tumor volume was completely covered in only two cases (six-field plans). The expanded PTVs did not cover the entire prostate bed in 50% of cases. Prostate base and mid-zones were the predominant site of inadequate coverage. Conclusions: Current postoperative CTV guidelines do not adequately cover the prostate bed and/or gross tumor based on preoperative MRI imaging. Additionally, expanded PTVs do not fully cover the prostate bed in 50% of cases. Inadequate CTV definition is likely a major contributing factor for the high risk of relapse despite adjuvant XRT. Preoperative imaging may lead to more

  8. Genetically targeted radiotherapy using the sodium-iodide symporter for treatment of head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaut, A.W.; Niu, G.; Graham, M.M.; Domann, F.E.; Krager, K.J.

    2003-01-01

    Attempts at using gene therapy for cancer treatment have achieved limited success. Traditional in vivo gene therapy techniques are limited by relatively inefficient gene transfer, with only a small fraction of tumor cells transfected with the gene of interest. Gene therapy strategies yielding substantial bystander cytotoxicity are preferable and could yield significant clinical effect despite a lack of gene transfer to the entire tumor. We report the successful use of such a strategy in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cell lines. The sodium iodide symporter (NIS) gene, expressed primarily in the thyroid, is responsible for physiologic iodide accumulation. Expression of NIS in non-thyroid cell lines has been shown to confer iodide-concentrating ability. Using a recombinant adenovirus-NIS construct (Ad-NIS) delivered to HNSCC cell lines, we demonstrate radioiodide accumulation 15- to 30-fold higher than that of cell lines transduced with a control (Ad-Bgl II) adenovirus. Consistent with NIS-mediated uptake, this accumulation is inhibited by treatment with perchlorate. Using a clonogenic cell survival assay, we demonstrate a statistically significant, dose-dependent decrease in cell survival after delivery of Ad-NIS followed by administration of varying doses of I-131. Compared to a control, Ad-Bgl II-treated group, absolute survival was reduced by 80% at the highest dose of I-131 in Ad-NIS-treated cells. We also demonstrate the ability of NIS gene transfer followed by systemic administration of I-131 to dramatically attenuate tumor formation in nude mice. Three weeks after subcutaneous injection of tumor cells, tumors treated with Ad-NIS had decreased in size by 0.7±0.1 mm, whereas control tumors treated with Ad-Bgl II had increased in size by 7.4±1.7 mm. The relative accessibility of head and neck cancers make them attractive targets for gene therapy. Our data demonstrate the feasibility of genetically targeted radiotherapy using the NIS gene as a

  9. Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging driven growth modeling for radiotherapy target definition in glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Morten B; Guldberg, Trine L; Harbøll, Anja; Lukacova, Slávka; Kallehauge, Jesper F

    2017-11-01

    The clinical target volume (CTV) in radiotherapy is routinely based on gadolinium contrast enhanced T1 weighted (T1w + Gd) and T2 weighted fluid attenuated inversion recovery (T2w FLAIR) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences which have been shown to over- or underestimate the microscopic tumor cell spread. Gliomas favor spread along the white matter fiber tracts. Tumor growth models incorporating the MRI diffusion tensors (DTI) allow to account more consistently for the glioma growth. The aim of the study was to investigate the potential of a DTI driven growth model to improve target definition in glioblastoma (GBM). Eleven GBM patients were scanned using T1w, T2w FLAIR, T1w + Gd and DTI. The brain was segmented into white matter, gray matter and cerebrospinal fluid. The Fisher-Kolmogorov growth model was used assuming uniform proliferation and a difference in white and gray matter diffusion of a ratio of 10. The tensor directionality was tested using an anisotropy weighting parameter set to zero (γ0) and twenty (γ20). The volumetric comparison was performed using Hausdorff distance, Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and surface area. The median of the standard CTV (CTVstandard) was 180 cm 3 . The median surface area of CTVstandard was 211 cm 2 . The median surface area of respective CTV γ0 and CTV γ20 significantly increased to 338 and 376 cm 2 , respectively. The Hausdorff distance was greater than zero and significantly increased for both CTV γ0 and CTV γ20 with respective median of 18.7 and 25.2 mm. The DSC for both CTV γ0 and CTV γ20 were significantly below one with respective median of 0.74 and 0.72, which means that 74 and 72% of CTVstandard were included in CTV γ0 and CTV γ20, respectively. DTI driven growth models result in CTVs with a significantly increased surface area, a significantly increased Hausdorff distance and decreased overlap between the standard and model derived volume.

  10. [Target volume margins for lung cancer: internal target volume/clinical target volume].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouin, A; Pourel, N

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to carry out a review of margins that should be used for the delineation of target volumes in lung cancer, with a focus on margins from gross tumour volume (GTV) to clinical target volume (CTV) and internal target volume (ITV) delineation. Our review was based on a PubMed literature search with, as a cornerstone, the 2010 European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) recommandations by De Ruysscher et al. The keywords used for the search were: radiotherapy, lung cancer, clinical target volume, internal target volume. The relevant information was categorized under the following headings: gross tumour volume definition (GTV), CTV-GTV margin (first tumoural CTV then nodal CTV definition), in field versus elective nodal irradiation, metabolic imaging role through the input of the PET scanner for tumour target volume and limitations of PET-CT imaging for nodal target volume definition, postoperative radiotherapy target volume definition, delineation of target volumes after induction chemotherapy; then the internal target volume is specified as well as tumoural mobility for lung cancer and respiratory gating techniques. Finally, a chapter is dedicated to planning target volume definition and another to small cell lung cancer. For each heading, the most relevant and recent clinical trials and publications are mentioned. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  11. Method comparison of ultrasound and kilovoltage x-ray fiducial marker imaging for prostate radiotherapy targeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Clifton David; Thomas, Charles R., Jr.; Schwartz, Scott; Golden, Nanalei; Ting, Joe; Wong, Adrian; Erdogmus, Deniz; Scarbrough, Todd J.

    2006-10-01

    Several measurement techniques have been developed to address the capability for target volume reduction via target localization in image-guided radiotherapy; among these have been ultrasound (US) and fiducial marker (FM) software-assisted localization. In order to assess interchangeability between methods, US and FM localization were compared using established techniques for determination of agreement between measurement methods when a 'gold-standard' comparator does not exist, after performing both techniques daily on a sequential series of patients. At least 3 days prior to CT simulation, four gold seeds were placed within the prostate. FM software-assisted localization utilized the ExacTrac X-Ray 6D (BrainLab AG, Germany) kVp x-ray image acquisition system to determine prostate position; US prostate targeting was performed on each patient using the SonArray (Varian, Palo Alto, CA). Patients were aligned daily using laser alignment of skin marks. Directional shifts were then calculated by each respective system in the X, Y and Z dimensions before each daily treatment fraction, previous to any treatment or couch adjustment, as well as a composite vector of displacement. Directional shift agreement in each axis was compared using Altman-Bland limits of agreement, Lin's concordance coefficient with Partik's grading schema, and Deming orthogonal bias-weighted correlation methodology. 1019 software-assisted shifts were suggested by US and FM in 39 patients. The 95% limits of agreement in X, Y and Z axes were ±9.4 mm, ±11.3 mm and ±13.4, respectively. Three-dimensionally, measurements agreed within 13.4 mm in 95% of all paired measures. In all axes, concordance was graded as 'poor' or 'unacceptable'. Deming regression detected proportional bias in both directional axes and three-dimensional vectors. Our data suggest substantial differences between US and FM image-guided measures and subsequent suggested directional shifts. Analysis reveals that the vast majority of

  12. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy by delineations on CT-based simulation in different respiratory phases for the treatment of senile patients with non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weifeng; Yuan, Feng; Wang, Guoping; Lin, Zhiren; Pan, Yanling; Chen, Longhua

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the application of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for elderly patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) based on computed tomography (CT) simulations in different respiratory phases. A total of 64 patients aged >70 years old with NSCLC were treated by 3D-CRT using CT images in different respiratory phases. The gross tumor volumes (GTVs) at the end of inspiration and end of expiration were combined to obtain the total GTV, which was close to the motional range of tumors during respiration, and no additional expansion of the clinical target volume (CTAV) to planning target volume (PTV) (CTAV:PTV) was included during the recording of respiratory movements. Patients were also planned according to the classic 3D-CRT approach. Efficacy, prognostic factors, and side effects were evaluated. Compared with the classic approach, the average PTV was 18.9% lower (median: 17.3%), and the average lung volume receiving a prescribed dose for a tumor was 22.4% lower (median: 20.9%). The 1-, 2-, and 3-year survival rates were 70.6%, 54.9%, and 29.4%, respectively, with an overall tumor response rate of 79.7%. The Karnofsky performance status and N stage were independent prognostic factors, whereas age was not. Without affecting therapeutic effects, CT simulations in different respiratory phases were well-tolerated in elderly patients with NSCLC, could effectively reduce PTV, and could improve the quality of life.

  13. Cone beam CT with zonal filters for simultaneous dose reduction, improved target contrast and automated set-up in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, C J; Marchant, T E; Amer, A M

    2006-01-01

    Cone beam CT (CBCT) using a zonal filter is introduced. The aims are reduced concomitant imaging dose to the patient, simultaneous control of body scatter for improved image quality in the tumour target zone and preserved set-up detail for radiotherapy. Aluminium transmission diaphragms added to the CBCT x-ray tube of the Elekta Synergy TM linear accelerator produced an unattenuated beam for a central 'target zone' and a partially attenuated beam for an outer 'set-up zone'. Imaging doses and contrast noise ratios (CNR) were measured in a test phantom for transmission diaphragms 12 and 24 mm thick, for 5 and 10 cm long target zones. The effect on automatic registration of zonal CBCT to conventional CT was assessed relative to full-field and lead-collimated images of an anthropomorphic phantom. Doses along the axis of rotation were reduced by up to 50% in both target and set-up zones, and weighted dose (two thirds surface dose plus one third central dose) was reduced by 10-20% for a 10 cm long target zone. CNR increased by up to 15% in zonally filtered CBCT images compared to full-field images. Automatic image registration remained as robust as that with full-field images and was superior to CBCT coned down using lead-collimation. Zonal CBCT significantly reduces imaging dose and is expected to benefit radiotherapy through improved target contrast, required to assess target coverage, and wide-field edge detail, needed for robust automatic measurement of patient set-up error

  14. Dosimetric consequences of the shift towards computed tomography guided target definition and planning for breast conserving radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korevaar Erik W

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The shift from conventional two-dimensional (2D to three-dimensional (3D-conformal target definition and dose-planning seems to have introduced volumetric as well as geometric changes. The purpose of this study was to compare coverage of computed tomography (CT-based breast and boost planning target volumes (PTV, absolute volumes irradiated, and dose delivered to the organs at risk with conventional 2D and 3D-conformal breast conserving radiotherapy. Methods Twenty-five patients with left-sided breast cancer were subject of CT-guided target definition and 3D-conformal dose-planning, and conventionally defined target volumes and treatment plans were reconstructed on the planning CT. Accumulated dose-distributions were calculated for the conventional and 3D-conformal dose-plans, taking into account a prescribed dose of 50 Gy for the breast plans and 16 Gy for the boost plans. Results With conventional treatment plans, CT-based breast and boost PTVs received the intended dose in 78% and 32% of the patients, respectively, and smaller volumes received the prescribed breast and boost doses compared with 3D-conformal dose-planning. The mean lung dose, the volume of the lungs receiving > 20 Gy, the mean heart dose, and volume of the heart receiving > 30 Gy were significantly less with conventional treatment plans. Specific areas within the breast and boost PTVs systematically received a lower than intended dose with conventional treatment plans. Conclusion The shift towards CT-guided target definition and planning as the golden standard for breast conserving radiotherapy has resulted in improved target coverage at the cost of larger irradiated volumes and an increased dose delivered to organs at risk. Tissue is now included into the breast and boost target volumes that was never explicitly defined or included with conventional treatment. Therefore, a coherent definition of the breast and boost target volumes is needed, based on

  15. Dosimetric consequences of the shift towards computed tomography guided target definition and planning for breast conserving radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laan, Hans Paul van der; Dolsma, Wil V; Maduro, John H; Korevaar, Erik W; Langendijk, Johannes A

    2008-01-01

    The shift from conventional two-dimensional (2D) to three-dimensional (3D)-conformal target definition and dose-planning seems to have introduced volumetric as well as geometric changes. The purpose of this study was to compare coverage of computed tomography (CT)-based breast and boost planning target volumes (PTV), absolute volumes irradiated, and dose delivered to the organs at risk with conventional 2D and 3D-conformal breast conserving radiotherapy. Twenty-five patients with left-sided breast cancer were subject of CT-guided target definition and 3D-conformal dose-planning, and conventionally defined target volumes and treatment plans were reconstructed on the planning CT. Accumulated dose-distributions were calculated for the conventional and 3D-conformal dose-plans, taking into account a prescribed dose of 50 Gy for the breast plans and 16 Gy for the boost plans. With conventional treatment plans, CT-based breast and boost PTVs received the intended dose in 78% and 32% of the patients, respectively, and smaller volumes received the prescribed breast and boost doses compared with 3D-conformal dose-planning. The mean lung dose, the volume of the lungs receiving > 20 Gy, the mean heart dose, and volume of the heart receiving > 30 Gy were significantly less with conventional treatment plans. Specific areas within the breast and boost PTVs systematically received a lower than intended dose with conventional treatment plans. The shift towards CT-guided target definition and planning as the golden standard for breast conserving radiotherapy has resulted in improved target coverage at the cost of larger irradiated volumes and an increased dose delivered to organs at risk. Tissue is now included into the breast and boost target volumes that was never explicitly defined or included with conventional treatment. Therefore, a coherent definition of the breast and boost target volumes is needed, based on clinical data confirming tumour control probability and normal

  16. Assessing Respiration-Induced Tumor Motion and Internal Target Volume Using Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography for Radiotherapy of Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, H. Helen; Balter, Peter; Tutt, Teresa; Choi, Bum; Zhang, Joy; Wang, Catherine; Chi, Melinda; Luo Dershan; Pan Tinsu; Hunjan, Sandeep; Starkschall, George; Rosen, Isaac; Prado, Karl; Liao Zhongxing; Chang, Joe; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.; Mohan, Radhe; Dong Lei

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To assess three-dimensional tumor motion caused by respiration and internal target volume (ITV) for radiotherapy of lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Respiration-induced tumor motion was analyzed for 166 tumors from 152 lung cancer patients, 57.2% of whom had Stage III or IV non-small-cell lung cancer. All patients underwent four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) during normal breathing before treatment. The expiratory phase of 4DCT images was used as the reference set to delineate gross tumor volume (GTV). Gross tumor volumes on other respiratory phases and resulting ITVs were determined using rigid-body registration of 4DCT images. The association of GTV motion with various clinical and anatomic factors was analyzed statistically. Results: The proportions of tumors that moved >0.5 cm along the superior-inferior (SI), lateral, and anterior-posterior (AP) axes during normal breathing were 39.2%, 1.8%, and 5.4%, respectively. For 95% of the tumors, the magnitude of motion was less than 1.34 cm, 0.40 cm, and 0.59 cm along the SI, lateral, and AP directions. The principal component of tumor motion was in the SI direction, with only 10.8% of tumors moving >1.0 cm. The tumor motion was found to be associated with diaphragm motion, the SI tumor location in the lung, size of the GTV, and disease T stage. Conclusions: Lung tumor motion is primarily driven by diaphragm motion. The motion of locally advanced lung tumors is unlikely to exceed 1.0 cm during quiet normal breathing except for small lesions located in the lower half of the lung

  17. EGFR-targeted anti-cancer drugs in radiotherapy: Preclinical evaluation of mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumann, Michael; Krause, Mechthild; Dikomey, Ekkehard; Dittmann, Klaus; Doerr, Wolfgang; Kasten-Pisula, Ulla; Rodemann, H. Peter

    2007-01-01

    Preclinical and clinical results indicate that the EGFR can mediate radioresistance in different solid human tumours. Combination of radiotherapy and EGFR inhibitors can improve local tumour control compared to irradiation alone and has been introduced into clinical radiotherapy practice. So far several mechanisms have been identified in preclinical studies to contribute to improved local tumour control after radiation combined with EGFR inhibitors. These include direct kill of cancer stem cells by EGFR inhibitors, cellular radiosensitization through modified signal transduction, inhibition of repair of DNA damage, reduced repopulation and improved reoxygenation during fractionated radiotherapy. Effects and mechanisms may differ for different classes of EGFR inhibitors, for different tumours and for normal tissues. The mechanisms underlying this heterogeneity are currently poorly understood, and predictive assays are not available yet. Importantly, mechanisms and predictors for the combined effects of radiation with EGFR inhibitors appear to be considerably different to those for application of EGFR inhibitors alone or in combination with chemotherapy. Therefore to further evaluate the efficacy and mechanisms of EGFR-inhibition in combined treatments, radiotherapy-specific preclinical research strategies, which include in vivo experiments using local tumour control as an endpoint, as well as animal studies on normal tissue toxicity are needed

  18. A critical evaluation of the planning target volume for 3-d conformal radiotherapy of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tinger, Alfred; Michalski, Jeff M.; Cheng, Abel; Low, Daniel A.; Zhu, Ron; Bosch, Walter R.; Purdy, James A.; Perez, Carlos A.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: The goal was to determine an adequate planning target volume (PTV) margin for three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D CRT) of prostate cancer. The uncertainty in the internal positions of the prostate and seminal vesicles and the uncertainty in the treatment set-ups for a single group of patients was measured. Methods: Weekly computed tomography (CT) scans of the pelvis (n=38) and daily electronic portal images (n=1225) were reviewed for six patients who received seven-field 3D CRT for prostate cancer. The weekly CT scans were registered in three dimensions to the original treatment planning CT scan using commercially available software. This registration permitted measurement of the motion in the center-of-volume (COV) of the prostate and seminal vesicles throughout the course of therapy. The daily portal images (PI) were registered to the corresponding simulation films to measure the set-up displacement for each of the seven fields. The field displacements were then entered into a matrix program which calculated the isocenter displacement by a least squares method. The uncertainty in the internal positions of the prostate and seminal vesicles (standard deviation of the motions) was added to the uncertainty in the set-up (standard deviation of the isocenter displacements) in quadrature to arrive at a total uncertainty. Positive directions were defined in the left, anterior, and superior directions. A discussion of an adequate PTV was based on these results. Results: The mean magnitude of motion for the COV of the prostate ± the standard deviation was 0 ± 1 mm in the left-right (LR) direction, 0.5 ± 2.8 mm in the anterior-posterior (AP) direction, and 0.5 ± 3.5 mm in the superior-inferior (SI) direction. The mean magnitude of motion for the COV of the seminal vesicles ± the standard deviation was -0.3 ± 1.5 mm in the LR, 0.6 ± 4.1 mm in the AP, and 0.7 ± 2.3 mm in the SI directions, respectively. For all patients the mean isocenter

  19. Designing Targets for Elective Nodal Irradiation in Lung Cancer Radiotherapy: A Planning Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kepka, Lucyna; Tatro, Daniel; Moran, Jean M.; Quint, Leslie E.; Hayman, James A.; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Kong Fengming

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To assess doses received by mediastinal and hilar lymph node stations (LNS) delineated according to published recommendations when 'standard' two-dimensional (2D) elective fields are applied and to assess doses to critical structures when fields are designed using 2D and three-dimensional (3D) treatment planning for elective irradiation. Methods and Materials: LNS were delineated on axial CT scans according to existing recommendations. For each case and tumor location, 2D anteroposterior-posteroanterior (AP-PA) elective fields were applied using the AP-PA CT topograms. From the 2D portal fields, 3D dose distributions were then calculated to particular LNS. Next, 3D plans were prepared for elective nodal irradiation for tumors of different lobes. Doses for critical structures were compared for 2D and 3D plans. Results: LNS 1/2R, 1/2L, 3A, 3P, 5, 6, and 8 were not adequately covered in a substantial part of plans by standard 2D portals when guidelines for delineation were strictly followed. The magnitude of the lack of coverage increased with margin application. There was a trend for a higher yet probably still safe dose delivered to lung for 3D plans compared with 2D plans with a prescription dose of 45 Gy. Conclusions: 2D fields did not entirely cover LNS delineated according to the recommendations for 3D techniques. A strict adherence to these guidelines may lead to larger portals than traditionally constructed using 2D methods. Some modifications for clinical implementation are discussed.

  20. Scanned proton radiotherapy for mobile targets-the effectiveness of re-scanning in the context of different treatment planning approaches and for different motion characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knopf, Antje-Christin; Hong, Theodore S; Lomax, Antony

    2011-01-01

    The most advanced delivery technique for proton radiotherapy is active spot scanning. So far, predominantly static targets have been treated with active spot scanning, since mobile targets in combination with dynamic treatment delivery can lead to interplay effects, causing inhomogeneous dose

  1. Feasibility of omitting clinical target volume for limited-disease small cell lung cancer treated with chemotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, Shuhua; Shi, Anhui; Yu, Rong; Zhu, Guangying

    2014-01-01

    To analyze the feasibility of omitting clinical target volume (CTV) for limited small cell lung cancer treated with chemotherapy and intensity modulated radiotherapy. 89 patients were treated from January 1, 2008 to August 31, 2011, 54 cases were irradiated with target volume without CTV, and 35 cases were irradiated with CTV. Both arms were irradiated post chemotherapy tumor extent and omitted elective nodal irradiation; dose prescription was 95% PTV56-63 Gy/28-35 F/5.6-7 weeks. In the arm without CTV and arm with CTV, the local relapse rates were 16.7% and 17.1% (p = 0.586) respectively. In the arm without CTV, of the 9 patients with local relapse, 6 recurred in-field, 2 recurred in margin, 1 recurred out of field. In the arm with CTV, of the 6 patients with local relapse, 4 recurred in-field, 1 recurred in margin, 1 recurred out of field. The distant metastases rates were 42.6% and 51.4% (p = 0.274) respectively. Grade 3-4 hematological toxicity and radiation esophagitis had no statistically significant, but grade 3-4 radiation pneumonia was observed in only 7.4% in the arm without CTV, compared 22.9% in the arm with CTV (p = 0.040). The median survival in the arm without CTV had not reached, compared with 38 months in the with CTV arm. The l- years, 2- years, 3- years survival rates of the arm without CTV and the arm with CTV were 81.0%, 66.2%, 61.5% and 88.6%, 61.7%, 56.6% (p = 0.517). The multivariate analysis indicated that the distant metastases (p = 0.000) and PCI factor (p = 0.004) were significantly related to overall survival. Target delineation omitting CTV for limited-disease small cell lung cancer received IMRT was feasible. The distant metastases and PCI factor were significantly related to overall survival

  2. Objective assessment of cosmetic outcome after targeted intraoperative radiotherapy in breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keshtgar, Mohammed R S; Williams, Norman R; Bulsara, Max

    2013-01-01

    and thus impair cosmesis further, so we objectively evaluated the aesthetic outcome of patients within the TARGIT randomised controlled trial. We have used an objective assessment tool for evaluation of cosmetic outcome. Frontal digital photographs were taken at baseline (before TARGIT or EBRT) and yearly...... in a randomised setting, the aesthetic outcome of patients demonstrates that those treated with TARGIT have a superior cosmetic result to those patients who received conventional external beam radiotherapy....

  3. Influence of the electron energy and number of beams on the absorbed dose distributions in radiotherapy of deep seated targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnica-Garza, H M

    2014-12-01

    With the advent of compact laser-based electron accelerators, there has been some renewed interest on the use of such charged particles for radiotherapy purposes. Traditionally, electrons have been used for the treatment of fairly superficial lesions located at depths of no more than 4cm inside the patient, but lately it has been proposed that by using very high energy electrons, i.e. those with an energy in the order of 200-250MeV it should be possible to safely reach deeper targets. In this paper, we used a realistic patient model coupled with detailed Monte Carlo simulations of the electron transport in such a patient model to examine the characteristics of the resultant absorbed dose distributions as a function of both the electron beam energy as well as the number of beams for a particular type of treatment, namely, a prostate radiotherapy treatment. Each treatment is modeled as consisting of nine, five or three beam ports isocentrically distributed around the patient. An optimization algorithm is then applied to obtain the beam weights in each treatment plan. It is shown that for this particularly challenging case, both excellent target coverage and critical structure sparing can be obtained for energies in the order of 150MeV and for as few as three treatment ports, while significantly reducing the total energy absorbed by the patient with respect to a conventional megavoltage x-ray treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. External beam radiotherapy of localized prostatic adenocarcinoma. Evaluation of conformal therapy, field number and target margins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lennernaes, B.; Rikner, G.; Letocha, H.; Nilsson, S.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to identify factors of importance in the planning of external beam radiotherapy of prostatic adenocarcinoma. Seven patients with urogenital cancers were planned for external radiotherapy of the prostate. Four different techniques were used, viz. a 4-field box technique and four-, five- or six-field conformal therapy set-ups combined with three different margins (1-3 cm). The evaluations were based on the doses delivered to the rectum and the urinary bladder. A normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) was calculated for each plan using Lyman's dose volume reduction method. The most important factors that resulted in a decrease of the dose delivered to the rectum and the bladder were the use of conformal therapy and smaller margins. Conformal therapy seemed more important for the dose distribution in the urinary bladder. Five- and six-field set-ups were not significantly better than those with four fields. NTCP calculations were in accordance with the evaluation of the dose volume histograms. To conclude, four-field conformal therapy utilizing reduced margins improves the dose distribution to the rectum and the urinary bladder in the radiotherapy of prostatic adenocarcinoma. (orig.)

  5. Inter-observer variation in delineation of the heart and left anterior descending coronary artery in radiotherapy for breast cancer: a multi-centre study from Denmark and the UK

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenzen, Ebbe L; Taylor, Carolyn W; Maraldo, Maja

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To determine the extent of inter-observer variation in delineation of the heart and left anterior descending coronary artery (LADCA) and its impact on estimated doses. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Nine observers from five centres delineated the heart and LADCA on fifteen patient...... guidelines were used. In contrast, for the LADCA there was substantial variation in the estimated dose, which was not reduced with guidelines....

  6. What margins should be added to the clinical target volume in radiotherapy treatment planning of lung cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekberg, L.; Wittgren, L.; Holmberg, O.

    1995-01-01

    When defining the planning target volume (PTV) in radiotherapy treatment planning, it is vital to add geometrical margins of normal tissue around the clinical target volume (CTV). This is to ensure that the whole CTV will receive the planned absorbed dose taking into account both set-up deviations and target movements as well as other geometrical variations in the treatment chain. The problem is our limited knowledge of how large these margins should be. To assess the size of needed margins around the CTV in conformal radiotherapy of lung cancer, electronic portal imaging was employed in 232 irradiation field set-ups of 14 patients. This was done in order to quantify the uncertainty in the execution of treatment considering patient movement and set-up displacements. For an estimation of the added geometrical variation from target movement during irradiation, fluoroscopy was used at the simulation of the irradiation fields. The set-up study showed an average systematic deviation for all individual fields of 3.1 mm and an average maximal systematic deviation (in either transversal or craniocaudal direction) of 4.8 mm. The random errors can be described by an average standard deviation of 2.8 mm for all fields in either direction. Major gradual displacements as a function of time was also detected in one of the patients. CTV-movements of several millimetres during respiration could be observed. It was also seen that heartbeats could add to CTV-movements during irradiation with an equal magnitude. The combined effect of these factors are considered when making an overall estimation of margins that should be added to the CTV

  7. Converting from CT- to MRI-only-based target definition in radiotherapy of localized prostate cancer. A comparison between two modalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seppaelae, Tiina; Visapaeae, Harri; Collan, Juhani; Kapanen, Mika; Kouri, Mauri; Tenhunen, Mikko; Saarilahti, Kauko [University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, Comprehensive Cancer Center, POB 180, Helsinki (Finland); Beule, Annette [University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, HUS Medical Imaging Center, Radiology, POB 180, Helsinki (Finland)

    2015-11-15

    To investigate the conversion of prostate cancer radiotherapy (RT) target definition from CT-based planning into an MRI-only-based planning procedure. Using the CT- and MRI-only-based RT planning protocols, 30 prostate cancer patients were imaged in the RT fixation position. Two physicians delineated the prostate in both CT and T2-weighted MRI images. The CT and MRI images were coregistered based on gold seeds and anatomic borders of the prostate. The uncertainty of the coregistration, as well as differences in target volumes and uncertainty of contour delineation were investigated. Conversion of margins and dose constraints from CT- to MRI-only-based treatment planning was assessed. On average, the uncertainty of image coregistration was 0.4 ± 0.5 mm (one standard deviation, SD), 0.9 ± 0.8 mm and 0.9 ± 0.9 mm in the lateral, anterior-posterior and base-apex direction, respectively. The average ratio of the prostate volume between CT and MRI was 1.20 ± 0.15 (one SD). Compared to the CT-based contours, the MRI-based contours were on average 2-7 mm smaller in the apex, 0-1 mm smaller in the rectal direction and 1-4 mm smaller elsewhere. When converting from a CT-based planning procedure to an MRI-based one, the overall planning target volumes (PTV) are prominently reduced only in the apex. The prostate margins and dose constraints can be retained by this conversion. (orig.) [German] Ziel unserer Studie war es, die Umstellung der Strahlentherapieplanung des Prostatakarzinoms von CT-gestuetzter in ausschliesslich MR-gestuetzte Zieldefinition zu untersuchen. Bei 30 Patienten mit Prostatakarzinom wurden eine CT und eine MRT unter Planungsbedingungen durchgefuehrt. Zwei Untersucher konturierten die Prostata in CT- und T2-gewichteten MR-Bildern. Mit Hilfe der Position von Goldstiften und der anatomischen Grenzen der Prostata wurden die CT- und MR-Bilder koregistriert. Es wurden die Genauigkeit der Koregistrierung sowie die Unterschiede der Zielvolumina und der

  8. Individualized planning target volumes for intrafraction motion during hypofractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy boost for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, Patrick; Sixel, Katharina; Morton, Gerard; Loblaw, D. Andrew; Tirona, Romeo; Pang, Geordi; Choo, Richard; Szumacher, Ewa; DeBoer, Gerrit; Pignol, Jean-Philippe

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of the study was to access toxicities of delivering a hypofractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) boost with individualized intrafraction planning target volume (PTV) margins and daily online correction for prostate position. Methods and materials: Phase I involved delivering 42 Gy in 21 fractions using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, followed by a Phase II IMRT boost of 30 Gy in 10 fractions. Digital fluoroscopy was used to measure respiratory-induced motion of implanted fiducial markers within the prostate. Electronic portal images were taken of fiducial marker positions before and after each fraction of radiotherapy during the first 9 days of treatment to calculate intrafraction motion. A uniform 10-mm PTV margin was used for the first phase of treatment. PTV margins for Phase II were patient-specific and were calculated from the respiratory and intrafraction motion data obtained from Phase I. The IMRT boost was delivered with daily online correction of fiducial marker position. Acute toxicity was measured using National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria, version 2.0. Results: In 33 patients who had completed treatment, the average PTV margin used during the hypofractionated IMRT boost was 3 mm in the lateral direction, 3 mm in the superior-inferior direction, and 4 mm in the anteroposterior direction. No patients developed acute Grade 3 rectal toxicity. Three patients developed acute Grade 3 urinary frequency and urgency. Conclusions: PTV margins can be reduced significantly with daily online correction of prostate position. Delivering a hypofractionated boost with this high-precision IMRT technique resulted in acceptable acute toxicity

  9. Targeted radiotherapy with {sup 177} Lu-DOTA-TATE in athymic mice with induced pancreatic malignant tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, M. A de; Pedraza L, M. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Rodriguez C, J. [Faculty of Medicine, UAEM, Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Ferro F, G. [ININ, 52045 Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Murphy S, E. [Hospital Santelena, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2006-07-01

    Malignant pancreas tumours induced in athymic mice are a good model for targeted radiotherapy. The objective of this research was to estimate pancreatic tumour absorbed radiation doses and to evaluate {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-TATE as a therapeutic radiopharmaceutical that could be used in humans. AR42J murine pancreas cancer cells, which over-express somatostatin receptors, were injected in athymic mice and 20 days later the mean tumour size was 3.08 square cm (n=3). A mean of 86.3 MBq {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-TATE, was injected in a tail vein and 19 days after therapy the size of the tumours was 0.81 square cm. There was a partial relapse and after 16 days, when sacrificed, the mean tumour size was 8.28 cubic cm. An epithelial and sarcoma mixed tumour in the kidney of one treated mouse was found. The tumour of the control mouse was 8.61 cubic cm when sacrificed 14 days after tumour induction. Radiotherapy estimates to the tumours was 35.9-39.7 Gy and the tumours might have been completely reduced with a second therapy dose. These preliminary studies justify further therapeutic and dosimetry estimations to ensure that Lu-{sup 177}-DOTA-TATE will act as expected in man, considering kidney radiation. (Author)

  10. SU-E-J-199: Evaluation of Motion Tracking Effects On Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy of Abdominal Targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monterroso, M; Dogan, N; Yang, Y [University Miami, Miami, FL (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effects of respiratory motion on the delivered dose distribution of CyberKnife motion tracking-based stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of abdominal targets. Methods: Four patients (two pancreas and two liver, and all with 4DCT scans) were retrospectively evaluated. A plan (3D plan) using CyberKnife Synchrony was optimized on the end-exhale phase in the CyberKnife's MultiPlan treatment planning system (TPS), with 40Gy prescribed in 5 fractions. A 4D plan was then created following the 4D planning utility in the MultiPlan TPS, by recalculating dose from the 3D plan beams on all 4DCT phases, with the same prescribed isodose line. The other seven phases of the 4DCT were then deformably registered to the end-exhale phase for 4D dose summation. Doses to the target and organs at risk (OAR) were compared between 3D and 4D plans for each patient. The mean and maximum doses to duodenum, liver, spinal cord and kidneys, and doses to 5cc of duodenum, 700cc of liver, 0.25cc of spinal cord and 200cc of kidneys were used. Results: Target coverage in the 4D plans was about 1% higher for two patients and about 9% lower in the other two. OAR dose differences between 3D and 4D varied among structures, with doses as much as 8.26Gy lower or as much as 5.41Gy higher observed in the 4D plans. Conclusion: The delivered dose can be significantly different from the planned dose for both the target and OAR close to the target, which is caused by the relative geometry change while the beams chase the moving target. Studies will be performed on more patients in the future. The differences of motion tracking versus passive motion management with the use of internal target volumes will also be investigated.

  11. Target tailoring and proton beam therapy to reduce small bowel dose in cervical cancer radiotherapy. A comparison of benefits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boer, Peter de; Westerveld, Henrike; Smit, Mark; Bel, Arjan; Rasch, Coen R.N.; Stalpers, Lukas J.A.; Schoot, Agustinus J.A.J. van de; Buist, Marrije R.

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the potential clinical benefit from both target tailoring by excluding the tumour-free proximal part of the uterus during image-guided adaptive radiotherapy (IGART) and improved dose conformity based on intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT). The study included planning CTs from 11 previously treated patients with cervical cancer with a >4-cm tumour-free part of the proximal uterus on diagnostic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). IGART and robustly optimised IMPT plans were generated for both conventional target volumes and for MRI-based target tailoring (where the non-invaded proximal part of the uterus was excluded), yielding four treatment plans per patient. For each plan, the V 15Gy , V 30Gy , V 45Gy and D mean for bladder, sigmoid, rectum and bowel bag were compared, and the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) for ≥grade 2 acute small bowel toxicity was calculated. Both IMPT and MRI-based target tailoring resulted in significant reductions in V 15Gy , V 30Gy , V 45Gy and D mean for bladder and small bowel. IMPT reduced the NTCP for small bowel toxicity from 25% to 18%; this was further reduced to 9% when combined with MRI-based target tailoring. In four of the 11 patients (36%), NTCP reductions of >10% were estimated by IMPT, and in six of the 11 patients (55%) when combined with MRI-based target tailoring. This >10% NTCP reduction was expected if the V 45Gy for bowel bag was >275 cm 3 and >200 cm 3 , respectively, during standard IGART alone. In patients with cervical cancer, both proton therapy and MRI-based target tailoring lead to a significant reduction in the dose to surrounding organs at risk and small bowel toxicity. (orig.) [de

  12. Influence of experience and qualification on PET-based target volume delineation. When there is no expert--ask your colleague

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doll, C; Duncker-Rohr, V; Rücker, G

    2014-01-01

    "experts" (E; n = 3), "experienced interdisciplinary pairs" (EP; 9 teams of radiation oncologist (RO) + nuclear medicine physician (NP)), "single field specialists" (SFS; n = 13), and "students" (S; n = 10). Five automatic delineation methods (AM) were also included. Volume sizes and concordance indices...... compared to SFS (eCI = 0.49) or S (eCI = 0.47). The intermethod variability of the AM (pCI = 0.44) was similar to that of SFS and S, showing poorer agreement with the experts (eCI = 0.35). CONCLUSION: The results suggest that interdisciplinary cooperation could be beneficial for consistent contouring...

  13. Development of a personalized dosimetric tool for radiation protection in case of internal contamination and targeted radiotherapy in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiavassa, S.

    2005-12-01

    Current internal dosimetric estimations are based on the M.I.R.D. formalism and used standard mathematical models. These standard models are often far from a given patient morphology and do not allow to perform patient-specific dosimetry. The aim of this study was to develop a personalized dosimetric tool, which takes into account real patient morphology, composition and densities. This tool, called O.E.D.I.P.E., a French acronym of Tool for the Evaluation of Personalized Internal Dose, is a user-friendly graphical interface. O.E.D.I.P.E. allows to create voxel-based patient-specific geometries and associates them with the M.C.N.P.X. Monte Carlo code. Radionuclide distribution and absorbed dose calculation can be performed at the organ and voxel scale. O.E.D.I.P.E. can be used in nuclear medicine for targeted radiotherapy and in radiation protection in case of internal contamination. (author)

  14. Co-targeting androgen receptor and DNA for imaging and molecular radiotherapy of prostate cancer: in vitro studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Guang; Kortylewicz, Zbigniew P; Enke, Thomas; Baranowska-Kortylewicz, Janina

    2014-12-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) axis, the key growth and survival pathway in prostate cancer, remains a prime target for drug development. 5-Radioiodo-3'-O-(17β-succinyl-5α-androstan-3-one)-2'-deoxyuridin-5'-yl phosphate (RISAD-P) is the AR-seeking reagent developed for noninvasive assessment of AR and proliferative status, and for molecular radiotherapy of prostate cancer with Auger electron-emitting radionuclides. RISAD-P radiolabeled with 123I, 124I, and 125I were synthesized using a common stannylated precursor. The cellular uptake, subcellular distribution, and radiotoxicity of 123I-, 124I-, and (125) IRISAD-P were measured in LNCaP, DU145, and PC-3 cell lines expressing various levels of AR. The uptake of RISAD-P by prostate cancer cells is proportional to AR levels and independent of the radionuclide. The intracellular accumulation of radioactivity is directly proportional to the extracellular concentration of RISAD-P and the duration of exposure. Initially, RISAD-P is trapped in the cytoplasm. Within 24 hr, radioactivity is associated exclusively with DNA. The RISAD-P radiotoxicity is determined by the radionuclide; however, the cellular responses are directly proportional to the AR expression levels. LNCaP cells expressing high levels of AR are killed at the rate of up to 60% per day after a brief 1 hr RISAD-P treatment. For the first time, the AR expression in PC-3 and DU 145 cells, generally reported as AR-negative, was quantitated by the ultra sensitive RISAD-P-based method. RISAD-P is a theranostic drug, which targets AR. Its subcellular metabolite participates in DNA synthesis. RISAD-P is a promising candidate for imaging of the AR expression and tumor proliferation as well as molecular radiotherapy of prostate cancer. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. EGFR and HER2 expression in primary cervical cancers and corresponding lymph node metastases: Implications for targeted radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Li; Shui, Yongjie; Wang, Xiaojia; Sheng, Liming; Yang, Zhengyan; Xue, Danfeng; Wei, Qichun

    2008-01-01

    Proteins overexpressed on the surface of tumor cells can be selectively targeted. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) are among the most often targeted proteins. The level and stability of expression in both primary tumors and corresponding metastases is crucial in the assessment of a receptor as target for imaging in nuclear medicine and for various forms of therapy. So far, the expression of EGFR and HER2 has only been determined in primary cervical cancers, and we have not found published data regarding the receptor status in corresponding metastatic lesions. The goal of this study was to evaluate whether any of these receptors are suitable as target for clinical diagnosis and therapy. Expression of EGFR and HER2 was investigated immunohistochemically in both lymph node metastases and corresponding primary cervical cancers (n = 53). HER2 and EGFR expression was scored using HercepTest criteria (0, 1+, 2+ or 3+). EGFR overexpression (2+ or 3+) was found in 64% (35/53) of the primary cervical tumors and 60% (32/53) of the corresponding lymph node metastases. There was a good concordance between the primary tumors and the paired metastases regarding EGFR expression. Only four patients who had 2+ or 3+ in the primary tumors changed to 0 or 1+ in lymph node metastases, and another two cases changed the other way around. None of the primary tumors or the lymph node metastases expressed HER2 protein. The EGFR expression seems to be common and stable during cervical cancer metastasis, which is encouraging for testing of EGFR targeted radiotherapy. HER2 appears to be of poor interest as a potential target in the treatment of cervical cancer

  16. An Investigation of Methods for CT Synthesis in MR-only Radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Daniel

    In recent years, the interest in using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in radiotherapy (RT) has increased. This is because MR has a superior soft tissue contrast compared to computed tomography (CT), which makes it a better modality for delineating the target volume (tumor) and possible organs...... at risk (OARs). In an MR/CT work-flow, independent MR and CT scans are acquired. The target and possible OARs are delineated on the MR and then transferred to CT by aligning the data using a registration. This introduces the risk of systematic registration errors especially in non-rigid body structures......, the consequence being a systematic miss of target or increased dose to healthy tissue. Radiotherapy based on MR as the only modality removes this uncertainty and simplifies the clinical work-flow. However, the information on electron density which is usually contained in the CT must now be derived from the MR...

  17. Does Motion Assessment With 4-Dimensional Computed Tomographic Imaging for Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer Radiotherapy Improve Target Volume Coverage?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naseer Ahmed

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Modern radiotherapy with 4-dimensional computed tomographic (4D-CT image acquisition for non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC captures respiratory-mediated tumor motion to provide more accurate target delineation. This study compares conventional 3-dimensional (3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT plans generated with standard helical free-breathing CT (FBCT with plans generated on 4D-CT contoured volumes to determine whether target volume coverage is affected. Materials and methods: Fifteen patients with stage I to IV NSCLC were enrolled in the study. Free-breathing CT and 4D-CT data sets were acquired at the same simulation session and with the same immobilization. Gross tumor volume (GTV for primary and/or nodal disease was contoured on FBCT (GTV_3D. The 3DCRT plans were obtained, and the patients were treated according to our institution’s standard protocol using FBCT imaging. Gross tumor volume was contoured on 4D-CT for primary and/or nodal disease on all 10 respiratory phases and merged to create internal gross tumor volume (IGTV_4D. Clinical target volume margin was 5 mm in both plans, whereas planning tumor volume (PTV expansion was 1 cm axially and 1.5 cm superior/inferior for FBCT-based plans to incorporate setup errors and an estimate of respiratory-mediated tumor motion vs 8 mm isotropic margin for setup error only in all 4D-CT plans. The 3DCRT plans generated from the FBCT scan were copied on the 4D-CT data set with the same beam parameters. GTV_3D, IGTV_4D, PTV, and dose volume histogram from both data sets were analyzed and compared. Dice coefficient evaluated PTV similarity between FBCT and 4D-CT data sets. Results: In total, 14 of the 15 patients were analyzed. One patient was excluded as there was no measurable GTV. Mean GTV_3D was 115.3 cm 3 and mean IGTV_4D was 152.5 cm 3 ( P = .001. Mean PTV_3D was 530.0 cm 3 and PTV_4D was 499.8 cm 3 ( P = .40. Both gross primary and nodal disease analyzed separately were larger

  18. Quality Management in Radiotherapy. Chapter 19

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scalliet, P.

    2017-01-01

    Soon after the discovery of X rays and natural radioactivity, the therapeutic use of ionizing radiation grew into what has today become an important oncological specialty, with unmatched cost–benefit features. Radiotherapy is an inexpensive solution to many cancers; it is a reproducible technique with fundamentals that rely both on a large set of evidence based medical data and on high technology equipment that has benefited from the digital revolution in the second half of the twentieth century. One characteristic of radiotherapy is its narrow therapeutic window, with cure being never very far from injury. Therefore, radiotherapy administration requires great accuracy in target volume definition and dose control. Modest underdosage leads to the recurrence of cancer, while overdosage leads to unacceptable toxicity. While more sophisticated treatment techniques have emerged recently (intensity modulation, image guidance, hadrons), equally sophisticated means to control the actual delivery of radiotherapy have been developed. Better control of dose delivery allows for better delineation between target tissue exposed to high doses and normal tissue shielded to the maximum, with steep dose gradients sometimes over a few millimetres. This, in turn, requires better volume definition and better control of patient positioning.

  19. A technique of using gated-CT images to determine internal target volume (ITV) for fractionated stereotactic lung radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Jianyue; Ajlouni, Munther; Chen Qing; Yin, Fang-Fang; Movsas, Benjamin

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: To develop and evaluate a technique and procedure of using gated-CT images in combination with PET image to determine the internal target volume (ITV), which could reduce the planning target volume (PTV) with adequate target coverage. Patients and methods: A skin marker-based gating system connected to a regular single slice CT scanner was used for this study. A motion phantom with adjustable motion amplitude was used to evaluate the CT gating system. Specifically, objects of various sizes/shapes, considered as virtual tumors, were placed on the phantom to evaluate the number of phases of gated images required to determine the ITV while taking into account tumor size, shape and motion. A procedure of using gated-CT and PET images to define ITV for patients was developed and was tested in patients enrolled in an IRB approved protocol. Results: The CT gating system was capable of removing motion artifacts for target motion as large as 3-cm when it was gated at optimal phases. A phantom study showed that two gated-CT scans at the end of expiration and the end of inspiration would be sufficient to determine the ITV for tumor motion less than 1-cm, and another mid-phase scan would be required for tumors with 2-cm motion, especially for small tumors. For patients, the ITV encompassing visible tumors in all sets of gated-CT and regular spiral CT images seemed to be consistent with the target volume determined from PET images. PTV expanded from the ITV with a setup uncertainty margin had less volume than PTVs from spiral CT images with a 10-mm generalized margin or an individualized margin determined at fluoroscopy. Conclusions: A technique of determining the ITV using gated-CT images was developed and was clinically implemented successfully for fractionated stereotactic lung radiotherapy

  20. Cone-Beam CT Localization of Internal Target Volumes for Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy of Lung Lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhiheng; Wu, Q. Jackie; Marks, Lawrence B.; Larrier, Nicole; Yin Fangfang

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, we investigate a technique of matching internal target volumes (ITVs) in four-dimensional (4D) simulation computed tomography (CT) to the composite target volume in free-breathing on-board cone-beam (CB) CT. The technique is illustrated by using both phantom and patient cases. Methods and Materials: A dynamic phantom with a target ball simulating respiratory motion with various amplitude and cycle times was used to verify localization accuracy. The dynamic phantom was scanned using simulation CT with a phase-based retrospective sorting technique. The ITV was then determined based on 10 sets of sorted images. The size and epicenter of the ITV identified from 4D simulation CT images and the composite target volume identified from on-board CBCT images were compared to assess localization accuracy. Similarly, for two clinical cases of patients with lung cancer, ITVs defined from 4D simulation CT images and CBCT images were compared. Results: For the phantom, localization accuracy between the ITV in 4D simulation CT and the composite target volume in CBCT was within 1 mm, and ITV was within 8.7%. For patient cases, ITVs on simulation CT and CBCT were within 8.0%. Conclusion: This study shows that CBCT is a useful tool to localize ITV for targets affected by respiratory motion. Verification of the ITV from 4D simulation CT using on-board free-breathing CBCT is feasible for the target localization of lung tumors

  1. Planning Target Margin Calculations for Prostate Radiotherapy Based on Intrafraction and Interfraction Motion Using Four Localization Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beltran, Chris; Herman, Michael G.; Davis, Brian J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To determine planning target volume (PTV) margins for prostate radiotherapy based on the internal margin (IM) (intrafractional motion) and the setup margin (SM) (interfractional motion) for four daily localization methods: skin marks (tattoo), pelvic bony anatomy (bone), intraprostatic gold seeds using a 5-mm action threshold, and using no threshold. Methods and Materials: Forty prostate cancer patients were treated with external radiotherapy according to an online localization protocol using four intraprostatic gold seeds and electronic portal images (EPIs). Daily localization and treatment EPIs were obtained. These data allowed inter- and intrafractional analysis of prostate motion. The SM for the four daily localization methods and the IM were determined. Results: A total of 1532 fractions were analyzed. Tattoo localization requires a SM of 6.8 mm left-right (LR), 7.2 mm inferior-superior (IS), and 9.8 mm anterior-posterior (AP). Bone localization requires 3.1, 8.9, and 10.7 mm, respectively. The 5-mm threshold localization requires 4.0, 3.9, and 3.7 mm. No threshold localization requires 3.4, 3.2, and 3.2 mm. The intrafractional prostate motion requires an IM of 2.4 mm LR, 3.4 mm IS and AP. The PTV margin using the 5-mm threshold, including interobserver uncertainty, IM, and SM, is 4.8 mm LR, 5.4 mm IS, and 5.2 mm AP. Conclusions: Localization based on EPI with implanted gold seeds allows a large PTV margin reduction when compared with tattoo localization. Except for the LR direction, bony anatomy localization does not decrease the margins compared with tattoo localization. Intrafractional prostate motion is a limiting factor on margin reduction

  2. Delineating CD4 dependency of HIV-1: Adaptation to infect low level CD4 expressing target cells widens cellular tropism but severely impacts on envelope functionality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Beauparlant

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A hallmark of HIV-1 infection is the continuously declining number of the virus' predominant target cells, activated CD4+ T cells. With diminishing CD4+ T cell levels, the capacity to utilize alternate cell types and receptors, including cells that express low CD4 receptor levels such as macrophages, thus becomes crucial. To explore evolutionary paths that allow HIV-1 to acquire a wider host cell range by infecting cells with lower CD4 levels, we dissected the evolution of the envelope-CD4 interaction under in vitro culture conditions that mimicked the decline of CD4high target cells, using a prototypic subtype B, R5-tropic strain. Adaptation to CD4low targets proved to severely alter envelope functions including trimer opening as indicated by a higher affinity to CD4 and loss in shielding against neutralizing antibodies. We observed a strikingly decreased infectivity on CD4high target cells, but sustained infectivity on CD4low targets, including macrophages. Intriguingly, the adaptation to CD4low targets altered the kinetic of the entry process, leading to rapid CD4 engagement and an extended transition time between CD4 and CCR5 binding during entry. This phenotype was also observed for certain central nervous system (CNS derived macrophage-tropic viruses, highlighting that the functional perturbation we defined upon in vitro adaptation to CD4low targets occurs in vivo. Collectively, our findings suggest that CD4low adapted envelopes may exhibit severe deficiencies in entry fitness and shielding early in their evolution. Considering this, adaptation to CD4low targets may preferentially occur in a sheltered and immune-privileged environment such as the CNS to allow fitness restoring compensatory mutations to occur.

  3. ESTRO ACROP guidelines for target volume definition in the treatment of locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestle, Ursula; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Ricardi, Umberto; Geets, Xavier; Belderbos, Jose; Pöttgen, Christoph; Dziadiuszko, Rafal; Peeters, Stephanie; Lievens, Yolande; Hurkmans, Coen; Slotman, Ben; Ramella, Sara; Faivre-Finn, Corinne; McDonald, Fiona; Manapov, Farkhad; Putora, Paul Martin; LePéchoux, Cécile; Van Houtte, Paul

    2018-04-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) plays a major role in the curative treatment of locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Therefore, the ACROP committee was asked by the ESTRO to provide recommendations on target volume delineation for standard clinical scenarios in definitive (chemo)radiotherapy (RT) and adjuvant RT for locally advanced NSCLC. The guidelines given here are a result of the evaluation of a structured questionnaire followed by a consensus discussion, voting and writing procedure within the committee. Hence, we provide advice for methods and time-points of diagnostics and imaging before the start of treatment planning and for the mandatory and optional imaging to be used for planning itself. Concerning target volumes, recommendations are given for GTV delineation of primary tumour and lymph nodes followed by issues related to the delineation of CTVs for definitive and adjuvant radiotherapy. In the context of PTV delineation, recommendations about the management of geometric uncertainties and target motion are given. We further provide our opinions on normal tissue delineation and organisational and responsibility questions in the process of target volume delineation. This guideline intends to contribute to the standardisation and optimisation of the process of RT treatment planning for clinical practice and prospective studies. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Three-dimensional intrafractional internal target motions in accelerated partial breast irradiation using three-dimensional conformal external beam radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Kimiko; Yoshimura, Michio; Mukumoto, Nobutaka; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Inoue, Minoru; Sasaki, Makoto; Fujimoto, Takahiro; Yano, Shinsuke; Nakata, Manabu; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2017-07-01

    We evaluated three-dimensional intrafractional target motion, divided into respiratory-induced motion and baseline drift, in accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). Paired fluoroscopic images were acquired simultaneously using orthogonal kV X-ray imaging systems at pre- and post-treatment for 23 patients who underwent APBI with external beam radiotherapy. The internal target motion was calculated from the surgical clips placed around the tumour cavity. The peak-to-peak respiratory-induced motions ranged from 0.6 to 1.5mm in all directions. A systematic baseline drift of 1.5mm towards the posterior direction and a random baseline drift of 0.3mm in the lateral-medial and cranial-caudal directions were observed. The baseline for an outer tumour cavity drifted towards the lateral and posterior directions, and that for an upper tumour cavity drifted towards the cranial direction. Moderate correlations were observed between the posterior baseline drift and the patients' physical characteristics. The posterior margin for intrafractional uncertainties was larger than 5mm in patients with greater fat thickness due to the baseline drift. The magnitude of the intrafractional motion was not uniform according to the direction, patients' physical characteristics, or tumour cavity location due to the baseline drift. Therefore, the intrafractional systematic movement should be properly managed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Low-energy electron emitters for targeted radiotherapy of small tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernhardt, Peter; Forssell-Aronsson, Eva; Jacobsson, Lars; Skarnemark, Gunnar

    2001-01-01

    The possibility of using electron emitters to cure a cancer with metastatic spread depends on the energy of the emitted electrons. Electrons with high energy will give a high, absorbed dose to large tumours, but the absorbed dose to small tumours or single tumour cells will be low, because the range of the electrons is too long. The fraction of energy absorbed within the tumour decreases with increasing electron energy and decreasing tumour size. For tumours smaller than 1 g, the tumour-to-normal-tissue mean absorbed dose-rate ratio, TND, will be low, e.g. for 131 I and 90 Y, because of the high energy of the emitted electrons. For radiotherapy of small tumours, radionuclides emitting charged particles with short ranges (a few m u m ) are required. A mathematical model was constructed to evaluate the relation between TND and electron energy, photon-to-electron energy ratio, p/e, and tumour size. Criteria for the selection of suitable radionuclides for the treatment of small tumours were defined based on the results of the TND model. In addition, the possibility of producing such radionuclides and their physical and chemical properties were evaluated. Based on the mathematical model, the energy of the emitted electrons should be = 40 keV for small tumours ( 58m Co, 103m Rh, 119 Sb, 161 Ho, and 189m Os. All of these nuclides by internal transition or electron capture, which yields conversion and Auger electrons, and it should be possible to produce most of them in therapeutic amounts. The five low-energy electron-emitting radionuclides identified may be relevant in the radiation treatment of small tumours, especially if bound to internalizing radiopharmaceuticals

  6. Target tailoring and proton beam therapy to reduce small bowel dose in cervical cancer radiotherapy. A comparison of benefits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boer, Peter de; Westerveld, Henrike; Smit, Mark; Bel, Arjan; Rasch, Coen R.N.; Stalpers, Lukas J.A. [Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiation Oncology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Schoot, Agustinus J.A.J. van de [The Netherlands Cancer Institute - Antoni van Leeuwenhoek, Department of Radiation Oncology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Buist, Marrije R. [Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2018-03-15

    The aim of the study was to investigate the potential clinical benefit from both target tailoring by excluding the tumour-free proximal part of the uterus during image-guided adaptive radiotherapy (IGART) and improved dose conformity based on intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT). The study included planning CTs from 11 previously treated patients with cervical cancer with a >4-cm tumour-free part of the proximal uterus on diagnostic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). IGART and robustly optimised IMPT plans were generated for both conventional target volumes and for MRI-based target tailoring (where the non-invaded proximal part of the uterus was excluded), yielding four treatment plans per patient. For each plan, the V{sub 15Gy}, V{sub 30Gy}, V{sub 45Gy} and D{sub mean} for bladder, sigmoid, rectum and bowel bag were compared, and the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) for ≥grade 2 acute small bowel toxicity was calculated. Both IMPT and MRI-based target tailoring resulted in significant reductions in V{sub 15Gy}, V{sub 30Gy}, V{sub 45Gy} and D{sub mean} for bladder and small bowel. IMPT reduced the NTCP for small bowel toxicity from 25% to 18%; this was further reduced to 9% when combined with MRI-based target tailoring. In four of the 11 patients (36%), NTCP reductions of >10% were estimated by IMPT, and in six of the 11 patients (55%) when combined with MRI-based target tailoring. This >10% NTCP reduction was expected if the V{sub 45Gy} for bowel bag was >275 cm{sup 3} and >200 cm{sup 3}, respectively, during standard IGART alone. In patients with cervical cancer, both proton therapy and MRI-based target tailoring lead to a significant reduction in the dose to surrounding organs at risk and small bowel toxicity. (orig.) [German] In der vorliegenden Studie wurden die moeglichen klinischen Vorteile einer Zielvolumenpraezisierung durch Ausschluss des tumorfreien proximalen Gebaermutteranteils bei der ''image-guided adaptive radiotherapy

  7. Phantom study of radiation doses outside the target volume brachytherapy versus external radiotherapy of early breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansson, Bengt; Persson, Essie; Westman, Gunnar; Persliden, Jan

    2003-01-01

    Background and purpose: Brachytherapy is sometimes suggested as an adjuvant treatment after surgery of some tumours. When introducing this, it would be useful to have an estimate of the dose distribution to different body sites, both near and distant to target, comparing conventional external irradiation to brachytherapy. The aim of the present study was to determine radiation doses with both methods at different body sites, near and distant to target, in an experimental situation on an operated left sided breast cancer on a female Alderson phantom. Methods: Five external beam treatments with isocentric tangential fields were given by a linear accelerator. A specified dose of 1.0 Gy was given to the whole left sided breast volume. Five interstitial brachytherapy treatments were given to the upper, lateral quadrant of the left breast by a two plane, 10 needles implant. A dose of 1.0 Gy specified according to the Paris system was administered by a pulsed dose rate afterloading machine. Absorbed dose in different fixed dose points were measured by thermoluminescence dosimeters. Results: Both methods yielded an absorbed dose of the same size to the bone marrow and internal organs distant to target, 1.0-1.4% of the prescribed dose. There was a trend of lower doses to the lower half of the trunk and higher doses to the upper half of the trunk, respectively, by brachytherapy. A 90% reduction of absorbed dose with brachytherapy compared to external irradiation was found in the near-target region within 5 cm from target boundary where parts of the left lung and the heart are situated. If an adjuvant dose of 50 Gy is given with the external radiotherapy and brachytherapy, the absorbed dose in a part of the myocardium could be reduced from 31.8 to 2.1 Gy. Conclusions: Near target, brachytherapy yielded a considerably lower absorbed dose which is of special importance when considering radiation effects on the myocard and lungs. We could not demonstrate any difference of

  8. SU-F-T-644: Reproducibility of Target Position Using Moderate Voluntary Breath- Hold During Liver Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui, G; Trakul, N; Chang, E; Shiu, A

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the reproducibility of target position using moderate voluntary breath-hold during liver stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR). Methods: Two patients who underwent liver SABR on a Varian TrueBeam STx linac were used for this study. Fiducial markers were placed in and around the target in the liver as surrogates for the target position and motion. GTVs were contoured by assessing tumor extent on contrast enhanced CT. The PTV was created from the GTV by adding 2 mm margins to account for the residual motion during breath-holds. A portable biofeedback system was used to facilitate the breath-hold to a reproducible position. The Varian RPM system was used for gating the linac. Proceeding each treatment, orthogonal kV pairs were taken, and alignment to nearby bony anatomy was performed. Then the breath-hold CBCT was acquired to align the fiducial markers. On-line fluoroscopy was used to fine-tune the breath-hold gating thresholds to correlate with the positions of the fiducial markers. The inter-fraction reproducibility of the target was evaluated by the offsets of the daily breath-hold CBCTs from the paired kV matches as a direct measure of the target position relative to the bony anatomy. The intra-fraction reproducibility of the target position was assessed by the gated window of the RPM marker block for each fraction. Results: The absolute mean offsets between the CBCT and paired kV matches in the vertical, longitudinal, and lateral directions were 0.06 cm, 0.10 cm, and 0.06 cm for patient 1, and 0.37 cm, 0.62 cm, and 0.09 cm for patient 2. The gated window of the RPM marker block for the breath-hold for each fraction was within 0.63 ± 0.16 cm and 0.59 ± 0.12 cm for patients 1 and 2, respectively. Conclusion: Moderate voluntary breath-hold showed good inter- and intra-fraction reproducibility of target position during liver SABR.

  9. SU-F-T-644: Reproducibility of Target Position Using Moderate Voluntary Breath- Hold During Liver Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, G; Trakul, N; Chang, E; Shiu, A [University Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the reproducibility of target position using moderate voluntary breath-hold during liver stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR). Methods: Two patients who underwent liver SABR on a Varian TrueBeam STx linac were used for this study. Fiducial markers were placed in and around the target in the liver as surrogates for the target position and motion. GTVs were contoured by assessing tumor extent on contrast enhanced CT. The PTV was created from the GTV by adding 2 mm margins to account for the residual motion during breath-holds. A portable biofeedback system was used to facilitate the breath-hold to a reproducible position. The Varian RPM system was used for gating the linac. Proceeding each treatment, orthogonal kV pairs were taken, and alignment to nearby bony anatomy was performed. Then the breath-hold CBCT was acquired to align the fiducial markers. On-line fluoroscopy was used to fine-tune the breath-hold gating thresholds to correlate with the positions of the fiducial markers. The inter-fraction reproducibility of the target was evaluated by the offsets of the daily breath-hold CBCTs from the paired kV matches as a direct measure of the target position relative to the bony anatomy. The intra-fraction reproducibility of the target position was assessed by the gated window of the RPM marker block for each fraction. Results: The absolute mean offsets between the CBCT and paired kV matches in the vertical, longitudinal, and lateral directions were 0.06 cm, 0.10 cm, and 0.06 cm for patient 1, and 0.37 cm, 0.62 cm, and 0.09 cm for patient 2. The gated window of the RPM marker block for the breath-hold for each fraction was within 0.63 ± 0.16 cm and 0.59 ± 0.12 cm for patients 1 and 2, respectively. Conclusion: Moderate voluntary breath-hold showed good inter- and intra-fraction reproducibility of target position during liver SABR.

  10. Study on delineation of tumor volume of primary locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma after induction chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long Jinhua; Dong Shi; Jin Feng; Wu Weili; Gan Jiaying; Chen Haixia; Li Yuanyuan; Gong Xiuyun

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the delineation of gross tumor volume (GTV) in locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (LANC) according to imageological changes before and after induction chemotherapy (IC) in order to decrease high dose area and protect normal tissue better. Methods: Between Mar 2010 to Jan 2011, 11 patients with LANC were enrolled and treated with TPF regimen followed by intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with concurrent chemotherapy, target volumes were delineated based on fused CT imaging before and after IC following project determination. Tumor target volumes after and before IC were respectively delineated according to imaging tumor residues and were overlaid by CTV nx in order to ensure radical doses for the imaging tumor volume before IC, the resulting differences of tumor target volumes of IC before and after were measured and analyzed by paired t-test. Results: Before and after IC, the average volumes of GTV nx were respectively 44.72 cm 3 and 28.87 (t=3.89, P=0.003), the average volumes of GTV nd were respectively 32.76 cm 3 and 19.82 cm 3 (t=2.47, P=0.033), the volumes of maximum dose area in brainstem and spinal cord as well as eyeball decreased (t=2.93-4.59, all P<0.05). Conclusions: LANC treated by 3 cycle TPF regimen followed by IMRT with concurrent chemotherapy shows significant shrinkage of tumor volume. The volume of high dose region which caused by normally recovered tissues were decreased by re-delineation of target volume in brainstem and spinal cord as well as eyeball of CT images after IC. (authors)

  11. Lipiodol injections for optimization of target volume delineation in a patient with a second tumor of the oropharynx. A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haderlein, Marlen; Merten, Ricarda; Stojanovic, Andrea; Speer, Stefan; Fietkau, Rainer; Ott, Oliver J. [University Hospitals of Erlangen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Erlangen (Germany); Scherl, Claudia [University Hospitals of Erlangen, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Erlangen (Germany)

    2015-08-15

    Lipiodol injections were administered in the head and neck area to improve gross tumor volume (GTV) definition for small-volume re-irradiation of a 63-year-old previously irradiated patient with a second tumor of the oropharynx in the posterior wall with longitudinal ligament infiltration (cT4cN0cM0). The patient had dialysis-depending renal failure. On diagnostic computed tomography (CT), which was performed with intravenous contrast agent, the tumor in the oropharynx was not detectable. Because of dialysis-depending renal failure comorbidity, no contrast agent was applied in the planning CT and in the diagnostic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study. In each cross-sectional imaging study performed, the GTV, especially in craniocaudal extensions, was not safely delineable. Therefore, craniocaudal tumor margins were pharyngoscopically marked with Lipiodol injections, an iodine-containing contrast agent. In a second planning CT, the GTV could be defined with the help of the Lipiodol marks and small-volume re-irradiation was performed. No Lipiodol-associated side effects occurred in the patient. In the present case, the use of Lipiodol injections at the tumor margins facilitated the definition of the GTV. (orig.) [German] Anwendung von Lipiodolinjektionen im Kopf-Hals-Bereich zur Verbesserung der GTV-Definition bei einer kleinvolumigen Re-Bestrahlung eines 63-jaehrigen, vorbestrahlten Patienten mit einem Zweitmalignom im Oropharynx mit Infiltration des hinteren Laengsbandes (cT4cN0cM0). Nebenbefundlich bestand bei dem Patienten eine dialysepflichtige Niereninsuffizienz. Im initialen diagnostischen Kontrastmittel-CT der Hals und Thoraxregion war der Tumor nicht abgrenzbar, so dass das Bestrahlungsplanungs-CT in Anbetracht des diagnostischen CTs und der bekannten Niereninsuffizienz ohne intravenoeses Kontrastmittel durchgefuehrt wurde. Das diagnostische MRT (vgl. Abb. 1) wurde ebenfalls ohne intravenoeses Kontrastmittel durchgefuehrt wurden. In allen durchgefuehrten

  12. Radiotherapy beyond cancer: Target localization in real-time MRI and treatment planning for cardiac radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ipsen, S.; Blanck, O.; Rades, D.; Oborn, B.; Bode, F.; Liney, G.; Hunold, P.; Schweikard, A.; Keall, P. J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Atrial fibrillation (AFib) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia that affects millions of patients world-wide. AFib is usually treated with minimally invasive, time consuming catheter ablation techniques. While recently noninvasive radiosurgery to the pulmonary vein antrum (PVA) in the left atrium has been proposed for AFib treatment, precise target location during treatment is challenging due to complex respiratory and cardiac motion. A MRI linear accelerator (MRI-Linac) could solve the problems of motion tracking and compensation using real-time image guidance. In this study, the authors quantified target motion ranges on cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and analyzed the dosimetric benefits of margin reduction assuming real-time motion compensation was applied. Methods: For the imaging study, six human subjects underwent real-time cardiac MRI under free breathing. The target motion was analyzed retrospectively using a template matching algorithm. The planning study was conducted on a CT of an AFib patient with a centrally located esophagus undergoing catheter ablation, representing an ideal case for cardiac radiosurgery. The target definition was similar to the ablation lesions at the PVA created during catheter treatment. Safety margins of 0 mm (perfect tracking) to 8 mm (untracked respiratory motion) were added to the target, defining the planning target volume (PTV). For each margin, a 30 Gy single fraction IMRT plan was generated. Additionally, the influence of 1 and 3 T magnetic fields on the treatment beam delivery was simulated using Monte Carlo calculations to determine the dosimetric impact of MRI guidance for two different Linac positions. Results: Real-time cardiac MRI showed mean respiratory target motion of 10.2 mm (superior–inferior), 2.4 mm (anterior–posterior), and 2 mm (left–right). The planning study showed that increasing safety margins to encompass untracked respiratory motion leads to overlapping structures even in the

  13. Radiotherapy beyond cancer: Target localization in real-time MRI and treatment planning for cardiac radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ipsen, S. [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia and Institute for Robotics and Cognitive Systems, University of Luebeck, Luebeck 23562 (Germany); Blanck, O.; Rades, D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Luebeck and University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck, Luebeck 23562 (Germany); Oborn, B. [Illawarra Cancer Care Centre (ICCC), Wollongong, New South Wales 2500, Australia and Centre for Medical Radiation Physics (CMRP), University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales 2500 (Australia); Bode, F. [Medical Department II, University of Luebeck and University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck, Luebeck 23562 (Germany); Liney, G. [Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, Liverpool Hospital, Liverpool, New South Wales 2170 (Australia); Hunold, P. [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University of Luebeck and University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck, Luebeck 23562 (Germany); Schweikard, A. [Institute for Robotics and Cognitive Systems, University of Luebeck, Luebeck 23562 (Germany); Keall, P. J., E-mail: paul.keall@sydney.edu.au [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia)

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: Atrial fibrillation (AFib) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia that affects millions of patients world-wide. AFib is usually treated with minimally invasive, time consuming catheter ablation techniques. While recently noninvasive radiosurgery to the pulmonary vein antrum (PVA) in the left atrium has been proposed for AFib treatment, precise target location during treatment is challenging due to complex respiratory and cardiac motion. A MRI linear accelerator (MRI-Linac) could solve the problems of motion tracking and compensation using real-time image guidance. In this study, the authors quantified target motion ranges on cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and analyzed the dosimetric benefits of margin reduction assuming real-time motion compensation was applied. Methods: For the imaging study, six human subjects underwent real-time cardiac MRI under free breathing. The target motion was analyzed retrospectively using a template matching algorithm. The planning study was conducted on a CT of an AFib patient with a centrally located esophagus undergoing catheter ablation, representing an ideal case for cardiac radiosurgery. The target definition was similar to the ablation lesions at the PVA created during catheter treatment. Safety margins of 0 mm (perfect tracking) to 8 mm (untracked respiratory motion) were added to the target, defining the planning target volume (PTV). For each margin, a 30 Gy single fraction IMRT plan was generated. Additionally, the influence of 1 and 3 T magnetic fields on the treatment beam delivery was simulated using Monte Carlo calculations to determine the dosimetric impact of MRI guidance for two different Linac positions. Results: Real-time cardiac MRI showed mean respiratory target motion of 10.2 mm (superior–inferior), 2.4 mm (anterior–posterior), and 2 mm (left–right). The planning study showed that increasing safety margins to encompass untracked respiratory motion leads to overlapping structures even in the

  14. Radiotherapy beyond cancer: target localization in real-time MRI and treatment planning for cardiac radiosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ipsen, S; Blanck, O; Oborn, B; Bode, F; Liney, G; Hunold, P; Rades, D; Schweikard, A; Keall, P J

    2014-12-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AFib) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia that affects millions of patients world-wide. AFib is usually treated with minimally invasive, time consuming catheter ablation techniques. While recently noninvasive radiosurgery to the pulmonary vein antrum (PVA) in the left atrium has been proposed for AFib treatment, precise target location during treatment is challenging due to complex respiratory and cardiac motion. A MRI linear accelerator (MRI-Linac) could solve the problems of motion tracking and compensation using real-time image guidance. In this study, the authors quantified target motion ranges on cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and analyzed the dosimetric benefits of margin reduction assuming real-time motion compensation was applied. For the imaging study, six human subjects underwent real-time cardiac MRI under free breathing. The target motion was analyzed retrospectively using a template matching algorithm. The planning study was conducted on a CT of an AFib patient with a centrally located esophagus undergoing catheter ablation, representing an ideal case for cardiac radiosurgery. The target definition was similar to the ablation lesions at the PVA created during catheter treatment. Safety margins of 0 mm (perfect tracking) to 8 mm (untracked respiratory motion) were added to the target, defining the planning target volume (PTV). For each margin, a 30 Gy single fraction IMRT plan was generated. Additionally, the influence of 1 and 3 T magnetic fields on the treatment beam delivery was simulated using Monte Carlo calculations to determine the dosimetric impact of MRI guidance for two different Linac positions. Real-time cardiac MRI showed mean respiratory target motion of 10.2 mm (superior-inferior), 2.4 mm (anterior-posterior), and 2 mm (left-right). The planning study showed that increasing safety margins to encompass untracked respiratory motion leads to overlapping structures even in the ideal scenario, compromising

  15. New Language and Old Problems in Breast Cancer Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiricuţă, Ion Christian

    2017-01-01

    New developments in breast cancer radiotherapy make possible new standards in treatment recommandations based on international guidelines. Developments in radiotherapy irradiation techniques from 2D to 3D-Conformal RT and to IMRT (Intensity Modulated Arc Therapy) make possible to reduce the usual side effects on the organs at risk as: skin, lung, miocard, bone, esophagus and brahial plexus. Dispite of all these progresses acute and late side effects are present. Side effects are as old as the radiotherapy was used. New solutions are available now by improving irradiation techniques. New techniques as sentinel node procedure (SNP) or partial breast irradiation (PBRT) and immediate breast reconstruction with silicon implants (IBRIS) make necessary new considerations regarding the target volume delineations. A new language for definition of gross tumor volume (GTV), clinical target volume (CTV) based on the new diagnostic methods as PET/CT,nonaparticle MRI will have real impact on target delineation and irradiation techniques. "The new common language in breast cancer therapy" would be the first step to improve the endresults and finally the quality of life of the patients. Celsius.

  16. Targeted radiotherapy with {sup 177} Lu-DOTA-TATE in athymic mice with induced pancreatic malignant tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez C, J.; Murphy, C.A. de; Pedraza L, M. [Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, 14000 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Ferro F, G. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Murphy S, E. [Hospital Santelena, 06000 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2006-07-01

    Malignant pancreas tumours induced in athymic mice are a good model for peptide receptor targeted radiotherapy. The objective of this research was to estimate pancreatic tumour absorbed radiation doses after administration of {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-TATE in mice as a therapeutic radiopharmaceutical that could be used in humans. AR42J murine pancreas cancer cells expressing somatostatin receptors, were implanted in athymic mice (n=18) to obtain the {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-TATE biokinetics and dosimetry. To estimate its therapeutic efficacy 87 MBq were injected in a tail vein of 3 mice and 19 days p.i. there were a partial relapse. There was an epithelial and sarcoma mixed tumour in the kidneys of mouse III. The absorbed dose to tumour, kidney and pancreas was 50.5 {+-} 7.2 Gy, 17.5 {+-} 2.5 Gy and 12.6 {+-} 2.3 Gy respectively. These studies justify further therapeutic and dosimetry estimations to ensure that {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-TATE will act as expected in man considering its kidney radiotoxicity. (Author)

  17. Labelling techniques of biomolecules for targeted radiotherapy. Final report of a co-ordinated research project 1998-2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    Malignant tumour disease accounts for approximately one third of deaths worldwide. Gastrointestinal adenocarcinomas, prostate and breast cancers are among the most frequently appearing tumours. Radiotherapy is an essential mode of treatment of all cancer patients either alone or in conjunction with other modalities like surgery and chemotherapy. In most cases radiotherapy is given using external radiation sources. It is also possible to administer radiotherapy by specifically localizing radioisotopes emitting particulate radiation in the tumour tissue. This targeted therapy has proved to have several advantages over external beam therapy, notably the possibility of selectively delivering higher radiation doses to the targeted tumour cells and treating multiple metastases. Procedures for therapy of thyroid carcinoma and hyper-thyroidism using radioiodine (131I) introduced about five decades ago, have stood the test of time and are still widely used the world over. In addition to the therapeutic nuclides of the first generation 131I, 89Sr, 32P, 90Y, etc., which are still widely utilized and accepted by the medical community, many other beta emitting radionuclides with relatively short half-lives such as 153Sm, 186Re, 188Re, 166Ho, 165Dy, etc. have also been recently made available for therapy and used with promising good results. In spite of the potential of targeted radiotherapy to treat a wide range of malignant conditions, routine clinical use is mostly confined to therapy of thyroid carcinoma, hyperthyroidism, metastatic bone pain and synovectomy. In most of the cases, the limitation is obviously not the availability of suitable radionuclides but rather the lack of suitable carrier molecules that would adequately concentrate these radionuclides in target tissues of interest. Based on the above considerations, the scope of the Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) has focused on the synthesis of the required BFCAs for MoAbs and peptide labelling, development and

  18. Labelling techniques of biomolecules for targeted radiotherapy. Final report of a co-ordinated research project 1998-2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-07-01

    Malignant tumour disease accounts for approximately one third of deaths worldwide. Gastrointestinal adenocarcinomas, prostate and breast cancers are among the most frequently appearing tumours. Radiotherapy is an essential mode of treatment of all cancer patients either alone or in conjunction with other modalities like surgery and chemotherapy. In most cases radiotherapy is given using external radiation sources. It is also possible to administer radiotherapy by specifically localizing radioisotopes emitting particulate radiation in the tumour tissue. This targeted therapy has proved to have several advantages over external beam therapy, notably the possibility of selectively delivering higher radiation doses to the targeted tumour cells and treating multiple metastases. Procedures for therapy of thyroid carcinoma and hyper-thyroidism using radioiodine (131I) introduced about five decades ago, have stood the test of time and are still widely used the world over. In addition to the therapeutic nuclides of the first generation 131I, 89Sr, 32P, 90Y, etc., which are still widely utilized and accepted by the medical community, many other beta emitting radionuclides with relatively short half-lives such as 153Sm, 186Re, 188Re, 166Ho, 165Dy, etc. have also been recently made available for therapy and used with promising good results. In spite of the potential of targeted radiotherapy to treat a wide range of malignant conditions, routine clinical use is mostly confined to therapy of thyroid carcinoma, hyperthyroidism, metastatic bone pain and synovectomy. In most of the cases, the limitation is obviously not the availability of suitable radionuclides but rather the lack of suitable carrier molecules that would adequately concentrate these radionuclides in target tissues of interest. Based on the above considerations, the scope of the Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) has focused on the synthesis of the required BFCAs for MoAbs and peptide labelling, development and

  19. Target volume for postoperative radiotherapy in non-small cell lung cancer: Results from a prospective trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kępka, Lucyna; Bujko, Krzysztof; Bujko, Magdalena; Matecka-Nowak, Mirosława; Salata, Andrzej; Janowski, Henryk; Rogowska, Danuta; Cieślak-Żerańska, Ewa; Komosińska, Katarzyna; Zawadzka, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: A previous prospective trial reported that three-dimensional conformal postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) for pN2 NSCLC patients using a limited clinical target volume (CTV) had a late morbidity rate and pulmonary function that did not differ from those observed in pN1 patients treated with surgery without PORT. The aim of this study was to assess locoregional control and localization of failure in patients treated with PORT. Materials and methods: The pattern of locoregional failure was evaluated retrospectively in 151 of 171 patients included in the PORT arm. The CTV included the involved lymph node stations and those with a risk of invasion >10%. Competing risk analysis was used to assess the incidence of locoregional failure and its location outside the CTV. Results: Overall survival at 5 years was 27.1% with a median follow-up of 67 months for 40 living patients. The 5-year cumulative incidence of locoregional failure was 19.4% (95% CI: 18.2–20.5%) including a failure rate of 2% (95% CI: 0–17%) in locations outside or at the border of the CTV. Conclusions: The use of limited CTV was associated with acceptable risk of geographic miss. Overall locoregional control was similar to that reported by other studies using PORT for pN2 patients

  20. How many sets of 4DCT images are sufficient to determine internal target volume for liver radiotherapy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xi Mian; Liu Mengzhong; Zhang Li; Li Qiaoqiao; Huang Xiaoyan; Liu Hui; Hu Yonghong

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: To determine the feasibility of using limited four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) images for treatment planning. Materials and methods: The 4DCT scans of 16 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) were analyzed. Gross tumor volumes (GTVs) were manually contoured on all 10 respiratory phases, and different internal clinical target volumes (ICTVs) were derived by encompassing volumes of the respective CTVs. Volume, position, and shape of ICTVs were calculated and compared. Results: The ICTV 2phases , ICTV 3phases , ICTV 4phases , and ICTV 6phases all showed excellent agreement with ICTV 10phases , and the ICTV 2phases encompassed ICTV 10phases by 94.1 ± 1.8% on average. The 3D shift between the centers of mass of the ICTVs was only 0.6 mm. The surface distance between ICTV 10phases and ICTV 2phases was 1.7 ± 0.8 mm in the left-right (LR) and anteroposterior (AP) directions. Conclusions: Contouring two extreme phases at end-inhalation and end-exhalation is a reasonably safe and labor-saving method of deriving ITV for liver radiotherapy with low and medium tumor motion amplitude (≤1.6 cm). Whether the larger tumor movement affects the results is the subject of ongoing research.

  1. Planning target volume (PTV) definition and its effects in the radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poli, Maria Esmeralda Ramos

    2007-01-01

    Tills work intends to study the margins required to define a planning target volume (PTV) for adequate treatment of the mobile tumors such as prostate or those located in areas with less mobility as the ones in head and neck region, in the absence of daily localization imaging based. It is also intends to evaluate the impact caused by the PTV, in terms of dose, to the critical structures surrounding the PTV and its influence when inverse planning is used in the intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Data from 387 prostate patients were analyzed retrospectively. Every patient in the study received daily pre-treatment localization with 2D ultrasound resulting in a total of 10,327 localizations, each comprising of an isocenter displacement in 3 directions: anterior-posterior (AP), right-left lateral (RL), and superior-inferior (SI). The mean displacement and standard deviation (SD) for each direction for each patient was computed from daily treatment records. The uncertainties (SD) in the target position were 4.4 mm (AP), 3.6 mm (RL), and 4.5 mm (SI). A study of the uncertainties in the daily positioning of 78 head and neck patients who used thermoplastic mask to immobilize them, evaluated with electronic portal imaging device (EPID), showed variations (SD) in the isocenter treatment position of 3.1 mm (AP), 1.5 mm (RL), and 4.5 mm (SI). By applying these shifts in an anthropomorphic phantom it was studied the dose-volume histograms resultant of the isocenter displacement in the daily treatment. The result showed the importance of putting margins in the clinical target volume to assure an adequate treatment and also showed that isocenter daily variation can cause an increase to the dose greater than the tolerance level to the critical organs. (author)

  2. Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging driven growth modeling for radiotherapy target definition in glioblastoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Morten B; Guldberg, Trine L; Harbøll, Anja

    2017-01-01

    the microscopic tumor cell spread. Gliomas favor spread along the white matter fiber tracts. Tumor growth models incorporating the MRI diffusion tensors (DTI) allow to account more consistently for the glioma growth. The aim of the study was to investigate the potential of a DTI driven growth model to improve...... target definition in glioblastoma (GBM). MATERIAL AND METHODS: Eleven GBM patients were scanned using T1w, T2w FLAIR, T1w + Gd and DTI. The brain was segmented into white matter, gray matter and cerebrospinal fluid. The Fisher-Kolmogorov growth model was used assuming uniform proliferation...

  3. Target volume definition in conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer: quality assurance in the MRC RT-01 trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seddon, B.S.; Wilson, J.; Khoo, V.; Dearnaley, D.; Bidmead, M.

    2000-01-01

    Prior to randomization of patients into the UK Medical Research Council multicentre randomized trial (RT-01) of conformal radiotherapy (CFRT) in prostate cancer, clinicians at participating centres were required to complete a quality assurance (QA) clinical planning exercise to enable an investigation of inter-observer variability in gross target volume (GTV) and normal structure outlining. Thirteen participating centres and two investigators completed the clinical planning exercise of three practice planning cases. Clinicians were asked to draw outlines of the GTV, rectum and bladder on hard-copy computerized tomography (CT) films of the pelvis, which were transferred onto the Cadplan computer planning system by a single investigator. Centre, inferior and superior CT levels of GTV, rectum and bladder were noted, and volume calculations performed. Planning target volumes (PTV) were generated using automatic volume expansion of GTVs by a 1 cm margin. Anterior, right and left lateral beam eye views (BEV) of the PTVs were generated. Using a common central point, the BEV PTVs were superimposed for each beam direction of each case. Radial PTV variation was investigated by measurement of a novel parameter, termed the radial line measurement variation (RLMV). GTV central slice and length were defined with reasonable consistency. The RLMV analysis showed that the main part of the prostate gland, bladder and inferior rectum were outlined with good consistency among clinicians. However, the outlining of the prostatic apex, superior aspect of the prostate projecting into the bladder, seminal vesicles, the base of seminal vesicles and superior rectum were more variable. This exercise has demonstrated adequate consistency of GTV definition. The RLMV method of analysis indicates particular regions of clinician uncertainty. Appropriate feedback has been given to all participating clinicians, and the final RT-01 trial protocol has been modified to accommodate these findings

  4. Comparison of the predictions of the LQ and CRE models for normal tissue damage due to biologically targeted radiotherapy with exponentially decaying dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Donoghue, J.A.; West of Schotland Health Boards, Glasgow

    1989-01-01

    For biologically targeted radiotherapy organ dose rates may be complex functions of time, related to the biodistribution kinetics of the delivery vehicle and radiolabel. The simples situation is where dose rates are exponentially decaying functions of time. Two normal tissue isoeffect models enable the effects of exponentially decaying dose rates to be addressed. These are the extension of the linear-quadratic model and the cumulative radiation effect model. This communication will compare the predictions of these models. (author). 14 refs.; 1 fig

  5. Antiproton Radiotherapy Peripheral Dose from Secondary Neutrons produced in the Annihilation of Antiprotons in the Target

    CERN Document Server

    Fahimian, Benjamin P; Keyes, Roy; Bassler, Niels; Iwamoto, Keisuke S; Zankl, Maria; Holzscheiter, Michael H

    2009-01-01

    The AD-4/ACE collaboration studies the biological effects of antiprotons with respect to a possible use of antiprotons in cancer therapy. In vitro experiments performed by the collaboration have shown an enhanced biological effectiveness for antiprotons relative to protons. One concern is the normal tissue dose resulting from secondary neutrons produced in the annihilation of antiprotons on the nucleons of the target atoms. Here we present the first organ specific Monte Carlo calculations of normal tissue equivalent neutron dose in antiproton therapy through the use of a segmented CT-based human phantom. The MCNPX Monte Carlo code was employed to quantify the peripheral dose for a cylindrical spread out Bragg peak representing a treatment volume of 1 cm diameter and 1 cm length in the frontal lobe of a segmented whole-body phantom of a 38 year old male. The secondary neutron organ dose was tallied as a function of energy and organ.

  6. Intercomparison of Dosimeters for Non-Target Organ Dose Measurements in Radiotherapy - Activity of EURADOS WG 9: Radiation Protection in Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miljanic, S.; Knezevic, Z.; Bessieres, I.; Bordy, J.-M.; D'Agostino, E.; d'Errico, F.; di Fulvio, A.; Domingo, C.; Olko, P.; Stolarczyk; Silari, M.; Harrison, R.

    2011-01-01

    It has been known for a long time that patients treated with ionizing radiation carry a risk of developing radiation induced cancer in their lifetimes. It is recognized that cure/survival rates in radiotherapy are increasing, but so are secondary cancers. These occurrences are amplified by the early detection of disease in younger patients. These patients are cured from the primary disease and have long life-expectancies, which increase their chances of developing secondary malignancies. The motivation of the EURADOS Working Group 9 (WG 9) ''Radiation protection dosimetry in medicine'' is to assess undue non-target patient doses in radiotherapy and the related risks of secondary malignancy with the most accredited available methods and with the emphasis on a thorough evaluation of dosimetry methods for the measurements of doses remote from the target volume, in phantom experiments. The development of a unified and comprehensive dosimetry methodology for non-target dose estimation is the key element of the WG9 current work. The first scientific aim is to select and review dosimeters suitable for photon and neutron dosimetry in radiotherapy and to evaluate the characteristics of dosimeters at CEA LIST Saclay in reference clinical LINAC beam. (author)

  7. High-risk clinical target volume delineation in CT-guided cervical cancer brachytherapy - Impact of information from FIGO stage with or without systematic inclusion of 3D documentation of clinical gynecological examination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hegazy, Neamat [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Comprehensive Cancer Centre Vienna, Medical Univ. of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Dept. of Clinical Oncology, Medical Univ. of Alexandria, Alexandria (Egypt); Poetter Rickard; Kirisits, Christian [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Comprehensive Cancer Centre Vienna, Medical Univ. of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Lab. for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical Univ. Vienna (Austria); Berger, Daniel; Federico, Mario; Sturdza, Alina; Nesvacil, Nicole [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Comprehensive Cancer Centre Vienna, Medical Univ. of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)], e-mail: nicole.nesvacil@meduniwien.ac.at

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: The aim of the study was to improve computed tomography (CT)-based high-risk clinical target volume (HR CTV) delineation protocols for cervix cancer patients, in settings without any access to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at the time of brachytherapy. Therefore the value of a systematic integration of comprehensive three-dimensional (3D) documentation of repetitive gynecological examination for CT-based HR CTV delineation protocols, in addition to information from FIGO staging, was investigated. In addition to a comparison between reference MRI contours and two different CT-based contouring methods (using complementary information from FIGO staging with or without additional 3D clinical drawings), the use of standardized uterine heights was also investigated. Material and methods: Thirty-five cervix cancer patients with CT- and MR-images and 3D clinical drawings at time of diagnosis and brachytherapy were included. HR CTV{sub stage} was based on CT information and FIGO stage. HR CTV{sub stage} {sub +3Dclin} was contoured on CT using FIGO stage and 3D clinical drawing. Standardized HR CTV heights were: 1/1, 2/3 and 1/2 of uterine height. MRI-based HR CTV was delineated independently. Resulting widths, thicknesses, heights, and volumes of HR CTV{sub stage}, HR CTV{sub stage+3Dclin} and MRI-based HR CTV contours were compared. Results: The overall normalized volume ratios (mean{+-}SD of CT/MRI{sub ref} volume) of HR CTV{sub stage} and HR{sub stage+3Dclin} were 2.6 ({+-}0.6) and 2.1 ({+-}0.4) for 1/1 and 2.3 ({+-}0.5) and 1.8 ({+-}0.4), for 2/3, and 1.9 ({+-}0.5) and 1.5 ({+-}0.3), for 1/2 of uterine height. The mean normalized widths were 1.5{+-}0.2 and 1.2{+-}0.2 for HR CTV{sub stage} and HR CTV{sub stage+3Dclin}, respectively (p < 0.05). The mean normalized heights for HR CTV{sub stage} and HR CTV{sub stage+3Dclin} were both 1.7{+-}0.4 for 1/1 (p < 0.05.), 1.3{+-}0.3 for 2/3 (p < 0.05) and 1.1{+-}0.3 for 1/2 of uterine height. Conclusion: CT-based HR

  8. Audio-Visual Biofeedback Does Not Improve the Reliability of Target Delineation Using Maximum Intensity Projection in 4-Dimensional Computed Tomography Radiation Therapy Planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Wei; Neuner, Geoffrey A.; George, Rohini; Wang, Zhendong; Sasor, Sarah; Huang, Xuan; Regine, William F.; Feigenberg, Steven J.; D'Souza, Warren D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether coaching patients' breathing would improve the match between ITV MIP (internal target volume generated by contouring in the maximum intensity projection scan) and ITV 10 (generated by combining the gross tumor volumes contoured in 10 phases of a 4-dimensional CT [4DCT] scan). Methods and Materials: Eight patients with a thoracic tumor and 5 patients with an abdominal tumor were included in an institutional review board-approved prospective study. Patients underwent 3 4DCT scans with: (1) free breathing (FB); (2) coaching using audio-visual (AV) biofeedback via the Real-Time Position Management system; and (3) coaching via a spirometer system (Active Breathing Coordinator or ABC). One physician contoured all scans to generate the ITV 10 and ITV MIP . The match between ITV MIP and ITV 10 was quantitatively assessed with volume ratio, centroid distance, root mean squared distance, and overlap/Dice coefficient. We investigated whether coaching (AV or ABC) or uniform expansions (1, 2, 3, or 5 mm) of ITV MIP improved the match. Results: Although both AV and ABC coaching techniques improved frequency reproducibility and ABC improved displacement regularity, neither improved the match between ITV MIP and ITV 10 over FB. On average, ITV MIP underestimated ITV 10 by 19%, 19%, and 21%, with centroid distance of 1.9, 2.3, and 1.7 mm and Dice coefficient of 0.87, 0.86, and 0.88 for FB, AV, and ABC, respectively. Separate analyses indicated a better match for lung cancers or tumors not adjacent to high-intensity tissues. Uniform expansions of ITV MIP did not correct for the mismatch between ITV MIP and ITV 10 . Conclusions: In this pilot study, audio-visual biofeedback did not improve the match between ITV MIP and ITV 10 . In general, ITV MIP should be limited to lung cancers, and modification of ITV MIP in each phase of the 4DCT data set is recommended

  9. Targeting mitochondria in cancer cells using gold nanoparticle-enhanced radiotherapy: A Monte Carlo study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirkby, Charles, E-mail: charles.kirkby@albertahealthservices.ca; Ghasroddashti, Esmaeel [Department of Medical Physics, Jack Ady Cancer Centre, Lethbridge, Alberta T1J 1W5 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada); Department of Oncology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T2N 4N2 (Canada)

    2015-02-15

    enhanced, as these simulations show, this work suggests the potential for both a tool to study the role of mitochondria in cellular response to radiation and a novel avenue for radiation therapy in that the mitochondria may be targeted, rather than the nuclear DNA.

  10. Implementing MRI-based target delineation for cervical cancer treatment within a rapid workflow environment for image-guided brachytherapy: A practical approach for centers without in-room MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifiletti, Daniel M; Libby, Bruce; Feuerlein, Sebastian; Kim, Taeho; Garda, Allison; Watkins, W Tyler; Erickson, Sarah; Ornan, Afshan; Showalter, Timothy N

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based intracavitary brachytherapy offers several advantages over computed tomography (CT)-based brachytherapy, but many centers are unable to offer it at the time of brachytherapy because of logistic and/or financial considerations. We have implemented a method of integrating MRI into a CT-guided, high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy workflow in clinics that do not have immediately available MRI capability. At our institution, patients receiving high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy as a component of the definitive treatment of cervical cancer have a Smit sleeve placed during the first brachytherapy fraction in a dedicated suite with in-room CT-on-rails. After the first fraction of brachytherapy, an MRI is obtained with the Smit sleeve, but no applicator, in place. For each subsequent fraction, CT scans are coregistered to the MRI scan by the Smit sleeve. The gross target volume is defined by MRI and overlaid on the CT images for each brachytherapy treatment for dose optimization. This MRI-integrated workflow adds workflow is a feasible compromise to preserve an efficient workflow while integrating MRI target delineation, and it provides many of the advantages of both MRI- and CT-based brachytherapy. The future collection and analysis of clinical data will serve to compare the proposed approach to non-MRI containing techniques. Copyright © 2015 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Audio-Visual Biofeedback Does Not Improve the Reliability of Target Delineation Using Maximum Intensity Projection in 4-Dimensional Computed Tomography Radiation Therapy Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Wei, E-mail: wlu@umm.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Neuner, Geoffrey A.; George, Rohini; Wang, Zhendong; Sasor, Sarah [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Huang, Xuan [Research and Development, Care Management Department, Johns Hopkins HealthCare LLC, Glen Burnie, Maryland (United States); Regine, William F.; Feigenberg, Steven J.; D' Souza, Warren D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether coaching patients' breathing would improve the match between ITV{sub MIP} (internal target volume generated by contouring in the maximum intensity projection scan) and ITV{sub 10} (generated by combining the gross tumor volumes contoured in 10 phases of a 4-dimensional CT [4DCT] scan). Methods and Materials: Eight patients with a thoracic tumor and 5 patients with an abdominal tumor were included in an institutional review board-approved prospective study. Patients underwent 3 4DCT scans with: (1) free breathing (FB); (2) coaching using audio-visual (AV) biofeedback via the Real-Time Position Management system; and (3) coaching via a spirometer system (Active Breathing Coordinator or ABC). One physician contoured all scans to generate the ITV{sub 10} and ITV{sub MIP}. The match between ITV{sub MIP} and ITV{sub 10} was quantitatively assessed with volume ratio, centroid distance, root mean squared distance, and overlap/Dice coefficient. We investigated whether coaching (AV or ABC) or uniform expansions (1, 2, 3, or 5 mm) of ITV{sub MIP} improved the match. Results: Although both AV and ABC coaching techniques improved frequency reproducibility and ABC improved displacement regularity, neither improved the match between ITV{sub MIP} and ITV{sub 10} over FB. On average, ITV{sub MIP} underestimated ITV{sub 10} by 19%, 19%, and 21%, with centroid distance of 1.9, 2.3, and 1.7 mm and Dice coefficient of 0.87, 0.86, and 0.88 for FB, AV, and ABC, respectively. Separate analyses indicated a better match for lung cancers or tumors not adjacent to high-intensity tissues. Uniform expansions of ITV{sub MIP} did not correct for the mismatch between ITV{sub MIP} and ITV{sub 10}. Conclusions: In this pilot study, audio-visual biofeedback did not improve the match between ITV{sub MIP} and ITV{sub 10}. In general, ITV{sub MIP} should be limited to lung cancers, and modification of ITV{sub MIP} in each phase of the 4DCT data set is recommended.

  12. Experimental pavement delineation treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryden, J. E.; Lorini, R. A.

    1981-06-01

    Visibility and durability of materials used to delineate shoulders and medians adjacent to asphalt pavements were evaluated. Materials evaluated were polysulfide and coal tar epoxies, one and two component polyesters, portland cement, acrylic paints, modified-alkyd traffic paint, preformed plastic tape, and thermoplastic markings. Neat applications, sand mortars, and surface treatments were installed in several geometric patterns including cross hatches, solid median treatments, and various widths of edge lines. Thermoplastic pavement markings generally performed very well, providing good visibility under adverse viewing conditions for at least 4 years. Thermoplastic 4 in. wide edge lines appear to provide adequate visibility for most conditions.

  13. Design of planning target volume margin using an active breathing control and Varian image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) system in unresectable liver tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yue Jinbo; Yu Jinming; Liu Jing; Liu Tonghai; Yin Yong; Shi Xuetao; Song Jinlong

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To define the planning target volume(PTV) margin with an active breathing control (ABC) and the Varian image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) system. Methods: Thirteen patients with liver cancer were treated with radiotherapy from May 2006 to September 2006. Prior to radiotherapy, all patients had undergone transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) by infusing a mixture of iodized oil contrast medium and chemotherapeutic agents, kV fluoroscopy was used to measure the potential motion of lipiodol spot positions during ABC breath-holds. ABC was used for planning CT scan and radiation delivery, with the breath held at the same phase of the respiratory cycle (near end-exhalation). Cone beam CT (CBCT) was taken using Varian IGRT system, which was then compared online with planning CT using a 3 D-3 D matching tool. Analysis relied on lipiodol spots on planning CT and CBCT manually. The treatment table was moved to produce acceptable setup before treatment delivery. Repeated CBCT image and another analysis were obtained after irradiation. Results: No motion of the intrahepatic tumor was observed on fluoroscopy during ABC breath-holds. The estimated required PTV margins, calculated according to the Stroom formula, were 4.4 mm, 5.3 mm and 7.8 mm in the x, y and z axis directions before radiotherapy. The corresponding parameters were 2.5m, 2.6 mm and 3.9 mm after radiotherapy. Conclusions: We have adopted a PTV margin of 5 mm, 6 mm and 8 mm in the x, y and z axis directions with ABC, and 3,3 and 4 mm with ABC and on-line kilovoltage CBCT. (authors)

  14. Implications of improved diagnostic imaging of small nodal metastases in head and neck cancer: Radiotherapy target volume transformation and dose de-escalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bosch, Sven; Vogel, Wouter V; Raaijmakers, Cornelis P; Dijkema, Tim; Terhaard, Chris H J; Al-Mamgani, Abrahim; Kaanders, Johannes H A M

    2018-05-03

    Diagnostic imaging continues to evolve, and now has unprecedented accuracy for detecting small nodal metastasis. This influences the tumor load in elective target volumes and subsequently has consequences for the radiotherapy dose required to control disease in these volumes. Small metastases that used to remain subclinical and were included in elective volumes, will nowadays be detected and included in high-dose volumes. Consequentially, high-dose volumes will more often contain low-volume disease. These target volume transformations lead to changes in the tumor burden in elective and "gross" tumor volumes with implications for the radiotherapy dose prescribed to these volumes. For head and neck tumors, nodal staging has evolved from mere palpation to combinations of high-resolution imaging modalities. A traditional nodal gross tumor volume in the neck typically had a minimum diameter of 10-15 mm, while nowadays much smaller tumor deposits are detected in lymph nodes. However, the current dose levels for elective nodal irradiation were empirically determined in the 1950s, and have not changed since. In this report the radiobiological consequences of target volume transformation caused by modern imaging of the neck are evaluated, and theoretically derived reductions of dose in radiotherapy for head and neck cancer are proposed. The concept of target volume transformation and subsequent strategies for dose adaptation applies to many other tumor types as well. Awareness of this concept may result in new strategies for target definition and selection of dose levels with the aim to provide optimal tumor control with less toxicity. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Variations of target volume definition and daily target volume localization in stereotactic body radiotherapy for early-stage non–small cell lung cancer patients under abdominal compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Chunhui, E-mail: chan@coh.org; Sampath, Sagus; Schultheisss, Timothy E.; Wong, Jeffrey Y.C.

    2017-07-01

    We aimed to compare gross tumor volumes (GTV) in 3-dimensional computed tomography (3DCT) simulation and daily cone beam CT (CBCT) with the internal target volume (ITV) in 4-dimensional CT (4DCT) simulation in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) treatment of patients with early-stage non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) under abdominal compression. We retrospectively selected 10 patients with NSCLC who received image-guided SBRT treatments under abdominal compression with daily CBCT imaging. GTVs were contoured as visible gross tumor on the planning 3DCT and daily CBCT, and ITVs were contoured using maximum intensity projection (MIP) images of the planning 4DCT. Daily CBCTs were registered with 3DCT and MIP images by matching of bony landmarks in the thoracic region to evaluate interfractional GTV position variations. Relative to MIP-based ITVs, the average 3DCT-based GTV volume was 66.3 ± 17.1% (range: 37.5% to 92.0%) (p < 0.01 in paired t-test), and the average CBCT-based GTV volume was 90.0 ± 6.7% (daily range: 75.7% to 107.1%) (p = 0.02). Based on bony anatomy matching, the center-of-mass coordinates for CBCT-based GTVs had maximum absolute shift of 2.4 mm (left-right), 7.0 mm (anterior-posterior [AP]), and 5.2 mm (superior-inferior [SI]) relative to the MIP-based ITV. CBCT-based GTVs had average overlapping ratio of 81.3 ± 11.2% (range: 45.1% to 98.9%) with the MIP-based ITV, and 57.7 ± 13.7% (range: 35.1% to 83.2%) with the 3DCT-based GTV. Even with abdominal compression, both 3DCT simulations and daily CBCT scans significantly underestimated the full range of tumor motion. In daily image-guided patient setup corrections, automatic bony anatomy-based image registration could lead to target misalignment. Soft tissue-based image registration should be performed for accurate treatment delivery.

  16. Can FDG-PET assist in radiotherapy target volume definition of metastatic lymph nodes in head-and-neck cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schinagl, Dominic A.X.; Hoffmann, Aswin L.; Vogel, Wouter V.; Dalen, Jorn A. van; Verstappen, Suzan M.M.; Oyen, Wim J.G.; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: The role of FDG-PET in radiotherapy target volume definition of the neck was evaluated by comparing eight methods of FDG-PET segmentation to the current CT-based practice of lymph node assessment in head-and-neck cancer patients. Materials and methods: Seventy-eight head-and-neck cancer patients underwent coregistered CT- and FDG-PET scans. Lymph nodes were classified as 'enlarged' if the shortest axial diameter on CT was ≥10 mm, and as 'marginally enlarged' if it was 7-10 mm. Subsequently, lymph nodes were assessed on FDG-PET applying eight segmentation methods: visual interpretation (PET VIS ), applying fixed thresholds at a standardized uptake value (SUV) of 2.5 and at 40% and 50% of the maximum signal intensity of the primary tumor (PET SUV , PET 40% , PET 50% ) and applying a variable threshold based on the signal-to-background ratio (PET SBR ). Finally, PET 40%N , PET 50%N and PET SBRN were acquired using the signal of the lymph node as the threshold reference. Results: Of 108 nodes classified as 'enlarged' on CT, 75% were also identified by PET VIS , 59% by PET 40% , 43% by PET 50% and 43% by PET SBR . Of 100 nodes classified as 'marginally enlarged', only a minority were visualized by FDG-PET. The respective numbers were 26%, 10%, 7% and 8% for PET VIS , PET 40% , PET 50% and PET SBR . PET 40%N , PET 50%N and PET SBRN , respectively, identified 66%, 82% and 96% of the PET VIS -positive nodes. Conclusions: Many lymph nodes that are enlarged and considered metastatic by standard CT-based criteria appear to be negative on FDG-PET scan. Alternately, a small proportion of marginally enlarged nodes are positive on FDG-PET scan. However, the results are largely dependent on the PET segmentation tool used, and until proper validation FDG-PET is not recommended for target volume definition of metastatic lymph nodes in routine practice.

  17. Reduced rectal toxicity with ultrasound-based image guided radiotherapy using BAT trademark (B-mode acquisition and targeting system) for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohrer, Markus; Schroeder, Peter; Welzel, Grit; Wertz, Hansjoerg; Lohr, Frank; Wenz, Frederik; Mai, Sabine Kathrin

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of image guided radiotherapy with stereotactic ultrasound BAT (B-mode acquisition and targeting system) on rectal toxicity in conformal radiotherapy of prostate cancer. Patients and Methods 42 sequential patients with prostate cancer undergoing radiotherapy before and after the introduction of BAT were included. Planning computed tomography (CT) was performed with empty rectum and moderately filled bladder. The planning target volume (PTV) included the prostate and seminal vesicles with a safety margin of 1.5 cm in anterior and lateral direction. In posterior direction the anterior 1/3 of the rectum circumference were included. Total dose was 66 Gy and a boost of 4 Gy excluding the seminal vesicles. 22 patients (BAT group) were treated with daily stereotactic ultrasound positioning, for the other 20 patients (NoBAT group) an EPID (electronic portal imaging device) was performed once a week. Acute and late genito-urinary (GU) and rectal toxicity and PSA values were evaluated after 1.5, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months. The total median follow up of toxicity was 3 years in the BAT group and 4 years in the NoBAT group. Results In the NoBAT group significant more rectal toxicity occurred, while in GU toxicity no difference was seen. Two patients in the NoBAT group showed late rectal toxicity grade 3, no toxicity > grade 2 occurred in the BAT group. There was no significant difference in PSA reduction between the groups. Conclusion Without BAT significant more acute and a trend to more late rectal toxicity was found. With regard to dose escalation this aspect is currently evaluated with a larger number of patients using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). (orig.)

  18. Internal targeted radiotherapy for bone metastasis: what about underlying physiopathology; Radiotherapie interne vectorisee (metabolique) des metastases osseuses: quid de la physiopathologie sous-jacente?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vuillez, J.Ph. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, Hopital Michallon, Service de Biophysique et Medecine Nucleaire, 38 - Grenoble (France); Laval, G. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, Hopital Michallon, Unite de Recherche et de Soutien en Soins Palliatifs, 38 - Grenoble (France)

    2006-03-15

    Once tumours metastasize to bone, they are usually incurable and responsible for several devastating consequences: severe pain, pathologic fractures, life-threatening hypercalcemia, spinal cord compression and other nerve-compression syndromes. Understanding of physiopathological mechanisms responsible for these symptoms is critical for therapeutic approach, especially pain treatments. Three types of pain occur in tumour bone involvement: tonic or background pain, which are deep non-specific ache rising in intensity as the disease progresses; incident pain on movement (allodynia); and spontaneous pain which can be severe. Bone metastases could be osteolytic or osteoblastic. However, this classification actually represents two extremes of a continuum characterized by dys-regulation of the normal bone remodeling process. Biochemical mediators production is crucial as a part of this process. The bone microenvironment plays a critical role in the formation of osteoclasts through the production of macrophage colony-stimulating factor, receptor activator of nuclear factor kB ligand (RANKL)... Many of these mediators of osteolysis also have been shown to activate nociceptors: prostaglandins A and E, IL-1, IL-6, TNF. Thus there is a link between osteolytic destruction, inflammation and pain. It explains that severe pain could occur independently from fractures and in absence of any bone structure alteration and nervous compression. Also, pain is often disproportionate to tumour size or degree of bone involvement. Inflammatory and osteolytic processes depend on number, localization and organization of tumour cells inside bone and bone marrow tissues. All these parameters are crucial to take into account for a good understanding of treatments mechanisms of action, especially anti-inflammatory drugs (corticosteroid and others), bi-phosphonates, internal radiotherapy (strontium 89 or radiolabelled bi-phosphonates), external radiotherapy and chemotherapy or hormonotherapy

  19. Difference in target definition using three different methods to include respiratory motion in radiotherapy of lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sloth Møller, Ditte; Knap, Marianne Marquard; Nyeng, Tine Bisballe

    2017-01-01

    : PTVσ yields the smallest volumes but does not ensure coverage of tumor during the full respiratory motion due to tumor deformation. Incorporating the respiratory motion in the delineation (PTVdel) takes into account the entire respiratory cycle including deformation, but at the cost, however, of larger...

  20. An assessment of interfractional uterine and cervical motion: Implications for radiotherapy target volume definition in gynaecological cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, Alexandra; Powell, Melanie E.B.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To assess interfractional movement of the uterus and cervix in patients with gynaecological cancer to aid selection of the internal margin for radiotherapy target volumes. Methods and materials: Thirty-three patients with gynaecological cancer had an MRI scan performed on two consecutive days. The two sets of T2-weighted axial images were co-registered, and the uterus and cervix outlined on each scan. Points were identified on the anterior uterine body (Point U), posterior cervix (Point C) and upper vagina (Point V). The displacement of each point in the antero-posterior (AP), supero-inferior (SI) and lateral directions between the two scans was measured. The changes in point position and uterine body angle were correlated with bladder volume and rectal diameter. Results: The mean difference (±1SD) in Point U position was 7 mm (±9.0) in the AP direction, 7.1 mm (±6.8) SI and 0.8 mm (±1.3) laterally. Mean Point C displacement was 4.1 mm (±4.4) SI, 2.7 mm (±2.8) AP, 0.3 (±0.8) laterally, and Point V was 2.6 mm (±3.0) AP and 0.3 mm (±1.0) laterally. There was correlation for uterine SI movement in relation to bladder filling, and for cervical and vaginal AP movement in relation to rectal filling. Conclusion: Large movements of the uterus can occur, particularly in the superior-inferior and anterior-posterior directions, but cervical displacement is less marked. Rectal filling may affect cervical position, while bladder filling has more impact on uterine body position, highlighting the need for specific instructions on bladder and rectal filling for treatment. We propose an asymmetrical margin with CTV-PTV expansion of the uterus, cervix and upper vagina of 15 mm AP, 15 mm SI and 7 mm laterally and expansion of the nodal regions and parametria by 7 mm in all directions

  1. Anatomical imaging for radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, Philip M

    2008-01-01

    The goal of radiation therapy is to achieve maximal therapeutic benefit expressed in terms of a high probability of local control of disease with minimal side effects. Physically this often equates to the delivery of a high dose of radiation to the tumour or target region whilst maintaining an acceptably low dose to other tissues, particularly those adjacent to the target. Techniques such as intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), stereotactic radiosurgery and computer planned brachytherapy provide the means to calculate the radiation dose delivery to achieve the desired dose distribution. Imaging is an essential tool in all state of the art planning and delivery techniques: (i) to enable planning of the desired treatment, (ii) to verify the treatment is delivered as planned and (iii) to follow-up treatment outcome to monitor that the treatment has had the desired effect. Clinical imaging techniques can be loosely classified into anatomic methods which measure the basic physical characteristics of tissue such as their density and biological imaging techniques which measure functional characteristics such as metabolism. In this review we consider anatomical imaging techniques. Biological imaging is considered in another article. Anatomical imaging is generally used for goals (i) and (ii) above. Computed tomography (CT) has been the mainstay of anatomical treatment planning for many years, enabling some delineation of soft tissue as well as radiation attenuation estimation for dose prediction. Magnetic resonance imaging is fast becoming widespread alongside CT, enabling superior soft-tissue visualization. Traditionally scanning for treatment planning has relied on the use of a single snapshot scan. Recent years have seen the development of techniques such as 4D CT and adaptive radiotherapy (ART). In 4D CT raw data are encoded with phase information and reconstructed to yield a set of scans detailing motion through the breathing, or cardiac, cycle. In ART a set of

  2. Evaluation of dose coverage to target volume and normal tissue sparing in the adjuvant radiotherapy of gastric cancers: 3D-CRT compared with dynamic IMRT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Kk; Shukeili, Ka; Kumar, Ss; Davis, Ca; Chandran, Rr; Namrata, S

    2010-01-01

    To assess the potential advantage of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) over 3D-conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) planning in postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy for patients with gastric carcinoma. In a retrospective study, for plan comparison, dose distribution was recalculated in 15 patients treated with 3D-CRT on the contoured structures of same CT images using an IMRT technique. 3D-conformal plans with three fields and four-fields were compared with seven-field dynamic IMRT plans. The different plans were compared by analyzing the dose coverage of planning target volume using TV(95), D(mean), uniformity index, conformity index and homogeneity index parameters. To assess critical organ sparing, D(mean), D(max), dose to one-third and two-third volumes of the OARs and percentage of volumes receiving more than their tolerance doses were compared. The average dose coverage values of PTV with 3F-CRT and 4F-CRT plans were comparable, where as IMRT plans achieved better target coverage(p3D-CRT plans. The doses to the liver and bowel reduced significantly (p3D-CRT plans. For all OARs the percentage of volumes receiving more than their tolerance doses were reduced with the IMRT plans. This study showed that a better target coverage and significant dose reduction to OARs could be achieved with the IMRT plans. The IMRT can be preferred with caution for organ motion. The authors are currently studying organ motion in the upper abdomen to use IMRT for patient treatment.

  3. Conformation radiotherapy and conformal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Kozo

    1999-01-01

    In order to coincide the high dose region to the target volume, the 'Conformation Radiotherapy Technique' using the multileaf collimator and the device for 'hollow-out technique' was developed by Prof. S. Takahashi in 1960. This technique can be classified a type of 2D-dynamic conformal RT techniques. By the clinical application of this technique, the late complications of the lens, the intestine and the urinary bladder after radiotherapy for the maxillary cancer and the cervical cancer decreased. Since 1980's the exact position and shape of the tumor and the surrounding normal tissues can be easily obtained by the tremendous development of the CT/MRI imaging technique. As a result, various kinds of new conformal techniques such as the 3D-CRT, the dose intensity modulation, the tomotherapy have been developed since the beginning of 1990'. Several 'dose escalation study with 2D-/3D conformal RT' is now under way to improve the treatment results. (author)

  4. Sequential versus simultaneous market delineation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haldrup, Niels; Møllgaard, Peter; Kastberg Nielsen, Claus

    2005-01-01

    and geographical markets. Using a unique data setfor prices of Norwegian and Scottish salmon, we propose a methodologyfor simultaneous market delineation and we demonstrate that comparedto a sequential approach conclusions will be reversed.JEL: C3, K21, L41, Q22Keywords: Relevant market, econometric delineation......Delineation of the relevant market forms a pivotal part of most antitrustcases. The standard approach is sequential. First the product marketis delineated, then the geographical market is defined. Demand andsupply substitution in both the product dimension and the geographicaldimension...

  5. Review of potential improvements using MRI in the radiotherapy workflow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torresin, Alberto; Brambilla, Maria Grazia; Monti, Angelo F.; Moscato, Alessio; Brockmann, Marc A.; University Medical Center Mannheim; Schad, Lothar; Attenberger, Ulrike I.; Lohr, Frank

    2015-01-01

    The goal of modern radiotherapy is to deliver a lethal amount of dose to tissue volumes that contain a significant amount of tumour cells while sparing surrounding unaffected or healthy tissue. Online image guided radiotherapy with stereotactic ultrasound, fiducial-based planar X-ray imaging or helical/conebeam CT has dramatically improved the precision of radiotherapy, with moving targets still posing some methodical problems regarding positioning. Therefore, requirements for precise target delineation and identification of functional body structures to be spared by high doses become more evident. The identification of areas of relatively radioresistant cells or areas of high tumor cell density is currently under development. This review outlines the state of the art of MRI integration into treatment planning and its importance in follow up and the quantification of biological effects. Finally the current state of the art of online imaging for patient positioning will be outlined and indications will be given what the potential of integrated radiotherapy/online MRI systems is.

  6. Improvement in Interobserver Accuracy in Delineation of the Lumpectomy Cavity Using Fiducial Markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaikh, Talha; Chen Ting; Khan, Atif; Yue, Ning J.; Kearney, Thomas; Cohler, Alan; Haffty, Bruce G.; Goyal, Sharad

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To determine, whether the presence of gold fiducial markers would improve the inter- and intraphysician accuracy in the delineation of the surgical cavity compared with a matched group of patients who did not receive gold fiducial markers in the setting of accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI). Methods and Materials: Planning CT images of 22 lumpectomy cavities were reviewed in a cohort of 22 patients; 11 patients received four to six gold fiducial markers placed at the time of surgery. Three physicians categorized the seroma cavity according to cavity visualization score criteria and delineated each of the 22 seroma cavities and the clinical target volume. Distance between centers of mass, percentage overlap, and average surface distance for all patients were assessed. Results: The mean seroma volume was 36.9 cm 3 and 34.2 cm 3 for fiducial patients and non-fiducial patients, respectively (p = ns). Fiducial markers improved the mean cavity visualization score, to 3.6 ± 1.0 from 2.5 ± 1.3 (p < 0.05). The mean distance between centers of mass, average surface distance, and percentage overlap for the seroma and clinical target volume were significantly improved in the fiducial marker patients as compared with the non-fiducial marker patients (p < 0.001). Conclusions: The placement of gold fiducial markers placed at the time of lumpectomy improves interphysician identification and delineation of the seroma cavity and clinical target volume. This has implications in radiotherapy treatment planning for accelerated partial-breast irradiation and for boost after whole-breast irradiation.

  7. Automatic segmentation of the heart in radiotherapy for breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laugaard Lorenzen, Ebbe; Ewertz, Marianne; Brink, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to evaluate two fully automatic segmentation methods in comparison with manual delineations for their use in delineating the heart on planning computed tomography (CT) used in radiotherapy for breast cancer. Material and methods. Automatic delineation of heart...... in 15 breast cancer patients was performed by two different automatic delineation systems. Analysis of accuracy and precision of the differences between manual and automatic delineations were evaluated on volume, mean dose, maximum dose and spatial distance differences. Two sets of manual delineations...

  8. Interest of FDG-PET for lung cancer radiotherapy; Interet de la TEP au FDG pour la radiotherapie des cancers bronchiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thureau, S.; Mezzani-Saillard, S.; Dubray, B. [Departement de radiotherapie et de physique medicale et QuantIF - Litis, EA 4108, CRLCC Henri-Becquerel, 1, rue d' Amiens, 76038 Rouen (France); Modzelewski, R.; Edet-Sanson, A.; Vera, P. [Departement de medecine nucleaire et QuantIF - Litis, EA 4108, CRLCC Henri-Becquerel, 1, rue d' Amiens, 76038 Rouen (France)

    2011-10-15

    The recent advances in medical imaging have profoundly altered the radiotherapy of non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC). A meta-analysis has confirmed the superiority of FDG PET-CT over CT for initial staging. FDG PET-CT improves the reproducibility of target volume delineation, especially close to the mediastinum or in the presence of atelectasis. Although not formally validated by a randomized trial, the reduction of the mediastinal target volume, by restricting the irradiation to FDG-avid nodes, is widely accepted. The optimal method of delineation still remains to be defined. The role of FDGPET-CT in monitoring tumor response during radiotherapy is under investigation, potentially opening the way to adapting the treatment modalities to tumor radiation sensitivity. Other tracers, such as F-miso (hypoxia), are also under clinical investigation. To avoid excessive delays, the integration of PET-CT in routine practice requires quick access to the imaging equipment, technical support (fusion and image processing) and multidisciplinary delineation of target volumes. (authors)

  9. The evaluation of a deformable image registration segmentation technique for semi-automating internal target volume (ITV) production from 4DCT images of lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Speight, Richard; Sykes, Jonathan; Lindsay, Rebecca; Franks, Kevin; Thwaites, David

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate a deformable image registration (DIR) segmentation technique for semi-automating ITV production from 4DCT for lung patients, in terms of accuracy and efficiency. Methods: Twenty-five stereotactic body radiotherapy lung patients were selected in this retrospective study. ITVs were manually delineated by an oncologist and semi-automatically produced by propagating the GTV manually delineated on the mid-ventilation phase to all other phases using two different DIR algorithms, using commercial software. The two ITVs produced by DIR were compared to the manually delineated ITV using the dice similarity coefficient (DSC), mean distance between agreement and normalised DSC. DIR-produced ITVs were assessed for their clinical suitability and also the time savings were estimated. Results: Eighteen out of 25 ITVs had normalised DSC > 1 indicating an agreement with the manually produced ITV within 1 mm uncertainty. Four of the other seven ITVs were deemed clinically acceptable and three would require a small amount of editing. In general, ITVs produced by DIR were smoother than those produced by manual delineation. It was estimated that using this technique would save clinicians on average 28 min/patient. Conclusions: ABAS was found to be a useful tool in the production of ITVs for lung patients. The ITVs produced are either immediately clinically acceptable or require minimal editing. This approach represents a significant time saving for clinicians.

  10. Variability Among Breast Radiation Oncologists in Delineation of the Postsurgical Lumpectomy Cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landis, Daniel M.; Luo Weixiu; Song Jun; Bellon, Jennifer R.; Punglia, Rinaa S.; Wong, Julia S.; Killoran, Joseph H.; Gelman, Rebecca; Harris, Jay R.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Partial breast irradiation (PBI) is becoming more widely used. Accurate determination of the surgical lumpectomy cavity volume is more critical with PBI than with whole breast radiation therapy. We examined the interobserver variability in delineation of the lumpectomy cavity among four academic radiation oncologists who specialize in the treatment of breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Thirty-four lumpectomy cavities in 33 consecutive patients were evaluated. Each physician contoured the cavity and a 1.5-cm margin was added to define the planning target volume (PTV). A cavity visualization score (CVS) was assigned (1-5). To eliminate bias, the physician of record was eliminated from the analysis in all cases. Three measures of variability of the PTV were developed: average shift of the center of mass (COM), average percent overlap between the PTV of two physicians (PVO), and standard deviation of the PTV. Results: Of variables examined, pathologic resection volume was significantly correlated with CVS, with larger volumes more easily visualized. Shift of the COM decreased and PVO increased significantly as CVS increased. For CVS 4 and 5 cases, the average COM shift was 3 mm and 2 mm, respectively, and PVO was 77% and 87%, respectively. In multiple linear regression, pathologic diameter >4 cm and CVS ≥3 were significantly associated with smaller COM shift. When CVS was omitted from analysis, PVO was significantly larger with pathologic diameter ≥5 cm, days to planning <36, and older age. Conclusions: Even among radiation oncologists who specialize in breast radiotherapy, there can be substantial differences in delineation of the postsurgical radiotherapy target volume. Large treatment margins may be prudent if the cavity is not clearly defined

  11. Evaluation of the role of 18FDG-PET/CT in radiotherapy target definition in patients with head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newbold, Katie L; Partridge, Mike; Cook, Gary; Sharma, Bhupinder; Rhys-Evans, Peter; Harrington, Kevin J; Nutting, Christopher M [The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2008-08-15

    Background and purpose. As techniques for radiotherapy delivery have developed, increasingly accurate localisation of disease is demanded. Functional imaging, particularly PET and its fusion with anatomical modalities, such as PET/CT, promises to improve detection and characterisation of disease. This study evaluated the impact of 18FDG-PET/CT on radiotherapy target volume definition in head and neck cancer (HNC). Materials and methods. The PET/CT scans of patients with HNC were used in a radiotherapy planning (RTP) study. The gross tumour volume (GTV), clinical target volume (CTV) and planning target volume (PTV) were defined conventionally and compared to those defined using the PET/CT. Data were reported as the median value with 95% confidence intervals. Results. Eighteen patients were consented, 9 had known primary tumour site, 9 presented as unknown primary. In nine cases where the primary site was known, the combined primary and nodal GTV (GTVp+n) increased by a median of 6.1cm3 (2.6, 12.2) or 78% (18, 313), p=0.008 with CTV increasing by a median of 10.1cm3 (1.3, 30.6) or 4% (0, 13) p=0.012. In 9 cases of unknown primary the GTVp+n increased by a median 6.3cm3 (0.2, 15.7) or 61% (4, 210), p=0.012, with CTV increasing by a median 155.4cm3 (2.7, 281.7) or 95% (1, 137), p=0.008. Conclusion. 18FDG-PET revealed disease lying outside the conventional target volume, either extending a known area or highlighting a previously unknown area of disease, including the primary tumour in 5 cases. We recommend PET/CT in the RTP of all cases of unknown primary. In patients with a known primary, although the change in volume was statistically significant the clinical impact is less clear. 18FDG-PET can also show areas within the conventional target volume that are hypermetabolic which may be possible biological target volumes for dose escalation studies in the future

  12. Investigation on effect of image lag in fluoroscopic images obtained with a dynamic flat-panel detector (FPD) on accuracy of target tracking in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Rie; Ichikawa, Katsuhiro; Sanada, Sigeru; Mori, Shinichiro; Dobashi, Suguru; Kumagai, Motoki; Minohara, Shinichi; Kawashima, Hiroki

    2010-01-01

    Real-time tumor tracking in external radiotherapy can be achieved by diagnostic (kV) X-ray imaging with a dynamic flat-panel detector (FPD). The purpose of this study was to address image lag in target tracking and its influence on the accuracy of tumor tracking. Fluoroscopic images were obtained using a direct type of dynamic FPD. Image lag properties were measured without test devices according to IEC 62220-1. Modulation transfer function (MTF) and profile curves were measured on the edges of a moving tungsten plate at movement rate of 10 and 20 mm/s, covering lung tumor movement of normal breathing. A lung tumor and metal sphere with blurred edge due to image lag was simulated using the results and then superimposed on breathing chest radiographs of a patient. The moving target with and without image lag was traced using a template-matching technique. In the results, the image lag for the first frame after X-ray cutoff was 2.0% and decreased to less than 0.1% in the fifth frame. In the measurement of profile curves on the edges of static and moving tungsten material plates, the effect of image lag was seen as blurred edges of the plate. The blurred edges of a moving target were indicated as reduction of MTF. However, the target could be traced within an error of ±5 mm. The results indicated that there was no effect of image lag on target tracking in usual breathing speed in a radiotherapy situation. (author)

  13. Recommendations for the use of PET and PET-CT for radiotherapy planning in research projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somer, E J; Pike, L C; Marsden, P K

    2012-08-01

    With the increasing use of positron emission tomography (PET) for disease staging, follow-up and therapy monitoring in a number of oncological indications there is growing interest in the use of PET and PET-CT for radiation treatment planning. In order to create a strong clinical evidence base for this, it is important to ensure that research data are clinically relevant and of a high quality. Therefore the National Cancer Research Institute PET Research Network make these recommendations to assist investigators in the development of radiotherapy clinical trials involving the use of PET and PET-CT. These recommendations provide an overview of the current literature in this rapidly evolving field, including standards for PET in clinical trials, disease staging, volume delineation, intensity modulated radiotherapy and PET-augmented planning techniques, and are targeted at a general audience. We conclude with specific recommendations for the use of PET in radiotherapy planning in research projects.

  14. Targeted intraoperative radiotherapy versus whole breast radiotherapy for breast cancer (TARGIT-A trial): an international, prospective, randomised, non-inferiority phase 3 trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaidya, Jayant S; Joseph, David J; Tobias, Jeffrey S

    2010-01-01

    After breast-conserving surgery, 90% of local recurrences occur within the index quadrant despite the presence of multicentric cancers elsewhere in the breast. Thus, restriction of radiation therapy to the tumour bed during surgery might be adequate for selected patients. We compared targeted int...

  15. Development of a personalized dosimetric tool for radiation protection in case of internal contamination and targeted radiotherapy in nuclear medicine; Developpement d'un outil dosimetrique personnalise pour la radioprotection en contamination interne et la radiotherapie vectorisee en medecine nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiavassa, S

    2005-12-15

    Current internal dosimetric estimations are based on the M.I.R.D. formalism and used standard mathematical models. These standard models are often far from a given patient morphology and do not allow to perform patient-specific dosimetry. The aim of this study was to develop a personalized dosimetric tool, which takes into account real patient morphology, composition and densities. This tool, called O.E.D.I.P.E., a French acronym of Tool for the Evaluation of Personalized Internal Dose, is a user-friendly graphical interface. O.E.D.I.P.E. allows to create voxel-based patient-specific geometries and associates them with the M.C.N.P.X. Monte Carlo code. Radionuclide distribution and absorbed dose calculation can be performed at the organ and voxel scale. O.E.D.I.P.E. can be used in nuclear medicine for targeted radiotherapy and in radiation protection in case of internal contamination. (author)

  16. Voluntary Deep Inspiration Breath-hold Reduces the Heart Dose Without Compromising the Target Volume Coverage During Radiotherapy for Left-sided Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hammadi, Noora; Caparrotti, Palmira; Naim, Carole; Hayes, Jillian; Rebecca Benson, Katherine; Vasic, Ana; Al-Abdulla, Hissa; Hammoud, Rabih; Divakar, Saju; Petric, Primoz

    2018-03-01

    During radiotherapy of left-sided breast cancer, parts of the heart are irradiated, which may lead to late toxicity. We report on the experience of single institution with cardiac-sparing radiotherapy using voluntary deep inspiration breath hold (V-DIBH) and compare its dosimetric outcome with free breathing (FB) technique. Left-sided breast cancer patients, treated at our department with postoperative radiotherapy of breast/chest wall +/- regional lymph nodes between May 2015 and January 2017, were considered for inclusion. FB-computed tomography (CT) was obtained and dose-planning performed. Cases with cardiac V25Gy ≥ 5% or risk factors for heart disease were coached for V-DIBH. Compliant patients were included. They underwent additional CT in V-DIBH for planning, followed by V-DIBH radiotherapy. Dose volume histogram parameters for heart, lung and optimized planning target volume (OPTV) were compared between FB and BH. Treatment setup shifts and systematic and random errors for V-DIBH technique were compared with FB historic control. Sixty-three patients were considered for V-DIBH. Nine (14.3%) were non-compliant at coaching, leaving 54 cases for analysis. When compared with FB, V-DIBH resulted in a significant reduction of mean cardiac dose from 6.1 +/- 2.5 to 3.2 +/- 1.4 Gy (p FB and V-DIBH, respectively (p FB- and V-DIBH-derived mean lung dose (11.3 +/- 3.2 vs. 10.6 +/- 2.6 Gy), lung V20Gy (20.5 +/- 7 vs. 19.5 +/- 5.1 Gy) and V95% for the OPTV (95.6 +/- 4.1 vs. 95.2 +/- 6.3%) were non-significant. V-DIBH-derived mean shifts for initial patient setup were ≤ 2.7 mm. Random and systematic errors were ≤ 2.1 mm. These results did not differ significantly from historic FB controls. When compared with FB, V-DIBH demonstrated high setup accuracy and enabled significant reduction of cardiac doses without compromising the target volume coverage. Differences in lung doses were non-significant.

  17. Interobserver variability in gross tumor volume delineation for hepatocellular carcinoma. Results of Korean Radiation Oncology Group 1207 study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Suk [Jeju National University School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Jeju National University Hospital, Jeju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jun Won; Lee, Ik Jae [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Won Sup [Korea University Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Ansan Hospital, Ansan (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Min Kyu [Kyungpook National University School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Hyun [National Cancer Center, Center for Liver Cancer, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin Hee [Keimyung University School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Dongsan Medical Center, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyung-Sik [Dong-A University College of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hee Chul [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Hong Seok; Kay, Chul Seung [The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Sang Min [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Mi-Sook [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seong, Jinsil [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Severance Hospital, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    There has been increasing use of external beam radiotherapy for localized treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with both palliative and curative intent. Quality control of target delineation in primary HCC is essential to deliver adequate doses of radiation to the primary tumor while preserving adjacent healthy organs. We analyzed interobserver variability in gross tumor volume (GTV) delineation for HCC. Twelve radiation oncologists specializing in liver malignancy participated in a multi-institutional contouring dummy-run study of nine HCC cases and independently delineated GTV on the same set of provided computed tomography images. Quantitative analysis was performed using an expectation maximization algorithm for simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE) with kappa statistics calculating agreement between physicians. To quantify the interobserver variability of GTV delineations, the ratio of the actual delineated volume to the estimated consensus volume (STAPLE), the ratio of the common and encompassing volumes, and the coefficient of variation were calculated. The median kappa agreement level was 0.71 (range 0.28-0.86). The ratio of the actual delineated volume to the estimated consensus volume ranged from 0.19 to 1.93 (median 0.94) for all cases. The ratio of the common and encompassing volumes ranged from 0.001 to 0.56 (median 0.25). The coefficient of variation for GTV delineation ranged from 8 to 57 % (median 26 %). The interobserver variability in target delineation of HCC GTV in this study is noteworthy. Multi-institution studies involving radiotherapy for HCC require appropriate quality assurance programs for target delineation. (orig.) [German] Die externe kurative Strahlentherapie ist zunehmend bei der lokalisierten Behandlung hepatozellulaerer Karzinome (HCC) in palliativer und kurativer Absicht in Gebrauch. Eine Qualitaetskontrolle der Zielabgrenzung beim primaeren HCC ist entscheidend, um die passende Dosis fuer die

  18. Variations in Target Volume Definition for Postoperative Radiotherapy in Stage III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Analysis of an International Contouring Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spoelstra, Femke; Senan, Suresh; Le Pechoux, Cecile; Ishikura, Satoshi; Casas, Francesc; Ball, David; Price, Allan; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Soernsen de Koste, John R. van

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) in patients with completely resected non-small-cell lung cancer with mediastinal involvement is controversial because of the failure of earlier trials to demonstrate a survival benefit. Improved techniques may reduce toxicity, but the treatment fields used in routine practice have not been well studied. We studied routine target volumes used by international experts and evaluated the impact of a contouring protocol developed for a new prospective study, the Lung Adjuvant Radiotherapy Trial (Lung ART). Methods and Materials: Seventeen thoracic radiation oncologists were invited to contour their routine clinical target volumes (CTV) for 2 representative patients using a validated CD-ROM-based contouring program. Subsequently, the Lung ART study protocol was provided, and both cases were contoured again. Variations in target volumes and their dosimetric impact were analyzed. Results: Routine CTVs were received for each case from 10 clinicians, whereas six provided both routine and protocol CTVs for each case. Routine CTVs varied up to threefold between clinicians, but use of the Lung ART protocol significantly decreased variations. Routine CTVs in a postlobectomy patient resulted in V 20 values ranging from 12.7% to 54.0%, and Lung ART protocol CTVs resulted in values of 20.6% to 29.2%. Similar results were seen for other toxicity parameters and in the postpneumectomy patient. With the exception of upper paratracheal nodes, protocol contouring improved coverage of the required nodal stations. Conclusion: Even among experts, significant interclinician variations are observed in PORT fields. Inasmuch as contouring variations can confound the interpretation of PORT results, mandatory quality assurance procedures have been incorporated into the current Lung ART study.

  19. Accurate Automatic Delineation of Heterogeneous Functional Volumes in Positron Emission Tomography for Oncology Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatt, Mathieu; Cheze le Rest, Catherine; Descourt, Patrice; Dekker, Andre; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Oellers, Michel; Lambin, Philippe; Pradier, Olivier; Visvikis, Dimitris

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Accurate contouring of positron emission tomography (PET) functional volumes is now considered crucial in image-guided radiotherapy and other oncology applications because the use of functional imaging allows for biological target definition. In addition, the definition of variable uptake regions within the tumor itself may facilitate dose painting for dosimetry optimization. Methods and Materials: Current state-of-the-art algorithms for functional volume segmentation use adaptive thresholding. We developed an approach called fuzzy locally adaptive Bayesian (FLAB), validated on homogeneous objects, and then improved it by allowing the use of up to three tumor classes for the delineation of inhomogeneous tumors (3-FLAB). Simulated and real tumors with histology data containing homogeneous and heterogeneous activity distributions were used to assess the algorithm's accuracy. Results: The new 3-FLAB algorithm is able to extract the overall tumor from the background tissues and delineate variable uptake regions within the tumors, with higher accuracy and robustness compared with adaptive threshold (T bckg ) and fuzzy C-means (FCM). 3-FLAB performed with a mean classification error of less than 9% ± 8% on the simulated tumors, whereas binary-only implementation led to errors of 15% ± 11%. T bckg and FCM led to mean errors of 20% ± 12% and 17% ± 14%, respectively. 3-FLAB also led to more robust estimation of the maximum diameters of tumors with histology measurements, with bckg and FCM lead to 10%, 12%, and 13%, respectively. Conclusion: These encouraging results warrant further investigation in future studies that will investigate the impact of 3-FLAB in radiotherapy treatment planning, diagnosis, and therapy response evaluation.

  20. Experiment study with baculovirus-mediated transfer of the thyroid sodium/iodide symporter gene into thyroid cancer for a targeted radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yifan; Li Biao; Zhao Long; You Bei; Yin Guizhi; Zhu Chengmo

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To explore the feasibility of thyroid cancers for radiotherapy by using baculoviral vector to deliver the NIS gene into the tumor cells. Method: Constructed a recombinant baculovirus encoding the human NIS gene under the control of the cytomegalovirus promoter. Using a mouse monoclonal antibody and a FITC-labeled antimouse antibody to confirm expression of the NIS protein of infected tumor cells by immunofluorescence. In vitro iodide uptake experiments were carded out on BacNIS-infected tumor cells to further characterize the BacNIS virus, and cell killing with 131I and clonogenic assay were performed on BacNIS-infected cell to observe the selective killing effect of 1311 on NIS-expressing cells. Results: Infection of thyroidcancer cells (FTC-133, W3) with BacNIS resulted in perchlorate-sensitive 125I uptake by these cells to a higher level than that in noninfected cells. But 1251 uptake of 8505C is very low. Demonstrating that the BacNIS vector can function in tumor cells. In addition, AdNIS-infected tumor cells were selectively killed by exposure to 1311, as revealed by clonogenicassays, higher than that in nontreated tumors. Conclusions: AdNIS is very efficient in triggering iodide uptake by infected tumor cell, outlining the potential of this novel cancer gene therapy approach for a targeted radiotherapy. (authors)

  1. Computation of mean and variance of the radiotherapy dose for PCA-modeled random shape and position variations of the target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budiarto, E; Keijzer, M; Storchi, P R M; Heemink, A W; Breedveld, S; Heijmen, B J M

    2014-01-20

    Radiotherapy dose delivery in the tumor and surrounding healthy tissues is affected by movements and deformations of the corresponding organs between fractions. The random variations may be characterized by non-rigid, anisotropic principal component analysis (PCA) modes. In this article new dynamic dose deposition matrices, based on established PCA modes, are introduced as a tool to evaluate the mean and the variance of the dose at each target point resulting from any given set of fluence profiles. The method is tested for a simple cubic geometry and for a prostate case. The movements spread out the distributions of the mean dose and cause the variance of the dose to be highest near the edges of the beams. The non-rigidity and anisotropy of the movements are reflected in both quantities. The dynamic dose deposition matrices facilitate the inclusion of the mean and the variance of the dose in the existing fluence-profile optimizer for radiotherapy planning, to ensure robust plans with respect to the movements.

  2. Computation of mean and variance of the radiotherapy dose for PCA-modeled random shape and position variations of the target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budiarto, E; Keijzer, M; Heemink, A W; Storchi, P R M; Breedveld, S; Heijmen, B J M

    2014-01-01

    Radiotherapy dose delivery in the tumor and surrounding healthy tissues is affected by movements and deformations of the corresponding organs between fractions. The random variations may be characterized by non-rigid, anisotropic principal component analysis (PCA) modes. In this article new dynamic dose deposition matrices, based on established PCA modes, are introduced as a tool to evaluate the mean and the variance of the dose at each target point resulting from any given set of fluence profiles. The method is tested for a simple cubic geometry and for a prostate case. The movements spread out the distributions of the mean dose and cause the variance of the dose to be highest near the edges of the beams. The non-rigidity and anisotropy of the movements are reflected in both quantities. The dynamic dose deposition matrices facilitate the inclusion of the mean and the variance of the dose in the existing fluence-profile optimizer for radiotherapy planning, to ensure robust plans with respect to the movements. (paper)

  3. Stereotactic Radiotherapy of Primary Lung Cancer and Other Targets: Results of Consultant Meeting of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagata, Yasushi; Wulf, Joern; Lax, Ingmar; Timmerman, Robert; Zimmermann, Frank; Stojkovski, Igor; Jeremic, Branislav

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the current status of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) and identify both advantages and disadvantages of its use in developing countries, a meeting composed of consultants of the International Atomic Energy Agency was held in Vienna in November 2006. Owing to continuous developments in the field, the meeting was extended by subsequent discussions and correspondence (2007-2010), which led to the summary presented here. The advantages and disadvantages of SBRT expected to be encountered in developing countries were identified. The definitions, typical treatment courses, and clinical results were presented. Thereafter, minimal methodology/technology requirements for SBRT were evaluated. Finally, characteristics of SBRT for developing countries were recommended. Patients for SBRT should be carefully selected, because single high-dose radiotherapy may cause serious complications in some serial organs at risk. Clinical experiences have been reported in some populations of lung cancer, lung oligometastases, liver cancer, pancreas cancer, and kidney cancer. Despite the disadvantages expected to be experienced in developing countries, SBRT using fewer fractions may be useful in selected patients with various extracranial cancers with favorable outcome and low toxicity.

  4. Nanoparticle-guided radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method and nano-sized particles for image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) of a target tissue. More specifically, the invention relates to nano-sized particles comprising X-ray-imaging contrast agents in solid form with the ability to block x-rays, allowing for simult...... for simultaneous or integrated external beam radiotherapy and imaging, e.g., using computed tomography (CT)....

  5. Tools to analyse and display variations in anatomical delineation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebert, Martin A.; McDermott, L.N.; Haworth, A; Van der Wath, E.; Hooton, B.

    2012-01-01

    Variations in anatomical delineation, principally due to a combination of inter-observer contributions and image-specificity, remain one of the most significant impediments to geometrically-accurate radiotherapy. Quantification of spatial variability of the delineated contours comprising a structure can be made with a variety of metrics, and the availability of software tools to apply such metrics to data collected during inter-observer or repeat-imaging studies would allow their validation. A suite of such tools have been developed which use an Extensible Markup Language format for the exchange of delineated 3D structures with radiotherapy planning or review systems. These tools provide basic operations for manipulating and operating on individual structures and related structure sets, and for deriving statistics on spatial variations of contours that can be mapped onto the surface of a reference structure. Use of these tools on a sample dataset is demonstrated together with import and display of results in the SWAN treatment plan review system.

  6. The incidence of inclusion of the sigmoid colon and small bowel in the planning target volume in radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meerleer, G.O. de; Vakaet, L.; Neve, W.J. de; Villeirs, G.M.; Delrue, L.J.

    2004-01-01

    Background and purpose: in radiotherapy for prostate cancer, the rectum is considered the dose-limiting organ. The incidence of overlap between the sigmoid colon and/or small bowel and the planning target volume (PTV) as well as the dose to sigmoid colon and small bowel were investigated. Patients and methods: the CT data of 75 prostate cancer patients were analyzed. The clinical target volume (CTV) consisted of prostate and seminal vesicles. The PTV was defined as a three-dimensional expansion of the CTV with a 10-mm margin in craniocaudal and a 7-mm margin in the other directions. All patients were planned to a mean CTV dose of at least 76 Gy. Minimum CTV dose was set at 70 Gy. Dose inhomogeneity within the CTV was kept between 12% and 17%. Sigmoid colon was defined upward from the level where the rectum turned in a transverse plane. Contrast-filled small bowel was contoured on all slices where it was visible. The presence of sigmoid colon and/or small bowel in close vicinity to or overlapping with the PTV was recorded. For each case, the dose to the sigmoid colon and small bowel was calculated. Results: the PTV was found to overlap with the sigmoid colon in 60% and with the small bowel in 19% of the cases. In these patients, mean maximum dose to the sigmoid colon was 76.2 Gy (5th-95th percentile: 70.0-80.7 Gy). Mean maximum dose to the small bowel was 74.9 Gy (5th-95th percentile: 68.0-80.0 Gy). Conclusion: when systematically investigating the anatomic position of sigmoid colon and small bowel in patients accepted for prostate irradiation, parts of both organs were often observed in close vicinity to the PTV. Apart from the rectum, these organs may be dose-limiting in prostate radiotherapy. (orig.)

  7. The incidence of inclusion of the sigmoid colon and small bowel in the planning target volume in radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meerleer, G.O. de; Vakaet, L.; Neve, W.J. de [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Gent Univ. Hospital, Gent (Belgium); Villeirs, G.M.; Delrue, L.J. [Dept. of Radiology, Gent Univ. Hospital, Gent (Belgium)

    2004-09-01

    Background and purpose: in radiotherapy for prostate cancer, the rectum is considered the dose-limiting organ. The incidence of overlap between the sigmoid colon and/or small bowel and the planning target volume (PTV) as well as the dose to sigmoid colon and small bowel were investigated. Patients and methods: the CT data of 75 prostate cancer patients were analyzed. The clinical target volume (CTV) consisted of prostate and seminal vesicles. The PTV was defined as a three-dimensional expansion of the CTV with a 10-mm margin in craniocaudal and a 7-mm margin in the other directions. All patients were planned to a mean CTV dose of at least 76 Gy. Minimum CTV dose was set at 70 Gy. Dose inhomogeneity within the CTV was kept between 12% and 17%. Sigmoid colon was defined upward from the level where the rectum turned in a transverse plane. Contrast-filled small bowel was contoured on all slices where it was visible. The presence of sigmoid colon and/or small bowel in close vicinity to or overlapping with the PTV was recorded. For each case, the dose to the sigmoid colon and small bowel was calculated. Results: the PTV was found to overlap with the sigmoid colon in 60% and with the small bowel in 19% of the cases. In these patients, mean maximum dose to the sigmoid colon was 76.2 Gy (5th-95th percentile: 70.0-80.7 Gy). Mean maximum dose to the small bowel was 74.9 Gy (5th-95th percentile: 68.0-80.0 Gy). Conclusion: when systematically investigating the anatomic position of sigmoid colon and small bowel in patients accepted for prostate irradiation, parts of both organs were often observed in close vicinity to the PTV. Apart from the rectum, these organs may be dose-limiting in prostate radiotherapy. (orig.)

  8. Health economics of targeted intraoperative radiotherapy (TARGIT-IORT) for early breast cancer: a cost-effectiveness analysis in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidya, Anil; Vaidya, Param; Both, Brigitte; Brew-Graves, Chris; Bulsara, Max; Vaidya, Jayant S

    2017-08-17

    The clinical effectiveness of targeted intraoperative radiotherapy (TARGIT-IORT) has been confirmed in the randomised TARGIT-A (targeted intraoperative radiotherapy-alone) trial to be similar to a several weeks' course of whole-breast external-beam radiation therapy (EBRT) in patients with early breast cancer. This study aims to determine the cost-effectiveness of TARGIT-IORT to inform policy decisions about its wider implementation. TARGIT-A randomised clinical trial (ISRCTN34086741) which compared TARGIT with traditional EBRT and found similar breast cancer control, particularly when TARGIT was given simultaneously with lumpectomy. Cost-utility analysis using decision analytic modelling by a Markov model. A cost-effectiveness Markov model was developed using TreeAge Pro V.2015. The decision analytic model compared two strategies of radiotherapy for breast cancer in a hypothetical cohort of patients with early breast cancer based on the published health state transition probability data from the TARGIT-A trial. Analysis was performed for UK setting and National Health Service (NHS) healthcare payer's perspective using NHS cost data and treatment outcomes were simulated for both strategies for a time horizon of 10 years. Model health state utilities were drawn from the published literature. Future costs and effects were discounted at the rate of 3.5%. To address uncertainty, one-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed. Quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs). In the base case analysis, TARGIT-IORT was a highly cost-effective strategy yielding health gain at a lower cost than its comparator EBRT. Discounted TARGIT-IORT and EBRT costs for the time horizon of 10 years were £12 455 and £13 280, respectively. TARGIT-IORT gained 0.18 incremental QALY as the discounted QALYs gained by TARGIT-IORT were 8.15 and by EBRT were 7.97 showing TARGIT-IORT as a dominant strategy over EBRT. Model outputs were robust to one-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses

  9. The need for rotational margins in intensity-modulated radiotherapy and a new method for planning target volume design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langer, Mark Peter; Papiez, Lech; Spirydovich, Siarhei; Thai, Van

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The effect of rotational errors on the coverage of clinical target volumes (CTVs) is examined. A new planning target volume (PTV) construction that considers the individual paths traced by movements of the target boundary points is developed. Methods and Materials: A standard uniform margin expansion was compared with a PTV constructed from the space swept out by a concave moving target. A new method formed the PTV by aggregating the separate convex hulls taken of the positions of the individual target boundary points in a sampling of CTV displacements. Results: A 0.5-cm uniform margin adequate for translations was inadequate given CTV rotation about a fixed off-center axis. A PTV formed of the target's swept-out area was 22% smaller than needed for coverage by a uniform margin, but computationally is not readily extended to translations combined with rotations about a shifting axis. Forming instead the union of convex hulls of the boundary points in a sampling of CTV displacements represented these movements in the PTV design and retained the target's concave shape. Conclusions: Planning target volumes should accommodate target rotation. The union of convex hulls of the boundary point positions in a sampling of displacements can effectively represent multiple sources of deviations while preserving target concavities

  10. Radiation dose in radiotherapy from prescription to delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    Cancer incidence is increasing in developed as well as in developing countries. Cancer may be expected to become a prominent problem and this will result in public pressure for higher priorities on cancer care. In some relatively advanced developing countries radiation therapy is applied in about 50% of all detected cancer cases. Approximately half of these treatments have curative intent. Surgery and radiotherapy applied individually or combined result in the cure of about 40% of all patients. The application of chemotherapy alone has curative effects only on a small percentage of cancer patients. It is encouraging to note that the results achieved by radiation therapy show continuous improvement. This can be traced back to a number of developments: increased knowledge regarding tumour and normal tissue response to radiation, early diagnosis with improved tumour localisation, improved dosimetry and dose planning. The introduction of modern equipment has been crucial in these developments and makes possible a more accurate target delineation, better treatment planning resulting in irradiation of the Planning Target Volume (PTV) with a highly uniform dose and, simultaneously, a reduction in dose to healthy tissues outside the PTV. Experience shows that high quality radiotherapy can only be achieved if its conducted by a skilled team working closely together with good communication between various categories of staff. Therefore, seminars and training courses covering all aspects of radiotherapy and dosimetry are of great importance and should be held regionally or nationally on a regular basis. Refs, figs, tabs.

  11. Radiation dose in radiotherapy from prescription to delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-08-01

    Cancer incidence is increasing in developed as well as in developing countries. Cancer may be expected to become a prominent problem and this will result in public pressure for higher priorities on cancer care. In some relatively advanced developing countries radiation therapy is applied in about 50% of all detected cancer cases. Approximately half of these treatments have curative intent. Surgery and radiotherapy applied individually or combined result in the cure of about 40% of all patients. The application of chemotherapy alone has curative effects only on a small percentage of cancer patients. It is encouraging to note that the results achieved by radiation therapy show continuous improvement. This can be traced back to a number of developments: increased knowledge regarding tumour and normal tissue response to radiation, early diagnosis with improved tumour localisation, improved dosimetry and dose planning. The introduction of modern equipment has been crucial in these developments and makes possible a more accurate target delineation, better treatment planning resulting in irradiation of the Planning Target Volume (PTV) with a highly uniform dose and, simultaneously, a reduction in dose to healthy tissues outside the PTV. Experience shows that high quality radiotherapy can only be achieved if its conducted by a skilled team working closely together with good communication between various categories of staff. Therefore, seminars and training courses covering all aspects of radiotherapy and dosimetry are of great importance and should be held regionally or nationally on a regular basis. Refs, figs, tabs

  12. 4D-CT-based target volume definition in stereotactic radiotherapy of lung tumours: Comparison with a conventional technique using individual margins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hof, Holger; Rhein, Bernhard; Haering, Peter; Kopp-Schneider, Annette; Debus, Juergen; Herfarth, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric benefit of integration of 4D-CT in the planning target volume (PTV) definition process compared to conventional PTV definition using individual margins in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of lung tumours. Material and methods: Two different PTVs were defined: PTV conv consisting of the helical-CT-based clinical target volume (CTV) enlarged isotropically for each spatial direction by the individually measured amount of motion in the 4D-CT, and PTV 4D encompassing the CTVs defined in the 4D-CT phases displaying the extremes of the tumour position. Tumour motion as well as volumetric and dosimetric differences and relations of both PTVs were evaluated. Results: Volumetric examinations revealed a significant reduction of the mean PTV by 4D-CT from 57.7 to 40.7 cm 3 (31%) (p 4D in PTV conv (r = -0.69, 90% confidence limits: -0.87 and -0.34, p = 0.007). Mean lung dose (MLD) was decreased significantly by 17% (p < 0.001). Conclusions: In SBRT of lung tumours the mere use of individual margins for target volume definition cannot compensate for the additional effects that the implementation of 4D-CT phases can offer.

  13. Radiotherapy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, G.T.Y.; Collier, J.M.; Lyman, J.T.; Pitluck, S.

    1982-01-01

    The Radiotherapy Physics Group works on the physical and biophysical aspects of charged particle radiotherapy. Our activities include the development of isosurvival beams (beams of uniform biological effect), computerized treatment planning development for charged particle radiotherapy, design of compensation to shape dose distributions, and development of dosimetry techniques to verify planned irradiations in both phantoms and patients

  14. Treatment simulations with a statistical deformable motion model to evaluate margins for multiple targets in radiotherapy for high-risk prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thörnqvist, Sara; Hysing, Liv B.; Zolnay, Andras G.; Söhn, Matthias; Hoogeman, Mischa S.; Muren, Ludvig P.; Bentzen, Lise; Heijmen, Ben J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: Deformation and correlated target motion remain challenges for margin recipes in radiotherapy (RT). This study presents a statistical deformable motion model for multiple targets and applies it to margin evaluations for locally advanced prostate cancer i.e. RT of the prostate (CTV-p), seminal vesicles (CTV-sv) and pelvic lymph nodes (CTV-ln). Material and methods: The 19 patients included in this study, all had 7–10 repeat CT-scans available that were rigidly aligned with the planning CT-scan using intra-prostatic implanted markers, followed by deformable registrations. The displacement vectors from the deformable registrations were used to create patient-specific statistical motion models. The models were applied in treatment simulations to determine probabilities for adequate target coverage, e.g. by establishing distributions of the accumulated dose to 99% of the target volumes (D 99 ) for various CTV–PTV expansions in the planning-CTs. Results: The method allowed for estimation of the expected accumulated dose and its variance of different DVH parameters for each patient. Simulations of inter-fractional motion resulted in 7, 10, and 18 patients with an average D 99 >95% of the prescribed dose for CTV-p expansions of 3 mm, 4 mm and 5 mm, respectively. For CTV-sv and CTV-ln, expansions of 3 mm, 5 mm and 7 mm resulted in 1, 11 and 15 vs. 8, 18 and 18 patients respectively with an average D 99 >95% of the prescription. Conclusions: Treatment simulations of target motion revealed large individual differences in accumulated dose mainly for CTV-sv, demanding the largest margins whereas those required for CTV-p and CTV-ln were comparable

  15. A consensus-based guideline defining the clinical target volume for pelvic lymph nodes in external beam radiotherapy for uterine cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toita, Takafumi; Ohno, Tatsuya; Kaneyasu, Yuko

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a consensus-based guideline as well as an atlas defining pelvic nodal clinical target volumes in external beam radiotherapy for uterine cervical cancer. A working subgroup to establish the consensus-based guideline on clinical target volumes for uterine cervical cancer was formulated by the Radiation Therapy Study Group of the Japan Clinical Oncology Group in July 2008. The working subgroup consisted of seven radiation oncologists. The process resulting in the consensus included a comparison of contouring on CT images among the members, reviewing of published textbooks and the relevant literature and a distribution analysis of metastatic nodes on computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging of actual patients. The working subgroup defined the pelvic nodal clinical target volumes for cervical cancer and developed an associated atlas. As a basic criterion, the lymph node clinical target volume was defined as the area encompassed by a 7 mm margin around the applicable pelvic vessels. Modifications were made in each nodal area to cover adjacent adipose tissues at risk of microscopic nodal metastases. Although the bones and muscles were excluded, the bowel was not routinely excluded in the definition. Each of the following pelvic node regions was defined: common iliac, external iliac, internal iliac, obturator and presacral. Anatomical structures bordering each lymph node region were defined for six directions; anterior, posterior, lateral, medial, cranial and caudal. Drafts of the definition and the atlas were reviewed by members of the JCOG Gynecologic Cancer Study Group (GCSG). We developed a consensus-based guideline defining the pelvic node clinical target volumes that included an atlas. The guideline will be continuously updated to reflect the ongoing changes in the field. (author)

  16. SU-E-J-153: MRI Based, Daily Adaptive Radiotherapy for Rectal Cancer: Contour Adaptation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleijnen, J; Burbach, M; Verbraeken, T; Weggers, R; Zoetelief, A; Reerink, O; Lagendijk, J; Raaymakers, B; Asselen, B

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: A major hurdle in adaptive radiotherapy is the adaptation of the planning MRI's delineations to the daily anatomy. We therefore investigate the accuracy and time needed for online clinical target volume (CTV) adaptation by radiation therapists (RTT), to be used in MRI-guided adaptive treatments on a MRI-Linac (MRL). Methods: Sixteen patients, diagnosed with early stage rectal cancer, underwent a T2-weighted MRI prior to each fraction of short-course radiotherapy, resulting in 4–5 scans per patient. On these scans, the CTV was delineated according to guidelines by an experienced radiation oncologist (RO) and considered to be the gold standard. For each patient, the first MRI was considered as the planning MRI and matched on bony anatomy to the 3–4 daily MRIs. The planning MRI's CTV delineation was rigidly propagated to the daily MRI scans as a proposal for adaptation. Three RTTs in training started the adaptation of the CTV conform guidelines, after a two hour training lecture and a two patient (n=7) training set. To assess the inter-therapist variation, all three RTTs altered delineations of 3 patients (n=12). One RTT altered the CTV delineations (n=53) of the remaining 11 patients. Time needed for adaptation of the CTV to guidelines was registered.As a measure of agreement, the conformity index (CI) was determined between the RTTs' delineations as a group. Dice similarity coefficients were determined between delineations of the RTT and the RO. Results: We found good agreement between RTTs' and RO's delineations (average Dice=0.91, SD=0.03). Furthermore, the inter-observer agreement between the RTTs was high (average CI=0.94, SD=0.02). Adaptation time reduced from 10:33 min (SD= 3:46) to 2:56 min (SD=1:06) between the first and last ten delineations, respectively. Conclusion: Daily CTV adaptation by RTTs, seems a feasible and safe way to introduce daily, online MRI-based plan adaptation for a MRL

  17. Reducing dose to the lungs through loosing target dose homogeneity requirement for radiotherapy of non small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Junjie; Yan, Hui; Tian, Yuan; Ma, Pan; Liu, Zhiqiang; Li, Minghui; Ren, Wenting; Chen, Jiayun; Zhang, Ye; Dai, Jianrong

    2017-11-01

    It is important to minimize lung dose during intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) of nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In this study, an approach was proposed to reduce lung dose by relaxing the constraint of target dose homogeneity during treatment planning of IMRT. Ten NSCLC patients with lung tumor on the right side were selected. The total dose for planning target volume (PTV) was 60 Gy (2 Gy/fraction). For each patient, two IMRT plans with six beams were created in Pinnacle treatment planning system. The dose homogeneity of target was controlled by constraints on the maximum and uniform doses of target volume. One IMRT plan was made with homogeneous target dose (the resulting target dose was within 95%-107% of the prescribed dose), while another IMRT plan was made with inhomogeneous target dose (the resulting target dose was more than 95% of the prescribed dose). During plan optimization, the dose of cord and heart in two types of IMRT plans were kept nearly the same. The doses of lungs, PTV and organs at risk (OARs) between two types of IMRT plans were compared and analyzed quantitatively. For all patients, the lung dose was decreased in the IMRT plans with inhomogeneous target dose. On average, the mean dose, V5, V20, and V30 of lung were reduced by 1.4 Gy, 4.8%, 3.7%, and 1.7%, respectively, and the dose to normal tissue was also reduced. These reductions in DVH values were all statistically significant (P target dose could protect lungs better and may be considered as a choice for treating NSCLC. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  18. 30 CFR 282.22 - Delineation Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Delineation Plan. 282.22 Section 282.22 Mineral... § 282.22 Delineation Plan. All exploration activities shall be conducted in accordance with a Delineation Plan submitted by the lessee and approved by the Director. The Delineation Plan shall describe the...

  19. Supine MRI for regional breast radiotherapy: imaging axillary lymph nodes before and after sentinel-node biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Heijst, Tristan C. F.; Eschbach-Zandbergen, Debora; Hoekstra, Nienke; van Asselen, Bram; Lagendijk, Jan J. W.; Verkooijen, Helena M.; Pijnappel, Ruud M.; de Waard, Stephanie N.; Witkamp, Arjen J.; van Dalen, Thijs; Desirée van den Bongard, H. J. G.; Philippens, Marielle E. P.

    2017-08-01

    Regional radiotherapy (RT) is increasingly used in breast cancer treatment. Conventionally, computed tomography (CT) is performed for RT planning. Lymph node (LN) target levels are delineated according to anatomical boundaries. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could enable individual LN delineation. The purpose was to evaluate the applicability of MRI for LN detection in supine treatment position, before and after sentinel-node biopsy (SNB). Twenty-three female breast cancer patients (cTis-3N0M0) underwent 1.5 T MRI, before and after SNB, in addition to CT. Endurance for MRI was monitored. Axillary levels were delineated. LNs were identified and delineated on MRI from before and after SNB, and on CT, and compared by Wilcoxon signed-rank tests. LN locations and LN-based volumes were related to axillary delineations and associated volumes. Although postoperative effects were visible, LN numbers on postoperative MRI (median 26 LNs) were highly reproducible compared to preoperative MRI when adding excised sentinel nodes, and higher than on CT (median 11, p  <  0.001). LN-based volumes were considerably smaller than respective axillary levels. Supine MRI of LNs is feasible and reproducible before and after SNB. This may lead to more accurate RT target definition compared to CT, with potentially lower toxicity. With the MRI techniques described here, initiation of novel MRI-guided RT strategies aiming at individual LNs could be possible.

  20. MRI to delineate the gross tumor volume of nasopharyngeal cancers: which sequences and planes should be used?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovtzer, Aron; Ibrahim, Mohannad; Tatro, Daniel; Feng, Felix Y; Ten Haken, Randall K; Eisbruch, Avraham

    2014-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been found to be better than computed tomography for defining the extent of primary gross tumor volume (GTV) in advanced nasopharyngeal cancer. It is routinely applied for target delineation in planning radiotherapy. However, the specific MRI sequences/planes that should be used are unknown. Twelve patients with nasopharyngeal cancer underwent primary GTV evaluation with gadolinium-enhanced axial T1 weighted image (T1) and T2 weighted image (T2), coronal T1, and sagittal T1 sequences. Each sequence was registered with the planning computed tomography scans. Planning target volumes (PTVs) were derived by uniform expansions of the GTVs. The volumes encompassed by the various sequences/planes, and the volumes common to all sequences/planes, were compared quantitatively and anatomically to the volume delineated by the commonly used axial T1-based dataset. Addition of the axial T2 sequence increased the axial T1-based GTV by 12% on average (p = 0.004), and composite evaluations that included the coronal T1 and sagittal T1 planes increased the axial T1-based GTVs by 30% on average (p = 0.003). The axial T1-based PTVs were increased by 20% by the additional sequences (p = 0.04). Each sequence/plane added unique volume extensions. The GTVs common to all the T1 planes accounted for 38% of the total volumes of all the T1 planes. Anatomically, addition of the coronal and sagittal-based GTVs extended the axial T1-based GTV caudally and cranially, notably to the base of the skull. Adding MRI planes and sequences to the traditional axial T1 sequence yields significant quantitative and anatomically important extensions of the GTVs and PTVs. For accurate target delineation in nasopharyngeal cancer, we recommend that GTVs be outlined in all MRI sequences/planes and registered with the planning computed tomography scans.

  1. Delineating SPTAN1 associated phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Syrbe, Steffen; Harms, Frederike L; Parrini, Elena

    2017-01-01

    De novo in-frame deletions and duplications in the SPTAN1 gene, encoding the non-erythrocyte αII spectrin, have been associated with severe West syndrome with hypomyelination and pontocerebellar atrophy. We aimed at comprehensively delineating the phenotypic spectrum associated with SPTAN1 mutati...

  2. Quality assurance patient positioning and immobilization techniques for radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wadhawan, G.S.; Negi, P.S.; Anand, A.K.; Munjal, R.K.; Sinha, S.N.

    2007-01-01

    Over the last decade the ability to precisely deliver radiotherapy (RT) treatments has advanced dramatically. Imaging technology has evolved to facilitate better target delineation during treatment planning. Treatment delivery techniques have advanced to enable intensity modulated RT (IMRT) treatments that provide radiation doses, tightly conforming to the target volumes. These advancements have been driven by the dual goals of maximizing the radiation dose to the tumor volume while minimizing the radiation dose to the surrounding normal tissue. The ability to expand the use of these techniques to deliver higher doses in fewer fractions is now largely limited by changes in the tumor position from day to day and even during treatment and so the ability to precisely locate the tumor throughout the course of RT has become a topic of concern

  3. Neurovascular bundle–sparing radiotherapy for prostate cancer using MRI-CT registration: A dosimetric feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cassidy, R.J., E-mail: richardjcassidy@emory.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Yang, X.; Liu, T.; Thomas, M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Nour, S.G. [Department of Radiology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Jani, A.B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Sexual dysfunction after radiotherapy for prostate cancer remains an important late adverse toxicity. The neurovascular bundles (NVB) that lie posterolaterally to the prostate are typically spared during prostatectomy, but in traditional radiotherapy planning they are not contoured as an organ-at-risk with dose constraints. Our goal was to determine the dosimetric feasibility of “NVB-sparing” prostate radiotherapy while still delivering adequate dose to the prostate. Methods: Twenty-five consecutive patients with prostate cancer (with no extraprostatic disease on pelvic magnetic resonance imaging [MRI]) who that were treated with external beam radiotherapy, with the same primary planning target volume margins, to a dose of 79.2 Gy were evaluated. Pelvic MRI and simulation computed tomography scans were registered using dedicated software to allow for bilateral NVB target delineation on T2-weighted MRI. A volumetric modulated arc therapy plan was generated using the NVB bilaterally with 2 mm margin as an organ to spare and compared to the patient’s previously delivered plan. Dose-volume histogram endpoints for NVB, rectum, bladder, and planning target volume 79.2 were compared between the 2 plans using a 2-tailed paired t-test. Results: The V70 for the NVB was significantly lower on the NVB-sparing plan (p <0.01), while rectum and bladder endpoints were similar. Target V100% was similar but V{sub 105%} was higher for the NVB-sparing plans (p <0.01). Conclusions: “NVB-sparing” radiotherapy is dosimetrically feasible using CT-MRI registration, and for volumetric modulated arc therapy technology — target coverage is acceptable without increased dose to other normal structures, but with higher target dose inhomogeneity. The clinical impact of “NVB-sparing” radiotherapy is currently under study at our institution.

  4. Inter-fractional Target Displacement in the Prostate Image-Guided Radiotherapy using Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Kap Sang; Back, Chang Wook; Jeong, Yun Jeong; Bae, Jae Beom; Choi, Young Eun; Sung, Ki Hoon

    2016-01-01

    To quantify the inter-fractional variation in prostate displacement and their dosimetric effects for prostate cancer treatment. A total of 176 daily cone-beam CT (CBCT) sets acquired for 6 prostate cancer patients treated with volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) were retrospectively reviewed. For each patient, the planning CT (pCT) was registered to each daily CBCT by aligning the bony anatomy. The prostate, rectum, and bladder were delineated on daily CBCT, and the contours of these organs in the pCT were copied to the daily CBCT. The concordance of prostate displacement, deformation, and size variation between pCT and daily CBCT was evaluated using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). The mean volume of prostate was 37.2 cm3 in the initial pCT, and the variation was around ±5% during the entire course of treatment for all patients. The mean DSC was 89.9%, ranging from 70% to 100% for prostate displacement. Although the volume change of bladder and rectum per treatment fraction did not show any correlation with the value of DSC (r=-0.084, p=0.268 and r=-0.162, p=0.032, respectively), a decrease in the DSC value was observed with increasing volume change of the bladder and rectum (r=-0.230,p=0.049 and r=-0.240,p=0.020, respectively). Consistency of the volume of the bladder and rectum cannot guarantee the accuracy of the treatment. Our results suggest that patient setup with the registration between the pCT and daily CBCT should be considered aligning soft tissue

  5. Inter-fractional Target Displacement in the Prostate Image-Guided Radiotherapy using Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Kap Sang; Back, Chang Wook; Jeong, Yun Jeong; Bae, Jae Beom; Choi, Young Eun; Sung, Ki Hoon [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Gachon University Gil Medical Center, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    To quantify the inter-fractional variation in prostate displacement and their dosimetric effects for prostate cancer treatment. A total of 176 daily cone-beam CT (CBCT) sets acquired for 6 prostate cancer patients treated with volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) were retrospectively reviewed. For each patient, the planning CT (pCT) was registered to each daily CBCT by aligning the bony anatomy. The prostate, rectum, and bladder were delineated on daily CBCT, and the contours of these organs in the pCT were copied to the daily CBCT. The concordance of prostate displacement, deformation, and size variation between pCT and daily CBCT was evaluated using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). The mean volume of prostate was 37.2 cm3 in the initial pCT, and the variation was around ±5% during the entire course of treatment for all patients. The mean DSC was 89.9%, ranging from 70% to 100% for prostate displacement. Although the volume change of bladder and rectum per treatment fraction did not show any correlation with the value of DSC (r=-0.084, p=0.268 and r=-0.162, p=0.032, respectively), a decrease in the DSC value was observed with increasing volume change of the bladder and rectum (r=-0.230,p=0.049 and r=-0.240,p=0.020, respectively). Consistency of the volume of the bladder and rectum cannot guarantee the accuracy of the treatment. Our results suggest that patient setup with the registration between the pCT and daily CBCT should be considered aligning soft tissue.

  6. On-line image guidance for frameless stereotactic radiotherapy of lung malignancies by cone beam CT: Comparison between target localization and alignment on bony anatomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masi, Laura; Casamassima, Franco; Menichelli, Claudia; Pasciuti, Katia; Doro, Raffaela; Polli, Caterina; D'imporzano, Elena; Bonucci, Ivano

    2008-01-01

    Introduction. Free-breathing stereotactic radiotherapy for lung malignancies requires reliable prediction of respiratory motion and accurate target localization. A protocol was adopted for reproducibility and reduction of respiratory motion and for target localization by CBCT image guidance. Tumor respiratory displacements and tumor positioning errors relative to bony anatomy alignment are analyzed. Materials and method. Image guided SRT was performed for 99 lung malignancies. Two groups of patients were considered: group A did not perform any breathing control; group B controlled visually their respiratory cycle and volumes on an Active Breathing Coordinator (ABC) monitor during the acquisition of simulation CT and CBCT, and treatment delivery. GTV on end inhale and exhale CT data sets were fused in an ITV and the extent of tumor motion evaluated between these 2 phases. A pre-treatment CBCT was acquired and aligned to the reference CT using bony anatomy; for tumor positioning the ITV contour on the reference CT was matched to the visible tumor on CBCT. Interobserver variability of tumor positioning was evaluated. ITV and CBCT tumor dimensions were compared. Results. 3D tumor breathing displacement (mean±SD) was significantly higher for group A (14.7±9.9 mm) than for group B (4.7±3.1 mm). The detected differences between tumor and bony structure alignment below 3 mm were 68% for group B and 45% for group A, reaching statistical significance. Interobserver variability was 1.7±1.1 mm (mean±SD). Dimensions of tumor image on CBCT were consistent with ITV dimensions for group B (max difference 14%). Conclusions. The adopted protocol seems effective in reducing respiratory internal movements and margin. Tumor positioning errors relative to bony anatomy are also reduced. However bony anatomy as a surrogate of the target may still lead to some relevant positioning errors. Target visualization on CBCT is essential for an accurate localization in lung SRT

  7. Utilization of cone-beam CT for offline evaluation of target volume coverage during prostate image-guided radiotherapy based on bony anatomy alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paluska, Petr; Hanus, Josef; Sefrova, Jana; Rouskova, Lucie; Grepl, Jakub; Jansa, Jan; Kasaova, Linda; Hodek, Miroslav; Zouhar, Milan; Vosmik, Milan; Petera, Jiri

    2012-01-01

    To assess target volume coverage dur